WorldWideScience

Sample records for monitoring disease activity

  1. Remote Physical Activity Monitoring in Neurological Disease: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Valerie A J; Pitsch, Erica; Tahir, Peggy; Cree, Bruce A C; Allen, Diane D; Gelfand, Jeffrey M

    2016-01-01

    To perform a systematic review of studies using remote physical activity monitoring in neurological diseases, highlighting advances and determining gaps. Studies were systematically identified in PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 2004 to December 2014 that monitored physical activity for ≥24 hours in adults with neurological diseases. Studies that measured only involuntary motor activity (tremor, seizures), energy expenditure or sleep were excluded. Feasibility, findings, and protocols were examined. 137 studies met inclusion criteria in multiple sclerosis (MS) (61 studies); stroke (41); Parkinson's Disease (PD) (20); dementia (11); traumatic brain injury (2) and ataxia (1). Physical activity levels measured by remote monitoring are consistently low in people with MS, stroke and dementia, and patterns of physical activity are altered in PD. In MS, decreased ambulatory activity assessed via remote monitoring is associated with greater disability and lower quality of life. In stroke, remote measures of upper limb function and ambulation are associated with functional recovery following rehabilitation and goal-directed interventions. In PD, remote monitoring may help to predict falls. In dementia, remote physical activity measures correlate with disease severity and can detect wandering. These studies show that remote physical activity monitoring is feasible in neurological diseases, including in people with moderate to severe neurological disability. Remote monitoring can be a psychometrically sound and responsive way to assess physical activity in neurological disease. Further research is needed to ensure these tools provide meaningful information in the context of specific neurological disorders and patterns of neurological disability.

  2. Remote Physical Activity Monitoring in Neurological Disease: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Valerie A. J.; Pitsch, Erica; Tahir, Peggy; Cree, Bruce A. C.; Allen, Diane D.; Gelfand, Jeffrey M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To perform a systematic review of studies using remote physical activity monitoring in neurological diseases, highlighting advances and determining gaps. Methods Studies were systematically identified in PubMed/MEDLINE, CINAHL and SCOPUS from January 2004 to December 2014 that monitored physical activity for ≥24 hours in adults with neurological diseases. Studies that measured only involuntary motor activity (tremor, seizures), energy expenditure or sleep were excluded. Feasibility, findings, and protocols were examined. Results 137 studies met inclusion criteria in multiple sclerosis (MS) (61 studies); stroke (41); Parkinson's Disease (PD) (20); dementia (11); traumatic brain injury (2) and ataxia (1). Physical activity levels measured by remote monitoring are consistently low in people with MS, stroke and dementia, and patterns of physical activity are altered in PD. In MS, decreased ambulatory activity assessed via remote monitoring is associated with greater disability and lower quality of life. In stroke, remote measures of upper limb function and ambulation are associated with functional recovery following rehabilitation and goal-directed interventions. In PD, remote monitoring may help to predict falls. In dementia, remote physical activity measures correlate with disease severity and can detect wandering. Conclusions These studies show that remote physical activity monitoring is feasible in neurological diseases, including in people with moderate to severe neurological disability. Remote monitoring can be a psychometrically sound and responsive way to assess physical activity in neurological disease. Further research is needed to ensure these tools provide meaningful information in the context of specific neurological disorders and patterns of neurological disability. PMID:27124611

  3. Validation of the Actiheart Activity Monitor for Measurement of Activity Energy Expenditure in Children and Adolescents with Chronic Disease.

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: The purpose of this study was to develop an activity energy expenditure (AEE) prediction equation for the Actiheart activity monitor (AH) for use in children with chronic disease. Methods: 63 children, aged 8-18 years with different types of chronic disease (Juvenile Arthritis, Hemophilia, Dermatomyositis, neuromuscular disease, Cystic Fibrosis or Congenital Heart Disease) participated in an activity testing session which consisted of a resting protocol, ...

  4. Behavioral and Locomotor Measurements Using an Open Field Activity Monitoring System for Skeletal Muscle Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Tatem, Kathleen S.; Quinn, James L.; Phadke, Aditi; Yu, Qing; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-01-01

    The open field activity monitoring system comprehensively assesses locomotor and behavioral activity levels of mice. It is a useful tool for assessing locomotive impairment in animal models of neuromuscular disease and efficacy of therapeutic drugs that may improve locomotion and/or muscle function. The open field activity measurement provides a different measure than muscle strength, which is commonly assessed by grip strength measurements. It can also show how drugs may affect other body sy...

  5. Prescribing of Electronic Activity Monitors in Cardiometabolic Diseases: Qualitative Interview-Based Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellicha, Alice; Macé, Sandrine; Oppert, Jean-Michel

    2017-09-23

    The prevalence of noncommunicable diseases, including those such as type 2 diabetes, obesity, dyslipidemia, and hypertension, so-called cardiometabolic diseases, is high and is increasing worldwide. Strong evidence supports the role of physical activity in management of these diseases. There is general consensus that mHealth technology, including electronic activity monitors, can potentially increase physical activity in patients, but their use in clinical settings remains limited. Practitioners' requirements when prescribing electronic activity monitors have been poorly described. The aims of this qualitative study were (1) to explore how specialist physicians prescribe electronic activity monitors to patients presenting with cardiometabolic conditions, and (2) to better understand their motivation for and barriers to prescribing such monitors. We conducted qualitative semistructured interviews in March to May 2016 with 11 senior physicians from a public university hospital in France with expertise in management of cardiometabolic diseases (type 1 and type 2 diabetes, obesity, hypertension, and dyslipidemia). Interviews lasted 45 to 60 minutes and were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed using directed content analysis. We report our findings following the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research (COREQ) checklist. Most physicians we interviewed had never prescribed electronic activity monitors, whereas they frequently prescribed blood glucose or blood pressure self-monitoring devices. Reasons for nonprescription included lack of interest in the data collected, lack of evidence for data accuracy, concern about work overload possibly resulting from automatic data transfer, and risk of patients becoming addicted to data. Physicians expected future marketing of easy-to-use monitors that will accurately measure physical activity duration and intensity and provide understandable motivating feedback. Features of electronic activity monitors

  6. Behavioral and locomotor measurements using an open field activity monitoring system for skeletal muscle diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatem, Kathleen S; Quinn, James L; Phadke, Aditi; Yu, Qing; Gordish-Dressman, Heather; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina

    2014-09-29

    The open field activity monitoring system comprehensively assesses locomotor and behavioral activity levels of mice. It is a useful tool for assessing locomotive impairment in animal models of neuromuscular disease and efficacy of therapeutic drugs that may improve locomotion and/or muscle function. The open field activity measurement provides a different measure than muscle strength, which is commonly assessed by grip strength measurements. It can also show how drugs may affect other body systems as well when used with additional outcome measures. In addition, measures such as total distance traveled mirror the 6 min walk test, a clinical trial outcome measure. However, open field activity monitoring is also associated with significant challenges: Open field activity measurements vary according to animal strain, age, sex, and circadian rhythm. In addition, room temperature, humidity, lighting, noise, and even odor can affect assessment outcomes. Overall, this manuscript provides a well-tested and standardized open field activity SOP for preclinical trials in animal models of neuromuscular diseases. We provide a discussion of important considerations, typical results, data analysis, and detail the strengths and weaknesses of open field testing. In addition, we provide recommendations for optimal study design when using open field activity in a preclinical trial.

  7. Self-monitoring to increase physical activity in patients with cardiovascular disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanejima, Yuji; Kitamura, Masahiro; Izawa, Kazuhiro P

    2018-04-30

    It is important to encourage physical activity in patients with cardiovascular disease (CVD), and self-monitoring is considered to contribute to increased physical activity. However, the effects of self-monitoring on CVD patients remain to be established. In this study, we examined the influence of self-monitoring on physical activity of patients with CVD via a systematic review and meta-analysis. Screening of randomized controlled trials only was undertaken twice on PubMed (date of appraisal: August 29, 2017). The inclusion criteria included outpatients with CVD, interventions for them, daily step counts as physical activity included in the outcome, and self-monitoring included in the intervention. Assessments of the risk of bias and meta-analysis in relation to the mean change of daily step counts were conducted to verify the effects of self-monitoring. From 205 studies retrieved on PubMed, six studies were included, with the oldest study published in 2005. Participants included 693 patients of whom 541 patients completed each study program. Their mean age was 60.8 years, and the ratio of men was 79.6%. From these 6 studies, a meta-analysis was conducted with 269 patients of 4 studies including only RCTs with step counts in the intervention group and the control group, and self-monitoring significantly increased physical activity (95% confidence interval, 1916-3090 steps per day, p monitoring combined with other behavior change techniques. The results suggest that self-monitoring of physical activity by patients with CVD has a significantly positive effect on their improvement. Moreover, the trend toward self-monitoring combined with setting counseling and activity goals, and increased intervention via the internet, may lead to the future development and spread of self-monitoring for CVD patients.

  8. Can systemically generated reactive oxygen species help to monitor disease activity in generalized vitiligo? A pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richeek Pradhan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Generalized vitiligo is a disease with unpredictable bursts of activity, goal of treatment during the active phase being to stabilize the lesions. This emphasizes the need for a prospective marker for monitoring disease activity to help decide the duration of therapy. Aims and Objectives: In the present study, we examined whether reactive oxygen species (ROS generated in erythrocytes can be translated into a marker of activity in vitiligo. Materials and Methods: Level of intracellular ROS was measured flow cytometrically in erythrocytes from venous blood of 21 patients with generalized vitiligo and 21 healthy volunteers using the probe dichlorodihydrofluorescein diacetate. Results: The levels of ROS differed significantly between patients and healthy controls, as well as between active versus stable disease groups. In the active disease group, ROS levels were significantly lower in those being treated with systemic steroids than those that were not. ROS levels poorly correlated with disease duration or body surface area involved. Conclusion: A long-term study based on these findings can be conducted to further validate the potential role of ROS in monitoring disease activity vitiligo.

  9. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in Niemann-Pick disease type B monitored by chitotriosidase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quarello, Paola; Spada, Marco; Porta, Francesco; Vassallo, Elena; Timeus, Fabio; Fagioli, Franca

    2018-02-01

    Here, we report a patient with Niemann-Pick disease type B, with early severe onset of disease and pulmonary involvement, treated with hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) from a bone marrow matched unrelated donor. We confirm that HSCT is feasible and potentially beneficial for patients with severe phenotype. Noteworthy, we discussed the potential usefulness of the activity of peripheral chitotriosidase for the longitudinal evaluation of HSCT success and effectiveness. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. MCO Monitoring activity description

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SEXTON, R.A.

    1998-01-01

    Spent Nuclear Fuel remaining from Hanford's N-Reactor operations in the 1970s has been stored under water in the K-Reactor Basins. This fuel will be repackaged, dried and stored in a new facility in the 200E Area. The safety basis for this process of retrieval, drying, and interim storage of the spent fuel has been established. The monitoring of MCOS in dry storage is a currently identified issue in the SNF Project. This plan outlines the key elements of the proposed monitoring activity. Other fuel stored in the K-Reactor Basins, including SPR fuel, will have other monitoring considerations and is not addressed by this activity description

  11. Telemetry Physical Activity Monitoring in Minipig’s Model of Huntington’s Disease

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pokorný, M.; Juhás, Štefan; Juhásová, Jana; Klíma, Jiří; Motlík, Jan; Klempíř, J.; Havlík, J.

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 78, Suppl 2 (2015), s. 39-42 ISSN 1210-7859. [Conference on Animal Models for neurodegenerative Diseases /3./. Liblice, 08.11.2015-10.11.2015] R&D Projects: GA MŠk ED2.1.00/03.0124; GA MŠk(CZ) 7F14308 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : Huntington´s disease * minipig * telemetry Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 0.209, year: 2015

  12. Monitoring and treatment of diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronyai, A.; Gielen, M.; Philipsen, E.; Kamstra, A.

    2003-01-01

    Early recognition and efficient treatment of diseases are important factors for the success of any fish farming operation. Experience learns that during the culture of a new species like pikeperch (partly in new systems) new disease problems will be encountered. The subtask on monitoring and

  13. Agreement Between Home-Based Measurement of Stool Calprotectin and ELISA Results for Monitoring Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heida, Anke; Knol, Mariska; Kobold, Anneke Muller; Bootsman, Josette; Dijkstra, Gerard; van Rheenen, Patrick F

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: An increasing number of physicians use repeated measurements of stool calprotectin to monitor intestinal inflammation in patients with inflammatory bowel diseases (IBDs). A lateral flow-based rapid test allows patients to measure their own stool calprotectin values at home. The

  14. Disease Monitoring and Health Campaign Evaluation Using Google Search Activities for HIV and AIDS, Stroke, Colorectal Cancer, and Marijuana Use in Canada: A Retrospective Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Infodemiology can offer practical and feasible health research applications through the practice of studying information available on the Web. Google Trends provides publicly accessible information regarding search behaviors in a population, which may be studied and used for health campaign evaluation and disease monitoring. Additional studies examining the use and effectiveness of Google Trends for these purposes remain warranted. Objective The objective of our study was to explore the use of infodemiology in the context of health campaign evaluation and chronic disease monitoring. It was hypothesized that following a launch of a campaign, there would be an increase in information seeking behavior on the Web. Second, increasing and decreasing disease patterns in a population would be associated with search activity patterns. This study examined 4 different diseases: human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, stroke, colorectal cancer, and marijuana use. Methods Using Google Trends, relative search volume data were collected throughout the period of February 2004 to January 2015. Campaign information and disease statistics were obtained from governmental publications. Search activity trends were graphed and assessed with disease trends and the campaign interval. Pearson product correlation statistics and joinpoint methodology analyses were used to determine significance. Results Disease patterns and online activity across all 4 diseases were significantly correlated: HIV infection (r=.36, Pcampaigns on colorectal cancer and marijuana use in stimulating search activity. No significant correlations were observed for the campaigns on stroke and HIV regarding search activity. Conclusions The use of infoveillance shows promise as an alternative and inexpensive solution to disease surveillance and health campaign evaluation. Further research is needed to understand Google Trends as a valid and reliable tool for health research. PMID:27733330

  15. Ultrasound and MRI of nerves for monitoring disease activity and treatment effects in chronic dysimmune neuropathies - Current concepts and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Décard, Bernhard F; Pham, Mirko; Grimm, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    New imaging modalities like high-resolution-ultrasound (HRUS) and MR-Neurography (MRN) are increasingly used for the evaluation of the peripheral nervous system. The increasing knowledge on morphological changes observed in different neuropathies has led to a better understanding of underlying pathophysiological processes. The diagnosis of acquired chronic dysimmune neuropathies (CDN) like chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), Lewis-Sumner Syndrome (LSS) or multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) can be challenging. The current diagnostic criteria and outcome parameters are mainly based on clinical and electrophysiological parameters. Especially in CDN cases with atypical presentation or during early disease stages, the diagnostic accuracy is low and standardized protocols for the evaluation of disease activity and treatment response are lacking. The establishment of combined diagnostic criteria for CDN including imaging modalities could help to improve the diagnostic accuracy, allow a better differentiation of subtypes and facilitate the follow-up of disease course. The appropriate selection of eligible patients and sensitive monitoring of treatment response is mandatory future in treatment trials. In this article, we briefly summarize the clinical presentations and pathophysiological concepts of different CDN like CIDP, LSS and MMN. Furthermore, this review focuses on the diagnostic value of HRUS/MRN and its potential role for the monitoring of disease activity. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Source Monitoring in Alzheimer's Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Haj, Mohamad; Fasotti, Luciano; Allain, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Source monitoring is the process of making judgments about the origin of memories. There are three categories of source monitoring: reality monitoring (discrimination between self- versus other-generated sources), external monitoring (discrimination between several external sources), and internal monitoring (discrimination between two types of…

  17. Comparison of two different physical activity monitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baer David J

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Understanding the relationships between physical activity (PA and disease has become a major area of research interest. Activity monitors, devices that quantify free-living PA for prolonged periods of time (days or weeks, are increasingly being used to estimate PA. A range of different activity monitors brands are available for investigators to use, but little is known about how they respond to different levels of PA in the field, nor if data conversion between brands is possible. Methods 56 women and men were fitted with two different activity monitors, the Actigraph™ (Actigraph LLC; AGR and the Actical™ (Mini-Mitter Co.; MM for 15 days. Both activity monitors were fixed to an elasticized belt worn over the hip, with the anterior and posterior position of the activity monitors randomized. Differences between activity monitors and the validity of brand inter-conversion were measured by t-tests, Pearson correlations, Bland-Altman plots, and coefficients of variation (CV. Results The AGR detected a significantly greater amount of daily PA (216.2 ± 106.2 vs. 188.0 ± 101.1 counts/min, P Conclusion Although activity monitors predict PA on the same scale (counts/min, the results between these two brands are not directly comparable. However, the data are comparable if a conversion equation is applied, with better results for log-transformed data.

  18. Value activity monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Alencar Silva, P.

    2013-01-01

    Current value modeling ontologies are grounded on the economic premise that profit sharing is a critical condition to be assessed during the configuration of a value constellation. Such a condition ought to be reinforced through a monitoring mechanism design, since a value model expresses only

  19. Epidemiological Concepts Regarding Disease Monitoring and Surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christensen Jette

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Definitions of epidemiological concepts regarding disease monitoring and surveillance can be found in textbooks on veterinary epidemiology. This paper gives a review of how the concepts: monitoring, surveillance, and disease control strategies are defined. Monitoring and surveillance systems (MO&SS involve measurements of disease occurrence, and the design of the monitoring determines which types of disease occurrence measures can be applied. However, the knowledge of the performance of diagnostic tests (sensitivity and specificity is essential to estimate the true occurrence of the disease. The terms, disease control programme (DCP or disease eradication programme (DEP, are defined, and the steps of DCP/DEP are described to illustrate that they are a process rather than a static MO&SS.

  20. Novel use of non-echo-planar diffusion weighted MRI in monitoring disease activity and treatment response in active Grave's orbitopathy: An initial observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingam, Ravi Kumar; Mundada, Pravin; Lee, Vickie

    2018-01-10

    To examine the novel use of non-echo-planar diffusion weighted MRI (DWI) in depicting activity and treatment response in active Grave's orbitopathy (GO) by assessing, with inter-observer agreement, for a correlation between its apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) and conventional Short tau Inversion Recovery (STIR) MRI signal-intensity ratios (SIRs). A total of 23 actively inflamed muscles and 30 muscle response episodes were analysed in patients with active GO who underwent medical treatment. The MRI orbit scans included STIR sequences and non-echo-planar DWI were evaluated. Two observers independently assessed the images qualitatively for the presence of activity in the extraocular muscles (EOMs) and recorded the STIR signal-intensity (SI), SIR (SI ratio of EOM/temporalis muscle), and ADC values of any actively inflamed muscle on the pre-treatment scans and their corresponding values on the subsequent post-treatment scans. Inter-observer agreement was examined. There was a significant positive correlation (0.57, p < 0.001) between ADC and both SIR and STIR SI of the actively inflamed EOM. There was also a significant positive correlation (0.75, p < 0.001) between SIR and ADC values depicting change in muscle activity associated with treatment response. There was good inter-observer agreement. Our preliminary results indicate that quantitative evaluation with non-echo-planar DWI ADC values correlates well with conventional STIR SIR in detecting active GO and monitoring its treatment response, with good inter-observer agreement.

  1. Contamination monitoring activities in Kanupp

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naqvi, S S [Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (Pakistan)

    1997-06-01

    The Karachi Nuclear Power Plant (Kanupp) is a 137 MWe pressurized heavy water reactor, designed and erected by the Canadian General Electric Company as a turn key project. The plant is in operation since it was commissioned in the year 1972. It is located at the Arabian Sea Coast about 15 miles to the west of Karachi. During its more than two decades of operation, the plant has generated about 8 billion units of electricity with an average life time availability factor of 60%. In Kanupp, radioactive contamination may exit due to the release of fission product, activation products etc., which may somehow escape from its confinement and may contaminate surface or other media such as air, water etc. In this paper, following items are described: main aspects of contamination, status of contamination monitoring, need of contamination monitoring, radiation protection activity, instruments, contamination, current status of contamination survey materials and their disposal, and environmental monitoring. (G.K.)

  2. Active Job Monitoring in Pilots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuehn, Eileen; Fischer, Max; Giffels, Manuel; Jung, Christopher; Petzold, Andreas

    2015-12-01

    Recent developments in high energy physics (HEP) including multi-core jobs and multi-core pilots require data centres to gain a deep understanding of the system to monitor, design, and upgrade computing clusters. Networking is a critical component. Especially the increased usage of data federations, for example in diskless computing centres or as a fallback solution, relies on WAN connectivity and availability. The specific demands of different experiments and communities, but also the need for identification of misbehaving batch jobs, requires an active monitoring. Existing monitoring tools are not capable of measuring fine-grained information at batch job level. This complicates network-aware scheduling and optimisations. In addition, pilots add another layer of abstraction. They behave like batch systems themselves by managing and executing payloads of jobs internally. The number of real jobs being executed is unknown, as the original batch system has no access to internal information about the scheduling process inside the pilots. Therefore, the comparability of jobs and pilots for predicting run-time behaviour or network performance cannot be ensured. Hence, identifying the actual payload is important. At the GridKa Tier 1 centre a specific tool is in use that allows the monitoring of network traffic information at batch job level. This contribution presents the current monitoring approach and discusses recent efforts and importance to identify pilots and their substructures inside the batch system. It will also show how to determine monitoring data of specific jobs from identified pilots. Finally, the approach is evaluated.

  3. HUMAN ACTIVITY MONITORING USING SMARTPHONE

    OpenAIRE

    TOKALA, SAI SUJIT; ROKALA, RANADEEP

    2014-01-01

    The main aim of the project is to develop an algorithm which will classify the activity performed by a human who is carrying a smart phone. The day to day life made humans very busy at work and during daily activities, mostly elderly people who are at home have an important need to monitor their activity by others when they are alone, if they are inactive for a long time without movement, or in some situations like if they have fallen down, became unconscious for sometime or seized with a car...

  4. The development of a mobile monitoring and feedback tool to stimulate physical activity of people with a chronic disease in primary care: a user-centered design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Weegen, Sanne; Verwey, Renée; Spreeuwenberg, Marieke; Tange, Huibert; van der Weijden, Trudy; de Witte, Luc

    2013-07-02

    Physical activity is an important aspect in the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or type-2 diabetes. A monitoring and feedback tool combined with guidance by a primary care provider might be a successful method to enhance the level of physical activity in these patients. As a prerequisite for useful technology, it is important to involve the end-users in the design process from an early stage. The aim of this study was to investigate the user requirements for a tool to stimulate physical activity, embedded in primary care practice. The leading principle of this tool is to change behavior by self-monitoring, goal-setting, and feedback. The research team collected qualitative data among 15 patients, 16 care professionals, and several experts. A prototype was developed in three stages. In stage 1, the literature was searched to identify end-users and context. In stage 2, the literature, experts and patient representatives were consulted to set up a use case with the general idea of the innovation. In stage 3, individual interviews and focus groups were held to identify the end-user requirements. Based on these requirements a prototype was built by the engineering team. The development process has led to a tool that generally meets the requirements of the end-users. A tri-axial activity sensor, worn on the hip, is connected by Bluetooth to a smartphone. In an app, quantitative feedback is given about the amount of activity and goals reached by means of graphical visualization, and an image shows a sun when the goal is reached. Overviews about activity per half an hour, per day, week, and month are provided. In the menu of the app and on a secured website, patients can enter information in individual sessions or read feedback messages generated by the system. The practice nurse can see the results of all patients on a secure webpage and can then discuss the results and set personalized goals in consultation with the patient. This study

  5. Reporters to monitor cellular MMP12 activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos-Correa, Amanda; Mall, Marcus A.; Schultz, Carsten

    2010-02-01

    Macrophage elastase, also called MMP12, belongs to a family of proteolytic enzymes whose best known physiological function is the remodeling of the extracellular matrix. Under certain pathological conditions, including inflammation, chronic overexpression of MMP12 has been observed and its elevated proteolytic activity has been suggested to be the cause of pulmonary emphysema. However, it was until recently impossible to monitor the activity of MMP12 under disease conditions, mainly due to a lack of detection methods. Recent development of new reporters for monitoring MMP12 activity in living cells, such as LaRee1, provided novel insights into the pathobiology of MMP12 in pulmonary inflammation.1 In the future, these reporters might contribute to improved diagnosis and in finding better treatments for chronic inflammatory lung diseases and emphysema. Our approach for visualizing MMP12 activity is based on peptidic, membrane-targeted FRET (Foerster Resonance Energy Transfer) reporters. Here we describe a set of new reporters containing different fluorophore pairs as well as modifications in the membrane-targeting lipid moiety. We studied the influence of these modifications on reporter performance and the reporter mobility on live cell membranes by FRAP (fluorescence recovery after photobleaching). Finally, we generated several new fluorescently labeled MMP inhibitors based on the peptidic reporter structures as prototypes for future tools to inhibit and monitor MMP activity at the same time.

  6. Digitally enhanced recovery: Investigating the use of digital self-tracking for monitoring leisure time physical activity of cardiovascular disease (CVD patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürgen Vogel

    Full Text Available Research has shown that physical activity is essential in the prevention and treatment of chronic diseases like cardiovascular disease (CVD. Smart wearables (e.g., smartwatches are increasingly used to foster and monitor human behaviour, including physical activity. However, despite this increased usage, little evidence is available on the effects of smart wearables in behaviour change. The little research which is available typically focuses on the behaviour of healthy individuals rather than patients. In this study, we investigate the effects of using smart wearables by patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation. A field experiment involving 29 patients was designed and participants were either assigned to the study group (N = 13 patients who finished the study and used a self-tracking device or the control group (N = 16 patients who finished the study and did not use a device. For both groups data about physiological performance during cardiac stress test was collected at the beginning (baseline, in the middle (in week 6, at the end of the rehabilitation in the organized rehabilitation setting, and at the end of the study (after 12 weeks, at the end of the rehabilitation, including the organized rehabilitation plus another 6 weeks of self-organized rehabilitation. Comparing the physiological performance of both groups, the data showed significant differences. The participants in the study group not only maintained the same performance level as during the midterm examination in week 6, they improved performance even further during the six weeks that followed. The results presented in this paper provide evidence for positive effects of digital self-tracking by patients undergoing cardiac rehabilitation on performance of the cardiovascular system. In this way, our study provides novel insight about the effects of the use of smart wearables by CVD patients. Our findings have implications for the design of self-management approaches in a patient

  7. [Wireless device for monitoring the patients with chronic disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciorap, R; Zaharia, D; Corciovă, C; Ungureanu, Monica; Lupu, R; Stan, A

    2008-01-01

    Remote monitoring of chronic diseases can improve health outcomes and potentially lower health care costs. The high number of the patients, suffering of chronically diseases, who wish to stay at home rather then in a hospital increasing the need of homecare monitoring and have lead to a high demand of wearable medical devices. Also, extended patient monitoring during normal activity has become a very important target. In this paper are presented the design of the wireless monitoring devices based on ultra low power circuits, high storage memory flash, bluetooth communication and the firmware for the management of the monitoring device. The monitoring device is built using an ultra low power microcontroller (MSP430 from Texas Instruments) that offers the advantage of high integration of some circuits. The custom made electronic boards used for biosignal acquisition are also included modules for storage device (SD/MMC card) with FAT32 file system and Bluetooth device for short-range communication used for data transmission between monitoring device and PC or PDA. The work was focused on design and implementation of an ultra low power wearable device able to acquire patient vital parameters, causing minimal discomfort and allowing high mobility. The proposed wireless device could be used as a warning system for monitoring during normal activity.

  8. Global disease monitoring and forecasting with Wikipedia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Generous, Nicholas; Fairchild, Geoffrey; Deshpande, Alina; Del Valle, Sara Y; Priedhorsky, Reid

    2014-11-01

    Infectious disease is a leading threat to public health, economic stability, and other key social structures. Efforts to mitigate these impacts depend on accurate and timely monitoring to measure the risk and progress of disease. Traditional, biologically-focused monitoring techniques are accurate but costly and slow; in response, new techniques based on social internet data, such as social media and search queries, are emerging. These efforts are promising, but important challenges in the areas of scientific peer review, breadth of diseases and countries, and forecasting hamper their operational usefulness. We examine a freely available, open data source for this use: access logs from the online encyclopedia Wikipedia. Using linear models, language as a proxy for location, and a systematic yet simple article selection procedure, we tested 14 location-disease combinations and demonstrate that these data feasibly support an approach that overcomes these challenges. Specifically, our proof-of-concept yields models with r2 up to 0.92, forecasting value up to the 28 days tested, and several pairs of models similar enough to suggest that transferring models from one location to another without re-training is feasible. Based on these preliminary results, we close with a research agenda designed to overcome these challenges and produce a disease monitoring and forecasting system that is significantly more effective, robust, and globally comprehensive than the current state of the art.

  9. Global disease monitoring and forecasting with Wikipedia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Generous

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Infectious disease is a leading threat to public health, economic stability, and other key social structures. Efforts to mitigate these impacts depend on accurate and timely monitoring to measure the risk and progress of disease. Traditional, biologically-focused monitoring techniques are accurate but costly and slow; in response, new techniques based on social internet data, such as social media and search queries, are emerging. These efforts are promising, but important challenges in the areas of scientific peer review, breadth of diseases and countries, and forecasting hamper their operational usefulness. We examine a freely available, open data source for this use: access logs from the online encyclopedia Wikipedia. Using linear models, language as a proxy for location, and a systematic yet simple article selection procedure, we tested 14 location-disease combinations and demonstrate that these data feasibly support an approach that overcomes these challenges. Specifically, our proof-of-concept yields models with r2 up to 0.92, forecasting value up to the 28 days tested, and several pairs of models similar enough to suggest that transferring models from one location to another without re-training is feasible. Based on these preliminary results, we close with a research agenda designed to overcome these challenges and produce a disease monitoring and forecasting system that is significantly more effective, robust, and globally comprehensive than the current state of the art.

  10. 1988 Monitoring Activities Review (MAR) of the environmental monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-03-01

    The EGandG Idaho Environmental Monitoring (EM) Unit is responsible for coordinating and conducting environmental measurements of radioactive and hazardous contaminants around facilities operated by EGandG Idaho. The EM Unit has several broad program objectives, which include complying with regulatory standards and developing a basis for estimating future impacts of operations at EGandG Idaho facilities. To improve program planning and to provide bases for technical improvement of the monitoring program, the EGandG Environmental Monitoring organization has regularly used the Monitoring Activities Review (MAR) process since 1982. Each MAR is conducted by a committee of individuals selected for their experience in the various types of monitoring performed by the EM organization. Previous MAR studies have focused on procedures for all currently monitored media except biota. Biotic monitoring was initiated following the last MAR. This report focuses on all currently monitored media, and includes the first review of biotic monitoring. The review of biotic monitoring has been conducted at a level of detail consistent with initial MAR reports for other parts of the Waste Management Program Facilities Environmental Monitoring Program. The review of the biotic monitoring activities is presented in Section 5.5 of this report. 21 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  11. Monitoring Activities Review action report for the Environmental Monitoring Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilhelmsen, R.N.; Wright, K.C.

    1990-12-01

    To improve program planning and to provide bases for technical improvement of the monitoring program, the EG ampersand G Environmental Monitoring (EM) organization has regularly used the Monitoring Activities Review (MAR) process since 1982. Each MAR is conducted by a committee of individuals selected for their experience in the various types of monitoring performed by the EM organization. An MAR of the Environmental Monitoring Program was conducted in 1988. This action report identifies and discusses the recommendations of this MAR committee. This action report also identifies the actions already taken by the EM Unit in response to these recommendations, as well as the actions and schedules to be taken. 10 refs

  12. How consumer physical activity monitors could transform human physiology research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall Brown, Tyish S.; Collier, Scott R.; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2017-01-01

    A sedentary lifestyle and lack of physical activity are well-established risk factors for chronic disease and adverse health outcomes. Thus, there is enormous interest in measuring physical activity in biomedical research. Many consumer physical activity monitors, including Basis Health Tracker, BodyMedia Fit, DirectLife, Fitbit Flex, Fitbit One, Fitbit Zip, Garmin Vivofit, Jawbone UP, MisFit Shine, Nike FuelBand, Polar Loop, Withings Pulse O2, and others have accuracies similar to that of research-grade physical activity monitors for measuring steps. This review focuses on the unprecedented opportunities that consumer physical activity monitors offer for human physiology and pathophysiology research because of their ability to measure activity continuously under real-life conditions and because they are already widely used by consumers. We examine current and potential uses of consumer physical activity monitors as a measuring or monitoring device, or as an intervention in strategies to change behavior and predict health outcomes. The accuracy, reliability, reproducibility, and validity of consumer physical activity monitors are reviewed, as are limitations and challenges associated with using these devices in research. Other topics covered include how smartphone apps and platforms, such as the Apple ResearchKit, can be used in conjunction with consumer physical activity monitors for research. Lastly, the future of consumer physical activity monitors and related technology is considered: pattern recognition, integration of sleep monitors, and other biosensors in combination with new forms of information processing. PMID:28052867

  13. How consumer physical activity monitors could transform human physiology research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Stephen P; Hall Brown, Tyish S; Collier, Scott R; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2017-03-01

    A sedentary lifestyle and lack of physical activity are well-established risk factors for chronic disease and adverse health outcomes. Thus, there is enormous interest in measuring physical activity in biomedical research. Many consumer physical activity monitors, including Basis Health Tracker, BodyMedia Fit, DirectLife, Fitbit Flex, Fitbit One, Fitbit Zip, Garmin Vivofit, Jawbone UP, MisFit Shine, Nike FuelBand, Polar Loop, Withings Pulse O 2 , and others have accuracies similar to that of research-grade physical activity monitors for measuring steps. This review focuses on the unprecedented opportunities that consumer physical activity monitors offer for human physiology and pathophysiology research because of their ability to measure activity continuously under real-life conditions and because they are already widely used by consumers. We examine current and potential uses of consumer physical activity monitors as a measuring or monitoring device, or as an intervention in strategies to change behavior and predict health outcomes. The accuracy, reliability, reproducibility, and validity of consumer physical activity monitors are reviewed, as are limitations and challenges associated with using these devices in research. Other topics covered include how smartphone apps and platforms, such as the Apple ResearchKit, can be used in conjunction with consumer physical activity monitors for research. Lastly, the future of consumer physical activity monitors and related technology is considered: pattern recognition, integration of sleep monitors, and other biosensors in combination with new forms of information processing. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in Rheumatic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NG Hoi-Yan Alexandra

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The ultimate goal of treating rheumatic disease is to achieve rapid suppression of inflammation, while at the same time minimizing the toxicities from rheumatic drugs. Different patients have different individual pharmacokinetics that can affect the drug level. Moreover, different factors, such as renal function, age or even different underlying diseases, can affect the drug level. Therefore, giving the same dosage of drugs to different patients may result in different drug levels. This article will review the usefulness of therapeutic drug monitoring in maximizing drug efficacy, while reducing the risk of toxicities in Hydroxychloroquine, Mycophenolate Mofetil, Tacrolimus and Tumor Necrosis Factor inhibitors (TNF Inhibitors.

  15. Epidemiological monitoring for emerging infectious diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, Marjorie

    2010-04-01

    The Homeland Security News Wire has been reporting on new ways to fight epidemics using digital tools such as iPhone, social networks, Wikipedia, and other Internet sites. Instant two-way communication now gives consumers the ability to complement official reports on emerging infectious diseases from health authorities. However, there is increasing concern that these communications networks could open the door to mass panic from unreliable or false reports. There is thus an urgent need to ensure that epidemiological monitoring for emerging infectious diseases gives health authorities the capability to identify, analyze, and report disease outbreaks in as timely and efficient a manner as possible. One of the dilemmas in the global dissemination of information on infectious diseases is the possibility that information overload will create inefficiencies as the volume of Internet-based surveillance information increases. What is needed is a filtering mechanism that will retrieve relevant information for further analysis by epidemiologists, laboratories, and other health organizations so they are not overwhelmed with irrelevant information and will be able to respond quickly. This paper introduces a self-organizing ontology that could be used as a filtering mechanism to increase relevance and allow rapid analysis of disease outbreaks as they evolve in real time.

  16. 7 CFR 800.216 - Activities that shall be monitored.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... merchandising activities identified in this section shall be monitored in accordance with the instructions. (b) Grain merchandising activities. Grain merchandising activities subject to monitoring for compliance with...) Recordkeeping activities. Elevator and merchandising recordkeeping activities subject to monitoring for...

  17. Mobile Monitoring and Reasoning Methods to Prevent Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego López-de-Ipiña

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available With the recent technological advances, it is possible to monitor vital signs using Bluetooth-enabled biometric mobile devices such as smartphones, tablets or electric wristbands. In this manuscript, we present a system to estimate the risk of cardiovascular diseases in Ambient Assisted Living environments. Cardiovascular disease risk is obtained from the monitoring of the blood pressure by means of mobile devices in combination with other clinical factors, and applying reasoning techniques based on the Systematic Coronary Risk Evaluation Project charts. We have developed an end-to-end software application for patients and physicians and a rule-based reasoning engine. We have also proposed a conceptual module to integrate recommendations to patients in their daily activities based on information proactively inferred through reasoning techniques and context-awareness. To evaluate the platform, we carried out usability experiments and performance benchmarks.

  18. Modeling of the active vibroseismic monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovalevskij, V.V.

    2006-01-01

    The results of the mathematical modeling of vibroseismic monitoring of changes in the elastic characteristics in the interior Earth's crust zone are presented. The model of the 'Earth's crust-mantle' system with point vibrational source on the free surface is considered. The estimates of sensitivity of active monitoring method with harmonic vibrational signals is determined. (author)

  19. Activity monitoring systems in health care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kröse, B.; van Oosterhout, T.; van Kasteren, T.; Salah, A.A.; Gevers, T.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter focuses on activity monitoring in a home setting for health care purposes. First the most current sensing systems are described, which consist of wearable and ambient sensors. Then several approaches for the monitoring of simple actions are discussed, like falls or therapies. After

  20. Monitoring Human Activity through Portable Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Sebestyen

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring human activity may be useful for medical supervision and for prophylactic purposes. Mobile devices like intelligent phones or watches have multiple sensors and wireless communication capabilities which can be used for this purpose. This paper presents some integrated solutions for determining and continuous monitoring of a person’s state. Aspects taken into consideration are: activity detection and recognition based on acceleration sensors, wireless communication protocols for data acquisition, web monitoring, alerts generation and statistical processing of multiple sensorial data. As practical implementations two case studies are presented, one using an intelligent phone and another using a mixed signal processor integrated in a watch.

  1. Being active when you have heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart disease - activity; CAD - activity; Coronary artery disease - activity; Angina - activity ... Getting regular exercise when you have heart disease is ... It may also help you be more active without chest pain or other ...

  2. Monitoring Biological Activity at Geothermal Power Plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peter Pryfogle

    2005-09-01

    The economic impact of microbial growth in geothermal power plants has been estimated to be as high as $500,000 annually for a 100 MWe plant. Many methods are available to monitor biological activity at these facilities; however, very few plants have any on-line monitoring program in place. Metal coupon, selective culturing (MPN), total organic carbon (TOC), adenosine triphosphate (ATP), respirometry, phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) characterizations have been conducted using water samples collected from geothermal plants located in California and Utah. In addition, the on-line performance of a commercial electrochemical monitor, the BIoGEORGE?, has been evaluated during extended deployments at geothermal facilities. This report provides a review of these techniques, presents data on their application from laboratory and field studies, and discusses their value in characterizing and monitoring biological activities at geothermal power plants.

  3. Fuel performance evaluation through iodine activity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anantharaman, K.; Chandra, R.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of the failed fuel detection system is to keep a watch on fuel behaviour during operation. This paper describes the evaluation of fuel behaviour by monitoring the activities of various isotopes of iodine both during steady state and during a reactor shutdown. The limitations of this approach also has been explained. The monitoring of tramp uranium for different types of release, namely fixed contamination and continuous release from fuel, is also presented. (author)

  4. Technology of remote monitoring for nuclear activity monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwack, Ehn Ho; Kim, Jong Soo; Yoon, Wan Ki; Park, Sung Sik; Na, Won Woo; An, Jin Soo; Cha, Hong Ryul; Kim, Jung Soo

    2000-05-01

    In a view of safeguards monitoring at nuclear facilities, the monitoring is changing to remote method so that this report is described to remote monitoring(RM) applying on commercial NPP in Korea. To enhance IAEA safeguards efficiency and effectiveness, IAEA is taking into account of remote monitoring system(RMS) and testing as a field trial. IRMP(International Remote Monitoring Project) in participating many nations for development of RMS is proceeding their project such as technical exchange and research etc. In case of our country are carrying out the research relevant RM since acceptance RMS at 7th ROK-IAEA safeguards implementation review meeting. With a view to enhancement the RMS, installation location and element technology of the RM equipment are evaluated in a view of safeguards in Korea LWRs, and proposed a procedure for national inspection application through remote data evaluation from Younggwang-3 NPP. These results are large valuable to use of national inspection at time point extending installation to all Korea PWR NPP. In case of CANDU, neutron, gamma measurement and basic concept of network using optical fiber scintillating detector as remote verification method for dry storage canister are described. Also RM basic design of spent fuel transfer campaign is described that unattended RM without inspector instead of performing in participating together with IAEA and national inspector. The transfer campaign means the spent fuel storage pond to dry storage canister for about two months every year. Therefore, positively participation of IAEA strength safeguards project will be increased transparency for our nuclear activity as well as contributed to national relevant industry.

  5. Technology of remote monitoring for nuclear activity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwack, Ehn Ho; Kim, Jong Soo; Yoon, Wan Ki; Park, Sung Sik; Na, Won Woo; An, Jin Soo; Cha, Hong Ryul; Kim, Jung Soo

    2000-05-01

    In a view of safeguards monitoring at nuclear facilities, the monitoring is changing to remote method so that this report is described to remote monitoring(RM) applying on commercial NPP in Korea. To enhance IAEA safeguards efficiency and effectiveness, IAEA is taking into account of remote monitoring system(RMS) and testing as a field trial. IRMP(International Remote Monitoring Project) in participating many nations for development of RMS is proceeding their project such as technical exchange and research etc. In case of our country are carrying out the research relevant RM since acceptance RMS at 7th ROK-IAEA safeguards implementation review meeting. With a view to enhancement the RMS, installation location and element technology of the RM equipment are evaluated in a view of safeguards in Korea LWRs, and proposed a procedure for national inspection application through remote data evaluation from Younggwang-3 NPP. These results are large valuable to use of national inspection at time point extending installation to all Korea PWR NPP. In case of CANDU, neutron, gamma measurement and basic concept of network using optical fiber scintillating detector as remote verification method for dry storage canister are described. Also RM basic design of spent fuel transfer campaign is described that unattended RM without inspector instead of performing in participating together with IAEA and national inspector. The transfer campaign means the spent fuel storage pond to dry storage canister for about two months every year. Therefore, positively participation of IAEA strength safeguards project will be increased transparency for our nuclear activity as well as contributed to national relevant industry

  6. Actigraphy monitoring of symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Weidong; Kwak, Shin; Li, Fuzhong; Wu, Chunlan; Chen, Yiyun; Yamamoto, Yoshiharu; Cai, Dingfang

    2013-07-02

    Although the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) is the "gold-standard" tool in assessing the severity of symptoms in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD), not all activity-related disease symptoms can be accurately captured by the well-established clinical rating scale. Using an alternative approach, this study examined the level of physical activity measured by actigraphy over time and whether change in physical activity was associated with disease severity assessed by UPDRS. We used a longitudinal design in which physical activity and disease severity were assessed repeatedly during a 4-month interval, over a 3-year observational period, in a sample of 61 patients with idiopathic PD and a control group of 32 neurologically intact individuals. Physical activity data during awake-time were analyzed using the power-law exponent (PLE) method. Correlational relationships between changes in maxima values of PLE and scores of total UPDRS, UPDRS-part II (Activities of Daily Living), and UPDRS-part III (Motor Examination) in patients with PD were examined. Results show an increase in maxima values of PLE and the UPDRS total score in PD patients and that there is a positive association between changes in maxima values and total UPDRS score (r=0.746, p=0.032), UPDRS-part II score (r=0.687, p=0.027), and UPDRS-part III score (r=0.893, p=0.018). There was no significant change in the level of physical activity over time for the controls. Findings from this study indicate that change in physical activity, as captured by actigraphy, is associated with increased severity in patients' clinical symptoms of PD over time. Thus, these data suggest that, when used in conjunction with the conventional UPDRS measure, an actigraphic measure of physical activity may provide clinicians an adjunct measurement approach to monitor patients' activity-based disease progression or responses to treatment in outpatient clinic settings. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by

  7. Gas bubble disease monitoring and research of juvenile salmonids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maule, A.G.; Beeman, J.; Hans, K.M.; Mesa, M.G.; Haner, P.; Warren, J.J.

    1997-10-01

    This document describes the project activities 1996--1997 contract year. This report is composed of three chapters which contain data and analyses of the three main elements of the project: field research to determine the vertical distribution of migrating juvenile salmonids, monitoring of juvenile migrants at dams on the Snake and Columbia rivers, and laboratory experiments to describe the progression of gas bubble disease signs leading to mortality. The major findings described in this report are: A miniature pressure-sensitive radio transmitter was found to be accurate and precise and, after compensation for water temperature, can be used to determine the depth of tagged-fish to within 0.32 m of the true depth (Chapter 1). Preliminary data from very few fish suggest that depth protects migrating juvenile steelhead from total dissolved gas supersaturation (Chapter 1). As in 1995, few fish had any signs of gas bubble disease, but it appeared that prevalence and severity increased as fish migrated downstream and in response to changing gas supersaturation (Chapter 2). It appeared to gas bubble disease was not a threat to migrating juvenile salmonids when total dissolved gas supersaturation was < 120% (Chapter 2). Laboratory studies suggest that external examinations are appropriate for determining the severity of gas bubble disease in juvenile salmonids (Chapter 3). The authors developed a new method for examining gill arches for intravascular bubbles by clamping the ventral aorta to reduce bleeding when arches were removed (Chapter 3). Despite an outbreak of bacterial kidney disease in the experimental fish, the data indicate that gas bubble disease is a progressive trauma that can be monitored (Chapter 3)

  8. Project monitoring package (PMP) : A package for project activity monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vyas, K.N.; Kannan, A.; Susandhi, R.; Basu, S.

    1987-01-01

    A package for preparing PERT/CPM network diagrams has been written for PDP-11/34. The program uses PLOT-10 library calls for device interfacing. The package is essentially non-interactive in nature, and reads input data in the form of activity description and duration. It calculates the critical path time and performs time scaling of the events. The report gives a brief outline of the logic used, a sample plot and tabular output for reference. An additional facility for performing project activity monitoring has also been implemented. Activity monitoring generally requires various reports such as feed back reports from various group co-ordinators, information report for project co-ordinator and brief periodical reports for management. A package 'DATATRIEVE' (DTR) on PDP-11/34 system is utilized for generating the above mentioned reports. As DTR can also use normal sequential files, an interfacing program has been written which reformats the files accepted by PERT program acceptable to DTR. Various types of reports as generated by DTR are included. However this part of the package is not transportable and can be implemented only on systems having DTR. 6 figures. (author)

  9. 3D monitoring of active tectonic structures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Stemberk, Josef; Košťák, Blahoslav; Vilímek, V.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 36, 1-2 (2003), s. 103-112 ISSN 0264-3707 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 625.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z3046908 Keywords : tectonics * monitoring * active structures Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 0.754, year: 2003

  10. Monitoring Malware Activity on the LAN Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrzewski, Mirosław

    Many security related organizations periodically publish current network and systems security information, with the lists of top malware programs. These lists raises the question how these threats spreads out, if the worms (the only threat with own communication abilities) are low or missing on these lists. The paper discuss the research on malware network activity, aimed to deliver the answer to the question, what is the main infection channel of modern malware, done with the usage of virtual honeypot systems on dedicated, unprotected network. Systems setup, network and systems monitoring solutions, results of over three months of network traffic and malware monitoring are presented, along with the proposed answer to our research question.

  11. Response monitoring in de novo patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Willemssen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD is accompanied by dysfunctions in a variety of cognitive processes. One of these is error processing, which depends upon phasic decreases of medial prefrontal dopaminergic activity. Until now, there is no study evaluating these processes in newly diagnosed, untreated patients with PD ("de novo PD". METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report large changes in performance monitoring processes using event-related potentials (ERPs in de novo PD-patients. The results suggest that increases in medial frontal dopaminergic activity after an error (Ne are decreased, relative to age-matched controls. In contrast, neurophysiological processes reflecting general motor response monitoring (Nc are enhanced in de novo patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It may be hypothesized that the Nc-increase is at costs of dopaminergic activity after an error; on a functional level errors may not always be detected and correct responses sometimes be misinterpreted as errors. This pattern differs from studies examining patients with a longer history of PD and may reflect compensatory processes, frequently occurring in pre-manifest stages of PD. From a clinical point of view the clearly attenuated Ne in the de novo PD patients may prove a useful additional tool for the early diagnosis of basal ganglia dysfunction in PD.

  12. Disease management: atrial fibrillation and home monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricci, Renato Pietro

    2013-06-01

    Device-detected atrial fibrillation (AF) episodes predict poor clinical outcome regardless of symptoms. Potential benefits of remote monitoring are early arrhythmia detection and patient continuous monitoring. Several studies of device remote monitoring consistently demonstrated that AF represents the most common clinical alert and that detailed information on arrhythmia onset, duration, and burden as well as on the ventricular rate may be early available for clinical evaluation. Reaction time to AF alerts was very short in all series involving either pacemakers or defibrillators and action ability of AF alerts was very high. In the Home Guide Registry, in which 1650 patients were enrolled, AF was detected in 16.3% of patients and represented 36% of all cardiovascular events during the follow-up. Timely anticoagulation introduction in asymptomatic patients may impact on the stroke rate. According to the results of repeated Monte Carlo simulations based on a real population of 166 patients, daily monitoring may reduce the 2-year stroke risk by 9-18% with an absolute reduction of 0.2-0.6%, compared with conventional inter-visit intervals of 6-12 months. In the COMPAS trial, the incidence of hospitalizations for atrial arrhythmias and related stroke was significantly higher in the control group than in the remote monitoring group. Major questions will be addressed by the ongoing IMPACT trial in which a remote monitoring guided anticoagulation strategy based on AF detection will be compared with a physician-directed standard strategy. In patients with heart failure, AF early detection combined with other indexes may help prevent hospitalizations.

  13. Clinical implications from monitoring fetal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayburn, W F

    1982-12-15

    The monitoring of fetal motion in high-risk pregnancies has been shown to be worthwhile in predicting fetal distress and impending fetal death. The maternal recording of perceived fetal activity is an inexpensive surveillance technique which is most useful when there is chronic uteroplacental insufficiency or when a stillbirth may be expected. The presence of an active, vigorous fetus is reassuring, but documented fetal inactivity required a reassessment of the underlying antepartum complication and further fetal evaluation with real-time ultrasonography, fetal heart rate testing, and biochemical testing. Fetal distress from such acute changes as abruptio placentae or umbilical cord compression may not be predicted by monitoring fetal motion. Although not used for routine clinical investigation, electromechanical devices such as tocodynamometry have provided much insight into fetal behavioral patterns at many stages of pregnancy and in pregnancies with an antepartum complication.

  14. Wireless Monitoring for Patients with Cardiovascular Diseases and Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kefaliakos, Antonios; Pliakos, Ioannis; Charalampidou, Martha; Diomidous, Marianna

    2016-01-01

    The use of applications for mobile devices and wireless sensors is common for the sector of telemedicine. Recently various studies and systems were developed in order to help patients suffering from severe diseases such as cardiovascular diseases and Parkinson's disease. They present a challenge for the sector because such systems demand the flow of accurate data in real time and the use of specialized sensors. In this review will be presented some very interesting applications developed for patients with cardiovascular diseases and Parkinson's disease.

  15. Activity monitoring of alpha-bearing wastes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Birkhoff, G.; Bondar, L.

    1980-01-01

    The paper aims at the survey on the actual situation in activity monitoring of alpha-bearing wastes. Homogeneous materials such as liquid-, gaseous- and homogeneous solid wastes are amenable to destructive analyses of representative samples. Available destructive analyses methods are sensitive and precise enough to cope with all requirements in alpha-waste monitoring. The more difficult problems are encountered with alpha-contaminated solids, when representative sampling is not practicable. Non-destructive analysis techniques are applied for monitoring this category of solid wastes. The techniques for nondestructive analysis of alpha-bearing wastes are based on the detection of gamma and/or neutron-emission of actinides. Principles and a theory of non-destructive radiometric assay of plutonium contaminated solid waste streams are explained. Guidelines for the calibration of instruments and interpretation of experimental data are given. Current theoretical and experimental development work in this problem area is reviewed. Evaluations concerning capabilities and limitations of monitoring systems for alpha-bearing solid wastes are very complex and out of the scope of this paper

  16. 4D monitoring of actively failing rockslopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosser, Nick; Williams, Jack; Hardy, Richard; Brain, Matthew

    2017-04-01

    Assessing the conditions which promote rockfall to collapse relies upon detailed monitoring, ideally before, during and immediately after failure. With standard repeat surveys it is common that surveys do not coincide with or capture precursors, or that surveys are widely spaced relative to the timing and duration of driving forces such as storms. As a result gaining insight into the controls on failure and the timescales over which precursors operate remains difficult to establish with certainty, and establishing direct links between environmental conditions and rock-falls, or sequences of events prior to rockfall, remain difficult to define. To address this, we present analysis of a high-frequency 3D laser scan dataset captured using a new permanently installed system developed to constantly monitor actively failing rock slopes. The system is based around a time of flight laser scanner, integrated with and remotely controlled by dedicated controls and analysis software. The system is configured to capture data at 0.1 m spacing across > 22,000 m3 at up to 30 minute intervals. Here we present results captured with this system over a period of 9 months, spanning spring to winter 2015. Our analysis is focussed upon improving the understanding of the nature of small (volumetric measurement of rock face erosion. The results hold implications for understanding of rockfall mechanics, but also for how actively eroding surfaces can be monitored at high temporal frequency. Whilst high frequency data is ideal for describing processes that evolve rapidly through time, the cumulative errors that accumulate when monitored changes are dominated by inverse power-law distributed volumes are significant. To conclude we consider the benefits of defining survey frequency on the basis of the changes being detected relative to the accumulation of errors that inevitably arises when comparing high numbers of sequential surveys.

  17. Entomological research on the vectors of bluetongue disease and the monitoring of activity of Culicoides in the Prishtinë region of Kosova

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betim Berisha

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Clinical bluetongue (BT caused by BT virus serotype 9 (BTV‑9 was observed in Kosova in 2001 and, although subsequently no further clinical cases was diagnosed, its continuing presence has been demonstrated by serological tests in cattle, sheep and goats. In this study, light traps were placed in stables near Prishtinë to identify possible vectors of BTV in Kosova. Samples were collected from October 2004 until the end of 2006. Culicoides were identified and speciated and results were plotted against temperature data. Samples contained Obsoletus and Pulicaris Complexes but not C. imicola. The first specimens of Culicoides were collected in April and they continued to be detected until November. Generally, Obsoletus Complex was present in the largest numbers, with the exception of the middle of the year when the Pulicaris Complex predominated. The number of Culicoides trapped was directly linked to temperature (p<0.05 and records indicated that Culicoides activity ceased when minimum temperatures fell below 0°C; activity recommenced when minimum temperatures rose to approximately 6°C. These results indicate that there was a lack of a vector for BTV during winter for a period lasting approximately five months.

  18. Monitoring active volcanoes: The geochemical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takeshi Ohba

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available

    The geochemical surveillance of an active volcano aims to recognize possible signals that are related to changes in volcanic activity. Indeed, as a consequence of the magma rising inside the volcanic "plumbing system" and/or the refilling with new batches of magma, the dissolved volatiles in the magma are progressively released as a function of their relative solubilities. When approaching the surface, these fluids that are discharged during magma degassing can interact with shallow aquifers and/or can be released along the main volcano-tectonic structures. Under these conditions, the following main degassing processes represent strategic sites to be monitored.

    The main purpose of this special volume is to collect papers that cover a wide range of topics in volcanic fluid geochemistry, which include geochemical characterization and geochemical monitoring of active volcanoes using different techniques and at different sites. Moreover, part of this volume has been dedicated to the new geochemistry tools.

  19. Verbal monitoring in Parkinson’s disease: A comparison between internal and external monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mertens, Jolien; Mariën, Peter; Santens, Patrick; Pickut, Barbara A.; Hartsuiker, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) display a variety of impairments in motor and non-motor language processes; speech is decreased on motor aspects such as amplitude, prosody and speed and on linguistic aspects including grammar and fluency. Here we investigated whether verbal monitoring is impaired and what the relative contributions of the internal and external monitoring route are on verbal monitoring in patients with PD relative to controls. Furthermore, the data were used to investigate whether internal monitoring performance could be predicted by internal speech perception tasks, as perception based monitoring theories assume. Performance of 18 patients with Parkinson’s disease was measured on two cognitive performance tasks and a battery of 11 linguistic tasks, including tasks that measured performance on internal and external monitoring. Results were compared with those of 16 age-matched healthy controls. PD patients and controls generally performed similarly on the linguistic and monitoring measures. However, we observed qualitative differences in the effects of noise masking on monitoring and disfluencies and in the extent to which the linguistic tasks predicted monitoring behavior. We suggest that the patients differ from healthy subjects in their recruitment of monitoring channels. PMID:28832595

  20. COAGULATION ACTIVITY IN LIVER DISEASE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Sheikh Sajjadieh Mohammad Reza

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Patients with advanced hepatic failure may present with the entire spectrum of coagulation factor deficiencies. This study was designed to determine laboratory abnormalities in coagulation in chronic liver disease and the association of these abnormalities with the extent of chronic hepatitis and cirrhosis. Coagulation markers were assayed in 60 participants: 20 patients with chronic hepatitis, 20 patients with cirrhosis, and 20 healthy individuals (control. Plasma levels of anti-thrombin III were determined by a chromogenic substrate method, and plasma concentrations of fibrinogen were analyzed by the Rutberg method. Commercially available assays were used for laboratory coagulation tests. The levels of coagualation activity markers in patients with chronic liver disease were significantly different in comparison to those in healthy participants. These results indicate the utility of measuring markers for coagulation activity in determining which cirrhosis patients are more susceptible to disseminated intravascular coagulation.

  1. Continuous Activity Monitoring During Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohri, Nitin, E-mail: ohri.nitin@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Kabarriti, Rafi; Bodner, William R.; Mehta, Keyur J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Shankar, Viswanathan [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Halmos, Balazs; Haigentz, Missak [Department of Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Rapkin, Bruce [Department of Epidemiology and Population Health, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States); Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur [Department of Radiation Oncology, Montefiore Medical Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, New York (United States)

    2017-04-01

    Purpose: To perform a prospective trial testing the feasibility and utility of acquiring activity data as a measure of health status during concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ambulatory patients who were planned for treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with curative intent for cancers of the head and neck, lung, or gastrointestinal tract were provided with activity monitors before treatment initiation. Patients were asked to wear the devices continuously throughout the radiation therapy course. Step count data were downloaded weekly during radiation therapy and 2 and 4 weeks after radiation therapy completion. The primary objective was to demonstrate feasibility, defined as collection of step counts for 80% of the days during study subjects' radiation therapy courses. Secondary objectives included establishing step count as a dynamic predictor of unplanned hospitalization risk. Results: Thirty-eight enrolled patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Primary diagnoses included head and neck cancer (n=11), lung cancer (n=13), and a variety of gastrointestinal cancers (n=14). Step data were collected for 1524 of 1613 days (94%) during patients' radiation therapy courses. Fourteen patients were hospitalized during radiation therapy or within 4 weeks of radiation therapy completion. Cox regression modeling demonstrated a significant association between recent step counts (3-day average) and hospitalization risk, with a 38% reduction in the risk of hospitalization for every 1000 steps taken each day (hazard ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.46-0.83, P=.002). Inferior quality of life scores and impaired performance status were not associated with increased hospitalization risk. Conclusion: Continuous activity monitoring during concurrent chemoradiotherapy is feasible and well-tolerated. Step counts may serve as powerful, objective, and dynamic indicators of hospitalization risk.

  2. Continuous Activity Monitoring During Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohri, Nitin; Kabarriti, Rafi; Bodner, William R.; Mehta, Keyur J.; Shankar, Viswanathan; Halmos, Balazs; Haigentz, Missak; Rapkin, Bruce; Guha, Chandan; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a prospective trial testing the feasibility and utility of acquiring activity data as a measure of health status during concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Ambulatory patients who were planned for treatment with concurrent chemoradiotherapy with curative intent for cancers of the head and neck, lung, or gastrointestinal tract were provided with activity monitors before treatment initiation. Patients were asked to wear the devices continuously throughout the radiation therapy course. Step count data were downloaded weekly during radiation therapy and 2 and 4 weeks after radiation therapy completion. The primary objective was to demonstrate feasibility, defined as collection of step counts for 80% of the days during study subjects' radiation therapy courses. Secondary objectives included establishing step count as a dynamic predictor of unplanned hospitalization risk. Results: Thirty-eight enrolled patients were treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy. Primary diagnoses included head and neck cancer (n=11), lung cancer (n=13), and a variety of gastrointestinal cancers (n=14). Step data were collected for 1524 of 1613 days (94%) during patients' radiation therapy courses. Fourteen patients were hospitalized during radiation therapy or within 4 weeks of radiation therapy completion. Cox regression modeling demonstrated a significant association between recent step counts (3-day average) and hospitalization risk, with a 38% reduction in the risk of hospitalization for every 1000 steps taken each day (hazard ratio 0.62, 95% confidence interval 0.46-0.83, P=.002). Inferior quality of life scores and impaired performance status were not associated with increased hospitalization risk. Conclusion: Continuous activity monitoring during concurrent chemoradiotherapy is feasible and well-tolerated. Step counts may serve as powerful, objective, and dynamic indicators of hospitalization risk.

  3. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frazier, T.P.

    1994-01-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the activities associated with the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, which are part of the overall Hanford Site Environmental Protection Plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of the individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans

  4. Monitoring and controlling ovarian activity in elephants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thitaram, Chatchote; Brown, Janine L

    2018-03-15

    Both Asian (Elephas maximus) and African (Loxodonta africana) elephants are important keystone, umbrella and flagship species. Paradoxically, world population numbers of both species are declining in many of their natural ranges due mainly to poaching, while over population of elephants in some areas is resulting in serious human-elephant conflict, and modifications of natural habitats that impact biodiversity. Understanding mechanisms of reproductive control is vital to effective population management, and for that reason significant advances have been made in endocrine and ultrasonographic monitoring techniques, particularly in studies of elephants ex situ. However, there remains a need to develop new methods to control ovarian activity, both for enhancing and inhibiting reproduction, to maintain population numbers at levels that ensure species survival and their ability to safely cohabitate with humans and other species. We present an overview of reproductive monitoring methods and how they have contributed to our knowledge of elephant reproductive biology, as well as their application for in situ and ex situ conservation purposes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. A monitor for beta activity in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bansode, P.Y.; Karpagam, R.; Phatak, P.R.; Jakati, R.K.

    2004-01-01

    Radiation monitors using compensated ion chamber technique have been in use in nuclear power plants and facilities for measurement of beta activity in presence of gamma background. This paper describes a system based on auto-ranging electrometer with provision for selecting alarm-level and giving out measurement and status information on RS232 serial link for remote use such as PC or notebook computer via RadNet protocol. The over all system incorporates indigenously developed 40 litre ion-chamber reported in the literature and facility for circulating air through the chamber using pumping system. The setup is housed in standard racks with wheels for easy transport within the laboratory building. The data acquiring and I/O processing is carried out using Philips 80c552 micro-controller. (author)

  6. Dynamic generalized linear models for monitoring endemic diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes Antunes, Ana Carolina; Jensen, Dan; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to use a Dynamic Generalized Linear Model (DGLM) based on abinomial distribution with a linear trend, for monitoring the PRRS (Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome sero-prevalence in Danish swine herds. The DGLM was described and its performance for monitoring control...... and eradication programmes based on changes in PRRS sero-prevalence was explored. Results showed a declining trend in PRRS sero-prevalence between 2007 and 2014 suggesting that Danish herds are slowly eradicating PRRS. The simulation study demonstrated the flexibility of DGLMs in adapting to changes intrends...... in sero-prevalence. Based on this, it was possible to detect variations in the growth model component. This study is a proof-of-concept, demonstrating the use of DGLMs for monitoring endemic diseases. In addition, the principles stated might be useful in general research on monitoring and surveillance...

  7. Reactive Nitrogen Monitoring Gaps: Issues, Activities and Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this article we demonstrate the importance of ammonia and organic nitrogen to total N deposition budgets and review the current activities to close these monitoring gaps. Finally, remaining monitoring needs and issues are discussed.

