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Sample records for monitor treatment response

  1. Gallium 67 imaging in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel, O.; Front, D.; Lam, M.; Ben-Haim, S.; Kleinhaus, U.; Ben-Shachar, M.; Robinson, E.; Kolodny, G.M.

    1988-01-01

    The value of gallium 67 (Ga) imaging in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment was assessed in 25 patients with Ga-avid tumors and compared to body computed tomography (CT), chest radiographs, and palpation of tumor infiltrated peripheral lymph nodes. Ga imaging was negative in 95% (20/21) of the patients who were clinically considered to be in remission and in whom treatment was stopped. The disease did not recur during a follow-up of 12 to 26 months in 15 patients. Six patients developed recurrence of the disease 3 to 12 months after treatment was stopped. In all six patients Ga imaging became positive again at the time of the appearance of active disease. In the group of patients in remission, CT was negative in 57% (11/19), chest x-rays in 55% (6/11) and peripheral lymph nodes were palpated in none of the patients (13/13). In four patients that did not achieve remission after treatment, Ga scans were positive. Ga imaging appears useful in monitoring lymphoma response to treatment. This is probably because Ga imaging monitors tumor cell viability, whereas body CT and chest radiographs show the tumor mass, which may consist of fibrotic or necrotic tissue

  2. Treatment dose-response in amblyopia therapy: the Monitored Occlusion Treatment of Amblyopia Study (MOTAS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Catherine E; Moseley, Merrick J; Stephens, David A; Fielder, Alistair R

    2004-09-01

    Amblyopia is the commonest visual disorder of childhood. Yet the contributions of the two principal treatments (spectacle wear and occlusion) to outcome are unknown. This study was undertaken to investigate the dose-response relationship of amblyopia therapy. The study comprised three distinct phases: baseline, in which repeat measures of visual function were undertaken to confirm the initial visual deficit; refractive adaptation: an 18-week period of spectacle wear with six weekly measurements of logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution (logMAR) visual acuity; occlusion: in which participants were prescribed 6 hours of "patching" per day. In the latter phase, occlusion was objectively monitored and logMAR visual acuity recorded at 2-week intervals until any observed gains had ceased. Data were obtained from 94 participants (mean age, 5.1 +/- 1.4 years) with amblyopia associated with strabismus (n = 34), anisometropia (n = 23), and both anisometropia and strabismus (n = 37). Eighty-six underwent refractive adaptation. Average concordance with patching was 48%. The relationship between logMAR visual acuity gain and total occlusion dose was monotonic and linear. Increasing dose rate beyond 2 h/d hastened the response but did not improve outcome. More than 80% of the improvement during occlusion occurred within 6 weeks. Treatment outcome was significantly better for children younger than 4 years (n = 17) than in those older than 6 years (n = 24; P = 0.0014). Continuous objective monitoring of the amount of patching therapy received has provided insight into the dose-response relationship of occlusion therapy for amblyopia. Patching is most effective within the first few weeks of treatment, even for those in receipt of a relatively small dose. Further studies are needed to elucidate the neural basis for the dose-response functions. Copyright Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology

  3. Monitoring treatment response and metastatic relapse in advanced bladder cancer by liquid biopsy analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkenkamp-Demtröder, Karin; Christensen, Emil; Nordentoft, Iver Kristiansen

    2017-01-01

    of circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA) in plasma and urine to detect metastatic relapse after cystectomy and measure treatment efficacy. We exome sequenced tumour and germline DNA from patients with muscle-invasive bladder cancer and monitored ctDNA in 370 liquid biopsies throughout the disease courses by 84......DNA detection in plasma and diagnosis of relapse was 101 d after cystectomy (range 0-932 d). Early detection of metastatic relapse and treatment response using liquid biopsies represents a novel, highly sensitive tool for monitoring patients, supporting clinicians, and guiding treatment decisions. PATIENT...

  4. Omitting cytogenetic assessment from routine treatment response monitoring in chronic myeloid leukemia is safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geelen, Inge G P; Thielen, Noortje; Janssen, Jeroen J W M; Hoogendoorn, Mels; Roosma, Tanja J A; Valk, Peter J M; Visser, Otto; Cornelissen, Jan J; Westerweel, Peter E

    2018-04-01

    The monitoring of response in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is of great importance to identify patients failing their treatment in order to adjust TKI choice and thereby prevent progression to advanced stage disease. Cytogenetic monitoring has a lower sensitivity, is expensive, and requires invasive bone marrow sampling. Nevertheless, chronic myeloid leukemia guidelines continue to recommend performing routine cytogenetic response assessments, even when adequate molecular diagnostics are available. In a population-based registry of newly diagnosed CML patients in the Netherlands, all simultaneous cytogenetic and molecular assessments performed at 3, 6, and 12 months were identified and response of these matched assessments was classified according to European Leukemia Net (ELN) recommendations. The impact of discrepant cytogenetic and molecular response classifications and course of patients with additional chromosomal abnormalities were evaluated. The overall agreement of 200 matched assessments was 78%. In case of discordant responses, response at 24 months was consistently better predicted by the molecular outcome. Cytogenetic response assessments provided relevant additional clinical information only in some cases of molecular "warning." The development of additional cytogenetic abnormalities was always accompanied with molecular failure. We conclude that it is safe to omit routine cytogenetics for response assessment during treatment and to only use molecular monitoring, in order to prevent ambiguous classifications, reduce costs, and reduce the need for invasive bone marrow sampling. Cytogenetic re-assessment should still be performed when molecular response is suboptimal. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia: assessing risk, monitoring response, and optimizing outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmuganathan, Naranie; Hiwase, Devendra Keshaorao; Ross, David Morrall

    2017-12-01

    Over the past two decades, tyrosine kinase inhibitors have become the foundation of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) treatment. The choice between imatinib and newer tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) needs to be balanced against the known toxicity and efficacy data for each drug, the therapeutic goal being to maximize molecular response assessed by BCR-ABL RQ-PCR assay. There is accumulating evidence that the early achievement of molecular targets is a strong predictor of superior long-term outcomes. Early response assessment provides the opportunity to intervene early with the aim of ensuring an optimal response. Failure to achieve milestones or loss of response can have diverse causes. We describe how clinical and laboratory monitoring can be used to ensure that each patient is achieving an optimal response and, in patients who do not reach optimal response milestones, how the monitoring results can be used to detect resistance and understand its origins.

  6. Monitoring Cancer Response to Treatment with Hyperpolarized 13C MRS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eldirdiri, Abubakr

    , and the patient is exposed to ionizing radiation. The introduction of hyperpolarized 13C MRS has opened completely new possibilities to study the biochemical changes in disease processes. Numerous 13C-labeled compounds were proposed to interrogate various aspects of cancer cell metabolism. The aim of this study......Monitoring the cancer response to treatment, non-invasively, by medical imaging is a key element in the management of cancer. For patients undergoing treatment, it is crucial to determine responders from non-responders in order to guide treatment decisions. Currently, PET is the most widely used...

  7. MR Imaging in Monitoring and Predicting Treatment Response in Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Río, Jordi; Auger, Cristina; Rovira, Àlex

    2017-05-01

    MR imaging is the most sensitive tool for identifying lesions in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). MR imaging has also acquired an essential role in the detection of complications arising from these treatments and in the assessment and prediction of efficacy. In the future, other radiological measures that have shown prognostic value may be incorporated within the models for predicting treatment response. This article examines the role of MR imaging as a prognostic tool in patients with MS and the recommendations that have been proposed in recent years to monitor patients who are treated with disease-modifying drugs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Assessment and monitoring of treatment response in adult ADHD patients: current perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsay, J Russell

    2017-01-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a neurodevelopmental syndrome that emerges in childhood or early adolescence and persists into adulthood for a majority of individuals. There are many other adults with ADHD who may not seek out evaluation and treatment until adulthood, having been able to "get by" before struggling with inattention, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity in adulthood, in addition to facing the associated features of disorganization, poor time management, and procrastination among many others. A lifetime diagnosis of ADHD is associated with a wide range of life impairments, which makes a comprehensive and accurate diagnostic assessment essential in order to obtain appropriate treatment. Moreover, while there are effective medical and psychosocial treatments for ADHD, it is important to be able to track treatment response in order to evaluate whether adjustments in specific interventions are needed or referrals for adjunctive treatments and supports are indicated to facilitate optimal therapeutic outcomes. The goal of this article is to provide a clinically useful review of the various measures that practicing clinicians can use to aid in the diagnostic assessment and monitoring of psychosocial and medical treatment of ADHD in adult patients. This review includes various structured interviews, screening scales, adult ADHD symptom inventories, measures of associated features of ADHD, as well as ratings of impairment and functioning which can be adapted to clinicians' practice needs in order to track treatment progress and optimize treatments for adults with ADHD.

  9. Assessment and monitoring of treatment response in adult ADHD patients: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramsay JR

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available J Russell Ramsay Adult ADHD Treatment & Research Program, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD is a neurodevelopmental syndrome that emerges in childhood or early adolescence and persists into adulthood for a majority of individuals. There are many other adults with ADHD who may not seek out evaluation and treatment until adulthood, having been able to “get by” before struggling with inattention, hyperactivity, and/or impulsivity in adulthood, in addition to facing the associated features of disorganization, poor time management, and procrastination among many others. A lifetime diagnosis of ADHD is associated with a wide range of life impairments, which makes a comprehensive and accurate diagnostic assessment essential in order to obtain appropriate treatment. Moreover, while there are effective medical and psychosocial treatments for ADHD, it is important to be able to track treatment response in order to evaluate whether adjustments in specific interventions are needed or referrals for adjunctive treatments and supports are indicated to facilitate optimal therapeutic outcomes. The goal of this article is to provide a clinically useful review of the various measures that practicing clinicians can use to aid in the diagnostic assessment and monitoring of psychosocial and medical treatment of ADHD in adult patients. This review includes various structured interviews, screening scales, adult ADHD symptom inventories, measures of associated features of ADHD, as well as ratings of impairment and functioning which can be adapted to clinicians’ practice needs in order to track treatment progress and optimize treatments for adults with ADHD. Keywords: adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, adult ADHD, pharmacotherapy, psychosocial treatment, symptoms, functional impairments, executive functions

  10. Lung clearance index to monitor treatment response in pulmonary exacerbations in preschool children with cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayment, Jonathan H; Stanojevic, Sanja; Davis, Stephanie D; Retsch-Bogart, George; Ratjen, Felix

    2018-05-01

    Antibiotic treatment for pulmonary symptoms in preschool children with cystic fibrosis (CF) varies among clinicians. The lung clearance index (LCI) is sensitive to early CF lung disease, but its utility to monitor pulmonary exacerbations in young children has not been assessed. We aim to (1) understand how LCI changes during lower respiratory tract symptoms relative to a recent clinically stable measurement, (2) determine whether LCI can identify antibiotic treatment response and (3) compare LCI changes to changes in spirometric indices. LCI and spirometry were measured at quarterly clinic visits over a 12-month period in preschool children with CF. Symptomatic visits were identified and classified as treated or untreated. Treatment response was estimated using propensity score matching methods. 104 symptomatic visits were identified in 78 participants. LCI increased from baseline in both treated (mean relative change +23.8% (95% CI 16.2 to 31.4)) and untreated symptomatic visits (mean relative change +11.2% (95% CI 2.4 to 19.9)). A significant antibiotic treatment effect was observed when LCI was used as the outcome measure (average treatment effect -15.5% (95% CI -25.4 to -5.6)) but not for z-score FEV 1 . LCI significantly deteriorated with pulmonary symptoms relative to baseline and improved with antibiotic treatment. These data suggest that LCI may have a role in the routine clinical care of preschool children with CF. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  11. IMAGE-GUIDED EVALUATION AND MONITORING OF TREATMENT RESPONSE IN PATIENTS WITH DRY EYE DISEASE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamrah, Pedram

    2014-01-01

    Dry eye disease (DED) is one of the most common ocular disorders worldwide. The pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the development of DED are not well understood and thus treating DED has been a significant challenge for ophthalmologists. Most of the currently available diagnostic tests demonstrate low correlation to patient symptoms and have low reproducibility. Recently, sophisticated in vivo imaging modalities have become available for patient care, namely, in vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). These emerging modalities are powerful and non-invasive, allowing real-time visualization of cellular and anatomical structures of the cornea and ocular surface. Here we discuss how, by providing both qualitative and quantitative assessment, these techniques can be used to demonstrate early subclinical disease, grade layer-by-layer severity, and allow monitoring of disease severity by cellular alterations. Imaging-guided stratification of patients may also be possible in conjunction with clinical examination methods. Visualization of subclinical changes and stratification of patients in vivo, allows objective image-guided evaluation of tailored treatment response based on cellular morphological alterations specific to each patient. This image-guided approach to DED may ultimately improve patient outcomes and allow studying the efficacy of novel therapies in clinical trials. PMID:24696045

  12. The role of ABO blood groups in Crohn's disease and in monitoring response to infliximab treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qiao; Wang, Lingyun; Zhang, Shenghong; Feng, Ting; Li, Li; Chen, Baili; Chen, Minhu

    2016-09-01

    The variation in ABO blood groups is reported to be associated with multiple diseases. Infliximab (IFX) has been widely used in the treatment of Crohn's disease (CD). We aim to investigate the distribution of ABO blood groups in Chinese patients with CD and to explore its impact on response to IFX. Patients with CD were consecutively recruited to the study between 2007 and 2014. CD patients receiving IFX therapy were followed for at least two years. In 293 patients with CD, most patients (40.6%) had blood type O (119/293). The odds ratio (OR) of CD in blood type O patients was 1.06 (95%CI: 0.6-1.86; p=0.84) compared to all other blood types. Among those CD patients, 107 patients received IFX treatment. One year after the first course of IFX, a significant association was found between the overall ABO system and outcomes of IFX treatment (pblood type AB (OR=4.42, 95% CI: 1.04-18.76; p=0.044) were more likely to achieve mucosal healing, while CD patients with blood type A had a high risk of losing response (OR=0.38, 95% CI: 0.15-0.96; p=0.040). ABO blood groups are not associated with prevalence of CD. Patients with blood type AB had a better response to IFX while those with blood type A appeared to have a risk of losing response to IFX.

  13. Hepatic fat quantification magnetic resonance for monitoring treatment response in pediatric nonalcoholic steatohepatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Hong; Kim, Seung; Kim, Myung-Joon; Kim, Hyun Gi; Shin, Hyun Joo; Lee, Mi-Jung

    2015-09-07

    To evaluate the possibility of treatment effect monitoring using hepatic fat quantification magnetic resonance (MR) in pediatric nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of patients who received educational recommendations and vitamin E for NASH and underwent hepatic fat quantification MR from 2011 to 2013. Hepatic fat fraction (%) was measured using dual- and triple-echo gradient-recalled-echo sequences at 3T. The compliant and non-compliant groups were compared clinically, biochemically, and radiologically. Twenty seven patients (M:F = 24:3; mean age: 12 ± 2.3 years) were included (compliant group = 22, non-compliant = 5). None of the baseline findings differed between the 2 groups, except for triglyceride level (compliant vs non-compliant, 167.7 mg/dL vs 74.2 mg/dL, P = 0.001). In the compliant group, high-density lipoprotein increased and all other parameters decreased after 1-year follow-up. However, there were various changes in the non-compliant group. Dual-echo fat fraction (-19.2% vs 4.6, P fat fraction (-13.4% vs 3.5, P fat fraction showed a positive correlation (ρ = 0.418, P = 0.030). Hepatic fat quantification MR can be a non-invasive, quantitative and useful tool for monitoring treatment effects in pediatric NASH.

  14. The role of interferon gamma release assays in the monitoring of response to anti-tuberculosis treatment in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Junaid; Pillay, Manormoney; Jeena, Prakash

    2014-09-01

    Successful control of childhood TB requires early diagnosis, effective chemotherapy and a method of evaluating the response to therapy. Identification of suitable biomarkers that predict the response to anti-TB therapy may allow the duration of treatment to be shortened. The majority of biomarker studies in paediatric TB have focused on the role of T cell-based interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) in the diagnosis of either latent or active disease. Little has been published on the role of IGRAs in the monitoring response to therapy in children. We reviewed the available literature to ascertain the value of IGRAs in the monitoring of response to anti-TB therapy in children. We explored the results of the few studies that have investigated the role of IGRAs as markers of response to anti-TB treatment in children. We conclude that the role of IGRAs as surrogate markers appears promising. Robust clinical trials are, however, needed to entrench the value of IGRAs as surrogate biomarkers of response to anti-TB therapy in children. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Use of PET to monitor the response of lung cancer to radiation treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erdi, Y.E.; Humm, J.L.; Erdi, A.K.; Yorke, E.D.; Macapinlac, H.; Larson, S.M.; Rosenzweig, K.E.

    2000-01-01

    Approximately 170,000 people are diagnosed with lung cancer in the United States each year. Many of these patients receive external beam radiation for treatment. Fluorine-18 2-fluoro-2-deoxy-d-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) is increasingly being used in evaluating non-small cell lung cancer and may be of clinical utility in assessing response to treatment. In this report, we present FDG PET images and data from two patients who were followed with a total of eight and seven serial FDG PET scans, respectively, through the entire course of their radiation therapy. Changes in several potential response parameters are shown versus time, including lesion volume (V FDG ) by PET, SUV av , SUV max , and total lesion glycolysis (TLG) during the course of radiotherapy. The response parameters for patient 1 demonstrated a progressive decrease; however, the response parameters for patient 2 showed an initial decrease followed by an increase. The data presented here may suggest that the outcome of radiation therapy can be predicted by PET imaging, but this observation requires a study of additional patients. (orig.)

  16. Circulating Tumour DNA for Monitoring Treatment Response to Anti-PD-1 Immunotherapy in Melanoma Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsuko Ashida

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Anti-programmed cell death-1 (anti-PD-1 antibody shows high therapeutic efficacy in patients with advanced melanoma. However, assessment of its therapeutic activity can be challenging because of tumour enlargement associated with intratumoural inflammation. Because circulating tumour DNA (ctDNA correlates with tumour burden, we assessed the value of ctDNA levels as an indicator of tumour changes. Quantification of ctDNA (BRAFmutant or NRASmutant levels by droplet digital PCR in 5 patients with BRAF or NRAS mutant melanoma during the treatment course showed dynamic changes corresponding to radiological and clinical alterations. In 3 cases in which the anti-PD-1 antibody was effective, ctDNA levels decreased within 2–4 weeks after treatment initiation. In 2 cases in which the anti-PD-1 antibody was ineffective, ctDNA levels did not decrease after treatment initiation. ctDNA could be a useful biomarker to predict early response to treatment in patients with advanced melanoma treated with anti-PD-1 immunotherapy.

  17. Use of an activity monitor to detect response to treatment in dogs with osteoarthritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Dorothy Cimino; Boston, Raymond C.; Farrar, John T.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether an activity monitor (AM) could be used to detect changes in activity in dogs with osteoarthritis treated with carprofen or a placebo. Design Randomized controlled trial. Animals 70 dogs with no clinically important abnormalities other than osteoarthritis for which they were not currently being treated. Procedures Dogs wore an AM continuously for 21 days. On days 8 through 21, the dogs were treated with carprofen (n = 35) or a placebo (35). Total activity counts for days 1 through 7 (baseline) were compared with total activity counts for days 15 through 21 (endpoint). The change in total activity count from baseline to endpoint was assessed within each treatment group as well as between groups. Linear regression analysis was performed to test for an association between treatment and percentage change in activity counts while controlling for other variables. Results For placebo-treated dogs, median baseline total activity count was not significantly different from median endpoint total activity count (1,378,408 vs 1,310,112, respectively). For dogs receiving carprofen, there was a significant increase in median activity count from baseline to endpoint (1,276,427 vs 1,374,133). When age and baseline activity counts were controlled for, dogs in the carpofen-treated group had a 20% increase in activity counts, compared with placebo-treated dogs (95% confidence interval, 10% to 26%). Conclusions and Clinical Relevance Results suggested that the AM used in the present study may be a valid outcome assessment tool for documenting improved activity associated with treatment in dogs with osteoarthritis. PMID:20590496

  18. Using Bioluminescence To Monitor Treatment Response in Real Time in Mice with Mycobacterium ulcerans Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Tianyu; Li, Si-Yang; Converse, Paul J.; Almeida, Deepak V.; Grosset, Jacques H.; Nuermberger, Eric L.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium ulcerans causes Buruli ulcer, a potentially disabling ulcerative skin disease. Only recently was antimicrobial therapy proven effective. Treatment for 2 months with rifampin plus streptomycin was first proposed after experiments in the mouse footpad model demonstrated bactericidal activity. This treatment is now considered the treatment of choice, although larger ulcers may require adjunctive surgery. Shorter, oral regimens are desired, but evaluating drug activity in mice is ha...

  19. Monitoring of treatment response after chemoradiotherapy for head and neck cancer using in vivo 1H MR spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    King, Ann D.; Yeung, David K.W.; Bhatia, Kunwar S.; Wong, Jeffrey K.T.; Ahuja, Anil T.; Yu, Kwok-hung; Mo, Frankie K.F.; Hu, Chen-wen; Tse, Gary M.K.; Vlantis, Alexander C.

    2010-01-01

    Elevated choline (Cho) level has been documented on proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and therefore percentage changes in Cho levels after chemoradiotherapy may serve as a marker of residual cancer in a post-treatment mass (PTM). Forty-six patients underwent 1 H MRS before treatment and the 30 patients with a PTM underwent repeat 1 H MRS at 6 weeks post-treatment. The percentage change in Cho/creatine and Cho/water ratios were correlated with residual cancer. The mean pretreatment Cho/creatine and Cho/water ratios were 2.24 and 1.20 x 10 -3 , respectively. Cho persisted in four out of nine PTMs with residual cancer. Cho was absent in five out of nine PTMs with residual cancer and 21/21 PTMs without cancer. The number of PTMs with persistent Cho was too small to allow analysis of percentage change in ratios but the presence of Cho in a PTM showed significant correlation with residual cancer (p=0.0046), producing a sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value of 44%, 100%, 100% and 81%, respectively. Therefore, the presence of Cho in a PTM may serve as a marker of residual cancer. Furthermore since so few PTMs contain Cho, a percentage change in Cho ratios may not be a useful method for monitoring treatment response. (orig.)

  20. Three-dimensional power doppler ultrasound is useful to monitor the response to treatment in a patient with primary papillary serous carcinoma of the peritoneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Jen-Min; Huang, Yu-Fang; Chen, Helen H W; Cheng, Ya-Min; Chou, Cheng-Yang

    2006-05-01

    To date, this is the first report to monitor changes of intratumor vascularization and the response to radiation and Cyberknife therapy in a patient with recurrent primary papillary serous carcinoma of the peritoneum by three dimensional (3D) power Doppler ultrasonography (PDUS). Transvaginal 3D PDUS detected a recurrent presacral tumor with abundant intratumor vascularity. Serial examinations of the tumor volume and serum CA-125 level were studied before, during, and 6 mo after therapy. Meanwhile, the intratumor blood flow was measured and expressed as vascularity indices. All of the tumor volume, intratumor vascularity indices and serum CA-125 level decreased progressively following therapy. A remaining lesion with nearly absent intratumor power Doppler signals suggested a scarring lesion posttreatment. Indeed, CT-guided tissue biopsy confirmed fibrotic change. 3D PDUS is useful to monitor the response to treatments and to differentiate residual tumors from lesions of scarring change posttreatment. It provides more accurate posttreatment information than pelvic computed tomography.

  1. Diagnostic Potential of Novel Salivary Host Biomarkers as Candidates for the Immunological Diagnosis of Tuberculosis Disease and Monitoring of Tuberculosis Treatment Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Ruschca; Maasdorp, Elizna; Malherbe, Stephanus; Loxton, Andre G; Stanley, Kim; van der Spuy, Gian; Walzl, Gerhard; Chegou, Novel N

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new tools for the early diagnosis of TB disease and monitoring of the response to treatment, especially in resource-constrained settings. We investigated the usefulness of host markers detected in saliva as candidate biomarkers for the immunological diagnosis of TB disease and monitoring of treatment response. We prospectively collected saliva samples from 51 individuals that presented with signs and symptoms suggestive of TB disease at a health centre in Cape Town, South Africa, prior to the establishment of a clinical diagnosis. Patients were later classified as having TB disease or other respiratory disease (ORD), using a combination of clinical, radiological and laboratory findings. We evaluated the concentrations of 69 host markers in saliva samples using a multiplex cytokine platform, and assessed the diagnostic potentials of these markers by receiver operator characteristics (ROC) curve analysis, and general discriminant analysis. Out of the 51 study participants, 18 (35.4%) were diagnosed with TB disease and 12 (23.5%) were HIV infected. Only two of the 69 host markers that were evaluated (IL-16 and IL-23) diagnosed TB disease individually with area under the ROC curve ≥0.70. A five-marker biosignature comprising of IL-1β, IL-23, ECM-1, HCC1 and fibrinogen diagnosed TB disease with a sensitivity of 88.9% (95% CI,76.7-99.9%) and specificity of 89.7% (95% CI, 60.4-96.6%) after leave-one-out cross validation, regardless of HIV infection status. Eight-marker biosignatures performed with a sensitivity of 100% (95% CI, 83.2-100%) and specificity of 95% (95% CI, 68.1-99.9%) in the absence of HIV infection. Furthermore, the concentrations of 11 of the markers changed during treatment, indicating that they may be useful in monitoring of TB treatment response. We have identified novel salivary biosignatures which may be useful in the diagnosis of TB disease and monitoring of the response to TB treatment. Our findings require further

  2. Monitoring and treatment of diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ronyai, A.; Gielen, M.; Philipsen, E.; Kamstra, A.

    2003-01-01

    Early recognition and efficient treatment of diseases are important factors for the success of any fish farming operation. Experience learns that during the culture of a new species like pikeperch (partly in new systems) new disease problems will be encountered. The subtask on monitoring and

  3. Novel use of non-echo-planar diffusion weighted MRI in monitoring disease activity and treatment response in active Grave's orbitopathy: An initial observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingam, Ravi Kumar; Mundada, Pravin; Lee, Vickie

    2018-01-10

    To examine the novel use of non-echo-planar diffusion weighted MRI (DWI) in depicting activity and treatment response in active Grave's orbitopathy (GO) by assessing, with inter-observer agreement, for a correlation between its apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) and conventional Short tau Inversion Recovery (STIR) MRI signal-intensity ratios (SIRs). A total of 23 actively inflamed muscles and 30 muscle response episodes were analysed in patients with active GO who underwent medical treatment. The MRI orbit scans included STIR sequences and non-echo-planar DWI were evaluated. Two observers independently assessed the images qualitatively for the presence of activity in the extraocular muscles (EOMs) and recorded the STIR signal-intensity (SI), SIR (SI ratio of EOM/temporalis muscle), and ADC values of any actively inflamed muscle on the pre-treatment scans and their corresponding values on the subsequent post-treatment scans. Inter-observer agreement was examined. There was a significant positive correlation (0.57, p < 0.001) between ADC and both SIR and STIR SI of the actively inflamed EOM. There was also a significant positive correlation (0.75, p < 0.001) between SIR and ADC values depicting change in muscle activity associated with treatment response. There was good inter-observer agreement. Our preliminary results indicate that quantitative evaluation with non-echo-planar DWI ADC values correlates well with conventional STIR SIR in detecting active GO and monitoring its treatment response, with good inter-observer agreement.

  4. 111In-cetuximab-F(ab')2 SPECT and 18F-FDG PET for prediction and response monitoring of combined-modality treatment of human head and neck carcinomas in a mouse model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijk, L.K. van; Boerman, O.C.; Franssen, G.M.; Kaanders, J.H.A.M.; Bussink, J.

    2015-01-01

    Treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas with radiotherapy and the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor cetuximab shows an improved response in a subgroup of patients. The aim of this study was to noninvasively monitor treatment response by visualizing systemically accessible

  5. Noninvasive monitoring of treatment response in a rabbit cyanide toxicity model reveals differences in brain and muscle metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae G.; Lee, Jangwoen; Mahon, Sari B.; Mukai, David; Patterson, Steven E.; Boss, Gerry R.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Brenner, Matthew

    2012-10-01

    Noninvasive near infrared spectroscopy measurements were performed to monitor cyanide (CN) poisoning and recovery in the brain region and in foreleg muscle simultaneously, and the effects of a novel CN antidote, sulfanegen sodium, on tissue hemoglobin oxygenation changes were compared using a sub-lethal rabbit model. The results demonstrated that the brain region is more susceptible to CN poisoning and slower in endogenous CN detoxification following exposure than peripheral muscles. However, sulfanegen sodium rapidly reversed CN toxicity, with brain region effects reversing more quickly than muscle. In vivo monitoring of multiple organs may provide important clinical information regarding the extent of CN toxicity and subsequent recovery, and facilitate antidote drug development.

  6. Monitoring of response to the treatment with ganglionic gamma radiography with 99Tc-MIBI in lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solano, Maria E.; Gomez, Jose Ramon.

    1997-01-01

    Recently the use of 99m Tc-MIBI for the diagnosis and follow-up of lymphomas have been reported. The aim of the present work was to assess the utility of this radiopharmaceuticals for the post treatment follow-up of patients lymphomas

  7. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging for pretreatment prediction and monitoring of treatment response of patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nilsen, Line; Olsen, Dag Rune; Seierstad, Therese; Fangberget, Anne; Geier, Oliver

    2010-01-01

    Background. For patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT), the European Guidelines for Breast Imaging recommends magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to be performed before start of NACT, when half of the NACT has been administered and prior to surgery. This is the first study addressing the value of flow-insensitive apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) obtained from diffusion-weighted (DW) MRI at the recommended time points for pretreatment prediction and monitoring of treatment response. Materials and methods. Twenty-five LABC patients were included in this prospective study. DW MRI was performed using single-shot spin-echo echo-planar imaging with b-values of 100, 250 and 800 s/mm 2 prior to NACT, after four cycles of NACT and at the conclusion of therapy using a 1.5 T MR scanner. ADC in the breast tumor was calculated from each assessment. The strength of correlation between pretreatment ADC, ADC changes and tumor volume changes were examined using Spearman's rho correlation test. Results. Mean pretreatment ADC was 1.11 ± 0.21 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s. After 4 cycles of NACT, ADC was significantly increased (1.39 ± 0.36 x 10 -3 mm 2 /s; p=0.018). There was no correlation between individual pretreatment breast tumor ADC and MR response measured after four cycles of NACT (p=0.816) or prior to surgery (p=0.620). Conclusion. Pretreatment tumor ADC does not predict treatment response for patients with LABC undergoing NACT. Furthermore, ADC increase observed mid-way in the course of NACT does not correlate with tumor volume changes.

  8. Blood pressure response to CPAP treatment in subjects with obstructive sleep apnoea: the predictive value of 24-h ambulatory blood pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Grattoni, Anabel L; Torres, Gerard; Martínez-Alonso, Montserrat; Barbé, Ferran; Turino, Cecilia; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Alicia; Cortijo, Anunciacion; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Egea, Carlos; Cao, Gonzalo; Sánchez-de-la-Torre, Manuel

    2017-10-01

    The reduction in blood pressure (BP) with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is modest and highly variable. In this study, we identified the variables that predict BP response to CPAP.24-h ambulatory BP monitoring (ABPM), C-reactive protein (CRP), leptin, adiponectin and 24-h urinary catecholamine were measured before and after 6 months of CPAP in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients.Overall, 88 middle-aged, obese male patients with severe OSA (median apnoea-hypopnoea index 42 events·h -1 ) were included; 28.4% had hypertension. 62 patients finished the study, and 60 were analysed. The daytime diastolic BP (-2 mmHg) and norepinephrine (-109.5 nmol·day -1 ) were reduced after CPAP, but no changes in the 24-h BP, night-time BP, dopamine, epinephrine, CRP, leptin or adiponectin were detected. The nocturnal normotension was associated with an increased night-time-BP (+4 mmHg) after CPAP, whereas nocturnal hypertension was associated with a reduction of 24-h BP (-3 mmHg). A multivariate linear regression model showed differential night-time BP changes after CPAP. Specifically, low night-time heart rate (CPAP and support the usefulness of 24-h ABPM for OSA patients before treatment initiation. These results need to be confirmed in further studies. Copyright ©ERS 2017.

  9. Unmanned Mobile Monitoring for Nuclear Emergency Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, YoungSoo; Park, JongWon; Kim, TaeWon; Jeong, KyungMin [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Severe accidents at nuclear power plant have led to significant consequences to the people, the environment or the facility. Therefore, the appropriate response is required for the mitigation of the accidents. In the past, most of responses were performed by human beings, but it was dangerous and risky. In this paper, we proposed unmanned mobile system for the monitoring of nuclear accident in order to response effectively. For the integrity of reactor cooling and containment building, reactor cooling pipe and hydrogen distribution monitoring with unmanned ground vehicle was designed. And, for the safety of workers, radiation distribution monitoring with unmanned aerial vehicle was designed. Unmanned mobile monitoring system was proposed to respond nuclear accidents effectively. Concept of reinforcing the integrity of RCS and containment building, and radiation distribution monitoring were described. RCS flow measuring, hydrogen distribution measuring and radiation monitoring deployed at unmanned vehicle were proposed. These systems could be a method for the preparedness of effective response of nuclear accidents.

  10. Cyanobacteria, Toxins and Indicators: Field Monitoring,Treatment Facility Monitoring and Treatment Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation is a compilation of harmful algal bloom (HAB) related field monitoring data from the 2015 bloom season, treatment plant monitoring data from the 2013 and 2014 bloom seasons, and bench-scale treatment study data from 2015.

  11. Treatment of operational monitoring data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azevedo P, D. de; Marcondes T, J.

    1996-01-01

    From effective doses calculation models, published in norms and regulatory guides, the specific dose conversion factors for different installations are used on monitoring data. The monitoring data are achieved from many individual parameters and, in case there is no individual parameters, area monitoring data are used. With the objective of reducing occupational exposures, the results are evaluated in function of the pertinent norms. The measurements are analyzed also in function of the consistency of the data obtained from former similar operations. The results are saved as individual historical dose, in each worker annual dose of every work year. The other files are formed by determined operation individual doses, calculated per capita; dose rates are achieved from individual monitoring data and the averages of each operational function are calculated; dose rates are also obtained by area monitoring, and each workplace mean is calculated. These averages are compared with the correspondent annual dose equivalent limit fraction. The analysis of variance is applied to individuals dose rates and to workplace dose rates in order to verify statistical differences, the largest mean is compared to the remaining. The individual working time in a programmed operation is limited in order to avoid that the predicted dose equivalent of twelve months exceed the established annual limit. When this limit is predicted to be exceeded, the working time is re-programmed, with worker removing at the beginning of the operation or before the end of operation, keeping prevision below the limit. (authors). 7 refs

  12. Diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of tuberous sclerosis complex ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of tuberous sclerosis complex: A South African consensus response to international guidelines. ... inhibitors to treat subependymal giant cell astrocytomas not amenable to surgery and renal angiomyolipomas larger than 3 cm, and as adjunctive treatment for refractory focal seizures.

  13. Design of the Monitored Occlusion Treatment of Amblyopia Study (MOTAS)

    OpenAIRE

    Stewart, C E; Fielder, A R; Stephens, D A; Moseley, M J

    2002-01-01

    Background/aims: The effectiveness of occlusion therapy for the treatment of amblyopia is a research priority. The authors describe the design of the Monitored Occlusion Treatment for Amblyopia Study (MOTAS) and its methodology. MOTAS will determine the dose-response relation for occlusion therapy as a function of age and category of amblyopia.

  14. Monitoring the response of patients with cutaneous leishmaniasis to treatment with pentamidine isethionate by quantitative real-time PCR, and identification of Leishmania parasites not responding to therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mans, D R A; Kent, A D; Hu, R V; Lai A Fat, E J; Schoone, G J; Adams, E R; Rood, E J; Alba, S; Sabajo, L O A; Lai A Fat, R F; de Vries, H J C; Schallig, H D F H

    2016-08-01

    Leishmania (Viannia) guyanensis is believed to be the principal cause of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) in Suriname. This disease is treated with pentamidine isethionate (PI), but treatment failure has increasingly been reported. To evaluate PI for its clinical efficacy, to compare parasite load, and to assess the possibility of treatment failure due to other infecting Leishmania species. Parasite load of patients with CL was determined in skin biopsies using real-time quantitative PCR before treatment and 6 and 12 weeks after treatment. Clinical responses were evaluated at week 12 and compared with parasite load. In parallel, molecular species differentiation was performed. L. (V.) guyanensis was the main infecting species in 129 of 143 patients (about 90%). PI treatment led to a significant decrease (P Leishmania (Viannia) braziliensis, Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis and L. (V.) guyanensis (1/92, 1/92 and 22/92 evaluable cases, respectively). There was substantial agreement beyond chance between the parasite load at week 6 and the clinical outcome at week 12, as indicated by the κ value of 0.61. L. (V.) guyanensis is the main infecting species of CL in Suriname, followed by L. (V.) braziliensis and L. (L.) amazonensis. Furthermore, patient response to PI can be better anticipated based on the parasite load 6 weeks after the treatment rather than on parasite load before treatment. © 2015 The Authors Clinical and Experimental Dermatology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Association of Dermatologists, North American Clinical Dermatologic Society and St Johns Dermatological Society.

  15. Effluent Treatment Facility tritium emissions monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dunn, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    An Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) approved sampling and analysis protocol was developed and executed to verify atmospheric emissions compliance for the new Savannah River Site (SRS) F/H area Effluent Treatment Facility. Sampling equipment was fabricated, installed, and tested at stack monitoring points for filtrable particulate radionuclides, radioactive iodine, and tritium. The only detectable anthropogenic radionuclides released from Effluent Treatment Facility stacks during monitoring were iodine-129 and tritium oxide. This paper only examines the collection and analysis of tritium oxide

  16. Automatic duress alarms through physiological response monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roehrig, S.C.

    1977-07-01

    Physiological response monitoring under controlled conditions can provide an effective means for passively determining if the wearer is under moderate to severe stresses. By monitoring the heart rate (HR) and galvanic skin response (GSR) of an individual, it is possible to detect in real time the increase in heart rate and GSR levels due to physiological reactions to mental duress. With existing physiological monitoring equipment, however, the work load of the wearer must be well defined since it is impossible, without additional data, to distinguish mental duress responses from those resulting from moderate physical exertion. Similarly, environmental conditions should be constrained within set limits to avoid masking increases in GSR levels due to metntal stress from those associated with increased perspiration. These constraints should not prove overly restrictive and would allow an integrated security system utilizing physiological monitoring equipment to provide an effective real time, automated early warning system for detection of mental duress or death of the wearer

  17. Improving ecological response monitoring of environmental flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alison J; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D; Nielsen, Daryl L; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  18. Improving Ecological Response Monitoring of Environmental Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Alison J.; Gawne, Ben; Beesley, Leah; Koehn, John D.; Nielsen, Daryl L.; Price, Amina

    2015-05-01

    Environmental flows are now an important restoration technique in flow-degraded rivers, and with the increasing public scrutiny of their effectiveness and value, the importance of undertaking scientifically robust monitoring is now even more critical. Many existing environmental flow monitoring programs have poorly defined objectives, nonjustified indicator choices, weak experimental designs, poor statistical strength, and often focus on outcomes from a single event. These negative attributes make them difficult to learn from. We provide practical recommendations that aim to improve the performance, scientific robustness, and defensibility of environmental flow monitoring programs. We draw on the literature and knowledge gained from working with stakeholders and managers to design, implement, and monitor a range of environmental flow types. We recommend that (1) environmental flow monitoring programs should be implemented within an adaptive management framework; (2) objectives of environmental flow programs should be well defined, attainable, and based on an agreed conceptual understanding of the system; (3) program and intervention targets should be attainable, measurable, and inform program objectives; (4) intervention monitoring programs should improve our understanding of flow-ecological responses and related conceptual models; (5) indicator selection should be based on conceptual models, objectives, and prioritization approaches; (6) appropriate monitoring designs and statistical tools should be used to measure and determine ecological response; (7) responses should be measured within timeframes that are relevant to the indicator(s); (8) watering events should be treated as replicates of a larger experiment; (9) environmental flow outcomes should be reported using a standard suite of metadata. Incorporating these attributes into future monitoring programs should ensure their outcomes are transferable and measured with high scientific credibility.

  19. Treatment response in oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandit-Taskar, Neeta; Batraki, Maria; Divgi, Chaitanya

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Currently, the evaluation of response to therapy in Oncology consists of determination of changes in size of lesions measurable by structural imaging, notably computerized tomography. These criteria, formalized using RECIST (Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors), are the current standard for evaluation (http://www3.cancer. gov/dip/RECIST.htm). An increasing body of evidence suggests that functional changes in tumors precede structural changes, and that methodologies that measure such changes may be able to evaluate the potential of therapy, allowing for better and earlier selection of these potentially cytotoxic therapies. Nuclear Medicine imaging is distinguished by its ability to determine functional characteristics. These include: 1. Receptor status - for example, the presence of sodium iodide symporters detected by radioiodine or pertechnetate imaging, the presence of somatostatin or norepinephrine receptors by pentetreotide or metaiodobenzylguanidine (mIBG) imaging respectively. Such imaging can help guide appropriate therapies with iodine-131, somatostatin analogues (radiolabeled or otherwise) or iodine-131 labeled mIBG. 2. Metabolic status - for example, glycolytic status (with fluorine-18 labeled fluorodeoxyglucose); amino acid metabolism (e.g. using carbon-11 labeled methionine), or tumor proliferation (using radiolabeled thymidine or deoxyuridine). These methods have advantages over structural imaging because in the vast majority of tumors, changes in the functional or molecular status of tumors are seen earlier than are structural changes. 3. Overall cellular status - these imaging agents are still in their early development but hold great promise for the determination of cellular viability. Annexin imaging is the archetype of such imaging modalities that predict the overall fate of the cell, in this instance its entry into the apoptotic pathway. This review will highlight the uses of functional imaging using radiotracers in all three

  20. Use of a hand-held bladder ultrasound scanner in the assessment of dehydration and monitoring response to treatment in a paediatric emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enright, Kevin; Beattie, Tom; Taheri, Sepideh

    2010-10-01

    Dehydration is a common concern in paediatric emergency care. Limited tools are available to assess reduced urine production, which is commonly cited as a reliable marker of dehydration. To evaluate the utility of a hand-held bladder ultrasound scanner in monitoring urine production in children attending the emergency department with suspected dehydration. A prospective pilot study was undertaken on a convenience sample of patients presenting with suspected dehydration. Serial bladder ultrasound scanning was performed to monitor urine output. Dehydration was assessed clinically using the WHO guide to dehydration assessment. Decisions about treatment and admission were made independently of the urine output measurements obtained using the bladder scanner. 45 children were studied. Using the WHO guide, 33 (73%) had mild dehydration, 8 (18%) had moderate dehydration and 4 (9%) had severe dehydration. There was a significant difference in estimated urine production between those admitted and those discharged (0.9±1.2 ml/kg/h vs 1.8±1.5 ml/kg/h, p=0.01) and between those with mild dehydration versus moderate/severe dehydration (2.3±1.5 ml/kg/h vs 0.6±0.7 ml/kg/h, p=0.0011). Urine output had been significantly reduced in those who had received an intravenous fluid bolus compared with those who had not (0.4±0.46 ml/kg/h vs 1.9±1.6 ml/kg/h, p=0.001). The hand-held bladder scanner is a convenient, non-invasive and objective adjunct in the assessment and management of children attending the emergency department with suspected dehydration.

  1. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging Early After Chemoradiotherapy to Monitor Treatment Response in Head-and-Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandecaveye, Vincent, E-mail: Vincent.Vandecaveye@uzleuven.be [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium); Dirix, Piet [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium); De Keyzer, Frederik; Op de Beeck, Katya [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium); Vander Poorten, Vincent [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Head and Neck Surgery, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium); Hauben, Esther [Department of Pathology, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium); Lambrecht, Maarten; Nuyts, Sandra [Department of Radiation Oncology, Leuven Cancer Institute, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium); Hermans, Robert [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven (Belgium)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: To evaluate diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) for assessment of treatment response in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) three weeks after the end of chemoradiotherapy (CRT). Methods and Materials: Twenty-nine patients with HNSCC underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) prior to and 3 weeks after CRT, including T{sub 2}-weighted and pre- and postcontrast T{sub 1}-weighted sequences and an echo-planar DWI sequence with six b values (0 to 1,000 s/mm{sup 2}), from which the apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) was calculated. ADC changes 3 weeks posttreatment compared to baseline ( Increment ADC) between responding and nonresponding primary lesions and adenopathies were correlated with 2 years locoregional control and compared with a Mann-Whitney test. In a blinded manner, the Increment ADC was compared to conventional MRI 3 weeks post-CRT and the routinely implemented CT, on average 3 months post-CRT, which used size-related and morphological criteria. Positive and negative predictive values (PPV and NPV, respectively) were compared between the Increment ADC and anatomical imaging. Results: The Increment ADC of lesions with later tumor recurrence was significantly lower than lesions with complete remission for both primary lesions (-2.3% {+-} 0.3% vs. 80% {+-} 41%; p < 0.0001) and adenopathies (19.9% {+-} 32% vs. 63% {+-} 36%; p = 0.003). The Increment ADC showed a PPV of 89% and an NPV of 100% for primary lesions and a PPV of 70% and an NPV of 96% for adenopathies per neck side. DWI improved PPV and NPV compared to anatomical imaging. Conclusion: DWI with the Increment ADC 3 weeks after concluding CRT for HNSCC allows for early assessment of treatment response.

  2. Dynamic Contrast Enhanced MRI Can Monitor the Very Early Inflammatory Treatment Response upon Intra-Articular Steroid Injection in the Knee Joint: A Case Report with Review of the Literature

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boesen, Mikael; Kubassova, Olga; Cimmino, Marco A

    2011-01-01

    Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in inflammatory arthritis, especially in conjunction with computer-aided analysis using appropriate dedicated software, seems to be a highly sensitive tool for monitoring the early inflammatory treatment response in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. This paper give...... a review of the current knowledge of the emerging technique. The potential of the technique is demonstrated and discussed in the context of a case report following the early effect of an intra-articular steroid injection in a patient with rheumatoid arthritis flare in the knee....

  3. Social media monitoring: Responsive governance in the shadow of surveillance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V.J.J.M. Bekkers (Victor); A.R. Edwards (Arthur); D. de Kool (Dennis)

    2013-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Social media monitoring is gradually becoming a common practice in public organizations in the Netherlands. The main purposes of social media monitoring are strategic control and responsiveness. Social media monitoring poses normative questions in terms of

  4. [Maintenance and monitoring of water treatment system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontoriero, G; Pozzoni, P; Tentori, F; Scaravilli, P; Locatelli, F

    2005-01-01

    Water treatment systems must be submitted to maintenance, disinfections and monitoring periodically. The aim of this review is to analyze how these processes must complement each other in order to preserve the efficiency of the system and optimize the dialysis fluid quality. The correct working of the preparatory process (pre-treatment) and the final phase of depuration (reverse osmosis) of the system need a periodic preventive maintenance and the regular substitution of worn or exhausted components (i.e. the salt of softeners' brine tank, cartridge filters, activated carbon of carbon tanks) by a competent and trained staff. The membranes of reverse osmosis and the water distribution system, including dialysis machine connections, should be submitted to dis-infections at least monthly. For this purpose it is possible to use chemical and physical agents according to manufacturer' recommendations. Each dialysis unit should predispose a monitoring program designed to check the effectiveness of technical working, maintenance and disinfections and the achievement of chemical and microbiological standards taken as a reference. Generally, the correct composition of purified water is monitored by continuous measuring of conductivity, controlling bacteriological cultures and endotoxin levels (monthly) and checking water contaminants (every 6-12 months). During pre-treatment, water hardness (after softeners) and total chlorine (after chlorine tank) should be checked periodically. Recently the Italian Society of Nephrology has developed clinical guidelines for water and dialysis solutions aimed at suggesting rational procedures for production and monitoring of dialysis fluids. It is hopeful that the application of these guidelines will lead to a positive cultural change and to an improvement in dialysis fluid quality.

  5. Systematic review of the use of bone turnover markers for monitoring the response to osteoporosis treatment: the secondary prevention of fractures, and primary prevention of fractures in high-risk groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burch, Jane; Rice, Stephen; Yang, Huiqin; Neilson, Aileen; Stirk, Lisa; Francis, Roger; Holloway, Paul; Selby, Peter; Craig, Dawn

    2014-02-01

    There is currently no standard practice for the monitoring of patients receiving treatment for osteoporosis. Repeated dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) is commonly used for monitoring treatment response, but it has its limitations. Bone turnover markers have advantages over DXA as they are non-invasive, relatively cheap and can detect changes in bone turnover rates earlier. However, they do have disadvantages, particularly high within- and between-patient variability. The ability of bone turnover markers to identify treatment non-responders and predict future fracture risk has yet to be established. We aimed to determine the clinical effectiveness, test accuracy, reliability, reproducibility and cost-effectiveness of bone turnover markers for monitoring the response to osteoporosis treatment. We searched 12 electronic databases (including MEDLINE, EMBASE, The Cochrane Library and trials registries) without language restrictions from inception to March 2012. We hand-searched three relevant journals for the 12 months prior to May 2012, and websites of five test manufacturers and the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). Reference lists of included studies and relevant reviews were also searched. A systematic review of test accuracy, clinical utility, reliability and reproducibility, and cost-effectiveness of two formation and two resorption bone turnover markers, in patients being treated for osteoporosis with any of bisphosphonate [alendronate (Fosamax, MSD), risedronate (Actonel, Warner Chilcott Company), zolendronate (Zometa, Novartis)], raloxifene (Evista, Eli Lilly and Company Ltd), strontium ranelate (Protelos, Servier Laboratories Ltd), denosumab (Prolia, Amgen Ltd) or teriparatide (Forsteo, Eli Lilly and Company Ltd), was undertaken according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) guidelines. Given the breadth of the review question, a range of study designs and outcome measures were eligible. The development

  6. Real-time PCR in detection and quantitation of Leishmania donovani for the diagnosis of Visceral Leishmaniasis patients and the monitoring of their response to treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Prakash; Khan, Md. Anik Ashfaq; Duthie, Malcolm S.; Vallur, Aarthy C.; Picone, Alessandro; Howard, Randall F.; Reed, Steven G.

    2017-01-01

    . donovani parasites in VL, PKDL and RVL patients, as well as being capable of assessing response to treatment. As such, this real time PCR assay represents an important contribution in efforts to eliminate VL. PMID:28957391

  7. Volumetric optoacoustic monitoring of endovenous laser treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fehm, Thomas F.; Deán-Ben, Xosé L.; Schaur, Peter; Sroka, Ronald; Razansky, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Chronic venous insufficiency (CVI) is one of the most common medical conditions with reported prevalence estimates as high as 30% in the adult population. Although conservative management with compression therapy may improve the symptoms associated with CVI, healing often demands invasive procedures. Besides established surgical methods like vein stripping or bypassing, endovenous laser therapy (ELT) emerged as a promising novel treatment option during the last 15 years offering multiple advantages such as less pain and faster recovery. Much of the treatment success hereby depends on monitoring of the treatment progression using clinical imaging modalities such as Doppler ultrasound. The latter however do not provide sufficient contrast, spatial resolution and three-dimensional imaging capacity which is necessary for accurate online lesion assessment during treatment. As a consequence, incidence of recanalization, lack of vessel occlusion and collateral damage remains highly variable among patients. In this study, we examined the capacity of volumetric optoacoustic tomography (VOT) for real-time monitoring of ELT using an ex-vivo ox foot model. ELT was performed on subcutaneous veins while optoacoustic signals were acquired and reconstructed in real-time and at a spatial resolution in the order of 200μm. VOT images showed spatio-temporal maps of the lesion progression, characteristics of the vessel wall, and position of the ablation fiber's tip during the pull back. It was also possible to correlate the images with the temperature elevation measured in the area adjacent to the ablation spot. We conclude that VOT is a promising tool for providing online feedback during endovenous laser therapy.

  8. Electronic compliance monitoring of topical treatment after ophthalmic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermann, Manuel Marcel; Ustündag, Can; Diestelhorst, Michael

    2010-08-01

    The success of many medical treatments is built on compliance. Electronic monitoring is the most accurate tool to quantify compliance by measuring adherence. In order to assess the efficiency of a recently introduced miniature monitoring device for eye drop application, we evaluated adherence in ophthalmic patients undergoing post-operative short-term topical treatment. This pilot study enrolled 30 outpatients (mean age 61.8 +/- 18.5 years) after cataract (n = 24) and glaucoma filtration surgery (n = 6) applying fixed-combination eye drops containing prednisolone and gentamicin five times daily for 2 weeks. Patients received eye drops in conventional bottles each equipped with a miniature monitoring device recording events of application. Two patients failed to bring back the monitoring device; therefore data collected from only 28 patients could be examined. Data showed highly variable results with a mean dose compliance of 50.2%. Dose compliance was below 25% in approximately one out of five patients. Four cataract patients, but no glaucoma patient, discontinued therapy prematurely. The observed mean dosage interval was calculated for each patient and ranged 4.6-19.7 h. Thirty percent of analysed dosage intervals exceeded 12.0 h. Different patterns of compliance behaviour-like early non-persistence, drug holiday and low treatment frequency could be identified and illustrated using electronic data. Age or gender did not significantly influence compliance rates. Our pilot study demonstrates successful electronic compliance monitoring using a technology capable of continuous data recording over weeks of treatment. The low compliance rate for a relevant part of the patients demonstrates the necessity to study and improve compliance in ophthalmology. In future, new application methods and electronic application devices may improve treatment response in eye care.

  9. Noninvasive monitoring of radiation-induced treatment response using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in a colorectal tumor model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seierstad, Therese; Roe, Kathrine; Olsen, Dag Rune

    2007-01-01

    Background and purpose: To examine whether in vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ( 1 H MRS) and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) can monitor radiation-induced changes in HT29 xenografts in mice. Materials and methods: HT29 xenografts in mice received a dose of 15 Gy. In vivo 1 H MRS and DW-MRI were acquired pretreatment and 1, 3, 6 and 10 days post-irradiation. After imaging, tumors were excised for histological analysis. The amounts of necrosis, fibrosis and viable cells in the cross sections were scored and compared to changes in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and choline/water ratio. Results: Radiation-induced necrosis in the xenografts was observed as increased tumor ADC. In-growth of fibrosis three days post-irradiation restricting water mobility was accompanied by decreased tumor ADC. Choline/water ratio correlated with metabolic activity and tumor growth. Conclusions: ADC and choline/water ratio assessed by in vivo DW-MRI and 1 H MRS depicts radiation-induced changes in HT29 xenografts following irradiation

  10. First external quality assurance program for bloodstream Real-Time PCR monitoring of treatment response in clinical trials of Chagas disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan C Ramírez

    Full Text Available Real-Time PCR (qPCR testing is recommended as both a diagnostic and outcome measurement of etiological treatment in clinical practice and clinical trials of Chagas disease (CD, but no external quality assurance (EQA program provides performance assessment of the assays in use. We implemented an EQA system to evaluate the performance of molecular biology laboratories involved in qPCR based follow-up in clinical trials of CD. An EQA program was devised for three clinical trials of CD: the E1224 (NCT01489228, a pro-drug of ravuconazole; the Sampling Study (NCT01678599, that used benznidazole, both conducted in Bolivia; and the CHAGASAZOL (NCT01162967, that tested posaconazole, conducted in Spain. Four proficiency testing panels containing negative controls and seronegative blood samples spiked with 1, 10 and 100 parasite equivalents (par. eq./mL of four Trypanosoma cruzi stocks, were sent from the Core Lab in Argentina to the participating laboratories located in Bolivia and Spain. Panels were analyzed simultaneously, blinded to sample allocation, at 4-month intervals. In addition, 302 random blood samples from both trials carried out in Bolivia were sent to Core Lab for retesting analysis. The analysis of proficiency testing panels gave 100% of accordance (within laboratory agreement and concordance (between laboratory agreement for all T. cruzi stocks at 100 par. eq./mL; whereas their values ranged from 71 to 100% and from 62 to 100% at 1 and 10 par. eq./mL, respectively, depending on the T. cruzi stock. The results obtained after twelve months of preparation confirmed the stability of blood samples in guanidine-EDTA buffer. No significant differences were found between qPCR results from Bolivian laboratory and Core Lab for retested clinical samples. This EQA program for qPCR analysis of CD patient samples may significantly contribute to ensuring the quality of laboratory data generated in clinical trials and molecular diagnostics laboratories of

  11. Quantitative Magnetization Transfer in Monitoring Glioblastoma (GBM) Response to Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehrabian, Hatef; Myrehaug, Sten; Soliman, Hany; Sahgal, Arjun; Stanisz, Greg J

    2018-02-06

    Quantitative magnetization transfer (qMT) was used as a biomarker to monitor glioblastoma (GBM) response to chemo-radiation and identify the earliest time-point qMT could differentiate progressors from non-progressors. Nineteen GBM patients were recruited and MRI-scanned before (Day 0 ), two weeks (Day 14 ), and four weeks (Day 28 ) into the treatment, and one month after the end of the treatment (Day 70 ). Comprehensive qMT data was acquired, and a two-pool MT model was fit to the data. Response was determined at 3-8 months following the end of chemo-radiation. The amount of magnetization transfer ([Formula: see text]) was significantly lower in GBM compared to normal appearing white matter (p GBM are more sensitive to treatment effects compared to clinically used metrics. qMT could assess tumor aggressiveness and identify early progressors even before the treatment. Changes in qMT parameters within the first 14 days of the treatment were capable of separating early progressors from non-progressors, making qMT a promising biomarker to guide adaptive radiotherapy for GBM.

  12. Symptom monitoring in treatment of cancer patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yao Wanxia; Lin Miao; Lü Ye; Yang Biao; Yao Cong; Liu Juan; Wang Wenru

    2008-01-01

    Objective To examine self-reported symptoms by the patients receiving cancer therapy, and find out the symptoms that should be coped with and managed during the treatment. Methods A pilot study was conducted on self-reported symptoms on 185 patients receiving chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy for different cancers. The Therapy-Related Symptoms Checklist (TRSC) was used. Results Severe symptoms on the TRSC subscales: loss of appetite,feeling sluggish, weight loss, nausea and hair loss, were reported by the patients. The frequently reported symptoms by those on chemotherapy were nausea, feeling sluggish, weight loss, vomiting, and taste change. The frequently reported symptoms by those on radiotherapy were feeling sluggish, weight loss, loss of appetite, difficult sleeping, and changing taste. The symptoms of loss of appetite, feeling sluggish, weight loss, hair loss, and nausea were both frequently reported by those on radiotherapy and those on chemotherapy. Conclusion Symptom monitoring may be facilitated by TRSC, based on the severity and frequency of reported symptoms, more patients and caregivers could know which symptoms should be preferential interventions.

  13. CEA monitoring of palliative treatment for colorectal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, M A; Chu, T M; Holyoke, E D; Mittelman, A

    1977-01-01

    Palliative treatment was applied to 131 cases of unresectable or palliatively resected colorectal carcinoma being monitored with serial CEA determinations. There were 84 instances of disease progression with 67 (80%) of them showing an increase in CEA above pretreatment levels or maintaining high levels, and 17 (20%) showing a fall when compared to pretreatment values or maintaining low initial values. There was a clear-cut regression of the disease in only 9 instances. In all 9, the CEA clearly dropped or maintained low valles throughout the period of regression. No patient in regression had a rise or maintained an elevated CEA level. These changes in CEA followed closely the clinical response of our patient to the use of a particular agent, although for the Nitrosourea compounds there may be a tendency to lower the CEA regardless of the patient's tumor response to the drug. This could be due to the fact that the Nitrosoureas produce a diffuse block of cellular activity, both at the nucleous and cytoplasm; while other compounds act as alkylating agents or by inhibition of enzymes involved in the metabolism of nucleic acids (i.e., 5-FU inhibiting thymidylate synthetase). In general, longer survival was found in those patients who had initially lower levels of CEA as compared to those with high initial levels. The patients with a favorable CEA response to the treatment (falling CEA or maintained low value), even in many who did not show a clinical response had a longer survival than the group with rising or stable high levels. The main value in CEA monitoring of patients resides in its correlation with the amount of disease present and then its ability to detect progression of tumor mass which is not clinically measurable. PMID:64132

  14. Response comparative study of Rn-222 alpha particles track monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Osvaldo Luiz dos Santos

    2010-01-01

    This work was a comparative study between the responses of three monitors, the NRPB, an acrylic monitor (in thin film geometry) and the aluminum monitor (also thin film geometry) in controlled and mixed environment. The experiments consisted on placing the monitors in a plastic tube, with a radio-226 source internal. Only internal CR-39 plastic detectors were analyzed in this work. It was found that the monitors in thin film geometry had activities response of approximately 15% less than the NRPB monitors. All monitors responded the same way when in controlled environment. Related to the type of material, conductive plastic or dielectric (insulator) plastic, the NRPB, in environments without ventilation, responded in the same way. (author)

  15. Monitoring and treatment of acute gastrointestinal bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenjani, Basri; Zeka, Sadik; Krasniqi, Salih; Bunjaku, Ilaz; Jakupi, Arianit; Elshani, Besni; Xhafa, Agim

    2012-01-01

    Acute gastrointestinal bleeding-massive acute bleeding from gastrointestinal section is one of the most frequent forms of acute abdomen. The mortality degree in emergency surgery is about 10%. It's very difficult to identify the place of bleeding and etiology. The important purpose of this research is to present the cases of acute gastrointestinal bleeding from the patients which were monitored and treated at The University Clinical Center of Kosova-Emergency Center in Pristina. These inquests included 137 patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding who were treated in emergency center of The University Clinical Center in Pristina for the period from January 2005 until December 2006. From 137 patients with acute gastrointestinal bleeding 41% or 29% was female and 96% or 70.1% male. Following the sex we gained a high significant difference of statistics (p < 0.01). The gastrointestinal bleeding was two times more frequent in male than in female. Also in the age-group we had a high significant difference of statistics (p < 0.01) 63.5% of patients were over 55 years old. The mean age of patients with an acute gastrointestinal bleeding was 58.4 years SD 15.8 age. The mean age for female patients was 56.4 age SD 18.5 age. The patients with arterial systolic pressure under 100 mmHg have been classified as patients with hypovolemic shock. They participate with 17.5% in all prevalence of acute gastrointestinal bleeding. From the number of prevalence 2 {1.5%} patients have been diagnosed with peptic ulcer, 1 {0.7%} as gastric perforation and 1 {0.7%} with intestine ischemia. Abdominal Surgery and Intensive Care 2 or 1.5% died, 1 at intensive care unit and 1 at nephrology. As we know the severe condition of the patients with gastrointestinal bleeding and etiology it is very difficult to establish, we need to improve for the better conditions in our emergency center for treatment and initiation base of clinic criteria.

  16. Reliability updating based on monitoring of structural response parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leira, B.J.

    2016-01-01

    Short- and long-term aspects of measuring structural response parameters are addressed. Two specific examples of such measurements are considered for the purpose of illustration and in order to focus the discussion. These examples are taken from the petroleum industry (monitoring of riser response) and from the shipping industry (monitoring of ice-induced strains in a ship hull). Similarities and differences between the two cases are elaborated with respect to which are the most relevant mechanical limit states. Furthermore, main concerns related to reliability levels within a short-term versus long-term time horizon are highlighted. Quantifying the economic benefits of applying monitoring systems is also addressed. - Highlights: • Two examples of structural response monitoring are described. • Application of measurements is discussed in relation to updating of load and structural parameters. • Quantification of the value of response monitoring is made for both of the examples.

  17. How to study optimal timing of PET/CT for monitoring of cancer treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vach, Werner; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming; Fischer, Barbara Malene Bjerregaard

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The use of PET/CT for monitoring treatment response in cancer patients after chemo- or radiotherapy is a very promising approach to optimize cancer treatment. However, the timing of the PET/CT-based evaluation of reduction in viable tumor tissue is a crucial question. We investigated how...

