WorldWideScience

Sample records for monitoring picarro cavity

  1. Ammonia emissions from air cleaners at pig farms in Denmark using a Picarro cavity ring-down spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkler, Renato; Adamsen, Anders Peter S.

    2017-04-01

    Ammonia emissions from agricultural activities such as, cattle, pig and poultry farms have become an ever more important topic both for scientists as well as for regulatory bodies due to the severe impacts of ammonia on human health and the environment. In the European Union, the agricultural sector accounts for most of the ammonia emissions, and therefore the EU authorities have put in place reduction targets for the member states. In Denmark, most pig farmers have to deploy one or more ammonia abatement technologies in order to fulfill the national regulation when building new pig houses. A promising ammonia abatement technology is partial floor ventilation and subsequent cleaning using one or two step chemical air cleaners. The cleaned air will have ammonia concentration is the sub-ppm level and with high humidity. Here we present method of monitoring NH3 emissions from air cleaners deployed on pig farms using the G2103 Picarro laser spectrometer. The Picarro G2103 NH3 analyzer is a high precision cavity ring-down spectrometer using a high finesse optical cavity and a near infra-red light laser light source with a very narrow light band. The latter eliminates cross-interferences from other gases present in livestock air. Picarro instruments are built for field measurements and have been widely used for atmospheric monitoring of greenhouse gases and of air pollutants such as NH3.

  2. H2S interference on CO2 isotopic measurements using a Picarro G1101-i cavity ring-down spectrometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Malowany

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cavity ring-down spectrometers (CRDS have the capacity to make isotopic measurements of CO2 where concentrations range from atmospheric (~ 400 ppm to 6000 ppm. Following field trials, it has come to light that the spectrographic lines used for CO2 have an interference with elevated (higher than ambient amounts of hydrogen sulfide (H2S, which causes significant depletions in the δ13C measurement by the CRDS. In order to deploy this instrument in environments with elevated H2S concentrations (i.e., active volcanoes, we require a robust method for eliminating this interference. Controlled experiments using a Picarro G1101-i optical spectrometer were done to characterize the H2S interference at varying CO2 and H2S concentrations. The addition of H2S to a CO2 standard gas reveals an increase in the 12CO2 concentration and a more significant decrease in the 13CO2 concentration, resulting in a depleted δ13C value. Reacting gas samples containing H2S with copper prior to analysis can eliminate this effect. However, experiments also revealed that the addition of H2S to CO2 results in the formation of carbonyl sulfide (OCS and carbon disulfide (CS2, causing a decrease in the overall CO2 concentration without affecting the δ13C value. It is important for future work with CRDS, particularly in volcanic regions where H2S is abundant, to be aware of the H2S interference on the CO2 spectroscopic lines and to remove all H2S prior to analysis. We suggest employing a scrub composed of copper to remove H2S from all gas samples that have concentrations in excess of 1 ppb.

  3. Comparison of a Gas Chromatograph and a Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer for Flux Quantification of Nitrous Oxide, Carbon Dioxide and Methane in Closed Soil Chambers Derek Fleck1, Yonggang He1, Donald Herman2, Serena Moseman-Valtierra3, Gloria Jacobson1 1 Picarro Inc, 3105 Patrick Henry Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054 2 College of Natural Resource, UC Berkeley, 130 Mulford Hall, University of California, Berkeley, CA, 94720-3114 3 University of Rhode Island, CBLS 489, Kingston, RI 02881

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, D.; He, Y.; Herman, D.; Moseman-valtierra, S.; Jacobson, G. A.

    2013-12-01

    The study of the three predominant greenhouse gasses effecting global climate change, CO2, CH4 and N2O, has become increasingly important in ecological and agricultural soil research. It is essential for current and future atmospheric greenhouse gas budgets to reduce the uncertainty of greenhouse gas soil fluxes in a variety of environments and climates. Traditional soil flux experiments using the closed chamber and discrete sampling for Gas Chromatograph ('GC') analysis cannot sufficiently capture the large temporal variation in soil gas fluxes, which can lead to large errors in ecosystem flux models. Real-time, simultaneous measurement of these gases should provide easier and more comprehensive and precise chamber flux measurements. We provide a comparison of the GC sampling method to a closed loop, continuous flow system coupled with a Picarro G2508 Cavity Ringdown Spectrometer to quantify the flux of CO2, CH4 and N2O. The Picarro analyzer has a data rate of approximately 6 seconds for all three gases, which gives a much higher temporal resolution than discrete sampling (performed every 8-15 minutes). This work will compare GC and Picarro G2508 soil flux measurement results from two independent researchers and will cover fluxes for three different soil environments. Details on the system configuration and sampling methodology effects on flux errors will also be discussed. We will show that by reducing the systematic error due to sample preparation for the GC, the continuous flow measurement of the Picarro G2508 field deployable analyzer can significantly increase the measurement precision of respiration rates of N2O, CH4 and CO2. It is noteworthy that the Picarro analyzer also simultaneously measures the concentration of ammonia (NH3) and water, and these results will also be discussed.

  4. Resonant cavity monitors for charged beam measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutledge, Gary A.

    2003-04-01

    The G_zero experiment at Jefferson Lab, will measure the strange quark content of the proton as it contributes to the proton's charge and magnetic properties. Parity violating elastic electron scattering is being used to measure the physics asymmetry to better than 1 part in 10^7. Helicity correlated properties of the electron beam used in this experiment must be measured to better than 1 in 10^7 over the course of the experiment. G_zero employs two types of beam monitors for this purpose. Standard, 4-wire, ``strip-line'' monitors measure beam positions with a resolution of 20microns. Another type of monitor, Beam Resonant Cavities are being tested. Two sets of three cavities are used to measure beam position in X and Y, as well as beam current. Presented will be the performance and evaluation of these cavities including their theoretical versus actual operation, their noise characteristics, and signal resolution. These cavities can be paired with either linear or logarithmic amplifier electronics. Overall performance of these cavity systems including amplifiers will be compared with standard 'strip-line' monitors.

  5. IM-CRDS for the analysis of matrix-bound water isotopes: a streamlined (and updated) tool for ecohydrologists to probe small-scale variability in plants Yasuhara, S. (syasuhara@picarro.com)1,Carter, J.A. (jcarter@picarro.com)1, Dennis, K.J. (kdennis@picarro.com)1 1Picarro Inc., 3105 Patrick Henry Drive, Santa Clara, CA 95054

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuhara, S.

    2013-12-01

    The ability to measure the isotopic composition of matrix-bound water is valuable to many facets of earth and environmental sciences. For example, ecohydrologists use stable isotopes of oxygen and hydrogen in plant and soil water, in combination with measurements of atmospheric water vapor, surface water and precipitation, to estimate budgets of evapotranspiration. Likewise, water isotopes of oceanic water, brines and other waters with high total dissolved solids (TDS, e.g., juices) are relevant to studying large-scale oceanic circulation, small-scale mixing, groundwater contamination, the balance of evaporation to precipitation, and the provenance of food. Conventionally matrix-bound water has been extracted using cryogenic distillation, whereby water is distilled from the material in question (e.g., a leaf sample) by heating under vacuum and collecting the resultant water vapor using liquid nitrogen. The water can then be analyzed for its stable isotopic composition by a variety of methods, including isotope ratio mass spectrometry and laser techniques, such as Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS). Here we present recent improvements in an alternative, and stream-lined, solution for integrated sample extraction and isotopic measurement using a Picarro Induction Module (IM) coupled to commercially-available CRDS analyzer from Picarro. This technique is also valuable for waters with high TDS, which can have detrimental effects on flash vaporization process, typically used for the introduction of water to Picarro CRDS water isotope analyzers. The IM works by inductively heating a sample held within a metal sample holder in a glass vial flushed with dry air. Tested samples include leaves, stems, twigs, calibration water, juices, and salt water. The heating process evolves water vapor which is then swept through the system at approximately 150 standard cubic centimeters per minute. The evolved water vapor passes through an activated charcoal cartridge for removal of

  6. Continuous ammonia monitor using a Stark microwave cavity resonator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uehara, H; Ijuuin, Y; Morino, Y; Kamidate, T; Nakamura, A; Imai, H

    1980-03-01

    An ammonia monitor has been made by using a rectangular Stark microwave cavity tightly coupled through an iris to a Gunn oscillator. The Stark electrode installed inside the cavity is provided with a 100 kHz sinusoidal modulation voltage and a dc sweep voltage. The oscillation of the Gunn diode is tuned with the coupled Stark cavity to a frequency near a J,K=3,3 transition (23870.1 MHz) of ammonia. By fixing the Stark dc bias to a voltage which gives a peak intensity of the derivative output of the electric-resonance signal, ammonia is continuously monitored. An extremely good long-term stability is obtained. The noise level corresponds to 0.08 ppm of ammonia.

  7. CAVITY BEAM POSITION MONITOR SYSTEM FOR ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Boogert, S T; Cullinan, F; Joshi, N; Lyapin, A; Aryshev, A; Honda, Y; Naito, T; Terunuma, N; Urakara, J; Heo, A; Kim, E-S; Kim, Y I; McCormick, D; Frisch, J; Nelson, J; Smith, T; White, G R

    2011-01-01

    The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2) in KEK, Japan, is a prototype scaled demonstrator system for the final focus required for a future high energy lepton linear collider. The ATF2 beam-line is instrumented with a total of 41 high resolution C and S band resonant cavity beam position monitors (BPM) with associated mixer electronics and digitisers. In addition 4 high resolution BPMs have been recently installed at the interaction point, we briefly describe the first operational experience of these cavities in the ATF2 beam-line. The current status of the overall BPM system is also described, with a focus on operational techniques and performance.

  8. Development of a Cavity Beam Position Monitor for CLIC

    CERN Document Server

    Cullinan, F; Joshi, N; Lyapin, A; Calvo, E; Chritin, N; Guillot-Vignot, F; Lefevre, T; Søby, L; Lunin, A; Wendt, M; Yakovlev, V P; Smith, S

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) project presents many challenges to its subsystems and the beam diagnostics in particular must perform beyond current limitations. The requirements for the CLIC main beam position monitors foresee a spacial resolution of 50 nm while delivering a 50 ns temporal resolution within the bunch train. We discuss the design of the microwave cavity pick-up and associated electronics, bench top tests with the first prototype cavity, as well as some of the machine-specific integration and operational issues.

  9. Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift (CAPS) Monitor Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sedlacek, Arthur J [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The CAPS PMex monitor is a cavity attenuated phase shift extinction instrument. It operates as an optical extinction spectrometer, using a visible-light-emitting diode (LED) as the light source, a sample cell incorporating two high-reflectivity mirrors centered at the wavelength of the LED, and a vacuum photodiode detector. Its efficacy is based on the fact that aerosols are broadband scatterers and absorbers of light.

  10. Performance of a reentrant cavity beam position monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Simon

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The beam-based alignment and feedback systems, essential operations for the future colliders, require high resolution beam position monitors (BPMs. In the framework of the European CARE/SRF program, a reentrant cavity BPM with its associated electronics was developed by the CEA/DSM/Irfu in collaboration with DESY. The design, the fabrication, and the beam test of this monitor are detailed within this paper. This BPM is designed to be inserted in a cryomodule, work at cryogenic temperature in a clean environment. It has achieved a resolution better than 10  μm and has the possibility to perform bunch to bunch measurements for the x-ray free electron laser (X-FEL and the International Linear Collider (ILC. Its other features are a small size of the rf cavity, a large aperture (78 mm, and an excellent linearity. A first prototype of a reentrant cavity BPM was installed in the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH, at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY and demonstrated its operation at cryogenic temperature inside a cryomodule. The second, installed, also, in the FLASH linac to be tested with beam, measured a resolution of approximately 4  μm over a dynamic range ±5  mm in single bunch.

  11. Performance of a reentrant cavity beam position monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, C.; Luong, M.; Chel, S.; Napoly, O.; Novo, J.; Roudier, D. [CEA Saclay, DSM, Irfu, SACM, F-91191 Gif Sur Yvette, (France); Rouviere, N. [CNRS, IN2P3-IPN, F-91406 Orsay, (France); Baboi, N.; Mildner, N.; Nolle, D. [DESY, D-22603 Hamburg, (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The beam-based alignment and feedback systems, essential operations for the future colliders, require high resolution beam position monitors (BPMs). In the framework of the European CARE/SRF program, a reentrant cavity BPM with its associated electronics was developed by the CEA/DSM/Irfu in collaboration with DESY. The design, the fabrication, and the beam test of this monitor are detailed within this paper. This BPM is designed to be inserted in a cryo-module, work at cryogenic temperature in a clean environment. It has achieved a resolution better than 10 {mu}m and has the possibility to perform bunch to bunch measurements for the X-ray free electron laser (X-FEL) and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Its other features are a small size of the rf cavity, a large aperture (78 mm), and an excellent linearity. A first prototype of a reentrant cavity BPM was installed in the free electron laser in Hamburg (FLASH), at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) and demonstrated its operation at cryogenic temperature inside a cryo-module. The second, installed, also, in the FLASH linac to be tested with beam, measured a resolution of approximately 4 {mu}m over a dynamic range {+-} 5 mm in single bunch. (authors)

  12. RF Cavity Induced Sensitivity Limitations on Beam Loss Monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastriotou, M.; Degiovanni, A.; Sousa, F. S. Domingues; Effinger, E.; Holzer, E. B.; Quirante, J. L. Navarro; del Busto, E. N.; Tecker, F.; Viganò, W.; Welsch, C. P.; Woolley, B. J.

    Due to the secondary showers generated when a particle hits the vacuum chamber, beam losses at an accelerator may be detected via radiation detectors located near the beam line. Several sources of background can limit the sensitivity and reduce the dynamic range of a Beam Loss Monitor (BLM). This document concentrates on potential sources of background generated near high gradient RF cavities due to dark current and voltage breakdowns. An optical fibre has been installed at an experiment of the Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) Test Facility (CTF3), where a dedicated study of the performance of a loaded and unloaded CLIC accelerating structure is undergoing. An analysis of the collected data and a benchmarking simulation are presented to estimate BLM sensitivity limitations. Moreover, the feasibility for the use of BLMs optimised for the diagnostics of RF cavities is discussed.

  13. Performance of a high resolution cavity beam position monitor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walston, Sean; Boogert, Stewart; Chung, Carl; Fitsos, Pete; Frisch, Joe; Gronberg, Jeff; Hayano, Hitoshi; Honda, Yosuke; Kolomensky, Yury; Lyapin, Alexey; Malton, Stephen; May, Justin; McCormick, Douglas; Meller, Robert; Miller, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Ross, Marc; Slater, Mark; Smith, Steve; Smith, Tonee; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Thomson, Mark; Urakawa, Junji; Vogel, Vladimir; Ward, David; White, Glen

    2007-07-01

    It has been estimated that an RF cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) could provide a position measurement resolution of less than 1 nm. We have developed a high resolution cavity BPM and associated electronics. A triplet comprised of these BPMs was installed in the extraction line of the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) at the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization (KEK) for testing with its ultra-low emittance beam. The three BPMs were each rigidly mounted inside an alignment frame on six variable-length struts which could be used to move the BPMs in position and angle. We have developed novel methods for extracting the position and tilt information from the BPM signals including a robust calibration algorithm which is immune to beam jitter. To date, we have demonstrated a position resolution of 15.6 nm and a tilt resolution of 2.1 μrad over a dynamic range of approximately ±20 μm.

  14. Monitoring the formation of oxide apertures in micropillar cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Bakker, Morten P; Suntrup, Donald J; Truong, Tuan-Ahn; van Exter, Martin P; Bouwmeester, Dirk

    2013-01-01

    We present an imaging technique that enables us to monitor the wet thermal oxidation of a thin AlAs layer embedded between two distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirrors in a micropillar. Directly after oxidation, we confirm in situ, without any further fabrication steps, that high quality optical modes confined to a small volume are formed. The combination of these two optical techniques provides a reliable and efficient way of producing oxidation apertured micropillar cavities for which the wet thermal oxidation is a critical fabrication step.

  15. High-R Walls for Remodeling: Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J.; Kochkin, V.

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  16. High-R Walls for Remodeling. Wall Cavity Moisture Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiehagen, J. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States); Kochkin, V. [NAHB Research Center Industry Partnership, Upper Marlboro, MD (United States)

    2012-12-01

    The focus of the study is on the performance of wall systems, and in particular, the moisture characteristics inside the wall cavity and in the wood sheathing. Furthermore, while this research will initially address new home construction, the goal is to address potential moisture issues in wall cavities of existing homes when insulation and air sealing improvements are made.

  17. Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... may pass these bacteria to a child through kissing, sampling the child's food, or sharing eating utensils. ... pass decay-causing bacteria to their children through kissing or sharing eating utensils. Symptoms of Cavities Whether ...

  18. The Development of Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy as a Toxic Metal Continuous Emission Monitor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Goeroge P. Miller; Dr. Christopher B. Winstead

    2001-12-04

    Innovative program to explore the viability of using Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS) for trace analysis and monitoring of remediation processes for hazardous and radioactive wastes. Cavity ringdown spectroscopy is a measurement of the rate of absorption of a sample within a closed optical cavity rather than the standard measurement of the avsorved signal strength over a given sample path. It is a technique capable of providing ultra-sensitive absorption measurements in hostile environments using commercially available easy-to-use pulsed lasers. The inherent high sensitivity stems from both the long effective sample pathlengths possible and the relaxed constraints on the accuracy of the measurement of the cavity decay time.

  19. A CAVITY RING-DOWN SPECTROSCOPY MERCURY CONTINUOUS EMISSION MONITOR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christopher C. Carter

    2002-12-31

    SRD tested a number of different length cavities during this past quarter. Continuous transmission was observed with cavity lengths from 65 to 12 cm. The 65 cm cavity was replaced with a 39 cm cavity for work performed during this quarter. Flue gas components were tested for background absorptions and any interference with the determination of accurate mercury concentrations. Sulfur dioxide was found to absorb fairly strongly in the region of the mercury transition, but the Cavity Ring-Down (CRD) instrument was still able to detect mercury at subparts-per-billion by volume (ppb) levels. Additional flue gases tested included H{sub 2}O, CO, CO{sub 2}, NO, NO{sub 2}. None of these flue gas constituents showed any observable absorption in the ultraviolet region near the atomic mercury transition. Work was also initiated in speciation studies. In particular mercury chloride (HgCl{sub 2}) was tested. A mercury signal was detected from a gas stream containing HgCl{sub 2}. SRD was not able to determine definitively if there exists a spectral shift great enough to separate HgCl{sub 2} from elemental mercury in these initial tests.

  20. Hydroacoustic monitoring of a salt cavity: an analysis of precursory events of the collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebert, F.; Bernardie, S.; Mainsant, G.

    2011-09-01

    One of the main features of "post mining" research relates to available methods for monitoring mine-degradation processes that could directly threaten surface infrastructures. In this respect, GISOS, a French scientific interest group, is investigating techniques for monitoring the eventual collapse of underground cavities. One of the methods under investigation was monitoring the stability of a salt cavity through recording microseismic-precursor signals that may indicate the onset of rock failure. The data were recorded in a salt mine in Lorraine (France) when monitoring the controlled collapse of 2 000 000 m3 of rocks surrounding a cavity at 130 m depth. The monitoring in the 30 Hz to 3 kHz frequency range highlights the occurrence of events with high energy during periods of macroscopic movement, once the layers had ruptured; they appear to be the consequence of the post-rupture rock movements related to the intense deformation of the cavity roof. Moreover the analysis shows the presence of some interesting precursory signals before the cavity collapsed. They occurred a few hours before the failure phases, when the rocks were being weakened and damaged. They originated from the damaging and breaking process, when micro-cracks appear and then coalesce. From these results we expect that deeper signal analysis and statistical analysis on the complete event time distribution (several millions of files) will allow us to finalize a complete typology of each signal families and their relations with the evolution steps of the cavity over the five years monitoring.

  1. PAL-XFEL cavity beam position monitor pick-up design and beam test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Sojeong, E-mail: sojung8681@postech.ac.kr; Park, Young Jung; Kim, Changbum; Kim, Seung Hwan; Shin, Dong Cheol; Han, Jang-Hui; Ko, In Soo

    2016-08-11

    As an X-ray Free Electron Laser, PAL-XFEL is about to start beam commissioning. X-band cavity beam position monitor (BPM) is used in the PAL-XFEL undulator beam line. Prototypes of cavity BPM pick-up were designed and fabricated to test the RF characteristics. Also, the beam test of a cavity BPM pick-up was done in the Injector Test Facility (ITF). In the beam test, the raw signal properties of the cavity BPM pick-up were measured at a 200 pC bunch charge. According to the RF test and beam test results, the prototype cavity BPM pick-up design was confirmed to meet the requirements of the PAL-XFEL cavity BPM system.

  2. A novel electromagnetic design and a new manufacturing process for the cavity BPM (Beam Position Monitor)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Forno, Massimo; Craievich, Paolo; Baruzzo, Roberto; De Monte, Raffaele; Ferianis, Mario; Lamanna, Giuseppe; Vescovo, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    The Cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) is a beam diagnostic instrument which, in a seeded Free Electron Laser (FEL), allows the measurement of the electron beam position in a non-destructive way and with sub-micron resolution. It is composed by two resonant cavities called reference and position cavity, respectively. The measurement exploits the dipole mode that arises when the electron bunch passes off axis. In this paper we describe the Cavity BPM that has been designed and realized in the context of the FERMI@Elettra project [1]. New strategies have been adopted for the microwave design, for both the reference and the position cavities. Both cavities have been simulated by means of Ansoft HFSS [2] and CST Particle Studio [3], and have been realized using high precision lathe and wire-EDM (Electro-Discharge) machine, with a new technique that avoids the use of the sinker-EDM machine. Tuners have been used to accurately adjust the working frequencies for both cavities. The RF parameters have been estimated, and the modifications of the resonant frequencies produced by brazing and tuning have been evaluated. Finally, the Cavity BPM has been installed and tested in the presence of the electron beam.

  3. A novel electromagnetic design and a new manufacturing process for the cavity BPM (Beam Position Monitor)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dal Forno, Massimo, E-mail: massimo.dalforno@phd.units.it [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information Technology, University of Trieste (Italy); Craievich, Paolo, E-mail: paolo.craievich@elettra.trieste.it [Sicrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Baruzzo, Roberto [Cinel Strumenti Scientifici s.r.l., Vigonza, Padova (Italy); De Monte, Raffaele; Ferianis, Mario [Sicrotrone Trieste S.C.p.A., Basovizza, Trieste (Italy); Lamanna, Giuseppe [Cinel Strumenti Scientifici s.r.l., Vigonza, Padova (Italy); Vescovo, Roberto [Department of Industrial Engineering and Information Technology, University of Trieste (Italy)

    2012-01-11

    The Cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) is a beam diagnostic instrument which, in a seeded Free Electron Laser (FEL), allows the measurement of the electron beam position in a non-destructive way and with sub-micron resolution. It is composed by two resonant cavities called reference and position cavity, respectively. The measurement exploits the dipole mode that arises when the electron bunch passes off axis. In this paper we describe the Cavity BPM that has been designed and realized in the context of the FERMI-Elettra project . New strategies have been adopted for the microwave design, for both the reference and the position cavities. Both cavities have been simulated by means of Ansoft HFSS and CST Particle Studio , and have been realized using high precision lathe and wire-EDM (Electro-Discharge) machine, with a new technique that avoids the use of the sinker-EDM machine. Tuners have been used to accurately adjust the working frequencies for both cavities. The RF parameters have been estimated, and the modifications of the resonant frequencies produced by brazing and tuning have been evaluated. Finally, the Cavity BPM has been installed and tested in the presence of the electron beam.

  4. Stability study of the higher order mode beam position monitors at the Accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Shi, L; Jones., R M

    2014-01-01

    erating cavities at FLASH linac, DESY, are equipped with electronics for beam position monitoring, which are based on HOM signals from special couplers. These monitors provide the beam position without additional vacuum components and at low cost. Moreover, they can be used to align the beam in the cavities to reduce the HOM effects on the beam. However, the HOMBPM (Higher Order Mode based Beam Position Monitor) shows an instability problem over time. In this paper, we will present the status of studies on this issue. Several methods are utilized to calibrate the HOMBPMs. These methods include DLR (Direct Linear Regression), and SVD (Singular Value Decomposition). We found that SVD generally is more suitable for HOMBPM calibration. We focus on the HOMBPMs at 1.3 GHz cavities. Techniques developed here are applicable to 3.9 ...

  5. Cavity beam position monitor system for the Accelerator Test Facility 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. I. Kim

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The Accelerator Test Facility 2 (ATF2 is a scaled demonstrator system for final focus beam lines of linear high energy colliders. This paper describes the high resolution cavity beam position monitor (BPM system, which is a part of the ATF2 diagnostics. Two types of cavity BPMs are used, C-band operating at 6.423 GHz, and S-band at 2.888 GHz with an increased beam aperture. The cavities, electronics, and digital processing are described. The resolution of the C-band system with attenuators was determined to be approximately 250 nm and 1  μm for the S-band system. Without attenuation the best recorded C-band cavity resolution was 27 nm.

  6. Non-destructive monitoring of Bloch oscillations in an optical cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Keßler, H; Venkatesh, B P; Georges, Ch; Hemmerich, A

    2016-01-01

    Bloch oscillations are a hallmark of coherent wave dynamics in periodic potentials. They occur as the response of quantum mechanical particles in a lattice if a weak force is applied. In optical lattices with their perfect periodic structure they can be readily observed and employed as a quantum mechanical force sensor, for example, for precise measurements of the gravitational acceleration. However, the destructive character of the measurement process in previous experimental implementations poses serious limitations for the precision of such measurements. In this article we show that the use of an optical cavity operating in the regime of strong cooperative coupling allows one to directly monitor Bloch oscillations of a cloud of cold atoms in the light leaking out of the cavity. Hence, with a single atomic sample the Bloch oscillation dynamics can be mapped out, while in previous experiments, each data point required the preparation of a new atom cloud. The use of a cavity-based monitor should greatly impro...

  7. A prototype cavity beam position monitor for the CLIC Main Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Cullinany , F; Joshi, N; Lyapin, A; Bastard, D; Calvo, E; Chritin, N; Guillot-Vignot, F; Lefevre, T; Søby, L; Wendt, M; Lunin, A; Yakovlev, V P; Smith, S

    2012-01-01

    The Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) places unprecedented demands on its diagnostics systems. A large number of cavity beam position monitors (BPMs) throughout the main linac and beam delivery system (BDS) must routinely perform with 50 nm spatial resolution. Multiple position measurements within a single 156 ns bunch train are also required. A prototype low-Q cavity beam position monitor has been designed and built to be tested on the CLIC Test Facility (CTF3) probe beam. This paper presents the latest measurements of the prototype cavity BPM and the design and simulation of the radio frequency (RF) signal processing electronics with regards to the final performance. Installation of the BPM in the CTF3 probe beamline is also discussed.

  8. Integrated optoelectronic probe including a vertical cavity surface emitting laser for laser Doppler perfusion monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serov, Alexander N.; Nieland, Janharm; Oosterbaan, Sjoerd; Mul, de Frits F.M.; Kranenburg, van Herma; Bekman, Herman H.P.Th.; Steenbergen, Wiendelt

    2006-01-01

    An integrated optoelectronic probe with small dimensions, for direct-contact laser Doppler blood flow monitoring has been realized. A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL), and a chip with photodetectors and all necessary electronics are integrated in a miniature probe head connected to a l

  9. Integrated Optoelectronic Probe Including a Vertical Cavity Surface Emitting Laser for Laser Doppler Perfusion Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Serov, A.N.; Nieland, J.; Oosterbaan, S.; Steenbergen, W.; Bekman, H.H.P.T.; Mul, F.F.M. de; Kranenburg, H. van

    2006-01-01

    An integrated optoelectronic probe with small dimensions, for direct-contact laser Doppler blood flow monitoring has been realized. A vertical cavity surface emitting laser (VCSEL), and a chip with photodetectors and all necessary electronics are integrated in a miniature probe head connected to a l

  10. Design and experiments for the waveguide to coaxial cable adapter of a cavity beam position monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xiang; ZHENG Shu-Xin

    2011-01-01

    The waveguide to coaxial cable adapter is very important to the cavity beam position monitor(CBPM)because it determines how much of the energy in the cavity could be coupled outside.In this paper,the waveguide to coaxial cable adapter of a CBPM is designed and experiments are conducted.The curve shapes of experiments and simulations are very similar and the difference in reflection is less than 0.1.This progress provides a reliable method for designing the adapter.

  11. A technique for monitoring fast tuner piezoactuator preload forces for superconducting rf cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pischalnikov, Y.; Branlard, J.; Carcagno, R.; Chase, B.; Edwards, H.; Orris, D.; Makulski, A.; McGee, M.; Nehring, R.; Poloubotko, V.; Sylvester, C.; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The technology for mechanically compensating Lorentz Force detuning in superconducting RF cavities has already been developed at DESY. One technique is based on commercial piezoelectric actuators and was successfully demonstrated on TESLA cavities [1]. Piezo actuators for fast tuners can operate in a frequency range up to several kHz; however, it is very important to maintain a constant static force (preload) on the piezo actuator in the range of 10 to 50% of its specified blocking force. Determining the preload force during cool-down, warm-up, or re-tuning of the cavity is difficult without instrumentation, and exceeding the specified range can permanently damage the piezo stack. A technique based on strain gauge technology for superconducting magnets has been applied to fast tuners for monitoring the preload on the piezoelectric assembly. The design and testing of piezo actuator preload sensor technology is discussed. Results from measurements of preload sensors installed on the tuner of the Capture Cavity II (CCII)[2] tested at FNAL are presented. These results include measurements during cool-down, warmup, and cavity tuning along with dynamic Lorentz force compensation.

  12. First attempt of at-cavity cryogenic X-ray detection in a CEBAF cryomodule for field emission monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geng, Rongli [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Daly, Edward [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Drury, Michael [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Palczewski, Ari [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    We report on the first result of at-cavity X-ray detection in a CEBAF cryomodule for field emission monitoring. In the 8-cavity cryomodule F100, two silicon diodes were installed near the end flange of each cavity. Each cavity was individually tested during the cryomodule test in JLab’s cryomodule test facility. The behaviors of these at-cavity cryogenic X-ray detectors were compared with those of the standard ‘in air’ Geiger-Muller (G-M) tubes. Our initial experiments establish correlation between X-ray response of near diodes and the field emission source cavity in the 8-cavity string. For two out of these eight cavities, we also carried out at-cavity X-ray detection experiment during their vertical testing. The aim is to track field emission behavior uniquely from vertical cavity testing to horizontal cavity testing in the cryomodule. These preliminary results confirmed our expectation and warrant further effort toward the establishment of permanent at-cavity cryogenic X-ray detection for SRF development and operation.

  13. Design and experiments for the waveguide to coaxial cable adapter of a cavity beam position monitor%Design and experiments for the waveguide to coaxial cable adapter of a cavity beam position monitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李享; 郑曙昕

    2011-01-01

    The waveguide to coaxial cable adapter is very important to the cavity beam position monitor (CBPM) because it determines how much of the energy in the cavity could be coupled outside. In this paper, the waveguide to coaxial cable adapter of a CBPM is des

  14. Development of a high-resolution cavity-beam position monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoichi Inoue

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a high-resolution cavity-beam position monitor (BPM to be used at the focal point of the ATF2, which is a test beam line that is now being built to demonstrate stable orbit control at ∼nanometer resolution. The design of the cavity structure was optimized for the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF beam in various ways. For example, the cavity has a rectangular shape in order to isolate two dipole modes in orthogonal directions, and a relatively thin gap that is less sensitive to trajectory inclination. A two stage homodyne mixer with highly sensitive electronics and phase-sensitive detection was also developed. Two BPM blocks, each containing two cavity BPMs, were installed in the existing ATF beam line using a rigid support frame. After testing the basic characteristics, we measured the resolution using three BPMs. The system demonstrated 8.7 nm position resolution over a dynamic range of 5  μm.

  15. Monitoring the Evaporation of Fluids from Fiber-Optic Micro-Cell Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borut Preloznik

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Fiber-optic sensors provide remote access, are readily embedded within structures, and can operate in harsh environments. Nevertheless, fiber-optic sensing of liquids has been largely restricted to measurements of refractive index and absorption spectroscopy. The temporal dynamics of fluid evaporation have potential applications in monitoring the quality of water, identification of fuel dilutions, mobile point-of-care diagnostics, climatography and more. In this work, the fiber-optic monitoring of fluids evaporation is proposed and demonstrated. Sub-nano-liter volumes of a liquid are applied to inline fiber-optic micro-cavities. As the liquid evaporates, light is refracted out of the cavity at the receding index boundary between the fluid and the ambient surroundings. A sharp transient attenuation in the transmission of light through the cavity, by as much as 50 dB and on a sub-second time scale, is observed. Numerical models for the transmission dynamics in terms of ray-tracing and wavefront propagation are provided. Experiments show that the temporal transmission profile can distinguish between different liquids.

  16. High-Precision Resonant Cavity Beam Position, Emittance And Third-Moment Monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barov, N.; Kim, J.S.; Weidemann, A.W.; /FARTECH, San Diego; Miller, R.H.; Nantista, C.D.; /SLAC

    2006-03-14

    Linear colliders and FEL facilities need fast, nondestructive beam position and profile monitors to facilitate machine tune-up, and for use with feedback control. FAR-TECH, Inc., in collaboration with SLAC, is developing a resonant cavity diagnostic to simultaneously measure the dipole, quadrupole and sextupole moments of the beam distribution. Measurements of dipole and quadrupole moments at multiple locations yield information about beam orbit and emittance. The sextupole moment can reveal information about beam asymmetry which is useful in diagnosing beam tail deflections caused by short-range dipole wakefields. In addition to the resonance enhancement of a single-cell cavity, use of a multi-cell standing-wave structure further enhances signal strength and improves the resolution of the device. An estimated resolution is better than 1 {micro}m in rms beam size and better than 1 nm in beam position.

  17. CALIBRATION ERRORS IN THE CAVITY BEAM POSITION MONITOR SYSTEM AT THE ATF2

    CERN Document Server

    Cullinan, F; Joshi, N; Lyapin, A

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown at the Accelerator Test Facility at KEK, that it is possible to run a system of 37 cavity beam position monitors (BPMs) and achieve high working resolution. However, stability of the calibration constants (position scale and radio frequency (RF) phase) over a three/four week running period is yet to be demonstrated. During the calibration procedure, random beam jitter gives rise to a statistical error in the position scale and slow orbit drift in position and tilt causes systematic errors in both the position scale and RF phase. These errors are dominant and have been evaluated for each BPM. The results are compared with the errors expected after a tested method of beam jitter subtraction has been applied.

  18. A metrology system for a high resolution cavity beam position monitor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walston, Sean; Boogert, Stewart; Chung, Carl; Fitsos, Pete; Frisch, Joe; Gronberg, Jeff; Hayano, Hitoshi; Hinton, Shantell; Honda, Yosuke; Khainovski, Oleg; Kolomensky, Yury; Loscutoff, Peter; Lyapin, Alexey; Malton, Stephen; May, Justin; McCormick, Douglas; Meller, Robert; Miller, David; Orimoto, Toyoko; Ross, Marc; Slater, Mark; Smith, Steve; Smith, Tonee; Terunuma, Nobuhiro; Thomson, Mark; Urakawa, Junji; Vogel, Vladimir; Ward, David; White, Glen

    2013-11-01

    International Linear Collider (ILC) interaction region beam sizes and component position stability requirements will likely be as small as a few nanometers. It is important to the ILC design effort to demonstrate that these tolerances can be achieved-ideally using a beam-based stability measurement. We developed a high resolution RF cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) system. A triplet of these BPMs, installed in the extraction line of the KEK Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) and tested with its ultra-low emittance beam, achieved a position measurement resolution of 15 nm. A metrology system for the three BPMs was subsequently installed. This system employed optical encoders to measure each BPM's position and orientation relative to a zero-coefficient of thermal expansion carbon fiber frame. We have demonstrated that the three BPMs behave as a rigid-body at the level of less than 5 nm.

  19. Status of Higher Order Mode Beam Position Monitors in 3.9 GHz Superconducting Accelerating Cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Flisgen, T; van Rienen, U; Jones, R M; Shinton, I R R

    2013-01-01

    Higher order mode (HOM) beam position monitors (BPM) are being developed for the 3.9 GHz third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. The transverse beam position in a cavity can be determined utilizing beam-excited HOMs based on dipole components. The existing couplers used for HOM suppression provide necessary signals. The diagnostics principle is similar to a cavity BPM, but requires no additional vacuum instruments on the linac. The challenges of HOM-BPM for 3.9 GHz cavities lie in the dense HOM spectrum arising from the coupling of the majority HOMs amongst the four cavities in the cryo-module ACC39. HOMs with particularly promising diagnostics features were evaluated using a spectrum analyzer and custom-built test electronics with various data analysis techniques, data reduction was focused on. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, multi-cavity modes in the region of 5 GHz were chosen to provide a global position over the complete module with superi...

  20. Status of higher order mode beam position monitors in 3.9 GHz superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Jones, R M; Flisgen, T; Van Rienen, U; Shinton, I R R

    2013-01-01

    Higher order mode (HOM) beam position monitors (BPM) are being developed for the 3.9 GHz third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities at FLASH. The transverse beam position in a cavity can be determined utilizing beam-excited HOMs based on dipole components. The existing couplers used for HOM suppression provide necessary signals. The diagnostics principle is similar to a cavity BPM, but requires no additional vacuum instruments on the linac. The challenges of HOM-BPM for 3.9 GHz cavities lie in the dense HOM spectrum arising from the coupling of the majority HOMs amongst the four cavities in the cryo-module ACC39. HOMs with particularly promising diagnostics features were evaluated using a spectrum analyzer and custom-built test electronics with various data analysis techniques, data reduction was focused on. After careful theoretical and experimental assessment of the HOM spectrum, multi-cavity modes in the region of 5 GHz were chosen to provide a global position over the complete module with superi...

  1. Sub-micron resolution rf cavity beam position monitor system at the SACLA XFEL facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maesaka, H., E-mail: maesaka@spring8.or.jp [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Ego, H. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Inoue, S. [SPring-8 Service Co. Ltd., Tatsuno, Hyogo (Japan); Matsubara, S. [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan); Ohshima, T.; Shintake, T.; Otake, Y. [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, Sayo, Hyogo (Japan)

    2012-12-22

    We have developed and constructed a C-band (4.760 GHz) rf cavity beam position monitor (RF-BPM) system for the XFEL facility at SPring-8, SACLA. The demanded position resolution of the RF-BPM is less than 1{mu}m, because an electron beam and x-rays must be overlapped within 4{mu}m precision in the undulator section for sufficient FEL interaction between the electrons and x-rays. In total, 57 RF-BPMs, including IQ demodulators and high-speed waveform digitizers for signal processing, were produced and installed into SACLA. We evaluated the position resolutions of 20 RF-BPMs in the undulator section by using a 7 GeV electron beam having a 0.1 nC bunch charge. The position resolution was measured to be less than 0.6{mu}m, which was sufficient for the XFEL lasing in the wavelength region of 0.1 nm, or shorter.

  2. External cavity tunable quantum cascade lasers and their applications to trace gas monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Gottipaty N; Karpf, Andreas

    2011-02-01

    Since the first quantum cascade laser (QCL) was demonstrated approximately 16 years ago, we have witnessed an explosion of interesting developments in QCL technology and QCL-based trace gas sensors. QCLs operate in the mid-IR region (3-24 μm) and can directly access the rotational vibrational bands of most molecular species and, therefore, are ideally suited for trace gas detection with high specificity and sensitivity. These sensors have applications in a wide range of fields, including environmental monitoring, atmospheric chemistry, medical diagnostics, homeland security, detection of explosive compounds, and industrial process control, to name a few. Tunable external cavity (EC)-QCLs in particular offer narrow linewidths, wide ranges of tunability, and stable power outputs, which open up new possibilities for sensor development. These features allow for the simultaneous detection of multiple species and the study of large molecules, free radicals, ions, and reaction kinetics. In this article, we review the current status of EC-QCLs and sensor developments based on them and speculate on possible future developments.

  3. A Wearable Real-Time and Non-Invasive Thoracic Cavity Monitoring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salman, Safa

    A surgery-free on-body monitoring system is proposed to evaluate the dielectric constant of internal body tissues (especially lung and heart) and effectively determine irregularities in real-time. The proposed surgery-free on-body monitoring system includes a sensor, a post-processing technique, and an automated data collection circuit. Data are automatically collected from the sensor electrodes and then post processed to extract the electrical properties of the underlying biological tissue(s). To demonstrate the imaging concept, planar and wrap-around sensors are devised. These sensors are designed to detect changes in the dielectric constant of inner tissues (lung and heart). The planar sensor focuses on a single organ while the wrap-around sensors allows for imaging of the thoracic cavity's cross section. Moreover, post-processing techniques are proposed to complement sensors for a more complete on-body monitoring system. The idea behind the post-processing technique is to suppress interference from the outer layers (skin, fat, muscle, and bone). The sensors and post-processing techniques yield high signal (from the inner layers) to noise (from the outer layers) ratio. Additionally, data collection circuits are proposed for a more robust and stand-alone system. The circuit design aims to sequentially activate each port of the sensor and portions of the propagating signal are to be received at all passive ports in the form of a voltage at the probes. The voltages are converted to scattering parameters which are then used in the post-processing technique to obtain epsilonr. The concept of wearability is also considered through the use of electrically conductive fibers (E-fibers). These fibers show matching performance to that of copper, especially at low frequencies making them a viable substitute. For the cases considered, the proposed sensors show promising results in recovering the permittivity of deep tissues with a maximum error of 13.5%. These sensors

  4. Real-time monitoring of ethane in human breath using mid-infrared cavity leak-out spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahnke, H.; Kleine, D.; Hering, P.; Mürtz, M.

    2001-06-01

    We report on spectroscopic real-time analysis of ethane traces in exhaled human breath. Ethane is considered the most important volatile marker of free-radical induced lipid peroxidation and cell damage in the human body. Our measurements were carried out by means of mid-infrared cavity leak-out spectroscopy in the 3 μm region, a cw variant of cavity ring-down spectroscopy. The spectrometer is based on a CO overtone laser with tunable microwave sidebands. The resulting system proved to be an unique tool with high sensitivity and selectivity for rapid and precise breath testing. With a 5 s integration time, we achieved a detection limit on the order of 100 parts per trillion ethane in human breath. Thus, sample preconcentration is unnecessary. Time-resolved monitoring of the decaying ethane fraction in breath after smoking a cigarette is demonstrated.

  5. HIE-Isolde: Commissioning and first results of the Mathilde system monitoring the positions of cavities and solenoids inside cryomodules

    CERN Document Server

    Kautzmann, Guillaume; Klumb, Francis; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The new superconducting HIE-ISOLDE Linac replaced most of pre-existing REX ISOLDE facility at CERN. This upgrade involves the design, construction, installation and commissioning of 4 high-β cryomodules. Each high-β cryomodule houses five superconducting cavities and one superconducting solenoid. Beam-physics simulations show that the optimum linac working conditions are obtained when the main axes of the active components, located inside the cryostats, are aligned and permanently monitored on the REX Nominal Beam Line (NBL) within a precision of 0.3 mm for the cavities and 0.15 mm for the solenoids at one sigma level along directions perpendicular to the beam axis. The Monitoring and Alignment Tracking for HIE-ISOLDE (MATHILDE) system has been developed to fulfil the alignment and monitoring needs for components exposed to non-standard environmental conditions such as high vacuum or cryogenic temperatures. MATHILDE is based on opto-electronic sensors (HBCAM) observing, through high quality viewports, spher...

  6. Monitoring Thermal Performance of Hollow Bricks with Different Cavity Fillers in Difference Climate Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlík, Zbyšek; Jerman, Miloš; Fořt, Jan; Černý, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Hollow brick blocks have found widespread use in the building industry during the last decades. The increasing requirements to the thermal insulation properties of building envelopes given by the national standards in Europe led the brick producers to reduce the production of common solid bricks. Brick blocks with more or less complex systems of internal cavities replaced the traditional bricks and became dominant on the building ceramics market. However, contrary to the solid bricks where the thermal conductivity can easily be measured by standard methods, the complex geometry of hollow brick blocks makes the application of common techniques impossible. In this paper, a steady-state technique utilizing a system of two climatic chambers separated by a connecting tunnel for sample positioning is used for the determination of the thermal conductivity, thermal resistance, and thermal transmittance ( U value) of hollow bricks with the cavities filled by air, two different types of mineral wool, polystyrene balls, and foam polyurethane. The particular brick block is provided with the necessary temperature- and heat-flux sensors and thermally insulated in the tunnel. In the climatic chambers, different temperatures are set. After steady-state conditions are established in the measuring system, the effective thermal properties of the brick block are calculated using the measured data. Experimental results show that the best results are achieved with hydrophilic mineral wool as a cavity filler; the worst performance exhibits the brick block with air-filled cavities.

  7. Development of an S-band cavity-type beam position monitor for a high power THz free-electron laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Seon Yeong; Kim, Eun-San; Hwang, Ji-Gwang; Heo, A.; won Jang, Si; Vinokurov, Nikolay A.; Jeong, Young UK; Hee Park, Seong; Jang, Kyu-Ha

    2015-01-01

    A cavity-type beam position monitor (BPM) has been developed for a compact terahertz (THz) free-electron laser (FEL) system and ultra-short pulsed electron Linac system at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Compared with other types of BPMs, the cavity-type BPM has higher sensitivity and faster response time even at low charge levels. When electron beam passes through the cavity-type BPM, it excites the dipole mode of the cavity of which amplitude depends linearly on the beam offset from the center of the cavity. Signals from the BPM were measured as a function of the beam offset by using an oscilloscope. The microtron accelerator for the KAERI THz FEL produces the electron beam with an energy of 6.5 MeV and pulse length of 5 μs with a micropulse of 10-20 ps at the frequency of 2.801 GHz. The macropulse beam current is 40 mA. Because the microtron provides multi-bunch system, output signal would be the superposition of each single bunch. So high output signal can be obtained from superposition of each single bunch. The designed position resolution of the cavity-type BPM in multi-bunch is submicron. Our cavity-type BPM is made of aluminum and vacuum can be maintained by indium sealing without brazing process, resulting in easy modification and cost saving. The resonance frequency of the cavity-type BPM is 2.803 GHz and the cavity-type BPM dimensions are 200 × 220 mm (length × height) with a pipe diameter of 38 mm. The measured position sensitivity was 6.19 (mV/mm)/mA and the measured isolation between the X and Y axis was -39 dB. By measuring the thermal noise of system, position resolution of the cavity-type BPM was estimated to be less than 1 μm. In this article, we present the test results of the S-band cavity-type BPM and prove the feasibility of the beam position measurement with high resolution using this device.

  8. Development of an S-band cavity-type beam position monitor for a high power THz free-electron laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noh, Seon Yeong; Kim, Eun-San, E-mail: eskim1@knu.ac.kr; Hwang, Ji-Gwang; Heo, A.; Won, Jang Si [Department of Physics, Kyungpook National University, Daegu 702-701 (Korea, Republic of); Vinokurov, Nikolay A.; Jeong, Young UK, E-mail: yujung@kaeri.re.kr; Hee Park, Seong; Jang, Kyu-Ha [WCI Center for Quantum-Beam-based Radiation Research, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, 989-111 Daedeok-Daero, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    A cavity-type beam position monitor (BPM) has been developed for a compact terahertz (THz) free-electron laser (FEL) system and ultra-short pulsed electron Linac system at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI). Compared with other types of BPMs, the cavity-type BPM has higher sensitivity and faster response time even at low charge levels. When electron beam passes through the cavity-type BPM, it excites the dipole mode of the cavity of which amplitude depends linearly on the beam offset from the center of the cavity. Signals from the BPM were measured as a function of the beam offset by using an oscilloscope. The microtron accelerator for the KAERI THz FEL produces the electron beam with an energy of 6.5 MeV and pulse length of 5 μs with a micropulse of 10-20 ps at the frequency of 2.801 GHz. The macropulse beam current is 40 mA. Because the microtron provides multi-bunch system, output signal would be the superposition of each single bunch. So high output signal can be obtained from superposition of each single bunch. The designed position resolution of the cavity-type BPM in multi-bunch is submicron. Our cavity-type BPM is made of aluminum and vacuum can be maintained by indium sealing without brazing process, resulting in easy modification and cost saving. The resonance frequency of the cavity-type BPM is 2.803 GHz and the cavity-type BPM dimensions are 200 × 220 mm (length × height) with a pipe diameter of 38 mm. The measured position sensitivity was 6.19 (mV/mm)/mA and the measured isolation between the X and Y axis was −39 dB. By measuring the thermal noise of system, position resolution of the cavity-type BPM was estimated to be less than 1 μm. In this article, we present the test results of the S-band cavity-type BPM and prove the feasibility of the beam position measurement with high resolution using this device.

  9. Intercomparison of a Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift-based extinction monitor (CAPS PMex) with an integrating nephelometer and a filter-based absorption monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, A.; Onasch, T.; Kebabian, P.; Freedman, A.

    2013-05-01

    An evaluation of the Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift particle light extinction monitor (CAPS PMex) using a combination of a 3-wavelength Integrating Nephelometer (NEPH) and a 3-wavelength filter-based Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) was carried out using both laboratory-generated test particles and ambient aerosols. An accurate determination of a fixed pathlength correction for the CAPS PMex was made by comparing extinction measurements using monodisperse PSL spheres in combination with Mie scattering calculations to account for the presence of PSL conglomerates. These studies yielded a linear instrument response over the investigated dynamical range from 20 to 450 Mm-1 (10-6 m-1) with a linear correlation coefficient of R2 > 0.98. The adjustment factor was determined to be 1.05 times that previously reported. Correlating CAPS extinction to extinction measured by the NEPH + PSAP combination using laboratory-generated polydisperse mixtures of purely scattering ammonium sulfate and highly absorbing black carbon provided a linear regression line with slope m = 1.00 (R2 = 0.994) for single-scattering albedo values (λ = 630 nm) ranging from 0.35 (black carbon) to 1.00 (ammonium sulfate). For ambient aerosol, light extinction measured by CAPS was highly correlated (R2 = 0.995) to extinction measured by the NEPH + PSAP combination with slope m = 0.95.