  8. Wearable activity monitors in oncology trials: Current use of an emerging technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gresham, Gillian; Schrack, Jennifer; Gresham, Louise M; Shinde, Arvind M; Hendifar, Andrew E; Tuli, Richard; Rimel, B J; Figlin, Robert; Meinert, Curtis L; Piantadosi, Steven

    2018-01-01

    Physical activity is an important outcome in oncology trials. Physical activity is commonly assessed using self-reported questionnaires, which are limited by recall and response biases. Recent advancements in wearable technology have provided oncologists with new opportunities to obtain real-time, objective physical activity data. The purpose of this review was to describe current uses of wearable activity monitors in oncology trials. We searched Pubmed, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials for oncology trials involving wearable activity monitors published between 2005 and 2016. We extracted details on study design, types of activity monitors used, and purpose for their use. We summarized activity monitor metrics including step counts, sleep and sedentary time, and time spent in moderate-to-vigorous activity. We identified 41 trials of which 26 (63%) involved cancer survivors (post-treatment) and 15 trials (37%) involved patients with active cancer. Most trials (65%) involved breast cancer patients. Wearable activity monitors were commonly used in exercise (54%) or behavioral (29%) trials. Cancer survivors take between 4660 and 11,000 steps/day and those undergoing treatment take 2885 to 8300steps/day. Wearable activity monitors are increasingly being used to obtain objective measures of physical activity in oncology trials. There is potential for their use to expand to evaluate and predict clinical outcomes such as survival, quality of life, and treatment tolerance in future studies. Currently, there remains a lack of standardization in the types of monitors being used and how their data are being collected, analyzed, and interpreted. Recent advancements in wearable activity monitor technology have provided oncologists with new opportunities to monitor their patients' daily activity in real-world settings. The integration of wearable activity monitors into cancer care will help increase our understanding of the associations between

  9. New developments in continuous monitoring of airborne activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swinth, K.L.

    1987-01-01

    Air monitors that operate continuously are used in nuclear facilities to detect unexpected malfunctions in controls that limit levels of airborne radioactivity in occupied area. Monitoring for concentrations of alpha-emitting transuranics is the most difficult task in air monitoring. Workplace monitoring for alpha emitters requires a detection level ∼2% that of nonalpha-emitting radionuclides with a half-life >2 h. Typically, air monitoring is accomplished by passing a volume of the monitored air through a filter to collect the particulates. The filter is located near a detector that monitors the radioactivity of the collected particles and sends an alarm when the activity exceeds established limits. Alpha activity from daughters of thoron and radon, present in all air in variable amounts, hampers monitoring for transuranics. This presentation describes developments that have improved the accuracy and sensitivity for the monitoring of airborne concentration of transuranics

  10. Monitoring emerging diseases of fish and shellfish using electronic sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thrush, M A; Dunn, P L; Peeler, E J

    2012-10-01

    New and emerging fish and shellfish diseases represent an important constraint to the growth and sustainability of many aquaculture sectors and have also caused substantial economic and environmental impacts in wild stocks. This paper details the results of 8 years of a monitoring programme for emerging aquatic animal diseases reported around the world. The objectives were to track global occurrences and, more specifically, to identify and provide advanced warning of disease threats that may affect wild and farmed fish stocks in the UK. A range of electronic information sources, including Internet newsletters, alerting services and news agency releases, was systematically searched for reports of new diseases, new presentations of known pathogens and known diseases occurring in new geographic locations or new host species. A database was established to log the details of key findings, and 250 emerging disease events in 52 countries were recorded during the period of study. These included 14 new diseases and a further 16 known diseases in new species. Viruses and parasites accounted for the majority of reports (55% and 24%, respectively), and known diseases occurring in new locations were the most important emerging disease category (in which viruses were dominant). Emerging diseases were reported disproportionally in salmonid species (33%), in farmed populations (62%) and in Europe and North America (80%). The lack of reports from some regions with significant aquaculture or fishery production may indicate that emerging diseases are not being recognized in these areas owing to insufficient surveillance or testing or that these events are being under-reported. The results are discussed in relation to processes underpinning disease emergence in the aquatic environment. © 2011 Crown Copyright. Reproduced with the permission of the Controller of Her Majesty’s Stationery Office and Centre for Environment Fisheries & Aquaculture Science.

  11. JAXA's activities for environmental health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    In the first ten years after establishment of the Japan Aerospace eXploration Agency (JAXA) in 2003, our focuses were mainly on technical development (hardware and software) and accumulation of application research. In the next decade, we focus more on solution on social issues using innovative space science technology. Currently, JAXA is operating and developing several earth observation satellites and sensors: Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) "IBUKI", Global Change Observation Mission - Water "SHIZUKU" (GCOM-W), Global Precipitation Measurement/Dual- frequency Precipitation Radar (GPM/DPR), Advanced Land Observing Satellite-2 "DAICHI-2" (ALOS-2), Global Change Observation Mission - Climate (GCOM-C), Earth Cloud, Aerosol and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE), and GOSAT-2. They will provide essential environmental parameters, such as aerosols, clouds, land vegetation, ocean color, GHGs, and so on. In addition to the above missions, we are studying new instruments (altimeter, LIDAR, detectors, optical components) to obtain new parameters. Our activities will advance to provide essential inputs for diagnosis, prediction, and management of climate change, environmental assessment, and disaster monitoring.

  12. Ahead with Cairo. Monitoring country activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danguilan, M; Wainer, J; Widyantoro, N; Capoor, I; Huq, N; Ashino, Y; Sadasivam, B; Le Thi Nham Tuyet

    1995-04-01

    In the aftermath of the 1994 UN Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) in Cairo, countries are proceeding with their implementation of the plan of action adopted at the conference. A brief description is given of some actions taken by specific countries toward plan implementation. In the Philippines meetings were held immediately after the conference in October on the implications for the Management, Family Planning, and Nongovernmental Organizations programs. The issues of concern were identified as the need for regular consultative meetings among relevant agencies, consultations with women's groups, and a responsive adolescents program. In Australia the program thrust was to focus on the implications for immigration. Monitoring of the plans of action will be undertaken by nongovernmental organizations (NGOs). In Malaysia committees are preparing a program of action suitable for implementation in Malaysia. A regional women's NGO organized a forum on the implications of ICPD for women's reproductive health, women's rights, and empowerment in Malaysia. In Vietnam, press conferences are used to communicate conference results. An NGO translated relevant ICPD materials into Vietnamese. In Indonesia, several ministries convened meetings among donors, NGOs, women's groups, and experts. In India, the government held a national conference. One view was that population issues should be discussed in the context of gender equality and empowerment of women. Another issue was the importance of placing reproductive health in the larger context of health and primary health services. Health personnel at all levels were considered in need of sensitization on gender issues. Problems such as anemia have not been successfully addressed in existing programs. The government agreed to remove in phases target driven programs and the sterilization emphasis. In Bangladesh, a national committee was formed, and NGOs are actively distributing information. In Japan, the Family Planning

  13. Medical Toxicology and Public Health-Update on Research and Activities at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry : Environmental Exposures among Arctic Populations: The Maternal Organics Monitoring Study in Alaska.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Mehruba; Ridpath, Alison; Berner, James; Schier, Joshua G

    2016-09-01

    Evidence suggests that in-utero exposure to environmental chemicals, such as persistent organic pollutants (POPs), heavy metals, and radionuclides, that might bioaccumulate in the mother may increase a newborn's risk of adverse developmental, neurological, and immunologic effects. Chemical contamination of bodies of water and strong ocean currents worldwide can drive these chemicals from lower latitudes to Arctic waters where they accumulate in common traditional subsistence foods. In response to concerns of the people from Alaska of the effects of bio-accumulated chemicals on their children, the Maternal Organics Monitoring Study(MOMS) was developed. The objective of the study was to assess the risks and benefits associated with the population's subsistence diet. Data analysis of biological samples at the CDC's NCEH laboratory and maternal questionnaires is ongoing. Results will be provided to Alaska Native communities to help support public health actions and inform future interventions and research.

  14. Cardiovascular Disease and Cancer: Student Awareness Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, James H., Comp.

    Awareness activities pertaining to cancer and cardiovascular disease are presented as a supplement for high school science classes. The exercises can be used to enrich units of study dealing with the circulatory system, the cell, or human diseases. Eight activities deal with the following topics: (1) cardiovascular disease risk factors; (2)…

  15. Responsiveness of Endoscopic Indices of Disease Activity for Crohn's Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khanna, Reena; Zou, Guangyong; Stitt, Larry; Feagan, Brian G.; Sandborn, William J.; Rutgeerts, Paul; McDonald, John W. D.; Dubcenco, Elena; Fogel, Ronald; Panaccione, Remo; Jairath, Vipul; Nelson, Sigrid; Shackelton, Lisa M.; Huang, Bidan; Zhou, Qian; Robinson, Anne M.; Levesque, Barrett G.; D'Haens, Geert

    2017-01-01

    The Crohn's Disease Endoscopic Index of Severity (CDEIS) and the Simple Endoscopic Score for Crohn's Disease (SES-CD) are commonly used to assess Crohn's disease (CD) activity; however neither instrument is fully validated. We evaluated the responsiveness to change of the SES-CD and CDEIS using data

  16. Internet-based surveillance systems for monitoring emerging infectious diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milinovich, Gabriel J; Williams, Gail M; Clements, Archie C A; Hu, Wenbiao

    2014-02-01

    Emerging infectious diseases present a complex challenge to public health officials and governments; these challenges have been compounded by rapidly shifting patterns of human behaviour and globalisation. The increase in emerging infectious diseases has led to calls for new technologies and approaches for detection, tracking, reporting, and response. Internet-based surveillance systems offer a novel and developing means of monitoring conditions of public health concern, including emerging infectious diseases. We review studies that have exploited internet use and search trends to monitor two such diseases: influenza and dengue. Internet-based surveillance systems have good congruence with traditional surveillance approaches. Additionally, internet-based approaches are logistically and economically appealing. However, they do not have the capacity to replace traditional surveillance systems; they should not be viewed as an alternative, but rather an extension. Future research should focus on using data generated through internet-based surveillance and response systems to bolster the capacity of traditional surveillance systems for emerging infectious diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Classifying Transition Behaviour in Postural Activity Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James BRUSEY

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A few accelerometers positioned on different parts of the body can be used to accurately classify steady state behaviour, such as walking, running, or sitting. Such systems are usually built using supervised learning approaches. Transitions between postures are, however, difficult to deal with using posture classification systems proposed to date, since there is no label set for intermediary postures and also the exact point at which the transition occurs can sometimes be hard to pinpoint. The usual bypass when using supervised learning to train such systems is to discard a section of the dataset around each transition. This leads to poorer classification performance when the systems are deployed out of the laboratory and used on-line, particularly if the regimes monitored involve fast paced activity changes. Time-based filtering that takes advantage of sequential patterns is a potential mechanism to improve posture classification accuracy in such real-life applications. Also, such filtering should reduce the number of event messages needed to be sent across a wireless network to track posture remotely, hence extending the system’s life. To support time-based filtering, understanding transitions, which are the major event generators in a classification system, is a key. This work examines three approaches to post-process the output of a posture classifier using time-based filtering: a naïve voting scheme, an exponentially weighted voting scheme, and a Bayes filter. Best performance is obtained from the exponentially weighted voting scheme although it is suspected that a more sophisticated treatment of the Bayes filter might yield better results.

  18. Individual monitoring: A tool for active ALARA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoefert, M.

    1989-01-01

    The system of individual monitoring at CERN is presented. Following the substantial decrease of individual doses over the last decade, emphasis is now placed on monitoring rather than on dosimetric aspects. Future developments have to face a possible decrease of dose limits that are difficult to control in view of the lower detection limits for the detectors presently used. One possible solution to the problem is the increase in the wearing time for individual dosemeters. (author)

  19. Environmental monitoring activities in JAERI at JCO accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaguchi, Takenori

    2001-01-01

    The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) was involved in a various environmental monitoring activities, such as environmental radiation monitoring by monitoring post and monitoring car, air dust, soil, green vegetables and water sampling and measurements, neutron and gamma radiation dose rate survey around the JCO site for emergency response actions to the JCO accident on September 30, 1999. These activities were performed from Sep. 30 to Oct. 2, and were the initial and first stage activities in the emergency environmental monitoring activities. JAERI has been assigned to the public organization to support the government by Disaster Prevention Fundamental Law. These activities were performed to ensure the public safety to avoid the effluent of the accident. Through the environmental monitoring activities, I recognized that the importance of the accident information to make the best use for the initial environmental monitoring, and the monitoring information exchange is important to perform the effective monitoring activities for taking the early countermeasures such as evacuation to the public. (author)

  20. Active sites environmental monitoring Program - Program Plan: Revision 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, C.M.; Hicks, D.S.; Ashwood, T.L.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1994-05-01

    The Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP), initiated in 1989, provides early detection and performance monitoring of active low-level-waste (LLW) and transuranic (TRU) waste facilities at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Several changes have recently occurred in regard to the sites that are currently used for waste storage and disposal. These changes require a second set of revisions to the ASEMP program plan. This document incorporates those revisions. This program plan presents the organization and procedures for monitoring the active sites. The program plan also provides internal reporting levels to guide the evaluation of monitoring results

  1. Habitual physical activity in mitochondrial disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehnaz Apabhai

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial disease is the most common neuromuscular disease and has a profound impact upon daily life, disease and longevity. Exercise therapy has been shown to improve mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disease. However, no information exists about the level of habitual physical activity of people with mitochondrial disease and its relationship with clinical phenotype.Habitual physical activity, genotype and clinical presentations were assessed in 100 patients with mitochondrial disease. Comparisons were made with a control group individually matched by age, gender and BMI.Patients with mitochondrial disease had significantly lower levels of physical activity in comparison to matched people without mitochondrial disease (steps/day; 6883±3944 vs. 9924±4088, p = 0.001. 78% of the mitochondrial disease cohort did not achieve 10,000 steps per day and 48% were classified as overweight or obese. Mitochondrial disease was associated with less breaks in sedentary activity (Sedentary to Active Transitions, % per day; 13±0.03 vs. 14±0.03, p = 0.001 and an increase in sedentary bout duration (bout lengths/fraction of total sedentary time; 0.206±0.044 vs. 0.187±0.026, p = 0.001. After adjusting for covariates, higher physical activity was moderately associated with lower clinical disease burden (steps/day; r(s = -0.49; 95% CI -0.33, -0.63, P<0.01. There were no systematic differences in physical activity between different genotypes mitochondrial disease.These results demonstrate for the first time that low levels of physical activity are prominent in mitochondrial disease. Combined with a high prevalence of obesity, physical activity may constitute a significant and potentially modifiable risk factor in mitochondrial disease.

  2. Habitual physical activity in mitochondrial disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apabhai, Shehnaz; Gorman, Grainne S; Sutton, Laura; Elson, Joanna L; Plötz, Thomas; Turnbull, Douglass M; Trenell, Michael I

    2011-01-01

    Mitochondrial disease is the most common neuromuscular disease and has a profound impact upon daily life, disease and longevity. Exercise therapy has been shown to improve mitochondrial function in patients with mitochondrial disease. However, no information exists about the level of habitual physical activity of people with mitochondrial disease and its relationship with clinical phenotype. Habitual physical activity, genotype and clinical presentations were assessed in 100 patients with mitochondrial disease. Comparisons were made with a control group individually matched by age, gender and BMI. Patients with mitochondrial disease had significantly lower levels of physical activity in comparison to matched people without mitochondrial disease (steps/day; 6883±3944 vs. 9924±4088, p = 0.001). 78% of the mitochondrial disease cohort did not achieve 10,000 steps per day and 48% were classified as overweight or obese. Mitochondrial disease was associated with less breaks in sedentary activity (Sedentary to Active Transitions, % per day; 13±0.03 vs. 14±0.03, p = 0.001) and an increase in sedentary bout duration (bout lengths/fraction of total sedentary time; 0.206±0.044 vs. 0.187±0.026, p = 0.001). After adjusting for covariates, higher physical activity was moderately associated with lower clinical disease burden (steps/day; r(s) = -0.49; 95% CI -0.33, -0.63, Pphysical activity between different genotypes mitochondrial disease. These results demonstrate for the first time that low levels of physical activity are prominent in mitochondrial disease. Combined with a high prevalence of obesity, physical activity may constitute a significant and potentially modifiable risk factor in mitochondrial disease.

  3. Instructional physical activity monitor video in english and spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    The ActiGraph activity monitor is a widely used method for assessing physical activity. Compliance with study procedures in critical. A common procedure is for the research team to meet with participants and demonstrate how and when to attach and remove the monitor and convey how many wear-days are ...

  4. Biomarkers in rheumatic diseases: how can they facilitate diagnosis and assessment of disease activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohan, Chandra; Assassi, Shervin

    2015-11-26

    Serological and proteomic biomarkers can help clinicians diagnose rheumatic diseases earlier and assess disease activity more accurately. These markers have been incorporated into the recently revised classification criteria of several diseases to enable early diagnosis and timely initiation of treatment. Furthermore, they also facilitate more accurate subclassification and more focused monitoring for the detection of certain disease manifestations, such as lung and renal involvement. These biomarkers can also make the assessment of disease activity and treatment response more reliable. Simultaneously, several new serological and proteomic biomarkers have become available in the routine clinical setting--for example, a protein biomarker panel for rheumatoid arthritis and a myositis antibody panel for dermatomyositis and polymyositis. This review will focus on commercially available antibody and proteomic biomarkers in rheumatoid arthritis, systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis (scleroderma), dermatomyositis and polymyositis, and axial spondyloarthritis (including ankylosing spondylitis). It will discuss how these markers can facilitate early diagnosis as well as more accurate subclassification and assessment of disease activity in the clinical setting. The ultimate goal of current and future biomarkers in rheumatic diseases is to enable early detection of these diseases and their clinical manifestations, and to provide effective monitoring and treatment regimens that are tailored to each patient's needs and prognosis. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd 2015.

  5. Quality Assurance Project Plan for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-06-01

    This Quality Assurance Project Plan addresses the quality assurance requirements for the Facility Monitoring Plans of the overall site-wide environmental monitoring plan. This plan specifically applies to the sampling and analysis activities and continuous monitoring performed for all Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan activities conducted by Westinghouse Hanford Company. It is generic in approach and will be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans. This document is intended to be a basic road map to the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan documents (i.e., the guidance document for preparing Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations, management plan, and Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans). The implementing procedures, plans, and instructions are appropriate for the control of effluent monitoring plans requiring compliance with US Department of Energy, US Environmental Protection Agency, state, and local requirements. This Quality Assurance Project Plan contains a matrix of organizational responsibilities, procedural resources from facility or site manuals used in the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans, and a list of the analytes of interest and analytical methods for each facility preparing a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan. 44 refs., 1 figs., 2 tabs

  6. Intraoperative functional MRI as a new approach to monitor deep brain stimulation in Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesselmann, Volker; Sorger, Bettina; Girnus, Ralf; Lasek, Kathrin; Schulte, Oliver; Krug, Barbara; Lackner, Klaus; Maarouf, Mohammad; Sturm, Volker; Wedekind, Christoph; Bunke, Juergen

    2004-01-01

    This article deals with technical aspects of intraoperative functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) for monitoring the effect of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in a patient with Parkinson's disease. Under motor activation, therapeutic high-frequency stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus was accompanied by an activation decrease in the contralateral primary sensorimotor cortex and the ipsilateral cerebellum. Furthermore, an activation increase in the contralateral basal ganglia and insula region were detected. These findings demonstrate that fMRI constitutes a promising clinical application for investigating brain activity changes induced by DBS. (orig.)

  7. Leisure time activities, parental monitoring and drunkenness in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomcikova, Zuzana; Veselska, Zuzana; Madarasova Geckova, Andrea; van Dijk, Jitse P; Reijneveld, Sijmen A

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the association between adolescent drunkenness and participation in risky leisure time activities and parental monitoring. A sample of 3,694 Slovak elementary school students (mean age 14.5 years; 49.0% males) was assessed for drunkenness in the previous month, participation in risky leisure activities and parental monitoring. Participation in risky leisure time activities increased the probability of drunkenness among adolescents, while parental monitoring decreased it. The effect did not change after adding the mother's and father's monitoring into the models. Our results imply that adolescents involved in going out with friends, having parties with friends and/or visiting sporting events every day or several times a week are at a higher risk of drunkenness, as are those less monitored by their parents. These less monitored adolescents and their parents should become a target group in prevention. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Monitoring activities review of the Radiological Environmental Surveillance Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritter, P.D.

    1992-03-01

    The 1992 Monitoring Activities Review (MAR) is directed at the Radiological Environment Surveillance Program (RESP) activities at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC) of Idaho Engineering Laboratory (INEL). MAR panelists studied RESP documents and discussed their concerns with Environmental Monitoring Unit (EMU) staff and other panel members. These concerns were subsequently consolidated into a collection of recommendations with supporting discussions. Recommendations focus on specific monitoring activities, as well as the overall program. The MAR report also contains pertinent comments that should not require further action

  9. Clinical monitoring of 'autoimmune' chronic active hepatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoek, Bart van

    1989-01-01

    This thesis describes the outcome- survival of a large group of 186 consecutive patients with chronic active hepatitis of variouse tiologies, and describes in detail the progress of 21 patients from this group with 'autoimmunie' chronic active hepatitis maintained on standardized immunosuppressive

  10. Fabry disease: recent advances in pathology, diagnosis, treatment and monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Björn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Fabry disease (α-galactosidase A deficiency accumulation of Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 leads to progressive organ failure and premature death. The introduction of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT was the beginning of a new era in this disorder, and has prompted a broad range of research activities. This review aims to summarize recent developments and progress with high impact for Fabry disease. Methods A Pubmed analysis was performed using the search terms "Fabry disease", "Anderson-Fabry disease", "alpha-galactosidase A" and "Gb3". Of the given publications by 31st January 2009 only original articles recently published in peer reviewed journals were included for this review. Case reports were included only when they comprised a new aspect. In addition we included relevant conference abstracts when the results had not already been published as original articles. Results Apart from Gb3-accumulation cellular and organ specific damages may be related also to inflammatory and immunological consequences. It will be interesting whether this may lead to new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of Fabry disease. Since newborn screening is still difficult in Fabry disease, detection of patients in populations at risk is of great importance. Undiagnosed patients with Fabry disease may still be found in cohorts of subjects with renal diseases, cardiomyopathy and TIA or stroke. Efforts should be undertaken to identify these individuals and initialise ERT in order to hault disease progression. It has also been demonstrated that Gb3-accumulation leads to pre-clinical damages and it is believed that early treatment may be the only possibility so far to prevent irreversible organ damage.

  11. Active imaging for monitoring and technical diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Piszczek

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the results of currently running work in the field of active imaging. The term active refers to both the image acquisition methods, so-called methods of the spatio-temporal framing and active visualization method applying augmented reality. Also results of application of the HMD and 6DoF modules as well as the experimental laser photography device are given. The device works by methods of spatio-temporal framing and it has been developed at the IOE WAT. In terms of image acquisition - active imaging involves the use of illumination of the observed scene. In the field of information visualization - active imaging directly concerns the issues of interaction human-machine environment. The results show the possibility of using the described techniques, among others, rescue (fire brigade, security of mass events (police or the protection of critical infrastructure as well as broadly understood diagnostic problems. Examples presented in the article show a wide range of possible uses of the methods both in observational techniques and measurement. They are relatively innovative solutions and require elaboration of series of hardware and algorithmic issues. However, already at this stage it is clear that active acquisition and visualization methods indicate a high potential for this type of information solutions.[b]Keywords[/b]: active imaging, augmented reality, digital image processing

  12. Active sites environmental monitoring program FY 1997 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, C.M.; Marshall, D.S.; Cunningham, G.R.

    1998-03-01

    This report summarizes the activities conducted by the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1996 through September 1997. The purpose of the program is to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 North. This report continues a series of annual and semiannual reports that present the results of ASEMP monitoring activities. This report details monitoring results for fiscal year (FY) 1997 from SWSA 6, including the Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF) and the Hillcut Disposal Test Facility (HDTF), and (2) TRU-waste storage areas in SWSA 5 N. This report presents a summary of the methodology used to gather data for each major area along with the FY 1997 results. Figures referenced in the text are found in Appendix A and data tables are presented in Appendix B

  13. Monitoring activities of satellite data processing services in real-time with SDDS Live Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duc Nguyen, Minh

    2017-10-01

    This work describes Live Monitor, the monitoring subsystem of SDDS - an automated system for space experiment data processing, storage, and distribution created at SINP MSU. Live Monitor allows operators and developers of satellite data centers to identify errors occurred in data processing quickly and to prevent further consequences caused by the errors. All activities of the whole data processing cycle are illustrated via a web interface in real-time. Notification messages are delivered to responsible people via emails and Telegram messenger service. The flexible monitoring mechanism implemented in Live Monitor allows us to dynamically change and control events being shown on the web interface on our demands. Physicists, whose space weather analysis models are functioning upon satellite data provided by SDDS, can use the developed RESTful API to monitor their own events and deliver customized notification messages by their needs.

  14. Monitoring activities of satellite data processing services in real-time with SDDS Live Monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duc Nguyen Minh

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This work describes Live Monitor, the monitoring subsystem of SDDS – an automated system for space experiment data processing, storage, and distribution created at SINP MSU. Live Monitor allows operators and developers of satellite data centers to identify errors occurred in data processing quickly and to prevent further consequences caused by the errors. All activities of the whole data processing cycle are illustrated via a web interface in real-time. Notification messages are delivered to responsible people via emails and Telegram messenger service. The flexible monitoring mechanism implemented in Live Monitor allows us to dynamically change and control events being shown on the web interface on our demands. Physicists, whose space weather analysis models are functioning upon satellite data provided by SDDS, can use the developed RESTful API to monitor their own events and deliver customized notification messages by their needs.

  15. Active Low Intrusion Hybrid Monitor for Wireless Sensor Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navia, Marlon; Campelo, Jose C; Bonastre, Alberto; Ors, Rafael; Capella, Juan V; Serrano, Juan J

    2015-09-18

    Several systems have been proposed to monitor wireless sensor networks (WSN). These systems may be active (causing a high degree of intrusion) or passive (low observability inside the nodes). This paper presents the implementation of an active hybrid (hardware and software) monitor with low intrusion. It is based on the addition to the sensor node of a monitor node (hardware part) which, through a standard interface, is able to receive the monitoring information sent by a piece of software executed in the sensor node. The intrusion on time, code, and energy caused in the sensor nodes by the monitor is evaluated as a function of data size and the interface used. Then different interfaces, commonly available in sensor nodes, are evaluated: serial transmission (USART), serial peripheral interface (SPI), and parallel. The proposed hybrid monitor provides highly detailed information, barely disturbed by the measurement tool (interference), about the behavior of the WSN that may be used to evaluate many properties such as performance, dependability, security, etc. Monitor nodes are self-powered and may be removed after the monitoring campaign to be reused in other campaigns and/or WSNs. No other hardware-independent monitoring platforms with such low interference have been found in the literature.

  16. Construction monitoring activities in the ESF starter tunnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pott, J.; Carlisle, S.

    1994-01-01

    In situ design verification activities am being conducted in the North Ramp Starter Tunnel of the Yucca Mountain Project Exploratory Studies Facility. These activities include: monitoring the peak particle velocities and evaluating the damage to the rock mass associated with construction blasting, assessing the rock mass quality surrounding the tunnel, monitoring the performance of the installed ground support, and monitoring the stability of the tunnel. In this paper, examples of the data that have been collected and preliminary conclusions from the data are presented

  17. Nordic monitoring on diet, physical activity and overweight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fagt, Sisse; Andersen, Lene Frost; Anderssen, Sigmund A.

    . In 2009, the indicator questions were validated against an objective method (physical activity) or existing survey methods (diet) and the present report mainly describes the validation studies. On basis of the validation studies the working group suggests that the indicators are used in a future......In 2007, a Nordic working group was established with the aim to describe a future Nordic monitoring system on diet, physical activity and overweight. The monitoring system should be simple and at relatively low cost. Therefore it has been decided to conduct the moni-toring as a telephone interview...

  18. Active Vaccines for Alzheimer Disease Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterner, Rosalie M; Takahashi, Paul Y; Yu Ballard, Aimee C

    2016-09-01

    Vaccination against peptides specific to Alzheimer disease may generate an immune response that could help inhibit disease and symptom progression. PubMed and Scopus were searched for clinical trial articles, review articles, and preclinical studies relevant to the field of active Alzheimer disease vaccines and raw searches yielded articles ranging from 2016 to 1973. ClinicalTrials.gov was searched for active Alzheimer disease vaccine trials. Manual research and cross-referencing from reviews and original articles was performed. First generation Aβ42 phase 2a trial in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease resulted in cases of meningoencephalitis in 6% of patients, so next generation vaccines are working to target more specific epitopes to induce a more controlled immune response. Difficulty in developing these vaccines resides in striking a balance between providing a vaccine that induces enough of an immune response to actually clear protein sustainably but not so much of a response that results in excess immune activation and possibly adverse effects such as meningoencephalitis. Although much work still needs to be done in the field to make this a practical possibility, the enticing allure of being able to treat or even prevent the extraordinarily impactful disease that is Alzheimer disease makes the idea of active vaccination for Alzheimer disease very appealing and something worth striving toward. Copyright © 2016 AMDA – The Society for Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Chronic Active Epstein-Barr Virus Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Hiroshi; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-01-01

    Chronic active Epstein-Barr virus (CAEBV) disease is a rare disorder in which persons are unable to control infection with the virus. The disease is progressive with markedly elevated levels of EBV DNA in the blood and infiltration of organs by EBV-positive lymphocytes. Patients often present with fever, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, EBV hepatitis, or pancytopenia. Over time, these patients develop progressive immunodeficiency and if not treated, succumb to opportunistic infections, hemophagocytosis, multiorgan failure, or EBV-positive lymphomas. Patients with CAEBV in the United States most often present with disease involving B or T cells, while in Asia, the disease usually involves T or NK cells. The only proven effective treatment for the disease is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Current studies to find a cause of this disease focus on immune defects and genetic abnormalities associated with the disease.

  20. Chronic Active Epstein–Barr Virus Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Kimura

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic active Epstein–Barr virus (CAEBV disease is a rare disorder in which persons are unable to control infection with the virus. The disease is progressive with markedly elevated levels of EBV DNA in the blood and infiltration of organs by EBV-positive lymphocytes. Patients often present with fever, lymphadenopathy, splenomegaly, EBV hepatitis, or pancytopenia. Over time, these patients develop progressive immunodeficiency and if not treated, succumb to opportunistic infections, hemophagocytosis, multiorgan failure, or EBV-positive lymphomas. Patients with CAEBV in the United States most often present with disease involving B or T cells, while in Asia, the disease usually involves T or NK cells. The only proven effective treatment for the disease is hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Current studies to find a cause of this disease focus on immune defects and genetic abnormalities associated with the disease.

  1. Biology, diversity and strategies for the monitoring and control of triatomines--Chagas disease vectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Jane; Lorenzo, Marcelo

    2009-07-01

    Despite the relevant achievements in the control of the main Chagas disease vectors Triatoma infestans and Rhodnius prolixus, several factors still promote the risk of infection. The disease is a real threat to the poor rural regions of several countries in Latin America. The current situation in Brazil requires renewed attention due to its high diversity of triatomine species and to the rapid and drastic environmental changes that are occurring. Using the biology, behaviour and diversity of triatomines as a basis for new strategies for monitoring and controlling the vectorial transmission are discussed here. The importance of ongoing long-term monitoring activities for house infestations by T. infestans, Triatoma brasiliensis, Panstrongylus megistus, Triatoma rubrovaria and R. prolixus is also stressed, as well as understanding the invasion by sylvatic species. Moreover, the insecticide resistance is analysed. Strong efforts to sustain and improve surveillance procedures are crucial, especially when the vectorial transmission is considered interrupted in many endemic areas.

  2. Pervasive mobile healthcare systems for chronic disease monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huzooree, Geshwaree; Kumar Khedo, Kavi; Joonas, Noorjehan

    2017-05-01

    Pervasive mobile healthcare system has the potential to improve healthcare and the quality of life of chronic disease patients through continuous monitoring. Recently, many articles related to pervasive mobile healthcare system focusing on health monitoring using wireless technologies have been published. The main aim of this review is to evaluate the state-of-the-art pervasive mobile healthcare systems to identify major technical requirements and design challenges associated with the realization of a pervasive mobile healthcare system. A systematic literature review was conducted over IEEE Xplore Digital Library to evaluate 20 pervasive mobile healthcare systems out of 683 articles from 2011 to 2016. The classification of the pervasive mobile healthcare systems and other important factors are discussed. Potential opportunities and challenges are pointed out for the further deployment of effective pervasive mobile healthcare systems. This article helps researchers in health informatics to have a holistic view toward understanding pervasive mobile healthcare systems and points out new technological trends and design challenges that researchers have to consider when designing such systems for better adoption, usability, and seamless integration.

  3. Evaluation of Activity Recognition Algorithms for Employee Performance Monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Mehreen Mumtaz; Hafiz Adnan Habib

    2012-01-01

    Successful Human Resource Management plays a key role in success of any organization. Traditionally, human resource managers rely on various information technology solutions such as Payroll and Work Time Systems incorporating RFID and biometric technologies. This research evaluates activity recognition algorithms for employee performance monitoring. An activity recognition algorithm has been implemented that categorized the activity of employee into following in to classes: job activities and...

  4. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: FY 1990 annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.; Ashwood, T.L.

    1991-10-01

    Chapter 3 of US Department of Energy (DOE) Order 5820.2A (DOE 1988) sets forth requirements for environmental monitoring of active low-level waste (LLW) disposal sites. Active sites are defined as those LLW facilities that were in use on or after the date of the order (September 1988). The transuranic (TRU) waste storage areas in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 5 North are covered by Chap. 2 of the order. In both chapters, monitoring is required to provide for early warning of leaks before those leaks pose a threat to human health or the environment. Chapter 3 also requires that monitoring be conducted to evaluate the short- and long-term performance of LLW disposal facilities. In accordance with this order, the Solid Waste Operations Department at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) has established an Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) that is implemented by staff of the Environmental Sciences Division (ESD) at ORNL. This report summarizes data from ASEMP monitoring activities for the final 6 months of FY 1990. A brief summary of the monitoring methodology for each site is presented also

  5. Enhanced surveillance strategies for detecting and monitoring chronic wasting disease in free-ranging cervids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Daniel P.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to provide wildlife management agencies with the foundation upon which they can build scientifically rigorous and cost-effective surveillance and monitoring programs for chronic wasting disease (CWD) or refine their existing programs. The first chapter provides an overview of potential demographic and spatial risk factors of susceptible wildlife populations that may be exploited for CWD surveillance and monitoring. The information contained in this chapter explores historic as well as recent developments in our understanding of CWD disease dynamics. It also contains many literature references for readers who may desire a more thorough review of the topics or CWD in general. The second chapter examines methods for enhancing efforts to detect CWD on the landscape where it is not presently known to exist and focuses on the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the surveillance program. Specifically, it describes the means of exploiting current knowledge of demographic and spatial risk factors, as described in the first chapter, through a two-stage surveillance scheme that utilizes traditional design-based sampling approaches and novel statistical methods to incorporate information about the attributes of the landscape, environment, populations and individual animals into CWD surveillance activities. By accounting for these attributes, efficiencies can be gained and cost-savings can be realized. The final chapter is unique in relation to the first two chapters. Its focus is on designing programs to monitor CWD once it is discovered within a jurisdiction. Unlike the prior chapters that are more detailed or prescriptive, this chapter by design is considerably more general because providing comprehensive direction for creating monitoring programs for jurisdictions without consideration of their monitoring goals, sociopolitical constraints, or their biological systems, is not possible. Therefore, the authors draw upon their collective

  6. Monitoring bat activity at the Dutch EEZ in 2014

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lagerveld, S.; Jonge Poerink, B.; Vries, de P.

    2015-01-01

    IMARES conducted studies in 2012 and 2013 to monitor offshore bat activity with passive acoustic ultrasonic recorders. In the follow-up project reported here, more data on the offshore occurrence of bats was collected in 2014. Using the same methodology as in 2012 and 2013, bat activity was

  7. Accelerometry-based monitoring of daily physical activity in children with juvenile idiopathic arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, M; Twilt, M; Andersen, L B

    2015-01-01

    with regard to disease activity and physical variables and to compare the data with those from healthy age- and gender-matched controls.Method: Patients underwent an evaluation of disease activity, functional ability, physical capacity, and pain. Accelerometer monitoring was assessed using the GT1M Acti...... range of motion (ROM). No correlation was found between PA and pain scores, functional ability, and hypermobility. Patients with involvement of ankles or hips demonstrated significantly lower levels of PA.Conclusions: Children with JIA are less physically active and have lower physical capacity......Objectives: Juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) may cause functional impairment, reduced participation in physical activity (PA) and, over time, physical deconditioning. The aim of this study was to objectively monitor daily free-living PA in 10-16-year-old children with JIA using accelerometry...

  8. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program. FY 1993: Annual report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morrissey, C.M.; Ashwood, T.L.; Hicks, D.S.; Marsh, J.D.

    1994-08-01

    This report continues a series of annual and semiannual reports that present the results of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) monitoring activities. The report details monitoring data for fiscal year (FY) 1993 and is divided into three major areas: SWSA 6 [including tumulus pads, Interim Waste Management Facility (IWMF), and other sites], the low-level Liquid-Waste Solidification Project (LWSP), and TRU-waste storage facilities in SWSA 5 N. The detailed monitoring methodology is described in the second revision of the ASEMP program plan. This report also presents a summary of the methodology used to gather data for each major area along with the results obtained during FY 1993

  9. Evaluation of neopterin as a biomarker for the monitoring of Gaucher disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drugan, Cristina; Drugan, Tudor C; Miron, Nicolae; Grigorescu-Sido, Paula; Naşcu, Ioana; Cătană, Cristina

    2016-07-01

    Biomarker research is an important area of investigation in Gaucher disease, caused by an inherited deficiency of a lysosomal enzyme, glucocerebrosidase. We evaluated the usefulness of neopterin, as a novel biomarker reflecting chronic inflammation and immune system activation in Gaucher disease and analysed its evolution in response to enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). Circulating plasma neopterin levels in 31 patients with non-neuronopathic Gaucher disease were measured before and after the onset of ERT and were compared with those of 18 healthy controls. Plasma chitotriosidase activity was also monitored, as a reference biomarker, against which we evaluated the evolution of neopterin. Neopterin levels were significantly increased in treatment-naïve patients (mean 11.90 ± 5.82 nM) compared with controls (6.63 ± 5.59 nM, Mann-Whitney U test P = 0.001), but returned to normal levels (6.92 ± 4.66 nM) following ERT. Investigating the diagnostic value of neopterin by receiver operating characteristic analysis, we found a cut-off value of 7.613 nM that corresponds to an area under the curve of 0.780 and indicates a good discrimination capacity, with a sensitivity of 0.774 and a specificity of 0.778. Our results suggest that measurement of circulating neopterin may be considered as a novel test for the confirmation of diagnosis and monitoring of the efficacy of therapeutic intervention in Gaucher disease. Plasma neopterin levels reflect the global accumulation and activation of Gaucher cells and the extent of chronic immune activation in this disorder. Neopterin may be an alternative storage cell biomarker in Gaucher disease, especially in chitotriosidase-deficient patients.

  10. Dashboard applications to monitor experiment activities at sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andreeva, Julia; Gaidioz, Benjamin; Grigoras, Costin; Kokoszkiewicz, Lukasz; Lanciotti, Elisa; Rocha, Ricardo; Saiz, Pablo; Santinelli, Roberto; Sidorova, Irina; Sciaba, Andrea [CERN, European Organization for Nuclear Research (Switzerland); Belforte, Stefano [INFN Trieste (Italy); Boehm, Max [EDS, an HP Company, Plano, TX (United States); Casajus, Adrian [Universitat de Barcelona (Spain); Flix, Josep [PIC, Port d' Informacio CientIfica, Bellaterra (Spain); Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei, E-mail: Elisa.Lanciotti@cern.c, E-mail: Pablo.Saiz@cern.c [CPPM Marseille (France)

    2010-04-01

    In the framework of a distributed computing environment, such as WLCG, monitoring has a key role in order to keep under control activities going on in sites located in different countries and involving people based in many different sites. To be able to cope with such a large scale heterogeneous infrastructure, it is necessary to have monitoring tools providing a complete and reliable view of the overall performance of the sites. Moreover, the structure of a monitoring system critically depends on the object to monitor and on the users it is addressed to. In this article we will describe two different monitoring systems both aimed to monitor activities and services provided in the WLCG framework, but designed in order to meet the requirements of different users: Site Status Board has an overall view of the services available in all the sites supporting an experiment, whereas Siteview provides a complete view of all the activities going on at a site, for all the experiments supported by the site.

  11. Dashboard applications to monitor experiment activities at sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andreeva, Julia; Gaidioz, Benjamin; Grigoras, Costin; Kokoszkiewicz, Lukasz; Lanciotti, Elisa; Rocha, Ricardo; Saiz, Pablo; Santinelli, Roberto; Sidorova, Irina; Sciaba, Andrea; Belforte, Stefano; Boehm, Max; Casajus, Adrian; Flix, Josep; Tsaregorodtsev, Andrei

    2010-01-01

    In the framework of a distributed computing environment, such as WLCG, monitoring has a key role in order to keep under control activities going on in sites located in different countries and involving people based in many different sites. To be able to cope with such a large scale heterogeneous infrastructure, it is necessary to have monitoring tools providing a complete and reliable view of the overall performance of the sites. Moreover, the structure of a monitoring system critically depends on the object to monitor and on the users it is addressed to. In this article we will describe two different monitoring systems both aimed to monitor activities and services provided in the WLCG framework, but designed in order to meet the requirements of different users: Site Status Board has an overall view of the services available in all the sites supporting an experiment, whereas Siteview provides a complete view of all the activities going on at a site, for all the experiments supported by the site.

  12. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossage, A.A.R.; Crawley, J.C.W.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of [ 9 -9μTc]pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity - TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p<0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination

  13. Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program: Mid-FY 1991 report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashwood, T.L.; Wickliff, D.S.; Morrissey, C.M.

    1991-10-01

    This report summarizes the activities of the Active Sites Environmental Monitoring Program (ASEMP) from October 1990 through March 1991. The ASEMP was established in 1989 by Solid Waste Operations and the Environmental Sciences Division to provide early detection and performance monitoring at active low-level radioactive waste (LLW) disposal sites in Solid Waste Storage Area (SWSA) 6 and transuranic (TRU) waste storage sites in SWSA 5 as required by chapters II and III of US Department of Energy Order 5820.2A. Monitoring results continue to demonstrate the no LLW is being leached from the storage vaults on the tumulus pads. Loading of vaults on Tumulus II began during this reporting period and 115 vaults had been loaded by the end of March 1991.

  14. Does Cueing Training Improve Physical Activity in Patients With Parkinson's Disease?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lim-de Vries, L.I.I.K.; van Wegen, E.E.H.; Jones, D.; Rochester, L.; Nieuwboer, A.; Willems, A.M.; Baker, K.; Hetherington, V.; Kwakkel, G.

    2010-01-01

    Background. Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) are encouraged to stay active to maintain their mobility. Ambulatory activity monitoring (AM) provides an objective way to determine type and amount of gait-related daily activities. Objective. To investigate the effects of a home cueing training

  15. Continuous gravity monitoring of geothermal activity; Renzoku juryoku sokutei ni yoru chinetsu katsudo no monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugihara, M [Geological Survey of Japan, Tsukuba (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    To clarify the geothermal activity in the geothermal fields in New Zealand, gravity monitoring was conducted using SCINTREX automatic gravimeter. The measurements were conducted between the end of January and the beginning of March, 1996. Firstly, continuous monitoring was conducted at the standard point for about ten days, and the tidal components were estimated from the records. After that, continuous monitoring was conducted at Waimangu area for several days. Continuous monitoring was repeated at the standard point, again. At the Waimangu area, three times of changes in the pulse-shape amplitude of 0.01 mgal having a width of several hours were observed. For the SCINTREX gravimeter, the inclination of gravimeter is also recorded in addition to the change of gravity. During the monitoring, the gravimeter was also inclined with the changes of gravity. This inclination was useful not only for the correction of gravity measured, but also for evaluating the ground fluctuation due to the underground pressure source. It is likely that the continuous gravity monitoring is the relatively conventional technique which is effective for prospecting the change of geothermal reservoir. 2 figs.

  16. Leisure time activities, parental monitoring and drunkenness in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomcikova, Z.; Veselska, Z.; Madarasova Geckova, A.; van Dijk, J.P.; Reijneveld, S.A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the association between adolescent drunkenness and participation in risky leisure time activities and parental monitoring. Methods: A sample of 3,694 Slovak elementary school students (mean age 14.5 years; 49.0% males) was assessed for

  17. Leisure Time Activities, Parental Monitoring and Drunkenness in Adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tomcikova, Zuzana; Veselska, Zuzana; Geckova, Andrea Madarasova; van Dijk, Jitse P.; Reijneveld, Sijmen A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore the association between adolescent drunkenness and participation in risky leisure time activities and parental monitoring. Methods: A sample of 3,694 Slovak elementary school students (mean age 14.5 years; 49.0% males) was assessed for

  18. Waste monitoring of the uranium ore processing activities in Romania

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nica, L.

    2002-01-01

    The uranium ore processing activities at the Feldioara site produce a range of liquid and solid waste that are monitored. Liquids are treated through decantation, pH correction and uranium precipitation before their release into the environment. The solid waste is gathered into ore specific area and are covered regularly with clay materials. (author)

  19. Embedded Triboelectric Active Sensors for Real-Time Pneumatic Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xian Peng; Bu, Tian Zhao; Xi, Feng Ben; Cheng, Ting Hai; Zhang, Chi; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2017-09-20

    Pneumatic monitoring sensors have great demands for power supply in cylinder systems. Here, we present an embedded sliding triboelectric nanogenerator (TENG) in air cylinder as active sensors for position and velocity monitoring. The embedded TENG is composed of a circular poly(tetrafluoroethylene) polymer and a triangular copper electrode. The working mechanism as triboelectric active sensors and electric output performance are systematically investigated. By integrating into the pneumatic system, the embedded triboelectric active sensors have been used for real-time air pressure/flow monitoring and energy storage. Air pressures are measured from 0.04 to 0.12 MPa at a step of 0.02 MPa with a sensitivity of 49.235 V/MPa, as well as airflow from 50 to 250 L/min at a step of 50 L/min with a sensitivity of 0.002 μA·min/L. This work has first demonstrated triboelectric active sensors for pneumatic monitoring and may promote the development of TENG in intelligent pneumatic system.

  20. Applied research of environmental monitoring using instrumental neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Young Sam; Moon, Jong Hwa; Chung, Young Ju

    1997-08-01

    This technical report is written as a guide book for applied research of environmental monitoring using Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis. The contents are as followings; sampling and sample preparation as a airborne particulate matter, analytical methodologies, data evaluation and interpretation, basic statistical methods of data analysis applied in environmental pollution studies. (author). 23 refs., 7 tabs., 9 figs.

  1. Complement Activation in Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Giang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The complement system is a fundamental part of the innate immune system, playing a crucial role in host defense against various pathogens, such as bacteria, viruses, and fungi. Activation of complement results in production of several molecules mediating chemotaxis, opsonization, and mast cell degranulation, which can contribute to the elimination of pathogenic organisms and inflammation. Furthermore, the complement system also has regulating properties in inflammatory and immune responses. Complement activity in diseases is rather complex and may involve both aberrant expression of complement and genetic deficiencies of complement components or regulators. The skin represents an active immune organ with complex interactions between cellular components and various mediators. Complement involvement has been associated with several skin diseases, such as psoriasis, lupus erythematosus, cutaneous vasculitis, urticaria, and bullous dermatoses. Several triggers including auto-antibodies and micro-organisms can activate complement, while on the other hand complement deficiencies can contribute to impaired immune complex clearance, leading to disease. This review provides an overview of the role of complement in inflammatory skin diseases and discusses complement factors as potential new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  2. Self-managed eHealth Disease Monitoring in Children and Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsen, Katrine; Jakobsen, Christian; Houen, Gunnar

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the impact of eHealth on disease activity, the need for hospital contacts, and medical adherence in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Furthermore, to assess eHealth's influence on school attendance and quality of life (QoL). METHODS: Patients...... with IBD, 10 to 17 years attending a public university hospital, were prospectively randomized to a 2-year open label case-controlled eHealth intervention. The eHealth-group used the web-application young.constant-care.com (YCC) on a monthly basis and in case of flare-ups, and were seen at one annual......: Fifty-three patients in nonbiological treatment were included (27 eHealth/26 control). We found no differences between the groups regarding escalation in treatment and disease activity (symptoms, fecal calprotectin, and blood). The number of total outpatient visits (mean: eHealth 3.26, SEM 0.51; control...

  3. Chronobiologically Interpreted Ambulatory Blood Pressure Monitoring in Health and Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halberg, Franz; Mult, Hc; Cornélissen, Germaine; Hillman, Dewayne; Beaty, Larry A; Hong, Shiyu; Schwartzkopff, Othild; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Otsuka, Kuniaki; Siegelova, Jarmila

    2012-05-01

    To detect vascular variability anomalies (VVAs), a blood pressure and heart rate profile around the clock for at least 7 days is a start. As a minimum, measurement every 60 or preferably 30 minutes for a week is needed, to be continued if abnormality is found, to assess the about 24-hour (circadian) variability that exists in all individuals. As a first dividend, one then also obtains a glimpse of 2 of the very many longer-than-circadian periodicities, the biological half-week and week. Certainly if we can have sensors and computer chips in our cars that continuously monitor the pressure over a tire's life, we should be able to do the same job for ourselves for diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. Healthcare today emphasizes wellness with recommendations for exercise and a proper diet, yet these evaluations may not be adequate. BP may be measured at a visit to the doctor or before an exercise session, along with measuring body weight and performing a physical exam. The seeds of disease are planted long before they are visible, and what appears to be normal from a conventional point of view may in fact actually be abnormal. Hidden alterations of physiological function, masked by the body's remarkable adaptive capabilities, may become visible through a new diagnostic and therapeutic realm-chronobiology-that reveals hitherto unseen abnormalities. The tools of chronobiology may yield additional dividends, such as the detection of physiological "loads" related to stress and stress relief and the undesirable effcts of space weather upon personal events such as sudden cardiac death, societal events like terrorism and war, and natural disasters. Chronobiologi cally interpreted automatic ambulatory BP and heart rate (HR) monitoring (C-ABPM) may detect the antecedents of these types of events. C-ABPM is of interest in preventive cardiology, since it reveals new diagnoses as vascular variability anomalies (VVAs) and renders previous conventional diagnoses more reliable, such

  4. Feedback from physical activity monitors is not compatible with current recommendations: A recalibration study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Dylan; Batterham, Alan M; Peacock, Oliver J; Western, Max J; Booso, Rahuman

    2016-10-01

    Wearable devices to self-monitor physical activity have become popular with individuals and healthcare practitioners as a route to the prevention of chronic disease. It is not currently possible to reconcile feedback from these devices with activity recommendations because the guidelines refer to the amount of activity required on top of normal lifestyle activities (e.g., 150 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity per week over-and-above normal moderate-to-vigorous lifestyle activities). The aim of this study was to recalibrate the feedback from self-monitoring. We pooled data from four studies conducted between 2006 and 2014 in patients and volunteers from the community that included both sophisticated measures of physical activity and 10-year risk for cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes (n=305). We determined the amount of moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity that corresponded to FAO/WHO/UNU guidance for a required PAL of 1.75 (Total Energy Expenditure/Basal Metabolic Rate). Our results show that, at the UK median PAL, total moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity will be around 735 minutes per week (~11% of waking time). We estimate that a 4% increase in moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity will achieve standardised guidance from FAO/WHO/UNU and will require ~1000 minutes of moderate-to-vigorous intensity activity per week. This study demonstrates that feedback from sophisticated wearable devices is incompatible with current physical activity recommendations. Without adjustment, people will erroneously form the view that they are exceeding recommendations by several fold. A more appropriate target from self-monitoring that accounts for normal moderate-to-vigorous lifestyle activities is ~1000 minutes per week, which represents ~15% of waking time. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Monitoring of the periodontal disease using digital image analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taba Junior, Mario.

    1995-01-01

    The radiographs play an important role in the diagnosis and management of periodontal disease although the most appropriate form of assessment vary. The great technologic advance and the easily accessible systems of digital image analyses, specify digitized radiographs, improve the diagnostic power. The studied group was 29 adults (14 female and 15 male) ranging in age from 18 to 45 years. They all had evidence of alveolar bone loss and established periodontitis. They were studied, without treatment, over a six month period with four posterior standardized vertical bite wings radiographs, electronic probing of attachment loss, and bacteriological and temperature analysis of periodontal pocket. The aim of this investigation was to determine the relationship between the loss of radiographic crestal bone height and probing attachment loss in digitized radiographs and show a standardization method for periodontal radiographs. Radiographic and probing attachment change at all sites, dichotomously classified as to not changing or loosing indicated 20.42% of sites were loosing by measurement of radiographic change and 5.29% were loosing by measurement of attachment change. There was concordance between the presence or absence of probing attachment loss and bone loss in 72% to 86% depending on the area. The results, admitting methodological limitations, indicate that when these two methods for the assessment of progressive periodontitis were used they represents measure degrees of different features of periodontitis and that the period of periodontal disease activity was detected in the either the soft tissue attachment or bone. (author)

  6. A Context-Aware Adaptive Feedback System for Activity Monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    op den Akker, Harm; Hermens, Hermanus J.; Jones, Valerie M.

    2011-01-01

    An active lifestyle is an important factor in the prevention of deconditioning and many negative secondary effects in chronic diseases (e.g. COPD). A number of studies have been conducted with the aim of gaining insight into the daily activity patterns of these patients. Current research is

  7. Inflammatory activity in Crohn disease: ultrasound findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migaleddu, Vincenzo; Quaia, Emilio; Scano, Domenico; Virgilio, Giuseppe

    2008-01-01

    Improvements in the ultrasound examination of bowel disease have registered in the last years the introduction of new technologies regarding high frequency probes (US), highly sensitive color or power Doppler units (CD-US), and the development of new non-linear technologies that optimize detection of contrast agents. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CE-US) most importantly increases the results in sonographic evaluation of Crohn disease inflammatory activity. CE-US has become an imaging modality routinely employed in the clinical practice for the evaluation of parenchymal organs due to the introduction of new generation microbubble contrast agents which persist in the bloodstream for several minutes after intravenous injection. The availability of high frequency dedicated contrast-specific US techniques provide accurate depiction of small bowel wall perfusion due to the extremely high sensitivity of non-linear signals produced by microbubble insonation. In Crohn's disease, CE-US may characterize the bowel wall thickness by differentiating fibrosis from edema and may grade the inflammatory disease activity by assessing the presence and distribution of vascularity within the layers of the bowel wall (submucosa alone or the entire bowel wall). Peri-intestinal inflammatory involvement can be also characterized. CE-US can provide prognostic data concerning clinical recurrence of the inflammatory disease and evaluate the efficacy of drugs treatments.

  8. Monitoring of the solar activity and solar energetic particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akioka, Maki; Kubo, Yuki; Nagatsuma, Tsutomu; Ohtaka, Kazuhiro

    2009-01-01

    Solar activity is the source of various space weather phenomena in geospace and deep space. Solar X-ray radiation in flare, energetic particles, coronal mass ejection (CME) can cause various kind of disturbance near earth space. Therefore, detailed monitoring of the solar activity and its propagation in the interplanetary space is essential task for space weather. For example, solar energetic particle which sometimes affect spacecraft operation and manned space flight, is considered to be produced by solar flares and travelling shockwave caused by flares and CME. The research and development of monitoring technique and system for various solar activity has been an important topic of space weather forecast program in NICT. In this article, we will introduce the real time data acquisitions of STEREO and optical and radio observations of the Sun at Hiraiso Solar Observatory. (author)

  9. Gastric emptying and disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keller, Jutta; Binnewies, Ulrich; Rösch, Marie

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Gastric emptying (GE) is delayed in a subset of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We have shown before that altered release of gastrointestinal hormones may contribute to GE disturbances, but overall effects of disease activity remain unclear. Thus, we aimed to evaluate GE...... test (baseline test). Plasma glucose, cholecystokinin (CCK), peptide YY (PYY) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) were measured periodically throughout the test. A total of 16 patients underwent a second GE test after 3-4 months of therapy. RESULTS: At baseline, nine patients with IBD had...... pathologically delayed GE half-time (T½ > 150 min) (P = 0·028 vs. HC). Moreover, T½ was significantly longer in the total group of patients with IBD than in HC (129 ± 12 min vs. 96 ± 7, P = 0·030). Postprandial GLP-1 responses were elevated in IBD (P = 0·002 vs. HC) and correlated with T½ (P = 0·05). Following...

  10. New Transcriptional Reporters to Quantify and Monitor PPARγ Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Séverine A. Degrelle

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The peroxisome-proliferator-activated-receptor-γ (PPARγ is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily that plays a critical role in diverse biological processes, including adipogenesis, lipid metabolism, and placental development. To study the activity of PPARγ, we constructed two new reporter genes: a fluorescent GFP-tagged histone-2B (PPRE-H2B-eGFP and a secreted nanoluciferase (PPRE-pNL1.3[secNluc]. This study demonstrates their usage to monitor PPARγ activity in different cell types and screen for PPARγ’s potential ligands.

  11. Incorporation monitoring by measurements of activity concentrations in air

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breukelmann, G.; Dalheimer, A.; Dilger, H.; Henrichs, K.

    1997-01-01

    The incorporation monitoring of workers handling actinides is in many cases not possible by individual methods: The sensitivity of bioassay of methods (in vivo, in vitro) is not sufficient to detect amounts as required by the low annual limits of intake. Similar difficulties may occur with the use of radionuclides with very short physical half-lives. In these cases, the measuring of activity concentrations in the air is the only way to monitor the workers and to meet legal requirements. The essential problem connected with this approach is to make sure, that the air sample analyzed represents the average air inhaled actually. Correspondingly, the new system regulating the incorporation monitoring in Germany requires additional measures to ensure this representatively. (author)

  12. Physical activity, obesity and cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakka, T A; Bouchard, C

    2005-01-01

    Sedentary lifestyle and overweight are major public health, clinical, and economical problems in modern societies. The worldwide epidemic of excess weight is due to imbalance between physical activity and dietary energy intake. Sedentary lifestyle, unhealthy diet, and consequent overweight and obesity markedly increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Regular physical activity 45-60 min per day prevents unhealthy weight gain and obesity, whereas sedentary behaviors such as watching television promote them. Regular exercise can markedly reduce body weight and fat mass without dietary caloric restriction in overweight individuals. An increase in total energy expenditure appears to be the most important determinant of successful exercise-induced weight loss. The best long-term results may be achieved when physical activity produces an energy expenditure of at least 2,500 kcal/week. Yet, the optimal approach in weight reduction programs appears to be a combination of regular physical activity and caloric restriction. A minimum of 60 min, but most likely 80-90 min of moderate-intensity physical activity per day may be needed to avoid or limit weight regain in formerly overweight or obese individuals. Regular moderate intensity physical activity, a healthy diet, and avoiding unhealthy weight gain are effective and safe ways to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases and to reduce premature mortality in all population groups. Although the efforts to promote cardiovascular health concern the whole population, particular attention should be paid to individuals who are physically inactive, have unhealthy diets or are prone to weight gain. They have the highest risk for worsening of the cardiovascular risk factor profile and for cardiovascular disease. To combat the epidemic of overweight and to improve cardiovascular health at a population level, it is important to develop strategies to increase habitual physical activity and to prevent overweight and obesity in

  13. Use of a consumer market activity monitoring and feedback device improves exercise capacity and activity levels in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caulfield, Brian; Kaljo, Indira; Donnelly, Seamas

    2014-01-01

    COPD is associated with a gradual decline in physical activity, which itself contributes to a worsening of the underlying condition. Strategies that improve physical activity levels are critical to halt this cycle. Wearable sensor based activity monitoring and persuasive feedback might offer a potential solution. However it is not clear just how much intervention might be needed in this regard - i.e. whether programmes need to be tailored specifically for the target clinical population or whether more simple activity monitoring and feedback solutions, such as that offered in consumer market devices, might be sufficient. This research was carried out to investigate the impact of 4 weeks of using an off the shelf consumer market activity monitoring and feedback application on measures of physical activity, exercise capacity, and health related quality of life in a population of 10 Stage I and II COPD patients. Results demonstrate a significant and positive effect on exercise capacity (measured using a 6-minute walk test) and activity levels (measured in terms of average number of steps per hour) yet no impact on health related quality of life (St Georges Respiratory Disease Questionnaire).

  14. An overview of existing raptor contaminant monitoring activities in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Ramírez, P; Shore, R F; van den Brink, N W; van Hattum, B; Bustnes, J O; Duke, G; Fritsch, C; García-Fernández, A J; Helander, B O; Jaspers, V; Krone, O; Martínez-López, E; Mateo, R; Movalli, P; Sonne, C

    2014-06-01

    Biomonitoring using raptors as sentinels can provide early warning of the potential impacts of contaminants on humans and the environment and also a means of tracking the success of associated mitigation measures. Examples include detection of heavy metal-induced immune system impairment, PCB-induced altered reproductive impacts, and toxicity associated with lead in shot game. Authorisation of such releases and implementation of mitigation is now increasingly delivered through EU-wide directives but there is little established pan-European monitoring to quantify outcomes. We investigated the potential for EU-wide coordinated contaminant monitoring using raptors as sentinels. We did this using a questionnaire to ascertain the current scale of national activity across 44 European countries. According to this survey, there have been 52 different contaminant monitoring schemes with raptors over the last 50years. There were active schemes in 15 (predominantly western European) countries and 23 schemes have been running for >20years; most monitoring was conducted for >5years. Legacy persistent organic compounds (specifically organochlorine insecticides and PCBs), and metals/metalloids were monitored in most of the 15 countries. Fungicides, flame retardants and anticoagulant rodenticides were also relatively frequently monitored (each in at least 6 countries). Common buzzard (Buteo buteo), common kestrel (Falco tinnunculus), golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos), white-tailed sea eagle (Haliaeetus albicilla), peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus), tawny owl (Strix aluco) and barn owl (Tyto alba) were most commonly monitored (each in 6-10 countries). Feathers and eggs were most widely analysed although many schemes also analysed body tissues. Our study reveals an existing capability across multiple European countries for contaminant monitoring using raptors. However, coordination between existing schemes and expansion of monitoring into Eastern Europe is needed. This would enable

  15. Monitoring and accountability for the Pacific response to the non-communicable diseases crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Tolley

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-communicable diseases (NCD are the leading cause of premature death and disability in the Pacific. In 2011, Pacific Forum Leaders declared “a human, social and economic crisis” due to the significant and growing burden of NCDs in the region. In 2013, Pacific Health Ministers’ commitment to ‘whole of government’ strategy prompted calls for the development of a robust, sustainable, collaborative NCD monitoring and accountability system to track, review and propose remedial action to ensure progress towards the NCD goals and targets. The purpose of this paper is to describe a regional, collaborative framework for coordination, innovation and application of NCD monitoring activities at scale, and to show how they can strengthen accountability for action on NCDs in the Pacific. A key component is the Dashboard for NCD Action which aims to strengthen mutual accountability by demonstrating national and regional progress towards agreed NCD policies and actions. Discussion The framework for the Pacific Monitoring Alliance for NCD Action (MANA draws together core country-level components of NCD monitoring data (mortality, morbidity, risk factors, health system responses, environments, and policies and identifies key cross-cutting issues for strengthening national and regional monitoring systems. These include: capacity building; a regional knowledge exchange hub; innovations (monitoring childhood obesity and food environments; and a robust regional accountability system. The MANA framework is governed by the Heads of Health and operationalised by a multi-agency technical Coordination Team. Alliance membership is voluntary and non-conditional, and aims to support the 22 Pacific Island countries and territories to improve the quality of NCD monitoring data across the region. In establishing a common vision for NCD monitoring, the framework combines data collected under the WHO Global Framework for NCDs with a set of action

  16. Monitoring and accountability for the Pacific response to the non-communicable diseases crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolley, Hilary; Snowdon, Wendy; Wate, Jillian; Durand, A Mark; Vivili, Paula; McCool, Judith; Novotny, Rachel; Dewes, Ofa; Hoy, Damian; Bell, Colin; Richards, Nicola; Swinburn, Boyd

    2016-09-10

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are the leading cause of premature death and disability in the Pacific. In 2011, Pacific Forum Leaders declared "a human, social and economic crisis" due to the significant and growing burden of NCDs in the region. In 2013, Pacific Health Ministers' commitment to 'whole of government' strategy prompted calls for the development of a robust, sustainable, collaborative NCD monitoring and accountability system to track, review and propose remedial action to ensure progress towards the NCD goals and targets. The purpose of this paper is to describe a regional, collaborative framework for coordination, innovation and application of NCD monitoring activities at scale, and to show how they can strengthen accountability for action on NCDs in the Pacific. A key component is the Dashboard for NCD Action which aims to strengthen mutual accountability by demonstrating national and regional progress towards agreed NCD policies and actions. The framework for the Pacific Monitoring Alliance for NCD Action (MANA) draws together core country-level components of NCD monitoring data (mortality, morbidity, risk factors, health system responses, environments, and policies) and identifies key cross-cutting issues for strengthening national and regional monitoring systems. These include: capacity building; a regional knowledge exchange hub; innovations (monitoring childhood obesity and food environments); and a robust regional accountability system. The MANA framework is governed by the Heads of Health and operationalised by a multi-agency technical Coordination Team. Alliance membership is voluntary and non-conditional, and aims to support the 22 Pacific Island countries and territories to improve the quality of NCD monitoring data across the region. In establishing a common vision for NCD monitoring, the framework combines data collected under the WHO Global Framework for NCDs with a set of action-orientated indicators captured in a NCD Dashboard for

  17. Validity of physical activity monitors in adults participating in free-living activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, S; Hageberg, R; Aandstad, A

    2010-01-01

    expenditure differently compared with indirect calorimetry, was also determined. Material and methods The activity monitors and a portable oxygen analyser were worn by 14 men and 6 women for 120 min doing a variety of activities of different intensities. Resting metabolic rate was measured with indirect......Background For a given subject, time in moderate to very vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) varies substantially among physical activity monitors. Objective In the present study, the primary objective, whether time in MVPA recorded with SenseWear Pro(2) Armband (Armband; Body......Reg, respectively. ActiReg (p = 0.004) and ActiGraph (p = 0.007) underestimated energy expenditure in MVPA, and all monitors underestimated total energy expenditure (by 5% to 21%). Conclusions Recorded time in MVPA and energy expenditure varies substantially among physical activity monitors. Thus, when comparing...