  18. Monitoring adaptive genetic responses to environmental change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, M.M.; Olivieri, I.; Waller, D.M.

    2012-01-01

    Widespread environmental changes including climate change, selective harvesting and landscape alterations now greatly affect selection regimes for most organisms. How animals and plants can adapt to these altered environments via contemporary evolution is thus of strong interest. We discuss how...... for selection and establishing clear links between genetic and environmental change. We then review a few exemplary studies that explore adaptive responses to climate change in Drosophila, selective responses to hunting and fishing, and contemporary evolution in Daphnia using resurrected resting eggs. We...

  19. Interferon treatment of neuroendocrine tumour xenografts as monitored by MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elvin, A.; Oeberg, K.; Lindgren, P.G.; Lundkvist, M.; Wilander, E.; Ericsson, A.; Hemmingsson, A.

    1994-01-01

    The neuroendocrine-differentiated colonic carcinoma cell line (LCC-18) was transplanted to 29 nude mice (Balb/c). The purpose of the present study was to establish an animal model that would allow monitoring with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of changes induced by interferon (IFN) therapy and to evaluate whether the therapeutic response, as expressed by changes in MR signal characteristics and tumour proliferative activity, could be modulated by different IFN dosages. IFN did not seem to have any obvious antiproliferative effect on the LCC-18 tumour cell line transplanted to nude mice and no convincing treatment-related changes in rho values or T1 and T2 relaxation values were observed. The animal model was probably unsuitable for demonstration of IFN effects. (orig.)

  20. Sensor response time monitoring using noise analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hashemian, H.M.; Thie, J.A.; Upadhyaya, B.R.; Holbert, K.E.

    1988-01-01

    Random noise techniques in nuclear power plants have been developed for system surveillance and for analysis of reactor core dynamics. The noise signals also contain information about sensor dynamics, and this can be extracted using frequency, amplitude and time domain analyses. Even though noise analysis has been used for sensor response time testing in some nuclear power plants, an adequate validation of this method has never been carried out. This paper presents the results of limited work recently performed to examine the validity of the noise analysis for sensor response time testing in nuclear power plants. The conclusion is that noise analysis has the potential for detecting gross changes in sensor response but it cannot be used for reliable measurement of response time until more laboratory and field experience is accumulated. The method is more advantageous for testing pressure sensors than it is for temperature sensors. This is because: 1) for temperature sensors, a method called Loop Current Step Response test is available which is quantitatively more exact than noise analysis, 2) no method currently exists for on-line testing of pressure transmitters other than the Power-Interrupt test which is applicable only to force balance pressure transmitters, and 3) pressure sensor response time is affected by sensing line degradation which is inherently taken into account by testing with noise analysis. (author)

  1. Post decommissioning monitoring of uranium mines; a watershed monitoring program based on biological response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russel, C.; Coggan, A.; Ludgate, I.

    2006-01-01

    Rio Algom Limited and Denison Mines own and operated uranium mines in the Elliot Lake area. The mines operated from the late 1950's to the mid 1960's and again for the early 1970's to the 1990's when the mines ceased operations. There are eleven decommissioned mines in the Serpent River watershed. At the time of decommissioning each mine had it's own monitoring program, which had evolved over the operating life of the mine and did not necessarily reflect the objectives associated with the monitoring of decommissioned sites. In order to assess the effectiveness of the decommissioning plans and monitoring the cumulative effects within the watershed, a single watershed monitoring program was developed in 1999: the Serpent River Watershed Monitoring Program which focused on water and sediment quality within the watershed and response of the biological community over time. In order to address other 'source area' monitoring, three complimentary objective-focused programs were developed 1) the In- Basin Monitoring Program, 2) the Source Area Monitoring Program and 3) the TMA Operational Monitoring Program. Through development this program framework and monitoring programs that were objective- focused, more meaningful data has been provided while providing a significant reduction in the cost of monitoring. These programs allow for the reduction in scope over time in response to improvement in the watershed. This talk will describe the development of these programs, their implementation and effectiveness. (author)

  2. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Phased Response Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.A.; Bowman, D.R.

    1999-01-01

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to the Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or state request when a major radiological emergency is anticipated of has occurred. The FRMAC becomes a coalition of federal off-site monitoring and assessment activities to assist the LFA, state(s), local, and tribal authorities. State, local, and tribal authorities are invited to co-locate and prioritize monitoring and assessment efforts in the FRMAC. The Department of Energy is tasked by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate the FRMAC

  3. Measuring Emotional Responses to TV Commercials: The Warmth Monitor Modernized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Roy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently there has been a lot of interest in measuring emotional responses to advertising. This study focuses on the measurement of a specific emotional response to television advertising; warmth. Nearly thirty years ago, (Aaker, Stayman and Hagerty, 1986 developed a procedure they called the Warmth Monitor; “paper and pencil” self-report process recording method. The Warmth Monitor has been used in a large number of empirical studies in marketing since, but the most recent versions of the procedure are computerized. The two methods of administering the Warmth Monitor are compared in this research.

  4. Treatment response in HCV related chronic hepatitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hussain, A.B.; Hussain, T.; Hussain, S.; Masood, A.; Kazmi, Y.; Tariq, W.Z.; Karamat, K.A.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the virological response to treatment with interferon and ribavirin in-patients with hepatitis C related liver disease. Material and Methods: Two hundred seventy-nine patients were included in the study. These patients had taken interferon and ribavirin treatment for HCV related chronic hepatitis, and were referred to AFIP for HCV RNA testing by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) between January 2002 and September 2002. Out of 279 cases, 229 had taken the treatment for 06 or 12 months and were tested for end-of-treatment response (ETR). Fifty patients had completed there treatment regimens of 6 or 12 months treatment, at least 24 weeks before their PCR test and were having follow-up testing for sustained viral response (SVR). The sera of these patients were tested for HCV RNA by PCR, using a commercial kit of Amplicor (Roche) for qualitative detection of HCV RNA. Results: Out of 229 cases tested for end-of-treatment response, 198 (86.5%) had no detectable HCV RNA (responders) and 31 (13.50%) were PCR positive (non-responders). Thirty-eight out of 50 cases, tested for a sustained viral response, had a negative result for HCV PCR thus showing sustained response rate of 76%. Conclusion: The viral remission/response to interferon and ribavirin combination therapy in our patients was better than that quoted in other regions. (author)

  5. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedele, F; Coleman, A J; Thomas, K; Ryves, S; Phillips, D; Leighton, T G

    2011-01-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p < 0.001). This suggests that the system could be used in pre-assessment; indicating if the stone is susceptible to ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  6. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedele, F; Coleman, A J [Medical Physics Department, Guy' s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Westminster Bridge Road, SE1 7EH, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, K; Ryves, S; Phillips, D [Urology Department, Guy' s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Great Maze Pond, SE1 9RT, London (United Kingdom); Leighton, T G, E-mail: fiammetta.fedele@gstt.nhs.uk [Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Highfield, S017 1BJ, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p < 0.001). This suggests that the system could be used in pre-assessment; indicating if the stone is susceptible to ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  7. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedele, F.; Thomas, K.; Leighton, T. G.; Ryves, S.; Phillips, D.; Coleman, A. J.

    2011-02-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  8. A passive acoustic monitor of treatment effectiveness during extracorporeal lithotripsy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fedele, F; Coleman, A J [Medical Physics Department, Guy' s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Westminster Bridge Road, SE1 7EH, London (United Kingdom); Thomas, K; Ryves, S; Phillips, D [Urology Department, Guy' s and St Thomas NHS Foundation Trust, Great Maze Pond, SE1 9RT, London (United Kingdom); Leighton, T G, E-mail: fiammetta.fedele@gstt.nhs.uk [Institute of Sound and Vibration Research, University of Southampton, Highfield, S017 1BJ, Southampton (United Kingdom)

    2011-02-01

    Although extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL) has now been in the clinic for at least three decades, there has been little advance in efforts (i) to estimate the efficacy of the treatment whilst it is in progress, or (ii) to determine the end-point of a treatment session in terms of the degree of stone fragmentation achieved. Previous in vitro experimentation and clinical trials have shown that a passive acoustic monitor has the potential to provide evidence of the effectiveness and end-point of lithotripsy. The system exploits secondary emissions generated during shock-tissue interaction, whose features depend on the quality of tissue at the beam focus. This prototype was developed into the first commercially available clinical ESWL treatment monitor (Precision Acoustic Ltd, Dorchester, UK), and a unit has been acquired and tested in the clinical routine by urologists at Guy's and St Thomas NHS Trust in March 2009. This paper critically assesses the performance of the new system for the first 25 treatments monitored. The ESWL monitor correctly predicted the treatment outcome of 15 of the 18 treatments that were followed-up clinically. In addition, it was noted that the measure of treatment effectiveness provided by the monitor after 500 shocks was predictive of the final treatment outcome (p < 0.001). This suggests that the system could be used in pre-assessment; indicating if the stone is susceptible to ESWL or if the patient should be sent for surgery.

  9. Response of a neutron monitor area with TLDs pairs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman G, K. A.; Borja H, C. G.; Valero L, C.; Hernandez D, V. M.; Vega C, H. R. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Calle Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Gallego, E.; Lorente, A., E-mail: ing_karen_guzman@yahoo.com.mx [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid, Departamento de Ingenieria Nuclear, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, E-28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-10-15

    The response of a passive neutron monitor area has been calculated using the Monte Carlo code MCNP5. The response was the amount of n({sup 6}Li, T){alpha} reactions occurring in a TLD-600 located at the center of a cylindrical polyethylene moderator. Fluence, (n, a) and H*(10) responses were calculated for 47 monoenergetic neutron sources. The H*(10) relative response was compared with responses of commercially available neutron monitors being alike. Due to {sup 6}Li cross section (n, {alpha}) reactions are mainly produced by thermal neutrons, however TLD-600 is sensitive to gamma-rays; to eliminate the signal due to photons monitor area was built to hold 2 pairs of TLD-600 and 2 pairs of TLD-700, thus from the difference between TLD-600 and TLD-700 readouts the net signal due to neutrons is obtained. The monitor area was calibrated at the Universidad Politecnica de Madrid using a {sup 241}AmBe neutron source; net TLD readout was compared with the H*(10) measured with a Bert hold Lb-6411. Performance of the neutron monitor area was determined through two independent experiments, in both cases the H*(10) was statistically equal to H*(10) measured with a Bert hold Lb-6411. Neutron monitor area with TLDs pairs can be used in working areas with intense, mixed and pulsed radiation fields. (Author)

  10. Establishing a mobile automatic monitoring station for emergency response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fang, Hsin-Fa

    2008-01-01

    Full text: A radiological/nuclear emergency event may cause environmental contamination. The emergency response works always need to plan an environmental survey programme incorporating the assessment results to see what is happening. The places where are assessed to have the highest radioactive contamination/radiation dose will catch more concern and need continuous monitoring. It will cause unnecessary dangers and dose to command that personnel conduct surveying in such places when the radiological/nuclear accident become more severe. A mobile automatic monitoring station has been established for emergency response by INER (Institute of Nuclear Energy Research) to solve the problem practically. The monitoring station involves a HPIC to monitor radiation dose, an anemometer to monitor wind speed and direction, a GPS to get position data, a GPRS/3G communication module to send monitoring and positioning data to the monitoring centre where can show the monitoring result directly on a map shown on the computer. These instruments are integrated in a trailer easy to be towed to the place need to be monitored. The electric power of the station is supplied by s a solar power energy system. It can supply the station working at least 10 days without extra electric power supply designed based on the expected time length of a nuclear power plant event. The HPIC is very sensitive and stable that can discriminate a 10 nSv/hr increasing of dose rate with the monitoring time period every ten seconds. Where the radiological dispersion device events happened is not predictable, it is difficult to get suitable wind monitoring data to assess the result of radiological dispersion device events. The anemometer added on the station can provide the real time wind monitoring data to help assessment works. (author)

  11. Assays for predicting and monitoring responses to lung cancer immunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Teixidó, Cristina; Karachaliou, Niki; González-Cao, Maria; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Rosell, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Immunotherapy has become a key strategy for cancer treatment, and two immune checkpoints, namely, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) and its ligand (PD-L1), have recently emerged as important targets. The interaction blockade of PD-1 and PD-L1 demonstrated promising activity and antitumor efficacy in early phase clinical trials for advanced solid tumors such as non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Many cell types in multiple tissues express PD-L1 as well as several tumor types, thereby suggesting that the ligand may play important roles in inhibiting immune responses throughout the body. Therefore, PD-L1 is a critical immunomodulating component within the lung microenvironment, but the correlation between PD-L1 expression and prognosis is controversial. More evidence is required to support the use of PD-L1 as a potential predictive biomarker. Clinical trials have measured PD-L1 in tumor tissues by immunohistochemistry (IHC) with different antibodies, but the assessment of PD-L1 is not yet standardized. Some commercial antibodies lack specificity and their reproducibility has not been fully evaluated. Further studies are required to clarify the optimal IHC assay as well as to predict and monitor the immune responses of the PD-1/PD-L1 pathway

  12. Energy response of neutron area monitor with silicon semiconductor detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitaguchi, Hiroshi; Izumi, Sigeru; Kobayashi, Kaoru; Kaihara, Akihisa; Nakamura, Takashi.

    1993-01-01

    A prototype neutron area monitor with a silicon semiconductor detector has been developed which has the energy response of 1 cm dose equivalent recommended by the ICRP-26. Boron and proton radiators are coated on the surface of the silicon semiconductor detector. The detector is set at the center of a cylindrical polyethylene moderator. This moderator is covered by a porous cadmium board which serves as the thermal neutron absorber. Neutrons are detected as α-particles generated by the nuclear reaction 10 B(n,α) 7 Li and as recoil protons generated by the interaction of fast neutrons with hydrogen. The neutron energy response of the monitor was measured using thermal neutrons and monoenergetic fast neutrons generated by an accelerator. The response was consistent with the 1 cm dose equivalent response required for the monitor within ±34% in the range of 0.025 - 15 Mev. (author)

  13. Breast cysts in adolescents - diagnostics, monitoring, treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakubowska, A; Brzewski, M [Department of Paediatric Radiology of the Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland); Grajewska-Ferens, M [Department of Paediatrics and Endocrinology of the Medical University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland)

    2011-07-01

    Background: The aim of the paper was the US evaluation of hormonal disorders and treatment results in adolescent girls and boys with breast cysts. Material/Methods: In the years 2001 - 2009, US examination of the breast was performed in 427 children aged 10 - 18 years, with clinically suspected breast pathologies. The indications for US examination typically included pain, breast swelling and a palpable tumor. The US examination was performed using a 7 - 12 MHz linear transducer. Results: Breast cysts were found in 42 children: 36 adolescent girls and 6 boys with gynaecomastia. Infected cysts were found in 35 children. The cysts ranged in size from 5 mm to 30 mm. In 5 of the girls, large cysts were treated by an incision and drainage, and in all the children with infected cysts, antibiotic therapy was used. Hormonal disorders were found in 30 girls. A follow-up examination was performed, and the observation time varied from 1/12 to 2 years. The cysts disappeared completely in 30 children. Hormonal therapy was introduced in 5 girls. Conclusions: Breast cysts found in US examinations are indications for check-up examinations including endocrinological diagnostics and, if the cyst is persistent, possibly for hormonal treatment. (authors)

  14. Integrating Social Media Monitoring Into Public Health Emergency Response Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadi, Tamer A; Fleshler, Keren

    2016-10-01

    Social media monitoring for public health emergency response and recovery is an essential response capability for any health department. The value of social media for emergency response lies not only in the capacity to rapidly communicate official and critical incident information, but as a rich source of incoming data that can be gathered to inform leadership decision-making. Social media monitoring is a function that can be formally integrated into the Incident Command System of any response agency. The approach to planning and required resources, such as staffing, logistics, and technology, is flexible and adaptable based on the needs of the agency and size and scope of the emergency. The New York City Department of Health and Mental Hygiene has successfully used its Social Media Monitoring Team during public health emergency responses and planned events including major Ebola and Legionnaires' disease responses. The concepts and implementations described can be applied by any agency, large or small, interested in building a social media monitoring capacity. (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;page 1 of 6).

  15. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center: Phase I Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riland, C.; Bowman, D.R.; Lambert, R.; Tighe, R.

    1999-01-01

    A Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is established in response to a Lead Federal Agency (LFA) or State request when a radiological emergency is anticipated or has occurred. The FRMAC coordinates the off-site monitoring, assessment, and analysis activities during such an emergency. The FRMAC response is divided into three phases. FRMAC Phase 1 is a rapid, initial-response capability that can interface with Federal or State officials and is designed for a quick response time and rapid radiological data collection and assessment. FRMAC Phase 1 products provide an initial characterization of the radiological situation and information on early health effects to officials responsible for making and implementing protective action decisions

  16. Laboratory tools for diagnosis and monitoring response in patients with chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tohami, Tali; Nagler, Arnon; Amariglio, Ninette

    2012-08-01

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal hematological disease that represents 15-20% of all adult leukemia cases. The study and treatment of CML has contributed pivotal advances to translational medicine and cancer therapy. The discovery that a single chromosomal abnormality, the Philadelphia (Ph) chromosome, is responsible for the etiology of this disease was a milestone for treating and understanding CML. Subsequently, CML became the first disease for which allogeneic bone marrow transplantation is the treatment of choice. Currently, CML is one of the few diseases where treatment targeted against the chromosomal abnormality is the sole frontline therapy for newly diagnosed patients. The use of directed therapy for CML challenged disease monitoring during treatment and led to the development of definitions that document response and predict relapse sooner than the former routine methods. These methods relied on classical cytogenetics through molecular cytogenetics (FISH) and, finally, on molecular monitoring assays. This review discusses the laboratory tools used for diagnosing CML, for monitoring during treatment, and for assessing remission or relapse. The advantages and disadvantages of each test, the common definition of response levels, and the efforts to standardize molecular monitoring for CML patient management are discussed.

  17. Daily Spiritual Experiences and Adolescent Treatment Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    LEE, MATTHEW T.; VETA, PAIGE S.; JOHNSON, BYRON R.; PAGANO, MARIA E.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore changes in belief orientation during treatment and the impact of increased daily spiritual experiences (DSE) on adolescent treatment response. One-hundred ninety-five adolescents court-referred to a 2-month residential treatment program were assessed at intake and discharge. Forty percent of youth who entered treatment as agnostic or atheist identified themselves as spiritual or religious at discharge. Increased DSE was associated with greater likelihood of abstinence, increased prosocial behaviors, and reduced narcissistic behaviors. Results indicate a shift in DSE that improves youth self-care and care for others that may inform intervention approaches for adolescents with addiction. PMID:25525291

  18. Daily Spiritual Experiences and Adolescent Treatment Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Matthew T; Veta, Paige S; Johnson, Byron R; Pagano, Maria E

    2014-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore changes in belief orientation during treatment and the impact of increased daily spiritual experiences (DSE) on adolescent treatment response. One-hundred ninety-five adolescents court-referred to a 2-month residential treatment program were assessed at intake and discharge. Forty percent of youth who entered treatment as agnostic or atheist identified themselves as spiritual or religious at discharge. Increased DSE was associated with greater likelihood of abstinence, increased prosocial behaviors, and reduced narcissistic behaviors. Results indicate a shift in DSE that improves youth self-care and care for others that may inform intervention approaches for adolescents with addiction.

  19. Response of radiation monitors for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grecco, Claudio Henrique dos Santos

    2001-01-01

    Radiation monitors are used all over the world to evaluate if places with presence of ionising radiation present safe conditions for people. Radiation monitors should be tested according to international or national standards in order to be qualified for use. This work describes a methodology and procedures to evaluate the energy and angular responses of any radiation monitor for ambient dose equivalent, H*(10), according to the recommendations of ISO and IEC standards. The methodology and the procedures were applied to the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026, developed by the Instituto em Engenharia Nuclear (IEN), to evaluate and to adjust its response for H*(10), characterizing it as an ambient dose equivalent meter. The tests were performed at the Laboratorio Nacional de Metrologia das Radiacoes Ionizantes (LNMRI), at Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD), and results showed that the Monitor Inteligente de Radiacao MIR 7026 can be used as an EI*(10) meter, in accordance to the IEC 60846 standard requirements. The overall estimated uncertainty for the determination of the MIR 7026 response, in all radiation qualities used in this work, was 4,5 % to a 95 % confidence limit. (author)

  20. Monitoring Immune Responses in Organ Recipients by Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Mukhalafi Zuha

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Allograft rejection remains a major barrier to successful organ transplan-tation. Cellular and humoral immune responses play a critical role in mediating graft rejection. During the last few years, monoclonal antibodies have been used as a new specific therapeutic approach in the prevention of allograft rejection. Recently, the technology of flow cytometry has become a useful tool for monitoring immunological responses in transplant recipients. The application of this valuable tool in clinical transplantation at the present time is aimed at, i determining the extent of immuno-suppressive therapy through T-cell receptor analysis of cellular components, ii monitoring levels of alloreactive antibodies to identify high-risk recipients (sensitized patients in the pre-operative period and iii to predict rejection by monitoring their development post-operatively. In future, further development of this technology may demonstrate greater benefit to the field of organ transplantation.

  1. Emergency response and radiation monitoring systems in Russian regions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunyan, R.; Osipiyants, I.; Kiselev, V.; Ogar, K; Gavrilov, S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Preparedness of the emergency response system to elimination of radiation incidents and accidents is one of the most important elements of ensuring safe operation of nuclear power facilities. Routine activities on prevention of emergency situations along with adequate, efficient and opportune response actions are the key factors reducing the risks of adverse effects on population and environment. Both high engineering level and multiformity of the nuclear branch facilities make special demands on establishment of response system activities to eventual emergency situations. First and foremost, while resolving sophisticated engineering and scientific problems emerging during the emergency response process, one needs a powerful scientific and technical support system.The emergency response system established in the past decade in Russian nuclear branch provides a high efficiency of response activities due to the use of scientific and engineering potential and experience of the involved institutions. In Russia the responsibility for population protection is imposed on regional authority. So regional emergence response system should include up-to-date tools of radiation monitoring and infrastructure. That's why new activities on development of radiation monitoring and emergency response system were started in the regions of Russia. The main directions of these activities are: 1) Modernization of the existing and setting-up new facility and territorial automatic radiation monitoring systems, including mobile radiation surveillance kits; 2) Establishment of the Regional Crisis Centres and Crisis Centres of nuclear and radiation hazardous facilities; 3) Setting up communication systems for transfer, acquisition, processing, storage and presentation of data for participants of emergency response at the facility, regional and federal levels; 4) Development of software and hardware systems for expert support of decision-making on protection of personnel, population

  2. Prediction of treatment response to adalimumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krintel, S B; Dehlendorff, C; Hetland, M L

    2016-01-01

    At least 30% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) do not respond to biologic agents, which emphasizes the need of predictive biomarkers. We aimed to identify microRNAs (miRNAs) predictive of response to adalimumab in 180 treatment-naïve RA patients enrolled in the OPtimized treatment algori...... of low expression of miR-22 and high expression of miR-886.3p was associated with EULAR good response. Future studies to assess the utility of these miRNAs as predictive biomarkers are needed.The Pharmacogenomics Journal advance online publication, 5 May 2015; doi:10.1038/tpj.2015.30....

  3. 7 CFR 305.3 - Monitoring and certification of treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... inspector or an official from the national plant protection organization (NPPO) of the exporting country. If... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Monitoring and certification of treatments. 305.3 Section 305.3 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH...

  4. Effluent treatment efficiency and compliance monitoring in Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effectiveness of effluent treatment at the Eleme Petrochemical Industry, Port Harcourt, Nigeria was monitored weekly for six weeks to assess their level of compliance with the Directorate of Petroleum Resources (DPR) guidelines and standards for environmental safety. Effluent samples were taken from the untreated ...

  5. PERMEABLE TREATMENT WALL EFFECTIVENESS MONITORING PROJECT, NEVADA STEWART MINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This report summarizes the results of Mine Waste Technology Program (MWTP) Activity III, Project 39, Permeable Treatment Wall Effectiveness Monitoring Project, implemented and funded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and jointly administered by EPA and the U.S. De...

  6. Compliance to HIV treatment monitoring guidelines can reduce ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Panel tests are a predetermined group of tests commonly requested together to provide a comprehensive and conclusive diagnosis, for example, liver function test (LFT). South African HIV antiretroviral treatment (ART) guidelines recommend individual tests for toxicity monitoring over panel tests. In 2008, the ...

  7. Neutronic analysis of JET external neutron monitor response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoj, Luka, E-mail: luka.snoj@ijs.si [Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Lengar, Igor; Čufar, Aljaž [Reactor Physics Division, Jožef Stefan Institute, Jamova cesta 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Syme, Brian; Popovichev, Sergey [Culham Centre for Fusion Energy, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, OX14 3DB, United Kingdom (United Kingdom); Batistoni, Paola [ENEA C. R. Frascati, via E. Fermi 45, 00044 Frascati, Roma (Italy); Conroy, Sean [VR Association, Uppsala University, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PO Box 516, SE-75120 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2016-11-01

    Highlights: • We model JET tokamak containing JET remote handling system. • We investigate effect of remote handling system on external neutron monitor response. • Remote handling system correction factors are calculated. • Integral correction factors are relatively small, i.e up to 8%. - Abstract: The power output of fusion devices is measured in terms of the neutron yield which relates directly to the fusion yield. JET made a transition from Carbon wall to ITER-Like Wall (Beryllium/Tungsten/Carbon) during 2010–11. Absolutely calibrated measurement of the neutron yield by JET neutron monitors was ensured by direct measurements using a calibrated {sup 252}Cf neutron source (NS) deployed by the in-vessel remote handling system (RHS) inside the JET vacuum vessel. Neutronic calculations were required in order to understand the neutron transport from the source in the vacuum vessel to the fission chamber detectors mounted outside the vessel on the transformer limbs of the tokamak. We developed a simplified computational model of JET and the JET RHS in Monte Carlo neutron transport code MCNP and analyzed the paths and structures through which neutrons reach the detectors and the effect of the JET RHS on the neutron monitor response. In addition we performed several sensitivity studies of the effect of substantial massive structures blocking the ports on the external neutron monitor response. As the simplified model provided a qualitative picture of the process only, some calculations were repeated using a more detailed full 3D model of the JET tokamak.

  8. Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Services in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Han, X.; Zhou, Y.; Yue, P.; Wang, X.; Lu, J.; Jiang, W.; Li, J.; Tang, H.; Wang, F.; Li, X.; Fan, J.

    2018-04-01

    The Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Service(DIMERS) project was kicked off in 2017 in China, with the purpose to improve timely responsive service of the institutions involved in the management of natural disasters and man-made emergency situations with the timely and high-quality products derived from Space-based, Air-based and the in-situ Earth observation. The project team brought together a group of top universities and research institutions in the field of Earth observations as well as the operational institute in typical disaster services at national level. The project will bridge the scientific research and the response services of massive catastrophe in order to improve the emergency response capability of China and provide scientific and technological support for the implementation of the national emergency response strategy. In response to the call for proposal of "Earth Observation and Navigation" of 2017 National Key R&D Program of China, Professor Wu Jianjun, the deputy chairman of Faculty of Geographical Science of Beijing Normal University, submitted the Disaster Monitoring and Emergency Response Service (DIMERS) project, jointly with the experts and scholars from Institute of Remote Sensing and Digital Earth, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Wuhan University, China Institute of Earthquake Forecasting of China Earthquake Administration and China Institute of Water Resources and Hydropower Science. After two round evaluations, the proposal was funded by Ministry of Science and Technology of China.

  9. Cryosurgery treatment of actinic keratoses monitored by optical coherence tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Themstrup, L.; Banzhaf, C.; Jemec, G.B.E.

    2013-01-01

    the tissue is exposed to the effects of cryotherapy. Methods: Normal ex vivo skin and in vivo AK lesions were examined. Cryotherapy was applied and OCT images were acquired at defined time points. OCT morphology was described. Results: Cryotherapy treatment produced an opaque iceball, and freezing depth...... could not be monitored by OCT. Vesicle formation after cryotherapy could be identified in OCT images. In ex vivo skin no vesicle formation occurred. Conclusion: OCT cannot monitor the freezing depth, but OCT was able to visualise AK lesions and vesicle formation shortly after cryotherapy. Results add...

  10. Psychobiologic correlates of treatment response in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, J A; Alvir, J M; Koreen, A; Geisler, S; Chakos, M; Sheitman, B; Woerner, M

    1996-03-01

    In studies conducted on largely treatment naive patients in their first episode of psychosis, we have found that treatment outcome is quite good and that most patients recover or at least achieve a substantial degree of symptom remission. However, over the course of their illness and in the context of subsequent psychotic episodes, they may experience some decrease in their treatment response from illness progression. In addition, the heterogeneity of treatment outcome is associated with specific clinical (gender, primary negative symptoms of the deficit state, duration of psychosis) and biological variables (pHVA, ventricular volume). It is unclear whether these variables represent aspects of discrete subtypes of schizophrenia or dimensional measures of pathology within the broad context of a unitary disease entity.

  11. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center. The analytical response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, E.C.

    2005-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local governments, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FRMAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant from the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. Emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FRMAC operations are discussed. (author)

  12. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center Analytical Response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nielsen, E.C.

    2003-01-01

    The Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FR-MAC) is authorized by the Federal Radiological Emergency Response Plan to coordinate all off-site radiological response assistance to state and local government s, in the event of a major radiological emergency in the United States. The FR-MAC is established by the U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration, to coordinate all Federal assets involved in conducting a comprehensive program of radiological environmental monitoring, sampling, radioanalysis, quality assurance, and dose assessment. During an emergency response, the initial analytical data is provided by portable field instrumentation. As incident responders scale up their response based on the seriousness of the incident, local analytical assets and mobile laboratories add additional capability and capacity. During the intermediate phase of the response, data quality objectives and measurement quality objectives are more rigorous. These higher objectives will require the use of larger laboratories, with greater capacity and enhanced capabilities. These labs may be geographically distant FR-om the incident, which will increase sample management challenges. This paper addresses emergency radioanalytical capability and capacity and its utilization during FR-MAC operations

  13. Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis treatment failure detection depends on monitoring interval and microbiological method

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Richard A.; Lu, Chunling; Rodriguez, Carly A.; Bayona, Jaime; Becerra, Mercedes C.; Burgos, Marcos; Centis, Rosella; Cohen, Theodore; Cox, Helen; D'Ambrosio, Lia; Danilovitz, Manfred; Falzon, Dennis; Gelmanova, Irina Y.; Gler, Maria T.; Grinsdale, Jennifer A.; Holtz, Timothy H.; Keshavjee, Salmaan; Leimane, Vaira; Menzies, Dick; Milstein, Meredith B.; Mishustin, Sergey P.; Pagano, Marcello; Quelapio, Maria I.; Shean, Karen; Shin, Sonya S.; Tolman, Arielle W.; van der Walt, Martha L.; Van Deun, Armand; Viiklepp, Piret

    2016-01-01

    Debate persists about monitoring method (culture or smear) and interval (monthly or less frequently) during treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). We analysed existing data and estimated the effect of monitoring strategies on timing of failure detection. We identified studies reporting microbiological response to MDR-TB treatment and solicited individual patient data from authors. Frailty survival models were used to estimate pooled relative risk of failure detection in the last 12 months of treatment; hazard of failure using monthly culture was the reference. Data were obtained for 5410 patients across 12 observational studies. During the last 12 months of treatment, failure detection occurred in a median of 3 months by monthly culture; failure detection was delayed by 2, 7, and 9 months relying on bimonthly culture, monthly smear and bimonthly smear, respectively. Risk (95% CI) of failure detection delay resulting from monthly smear relative to culture is 0.38 (0.34–0.42) for all patients and 0.33 (0.25–0.42) for HIV-co-infected patients. Failure detection is delayed by reducing the sensitivity and frequency of the monitoring method. Monthly monitoring of sputum cultures from patients receiving MDR-TB treatment is recommended. Expanded laboratory capacity is needed for high-quality culture, and for smear microscopy and rapid molecular tests. PMID:27587552

  14. Response Monitoring and Adjustment: Differential Relations with Psychopathic Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresin, Konrad; Finy, M. Sima; Sprague, Jenessa; Verona, Edelyn

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the relation between psychopathy and cognitive functioning often show mixed results, partially because different factors of psychopathy have not been considered fully. Based on previous research, we predicted divergent results based on a two-factor model of psychopathy (interpersonal-affective traits and impulsive-antisocial traits). Specifically, we predicted that the unique variance of interpersonal-affective traits would be related to increased monitoring (i.e., error-related negativity) and adjusting to errors (i.e., post-error slowing), whereas impulsive-antisocial traits would be related to reductions in these processes. Three studies using a diverse selection of assessment tools, samples, and methods are presented to identify response monitoring correlates of the two main factors of psychopathy. In Studies 1 (undergraduates), 2 (adolescents), and 3 (offenders), interpersonal-affective traits were related to increased adjustment following errors and, in Study 3, to enhanced monitoring of errors. Impulsive-antisocial traits were not consistently related to error adjustment across the studies, although these traits were related to a deficient monitoring of errors in Study 3. The results may help explain previous mixed findings and advance implications for etiological models of psychopathy. PMID:24933282

  15. Stream periphyton responses to mesocosm treatments of ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    A stream mesocosm experiment was designed to compare biotic responses among streams exposed to an equal excess specific conductivity target of 850 µS/cm relative to a control that was set for 200 µS/cm and three treatments comprised of different major ion contents. Each treatment and the control was replicated 4 times at the mesocosm scale (16 mesocosms total). The treatments were based on dosing the background mesocosm water, a continuous flow-through mixture of natural river water and reverse osmosis treated water, with stock salt solutions prepared from 1) a mixture of sodium chloride and calcium chloride (Na/Cl chloride), 2) sodium bicarbonate, and 3) magnesium sulfate. The realized average specific conductance over the first 28d of continuous dosing was 827, 829, and 847 µS/cm, for the chloride, bicarbonate, and sulfate based treatments, respectively, and did not differ significantly. The controls averaged 183 µS/cm. Here we focus on comparing stream periphyton communities across treatments based on measurements obtained from a Pulse-Amplitude Modulated (PAM) fluorometer. The fluorometer is used in situ and with built in algorithms distributes the total aerial algal biomass (µg/cm2) of the periphyton among cyanobacteria, diatoms, and green algae. A measurement is recorded in a matter of seconds and, therefore, many different locations can be measured with in each mesocosm at a high return frequency. Eight locations within each of the 1 m2 (0.3 m W x 3

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging in monitoring of treatment of multiple sclerosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bekiesinska-Figatowska, M.; Walecki, J.; Stelmasiak, Z.

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish the value of MR in monitoring of treatment of multiple sclerosis with new drug 2-CDA and placebo. 83 patients (51 women, 32 men) were examined - 81 of them twice, 66 - three times: before and after 6 and 12 courses of treatment. Toshiba MRT50A machine was used. After the first 6 courses of treatment the number of new plaques was twice as big in placebo group than in 2-CDA group. After 12 courses it turned out that a certain inhibitory influence of 2-CDA on new plaques' appearance was more evident after 15 than 3 months after the end of its administration. This may indicate the delayed action of 2-CDA but requires further investigation. (author)

  17. Therapy of chronic hepatitis C: Virologic response monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuljić-Kapulica Nada

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Virological testing is considered to be essential in the management of hepatitis C virus (HCV infection in order to diagnose infection, and, most importantly, as a quide for treatment decisions and assess the virological response to antiviral therapy. The aim of this study was to determine the rate of a sustained virological response (SVR and various factors associated with response rates in chronic hepatitis C infected patients treated with pegiinterferon alpha (PEGINF and ribavirin (RBV combination therapy. Methods. A total of 34 patients, treated with PEG-IFN and RBV were studied. Serum HCV-RNA was measured before the treatment, 12 weeks following the start of the therapy and 6 weeks after the treatment cessation. SVR was defined as undetectable serum HCV-RNA 6 months of post-treatment follow-up, virologic relapse (VR as relapse of HCV-RNA during the post-treatment follow-up. Serum HCV-RNA was measured with the Cobas Amplicor test. Results. At the end of post-treatment follow-up 19 (55.8% patients demonstrated a SVR. The majority of the patients were genotype 1 (27, and the other were genotype 3 (5 patients and genotype 4 (2 patients. There was VR in 6 patients 6 months after the therapy. In 9 patients HCV-RNA was positive after 12 weeks. Conclusion. We demonstrated that patients with chronic HCV infection can be successfully treated with combination of PEG-INF and RBV. This result emphasizes also that post-treatment follow-up to identify patients with SVR or VR could be important.

  18. Monitoring anti-TNFalpha treatment in rheumatoid arthritis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, E A; Østergaard, Mikkel; Hammer, H B

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the responsiveness of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and ultrasonography (US) compared with conventional measures of disease activity and structural damage in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) during the first year of treatment with anti-tumour necrosis factor alpha...

  19. A search for solar neutron response in neutron monitor data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kudela, K.

    1990-01-01

    The search for an impulsive increase corresponding to a solar neutron response on high-mountain neutron monitors requires control of the stability of the measurement and elimination of other sources of short-time increases of different kinds which are involved in fluctuations of cosmic-ray intensity. For the solar flare of June 3, 1982 the excess of counting rate on the Lomnicky stit neutron monitor is, within a factor or 1.8, equal to that expected from solar neutrons. Superposed epoch analysis of 17 flares with gamma-ray or hard X-ray production gives a slight tendency of an occurring signal in cases of high heliocentric angles, indicating anisotropic production of neutrons on the sun. The low statistical significance of the result indicates that higher temporal resolution, better evaluation of multiplicity, better knowledge of the power spectra of short-term intensity fluctuations on neutron monitors, as well as coordinated measurements of solar gamma-rays and neutrons on satellites, are required. 21 refs

  20. Gallium-67 scintigraphy for monitoring therapy response and follow-up of paracoccidioidomycosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamaga, L.Y.; Watanabe, T.; Hironaka, F.; Buchpiguel, C.; Cerri, G.; Benard, G.; Shikanai-Yasuda, M.A.

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: The current tools to evaluate patients' therapy response in paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) are based on clinical, immunological and radiological data. However, these criteria may be of limited value in the follow-up of asymptomatic lesions, negative pre-treatment serological tests and in severe pulmonary involvement whose chest radiography usually doesn't differentiate active from fibrotic lesions. The purpose of this study was to determine the value of Ga imaging for monitoring therapy response and follow-up of PCM patients. Methods: We studied 45 patients with confirmed PCM. Each patient underwent 2 to 7 Ga scintigraphies (total:147 scans) during a follow-up period of 4 months to 8,5 years. The Ga findings were compared to the clinical outcome and serum specific antibody levels. Results: Most patients showed improvement in the sequential Ga scans during the treatment with progressive decrease in number and intensity of sites with active infectious process. Ga scan was performed in nine patients with clinical cure and negative or persistently low levels of serum antibody following prolonged treatment. The scintigraphy confirmed the absence of inflammatory disease in all of these cases. Three patients with clinically suspected recurrence after irregular treatment showed positive Ga scans, confirming disease reactivation. Conclusion: Ga imaging is helpful in monitoring therapy response of PCM patients. Moreover, this method may be used to evaluate disease activity by confirming apparent cure and clinical recurrence

  1. Response monitoring in de novo patients with Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Willemssen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Parkinson's disease (PD is accompanied by dysfunctions in a variety of cognitive processes. One of these is error processing, which depends upon phasic decreases of medial prefrontal dopaminergic activity. Until now, there is no study evaluating these processes in newly diagnosed, untreated patients with PD ("de novo PD". METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we report large changes in performance monitoring processes using event-related potentials (ERPs in de novo PD-patients. The results suggest that increases in medial frontal dopaminergic activity after an error (Ne are decreased, relative to age-matched controls. In contrast, neurophysiological processes reflecting general motor response monitoring (Nc are enhanced in de novo patients. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It may be hypothesized that the Nc-increase is at costs of dopaminergic activity after an error; on a functional level errors may not always be detected and correct responses sometimes be misinterpreted as errors. This pattern differs from studies examining patients with a longer history of PD and may reflect compensatory processes, frequently occurring in pre-manifest stages of PD. From a clinical point of view the clearly attenuated Ne in the de novo PD patients may prove a useful additional tool for the early diagnosis of basal ganglia dysfunction in PD.

  2. Nonlinearities in the response of beam position monitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Assmann, R.; Dehning, B.; Matheson, J.; Prochnow, J.

    2000-01-01

    At the LEP e + /e - collider at CERN, Geneva, a Spectrometer is used to determine the beam energy with a relative accuracy of 10 -4 .The Spectrometer measures the change in bending angle in a dipole magnet, the beam trajectory being obtained using beam position monitors (BPMs), which must have an accuracy close to 1 μm in order to achieve the desired precision. The BPMs used feature an aluminum block with an elliptical aperture and capacitive pickup electrodes. The response depends on the electrode geometry and also on the shape of the monitor aperture. In addition, the size of the beam itself contributes if the beam is off-center. The beam size varies according to the beta and dispersion functions at the Spectrometer, so that each BPM may exhibit a systematic shift of the measured beam position. We have investigated the implications of such shifts on the performance of the Spectrometer. We present analytical results, a computer model of the BPM response, and comparison with measurements. The model suggests strategies such as beam-based alignment to minimize the systematic effects arising from the BPMs

  3. In-vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging for monitoring the efficacy of the cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Chernomordik, Victor; Hassan, Moinuddin; Zielinski, Rafal; Capala, Jacek; Gandjbakhche, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Advances in tumor biology created a foundation for targeted therapy aimed at inactivation of specific molecular mechanisms responsible for cell malignancy. In this paper, we used in-vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging with HER2 targeted fluorescent probes as an alternative imaging method to investigate the efficacy of targeted therapy with 17-DMAG (an HSP90 inhibitor) on tumors with high expression of HER2 receptors. Experimental Design HER2-specific Affibody, conjugated to Alexafluor 750, was injected into nude mice, bearing HER2-positive tumor xenograft. The fluorescence lifetime was measured before treatment and monitored after the probe injections at 12 hours after the last treatment dose, when the response to the 17-DMAG therapy was the most pronounced as well as a week after the last treatment when the tumors grew back almost to their pre-treatment size. Results Imaging results showed significant difference between the fluorescence lifetimes at the tumor and the contralateral site (~0.13ns) in the control group (before treatment) and 7 days after the last treatment when the tumors grew back to their pretreatment dimensions. However, at the time frame that the treatment had its maximum effect (12 hours after the last treatment) the difference between the fluorescence lifetime at the tumor and contralateral site decreased to 0.03ns. Conclusions The results showed a good correlation between fluorescence lifetime and the efficacy of the treatment. These findings show that in-vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used as a promising molecular imaging tool for monitoring the treatment outcome in preclinical models and potentially in patients. PMID:24671949

  4. Use of electrical impedance tomography to monitor regional cerebral edema during clinical dehydration treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Fu

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Variations of conductive fluid content in brain tissue (e.g. cerebral edema change tissue impedance and can potentially be measured by Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT, an emerging medical imaging technique. The objective of this work is to establish the feasibility of using EIT as an imaging tool for monitoring brain fluid content. DESIGN: a prospective study. SETTING: In this study EIT was used, for the first time, to monitor variations in cerebral fluid content in a clinical model with patients undergoing clinical dehydration treatment. The EIT system was developed in house and its imaging sensitivity and spatial resolution were evaluated on a saline-filled tank. PATIENTS: 23 patients with brain edema. INTERVENTIONS: The patients were continuously imaged by EIT for two hours after initiation of dehydration treatment using 0.5 g/kg intravenous infusion of mannitol for 20 minutes. MEASUREMENT AND MAIN RESULTS: Overall impedance across the brain increased significantly before and after mannitol dehydration treatment (p = 0.0027. Of the all 23 patients, 14 showed high-level impedance increase and maintained this around 4 hours after the dehydration treatment whereas the other 9 also showed great impedance gain during the treatment but it gradually decreased after the treatment. Further analysis of the regions of interest in the EIT images revealed that diseased regions, identified on corresponding CT images, showed significantly less impedance changes than normal regions during the monitoring period, indicating variations in different patients' responses to such treatment. CONCLUSIONS: EIT shows potential promise as an imaging tool for real-time and non-invasive monitoring of brain edema patients.

  5. Three-dimensional volumetric assessment of response to treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willett, C.G.; Stracher, M.A.; Linggood, R.M.; Leong, J.C.; Skates, S.J.; Miketic, L.M.; Kushner, D.C.; Jacobson, J.O.

    1988-01-01

    From 1981 to 1986, 12 patients with Stage I and II diffuse large cell lymphoma of the mediastinum were treated with 4 or more cycles of multiagent chemotherapy and for nine patients this was followed by mediastinal irradiation. The response to treatment was assessed by three-dimensional volumetric analysis utilizing thoracic CT scans. The initial mean tumor volume of the five patients relapsing was 540 ml in contrast to an initial mean tumor volume of 360 ml for the seven patients remaining in remission. Of the eight patients in whom mediastinal lymphoma volumes could be assessed 1-2 months after chemotherapy prior to mediastinal irradiation, the three patients who have relapsed had volumes of 292, 92 and 50 ml (mean volume 145 ml) in contrast to five patients who have remained in remission with residual volume abnormalities of 4-87 ml (mean volume 32 ml). Four patients in prolonged remission with CT scans taken one year after treatment have been noted to have mediastinal tumor volumes of 0-28 ml with a mean value of 10 ml. This volumetric technique to assess the extent of mediastinal large cell lymphoma from thoracic CT scans appears to be a useful method to quantitate the amount of disease at presentation as well as objectively monitor response to treatment. 13 refs.; 2 figs.; 1 table

  6. Monitoring temozolomide treatment of low-grade glioma with proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murphy, P. S.; Viviers, L; Abson, C

    2004-01-01

    Assessment of low-grade glioma treatment response remains as much of a challenge as the treatment itself. Proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((1)H-MRS) and imaging were incorporated into a study of patients receiving temozolomide therapy for low-grade glioma in order to evaluate and monitor...... tumour metabolite and volume changes during treatment. Patients (n=12) received oral temozolomide (200 mg m(-2) day(-1)) over 5 days on a 28-day cycle for 12 cycles. Response assessment included baseline and three-monthly magnetic resonance imaging studies (pretreatment, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months) assessing...... months, a significant reduction in the mean choline signal was observed compared with the pretreatment (P=0.035) and 3-month scan (P=0.021). The reduction in the tumour choline/water signal paralleled tumour volume change and may reflect the therapeutic effect of temozolomide...

  7. Measuring treatment response in psychotic depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Søren D; Meyers, Barnett S; Flint, Alastair J

    2014-01-01

    ). The response to the two regimens was compared using both a mixed effects model and effect size statistics on the total scores of three rating scales: the 17-item Hamilton Depression Rating Scale (HAM-D17), its 6-item melancholia subscale (HAM-D6), and the 11-item PDAS consisting of the HAM-D6 plus five items......BACKGROUND: There is no established psychometric instrument dedicated to the measurement of severity in psychotic depression (PD). The aim of this study was to investigate whether a new composite rating scale, the Psychotic Depression Assessment Scale (PDAS), covering both the psychotic...... and the depressive domains of PD, could detect differences in effect between two psychopharmacological treatment regimens. METHODS: We reanalyzed the data from the Study of Pharmacotherapy of Psychotic Depression (STOP-PD), which compared the effect of Olanzapine+Sertraline (n=129) versus Olanzapine+Placebo (n=130...

  8. Composition and fundamental requirements of nuclear emergency response monitoring equipment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai Yongfang; Huang Weiqi; Wang Yonghong

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear emergency monitoring equipment is concrete foundation for accomplishing radiation monitoring in nuclear or radiation accidents. Based on technical report: Generic procedures for monitoring in a nuclear or radiological emergency published by IAEA in 1999, this paper presents the main task and composition of nuclear emergency monitoring briefly, and then the basic equipment and trends of nuclear emergency monitoring equipment is put forward in detail, which is useful to construction and reinforcement of our nuclear emergency monitoring. (authors)

  9. Monitoring anti-TNF{alpha} treatment in RA: Responsiveness of magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasonography of the dominant wrist compared to conventional measures of disease activity and structural damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haavardsholm, Espen A; Ostergaard, Mikkel; Hammer, Hilde Berner

    2008-01-01

    months. Responsiveness was assessed by standardized response means (SRM). Accepted thresholds were applied to classify responsiveness as trivial, low, moderate or good. RESULTS: MRI synovitis (SRM between -0.79 and -0.92) and the MRI total inflammation score comprising synovitis, tenosynovitis and bone...... marrow edema (SRM between -1.05 and -1.24) were highly responsive. Moderate to high responsiveness was found for MRI tenosynovitis and bone marrow edema, all the composite indices (DAS28, SDAI and CDAI) and the 28-swollen joint count. US displayed low to moderate responsiveness. The MRI erosion score...... was a composite measure comprising MRI synovitis, tenosynovitis and bone marrow edema, and this may be a promising outcome measure in clinical studies....

  10. Instrument Response Modeling and Simulation for the GLAST Burst Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kippen, R. M.; Hoover, A. S.; Wallace, M. S.; Pendleton, G. N.; Meegan, C. A.; Fishman, G. J.; Wilson-Hodge, C. A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Lichti, G. G.; Kienlin, A. von; Steinle, H.; Diehl, R.; Greiner, J.; Preece, R. D.; Connaughton, V.; Briggs, M. S.; Paciesas, W. S.; Bhat, P. N.

    2007-01-01

    The GLAST Burst Monitor (GBM) is designed to provide wide field of view observations of gamma-ray bursts and other fast transient sources in the energy range 10 keV to 30 MeV. The GBM is composed of several unshielded and uncollimated scintillation detectors (twelve NaI and two BGO) that are widely dispersed about the GLAST spacecraft. As a result, reconstructing source locations, energy spectra, and temporal properties from GBM data requires detailed knowledge of the detectors' response to both direct radiation as well as that scattered from the spacecraft and Earth's atmosphere. This full GBM instrument response will be captured in the form of a response function database that is derived from computer modeling and simulation. The simulation system is based on the GEANT4 Monte Carlo radiation transport simulation toolset, and is being extensively validated against calibrated experimental GBM data. We discuss the architecture of the GBM simulation and modeling system and describe how its products will be used for analysis of observed GBM data. Companion papers describe the status of validating the system

  11. In vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging for monitoring the efficacy of the cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardeshirpour, Yasaman; Chernomordik, Victor; Hassan, Moinuddin; Zielinski, Rafal; Capala, Jacek; Gandjbakhche, Amir

    2014-07-01

    Advances in tumor biology created a foundation for targeted therapy aimed at inactivation of specific molecular mechanisms responsible for cell malignancy. In this paper, we used in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging with HER2-targeted fluorescent probes as an alternative imaging method to investigate the efficacy of targeted therapy with 17-DMAG (an HSP90 inhibitor) on tumors with high expression of HER2 receptors. HER2-specific Affibody, conjugated to Alexafluor 750, was injected into nude mice bearing HER2-positive tumor xenograft. The fluorescence lifetime was measured before treatment and monitored after the probe injections at 12 hours after the last treatment dose, when the response to the 17-DMAG therapy was the most pronounced as well as a week after the last treatment when the tumors grew back almost to their pretreatment size. Imaging results showed significant difference between the fluorescence lifetimes at the tumor and the contralateral site (∼0.13 ns) in the control group (before treatment) and 7 days after the last treatment when the tumors grew back to their pretreatment dimensions. However, at the time frame that the treatment had its maximum effect (12 hours after the last treatment), the difference between the fluorescence lifetime at the tumor and contralateral site decreased to 0.03 ns. The results showed a good correlation between fluorescence lifetime and the efficacy of the treatment. These findings show that in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging can be used as a promising molecular imaging tool for monitoring the treatment outcome in preclinical models and potentially in patients. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Tuberculosis treatment outcome monitoring in European Union countries: systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hest, Rob; Ködmön, Csaba; Verver, Suzanne; Erkens, Connie G.M.; Straetemans, Masja; Manissero, Davide; de Vries, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Treatment success measured by treatment outcome monitoring (TOM) is a key programmatic output of tuberculosis (TB) control programmes. We performed a systematic literature review on national-level TOM in the 30 European Union (EU)/European Economic Areas (EEA) countries to summarise methods used to collect and report data on TOM. Online reference bibliographic databases PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE were searched to identify relevant indexed and non-indexed literature published between January 2000 and August 2010. The search strategy resulted in 615 potentially relevant indexed citations, of which 27 full-text national studies (79 data sets) were included for final analysis. The selected studies were performed in 10 EU/EEA countries and gave a fragmented impression of TOM in the EU/EEA. Publication year, study period, sample size, databases, definitions, variables, patient and outcome categories, and population subgroups varied widely, portraying a very heterogeneous picture. This review confirmed previous reports of considerable heterogeneity in publications of TOM results across EU/EEA countries. PubMed/MEDLINE and EMBASE indexed studies are not a suitable instrument to measure representative TOM results for the 30 EU/EEA countries. Uniform and complete reporting to the centralised European Surveillance System will produce the most timely and reliable results of TB treatment outcomes in the EU/EEA. PMID:22790913

  13. On- and off-line monitoring of ion beam treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parodi, Katia, E-mail: katia.parodi@lmu.de

    2016-02-11

    Ion beam therapy is an emerging modality for high precision radiation treatment of cancer. In comparison to conventional radiation sources (photons, electrons), ion beams feature major dosimetric advantages due to their finite range with a localized dose deposition maximum, the Bragg peak, which can be selectively adjusted in depth. However, due to several sources of treatment uncertainties, full exploitation of these dosimetric advantages in clinical practice would require the possibility to visualize the stopping position of the ions in vivo, ideally in real-time. To this aim, different imaging methods have been proposed and investigated, either pre-clinically or even clinically, based on the detection of prompt or delayed radiation following nuclear interaction of the beam with the irradiated tissue. However, the chosen or ad-hoc developed instrumentation has often relied on technologies originally conceived for different applications, thus compromising on the achievable performances for the sake of cost-effectiveness. This contribution will review major examples of used instrumentation and related performances, identifying the most promising detector developments for next generation devices especially dedicated to on-line monitoring of ion beam treatment. Moreover, it will propose an original combination of different techniques in a hybrid detection scheme, aiming to make the most of complementary imaging methods and open new perspectives of image guidance for improved precision of ion beam therapy.

  14. MIC in long oil pipelines: diagnosis, treatment and monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jenneman, Gary; Harris, Jennifer; Webb, Robert [ConocoPhillips (Canada)

    2011-07-01

    The paper presents the diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of microbial influenced corrosion (MIC) in long oil pipelines. The presence of inorganic solids, bacteria, gases and organic acids in produced water in the oil pipelines causes MIC, which is hard to detect or test and it does not produce any unique type of corrosion. Chemical analysis of water from pig runs is presented in a tabular form and a graphical analysis of pig sludge solids is shown. From the biometabolite analysis, 23 putative hydrocarbon biometabolites were identified and biometabolites for the anaerobic biodegradation of aromatic HC were also detected. Operational considerations include the history of MIC in upstream pipelines, water slugging, and presence of suspended solids, among others. From microbiological, chemical, metallurgical and operational evidence it was suggested that MIC is a likely mechanism. The mitigation program is described and suggestions for successful mitigation measures include removal of oxygen sources, scale inhibitor injection, and increasing CO2 inhibitor concentration.

  15. Noninvasive optical monitoring multiple physiological parameters response to cytokine storm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zebin; Li, Ting

    2018-02-01

    Cancer and other disease originated by immune or genetic problems have become a main cause of death. Gene/cell therapy is a highlighted potential method for the treatment of these diseases. However, during the treatment, it always causes cytokine storm, which probably trigger acute respiratory distress syndrome and multiple organ failure. Here we developed a point-of-care device for noninvasive monitoring cytokine storm induced multiple physiological parameters simultaneously. Oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin, water concentration and deep-tissue/tumor temperature variations were simultaneously measured by extended near infrared spectroscopy. Detection algorithms of symptoms such as shock, edema, deep-tissue fever and tissue fibrosis were developed and included. Based on these measurements, modeling of patient tolerance and cytokine storm intensity were carried out. This custom device was tested on patients experiencing cytokine storm in intensive care unit. The preliminary data indicated the potential of our device in popular and milestone gene/cell therapy, especially, chimeric antigen receptor T-cell immunotherapy (CAR-T).

  16. Temperature-monitored optical treatment for radial tissue expansion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bak, Jinoh; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2017-07-01

    Esophageal stricture occurs in 7-23% of patients with gastroesophageal reflux disease. However, the current treatments including stent therapy, balloon dilation, and bougienage involve limitations such as stent migration, formation of the new strictures, and snowplow effect. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the feasibility of structural expansion in tubular tissue ex vivo during temperature-monitored photothermal treatment with a diffusing applicator for esophageal stricture. Porcine liver was used as an ex vivo tissue sample for the current study. A glass tube was used to maintain a constant distance between the diffuser and tissue surface and to evaluate any variations in the luminal area after 10-W 1470-nm laser irradiation for potential stricture treatment. The 3D goniometer measurements confirmed roughly isotropic distribution with less than 10% deviation from the average angular intensity over 2π (i.e., 0.86 ± 0.09 in arbitrary unit) from the diffusing applicator. The 30-s irradiation increased the tissue temperature up to 72.5 °C, but due to temperature feedback, the interstitial tissue temperature became saturated at 70 °C (i.e., steady-state error = ±0.4 °C). The irradiation times longer than 5 s presented area expansion index of 1.00 ± 0.04, signifying that irreversible tissue denaturation permanently deformed the lumen in a circular shape and secured the equivalent luminal area to that of the glass tube. Application of a temperature feedback controller for photothermal treatment with the diffusing applicator can regulate the degree of thermal denaturation to feasibly treat esophageal stricture in a tubular tissue.

  17. Routine outcome monitoring and clinical decision-making in forensic psychiatry based on the Instrument for Forensic Treatment Evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veeken, F.C.A.; Lucieer, Jacques; Bogaerts, S.

    2016-01-01

    Background Rehabilitation in forensic psychiatry is achieved gradually with different leave modules, in line with the Risk Need Responsivity model. A forensic routine outcome monitoring tool should measure treatment progress based on the rehabilitation theory, and it should be predictive of

  18. Optimizing Treatment with TNF Inhibitors in Inflammatory Bowel Disease by Monitoring Drug Levels and Antidrug Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steenholdt, Casper; Bendtzen, Klaus; Brynskov, Jørn

    2016-01-01

    costs. The objective is to review optimization of anti-TNF therapy by use of personalized treatment strategies based on circulating drug levels and antidrug antibodies (Abs), i.e. therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). Furthermore, to outline TDM-related pitfalls and their prevention. METHODS: Literature...... inflammatory phenotype influencing the pharmacodynamic (PD) responses to TNF inhibitors also affect treatment outcomes. As an alternative to handling anti-TNF-treated patients by empiric strategies, TDM identifies underlying PK and PD-related reasons for treatment failure and aids decision making to secure...... of chronology between changes in PK versus symptomatic and objective disease activity manifestations. Biases can be accommodated by knowledgeable interpretation of results obtained by validated assays with clinically established thresholds, and by repeated assessments over time using complimentary techniques...

  19. Monitoring cardiac output during hyperbaric oxygen treatment of haemodynamically unstable patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Marco Bo; Treschow, Frederik; Skielboe, Martin

    2013-01-01

    Patients suffering from necrotizing fasciitis (NF) are often haemodynamically unstable and require extended monitoring of cardiovascular parameters; yet this is limited during hyperbaric oxygen treatment (HBOT). We aimed to evaluate the use and safety of transoesophageal Doppler (TED) monitoring ...

  20. Antisocial Traits as Modifiers of Treatment Response in Borderline Inpatients

    OpenAIRE

    CLARKIN, JOHN F.; HULL, JAMES; YEOMANS, FRANK; KAKUMA, TATSUYUKI; CANTOR, JENNIFER

    1994-01-01

    The relationship of antisocial traits to treatment response in 35 female inpatients with borderline personality disorder was studied. Antisocial traits were measured with the Personality Assessment Inventory. Treatment response was measured by weekly ratings on the Symptom Checklist-90—Revised over 25 weeks of hospitalization. Treatment course was found to be significantly associated with the level of antisocial behavior reported at admission.

  1. Exposure Plus Response-Prevention Treatment of Bulimia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitenberg, Harold; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Evaluated exposure plus response-prevention treatment of bulimia nervosa among 47 women. Subjects were assigned to either exposure plus response-prevention in one setting, exposure plus response-prevention in multiple settings, cognitive-behavioral therapy, or waiting-list control conditions. Found three treatment groups improved significantly on…

  2. Biophysical Monitoring and dose response characteristics of irradiated hemoglobin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elshemey, W.M; Selim, N.S.; Desouky, O.

    2003-01-01

    The present work aims to move a step forward towards a deeper understanding of the scattering of x-ray, from lyophilized biological samples. Comparative study has been performed using LAXS and UV-visible spectrophotometry for monitoring the dose response characteristics of the hemoglobin molecule of irradiated blood. Blood samples were irradiated at doses ranging from 5 up to 100 Gy. Diluted hemoglobin solution was scanned in the UV- visible range (200-700 nm), and lyophilized hemoglobin was prepared for LAXS measurement. The radiation-induced changes in the hemoglobin structure have been evaluated. The LAXS profile of hemoglobin molecule is characterized by the presence of two peaks in the forward direction of scattering. These peaks were found to be sensitive to the variations in the molecular structure of a given sample. The obtained results suggest that the 1 s t peak, recorded at 4.65 o , is sensitive to the tertiary and quaternary structure of the globin part, while the major peak, recorded at 10.5 o , appeared to be related to its primary and secondary structure

  3. Monitoring of wind load and response for cable-supported bridges in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Kai-yuen; Chan, Wai-Yee K.; Man, King-Leung

    2001-08-01

    Structural health monitoring for the three cable-supported bridges located in the West of Hong Kong or the Tsing Ma Control Area has been carried out since the opening of these bridges to public traffic. The three cable-supported bridges are referred to as the Tsing Ma (suspension) Bridge, the Kap Shui Mun (cable-stayed) Bridge and the Ting Kau (cable-stayed) Bridge. The structural health monitoring works involved are classified as six monitoring categories, namely, wind load and response, temperature load and response, traffic load and response, geometrical configuration monitoring, strains and stresses/forces monitoring and global dynamic characteristics monitoring. As wind loads and responses had been a major concern in the design and construction stages, this paper therefore outlines the work of wind load and response monitoring on Tsing Ma, Kap Shui Mun and Ting Kau Bridges. The paper starts with a brief description of the sensory systems. The description includes the layout and performance requirements of sensory systems for wind load and responses monitoring. Typical results of wind load and response monitoring in graphical forms are then presented. These graphical forms include the plots of wind rose diagrams, wind incidences vs wind speeds, wind turbulence intensities, wind power spectra, gust wind factors, coefficient of terrain roughness, extreme wind analyses, deck deflections/rotations vs wind speeds, acceleration spectra, acceleration/displacement contours, and stress demand ratios. Finally conclusions on wind load and response monitoring on the three cable-supported bridges are drawn.

  4. N Springs expedited response action performance monitoring plan. Revision 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-08-01

    Groundwater contained in the 100-NR-2 Operable Unit is contaminated with various radionuclides derived from waste water disposal practices and spills associated with 100-N Reactor operations. Of primary concern is the presence of high levels of 90 Sr in the groundwater and the discharge of 90 Sr-contaminated groundwater to the nearby Columbia River through historic river bank seeps known as ''N Springs.'' A pump-and-treat system is being installed to remove 90 Sr contamination from the groundwater as part of the N Springs expedited response action (ERA). The groundwater extraction system will consist of four extraction and two injection wells with a proposed initial treatment capacity of 50 gal/min. The proposed location of the groundwater extraction system relative to the 90 Sr groundwater plume is presented

  5. Natural radiation monitoring and control treatment in the Hantepe beach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetiner, M. A.; Gunduz, H.; Tukenmez, I.