  10. Assessing the measurement of aerosol single scattering albedo by Cavity Attenuated Phase-Shift Single Scattering Monitor (CAPS PMssa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perim de Faria, Julia; Bundke, Ulrich; Onasch, Timothy B.; Freedman, Andrew; Petzold, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The necessity to quantify the direct impact of aerosol particles on climate forcing is already well known; assessing this impact requires continuous and systematic measurements of the aerosol optical properties. Two of the main parameters that need to be accurately measured are the aerosol optical depth and single scattering albedo (SSA, defined as the ratio of particulate scattering to extinction). The measurement of single scattering albedo commonly involves the measurement of two optical parameters, the scattering and the absorption coefficients. Although there are well established technologies to measure both of these parameters, the use of two separate instruments with different principles and uncertainties represents potential sources of significant errors and biases. Based on the recently developed cavity attenuated phase shift particle extinction monitor (CAPS PM_{ex) instrument, the CAPS PM_{ssa instrument combines the CAPS technology to measure particle extinction with an integrating sphere capable of simultaneously measuring the scattering coefficient of the same sample. The scattering channel is calibrated to the extinction channel, such that the accuracy of the single scattering albedo measurement is only a function of the accuracy of the extinction measurement and the nephelometer truncation losses. This gives the instrument an accurate and direct measurement of the single scattering albedo. In this study, we assess the measurements of both the extinction and scattering channels of the CAPS PM_{ssa through intercomparisons with Mie theory, as a fundamental comparison, and with proven technologies, such as integrating nephelometers and filter-based absorption monitors. For comparison, we use two nephelometers, a TSI 3563 and an Aurora 4000, and two measurements of the absorption coefficient, using a Particulate Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) and a Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP). We also assess the indirect absorption coefficient

  11. Measurements of Nascent Soot Using a Cavity Attenauted Phase Shift (CAPS)-based Single Scattering Albedo Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, A.; Onasch, T. B.; Renbaum-Wollf, L.; Lambe, A. T.; Davidovits, P.; Kebabian, P. L.

    2015-12-01

    Accurate, as compared to precise, measurement of aerosol absorption has always posed a significant problem for the particle radiative properties community. Filter-based instruments do not actually measure absorption but rather light transmission through the filter; absorption must be derived from this data using multiple corrections. The potential for matrix-induced effects is also great for organic-laden aerosols. The introduction of true in situ measurement instruments using photoacoustic or photothermal interferometric techniques represents a significant advance in the state-of-the-art. However, measurement artifacts caused by changes in humidity still represent a significant hurdle as does the lack of a good calibration standard at most measurement wavelengths. And, in the absence of any particle-based absorption standard, there is no way to demonstrate any real level of accuracy. We, along with others, have proposed that under the circumstance of low single scattering albedo (SSA), absorption is best determined by difference using measurement of total extinction and scattering. We discuss a robust, compact, field deployable instrument (the CAPS PMssa) that simultaneously measures airborne particle light extinction and scattering coefficients and thus the single scattering albedo (SSA) on the same sample volume. The extinction measurement is based on cavity attenuated phase shift (CAPS) techniques as employed in the CAPS PMex particle extinction monitor; scattering is measured using integrating nephelometry by incorporating a Lambertian integrating sphere within the sample cell. The scattering measurement is calibrated using the extinction measurement of non-absorbing particles. For small particles and low SSA, absorption can be measured with an accuracy of 6-8% at absorption levels as low as a few Mm-1. We present new results of the measurement of the mass absorption coefficient (MAC) of soot generated by an inverted methane diffusion flame at 630 nm. A value

  12. A new cavity ring-down instrument for airborne monitoring of N2O5, NO3, NO2 and O3 in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Albert A.; Brown, Steven S.; Dinesan, Hemanth; Dubé, William P.; Goulette, Marc; Hübler, Gerhard; Orphal, Johannes; Zahn, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    The chemistry of NO3 and N2O5 is important to the regulation of both tropospheric and stratospheric ozone. In situ detection of NO3 and N2O5 in the upper troposphere lower stratosphere (UTLS) represents a new scientific direction as the only previous measurements of these species in this region of the atmosphere has been via remote sensing techniques. Because both the sources and the sinks for NO3 and N2O5 are potentially stratified spatially, their mixing ratios, and their influence on nitrogen oxide and ozone transport and loss at night can show large variability as a function of altitude. Aircraft-based measurements of heterogeneous N2O5 uptake in the lower troposphere have uncovered a surprising degree of variability in the uptake coefficient [1], but there are no corresponding high altitude measurements.The UTLS is routinely sampled by the IAGOS-CARIBIC program (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container, www.caribic-atmospheric.com), a European infrastructural program with the aim of studying the chemistry and transport across this part of the atmosphere. An airfreight container with 15 different automated instruments from 8 European research partners is utilized on board a commercial Lufthansa airbus 340-600 to monitor ~ 100 atmospheric species (trace gases and aerosol parameters) in the UTLS. The instrumentation in the CARIBIC container is now to be supplemented by a new cavity ring-down device for monitoring nitrogen oxides, jointly developed by researchers from Cork (Ireland), Boulder (USA) and Karlsruhe (Germany). The compact and light-weight instrument is designed to monitor not only NO3 and N2O5, but also NO2 and O3. The detection is based on 4 high-finesse optical cavities (cavity length ~ 44 cm). Two cavities are operated at 662 nm (maximum absorption of NO3), the other two at 405 nm (maximum absorption of NO2). The inlet to one of the (662)-cavities is heated in order to thermally decompose N2O5

  13. Dental cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001055.htm Dental cavities To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Dental cavities are holes (or structural damage) in the ...

  14. Measurement of Microvibration by Using Dual-Cavity Fiber Fabry-Perot Interferometer for Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dae-Hyun Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extensive researches have recently been performed to study structural integrity using structural vibration data measured by in-structure sensors. A fiber optic sensor is one of candidates for the in-structure sensors because it is low in cost, light in weight, small in size, resistant to EM interference, long in service life, and so forth. Especially, an interferometric fiber optic sensor is very useful to measure vibrations with high resolution and accuracy. In this paper, a dual-cavity fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer was proposed with a phase-compensating algorithm for measuring micro-vibration. The interferometer has structurally two arbitrary cavities; therefore the initial phase difference between two sinusoidal signals induced from the interferometer was also arbitrary. In order to do signal processing including an arc-tangent method, a random value of the initial phase difference is automatically adjusted to the exact 90 degrees in the phase-compensating algorithm part. For the verification of the performance of the interferometer, a simple vibration-test was performed to measure micro-vibration caused by piezoelectric transducer (PZT. As an experimental result, the interferometer attached on the PZT successfully measured the 50 Hz-vibration of which the absolute displacement oscillated between −424 nm and +424 nm.

  15. Development of a New N2O/CO Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer for sub-ppb Ambient Gas Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leggett, G. A.; Saad, N.; Zhou, J.; Hoffnagle, J.; Fleck, D.

    2015-12-01

    With a global warming potential of nearly 300, N2O is a critically important greenhouse gas, contributing about 5% of the US total GHG emissions. Agriculture soil management practices are the dominant source of anthropogenic N2O emissions, contributing nearly 3/4ths of US N2O emissions. In urban areas, vehicle tailpipe emissions and waste water treatment plants are significant sources of N2O. We report here a new mid-infrared laser-based cavity ring-down spectrometer that was recently developed to measure sub-ppb ambient concentrations of two key greenhouse gas species, N2O and CO, simultaneously. It combines a quantum cascade laser with a proprietary 3-mirror optical cavity. The new optical analyzer was set up to monitor nitrous oxide and carbon monoxide, along with CO2 and CH4, in ambient air obtained from a 10m tower in Santa Clara, California. In the data collected, the contribution from traffic and a nearby sewage treatment facility was evident.

  16. Performance of a Downconverter Test-electronics with MTCA-based Digitizers for Beam Position Monitoring in 3.9 GHz Accelerating Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Wamsat, T; Lorbeer, B; Zhang, P

    2012-01-01

    Beam-excited higher order modes (HOM) in 3.9GHz accelerating cavities are planned to be used for beam position monitoring at the European XFEL. The selected HOMs are located around 5440MHz, with a bandwidth of 100MHz and 9060MHz, with a bandwidth of 50MHz. A downconverter electronics, built for tests at FLASH, converts the HOMs to an intermediate frequency of 70MHz. The MTCA (Micro Telecommunications Computing Architecture) standard will be used for the XFEL. Thus it is important to have a performance study of the downconverter test-electronics using the MTCA digitizer card SIS8300. In the digitizer the IF frequency of 70MHz is undersampled with a clock frequency of 108MS/s. The paper presents the performance of the digitizer together with the test-electronics. A comparison with a 216MS/s VME (Versa Module Eurocard) digitizer is made.

  17. Rapid monitoring of intermediate states and mass balance of nitrogen during denitrification by means of cavity enhanced Raman multi-gas sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keiner, Robert [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena 07743 (Germany); Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena 07745 (Germany); Herrmann, Martina; Küsel, Kirsten [Institute of Ecology, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena 07743 (Germany); German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research (iDiv) Halle–Jena–Leipzig, Leipzig 04103 (Germany); Popp, Jürgen [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena 07743 (Germany); Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena 07745 (Germany); InfectoGnostics Forschungscampus, Zentrum für Angewandte Forschung, Jena 07743 (Germany); Abbe School of Photonics, Friedrich Schiller University, Jena (Germany); Frosch, Torsten, E-mail: torsten.frosch@uni-jena.de [Institute of Physical Chemistry, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Jena 07743 (Germany); Leibniz Institute of Photonic Technology, Jena 07745 (Germany); InfectoGnostics Forschungscampus, Zentrum für Angewandte Forschung, Jena 07743 (Germany)

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • CERS is a versatile new analytical methodology. • Continuous online quantification of reduction of {sup 15}N-labelled nitrate by P. stutzeri was demonstrated. • The total nitrogen element budget was monitored online for the first time. • Sterile online acquisition of the pH changes in the P. stutzeri culture was demonstrated. • An increased slope of the pH value coincided with a temporary accumulation of N{sub 2}O. - Abstract: The comprehensive investigation of changes in N cycling has been challenging so far due to difficulties with measuring gases such as N{sub 2} and N{sub 2}O simultaneously. In this study we introduce cavity enhanced Raman gas spectroscopy as a new analytical methodology for tracing the stepwise reduction of {sup 15}N-labelled nitrate by the denitrifying bacteria Pseudomonas stutzeri. The unique capabilities of Raman multi-gas analysis enabled real-time, continuous, and non-consumptive quantification of the relevant gases ({sup 14}N{sub 2}, {sup 14}N{sub 2}O, O{sub 2}, and CO{sub 2}) and to trace the fate of {sup 15}N-labeled nitrate substrate ({sup 15}N{sub 2}, {sup 15}N{sub 2}O) added to a P. stutzeri culture with one single measurement. Using this new methodology, we could quantify the kinetics of the formation and degradation for all gaseous compounds (educts and products) and thus study the reaction orders. The gas quantification was complemented with the analysis of nitrate and nitrite concentrations for the online monitoring of the total nitrogen element budget. The simultaneous quantification of all gases also enabled the contactless and sterile online acquisition of the pH changes in the P. stutzeri culture by the stoichiometry of the redox reactions during denitrification and the CO{sub 2}-bicarbonate equilibrium. Continuous pH monitoring – without the need to insert an electrode into solution – elucidated e.g. an increase in the slope of the pH value coinciding with an accumulation of nitrite, which in

  18. accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    On the inside of the cavity there is a layer of niobium. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment.

  19. radiofrequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1988-01-01

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  20. Intercomparison Study of the CAPS PMex (Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift Particle Light Extinction Monitor) with the combination of an Integrating Nephelometer and a Particle Soot Absorption Photometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petzold, A.; Onasch, T.; Kebabian, P.; Freedman, A.

    2012-10-01

    An evaluation of the Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift particle light extinction monitor (CAPS PMex) by means of a combination of a 3-wavelength Integrating Nephelometer (NEPH; TSI Model 3563) and a 3-wavelength filter-based Particle Soot Absorption Photometer (PSAP) was carried out using both laboratory generated test particles and ambient aerosols. An accurate determination of a fixed pathlength correction for the CAPS PMex was made by comparing extinction measurements using polystyrene latex (PSL) spheres in combination with Mie scattering calculations to account for the presence of PSL conglomerates. These studies yielded a linear instrument response over the investigated dynamical range from 20 to 450 M m-1 (10-6 m-1) with a linear correlation coefficient of R2 > 0.98. The adjustment factor was determined to be 1.05 times that previously reported. Correlating CAPS extinction to extinction measured by the NEPH-PSAP combination using laboratory-generated polydisperse mixtures of purely scattering ammonium sulfate and highly absorbing black carbon provided a linear regression line with slope m = 0.99 (R2 = 0.996) for single-scattering albedo values (λ = 630 nm) ranging from 0.35 (black carbon) to 1.00 (ammonium sulfate). For ambient aerosol, light extinction measured by CAPS PMex was highly correlated (R2 = 0.995) to extinction measured by the NEPH-PSAP combination with slope m = 0.95.

  1. Comparison of two closed-path cavity-based spectrometers for measuring air-water CO2 and CH4 fluxes by eddy covariance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Mingxi; Prytherch, John; Kozlova, Elena; Yelland, Margaret J.; Parenkat Mony, Deepulal; Bell, Thomas G.

    2016-11-01

    In recent years several commercialised closed-path cavity-based spectroscopic instruments designed for eddy covariance flux measurements of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4), and water vapour (H2O) have become available. Here we compare the performance of two leading models - the Picarro G2311-f and the Los Gatos Research (LGR) Fast Greenhouse Gas Analyzer (FGGA) at a coastal site. Both instruments can compute dry mixing ratios of CO2 and CH4 based on concurrently measured H2O, temperature, and pressure. Additionally, we used a high throughput Nafion dryer to physically remove H2O from the Picarro airstream. Observed air-sea CO2 and CH4 fluxes from these two analysers, averaging about 12 and 0.12 mmol m-2 day-1 respectively, agree within the measurement uncertainties. For the purpose of quantifying dry CO2 and CH4 fluxes downstream of a long inlet, the numerical H2O corrections appear to be reasonably effective and lead to results that are comparable to physical removal of H2O with a Nafion dryer in the mean. We estimate the high-frequency attenuation of fluxes in our closed-path set-up, which was relatively small ( ≤ 10 %) for CO2 and CH4 but very large for the more polar H2O. The Picarro showed significantly lower noise and flux detection limits than the LGR. The hourly flux detection limit for the Picarro was about 2 mmol m-2 day-1 for CO2 and 0.02 mmol m-2 day-1 for CH4. For the LGR these detection limits were about 8 and 0.05 mmol m-2 day-1. Using global maps of monthly mean air-sea CO2 flux as reference, we estimate that the Picarro and LGR can resolve hourly CO2 fluxes from roughly 40 and 4 % of the world's oceans respectively. Averaging over longer timescales would be required in regions with smaller fluxes. Hourly flux detection limits of CH4 from both instruments are generally higher than the expected emissions from the open ocean, though the signal to noise of this measurement may improve closer to the coast.

  2. First Continuous High Frequency in Situ Measurements of CO2 and CH4 in Rwanda Using Cavity Ring-down Spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasore, J.; DeWitt, L. H.; Prinn, R. G.

    2015-12-01

    Recent IPCC reports emphasize the lack of ground measurements of greenhouse gases on the African continent, despite Africa's significant emissions from agriculture and biomass burning as well as ongoing land use changes. We have established a greenhouse gas monitoring station in northern Rwanda that will be part of the Advanced Global Atmospheric Gases Experiment (AGAGE), a global network of high frequency long-term remote atmospheric measurement stations. Using a Picarro G2401 cavity ring-down analyzer, continuous measurements of CO2, CH4, and CO at a frequency of five seconds are being captured at this equatorial East African site. The measurement site is located near the Virunga mountains, a volcanic range in North-West Rwanda, on the summit of Mt. Mugogo (2507 m above sea level). Mt. Mugogo is located in a rural area 70km away from Kigali, the capital of Rwanda, and about 13km from the nearest town. From HYSPLIT 7-day back-trajectory calculations, we have determined that the station measures air masses originating from East and Central Africa, the Indian Ocean and occasionally from Southern Asia. Depending on the wind direction and local boundary layer height, measurements taken at Mt Mugogo are occasionally influenced by local sources, including emissions from the nearby city and wood fires from small rural settlements around the station. Here we present the first greenhouse gas measurement data from this unique and understudied location in Africa. Using the lagrangian transport and dispersion model FLEXPART, we derive the relationship between the observed mole fractions of CO2 and CH4 and our current knowledge of their sources and sinks, across this large African footprint.

  3. Rapid, Long-term Monitoring of CO2 Concentration and δ13CO2 at CCUS Sites Allows Discrimination of Leakage Patterns from Natural Background Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galfond, B.; Riemer, D. D.; Swart, P. K.

    2014-12-01

    In order for Carbon Capture Utilization and Storage (CCUS) to gain wide acceptance as a method for mitigating atmospheric CO2 concentrations, schemes must be devised to ensure that potential leakage is detected. New regulations from the US Environmental Protection Agency require monitoring and accounting for Class VI injection wells, which will remain a barrier to wide scale CCUS deployment until effective and efficient monitoring techniques have been developed and proven. Monitoring near-surface CO2 at injection sites to ensure safety and operational success requires high temporal resolution CO2 concentration and carbon isotopic (δ13C) measurements. The only technologies currently capable of this rapid measurement of δ13C are optical techniques such as Cavity Ringdown Spectroscopy (CRDS). We have developed a comprehensive remote monitoring approach using CRDS and a custom manifold system to obtain accurate rapid measurements from a large sample area over an extended study period. Our modified Picarro G1101-i CRDS allows for automated rapid and continuous field measurement of δ13CO2 and concentrations of relevant gas species. At our field site, where preparations have been underway for Enhanced Oil Recovery (EOR) operations, we have been able to measure biogenic effects on a diurnal scale, as well as variation due to precipitation and seasonality. Taking these background trends into account, our statistical treatment of real data has been used to improve signal-to-noise ratios by an order of magnitude over published models. Our system has proven field readiness for the monitoring of sites with even modest CO2 fluxes.

  4. Cavity magnomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Chang-Ling; Zhang, Xufeng; Jiang, Liang; Tang, Hong

    2016-05-01

    Recently, cavity magnonics has attracted much attention for potential applications of coherent information transduction and hybrid quantum devices. The magnon is a collective spin wave excitation in ferromagnetic material. It is magnetically tunability, with long coherence time and non-reciprocical interaction with electro-magnetic fields. We report the coherent coupling between magnon, microwave photon and phonon. First, we demonstrate strong coupling and ultrastrong coupling between the magnon in YIG sphere and microwave photon in three-dimensional cavity. Then, based on the hybridized magnon-photon modes, we observe the triply resonant magnon-mcirowave photon-phonon coupling, where the ultrahigh-Q mechanical vibration of YIG sphere is dispersively coupled with the magnon via magnetostrictive interaction. We observe interesting phenomena, including electromagnetically induced transparency/absorption and parametric amplification. In particular, benefit from the large tunability of the magnon, we demonstrate a tunable microwave amplifier with gain as high as 30 dB. The single crystal YIG also has excellent optical properties, and thus provide a unique platform bridging MHz, GHz and THz information carriers. Finally, we present the latest progress towards coherent magnon to optical photon conversion.

  5. Cavities/Tooth Decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavities/tooth decay Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cavities are permanently damaged areas in the hard surface of your teeth ... into tiny openings or holes. Cavities, also called tooth decay or caries, are caused by a combination of ...

  6. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Kuhn, A G; Ducloux, O; Chartier, C; Traon, O Le; Briant, T; Cohadon, P -F; Heidmann, A; Michel, C; Pinard, L; Flaminio, R

    2011-01-01

    We present a new micromechanical resonator designed for cavity optomechanics. We have used a micropillar geometry to obtain a high-frequency mechanical resonance with a low effective mass and a very high quality factor. We have coated a 60-$\\mu$m diameter low-loss dielectric mirror on top of the pillar and are planning to use this micromirror as part of a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity, to laser cool the resonator down to its quantum ground state and to monitor its quantum position fluctuations by quantum-limited optical interferometry.

  7. [Role of beta-carotene in the prevention of genotoxic damage in patients undergoing radiotherapy. Monitoring by the micronucleus test in exfoliative cells of the oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldini, C; Malusardi, G; Grossi, L; Chiarelli, G

    1992-01-01

    Radiotherapic treatment of patients with carcinoma usually causes genotoxis damage. This has been studied recently using the test of micronuclei in esfoliated cells. This test presents methodologic advantages in compared with the classic citogenetic analysis and as it is carried out on esfolieted cells from the oral cavity it faithfully reflects the genotoxic damage undergone by the cells of the basal layer of the epitelium. The preliminary result obtained so far have confirmed the anticlastogenic activity of beta-carotene in fact, the frequence of micronuclei in esfolieted cells from the oral cavity in patients undergoing radiotherapy or undergoing treatment with beta-carotene is inferior to that of patients undergoing treatment with beta-carotene is inferior to that of patients undergoing radiotherapy without the subministration of carotenoids. Treatment with carotenoids does not influence the therapeutic efficiency of radiotherapy treatment. Therefore, the results seem to confirm that indirect ossidaction processes are involved in the mechanism of the clastogenic action of radiotherapia. The carotenoids seem to be able to contrast validly this undesirable effect without interfering with the desirable therapeutic effect.

  8. Crab Cavity Development

    CERN Document Server

    Calaga, R; Burt, G; Ratti, A

    2015-01-01

    The HL-LHC upgrade will use deflecting (or crab) cavities to compensate for geometric luminosity loss at low β* and non-zero crossing angle. A local scheme with crab cavity pairs across the IPs is used employing compact crab cavities at 400 MHz. Design of the cavities, the cryomodules and the RF system is well advanced. The LHC crab cavities will be validated initially with proton beam in the SPS.

  9. Quantifying Fugitive Methane Emissions at an Underground Coal Fire Using Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, D.; Gannon, L.; Kim-Hak, D.; Ide, T.

    2016-12-01

    Understanding methane emissions is of utmost importance due to its greenhouse warming potential. Methane emissions can occur from a variety of natural and anthropogenic sources which include wetlands, landfills, oil/gas/coal extraction activities, underground coal fires, and natural gas distribution systems. Locating and containing these emissions are critical to minimizing their environmental impacts and economically beneficial when retrieving large fugitive amounts. In order to design a way to mitigate these methane emissions, they must first be accurately quantified. One such quantification method is to measure methane fluxes, which is a measurement technique that is calculated based on rate of gas accumulation in a known chamber volume over methane seepages. This allows for quantification of greenhouse gas emissions at a localized level (sub one meter) that can complement remote sensing and other largescale modeling techniques to further paint the picture of emission points. High performance analyzers are required to provide both sufficient temporal resolution and precise concentration measurements in order to make these measurements over only minutes. A method of measuring methane fluxes was developed using the latest portable, battery-powered Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy analyzer from Picarro (G4301). In combination with a mobile accumulation chamber, the instrument allows for rapid measurement of methane and carbon dioxide fluxes over wide areas. For this study, methane fluxes that were measured at an underground coal fire near the Four Corners region using the Picarro analyzer are presented. The flux rates collected demonstrate the ability for the analyzer to detect methane fluxes across many orders of magnitude. Measurements were accompanied by simultaneously geotagging the measurements with GPS to georeferenced the data. Methane flux data were instrumental in our ability to characterize the extent and the migration of the underground fire. In the future

  10. Dawn of Cavity Spintronics

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Can-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Merging the progress of spintronics with the advancement in cavity quantum electrodynamics and cavity polaritons, a new field of Cavity Spintronics is forming, which connects some of the most exciting modern physics, such as quantum information and quantum optics, with one of the oldest science on the earth, the magnetism.

  11. Supersonic flows over cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tianwen FANG; Meng DING; Jin ZHOU

    2008-01-01

    The characteristics of supersonic cold flows over cavities were investigated experimentally and numer-ically, and the effects of cavities of different sizes on super-sonic flow field were analyzed. The results indicate that the ratio of length to depth L/D within the range of 5-9 has little relevance to integral structures of cavity flow. The bevel angle of the rear wall does not alter the overall structure of the cavity flow within the range of 30°-60°, but it can exert obvious effect on the evolvement of shear layer and vortexes in cavities.

  12. Beam cavity interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Gamp, A

    2011-01-01

    We begin by giving a description of the rf generator-cavity-beam coupled system in terms of basic quantities. Taking beam loading and cavity detuning into account, expressions for the cavity impedance as seen by the generator and as seen by the beam are derived. Subsequently methods of beam-loading compensation by cavity detuning, rf feedback, and feed-forward are described. Examples of digital rf phase and amplitude control for the special case of superconducting cavities are also given. Finally, a dedicated phase loop for damping synchrotron oscillations is discussed.

  13. Greenhouse Gases in the South Atlantic: Testing and Automation of Instrumentation for Long-Term Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowry, D.; Fisher, R.; Sriskantharajah, S.; Lanoisellé, M.; Etchells, A.; Manning, A.; Nisbet, E.

    2009-04-01

    Understanding ocean uptake of atmospheric CO2 by the Southern Ocean is important for modelling of future global warming scenarios, particularly since it was recently proposed that this sink was reducing (Le Quéré, et al., 2007). To help our understanding of this problem a new project aims to flask sample air from 5 South Atlantic sites and set up continuous monitoring at the 2 most accessible of these: Ascension Island and the Falklands. Flask sample measurements will include CO2 and CH4 mixing ratios and the ^13C measurement of both of these gases using the rapid continuous flow trace gas analysis system at Royal Holloway, University of London (RHUL). Routine precisions are ±0.03 per mil and ±0.05 per mil for CO2 and CH4, respectively (Fisher et al., 2006). A time series of ^13C in CH4 was maintained for Ascension Island from 2000-2005 and a time series for methane isotopes commenced for the Falkland Islands in autumn 2007. To meet the continuous monitoring requirements of the new project, three Picarro G1301 CO2 / CH4 / H2O Cavity Ring Down Spectrometers (CRDS) were installed at RHUL in October 2008 for testing, calibration and the development of an automated air inlet system suitable for analysis of calibration gases at the remote sites. Initial testing included calibration with NOAA calibrated and target gases, validation of the Picarro-defined H2O-correction of CO2, and derivation of an H2O-correction for CH4. Continuing checks on the H2O correction are made by having 2 instruments side-by-side taking air from the same inlet, but one having a combined Nafion / Mg-perchlorate drying system that utilizes the analysis system exhaust gas for the reverse flow through the Nafion and maintains water-levels at 0.05% for more than 2 weeks. These instruments are connected to the same air inlet as a GC measuring CH4 mixing ratio and a LiCor 6252 measuring CO2 mixing ratio at 30-minute and 1-minute intervals respectively. The third CRDS instrument is connected to a

  14. RESONANT CAVITY EXCITATION SYSTEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, W.R.; Kerns, Q.A.; Riedel, J.

    1959-01-13

    An apparatus is presented for exciting a cavity resonator with a minimum of difficulty and, more specifically describes a sub-exciter and an amplifier type pre-exciter for the high-frequency cxcitation of large cavities. Instead of applying full voltage to the main oscillator, a sub-excitation voltage is initially used to establish a base level of oscillation in the cavity. A portion of the cavity encrgy is coupled to the input of the pre-exciter where it is amplified and fed back into the cavity when the pre-exciter is energized. After the voltage in the cavity resonator has reached maximum value under excitation by the pre-exciter, full voltage is applied to the oscillator and the pre-exciter is tunned off. The cavity is then excited to the maximum high voltage value of radio frequency by the oscillator.

  15. Cavity turnover and equilibrium cavity densities in a cottonwood bottomland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedgwick, James A.; Knopf, Fritz L.

    1992-01-01

    A fundamental factor regulating the numbers of secondary cavity nesting (SCN) birds is the number of extant cavities available for nesting. The number of available cavities may be thought of as being in an approximate equilibrium maintained by a very rough balance between recruitment and loss of cavities. Based on estimates of cavity recruitment and loss, we ascertained equilibrium cavity densities in a mature plains cottonwood (Populus sargentii) bottomland along the South Platte River in northeastern Colorado. Annual cavity recruitment, derived from density estimates of primary cavity nesting (PCN) birds and cavity excavation rates, was estimated to be 71-86 new cavities excavated/100 ha. Of 180 active cavities of 11 species of cavity-nesting birds found in 1985 and 1986, 83 were no longer usable by 1990, giving an average instantaneous rate of cavity loss of r = -0.230. From these values of cavity recruitment and cavity loss, equilibrium cavity density along the South Platte is 238-289 cavities/100 ha. This range of equilibrium cavity density is only slightly above the minimum of 205 cavities/100 ha required by SCN's and suggests that cavity availability may be limiting SCN densities along the South Platte River. We submit that snag management alone does not adequately address SCN habitat needs, and that cavity management, expressed in terms of cavity turnover and cavity densities, may be more useful.

  16. The Value of Real-time Ultrasound Monitoring in the Indolent Family Planning Uterine Cavity Operation%实时超声监护在无痛计划生育宫腔手术中的应用价值

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李梅; 王怡; 王涌

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss the value of real-time ultrasound monitoring in the indolent family planning uterine cavity operation. Methods: Six hundred and eighty-two patients who had undergone the indolent family planning uterine cavity operation during the period from Jan. 2009 to Feb.2011, including 483 abortion curettages, 6 hydatidiform moles, 52 after cesarean uterine scar pregnancies, 141 IUD taking outs, were reviewed and analyzed. All these operations were under the monitoring of ultrasound. Results: Of all the 682 operations, 670 were successful. Six cases of hydatidiform moles were experienced multiple uterine curettages. The rest 12 cases included 3 after drug residues, 1 pregnancy complicated with uterine myoma, 1 formation of false passage, 1 IUD embedded in the muscle layer. The others were completed without difficulties. There were no complications such as uterine perforation or overuse injuries. Conclusion: The indolent family planning uterine cavity operation under the real-time ultrasound monitoring is direct and safe. It can avoid aimless operations and improve the success rate of the operation. It has a high clinical utility value and is worth clinical popularizing.%目的:探讨实时超声监护在无痛计划生育宫腔手术中的应用价值.方法:回顾性分析2009年1月~2011年12月在超声监护下行无痛计划生育宫腔手术的682例患者,其中人流清宫术483例,葡萄胎6例,剖宫产术后子宫瘢痕妊娠52例,取环141例,均在超声监护下进行手术.结果:682例患者中手术一次成功的有670例,葡萄胎6例均行多次清宫,没有一次成功的病例包括药流后残留3例,妊娠合并子宫黏膜下肌瘤1例,疑难取环术假道形成1例,节育器嵌入肌层1例,余均顺利完成,无子宫穿孔、过度损伤等并发症.结论:实时超声监护下行无痛计划生育宫腔手术,能直观、安全地进行手术,避免盲目操作,提高了手术成功率和安全性,具有很高的临床实用价值,值得临床推广.

  17. High-frequency isotopic analysis of liquid water samples in the field - initial results from continuous water sampling and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Freyberg, Jana; Studer, Bjørn; Kirchner, James

    2016-04-01

    Studying rapidly changing hydrochemical signals in catchments can help to improve our mechanistic understanding of their water flow pathways and travel times. For these purposes, stable water isotopes (18O and 2H) are commonly used as natural tracers. However, high-frequency isotopic analyses of liquid water samples are challenging. One must capture highly dynamic behavior with high precision and accuracy, but the lab workload (and sample storage artifacts) involved in collecting and analyzing thousands of bottled samples should also be avoided. Therefore, we have tested Picarro, Inc.'s newly developed Continuous Water Sampler Module (CoWS), which is coupled to their L2130-i Cavity Ring-Down Spectrometer to enable real-time on-line measurements of 18O and 2H in liquid water samples. We coupled this isotope analysis system to a dual-channel ion chomatograph (Metrohm AG, Herisau, Switzerland) for analysis of major cations and anions, as well as a UV-Vis spectroscopy system (s::can Messtechnik GmbH, Vienna, Austria) and electrochemical probes for characterization of basic water quality parameters. The system was run unattended for up to a week at a time in the laboratory and at a small catchment. At the field site, stream-water and precipitation samples were analyzed, alternating at sub-hourly intervals. We observed that measured isotope ratios were highly sensitive to the liquid water flow rate in the CoWS, and thus to the hydraulic head difference between the CoWS and the samples from which water was drawn. We used a programmable high-precision dosing pump to control the injection flow rate and eliminate this flow-rate artifact. Our experiments showed that the precision of the CoWS-L2130-i-system for 2-minute average values was typically better than 0.06‰ for δ18O and 0.16‰ for δ2H. Carryover effects were 1% or less between isotopically contrasting water samples for 30-minute sampling intervals. Instrument drift could be minimized through periodic analysis of

  18. delta C-13 Analysis of Mars Analog Carbonates Using Evolved Gas Cavity - Ringdown Spectrometry on the 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, J. C.; McAdam, A. C.; ten Kate, I. L.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Steele, A.; Amundson, H. E. F.

    2011-01-01

    The 2010 Arctic Mars Analog Svalbard Expedition (AMASE) investigated two distinct geologic settings on Svalbard, using instrumentation and techniques in development for future Mars missions, such as the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), ExoMars, and Mars Sample Return (MSR). The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, which will fly on MSL, was developed at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), together with several partners. SAM consists of a quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS), a gas chromatograph CGC), and a tunable laser spectrometer (TLS), which all analyze gases created by evolved gas analysis (EGA). The two sites studied represent "biotic" and "abiotic" analogs; the "biotic" site being the Knorringfjell fossil methane seep, and the "abiotic" site being the basaltic Sigurdfjell vent complex. The data presented here represent experiments to measure the carbon isotopic composition of carbonates from these two analogs using evolved gas analysis coupled with a commercial cavity ringdown CO2 isotopic analyzer (Picarro) as a proxy for the TLS on SAM.

  19. LEP copper accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Guiraud

    1999-01-01

    These copper cavities were used to generate the radio frequency electric field that was used to accelerate electrons and positrons around the 27-km Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN, which ran from 1989 to 2000. The copper cavities were gradually replaced from 1996 with new superconducting cavities allowing the collision energy to rise from 90 GeV to 200 GeV by mid-1999.

  20. Optical properties of urban aerosols, aircraft emissions, and heavy-duty diesel trucks using aerosol light extinction measurements by an Aerodyne Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift Particle Extinction Monitor (CAPS PMex)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, A.; Massoli, P.; Wood, E. C.; Allan, J. D.; Fortner, E.; Yu, Z.; Herndon, S. C.; Miake-Lye, R. C.; Onasch, T. B.

    2010-12-01

    We present results of optical property characterization of ambient particulate during several field deployments where measurements of aerosol light extinction (σep) are obtained using an Aerodyne Cavity Attenuated Phase Shift Particle Extinction Monitor (CAPS PMex). The CAPS PMex is able to provide extinction measurements with 3-σ detection limit of 3 Mm-1 for 1s integration time. The CAPS PMex (630 nm) is integrated in the Aerodyne Research, Inc. (ARI) mobile laboratory where a co-located Multi Angle Absorption Photometer (MAAP) provides particle light absorption coefficient at 632 nm. The combination of the CAPS with the MAAP data allows estimating the single scattering albedo (ω) of the ambient aerosol particles. The ARI mobile laboratory was deployed in winter 2010 at the Chicago O’Hare International Airport to measure gas phase and particulate emissions from different aircraft engines, and during summer 2010 in Oakland, CA, to characterize vehicular gaseous and particulate emissions (mainly exhaust from heavy-duty diesel trucks) from the Caldecott Tunnel. We provide estimates of black carbon emission factors from individual aircraft engines and diesel trucks, in addition to characterizing the optical properties of these ambient samples studying fleet-average emissions for both light-duty passenger vehicles and heavy-duty diesel trucks. Two CAPS PMex instruments (measuring σep at 630 and 532 nm) were also deployed during the CalNex 2010 study (May 14 - June 16) at the CalTech ground site in Pasadena, CA. During the same time, a photo-acoustic spectrometer (PAS, DMT) and an aethalometer instrument (Magee Sci.) measured particle light absorption of submicron aerosol particles from the same sample line as the CAPS PMex monitors. We combine these data to provide multi-wavelength ω trends for the one-month campaign. Our results show the high potential of the CAPS as light weight, compact instrument to perform precise and accurate σep measurements of

  1. Updating of Optical Inspection System for 6 GHz Superconducting Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU; Guo-long

    2013-01-01

    As a validation tool for the material properties and the surface treatment process,6 GHz superconducting cavity needs complex surface treatment process during its manufacture.It is verynecessary to record and monitor the statues of the internal surface of the cavity after each surface treatment,such as ultrasonic washing,mechanical polishing,electronic polishing(EP),buffered chemical

  2. Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oral Cavity in the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Shing Leu

    2009-03-01

    Conclusion: Squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity did not have a significantly different outcome for elderly patients when compared with younger patients. Elderly patients with stage IVA squamous cell carcinoma of the oral cavity had poorer survival rates. When properly evaluated and monitored, conservative and conventional therapies seemed efficacious in the elderly.

  3. Cavity spin optodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Brahms, N

    2010-01-01

    The dynamics of a large quantum spin coupled parametrically to an optical resonator is treated in analogy with the motion of a cantilever in cavity optomechanics. New spin optodynamic phenonmena are predicted, such as cavity-spin bistability, optodynamic spin-precession frequency shifts, coherent amplification and damping of spin, and the spin optodynamic squeezing of light.

  4. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    One of the SPS acceleration cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). On the ceiling one sees the coaxial transmission line which feeds the power from the amplifier, located in a surface building above, to the upstream end of the cavity. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8104138, 8302397.

  5. Superconducting cavities for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Above: a 350 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity in niobium of the type envisaged for accelerating electrons and positrons in later phases of LEP. Below: a small 1 GHz cavity used for investigating the surface problems of superconducting niobium. Albert Insomby stays on the right. See Annual Report 1983 p. 51.

  6. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    One of the SPS accelerating cavities (200 MHz, travelling wave structure). The power that is fed into the upstream end of the cavity is extracted at the downstream end and sent into a dump load. See 7603195 for more details, 7411032 for the travelling wave structure, and also 8011289, 8302397.

  7. Dynamic monitoring on articular cavity bleeding after total knee arthroplasty%全膝关节置换术后关节腔出血动态监测相关研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阚金庆; 李海涛; 宋扬; 孙培磊; 高忠礼; 杨玉宝

    2015-01-01

    Objective To observe the hemorrhage in the joint cavity six hours after the total knee arthroplasty(TKA), and discuss the pattern and influence of the bleeding .Methods A total of 105 TKA cases were selected, of which the patients were aged from 47 to 85 years, (64.9 ±8.2) years in average. After the surgery , the drainage volume was monitored dynamically for six hours while the knee was at the extension position .The composition of the drainage fluid was dermined , and the total drainage volume of 24 hours was recorded.Results The postoperative hemorrhage volume reached the maximum at the 1st hour after the surgery , and then decreased at the speed of a half volume per hour .The concentrations of red blood cells and hemoglobin in the drainage were similar to the whole blood concentration in three hours , and decreased gradually .The 24-hour drainage of the joint cavity after the operation was (808.8 ±286.7) ml.Conclusion After TKA, the dominant blood loss in the knee joint cavity occurrs mainly in three hours postoperatively , while the drainage volume significantly reduces six hours after the operation; the drainage should be performed for six hours to prevent hemarthrosis .%目的:通过观察全膝关节置换术后6h关节腔动态出血量,明确其出血规律及其影响。方法选取105例全膝关节置换患者,年龄47~85岁,平均年龄(64.9±8.2)岁。在伸膝状态下动态观测术后6h内的引流量,测定引流液成分,并统计24h引流量。结果术后1h出血量最多,随后以每小时递减一半的速度降低。引流液的红细胞及血红蛋白浓度由3h内接近全血浓度,转而逐渐降低,其中术后24 h内关节腔引流量为(808.8±286.7)ml。结论全膝置换术后关节腔显性失血主要发生于术后3h内,术后6h后引流量显著减少,引流时限6h可预防关节积血的危害。

  8. SPS RF Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows one of the 2 new cavities installed in 1978-1979. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also increased: to the first 2 MW plant a second 2 MW plant was added and by end 1979 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412016X, 7412017X, 7411048X

  9. SPS RF Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X, 7505074.

  10. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopies

    CERN Document Server

    van Zee, Roger

    2003-01-01

    ""Cavity-Enhanced Spectroscopy"" discusses the use of optical resonators and lasers to make sensitive spectroscopic measurements. This volume is written by the researcchers who pioneered these methods. The book reviews both the theory and practice behind these spectroscopic tools and discusses the scientific discoveries uncovered by these techniques. It begins with a chapter on the use of optical resonators for frequency stabilization of lasers, which is followed by in-depth chapters discussing cavity ring-down spectroscopy, frequency-modulated, cavity-enhanced spectroscopy, intracavity spectr

  11. Tuned optical cavity magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okandan, Murat; Schwindt, Peter

    2010-11-02

    An atomic magnetometer is disclosed which utilizes an optical cavity formed from a grating and a mirror, with a vapor cell containing an alkali metal vapor located inside the optical cavity. Lasers are used to magnetically polarize the alkali metal vapor and to probe the vapor and generate a diffracted laser beam which can be used to sense a magnetic field. Electrostatic actuators can be used in the magnetometer for positioning of the mirror, or for modulation thereof. Another optical cavity can also be formed from the mirror and a second grating for sensing, adjusting, or stabilizing the position of the mirror.

  12. SPS RF cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1974-01-01

    The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. A power of up to 790 kW can be supplied to each giving a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities.

  13. Fast Flow Cavity Enhanced Ozone Monitor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Naturally occurring in the stratosphere, ozone plays a significant role in many atmospheric reactions, cloud formation, and is the key player in shielding harmful UV...

  14. Cavity Loss Induced Generation of Entangled Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Plenio, M B; Beige, A; Knight, P L

    1999-01-01

    We discuss the generation of entangled states of two two-level atoms inside an optical resonator. When the cavity decay is continuously monitored, the absence of photon-counts is associated with the presence of an atomic entangled state. In addition to being conceptually simple, this scheme could be demonstrated with presently available technology. We describe how such a state is generated through conditional dynamics, using quantum jump methods, including both cavity damping and spontaneous emission decay, and evaluate the fidelity and relative entropy of entanglement of the generated state compared with the target entangled state.

  15. SPS accelerating cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1976-01-01

    The SPS started up with 2 accelerating cavities (each consisting of 5 tank sections) in LSS3. They have a 200 MHz travelling wave structure (see 7411032 and 7802190) and 750 kW of power is fed to each of the cavities from a 1 MW tetrode power amplifier, located in a surface building above, via a coaxial transmission line. Clemens Zettler, builder of the SPS RF system, is standing at the side of one of the cavities. In 1978 and 1979 another 2 cavities were added and entered service in 1980. These were part of the intensity improvement programme and served well for the new role of the SPS as proton-antiproton collider. See also 7411032, 8011289, 8104138, 8302397.

  16. accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is an accelerating cavity from LEP, with a layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  17. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... MMWR RSS VitalSigns RSS Error processing SSI file Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities Effective protection for children Language: ... more use of sealants and reimbursement of services. Dental care providers can Apply sealants to children at ...

  18. Hybrid vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chung, Il-Sug; Mørk, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide.......A new hybrid vertical cavity laser structure for silicon photonics is suggested and numerically investigated. It incorporates a silicon subwavelength grating as a mirror and a lateral output coupler to a silicon ridge waveguide....

  19. Determination of dissolved methane in natural waters using headspace analysis with cavity ring-down spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Hannah M; Shiller, Alan M

    2015-01-26

    Methane (CH4) is the third most abundant greenhouse gas (GHG) but is vastly understudied in comparison to carbon dioxide. Sources and sinks to the atmosphere vary considerably in estimation, including sources such as fresh and marine water systems. A new method to determine dissolved methane concentrations in discrete water samples has been evaluated. By analyzing an equilibrated headspace using laser cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS), low nanomolar dissolved methane concentrations can be determined with high reproducibility (i.e., 0.13 nM detection limit and typical 4% RSD). While CRDS instruments cost roughly twice that of gas chromatographs (GC) usually used for methane determination, the process presented herein is substantially simpler, faster, and requires fewer materials than GC methods. Typically, 70-mL water samples are equilibrated with an equivalent amount of zero air in plastic syringes. The equilibrated headspace is transferred to a clean, dry syringe and then drawn into a Picarro G2301 CRDS analyzer via the instrument's pump. We demonstrate that this instrument holds a linear calibration into the sub-ppmv methane concentration range and holds a stable calibration for at least two years. Application of the method to shipboard dissolved methane determination in the northern Gulf of Mexico as well as river water is shown. Concentrations spanning nearly six orders of magnitude have been determined with this method.

  20. Surface explosion cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Benusiglio, Adrien; Clanet, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    We present a fluid dynamics video on cavities created by explosions of firecrackers at the water free surface. We use three types of firecrackers containing 1, 1.3 and 5 g of flash powder. The firecrackers are held with their center at the surface of water in a cubic meter pool. The movies are recorded from the side with a high-speed video camera. Without confinement the explosion produces an hemispherical cavity. Right after the explosion this cavity grows isotropically, the bottom then stops while the sides continue to expand. In the next phase the bottom of the cavity accelerates backwards to the surface. During this phase the convergence of the flow creates a central jet that rises above the free surface. In the last part of the video the explosion is confined in a vertical open tube made of glass and of centimetric diameter. The explosion creates a cylindrical cavity that develops towards the free end of the tube. Depending on the charge, the cavity can either stop inside the tube or at its exit, but nev...

  1. The Superconducting TESLA Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Aune, B.; Bloess, D.; Bonin, B.; Bosotti, A.; Champion, M.; Crawford, C.; Deppe, G.; Dwersteg, B.; Edwards, D.A.; Edwards, H.T.; Ferrario, M.; Fouaidy, M.; Gall, P-D.; Gamp, A.; Gössel, A.; Graber, J.; Hubert, D.; Hüning, M.; Juillard, M.; Junquera, T.; Kaiser, H.; Kreps, G.; Kuchnir, M.; Lange, R.; Leenen, M.; Liepe, M.; Lilje, L.; Matheisen, A.; Möller, W-D.; Mosnier, A.; Padamsee, H.; Pagani, C.; Pekeler, M.; Peters, H-B.; Peters, O.; Proch, D.; Rehlich, K.; Reschke, D.; Safa, H.; Schilcher, T.; Schmüser, P.; Sekutowicz, J.; Simrock, S.; Singer, W.; Tigner, M.; Trines, D.; Twarowski, K.; Weichert, G.; Weisend, J.; Wojtkiewicz, J.; Wolff, S.; Zapfe, K.

    2000-01-01

    The conceptional design of the proposed linear electron-positron colliderTESLA is based on 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium cavities with anaccelerating gradient of Eacc >= 25 MV/m at a quality factor Q0 > 5E+9. Thedesign goal for the cavities of the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) linac was set tothe more moderate value of Eacc >= 15 MV/m. In a first series of 27industrially produced TTF cavities the average gradient at Q0 = 5E+9 wasmeasured to be 20.1 +- 6.2 MV/m, excluding a few cavities suffering fromserious fabrication or material defects. In the second production of 24 TTFcavities additional quality control measures were introduced, in particular aneddy-current scan to eliminate niobium sheets with foreign material inclusionsand stringent prescriptions for carrying out the electron-beam welds. Theaverage gradient of these cavities at Q0 = 5E+9 amounts to 25.0 +- 3.2 MV/mwith the exception of one cavity suffering from a weld defect. Hence only amoderate improvement in production and preparation technique...

  2. Decoherence of mesoscopic states of cavity fields

    CERN Document Server

    Fonseca-Romero, K M; De Faria, J G P; Salgueiro, A N; De Toledo di Piza, A F R

    1998-01-01

    We show that two-atom correlation measurements of the type involved in a recent experimental study of the evolution of a mesoscopic superposition state prepared in a definite mode of a high-Q cavity can be used to determine the eigenvalues of the reduced density matrix of the field, provided the assumed dynamical conditions are actually fulfilled to experimental accuracy. These conditions involve i) a purely dispersive coupling of the field to the Rydberg atoms used to manipulate and to monitor the cavity field, and ii) the effective absence of correlations in the ground state of the system consisting of the cavity coupled to the ``reservoir'' which accounts for the decoherence and damping processes. A microscopic calculation at zero temperature is performed and compared to master equation results.

  3. Coupled resonator vertical cavity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquette, K.D.; Chow, W.W.; Hou, H.Q.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    The monolithic integration of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. The authors report the first electrically injected coupled resonator vertical-cavity laser diode and demonstrate novel characteristics arising from the cavity coupling, including methods for external modulation of the laser. A coupled mode theory is used model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser.