  18. National physical activity surveillance: Users of wearable activity monitors as a potential data source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John D. Omura, MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to assess usage patterns of wearable activity monitors among US adults and how user characteristics might influence physical activity estimates from this type of sample. We analyzed data on 3367 respondents to the 2015 HealthStyles survey, an annual consumer mail panel survey conducted on a nationwide sample. Approximately 1 in 8 respondents (12.5% reported currently using a wearable activity monitor. Current use varied by sex, age, and education level. Use increased with physical activity level from 4.3% for inactive adults to 17.4% for active adults. Overall, 49.9% of all adults met the aerobic physical activity guideline, while this prevalence was 69.5% among current activity monitor users. Our findings suggest that current users of wearable activity monitors are not representative of the overall US population. Estimates of physical activity levels using data from wearable activity monitors users may be an overestimate and therefore data from users alone may have a limited role in physical activity surveillance.

  19. Validity of Wearable Activity Monitors during Cycling and Resistance Exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudreaux, Benjamin D; Hebert, Edward P; Hollander, Daniel B; Williams, Brian M; Cormier, Corinne L; Naquin, Mildred R; Gillan, Wynn W; Gusew, Emily E; Kraemer, Robert R

    2018-03-01

    The use of wearable activity monitors has seen rapid growth; however, the mode and intensity of exercise could affect the validity of heart rate (HR) and caloric (energy) expenditure (EE) readings. There is a lack of data regarding the validity of wearable activity monitors during graded cycling regimen and a standard resistance exercise. The present study determined the validity of eight monitors for HR compared with an ECG and seven monitors for EE compared with a metabolic analyzer during graded cycling and resistance exercise. Fifty subjects (28 women, 22 men) completed separate trials of graded cycling and three sets of four resistance exercises at a 10-repetition-maximum load. Monitors included the following: Apple Watch Series 2, Fitbit Blaze, Fitbit Charge 2, Polar H7, Polar A360, Garmin Vivosmart HR, TomTom Touch, and Bose SoundSport Pulse (BSP) headphones. HR was recorded after each cycling intensity and after each resistance exercise set. EE was recorded after both protocols. Validity was established as having a mean absolute percent error (MAPE) value of ≤10%. The Polar H7 and BSP were valid during both exercise modes (cycling: MAPE = 6.87%, R = 0.79; resistance exercise: MAPE = 6.31%, R = 0.83). During cycling, the Apple Watch Series 2 revealed the greatest HR validity (MAPE = 4.14%, R = 0.80). The BSP revealed the greatest HR accuracy during resistance exercise (MAPE = 6.24%, R = 0.86). Across all devices, as exercise intensity increased, there was greater underestimation of HR. No device was valid for EE during cycling or resistance exercise. HR from wearable devices differed at different exercise intensities; EE estimates from wearable devices were inaccurate. Wearable devices are not medical devices, and users should be cautious when using these devices for monitoring physiological responses to exercise.

  20. Patient-centered activity monitoring in the self-management of chronic health conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiauzzi, Emil; Rodarte, Carlos; DasMahapatra, Pronabesh

    2015-04-09

    As activity tracking devices become smaller, cheaper, and more consumer-accessible, they will be used more extensively across a wide variety of contexts. The expansion of activity tracking and personal data collection offers the potential for patient engagement in the management of chronic diseases. Consumer wearable devices for activity tracking have shown promise in post-surgery recovery in cardiac patients, pulmonary rehabilitation, and activity counseling in diabetic patients, among others. Unfortunately, the data generated by wearable devices is seldom integrated into programmatic self-management chronic disease regimens. In addition, there is lack of evidence supporting sustained use or effects on health outcomes, as studies have primarily focused on establishing the feasibility of monitoring activity and the association of measured activity with short-term benefits. Monitoring devices can make a direct and real-time impact on self-management, but the validity and reliability of measurements need to be established. In order for patients to become engaged in wearable data gathering, key patient-centered issues relating to usefulness in care, motivation, the safety and privacy of information, and clinical integration need to be addressed. Because the successful usage of wearables requires an ability to comprehend and utilize personal health data, the user experience should account for individual differences in numeracy skills and apply evidence-based behavioral science principles to promote continued engagement. Activity monitoring has the potential to engage patients as advocates in their personalized care, as well as offer health care providers real world assessments of their patients' daily activity patterns. This potential will be realized as the voice of the chronic disease patients is accounted for in the design of devices, measurements are validated against existing clinical assessments, devices become part of the treatment 'prescription', behavior

  1. Graves' disease: thyroid function and immunologic activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossage, A.A.; Crawley, J.C.; Copping, S.; Hinge, D.; Himsworth, R.L.

    1982-01-01

    Patients with Graves' disease were studied for two years during and after a twelve-month course of treatment. Disease activity was determined by repeated measurements of thyroidal uptake of [/sup 99m/Tc]pertechnetate during tri-iodothyronine administration. These in-vivo measurements of thyroid stimulation were compared with the results of in-vitro assays of Graves, immunoglobulin (TSH binding inhibitory activity--TBIA). There was no correlation between the thyroid uptake and TBIA on diagnosis. Pertechnetate uptake and TBIA both declined during the twelve months of antithyroid therapy. TBIA was detectable in sera from 19 of the 27 patients at diagnosis; in 11 of these 19 patients there was a good correlation (p less than 0.05) throughout the course of their disease between the laboratory assay of the Graves, immunoglobulin and the thyroid uptake. Probability of recurrence can be assessed but sustained remission of Graves' disease after treatment cannot be predicted from either measurement alone or in combination

  2. Bioluminescence Monitoring of Neuronal Activity in Freely Moving Zebrafish Larvae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knafo, Steven; Prendergast, Andrew; Thouvenin, Olivier; Figueiredo, Sophie Nunes; Wyart, Claire

    2017-01-01

    The proof of concept for bioluminescence monitoring of neural activity in zebrafish with the genetically encoded calcium indicator GFP-aequorin has been previously described (Naumann et al., 2010) but challenges remain. First, bioluminescence signals originating from a single muscle fiber can constitute a major pitfall. Second, bioluminescence signals emanating from neurons only are very small. To improve signals while verifying specificity, we provide an optimized 4 steps protocol achieving: 1) selective expression of a zebrafish codon-optimized GFP-aequorin, 2) efficient soaking of larvae in GFP-aequorin substrate coelenterazine, 3) bioluminescence monitoring of neural activity from motor neurons in free-tailed moving animals performing acoustic escapes and 4) verification of the absence of muscle expression using immunohistochemistry. PMID:29130058

  3. Monitoring Active Volcanos Using Aerial Images and the Orthoview Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Marsella; Carla Nardinocchi; Cristina Proietti; Leonardo Daga; Mauro Coltelli

    2014-01-01

    In volcanic areas, where it can be difficult to perform direct surveys, digital photogrammetry techniques are rarely adopted for routine volcano monitoring. Nevertheless, they have remarkable potentialities for observing active volcanic features (e.g., fissures, lava flows) and the connected deformation processes. The ability to obtain accurate quantitative data of definite accuracy in short time spans makes digital photogrammetry a suitable method for controlling the evolution of rapidly cha...

  4. Integrated active sensor system for real time vibration monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qijie; Yan, Xiaoqin; Liao, Xinqin; Cao, Shiyao; Lu, Shengnan; Zheng, Xin; Zhang, Yue

    2015-11-05

    We report a self-powered, lightweight and cost-effective active sensor system for vibration monitoring with multiplexed operation based on contact electrification between sensor and detected objects. The as-fabricated sensor matrix is capable of monitoring and mapping the vibration state of large amounts of units. The monitoring contents include: on-off state, vibration frequency and vibration amplitude of each unit. The active sensor system delivers a detection range of 0-60 Hz, high accuracy (relative error below 0.42%), long-term stability (10000 cycles). On the time dimension, the sensor can provide the vibration process memory by recording the outputs of the sensor system in an extend period of time. Besides, the developed sensor system can realize detection under contact mode and non-contact mode. Its high performance is not sensitive to the shape or the conductivity of the detected object. With these features, the active sensor system has great potential in automatic control, remote operation, surveillance and security systems.

  5. Monitoring diseases based on register data: Methods and application in the Danish swine production

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes Antunes, Ana Carolina

    The spread of diseases is one of the most important threats to animal production and public health. Disease spread causes considerable economic losses for the agricultural sector and constitutes trade-limiting factors, as transmission to countries free from disease should beavoided. Monitoring...

  6. Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minderhoud, I.M.

    2007-01-01

    Symptoms in Inflammatory Bowel Disease: pathophysiologic aspects and their relation with disease activity Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) comprises ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD). IBD patients frequently complain of fatigue, and a substantial proportion of the patients have

  7. Advanced Performance Modeling with Combined Passive and Active Monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dovrolis, Constantine [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Sim, Alex [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-04-15

    To improve the efficiency of resource utilization and scheduling of scientific data transfers on high-speed networks, the "Advanced Performance Modeling with combined passive and active monitoring" (APM) project investigates and models a general-purpose, reusable and expandable network performance estimation framework. The predictive estimation model and the framework will be helpful in optimizing the performance and utilization of networks as well as sharing resources with predictable performance for scientific collaborations, especially in data intensive applications. Our prediction model utilizes historical network performance information from various network activity logs as well as live streaming measurements from network peering devices. Historical network performance information is used without putting extra load on the resources by active measurement collection. Performance measurements collected by active probing is used judiciously for improving the accuracy of predictions.

  8. Clinical significance of monitoring of serum TRAb in pregnant women with graves' disease treated by propylthiouracil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou Jinhai; Li Xue; Wang Yansheng; Zhang Qingfeng; Wang Jianchun

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the change of serum TRAb and changeable regularity of thyroid function and clinical significance of pregnant women with Graves' diease treated by propylthiouracil. Methods: Detecting the serum TRAb, FT 3 , FT 4 , TSH levels of pregnant women with Graves' disease treated by propylthiouracil using radioreceptor assay and electro chemiluminescence. Results: The serum TRAb level of the pregnant women with Graves' disease in early gestation treated by propylthiouracil descended much more than that in the initial diagnosis (P<0.01). The positive rates of TRAb in the women before treated by propylthiouracil and treated 3 months, 6 months, 8 months were 90.2%, 82.9%, 68.2% and 21.9% separately. The activity of TRAb descended slightly 3 months latter after treated. The activity of TRAb descend obviously and the positive rates changed largely 8 months after treated. Conclusion: There is very important clinical significance of monitoring of serum TRAb in pregnant women with Graves' disease in diagnosis and differential diagnosis and observation of therapeutic effects. Also, a favourable prognosis judgement. Meanwhile, provides significant reference index of pathogenetic condition judgement and drug discontinuance whether or not for the clinician. (authors)

  9. Antistress activation therapy for cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroshnik E.V.

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The cohort pilot study had been done. Aim: to study the effectiveness of an antistress activation therapy on the functional state of human with the purpose of formation of adaptive reactions of activation and training high levels of reactivity among the two groups of patients with cardiovascular problems, ranks first among causes of death population: arterial hypertension (AH and coronary heart disease (CHD. Material and methods. From the sub-sample of the Moscow population (396 were allocated to 2 groups of patients of 30 people in each (a control group and a group for anti-stress therapy for persons with hypertension and coronary artery disease that within 1 month took adaptogens (tincture of ginseng, Eleutherococcus, etc. is minimized by a specially developed algorithm. For stress diagnosis international integrated questionnaire Perceived Stress (PSS; as well as Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS were used. Blood pressure, heart rate, body mass index, waist circumference were measured. In addition we used new methods "Antistress activation health improvement". Results. The average age in the intervention group was 59.4 years, and in the control group was 58.3 years, p>0.05. In compliance with results of the study has been marked that persons who were treated by methods "Antistress activation health improvement" sensed general and "internal" dumping, improving of duration and quality of sleeping. Irritability, level of stress, depression, and fatigability became rather less. Dynamics of emotions locked in psychometric scales showed distinct improvement of mood, decrease of fear, sorrow, anxiety, anger, emotional instability, increase of self-reliance, activity. Conclusion. The treatment of stress, anxiety, and depression must be complexes based on biological and psychological approaches.

  10. Monitoring single protease activities on triple-helical collagen molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harzar, Raj; Froberg, James; Srivastava, D. K.; Choi, Yongki

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a particular family of proteases, play a pivotal role in degrading the extracellular matrix (ECM). It has been known for more than 40 years that MMPs are closely involved in multiple human cancers during cell growth, invasion, and metastasis. However, the mechanisms of MMP activity are far from being understood. Here, we monitored enzymatic processing of MMPs with two complementary approaches, atomic force microscopy and nanocircuits measurements. AFM measurements demonstrated that incubation of collagen monomers with MMPs resulted in a single position cleavage, producing 3/4 and 1/4 collagen fragments. From electronic monitoring of single MMP nanocircuit measurements, we were able to capture a single cleavage event with a rate of 0.012 Hz, which were in good agreement with fluorescence assay measurements. This work was supported financially by the NIGMS/NIH (P30GM103332-02) and ND NASA EPSCoR RID Grant.

  11. Laboratory studies and Pompe disease: from suspicion to therapy monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Savost’yanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pompe disease (PD is a rare, progressive, commonly fatal inherited autosomal recessive disease that is difficult to diagnose due to its obvious clinical heterogeneity and low awareness among physicians. Access to the laboratory diagnosis of rare diseases increases every year. In the past several years, Russian and foreign laboratories have achieved considerable success in accelerating and improving the diagnostic accuracy of PD. Unfortunately, the Russian-language literature contains scarce relevant information on the laboratory diagnosis of PD. This review is to fill up this gap. 

  12. Interest of Monitoring Diaphragmatic Electrical Activity in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Ducharme-Crevier

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The monitoring of electrical activity of the diaphragm (EAdi is a new minimally invasive bedside technology that was developed for the neurally adjusted ventilatory assist (NAVA mode of ventilation. In addition to its role in NAVA ventilation, this technology provides the clinician with previously unavailable and essential information on diaphragm activity. In this paper, we review the clinical interests of EAdi in the pediatric intensive care setting. Firstly, the monitoring of EAdi allows the clinician to tailor the ventilatory settings on an individual basis, avoiding frequent overassistance leading potentially to diaphragmatic atrophy. Increased inspiratory EAdi levels can also suggest insufficient support, while a strong tonic activity may reflect the patient efforts to increase its lung volume. EAdi monitoring also allows detection of patient-ventilator asynchrony. It can play a role in evaluation of extubation readiness. Finally, EAdi monitoring provides the clinician with better understanding of the ventilatory capacity of patients with acute neuromuscular disease. Further studies are warranted to evaluate the clinical impact of these potential benefits.

  13. Biomarkers of disease activity in vitiligo: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speeckaert, R; Speeckaert, M; De Schepper, S; van Geel, N

    2017-09-01

    The pathophysiology of vitiligo is complex although recent research has discovered several markers which are linked to vitiligo and associated with disease activity. Besides providing insights into the driving mechanisms of vitiligo, these findings could reveal potential biomarkers. Activity markers can be used to monitor disease activity in clinical trials and may also be useful in daily practice. The aim of this systematic review was to document which factors have been associated with vitiligo activity in skin and blood. A second goal was to determine how well these factors are validated in terms of sensitivity and specificity as biomarkers to determine vitiligo activity. Both in skin (n=43) as in blood (n=66) an adequate number of studies fulfilled the predefined inclusion criteria. These studies used diverse methods and investigated a broad range of plausible biomarkers. Unfortunately, sensitivity and specificity analyses were scarce. In skin, simple histopathology with or without supplemental CD4 and CD8 stainings can still be considered as the gold standard, although more recently chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL) 9 and NLRP1 have demonstrated a good and possibly even better association with progressive disease. Regarding circulating biomarkers, cytokines (IL-1β, IL-17, IFN-γ, TGF-β), autoantibodies, oxidative stress markers, immune cells (Tregs), soluble CDs (sCD25, sCD27) and chemokines (CXCL9, CXCL10) are still competing. However, the two latter may be preferable as both chemokines and soluble CDs are easy to measure and the available studies display promising results. A large multicenter study could make more definitive statements regarding their sensitivity and specificity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Wearable strain sensors based on thin graphite films for human activity monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Takanari; Kihara, Yusuke; Shirakashi, Jun-ichi

    2017-12-01

    Wearable health-monitoring devices have attracted increasing attention in disease diagnosis and health assessment. In many cases, such devices have been prepared by complicated multistep procedures which result in the waste of materials and require expensive facilities. In this study, we focused on pyrolytic graphite sheet (PGS), which is a low-cost, simple, and flexible material, used as wearable devices for monitoring human activity. We investigated wearable devices based on PGSs for the observation of elbow and finger motions. The thin graphite films were fabricated by cutting small films from PGSs. The wearable devices were then made from the thin graphite films assembled on a commercially available rubber glove. The human motions could be observed using the wearable devices. Therefore, these results suggested that the wearable devices based on thin graphite films may broaden their application in cost-effective wearable electronics for the observation of human activity.

  15. Passive and Active Sensing Technologies for Structural Health Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do, Richard

    A combination of passive and active sensing technologies is proposed as a structural health monitoring solution for several applications. Passive sensing is differentiated from active sensing in that with the former, no energy is intentionally imparted into the structure under test; sensors are deployed in a pure detection mode for collecting data mined for structural health monitoring purposes. In this thesis, passive sensing using embedded fiber Bragg grating optical strain gages was used to detect varying degrees of impact damage using two different classes of features drawn from traditional spectral analysis and auto-regressive time series modeling. The two feature classes were compared in detail through receiver operating curve performance analysis. The passive detection problem was then augmented with an active sensing system using ultrasonic guided waves (UGWs). This thesis considered two main challenges associated with UGW SHM including in-situ wave propagation property determination and thermal corruption of data. Regarding determination of wave propagation properties, of which dispersion characteristics are the most important, a new dispersion curve extraction method called sparse wavenumber analysis (SWA) was experimentally validated. Also, because UGWs are extremely sensitive to ambient temperature changes on the structure, it significantly affects the wave propagation properties by causing large errors in the residual error in the processing of the UGWs from an array. This thesis presented a novel method that compensates for uniform temperature change by considering the magnitude and phase of the signal separately and applying a scalable transformation.

  16. Monitoring of thiopurine metabolites in patients with inflammatory bowel disease-what is actually measured?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vikingsson, Svante; Carlsson, Björn; Almer, Sven H C; Peterson, Curt

    2009-06-01

    Azathioprine and 6-mercaptopurine are often used in the treatment of patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). They are prodrugs and undergo a complex metabolism to active and inactive metabolites. Thiopurine treatment is monitored in many laboratories by measuring metabolite concentrations in erythrocytes (red blood cells). The metabolites of interest are not measured directly but as hydrolysis products, which can be produced from several metabolites. The aim of this study was to examine which metabolites are actually measured during routine monitoring. Samples from 18 patients treated with a thiopurine were analyzed by a typical routine high-performance liquid chromatography method for therapeutic drug monitoring and by a newly developed specific method measuring thioguanosine monophosphate (TGMP), thioguanosine diphosphate (TGDP), and thioguanosine triphosphate (TGTP), as well as methylthioinosine monophosphate (meTIMP), and the results were compared. 6-Thioguanine nucleotide (TGN) values detected by the routine method were 69% (range 40%-90%) of the sum of TGMP, TGDP, and TGTP measured by the specific method. TGTP and TGDP contributed 85% (range 78%-90%) and 14% (range 10%-21%) of the TGN total, respectively. Thioguanosine was not found in any patient sample. The concentration of meTIMP obtained by the routine method was 548% of the value obtained by the specific method (range 340%-718%). The difference in TGN measurements between the routine and specific methods can be explained by low hydrolysis efficiency in the routine method, although the most likely explanation for the difference in meTIMP values is that not yet identified metabolites are codetermined in the routine high-performance liquid chromatography method. Concentrations reported as TGN during therapeutic drug monitoring of thiopurine metabolites consist of TGDP and TGTP with a minor contribution of the TGMP. Concentrations reported as meTIMP or methyl mercaptopurine consist in part of me

  17. Monitoring Active Volcanos Using Aerial Images and the Orthoview Tool

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Marsella

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In volcanic areas, where it can be difficult to perform direct surveys, digital photogrammetry techniques are rarely adopted for routine volcano monitoring. Nevertheless, they have remarkable potentialities for observing active volcanic features (e.g., fissures, lava flows and the connected deformation processes. The ability to obtain accurate quantitative data of definite accuracy in short time spans makes digital photogrammetry a suitable method for controlling the evolution of rapidly changing large-area volcanic phenomena. The systematic acquisition of airborne photogrammetric datasets can be adopted for implementing a more effective procedure aimed at long-term volcano monitoring and hazard assessment. In addition, during the volcanic crisis, the frequent acquisition of oblique digital images from helicopter allows for quasi-real-time monitoring to support mitigation actions by civil protection. These images are commonly used to update existing maps through a photo-interpretation approach that provide data of unknown accuracy. This work presents a scientific tool (Orthoview that implements a straightforward photogrammetric approach to generate digital orthophotos from single-view oblique images provided that at least four Ground Control Points (GCP and current Digital Elevation Models (DEM are available. The influence of the view geometry, of sparse and not-signalized GCP and DEM inaccuracies is analyzed for evaluating the performance of the developed tool in comparison with other remote sensing techniques. Results obtained with datasets from Etna and Stromboli volcanoes demonstrate that 2D features measured on the produced orthophotos can reach sub-meter-level accuracy.

  18. Cross domain self-monitoring in anosognosia for memory loss in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Silvia; Colvin, Leigh E; Vuorre, Matti; Cocchini, Gianna; Metcalfe, Janet; Huey, Edward D; Cosentino, Stephanie

    2018-04-01

    Anosognosia for memory loss is a common feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent theories have proposed that anosognosia, a disruption in awareness at a global level, may reflect specific deficits in self-monitoring, or local awareness. Though anosognosia for memory loss has been shown to relate to memory self-monitoring, it is not clear if it relates to self-monitoring deficits in other domains (i.e., motor). The current study examined this question by analyzing the relationship between anosognosia for memory loss, memory monitoring, and motor monitoring in 35 individuals with mild to moderate AD. Anosognosia was assessed via clinical interview before participants completed a metamemory task to measure memory monitoring, and a computerized agency task to measure motor monitoring. Cognitive and psychological measures included memory, executive functions, and mood. Memory monitoring was associated with motor monitoring; however, anosognosia was associated only with memory monitoring, and not motor monitoring. Cognition and mood related differently to each measure of self-awareness. Results are interpreted within a hierarchical model of awareness in which local self-monitoring processes are associated across domain, but appear to only contribute to a global level awareness in a domain-specific fashion. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Optimizing Treatment with TNF Inhibitors in Inflammatory Bowel Disease by Monitoring Drug Levels and Antidrug Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenholdt, Casper; Bendtzen, Klaus; Brynskov, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    costs. The objective is to review optimization of anti-TNF therapy by use of personalized treatment strategies based on circulating drug levels and antidrug antibodies (Abs), i.e. therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Furthermore, to outline TDM-related pitfalls and their prevention. METHODS: Literature...... inflammatory phenotype influencing the pharmacodynamic (PD) responses to TNF inhibitors also affect treatment outcomes. As an alternative to handling anti-TNF-treated patients by empiric strategies, TDM identifies underlying PK and PD-related reasons for treatment failure and aids decision making to secure...... of chronology between changes in PK versus symptomatic and objective disease activity manifestations. Biases can be accommodated by knowledgeable interpretation of results obtained by validated assays with clinically established thresholds, and by repeated assessments over time using complimentary techniques...

  20. Neuroelectronics and modeling of electrical signals for monitoring and control of Parkinson's disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chintakuntla, Ritesh R.; Abraham, Jose K.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2009-03-01

    The brain and the human nervous system are perhaps the most researched but least understood components of the human body. This is so because of the complex nature of its working and the high density of functions. The monitoring of neural signals could help one better understand the working of the brain and newer recording and monitoring methods have been developed ever since it was discovered that the brain communicates internally by means of electrical pulses. Neuroelectronics is the field which deals with the interface between electronics or semiconductors to living neurons. This includes monitoring of electrical activity from the brain as well as the development of feedback devices for stimulation of parts of the brain for treatment of disorders. In this paper these electrical signals are modeled through a nano/microelectrode arrays based on the electronic equivalent model using Cadence PSD 15.0. The results were compared with those previously published models such as Kupfmuller and Jenik's model, McGrogan's Neuron Model which are based on the Hodgkin and Huxley model. We have developed and equivalent circuit model using discrete passive components to simulate the electrical activity of the neurons. The simulated circuit can be easily be modified by adding some more ionic channels and the results can be used to predict necessary external stimulus needed for stimulation of neurons affected by the Parkinson's disease (PD). Implementing such a model in PD patients could predict the necessary voltages required for the electrical stimulation of the sub-thalamus region for the control tremor motion.

  1. EULAR Sjögren's syndrome disease activity index (ESSDAI)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Seror, Raphaèle; Bowman, Simon J; Brito-Zeron, Pilar

    2015-01-01

    The EULAR Sjögren's syndrome (SS) disease activity index (ESSDAI) is a systemic disease activity index that was designed to measure disease activity in patients with primary SS. With the growing use of the ESSDAI, some domains appear to be more challenging to rate than others. The ESSDAI is now...

  2. Available data sources for monitoring non-communicable diseases and their risk factors in South Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandai, M.; Aagaard-Hansen, Jens; Day, C.

    2017-01-01

    Background. Health information systems for monitoring chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs) in South Africa (SA) are relatively less advanced than those for infectious diseases (particularly tuberculosis and HIV) and for maternal and child health. NCDs are now the largest cause of premature mo...

  3. Active sensors for health monitoring of aging aerospace structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giurgiutiu, Victor; Redmond, James M.; Roach, Dennis P.; Rackow, Kirk

    2000-06-01

    A project to develop non-intrusive active sensors that can be applied on existing aging aerospace structures for monitoring the onset and progress of structural damage (fatigue cracks and corrosion) is presented. The state of the art in active sensors structural health monitoring and damage detection is reviewed. Methods based on (a) elastic wave propagation and (b) electro-mechanical (E/M) impedance technique are cited and briefly discussed. The instrumentation of these specimens with piezoelectric active sensors is illustrated. The main detection strategies (E/M impedance for local area detection and wave propagation for wide area interrogation) are discussed. The signal processing and damage interpretation algorithms are tuned to the specific structural interrogation method used. In the high frequency E/M impedance approach, pattern recognition methods are used to compare impedance signatures taken at various time intervals and to identify damage presence and progression from the change in these signatures. In the wave propagation approach, the acousto- ultrasonic methods identifying additional reflection generated from the damage site and changes in transmission velocity and phase are used. Both approaches benefit from the use of artificial intelligence neural networks algorithms that can extract damage features based on a learning process. Design and fabrication of a set of structural specimens representative of aging aerospace structures is presented. Three built-up specimens, (pristine, with cracks, and with corrosion damage) are used. The specimen instrumentation with active sensors fabricated at the University of South Carolina is illustrated. Preliminary results obtained with the E/M impedance method on pristine and cracked specimens are presented.

  4. Differential actigraphy for monitoring asymmetry in upper limb motor activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabuffetti, M; Meriggi, P; Pagliari, C; Bartolomeo, P; Ferrarin, M

    2016-09-21

    Most applications of accelerometry-based actigraphy require a single sensor, properly located onto the body, to estimate, for example, the level of activity or the energy expenditure. Some approaches adopt a multi-sensor setup to improve those analyses or to classify different types of activity. The specific case of two symmetrically placed actigraphs allowing, by some kind of differential analysis, for the assessment of asymmetric motor behaviors, has been considered in relatively few studies. This article presents a novel method for differential actigraphy, which requires the synchronized measurements of two triaxial accelerometers (programmable eZ430-Chronos, Texas Instruments, USA) placed symmetrically on both wrists. The method involved the definition of a robust epoch-related activity index and its implementation on-board the adopted programmable platform. Finally, the activity recordings from both sensors allowed us to define a novel asymmetry index AR 24 h ranging from  -100% (only the left arm moves) to  +100% (only the right arm moves) with null value marking a perfect symmetrical behavior. The accuracy of the AR 24 h index was 1.3%. Round-the-clock monitoring on 31 healthy participants (20-79 years old, 10 left handed) provided for the AR 24 h reference data (range  -5% to 21%) and a fairly good correlation to the clinical handedness index (r  =  0.66, p  <  0.001). A subset of 20 participants repeated the monitoring one week apart evidencing an excellent test-retest reliability (r  =  0.70, p  <  0.001). Such figures support future applications of the methodology for the study of pathologies involving motor asymmetries, such as in patients with motor hemisyndromes and, in general, for those subjects for whom a quantification of the asymmetry in daily motor performances is required to complement laboratory tests.

  5. Devices for Self-Monitoring Sedentary Time or Physical Activity: A Scoping Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, James P; Loveday, Adam; Pearson, Natalie; Edwardson, Charlotte; Yates, Thomas; Biddle, Stuart J H; Esliger, Dale W

    2016-05-04

    It is well documented that meeting the guideline levels (150 minutes per week) of moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (PA) is protective against chronic disease. Conversely, emerging evidence indicates the deleterious effects of prolonged sitting. Therefore, there is a need to change both behaviors. Self-monitoring of behavior is one of the most robust behavior-change techniques available. The growing number of technologies in the consumer electronics sector provides a unique opportunity for individuals to self-monitor their behavior. The aim of this study is to review the characteristics and measurement properties of currently available self-monitoring devices for sedentary time and/or PA. To identify technologies, four scientific databases were systematically searched using key terms related to behavior, measurement, and population. Articles published through October 2015 were identified. To identify technologies from the consumer electronic sector, systematic searches of three Internet search engines were also performed through to October 1, 2015. The initial database searches identified 46 devices and the Internet search engines identified 100 devices yielding a total of 146 technologies. Of these, 64 were further removed because they were currently unavailable for purchase or there was no evidence that they were designed for, had been used in, or could readily be modified for self-monitoring purposes. The remaining 82 technologies were included in this review (73 devices self-monitored PA, 9 devices self-monitored sedentary time). Of the 82 devices included, this review identified no published articles in which these devices were used for the purpose of self-monitoring PA and/or sedentary behavior; however, a number of technologies were found via Internet searches that matched the criteria for self-monitoring and provided immediate feedback on PA (ActiGraph Link, Microsoft Band, and Garmin Vivofit) and sedentary time (activPAL VT, the Lumo Back, and Darma

  6. MCID/Low Disease Activity State Workshop: low disease activity state in rheumatoid arthritis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, G.A.; Boers, M.; Shea, B.; Anderson, J.; Felson, D.T.; Johnson, K.; Kirwan, J.; Lassere, M.N.; Robinson, V.; Simon, L.S.; Strand, V.; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Tugwell, P.S.

    2003-01-01

    The MCID (minimal clinically important difference) module of OMERACT 5 developed a research agenda that led to the conclusion that a state of low disease activity for rheumatoid arthritis (RA) would need to be defined. To develop such a definition the various concepts and terminologies, the process

  7. Monitoring of the 14C activity in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Svingor, E.; Molnar, M.; Futo, I.; Rinyu, L.

    2006-01-01

    Complete text of publication follows. The distribution of atmospheric radiocarbon has been extensively investigated both in the Northern and Southern Hemisphere as well as in the Tropics for a number of decades. Systematic global observations of 14 CO 2 in the troposphere were made during and after atmospheric nuclear weapon tests in the 1950s and 1960s by several laboratories. Nowadays the monitoring of 14 C in regions adjacent to nuclear power plants (NPP) or sites of land-filled radioactive wastes has growing importance in determining the frequency and activity of anthropogenic 14 C released to the environment. On the other hand, the depletion of 14 C in the atmosphere gives information about the regional fossil fuel CO 2 contributions (Figure 1., Prague-Bulovka). The 14 C activity of the atmosphere has been monitored in the vicinity of Paks NPP by sampling environmental air monthly since 1994. Four differential sampling units collect air samples less than 2 km away from the 100- m-high stacks of Paks NPP (A-type stations), and for reference a sampler is operated at a station (B24) ca. 30 km away from Paks NPP. The highest 14 C values were measured at the site located less than 1km away from Paks NPP. The influence of the 14 C discharge in the environment decreases rapidly with the distance from the source and under normal operating conditions the effect of Paks NPP is negligible at a distance of 2.5km. In Figure 1. we have compared our data for Paks NPP measured during the time span of 2000 - 2005 with data from different European monitoring stations. (The 14 C activities are given in Δ values: Δ 14 C(% (A sample /A standard -1) x 1000.) In 2000-2001 the excess 14 C at Paks NPP compared to the B24 was 5-10 (per mille) but its Δ value didn't exceed the tropospheric background (1). With the growing traffic the inactive CO 2 emission (Suess effect) exceeded the influence of the NPP (2). After a cleaning tank incident at unit 2 of Paks NPP in April 2003 a 5

  8. Evaluation of a novel canine activity monitor for at-home physical activity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yashari, Jonathan M; Duncan, Colleen G; Duerr, Felix M

    2015-07-04

    Accelerometers are motion-sensing devices that have been used to assess physical activity in dogs. However, the lack of a user-friendly, inexpensive accelerometer has hindered the widespread use of this objective outcome measure in veterinary research. Recently, a smartphone-based, affordable activity monitor (Whistle) has become available for measurement of at-home physical activity in dogs. The aim of this research was to evaluate this novel accelerometer. Eleven large breed, privately owned dogs wore a collar fitted with both the Whistle device and a previously validated accelerometer-based activity monitor (Actical) for a 24-h time period. Owners were asked to have their dogs resume normal daily activities. Total activity time obtained from the Whistle device in minutes was compared to the total activity count from the Actical device. Activity intensity from the Whistle device was calculated manually from screenshots of the activity bars displayed in the smartphone-application and compared to the activity count recorded by the Actical in the same 3-min time period. A total of 3740 time points were compared. There was a strong correlation between activity intensity of both devices for individual time points (Pearson's correlation coefficient 0.81, p battery life, the need for manual derivation of activity intensity data and data transfer, and the requirement of Wi-Fi and Bluetooth availability for data transmission.

  9. Activity monitor intervention to promote physical activity of physicians-in-training: randomized controlled trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne N Thorndike

    Full Text Available Physicians are expected to serve as role models for healthy lifestyles, but long work hours reduce time for healthy behaviors. A hospital-based physical activity intervention could improve physician health and increase counseling about exercise.We conducted a two-phase intervention among 104 medical residents at a large hospital in Boston, Massachusetts. Phase 1 was a 6-week randomized controlled trial comparing daily steps of residents assigned to an activity monitor displaying feedback about steps and energy consumed (intervention or to a blinded monitor (control. Phase 2 immediately followed and was a 6-week non-randomized team steps competition in which all participants wore monitors with feedback. Phase 1 outcomes were: 1 median steps/day and 2 proportion of days activity monitor worn. The Phase 2 outcome was mean steps/day on days monitor worn (≥500 steps/day. Physiologic measurements were collected at baseline and study end. Median steps/day were compared using Wilcoxon rank-sum tests. Mean steps were compared using repeated measures regression analyses.In Phase 1, intervention and control groups had similar activity (6369 vs. 6063 steps/day, p = 0.16 and compliance with wearing the monitor (77% vs. 77% of days, p = 0.73. In Phase 2 (team competition, residents recorded more steps/day than during Phase 1 (CONTROL: 7,971 vs. 7,567, p = 0.002;7,832 vs. 7,739, p = 0.13. Mean compliance with wearing the activity monitor decreased for both groups during Phase 2 compared to Phase 1 (60% vs. 77%, p<0.001. Mean systolic blood pressure decreased (p = 0.004 and HDL cholesterol increased (p<0.001 among all participants at end of study compared to baseline.Although the activity monitor intervention did not have a major impact on activity or health, the high participation rates of busy residents and modest changes in steps, blood pressure, and HDL suggest that more intensive hospital-based wellness programs have potential for

  10. Passive and Active Monitoring on a High Performance Research Network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matthews, Warren

    2001-01-01

    The bold network challenges described in ''Internet End-to-end Performance Monitoring for the High Energy and Nuclear Physics Community'' presented at PAM 2000 have been tackled by the intrepid administrators and engineers providing the network services. After less than a year, the BaBar collaboration has collected almost 100 million particle collision events in a database approaching 165TB (Tera=10 12 ). Around 20TB has been exported via the Internet to the BaBar regional center at IN2P3 in Lyon, France, for processing and around 40 TB of simulated events have been imported to SLAC from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An unforseen challenge has arisen due to recent events and highlighted security concerns at DoE funded labs. New rules and regulations suggest it is only a matter of time before many active performance measurements may not be possible between many sites. Yet, at the same time, the importance of understanding every aspect of the network and eradicating packet loss for high throughput data transfers has become apparent. Work at SLAC to employ passive monitoring using netflow and OC3MON is underway and techniques to supplement and possibly replace the active measurements are being considered. This paper will detail the special needs and traffic characterization of a remarkable research project, and how the networking hurdles have been resolved (or not) to achieve the required high data throughput. Results from active and passive measurements will be compared, and methods for achieving high throughput and the effect on the network will be assessed along with tools that directly measure throughput and applications used to actually transfer data

  11. Passive and Active Monitoring on a High Performance Research Network.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Warren

    2001-05-01

    The bold network challenges described in ''Internet End-to-end Performance Monitoring for the High Energy and Nuclear Physics Community'' presented at PAM 2000 have been tackled by the intrepid administrators and engineers providing the network services. After less than a year, the BaBar collaboration has collected almost 100 million particle collision events in a database approaching 165TB (Tera=10{sup 12}). Around 20TB has been exported via the Internet to the BaBar regional center at IN2P3 in Lyon, France, for processing and around 40 TB of simulated events have been imported to SLAC from Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). An unforseen challenge has arisen due to recent events and highlighted security concerns at DoE funded labs. New rules and regulations suggest it is only a matter of time before many active performance measurements may not be possible between many sites. Yet, at the same time, the importance of understanding every aspect of the network and eradicating packet loss for high throughput data transfers has become apparent. Work at SLAC to employ passive monitoring using netflow and OC3MON is underway and techniques to supplement and possibly replace the active measurements are being considered. This paper will detail the special needs and traffic characterization of a remarkable research project, and how the networking hurdles have been resolved (or not!) to achieve the required high data throughput. Results from active and passive measurements will be compared, and methods for achieving high throughput and the effect on the network will be assessed along with tools that directly measure throughput and applications used to actually transfer data.

  12. Disease activity in pregnant women with Crohn's disease and birth outcomes: a regional Danish cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgård, Bente; Hundborg, Heidi H; Jacobsen, Bent Ascanius

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: CD is associated with increased risk of adverse birth outcomes, but existing studies have not assessed the impact of disease activity during pregnancy. We examined the impact of disease activity on birth outcomes: LBW, preterm birth, LBW at term, and CAs. METHODS: All births by CD wom...... disease activity). Further research is needed to assess the critical impact of disease activity in larger cohorts of CD women....

  13. Drought monitoring with soil moisture active passive (SMAP) measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Ashok; Vu, Tue; Veettil, Anoop Valiya; Entekhabi, Dara

    2017-09-01

    Recent launch of space-borne systems to estimate surface soil moisture may expand the capability to map soil moisture deficit and drought with global coverage. In this study, we use Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) soil moisture geophysical retrieval products from passive L-band radiometer to evaluate its applicability to forming agricultural drought indices. Agricultural drought is quantified using the Soil Water Deficit Index (SWDI) based on SMAP and soil properties (field capacity and available water content) information. The soil properties are computed using pedo-transfer function with soil characteristics derived from Harmonized World Soil Database. The SMAP soil moisture product needs to be rescaled to be compatible with the soil parameters derived from the in situ stations. In most locations, the rescaled SMAP information captured the dynamics of in situ soil moisture well and shows the expected lag between accumulations of precipitation and delayed increased in surface soil moisture. However, the SMAP soil moisture itself does not reveal the drought information. Therefore, the SMAP based SWDI (SMAP_SWDI) was computed to improve agriculture drought monitoring by using the latest soil moisture retrieval satellite technology. The formulation of SWDI does not depend on longer data and it will overcome the limited (short) length of SMAP data for agricultural drought studies. The SMAP_SWDI is further compared with in situ Atmospheric Water Deficit (AWD) Index. The comparison shows close agreement between SMAP_SWDI and AWD in drought monitoring over Contiguous United States (CONUS), especially in terms of drought characteristics. The SMAP_SWDI was used to construct drought maps for CONUS and compared with well-known drought indices, such as, AWD, Palmer Z-Index, sc-PDSI and SPEI. Overall the SMAP_SWDI is an effective agricultural drought indicator and it provides continuity and introduces new spatial mapping capability for drought monitoring. As an

  14. Putaminal serotonergic innervation: monitoring dyskinesia risk in Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jee-Young; Seo, Seongho; Lee, Jae Sung; Kim, Han-Joon; Kim, Yu Kyeong; Jeon, Beom S

    2015-09-08

    To explore serotonergic innervation in the basal ganglia in relation to levodopa-induced dyskinesia in patients with Parkinson disease (PD). A total of 30 patients with PD without dementia or depression were divided into 3 matched groups (dyskinetic, nondyskinetic, and drug-naive) for this study. We acquired 2 PET scans and 3T MRI for each patient using [(11)C]-3-amino-4-(2-dimethylaminomethylphenylsulfanyl)-benzonitrile ((11)C-DASB) and N-(3-[(18)F]fluoropropyl)-2-carbomethoxy-3-(4-iodophenyl) nortropane ((18)F-FP-CIT). Then we analyzed binding potentials of the 2 radiotracers at basal ganglia structures and correlations with clinical variables. We observed no difference in (18)F-FP-CIT binding between dyskinetic and nondyskinetic patients, whereas there were differences in (11)C-DASB binding for the caudate and putamen. Binding potential ratios ((11)C-DASB/(18)F-FP-CIT) at the putamen, which indicate serotoninergic fiber innervation relative to dopaminergic fiber availability, were highest in the dyskinetic group, followed by the nondyskinetic and drug-naive PD groups. (11)C-DASB/(18)F-FP-CIT ratios at the putamen and pallidum correlated positively with Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) total scores and duration of PD, and pallidal binding ratio also correlated with the UPDRS motor scores. Ratios were not dependent on dopaminergic medication dosages for any of the regions studied. Relative serotonergic innervation of the putamen and pallidum increased with clinical PD progression and was highest in patients with established dyskinesia. The serotonin/dopamine transporter ratio might be a potential marker of disease progression and an indicator of risk for levodopa-induced dyskinesia in PD. A prospective evaluation is warranted in the future. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  15. Monitoring of anticoagulant therapy in heart disease: considerations for the current assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boroumand, Mohammadali; Goodarzynejad, Hamidreza

    2010-01-01

    Clinicians should be aware of new developments to familiarize themselves with pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics of new anticoagulant agents to appropriately and safely use them. For the moment, cardiologists and other clinicians also require to master currently available drugs, realizing the mechanism of action, side effects, and laboratory monitoring to measure their anticoagulant effects. Warfarin and heparin have narrow therapeutic window with high inter- and intra-patient variability, thereby the use of either drug needs careful laboratory monitoring and dose adjustment to ensure proper antithrombotic protection while minimizing the bleeding risk. The prothrombin time (PT) and the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) are laboratory tests commonly used to monitor warfarin and heparin, respectively. These two tests depend highly on the combination of reagent and instrument utilized. Results for a single specimen tested in different laboratories are variable; this is mostly attributable to the specific reagents and to a much lesser degree to the instrument used. The PT stands alone as the single coagulation test that has undergone the most extensive attempt at assay standardization. The international normalized ratio (INR) was introduced to "normalize" all PT reagents to a World Health Organization (WHO) reference thromboplastin preparation standard, such that a PT measured anywhere in the world would result in an INR value similar to that which would have been achieved had the WHO reference thromboplastin been utilized. However, INRs are reproducible between laboratories for only those patients who are stably anticoagulated with vitamin K antagonists (VKAs) (i.e., at least 6 weeks of VKA therapy), and are not reliable or reproducible between laboratories for patients for whom VKA therapy has recently been started or any other clinical conditions associated with a prolonged PT such as liver disease, disseminated intravascular coagulation

  16. Increasing trend of wearables and multimodal interface for human activity monitoring: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Preeti; Mathew, Lini; Syal, Poonam

    2017-04-15

    Activity recognition technology is one of the most important technologies for life-logging and for the care of elderly persons. Elderly people prefer to live in their own houses, within their own locality. If, they are capable to do so, several benefits can follow in terms of society and economy. However, living alone may have high risks. Wearable sensors have been developed to overcome these risks and these sensors are supposed to be ready for medical uses. It can help in monitoring the wellness of elderly persons living alone by unobtrusively monitoring their daily activities. The study aims to review the increasing trends of wearable devices and need of multimodal recognition for continuous or discontinuous monitoring of human activity, biological signals such as Electroencephalogram (EEG), Electrooculogram (EOG), Electromyogram (EMG), Electrocardiogram (ECG) and parameters along with other symptoms. This can provide necessary assistance in times of ominous need, which is crucial for the advancement of disease-diagnosis and treatment. Shared control architecture with multimodal interface can be used for application in more complex environment where more number of commands is to be used to control with better results in terms of controlling. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Nanosensors for a Monitoring System in Intelligent and Active Packaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Fuertes

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical wireless nanosensor network (WNSN system that gives information about the food packaging condition is proposed. The protection effectiveness is estimated by measuring many factors, such as the existence of microorganisms, bacteria, gases, and contaminants. This study is focused on the detection of an antimicrobial agent (AA attached on a polymer forming an active integrated package. All monitoring technologies for food conservation are analyzed. Nanobiosensor nanomachine (NM, which converts biological or chemical signals into electrical signals, is used. A mathematical model, which describes the constituent’s emigration from the package to food, is programmed in MatLab software. The results show three nanobiosensors forming a WNSN. The nanobiosensors are able to carry out the average concentration for different spots in the package. This monitoring system shows reading percentages in three degrees and different colors: excellent (green, good (cyan, and lacking (red. To confirm the utility of the model, different simulations are performed. Using the WNSNs, results of AA existing in food package (FP through time were successfully obtained.

  18. Anoxic Activated Sludge Monitoring with Combined Nitrate and Titrimetric Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, B.; Gernaey, Krist; Vanrolleghem, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    was with the carbon source in excess, since excess nitrate provoked nitrite build-up thereby complicating the data interpretation. A conceptual model could quantitatively describe the experimental observations and thus link the experimentally measured proton production with the consumption of electron acceptor......An experimental procedure for anoxic activated sludge monitoring with combined nitrate and titrimetric measurements is proposed and evaluated successfully with two known carbon sources, (-)acetate and dextrose. For nitrate measurements an ion-selective nitrate electrode is applied to allow...... for frequent measurements, and thereby the possibility for detailed determination of the denitrification biokinetics. An internal nitrate electrode calibration is implemented in the experiments to avoid the often-encountered electrode drift problem. It was observed that the best experimental design...

  19. Bioimpedance system for monitoring muscle and cardiovascular activity in the stump of lower-limb amputees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hornero, G; Díaz, D; Casas, O

    2013-01-01

    A bioimpedance system for the continuous measurement of non-invasive physiological parameters in lower-limb amputees is presented. The aim of the system is to monitor as many physiological parameters as possible from a single bioimpedance electrode configuration. In this way, a simple, low-cost and low-size autonomous system is developed that is able to continuously monitor the amputee in different environments (home, work, etc). The system measures both electrical impedance myography and electrical impedance plethysmography in the stump with electrodes placed in the inside face of a silicone interface. Such a system allows for the monitoring of a patient's muscle activity, and heart and breath rate, thus enabling the study and continuous monitoring of prosthesis adaptation and improvement of patient's gait to reduce physiological stress. Additionally, it can prevent cardiovascular problems due to the effort involved in the use of prostheses, which can decrease the life expectancy of amputees with previous vascular diseases. Experimental results obtained from different amputees' test validate the purpose of the system. (paper)

  20. A sonographic lesion index for Crohn's disease helps monitor changes in transmural bowel damage during therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Francesca; Stasi, Elisa; Bevivino, Gerolamo; Scarozza, Patrizio; Biancone, Livia; Zuzzi, Sara; Rossi, Carla; Pallone, Francesco; Calabrese, Emma

    2014-12-01

    Therapeutic antibodies against tumor necrosis factor α (anti-TNF) are effective in patients with Crohn's disease (CD). Mucosal healing is a surrogate marker of efficacy, but little is known about the effects of anti-TNF agents on structural damage in the intestine. Small-intestine contrast ultrasonography (SICUS) is a valuable tool for assessing CD lesions. A new sonographic quantitative index (the sonographic lesion index for CD [SLIC]) was developed to quantify changes in CD lesions detected by SICUS. We explored whether the SLIC can be used to monitor transmural bowel damage in CD patients during anti-TNF therapy. We performed a prospective study of 29 patients with ileal or ileocolonic CD treated with anti-TNF agents; patients underwent SICUS before and after scheduled induction and maintenance therapy. To determine whether changes that can be detected by SICUS occur independently of anti-TNF therapy, 7 patients with ileal CD treated with mesalamine were enrolled as controls. A clinical response was defined as steroid-free remission, with CD activity index scores less than 150. We observed significant improvements in SLIC scores and subscores after induction and maintenance therapy with anti-TNFs, compared with before therapy. SLIC scores and subscores and index classes were improved significantly in patients with vs without clinical responses. Controls had no improvements in terms of CD activity index or SLIC scores, or index classes. Sonographic assessment using the quantitative index SLIC can be used to monitor changes in transmural bowel damage during anti-TNF therapy for CD. Copyright © 2014 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Methods to Monitor and Manipulate TFEB Activity During Autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medina, D L; Settembre, C; Ballabio, A

    2017-01-01

    Macroautophagy is a catabolic process deputed to the turnover of intracellular components. Recent studies have revealed that transcriptional regulation is a major mechanism controlling autophagy. Currently, more than 20 transcription factors have been shown to modulate cellular autophagy levels. Among them, the transcription factor EB (TFEB) appears to have the broadest proautophagy role, given its capacity to control the biogenesis of lysosomes and autophagosomes, the two main organelles required for the autophagy pathway. TFEB has attracted major attention owing to its ability to enhance cellular clearance of pathogenic substrates in a variety of animal models of disease, such as lysosomal storage disorders, Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, α1-antitrypsin, obesity as well as others, suggesting that the TFEB pathway represents an extraordinary possibility for future development of innovative therapies. Importantly, the subcellular localization and activity of TFEB are regulated by its phosphorylation status, suggesting that TFEB activity can be pharmacologically targeted. Given the growing list of common and rare diseases in which manipulation of autophagy may be beneficial, in this chapter we describe a set of validated protocols developed to modulate and analyze TFEB-mediated enhancement of autophagy both in vitro and in vivo conditions. © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Remote Monitoring of Hypertension Diseases in Pregnancy: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanssens, Dorien; Vandenberk, Thijs; Smeets, Christophe Jp; De Cannière, Hélène; Molenberghs, Geert; Van Moerbeke, Anne; van den Hoogen, Anne; Robijns, Tiziana; Vonck, Sharona; Staelens, Anneleen; Storms, Valerie; Thijs, Inge M; Grieten, Lars; Gyselaers, Wilfried

    2017-03-09

    Although remote monitoring (RM) has proven its added value in various health care domains, little is known about the remote follow-up of pregnant women diagnosed with a gestational hypertensive disorders (GHD). The aim of this study was to evaluate the added value of a remote follow-up program for pregnant women diagnosed with GHD. A 1-year retrospective study was performed in the outpatient clinic of a 2nd level prenatal center where pregnant women with GHD received RM or conventional care (CC). Primary study endpoints include number of prenatal visits and admissions to the prenatal observation ward. Secondary outcomes include gestational outcome, mode of delivery, neonatal outcome, and admission to neonatal intensive care (NIC). Differences in continuous and categorical variables in maternal demographics and characteristics were tested using Unpaired Student's two sampled t test or Mann-Whitney U test and the chi-square test. Both a univariate and multivariate analysis were performed for analyzing prenatal follow-up and gestational outcomes. All statistical analyses were done at nominal level, Cronbach alpha=.05. Of the 166 patients diagnosed with GHD, 53 received RM and 113 CC. After excluding 5 patients in the RM group and 15 in the CC group because of the missing data, 48 patients in RM group and 98 in CC group were taken into final analysis. The RM group had more women diagnosed with gestational hypertension, but less with preeclampsia when compared with CC (81.25% vs 42.86% and 14.58% vs 43.87%). Compared with CC, univariate analysis in RM showed less induction, more spontaneous labors, and less maternal and neonatal hospitalizations (48.98% vs 25.00%; 31.63% vs 60.42%; 74.49% vs 56.25%; and 27.55% vs 10.42%). This was also true in multivariate analysis, except for hospitalizations. An RM follow-up of women with GHD is a promising tool in the prenatal care. It opens the perspectives to reverse the current evolution of antenatal interventions leading to more

  3. A prospective study of monitoring practices for metabolic disease in antipsychotic-treated community psychiatric patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watkinson Helen MO

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patients with severe mental illness are at increased risk for metabolic and cardiovascular disease. A number of recent guidelines and consensus statements recommend stringent monitoring of metabolic function in individuals receiving antipsychotic drugs. Methods We conducted a prospective cohort study of 106 community-treated psychiatric patients from across the diagnostic spectrum from the Northeast of England to investigate changes in metabolic status and monitoring practices for metabolic and cardiovascular disease. We undertook detailed anthropometric and metabolic assessment at baseline and follow-up, and examined clinical notes and hospital laboratory records to ascertain monitoring practices. Results A high prevalence of undiagnosed and untreated metabolic disease was present at baseline assessment. Mean follow-up time was 599.3 (SD ± 235.4 days. Body mass index (p 50% of subjects had neither blood glucose nor lipids monitored during the follow-up period. Conclusion This cohort has a high prevalence of metabolic disease and heightened cardiovascular risk. Despite the publication of a number of recommendations regarding physical health screening in this population, monitoring rates are poor, and physical health worsened during the follow-up period.

  4. Active and Passive Smoking, Chronic Disease and Poverty in China ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Active and Passive Smoking, Chronic Disease and Poverty in China. The globalization ... The impending burden of tobacco-related chronic disease will be significant in a population of 1.3 billion. ... Center for Health Statistics and Information.

  5. Actively cooled plasma facing components qualification, commissioning and health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escourbiac, F.; Durocher, A.; Grosman, A.; Courtois, X.; Farjon, J.-L.; Schlosser, J.; Merola, M.; Tivey, R.

    2006-01-01

    In modern steady state magnetic fusion devices, actively cooled plasma facing components (PFC) have to handle heat fluxes in the range of 10-20 MW/m 2 . This generates a number of engineering constraints: the armour materials must be refractory and compatible with plasma wall interaction requirements (low sputtering and/or low atomic number); the heat sink must offer high thermal conductivity, high mechanical resistance and sufficient ductility; the component cooling system -which is generally based on the circulation of pressurized water in the PFC's heat sink - must offer high thermal heat transfer efficiency. Furthermore, the assembling of the refractory armour material onto the metallic heat sink causes generic difficulties strongly depending on thermo-mechanical properties of materials and design requirements. Life time of the PFC during plasma operation are linked to their manufacturing quality, in particular they are reduced by the possible presence of flaw assembling. The fabrication of PFC in an industrial frame including their qualification and their commissioning - which consists in checking the manufacturing quality during and at the end of manufacture - is a real challenge. From experience gained at Tore Supra on carbon fibre composite flat tiles technology components, it was assessed that a set of qualifications activities must be operated during R(and)D and manufacturing phases. Dedicated Non Destructive Technique (NDT) based on advanced active infrared thermography was developed for this purpose, afterwards, correlations between NDT, high heat flux testing and thermomechanical modelling were performed to analyse damage detection and propagation, and define an acceptance criteria valuable for industrial application. Health monitoring using lock-in technique was also recently operated in-situ of the Tore Supra tokamak for detection of possible defect propagation during operations, presence of acoustic precursor for critical heat flux detection induced

  6. Neutron-activation method of monitoring of the environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sattarov, G.S.; Muzafarov, A.M.; Komilov, J.M.; Kadirov, F.; Kist, A.A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Estimation of technogenic influences of the industrial enterprises on an environment, in particular, on ground and underground waters, was carried out by the fragmentary analysis of their element structure. In the report application of neutron-activation analysis (NAA) for monitoring an environment is considered. The total contents of elements was determined by NAA method with use of a reactor such as WWR-SM. Values of factors of correlation (K) are calculated with use of the computer, by special algorithm and reception of numerical values between 30 elements in the samples selected by a traditional technique from more than 600 points in area of activity GMZ-2. The developed technique has allowed to reveal elements indicators of technogenic (As, Ag, Sb, W, Au), mixed (Mo, Ba, Hg) and natural (Sc, Fe, Co, Ni, Rb, Cs, REE, Hf, Th, U) origins. Change of the total contents of elements in underground waters which were selected from observant chinks quarterly within three years is investigated. The technique of definition of forms of a presence of elements in underground and the sewage, based on electrodialysis division of ions with use nuclear (on a basis polyethyleneterephtalate film) filters with a diameter of pores of 0,16x0,2 micrometres is developed

  7. Active Learning Framework for Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, Xin

    2016-05-16

    Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring (NILM) is a set of techniques that estimate the electricity usage of individual appliances from power measurements taken at a limited number of locations in a building. One of the key challenges in NILM is having too much data without class labels yet being unable to label the data manually for cost or time constraints. This paper presents an active learning framework that helps existing NILM techniques to overcome this challenge. Active learning is an advanced machine learning method that interactively queries a user for the class label information. Unlike most existing NILM systems that heuristically request user inputs, the proposed method only needs minimally sufficient information from a user to build a compact and yet highly representative load signature library. Initial results indicate the proposed method can reduce the user inputs by up to 90% while still achieving similar disaggregation performance compared to a heuristic method. Thus, the proposed method can substantially reduce the burden on the user, improve the performance of a NILM system with limited user inputs, and overcome the key market barriers to the wide adoption of NILM technologies.

  8. Performance of a coincidence based blood activity monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moses, W.W.

    1989-12-01

    A new device has been constructed that measures the positron emitting radio-tracer concentration in arterial blood by extracting blood with a peristaltic pump, then measuring the activity concentration by detecting coincident pairs of 511 keV photons with a pair of heavy inorganic scintillators attached to photomultiplier tubes. The sensitivity of this device is experimentally determined to be 610 counts/second per μCi/ml, and has a paralyzing dead time of 1.2 μs, so is capable of measuring blood activity concentration as high as 1 mCi/ml. Its performance is compared to two other blood monitoring methods: discrete blood samples counted with a well counter and device that uses a plastic scintillator to directly detect positrons. The positron detection efficiency of this device for 18 F is greater than the plastic scintillation counter, and also eliminates the radioisotope dependent correction factors necessary to convert count rate to absolute concentration. Coincident photon detection also has the potential of reducing the background compared to direct positron detection, thereby increasing the minimum detectable isotope concentration. 10 refs., 6 figs

  9. Monitoring of activity of the persons and vehicles at the exit from the NPP Bohunice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dobis, L.; Kaizer, J.; Svitek, J.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper the technical description of the monitoring of activity of the persons and vehicles at the exit from the NPP Bohunice as well as the results of monitoring during last six months are described

  10. Overview of biomarkers for diagnosis and monitoring of celiac disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brusca, Ignazio

    2015-01-01

    Among the adverse reactions caused by wheat, celiac disease (CD) is the longest studied and best-known pathology. The more recently defined non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS) presents with symptoms which are often indistinguishable from CD. Diagnosis of CD is based on serologic, molecular, and bioptic testing. The IgA anti-transglutaminase (tTG) test is considered highly important, as it shows high sensitivity and specificity and its levels correlate to the degree of intestinal damage. Small bowel biopsy can be avoided in symptomatic patients with IgA anti-tTG levels above 10× the manufacturer's cut-off. Recently, tests of anti-deamidated peptides of gliadin (DGP) have replaced classic anti-native gliadin (AGA) tests. DGP assays have a considerably higher diagnostic accuracy than AGA assays, especially in the IgG class, and can replace anti-tTG tests in patients with selective IgA deficiency. The combination of IgG anti-DGP plus IgA anti-tTG assays show greater sensitivity than a single test, with very high specificity. EMA tests have great diagnostic accuracy but are not recommended by all the latest guidelines because they are observer dependent. Biopsy must still be considered the gold standard for CD diagnosis. HLA-DQ genotyping can be used to screen asymptomatic children and in cases of histology/serology disagreement. About half of NCGS patients are DQ2 positive and have IgG AGA. To diagnose NCGS, first CD and wheat allergy must be excluded; then the wheat dependence of symptoms must be verified by a gluten-free diet and subsequent gluten challenge. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cadence Feedback With ECE PEDO to Monitor Physical Activity Intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardic, Fusun; Göcer, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the monitoring capabilities of the equipment for clever exercise pedometer (ECE PEDO) that provides audible feedback when the person exceeds the upper and lower limits of the target step numbers per minute and to compare step counts with Yamax SW-200 (YX200) as the criterion pedometer. A total of 30 adult volunteers (15 males and 15 females) were classified as normal weight (n = 10), overweight (n = 10), and obese (n = 10). After the submaximal exercise test on a treadmill, the moderate intensity for walking was determined by using YX200 pedometer and then the number of steps taken in a minute was measured. Lower and upper limits of steps per minute (cadence) were recorded in ECE PEDO providing audible feedback when the person's walking speed gets out of the limits. Volunteers walked for 30 minutes in the individual step count range by attaching the ECE PEDO and YX200 pedometer on both sides of the waist belt in the same session. Step counts of the volunteers were recorded. Wilcoxon, Spearman correlation, and Bland–Altman analyses were performed to show the relationship and agreement between the results of 2 devices. Subjects took an average of 3511 ± 426 and 3493 ± 399 steps during 30 minutes with ECE PEDO and criterion pedometer, respectively. About 3500 steps taken by ECE PEDO reflected that this pedometer has capability of identifying steps per minute to meet moderate intensity of physical activity. There was a strong correlation between step counts of both devices (P PEDO and YX200 pedometer in the Bland–Altman analysis. Although both devices showed a strong similarity in counting steps, the ECE PEDO provides monitoring of intensity such that a person can walk in a specified time with a desired speed. PMID:26962822

  12. Established and emerging biological activity markers of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Madsen, S M

    2000-01-01

    Assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is done using clinical parameters and various biological disease markers. Ideally, a disease marker must: be able to identify individuals at risk of a given disorder......, be disease specific, mirror the disease activity and, finally, be easily applicable for routine clinical purposes. However, no such disease markers have yet been identified for IBD. In this article, classical disease markers including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, acute phase proteins (especially...... orosomucoid and CRP), leukocyte and platelet counts, albumin, neopterin, and beta2-microglobulin will be reviewed together with emerging disease markers such as antibodies of the ANCA/ASCA type, cytokines (e.g., IL-1, IL-2Ralpha, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, and TNF-alpha receptors) and with various adhesion...

  13. Established and emerging biological activity markers of inflammatory bowel disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, O H; Vainer, B; Madsen, S M

    2000-01-01

    orosomucoid and CRP), leukocyte and platelet counts, albumin, neopterin, and beta2-microglobulin will be reviewed together with emerging disease markers such as antibodies of the ANCA/ASCA type, cytokines (e.g., IL-1, IL-2Ralpha, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-alpha, and TNF-alpha receptors) and with various adhesion......Assessment of disease activity in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), i.e., ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn's disease (CD), is done using clinical parameters and various biological disease markers. Ideally, a disease marker must: be able to identify individuals at risk of a given disorder......, be disease specific, mirror the disease activity and, finally, be easily applicable for routine clinical purposes. However, no such disease markers have yet been identified for IBD. In this article, classical disease markers including erythrocyte sedimentation rate, acute phase proteins (especially...