    2012-01-01

    This work has been carried out to monitor and decrease the natural radiation exposure at the Hantepe beach (Canakkale (Turkey)). A 0.25- to 0.30-m-thick layer of sand was scraped, removed and deposited in a safe place in order to decrease people's exposure to radiation and to relieve relevant radio-phobia. The original mean value of dose rate on the beach was 1.38 μGy h -1 at the contact and 1.0 μGy h -1 at 1 m above the ground. After the scraping process, the mean value of dose rate decreased to 0.98 μGy h -1 at the contact and to 0.78 μGy h -1 at 1 m above the ground. One year later, these values decreased to 0.70 μGy h -1 at the contact and to 0.56 μGy h -1 at 1 m above the ground. The effective original dose rate of 1.2 mSv y -1 decreased to 0.95 mSv y -1 after the surface treatment and to 0.69 mSv y -1 one year later. (authors)

  6. FDG-PET/CT response evaluation during EGFR-TKI treatment in patients with NSCLC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Matthijs; H; van; Gool; Tjeerd; S; Aukema; Koen; J; Hartemink; Renato; A; Valdés; Olmos; Houke; M; Klomp; Harm; van; Tinteren

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years,[18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography acquired together with low dose computed tomography(FDG-PET/CT)has proven its role as a staging modality in patients with non-small cell lung cancer(NSCLC).The purpose of this review was to present the evidence to use FDG-PET/CT for response evaluation in patients with NSCLC,treated with epidermal growth factor receptor(EGFR)-tyrosine kinase inhibitors(TKI).All published articles from 1November 2003 to 1 November 2013 reporting on 18FFDG-PET response evaluation during EGFR-TKI treatment in patients with NSCLC were collected.In total 7studies,including data of 210 patients were eligible for analyses.Our report shows that FDG-PET/CT responseduring EGFR-TKI therapy has potential in targeted treatment for NSCLC.FDG-PET/CT response is associated with clinical and radiologic response and with survival.Furthermore FDG-PET/CT response monitoring can be performed as early as 1-2 wk after initiation of EGFR-TKI treatment.Patients with substantial decrease of metabolic activity during EGFR-TKI treatment will probably benefit from continued treatment.If metabolic response does not occur within the first weeks of EGFR-TKI treatment,patients may be spared(further)unnecessary toxicity of ineffective treatment.Refining FDG-PET response criteria may help the clinician to decide on continuation or discontinuation of targeted treatment.

  7. Preference for Blocking or Response Redirection during Stereotypy Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Aimee F.; St. Peter, Claire C.; Pence, Sacha T.; Gibson, Alexandra B.

    2012-01-01

    Response redirection and response blocking reduce stereotypy maintained by automatic reinforcement. The current study evaluated the effects of redirection and response blocking on the stereotypic responding of three elementary-age children diagnosed with autism. During the treatment evaluation, redirection and response blocking were evaluated…

  8. Validation of a questionnaire to monitor symptoms in HIV-infected patients during hepatitis C treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cachay, Edward R; Ballard, Craig; Colwell, Bradford; Torriani, Francesca; Hicks, Charles; Mathews, Wm Christopher

    2017-09-20

    Clinicians are incorporating patient-reported outcomes in the management of HIV-infected persons co-infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV), but there are no validated inventories to monitor symptoms of patients during HCV therapy. Five-year retrospective cohort analysis of persons living with HIV (PLWH) treated for HCV. The HCV symptom-inventory (HCV-SI) was administered before, during, and after HCV treatment. Discriminant validity was assessed, separately, in mixed model linear regression of HCV-SI T-scores on treatment regimens (pegylated-interferon and ribavirin; pegylated-interferon, ribavirin, and telaprevir; and interferon-free antivirals); and side effect-related premature treatment discontinuation (SE-DC). From the 103 patients who completed the HCV-SI, 7% were female, 26% non-white, 32% cirrhotics and 91% had undetectable HIV viral loads. Most had genotype 1 (83%) and were HCV treatment-naïve (78%). We treated 19% of patients with pegylated-interferon and ribavirin, 22% with pegylated-interferon, ribavirin, and telaprevir and 59% received interferon-free antivirals. Overall, 77% achieved a sustained virologic response, and 6% discontinued HCV treatment due to side effects. In the treatment discrimination model, compared to the no treatment period, HCV-SI scores were significantly (p < 0.01) lower for interferon-free antivirals and higher for interferon-containing regimens. In the SE-DC model, the total HCV-SI, somatic and neuropsychiatric scores significantly predicted those patients who prematurely discontinued HCV treatment (P < 0.05). The HCV-SI effectively differentiated among treatment regimens known to vary by side effect profiles and between patients with and without treatment discontinuation due to side effects. The HCV-SI may have value as a patient-reported outcome instrument predicting the risk of HCV treatment discontinuation.

  9. Research on monitoring and management information integration technique in waste treatment and management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kong Jinsong; Yu Ren; Mao Wei

    2013-01-01

    The integration of the waste treatment process and the device status monitoring information and management information is a key problem required to be solved in the information integration of the waste treatment and management. The main content of the monitoring and management information integration is discussed in the paper. The data exchange techniques, which are based on the OPC, FTP and data push technology, are applied to the different monitoring system respectively, according to their development platform, to realize the integration of the waste treatment process and device status monitoring information and management information in a waste treatment center. (authors)

  10. FDG PET/CT for therapeutic response monitoring in multi-site non-respiratory tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Geng Tian; Yong Xiao; Bin Chen; Jun Xia; Hong Guan; Qunyi Deng

    2010-01-01

    Background: Tuberculosis (TB) can produce positive signals during 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) scanning. Until now, there has been no better method than clinical assessment to evaluate the therapeutic response of non-respiratory TB (NRTB). Purpose: To retrospectively assess the ability of FDG PET/CT to evaluate the response to anti-TB treatment in patients with NRTB. Material and Methods: Three patients with multi-site NRTB underwent repeat PET/CT scans during anti-TB treatment. Changes in maximal standard uptake value (SUVmax) of the TB lesions on PET/CT images were analyzed between two scans. Initial PET/CT scans were performed before the start of anti-TB treatment, and later scans were performed after completion of the treatment. Results: Patient 1, a 63-year-old female, and patient 2, a 50-year-old male, were diagnosed as multi-site NRTB by biopsy. Patient 3, a 37-year-old male was diagnosed clinically. These patients demonstrated multiple FDG-avid lesions in whole body on initial PET/CT images. The highest SUVmax of patient 1, 2, and 3 were 13.6, 17.7, and 13.9 separately. After completion of the treatment, all positive signals of patient 1, 2, and 3 decreased to undetectable value on repeated PET/CT scans with intervals of 318 days, 258 days, and 182 days separately. Conclusion: FDG PET/CT scan may be useful for monitoring responses to anti-TB treatment in patients with NRTB

  11. Improving Treatment Response for Paediatric Anxiety Disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ege, Sarah; Reinholdt-Dunne, Marie Louise

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is considered the treatment of choice for paediatric anxiety disorders, yet there remains substantial room for improvement in treatment outcomes. This paper examines whether theory and research into the role of information-processing in the underlying psychopat......Cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) is considered the treatment of choice for paediatric anxiety disorders, yet there remains substantial room for improvement in treatment outcomes. This paper examines whether theory and research into the role of information-processing in the underlying...... interpretational biases, evidence regarding the effects of CBT on attentional biases is mixed. Novel treatment methods including attention bias modification training, attention feedback awareness and control training, and mindfulness-based therapy may hold potential in targeting attentional biases, and thereby...

  12. The possibilities of radioimmune and radiologic monitoring of the treatment of patients with rectal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navruzov, S.N.; Kim, L.V.; Daminova, E.A.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The method of dynamic control (monitoring) of the treatment efficiency of the patients with rectal carcinoma was developed. Data of dynamic examination (every 10 days) of 174 patients with rectal carcinoma received a specific treatment at the clinic of NOSC of Uzbekistan (Tashkent) were presented. Complex examination of the patients included the data of conventional clinical, special and radionuclide methods (RIA CEA, AFP, IRI ACTH in serum, gamma scintigraphy of liver) was carried out. For a selection of 17 parameters the factor analysis was used. Diagnostic significance of every parameter was determined. CEA and AFP markers were included as indices of tumor activity, ACTH and IRI markers were used as characterization of an organism's response to therapy. In the results of the multifactor investigations the monitoring programs 'Diagnosis-1' and 'Diagnosis-2' were developed. These programs permit to evaluate the treatment efficiency and correct the treatment schemes the case of the absence of the effect. Programmes 'Diagnosis-1' and D iagnosis-2' have a high both the diagnostic (89.9 ± 0.9% and 87.1 ± 0.9 %) and the prognostic (85.2 ± 1.3 % and 83.2 ± 1.3 %) significance. It is concluded that use of radionuclide methods permit to provide an adequate treatment in every case of rectal carcinoma. We suggesting: Use the D iagnosis-1' for evaluation of efficiency of different methods of treatment (CEA-produced tumors of rectum). Use the 'Diagnosis-2' for evaluation of efficiency of treatment of the CEA un-produced tumors of rectum. For objective and quantitative evaluation of the cancer of rectum it is necessary to determine the CEA and AKTH level in blood serum

  13. Serological monitoring of previously treated lepromatous patients during a course of multiple immunotherapy treatments with heat-killed Mycobacterium leprae and BCG

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Douglas, J. T.; Hirsch, D. S.; Fajardo, T. T.; Guido, L. S.; Klatser, P. R.

    1990-01-01

    Two-hundred and seventy lepromatous patients who had completed treatment received multiple treatments with heat-killed M. leprae and BCG and were monitored for changes in humoral responses to M. leprae-specific antigens. These patients were divided into four treatment groups: placebo (n = 69); BCG

  14. Vegetation Response to Western Juniper Slash Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Casey; Miller, Rick; Bates, Jonathan D.

    2013-09-01

    The expansion of piñon-juniper woodlands the past 100 years in the western United States has resulted in large scale efforts to kill trees and recover sagebrush steppe rangelands. It is important to evaluate vegetation recovery following woodland control to develop best management practices. In this study, we compared two fuel reduction treatments and a cut-and-leave (CUT) treatment used to control western juniper ( Juniperus occidentalis spp. occidentalis Hook.) of the northwestern United States. Treatments were; CUT, cut-and-broadcast burn (BURN), and cut-pile-and-burn the pile (PILE). A randomized complete block design was used with five replicates of each treatment located in a curl leaf mahogany ( Cercocarpus ledifolius Nutt. ex Torr. & A. Gray)/mountain big sagebrush ( Artemisia tridentata Nutt. spp. vaseyana (Rydb.) Beetle)/Idaho fescue ( Festuca idahoensis Elmer) association. In 2010, 4 years after tree control the cover of perennial grasses (PG) [Sandberg's bluegrass ( Poa secunda J. Pres) and large bunchgrasses] were about 4 and 5 % less, respectively, in the BURN (7.1 ± 0.6 %) than the PILE (11.4 ± 2.3 %) and CUT (12.4 ± 1.7 %) treatments ( P < 0.0015). In 2010, cover of invasive cheatgrass ( Bromus tectorum L.) was greater in the BURN (6.3 ± 1.0 %) and was 50 and 100 % greater than PILE and CUT treatments, respectively. However, the increase in perennial bunchgrass density and cover, despite cheatgrass in the BURN treatment, mean it unlikely that cheatgrass will persist as a major understory component. In the CUT treatment mahogany cover increased 12.5 % and density increased in from 172 ± 25 to 404 ± 123 trees/ha. Burning, killed most or all of the adult mahogany, and mahogany recovery consisted of 100 and 67 % seedlings in the PILE and BURN treatments, respectively. After treatment, juniper presence from untreated small trees (<1 m tall; PILE and CUT treatments) and seedling emergence (all treatments) represented 25-33 % of pre-treatment tree

  15. Electronic monitoring of occlusion treatment for amblyopia in patients aged 7 to 16 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronius, Maria; Bachert, Iris; Lüchtenberg, Marc

    2009-10-01

    Age limits for the prescription of amblyopia treatment have been debated and challenged recently, due to results of studies from ophthalmology and the neurosciences. Lack of knowledge about compliance with prescribed treatment is still a major factor for the uncertainty about the amount of plasticity in the visual system of older children and adolescents. The development of devices for the electronic recording of patching (Occlusion Dose Monitor, ODM) has allowed the collection of objective data about daily occlusion. In a prospective study, occlusion dose rates were recorded continuously during 4 months by means of the ODM developed in the Netherlands [1] in nine amblyopic patients between 7 and 16 years of age who were prescribed between 5 and 7 hours of daily patching. Visual acuity was assessed every 3 to 6 weeks. The electronic monitoring showed objective occlusion between 2 and 6.25 hours/day (mean 4.61 h/d) during the first month and 0 to 6.5 hours/day (mean 3.47 h/d) during the following 3 months of treatment. The total acuity gain in the amblyopic eye amounted to between -0.1 and 0.4 log units (mean 0.19) for crowded optotypes. Differences to initial acuities were statistically significant. The calculated average dose-response relationship (cumulated hours occlusion*0.1/acuity gain) for 4 months of occlusion was 234 hours of occlusion per 0.1 log unit of acuity gain. This study presents for the first time objective treatment and dose response data in amblyopic patients beyond the "classical" treatment age. Electronic monitoring of occlusion and considerable amounts of patching were shown to be feasible. The acuity results indicate that there is a potential for improvement, yet treatment seemed to be less efficient than shown by previous studies in younger patients. Continuation of this research may advance the discussion about age-dependent evidence-based amblyopia treatment, about preschool screening for amblyopia and about plasticity of the visual system.

  16. Novel Biomarker for Prognosis, Treatment Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    An NCI Cancer Currents blog about a study of a new type of cancer biomarker that measures the extent of chromosomal instability as a way to potentially predict patient prognosis and help guide cancer treatment choices.

  17. Variation in monitoring and treatment policies for intracranial hypertension in traumatic brain injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cnossen, Maryse C; Huijben, Jilske A; van der Jagt, Mathieu

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: No definitive evidence exists on how intracranial hypertension should be treated in patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI). It is therefore likely that centers and practitioners individually balance potential benefits and risks of different intracranial pressure (ICP) management......, and it was pilot-tested in 16 centers. The questionnaire was sent to 68 neurotrauma centers participating in the Collaborative European Neurotrauma Effectiveness Research in Traumatic Brain Injury (CENTER-TBI) study. RESULTS: The survey was completed by 66 centers (97% response rate). Centers were mainly academic....... There was no consensus on other indications or on peri-insertion precautions. We found wide variation in the use of first- and second-tier treatments for elevated ICP. Approximately half of the centers were classified as using a relatively aggressive approach to ICP monitoring and treatment (n = 32, 48%), whereas...

  18. Prognostic value of monitoring tumour markers CA 15-3 and CEA during fulvestrant treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Locker Gottfried J

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background At many centres tumour markers are used to detect disease recurrence and to monitor response to therapy in patients with advanced disease, although the real value of serial observation of marker levels remains disputed. In this study, we evaluated the prognostic value of tumour markers for predicting response (partial response [PR], stable disease [SD] ≥ 6 months, de novo disease progression (PD and secondary PD in patients receiving fulvestrant ('Faslodex' 250 mg/month for the treatment of metastatic breast cancer (MBC. Methods Changes in cancer antigen 15–3 (CA 15-3 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA were prospectively monitored (monthly and were also evaluated for the 3 months preceding secondary PD. Data from 67 patients with previously treated MBC participating in a Compassionate Use Programme were analysed. Results In patients with a PR (n = 7 [10.4%], a non-significant increase in CA 15-3 occurred during the first 6 months of treatment; CEA was significantly reduced (P = 0.0165. In patients with SD ≥ 6 months (n = 28 [41.8%], both CA 15-3 (P P = 0.0399 levels increased significantly after 6 months treatment. In those experiencing de novo PD (n = 32 [47.8%], CA 15-3 increased significantly (P P = 0.0002 during the same time period. Both CA 15-3 (P P Conclusion CA 15-3 increases in patients progressing on fulvestrant but may also increase in those experiencing clinical benefit; this should not be taken as a sign of PD without verification. Overall, both CA 15-3 and CEA appear to be poor prognostic markers for determining progression in patients receiving fulvestrant.

  19. Response of cortical bone to antiresorptive treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hyldstrup, Lars; Jørgensen, J T; Sørensen, T K

    2001-01-01

    of the spine, hip, and forearm. Longitudinal changes in bone densitometry were compared with changes captured by DXR: BMD evaluated by DXR (BMDDXR), cortical thickness of the second metacarpal (CTMC2), and porosity of cortical bone. The expected annual postmenopausal reduction in BMD in the control group...... treatment regimens used in the prevention of osteoporosis....

  20. Benefits of remote real-time side-effect monitoring systems for patients receiving cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kofoed, Sarah; Breen, Sibilah; Gough, Karla; Aranda, Sanchia

    2012-03-05

    In Australia, the incidence of cancer diagnoses is rising along with an aging population. Cancer treatments, such as chemotherapy, are increasingly being provided in the ambulatory care setting. Cancer treatments are commonly associated with distressing and serious side-effects and patients often struggle to manage these themselves without specialized real-time support. Unlike chronic disease populations, few systems for the remote real-time monitoring of cancer patients have been reported. However, several prototype systems have been developed and have received favorable reports. This review aimed to identify and detail systems that reported statistical analyses of changes in patient clinical outcomes, health care system usage or health economic analyses. Five papers were identified that met these criteria. There was wide variation in the design of the monitoring systems in terms of data input method, clinician alerting and response, groups of patients targeted and clinical outcomes measured. The majority of studies had significant methodological weaknesses. These included no control group comparisons, small sample sizes, poor documentation of clinical interventions or measures of adherence to the monitoring systems. In spite of the limitations, promising results emerged in terms of improved clinical outcomes (e.g. pain, depression, fatigue). Health care system usage was assessed in two papers with inconsistent results. No studies included health economic analyses. The diversity in systems described, outcomes measured and methodological issues all limited between-study comparisons. Given the acceptability of remote monitoring and the promising outcomes from the few studies analyzing patient or health care system outcomes, future research is needed to rigorously trial these systems to enable greater patient support and safety in the ambulatory setting.

  1. Monitoring the anaerobic treatment of waste waters; Control en la depuracion anaerobia de aguas residuales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon de Mora, C.; Molina Cantero, F.J.; Romero Galey, F.J.; Gomez Banderas, J.M. [Dpto. Tecnologia Electronica. Esc. Univ. Politec. Sevilla, Sevilla, (Spain)

    1997-04-01

    This article describes the results obtained in developing a system for monitoring sewage treatment. The system, supported by a PC, includes a fuzzy logic control algorithm for monitoring the anaerobic treatment of waste waters on the basis of data from sensors attached to an industrial robot (PLC). Its most outstanding features is that it is also capable of evaluating new monitoring strategies using parameters not originally included. (Author) 6 refs.

  2. Microbiological monitoring of acid mine drainage treatment systems and aquatic surroundings using real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, J S; Kim, C G

    2009-01-01

    In general, acid mine drainage (AMD) causes low pH and high metal concentrations in mining areas and surroundings. The aim of this research was to achieve microbiological monitoring for AMD and to assess whether mine water outflows have any ecological effects on the aqueous ecosystem receiving effluents from different types of treatment system. The water quality of aquatic sample was analyzed and the molecular biological diversity of the samples was assessed using 16S rRNA methods, which were implemented to determine which bacteria existed throughout various unit processes for different AMD treatment systems and their receiving water environments. Acidiphilium cryptum, a heterotrophic acidophile, was found at the AMD sites, and Rhodoferax ferrireducens, which can reduce iron using insoluble Fe(III) as an electron acceptor, was detected at many AMD treatment facilities and downstream of the treatment processes. Subsequently, quantitative real-time PCR was conducted on specific genes of selected bacteria. Surprisingly, obvious trends were observed in the relative abundance of the various bacteria that corresponded to the water quality analytical results. The copy number of Desulfosporosinus orientus, a sulfate reducing bacteria, was also observed to decrease in response to decreases in metals according to the downstream flow of the AMD treatment system.

  3. A computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. III: graphical simulation and monitoring of treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessler, Marc L.; McShan, Daniel L.; Fraass, Benedick A.

    1995-01-01

    Purpose: Safe and efficient delivery of radiotherapy using computer-controlled machines requires new procedures to design and verify the actual delivery of these treatments. Graphical simulation and monitoring techniques for treatment delivery have been developed for this purpose. Methods and Materials: A graphics-based simulator of the treatment machine and a set of procedures for creating and manipulating treatment delivery scripts are used to simulate machine motions, detect collisions, and monitor machine positions during treatment. The treatment delivery simulator is composed of four components: a three-dimensional dynamic model of the treatment machine; a motion simulation and collision detection algorithm, user-interface widgets that mimic the treatment machine's control and readout devices; and an icon-based interface for creating and manipulating treatment delivery scripts. These components are used in a stand-alone fashion for interactive treatment delivery planning and integrated with a machine control system for treatment implementation and monitoring. Results: A graphics-based treatment delivery simulator and a set of procedures for planning and monitoring computer-controlled treatment delivery have been developed and implemented as part of a comprehensive computer-controlled conformal radiotherapy system. To date, these techniques have been used to design and help monitor computer-controlled treatments on a radiotherapy machine for more than 200 patients. Examples using these techniques for treatment delivery planning and on-line monitoring of machine motions during therapy are described. Conclusion: A system that provides interactive graphics-based tools for defining the sequence of machine motions, simulating treatment delivery including collision detection, and presenting the therapists with continual visual feedback from the treatment machine has been successfully implemented for routine clinical use as part of an overall system for computer

  4. The national response plan and radioactive incident monitoring network (RIMNET)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, M.W.

    1989-01-01

    The Department of the Environment is responsible through Her Majesty's Inspectorate of Pollution for co-ordination of the Government's response to overseas nuclear incidents. This paper describes the contingency arrangements that have been set up for this purpose. (author)

  5. Popular Musician Responses to Mental Health Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, Lloyd; King, Benjamin; Koenig, Jessica; McRoberts, Roger L

    2018-06-01

    Popular (i.e., nonclassical) musicians have higher rates of mental health disorders and mental health service utilization than the general population. Little is known, however, about how popular musicians perceive mental health interventions in terms of overall satisfaction and therapeutic benefit. An online client satisfaction survey was sent to all musicians and family members who received mental health services through a nonprofit mental health organization in Austin, Texas, between July 2014 and June 2015 (n=628). 260 individuals (41.4%) responded to the survey, of whom 94% (n=244) were musicians. A majority of musician respondents were male (60%) and white (82%). 87% received counseling, 32% received psychiatric medication treatment, and 8% received addiction recovery services. 97% of musicians (205/211) rated their counselor as 'very good' or 'excellent,' 88% (64/79) rated their psychiatric providers as 'very good' or 'excellent,' and 94% (17/19) rated their addiction recovery specialists as 'very good' or 'excellent' (nonsignificant between all categories, p>0.05). 89% of musicians receiving counseling, 84% receiving psychiatric medication treatment, and 95% receiving addiction recovery services agreed or strongly agreed that their symptoms and overall functioning improved as a result of their treatment (nonsignificant between all categories, p>0.05). Popular musicians express strong provider satisfaction and overall benefit when mental health interventions are accessible, affordable, and delivered by professionals familiar with their concerns. More research is needed to understand the unique psychosocial stresses popular musicians face to inform treatment planning for this high-risk, underserved population.

  6. Monitoring Bridge Dynamic Responses Using Fiber Bragg Grating Tiltmeters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Feng; Chen, Gang S; Hulsey, J Leroy

    2017-10-20

    In bridge health monitoring, tiltmeters have been used for measuring rotation and curvature; however, their application in dynamic parameter identification has been lacking. This study installed fiber Bragg grating (FBG) tiltmeters on the bearings of a bridge and monitored the dynamic rotational angle. The dynamic features, including natural frequencies and mode shapes, have been identified successfully. The innovation presented in this paper is the first-time use of FBG tiltmeter readings to identify the natural frequencies of a long-span steel girder bridge. The identified results have been verified using a bridge finite element model. This paper introduces a new method for the dynamic monitoring of a bridge using FBG tiltmeters. Limitations and future research directions are also discussed in the conclusion.

  7. Monitoring Bridge Dynamic Responses Using Fiber Bragg Grating Tiltmeters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Xiao

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In bridge health monitoring, tiltmeters have been used for measuring rotation and curvature; however, their application in dynamic parameter identification has been lacking. This study installed fiber Bragg grating (FBG tiltmeters on the bearings of a bridge and monitored the dynamic rotational angle. The dynamic features, including natural frequencies and mode shapes, have been identified successfully. The innovation presented in this paper is the first-time use of FBG tiltmeter readings to identify the natural frequencies of a long-span steel girder bridge. The identified results have been verified using a bridge finite element model. This paper introduces a new method for the dynamic monitoring of a bridge using FBG tiltmeters. Limitations and future research directions are also discussed in the conclusion.

  8. Response of radiation monitoring labels to gamma rays and electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rahim, F. Abdel; Miller, Arne; McLaughlin, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    or location has been irradiated to high doses. Among labels available worldwide, a few are suitable for indicating absorbed dose regions of slightly less than 104 Gy (monitoring high dose ranges (i.e., sterilization dose levels of > 104 Gy or > 1 Mrad), and in some cases......, and differences in dose rate and radiation type (gamma rays and electron beams) were made on 15 kinds of labels. The results show that, for many types of indicators, diverse effects may give misleading conclusions unless countermeasures are taken. For example, some of the most commonly used labels, which contain...... permit somewhat more precise discrimination of dose levels, and may sometimes be useful for monitoring differences in local dose distributions or area monitoring of radiation damage probabilities around particle accelerators or large radionuclide sources....

  9. Phonetic Accounts of Timed Responses in Syllable Monitoring Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietveld, A.C.M.; Schiller, N.O.; Caspers, J.; Chen, Y.; Heeren, W.; Pacilly, J.; Schiller, N.O.; Zanten, E. van

    2014-01-01

    This paper reports a syllable monitoring experiment that examines the role of segmental phonetic information in Dutch. Participants were presented with lists of spoken words and were required to detect auditorily specified targets that matched or did not match the initial syllable of the spoken

  10. Contrast-enhanced MR imaging monitoring of acute tumor response to chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranney, D.F.; Cohen, J.M.; Antich, P.P.; Endman, W.A.; Kulkarni, P.; Weinreb, J.C.; Giovanella, B.

    1987-01-01

    Treatment responses of human malignant melanomas were monitored at millimeter resolution in athymic mice by injecting a new polymeric contrast agent, Gd-DTPA-dextran (0.1 mmol Gd/kg, intravenously). Proton MR imaging (0.35 T, spin-echo, repetition time = 0.5 second, echo time = 50 msec) was performed 30 hours after administering diphtheria toxin. Pre-contrast medium images revealed only homogeneous intermediate-intensity tumor masses. Post-contrast medium images of untreated (viable) tumors demonstrated 32% enhancement throughout the entire mass. Post-contrast medium images of toxin-treated tumors revealed marked enhancement (65%) of the histologically viable outer rims, lesser enhancement (38%) of heavily damaged subregions, and no enhancement of dead tumor. These acute, contrast medium-enhanced MR images accurately identified tumor subregions that survived for longer than one week

  11. Monitoring early phases of orthodontic treatment by means of Raman spectroscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    d'Apuzzo, Fabrizia; Perillo, Letizia; Delfino, Ines; Portaccio, Marianna; Lepore, Maria; Camerlingo, Carlo

    2017-11-01

    Gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) is a site-specific exudate in the gingival sulcus. GCF composition changes in response to diseases or mechanical stimuli, such as those occurring during orthodontic treatments. Raman microspectroscopy (μ-RS) and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) were adopted for a GCF analysis during different initial phases of orthodontic force application. GCF samples were pooled from informed patients using paper cones. SERS spectra were obtained from GCF extracted from these cones, whereas μ-RS spectra were directly acquired on paper cones without any manipulation. The spectral characteristics of the main functional groups and the changes in cytochrome, amide III, and amide I contributions were highlighted in the different phases of orthodontic treatment with both SERS and μ-RS analysis. μ-RS directly performed on the paper cones together with proper statistical methods can offer an effective approach for the development of a tool for monitoring the processes occurring during orthodontic treatments, which may help the clinician in the choice of type of treatment individually for each patient and accelerate and improve the orthodontic therapy.

  12. PROFILE: Integrating Stressor and Response Monitoring into a Resource-Based Water-Quality Assessment Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ROUX; KEMPSTER; KLEYNHANS; VAN; DU

    1999-01-01

    / South African water law as well as the country's water resource management policies are currently under review. The Water Law Principles, which were established as part of this review process, indicate a commitment to sustainable development of water resources and the protection of an ecological "reserve." Such policy goals highlight the limitations of traditional and current water-quality management strategies, which rely on stressor monitoring and associated regulation of pollution. The concept of an assimilative capacity is central to the implementation of the current water-quality management approach. Weaknesses inherent in basing water management on the concept of assimilative capacity are discussed. Response monitoring is proposed as a way of addressing some of the weaknesses. Following a global trend, the new policy goals emphasize the need to protect rather than to use the ability of ecosystems to recover from disturbances. This necessitates the adoption of response measurements to quantify ecological condition and monitor ecological change. Response monitoring focuses on properties that are essential to the sustainability of the ecosystem. These monitoring tools can be used to establish natural ranges of ecological change within ecosystems, as well as to quantify conceptually acceptable and unacceptable ranges of change. Through a framework of biological criteria and biological impairment standards, the results of response monitoring can become an integral part of future water resource management strategies in South Africa. KEY WORDS: Stressor monitoring; Response monitoring; Assimilative capacity; Ecosystem stability; Resilience; Biocriteria

  13. Real-time earthquake monitoring: Early warning and rapid response

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-01

    A panel was established to investigate the subject of real-time earthquake monitoring (RTEM) and suggest recommendations on the feasibility of using a real-time earthquake warning system to mitigate earthquake damage in regions of the United States. The findings of the investigation and the related recommendations are described in this report. A brief review of existing real-time seismic systems is presented with particular emphasis given to the current California seismic networks. Specific applications of a real-time monitoring system are discussed along with issues related to system deployment and technical feasibility. In addition, several non-technical considerations are addressed including cost-benefit analysis, public perceptions, safety, and liability.

  14. ACR Appropriateness Criteria® Monitoring Response to Neoadjuvant Systemic Therapy for Breast Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slanetz, Priscilla J; Moy, Linda; Baron, Paul; diFlorio, Roberta M; Green, Edward D; Heller, Samantha L; Holbrook, Anna I; Lee, Su-Ju; Lewin, Alana A; Lourenco, Ana P; Niell, Bethany; Stuckey, Ashley R; Trikha, Sunita; Vincoff, Nina S; Weinstein, Susan P; Yepes, Monica M; Newell, Mary S

    2017-11-01

    Patients with locally advanced invasive breast cancers are often treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy prior to definitive surgical intervention. The primary aims of this approach are to: 1) reduce tumor burden thereby permitting breast conservation rather than mastectomy; 2) promptly treat possible metastatic disease, whether or not it is detectable on preoperative staging; and 3) potentially tailor future chemotherapeutic decisions by monitoring in-vivo tumor response. Accurate radiological assessment permits optimal management and planning in this population. However, assessment of tumor size and response to treatment can vary depending on the modality used, the measurement technique (such as single longest diameter, 3-D measurements, or calculated tumor volume), and varied response of different tumor subtypes to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (such as concentric shrinkage or tumor fragmentation). As discussed in further detail, digital mammography, digital breast tomosynthesis, US and MRI represent the key modalities with potential to help guide patient management. The American College of Radiology Appropriateness Criteria are evidence-based guidelines for specific clinical conditions that are reviewed annually by a multidisciplinary expert panel. The guideline development and revision include an extensive analysis of current medical literature from peer reviewed journals and the application of well-established methodologies (RAND/UCLA Appropriateness Method and Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation or GRADE) to rate the appropriateness of imaging and treatment procedures for specific clinical scenarios. In those instances where evidence is lacking or equivocal, expert opinion may supplement the available evidence to recommend imaging or treatment. Copyright © 2017 American College of Radiology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Excessive biologic response to IFNβ is associated with poor treatment response in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A Rudick

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Interferon-beta (IFNβ is used to inhibit disease activity in multiple sclerosis (MS, but its mechanisms of action are incompletely understood, individual treatment response varies, and biological markers predicting response to treatment have yet to be identified. METHODS: The relationship between the molecular response to IFNβ and treatment response was determined in 85 patients using a longitudinal design in which treatment effect was categorized by brain magnetic resonance imaging as good (n = 70 or poor response (n = 15. Molecular response was quantified using a customized cDNA macroarray assay for 166 IFN-regulated genes (IRGs. RESULTS: The molecular response to IFNβ differed significantly between patients in the pattern and number of regulated genes. The molecular response was strikingly stable for individuals for as long as 24 months, however, suggesting an individual 'IFN response fingerprint'. Unexpectedly, patients with poor response showed an exaggerated molecular response. IRG induction ratios demonstrated an exaggerated molecular response at both the first and 6-month IFNβ injections. CONCLUSION: MS patients exhibit individually unique but temporally stable biological responses to IFNβ. Poor treatment response is not explained by the duration of biological effects or the specific genes induced. Rather, individuals with poor treatment response have a generally exaggerated biological response to type 1 IFN injections. We hypothesize that the molecular response to type I IFN identifies a pathogenetically distinct subset of MS patients whose disease is driven in part by innate immunity. The findings suggest a strategy for biologically based, rational use of IFNβ for individual MS patients.

  16. Pre-treatment amygdala volume predicts electroconvulsive therapy response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Doesschate, Freek; van Eijndhoven, Philip; Tendolkar, Indira; van Wingen, Guido A.; van Waarde, Jeroen A.

    2014-01-01

    Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is an effective treatment for patients with severe depression. Knowledge on factors predicting therapeutic response may help to identify patients who will benefit most from the intervention. Based on the neuroplasticity hypothesis, volumes of the amygdala and

  17. 24 CFR 108.20 - Monitoring office responsibility for monitoring plans and reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... documenting the implementation of the AFHM plan, including sales or rental reports, as required by the.... When sales or rental reports show that 20% of the units covered by the AFHM plan have been sold or... for monitoring plans and reports. 108.20 Section 108.20 Housing and Urban Development Regulations...

  18. How Do Psychiatrists Apply the Minimum Clinically Important Difference to Assess Patient Responses to Treatment?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan J. McMichael BSc

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Symptom report scales are used in clinical practice to monitor patient outcomes. Using them permits the definition of a minimum clinically important difference (MCID beyond which a patient may be judged as having responded to treatment. Despite recommendations that clinicians routinely use MCIDs in clinical practice, statisticians disagree about how MCIDs should be used to evaluate individual patient outcomes and responses to treatment. To address this issue, we asked how clinicians actually use MCIDs to evaluate patient outcomes in response to treatment. Sixty-eight psychiatrists made judgments about whether hypothetical patients had responded to treatment based on their pre- and posttreatment change scores on the widely used Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale. Psychiatrists were provided with the scale’s MCID on which to base their judgments. Our secondary objective was to assess whether knowledge of the patient’s genotype influenced psychiatrists’ responder judgments. Thus, psychiatrists were also informed of whether patients possessed a genotype indicating hyperresponsiveness to treatment. While many psychiatrists appropriately used the MCID, others accepted a far lower posttreatment change as indicative of a response to treatment. When psychiatrists accepted a lower posttreatment change than the MCID, they were less confident in such judgments compared to when a patient’s posttreatment change exceeded the scale’s MCID. Psychiatrists were also less likely to identify patients as responders to treatment if they possessed a hyperresponsiveness genotype. Clinicians should recognize that when judging patient responses to treatment, they often tolerate lower response thresholds than warranted. At least some conflate their judgments with information, such as the patient’s genotype, that is irrelevant to a post hoc response-to-treatment assessment. Consequently, clinicians may be at risk of persisting with treatments that have failed

  19. (1→3)-β-D-Glucan Assay in Monitoring Response to Anti-Fungal Therapy in Fungal Endocarditis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slim, Jihad; Saling, Christopher; Szabela, Maria; Brown, Melinda; Johnson, Tamara; Goldfarb, Irvin

    2017-03-01

    A case is reported of Candida glabrata infective endocarditis (IE) treated without surgical intervention. The study aim was to: (i) briefly discuss the outcomes of other documented cases of fungal IE managed medically with fluconazole; (ii) discuss the (1→3)-β-D-glucan assay and its previously studied role in the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections; and (iii) examine a possible application of the (1→3)-β-D-glucan assay to monitor response to antifungal treatment in patients with Candida endocarditis. The serum Fungitell assay was used to trend (1→3)-β-D-glucan in a patient with Candida endocarditis to determine treatment effectiveness with fluconazole, to provide an appropriate end date for antifungal therapy, and to survey infection suppression while off treatment. The (1→03)-β-D-glucan assay began trending downwards at 197 days into treatment with oral fluconazole. After 16 months of therapy, fluconazole was stopped due to transaminitis. (1→3)-β-Dglucan levels were checked six weeks after the discontinuation of treatment and were negative. The patient has now been off therapy for 21 weeks with no signs of clinical disease, and values remain negative. The present case indicates that a trending (1→3)-β-D-glucan assay may have valuable application in monitoring treatment response and infection suppression for Candida endocarditis.

  20. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M.; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28–83) provided informed consent. T 2 - and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm 2 /s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6–8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs ( −3 mm 2 /s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p 23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC ≥1.4 × 10 −3 mm 2 /s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2–4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT.

  1. Allocation of responsibilities for monitoring and retrieval activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCombie, C.

    2000-01-01

    Geologic disposal is considered by many to offer a way to achieve the long term isolation required for radioactive wastes. The extremely long timescales, however, have drawn attention to the need for society to plan far ahead into the future. Perhaps for the first time, much thought and debate is being explicitly devoted to the burdens and the benefits which a technology will bring to many generations in the future. The questions to be answered concern not only what the benefits and burdens are, but also who bears the responsibility for defining courses of action affecting future generations and for implementing any measures required to protect society beyond the lifetimes of those initiating activities with far future impacts. In the present paper, the intention is to review the actions which may have to be taken during and after the operation of a disposal facility, to consider who shares responsibility for such actions and to look rationally at how responsibilities can best be allocated to ensure that they will be fulfilled in a way which protects future generations from harm, be it physical or financial. The paper defines the phases in the lifetime of a geologic repository, and postulates that responsibilities are to be shared between governments, regulators, repository implementers, waste producers and potentially also supra-national bodies. The specific responsibilities ranging from conceptual planning through to financial provisions for actions are then listed. The allocation of these responsibilities is then discussed. The broad conclusions are that waste producers are responsible for all financing and for most of the specific actions to be taken. In very far future times, however, responsibility for a closed and sealed national repository must revert to the government of a State. (author)

  2. Treatment non-response: Associations with smoking expectancies among treatment-seeking smokers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garey, Lorra; Taha, Samar A; Kauffman, Brooke Y; Manning, Kara F; Neighbors, Clayton; Schmidt, Norman B; Zvolensky, Michael J

    2017-10-01

    Despite the high rate of smoking cessation treatment non-response, relatively little empirical work has examined predictors of treatment non-response. The present study sought to explore the effect of smoking outcome expectancies on treatment response in a sample of treatment-seeking adult daily smokers (N=182; 53.3% female; M age =40.67; SD=13.63). Results indicated that expectancies for smoking to reduce negative affect were related to an increased likelihood of treatment non-response (OR=0.73, CI: 0.54, 0.98). These findings remained significant after controlling for sex, presence of Axis I disorder, tobacco-related health problems, tobacco dependence, anxiety sensitivity, and condition assignment as well as other smoking expectancy dimensions. Post hoc analyses revealed that this relation was stronger for smokers in the integrated care condition vs. the standard care condition (Interaction: OR=1.69, CI: 1.05, 2.73). Additionally, expectancies for smoking to enhance positive affect and provide sensory satisfaction were associated with an increased likelihood of treatment response in the standard care condition. The current findings suggest expectancies that smoking will alleviate negative affect may be a risk factor of smoking cessation treatment non-response. Additionally, findings provide evidence that the relation between smoking expectancies and treatment non-response may differ by smoking cessation treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Implicit Learning Abilities Predict Treatment Response in Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    early behavioral interventions are the most effective treatment for Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), but almost half of the children do not make...behavioral intervention . 2. KEYWORDS Autism Spectrum Disorder , implicit learning, associative learning, individual differences, functional Magnetic...2 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0261 TITLE: Implicit Learning Abilities Predict Treatment Response in Autism Spectrum Disorders PRINCIPAL

  4. Examination of Studies Targeting Social Skills with Pivotal Response Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozkus Genc, Gulden; Vuran, Sezgin

    2013-01-01

    In early education, especially in effective teaching to children with autism spectrum disorders, the teaching methods which are applicable in natural settings like pivotal response treatment (PRT) are commonly used. It is one of the naturalistic intervention models aiming to facilitate the stimulant-response generalization, decrease the dependency…

  5. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center advanced part phase response actions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hurley, B.

    1997-01-01

    Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC) response actions are carried out in Advance Party and Main Party phases of deployment. Response activities are initiated by a FRMAC Home Team prior to and during Advance Party deployment, with Home Team support continuing until the FRMAC Main Party is fully deployed. Upon arrival at the incident scene, the Advance Party establishes communications with other federal, state, and local response organizations, Following an Advance Party Meeting with these response organizations, FRMAC begins formulation of an initial monitoring and sampling plan, in coordination with the jurisdictional state and the Lead Federal Agency, and initiates detailed logistical arrangements for Main Party deployment and operations

  6. An optical microfluidic platform for spatiotemporal biofilm treatment monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Wook; Mosteller, Matthew P; Subramanian, Sowmya; Meyer, Mariana T; Ghodssi, Reza; Bentley, William E

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms constitute in excess of 65% of clinical microbial infections, with the antibiotic treatment of biofilm infections posing a unique challenge due to their high antibiotic tolerance. Recent studies performed in our group have demonstrated that a bioelectric effect featuring low-intensity electric signals combined with antibiotics can significantly improve the efficacy of biofilm treatment. In this work, we demonstrate the bioelectric effect using sub-micron thick planar electrodes in a microfluidic device. This is critical in efforts to develop microsystems for clinical biofilm infection management, including both in vivo and in vitro applications. Adaptation of the method to the microscale, for example, can enable the development of localized biofilm infection treatment using microfabricated medical devices, while augmenting existing capabilities to perform biofilm management beyond the clinical realm. Furthermore, due to scale-down of the system, the voltage requirement for inducing the electric field is reduced further below the media electrolysis threshold. Enhanced biofilm treatment using the bioelectric effect in the developed microfluidic device elicited a 56% greater reduction in viable cell density and 26% further decrease in biomass growth compared to traditional antibiotic therapy. This biofilm treatment efficacy, demonstrated in a micro-scale device and utilizing biocompatible voltage ranges, encourages the use of this method for future clinical biofilm treatment applications. (paper)

  7. Ground Water Monitoring Requirements for Hazardous Waste Treatment, Storage and Disposal Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    The groundwater monitoring requirements for hazardous waste treatment, storage and disposal facilities (TSDFs) are just one aspect of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) hazardous waste management strategy for protecting human health and the

  8. Comparison of monitor units calculated by radiotherapy treatment planning system and an independent monitor unit verification software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellakumar, P; Arun, C; Sanjay, S S; Ramesh, S B

    2011-01-01

    In radiation therapy, the monitor units (MU) needed to deliver a treatment plan are calculated by treatment planning systems (TPS). The essential part of quality assurance is to verify the MU with independent monitor unit calculation to correct any potential errors prior to the start of treatment. In this study, we have compared the MU calculated by TPS and by independent MU verification software. The MU verification software was commissioned and tested for the data integrity to ensure that the correct beam data was considered for MU calculations. The accuracy of the calculations was tested by creating a series of test plans and comparing them with ion chamber measurements. The results show that there is good agreement between the two. The MU difference (MUdiff) between the monitor unit calculations of TPS and independent MU verification system was calculated for 623 fields from 245 patients and was analyzed by treatment site for head & neck, thorax, breast, abdomen and pelvis. The mean MUdiff of -0.838% with a standard deviation of 3.04% was observed for all 623 fields. The site specific standard deviation of MUdiff was as follows: abdomen and pelvis (<1.75%), head & neck (2.5%), thorax (2.32%) and breast (6.01%). The disparities were analyzed and different correction methods were used to reduce the disparity. © 2010 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Monitoring water supply systems for anomaly detection and response

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.; Lapikas, T.; Tangena, B.H.; Vreeburg, J.H.G.

    2012-01-01

    Water supply systems are vulnerable to damage caused by unintended or intended human actions, or due to aging of the system. In order to minimize the damages and the inconvenience for the customers, a software tool was developed to detect anomalies at an early stage, and to support the responsible

  10. Cellular stress responses for monitoring and modulating ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Demirovic, Dino; Schnebert, Sylvianne; Nizard, Carine

    2013-01-01

    biochemical methods, detecting one or more proteins exclusively involved in the specific stress response pathways. The results indicate that the ageing phenotype is a result of an ineffective probability for cells to respond to stress. http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.freeradbiomed.2013.08.023...

  11. Patterns of Response After Preoperative Treatment in Gastric Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diaz-Gonzalez, Juan A.; Rodriguez, Javier; Hernandez-Lizoain, Jose L.; Ciervide, Raquel; Gaztanaga, Miren; San Miguel, Inigo; Arbea, Leire; Aristu, J. Javier; Chopitea, Ana; Martinez-Regueira, Fernando; Valenti, Victor; Garcia-Foncillas, Jesus; Martinez-Monge, Rafael; Sola, Jesus J.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To analyze the rate of pathologic response in patients with locally advanced gastric cancer treated with preoperative chemotherapy with and without chemoradiation at our institution. Methods and Materials: From 2000 to 2007 patients were retrospectively identified who received preoperative treatment for gastric cancer (cT3-4/ N+) with induction chemotherapy (Ch) or with Ch followed by concurrent chemoradiotherapy (45 Gy in 5 weeks) (ChRT). Surgery was planned 4-6 weeks after the completion of neoadjuvant treatment. Pathologic assessment was used to investigate the patterns of pathologic response after neoadjuvant treatment. Results: Sixty-one patients were analyzed. Of 61 patients, 58 (95%) underwent surgery. The R0 resection rate was 87%. Pathologic complete response was achieved in 12% of the patients. A major pathologic response (<10% of residual tumor) was observed in 53% of patients, and T downstaging was observed in 75%. Median follow-up was 38.7 months. Median disease-free survival (DFS) was 36.5 months. The only patient-, tumor-, and treatment-related factor associated with pathologic response was the use of preoperative ChRT. Patients achieving major pathologic response had a 3-year actuarial DFS rate of 63%. Conclusions: The patterns of pathologic response after preoperative ChRT suggest encouraging intervals of DFS. Such a strategy may be of interest to be explored in gastric cancer.

  12. Treatment of fluctuations of startup rates for core subcriticality monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mol, Antonio Carlos de Abreu; Martinez, Aquilino Senra

    1996-01-01

    In this paper it is presented a method to eliminate the variations in the source and intermediate range count rate, which are used for the on-line and real time monitoring of the critical safety function Subcriticality. The method may be applied to a safety parameters display system, because it is very simple and precise, which it will not affect the real time requirements of such systems. Variations in the count range could cause a temporary positive startup rate, that could lead to incorrect addressing of function restoration guideline. (author)

  13. Monitoring carbon dioxide in mechanically ventilated patients during hyperbaric treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerregård, Asger; Jansen, Erik

    2012-01-01

    Measurement of the arterial carbon dioxide (P(a)CO(2)) is an established part of the monitoring of mechanically ventilated patients. Other ways to get information about carbon dioxide in the patient are measurement of end-tidal carbon dioxide (P(ET)CO(2)) and transcutaneous carbon dioxide (PTCCO2......). Carbon dioxide in the blood and cerebral tissue has great influence on vasoactivity and thereby blood volume of the brain. We have found no studies on the correlation between P(ET)CO(2) or P(TC)CO(2), and P(a)CO(2) during hyperbaric oxygen therapy (HBOT)....

  14. A radioactive waste transportation package monitoring system for normal transport and accident emergency response conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, G.S.; Cashwell, J.W.; Apple, M.L.

    1993-01-01

    This paper addresses spent fuel and high level waste transportation history and prospects, discusses accident histories of radioactive material transport, discusses emergency responder needs and provides a general description of the Transportation Intelligent Monitoring System (TRANSIMS) design. The key objectives of the monitoring system are twofold: (1) to facilitate effective emergency response to accidents involving a radioactive waste transportation package, while minimizing risk to the public and emergency first-response personnel, and (2) to allow remote monitoring of transportation vehicle and payload conditions to enable research into radioactive material transportation for normal and accident conditions. (J.P.N.)

  15. What’s New in Traumatic Brain Injury: Update on Tracking, Monitoring and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Reis

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic brain injury (TBI, defined as an alteration in brain functions caused by an external force, is responsible for high morbidity and mortality around the world. It is important to identify and treat TBI victims as early as possible. Tracking and monitoring TBI with neuroimaging technologies, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, positron emission tomography (PET, and high definition fiber tracking (HDFT show increasing sensitivity and specificity. Classical electrophysiological monitoring, together with newly established brain-on-chip, cerebral microdialysis techniques, both benefit TBI. First generation molecular biomarkers, based on genomic and proteomic changes following TBI, have proven effective and economical. It is conceivable that TBI-specific biomarkers will be developed with the combination of systems biology and bioinformation strategies. Advances in treatment of TBI include stem cell-based and nanotechnology-based therapy, physical and pharmaceutical interventions and also new use in TBI for approved drugs which all present favorable promise in preventing and reversing TBI.

  16. What’s New in Traumatic Brain Injury: Update on Tracking, Monitoring and Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, Cesar; Wang, Yuechun; Akyol, Onat; Ho, Wing Mann; Applegate II, Richard; Stier, Gary; Martin, Robert; Zhang, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), defined as an alteration in brain functions caused by an external force, is responsible for high morbidity and mortality around the world. It is important to identify and treat TBI victims as early as possible. Tracking and monitoring TBI with neuroimaging technologies, including functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), positron emission tomography (PET), and high definition fiber tracking (HDFT) show increasing sensitivity and specificity. Classical electrophysiological monitoring, together with newly established brain-on-chip, cerebral microdialysis techniques, both benefit TBI. First generation molecular biomarkers, based on genomic and proteomic changes following TBI, have proven effective and economical. It is conceivable that TBI-specific biomarkers will be developed with the combination of systems biology and bioinformation strategies. Advances in treatment of TBI include stem cell-based and nanotechnology-based therapy, physical and pharmaceutical interventions and also new use in TBI for approved drugs which all present favorable promise in preventing and reversing TBI. PMID:26016501

  17. Structural health monitoring in composite materials using frequency response methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Seth S.; Spearing, S. Mark; Atalla, Mauro J.; Cesnik, Carlos E. S.; Soutis, Constantinos

    2001-08-01

    Cost effective and reliable damage detection is critical for the utilization of composite materials in structural applications. Non-destructive evaluation techniques (e.g. ultrasound, radiography, infra-red imaging) are available for use during standard repair and maintenance cycles, however by comparison to the techniques used for metals these are relatively expensive and time consuming. This paper presents part of an experimental and analytical survey of candidate methods for the detection of damage in composite materials. The experimental results are presented for the application of modal analysis techniques applied to rectangular laminated graphite/epoxy specimens containing representative damage modes, including delamination, transverse ply cracks and through-holes. Changes in natural frequencies and modes were then found using a scanning laser vibrometer, and 2-D finite element models were created for comparison with the experimental results. The models accurately predicted the response of the specimems at low frequencies, but the local excitation and coalescence of higher frequency modes make mode-dependent damage detection difficult and most likely impractical for structural applications. The frequency response method was found to be reliable for detecting even small amounts of damage in a simple composite structure, however the potentially important information about damage type, size, location and orientation were lost using this method since several combinations of these variables can yield identical response signatures.

  18. Pharmacogenetics of clozapine treatment response and side-effects in schizophrenia: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriretnakumar, Venuja; Huang, Eric; Müller, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Clozapine (CLZ) is the most effective treatment for treatment-resistant schizophrenia (SCZ) patients, with potential added benefits of reduction in suicide risk and aggression. However, CLZ is also mainly underused due to its high risk for the potentially lethal side-effect of agranulocytosis as well as weight gain and related metabolic dysregulation. Pharmacogenetics promises to enable the prediction of patient treatment response and risk of adverse effects based on patients' genetics, paving the way toward individualized treatment. This article reviews pharmacogenetics studies of CLZ response and side-effects with a focus on articles from January 2012 to February 2015, as an update to the previous reviews. Pharmacokinetic genes explored primarily include CYP1A2, while pharmacodynamic genes consisted of traditional pharmacogenetic targets such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor as well novel mitochondrial genes, NDUFS-1 and translocator protein. Pharmacogenetics is a promising avenue for individualized medication of CLZ in SCZ, with several consistently replicated gene variants predicting CLZ response and side-effects. However, a large proportion of studies have yielded mixed results. Large-scale Genome-wide association studies (e.g., CRESTAR) and targeted gene studies with standardized designs (response measurements, treatment durations, plasma level monitoring) are required for further progress toward clinical translation. Additionally, in order to improve study quality, we recommend accounting for important confounders, including polypharmacy, baseline measurements, treatment duration, gender, and age at onset.

  19. Hormonal receptors and response to treatment of breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loven, D.; Rakowsky, E.; Stein, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Response to several types of endocrine therapy or chemotherapy was evaluated in 60 patients with breast cancer. Estrogen and progesterone receptors were determined by radioimmunoassay. Response to endocrine therapy was significantly higher (P<0.01) among estrogen receptor (ER)-positive cases than among ER-negative cases. The response to chemotherapy did not differ significantly between the two groups. The results of this small series support the conclusion that determination of ER is valuable in planning endocrine treatment of the breast cancer patient, whereas response to chemotherapy does not correlate with ER levels. (author)

  20. A Multiplexed Assay That Monitors Effects of Multiple Compound Treatment Times Reveals Candidate Immune-Enhancing Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ziyan; Henowitz, Liza; Zweifach, Adam

    2018-05-01

    We previously developed a flow cytometry assay that monitored lytic granule exocytosis in cytotoxic T lymphocytes stimulated by contacting beads coated with activating anti-CD3 antibodies. That assay was multiplexed in that responses of cells that did or did not receive the activating stimulus were distinguished via changes in light scatter accompanying binding of cells to beads, allowing us to discriminate compounds that activate responses on their own from compounds that enhance responses in cells that received the activating stimulus, all within a single sample. Here we add a second dimension of multiplexing by developing means to assess in a single sample the effects of treating cells with test compounds for different times. Bar-coding cells before adding them to test wells lets us determine compound treatment time while also monitoring activation status and response amplitude at the point of interrogation. This multiplexed assay is suitable for screening 96-well plates. We used it to screen compounds from the National Cancer Institute, identifying several compounds that enhance anti-LAMP1 responses. Multiple-treatment-time (MTT) screening enabled by bar-coding and read via high-throughput flow cytometry may be a generally useful method for facilitating the discovery of compounds of interest.

  1. Interferon-gamma response to the treatment of active pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, L; Shi, R; Liu, X; Yuan, X; Zheng, S; Zhang, G; Wang, W; Wang, J; England, K; Via, L E; Cai, Y; Goldfeder, L C; Dodd, L E; Barry, C E; Chen, R Y

    2017-10-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) release assays (IGRAs) are used to diagnose tuberculosis (TB) but not to measure treatment response. To measure IFN-γ response to active anti-tuberculosis treatment. Patients from the Henan Provincial Chest Hospital, Henan, China, with TB symptoms and/or signs were enrolled into this prospective, observational cohort study and followed for 6 months of treatment, with blood and sputum samples collected at 0, 2, 4, 6, 8, 16 and 24 weeks. The QuantiFERON® TB-Gold assay was run on collected blood samples. Participants received a follow-up telephone call at 24 months to determine relapse status. Of the 152 TB patients enrolled, 135 were eligible for this analysis: 118 pulmonary (PTB) and 17 extra-pulmonary TB (EPTB) patients. IFN-γ levels declined significantly over time among all patients (P = 0.002), with this decline driven by PTB patients (P = 0.001), largely during the initial 8 weeks of treatment (P = 0.019). IFN-γ levels did not change among EPTB patients over time or against baseline culture or drug resistance status. After 6 months of effective anti-tuberculosis treatment, IFN-γ levels decreased significantly in PTB patients, largely over the initial 8 weeks of treatment. IFN-γ concentrations may offer some value for monitoring anti-tuberculosis treatment response among PTB patients.

  2. Mechanisms Underlying the Antidepressant Response and Treatment Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Rose Levinstein

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Depression is a complex and heterogeneous disorder affecting millions of Americans. There are several different medications and other treatments that are available and effective for many patients with depression. However, a substantial percentage of patients fail to achieve remission with these currently available interventions, and relapse rates are high. Therefore, it is necessary to determine both the mechanisms underlying the antidepressant response and the differences between responders and non-responders to treatment. Delineation of these mechanisms largely relies on experiments that utilize animal models. Therefore, this review provides an overview of the various mouse models that are currently used to assess the antidepressant response, such as chronic mild stress, social defeat, and chronic corticosterone. We discuss how these mouse models can be used to advance our understanding of the differences between responders and non-responders to antidepressant treatment. We also provide an overview of experimental treatment modalities that are used for treatment-resistant depression, such as deep brain stimulation and ketamine administration. We will then review the various genetic polymorphisms and transgenic mice that display resistance to antidepressant treatment. Finally, we synthesize the published data to describe a potential neural circuit underlying the antidepressant response and treatment resistance.

  3. Immunological monitoring for prediction of clinical response to antitumor vaccine therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhaylova, Irina N; Shubina, Irina Zh; Chkadua, George Z; Petenko, Natalia N; Morozova, Lidia F; Burova, Olga S; Beabelashvili, Robert Sh; Parsunkova, Kermen A; Balatskaya, Natalia V; Chebanov, Dmitrii K; Pospelov, Vadim I; Nazarova, Valeria V; Vihrova, Anastasia S; Cheremushkin, Evgeny A; Molodyk, Alvina A; Kiselevsky, Mikhail V; Demidov, Lev V

    2018-05-11

    Immunotherapy has shown promising results in a variety of cancers, including melanoma. However, the responses to therapy are usually heterogeneous, and understanding the factors affecting clinical outcome is still not achieved. Here, we show that immunological monitoring of the vaccine therapy for melanoma patients may help to predict the clinical course of the disease. We studied cytokine profile of cellular Th1 (IL-2, IL-12, IFN-γ) and humoral Th2 (IL-4, IL-10) immune response, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFA), transforming growth factor-β 2 (TGF-β 2), S100 protein (S100A1B and S100BB), adhesion molecule CD44 and serum cytokines β2-microglobulin to analyze different peripheral blood mononuclear cell subpopuations of patients treated with dendritic vaccines and/or cyclophosphamide in melanoma patients in the course of adjuvant treatment. The obtained data indicate predominance of cellular immunity in the first adjuvant group of patients with durable time to progression and shift to humoral with low cellular immunity in patients with short-term period to progression (increased levels of IL-4 and IL- 10). Beta-2 microglobulin was differentially expressed in adjuvant subgroups: its higher levels correlated with shorter progression-free survival and the total follow-up time. Immunoregulatory index was overall higher in patients with disease progression compared to the group of patients with no signs of disease progression.

  4. Imaging tools to measure treatment response in gout.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalbeth, Nicola; Doyle, Anthony J

    2018-01-01

    Imaging tests are in clinical use for diagnosis, assessment of disease severity and as a marker of treatment response in people with gout. Various imaging tests have differing properties for assessing the three key disease domains in gout: urate deposition (including tophus burden), joint inflammation and structural joint damage. Dual-energy CT allows measurement of urate deposition and bone damage, and ultrasonography allows assessment of all three domains. Scoring systems have been described that allow radiological quantification of disease severity and these scoring systems may play a role in assessing the response to treatment in gout. This article reviews the properties of imaging tests, describes the available scoring systems for quantification of disease severity and discusses the challenges and controversies regarding the use of imaging tools to measure treatment response in gout. © The Author 2018. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Diffusion-sensitive optical coherence tomography for real-time monitoring of mucus thinning treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackmon, Richard L.; Kreda, Silvia M.; Sears, Patrick R.; Ostrowski, Lawrence E.; Hill, David B.; Chapman, Brian S.; Tracy, Joseph B.; Oldenburg, Amy L.

    2016-03-01

    Mucus hydration (wt%) has become an increasingly useful metric in real-time assessment of respiratory health in diseases like cystic fibrosis and COPD, with higher wt% indicative of diseased states. However, available in vivo rheological techniques are lacking. Gold nanorods (GNRs) are attractive biological probes whose diffusion through tissue is sensitive to the correlation length of comprising biopolymers. Through employment of dynamic light scattering theory on OCT signals from GNRs, we find that weakly-constrained GNR diffusion predictably decreases with increasing wt% (more disease-like) mucus. Previously, we determined this method is robust against mucus transport on human bronchial epithelial (hBE) air-liquid interface cultures (R2=0.976). Here we introduce diffusion-sensitive OCT (DS-OCT), where we collect M-mode image ensembles, from which we derive depth- and temporally-resolved GNR diffusion rates. DS-OCT allows for real-time monitoring of changing GNR diffusion as a result of topically applied mucus-thinning agents, enabling monitoring of the dynamics of mucus hydration never before seen. Cultured human airway epithelial cells (Calu-3 cell) with a layer of endogenous mucus were doped with topically deposited GNRs (80x22nm), and subsequently treated with hypertonic saline (HS) or isotonic saline (IS). DS-OCT provided imaging of the mucus thinning response up to a depth of 600μm with 4.65μm resolution, over a total of 8 minutes in increments of >=3 seconds. For both IS and HS conditions, DS-OCT captured changes in the pattern of mucus hydration over time. DS-OCT opens a new window into understanding mechanisms of mucus thinning during treatment, enabling real-time efficacy feedback needed to optimize and tailor treatments for individual patients.

  6. The Role of Civil Society Organizations in Monitoring the Global AIDS Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Julia; Mallouris, Christoforos; Lee, Kelley; Alfvén, Tobias

    2017-07-01

    Civil society organizations (CSOs) are recognized as playing an exceptional role in the global AIDS response. However, there is little detailed research to date on how they contribute to specific governance functions. This article uses Haas' framework on global governance functions to map CSO's participation in the monitoring of global commitments to the AIDS response by institutions and states. Drawing on key informant interviews and primary documents, it focuses specifically on CSO participation in Global AIDS Response Progress Reporting and in Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria processes. It argues that the AIDS response is unique within global health governance, in that CSOs fulfill both formal and informal monitoring functions, and considers the strengths and weaknesses of these contributions. It concludes that future global health governance arrangements should include provisions and resources for monitoring by CSOs because their participation creates more inclusive global health governance and contributes to strengthening commitments to human rights.

  7. Opportunities for Automated Demand Response in California Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aghajanzadeh, Arian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); Wray, Craig [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States); McKane, Aimee [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2015-08-30

    Previous research over a period of six years has identified wastewater treatment facilities as good candidates for demand response (DR), automated demand response (Auto-­DR), and Energy Efficiency (EE) measures. This report summarizes that work, including the characteristics of wastewater treatment facilities, the nature of the wastewater stream, energy used and demand, as well as details of the wastewater treatment process. It also discusses control systems and automated demand response opportunities. Furthermore, this report summarizes the DR potential of three wastewater treatment facilities. In particular, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has collected data at these facilities from control systems, submetered process equipment, utility electricity demand records, and governmental weather stations. The collected data were then used to generate a summary of wastewater power demand, factors affecting that demand, and demand response capabilities. These case studies show that facilities that have implemented energy efficiency measures and that have centralized control systems are well suited to shed or shift electrical loads in response to financial incentives, utility bill savings, and/or opportunities to enhance reliability of service. In summary, municipal wastewater treatment energy demand in California is large, and energy-­intensive equipment offers significant potential for automated demand response. In particular, large load reductions were achieved by targeting effluent pumps and centrifuges. One of the limiting factors to implementing demand response is the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration at an earlier stage of the process. Another limiting factor is that cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities, limit a facility’s potential to participate in other DR activities.