  4. Metasurface external cavity laser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Luyao, E-mail: luyaoxu.ee@ucla.edu; Curwen, Christopher A.; Williams, Benjamin S. [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); California NanoSystems Institute, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Hon, Philip W. C.; Itoh, Tatsuo [Department of Electrical Engineering, University of California, Los Angeles, California 90095 (United States); Chen, Qi-Sheng [Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems, Redondo Beach, California 90278 (United States)

    2015-11-30

    A vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting-laser is demonstrated in the terahertz range, which is based upon an amplifying metasurface reflector composed of a sub-wavelength array of antenna-coupled quantum-cascade sub-cavities. Lasing is possible when the metasurface reflector is placed into a low-loss external cavity such that the external cavity—not the sub-cavities—determines the beam properties. A near-Gaussian beam of 4.3° × 5.1° divergence is observed and an output power level >5 mW is achieved. The polarized response of the metasurface allows the use of a wire-grid polarizer as an output coupler that is continuously tunable.

  5. Experimental investigation of cavity flows

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loeland, Tore

    1998-12-31

    This thesis uses LDV (Laser Doppler Velocimetry), PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) and Laser Sheet flow Visualisation to study flow inside three different cavity configurations. For sloping cavities, the vortex structure inside the cavities is found to depend upon the flow direction past the cavity. The shape of the downstream corner is a key factor in destroying the boundary layer flow entering the cavity. The experimental results agree well with numerical simulations of the same geometrical configurations. The results of the investigations are used to find the influence of the cavity flow on the accuracy of the ultrasonic flowmeter. A method to compensate for the cavity velocities is suggested. It is found that the relative deviation caused by the cavity velocities depend linearly on the pipe flow. It appears that the flow inside the cavities should not be neglected as done in the draft for the ISO technical report on ultrasonic flowmeters. 58 refs., 147 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Seismic wave interaction with underground cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Felix M.; Esterhazy, Sofi; Perugia, Ilaria; Bokelmann, Götz

    2016-04-01

    Realization of the future Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) will require ensuring its compliance, making the CTBT a prime example of forensic seismology. Following indications of a nuclear explosion obtained on the basis of the (IMS) monitoring network further evidence needs to be sought at the location of the suspicious event. For such an On-Site Inspection (OSI) at a possible nuclear test site the treaty lists several techniques that can be carried out by the inspection team, including aftershock monitoring and the conduction of active seismic surveys. While those techniques are already well established, a third group of methods labeled as "resonance seismometry" is less well defined and needs further elaboration. A prime structural target that is expected to be present as a remnant of an underground nuclear explosion is a cavity at the location and depth the bomb was fired. Originally "resonance seismometry" referred to resonant seismic emission of the cavity within the medium that could be stimulated by an incident seismic wave of the right frequency and observed as peaks in the spectrum of seismic stations in the vicinity of the cavity. However, it is not yet clear which are the conditions for which resonant emissions of the cavity could be observed. In order to define distance-, frequency- and amplitude ranges at which resonant emissions could be observed we study the interaction of seismic waves with underground cavities. As a generic model for possible resonances we use a spherical acoustic cavity in an elastic full-space. To solve the forward problem for the full elastic wave field around acoustic spherical inclusions, we implemented an analytical solution (Korneev, 1993). This yields the possibility of generating scattering cross-sections, amplitude spectrums and synthetic seismograms for plane incident waves. Here, we focus on the questions whether or not we can expect resonant responses in the wave field scattered from the cavity. We show

  7. Statistical electromagnetics: Complex cavities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naus, H.W.L.

    2008-01-01

    A selection of the literature on the statistical description of electromagnetic fields and complex cavities is concisely reviewed. Some essential concepts, for example, the application of the central limit theorem and the maximum entropy principle, are scrutinized. Implicit assumptions, biased choic

  8. LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1995-01-01

    Engineers work in a clean room on one of the superconducting cavities for the upgrade to the LEP accelerator, known as LEP-2. The use of superconductors allow higher electric fields to be produced so that higher beam energies can be reached.

  9. Finemet cavity impedance studies

    CERN Document Server

    Persichelli, S; Migliorati, M; Salvant, B

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study is to evaluate the impedance of the Finemet kicker cavity to be installed in the PS straight section 02 during LS1, under realistic assumptions of bunch length. Time domain simulations with CST Particle Studio have been performed in order to get the impedance of the cavity and make a comparison with the longitudinal impedance measured for a single cell prototype. The study has been performed on simplified 3D geometries imported from a mechanical CATIA drawing, assuming that the simplications have small impact on the nal results. Simulations confirmed that the longitudinal impedance observed with measurements can be excited by bunches circulating in the PS. In the six-cells Finemet cavity, PS bunches circulating in the center can excite a longitudinal impedance, the real part of which has a maximum of 2 kOhm at 4 MHz. This mode does not seem to have any transverse component. All the eigenmodes of the cavity are strongly damped by the Finemet rings: we predict to have no issues regarding tr...

  10. Melatonin and oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengiz, Murat İnanç; Cengiz, Seda; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2012-01-01

    While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  11. Melatonin and Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murat İnanç Cengiz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available While initially the oral cavity was considered to be mainly a source of various bacteria, their toxins and antigens, recent studies showed that it may also be a location of oxidative stress and periodontal inflammation. Accordingly, this paper focuses on the involvement of melatonin in oxidative stress diseases of oral cavity as well as on potential therapeutic implications of melatonin in dental disorders. Melatonin has immunomodulatory and antioxidant activities, stimulates the proliferation of collagen and osseous tissue, and acts as a protector against cellular degeneration associated with aging and toxin exposure. Arising out of its antioxidant actions, melatonin protects against inflammatory processes and cellular damage caused by the toxic derivates of oxygen. As a result of these actions, melatonin may be useful as a coadjuvant in the treatment of certain conditions of the oral cavity. However, the most important effect of melatonin seems to result from its potent antioxidant, immunomodulatory, protective, and anticancer properties. Thus, melatonin could be used therapeutically for instance, locally, in the oral cavity damage of mechanical, bacterial, fungal, or viral origin, in postsurgical wounds caused by tooth extractions and other oral surgeries. Additionally, it can help bone formation in various autoimmunological disorders such as Sjorgen syndrome, in periodontal diseases, in toxic effects of dental materials, in dental implants, and in oral cancers.

  12. Niobium superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1980-01-01

    This 5-cell superconducting cavity, made from bulk-Nb, stems from the period of general studies, not all directed towards direct use at LEP. This one is dimensioned for 1.5 GHz, the frequency used at CEBAF and also studied at Saclay (LEP RF was 352.2 MHz). See also 7908227, 8007354, 8209255, 8210054, 8312339.

  13. Vertical cavity laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention provides a vertical cavity laser comprising a grating layer comprising an in-plane grating, the grating layer having a first side and having a second side opposite the first side and comprising a contiguous core grating region having a grating structure, wherein an index...

  14. Filling a Conical Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Kyle; Eslam-Panah, Azar

    2016-11-01

    Root canal treatment involves the removal of infected tissue inside the tooth's canal system and filling the space with a dense sealing agent to prevent further infection. A good root canal treatment happens when the canals are filled homogeneously and tightly down to the root apex. Such a tooth is able to provide valuable service for an entire lifetime. However, there are some examples of poorly performed root canals where the anterior and posterior routes are not filled completely. Small packets of air can be trapped in narrow access cavities when restoring with resin composites. Such teeth can cause trouble even after many years and lead the conditions like acute bone infection or abscesses. In this study, the filling of dead-end conical cavities with various liquids is reported. The first case studies included conical cavity models with different angles and lengths to visualize the filling process. In this investigation, the rate and completeness at which a variety of liquids fill the cavity were observed to find ideal conditions for the process. Then, a 3D printed model of the scaled representation of a molar with prepared post spaces was used to simulate the root canal treatment. The results of this study can be used to gain a better understanding of the restoration for endodontically treated teeth.

  15. Teleportation of Cavity Field States via Cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, E S

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss two schemes of teleportation of cavity field states. In the first scheme we consider cavities prepared in a coherent state and in the second scheme we consider cavities prepared in a superposition of zero and one Fock states.

  16. Optimization of photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Fengwen; Sigmund, Ole

    2017-01-01

    We present optimization of photonic crystal cavities. The optimization problem is formulated to maximize the Purcell factor of a photonic crystal cavity. Both topology optimization and air-hole-based shape optimization are utilized for the design process. Numerical results demonstrate...... that the Purcell factor of the photonic crystal cavity can be significantly improved through optimization....

  17. Hollow waveguide cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Chris (Inventor); Mungas, Greg S. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Laser light is confined in a hollow waveguide between two highly reflective mirrors. This waveguide cavity is used to conduct Cavity Ringdown Absorption Spectroscopy of loss mechanisms in the cavity including absorption or scattering by gases, liquid, solids, and/or optical elements.

  18. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    CERN Document Server

    Crepaz, Herbert; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  19. Access cavity preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, N; Tomson, P L

    2014-03-01

    Each stage of root canal treatment should be carried out to the highest possible standard. The access cavity is arguably the most important technical stage, as subsequent preparation of the root canal(s) can be severely comprised if this is not well executed. Inadequate access can lead to canals being left untreated, poorly disinfected, difficult to shape and obturate, and may ultimately lead to the failure of the treatment. This paper highlights common features in root canal anatomy and outlines basic principles for locating root canals and producing a good access cavity. It also explores each phase of the preparation in detail and offers suggestions of instruments that have been specifically designed to overcome potential difficulties in the process. Good access design and preparation will result in an operative environment which will facilitate cleaning, shaping and obturation of the root canal system in order to maximise success.

  20. Colloquium: cavity optomechanics

    CERN Multimedia

    2011-01-01

    Monday 14 November 2011, 17:00 Ecole de Physique, Auditoire Stueckelberg Université de Genève Cavity optomechanics: controlling micro mechanical oscillators with laser light Prof. Tobias Kippenberg EPFL, Lausanne Laser light can be used to cool and to control trapped ions, atoms and molecules at the quantum level. This has lead to spectacular advances such as the most precise atomic clocks. An outstanding frontier is the control with lasers of nano- and micro-mechancial systems. Recent advances in cavity optomechanics have allowed such elementary control for the first time, enabling mechanical systems to be ground state cooled leading to readout with quantum limited sensitivity and permitting to explore new device concepts resulting from radiation pressure.  

  1. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crepaz, Herbert; Ley, Li Yuan; Dumke, Rainer

    2015-10-20

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage that they can be effectively coated inside with a spin relaxation suppressing layer providing long spin coherence times without addition of a buffer gas. Cavity enhancement shows in an increase in optical polarization rotation and sensitivity compared to single-pass configurations.

  2. Cavity enhanced atomic magnetometry

    OpenAIRE

    Herbert Crepaz; Li Yuan Ley; Rainer Dumke

    2015-01-01

    Atom sensing based on Faraday rotation is an indispensable method for precision measurements, universally suitable for both hot and cold atomic systems. Here we demonstrate an all-optical magnetometer where the optical cell for Faraday rotation spectroscopy is augmented with a low finesse cavity. Unlike in previous experiments, where specifically designed multipass cells had been employed, our scheme allows to use conventional, spherical vapour cells. Spherical shaped cells have the advantage...

  3. Geophysical observations at cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jousset, Philippe; Bazargan-Sabet, Behrooz; Lebert, François; Bernardie, Séverine; Gourry, Jean-Christophe

    2010-05-01

    In Lorraine region (France) salt layers at about 200 meters depth are exploited by Solvay using solution mining methodology which consists in extracting the salt by dissolution, collapsing the cavern overburden during the exploitation phase and finally reclaiming the landscape by creating a water area. In this process, one of the main challenges for the exploiting company is to control the initial 120-m diameter collapse so as to minimize possible damages. In order to detect potential precursors and understand processes associated with such collapses, a wide series of monitoring techniques including micro seismics, broad-band seismology, hydro-acoustic, electromagnetism, gas probing, automatic leveling, continuous GPS, continuous gravity and borehole extensometry was set-up in the frame of an in-situ study carried out by the "Research Group for the Impact and Safety of Underground Works" (GISOS, France). Equipments were set-up well before the final collapse, giving a unique opportunity to analyze a great deal of information prior to and during the collapse process which has been successfully achieved on February the 13th, 2009 by controlling the cavity internal pressure. In this work, we present the results of data recorded by a network of 3 broadband seismometers, 2 accelerometers, 2 tilt-meters and a continuously gravity meter. We relate the variations of the brine pumping rate with the evolutions of the induced geophysical signals and finally we propose a first mechanical model for describing the controlled collapse. Beyond the studied case, extrapolation of the results obtained might contribute to the understanding of uncontrolled cavity collapses, such as pit-craters or calderas at volcanoes.

  4. Off-resonance coupling between a cavity mode and an ensemble of driven spins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hui; Masis, Sergei; Levi, Roei; Shtempluk, Oleg; Buks, Eyal

    2017-05-01

    We study the interaction between a superconducting cavity and a spin ensemble. The response of a cavity mode is monitored while simultaneously the spins are driven at a frequency close to their Larmor frequency, which is tuned to a value much higher than the cavity resonance. We experimentally find that the effective damping rate of the cavity mode is shifted by the driven spins. The measured shift in the damping rate is attributed to the retarded response of the cavity mode to the driven spins. The experimental results are compared with theoretical predictions and fair agreement is found.

  5. Cavity QED by the Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, H. J.; Boca, A.; Boozer, A. D.; Bowen, W. P.; Buck, J. R.; Chou, C. W.; Duan, L.-M.; Kuzmich, A.; McKeever, J.

    2004-12-01

    Observations of cooling and trapping of N = 1,2,3,... atoms inside a small optical cavity are described. The atom-cavity system operates in a regime of strong coupling for which single photons are sufficient to saturate the atomic response. New theoretical protocols for the efficient engineering of multi-atom entanglement within the setting of cavity QED are described. By trapping a single atom within the cavity mode, a one-atom laser is experimentally realized in a regime of strong coupling. Beyond the setting of cavity QED, quantum correlations have been observed for photon pairs emitted from an atomic ensemble and with a programmable time offset.

  6. Crab Cavities for Linear Colliders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Ambattu, P.; Carter, R.; Dexter, A.; Tahir, I.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Dykes, M.; Goudket, P.; Kalinin, A.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; /Daresbury; Shulte, D.; /CERN; Jones, Roger M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Bellantoni, L.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Khabouline, T.; Latina, A.; /Fermilab; Adolphsen, C.; Li, Z.; Seryi, Andrei; /SLAC

    2011-11-08

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  7. Crab cavities for linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Burt, G; Carter, R; Dexter, A; Tahir, I; Beard, C; Dykes, M; Goudket, P; Kalinin, A; Ma, L; McIntosh, P; Shulte, D; Jones, Roger M; Bellantoni, L; Chase, B; Church, M; Khabouline, T; Latina, A; Adolphsen, C; Li, Z; Seryi, Andrei; Xiao, L

    2008-01-01

    Crab cavities have been proposed for a wide number of accelerators and interest in crab cavities has recently increased after the successful operation of a pair of crab cavities in KEK-B. In particular crab cavities are required for both the ILC and CLIC linear colliders for bunch alignment. Consideration of bunch structure and size constraints favour a 3.9 GHz superconducting, multi-cell cavity as the solution for ILC, whilst bunch structure and beam-loading considerations suggest an X-band copper travelling wave structure for CLIC. These two cavity solutions are very different in design but share complex design issues. Phase stabilisation, beam loading, wakefields and mode damping are fundamental issues for these crab cavities. Requirements and potential design solutions will be discussed for both colliders.

  8. Monitoring of Underground Coal Gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, X. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wagoner, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Ramirez, A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2012-08-31

    For efficient and responsible UCG operations, a UCG process must be monitored in the following three categories: 1) process parameters such as injection and product gas flow rates, temperature, pressure and syngas content and heating value; 2) geomechanical parameters, e.g., cavity and coal seam pressures, cavity development, subsidence and ground deformation; and 3) environmental parameters, e.g., groundwater chemistry and air quality. This report focuses on UCG monitoring with geophysical techniques that can contribute to monitoring of subsurface temperature, cavity development, burn front, subsidence and deformation.

  9. ISR RF cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    In each ISR ring the radiofrequency cavities were installed in one 9 m long straight section. The RF system of the ISR had the main purpose to stack buckets of particles (most of the time protons)coming from the CPS and also to accelerate the stacked beam. The installed RF power per ring was 18 kW giving a peak accelerating voltage of 20 kV. The system had a very fine regulation feature allowing to lower the voltage down to 75 V in a smooth and well controlled fashion.

  10. Cavity Optomechanical Magnetometer

    CERN Document Server

    Forstner, S; Knittel, J; van Ooijen, E D; Swaim, J D; Harris, G I; Szorkovszky, A; Bowen, W P; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H

    2011-01-01

    A cavity optomechanical magnetometer is demonstrated where the magnetic field induced expansion of a magnetostrictive material is transduced onto the physical structure of a highly compliant optical microresonator. The resulting motion is read out optically with ultra-high sensitivity. Detecting the magnetostrictive deformation of Terfenol-D with a toroidal whispering gallery mode (TWGM) resonator a peak sensitivity of 400 nT/Hz^.5 was achieved with theoretical modelling predicting that sensitivities of up to 500 fT/Hz^.5 may be possible. This chip-based magnetometer combines high-sensitivity and large dynamic range with small size and room temperature operation.

  11. Cavity optomechanical magnetometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forstner, S; Prams, S; Knittel, J; van Ooijen, E D; Swaim, J D; Harris, G I; Szorkovszky, A; Bowen, W P; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, H

    2012-03-23

    A cavity optomechanical magnetometer is demonstrated. The magnetic-field-induced expansion of a magnetostrictive material is resonantly transduced onto the physical structure of a highly compliant optical microresonator and read out optically with ultrahigh sensitivity. A peak magnetic field sensitivity of 400  nT  Hz(-1/2) is achieved, with theoretical modeling predicting the possibility of sensitivities below 1  pT  Hz(-1/2). This chip-based magnetometer combines high sensitivity and large dynamic range with small size and room temperature operation.

  12. The importance of oral hygiene on adults with the focus on preventive measures resulting in the reduction of oral cavity diseases frequency.

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    The Dissertation work presented herein monitors the significance of oral hygiene in adults, while aiming at preventive measures leading to lowering mouth cavity illness occurrences. Within the theoretical part, I focus on the delineation of important terms relating to preventive care for oral cavity, information concerning anatomy, physiology of oral cavity, influence of foods and other problems within the oral cavity, among which there are tooth cavities and diseases of gingiva. In the pract...

  13. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metcalfe, Michael

    2014-09-01

    "Cavity-optomechanics" aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  14. Oral cavity eumycetoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nai, Gisele Alborghetti; Stuani, Maria Luiza de Toledo; Stuani, Luís Antonio Sasso

    2011-01-01

    Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal) or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  15. Oral cavity eumycetoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisele Alborghetti Nai

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Mycetoma is a pathological process in which eumycotic (fungal or actinomycotic causative agents from exogenous source produce grains. It is a localized chronic and deforming infectious disease of subcutaneous tissue, skin and bones. We report the first case of eumycetoma of the oral cavity in world literature. CASE REPORT: A 43-year-old male patient, complaining of swelling and fistula in the hard palate. On examination, swelling of the anterior and middle hard palate, with fistula draining a dark liquid was observed. The panoramic radiograph showed extensive radiolucent area involving the region of teeth 21-26 and the computerized tomography showed communication with the nasal cavity, suggesting the diagnosis of periapical cyst. Surgery was performed to remove the lesion. Histopathological examination revealed purulent material with characteristic grain. Gram staining for bacteria was negative and Grocott-Gomori staining for the detection of fungi was positive, concluding the diagnosis of eumycetoma. The patient was treated with ketoconazole for nine months, and was considered cured at the end of treatment. CONCLUSION: Histopathological examination, using histochemical staining, and direct microscopic grains examination can provide the distinction between eumycetoma and actinomycetoma accurately.

  16. Applications of cavity optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metcalfe, Michael [Booz Allen Hamilton, 3811 Fairfax Drive, Arlington, Virginia 22203 (United States)

    2014-09-15

    Cavity-optomechanics” aims to study the quantum properties of mechanical systems. A common strategy implemented in order to achieve this goal couples a high finesse photonic cavity to a high quality factor mechanical resonator. Then, using feedback forces such as radiation pressure, one can cool the mechanical mode of interest into the quantum ground state and create non-classical states of mechanical motion. On the path towards achieving these goals, many near-term applications of this field have emerged. After briefly introducing optomechanical systems and describing the current state-of-the-art experimental results, this article summarizes some of the more exciting practical applications such as ultra-sensitive, high bandwidth accelerometers and force sensors, low phase noise x-band integrated microwave oscillators and optical signal processing such as optical delay-lines, wavelength converters, and tunable optical filters. In this rapidly evolving field, new applications are emerging at a fast pace, but this article concentrates on the aforementioned lab-based applications as these are the most promising avenues for near-term real-world applications. New basic science applications are also becoming apparent such as the generation of squeezed light, testing gravitational theories and for providing a link between disparate quantum systems.

  17. Cavity coalescence in superplastic deformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stowell, M.J.; Livesey, D.W.; Ridley, N.

    1984-01-01

    An analysis of the probability distribution function of particles randomly dispersed in a solid has been applied to cavitation during superplastic deformation and a method of predicting cavity coalescence developed. Cavity size distribution data were obtained from two microduplex nickel-silver alloys deformed superplastically to various extents at elevated temperature, and compared to theoretical predictions. Excellent agreement occurred for small void sizes but the model underestimated the number of voids in the largest size groups. It is argued that the discrepancy results from a combination of effects due to non-random cavity distributions and to enhanced growth rates and incomplete spheroidization of the largest cavities.

  18. JLEIC SRF cavity RF Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Shaoheng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Guo, Jiquan [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Rimmer, Robert A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States)

    2016-05-01

    The initial design of a low higher order modes (HOM) impedance superconducting RF (SRF) cavity is presented in this paper. The design of this SRF cavity is for the proposed Jefferson Lab Electron Ion Collider (JLEIC). The electron ring of JLEIC will operate with electrons of 3 to 10 GeV energy. The ion ring of JLEIC will operate with protons of up to 100 GeV energy. The bunch lengths in both rings are ~12 mm (RMS). In order to maintain the short bunch length in the ion ring, SRF cavities are adopted to provide large enough gradient. In the first phase of JLEIC, the PEP II RF cavities will be reused in the electron ring to lower the initial cost. The frequency of the SRF cavities is chosen to be the second harmonic of PEP II cavities, 952.6 MHz. In the second phase of JLEIC, the same frequency SRF cavities may replace the normal conducting PEP II cavities to achieve higher luminosity at high energy. At low energies, the synchro-tron radiation damping effect is quite weak, to avoid the coupled bunch instability caused by the intense closely-spaced electron bunches, low HOM impedance of the SRF cavities combined with longitudinal feedback sys-tem will be necessary.

  19. Nanofriction in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fogarty, T; Cormick, C; Landa, H; Stojanović, Vladimir M; Demler, E; Morigi, Giovanna

    2015-12-01

    The dynamics of cold trapped ions in a high-finesse resonator results from the interplay between the long-range Coulomb repulsion and the cavity-induced interactions. The latter are due to multiple scatterings of laser photons inside the cavity and become relevant when the laser pump is sufficiently strong to overcome photon decay. We study the stationary states of ions coupled with a mode of a standing-wave cavity as a function of the cavity and laser parameters, when the typical length scales of the two self-organizing processes, Coulomb crystallization and photon-mediated interactions, are incommensurate. The dynamics are frustrated and in specific limiting cases can be cast in terms of the Frenkel-Kontorova model, which reproduces features of friction in one dimension. We numerically recover the sliding and pinned phases. For strong cavity nonlinearities, they are in general separated by bistable regions where superlubric and stick-slip dynamics coexist. The cavity, moreover, acts as a thermal reservoir and can cool the chain vibrations to temperatures controlled by the cavity parameters and by the ions' phase. These features are imprinted in the radiation emitted by the cavity, which is readily measurable in state-of-the-art setups of cavity quantum electrodynamics.

  20. Cavity Pressure Behaviour in Micro Injection Moulding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, C.A.; Dimov, S.S.; Scholz, S.

    2010-01-01

    Process monitoring of micro injection moulding (µIM) is of crusial importance to analyse the effect of different parameter settings on the process and to assess its quality. Quality factors related to cavity pressure can provide useful information directly connected with the dyanmics of the process...... has been investigated by moulding a micro fluidic component on three different polymers (PP, ABS, PC) using the design of experiment approach. Similar trends such as the effects of a higher injection speed in decreasing the pressure work and of a lower temperature in decreasing pressure rate have been...

  1. Shock induced cavity collapse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidmore, Jonathan; Doyle, Hugo; Tully, Brett; Betney, Matthew; Foster, Peta; Ringrose, Tim; Ramasamy, Rohan; Parkin, James; Edwards, Tom; Hawker, Nicholas

    2016-10-01

    Results from the experimental investigation of cavity collapse driven by a strong planar shock (>6km/s) are presented. Data from high speed framing cameras, laser backlit diagnostics and time-resolved pyromety are used to validate the results of hydrodynamic front-tracking simulations. As a code validation exercise, a 2-stage light gas gun was used to accelerate a 1g Polycarbonate projectile to velocities exceeding 6km/s; impact with a PMMA target containing a gas filled void results in the formation of a strong shockwave with pressures exceeding 1Mbar. The subsequent phenomena associated with the collapse of the void and excitation of the inert gas fill are recorded and compared to simulated data. Variation of the mass density and atomic number of the gas fill is used to alter the plasma parameters furthering the extent of the code validation.

  2. A Scanning Cavity Microscope

    CERN Document Server

    Mader, Matthias; Hänsch, Theodor W; Hunger, David

    2014-01-01

    Imaging of the optical properties of individual nanosystems beyond fluorescence can provide a wealth of information. However, the minute signals for absorption and dispersion are challenging to observe, and only specialized techniques requiring sophisticated noise rejection are available. Here we use signal enhancement in a scanning optical microcavity to demonstrate ultra-sensitive imaging. Harnessing multiple interactions of probe light with a sample within an optical resonator, we achieve a 1700-fold signal enhancement compared to diffraction-limited microscopy. We demonstrate quantitative imaging of the extinction cross section of gold nanoparticles with a sensitivity below 1 nm2, we show a method to improve spatial resolution potentially below the diffraction limit by using higher order cavity modes, and we present measurements of the birefringence and extinction contrast of gold nanorods. The demonstrated simultaneous enhancement of absorptive and dispersive signals promises intriguing potential for opt...

  3. Frequency Tuning for a DQW Crab Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Verdú-Andrés, Silvia; Ben-Zvi, Ilan; Calaga, Rama; Capatina, Ofelia; Leuxe, Raphael; Skaritka, John; Wu, Qiong; Xiao, Binping; Zanoni, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The nominal operating frequency for the HL-LHC crab cavities is 400.79 MHz within a bandwidth of ±60kHz. Attaining the required cavity tune implies a good understanding of all the processes that influence the cavity frequency from the moment when the cavity parts are being fabricated until the cavity is installed and under operation. Different tuning options will be available for the DQW crab cavity of LHC. This paper details the different steps in the cavity fabrication and preparation that may introduce a shift in the cavity frequency and introduces the different tuning methods foreseen to bring the cavity frequency to meet the specifications.

  4. Quantum entanglement purification in cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Romero, J L; Saavedra, C; Retamal, J C

    2002-01-01

    A physical implementation of an entanglement purification protocol is studied using a cavity quantum electrodynamic based proposal, where, the quantum information is stored in quantum field sates inside cavities. Also a procedure is given for quantifying the degree of entanglement between quantum fields. (Author)

  5. Quench studies of ILC cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eremeev, Grigory; Geng, Rongli; Palczewski, Ari; Dai, Jin

    2011-07-01

    Quench limits accelerating gradient in SRF cavities to a gradient lower than theoretically expected for superconducting niobium. Identification of the quenching site with thermometry and OST, optical inspection, and replica of the culprit is an ongoing effort at Jefferson Lab aimed at better understanding of this limiting phenomenon. In this contribution we present our finding with several SRF cavities that were limited by quench.

  6. Superconducting cavity model for LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    1979-01-01

    A superconducting cavity model is being prepared for testing in a vertical cryostat.At the top of the assembly jig is H.Preis while A.Scharding adjusts some diagnostic equipment to the cavity. See also photo 7912501X.

  7. LEP radio-frequency cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    One of the copper radio-frequency accelerating cavities installed for the first phase of LEP (1989-1995). Bunches of electrons and positrons circulated in LEP in opposite directions and were accelerated in eight different sets of 16 cavities (situated on either side of the four experiments), gaining 400 million volts of accelerating power per turn.

  8. Single and Coupled Nanobeam Cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivinskaya, Aliaksandra; Lavrinenko, Andrei; Shyroki, Dzmitry M.

    2013-01-01

    for analysis and design of photonic crystal devices, such as 2D ring resonators for filters, single and coupled nanobeam cavities, birefringence in photonic crystal cavities, threshold analysis in photonic crystal lasers, gap solitons in photonic crystals, novel photonic atolls, dynamic characteristics...

  9. Mechanical Properties of Niobium Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Matalevich, Joseph R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    The mechanical stability of bulk Nb cavity is an important aspect to be considered in relation to cavity material, geometry and treatments. Mechanical properties of Nb are typically obtained from uniaxial tensile tests of small samples. In this contribution we report the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and local strain along the contour of single-cell cavities made of ingot and fine-grain Nb of different purity subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. Measurements have been done on cavities subjected to different heat treatments. Good agreement between finite element analysis simulations and experimental data in the elastic regime was obtained with a single set of values of Young’s modulus and Poisson’s ratio. The experimental results indicate that the yield strength of medium-purity ingot Nb cavities is higher than that of fine-grain, high-purity Nb.

  10. A new Methane and carbon dioxide eddy-covariance flux monitor for land-based, sea-based, and aircraft-based applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosson, Eric; Karion, Anna; Law, Beverly; Sweeney, Colm; Christoph, Thomas; Rahn, Thomas; Mc Gillis, Wade

    2010-05-01

    It is now recognized that a comprehensive understanding of global warming's full impact on local and global weather patterns still requires much more data, namely, mapping the atmospheric mixing ratios (concentrations) of carbon dioxide (CO2), methane (CH4). Moreover, even as this understanding becomes more complete, there will also be a major ongoing need to continuously map quantitative levels of these gases to monitor the effects of regional, national and international green house gas (GHG) reduction efforts, as well as to certify compliance. To carry out this effort will require analyzers that can produce continuous, parts-per-billion precision, high accuracy measurements of ambient levels of atmospheric gases at very high data rates over years of operation in land-based, sea-based, as well as aircraft-based applications. A challenge worth considering is to create a single analyzer that can address the GHG measurement needs of virtually all these applications. Such an analyzer would be required to produce slow time-response (e.g. minute to minute data is considered very fast time response), and very high accuracy (which can also be described as precision across a network of independent measurements) as required for atmospheric inversions and some mobile applications as well as fast time-response (e.g. 1 Hz to 10 Hz) and excellent relative precision (without the need for long-term accuracy, or comparability of mixing ratios across multiple sites) as needed for eddy covariance flux measurements. Such an analyzer would give the research community much more flexibility, a wider choice of research applications, reduce overall capital equipment cost, and improve the inter-comparability of GHG measurements across applications. Picarro, Inc. has developed a high speed Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) based analyzer, able to measure carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration to a precision (one standard deviation) of 200 parts-per-billion (ppbv), and methane (CH4

  11. An Automated 476 MHz RF Cavity Processing Facility at SLAC

    CERN Document Server

    McIntosh, P; Schwarz, H

    2003-01-01

    The 476 MHz accelerating cavities currently used at SLAC are those installed on the PEP-II B-Factory collider accelerator. They are designed to operate at a maximum accelerating voltage of 1 MV and are routinely utilized on PEP-II at voltages up to 750 kV. During the summer of 2003, SPEAR3 will undergo a substantial upgrade, part of which will be to replace the existing 358.54 MHz RF system with essentially a PEP-II high energy ring (HER) RF station operating at 476.3 MHz and 3.2 MV (or 800 kV/cavity). Prior to installation, cavity RF processing is required to prepare them for use. A dedicated high power test facility is employed at SLAC to provide the capability of conditioning each cavity up to the required accelerating voltage. An automated LabVIEW based interface controls and monitors various cavity and test stand parameters, increasing the RF fields accordingly such that stable operation is finally achieved. This paper describes the high power RF cavity processing facility, highlighting the features of t...

  12. Composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquette, K.D.; Hou, H.Q.; Chow, W.W.; Geib, K.M.; Hammons, B.E.

    1998-05-01

    The use of two coupled laser cavities has been employed in edge emitting semiconductor lasers for mode suppression and frequency stabilization. The incorporation of coupled resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the interaction between the cavities. Composite resonators can be utilized to control spectral and temporal properties within the laser; previous studies of coupled cavity vertical cavity lasers have employed photopumped structures. The authors report the first composite resonator vertical cavity laser diode consisting of two optical cavities and three monolithic distributed Bragg reflectors. Cavity coupling effects and two techniques for external modulation of the laser are described.

  13. Time-Lapse Electrical Resistivity Investigations for Imaging the Grouting Injection in Shallow Subsurface Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Farooq

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The highway of Yongweol-ri, Muan-gun, south-western part of the South Korean Peninsula, is underlain by the abandoned of subsurface cavities, which were discovered in 2005. These cavities lie at shallow depths with the range of 5∼15 meters below the ground surface. Numerous subsidence events have repeatedly occurred in the past few years, damaging infrastructure and highway. As a result of continuing subsidence issues, the Korean Institute of Geosciences and Mineral Resources (KIGAM was requested by local administration to resolve the issue. The KIGAM used geophysical methods to delineate subsurface cavities and improve more refined understanding of the cavities network in the study area. Cement based grouting has been widely employed in the construction industry to reinforce subsurface ground. In this research work, time-lapse electrical resistivity surveys were accomplished to monitor the grouting injection in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway, which have provided a quasi-real-time monitoring for modifying the subsurface cavities related to ground reinforcement, which would be difficult with direct methods. The results obtained from time-lapse electrical resistivity technique have satisfactory imaged the grouting injection experiment in the subsurface cavities beneath the highway. Furthermore, the borehole camera confirmed the presence of grouting material in the subsurface cavities, and hence this procedure increases the mechanical resistance of subsurface cavities below the highway.

  14. Porous silicon optical cavity as an immunosensor platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xiao-Yi; Mo, Jia-Qing; Tu, Yi-Xian; Zhong, Fu-Ru; Jiang, Tao; Jia, Zhen-Hong; Li, Jiang-Wei; Zhang, Fu-Chun

    2010-07-01

    A novel porous silicon based optical Fabry-Perot cavity structure is prepared as a label-free immunosensor platform for detecting antigen-antibody. The lagurus zona pelluciad 3 (LZP3) and the specificity of the polyclonal anti-LZP3 antibodies are employed in our laboratory as the target and the probe, respectively. Firstly, the antibodies are immobilized to the porous silicon optical cavity using silanization and glutaraldehyde (GA) chemistry. And then, after the antigen-antibody reaction, it is monitored that the red shift of the reflection spectrum of the immunosensor increases with the antigen concentration. This research also plays a potential role for the extensive applications in immunoassay.

  15. Vibration insensitive optical ring cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miao Jin; Jiang Yan-Yi; Fang Su; Bi Zhi-Yi; Ma Long-Sheng

    2009-01-01

    The mounting configuration of an optical ring cavity is optimized for vibration insensitivity by finite element analysis. A minimum response to vertical accelerations is found by simulations made for different supporting positions.

  16. Niobium LEP 2 accelerating cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    An accelerating cavity from LEP. This could be cut open to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities were used in an upgrade of the LEP accelerator to double the energy of the particle beams.

  17. SRF Cavity Fabrication and Materials

    CERN Document Server

    Singer, W

    2014-07-17

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for highgradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10μg/g. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2μg/g to prevent degradation of the Q-value under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Defects may be detected by quality control methods such as eddy current scanning and identified by a number of special methods. Conventional and alternative cavity fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and Electron-Beam Welding (EBW). The welding of half-cells is a delicate...

  18. Sterility of the uterine cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Birger R.; Kristiansen, Frank V.; Thorsen, Poul

    1995-01-01

    from the same sites. Nearly a quarter of all the patients harbored one or more microorganisms in the uterus, mostly Gardnerella vaginalis, Enterobacter and Streptococcus agalactiae. We found that in a significant number of cases, the uterine cavity is colonized with potentially pathogenic organisms...... which may play a causative role in endometritis. The results indicate that inflammation of the uterine cavity should be evaluated by hysteroscopic examination before hysterectomy is undertaken in patients with persistent irregular vaginal bleeding. Udgivelsesdato: 1995-Mar...

  19. LEP Radio Frequency Copper Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    The pulse of a particle accelerator. 128 of these radio frequency cavities were positioned around CERN's 27-kilometre LEP ring to accelerate electrons and positrons. The acceleration was produced by microwave electric oscillations at 352 MHz. The electrons and positrons were grouped into bunches, like beads on a string, and the copper sphere at the top stored the microwave energy between the passage of individual bunches. This made for valuable energy savings as it reduced the heat generated in the cavity.

  20. Imaging of the oral cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meesa, Indu Rekha; Srinivasan, Ashok

    2015-01-01

    The oral cavity is a challenging area in head and neck imaging because of its complex anatomy and the numerous pathophysiologies that involve its contents. This challenge is further compounded by the ubiquitous artifacts that arise from the dental amalgam, which compromise image quality. In this article, the anatomy of the oral cavity is discussed in brief, followed by a description of the imaging technique and some common pathologic abnormalities.

  1. Active Control of Open Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    UKeiley, Lawrence

    2010-01-01

    Open loop edge blowing was demonstrated as an effective method for reducing the broad band and tonal components of the fluctuating surface pressure in open cavities. Closed loop has been successfully applied to low Mach number open cavities. Need to push actuators that are viable for closed loop control in bandwidth and output. Need a better understanding of the effects of control on the flow through detailed measurements so better actuation strategies can be developed.

  2. 如皋市口腔医疗机构消毒质量监测报告%Monitoring on disinfection quality of oral cavity medical institution in Rugao

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王磊; 鞠海

    2013-01-01

    目的:了解如皋市口腔医疗机构的消毒工作现状,为规范管理和指导口腔医疗机构消毒工作提供科学依据.方法:现场采样监测,对全市口腔医疗机构消毒情况进行调查.结果:全市32家口腔医疗机构采样81份,合格率为93.83%.其中,医疗用品合格率为97.06%;医护人员手合格率88.89%;使用中消毒剂合格率100%.结论:如皋市口腔医疗机构消毒管理基本情况良好,消毒效果合格率较高,然而消毒灭菌工作仍存在差距,应进一步加强改进.%Objective:To understand the current disinfection status of dental institutions in Rugao,in order to provide scientific basis for the disinfection management and guidance of the dental institutions.Methods:Sampling examination method was used to investigate the disinfection status of oral cavity medical institutions.Results:The average eligible rate of 81 samples from 32 dental institutions was 93.83%.The disinfection qualified rate of medical devices,medical staff hands,disinfectants in use and disposable medical supplies were 97.06%,88.89%,100% respectively.Conclusion:The situation of disinfection management in mos dental institutions was roughly satisfactory in Rugao.The efficacy of disinfection for dental institutions is optimistic.However,there is insufficiency in disinfection and sterilization.So improvement of disinfection is necessary.

  3. TESLA superconducting RF cavity development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koepke, K. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); TESLA Collaboration

    1995-05-01

    The TESLA collaboration has made steady progress since its first official meeting at Cornell in 1990. The infrastructure necessary to assemble and test superconducting rf cavities has been installed at the TESLA Test Facility (TTF) at DESY. 5-cell, 1.3 GHz cavities have been fabricated and have reached accelerating fields of 25 MV/m. Full sized 9-cell copper cavities of TESLA geometry have been measured to verify the higher order modes present and to evaluate HOM coupling designs. The design of the TESLA 9-cell cavity has been finalized and industry has started delivery. Two prototype 9-cell niobium cavities in their first tests have reached accelerating fields of 10 MV/m and 15 MV/m in a vertical dewar after high peak power (HPP) conditioning. The first 12 m TESLA cryomodule that will house 8 9-cell cavities is scheduled to be delivered in Spring 1995. A design report for the TTF is in progress. The TTF test linac is scheduled to be commissioned in 1996/1997. (orig.).

  4. Polishing Difficult-To-Reach Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinzak, R. Michael; Booth, Gary N.

    1990-01-01

    Springy abrasive tool used to finish surfaces of narrow cavities made by electrical-discharge machining. Robot arm moves vibrator around perimeters of cavities, polishing walls of cavities as it does so. Tool needed because such cavities inaccessible or at least difficult to reach with most surface-finishing tools.

  5. Suppression of extraneous thermal noise in cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Yi; Ni, Kang-Kuen; Kimble, H Jeff

    2011-01-01

    Extraneous thermal motion can limit displacement sensitivity and radiation pressure effects, such as optical cooling, in a cavity-optomechanical system. Here we present an active noise suppression scheme and its experimental implementation. The main challenge is to selectively sense and suppress extraneous thermal noise without affecting motion of the oscillator. Our solution is to monitor two modes of the optical cavity, each with different sensitivity to the oscillator's motion but similar sensitivity to the extraneous thermal motion. This information is used to imprint "anti-noise" onto the frequency of the incident laser field. In our system, based on a nano-mechanical membrane coupled to a Fabry-P\\'{e}rot cavity, simulation and experiment demonstrate that extraneous thermal noise can be selectively suppressed and that the associated limit on optical cooling can be reduced.

  6. Synchronization of Bloch oscillations by a ring cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samoylova, M; Piovella, N; Robb, G R M; Bachelard, R; Courteille, Ph W

    2015-06-01

    We consider Bloch oscillations of ultracold atoms stored in a one-dimensional vertical optical lattice and simultaneously interacting with a unidirectionally pumped optical ring cavity whose vertical arm is collinear with the optical lattice. We find that the feedback provided by the cavity field on the atomic motion synchronizes Bloch oscillations via a mode-locking mechanism, steering the atoms to the lowest Bloch band. It also stabilizes Bloch oscillations against noise, and even suppresses dephasing due to atom-atom interactions. Furthermore, it generates periodic bursts of light emitted into the counter-propagating cavity mode, providing a non-destructive monitor of the atomic dynamics. All these features may be crucial for future improvements of the design of atomic gravimeters based on recording Bloch oscillations.

  7. Fabrication of elliptical SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.

    2017-03-01

    The technological and metallurgical requirements of material for high-gradient superconducting cavities are described. High-purity niobium, as the preferred metal for the fabrication of superconducting accelerating cavities, should meet exact specifications. The content of interstitial impurities such as oxygen, nitrogen, and carbon must be below 10 μg g-1. The hydrogen content should be kept below 2 μg g-1 to prevent degradation of the quality factor (Q-value) under certain cool-down conditions. The material should be free of flaws (foreign material inclusions or cracks and laminations) that can initiate a thermal breakdown. Traditional and alternative cavity mechanical fabrication methods are reviewed. Conventionally, niobium cavities are fabricated from sheet niobium by the formation of half-cells by deep drawing, followed by trim machining and electron beam welding. The welding of half-cells is a delicate procedure, requiring intermediate cleaning steps and a careful choice of weld parameters to achieve full penetration of the joints. A challenge for a welded construction is the tight mechanical and electrical tolerances. These can be maintained by a combination of mechanical and radio-frequency measurements on half-cells and by careful tracking of weld shrinkage. The main aspects of quality assurance and quality management are mentioned. The experiences of 800 cavities produced for the European XFEL are presented. Another cavity fabrication approach is slicing discs from the ingot and producing cavities by deep drawing and electron beam welding. Accelerating gradients at the level of 35-45 MV m-1 can be achieved by applying electrochemical polishing treatment. The single-crystal option (grain boundary free) is discussed. It seems that in this case, high performance can be achieved by a simplified treatment procedure. Fabrication of the elliptical resonators from a seamless pipe as an alternative is briefly described. This technology has yielded good

  8. 3D cavity detection technique and its application based on cavity auto scanning laser system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xi-ling; LI Xi-bing; LI Fa-ben; ZHAO Guo-yan; QIN Yu-hui

    2008-01-01

    Ground constructions and mines are severely threatened by underground cavities especially those unsafe or inaccessible ones. Safe and precise cavity detection is vital for reasonable cavity evaluation and disposal. The conventional cavity detection methods and their limitation were analyzed. Those methods cannot form 3D model of underground cavity which is used for instructing the cavity disposal; and their precisions in detection are always greatly affected by the geological circumstance. The importance of 3D cavity detection in metal mine for safe exploitation was pointed out; and the 3D cavity laser detection method and its principle were introduced. A cavity auto scanning laser system was recommended to actualize the cavity 3D detection after comparing with the other laser detection systems. Four boreholes were chosen to verify the validity of the cavity auto scanning laser system. The results show that the cavity auto scanning laser system is very suitable for underground 3D cavity detection, especially for those inaccessible ones.

  9. The ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darve, Christine; Bosland, Pierre; Devanz, Guillaume; Olivier, Gilles; Renard, Bertrand; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. The superconducting section of the Linac accelerates the beam from 80 MeV to 2.0 GeV. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain four elliptical Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 704.42 MHz. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design, the prototyping and the expected operation of the ESS elliptical cavity cryomodules. An Elliptical Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator (ECCTD) will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  10. The ESS spoke cavity cryomodules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousson, Sebastien; Darve, Christine; Duthil, Patxi; Elias, Nuno; Molloy, Steve; Reynet, Denis; Thermeau, Jean-Pierre

    2014-01-01

    The European Spallation Source (ESS) is a multi-disciplinary research centre under design and construction in Lund, Sweden. This new facility is funded by a collaboration of 17 European countries and is expected to be up to 30 times brighter than today's leading facilities and neutron sources. The ESS will enable new opportunities for researchers in the fields of life sciences, energy, environmental technology, cultural heritage and fundamental physics. A 5 MW long pulse proton accelerator is used to reach this goal. The pulsed length is 2.86 ms, the repetition frequency is 14 Hz (4 % duty cycle), and the beam current is 62.5 mA. It is composed of one string of spoke cavity cryomodule and two strings of elliptical cavity cryomodules. This paper introduces the thermo-mechanical design and expected operation of the ESS spoke cavity cryomodules. These cryomodules contain two double spoke bulk Niobium cavities operating at 2 K and at a frequency of 352.21 MHz. The superconducting section of the Spoke Linac accelerates the beam from 90 MeV to 220 MeV. A Spoke Cavity Cryomodule Technology Demonstrator will be built and tested in order to validate the ESS series production.

  11. Measurement of aerosol optical properties by cw cavity enhanced spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jie, Guo; Ye, Shan-Shan; Yang, Xiao; Han, Ye-Xing; Tang, Huai-Wu; Yu, Zhi-Wei

    2016-10-01

    The CAPS (Cavity Attenuated Phase shift Spectroscopy) system, which detects the extinction coefficients within a 10 nm bandpass centered at 532 nm, comprises a green LED with center wavelength in 532nm, a resonant optical cavity (36 cm length), a Photo Multiplier Tube detector, and a lock in amplifier. The square wave modulated light from the LED passes through the optical cavity and is detected as a distorted waveform which is characterized by a phase shift with respect to the initial modulation. Extinction coefficients are determined from changes in the phase shift of the distorted waveform of the square wave modulated LED light that is transmitted through the optical cavity. The performance of the CAPS system was evaluated by using measurements of the stability and response of the system. The minima ( 0.1 Mm-1) in the Allan plots show the optimum average time ( 100s) for optimum detection performance of the CAPS system. In the paper, it illustrates that extinction coefficient was correlated with PM2.5 mass (0.91). These figures indicate that this method has the potential to become one of the most sensitive on-line analytical techniques for extinction coefficient detection. This work aims to provide an initial validation of the CAPS extinction monitor in laboratory and field environments. Our initial results presented in this paper show that the CAPS extinction monitor is capable of providing state-of-the-art performance while dramatically reducing the complexity of optical instrumentation for directly measuring the extinction coefficients.

  12. RRR Characteristics for SRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Jung, Yoochul; Joung, Mijoung

    2015-01-01

    The first heavy ion accelerator is being constructed by the rare isotope science project (RISP) launched by the Institute of Basic Science (IBS) in South Korea. Four different types of superconducting cavities were designed, and prototypes were fabricated such as a quarter wave resonator (QWR), a half wave resonator (HWR) and a single spoke resonator (SSR). One of the critical factors determining performances of the superconducting cavities is a residual resistance ratio (RRR). The RRR values essentially represent how much niobium is pure and how fast niobium can transmit heat as well. In general, the RRR degrades during electron beam welding due to the impurity incorporation. Thus it is important to maintain RRR above a certain value at which a niobium cavity shows target performance. In this study, RRR degradation related with electron beam welding conditions, for example, welding power, welding speed, and vacuum level will be discussed.

  13. Measurements of methane emissions from landfills using mobile plume method with trace gas and cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mønster, J.; Kjeldsen, P.; Scheutz, C.

    2012-04-01

    Methane is emitted to the atmosphere from both anthropogenic and natural sources. One of the major anthropogenic sources is methane produced by bacteria in anaerobic environments such as rice pads and landfills. Land filling has for many years been the preferred waste disposal method, resulting in a large methane production with a large contribution to the global increase in atmospheric green house gas concentration. Several steps have been taken to reduce the emission of methane from landfills. In order to validate the effect of these steps, a measurement method is needed to quantify methane emissions with a large spatial variation. One method is to use a highly sensitive and fast analytical method, capable of measuring the atmospheric concentration methane downwind from emission areas. Combined with down-wind measurements of a trace gas, emitted at a controlled mass flow rate, the methane emission can be calculated. This method is called the mobile plume method, as the whole plume is measured by doing several transects. In the current study a methane/acetylene analyzer with cavity ring-down spectroscopy detection (Picarro, G2203) was used to estimate methane from a number of Danish landfills. We measured at both active and closed landfills and investigated the difference in methane emission. At landfills where the emissions could have more than one origin, the source strength of the different emission areas was determined by accurate trace gas positioning and choosing appropriate wind speed and measurement distance. To choose these factors, we addressed the uncertainties and limitations of the method with respect to the configuration of the trace gas bottles and the distance between the emission area and the measurement points. Composting of organic material in large piles was done at several of the investigated landfills and where possible, the methane emission from this partly anaerobic digestion was measured as a separate emission.