  14. Maternal urogenital schistosomiasis; monitoring disease morbidity by simple reagent strips.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyetunde T Oyeyemi

    used for early detection of urogenital schistosomiasis in endemic areas especially in younger women. However because microhematuria is a condition that occurs during pregnancy and in several other diseases, it is necessary to compliment the diagnosis with other diagnostic tools such as microscopy and serology. Treatment with praziquantel is recommended for the women in their late trimesters after follow up test in order to avert associated adverse pregnancy outcomes.

  15. Management and monitoring recommendations for the use of eliglustat in adults with type 1 Gaucher disease in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belmatoug, Nadia; Di Rocco, Maja; Fraga, Cristina; Giraldo, Pilar; Hughes, Derralynn; Lukina, Elena; Maison-Blanche, Pierre; Merkel, Martin; Niederau, Claus; Plӧckinger, Ursula; Richter, Johan; Stulnig, Thomas M; Vom Dahl, Stephan; Cox, Timothy M

    2017-01-01

    In Gaucher disease, diminished activity of the lysosomal enzyme, acid β-glucosidase, leads to accumulation of glucosylceramides and related substrates, primarily in the spleen, liver, and bone marrow. Eliglustat is an oral substrate reduction therapy approved in the European Union and the United States as a first-line treatment for adults with type 1 Gaucher disease who have compatible CYP2D6 metabolism phenotypes. A European Advisory Council of experts in Gaucher disease describes the characteristics of eliglustat that are distinct from enzyme augmentation therapy (the standard of care) and miglustat (the other approved substrate reduction therapy) and recommends investigations and monitoring for patients on eliglustat therapy within the context of current recommendations for Gaucher disease management. Eliglustat is a selective, potent inhibitor of glucosylceramide synthase, the enzyme responsible for biosynthesis of glucosylceramides which accumulate in Gaucher disease. Extensive metabolism of eliglustat by CYP2D6, and, to a lesser extent, CYP3A of the cytochrome P450 pathway, necessitates careful consideration of the patient's CYP2D6 metaboliser status and use of concomitant medications which share metabolism by these pathways. Guidance on specific assessments and monitoring required for eliglustat therapy, including an algorithm to determine eligibility for eliglustat, are provided. As a first-line therapy for type 1 Gaucher disease, eliglustat offers eligible patients a daily oral therapy alternative to biweekly infusions of enzyme therapy. Physicians will need to carefully assess individual Gaucher patients to determine their appropriateness for eliglustat therapy. The therapeutic response to eliglustat and use of concomitant medications will require long-term monitoring. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Reliability and validity of the Mywellness Key physical activity monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sieverdes JC

    2013-01-01

    of physical activity.Keywords: physical activity, accelerometer, health monitor

  17. SME2EM: Smart mobile end-to-end monitoring architecture for life-long diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serhani, Mohamed Adel; Menshawy, Mohamed El; Benharref, Abdelghani

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring life-long diseases requires continuous measurements and recording of physical vital signs. Most of these diseases are manifested through unexpected and non-uniform occurrences and behaviors. It is impractical to keep patients in hospitals, health-care institutions, or even at home for long periods of time. Monitoring solutions based on smartphones combined with mobile sensors and wireless communication technologies are a potential candidate to support complete mobility-freedom, not only for patients, but also for physicians. However, existing monitoring architectures based on smartphones and modern communication technologies are not suitable to address some challenging issues, such as intensive and big data, resource constraints, data integration, and context awareness in an integrated framework. This manuscript provides a novel mobile-based end-to-end architecture for live monitoring and visualization of life-long diseases. The proposed architecture provides smartness features to cope with continuous monitoring, data explosion, dynamic adaptation, unlimited mobility, and constrained devices resources. The integration of the architecture׳s components provides information about diseases׳ recurrences as soon as they occur to expedite taking necessary actions, and thus prevent severe consequences. Our architecture system is formally model-checked to automatically verify its correctness against designers׳ desirable properties at design time. Its components are fully implemented as Web services with respect to the SOA architecture to be easy to deploy and integrate, and supported by Cloud infrastructure and services to allow high scalability, availability of processes and data being stored and exchanged. The architecture׳s applicability is evaluated through concrete experimental scenarios on monitoring and visualizing states of epileptic diseases. The obtained theoretical and experimental results are very promising and efficiently satisfy the proposed

  18. Smartphone-Based Patients' Activity Recognition by Using a Self-Learning Scheme for Medical Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Junqi; Zhou, Xi; Sun, Yunchuan; Ping, Gong; Zhao, Guoxing; Li, Zhuorong

    2016-06-01

    Smartphone based activity recognition has recently received remarkable attention in various applications of mobile health such as safety monitoring, fitness tracking, and disease prediction. To achieve more accurate and simplified medical monitoring, this paper proposes a self-learning scheme for patients' activity recognition, in which a patient only needs to carry an ordinary smartphone that contains common motion sensors. After the real-time data collection though this smartphone, we preprocess the data using coordinate system transformation to eliminate phone orientation influence. A set of robust and effective features are then extracted from the preprocessed data. Because a patient may inevitably perform various unpredictable activities that have no apriori knowledge in the training dataset, we propose a self-learning activity recognition scheme. The scheme determines whether there are apriori training samples and labeled categories in training pools that well match with unpredictable activity data. If not, it automatically assembles these unpredictable samples into different clusters and gives them new category labels. These clustered samples combined with the acquired new category labels are then merged into the training dataset to reinforce recognition ability of the self-learning model. In experiments, we evaluate our scheme using the data collected from two postoperative patient volunteers, including six labeled daily activities as the initial apriori categories in the training pool. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed self-learning scheme for activity recognition works very well for most cases. When there exist several types of unseen activities without any apriori information, the accuracy reaches above 80 % after the self-learning process converges.

  19. Tuning permissiveness of active safety monitors for autonomous systems

    OpenAIRE

    Masson , Lola; Guiochet , Jérémie; Waeselynck , Hélène; Cabrera , Kalou; Cassel , Sofia; Törngren , Martin

    2018-01-01

    International audience; Robots and autonomous systems have become a part of our everyday life, therefore guaranteeing their safety is crucial.Among the possible ways to do so, monitoring is widely used, but few methods exist to systematically generate safety rules to implement such monitors. Particularly, building safety monitors that do not constrain excessively the system's ability to perform its tasks is necessary as those systems operate with few human interventions.We propose in this pap...

  20. Active Monitoring of Travelers Arriving from Ebola-Affected Countries - New York City, October 2014-April 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millman, Alexander J; Chamany, Shadi; Guthartz, Seth; Thihalolipavan, Sayone; Porter, Michael; Schroeder, Andrew; Vora, Neil M; Varma, Jay K; Starr, David

    2016-01-29

    The Ebola virus disease (Ebola) outbreak in West Africa has claimed approximately 11,300 lives (1), and the magnitude and course of the epidemic prompted many nonaffected countries to prepare for Ebola cases imported from affected countries. In October 2014, CDC and the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) implemented enhanced entry risk assessment and management at five U.S. airports: John F. Kennedy (JFK) International Airport in New York City (NYC), O'Hare International Airport in Chicago, Newark Liberty International Airport in New Jersey, Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta, and Dulles International Airport in Virginia (2). Enhanced entry risk assessment began at JFK on October 11, 2014, and at the remaining airports on October 16 (3). On October 21, DHS exercised its authority to direct all travelers flying into the United States from an Ebola-affected country to arrive at one of the five participating airports. At the time, the Ebola-affected countries included Guinea, Liberia, Mali, and Sierra Leone. On October 27, CDC issued updated guidance for monitoring persons with potential Ebola virus exposure (4), including recommending daily monitoring of such persons to ascertain the presence of fever or symptoms for a period of 21 days (the maximum incubation period of Ebola virus) after the last potential exposure; this was termed "active monitoring." CDC also recommended "direct active monitoring" of persons with a higher risk for Ebola virus exposure, including health care workers who had provided direct patient care in Ebola-affected countries. Direct active monitoring required direct observation of the person being monitored by the local health authority at least once daily (5). This report describes the operational structure of the NYC Department of Health and Mental Hygiene's (DOHMH) active monitoring program during its first 6 months (October 2014-April 2015) of operation. Data collected on persons who required direct active monitoring

  1. Active Crohn's disease is associated with low vitamin D levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Søren Peter; Hvas, Christian Lodberg; Agnholt, Jørgen

    2013-01-01

    activity is associated with low vitamin D levels. METHODS: In a cross-sectional study of 182 CD patients and 62 healthy controls, we measured serum 25-OH vitamin D. Stratified analysis was used to compare 25-OH vitamin D levels with Crohn's disease activity index, C-reactive protein, smoking status, intake...... of oral vitamin D supplements and seasonal variation in CD patients and healthy controls. RESULTS: Serum 25-OH vitamin D was inversely associated with disease activity: Median 25-OH vitamin D levels of Crohn's disease in remission, mildly, and moderately active diseases evaluated by Crohn's disease...... D levels (51nmol/l) than patients who did not smoke (76nmol/l), plevels. CONCLUSIONS: Active Crohn's disease was associated with low serum 25-OH vitamin D. Patients who smoked had lower 25-OH...

  2. Uganda's participation in CTBT activities and earthquake monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tugume, F.A.

    2002-01-01

    Earthquake occurrence in Uganda is mostly related to East Africa Rift System. The country's western border lies within the Western branch of this system while the Eastern branch is only 200 km from its eastern border. The two tectonic features contribute to seismicity in Uganda. These are the Aswar shear zone running from Nimule at the border of Uganda and Sudan, to Mount Elgon on the Eastern border and Katonga fault break which cuts across the country from the foot hills of mount Rwenzori to the Western side of Lake Victoria. This unique tectonic setting makes Uganda one of most seismically active countries on the African continet as exemplified by some destructive earthquakes that have hit the country. For this reason the Government of uganda is in the process of setting up an earthquake monitoring system, the National Seismological Network, with efficient detectability, efficient data transmission and processing facilities so that earthquakes in Uganda can be properly assessed and seismic hazard studies of the country cunducted. The objectives of the said network, the seismic developments for the last two decades and its current satus are described

  3. Activities and Issues in Monitoring Scrap Metal Against Radioactive Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, S.Y., E-mail: sychen@anl.gov [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, IL (United States)

    2011-07-15

    Over the past few decades, the global scrap metal industry has grown increasingly vigilant regarding radioactive contamination. Accidental melts of radioactive sources in some smelting facilities, in particular, have caused considerable damage and required recovery efforts costing tens of millions of dollars. In response, the industry has developed and deployed countermeasures. Increasingly expensive and sophisticated radiation monitoring devices have been implemented at key scrap entry points - ports and scrapyards. Recognition of the importance of such endeavors has led to a series of activities aimed at establishing organized and coordinated efforts among the interested parties. Recent concerns over the potential use of radioactive sources for radiological devices in terrorist acts have substantially heightened the need for national and international authorities to further control, intercept, and secure the sources that have escaped the regulatory domain. Enhanced collaboration by the government and industry could substantially improve the effectiveness of efforts at control; the 'Spanish Protocol' as developed by the Spanish metal industry and government regulators is a good example of such collaboration. (author)

  4. Cooperative wireless network control based health and activity monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, R; Ganesh, A Balaji; Girish, Siva V

    2016-10-01

    A real-time cooperative communication based wireless network is presented for monitoring health and activity of an end-user in their environment. The cooperative communication offers better energy consumption and also an opportunity to aware the current location of a user non-intrusively. The link between mobile sensor node and relay node is dynamically established by using Received Signal Strength Indicator (RSSI) and Link Quality Indicator (LQI) based on adaptive relay selection scheme. The study proposes a Linear Acceleration based Transmission Power Decision Control (LA-TPDC) algorithm to further enhance the energy efficiency of cooperative communication. Further, the occurrences of false alarms are carefully prevented by introducing three stages of sequential warning system. The real-time experiments are carried-out by using the nodes, namely mobile sensor node, relay nodes and a destination node which are indigenously developed by using a CC430 microcontroller integrated with an in-built transceiver at 868 MHz. The wireless node performance characteristics, such as energy consumption, Signal-Noise ratio (SNR), Bit Error Rate (BER), Packet Delivery Ratio (PDR) and transmission offset are evaluated for all the participated nodes. The experimental results observed that the proposed linear acceleration based transmission power decision control algorithm almost doubles the battery life time than energy efficient conventional cooperative communication.

  5. Active Wireless System for Structural Health Monitoring Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, Ricardo; Pérez, Alberto; García-Diéguez, Marta; Zapico-Valle, José Luis

    2017-12-11

    The use of wireless sensors in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) has increased significantly in the last years. Piezoelectric-based lead zirconium titanate (PZT) sensors have been on the rise in SHM due to their superior sensing abilities. They are applicable in different technologies such as electromechanical impedance (EMI)-based SHM. This work develops a flexible wireless smart sensor (WSS) framework based on the EMI method using active sensors for full-scale and autonomous SHM. In contrast to passive sensors, the self-sensing properties of the PZTs allow interrogating with or exciting a structure when desired. The system integrates the necessary software and hardware within a service-oriented architecture approach able to provide in a modular way the services suitable to satisfy the key requirements of a WSS. The framework developed in this work has been validated on different experimental applications. Initially, the reliability of the EMI method when carried out with the proposed wireless sensor system is evaluated by comparison with the wireless counterpart. Afterwards, the performance of the system is evaluated in terms of software stability and reliability of functioning.

  6. Optical monitoring of Active Galactic Nuclei from ARIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal-Krishna; Wiita, Paul Joseph

    2018-04-01

    This overview provides a historical perspective highlighting the pioneering role which the fairly modest observational facilities of ARIES have played since the 1990s in systematically characterizing the optical variability on hour-like time scale (intra-night optical variability, or INOV) of several major types of high-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Such information was previously available only for blazars. Similar studies have since been initiated in at least a dozen countries, giving a boost to AGN variability research. Our work has, in particular, provided strong indication that mild INOV occurs in radio-quiet QSOs (amplitude up to 3 – 5 % and duty cycle 10%) and, moreover, has demonstrated that similarly mild INOV is exhibited even by the vast majority of radio-loud quasars which possess powerful relativistic jets (even including many that are beamed towards us). The solitary outliers are blazars, the tiny strongly polarized subset of powerful AGN, which frequently exhibit a pronounced INOV. Among the blazars, BL Lac objects often show a bluer-when-brighter chromatic behavior, while the flat spectrum radio quasars seem not to. Quantifying any differences of INOV among the major subclasses of non-blazar type AGNs will require dedicated monitoring programs using 2 - 3 metre class telescopes.

  7. Active Wireless System for Structural Health Monitoring Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Perera

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The use of wireless sensors in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM has increased significantly in the last years. Piezoelectric-based lead zirconium titanate (PZT sensors have been on the rise in SHM due to their superior sensing abilities. They are applicable in different technologies such as electromechanical impedance (EMI-based SHM. This work develops a flexible wireless smart sensor (WSS framework based on the EMI method using active sensors for full-scale and autonomous SHM. In contrast to passive sensors, the self-sensing properties of the PZTs allow interrogating with or exciting a structure when desired. The system integrates the necessary software and hardware within a service-oriented architecture approach able to provide in a modular way the services suitable to satisfy the key requirements of a WSS. The framework developed in this work has been validated on different experimental applications. Initially, the reliability of the EMI method when carried out with the proposed wireless sensor system is evaluated by comparison with the wireless counterpart. Afterwards, the performance of the system is evaluated in terms of software stability and reliability of functioning.

  8. Monitoring uterine activity during labor: a comparison of three methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    EULIANO, Tammy Y.; NGUYEN, Minh Tam; DARMANJIAN, Shalom; MCGORRAY, Susan P.; EULIANO, Neil; ONKALA, Allison; GREGG, Anthony R.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Tocodynamometry (Toco—strain gauge technology) provides contraction frequency and approximate duration of labor contractions, but suffers frequent signal dropout necessitating re-positioning by a nurse, and may fail in obese patients. The alternative invasive intrauterine pressure catheter (IUPC) is more reliable and adds contraction pressure information, but requires ruptured membranes and introduces small risks of infection and abruption. Electrohysterography (EHG) reports the electrical activity of the uterus through electrodes placed on the maternal abdomen. This study compared all three methods of contraction detection simultaneously in laboring women. Study Design Upon consent, laboring women were monitored simultaneously with Toco, EHG, and IUPC. Contraction curves were generated in real-time for the EHG and all three curves were stored electronically. A contraction detection algorithm was used to compare frequency and timing between methods. Seventy-three subjects were enrolled in the study; 14 were excluded due to hardware failure of one or more of the devices (12) or inadequate data collection duration(2). Results In comparison with the gold-standard IUPC, EHG performed significantly better than Toco with regard to Contractions Consistency Index (CCI). The mean CCI for EHG was 0.88 ± 0.17 compared to 0.69 ± 0.27 for Toco (pToco, EHG was not significantly affected by obesity. Conclusion Toco does not correlate well with the gold-standard IUPC and fails more frequently in obese patients. EHG provides a reliable non-invasive alternative regardless of body habitus. PMID:23122926

  9. Monitoring uterine activity during labor: a comparison of 3 methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Euliano, Tammy Y; Nguyen, Minh Tam; Darmanjian, Shalom; McGorray, Susan P; Euliano, Neil; Onkala, Allison; Gregg, Anthony R

    2013-01-01

    Tocodynamometry (Toco; strain gauge technology) provides contraction frequency and approximate duration of labor contractions but suffers frequent signal dropout, necessitating repositioning by a nurse, and may fail in obese patients. The alternative invasive intrauterine pressure catheter (IUPC) is more reliable and adds contraction pressure information but requires ruptured membranes and introduces small risks of infection and abruption. Electrohysterography (EHG) reports the electrical activity of the uterus through electrodes placed on the maternal abdomen. This study compared all 3 methods of contraction detection simultaneously in laboring women. Upon consent, laboring women were monitored simultaneously with Toco, EHG, and IUPC. Contraction curves were generated in real-time for the EHG, and all 3 curves were stored electronically. A contraction detection algorithm was used to compare frequency and timing between methods. Seventy-three subjects were enrolled in the study; 14 were excluded due to hardware failure of 1 or more of the devices (n = 12) or inadequate data collection duration (n = 2). In comparison with the gold-standard IUPC, EHG performed significantly better than Toco with regard to the Contractions Consistency Index (CCI). The mean CCI for EHG was 0.88 ± 0.17 compared with 0.69 ± 0.27 for Toco (P Toco, EHG was not significantly affected by obesity. Toco does not correlate well with the gold-standard IUPC and fails more frequently in obese patients. EHG provides a reliable noninvasive alternative, regardless of body habitus. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Chemically activated nanodiamonds for aluminum alloy corrosion protection and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannstein, Inga; Adler, Anne-Katrin; Lapina, Victoria; Osipov, Vladimir; Opitz, Jörg; Schreiber, Jürgen; Meyendorf, Norbert

    2009-03-01

    In the present study, a smart coating for light metal alloys was developed and investigated. Chemically activated nanodiamonds (CANDiT) were electrophoretically deposited onto anodized aluminum alloy AA2024 substrates in order to increase corrosion resistance, enhance bonding properties and establish a means of corrosion monitoring based on the fluorescence behavior of the particles. In order to create stable aqueous CANDiT dispersions suitable for electrophoretic deposition, mechanical milling had to be implemented under specific chemical conditions. The influence of the CANDiT volume fraction and pH of the dispersion on the electrochemical properties of the coated samples was investigated. Linear voltammetry measurements reveal that the chemical characteristics of the CANDiT dispersion have a distinct influence on the quality of the coating. The fluorescence spectra as well as fluorescence excitation spectra of the samples show that corrosion can be easily detected by optical means. Furthermore, an optimization on the basis of "smart" - algorithms for the data processing of a surface analysis by the laser-speckle-method is presented.

  11. Heart activity monitoring using 3D hologram based on smartphone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thap, Tharoeun; Heewon Chung; Jinseok Lee

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we used smartphone to obtained pulsatile signal from a fingertip by illuminating the skin tissue using flashlight and with an on-board camera to record the change of the light intensity reflected from the tissue. The pulsatile signal is produced by analyzing average green component values of the frames taken by the camera and the heart rate is estimated in real time by detecting the pulse peaks. Based on each instant obtained heartbeat, we design a heart animation that beats according to each interval of the heartbeat. At the same time, we made a simple pyramid shaped hologram from a transparent OHP film to show the heart animation acting above the smartphone screen in three-dimensional view. With this application, users can actually monitor their heart activity in 3D rather than just to see the pulsatile signal graphically. The performances were done in two different conditions: under bright and dark environments. The holograms were made based on three different materials: grey transparent film, clear transparent film, and hard black acrylic board; the grey transparent film provided better performance and we achieved satisfactory results regardless of all environments.

  12. Development and Validation of an Inflammatory Bowel Diseases Monitoring Index for Use With Mobile Health Technologies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Deen, Welmoed K.; van der Meulen-de Jong, Andrea E.; Parekh, Nimisha K.; Kane, Ellen; Zand, Aria; DiNicola, Courtney A.; Hall, Laurin; Inserra, Elizabeth K.; Choi, Jennifer M.; Ha, Christina Y.; Esrailian, Eric; van Oijen, Martijn G. H.; Hommes, Daniel W.

    2016-01-01

    Mobile health technologies are advancing rapidly as smartphone use increases. Patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) might be managed remotely through smartphone applications, but no tools are yet available. We tested the ability of an IBD monitoring tool, which can be used with mobile

  13. Available data sources for monitoring non-communicable diseases and their risk factors in South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Wandai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. Health information systems for monitoring chronic non-communicable diseases (NCDs in South Africa (SA are relatively less advanced than those for infectious diseases (particularly tuberculosis and HIV and for maternal and child health. NCDs are now the largest cause of premature mortality owing to exposure to risk factors arising from obesity that include physical inactivity and accessible, cheap but unhealthy diets. The National Strategic Plan for the Prevention and Control of Non-Communicable Diseases 2013 - 17 developed by the SA National Department of Health outlines targets and monitoring priorities. Objectives. To assess data sources relevant for monitoring NCDs and their risk factors by identifying the strengths and weaknesses, including usability and availability, of surveys and routine systems focusing at national and certain sub-national levels. Methods. Publicly available survey and routine data sources were assessed for variables collected, their characteristics, frequency of data collection, geographical coverage and data availability. Results. Survey data sources were found to be quite different in the way data variables are collected, their geographical coverage and also availability, while the main weakness of routine data sources was poor quality of data. Conclusions. To provide a sound basis for monitoring progress of NCDs and related risk factors, we recommend harmonising and strengthening available SA data sources in terms of data quality, definitions, categories used, timeliness, disease coverage and biomarker measurement.

  14. The ebb and flow of airborne pathogens: Monitoring and use in disease management decisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perhaps the earliest form of monitoring the regional spread of plant disease was a group of growers gathering together at the market and discussing what they see in their crops. This type of reporting continues to this day through regional extension blogs, by crop consultants and more formal scoutin...

  15. Promotion of physical activity and fitness in sedentary patients with Parkinson's disease: randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nimwegen, Marlies; Speelman, Arlène D; Overeem, Sebastiaan; van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Smulders, Katrijn; Dontje, Manon L; Borm, George F; Backx, Frank J G; Bloem, Bastiaan R; Munneke, Marten

    2013-03-01

    To evaluate whether a multifaceted behavioural change programme increases physical activities in patients with Parkinson's disease. Multicentre randomised controlled trial. 32 community hospitals in the Netherlands, collaborating in a nationwide network (ParkinsonNet). 586 sedentary patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease aged between 40 and 75 years with mild to moderate disease severity (Hoehn and Yahr stage ≤ 3). Patients were randomly assigned to the ParkFit programme or a matched general physiotherapy intervention. ParkFit is a multifaceted behavioural change programme, designed specifically to achieve an enduring increase in the level of physical activity (coaches using motivational strategies; ambulatory feedback). The primary endpoint was the level of physical activity, measured every six months with a standardised seven day recall (LASA physical activity questionnaire-LAPAQ). Secondary endpoints included two other measures of physical activity (activity diary and ambulatory activity monitor), quality of life (Parkinson's disease questionnaire-PDQ-39), and fitness (six minute walk test). 540 (92.2%) patients completed the primary outcome. During follow-up, overall time spent on physical activities (LAPAQ) was comparable between the groups (adjusted group difference 7%, 95% confidence interval -3 to 17%; P=0.19). Analyses of three secondary outcomes indicated increased physical activity in ParkFit patients, as suggested by the activity diary (difference 30%; Pactivity monitor (difference 12%; Pphysical activity, as measured with the LAPAQ. The analysis of the secondary endpoints justifies further work into the possible merits of behavioural change programmes to increase physical activities in daily life in Parkinson's disease. Clinical trials NCT00748488.

  16. Vectra DA for the objective measurement of disease activity in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segurado, O G; Sasso, E H

    2014-01-01

    Quantitative and regular assessment of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is required to achieve treatment targets such as remission and to optimize clinical outcomes. To assess inflammation accurately, predict joint damage and monitor treatment response, a measure of disease activity in RA should reflect the pathological processes resulting in irreversible joint damage and functional disability. The Vectra DA blood test is an objective measure of disease activity for patients with RA. Vectra DA provides an accurate, reproducible score on a scale of 1 to 100 based on the concentrations of 12 biomarkers that reflect the pathophysiologic diversity of RA. The analytical validity, clinical validity, and clinical utility of Vectra DA have been evaluated for patients with RA in registries and prospective and retrospective clinical studies. As a biomarker-based instrument for assessing disease activity in RA, the Vectra DA test can help monitor therapeutic response to methotrexate and biologic agents and assess clinically challenging situations, such as when clinical measures are confounded by non-inflammatory pain from fibromyalgia. Vectra DA scores correlate with imaging of joint inflammation and are predictive for radiographic progression, with high Vectra DA scores being associated with more frequent and severe progression and low scores being predictive for non-progression. In summary, the Vectra DA score is an objective measure of RA disease activity that quantifies inflammatory status. By predicting risk for joint damage more effectively than conventional clinical and laboratory measures, it has the potential to complement these measures and optimise clinical decision making.

  17. Step detection and activity recognition accuracy of seven physical activity monitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio A Storm

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the seven following commercially available activity monitors in terms of step count detection accuracy: Movemonitor (Mc Roberts, Up (Jawbone, One (Fitbit, ActivPAL (PAL Technologies Ltd., Nike+ Fuelband (Nike Inc., Tractivity (Kineteks Corp. and Sensewear Armband Mini (Bodymedia. Sixteen healthy adults consented to take part in the study. The experimental protocol included walking along an indoor straight walkway, descending and ascending 24 steps, free outdoor walking and free indoor walking. These tasks were repeated at three self-selected walking speeds. Angular velocity signals collected at both shanks using two wireless inertial measurement units (OPAL, ADPM Inc were used as a reference for the step count, computed using previously validated algorithms. Step detection accuracy was assessed using the mean absolute percentage error computed for each sensor. The Movemonitor and the ActivPAL were also tested within a nine-minute activity recognition protocol, during which the participants performed a set of complex tasks. Posture classifications were obtained from the two monitors and expressed as a percentage of the total task duration. The Movemonitor, One, ActivPAL, Nike+ Fuelband and Sensewear Armband Mini underestimated the number of steps in all the observed walking speeds, whereas the Tractivity significantly overestimated step count. The Movemonitor was the best performing sensor, with an error lower than 2% at all speeds and the smallest error obtained in the outdoor walking. The activity recognition protocol showed that the Movemonitor performed best in the walking recognition, but had difficulty in discriminating between standing and sitting. Results of this study can be used to inform choice of a monitor for specific applications.

  18. Step detection and activity recognition accuracy of seven physical activity monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storm, Fabio A; Heller, Ben W; Mazzà, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the seven following commercially available activity monitors in terms of step count detection accuracy: Movemonitor (Mc Roberts), Up (Jawbone), One (Fitbit), ActivPAL (PAL Technologies Ltd.), Nike+ Fuelband (Nike Inc.), Tractivity (Kineteks Corp.) and Sensewear Armband Mini (Bodymedia). Sixteen healthy adults consented to take part in the study. The experimental protocol included walking along an indoor straight walkway, descending and ascending 24 steps, free outdoor walking and free indoor walking. These tasks were repeated at three self-selected walking speeds. Angular velocity signals collected at both shanks using two wireless inertial measurement units (OPAL, ADPM Inc) were used as a reference for the step count, computed using previously validated algorithms. Step detection accuracy was assessed using the mean absolute percentage error computed for each sensor. The Movemonitor and the ActivPAL were also tested within a nine-minute activity recognition protocol, during which the participants performed a set of complex tasks. Posture classifications were obtained from the two monitors and expressed as a percentage of the total task duration. The Movemonitor, One, ActivPAL, Nike+ Fuelband and Sensewear Armband Mini underestimated the number of steps in all the observed walking speeds, whereas the Tractivity significantly overestimated step count. The Movemonitor was the best performing sensor, with an error lower than 2% at all speeds and the smallest error obtained in the outdoor walking. The activity recognition protocol showed that the Movemonitor performed best in the walking recognition, but had difficulty in discriminating between standing and sitting. Results of this study can be used to inform choice of a monitor for specific applications.

  19. Women, men, and rheumatoid arthritis: analyses of disease activity, disease characteristics, and treatments in the QUEST-RA study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokka, Tuulikki; Toloza, Sergio; Cutolo, Maurizio; Kautiainen, Hannu; Makinen, Heidi; Gogus, Feride; Skakic, Vlado; Badsha, Humeira; Peets, Tõnu; Baranauskaite, Asta; Géher, Pál; Ujfalussy, Ilona; Skopouli, Fotini N; Mavrommati, Maria; Alten, Rieke; Pohl, Christof; Sibilia, Jean; Stancati, Andrea; Salaffi, Fausto; Romanowski, Wojciech; Zarowny-Wierzbinska, Danuta; Henrohn, Dan; Bresnihan, Barry; Minnock, Patricia; Knudsen, Lene Surland; Jacobs, Johannes Wg; Calvo-Alen, Jaime; Lazovskis, Juris; Pinheiro, Geraldo da Rocha Castelar; Karateev, Dmitry; Andersone, Daina; Rexhepi, Sylejman; Yazici, Yusuf; Pincus, Theodore

    2009-01-01

    Gender as a predictor of outcomes of rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has evoked considerable interest over the decades. Historically, there is no consensus whether RA is worse in females or males. Recent reports suggest that females are less likely than males to achieve remission. Therefore, we aimed to study possible associations of gender and disease activity, disease characteristics, and treatments of RA in a large multinational cross-sectional cohort of patients with RA called Quantitative Standard Monitoring of Patients with RA (QUEST-RA). The cohort includes clinical and questionnaire data from patients who were seen in usual care, including 6,004 patients at 70 sites in 25 countries as of April 2008. Gender differences were analyzed for American College of Rheumatology Core Data Set measures of disease activity, DAS28 (disease activity score using 28 joint counts), fatigue, the presence of rheumatoid factor, nodules and erosions, and the current use of prednisone, methotrexate, and biologic agents. Women had poorer scores than men in all Core Data Set measures. The mean values for females and males were swollen joint count-28 (SJC28) of 4.5 versus 3.8, tender joint count-28 of 6.9 versus 5.4, erythrocyte sedimentation rate of 30 versus 26, Health Assessment Questionnaire of 1.1 versus 0.8, visual analog scales for physician global estimate of 3.0 versus 2.5, pain of 4.3 versus 3.6, patient global status of 4.2 versus 3.7, DAS28 of 4.3 versus 3.8, and fatigue of 4.6 versus 3.7 (P < 0.001). However, effect sizes were small-medium and smallest (0.13) for SJC28. Among patients who had no or minimal disease activity (0 to 1) on SJC28, women had statistically significantly higher mean values compared with men in all other disease activity measures (P < 0.001) and met DAS28 remission less often than men. Rheumatoid factor was equally prevalent among genders. Men had nodules more often than women. Women had erosions more often than men, but the statistical significance

  20. Non-invasive imaging of tumors by monitoring autotaxin activity using an enzyme-activated near-infrared fluorogenic substrate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian Madan

    Full Text Available Autotaxin (ATX, an autocrine motility factor that is highly upregulated in metastatic cancer, is a lysophospholipase D enzyme that produces the lipid second messenger lysophosphatidic acid (LPA from lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC. Dysregulation of the lysolipid signaling pathway is central to the pathophysiology of numerous cancers, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other inflammatory diseases. Consequently, the ATX/LPA pathway has emerged as an important source of biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Herein we describe development and validation of a fluorogenic analog of LPC (AR-2 that enables visualization of ATX activity in vivo. AR-2 exhibits minimal fluorescence until it is activated by ATX, which substantially increases fluorescence in the near-infrared (NIR region, the optimal spectral window for in vivo imaging. In mice with orthotopic ATX-expressing breast cancer tumors, ATX activated AR-2 fluorescence. Administration of AR-2 to tumor-bearing mice showed high fluorescence in the tumor and low fluorescence in most healthy tissues with tumor fluorescence correlated with ATX levels. Pretreatment of mice with an ATX inhibitor selectively decreased fluorescence in the tumor. Together these data suggest that fluorescence directly correlates with ATX activity and its tissue expression. The data show that AR-2 is a non-invasive and selective tool that enables visualization and quantitation of ATX-expressing tumors and monitoring ATX activity in vivo.

  1. Individual Self-monitoring &Peer-monitoring In One Classroom in Writing Activities: Who Is at Disadvantage?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Zare Toofan

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Writing is an important experience through which we are able to share ideas, arouse feelings, persuade and convince other people (white & Arndt, 1991. It is important to view writing not solely as the product of an individual, but as a cognitive, social and cultural act. Writing is an act that takes place within a context, that accomplishes a particular purpose and that is appropriately shaped for its intended audience (Hamplyones & Condon, 1989. Here, the present research considers the significance effects of two important independent variables self-monitoring and peer-monitoring in writing activities on Iranian EFL learners. In this research it was supposed to study new effects of two Meta cognitive strategies self-monitoring and peer-monitoring on 173 male and female learners' writing activities whose age ranged between the age 16-27, and they had a composing description writing paragraph as pre & post test in the same conditions. Although many studies have been conducted on the effects of self-monitoring with a variety of students across a variety of settings (Amato-Zech, Hoff, & Doepke, 2006 Cooper et al., 2007, Dunlap, Dunlap, Koegel, & Koegel 1991. But goal of this study was to increase the participant’s on-task behavior in self & peer-monitoring (E. Johnson, 2007, Self &Peer-monitoring added. Although both of them were useful for providing challengeable students, and became useful for prosocial life, but self-monitoring helped them to become awareness of their weaknesses and strengths to increase positive way of the quality and quantity of their learning in written task, and peer-monitoring occurred when the students achieved recognition level to evaluate the other peers' behavior, and it was obviously understood that it needed more training time to arrive at the level of recognition of each others' behavior.

  2. Using Commercial Activity Monitors to Measure Gait in Patients with Suspected iNPH: Implications for Ambulatory Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaglani, Shiv; Moore, Jessica; Haynes, M Ryan; Hoffberger, Jamie B; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2015-11-17

    This study seeks to validate the use of activity monitors to detect and record gait abnormalities, potentially identifying patients with idiopathic normal pressure hydrocephalus (iNPH) prior to the onset of cognitive or urinary symptoms. This study compared the step counts of four common activity monitors (Omron Step Counter HJ-113, New Lifestyles 2000, Nike Fuelband, and Fitbit Ultra) to an observed step count in 17 patients with confirmed iNPH. Of the four devices, the Fitbit Ultra (Fitbit, Inc., San Francisco, CA) provided the most accurate step count. The correlation with the observed step count was significantly higher (p<0.009) for the Fitbit Ultra than for any of the other three devices. These preliminary findings suggest that existing activity monitors have variable efficacy in the iNPH patient population and that the MEMS tri-axial accelerometer and algorithm of the Fitbit Ultra provides the most accurate gait measurements of the four devices tested.

  3. The promise of mHealth: daily activity monitoring and outcome assessments by wearable sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobkin, Bruce H; Dorsch, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    Mobile health tools that enable clinicians and researchers to monitor the type, quantity, and quality of everyday activities of patients and trial participants have long been needed to improve daily care, design more clinically meaningful randomized trials of interventions, and establish cost-effective, evidence-based practices. Inexpensive, unobtrusive wireless sensors, including accelerometers, gyroscopes, and pressure-sensitive textiles, combined with Internet-based communications and machine-learning algorithms trained to recognize upper- and lower-extremity movements, have begun to fulfill this need. Continuous data from ankle triaxial accelerometers, for example, can be transmitted from the home and community via WiFi or a smartphone to a remote data analysis server. Reports can include the walking speed and duration of every bout of ambulation, spatiotemporal symmetries between the legs, and the type, duration, and energy used during exercise. For daily care, this readily accessible flow of real-world information allows clinicians to monitor the amount and quality of exercise for risk factor management and compliance in the practice of skills. Feedback may motivate better self-management as well as serve home-based rehabilitation efforts. Monitoring patients with chronic diseases and after hospitalization or the start of new medications for a decline in daily activity may help detect medical complications before rehospitalization becomes necessary. For clinical trials, repeated laboratory-quality assessments of key activities in the community, rather than by clinic testing, self-report, and ordinal scales, may reduce the cost and burden of travel, improve recruitment and retention, and capture more reliable, valid, and responsive ratio-scaled outcome measures that are not mere surrogates for changes in daily impairment, disability, and functioning.

  4. Changes in spontaneous brain activity in early Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Zhou, Xiaohong Joe; Zhang, Min-Ming; Zheng, Xu-Ning; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Wang, Jue

    2013-08-09

    Resting state brain activity can provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of Parkinson's disease (PD). The purpose of the present study was (a) to investigate abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity in early PD patients using resting-state functional MRI (fMRI) with a regional homogeneity (ReHo) method and (b) to demonstrate the potential of using changes in abnormal spontaneous neuronal activity for monitoring the progression of PD during its early stages. Seventeen early PD patients were assessed with the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS), the Hoehn and Yahr disability scale and the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE) were compared with seventeen gender- and age-matched healthy controls. All subjects underwent MRI scans using a 1.5T General Electric Signa Excite II scanner. The MRI scan protocol included whole-brain volumetric imaging using a 3D inversion recovery prepared (IR-Prep) fast spoiled gradient-echo pulse sequence and 2D multi-slice (22 axial slices covering the whole brain) resting-state fMRI using an echo planar imaging (EPI) sequence. Images were analyzed in SPM5 together with a ReHo algorithm using the in-house software program REST. A corrected threshold of pbrain regions, including the left cerebellum, left parietal lobe, right middle temporal lobe, right sub-thalamic nucleus areas, right superior frontal gyrus, middle frontal gyrus (MFG), right inferior parietal lobe (IPL), right precuneus lobe, left MFG and left IPL. Additionally, significantly reduced ReHo was also observed in the early PD patients in the following brain regions: the left putamen, left inferior frontal gyrus, right hippocampus, right anterior cingulum, and bilateral lingual gyrus. Moreover, in PD patients, ReHo in the left putamen was negatively correlated with the UPDRS scores (r=-0.69). These results indicate that the abnormal resting state spontaneous brain activity associated with patients with early PD can be revealed by Reho analysis. Copyright

  5. Technology of remote nuclear activity monitoring for national safeguards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwack, Eun Ho; Kim, B. K.; Kim, J. S.; Yoon, W. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. S.; Cha, H. R.; Na, W. W.; Choi, Y. M.

    2001-07-01

    This project mainly focused on technical development on remote monitoring. It covers optical fiber scintillator to be used as NDA sensor to targets to be applied. Optical fiber scintillator was tested at the high radioactive environment. It is the first try in its kind for spent fuel measurement. It is confirmed that optical fiber sensor can be used for safeguards verification. Its feasibility for spent fuel storage silo at Wolsong reactor was studied. And to optimize remote transmission cost which can be regarded as a major barrier, virtual private network was studied for possible application for safeguards purpose. It can drastically reduce transmission cost and upgrade information surety. As target for remote monitoring, light water reactor and heavy water reactor were feasibly studied. Especially heavy water reactor has much potential for reduction of inspection efforts if remote monitoring is introduced. In overall remote monitoring can play a pivotal role to streamline safeguards inspection

  6. New and emerging technologies for the diagnosis and monitoring of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A horizon scanning review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Louise C; Ward, Derek J; Smith, Joanna; Holmes, Steve; Mahadeva, Ravi

    2016-03-11

    There is a need for straightforward, novel diagnostic and monitoring technologies to enable the early diagnosis of COPD and its differentiation from other respiratory diseases, to establish the cause of acute exacerbations and to monitor disease progression. We sought to establish whether technologies already in development could potentially address these needs. A systematic horizon scanning review was undertaken to identify technologies in development from a wide range of commercial and non-commercial sources. Technologies were restricted to those likely to be available within 18 months, and then evaluated for degree of innovation, potential for impact, acceptability to users and likelihood of adoption by clinicians and patients with COPD. Eighty technologies were identified, of which 25 were considered particularly promising. Biomarker tests, particularly those using sputum or saliva samples and/or available at the point of care, were positively evaluated, with many offering novel approaches to early diagnosis and to determining the cause for acute exacerbations. Several wrist-worn devices and smartphone-based spirometers offering the facility for self-monitoring and early detection of exacerbations were also considered promising. The most promising identified technologies have the potential to improve COPD care and patient outcomes. Further research and evaluation activities should be focused on these technologies. © The Author(s) 2016.

  7. Paraoxonase 1 Activity in Endocrine Diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Özlem Tarçın; Dilek Gogas Yavuz

    2011-01-01

    Paraoxonase is an esterase bound to high-density lipoproteins which by metabolizing lipid peroxides, prevents their accumulation on low-density lipoproteins. It also hydrolyzes various organophosphorus compounds. Considering the role of PON1 in hydrolyzing phospholipid and cholesteryl-ester hydroperoxides and thus protecting lipoproteins against oxidative modification, it can be concluded that PON1 may be an indicator of the risk of atherosclerosis/coronary artery disease development. Recent ...

  8. Behavior change techniques implemented in electronic lifestyle activity monitors: a systematic content analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Elizabeth J; Lewis, Zakkoyya H; Mayrsohn, Brian G; Rowland, Jennifer L

    2014-08-15

    Electronic activity monitors (such as those manufactured by Fitbit, Jawbone, and Nike) improve on standard pedometers by providing automated feedback and interactive behavior change tools via mobile device or personal computer. These monitors are commercially popular and show promise for use in public health interventions. However, little is known about the content of their feedback applications and how individual monitors may differ from one another. The purpose of this study was to describe the behavior change techniques implemented in commercially available electronic activity monitors. Electronic activity monitors (N=13) were systematically identified and tested by 3 trained coders for at least 1 week each. All monitors measured lifestyle physical activity and provided feedback via an app (computer or mobile). Coding was based on a hierarchical list of 93 behavior change techniques. Further coding of potentially effective techniques and adherence to theory-based recommendations were based on findings from meta-analyses and meta-regressions in the research literature. All monitors provided tools for self-monitoring, feedback, and environmental change by definition. The next most prevalent techniques (13 out of 13 monitors) were goal-setting and emphasizing discrepancy between current and goal behavior. Review of behavioral goals, social support, social comparison, prompts/cues, rewards, and a focus on past success were found in more than half of the systems. The monitors included a range of 5-10 of 14 total techniques identified from the research literature as potentially effective. Most of the monitors included goal-setting, self-monitoring, and feedback content that closely matched recommendations from social cognitive theory. Electronic activity monitors contain a wide range of behavior change techniques typically used in clinical behavioral interventions. Thus, the monitors may represent a medium by which these interventions could be translated for

  9. Monitoring of Volcanic Activity by Sub-mm Geodetic Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, S.; Mare, Y.; Ichiki, M.; Demachi, T.; Tachibana, K.; Nishimura, T.

    2017-12-01

    Volcanic earthquakes have been occurring beneath Zao volcano in northern Honshu, Japan since 2013, following the increase of deep low frequency earthquakes from 2012. On account of a burst of seismicity initiated in April 2015, the JMA announced a warning of eruption, however, the seismicity gradually decreased for the next two months and the warning was canceled in June. In the same time period, minor expansive deformation was observed by GNSS. Small earthquakes are still occurring, and low-freq. earthquakes (LPE) occur sometimes accompanied by static tilt changes. In this study, we try to extract the sub-mm displacements from the LPE waveforms observed by broadband seismometers (BBS) and utilize them for geodetic inversion to monitor volcanic activities. Thun et al. (2015, 2016) devised an efficient method using a running median filter (RMF) to remove LP noises, which contaminate displacement waveforms. They demonstrated the reproducibility of the waveforms corresponding to the experimentally given sub-mm displacements in the laboratory. They also apply the method to the field LPE data obtained from several volcanoes to show static displacements. The procedure is outlined as follows: (1) Unfiltered removal of the instrument response, (2) LP noise estimate by LPF with a corner frequency of 5/M, where M (seconds) is the time window of the RMF and should be at least three times the length of the rise time. (3) Subtract the noise estimated from step (2). (4) Integrate to obtain displacement waveforms. We apply the method to the BBS waveform at a distance of about 1.5 km ESE from the summit crater of Zao Volcano associated with a LPE on April 1, 2017. Assuming the time window M as 300 seconds, we successfully obtained the displacement history: taking the rise time of about 2 minutes, the site was gradually uplifted with the amount of about 50-60 µm and then subsided with HF displacements in the next 2 minutes resulting about 20-30 µm static upheaval. Comparing the

  10. Weight preserving image registration for monitoring disease progression in lung CT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Lol, Pechin; Ashraf, Haseem; Dirksen, Asger; Nielsen, Mads; de Bruijne, Marleen

    2008-01-01

    We present a new image registration based method for monitoring regional disease progression in longitudinal image studies of lung disease. A free-form image registration technique is used to match a baseline 3D CT lung scan onto a following scan. Areas with lower intensity in the following scan compared with intensities in the deformed baseline image indicate local loss of lung tissue that is associated with progression of emphysema. To account for differences in lung intensity owing to differences in the inspiration level in the two scans rather than disease progression, we propose to adjust the density of lung tissue with respect to local expansion or compression such that the total weight of the lungs is preserved during deformation. Our method provides a good estimation of regional destruction of lung tissue for subjects with a significant difference in inspiration level between CT scans and may result in a more sensitive measure of disease progression than standard quantitative CT measures.

  11. The importance of monitoring minimal residual disease in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolenova, A.; Subova, Z.; Cizmar, A.; Sejnova, D.; Kaiserova, E.; Hikkel, I.; Hikkelova, M.; Bubanska, E.; Oravkinova, I.

    2012-01-01

    Since the strong correlation between minimal residual disease (MRD) levels and risk of relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia, monitoring of MRD provides unique information regarding treatment response. Because the significance of MRD monitoring has been strongly supported by several studies and because it has been implemented in the latest protocols, there has been a significant effort to develop MRD monitoring in the Slovak Republic. Between 1. 10. 2006 and 31. 12. 2009, 50 children with ALL who were treated at three Slovak centers were included in the RQ PCR MRD pilot project. Based on MRD stratification, we identified 26 patients who were stratified into the HRG (high risk group) 3 patients (11,5 %), IRG (intermediate risk group), 14 p. 54 % and SRG (standard risk group), 9 p. (34,5 %). (author)

  12. IL-8 as antibody therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases: Reduction of clinical activity in palmoplantar pustulosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, L.; Beurskens, F.J.; Reitamo, S.

    2008-01-01

    IL-8 is a chemokine that has been implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases involving neutrophil activation. HuMab 10F8 is a novel fully human mAb against IL-8, which binds a discontinuous epitope on IL-8 overlapping the receptor binding site, and which effectively neutralizes IL-8-dependent...... human neutrophil activation and migration. We investigated whether interference in the cytokine network by HuMab 10F8 might benefit patients suffering from palmoplantar pustulosis, a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Treatment of patients with HuMab 10F8 was well tolerated and significantly reduced...... clinical disease activity at all five endpoints, which included a >= 50% reduction in the formation of fresh pustules. IL-8 neutralization was monitored at the site of inflammation by assessing exudates of palmoplantar pustulosis lesions. HuMab 10F8 sequestered IL-8 in situ, as observed by rapid dose...

  13. A participatory approach to design monitoring indicators of production diseases in organic dairy farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duval, J E; Fourichon, C; Madouasse, A; Sjöström, K; Emanuelson, U; Bareille, N

    2016-06-01

    Production diseases have an important negative effect on the health and welfare of dairy cows. Although organic animal production systems aim for high animal health levels, compliance with European organic farming regulations does not guarantee that this is achieved. Herd health and production management (HHPM) programs aim at optimizing herd health by preventing disease and production problems, but as yet they have not been consistently implemented by farmers. We hypothesize that one reason is the mismatch between what scientists propose as indicators for herd health monitoring and what farmers would like to use. Herd health monitoring is a key element in HHPM programs as it permits a regular assessment of the functioning of the different components of the production process. Planned observations or measurements of these components are indispensable for this monitoring. In this study, a participatory approach was used to create an environment in which farmers could adapt the indicators proposed by scientists for monitoring the five main production diseases on dairy cattle farms. The adaptations of the indicators were characterized and the farmers' explanations for the changes made were described. The study was conducted in France and Sweden, which differ in terms of their national organic regulations and existing advisory services. In both countries, twenty certified organic dairy farmers and their animal health management advisors participated in the study. All of the farmers adapted the initial monitoring plan proposed by scientists to specific production and animal health situation on their farm. This resulted in forty unique and farm-specific combinations of indicators for herd health monitoring. All but three farmers intended to monitor five health topics simultaneously using the constructed indicators. The qualitative analysis of the explanations given by farmers for their choices enabled an understanding of farmers' reasons for selecting and adapting

  14. Monitoring the efficacy of drugs for neglected tropical diseases controlled by preventive chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albonico, M; Levecke, B; LoVerde, P T; Montresor, A; Prichard, R; Vercruysse, J; Webster, J P

    2015-12-01

    In the last decade, pharmaceutical companies, governments and global health organisations under the leadership of the World Health Organization (WHO) have pledged large-scale donations of anthelmintic drugs, including ivermectin (IVM), praziquantel (PZQ), albendazole (ALB) and mebendazole (MEB). This worldwide scale-up in drug donations calls for strong monitoring systems to detect any changes in anthelmintic drug efficacy. This review reports on the outcome of the WHO Global Working Group on Monitoring of Neglected Tropical Diseases Drug Efficacy, which consists of three subgroups: (i) soil-transmitted helminthiases (ALB and MEB); (ii) onchocerciasis and lymphatic filariasis (IVM); and (iii) schistosomiasis (PZQ). Progress of ongoing work, challenges and research needs for each of the four main drugs used in helminthic preventive chemotherapy (PC) are reported, laying the ground for appropriate implementation of drug efficacy monitoring programmes under the co-ordination and guidelines of the WHO. Best practices for monitoring drug efficacy should be made available and capacity built as an integral part of neglected tropical disease (NTD) programme monitoring. Development of a disease-specific model to predict the impact of PC programmes, to detect outliers and to solicit responses is essential. Research studies on genetic polymorphisms in relation to low-efficacy phenotypes should be carried out to identify markers of putative resistance against all NTD drugs and ultimately to develop diagnostic assays. Development of combination and co-administration of NTD drugs as well as of new drug entities to boost the armamentarium of the few drugs available for NTD control and elimination should be pursued in parallel. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Chemotherapy of Infection and Cancer. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Lipids in hepatic glycogen storage diseases: pathophysiology, monitoring of dietary management and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derks, Terry G J; van Rijn, Margreet

    2015-05-01

    Hepatic glycogen storage diseases (GSD) underscore the intimate relationship between carbohydrate and lipid metabolism. The hyperlipidemias in hepatic GSD reflect perturbed intracellular metabolism, providing biomarkers in blood to monitor dietary management. In different types of GSD, hyperlipidemias are of a different origin. Hypertriglyceridemia is most prominent in GSD type Ia and associated with long-term outcome morbidity, like pancreatitis and hepatic adenomas. In the ketotic subtypes of GSD, hypertriglyceridemia reflects the age-dependent fasting intolerance, secondary lipolysis and increased mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. The role of high protein diets is established for ketotic types of GSD, but non-traditional dietary interventions (like medium-chain triglycerides and the ketogenic diet) in hepatic GSD are still controversial and necessitate further studies. Patients with these rare inherited disorders of carbohydrate metabolism meet several criteria of the metabolic syndrome, therefore close monitoring for cardiovascular diseases in ageing GSD patients may be justified.

  16. Weight preserving image registration for monitoring disease progression in lung CT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gorbunova, Vladlena; Lo, Pechin Chien Pau; Haseem, Ashraf

    2008-01-01

    We present a new image registration based method for monitoring regional disease progression in longitudinal image studies of lung disease. A free-form image registration technique is used to match a baseline 3D CT lung scan onto a following scan. Areas with lower intensity in the following scan...... the density of lung tissue with respect to local expansion or compression such that the total weight of the lungs is preserved during deformation. Our method provides a good estimation of regional destruction of lung tissue for subjects with a significant difference in inspiration level between CT scans...

  17. Analysis of circulating tumour DNA to monitor disease burden following colorectal cancer surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reinert, Thomas; Schøler, Lone Vedel; Thomsen, Rune

    2016-01-01

    in 151 serial plasma samples from six relapsing and five non-relapsing colorectal cancer (CRC) patients by droplet digital PCR, and correlated to clinical findings. RESULTS: Up to six personalised assays were designed for each patient. Our approach enabled efficient temporal assessment of disease status...... relapse were 100%. CONCLUSIONS: We show that assessment of ctDNA is a non-invasive, exquisitely specific and highly sensitive approach for monitoring disease load, which has the potential to provide clinically relevant lead times compared with conventional methods. Furthermore, we provide a low...

  18. Management system of occupational diseases in Korea: statistics, report and monitoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Kyung Yong; Choe, Seong Weon

    2010-12-01

    The management system of occupational diseases in Korea can be assessed from the perspective of a surveillance system. Workers' compensation insurance reports are used to produce official statistics on occupational diseases in Korea. National working conditions surveys are used to monitor the magnitude of work-related symptoms and signs in the labor force. A health examination program was introduced to detect occupational diseases through both selective and mass screening programs. The Working Environment Measurement Institution assesses workers' exposure to hazards in the workplace. Government regulates that the employer should do health examinations and working conditions measurement through contracted private agencies and following the Occupational Safety and Health Act. It is hoped that these institutions may be able to effectively detect and monitor occupational diseases and hazards in the workplace. In view of this, the occupational management system in Korea is well designed, except for the national survey system. In the future, national surveys for detection of hazards and ill-health outcomes in workers should be developed. The existing surveillance system for occupational disease can be improved by providing more refined information through statistical analysis of surveillance data.

  19. [Evaluation and analysis of monitoring and early warning functions of the occupational disease reporting system in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaojun; Li, Tao; Liu, Mengxuan

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the monitoring and early warning functions of the occupational disease reporting system right now in China, and to analyze their influencing factors. An improved audit tool (ODIT) was used to score the monitoring and early warning functions with a total score of 10. The nine indices were completeness of information on the reporting form, coverage of the reporting system, accessibility of criteria or guidelines for diagnosis, education and training for physicians, completeness of the reporting system, statistical methods, investigation of special cases, release of monitoring information, and release of early warning information. According to the evaluation, the occupational disease reporting system in China had a score of 5.5 in monitoring existing occupational diseases with a low score for release of monitoring information; the reporting system had a score of 6.5 in early warning of newly occurring occupational diseases with low scores for education and training for physicians as well as completeness of the reporting system. The occupational disease reporting system in China still does not have full function in monitoring and early warning. It is the education and participation of physicians from general hospitals in the diagnosis and treatment of occupational diseases and suspected occupational diseases that need to be enhanced. In addition, the problem of monitoring the incidence of occupational diseases needs to be solved as soon as possible.

  20. Metabolism features in the active rheumatoid disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cossermelli, W; Carvalho, N; Papaleo Netto, M [Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Centro de Medicina Nuclear

    1974-02-01

    The /sup 131/I-labelled albumin metabolism was studied in fourteen female patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The half-life of distribution was increased while the turnover half-life and turnover rate was within normal limits. These results led to assume that synthesis and catabolism may not change this disease, not being the responsible mechanism of hypoalbuminemia. Hypoalbuminemia would appear as compensatory mechanism in view of other protein alterations, as hypergammaglobulinemia, without changes of stabilizing and metabolic properties of albumin, perhaps due to albumin molecular alterations.

  1. Metabolism features in the active rheumatoid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cossermelli, W.; Carvalho, N.; Papaleo Netto, M.

    1974-01-01

    It was studied the 131 I-labelled albumin metabolism in fourteen female patients with rheumatoid arthritis. The half-life of distribution was increased while the turnover half-life and turnover rate was within normal limits. These results led to assume that synthesis and catabolism may not change this disease, not being the responsible mechanism of hypoalbuminemia. Hypoalbuminemia would appear as compensatory mechanism in view of other protein alterations, as hypergammaglobulinemia, without changes of stabilizing and metabolic properties of albumin, perhaps due to albumin molecular alterations [pt

  2. Relationship between balance and physical activity measured by an activity monitor in elderly COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwakura M

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Masahiro Iwakura,1,2 Kazuki Okura,2 Kazuyuki Shibata,1,2 Atsuyoshi Kawagoshi,2 Keiyu Sugawara,2 Hitomi Takahashi,2 Takanobu Shioya1 1Department of Rehabilitation, Akita City Hospital, 2Department of Physical Therapy, Akita University Graduate School of Health Sciences, Akita, Japan Background: Little is known regarding the relationship between balance impairments and physical activity in COPD. There has been no study investigating the relationship between balance and objectively measured physical activity. Here we investigated the association between balance and physical activity measured by an activity monitor in elderly COPD patients. Materials and methods: Twenty-two outpatients with COPD (mean age, 72±7 years; forced expiratory volume in 1 second, 53%±21% predicted and 13 age-matched healthy control subjects (mean age, 72±6 years participated in the study. We assessed all 35 subjects’ balance (one-leg standing test [OLST] times, Short Physical Performance Battery total scores, standing balance test scores, 4 m gait speed, and five-times sit-to-stand test [5STST] and physical activity (daily steps and time spent in moderate-to-vigorous physical activity per day [MV-PA]. Possible confounders were assessed in the COPD group. The between-group differences in balance test scores and physical activity were analyzed. A correlation analysis and multivariate regression analysis were conducted in the COPD group. Results: The COPD patients exhibited significant reductions in OLST times (P=0.033, Short Physical Performance Battery scores (P=0.013, 4 m gait speed (P<0.001, five-times sit-to-stand times (P=0.002, daily steps (P=0.003, and MV-PA (P=0.022 compared to the controls; the exception was the standing balance test scores. The correlation and multivariate regression analyses revealed significant independent associations between OLST times and daily steps (P<0.001 and between OLST times and MV-PA (P=0.014 in the COPD group after adjusting for

  3. Evaluation of high density lipoprotein as a circulating biomarker of Gaucher disease activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Philip; Yang, Ruhua; Liu, Jun; Pastores, Gregory M.; Mistry, Pramod K.

    2011-01-01

    Circulating biomarkers are important surrogates for monitoring disease activity in type I Gaucher disease (GD1). We and others have reported low high-density lipoprotein (HDL) in GD1. We assessed HDL cholesterol as a biomarker of GD1, with respect to its correlation with indicators of disease severity and its response to imiglucerase enzyme replacement therapy (ERT). In 278 consecutively evaluated GD1 patients, we correlated HDL cholesterol, chitotriosidase, and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) with indicators of disease severity. Additionally, we measured the response of these biomarkers to ERT. HDL cholesterol was negatively correlated with spleen volume, liver volume, and GD severity score index; the magnitude of this association of disease severity with HDL cholesterol was similar to that for ACE and for chitotriosidase. Within individual patients monitored over many years, there was a strikingly strong correlation of HDL with liver and spleen volumes; there was a similarly strong correlation of chitotriosidase and ACE with disease severity in individual patients monitored serially over many years (chitotriosidase r=0.96 to 0.98, ACE r =0.88 to 0.94, and HDL r=−0.84 to −0.94, p<0.001). ERT for 3 years resulted in a striking increase of HDL while serum levels of chitotriosidase and ACE decreased. Our results reveal markedly low HDL cholesterol in untreated GD1, a correlation with indicators of disease severity in GD1, and a rise towards normal after ERT. These findings suggest HDL cholesterol merits inclusion within the “biomarker basket” for monitoring of patients with GD1. PMID:21290183

  4. Active surveillance monitoring: the role of novel biomarkers and imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John F Ward

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available "CANCER" is a disease state that leads to progressive illness that is uniformly fatal without treatment. Hippocrates invoked the Greek word karkinos, or "crab," to describe tumors he observed. For centuries, "CANCER" remained a disease that was recognized primarily in its locally advanced or metastatic stage, when it was almost uniformly fatal.

  5. Short communication. Platform for bee-hives monitoring based on sound analysis. A perpetual warehouse for swarms daily activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Atauri Mezquida, D.; Llorente Martinez, J.

    2009-07-01

    Bees and beekeeping are suffering a global crisis. Constant information on swarms conditions would be a key to study new diseases like colony collapse disorder and to develop new beekeeping tools to improve the hive management and make it more efficient. A platform for beehives monitoring is presented. It is based on the analysis of the colonies buzz which is registered by a bunch of sensors sending the data to a common database. Data obtained through sound processing shows plenty of patterns and tendency lines related to colonies activities and their conditions. It shows the potential of the sound as a swarm activity gauge. The goal of the platform is the possibility to store information about the swarms activity. The objective is to build a global net of monitored hives covering apiaries with different climates, razes and managements. (Author) 21 refs.

  6. Monitoring of Physiological Parameters to Predict Exacerbations of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M. Al Rajeh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The value of monitoring physiological parameters to predict chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD exacerbations is controversial. A few studies have suggested benefit from domiciliary monitoring of vital signs, and/or lung function but there is no existing systematic review. Objectives: To conduct a systematic review of the effectiveness of monitoring physiological parameters to predict COPD exacerbation. Methods: An electronic systematic search compliant with Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA guidelines was conducted. The search was updated to April 6, 2016. Five databases were examined: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online, or MEDLARS Online (Medline, Excerpta Medica dataBASE (Embase, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database (AMED, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL and the Cochrane clinical trials database. Results: Sixteen articles met the pre-specified inclusion criteria. Fifteen of these articules reported positive results in predicting COPD exacerbation via monitoring of physiological parameters. Nine studies showed a reduction in peripheral oxygen saturation (SpO2% prior to exacerbation onset. Three studies for peak flow, and two studies for respiratory rate reported a significant variation prior to or at exacerbation onset. A particular challenge is accounting for baseline heterogeneity in parameters between patients. Conclusion: There is currently insufficient information on how physiological parameters vary prior to exacerbation to support routine domiciliary monitoring for the prediction of exacerbations in COPD. However, the method remains promising.

  7. Ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, and irritable bowel syndrome have different profiles of extracellular matrix turnover, which also reflects disease activity in Crohn's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Joachim Høg; Manon-Jensen, Tina; Jensen, Michael Dam

    2017-01-01

    Increased protease activity is a key pathological feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). However, the differences in extracellular matrix remodelling (ECM) in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) are not well described. An increased understanding of the inflammatory processes may...... provide optimized disease monitoring and diagnostics. We investigated the tissue remodelling in IBD and IBS patients by using novel blood-based biomarkers reflecting ECM remodelling. Five ECM biomarkers (VICM, BGM, EL-NE, C5M, Pro-C5) were measured by competitive ELISAs in serum from 72 CD patients, 60 UC...... patients, 22 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), and 24 healthy donors. One-way analysis of variance, Mann-Whitney U-test, logistic regression models, and receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was carried out to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the biomarkers. The ECM...

  8. Results of the marine biota monitoring during drilling activity on Campos Basin, Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petta, Claudia Brigagao de; Bastos, Fabio; Danielski, Monica; Ferreira, Mariana; Gama, Mariana; Coelho, Ana Paula Athanazio; Maia, Decio [Aecom do Brasil Ltda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    The Environmental Monitoring Project (PMA) aims to report environmental changes arising from drilling activity, in relation to the marine fauna. This project can also help in the monitoring of accidental spills. Since the professionals spend six hours of the day monitoring the ocean around the rigs, they can locate and identify oil stains, notify the responsible onboard, and also help in the monitoring of the oil stain. Such Project has been developed onboard a drilling unit working in Campos Basin. The results presented here were collected during the drilling activity in Bijupira and Salema fields, by Shell Brasil Petroleo Ltda, from July 13th to October 8th, 2011.