  8. Evaluation of energy response of neutron rem monitor applied to high-energy accelerator facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakane, Yoshihiro; Harada, Yasunori; Sakamoto, Yukio [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan). Tokai Research Establishment] [and others

    2003-03-01

    A neutron rem monitor was newly developed for applying to the high-intensity proton accelerator facility (J-PARC) that is under construction as a joint project between the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute and the High Energy Accelerator Research Organization. To measure the dose rate accurately for wide energy range of neutrons from thermal to high-energy region, the neutron rem monitor was fabricated by adding a lead breeder layer to a conventional neutron rem monitor. The energy response of the monitor was evaluated by using neutron transport calculations for the energy range from thermal to 150 MeV. For verifying the results, the response was measured at neutron fields for the energy range from thermal to 65 MeV. The comparisons between the energy response and dose conversion coefficients show that the newly developed neutron rem monitor has a good performance in energy response up to 150 MeV, suggesting that the present study offered prospects of a practical fabrication of the rem monitor applicable to the high intensity proton accelerator facility. (author)

  9. Predictors of response to neuroleptic treatment in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, R G; Kahn, R S; Davidson, M

    1993-06-01

    Baseline symptom severity, early reduction in symptom severity, initial subjective response to neuroleptic treatment, the degree of brain atrophy, and early changes in pHVA levels appear to predict treatment outcome in schizophrenic patients. Computerized EEG results, neuropsychological and neurophysiologic tests, and baseline pHVA concentrations require further examination. Only a limited proportion of variance in treatment response, however, could be explained by either of the nine predictors alone or combined. Therefore, further research is necessary to discover yet unidentified determinants of treatment response. Future studies should test the validity and reliability of these five promising predictors in large groups of male and female patients, employ high standards for assessment reliability of clinical parameters, and use absolute rating scores on psychopathology as well as functional scales for the definition of good and poor treatment response. Furthermore, the statistical approach for data analysis should take in consideration the need for appropriate corrections when multiple correlations are performed and should test the extent to which these predictors are interdependent.

  10. Fiber Optic Sensors for Temperature Monitoring during Thermal Treatments: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schena, Emiliano; Tosi, Daniele; Saccomandi, Paola; Lewis, Elfed; Kim, Taesung

    2016-01-01

    During recent decades, minimally invasive thermal treatments (i.e., Radiofrequency ablation, Laser ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, and Cryo-ablation) have gained widespread recognition in the field of tumor removal. These techniques induce a localized temperature increase or decrease to remove the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue remains intact. An accurate measurement of tissue temperature may be particularly beneficial to improve treatment outcomes, because it can be used as a clear end-point to achieve complete tumor ablation and minimize recurrence. Among the several thermometric techniques used in this field, fiber optic sensors (FOSs) have several attractive features: high flexibility and small size of both sensor and cabling, allowing insertion of FOSs within deep-seated tissue; metrological characteristics, such as accuracy (better than 1 °C), sensitivity (e.g., 10 pm·°C−1 for Fiber Bragg Gratings), and frequency response (hundreds of kHz), are adequate for this application; immunity to electromagnetic interference allows the use of FOSs during Magnetic Resonance- or Computed Tomography-guided thermal procedures. In this review the current status of the most used FOSs for temperature monitoring during thermal procedure (e.g., fiber Bragg Grating sensors; fluoroptic sensors) is presented, with emphasis placed on their working principles and metrological characteristics. The essential physics of the common ablation techniques are included to explain the advantages of using FOSs during these procedures. PMID:27455273

  11. Fiber Optic Sensors for Temperature Monitoring during Thermal Treatments: An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emiliano Schena

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available During recent decades, minimally invasive thermal treatments (i.e., Radiofrequency ablation, Laser ablation, Microwave ablation, High Intensity Focused Ultrasound ablation, and Cryo-ablation have gained widespread recognition in the field of tumor removal. These techniques induce a localized temperature increase or decrease to remove the tumor while the surrounding healthy tissue remains intact. An accurate measurement of tissue temperature may be particularly beneficial to improve treatment outcomes, because it can be used as a clear end-point to achieve complete tumor ablation and minimize recurrence. Among the several thermometric techniques used in this field, fiber optic sensors (FOSs have several attractive features: high flexibility and small size of both sensor and cabling, allowing insertion of FOSs within deep-seated tissue; metrological characteristics, such as accuracy (better than 1 °C, sensitivity (e.g., 10 pm·°C−1 for Fiber Bragg Gratings, and frequency response (hundreds of kHz, are adequate for this application; immunity to electromagnetic interference allows the use of FOSs during Magnetic Resonance- or Computed Tomography-guided thermal procedures. In this review the current status of the most used FOSs for temperature monitoring during thermal procedure (e.g., fiber Bragg Grating sensors; fluoroptic sensors is presented, with emphasis placed on their working principles and metrological characteristics. The essential physics of the common ablation techniques are included to explain the advantages of using FOSs during these procedures.

  12. Twitter Seismology: Earthquake Monitoring and Response in a Social World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowden, D. C.; Earle, P. S.; Guy, M.; Smoczyk, G.

    2011-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is investigating how the social networking site Twitter, a popular service for sending and receiving short, public, text messages, can augment USGS earthquake response products and the delivery of hazard information. The potential uses of Twitter for earthquake response include broadcasting earthquake alerts, rapidly detecting widely felt events, qualitatively assessing earthquake damage effects, communicating with the public, and participating in post-event collaboration. Several seismic networks and agencies are currently distributing Twitter earthquake alerts including the European-Mediterranean Seismological Centre (@LastQuake), Natural Resources Canada (@CANADAquakes), and the Indonesian meteorological agency (@infogempabmg); the USGS will soon distribute alerts via the @USGSted and @USGSbigquakes Twitter accounts. Beyond broadcasting alerts, the USGS is investigating how to use tweets that originate near the epicenter to detect and characterize shaking events. This is possible because people begin tweeting immediately after feeling an earthquake, and their short narratives and exclamations are available for analysis within 10's of seconds of the origin time. Using five months of tweets that contain the word "earthquake" and its equivalent in other languages, we generate a tweet-frequency time series. The time series clearly shows large peaks correlated with the origin times of widely felt events. To identify possible earthquakes, we use a simple Short-Term-Average / Long-Term-Average algorithm similar to that commonly used to detect seismic phases. As with most auto-detection algorithms, the parameters can be tuned to catch more or less events at the cost of more or less false triggers. When tuned to a moderate sensitivity, the detector found 48 globally-distributed, confirmed seismic events with only 2 false triggers. A space-shuttle landing and "The Great California ShakeOut" caused the false triggers. This number of

  13. Biofouling of Water Treatment Membranes: A Review of the Underlying Causes, Monitoring Techniques and Control Measures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicity A. Roddick

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Biofouling is a critical issue in membrane water and wastewater treatment as it greatly compromises the efficiency of the treatment processes. It is difficult to control, and significant economic resources have been dedicated to the development of effective biofouling monitoring and control strategies. This paper highlights the underlying causes of membrane biofouling and provides a review on recent developments of potential monitoring and control methods in water and wastewater treatment with the aim of identifying the remaining issues and challenges in this area.

  14. Integration of radiation monitoring for nuclear emergency response teams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olsen, J T; Thompson, N Y [Royal Military Coll. of Canada, Kingston, ON (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    The Canadian Forces have established Nuclear Emergency Response Teams to cope with potential radiation accidents. Previously, only gamma and high-energy beta radiation could be detected. Recently, new radiation sampling, detecting, and analytical equipment has been bought, including air samplers, beta counters, high-purity germanium gamma detectors, and multi-channel analyzers together with Gamma Vision Software to analyze gamma spectra. The purpose of the present study is to propose a way to use the new equipment, to analyze the results from the gamma and beta detectors, and to integrate the results into a format for decision making. Integration is achieved through the creation of a computer program, Radiation Integration Program (RIP). This program analyzes gross beta counts, and uses them to estimate danger to the thyroid. As well the results from Gamma Vision are converted from Bq to dose rate for several parts of the body. Overall gamma results affecting the thyroid are compared to the beta results to verify the initial estimations.

  15. Monitoring T-Cell Responses in Translational Studies: Optimization of Dye-Based Proliferation Assay for Evaluation of Antigen-Specific Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja Ten Brinke

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Adoptive therapy with regulatory T cells or tolerance-inducing antigen (Ag-presenting cells is innovative and promising therapeutic approach to control undesired and harmful activation of the immune system, as observed in autoimmune diseases, solid organ and bone marrow transplantation. One of the critical issues to elucidate the mechanisms responsible for success or failure of these therapies and define the specificity of the therapy is the evaluation of the Ag-specific T-cell responses. Several efforts have been made to develop suitable and reproducible assays. Here, we focus on dye-based proliferation assays. We highlight with practical examples the fundamental issues to take into consideration for implementation of an effective and sensitive dye-based proliferation assay to monitor Ag-specific responses in patients. The most critical points were used to design a road map to set up and analyze the optimal assay to assess Ag-specific T-cell responses in patients undergoing different treatments. This is the first step to optimize monitoring of tolerance induction, allowing comparison of outcomes of different clinical studies. The road map can also be applied to other therapeutic interventions, not limited to tolerance induction therapies, in which Ag-specific T-cell responses are relevant such as vaccination approaches and cancer immunotherapy.

  16. Monitoring the biological activity of micropollutants during advanced wastewater treatment with ozonation and activated carbon filtration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macova, M; Escher, B I; Reungoat, J; Carswell, S; Chue, K Lee; Keller, J; Mueller, J F

    2010-01-01

    A bioanalytical test battery was used to monitor the removal efficiency of organic micropollutants during advanced wastewater treatment in the South Caboolture Water Reclamation Plant, Queensland, Australia. This plant treats effluent from a conventional sewage treatment plant for industrial water reuse. The aqueous samples were enriched using solid-phase extraction to separate some organic micropollutants of interest from metals, nutrients and matrix components. The bioassays were chosen to provide information on groups of chemicals with a common mode of toxic action. Therefore they can be considered as sum indicators to detect certain relevant groups of chemicals, not as the most ecologically or human health relevant endpoints. The baseline toxicity was quantified with the bioluminescence inhibition test using the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri. The specific modes of toxic action that were targeted with five additional bioassays included aspects of estrogenicity, dioxin-like activity, genotoxicity, neurotoxicity, and phytotoxicity. While the accompanying publication discusses the treatment steps in more detail by drawing from the results of chemical analysis as well as the bioanalytical results, here we focus on the applicability and limitations of using bioassays for the purpose of determining the treatment efficacy of advanced water treatment and for water quality assessment in general. Results are reported in toxic equivalent concentrations (TEQ), that is, the concentration of a reference compound required to elicit the same response as the unknown and unidentified mixture of micropollutants actually present. TEQ proved to be useful and easily communicable despite some limitations and uncertainties in their derivation based on the mixture toxicity theory. The results obtained were reproducible, robust and sensitive. The TEQ in the influent ranged in the same order of magnitude as typically seen in effluents of conventional sewage treatment plants. In the

  17. Resource consumption and management associated with monitoring of warfarin treatment in primary health care in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nilsson Gunnar H

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Warfarin is used for the prevention and treatment of various thromboembolic complications. It is an efficacious anticoagulant, but it has a narrow therapeutic range, and regular monitoring is required to ensure therapeutic efficacy and at the same time avoid life-threatening adverse events. The objective was to assess management and resource consumption associated with patient monitoring episodes during warfarin treatment in primary health care in Sweden. Methods Delphi technique was used to systematically explore attitudes, demands and priorities, and to collect informed judgements related to monitoring of warfarin treatment. Two separate Delphi-panels were performed in three and two rounds, respectively, one concerning tests taken in primary health care centres, involving 34 GPs and 10 registered nurses, and one concerning tests taken in patients' homes, involving 49 district nurses. Results In the primary health care panel 10 of the 34 GPs regularly collaborated with a registered nurse. Average time for one monitoring episode was estimated to 10.1 minutes for a GP and 21.4 minutes for a nurse, when a nurse assisted a doctor. The average time for monitoring was 17.6 minutes for a GP when not assisted by a nurse. Considering all the monitoring episodes, 11.6% of patient blood samples were taken in the individual patient's home. Average time for such a monitoring episode was estimated to 88.2 minutes. Of all the visits, 8.2% were performed in vain and took on average 44.6 minutes. In both studies, approximately 20 different elements of work concerning management of patients during warfarin treatment were identified. Conclusion Monitoring of patients during treatment with warfarin in primary health care in Sweden involves many elements of work, and demands large resources, especially when tests are taken in the patient's home.

  18. Fabry disease: recent advances in pathology, diagnosis, treatment and monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoffmann Björn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Fabry disease (α-galactosidase A deficiency accumulation of Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3 leads to progressive organ failure and premature death. The introduction of enzyme replacement therapy (ERT was the beginning of a new era in this disorder, and has prompted a broad range of research activities. This review aims to summarize recent developments and progress with high impact for Fabry disease. Methods A Pubmed analysis was performed using the search terms "Fabry disease", "Anderson-Fabry disease", "alpha-galactosidase A" and "Gb3". Of the given publications by 31st January 2009 only original articles recently published in peer reviewed journals were included for this review. Case reports were included only when they comprised a new aspect. In addition we included relevant conference abstracts when the results had not already been published as original articles. Results Apart from Gb3-accumulation cellular and organ specific damages may be related also to inflammatory and immunological consequences. It will be interesting whether this may lead to new therapeutic strategies in the treatment of Fabry disease. Since newborn screening is still difficult in Fabry disease, detection of patients in populations at risk is of great importance. Undiagnosed patients with Fabry disease may still be found in cohorts of subjects with renal diseases, cardiomyopathy and TIA or stroke. Efforts should be undertaken to identify these individuals and initialise ERT in order to hault disease progression. It has also been demonstrated that Gb3-accumulation leads to pre-clinical damages and it is believed that early treatment may be the only possibility so far to prevent irreversible organ damage.

  19. Monitors display of radiological images: quality control and response of the observer; Monitores de visualizacion de imagenes radiologicas: control de calidad y respuesta del observador

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cesares Magaz, O.; Catalan Acosta, A.; Hernandez Armas, O. C.; Gonzalez Martin, A. E.; Hernandez Armas, J.

    2011-07-01

    This thesis is aimed to determine the possible change experienced by a human reader response to the qualification of a test image on a monitor diagnostic radiographic image when observed before and after calibration of the monitor following the provisions of the AAPM TG18 protocol. It also quantified the change experienced by the monitor as a result of the calibration, by measuring the luminance response as set out in the protocol.

  20. Response after Infection-Associated Rise in Clozapine Levels in Treatment-Resistant Schizoaffective Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina H. Grootendorst-van Mil

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical management of patients with treatment-resistant psychotic disorders is still challenging despite years of extensive research. If first-line antipsychotic treatment proves ineffective, clozapine is considered golden standard. Herein, we report on a patient with schizoaffective disorder that initially showed no response to treatment with clozapine and ECT and therefore reached a therapeutic dead end. After an unintentional exposure to supratherapeutic clozapine levels, related to a pneumonia, a significant and persistent reduction of psychotic symptoms occurred. The report suggests a careful reevaluation of the clozapine dose in cases of treatment-resistant psychotic disorders with failed trials of clozapine. Further increase of dose may prove efficacious, although side effects should be closely monitored. Research to determine the upper threshold of clozapine for antipsychotic efficacy is warranted.

  1. Mechanical Harvesting Effectively Controls Young Typha spp. Invasion and Unmanned Aerial Vehicle Data Enhances Post-treatment Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane C. Lishawa

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The ecological impacts of invasive plants increase dramatically with time since invasion. Targeting young populations for treatment is therefore an economically and ecologically effective management approach, especially when linked to post-treatment monitoring to evaluate the efficacy of management. However, collecting detailed field-based post-treatment data is prohibitively expensive, typically resulting in inadequate documentation of the ecological effects of invasive plant management. Alternative approaches, such as remote detection with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV, provide an opportunity to advance the science and practice of restoration ecology. In this study, we sought to determine the plant community response to different mechanical removal treatments to a dominant invasive wetland macrophyte (Typha spp. along an age-gradient within a Great Lakes coastal wetland. We assessed the post-treatment responses with both intensive field vegetation and UAV data. Prior to treatment, the oldest Typha stands had the lowest plant diversity, lowest native sedge (Carex spp. cover, and the greatest Typha cover. Following treatment, plots that were mechanically harvested below the surface of the water differed from unharvested control and above-water harvested plots for several plant community measures, including lower Typha dominance, lower native plant cover, and greater floating and submerged aquatic species cover. Repeated-measures analysis revealed that above-water cutting increased plant diversity and aquatic species cover across all ages, and maintained native Carex spp. cover in the youngest portions of Typha stands. UAV data revealed significant post-treatment differences in normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI scores, blue band reflectance, and vegetation height, and these remotely collected measures corresponded to field observations. Our findings suggest that both mechanically harvesting the above-water biomass of young Typha stands

  2. Personality, Stressful Life Events, and Treatment Response in Major Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulmash, Eric; Harkness, Kate L.; Stewart, Jeremy G.; Bagby, R. Michael

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined whether the personality traits of self-criticism or dependency moderated the effect of stressful life events on treatment response. Depressed outpatients (N = 113) were randomized to 16 weeks of cognitive-behavioral therapy, interpersonal psychotherapy, or antidepressant medication (ADM). Stressful life events were…

  3. Socio-demographic correlates of treatment response among ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Mark S. Ezeme, Richard Uwakwe, Appolos C. Ndukuba, Monday N. Igwe, Paul C. Odinka, Kennedy Amadi, Nichodemus O. Obayi ... Conclusion: Knowledge about these variables in relation to treatment response would improve mental health services as regards articulation of prognosis and psycho education. Keywords: ...

  4. The evolution of the female sexual response concept: Treatment implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damjanović Aleksandar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sexual dysfunctions have been the most prevalent group of sexual disorders and include a large number of populations of both sexes. The research of sexual behavior and treatment of women with sexual distress arises many questions related to differences in sexual response of men and women. The conceptualization of this response in modern sexology has changed over time. The objective of our paper was to present the changes and evolution of the female’s sexual response concept in a summarized and integrated way, to analyze the expanded and revised definitions of the female sexual response as well as implications and recommendations of new approaches to diagnostics and treatment according to the established changes. The lack of adequate empirical basis of the female sexual response model is a critical question in the literature dealing with this issue. Some articles report that linear models demonstrate more correctly and precisely the sexual response of women with normal sexual functions in relation to women with sexual dysfunction. Modification of this model later resulted in a circular model which more adequately presented the sexual response of women with sexual function disorder than of women with normal sexual function. The nonlinear model of female sexual response constructed by Basson incorporates the value of emotional intimacy, sexual stimulus and satisfaction with the relationship. Female functioning is significantly affected by multiple psychosocial factors such as satisfaction with the relationship, self-image, earlier negative sexual experience, etc. Newly revised, expanded definitions of female sexual dysfunction try to contribute to new knowledge about a highly contextual nature of woman’s sexuality so as to enhance clinical treatment of dysfunctions. The definitions emphasize the evaluation of the context of women’s problematic sexual experiences.

  5. Study of the response of radiation protection monitors in terms of H*(10) in X radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nonato, Fernanda B.C.; Carvalho, Valdir S.; Vivolo, Vitor; Caldas, Linda V.E.

    2009-01-01

    The ambient dose equivalent, H * (10), is an operational quantity recommended by the International Commission of radiation Units and Measurements Report 39 for measurements in area monitoring. However, most of the monitoring instruments used in radiation protection in Brazil still use the old quantities exposure rate and absorbed dose rate. Therefore, it is necessary to study how to change the operational quantity to H * (10). In this work, the response of radiation protection monitoring detectors was studied in terms of H * (10) for different energies using standard X-rays (narrow beams) at the Calibration Laboratory of IPEN. (author)

  6. Diffusion-Weighted Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Monitoring Rectal Cancer Response to Neoadjuvant Chemoradiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbaro, Brunella, E-mail: bbarbaro@rm.unicatt.it [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Vecchio, Fabio M. [Department of Pathology, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Rizzo, Gianluca [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi [Department of Surgery, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy); Bonomo, Lorenzo [Department of Bioimaging and Radiological Sciences, Catholic University School of Medicine, Rome (Italy)

    2012-06-01

    Purpose: To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. Methods and Materials: The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T{sub 2}- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm{sup 2}/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Results: Low pretreatment ADCs (<1.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s) were correlated with TRG 4 scores (p = .0011) and associated to extramural vascular invasion with ypN+ (85.7% positive predictive value for ypN+). During treatment, the mean percentage of increase in tumor ADC was significantly greater in the responders than in the nonresponders (p < .0001) and a >23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC {>=}1.4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3}mm{sup 2}/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising

  7. The limits of parental responsibility regarding medical treatment decisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Sarah L

    2011-11-01

    Parental responsibility (PR) was a concept introduced by the Children Act (CA) 1989 which aimed to replace the outdated notion of parental rights and duties which regarded children as parental possessions. Section 3(1) CA 1989 defines PR as 'all the rights, duties, powers, responsibilities and authority which by law a parent of a child has in relation to the child'. In exercising PR, individuals may make medical treatment decisions on children's behalf. Medical decision-making is one area of law where both children and the state can intercede and limit parental decision-making. Competent children can consent to treatment and the state can interfere if parental decisions are not seemingly in the child's 'best interests'. This article examines the concept, and limitations, of PR in relation to medical treatment decision-making.

  8. Chronic nailbiting: a controlled comparison of competing response and mild aversion treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, K W

    1996-03-01

    Recent studies have suggested that competing response, an abridged version of Azrin and Nunn's (1973) habit reversal method (Behaviour Research and Therapy, 11, 619-628), is a key component in the treatment of chronic nailbiting (Horne & Wilkinson, 1980, Behaviour Research and Therapy, 18, 287-291; Silber & Haynes, 1992, Behaviour Research and Therapy, 30, 15-22). This study replicated and extended the latter by adding an 8 week follow-up period and by using a non-student sample. Forty-five chronic nailbiter Ss were divided into three experimental groups. One method involved the use of mild aversion in which Ss painted a bitter substance on their nails. A second method required the subject to perform a competing response whenever they had the urge to nailbite or found themselves biting their nails. Both methods included self-monitoring of the behaviour and a third group of Ss performed self-monitoring alone as a control condition. The study lasted 12 weeks. Mild aversion resulted in significant improvements in nail length, with the competing response method just failing to show significance in this regard. There was no significant improvement for the control group. The implications for further study and the benefits of competing response in the light of these findings are discussed in terms of treatment success and use of therapist time.

  9. EMIR: a configurable hierarchical system for event monitoring and incident response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deich, William T. S.

    2014-07-01

    The Event Monitor and Incident Response system (emir) is a flexible, general-purpose system for monitoring and responding to all aspects of instrument, telescope, and general facility operations, and has been in use at the Automated Planet Finder telescope for two years. Responses to problems can include both passive actions (e.g. generating alerts) and active actions (e.g. modifying system settings). Emir includes a monitor-and-response daemon, plus graphical user interfaces and text-based clients that automatically configure themselves from data supplied at runtime by the daemon. The daemon is driven by a configuration file that describes each condition to be monitored, the actions to take when the condition is triggered, and how the conditions are aggregated into hierarchical groups of conditions. Emir has been implemented for the Keck Task Library (KTL) keyword-based systems used at Keck and Lick Observatories, but can be readily adapted to many event-driven architectures. This paper discusses the design and implementation of Emir , and the challenges in balancing the competing demands for simplicity, flexibility, power, and extensibility. Emir 's design lends itself well to multiple purposes, and in addition to its core monitor and response functions, it provides an effective framework for computing running statistics, aggregate values, and summary state values from the primitive state data generated by other subsystems, and even for creating quick-and-dirty control loops for simple systems.

  10. Rapid Response in Psychological Treatments for Binge-Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Anja; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Agras, W. Stewart; Wilfley, Denise E.; Wilson, G. Terence

    2015-01-01

    Objective Analysis of short- and long-term effects of rapid response across three different treatments for binge-eating disorder (BED). Method In a randomized clinical study comparing interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), cognitive-behavioral guided self-help (CBTgsh), and behavioral weight loss (BWL) treatment in 205 adults meeting DSM-IV criteria for BED, the predictive value of rapid response, defined as ≥ 70% reduction in binge-eating by week four, was determined for remission from binge-eating and global eating disorder psychopathology at posttreatment, 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-month follow-up. Results Rapid responders in CBTgsh, but not in IPT or BWL, showed significantly greater rates of remission from binge-eating than non-rapid responders, which was sustained over the long term. Rapid and non-rapid responders in IPT and rapid responders in CBTgsh showed a greater remission from binge-eating than non-rapid responders in CBTgsh and BWL. Rapid responders in CBTgsh showed greater remission from binge-eating than rapid responders in BWL. Although rapid responders in all treatments had lower global eating disorder psychopathology than non-rapid responders in the short term, rapid responders in CBTgsh and IPT were more improved than those in BWL and non-rapid responders in each treatment. Rapid responders in BWL did not differ from non-rapid responders in CBTgsh and IPT. Conclusions Rapid response is a treatment-specific positive prognostic indicator of sustained remission from binge-eating in CBTgsh. Regarding an evidence-based stepped care model, IPT, equally efficacious for rapid and non-rapid responders, could be investigated as a second-line treatment in case of non-rapid response to first-line CBTgsh. PMID:25867446

  11. Rapid response in psychological treatments for binge eating disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilbert, Anja; Hildebrandt, Thomas; Agras, W Stewart; Wilfley, Denise E; Wilson, G Terence

    2015-06-01

    Analysis of short- and long-term effects of rapid response across 3 different treatments for binge eating disorder (BED). In a randomized clinical study comparing interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), cognitive-behavioral therapy guided self-help (CBTgsh), and behavioral weight loss (BWL) treatment in 205 adults meeting Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (4th ed.; DSM-IV; APA, 1994) criteria for BED, the predictive value of rapid response, defined as ≥70% reduction in binge eating by Week 4, was determined for remission from binge eating and global eating disorder psychopathology at posttreatment, 6-, 12-, 18-, and 24-month follow-ups. Rapid responders in CBTgsh, but not in IPT or BWL, showed significantly greater rates of remission from binge eating than nonrapid responders, which was sustained over the long term. Rapid and nonrapid responders in IPT and rapid responders in CBTgsh showed a greater remission from binge eating than nonrapid responders in CBTgsh and BWL. Rapid responders in CBTgsh showed greater remission from binge eating than rapid responders in BWL. Although rapid responders in all treatments had lower global eating disorder psychopathology than nonrapid responders in the short term, rapid responders in CBTgsh and IPT were more improved than those in BWL and nonrapid responders in each treatment. Rapid responders in BWL did not differ from nonrapid responders in CBTgsh and IPT. Rapid response is a treatment-specific positive prognostic indicator of sustained remission from binge eating in CBTgsh. Regarding an evidence-based, stepped-care model, IPT, equally efficacious for rapid and nonrapid responders, could be investigated as a second-line treatment in case of nonrapid response to first-line CBTgsh. (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Sensor response monitoring in pressurized water reactors using time series modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Upadhyaya, B.R.; Kerlin, T.W.

    1978-01-01

    Random data analysis in nuclear power reactors for purposes of process surveillance, pattern recognition and monitoring of temperature, pressure, flow and neutron sensors has gained increasing attention in view of their potential for helping to ensure safe plant operation. In this study, application of autoregressive moving-average (ARMA) time series modeling for monitoring temperature sensor response characteristrics is presented. The ARMA model is used to estimate the step and ramp response of the sensors and the related time constant and ramp delay time. The ARMA parameters are estimated by a two-stage algorithm in the spectral domain. Results of sensor testing for an operating pressurized water reactor are presented. 16 refs

  13. Monitoring Initial Response to Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitor-Based Regimens An Individual Patient Data Meta-Analysis From Randomized, Placebo-Controlled Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bell, Katy J. L.; Hayen, Andrew; Macaskill, Petra; Craig, Jonathan C.; Neal, Bruce C.; Fox, Kim M.; Remme, Willem J.; Asselbergs, Folkert W.; van Gilst, Wiek H.; MacMahon, Stephen; Remuzzi, Giuseppe; Ruggenenti, Piero; Teo, Koon K.; Irwig, Les

    Most clinicians monitor blood pressure to estimate a patient's response to blood pressure-lowering therapy. However, the apparent change may not actually reflect the effect of the treatment, because a person's blood pressure varies considerably even without the administration of drug therapy. We

  14. Tacrolimus drug level and response to treatment in idiopathic childhood steroid resistant nephrotic syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, S.S.; Hafeez, F.; Akhtar, N.

    2015-01-01

    The management of Steroid Resistant Nephrotic Syndrome (SRNS) is an uphill task for paediatric nephrologists as immunosuppressive agents are the mainstay of treatment in these patients. Tacrolimus is used along with steroids. This study is conducted to see the relationship between the tacrolimus dose, drug level and response in the management of SRNS. Methods: This quasi experimental study was conducted at The Childrens Hospital Lahore over a period of one year. Patients with SRNS of either sex and 1-10 years of age were included and those with secondary nephrotic syndrome were excluded. Tacrolimus was given at a dose of 0.05-0.1 mg/kg/day in 2 divided doses along with steroids. The follow-up was done for six months with proteinuria monitoring and tacrolimus drug levels done two weeks after initiation of treatment. Results: Out of 42 patients, 27 (64.3%) were males and 15 (35.7%) were females. The most common histological diagnosis observed was mesangio-proliferative glomerulonephritis in 30 (71.4%) patients. The tacrolimus trough level range was 0.5-15.20 ng/ml with a mean value of 4.68 ng/ml±2.85. Forty-one (97.6%) children showed complete response to treatment while one patient showed partial response. Conclusion: This study suggests that tacrolimus is an effective drug for treatment of SRNS in paediatric patients and there is no linear relationship between the drug dose, response and drug level. (author)

  15. The Impact of Early Substance Use Disorder Treatment Response on Treatment Outcomes Among Pregnant Women With Primary Opioid Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuten, Michelle; Fitzsimons, Heather; Hochheimer, Martin; Jones, Hendree E; Chisolm, Margaret S

    2018-03-13

    This study examined the impact of early patient response on treatment utilization and substance use among pregnant participants enrolled in substance use disorder (SUD) treatment. Treatment responders (TRs) and treatment nonresponders (TNRs) were compared on pretreatment and treatment measures. Regression models predicted treatment utilization and substance use. TR participants attended more treatment and had lower rates of substance use relative to TNR participants. Regression models for treatment utilization and substance use were significant. Maternal estimated gestational age (EGA) and baseline cocaine use were negatively associated with treatment attendance. Medication-assisted treatment, early treatment response, and baseline SUD treatment were positively associated with treatment attendance. Maternal EGA was negatively associated with counseling attendance; early treatment response was positively associated with counseling attendance. Predictors of any substance use at 1 month were maternal education, EGA, early treatment nonresponse, and baseline cocaine use. The single predictor of any substance use at 2 months was early treatment nonresponse. Predictors of opioid use at 1 month were maternal education, EGA, early treatment nonresponse, and baseline SUD treatment. Predictors of opioid use at 2 months were early treatment nonresponse, and baseline cocaine and marijuana use. Predictors of cocaine use at 1 month were early treatment nonresponse, baseline cocaine use, and baseline SUD treatment. Predictors of cocaine use at 2 months were early treatment nonresponse and baseline cocaine use. Early treatment response predicts more favorable maternal treatment utilization and substance use outcomes. Treatment providers should implement interventions to maximize patient early response to treatment.

  16. Modernisation of Radiation Monitoring Room as a Part of Slovenian Emergency Response Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarvari, A.; Mitic, D.

    2003-01-01

    In the year 2002 the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration (SNSA) moved to the new premises therefore it had to rearrange some of its rooms for the emergency situation. SNSA does not operate with a dedicated Emergency Response Centre (ERC), instead of it the SNSA has to rearrange the existing rooms in case of an emergency. Modernisation of the equipment, with the help of government of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, for the emergency situation was carried out, especially in the monitoring room. The radiation monitoring system, which is placed in the monitoring room, continuously collects, processes and archives the incoming data of exposure to radiation and meteorological parameters on the Slovenian territory (A model national emergency response plan for radiological accidents, IAEA, Vienna, 1993. IAEA-TECDOC-718). In the emergency situation the monitoring room transforms into the room for the Dose Assessment Group (DAG), which is part of ERC (IAEA emergency response network, IAEA, Vienna, 2000, EPR-ERNET (2000)). The modernisation of monitoring room and within the DAG room with new equipment and its purpose is described in this article. Modernisation of the monitoring room and the room for DAG showed to be inevitably needed. Modernisation of the monitoring room has brought the SNSA a sophisticated and reliable system of controlling the external exposure to radiation on the Slovenian territory. The equipment, especially the equipment for the use in the emergency situation, brought novelties for the Dose Assessment Group. The group has now better and easier control of radiation situation in case of an accident. In overall this modernisation has put the Slovenian Nuclear Safety Administration a step forward in having a dedicated Emergency Response Centre, since it does not need to rearrange the room for the Dose Assessment Group. (author)

  17. Neurofilament light antibodies in serum reflect response to natalizumab treatment in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amor, Sandra; van der Star, Baukje J; Bosca, Isabel; Raffel, Joel; Gnanapavan, Sharmilee; Watchorn, Jonathan; Kuhle, Jens; Giovannoni, Gavin; Baker, David; Malaspina, Andrea; Puentes, Fabiola

    2014-09-01

    Increased levels of antibodies to neurofilament light protein (NF-L) in biological fluids have been found to reflect neuroinflammatory responses and neurodegeneration in multiple sclerosis (MS). To evaluate whether levels of serum antibodies against NF-L correlate with clinical variants and treatment response in MS. The autoantibody reactivity to NF-L protein was tested in serum samples from patients with relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) (n=22) and secondary progressive MS (SPMS) (n=26). Two other cohorts of RRMS patients under treatment with natalizumab were analysed cross-sectionally (n=16) and longitudinally (n=24). The follow-up samples were taken at 6, 12, 18 and 24 months after treatment, and the NF-L antibody levels were compared against baseline levels. NF-L antibodies were higher in MS clinical groups than healthy controls and in RRMS compared to SPMS patients (ptreatment compared with baseline measurements (p=0.001). Drug efficacy in MS treatment indicates the potential use of monitoring the content of antibodies against the NF-L chain as a predictive biomarker of treatment response in MS. © The Author(s) 2014.

  18. Regulating task-monitoring systems in response to variable reward contingencies and outcomes in cocaine addicts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morie, Kristen P; De Sanctis, Pierfilippo; Garavan, Hugh; Foxe, John J

    2016-03-01

    We investigated anticipatory and consummatory reward processing in cocaine addiction. In addition, we set out to assess whether task-monitoring systems were appropriately recalibrated in light of variable reward schedules. We also examined neural measures of task-monitoring and reward processing as a function of hedonic tone, since anhedonia is a vulnerability marker for addiction that is obviously germane in the context of reward processing. High-density event-related potentials were recorded while participants performed a speeded response task that systematically varied anticipated probabilities of reward receipt. The paradigm dissociated feedback regarding task success (or failure) from feedback regarding the value of reward (or loss), so that task-monitoring and reward processing could be examined in partial isolation. Twenty-three active cocaine abusers and 23 age-matched healthy controls participated. Cocaine abusers showed amplified anticipatory responses to reward predictive cues, but crucially, these responses were not as strongly modulated by reward probability as in controls. Cocaine users also showed blunted responses to feedback about task success or failure and did not use this information to update predictions about reward. In turn, they showed clearly blunted responses to reward feedback. In controls and users, measures of anhedonia were associated with reward motivation. In cocaine users, anhedonia was also associated with diminished monitoring and reward feedback responses. Findings imply that reward anticipation and monitoring deficiencies in addiction are associated with increased responsiveness to reward cues but impaired ability to predict reward in light of task contingencies, compounded by deficits in responding to actual reward outcomes.

  19. Monitoring breast cancer treatment using a Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy-based computational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depciuch, J; Kaznowska, E; Golowski, S; Koziorowska, A; Zawlik, I; Cholewa, M; Szmuc, K; Cebulski, J

    2017-09-05

    Breast cancer affects one in four women, therefore, the search for new diagnostic technologies and therapeutic approaches is of critical importance. This involves the development of diagnostic tools to facilitate the detection of cancer cells, which is useful for assessing the efficacy of cancer therapies. One of the major challenges for chemotherapy is the lack of tools to monitor efficacy during the course of treatment. Vibrational spectroscopy appears to be a promising tool for such a purpose, as it yields Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectra which can be used to provide information on the chemical composition of the tissue. Previous research by our group has demonstrated significant differences between the infrared spectra of healthy, cancerous and post-chemotherapy breast tissue. Furthermore, the results obtained for three extreme patient cases revealed that the infrared spectra of post-chemotherapy breast tissue closely resembles that of healthy breast tissue when chemotherapy is effective (i.e., a good therapeutic response is achieved), or that of cancerous breast tissue when chemotherapy is ineffective. In the current study, we compared the infrared spectra of healthy, cancerous and post-chemotherapy breast tissue. Characteristic parameters were designated for the obtained spectra, spreading the function of absorbance using the Kramers-Kronig transformation and the best fit procedure to obtain Lorentz functions, which represent components of the bands. The Lorentz function parameters were used to develop a physics-based computational model to verify the efficacy of a given chemotherapy protocol in a given case. The results obtained using this model reflected the actual patient data retrieved from medical records (health improvement or no improvement). Therefore, we propose this model as a useful tool for monitoring the efficacy of chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Neurobehavioral response to increased treatment dosage in chronic, severe aphasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer L Mozeiko

    2014-04-01

    •\tIncreased activation in S2’s bilateral inferior frontal gyrus following the second treatment session indicates that a second Treatment Period can influence continued neuroplastic change in severe, chronic aphasia. •\tS1 appears to show the most activation following Treatment Period I. It is possible that his greater lesion volume or site did not allow for benefit from a second dose to the same degree as S2. •\tActivation changes (or lack thereof in both cases corresponded with performance on the naming task in the scanner, reflecting the effect of treatment. •\tFor S2, neuroimaging supported the behavioral results which favor a second dose of ILAT. For S1, behavioral results, particularly in his consistent increases on the BNT, are not supported by either the behavioral results in the scanner or the BOLD response.

  1. The Trauma Patient Tracking System: implementing a wireless monitoring infrastructure for emergency response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maltz, Jonathan; C Ng, Thomas; Li, Dustin; Wang, Jian; Wang, Kang; Bergeron, William; Martin, Ron; Budinger, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    In mass trauma situations, emergency personnel are challenged with the task of prioritizing the care of many injured victims. We propose a trauma patient tracking system (TPTS) where first-responders tag all patients with a wireless monitoring device that continuously reports the location of each patient. The system can be used not only to prioritize patient care, but also to determine the time taken for each patient to receive treatment. This is important in training emergency personnel and in identifying bottlenecks in the disaster response process. In situations where biochemical agents are involved, a TPTS may be employed to determine sites of cross-contamination. In order to track patient location in both outdoor and indoor environments, we employ both Global Positioning System (GPS) and Television/ Radio Frequency (TVRF) technologies. Each patient tag employs IEEE 802.11 (Wi-Fi)/TCP/IP networking to communicate with a central server via any available Wi-Fi basestation. A key component to increase TPTS fault-tolerance is a mobile Wi-Fi basestation that employs redundant Internet connectivity to ensure that tags at the disaster scene can send information to the central server even when local infrastructure is unavailable for use. We demonstrate the robustness of the system in tracking multiple patients in a simulated trauma situation in an urban environment.

  2. Uveitis profile and treatment response in Iranian patients with sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudzadeh, Pouya; Tousi, Adib; Ramezani, Alireza; Soheilian, Roham; Soheilian, Masoud

    2015-06-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the clinical features and treatment responses in Iranian patients with sarcoid uveitis. A retrospective review of patients diagnosed with sarcoid uveitis from 1996 to 2010 was performed in a referral clinic in Tehran, Iran. Demographic and clinical features of patients, treatment modalities and therapeutic responses, and outcomes were recorded. Sixty-six eyes from 36 patients were studied. Twenty cases had biopsy-proven sarcoidosis. Mean duration of follow-up was 44.7 ± 45 months (range 3-175). Thirty-six eyes (54.5 %) had intermediate uveitis, 25 (37.9 %) panuveitis, and 5 (7.6 %) anterior uveitis. Twenty patients (55.5 %) responded to both systemic and/or topical corticosteroids, and 16 (44.4 %) required immunomodulatory drugs for control of uveitis. All of the patients finally responded to treatment in the form of inflammation reduction and/or vision improvement. The average time interval before initial clinical response following treatment was 3.2 ± 3 months (range 1-72). This study disclosed a higher predominance of females and intermediate form of uveitis in Iranian patients with sarcoid uveitis. Use of immunomodulatory drugs combined with corticosteroids resulted in good visual outcome and control of uveitis with a possible fewer corticosteroid side effects.

  3. Optimization of in-vivo monitoring program for radiation emergency response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, Wi Ho; Kim, Jong Kyung [Dept. of Nuclear Engineering, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    In case of radiation emergencies, internal exposure monitoring for the members of public will be required to confirm internal contamination of each individual. In-vivo monitoring technique using portable gamma spectrometer can be easily applied for internal exposure monitoring in the vicinity of the on-site area. In this study, minimum detectable doses (MDDs) for '1'3'4Cs, {sup 137}Cs, and {sup 131}I were calculated adjusting minimum detectable activities (MDAs) from 50 to 1,000 Bq to find out the optimal in-vivo counting condition. DCAL software was used to derive retention fraction of Cs and I isotopes in the whole body and thyroid, respectively. A minimum detectable level was determined to set committed effective dose of 0.1 mSv for emergency response. We found that MDDs at each MDA increased along with the elapsed time. 1,000 Bq for {sup 134}Cs and {sup 137}Cs, and 100 Bq for {sup 131}I were suggested as optimal MDAs to provide in-vivo monitoring service in case of radiation emergencies. In-vivo monitoring program for emergency response should be designed to achieve the optimal MDA suggested from the present work. We expect that a reduction of counting time compared with routine monitoring program can achieve the high throughput system in case of radiation emergencies.

  4. Stochastic responses of tumor–immune system with periodic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Dong-Xi; Li Ying

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the stochastic responses of a tumor–immune system competition model with environmental noise and periodic treatment. Firstly, a mathematical model describing the interaction between tumor cells and immune system under external fluctuations and periodic treatment is established based on the stochastic differential equation. Then, sufficient conditions for extinction and persistence of the tumor cells are derived by constructing Lyapunov functions and Ito’s formula. Finally, numerical simulations are introduced to illustrate and verify the results. The results of this work provide the theoretical basis for designing more effective and precise therapeutic strategies to eliminate cancer cells, especially for combining the immunotherapy and the traditional tools. (paper)

  5. Meteorological monitoring for dose assessment and emergency response modeling - how much is enough?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glantz, C.S.

    1990-01-01

    Individuals responsible for emergency response or environmental/dose assessment routinely ask if there are enough meteorological data to adequately support their objectives. The answer requires detailed consideration of the intended applications, capabilities of the atmospheric dispersion model data, pollutant release characteristics, terrain in the modeling region, and size and distribution of the human population in the modeling domain. The meteorologist's detailed knowledge of, and experience in, studying atmospheric transport and diffusion can assist in determining the appropriate level of meteorological monitoring

  6. Novel microelectrode-based online system for monitoring N2O gas emissions during wastewater treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, Ricardo; Oehmen, Adrian; Pijuan, Maite

    2014-11-04

    Clark-type nitrous oxide (N2O) microelectrodes are commonly used for measuring dissolved N2O levels, but have not previously been tested for gas-phase applications, where the N2O emitted from wastewater systems can be directly quantified. In this study, N2O microelectrodes were tested and validated for online gas measurements, and assessed with respect to their temperature, gas flow, composition dependence, gas pressure, and humidity. An exponential correlation between temperature and sensor signal was found, whereas gas flow, composition, pressure, and humidity did not have any influence on the signal. Two of the sensors were tested at different N2O concentration ranges (0-422.3, 0-50, 0-10, and 0-2 ppmv N2O) and exhibited a linear response over each range. The N2O emission dynamics from two laboratory scale sequencing batch reactors performing ammonia or nitrite oxidation were also monitored using one of the microsensors and results were compared with two other analytical methods. Results show that N2O emissions were accurately described with these microelectrodes and support their application for assessing gaseous N2O emissions from wastewater treatment systems. Advantages of the sensors as compared to conventional measurement techniques include a wider quantification range of N2O fluxes, and a single measurement system that can assess both liquid and gas-phase N2O dynamics.

  7. MR Imaging Biomarkers to Monitor Early Response to Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 in Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaomeng Zhang

    Full Text Available TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug known to activate selectively under the hypoxic conditions commonly found in solid tumors. It is currently being evaluated in clinical trials, including two trials in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas (PDAC. The current study was undertaken to evaluate imaging biomarkers for prediction and response monitoring of TH-302 efficacy in xenograft models of PDAC. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE and diffusion weighted (DW magnetic resonance imaging (MRI were used to monitor acute effects on tumor vasculature and cellularity, respectively. Three human PDAC xenografts with known differential responses to TH-302 were imaged prior to, and at 24 h and 48 hours following a single dose of TH-302 or vehicle to determine if imaging changes presaged changes in tumor volumes. DW-MRI was performed at five b-values to generate apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC maps. For DCE-MRI, a standard clinically available contrast reagent, Gd-DTPA, was used to determine blood flow into the tumor region of interest. TH-302 induced a dramatic decrease in the DCE transfer constant (Ktrans within 48 hours after treatment in the sensitive tumors, Hs766t and Mia PaCa-2, whereas TH-302 had no effect on the perfusion behavior of resistant SU.86.86 tumors. Tumor cellularity, estimated from ADC, was significantly increased 24 and 48 hours after treatment in Hs766t, but was not observed in the Mia PaCa-2 and SU.86.86 groups. Notably, growth inhibition of Hs766t was observed immediately (day 3 following initiation of treatment, but was not observed in MiaPaCa-2 tumors until 8 days after initiation of treatment. Based on these preclinical findings, DCE-MRI measures of vascular perfusion dynamics and ADC measures of cell density are suggested as potential TH-302 response biomarkers in clinical trials.

  8. MR Imaging Biomarkers to Monitor Early Response to Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 in Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaomeng; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W; Martinez, Gary V; Cornnell, Heather H; Hart, Charles P; Baker, Amanda F; Gillies, Robert

    2016-01-01

    TH-302 is a hypoxia-activated prodrug known to activate selectively under the hypoxic conditions commonly found in solid tumors. It is currently being evaluated in clinical trials, including two trials in Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinomas (PDAC). The current study was undertaken to evaluate imaging biomarkers for prediction and response monitoring of TH-302 efficacy in xenograft models of PDAC. Dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) and diffusion weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) were used to monitor acute effects on tumor vasculature and cellularity, respectively. Three human PDAC xenografts with known differential responses to TH-302 were imaged prior to, and at 24 h and 48 hours following a single dose of TH-302 or vehicle to determine if imaging changes presaged changes in tumor volumes. DW-MRI was performed at five b-values to generate apparent diffusion coefficient of water (ADC) maps. For DCE-MRI, a standard clinically available contrast reagent, Gd-DTPA, was used to determine blood flow into the tumor region of interest. TH-302 induced a dramatic decrease in the DCE transfer constant (Ktrans) within 48 hours after treatment in the sensitive tumors, Hs766t and Mia PaCa-2, whereas TH-302 had no effect on the perfusion behavior of resistant SU.86.86 tumors. Tumor cellularity, estimated from ADC, was significantly increased 24 and 48 hours after treatment in Hs766t, but was not observed in the Mia PaCa-2 and SU.86.86 groups. Notably, growth inhibition of Hs766t was observed immediately (day 3) following initiation of treatment, but was not observed in MiaPaCa-2 tumors until 8 days after initiation of treatment. Based on these preclinical findings, DCE-MRI measures of vascular perfusion dynamics and ADC measures of cell density are suggested as potential TH-302 response biomarkers in clinical trials.

  9. Poor Response to Periodontal Treatment May Predict Future Cardiovascular Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmlund, A; Lampa, E; Lind, L

    2017-07-01

    Periodontal disease has been associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD), but whether the response to the treatment of periodontal disease affects this association has not been investigated in any large prospective study. Periodontal data obtained at baseline and 1 y after treatment were available in 5,297 individuals with remaining teeth who were treated at a specialized clinic for periodontal disease. Poor response to treatment was defined as having >10% sites with probing pocket depth >4 mm deep and bleeding on probing at ≥20% of the sites 1 y after active treatment. Fatal/nonfatal incidence rate of CVD (composite end point of myocardial infarction, stroke, and heart failure) was obtained from the Swedish cause-of-death and hospital discharge registers. Poisson regression analysis was performed to analyze future risk of CVD. During a median follow-up of 16.8 y (89,719 person-years at risk), those individuals who did not respond well to treatment (13.8% of the sample) had an increased incidence of CVD ( n = 870) when compared with responders (23.6 vs. 15.3%, P 4 mm, and number of teeth, the incidence rate ratio for CVD among poor responders was 1.28 (95% CI, 1.07 to 1.53; P = 0.007) as opposed to good responders. The incidence rate ratio among poor responders increased to 1.39 (95% CI, 1.13 to 1.73; P = 0.002) for those with the most remaining teeth. Individuals who did not respond well to periodontal treatment had an increased risk for future CVD, indicating that successful periodontal treatment might influence progression of subclinical CVD.

  10. Hepatitis C treatment response kinetics and impact of baseline predictors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindh, M; Arnholm, B; Eilard, A

    2011-01-01

    Summary. The optimal duration of treatment for hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections is highly variable but critical for achieving cure (sustained virological response, SVR). We prospectively investigated the impact of age, fibrosis, baseline viraemia and genotype on the early viral kinetics...... above 400 000 IU/mL were strongly associated with slower second phase declines of HCV RNA. Genotype 2/3 infections responded more rapidly than genotype 1, reaching week 4 negativity (RVR) in 59%vs 22%. We conclude that baseline response predictors such as age, fibrosis and viral load were well reflected...... by the early viral kinetics as assessed by repeated HCV RNA quantifications. The kinetic patterns and the high relapse rate in genotype 2/3 patients without RVR suggest that this group might benefit from treatment durations longer than 24 weeks....

  11. SU-D-201-03: During-Treatment Delivery Monitoring System for TomoTherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Q; Read, P [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Multiple error pathways can lead to delivery errors during the treatment course that cannot be caught with pre-treatment QA. While in vivo solutions are being developed for linacs, no such solution exists for tomotherapy. The purpose of this study is to develop a near real-time system for tomotherapy that can monitor the delivery and dose accumulation process during the treatment-delivery, which enable the user to assess the impact of delivery variations and/or errors and to interrupt the treatment if necessary. Methods: A program running on a tomotherapy planning station fetches the raw DAS data during treatment. Exit detector data is extracted as well as output, gantry angle, and other machine parameters. For each sample, the MLC open-close state is determined. The delivered plan is compared with the original plan via a Monte Carlo dose engine which transports fluence deviations from a pre-treatment Monte Carlo run. A report containing the difference in fluence, dose and DVH statistics is created in html format. This process is repeated until the treatment is completed. Results: Since we only need to compute the dose for the difference in fluence for a few projections each time, dose with 2% statistical uncertainty can be computed in less than 1 second on a 4-core cpu. However, the current bottleneck in this near real-time system is the repeated fetching and processing the growing DAS data file throughout the delivery. The frame rate drops from 10Hz at the beginning of treatment to 5Hz after 3 minutes and to 2Hz after 10 minutes. Conclusion: A during-treatment delivery monitor system has been built to monitor tomotherapy treatments. The system improves patient safety by allowing operators to assess the delivery variations and errors during treatment delivery and adopt appropriate actions.

  12. SU-D-201-03: During-Treatment Delivery Monitoring System for TomoTherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Q; Read, P

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Multiple error pathways can lead to delivery errors during the treatment course that cannot be caught with pre-treatment QA. While in vivo solutions are being developed for linacs, no such solution exists for tomotherapy. The purpose of this study is to develop a near real-time system for tomotherapy that can monitor the delivery and dose accumulation process during the treatment-delivery, which enable the user to assess the impact of delivery variations and/or errors and to interrupt the treatment if necessary. Methods: A program running on a tomotherapy planning station fetches the raw DAS data during treatment. Exit detector data is extracted as well as output, gantry angle, and other machine parameters. For each sample, the MLC open-close state is determined. The delivered plan is compared with the original plan via a Monte Carlo dose engine which transports fluence deviations from a pre-treatment Monte Carlo run. A report containing the difference in fluence, dose and DVH statistics is created in html format. This process is repeated until the treatment is completed. Results: Since we only need to compute the dose for the difference in fluence for a few projections each time, dose with 2% statistical uncertainty can be computed in less than 1 second on a 4-core cpu. However, the current bottleneck in this near real-time system is the repeated fetching and processing the growing DAS data file throughout the delivery. The frame rate drops from 10Hz at the beginning of treatment to 5Hz after 3 minutes and to 2Hz after 10 minutes. Conclusion: A during-treatment delivery monitor system has been built to monitor tomotherapy treatments. The system improves patient safety by allowing operators to assess the delivery variations and errors during treatment delivery and adopt appropriate actions.

  13. Clinical Significance of Monitoring Serum β-HCG in the Conservative Treatment of Ectopic Pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Xue

    2010-01-01

    To explore the clinical value of the serum β-HCG (human chorionic gonadotrophin) in the conservative treatment of ectopic pregnancy, the serum β-HCG levels in 118 patients with ectopic pregnancy were measured with RIA. The results showed that the serum β-HCG levels in patients with successful conservative treatment of ectopic pregnancy were all less than 200mIU/mL. The patients require a surgical treatment to reach <200mIU/mL serum β-HCG concentration were only 26.3%. There was significant difference between two groups (P<0.01). The monitoring of serum β-HCG was very useful in the diagnosis, the choice of treatment measures and the evaluation of conservative treatment effect of ectopic pregnancy. In the course of treatment of ectopic pregnancy, serum β-HCG is a good marker in determining the success or failure of treatment. (authors)

  14. Annexin V Imaging Detects Diabetes-Accelerated Apoptosis and Monitors the Efficacy of Benfotiamine Treatment in Ischemic Limbs of Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Ho Jung

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of apoptosis imaging for monitoring treatment response in ischemic limbs has not been properly explored. In this study, we investigated the ability of annexin V (AnxV imaging to assess the efficacy of antiapoptotic treatment in ischemic limbs of diabetic mice. Normal C57BL/6 mice and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were subject to hindlimb ischemia. AnxV-conjugated fluorescent streptavidin probes were intravenously injected, and optical imaging was performed. Tissue apoptosis was quantified by histochemistry and Western blotting. The AnxV probes showed specific targeting to apoptotic cells on confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Intravenous AnxV probes displayed substantially greater accumulation in ischemic limbs of diabetic mice. Benfotiamine (BFT treatment of diabetic mice led to better perfusion recovery on laser Doppler imaging and reduced AnxV binding on optical imaging. TUNEL staining and cleaved caspase-3 Western blots confirmed accelerated apoptosis by diabetes and its suppression by BFT treatment. Furthermore, AnxV-SAv-PEcy5.5 uptake in the ischemic limbs closely correlated to cleaved caspase-3 expression. Thus, AnxV imaging may be useful for monitoring the efficacy of therapeutic agents designed to suppress ischemia-induced apoptosis.

  15. Annexin V imaging detects diabetes-accelerated apoptosis and monitors the efficacy of benfotiamine treatment in ischemic limbs of mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Jin Hee; Park, Jin Won; Paik, Jin Young; Quach, Cung Hoa Thien; Lee, Eun Jeong; Lee, Kyung-Han

    2014-01-01

    The role of apoptosis imaging for monitoring treatment response in ischemic limbs has not been properly explored. In this study, we investigated the ability of annexin V (AnxV) imaging to assess the efficacy of antiapoptotic treatment in ischemic limbs of diabetic mice. Normal C57BL/6 mice and streptozotocin-induced diabetic mice were subject to hindlimb ischemia. AnxV-conjugated fluorescent streptavidin probes were intravenously injected, and optical imaging was performed. Tissue apoptosis was quantified by histochemistry and Western blotting. The AnxV probes showed specific targeting to apoptotic cells on confocal microscopy and flow cytometry. Intravenous AnxV probes displayed substantially greater accumulation in ischemic limbs of diabetic mice. Benfotiamine (BFT) treatment of diabetic mice led to better perfusion recovery on laser Doppler imaging and reduced AnxV binding on optical imaging. TUNEL staining and cleaved caspase-3 Western blots confirmed accelerated apoptosis by diabetes and its suppression by BFT treatment. Furthermore, AnxV-SAv-PEcy5.5 uptake in the ischemic limbs closely correlated to cleaved caspase-3 expression. Thus, AnxV imaging may be useful for monitoring the efficacy of therapeutic agents designed to suppress ischemia-induced apoptosis.

  16. Atomoxetine pharmacogenetics: associations with pharmacokinetics, treatment response and tolerability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jacob T; Bishop, Jeffrey R

    2015-01-01

    Atomoxetine is indicated for the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and is predominantly metabolized by the CYP2D6 enzyme. Differences in pharmacokinetic parameters as well as clinical treatment outcomes across CYP2D6 genotype groups have resulted in dosing recommendations within the product label, but clinical studies supporting the use of genotype guided dosing are currently lacking. Furthermore, pharmacokinetic and clinical studies have primarily focused on extensive as compared with poor metabolizers, with little information known about other metabolizer categories as well as genes involved in the pharmacodynamics of atomoxetine. This review describes the pharmacogenetic associations with atomoxetine pharmacokinetics, treatment response and tolerability with considerations for the clinical utility of this information.

  17. Adolescents with Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD): profiles and treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-Fernández, María; Matalí, Josep Lluís; García-Sánchez, Sara; Pardo, Marta; Lleras, María; Castellano-Tejedor, Carmina

    2016-10-07

    Demand for treatment for problems related to the use of video games have increased significantly in adolescents. Most cases have a comorbid mental disorder that jeopardises both pathologies. The aim of this study is to describe profiles of adolescents with Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) according to comorbidity and analyze treatment response at 3 and 6 months. A sample of 86 patients which consulted in the Addictive Behavior Unit of a hospital was assessed with diagnostic criteria for IGD, the interview K-SADS-PL for mental disorders and the Clinical Global Impression (CGI) to treatment progress. Of the initial sample, 68,6% (n = 59) met diagnostic criteria for IGD. Of these, the 45,76% matched an internalizing profile, presenting comorbidity with Mood Disorders (44,4%), Anxiety Disorders (44,4%) and Personality Disorders (11,1%). The externalizing profile would comprise 52,54% of the sample presenting Disruptive Behavior Disorder (48,4%=, ADHD (29%) and Disruptive Behavior Disorders not otherwise specified (22,6%). Unlike externalizing, the internalizing patients had a family history of psychiatric problems (63%), difficulties in social relationships (77,8%) and seemed to use video games preferably to escape discomfort (66,7%). After 3 months the externalizing profile showed improvements. Comorbid disorders allow the discrimination of two IGD profiles in adolescents and these could influence treatment response. Therefore, it is important to assess comorbidities to design a more accurate intervention focused on the specificities of each profile.

  18. Large granular lymphocyte leukemia: natural history and response to treatment.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Fortune, Anne F

    2012-02-01

    Large granular lymphocyte leukemia (T-LGL) is an indolent T lymphoproliferative disorder that was difficult to diagnose with certainty until clonality testing of the T cell receptor gene became routinely available. We studied the natural history and response to treatment in 25 consecutive patients with T-LGL diagnosed between 2004 and 2008 in which the diagnosis was confirmed by molecular analysis, to define an effective treatment algorithm. The median age at diagnosis was 61 years (range 27-78), with a male to female ratio of 1:1.8 and presenting features of fatigue (n = 13), recurrent infections (n = 9), and\\/or abnormal blood counts (n = 5). Thirteen patients with symptomatic disease were treated as follows: pentostatin (nine patients), cyclosporine (six patients), methotrexate (three patients), and alemtuzumab in two patients in whom pentostatin was ineffective. Pentostatin was the single most effective therapy, with a response rate of 75% and minimal toxicity. The overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) 37 months from diagnosis were 80% and 52%, respectively. Treatment of T-LGL should be reserved for patients with symptomatic disease, but in this series, pentostatin treatment was less toxic and more effective than cyclosporine or methotrexate.

  19. Hyperthyroid dementia: clinicoradiological findings and response to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, T; Hasegawa, Y; Takenaka, H

    2001-02-15

    Dementia associated with hyperthyroidism is less well documented than is hypothyroid dementia. Therapeutic response of hyperthyroid dementia and associated cerebral circulatory and/or metabolic abnormalities has not been elucidated. We described a patient with hyperthyroid dementia and clinicoradiological response to treatment. Single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) study was repeated and analyzed semiquantitatively. A 67-year-old man experienced progressive impairments of attention, memory, constructive skills and behavior as well as hand tremor and weight loss of two-year duration. Laboratory findings were compatible with Graves' disease. The initial SPECT showed diffuse tracer uptake defect with an accentuation in the bilateral temporoparietal regions. Clinical and SPECT findings both suggested concurrent "possible" Alzheimer's disease. However, initial treatment with a beta-blocker improved behavior and attention-related cognitive functions as well as tracer uptake in the frontal lobes. Subsequent treatment with additional methimazole then improved memory and constructive abilities when a euthyroid state was established. Uptake defect in the temporoparietal regions also responded gradually to the medication. We suggest that the present patient represent hyperthyroid dementia, which responds favorably to treatment with regard to clinical symptoms and SPECT findings. We also suggest that thyroid function be measured in patients with "possible" Alzheimer's disease because treatable hyperthyroid dementia may not be identified.

  20. Application for verification of monitor units of the treatment planning system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suero Rodrigo, M. A.; Marques Fraguela, E.

    2011-01-01

    Current estimates algorithms achieve acceptable degree of accuracy. However, operate on the basis of un intuitive models. It is therefore necessary to verify the calculation of monitor units of the treatment planning system (TPS) with those obtained by other independent formalisms. To this end, we have developed an application based on factorization formalism that automates the calculation of dose.

  1. Bronchial thermoplasty: a novel treatment for severe asthma requiring monitored anesthesia care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jamille A; Rowen, David W; Rose, David D

    2011-12-01

    Dexmedetomidine used in monitored anesthesia care produces a safe and effective technique well documented in research. We report the successful use of dexmedetomidine for sedation during bronchial thermoplasty, a new treatment for patients with severe persistent asthma refractory to inhaled corticosteroids and long-term beta-2 agonists.

  2. Cyanobacteria, Toxins and Indicators: Full-Scale Monitoring & Bench-Scale Treatment Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summary of: 1) Lake Erie 2014 bloom season full-scale treatment plant monitoring data for cyanobacteria and cyanobacteria toxins; 2) Follow-up work to examine the impact of pre-oxidation on suspensions of intact toxin-producing cyanobacterial cells.