  14. Protein dynamics: hydration and cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Heremans

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available The temperature-pressure behavior of proteins seems to be unique among the biological macromolecules. Thermodynamic as well as kinetic data show the typical elliptical stability diagram. This may be extended by assuming that the unfolded state gives rise to volume and enthalpy-driven liquid-liquid transitions. A molecular interpretation follows from the temperature and the pressure dependence of the hydration and cavities. We suggest that positron annihilation spectroscopy can provide additional quantitative evidence for the contributions of cavities to the dynamics of proteins. Only mature amyloid fibrils that form from unfolded proteins are very resistant to pressure treatment.

  15. Cavity air flow behavior during filling in microinjection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Griffiths, C.A.; Dimov, S.S.; Scholz, S.

    2011-01-01

    Process monitoring of microinjection molding (μ-IM) is of crucial importance in understanding the effects of different parameter settings on the process, especially on its performance and consistency with regard to parts' quality. Quality factors related to mold cavity air evacuation can provide...... valuable information about the process dynamics and also about the filling of a cavity by a polymer melt. In this paper, a novel experimental setup is proposed to monitor maximum air flow and air flow work as an integral of the air flow over time by employing a microelectromechanical system gas sensor...... mounted inside the mold. The influence of four μIM parameters, melt temperature, mold temperature, injection speed, and resistance to air evacuation, on two air flow-related output parameters is investigated by carrying out a design of experiment study. The results provide empirical evidences about...

  16. Entanglement swapping between atom and cavity and generation of entangled state of cavity fields

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ai-Xi; Deng Li

    2007-01-01

    This paper proposes a scheme where entanglement swapping between atom and cavity can be realized. A-type three-level atoms interacting resonantly with cavity field are considered. By detecting atom and cavity field, it realizes entanglement swapping between atom and cavity. It uses the technique of entanglement swapping to generate an entangled state of two cavity fields by measuring on atoms. It discusses the experimental feasibility of the proposed scheme and application of entangled state of cavity fields.

  17. Novel Instrument to Measure Aerosol Fluorescence, Absorption, and Scattering Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Picarro, Inc proposes to develop the first cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) system to measure fluorescence, absorption, and scattering properties of atmospheric...

  18. On cavity modification of stimulated Raman scattering

    CERN Document Server

    Matsko, A B; Letargat, R J; Ilchenko, V S; Maleki, L

    2003-01-01

    We study theoretically stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in a nonlinear dielectric microcavity and compare SRS thresholds for the cavity and the bulk material it is made of. We show that cavity SRS enhancement results solely from the intensity build up in the cavity and from the differences of the SRS dynamics in free and confined space. There is no significant modification of the Raman gain due to cavity QED effects. We show that the SRS threshold depends significantly on the nature of the dominating cavity decay as well as on the coupling technique with the cavity used for SRS measurements.

  19. A STUDY OF FERRITE CAVITY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZHAO, Y.

    2002-04-19

    This note addresses the general concerns for the design of a ferrite cavity. The parameters are specified for the RCMS, for which the frequency ramp is in the range of 1.27 MHz to 6.44 MHz, or a ratio of 1:5.

  20. Droplet based cavities and lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Kristian; Kristensen, Anders; Mortensen, Asger

    2009-01-01

    The self-organized and molecularly smooth surface on liquid microdroplets makes them attractive as optical cavities with very high quality factors. This chapter describes the basic theory of optical modes in spherical droplets. The mechanical properties including vibrational excitation are also d...

  1. A 200 MHz prebunching cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1977-01-01

    This cavity was installed in the PS ring and proved very efficient in providing a modulation on the PS beam before it is injected into the SPS machine. Moreover it allowed longitudinal instabilities studies at high intensities. Roberto Cappi stands on the left.

  2. "Grinding" cavities in polyurethane foam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brower, J. R.; Davey, R. E.; Dixon, W. F.; Robb, P. H.; Zebus, P. P.

    1980-01-01

    Grinding tool installed on conventional milling machine cuts precise cavities in foam blocks. Method is well suited for prototype or midsize production runs and can be adapted to computer control for mass production. Method saves time and materials compared to bonding or hot wire techniques.

  3. Hybrid Vertical-Cavity Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention provides a light source (2) for light circuits on a silicon platform (3). A vertical laser cavity is formed by a gain region (101) arranged between a top mirror (4) and a bottom grating-mirror (12) in a grating region (11) in a silicon layer (10) on a substrate. A waveguide...

  4. Cavity length below chute aerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is proved that air entrainment is one of the efficient measures dealing with cavi-tation control for the release works of hydropower projects. There are many factors to be considered in designing a chute aerator. One of the most important factors concerns the cavity length below the aerator,which has outstanding effects on air entrainment against cavitation damage. It is crucial to determine reasonable emergence angle for the calculation of the cavity length. In the present paper the overall effects of structural and hydraulic parameters on the emergence angle of the flow from the aerator were analyzed. Four improved expressions of the emer-gence angle with weight coefficient were investigated through experimental data of 68 points observed from 12 aerators of 6 hydropower projects,of both model and prototype,on the basis of error theory. A method to calculate the cavity length be-low aerators was suggested,which considers overall effects of the above men-tioned parameters. Comparison between the method in this paper and the other five methods of calculating the cavity length showed that the present method is much more reliable than the existing methods while the mean error of the method is less than others.

  5. Cavity length below chute aerators

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU JianHua; RUAN ShiPing

    2008-01-01

    It is proved that air entrainment is one of the efficient measures dealing with cavitation control for the release works of hydropower projects. There are many factors to be considered in designing a chute aerator. One of the most important factors concerns the cavity length below the aerator, which has outstanding effects on air entrainment against cavitation damage. It is crucial to determine reasonable emergence angle for the calculation of the cavity length. In the present paper the overall effects of structural and hydraulic parameters on the emergence angle of the flow from the aerator were analyzed. Four improved expressions of the emergence angle with weight coefficient were investigated through experimental data of 68 points observed from 12 aerators of 6 hydropower projects, of both model and prototype, on the basis of error theory. A method to calculate the cavity length below aerators was suggested, which considers overall effects of the above mentioned parameters. Comparison between the method in this paper and the other five methods of calculating the cavity length showed that the present method is much more reliable than the existing methods while the mean error of the method is less than others.

  6. 21 CFR 872.3260 - Cavity varnish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3260 Cavity varnish. (a) Identification. Cavity varnish is a... restorative materials. The device is intended to prevent penetration of restorative materials, such as...

  7. Cavity QED experiments with ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Peter Fønss; Dantan, Aurélien; Marler, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained....

  8. Cavity QED experiments with ion Coulomb crystals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herskind, Peter Fønss; Dantan, Aurélien; Marler, Joan

    2009-01-01

    Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained.......Cavity QED experimental results demonstrating collective strong coupling between ensembles of atomic ions cooled into Coulomb crystals and optical cavity fields have been achieved. Collective Zeeman coherence times of milliseconds have furthermore been obtained....

  9. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. Ian Wilso seems to hold it in his hands. The storage cavities had 4 portholes, 1 each for: RF feed; tuning; connection to the accelerating cavity; vacuum pump. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the lower LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. See also 8002294, 8006510X, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  10. Theory and technology for superconducting cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lengeler, Herbert

    1993-01-01

    The course will address Physicist and Engineers who are newcomers in the field of accelerators and accelerating cavities. The elements of RF-Superconductivity will be presented with special relevance to accelerating cavities. The present ststus of achievable accelerating fields and RF losses will be given and their link to the special technologies for cavity fabrication and surface treatments will be stressed. Cavity auxiliaries like main couplers, higher order mode couplers and frequency tuners will be described.

  11. Polymer-based Photonic Crystal Cavity Sensor for Optical Detection in the Visible Wavelength Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeno, Kenichi; Aki, Shoma; Sueyoshi, Kenji; Hisamoto, Hideaki; Endo, Tatsuro

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a polymer-based two-dimensional photonic crystal (PhC) cavity for visible-light-based optical-sensing applications was designed and fabricated for the first time. The PhC cavity configuration was designed to operate at 650 nm, and fabricated with a polymer (resist) on a silicon substrate using electron-beam lithography. For investigating sensing applications based on shifting of condition exhibiting a photonic bandgap (PBG), the polymer monolayer deposition (layer-by-layer method) was monitored as the light-intensity change at the cavity position. Consequently, the monolayer-level detection of polyions was achieved.

  12. Interfering with decay of a single photon in microwave cavities through SP-QND

    CERN Document Server

    De Faria, J G P; De Toledo di Piza, A F R; Nemes, M C

    2000-01-01

    The decay of a single photon in a microwave cavity is shown to be retarded by interaction with a resonant two-level atom in the experimental setup recently developed by Nogues and co-workers [see G. Nogues, A. Rauschenbeutel, S. Osnaghi, M. Brune, J. M. Raimond and S. Haroche, Nature vol 400, 239(1999)]. The effect may be interpreted in terms of the temporary removal of the photon from the cavity thereby protecting it from the effects of the environment to wich the cavity is coupled. Realistic parameters lead to a 10% increase of the survival probability of the photon subsequently to the monitoring interaction.

  13. Digital Cavities and Their Potential Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Karki, Khadga; Widom, Julia R; Marcus, Andrew H; Pullerits, Tonu

    2013-01-01

    The concept of a digital cavity is presented. The functionality of a tunable radio-frequency/microwave cavity with unrestricted Q-factor is implemented. The theoretical aspects of the cavity and its potential applications in high resolution spectroscopy and synchronization of clocks together with examples in signal processing and data acquisition are discussed.

  14. Diagram of a LEP superconducting cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1991-01-01

    This diagram gives a schematic representation of the superconducting radio-frequency cavities at LEP. Liquid helium is used to cool the cavity to 4.5 degrees above absolute zero so that very high electric fields can be produced, increasing the operating energy of the accelerator. Superconducting cavities were used only in the LEP-2 phase of the accelerator, from 1996 to 2000.

  15. Power coupler for the ILC crab cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burt, G.; Dexter, A.; Jenkins, R.; /Lancaster U.; Beard, C.; Goudket, P.; McIntosh, P.A.; /Daresbury; Bellantoni, Leo; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The ILC crab cavity will require the design of an appropriate power coupler. The beam-loading in dipole mode cavities is considerably more variable than accelerating cavities, hence simulations have been performed to establish the required external Q. Simulations of a suitable coupler were then performed and were verified using a normal conducting prototype with variable coupler tips.

  16. Advanced geophysical underground coal gasification monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mellors, Robert; Yang, X.; White, J. A.; Ramirez, A.; Wagoner, J.; Camp, D. W.

    2014-07-01

    Underground Coal Gasification (UCG) produces less surface impact, atmospheric pollutants and greenhouse gas than traditional surface mining and combustion. Therefore, it may be useful in mitigating global change caused by anthropogenic activities. Careful monitoring of the UCG process is essential in minimizing environmental impact. Here we first summarize monitoring methods that have been used in previous UCG field trials. We then discuss in more detail a number of promising advanced geophysical techniques. These methods – seismic, electromagnetic, and remote sensing techniques – may provide improved and cost-effective ways to image both the subsurface cavity growth and surface subsidence effects. Active and passive seismic data have the promise to monitor the burn front, cavity growth, and observe cavity collapse events. Electrical resistance tomography (ERT) produces near real time tomographic images autonomously, monitors the burn front and images the cavity using low-cost sensors, typically running within boreholes. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is a remote sensing technique that has the capability to monitor surface subsidence over the wide area of a commercial-scale UCG operation at a low cost. It may be possible to infer cavity geometry from InSAR (or other surface topography) data using geomechanical modeling. The expected signals from these monitoring methods are described along with interpretive modeling for typical UCG cavities. They are illustrated using field results from UCG trials and other relevant subsurface operations.

  17. Does the availability of artificial cavities affect cavity excavation rates in red-cockaded woodpeckers?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Conner; Daniel Saenz; D. Craig Rudolph; Richard R. Schaefer

    2002-01-01

    Rates of cavity excavation by Red-cockaded Woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) were examined from 1983 to 1999 on the Angelina National Forest in east Texas. We compared the rare of natural cavity excavation between 1983 and 1990 (before artificial cavities were available) with the rate of cavity excavation between 1992 and 1993, a period when...

  18. High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D.; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.

    2002-05-01

    We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q0 of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons.

  19. High power RF test of an 805 MHz RF cavity for a muon cooling channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Derun; Corlett, J.; MacGill, R.; Rimmer, R.; Wallig, J.; Zisman, M.; Moretti, A.; Qian, Z.; Wu, V.; Summers, D.; Norem, J.

    2002-05-30

    We present recent high power RF test results on an 805 MHz cavity for a muon cooling experiment at Lab G in Fermilab. In order to achieve high accelerating gradient for large transverse emittance muon beams, the cavity design has adopted a pillbox like shape with 16 cm diameter beam iris covered by thin Be windows, which are demountable to allow for RF tests of different windows. The cavity body is made from copper with stiff stainless steel rings brazed to the cavity body for window attachments. View ports and RF probes are available for visual inspections of the surface of windows and cavity and measurement of the field gradient. Maximum of three thermo-couples can be attached to the windows for monitoring the temperature gradient on the windows caused by RF heating. The cavity was measured to have Q{sub 0} of about 15,000 with copper windows and coupling constant of 1.3 before final assembling. A 12 MW peak power klystron is available at Lab G in Fermilab for the high power test. The cavity and coupler designs were performed using the MAFIA code in the frequency and the time domain. Numerical simulation results and cold test measurements on the cavity and coupler will be presented for comparisons.

  20. HOM identification by bead pulling in the Brookhaven ERL cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, H; Jain, Puneet; Johnson, Elliott C; Xu, Wencan

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory measurements of the Brookhaven Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) cavity at superconducting temperature produced a long list of high order modes (HOMs). The niobium 5-cell cavity is terminated at each end with HOM ferrite dampers that successfully reduce the Q-factors to levels required to avoid beam break up (BBU) instabilities. However, a number of un-damped resonances with Q≥106 were found at 4 K and their mode identification forms the focus of this paper. The approach taken here consists of bead pulling on a copper (Cu) replica of the ERL cavity with dampers involving various network analyzer measurements. Several different S21 transmission measurements are used, including those taken from the fundamental input coupler to the pick-up probe across the cavity, others between beam-position monitor probes in the beam tubes, and also between probes placed into the cells. The bead pull technique suitable for HOM identification with a metallic needle or dielectric bead is detailed. This paper presents the...

  1. POSITION DETERMINATION OF CLOSELY SPACED BUNCHES USING CAVITY BPMs

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, N; Cullinan, F; Lyapin, A

    2011-01-01

    Radio Frequency (RF) Cavity Beam Position Monitor (BPM) systems form a major part of precision position measurement diagnostics for linear accelerators with low emittance beams. Using cavity BPMs, a position resolution of less than 100 nm has been demonstrated in single bunch mode operation. In the case of closely spaced bunches, where the decay time of the cavity is comparable to the time separation between bunches, the BPM signal from a bunch is polluted by the signal induced by the previous bunches in the same bunch-train. This paper discusses our ongoing work to develop the methods to extract the position of closely spaced bunches using cavity BPMs. A signal subtraction code is being developed to remove the signal pollution from previous bunches and to determine the individual bunch position. Another code has been developed to simulate the BPM data for the cross check. Performance of the code is studied on the experimental and simulated data. Application of the analysis techniques to the linear colliders,...

  2. Cavity Voltage Phase Modulation MD

    CERN Document Server

    Mastoridis, Themistoklis; Molendijk, John; Timko, Helga; CERN. Geneva. ATS Department

    2016-01-01

    The LHC RF/LLRF system is currently configured for extremely stable RF voltage to minimize transient beam loading effects. The present scheme cannot be extended beyond nominal beam current since the demanded power would exceed the peak klystron power and lead to saturation. A new scheme has therefore been proposed: for beam currents above nominal (and possibly earlier), the cavity phase modulation by the beam will not be corrected (transient beam loading), but the strong RF feedback and One-Turn Delay feedback will still be active for loop and beam stability in physics. To achieve this, the voltage set point will be adapted for each bunch. The goal of this MD was to test a new algorithm that would adjust the voltage set point to achieve the cavity phase modulation that would minimize klystron forward power.

  3. A micropillar for cavity optomechanics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhn, Aurélien; Neuhaus, Leonhard; Deléglise, Samuel; Briant, Tristan; Cohadon, Pierre-François; Heidmann, Antoine [Laboratoire Kastler Brossel, UPMC-ENS-CNRS, Paris (France); Van Brackel, Emmanuel [Département de Physique, ENS, Paris (France); Chartier, Claude; Ducloux, Olivier; Le Traon, Olivier [Département Mesures Physiques, ONERA, Châtillon (France); Michel, Christophe; Pinard, Laurent; Flaminio, Raffaele [Laboratoire des Matériaux Avancés, IN2P3-CNRS, Lyon (France)

    2014-12-04

    Demonstrating the quantum ground state of a macroscopic mechanical object is a major experimental challenge in physics, at the origin of the rapid emergence of cavity optomechanics. We have developed a new generation of optomechanical devices, based on a microgram quartz micropillar with a very high mechanical quality factor. The structure is used as end mirror in a Fabry-Perot cavity with a high optical finesse, leading to ultra-sensitive interferometric measurement of the resonator displacement. We expect to reach the ground state of this optomechanical resonator by combining cryogenic cooling in a dilution fridge at 30 mK and radiation-pressure cooling. We have already carried out a quantum-limited measurement of the micropillar thermal noise at low temperature.

  4. Spontaneous Photon Emission in Cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alber G.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate spontaneous photon emission processes of two-level atoms in parabolic and ellipsoidal cavities thereby taking into account the full multimode scenario. In particular, we calculate the excitation probabilities of the atoms and the energy density of the resulting few-photon electromagnetic radiation field by using semiclassical methods for the description of the multimode scenario. Based on this approach photon path representations are developed for relevant transition probability amplitudes which are valid in the optical frequency regime where the dipole and the rotating-wave approximations apply. Comparisons with numerical results demonstrate the quality of these semiclassical results even in cases in which the wave length of a spontaneously emitted photon becomes comparable or even larger than characteristic length scales of the cavity. This is the dynamical regime in which diffraction effects become important so that geometric optical considerations are typically not applicable.

  5. Dissipative structures in optomechanical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquín; Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos; Patera, Giuseppe; Roldán, Eugenio; de Valcárcel, Germán J.

    2016-03-01

    Motivated by the increasing interest in the properties of multimode optomechanical devices, here we study a system in which a driven longitudinal mode of a large-area optical cavity is dispersively coupled to a deformable mechanical element. Two different models naturally appear in such scenario, for which we predict the formation of periodic patterns, localized structures (cavity solitons), and domain walls, among other complex nonlinear phenomena. Further, we propose a realistic design based on intracavity membranes where our models can be studied experimentally. Apart from its relevance to the field of nonlinear optics, the results put forward here are a necessary step towards understanding the quantum properties of optomechanical systems in the multimode regime of both the optical and the mechanical degrees of freedom.

  6. Retention proposal in complex cavities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Alvarez Rodríguez

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dental Operatory is the main structure in which Odontology lies. It is not an easy discipline that gives enjoyable results with little effort due to the difficulties that a correct reconstruction of a destroyed dental element offers.The frequency with which pulpar injury occurs while anchoring additional retainers in complex cavities, the technical difficulties the lack of these devices cause and the need to simplify dental procedures lead this study to show the advantages to substitute additional retainers for a retainer surcus. Method: An observational descriptive study was applied to 53 patients(42% of the universe , sample which was selected by means of a simple randomized sample . From a proximal-occlusal cavity, the preparations were extended in a box-like shape towards the bucal or lingual region and the additional retainers were substituted for a surcus which was performed in the gingival wall of the preparation. Calcium Hydroxide of rapid dryness was used as a cavity cover and Policarboxilate cement as a base; then the amalgam restoration was performed. The number of restorations were studied taking into account the patient´s age and the failures due to fractures of amalgam, loss of vitality and periapical changes were assessed taking into consideration the patient´s age and a one- year follow up. Results: Most of the amalgam restorations were performed in patients aged from 35 to 59 years and the relative frequencies due to fractures of amalgam, loss of vitality and periapical changes were very low. Conclusion: The substitution of additional retainers for a retainer surcus in complex cavities of vital molars showed to be advantageous because it guarantees a less degree of pulpar damage and less pulpar damage.

  7. Aerosol Observing System Greenhouse Gas (AOS GhG) Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biraud, S. C. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Reichl, K. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2016-03-01

    The Greenhouse Gas (GhG) Measurement system is a combination of two systems in series: (1) the Tower Gas Processing (TGP) System, an instrument rack which pulls, pressurizes, and dries air streams from an atmospheric sampling tower through a series of control and monitoring components, and (2) the Picarro model G2301 cavity ringdown spectrometer (CRDS), which measures CO2, CH4, and H2O vapor; the primary measurements of the GhG system.

  8. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahram Djafari-Rouhani

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  9. Angioleiomyoma of the Nasal Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arruda, Milena Moreira

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Vascular leiomyoma of the nasal cavity is an extremely rare tumor that represents less than 1% of all vascular leiomyomas. It is more prevalent in women between the fourth and sixth decades, reaching primarily the inferior nasal turbinates. Objectives Reporting and assisting the systematization of more accurate diagnostic methods in clinical and complementary investigation of vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity. Resumed Report We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity, which manifested mainly with nasal obstruction. During investigation, computer tomography was not diagnostic, the cytologic study was not conclusive, and according to the biopsy, it was a squamous papilloma. Conclusion We suggest that the technical difficulty in obtaining an adequate amount of material for preoperative biopsy, associated with the topography of the lesion in the vestibular nasal region, may have contributed to changing the postoperative diagnosis. Thus, pathologic study of the surgical fragment is the more accurate method for diagnosis.

  10. Angioleiomyoma of the Nasal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arruda, Milena Moreira; Monteiro, Daniela Yasbek; Fernandes, Atilio Maximino; Menegatti, Vanessa; Thomazzi, Emerson; Hubner, Ricardo Arthur; Lima, Luiz Guilherme Cernaglia Aureliano de

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Vascular leiomyoma of the nasal cavity is an extremely rare tumor that represents less than 1% of all vascular leiomyomas. It is more prevalent in women between the fourth and sixth decades, reaching primarily the inferior nasal turbinates. Objectives Reporting and assisting the systematization of more accurate diagnostic methods in clinical and complementary investigation of vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity. Resumed Report We present the case of a 49-year-old woman diagnosed with vascular leiomyoma in the nasal cavity, which manifested mainly with nasal obstruction. During investigation, computer tomography was not diagnostic, the cytologic study was not conclusive, and according to the biopsy, it was a squamous papilloma. Conclusion We suggest that the technical difficulty in obtaining an adequate amount of material for preoperative biopsy, associated with the topography of the lesion in the vestibular nasal region, may have contributed to changing the postoperative diagnosis. Thus, pathologic study of the surgical fragment is the more accurate method for diagnosis. PMID:25992133

  11. Optomechanic interactions in phoxonic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djafari-Rouhani, Bahram; Oudich, Mourad; Pennec, Yan [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de physique, Université Lille1, Cité Scientifique, 59652, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); El-Jallal, Said [Institut d’Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie (IEMN), UMR CNRS 8520, UFR de physique, Université Lille1, Cité Scientifique, 59652, Villeneuve d’Ascq (France); Physique du Rayonnement et de l’Interaction Laser Matière, Faculté des sciences, Université de Moulay Ismail, Meknès (Morocco)

    2014-12-15

    Phoxonic crystals are periodic structures exhibiting simultaneous phononic and photonic band gaps, thus allowing the confinement of both excitations in the same cavity. The phonon-photon interaction can be enhanced due to the overlap of both waves in the cavity. In this paper, we discuss some of our recent theoretical works on the strength of the optomechanic coupling, based on both photoelastic and moving interfaces mechanisms, in different (2D, slabs, strips) phoxonic crystals cavities. The cases of two-dimensional infinite and slab structures will enable us to mention the important role of the symmetry and degeneracy of the modes, as well as the role of the materials whose photoelastic constants can be wavelength dependent. Depending on the phonon-photon pair, the photoelastic and moving interface mechanisms can contribute in phase or out-of-phase. Then, the main part of the paper will be devoted to the optomechanic interaction in a corrugated nanobeam waveguide exhibiting dual phononic/photonic band gaps. Such structures can provide photonic modes with very high quality factor, high frequency phononic modes of a few GHz inside a gap and optomechanical coupling rate reaching a few MHz.

  12. LHC crab-cavity aspects and strategy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calaga, R.; Tomas, R.; Zimmermann, F.

    2010-05-23

    The 3rd LHC Crab Cavity workshop (LHC-CC09) took place at CERN in October 2009. It reviewed the current status and identified a clear strategy towards a future crab-cavity implementation. Following the success of crab cavities in KEK-B and the strong potential for luminosity gain and leveling, CERN will pursue crab crossing for the LHC upgrade. We present a summary and outcome of the variousworkshop sessions which have led to the LHC crab-cavity strategy, covering topics like layout, cavity design, integration, machine protection, and a potential validation test in the SPS.

  13. Differential cavity mode spectroscopy: A new cavity enhanced technique for the detection of weak transitions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vine, Glenn de [Centre for Gravitational Physics, Faculty of Science, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)], E-mail: glenn.devine@jpl.nasa.gov; McClelland, David E.; Gray, Malcolm B. [Centre for Gravitational Physics, Faculty of Science, The Australian National University, Canberra ACT 0200 (Australia)

    2008-06-16

    We present a new cavity enhanced, continuous wave spectroscopic technique for the detection of weak atomic and molecular transitions. Differential Cavity Mode Spectroscopy (DCMS) measures the difference in absorption between two adjacent cavity longitudinal modes to yield a highly sensitive, yet relatively simple, cavity enhanced spectroscopic technique. In addition this relative absorption measurement is, to first order, independent of both laser frequency noise and cavity acoustic noise. Here we present both a theoretical description of this new technique and an initial experimental demonstration.

  14. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, B. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Burt, G. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Smith, J. D.A. [Lancaster Univ. (United Kingdom); Rimmer, R. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wang, H. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Delayen, J. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Calaga, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2009-05-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme but the frequency cannot be increased any higher due to the long bunch length of the LHC beam. This will require a novel compact crab cavity design. A superconducting version of a two rod coaxial deflecting cavity as a suitable design is proposed in this paper.

  15. Plasmonic Coupled Cavities on Moire Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Askin; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    We investigate surface plasmon polariton (SPP) coupled cavity modes on Moire surfaces. An experimental study has been made of the propagation of SPPs on a thin silver surface that is textured with Moire surface pattern using interference lithography. The Moire surface contains periodic array of one dimensional cavities. The distance between the cavities can be controlled by changing the periodicities of Moire surface. When the SPP cavity separation is sufficiently small, we show splitting of strongly coupled plasmonic cavity modes through numerical simulations. Conversely, when the SPP cavity separation is sufficiently large, SPP cavity modes are found to be localized and do not show splitting of SPP cavity modes . This splitting of SPP cavity modes are well explained with a tight binding model that has been succesfully applied in photonic coupled cavities. Reflection measurements and numerical simulation of a large number of adjacent SPP cavities have shown a coupled resonator optical waveguide (CROW) type plasmonic waveguide band formation within the band gap region of unperturbed uniform grating.

  16. Coupled Resonator Vertical Cavity Laser Diode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CHOQUETTE, KENT D.; CHOW, WENG W.; FISCHER, ARTHUR J.; GEIB, KENT M.; HOU, HONG Q.

    1999-09-16

    We report the operation of an electrically injected monolithic coupled resonator vertical cavity laser which consists of an active cavity containing In{sub x}Ga{sub 1{minus}x}As quantum wells optically coupled to a passive GaAs cavity. This device demonstrates novel modulation characteristics arising from dynamic changes in the coupling between the active and passive cavities. A composite mode theory is used to model the output modulation of the coupled resonator vertical cavity laser. It is shown that the laser intensity can be modulated by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity. Under forward biasing, the modulation is due to carrier induced changes in the refractive index, while for reverse bias operation the modulation is caused by field dependent cavity enhanced absorption.

  17. CHECHIA cavity driving with FPGA controller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czarski, T.; Koprek, W.; Pozniak, K.T.; Romaniuk, R.S. [Technical Univ. Warsaw (Poland). ELHEP Laboratory, ISE; Simrock, S. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany). TESLA

    2005-07-01

    The initial control of the superconductive cavity has recently been performed by applying the FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array) technology system in DESY Hamburg. This first experiment turned attention to the general recognition of the cavity features and projected control methods. The electrical model of the cavity is taken as a consideration origin. The calibration of the signal channel is considered as a key preparation for an efficient cavity driving. The cavity parameters identification is confirmed as a proper approach for the required performance: driving on resonance during filling and field stabilization during flattop time with reasonable power consumption. The feed-forward and feedback modes were applied successfully for the CHECHIA cavity driving. Representative results of experiments are presented for different levels of the cavity field gradient. (orig.)

  18. Novel Geometries for the LHC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    B. Hall, G. Burt, C. Lingwood, R. Rimmer, H. Wang

    2010-05-23

    The planned luminosity upgrade to LHC is likely to necessitate a large crossing angle and a local crab crossing scheme. For this scheme crab cavities align bunches prior to collision. The scheme requires at least four such cavities, a pair on each beam line either side of the interaction point (IP). Upstream cavities initiate rotation and downstream cavities cancel rotation. Cancellation is usually done at a location where the optics has re-aligned the bunch. The beam line separation near the IP necessitates a more compact design than is possible with elliptical cavities such as those used at KEK. The reduction in size must be achieved without an increase in the operational frequency to maintain compatibility with the long bunch length of the LHC. This paper proposes a suitable superconducting variant of a four rod coaxial deflecting cavity (to be phased as a crab cavity), and presents analytical models and simulations of suitable designs.

  19. SPS RF System an Accelerating Cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1975-01-01

    The picture shows one of the two initially installed cavities. The main RF-system of the SPS comprises four cavities: two of 20 m length and two of 16.5 m length. They are all installed in one long straight section (LSS 3). These cavities are of the travelling-wave type operating at a centre frequency of 200.2 MHz. They are wideband, filling time about 700 ns and untuned. The power amplifiers, using tetrodes are installed in a surface building 200 m from the cavities. Initially only two cavities were installed, a third cavity was installed in 1978 and a forth one in 1979. The number of power amplifiers was also gradually increased: by end 1980 there were 8 500 kW units combined in pairs to feed each of the 4 cavities with up to about 1 MW RF power, resulting in a total accelerating voltage of about 8 MV. See also 7412017X, 7411048X.

  20. Highly stable piezoelectrically tunable optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Möhle, Katharina; Döringshoff, Klaus; Nagel, Moritz; Peters, Achim

    2013-01-01

    We have implemented highly stable and tunable frequency references using optical high finesse cavities which incorporate a piezo actuator. As piezo material we used ceramic PZT, crystalline quartz, or PZN-PT single crystals. Lasers locked to these cavities show a relative frequency stability better than 1 x 10^{-14}, which is most likely not limited by the piezo actuators. The piezo cavities can be electrically tuned over more than one free spectral range (> 1.5 GHz) with only a minor decrease in frequency stability. Furthermore, we present a novel cavity design, where the piezo actuator is prestressed between the cavity spacer components. This design features a hermetically sealable intra cavity volume suitable for, e.g., cavity enhanced spectroscopy.

  1. Dual-etalon, cavity-ring-down, frequency comb spectroscopy.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strecker, Kevin E.; Chandler, David W.

    2010-10-01

    The 'dual etalon frequency comb spectrometer' is a novel low cost spectometer with limited moving parts. A broad band light source (pulsed laser, LED, lamp ...) is split into two beam paths. One travels through an etalon and a sample gas, while the second arm is just an etalon cavity, and the two beams are recombined onto a single detector. If the free spectral ranges (FSR) of the two cavities are not identical, the intensity pattern at the detector with consist of a series of heterodyne frequencies. Each mode out of the sample arm etalon with have a unique frequency in RF (radio-frequency) range, where modern electronics can easily record the signals. By monitoring these RF beat frequencies we can then determine when an optical frequencies is absorbed. The resolution is set by the FSR of the cavity, typically 10 MHz, with a bandwidth up to 100s of cm{sup -1}. In this report, the new spectrometer is described in detail and demonstration experiments on Iodine absorption are carried out. Further we discuss powerful potential next generation steps to developing this into a point sensor for monitoring combustion by-products, environmental pollutants, and warfare agents.

  2. Dynamical tunneling in optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Hackenbroich, G; Hackenbroich, Gregor; Noeckel, Jens U.

    1998-01-01

    The lifetime of whispering gallery modes in a dielectric cavity with a metallic inclusion is shown to fluctuate by orders of magnitude when size and location of the inclusion are varied. We ascribe these fluctuations to tunneling transitions between resonances quantized in different regions of phase space. This interpretation is confirmed by a comparison of the classical phase space structure with the Husimi distribution of the resonant modes. A model Hamiltonian is introduced that describes the phenomenon and shows that it can be expected in a more general class of systems.

  3. Basketballs as spherical acoustic cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Daniel A.

    2010-06-01

    The sound field resulting from striking a basketball is found to be rich in frequency content, with over 50 partials in the frequency range of 0-12 kHz. The frequencies are found to closely match theoretical expectations for standing wave patterns inside a spherical cavity. Because of the degenerate nature of the mode shapes, explicit identification of the modes is not possible without internal investigation with a microphone probe. A basketball proves to be an interesting application of a boundary value problem involving spherical coordinates.

  4. Exciton-polariton dynamics in quantum dot-cavity system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neto, Antonio F.; Lima, William J.; Villas-Boas, Jose M. [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), MG (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica

    2012-07-01

    Full text: One of the basic requirement for quantum information processing systems is the ability to completely control the state of a single qubit. This imply in know all sources of decoherence and elaborate ways to avoid them. In recent work, A. Laucht et al. [1] presented detailed theoretical and experimental investigations of electrically tunable single quantum dot (QD) - photonic crystal (PhC) nanocavity systems operating in the strong coupling regime of the light matter interaction. Unlike previous studies, where the exciton-cavity spectral detuning was varied by changing the lattice temperature, or by the adsorption of inert gases at low temperatures, they employ the quantum confined Stark-effect to electro-optically control the exciton-cavity detuning. The new built device enabled them to systematically probe the emission spectrum of the strongly coupled system as a function of external control parameters, as for example the incoherent excitation power density or the lattice temperature. Those studies reveal for the first time insights in dephasing mechanisms of 0D exciton polaritons [1]. In another study [2], using a similar device, they investigate the coupling between two different QDs with a single cavity mode. In both works, incoherent pumping was used, but for quantum information, coherent and controlled excitations are necessary. Here, we theoretically investigate the dynamics a single quantum dot inside a cavity under coherent pulse excitation and explore a wide range of parameters, as for example, the exciton-cavity detunings, the excitation power, the spontaneous decay, and pure dephasing. We use density matrix formalism in the Lindblad form, and we solve it numerically. Our results show that coherent excitation can be used to probe strong coupling between exciton and cavity mode by monitoring the exciton Rabi oscillation as function of the cavity detuning. This can give new insights for future experimental measurement focusing on quantum

  5. Nanobeam photonic crystal cavity quantum dot laser

    CERN Document Server

    Gong, Yiyang; Shambat, Gary; Sarmiento, Tomas; Harris, James S; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    The lasing behavior of one dimensional GaAs nanobeam cavities with embedded InAs quantum dots is studied at room temperature. Lasing is observed throughout the quantum dot PL spectrum, and the wavelength dependence of the threshold is calculated. We study the cavity lasers under both 780 nm and 980 nm pump, finding thresholds as low as 0.3 uW and 19 uW for the two pump wavelengths, respectively. Finally, the nanobeam cavity laser wavelengths are tuned by up to 7 nm by employing a fiber taper in near proximity to the cavities. The fiber taper is used both to efficiently pump the cavity and collect the cavity emission.

  6. [Trichomonosomycosis of the oral cavity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurnatowska, A J; Kurnatowski, P

    1999-01-01

    Protozoa and fungi of the oral cavity, although frequently occuring and connected with considerable clinical adverse effects, are as yet insufficiently known. The aims of the study were to estimate the prevalence of common invasions of Trichomonas tenax and fungi, to associate the symptoms with the diagnosis of trichomonosis complicated by mycosis and to determine trichomonacidal properties of ornidazole, tinidazole and metronidazole. 936 dentist patients with different diagnoses were included into the study. The collected material consisted of rinsings, with simultaneous application of selective media, different for protozoa and for fungi 6ultures. Among the examined patients T. tenax was found in 90 cases including 85 cases where it occurred together with fungi (11 species), on the basis of which the diagnosis of trichomonosomycosis of the oral cavity was established. It was the most often in patients with leukoplakia and Lichen Wilsoni. We received a statistically significant association (0.001 tenax with fungi and xerostomia, burning sensation, periodontal pockets and denuded teeth. Trichomonas tenax was not found in any patiem with caries and with aphthe recidivans.

  7. Rationale for designing cavity preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laswell, H R; Welk, D A

    1985-04-01

    Increased resistance to caries, increased dental awareness, superior diagnostic capabilities, better illumination, optical aids that significantly enhance vision, improved and standardized materials for restoration, and a deeper understanding of the caries process enable a far more conservative approach to tooth preparation. The dentist can concentrate on preserving as much sound tooth structure as possible with less attention being devoted to resistance and retention form that previously demanded in bulk restorations and massive channels and locks that are no longer appropriate. Although caries inhibitory effects have been shown with materials such as silicate cement, glass ionomers, and resins that leach fluoride, in general, dentists should not rely on restorative materials to inhibit the development of future decay. Characteristics of the carious lesion are unique for each tooth according to many factors centering around the plaque pattern for that tooth and not according to zones of natural susceptibility or immunity strictly dictated by morphology. Therefore, no single cavity preparation duplicated from a textbook is likely to be satisfactory for an individual tooth. Furthermore, novices learning the subject of cavity preparation often leave decalcified enamel when they attempt to replicate under clinical conditions that which they have learned in technique courses. This is the major invitation to future caries reappearing adjacent to restorations. Also, failure to duplicate the exact morphology of the tooth surface that has been replaced is likely to alter the pattern of plaque accumulation and create other caries prone areas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Ray splitting in paraxial optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Puentes, G; Woerdman, J P

    2003-01-01

    We present a numerical investigation of the ray dynamics in a paraxial optical cavity when a ray splitting mechanism is present. The cavity is a conventional two-mirror stable resonator and the ray splitting is achieved by inserting an optical beam splitter perpendicular to the cavity axis. We show that depending on the position of the beam splitter the optical resonator can become unstable and the ray dynamics displays a positive Lyapunov exponent.

  9. Tunable Cavity Optomechanics with Ultracold Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Purdy, T P; Botter, T; Brahms, N; Ma, Z -Y; Stamper-Kurn, D M

    2010-01-01

    We present an atom-chip-based realization of quantum cavity optomechanics with cold atoms localized within a Fabry-Perot cavity. Effective sub-wavelength positioning of the atomic ensemble allows for tuning the linear and quadratic optomechanical coupling parameters, varying the sensitivity to the displacement and strain of a compressible gaseous cantilever. We observe effects of such tuning on cavity optical nonlinearity and optomechanical frequency shifts, providing their first characterization in the quadratic-coupling regime.

  10. Cavity QED-based quantum walk

    Science.gov (United States)

    di, Tiegang; Hillery, Mark; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2004-09-01

    We discuss a possible experimental scheme for the implementation of a quantum walk. The scheme is based on the passage of an atom inside a high- Q cavity. The chirality is characterized by the atomic states and the displacement is characterized by the photon number inside the cavity. The quantum steps are described by appropriate interactions with a sequence of classical and quantized cavity fields.

  11. Continuously tunable, split-cavity gyrotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, G. F.; Gross, M.

    1985-12-01

    Attention is given to a gyrotron cavity configuration which is split in halves longitudinally, to allow any frequency lying between the fixed cavity resonance to be assessed by mechanically changing the separation of the two halves. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate that the rate-of-change in resonant frequency with separation is greatest if the minor axis of the cavity cross section is the one undergoing change. Excellent agreement with theory is noted for these results.

  12. Dither Cavity Length Controller with Iodine Locking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawson Marty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A cavity length controller for a seeded Q-switched frequency doubled Nd:YAG laser is constructed. The cavity length controller uses a piezo-mirror dither voltage to find the optimum length for the seeded cavity. The piezo-mirror dither also dithers the optical frequency of the output pulse. [1]. This dither in optical frequency is then used to lock to an Iodine absorption line.

  13. [Profile of patients with anophthalmic cavity: study at Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu - UNESP].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narikawa, Silvia; Natsuaki, Kryscia Leiko; Fruet, Juliana; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Schellini, Silvana Artioli

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate the profile of anophthalmic cavity carriers and patients' evolution with the employed treatments. Retrospective study carried out at Faculdade de Medicina de Botucatu, to evaluate the profile and the evolution of patients with anophthalmic cavity treated in our service. Data were evaluated according to the frequency of occurrence and analysis of association. Anophthalmic cavity was more frequently observed in young males, workers in activities carried on with their hands. Trauma and phthisis bulbi were the most frequent causes, with differences according to age and gender. The complications were high (57.1% of cases), the majority occurred belatedly. Trauma is still an important cause of loss of the eye. The complications during the follow-up of the patient are frequent, occurring in general, very late, which reinforces the need for periodic and prolonged monitoring of patients with anophthalmic cavity.

  14. External-cavity solid-state organic lasers: Design rules and application perspectives (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chénais, Sébastien; Gallinelli, Thomas; Mhibik, Oussama; Blanchard, Cédric; Forget, Sébastien

    2016-09-01

    Among various laser architectures currently used to make lasers out of organic materials (distributed feedback lasers or organic vertical cavity surface-emitting lasers, ....), vertical EXTERNAL cavities have several distinctive features that enable making lasers with a high brightness, resulting from a combination of high efficiency and good beam quality, and also offer a superior flexibility to monitor the laser spectrum. In this talk I will highlight a few recent results on external-cavity organic lasers and reveal their potential through the example of a single mode organic laser device with an ultranarrow linewidth (art). From the material point of view, I will also show how ink-jet printing can be successfully used in vertical external-cavity organic lasers to make thick and optical-quality films that have the potential to be easily produced with a high throughput.

  15. Design of the ILC Crab Cavity System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adolphsen, C.; Beard, C.; Bellantoni, L.; Burt, G.; Carter, R.; Chase, B.; Church, M.; Dexter, A.; Dykes, M.; Edwards, H.; Goudket, P; Jenkins, R.; Jones, R.M.; Kalinin,; Khabiboulline, T.; Ko, K.; Latina, A.; Li, Z.; Ma, L.; McIntosh, P.; Ng, C.; /SLAC /Daresbury /Fermilab /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /CERN

    2007-08-15

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) has a 14 mrad crossing angle in order to aid extraction of spent bunches. As a result of the bunch shape at the interaction point, this crossing angle at the collision causes a large luminosity loss which can be recovered by rotating the bunches prior to collision using a crab cavity. The ILC baseline crab cavity is a 9-cell superconducting dipole cavity operating at a frequency of 3.9 GHz. In this paper the design of the ILC crab cavity and its phase control system, as selected for the RDR in February 2007 is described in fuller detail.

  16. Novel Geometries for the LHC CRAB Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hall, Ben

    2010-01-01

    In 2017 the LHC is envisioned to increase its luminosity via an upgrade. This upgrade is likely to require a large crossing angle hence a crab cavity is required to align the bunches prior to collision. There are two possible schemes for crab cavity implementation, global and local. In a global crab cavity the crab cavity is far from the IP and the bunch rotates back and forward as it traverses around the accelerator in a closed orbit. For this scheme a two-cell elliptical squashed cavity at 800 MHz is preferred. To avoid any potential beam instabilities all the parasitic modes of the cavities must be damped strongly, however crab cavities have lower order and same order modes in addition to the usual higher order modes and hence a novel damping scheme must be used to provide sufficient damping of these modes. In the local scheme two crab cavities are placed at each side of the IP two start and stop rotation of the bunches. This would require crab cavities much smaller transversely than in the global scheme b...

  17. Cavity quantum electrodynamics: coherence in context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mabuchi, H; Doherty, A C

    2002-11-15

    Modern cavity quantum electrodynamics (cavity QED) illuminates the most fundamental aspects of coherence and decoherence in quantum mechanics. Experiments on atoms in cavities can be described by elementary models but reveal intriguing subtleties of the interplay of coherent dynamics with external couplings. Recent activity in this area has pioneered powerful new approaches to the study of quantum coherence and has fueled the growth of quantum information science. In years to come, the purview of cavity QED will continue to grow as researchers build on a rich infrastructure to attack some of the most pressing open questions in micro- and mesoscopic physics.

  18. State of the Art SRF Cavity Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Lilje, L

    2004-01-01

    The paper will review superconducting RF cavity performance for β=1 cavities used in both linear and circular accelerators. These superconducting cavities are used in two kinds of applications: High current storage rings and efficient high duty cycle linacs. In recent years the performance of those cavities has been improving steadily. High accelerating gradients have been achieved using advanced surface preparation techniques like electropolishing and surface cleaning methods like high pressure water rinsing. High intensity beams can be handled with advanced higher-order-mode damping schemes.

  19. Engineering topological materials in microwave cavity arrays

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Brandon M; Owens, Clai; Schuster, David I; Simon, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    We present a scalable architecture for the exploration of interacting topological phases of photons in arrays of microwave cavities, using established techniques from cavity and circuit quantum electrodynamics. A time-reversal symmetry breaking (non-reciprocal) flux is induced by coupling the microwave cavities to ferrites, allowing for the production of a variety of topological band structures including the $\\alpha=1/4$ Hofstadter model. Effective photon-photon interactions are included by coupling the cavities to superconducting qubits, and are sufficient to produce a $\

  20. Mechanical Properties of Ingot Nb Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciovati, Gianluigi; Dhakal, Pashupati; Kneisel, Peter; Mammosser, John; Matalevich, Joseph; Rao Myneni, Ganapati

    2014-07-01

    This contribution presents the results of measurements of the resonant frequency and of strain along the contour of a single-cell cavity made of ingot Nb subjected to increasing uniform differential pressure, up to 6 atm. The data were used to infer mechanical properties of this material after cavity fabrication, by comparison with the results from simulation calculations done with ANSYS. The objective is to provide useful information about the mechanical properties of ingot Nb cavities which can be used in the design phase of SRF cavities intended to be built with this material.

  1. Comparison of coherently coupled multi-cavity and quantum dot embedded single cavity systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaman, Serdar; Sayan, Gönül Turhan

    2016-12-12

    Temporal group delays originating from the optical analogue to electromagnetically induced transparency (EIT) are compared in two systems. Similar transmission characteristics are observed between a coherently coupled high-Q multi-cavity array and a single quantum dot (QD) embedded cavity in the weak coupling regime. However, theoretically generated group delay values for the multi-cavity case are around two times higher. Both configurations allow direct scalability for chip-scale optical pulse trapping and coupled-cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED).

  2. Cancer Salivary Biomarkers for Tumours Distant to the Oral Cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Óscar Rapado-González

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of saliva as a diagnostic approach for systemic diseases was proposed just two decades ago, but recently great interest in the field has emerged because of its revolutionary potential as a liquid biopsy and its usefulness as a non-invasive sampling method. Multiple molecules isolated in saliva have been proposed as cancer biomarkers for diagnosis, prognosis, drug monitoring and pharmacogenetic studies. In this review, we focus on the current status of the salivary diagnostic biomarkers for different cancers distant to the oral cavity, noting their potential use in the clinic and their applicability in personalising cancer therapies.

  3. Hydrodynamic Drag on Streamlined Projectiles and Cavities

    KAUST Repository

    Jetly, Aditya

    2016-04-19

    The air cavity formation resulting from the water-entry of solid objects has been the subject of extensive research due to its application in various fields such as biology, marine vehicles, sports and oil and gas industries. Recently we demonstrated that at certain conditions following the closing of the air cavity formed by the initial impact of a superhydrophobic sphere on a free water surface a stable streamlined shape air cavity can remain attached to the sphere. The formation of superhydrophobic sphere and attached air cavity reaches a steady state during the free fall. In this thesis we further explore this novel phenomenon to quantify the drag on streamlined shape cavities. The drag on the sphere-cavity formation is then compared with the drag on solid projectile which were designed to have self-similar shape to that of the cavity. The solid projectiles of adjustable weight were produced using 3D printing technique. In a set of experiments on the free fall of projectile we determined the variation of projectiles drag coefficient as a function of the projectiles length to diameter ratio and the projectiles specific weight, covering a range of intermediate Reynolds number, Re ~ 104 – 105 which are characteristic for our streamlined cavity experiments. Parallel free fall experiment with sphere attached streamlined air cavity and projectile of the same shape and effective weight clearly demonstrated the drag reduction effect due to the stress-free boundary condition at cavity liquid interface. The streamlined cavity experiments can be used as the upper bound estimate of the drag reduction by air layers naturally sustained on superhydrophobic surfaces in contact with water. In the final part of the thesis we design an experiment to test the drag reduction capacity of robust superhydrophobic coatings deposited on the surface of various model vessels.