  9. Device-based monitoring in physical activity and public health research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bassett, David R

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of physical activity is important, given the vital role of this behavior in physical and mental health. Over the past quarter of a century, the use of small, non-invasive, wearable monitors to assess physical activity has become commonplace. This review is divided into three sections. In the first section, a brief history of physical activity monitoring is provided, along with a discussion of the strengths and weaknesses of different devices. In the second section, recent applications of physical activity monitoring in physical activity and public health research are discussed. Wearable monitors are being used to conduct surveillance, and to determine the extent and distribution of physical activity and sedentary behaviors in populations around the world. They have been used to help clarify the dose–response relation between physical activity and health. Wearable monitors that provide feedback to users have also been used in longitudinal interventions to motivate research participants and to assess their compliance with program goals. In the third section, future directions for research in physical activity monitoring are discussed. It is likely that new developments in wearable monitors will lead to greater accuracy and improved ease-of-use. (paper)

  10. Physical Activity Recommendations in Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartman, Jorine E.; Boezen, H. Marike; Zuidema, Menno J.; de Greef, Mathieu H. G.; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; Boezen, Hendrika

    2014-01-01

    Background: Physical activity recommendations are hardly studied in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and specifically recommendations that are individualized to a patient's aerobic fitness level are not studied. Objectives: To compare individualized (relative) and

  11. When a Step Is Not a Step! Specificity Analysis of Five Physical Activity Monitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra O'Connell

    Full Text Available Physical activity is an essential aspect of a healthy lifestyle for both physical and mental health states. As step count is one of the most utilized measures for quantifying physical activity it is important that activity-monitoring devices be both sensitive and specific in recording actual steps taken and disregard non-stepping body movements. The objective of this study was to assess the specificity of five activity monitors during a variety of prescribed non-stepping activities.Participants wore five activity monitors simultaneously for a variety of prescribed activities including deskwork, taking an elevator, taking a bus journey, automobile driving, washing and drying dishes; functional reaching task; indoor cycling; outdoor cycling; and indoor rowing. Each task was carried out for either a specific duration of time or over a specific distance. Activity monitors tested were the ActivPAL micro™, NL-2000™ pedometer, Withings Smart Activity Monitor Tracker (Pulse O2™, Fitbit One™ and Jawbone UP™. Participants were video-recorded while carrying out the prescribed activities and the false positive step count registered on each activity monitor was obtained and compared to the video.All activity monitors registered a significant number of false positive steps per minute during one or more of the prescribed activities. The Withings™ activity performed best, registering a significant number of false positive steps per minute during the outdoor cycling activity only (P = 0.025. The Jawbone™ registered a significant number of false positive steps during the functional reaching task and while washing and drying dishes, which involved arm and hand movement (P < 0.01 for both. The ActivPAL™ registered a significant number of false positive steps during the cycling exercises (P < 0.001 for both.As a number of false positive steps were registered on the activity monitors during the non-stepping activities, the authors conclude that non

  12. Effects of physical activity on life expectancy with cardiovascular disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    O.H. Franco (Oscar); C.E.D. de Laet (Chris); A. Peeters (Andrea); J. Jonker (Joost); J.P. Mackenbach (Johan); W.J. Nusselder (Wilma)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Physical inactivity is a modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular disease. However, little is known about the effects of physical activity on life expectancy with and without cardiovascular disease. Our objective was to calculate the consequences of different physical

  13. Microbial enrichment to enhance the disease suppressive activity of compost

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Postma, J.; Montenari, M.; Boogert, van den P.H.J.F.

    2003-01-01

    Compost amended soil has been found to be suppressive against plant diseases in various cropping systems. The level and reproducibility of disease suppressive properties of compost might be increased by the addition of antagonists. In the present study, the establishment and suppressive activity of

  14. An alpha-synuclein MRM assay with diagnostic potential for Parkinson's disease and monitoring disease progression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Li [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Stewart, Tessandra [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Shi, Min [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Pottiez, Gwenael [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Dator, Romel [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Wu, Rui [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Department of Pathology, No. 3 Hospital of Beijing University, Beijing China; Aro, Patrick [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Schuster, Robert J. [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Ginghina, Carmen [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Pan, Catherine [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Gao, Yuqian [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Qian, Weijun [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA USA; Zabetian, Cyrus P. [Parkinson' s Disease Research and Geriatric Research, Education and Clinical Center, Veterans Affairs Puget Sound Health Care System, Seattle WA USA; Department of Neurology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle WA USA; Hu, Shu-Ching [Department of Neurology, University of Washington School of Medicine, Seattle WA USA; Quinn, Joseph F. [Department of Neurology, Oregon Health and Science University, Portland OR USA; Zhang, Jing [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, Seattle WA USA; Department of Pathology, Peking University Health Science Centre and Third Hospital, Beijing 100083 China

    2017-04-19

    Aim: The alpha-synuclein (α-syn) level in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as measured by immunoassays, is promising as a Parkinson’s disease (PD) biomarker. However, the levels of total α-syn are inconsistent among studies with large cohorts and different measurement platforms. Total α-syn level also does not correlate with disease severity or progression. Here, we developed a highly sensitive Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM) method to measure absolute CSF α-syn peptide concentrations without prior enrichment or fractionation, aiming to discover new candidate biomarkers. Results: Six peptides covering 73% of protein sequence were reliably identified, and two were consistently quantified in cross-sectional and longitudinal cohorts. Absolute concentration of α-syn in human CSF was determined to be 2.1ng/mL. A unique α-syn peptide, TVEGAGSIAAATGFVK (81-96), displayed excellent correlation with previous immunoassay results in two independent PD cohorts (p < 0.001), correlated with disease severity, and its changes significantly tracked the disease progression longitudinally. Conclusions: An MRM assay to quantify human CSF α-syn was developed and optimized. Sixty clinical samples from cross-sectional and longitudinal PD cohorts were analyzed with this approach. Although further larger-scale validation is needed, the results suggest that α-syn peptide could serve as a promising biomarker in PD diagnosis and progression.

  15. Measures of rheumatoid arthritis disease activity in Australian clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Andrew; Bagga, Hanish

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate which rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity measures are being collected in patients receiving glucocorticoids, non-biologic or biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in Australian rheumatology practice. Methods. A retrospective audit of medical records was conducted from eight rheumatology practices around Australia. Each rheumatologist recruited 30 consecutive eligible patients into the review, 10 of whom must have been receiving a biological agent for rheumatoid arthritis. Disease activity measures and radiographic assessments were collected from each patient's last consultation. For biologic patients, disease activity measures were also collected from when the patient was first initiated on the biological agent. Results. At last consultation, the disease measures that were recorded most often were ESR (89.2%), haemoglobin (87.5%), and CRP (84.2%). DAS28 was infrequently recorded (16.3%). The rate of recording disease activity measures for patients receiving biologic DMARDs decreased over time (mean 27 months). Conclusion. This review has shown inconsistency of RA activity measures being recorded in Australian rheumatology clinical practice. An accurate assessment of the disease process is necessary to effectively target rheumatoid arthritis patients to treat in order to achieve optimal outcomes.

  16. Selected reaction monitoring as an effective method for reliable quantification of disease-associated proteins in maple syrup urine disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández-Guerra, Paula; Birkler, Rune I D; Merinero, Begoña

    2014-01-01

    in mitochondria-enriched samples from cultured fibroblasts from healthy individuals and patients with mutations in branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKDH) complex. BCKDH is a mitochondrial multienzyme complex and its defective activity causes maple syrup urine disease (MSUD), a rare but severe inherited...

  17. Ambulatory measurement of knee motion and physical activity: preliminary evaluation of a smart activity monitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malchau Henrik

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a paucity of devices available for continuous, long-term monitoring of human joint motion. Non-invasive, inexpensive devices capable of recording human activity and joint motion have many applications for medical research. Such a device could be used to quantify range of motion outside the gait laboratory. The purpose of this study was to test the accuracy of the modified Intelligent Device for Energy Expenditure and Activity (IDEEA in measuring knee flexion angles, to detect different physical activities, and to quantify how often healthy subjects use deep knee flexion in the ambulatory setting. Methods We compared Biomotion Laboratory (BML "gold standard" data to simultaneous IDEEA measures of knee motion and gait, step up/down, and stair descent in 5 healthy subjects. In addition, we used a series of choreographed physical activities outside the BML to confirm the IDEEA's ability to accurately measure 7 commonly-performed physical activities. Subjects then continued data collection during ordinary activities outside the gait laboratory. Results Pooled correlations between the BML and IDEEA knee flexion angles were .97 +/- .03 for step up/down, .98 +/- .02 for stair descent, and .98 +/- .01 for gait. In the BML protocol, the IDEEA accurately identified gait, but was less accurate in identifying step up/down and stair descent. During sampling outside the BML, the IDEEA accurately detected walking, running, stair ascent, stair descent, standing, lying, and sitting. On average, subjects flexed their knees >120° for 0.17% of their data collection periods outside the BML. Conclusion The modified IDEEA system is a useful clinical tool for evaluating knee motion and multiple physical activities in the ambulatory setting. These five healthy subjects rarely flexed their knees >120°.

  18. Self-managed eHealth Disease Monitoring in Children and Adolescents with Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Katrine; Jakobsen, Christian; Houen, Gunnar; Kallemose, Thomas; Paerregaard, Anders; Riis, Lene B; Munkholm, Pia; Wewer, Vibeke

    2017-03-01

    To evaluate the impact of eHealth on disease activity, the need for hospital contacts, and medical adherence in children and adolescents with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Furthermore, to assess eHealth's influence on school attendance and quality of life (QoL). Patients with IBD, 10 to 17 years attending a public university hospital, were prospectively randomized to a 2-year open label case-controlled eHealth intervention. The eHealth-group used the web-application young.constant-care.com (YCC) on a monthly basis and in case of flare-ups, and were seen at one annual preplanned outpatient visit. The control-group continued standard visits every third month. Every 3 months, both groups had blood and fecal calprotectin tested and the following were assessed: escalation in medication, disease activity, hospital contacts, medical adherence, school absence, and QoL. Fifty-three patients in nonbiological treatment were included (27 eHealth/26 control). We found no differences between the groups regarding escalation in treatment and disease activity (symptoms, fecal calprotectin, and blood). The number of total outpatient visits (mean: eHealth 3.26, SEM 0.51; control 7.31, SEM 0.69; P eHealth 1.6, SEM 0.5; control 16.5, SEM 4.4; P eHealth-group. No differences in medical adherence and QoL were found. Adherence to YCC was 81% (384 of the 475 expected entries). None of the patients or parents felt unsafe using the eHealth system. The use of eHealth in children and adolescents with IBD is feasible, does not lead to impaired disease control, and can be managed by the patients without risk of increased disease activity.

  19. When a Step Is Not a Step! Specificity Analysis of Five Physical Activity Monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Sandra; ÓLaighin, Gearóid; Quinlan, Leo R

    2017-01-01

    Physical activity is an essential aspect of a healthy lifestyle for both physical and mental health states. As step count is one of the most utilized measures for quantifying physical activity it is important that activity-monitoring devices be both sensitive and specific in recording actual steps taken and disregard non-stepping body movements. The objective of this study was to assess the specificity of five activity monitors during a variety of prescribed non-stepping activities. Participants wore five activity monitors simultaneously for a variety of prescribed activities including deskwork, taking an elevator, taking a bus journey, automobile driving, washing and drying dishes; functional reaching task; indoor cycling; outdoor cycling; and indoor rowing. Each task was carried out for either a specific duration of time or over a specific distance. Activity monitors tested were the ActivPAL micro™, NL-2000™ pedometer, Withings Smart Activity Monitor Tracker (Pulse O2)™, Fitbit One™ and Jawbone UP™. Participants were video-recorded while carrying out the prescribed activities and the false positive step count registered on each activity monitor was obtained and compared to the video. All activity monitors registered a significant number of false positive steps per minute during one or more of the prescribed activities. The Withings™ activity performed best, registering a significant number of false positive steps per minute during the outdoor cycling activity only (P = 0.025). The Jawbone™ registered a significant number of false positive steps during the functional reaching task and while washing and drying dishes, which involved arm and hand movement (P positive steps during the cycling exercises (P positive steps were registered on the activity monitors during the non-stepping activities, the authors conclude that non-stepping physical activities can result in the false detection of steps. This can negatively affect the quantification of physical

  20. Method for monitoring drilling materials for gamma ray activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.D. Jr.; Arnold, D.M.; Schultz, W.E.

    1985-01-01

    In the preferred and illustrated embodiment taught herein, method steps for monitoring of raw materials to be used in drilling mud are disclosed. The materials are monitored for radioactivity. Procedures for taking such measurements are disclosed, and the extent of gamma radioactivity in the raw materials used in drilling mud is, determined. This is correlated to the increased radiation attributable to mud made from these materials and the effect the mud would have on gamma ray measuring logs. An alternate procedure for testing drilling mud, typically at the well site, is also disclosed. The method detects mud radioactivity from any additives including barite, potassium chloride, well cuttings or others. Excessive background levels due to mud gamma radioactivity in a well may very well mask the data obtained by various logging procedures dependent on gamma radiation. Procedures are also described for either rejecting mud which is too radioactive or correcting the log measurements for mud effects

  1. Synthetic Training Data Generation for Activity Monitoring and Behavior Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monekosso, Dorothy; Remagnino, Paolo

    This paper describes a data generator that produces synthetic data to simulate observations from an array of environment monitoring sensors. The overall goal of our work is to monitor the well-being of one occupant in a home. Sensors are embedded in a smart home to unobtrusively record environmental parameters. Based on the sensor observations, behavior analysis and modeling are performed. However behavior analysis and modeling require large data sets to be collected over long periods of time to achieve the level of accuracy expected. A data generator - was developed based on initial data i.e. data collected over periods lasting weeks to facilitate concurrent data collection and development of algorithms. The data generator is based on statistical inference techniques. Variation is introduced into the data using perturbation models.

  2. Detection of recurrent Cushing's disease: proposal for standardized patient monitoring following transsphenoidal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Alejandro; Manzano, Alex J

    2014-09-01

    Transsphenoidal surgery (TSS) is first-line treatment for Cushing's disease (CD), a devastating disorder of hypercortisolism resulting from overproduction of adrenocorticotropic hormone by a pituitary adenoma. Surgical success rates vary widely and disease may recur years after remission is achieved. Recognizing CD recurrence can be challenging; although there is general acceptance among endocrinologists that patients need lifelong follow-up, there are currently no standardized monitoring guidelines. To begin addressing this need we created a novel, systematic algorithm by integrating information from literature on relapse rates in surgically-treated CD patients and our own clinical experiences. Reported recurrence rates range from 3 to 47 % (mean time to recurrence 16-49 months), emphasizing the need for careful post-surgical patient monitoring. We recommend that patients with post-operative serum cortisol surgery) be monitored semiannually for 3 years and annually thereafter. Patients with post-operative cortisol between 2 and 5 µg/dL may experience persistent or subclinical CD and should be evaluated every 2-3 months until biochemical control is achieved or additional treatment is initiated. Post-operative cortisol >5 µg/dL often signifies persistent disease and second-line treatment (e.g., immediate repeat pituitary surgery, radiotherapy, and/or medical therapy) may be considered. This follow-up algorithm aims to (a) enable early diagnosis and treatment of recurrent CD, thereby minimizing the detrimental effects of hypercortisolism, and (b) begin addressing the need for standardized guidelines for vigilant monitoring of CD patients treated by TSS, as demonstrated by the reported rates of recurrence.

  3. Activity Monitors Help Users Get Optimum Sun Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Goddard scientist Shahid Aslam was investigating alternative methods for measuring extreme ultraviolet radiation on the Solar Dynamics Observatory when he hit upon semiconductors that measured wavelengths pertinent to human health. As a result, he and a partner established College Park, Maryland-based Sensor Sensor LLC and developed UVA+B SunFriend, a wrist monitor that lets people know when they've received their optimal amounts of sunlight for the day.

  4. Monitoring and diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease using noninvasive compressive sensing EEG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morabito, F. C.; Labate, D.; Morabito, G.; Palamara, I.; Szu, H.

    2013-05-01

    The majority of elderly with Alzheimer's Disease (AD) receive care at home from caregivers. In contrast to standard tethered clinical settings, a wireless, real-time, body-area smartphone-based remote monitoring of electroencephalogram (EEG) can be extremely advantageous for home care of those patients. Such wearable tools pave the way to personalized medicine, for example giving the opportunity to control the progression of the disease and the effect of drugs. By applying Compressive Sensing (CS) techniques it is in principle possible to overcome the difficulty raised by smartphones spatial-temporal throughput rate bottleneck. Unfortunately, EEG and other physiological signals are often non-sparse. In this paper, it is instead shown that the EEG of AD patients becomes actually more compressible with the progression of the disease. EEG of Mild Cognitive Impaired (MCI) subjects is also showing clear tendency to enhanced compressibility. This feature favor the use of CS techniques and ultimately the use of telemonitoring with wearable sensors.

  5. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation monitoring in childhood. Hematological diseases in Serbia: STR-PCR techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstić Aleksandra D.

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT is a very successful method of treatment for children with different aquired or inborn diseases. The main goal of post-transplantation chimerism monitoring in HSCT is to predict negative events (such as disease relapse and graft rejection, in order to intervene with appropriate therapy and improve the probability of long-term DFS (disease free survival. In this context, by quantifying the relative amounts of donor and recipient cells present in the peripheral blood sample, it can be determined if engraftment has taken place at all, or if full or mixed chimerism exists. In a group of patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation at the Mother and Child Health Care Institute, we decided to use standard human identfication tests based on multiplex PCR analyses of short tandem repeats (STRs, as they are highly informative, sensitive, and fast and therefore represent an optimal methodological approach to engraftment analysis.

  6. Validity of consumer-grade activity monitor to identify manual wheelchair propulsion in standardized activities of daily living.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leving, Marika T; Horemans, Henricus L D; Vegter, Riemer J K; de Groot, Sonja; Bussmann, Johannes B J; van der Woude, Lucas H V

    2018-01-01

    Hypoactive lifestyle contributes to the development of secondary complications and lower quality of life in wheelchair users. There is a need for objective and user-friendly physical activity monitors for wheelchair-dependent individuals in order to increase physical activity through self-monitoring, goal setting, and feedback provision. To determine the validity of Activ8 Activity Monitors to 1) distinguish two classes of activities: independent wheelchair propulsion from other non-propulsive wheelchair-related activities 2) distinguish five wheelchair-related classes of activities differing by the movement intensity level: sitting in a wheelchair (hands may be moving but wheelchair remains stationary), maneuvering, and normal, high speed or assisted wheelchair propulsion. Sixteen able-bodied individuals performed sixteen various standardized 60s-activities of daily living. Each participant was equipped with a set of two Activ8 Professional Activity Monitors, one at the right forearm and one at the right wheel. Task classification by the Active8 Monitors was validated using video recordings. For the overall agreement, sensitivity and positive predictive value, outcomes above 90% are considered excellent, between 70 and 90% good, and below 70% unsatisfactory. Division in two classes resulted in overall agreement of 82.1%, sensitivity of 77.7% and positive predictive value of 78.2%. 84.5% of total duration of all tasks was classified identically by Activ8 and based on the video material. Division in five classes resulted in overall agreement of 56.6%, sensitivity of 52.8% and positive predictive value of 51.9%. 59.8% of total duration of all tasks was classified identically by Activ8 and based on the video material. Activ8 system proved to be suitable for distinguishing between active wheelchair propulsion and other non-propulsive wheelchair-related activities. The ability of the current system and algorithms to distinguish five various wheelchair-related activities

  7. Minimal Disease Activity as a Treatment Target in Psoriatic Arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gossec, Laure; McGonagle, Dennis; Korotaeva, Tatiana

    2018-01-01

    As in other inflammatory rheumatic diseases, the objective of psoriatic arthritis (PsA) treatment is the achievement of a defined target. Recent recommendations propose aiming for remission or low disease activity; however, a consensual definition of remission is lacking. A state of minimal disease....... Since its development, MDA has been used increasingly in studies and clinical trials. In this article, the potential use of MDA as a treatment target in PsA is reviewed. The frequencies of MDA achievement with biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs are summarized based on data from registries...

  8. Serum Renalase Levels Correlate with Disease Activity in Lupus Nephritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaojun Qi

    Full Text Available Lupus nephritis (LN is among the most serious complications of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE, which causes significant morbidity and mortality. Renalase is a novel, kidney-secreted cytokine-like protein that promotes cell survival. Here, we aimed to investigate the relationship of serum renalase levels with LN and its role in the disease progression of LN.For this cross-sectional study, 67 LN patients and 35 healthy controls were enrolled. Seventeen active LN patients who received standard therapies were followed up for six months. Disease activity was determined by the SLE Disease Activity-2000 (SLEDAI-2K scoring system and serum renalase amounts were determined by ELISA. Predictive value of renalase for disease activity was assessed. Furthermore, the expression of renalase in the kidneys of patients and macrophage infiltration was assessed by immunohistochemistry.Serum renalase amounts were significantly higher in LN patients than in healthy controls. Moreover, patients with proliferative LN had more elevated serum renalase levels than Class V LN patients. In proliferative LN patients, serum renalase levels were significantly higher in patients with active LN than those with inactive LN. Serum renalase levels were positively correlated with SLEDAI-2K, 24-h urine protein excretion, ds-DNA and ESR but inversely correlated with serum albumin and C3. Renalase amounts decreased significantly after six-months of standard therapy. The performance of renalase as a marker for diagnosis of active LN was 0.906 with a cutoff value of 66.67 μg/ml. We also observed that the amount of renalase was significantly higher in glomerular of proliferative LN along with the co-expression of macrophages.Serum renalase levels were correlated with disease activity in LN. Serum renalase might serve as a potential indicator for disease activity in LN. The marked increase of glomerular renalase and its association with macrophages suggest that it might play an

  9. Enhanced Sensitivity of Gas Sensor Based on Poly(3-hexylthiophene Thin-Film Transistors for Disease Diagnosis and Environment Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco R. Cavallari

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Electronic devices based on organic thin-film transistors (OTFT have the potential to supply the demand for portable and low-cost gadgets, mainly as sensors for in situ disease diagnosis and environment monitoring. For that reason, poly(3-hexylthiophene (P3HT as the active layer in the widely-used bottom-gate/bottom-contact OTFT structure was deposited over highly-doped silicon substrates covered with thermally-grown oxide to detect vapor-phase compounds. A ten-fold organochloride and ammonia sensitivity compared to bare sensors corroborated the application of this semiconducting polymer in sensors. Furthermore, P3HT TFTs presented approximately three-order higher normalized sensitivity than any chemical sensor addressed herein. The results demonstrate that while TFTs respond linearly at the lowest concentration values herein, chemical sensors present such an operating regime mostly above 2000 ppm. Simultaneous alteration of charge carrier mobility and threshold voltage is responsible for pushing the detection limit down to units of ppm of ammonia, as well as tens of ppm of alcohol or ketones. Nevertheless, P3HT transistors and chemical sensors could compose an electronic nose operated at room temperature for a wide range concentration evaluation (1–10,000 ppm of gaseous analytes. Targeted analytes include not only biomarkers for diseases, such as uremia, cirrhosis, lung cancer and diabetes, but also gases for environment monitoring in food, cosmetic and microelectronics industries.

  10. Early detection of tumor relapse/regrowth by consecutive minimal residual disease monitoring in high-risk neuroblastoma patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirase, Satoshi; Saitoh, Atsuro; Hartomo, Tri Budi; Kozaki, Aiko; Yanai, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Daiichiro; Kawasaki, Keiichiro; Kosaka, Yoshiyuki; Matsuo, Masafumi; Yamamoto, Nobuyuki; Mori, Takeshi; Hayakawa, Akira; Iijima, Kazumoto; Nishio, Hisahide; Nishimura, Noriyuki

    2016-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is an aggressive pediatric tumor accounting for ~15% of cancer-associated mortalities in children. Despite the current intensive therapy, >50% of high-risk patients experience tumor relapse or regrowth caused by the activation of minimal residual disease (MRD). Although several MRD detection protocols using various reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) markers have been reported to evaluate the therapeutic response and disease status of neuroblastoma patients, their clinical significance remains elusive. The present study reports two high-risk neuroblastoma patients, whose MRD was consecutively monitored using 11 RT-qPCR markers (CHRNA3, CRMP1, DBH, DCX, DDC, GABRB3, GAP43, ISL1, KIF1A, PHOX2B and TH) during their course of treatment. The two patients initially responded to the induction therapy and reached MRD-negative status. The patients' MRD subsequently became positive with no elevation of their urinary homovanillic acid, urinary vanillylmandelic acid and serum neuron-specific enolase levels at 13 or 19 weeks prior to the clinical diagnosis of tumor relapse or regrowth. The present cases highlight the possibility of consecutive MRD monitoring using 11 markers to enable an early detection of tumor relapse or regrowth in high-risk neuroblastoma patients. PMID:27446404

  11. Surveillance for Neisseria meningitidis Disease Activity and Transmission Using Information Technology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Sohail Ahmed

    Full Text Available While formal reporting, surveillance, and response structures remain essential to protecting public health, a new generation of freely accessible, online, and real-time informatics tools for disease tracking are expanding the ability to raise earlier public awareness of emerging disease threats. The rationale for this study is to test the hypothesis that the HealthMap informatics tools can complement epidemiological data captured by traditional surveillance monitoring systems for meningitis due to Neisseria meningitides (N. meningitides by highlighting severe transmissible disease activity and outbreaks in the United States.Annual analyses of N. meningitides disease alerts captured by HealthMap were compared to epidemiological data captured by the Centers for Disease Control's Active Bacterial Core surveillance (ABCs for N. meningitides. Morbidity and mortality case reports were measured annually from 2010 to 2013 (HealthMap and 2005 to 2012 (ABCs.HealthMap N. meningitides monitoring captured 80-90% of alerts as diagnosed N. meningitides, 5-20% of alerts as suspected cases, and 5-10% of alerts as related news articles. HealthMap disease alert activity for emerging disease threats related to N. meningitides were in agreement with patterns identified historically using traditional surveillance systems. HealthMap's strength lies in its ability to provide a cumulative "snapshot" of weak signals that allows for rapid dissemination of knowledge and earlier public awareness of potential outbreak status while formal testing and confirmation for specific serotypes is ongoing by public health authorities.The underreporting of disease cases in internet-based data streaming makes inadequate any comparison to epidemiological trends illustrated by the more comprehensive ABCs network published by the Centers for Disease Control. However, the expected delays in compiling confirmatory reports by traditional surveillance systems (at the time of writing, ABCs data

  12. Effectiveness of Intraoperative Parathyroid Monitoring (ioPTH) in predicting a multiglandular or malignant parathyroid disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrinja, C; Santandrea, G; Giacca, M; Stenner, Elisabetta; Ruscio, Maurizio; de Manzini, Nicolò

    2017-05-01

    The main goal of our study was to confirm the usefulness of intra-operative parathyroid hormone (PTH) monitoring (ioPTH) when using minimally invasive techniques for treatment of sporadic Primary hyperparathyroidism (pHTP). Furthermore, we aimed to evaluate if ioPTH monitoring may help to predict the etiology of primary hyperparathyroidism, especially in malignant or multiglandular parathyroid disease. A retrospective review of 125 consecutive patients with pHPT who underwent parathyroidectomy between 2001 and 2016 at the Department of General Surgery was performed. For each patient, the specific preoperative work-up consisted of: high-resolution US of the neck by a skilled sonographer, sestamibi parathyroid scan, laryngoscopy, and serum measurement of PTH, serum calcium levels, and serum 25(OH)D levels. The study included 125 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for pHPT. At the histological examination, we registered 113 patients with simple adenomatous pathology (90,4%), 5 atypical adenomas (4%), 3 cases of parathyroid carcinoma (2,4%),, , and 4 histological exams of different nature (3,2%). Overall, 6 cases (4,8%) of multiglandular disease were found. We reported 10 cases (8%) of recurrent/persistent hyperparathyroidism: 1/10 in a patient affected by atypical adenoma, 9/10 in patients with benign pathology. Regarding these 10 cases, in three (30%) patients, ioPTH wasn't dosed (only frozen section (FS) exam was taken), in 5 cases (50%) ioPTH dropped more than 50% compared to basal value (false negative results), and in 2 (20%) cases, ioPTH did not drop >50% from the first samples taken, the extemporary exam had confirmed the presence of adenoma and the probable second hyperfunctioning adenoma was not found. IoPTH determinations ensure operative success of surgical resection in almost all hyperfunctioning tissue; in particular it is very important during minimally invasive parathyroidectomy, as it allows avoiding bilateral neck exploration. The use of io

  13. Cadence Feedback With ECE PEDO to Monitor Physical Activity Intensity

    OpenAIRE

    Ardic, Fusun; G?cer, Esra

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the monitoring capabilities of the equipment for clever exercise pedometer (ECE PEDO) that provides audible feedback when the person exceeds the upper and lower limits of the target step numbers per minute and to compare step counts with Yamax SW-200 (YX200) as the criterion pedometer. A total of 30 adult volunteers (15 males and 15 females) were classified as normal weight (n?=?10), overweight (n?=?10), and obese (n?=?10). After the submaxima...

  14. Reverse iontophoresis of urea in health and chronic kidney disease: a potential diagnostic and monitoring tool?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebah, Leonard M; Read, Ian; Sayce, Andrew; Morgan, Jane; Chaloner, Christopher; Brenchley, Paul; Mitra, Sandip

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) need regular monitoring, usually by blood urea and creatinine measurements, needing venepuncture, frequent attendances and a healthcare professional, with significant inconvenience. Noninvasive monitoring will potentially simplify and improve monitoring. We tested the potential of transdermal reverse iontophoresis of urea in patients with CKD and healthy controls. Methods Using a MIC 2® Iontophoresis Controller, reverse iontophoresis was applied on the forearm of five healthy subjects (controls) and 18 patients with CKD for 3–5 h. Urea extracted at the cathode was measured and compared with plasma urea. Results Reverse iontophoresis at 250 μA was entirely safe for the duration. Cathodal buffer urea linearly correlated with plasma urea after 2 h (r = 0·82, P urea (y) from cathodal urea after 2 and 3 h, respectively. Cathodal urea concentration in controls was significantly lower than in patients with CKD after a minimum current application of 2 h (P urea cut-off of 30 μM gave a sensitivity of 83·3% and positive predictive value of 87% CKD. During haemodialysis, the fall in cathodal urea was able to track that of blood urea. Conclusion Reverse iontophoresis is safe, can potentially discriminate patients with CKD and healthy subjects and is able to track blood urea changes on dialysis. Further development of the technology for routine use can lead to an exciting opportunity for its use in diagnostics and monitoring. PMID:22409780

  15. Assessing pediatric ileocolonic Crohn's disease activity based on global MR enterography scores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pomerri, Fabio; Zuliani, Monica; Giorgi, Benedetta; Muzzio, Pier Carlo [University of Padova, Department of Medicine-DIMED, Padova (Italy); Al Bunni, Faise [Rovigo Hospital, Radiology Unit, S. Maria della Misericordia, Rovigo (Italy); Guariso, Graziella; Gasparetto, Marco; Cananzi, Mara [University of Padova, Department of Women and Child Health, Padova (Italy)

    2017-03-15

    This study was aimed at correlating a magnetic resonance index of activity (MaRIA) and a magnetic resonance enterography global score (MEGS) with activity indexes in a paediatric population with Crohn's disease (CD). This retrospective study included 32 paediatric patients (median age 14.5 years, 18 male) with proven CD who underwent magnetic resonance enterography (MRE). A correlation analysis was performed on the MRE-based scores, the simplified endoscopic score for CD (SES-CD), the paediatric Crohn's disease activity index (PCDAI), and C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Based on PCDAI, comparison of both global MaRIA and MEGS was made between patients with mild and moderate/severe disease activity. Global MaRIA correlated with SES-CD (r = 0.70, p = 0.001) and PCDAI (r = 0.42, p = 0.016). MEGS correlated with PCDAI (r = 0.46, p = 0.007) and CRP levels (r = 0.35, p = 0.046). MEGS differed significantly (p = 0.027) between patients grouped by clinical disease severity. MRE-based global scores correlated with clinical indexes of CD activity. Therefore, they represent a potential useful tool to predict CD activity and severity, as well as a possible promising alternative to endoscopy, to monitor paediatric patients with CD during their follow-up. (orig.)

  16. Active Layer Monitoring, Arctic and Subarctic Canada, Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project involves measuring regional and site variability in maximum annual active layer development and vertical surface movement over permafrost, and...

  17. Physical activity and cardiovascular disease risk factors among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) risk factors are increasing at an unprecedented rate in developing countries. However, fewer studies have evaluated the role of physical activity in preventing CVD in these countries. We assessed level physical activity and its relationship with CVD risk factors among young and ...

  18. 30 CFR 280.29 - Will MMS monitor the environmental effects of my activity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Will MMS monitor the environmental effects of my activity? 280.29 Section 280.29 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE... Obligations Under This Part Environmental Issues § 280.29 Will MMS monitor the environmental effects of my...

  19. New Monitoring Technology to Objectively Assess Adherence to Prescribed Footwear and Assistive Devices During Ambulatory Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bus, Sicco A.; Waaijman, Roelof; Nollet, Frans

    2012-01-01

    Bus SA, Waaijman R, Nollet F. New monitoring technology to objectively assess adherence to prescribed footwear and assistive devices during ambulatory activity. Arch Phys Med Rehabil 2012;93:2075-9. Objective: To assess the validity and feasibility of a new temperature-based adherence monitor to

  20. Causes and consequences of timing errors associated with global positioning system collar accelerometer activity monitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam J. Gaylord; Dana M. Sanchez

    2014-01-01

    Direct behavioral observations of multiple free-ranging animals over long periods of time and large geographic areas is prohibitively difficult. However, recent improvements in technology, such as Global Positioning System (GPS) collars equipped with motion-sensitive activity monitors, create the potential to remotely monitor animal behavior. Accelerometer-equipped...

  1. Diaper-Embedded Urinary Tract Infection Monitoring Sensor Module Powered by Urine-Activated Batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Weeseong; Yu, Wuyang; Tan, Tianlin; Ziaie, Babak; Jung, Byunghoo

    2017-06-01

    Urinary tract infection (UTI) is one of the most common infections in humans. UTI is easily treatable using antibiotics if identified in early stage. However, without early identification and treatment, UTI can be a major source of serious complications in geriatric patients, in particular, those suffering from neurodegenerative diseases. Also, for infants who have difficulty in describing their symptoms, UTI may lead to serious development of the disease making early identification of UTI crucial. In this paper, we present a diaper-embedded, wireless, self-powered, and autonomous UTI monitoring sensor module that allows an early detection of UTI with minimal effort. The sensor module consists of a paper-based colorimetric nitrite sensor, urine-activated batteries, a boost dc-dc converter, a low-power sensor interface utilizing pulse width modulation, and a Bluetooth low energy module for wireless transmission. Experimental results show a better detection of nitrite, a surrogate of UTI, than that of conventional dipstick testing. The proposed sensor module achieves a sensitivity of 1.35 ms/(mg/L) and a detection limit of 4 mg/L for nitrite.

  2. Liposomes for Targeted Delivery of Active Agents against Neurodegenerative Diseases (Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Spuch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease represent a huge unmet medical need. The prevalence of both diseases is increasing, but the efficacy of treatment is still very limited due to various factors including the blood brain barrier (BBB. Drug delivery to the brain remains the major challenge for the treatment of all neurodegenerative diseases because of the numerous protective barriers surrounding the central nervous system. New therapeutic drugs that cross the BBB are critically needed for treatment of many brain diseases. One of the significant factors on neurotherapeutics is the constraint of the blood brain barrier and the drug release kinetics that cause peripheral serious side effects. Contrary to common belief, neurodegenerative and neurological diseases may be multisystemic in nature, and this presents numerous difficulties for their potential treatment. Overall, the aim of this paper is to summarize the last findings and news related to liposome technology in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and demonstrate the potential of this technology for the development of novel therapeutics and the possible applications of liposomes in the two most widespread neurodegenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease.

  3. PET activation in basal ganglia disorders: Parkinson's disease and dystonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ceballos-Baumann, A.O.; Boecker, H.; Conrad, B.

    1997-01-01

    This article reviews PET activation studies with performance of different motor paradigms (joy-stick movements, imagination of movement, writing) in patients with movement disorders. The focus will be on Parkinson's disease (PD) and dystonia. PET findings will be related to clinical and electrophysiological observations. PET activation studies before and after therapeutic interventions such as pallidotomy in Parkinson's disease and botulinum toxin in writer's cramp are described. The contribution of PET activation studies to the understanding of the pathophysiology of dystonia and PD is discussed. (orig.) [de

  4. Histologic scoring indices for evaluation of disease activity in Crohn's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Novak, Gregor; Parker, Claire E.; Pai, Rish K.; Macdonald, John K.; Feagan, Brian G.; Sandborn, William J.; D'Haens, Geert; Jairath, Vipul; Khanna, Reena

    2017-01-01

    Histologic assessment of mucosal disease activity has been increasingly used in clinical trials of treatment for Crohn's disease. However, the operating properties of the currently existing histologic scoring indices remain unclear. A systematic review was undertaken to evaluate the development and

  5. Magnetic resonance imaging for evaluation of disease activity in Crohn's disease: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Horsthuis, Karin; Bipat, Shandra; Stokkers, Pieter C. F.; Stoker, Jaap

    2009-01-01

    To systematically review the evidence on the accuracy of MRI for grading disease activity in Crohn's disease (CD). The MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL and Cochrane databases were searched for studies on the accuracy of MRI in grading CD compared to a predefined reference standard. Two independent observers

  6. Postural activity monitoring for increasing safety in bomb disposal missions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brusey, James; Rednic, Ramona; Gaura, Elena I; Kemp, John; Poole, Nigel

    2009-01-01

    In enclosed suits, such as those worn by explosive ordnance disposal (EOD) experts, evaporative cooling through perspiration is less effective and, particularly in hot environments, uncompensable heat stress (UHS) may occur. Although some suits have cooling systems, their effectiveness during missions is dependent on the operative's posture. In order to properly assess thermal state, temperature-based assessment systems need to take posture into account. This paper builds on previous work for instrumenting EOD suits with regard to temperature monitoring and proposes to also monitor operative posture with MEMS accelerometers. Posture is a key factor in predicting how body temperature will change and is therefore important in providing local or remote warning of the onset of UHS. In this work, the C4.5 decision tree algorithm is used to produce an on-line classifier that can differentiate between nine key postures from current acceleration readings. Additional features that summarize how acceleration is changing over time are used to improve average classification accuracy to around 97.2%. Without such temporal feature extraction, dynamic postures are difficult to classify accurately. Experimental results show that training over a variety of subjects, and in particular, mixing gender, improves results on unseen subjects. The main advantages of the on-line posture classification system described here are that it is accurate, does not require integration of acceleration over time, and is computationally lightweight, allowing it to be easily supported on wearable microprocessors

  7. Active structural health monitoring of composite plates and sandwiches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadílek P.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of presented work is to design, assemble and test a functional system, that is able to reveal damage from impact loading. This is done by monitoring of change of spectral characteristics on a damaged structure that is caused by change of mechanical properties of material or by change of structure’s geometry. Excitation and monitoring of structures was done using piezoelectric patches. Unidirectional composite plate was tested for eigenfrequencies using chirp signal. The eigenfrequencies were compared to results from experiments with an impact hammer and consequently with results from finite element method. Same method of finding eigenfrequencies was used on a different unidirectional composite specimen. Series of impacts were performed. Spectrum of eigenfrequencies was measured on undamaged plate and then after each impact. Measurements of the plate with different level of damage were compared. Following experiments were performed on sandwich materials where more different failures may happen. Set of sandwich beams (cut out from one plate made of two outer composite layers and a foam core was investigated and subjected to several impacts. Several samples were impacted in the same manner to get comparable results. The impacts were performed with growing impact energy.

  8. Telemetered sensors for dynamic activity and structural performance monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Christopher P.; Hamel, Michael J.; Arms, Steven W.

    2001-08-01

    The development of improved structures requires knowledge of their dynamic behavior. Minimally intrusive wireless systems, capable of monitoring vibration and impact, are needed in order to provide this knowledge. Our objective was to design, build, and test a high speed data collection and wireless data communications system, including microsensors, and capable of being embedded or externally worn. Our previous transmitter designs were small and could be used to transmit multichannel digital data, but they were not capable of fast data transmission rates. The addition of a remotely triggered datalogger allowed us to overcome the limitations of our earlier designs. A bi-directional RF communications link was used to trigger a sample to be logged (from 30 meters), as well as to request data to be transmitted to the host PC for data acquisition/analysis. Sweep rates of 2000 Hz were successfully demonstrated from a triad of MEMs accelerometers. The remote datalogger and transceiver and accelerometer package measured 12 mm by 24 mm by 6 mm thick; these were mounted to the feet of thoroughbred horses to study their impact levels. These small, fast, wireless data recording systems can be used to monitor rotating/ vibrating machinery and civil/automotive/aerospace structures.

  9. Serum tryptase monitoring in indolent systemic mastocytosis: association with disease features and patient outcome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almudena Matito

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serum baseline tryptase (sBT is a minor diagnostic criterion for systemic mastocytosis (SM of undetermined prognostic impact. We monitored sBT levels in indolent SM (ISM patients and investigated its utility for predicting disease behaviour and outcome. METHODS: In total 74 adult ISM patients who were followed for ≥48 months and received no cytoreductive therapy were retrospectively studied. Patients were classified according to the pattern of evolution of sBT observed. RESULTS: Overall 16/74 (22% cases had decreasing sBT levels, 48 (65% patients showed increasing sBT levels and 10 (13% patients showed a fluctuating pattern. Patients with significantly increasing sBT (sBT slope ≥0.15 after 48 months of follow-up showed a slightly greater rate of development of diffuse bone sclerosis (13% vs. 2% and hepatomegaly plus splenomegaly (16% vs. 5%, as well as a significantly greater frequency of multilineage vs. mast cells (MC-restricted KIT mutation (p = 0.01 together with a greater frequency of cases with progression of ISM to smouldering and aggressive SM (p = 0.03, and a shorter progression-free survival (p = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: Monitoring of sBT in ISM patients is closely associated with poor prognosis disease features as well as with disease progression, pointing out the need for a closer follow-up in ISM patients with progressively increasing sBT values.

  10. A Parallel Reaction Monitoring Mass Spectrometric Method for Analysis of Potential CSF Biomarkers for Alzheimer's Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brinkmalm, Gunnar; Sjödin, Simon; Simonsen, Anja Hviid

    2018-01-01

    SCOPE: The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a parallel reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (PRM-MS) assay consisting of a panel of potential protein biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Thirteen proteins were selected based on their association with neurode......SCOPE: The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a parallel reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (PRM-MS) assay consisting of a panel of potential protein biomarkers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN: Thirteen proteins were selected based on their association...... with neurodegenerative diseases and involvement in synaptic function, secretory vesicle function, or innate immune system. CSF samples were digested and two to three peptides per protein were quantified using stable isotope-labeled peptide standards. RESULTS: Coefficients of variation were generally below 15%. Clinical...

  11. Patient perceptions of a remote monitoring intervention for chronic disease management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Bonnie J; Holman, John E; Ray, Annette; Scherubel, Melody

    2011-04-01

    Use of telecommunications technology to provide remote monitoring for people with chronic disease is becoming increasingly accepted as a means to improve patient outcomes and reduce resource use. The purpose of this project was to evaluate patient perceptions of a nurse-managed remote monitoring intervention to improve outcomes in veterans with comorbid diabetes and hypertension. Postintervention evaluation data were collected using a 12-item questionnaire and an open-ended question. Participants rated the program as generally positive on the questionnaire, but responses to the open-ended question revealed criticisms and suggestions for improvement not captured on the questionnaire. Interviewing participants in these programs may offer richer data for identifying areas for program improvement. Copyright 2011, SLACK Incorporated.

  12. Methodology for monitoring radionuclide activity in waste waters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padilla, R.; Hernandez, R.; Fernandez, J.; Vizcaino, M.

    1996-01-01

    A procedure for the determination of the volumetric specific activity of the liquid effluents of the CEADEN was established. The waters of the retention tank are sampled weekly and analyzed by gamma and beta spectrometry, determining the activity of several isotopes used in the radiochemistry works

  13. What tools are useful for monitoring endemic diseases? A simulation study based on different time-series components

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopes Antunes, Ana Carolina; Jensen, D; Hisham Beshara Halasa, Tariq

    2017-01-01

    Control and eradication programs play an important role in disease monitoring and surveillance. It is important to follow up on implemented strategies to reduce and/or eliminate a specific disease. The objectives of this study were to investigate the performance of different detection methods......, including methods commonly used in biosurveillance as well as state space models, for monitoring the effect of endemic disease control and eradication programs. We simulated 16 different scenarios of changes in disease sero-prevalence, inspired by real-world data from the Danish PRRS (Porcine Reproductive...... and Respiratory Syndrome) monitoring program. The changes included increases, decreases and/or constant sero-prevalence levels in different combinations. Two state space models were used to model the simulated data and different monitoring methods, such as univariate process control algorithms (UPCA...

  14. Interactive multimodal ambulatory monitoring to investigate the association between physical activity and affect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich W. Ebner-Priemer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Although there is a wealth of evidence that physical activity has positive effects on psychological health, a large proportion of people are inactive. Data regarding counts, steps, and movement patterns are limited in their ability to explain why people remain inactive. We propose that multimodal ambulatory monitoring, which combines the assessment of physical activity with the assessment of psychological variables, helps to elucidate real world physical activity. Whereas physical activity can be monitored continuously, psychological variables can only be assessed at discrete intervals, such as every hour. Moreover, the assessment of psychological variables must be linked to the activity of interest. For example, if an inactive and overweight person is physically active once a week, psychological variables should be assessed during this episode. Linking the assessment of psychological variables to episodes of an activity of interest can be achieved with interactive monitoring. The primary aim of our interactive multimodal ambulatory monitoring approach was to intentionally increase the number of e-diary assessments during active episodes.We developed and tested an interactive monitoring algorithm that continuously monitors physical activity in everyday life. When predefined thresholds are surpassed, the algorithm triggers a signal for participants to answer questions in their electronic diary.Using data from 70 participants wearing an accelerative device for 24 hours each, we found that our algorithm quadrupled the frequency of e-diary assessments during the activity episodes of interest compared to random sampling. Multimodal interactive ambulatory monitoring appears to be a promising approach to enhancing our understanding of real world physical activity and movement.

  15. Airport Gate Activity Monitoring Tool Suite for Improved Turnaround Prediction, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The objective of this research is to create a suite of tools for monitoring airport gate activities with the objective of improving aircraft turnaround. Airport ramp...

  16. Fibromyalgia in patients with other rheumatic diseases: prevalence and relationship with disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haliloglu, Sema; Carlioglu, Ayse; Akdeniz, Derya; Karaaslan, Yasar; Kosar, Ali

    2014-09-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a syndrome characterized by chronic widespread pain and the presence of specific tender points. The prevalence of FM has been estimated at 2-7 % of the general global population. The presence of FM in several rheumatic diseases with a structural pathology has been reported as 11-30 %. The objectives of this study were to determine the prevalence of FM and to evaluate the possible relationship between FM existence and disease activity among rheumatic diseases. The study group included 835 patients--197 rheumatoid arthritis (RA), 67 systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), 119 ankylosing spondylitis (AS), 238 osteoarthritis (OA), 14 familial Mediterranean fever (FMF), 53 Behçet's disease (BD), 71 gout, 25 Sjögren's syndrome (SS), 20 vasculitis, 29 polymyalgia rheumatica (PMR), and two polymyositis (PM)--with or without FM. Recorded information included age, gender, laboratory parameters, presence of fatigue, and disease activity indexes. The prevalence of FM in patients with rheumatologic diseases was found to be 6.6 % for RA, 13.4 % for SLE, 12.6 % for AS, 10.1 % for OA, 5.7 % for BD, 7.1 % for FMF, 12 % for SS, 25 % for vasculitis, 1.4 % for gout, and 6.9 % for PMR. One out of two patients with PM was diagnosed with FM. Some rheumatologic cases (AS, OA) with FM were observed mostly in female patients (p = 0.000). Also, there were significant correlations between disease activity indexes and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire scores for most rheumatologic patients (RA, AS, OA, and BD) (p diseases, and its recognition is important for the optimal management of these diseases. Increased pain, physical limitations, and fatigue may be interpreted as increased activity of these diseases, and a common treatment option is the prescription of higher doses of biologic agents or corticosteroids. Considerations of the FM component in the management of rheumatologic diseases increase the likelihood of the success of the treatment.

  17. 24-h monitoring of calcineurin phosphatase activity in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koefoed-Nielsen, P.B.; Karamperis, N.; Jørgensen, Kaj Anker

    2005-01-01

    The calcineurin inhibitors cyclosporine and tacrolimus are the cornerstone immunosuppressants used in solid organ transplantation. Studies investigating calcineurin (CaN) activity in renal transplanted patients have been published, but basic properties of the enzyme activity in healthy subjects...... remain to be described. The aim of this study was to investigate whether CaN displays circadian variation or sex difference is present in healthy subjects. Twenty subjects had blood samples drawn every 4 h for a 24-h period. CaN activity was determined in whole blood as the release of 32P from...

  18. Prenatal Remote Monitoring of Women With Gestational Hypertensive Diseases: Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanssens, Dorien; Vandenberk, Thijs; Smeets, Christophe Jp; De Cannière, Hélène; Vonck, Sharona; Claessens, Jade; Heyrman, Yenthel; Vandijck, Dominique; Storms, Valerie; Thijs, Inge M; Grieten, Lars; Gyselaers, Wilfried

    2018-03-26

    Remote monitoring in obstetrics is relatively new; some studies have shown its effectiveness for both mother and child. However, few studies have evaluated the economic impact compared to conventional care, and no cost analysis of a remote monitoring prenatal follow-up program for women diagnosed with gestational hypertensive diseases (GHD) has been published. The aim of this study was to assess the costs of remote monitoring versus conventional care relative to reported benefits. Patient data from the Pregnancy Remote Monitoring (PREMOM) study were used. Health care costs were calculated from patient-specific hospital bills of Ziekenhuis Oost-Limburg (Genk, Belgium) in 2015. Cost comparison was made from three perspectives: the Belgian national health care system (HCS), the National Institution for Insurance of Disease and Disability (RIZIV), and costs for individual patients. The calculations were made for four major domains: prenatal follow-up, prenatal admission to the hospital, maternal and neonatal care at and after delivery, and total amount of costs. A simulation exercise was made in which it was calculated how much could be demanded of RIZIV for funding the remote monitoring service. A total of 140 pregnancies were included, of which 43 received remote monitoring (30.7%) and 97 received conventional care (69.2%). From the three perspectives, there were no differences in costs for prenatal follow-up. Compared to conventional care, remote monitoring patients had 34.51% less HCS and 41.72% less RIZIV costs for laboratory test results (HCS: mean €0.00 [SD €55.34] vs mean €38.28 [SD € 44.08], Pmonitoring than conventional care (mean €209.22 [SD €213.32] vs mean €231.32 [SD 67.09], P=.02), but were 0.69% higher for RIZIV (mean €122.60 [SD €92.02] vs mean €121.78 [SD €20.77], Pmonitoring were mean €4233.31 (SD €3463.31) per person and mean €4973.69 (SD €5219.00) per person for conventional care (P=.82), a reduction of €740.38 (14

  19. Method of monitoring volume activity of natural radioactive aerosol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dvorak, V.

    1980-01-01

    The method of monitoring radioactivity of a aerosol trapped, eg., with a filter is based on counting quasi-coincidences of the RaC-RaC' and ThC-ThC' decay. The first electronic unit counts quasi-coincidences at a time interval proportional to the ThC' half-life while the second electronic unit counts quasi-coincidences at a time interval proportional to the RaC' half-life, reduced by the time interval of the first electronic unit. The quasi-coincidences are evaluated of the RaC-RaC' decay independently of the ThC-ThC' quasi-coincidences and the decay products of the trapped radon and thoron gases are thus offset separately. (J.P.)

  20. Contamination monitoring in radiation protection activities in Myanmar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thin, K T; Htoon, S [Yangon Univ. (Myanmar). Dept. of Physics

    1997-06-01

    The radioactive contamination in rainwater, seawater, air, milk powder and other eatables were measured with low level counter assembly. The measured activities are found to be very low and well within the maximum permissible level. (author)

  1. Circumpolar Active Layer Monitoring (CALM) Program Network, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The CALM network includes 168 active sites in both hemispheres with 15 participating countries. This network represents the only coordinated and standardized program...

  2. Ultrafast chiroptical spectroscopy: Monitoring optical activity in quick time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanju Rhee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical activity spectroscopy provides rich structural information of biologically important molecules in condensed phases. However, a few intrinsic problems of conventional method based on electric field intensity measurement scheme prohibited its extension to time domain technique. We have recently developed new types of optical activity spectroscopic methods capable of measuring chiroptical signals with femtosecond pulses. It is believed that these novel approaches will be applied to a variety of ultrafast chiroptical studies.

  3. Validation of Marek's disease diagnosis and monitoring of Marek's disease vaccines from samples collected in FTA cards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Aneg L; Montiel, Enrique R; Gimeno, Isabel M

    2009-12-01

    The use of Flinders Technology Associates (FTA) filter cards to quantify Marek's disease virus (MDV) DNA for the diagnosis of Marek's disease (MD) and to monitor MD vaccines was evaluated. Samples of blood (43), solid tumors (14), and feather pulp (FP; 36) collected fresh and in FTA cards were analyzed. MDV DNA load was quantified by real-time PCR. Threshold cycle (Ct) ratios were calculated for each sample by dividing the Ct value of the internal control gene (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) by the Ct value of the MDV gene. Statistically significant correlation (P FTA cards by using Pearson's correlation test. Load of serotype 1 MDV DNA was quantified in 24 FP, 14 solid tumor, and 43 blood samples. There was a statistically significant correlation between FP (r = 0.95), solid tumor (r = 0.94), and blood (r = 0.9) samples collected fresh and in FTA cards. Load of serotype 2 MDV DNA was quantified in 17 FP samples, and the correlation between samples collected fresh and in FTA cards was also statistically significant (Pearson's coefficient, r = 0.96); load of serotype 3 MDV DNA was quantified in 36 FP samples, and correlation between samples taken fresh and in FTA cards was also statistically significant (r = 0.84). MDV DNA samples extracted 3 days (t0) and 8 months after collection (t1) were used to evaluate the stability of MDV DNA in archived samples collected in FTA cards. A statistically significant correlation was found for serotype 1 (r = 0.96), serotype 2 (r = 1), and serotype 3 (r = 0.9). The results show that FTA cards are an excellent media to collect, transport, and archive samples for MD diagnosis and to monitor MD vaccines. In addition, FTA cards are widely available, inexpensive, and adequate for the shipment of samples nationally and internationally.

  4. Rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography in the ambulatory monitoring of patients with valvular heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raichlen, J.S.; Brest, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography serves as a valuable adjunct in the noninvasive evaluation and monitoring of patients with valvular heart disease. Although estimations of regurgitant fractions and the differences between left and right ventricular stroke volumes can be made, the limitations of the techniques do not enable adequate quantitation of the severity of valvular insufficiency to warrant routine use in ambulatory management. The importance of radionuclide ventriculography, however, lies in its ability to examine global ventricular function both at rest and with exercise, thus enabling assessment of the functional reserve of the left and right ventricles. Such data are of considerable value in determining the need for invasive evaluation and the timing of valve replacement in patients with valvular heart disease. 41 references.

  5. Rest and exercise radionuclide ventriculography in the ambulatory monitoring of patients with valvular heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raichlen, J.S.; Brest, A.N.

    1988-01-01

    Radionuclide angiography serves as a valuable adjunct in the noninvasive evaluation and monitoring of patients with valvular heart disease. Although estimations of regurgitant fractions and the differences between left and right ventricular stroke volumes can be made, the limitations of the techniques do not enable adequate quantitation of the severity of valvular insufficiency to warrant routine use in ambulatory management. The importance of radionuclide ventriculography, however, lies in its ability to examine global ventricular function both at rest and with exercise, thus enabling assessment of the functional reserve of the left and right ventricles. Such data are of considerable value in determining the need for invasive evaluation and the timing of valve replacement in patients with valvular heart disease. 41 references

  6. Measures of Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity in Australian Clinical Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Andrew; Bagga, Hanish

    2011-01-01

    Objectives. To investigate which rheumatoid arthritis (RA) disease activity measures are being collected in patients receiving glucocorticoids, non-biologic or biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs) in Australian rheumatology practice. Methods. A retrospective audit of medical records was conducted from eight rheumatology practices around Australia. Each rheumatologist recruited 30 consecutive eligible patients into the review, 10 of whom must have been receiving a biological...

  7. Antibacterial Activity of Hawaiian Corals: Possible Protection from Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gochfeld, D. J.; Aeby, G. S.; Miller, J. D.

    2006-12-01

    Reports of coral diseases in the Caribbean have appeared with increasing frequency over the past two decades; however, records of coral diseases in the Pacific have lagged far behind. Recent surveys of coral disease in the Hawaiian Islands indicate relatively low, but consistent, levels of disease throughout the inhabited Main and uninhabited Northwestern Hawaiian Islands, and demonstrate variation in levels of disease among the major genera of Hawaiian corals. Although little is known about immune defense to disease in corals, one potential mechanism of defense is the production of antimicrobial compounds that protect corals from pathogens. A preliminary survey of antibacterial chemical defenses among three dominant species of Hawaiian corals was undertaken. Crude aqueous extracts of Porites lobata, Pocillopora meandrina and Montipora capitata were tested against nine strains of bacteria in a growth inhibition assay. Inhibitory extracts were further tested to determine whether their effects were cytostatic or cytotoxic. The bacteria selected included known coral pathogens, potential marine pathogens found in human waste and strains previously identified from the surfaces of Hawaiian corals. Extracts from all three species of coral exhibited a high degree of antibacterial activity, but also a high degree of selectivity against different bacterial strains. In addition, some extracts were stimulatory to some bacteria. In addition to interspecific variability, extracts also exhibited intraspecific variability, both within and between sites. Hawaiian corals have significant antibacterial activity, which may explain the relatively low prevalence of disease in these corals; however, further characterization of pathogens specifically responsible for disease in Hawaiian corals is necessary before we can conclude that antibacterial activity protects Hawaiian corals from disease.

  8. Fish monitoring project -- Oregon: Smolt monitoring activities at Little Goose Dam in 1996. Annual Report 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setter, A.

    1998-01-01

    The juvenile fish facility at Little Goose Dam is operated seasonally to collect and bypass downstream migrating smolts and keep them from passing through the turbine blades. Fish are diverted from turbines by traveling screens as they sound in the forebay to pass the dam. A small percentage of the passing fish are sampled on a daily basis to provide information on fish condition, species composition, migration timing, and size distribution. Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife personnel perform daily fish sampling and data collection. Physical operation of the facility is the responsibility of the US Army Corps of Engineers. Data is reported to the Fish Passage Center daily by means of electronic data transfer. Funding for this project was provided through the Smolt Monitoring Program administered by the Fish Passage Center. Overall, the number of fish collected and sampled in 1996 was a reduction from the previous years of operation. The 1996 migration season was characterized by higher than average flows and greater spill frequency at the dam. It was the first year that coho salmon were obtained in the sample. The predominant species collected was steelhead with hatchery fish outnumbering wild fish by a ratio of 8:1. An increased emphasis was placed on gas bubble trauma examination and a routine, consistent effort was implemented using a protocol established by the Fish Passage Center. The objective of the gas bubble trauma (GBT) examinations was to document the relative incidence of symptoms throughout the migration season

  9. Does self-perceived sleep reflect sleep estimated via activity monitors in professional rugby league athletes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caia, Johnpaul; Thornton, Heidi R; Kelly, Vincent G; Scott, Tannath J; Halson, Shona L; Cupples, Balin; Driller, Matthew W

    2018-07-01

    This study examined agreement between self-perceived sleep and sleep estimated via activity monitors in professional rugby league athletes. 63 athletes, from three separate teams wore actigraphy monitors for 10.3 ± 3.9 days. During the monitoring period, ratings of perceived sleep quality (on a 1-5 and 1-10 Likert scale), and an estimate of sleep duration were recorded daily. Agreement between sleep estimated via activity monitors and self-perceived sleep was examined using mean bias, Pearson correlation (r) and typical error of the estimate (TEE). 641 nights of sleep were recorded, with a very large, positive correlation observed between sleep duration estimated via activity monitors and subjective sleep duration (r = 0.85), and a TEE of 48 minutes. Mean bias revealed subjective sleep duration overestimated sleep by an average of 19.8 minutes. The relationship between sleep efficiency estimated via activity monitors and self-perceived sleep quality on a 1-5 (r = 0.22) and 1-10 Likert scale (r = 0.28) was limited. The outcomes of this investigation support the use of subjective measures to monitor sleep duration in rugby league athletes when objective means are unavailable. However, practitioners should be aware of the tendency of athletes to overestimate sleep duration.

  10. Sleep disorders and inflammatory disease activity: chicken or the egg?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Parth J; Oldfield Iv, Edward C; Challapallisri, Vaishnavi; Ware, J Catsby; Johnson, David A

    2015-04-01

    Sleep dysfunction is a highly prevalent condition that has long been implicated in accelerating disease states characterized by having an inflammatory component such as systemic lupus erythematosus, HIV, and multiple sclerosis. Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is a chronic, debilitating disease that is characterized by waxing and waning symptoms, which are a direct result of increased circulating inflammatory cytokines. Recent studies have demonstrated sleep dysfunction and the disruption of the circadian rhythm to result in an upregulation of inflammatory cytokines. Not only does this pose a potential trigger for disease flares but also an increased risk of malignancy in this subset of patients. This begs to question whether or not there is a therapeutic role of sleep cycle and circadian rhythm optimization in the prevention of IBD flares. Further research is needed to clarify the role of sleep dysfunction and alterations of the circadian rhythm in modifying disease activity and also in reducing the risk of malignancy in patients suffering from IBD.

  11. The PROactive instruments to measure physical activity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gimeno-Santos, Elena; Raste, Yogini; Demeyer, Heleen; Louvaris, Zafeiris; de Jong, Corina; Rabinovich, Roberto A.; Hopkinson, Nicholas S.; Polkey, Michael I.; Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Tabberer, Maggie; Dobbels, Fabienne; Ivanoff, Nathalie; de Boer, Willem I.; van der Molen, Thys; Kulich, Karoly; Serra, Ignasi; Basagaña, Xavier; Troosters, Thierry; Puhan, Milo A.; Karlsson, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    No current patient-centred instrument captures all dimensions of physical activity in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Our objective was item reduction and initial validation of two instruments to measure physical activity in COPD. Physical activity was assessed in a 6-week, randomised, two-way cross-over, multicentre study using PROactive draft questionnaires (daily and clinical visit versions) and two activity monitors. Item reduction followed an iterative process including classical and Rasch model analyses, and input from patients and clinical experts. 236 COPD patients from five European centres were included. Results indicated the concept of physical activity in COPD had two domains, labelled “amount” and “difficulty”. After item reduction, the daily PROactive instrument comprised nine items and the clinical visit contained 14. Both demonstrated good model fit (person separation index >0.7). Confirmatory factor analysis supported the bidimensional structure. Both instruments had good internal consistency (Cronbach's α>0.8), test–retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient ≥0.9) and exhibited moderate-to-high correlations (r>0.6) with related constructs and very low correlations (r<0.3) with unrelated constructs, providing evidence for construct validity. Daily and clinical visit “PROactive physical activity in COPD” instruments are hybrid tools combining a short patient-reported outcome questionnaire and two activity monitor variables which provide simple, valid and reliable measures of physical activity in COPD patients. PMID:26022965

  12. Method for monitoring stack gases for uranium activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beverly, C.R.; Ernstberger, H.G.

    1988-01-01

    A method for sampling stack gases emanating from the purge cascade of a gaseous diffusion cascade system utilized to enrich uranium for determining the presence and extent of uranium in the stack gases in the form of gaseous uranium hexafluoride, is described comprising the steps of removing a side stream of gases from the stack gases, contacting the side stream of the stack gases with a stream of air sufficiently saturated with moisture for reacting with and converting any gaseous uranium hexafluroide contracted thereby in the side stream of stack gases to particulate uranyl fluoride. Thereafter contacting the side stream of stack gases containing the particulate uranyl fluoride with moving filter means for continuously intercepting and conveying the intercepted particulate uranyl fluoride away from the side stream of stack gases, and continually scanning the moving filter means with radiation monitoring means for sensing the presence and extent of particulate uranyl fluoride on the moving filter means which is indicative of the extent of particulate uranyl fluoride in the side stream of stack gases which in turn is indicative of the presence and extent of uranium hexafluoride in the stack gases

  13. Monitoring of risk and protective factors for chronic non communicable diseases by telephone survey in Brazilian State Capitals, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malta, Deborah Carvalho; da Silva, Sara Araújo; de Oliveira, Patrícia Pereira Vasconcelos; Iser, Betine Pinto Moehlecke; Bernal, Regina Tomie Ivata; Sardinha, Luciana Monteiro Vasconcelos; Moura, Lenildo de

    2012-09-01

    To estimate the prevalence of protective and risk factors for the most important chronic non communicable diseases in all Brazilian capitals, including the Federal District. Data used were collected in 2008 through VIGITEL, an ongoing population-based telephone survey surveillance system implemented in all Brazilian State capitals since 2006. In 2008, over 54,000 interviews were completed over the phone with a random sample of individuals living in all 27 capitals. The analyses showed differences in the prevalence of determinants of chronic diseases by demographic characteristics such as gender, age and schooling. Men were more likely to be current smokers, overweight, and consumers of soft drinks, fatty meat and alcohol. They were also more likely to be more active in leisure. Women reported being more likely to eat healthy, but also were more likely to have a physician diagnosis of high blood pressure, dyslipidemia, osteoporosis and overall poor health status. In general, the prevalence of risk factors studied increased with decreasing levels of schooling. The VIGITEL system was implemented to monitor changes in the prevalence of determinants of chronic diseases over time to inform public health workers and decision makers to adjust existing programs and policies according to the changing profile of consumers. The ultimate goal is to improve the health of the Brazilian population.