  3. Preparing patients with cancer who work and treatment responsiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamau, Caroline

    2017-03-01

    Many patients with life-limiting illnesses continue to work because of financial reasons and because work provides good psychosocial support. A lack of appropriate advice/support through patient education could, however, make having a job detrimental to well-being (eg, symptom worsening). This study investigated the frequency with which patients received information that empowers their understanding of their condition, treatment, side effects of treatment and the likely impact on occupational functioning. A cross-sectional study. An analysis of survey data from 3457 patients with cancer in employment. Logistic regression showed that patients who received information about the impact of cancer on work life or education are 1.72 times more likely to have a positive treatment outcome. Patients who receive written information about the type of cancer are 1.99 times more likely to have a positive treatment outcome. Also, patients who receive written information before a cancer-related operation are 1.90 times more likely to have a positive treatment outcome. Information about the side effects of cancer treatment produces worse odds of a positive treatment outcome (0.65-1). A stepwise logistic regression analysing the effects irrespective of current employment status in 6710 patients showed that preparing them produces nearly twice better odds of cancer treatment responsiveness. Palliative care teams should consider ways of actively advising patients who work. Whereas the results showed evidence of good practice in cancer care, there is a need to ensure that all working patients with potentially life-limiting illnesses receive similar support. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  4. Selection of response criteria for clinical trials of sarcoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuetze, Scott M; Baker, Laurence H; Benjamin, Robert S; Canetta, Renzo

    2008-01-01

    Soft tissue sarcomas are a heterogeneous group of malignancies arising from mesenchymal tissues. A large number of new therapies are being evaluated in patients with sarcomas, and consensus criteria defining treatment responses are essential for comparison of results from studies completed by different research groups. The 1979 World Health Organization (WHO) handbook set forth operationally defined criteria for response evaluation in solid tumors that were updated in 2000 with the publication of the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). There have been significant advances in tumor imaging, however, that are not reflected in the RECIST. For example, computed tomography (CT) slice thickness has been reduced from 10 mm to < or =2.5 mm, allowing for more reproducible and accurate measurement of smaller lesions. Combination of imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography with fluorine-18-fluorodeoxyglucose (18FDG-PET) and CT can provide investigators and clinicians with both anatomical and functional information regarding tumors, and there is now a large body of evidence demonstrating the effectiveness of PET/CT and other newer imaging methods for the detection and staging of tumors as well as early determination of responses to therapy. The application of newer imaging methods has the potential to decrease both the sample sizes required for, and duration of, clinical trials by providing an early indication of therapeutic response that is well correlated with clinical outcomes, such as time to tumor progression or overall survival. The results summarized in this review support the conclusion that the RECIST and the WHO criteria for evaluation of response in solid tumors need to be modernized. In addition, there is a current need for prospective trials to compare new response criteria with established endpoints and to validate imaging-based response rates as surrogate endpoints for clinical trials of new agents for sarcoma and other solid

  5. A new catheter design for combined radiofrequency ablation and optoacoustic treatment monitoring using copper-coated light-guides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebling, Johannes; Oyaga Landa, Francisco Javier; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luis; Razansky, Daniel

    2018-02-01

    Electrosurgery, i.e. the application of radiofrequency current for tissue ablation, is a frequently used treatment for many cardiac arrhythmias. Electrophysiological and anatomic mapping, as well as careful radiofrequency power control typically guide the radiofrequency ablation procedure. Despite its widespread application, accurate monitoring of the lesion formation with sufficient spatio-temporal resolution remains challenging with the existing imaging techniques. We present a novel integrated catheter for simultaneous radiofrequency ablation and optoacoustic monitoring of the lesion formation in real time and 3D. The design combines the delivery of both electric current and optoacoustic excitation beam in a single catheter consisting of copper-coated multimode light-guides and its manufacturing is described in detail. The electrical current causes coagulation and desiccation while the excitation light is locally absorbed, generating OA responses from the entire treated volume. The combined ablation-monitoring capabilities were verified using ex-vivo bovine tissue. The formed ablation lesions showed a homogenous coagulation while the ablation was monitored in realtime with a volumetric frame rate of 10 Hz over 150 seconds.

  6. Monitoring and Correcting for Response Changes in the CMS Lead-tungstate Electromagnetic Calorimeter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferri, Federico

    2012-01-01

    The CMS Electromagnetic Calorimeter (ECAL) comprises 75848 lead-tungstate scintillating crystals. Changes in the ECAL response, due to crystal radiation damage or changes in photo-detector output, are monitored in real time with a sophisticated system of lasers to allow corrections to the energy measurements to be calculated and used. The excellent intrinsic resolution of the CMS ECAL requires the monitoring system itself to be calibrated to a high precision and its stability to be controlled and understood. The components of the CMS ECAL monitoring system, and how it has evolved to include modern solid-state lasers, are described. Several physics channels are exploited to normalise the ECAL response to the changes measured by the monitoring system. These include low energy diphoton resonances, electrons from W and Z decays (using shower energy versus track momentum measurements), and the azimuthal symmetry of low energy deposits in minimum bias events. This paper describes how the monitoring system is operated, how the corrections are obtained, and the resulting ECAL performance.

  7. Bioimpedance in monitoring of effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuznecova LV

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Vasiliy Grigorievich Alexeev, Ludmila Vasilievna KuznecovaDepartment of Physiology, SP Botkin Moscow City Clinical Hospital, Moscow, RussiaBackground: Bioimpedance has been shown to be a safe technique when used in a number of biomedical applications. In this study, we used the Electro Interstitial Scan (EIS to perform bioimpedance measurements to follow up the efficacy of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI treatment in subjects diagnosed to have major depressive disorder.Methods: We recruited 59 subjects (38 women, 21 men aged 17–76 (mean 47 years diagnosed with major depressive disorder by psychiatric assessment at the Botkin Hospital according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition (DSM-IV. Baseline Clinical Global Impression scores and EIS (electrical conductivity and dispersion α parameter measurements were done before starting SSRI therapy. Treatment follow-up was undertaken using EIS bioimpedance measurements and by treatment response based on the Hamilton Depression Scale and Clinical Global Impression, every 15 days for 60 days. At day 45, we classified the patients into two groups, ie, Group 1, including treatment responders, and Group 2, including nonresponders. At day 60, patients were classified into two further groups, ie, Group 3, comprising treatment responders, and Group 4, comprising nonresponders.Results: Comparing Group 1 and Group 2, electrical conductivity measurement of the pathway between the two forehead electrodes had a specificity of 72% and a sensitivity of 85.3% (P < 0.0001, with a cutoff >4.32. Comparing Group 3 and Group 4, electrical conductivity measurements in the same pathway had a specificity of 47.6% and a sensitivity of 76.3% (P < 0.16, with a cutoff >5.92. Comparing Group 1 and Group 2, the electrical dispersion α parameter of the pathway between the two disposable forehead electrodes had a specificity of 80% and a sensitivity of 85.2% (P < 0.0001 with a

  8. Targeted Proteomics to Assess the Response to Anti-Angiogenic Treatment in Human Glioblastoma (GBM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demeure, Kevin; Fack, Fred; Duriez, Elodie; Tiemann, Katja; Bernard, Amandine; Golebiewska, Anna; Bougnaud, Sébastien; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Domon, Bruno; Niclou, Simone P

    2016-02-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is a highly aggressive primary brain tumor with dismal outcome for affected patients. Because of the significant neo-angiogenesis exhibited by GBMs, anti-angiogenic therapies have been intensively evaluated during the past years. Recent clinical studies were however disappointing, although a subpopulation of patients may benefit from such treatment. We have previously shown that anti-angiogenic targeting in GBM increases hypoxia and leads to a metabolic adaptation toward glycolysis, suggesting that combination treatments also targeting the glycolytic phenotype may be effective in GBM patients. The aim of this study was to identify marker proteins that are altered by treatment and may serve as a short term readout of anti-angiogenic therapy. Ultimately such proteins could be tested as markers of efficacy able to identify patient subpopulations responsive to the treatment. We applied a proteomics approach based on selected reaction monitoring (SRM) to precisely quantify targeted protein candidates, selected from pathways related to metabolism, apoptosis and angiogenesis. The workflow was developed in the context of patient-derived intracranial GBM xenografts developed in rodents and ensured the specific identification of human tumor versus rodent stroma-derived proteins. Quality control experiments were applied to assess sample heterogeneity and reproducibility of SRM assays at different levels. The data demonstrate that tumor specific proteins can be precisely quantified within complex biological samples, reliably identifying small concentration differences induced by the treatment. In line with previous work, we identified decreased levels of TCA cycle enzymes, including isocitrate dehydrogenase, whereas malectin, calnexin, and lactate dehydrogenase A were augmented after treatment. We propose the most responsive proteins of our subset as potential novel biomarkers to assess treatment response after anti-angiogenic therapy that warrant future

  9. DoPET: an in-treatment monitoring system for proton therapy at 62 MeV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosso, V.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M. G.; Camarlinghi, N.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Collini, F.; Cuttone, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Milluzzo, G.; Morrocchi, M.; Raffaele, L.; Romano, F.; Sportelli, G.; Zaccaro, E.

    2016-12-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy is highly effective in treating cancer thanks to its conformal dose deposition. This superior capability in dose deposition has led to a massive growth of the treated patients around the world, raising the need of treatment monitoring systems. An in-treatment PET system, DoPET, was constructed and tested at CATANA beam-line, LNS-INFN in Catania, where 62 MeV protons are used to treat ocular melanoma. The PET technique profits from the beta+ emitters generated by the proton beam in the irradiated body, mainly 15-O and 11-C. The current DoPET prototype consists of two planar 15 cm × 15 cm LYSO-based detector heads. With respect to the previous versions, the system was enlarged and the DAQ up-graded during the years so now also anthropomorphic phantoms, can be fitted within the field of view of the system. To demonstrate the capability of DoPET to detect changes in the delivered treatment plan with respect to the planned one, various treatment plans were used delivering a standard 15 Gy fraction to an anthropomorphic phantom. Data were acquired during and after the treatment delivery up to 10 minutes. When the in-treatment phase was long enough (more than 1 minute), the corresponding activated volume was visible just after the treatment delivery, even if in presence of a noisy background. The after-treatment data, acquired for about 9 minutes, were segmented finding that few minutes are enough to be able to detect changes. These experiments will be presented together with the studies performed with PMMA phantoms where the DoPET response was characterized in terms of different dose rates and in presence of range shifters: the system response is linear up to 16.9 Gy/min and has the ability to see a 1 millimeter range shifter.

  10. DoPET: an in-treatment monitoring system for proton therapy at 62 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosso, V.; Belcari, N.; Bisogni, M.G.; Camarlinghi, N.; Guerra, A. Del; Morrocchi, M.; Sportelli, G.; Zaccaro, E.; Cirrone, G.A.P.; Cuttone, G.; Milluzzo, G.; Raffaele, L.; Romano, F.; Collini, F.

    2016-01-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy is highly effective in treating cancer thanks to its conformal dose deposition. This superior capability in dose deposition has led to a massive growth of the treated patients around the world, raising the need of treatment monitoring systems. An in-treatment PET system, DoPET, was constructed and tested at CATANA beam-line, LNS-INFN in Catania, where 62 MeV protons are used to treat ocular melanoma. The PET technique profits from the beta+ emitters generated by the proton beam in the irradiated body, mainly 15-O and 11-C. The current DoPET prototype consists of two planar 15 cm × 15 cm LYSO-based detector heads. With respect to the previous versions, the system was enlarged and the DAQ up-graded during the years so now also anthropomorphic phantoms, can be fitted within the field of view of the system. To demonstrate the capability of DoPET to detect changes in the delivered treatment plan with respect to the planned one, various treatment plans were used delivering a standard 15 Gy fraction to an anthropomorphic phantom. Data were acquired during and after the treatment delivery up to 10 minutes. When the in-treatment phase was long enough (more than 1 minute), the corresponding activated volume was visible just after the treatment delivery, even if in presence of a noisy background. The after-treatment data, acquired for about 9 minutes, were segmented finding that few minutes are enough to be able to detect changes. These experiments will be presented together with the studies performed with PMMA phantoms where the DoPET response was characterized in terms of different dose rates and in presence of range shifters: the system response is linear up to 16.9 Gy/min and has the ability to see a 1 millimeter range shifter.

  11. RESPONSE OF TOMATO PLANTS EXPOSED TO TREATMENT WITH NANOPARTICLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommaso Giordani

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work the response of Tomato plants cv. Micro-Tom to nanoparticles (NPs treatment was investigated. Tomato seedlings were grown in hydroponic condition and NPs treatments were carried out by adding Fe3O4 or TiO2 NPs to nutrient solution. At the end of treatments, NPs root uptake and tissue deposition were investigated using Environmental Scanning Electron Microscope, equipped with energy dispersive spectroscopy for chemical identification. At morphological level, one week after the beginning of NP treatment, seedlings grown with high concentration of TiO2 NPs showed an abnormal proliferation of root hairs, as compared to the control seedlings and to the seedlings exposed to Fe3O4 NPs, Shoot morphology did not differ in tomato seedlings grown under different conditions and no symptoms of toxicity were observed in NP-treated plants. In order to analyse genetic effects of NPs treatments, RNA transcription was studied in roots of NP-exposed and control plants by Illumina RNA sequencing, evidencing the induction of transposable elements.

  12. A Production-Rule Analysis System for Nuclear Plant monitoring and emergency response applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ragheb, M.; Tsoukalas, L.; McDonough, T.; Parker, M.

    1987-01-01

    A Production-Rule Analysis System for Nuclear Power Plant Monitoring is presented. The signals generated by the Zion-1 Plant are considered for emergency Response applications. The integrity of the Plant Radiation, the Reactor Coolant, the Fuel Clad, and the Containment Systems, is monitored. Representation of the system is in the form of a goal-tree generating a Knowledge-Base searched by an Inference Engine functioning in the forward-chaining mode. The Gaol-tree is built from Fault-Trees based on plant operational information. The system is implemented on a VAX-8500 and is programmed in OPS-5

  13. Integration of laser trapping for continuous and selective monitoring of photothermal response of a single microparticle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasudevan, Srivathsan; Chen, George C K; Ahluwalia, Balpreet Singh

    2008-12-01

    Photothermal response (PTR) is an established pump and probe technique for real-time sensing of biological assays. Continuous and selective PTR monitoring is difficult owing to the Brownian motion changing the relative position of the target with respect to the beams. Integration of laser trapping with PTR is proposed as a solution. The proposed method is verified on red polystyrene microparticles. PTR is continuously monitored for 30 min. Results show that the mean relaxation time variation of the acquired signals is less than 5%. The proposed method is then applied to human red blood cells for continuous and selective PTR.

  14. Enteric microbiome metabolites correlate with response to simvastatin treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima Kaddurah-Daouk

    Full Text Available Although statins are widely prescribed medications, there remains considerable variability in therapeutic response. Genetics can explain only part of this variability. Metabolomics is a global biochemical approach that provides powerful tools for mapping pathways implicated in disease and in response to treatment. Metabolomics captures net interactions between genome, microbiome and the environment. In this study, we used a targeted GC-MS metabolomics platform to measure a panel of metabolites within cholesterol synthesis, dietary sterol absorption, and bile acid formation to determine metabolite signatures that may predict variation in statin LDL-C lowering efficacy. Measurements were performed in two subsets of the total study population in the Cholesterol and Pharmacogenetics (CAP study: Full Range of Response (FR, and Good and Poor Responders (GPR were 100 individuals randomly selected from across the entire range of LDL-C responses in CAP. GPR were 48 individuals, 24 each from the top and bottom 10% of the LDL-C response distribution matched for body mass index, race, and gender. We identified three secondary, bacterial-derived bile acids that contribute to predicting the magnitude of statin-induced LDL-C lowering in good responders. Bile acids and statins share transporters in the liver and intestine; we observed that increased plasma concentration of simvastatin positively correlates with higher levels of several secondary bile acids. Genetic analysis of these subjects identified associations between levels of seven bile acids and a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP, rs4149056, in the gene encoding the organic anion transporter SLCO1B1. These findings, along with recently published results that the gut microbiome plays an important role in cardiovascular disease, indicate that interactions between genome, gut microbiome and environmental influences should be considered in the study and management of cardiovascular disease. Metabolic

  15. In vivo Confocal Laser Microscopy for monitoring of actinic keratosis treatment: a comparison with histopathologic assessment after treatment with topical 5% 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishioka, P; Maia, M; Rodrigues, S B; Lellis, R F; Hirata, S H

    2017-11-24

    Histological examination is the gold standard for actinic keratosis diagnosis; however, it is not always a feasible approach. Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) is a non-invasive technique that may be an alternative for monitoring actinic keratoses treatment response. Topical 5-fluorouracil is indicated for actinic keratosis multiple lesions and for field cancerization treatment. To assess the RCM accuracy, sensibility and specificity for actinic keratosis, considering as a gold standard the histopathological examination; as well as to evaluate the efficacy of 5% 5-fluorouracil treatment. This is a prospective study in actinic keratosis patients between August 2014 and November 2015. RCM analyses were performed in one randomly selected actinic keratosis lesion of the upper limbs by two independent observers before and after 5% 5-fluorouracil treatment. At the end of treatment and with clinical bleaching of treated lesions, histological examination was performed by two pathologists. A total of 50 lesions were enroled, and 40 lesions presented complete clinical bleaching after treatment and were included in the final analysis. Accuracy, sensibility and specificity means among observers were 83.8%, 84.6% and 83.3%, respectively. After 5-fluorouracil treatment, actinic keratosis was diagnosed in 45.0% (observer 1) and 32.5% (observer 2) of subjects according to RCM and in 32.5% of subjects according to histological examination. Considering RCM observers diagnosis, the concordance was substantial (k 0.637, P keratosis therapeutic response to 5-fluorouracil, presenting efficacy comparable to histological examination. Additionally, the results suggest that 5-fluorouracil may be a satisfactory option for therapeutic control of this condition. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  16. Pre-treatment cortisol awakening response predicts symptom reduction in posttraumatic stress disorder after treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapcencu, A.E.; Gorter, R.; Kennis, Mitzy; van Rooij, S.J.H.; Geuze, E.

    2017-01-01

    Dysfunction of the HPA-axis has frequently been found in the aftermath of trauma exposure with or without PTSD. Decreasing HPA-axis reactivity to different stress cues has been reported during PTSD treatment. The cortisol awakening response (CARi) is a well-validated, standardized measure of

  17. Pre-treatment cortisol awakening response predicts symptom reduction in posttraumatic stress disorder after treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rapcencu, A E; Gorter, R; Kennis, M; van Rooij, S J H; Geuze, E

    Dysfunction of the HPA-axis has frequently been found in the aftermath of trauma exposure with or without PTSD. Decreasing HPA-axis reactivity to different stress cues has been reported during PTSD treatment. The cortisol awakening response (CARi) is a well-validated, standardized measure of

  18. The Key to Individualized Addiction Treatment is Comprehensive Assessment and Monitoring of Symptoms and Behavioral Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas F. Hilton

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Modern health services now strive for individualized treatment. This approach has been enabled by the increase in knowledge derived from neuroscience and genomics. Substance use disorders are no exception to individualized treatment even though there are no gene-specific medications yet available. What is available is the ability to quickly and precisely assess and monitor biopsychosocial variables known to vary during addiction recovery and which place addicts at increased risk of relapse. Monitoring a broad spectrum of biopsychosocial health enables providers to address diverse genome-specific changes that might trigger withdrawal from treatment or recovery relapse in time to prevent that from occurring. This paper describes modern measurement tools contained in the NIH Patient-Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS and the NIH Toolbox and suggests how they might be applied to support recovery from alcohol and other substance use disorders in both pharmacological and abstinence-oriented modalities of care.

  19. Predictors of response in the treatment of moderate depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andre G. Bastos

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify neurocognitive and sociodemographic variables that could be associated with clinical response to three modalities of treatment for depression, as well as variables that predicted superior response to one treatment over the others. Method: The present study derives from a research project in which depressed patients (n=272 received one of three treatments – long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy (n=90, fluoxetine therapy (n=91, or a combination thereof (n=91 – over a 24-month period. Results: Sociodemographic variables were not found to be predictive. Six predictive neurocognitive variables were identified: three prognostic variables related to working memory and abstract reasoning; one prescriptive variable related to working memory; and two variables found to be moderators. Conclusions: The results of this study indicate subgroups of patients who might benefit from specific therapeutic strategies and subgroups that seem to respond well to long-term psychodynamic psychotherapy and combined therapy. The moderators found suggest that abstract reasoning and processing speed may influence the magnitude and/or direction of clinical improvement.

  20. Improved growth response to GH treatment in irradiated children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lannering, B.; Albertsson-Wikland, K.

    1989-01-01

    The growth response to two years of GH treatment was studied in fifteen children after radiotherapy for a cranial tumour. The growth response was compared to that of short children (-2 SD) and that of children with idiopathic growth hormone deficiency (GHD) of similar ages. All children were treated with hGH 0.1 IU/kg/day s.c.; which is a higher dose and frequency than previously reported for irradiated children. On this protocol the growth rate increased 5.0 +- 0.5 cm/y (mean +- SEM) the first year and 3.8 +- 0.7 cm/y the second year compared to the growth rate the year before GH-treatment. Although the net gain in growth was higher than previously reported, the first year growth response was significantly reduced (p less than 0.05) compared to that of GHD-children (7.6 +- 0.5 cm/y) but exceeded (p less than 0.05) that of short children (3.4 +- 0.3 cm/y). The median spontaneous 24 h-GH secretion was 209 mU/l in the short children, 52 mU/l in the irradiated children and 16 mU/l in the idiopathic GHD children. Thus the growth increment varied inversely to the spontaneous GH secretion observed in the three groups

  1. Chemical monitoring strategy for the assessment of advanced water treatment plant performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, J E; McDonald, J A; Trinh, T; Storey, M V; Khan, S J

    2011-01-01

    A pilot-scale plant was employed to validate the performance of a proposed full-scale advanced water treatment plant (AWTP) in Sydney, Australia. The primary aim of this study was to develop a chemical monitoring program that can demonstrate proper plant operation resulting in the removal of priority chemical constituents in the product water. The feed water quality to the pilot plant was tertiary-treated effluent from a wastewater treatment plant. The unit processes of the AWTP were comprised of an integrated membrane system (ultrafiltration, reverse osmosis) followed by final chlorination generating a water quality that does not present a source of human or environmental health concern. The chemical monitoring program was undertaken over 6 weeks during pilot plant operation and involved the quantitative analysis of pharmaceuticals and personal care products, steroidal hormones, industrial chemicals, pesticides, N-nitrosamines and halomethanes. The first phase consisted of baseline monitoring of target compounds to quantify influent concentrations in feed waters to the plant. This was followed by a period of validation monitoring utilising indicator chemicals and surrogate measures suitable to assess proper process performance at various stages of the AWTP. This effort was supported by challenge testing experiments to further validate removal of a series of indicator chemicals by reverse osmosis. This pilot-scale study demonstrated a simplified analytical approach that can be employed to assure proper operation of advanced water treatment processes and the absence of trace organic chemicals.

  2. Use of FDG-PET to monitor response to chemotherapy and radiotherapy in patients with lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikhaeel, N. George

    2006-01-01

    Lymphoma is a heterogeneous group of diseases with many curable subtypes. Primary treatment cures a significant proportion of, but not all, patients. Patients not achieving a complete remission with primary treatment, or those who relapse later, have a second chance of cure with high-dose chemotherapy and haematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Response assessment is therefore crucial in the management of lymphomas. FDG-PET has an emerging role in assessing response, both at the end of and during treatment. This article will review the current published evidence and offer some suggestions on future directions from a clinician's viewpoint. (orig.)

  3. [Occlusion treatment for amblyopia. Age dependence and dose-response relationship].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fronius, M

    2016-04-01

    Based on clinical experience and studies on animal models the age of 6-7 years was regarded as the limit for treatment of amblyopia, although functional improvement was also occasionally reported in older patients. New technical developments as well as insights from clinical studies and the neurosciences have attracted considerable attention to this topic. Various aspects of the age dependence of amblyopia treatment are discussed in this article, e. g. prescription, electronic monitoring of occlusion dosage, calculation of indicators for age-dependent plasticity of the visual system, and novel, alternative treatment approaches. Besides a discussion of the recent literature, results of studies by our "Child Vision Research Unit" in Frankfurt are presented: results of a questionnaire about prescription habits concerning age limits of patching, electronic recording of occlusion in patients beyond the conventional treatment age, calculation of dose-response function and efficiency of patching and their age dependence. The results of the questionnaire illustrate the uncertainty about age limits of prescription with significant deviations from the guideline of the German Ophthalmological Society (DOG). Electronic recording of occlusion allowed the quantification of declining dose-response function and treatment efficiency between 5 and 16 years of age. Reports about successful treatment with conventional and novel methods in adults are at variance with the notion of a rigid adult visual system lacking plasticity. Electronic recording of patching allowed new insights into the age-dependent susceptibility of the visual system and contributes to a more evidence-based treatment of amblyopia. Alternative approaches for adults challenge established notions about age limits of amblyopia therapy. Further studies comparing different treatment options are urgently needed.

  4. A handbook for the triage, monitoring and treatment of people exposed to a malevolent use of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojas-Palma, Carlos; Meer, Klaas van der; Liland, Astrid; Jaworska, Alicja; Jerstad, Ane; Kruse, Phil; Smith, Karen; Rahola, Tua; Muikku, Maarit; Etherington, George; Perez, Maria del R.; Carr, Zhanat; Smagala, Genowefa

    2008-01-01

    In the aftermath of the Chernobyl accident European national emergency response plans have been tailored to deal with accidents at nuclear power plants. Several terrorist acts (World Trade Center, New York; Atocha train station, Madrid; suicide bombings) carried out by disaffected groups have shifted the focus to malevolent use of radiation. The radiation exposure can range from very low to substantial, possibly combined with conventional injuries. Therefore practicable tools are needed for an adequate response to such acts and more specifically to address European guidelines covering triage to treatment and long term follow up of exposed people. The European Commission through the EURATOM 6th Framework Programme is co-sponsoring the specific targeted research project TMT handbook. The main objective of this project is to produce a practicable handbook for the effective and timely triage, monitoring and treatment of people exposed to radiation following a malevolent act. This paper elaborates on the work being carried out and outlines the progress achieved prior to the deployment of the handbook in European national emergency response organizations, which are in the process of testing and evaluating the material through targeted emergency response exercises. The end of this paper includes some remarks on the challenges that need to be dealt with in order to achieve a sustainable development of what has been achieved through the lifetime of this project. (author)

  5. Global response to HIV: treatment as prevention, or treatment for treatment?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sigaloff, Kim C. E.; Lange, Joep M. A.; Montaner, Julio

    2014-01-01

    The concept of "treatment as prevention" has emerged as a means to curb the global HIV epidemic. There is, however, still ongoing debate about the evidence on when to start antiretroviral therapy in resource-poor settings. Critics have brought forward multiple arguments against a "test and treat"

  6. Practice Patterns in the Treatment and Monitoring of Acute T Cell-Mediated Kidney Graft Rejection in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leblanc, Julie; Subrt, Peter; Paré, Michèle; Hartell, David; Sénécal, Lynne; Blydt-Hansen, Tom; Cardinal, Héloïse

    2018-01-01

    One of the goals of the Canadian National Transplant Research Program (CNTRP) is to develop novel therapies for acute rejection that could positively affect graft outcomes with greater efficacy or less toxicity. To develop innovative management strategies for kidney graft rejection, new modalities need to be compared with current clinical practices. However, there are no standardized practices concerning the management of acute T cell-mediated rejection (TCMR). To describe clinicians' practice patterns in the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of acute TCMR in Canada. Survey. Canadian transplant nephrologists and transplant surgeons involved in the management of acute TCMR. We developed an anonymous, web-based survey consisting of questions related to the diagnosis, treatment, and monitoring of TCMR. The survey was disseminated on 3 occasions between June and October 2016 through the Canadian Society of Transplantation (CST) kidney group electronic mailing list. Forty-seven respondents, mostly transplant nephrologists (97%), originating from at least 18 of the 25 Canadian centers offering adult or pediatric kidney transplantation, participated in the study. Surveillance biopsies were used by 28% of respondents to screen for kidney graft rejection. High-dose steroids were used by most of the respondents to treat clinical and subclinical Banff grade 1A and 1B rejections. Nine percent (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1-17) of practitioners used lymphocyte-depleting agents as the first-line approach for the treatment of Banff grade 1B acute rejection. Eighteen percent (95% CI: 7-29) and 36% (95% CI: 8-65) of respondents reported that they would not use high-dose steroids for treating clinical and subclinical borderline rejections, respectively. Seventy percent (95% CI: 54-83) of respondents answered that there was no indication to assess histological response to treatment independent of the change in kidney function. The limitations of this study are its limited sample

  7. Copepod behavior response to Burgers' vortex treatments mimicking turbulent eddies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmi, D.; Webster, D. R.; Fields, D. M.

    2017-11-01

    Copepods detect hydrodynamic cues in the water by their mechanosensory setae. We expect that copepods sense the flow structure of turbulent eddies in order to evoke behavioral responses that lead to population-scale distribution patterns. In this study, the copepods' response to the Burgers' vortex is examined. The Burgers' vortex is a steady-state solution of three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations that allows us to mimic turbulent vortices at the appropriate scale and eliminate the stochastic nature of turbulence. We generate vortices in the laboratory oriented in the horizontal and vertical directions each with four intensity levels. The objective of including vortex orientation as a parameter in the study is to quantify directional responses that lead to vertical population distribution patterns. The four intensity levels correspond to target vortex characteristics of eddies corresponding to the typical dissipative vortices in isotropic turbulence with mean turbulent dissipation rates in the range of 0.002 to 0.25 cm2/s3. These vortices mimic the characteristics of eddies that copepods most likely encounter in coastal zones. We hypothesize that the response of copepods to hydrodynamic features depends on their sensory architecture and relative orientation with respect to gravity. Tomo-PIV is used to quantify the vortex circulation and axial strain rate for each vortex treatment. Three-dimensional trajectories of the copepod species Calanus finmarchicus are analyzed to examine their swimming kinematics in and around the vortex to quantify the hydrodynamic cues that trigger their behavior.

  8. Monitoring and accountability for the Pacific response to the non-communicable diseases crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hilary Tolley

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-communicable diseases (NCD are the leading cause of premature death and disability in the Pacific. In 2011, Pacific Forum Leaders declared “a human, social and economic crisis” due to the significant and growing burden of NCDs in the region. In 2013, Pacific Health Ministers’ commitment to ‘whole of government’ strategy prompted calls for the development of a robust, sustainable, collaborative NCD monitoring and accountability system to track, review and propose remedial action to ensure progress towards the NCD goals and targets. The purpose of this paper is to describe a regional, collaborative framework for coordination, innovation and application of NCD monitoring activities at scale, and to show how they can strengthen accountability for action on NCDs in the Pacific. A key component is the Dashboard for NCD Action which aims to strengthen mutual accountability by demonstrating national and regional progress towards agreed NCD policies and actions. Discussion The framework for the Pacific Monitoring Alliance for NCD Action (MANA draws together core country-level components of NCD monitoring data (mortality, morbidity, risk factors, health system responses, environments, and policies and identifies key cross-cutting issues for strengthening national and regional monitoring systems. These include: capacity building; a regional knowledge exchange hub; innovations (monitoring childhood obesity and food environments; and a robust regional accountability system. The MANA framework is governed by the Heads of Health and operationalised by a multi-agency technical Coordination Team. Alliance membership is voluntary and non-conditional, and aims to support the 22 Pacific Island countries and territories to improve the quality of NCD monitoring data across the region. In establishing a common vision for NCD monitoring, the framework combines data collected under the WHO Global Framework for NCDs with a set of action

  9. Monitoring and accountability for the Pacific response to the non-communicable diseases crisis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolley, Hilary; Snowdon, Wendy; Wate, Jillian; Durand, A Mark; Vivili, Paula; McCool, Judith; Novotny, Rachel; Dewes, Ofa; Hoy, Damian; Bell, Colin; Richards, Nicola; Swinburn, Boyd

    2016-09-10

    Non-communicable diseases (NCD) are the leading cause of premature death and disability in the Pacific. In 2011, Pacific Forum Leaders declared "a human, social and economic crisis" due to the significant and growing burden of NCDs in the region. In 2013, Pacific Health Ministers' commitment to 'whole of government' strategy prompted calls for the development of a robust, sustainable, collaborative NCD monitoring and accountability system to track, review and propose remedial action to ensure progress towards the NCD goals and targets. The purpose of this paper is to describe a regional, collaborative framework for coordination, innovation and application of NCD monitoring activities at scale, and to show how they can strengthen accountability for action on NCDs in the Pacific. A key component is the Dashboard for NCD Action which aims to strengthen mutual accountability by demonstrating national and regional progress towards agreed NCD policies and actions. The framework for the Pacific Monitoring Alliance for NCD Action (MANA) draws together core country-level components of NCD monitoring data (mortality, morbidity, risk factors, health system responses, environments, and policies) and identifies key cross-cutting issues for strengthening national and regional monitoring systems. These include: capacity building; a regional knowledge exchange hub; innovations (monitoring childhood obesity and food environments); and a robust regional accountability system. The MANA framework is governed by the Heads of Health and operationalised by a multi-agency technical Coordination Team. Alliance membership is voluntary and non-conditional, and aims to support the 22 Pacific Island countries and territories to improve the quality of NCD monitoring data across the region. In establishing a common vision for NCD monitoring, the framework combines data collected under the WHO Global Framework for NCDs with a set of action-orientated indicators captured in a NCD Dashboard for

  10. Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Clinical Features, Endoscopic Findings and Response to Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Enns

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Eosinophilic esophagitis (EE is a motility disorder of the esophagus that typically presents with dysphagia. The objective of the present study was to explore patient characteristics, clinical and endoscopic features, and response to treatment of patients with EE. Patients were selected retrospectively based on a review of biopsy results from previous endoscopies performed between 2004 and 2008. A total of 54 patients (41 men and 13 women with biopsy-proven EE were included in the study. Further information regarding the patients’ clinical and endoscopic features, and response to treatment were obtained through chart reviews and patient telephone interviews. The mean age of the patients at symptom onset was 30 years. All patients complained of dysphagia, 81% had a history of bolus obstruction, 43% had a history of asthma and 70% had a history of environmental allergies. Thirty-three per cent had a family history of asthma, while 52% had a family history of food or seasonal allergies. The most common endoscopic findings were rings and/or corrugations, which were found in 63% of patients. Swallowed fluticasone therapy resulted in symptom resolution in 74% of patients; however, 79% of these patients relapsed after discontinuing fluticasone therapy and required repeat treatments. Esophageal dilation was complication free and resulted in improvement in 80% of patients. However, 83% of those reporting improvement relapsed within one year. The clinical and endoscopic findings were similar to those found in the literature, with most patients requiring ongoing, repeated therapies. Further studies are needed to assess the safety and efficacy of treatment modalities ideally suited to patients with EE.

  11. UNDERSTANDING THE NEUROINFLAMMATORY RESPONSE FOLLOWING CONCUSSION TO DEVELOP TREATMENT STRATEGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary Robert Patterson

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Mild traumatic brain injuries (mTBI have been associated with long-term cognitive deficits relating to trauma-induced neurodegeneration. These long-term deficits include impaired memory and attention, changes in executive function, emotional instability and sensorimotor deficits. Furthermore, individuals with concussions show a high co-morbidity with a host of psychiatric illnesses (e.g. depression, anxiety, addiction and dementia. The neurological damage seen in mTBI patients is the result of the direct impact and mechanical injury, followed by a delayed neuroimmune response that can last hours, days and even months after the injury. As part of the neuroimmune response, a cascade of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines are released and can be detected at the site of injury as well as subcortical, and often contralateral, regions. It has been suggested that the delayed neuroinflammatory response to concussions is more damaging then the initial impact itself. However, evidence exists for favourable consequences of cytokine production following traumatic brain injuries as well. In some cases, treatments that reduce the inflammatory response will also hinder the brain's intrinsic repair mechanisms. At present, there is no evidence-based pharmacological treatment for concussions in humans. The ability to treat concussions with drug therapy requires an in-depth understanding of the pathophysiological and neuroinflammatory changes that accompany concussive injuries. The use of neurotrophic factors (e.g. nerve growth factor and anti-inflammatory agents as an adjunct for the management of post-concussion symptomology will be explored in this review.

  12. Performance monitoring and response conflict resolution associated with choice stepping reaction tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Tatsunori; Tsutou, Kotaro; Saito, Kotaro; Ishida, Kazuto; Tanabe, Shigeo; Nojima, Ippei

    2016-11-01

    Choice reaction requires response conflict resolution, and the resolution processes that occur during a choice stepping reaction task undertaken in a standing position, which requires maintenance of balance, may be different to those processes occurring during a choice reaction task performed in a seated position. The study purpose was to investigate the resolution processes during a choice stepping reaction task at the cortical level using electroencephalography and compare the results with a control task involving ankle dorsiflexion responses. Twelve young adults either stepped forward or dorsiflexed the ankle in response to a visual imperative stimulus presented on a computer screen. We used the Simon task and examined the error-related negativity (ERN) that follows an incorrect response and the correct-response negativity (CRN) that follows a correct response. Error was defined as an incorrect initial weight transfer for the stepping task and as an incorrect initial tibialis anterior activation for the control task. Results revealed that ERN and CRN amplitudes were similar in size for the stepping task, whereas the amplitude of ERN was larger than that of CRN for the control task. The ERN amplitude was also larger in the stepping task than the control task. These observations suggest that a choice stepping reaction task involves a strategy emphasizing post-response conflict and general performance monitoring of actual and required responses and also requires greater cognitive load than a choice dorsiflexion reaction. The response conflict resolution processes appear to be different for stepping tasks and reaction tasks performed in a seated position.

  13. Real-time monitoring/emergency response modeling workstation for a tritium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawver, B.S.; Sims, J.M.; Baskett, R.L.

    1993-01-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we have developed a real-time system to monitor two stacks on our tritium handling facility. The monitors transmit the stack data to a workstation, which computes a three-dimensional numerical model of atmospheric dispersion. The workstation also collects surface and upper air data from meteorological towers and a sodar. The complex meteorological and terrain setting in the Livermore Valley demands more sophisticated resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere to reliably calculate plume dispersion than afforded by Gaussian models. We experience both mountain valley and sea breeze flows. To address these complexities, we have implemented the three-dimensional diagnostic MATHEW mass-adjusted wind field and ADPIC particle-in-cell dispersion models on the workstation for use in real-time emergency response modeling. Both MATHEW and ADPIC have shown their utility in a variety of complex settings over the last 15 yr within the U.S. Department of Energy's Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC) project. Faster workstations and real-time instruments allow utilization of more complex three-dimensional models, which provides a foundation for building a real-time monitoring and emergency response workstation for a tritium facility. The stack monitors are two ion chambers per stack

  14. Tracking the harmonic response of magnetically-soft sensors for wireless temperature, stress, and corrosive monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, Keat G.; Grimes, Craig A.

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the application of magnetically-soft ribbon-like sensors for measurement of temperature and stress, as well as corrosive monitoring, based upon changes in the amplitudes of the higher-order harmonics generated by the sensors in response to a magnetic interrogation signal. The sensors operate independently of mass loading, and so can be placed or rigidly embedded inside nonmetallic, opaque structures such as concrete or plastic. The passive harmonic-based sensor is remotely monitored through a single coplanar interrogation and detection coil. Effects due to the relative location of the sensor are eliminated by tracking harmonic amplitude ratios, thereby, enabling wide area monitoring. The wireless, passive, mass loading independent nature of the described sensor platform makes it ideally suited for long-term structural monitoring applications, such as measurement of temperature and stress inside concrete structures. A theoretical model is presented to explain the origin and behavior of the higher-order harmonics in response to temperature and stress. c2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Real-Time Molecular Monitoring of Chemical Environment in ObligateAnaerobes during Oxygen Adaptive Response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Wozei, Eleanor; Lin, Zhang; Comolli, Luis R.; Ball, David. A.; Borglin, Sharon; Fields, Matthew W.; Hazen, Terry C.; Downing, Kenneth H.

    2009-02-25

    Determining the transient chemical properties of the intracellular environment canelucidate the paths through which a biological system adapts to changes in its environment, for example, the mechanisms which enable some obligate anaerobic bacteria to survive a sudden exposure to oxygen. Here we used high-resolution Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectromicroscopy to continuously follow cellular chemistry within living obligate anaerobes by monitoring hydrogen bonding in their cellular water. We observed a sequence of wellorchestrated molecular events that correspond to changes in cellular processes in those cells that survive, but only accumulation of radicals in those that do not. We thereby can interpret the adaptive response in terms of transient intracellular chemistry and link it to oxygen stress and survival. This ability to monitor chemical changes at the molecular level can yield important insights into a wide range of adaptive responses.

  16. Cotton Fabric Coated with Conducting Polymers and its Application in Monitoring of Carnivorous Plant Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Bajgar

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes the electrical plant response to mechanical stimulation monitored with the help of conducting polymers deposited on cotton fabric. Cotton fabric was coated with conducting polymers, polyaniline or polypyrrole, in situ during the oxidation of respective monomers in aqueous medium. Thus, modified fabrics were again coated with polypyrrole or polyaniline, respectively, in order to investigate any synergetic effect between both polymers with respect to conductivity and its stability during repeated dry cleaning. The coating was confirmed by infrared spectroscopy. The resulting fabrics have been used as electrodes to collect the electrical response to the stimulation of a Venus flytrap plant. This is a paradigm of the use of conducting polymers in monitoring of plant neurobiology.

  17. Meteorological monitoring for environmental/dose assessment and emergency response modeling: How much is enough?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glantz, C.S.

    1989-01-01

    In evaluation the effectiveness and appropriateness of meteorological monitoring programs, managers responsible for planning and operating emergency response or environmental/dose assessment systems must routinely question whether enough meteorological data are being obtained to adequately support system applications. There is no simple answer or cookbook procedure that can be followed in generating an appropriate answer to this question. The answer must be developed through detailed consideration of the intended applications for the data, the capabilities of the models that would use the data, pollutant release characteristics, terrain in the modeling region, the size of the modeling domain, and the distribution of human population in the modeling domain. It is recommended that manager consult meteorologists when assessing these factors; the meteorologist's detailed knowledge of, and experience in, studying atmospheric transport and diffusion should assist the manager in determining the appropriate level of meteorological monitoring. 1 ref

  18. Study of response of radiation monitors for environmental dose equivalent measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souza, Macilene N.; Khoury, H.J.

    2005-01-01

    The environmental dose equivalent H * (10), is the magnitude recommended by ICRU 39 for environmental monitoring in fields of radiation of photons. Most of the equipment used for area monitoring, only quantifies the magnitudes exposure or dose not being designed to this new magnitude. In Brazil, particularly, is not yet regulated the use of H * (10). However, with the revision of the standard 3.01 it will necessary the use of monitors that allow the achievement of measures according to H * (10). The transition for using new magnitudes will be a slow process and the contribution that the laboratories of metrology of ionizing radiation in the country can give is, at first, promote and create the habit of using the unit Sievert (Sv) in the calibration of the instruments, and that is the unit recommended for H * (10). In a second step, the tests for determining the response of the instruments for H * (10) should be made and this is the harder step, taking into account the large number of area monitors around the country. These tests will provide information about the limitations of the instrument to the new magnitude, that is, the range where the instrument will have the best performance in quantification of new magnitude. This paper evaluates the performance for H * (10), with the variation of energy and angle of incidence of radiation, of three of the most used monitors in the country

  19. The strategic control of prospective memory monitoring in response to complex and probabilistic contextual cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bugg, Julie M; Ball, B Hunter

    2017-07-01

    Participants use simple contextual cues to reduce deployment of costly monitoring processes in contexts in which prospective memory (PM) targets are not expected. This study investigated whether this strategic monitoring pattern is observed in response to complex and probabilistic contextual cues. Participants performed a lexical decision task in which words or nonwords were presented in upper or lower locations on screen. The specific condition was informed that PM targets ("tor" syllable) would occur only in words in the upper location, whereas the nonspecific condition was informed that targets could occur in any location or word type. Context was blocked such that word type and location changed every 8 trials. In Experiment 1, the specific condition used the complex contextual cue to reduce monitoring in unexpected contexts relative to the nonspecific condition. This pattern largely was not evidenced when the complex contextual cue was probabilistic (Experiment 2). Experiment 3 confirmed that strategic monitoring is observed for a complex cue that is deterministic, but not one that is probabilistic. Additionally, Experiments 1 and 3 demonstrated a disadvantage associated with strategic monitoring-namely, that the specific condition was less likely to respond to a PM target in an unexpected context. Experiment 3 provided evidence that this disadvantage is attributable to impaired noticing of the target. The novel findings suggest use of a complex contextual cue per se is not a boundary condition for the strategic, context-specific allocation of monitoring processes to support prospective remembering; however, strategic monitoring is constrained by the predictive utility of the complex contextual cue.

  20. Monitoring Utilization of a Large Scale Addiction Treatment System: The Drug and Alcohol Treatment Information System (DATIs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nooshin Khobzi Rotondi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Client-based information systems can yield data to address issues of system accountability and planning, and contribute information related to changing patterns of substance use in treatment and, indirectly, general populations. The Drug and Alcohol Treatment Information System (DATIS monitors the number/types of clients treated in approximately 170 publicly-funded addiction treatment agencies in Ontario. The purpose of this study was to estimate the caseload of addiction treatment agencies, and describe important characteristics of clients, their patterns of service utilization and trends over-time from 2005 to 2010. In 2009–2010, 47,065 individuals were admitted to treatment. Since 2005–2006, there has been an increase in adolescents/youth in treatment, and a decrease in the male-female gender ratio. Alcohol problems predominated, but an increasing proportion of clients used cannabis and prescription opioids. DATIS is an evolving system and an integral component of Ontario's performance measurement system. Linkages with healthcare information systems will allow for longitudinal tracking of client health-related outcomes.

  1. Mycobacteria-specific cytokine responses as correlates of treatment response in active and latent tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, Vanessa; Tebruegge, Marc; Zufferey, Christel; Germano, Susie; Forbes, Ben; Cosentino, Lucy; McBryde, Emma; Eisen, Damon; Robins-Browne, Roy; Street, Alan; Denholm, Justin; Curtis, Nigel

    2017-08-01

    A biomarker indicating successful tuberculosis (TB) therapy would assist in determining appropriate length of treatment. This study aimed to determine changes in mycobacteria-specific antigen-induced cytokine biomarkers in patients receiving therapy for latent or active TB, to identify biomarkers potentially correlating with treatment success. A total of 33 adults with active TB and 36 with latent TB were followed longitudinally over therapy. Whole blood stimulation assays using mycobacteria-specific antigens (CFP-10, ESAT-6, PPD) were done on samples obtained at 0, 1, 3, 6 and 9 months. Cytokine responses (IFN-γ, IL-1ra, IL-2, IL-10, IL-13, IP-10, MIP-1β, and TNF-α) in supernatants were measured by Luminex xMAP immunoassay. In active TB cases, median IL-1ra (with CFP-10 and with PPD stimulation), IP-10 (CFP-10, ESAT-6), MIP-1β (ESAT-6, PPD), and TNF-α (ESAT-6) responses declined significantly over the course of therapy. In latent TB cases, median IL-1ra (CFP-10, ESAT-6, PPD), IL-2 (CFP-10, ESAT-6), and IP-10 (CFP-10, ESAT-6) responses declined significantly. Mycobacteria-specific cytokine responses change significantly over the course of therapy, and their kinetics in active TB differ from those observed in latent TB. In particular, mycobacteria-specific IL-1ra responses are potential correlates of successful therapy in both active and latent TB. Copyright © 2017 The British Infection Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A seismic monitoring system for response and failure of structures with intentionally reduced seismic strength

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takanashi, Koichi; Ohi, Kenichi

    1988-01-01

    A group of steel and reinforced concrete scaled structures with intentionally reduced seismic strength to 1/3 to 1/2 were constructed in 1983 for long term observation in order to collect precise data of earthquake response and grasp failure mechanisms during earthquakes. A monitoring system was installed in the structures as well as in the surrounding soil. Some reliable data have been successfully recorded since then, which can be available for verification of analytical models. (author)

  3. A solution to the varying response of the linear power monitor induced by xenon poisoning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Godsey, T A; Randall, J D [Texas A and M University (United States)

    1974-07-01

    After conversion to FLIP fuel at Texas A and M, the fuel temperatures were examined very carefully. It was observed that the fuel temperature at 1 Mw varied over a wide range during the week. This variation was shown to be due to the variation in response of the linear CIC which was used to establish reactor power level. A modification of the linear power monitor was designed and installed. The response of this system was verified by using cobalt wires, fuel temperature, and a fission chamber located at 6 feet from the reactor core. The system has proven to be operationally satisfactory. (author)

  4. Application of laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy techniques to the monitoring of single cell response to stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, James W.; Liu, Rui; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2012-06-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) combines optical trapping with micro-Raman spectroscopy to enable label-free biochemical analysis of individual cells and small biological particles in suspension. The integration of the two technologies greatly simplifies the sample preparation and handling of suspension cells for spectroscopic analysis in physiologically meaningful conditions. In our group, LTRS has been used to study the effects of external perturbations, both chemical and mechanical, on the biochemistry of the cell. Single cell dynamics can be studied by performing longitudinal studies to continuously monitor the response of the cell as it interacts with its environment. The ability to carry out these measurements in-vitro makes LTRS an attractive tool for many biomedical applications. Here, we discuss the use of LTRS to study the response of cancer cells to chemotherapeutics and bacteria cells to antibiotics and show that the life cycle and apoptosis of the cells can be detected. These results show the promise of LTRS for drug discovery/screening, antibiotic susceptibility testing, and chemotherapy response monitoring applications. In separate experiments, we study the response of red blood cells to the mechanical forces imposed on the cell by the optical tweezers. A laser power dependent deoxygenation of the red blood cell in the single beam trap is reported. Normal, sickle cell, and fetal red blood cells have a different behavior that enables the discrimination of the cell types based on this mechanochemical response. These results show the potential utility of LTRS for diagnosing and studying red blood cell diseases.

  5. Evaluation of eleven years of area monitoring in ore treatment unit: I external exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, W.S.; Py Junior, D.A.; Oliveira, S.Q. de; Dantas, M.V.A., E-mail: pereiraws@gmail.com [Industrias Nucleares do Brasil (INB), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil). Unidade de Tratamento de Minerio. Grupo Multidisciplinar de Radioprotecao; Kelecom, A., E-mail: akelecom@id.uff.br [Universidade Federal Fluminense (LARARA-PLS/GETA/UFF), Niteroi, RJ (Brazil). Laboratorio de Radiobiologia e Radiometria Pedro Lopes dos Santos. Grupo de Estudos em Temas Ambientais; Pereira, J.R.S., E-mail: pereirarsj@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Alfenas (UNIFAL), Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    The Ore Treatment Unit (OTU) is an uranium mining and milling complex deactivated in 1995 that operated monazite during the years 2004 and 2005 in a plant used especially for that purpose called Chemical Treatment of Monazite (CTM). This study aims to analyze the monitoring of area to exposure rate from 2002 to 2012, comparing periods of suspended operation of OTU and identifying the influences of CTM and of the radioactive waste deposit, from other facilities of OTU. A total of 22,294 samples were analyzed for area dose rates; average values were obtained of 6.74 μSv h{sup -1} with an amplitude from 0 to 420 μSv h{sup -1}. 92% of the monitoring were below the derivative limit for workers, and 1,702 monitoring samples showed values above this limit. Ignoring the monitoring that was realized at CTM and at the deposit of radioactive waste, the number of monitoring samples were reduced to 1,341. In this case, the average reduces to 0.96 μSv h{sup -1}, going from 0 to 25 μSv h{sup -1}, only 15 samples remained above the threshold for workers and 675 samples were below the limit for individual public. It can be concluded that the OTU is an installation with nearly 99% of monitoring area safe for workers and 50% for individual public. The inclusion of new practices (CTM) and the deposit of radioactive waste coming from other facilities alter this picture dramatically, increased the dose rates. (author)

  6. Faunal and vegetation monitoring in response to harbor dredging in the Port of Miami

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Andre; Stevenson, Rachael; Smith, Erin; Robblee, Michael

    2018-04-11

    Seagrasses are highly productive ecosystems. A before-after-control-impact (BACI) design was used to examine effects of dredging on seagrasses and the animals that inhabit them. The control site North Biscayne Bay and the affected site Port of Miami had seagrass densities decrease during both the before, Fish and Invertebrate Assessment Network 2006-2011, and after, Faunal Monitoring in Response to Harbor Dredging 2014-2016, studies. Turbidity levels increased at North Biscayne Bay and Port of Miami basins during the Faunal Monitoring in Response to Harbor Dredging study, especially in 2016. Animal populations decreased significantly in North Biscayne Bay and Port of Miami in the Faunal Monitoring in Response to Harbor Dredging study compared to the Fish and Invertebrate Assessment Network study. Predictive modeling shows that numbers of animal populations will likely continue to decrease if the negative trends in seagrass densities continue unabated. There could be effects on several fisheries vital to the south Florida economy. Additional research could determine if animal populations and seagrass densities have rebounded or continued to decrease.

  7. Conflict-triggered goal shielding: response conflicts attenuate background monitoring for prospective memory cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goschke, Thomas; Dreisbach, Gesine

    2008-01-01

    Action control in a changing environment requires that one shield current goals from distracting information (goal shielding) and at the same time monitor the environment for potentially significant stimuli that may afford a goal switch (background monitoring). Response conflicts modulate the balance between goal shielding and background monitoring, as indicated by reduced susceptibility to interference after response conflicts. Such conflict-adaptation effects have been attributed to enhanced recruitment of cognitive control on trials following conflicts. Here we show that conflict triggers increased goal shielding on the conflict trial itself. Subjects performed a spatial compatibility task during which they had to notice rare prospective memory cues. Such cues were overlooked more often on conflict trials than on nonconflict trials, a result indicating that shielding of the current goal and inhibition of distractors were increased on the current trial when it involved a response conflict. Thus, evidence for enhanced recruitment of control following conflict may partly reflect aftereffects of goal shielding on the conflict trial itself.

  8. Routine Outcome Monitoring and Clinical Decision-Making in Forensic Psychiatry Based on the Instrument for Forensic Treatment Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Veeken, Frida C A; Lucieer, Jacques; Bogaerts, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Rehabilitation in forensic psychiatry is achieved gradually with different leave modules, in line with the Risk Need Responsivity model. A forensic routine outcome monitoring tool should measure treatment progress based on the rehabilitation theory, and it should be predictive of important treatment outcomes in order to be usable in decision-making. Therefore, this study assesses the predictive validity for both positive (i.e., leave) and negative (i.e., inpatient incidents) treatment outcomes with the Instrument for Forensic Treatment Evaluation (IFTE). Two-hundred and twenty-four patients were included in this study. ROC analyses were conducted with the IFTE factors and items for three leave modules: guided, unguided and transmural leave for the whole group of patients. Predictive validity of the IFTE for aggression in general, physical aggression specifically, and urine drug screening (UDS) violations was assessed for patients with the main diagnoses in Dutch forensic psychiatry, patients with personality disorders and the most frequently occurring co-morbid disorders: those with combined personality and substance use disorders. Results tentatively imply that the IFTE has a reasonable to good predictive validity for inpatient aggression and a marginal to reasonable predictive value for leave approvals and UDS violations. The IFTE can be used for information purposes in treatment decision-making, but reports should be interpreted with care and acknowledge patients' personal risk factors, strengths and other information sources.

  9. Experiences with SCRAMx alcohol monitoring technology in 100 alcohol treatment outpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, Sheila M; Barnett, Nancy P; Petry, Nancy M

    2017-09-01

    Transdermal alcohol monitoring technology allows for new research on alcohol use disorders. This study assessed feasibility, acceptability, and adherence with this technology in the context of two clinical research trials. Participants were the first 100 community-based alcohol treatment outpatients enrolled in randomized studies that monitored drinking with the secure continuous remote alcohol monitor (SCRAMx ® ) for 12 weeks. Study 1 participants were randomized to usual care (n=36) or usual care with contingency management incentives for treatment attendance (CM-Att; n=30). Study 2 participants were randomized to usual care (n=17) or usual care with CM for each day of no drinking per SCRAMx (CM-Abst; n=17). After 12 weeks, participants completed a survey about the bracelet. Nine percent of individuals screened (54 of 595) declined participation because of the bracelet. Of participants, 84% provided 12weeks of data, and 96% of bracelets were returned fully intact. Ninety-four equipment tampers occurred, affecting 2% of monitoring days; 56% (67) of tampers coincided with detected drinking. Common concerns reported by participants were skin marks (58%), irritation (54%), and interfered with clothing choices (51%), but severity ratings were generally mild (60%-94%). Eighty-one percent of participants reported that the bracelet helped them reduce drinking, and 75% indicated that they would wear it for longer. A common suggestion for improvement was to reduce the size of the bracelet. Results support the viability of transdermal monitoring in voluntary substance abuse treatment participants for an extended duration. Issues to consider for future applications of this technology are discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Building M7-0505 Treatment Tank (SWMU 039) Annual Performance Monitoring Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    This Annual Performance Monitoring Report presents a summary of Interim Measure (IM) activities and an evaluation of data collected during the third year (June 2014 to September 2015) of operation, maintenance, and monitoring (OM&M) conducted at the Building M7-505 (M505) Treatment Tank area, Kennedy Space Center (KSC), Florida ("the Site"). Under KSC's Resource Conservation and Recovery Act Corrective Action Program, the M505 Treatment Tank area was designated Solid Waste Management Unit 039. Arcadis U.S., Inc. (Arcadis) began IM activities on January 10, 2012, after completion of construction of an in situ air sparge (IAS) system to remediate volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in groundwater at concentrations exceeding applicable Florida Department of Environmental Protection (FDEP) Chapter 62-777, Florida Administrative Code, Natural Attenuation Default Concentrations (NADCs). This report presents a summary of the third year of OM&M activities conducted between June 2014 and September 2015.

  11. SU-F-J-147: Magnetic Field Dose Response Considerations for a Linac Monitor Chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, M; Fallone, B [Cross Cancer Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: The impact of magnetic fields on the readings of a linac monitor chamber have not yet been investigated. Herein we examine the total dose response as well as any deviations in the beam parameters of flatness and symmetry when a Varian monitor chamber is irradiated within an applied magnetic field. This work has direct application to the development of Linac-MR systems worldwide. Methods: A Varian monitor chamber was modeled in the Monte Carlo code PENELOPE and irradiated in the presence of a magnetic field with a phase space generated from a model of a Linac-MR prototype system. The magnetic field strength was stepped from 0 to 3.0T in both parallel and perpendicular directions with respect to the normal surface of the phase space. Dose to each of the four regions in the monitor chamber were scored separately for every magnetic field adaptation to evaluate the effect of the magnetic field on flatness and symmetry. Results: When the magnetic field is perpendicular to the phase space normal we see a change in dose response with a maximal deviation (10–25% depending on the chamber region) near 0.75T. In the direction of electron deflection we expectedly see opposite responses in chamber regions leading to a measured asymmetry. With a magnetic field parallel to the phase space normal we see no measured asymmetries, however there is a monotonic rise in dose response leveling off at about +12% near 2.5T. Conclusion: Attention must be given to correct for the strength and direction of the magnetic field at the location of the linac monitor chamber in hybrid Linac-MR devices. Elsewise the dose sampled by these chambers may not represent the actual dose expected at isocentre; additionally there may be a need to correct for the symmetry of the beam recorded by the monitor chamber. Fallone is a co-founder and CEO of MagnetTx Oncology Solutions (under discussions to license Alberta bi-planar linac MR for commercialization).

  12. Yield Responses of Black Spruce to Forest Vegetation Management Treatments: Initial Responses and Rotational Projections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter F. Newton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The objectives of this study were to (1 quantitatively summarize the early yield responses of black spruce (Picea mariana (Mill. B.S.P. to forest vegetation management (FVM treatments through a meta-analytical review of the scientific literature, and (2 given (1, estimate the rotational consequences of these responses through model simulation. Based on a fixed-effects meta-analytic approach using 44 treated-control yield pairs derived from 12 experiments situated throughout the Great Lakes—St. Lawrence and Canadian Boreal Forest Regions, the resultant mean effect size (response ratio and associated 95% confidence interval for basal diameter, total height, stem volume, and survival responses, were respectively: 54.7% (95% confidence limits (lower/upper: 34.8/77.6, 27.3% (15.7/40.0, 198.7% (70.3/423.5, and 2.9% (−5.5/11.8. The results also indicated that early and repeated treatments will yield the largest gains in terms of mean tree size and survival. Rotational simulations indicated that FVM treatments resulted in gains in stand-level operability (e.g., reductions of 9 and 5 yr for plantations established on poor-medium and good-excellent site qualities, resp.. The challenge of maintaining coniferous forest cover on recently disturbed sites, attaining statutory-defined free-to-grow status, and ensuring long-term productivity, suggest that FVM will continue to be an essential silvicultural treatment option when managing black spruce plantations.

  13. Integrated monitoring and assessment of soil restoration treatments in the Lake Tahoe Basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grismer, M E; Schnurrenberger, C; Arst, R; Hogan, M P

    2009-03-01

    Revegetation and soil restoration efforts, often associated with erosion control measures on disturbed soils, are rarely monitored or otherwise evaluated in terms of improved hydrologic, much less, ecologic function and longer term sustainability. As in many watersheds, sediment is a key parameter of concern in the Tahoe Basin, particularly fine sediments less than about ten microns. Numerous erosion control measures deployed in the Basin during the past several decades have under-performed, or simply failed after a few years and new soil restoration methods of erosion control are under investigation. We outline a comprehensive, integrated field-based evaluation and assessment of the hydrologic function associated with these soil restoration methods with the hypothesis that restoration of sustainable function will result in longer term erosion control benefits than that currently achieved with more commonly used surface treatment methods (e.g. straw/mulch covers and hydroseeding). The monitoring includes cover-point and ocular assessments of plant cover, species type and diversity; soil sampling for nutrient status; rainfall simulation measurement of infiltration and runoff rates; cone penetrometer measurements of soil compaction and thickness of mulch layer depths. Through multi-year hydrologic and vegetation monitoring at ten sites and 120 plots, we illustrate the results obtained from the integrated monitoring program and describe how it might guide future restoration efforts and monitoring assessments.

  14. Coherent national IT infrastructure for telehomecare - a case of hypertension measurement, treatment and monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambo, Torben; Hoffmann-Petersen, Nikolai; Pedersen, Erling B.

    2010-01-01

    defined general repositories eases citizen and professional access to data. By identifying potential datastorage options, and by using a common public infrastructure for making healthcare data secured and available, telehomecare can be realized and barriers between different entities of the healthcare......Hypertension is affecting almost 20% of the population in many countries. Monitoring and treatment is critical. Mobile, wireless hypertension measurement - as other vital signs - is breaking through but require substantial organisational engineering and management of technology at its best. Well...

  15. The effectiveness of anticellulite treatment using tripolar radiofrequency monitored by classic and high-frequency ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlosek, R K; Woźniak, W; Malinowska, S; Lewandowski, M; Nowicki, A

    2012-06-01

      Cellulite affects nearly 85% of the female population. Given the size of the phenomenon, we are continuously looking for effective ways to reduce cellulite. Reliable monitoring of anticellulite treatment remains a problem.   The main aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of anticellulite treatment carried out using radiofrequency (RF), which was monitored by classical and high-frequency ultrasound.   Twenty-eight women underwent anticellulite treatment using RF, 17 women were in the placebo group. The therapy was monitored by classical and high-frequency ultrasound. The examinations evaluated the thickness of the epidermal echo, dermis thickness, dermis echogenicity, the length of the subcutaneous tissue bands growing into the dermis, the presence or absence of oedema, the thickness of subcutaneous tissue as well as thigh circumference and the stage of cellulite (according to the Nürnberger-Müller scale).   Cellulite was reduced in 89.286% of the women who underwent RF treatment. After the therapy, the following observations were made: a decrease in the thickness of the dermis and subcutaneous tissue, an increase in echogenicity reflecting on the increase in the number of collagen fibres, decreased subcutaneous tissue growing into bands in the dermis, and the reduction of oedema. In the placebo group, no statistically significant changes of the above parameters were observed.   Radiofrequency enables cellulite reduction. A crucial aspect is proper monitoring of the progress of such therapy, which ultrasound allows. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of the European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology © 2011 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  16. Coherent national IT infrastructure for telehomecare - a case of hypertension measurement, treatment and monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tambo, Torben; Hoffmann-Petersen, Nikolai; Pedersen, Erling Bjerregaard

    2010-01-01

    Hypertension is affecting almost 20% of the population in many countries. Monitoring and treatment is critical. Mobile, wireless hypertension measurement - as other vital signs - is breaking through but require substantial organisational engineering and management of technology at its best. Well...... defined general repositories eases citizen and professional access to data. By identifying potential datastorage options, and by using a common public infrastructure for making healthcare data secured and available, telehomecare can be realized and barriers between different entities of the healthcare...