  4. Slow plasmons in grating cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydinli, Atilla; Karademir, Ertugrul; Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Coskun

    2016-03-01

    Recent research on surface plasmon polaritons and their applications have brought forward a wealth of information and continues to be of interest to many. In this report, we concentrate on propagating surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and their interaction with matter. Using grating based metallic structures, it is possible to control the electrodynamics of propagating SPPs. Biharmonic gratings loaded with periodic Si stripes allow excitation of SPPs that are localized inside the band gap with grating coupling. The cavity state is formed due to periodic effective index modulation obtained by one harmonic of the grating and loaded Si stripes. More complicated grating structures such as metallic Moiré surfaces have also been shown to form a localized state inside the band gap when excited with Kretschmann configuration.

  5. Leaky Modes of Dielectric Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Mansuripur, Masud; Jakobsen, Per

    2016-01-01

    In the absence of external excitation, light trapped within a dielectric medium generally decays by leaking out (and also by getting absorbed within the medium). We analyze the leaky modes of a parallel-plate slab, a solid glass sphere, and a solid glass cylinder, by examining those solutions of Maxwell's equations (for dispersive as well as non-dispersive media) which admit of a complex-valued oscillation frequency. Under certain circumstances, these leaky modes constitute a complete set into which an arbitrary distribution of the electromagnetic field residing inside a dielectric body can be expanded. We provide completeness proofs, and also present results of numerical calculations that illustrate the relationship between the leaky modes and the resonances of dielectric cavities formed by a simple parallel-plate slab, a glass sphere, and a glass cylinder.

  6. Primary leiomyosarcoma of peritoneal cavity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyotsna Naresh Bharti

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Leiomyosarcomas of soft tissue are the rare tumors and the retroperitoneum is the most common site involved. We report a case of primary leiomyosarcoma of the peritoneal cavity which clinically presented with suprapubic, freely mobile, nontender mass which measured 10×10 cm in size. Contrast enhanced computed tomography revealed well defined heterogenous hypodense solid cystic mass. The mass was surgically excised out in its entirety. The histopathological examination revealed spindle cells arranged in alternating fascicles having pleomorphic nuclei, indistinct margin and eosinophilic cytoplasm with foci of haemorrhage, necrosis and 5-6 mitosis/HPF. The spindle cells were immunoreactive for smooth muscle actin, desmin and negative for S-100, CD-34 and c-kit. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were helpful in making the final confirmatory diagnosis. Leiomyosarcomas are aggressive tumors, with poor prognosis and often difficult to treat. The survival rates are lowest among all soft tissue sarcomas.

  7. A scheme for implementing quantum game in cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CaoShuai; Fang Mao-Fa; Liu Jian-Bin; Wang Xin-Wen; Zheng Xiao-juan

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a scheme fot implementing quantum game (QG) in cavity quantum electrodynam-ics(QED). In the scheme, the cavity is only virtually excited and thus the proposal is insensitive to the cavity fields states and cavity decay. So our proposal can be experimentally realized in the range of current cavity QED techniques.

  8. Scheme for Implementation of Quantum Game in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Li-Chun; CAO Shu-Ai; WU Yue-Qin; FANG Mao-Fa; LI Huai-Fan; ZHENG Xiao-Juan; ZHAO Ren; WANG Xin-Wen; LI Ze-Hua

    2008-01-01

    We propose an experimentally feasible scheme to implement two-player quantum game in cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). During the process, the cavity is only virtually excited, thus our scheme is insensitive to the cavity field states and cavity decay. The scheme can be realized in the range of current cavity QED techniques.

  9. Temperature stabilization of optofluidic photonic crystal cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kamutsch, Christian; Smith, Cameron L.C.; Graham, Alexandra;

    2009-01-01

    We present a principle for the temperature stabilization of photonic crystal (PhC) cavities based on optofluidics. We introduce an analytic method enabling a specific mode of a cavity to be made wavelength insensitive to changes in ambient temperature. Using this analysis, we experimentally demon...

  10. Coupled-cavity traveling-wave tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, D. J.; Omalley, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    Computer program is developed for analysis of coupled cavity traveling waves tubes (TWT's) which are used in variety of radar and communications applications. Programmers can simulate tubes of arbitrary complexity such as input and output couplers and other features peculiar to one or few cavities which may be modeled by correct choices of input data.

  11. Large grain cavities from pure niobium ingot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Yorktown, VA; Kneisel, Peter [Williamsburg, VA; Cameiro, Tadeu [McMurray, PA

    2012-03-06

    Niobium cavities are fabricated by the drawing and ironing of as cast niobium ingot slices rather than from cold rolled niobium sheet. This method results in the production of niobium cavities having a minimum of grain boundaries at a significantly reduced cost as compared to the production of such structures from cold rolled sheet.

  12. Geometric Model of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Gibson, S. E.; Ratawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; hide

    2010-01-01

    We observed a coronal cavity from August 8-18 2007 during a multi-instrument observing campaign organized under the auspices of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Here we present initial efforts to model the cavity with a geometrical streamer-cavity model. The model is based the white-light streamer mode] of Gibson et a]. (2003 ), which has been enhanced by the addition of a cavity and the capability to model EUV and X-ray emission. The cavity is modeled with an elliptical cross-section and Gaussian fall-off in length and width inside the streamer. Density and temperature can be varied in the streamer and cavity and constrained via comparison with data. Although this model is purely morphological, it allows for three-dimensional, multi-temperature analysis and characterization of the data, which can then provide constraints for future physical modeling. Initial comparisons to STEREO/EUVI images of the cavity and streamer show that the model can provide a good fit to the data. This work is part of the effort of the International Space Science Institute International Team on Prominence Cavities

  13. Dissipative preparation of entanglement in optical cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kastoryano, Michael James; Reiter, Florentin; Sørensen, Anders Søndberg

    2011-01-01

    We propose a novel scheme for the preparation of a maximally entangled state of two atoms in an optical cavity. Starting from an arbitrary initial state, a singlet state is prepared as the unique fixed point of a dissipative quantum dynamical process. In our scheme, cavity decay is no longer...... as compared to preparation protocols based on coherent unitary dynamics...

  14. Continuous optical discharge in a laser cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chivel', Yu. A.

    2016-08-01

    Optical discharge in a laser cavity is experimentally studied. A significant increase in the absorption of laser radiation (up to total absorption) is revealed. Optical schemes for initiation and maintaining of optical discharge in the cavity are proposed for technological applications of the optical discharge.

  15. Collapsing cavities in reactive and nonreactive media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, Neil K.; Field, John E.

    1991-04-01

    This paper presents results of a high-speed photographic study of cavities collapsed asymmetrically by shocks of strengths in the range 0.26 GPa to 3.5 GPa. Two-dimensional collapses of cavity configurations punched into a 12% by weight gelatine in water sheet, and an ammonium nitrate/sodium nitrate (AN/SN) emulsion explosive were photographed using schlieren optics. The single cavity collapses were characterized by the velocity of the liquid jet formed by the upstream wall as it was accelerated by the shock and by the time taken for the cavity to collapse. The shock pressure did not qualitatively affect the collapse behaviour but jet velocities were found to exceed incident shock velocities at higher pressures. The more violent collapses induced light emission from the compressed gas in the cavity. When an array of cavities collapsed, a wave, characterized by the particle velocity in the medium, the cavity diameter and the inter-cavity spacing, was found to run through the array. When such an array was created within an emulsion explosive, ignition of the reactive matrix occurred ahead of the collapse wave when the incident shock was strong.

  16. Superconducting accelerating four-cell cavity

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    A close view of the four-cell cavity. This was a prototype designed for LEP2 (LEP1 had warm copper cavities as accelerating elements). The first successful tests were made in December 1980 - reaching a Q = 10^6. (see photo 8012650X)

  17. The ADMX Microwave Cavity: Present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollett, Nathan; ADMX Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The Axion Dark Matter eXperiment (ADMX), a direct-detection axion search, uses a tunable resonant cavity to enhance axion to photon conversion rates to a detectable level when the cavity resonance matches the mass of the axion. It has successfully taken data in the 460 - 890 MHz frequency range and is now probing a similar range with much higher sensitivity. However the axion mass is unknown and may be at higher frequencies than the currently operating system. In anticipation of future runs with an increased mass range, ADMX is conducting extensive research and development of microwave cavities. These developments include photonic band-gap cavities, multi-vane cavities, partitioned cavities, in-phase coupled cavities, and superconducting hybrid cavities. Many of these projects are in different stages between simulations and testing of physical prototypes. The status and current objectives of these projects will be presented. Supported by DOE Grants DE-SC0010280, DE-FG02-96ER40956, DE-AC52-07NA27344, DE-AC03-76SF00098, the Heising-Simons Foundation and the LLNL, FNAL and PNNL LDRD program.

  18. Geometric Model of a Coronal Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kucera, Therese A.; Gibson, S. E.; Ratawicki, D.; Dove, J.; deToma, G.; Hao, J.; Hudson, H. S.; Marque, C.; McIntosh, P. S.; Reeves, K. K.; Schmidt, D. J.; Sterling, A. C.; Tripathi, D. K.; Williams, D. R.; Zhang, M.

    2010-01-01

    We observed a coronal cavity from August 8-18 2007 during a multi-instrument observing campaign organized under the auspices of the International Heliophysical Year (IHY). Here we present initial efforts to model the cavity with a geometrical streamer-cavity model. The model is based the white-light streamer mode] of Gibson et a]. (2003 ), which has been enhanced by the addition of a cavity and the capability to model EUV and X-ray emission. The cavity is modeled with an elliptical cross-section and Gaussian fall-off in length and width inside the streamer. Density and temperature can be varied in the streamer and cavity and constrained via comparison with data. Although this model is purely morphological, it allows for three-dimensional, multi-temperature analysis and characterization of the data, which can then provide constraints for future physical modeling. Initial comparisons to STEREO/EUVI images of the cavity and streamer show that the model can provide a good fit to the data. This work is part of the effort of the International Space Science Institute International Team on Prominence Cavities

  19. A spherical cavity in an Einstein universe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kofinti, N.K.

    1980-03-01

    Suitable metric forms for the regions and a outside a sperical cavity in an Einstein universe are derived by means of perturbation. It is shown that for low proper pressure, the cavity behaves like ''negative'' Schwarzchild mass. Finally, the possibility of carrying over to the exact theory a proposed definition of the gravitational field in a matter is examined.

  20. Cavity-enhanced absorption for optical refrigeration

    CERN Document Server

    Seletskiy, Denis V; Sheik-Bahae, Mansoor

    2009-01-01

    A 20-fold increase over the single path optical absorption is demonstrated with a low loss medium placed in a resonant cavity. This has been applied to laser cooling of Yb:ZBLAN glass resulting in 90% absorption of the incident pump light. A coupled-cavity scheme to achieve active optical impedance matching is analyzed.

  1. Prototype storage cavity for LEP accelerating RF

    CERN Multimedia

    1980-01-01

    The principle of an RF storage cavity was demonstrated with this prototype, working at 500 MHz. The final storage cavities were larger, to suit the LEP accelerating frequency of 352.2 MHz. Cu-tubes for watercooling are brazed onto the upper half, the lower half is to follow. See also 8006061, 8109346, 8407619X, and Annual Report 1980, p.115.

  2. Subglacial Silicic Eruptions: Wet Cavities and Moist Cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevenson, J. A.; McGarvie, D. W.; Gilbert, J. S.; Smellie, J. L.

    2007-05-01

    ice produces water, however in the Kerlingarfjöll eruption (which is thought to have been relatively brief and the vesicular magma is likely to have contained less heat per unit volume) the volumes were small and the subglacial cavity could be appropriately described as 'moist'. The Prestahnúkur eruption occurred in a 'wet' cavity but 'lacustrine' conditions were never developed and the ice was always close to the edifice. Poor sorting and structure in the subglacial deposits are due to a lack of time and space for sorting to occur. In contrast to more mafic eruptions, which are characterised by very strong meltwater-ice interactions, the main influence of the ice during subglacial rhyolite eruptions is reflected in the confinement of eruptive products.

  3. High Resolution Cavity BPM for ILC Final Focal System (IP-BPM)

    CERN Document Server

    Nakamura, Tomoya; Inoue, Yoichi; Tauchi, Toshiaki; Urakawa, Junji; Sanuki, Tomoyuki; Komamiya, Sachio

    2007-01-01

    IP-BPM (Interaction Point Beam Position Monitor) is an ultra high resolution cavity BPM to be used at ATF2, a test facility for ILC final focus system. Control of beam position in 2 nm precision is required for ATF2. Beam tests at ATF extraction line proved a 8.7 nm position resolution.

  4. Lable-free Enzyme Sensing with a Si3N4 Grated Waveguide Optical Cavity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, S.V.; Dijkstra, M.; Hollink, A.J.F.; Kauppinen, L.J.; Ridder, de R.M.; Hoekstra, H.J.W.M.

    2011-01-01

    We report the label-free, sensitive detection of PepN enzyme using a Si3N4 grated waveguide optical cavity covered with an immobilized, selective (antibody) receptor layer. The receptor-enzyme reaction was monitored in real-time.

  5. Niobium Cavity Electropolishing Modelling and Optimisation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, L M A; Forel, S; Shirra, J A

    2013-01-01

    It’s widely accepted that electropolishing (EP) is the most suitable surface finishing process to achieve high performance bulk Nb accelerating cavities. At CERN and in preparation for the processing of the 704 MHz high-beta Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) cavities a new vertical electropolishing facility has been assembled and a study is on-going for the modelling of electropolishing on cavities with COMSOL® software. In a first phase, the electrochemical parameters were taken into account for a fixed process temperature and flow rate, and are presented in this poster as well as the results obtained on a real SPL single cell cavity. The procedure to acquire the data used as input for the simulation is presented. The modelling procedure adopted to optimise the cathode geometry, aimed at a uniform current density distribution in the cavity cell for the minimum working potential and total current is explained. Some preliminary results on fluid dynamics is also briefly described.

  6. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Huan

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical motion of photonic devices driven by optical forces provides a profound means of coupling between optical fields. The current focus of these optomechanical effects has been on cavity optomechanics systems in which co-localized optical and mechanical modes interact strongly to enable wave-mixing between photons and phonons and backaction cooling of mechanical modes. Alternatively, extended mechanical modes can also induce strong nonlocal effects on propagating optical fields or multiple localized optical modes at distances. Here, we demonstrate a novel multi-cavity optomechanical device: a "photon see-saw", in which torsional optomechanical motion can shuttle photons between two photonic crystal nanocavities. The resonance frequencies of the two cavities, one on each side of the see-saw, are modulated anti-symmetrically by the device's rotation. Pumping photons into one cavity excites optomechanical self-oscillation which strongly modulates the inter-cavity coupling and shuttles photons to the other...

  7. Optomechanical photon shuttling between photonic cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huan; Li, Mo

    2014-11-01

    Mechanical motion of photonic devices driven by optical forces provides a profound means of coupling between optical fields. The current focus of these optomechanical effects has been on cavity optomechanics systems in which co-localized optical and mechanical modes interact strongly to enable wave mixing between photons and phonons, and backaction cooling of mechanical modes. Alternatively, extended mechanical modes can also induce strong non-local effects on propagating optical fields or multiple localized optical modes at distances. Here, we demonstrate a multicavity optomechanical device in which torsional optomechanical motion can shuttle photons between two photonic crystal nanocavities. The resonance frequencies of the two cavities, one on each side of this 'photon see-saw', are modulated antisymmetrically by the device's rotation. Pumping photons into one cavity excites optomechanical self-oscillation, which strongly modulates the inter-cavity coupling and shuttles photons to the other empty cavity during every oscillation cycle in a well-regulated fashion.

  8. Proven procedures guide cavity VCO design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrak, F.

    1981-05-01

    The design of a high performance voltage-tuned cavity oscillator is discussed. The circuit is to be modeled with an equivalent inductance and capacitance. Close attention is to be given to the influence of cavity loading. Center frequency and impedance are computed on the basis of the model's L and C values. The last step is particularly important, since the size of a cavity-based oscillator, such as the Gunn/varactor version is directly related to operating frequency. Attention is given to the parallel L-C circuit representing the cavity, parameter relations concerning the height, higher-order TE modes, and effects of post inductance. The basic oscillator consists of a hollow cavity with metal walls, and diodes mounted on posts.

  9. Coupled Resonator Vertical Cavity Laser Diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquette, K.D.; Chow, W.W.; Fischer, A.J.; Allerman, A.A.; Hou, H.Q.; Geib, K.M.

    1999-07-22

    For many applications, the device performance of edge emitting semiconductor lasers can be significantly improved through the use of multiple section devices. For example, cleaved coupled cavity (C3) lasers have been shown to provide single mode operation, wavelength tuning, high speed switching, as well as the generation of short pulses via mode-locking and Q-switching [1]. Using composite resonators within a vertical cavity laser opens up new possibilities due to the unique ability to tailor the coupling between the monolithic cavities, incorporate passive or active resonators which are spectrally degenerate or detuned, and to fabricate these devices in 2-dimensional arrays. Composite resonator vertical cavity lasers (CRVCL) have been examined using optical pumping and electrical injection [2-5]. We report on CRVCL diodes and show that efficient modulation of the laser emission can be achieved by either forward or reverse biasing the passive cavity within a CRVCL.

  10. Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmsen, Carl W.; Temkin, Henryk; Coldren, Larry A.

    2002-01-01

    1. Introduction to VCSELs L. A. Coldren, C. W. Wilmsen and H. Temkin; 2. Fundamental issues in VCSEL design L. A. Coldren and Eric R. Hegblom; 3. Enhancement of spontaneous emission in microcavities E. F. Schubert and N. E. J. Hunt; 4. Epitaxy of vertical-cavity lasers R. P. Schneider Jr and Y. H. Young; 5. Fabrication and performance of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers Kent D. Choquette and Kent Geib; 6. Polarization related properties of vertical cavity lasers Dmitri Kuksenkov and Henryk Temkin; 7. Visible light emitting vertical cavity lasers Robert L. Thornton; 8. Long-wavelength vertical-cavity lasers Dubrakovo I. Babic, Joachim Piprek and John E. Bowers; 9. Overview of VCSEL applications Richard C. Williamson; 10. Optical interconnection applications and required characteristics Kenichi Kasahara; 11. VCSEL-based fiber-optic data communications Kenneth Hahn and Kirk Giboney; 12. VCSEL-based smart pixels for free space optoelectronic processing C. W. Wilmsen.

  11. A gas jet impacting a cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiffler, A. Kent; Bakhsh, Hazoor

    1986-11-01

    A subsonic jet impinging upon a cavity is studied to explain the resultant heating phenomenon. Flow visualization within the cavity shows a large central vortex dominating the flow pattern. Velocity measurements inside the cavity are made using a hot-wire anemometer. Temperature is measured with a copper-constantan thermocouple. The velocity field within the cavity is described by a modified Rankine combined vortex. An uncommon form of the energy equation is used to account for turbulent heating in adverse pressure gradients. A theoretical solution is developed to model the temperature field in the cavity. There is a good agreement between the calculated and measured temperatures. The heating effect is related to Ranque-Hilsch tubes.

  12. Performance of 3-cell Seamless Niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kneisel, Peter K. [JLAB; Ciovati, Gianluigi [JLBA; Jelezov, I. [DESY, Hamburg; Singer, W. [DESY, Hamburg; Singer, X. [DESY, Hamburg

    2009-11-01

    In the last several months we have surface treated and cryogenically tested three TESLA-type 3-cell cavities, which had been manufactured at DESY as seamless assemblies by hydroforming. The cavities were completed at JLab with beam tube/flange assemblies. All three cavities performed very well after they had been post-purified with titanium at 1250C for 3 hrs. The cavities, two of which consisted of an end cell and 2 center cells and one was a center cell assembly, achieved gradients of Eacc = 32 MV/m, 34 MV/m and 35 MV/m without quenches. The performance was limited by the appearance of the “Q-drop” in the absence of field emission. This contribution reports about the various measurements undertaken with these cavities.

  13. Cavity cooling below the recoil limit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolke, Matthias; Klinner, Julian; Keßler, Hans; Hemmerich, Andreas

    2012-07-06

    Conventional laser cooling relies on repeated electronic excitations by near-resonant light, which constrains its area of application to a selected number of atomic species prepared at moderate particle densities. Optical cavities with sufficiently large Purcell factors allow for laser cooling schemes, avoiding these limitations. Here, we report on an atom-cavity system, combining a Purcell factor above 40 with a cavity bandwidth below the recoil frequency associated with the kinetic energy transfer in a single photon scattering event. This lets us access a yet-unexplored regime of atom-cavity interactions, in which the atomic motion can be manipulated by targeted dissipation with sub-recoil resolution. We demonstrate cavity-induced heating of a Bose-Einstein condensate and subsequent cooling at particle densities and temperatures incompatible with conventional laser cooling.

  14. Air flow in a collapsing cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, Ivo R; Lohse, Detlef; van der Meer, Devaraj

    2013-01-01

    We experimentally study the airflow in a collapsing cavity created by the impact of a circular disk on a water surface. We measure the air velocity in the collapsing neck in two ways: Directly, by means of employing particle image velocimetry of smoke injected into the cavity and indirectly, by determining the time rate of change of the volume of the cavity at pinch-off and deducing the air flow in the neck under the assumption that the air is incompressible. We compare our experiments to boundary integral simulations and show that close to the moment of pinch-off, compressibility of the air starts to play a crucial role in the behavior of the cavity. Finally, we measure how the air flow rate at pinch-off depends on the Froude number and explain the observed dependence using a theoretical model of the cavity collapse.

  15. Vertical external cavity surface emitting semiconductor lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Holm, M

    2001-01-01

    Active stabilisation showed a relative locked linewidth of approx 3 kHz. Coarse tuning over 7 nm was achieved using a 3-plate birefingent filter plate while fine-tuning using cavity length change allowed tuning over 250 MHz. Vertical external cavity semiconductor lasers have emerged as an interesting technology based on current vertical cavity semiconductor laser knowledge. High power output into a single transverse mode has attracted companies requiring good fibre coupling for telecommunications systems. The structure comprises of a grown semiconductor Bragg reflector topped with a multiple quantum well gain region. This is then included in an external cavity. This device is then optically pumped to promote laser action. Theoretical modelling of AIGaAs based VECSEL structures was undertaken, showing the effect of device design on laser characteristics. A simple 3-mirror cavity was constructed to assess the static characteristics of the structure. Up to 153 mW of output power was achieved in a single transver...

  16. Cavity solitons in vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    CERN Document Server

    Vladimirov, A G; Gurevich, S V; Panajotov, K; Averlant, E; Tlidi, M

    2014-01-01

    We investigate a control of the motion of localized structures of light by means of delay feedback in the transverse section of a broad area nonlinear optical system. The delayed feedback is found to induce a spontaneous motion of a solitary localized structure that is stationary and stable in the absence of feedback. We focus our analysis on an experimentally relevant system namely the Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser (VCSEL). In the absence of the delay feedback we present experimental evidence of stationary localized structures in a 80 $\\mu$m aperture VCSEL. The spontaneous formation of localized structures takes place above the lasing threshold and under optical injection. Then, we consider the effect of the time-delayed optical feedback and investigate analytically the role of the phase of the feedback and the carrier lifetime on the self-mobility properties of the localized structures. We show that these two parameters affect strongly the space time dynamics of two-dimensional localized structures...

  17. Cavity solitons and localized patterns in a finite-size optical cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozyreff, G. [Optique Nonlineaire Theorique, Universite Libre de Bruxelles (U.L.B.), CP 231 (Belgium); Gelens, L. [Applied Physics Research Group (APHY), Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Belgium)

    2011-08-15

    In appropriate ranges of parameters, laser-driven nonlinear optical cavities can support a wide variety of optical patterns, which could be used to carry information. The intensity peaks appearing in these patterns are called cavity solitons and are individually addressable. Using the Lugiato-Lefever equation to model a perfectly homogeneous cavity, we show that cavity solitons can only be located at discrete points and at a minimal distance from the edges. Other localized states which are attached to the edges are identified. By interpreting these patterns in an information coding frame, the information capacity of this dynamical system is evaluated. The results are explained analytically in terms of the the tail characteristics of the cavity solitons. Finally, the influence of boundaries and of cavity imperfections on cavity solitons are compared.

  18. Cavity solitons and localized patterns in a finite-size optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyreff, G.; Gelens, L.

    2011-08-01

    In appropriate ranges of parameters, laser-driven nonlinear optical cavities can support a wide variety of optical patterns, which could be used to carry information. The intensity peaks appearing in these patterns are called cavity solitons and are individually addressable. Using the Lugiato-Lefever equation to model a perfectly homogeneous cavity, we show that cavity solitons can only be located at discrete points and at a minimal distance from the edges. Other localized states which are attached to the edges are identified. By interpreting these patterns in an information coding frame, the information capacity of this dynamical system is evaluated. The results are explained analytically in terms of the the tail characteristics of the cavity solitons. Finally, the influence of boundaries and of cavity imperfections on cavity solitons are compared.

  19. Terahertz gas sensing based on a simple one-dimensional photonic crystal cavity with high-quality factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, T.; Han, Z. H.; Liu, J. J.

    2014-01-01

    exhibits high-quality factors, facilitating the realization of high sensitivity in the gas refractive index sensing. In our experiment, 6% of the change of hydrogen concentration in air, which corresponds to a refractive index change of 1.4 x 10(-5), can be steadily detected, and different gas samples can......We report in this paper terahertz gas sensing using a simple 1D photonic crystal cavity. The resonant frequencies of the cavity depend linearly on the refractive index of the ambient gas, which can then be measured by monitoring the resonance shift. Although quite easy to manufacture, this cavity...

  20. 21 CFR 884.2700 - Intrauterine pressure monitor and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... pressure with a catheter placed transcervically into the uterine cavity. The device is used to monitor intensity, duration, and frequency of uterine contractions during labor. This generic type of device...

  1. Demonstration of superconducting micromachined cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brecht, T., E-mail: teresa.brecht@yale.edu; Reagor, M.; Chu, Y.; Pfaff, W.; Wang, C.; Frunzio, L.; Devoret, M. H.; Schoelkopf, R. J. [Department of Applied Physics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut 06511 (United States)

    2015-11-09

    Superconducting enclosures will be key components of scalable quantum computing devices based on circuit quantum electrodynamics. Within a densely integrated device, they can protect qubits from noise and serve as quantum memory units. Whether constructed by machining bulk pieces of metal or microfabricating wafers, 3D enclosures are typically assembled from two or more parts. The resulting seams potentially dissipate crossing currents and limit performance. In this letter, we present measured quality factors of superconducting cavity resonators of several materials, dimensions, and seam locations. We observe that superconducting indium can be a low-loss RF conductor and form low-loss seams. Leveraging this, we create a superconducting micromachined resonator with indium that has a quality factor of two million, despite a greatly reduced mode volume. Inter-layer coupling to this type of resonator is achieved by an aperture located under a planar transmission line. The described techniques demonstrate a proof-of-principle for multilayer microwave integrated quantum circuits for scalable quantum computing.

  2. LEP superconducting accelerating cavity module

    CERN Multimedia

    With its 27-kilometre circumference, the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider was – and still is – the largest electron-positron accelerator ever built. The excavation of the LEP tunnel was Europe’s largest civil-engineering project prior to the Channel Tunnel. Three tunnel-boring machines started excavating the tunnel in February 1985 and the ring was completed three years later. In its first phase of operation, LEP consisted of 5176 magnets and 128 accelerating cavities. CERN’s accelerator complex provided the particles and four enormous detectors, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, observed the collisions. LEP was commissioned in July 1989 and the first beam circulated in the collider on 14 July. The collider's initial energy was chosen to be around 91 GeV, so that Z bosons could be produced. The Z boson and its charged partner the W boson, both discovered at CERN in 1983, are responsible for the weak force, which drives the Sun, for example. Observing the creation and decay of the short-lived Z boson w...

  3. LHC Crab Cavity Coupler Test Boxes

    CERN Document Server

    Mitchell, James; Burt, Graeme; Calaga, Rama; Macpherson, Alick; Montesinos, Eric; Silva, Subashini; Tutte, Adam; Xiao, Binping

    2016-01-01

    The LHC double quarter wave (DQW) crab cavities have two different types of Higher Order Mode (HOM) couplers in addition to a fundamental power coupler (FPC). The FPC requires conditioning, so to achieve this we have designed a radio-frequency (RF) quarter wave resonator to provide high transmission between two opposing FPCs. For the HOM couplers we must ensure that the stop-band filter is positioned at the cavity frequency and that peak transmission occurs at the same frequencies as the strongest HOMs. We have designed two test boxes which preserve the cavity spectral response in order to test the couplers.

  4. Discrete solitons in coupled active lasing cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Prilepsky, Jaroslaw E; Johansson, Magnus; Derevyanko, Stanislav A

    2012-01-01

    We examine the existence and stability of discrete spatial solitons in coupled nonlinear lasing cavities (waveguide resonators), addressing the case of active media, where the gain exceeds damping in the linear limit. A zoo of stable localized structures is found and classified: these are bright and grey cavity solitons with different symmetry. It is shown that several new types of solitons with a nontrivial intensity distribution pattern can emerge in the coupled cavities due to the stability of a periodic extended state. The latter can be stable even when a bistability of homogenous states is absent.

  5. Piezoelectric Voltage Coupled Reentrant Cavity Resonator

    CERN Document Server

    Carvalho, Natalia C; Floch, Jean-Michel Le; Tobar, Michael Edmund

    2014-01-01

    A piezoelectric voltage coupled microwave reentrant cavity has been developed. The central cavity post is bonded to a piezoelectric actuator allowing the voltage control of small post displacements over a high dynamic range. We show that such a cavity can be implemented as a voltage tunable resonator, a transducer for exciting and measuring mechanical modes of the structure and a transducer for measuring comparative sensitivity of the piezoelectric material. Experiments were conducted at room and cryogenic temperatures with results verified using Finite Element software.

  6. Dispersion of coupled mode-gap cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Lian, Jin; Yüce, Emre; De Rossi, Sylvain Combrié Alfredo; Mosk, Allard P

    2015-01-01

    The dispersion of a CROW made of photonic crystal mode-gap cavities is pronouncedly asymmetric. This asymmetry cannot be explained by the standard tight binding model. We show that the fundamental cause of the asymmetric dispersion is the fact that the cavity mode profile itself is dispersive, i.e., the mode wave function depends on the driving frequency, not the eigenfrequency. This occurs because the photonic crystal cavity resonances do not form a complete set. By taking into account the dispersive mode profile, we formulate a mode coupling model that accurately describes the asymmetric dispersion without introducing any new free parameters.

  7. Beam Test of a High Pressure Cavity for a Muon Collider

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, M.; Jansson, A.; Moretti, A.; Tollestrup, A.; Yonehara, K.; /Fermilab; Kurup, A.; /Imperial Coll., London

    2010-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of a high pressure RF cavity for use in the cooling channel of a muon collider, an experimental setup that utilizes 400-MeV Fermilab linac proton beam has been developed. In this paper, we describe the beam diagnostics and the collimator system for the experiment, and report the initial results of the beam commissioning. The transient response of the cavity to the beam is measured by the electric and magnetic pickup probes, and the beam-gas interaction is monitored by the optical diagnostic system composed of a spectrometer and two PMTs.

  8. Reflective SOA fiber cavity adaptive laser source for measuring dynamic strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Heming; Tao, Chuanyi; Krishnaswamy, Sridhar

    2016-04-01

    Smart sensors based on Optical fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) are suitable for structural health monitoring of dynamic strains in civil, aerospace, and mechanical structures. In these structures, dynamic strains with high frequencies reveal acoustic emissions cracking or impact loading. It is necessary to find a practical tool for monitoring such structural damages. In this work, we explore an intelligent system based on a reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (RSOA)- FBG composed as a fiber cavity for measuring dynamic strain in intelligent structures. The ASE light emitted from a RSOA laser and reflected by a FBG is amplified in the fiber cavity and coupled out by a 90:10 coupler, which is demodulated by a low frequency compensated Michelson interferometer using a proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller and is monitored via a photodetector. As the wavelength of the FBG shifts due to dynamic strain, the wavelength of the optical output from the laser cavity shifts accordingly, which is demodulated by the Michelson Interferometer. Because the RSOA has a quick transition time, the RSOA- FBG fiber cavity shows an ability of high frequency response to the FBG reflective spectrum shift, with frequency response extending to megahertz.

  9. Hydrology of precipitation and groundwater in a plateau area, southward South Carpathians, Mehedinti district, Romania, identified from isotope and climate monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bojar, Ana-Voica; Halas, Stanislaw

    2014-05-01

    permil. The d-excess values are the lowest in the summer/early fall and highest in the winter. Spring distribution with altitude indicate the presence of two aquifers. The hydrogen and oxygen isotopic composition of spring waters plot close to the midpoint of the LMWL. The isotope data indicate that an integration rain- and snowfall is the water source for the springs and drill water. Therefore, spring isotopic composition is controlled by climate, including amounts of precipitation gain and evaporation loss. Less moisture on multiannual to decadal time scale most probably leads to lower water table height and reduced inflow. We are grateful to the Faculty of Earth Sciences and Spatial Managements, Maria Curie-Sklodowska University, Lublin, for free access to PICARRO cavity ring down spectrometer.

  10. Perturbing Open Cavities: Anomalous Resonance Frequency Shifts in a Hybrid Cavity-Nanoantenna System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruesink, Freek; Doeleman, Hugo M.; Hendrikx, Ruud; Koenderink, A. Femius; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-11-01

    The influence of a small perturbation on a cavity mode plays an important role in fields like optical sensing, cavity quantum electrodynamics, and cavity optomechanics. Typically, the resulting cavity frequency shift directly relates to the polarizability of the perturbation. Here, we demonstrate that particles perturbing a radiating cavity can induce strong frequency shifts that are opposite to, and even exceed, the effects based on the particles' polarizability. A full electrodynamic theory reveals that these anomalous results rely on a nontrivial phase relation between cavity and nanoparticle radiation, allowing backaction via the radiation continuum. In addition, an intuitive model based on coupled mode theory is presented that relates the phenomenon to retardation. Because of the ubiquity of dissipation, we expect these findings to benefit the understanding and engineering of a wide class of systems.

  11. Frequency combs for cavity cascades: OPO combs and graphene-coupled cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kevin F.; Kowzan, Grzegorz; Lee, C.-C.; Mohr, C.; Jiang, Jie; Schunemann, Peter G.; Schibli, T. R.; Maslowski, Piotr; Fermann, M. E.

    2017-01-01

    Frequency combs can be used directly, for example as a highly precise spectroscopic light source. They can also be used indirectly, as a bridge between devices whose high precision requirements would normally make them incompatible. Here, we demonstrate two ways that a frequency comb enables new technologies by matching optical cavities. One cavity is the laser oscillator. A second cavity is a low-threshold doubly-resonant optical parametric oscillator (OPO). Extending optical referencing to the doubly-resonant OPO turns the otherwise unstable device into an extremely precise midinfrared frequency comb. Another cavity is an optical enhancement cavity for amplifying spectral absorption in a gas. With the high speed of a graphene-modulated frequency comb, we can couple a frequency comb directly into a high-finesse cavity for trace gas detection.

  12. Perturbing open cavities: Anomalous resonance frequency shifts in a hybrid cavity-nanoantenna system

    CERN Document Server

    Ruesink, Freek; Hendrikx, Ruud; Koenderink, A Femius; Verhagen, Ewold

    2015-01-01

    The influence of a small perturbation on a cavity mode plays an important role in fields like optical sensing, cavity quantum electrodynamics and cavity optomechanics. Typically, the resulting cavity frequency shift directly relates to the polarizability of the perturbation. Here we demonstrate that particles perturbing a radiating cavity can induce strong frequency shifts that are opposite to, and even exceed, the effects based on the particles' polarizability. A full electrodynamic theory reveals that these anomalous results rely on a non-trivial phase relation between cavity and nanoparticle radiation, allowing back-action via the radiation continuum. In addition, an intuitive model based on coupled mode theory is presented that relates the phenomenon to retardation. Because of the ubiquity of dissipation, we expect these findings to benefit the understanding and engineering of a wide class of systems.

  13. Interference and Chaos in Metamaterials Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchinitser, Natalia; Jose, Jorge

    2014-03-01

    Optical metamaterials are engineered artificial nanostructures that possess optical properties not available in nature. As metamaterials research continues to mature, their practical applications as well as fundamental questions on wave propagation in these materials attract significant interest. In this talk we focus on wave propagation and interference in chaotic wave cavities with negative or near-zero index of refraction and in double-slit configurations. In this context, we explicitly consider an incomplete two-dimensional D-cavity previously studied, which shows chaotic ray propagation together with scars. We have addressed the question as to how that type of wave propagation is modified by adding metamaterials in these chaotic cavities. We find that the wave interference patterns show significant qualitatively and quantitative changes depending on the effective parameters of the cavity, illumination conditions (planes waves versus beams), and geometry of the system. We will discuss possible experimental setups where these results may be validated.

  14. Two Dimensional Plasmonic Cavities on Moire Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balci, Sinan; Kocabas, Askin; Karabiyik, Mustafa; Kocabas, Coskun; Aydinli, Atilla

    2010-03-01

    We investigate surface plasmon polariton (SPP) cavitiy modes on two dimensional Moire surfaces in the visible spectrum. Two dimensional hexagonal Moire surface can be recorded on a photoresist layer using Interference lithography (IL). Two sequential exposures at slightly different angles in IL generate one dimensional Moire surfaces. Further sequential exposure for the same sample at slightly different angles after turning the sample 60 degrees around its own axis generates two dimensional hexagonal Moire cavity. Spectroscopic reflection measurements have shown plasmonic band gaps and cavity states at all the azimuthal angles (omnidirectional cavity and band gap formation) investigated. The plasmonic band gap edge and the cavity states energies show six fold symmetry on the two dimensional Moire surface as measured in reflection measurements.

  15. Development of rebunching cavities at IAP

    CERN Document Server

    Welsch, C P; Schempp, A

    2000-01-01

    A focus of work at IAP has been the development and optimization of spiral loaded cavities since the 1970s [A. Schempp et al, NIM 135, 409 (1976)]. These cavities feature a high efficiency, a compact design and a big variety of possible fields of application. They find use both as bunchers and post accelerators to vary the final energy of the beam. In comparison to other available designs, the advantage of these structures lies in their small size. Furthermore they can easily be tuned to the required resonance frequency by varying the length of the spiral. Due to the small size of the cavities the required budget can also be kept low. Here, two slightly different types of spiral loaded cavities, which were built for the REX-ISOLDE project at CERN and the intensity upgrade program at GSI are being discussed.

  16. Stable planar mesoscopic photonic crystal cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Magno, Giovanni; Grande, Marco; Lozes-Dupuy, Françoise; Gauthier-Lafaye, Olivier; Calò, Giovanna; Petruzzelli, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    Mesoscopic self-collimation in mesoscopic photonic crystals with high reflectivity is exploited to realize a novel high-Q factor cavity by means of mesoscopic PhC planar mirrors. These mirrors efficiently confine a mode inside a planar Fabry-Perot-like cavity, due to a beam focusing effect that stabilises the cavity even for small beam sizes, resembling the focusing behaviour of curved mirrors. Moreover, they show an improved reflectivity with respect to their standard distributed Bragg reflector counterparts that allows higher compactness. A Q factor higher than 10^4 has been achieved for an optimized 5-period-long mirror cavity. The optimization of the Q factor and the performances in terms of energy storage, field enhancement and confinement are detailed.

  17. Pulp response to bases and cavity depths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S J; Walton, R E; Osborne, J W

    1992-04-01

    In cavities of ferret canines, preparation depth and bases were compared as to their effect on odontoblasts and to rate of dentin formation. These were measured by injecting 3H-proline at 0, 20 and 40 days post-preparation. Odontoblast activity was determined by label density in each band; inter-band distances indicated the amount of dentin formed. Correlations were by Pearson's coefficient. The following were determined: 1) cavity depth (remaining dentin thickness) was the major factor in odontoblast response and in dentin formation; deeper cavities suppressed odontoblasts with less subsequent dentin formation at all time periods; 2) basing materials had little effect on odontoblast activity or on the rate of dentin formation. An exception was in deep cavities, with Ca(OH)2 showing more label; this activity was temporary with no increased dentin formation; 3) there was no evidence of a "rebound" response.

  18. section of an accelerating cavity from LEP

    CERN Multimedia

    This is a section of an accelerating cavity from LEP, cut in half to show the layer of niobium on the inside. Operating at 4.2 degrees above absolute zero, the niobium is superconducting and carries an accelerating field of 6 million volts per metre with negligible losses. Each cavity has a surface of 6 m2. The niobium layer is only 1.2 microns thick, ten times thinner than a hair. Such a large area had never been coated to such a high accuracy. A speck of dust could ruin the performance of the whole cavity so the work had to be done in an extremely clean environment. These challenging requirements pushed European industry to new achievements. 256 of these cavities are now used in LEP to double the energy of the particle beams.

  19. Prominence Mass Supply and the Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Schmit, Donald; Luna, Manuel; Karpen, Judy; Innes, Davina

    2013-01-01

    A prevalent but untested paradigm is often used to describe the prominence-cavity system: the cavity is under-dense because it is evacuated by supplying mass to the condensed prominence. The thermal non-equilibrium (TNE) model of prominence formation offers a theoretical framework to predict the thermodynamic evolution of the prominence and the surrounding corona. We examine the evidence for a prominence-cavity connection by comparing the TNE model with diagnostics of dynamic extreme ultraviolet emission (EUV) surrounding the prominence, specifically prominence horns. Horns are correlated extensions of prominence plasma and coronal plasma which appear to connect the prominence and cavity. The TNE model predicts that large-scale brightenings will occur in the SDO/AIA 171\\AA\\ bandpass near the prominence that are associated with the cooling phase of condensation formation. In our simulations, variations in the magnitude of footpoint heating lead to variations in the duration, spatial scale, and temporal offset ...

  20. Wakefield Damping for the CLIC Crab Cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambattu, P.K.; Burt, G.; Dexter, A.C.; Carter, R.G.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Lancaster U.; Khan, V.; Jones, R.M.; /Cockcroft Inst. Accel. Sci. Tech. /Manchester U.; Dolgashev, V.; /SLAC

    2011-12-01

    A crab cavity is required in the CLIC to allow effective head-on collision of bunches at the IP. A high operating frequency is preferred as the deflection voltage required for a given rotation angle and the RF phase tolerance for a crab cavity are inversely proportional to the operating frequency. The short bunch spacing of the CLIC scheme and the high sensitivity of the crab cavity to dipole kicks demand very high damping of the inter-bunch wakes, the major contributor to the luminosity loss of colliding bunches. This paper investigates the nature of the wakefields in the CLIC crab cavity and the possibility of using various damping schemes to suppress them effectively.

  1. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopy and sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Loock, Hans-Peter

    2014-01-01

    The book reviews the dramatic recent advances in the use of optical resonators for high sensitivity and high resolution molecular spectroscopy as well as for chemical, mechanical and physical sensing.  It encompasses a variety of cavities including those made of two or more mirrors, optical fiber loops, fiber gratings and spherical cavities. The book focuses on novel techniques and their applications. Each chapter is written by an expert and/or pioneer in the field. These experts also provide the theoretical background in optics and molecular physics where needed. Examples of recent breakthroughs include the use of frequency combs (Nobel prize 2005) for cavity enhanced sensing and spectroscopy, the use of novel cavity materials and geometries, the development of optical heterodyne detection techniques combined to active frequency-locking schemes. These methods allow the use and interrogation of optical resonators with a variety of coherent light sources for trace gas detection and sensing of strain, temperat...

  2. Circuit QED with 3D cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Edwar; Baust, Alexander; Zhong, Ling; Gross, Rudolf [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Nanosystems Initiative Munich (NIM), Muenchen (Germany); Anderson, Gustav; Wang, Lujun; Eder, Peter; Fischer, Michael; Goetz, Jan; Haeberlein, Max; Schwarz, Manuel; Wulschner, Karl Friedrich; Deppe, Frank; Fedorov, Kirill; Huebl, Hans; Menzel, Edwin [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany); Physik-Department, TU Muenchen, Garching (Germany); Marx, Achim [Walther-Meissner-Institut, Bayerische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Garching (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    In typical circuit QED systems on-chip superconducting qubits are coupled to integrated coplanar microwave resonators. Due to the planar geometry, the resonators are often a limiting factor regarding the total coherence of the system. Alternatively, similar hybrid systems can be realized using 3D microwave cavities. Here, we present design considerations for the 3D microwave cavity as well as the superconducting transmon qubit. Moreover, we show experimental data of a high purity aluminum cavity demonstrating quality factors above 1.4 .10{sup 6} at the single photon level and a temperature of 50 mK. Our experiments also demonstrate that the quality factor is less dependent on the power compared to planar resonator geometries. Furthermore, we present strategies for tuning both the cavity and the qubit individually.

  3. Reducing the convective losses of cavity receivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flesch, Robert; Grobbel, Johannes; Stadler, Hannes; Uhlig, Ralf; Hoffschmidt, Bernhard

    2016-05-01

    Convective losses reduce the efficiency of cavity receivers used in solar power towers especially under windy conditions. Therefore, measures should be taken to reduce these losses. In this paper two different measures are analyzed: an air curtain and a partial window which covers one third of the aperture opening. The cavity without modifications and the usage of a partial window were analyzed in a cryogenic wind tunnel at -173°C. The cryogenic environment allows transforming the results from the small model cavity to a large scale receiver with Gr≈3.9.1010. The cavity with the two modifications in the wind tunnel environment was analyzed with a CFD model as well. By comparing the numerical and experimental results the model was validated. Both modifications are capable of reducing the convection losses. In the best case a reduction of about 50 % was achieved.

  4. Stafne bone cavity--magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segev, Yoram; Puterman, Max; Bodner, Lipa

    2006-07-01

    A case of Stafne bone cavity (SBC) affecting the body of the mandible of a 51-year-old female is reported. The imaging modalities included panoramic radiograph, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Panoramic radiograph and CT were able to determine the outline of the cavity and its three dimensional shape, but failed to precisely diagnose the soft tissue content of the cavity. MR imaging demonstrated that the bony cavity is filled with soft tissue that is continuous and identical in signal with that of the submandibular salivary gland. Based on the MR imaging a diagnosis of SBC was made and no further studies or surgical treatment were initiated. MR imaging should be considered the diagnostic technique in cases where SBC is suspected. Recognition of the lesion should preclude any further treatment or surgical exploration.

  5. Cavity-enhanced spectroscopy and sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gagliardi, Gianluca [CNR-Istituto Nazionale di Ottica (INO), Pozzuoli (Italy); Loock, Hans-Peter (ed.) [Queen' s Univ., Kingston, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry

    2014-07-01

    The book reviews the dramatic recent advances in the use of optical resonators for high sensitivity and high resolution molecular spectroscopy as well as for chemical, mechanical and physical sensing. It encompasses a variety of cavities including those made of two or more mirrors, optical fiber loops, fiber gratings and spherical cavities. The book focuses on novel techniques and their applications. Each chapter is written by an expert and/or pioneer in the field. These experts also provide the theoretical background in optics and molecular physics where needed. Examples of recent breakthroughs include the use of frequency combs (Nobel prize 2005) for cavity enhanced sensing and spectroscopy, the use of novel cavity materials and geometries, the development of optical heterodyne detection techniques combined to active frequency-locking schemes. These methods allow the use and interrogation of optical resonators with a variety of coherent light sources for trace gas detection and sensing of strain, temperature and pressure.

  6. Cavity loss induced generation of W states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wu Huai-Zhi; Yang Zhen-Biao; Su Wan-Jun; Zhong Zhi-Rong; Zheng Shi-Biao

    2008-01-01

    The existence of decoherence-free subspace (DFS) has been discussed widely.In this paper,we propose an alternative scheme for generating the four-atom W states by manipulating DF qubits.The atoms are divided into two pairs and trapped in two separate optical cavities.Manipulation of atoms within DFS may generate a two-atom maximally entangled state in an individual cavity,which is a stable state.After driving the system out of DFS,the atoms will interact resonantly with the cavity field.The photons leaking from the cavities interfere at the beamsplitter,which destroys which-path information,and are finally detected by one of the detectors,leading to the generation of a W state.In addition,the numerical simulation indicates that the fidelity of the prepared state can,for a very wide parameter regime,be very close to unity.

  7. Cavity QED with Multiple Hyperfine Levels

    CERN Document Server

    Birnbaum, K M; Kimble, H J

    2006-01-01

    We calculate the weak-driving transmission of a linearly polarized cavity mode strongly coupled to the D2 transition of a single Cesium atom. Results are relevant to future experiments with microtoroid cavities, where the single-photon Rabi frequency g exceeds the excited-state hyperfine splittings, and photonic bandgap resonators, where g is greater than both the excited- and ground-state splitting.

  8. Open safety pin in the nasal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, I; Sikder, B; Sinha, R; Paul, R

    2004-04-01

    Foreign bodies in the nasal cavity are common-day occurrences in Otolaryngologic practice. But an open safety pin in nose with it' s sharp end directed towards roof is a rare incidence, and available literature is silent about this presentation; it is probably, the first of it' s kind being reported. Two cases of safety pins inside the nasal cavity, one open and the other closed, have been presented here with a brief review of literature.

  9. Open safety pin in the nasal cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Sen, I; Sikder, B.; R. Sinha; Paul, R

    2004-01-01

    Foreign bodies in the nasal cavity are common-day occurrences in Otolaryngologic practice. But an open safety pin in nose with it’ s sharp end directed towards roof is a rare incidence, and available literature is silent about this presentation; it is probably, the first of it’ s kind being reported. Two cases of safety pins inside the nasal cavity, one open and the other closed, have been presented here with a brief review of literature.