  14. Monitoring active filters under automotive aging scenarios with embedded instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wan, J.; Kerkhoff, Hans G.

    2012-01-01

    In automotive mixed-signal SoCs, the analogue/mixed-signal front-ends are of particular interest with regard to dependability. Because of the many electrical disturbances at the front-end, often (active) filters are being used. Due to the harsh environments, in some cases, degradation of these

  15. Hemispheric Asymmetries in the Activation and Monitoring of Memory Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giammattei, Jeannette; Arndt, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on the lateralization of memory errors suggests that the right hemisphere's tendency to produce more memory errors than the left hemisphere reflects hemispheric differences in semantic activation. However, all prior research that has examined the lateralization of memory errors has used self-paced recognition judgments. Because…

  16. The Use of Electrocortical Activity to Monitor Human Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-02-01

    processor’ lies in a principle i of neural organization rather than in a specific locus in the CNS. We cannot assume that activity related to the...Slov potential changes and choice RT as a function cf Ir.terctlmitlua Interval, Acta Paychoiepical 37, 173-186, 1973. Gerbrandt, L. K., Coff , W. R

  17. Remote health monitoring: predicting outcome success based on contextual features for cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshurafa, Nabil; Eastwood, Jo-Ann; Pourhomayoun, Mohammad; Liu, Jason J; Sarrafzadeh, Majid

    2014-01-01

    Current studies have produced a plethora of remote health monitoring (RHM) systems designed to enhance the care of patients with chronic diseases. Many RHM systems are designed to improve patient risk factors for cardiovascular disease, including physiological parameters such as body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference, and lipid profiles such as low density lipoprotein (LDL) and high density lipoprotein (HDL). There are several patient characteristics that could be determining factors for a patient's RHM outcome success, but these characteristics have been largely unidentified. In this paper, we analyze results from an RHM system deployed in a six month Women's Heart Health study of 90 patients, and apply advanced feature selection and machine learning algorithms to identify patients' key baseline contextual features and build effective prediction models that help determine RHM outcome success. We introduce Wanda-CVD, a smartphone-based RHM system designed to help participants with cardiovascular disease risk factors by motivating participants through wireless coaching using feedback and prompts as social support. We analyze key contextual features that secure positive patient outcomes in both physiological parameters and lipid profiles. Results from the Women's Heart Health study show that health threat of heart disease, quality of life, family history, stress factors, social support, and anxiety at baseline all help predict patient RHM outcome success.

  18. Towards a European Framework to Monitor Infectious Diseases among Migrant Populations: Design and Applicability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flavia Riccardo

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available There are limitations in our capacity to interpret point estimates and trends of infectious diseases occurring among diverse migrant populations living in the European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA. The aim of this study was to design a data collection framework that could capture information on factors associated with increased risk to infectious diseases in migrant populations in the EU/EEA. The authors defined factors associated with increased risk according to a multi-dimensional framework and performed a systematic literature review in order to identify whether those factors well reflected the reported risk factors for infectious disease in these populations. Following this, the feasibility of applying this framework to relevant available EU/EEA data sources was assessed. The proposed multidimensional framework is well suited to capture the complexity and concurrence of these risk factors and in principle applicable in the EU/EEA. The authors conclude that adopting a multi-dimensional framework to monitor infectious diseases could favor the disaggregated collection and analysis of migrant health data.

  19. Non-Contact Monitoring of Heart and Lung Activity by Magnetic Induction Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Steffen

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In many clinical applications, the monitoring of heart and lung activity is of vital importance. State-of-the-art monitoring involves the use of electrodes or other contact based sensors (electrocardiogram (ECG, impedance cardiography (ICG, pulse oximetry or equivalent. With the equipment that is used, side effects like skin irritation, difficult application or additional cabling may occur. In contrast, this paper describes a method for non-contact monitoring of heart and lung activity, which is solely based on magnetic induction. This method allows simultaneous monitoring of heart and lung activity, and has the potential of an integrated application in a personal healthcare scenario. To illustrate the performance, a simple test-setup has been developed and the first results are presented here (some of which have been previously presented on the Poster 2008 [10]. 

  20. Thiopurine monitoring in children with inflammatory bowel disease: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konidari, Anastasia; Anagnostopoulos, Antonios; Bonnett, Laura J; Pirmohamed, Munir; El-Matary, Wael

    2014-09-01

    The aim was to systematically review the evidence on the clinical usefulness of thiopurine metabolite and white blood count (WBC) monitoring in the assessment of clinical outcomes in children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Medline, Embase, Cochrane Central Register of controlled trials and http://www.clinicaltrials.gov were screened in adherence to the PRISMA statement by two independent reviewers for identification of eligible studies. Eligible studies were randomized controlled trials (RCTs), cohort studies and large case series of children with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) (6MMPR) as an indicator of hepatotoxicity. Low thiopurine metabolite concentration may be indicative of non-compliance. Thiopurine metabolite testing does not safely predict clinical outcome, but may facilitate toxicity surveillance and treatment optimization in poor responders. Current evidence favours the combination of thiopurine metabolite/WBC monitoring and clinic follow-up for prompt identification of haematologic/hepatic toxicity safe dose adjustment, and treatment modification in cases of suboptimal clinical outcome or non-compliance. Well designed RCTs for the identification of robust surrogate markers of thiopurine efficacy and toxicity are required. © 2014 The British Pharmacological Society.

  1. Hepatic and erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity in liver diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordero, R; Ortiz, A; Hernández, R; López, V; Gómez, M M; Mena, P

    1996-09-01

    Hepatic and erythrocytic glutathione peroxidase activity, together with malondialdehyde levels, were determined as indicators of peroxidation in 83 patients from whom liver biopsies had been taken for diagnostic purposes. On histological study, the patients were classified into groups as minimal changes (including normal liver), steatosis, alcoholic hepatitis, hepatic cirrhosis, light to moderately active chronic hepatitis, and severe chronic active hepatitis. The glutathione peroxidase activity in erythrocytes showed no significant changes in any liver disease group. In the hepatic study, an increased activity was observed in steatosis with respect to the minimal changes group, this increased activity induced by the toxic agent in the initial stages of the alcoholic hepatic disease declining as the hepatic damage progressed. There was a negative correlation between the levels of hepatic malondialdehyde and hepatic glutathione peroxidase in subjects with minimal changes. This suggested the existence of an oxidative equilibrium in this group. This equilibrium is broken in the liver disease groups as was manifest in a positive correlation between malondialdehyde and glutathione peroxidase activity.

  2. ILRS Activities in Monitoring Systematic Errors in SLR Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlis, E. C.; Luceri, V.; Kuzmicz-Cieslak, M.; Bianco, G.

    2017-12-01

    The International Laser Ranging Service (ILRS) contributes to ITRF development unique information that only Satellite Laser Ranging—SLR is sensitive to: the definition of the origin, and in equal parts with VLBI, the scale of the model. For the development of ITRF2014, the ILRS analysts adopted a revision of the internal standards and procedures in generating our contribution from the eight ILRS Analysis Centers. The improved results for the ILRS components were reflected in the resulting new time series of the ITRF origin and scale, showing insignificant trends and tighter scatter. This effort was further extended after the release of ITRF2014, with the execution of a Pilot Project (PP) in the 2016-2017 timeframe that demonstrated the robust estimation of persistent systematic errors at the millimeter level. ILRS ASC is now turning this into an operational tool to monitor station performance and to generate a history of systematics at each station, to be used with each re-analysis for future ITRF model developments. This is part of a broader ILRS effort to improve the quality control of the data collection process as well as that of our products. To this end, the ILRS has established a "Quality Control Board—QCB" that comprises of members from the analysis and engineering groups, the Central Bureau, and even user groups with special interests. The QCB meets by telecon monthly and oversees the various ongoing projects, develops ideas for new tools and future products. This presentation will focus on the main topic with an update on the results so far, the schedule for the near future and its operational implementation, along with a brief description of upcoming new ILRS products.

  3. Detection of uranium enrichment activities using environmental monitoring techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belew, W.L.; Carter, J.A.; Smith, D.H.; Walker, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    Uranium enrichment processes have the capability of producing weapons-grade material in the form of highly enriched uranium. Thus, detection of undeclared uranium enrichment activities is an international safeguards concern. The uranium separation technologies currently in use employ UF 6 gas as a separation medium, and trace quantities of enriched uranium are inevitably released to the environment from these facilities. The isotopic content of uranium in the vegetation, soil, and water near the plant site will be altered by these releases and can provide a signature for detecting the presence of enriched uranium activities. This paper discusses environmental sampling and analytical procedures that have been used for the detection of uranium enrichment facilities and possible safeguards applications of these techniques

  4. Subsidence monitoring network: an Italian example aimed at a sustainable hydrocarbon E&P activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. Dacome

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available According to the Italian law in order to start-up any new hydrocarbon exploitation activity, an Environmental Impact Assessment study has to be presented, including a monitoring plan, addressed to foresee, measure and analyze in real time any possible impact of the project on the coastal areas and on those ones in the close inland located. The occurrence of subsidence, that could partly be related to hydrocarbon production, both on-shore and off-shore, can generate great concern in those areas where its occurrence may have impacts on the local environment. ENI, following the international scientific community recommendations on the matter, since the beginning of 90's years, implemented a cutting-edge monitoring network, with the aim to prevent, mitigate and control geodynamics phenomena generated in the activity areas, with a particular attention to conservation and protection of environmental and territorial equilibrium, taking care of what is known as "sustainable development". The current ENI implemented monitoring surveys can be divided as: – Shallow monitoring: spirit levelling surveys, continuous GPS surveys in permanent stations, SAR surveys, assestimeter subsurface compaction monitoring, ground water level monitoring, LiDAR surveys, bathymetrical surveys. – Deep monitoring: reservoir deep compaction trough radioactive markers, reservoir static (bottom hole pressure monitoring. All the information, gathered through the monitoring network, allow: 1. to verify if the produced subsidence is evolving accordingly with the simulated forecast. 2. to provide data to revise and adjust the prediction compaction models 3. to put in place the remedial actions if the impact exceeds the threshold magnitude originally agreed among the involved parties. ENI monitoring plan to measure and monitor the subsidence process, during field production and also after the field closure, is therefore intended to support a sustainable field development and an

  5. Subsidence monitoring network: an Italian example aimed at a sustainable hydrocarbon E&P activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dacome, M. C.; Miandro, R.; Vettorel, M.; Roncari, G.

    2015-11-01

    According to the Italian law in order to start-up any new hydrocarbon exploitation activity, an Environmental Impact Assessment study has to be presented, including a monitoring plan, addressed to foresee, measure and analyze in real time any possible impact of the project on the coastal areas and on those ones in the close inland located. The occurrence of subsidence, that could partly be related to hydrocarbon production, both on-shore and off-shore, can generate great concern in those areas where its occurrence may have impacts on the local environment. ENI, following the international scientific community recommendations on the matter, since the beginning of 90's years, implemented a cutting-edge monitoring network, with the aim to prevent, mitigate and control geodynamics phenomena generated in the activity areas, with a particular attention to conservation and protection of environmental and territorial equilibrium, taking care of what is known as "sustainable development". The current ENI implemented monitoring surveys can be divided as: - Shallow monitoring: spirit levelling surveys, continuous GPS surveys in permanent stations, SAR surveys, assestimeter subsurface compaction monitoring, ground water level monitoring, LiDAR surveys, bathymetrical surveys. - Deep monitoring: reservoir deep compaction trough radioactive markers, reservoir static (bottom hole) pressure monitoring. All the information, gathered through the monitoring network, allow: 1. to verify if the produced subsidence is evolving accordingly with the simulated forecast. 2. to provide data to revise and adjust the prediction compaction models 3. to put in place the remedial actions if the impact exceeds the threshold magnitude originally agreed among the involved parties. ENI monitoring plan to measure and monitor the subsidence process, during field production and also after the field closure, is therefore intended to support a sustainable field development and an acceptable exploitation

  6. Ramiprilate inhibits functional matrix metalloproteinase activity in Crohn's disease fistulas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Efsen, Eva; Saermark, Torben; Hansen, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Increased expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -3 and -9 has been demonstrated in Crohn's disease fistulas, but it is unknown whether these enzymes are biologically active and represent a therapeutic target. Therefore, we investigated the proteolytic activity of MMPs in fistula tissue...... from six controls were also included. Total functional MMP activity was measured by a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC)-based, fluorogenic MMP-substrate cleavage assay, and the specific activity of MMP-2, -3 and -9 by the MMP Biotrak Activity Assay. The MMP inhibitors comprised ethylene......-9.83) compared with non-Crohn's fistulas, [0.32 ng/ml, range 0-2.66, (p MMP-9 activity [0.64 ng/ml, range 0-5.66 and 0.17 ng/ml, range 0-1.1, respectively (p MMP activity level by 42% and suppressed the specific MMP-3...

  7. Intra-Individual Variability of Physical Activity in Older Adults With and Without Mild Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Amber; Walters, Ryan W; Hoffman, Lesa; Templin, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Physical activity shows promise for protection against cognitive decline in older adults with and without Alzheimer's disease (AD). To better understand barriers to adoption of physical activity in this population, a clear understanding of daily and weekly activity patterns is needed. Most accelerometry studies report average physical activity over an entire wear period without considering the potential importance of the variability of physical activity. This study evaluated individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity and determined whether these differences could be predicted by AD status, day of wear, age, gender, education, and cardiorespiratory capacity. Physical activity was measured via accelerometry (Actigraph GT3X+) over one week in 86 older adults with and without AD (n = 33 and n = 53, respectively). Mixed-effects location-scale models were estimated to evaluate and predict individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity. Results indicated that compared to controls, participants with AD averaged 21% less activity, but averaged non-significantly greater intra-individual variability. Women and men averaged similar amounts of physical activity, but women were significantly less variable. The amount of physical activity differed significantly across days of wear. Increased cardiorespiratory capacity was associated with greater average amounts of physical activity. Investigation of individual differences in the amount and intra-individual variability of physical activity provided insight into differences by AD status, days of monitor wear, gender, and cardiovascular capacity. All individuals regardless of AD status were equally consistent in their physical activity, which may have been due to a highly sedentary sample and/or the early disease stage of those participants with AD. These results highlight the value of considering individual differences in both the amount and

  8. Determination of MMP-2 and -9 activities in synovial fluid of horses with osteoarthritic and arthritic joint diseases using gelatin zymography and immunocapture activity assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fietz, S; Einspanier, R; Hoppner, S; Hertsch, B; Bondzio, A

    2008-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and -9 activities have been found elevated in synovial fluid from various joint diseases in man. However, in the horse few data are available. To explore the clinical significance of MMP-2 and -9 activities in synovial fluid of horses with different forms of joint diseases. Gelatin zymography and MMP-2 and -9 immunocapture activity assays were applied on synovial fluids from control joints and joints with aseptic joint disease (AJD) and septic arthritis (SA). Additionally, MMP-2 and -9 activities were measured in samples from SA to monitor the disease process. Zymographic analysis revealed that samples from AJD and SA contained significantly increased latent MMP-2 activity compared to controls. Samples from SA showed significantly increased monomeric latent MMP-9 activity compared with all other affected joints and controls. Trace amounts of MMP-9 activity, due to the active and dimer form, were detected in samples from SA; however, these bands were absent in samples from AJD and controls. Using immunocapture activity assays, MMP-2 and -9 activities were found to be significantly elevated in joints from SA compared to controls and AJD samples. MMP-2 activity in samples from AJD was significantly increased compared to controls. Both MMP activities decreased in the joints from SA in the course of successful therapy. Data from zymographic analysis confirmed that MMP-2 and -9 were elevated in equine joint diseases. Immunocapture activity assays have been shown to be suitable for the quantitative determination of MMP-2 and -9 activities in synovial fluid of horses. Both MMP-2 and -9 activities seem to be useful to indicate SA, and MMP-2 activity might be a suitable marker for AJD. These findings encourage the potential use of MMP-2 and -9 as additional aids to clinical investigation. Further work is required to validate the clinical significance of MMP activities in the progress of different joint diseases in horses.

  9. Interactions between stress and physical activity on Alzheimer's disease pathology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla M. Yuede

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Physical activity and stress are both environmental modifiers of Alzheimer's disease (AD risk. Animal studies of physical activity in AD models have largely reported positive results, however benefits are not always observed in either cognitive or pathological outcomes and inconsistencies among findings remain. Studies using forced exercise may increase stress and mitigate some of the benefit of physical activity in AD models, while voluntary exercise regimens may not achieve optimal intensity to provide robust benefit. We evaluated the findings of studies of voluntary and forced exercise regimens in AD mouse models to determine the influence of stress, or the intensity of exercise needed to outweigh the negative effects of stress on AD measures. In addition, we show that chronic physical activity in a mouse model of AD can prevent the effects of acute restraint stress on Aβ levels in the hippocampus. Stress and physical activity have many overlapping and divergent effects on the body and some of the possible mechanisms through which physical activity may protect against stress-induced risk factors for AD are discussed. While the physiological effects of acute stress and acute exercise overlap, chronic effects of physical activity appear to directly oppose the effects of chronic stress on risk factors for AD. Further study is needed to identify optimal parameters for intensity, duration and frequency of physical activity to counterbalance effects of stress on the development and progression of AD. Keywords: Alzheimer's disease, Amyloid, Stress, Exercise, Physical activity

  10. Testing the applicability of rapid on-site enzymatic activity detection for surface water monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stadler, Philipp; Vogl, Wolfgang; Juri, Koschelnik; Markus, Epp; Maximilian, Lackner; Markus, Oismüller; Monika, Kumpan; Peter, Strauss; Regina, Sommer; Gabriela, Ryzinska-Paier; Farnleitner Andreas, H.; Matthias, Zessner

    2015-04-01

    On-site detection of enzymatic activities has been suggested as a rapid surrogate for microbiological pollution monitoring of water resources (e.g. using glucuronidases, galactosidases, esterases). Due to the possible short measuring intervals enzymatic methods have high potential as near-real time water quality monitoring tools. This presentation describes results from a long termed field test. For twelve months, two ColiMinder devices (Vienna Water Monitoring, Austria) for on-site determination of enzymatic activity were tested for stream water monitoring at the experimental catchment HOAL (Hydrological Open Air Laboratory, Center for Water Resource Systems, Vienna University of Technology). The devices were overall able to follow and reflect the diverse hydrological and microbiological conditions of the monitored stream during the test period. Continuous data in high temporal resolution captured the course of enzymatic activity in stream water during diverse rainfall events. The method also proofed sensitive enough to determine diurnal fluctuations of enzymatic activity in stream water during dry periods. The method was able to capture a seasonal trend of enzymatic activity in stream water that matches the results gained from Colilert18 analysis for E. coli and coliform bacteria of monthly grab samples. Furthermore the comparison of ColiMinder data with measurements gained at the same test site with devices using the same method but having different construction design (BACTcontrol, microLAN) showed consistent measuring results. Comparative analysis showed significant differences between measured enzymatic activity (modified fishman units and pmol/min/100ml) and cultivation based analyses (most probable number, colony forming unit). Methods of enzymatic activity measures are capable to detect ideally the enzymatic activity caused by all active target bacteria members, including VBNC (viable but nonculturable) while cultivation based methods cannot detect VBNC

  11. Continued monitoring of aeolian activity within Herschel Crater, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardinale, Marco; Pozzobon, Riccardo; Michaels, Timothy; Bourke, Mary C.; Okubo, Chris H.; Chiara Tangari, Anna; Marinangeli, Lucia

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we study a dark dune field on the western side of Herschel crater, a 300 km diameter impact basin located near the Martian equator (14.4°S, 130°E), where the ripple and dune motion reflects the actual atmospheric wind conditions. We develop an integrated analysis using (1) automated ripple mapping that yields ripple orientations and evaluates the spatial variation of actual atmospheric wind conditions within the dunes, (2) an optical cross-correlation that allows us to quantify an average ripple migration rate of 0.42 m per Mars year, and (3) mesoscale climate modeling with which we compare the observed aeolian changes with modeled wind stresses and directions. Our observations are consistent with previous work [1] [2] that detected aeolian activity in the western part of the crater. It also demonstrates that not only are the westerly Herschel dunes movable, but that predominant winds from the north are able to keep the ripples and dunes active within most (if not all) of Herschel crater in the current atmospheric conditions. References: [1] Cardinale, M., Silvestro, S., Vaz, D.A., Michaels, T., Bourke, M.C., Komatsu, G., Marinangeli, L., 2016. Present-day aeolian activity in Herschel Crater, Mars. Icarus 265, 139-148. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.10.022. [2] Runyon, K.D., Bridges, N.T., Ayoub, F., Newman, C.E. and Quade, J.J., 2017. An integrated model for dune morphology and sand fluxes on Mars. Earth and Planetary Science Letters, 457, pp.204-212.

  12. Local seismic activity monitored at King Sejong Station, Antarctica

    OpenAIRE

    Lee,Duk Kee; Kim,Yea Dong; Nam,Sang Heon; Jin,Young Keun

    1998-01-01

    Source location estimation from single station earthquake data collected at King Sejong Station (62°13'3l"N, 58°47'07"W) from 1995 to 1996 provides seismic activity around King Sejong Station. Analysis of local events, less than 1.5°in angular epicentral distance, finds epicenters located near the Shackleton Fracture Zone, the South Shetland Platform, Deception Island, and North Bransfield Basin. Estimated magnitudes range from 2.2 to 4.5 on the Richter scale, averaging 4.0 in North Bransfiel...

  13. Management of Graves' disease during pregnancy: the key role of fetal thyroid gland monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luton, Dominique; Le Gac, Isabelle; Vuillard, Edith; Castanet, Mireille; Guibourdenche, Jean; Noel, Michèle; Toubert, Marie-Elisabeth; Léger, Juliane; Boissinot, Christine; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Garel, Catherine; Tébeka, Brigitte; Oury, Jean-François; Czernichow, Paul; Polak, Michel

    2005-11-01

    Fetuses from mothers with Graves' disease may experience hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism due to transplacental transfer of antithyroid drugs (ATD) or anti-TSH receptor antibodies, respectively. Little is known about the fetal consequences. Early diagnosis is essential to successful management. We investigated a new approach to the fetal diagnosis of thyroid dysfunction and validated the usefulness of fetal thyroid ultrasonograms. Seventy-two mothers with past or present Graves' disease and their fetuses were monitored monthly from 22 wk gestation. Fetal thyroid size and Doppler signals, and fetal bone maturation were determined on ultrasonograms, and thyroid function was evaluated at birth. Thyroid function and ATD dosage were monitored in the mothers. The 31 fetuses whose mothers were anti-TSH receptor antibody negative and took no ATDs during late pregnancy had normal test results. Of the 41 other fetuses, 30 had normal test results at 32 wk, 29 were euthyroid at birth, and one had moderate hypothyroidism on cord blood tests. In the remaining 11 fetuses, goiter was visualized by ultrasonography at 32 wk, and fetal thyroid dysfunction was diagnosed and treated; there was one death, in a late referral, and 10 good outcomes with normal or slightly altered thyroid function at birth. The sensitivity and specificity of fetal thyroid ultrasound at 32 wk for the diagnosis of clinically relevant fetal thyroid dysfunction were 92 and 100%, respectively. In pregnant women with past or current Graves' disease, ultrasonography of the fetal thyroid gland by an experienced ultrasonographer is an excellent diagnostic tool. This tool in conjunction with close teamwork among internists, endocrinologists, obstetricians, echographists, and pediatricians can ensure normal fetal thyroid function.

  14. Ambulatory monitoring of left ventricular function in patients with Parkinson`s disease and postural hypotension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nappi, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Cuocolo, A. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Iazzetta, N. [Inst. of Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Ferrara, L.A. [Inst. of Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Marotta, T. [Inst. of Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Pace, L. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Nicolai, E. [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); De Michele, G. [Inst. of Neurological Sciences, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Campanella, G. [Inst. of Neurological Sciences, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy); Salvatore, M. [National Cancer Inst., Naples (Italy); Postiglione, A. [Inst. of Internal Medicine and Metabolic Diseases, Univ. ``Federico II``, Naples (Italy)

    1994-12-01

    Left ventricular (LV) function was continuously monitored using a radionuclide detector (VEST) after intravenous injection of 25 mCi technetium-99m labelled red blood cells in nine patients with Parkinson`s disease and postural hypotension (group 1) and ten patients with Parkinson`s disease but without postural hypotension (group 2). LV function and blood pressure were monitored in the supine position for 15 min (period A), upon changing posture from the supine to the upright position for 10 min (period B), and upon returning to the supine position for 10 min (period C). In group 1, the passage from period A to period B induced a significant decrease in end-diastolic volume, end-systolic volume and ejection fraction (all P<0.01). In group 2, ejection fraction increased (P<0.05) upon changing posture from the supine to the upright position. Ejection fraction (F=33, P<0.01), end-diastolic volume (F=9, P<0.05) and end-systolic volume (F=10, P<0.05) were significantly different between the two groups. In group 1, stroke volume, cardiac output and vascular peripheral resistance decreased from period A to period B (all P<0.001). In group 2, no changes in stroke volume, cardiac output and vascular peripheral resistance were observed from period A to period B. All parameters were similar in the two groups during the periods A and C. Upon changing posture from the supine to the upright position, patients with Parkinson`s disease and postural hypotension showed marked changes in parameters of LV function induced by vascular abnormalities. The results of this study may help to clarify the potential risk of sudden postural changes in such patients, which may cause fainting, syncope and increased risk of ischaemic coronary and cerebrovascular attacks and of lower limb fractures. (orig.)

  15. Organisational and Methodical Grounds of Financial Monitoring of Business Activity of an Enterprise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sydorenko-Melnyk Ganna M.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article analyses organisational and methodical grounds of financial monitoring of business activity of an enterprise, which is presented as a complex of measures of organisational, methodical and managerial nature. It justifies urgency and practical significance of introduction of the system of financial monitoring as a basic element of the system of financial management of business activity under modern economic conditions. It considers the essence and purpose of financial monitoring of business activity, presents its principles and formulates tasks. It offers methodical provision of the process of monitoring focusing on the study of essential characteristics of business activity of an enterprise. It states that introduction of the financial monitoring of business activity allows understanding of the state of an object or situation, identification of the reason of the detected deviations from the planned (forecasted results and establishment of a base for development of applied recommendations on a relevant adjustment, which results in increase of efficiency of the financial and economic activity of an enterprise and availability of prerequisites of sustainable development.

  16. "It's Like a Cyber-Security Blanket": The Utility of Remote Activity Monitoring in Family Dementia Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Lauren L; Peterson, Colleen M; Rud, Shaina R; Jutkowitz, Eric; Sarkinen, Andrielle; Trost, Sierra; Porta, Carolyn M; Finlay, Jessica M; Gaugler, Joseph E

    2018-03-01

    Technologies have emerged that aim to help older persons with Alzheimer's disease and related dementias (ADRDs) remain at home while also supporting their caregiving family members. However, the usefulness of these innovations, particularly in home-based care contexts, remains underexplored. The current study evaluated the acceptability and utility of an in-home remote activity monitoring (RAM) system for 30 family caregivers of persons with ADRD via quantitative survey data collected over a 6-month period and qualitative survey and interview data collected for up to 18 months. A parallel convergent mixed methods design was employed. The integrated qualitative and quantitative data suggested that RAM technology offered ongoing monitoring and provided caregivers with a sense of security. Considerable customization was needed so that RAM was most appropriate for persons with ADRD. The findings have important clinical implications when considering how RAM can supplement, or potentially substitute for, ADRD family care.

  17. Nutrition and Physical Activity in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia P. Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is the most common liver disease worldwide and it is associated with other medical conditions such as diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome, and obesity. The mechanisms of the underlying disease development and progression are not completely established and there is no consensus concerning the pharmacological treatment. In the gold standard treatment for NAFLD weight loss, dietary therapy, and physical activity are included. However, little scientific evidence is available on diet and/or physical activity and NAFLD specifically. Many dietary approaches such as Mediterranean and DASH diet are used for treatment of other cardiometabolic risk factors such as insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM, but on the basis of its components their role in NAFLD has been discussed. In this review, the implications of current dietary and exercise approaches, including Brazilian and other guidelines, are discussed, with a focus on determining the optimal nonpharmacological treatment to prescribe for NAFLD.

  18. Usability testing of a monitoring and feedback tool to stimulate physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Weegen S

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Sanne van der Weegen,1 Renée Verwey,1,2 Huibert J Tange,3 Marieke D Spreeuwenberg,1 Luc P de Witte1,2 1Department of Health Services Research, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, the Netherlands; 2Research Centre Technology in Care, Zuyd University of Applied Sciences, Heerlen, the Netherlands; 3Department of General Practice, CAPHRI School for Public Health and Primary Care, Faculty of Health Medicine and Life Sciences, Maastricht University, the Netherlands Introduction: A monitoring and feedback tool to stimulate physical activity, consisting of an activity sensor, smartphone application (app, and website for patients and their practice nurses, has been developed: the 'It's LiFe!' tool. In this study the usability of the tool was evaluated by technology experts and end users (people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or type 2 diabetes, with ages from 40–70 years, to improve the user interfaces and content of the tool. Patients and methods: The study had four phases: 1 a heuristic evaluation with six technology experts; 2 a usability test in a laboratory by five patients; 3 a pilot in real life wherein 20 patients used the tool for 3 months; and 4 a final lab test by five patients. In both lab tests (phases 2 and 4 qualitative data were collected through a thinking-aloud procedure and video recordings, and quantitative data through questions about task complexity, text comprehensiveness, and readability. In addition, the post-study system usability questionnaire (PSSUQ was completed for the app and the website. In the pilot test (phase 3, all patients were interviewed three times and the Software Usability Measurement Inventory (SUMI was completed. Results: After each phase, improvements were made, mainly to the layout and text. The main improvement was a refresh button for active data synchronization between activity sensor, app, and server

  19. Assessment of disease activity in large-vessel vasculitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aydin, Sibel Z.; Direskeneli, Haner; Merkel, Peter A.

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To arrive at consensus for candidate outcomes for disease activity assessment in largevessel vasculitis (LVV) in clinical trials. Methods.A Delphi survey including 99 items was circulated among international experts for 3 rounds. Results. Fifty-seven items were accepted for both giant ...

  20. Neural activities during affective processing in people with Alzheimer's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Tatia M. C.; Sun, Delin; Leung, Mei-Kei; Chu, Leung-Wing; Keysers, Christian

    This study examined brain activities in people with Alzheimer's disease when viewing happy, sad, and fearful facial expressions of others. A functional magnetic resonance imaging and a voxel-based morphometry methodology together with a passive viewing of emotional faces paradigm were employed to

  1. Seasonal disease activity and serum vitamin D levels in rheumatoid ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Vitamin D is a steroid hormone that plays essential roles in calcium and phosphorus metabolism, bone formation and mineralization homeostasis, also has a role in the maintenance of immune-homeostasis. Objective: We aimed to investigate seasonal serum vitamin D levels and seasonal disease activity in ...

  2. Tea and coronary heart disease : protection through estrogenlike activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geleijnse, J.M.; Witteman, J.C.; Launer, L.J.; Lamberts, S.J.; Pols, H.A.

    2000-01-01

    Tea drinking appears to be protective against coronary heart disease in a number of epidemiologic studies. It has been suggested that tea flavonols with antioxidative activity, including quercetin, kaempferol, and myricetin,1 could account for the favorable effect on cardiovascular health. In the

  3. Minimal disease activity for rheumatoid arthritis: a preliminary definition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, George A.; Boers, Maarten; Shea, Beverley; Brooks, Peter M.; Simon, Lee S.; Strand, C. Vibeke; Aletaha, Daniel; Anderson, Jennifer J.; Bombardier, Claire; Dougados, Maxime; Emery, Paul; Felson, David T.; Fransen, Jaap; Furst, Dan E.; Hazes, Johanna M. W.; Johnson, Kent R.; Kirwan, John R.; Landewé, Robert B. M.; Lassere, Marissa N. D.; Michaud, Kaleb; Suarez-Almazor, Maria; Silman, Alan J.; Smolen, Josef S.; van der Heijde, Desiree M. F. M.; van Riel, Piet L. C. M.; Wolfe, Fred; Tugwell, Peter S.

    2005-01-01

    Agreement on response criteria in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has allowed better standardization and interpretation of clinical trial reports. With recent advances in therapy, the proportion of patients achieving a satisfactory state of minimal disease activity (MDA) is becoming a more important

  4. Minimal disease activity for rheumatoid arthritis: a preliminary definition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wells, G.A.; Boers, M.; Shea, B.; Brooks, P.M.; Simon, L.S.; Strand, C.V.; Aletaha, D.; Anderson, J.; Bombardier, C.; Dougados, M.; Emery, P.; Felson, D.T.; Fransen, J.; Furst, D.E.; Hazes, J.M.W.; Johnson, K.; Kirwan, J.; Landewe, R.B.; Lassere, M.N.; Michaud, K.; Suarez-Almazor, M.; Silman, A.J.; Smolen, J.S.; Heijde, D.M.F.M. van der; Riel, P.L.C.M. van; Wolfe, F.; Tugwell, P.S.

    2005-01-01

    Agreement on response criteria in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has allowed better standardization and interpretation of clinical trial reports. With recent advances in therapy, the proportion of patients achieving a satisfactory state of minimal disease activity (MDA) is becoming a more important

  5. Health physics experience in commissioning and operation of radiation and air activity monitoring system at FBTR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raghunath, V.M.; Meenakshisundaram, V.; Viswanathan, S.; Bala Sundar, S.; Jose, M.T.; Suriyamurthy, N.; Ravi, T.; Subramanian, V.

    2001-01-01

    The Radiation and Air Activity Monitoring System (RAAMS) at Fast Breeder Test Reactor (FBTR) is meant to monitor and record the radiation and air activity levels at various potentially active areas in FBTR complex. Health Physics Group, FBTR was associated during commissioning of RAAMS in fixing the alarm settings for the monitors, their relocation and in formulating the surveillance procedures. The areas were surveyed to check for any release of activity for confirming the observed readings during operation of the reactor. In such cases, augmentation of shielding was recommended and was promptly implemented by the station management. The details of the long and fruitful experience gained by the Health Physics Group, FBTR are described in this paper. (author)

  6. Individual differences in epistemic motivation and brain conflict monitoring activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kossowska, Małgorzata; Czarnek, Gabriela; Wronka, Eligiusz; Wyczesany, Miroslaw; Bukowski, Marcin

    2014-06-06

    It is well documented that motivation toward closure (NFC), defined as a desire for a quick and unambiguous answer to a question and an aversion to uncertainty, is linked to more structured, rigid, and persistent cognitive styles. However, the neurocognitive correlates of NFC have never been tested. Thus, using event-related potentials, we examined the hypothesis that NFC is associated with the neurocognitive process for detecting discrepancies between response tendencies and higher level intentions. We found that greater NFC is associated with lower conflict-related anterior cingulate activity, suggesting lower sensitivity to cues for altering a habitual response pattern and lower sensitivity to committing errors. This study provides evidence that high NFC acts as a bulwark against anxiety-producing uncertainty and minimizes the experience of error. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Positive correlation between disease activity index and matrix metalloproteinases activity in a rat model of colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, Luiz Gustavo de; Cunha, André Luiz da; Duarte, Amaury Caiafa; Castañon, Maria Christina Marques Nogueira; Chebli, Júlio Maria Fonseca; Aguiar, Jair Adriano Kopke de

    2014-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease, including ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease, comprising a broad spectrum of diseases those have in common chronic inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract, histological alterations and an increased activity levels of certain enzymes, such as, metalloproteinases. Evaluate a possible correlation of disease activity index with the severity of colonic mucosal damage and increased activity of metalloproteinases in a model of ulcerative colitis induced by dextran sulfate sodium. Colitis was induced by oral administration of 5% dextran sulfate sodium for seven days in this group (n=10), whereas control group (n=16) received water. Effects were analyzed daily by disease activity index. In the seventh day, animals were euthanized and hematological measurements, histological changes (hematoxylin and eosin and Alcian Blue staining), myeloperoxidase and metalloproteinase activities (MMP-2 and MMP-9) were determined. Dextran sulfate sodium group showed elevated disease activity index and reduced hematological parameters. Induction of colitis caused tissue injury with loss of mucin and increased myeloperoxidase (Pcorrelation with the degree of histopathological changes after induction of colitis, and this result may be related mainly to the increased activity of MMP-9 and mieloperoxidase.

  8. IMAGE-GUIDED EVALUATION AND MONITORING OF TREATMENT RESPONSE IN PATIENTS WITH DRY EYE DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is one of the most common ocular disorders worldwide. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of DED are not well understood and thus treating DED has been a significant challenge for ophthalmologists. Most of the currently available diagnostic tests demonstrate low correlation to patient symptoms and have low reproducibility. Recently, sophisticated in vivo imaging modalities have become available for patient care, namely, in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). These emerging modalities are powerful and non-invasive, allowing real-time visualization of cellular and anatomical structures of the cornea and ocular surface. Here we discuss how, by providing both qualitative and quantitative assessment, these techniques can be used to demonstrate early subclinical disease, grade layer-by-layer severity, and allow monitoring of disease severity by cellular alterations. Imaging-guided stratification of patients may also be possible in conjunction with clinical examination methods. Visualization of subclinical changes and stratification of patients in vivo, allows objective image-guided evaluation of tailored treatment response based on cellular morphological alterations specific to each patient. This image-guided approach to DED may ultimately improve patient outcomes and allow studying the efficacy of novel therapies in clinical trials. PMID:24696045

  9. New monitoring technology to objectively assess adherence to prescribed footwear and assistive devices during ambulatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bus, Sicco A; Waaijman, Roelof; Nollet, Frans

    2012-11-01

    To assess the validity and feasibility of a new temperature-based adherence monitor to measure footwear use. Observational study. University medical center and participants' homes. Convenience sample of healthy subjects (n=11) and neuropathic diabetic patients at high risk for foot ulceration (n=14). In healthy subjects, the validity of the in-shoe attached adherence monitor was investigated by comparing its registrations of donning and doffing of footwear during 7 days to an accurately kept log registration. In diabetic patients, the feasibility of using the adherence monitor for 7 days in conjunction with a time-synchronized ankle-worn step activity monitor to register prescribed footwear use during walking was assessed. Furthermore, a usability questionnaire was completed. For validity, the mean time difference and 95% confidence interval (CI) between moments of donning/doffing footwear recorded with the adherence monitor and in the log were calculated. For feasibility, technical performance, usability, and the percentage of steps that the footwear was worn (adherence) were assessed. The mean time difference between the adherence monitor and log recordings was 0.4 minutes (95% CI, 0.2-0.6min). One erroneous recording and 2 incomplete recordings were obtained in diabetic patients. Three patients reported discomfort with the step activity monitor, and 4 patients would not favor repeated testing. Patients used their footwear for between 9% and 99% of their walking steps. The adherence monitor shows good validity in measuring when footwear is used or not, and is, together with instrumented monitoring of walking activity, a feasible and objective method to assess treatment adherence. This method can have wide application in clinical practice and research regarding prescribed footwear and other body-worn assistive devices. Copyright © 2012 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. CREAM - a Cosmic Radiation Effects and Activation Monitor for space experiments: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mapper, D.; Stephen, J.H.; Farren, J.; Stimpson, B.P.; Bolus, D.J.; Ellaway, A.M.

    1987-12-01

    A detailed account is given of the design and construction of the experimental CREAM packages, intended for flight in the mid-deck area of the Space Transport System (Shuttle) Mission in 1986. The complete experiment involved; 1) a self-contained and battery powered activation monitor for measuring energy losses of charged particles; 2) CR-39 and Kapton polymer solid state nuclear track detectors for the detection of ionising particles; 3) metal foils of nickel, titanium and gold for neutron monitoring; and 4) thermoluminescent detectors for dosimetry measurements of the radiation background. The circuit design and detailed functioning of the active monitor is fully described, together with a complete discussion of the principles and operation of the passive monitors. (author)

  11. Dynamic Measurement of Disease Activity in Acute Pancreatitis: The Pancreatitis Activity Scoring System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Bechien U; Batech, Michael; Quezada, Michael; Lew, Daniel; Fujikawa, Kelly; Kung, Jonathan; Jamil, Laith H; Chen, Wansu; Afghani, Elham; Reicher, Sonya; Buxbaum, James; Pandol, Stephen J

    2017-07-01

    Acute pancreatitis has a highly variable course. Currently there is no widely accepted method to measure disease activity in patients hospitalized for acute pancreatitis. We aimed to develop a clinical activity index that incorporates routine clinical parameters to assist in the measurement, study, and management of acute pancreatitis. We used the UCLA/RAND appropriateness method to identify items for inclusion in the disease activity instrument. We conducted a systematic literature review followed by two sets of iterative modified Delphi meetings including a panel of international experts between November 2014 and November 2015. The final instrument was then applied to patient data obtained from five separate study cohorts across Southern California to assess profiles of disease activity. From a list of 35 items comprising 6 domains, we identified 5 parameters for inclusion in the final weighted clinical activity scoring system: organ failure, systemic inflammatory response syndrome, abdominal pain, requirement for opiates and ability to tolerate oral intake. We applied the weighted scoring system across the 5 study cohorts comprising 3,123 patients. We identified several distinct patterns of disease activity: (i) overall there was an elevated score at baseline relative to discharge across all study cohorts, (ii) there were distinct patterns of disease activity related to duration of illness as well as (iii) early and persistent elevation of disease activity among patients with severe acute pancreatitis defined as persistent organ failure. We present the development and initial validation of a clinical activity score for real-time assessment of disease activity in patients with acute pancreatitis.

  12. The continuous monitoring of the artificial beta aerosol activity by measuring the alpha and beta activity in aerosol simultaneously

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayakawa, Hironobu; Oonishi, Masaki; Matsuura, Hiroyuki

    1990-01-01

    We have constructed the system to monitor the artificial beta aerosol activity around the nuclear power plants continuously in real time. The smaller releases of artificial radionuclides from the nuclear power plants can be lost in the fluctuations of the natural background of the beta aerosol activity, when only the beta activity of the aerosol is measured. This method to discriminate the artificial and the natural beta activity of the aerosol is based on the fact that the ratio of the natural alpha and beta activities of the aerosol is almost constant. The detection limit of this system is below 3 Bq/m 3 . (author)

  13. Monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in liquids by using ZnS(Ag) scintillation detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stevanato, L.; Cester, D.; Filippi, D.; Lunardon, M.; Mistura, G.; Moretto, S.; Viesti, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy ' Galileo Galilei' , University of Padova, (Italy); Badocco, D.; Pastore, P.; Romanini, F. [Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Padova, (Italy)

    2015-07-01

    In this work the possibility of monitoring gross alpha and beta activity in liquids using EJ-444 was investigated. Specific tests were carried out to determine the change of the detector properties in water tests. Possible protecting coating is also proposed and tested. Alpha/beta real-time monitoring in liquids is a goal of the EU project TAWARA{sub R}TM. (authors)

  14. 99M-TC MIBI-an indicator of active disease in multiple myeloma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raluca Mititelu; Serban Ghita; Catalin Mazilu; George Marinescu

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: to evaluate the role of 99mTc-MIBI in the assessment of bone marrow involvement in patients with multiple myeloma and to demonstrate how different patterns of 99mTc-MIBI uptake are reflecting the activity of the disease. Material and method: 27 patients with documented MM were studied, 14M, 13 F, median age 62 years, range 31 - 78. 7 MPI (myocardial perfusion imaging) patients served as controle. Diagnosis and staging of the disease were based on standard criteria: 5 patients in stage I, 7 in stage II, 15 in stage III. The disease activity was determined by clinical and biological assessment and the aspect of bone marrow biopsy. 17 patients had active disease (2 patients in stage I, 4 in stage II, 11 in stage III), 10 patients had not' clinical and biological criteria of active disease. All patients included in the group of active disease underwent radiological examination, 99mTc-MDP whole-body scan and 99mTc-MIBI whole-body scan. MRI was performed in 5 patients with active disease (2 in stage I, 1 in stage II, 2 in stage lib - for evaluation of spine involvement. In the other group (patients with clinical and biological criteria of non-active disease), due to high cost of investigations, we performed whole-body 99mTc-MIBI scan, as the oncologist referred us the patient for monitoring therapeutic response. Whole-body 99mTc-MIBI scans were obtained 20 rain after iv injection of 740 MBq 99mTc-MIBI, in anterior and posterior views, with a dual-head gamma camera Philips -Axis. Results: In the group of patients with active disease (17 patients) we found three different patterns of pathologic 99mTc-MIBI uptake: focal uptake in different sites in 9 patients, diffuse uptake in 4, both focal and diffuse uptake in 3; no pathologic uptake was seen in 1 patient (probably due to overexpression of Pglycoprotein). In the other group, with non-active disease criteria (10 patients), we found normal aspect of 99mTc-MIBI uptake in 8 patients; 2 patients had diffuse increased

  15. Histologic scoring indices for evaluation of disease activity in Crohn's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Gregor; Parker, Claire E; Pai, Rish K; MacDonald, John K; Feagan, Brian G; Sandborn, William J; D'Haens, Geert; Jairath, Vipul; Khanna, Reena

    2017-07-21

    Histologic assessment of mucosal disease activity has been increasingly used in clinical trials of treatment for Crohn's disease. However, the operating properties of the currently existing histologic scoring indices remain unclear. A systematic review was undertaken to evaluate the development and operating characteristics of available histologic disease activity indices in Crohn's disease. Electronic searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PubMed, and the Cochrane Library (CENTRAL) databases from inception to 20 July 2016 were supplemented by manual reviews of bibliographies and abstracts submitted to major gastroenterology meetings (Digestive Disease Week, United European Gastroenterology Week, European Crohn's and Colitis Organisation). Any study design (e.g. randomised controlled trial, cohort study, case series) that evaluated a histologic disease activity index in patients with Crohn's disease was considered for inclusion. Study participants included adult patients (> 16 years), diagnosed with Crohn's disease using conventional clinical, radiographic or endoscopic criteria. Two authors independently reviewed the titles and abstracts of the studies identified from the literature search. The full text of potentially relevant citations were reviewed for inclusion and the study investigators were contacted as needed for clarification. Any disagreements regarding study eligibility were resolved by discussion and consensus with a third author.Two authors independently extracted and recorded data using a standard form. The following data were recorded from each eligible study: number of patients enrolled; number of patients per treatment arm; patient characteristics: age and gender distribution; description of histologic disease activity index utilized; and outcomes such as content validity, construct validity, criterion validity, responsiveness, intra-rater reliability, inter-rater reliability, and feasibility. Sixteen reports of 14 studies describing 14 different numerical

  16. ATLAS off-Grid sites (Tier 3) monitoring. From local fabric monitoring to global overview of the VO computing activities

    CERN Document Server

    PETROSYAN, A; The ATLAS collaboration; BELOV, S; ANDREEVA, J; KADOCHNIKOV, I

    2012-01-01

    The ATLAS Distributed Computing activities have so far concentrated in the "central" part of the experiment computing system, namely the first 3 tiers (the CERN Tier0, 10 Tier1 centers and over 60 Tier2 sites). Many ATLAS Institutes and National Communities have deployed (or intend to) deploy Tier-3 facilities. Tier-3 centers consist of non-pledged resources, which are usually dedicated to data analysis tasks by the geographically close or local scientific groups, and which usually comprise a range of architectures without Grid middleware. Therefore a substantial part of the ATLAS monitoring tools which make use of Grid middleware, cannot be used for a large fraction of Tier3 sites. The presentation will describe the T3mon project, which aims to develop a software suite for monitoring the Tier3 sites, both from the perspective of the local site administrator and that of the ATLAS VO, thereby enabling the global view of the contribution from Tier3 sites to the ATLAS computing activities. Special attention in p...

  17. Allocation of responsibilities for monitoring and retrieval activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCombie, C.

    2000-01-01

    Geologic disposal is considered by many to offer a way to achieve the long term isolation required for radioactive wastes. The extremely long timescales, however, have drawn attention to the need for society to plan far ahead into the future. Perhaps for the first time, much thought and debate is being explicitly devoted to the burdens and the benefits which a technology will bring to many generations in the future. The questions to be answered concern not only what the benefits and burdens are, but also who bears the responsibility for defining courses of action affecting future generations and for implementing any measures required to protect society beyond the lifetimes of those initiating activities with far future impacts. In the present paper, the intention is to review the actions which may have to be taken during and after the operation of a disposal facility, to consider who shares responsibility for such actions and to look rationally at how responsibilities can best be allocated to ensure that they will be fulfilled in a way which protects future generations from harm, be it physical or financial. The paper defines the phases in the lifetime of a geologic repository, and postulates that responsibilities are to be shared between governments, regulators, repository implementers, waste producers and potentially also supra-national bodies. The specific responsibilities ranging from conceptual planning through to financial provisions for actions are then listed. The allocation of these responsibilities is then discussed. The broad conclusions are that waste producers are responsible for all financing and for most of the specific actions to be taken. In very far future times, however, responsibility for a closed and sealed national repository must revert to the government of a State. (author)

  18. Disease activity indices in coeliac disease: systematic review and recommendations for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hindryckx, Pieter; Levesque, Barrett G; Holvoet, Tom; Durand, Serina; Tang, Ceen-Ming; Parker, Claire; Khanna, Reena; Shackelton, Lisa M; D'Haens, Geert; Sandborn, William J; Feagan, Brian G; Lebwohl, Benjamin; Leffler, Daniel A; Jairath, Vipul

    2018-01-01

    Although several pharmacological agents have emerged as potential adjunctive therapies to a gluten-free diet for coeliac disease, there is currently no widely accepted measure of disease activity used in clinical trials. We conducted a systematic review of coeliac disease activity indices to evaluate their operating properties and potential as outcome measures in registration trials. MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane central library were searched from 1966 to 2015 for eligible studies in adult and/or paediatric patients with coeliac disease that included coeliac disease activity markers in their outcome measures. The operating characteristics of histological indices, patient-reported outcomes (PROs) and endoscopic indices were evaluated for content and construct validity, reliability, responsiveness and feasibility using guidelines proposed by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Of 19 123 citations, 286 studies were eligible, including 24 randomised-controlled trials. Three of five PROs identified met most key evaluative criteria but only the Celiac Disease Symptom Diary (CDSD) and the Celiac Disease Patient-Reported Outcome (CeD PRO) have been approved by the FDA. All histological and endoscopic scores identified lacked content validity. Quantitative morphometric histological analysis had better reliability and responsiveness compared with qualitative scales. Endoscopic indices were infrequently used, and only one index demonstrated responsiveness to effective therapy. Current best evidence suggests that the CDSD and the CeD PRO are appropriate for use in the definition of primary end points in coeliac disease registration trials. Morphometric histology should be included as a key secondary or co-primary end point. Further work is needed to optimise end point configuration to inform efficient drug development. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  19. Circulating ACE2 activity correlates with cardiovascular disease development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Úri

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available It was shown recently that angiotensin-converting enzyme activity is limited by endogenous inhibition in vivo, highlighting the importance of angiotensin II (ACE2 elimination. The potential contribution of the ACE2 to cardiovascular disease progression was addressed. Serum ACE2 activities were measured in different clinical states (healthy, n=45; hypertensive, n=239; heart failure (HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF n=141 and HF with preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF n=47. ACE2 activity was significantly higher in hypertensive patients (24.8±0.8 U/ml than that in healthy volunteers (16.2±0.8 U/ml, p=0.01. ACE2 activity further increased in HFrEF patients (43.9±2.1 U/ml, p=0.001 but not in HFpEF patients (24.6±1.9 U/ml when compared with hypertensive patients. Serum ACE2 activity negatively correlated with left ventricular systolic function in HFrEF, but not in hypertensive, HFpEF or healthy populations. Serum ACE2 activity had a fair diagnostic value to differentiate HFpEF from HFrEF patients in this study. Serum ACE2 activity correlates with cardiovascular disease development: it increases when hypertension develops and further increases when the cardiovascular disease further progresses to systolic dysfunction, suggesting that ACE2 metabolism plays a role in these processes. In contrast, serum ACE2 activity does not change when hypertension progresses to HFpEF, suggesting a different pathomechanism for HFpEF, and proposing a biomarker-based identification of these HF forms.

  20. Usability Study of a Wireless Monitoring System among Alzheimer’s Disease Elderly Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano Abbate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Healthcare technologies are slowly entering into our daily lives, replacing old devices and techniques with newer intelligent ones. Although they are meant to help people, the reaction and willingness to use such new devices by the people can be unexpected, especially among the elderly. We conducted a usability study of a fall monitoring system in a long-term nursing home. The subjects were the elderly with advanced Alzheimer’s disease. The study presented here highlights some of the challenges faced in the use of wearable devices and the lessons learned. The results gave us useful insights, leading to ergonomics and aesthetics modifications to our wearable systems that significantly improved their usability and acceptance. New evaluating metrics were designed for the performance evaluation of usability and acceptability.

  1. Evaluating a Miniature Multisensor Biosignal Recorder for Unsupervised Parkinson’s Disease Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris BAILEY

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An improved miniature biosignal data sensor and recorder device is described, (NAT-1-4G with 3-axis accelerometer, and a 500 Sa/sec all-channel recording capacity of 36 hours or more with a single zinc-air battery cell, and up to 6 days at 100 Sa/Sec for accelerometer only. Like the previous NAT-1 prototype device, this measures less than 18´22´10 mm and weighs less than 2.3 grams, including the battery. In this paper we describe the device in detail, and introduce the presentation of tremor data measurement captured in the context of Parkinson’s disease fore-arm monitoring. The NAT-1-4G device itself has already achieved translation to commercialization and is currently available.

  2. MIRO and IRbase: IT Tools for the Epidemiological Monitoring of Insecticide Resistance in Mosquito Disease Vectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dialynas, Emmanuel; Topalis, Pantelis; Vontas, John; Louis, Christos

    2009-01-01

    Background Monitoring of insect vector populations with respect to their susceptibility to one or more insecticides is a crucial element of the strategies used for the control of arthropod-borne diseases. This management task can nowadays be achieved more efficiently when assisted by IT (Information Technology) tools, ranging from modern integrated databases to GIS (Geographic Information System). Here we describe an application ontology that we developed de novo, and a specially designed database that, based on this ontology, can be used for the purpose of controlling mosquitoes and, thus, the diseases that they transmit. Methodology/Principal Findings The ontology, named MIRO for Mosquito Insecticide Resistance Ontology, developed using the OBO-Edit software, describes all pertinent aspects of insecticide resistance, including specific methodology and mode of action. MIRO, then, forms the basis for the design and development of a dedicated database, IRbase, constructed using open source software, which can be used to retrieve data on mosquito populations in a temporally and spatially separate way, as well as to map the output using a Google Earth interface. The dependency of the database on the MIRO allows for a rational and efficient hierarchical search possibility. Conclusions/Significance The fact that the MIRO complies with the rules set forward by the OBO (Open Biomedical Ontologies) Foundry introduces cross-referencing with other biomedical ontologies and, thus, both MIRO and IRbase are suitable as parts of future comprehensive surveillance tools and decision support systems that will be used for the control of vector-borne diseases. MIRO is downloadable from and IRbase is accessible at VectorBase, the NIAID-sponsored open access database for arthropod vectors of disease. PMID:19547750

  3. Alterations in conflict monitoring are related to functional connectivity in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg-Katz, Keren; Maidan, Inbal; Jacob, Yael; Giladi, Nir; Mirelman, Anat; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M

    2016-09-01

    Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have difficulties in executive functions including conflict monitoring. The neural mechanisms underlying these difficulties are not yet fully understood. In order to examine the neural mechanisms related to conflict monitoring in PD, we evaluated 35 patients with PD and 20 healthy older adults while they performed a word-color Stroop paradigm in the MRI. Specifically, we focused on changes between the groups in task-related functional connectivity using psycho-physiological interaction (PPI) analysis. The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), which is a brain node previously associated with the Stroop paradigm, was selected as the seed region for this analysis. Patients with PD, as compared to healthy controls, had reduced task-related functional connectivity between the ACC and parietal regions including the precuneus and inferior parietal lobe. This was seen only in the incongruent Stroop condition. A higher level of connectivity between the ACC and precuneus was correlated with a lower error rate in the conflicting, incongruent Stroop condition in the healthy controls, but not in the patients with PD. Furthermore, the patients also had reduced functional connectivity between the ACC and the superior frontal gyrus which was present in both the incongruent and congruent task condition. The present findings shed light on brain mechanisms that are apparently associated with specific cognitive difficulties in patients with PD. Among patients with PD, impaired conflict monitoring processing within the ACC-based fronto-parietal network may contribute to difficulties under increased executive demands. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Physical activity and neuropsychiatric symptoms of Parkinson disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, Ana M; Friedman, Joseph H; Brown, Richard A; Strong, David R; Desaulniers, Julie; Ing, Eileen; Saritelli, Jennifer; Riebe, Deborah

    2012-09-01

    Neuropsychiatric symptoms of Parkinson disease (PD) such as fatigue, depression, and apathy are common and detract from quality of life. There is little published on the impact of physical activity on the neuropsychiatric symptoms of PD. A convenience sample of 45 patients with PD (mean age = 66.1 years; 33% female) completed questionnaires on physical activity, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and specific exercise preferences. Covarying for age and gender, higher levels of physical activity were associated with significantly less fatigue, as well as a trend for less apathy and depression and greater positive affect. Exercise preferences included moderate intensity (73%), at home (56%), in the morning (73%), scheduled (69%), options for varied activities (73%), and preference for both structured/supervised (50%), and unsupervised/self-paced (50%) programs. Preferred activities included the use of aerobic exercise equipment, resistance training, and yoga. Developing and tailoring exercise programs that incorporate specific preferences may result in more effective interventions for patients with PD.

  5. Materiomics for Oral Disease Diagnostics and Personal Health Monitoring: Designer Biomaterials for the Next Generation Biomarkers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wenjun; Wang, Ming L.; Khalili, Sammy

    2016-01-01

    Abstract We live in exciting times for a new generation of biomarkers being enabled by advances in the design and use of biomaterials for medical and clinical applications, from nano- to macro-materials, and protein to tissue. Key challenges arise, however, due to both scientific complexity and compatibility of the interface of biology and engineered materials. The linking of mechanisms across scales by using a materials science approach to provide structure–process–property relations characterizes the emerging field of ‘materiomics,’ which offers enormous promise to provide the hitherto missing tools for biomaterial development for clinical diagnostics and the next generation biomarker applications towards personal health monitoring. Put in other words, the emerging field of materiomics represents an essentially systematic approach to the investigation of biological material systems, integrating natural functions and processes with traditional materials science perspectives. Here we outline how materiomics provides a game-changing technology platform for disruptive innovation in biomaterial science to enable the design of tailored and functional biomaterials—particularly, the design and screening of DNA aptamers for targeting biomarkers related to oral diseases and oral health monitoring. Rigorous and complementary computational modeling and experimental techniques will provide an efficient means to develop new clinical technologies in silico, greatly accelerating the translation of materiomics-driven oral health diagnostics from concept to practice in the clinic. PMID:26760957

  6. Devices for Ambulatory Monitoring of Sleep-Associated Disorders in Children with Neurological Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulate-Campos, Adriana; Tsuboyama, Melissa; Loddenkemper, Tobias

    2017-12-25

    Good sleep quality is essential for a child's wellbeing. Early sleep problems have been linked to the later development of emotional and behavioral disorders and can negatively impact the quality of life of the child and his or her family. Sleep-associated conditions are frequent in the pediatric population, and even more so in children with neurological problems. Monitoring devices can help to better characterize sleep efficiency and sleep quality. They can also be helpful to better characterize paroxysmal nocturnal events and differentiate between nocturnal seizures, parasomnias, and obstructive sleep apnea, each of which has a different management. Overnight ambulatory detection devices allow for a tolerable, low cost, objective assessment of sleep quality in the patient's natural environment. They can also be used as a notification system to allow for rapid recognition and prompt intervention of events like seizures. Optimal monitoring devices will be patient- and diagnosis-specific, but may include a combination of modalities such as ambulatory electroencephalograms, actigraphy, and pulse oximetry. We will summarize the current literature on ambulatory sleep devices for detecting sleep disorders in children with neurological diseases.

  7. Postinduction minimal residual disease monitoring by polymerase chain reaction in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganin, Maddalena; Fabbri, Giulia; Conter, Valentino; Barisone, Elena; Polato, Katia; Cazzaniga, Giovanni; Giraldi, Eugenia; Fagioli, Franca; Aricò, Maurizio; Valsecchi, Maria Grazia; Basso, Giuseppe

    2014-11-01

    Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is the most common pediatric cancer. Monitoring minimal residual disease (MRD) by using real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RQ-PCR) provides information for patient stratification and individual risk-directed treatment. Cooperative studies have documented that measurement of blast clearance from the bone marrow during and after induction therapy identifies patient populations with different risk of relapse. We explored the possible contribution of measurements of MRD during the course of treatment. We used RQ-PCR to detect MRD in 110 unselected patients treated in Italy in the International Collaborative Treatment Protocol for Children and Adolescents With Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (AIEOP-BFM ALL 2000). The trial took place in AIEOP centers during postinduction chemotherapy. Results were categorized as negative, low positive (below the quantitative range [< 5 × 10(-4)]), or high positive (≥ 5 × 10(-4)). Patients with at least one low-positive or high-positive result were assigned to the corresponding subgroup. Patients who tested high positive, low positive, or negative had significantly different cumulative incidences of leukemia relapse: 83.3%, 34.8%, and 8.6%, respectively (P < .001). Two thirds of positive cases were identified within 4 months after induction-consolidation therapy, suggesting that this time frame may be most suitable for cost-effective MRD monitoring, particularly in patients who did not clear their disease at the end of consolidation. These findings provide further insights into the dynamic of MRD and the ongoing effort to define molecular relapse in childhood ALL. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  8. Mental health status can reflect disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolovic, Sekib; Dervisevic, Vedina; Fisekovic, Saida

    2014-06-01

    A significant number of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) link the start of illness with psychological trauma or severe stress. Impaired mental health (IMH), defined as depression and anxiety with psychoneuroimmunological factors, can play a significant role in RA. The main objective of this research was to investigate the mutual correlation of IMH and RA activity, estimated by the laboratory and clinical parameters in RA patients. An open clinical prospective study that lasted for 6 months was designed. There were 72 patients included, 58 women and 14 men, aged 34 to 80 years and screened for mental health status. The study population was randomized following the Brief Symptoms Inventory (BSI) scale, comprised of 53 questions with a range from 0 (no symptoms) to 4 (severe). This mental test was done only once during the study. Following the results from the BSI scale, RA patients were divided into mentally stable and mentally unstable patients to investigate the influence of RA activity on mental health. The following laboratory and clinical parameters were analyzed: sex, age, erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR), rheumatoid factor (RF), C-reactive protein (CRP), anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody, and disease activity score (DAS28). All RA patients did not express extra-articular manifestations or Sjögren's syndrome. The chi-square test, ANOVA, Pearson's coefficient, and IBM Statistics - SPSS v19 were used. From a total of 72 RA patients, there were 44 mentally stable and 28 mentally unstable patients. All patients had either moderate or severe active disease. The only significant correlation of IMH and activity of RA was found in CRP and DAS28, but no significance was observed in ESR, RF, and anti-CCP. The DAS28 showed high disease activity with an average of 5.3 and CRP of 20.9 mg/L in patients with unstable mental health compared to stable mental health patients, where RA was associated with a moderate DAS average value of 4.35 and

  9. Assessment of disease activity in juvenile idiopathic arthritis. The number and the size of joints matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntson, Lillemor; Wernroth, Lisa; Fasth, Anders

    2007-01-01

    Variables for assessment of disease activity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were studied, in order to develop a disease activity score for children with JIA.......Variables for assessment of disease activity of juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA) were studied, in order to develop a disease activity score for children with JIA....