  17. Spasmodic dysphonia: onset, course, socioemotional effects, and treatment response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Kristine; Roy, Nelson; Merrill, Ray M; Sauder, Cara; Houtz, Daniel R; Smith, Marshall E

    2011-07-01

    This investigation explored the onset, progression, socioemotional effects, and treatment outcomes of spasmodic dysphonia (SD). A cross-sectional epidemiological approach was used to examine questionnaire responses from 150 individuals with SD. Symptoms of SD (mean age at onset, 46 years) began gradually in 76% of cases and were progressive (ie, failed to plateau) in 34% of cases. Botulinum toxin A (Botox) helped to attenuate voice symptoms in 91% of cases; however, the scores on the Voice-Related Quality of Life questionnaire (V-RQOL) were not associated with this effect. The V-RQOL scores improved with time since symptom onset, independent of age and treatment. The patients with only SD experienced onset, course, and progression of symptoms similar to those of the patients with SD and coexisting vocal tremor. The symptoms of SD begin gradually and worsen over time. New evidence indicates that SD symptoms may continue to progress without plateau in at least a subset of patients. Individuals with SD and coexisting vocal tremor experience symptom trajectories similar to those of patients with SD only. Although Botox may attenuate voice symptoms, these effects do not appear to be strongly related to the V-RQOL scores. These results provide new and valuable insights regarding the onset, course, progression, and treatment of SD.

  18. RADIOIODINE TREATMENT OF GRAVES’ DISEASE – DOSE/RESPONSE ANALYSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitka Čepková

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The clinical outcome of 153 Graves’ disease patients treated with a wide dose range of radioactive iodine-131 (RAI was analyzed retrospectively. Six to nine months after the first dose of RAI 60 patients (39% were hypothyroid (or rather thyroxine-substituted and 26 (17% were euthyroid, while 67 patients (44% did not respond properly: in 32 (21% their antithyroid drug (ATD dose could be reduced but not withdrawn (partial response and 35 (23% remained hyperthyroid or the same dose of ATD was necessary (no response. The outcome did not correspond significantly to the administered activity of RAI (medians 259, 259, 222, and 259 MBq for hypothyroid, euthyroid, partial, and no response subgroups, respectively, or the activity retained in the gland at 24 h (medians 127, 105, 143, and 152 MBq. The effect was, however, clearly, and in a stepwise pattern, dependent on initial thyroid volume (17, 26, 33 and 35 ml, P  6 MBq/g, cure rate 80% and lower (≤ 6 MBq/g, cure rate 46% doses gave highly significant difference (P < 0.001. With our dosing range we found a dose-dependent clinical outcome that suggests an optimum delivered dose near 6.5 MBq/g, resulting in successful treatment of ca 80% patients.

  19. Can quantitative sensory testing predict responses to analgesic treatment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosen, K; Fischer, I W D; Olesen, A E; Drewes, A M

    2013-10-01

    The role of quantitative sensory testing (QST) in prediction of analgesic effect in humans is scarcely investigated. This updated review assesses the effectiveness in predicting analgesic effects in healthy volunteers, surgical patients and patients with chronic pain. A systematic review of English written, peer-reviewed articles was conducted using PubMed and Embase (1980-2013). Additional studies were identified by chain searching. Search terms included 'quantitative sensory testing', 'sensory testing' and 'analgesics'. Studies on the relationship between QST and response to analgesic treatment in human adults were included. Appraisal of the methodological quality of the included studies was based on evaluative criteria for prognostic studies. Fourteen studies (including 720 individuals) met the inclusion criteria. Significant correlations were observed between responses to analgesics and several QST parameters including (1) heat pain threshold in experimental human pain, (2) electrical and heat pain thresholds, pressure pain tolerance and suprathreshold heat pain in surgical patients, and (3) electrical and heat pain threshold and conditioned pain modulation in patients with chronic pain. Heterogeneity among studies was observed especially with regard to application of QST and type and use of analgesics. Although promising, the current evidence is not sufficiently robust to recommend the use of any specific QST parameter in predicting analgesic response. Future studies should focus on a range of different experimental pain modalities rather than a single static pain stimulation paradigm. © 2013 European Federation of International Association for the Study of Pain Chapters.

  20. Paradoxical response during antituberculous treatment for abdominal tuberculosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ji Young; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Kim, Mi Jeong; Chang, Hyuk Won; Hwang, Jae Seok; Cho, Kwang Bum; Park, Kyung Sik; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin [Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University School of Medicine, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-12-15

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate clinical and CT findings of paradoxical response during treatment for abdominal tuberculosis. Authors reviewed the patient records of 138 patients with abdominal tuberculosis during a recent 6-year period and we selected 11 patients with a paradoxical response. The CT findings and pathologic findings of the initial lesions and new lesions were reviewed. The intervals between initiation of therapy and the detection of new lesions, improvement of new lesion and the final follow-up were evaluated. At the initial presentation, we identified tuberculous peritonitis in 8 patients, tuberculous lymphadenitis in 3 patients and ileocolic tuberculosis in two patients. New lesions were identified at 2-10 months (mean: 3.8 months) after the initiation of therapy and following improvement of the initial lesions. The new lesions were perihepatic caseous abscess (n=4), hepatic tuberculoma (n=3), hepatic caseous abscess (n=1), tuberculous lymphadenitis (n=3), ileocolic tuberculosis (n=3), and splenic tuberculoma (n=1). Improvement of new lesions was noted at 4-14 months (mean: 7.6 months). At the final follow-up of seven patients, the new lesions disappeared and four patients still had small residual lesions. New lesions that develop in a patient with initial improvement should be considered a paradoxical response that will ultimately improve with continuation of the original medication.

  1. Paradoxical response during antituberculous treatment for abdominal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ji Young; Kwon, Jung Hyeok; Kim, Mi Jeong; Chang, Hyuk Won; Hwang, Jae Seok; Cho, Kwang Bum; Park, Kyung Sik; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of our study was to evaluate clinical and CT findings of paradoxical response during treatment for abdominal tuberculosis. Authors reviewed the patient records of 138 patients with abdominal tuberculosis during a recent 6-year period and we selected 11 patients with a paradoxical response. The CT findings and pathologic findings of the initial lesions and new lesions were reviewed. The intervals between initiation of therapy and the detection of new lesions, improvement of new lesion and the final follow-up were evaluated. At the initial presentation, we identified tuberculous peritonitis in 8 patients, tuberculous lymphadenitis in 3 patients and ileocolic tuberculosis in two patients. New lesions were identified at 2-10 months (mean: 3.8 months) after the initiation of therapy and following improvement of the initial lesions. The new lesions were perihepatic caseous abscess (n=4), hepatic tuberculoma (n=3), hepatic caseous abscess (n=1), tuberculous lymphadenitis (n=3), ileocolic tuberculosis (n=3), and splenic tuberculoma (n=1). Improvement of new lesions was noted at 4-14 months (mean: 7.6 months). At the final follow-up of seven patients, the new lesions disappeared and four patients still had small residual lesions. New lesions that develop in a patient with initial improvement should be considered a paradoxical response that will ultimately improve with continuation of the original medication

  2. Task-dependent response conflict monitoring and cognitive control in anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chobok; Chung, Chongwook; Kim, Jeounghoon

    2013-11-06

    Previous experience affects our behavior in terms of adjustments. It has been suggested that the conflict monitor-controller system implemented in the prefrontal cortex plays a critical role in such adjustments. Previous studies suggested that there exists multiple conflict monitor-controller systems associated with the level of information (i.e., stimulus and response levels). In this study, we sought to test whether different types of conflicts occur at the same information processing level (i.e., response level) are independently processed. For this purpose, we designed a task paradigm to measure two different types of response conflicts using color-based and location-based conflict stimuli and measured the conflict adaptation effects associated with the two types of conflicts either independently (i.e., single conflict conditions) or simultaneously (i.e., a double-conflict condition). The behavioral results demonstrated that performance on current incongruent trials was faster only when the preceding trial was the same type of response conflict regardless of whether they included a single- or double-conflict. Imaging data also showed that anterior cingulate and dorsolateral prefrontal cortices operate in a task-specific manner. These findings suggest that there may be multiple monitor-controller loops for color-based and location-based conflicts even at the same response level. Importantly, our results suggest that double-conflict processing is qualitatively different from single-conflict processing although double-conflict shares the same sources of conflict with two single-conflict conditions. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. [Clinical guidelines for diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of patients with non-invasive breast cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brnijć, Zoran; Brkljacić, Boris; Drinković, Ivan; Jakić-Razumović, Jasminka; Kardum-Skelin, Ika; Krajina, Zdenko; Margaritoni, Marko; Strnad, Marija; Sarcević, Bozena; Tomić, Snjezana; Zic, Rado

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Early diagnosis and more effective treatment of invasive breast cancer resulted in significant mortality reduction, improvement of survival and the quality of life of the patients. The management od non-invasive breast cancer, on the contrary, is still controversial and the problem of overdiagnosis and overtreatment of patients come to evidence. In the following text a multidisciplinary team of experts brings the first consensus guidelines aimed to standardize and optimize the criteria and management in diagnosis, treatment and monitoring of non-invasive breast cancer patients in the Republic of Croatia.

  4. Six-years monitoring the efficacy of the combination of artesunate and mefloquine for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wattanakoon, Yupaporn; Chittamas, Sunee; Pornkulprasit, Vichitra; Kanda, Tozo; Thimasarn, Krongthong; Rojanawatsirivej, Chaiporn; Looareesuwan, Sornchai; Bunnag, Danai

    2003-09-01

    Plasmodium falciparum in Thailand is multi-drug resistant. In a previous study it was shown that artesunate and mefloquine were effective, as follow up, we monitored the efficacy of this regimen for six years. During 1997-2002, 516 adult male volunteer patients in Chanthaburi Province were enrolled (50 patients in the first year, 400 patients in 1998-2001 and 66 patients in 2002). The symptom complex and parasite count (thick blood film) were monitored on days 0, 1, 2, 7, 14, 21, 28, 35 and 42. The dosages used were artesunate (ATS) 150 mg and mefloquine (M) 750 mg at hour 0 and ATS 100 mg and M 500 mg at hour 24. Their ages ranged from 30-35 years and their mean body weights were 54-56 kg. The presenting symptoms were fever 100%, headache 97-100%, anorexia 78-90%, and nausea 28-40%. The geometric mean of parasitemia ranged from 7,357-12,750/mm3. Defervescence in one day was found in 42-76% of patients and 85-100% in 2 days. The sensitivity (S) ranged from 87-94% and RI resistance (recrudescence) ranged from 6-13%. Forty patients demonstrated RI type of response, 37 were cured after being retreated with the same dosage and another 3 patients were cured after the third course of treatment. The aggravated adverse effects included vomiting (8-20%), anorexia (1-41%) and diarrhea (0-16%). These side effects were mild and transient. The efficacy of the artesunate and mefloquine combination for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria was high. The RI type of response was possibly due to re-infection or multiple broods and not to drug resistance. The adverse effects of anorexia, nausea, vomiting and diarrhea were mild and transient for mefloquine. The combination can be used as stand by treatment in areas of multi-drug resistant falciparum malaria.

  5. Performance Monitoring and Response Inhibition in a Saccadic Countermanding Task in High and Low proficient bilinguals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niharika eSingh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared Hindi-English bilinguals differing in their L2 fluency on a saccadic countermanding task which taps inhibitory control as well as monitoring. We particularly explored whether response inhibition and performance monitoring within the oculomotor domain are affected by language proficiency in bilinguals. There were two different oculomotor redirect tasks: Visually Guided Redirect (VGR task (Experiment1 and Memory Guided Redirect (MGR task (Experiment 2. In this task typically a target is presented to which subject must make saccade (No step trials, unless a new target appears on the other location after some delay from the first target onset (Step trials. On such trials participants are required to inhibit and cancel the saccade to the first instead program a saccade to the new target. Using trial switch reaction time (TSRT, which is the time taken to inhibit the initiated saccade to the first target, as a measure of response inhibition, and post-stop slowing as a measure of performance monitoring, we observed two important results. It was found that high proficiency bilinguals showed more post-stop slowing on the no-step trials as compared to the low proficiency bilinguals for both VGR and MGR. Secondly, high and low proficiency bilingual exhibited comparable TSRT in both VGR and MGR, showing no altering effect of language proficiency on the response inhibition in bilinguals. These results suggest that bilingualism impacts performance monitoring which is modulated by language proficiency if not the inhibitory control system. Higher fluency may lead to superior cognitive flexibility, and ability to adjust behaviour that facilitates attainment of cognitive goal. These findings are in consonance with other current studies that suggest a top-down effect of bilingualism on action control systems.

  6. Integrated monitoring technologies for the management of a Soil-Aquifer-Treatment (SAT) system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadopoulos, Alexandros; Kallioras, Andreas; Kofakis, Petros; Bumberger, Jan; Schmidt, Felix; Athanasiou, Georgios; Uzunoglou, Nikolaos; Amditis, Angelos; Dietrich, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Artificial recharge of groundwater has an important role to play in water reuse as treated wastewater effluent can be infiltrated into the ground for aquifer recharge. As the effluent moves through the soil and the aquifer, it undergoes significant quality improvements through physical, chemical, and biological processes in the underground environment. Collectively, these processes and the water quality improvement obtained are called soil-aquifer-treatment (SAT) or geopurification. The pilot site of Lavrion Technological & Cultural Park (LTCP) of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA), involves the employment of plot infiltration basins at experimental scale, which will be using waters of impaired quality as a recharge source, and hence acting as a Soil-Aquifer-Treatment, SAT, system. Τhe LTCP site will be employed as a pilot SAT system complemented by new technological developments, which will be providing continuous monitoring of the quantitative and qualitative characteristics of infiltrating groundwater through all hydrologic zones (i.e. surface, unsaturated and saturated zone). This will be achieved by the development and installation of an integrated system of prototype sensing technologies, installed on-site, and offering a continuous evaluation of the performance of the SAT system. An integrated approach of the performance evaluation of any operating SAT system should aim at parallel monitoring of all hydrologic zones, proving the sustainability of all involved water quality treatment processes within unsaturated and saturated zone. Hence a prototype system of Time and Frequency Domain Reflectometry (TDR & FDR) sensors is developed and will be installed, in order to achieve continuous quantitative monitoring of the unsaturated zone through the entire soil column down to significant depths below the SAT basin. Additionally, the system contains two different radar-based sensing systems that will be offering (i) identification of preferential

  7. [Exposure to addictogenic substances, conditioned response and treatment of the exposure with response prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaal, Y; Frésard, E; Zullino, D

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to drugs or related cues is associated with psycho-physiological reactivity. These responses are conditioned during periods of active consumption. Exposure with response prevention (EPR) is a treatment established for anxiety disorder and aims to reduce anxiety by an extinction of previously conditioned responses. The conditioning recognized in additive processes has led to research into EPR's therapeutic potential for treating addiction. This paper is a review of the main studies on reactivity to cues, and EPR, particularly with respect to addiction to alcohol, opiates, cocaine and tobacco. This review is based on information from the Medline database, dealing with cue reactivity, attentional bias during exposure to cues and exposure treatment for addiction in general and, in particular, for each of the aforementioned substances. Exposure to drug-related cues is clearly associated with psycho-physiological reactivity and with attentional bias. Those phenomena are associated with craving and more difficulty in maintaining abstinence. The subject's attention is thus held by a large number of drug-related environmental stimuli. These observations are linked with conditioning phenomena and suggest the possibility of treatment by EPR conditioning extinction procedures. EPR has been most widely studied for abuse and alcohol addiction. Case reports give favourable outcomes. Results from controlled studies are less clear. Studies on patients addicted to cocaine or heroine are still limited and not conclusive. Different controlled studies on EPR for nicotine addiction have not produced conclusions in favour of this treatment. Generally, the EPR procedures used vary among studies. Studies focussing particularly on the evolution of physiological responses in a laboratory setting after EPR have demonstrated reduced autonomic nervous system activity. These results do not consistently lead to a reduction in consumption behaviour and in craving when the patient is in

  8. Radiological evaluation of response to treatment: Application to metastatic renal cancers receiving anti-angiogenic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ammari, S.; Hernigou, A.; Grataloup, C.; Thiam, R.; Cuenod, C.A.; Siauve, N.; Fournier, L.S.; Oudard, S.; Medioni, J.

    2014-01-01

    Targeted therapies have considerably improved the prognosis of patients with metastatic renal cancer (mRCC) but there are no reliable response assessment criteria reflecting the clinical benefits, because there is no regression in size, or it is delayed. Such criteria would help early identification of non-responders, who would then benefit from a change of treatment, and would avoid their being subjected to unnecessary side effects related to the treatment. We will review the imaging techniques currently available for evaluating tumour response in mRCC patients, including the response evaluation criteria in solid tumours (RECIST), the Choi criteria, the modified Choi criteria, and the CT size and attenuation criteria (SACT). We will also discuss functional imaging techniques, which are based on the physiological characteristics of the tumours, such as perfusion CT, magnetic resonance imaging or ultrasound (DCE-CT, DCE-MRI, DCE-US), diffusion MRI, BOLD MRI and new positron emission tomography (PET) tracers. It is not possible at present to propose a unanimously acknowledged criterion for evaluating tumour response to targeted therapy. However, there is a real need for this according to oncologists and the pharmaceutical industry, and radiologists need to be involved in reflecting on the subject. (authors)

  9. Predicting Treatment Response for Oppositional Defiant and Conduct Disorder Using Pre-treatment Adrenal and Gonadal Hormones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenk, Chad E; Dorn, Lorah D; Kolko, David J; Susman, Elizabeth J; Noll, Jennie G; Bukstein, Oscar G

    2012-12-01

    Variations in adrenal and gonadal hormone profiles have been linked to increased rates of oppositional defiant disorder (ODD) and conduct disorder (CD). These relationships suggest that certain hormone profiles may be related to how well children respond to psychological treatments for ODD and CD. The current study assessed whether pre-treatment profiles of adrenal and gonadal hormones predicted response to psychological treatment of ODD and CD. One hundred five children, 6 - 11 years old, participating in a randomized, clinical trial provided samples for cortisol, testosterone, dehydroepiandrosterone, and androstenedione. Diagnostic interviews of ODD and CD were administered up to three years post-treatment to track treatment response. Group-based trajectory modeling identified two trajectories of treatment response: 1) a High-response trajectory where children demonstrated lower rates of an ODD or CD diagnosis throughout follow-up, and 2) a Low-response trajectory where children demonstrated higher rates of an ODD or CD diagnosis throughout follow-up. Hierarchical logistic regression predicting treatment response demonstrated that children with higher pre-treatment concentrations of testosterone were four times more likely to be in the Low-response trajectory. No other significant relationship existed between pre-treatment hormone profiles and treatment response. These results suggest that higher concentrations of testosterone are related to how well children diagnosed with ODD or CD respond to psychological treatment over the course of three years.

  10. Response monitoring of breast cancer patients receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy using quantitative ultrasound, texture, and molecular features.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshmanan Sannachi

    Full Text Available Pathological response of breast cancer to chemotherapy is a prognostic indicator for long-term disease free and overall survival. Responses of locally advanced breast cancer in the neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC settings are often variable, and the prediction of response is imperfect. The purpose of this study was to detect primary tumor responses early after the start of neoadjuvant chemotherapy using quantitative ultrasound (QUS, textural analysis and molecular features in patients with locally advanced breast cancer.The study included ninety six patients treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. Breast tumors were scanned with a clinical ultrasound system prior to chemotherapy treatment, during the first, fourth and eighth week of treatment, and prior to surgery. Quantitative ultrasound parameters and scatterer-based features were calculated from ultrasound radio frequency (RF data within tumor regions of interest. Additionally, texture features were extracted from QUS parametric maps. Prior to therapy, all patients underwent a core needle biopsy and histological subtypes and biomarker ER, PR, and HER2 status were determined. Patients were classified into three treatment response groups based on combination of clinical and pathological analyses: complete responders (CR, partial responders (PR, and non-responders (NR. Response classifications from QUS parameters, receptors status and pathological were compared. Discriminant analysis was performed on extracted parameters using a support vector machine classifier to categorize subjects into CR, PR, and NR groups at all scan times.Of the 96 patients, the number of CR, PR and NR patients were 21, 52, and 23, respectively. The best prediction of treatment response was achieved with the combination mean QUS values, texture and molecular features with accuracies of 78%, 86% and 83% at weeks 1, 4, and 8, after treatment respectively. Mean QUS parameters or clinical receptors status alone predicted the

  11. Simplified response monitoring criteria for multiple myeloma in patients undergoing therapy with novel agents using computed tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schabel, Christoph; Horger, Marius; Kum, Sara [Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Weisel, Katja [Department of Internal Medicine II – Hematology & Oncology, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Otfried-Müller-Str. 5, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany); Fritz, Jan [Russell H. Morgan Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N Wolfe St., Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States); Ioanoviciu, Sorin D. [Department of Internal Medicine, Clinical Municipal Hospital Timisoara, Gheorghe Dima Str. 5, 300079 Timisoara (Romania); Bier, Georg, E-mail: georg.bier@med.uni-tuebingen.de [Department of Neuroradiology, Eberhard-Karls-University Tuebingen, Hoppe-Seyler-Str. 3, 72076 Tuebingen (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Highlights: • A simplified method for response monitoring of multiple myeloma is proposed. • Medullary bone lesions of all limbs were included and analysed. • Diameters of ≥2 medullary bone lesions are sufficient for therapy monitoring. - Abstract: Introduction: Multiple myeloma is a malignant hematological disorder of the mature B-cell lymphocytes originating in the bone marrow. While therapy monitoring is still mainly based on laboratory biomarkers, the additional use of imaging has been advocated due to inaccuracies of serological biomarkers or in a-secretory myelomas. Non-enhanced CT and MRI have similar sensitivities for lesions in yellow marrow-rich bone marrow cavities with a favourable risk and cost-effectiveness profile of CT. Nevertheless, these methods are still limited by frequently high numbers of medullary lesions and its time consumption for proper evaluation. Objective: To establish simplified response criteria by correlating size and CT attenuation changes of medullary multiple myeloma lesions in the appendicular skeleton with the course of lytic bone lesions in the entire skeleton. Furthermore to evaluate these criteria with respect to established hematological myeloma-specific parameters for the prediction of treatment response to bortezomib or lenalidomide. Materials and methods: Non-enhanced reduced-dose whole-body CT examinations of 78 consecutive patients (43 male, 35 female, mean age 63.69 ± 9.2 years) with stage III multiple myeloma were retrospectively re-evaluated. On per patient basis, size and mean CT attenuation of 2–4 representative lesions in the limbs were measured at baseline and at a follow-up after a mean of 8 months. Results were compared with the course of lytical bone lesions as well with that of specific hematological biomarkers. Myeloma response was assessed according to the International Myeloma Working Group (IMWG) uniform response criteria. Testing for correlation between response of medullary lesions (Resp

  12. Ultrasonography for diagnosis, monitoring and treatment of tenosynovitis in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danielsen, Mads Ammitzbøll

    2018-03-01

    studies presented in the PhD thesis the following was concluded:
 Doppler findings in or in close proximity to the tendon sheaths were common in wrists and fingers in healthy participants. These feeding vessels may be a source of misinterpretation, i.e .wrong diagnosis of a low degree of tenosynovitis, not only due to their presence but also because they may be interpreted as being inside the tendon sheath due to blooming and reverberations artefacts.
 Ultrasound and MRI had high agreement using image fusion for assessment of tenosynovitis when MRI partial volume artefacts were taken into account. In contrast, the agreement between B-flow and ultrasound was poor, since the quality of the b-flow images and the flow sensitivity were low.
 The OMERACT ultrasound scoring system for tenosynovitis had an excellent intra- and interreader agreement between trained investigators and a high ability to detect change over time, similarly, the quantitative tenosynovitis assessment by pixel index had a very good intrareader agreement and moderate to good interreader agreement, but only a moderate ability to detect change over time. The ultrasound scores had a high responsiveness, indicating that the OMERACT ultrasound scoring system was useful for diagnosing and monitoring tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis patients in clinical trials and practice. For treatment of tenosynovitis in rheumatoid arthritis patients, remission (ultrasound tenosynovitis grey scale score ≤1 and Doppler score = 0) was achieved significantly more frequently in the ultrasound guided intratenosynovial glucocorticoid injection group than in the intramuscular glucocorticoid injection group, both at 4 and 12 week follow-ups. Furthermore, tenosynovitis responded significantly better clinically and by ultrasound assessment when treated with ultrasound guided intratenosynovial glucocorticoid injection com-pared to intramuscular glucocorticoid injection, both at 4 and 12 week follow-ups. Articles published in

  13. Antipsychotic treatment dosing profile in patients with schizophrenia evaluated with electronic monitoring (MEMS®).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, Francisco J; Ramallo-Fariña, Yolanda; Bosch, Esperanza; Mayans, Teresa; Rodríguez, Carlos J; Caravaca, Ana

    2013-05-01

    Although the Medication Event Monitoring System (MEMS®) device offers accurate information on treatment dosing profile, such profile has never been studied in patients with schizophrenia. Enhancing our knowledge on this issue would help in developing intervention strategies to improve adherence to antipsychotic treatment in these patients. 74 outpatients with schizophrenia were monitored with the MEMS device for a 3-month period, for evaluation of antipsychotic treatment dosing profile, possible influence of medication schedule-related variables, adherence to treatment--considering dose intake within prescribed timeframes--and possible Hawthorne's effect of using the MEMS device. Dose-omission gaps occurred in 18.7% of monitoring days, most frequently during weekends, almost significantly. Almost one-third of prescribed doses were taken out of prescribed time. Neither the prescribed number of daily doses nor the indicated time of the day for dose intake (breakfast, dinner), were associated with correct antipsychotic dosing. Excess-dose was rare in general, and more frequent out of prescribed dose timeframe. No Hawthorne's effect was found for the MEMS device. Adherence reached only 35% according to a definition that included dose intake within prescribed timeframes. Antipsychotic treatment dosing was considerably irregular among patients with schizophrenia. Strategies to reduce dose-omission gaps and increase dosing within prescribed timeframes seem to be necessary. Gaining knowledge on precise oral antipsychotic dosing profiles or the influence of schedule-related variables may be useful to design strategies towards enhancing adherence. There appears to be no Hawthorne's effect associated with the use of MEMS devices in outpatients with schizophrenia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Monitoring the lesion formation during histotripsy treatment using shear wave imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnal, Bastien; Lee, Wei-Ning; Pernot, Mathieu; Fink, Mathias; Tanter, Mickael

    2012-11-01

    Monitoring the lesion formation induced by histotripsy has mainly relied on the quantitative change in backscatter intensity using ultrasound B-mode imaging. However, how the mechanical properties of the histotripsy-treated tissue region alter during the procedure is yet to be fully investigated. We thus proposed here to monitor such a therapeutic process based on shear modulus estimated by shear wave imaging (SWI). In the therapeutic procedure, a single-element piezo-composite focused transducer (Imasonic, Besançon, France) with a center frequency of 660 kHz, a focal length of 45 mm, and an fnumber of 1 was driven by a function generator (AFG 3101, Tektronix, Beaverton, OR) and a gated RF power amplifier (GA-2500A, RITEC Inc., USA) to generate ultrasound histotripsy pulses. Histotripsy pulses were delivered for 20 seconds and then followed by a 30-second pause and a rapid monitoring step. Such a treatment and monitoring scheme was repeated for 10 mins. Both the reference measurement and monitoring were realized by SWI, where plane shear waves were generated by an 8 MHz linear array probe connected to a prototype ultrasound scanner, and acquired at a frame rate of 10000 Hz. Shear modulus was estimated and mapped in 2D through a time-of-flight algorithm. Gelatin (8%)-agar (2%) phantoms and ex-vivo porcine liver samples were tested. Regions of interests (ROI's) of 2 mm-by-2 mm in both untreated and treated regions were selected to compute the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). In all three scenarios where different PD's and PRF's were implemented, during the first 100 seconds of the treatment, 50% decrease in the shear modulus within the histotripsy-targeted zone was already observed, and the CNR of the shear modulus increased by 18 dB. In contrast, the backscatter intensity began to reduce and the corresponding CNR was found to increase by 6 dB only after 120 seconds of treatment. The results demonstrated that SWI can map quantitatively the change of mechanical

  15. Nerve Ultrasound Predicts Treatment Response in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyradiculoneuropathy-a Prospective Follow-Up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Härtig, Florian; Ross, Marlene; Dammeier, Nele Maria; Fedtke, Nadin; Heiling, Bianka; Axer, Hubertus; Décard, Bernhard F; Auffenberg, Eva; Koch, Marilin; Rattay, Tim W; Krumbholz, Markus; Bornemann, Antje; Lerche, Holger; Winter, Natalie; Grimm, Alexander

    2018-04-01

    As reliable biomarkers of disease activity are lacking, monitoring of therapeutic response in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) remains a challenge. We sought to determine whether nerve ultrasound and electrophysiology scoring could close this gap. In CIDP patients (fulfilling EFNS/PNS criteria), we performed high-resolution nerve ultrasound to determine ultrasound pattern sum scores (UPSS) and predominant echotexture nerve conduction study scores (NCSS) as well as Medical Research Council sum scores (MRCSS) and inflammatory neuropathy cause and treatment disability scores (INCAT) at baseline and after 12 months of standard treatment. We retrospectively correlated ultrasound morphology with nerve histology when available. 72/80 CIDP patients featured multifocal nerve enlargement, and 35/80 were therapy-naïve. At baseline, clinical scores correlated with NCSS (r 2  = 0.397 and r 2  = 0.443, p  50% of measured segments, possibly reflecting axonal degeneration; and 3) almost no enlargement, reflecting "burned-out" or "cured" disease without active inflammation. Clinical improvement after 12 months was best in patients with pattern 1 (up to 75% vs up to 43% in pattern 2/3, Fisher's exact test p < 0.05). Nerve ultrasound has additional value not only for diagnosis, but also for classification of disease state and may predict treatment response.

  16. Using Item Response Theory to Develop Measures of Acquisitive and Protective Self-Monitoring From the Original Self-Monitoring Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilmot, Michael P; Kostal, Jack W; Stillwell, David; Kosinski, Michal

    2017-07-01

    For the past 40 years, the conventional univariate model of self-monitoring has reigned as the dominant interpretative paradigm in the literature. However, recent findings associated with an alternative bivariate model challenge the conventional paradigm. In this study, item response theory is used to develop measures of the bivariate model of acquisitive and protective self-monitoring using original Self-Monitoring Scale (SMS) items, and data from two large, nonstudent samples ( Ns = 13,563 and 709). Results indicate that the new acquisitive (six-item) and protective (seven-item) self-monitoring scales are reliable, unbiased in terms of gender and age, and demonstrate theoretically consistent relations to measures of personality traits and cognitive ability. Additionally, by virtue of using original SMS items, previously collected responses can be reanalyzed in accordance with the alternative bivariate model. Recommendations for the reanalysis of archival SMS data, as well as directions for future research, are provided.

  17. A multi-detector neutron spectrometer with nearly isotropic response for environmental and workplace monitoring

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Ros, J.M., E-mail: jm.gomezros@ciemat.e [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Bedogni, R. [INFN-LNF Frascati National Laboratory-U.F. Fisica Sanitaria, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy); Moraleda, M.; Delgado, A.; Romero, A. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Esposito, A. [INFN-LNF Frascati National Laboratory-U.F. Fisica Sanitaria, via E. Fermi n. 40, 00044 Frascati (Italy)

    2010-01-21

    This communication describes an improved design for a neutron spectrometer consisting of {sup 6}Li thermoluminescent dosemeters located at selected positions within a single moderating polyethylene sphere. The spatial arrangement of the dosemeters has been designed using the MCNPX Monte Carlo code to calculate the response matrix for 56 log-equidistant energies from 10{sup -9} to 100 MeV, looking for a configuration that permits to obtain a nearly isotropic response for neutrons in the energy range from thermal to 20 MeV. The feasibility of the proposed spectrometer and the isotropy of its response have been evaluated by simulating exposures to different reference and workplace neutron fields. The FRUIT code has been used for unfolding purposes. The results of the simulations as well as the experimental tests confirm the suitability of the prototype for environmental and workplace monitoring applications.

  18. Treatment Recommendation Actions, Contingencies, and Responses: An Introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stivers, Tanya; Barnes, Rebecca K

    2017-08-21

    In the era of patient participation in health care decision making, we know surprisingly little about the ways in which treatment recommendations are made, the contexts that shape their formulation, and the consequences of these formulations. In this article, we introduce a systematic collective investigation of how recommendations for medications are responded to and made in primary versus secondary care, in the US versus the UK, and in contexts where the medication was over the counter versus by prescription. This article provides an overview of the coding system that was used in this project including describing what constitutes a recommendation, the primary action types clinicians use for recommendations, and the types of responses provided by patients to recommendations.

  19. Response of Complex Undefined Hypereosinophilic Syndrome to Treatment with Imatinib.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yılmaz, İnsu; Kaynar, Leylagül; Tutar, Nuri; Pala, Çiğdem; Canöz, Özlem; Yıldırım, Afra; Büyükoğlan, Hakan; Gülmez, İnci

    2016-07-01

    Hypereosinophilic syndomes (HESs) include potentially lethal multisystem disorders characterized by eosinophilic infiltration of a variable spectrum of target organs, predominantly the skin, heart, lungs, gastrointestinal tract, and nervous system. Based on recent advances in molecular and genetic diagnostic techniques and increasing experience with differences in clinical features and prognosis, subtypes have been defined, including "myeloproliferative-HES ", "lymphocytic-HES", "familial eosinophilia", "overlap HES", "undefined HES" ("complex undefined HES", "simple undefined HES", "episodic undefined HES") and "eosinophil associated diseases" (such as Churg-Strauss syndrome). HES should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of eosinophilic lung diseases especially in patients with peripheral eosinophilia and pulmonary infiltrates. Corticosteroids represent an effective firstline approach to decreasing eosinophil counts in the majority of cases. Imatinib might be used for corticosteroid nonresponders. We herein report a patient with "complex undefined HES" who had disease resistant to corticosteroids, but who had a significant response after treatment with imatinib.

  20. Use of home blood-pressure monitoring in the detection, treatment and surveillance of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, Gillian; Donnelly, Richard

    2005-11-01

    Use of home blood-pressure monitoring is increasing but the technique and the equipment have limitations. We provide an overview of recent evidence in this rapidly evolving field. Home blood-pressure monitoring is an acceptable method for screening patients for hypertension. There is increasing evidence supporting the predictive power of home blood pressure for stroke risk even in the general population. The identification of white-coat and masked hypertension remains an important role for home blood-pressure monitoring. Unvalidated equipment and poor patient technique are major concerns. The purchase of devices needs to be linked to a simple patient-education programme, which is perhaps an opportunity for collaboration between healthcare providers and commercial companies. Devices that store the blood-pressure measurements in the memory are preferred to ensure accuracy of reporting. Data-transmission systems providing automatic storage, transmission and reporting of blood pressure, direct involvement of the patient and potentially a reduced number of hospital/general practitioner visits, offer significant advantages. To reduce patient anxiety, overuse of home blood-pressure monitoring should be avoided but there is the potential for self-modification of treatment, subject to certain safeguards. Self-monitoring of blood pressure is developing rapidly, linked to increasing awareness of the impact of reducing high blood pressure on public health and the marketing/advertising strategies used to sell automatic devices. Home blood-pressure monitoring has a role in the detection and management of blood pressure, but not at the expense of careful blood-pressure measurement in the office and adherence to national guidelines.

  1. Evidence-Responsiveness and the Ongoing Autonomy of Treatment Preferences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weimer, Steven

    2017-06-14

    To be an autonomous agent is to determine one's own path in life. However, this cannot plausibly be seen as a one-off affair. An autonomous agent does not merely set herself on a particular course and then lock the steering wheel in place, so to speak, but must maintain some form of ongoing control over her direction in life-must keep her eyes on the road and her hands on the wheel. Circumstances often change in important and unexpected ways, after all, and it is reasonable to think that a crucial part of autonomy consists of the ability and disposition to recognize and properly respond to such changes. This implies, I contend, that a patient whose initial decision to undergo a given treatment satisfied plausible requirements of autonomy, but who is now unable to recognize that available evidence indicates the need to reconsider her medical situation and options has come to lack autonomy with respect to her desire to continue that treatment. However, and despite its importance with respect to both theoretical understandings of autonomy and applications of the concept to clinical ethics, this ongoing aspect of autonomy has received little attention. This paper aims to go some way toward remedying that. I first critically review two of the few theories of autonomy that do address "evidence-responsiveness" so as to identify and elaborate what I take to be the most promising way in which to account for this aspect of autonomy. After considering and responding to a possible objection to the evidence-responsiveness condition I propose, I conclude by discussing its clinical implications. That condition, I argue, is not merely theoretically sound, but can and should be applied to clinical practice.

  2. Prescription drug monitoring program data tracking of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in integrated dual diagnosis care involving injectable naltrexone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sajid, Ayesha; Whiteman, Aaron; Bell, Richard L; Greene, Marion S; Engleman, Eric A; Chambers, R Andrew

    2016-10-01

    Fourfold increases in opioid prescribing and dispensations over 2 decades in the U.S. has paralleled increases in opioid addictions and overdoses, requiring new preventative, diagnostic, and treatment strategies. This study examines Prescription Drug Monitoring Program (PDMP) tracking as a novel measure of opioid addiction treatment outcomes in a university-affiliated integrated mental health-addiction treatment clinic. Repeated measure parametrics examined PDMP and urine drug screening (UDS) data before and after first injection for all patients (N = 68) who received at least one long-acting naltrexone injection (380 mg/IM) according to diagnostic groupings of having either (i) alcohol (control); (ii) opioid; or (iii) combined alcohol and opioid use disorders. There were no group differences post-injection in treatment days, injections delivered, or treatment service encounters. UDS and PDMP measures of opioid exposures were greater in opioid compared to alcohol-only patients. Post-first injection, UDS's positive for opioids declined (p opioid prescriptions (p Opioid patients without alcohol disorders showed the best outcomes with 50% to 80% reductions in PDMP-measures of opioids, down to levels of alcohol-only patients. This study shows PDMP utility for measuring opioid addiction treatment outcomes, supporting the routine use of PDMPs in clinical and research settings. These findings demonstrate that opioid addiction in patients with complex addictions and mental illnesses comorbidities can show effective treatment responses as measured by PDMP tracking of decreases in opioid prescriptions to those patients. (Am J Addict 2016;25:557-564). © 2016 The Authors. The American Journal on Addictions Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry (AAAP).

  3. Emergency response monitoring activities and environmental impact of the K-Reactor aqueous tritium release of December 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamby, D.M.; Addis, R.P.; Beals, D.M.; Cadieux, J.R.; Carlton, W.H.; Dunn, D.L.; Hall, G.; Hayes, D.W.; Lorenz, R.; Kantelo, M.V.; Taylor, R.W.

    1992-01-01

    Approximately 150 gallons of tritiated water leaked from one of the K-Reactor heat exchangers between December 22 and December 25, 1991. Upon notification, the Environmental Technology Section (ETS) activated its emergency response team to provide predictions of river concentrations, transport times, and radiological effects to downstream water users. Additionally, within a few days of the release, ETS and the Environmental Monitoring Section (EMS) began a comprehensive program to collect and analyze surface water samples from SRS down to the Savannah River estuary. The TRAC mobile laboratory was deployed to the Beaufort-Jasper water treatment plant to provide initial analyses for downriver water samples. This document discusses the results of the sampling activities. Concentration levels are provided along with hypothetical maximum individual doses

  4. Assessment of therapeutic response and treatment planning for brain tumors using metabolic and physiological MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Sarah J

    2011-07-01

    MRI is routinely used for diagnosis, treatment planning and assessment of response to therapy for patients with glioma. Gliomas are spatially heterogeneous and infiltrative lesions that are quite variable in terms of their response to therapy. Patients classified as having low-grade histology have a median overall survival of 7 years or more, but need to be monitored carefully to make sure that their tumor does not upgrade to a more malignant phenotype. Patients with the most aggressive grade IV histology have a median overall survival of 12-15 months and often undergo multiple surgeries and adjuvant therapies in an attempt to control their disease. Despite improvements in the spatial resolution and sensitivity of anatomic images, there remain considerable ambiguities in the interpretation of changes in the size of the gadolinium-enhancing lesion on T(1) -weighted images as a measure of treatment response, and in differentiating between treatment effects and infiltrating tumor within the larger T(2) lesion. The planning of focal therapies, such as surgery, radiation and targeted drug delivery, as well as a more reliable assessment of the response to therapy, would benefit considerably from the integration of metabolic and physiological imaging techniques into routine clinical MR examinations. Advanced methods that have been shown to provide valuable data for patients with glioma are diffusion, perfusion and spectroscopic imaging. Multiparametric examinations that include the acquisition of such data are able to assess tumor cellularity, hypoxia, disruption of normal tissue architecture, changes in vascular density and vessel permeability, in addition to the standard measures of changes in the volume of enhancing and nonenhancing anatomic lesions. This is particularly critical for the interpretation of the results of Phase I and Phase II clinical trials of novel therapies, which are increasingly including agents that are designed to have anti-angiogenic and anti

  5. Monitoring of vegetation dynamics and assessing vegetation response to drought in the Iberian Peninsula

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Haro, F. J.; Moreno, A.; Perez-Hoyos, A.; Gilabert, M. A.; Melia, J.; Belda, F.; Poquet, D.; Martinez, B.; Verger, A.

    2009-07-01

    Monitoring the vegetation activity over long time-scales is necessary to discern ecosystem response to climate variability. Spatial and temporally consistent estimates of the biophysical variables such as fractional vegetation cover (FVC) and leaf area index (LAI) have been obtained in the context of DULCINEA Project. We used long-term monthly climate statistics to build simple climatic indices (SPI, moisture index) at different time scales. From these indices, we estimated that the climatic disturbances affected both the growing season and the total amount of vegetation. This implies that the anomaly of vegetation cover is a good indicator of moisture condition and can be an important data source when used for detecting an monitoring drought in the Iberian Peninsula. The impact of climate variability on the vegetation dynamics has shown not to be the same for every region. We concluded that the relationships between vegetation anomaly and moisture availability are significant for the arid and semiarid areas. (Author) 6 refs.

  6. Monitoring of vegetation dynamics and assessing vegetation response to drought in the Iberian Peninsula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia-Haro, F. J.; Moreno, A.; Perez-Hoyos, A.; Gilabert, M. A.; Melia, J.; Belda, F.; Poquet, D.; Martinez, B.; Verger, A.

    2009-01-01

    Monitoring the vegetation activity over long time-scales is necessary to discern ecosystem response to climate variability. Spatial and temporally consistent estimates of the biophysical variables such as fractional vegetation cover (FVC) and leaf area index (LAI) have been obtained in the context of DULCINEA Project. We used long-term monthly climate statistics to build simple climatic indices (SPI, moisture index) at different time scales. From these indices, we estimated that the climatic disturbances affected both the growing season and the total amount of vegetation. This implies that the anomaly of vegetation cover is a good indicator of moisture condition and can be an important data source when used for detecting an monitoring drought in the Iberian Peninsula. The impact of climate variability on the vegetation dynamics has shown not to be the same for every region. We concluded that the relationships between vegetation anomaly and moisture availability are significant for the arid and semiarid areas. (Author) 6 refs.

  7. Low-complexity Wireless Monitoring of Respiratory Movements Using Ultra-wideband Impulse Response Estimation

    KAUST Repository

    Sana, Furrukh

    2014-03-01

    In this paper; we present a comprehensive scheme for wireless monitoring of the respiratory movements in humans. Our scheme overcomes the challenges low signal-to-noise ratio, background clutter and high sampling rates. It is based on the estimation of the ultra-wideband channel impulse response. We suggest techniques for dealing with background clutter in situations when it might be time variant. We also present a novel methodology for reducing the required sampling rate of the system significantly while achieving the accuracy offered by the Nyquist rate. Performance results from simulations conducted with pre-recorded respiratory signals demonstrate the robustness of our scheme for tackling the above challenges and providing a low-complexity solution for the monitoring of respiratory movements.

  8. Salient features, response and operation of Lead-Free Gulmarg Neutron Monitor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mufti, S.; Chatterjee, S.; Ishtiaq, P.M.; Darzi, M.A.; Mir, T.A.; Shah, G.N.

    2016-01-01

    Lead-Free Gulmarg Neutron Monitor (LFGNM) provides continuous ground level intensity measurements of atmospheric secondary neutrons produced in interactions of primary cosmic rays with the Earth's constituent atmosphere. We report the LFGNM detector salient features and simulation of its energy response for 10"−"1"1 MeV to 10"4 MeV energy incident neutrons using the FLUKA Monte Carlo package. An empirical calibration of the LFGNM detector carried out with a Pu–Be neutron source for maximising its few MeV neutron counting sensitivity is also presented. As an illustration of its functionality a single representative transient solar modulation event recorded by LFGNM depicting Forbush decrease in integrated neutron data for which the geospace consequences are well known is also presented. Performance of LFGNM under actual observation conditions for effectively responding to transient solar modulation is seen to compare well with other world-wide conventional neutron monitors.

  9. Visual functions in amblyopia as determinants of response to treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vinita; Agrawal, Siddharth

    2013-01-01

    To describe the visual functions in amblyopia as determinants of response to treatment. Sixty-nine patients with unilateral and bilateral amblyopia (114 amblyopic eyes) 3 to 15 years old (mean age: 8.80 ± 2.9 years), 40 males (58%) and 29 females (42%), were included in this study. All patients were treated by conventional occlusion 6 hours per day for mild to moderate amblyopia (visual acuity 0.70 or better) and full-time for 4 weeks followed by 6 hours per day for severe amblyopia (visual acuity 0.8 or worse). During occlusion, near activities requiring hand-eye coordination were advised. The follow-up examination was done at 3 and 6 months. Improvement in visual acuity was evaluated on the logMAR chart and correlated with the visual functions. Statistical analysis was done using Wilcoxon rank sum test (Mann-Whitney U test) and Kruskal-Wallis analysis. There was a statistically significant association of poor contrast sensitivity with the grade of amblyopia (P amblyopia (P amblyopia therapy. The grade of amblyopia (initial visual acuity) and accommodation are strong determinants of response to amblyopia therapy, whereas stereopsis and mesopic visual acuity have some value as determinants. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Biological response of cancer cells to radiation treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajamanickam eBaskar

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Cancer is a class of diseases characterized by uncontrolled cell growth and has the ability to spread or metastasize throughout the body. In recent years, remarkable progress has been made towards the understanding of proposed hallmarks of cancer development, care and treatment modalities. Radiation therapy or radiotherapy is an important and integral component of cancer management, mostly conferring a survival benefit. Radiation therapy destroys cancer by depositing high-energy radiation on the cancer tissues. Over the years, radiation therapy has been driven by constant technological advances and approximately 50% of all patients with localized malignant tumors are treated with radiation at some point in the course of their disease. In radiation oncology, research and development in the last three decades has led to considerable improvement in our understanding of the differential responses of normal and cancer cells. The biological effectiveness of radiation depends on the linear energy transfer (LET, total dose, number of fractions and radiosensitivity of the targeted cells or tissues. Radiation can either directly or indirectly (by producing free radicals damages the genome of the cell. This has been challenged in recent years by a newly identified phenomenon known as radiation induced bystander effect (RIBE. In RIBE, the non-irradiated cells adjacent to or located far from the irradiated cells/tissues demonstrate similar responses to that of the directly irradiated cells. Understanding the cancer cell responses during the fractions or after the course of irradiation will lead to improvements in therapeutic efficacy and potentially, benefitting a significant proportion of cancer patients. In this review, the clinical implications of radiation induced direct and bystander effects on the cancer cell are discussed.

  11. Independent dose per monitor unit review of eight U.S.A. proton treatment facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moyers, M. F.; Ibbott, G. S.; Grant, R. L.; Summers, P. A.; Followill, D. S.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Compare the dose per monitor unit at different proton treatment facilities using three different dosimetry methods. Methods: Measurements of dose per monitor unit were performed by a single group at eight facilities using 11 test beams and up to six different clinical portal treatment sites. These measurements were compared to the facility reported dose per monitor unit values. Results: Agreement between the measured and reported doses was similar using any of the three dosimetry methods. Use of the ICRU 59 N D,w based method gave results approximately 3% higher than both the ICRU 59 N X and ICRU 78 (TRS-398) N D,w based methods. Conclusions: Any single dosimetry method could be used for multi-institution trials with similar conformity between facilities. A multi-institutional trial could support facilities using both the ICRU 59 N X based and ICRU 78 (TRS-398) N D,w based methods but use of the ICRU 59 N D,w based method should not be allowed simultaneously with the other two until the difference is resolved

  12. Intraoperative monitoring for spinal radiculomedullary artery aneurysm occlusion treatment: What, when, and how long?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landriel, Federico; Baccanelli, Matteo; Hem, Santiago; Vecchi, Eduardo; Bendersky, Mariana; Yampolsky, Claudio

    2017-01-01

    Spinal radiculomedullary artery aneurysms are extremely rare. Treatment should be tailored to clinical presentation, distal aneurysm flow, and lesion anatomical features. When a surgical occlusion is planned, it is necessary to evaluate whether intraoperative monitoring (IOM) should be considered as an indispensable tool to prevent potential spinal cord ischemia. We present a patient with symptoms and signs of spinal subarachnoid hemorrhage resulting from the rupture of a T4 anterior radiculomedullary aneurysm who underwent open surgical treatment under motor evoked potential (MEP) monitoring. Due to the aneurysmal fusiform shape and preserved distal flow, the afferent left anterior radiculomedullary artery was temporarily clipped; 2 minutes after the clamping, the threshold stimulation level rose higher than 100 V, and at minute 3, MEPs amplitude became attenuated over 50%. This was considered as a warning criteria to leave the vessel occlusion. The radiculomedullary aneurysm walls were reinforced and wrapped with muscle and fibrin glue to prevent re-bleeding. The patient awoke from general anesthesia without focal neurologic deficit and made an uneventful recovery with complete resolution of her symptoms and signs. This paper attempts to build awareness of the possibility to cause or worsen a neurological deficit if a radiculomedullary aneurysm with preserved distal flow is clipped or embolized without an optimal IOM control. We report in detail MEP monitoring during the occlusion of a unilateral T4 segmental artery that supplies an anterior radiculomedullary artery aneurysm.

  13. Patient Characteristics Associated with HCV Treatment Adherence, Treatment Completion, and Sustained Virologic Response in HIV Coinfected Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Wagner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Hepatitis C (HCV treatment efficacy among HIV patients is limited by poor treatment adherence and tolerance, but few studies have examined the psychosocial determinants of treatment adherence and outcomes. Methods. Chart abstracted and survey data were collected on 72 HIV patients who had received pegylated interferon and ribavirin to assess correlates of treatment adherence, completion, and sustained virologic response (SVR. Results. Nearly half (46% the sample had active psychiatric problems and 13% had illicit drug use at treatment onset; 28% reported <100% treatment adherence, 38% did not complete treatment (mostly due to virologic nonresponse, and intent to treat SVR rate was 49%. Having a psychiatric diagnosis was associated with nonadherence, while better HCV adherence was associated with both treatment completion and SVR. Conclusions. Good mental health may be an indicator of HCV treatment adherence readiness, which is in turn associated with treatment completion and response, but further research is needed with new HCV treatments emerging.

  14. Treatment, monitoring, and economic outcomes of venous thromboembolism among hospitalized patients in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Eric Q; Xie, Jipan; Wu, Chun; Du, Ella Xiaoyan; Li, Nanxin; Tan, Ruoding; Liu, Yuanli

    2014-03-01

    The prevalence of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has been increasing in China. However, the treatment pattern and economic burden of these patients have not been well-understood. The objective of this study was to examine the patient characteristics, treatment pattern, anticoagulant monitoring, and economic burden of VTE among hospitalized patients in China. Hospitalizations with a diagnosis of VTE [including deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE)] between 1 January 2010 and 30 June 2013 were included. Descriptive analysis was conducted for patients' characteristics, anticoagulant treatment, international normalized ratio (INR) monitoring, and hospitalization cost [in 2013 Chinese yuan (Y) and US dollars (US$)]. Multivariate regressions were performed to assess factors associated with oral anticoagulant use and total costs of inpatient care. A total of 1,047 VTE-related hospitalizations were selected. The sample had a mean age of 62.4 years, with 45.9 % female. About 46.3 % of hospitalizations used heparin only, 35.0 % used warfarin, 0.8 % used rivaroxaban, and 18.0 % did not use anticoagulants. Among hospitalizations where warfarin was used, 90.8 % received at least one INR test and only 30 % had the last INR within the target therapeutic range (2-3) before discharge. The mean (standard deviation) total cost per hospitalization was Y29,114 (43,772) [US$4,757 (7,152)]. PE, VTE as primary diagnosis, female, insurance coverage, anticoagulant treatment, co-morbidities, admission condition, and surgical procedure were significantly associated with inpatient costs. Conventional anticoagulants were most commonly used in the study sample. Under-monitoring and suboptimal care may be an issue for patients treated with warfarin. The average total inpatient cost of VTE-related hospitalizations is high.

  15. Auditory brainstem evoked responses and temperature monitoring during pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, R A; Edmonds, H L; Auden, S M; Austin, E H

    1999-09-01

    To examine the effects of temperature on auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) in infants during hypothermic cardiopulmonary bypass for total circulatory arrest (TCA). The relationship between ABRs (as a surrogate measure of core-brain temperature) and body temperature as measured at several temperature monitoring sites was determined. In a prospective, observational study, ABRs were recorded non-invasively at normothermia and at every 1 or 2 degrees C change in ear-canal temperature during cooling and rewarming in 15 infants (ages: 2 days to 14 months) that required TCA. The ABR latencies and amplitudes and the lowest temperatures at which an ABR was identified (the threshold) were measured during both cooling and rewarming. Temperatures from four standard temperature monitoring sites were simultaneously recorded. The latencies of ABRs increased and amplitudes decreased with cooling (P < 0.01), but rewarming reversed these effects. The ABR threshold temperature as related to each monitoring site (ear-canal, nasopharynx, esophagus and bladder) was respectively determined as 23 +/- 2.2 degrees C, 20.8 +/- 1.7 degrees C, 14.6 +/- 3.4 degrees C, and 21.5 +/- 3.8 degrees C during cooling and 21.8 +/- 1.6 degrees C, 22.4 +/- 2.0 degrees C, 27.6 +/- 3.6 degrees C, and 23.0 +/- 2.4 degrees C during rewarming. The rewarming latencies were shorter and Q10 latencies smaller than the corresponding cooling values (P < 0.01). Esophageal and bladder sites were more susceptible to temperature variations as compared with the ear-canal and nasopharynx. No temperature site reliably predicted an electrophysiological threshold. A faster latency recovery during rewarming suggests that body temperature monitoring underestimates the effects of rewarming in the core-brain. ABRs may be helpful to monitor the effects of cooling and rewarming on the core-brain during pediatric cardiopulmonary bypass.

  16. Implementation of distributed computing system for emergency response and contaminant spill monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojo, T.O.; Sterling, M.C.Jr.; Bonner, J.S.; Fuller, C.B.; Kelly, F.; Page, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    The availability and use of real-time environmental data greatly enhances emergency response and spill monitoring in coastal and near shore environments. The data would include surface currents, wind speed, wind direction, and temperature. Model predictions (fate and transport) or forensics can also be included. In order to achieve an integrated system suitable for application in spill or emergency response situations, a link is required because this information exists on many different computing platforms. When real-time measurements are needed to monitor a spill, the use of a wide array of sensors and ship-based post-processing methods help reduce the latency in data transfer between field sampling stations and the Incident Command Centre. The common thread linking all these modules is the Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP), and the result is an integrated distributed computing system (DCS). The in-situ sensors are linked to an onboard computer through the use of a ship-based local area network (LAN) using a submersible device server. The onboard computer serves as both the data post-processor and communications server. It links the field sampling station with other modules, and is responsible for transferring data to the Incident Command Centre. This link is facilitated by a wide area network (WAN) based on wireless broadband communications facilities. This paper described the implementation of the DCS. The test results for the communications link and system readiness were also included. 6 refs., 2 tabs., 3 figs

  17. Real-time seismic monitoring of the integrated cape girardeau bridge array and recorded earthquake response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the state of the art, real-time and broad-band seismic monitoring network implemented for the 1206 m [3956 ft] long, cable-stayed Bill Emerson Memorial Bridge in Cape Girardeau (MO), a new Mississippi River crossing, approximately 80 km from the epicentral region of the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes. The bridge was designed for a strong earthquake (magnitude 7.5 or greater) during the design life of the bridge. The monitoring network comprises a total of 84 channels of accelerometers deployed on the superstructure, pier foundations and at surface and downhole free-field arrays of the bridge. The paper also presents the high quality response data obtained from the network. Such data is aimed to be used by the owner, researchers and engineers to assess the performance of the bridge, to check design parameters, including the comparison of dynamic characteristics with actual response, and to better design future similar bridges. Preliminary analyses of ambient and low amplitude small earthquake data reveal specific response characteristics of the bridge and the free-field. There is evidence of coherent tower, cable, deck interaction that sometimes results in amplified ambient motions. Motions at the lowest tri-axial downhole accelerometers on both MO and IL sides are practically free from any feedback from the bridge. Motions at the mid-level and surface downhole accelerometers are influenced significantly by feedback due to amplified ambient motions of the bridge. Copyright ASCE 2006.

  18. Clinicians' perspective on an app for patient self-monitoring in eating disorder treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgreen, Pil; Clausen, Loa; Lomborg, Kirsten

    2018-04-01

    The Recovery Record smartphone app is a self-monitoring tool for individuals recovering from eating disorders. Oppositely to traditional pen-and-paper meal diaries, the app allows for in-app patient-clinician linkage enabling clinicians to access patient app data anytime. The aim of our study was to explore the interdisciplinary clinical perspective on Recovery Record and its impact on treatment. Thirty-one clinicians from a Danish eating disorder treatment facility participated in field studies and 23 of these in interviews. Data were generated and analyzed concurrently applying the inductive methodology of Interpretive Description. We found two overarching themes: "Access to app data between treatment sessions", and "The patient-clinician relationship". Sub-themes associated with the former were "Online obligations" in relation to the added workload of continuously monitoring patient app data, and "Prepared or prejudiced" relating to advantages and disadvantages of using patient app data as preparation for treatment sessions. Sub-themes pertaining to the latter were "Expectation discrepancy" in relation to patients' and clinicians' divergent expectations for app usage, and "Pacified patients" regarding the clinicians' experience that the app potentially compromised the patient initiative in treatment sessions. Recovery Record induced new and affected pre-existing treatment and work conditions for clinicians. Clinicians were preoccupied with challenges associated with the app, for example, an added work load and potential harm to the patient-clinician collaboration. Thus, prior to adopting the app, we encourage clinicians and managements to discuss the objectives, advantages and disadvantages of adopting the app, and outline specific guidelines for patient and clinician app usage. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Analysis of the transcriptional responses in inflorescence buds of Jatropha curcas exposed to cytokinin treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Mao-Sheng; Pan, Bang-Zhen; Wang, Gui-Juan; Ni, Jun; Niu, Longjian; Xu, Zeng-Fu

    2014-11-30

    Jatropha curcas L. is a potential biofuel plant. Application of exogenous cytokinin (6-benzyladenine, BA) on its inflorescence buds can significantly increase the number of female flowers, thereby improving seed yield. To investigate which genes and signal pathways are involved in the response to cytokinin in J. curcas inflorescence buds, we monitored transcriptional activity in inflorescences at 0, 3, 12, 24, and 48 h after BA treatment using a microarray. We detected 5,555 differentially expressed transcripts over the course of the experiment, which could be grouped into 12 distinct temporal expression patterns. We also identified 31 and 131 transcripts in J. curcas whose homologs in model plants function in flowering and phytohormonal signaling pathways, respectively. According to the transcriptional analysis of genes involved in flower development, we hypothesized that BA treatment delays floral organ formation by inhibiting the transcription of the A, B and E classes of floral organ-identity genes, which would allow more time to generate more floral primordia in inflorescence meristems, thereby enhancing inflorescence branching and significantly increasing flower number per inflorescence. BA treatment might also play an important role in maintaining the flowering signals by activating the transcription of GIGANTEA (GI) and inactivating the transcription of CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1 (COP1) and TERMINAL FLOWER 1b (TFL1b). In addition, exogenous cytokinin treatment could regulate the expression of genes involved in the metabolism and signaling of other phytohormones, indicating that cytokinin and other phytohormones jointly regulate flower development in J. curcas inflorescence buds. Our study provides a framework to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying changes in flowering traits in response to cytokinin treatment in J. curcas inflorescence buds. The results provide valuable information related to the mechanisms of cross-talk among

  20. Immunological correlates of treatment and response in stage IV malignant melanoma patients treated with Ipilimumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjoern, Jon; Juul Nitschke, Nikolaj; Zeeberg Iversen, Trine

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Ipilimumab is effective in the treatment of metastatic malignant melanoma, but few biomarkers reliably predict treatment response. Methods: Patients were treated with Ipilimumab for metastatic malignant melanoma. Blood and serum samples were collected before and during treatment. Mo...