  10. Chaotic dynamics of a classical radiant cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Benenti, G; Guarneri, I; Benenti, Giuliano; Casati, Giulio; Guarneri, Italo

    1999-01-01

    The statistical properties of a classical electromagnetic field in interaction with matter are numerically investigated on a one-dimensional model of a radiant cavity, conservative and with finite total energy. Our results suggest a trend towards equipartition of energy, with the relaxation times of the normal modes of the cavity increasing with the mode frequency according to a law, the form of which depends on the shape of the charge distribution.

  11. Electrically Pumped Vertical-Cavity Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greibe, Tine

    2007-01-01

    In this work, the design of electrically pumped vertical cavity semiconductor optical amplifiers (eVCAs) for use in a mode-locked external-cavity laser has been developed, investigated and analysed. Four different eVCAs, one top-emitting and three bottom emitting structures, have been designed...... and discussed. The thesis concludes with recommendations for further work towards the realisation of compact electrically pumped mode-locked vertical externalcavity surface emitting lasers....

  12. Niobium films for superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benvenuti, C.; Circelli, N.; Hauer, M.

    1984-09-01

    Superconducting accelerating cavities made of Nb-coated copper were produced. Niobium films of a thickness ranging from 1.4 to 4 ..mu..m were deposited onto the inside of 3-GHz cavities and 500-MHz frequency by bias diode sputtering. A maximum accelerating field of 8.6 MV m/sup -1/ was reached without quench which is attributed to the large thermal conductivity of copper at liquid helium temperatures.

  13. Cavity QED: applications to quantum computation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Han; Zubairy, M. Suhail

    2004-10-01

    Possible schemes to implement the basic quantum gates for quantum computation have been presented based on cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) systems. We then discuss schemes to implement several important quantum algorithms such as the discrete quantum fourier transform (QFT) algorithm and Grover's quantum search algorithm based on these quantum gates. Some other applications of cavity QED based systems including the implementations of a quantum disentanglement eraser and an entanglement amplifier are also discussed.

  14. Quantum Dynamics of Nonlinear Cavity Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Nation, Paul D.

    2010-01-01

    We investigate the quantum dynamics of three different configurations of nonlinear cavity systems. To begin, we carry out a quantum analysis of a dc superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) mechanical displacement detector comprised of a SQUID with a mechanically compliant loop segment. The SQUID is approximated by a nonlinear current-dependent inductor, inducing a flux tunable nonlinear Duffing term in the cavity equation of motion. Expressions are derived for the detector signal ...

  15. Cavity Optomechanics in the Quantum Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botter, Thierry Claude Marc

    An exciting scientific goal, common to many fields of research, is the development of ever-larger physical systems operating in the quantum regime. Relevant to this dissertation is the objective of preparing and observing a mechanical object in its motional quantum ground state. In order to sense the object's zero-point motion, the probe itself must have quantum-limited sensitivity. Cavity optomechanics, the interactions between light and a mechanical object inside an optical cavity, provides an elegant means to achieve the quantum regime. In this dissertation, I provide context to the successful cavity-based optical detection of the quantum-ground-state motion of atoms-based mechanical elements; mechanical elements, consisting of the collective center-of-mass (CM) motion of ultracold atomic ensembles and prepared inside a high-finesse Fabry-Perot cavity, were dispersively probed with an average intracavity photon number as small as 0.1. I first show that cavity optomechanics emerges from the theory of cavity quantum electrodynamics when one takes into account the CM motion of one or many atoms within the cavity, and provide a simple theoretical framework to model optomechanical interactions. I then outline details regarding the apparatus and the experimental methods employed, highlighting certain fundamental aspects of optical detection along the way. Finally, I describe background information, both theoretical and experimental, to two published results on quantum cavity optomechanics that form the backbone of this dissertation. The first publication shows the observation of zero-point collective motion of several thousand atoms and quantum-limited measurement backaction on that observed motion. The second publication demonstrates that an array of near-ground-state collective atomic oscillators can be simultaneously prepared and probed, and that the motional state of one oscillator can be selectively addressed while preserving the near-zero-point motion of

  16. Cavity QED on a nanofiber using a composite photonic crystal cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Yalla, Ramachandrarao; Nayak, Kali P; Hakuta, Kohzo

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate cavity QED conditions in the Purcell regime for single quantum emitters on the surface of an optical nanofiber. The cavity is formed by combining an optical nanofiber and a nanofabricated grating to create a composite photonic crystal cavity. Using this technique, significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into the nanofiber guided modes is observed for single quantum dots. Our results pave the way for enhanced on-fiber light-matter interfaces with clear applications to quantum networks.

  17. Cavity quantum electrodynamics on a nanofiber using a composite photonic crystal cavity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalla, Ramachandrarao; Sadgrove, Mark; Nayak, Kali P; Hakuta, Kohzo

    2014-10-01

    We demonstrate cavity QED conditions in the Purcell regime for single quantum emitters on the surface of an optical nanofiber. The cavity is formed by combining an optical nanofiber and a nanofabricated grating to create a composite photonic crystal cavity. By using this technique, significant enhancement of the spontaneous emission rate into the nanofiber guided modes is observed for single quantum dots. Our results pave the way for enhanced on-fiber light-matter interfaces with clear applications to quantum networks.

  18. The emission properties of an atom inside a cavity when manipulating the atoms outside the cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Wen; YE Liu; XIONG Kuang-wei; ZHANG Jin

    2003-01-01

    Considering three two-level atoms initially in the GHZ state, then one atom of them is put into an initially empty cavity and made resonant interaction. It is shown that the emission properties of the atom inside the cavity can be affected only when both of the atoms outside the cavity have been manipulated. This conclusion can also be generalized to n two-level atoms.

  19. "Fine grain Nb tube for SRF cavities"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robert E. Barber

    2012-07-08

    Superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities used in charged particle linear accelerators, are currently fabricated by deep drawing niobium sheets and welding the drawn dishes together. The Nb sheet has a non-uniform microstructure, which leads to unpredictable cavity shape and surface roughness, and inconsistent "spring-back" during forming. In addition, weld zones cause hot spots during cavity operation. These factors limit linear accelerator performance and increase cavity manufacturing cost. Equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) can be used to refine and homogenize the microstructure of Nb tube for subsequent hydroforming into SRF cavities. Careful selection of deformation and heat treatment conditions during the processing steps can give a uniform and consistent microstructure in the tube, leading to improved deformability and lower manufacturing costs. Favorable microstructures were achieved in short test samples of RRR Nb tube, which may be particularly suitable for hydroforming into SRF cavity strings. The approach demonstrated could be applicable to microstructure engineering of other tube materials including tantalum, titanium, and zirconium.

  20. Flux expulsion variation in SRF cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Posen, S; Romanenko, A; Melnychuk, O; Sergatskov, D A; Martinello, M; Checchin, M; Crawford, A C

    2015-01-01

    Treating a cavity with nitrogen doping significantly increases $Q_0$ at medium fields, reducing cryogenic costs for high duty factor linear accelerators such as LCLS II. N-doping also makes cavities more sensitive to increased residual resistance due to trapped magnetic flux, making it critical to either have extremely effective magnetic shielding, or to prevent flux from being trapped in the cavity during cooldown. In this paper, we report on results of a study of flux expulsion. We discuss possible ways in which flux can be pinned in the inner surface, outer surface, or bulk of a cavity, and we present experimental results studying these mechanisms. We show that grain structure appears to play a key role and that a cavity that expelled flux poorly changed to expelling flux well after a high temperature furnace treatment. We further show that after furnace treatment, this cavity exhibited a significant improvement in quality factor when cooled in an external magnetic field. We conclude with implications for ...

  1. The CEBAF Separator Cavity Resonance Control System

    CERN Document Server

    Wissmann, Mark J; Hovater, Curt; Plawski, Tomasz

    2005-01-01

    The CEBAF energy upgrade from 6 GeV to 12GeV will increase the range of beam energies available to the experimental halls. RF deflection cavities (separators) are used to direct the electron beam to the three experimental halls. Consequently with the increase in RF separator cavity gradient needed for the higher energies, RF power will also increase requiring the cavities to have active resonance control. At the 6 GeV energy, the cavities are tuned mechanically and then stabilized with Low Conductivity Water (LCW), which is maintained at constant temperature of 95o Fahrenheit. This is no longer feasible and an active resonance control system, that controls both water temperature and flow has been built. The system uses a commercial PLC with embedded PID controls to control water temperature and flow to the cavities. The system allows the operator to remotely adjust temperature/flow and consequently cavity resonance for the full range of beam energies. Ultimately closed loop control will be maintained by monit...

  2. The crab cavities cryomodule for SPS test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanoni, C.; Amorim Carvalho, A.; Artoos, K.; Atieh, S.; Brodzinski, K.; Calaga, R.; Capatina, O.; Capelli, T.; Carra, F.; Dassa, L.; Dijoud, T.; Eiler, K.; Favre, G.; Freijedo Menendez, P.; Garlaschè, M.; Giordanino, L.; Jones, T.; E Langeslag, S. A.; Leuxe, R.; Mainaud-Durand, H.; Minginette, P.; Narduzzi, M.; Rude, V.; Sosin, M.; Swieszek, J. S.; Templeton, N.

    2017-07-01

    RF Crab Cavities are an essential part of the HL-LHC upgrade. Two concepts of such systems are being developed: the Double Quarter Wave (DQW) and the RF Dipole (RFD). A cryomodule with two DQW cavities is in advanced fabrication stage for the tests with protons in the SPS. The cavities must be operated at 2 K, without excessive heat loads, in a low magnetic environment and in compliance with CERN safety guidelines on pressure and vacuum systems. A large set of components, such as a thermal shield, a two layers magnetic shield, RF lines, helium tank and tuner are required for the successful and safe operation of the cavities. The sum of all these components with the cavities and their couplers forms the cryomodule. An overview of the design and fabrication strategy of this cryomodule is presented. The main components are described along with the present status of cavity fabrication and processing and cryomodule assembly. The lesson learned from the prototypes and first manufactured systems are also included.

  3. Cavity Mode Frequencies and Large Optomechanical Coupling in Two-Membrane Cavity Optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Li, J; Malossi, N; Vitali, D

    2015-01-01

    We study the cavity mode frequencies of a Fabry-Perot cavity containing two vibrating dielectric membranes and the corresponding optomechanical coupling. Due to optical interference, extremely large optomechanical coupling of the membrane relative motion is achieved when the two membranes are placed very close to a resonance of the inner cavity formed by the two membranes, and in the limit of highly reflective membranes. The upper bound of the coupling strength is given by the optomechanical coupling associated with the much shorter inner cavity, consistently with the analysis of A. Xuereb et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 109, 223601 (2012).

  4. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Pei

    2013-02-15

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrumentation. At the FLASH facility in DESY, 1.3 GHz (known as TESLA) and 3.9 GHz (third harmonic) cavities are installed. Wakefields in 3.9 GHz cavities are significantly larger than in the 1.3 GHz cavities. It is therefore important to mitigate the adverse effects of HOMs to the beam by aligning the beam on the electric axis of the cavities. This alignment requires an accurate beam position diagnostics inside the 3.9 GHz cavities. It is this aspect that is focused on in this thesis. Although the principle of beam diagnostics with HOM has been demonstrated on 1.3 GHz cavities, the realization in 3.9 GHz cavities is considerably more challenging. This is due to the dense HOM spectrum and the relatively strong coupling of most HOMs amongst the four cavities in the third harmonic cryo-module. A comprehensive series of simulations and HOM spectra measurements have been performed in order to study the modal band structure of the 3.9 GHz cavities. The dependencies of

  5. Scheme for implementing quantum secret sharing via cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Zhi-Hua; Lin Xiu-Min

    2005-01-01

    An experimentally feasible scheme for implementing quantum secret sharing via cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) is proposed. The scheme requires the large detuning of the cavity field from the atomic transition, the cavity is only virtually excited, thus the requirement on the quality factor of the cavity is greatly loosened.

  6. Compound parabolic concentrator with cavity for tubular absorbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Roland

    1983-01-01

    A compond parabolic concentrator with a V-shaped cavity is provided in which an optical receiver is emplaced. The cavity redirects all energy entering between the receiver and the cavity structure onto the receiver, if the optical receiver is emplaced a distance from the cavity not greater than 0.27 r (where r is the radius of the receiver).

  7. Teleportation of atomic states with a weak coherent cavity field

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zheng Shi-Biao

    2005-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for the teleportation of an unknown atomic state. The scheme is based on the resonant interaction of atoms with a coherent cavity field. The mean photon-number of the cavity field is much smaller than one and thus the cavity decay can be effectively suppressed. Another adwntage of the scheme is that only one cavity is required.

  8. Cavity contour segmentation in chest radiographs using supervised learning and dynamic programming

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maduskar, Pragnya, E-mail: pragnya.maduskar@radboudumc.nl; Hogeweg, Laurens; Sánchez, Clara I.; Ginneken, Bram van [Diagnostic Image Analysis Group, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, 6525 GA (Netherlands); Jong, Pim A. de [Department of Radiology, University Medical Center Utrecht, 3584 CX (Netherlands); Peters-Bax, Liesbeth [Department of Radiology, Radboud University Medical Center, Nijmegen, 6525 GA (Netherlands); Dawson, Rodney [University of Cape Town Lung Institute, Cape Town 7700 (South Africa); Ayles, Helen [Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT (United Kingdom)

    2014-07-15

    Purpose: Efficacy of tuberculosis (TB) treatment is often monitored using chest radiography. Monitoring size of cavities in pulmonary tuberculosis is important as the size predicts severity of the disease and its persistence under therapy predicts relapse. The authors present a method for automatic cavity segmentation in chest radiographs. Methods: A two stage method is proposed to segment the cavity borders, given a user defined seed point close to the center of the cavity. First, a supervised learning approach is employed to train a pixel classifier using texture and radial features to identify the border pixels of the cavity. A likelihood value of belonging to the cavity border is assigned to each pixel by the classifier. The authors experimented with four different classifiers:k-nearest neighbor (kNN), linear discriminant analysis (LDA), GentleBoost (GB), and random forest (RF). Next, the constructed likelihood map was used as an input cost image in the polar transformed image space for dynamic programming to trace the optimal maximum cost path. This constructed path corresponds to the segmented cavity contour in image space. Results: The method was evaluated on 100 chest radiographs (CXRs) containing 126 cavities. The reference segmentation was manually delineated by an experienced chest radiologist. An independent observer (a chest radiologist) also delineated all cavities to estimate interobserver variability. Jaccard overlap measure Ω was computed between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation; and between the reference segmentation and the independent observer's segmentation for all cavities. A median overlap Ω of 0.81 (0.76 ± 0.16), and 0.85 (0.82 ± 0.11) was achieved between the reference segmentation and the automatic segmentation, and between the segmentations by the two radiologists, respectively. The best reported mean contour distance and Hausdorff distance between the reference and the automatic segmentation were

  9. Electromagnetic coupling to centimeter-scale mechanical membrane resonators via RF cylindrical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Luis A.; Castelli, Alessandro R.; Delmas, William; Sharping, Jay E.; Chiao, Raymond

    2016-11-01

    We present experimental and theoretical results for the excitation of a mechanical oscillator via radiation pressure with a room-temperature system employing a relatively low-(Q) centimeter-size mechanical oscillator coupled to a relatively low-Q standard three-dimensional radio-frequency (RF) cavity resonator. We describe the forces giving rise to optomechanical coupling using the Maxwell stress tensor and show that nanometer-scale displacements are possible and experimentally observable. The experimental system is composed of a 35 mm diameter silicon nitride membrane sputtered with a 300 nm gold conducting film and attached to the end of a RF copper cylindrical cavity. The RF cavity is operated in its {{TE}}011 mode and amplitude modulated on resonance with the fundamental drum modes of the membrane. Membrane motion is monitored using an unbalanced, non-zero optical path difference, optically filtered Michelson interferometer capable of measuring sub-nanometer displacements.

  10. High-precision spectral tuning of micro and nanophotonic cavities by resonantly enhanced photoelectrochemical etching

    CERN Document Server

    Gil-Santos, Eduardo; Lemaitre, Aristide; Gomez, Carmen; Ducci, Sara; Leo, Giuseppe; Favero, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We present a simple method to tune optical micro- and nanocavities with picometer precision in the resonant wavelength, corresponding to an effective sub atomic monolayer control of the cavity dimension. This is obtained through resonant photo-electrochemical etching, with in-situ monitoring of the optical spectrum. We employ this technique to spectrally align an ensemble of resonant cavities in a permanent manner, overcoming the dimension variability resulting from current nanofabrication techniques. In a device containing several resonators, each is individually addressed and tuned, with no optical quality factor degradation. The technique is general and opens the way to multiple applications, such as the straightforward fabrication of networks of identical coupled resonators, or the tuning of chip-based cavities to external references.

  11. RF BREAKDOWN STUDIES USING PRESSURIZED CAVITIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Rolland

    2014-09-21

    Many present and future particle accelerators are limited by the maximum electric gradient and peak surface fields that can be realized in RF cavities. Despite considerable effort, a comprehensive theory of RF breakdown has not been achieved and mitigation techniques to improve practical maximum accelerating gradients have had only limited success. Part of the problem is that RF breakdown in an evacuated cavity involves a complex mixture of effects, which include the geometry, metallurgy, and surface preparation of the accelerating structures and the make-up and pressure of the residual gas in which plasmas form. Studies showed that high gradients can be achieved quickly in 805 MHz RF cavities pressurized with dense hydrogen gas, as needed for muon cooling channels, without the need for long conditioning times, even in the presence of strong external magnetic fields. This positive result was expected because the dense gas can practically eliminate dark currents and multipacting. In this project we used this high pressure technique to suppress effects of residual vacuum and geometry that are found in evacuated cavities in order to isolate and study the role of the metallic surfaces in RF cavity breakdown as a function of magnetic field, frequency, and surface preparation. One of the interesting and useful outcomes of this project was the unanticipated collaborations with LANL and Fermilab that led to new insights as to the operation of evacuated normal-conducting RF cavities in high external magnetic fields. Other accomplishments included: (1) RF breakdown experiments to test the effects of SF6 dopant in H2 and He gases with Sn, Al, and Cu electrodes were carried out in an 805 MHz cavity and compared to calculations and computer simulations. The heavy corrosion caused by the SF6 components led to the suggestion that a small admixture of oxygen, instead of SF6, to the hydrogen would allow the same advantages without the corrosion in a practical muon beam line. (2) A

  12. Modelling and monitoring in injection molding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thyregod, Peter

    2001-01-01

    -conforning unit is only expected very rarely during sampling, a moving sum chart and a CUSUM chart are equivalent. Finally, the correlation structure of 21 process variables has been studied prior to monitoring the process. Is is illustrated how the process can be analysed with multivariate techniques......This thesis is concerned with the application of statistical methods in quality improvement of injection molded parts. The methods described are illustrated with data from the manufacturing of parts for a medical device. The emphasis has been on the variation between cavities in multi-cavity molds...... taken within the same machine set-point did not cause great variation compared to the two preceding sources of variation. A simple graphical approach is suggested for finding patterns in the cavity differences. Applying this method to data from a 16 cavity mold, a clear connection was found between...

  13. Preparation of Cluster States for Many Atoms in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAN Zhi-Ming

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme for the generation of the cluster states for many atoms in cavity QED. In our scheme,the atoms are sent through nonresonant cavity fields in the vacuum states. The cavity fields are only virtually excited and no quantum information will be transferred from the atoms to the cavity fields. The advantage is that the cavities are suppressed during the procedure. The scheme can also be generalized to the ion trap system.

  14. New Method to Improve the Accelerating Gradient of Superconducting Cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Zhenchao

    2013-01-01

    Quench is a common phenomenon in a superconducting cavity and often limits the accelerating gradient of the cavity. Accurate location of the quench site can be located by second sound detection. For multi-cell superconducting cavity, one defect may cause the cell with defect quenches and then the whole cavity quenches. Now we proposed a new method to eliminate the bad influence of the quench cell to the whole cavity.

  15. Entanglement distillation for atomic states via cavity QED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ming; Song, Wei; Cao, Zhuo-Liang

    2004-10-01

    Following a recent proposal (Phys. Rev. Lett. 85 (2000) 2392) about quantum information processing using dispersive atom-cavity interaction, in this paper, we proposed a physical scheme to concentrate the pure non-maximally entangled atomic states via cavity QED by using atomic collision in a far-off-resonant cavity. The most distinctive advantage of our scheme is that there is no excitation of cavity mode during the distillation procedure. Therefore the requirement on the quality of cavity is greatly loosened.

  16. Quantum state engineering and reconstruction in cavity QED. An analytical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lougovski, P.

    2004-09-25

    The models of a strongly-driven micromaser and a one-atom laser are developed. Their analytical solutions are obtained by means of phase space techniques. It is shown how to exploit the model of a one-atom laser for simultaneous generation and monitoring of the decoherence of the atom-field ''Schroedinger cat'' states. The similar machinery applied to the problem of the generation of the maximally-entangled states of two atoms placed inside an optical cavity permits its analytical solution. The steady-state solution of the problem exhibits a structure in which the two-atom maximally-entangled state correlates with the vacuum state of the cavity. As a consequence, it is demonstrated that the atomic maximally-entangled state, depending on a coupling regime, can be produced via a single or a sequence of no-photon measurements. The question of the implementation of a quantum memory device using a dispersive interaction between the collective internal ground state of an atomic ensemble and two orthogonal modes of a cavity is addressed. The problem of quantum state reconstruction in the context of cavity quantum electrodynamics is considered. The optimal operational definition of the Wigner function of a cavity field is worked out. It is based on the Fresnel transform of the atomic inversion of a probe atom. The general integral transformation for the Wigner function reconstruction of a particle in an arbitrary symmetric potential is derived.

  17. Plasmonic band gap cavities on biharmonic gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocabas, Askin; Seckin Senlik, S.; Aydinli, Atilla

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we have experimentally demonstrated the formation of plasmonic band gap cavities in infrared and visible wavelength range. The cavity structure is based on a biharmonic metallic grating with selective high dielectric loading. A uniform metallic grating structure enables strong surface plasmon polariton (SPP) excitation and a superimposed second harmonic component forms a band gap for the propagating SPPs. We show that a high dielectric superstructure can dramatically perturb the optical properties of SPPs and enables the control of the plasmonic band gap structure. Selective patterning of the high index superstructure results in an index contrast in and outside the patterned region that forms a cavity. This allows us to excite the SPPs that localize inside the cavity at specific wavelengths, satisfying the cavity resonance condition. Experimentally, we observe the formation of a localized state in the band gap and measure the dispersion diagram. Quality factors as high as 37 have been observed in the infrared wavelength. The simplicity of the fabrication and the method of testing make this approach attractive for applications requiring localization of propagating SPPs.

  18. Long Wave Infrared Cavity Enhanced Sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taubman, Matthew S.; Scott, David C.; Cannon, Bret D.; Myers, Tanya L.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Aker, Pam M.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Munley, John T.; Nguyen, Vinh T.; Schultz, John F.

    2004-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) long wave infrared (LWIR) cavity enhanced sensor (CES) project is to explore ultra-sensitive spectroscopic techniques and apply them to the development of LWIR chemical sensors needed for detecting weapons proliferation. This includes detecting not only the weapons of mass destruction (WMDs) themselves, but also signatures of their production and/or detonation. The LWIR CES project is concerned exclusively with developing point sensors; other portions of PNNL's IR Sensors program address stand off detection. PNNL's LWIR CES research is distinguished from that done by others by the use quantum cascade lasers (QCLs) as the light source. QCLs are novel devices, and a significant fraction of our research has been devoted to developing the procedures and hardware required to implement them most effectively for chemical sensing. This report details the progress we have made on our LWIR CES sensor development. During FY02, PNNL investigated three LWIR CES implementations beginning with the easiest to implement, direct cavity-enhanced detection (simple CES), including a technique of intermediate difficulty, cavity-dithered phase-sensitive detection (FM recovery CES) through to the most complex technique, that of resonant sideband cavity-enhanced detection also known as noise-immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy, or NICE-OHMS.

  19. CERN Developments for 704 MHz Superconducting Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Capatina, O; Aviles Santillana, I; Arnau Izquierdo, G; Bonomi, R; Calatroni, S; Chambrillon, J; Gerigk, F; Garoby, R; Guinchard, M; Junginger, T; Malabaila, M; Marques Antunes Ferreira, L; Mikulas, S; Parma, V; Pillon, F; Renaglia, T; Schirm, K; Tardy, T; Therasse, M; Vacca, A; Valverde Alonso, N; Vande Craen, A

    2013-01-01

    The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) is an R&D effort coordinated by CERN in partnership with other international laboratories. It is aiming at developing key technologies for the construction of a multi-megawatt proton linac based on state-of-the-art RF superconducting technology, which would serve as a driver in new physics facilities for neutrinos and/or Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB). Amongst the main objectives of this R&D effort, is the development of 704 MHz bulk niobium beta=1 elliptical cavities, operating at 2 K with a maximum accelerating gradient of 25 MV/m, and the testing of a string of cavities integrated in a machine-type cryomodule. The cavity together with its helium tank had to be carefully designed in coherence with the innovative design of the cryomodule. New fabrication methods have also been explored. Five such niobium cavities and two copper cavities are in fabrication. The key design aspects are discussed, the results of the alternative fabrication methods presented and the stat...

  20. Multi-Mode Cavity Accelerator Structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yong [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States); Hirshfield, Jay Leonard [Omega-P R& D, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2016-11-10

    This project aimed to develop a prototype for a novel accelerator structure comprising coupled cavities that are tuned to support modes with harmonically-related eigenfrequencies, with the goal of reaching an acceleration gradient >200 MeV/m and a breakdown rate <10-7/pulse/meter. Phase I involved computations, design, and preliminary engineering of a prototype multi-harmonic cavity accelerator structure; plus tests of a bimodal cavity. A computational procedure was used to design an optimized profile for a bimodal cavity with high shunt impedance and low surface fields to maximize the reduction in temperature rise ΔT. This cavity supports the TM010 mode and its 2nd harmonic TM011 mode. Its fundamental frequency is at 12 GHz, to benchmark against the empirical criteria proposed within the worldwide High Gradient collaboration for X-band copper structures; namely, a surface electric field Esurmax< 260 MV/m and pulsed surface heating ΔTmax< 56 °K. With optimized geometry, amplitude and relative phase of the two modes, reductions are found in surface pulsed heating, modified Poynting vector, and total RF power—as compared with operation at the same acceleration gradient using only the fundamental mode.

  1. Inflammatory oral cavity diseases of the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, N C

    1992-11-01

    There is a great deal of frustration among veterinarians about the diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory diseases of the oral cavity of the cat. This frustration is due to both the high frequency of feline oral inflammatory lesions and our poor understanding of their causes. This poor understanding can be blamed on several things: (1) a rapidly emerging, but still relatively poor, understanding of feline diseases in general and nutrition in particular; (2) a tendency to lump rather than separate specific oral inflammations; (3) a tendency not to use a thorough and systematic approach to diagnosing oral cavity disease; and (4) the reluctance of veterinarians to apply what is already known about human oral cavity diseases to cats. When problems 2 through 4 are adequately addressed, it becomes apparent that we really know more about oral cavity disease in the cat than we thought we knew and that great progress has been made. The task ahead is to define, in precise medical terms, those remaining disease entities of the oral cavity that pose the greatest health risk to cats, to apply what has been already been discovered from human disease counterparts, and to study them systematically.

  2. DISCHARGING MASTOID CAVITY: A CLINICAL ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: A discharging mastoid cavity is a frustrating condition for both patient and surgeon and can occur after a canal wall down mastoidectomy operation . AIMS: To determine the percentage of patients having a discharging mastoid cavity and to establish the aetiological factors responsible for it . SETTING: Academic tertiary care referral institution . DESIGN: Prospective study MATERIALS AND METHODS: One hundred and sixty nine patie nts with chronic suppurative otitis media with cholesteatoma who underwent a canal wall down mastoidectomy were included in the study . These patients were regularly followed up to detect the occurrence of discharging mastoid cavity . RESULTS: Forty one ( 24 . 26% patients had a discharging mastoid cavity after a mean follow up of 4 . 2 years . The main causes were tympanic membrane perforation with exposed middle ear mucosa and open eustachian tube in thirty two patients ( 78 . 04% , followed by meatal stenosis in twenty five patients ( 60 . 97% and high facial ridge in twenty patients ( 48 . 78% . CONCLUSIONS: Tympanic membrane perforation with exposure of middle ear mucosa , meatal stenosis and a high facial ridge are important causes for a discharging mastoid cavity .

  3. A hemispherical, high-solid-angle optical micro-cavity for cavity-QED studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Guoqiang; Hannigan, J. M.; Loeckenhoff, R.; Matinaga, F. M.; Raymer, M. G.; Bhongale, S.; Holland, M.; Mosor, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Gibbs, H. M.; Khitrova, G.

    2006-03-01

    We report a novel hemispherical micro-cavity that is comprised of a planar integrated semiconductor distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirror, and an external, concave micro-mirror having a radius of curvature 50 µm. The integrated DBR mirror containing quantum dots (QD), is designed to locate the QDs at an antinode of the field in order to maximize the interaction between the QD and cavity. The concave micro-mirror, with high-reflectivity over a large solid-angle, creates a diffraction-limited (sub-micron) mode-waist at the planar mirror, leading to a large coupling constant between the cavity mode and QD. The half-monolithic design gives more spatial and spectral tuning abilities, relatively to fully monolithic structures. This unique micro-cavity design will potentially enable us to both reach the cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED) strong coupling regime and realize the deterministic generation of single photons on demand.

  4. Cavity nano-optomechanics: a nanomechanical system in a high finesse optical cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Stapfner, Sebastian; Hunger, David; Paulitschke, Philipp; Reichel, Jakob; Karrai, Khaled; Weig, Eva M; 10.1117/12.705901

    2011-01-01

    The coupling of mechanical oscillators with light has seen a recent surge of interest, as recent reviews report.[1, 2] This coupling is enhanced when confining light in an optical cavity where the mechanical oscillator is integrated as back- mirror or movable wall. At the nano-scale, the optomechanical coupling increases further thanks to a smaller optomechanical interaction volume and reduced mass of the mechanical oscillator. In view of realizing such cavity nano- optomechanics experiments, a scheme was proposed where a sub-wavelength sized nanomechanical oscillator is coupled to a high finesse optical microcavity.[3] Here we present such an experiment involving a single nanomechanical rod precisely positioned into the confined mode of a miniature Fabry-P\\'erot cavity.[4] We describe the employed stabilized cavity set-up and related finesse measurements. We proceed characterizing the nanorod vibration properties using ultrasonic piezo-actuation methods. Using the optical cavity as a transducer of nanomechan...

  5. Cavity-enhanced laser cooling of solid-state materials in a standing-wave cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Youhua Jia; Biao Zhong; Jianping Yin

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new method to cool the Yba+-doped ZBLANP glass in a standing-wave cavity. There are two advantages of this cavity-enhanced technique: the pumping power is greatly enhanced and the absorption of the cooling material is greatly increased. We introduce the basic principle of the cavity-enhanced laser cooling and discuss the cooling effect of a solid-state material in a cavity. From the theoretical study, it is found that the laser cooling effect is strongly dependent on the reflectivity of the cavity mirrors, the length of the solid material, the surface scattering of the material, and so on. Some optimal parameters for efficient laser cooling are obtained.

  6. An unstructured finite-volume method to analyze the impact of shape on natural convection and melting inside cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Omari, Kamal El; Guer, Yves Le

    2010-01-01

    The present paper numerically analyzes a passive cooling system using cavities with different geometries filled with thermal conductivity-enhanced phase change material (PCM). A numerical code is developed using an unstructured finite-volume method and an enthalpy-porosity technique to solve for natural convection coupled to a solid-liquid phase change. Five geometries containing the same volume of PCM are compared while cooling the same surface. The unsteady evolution of the melting front and the velocity and temperature fields is detailed. Other indicators of cooling efficiency are monitored, including the maximum temperature reached at the cooled surface. The computational results show the high impact of varying geometry: a maximum temperature difference as high as 40 degrees Celsius is observed between two of the cavities. The best efficiency is obtained for a cavity shifted vertically relative to the cooled surface. Other findings and recommendations are made for the design of PCM-filled cavities.

  7. The Influence of Tuners and Temperature on the Higher Order Mode Spectrum for 1.3 GHz SCRF Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Ainsworth, R; Zhang, P; Grecki, M; Baboi, N; Wamsat, T; Eddy, N

    2013-01-01

    Higher Order Modes (HOMs) are of concern for superconducting cavities as they can drive instabilities and so are usually damped and monitored. With special dedicated electronics, HOMs can provide information on the position on the beam. It has been proposed that piezo tuners used to keep the cavities operating at 1.3 GHz could alter the HOM spectrum altering the calibration constants used to read out the beam position affecting long term stability of the system. Also, of interest is how the cavity reacts to the slow tuner. Detuning and the retuning the cavity may alter the HOM spectrum. This is of particular interest for future machines not planning to use dedicated HOM damping as the tuning procedure may shift the frequency of HOMs onto dangerous resonances. The effect of temperature on the HOM spectrum is also investigated. An investigation of these effects has been performed at FLASH and the results are presented.

  8. Spoke cavity developments for the EURISOL driver

    CERN Document Server

    Bousson, S; Biarrotte, J.L; Dufour, J.M; Gandolfo, N; Junquera, T; Lesrel, J; Lukovac, L; Lutton, F; Martinet, G; Olry, G; Ponton, A; Rampnoux, E; Saugnac, H

    EURISOL is the next generation of Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility which aims at the provision of high intensity beams of radioactive nuclei with variable energy, from a few keV to greater than 100 MeV per nucleon, at an intensity several orders of magnitude higher than those currently available. The driver of EURISOL has to accelerate protons at a final energy of 1 GeV and 5 mA current, but also deuterons at 200 MeV (total energy). For the intermediate energy part of the driver, a solution based on superconducting (SC) spoke cavities is under study at the IPN Orsay laboratory. In this paper are presented the experimental results on the beta 0.15 spoke cavity, as well as achievements on the power coupler and cold tuning system. A new horizontal cryostat for performing a test of a fully equipped spoke cavity is also presented.

  9. Nitrogen doping study in ingot niobium cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhakal, Pashupati [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Ciovati, Gianluigi [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Kneisel, Peter [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Myneni, Ganapati Rao [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Makita, Junki [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Thermal diffusion of nitrogen in niobium superconducting radio frequency cavities at temperature ~800 °C has resulted in the increase in quality factor with a low-field Q-rise extending to Bp > 90 mT. However, the maximum accelerating gradient of these doped cavities often deteriorates below the values achieved by standard treatments prior to doping. Here, we present the results of the measurements on ingot niobium cavities doped with nitrogen at 800 °C. The rf measurements were carried out after the successive electropolishing to remove small amount of material from the inner surface layer. The result showed higher breakdown field with lower quality factor as material removal increases.

  10. Ponderomotive light squeezing with atomic cavity optomechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Brooks, Daniel W C; Brahms, Nathan; Purdy, Thomas P; Schreppler, Sydney; Stamper-Kurn, Dan M

    2011-01-01

    Accessing distinctly quantum aspects of the interaction between light and the position of a mechanical object has been an outstanding challenge to cavity-optomechanical systems. Only cold-atom implementations of cavity optomechanics have indicated effects of the quantum fluctuations in the optical radiation pressure force. Here we use such a system, in which quantum photon-number fluctuations significantly drive the center of mass of an atomic ensemble inside a Fabry-Perot cavity. We show that the optomechanical response both amplifies and ponderomotively squeezes the quantum light field. We also demonstrate that classical optical fluctuations can be attenuated by 26 dB or amplified by 20 dB with a weak input pump power of < 40 pW, and characterize the optomechanical amplifier's frequency-dependent gain and phase response in both the amplitude and phase-modulation quadratures.

  11. Coupled external cavity photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhriyal, Anusha; Lu, Meng; Ge, Chun; Cunningham, Brian T

    2014-05-01

    We report a fundamentally new approach to enhance fluorescence in which surface adsorbed fluorophore-tagged biomolecules are excited on a photonic crystal surface that functions as a narrow bandwidth and tunable mirror of an external cavity laser. This scheme leads to ∼10× increase in the electromagnetic enhancement factor compared to ordinary photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence. In our experiments, the cavity automatically tunes its lasing wavelength to the resonance wavelength of the photonic crystal, ensuring optimal on-resonance coupling even in the presence of variable device parameters and variations in the density of surface-adsorbed capture molecules. We achieve ∼10(5) × improvement in the limit of detection of a fluorophore-tagged protein compared to its detection on an unpatterned glass substrate. The enhanced fluorescence signal and easy optical alignment make cavity-coupled photonic crystals a viable approach for further reducing detection limits of optically-excited light emitters that are used in biological assays.

  12. Plasmonic coaxial waveguide-cavity devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahigir, Amirreza; Dastmalchi, Pouya; Shin, Wonseok; Fan, Shanhui; Veronis, Georgios

    2015-08-10

    We theoretically investigate three-dimensional plasmonic waveguide-cavity structures, built by side-coupling stub resonators that consist of plasmonic coaxial waveguides of finite length, to a plasmonic coaxial waveguide. The resonators are terminated either in a short or an open circuit. We show that the properties of these waveguide-cavity systems can be accurately described using a single-mode scattering matrix theory. We also show that, with proper choice of their design parameters, three-dimensional plasmonic coaxial waveguide-cavity devices and two-dimensional metal-dielectric-metal devices can have nearly identical transmission spectra. Thus, three-dimensional plasmonic coaxial waveguides offer a platform for practical implementation of two-dimensional metal-dielectric-metal device designs.

  13. Collective multiphoton blockade in cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, C. J.; Yang, Y. P.; Agarwal, G. S.

    2017-06-01

    We present a study of collective multiphoton blockade in coherently driven atoms in a single-mode cavity. Considering two atoms strongly coupled to an optical cavity, we show that the two-photon blockade with two-photon antibunching, and the three-photon blockade with three-photon antibunching can be observed simultaneously. The three-photon blockade probes both dressed states in the two-photon and three-photon spaces. The two-photon and three-photon blockades strongly depend on the location of the two atoms in the strong-coupling regime. The asymmetry in the atom-cavity coupling constants opens pathways for multiphoton blockade which is also shown to be sensitive to the atomic decay and pumping strengths. The work presented here predicts many quantum statistical features due to the collective behavior of atoms and can be useful to generate nonclassical photon pairs.

  14. Cavity lining after excavating caries lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwendicke, Falk; Göstemeyer, Gerd; Gluud, Christian

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: After removal of dentin caries lesions, cavity lining has been advocated. Non-clinical data support this approach, but clinical data are sparse and ambiguous. We aimed at evaluating the benefits and harms of cavity lining using meta-analysis and Trial Sequential Analysis. DATA: We...... included randomized clinical trials comparing restorations without versus with cavity lining for treating primary caries lesions. Only trials reporting failure (defined as need to re-retreat) after ≥1 year follow-up were included. Trial selection, data extraction, and risk of bias assessment were conducted....... STUDY SELECTION: From 128 studies, three randomized trials (89/130 patients or teeth), all treating primary teeth, were included. The trials had high risk of bias. All trials compared no lining versus calcium hydroxide lining after selective caries removal followed by adhesive restoration. Follow...

  15. Multiple bunch HOM evaluation for ERL cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chen; Ben-Zvi, I.; Blaskiewicz, Michael M.; Hao, Yue; Ptitsyn, Vadim

    2017-09-01

    In this work we investigate the effect of the bunch pattern in a linac on the Higher Order Mode (HOM) power generation. The future ERL-based electron-ion collider eRHIC at BNL is used as an illustrative example. This ERL has multiple high current Superconducting Radiofrequency (SRF) 5-cell cavities. The HOM power generated when a single bunch traverses the cavity is estimated by the corresponding loss factor. Multiple re-circulations through the Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) create a specific bunch pattern. In this case the loss factor can be different than the single bunch loss factor. HOM power can vary dramatically when the ERL bunch pattern changes. The HOM power generation can be surveyed in the time and frequency domains. We estimate the average HOM power in a 5-cell cavity with different ERL bunch patterns.

  16. Field Stabilization of Alvarez-Type Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Du, Xiaonan; Mickat, Sascha; Seibel, Anja

    2016-01-01

    Alvarez-type cavities are commonly used to reliably accelerate high quality hadron beams. Optimization of their longitudinal field homogeneity is usually accomplished by post-couplers, i.e. additional rods being integrated into the cavity. This paper instead proposes to use the stems that keep the drift tubes for that purpose. As their individual azimuthal orientations do not change the cavity's undisturbed operational mode, they comprise a set of free parameters that can be used to modify higher mode field patterns. The latter have significant impact on the robustness of the operational mode w.r.t. eventual perturbations. Several optimized stem configurations are presented and benchmarked against each other. The path to obtain these configurations is paved analytically and worked out in detail through simulations. It is shown that the method provides for flat field distributions and very low field tilt sensitivities without insertion of post-couplers.

  17. Cavity BPM System Tests for the ILC Spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slater, M.

    2007-12-21

    The main physics program of the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires a measurement of the beam energy at the interaction point with an accuracy of 10{sup -4} or better. To achieve this goal a magnetic spectrometer using high resolution beam position monitors (BPMs) has been proposed. This paper reports on the cavity BPM system that was deployed to test this proposal. We demonstrate sub-micron resolution and micron level stability over 20 hours for a 1 m long BPM triplet. We find micron-level stability over 1 hour for 3 BPM stations distributed over a 30 m long baseline. The understanding of the behavior and response of the BPMs gained from this work has allowed full spectrometer tests to be carried out.

  18. Prominence Mass Supply and the Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmit, Donald J.; Gibson, S.; Luna, M.; Karpen, J.; Innes, D.

    2013-01-01

    A prevalent but untested paradigm is often used to describe the prominence-cavity system; the cavity is under-dense because it it evacuated by supplying mass to the condensed prominence. The thermal non-equilibrium (TNE) model of prominence formation offers a theoretical framework to predict the thermodynamic evolutin of the prominence and the surrounding corona. We examine the evidence for a prominence-cavity connection by comparing the TNE model and diagnostics of dynamic extreme ultraviolet (EUV) emission surrounding the prominence, specifically prominence horns. Horns are correlated extensions of prminence plasma and coronal plasma which appear to connect the prominence and cavity. The TNE model predicts that large-scale brightenings will occur in the Solar Dynamics Observatory Atmospheric Imaging Assembly 171 A badpass near he prominence that are associated with the cooling phase of condensation formation. In our simulations, variations in the magnitude of footpoint heating lead to variations in the duration, spatial scale, and temporal offset between emission enhancements in the other EUV bandpasses. While these predictions match well a subset of the horn observations, the range of variations in the observed structures is not captured by the model. We discuss the implications of one-dimensional loop simulations for the three-dimensional time-averaged equilibrium in the prominence and the cavity. Evidence suggests that horns are likely caused by condensing prominence plasma, but the larger question of whether this process produces a density-depleted cavity requires a more tightly constrained model of heating and better knowledge of the associated magnetic structure.

  19. Electrostatically tunable optomechanical "zipper" cavity laser

    CERN Document Server

    Perahia, Raviv; Meenehan, Sean; Alegre, Thiago P Mayer; Painter, Oskar

    2010-01-01

    A tunable nanoscale "zipper" laser cavity, formed from two doubly clamped photonic crystal nanobeams, is demonstrated. Pulsed, room temperature, optically pumped lasing action at a wavelength of 1.3 micron is observed for cavities formed in a thin membrane containing InAsP/GaInAsP quantum-wells. Metal electrodes are deposited on the ends of the nanobeams to allow for micro-electro-mechanical actuation. Electrostatic tuning and modulation of the laser wavelength is demonstrated at a rate of 0.25nm/V^2 and a frequency as high as 6.7MHz, respectively.

  20. A STUDY OF RAPID CAVITY TUNING.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ZHAO, Y.

    2001-07-12

    An FFAG moot likely requires rapid cavity tuning. The cavity must also have a very high gradient. To satisfy both the high power and rapid tuning requirements is a big challenge. Detailed investigation of the possibility is addressed. Included are general thoughts, dual-loop and simple loop analyses, and a study of using ferrite or PIN diodes. Also proposed is a phase control scheme, which may be a better solution if the needed components can be developed. Finally, an energy analysis reveals the difficult of high power tuning.

  1. Fundamental Research in Superconducting RF Cavity Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Georg Hoffstaetter

    2012-11-13

    This is a 3-year SRF R&D proposal with two main goals: 1) to benefit near term high gradient SRF applications by understanding the causes of quench at high fields in present-day niobium cavities 2) to open the long-range prospects for SRF applications by experimentally verifying the recent exciting theoretical predication for new cavity materials such as Nb3Sn and MgB2. These predictions shwo that ultimately gradients of 100Mv/m to 200MV/m may become possible as material imperfections are overcome.

  2. Instrumentation for localized superconducting cavity diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Z. A.; Ge, M.; Iwashita, Y.

    2017-03-01

    Superconducting accelerator cavities are now routinely operated at levels approaching the theoretical limit of niobium. To achieve these operating levels more information than is available from the RF excitation signal is required to characterize and determine fixes for the sources of performance limitations. This information is obtained using diagnostic techniques which complement the analysis of the RF signal. In this paper we describe the operation and select results from three of these diagnostic techniques: the use of large scale thermometer arrays, second sound wave defect location and high precision cavity imaging with the Kyoto camera.

  3. Intensity correlations near a cavity QED antiresonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qing; Mølmer, Klaus

    2017-02-01

    We explore the antiresonance phenomenon, where a two-level atom is excited inside a single-mode, laser-driven cavity without appreciably exciting the field mode. Antiresonance is well known in classical physics and the excitation of the atomic and field degrees of freedom by a weak laser field can be easily understood in a classical oscillator picture. The temporal intensity correlations in the signal emitted from the atom and from the cavity, however, show strong signs of nonclassical behavior. We calculate these correlations and show how they can be interpreted in terms of a conditional quantum trajectory dynamics of the system.

  4. BNl 703 MHz superconducting RF cavity testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheehy, B.; Altinbas, Z.; Burrill, A.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Gassner, D.; Hahn, H.; Hammons, L.; Jamilkowski, J.; Kayran, D.; Kewisch, J.; Laloudakis, N.; Lederle, D.; Litvinenko, V.; McIntyre, G.; Pate, D.; Phillips, D.; Schultheiss, C.; Seda,T.; Than, R.; Xu, W.; Zaltsman, A.; Schultheiss, T.

    2011-03-28

    The BNL 5-cell, 703 MHz superconducting accelerating cavity has been installed in the high-current ERL experiment. This experiment will function as a proving ground for the development of high-current machines in general and is particularly targeted at beam development for an electron-ion collider (eRHIC). The cavity performed well in vertical tests, demonstrating gradients of 20 MV/m and a Q{sub 0} of 1e10. Here we will present its performance in the horizontal tests, and discuss technical issues involved in its implementation in the ERL.

  5. Plasma processing of superconducting radio frequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Janardan

    The development of plasma processing technology of superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities not only provides a chemical free and less expensive processing method, but also opens up the possibility for controlled modification of the inner surfaces of the cavity for better superconducting properties. The research was focused on the transition of plasma etching from two dimensional flat surfaces to inner surfaces of three dimensional (3D) structures. The results could be applicable to a variety of inner surfaces of 3D structures other than SRF cavities. Understanding the Ar/Cl2 plasma etching mechanism is crucial for achieving the desired modification of Nb SRF cavities. In the process of developing plasma etching technology, an apparatus was built and a method was developed to plasma etch a single cell Pill Box cavity. The plasma characterization was done with the help of optical emission spectroscopy. The Nb etch rate at various points of this cavity was measured before processing the SRF cavity. Cylindrical ring-type samples of Nb placed on the inner surface of the outer wall were used to measure the dependence of the process parameters on plasma etching. The measured etch rate dependence on the pressure, rf power, dc bias, temperature, Cl2 concentration and diameter of the inner electrode was determined. The etch rate mechanism was studied by varying the temperature of the outer wall, the dc bias on the inner electrode and gas conditions. In a coaxial plasma reactor, uniform plasma etching along the cylindrical structure is a challenging task due to depletion of the active radicals along the gas flow direction. The dependence of etch rate uniformity along the cylindrical axis was determined as a function of process parameters. The formation of dc self-biases due to surface area asymmetry in this type of plasma and its variation on the pressure, rf power and gas composition was measured. Enhancing the surface area of the inner electrode to reduce the

  6. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    1983-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity.It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. 2 figure-of-eight loops tune the frequency throughout the accelerating cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm, and are forced-air cooled. The 2 round objects in the front-compartments are the final-stage power-tetrodes. See also 8111095.

  7. Accelerating RF cavity of the Booster

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1981-01-01

    Each of the 4 PS Booster rings has a single accelerating cavity. It consists of 2 quarter-wave ferrite-loaded resonators. There are 2 figure-of-eight loops on the ferrite loads for tuning the frequency throughout the acceleration cycle, from 3 to 8 MHz (from 50 MeV at injection to the original Booster energy of 800 MeV, 2 GeV today). The cavities have a flat design, to fit the ring-to-ring distance of 36 cm. The tube for forced-air cooling is visible in the left front. See also 8301084.