  10. Adult Congenital Heart Disease Patients Experience Similar Symptoms of Disease Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cedars, Ari M; Stefanescu Schmidt, Ada; Broberg, Craig; Zaidi, Ali; Opotowsky, Alexander; Grewal, Jasmine; Kay, Joseph; Bhatt, Ami B; Novak, Eric; Spertus, John

    2016-03-01

    There is a lack of objective data on the symptoms characterizing disease activity among adults with congenital heart disease (ACHD). The purpose of this study was to elicit the most important symptoms from patients across the spectrum of ACHD and to examine whether reported symptoms were similar across the spectrum of ACHD as a foundation for creating a patient-reported outcome measure(s). We constructed a 39-item survey using input from physicians specializing in ACHD to assess the symptoms patients associate with disease activity. Patients (n=124) prospectively completed this survey, and the results were analyzed based on underlying anatomy and disease complexity. A confirmatory cohort of patients (n=40) was then recruited prospectively to confirm the validity of the initial data. When grouped based on underlying anatomy, significant differences in disease-related symptom rankings were found for only 6 of 39 symptoms. Six symptoms were identified which were of particular significance to patients, regardless of underlying anatomy. Patients with anatomy of great complexity experienced greater overall symptom severity than those with anatomy of low or moderate complexity, attributable exclusively to higher ranking of 5 symptoms. The second patient cohort had symptom experiences similar to those of the initial cohort, differing in only 5 of 39 symptoms. This study identified 6 symptoms relevant to patients across the spectrum of ACHD and remarkable homogeneity of patient experience, suggesting that a single disease-specific patient-reported outcome can be created for quality and outcome assessments. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  11. Graves' disease: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges (multimedia activity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Grebe, Stefan K G; Lupo, Mark A; McDonald, Nicole; Sipos, Jennifer A

    2011-06-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the United States. Graves' disease occurs more often in women with a female:male ratio of 5:1 and a population prevalence of 1% to 2%. A genetic determinant to the susceptibility to Graves' disease is suspected because of familial clustering of the disease, a high sibling recurrence risk, the familial occurrence of thyroid autoantibodies, and the 30% concordance in disease status between identical twins. Graves' disease is an autoimmune thyroid disorder characterized by the infiltration of immune effector cells and thyroid antigen-specific T cells into the thyroid and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor expressing tissues, with the production of autoantibodies to well-defined thyroidal antigens, such as thyroid peroxidase, thyroglobulin, and the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor is central to the regulation of thyroid growth and function. Stimulatory autoantibodies in Graves' disease activate the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor leading to thyroid hyperplasia and unregulated thyroid hormone production and secretion. Below-normal levels of baseline serum thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor, normal to elevated serum levels of T4, elevated serum levels of T3 and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor autoantibodies, and a diffusely enlarged, heterogeneous, hypervascular (increased Doppler flow) thyroid gland confirm diagnosis of Graves' disease (available at: http://supplements.amjmed.com/2010/hyperthyroid/faculty.php). This Resource Center is also available through the website of The American Journal of Medicine (www.amjmed.com). Click on the “Thyroid/Graves' Disease” link in the “Resource Centers” section, found on the right side of the Journal homepage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Computerized monitoring of physical activity and sleep in postoperative abdominal surgery patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, T; Kjaersgaard, M; Bernhard, A

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Assessment of early postoperative activity is important in the documentation of improvements of peri-operative care. This study was designed to validate computerized activity-based monitoring of physical activity and sleep (actigraphy) in patients after abdominal surgery. METHODS...... physical activity and sleep-wake cycles after major abdominal surgery.......: The study included twelve hospitalized patients after major abdominal surgery studied on day 2 to 4 after operation and twelve unhospitalized healthy volunteers. Measurements were performed for 24 consecutive hours. The actigraphy measurements were compared with self-reported activity- and sleep...

  13. Assessing Human Activity in Elderly People Using Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcalá, José M; Ureña, Jesús; Hernández, Álvaro; Gualda, David

    2017-02-11

    The ageing of the population, and their increasing wish of living independently, are motivating the development of welfare and healthcare models. Existing approaches based on the direct heath-monitoring using body sensor networks (BSN) are precise and accurate. Nonetheless, their intrusiveness causes non-acceptance. New approaches seek the indirect monitoring through monitoring activities of daily living (ADLs), which proves to be a suitable solution. ADL monitoring systems use many heterogeneous sensors, are less intrusive, and are less expensive than BSN, however, the deployment and maintenance of wireless sensor networks (WSN) prevent them from a widespread acceptance. In this work, a novel technique to monitor the human activity, based on non-intrusive load monitoring (NILM), is presented. The proposal uses only smart meter data, which leads to minimum intrusiveness and a potential massive deployment at minimal cost. This could be the key to develop sustainable healthcare models for smart homes, capable of complying with the elderly people' demands. This study also uses the Dempster-Shafer theory to provide a daily score of normality with regard to the regular behavior. This approach has been evaluated using real datasets and, additionally, a benchmarking against a Gaussian mixture model approach is presented.

  14. Assessing Human Activity in Elderly People Using Non-Intrusive Load Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José M. Alcalá

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The ageing of the population, and their increasing wish of living independently, are motivating the development of welfare and healthcare models. Existing approaches based on the direct heath-monitoring using body sensor networks (BSN are precise and accurate. Nonetheless, their intrusiveness causes non-acceptance. New approaches seek the indirect monitoring through monitoring activities of daily living (ADLs, which proves to be a suitable solution. ADL monitoring systems use many heterogeneous sensors, are less intrusive, and are less expensive than BSN, however, the deployment and maintenance of wireless sensor networks (WSN prevent them from a widespread acceptance. In this work, a novel technique to monitor the human activity, based on non-intrusive load monitoring (NILM, is presented. The proposal uses only smart meter data, which leads to minimum intrusiveness and a potential massive deployment at minimal cost. This could be the key to develop sustainable healthcare models for smart homes, capable of complying with the elderly people’ demands. This study also uses the Dempster-Shafer theory to provide a daily score of normality with regard to the regular behavior. This approach has been evaluated using real datasets and, additionally, a benchmarking against a Gaussian mixture model approach is presented.

  15. Active waste disposal monitoring at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex, Idaho National Engineering Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hubbell, J.M.

    1990-10-01

    This report describes an active waste disposal monitoring system proposed to be installed beneath the low-level radioactive disposal site at the Radioactive Waste Management Complex (RWMC), Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, Idaho. The monitoring instruments will be installed while the waste is being disposed. Instruments will be located adjacent to and immediately beneath the disposal area within the unsaturated zone to provide early warning of contaminant movement before contaminants reach the Snake River Plain Aquifer. This study determined the optimum sampling techniques using existing monitoring equipment. Monitoring devices were chosen that provide long-term data for moisture content, movement of gamma-emitting nuclides, and gas concentrations in the waste. The devices will allow leachate collection, pore-water collection, collection of gasses, and access for drilling through and beneath the waste at a later time. The optimum monitoring design includes gas sampling devices above, within, and below the waste. Samples will be collected for methane, tritium, carbon dioxide, oxygen, and volatile organic compounds. Access tubes will be utilized to define the redistribution of radionuclides within, above, and below the waste over time and to define moisture content changes within the waste using spectral and neutron logging, respectively. Tracers will be placed within the cover material and within waste containers to estimate transport times by conservative chemical tracers. Monitoring the vadose zone below, within, and adjacent to waste while it is being buried is a viable monitoring option. 12 refs., 16 figs., 1 tab

  16. Screening and Monitoring Coeliac Disease: Multicentre Trial of a New Serum Antibody Test Kit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L. Devine

    1994-01-01

    average interassay CV was 6.4% for IgA and 4.3% for IgG (n=3. By defining a positive te st as both IgA and IgG elevated, a sensitivity of 93% in untreated coeliacs (n=75 was observed. The corresponding specificities in healthy adults (n=130 and healthy children (n=77 were >99% and 100% respectively, while in patients with other gastrointestinal disorders (disease controls the specificity was 94% (n=129. The test was also useful in monitoring patients, with anti-gliadin IgA and IgG falling for up to a year after commencing a gluten-free diet (GFD (12 adults. In some patients however, antibody levels did not reach the normal cutpoint after many months on a GFD, which may reflect the patients ' poor adherence to their gluten free diet. The test was superior to the Pharmacia anti-gliadin ELISA, and should be useful as an aid to the diagnosis of coeliac disease, as well as in the follow-up of treated patients.

  17. Impact of Falls on Physical Activity in People with Parkinson's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiorth, Ylva Hivand; Larsen, Jan Petter; Lode, Kirsten; Tysnes, Ole-Bjørn; Godfrey, Alan; Lord, Sue; Rochester, Lynn; Pedersen, Kenn Freddy

    2016-01-01

    A complex relationship exists between motor impairment, physical activity (sedentary behavior, standing and ambulatory activity) and falls in people with Parkinson's disease (PD). To explore associations between recent fall history and the ability to retain an active lifestyle as determined by the volume, pattern and variability of physical activity in people with PD. Forty-eight participants with PD were recruited from the Norwegian ParkWest study. Body posture and ambulatory activity were monitored objectively over 7 days using the activPAL3 accelerometer. Clinical assessments included the Hoehn and Yahr stage, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale motor section and Falls Efficacy Scale-International. Structured interviews were performed to obtain information about demographics, fall history last 6 months, mobility and dementia. Participants with a fall history (n = 20) spent more time sedentary and less time standing than non-falling participants (n = 28). There were no significant differences regarding pattern or variability of sedentary behavior, standing or ambulatory activity in falling versus non-falling participants. Confidence in being able to get up from floor contributed significantly to time spent in sedentary behavior and ambulatory activity in participants with fall history, whereas motor impairment was significantly associated with time spent in all facets of physical activity for non-falling participants. Fall history in our PD cohort was associated with a more sedentary lifestyle, but not less ambulatory activity. More emphasis on improving the capacity to safely complete activities of daily living and increase confidence in getting up from floor may reduce sedentary behavior in people with PD.

  18. Thin layer activation : on-line monitoring of metal loss in process plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boulton, L.H.; Wallace, G.

    1993-01-01

    Corrosion, erosion and wear of metals is a common cause of failure in some process plant and equipment. Monitoring of these destructive effects has been done for many years to help plant engineers minimise the damage, in order to avoid unexpected failures and unscheduled shutdowns. Traditional methods of monitoring, such as standard NDT techniques, inform the engineer of what has happened, providing data such as culmulative loss of wall thickness. The modern approach to monitoring however, is to employ a technique which gives both current loss rates as well as integrated losses. Thin Layer Activation (TLA) provides on-line monitoring of corrosion, erosion and wear of metals, to a high degree of accuracy. It also gives cumulative information which can be backed up with weight-loss results if required. Thus current rather than historical loss rates are measured before any significant loss of metal has occurred. (author). 14 refs., 2 figs

  19. Adult self-reported and objectively monitored physical activity and sedentary behavior: NHANES 2005–2006

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background It remains unclear what people are attempting to communicate, in terms of objectively monitored behavior, when describing their physical activity and sedentary behavior through self-report. The purpose of this study was to examine various objectively monitored accelerometer variables (e.g., moderate-to-vigorous physical activity [MVPA], steps/day, sedentary time, etc.) across categories of self-reported MVPA (activity (UODA; “mostly sitting” vs. “stand, walk, lift, or carry”), and leisure-time sedentary behavior (LTSB; ≥ 3 vs. behavior between categories of self-reported MVPA, UODA, and LTSB. Results On average, adults reporting compliance with physical activity guidelines (≥ 150 minutes/week of MVPA) accumulated more objectively measured physical activity and similar amounts of sedentary time relative to those reporting not achieving guidelines. Adults reporting their daily UODA as “mostly sitting” or accruing ≥ 3 hours/day of LTSB accumulated less objectively monitored physical activity and more sedentary time than those who described their UODA as “stand, walk, lift, or carry” or accrued active cross-classified category (7,935 steps/day; ≥ 150 minutes/week of self-reported MVPA, “stand, walk, lift, or carry” UODA, and active cross-classified category (3,532 steps/day; physical activity indicators varied significantly between self-reported MVPA, UODA, and LTSB categories, while objectively monitored sedentary time only varied between UODA and LTSB categories. Cross-classifications of self-reported MVPA, UODA, and LTSB responses depict a greater range of physical activity than viewing dichotomous responses for these variables one-at-a-time. PMID:24215625

  20. CD4 T cell activation and disease activity at onset of multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J; Langkilde, Annika Reynberg; Fenst, C

    2004-01-01

    We studied CD4 T cell activation in patients with clinically isolated syndromes (CIS) suggesting an initial attack of multiple sclerosis. The percentage of blood CD26+ CD4 T cells was increased in these patients, and correlated with magnetic resonance imaging disease activity and clinical disease...... severity. In contrast, the percentage of CD25+ CD4 T cells in cerebrospinal fluid correlated negatively with the cerebrospinal fluid concentration of myelin basic protein and the presence of IgG oligoclonal bands. These results suggest that distinct systemic and intrathecal T cell activation states...

  1. Physical Activity and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Among Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho-Jen Cheng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD represents a leading cause of mortality and morbidity especially among the elder people, and therefore the need of effective preventive strategies is imperative. Despite limited data among the elderly people, the majority of published studies have demonstrated that physically active elderly people have lower rates of CVD. In this article, we provide an overview of the epidemiology studies that investigate this association and analyze the relevant underlying biological mechanisms. We also discuss the types and amounts of physical activity recommended for the primary prevention of CVD in older adults.

  2. MR imaging in adults with Gaucher disease type I: evulation of marrow involvement and disease activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hermann, G. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Shaprio, R.S. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Abdelwahab, I.F. (Dept. of Radiology, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States)); Grabowski, G. (Dept. of Pediatrics, Mount Sinai Medical Center, City Univ. of New York, NY (United States))

    1993-05-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of bone marrow involvement in patients with Gaucher disease type I. T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained of the lower extremities of 29 adult patients. Patients were classified into one of three groups based on marrow signal patterns on T1- and T2-weighted images as well as change in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images. An increase in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images was the criterion for an 'active process' within the bone marrow. Classification of the 29 patients produced the following results: Group A: Normal, 4 patients; group B: Marrow infiltration, 16 patients; group C: Marrow infiltration plus active marrow process, 9 patients. Correlation with clinical findings revealed that all nine patients with evidence of an active marrow process on MRI (group C) had acute bone pain. Conversely, only one of the remaining 20 patients (groups A and B) had bone pain. There was no correlation between disease activity and findings on conventional radiographs. We conclude the MRI provides an excellent noninvasive assessment of the extent and activity of marrow involvement in type I Gaucher disease. (orig.)

  3. MR imaging in adults with Gaucher disease type I: evulation of marrow involvement and disease activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hermann, G.; Shaprio, R.S.; Abdelwahab, I.F.; Grabowski, G.

    1993-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the usefulness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the evaluation of bone marrow involvement in patients with Gaucher disease type I. T1- and T2-weighted images were obtained of the lower extremities of 29 adult patients. Patients were classified into one of three groups based on marrow signal patterns on T1- and T2-weighted images as well as change in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images. An increase in signal intensity from T1- to T2-weighted images was the criterion for an 'active process' within the bone marrow. Classification of the 29 patients produced the following results: Group A: Normal, 4 patients; group B: Marrow infiltration, 16 patients; group C: Marrow infiltration plus active marrow process, 9 patients. Correlation with clinical findings revealed that all nine patients with evidence of an active marrow process on MRI (group C) had acute bone pain. Conversely, only one of the remaining 20 patients (groups A and B) had bone pain. There was no correlation between disease activity and findings on conventional radiographs. We conclude the MRI provides an excellent noninvasive assessment of the extent and activity of marrow involvement in type I Gaucher disease. (orig.)

  4. Monitoring the biological activity of micropollutants during advanced wastewater treatment with ozonation and activated carbon filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macova, M; Escher, B I; Reungoat, J; Carswell, S; Chue, K Lee; Keller, J; Mueller, J F

    2010-01-01

    A bioanalytical test battery was used to monitor the removal efficiency of organic micropollutants during advanced wastewater treatment in the South Caboolture Water Reclamation Plant, Queensland, Australia. This plant treats effluent from a conventional sewage treatment plant for industrial water reuse. The aqueous samples were enriched using solid-phase extraction to separate some organic micropollutants of interest from metals, nutrients and matrix components. The bioassays were chosen to provide information on groups of chemicals with a common mode of toxic action. Therefore they can be considered as sum indicators to detect certain relevant groups of chemicals, not as the most ecologically or human health relevant endpoints. The baseline toxicity was quantified with the bioluminescence inhibition test using the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. The specific modes of toxic action that were targeted with five additional bioassays included aspects of estrogenicity, dioxin-like activity, genotoxicity, neurotoxicity, and phytotoxicity. While the accompanying publication discusses the treatment steps in more detail by drawing from the results of chemical analysis as well as the bioanalytical results, here we focus on the applicability and limitations of using bioassays for the purpose of determining the treatment efficacy of advanced water treatment and for water quality assessment in general. Results are reported in toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQ), that is, the concentration of a reference compound required to elicit the same response as the unknown and unidentified mixture of micropollutants actually present. TEQ proved to be useful and easily communicable despite some limitations and uncertainties in their derivation based on the mixture toxicity theory. The results obtained were reproducible, robust and sensitive. The TEQ in the influent ranged in the same order of magnitude as typically seen in effluents of conventional sewage treatment plants. In the

  5. Chemical Sensor Platform for Non-Invasive Monitoring of Activity and Dehydration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitry Solovei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A non-invasive solution for monitoring of the activity and dehydration of organisms is proposed in the work. For this purpose, a wireless standalone chemical sensor platform using two separate measurement techniques has been developed. The first approach for activity monitoring is based on humidity measurement. Our solution uses new humidity sensor based on a nanostructured TiO2 surface for sweat rate monitoring. The second technique is based on monitoring of potassium concentration in urine. High level of potassium concentration denotes clear occurrence of dehydration. Furthermore, a Wireless Body Area Network (WBAN was developed for this sensor platform to manage data transfer among devices and the internet. The WBAN coordinator controls the sensor devices and collects and stores the measured data. The collected data is particular to individuals and can be shared with physicians, emergency systems or athletes’ coaches. Long-time monitoring of activity and potassium concentration in urine can help maintain the appropriate water intake of elderly people or athletes and to send warning signals in the case of near dehydration. The created sensor system was calibrated and tested in laboratory and real conditions as well. The measurement results are discussed.

  6. A Study on the Use of Commercial Satellite Imagery for Monitoring of Yongbyon Nuclear Activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jung Hyun; Kim, Min Soo [Korea Institute of Nuclear Nonproliferation and Control Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-10-15

    It is particularly useful for the areas that are hard to access, such as the DPRK. On April 2009, North Korea expelled IAEA inspectors and USA disabling team at Yongbyon. Since then, there is not much left except for satellite imagery analysis. In this paper, we focused on the growing role and importance of commercial satellite imagery analysis for detecting and identifying nuclear activities at Yongbyon. For this, we examined monitoring capability of commercial satellite imagery status of commercial satellite imagery analysis to monitor the Yongbyon nuclear site. And we suggested several recommendations for enhancing the monitoring and analyzing capability. Current commercial satellite imagery has proven effective in monitoring for Yongbyon nuclear activities, especially change detection including the new construction activities. But identification and technical analysis of the operation status is still limited. In case of North Korea, operation status of 5 MWe reactor should be clearly identified to assess its plutonium production capability and to set up the negotiation strategy. To enhance the monitoring capability, we need much more thermal infrared imagery and radar imagery.

  7. [Monitoring of hematogenous occupational exposure in medical staff in infectious disease hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Manxia; Zhou, Jin; Wang, Yimei

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the status and risk factors for hematogenous occupational exposure in medical staff in an infectious disease hospital, and to provide a scientific basis for targeted preventive and control measures. The occupational exposure of 395 medical workers in our hospital was monitored from January 2012 to December 2014, among whom 79 individuals with occupational exposure were subjected to intervention and the risk factors for occupational exposure were analyzed. The high-risk group was mainly the nursing staff (69.6%). The incidence of hematogenous occupational exposure was high in medical personnel with a working age under 3 years, aged under 25 years, and at the infection ward, accounting for 63.3%, 72.1%, and 72.2%, respectively. Hepatitis B virus, hepatitis C virus, Treponema pallidum, and human immunodeficiency virus were the primary exposure sources. Sharp injury was the major way of injury (91.1%), with needle stick injury accounting for the highest proportion (86.1%). Injury occurred on the hand most frequently (91.1%). The high-risk links were improper disposal during or after pulling the needle, re-capturing the needle, and processing waste, accounting for 46.8%, 17.7%, and 12.7%, respectively. Seventy-nine professionals with occupational exposure were not infected. The main risk factor for hematogenous occupational exposure in medical staff in the infectious disease hospital is needle stick injury. Strengthening the occupational protection education in medical staff in infectious disease hospital, implementing protective measures, standardizing operating procedures in high-risk links, and enhancing the supervision mechanism can reduce the incidence of occupational exposure and infection after exposure.

  8. CHI: A contemporaneous health index for degenerative disease monitoring using longitudinal measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yijun; Meng, Qiang; Evans, Heather; Lober, William; Cheng, Yu; Qian, Xiaoning; Liu, Ji; Huang, Shuai

    2017-09-01

    In this paper, we develop a novel formulation for contemporaneous patient risk monitoring by exploiting the emerging data-rich environment in many healthcare applications, where an abundance of longitudinal data that reflect the degeneration of the health condition can be continuously collected. Our objective, and the developed formulation, is fundamentally different from many existing risk score models for different healthcare applications, which mostly focus on predicting the likelihood of a certain outcome at a pre-specified time. Rather, our formulation translates multivariate longitudinal measurements into a contemporaneous health index (CHI) that captures patient condition changes over the course of progression. Another significant feature of our formulation is that, CHI can be estimated with or without label information, different from other risk score models strictly based on supervised learning. To develop this formulation, we focus on the degenerative disease conditions, for which we could utilize the monotonic progression characteristic (either towards disease or recovery) to learn CHI. Such a domain knowledge leads us to a novel learning formulation, and on top of that, we further generalize this formulation with a capacity to incorporate label information if available. We further develop algorithms to mitigate the challenges associated with the nonsmooth convex optimization problem by first identifying its dual reformulation as a constrained smooth optimization problem, and then, using the block coordinate descent algorithm to iteratively solve the optimization with a derived efficient projection at each iteration. Extensive numerical studies are performed on both synthetic datasets and real-world applications on Alzheimer's disease and Surgical Site Infection, which demonstrate the utility and efficacy of the proposed method on degenerative conditions that include a wide range of applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Participation in novelty-seeking leisure activities and Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritsch, Thomas; Smyth, Kathleen A; Debanne, Sara M; Petot, Grace J; Friedland, Robert P

    2005-09-01

    The objective was to study the associations between participation in different types of mentally stimulating leisure activities and status as Alzheimer's disease (AD) case or normal control. Research suggests that participation in leisure activities, especially mentally stimulating activities, is associated with a lower risk for AD. However, no study has yet evaluated associations between AD and different types of mental leisure activities, especially those involving "novelty seeking." The authors used a case-control design to compare participation in activities across the life span in persons with AD and normal controls. Cases (n = 264) were recruited from clinical settings and from the community. Controls were drawn from 2 populations. Control group A members (n = 364) were the friends or neighbors of the cases or members of the same organizations to which the cases belonged. Control group B members (n = 181) were randomly drawn from the community. The 2 control groups did not differ in their responses to most activity questions, so they were combined. Factor analysis of activity questions identified 3 activity factors: (1) novelty seeking; (2) exchange of ideas; and (3) social. Logistic regression analysis indicated that, adjusting for control variables, greater participation in novelty-seeking and exchange-of-ideas activities was significantly associated with decreased odds of AD. The odds of AD were lower among those who more often participated in activities involving exchange of ideas and were lower yet for those who more frequently participated in novelty-seeking activities. We conclude that participation in a variety of mental activities across the life span may lower one's chances of developing AD.

  10. [Physical activity in basic and primary prevention of cardiovascular disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieszczańska, Małgorzata; Kałka, Dariusz; Pilecki, Witold; Adamus, Jerzy

    2009-06-01

    On account of the frequency of appearing and character of atherosclerosis cardiac vascular disease, one of the most crucial elements of effective fight against it is preparation of complex preventive programs including as vast number of population as possible. Consequently, Benjamin and Smitch suggested attaching the notion of basic prevention to the standard division into primary and secondary one. The basic prevention, carrying out in the general population, should concern genetic predisposition, psychosocial factors, keeping up proper body weight, healthy eating and physical activity. Especially high hopes are connected with high efficiency, simplicity and low money-consumption of preventive activities associated with physical activity modification, which has a crucial influence on reducing negative impact of atherosclerosis hazard. The results of numerous scientific research, carried out in many countries and on various, large groups, proved undoubtedly that at the healthy adult people of both sex the systematic physical activity of moderate intensification plays an essential part in preventing CVD and decreasing the death risk because of that reason as well. Moreover, systematic physical exercises show many other health-oriented actions, thanks to which they have an influence on decreasing premature and total death rate. The risk of incidence of civilization-related diseases such as diabetes type II, hypertension, obesity, osteoporosis, tumors (of large intestine, breast, prostatic gland) and depression has decreased significantly. Unequivocally positive influence has been proved at many observations dedicated to health recreational physical activity and physical activity connected with professional work based on aerobe effort. The positive effects have been also observed at children population and senior population which is more and more numerous and the most at risk. The beneficial action of physical activity is connected with direct effect on organism

  11. Evaluation of surveillance methods for monitoring house fly abundance and activity on large commercial dairy operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerry, Alec C; Higginbotham, G E; Periera, L N; Lam, A; Shelton, C R

    2011-06-01

    Relative house fly, Musca domestica L., activity at three large dairies in central California was monitored during the peak fly activity period from June to August 2005 by using spot cards, fly tapes, bait traps, and Alsynite traps. Counts for all monitoring methods were significantly related at two of three dairies; with spot card counts significantly related to fly tape counts recorded the same week, and both spot card counts and fly tape counts significantly related to bait trap counts 1-2 wk later. Mean fly counts differed significantly between dairies, but a significant interaction between dairies sampled and monitoring methods used demonstrates that between-dairy comparisons are unwise. Estimate precision was determined by the coefficient of variability (CV) (or SE/mean). Using a CV = 0.15 as a desired level of estimate precision and assuming an integrate pest management (IPM) action threshold near the peak house fly activity measured by each monitoring method, house fly monitoring at a large dairy would require 12 spot cards placed in midafternoon shaded fly resting sites near cattle or seven bait traps placed in open areas near cattle. Software (FlySpotter; http://ucanr.org/ sites/FlySpotter/download/) using computer vision technology was developed to count fly spots on a scanned image of a spot card to dramatically reduce time invested in monitoring house flies. Counts provided by the FlySpotter software were highly correlated to visual counts. The use of spot cards for monitoring house flies is recommended for dairy IPM programs.

  12. Clinical Feasibility of Continuously Monitored Data for Heart Rate, Physical Activity, and Sleeping by Wearable Activity Trackers in Patients with Thyrotoxicosis: Protocol for a Prospective Longitudinal Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jie-Eun; Lee, Dong Hwa; Oh, Tae Jung; Kim, Kyoung Min; Choi, Sung Hee; Lim, Soo; Park, Young Joo; Park, Do Joon; Jang, Hak Chul; Moon, Jae Hoon

    2018-02-21

    Thyrotoxicosis is a common disease caused by an excess of thyroid hormones. The prevalence of thyrotoxicosis about 2% and 70-90% of thyrotoxicosis cases are caused by Graves' disease, an autoimmune disease, which has a high recurrence rate when treated with antithyroid drugs such as methimazole or propylthiouracil. The clinical symptoms and signs of thyrotoxicosis include palpitation, weight loss, restlessness, and difficulty sleeping. Although these clinical changes in thyrotoxicosis can be detected by currently available wearable activity trackers, there have been few trials of the clinical application of wearable devices in patients with thyrotoxicosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical applicability of wearable device-generated data to the management of thyrotoxicosis. We are analyzing continuously monitored data for heart rate, physical activity, and sleep in patients with thyrotoxicosis during their clinical course after treatment. Thirty thyrotoxic patients and 10 control subjects were enrolled in this study at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. Heart rate, physical activity, and sleep are being monitored using a Fitbit Charge HR or Fitbit Charge 2. Clinical data including anthropometric measures, thyroid function test, and hyperthyroidism symptom scale are recorded. Study enrollment began in December 2016, and the intervention and follow-up phases are ongoing. The results of the data analysis are expected to be available by September 2017. This study will provide a foundational feasibility trial of the clinical applications of biosignal measurements to the differential diagnosis, prediction of clinical course, early detection of recurrence, and treatment in patients with thyrotoxicosis. ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03009357; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03009357 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6wh4MWPm2). ©Jie-Eun Lee, Dong Hwa Lee, Tae Jung Oh, Kyoung Min Kim, Sung Hee Choi, Soo Lim, Young Joo Park, Do

  13. Clinical Feasibility of Continuously Monitored Data for Heart Rate, Physical Activity, and Sleeping by Wearable Activity Trackers in Patients with Thyrotoxicosis: Protocol for a Prospective Longitudinal Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jie-Eun; Lee, Dong Hwa; Oh, Tae Jung; Kim, Kyoung Min; Choi, Sung Hee; Lim, Soo; Park, Young Joo; Park, Do Joon; Jang, Hak Chul

    2018-01-01

    Background Thyrotoxicosis is a common disease caused by an excess of thyroid hormones. The prevalence of thyrotoxicosis about 2% and 70-90% of thyrotoxicosis cases are caused by Graves' disease, an autoimmune disease, which has a high recurrence rate when treated with antithyroid drugs such as methimazole or propylthiouracil. The clinical symptoms and signs of thyrotoxicosis include palpitation, weight loss, restlessness, and difficulty sleeping. Although these clinical changes in thyrotoxicosis can be detected by currently available wearable activity trackers, there have been few trials of the clinical application of wearable devices in patients with thyrotoxicosis. Objective The aim of this study is to investigate the clinical applicability of wearable device-generated data to the management of thyrotoxicosis. We are analyzing continuously monitored data for heart rate, physical activity, and sleep in patients with thyrotoxicosis during their clinical course after treatment. Methods Thirty thyrotoxic patients and 10 control subjects were enrolled in this study at Seoul National University Bundang Hospital. Heart rate, physical activity, and sleep are being monitored using a Fitbit Charge HR or Fitbit Charge 2. Clinical data including anthropometric measures, thyroid function test, and hyperthyroidism symptom scale are recorded. Results Study enrollment began in December 2016, and the intervention and follow-up phases are ongoing. The results of the data analysis are expected to be available by September 2017. Conclusions This study will provide a foundational feasibility trial of the clinical applications of biosignal measurements to the differential diagnosis, prediction of clinical course, early detection of recurrence, and treatment in patients with thyrotoxicosis. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT03009357; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT03009357 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6wh4MWPm2) PMID:29467121

  14. A Wearable System for Real-Time Continuous Monitoring of Physical Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrizio Taffoni

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the last decades, wearable systems have gained interest for monitoring of physiological variables, promoting health, and improving exercise adherence in different populations ranging from elite athletes to patients. In this paper, we present a wearable system for the continuous real-time monitoring of respiratory frequency (fR, heart rate (HR, and movement cadence during physical activity. The system has been experimentally tested in the laboratory (by simulating the breathing pattern with a mechanical ventilator and by collecting data from one healthy volunteer. Results show the feasibility of the proposed device for real-time continuous monitoring of fR, HR, and movement cadence both in resting condition and during activity. Finally, different synchronization techniques have been investigated to enable simultaneous data collection from different wearable modules.

  15. Ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, and irritable bowel syndrome have different profiles of extracellular matrix turnover, which also reflects disease activity in Crohn's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Høg Mortensen

    Full Text Available Increased protease activity is a key pathological feature of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD. However, the differences in extracellular matrix remodelling (ECM in Crohn's disease (CD and ulcerative colitis (UC are not well described. An increased understanding of the inflammatory processes may provide optimized disease monitoring and diagnostics. We investigated the tissue remodelling in IBD and IBS patients by using novel blood-based biomarkers reflecting ECM remodelling.Five ECM biomarkers (VICM, BGM, EL-NE, C5M, Pro-C5 were measured by competitive ELISAs in serum from 72 CD patients, 60 UC patients, 22 patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS, and 24 healthy donors. One-way analysis of variance, Mann-Whitney U-test, logistic regression models, and receiver operator characteristics (ROC curve analysis was carried out to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of the biomarkers.The ECM remodelling was significantly different in UC compared to CD. The best biomarker combination to differentiate UC from CD and colonic CD was BGM and VICM (AUC = 0.98, P5mg/mL, correlation of Pro-C5 (r = 0.36 with CDAI was slightly improved compared to CRP (r = 0.27 corrected for the use of immunosuppressant. Furthermore, BGM and EL-NE biomarkers were highly associated with colon inflammation in CD patients.ECM fragments of tissue remodelling in IBD affect UC and CD differently, and may aid in differentiating IBD from IBS (EL-NE, BGM, Pro-C5, and UC from CD patients (BGM, VICM. Formation of type V collagen is related to the level of inflammation in CD and may reflect disease activity in CD.

  16. Clinical utility of therapeutic drug monitoring in biological disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment of rheumatic disorders: a systematic narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwaarden, Noortje; Van Den Bemt, Bart J F; Wientjes, Maike H M; Kramers, Cornelis; Den Broeder, Alfons A

    2017-08-01

    Biological Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (bDMARDs) have improved the treatment outcomes of inflammatory rheumatic diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis and spondyloarthropathies. Inter-individual variation exists in (maintenance of) response to bDMARDs. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) of bDMARDs could potentially help in optimizing treatment for the individual patient. Areas covered: Evidence of clinical utility of TDM in bDMARD treatment is reviewed. Different clinical scenarios will be discussed, including: prediction of response after start of treatment, prediction of response to a next bDMARD in case of treatment failure of the first, prediction of successful dose reduction or discontinuation in case of low disease activity, prediction of response to dose-escalation in case of active disease and prediction of response to bDMARD in case of flare in disease activity. Expert opinion: The limited available evidence does often not report important outcomes for diagnostic studies, such as sensitivity and specificity. In most clinical relevant scenarios, predictive value of serum (anti-) drug levels is absent, therefore the use of TDM of bDMARDs cannot be advocated. Well-designed prospective studies should be done to further investigate the promising scenarios to determine the place of TDM in clinical practice.

  17. A Mobile Application for Easy Design and Testing of Algorithms to Monitor Physical Activity in the Workplace

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Spinsante

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses approaches to Human Activity Recognition (HAR with the aim of monitoring the physical activity of people in the workplace, by means of a smartphone application exploiting the available on-board accelerometer sensor. In fact, HAR via a smartphone or wearable sensor can provide important information regarding the level of daily physical activity, especially in situations where a sedentary behavior usually occurs, like in modern workplace environments. Increased sitting time is significantly associated with severe health diseases, and the workplace is an appropriate intervention setting, due to the sedentary behavior typical of modern jobs. Within this paper, the state-of-the-art components of HAR are analyzed, in order to identify and select the most effective signal filtering and windowing solutions for physical activity monitoring. The classifier development process is based upon three phases; a feature extraction phase, a feature selection phase, and a training phase. In the training phase, a publicly available dataset is used to test among different classifier types and learning methods. A user-friendly Android-based smartphone application with low computational requirements has been developed to run field tests, which allows to easily change the classifier under test, and to collect new datasets ready for use with machine learning APIs. The newly created datasets may include additional information, like the smartphone position, its orientation, and the user’s physical characteristics. Using the mobile tool, a classifier based on a decision tree is finally set up and enriched with the introduction of some robustness improvements. The developed approach is capable of classifying six activities, and to distinguish between not active (sitting and active states, with an accuracy near to 99%. The mobile tool, which is going to be further extended and enriched, will allow for rapid and easy benchmarking of new algorithms based

  18. Monitoring Ion Activities In and Around Cells Using Ion-Selective Liquid-Membrane Microelectrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Parker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining the effective concentration (i.e., activity of ions in and around living cells is important to our understanding of the contribution of those ions to cellular function. Moreover, monitoring changes in ion activities in and around cells is informative about the actions of the transporters and/or channels operating in the cell membrane. The activity of an ion can be measured using a glass microelectrode that includes in its tip a liquid-membrane doped with an ion-selective ionophore. Because these electrodes can be fabricated with tip diameters that are less than 1 μm, they can be used to impale single cells in order to monitor the activities of intracellular ions. This review summarizes the history, theory, and practice of ion-selective microelectrode use and brings together a number of classic and recent examples of their usefulness in the realm of physiological study.

  19. Activity Learning as a Foundation for Security Monitoring in Smart Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessamyn Dahmen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Smart environment technology has matured to the point where it is regularly used in everyday homes as well as research labs. With this maturation of the technology, we can consider using smart homes as a practical mechanism for improving home security. In this paper, we introduce an activity-aware approach to security monitoring and threat detection in smart homes. We describe our approach using the CASAS smart home framework and activity learning algorithms. By monitoring for activity-based anomalies we can detect possible threats and take appropriate action. We evaluate our proposed method using data collected in CASAS smart homes and demonstrate the partnership between activity-aware smart homes and biometric devices in the context of the CASAS on-campus smart apartment testbed.

  20. Activity Learning as a Foundation for Security Monitoring in Smart Homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Jessamyn; Thomas, Brian L; Cook, Diane J; Wang, Xiaobo

    2017-03-31

    Smart environment technology has matured to the point where it is regularly used in everyday homes as well as research labs. With this maturation of the technology, we can consider using smart homes as a practical mechanism for improving home security. In this paper, we introduce an activity-aware approach to security monitoring and threat detection in smart homes. We describe our approach using the CASAS smart home framework and activity learning algorithms. By monitoring for activity-based anomalies we can detect possible threats and take appropriate action. We evaluate our proposed method using data collected in CASAS smart homes and demonstrate the partnership between activity-aware smart homes and biometric devices in the context of the CASAS on-campus smart apartment testbed.

  1. Medicinal plant activity on Helicobacter pylori related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuan-Chuen

    2014-08-14

    More than 50% of the world population is infected with Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). The bacterium highly links to peptic ulcer diseases and duodenal ulcer, which was classified as a group I carcinogen in 1994 by the WHO. The pathogenesis of H. pylori is contributed by its virulence factors including urease, flagella, vacuolating cytotoxin A (VacA), cytotoxin-associated gene antigen (Cag A), and others. Of those virulence factors, VacA and CagA play the key roles. Infection with H. pylori vacA-positive strains can lead to vacuolation and apoptosis, whereas infection with cagA-positive strains might result in severe gastric inflammation and gastric cancer. Numerous medicinal plants have been reported for their anti-H. pylori activity, and the relevant active compounds including polyphenols, flavonoids, quinones, coumarins, terpenoids, and alkaloids have been studied. The anti-H. pylori action mechanisms, including inhibition of enzymatic (urease, DNA gyrase, dihydrofolate reductase, N-acetyltransferase, and myeloperoxidase) and adhesive activities, high redox potential, and hydrophilic/hydrophobic natures of compounds, have also been discussed in detail. H. pylori-induced gastric inflammation may progress to superficial gastritis, atrophic gastritis, and finally gastric cancer. Many natural products have anti-H. pylori-induced inflammation activity and the relevant mechanisms include suppression of nuclear factor-κB and mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway activation and inhibition of oxidative stress. Anti-H. pylori induced gastric inflammatory effects of plant products, including quercetin, apigenin, carotenoids-rich algae, tea product, garlic extract, apple peel polyphenol, and finger-root extract, have been documented. In conclusion, many medicinal plant products possess anti-H. pylori activity as well as an anti-H. pylori-induced gastric inflammatory effect. Those plant products have showed great potential as pharmaceutical candidates for H. pylori

  2. GridICE: monitoring the user/application activities on the grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiftimiei, C; Pra, S D; Andreozzi, S; Fattibene, E; Misurelli, G; Cuscela, G; Donvito, G; Dudhalkar, V; Maggi, G; Pierro, A; Fantinel, S

    2008-01-01

    The monitoring of the grid user activity and application performance is extremely useful to plan resource usage strategies particularly in cases of complex applications. Large VOs, such as the LHC VOs, do their monitoring by means of dashboards. Other VOs or communities, like for example the BioinfoGRID one, are characterized by a greater diversification of the application types: so the effort to provide a dashboard like monitor is particularly heavy. The main theme of this paper is to show the improvements introduced in GridICE, a web tool built to provides an almost complete grid monitoring. These recent improvements allows GridICE to provide new reports on the resources usage with details of the VOMS groups, roles and users. By accessing the GridICE web pages, the grid user can get all information that is relevant to keep track of his activity on the grid. In the same way, the activity of a VOMS group can be distinguished from the activity of the entire VO. In this paper we briefly talk about the features and advantages of this approach and, after discussing the requirements, we describe the software solutions, middleware and prerequisite to manage and retrieve the user's credentials

  3. Quality assurance project plan for ground water monitoring activities managed by Westinghouse Hanford Company. Revision 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stauffer, M.

    1995-11-01

    This quality assurance project plan (QAPP) applies specifically to the field activities and laboratory analysis performed for all RCRA groundwater projects conducted by Hanford Technical Services. This QAPP is generic in approach and shall be implemented in conjunction with the specific requirements of individual groundwater monitoring plans

  4. Neutron activation procedures used for the calibration of a nitrogen-16 reactor power monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jester, W.A.; Daubenspeck, T.

    2000-01-01

    Personnel from the Pennsylvania State University's Breazeale Nuclear Reactor assisted NRC (Nuclear Research Corporation) personnel in calibrating a new MSL/ 16 N Nitrogen-16 Monitor. Neutron flux calibration procedures utilized and the results obtained for the production of a nitrogen-16 source of known activity for a BGO detector calibration are described. (author)

  5. Novel Use of a Noninvasive Hemodynamic Monitor in a Personalized, Active Learning Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoller, Jonathan K.; He, Jianghua; Ballew, Angela T.; Orr, Walter N.; Flynn, Brigid C.

    2017-01-01

    The present study furthered the concept of simulation-based medical education by applying a personalized active learning component. We tested this novel approach utilizing a noninvasive hemodynamic monitor with the capability to measure and display in real time numerous hemodynamic parameters in the exercising participant. Changes in medical…

  6. Impact of Middle School Student Energy Monitoring Activities on Climate Change Beliefs and Intentions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Rhonda; Knezek, Gerald

    2018-01-01

    The Going Green! Middle Schoolers Out to Save the World project aims to direct middle school students' enthusiasm for hands-on activities toward interest in science and other STEM areas while guiding them to solve real-world problems. Students in this project are taught by their teachers to use energy monitoring equipment to audit standby power…

  7. Ileal Crohn disease: mural microvascularity quantified with contrast-enhanced US correlates with disease activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Franco, Antonio; Di Veronica, Alessandra; Armuzzi, Alessandro; Roberto, Italia; Marzo, Manuela; De Pascalis, Barbara; De Vitis, Italo; Papa, Alfredo; Bock, Enrico; Danza, Francesco M; Bonomo, Lorenzo; Guidi, Luisa

    2012-02-01

    To quantitatively assess microvascular activation in the thickened ileal walls of patients with Crohn disease (CD) by using contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (US) and evaluate its correlation with widely used indexes of CD activity. This prospective study was approved by the ethics committee, and written informed consent was obtained from all patients. The authors examined 54 consecutively enrolled patients (mean age, 35.29 years; age range, 18-69 years; 39 men, 15 women) with endoscopically confirmed CD of the terminal ileum. Ileal wall segments thicker than 3 mm were examined with low-mechanical-index contrast-enhanced US and a second-generation US contrast agent. The authors analyzed software-plotted time-enhancement intensity curves to determine the maximum peak intensity (MPI) and wash-in slope coefficient (β) and evaluated their correlation with (a) the composite index of CD activity (CICDA), (b) the CD activity index (CDAI), and (c) the simplified endoscopic score for CD (SES-CD, evaluated in 37 patients) for the terminal ileum. Statistical analysis was performed with the Mann-Whitney test, Spearman rank test, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. MPI and β coefficients were significantly increased in the 36 patients with a CICDA indicative of active disease (P<.0001 for both), the 33 patients with a CDAI of at least 150 (P<.032 and P<.0074, respectively), and the 26 patients with an SES-CD of at least 1 (P<.0001 and P<.002, respectively). ROC analysis revealed accurate identification (compared with CICDA) of active CD with an MPI threshold of 24 video intensity (VI) (sensitivity, 97%; specificity, 83%) and a β coefficient of 4.5 VI/sec (sensitivity, 86%; specificity, 83%). Contrast-enhanced US of the ileal wall is a promising method for objective, reproducible assessment of disease activity in patients with ileal CD. © RSNA, 2011

  8. Validation of the "German Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity Index (GIBDI)": An Instrument for Patient-Based Disease Activity Assessment in Crohn's Disease and Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hüppe, Angelika; Langbrandtner, Jana; Häuser, Winfried; Raspe, Heiner; Bokemeyer, Bernd

    2018-05-09

     Assessment of disease activity in Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) is usually based on the physician's evaluation of clinical symptoms, endoscopic findings, and biomarker analysis. The German Inflammatory Bowel Disease Activity Index for CD (GIBDI CD ) and UC (GIBDI UC ) uses data from patient-reported questionnaires. It is unclear to what extent the GIBDI agrees with the physicians' documented activity indices.  Data from 2 studies were reanalyzed. In both, gastroenterologists had documented disease activity in UC with the partial Mayo Score (pMS) and in CD with the Harvey Bradshaw Index (HBI). Patient-completed GIBDI questionnaires had also been assessed. The analysis sample consisted of 151 UC and 150 CD patients. Kappa coefficients were determined as agreement measurements.  Rank correlations were 0.56 (pMS, GIBDI UC ) and 0.57 (HBI, GIBDI CD ), with p < 0.001. The absolute agreement for 2 categories of disease activity (remission yes/no) was 74.2 % (UC) and 76.6 % (CD), and for 4 categories (none/mild/moderate/severe) 60.3 % (UC) and 61.9 % (CD). The kappa values ranged between 0.47 for UC (2 categories) and 0.58 for CD (4 categories).  There is satisfactory agreement of GIBDI with the physician-documented disease activity indices. GIBDI can be used in health care research without access to assessments of medical practitioners. In clinical practice, the index offers a supplementary source of information. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. Sensing interstitial glucose to nudge active lifestyles (SIGNAL): feasibility of combining novel self-monitoring technologies for persuasive behaviour change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Maxine E; Kingsnorth, Andrew P; Orme, Mark W; Sherar, Lauren B; Esliger, Dale W

    2017-10-08

    Increasing physical activity (PA) reduces the risk of developing diabetes, highlighting the role of preventive medicine approaches. Changing lifestyle behaviours is difficult and is often predicated on the assumption that individuals are willing to change their lifestyles today to reduce the risk of developing disease years or even decades later. The self-monitoring technologies tested in this study will present PA feedback in real time, parallel with acute physiological data. Presenting the immediate health benefits of being more physically active may help enact change by observing the immediate consequences of that behaviour. The present study aims to assess user engagement with the self-monitoring technologies in individuals at moderate-to-high risk of developing type 2 diabetes. 45 individuals with a moderate-to-high risk, aged ≥40 years old and using a compatible smartphone, will be invited to take part in a 7-week protocol. Following 1 week of baseline measurements, participants will be randomised into one of three groups: group 1- glucose feedback followed by biobehavioural feedback (glucose plus PA); group 2-PA feedback followed by biobehavioural feedback; group 3-biobehavioural feedback. A PA monitor and a flash glucose monitor will be deployed during the intervention. Participants will wear both devices throughout the intervention but blinded to feedback depending on group allocation. The primary outcome is the level of participant engagement and will be assessed by device use and smartphone usage. Feasibility will be assessed by the practicality of the technology and screening for diabetes risk. Semistructured interviews will be conducted to explore participant experiences using the technologies. ISRCTN17545949. Registered on 15/05/2017. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. A demonstration of on-line plant corrosion monitoring using thin layer activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asher, J.; Webb, J.W.; Wilkins, N.J.M.; Lawrence, P.F.; UKAEA Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Harwell. Materials Development Div.)

    1981-12-01

    The corrosion of a 1 inch water pipe in an evaporative cooling system has been monitored over three periods of plant operation using thin layer activation (TLA). The corrosion rate was followed at a sensitivity of about 1 μm and clearly reflected changes in plant operation. Examination of the test section after removal, both by autoradiography and metallography revealed the extent of corrosion and pitting over the active area. (author)

  11. A system of radiation monitoring, and methods and equipment for measuring water of low specific activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sivintsev, Yu.V.

    1975-01-01

    The author considers criteria for the radiation protection of the population and the environment. He describes the role of procedures for monitoring waters of low specific activity in the framework of a system for ensuring the radiation safety of the population living near a nuclear power station. The main technical characteristics (background, efficiency, sensitivity) of the laboratory equipment for gamma spectrometric analysis of water samples of low specific activity are discussed. (author)

  12. PERFORM: A System for Monitoring, Assessment and Management of Patients with Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandros T. Tzallas

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we describe the PERFORM system for the continuous remote monitoring and management of Parkinson’s disease (PD patients. The PERFORM system is an intelligent closed-loop system that seamlessly integrates a wide range of wearable sensors constantly monitoring several motor signals of the PD patients. Data acquired are pre-processed by advanced knowledge processing methods, integrated by fusion algorithms to allow health professionals to remotely monitor the overall status of the patients, adjust medication schedules and personalize treatment. The information collected by the sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes is processed by several classifiers. As a result, it is possible to evaluate and quantify the PD motor symptoms related to end of dose deterioration (tremor, bradykinesia, freezing of gait (FoG as well as those related to over-dose concentration (Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID. Based on this information, together with information derived from tests performed with a virtual reality glove and information about the medication and food intake, a patient specific profile can be built. In addition, the patient specific profile with his evaluation during the last week and last month, is compared to understand whether his status is stable, improving or worsening. Based on that, the system analyses whether a medication change is needed—always under medical supervision—and in this case, information about the medication change proposal is sent to the patient. The performance of the system has been evaluated in real life conditions, the accuracy and acceptability of the system by the PD patients and healthcare professionals has been tested, and a comparison with the standard routine clinical evaluation done by the PD patients’ physician has been carried out. The PERFORM system is used by the PD patients and in a simple and safe non-invasive way for long-term record of their motor status, thus offering to the clinician a

  13. PERFORM: a system for monitoring, assessment and management of patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzallas, Alexandros T; Tsipouras, Markos G; Rigas, Georgios; Tsalikakis, Dimitrios G; Karvounis, Evaggelos C; Chondrogiorgi, Maria; Psomadellis, Fotis; Cancela, Jorge; Pastorino, Matteo; Waldmeyer, María Teresa Arredondo; Konitsiotis, Spiros; Fotiadis, Dimitrios I

    2014-11-11

    In this paper, we describe the PERFORM system for the continuous remote monitoring and management of Parkinson's disease (PD) patients. The PERFORM system is an intelligent closed-loop system that seamlessly integrates a wide range of wearable sensors constantly monitoring several motor signals of the PD patients. Data acquired are pre-processed by advanced knowledge processing methods, integrated by fusion algorithms to allow health professionals to remotely monitor the overall status of the patients, adjust medication schedules and personalize treatment. The information collected by the sensors (accelerometers and gyroscopes) is processed by several classifiers. As a result, it is possible to evaluate and quantify the PD motor symptoms related to end of dose deterioration (tremor, bradykinesia, freezing of gait (FoG)) as well as those related to over-dose concentration (Levodopa-induced dyskinesia (LID)). Based on this information, together with information derived from tests performed with a virtual reality glove and information about the medication and food intake, a patient specific profile can be built. In addition, the patient specific profile with his evaluation during the last week and last month, is compared to understand whether his status is stable, improving or worsening. Based on that, the system analyses whether a medication change is needed--always under medical supervision--and in this case, information about the medication change proposal is sent to the patient. The performance of the system has been evaluated in real life conditions, the accuracy and acceptability of the system by the PD patients and healthcare professionals has been tested, and a comparison with the standard routine clinical evaluation done by the PD patients' physician has been carried out. The PERFORM system is used by the PD patients and in a simple and safe non-invasive way for long-term record of their motor status, thus offering to the clinician a precise, long-term and

  14. A mobile cloud-based Parkinson's disease assessment system for home-based monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Di; Dhall, Rohit; Lieberman, Abraham; Petitti, Diana B

    2015-03-26

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is the most prevalent movement disorder of the central nervous system, and affects more than 6.3 million people in the world. The characteristic motor features include tremor, bradykinesia, rigidity, and impaired postural stability. Current therapy based on augmentation or replacement of dopamine is designed to improve patients' motor performance but often leads to levodopa-induced adverse effects, such as dyskinesia and motor fluctuation. Clinicians must regularly monitor patients in order to identify these effects and other declines in motor function as soon as possible. Current clinical assessment for Parkinson's is subjective and mostly conducted by brief observations made during patient visits. Changes in patients' motor function between visits are hard to track and clinicians are not able to make the most informed decisions about the course of therapy without frequent visits. Frequent clinic visits increase the physical and economic burden on patients and their families. In this project, we sought to design, develop, and evaluate a prototype mobile cloud-based mHealth app, "PD Dr", which collects quantitative and objective information about PD and would enable home-based assessment and monitoring of major PD symptoms. We designed and developed a mobile app on the Android platform to collect PD-related motion data using the smartphone 3D accelerometer and to send the data to a cloud service for storage, data processing, and PD symptoms severity estimation. To evaluate this system, data from the system were collected from 40 patients with PD and compared with experts' rating on standardized rating scales. The evaluation showed that PD Dr could effectively capture important motion features that differentiate PD severity and identify critical symptoms. For hand resting tremor detection, the sensitivity was .77 and accuracy was .82. For gait difficulty detection, the sensitivity was .89 and accuracy was .81. In PD severity estimation, the

  15. A framework to monitor activities of satellite data processing in real-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, M. D.; Kryukov, A. P.

    2018-01-01

    Space Monitoring Data Center (SMDC) of SINP MSU is one of the several centers in the world that collects data on the radiational conditions in near-Earth orbit from various Russian (Lomonosov, Electro-L1, Electro-L2, Meteor-M1, Meteor-M2, etc.) and foreign (GOES 13, GOES 15, ACE, SDO, etc.) satellites. The primary purposes of SMDC are: aggregating heterogeneous data from different sources; providing a unified interface for data retrieval, visualization, analysis, as well as development and testing new space weather models; and controlling the correctness and completeness of data. Space weather models rely on data provided by SMDC to produce forecasts. Therefore, monitoring the whole data processing cycle is crucial for further success in the modeling of physical processes in near-Earth orbit based on the collected data. To solve the problem described above, we have developed a framework called Live Monitor at SMDC. Live Monitor allows watching all stages and program components involved in each data processing cycle. All activities of each stage are logged by Live Monitor and shown in real-time on a web interface. When an error occurs, a notification message will be sent to satellite operators via email and the Telegram messenger service so that they could take measures in time. The Live Monitor’s API can be used to create a customized monitoring service with minimum coding.

  16. Dystromirs as serum biomarkers for monitoring the disease severity in Duchenne muscular Dystrophy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irina T Zaharieva

    Full Text Available Duchenne muscular Dystrophy (DMD is an inherited disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene that disrupt the open reading frame, while in frame mutations result in Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD. Ullrich congenital muscular dystrophy (UCMD is due to mutations affecting collagen VI genes. Specific muscle miRNAs (dystromirs are potential non-invasive biomarkers for monitoring the outcome of therapeutic interventions and disease progression. We quantified miR-1, miR-133a,b, miR-206 and miR-31 in serum from patients with DMD, BMD, UCMD and healthy controls. MiR-1, miR-133a,b and miR-206 were upregulated in DMD, but unchanged in UCMD compared to controls. Milder DMD patients had higher levels of dystromirs than more severely affected patients. Patients with low forced vital capacity (FVC values, indicating respiratory muscle weakness, had low levels of serum miR-1 and miR-133b. There was no significant difference in the level of the dystromirs in BMD compared to controls. We also assessed the effect of dystrophin restoration on the expression of the five dystromirs in serum of DMD patients treated systemically for 12 weeks with antisense oligomer eteplirsen that induces skipping of exon 51 in the dystrophin gene. The dystromirs were also analysed in muscle biopsies of DMD patients included in a single dose intramuscular eteplirsen clinical trial. Our analysis detected a trend towards normalization of these miRNA between the pre- and post-treatment samples of the systemic trial, which however failed to reach statistical significance. This could possibly be due to the small number of patients and the short duration of these clinical trials. Although longer term studies are needed to clarify the relationship between dystrophin restoration following therapeutic intervention and the level of circulating miRNAs, our results indicate that miR-1 and miR-133 can be considered as exploratory biomarkers for monitoring the progression of muscle weakness

  17. Grey Incidence analyze of Environment Monitoring Data and Research on the Disease Prevention Measures of Longmen Grottoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeiLei, Zheng; XueZhi, Fu; Fei, Chu

    2018-05-01

    Longmen Grottoes was afflicted with many diseases for a long period such as weathering, seepage water and organism growth. Those adverse factors were threatening to preserve cultural relic. Longmen Grottoes conservation and restoration project being put into effect by UNESCO in 2002. The Longmen Grottoes area environmental monitoring system was built in order to comprehensively master the distribution law of environmental factors over the Longmen Grottoes. The monitoring items contains temperature, humidity, wind direction, wind speed, precipitation, light intensity,water content in soil, the rock surface temperature and so on. At the same time, monitoring three experiment caves, monitoring the inside temperature, humidity, seepage water and the wall face temperature etc. So as to analyze the relationship between cave environment and regional environment. We statistical and arrange the data using Excel software, Kgraph software and DPS software. Through the grey incidence analyze, the incidence matrix and the correlation degree of the environmental factors was obtained[1]. The main environment factors for the formation of the disease had been researched. Based on the existing environmental monitor data, the relevance of seepage water and fracture displacement with other environmental factors had been studied, and the relational order was obtained. Corresponding preventive measures were put forward by the formation mechanism analyze of the disease.

  18. Mechanisms of Physical Activity Limitation in Chronic Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioannis Vogiatzis

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In chronic lung diseases physical activity limitation is multifactorial involving respiratory, hemodynamic, and peripheral muscle abnormalities. The mechanisms of limitation discussed in this paper relate to (i the imbalance between ventilatory capacity and demand, (ii the imbalance between energy demand and supply to working respiratory and peripheral muscles, and (iii the factors that induce peripheral muscle dysfunction. In practice, intolerable exertional symptoms (i.e., dyspnea and/or leg discomfort are the main symptoms that limit physical performance in patients with chronic lung diseases. Furthermore, the reduced capacity for physical work and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle, in an attempt to avoid breathlessness upon physical exertion, cause profound muscle deconditioning which in turn leads to disability and loss of functional independence. Accordingly, physical inactivity is an important component of worsening the patients’ quality of life and contributes importantly to poor prognosis. Identifying the factors which prevent a patient with lung disease to easily carry out activities of daily living provides a unique as well as important perspective for the choice of the appropriate therapeutic strategy.

  19. Role of Diet in Influencing Rheumatoid Arthritis Disease Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badsha, Humeira

    2018-01-01

    Background: Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA) frequently ask their doctors about which diets to follow, and even in the absence of advice from their physicians, many patients are undertaking various dietary interventions. Discussion: However, the role of dietary modifications in RA is not well understood. Several studies have tried to address these gaps in our understanding. Intestinal microbial modifications are being studied for the prevention and management of RA. Some benefits of vegan diet may be explained by antioxidant constituents, lactobacilli and fibre, and by potential changes in intestinal flora. Similarly, Mediterranean diet shows anti-inflammatory effects due to protective properties of omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids and vitamins, but also by influencing the gut microbiome. Gluten-free and elemental diets have been associated with some benefits in RA though the existing evidence is limited. Long-term intake of fish and other sources of long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids are protective for development of RA. The benefits of fasting, anti-oxidant supplementation, flavanoids, and probiotics in RA are not clear. Vitamin D has been shown to influence autoimmunity and specifically decrease RA disease activity. The role of supplements such as fish oils and vitamin D should be explored in future trials to gain new insights in disease pathogenesis and develop RA-specific dietary recommendations. Conclusion: Specifically more research is needed to explore the association of diet and the gut microbiome and how this can influence RA disease activity. PMID:29515679

  20. Mechanisms of physical activity limitation in chronic lung diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogiatzis, Ioannis; Zakynthinos, George; Andrianopoulos, Vasileios

    2012-01-01

    In chronic lung diseases physical activity limitation is multifactorial involving respiratory, hemodynamic, and peripheral muscle abnormalities. The mechanisms of limitation discussed in this paper relate to (i) the imbalance between ventilatory capacity and demand, (ii) the imbalance between energy demand and supply to working respiratory and peripheral muscles, and (iii) the factors that induce peripheral muscle dysfunction. In practice, intolerable exertional symptoms (i.e., dyspnea) and/or leg discomfort are the main symptoms that limit physical performance in patients with chronic lung diseases. Furthermore, the reduced capacity for physical work and the adoption of a sedentary lifestyle, in an attempt to avoid breathlessness upon physical exertion, cause profound muscle deconditioning which in turn leads to disability and loss of functional independence. Accordingly, physical inactivity is an important component of worsening the patients' quality of life and contributes importantly to poor prognosis. Identifying the factors which prevent a patient with lung disease to easily carry out activities of daily living provides a unique as well as important perspective for the choice of the appropriate therapeutic strategy.

  1. Serum Inflammatory Mediators as Markers of Human Lyme Disease Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soloski, Mark J.; Crowder, Lauren A.; Lahey, Lauren J.; Wagner, Catriona A.

    2014-01-01

    Chemokines and cytokines are key signaling molecules that orchestrate the trafficking of immune cells, direct them to sites of tissue injury and inflammation and modulate their states of activation and effector cell function. We have measured, using a multiplex-based approach, the levels of 58 immune mediators and 7 acute phase markers in sera derived from of a cohort of patients diagnosed with acute Lyme disease and matched controls. This analysis identified a cytokine signature associated with the early stages of infection and allowed us to identify two subsets (mediator-high and mediator-low) of acute Lyme patients with distinct cytokine signatures that also differed significantly (pLyme disease (p = 0.01) and the decrease correlates with chemokine levels (p = 0.0375). The levels of CXCL9/10 did not relate to the size or number of skin lesions but elevated levels of serum CXCL9/CXCL10 were associated with elevated liver enzymes levels. Collectively these results indicate that the levels of serum chemokines and the levels of expression of their respective chemokine receptors on T cell subsets may prove to be informative biomarkers for Lyme disease and related to specific disease manifestations. PMID:24740099

  2. Screening protocols to monitor respiratory status in primary immunodeficiency disease : Findings from a European survey and subclinical infection working group

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jolles, S.; Sánchez-Ramón, S.; Quinti, I.; Soler-Palacín, P.; Agostini, C.; Florkin, B.; Couderc, L.J.; Brodszki, N.; Jones, A.; Longhurst, H.; Warnatz, K.; Haerynck, F.; Matucci, A.; de Vries, E.

    2017-01-01

    Many patients with primary immunodeficiency (PID) who have antibody deficiency develop progressive lung disease due to underlying subclinical infection and inflammation. To understand how these patients are monitored we conducted a retrospective survey based on patient records of 13 PID centres

  3. Pattern Matching for Volcano Status Assessment: what monitoring data alone can say about Mt. Etna activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannavo, F.; Cannata, A.; Cassisi, C.