  1. Quality assurance for online adapted treatment plans: Benchmarking and delivery monitoring simulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Taoran; Wu, Qiuwen; Yang, Yun; Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Jackie Wu, Q.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: An important challenge facing online adaptive radiation therapy is the development of feasible and efficient quality assurance (QA). This project aimed to validate the deliverability of online adapted plans and develop a proof-of-concept online delivery monitoring system for online adaptive radiation therapy QA. Methods: The first part of this project benchmarked automatically online adapted prostate treatment plans using traditional portal dosimetry IMRT QA. The portal dosimetry QA results of online adapted plans were compared to original (unadapted) plans as well as randomly selected prostate IMRT plans from our clinic. In the second part, an online delivery monitoring system was designed and validated via a simulated treatment with intentional multileaf collimator (MLC) errors. This system was based on inputs from the dynamic machine information (DMI), which continuously reports actual MLC positions and machine monitor units (MUs) at intervals of 50 ms or less during delivery. Based on the DMI, the system performed two levels of monitoring/verification during the delivery: (1) dynamic monitoring of cumulative fluence errors resulting from leaf position deviations and visualization using fluence error maps (FEMs); and (2) verification of MLC positions against the treatment plan for potential errors in MLC motion and data transfer at each control point. Validation of the online delivery monitoring system was performed by introducing intentional systematic MLC errors (ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm) to the DMI files for both leaf banks. These DMI files were analyzed by the proposed system to evaluate the system’s performance in quantifying errors and revealing the source of errors, as well as to understand patterns in the FEMs. In addition, FEMs from 210 actual prostate IMRT beams were analyzed using the proposed system to further validate its ability to catch and identify errors, as well as establish error magnitude baselines for prostate IMRT delivery

  2. Quality assurance for online adapted treatment plans: Benchmarking and delivery monitoring simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Taoran, E-mail: taoran.li.duke@gmail.com; Wu, Qiuwen; Yang, Yun; Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Jackie Wu, Q. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University Medical Center Durham, North Carolina 27710 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Purpose: An important challenge facing online adaptive radiation therapy is the development of feasible and efficient quality assurance (QA). This project aimed to validate the deliverability of online adapted plans and develop a proof-of-concept online delivery monitoring system for online adaptive radiation therapy QA. Methods: The first part of this project benchmarked automatically online adapted prostate treatment plans using traditional portal dosimetry IMRT QA. The portal dosimetry QA results of online adapted plans were compared to original (unadapted) plans as well as randomly selected prostate IMRT plans from our clinic. In the second part, an online delivery monitoring system was designed and validated via a simulated treatment with intentional multileaf collimator (MLC) errors. This system was based on inputs from the dynamic machine information (DMI), which continuously reports actual MLC positions and machine monitor units (MUs) at intervals of 50 ms or less during delivery. Based on the DMI, the system performed two levels of monitoring/verification during the delivery: (1) dynamic monitoring of cumulative fluence errors resulting from leaf position deviations and visualization using fluence error maps (FEMs); and (2) verification of MLC positions against the treatment plan for potential errors in MLC motion and data transfer at each control point. Validation of the online delivery monitoring system was performed by introducing intentional systematic MLC errors (ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm) to the DMI files for both leaf banks. These DMI files were analyzed by the proposed system to evaluate the system’s performance in quantifying errors and revealing the source of errors, as well as to understand patterns in the FEMs. In addition, FEMs from 210 actual prostate IMRT beams were analyzed using the proposed system to further validate its ability to catch and identify errors, as well as establish error magnitude baselines for prostate IMRT delivery

  3. Quality assurance for online adapted treatment plans: benchmarking and delivery monitoring simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Taoran; Wu, Qiuwen; Yang, Yun; Rodrigues, Anna; Yin, Fang-Fang; Jackie Wu, Q

    2015-01-01

    An important challenge facing online adaptive radiation therapy is the development of feasible and efficient quality assurance (QA). This project aimed to validate the deliverability of online adapted plans and develop a proof-of-concept online delivery monitoring system for online adaptive radiation therapy QA. The first part of this project benchmarked automatically online adapted prostate treatment plans using traditional portal dosimetry IMRT QA. The portal dosimetry QA results of online adapted plans were compared to original (unadapted) plans as well as randomly selected prostate IMRT plans from our clinic. In the second part, an online delivery monitoring system was designed and validated via a simulated treatment with intentional multileaf collimator (MLC) errors. This system was based on inputs from the dynamic machine information (DMI), which continuously reports actual MLC positions and machine monitor units (MUs) at intervals of 50 ms or less during delivery. Based on the DMI, the system performed two levels of monitoring/verification during the delivery: (1) dynamic monitoring of cumulative fluence errors resulting from leaf position deviations and visualization using fluence error maps (FEMs); and (2) verification of MLC positions against the treatment plan for potential errors in MLC motion and data transfer at each control point. Validation of the online delivery monitoring system was performed by introducing intentional systematic MLC errors (ranging from 0.5 to 2 mm) to the DMI files for both leaf banks. These DMI files were analyzed by the proposed system to evaluate the system's performance in quantifying errors and revealing the source of errors, as well as to understand patterns in the FEMs. In addition, FEMs from 210 actual prostate IMRT beams were analyzed using the proposed system to further validate its ability to catch and identify errors, as well as establish error magnitude baselines for prostate IMRT delivery. Online adapted plans were

  4. Watertrak, a computerized liquid waste treatment system status and performance monitoring program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vance, J.N.; Tafazzoli, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    Because of continuing problems in the radwaste system operations of a large number of plants currently operating, there is an increasing need to provide greater quantities of radwaste system information to plant operators and managers. Current and more complete information is required to enhance the operation and performance of the radwaste treatment systems, to assess the current system status, to plan for changing plant conditions and to diagnose actual or impending problems. The information needs include: real-time system status monitoring, equipment performance monitoring, report generation for operators and plant management, and training information. The nature and quantity of information required makes this program well-suited for a computer-aided engineering application

  5. ED pharmacist monitoring of provider antibiotic selection aids appropriate treatment for outpatient UTI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, Erin; Drapkin, Zachary; Fritz, Kelly; Youngquist, Scott; Madsen, Troy; Fix, Megan

    2016-08-01

    We sought to determine whether an emergency department (ED) pharmacist could aid in the monitoring and correction of inappropriate empiric antibiotic selection for urinary tract infections in an outpatient ED population. Urine cultures with greater than 100 000 CFU/mL bacteria from the University of Utah Emergency Department over 1 year (October 2011-Sept 2012) were identified using our electronic medical record system. Per ED protocol, an ED pharmacist reviews all cultures and performs a chart review of patient symptoms, diagnosis, and discharge antibiotics to determine whether the treatment was appropriate. A retrospective review of this process was performed to identify how often inappropriate treatment was recognized and intervened on by an ED pharmacist. Of the 180 cultures included, a total of 42 (23%) of empiric discharge treatments were considered inappropriate and required intervention. In 35 (83%) of 42 patients, the ED pharmacist was able to contact the patient and make appropriate changes; the remaining 7 patients were unable to be contacted, and no change could be made in their treatment. A chart review of all urine cultures with greater than 100 000 CFU/mL performed by an ED pharmacist helped identify inappropriate treatment in 23% of patients discharged to home with the diagnosis of urinary tract infection. Of these patients who had received inappropriate treatment, an ED pharmacist was able to intervene in 83% of cases. These data highlight the role of ED pharmacists in improving patient care after discharge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. An error-related negativity potential investigation of response monitoring function in individuals with Internet addiction disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhenhe eZhou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Internet addiction disorder (IAD is an impulse disorder or at least related to impulse control disorder. Deficits in executive functioning, including response monitoring, have been proposed as a hallmark feature of impulse control disorders. The error-related negativity (ERN reflects individual’s ability to monitor behavior. Since IAD belongs to a compulsive-impulsive spectrum disorder, theoretically, it should present response monitoring functional deficit characteristics of some disorders, such as substance dependence, ADHD or alcohol abuse, testing with an Erikson flanker task. Up to now, no studies on response monitoring functional deficit in IAD were reported. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether IAD displays response monitoring functional deficit characteristics in a modified Erikson flanker task.23 subjects were recruited as IAD group. 23 matched age, gender and education healthy persons were recruited as control group. All participants completed the modified Erikson flanker task while measured with event-related potentials (ERPs. IAD group made more total error rates than did controls (P < 0.01; Reactive times for total error responses in IAD group were shorter than did controls (P < 0.01. The mean ERN amplitudes of total error response conditions at frontal electrode sites and at central electrode sites of IAD group were reduced compared with control group (all P < 0.01. These results revealed that IAD displays response monitoring functional deficit characteristics and shares ERN characteristics of compulsive-impulsive spectrum disorder.

  7. Optical monitoring systems for thermal spray processes: droplets behavior and substrate pre-treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawaguchi, Y.; Kobayashi, N.; Yamagata, Y.; Miyazaki, F.; Yamasaki, M.; Tanaka, J.; Muraoka, K.

    2017-11-01

    Thermal spray is a technique to form molten droplets using either plasma- or combustion-heating, which impinge upon substrates to form coating layers for various purposes, such as anti-corrosion and anti-wear layers. Although it is an established technique having a history of more than a century, operations of spray guns together with preparing suitable substrate surfaces for obtaining good coating layers still rely on experienced technicians. Because of the necessity of meeting more and more stringent requirements for coating quality and cost from customers, there has been a strong need to try to monitor spray processes, so as to obtain the best possible spray coating layers. The basic requirements for such monitoring systems are *reasonably cheap, *easy operation for laypersons, *easy access to targets to be investigated, and *an in-situ capability. The purpose of the present work is to provide suitable optical monitoring systems for (1) droplets behavior and (2) substrate pre-treatments. For the former (1), the first result was already presented at the 17th laser-aided plasma diagnostics meeting (LAPD17) in 2015 in Sapporo, and the results of its subsequent applications into real spray environments are shown in this article in order to validate the previous proposal. Topic (2) is new in the research program, and the proof-of-principle experiment for the proposed method yielded a favorable result. Based on this positive result, an overall strategy is being planned to fulfill the final objective of the optical monitoring of substrate pre-treatments. Details of these two programs (1) and (2) together with the present status are described.

  8. On-line acquisition of plant related and environmental parameters (plant monitoring) in gerbera: determining plant responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, R.; Slootweg, G.

    2004-01-01

    For on-line plant monitoring equipment to be functional in commercial glasshouse horticulture, relations between sensor readings and plant responses on both the short (days) and long term (weeks) are required. For this reason, systems were installed to monitor rockwool grown gerbera plants on a

  9. A new solution of measuring thermal response of prestressed concrete bridge girders for structural health monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiao, Pengcheng; Borchani, Wassim; Hasni, Hassene; Lajnef, Nizar

    2017-01-01

    This study develops a novel buckling-based mechanism to measure the thermal response of prestressed concrete bridge girders under continuous temperature changes for structural health monitoring. The measuring device consists of a bilaterally constrained beam and a piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride transducer that is attached to the beam. Under thermally induced displacement, the slender beam is buckled. The post-buckling events are deployed to convert the low-rate and low-frequency excitations into localized high-rate motions and, therefore, the attached piezoelectric transducer is triggered to generate electrical signals. Attaching the measuring device to concrete bridge girders, the electrical signals are used to detect the thermal response of concrete bridges. Finite element simulations are conducted to obtain the displacement of prestressed concrete girders under thermal loads. Using the thermal-induced displacement as input, experiments are carried out on a 3D printed measuring device to investigate the buckling response and corresponding electrical signals. A theoretical model is developed based on the nonlinear Euler–Bernoulli beam theory and large deformation assumptions to predict the buckling mode transitions of the beam. Based on the presented theoretical model, the geometry properties of the measuring device can be designed such that its buckling response is effectively controlled. Consequently, the thermally induced displacement can be designed as limit states to detect excessive thermal loads on concrete bridge girders. The proposed solution sufficiently measures the thermal response of concrete bridges. (paper)

  10. A new solution of measuring thermal response of prestressed concrete bridge girders for structural health monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Pengcheng; Borchani, Wassim; Hasni, Hassene; Lajnef, Nizar

    2017-08-01

    This study develops a novel buckling-based mechanism to measure the thermal response of prestressed concrete bridge girders under continuous temperature changes for structural health monitoring. The measuring device consists of a bilaterally constrained beam and a piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride transducer that is attached to the beam. Under thermally induced displacement, the slender beam is buckled. The post-buckling events are deployed to convert the low-rate and low-frequency excitations into localized high-rate motions and, therefore, the attached piezoelectric transducer is triggered to generate electrical signals. Attaching the measuring device to concrete bridge girders, the electrical signals are used to detect the thermal response of concrete bridges. Finite element simulations are conducted to obtain the displacement of prestressed concrete girders under thermal loads. Using the thermal-induced displacement as input, experiments are carried out on a 3D printed measuring device to investigate the buckling response and corresponding electrical signals. A theoretical model is developed based on the nonlinear Euler-Bernoulli beam theory and large deformation assumptions to predict the buckling mode transitions of the beam. Based on the presented theoretical model, the geometry properties of the measuring device can be designed such that its buckling response is effectively controlled. Consequently, the thermally induced displacement can be designed as limit states to detect excessive thermal loads on concrete bridge girders. The proposed solution sufficiently measures the thermal response of concrete bridges.

  11. Monitoring the response to rTMS in depression with visual analog scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grunhaus, Leon; Dolberg, Ornah T; Polak, Dana; Dannon, Pinhas N

    2002-10-01

    Visual analog scales (VAS) administered on a daily basis provide a fast and reliable method for assessing clinical change during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We treated 40 patients with major depression with TMS and assessed their clinical condition with VAS. Response to TMS was defined with the Hamilton rating scale for depression and the Global assessment of function scale. Nineteen patients of 40 were responders to TMS (when the whole sample was considered) whereas 17 of 29 responded when only the non-psychotic patients were considered. Patients who eventually responded to TMS demonstrated early changes in the VAS scores. We conclude that monitoring with VAS scores can detect early response to TMS. Copyright 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. Conformable amplified lead zirconate titanate sensors with enhanced piezoelectric response for cutaneous pressure monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dagdeviren, Canan; Su, Yewang; Joe, Pauline; Yona, Raissa; Liu, Yuhao; Kim, Yun-Soung; Huang, YongAn; Damadoran, Anoop R; Xia, Jing; Martin, Lane W; Huang, Yonggang; Rogers, John A

    2014-08-05

    The ability to measure subtle changes in arterial pressure using devices mounted on the skin can be valuable for monitoring vital signs in emergency care, detecting the early onset of cardiovascular disease and continuously assessing health status. Conventional technologies are well suited for use in traditional clinical settings, but cannot be easily adapted for sustained use during daily activities. Here we introduce a conformal device that avoids these limitations. Ultrathin inorganic piezoelectric and semiconductor materials on elastomer substrates enable amplified, low hysteresis measurements of pressure on the skin, with high levels of sensitivity (~0.005 Pa) and fast response times (~0.1 ms). Experimental and theoretical studies reveal enhanced piezoelectric responses in lead zirconate titanate that follow from integration on soft supports as well as engineering behaviours of the associated devices. Calibrated measurements of pressure variations of blood flow in near-surface arteries demonstrate capabilities for measuring radial artery augmentation index and pulse pressure velocity.

  13. Computational Model and Numerical Simulation for Submerged Mooring Monitoring Platform’s Dynamical Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Kongde

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Computational model and numerical simulation for submerged mooring monitoring platform were formulated aimed at the dynamical response by the action of flow force, which based on Hopkinson impact load theory, taken into account the catenoid effect of mooring cable and revised the difference of tension and tangential direction action force by equivalent modulus of elasticity. Solved the equation by hydraulics theory and structural mechanics theory of oceaneering, studied the response of buoy on flow force. The validity of model were checked and the results were in good agreement; the result show the buoy will engender biggish heave and swaying displacement, but the swaying displacement got stable quickly and the heaven displacement cause vibration for the vortex-induced action by the flow.

  14. Pivotal response treatment for autism spectrum disorder: current perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei J

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Jiedi Lei, Pamela Ventola Yale Child Study Center, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Abstract: Pivotal response treatment (PRT is an evidence-based behavioral intervention based on applied behavior analysis principles aimed to improve social communication skills in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD. PRT adopts a more naturalistic approach and focuses on using a number of strategies to help increase children’s motivation during intervention. Since its conceptualization, PRT has received much empirical support for eliciting therapeutic gains in greater use of functional social communication skills in individuals with ASD. Building upon the empirical evidence supporting PRT, recent advancements have increasingly turned to using interdisciplinary research integrating neuroimaging techniques and behavioral measures to help identify objective biomarkers of treatment, which have two primary purposes. First, neuroimaging results can help characterize how PRT may elicit change, and facilitate partitioning of the heterogeneous profiles of neural mechanisms underlying similar profile of behavioral changes observed over PRT. Second, neuroimaging provides an objective means to both map and track how biomarkers may serve as reliable and sensitive predictors of responder profiles to PRT, assisting clinicians to identify who will most likely benefit from PRT. Together, a better understanding of both mechanisms of change and predictors of responder profile will help PRT to serve as a more precise and targeted intervention for individuals with ASD, thus moving towards the goal of precision medicine and improving quality of care. This review focuses on the recent emerging neuroimaging evidences supporting PRT, offering current perspectives on the importance of interdisciplinary research to help clinicians better understand how PRT works and predict who will respond to PRT. Keywords: PRT, ASD, biomarkers, neuroimaging

  15. Modeling pathogenesis and treatment response in childhood absence epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Andrew T; Glauser, Tracy; Tenney, Jeffrey; Lytton, William W; Holland, Katherine

    2018-01-01

    Childhood absence epilepsy (CAE) is a genetic generalized epilepsy syndrome with polygenic inheritance, with genes for γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors and T-type calcium channels implicated in the disorder. Previous studies of T-type calcium channel electrophysiology have shown genetic changes and medications have multiple effects. The aim of this study was to use an established thalamocortical computer model to determine how T-type calcium channels work in concert with cortical excitability to contribute to pathogenesis and treatment response in CAE. The model is comprised of cortical pyramidal, cortical inhibitory, thalamocortical relay, and thalamic reticular single-compartment neurons, implemented with Hodgkin-Huxley model ion channels and connected by AMPA, GABA A , and GABA B synapses. Network behavior was simulated for different combinations of T-type calcium channel conductance, inactivation time, steady state activation/inactivation shift, and cortical GABA A conductance. Decreasing cortical GABA A conductance and increasing T-type calcium channel conductance converted spindle to spike and wave oscillations; smaller changes were required if both were changed in concert. In contrast, left shift of steady state voltage activation/inactivation did not lead to spike and wave oscillations, whereas right shift reduced network propensity for oscillations of any type. These results provide a window into mechanisms underlying polygenic inheritance in CAE, as well as a mechanism for treatment effects and failures mediated by these channels. Although the model is a simplification of the human thalamocortical network, it serves as a useful starting point for predicting the implications of ion channel electrophysiology in polygenic epilepsy such as CAE. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 International League Against Epilepsy.

  16. Soil microbial community responses to acid exposure and neutralization treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Doyun; Lee, Yunho; Park, Jeonghyun; Moon, Hee Sun; Hyun, Sung Pil

    2017-12-15

    Changes in microbial community induced by acid shock were studied in the context of potential release of acids to the environment due to chemical accidents. The responses of microbial communities in three different soils to the exposure to sulfuric or hydrofluoric acid and to the subsequent neutralization treatment were investigated as functions of acid concentration and exposure time by using 16S-rRNA gene based pyrosequencing and DGGE (Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis). Measurements of soil pH and dissolved ion concentrations revealed that the added acids were neutralized to different degrees, depending on the mineral composition and soil texture. Hydrofluoric acid was more effectively neutralized by the soils, compared with sulfuric acid at the same normality. Gram-negative ß-Proteobacteria were shown to be the most acid-sensitive bacterial strains, while spore-forming Gram-positive Bacilli were the most acid-tolerant. The results of this study suggest that the Gram-positive to Gram-negative bacterial ratio may serve as an effective bio-indicator in assessing the impact of the acid shock on the microbial community. Neutralization treatments helped recover the ratio closer to their original values. The findings of this study show that microbial community changes as well as geochemical changes such as pH and dissolved ion concentrations need to be considered in estimating the impact of an acid spill, in selecting an optimal remediation strategy, and in deciding when to end remedial actions at the acid spill impacted site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Optical satellite data volcano monitoring: a multi-sensor rapid response system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duda, Kenneth A.; Ramsey, Michael; Wessels, Rick L.; Dehn, Jonathan

    2009-01-01

    In this chapter, the use of satellite remote sensing to monitor active geological processes is described. Specifically, threats posed by volcanic eruptions are briefly outlined, and essential monitoring requirements are discussed. As an application example, a collaborative, multi-agency operational volcano monitoring system in the north Pacific is highlighted with a focus on the 2007 eruption of Kliuchevskoi volcano, Russia. The data from this system have been used since 2004 to detect the onset of volcanic activity, support the emergency response to large eruptions, and assess the volcanic products produced following the eruption. The overall utility of such integrative assessments is also summarized. The work described in this chapter was originally funded through two National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Earth System Science research grants that focused on the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) instrument. A skilled team of volcanologists, geologists, satellite tasking experts, satellite ground system experts, system engineers and software developers collaborated to accomplish the objectives. The first project, Automation of the ASTER Emergency Data Acquisition Protocol for Scientific Analysis, Disaster Monitoring, and Preparedness, established the original collaborative research and monitoring program between the University of Pittsburgh (UP), the Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO), the NASA Land Processes Distributed Active Archive Center (LP DAAC) at the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Earth Resources Observation and Science (EROS) Center, and affiliates on the ASTER Science Team at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) as well as associates at the Earth Remote Sensing Data Analysis Center (ERSDAC) in Japan. This grant, completed in 2008, also allowed for detailed volcanic analyses and data validation during three separate summer field campaigns to Kamchatka Russia. The second project, Expansion and synergistic use

  18. Optical fiber biocompatible sensors for monitoring selective treatment of tumors via thermal ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosi, Daniele; Poeggel, Sven; Dinesh, Duraibabu B.; Macchi, Edoardo G.; Gallati, Mario; Braschi, Giovanni; Leen, Gabriel; Lewis, Elfed

    2015-09-01

    Thermal ablation (TA) is an interventional procedure for selective treatment of tumors, that results in low-invasive outpatient care. The lack of real-time control of TA is one of its main weaknesses. Miniature and biocompatible optical fiber sensors are applied to achieve a dense, multi-parameter monitoring, that can substantially improve the control of TA. Ex vivo measurements are reported performed on porcine liver tissue, to reproduce radiofrequency ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma. Our measurement campaign has a two-fold focus: (1) dual pressure-temperature measurement with a single probe; (2) distributed thermal measurement to estimate point-by-point cells mortality.

  19. Clinical utility of therapeutic drug monitoring in biological disease modifying anti-rheumatic drug treatment of rheumatic disorders: a systematic narrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Herwaarden, Noortje; Van Den Bemt, Bart J F; Wientjes, Maike H M; Kramers, Cornelis; Den Broeder, Alfons A

    2017-08-01

    Biological Disease Modifying Anti-Rheumatic Drugs (bDMARDs) have improved the treatment outcomes of inflammatory rheumatic diseases including Rheumatoid Arthritis and spondyloarthropathies. Inter-individual variation exists in (maintenance of) response to bDMARDs. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring (TDM) of bDMARDs could potentially help in optimizing treatment for the individual patient. Areas covered: Evidence of clinical utility of TDM in bDMARD treatment is reviewed. Different clinical scenarios will be discussed, including: prediction of response after start of treatment, prediction of response to a next bDMARD in case of treatment failure of the first, prediction of successful dose reduction or discontinuation in case of low disease activity, prediction of response to dose-escalation in case of active disease and prediction of response to bDMARD in case of flare in disease activity. Expert opinion: The limited available evidence does often not report important outcomes for diagnostic studies, such as sensitivity and specificity. In most clinical relevant scenarios, predictive value of serum (anti-) drug levels is absent, therefore the use of TDM of bDMARDs cannot be advocated. Well-designed prospective studies should be done to further investigate the promising scenarios to determine the place of TDM in clinical practice.

  20. School absence and treatment in school children with respiratory symptoms in the Netherlands: Data from the Child Health Monitoring System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spee-van Der Wekke, J.; Meulmeester, J.F.; Radder, J.J.; Verloove-Vanhorick, S.P.

    1998-01-01

    Study objective - To assess the prevalence of respiratory problems, and the relation of these problems with school attendance, medicine use, and medical treatment. Design - The Child Health Monitoring System. Setting - Nineteen public health services across the Netherlands. Participants - 5186

  1. Monte carlo calculation of energy-dependent response of high-sensitive neutron monitor, HISENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imanaka, Tetsuji; Ebisawa, Tohru; Kobayashi, Keiji; Koide, Hiroaki; Seo, Takeshi; Kawano, Shinji

    1988-01-01

    A highly sensitive neutron monitor system, HISENS, has been developed to measure leakage neutrons from nuclear facilities. The counter system of HISENS contains a detector bank which consists of ten cylindrical proportional counters filled with 10 atm 3 He gas and a paraffin moderator mounted in an aluminum case. The size of the detector bank is 56 cm high, 66 cm wide and 10 cm thick. It is revealed by a calibration experiment using an 241 Am-Be neutron source that the sensitivity of HISENS is about 2000 times as large as that of a typical commercial rem-counter. Since HISENS is designed to have a high sensitivity in a wide range of neutron energy, the shape of its energy dependent response curve cannot be matched to that of the dose equivalent conversion factor. To estimate dose equivalent values from neutron counts by HISENS, it is necessary to know the energy and angular characteristics of both HISENS and the neutron field. The area of one side of the detector bank is 3700 cm 2 and the detection efficiency in the constant region of the response curve is about 30 %. Thus, the sensitivity of HISENS for this energy range is 740 cps/(n/cm 2 /sec). This value indicates the extremely high sensitivity of HISENS as compared with exsisting highly sensitive neutron monitors. (Nogami, K.)

  2. A report on upgraded seismic monitoring stations in Myanmar: Station performance and site response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiam, Hrin Nei; Min Htwe, Yin Myo; Kyaw, Tun Lin; Tun, Pa Pa; Min, Zaw; Htwe, Sun Hninn; Aung, Tin Myo; Lin, Kyaw Kyaw; Aung, Myat Min; De Cristofaro, Jason; Franke, Mathias; Radman, Stefan; Lepiten, Elouie; Wolin, Emily; Hough, Susan E.

    2017-01-01

    Myanmar is in a tectonically complex region between the eastern edge of the Himalayan collision zone and the northern end of the Sunda megathrust. Until recently, earthquake monitoring and research efforts have been hampered by a lack of modern instrumentation and communication infrastructure. In January 2016, a major upgrade of the Myanmar National Seismic Network (MNSN; network code MM) was undertaken to improve earthquake monitoring capability. We installed five permanent broadband and strong‐motion seismic stations and real‐time data telemetry using newly improved cellular networks. Data are telemetered to the MNSN hub in Nay Pyi Taw and archived at the Incorporated Research Institutions for Seismology Data Management Center. We analyzed station noise characteristics and site response using noise and events recorded over the first six months of station operation. Background noise characteristics vary across the array, but indicate that the new stations are performing well. MM stations recorded more than 20 earthquakes of M≥4.5 within Myanmar and its immediate surroundings, including an M 6.8 earthquake located northwest of Mandalay on 13 April 2016 and the Mw 6.8 Chauk event on 24 August 2016. We use this new dataset to calculate horizontal‐to‐vertical spectral ratios, which provide a preliminary characterization of site response of the upgraded MM stations.

  3. Drought is Coming: Monitoring Vegetation Response to Water Scarcity through Variable Chlorophyll a Fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guadagno, C. R.; Beverly, D.; Pleban, J. R.; Speckman, H. N.; Ewers, B. E.; Weinig, C.

    2017-12-01

    Aridity is one of the most pronounced environmental limits to plant survival, and understanding how plants respond to drought and recovery is crucial for predicting impacts on managed and natural ecosystems. Changes in soil moisture conditions induce a suite of physiological responses from the cell to ecosystem scale, complicating the assessment of drought effects. Characterizing early indicators of water scarcity across species can inform biophysical models with improved understanding of plant hydraulics. While indexes exist for drought monitoring across scales, many are unable to identify imminent vegetative drought. We explore a method of early diagnosis using leaf-level and kinetic imaging measures of variable chlorophyll a fluorescence. This is a fast and reliable tool capturing leaf physiological changes in advance of changes in NDVI or passive solar induced fluorescence. Both image and leaf level Pulse Amplitude Method (PAM) measurements illustrate the utility of variable chlorophyll a fluorescence for monitoring vegetative drought. Variable fluorescence was monitored across populations of crops, desert shrubs, montane conifers and riparian deciduous trees under variable water regimes. We found a strong correlation (R = 0.85) between the maximum efficiency of photosystem II measured using variable fluorescence (Fv'Fm') and leaf level electrolyte leakage, a proximal cause of drought stress induced by cellular damage in leaves. This association was confirmed in two gymnosperm species (Picea engelmannii and Pinus contorta) and for diverse varieties of the crop species Brassica rapa. The use of chlorophyll a fluorescence per image also allowed for early detection of drought in aspen (Populus tremuloides). These results provide evidence that variable chlorophyll fluorescence decreases between 25% and 70% in mild and severely droughted twigs with respect to ones collected from trees in wet soil conditions. While current systems for monitoring variable fluorescence

  4. Radiological emergency response in a medical waste treatment unit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, Fabio F.; Boni-Mitake, Malvina; Vianna, Estanislau B.; Nicolau, Jose R.A.; Rodrigues, Demerval L. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    Radioactive materials are largely used in medicine, research and industry. The amount of radioactive material employed in each application varies from negligible to large and it can be in sealed or non-sealed form. A medical waste treatment unit that deals only with A-type medical waste (ABNT-NBR 12808), which does not include radioactive waste, detected abnormal radiation levels in a collecting truck and the IPEN-CNEN/SP Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Response Team was called. The presence of radioactive material inside the truck was confirmed; however, its origin and nature were not possible to be determined because the truck had collected medical waste in several facilities. So, an operation in order to segregate and identify that material was carried out. During the operation, a second collecting truck presenting abnormal radiation levels arrived to the unit and the same procedure was carried out on that truck. In both situations, the contaminated objects found were infantile diapers. The radioactive waste was transported to IPEN-CNEN/SP to be managed. Samples of the radioactive materials were submitted to gamma spectrometry and the radionuclide was identified as Iodine-131. Since that attendance, similar occurrences have been frequent. These events suggest that it is necessary a better control of the radioactive waste at the generating facilities and there should be basic radioprotection orientations to the discharging patients that were submitted to nuclear medicine procedures. (author)

  5. Radiological emergency response in a medical waste treatment unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suzuki, Fabio F.; Boni-Mitake, Malvina; Vianna, Estanislau B.; Nicolau, Jose R.A.; Rodrigues, Demerval L.

    2000-01-01

    Radioactive materials are largely used in medicine, research and industry. The amount of radioactive material employed in each application varies from negligible to large and it can be in sealed or non-sealed form. A medical waste treatment unit that deals only with A-type medical waste (ABNT-NBR 12808), which does not include radioactive waste, detected abnormal radiation levels in a collecting truck and the IPEN-CNEN/SP Nuclear and Radiological Emergency Response Team was called. The presence of radioactive material inside the truck was confirmed; however, its origin and nature were not possible to be determined because the truck had collected medical waste in several facilities. So, an operation in order to segregate and identify that material was carried out. During the operation, a second collecting truck presenting abnormal radiation levels arrived to the unit and the same procedure was carried out on that truck. In both situations, the contaminated objects found were infantile diapers. The radioactive waste was transported to IPEN-CNEN/SP to be managed. Samples of the radioactive materials were submitted to gamma spectrometry and the radionuclide was identified as Iodine-131. Since that attendance, similar occurrences have been frequent. These events suggest that it is necessary a better control of the radioactive waste at the generating facilities and there should be basic radioprotection orientations to the discharging patients that were submitted to nuclear medicine procedures. (author)

  6. Treatment and Response to Statins: Gender-related Differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raparelli, Valeria; Pannitteri, Gaetano; Todisco, Tommaso; Toriello, Filippo; Napoleone, Laura; Manfredini, Roberto; Basili, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    Response to drug administration is a primary determinant for treatment success. Sex and gender disparities play a role in determining the efficacy and safety of the most commonly used medications suggesting the need for a sex-tailored approach in prescription. Statins are a cost-effective strategy for cardiovascular disease (CVD) prevention. While statins are similarly effective in secondary CVD prevention, some concerns raised by conflicting data reported in primary CVD prevention clinical trials. The small representation of women in clinical trials and the fewer rates of events due to the lower female baseline CVD risk may have conditioned contradictory meta-analysis findings. Specifically, benefits outweigh disadvantages of statin therapy in women with a high CVD risk, while several doubts exist for the primary prevention of women at low-intermediate CVD risk. Furthermore, disparities between women and men in medication adherence may influence statin efficacy in CVD prevention. The sex-dependent impact of adverse side effects is one of the reasons advocated for explaining the gender gap, but it is not evidence-proved. The present review summarizes the sex and gender differences in the use of statins, pointing out new perspectives and opening issues in sex-tailored CVD prevention strategy. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. Shear Wave Elastography (SWE) for Monitoring of Treatment of Tendinopathies: A Double-blinded, Longitudinal Clinical Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirrichs, Timm; Quack, Valentin; Gatz, Matthias; Tingart, Markus; Rath, Björn; Betsch, Marcel; Kuhl, Christiane K; Schrading, Simone

    2018-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the diagnostic accuracy with which shear wave elastography (SWE) can be used to monitor response to treatment of tendinopathies, and to compare it to conventional ultrasound (US)-imaging methods (B-mode US (B-US) and power Doppler US (PD-US)). A prospective Institutional Review Board-approved longitudinal study on 35 patients with 47 symptomatic tendons (17 Achilles-, 15 patellar-, and 15 humeral-epicondylar) who underwent standardized multimodal US and standardized clinical assessment before and after 6 months of treatment (tailored stretching exercise, sport break, and local Polidocanol) was carried out. All US studies were performed by radiologists blinded to the clinical symptoms on both tendon sides to avoid biased interpretations, by B-US, PD-US, and SWE, conducted in the same order, using a high-resolution linear 15 MHz probe (Aixplorer). Orthopedic surgeons who were in turn blinded to US imaging results used established orthopedic scores (Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment questionnaire for Achilles, Victorian Institute of Sports Assessment questionnaire for patellar tendons, and Disability Arm Shoulder Hand scoring system) to rate presence, degree, and possible resolution of symptoms. We analyzed the diagnostic accuracy with which the different US imaging methods were able to detect symptomatic tendons at baseline as well as treatment effects, with orthopedic scores serving as reference standard. B-US, PD-US, and SWE detected symptomatic tendons with a sensitivity of 66% (31 of 47), 72% (34 of 47), and 87.5% (41 of 47), respectively. Positive predictive value was 0.67 for B-US, 0.87 for PD-US, and 1 for SWE. After treatment, clinical scores improved in 68% (32 of 47) of tendons. Treatment effects were observable by B-US, PD-US, and SWE with a sensitivity of 3.1% (1 of 32), 28.1% (9 of 32), and 81.3% (26 of 32), respectively. B-US was false-positive in 68.8% (20 of 32), PD-US in 46.9% (15 of 32), and SWE in 12.5% (4 of 32

  8. Identification of imaging biomarkers for the assessment of tumour response to different treatments in a preclinical glioma model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lo Dico, A.; Martelli, C.; Valtorta, S.; Belloli, S.; Raccagni, I.; Moresco, R.M.; Diceglie, C.; Gianelli, U.; Bosari, S.; Vaira, V.; Politi, L.S.; Lucignani, G.; Ottobrini, L.

    2015-01-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) activity is one of the major players in hypoxia-mediated glioma progression and resistance to therapies, and therefore the focus of this study was the evaluation of HIF-1α modulation in relation to tumour response with the purpose of identifying imaging biomarkers able to document tumour response to treatment in a murine glioma model. U251-HRE-mCherry cells expressing Luciferase under the control of a hypoxia responsive element (HRE) and mCherry under the control of a constitutive promoter were used to assess HIF-1α activity and cell survival after treatment, both in vitro and in vivo, by optical, MRI and positron emission tomography imaging. This cell model can be used to monitor HIF-1α activity after treatment with different drugs modulating transduction pathways involved in its regulation. After temozolomide (TMZ) treatment, HIF-1α activity is early reduced, preceding cell cytotoxicity. Optical imaging allowed monitoring of this process in vivo, and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression was identified as a translatable non-invasive biomarker with potential clinical significance. A preliminary in vitro evaluation showed that reduction of HIF-1α activity after TMZ treatment was comparable to the effect of an Hsp90 inhibitor, opening the way for further elucidation of its mechanism of action. The results of this study suggest that the U251-HRE-mCherry cell model can be used for the monitoring of HIF-1α activity through luciferase and CAIX expression. These cells can become a useful tool for the assessment and improvement of new targeted tracers for potential theranostic procedures. (orig.)

  9. Identification of imaging biomarkers for the assessment of tumour response to different treatments in a preclinical glioma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lo Dico, A.; Martelli, C. [University of Milan, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Centre of Molecular and Cellular Imaging-IMAGO, Milan (Italy); Valtorta, S.; Belloli, S. [National Researches Council (CNR), Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology (IBFM), Segrate, MI (Italy); IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Experimental Imaging Center, Milan (Italy); Raccagni, I.; Moresco, R.M. [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Experimental Imaging Center, Milan (Italy); University of Milano-Bicocca, Department of Health Sciences, Monza (Italy); Diceglie, C. [University of Milan, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Doctorate School of Molecular Medicine, Milan (Italy); Gianelli, U.; Bosari, S. [University of Milan, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milan (Italy); Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda-Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Division of Pathology, Milan (Italy); Vaira, V. [Fondazione IRCCS Ca' Granda-Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico, Division of Pathology, Milan (Italy); Istituto Nazionale Genetica Molecolare ' ' Romeo ed Enrica Invernizzi' ' (INGM), Milan (Italy); Politi, L.S. [IRCCS San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Neuroradiology Department and Neuroradiology Research Group, Milan (Italy); Lucignani, G. [University of Milan, Centre of Molecular and Cellular Imaging-IMAGO, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Department of Health Sciences, Milan (Italy); San Paolo Hospital, Department of Diagnostic Services, Unit of Nuclear Medicine, Milan (Italy); Ottobrini, L. [University of Milan, Department of Pathophysiology and Transplantation, Milan (Italy); University of Milan, Centre of Molecular and Cellular Imaging-IMAGO, Milan (Italy); National Researches Council (CNR), Institute of Molecular Bioimaging and Physiology (IBFM), Segrate, MI (Italy)

    2015-03-27

    Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) activity is one of the major players in hypoxia-mediated glioma progression and resistance to therapies, and therefore the focus of this study was the evaluation of HIF-1α modulation in relation to tumour response with the purpose of identifying imaging biomarkers able to document tumour response to treatment in a murine glioma model. U251-HRE-mCherry cells expressing Luciferase under the control of a hypoxia responsive element (HRE) and mCherry under the control of a constitutive promoter were used to assess HIF-1α activity and cell survival after treatment, both in vitro and in vivo, by optical, MRI and positron emission tomography imaging. This cell model can be used to monitor HIF-1α activity after treatment with different drugs modulating transduction pathways involved in its regulation. After temozolomide (TMZ) treatment, HIF-1α activity is early reduced, preceding cell cytotoxicity. Optical imaging allowed monitoring of this process in vivo, and carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) expression was identified as a translatable non-invasive biomarker with potential clinical significance. A preliminary in vitro evaluation showed that reduction of HIF-1α activity after TMZ treatment was comparable to the effect of an Hsp90 inhibitor, opening the way for further elucidation of its mechanism of action. The results of this study suggest that the U251-HRE-mCherry cell model can be used for the monitoring of HIF-1α activity through luciferase and CAIX expression. These cells can become a useful tool for the assessment and improvement of new targeted tracers for potential theranostic procedures. (orig.)

  10. Agressive osteoblastoma in a seven-year-old girl's mandible: Treatment and six-year monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Paulo Henrique Souza; Molinari, Danielle Lima; Stateri, Hiran Queiroz; Borges, Alvaro Henrique; Volpato, Luiz Evaristo Ricci

    2016-01-01

    Osteoblastoma is a rare benign bone tumor with locally aggressive behavior in some cases; however, with rare malignant transformations. A case of osteoblastoma in a seven-year-old patient's mandible is presented. After the diagnosis, the patient underwent two stages of treatment. In the first intervention, an intralesional curettage was performed as well as a marsupialization of the lesion, in order to reduce its volume and allow a second and more conservative surgical period. In the second surgery, after reducing the lesion, enucleation and rigid internal fixation of the mandible were performed. The treatment has proven to be satisfactory, without recurrence of the injury for two years, when the patient suffered a car accident that caused the synthetic material to fracture. The internal fixation was surgically replaced and the patient is being monitored after six years of the initial intervention, without presenting further changes. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Results of the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility biological monitoring program, July 1987--July 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Specht, W.L.

    1992-07-01

    As required by the South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) under NPDES Permit SCO000175, biological monitoring was conducted in Upper Three Runs Creek to determine if discharges from the F/H Effluent Treatment Facility have adversely impacted the biotic community of the receiving stream. Data included in this summary report encompass July 1987 through July 1991. As originally designed, the F/H ETF was not expected to remove all of the mercury from the wastewater; therefore, SCDHEC specified that studies be conducted to determine if mercury was bioaccumulating in aquatic biota. Subsequent to approval of the biological monitoring program, an ion exchange column was added to the F/H ETF specifically to remove mercury, which eliminated mercury from the F/H ETF effluent. The results of the biological monitoring program indicate that at the present rate of discharge, the F/H ETF effluent has not adversely affected the receiving stream with respect to any of the parameters that were measured. The effluent is not toxic at the in-stream waste concentration and there is no evidence of mercury bioaccumulation

  12. Pregnancy risk assessment monitoring system in Ireland: methods and response rates

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Keeffe, Linda M.

    2014-06-01

    To describe response rates and characteristics associated with response to the Pregnancy Risk Assessment Monitoring System study in Ireland (PRAMS Ireland). Using hospital discharge records of live births at a large, urban, obstetric hospital, a sampling frame of approximately 2,400 mother-infant pairs were used to alternately sample 1,200 women. Mothers’ information including name, address, parity, age and infant characteristics such as sex and gestational age at delivery were extracted from records. Modes of contact included an invitation letter with option to opt out of the study, three mail surveys, a reminder letter and text message reminder for remaining non-respondents. Sixty-one per cent of women responded to the PRAMS Ireland survey over a 133 day response period. Women aged <30, single women, multiparous women and women with a preterm delivery were less likely to respond. Women participating in PRAMS Ireland were similar to the national birth profile in 2011 which had a mean age of 32, were 40 % primiparous, 33 % single or never married and had a 28 % caesarean section rate. Survey and protocol changes are required to increase response rates above recommended Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) thresholds of 65 % within the recommended 90 day data collection cycle. Additional efforts such as stratification and over-sampling are required to increase representativeness among hard to reach groups such as younger, single and multiparous women before expanding the project to an ongoing, national surveillance system in Ireland.

  13. C-reactive protein, Rheumatoid factor and circulatory immune complex as markers for monitoring treatment of infective endocarditis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alavi, S.M.; Ahmadi, F.; Nashibi, R.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: To evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of serum C-reactive protein (CRP), rheumatoid factor (RF) and circulatory immune complex (CIC) determinations in monitoring the outcome of infective endocarditis (IE). Methodology: In this prospective analytic descriptive study CRP, RF and CIC were measured on admission and 4 weeks after initiation of standard antibiotic regimen in 30 hospitalized patients with IE in an educational hospital between 2006 and 2007 in Ahvaz a city south west Iran . Duke criteria were used for diagnosis of IE. CRP and RF were examined using quantitative neflometry (Binding site kit, UK) and CIC was detected by semi quantitative immune diffusion (Baharafshan SIRD kit, Iran). Data were evaluated using statistical analyses in SPSS (version 12, USA) software for windows. Results: The fall in serum C-reactive protein or RF was significant (P= 0.05). Only two of the 30 patients, who had elevated CRP, RF and CIC week four failed to response and one needed cardiac surgery. Conclusions: The C-reactive protein proved to be a good tool for monitoring the treatment of IE. Also RF proved useful in the assessment of patients with IE, but the value of CIC was negligible. (author)

  14. Monitoring therapeutic response of human ovarian cancer to 17-DMAG by noninvasive PET imaging with {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niu, Gang; Cao, Qizhen; Chen, Xiaoyuan [Stanford University School of Medicine, The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States); Li, Zibo [Stanford University School of Medicine, The Molecular Imaging Program at Stanford (MIPS), Department of Radiology and Bio-X Program, Stanford, CA (United States); Keck School of Medicine, USC Molecular Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Los Angeles, CA (United States)

    2009-09-15

    17-Dimethylaminoethylamino-17-demethoxygeldanamycin (17-DMAG), a heat-shock protein 90 (Hsp90) inhibitor, has been intensively investigated for cancer therapy and is undergoing clinical trials. Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER-2) is one of the client proteins of Hsp90 and its expression is decreased upon 17-DMAG treatment. In this study, we aimed to noninvasively monitor the HER-2 response to 17-DMAG treatment in xenografted mice. The sensitivity of human ovarian cancer SKOV-3 cells to 17-DMAG in vitro was measured by MTT assay. HER-2 expression in SKOV-3 cells was determined by flow cytometry. Nude mice bearing SKOV-3 tumors were treated with 17-DMAG and the therapeutic efficacy was evaluated by tumor size measurement. Both treated and control mice were imaged with microPET using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab and {sup 18}F-FDG. Biodistribution studies and immunofluorescence staining were performed to validate the microPET results. SKOV-3 cells are sensitive to 17-DMAG treatment, in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC{sub 50} value of 24.72 nM after 72 h incubation. The tumor growth curve supported the inhibition effect of 17-DMAG on SKOV-3 tumors. Quantitative microPET imaging showed that {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab had prominent tumor accumulation in untreated SKOV-3 tumors, which was significantly reduced in 17-DMAG-treated tumors. There was no uptake difference detected by FDG PET. Immunofluorescence staining confirmed the significant reduction in tumor HER-2 level upon 17-DMAG treatment. The early response to anti-Hsp90 therapy was successfully monitored by quantitative PET using {sup 64}Cu-DOTA-trastuzumab. This approach may be valuable in monitoring the therapeutic response in HER-2-positive cancer patients under 17-DMAG treatment. (orig.)

  15. The development of an on-site wastewater treatment system with monitoring capabilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kubota, Hiroshi; Shigeizumi, Koga; Noguchi, Shuntaro; Kita, Shingo; Egawa, Moritoshi; Takeshima, Toshikatsu

    2015-01-01

    A compact Wastewater Treatment Unit that can monitor its own decontamination efficiency by using an underwater dosimeter and turbidity meter was developed. This equipment is so compact as to be able to be loaded up a 1t-class truck and is efficient enough to decrease radioactivity level of wastewater to under 10 Bq/L. There are high levels of correlation between radioactivity and turbidity and underwater radiation dose (URD). Turbidity has the advantage of measuring low radiation density, whilst URD can measure radioactive contamination independently of other factors affecting water quality. However experiments showed that the relationship between turbidity and radioactivity density was changed according to radioactivity of the suspensoid, and that air dose rate had an impact on determination limit of URD index. As this Wastewater Treatment Unit has a dual-meter system, it is possible to calibrate the turbidity index with the measured URD. This dual-meter system would be able to monitor low radioactivity levels in a range of wastewaters. (author)

  16. Successful management of severe cow's milk allergy with omalizumab treatment and CD-sens monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilsson, Caroline; Nordvall, Lennart; Johansson, S G O; Nopp, Anna

    2014-10-01

    Food allergy is common in children and young adults and may be difficult to diagnose and is at present treated with avoidance of the food in question. The aim of this report is to share our clinical experiences monitoring omalizumab treatment by basophil allergen threshold sensitivity, CD-sens. Five children, 6-16 years of age, with a severe milk allergy including episodes of anaphylaxis and IgE-antibodies, between 30 and 160 kUA/L to casein and alpha-lactalbumin (milk proteins), were treated with omalizumab. CD-sens, was tested prior to and after 4 months of omalizumab and if turned negative, it was followed by an oral milk challenge. All children became negative in CD-sens and had a negative milk challenge, but one child required doubling of the omalizumab dose to achieve a negative CD-sens before a challenge was done. Omalizumab appears useful in treatment of severe food allergy, e.g., anaphylaxis to milk, and CD-sens monitoring may decide when and how to perform a food challenge.

  17. Online total organic carbon (TOC) monitoring for water and wastewater treatment plants processes and operations optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assmann, Céline; Scott, Amanda; Biller, Dondra

    2017-08-01

    Organic measurements, such as biological oxygen demand (BOD) and chemical oxygen demand (COD) were developed decades ago in order to measure organics in water. Today, these time-consuming measurements are still used as parameters to check the water treatment quality; however, the time required to generate a result, ranging from hours to days, does not allow COD or BOD to be useful process control parameters - see (1) Standard Method 5210 B; 5-day BOD Test, 1997, and (2) ASTM D1252; COD Test, 2012. Online organic carbon monitoring allows for effective process control because results are generated every few minutes. Though it does not replace BOD or COD measurements still required for compliance reporting, it allows for smart, data-driven and rapid decision-making to improve process control and optimization or meet compliances. Thanks to the smart interpretation of generated data and the capability to now take real-time actions, municipal drinking water and wastewater treatment facility operators can positively impact their OPEX (operational expenditure) efficiencies and their capabilities to meet regulatory requirements. This paper describes how three municipal wastewater and drinking water plants gained process insights, and determined optimization opportunities thanks to the implementation of online total organic carbon (TOC) monitoring.

  18. Conformable liquid metal printed epidermal electronics for smart physiological monitoring and simulation treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuelin; Zhang, Yuxin; Guo, Rui; Wang, Hongzhang; Yuan, Bo; Liu, Jing

    2018-03-01

    Conformable epidermal printed electronics enabled from gallium-based liquid metals (LMs), highly conductive and low-melting-point alloys, are proposed as the core to achieving immediate contact between skin surface and electrodes, which can avoid the skin deformation often caused by conventional rigid electrodes. When measuring signals, LMs can eliminate resonance problems with shorter time to reach steady state than Pt and gelled Pt electrodes. By comparing the contact resistance under different working conditions, it is demonstrated that both ex vivo and in vivo LM electrode-skin models have the virtues of direct and immediate contact with skin surface without the deformation encountered with conventional rigid electrodes. In addition, electrocardio electrodes composed of conformable LM printed epidermal electronics are adopted as smart devices to monitor electrocardiogram signals of rabbits. Furthermore, simulation treatment for smart defibrillation offers a feasible way to demonstrate the effect of liquid metal electrodes (LMEs) on the human body with less energy loss. The remarkable features of soft epidermal LMEs such as high conformability, good conductivity, better signal stability, and fine biocompatibility represent a critical step towards accurate medical monitoring and future smart treatments.

  19. MRI monitoring of tumor response following angiogenesis inhibition in an experimental human breast cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turetschek, Karl; Preda, Anda; Shames, David M.; Novikov, Viktor; Roberts, Timothy P.L.; Fu, Yanjun; Brasch, Robert C.; Floyd, Eugenia; Carter, Wayne O.; Wood, Jeanette M.

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential of dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) enhanced by macromolecular contrast agents to monitor noninvasively the therapeutic effect of an anti-angiogenesis VEGF receptor kinase inhibitor in an experimental cancer model. MDA-MB-435, a poorly differentiated human breast cancer cell line, was implanted into the mammary fat pad in 20 female homozygous athymic rats. Animals were assigned randomly to a control (n=10) or drug treatment group (n=10). Baseline dynamic MRI was performed on sequential days using albumin-(GdDTPA) 30 (6.0 nm diameter) and ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide (USPIO) particles (30 nm diameter). Subjects were treated either with PTK787/ZK 222584, a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor, or saline given orally twice daily for 1 week followed by repeat MRI examinations serially using each contrast agent. Employing a unidirectional kinetic model comprising the plasma and interstitial water compartments, tumor microvessel characteristics including fractional plasma volume and transendothelial permeability (K PS ) were estimated for each contrast medium. Tumor growth and the microvascular density, a histologic surrogate of angiogenesis, were also measured. Control tumors significantly increased (P PS ) based on MRI assays using both macromolecular contrast media. In contrast, tumor growth was significantly reduced (P PS values declined slightly. Estimated values for the fractional plasma volume did not differ significantly between treatment groups or contrast agents. Microvascular density counts correlated fairly with the tumor growth rate (r=0.64) and were statistically significant higher (P PS ), using either of two macromolecular contrast media, were able to detect effects of treatment with a VEGF receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor on tumor vascular permeability. In a clinical setting such quantitative MRI measurements could be used to monitor tumor anti-angiogenesis therapy. (orig.)

  20. Application for verification of monitor units of the treatment planning system; Aplicacion para la verificacion de unidades monitor del sistema de planificacion de tratamientos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suero Rodrigo, M. A.; Marques Fraguela, E.

    2011-07-01

    Current estimates algorithms achieve acceptable degree of accuracy. However, operate on the basis of un intuitive models. It is therefore necessary to verify the calculation of monitor units of the treatment planning system (PTS) with those obtained by other independent formalisms. To this end, we have developed an application based on factorization formalism that automates the calculation of dose.

  1. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging in monitoring rectal cancer response to neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbaro, Brunella; Vitale, Renata; Valentini, Vincenzo; Illuminati, Sonia; Vecchio, Fabio M; Rizzo, Gianluca; Gambacorta, Maria Antonietta; Coco, Claudio; Crucitti, Antonio; Persiani, Roberto; Sofo, Luigi; Bonomo, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    To prospectively monitor the response in patients with locally advanced nonmucinous rectal cancer after chemoradiotherapy (CRT) using diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. The histopathologic finding was the reference standard. The institutional review board approved the present study. A total of 62 patients (43 men and 19 women; mean age, 64 years; range, 28-83) provided informed consent. T(2)- and diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans (b value, 0 and 1,000 mm(2)/s) were acquired before, during (mean 12 days), and 6-8 weeks after CRT. We compared the median apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) between responders and nonresponders and examined the associations with the Mandard tumor regression grade (TRG). The postoperative nodal status (ypN) was evaluated. The Mann-Whitney/Wilcoxon two-sample test was used to evaluate the relationships among the pretherapy ADCs, extramural vascular invasion, early percentage of increases in ADCs, and preoperative ADCs. Low pretreatment ADCs (23% ADC increase had a 96.3% negative predictive value for TRG 4. In 9 of 16 complete responders, CRT-related tumor downsizing prevented ADC evaluations. The preoperative ADCs were significantly different (p = .0012) between the patients with and without downstaging (preoperative ADC ≥1.4 × 10(-3)mm(2)/s showed a positive and negative predictive value of 78.9% and 61.8%, respectively, for response assessment). The TRG 1 and TRG 2-4 groups were not significantly different. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging seems to be a promising tool for monitoring the response to CRT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. HVSR Response Evolution due to Seasonal Variation: Observations from 2 Years of Continuous Monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nurse, K. B.; Milkereit, B.

    2017-12-01

    The seismic Horizontal to Vertical Spectral Ratio analysis technique reliably gives overburden depth to bedrock, for an independently determined Vs, based on the frequency of the main resonance peak. Above this, smaller resonances reflect the velocity structure within the overburden itself. This range in the HVSR response shows sufficient sensitivity to be exploited as a monitoring tool, to detect change in seismic physical properties and from that, change in overburden conditions. To explore the variation of the response, several 3C geophones have been deployed in southern Ontario, Canada since December 2015 (and ongoing). The local geology is a sedimentary basin with 30m of overburden, a simple 2D environment well suited for the HVSR method. Data are collected for 15s per minute, with an effective frequency band of 2-400Hz. HVSR estimates are produced for each sampling period and archived. Over these two years, winter freeze/thaw, saturated spring and summer draught conditions were sampled. H/V daily averages are dominated by the stable 3Hz resonance due to the overall surface layer, but smaller spectral peaks up to 100Hz are clear and evolve in frequency and amplitude over the collection period. Ground freeze/thaw cycles are clearly evident by significant reduction in the horizontal field, but also the changing of the soil moisture content throughout the year causes subtle shifts in the response (correlated to rain events and water table variation). The long term sampling does show a sensitivity of the HVSR method to the overburden in proximity to the sensor, and suggests a possibility for its use in monitoring soil / water-table conditions. But it also highlights that the estimate from an isolated H/V acquisition does include this variability and needs to be adequately quantified in VS30 estimates.

  3. On the possibility of using biological toxicity tests to monitor the work of wastewater treatment plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zorić Jelena

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to ascertain the possibility of using biological toxicity tests to monitor influent and effluent wastewaters of wastewater treatment plants. The information obtained through these tests is used to prevent toxic pollutants from entering wastewater treatment plants and discharge of toxic pollutants into the recipient. Samples of wastewaters from the wastewater treatment plants of Kragujevac and Gornji Milanovac, as well as from the Lepenica and Despotovica Rivers immediately before and after the influx of wastewaters from the plants, were collected between October 2004 and June 2005. Used as the test organism in these tests was the zebrafish Brachydanio rerio Hamilton - Buchanon (Cyprinidae. The acute toxicity test of 96/h duration showed that the tested samples had a slight acutely toxic effect on B. rerio, except for the sample of influent wastewater into the Cvetojevac wastewater treatment plant, which had moderately acute toxicity, indicating that such water should be prevented from entering the system in order to eliminate its detrimental effect on the purification process.

  4. An effective tool to manage the distribution of medicines and monitor the treatment in hospital pharmacies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzoso, Gianpaolo

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of the article is to share a modus operandi and a tool that allows the recruitment and management of thousands of patients and their treatment by using a simple software created by the author and made freely available to all colleague-pharmacists. The author, a pharmacist, created this database because there were no tools on the market with all the features needed to manage the treatment of patients and the orders of drugs to ensure continuity of care without waste of public money. Methods The data collection is facilitated by the software and allows the monitoring of treatment of the patients and their re-evaluation. This tool can create a table containing all the information needed to predict the demand for drugs, the timing of therapies and of the treatment plans. It is an effective instrument to calculate the optimal purchase of drugs and the delivery of therapies to patients. Conclusions A simple tool that allows the management of many patients, reduces research time and facilitates the control of therapies. It allows us to optimize inventory and minimize the stock of drugs. It allows the pharmacist to focus attention on the clinical management of the patient by helping him to follow therapy and respond to his needs.

  5. Monitoring the Bystander Killing Effect of Human Multipotent Stem Cells for Treatment of Malignant Brain Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cindy Leten

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor infiltrating stem cells have been suggested as a vehicle for the delivery of a suicide gene towards otherwise difficult to treat tumors like glioma. We have used herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase expressing human multipotent adult progenitor cells in two brain tumor models (hU87 and Hs683 in immune-compromised mice. In order to determine the best time point for the administration of the codrug ganciclovir, the stem cell distribution and viability were monitored in vivo using bioluminescence (BLI and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI. Treatment was assessed by in vivo BLI and MRI of the tumors. We were able to show that suicide gene therapy using HSV-tk expressing stem cells can be followed in vivo by MRI and BLI. This has the advantage that (1 outliers can be detected earlier, (2 GCV treatment can be initiated based on stem cell distribution rather than on empirical time points, and (3 a more thorough follow-up can be provided prior to and after treatment of these animals. In contrast to rodent stem cell and tumor models, treatment success was limited in our model using human cell lines. This was most likely due to the lack of immune components in the immune-compromised rodents.

  6. Therapeutic drug monitoring: how to improve drug dosage and patient safety in tuberculosis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Sotgiu

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article we describe the key role of tuberculosis (TB treatment, the challenges (mainly the emergence of drug resistance, and the opportunities represented by the correct approach to drug dosage, based on the existing control and elimination strategies. In this context, the role and contribution of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM is discussed in detail. Treatment success in multidrug-resistant (MDR TB cases is low (62%, with 7% failing or relapsing and 9% dying and in extensively drug-resistant (XDR TB cases is even lower (40%, with 22% failing or relapsing and 15% dying. The treatment of drug-resistant TB is also more expensive (exceeding €50 000 for MDR-TB and €160 000 for XDR-TB and more toxic if compared to that prescribed for drug-susceptible TB. Appropriate dosing of first- and second-line anti-TB drugs can improve the patient's prognosis and lower treatment costs. TDM is based on the measurement of drug concentrations in blood samples collected at appropriate times and subsequent dose adjustment according to the target concentration. The ‘dried blood spot’ technique offers additional advantages, providing the rationale for discussions regarding a possible future network of selected, quality-controlled reference laboratories for the processing of dried blood spots of difficult-to-treat patients from reference TB clinics around the world.

  7. Diagnosis, characterisation and evaluation of treatment response of frostbite using pertechnetate scintigraphy: a prospective study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhatnagar, Aseem; Sawroop, Krishan; Chopra, M.K.; Sinha, Noaline; Kashyap, Ravi [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Institute of Nuclear Medicine and Allied Sciences, Delhi (India); Sarker, B.B. [Defence Institute of Physiology and Allied Sciences, Delhi (India)

    2002-02-01

    radionuclide method in monitoring treatment response. In contrast to the previous findings that non-uptake on a scan performed 2 or more weeks after exposure correlates with the need for amputation, none of the 80 ischaemic lesions in our series required amputation while 60% showed improvement or normalisation in microvascular blood flow even though they were 10-180 days old. Our findings suggest that moderate to severe frostbite lesion can be classified as having infarcted, ischaemic or hibernating (viable) tissue, similar to the classification employed when using myocardial scintigraphy. Absence of uptake even after the initial 10 days does not necessarily indicate infarction and the need for amputation as many such lesions retain potential for vasodilation and recovery. (orig.)

  8. Diagnosis, characterisation and evaluation of treatment response of frostbite using pertechnetate scintigraphy: a prospective study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatnagar, Aseem; Sawroop, Krishan; Chopra, M.K.; Sinha, Noaline; Kashyap, Ravi; Sarker, B.B.

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we performed early blood pool scintigraphy with technetium-99m pertechnetate in 20 patients (10-180 days after frostbite injury; 71 clinical lesions) referred for a topical treatment protocol for mild to moderately severe frostbite, and in 22 asymptomatic controls. The aims of the study were to define the ''normal'' microcirculation of the hands and feet, to characterise the appearances of frostbite lesions on scintigraphy and correlate these with the clinical presentation, and to evaluate the usefulness of scintigraphy for assessing the treatment response. Six patients were ''fresh'', 12 had been undergoing conservative treatment (topical homeopathic) for several weeks and two had permanent fibrotic hand phalanges. Nine patients on treatment underwent serial scintigraphy a total of 22 times. Eleven patients were imaged only once, including the two with permanent fixed defects. Three distinct physiological microcirculation patterns were evident in control hands or feet: right- or left-handedness (seven subjects), subclinical inflammatory foci correlating with callosity or pressure points (36 lesions) and distinctly increased pooling of radiotracer at the thenar or hypothenar region (eight subjects). In frostbite patients, 128 lesions (48 inflammatory, 80 ischaemic) were seen on the scan. This number included all 71 lesions identified clinically, the rest being subclinical. Subclinical frostbite lesion as an entity has not been described previously. Microvasculature of normal muscle groups (in the hands, elbow or feet) was shown on scintigraphy to improve after topical treatment. The treatment resulted in improved or normalised perfusion scan in 25 of 45 ischaemic segments with matching clinical improvement, and reduction or normalisation of uptake in inflammatory lesions (n=30). The data confirm the vasodilator and anti-inflammatory action of the topical preparation, and the sensitivity of the radionuclide method in monitoring treatment

  9. HPA axis response to psychological stress and treatment retention in residential substance abuse treatment: a prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daughters, Stacey B; Richards, Jessica M; Gorka, Stephanie M; Sinha, Rajita

    2009-12-01

    Substance abuse treatment programs are often characterized by high rates of premature treatment dropout, which increases the likelihood of relapse to drug use. Negative reinforcement models of addiction emphasize an individual's inability to tolerate stress as a key factor for understanding poor substance use treatment outcomes, and evidence indicates that dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis contributes to an individual's inability to respond adaptively to stress. The aim of the current study was to examine whether HPA axis response to stress is predictive of treatment retention among a sample of drug users in residential substance abuse treatment. Prospective study assessing treatment retention among 102 individuals enrolled in residential substance abuse treatment. Participants completed two computerized stress tasks, and HPA axis response to stress was measured via salivary cortisol at five time points from baseline (pre-stress) to 30 min post-stress exposure. The main outcome measures were treatment dropout (categorical) and total number of days in treatment (continuous). A significantly higher salivary cortisol response to stress was observed in treatment dropouts compared to treatment completers. Further, Cox proportional hazards survival analyses indicated that a higher peak cortisol response to stress was associated with a shorter number of days to treatment dropout. Results indicate that a higher salivary cortisol level in response to stress is associated with an inability to remain in substance abuse treatment. These findings are the first to document a biological marker of stress as a predictor of substance abuse treatment dropout, and support the development and implementation of treatments targeting this vulnerability.