  8. Achieving High Sensitivity in Cavity Optomechanical Magnetometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-08

    contained in this report are those of the author(s) and should not contrued as an official Department of the Army position, policy...architecture  with  Terfenol-­‐D  affixed  to  the  top  of   the   toroid .  (b)  New  cavity  optomechanical  magnetometer...architecture  with  Terfenol-­‐D  affixed  inside   the   toroid  in  a  specially  designed  cavity.   Fig.  2

  9. Optical cavity resonator in an expanding universe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M.

    2015-02-01

    We study the cosmological evolution of frequency of a standing electromagnetic wave in a resonant optical cavity placed to the expanding manifold described by the Robertson-Walker metric. Because of the Einstein principle of equivalence (EEP), one can find a local coordinate system (a local freely falling frame), in which spacetime is locally Minkowskian. However, due to the conformal nature of the Robertson-Walker metric the conventional transformation to the local inertial coordinates introduces ambiguity in the physical interpretation of the local time coordinate, . Therefore, contrary to a common-sense expectation, a straightforward implementation of EEP alone does not allow us to unambiguously decide whether atomic clocks based on quantum transitions of atoms, ticks at the same rate as the clocks based on electromagnetic modes of a cavity. To resolve this ambiguity we have to analyse the cavity rigidity and the oscillation of its electromagnetic modes in an expanding universe by employing the full machinery of the Maxwell equations irrespectively of the underlying theory of gravity. We proceed in this way and found out that the size of the cavity and the electromagnetic frequency experience an adiabatic drift in conformal (unphysical) coordinates as the universe expands in accordance with the Hubble law. We set up the oscillation equation for the resonant electromagnetic modes, solve it by the WKB approximation, and reduce the coordinate-dependent quantities to their counterparts measured by a local observer who counts time with atomic clock. The solution shows that there is a perfect mutual cancellation of the adiabatic drift of cavity's frequency by space transformation to local coordinates and the time counted by the clocks based on electromagnetic modes of cavity has the same rate as that of atomic clocks. We conclude that if general relativity is correct and the local expansion of space is isotropic there should be no cosmological drift of frequency of a

  10. Transformation optics for cavity array metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quach, James Q; Su, Chun-Hsu; Greentree, Andrew D

    2013-03-11

    Cavity array metamaterials (CAMs), composed of optical microcavities in a lattice coupled via tight-binding interactions, represent a novel architecture for engineering metamaterials. Since the size of the CAMs' constituent elements are commensurate with the operating wavelength of the device, it cannot directly utilise classical transformation optics in the same way as traditional metamaterials. By directly transforming the internal geometry of the system, and locally tuning the permittivity between cavities, we provide an alternative framework suitable for tight-binding implementations of metamaterials. We develop a CAM-based cloak as the case study.

  11. Impedance-matched cavity quantum memory

    CERN Document Server

    Afzelius, Mikael

    2010-01-01

    We consider an atomic frequency comb based quantum memory inside an asymmetric optical cavity. In this configuration it is possible to absorb the input light completely in a system with an effective optical depth of one, provided that the absorption per cavity round trip exactly matches the transmission of the coupling mirror ("impedance matching"). We show that the impedance matching results in a readout efficiency only limited by irreversible atomic dephasing, whose effect can be made very small in systems with large inhomogeneous broadening. Our proposal opens up an attractive route towards quantum memories with close to unit efficiency.

  12. Energy Levels of Coupled Plasmonic Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chuan-Pu Liu; Xin-Li Zhu; Jia-Sen Zhang; Jun Xu; Yamin Leprince-Wang; Da-Peng Yu

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate the hybridization of the plasmonic modes in directly coupled whispering gallery cavities fabricated on silver films and present the mode patterns and energy levels using cathodoluminescence spectroscopy.Although the energy of the most antisymmetrically coupled modes is higher than that of the corresponding symmetrically coupled ones,the contrary cases happen for small quantum number modes.We attribute the phenomenon to the different surface plasmon polariton paths between the symmetrically and antisymmetrically coupled modes.These results provide an understanding of the resonant properties in coupled plasmonic cavities,which have potential applications in nanophotonic devices.

  13. Instrumentation for localized superconducting cavity diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conway, Z. A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States). Physics Division; Ge, M. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Iwashita, Y. [Kyoto Univ. (Japan)

    2017-01-12

    Superconducting accelerator cavities are now routinely operated at levels approaching the theoretical limit of niobium. To achieve these operating levels more information than is available from the RF excitation signal is required to characterize and determine fixes for the sources of performance limitations. This information is obtained using diagnostic techniques which complement the analysis of the RF signal. In this paper we describe the operation and select results from three of these diagnostic techniques: the use of large scale thermometer arrays, second sound wave defect location and high precision cavity imaging with the Kyoto camera.

  14. Parasitic Cavities Losses in SPEAR-2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sands, Matt

    2016-12-19

    In PEP the large number of particles in a bunch, together with the small bunch length, may cause grievous energy loss from the beam to parasitic modes in the accelerating cavities. I have recently tried to estimate the parasitic cavity in PEP, based on a paper of Keil and I have obtained the result that the loss to parasitic modes will be about 10 MeV per particle per revolution for a bunch length of about 10 cm. In this note, I bring together some of the considerations that might bear on an experimental investigation of the loss using SPEAR-2.

  15. Ferrite-filled cavities for compact planar resonators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keatley, P. S.; Durrant, C. J.; Berry, S. J.; Sirotkin, E.; Hibbins, A. P.; Hicken, R. J.

    2014-01-01

    Sub-wavelength metallic planar cavities, closed at one end, have been constructed by wrapping aluminium foil around teflon or ferrite slabs. Finite cavity width perturbs the fundamental cavity mode frequency of ferrite-filled cavities due to different permeability inside and outside of the cavity, in contrast to teflon-filled cavities, while the cavity length required to achieve a specific resonance frequency is significantly reduced for a ferrite-filled cavity. Ferrite-filled cavities may be excited by an in-plane alternating magnetic field and may be advantageous for high-frequency (HF) and ultra HF tagging and radio frequency identification of metallic objects within security, manufacturing, and shipping environments.

  16. 1.3 GHz superconducting RF cavity program at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsburg, C.M.; Arkan, T.; Barbanotti, S.; Carter, H.; Champion, M.; Cooley, L.; Cooper, C.; Foley, M.; Ge, M.; Grimm, C.; Harms, E.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    At Fermilab, 9-cell 1.3 GHz superconducting RF (SRF) cavities are prepared, qualified, and assembled into cryomodules (CMs) for Project X, an International Linear Collider (ILC), or other future projects. The 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program includes targeted R&D on 1-cell 1.3 GHz cavities for cavity performance improvement. Production cavity qualification includes cavity inspection, surface processing, clean assembly, and one or more cryogenic low-power CW qualification tests which typically include performance diagnostics. Qualified cavities are welded into helium vessels and are cryogenically tested with pulsed high-power. Well performing cavities are assembled into cryomodules for pulsed high-power testing in a cryomodule test facility, and possible installation into a beamline. The overall goals of the 1.3 GHz SRF cavity program, supporting facilities, and accomplishments are described.

  17. Polymer-coated vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser diode vapor sensor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ansbæk, Thor; Nielsen, Claus Højgaard; Larsen, Niels Bent

    2010-01-01

    We report a new method for monitoring vapor concentration of volatile organic compounds using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The VCSEL is coated with a polymer thin film on the top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). The analyte absorption is transduced to the electrical domain ...... through modulation of the VCSEL output power as the polymer swell. We have investigated the responsivity of this technique experimentally using a plasma polymerized polystyrene coating and explain the results theoretically as a reflectance modulation of the top DBR.......We report a new method for monitoring vapor concentration of volatile organic compounds using a vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (VCSEL). The VCSEL is coated with a polymer thin film on the top distributed Bragg reflector (DBR). The analyte absorption is transduced to the electrical domain...

  18. Variable pathlength cavity spectroscopy development of an automated prototype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmeling, Ryan Andrew

    ) enters the optical cavity in the same manner as in Cavity Ring-Down Spectroscopy (CRDS), i.e., by passing through the cavity entrance mirror. However, unlike CRDS in which the mirrors are fixed, concave, and mechanically unaltered, the cavity exit mirror contains a slit (1.0 mm diameter) that is rotated at high speed on an axle, thereby transmitting a small fraction of the trapped light to a photomultiplier tube detector. In this approach, unlike CRDS, absorbance is measured directly. In previous prototype designs of the VPCS instrument, instrument control (alignment) and data acquisition and reduction were performed manually; these functions were both inefficient and tedious. Despite this, the VPCS was validated in "proof of concept" testing, as described with a previous prototype (Frost, 2011). Frost demonstrated that the pathlength enhancement increased 53-fold compared to single-pass absorption measurements in monitoring NO2 (g) at part-per-billion levels. The goal of the present work is to improve upon the previous prototype ("P4") that required manual alignment, data collection, and data reduction by creating a completely automated version of VPCS -- i.e., the "P5" prototype. By developing source code in LabVIEW(TM), demonstration that the VPCS can be completely controlled in an automated fashion is described. Computationally, a Field-Programmable Gate Array is used to automate the process of data collection and reduction in real-time. It is shown that the inputs and outputs of the P5 instrument can be continuously monitored, allowing for real-time triggering of the source laser, collection of all data, and reduction of the data to report absorbance. Furthermore, it is shown that the VPCS can be automatically aligned -- also in real-time on the order of microseconds -- to a high degree of precision by using servo-actuators that adjust the beam position based upon the input from a sensitive CCD camera. With the implementation of this hardware and LabVIEW code, more

  19. Digital Beam Position Monitor for the Happex Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Kauffman, Sherlon R; Freyberger, Arne; Kaufman, Lisa; Musson, John

    2005-01-01

    The proposed HAPPEX experiment at CEBAF employs a three cavity monitor system for high-precision (1 mm), high-bandwidth (100 kHz) position measurements. This is performed using a cavity triplet consisting of two TM110-mode cavities (one each for X and Y planes) combined with a conventional TM-010-mode cavity for a phase and magnitude reference. Traditional systems have used the TM010 cavity output to directly down convert the BPM cavity signals to base band. The Multi-channel HAPPEX digital receiver simultaneously I/Q samples each cavity and extracts position using a CORDIC algorithm. The hardware design consists of a digital receiver daughter board and digital processor motherboard that resides in a VXI crate. The daughter board down converts 1.497 GHz signals from the TM010 cavity and X and Y signals from the TM110 cavities to 4 MHz, and extracts the quadrature digital signals. The motherboard processes this data and computes beam intensity and X-Y positions with a resolution of one mm, 100 kHz output bandw...

  20. Cavity sideband cooling of a single trapped ion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibrandt, David R; Labaziewicz, Jaroslaw; Vuletić, Vladan; Chuang, Isaac L

    2009-09-04

    We report a demonstration and quantitative characterization of one-dimensional cavity cooling of a single trapped (88)Sr(+) ion in the resolved-sideband regime. We measure the spectrum of cavity transitions, the rates of cavity heating and cooling, and the steady-state cooling limit. The cavity cooling dynamics and cooling limit of 22.5(3) motional quanta, limited by the moderate coupling between the ion and the cavity, are consistent with a simple model [Phys. Rev. A 64, 033405 (2001)] without any free parameters, validating the rate equation model for cavity cooling.

  1. Controlled coupling of photonic crystal cavities using photochromic tuning

    CERN Document Server

    Cai, Tao; Solomon, Glenn S; Waks, Edo

    2013-01-01

    We present a method to control the resonant coupling interaction in a coupled-cavity photonic crystal molecule by using a local and reversible photochromic tuning technique. We demonstrate the ability to tune both a two-cavity and a three-cavity photonic crystal molecule through the resonance condition by selectively tuning the individual cavities. Using this technique, we can quantitatively determine important parameters of the coupled-cavity system such as the photon tunneling rate. This method can be scaled to photonic crystal molecules with larger numbers of cavities, which provides a versatile method for studying strong interactions in coupled resonator arrays.

  2. Schemes for Generating Cluster States via Cavity Systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DU Gang; LAI Bo-Hui; YU Ya-Fei; ZHANG Zhi-Ming

    2009-01-01

    We propose a scheme for generating an N-atom cluster state via cavity quantum electrodynamics (CQED).In our scheme, there is no transfer of quantum information between the atoms and the cavity, i.e., the cavity is always in the vacuum state, so the cavity decay can be suppressed.Also, the generated cluster state is the entanglement of the ground states, so the atomic spontaneous emission can be avoided.Therefore, the cluster state generated in our scheme has a longer lifetime. Furthermore, the requirement on the quality factor of the cavity greatly loosened for the cavity is only virtually excited.

  3. BIOREACTOR WITH LID FOR EASY ACCESS TO INCUBATION CAVITY

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    There is provided a bioreactor which is provided with a lid (13) that facilitates access to the incubation cavity. Specifically the end wall of the incubation cavity is constituted by the lid (13) so that removal of the cap renders the incubation cavity fully accessible.......There is provided a bioreactor which is provided with a lid (13) that facilitates access to the incubation cavity. Specifically the end wall of the incubation cavity is constituted by the lid (13) so that removal of the cap renders the incubation cavity fully accessible....

  4. Subwavelength rectangular cavity partially filled with left-handed materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Tian; Chen Yan; Feng Yi-Jun

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we present the electromagnetic analysis of a rectangular cavity partially filled with a left-handed material slab. Our theoretical investigation shows that there exist novel resonant modes in the cavity, and such a cavity becomes a subwavelength cavity. The eigenvalue equation of the cavity is derived and the resonant frequencies of the novel modes are calculated by using numerical simulation. We also discuss the stability of the novel resonant modes and show the best condition under which a useful rectangular cavity of subwavelength dimensions with tolerable stability is obtained.

  5. Efficient generation of Bell-cat states in remote cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Xing; ZHANG Ying-Jie; XIA Yun-Jie

    2008-01-01

    In the context of cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED), a potential scheme is proposed to generate entangled coherentstates. The scheme includes twice interactions of two-level atoms with cavities. In the first interaction, two atoms are sentinto a microwave cavity with the large detuning respectively. And then the second interaction is that the two atoms enteranother microwave cavity and are driven by a resonant classical field meantime. When we choose the proper interactiontime and make measurement on the two atoms, the two microwave cavity mode fields are determinatively entangled. Inaddition, it is easy to generalize the scheme to multi-cavity and multi-atom.

  6. Superconducting RF cavity R&D for future accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Ginsburg, C M

    2009-01-01

    High-beta superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) elliptical cavities are being developed for several accelerator projects including Project X, the European XFEL, and the International Linear Collider (ILC). Fermilab has recently established an extensive infrastructure for SRF cavity R&D for future accelerators, including cavity surface processing and testing and cavity assembly into cryomodules. Some highlights of the global effort in SRF R&D toward improving cavity performance, and Fermilab SRF cavity R&D in the context of global projects are reviewed.

  7. Optical fiber tips functionalized with semiconductor photonic crystal cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Shambat, Gary; Rivoire, Kelley; Sarmiento, Tomas; Harris, James; Vuckovic, Jelena

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate a simple and rapid epoxy-based method for transferring photonic crystal cavities to the facets of optical fibers. Passive Si cavities were measured via fiber taper coupling as well as direct transmission from the fiber facet. Active quantum dot containing GaAs cavities showed photoluminescence that was collected both in free space and back through the original fiber. Cavities maintain a high quality factor (2000-4000) in both material systems. This new design architecture provides a practical mechanically stable platform for the integration of photonic crystal cavities with macroscale optics and opens the door for novel research on fiber-coupled cavity devices.

  8. Injector Cavities Fabrication, Vertical Test Performance and Primary Cryomodule Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Haipeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Cheng, Guangfeng [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Clemens, William [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Davis, G [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Macha, Kurt [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Overton, Roland [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States); Spell, D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, Newport News, VA (United States)

    2015-09-01

    After the electromagnetic design and the mechanical design of a β=0.6, 2-cell elliptical SRF cavity, the cavity has been fabricated. Then both 2-cell and 7-cell cavities have been bench tuned to the target values of frequency, coupling external Q and field flatness. After buffer chemistry polishing (BCP) and high pressure rinses (HPR), Vertical 2K cavity test results have been satisfied the specifications and ready for the string assembly. We will report the cavity performance including Lorenz Force Detuning (LFD) and Higher Order Modes (HOM) damping data. Its integration with cavity tuners to the cryomodule design will be reported.

  9. Shallow Cavities in Multiple-Planet Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Duffell, Paul C

    2014-01-01

    Large cavities are often observed in protoplanetary disks, which might suggest the presence of planets opening gaps in the disk. Multiple planets are necessary to produce a wide cavity in the gas. However, multiple planets may also be a burden to the carving out of very deep gaps. When additional planets are added to the system, the time-dependent perturbations from these additional satellites can stir up gas in the gap, suppressing cavity opening. In this study, we perform two-dimensional numerical hydro calculations of gap opening for single and multiple planets, showing the effect that additional planets have on the gap depths. We show that multiple planets produce much shallower cavities than single planets, so that more massive planets are needed in the multiple-planet case to produce an equivalent gap depth as in the single-planet case. To deplete a gap by a factor of 100 for the parameters chosen in this study, one only requires $M_p \\approx 3.5M_J$ in the single-planet case, but much more massive plan...

  10. Quantization of Electromagnetic Fields in Cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakazu, Kiyotaka; Oshiro, Kazunori

    1996-01-01

    A quantization procedure for the electromagnetic field in a rectangular cavity with perfect conductor walls is presented, where a decomposition formula of the field plays an essential role. All vector mode functions are obtained by using the decomposition. After expanding the field in terms of the vector mode functions, we get the quantized electromagnetic Hamiltonian.

  11. Pressurized rf cavities in ionizing beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemire, B.; Tollestrup, A. V.; Yonehara, K.; Chung, M.; Torun, Y.; Johnson, R. P.; Flanagan, G.; Hanlet, P. M.; Collura, M. G.; Jana, M. R.; Leonova, M.; Moretti, A.; Schwarz, T.

    2016-06-01

    A muon collider or Higgs factory requires significant reduction of the six dimensional emittance of the beam prior to acceleration. One method to accomplish this involves building a cooling channel using high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities. The performance of such a cavity when subjected to an intense particle beam must be investigated before this technology can be validated. To this end, a high pressure gas filled radio frequency (rf) test cell was built and placed in a 400 MeV beam line from the Fermilab linac to study the plasma evolution and its effect on the cavity. Hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen gases were studied. Additionally, sulfur hexafluoride and dry air were used as dopants to aid in the removal of plasma electrons. Measurements were made using a variety of beam intensities, gas pressures, dopant concentrations, and cavity rf electric fields, both with and without a 3 T external solenoidal magnetic field. Energy dissipation per electron-ion pair, electron-ion recombination rates, ion-ion recombination rates, and electron attachment times to SF6 and O2 were measured.

  12. Characterization and simulation of a pillbox cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Moran Guizan, Carla

    2017-01-01

    A cylindrical pillbox cavity is characterized and its principal parameters, such as the cut-off frequencies of the modes, the quality factor and R/Q figure, are calculated. Additionally, these measurements are compared with an analytical analysis and with a simulation with the software CST Studio to determine how precise they are.

  13. AGN Heating Through Cavities and Shocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.E.J. Nulsen; C. Jones; W.R. Forman; L.P. David; B.R. McNamara; D.A. Rafferty; L. Bîrzan; M. Wise

    2007-01-01

    Three comments are made on AGN heating of cooling flows. A simple physical argument is used to show that the enthalpy of a buoyant radio lobe is converted to heat in its wake. Thus, a significant part of ``cavity'' enthalpy is likely to end up as heat. Second, the properties of the repeated weak sho

  14. Pressurized rf cavities in ionizing beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Freemire

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available A muon collider or Higgs factory requires significant reduction of the six dimensional emittance of the beam prior to acceleration. One method to accomplish this involves building a cooling channel using high pressure gas filled radio frequency cavities. The performance of such a cavity when subjected to an intense particle beam must be investigated before this technology can be validated. To this end, a high pressure gas filled radio frequency (rf test cell was built and placed in a 400 MeV beam line from the Fermilab linac to study the plasma evolution and its effect on the cavity. Hydrogen, deuterium, helium and nitrogen gases were studied. Additionally, sulfur hexafluoride and dry air were used as dopants to aid in the removal of plasma electrons. Measurements were made using a variety of beam intensities, gas pressures, dopant concentrations, and cavity rf electric fields, both with and without a 3 T external solenoidal magnetic field. Energy dissipation per electron-ion pair, electron-ion recombination rates, ion-ion recombination rates, and electron attachment times to SF_{6} and O_{2} were measured.

  15. Magnetic shielding for superconducting RF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuzawa, M.; Terashima, A.; Tsuchiya, K.; Ueki, R.

    2017-03-01

    Magnetic shielding is a key technology for superconducting radio frequency (RF) cavities. There are basically two approaches for shielding: (1) surround the cavity of interest with high permeability material and divert magnetic flux around it (passive shielding); and (2) create a magnetic field using coils that cancels the ambient magnetic field in the area of interest (active shielding). The choice of approach depends on the magnitude of the ambient magnetic field, residual magnetic field tolerance, shape of the magnetic shield, usage, cost, etc. However, passive shielding is more commonly used for superconducting RF cavities. The issue with passive shielding is that as the volume to be shielded increases, the size of the shielding material increases, thereby leading to cost increase. A recent trend is to place a magnetic shield in a cryogenic environment inside a cryostat, very close to the cavities, reducing the size and volume of the magnetic shield. In this case, the shielding effectiveness at cryogenic temperatures becomes important. We measured the permeabilities of various shielding materials at both room temperature and cryogenic temperature (4 K) and studied shielding degradation at that cryogenic temperature.

  16. Femtosecond SESAM lasers with shortlength cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trunov, V. I.; Pestryakov, Efim V.; Petrov, V. V.; Kirpichnikov, A. V.; Bordzilovskii, A. S.; Preobrazhenskii, V. V.; Putyato, M. A.; Semyagin, B. R.

    2003-10-01

    Femtosecond pulse generation in Al2O3:Ti3+ laser with some types of laser cavity configuration with semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM), based on semiconductor quantum well low temperature (LT) GaAs/AlAs, GaxIn1-xAs/AlyGa1-yAs saturated absorbers and metal mirrors have been investigated.

  17. Micro-Cavity Fluidic Dye Laser

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helbo, Bjarne; Kristensen, Anders; Menon, Aric Kumaran

    2003-01-01

    We have successfully designed, fabricated and characterized a micro-cavity fluidic dye laser with metallic mirrors, which can be integrated with polymer based lab-on-a-chip microsystems without further processing steps. A simple rate-equation model is used to predict the average pumping power...

  18. All-optical tunable photonic crystal cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Liu, Liu; Ou, Haiyan

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an ultra-small photonic crystal cavity with two resonant modes. An all-optical tuning operation based on the free-carrier plasma effect is, for the first time, realized utilizing a continuous wave light source. The termo-optical effect is minimized by isoproponal infiltration...... of the photonic crystal structure....

  19. Tooth structure and fracture strength of cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondelli, José; Sene, Fábio; Ramos, Renata Pereira

    2007-01-01

    (Groups I, II and III) and indirect inlay cavities (Groups IV, V and VI) were prepared maintaining standardized dimensions: 2-mm deep pulpal floors, 1.5-mm wide gingival walls and 2-mm high axial walls. Buccolingual width of the occlusal box was established at 1/4 (Groups I and IV), 1/3 (Groups II and V...

  20. Defects in III-nitride microdisk cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, C. X.; Puchtler, T. J.; Zhu, T.; Griffiths, J. T.; Oliver, R. A.

    2017-03-01

    Nitride microcavities offer an exceptional platform for the investigation of light–matter interactions as well as the development of devices such as high efficiency light emitting diodes (LEDs) and low-threshold nanolasers. Microdisk geometries in particular are attractive for low-threshold lasing applications due to their ability to support high finesse whispering gallery modes (WGMs) and small modal volumes. In this article we review the effect of defects on the properties of nitride microdisk cavities fabricated using photoelectrochemical etching of an InGaN sacrificial superlattice (SSL). Threading dislocations originating from either the original GaN pseudosubstrate are shown to hinder the undercutting of microdisk cavities during the photoelectric chemical etching process resulting in whiskers of unetched material on the underside of microdisks. The unetched whiskers provide a pathway for light to escape, reducing microdisk Q-factor if located in the region occupied by the WGMs. Additionally, dislocations can affect the spectral stability of quantum dot emitters, thus hindering their effective integration in microdisk cavities. Though dislocations are clearly undesirable, the limiting factor on nitride microdisk Q-factor is expected to be internal absorption, indicating that the further optimisation of nitride microdisk cavities must incorporate both the elimination of dislocations and careful tailoring of the active region emission wavelength and background doping levels.

  1. Tooth structure and fracture strength of cavities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mondelli, José; Sene, Fábio; Ramos, Renata Pereira;

    2007-01-01

    (Groups I, II and III) and indirect inlay cavities (Groups IV, V and VI) were prepared maintaining standardized dimensions: 2-mm deep pulpal floors, 1.5-mm wide gingival walls and 2-mm high axial walls. Buccolingual width of the occlusal box was established at 1/4 (Groups I and IV), 1/3 (Groups II and V...

  2. Coupling coefficients for coupled-cavity lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, R.J.; Yariv, A.

    1987-03-01

    The authors derive simple, analytic formulas for the field coupling coefficients in a two-section coupled-cavity laser using a local field rate equation treatment. They show that there is a correction to the heuristic formulas based on power flow calculated by Marcuse; the correction is in agreement with numerical calculations from a coupled-mode approach.

  3. Observing mode propagation inside a laser cavity

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naidoo, Darryl

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The mode inside a laser cavity may be understood as the interference of two counter-propagating waves, referred to as the forward and backward waves, respectively. We outline a simple experimental procedure, which does not require any additional...

  4. Uterine cavity assessment prior to IVF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pundir, Jyotsna; El Toukhy, Tarek

    2010-11-01

    Approximately 15% of couples are affected with subfertility, of which up to 20% remain unexplained. Uterine cavity abnormalities can be a contributing cause of subfertility and recurrent implantation failure. Uterine cavity assessment has been suggested as a routine investigation in the evaluation of subfertile women. Traditionally, hysterosalpingography has been the most commonly used technique in the evaluation of infertility. Transvaginal ultrasound scan allows visualization of the endometrial lining and cavity, and has been used as a screening test for the assessment of uterine cavity. Abnormal uterine findings on a baseline scan can be further evaluated with saline hysterosonography, which is highly sensitive and specific in identifying intrauterine abnormalities. Hysteroscopy is considered as the definitive diagnostic tool to evaluate any abnormality suspected on hysterosalpingography, transvaginal ultrasound scan or saline hysterosonography during routine investigation of infertile patients. Minimally invasive hysteroscopes have minimized the pain experienced by patients during the procedure and made it feasible to use hysteroscopy as a routine outpatient examination. Following recurrent IVF failure there is some evidence of benefit from hysteroscopy in increasing the chance of pregnancy in the subsequent IVF cycle, both in those with abnormal and normal hysteroscopic findings. Various possible mechanisms have been proposed for this beneficial effect, but more randomized controlled trials are needed before its routine use in the general subfertile population can be recommended.

  5. Nonlinear Analysis of Cavities in Rock Salt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ottosen, N. S.; Krenk, Steen

    1979-01-01

    The paper covers some material and computational aspects of the rock mechanics of leached cavities in salt. A material model is presented in which the instantaneous stiffness of the salt is obtained by interpolation between the unloaded state and a relevant failure state. The model enables predic...

  6. Bifurcation structure of an optical ring cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kubstrup, C.; Mosekilde, Erik

    1996-01-01

    One- and two-dimensional continuation techniques are applied to determine the basic bifurcation structure for an optical ring cavity with a nonlinear absorbing element (the Ikeda Map). By virtue of the periodic structure of the map, families of similar solutions develop in parameter space. Within...

  7. Hybrid ion chains inside an optical cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zichao; Siverns, James; Quraishi, Qudsia

    2016-05-01

    Trapped ions remain a leading candidate for the implementation of large-scale quantum networks. These networks require nodes that can store and process quantum information as well as communicate with each other though photonic flying qubits. We propose to use hybrid ion chains of barium, for communication, and ytterbium, for quantum information processing. We report on progress in setting up a hybrid ion chain in a versatile four-blade trap using high numerical aperture collection optics. Although the visible photons produced from barium ions are more favorable as they are not suitable for long distance fiber communication. With this in mind, we intend to implement frequency conversion to overcome this issue. Also, with the view toward increasing the flying-qubit production rate, we propose a cavity-based system to enhance interactions between the ions and photons. The cavity axis is to be placed along the axial direction of the trap allowing a chain of multiple ions to interact with the cavity at the same time. With this configuration the atom-photon coupling strength can be improved by sqrt(N), where N is the number of ions. Experiments will focus on exploring the dynamics of hybrid ion chain, dual species quantum information processing, two-colour entanglement and phase gates assisted by the ion-cavity coupling are to be explored.

  8. Design of 162 MHz RF Experimental Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YIN; Zhi-guo; CAO; Xue-long; GUO; Juan-juan; JI; Bin; FU; Xiao-liang; WEI; Jun-yi

    2015-01-01

    In this paper,a 162MHz RF experimental cavity is designed to study the multipacting multiplier effect of the medium and the metal electrode and its relationship with the plate surface characteristics,and to find out the method for inhibiting multipacting multiplier effects.The

  9. Optical cavity resonator in an expanding universe

    CERN Document Server

    Kopeikin, Sergei

    2014-01-01

    We study evolution of frequency of a standing electromagnetic (EM) wave in a resonant optical cavity placed to the expanding manifold described by the Robertson-Walker metric. One builds a local coordinate system in which spacetime is locally Minkowskian. However, due to the conformal nature of the Robertson-Walker metric the conventional transformation to the local inertial coordinates introduces ambiguity in the physical interpretation of the local time coordinate. Therefore, contrary to a common-sense expectation, a straightforward implementation of EEP alone does not allow us to decide whether atomic clocks ticks at the same rate as the clocks based on EM modes of a cavity. To resolve the ambiguity we analyzed the cavity rigidity and the oscillation of its EM modes in an expanding universe by employing the Maxwell equations. We found out that both the size of the cavity and the EM frequency experience an adiabatic drift in conformal coordinates as the universe expands. We set up the oscillation equation f...

  10. Coherent acoustic excitation of cavity polaritons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poel, Mike van der; de Lima, M. M.; Hey, R.

    and highly nonlinear optical response.Our sample consists of epitaxially grown GaAs/AlGaAs QWs located at the anti-node ofa high Q lambda cavity, which is resonant with the QW excitonic transition3. The SAWfield, which is excited by an interdigital transducer on the piezoelectric GaAs samplesurface...

  11. All-optical tunable photonic crystal cavity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pu, Minhao; Liu, Liu; Ou, Haiyan;

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an ultra-small photonic crystal cavity with two resonant modes. An all-optical tuning operation based on the free-carrier plasma effect is, for the first time, realized utilizing a continuous wave light source. The termo-optical effect is minimized by isoproponal infiltration...... of the photonic crystal structure....

  12. Cavity-enhanced dual-comb spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Bernhardt, Birgitta; Jacquet, Patrick; Jacquey, Marion; Kobayashi, Yohei; Udem, Thomas; Holzwarth, Ronald; Guelachvili, Guy; Hänsch, Theodor W; Picqué, Nathalie

    2009-01-01

    The sensitivity of molecular fingerprinting is dramatically improved when placing the absorbing sample in a high-finesse optical cavity, thanks to the large increase of the effective path-length. As demonstrated recently, when the equidistant lines from a laser frequency comb are simultaneously injected into the cavity over a large spectral range, multiple trace-gases may be identified within a few milliseconds. Analyzing efficiently the light transmitted through the cavity however still remains challenging. Here, a novel approach, cavity-enhanced frequency comb Fourier transform spectroscopy, fully overcomes this difficulty and measures ultrasensitive, broad-bandwidth, high-resolution spectra within a few tens of $\\mu$s. It could be implemented from the Terahertz to the ultraviolet regions without any need for detector arrays. We recorded, within 18 $\\mu$s, spectra of the 1.0 $\\mu$m overtone bands of ammonia spanning 20 nm with 4.5 GHz resolution and a noise-equivalent-absorption at one-second-averaging per ...

  13. Effect of cyanoacrylate treatment of cavity walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushi, Y; Fusayama, T

    1980-04-01

    Cyanoacrylate treatment of the cavity wall for composite resin restoration failed to keep adhesion when set, but the marginal closure improved markedly both in vivo and vitro, even when thermal-cycled. It irritated the pulp slightly only at the beginning. Ethylcyanoacrylate was superior to methylcyanoacrylate in regard to adhesion, leakage and pulp response.

  14. Classical stochastic measurement trajectories: Bosonic atomic gases in an optical cavity and quantum measurement backaction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mark D.; Ruostekoski, Janne

    2014-08-01

    We formulate computationally efficient classical stochastic measurement trajectories for a multimode quantum system under continuous observation. Specifically, we consider the nonlinear dynamics of an atomic Bose-Einstein condensate contained within an optical cavity subject to continuous monitoring of the light leaking out of the cavity. The classical trajectories encode within a classical phase-space representation a continuous quantum measurement process conditioned on a given detection record. We derive a Fokker-Planck equation for the quasiprobability distribution of the combined condensate-cavity system. We unravel the dynamics into stochastic classical trajectories that are conditioned on the quantum measurement process of the continuously monitored system. Since the dynamics of a continuously measured observable in a many-atom system can be closely approximated by classical dynamics, the method provides a numerically efficient and accurate approach to calculate the measurement record of a large multimode quantum system. Numerical simulations of the continuously monitored dynamics of a large atom cloud reveal considerably fluctuating phase profiles between different measurement trajectories, while ensemble averages exhibit local spatially varying phase decoherence. Individual measurement trajectories lead to spatial pattern formation and optomechanical motion that solely result from the measurement backaction. The backaction of the continuous quantum measurement process, conditioned on the detection record of the photons, spontaneously breaks the symmetry of the spatial profile of the condensate and can be tailored to selectively excite collective modes.

  15. Novel use of cavity ring-down spectroscopy to investigate aquatic carbon cycling from microbial to ecosystem scales

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Maher, D.T.; Santos, I.S.; Leuven, J.R.F.W.; Oakes, J.M.; Erler, D.V.; Carvalho, M.C.; Eyre, B.D.

    2013-01-01

    Development of cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) has enabled real-time monitoring of carbon stable isotope ratios of carbon dioxide and methane in air. Here we demonstrate that CRDS can be adapted to assess aquatic carbon cycling processes from microbial to ecosystem scales. We first measured in

  16. Multipacting studies in elliptic SRF cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Ram; Jana, Arup Ratan; Kumar, Vinit

    2017-09-01

    Multipacting is a resonant process, where the number of unwanted electrons resulting from a parasitic discharge rapidly grows to a larger value at some specific locations in a radio-frequency cavity. This results in a degradation of the cavity performance indicators (e.g. the quality factor Q and the maximum achievable accelerating gradient Eacc), and in the case of a superconducting radiofrequency (SRF) cavity, it leads to a quenching of superconductivity. Numerical simulations are essential to pre-empt the possibility of multipacting in SRF cavities, such that its design can be suitably refined to avoid this performance limiting phenomenon. Readily available computer codes (e.g.FishPact, MultiPac,CST-PICetc.) are widely used to simulate the phenomenon of multipacting in such cases. Most of the contemporary two dimensional (2D) codes such as FishPact, MultiPacetc. are unable to detect the multipacting in elliptic cavities because they use a simplistic secondary emission model, where it is assumed that all the secondary electrons are emitted with same energy. Some three-dimensional (3D) codes such as CST-PIC, which use a more realistic secondary emission model (Furman model) by following a probability distribution for the emission energy of secondary electrons, are able to correctly predict the occurrence of multipacting. These 3D codes however require large data handling and are slower than the 2D codes. In this paper, we report a detailed analysis of the multipacting phenomenon in elliptic SRF cavities and development of a 2D code to numerically simulate this phenomenon by employing the Furman model to simulate the secondary emission process. Since our code is 2D, it is faster than the 3D codes. It is however as accurate as the contemporary 3D codes since it uses the Furman model for secondary emission. We have also explored the possibility to further simplify the Furman model, which enables us to quickly estimate the growth rate of multipacting without

  17. Accoustic Localization of Breakdown in Radio Frequency Accelerating Cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lane, Peter Gwin [IIT, Chicago

    2016-07-01

    Current designs for muon accelerators require high-gradient radio frequency (RF) cavities to be placed in solenoidal magnetic fields. These fields help contain and efficiently reduce the phase space volume of source muons in order to create a usable muon beam for collider and neutrino experiments. In this context and in general, the use of RF cavities in strong magnetic fields has its challenges. It has been found that placing normal conducting RF cavities in strong magnetic fields reduces the threshold at which RF cavity breakdown occurs. To aid the effort to study RF cavity breakdown in magnetic fields, it would be helpful to have a diagnostic tool which can localize the source of breakdown sparks inside the cavity. These sparks generate thermal shocks to small regions of the inner cavity wall that can be detected and localized using microphones attached to the outer cavity surface. Details on RF cavity sound sources as well as the hardware, software, and algorithms used to localize the source of sound emitted from breakdown thermal shocks are presented. In addition, results from simulations and experiments on three RF cavities, namely the Aluminum Mock Cavity, the High-Pressure Cavity, and the Modular Cavity, are also given. These results demonstrate the validity and effectiveness of the described technique for acoustic localization of breakdown.

  18. Modelling and fabrication of GaAs photonic-crystal cavities for cavity quantum electrodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khankhoje, U K; Kim, S-H; Richards, B C; Hendrickson, J; Sweet, J; Olitzky, J D; Khitrova, G; Gibbs, H M; Scherer, A

    2010-02-10

    In this paper, we present recent progress in the growth, modelling, fabrication and characterization of gallium arsenide (GaAs) two-dimensional (2D) photonic-crystal slab cavities with embedded indium arsenide (InAs) quantum dots (QDs) that are designed for cavity quantum electrodynamics (cQED) experiments. Photonic-crystal modelling and device fabrication are discussed, followed by a detailed discussion of different failure modes that lead to photon loss. It is found that, along with errors introduced during fabrication, other significant factors such as the presence of a bottom substrate and cavity axis orientation with respect to the crystal axis, can influence the cavity quality factor (Q). A useful diagnostic tool in the form of contour finite-difference time domain (FDTD) is employed to analyse device performance.

  19. Influence of cavity loss on an extrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity intensity-based pressure sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lű, Tao

    2015-09-01

    We present an extrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity intensity-based pressure sensor that mainly comprises a single-mode fiber end and an elastic monocrystalline silicon layer bonded to a silicon diaphragm. We investigated the influence of cavity loss on the performance indexes (PIS) of the intensity-based extrinsic Fabry-Perot cavity optical fiber pressure sensor. A buffer unit made of three incompressible oil cavities attenuated outside pressure and transformed pressure information into cavity length microchange information. Experimental results indicated that, under center quadrature-points within the linear regions of adjacent fringes, for an applied 40 kPa external pressure, cavity length was modulated by pressures of 69.9 kPa-109.9 kPa, 150.1 kPa-190 kPa, 220.1 kPa-259.9 kPa, and 279.9 kPa-319.9 kPa, output intensity ranges increased as 1 μW, 1.02 μW, 1.03 μW, and 1.05 μW, sensitivity increased as 0.01909 μW/kPa, 0.01986 μW/kPa, 0.02127 μW/kPa, and 0.02387 μW/kPa, but linearity degraded, as indicated by the standard deviation of linear fits of 0.02607, 0.02664, 0.02935, and 0.04879 due to cavity loss. Furthermore, the pressure ranges within the same quarter period decreased as 40 kPa, 37.45 kPa, 32.4 kPa, and 30.15 kPa. Consequently, the same lengths of linear regions within adjacent fringes of an approximately sinusoidal curve corresponded to different measurement ranges, linearities, and sensitivities. Initial cavity length must be chosen to optimize both signal strength and the PIS studied here in manufacturing this type sensor.

  20. Incompressible Laminar Flow Over a Three-Dimensional Rectangular Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    This paper investigates unsteady incompressible flow over cavities,Previous research in in compressible cavity-flow has included flow inside and past a 2-dimensional cavity,and flow inside a 3-dimensional cavity,driven by a moving lid.The present research is focused on incompressible flow past a 3-dimensional open shallow cavity.This involves the complex interaction etween the external flow and the re-circulating flow within the cavity.In particular,computation was performed on a 3-dimensonal shallow rectangular cavity with a laminar boundary layer at the cavity and a Reynolds number of 5,000 and 10,000,respectively,A CFD approach,based on the unsteady Navier-Stokes equation for 3-dimensional incompressible flow,was used in the study.Typical results of the computation are presented.Theses results reveal the highly unsteady and complex vortical structures at high Reynolds numbers.

  1. MMIC Cavity Oscillator at 50 and 94 GHz (2007040) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An innovative, ultra-low phase-noise, fully integrated single-chip cavity oscillator is proposed. The cavity is built on a standard MMIC process and has a quality...

  2. Sputtering System for QWR Cavity in BRIF Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>1 Introduction Four superconducting QWR cavities will be used in HI-13 tandem accelerator upgrade project (BRIF). These niobium coated cavities will be produced by CIAE. Up to now, a niobium sputtering

  3. Liquid hydrogen densitometer utilizes open-ended microwave cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, J.; Wenger, N. C.

    1967-01-01

    Open-ended microwave cavity directly measures the density of flowing liquid, gaseous, or two-phase hydrogen. Its operation is based on derived relations between the cavity resonant frequency and the dielectric constant and density of hydrogen.

  4. Unconditional preparation of entanglement between atoms in cascaded optical cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Clark, S; Gu, M; Parkins, S; Clark, Stephen; Peng, Amy; Gu, Mile; Parkins, Scott

    2003-01-01

    We propose a scheme to unconditionally entangle the internal states of atoms trapped in separate high finesse optical cavities. The scheme uses the technique of quantum reservoir engineering in a cascaded cavity QED setting, and for ideal (lossless) coupling between the cavities generates an entangled pure state. Highly entangled states are also shown to be possible for realizable cavity QED parameters and with nonideal coupling.

  5. Installation and Commissioning of CYCIAE-100 RF Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JI; Bin; XING; Jian-sheng; LIU; Geng-shou; YIN; Zhi-guo; ZHANG; Tian-jue; LEI; Yu; FU; Xiao-liang; LI; Peng-zhan; LV; Yin-long; ZHU; Peng-fei; FU; Li-cheng; LIU; Jie; ZHANG; De-zhi; CUI; Bai-yao; DONG; Huan-jun; WANG; Zhen-hui

    2013-01-01

    The RF cavity is used to establish electrical field for the particle acceleration in the cyclotron,the stability of the RF cavity affects the RF system directly.A RF cavity with high quality can reduce thepower consumption of the RF system and make the cooling system simple.A good design is the first step towards RF cavity with high quality.The installation and commissioning are the next important process to achieve an excellent performance.The height of the

  6. Effective Scheme for Generating Cluster States in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Huai-Zhi; YANG Zhen-Biao; ZHENG Shi-Biao

    2007-01-01

    We propose a scheme to prepare many two-mode cavities into one-dimensional cluster states in the context of cavity QED. The left-circularly polarized state and right-circularly polarized state of the cavity are encoded as the logic zero and one of the qubits. In the scheme, the atomic spontaneous emission is suppressed, and the fidelity is unaffected by the cavity decay on the assumption that the detection efficiencies of all the photondetectors are 1.

  7. Preparation of the W state via cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Jin; YE Liu

    2004-01-01

    A scheme for preparation of the tripartite W state via cavity quantum electrodynamics is presented in this paper. And the scheme can be generalized to prepare the n-atom W states. The second part of this paper shows how to prepare n-cavity W states. All cavities involved are initially in the vacuum states, thus the requirement on the quality factor of the cavities is greatly loosened.

  8. Three-qubit Fredkin gate based on cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shao Xiao-Qiang; Chen Li; Zhang Shou

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a scheme for implementing a Fredkin gate on three modes of a cavity.The scheme is based on the dispersive atom-cavity interaction.By modulating the cavity frequency and the atomic transition frequency appropriately,it obtains the effective form of nonlinear interaction between photons in the three-mode cavity.This availability is testified via numerical analysis.It also considers both the situations with and without dissipation.

  9. Teleportation of Atomic States via Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Guerra, E S

    2004-01-01

    In this article we discuss a scheme of teleportation of atomic states. The experimental realization proposed makes use of cavity Quatum Electrodynamics involving the interaction of Rydberg atoms with a micromaser cavity prepared in a coherent state. We start presenting a scheme to prepare atomic Bell states via the interaction of atoms with a cavity. In our scheme the cavity and some atoms play the role of auxiliary systems used to achieve the teleportation.

  10. Unconditional preparation of entanglement between atoms in cascaded optical cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Stephen; Peng, Amy; Gu, Mile; Parkins, Scott

    2003-10-24

    We propose a scheme to unconditionally entangle the internal states of atoms trapped in separate high-finesse optical cavities. The scheme uses the technique of quantum reservoir engineering in a cascaded cavity-QED setting, and for ideal (lossless) coupling between the cavities generates an entangled pure state. Highly entangled states are also shown to be possible for realizable cavity-QED parameters and with nonideal coupling.

  11. The First Nine-Cell TESLA Cavity Made in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Xiang-Yang; JIN Song; XIN Tian-Mu; YAO Zhong-Yuan; CHEN Jia-Er; ZHAO Kui; QUAN Sheng-Wen; ZHANG Bao-Cheng; HAO Jian-Kui; ZHU Feng; LIN Lin; XU Wen-Can; WANG Er-Dong; WANG Fang

    2008-01-01

    A totally home-made 9-cell TESLA type superconducting cavity is made at Peking University. The cavity fabrication is according to DESY specification. The cavity is made of high purity niobium from OTIC, Ningxia.The electron beam welding is carried out at Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin. By the cooperation, the cavity is tested at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility, USA. The preliminary result shows the acceleration gradient Eacc is 23 MV/m without quench and has potential for improvement.

  12. Extreme diffusion limited electropolishing of niobium radiofrequency cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Anthony C.

    2017-03-01

    A deeply modulated, regular, continuous, oscillating current waveform is reliably and repeatably achieved during electropolishing of niobium single-cell elliptical radiofrequency cavities. Details of the technique and cavity test results are reported here. The method is applicable for cavity frequencies in the range 500 MHz to 3.9 GHz and can be extended to multicell structures.

  13. 21 CFR 872.6030 - Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. 872.6030... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Miscellaneous Devices § 872.6030 Oral cavity abrasive polishing agent. (a) Identification. An oral cavity abrasive polishing agent is a device in paste or powder...

  14. Effects of prescribed burns on wintering cavity-nesting birds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heather L. Bateman; Margaret A. O' Connell

    2006-01-01

    Primary cavity-nesting birds play a critical role in forest ecosystems by excavating cavities later used by other birds and mammals as nesting or roosting sites. Several species of cavity-nesting birds are non-migratory residents and consequently subject to winter conditions. We conducted winter bird counts from 1998 to 2000 to examine the abundance and habitat...

  15. 21 CFR 872.3250 - Calcium hydroxide cavity liner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES DENTAL DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 872.3250 Calcium hydroxide cavity liner. (a) Identification. A calcium hydroxide cavity liner is a device material intended to be applied to the interior of a prepared cavity before insertion of restorative material, such as amalgam, to protect the pulp of a...

  16. Preparation of Two-Qutrit Entangled State in Cavity QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xiu-Min; ZHOU Zheng-Wei; WU Yu-Chun; WANG Cheng-Zhi; GUO Guang-Can

    2005-01-01

    @@ We propose a scheme to generate a 3 × 3-dimensional maximally entangled state of two particles. Two three-level atoms interact with a strongly detuned cavity so that the cavity is only virtually excited and efficient decoherence time of the cavity is greatly prolonged. Compared to other protocols, this protocol is simpler and has a higher fidelity.

  17. Comparison of Multi-field Coupling Analysis of Accelerator Cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI; Chun-guang; LI; Jin-hai

    2013-01-01

    In the high power accelerator cavity,the joule heat produced by the electromagnetic fields causes the temperature of the cavity rising which leads to frequency changed,called frequency shift.The analysis of the effect of power to the frequency shift is an important task of accelerator cavity design.It involves heat,structure and high frequency analysis.

  18. Extreme diffusion limited electropolishing of niobium radiofrequency cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Crawford, Anthony C

    2016-01-01

    Deeply modulated, continuous, diffusion-limited current waveforms for electropolishing niobium single-cell elliptical radiofrequency cavities are reliably and repeatedly achieved at Fermilab. Details of the technique and cavity test results are reported here. The method is applicable for cavity frequencies in the range 500MHz to 3.9 GHz and can be extended to multicell structures.

  19. Fallopian tube insertion into the uterine cavity discovered accidentally during laparoscopic retrieval of a misplaced coil from the pelvic cavity

    OpenAIRE

    Panayotidis, Costas; Foidart, Jean-Michel; Nisolle, Michelle

    2008-01-01

    This article presents for the first time in the literature a case of fallopian tube insertion into the uterine cavity discovered accidentally during laparoscopic retrieval of a misplaced coil from the pelvic cavity. Peer reviewed

  20. Beam position diagnostics with higher order modes in third harmonic superconducting accelerating cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P; Baboi, Nicoleta

    2012-01-01

    Higher order modes (HOM) are electromagnetic resonant fields. They can be excited by an electron beam entering an accelerating cavity, and constitute a component of the wakefield. This wakefield has the potential to dilute the beam quality and, in the worst case, result in a beam-break-up instability. It is therefore important to ensure that these fields are well suppressed by extracting energy through special couplers. In addition, the effect of the transverse wakefield can be reduced by aligning the beam on the cavity axis. This is due to their strength depending on the transverse offset of the excitation beam. For suitably small offsets the dominant components of the transverse wakefield are dipole modes, with a linear dependence on the transverse offset of the excitation bunch. This fact enables the transverse beam position inside the cavity to be determined by measuring the dipole modes extracted from the couplers, similar to a cavity beam position monitor (BPM), but requires no additional vacuum instrum...