    2017-12-01

    The importance of assessing the ongoing status of active volcanoes is crucial not only for exposures to the local population but due to possible presence of tephra also for airline traffic. Adequately monitoring of active volcanoes, hence, plays a key role for civil protection purposes. In last decades, in order to properly monitor possible threats, continuous measuring networks have been designed and deployed on most of potentially hazardous volcanos. Nevertheless, at the present, volcano real-time surveillance is basically delegated to one or more human experts in volcanology, who interpret data coming from different kind of monitoring networks using their experience and non-measurable information (e.g. information from the field) to infer the volcano status. In some cases, raw data are used in some models to obtain more clues on the ongoing activity. In the last decades, with the development of volcano monitoring networks, huge amount of data of different geophysical, geochemical and volcanological types have been collected and stored in large databases. Having such big data sets with many examples of volcanic activity allows us to study volcano monitoring from a machine learning perspective. Thus, exploiting opportunities offered by the abundance of volcano monitoring time-series data we can try to address the following questions: Are the monitored parameters sufficient to discriminate the volcano status? Is it possible to infer/distinguish the volcano status only from the multivariate patterns of measurements? Are all the kind of measurements in the pattern equally useful for status assessment? How accurate would be an automatic system of status inference based only on pattern recognition of data? Here we present preliminary results of the data analysis we performed on a set of data and activity covering the period 2011-2017 at Mount Etna (Italy). In the considered period, we had 52 events of lava fountaining and long periods of Strombolian activity. We

  4. Clinical evaluation of chitotriosidase enzyme activity in Gaucher and Niemann Pick A/B diseases: A retrospective study from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadali, Srilatha; Kolusu, Anusha; Sunkara, Satish; Gummadi, Maheshwar Reddy; Undamatla, Jayanthi

    2016-06-01

    Plasma chitotriosidase originates from activated macrophages and is reported to be elevated in many Lysosomal Storage Disorders. Measurement of this enzyme activity has been an available tool for monitoring therapy of Gaucher disease. The degree of elevation of chitotriosidase is useful for differential diagnosis of Gaucher disease and Niemann Pick A/B. However the potential utility of this chitotriosidase assay depends on the frequency of deficient chitotriosidase activity in a particular population. We therefore aim to study the clinical utility of this assay Gaucher and Niemann Pick A/B diseases in the backdrop of chitotriosidase deficiency in our population. The study comprises 173 patients with clinical suspicion of either Gaucher disease (n=108) or Niemann Pick A/B (n=65) and 92 healthy controls. The plasma samples of controls, Gaucher disease, and Niemann Pick A/B showed chitotriosidase deficiency of 12%, 25% and 27% respectively. The degree of elevation of chitotriosidase in Gaucher disease and Niemann Pick A/B patients is 40-326 (11,325.7±6395.4nmol/h/ml) and 7-22 folds (1192.5±463.0nmol/h/ml) respectively. In view of these findings of distinguishable fold elevation of chitotriosidase in Gaucher disease or Niemann Pick A/B, it can be a potential surrogate differential diagnostic marker for these groups of diseases, except in the patients in whom this enzyme is deficient. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Drug persistence and need for dose intensification to adalimumab therapy; the importance of therapeutic drug monitoring in inflammatory bowel diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonczi, Lorant; Kurti, Zsuzsanna; Rutka, Mariann; Vegh, Zsuzsanna; Farkas, Klaudia; Lovasz, Barbara D; Golovics, Petra A; Gecse, Krisztina B; Szalay, Balazs; Molnar, Tamas; Lakatos, Peter L

    2017-08-08

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) aid therapeutic decision making in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) who lose response to anti-TNF therapy. Our aim was to evaluate the frequency and predictive factors of loss of response (LOR) to adalimumab using TDM in IBD patients. One hundred twelve IBD patients (with 214 TDM measurements, CD/UC 84/28, male/female 50/62, mean age CD/UC: 36/35 years) were enrolled in this consecutive cohort from two referral centres in Hungary. Demographic data were comprehensively collected and harmonized monitoring strategy was applied. Previous and current therapy, laboratory data and clinical activity were recorded at the time of TDM. Patients were evaluated either at the time of suspected LOR or during follow-up. TDM measurements were determined by commercial ELISA (LISA TRACKER, Theradiag, France). Among 112 IBD patients, LOR/drug persistence was 25.9%/74.1%. The cumulative ADA positivity (>10 ng/mL) and low TL (<5.0 μg/mL) was 12.1% and 17.8% after 1 year and 17.3% and 29.5% after 2 years of adalimumab therapy. Dose intensification was needed in 29.5% of the patients. Female gender and ADA positivity were associated with LOR (female gender: p < 0.001, OR:7.8 CI 95%: 2.5-24.3, ADA positivity: p = 0.007 OR:3.6 CI 95%: 1.4-9.5). ADA development, low TL and need for dose intensification were frequent during adalimumab therapy and support the selective use of TDM in IBD patients treated with adalimumab. ADA positivity and gender were predictors of LOR.

  6. Oral-Fluid Thiol-Detection Test Identifies Underlying Active Periodontal Disease Not Detected by the Visual Awake Examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queck, Katherine E; Chapman, Angela; Herzog, Leslie J; Shell-Martin, Tamara; Burgess-Cassler, Anthony; McClure, George David

    Periodontal disease in dogs is highly prevalent but can only be accurately diagnosed by performing an anesthetized oral examination with periodontal probing and dental radiography. In this study, 114 dogs had a visual awake examination of the oral cavity and were administered an oral-fluid thiol-detection test prior to undergoing a a full-mouth anesthetized oral examination and digital dental radiographs. The results show the visual awake examination underestimated the presence and severity of active periodontal disease. The thiol-detection test was superior to the visual awake examination at detecting the presence and severity of active periodontal disease and was an indicator of progression toward alveolar bone loss. The thiol-detection test detected active periodontal disease at early stages of development, before any visual cues were present, indicating the need for intervention to prevent periodontal bone loss. Early detection is important because without intervention, dogs with gingivitis (active periodontal disease) progress to irreversible periodontal bone loss (stage 2+). As suggested in the current AAHA guidelines, a thiol-detection test administered in conjunction with the visual awake examination during routine wellness examinations facilitates veterinarian-client communication and mitigates under-diagnosis of periodontal disease and underutilization of dental services. The thiol-detection test can be used to monitor the periodontal health status of the conscious patient during follow-up examinations based on disease severity.

  7. Comparison of the Serum Tumor Markers S100 and Melanoma-inhibitory Activity (MIA) in the Monitoring of Patients with Metastatic Melanoma Receiving Vaccination Immunotherapy with Dendritic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uslu, Ugur; Schliep, Stefan; Schliep, Klaus; Erdmann, Michael; Koch, Hans-Uwe; Parsch, Hans; Rosenheinrich, Stina; Anzengruber, Doris; Bosserhoff, Anja Katrin; Schuler, Gerold; Schuler-Thurner, Beatrice

    2017-09-01

    In patients with melanoma, early dissemination via lymphatic and hematogenous routes is frequently seen. Thus, besides clinical follow-up examination and imaging, reliable melanoma-specific serological tumor markers are needed. We retrospectively compared two serum markers for melanoma, S100 and melanoma-inhibitory activity (MIA), for monitoring of patients with metastatic melanoma under either adjuvant or therapeutic vaccination immunotherapy with dendritic cells (DC). Serum was obtained from a total of 100 patients (28 patients in stage III and 72 patients in stage IV, according to the American Joint Committee on Cancer 2002) at regular intervals during therapy, accompanied by follow-up imaging. When relapse was detected, both markers often remained within normal range. In contrast, in patients with metastatic measurable disease receiving therapeutic and not adjuvant DC vaccination, an increase of both markers was a strong indicator for disease progression. When comparing both markers in the whole study population, MIA showed a superior sensitivity to detect disease progression. S100 and MIA are highly sensitive tumor markers for monitoring of patients with melanoma with current metastases, but less sensitive for monitoring of tumor-free patients. In the current study, MIA had a slightly superior sensitivity to detect progressive disease compared to S100 and seems to be more useful in monitoring of patients with metastatic melanoma receiving immunotherapy. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  8. Diagnosis of digestive functional disease by the statistics of continuous monitoring of esophageal acidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera Landa, Rogelio; Cardenas Cardenas, Eduardo; Fossion, Ruben; Pérez Zepeda, Mario Ulises

    2014-11-01

    Technological advances in the last few decennia allow the monitoring of many physiological observables in a continuous way, which in physics is called a "time series". The best studied physiological time series is that of the heart rhythm, which can be derived from an electrocardiogram (ECG). Studies have shown that a healthy heart is characterized by a complex time series and high heart rate variability (HRV). In adverse conditions, the cardiac time series degenerates towards randomness (as seen in, e.g., fibrillation) or rigidity (as seen in, e.g., ageing), both corresponding to a loss of HRV as described by, e.g., Golberger et. al [1]. Cardiac and digestive rhythms are regulated by the autonomous nervous system (ANS), that consists of two antagonistic branches, the orthosympathetic branch (ONS) that accelerates the cardiac rhythm but decelerates the digestive system, and the parasympathetic brand (PNS) that works in the opposite way. Because of this reason, one might expect that the statistics of gastro-esophageal time series, as described by Gardner et. al. [2,3], reflects the health state of the digestive system in a similar way as HRV in the cardiac case, described by Minocha et. al. In the present project, we apply statistical methods derived from HRV analysis to time series of esophageal acidity (24h pHmetry). The study is realized on data from a large patient population from the Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Médicas y Nutrición Salvador Zubirán. Our focus is on patients with functional disease (symptoms but no anatomical damage). We find that traditional statistical approaches (e.g. Fourier spectral analysis) are unable to distinguish between different degenerations of the digestive system, such as gastric esophageal reflux disease (GERD) or functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID).

  9. Monitoring endemic livestock diseases using laboratory diagnostic data: A simulation study to evaluate the performance of univariate process monitoring control algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes Antunes, Ana Carolina; Dórea, Fernanda; Halasa, Tariq; Toft, Nils

    2016-05-01

    Surveillance systems are critical for accurate, timely monitoring and effective disease control. In this study, we investigated the performance of univariate process monitoring control algorithms in detecting changes in seroprevalence for endemic diseases. We also assessed the effect of sample size (number of sentinel herds tested in the surveillance system) on the performance of the algorithms. Three univariate process monitoring control algorithms were compared: Shewart p Chart(1) (PSHEW), Cumulative Sum(2) (CUSUM) and Exponentially Weighted Moving Average(3) (EWMA). Increases in seroprevalence were simulated from 0.10 to 0.15 and 0.20 over 4, 8, 24, 52 and 104 weeks. Each epidemic scenario was run with 2000 iterations. The cumulative sensitivity(4) (CumSe) and timeliness were used to evaluate the algorithms' performance with a 1% false alarm rate. Using these performance evaluation criteria, it was possible to assess the accuracy and timeliness of the surveillance system working in real-time. The results showed that EWMA and PSHEW had higher CumSe (when compared with the CUSUM) from week 1 until the end of the period for all simulated scenarios. Changes in seroprevalence from 0.10 to 0.20 were more easily detected (higher CumSe) than changes from 0.10 to 0.15 for all three algorithms. Similar results were found with EWMA and PSHEW, based on the median time to detection. Changes in the seroprevalence were detected later with CUSUM, compared to EWMA and PSHEW for the different scenarios. Increasing the sample size 10 fold halved the time to detection (CumSe=1), whereas increasing the sample size 100 fold reduced the time to detection by a factor of 6. This study investigated the performance of three univariate process monitoring control algorithms in monitoring endemic diseases. It was shown that automated systems based on these detection methods identified changes in seroprevalence at different times. Increasing the number of tested herds would lead to faster

  10. Plasma renin activity in patients with ischaemic heart disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Urbanek, J.; Hofman, O.; Reisenauer, R.; Slaby, A.

    1977-01-01

    Plasma renin activity (PRA) stimulated by upright posture was measured in 300 men aged 45-64 years using a radioimmunoassay of angiotensin-I. The examined subjects were normotensive or patients with benign essential hypertension and were divided into 6 groups according to the absence of manifest atherosclerosis, the presence of definite angina pectoris or a history of myocardial infarction. Each group contained 50 unselected subjects, with a comparable mean age. Significant differences in mean PRA were found between corresponding groups of hypertensives and normotensives, the values in hypertensives being lower. The percentage of low renin values was higher in hypertensives with ischaemic heart disease than in other groups. It is suggested that this finding might be explained by functional disturbances in the kidneys in hypertensives with ischaemic heart disease. (orig.) [de

  11. Plasma renin activity in patients with ischaemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbanek, J; Hofman, O; Reisenauer, R; Slaby, A [Karlova Universita, Prague (Czechoslovakia). Inst. of Biophysics and Nuclear Medicine; Karlova Universita, Prague (Czechoslovakia). IV. Dept. of Internal Medicine; Vyzkumny Ustav Endokrinologicky, Prague [Czechoslovakia

    1977-04-01

    Plasma renin activity (PRA) stimulated by upright posture was measured in 300 men aged 45 to 64 years using a radioimmunoassay of angiotensin-I. The examined subjects were normotensive or patients with benign essential hypertension and were divided into 6 groups according to the absence of manifest atherosclerosis, the presence of definite angina pectoris or a history of myocardial infarction. Each group contained 50 unselected subjects, with a comparable mean age. Significant differences in mean PRA were found between corresponding groups of hypertensives and normotensives, the values in hypertensives being lower. The percentage of low renin values was higher in hypertensives with ischaemic heart disease than in other groups. It is suggested that this finding might be explained by functional disturbances in the kidneys in hypertensives with ischaemic heart disease.

  12. The role of nanotechnology and nano and micro-electronics in monitoring and control of cardiovascular diseases and neurological disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadan, Vijay K.

    2007-04-01

    Nanotechnology has been broadly defined as the one for not only the creation of functional materials and devices as well as systems through control of matter at the scale of 1-100 nm, but also the exploitation of novel properties and phenomena at the same scale. Growing needs in the point-of-care (POC) that is an increasing market for improving patient's quality of life, are driving the development of nanotechnologies for diagnosis and treatment of various life threatening diseases. This paper addresses the recent development of nanodiagnostic sensors and nanotherapeutic devices with functionalized carbon nanotube and/or nanowire on a flexible organic thin film electronics to monitor and control of the three leading diseases namely 1) neurodegenerative diseases, 2) cardiovascular diseases, and 3) diabetes and metabolic diseases. The sensors developed include implantable and biocompatible devices, light weight wearable devices in wrist-watches, hats, shoes and clothes. The nanotherapeutics devices include nanobased drug delivery system. Many of these sensors are integrated with the wireless systems for the remote physiological monitoring. The author's research team has also developed a wireless neural probe using nanowires and nanotubes for monitoring and control of Parkinson's disease. Light weight and compact EEG, EOG and EMG monitoring system in a hat developed is capable of monitoring real time epileptic patients and patients with neurological and movement disorders using the Internet and cellular network. Physicians could be able to monitor these signals in realtime using portable computers or cell phones and will give early warning signal if these signals cross a pre-determined threshold level. In addition the potential impact of nanotechnology for applications in medicine is that, the devices can be designed to interact with cells and tissues at the molecular level, which allows high degree of functionality. Devices engineered at nanometer scale imply a

  13. Tritium in water monitor for measurement of tritium activity in the process water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rathnakaran, M.; Ravetkar, R.M.; Abani, M.C.; Mehta, S.K.

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the evaluation of a tritium in water monitor for measurement of tritium activity in the secondary coolant in pressurised heavy water reactor used for power generation. For this purpose it uses a plastic scintillator flow cell detector in a continuous on-line mode. It is observed that the sensitivity of the system depends on the transparency of the detector, which gradually reduces with use because of the collection of dirt around the scintillator. A simple type of sample conditioner based on polypropylene candle filter and filter paper is developed and installed at RAPS along with tritium in water monitor. The functioning of this system is reported here. (author)

  14. Sulforaphane Protects against Cardiovascular Disease via Nrf2 Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Bai

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease (CVD causes an unparalleled proportion of the global burden of disease and will remain the main cause of mortality for the near future. Oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathophysiology of cardiac disorders. Several studies have highlighted the cardinal role played by the overproduction of reactive oxygen or nitrogen species in the pathogenesis of ischemic myocardial damage and consequent cardiac dysfunction. Isothiocyanates (ITC are sulfur-containing compounds that are broadly distributed among cruciferous vegetables. Sulforaphane (SFN is an ITC shown to possess anticancer activities by both in vivo and epidemiological studies. Recent data have indicated that the beneficial effects of SFN in CVD are due to its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. SFN activates NF-E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2, a basic leucine zipper transcription factor that serves as a defense mechanism against oxidative stress and electrophilic toxicants by inducing more than a hundred cytoprotective proteins, including antioxidants and phase II detoxifying enzymes. This review will summarize the evidence from clinical studies and animal experiments relating to the potential mechanisms by which SFN modulates Nrf2 activation and protects against CVD.

  15. Acetylcholine esterase activity in mild cognitive impairment and Alzheimer's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herholz, Karl

    2008-01-01

    Impairment of cholinergic neurotransmission is a well-established fact in Alzheimer's disease (AD), but there is controversy about its relevance at the early stages of the disease and in mild cognitive impairment (MCI). In vivo positron emission tomography imaging of cortical acetylcholine esterase (AChE) activity as a marker of cholinergic innervation that is expressed by cholinergic axons and cholinoceptive neurons has demonstrated a reduction of this enzyme activity in manifest AD. The technique is also useful to measure the inhibition of cerebral AChE induced by cholinesterase inhibitors for treatment of dementia symptoms. A reduction of cortical AchE activity was found consistently in all studies of AD and in few cases of MCI who later concerted to AD. The in vivo findings in MCI and very mild AD are still preliminary, and studies seem to suggest that cholinergic innervation and AChE as the main degrading enzyme are both reduced, which might result in partial compensation of their effect. (orig.)

  16. The role of 18F-FDG PET in characterising disease activity in Takayasu arteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, Myles; Chambers, Anthony; AL-Nahhas, Adil; Maudlin, Lucy; Rahman, Lucy; Frank, John; Mason, Justin C.

    2004-01-01

    Takayasu arteritis (TA) is a rare, sporadic and chronic inflammatory arteritis, which predominantly affects the aorta and its branches. Diagnosis can be difficult and there are limitations to the current diagnostic work-up. By detecting areas of active glucose metabolism present in active vasculitis, imaging with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ( 18 F-FDG PET) could potentially have a role in the management of TA. Our aim was to assess this role by reviewing 28 18 F-FDG PET scans performed on 18 patients suspected of having TA. All patients had full clinical and laboratory assessment, cross-sectional imaging and angiography, and 16/18 satisfied the American College of Rheumatologists' criteria for TA. 18 F-FDG PET achieved a sensitivity of 92%, a specificity of 100%, and negative and positive predictive values of 85% and 100% respectively in the initial assessment of active vasculitis in TA. We conclude that 18 F-FDG PET can be used to diagnose early disease, to detect active disease (even within chronic changes) and to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. (orig.)

  17. The role of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in characterising disease activity in Takayasu arteritis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webb, Myles; Chambers, Anthony; AL-Nahhas, Adil; Maudlin, Lucy; Rahman, Lucy; Frank, John [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, W12 0HS, London (United Kingdom); Mason, Justin C. [Department of Rheumatology, Hammersmith Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    2004-05-01

    Takayasu arteritis (TA) is a rare, sporadic and chronic inflammatory arteritis, which predominantly affects the aorta and its branches. Diagnosis can be difficult and there are limitations to the current diagnostic work-up. By detecting areas of active glucose metabolism present in active vasculitis, imaging with fluorine-18 fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography ({sup 18}F-FDG PET) could potentially have a role in the management of TA. Our aim was to assess this role by reviewing 28 {sup 18}F-FDG PET scans performed on 18 patients suspected of having TA. All patients had full clinical and laboratory assessment, cross-sectional imaging and angiography, and 16/18 satisfied the American College of Rheumatologists' criteria for TA. {sup 18}F-FDG PET achieved a sensitivity of 92%, a specificity of 100%, and negative and positive predictive values of 85% and 100% respectively in the initial assessment of active vasculitis in TA. We conclude that {sup 18}F-FDG PET can be used to diagnose early disease, to detect active disease (even within chronic changes) and to monitor the effectiveness of treatment. (orig.)

  18. Miniaturized Bio-and Chemical-Sensors for Point-of-Care Monitoring of Chronic Kidney Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tricoli, Antonio; Neri, Giovanni

    2018-03-22

    This review reports the latest achievements in point-of-care (POC) sensor technologies for the monitoring of ammonia, creatinine and urea in patients suffering of chronic kidney diseases (CKDs). Abnormal levels of these nitrogen biomarkers are found in the physiological fluids, such as blood, urine and sweat, of CKD patients. Delocalized at-home monitoring of CKD biomarkers via integration of miniaturized, portable, and low cost chemical- and bio-sensors in POC devices, is an emerging approach to improve patients' health monitoring and life quality. The successful monitoring of CKD biomarkers, performed on the different body fluids by means of sensors having strict requirements in term of size, cost, large-scale production capacity, response time and simple operation procedures for use in POC devices, is reported and discussed.

  19. Miniaturized Bio-and Chemical-Sensors for Point-of-Care Monitoring of Chronic Kidney Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Tricoli

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This review reports the latest achievements in point-of-care (POC sensor technologies for the monitoring of ammonia, creatinine and urea in patients suffering of chronic kidney diseases (CKDs. Abnormal levels of these nitrogen biomarkers are found in the physiological fluids, such as blood, urine and sweat, of CKD patients. Delocalized at-home monitoring of CKD biomarkers via integration of miniaturized, portable, and low cost chemical- and bio-sensors in POC devices, is an emerging approach to improve patients’ health monitoring and life quality. The successful monitoring of CKD biomarkers, performed on the different body fluids by means of sensors having strict requirements in term of size, cost, large-scale production capacity, response time and simple operation procedures for use in POC devices, is reported and discussed.

  20. Evaluating outcomes of endoscopic full-thickness plication for gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) with impedance monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Renteln, Daniel; Schmidt, Arthur; Riecken, Bettina; Caca, Karel

    2010-05-01

    Endoscopic full-thickness plication allows transmural suturing at the gastroesophageal junction to recreate the antireflux barrier. Multichannel intraluminal impedance monitoring (MII) can be used to detect nonacid or weakly acidic reflux, acidic swallows, and esophageal clearance time. This study used MII to evaluate the outcome of endoscopic full-thickness plication. In this study, 12 subsequent patients requiring maintenance proton pump inhibitor therapy underwent endoscopic full-thickness plication for treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease. With patients off medication, MII was performed before and 6-months after endoscopic full-thickness plication. The total median number of reflux episodes was significantly reduced from 105 to 64 (p = 0.016). The median number of acid reflux episodes decreased from 73 to 43 (p = 0.016). Nonacid reflux episodes decreased from 23 to 21 (p = 0.306). The median bolus clearance time was 12 s before treatment and 11 s at 6 months (p = 0.798). The median acid exposure time was reduced from 6.8% to 3.4% (p = 0.008), and the DeMeester scores were reduced from 19 to 12 (p = 0.008). Endoscopic full-thickness plication significantly reduced total reflux episodes, acid reflux episodes, and total reflux exposure time. The DeMeester scores and total acid exposure time for the distal esophagus were significantly improved. No significant changes in nonacid reflux episodes and median bolus clearance time were encountered.

  1. Activity enhances dopaminergic long-duration response in Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auinger, Peggy; Fahn, Stanley; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Rudolph, Alice; Marek, Kenneth; Seibyl, John; Lang, Anthony; Olanow, C. Warren; Tanner, Caroline; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhao, Hongwei; Reyes, Lydia; Shinaman, Aileen; Comella, Cynthia L.; Goetz, Christopher; Blasucci, Lucia M.; Samanta, Johan; Stacy, Mark; Williamson, Kelli; Harrigan, Mary; Greene, Paul; Ford, Blair; Moskowitz, Carol; Truong, Daniel D.; Pathak, Mayank; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William; Atassi, Farah; Hunter, Christine; Jacques, Carol; Friedman, Joseph H.; Lannon, Margaret; Russell, David S.; Jennings, Danna; Fussell, Barbara; Standaert, David; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Growdon, John H.; Tennis, Marsha; Gauthier, Serge; Panisset, Michel; Hall, Jean; Gancher, Stephen; Hammerstad, John P.; Stone, Claudia; Alexander-Brown, Barbara; Factor, Stewart A.; Molho, Eric; Brown, Diane; Evans, Sharon; Clark, Jeffrey; Manyam, Bala; Simpson, Patricia; Wulbrecht, Brian; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Martin, Wayne; Roberts, Ted; King, Pamela; Hauser, Robert; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Gauger, Lisa; Trugman, Joel; Wooten, G. Frederick; Rost-Ruffner, Elke; Perlmutter, Joel; Racette, Brad A.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Wood, Susan; Pantella, Carol; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Pearson, Nancy; Caviness, John N.; Adler, Charles; Lind, Marlene; Simuni, Tanya; Siderowf, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Lloyd, Mary; Weiner, William; Shulman, Lisa; Koller, William; Lyons, Kelly; Feldman, Robert G.; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Ellias, Samuel; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Juncos, Jorge; Watts, Ray; Partlow, Anna; Tetrud, James; Togasaki, Daniel M.; Stewart, Tracy; Mark, Margery H.; Sage, Jacob I.; Caputo, Debbie; Gould, Harry; Rao, Jayaraman; McKendrick, Ann; Brin, Mitchell; Danisi, Fabio; Benabou, Reina; Hubble, Jean; Paulson, George W.; Reider, Carson; Birnbaum, Alex; Miyasaki, Janis; Johnston, Lisa; So, Julie; Pahwa, Rajesh; Dubinsky, Richard M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Uitti, Ryan; Turk, Margaret; Tuite, Paul; Rottenberg, David; Hansen, Joy; Ramos, Serrano; Waters, Cheryl; Lew, Mark; Welsh, Mickie; Kawai, Connie; O'Brien, Christopher; Kumar, Rajeev; Seeberger, Lauren; Judd, Deborah; Barclay, C. Lynn; Grimes, David A.; Sutherland, Laura; Dawson, Ted; Reich, Stephen; Dunlop, Rebecca; Albin, Roger; Frey, Kirk; Wernette, Kristine; Fahn, Stanley; Oakes, David; Shoulson, Ira; Kieburtz, Karl; Rudolph, Alice; Marek, Kenneth; Seibyl, John; Lang, Anthony; Olanow, C. Warren; Tanner, Caroline; Schifitto, Giovanni; Zhao, Hongwei; Reyes, Lydia; Shinaman, Aileen; Comella, Cynthia L.; Goetz, Christopher; Blasucci, Lucia M.; Samanta, Johan; Stacy, Mark; Williamson, Kelli; Harrigan, Mary; Greene, Paul; Ford, Blair; Moskowitz, Carol; Truong, Daniel D.; Pathak, Mayank; Jankovic, Joseph; Ondo, William; Atassi, Farah; Hunter, Christine; Jacques, Carol; Friedman, Joseph H.; Lannon, Margaret; Russell, David S.; Jennings, Danna; Fussell, Barbara; Standaert, David; Schwarzschild, Michael A.; Growdon, John H.; Tennis, Marsha; Gauthier, Serge; Panisset, Michel; Hall, Jean; Gancher, Stephen; Hammerstad, John P.; Stone, Claudia; Alexander-Brown, Barbara; Factor, Stewart A.; Molho, Eric; Brown, Diane; Evans, Sharon; Clark, Jeffrey; Manyam, Bala; Simpson, Patricia; Wulbrecht, Brian; Whetteckey, Jacqueline; Martin, Wayne; Roberts, Ted; King, Pamela; Hauser, Robert; Zesiewicz, Theresa; Gauger, Lisa; Trugman, Joel; Wooten, G. Frederick; Rost-Ruffner, Elke; Perlmutter, Joel; Racette, Brad A.; Suchowersky, Oksana; Ranawaya, Ranjit; Wood, Susan; Pantella, Carol; Kurlan, Roger; Richard, Irene; Pearson, Nancy; Caviness, John N.; Adler, Charles; Lind, Marlene; Simuni, Tanya; Siderowf, Andrew; Colcher, Amy; Lloyd, Mary; Weiner, William; Shulman, Lisa; Koller, William; Lyons, Kelly; Feldman, Robert G.; Saint-Hilaire, Marie H.; Ellias, Samuel; Thomas, Cathi-Ann; Juncos, Jorge; Watts, Ray; Partlow, Anna; Tetrud, James; Togasaki, Daniel M.; Stewart, Tracy; Mark, Margery H.; Sage, Jacob I.; Caputo, Debbie; Gould, Harry; Rao, Jayaraman; McKendrick, Ann; Brin, Mitchell; Danisi, Fabio; Benabou, Reina; Hubble, Jean; Paulson, George W.; Reider, Carson; Birnbaum, Alex; Miyasaki, Janis; Johnston, Lisa; So, Julie; Pahwa, Rajesh; Dubinsky, Richard M.; Wszolek, Zbigniew; Uitti, Ryan; Turk, Margaret; Tuite, Paul; Rottenberg, David; Hansen, Joy; Ramos, Serrano; Waters, Cheryl; Lew, Mark; Welsh, Mickie; Kawai, Connie; O'Brien, Christopher; Kumar, Rajeev; Seeberger, Lauren; Judd, Deborah; Barclay, C. Lynn; Grimes, David A.; Sutherland, Laura; Dawson, Ted; Reich, Stephen; Dunlop, Rebecca; Albin, Roger; Frey, Kirk; Wernette, Kristine; Mendis, Tilak

    2012-01-01

    Objective: We tested the hypothesis that dopamine-dependent motor learning mechanism underlies the long-duration response to levodopa in Parkinson disease (PD) based on our studies in a mouse model. By data-mining the motor task performance in dominant and nondominant hands of the subjects in a double-blind randomized trial of levodopa therapy, the effects of activity and dopamine therapy were examined. Methods: We data-mined the Earlier versus Later Levodopa Therapy in Parkinson's Disease (ELLDOPA) study published in 2005 and performed statistical analysis comparing the effects of levodopa and dominance of handedness over 42 weeks. Results: The mean change in finger-tapping counts from baseline before the initiation of therapy to predose at 9 weeks and 40 weeks increased more in the dominant compared to nondominant hand in levodopa-treated subjects in a dose-dependent fashion. There was no significant difference in dominant vs nondominant hands in the placebo group. The short-duration response assessed by the difference of postdose performance compared to predose performance at the same visit did not show any significant difference between dominant vs nondominant hands. Conclusions: Active use of the dominant hand and dopamine replacement therapy produces synergistic effect on long-lasting motor task performance during “off” medication state. Such effect was confined to dopamine-responsive symptoms and not seen in dopamine-resistant symptoms such as gait and balance. We propose that long-lasting motor learning facilitated by activity and dopamine is a form of disease modification that is often seen in trials of medications that have symptomatic effects. PMID:22459675

  2. Can Diet and Physical Activity Limit Alzheimer's Disease Risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rege, Shraddha D; Geetha, Thangiah; Broderick, Tom L; Babu, Jeganathan Ramesh

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease affecting elderly individuals at an alarming rate. It has become a global health crisis imposing tremendous social and economic burden on society. Although there is no cure for AD, it is important to identify and implement preventive strategies that may delay or prevent the symptoms, limit the burden, and improve the quality of life of those afflicted. Adequate nutrition and physical activity are the two potential lifestyle modifiable factors that have gained considerable interest for their potential in the prevention or management of this challenging disease. In this review, we discuss the beneficial effects of physical activity and adequate nutrition on minimizing the risk of developing AD. The research question was initially formulated in a structured and explicit way. Relevant studies were identified using a wide range of scientific databases. Their potential relevance was based on the criteria for inclusion and exclusion. The quality of selected studies was subjected to a more precise quality assessment using standard tools. A detailed description of the implemented intervention and how it differed from what the control group received was outlined. The effects of intervention on measurable outcomes for the study sample were applied. One hundred and sixty-four references were included in the review comprising of epidemiological, longitudinal, cross-sectional, intervention and randomized controlled studies. This review highlighted the effect of various nutrient diet supplements on cognitive performance in humans as well as animals with AD and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). Moreover, the effect of physical exercise on the cognitive function in animal models with AD was outlined. The findings of this review highlight the therapeutic potential of combination of nutritionally adequate diet and physical activity in preventing or delaying the symptoms associated with AD pathology.

  3. Familial occurrence of systemic mast cell activation disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard J Molderings

    Full Text Available Systemic mast cell activation disease (MCAD comprises disorders characterized by an enhanced release of mast cell mediators accompanied by accumulation of dysfunctional mast cells. Demonstration of familial clustering would be an important step towards defining the genetic contribution to the risk of systemic MCAD. The present study aimed to quantify familial aggregation for MCAD and to investigate the variability of clinical and molecular findings (e.g. somatic mutations in KIT among affected family members in three selected pedigrees. Our data suggest that systemic MCAD pedigrees include more systemic MCAD cases than would be expected by chance, i.e., compared with the prevalence of MCAD in the general population. The prevalence of MCAD suspected by symptom self-report in first-degree relatives of patients with MCAD amounted to approximately 46%, compared to prevalence in the general German population of about 17% (p<0.0001. In three families with a high familial loading of MCAD, the subtype of MCAD and the severity of mediator-related symptoms varied between family members. In addition, genetic alterations detected in KIT were variable, and included mutations at position 816 of the amino acid sequence. In conclusion, our data provide evidence for common familial occurrence of MCAD. Our findings observed in the three pedigrees together with recent reports in the literature suggest that, in familial cases (i.e., in the majority of MCAD, mutated disease-related operator and/or regulator genes could be responsible for the development of somatic mutations in KIT and other proteins important for the regulation of mast cell activity. Accordingly, the immunohistochemically different subtypes of MCAD (i.e. mast cell activation syndrome and systemic mastocytosis should be more accurately regarded as varying presentations of a common generic root process of mast cell dysfunction, than as distinct diseases.

  4. How many days of accelerometer monitoring predict weekly physical activity behaviour in obese youth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhelst, Jérémy; Fardy, Paul S; Duhamel, Alain; Béghin, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the type and the number of accelerometer monitoring days needed to predict weekly sedentary behaviour and physical activity in obese youth. Fifty-three obese youth wore a triaxial accelerometer for 7 days to measure physical activity in free-living conditions. Analyses of variance for repeated measures, Intraclass coefficient (ICC) and regression linear analyses were used. Obese youth spent significantly less time in physical activity on weekends or free days compared with school days. ICC analyses indicated a minimum of 2 days is needed to estimate physical activity behaviour. ICC were 0·80 between weekly physical activity and weekdays and 0·92 between physical activity and weekend days. The model has to include a weekday and a weekend day. Using any combination of one weekday and one weekend day, the percentage of variance explained is >90%. Results indicate that 2 days of monitoring are needed to estimate the weekly physical activity behaviour in obese youth with an accelerometer. Our results also showed the importance of taking into consideration school day versus free day and weekday versus weekend day in assessing physical activity in obese youth. © 2013 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Treatment with radioiodine of Graves' disease. Calculated activity; fixed activity or ablation. Were are we going?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degrossi, O.

    2006-01-01

    The new tendencies of radioiodine ( 131 I) treatment of Graves'disease are presented . One group have the objective of administrate an activity of radioiodine to bring back the patient to euthyroidism , using individual activities to each patient. Others propose a fixed dose, with high activity to cure the disease and anticipating the hypothyroidism of the patient. The third group propose directly the ablation of the thyroids with a calculated activity to deliver 300 Gy .This calculi demand the investigation of the maximum uptake of radioiodine, the biological half life, and the thyroid weight with adequate method (US, TC, MR) Finally, the dose to not thyroid tissues are discussed and the risk of these procedures are presented. (author)

  6. Use of Germanium as comparator and integral monitor of neutron flux in activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Furnari, Juan C.; Cohen, Isaac M.; Arribere, Maria A.; Kestelman, Abraham J.

    1997-01-01

    The possibility of using germanium as monitor of the thermal and epithermal components of the neutron flux, and comparator in parametric activation analysis, is discussed. The advantages and drawbacks associated to the use of this element are commented on, and the comparison with zirconium, in terms of the determination relative error, is performed. The utilisation of germanium as integral flux monitor, including the fast component of the neutron spectrum, is also discussed. Data corresponding to measurements of k 0 factor for the most relevant gamma transitions from Ge-75 and Be-77 are presented, as well as the results of the reference material analysis, employing germanium as flux monitor and comparator in a simultaneous way. (author). 8 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  7. Role of laboratory biomarkers in monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of treatment of rheumatic diseases using genetically engineered drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nikolayevna Aleksandrova

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress in treating immunoinflammatory rheumatic diseases (RD is related to the design of a novel family of drugs, genetically engineered (GE drugs. Molecular and cellular biomarkers (antibodies, indicators of acute inflammation, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, endothelial activation markers, immunoglobulins, cryoglobulins, T- and B-cell subpopulations, products of bone and cartilage metabolism, genetic and metabolic markers that allow one to conduct immunological monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of RD therapy using tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, etanercept, anti-B-cell drugs (rituximab, belimumab, interleukin-6 receptor antagonist (tocilizumab, and T-cell costimulation blocker (abatacept have been detected in blood, synovial fluid, urine, and bioptates of the affected tissues. In addition to the conventional uniplex immunodiagnostics techniques, multiplex analysis of marker, which is based on genetic, transcriptomic and proteomic technologies using DNA and protein microarrays, polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry, is becoming increasingly widespread. The search for and validation of immunological predictors of the effective response to GE drug therapy make it possible to optimize and reduce the cost of therapy using these drugs in future.

  8. Role of laboratory biomarkers in monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of treatment of rheumatic diseases using genetically engineered drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Nikolayevna Aleksandrova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Significant progress in treating immunoinflammatory rheumatic diseases (RD is related to the design of a novel family of drugs, genetically engineered (GE drugs. Molecular and cellular biomarkers (antibodies, indicators of acute inflammation, cytokines, chemokines, growth factors, endothelial activation markers, immunoglobulins, cryoglobulins, T- and B-cell subpopulations, products of bone and cartilage metabolism, genetic and metabolic markers that allow one to conduct immunological monitoring and prediction of the effectiveness of RD therapy using tumor necrosis factor α inhibitors (infliximab, adalimumab, golimumab, etanercept, anti-B-cell drugs (rituximab, belimumab, interleukin-6 receptor antagonist (tocilizumab, and T-cell costimulation blocker (abatacept have been detected in blood, synovial fluid, urine, and bioptates of the affected tissues. In addition to the conventional uniplex immunodiagnostics techniques, multiplex analysis of marker, which is based on genetic, transcriptomic and proteomic technologies using DNA and protein microarrays, polymerase chain reaction, and flow cytometry, is becoming increasingly widespread. The search for and validation of immunological predictors of the effective response to GE drug therapy make it possible to optimize and reduce the cost of therapy using these drugs in future.

  9. Emerging Animal Parasitic Diseases: A Global Overview and Appropriate Strategies for their Monitoring and Surveillance in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atehmengo, Ngongeh L; Nnagbo, Chiejina S

    2014-01-01

    Emerging animal parasitic diseases are reviewed and appropriate strategies for efficient monitoring and surveillance in Nigeria are outlined. Animal and human parasitic infections are distinguished. Emerging diseases have been described as those diseases that are being recognised for the first time or diseases that are already recorded but their frequency and/or geographic range is being increased tremendously. Emergence of new diseases may be due to a number of factors such as the spread of a new infectious agent, recognition of an infection that has been in existence but undiagnosed, or when it is realised that an established disease has an infectious origin. The terms could also be used to describe the resurgence of a known infection after its incidence had been known to have declined. Emerging infections are compounding the control of infectious diseases and huge resources are being channeled to alleviate the rising challenge. The diseases are numerous and include helminth, protozoal / rickettsial and entomological. A list of parasitic emerging diseases in Nigeria is included. Globally occurring emerging parasitic diseases are also outlined. Emerging and re-emerging infections can be brought about by many factors including climate change and global warming, changes in biodiversity, population mobility, movement of animals, globalisation of commerce/trade and food supply, social and cultural factors such as food eating habits, religious beliefs, farming practices, trade of infected healthy animals, reduction in the available land for animals, immune-suppressed host and host density and misuse or over use of some drugs leading to drug resistance.

  10. Invasive pneumococcal and meningococcal disease : association with influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus activity?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, A G S C; Sanders, E A M; VAN DER Ende, A; VAN Loon, A M; Hoes, A W; Hak, E

    2008-01-01

    Few studies have examined the relationship between viral activity and bacterial invasive disease, considering both influenza virus and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study aimed to assess the potential relationship between invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD), meningococcal disease (MD), and

  11. Alzheimer's disease pathological lesions activate the spleen tyrosine kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweig, Jonas Elias; Yao, Hailan; Beaulieu-Abdelahad, David; Ait-Ghezala, Ghania; Mouzon, Benoit; Crawford, Fiona; Mullan, Michael; Paris, Daniel

    2017-09-06

    The pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by dystrophic neurites (DNs) surrounding extracellular Aβ-plaques, microgliosis, astrogliosis, intraneuronal tau hyperphosphorylation and aggregation. We have previously shown that inhibition of the spleen tyrosine kinase (Syk) lowers Aβ production and tau hyperphosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. Here, we demonstrate that Aβ-overexpressing Tg PS1/APPsw, Tg APPsw mice, and tau overexpressing Tg Tau P301S mice exhibit a pathological activation of Syk compared to wild-type littermates. Syk activation is occurring in a subset of microglia and is age-dependently increased in Aβ-plaque-associated dystrophic neurites of Tg PS1/APPsw and Tg APPsw mice. In Tg Tau P301S mice, a pure model of tauopathy, activated Syk occurs in neurons that show an accumulation of misfolded and hyperphosphorylated tau in the cortex and hippocampus. Interestingly, the tau pathology is exacerbated in neurons that display high levels of Syk activation supporting a role of Syk in the formation of tau pathological species in vivo. Importantly, human AD brain sections show both pathological Syk activation in DNs around Aβ deposits and in neurons immunopositive for pathological tau species recapitulating the data obtained in transgenic mouse models of AD. Additionally, we show that Syk overexpression leads to increased tau accumulation and promotes tau hyperphosphorylation at multiple epitopes in human neuron-like SH-SY5Y cells, further supporting a role of Syk in the formation of tau pathogenic species. Collectively, our data show that Syk activation occurs following Aβ deposition and the formation of tau pathological species. Given that we have previously shown that Syk activation also promotes Aβ formation and tau hyperphosphorylation, our data suggest that AD pathological lesions may be self-propagating via a Syk dependent mechanism highlighting Syk as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of AD.

  12. Active MMPs captured by alpha2Macroglobulin as a marker of disease activity in rheumatoid arthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tchetverikov, I.; Verzijl, N.; Huizinga, T.W.J.; TeKoppele, J.M.; Hanemaaijer, R.; Groot, J. de

    2003-01-01

    Objective. The aim of the present study was to analyze α2Macroglobulin/MMP (α2M/MMP) complex formation and to investigate whether MMP activity in α2M/MMP complexes in serum can be used as a disease marker in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods. High and low molecular weight (H/LMW) substrates and

  13. ELISPOT Assay for Monitoring Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes (CTL Activity in Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. Sayers

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The profiling and monitoring of immune responses are key elements in the evaluation of the efficacy and development of new biotherapies, and a number of assays have been introduced for analyzing various immune parameters before, during, and after immunotherapy. The choice of immune assays for a given clinical trial depends on the known or suggested immunomodulating mechanisms associated with the tested therapeutic modality. Cell-mediated cytotoxicity represents a key mechanism in the immune response to various pathogens and tumors. Therefore, the selection of monitoring methods for the appropriate assessment of cell-mediated cytotoxicity is thought to be crucial. Assays that can detect both cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL frequency and function, such as the IFN-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assay (ELISPOT have gained increasing popularity for monitoring clinical trials and in basic research. Results from various clinical trials, including peptide and whole tumor cell vaccination and cytokine treatment, have shown the suitability of the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay for monitoring T cell responses. However, the Granzyme B ELISPOT assay and Perforin ELISPOT assay may represent a more direct analysis of cell-mediated cytotoxicity as compared to the IFN-γ ELISPOT, since Granzyme B and perforin are the key mediators of target cell death via the granule-mediated pathway. In this review we analyze our own data and the data reported by others with regard to the application of various modifications of ELISPOT assays for monitoring CTL activity in clinical vaccine trials.

  14. AVHRR-based drought-observing system for monitoring the environment and socioeconomic activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogan, F.

    From all natural disaster, drought is the least understandable and the most damaging environmental phenomenon. Although in pre-satellite era, climate data were used for drought monitoring, drought specifics created problems in early drought detection start/end, monitoring its expansion/contraction, intensity and area coverage and the most important, timely estimation of the impacts on the environment and socioeconomic activities. The latest prevented to take prompt measures in mitigating negative consequences of drought for the society. Advances in remote sensing of the past ten years, contributed to the development of comprehensive drought monitoring system and numerous applications, which helped to make decisions for monitoring the environment and predicting sustainable socioeconomic activities. This paper discusses satellite-based land-surface observing system, which provides wells of information used for monitoring such unusual natural disaster as drought. This system was developed from the observations of the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) flown on NOAA operational polar-orbiting satellites. The AVHRR data were packed into the Global Vegetation Index (GVI) product, which have served the global community since 1981. The GVI provided reflectances and indices (4 km spacial resolution) every seven days for each 16 km map cell between 75EN and 55ES covering all land ecosystems. The data includes raw and calibrated radiances in the visible, near infrared and infrared spectral bands, processed (with eliminated high frequency noise) radiances, normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), 20-year climatology, vegetation condition indices and also products, such as vegetation health, drought, vegetation fraction, fire risk etc. In the past ten years, users around the world used this information addressing different issues of drought impacts on socioeconomic activities and responded positively to real time drought information place regularly on the

  15. Efficient Active Sensing with Categorized Further Explorations for a Home Behavior-Monitoring Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenwei Yu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile robotics is a potential solution to home behavior monitoring for the elderly. For a mobile robot in the real world, there are several types of uncertainties for its perceptions, such as the ambiguity between a target object and the surrounding objects and occlusions by furniture. The problem could be more serious for a home behavior-monitoring system, which aims to accurately recognize the activity of a target person, in spite of these uncertainties. It detects irregularities and categorizes situations requiring further explorations, which strategically maximize the information needed for activity recognition while minimizing the costs. Two schemes of active sensing, based on two irregularity detections, namely, heuristic-based and template-matching-based irregularity detections, were implemented and examined for body contour-based activity recognition. Their time cost and accuracy in activity recognition were evaluated through experiments in both a controlled scenario and a home living scenario. Experiment results showed that the categorized further explorations guided the robot system to sense the target person actively. As a result, with the proposed approach, the robot system has achieved higher accuracy of activity recognition.

  16. Development of a real time activity monitoring Android application utilizing SmartStep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegde, Nagaraj; Melanson, Edward; Sazonov, Edward

    2016-08-01

    Footwear based activity monitoring systems are becoming popular in academic research as well as consumer industry segments. In our previous work, we had presented developmental aspects of an insole based activity and gait monitoring system-SmartStep, which is a socially acceptable, fully wireless and versatile insole. The present work describes the development of an Android application that captures the SmartStep data wirelessly over Bluetooth Low energy (BLE), computes features on the received data, runs activity classification algorithms and provides real time feedback. The development of activity classification methods was based on the the data from a human study involving 4 participants. Participants were asked to perform activities of sitting, standing, walking, and cycling while they wore SmartStep insole system. Multinomial Logistic Discrimination (MLD) was utilized in the development of machine learning model for activity prediction. The resulting classification model was implemented in an Android Smartphone. The Android application was benchmarked for power consumption and CPU loading. Leave one out cross validation resulted in average accuracy of 96.9% during model training phase. The Android application for real time activity classification was tested on a human subject wearing SmartStep resulting in testing accuracy of 95.4%.

  17. A multi-sensor monitoring system of human physiology and daily activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Sean T; Oh, Paul

    2012-04-01

    To present the design and pilot test results of a continuous multi-sensor monitoring system of real-world physiological conditions and daily life (activities, travel, exercise, and food consumption), culminating in a Web-based graphical decision-support interface. The system includes a set of wearable sensors wirelessly connected to a "smartphone" with a continuously running software application that compresses and transmits the data to a central server. Sensors include a Global Positioning System (GPS) receiver, electrocardiogram (ECG), three-axis accelerometer, and continuous blood glucose monitor. A food/medicine diary and prompted recall activity diary were also used. The pilot test involved 40 type 2 diabetic patients monitored over a 72-h period. All but three subjects were successfully monitored for the full study period. Smartphones proved to be an effective hub for managing multiple streams of data but required attention to data compression and battery consumption issues. ECG, accelerometer, and blood glucose devices performed adequately as long as subjects wore them. GPS tracking for a full day was feasible, although significant efforts are needed to impute missing data. Activity detection algorithms were successful in identifying activities and trip modes but could benefit by incorporating accelerometer data. The prompted recall diary was an effective tool for augmenting algorithm results, although subjects reported some difficulties with it. The food and medicine diary was completed fully, although end times and medicine dosages were occasionally missing. The unique combination of sensors holds promise for increasing accuracy and reducing burden associated with collecting individual-level activity and physiological data under real-world conditions, but significant data processing issues remain. Such data will provide new opportunities to explore the impacts of human geography and daily lifestyle on health at a fine spatial/temporal scale.

  18. Integrated experiment activity monitoring for wLCG sites based on GWT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feijóo, Alejandro Guinó; Espinal, Xavier

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this work is to develop a High Level Monitoring (HLM) where to merge the distributed computing activities of an LHC experiment (ATLAS). ATLAS distributed computing is organized in clouds, where the Tier-Is (primary centers) provide services to the associated Tier-2s centers (secondaries) so they are all seen as a cloud by the experiment. Computing activities and sites stability monitoring services are numerous and delocalized. It would be very useful for a cloud manager to have a single place where to aggregate available monitoring information. The idea presented in this paper is to develop a set of collectors to gather information regarding site status and performance on data distribution, data processing and Worldwide LHC Computing Grid (WLCG) tests (Service Availability Monitoring), store them in specific databases, process the results and show it in a single HLM page. Once having it, one can investigate further by interacting with the front-end, which is fed by the stats stored on databases.

  19. Histaminergic activity in a rodent model of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak, Przemysław; Noras, Lukasz; Jochem, Jerzy; Szkilnik, Ryszard; Brus, Halina; Körossy, Eva; Drab, Jacek; Kostrzewa, Richard M; Brus, Ryszard

    2009-04-01

    Rats lesioned shortly after birth with 6-OHDA have been proposed to be a near-ideal model of severe Parkinson's disease, because of non-lethality of the procedure, near-total destruction of nigrostriatal dopaminergic fibers, and near-total dopamine (DA) denervation of striatum. There are scarce data that in Parkinson's disease, activity of the central histaminergic system is increased. Therefore, the aim of this study was to determine histamine content in the brain and the effect of histamine receptor antagonists on behavior of adult rats. At 3 days after birth, Wistar rats were pretreated with desipramine (20.0 mg/kg ip) 1 h before bilateral icv administration of the catecholaminergic neurotoxin 6-OHDA (67 microg base, on each side) or saline-ascorbic acid (0.1%) vehicle (control). At 8 weeks levels of DA and its metabolites L: -3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA) were estimated in the striatum and frontal cortex by HPCL/ED technique. In the hypothalamus, hippocampus, frontal cortex, and medulla oblongata, the level of histamine was analyzed by immunoenzymatic method. Behavioral observations (locomotion, exploratory-, oral-, and stereotyped-activity) were additionally made on control and 6-OHDA neonatally lesioned rats. Effects of DA receptor agonists (SKF 38393, apomorphine) and histamine receptor antagonists (e.g., S(+)chlorpheniramine, H(1); cimetidine, H(2); thioperamide, H(3) agonist) were determined. We confirmed that 6-OHDA significantly reduced contents of DA and its metabolites in the brain in adulthood. Histamine content was significantly increased in the hypothalamus, hipocampus, and medulla oblongata. Moreover, in 6-OHDA-lesioned rats behavioral response was altered mainly by thioperamide (H(3) antagonist). These findings indicate that histamine and the central histaminergic system are altered in the brain of rats lesioned to model Parkinson's disease, and that histaminergic neurons exert a modulating role in Parkinsonian 6

  20. Ambulatory activity monitoring: Progress in measurement of activity, posture, and specific motion patterns in daily life

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.B.J. Bussmann (Hans); U.W. Ebner-Priemer (Ulrich); J. Fahrenberg (Jochen)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractBehavior is central to psychology in almost any definition. Although observable activity is a core aspect of behavior, assessment strategies have tended to focus on emotional, cognitive, or physiological responses. When physical activity is assessed, it is done so mostly with

  1. Serum inflammatory mediators as markers of human Lyme disease activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark J Soloski

    Full Text Available Chemokines and cytokines are key signaling molecules that orchestrate the trafficking of immune cells, direct them to sites of tissue injury and inflammation and modulate their states of activation and effector cell function. We have measured, using a multiplex-based approach, the levels of 58 immune mediators and 7 acute phase markers in sera derived from of a cohort of patients diagnosed with acute Lyme disease and matched controls. This analysis identified a cytokine signature associated with the early stages of infection and allowed us to identify two subsets (mediator-high and mediator-low of acute Lyme patients with distinct cytokine signatures that also differed significantly (p<0.0005 in symptom presentation. In particular, the T cell chemokines CXCL9 (MIG, CXCL10 (IP-10 and CCL19 (MIP3B were coordinately increased in the mediator-high group and levels of these chemokines could be associated with seroconversion status and elevated liver function tests (p = 0.027 and p = 0.021 respectively. There was also upregulation of acute phase proteins including CRP and serum amyloid A. Consistent with the role of CXCL9/CXCL10 in attracting immune cells to the site of infection, CXCR3+ CD4 T cells are reduced in the blood of early acute Lyme disease (p = 0.01 and the decrease correlates with chemokine levels (p = 0.0375. The levels of CXCL9/10 did not relate to the size or number of skin lesions but elevated levels of serum CXCL9/CXCL10 were associated with elevated liver enzymes levels. Collectively these results indicate that the levels of serum chemokines and the levels of expression of their respective chemokine receptors on T cell subsets may prove to be informative biomarkers for Lyme disease and related to specific disease manifestations.

  2. Serum Leptin levels do not correlate with disease activity in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sibel Yilmaz Oner

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Leptin, is a fat tissue hormone which effects energy expenditure , food intake , hematopoiesis, osteogenesis, angiogenesis, reproductive and immune systems. We aimed to determine serum leptin levels and investigate the association between disease activity and other parameters in RA patients. Methods Patients with RA (n=106 as the study group, healthy controls (n=52 and osteoarthritis (OA patients (n=37 as a control group were enrolled to the study. RA patients were categorized in four different groups according to DAS28 scores: remission ,low (LDA, moderate (MDA or high (HDA disease activity . Results No differences were present between the body mass indices of the three groups. Mean leptin levels in RA patients, OA group and healthy individuals were 25,60±13,41, 23,03±11,51 and 23,81±12,85 ng/ml, respectively and no significant difference was present between the groups. Nine of (8,5% RA patients were in remission, 16 (15,1% were in LDA, 40 (37,7% in MDA and 41 (38,7% were in HDA. Leptin levels did not correlate with DAS28 scores of RA patients (r=-0,12, p=0,11. Mean leptin levels in RA patients with remission was 32,65±7, 28 in LDA 23,94±10,94 in MDA 26,73±14,92 and in HDA 23,59±13,50 ng/ml (p=NS. No associations were observed between leptin levels and CRP, ESR, RF positivity and disease duration. Conclusions Our study revealed no correlation of disease activity and serum leptin levels. Therefore leptin does not seem to be an appropriate biomarker to monitorize inflammation in RA.

  3. Measuring physical activity in young people with cerebral palsy: validity and reliability of the ActivPAL™ monitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bania, Theofani

    2014-09-01

    We determined the criterion validity and the retest reliability of the ΑctivPAL™ monitor in young people with diplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Activity monitor data were compared with the criterion of video recording for 10 participants. For the retest reliability, activity monitor data were collected from 24 participants on two occasions. Participants had to have diplegic CP and be between 14 and 22 years of age. They also had to be of Gross Motor Function Classification System level II or III. Outcomes were time spent in standing, number of steps (physical activity) and time spent in sitting (sedentary behaviour). For criterion validity, coefficients of determination were all high (r(2)  ≥ 0.96), and limits of group agreement were relatively narrow, but limits of agreement for individuals were narrow only for number of steps (≥5.5%). Relative reliability was high for number of steps (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.87) and moderate for time spent in sitting and lying, and time spent in standing (intraclass correlation coefficients = 0.60-0.66). For groups, changes of up to 7% could be due to measurement error with 95% confidence, but for individuals, changes as high as 68% could be due to measurement error. The results support the criterion validity and the retest reliability of the ActivPAL™ to measure physical activity and sedentary behaviour in groups of young people with diplegic CP but not in individuals. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Active and passive electrical and seismic time-lapse monitoring of earthen embankments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittgers, Justin Bradley

    In this dissertation, I present research involving the application of active and passive geophysical data collection, data assimilation, and inverse modeling for the purpose of earthen embankment infrastructure assessment. Throughout the dissertation, I identify several data characteristics, and several challenges intrinsic to characterization and imaging of earthen embankments and anomalous seepage phenomena, from both a static and time-lapse geophysical monitoring perspective. I begin with the presentation of a field study conducted on a seeping earthen dam, involving static and independent inversions of active tomography data sets, and self-potential modeling of fluid flow within a confined aquifer. Additionally, I present results of active and passive time-lapse geophysical monitoring conducted during two meso-scale laboratory experiments involving the failure and self-healing of embankment filter materials via induced vertical cracking. Identified data signatures and trends, as well as 4D inversion results, are discussed as an underlying motivation for conducting subsequent research. Next, I present a new 4D acoustic emissions source localization algorithm that is applied to passive seismic monitoring data collected during a full-scale embankment failure test. Acoustic emissions localization results are then used to help spatially constrain 4D inversion of collocated self-potential monitoring data. I then turn to time-lapse joint inversion of active tomographic data sets applied to the characterization and monitoring of earthen embankments. Here, I develop a new technique for applying spatiotemporally varying structural joint inversion constraints. The new technique, referred to as Automatic Joint Constraints (AJC), is first demonstrated on a synthetic 2D joint model space, and is then applied to real geophysical monitoring data sets collected during a full-scale earthen embankment piping-failure test. Finally, I discuss some non-technical issues related to

  5. CT pulmonary densitovolumetry in patients with acromegaly: a comparison between active disease and controlled disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camilo, Gustavo B; Carvalho, Alysson R S; Machado, Dequitier C; Mogami, Roberto; Melo, Pedro L

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Our purpose was to compare the findings of CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function in patients with active acromegaly and controlled acromegaly and, secondarily, to correlate these findings. Methods: 11 patients with active acromegaly, 18 patients with controlled acromegaly and 17 control subjects, all non-smokers, underwent quantification of lung volume using multidetector CT (Q-MDCT) and pulmonary function tests. Results: Patients with active acromegaly had larger total lung mass (TLM) values than the controls and larger amounts of non-aerated compartments than the other two groups. Patients with active acromegaly also had larger amounts of poorly aerated compartments than the other two groups, a difference that was observed in both total lung volume (TLV) and TLM. TLV as measured by inspiratory Q-MDCT correlated significantly with total lung capacity, whereas TLV measured using expiratory Q-MDCT correlated significantly with functional residual capacity. Conclusion: Patients with active acromegaly have more lung mass and larger amounts of non-aerated and poorly aerated compartments. There is a relationship between the findings of CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function test parameters. Advances in knowledge: Although the nature of our results demands further investigation, our data suggest that both CT pulmonary densitovolumetry and pulmonary function tests can be used as useful tools for patients with acromegaly by assisting in the prediction of disease activity. PMID:26246281

  6. MONITORING OF THE ACTIVITY OF PUBLIC PROCUREMENT SYSTEM IN COUNTRIES OF EUROPEAN UNION AND UKRAINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iryna Ksonzhyk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The research objective is to study and summarize the experience of the European Union countries in the field of public procurement monitoring; to study the activities that form its mechanism; to analyse forms of monitoring. Also, the current state, problems and prospects of creation and implementation of the mechanism for public procurement monitoring in Ukraine are studied; administrative and corruption risks are revealed. Methodology. Theoretical and methodological backgrounds of the research are formed on the basis of the provisions, categories, and concepts of economic theory, national and world economy, strategic development of public procurement, modelling. Laws and regulations that are regulators of the public procurement system and its monitoring, the works of domestic and foreign scientists on investigated issues were of greater importance. The system-structural analysis and synthesis, general scientific methods and methods of economic research are used to analyse and evaluate the phenomena and processes that accompany the functioning of the public procurement market and the mechanism for its monitoring. In particular, historical and dialectical methods (when studying the development of public procurement system in Western countries, the definition of stages and trends in its formation, the development and adoption of treaties for the regulation of public procurement within the European Union; method of expert assessments (for assessing the regulatory and legal support for public procurement monitoring; abstractlogical method (when establishing the factors for the formation of a monitoring mechanism in the field of public procurement in Ukraine, in particular, the institutional and organizational-economic features of its implementation, when assessing the criteria and performance indicators for the functioning of the monitoring system and its impact on the public procurement market, for theoretical generalization and conclusions

  7. A Scoping Review of Economic Evaluations Alongside Randomised Controlled Trials of Home Monitoring in Chronic Disease Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidholm, Kristian; Kristensen, Mie Borch Dahl

    2018-04-01

    Many countries have considered telemedicine and home monitoring of patients as a solution to the demographic challenges that health-care systems face. However, reviews of economic evaluations of telemedicine have identified methodological problems in many studies as they do not comply with guidelines. The aim of this study was to examine economic evaluations alongside randomised controlled trials of home monitoring in chronic disease management and hereby to explore the resources included in the programme costs, the types of health-care utilisation that change as a result of home monitoring and discuss the value of economic evaluation alongside randomised controlled trials of home monitoring on the basis of the studies identified. A scoping review of economic evaluations of home monitoring of patients with chronic disease based on randomised controlled trials and including information on the programme costs and the costs of equipment was carried out based on a Medline (PubMed) search. Nine studies met the inclusion criteria. All studies include both costs of equipment and use of staff, but there is large variation in the types of equipment and types of tasks for the staff included in the costs. Equipment costs constituted 16-73% of the total programme costs. In six of the nine studies, home monitoring resulted in a reduction in primary care or emergency contacts. However, in total, home monitoring resulted in increased average costs per patient in six studies and reduced costs in three of the nine studies. The review is limited by the small number of studies found and the restriction to randomised controlled trials, which can be problematic in this area due to lack of blinding of patients and healthcare professionals and the difficulty of implementing organisational changes in hospital departments for the limited period of a trial. Furthermore, our results may be based on assessments of older telemedicine interventions.

  8. Comprehensive Approach for Monitoring and Analyzing the Activity Concentration Level of PET Isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osovizky, A.; Paran, J.; Ankry, N.; Vulasky, E.; Ashkenazi, B.; Tal, N.; Dolev, E.; Gonen, E.

    2004-01-01

    A comprehensive approach for measuring and analyzing low concentration levels of positron emitter isotopes is introduced. The solution is based on a Continuous Air Monitoring Sampler (CAMS), Stack Monitoring System (SMS) and software package. Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a major tool for both, biochemical research and non-invasive diagnostics for medicine imaging. The PET method utilizes short half life β + radioisotopes that are produced in cyclotron sites built especially for this purpose. The growing need for β + isotopes brought about a commonly wide use of cyclotrons next to populated areas. Isotopes production involves two possible radiation hazards deriving from the activity concentration; one refers to the nearby population by the activity released through the ventilation system and the other refers to the personnel working in the nuclear facility. A comprehensive system providing solution for both radiation hazards is introduced in this work

  9. The green turtle Chelonia mydas as a marine and coastal environmental sentinels: anthropogenic activities and diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabela Guarnier Domiciano

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The green turtle Chelonia mydas is a widely distributed, slowly maturing species with a complex life cycle, using both oceanic and coastal environments. The species is exposed to different threats and is considered an environmental sentinel that indicates variation among, and the severity of hazards to marine ecosystems. This study aimed to describe both anthropogenic impacts, and infectious and parasitic diseases in C. mydas - including cases along the Brazilian coast - and implications for conservation. Bycatch is reported as the main threat to the conservation of this species, followed by debris ingestion, collisions with boats, dredging, and chronic environmental contamination. All of these impacts may directly or indirectly cause death, by facilitating contact with pathological agents and by increasing vulnerability to secondary diseases. The pathological agents associated with lesions include viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and helminths. Fibropapillomatosis is an example of a chronic disease characterized by cutaneous and visceral tumors that affects mostly juvenile C. mydas worldwide and is associated with the Chelonid herpesvirus 5. The bacterias Vibrio alginolyticus, Aeromonas hydrophila, and Pseudomonas fluorescens are found in the aquatic environment and among C. mydas lesions in various organs. Trematode adults and eggs of the family Spirorchiidae are also frequent in systemic cardiovascular diseases of C. mydas. The direct impacts of anthropogenic activities and diseases are synergistic and may affect the specie’s health and conservation. Therefore, the monitoring and systematic diagnosing of diseases and causes of death - including necropsy, histopathology, and molecular exams - are necessary to assess a population’s health, to support appropriate decisions of coastal management and to target future research topics that optimize C. mydas conservation.

  10. An Overview of Recent Geostationary Fire Monitoring Activities and Applications in the Western Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, D. J.; Conard, S. G.; Ivanova, G. A.; Sukhinin, A. I.; Hao, W. M.; Koutzenogii, K. P.; Prins, E. M.; Schmidt, C. C.; Feltz, J. M.

    2002-05-01

    Over the past twenty years the international scientific research and environmental monitoring communities have recognized the vital role environmental satellites can play in detecting and monitoring active fires both regionally and around the globe for hazards applications and to better understand the extent and impact of biomass burning on the global environment. Both groups have stressed the importance of utilizing operational satellites to produce routine fire products and to ensure long-term stable records of fire activity for applications such as land-use/land cover change analyses and global climate change research. The current NOAA GOES system provides the unique opportunity to detect fires throughout the Western Hemisphere every half-hour from a series of nearly identical satellites for a period of 15+ years. This presentation will provide an overview of the GOES biomass burning monitoring program at UW-Madison Cooperative Institute for Meteorological Satellite Studies (CIMSS) with an emphasis on recent applications of the new GOES Wildfire Automated Biomass Burning Algorithm (WF_ABBA). For the past 8 years, CIMSS has utilized the GOES-8 imager to monitor biomass burning trends in South America. Since September 2000, CIMSS has been producing half-hourly fire products in real-time for most of the Western Hemisphere. The WF_ABBA half-hourly fire product is providing new insights into diurnal, spatial, seasonal and interannual fire dynamics in North, Central, and South America. In North America these products are utilized to detect and monitor wildfires in northerly and remote locations. In South America the diurnal GOES fire product is being used as an indicator of land-use and land-cover change and carbon dynamics along the borders between Brazil, Peru, and Bolivia. The Navy is assimilating the Wildfire ABBA fire product into the Navy Aerosol Analysis and Prediction System (NAAPS) to analyze and predict aerosol loading and transport as part of the NASA