  1. Histopathologic Approach to Oral Cavity Lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cuyan Demirkesen

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Diseases of the oral cavity may be either a reflection of system or cutaneous diseases or can be seen as a primary oral lesion. These lesions are inflammatory reactions due to miscellaneous mechanisms, ulceration or erosion, reactive proliferative nodules, precancerous or neoplastic diseases. In this study, microscopic features of the most common diseases, together with their differential diagnosis are discussed. Some of the diseases of the oral cavity have overlapping histopathological findings. In these conditions, ancillary methods such as immunoflourescence or immunohistochemistry can be performed. Deep biopsies from representative areas are essential for proper histopathological diagnosis. Moreover, informing the pathologist about the exact anatomic localization of the biopsy, as well as the clinical findings of the lesion is crucial for a better approach.

  2. Performance of production SRF cavities for CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, C.; Benesch, J.; Kneisel, P.; Kushnick, P.; Mammosser, J.; Powers, T.

    1993-06-01

    Construction of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility recirculating linac represents the largest scale application of superconducting rf (SRF) technology to date. Over 250 of the eventual 338 SRF 1497 MHz cavities have been assembled into hermetic pairs and completed rf testing at 2.0 K. Although the rf performance characteristics well exceed the CEBAF baseline requirements of Q[sub 0] = 2.4[times]10[sup 9] at 5 MV/m, the usual limiting phenomena are encountered field emission, quenching, Q-switching, will occasional multipacting. An analysis of the occurrence conditions and severity of these phenomena during production cavity testing is presented. The frequency with which performance is limited by quenching suggests that additional material advances may be required for applications which require the reliable achievement of accelerating gradients of more than 15 MV/m. The distributions of frequency and Q for a higher-order mode are also presented.

  3. Making of a nonlinear optical cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Martínez-Lorente, R; Esteban-Martín, A; García-Monreal, J; Roldán, E; Silva, F

    2016-01-01

    In the article we explain in detail how to build a photorefractive oscillator (PRO), which is a laser-pumped nonlinear optical cavity containing a photorefractive crystal. The specific PRO whose construction we describe systematically, is based on a Fabry-Perot optical cavity working in a non-degenerate four wave-mixing configuration. This particular PRO has the property that the generated beam exhibits laser-like phase invariance and, as an application, we show how a suitably modulated injected beam converts the output field from phase-invariant into phase-bistable. While the emphasis is made on the making of the experimental device and on the way measurements are implemented, some introduction to the photorefractive effect as well as to the necessary concepts of nonlinear dynamics are also given, so that the article is reasonably self-contained.

  4. HOM Couplers for CERN SPL Cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Papke, Kai; Van Rienen, U

    2013-01-01

    Higher-Order-Modes (HOMs) may affect beam stability and refrigeration requirements of superconducting proton linacs such as the SPL, which is studied at CERN as the driver for future neutrino facilities. In order to limit beam-induced HOM effects, CERN considers the use of HOM couplers on the cut-off tubes of the 5-cell superconducting cavities. These couplers consist of resonant antennas shaped as loops or probes, which are designed to couple to modes of a specific frequency range. In this paper the design process is presented and a comparison is made between various design options for the medium and high-beta SPL cavities, both operating at 704.4 MHz. The RF characteristics and thermal behaviour of the various designs are discussed.

  5. Orthogonal Coupling in Cavity BPM with Slots

    CERN Document Server

    Lipka, D; Siemens, M; Vilcins, S; Caspers, Friedhelm; Stadler, M; Treyer, DM; Maesaka, H; Shintake, T

    2009-01-01

    XFELs require high precision orbit control in their long undulator sections. Due to the pulsed operation of drive linacs the high precision has to be reached by single bunch measurements. So far only cavity BPMs achieve the required performance and will be used at the European XFEL, one between each of the up to 116 undulators. Coupling between the orthogonal planes limits the performance of beam position measurements. A first prototype build at DESY shows a coupling between orthogonal planes of about -20 dB, but the requirement is lower than -40 dB (1%). The next generation cavity BPM was build with tighter tolerances and mechanical changes, the orthogonal coupling is measured to be lower than -43 dB. This report discusses the various observations, measurements and improvements which were done.

  6. Structure of magnetic fields in intracluster cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Gourgouliatos, Konstantinos Nektarios; Lyutikov, Maxim

    2010-01-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies show ubiquitous presence of X-ray cavities, presumably blown by the AGN jets. We consider magnetic field structures of these cavities. Stability requires that they contain both toroidal and poloidal magnetic fields, while realistic configurations should have vanishing magnetic field on the boundary. For axisymmetric configurations embedded in unmagnetized plasma, the continuity of poloidal and toroidal magnetic field components on the surface of the bubble then requires solving the elliptical Grad-Shafranov equation with both Dirichlet and Neumann boundary conditions. This leads to a double eigenvalue problem, relating the pressure gradients and the toroidal magnetic field to the radius of the bubble. We have found fully analytical stable solutions. This result is confirmed by numerical simulation. We present synthetic X-ray images and synchrotron emission profiles and evaluate the rotation measure for radiation traversing the bubble.

  7. A microelectromechanically controlled cavity optomechanical sensing system

    CERN Document Server

    Miao, Houxun; Aksyuk, Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) have been applied to many measurement problems in physics, chemistry, biology and medicine. In parallel, cavity optomechanical systems have achieved quantum-limited displacement sensitivity and ground state cooling of nanoscale objects. By integrating a novel cavity optomechanical structure into an actuated MEMS sensing platform, we demonstrate a system with high quality-factor interferometric readout, electrical tuning of the optomechanical coupling by two orders of magnitude, and a mechanical transfer function adjustable via feedback. The platform separates optical and mechanical components, allowing flexible customization for specific scientific and commercial applications. We achieve displacement sensitivity of 4.6 fm/Hz^1/2 and force sensitivity of 53 aN/Hz^1/2 with only 250 nW optical power launched into the sensor. Cold-damping feedback is used to reduce the thermal mechanical vibration of the sensor by 3 orders of magnitude and to broaden the sensor bandwidth by a...

  8. Cavity techniques for holographic data storage recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Bo E; Takashima, Yuzuru

    2016-03-21

    Conventionally, reading and writing of data holograms utilizes a fraction of the light power because of a trade off in write and read efficiencies. This system constraint can be mitigated by applying a resonator cavity. Cavities enable more efficient use of the available light leading to enhanced read and write data rates with no additional energy cost. This enhancement is inversely related to diffraction efficiency, so these techniques work well for large capacity holographic data storage having low diffraction efficiency. The enhancement in write data transfer rate is evaluated by writing plane wave holograms and image bearing holograms in Fe:LiNbO3 with a 532 nm wavelength laser. We confirmed 1.2 times enhancement in write data rate, out of a 1.4 theoretical maximum for materials absorption of 16%.

  9. [Oral cavity pathology by renal failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maĭborodin, I V; Minikeev, I M; Kim, S A; Ragimova, T M

    2014-01-01

    The analysis of the scientific literature devoted to organ and tissue changes of oral cavity at the chronic renal insufficiency (CRI)is made. The number of patients in an end-stage of CRI constantly increases and patients receiving renal replacement therapy including hemodialysis, peritoneal dialysis or renal transplantation will comprise an enlarging segment of the dental patient population. Owing to CRI and its treatment there is a set of changes of teeth and oral cavity fabrics which remain even in a end-stage. Renal replacement therapy can affect periodontal tissues including gingival hyperplasia in immune suppressed renal transplantation patients and increased levels of bacterial contamination, gingival inflammation, formation of calculus, and possible increased prevalence and severity of destructive periodontal diseases. Besides, the presence of undiagnosed periodontitis may have significant effects on the medical management of the patients in end-stage of CRI.

  10. Modeling of Coupled Nano-Cavity Lasers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovgård, Troels Suhr

    Modeling of nanocavity light emitting semiconductor devices is done using the semiconductor laser rate equations with spontaneous and stimulated emission terms modified for Purcell enhanced recombination. The modified terms include details about the optical and electronic density......, coupled photonic crystal nanocavity structures are simulated. The resonance frequencies of in-phase and out-of-phase coupled quadrupole modes in rectangular photonic crystal H1 cavities are extracted and are found to vary non-trivially with the intercavity separation. A qualitative explanation is given...... in terms of the in-plane mode profiles. Fareld emission patterns for the structures are calculated based on the finite-dierence time-domain simulations. It is found that only systems with an even number of holes separating the cavities show clear signs of being coupled. This non-trivial coupling behavior...

  11. Heat loss from an open cavity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonald, C.G. [California State Polytechnic Univ., Pomona, CA (United States). Coll. of Engineering

    1995-12-01

    Cavity type receivers are used extensively in concentrating solar thermal energy collecting systems. The Solar Total Energy Project (STEP) in Shenandoah, Georgia is a large scale field test for the collection of solar thermal energy. The STEP experiment consists of a large field array of solar collectors used to supplement the process steam, cooling and other electrical power requirements of an adjacent knitwear manufacturing facility. The purpose of the tests, conducted for this study, was to isolate and quantify the radiative, conductive, and convective components of total heat loss, and to determine the effects of operating temperature, receiver angle, and aperture size on cavity heat loss. An analytical model for radiative heat loss was developed and compared with two other methods used to determine radiative heat loss. A proposed convective heat loss correlation, including effects of aperture size, receiver operating temperature, and receiver angle is presented. The resulting data is a source to evaluate the STEP measurements.

  12. Dynamics of bouncing droplets in annular cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentz, Zachary Louis; Jalali, Mir Abbas; Alam, Mohammad-Reza

    2014-11-01

    In a cylindrical bath of silicon oil, vertically excited by a frequency of 45 Hz, we trace the motion of bouncing droplets as they fill an annular region. We compute the mean tangential and radial velocity components of the droplets and show that the maximum tangential velocity is larger than the maximum radial velocity by one order of magnitude. Velocity dispersions have almost equal levels in the radial and tangential directions, and their mean values are 1/4 times smaller than the mean tangential velocity. These results show that bouncing droplets undergo random motions within annular cavities determined by the interference patterns of self-induced circumferential waves. We derive analytical relations between the velocity dispersion and the wavelength of surface waves, and calculate the mean tangential velocity of droplets using the random kicks that they experience at the boundaries of the cavity by inward and outward traveling waves.

  13. Performance of production SRF cavities for CEBAF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reece, C.; Benesch, J.; Kneisel, P.; Kushnick, P.; Mammosser, J.; Powers, T.

    1993-06-01

    Construction of the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility recirculating linac represents the largest scale application of superconducting rf (SRF) technology to date. Over 250 of the eventual 338 SRF 1497 MHz cavities have been assembled into hermetic pairs and completed rf testing at 2.0 K. Although the rf performance characteristics well exceed the CEBAF baseline requirements of Q[sub 0] = 2.4[times]10[sup 9] at 5 MV/m, the usual limiting phenomena are encountered field emission, quenching, Q-switching, will occasional multipacting. An analysis of the occurrence conditions and severity of these phenomena during production cavity testing is presented. The frequency with which performance is limited by quenching suggests that additional material advances may be required for applications which require the reliable achievement of accelerating gradients of more than 15 MV/m. The distributions of frequency and Q for a higher-order mode are also presented.

  14. Quantum networks based on cavity QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritter, Stephan; Bochmann, Joerg; Figueroa, Eden; Hahn, Carolin; Kalb, Norbert; Muecke, Martin; Neuzner, Andreas; Noelleke, Christian; Reiserer, Andreas; Uphoff, Manuel; Rempe, Gerhard [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Quantenoptik, Hans-Kopfermann-Strasse 1, 85748 Garching (Germany)

    2014-07-01

    Quantum repeaters require an efficient interface between stationary quantum memories and flying photons. Single atoms in optical cavities are ideally suited as universal quantum network nodes that are capable of sending, storing, retrieving, and even processing quantum information. We demonstrate this by presenting an elementary version of a quantum network based on two identical nodes in remote, independent laboratories. The reversible exchange of quantum information and the creation of remote entanglement are achieved by exchange of a single photon. Quantum teleportation is implemented using a time-resolved photonic Bell-state measurement. Quantum control over all degrees of freedom of the single atom also allows for the nondestructive detection of flying photons and the implementation of a quantum gate between the spin state of the atom and the polarization of a photon upon its reflection from the cavity. Our approach to quantum networking offers a clear perspective for scalability and provides the essential components for the realization of a quantum repeater.

  15. The electromagnetic Casimir effect of spherical cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    The Casimir effect results from the zero-point energy of vacuum. A spherical cavity can be divided into three regions, and we make an analysis of every region and then give a formal solution of Casimir energy. The zeta-function regularization is also used to dispel the divergence of the summation. At the end, we can see the Casimir effect of a single sphere is included in our results.

  16. Study of multipacting effect in superconducting cavity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Meng; ZHAO Ming-Hua

    2008-01-01

    A number of superconducting cavities of axis-symmetric geometry have been considered to study the effect in order to achieve the desired performance.It is shown that the multipacting effect is strongly dependent on the condition of the RF surface and can be suppressed with reconsideration of the geometry.The simulation result is compared with the result of the semi-analytical model in the end.

  17. Laser in-cavity Michelson interferometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, C.M.

    1978-09-01

    A new laser interferometer is proposed which can be regarded as an in-cavity Michelson interferometer. It utilizes a polarizing beam splitter in conjunction with two quarter-wave plates to produce oscillations between three mirrors. It would measure a change in length of 10/sup -3/ A that, if used for plasma diagnostics, is equivalent to measuring an electron density of 10/sup 9/ cm/sup -3/ over a plasma length of 1 cm.

  18. Dental Sealants Prevent Cavities PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2016-10-18

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the October 2016 CDC Vital Signs report. Dental sealants, applied soon after a child's permanent molars come in, can protect against cavities for up to nine years. Applying sealants in schools for low-income children could save millions in dental treatment costs.  Created: 10/18/2016 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 10/18/2016.

  19. Capillary condensation for fluids in spherical cavities

    OpenAIRE

    Urrutia, Ignacio; Szybisz, Leszek

    2005-01-01

    The capillary condensation for fluids into spherical nano-cavities is analyzed within the frame of two theoretical approaches. One description is based on a widely used simplified version of the droplet model formulated for studying atomic nuclei. The other, is a more elaborated calculation performed by applying a density functional theory. The agreement between both models is examined and it is shown that a small correction to the simple fluid model improves the predictions. A connection to ...

  20. Characterization of transducer cavities to oscillatory inputs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, J.D.; Hollingshead, J.R.

    1993-12-31

    The design and use of measurement systems must ensure that the data are not computed by the measurement system. A wide variety of sources can be responsible for compromising the integrity of test data. Among the sources of error are transducer calibration errors, signal conditioning problems, recording problems, and characteristics of the mechanical system which introduce errors. In this paper, the characteristics of an acoustic cavity are discussed as they apply to a pressure measurement problem.

  1. Engineering high-performance vertical cavity lasers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lear, K.L.; Hou, H.Q.; Hietala, V.M.; Choquette, K.D.; Schneider, R.P. Jr.

    1996-12-31

    The cw and high-speed performance of vertical cavity surface emitting laser diodes (VCSELs) are affected by both electrical and optical issues arising from the geometry and fabrication of these devices. Structures with low resistance semiconductor mirrors and Al-oxide confinement layers address these issues and have produced record performance including 50% power conversion efficiency and modulation bandwidths up to 20 GHz at small bias currents.

  2. Rugged, Tunable Extended-Cavity Diode Laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Donald; Brinza, David; Seidel, David; Klipstein, William; Choi, Dong Ho; Le, Lam; Zhang, Guangzhi; Iniguez, Roberto; Tang, Wade

    2007-01-01

    A rugged, tunable extended-cavity diode laser (ECDL) has been developed to satisfy stringent requirements for frequency stability, notably including low sensitivity to vibration. This laser is designed specifically for use in an atomic-clock experiment to be performed aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Lasers of similar design would be suitable for use in terrestrial laboratories engaged in atomic-clock and atomic-physics research.

  3. Controlling spin relaxation with a cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bienfait, A.; Pla, J. J.; Kubo, Y.; Zhou, X.; Stern, M.; Lo, C. C.; Weis, C. D.; Schenkel, T.; Vion, D.; Esteve, D.; Morton, J. J. L.; Bertet, P.

    2016-03-01

    Spontaneous emission of radiation is one of the fundamental mechanisms by which an excited quantum system returns to equilibrium. For spins, however, spontaneous emission is generally negligible compared to other non-radiative relaxation processes because of the weak coupling between the magnetic dipole and the electromagnetic field. In 1946, Purcell realized that the rate of spontaneous emission can be greatly enhanced by placing the quantum system in a resonant cavity. This effect has since been used extensively to control the lifetime of atoms and semiconducting heterostructures coupled to microwave or optical cavities, and is essential for the realization of high-efficiency single-photon sources. Here we report the application of this idea to spins in solids. By coupling donor spins in silicon to a superconducting microwave cavity with a high quality factor and a small mode volume, we reach the regime in which spontaneous emission constitutes the dominant mechanism of spin relaxation. The relaxation rate is increased by three orders of magnitude as the spins are tuned to the cavity resonance, demonstrating that energy relaxation can be controlled on demand. Our results provide a general way to initialize spin systems into their ground state and therefore have applications in magnetic resonance and quantum information processing. They also demonstrate that the coupling between the magnetic dipole of a spin and the electromagnetic field can be enhanced up to the point at which quantum fluctuations have a marked effect on the spin dynamics; as such, they represent an important step towards the coherent magnetic coupling of individual spins to microwave photons.

  4. A COMPARATIVE STUDY ON COPPER-PLATED UTERINE CAVITY SHAPED IUD AND NON-COPPER BEARING UTERINE CAVITY SHAPED IUD

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZENGQing-Gu; etal

    1989-01-01

    A comparative randomized clinical trial was carried out between two uterine cavity shaped IUDs: the copper-plated uterine cavity shaped IUD(UCDCu) and non-copper bearing uterine cavity shaped IUD(UCD). The IUDs were used by 1004 and 1005 women

  5. A fully integrated standalone portable cavity ringdown breath acetone analyzer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Meixiu; Jiang, Chenyu; Gong, Zhiyong; Zhao, Xiaomeng; Chen, Zhuying; Wang, Zhennan; Kang, Meiling; Li, Yingxin; Wang, Chuji

    2015-09-01

    Breath analysis is a promising new technique for nonintrusive disease diagnosis and metabolic status monitoring. One challenging issue in using a breath biomarker for potential particular disease screening is to find a quantitative relationship between the concentration of the breath biomarker and clinical diagnostic parameters of the specific disease. In order to address this issue, we need a new instrument that is capable of conducting real-time, online breath analysis with high data throughput, so that a large scale of clinical test (more subjects) can be achieved in a short period of time. In this work, we report a fully integrated, standalone, portable analyzer based on the cavity ringdown spectroscopy technique for near-real time, online breath acetone measurements. The performance of the portable analyzer in measurements of breath acetone was interrogated and validated by using the certificated gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. The results show that this new analyzer is useful for reliable online (online introduction of a breath sample without pre-treatment) breath acetone analysis with high sensitivity (57 ppb) and high data throughput (one data per second). Subsequently, the validated breath analyzer was employed for acetone measurements in 119 human subjects under various situations. The instrument design, packaging, specifications, and future improvements were also described. From an optical ringdown cavity operated by the lab-set electronics reported previously to this fully integrated standalone new instrument, we have enabled a new scientific tool suited for large scales of breath acetone analysis and created an instrument platform that can even be adopted for study of other breath biomarkers by using different lasers and ringdown mirrors covering corresponding spectral fingerprints.

  6. Cavity filling water control below aerator devices

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    钱尚拓; 吴建华; 马飞; 徐建荣; 彭育; 汪振

    2014-01-01

    With the rapid development of high dam projects within China, the dragon-drop-tail spillway tunnel is introduced and widely used. In view of the high water head and the large flow velocity on the dragon-drop-tail section, aerator devices are usually placed for the cavitation damage control. For the device placed in its initial position, it is a serious concern to design a suitable flow regime of the cavity and to control the cavity filling water due to the large flow depth and the low Froude number through this aera-tor. In this study, the relationships between the geometries of the aerator device and the jet impact angle of the lower trajectory of the flow are theoretically analyzed with/without a local slope. Nine test cases with different geometries are designed, the effectiveness of the filling water control is experimentally investigated under different operation conditions, and two criteria of the local slope design are proposed. It is concluded that the cavity flow regime and the filling water can be improved if a small impact angle and some sui-table geometries of the local slope are designed.

  7. Coherently Opening a High-Q Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufarelli, Tommaso; Ferraro, Alessandro; Serafini, Alessio; Bose, Sougato; Kim, M. S.

    2014-04-01

    We propose a general framework to effectively "open" a high-Q resonator, that is, to release the quantum state initially prepared in it in the form of a traveling electromagnetic wave. This is achieved by employing a mediating mode that scatters coherently the radiation from the resonator into a one-dimensional continuum of modes such as a waveguide. The same mechanism may be used to "feed" a desired quantum field to an initially empty cavity. Switching between an open and "closed" resonator may then be obtained by controlling either the detuning of the scatterer or the amount of time it spends in the resonator. First, we introduce the model in its general form, identifying (i) the traveling mode that optimally retains the full quantum information of the resonator field and (ii) a suitable figure of merit that we study analytically in terms of the system parameters. Then, we discuss two feasible implementations based on ensembles of two-level atoms interacting with cavity fields. In addition, we discuss how to integrate traditional cavity QED in our proposal using three-level atoms.

  8. Cavity cooling of an optically levitated nanoparticle

    CERN Document Server

    Kiesel, Nikolai; Delic, Uros; Grass, David; Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Aspelmeyer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    The ability to trap and to manipulate individual atoms is at the heart of current implementations of quantum simulations, quantum computing, and long-distance quantum communication. Controlling the motion of larger particles opens up yet new avenues for quantum science, both for the study of fundamental quantum phenomena in the context of matter wave interference, and for new sensing and transduction applications in the context of quantum optomechanics. Specifically, it has been suggested that cavity cooling of a single nanoparticle in high vacuum allows for the generation of quantum states of motion in a room-temperature environment as well as for unprecedented force sensitivity. Here, we take the first steps into this regime. We demonstrate cavity cooling of an optically levitated nanoparticle consisting of approximately 10e9 atoms. The particle is trapped at modest vacuum levels of a few millibar in the standing-wave field of an optical cavity and is cooled through coherent scattering into the modes of the...

  9. Theory of RF superconductivity for resonant cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Alex

    2017-03-01

    An overview of a theory of electromagnetic response of superconductors in strong radio-frequency (RF) electromagnetic fields is given with the emphasis on applications to superconducting resonant cavities for particle accelerators. The paper addresses fundamentals of the BCS surface resistance, the effect of subgap states and trapped vortices on the residual surface resistance at low RF fields, and a nonlinear surface resistance at strong fields, particularly the effect of the RF field suppression of the surface resistance. These issues are essential for the understanding of the field dependence of high quality factors Q({B}a)∼ {10}10{--}{10}11 achieved on the Nb cavities at 1.3–2 K in strong RF fields B a close to the depairing limit, and the extended Q({B}a) rise which has been observed on Ti and N-treated Nb cavities. Possible ways of further increase of Q({B}a) and the breakdown field by optimizing impurity concentration at the surface and by multilayer nanostructuring with materials other than Nb are discussed.

  10. Atraumatic restorative treatment in atypical cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Letícia Simino Carvalho

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The atraumatic restorative treatment has been widely divulged among professionals in the area of Pediatric Dentistry. This restorative technique is included in the philosophy of Minimal Intervention and is considered one of the most conservative treatments, because only the layer of infected dentin caries is removed. Moreover, the atraumatic restorative treatment has been shown to be less painful than conventional approaches, and local anesthesia is rarely required. After the removal of the infected dentin, the cavities are filled with glass ionomer cement, a material that has antimicrobial capacity, good marginal sealing and constant fluorine release and recharge. In spite of the increasing number of studies about atraumatic restorative treatment, only studies related to restorations in occlusal cavities have shown scientific evidences about the technique. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of atraumatic restorative treatment in cavities with 3 or more surfaces involved, by means of a clinical case report of a patient with extensive dstruction in primary teeth, who was submitted to atraumatic restorative treatment, and observe the result of the treatment after one year of clinical and radiographic control.

  11. Bioengineering in the oral cavity: our experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalfamo L

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available L Catalfamo,1 E Belli,2 C Nava,1 E Mici,1 A Calvo,1 B D'Alessandro,1 FS De Ponte1 1Unit of Maxillofacial Surgery, University of Messina, Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria, Policlinico G Martino, Messina, Italy; 2Unit of Maxillofacial Surgery, University Rome Sapienza, Azienda Ospedaliera Sant Andrea, Rome, Italy Background: To date, there are no studies reported in the literature on the possible use of bovine collagen, oxidized regenerated cellulose, or synthetic hyaluronic acid medications in the oral cavity. The aim of this paper is to report the use of bovine collagen, oxidized regenerated cellulose, and synthetic hyaluronic acid medications to improve wound healing in the oral cavity by stimulating granulomatous tissue. Methods: From 2007 to 2011, 80 patients (median age 67 years suffering from oral mucosal lesions participated in this double-blind study. The patients were divided into two groups, each consisting of 40 patients. One group received conventional medications, while the other group of patients were treated with the advanced medications. Results: Advanced medications allowed re-epithelialization of the wound margin in 2–20 days, whereas patients receiving conventional medication showed a median healing duration of 45 days. Conclusion: The results of this study demonstrate that treating oral mucosal wounds with advanced medication has an advantage with regard to wound healing time, allowing patients to have a rapid, functional, and esthetic recovery. Keywords: bioengineering, oral cavity, mucosal recovery

  12. Direct Numerical Simulation of Automobile Cavity Tones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurbatskii, Konstantin; Tam, Christopher K. W.

    2000-01-01

    The Navier Stokes equation is solved computationally by the Dispersion-Relation-Preserving (DRP) scheme for the flow and acoustic fields associated with a laminar boundary layer flow over an automobile door cavity. In this work, the flow Reynolds number is restricted to R(sub delta*) < 3400; the range of Reynolds number for which laminar flow may be maintained. This investigation focuses on two aspects of the problem, namely, the effect of boundary layer thickness on the cavity tone frequency and intensity and the effect of the size of the computation domain on the accuracy of the numerical simulation. It is found that the tone frequency decreases with an increase in boundary layer thickness. When the boundary layer is thicker than a certain critical value, depending on the flow speed, no tone is emitted by the cavity. Computationally, solutions of aeroacoustics problems are known to be sensitive to the size of the computation domain. Numerical experiments indicate that the use of a small domain could result in normal mode type acoustic oscillations in the entire computation domain leading to an increase in tone frequency and intensity. When the computation domain is expanded so that the boundaries are at least one wavelength away from the noise source, the computed tone frequency and intensity are found to be computation domain size independent.

  13. Fundamental tests in Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    CERN. Geneva

    2010-01-01

    At the dawn of quantum physics, Einstein and Bohr had the dream to confine a photon in a box and to use this contraption in order to illustrate the strange laws of the quantum world. Cavity Quantum Electrodynamics has now made this dream real, allowing us to actually achieve in the laboratory variants of the thought experiments of the founding fathers of quantum theory. In our work at Ecole Normale Supérieure, we use a beam of Rydberg atoms to manipulate and probe non-destructively microwave photons trapped in a very high Q superconducting cavity. We realize ideal quantum non-demolition (QND) measurements of photon numbers, observe the radiation quantum jumps due to cavity relaxation and prepare non-classical fields such as Fock and Schrödinger cat states. Combining QND photon counting with a homodyne mixing method, we reconstruct the Wigner functions of these non-classical states and, by taking snapshots of these functions at increasing times, obtain movies of the decoherence process. These experiments ope...

  14. A new awakening for accelerator cavities

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Imagine: an accelerator unbound by length; one that can bring a beam up to the TeV level in just a few hundred metres. Sounds like a dream? Perhaps not for long. At CERN’s Proton Driven Plasma Wakefield Acceleration Experiment (AWAKE), physicists may soon be working to bring this contemporary fairy-tale to life.   The AWAKE experiment in the CNGS facility. Wherever you find a modern linear particle accelerator, you’ll find with it a lengthy series of RF accelerating cavities. Although based on technology first developed over half a century ago, RF cavities have dominated the accelerating world since their inception. However, new developments in plasma accelerator systems may soon be bringing a new player into the game. By harnessing the power of wakefields generated by beams in plasma cells, physicists may be able to produce accelerator gradients of many GV/m –  hundreds of times higher than those achieved in current RF cavities. “Plasma wakef...

  15. Chemical Sensing Using Infrared Cavity Enhanced Spectroscopy: Short Wave Infrared Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (SWIR CRDS) Sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Richard M.; Harper, Warren W.; Aker, Pam M.; Thompson, Jason S.; Stewart, Timothy L.

    2003-10-01

    The principal goal of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL's) Remote Spectroscopy Project is to explore and develop the science and technology behind point and stand off infrared (IR) spectroscopic chemical sensors that are needed for detecting weapons proliferation activity and countering terrorism. Missions addressed include detecting chemical, biological, and nuclear weapons and their production; counter terrorism measures that involve screening luggage, personnel, and shipping containers for explosives, firearms, narcotics, chemical weapons and/or their residues; and mapping of contaminated areas. The science and technology developed in this program is dual use in that it additionally supports progress in a diverse set of agendas that include chemical weapons defense programs, air operations activities, emissions monitoring, law enforcement, and medical diagnostics. Sensors for these missions require extremely low limits of detection because many of the targeted signature species are either present in low concentrations or have extremely low vapor pressures. The sensors also need to be highly selective as the environments that they will be operated in will contain a variety of interferent species and false positive detection is not an option. PNNL has been working on developing a class of sensors that draw vapor into optical cavities and use laser-based spectroscopy to identify and quantify the vapor chemical content. The cavity enhanced spectroscopies (CES) afford extreme sensitivity, excellent selectivity, noise immunity, and rapid, real-time, in-situ chemical characterization. PNNL's CES program is currently focused on developing two types of sensors. The first one, which is based on cavity ring down spectroscopy (CRDS), uses short wave infrared (SWIR) lasers to interrogate species. The second sensor, which is based on noise immune cavity-enhanced optical heterodyne molecular spectroscopy (NICE OHMS), uses long wave infrared (LWIR

  16. Preparation of W state in resonant bimodal cavity quantum electrodynamics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A scheme is proposed for generating entangled W states with four cavity modes. In this scheme, we send a Ⅴ-type three-level atom through two identical two-mode cavities in succession. After the atom exits from the second cavity,the four cavity modes are prepared in the W state. On the other hand we can obtain three-atom W states by sending three Ⅴ-type three-level atoms through a two-mode cavity in turn. The present scheme does not require conditional measurement, and it is easily generalized to preparing 2n-mode W states and n-atom W states.

  17. The crystal cavities of the New Jersey zeolite region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaller, Waldemar Theodore

    1932-01-01

    The crystal cavities present in the mineral complex of the New Jersey traprock region have long excited the interest of mineralogists. In 1914 Fenner made the first detailed and comprehensive study of these cavities and suggested that babingtonite was the original mineral. Soon after this anhydrite was found occupying parts of some of the cavities at one of the quarries. At this time, too, Wherry concluded that glauberite was the original mineral of some of the cavities because of his studies of similar crystal cavities in Triassic shale at different places.

  18. Scheme for Quantum Entanglement Swapping on Cavity QED System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chang-Yong; YU Yan

    2006-01-01

    We propose a scheme for realizing quantum entanglement swapping between the atoms in cavity QED.With only virtual excitation of the cavity during the interaction between the atoms and cavity, the scheme is insensitive to the cavity mode states and the cavity decay. The ideas can also be utilized for realizing entanglement swapping between the atomic levels in a single atom and the atomic levels in the Bell states and between the atomic levels in the Bell states and the atomic levels in the W states.

  19. Status of the LCLS-II Accelerating Cavity Production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daly, Ed [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Marhauser, Frank [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Fitzpatrick, Jarrod A. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Palczewski, Ari D. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Preble, Joe [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Wilson, Katherine M. [Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (TJNAF), Newport News, VA (United States); Grimm, C. J. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab. (FNAL), Batavia, IL (United States); Burrill, Andrew B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gonnella, Daniel [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2017-05-01

    Cavity serial production for the LCLS-II 4 GeV CM SRF linac has started. A quantity of 266 accelerating cavities has been ordered from two industrial vendors. Jefferson Laboratory leads the cavity procurement activities for the project and has successfully transferred the Nitrogen-Doping process to the industrial partners in the initial phase, which is now being applied for the production cavities. We report on the results from vendor qualification and the status of the cavity production for LCLS-II.

  20. Analysis of superconducting cavity quench events at SSRF

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HOU Hong-Tao; LI Zheng; LIU Jian-Fei; ZHAO Yu-Bin; ZHAO Shen-jie; ZHANG Zhi-Gang; LUO Chen; FENG Zi-Qiang; MAO Dong-Qing; ZHENG Xiang

    2011-01-01

    Quench is important and dangerous to superconducting RF cavities. This paper illustrates the mechanism of quench and how a quench detector works, and analyzes the quench events happening during beam operations and cavity conditioning. We find that the quench protection is mostly triggered by some reasons such as fluctuation of cavity voltage, multipacting or arc, rather than a real cavity thermal breakdown. The results will be beneficial to optimize the operation parameters of superconducting cavities, to discover the real reasons for beam trip by quench interlock, and to improve the operation stability of superconducting RF systems.

  1. Scheme for Generation of Entanglement among Bimodal Cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SONG Xin-Guo; FENG Xun-Li

    2004-01-01

    @@ We present a scheme for generation of an entangled state in many spatially separated bimodal cavity modes via cavity quantum electrodynamics. A V-type three-level atom, initially prepared in a coherent superposition of its excited states, successively passes through both the bimodal cavities. If the atom is measured in its ground state after leaving the last cavity, an entangled state of many cavity modes can be generated. The conditions to generate the maximally entangled state with unity probability are worked out.

  2. Unconventional geometric quantum phase gates with a cavity QED system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Shi-Biao

    2004-11-01

    We propose a scheme for realizing two-qubit quantum phase gates via an unconventional geometric phase shift with atoms in a cavity. In the scheme the atoms interact simultaneously with a highly detuned cavity mode and a classical field. The atoms undergo no transitions during the gate operation, while the cavity mode is displaced along a circle in the phase space, aquiring a geometric phase conditional upon the atomic state. Under certain conditions, the atoms are disentangled with the cavity mode and thus the gate is insensitive to both the atomic spontaneous emission and the cavity decay.

  3. Rapid cavity prototyping using mode matching and globalised scattering matrix

    CERN Document Server

    Shinton, I

    2009-01-01

    Cavity design using traditional mesh based numerical means (such as the finite element or finite difference methods) require large mesh calculations in order to obtain accurate values and cavity optimisation is often not achieved. Here we present a mode matching scheme which utilises a globalised scattering matrix approach that allows cavities with curved surfaces (i.e. cavities with elliptical irises and or equators) to be accurately simulated allowing rapid cavity prototyping and optimisation to be achieved. Results on structures in the CLIC main

  4. Geometrically induced surface polaritons in planar nanostructured metallic cavities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davids, P. S. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Intravia, F [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Dalvit, Diego A. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2014-01-14

    We examine the modal structure and dispersion of periodically nanostructured planar metallic cavities within the scattering matrix formulation. By nanostructuring a metallic grating in a planar cavity, artificial surface excitations or spoof plasmon modes are induced with dispersion determined by the periodicity and geometric characteristics of the grating. These spoof surface plasmon modes are shown to give rise to new cavity polaritonic modes at short mirror separations that modify the density of modes in nanostructured cavities. The increased modal density of states form cavity polarirons have a large impact on the fluctuation induced electromagnetic forces and enhanced hear transfer at short separations.

  5. Interaction between dual cavity modes in a planar photonic microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Elizabeth; Nair, Rajesh V.; Jagatap, B. N.

    2016-10-01

    We theoretically study the interaction between dual cavity modes in a planar photonic microcavity structure in the optical communication wavelength range. The merging and splitting of cavity mode is analysed with realistic microcavity structures. The merging of dual cavity resonance into a single cavity resonance is achieved by changing the number of layers between the two cavities. The splitting of single cavity resonance into dual cavity resonance is obtained with an increase in the reflectivity of mirrors in the front and rear side of the microcavity structure. The threshold condition for the merging and splitting of cavity mode is established in terms of structural parameters. The physical origin of the merging of dual cavity modes into a single cavity resonance is discussed in terms of the electric field intensity distribution in the microcavity structure. The microcavity structure with dual cavity modes is useful for the generation of entangled photon pairs, for achieving the strong-coupling regime between exciton and photon and for high-resolution multi-wavelength filters in optical communication.

  6. 805 MHz and 201 MHz RF cavity development for MUCOOL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Derun [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Corlett, J [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Ladran, A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); MacGill, R [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Wallig, J [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Zisman, M [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Moretti, A [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Rowe, A [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Qian, Z B [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Wu, V [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL 60510 (United States); Rimmer, R A [Jefferson Lab, Newport News, VA 23606 (United States); Norem, J [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Summers, D [University of Mississippi at Oxford, MS 38677 (United States); Torun, Y [Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616 (United States)

    2003-08-01

    A muon cooling channel calls for very high accelerating gradient RF structures to restore the energy lost by muons in the absorbers. The RF structures have to be operated in a strong magnetic field and thus the use of superconducting RF cavities is excluded. To achieve a high shunt impedance while maintaining a large enough aperture to accommodate a large transverse emittance muon beam, the cavity design adopted is a pillbox-like geometry with thin Be foils to terminate the electromagnetic field at the cavity iris. The possibility of using grids of thin-walled metallic tubes for the termination is also being explored. Many of the RF-related issues for muon cooling channels are being studied both theoretically and experimentally using an 805 MHz cavity that has a pillbox-like geometry with thin Be windows to terminate the cavity aperture. The design and performance of this cavity are reported here. High-power RF tests of the 805 MHz cavity are in progress at Lab G in Fermilab. The cavity has exceeded its design gradient of 30 MV m{sup -1}, reaching 34 MV m{sup -1} without external magnetic field. No surface damage was observed at this gradient. The cavity is currently under conditioning at Lab G with an external magnetic field of 2.5 T. We also present here a 201 MHz cavity design for muon cooling channels. The proposed cavity design is also suitable for use in a proof-of-principle muon ionization cooling experiment.

  7. Rigorous analysis of trapped modes in accelerating cavities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rolf Schuhmann

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the development of different algorithms for the calculation of quality factors of eigenmodes in accelerating cavities, which have resonance frequencies above the cutoff frequency of the beam tubes. The analysis is based on a discretization of such cavity structures by the finite integration technique, and the radiation at the open boundaries is systematically taken into account by different approaches in time and frequency domain. Results indicate that even single cell cavities of the TESLA type show Q values of 10^{3} and multicell cavities values in excess of 10^{4}. Thus these modes may cause considerable beam instabilities. Comparison with the conventional method of analyzing closed cavities and identifying modes with little change in frequency as a function of boundary condition shows qualitative differences. Some modes from the closed cavity model do not exist in the open structure and thus would be misinterpreted as trapped modes when only a closed cavity analysis is employed.

  8. Cryogenic rf test of the first plasma etched SRF cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Upadhyay, J; Popović, S; Valente-Feliciano, A -M; Im, D; Phillips, L; Vušković, L

    2016-01-01

    Plasma etching has a potential to be an alternative processing technology for superconducting radio frequency (SRF) cavities. An apparatus and a method are developed for plasma etching of the inner surfaces of SRF cavities. To test the effect of the plasma etching on the cavity rf performance, a 1497 MHz single cell SRF cavity is used. The single cell cavity is mechanically polished, buffer chemically etched afterwards and rf tested at cryogenic temperatures for a baseline test. This cavity is then plasma processed. The processing was accomplished by moving axially the inner electrode and the gas flow inlet in a step-wise manner to establish segmented plasma processing. The cavity is rf tested afterwards at cryogenic temperatures. The rf test and surface condition results are presented.

  9. Evaluating and Minimizing Distributed Cavity Phase Errors in Atomic Clocks

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ruoxin

    2010-01-01

    We perform 3D finite element calculations of the fields in microwave cavities and analyze the distributed cavity phase errors of atomic clocks that they produce. The fields of cylindrical cavities are treated as an azimuthal Fourier series. Each of the lowest components produces clock errors with unique characteristics that must be assessed to establish a clock's accuracy. We describe the errors and how to evaluate them. We prove that sharp structures in the cavity do not produce large frequency errors, even at moderately high powers, provided the atomic density varies slowly. We model the amplitude and phase imbalances of the feeds. For larger couplings, these can lead to increased phase errors. We show that phase imbalances produce a novel distributed cavity phase error that depends on the cavity detuning. We also design improved cavities by optimizing the geometry and tuning the mode spectrum so that there are negligible phase variations, allowing this source of systematic error to be dramatically reduced.

  10. Ultra-high-Q toroidal microresonators for cavity quantum electrodynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Spillane, S M; Vahala, K J; Goh, K W; Wilcut, E; Kimble, H J

    2004-01-01

    We investigate the suitability of toroidal microcavities for strong-coupling cavity quantum electrodynamics (QED). Numerical modeling of the optical modes demonstrate a significant reduction of modal volume with respect to the whispering gallery modes of dielectric spheres, while retaining the high quality factors representative of spherical cavities. The extra degree of freedom of toroid microcavities can be used to achieve improved cavity QED characteristics. Numerical results for atom-cavity coupling strength, critical atom number N_0 and critical photon number n_0 for cesium are calculated and shown to exceed values currently possible using Fabry-Perot cavities. Modeling predicts coupling rates g/(2*pi) exceeding 700 MHz and critical atom numbers approaching 10^{-7} in optimized structures. Furthermore, preliminary experimental measurements of toroidal cavities at a wavelength of 852 nm indicate that quality factors in excess of 100 million can be obtained in a 50 micron principal diameter cavity, which w...

  11. Blasting practices in a quarry with karstic cavities

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2002-01-01

    The blasting practices in a limestone quarry with karstic cavities have been presented. The existence of karstic cavities in the quarry has reduced blasting efficiency significantly. In order to improve blasting efficiency different blasting strategies (loading holes with ANFO in plastic bag, recording cavity location along the holes and charging the holes according to this information, and modifying blasting pattern according to karstic cavities) had been implemented and the results were evaluated on per ton cost basis. It was concluded that efficient blasting in such aquarries requires determining the size and shape of karstic cavities and based on this information, to modify the blast pattern and charge the holes. The suggested method is to record the cavity along the drill hole and to generate 3D model of cavities. By doing this, the production cost in the limestone quarry has decreased from 0.407 $/t to 0.354 $/t.

  12. HOM electronics and code to probe beam centring on 3.9 GHz cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, P

    2014-01-01

    The work within sub-task 10.5.1 was aimed at developing electronics for beam position monitoring (BPM) based on Higher-Order Modes (HOM) excited by electron beams in 3.9 GHz cavities in the FLASH linac at DESY, Hamburg, defining realistic specifications and proving that these signals can be used for beam centering. A series of measurements with devices like a fast oscilloscopes and a real-time spectrum analyzer, as well as with specially designed test electronics. These measurements in conjunction with the simulations made by the other 2 sub-tasks have enabled us to find two spectra regions suitable for use as BPM: modes with strong coupling to the beam around 5.4 GHz, enabling precise monitoring (resolution of ca 20 μm rms) within the whole 4-cavity module, and localized modes at ca.9 GHz for localized measurements in each cavity (resolution of ca 50 mm rms). Various data analysis approaches have been studied. Based on the EuCARD work the HOMBPM electronics has been designed and is now being built at FNAL. ...

  13. Selective oxidization cavity confinement for low threshold vertical cavity transistor laser

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, M. K.; Liu, M.; Tan, F.; Feng, M.; Holonyak, N.

    2013-07-01

    Data are presented for a low threshold n-p-n vertical cavity transistor laser (VCTL) with improved cavity confinement by trench opening and selective oxidation. The oxide-confined VCTL with a 6.5 × 7.5 μm2 oxide aperture demonstrates a threshold base current of 1.6 mA and an optical power of 150 μW at IB = 3 mA operating at -80 °C due to the mismatch between the quantum well emission peak and the resonant cavity optical mode. The VCTL operation switching from spontaneous to coherent stimulated emission is clearly observed in optical output power L-VCE characteristics. The collector output IC-VCE characteristics demonstrate the VCTL can lase in transistor's forward-active mode with a collector current gain β = 0.48.

  14. Scheme for Implementation of an Economic 1→3 Quantum Cloning Machine via Cavity-Assisted Atomic Collisions in Cavity-QED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhi-Qiang; LIU Qi; LIANG Xian-Ting; ZHANG Wen-Hai; YE Liu

    2008-01-01

    A scheme to implement of 1→ 3 economic phase-covariant cloning machine for unknown equator state in cavity-QED is proposed. The scheme requires cavity-assisted collision processes between atoms, which cross through nonresonant cavity fields in the vacuum states. The cavity fields are only virtually excited so that the cavity quality factor can be loosened.

  15. An unobtrusive liquid sensor utilizing a micromilled RF spark gap transmitter and resonant cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, H.; Wilson, C.

    2009-09-01

    This paper reports on a new dielectric liquid sensor that utilizes an RF sparkgap transmitter coupled with an aluminum microwave resonant cavity. The transmitter is a micromilled polymer transmitter housing with patterned copper electrodes that generate micro-arcs. This transmitter which operates outside the measured liquid generates a directed ultrawideband signal which is received by the aluminum waveguide. Absorption resonances in the microwave cavity, measured with a spectrum analyzer are a function of the liquids' dielectric constant at lower frequencies, as well as from molecular vibrations/rotations at higher frequencies. In many chemical manufacturing processes, liquids being manufactured are removed, tested in a lab, and then disposed of, or else they will contaminate the full batch. In beer brewing, for instance, samples are removed, density tested for alcohol content, then disposed of. Using this sensor, the chemical process could be continuously monitored by a computerized system without risk of contamination.

  16. Sensitive and ultra-fast species detection using pulsed cavity ringdown spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Alquaity, Awad

    2015-01-01

    Pulsed cavity ringdown spectroscopy (CRDS) is used to develop a novel, ultra-fast, high-sensitivity diagnostic for measuring species concentrations in shock tube experiments. The diagnostic is demonstrated by monitoring trace concentrations of ethylene in the mid-IR region near 949.47 cm-1. Each ringdown measurement is completed in less than 1 μs and the time period between successive pulses is 10 μs. The high sensitivity diagnostic has a noise-equivalent detection limit of 1.08 x 10-5 cm-1 which enables detection of 15 ppm ethylene at fuel pyrolysis conditions (1845 K and 2 bar) and 294 ppb ethylene under ambient conditions (297 K and 1 bar). To our knowledge, this is the first successful application of the cavity ringdown method to the measurement of species time-histories in a shock tube. © 2015 OSA.

  17. A Tool Measuring Remaining Thickness of Notched Acoustic Cavities in Primary Reaction Control Thruster NDI Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yushi; Sun, Changhong; Zhu, Harry; Wincheski, Buzz

    2006-01-01

    Stress corrosion cracking in the relief radius area of a space shuttle primary reaction control thruster is an issue of concern. The current approach for monitoring of potential crack growth is nondestructive inspection (NDI) of remaining thickness (RT) to the acoustic cavities using an eddy current or remote field eddy current probe. EDM manufacturers have difficulty in providing accurate RT calibration standards. Significant error in the RT values of NDI calibration standards could lead to a mistaken judgment of cracking condition of a thruster under inspection. A tool based on eddy current principle has been developed to measure the RT at each acoustic cavity of a calibration standard in order to validate that the standard meets the sample design criteria.

  18. Development of superconducting Klystron cavity for the Mario Schenberg gravitational wave detector

    CERN Document Server

    Liccardo, Vincenzo; de França, Enrique Klai

    2015-01-01

    Superconducting reentrant cavities can be used in parametric transducers for Gravitational Wave antennas. The Mario Schenberg detector, which is being built by the GRAVITON group at Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), basically consists of a resonant mass (ball) and a set of parametric transducers in order to monitor the fundamental modes of vibration. When coupled to the antenna, the transducer-sphere system will work as a mass-spring system. In this work the main task is the development of parametric transducers consisting of reentrant superconducting cavity with high performance to be implemented in the Mario Schenberg detector. Many geometries, materials and designs have been tested and compared to optimize parameters such as electric and mechanical Q-factor. The aim is the construction of a complete set of nine parametric transducers that, attached to the spherical antenna, will possibly reach the sensitivity $h$ $\\sim$ 10$^{-22}$ $Hz$$^{-1/2}$ in the near future.

  19. Note: Broadband cavity ring-down spectroscopy of an intra-cavity bulk sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeuner, T; Paa, W; Mühlig, C; Stafast, H

    2013-03-01

    A cavity ring-down (CRD) setup equipped with a pulsed broadband light source (480 nm ≤ λ ≤ 650 nm) and a multichannel detection system (temporal gate width Δτ = 20 ns) is used to simultaneously record the optical loss spectrum of an intra-cavity CaF2 sample and its changes upon transverse ArF laser irradiation at 193 nm. The CRD setup with mirrors of high reflectivity (R > 99.93%) allows to register loss changes of 5 × 10(-5) with a spectral resolution of 0.3 nm in less than 2 min.

  20. A hemispherical, high-solid-angle optical micro-cavity for cavity-QED studies

    OpenAIRE

    Cui, Guoqiang; Hannigan, J. M.; Loeckenhoff, R.; Matinaga, F. M.; Raymer, M. G.; Bhongale, S.; Holland, M.; Mosor, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Gibbs, H. M.; Khitrova, G.

    2006-01-01

    We report a novel hemispherical micro-cavity that is comprised of a planar integrated semiconductor distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) mirror, and an external, concave micro-mirror having a radius of curvature $50\\mathrm{\\mu m}$. The integrated DBR mirror containing quantum dots (QD), is designed to locate the QDs at an antinode of the field in order to maximize the interaction between the QD and the cavity. The concave micro-mirror, with high-reflectivity over a large solid-angle, creates a d...