  10. Redox cycling-based amplifying electrochemical sensor for in situ clozapine antipsychotic treatment monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Yoav, Hadar; Winkler, Thomas E.; Kim, Eunkyoung; Chocron, Sheryl E.; Kelly, Deanna L.; Payne, Gregory F.; Ghodssi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A new concept for clozapine in situ sensing with minimal pre-treatment procedures. • A catechol-chitosan redox cycling system amplifies clozapine oxidation current. • The modified amplifier signal is 3 times greater than the unmodified system. • Differentiation between clozapine and its metabolite norclozapine has been shown. • The sensor has the capability to detect clozapine in human serum. - Abstract: Schizophrenia is a lifelong mental disorder with few recent advances in treatment. Clozapine is the most effective antipsychotic for schizophrenia treatment. However, it remains underutilized since frequent blood draws are required to monitor adverse side effects, and maintain clozapine concentrations in a therapeutic range. Micro-system technology utilized towards real-time monitoring of efficacy and safety will enable personalized medicine and better use of this medication. Although work has been reported on clozapine detection using its electrochemical oxidation, no in situ monitoring of clozapine has been described. In this work, we present a new concept for clozapine in situ sensing based on amplifying its oxidation current. Specifically, we use a biofabricated catechol-modified chitosan redox cycling system to provide a significant amplification of the generated oxidizing current of clozapine through a continuous cycle of clozapine reduction followed by re-oxidation. The amplified signal has improved the signal-to-noise ratio and provided the required limit-of-detection and dynamic range for clinical applications with minimal pre-treatment procedures. The sensor reports on the functionality and sensitivity of clozapine detection between 0.1 and 10 μg/mL. The signal generated by clozapine using the catechol-modified chitosan amplifier has shown to be 3 times greater than the unmodified system. The sensor has the ability to differentiate between clozapine and its metabolite norclozapine, as well as the feasibility to detect clozapine in

  11. Serial hemodynamic monitoring to guide treatment of maternal hypertension leads to reduction in severe hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stott, D; Papastefanou, I; Paraschiv, D; Clark, K; Kametas, N A

    2017-01-01

    To examine whether treatment for hypertension in pregnancy that is guided by serial monitoring of maternal central hemodynamics leads to a reduction in the rate of severe hypertension, defined as blood pressure ≥ 160/110 mmHg; and to assess the distinct longitudinal hemodynamic profiles associated with beta-blocker monotherapy, vasodilator monotherapy and dual agent therapy, and their relationships with outcomes, including fetal growth restriction. This was a prospective observational study at a dedicated antenatal hypertension clinic in a tertiary UK hospital. Fifty-two untreated women presenting with hypertension were recruited consecutively and started on treatment, either with a beta-blocker or a vasodilator. The choice of initial antihypertensive agent was determined according to a model constructed previously to predict the response to the beta-blocker labetalol in pregnant women needing antihypertensive treatment. At presentation, the demographic and maternal hemodynamic variables associated with a therapeutic response to labetalol, defined as blood pressure control embarazo guiado por un seguimiento en serie de las principales constantes hemodinámicas de la madre conduce a una reducción en la tasa de hipertensión grave, definida como presión arterial ≥ 160/110 mmHg; y evaluar los diferentes perfiles hemodinámicos longitudinales asociados a la monoterapia con beta-bloqueantes, la monoterapia con vasodilatadores y la terapia dual, y su relación con los resultados, como la restricción del crecimiento fetal. MÉTODOS: Se realizó un estudio observacional prospectivo en una clínica especializada en hipertensión prenatal de un hospital de atención terciaria del Reino Unido. Se reclutaron consecutivamente a cincuenta y dos mujeres no tratadas que presentaban hipertensión y se comenzó a tratarlas, bien con un beta-bloqueante o bien con un vasodilatador. La elección del agente antihipertensivo inicial se determinó de acuerdo con un modelo elaborado

  12. Independent calculation of the monitor units and times of treatment in radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, Marcio Rogerio

    2005-01-01

    In this work, an independent verification system of calculations in radiotherapy was developed and applied, using Visual Basic TM programming language. The computational program performs calculations of monitor units and treatment time, based on the algorithm of manual calculation. The calculations executed for the independent system had initially been compared with the manual calculations performed by the medical physicists of the Institute of Radiotherapy of the Hospital das Clinicas da Universidade de Sao Paulo. In this step, the results found for more than two hundred fields studied were similar to those found in the literature; deviations larger than +- 1% were found only in five cases involving errors in manual calculation. The application of the independent system, in this stage, could have identified errors up to +- 2,4%. Based on these data, the system was validated for use in clinical routine. In a second step, calculations were compared with calculations realized by the treatment computerized planning system CadPIan TM . When, again, the results were similar to those published in other works allowing to obtain levels of acceptance of the discrepancies between the calculations executed for the independent system and the calculations developed from the planning system, separated by anatomical region, as recommended according by the recent literature. For beams of 6 MV, the levels of acceptance for deviations between the calculations of monitor units, separated by treatment region were the following; breast +- 1.7%, head and neck +2%; hypophysis +- 2.2%; pelvis +- 4 . 1% and thorax +- 1.5%. For beams of 15 MV, the level suggested for pelvis was of +- 4.5%. (author)

  13. Differential stress response of Saccharomyces hybrids revealed by monitoring Hsp104 aggregation and disaggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Claudia; Lengeler, Klaus; Wendland, Jürgen

    2017-07-01

    Proteotoxic stress may occur upon exposure of yeast cells to different stress conditions. The induction of stress response mechanisms is important for cells to adapt to changes in the environment and ensure survival. For example, during exposure to elevated temperatures the expression of heat shock proteins such as Hsp104 is induced in yeast. Hsp104 extracts misfolded proteins from aggregates to promote their refolding. We used an Hsp104-GFP reporter to analyze the stress profiles of Saccharomyces species hybrids. To this end a haploid S. cerevisiae strain, harboring a chromosomal HSP104-GFP under control of its endogenous promoter, was mated with stable haploids of S. bayanus, S. cariocanus, S. kudriavzevii, S. mikatae, S. paradoxus and S. uvarum. Stress response behaviors in these hybrids were followed over time by monitoring the appearance and dissolution of Hsp104-GFP foci upon heat shock. General stress tolerance of these hybrids was related to the growth rate detected during exposure to e.g. ethanol and oxidizing agents. We observed that hybrids were generally more resistant to high temperature and ethanol stress compared to their parental strains. Amongst the hybrids differential responses regarding the appearance of Hsp104-foci and the time required for dissolving these aggregates were observed. The S. cerevisiae/S. paradoxus hybrid, combining the two most closely related strains, performed best under these conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. Monitoring and evaluation of disaster response efforts undertaken by local health departments: a rapid realist review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gossip, Kate; Gouda, Hebe; Lee, Yong Yi; Firth, Sonja; Bermejo, Raoul; Zeck, Willibald; Jimenez Soto, Eliana

    2017-06-29

    Local health departments are often at the forefront of a disaster response, attending to the immediate trauma inflicted by the disaster and also the long term health consequences. As the frequency and severity of disasters are projected to rise, monitoring and evaluation (M&E) efforts are critical to help local health departments consolidate past experiences and improve future response efforts. Local health departments often conduct M&E work post disaster, however, many of these efforts fail to improve response procedures. We undertook a rapid realist review (RRR) to examine why M&E efforts undertaken by local health departments do not always result in improved disaster response efforts. We aimed to complement existing frameworks by focusing on the most basic and pragmatic steps of a M&E cycle targeted towards continuous system improvements. For these purposes, we developed a theoretical framework that draws on the quality improvement literature to 'frame' the steps in the M&E cycle. This framework encompassed a M&E cycle involving three stages (i.e., document and assess, disseminate and implement) that must be sequentially completed to learn from past experiences and improve future disaster response efforts. We used this framework to guide our examination of the literature and to identify any context-mechanism-outcome (CMO) configurations which describe how M&E may be constrained or enabled at each stage of the M&E cycle. This RRR found a number of explanatory CMO configurations that provide valuable insights into some of the considerations that should be made when using M&E to improve future disaster response efforts. Firstly, to support the accurate documentation and assessment of a disaster response, local health departments should consider how they can: establish a culture of learning within health departments; use embedded training methods; or facilitate external partnerships. Secondly, to enhance the widespread dissemination of lessons learned and facilitate

  15. Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC), US response to major radiological accidents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, P.G.

    2000-01-01

    radiological materials from: Nuclear Fuel Cycle Facilities, Space Craft Launches, Weapon (Department of Defence or DOE) Transportation, Weapon Production Facilities, Spacecraft Re-entry (domestic or foreign), Terrorist Incidents, High-Level Waste Transportation, Nuclear Power Plants. Key to the FRERP would be the establishment of the Federal Radiological Monitoring and Assessment Center (FRMAC). Development and implementation was assigned to DOE as the agency most capable of providing sufficient resources, assets, and support. In 1987, DOE subsequently assigned programmatic responsibility, with limited funding, to the Nevada Operations Office in Las Vegas, Nevada. (author)

  16. Rapid response sensor to monitor the temperature and flow of liquid metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCann, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    Two forms of a sensor capable of simultaneously monitoring the temperature and flow of liquid metal coolants within a reactor are described. They operate by measuring the coupling impedances between the sensor and the surrounding electrically conductive coolant. Since the system utilises electrical rather than thermal properties, the response to perturbations is rapid, typically displaying the changed conditions within a few milliseconds. The first form of the sensor was designed to operate whilst protected by a thick walled service tube positioned in the reactor coolant. Providing bends in the tube had a radius greater than 70 cm, the sensor could be removed for inspection and maintenance if necessary. The second sensor was fitted inside a streamlined NaK proof capsule. This was inserted directly into the coolant outlet stream of a fuel pin assembly in the Dounreay Fast Reactor. In this form the sensor successfully monitored flow, entrained gas and temperature excursions during the final operating cycle of D.F.R. (author)

  17. A real-time monitoring/emergency response modeling workstation for a tritium facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawver, B.S.; Sims, J.M.; Baskett, R.L.

    1993-07-01

    At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we developed a real-time system to monitor two stacks on our tritium handling facility. The monitors transmit the stack data to a workstation which computes a 3D numerical model of atmospheric dispersion. The workstation also collects surface and upper air data from meteorological towers and a sodar. The complex meteorological and terrain setting in the Livermore Valley demands more sophisticated resolution of the three-dimensional structure of the atmosphere to reliably calculate plume dispersion than afforded by Gaussian models. We experience both mountain valley and sea breeze flows. To address these complexities, we have implemented the three-dimensional diagnostic MATHEW mass-adjusted wind field and ADPIC particle-in-cell dispersion models on the workstation for use in real-time emergency response modeling. Both MATHEW and ADPIC have shown their utility in a variety of complex settings over the last 15 years within the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability (ARAC[1,2]) project

  18. Monitoring and modeling shoreline response due to shoreface nourishment on a high-energy coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, P. L.; Erikson, Li H.; Hansen, J. E.

    2009-01-01

    Shoreface nourishment can be an efficient technique to feed sediment into the littoral zone without the order of magnitude cost increase incurred by directly nourishing the beach. An erosion hot spot at Ocean Beach in San Francisco, California, USA, threatens valuable public infrastructure as well as safe recreational use of the beach. In an effort to reduce the erosion at this location, a new beneficial reuse plan was implemented in May 2005 for the sediment dredged annually from the main shipping channel at the mouth of San Francisco Bay. From 2005 to 2007, approximately 230,000 m of sand was placed annually at depths between 9 and 14 m, in a location where strong tidal currents and open-ocean waves could potentially feed sediment onto the section of beach experiencing critical erosion. The evolution of the disposal mound and adjacent beach were monitored with 12 multibeam bathymetric surveys, and over 40 high-resolution beach topographic surveys. In addition, sediment transport processes were investigated using sediment grab samples, acoustic Doppler profilers, and two separate models: a cross-shore profile model (UNIBEST-TC) and a coastal area model (Delft3D). The results of the monitoring and modeling demonstrate that the disposal mound may be effective in dissipating wave energy striking this vulnerable stretch of coast with negligible shadowing effects, but a positive shoreline response can only be achieved by placing the sediment in water depths less than 5 m. 

  19. Treatment of landfill leachate by irrigation of willow coppice - Plant response and treatment efficiency

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aronsson, Paer; Dahlin, Torleif; Dimitriou, Ioannis

    2010-01-01

    Landfill leachates usually need to be treated before discharged, and using soil-plant systems for this has gained substantial interest in Sweden and in the UK. A three-year field study was conducted in central Sweden to quantify plant response, treatment efficiency and impact on groundwater quality of landfill leachate irrigation of short-rotation willow coppice (Salix). Two willow varieties were tested and four irrigation regimes in sixteen 400-m 2 plots. The willow plants did not react negatively, despite very high annual loads of nitrogen (≤2160 kg N/ha), chloride (≤8600 kg Cl/ha) and other elements. Mean annual growth was 1.5, 9.8 and 12.6 tonnes DM/ha during years 1-3. For one of two willow varieties tested, relative leaf length accurately predicted growth rate. Irrigation resulted in elevated groundwater concentrations of all elements applied. Treatment efficiency varied considerably for different elements, but was adequate when moderate loads were applied. - Short-rotation willow coppice was successfully used for treating a strong landfill leachate in central Sweden over three years.

  20. Hepatitis B viral factors and treatment responses in chronic hepatitis B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Lin Lin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Baseline and on-treatment hepatitis B viral factors are reported to affect treatment responses. A lower baseline hepatitis B virus (HBV DNA level is a strong predictor of the response to antiviral therapy. HBV genotype A/B patients have better responses to interferon-based therapy than those with genotypes C/D. Regarding the association of HBV mutants with responses to antiviral therapy, current evidence is limited. On-treatment viral suppression is the most important predictor of response to nucleoside analogs. On-treatment hepatitis B surface antigen decline is significantly associated with response to pegylated interferon. In the future, individualized therapy should be based on treatment efficacy, adverse effects, baseline and on-treatment predictors of antiviral therapy.

  1. Central hemodynamic responses during serial exercise tests in heart failure patients using implantable hemodynamic monitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlsson, A; Steinhaus, D; Kjellström, B; Ryden, L; Bennett, T

    2003-06-01

    Exercise testing is commonly used in patients with congestive heart failure for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Such testing may be even more valuable if invasive hemodynamics are acquired. However, this will make the test more complex and expensive and only provides information from isolated moments. We studied serial exercise tests in heart failure patients with implanted hemodynamic monitors allowing recording of central hemodynamics. Twenty-one NYHA Class II-III heart failure patients underwent maximal exercise tests and submaximal bike or 6-min hall walk tests to quantify their hemodynamic responses and to study the feasibility of conducting exercise tests in patients with such devices. Patients were followed for 2-3 years with serial exercise tests. During maximal tests (n=70), heart rate increased by 52+/-19 bpm while S(v)O(2) decreased by 35+/-10% saturation units. RV systolic and diastolic pressure increased 29+/-11 and 11+/-6 mmHg, respectively, while pulmonary artery diastolic pressure increased 21+/-8 mmHg. Submaximal bike (n=196) and hall walk tests (n=172) resulted in S(v)O(2) changes of 80 and 91% of the maximal tests, while RV pressures ranged from 72 to 79% of maximal responses. An added potential value of implantable hemodynamic monitors in heart failure patients may be to quantitatively determine the true hemodynamic profile during standard non-invasive clinical exercise tests and to compare that to hemodynamic effects of regular exercise during daily living. It would be of interest to study whether such information could improve the ability to predict changes in a patient's clinical condition and to improve tailoring patient management.

  2. Preliminary results with a strip ionization chamber used as beam monitor for hadrontherapy treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boriano, A. [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale e INFN, Via P.Giuria 1, 1-10125 Turin (Italy); Bourhaleb, F. [Fondazione TERA, Via Puccini 1, 1-28100 Novara (Italy); Cirio, R. [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale e INFN, Via P.Giuria 1, 1-10125 Turin (Italy)] (and others)

    2006-01-15

    Preliminary results are presented from a test of a parallel plate ionization chamber with the anode segmented in strips (MOPI) to be used as a beam monitor for therapeutical treatments on the 62 MeV proton beam line of the INFN-LNS Superconducting Cyclotron. Ocular pathologies have been treated at the Catana facility since March 2002. The detector, placed downstream of the patient collimator, will allow the measurement of the relevant beam diagnostic parameters during treatment such as integrated beam fluence, for dose determination; the beam baricentre, width and asymmetry will be obtained from the fluence profile sampled with a resolution of about 100 Urn at a rate up to 1 kHz with no dead time. In this test, carried out at LNS, the detector has been exposed to different beam shapes and the integrated fluence derived by the measured beam profiles has been compared with that obtained with other dosimeters normally used for treatment. The skewness of the beam profile has been measured and shown to be suitable to on-line check variations of the beam shape.

  3. Preliminary results with a strip ionization chamber used as beam monitor for hadrontherapy treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a test of a parallel plate ionization chamber with the anode segmented in strips (MOPI) to be used as a beam monitor for therapeutical treatments on the 62 MeV proton beam line of the INFN-LNS Superconducting Cyclotron. Ocular pathologies have been treated at the Catana facility since March 2002. The detector, placed downstream of the patient collimator, will allow the measurement of the relevant beam diagnostic parameters during treatment such as integrated beam fluence, for dose determination; the beam baricentre, width and asymmetry will be obtained from the fluence profile sampled with a resolution of about 100 Urn at a rate up to 1 kHz with no dead time. In this test, carried out at LNS, the detector has been exposed to different beam shapes and the integrated fluence derived by the measured beam profiles has been compared with that obtained with other dosimeters normally used for treatment. The skewness of the beam profile has been measured and shown to be suitable to on-line check variations of the beam shape

  4. First Derivative UV Spectra of Surface Water as a Monitor of Chlorination in Drinking Water Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Zitko

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Many countries require the presence of free chlorine at about 0.1 mg/l in their drinking water supplies. For various reasons, such as cast-iron pipes or long residence times in the distribution system, free chlorine may decrease below detection limits. In such cases it is important to know whether or not the water was chlorinated or if nonchlorinated water entered the system by accident. Changes in UV spectra of natural organic matter in lakewater were used to assess qualitatively the degree of chlorination in the treatment to produce drinking water. The changes were more obvious in the first derivative spectra. In lakewater, the derivative spectra have a maximum at about 280 nm. This maximum shifts to longer wavelengths by up to 10 nm, decreases, and eventually disappears with an increasing dose of chlorine. The water treatment system was monitored by this technique for over 1 year and changes in the UV spectra of water samples were compared with experimental samples treated with known amounts of chlorine. The changes of the UV spectra with the concentration of added chlorine are presented. On several occasions, water, which received very little or no chlorination, may have entered the drinking water system. The results show that first derivative spectra are potentially a tool to determine, in the absence of residual chlorine, whether or not surface water was chlorinated during the treatment to produce potable water.

  5. Preliminary results with a strip ionization chamber used as beam monitor for hadrontherapy treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boriano, A.; Bourhaleb, F.; Cirio, R.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cuttone, G.; Donetti, M.; Garelli, E.; Giordanengo, S.; Luparia, A.; Marchette, F.; Peroni, C.; Raffaele, L.; Sabini, M. G.; Valastro, L.

    2006-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented from a test of a parallel plate ionization chamber with the anode segmented in strips (MOPI) to be used as a beam monitor for therapeutical treatments on the 62 MeV proton beam line of the INFN-LNS Superconducting Cyclotron. Ocular pathologies have been treated at the Catana facility since March 2002. The detector, placed downstream of the patient collimator, will allow the measurement of the relevant beam diagnostic parameters during treatment such as integrated beam fluence, for dose determination; the beam baricentre, width and asymmetry will be obtained from the fluence profile sampled with a resolution of about 100 Urn at a rate up to 1 kHz with no dead time. In this test, carried out at LNS, the detector has been exposed to different beam shapes and the integrated fluence derived by the measured beam profiles has been compared with that obtained with other dosimeters normally used for treatment. The skewness of the beam profile has been measured and shown to be suitable to on-line check variations of the beam shape.

  6. Vegetation responses to sagebrush-reduction treatments measured by satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Aaron; Beever, Erik; Merkle, Jerod A.; Chong, Geneva W.

    2018-01-01

    Time series of vegetative indices derived from satellite imagery constitute tools to measure ecological effects of natural and management-induced disturbances to ecosystems. Over the past century, sagebrush-reduction treatments have been applied widely throughout western North America to increase herbaceous vegetation for livestock and wildlife. We used indices from satellite imagery to 1) quantify effects of prescribed-fire, herbicide, and mechanical treatments on vegetative cover, productivity, and phenology, and 2) describe how vegetation changed over time following these treatments. We hypothesized that treatments would increase herbaceous cover and accordingly shift phenologies towards those typical of grass-dominated systems. We expected prescribed burns would lead to the greatest and most-prolonged effects on vegetative cover and phenology, followed by herbicide and mechanical treatments. Treatments appeared to increase herbaceous cover and productivity, which coincided with signs of earlier senescence − signals expected of grass-dominated systems, relative to sagebrush-dominated systems. Spatial heterogeneity for most phenometrics was lower in treated areas relative to controls, which suggested treatment-induced homogenization of vegetative communities. Phenometrics that explain spring migrations of ungulates mostly were unaffected by sagebrush treatments. Fire had the strongest effect on vegetative cover, and yielded the least evidence for sagebrush recovery. Overall, treatment effects were small relative to those reported from field-based studies for reasons most likely related to sagebrush recovery, treatment specification, and untreated patches within mosaicked treatment applications. Treatment effects were also small relative to inter-annual variation in phenology and productivity that was explained by temperature, snowpack, and growing-season precipitation. Our results indicated that cumulative NDVI, late-season phenometrics, and spatial

  7. Detection, diagnosis, and treatment of accident conditions using response trees

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nelson, W.R.

    1980-01-01

    Response Trees were developed at the LOFT facility in 1978 and included in the Plant Operating Manual (POM) to assist reactor operators in selecting emergency procedures. In an emergency situation the operator would manually gather data and evaluate the trees to select the appropriate procedures. As a portion of the LOFT Augmented Operator Capability (AOC) Program, the response tree methodology has been extended so that a computer can be used to evaluate the trees and recommend an appropriate response for an accident. Techniques for diagnosing failures within a cooling mode have also been investigated. This paper summarizes these additions to the response tree methodology

  8. Dynamics of response-conflict monitoring and individual differences in response control and behavioral control: an electrophysiological investigation using a stop-signal task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, Jutta; Gibbons, Henning

    2007-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the functional significance of error (related) negativity Ne/ERN and individual differences in human action monitoring. A response-conflict model of Ne/ERN should be tested applying a stop-signal paradigm. After a few modifications of Ne/ERN response-conflict theory (Yeung N, Botvinick MM, Cohen JD. The neural basis of error detection: conflict monitoring and the error-related negativity. Psychological Review 2004:111(4);931-959), strength and time course of response conflict could be modeled as a function of stop-signal delay. In Experiment 1, 35 participants performed a visual two-choice response-time task but tried to withhold the response if an auditory stop signal was presented. Probability of stopping errors was held at 50% using variable delays between visual and auditory stimuli. Experiment 2 (n=10) employed both auditory go and stop signals and confirmed that Ne/ERN effects are due to conflict induced by the auditory stop signal, and not the mere presence or absence of an additional stimulus. As predicted, amplitudes of both the stimulus-locked and response-locked Ne/ERN were largest for non-stopped responses, followed by successfully stopped and go responses. However, independently of response type Ne/ERN also increased with increasing stop-signal delay. Since longer delay invokes stronger response conflict, results specifically support the notion of Ne/ERN reflecting response-conflict monitoring. Furthermore, individual differences related to measures of response control and behavioral control were observed. Both low response control estimated from stop-task performance and high psychometric impulsivity were accompanied by smaller Ne/ERN amplitude on stop trials, suggesting reduced response-conflict monitoring. The present study supported the response-conflict view of Ne/ERN. Furthermore, the observed relationship between impulsivity and Ne/ERN amplitude suggested that individuals with low behavioral

  9. Monitoring the Effects of Forest Restoration Treatments on Post-Fire Vegetation Recovery with MODIS Multitemporal Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem J. D. van Leeuwen

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available This study examines how satellite based time-series vegetation greenness data and phenological measurements can be used to monitor and quantify vegetation recovery after wildfire disturbances and examine how pre-fire fuel reduction restoration treatments impact fire severity and impact vegetation recovery trajectories. Pairs of wildfire affected sites and a nearby unburned reference site were chosen to measure the post-disturbance recovery in relation to climate variation. All site pairs were chosen in forested uplands in Arizona and were restricted to the area of the Rodeo-Chediski fire that occurred in 2002. Fuel reduction treatments were performed in 1999 and 2001. The inter-annual and seasonal vegetation dynamics before, during, and after wildfire events can be monitored using a time series of biweekly composited MODIS NDVI (Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer - Normalized Difference Vegetation Index data. Time series analysis methods included difference metrics, smoothing filters, and fitting functions that were applied to extract seasonal and inter-annual change and phenological metrics from the NDVI time series data from 2000 to 2007. Pre- and post-fire Landsat data were used to compute the Normalized Burn Ratio (NBR and examine burn severity at the selected sites. The phenological metrics (pheno-metrics included the timing and greenness (i.e. NDVI for the start, peak and end of the growing season as well as proxy measures for the rate of green-up and senescence and the annual vegetation productivity. Pre-fire fuel reduction treatments resulted in lower fire severity, which reduced annual productivity much less than untreated areas within the Rodeo-Chediski fire perimeter. The seasonal metrics were shown to be useful for estimating the rate of post-fire disturbance recovery and the timing of phenological greenness phases. The use of satellite time series NDVI data and derived pheno-metrics show potential for tracking vegetation

  10. Prepotent response inhibition predicts treatment outcome in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Oord, S.; Geurts, H.M.; Prins, P.J.M.; Emmelkamp, P.M.G.; Oosterlaan, J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Inhibition deficits, including deficits in prepotent response inhibition and interference control, are core deficits in ADHD. The predictive value of prepotent response inhibition and interference control was assessed for outcome in a 10-week treatment trial with methylphenidate. Methods:

  11. Bryoid layer response to soil disturbance by fuel reduction treatments in a dry conifer forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amanda Hardman; Bruce McCune

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the response of the bryoid layer, bryophyte and lichen communities on the soil surface three years after fuel reduction treatment (logging and burning) in the central Blue Mountains of eastern Oregon. Both treatment and control areas had been decimated by spruce budworm and drought before the fuel reduction treatments. Treatments reduced overstory and...

  12. Multipronged diagnostic approaches for monitoring the treatment of Brucella abortus infected patient: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeswari Shome

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Brucellosis caused by Brucella species is readily transmissible to humans, causing acute febrile illness and undulant fever which may progress to a more chronic form and can also produce serious complications affecting the musculoskeletal, cardiovascular, and central nervous systems. A veterinary livestock inspector presented to the institute with symptoms of intermittent fever, pain involving muscles and joints, loss of weight, anxiety and weakness for about three months has been investigated. The isolation, serological tests and PCR were performed for diagnosis of brucellosis. Based on history of constant professional association with animals, characteristic symptoms, hematological and biochemical, multiple serological and PCR assay results, the patient was diagnosed as brucellosis. Detection of Brucella abortus directly in the clinical samples by gel based PCRs were highly useful for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. This diagnostic protocol will facilitate in a simple way to map major Brucella species infecting humans in a geographical region.

  13. Monitoring of Legionella pneumophila viability after chlorine dioxide treatment using flow cytometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mustapha, Pascale; Epalle, Thibaut; Allegra, Séverine; Girardot, Françoise; Garraud, Olivier; Riffard, Serge

    2015-04-01

    The viability of three Legionella pneumophila strains was monitored after chlorine dioxide (ClO2) treatment using a flow cytometric assay. Suspensions of L. pneumophila cells were submitted to increasing concentrations of ClO2. Culturable cells were still detected when using 4 mg/L, but could no longer be detected after exposure to 6 mg/L of ClO2, although viable but not culturable (VBNC) cells were found after exposure to 4-5 mg/L of ClO2. When testing whether these VBNC were infective, two of the strains were resuscitated after co-culture with Acanthamoeba polyphaga, but neither of them could infect macrophage-like cells. Copyright © 2015 Institut Pasteur. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Heterogeneity Moderates Treatment Response among Patients with Binge Eating Disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sysko, Robyn; Hildebrandt, Tom; Wilson, G. Terence; Wilfley, Denise E.; Agras, W. Stewart

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the study was to explore heterogeneity and differential treatment outcome among a sample of patients with binge eating disorder (BED). Method: A latent class analysis was conducted with 205 treatment-seeking, overweight or obese individuals with BED randomized to interpersonal psychotherapy (IPT), behavioral weight loss…

  15. Similar cellular responses after treatment with either praziquantel or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of treatment with either oxamniquine or praziquantel on S.mansoni specific IFN-gamma, IL-4 , IL-5 and IL-10 was compared on PBMC which were collected pretreatment, 6 and 18 weeks post treatment. Using sandwich ELISA on the supernatants harvested from the PBMC stimulation by crude S. mansoni SEA and ...

  16. Response monitoring using quantitative ultrasound methods and supervised dictionary learning in locally advanced breast cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangeh, Mehrdad J.; Fung, Brandon; Tadayyon, Hadi; Tran, William T.; Czarnota, Gregory J.

    2016-03-01

    A non-invasive computer-aided-theragnosis (CAT) system was developed for the early assessment of responses to neoadjuvant chemotherapy in patients with locally advanced breast cancer. The CAT system was based on quantitative ultrasound spectroscopy methods comprising several modules including feature extraction, a metric to measure the dissimilarity between "pre-" and "mid-treatment" scans, and a supervised learning algorithm for the classification of patients to responders/non-responders. One major requirement for the successful design of a high-performance CAT system is to accurately measure the changes in parametric maps before treatment onset and during the course of treatment. To this end, a unified framework based on Hilbert-Schmidt independence criterion (HSIC) was used for the design of feature extraction from parametric maps and the dissimilarity measure between the "pre-" and "mid-treatment" scans. For the feature extraction, HSIC was used to design a supervised dictionary learning (SDL) method by maximizing the dependency between the scans taken from "pre-" and "mid-treatment" with "dummy labels" given to the scans. For the dissimilarity measure, an HSIC-based metric was employed to effectively measure the changes in parametric maps as an indication of treatment effectiveness. The HSIC-based feature extraction and dissimilarity measure used a kernel function to nonlinearly transform input vectors into a higher dimensional feature space and computed the population means in the new space, where enhanced group separability was ideally obtained. The results of the classification using the developed CAT system indicated an improvement of performance compared to a CAT system with basic features using histogram of intensity.

  17. Response rates to oestrogen treatment in perimenopausal women

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rejnmark, Lars; Vestergaard, Peter; Tofteng, C.L.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To characterise women with no response or with a good response to hormone replacement therapy (HRT), evaluated by change in bone mineral density (BMD). Design: Nested case-control study within a comprehensive cohort study. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: In the Danish Osteoporosis Prevention Study...

  18. On-line acquisition of plant related and environmental parameters (plant monitoring) in gerbera: determining plant responses

    OpenAIRE

    Baas, R.; Slootweg, G.

    2004-01-01

    For on-line plant monitoring equipment to be functional in commercial glasshouse horticulture, relations between sensor readings and plant responses on both the short (days) and long term (weeks) are required. For this reason, systems were installed to monitor rockwool grown gerbera plants on a minute-to-minute basis from July 2002 until April 2003. Data collected included, amongst others, crop transpiration from lysimeter data (2 m2), canopy temperature using infrared sensors, rockwool water...

  19. Preclinical Evaluation and Monitoring of the Therapeutic Response of a Dual Targeted Hyaluronic Acid Nanodrug

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minglong Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy is a powerful cancer treatment but suffers from poor biocompatibility and a lack of tumor targeting. Here, we developed a CD44-targeted polymeric nanocomplex by encapsulating 10-hydroxycamptothecin (HCPT into hyaluronic acid nanoparticles (HANP for targeted cancer therapy. In vitro, the HANP/HCPT showed improved cytotoxicity to five cancer cell lines including HT29, A549, MDA-MB-231, HepG2, and MDA-MB-435 versus free HCPT. After systemic administration into MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenograft, tumor growth was significantly inhibited 5.25 ± 0.21 times in the HANP/HCPT treated group relative to the nontreated group. In addition, the treatment response was also accessed and confirmed by 18F-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ([18F] FDG positron emission tomography (PET. The MDA-MB-231 tumors responded to HANP/HCPT 7 days after the first treatment, which benefits treatment strategy adjustment and personalization. No apparent systemic toxic effects were seen in mice treated with HANP/HCPT. In summary, the HANPs have great promise as a targeted drug carrier for cancer chemotherapy. Our HANP platform can also deliver other hydrophobic chemotherapy agents.

  20. Characterization and monitoring of host immune responses to infectious agents: what a future for microbiological diagnostics?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Dolcetti

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Our knowledge on the mechanisms underlying microbial pathogenesis and host-microbe interactions has greatly improved over the last decade. In particular, the development of new and specific analytical methods has allowed the detailed characterization of innate and adaptive immune responses against clinically relevant microbial infections. Immunogenetic studies are continuously providing new insights on the genetic bases of individual differences in susceptibility to specific pathogens and most of the genetic markers identified so far include polymorphisms in genes controlling both innate and adaptive immune responses. Moreover, new standardized T cell assays allow reliable and reproducible evaluations of T cell phenotype and functions (i.e.: ELISPOT, including the identification of distinct functional signatures that are associated with the control of the infection.Although the number of these assays currently used in clinical practice is limited, a considerable increase is foreseen for the near future.This perspective constitutes an unprecedented opportunity for Clinical Microbiologists, who may now develop and apply integrated microbiologic/immunologic assays that may be useful for a more precise diagnostic definition and a more accurate clinical monitoring of the disease.

  1. Response-cue interval effects in extended-runs task switching: memory, or monitoring?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altmann, Erik M

    2017-09-26

    This study investigated effects of manipulating the response-cue interval (RCI) in the extended-runs task-switching procedure. In this procedure, a task cue is presented at the start of a run of trials and then withdrawn, such that the task has to be stored in memory to guide performance until the next task cue is presented. The effects of the RCI manipulation were not as predicted by an existing model of memory processes in task switching (Altmann and Gray, Psychol Rev 115:602-639, 2008), suggesting that either the model is incorrect or the RCI manipulation did not have the intended effect. The manipulation did produce a theoretically meaningful pattern, in the form of a main effect on response time that was not accompanied by a similar effect on the error rate. This pattern, which replicated across two experiments, is interpreted here in terms of a process that monitors for the next task cue, with a longer RCI acting as a stronger signal that a cue is about to appear. The results have implications for the human factors of dynamic task environments in which critical events occur unpredictably.

  2. Methods for monitoring endoplasmic reticulum stress and the unfolded protein response.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Samali, Afshin

    2010-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is the site of folding of membrane and secreted proteins in the cell. Physiological or pathological processes that disturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum cause ER stress and activate a set of signaling pathways termed the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR). The UPR can promote cellular repair and sustained survival by reducing the load of unfolded proteins through upregulation of chaperones and global attenuation of protein synthesis. Research into ER stress and the UPR continues to grow at a rapid rate as many new investigators are entering the field. There are also many researchers not working directly on ER stress, but who wish to determine whether this response is activated in the system they are studying: thus, it is important to list a standard set of criteria for monitoring UPR in different model systems. Here, we discuss approaches that can be used by researchers to plan and interpret experiments aimed at evaluating whether the UPR and related processes are activated. We would like to emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation and strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to verify UPR activation.

  3. MONITORING TRAINING LOADS, STRESS, IMMUNE-ENDOCRINE RESPONSES AND PERFORMANCE IN TENNIS PLAYERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Vitasovic Gomes

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The study aim was to investigate the effect of a periodised pre-season training plan on internal training load and subsequent stress tolerance, immune-endocrine responses and physical performance in tennis players. Well-trained young tennis players (n = 10 were monitored across the pre-season period, which was divided into 4 weeks of progressive overloading training and a 1-week tapering period. Weekly measures of internal training load, training monotony and stress tolerance (sources and symptoms of stress were taken, along with salivary testosterone, cortisol and immunoglobulin A. One repetition maximum strength, running endurance, jump height and agility were assessed before and after training. The periodised training plan led to significant weekly changes in training loads (i.e. increasing in weeks 3 and 4, decreasing in week 5 and post-training improvements in strength, endurance and agility (P < 0.05. Cortisol concentration and the symptoms of stress also increased in weeks 3 and/or 4, before returning to baseline in week 5 (P < 0.05. Conversely, the testosterone to cortisol ratio decreased in weeks 3 and 4, before returning to baseline in week 5 (P < 0.05. In conclusion, the training plan evoked adaptive changes in stress tolerance and hormonal responses, which may have mediated the improvements in physical performance.

  4. Methods for Monitoring Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and the Unfolded Protein Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afshin Samali

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The endoplasmic reticulum (ER is the site of folding of membrane and secreted proteins in the cell. Physiological or pathological processes that disturb protein folding in the endoplasmic reticulum cause ER stress and activate a set of signaling pathways termed the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR. The UPR can promote cellular repair and sustained survival by reducing the load of unfolded proteins through upregulation of chaperones and global attenuation of protein synthesis. Research into ER stress and the UPR continues to grow at a rapid rate as many new investigators are entering the field. There are also many researchers not working directly on ER stress, but who wish to determine whether this response is activated in the system they are studying: thus, it is important to list a standard set of criteria for monitoring UPR in different model systems. Here, we discuss approaches that can be used by researchers to plan and interpret experiments aimed at evaluating whether the UPR and related processes are activated. We would like to emphasize that no individual assay is guaranteed to be the most appropriate one in every situation and strongly recommend the use of multiple assays to verify UPR activation.

  5. From feedback- to response-based performance monitoring in active and observational learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellebaum, Christian; Colosio, Marco

    2014-09-01

    Humans can adapt their behavior by learning from the consequences of their own actions or by observing others. Gradual active learning of action-outcome contingencies is accompanied by a shift from feedback- to response-based performance monitoring. This shift is reflected by complementary learning-related changes of two ACC-driven ERP components, the feedback-related negativity (FRN) and the error-related negativity (ERN), which have both been suggested to signal events "worse than expected," that is, a negative prediction error. Although recent research has identified comparable components for observed behavior and outcomes (observational ERN and FRN), it is as yet unknown, whether these components are similarly modulated by prediction errors and thus also reflect behavioral adaptation. In this study, two groups of 15 participants learned action-outcome contingencies either actively or by observation. In active learners, FRN amplitude for negative feedback decreased and ERN amplitude in response to erroneous actions increased with learning, whereas observational ERN and FRN in observational learners did not exhibit learning-related changes. Learning performance, assessed in test trials without feedback, was comparable between groups, as was the ERN following actively performed errors during test trials. In summary, the results show that action-outcome associations can be learned similarly well actively and by observation. The mechanisms involved appear to differ, with the FRN in active learning reflecting the integration of information about own actions and the accompanying outcomes.

  6. Monitoring the effects of different conservation treatments on paper-infecting fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaelsen, Astrid; Pinzari, Flavia; Barbabietola, Nicoletta; Piñar, Guadalupe

    2013-10-01

    Fungi are among the most degradative organisms inducing biodeterioration of paper-based items of cultural heritage. Appropriate conservation measures and restoration treatments to deal with fungal infections include mechanical, chemical, and biological methods, which entail effects on the paper itself and health hazards for humans. Three different conservation treatments, namely freeze-drying, gamma rays, and ethylene oxide fumigation, were compared and monitored to assess their short- (one month, T1) and long-term (one year, T2) effectiveness to inhibit fungal growth. After the inoculation with fungi possessing cellulose hydrolysis ability - Chaetomium globosum , Trichoderma viride, and Cladosporium cladosporioides - as single strains or as a mixture, different quality paper samples were treated and screened for fungal viability by culture-dependent and -independent techniques. Results derived from both strategies were contradictory. Both gamma irradiation and EtO fumigation showed full efficacy as disinfecting agents when evaluated with cultivation techniques. However, when using molecular analyses, the application of gamma rays showed a short-term reduction in DNA recovery and DNA fragmentation; the latter phenomenon was also observed in a minor degree in samples treated with freeze-drying. When RNA was used as an indicator of long-term fungal viability, differences in the RNA recovery from samples treated with freeze-drying or gamma rays could be observed in samples inoculated with the mixed culture. Only the treatment with ethylene oxide proved negative for both DNA and RNA recovery. Therefore, DNA fragmentation after an ethylene oxide treatment can hamper future paleogenetic and archaeological molecular studies on the objects.

  7. Electronic medication monitoring-informed counselling to improve adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy and virologic treatment outcomes: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nienke eLangebeek

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Adherence to combination antiretroviral therapy (cART for HIV infection is a primary determinant of treatment success, but is often suboptimal. Previous studies have suggested that electronic medication monitoring-informed counselling is among the most effective adherence intervention components. Our objective was to review available evidence about the effectiveness of monitoring-informed counselling and to aggregate findings into quantitative estimates of the effect of such intervention on medication adherence and virologic treatment outcomes.Methods: We searched PubMed for papers reporting on randomized controlled trials (RCTs comparing intervention groups receiving monitoring-informed counselling as one of the intervention components versus control groups not receiving such counselling for their effect on medication adherence and viral load concentrations. The standardized mean difference (SMD in adherence and the odds ratio (OR of undetectable HIV RNA in intervention versus control groups were the common effect sizes. Random-effect models with inverse variance weights were used to aggregate findings into pooled effect estimates with 95% confidence limits. Results: A total of 13 studies were included. Adherence was significantly higher in intervention groups than in control groups (SMD 0.51, 95% CI 0.31 to 0.71. Patients in intervention groups were significantly more likely to have undetectable HIV RNA concentrations than patients in control groups (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.12 to 1.63. However, in studies in which monitoring-informed counselling was the only intervention component, the difference in adherence and virologic response between intervention and control groups was not statistically significant.Conclusion: Electronic monitoring-informed counselling improved adherence and virologic response compared with control groups not receiving such counselling in studies in which it was one out of multiple intervention components, but not

  8. Electronic medication monitoring-informed counseling to improve adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy and virologic treatment outcomes: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langebeek, Nienke; Nieuwkerk, Pythia

    2015-01-01

    Adherence to combination anti-retroviral therapy for HIV infection is a primary determinant of treatment success, but is often suboptimal. Previous studies have suggested that electronic medication monitoring-informed counseling is among the most effective adherence intervention components. Our objective was to review available evidence about the effectiveness of monitoring-informed counseling and to aggregate findings into quantitative estimates of the effect of such intervention on medication adherence and virologic treatment outcomes. We searched PubMed for papers reporting on randomized controlled trials comparing intervention groups receiving monitoring-informed counseling as one of the intervention components versus control groups not receiving such counseling for their effect on medication adherence and viral load concentrations. The standardized mean difference (SMD) in adherence and the odds ratio (OR) of undetectable HIV RNA in intervention versus control groups were the common effect sizes. Random-effect models with inverse variance weights were used to aggregate findings into pooled effect estimates with 95% confidence limits (CI). A total of 13 studies were included. Adherence was significantly higher in intervention groups than in control groups (SMD 0.51, 95% CI 0.31-0.71). Patients in intervention groups were significantly more likely to have undetectable HIV RNA concentrations than patients in control groups (OR 1.35, 95% CI 1.12-1.63). However, in studies in which monitoring-informed counseling was the only intervention component, the difference in adherence and virologic response between intervention and control groups was not statistically significant. Electronic monitoring-informed counseling improved adherence and virologic response compared with control groups not receiving such counseling in studies in which it was one out of multiple intervention components, but not in studies where it was the only intervention component.

  9. Monitoring reservoir response to earthquakes and fluid extraction, Salton Sea geothermal field, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Taka’aki; Nayak, Avinash; Brenguier, Florent; Manga, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of in situ reservoir responses to stress transients provides insights into the evolution of geothermal reservoirs. By exploiting the stress dependence of seismic velocity changes, we investigate the temporal evolution of the reservoir stress state of the Salton Sea geothermal field (SSGF), California. We find that the SSGF experienced a number of sudden velocity reductions (~0.035 to 0.25%) that are most likely caused by openings of fractures due to dynamic stress transients (as small as 0.08 MPa and up to 0.45 MPa) from local and regional earthquakes. Depths of velocity changes are estimated to be about 0.5 to 1.5 km, similar to the depths of the injection and production wells. We derive an empirical in situ stress sensitivity of seismic velocity changes by relating velocity changes to dynamic stresses. We also observe systematic velocity reductions (0.04 to 0.05%) during earthquake swarms in mid-November 2009 and late-December 2010. On the basis of volumetric static and dynamic stress changes, the expected velocity reductions from the largest earthquakes with magnitude ranging from 3 to 4 in these swarms are less than 0.02%, which suggests that these earthquakes are likely not responsible for the velocity changes observed during the swarms. Instead, we argue that velocity reductions may have been induced by poroelastic opening of fractures due to aseismic deformation. We also observe a long-term velocity increase (~0.04%/year) that is most likely due to poroelastic contraction caused by the geothermal production. Our observations demonstrate that seismic interferometry provides insights into in situ reservoir response to stress changes. PMID:29326977

  10. Additive effects prevail: The response of biota to multiple stressors in an intensively monitored watershed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieswein, Alexander; Hering, Daniel; Feld, Christian K

    2017-09-01

    Freshwater ecosystems are impacted by a range of stressors arising from diverse human-caused land and water uses. Identifying the relative importance of single stressors and understanding how multiple stressors interact and jointly affect biology is crucial for River Basin Management. This study addressed multiple human-induced stressors and their effects on the aquatic flora and fauna based on data from standard WFD monitoring schemes. For altogether 1095 sites within a mountainous catchment, we used 12 stressor variables covering three different stressor groups: riparian land use, physical habitat quality and nutrient enrichment. Twenty-one biological metrics calculated from taxa lists of three organism groups (fish, benthic invertebrates and aquatic macrophytes) served as response variables. Stressor and response variables were subjected to Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) analysis to identify stressor hierarchy and stressor interactions and subsequently to Generalised Linear Regression Modelling (GLM) to quantify the stressors standardised effect size. Our results show that riverine habitat degradation was the dominant stressor group for the river fauna, notably the bed physical habitat structure. Overall, the explained variation in benthic invertebrate metrics was higher than it was in fish and macrophyte metrics. In particular, general integrative (aggregate) metrics such as % Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera and Trichoptera (EPT) taxa performed better than ecological traits (e.g. % feeding types). Overall, additive stressor effects dominated, while significant and meaningful stressor interactions were generally rare and weak. We concluded that given the type of stressor and ecological response variables addressed in this study, river basin managers do not need to bother much about complex stressor interactions, but can focus on the prevailing stressors according to the hierarchy identified. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring reservoir response to earthquakes and fluid extraction, Salton Sea geothermal field, California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taira, Taka'aki; Nayak, Avinash; Brenguier, Florent; Manga, Michael

    2018-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of in situ reservoir responses to stress transients provides insights into the evolution of geothermal reservoirs. By exploiting the stress dependence of seismic velocity changes, we investigate the temporal evolution of the reservoir stress state of the Salton Sea geothermal field (SSGF), California. We find that the SSGF experienced a number of sudden velocity reductions (~0.035 to 0.25%) that are most likely caused by openings of fractures due to dynamic stress transients (as small as 0.08 MPa and up to 0.45 MPa) from local and regional earthquakes. Depths of velocity changes are estimated to be about 0.5 to 1.5 km, similar to the depths of the injection and production wells. We derive an empirical in situ stress sensitivity of seismic velocity changes by relating velocity changes to dynamic stresses. We also observe systematic velocity reductions (0.04 to 0.05%) during earthquake swarms in mid-November 2009 and late-December 2010. On the basis of volumetric static and dynamic stress changes, the expected velocity reductions from the largest earthquakes with magnitude ranging from 3 to 4 in these swarms are less than 0.02%, which suggests that these earthquakes are likely not responsible for the velocity changes observed during the swarms. Instead, we argue that velocity reductions may have been induced by poroelastic opening of fractures due to aseismic deformation. We also observe a long-term velocity increase (~0.04%/year) that is most likely due to poroelastic contraction caused by the geothermal production. Our observations demonstrate that seismic interferometry provides insights into in situ reservoir response to stress changes.

  12. Improving staff response to seizures on the epilepsy monitoring unit with online EEG seizure detection algorithms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommens, Nicole; Geertsema, Evelien; Jansen Holleboom, Lisanne; Cox, Fieke; Visser, Gerhard

    2018-05-11

    User safety and the quality of diagnostics on the epilepsy monitoring unit (EMU) depend on reaction to seizures. Online seizure detection might improve this. While good sensitivity and specificity is reported, the added value above staff response is unclear. We ascertained the added value of two electroencephalograph (EEG) seizure detection algorithms in terms of additional detected seizures or faster detection time. EEG-video seizure recordings of people admitted to an EMU over one year were included, with a maximum of two seizures per subject. All recordings were retrospectively analyzed using Encevis EpiScan and BESA Epilepsy. Detection sensitivity and latency of the algorithms were compared to staff responses. False positive rates were estimated on 30 uninterrupted recordings (roughly 24 h per subject) of consecutive subjects admitted to the EMU. EEG-video recordings used included 188 seizures. The response rate of staff was 67%, of Encevis 67%, and of BESA Epilepsy 65%. Of the 62 seizures missed by staff, 66% were recognized by Encevis and 39% by BESA Epilepsy. The median latency was 31 s (staff), 10 s (Encevis), and 14 s (BESA Epilepsy). After correcting for walking time from the observation room to the subject, both algorithms detected faster than staff in 65% of detected seizures. The full recordings included 617 h of EEG. Encevis had a median false positive rate of 4.9 per 24 h and BESA Epilepsy of 2.1 per 24 h. EEG-video seizure detection algorithms may improve reaction to seizures by improving the total number of seizures detected and the speed of detection. The false positive rate is feasible for use in a clinical situation. Implementation of these algorithms might result in faster diagnostic testing and better observation during seizures. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Similar cellular responses after treatment with either praziquantel or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and age before being randomly allocated to one treatment, with either ..... Cioli D, Pica-Mattoccia L, Archer S. Antischistosomal drugs: past, present ... and .... approach to schistosome population dynamics and estimation of the life-span of ...

  14. Treatment responses in adult depressive patients treated with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with dexamethasone/corticotrophin-releasing hormone. Lina Zhang1*, Yanbo Chen2, ... Keywords: stress, depressive patients, hormonal response, hormonal dysregulation, sertraline, ..... interactions in depression: will cause inform cure. Mol.

  15. On switching response surface models, with applications to the structural health monitoring of bridges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worden, K.; Cross, E. J.

    2018-01-01

    Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) is the engineering discipline of diagnosing damage and estimating safe remaining life for structures and systems. Often, SHM is accomplished by detecting changes in measured quantities from the structure of interest; if there are no competing explanations for the changes, one infers that they are the result of damage. If the structure of interest is subject to changes in its environmental or operational conditions, one must understand the effects of these changes in order that one does not falsely claim that damage has occurred when changes in measured quantities are observed. This problem - the problem of confounding influences - is particularly pressing for civil infrastructure where the given structure is usually openly exposed to the weather and may be subject to strongly varying operational conditions. One approach to understanding confounding influences is to construct a data-based response surface model that can represent measurement variations as a function of environmental and operational variables. The models can then be used to remove environmental and operational variations so that change detection algorithms signal the occurrence of damage alone. The current paper is concerned with such response surface models in the case of SHM of bridges. In particular, classes of response surface models that can switch discontinuously between regimes are discussed. Recently, it has been shown that Gaussian Process (GP) models are an effective means of developing response surface or surrogate models. However, the GP approach runs into difficulties if changes in the latent variables cause the structure of interest to abruptly switch between regimes. A good example here, which is well known in the SHM literature, is given by the Z24 Bridge in Switzerland which completely changed its dynamical behaviour when it cooled below zero degrees Celsius as the asphalt of the deck stiffened. The solution proposed here is to adopt the recently

  16. Targeted Drug Delivery and Treatment of Endoparasites with Biocompatible Particles of pH-Responsive Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathews, Patrick D; Fernandes Patta, Ana C M; Gonçalves, Joao V; Gama, Gabriella Dos Santos; Garcia, Irene Teresinha Santos; Mertins, Omar

    2018-02-12

    Biomaterials conceived for vectorization of bioactives are currently considered for biomedical, biological, and environmental applications. We have produced a pH-sensitive biomaterial composed of natural source alginate and chitosan polysaccharides for application as a drug delivery system via oral administration. The composite particle preparation was in situ monitored by means of isothermal titration calorimetry. The strong interaction established between the macromolecules during particle assembly led to 0.60 alginate/chitosan effective binding sites with an intense exothermic effect and negative enthalpy variation on the order of a thousand kcal/mol. In the presence of model drugs mebendazole and ivermectin, with relatively small and large structures, respectively, mebendazole reduced the amount of chitosan monomers available to interact with alginate by 27%, which was not observed for ivermectin. Nevertheless, a state of intense negative Gibbs energy and large entropic decrease was achieved, providing evidence that formation of particles is thermodynamically driven and favored. Small-angle X-ray scattering provided further evidence of similar surface aspects independent of the presence of drug. The physical responses of the particles to pH variation comprise partial hydration, swelling, and the predominance of positive surface charge in strong acid medium, whereas ionization followed by deprotonation leads to compaction and charge reversal rather than new swelling in mild and slightly acidic mediums, respectively. In vivo performance was evaluated in the treatment of endoparasites in Corydoras fish. Systematically with a daily base oral administration, particles significantly reduced the infections over 15 days of treatment. The experiments provide evidence that utilizing particles granted and boosted the action of the antiparasitic drugs, leading to substantial reduction or elimination of infection. Hence, the pH-responsive particles represent a biomaterial

  17. The role of MRI in monitoring of the effect of treatment with betaferon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanov, A.; Nikolov, I.; Nikolov, V.

    2002-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. Diagnostics of the disease is mainly clinical. Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is the basic paraclinical method in describing the evolution of the disease.The aim of this study was to determine the role of MRI in the evaluation of treatment efficacy in MS particularly regarding the use of betaferon (Schering). The trial was conducted with 41 patients suffering from relapsing-remitting MS. The patients were examined before and after 6 - 12 months treatment with betaferon (interferon beta - lb). Standard MRI criteria have been used for evaluation of the disease progression. Post-contrast T1 images have been used for evaluation of the disease activity. In 31 % of the patients there was recurrent evolution of the disease expressed by reduction of number, size or signal intensity of the lesions. There was no change of the findings in 54 % of the cases. Only in 15 % of the patients we found MRI-features indicating progression of the disease. MRI is an imaging method that is mandatory in the early diagnostics of MS, in describing the course and the activity of the disease and particularly in monitoring of therapy. (authors)

  18. Impact of antiepileptic drugs on bone health: Need for monitoring, treatment, and prevention strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekta Arora

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is the most common neurological disorder affecting approximately 50 million people worldwide. In India, overall prevalence of epilepsy is reported to be 5.59/1000 population. Antiepileptic drugs (AEDs constitute the main-stay of treatment with a large number of AEDs available in the market. High incidence of adverse effects is a major limitation with AEDs. One of the major concerns is significant metabolic effects on the bone. However, little attention has been paid to this issue because most of the bone effects remain subclinical for a long time and may take years to manifest clinically. The main effects include hypocalcemia, hypophosphatemia, reduced serum levels of Vitamin D, increase in parathormone (PTH levels, and alterations in bone turnover markers. The CYP450 enzyme-inducing AEDs such as phenytoin, phenobarbital, carbamazepine, and primidone are the most common AEDs associated with bone disorders while the data regarding the effect of valproate and newer AEDs such as lamotrigine, gabapentin, vigabatrin, levetiracetam, and topiramate on bone metabolism and bone density are scanty and controversial. Deficiency of Vitamin D is commonly described as a cause for the bone loss in epileptic patients while others being decreased absorption of calcium, increased PTH levels, and inhibition of calcitonin secretion, etc. However, there are no formal practical guidelines for the management of bone disease among those taking AEDs. Evidence-based strategies regarding monitoring, prevention, and treatment of bone diseases in patients on AED therapy are needed.

  19. Mineralogical characterization of Greda clays and monitoring of their phase transformations on thermal treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez Panduro, E.; Bravo Cabrejos, J.

    2010-01-01

    The mineralogical characterization of two clay samples from the Central Andean Region of Peru, denominated White Greda and Red Greda, is reported. These clays contain the clay minerals mica and illite respectively. Both clays were treated thermally in an oxidising atmosphere under controlled conditions up to 1,100 deg. C with the purpose of obtaining information about structural changes that may be useful for pottery manufacture. X-ray fluorescence was used for the elemental characterization of the samples and X-ray diffractometry was used to determine the collapse and formation of the mineral phases present in the samples caused by thermal treatment. At temperatures above 1,000 deg. C it is observed the formation of spinel in the case of White Greda and of hematite, corundum and cristobalite in the case of Red Greda. Room temperature transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy allowed the monitoring of the variation of the hyperfine parameters with the thermal treatment temperature; In the case of the evolution of the quadruple splitting of the paramagnetic Fe 3+ sites with temperature, in both clays, the analyses reproduced results such as the 'camel back' curve shape, found by other workers (Wagner and Wagner, Hyperfine Interact 154:35-82, 2004; Wagner and Kyek, Hyperfine Interact 154:5-33, 2004).

  20. Mineralogical characterization of Greda clays and monitoring of their phase transformations on thermal treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panduro, E. Chavez; Cabrejos, J. Bravo

    2010-01-01

    The mineralogical characterization of two clay samples from the Central Andean Region of Peru, denominated White Greda and Red Greda, is reported. These clays contain the clay minerals mica and illite respectively. Both clays were treated thermally in an oxidising atmosphere under controlled conditions up to 1,100°C with the purpose of obtaining information about structural changes that may be useful for pottery manufacture. X-ray fluorescence was used for the elemental characterization of the samples and X-ray diffractometry was used to determine the collapse and formation of the mineral phases present in the samples caused by thermal treatment. At temperatures above 1,000°C it is observed the formation of spinel in the case of White Greda and of hematite, corundum and cristobalite in the case of Red Greda. Room temperature transmission Mössbauer spectroscopy allowed the monitoring of the variation of the hyperfine parameters with the thermal treatment temperature; In the case of the evolution of the quadruple splitting of the paramagnetic Fe3 + sites with temperature, in both clays, the analyses reproduced results such as the “camel back” curve shape, found by other workers (Wagner and Wagner, Hyperfine Interact 154:35-82, 2004; Wagner and Kyek, Hyperfine Interact 154:5-33, 2004).

  1. Mineralogical characterization of Greda clays and monitoring of their phase transformations on thermal treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez Panduro, E., E-mail: 04130127@unmsm.edu.pe; Bravo Cabrejos, J., E-mail: jbravoc@unmsm.edu.pe [Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas (Peru)

    2010-01-15

    The mineralogical characterization of two clay samples from the Central Andean Region of Peru, denominated White Greda and Red Greda, is reported. These clays contain the clay minerals mica and illite respectively. Both clays were treated thermally in an oxidising atmosphere under controlled conditions up to 1,100 deg. C with the purpose of obtaining information about structural changes that may be useful for pottery manufacture. X-ray fluorescence was used for the elemental characterization of the samples and X-ray diffractometry was used to determine the collapse and formation of the mineral phases present in the samples caused by thermal treatment. At temperatures above 1,000 deg. C it is observed the formation of spinel in the case of White Greda and of hematite, corundum and cristobalite in the case of Red Greda. Room temperature transmission Moessbauer spectroscopy allowed the monitoring of the variation of the hyperfine parameters with the thermal treatment temperature; In the case of the evolution of the quadruple splitting of the paramagnetic Fe{sup 3+} sites with temperature, in both clays, the analyses reproduced results such as the 'camel back' curve shape, found by other workers (Wagner and Wagner, Hyperfine Interact 154:35-82, 2004; Wagner and Kyek, Hyperfine Interact 154:5-33, 2004).

  2. Development of an analytical microbial consortia method for enhancing performance monitoring at aerobic wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razban, Behrooz; Nelson, Kristina Y; McMartin, Dena W; Cullimore, D Roy; Wall, Michelle; Wang, Dunling

    2012-01-01

    An analytical method to produce profiles of bacterial biomass fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) was developed employing rapid agitation followed by static incubation (RASI) using selective media of wastewater microbial communities. The results were compiled to produce a unique library for comparison and performance analysis at a Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP). A total of 146 samples from the aerated WWTP, comprising 73 samples of each secondary and tertiary effluent, were included analyzed. For comparison purposes, all samples were evaluated via a similarity index (SI) with secondary effluents producing an SI of 0.88 with 2.7% variation and tertiary samples producing an SI 0.86 with 5.0% variation. The results also highlighted significant differences between the fatty acid profiles of the tertiary and secondary effluents indicating considerable shifts in the bacterial community profile between these treatment phases. The WWTP performance results using this method were highly replicable and reproducible indicating that the protocol has potential as a performance-monitoring tool for aerated WWTPs. The results quickly and accurately reflect shifts in dominant bacterial communities that result when processes operations and performance change.

  3. Monitoring bottlenose dolphin leukocyte cytokine mRNA responsiveness by qPCR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, Kirsten C.; Venn-Watson, Stephanie K.; Jensen, Eric D.; Porter, Tracy J.; Waters, Theresa E.; Sacco, Randy E.

    2017-01-01

    Both veterinarians caring for dolphins in managed populations and researchers monitoring wild populations use blood-based diagnostics to monitor bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) health. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) can be used to assess cytokine transcription patterns of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). This can supplement currently available blood tests with information on immune status. Full realization of this potential requires establishment of normal ranges of cytokine gene transcription levels in bottlenose dolphins. We surveyed four dolphins over the span of seven months by serial bleeds. PBMC were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (1, 5, and 10 μg/mL) and concanavalin A (1 μg/mL) for 48 H in vitro. RNA from these cultures was probed by qPCR using Tursiops truncatus-specific primers (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-13, IL-18, IFN-γ and TNF-α). Two blood samples from an additional bottlenose dolphin diagnosed with acute pulmonary disease add further perspective to the data. We observed that mitogen choice made a significant difference in the magnitude of gene transcription observed. On the other hand, most cytokines tested exhibited limited intra-animal variation. However, IL-6 and IL-12p40 differed between older and younger dolphins. Furthermore, the magnitude of mitogenic response clusters the tested cytokines into three groups. The data provide a reference for the selection of target cytokine mRNAs and their expected range of mitogen-stimulated cytokine gene transcription for future studies. PMID:29272269

  4. Recorded earthquake responses from the integrated seismic monitoring network of the Atwood Building, Anchorage, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celebi, M.

    2006-01-01

    An integrated seismic monitoring system with a total of 53 channels of accelerometers is now operating in and at the nearby free-field site of the 20-story steel-framed Atwood Building in highly seismic Anchorage, Alaska. The building has a single-story basement and a reinforced concrete foundation without piles. The monitoring system comprises a 32-channel structural array and a 21-channel site array. Accelerometers are deployed on 10 levels of the building to assess translational, torsional, and rocking motions, interstory drift (displacement) between selected pairs of adjacent floors, and average drift between floors. The site array, located approximately a city block from the building, comprises seven triaxial accelerometers, one at the surface and six in boreholes ranging in depths from 15 to 200 feet (???5-60 meters). The arrays have already recorded low-amplitude shaking responses of the building and the site caused by numerous earthquakes at distances ranging from tens to a couple of hundred kilometers. Data from an earthquake that occurred 186 km away traces the propagation of waves from the deepest borehole to the roof of the building in approximately 0.5 seconds. Fundamental structural frequencies [0.58 Hz (NS) and 0.47 Hz (EW)], low damping percentages (2-4%), mode coupling, and beating effects are identified. The fundamental site frequency at approximately 1.5 Hz is close to the second modal frequencies (1.83 Hz NS and 1.43 EW) of the building, which may cause resonance of the building. Additional earthquakes prove repeatability of these characteristics; however, stronger shaking may alter these conclusions. ?? 2006, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  5. Reducing uncertainty in dust monitoring to detect aeolian sediment transport responses to land cover change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, N.; Chappell, A.; Van Zee, J.; Toledo, D.; Duniway, M.; Billings, B.; Tedela, N.

    2017-12-01

    Anthropogenic land use and land cover change (LULCC) influence global rates of wind erosion and dust emission, yet our understanding of the magnitude of the responses remains poor. Field measurements and monitoring provide essential data to resolve aeolian sediment transport patterns and assess the impacts of human land use and management intensity. Data collected in the field are also required for dust model calibration and testing, as models have become the primary tool for assessing LULCC-dust cycle interactions. However, there is considerable uncertainty in estimates of dust emission due to the spatial variability of sediment transport. Field sampling designs are currently rudimentary and considerable opportunities are available to reduce the uncertainty. Establishing the minimum detectable change is critical for measuring spatial and temporal patterns of sediment transport, detecting potential impacts of LULCC and land management, and for quantifying the uncertainty of dust model estimates. Here, we evaluate the effectiveness of common sampling designs (e.g., simple random sampling, systematic sampling) used to measure and monitor aeolian sediment transport rates. Using data from the US National Wind Erosion Research Network across diverse rangeland and cropland cover types, we demonstrate how only large changes in sediment mass flux (of the order 200% to 800%) can be detected when small sample sizes are used, crude sampling designs are implemented, or when the spatial variation is large. We then show how statistical rigour and the straightforward application of a sampling design can reduce the uncertainty and detect change in sediment transport over time and between land use and land cover types.

  6. Track-monitoring from the dynamic response of an operational train

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lederman, George; Chen, Siheng; Garrett, James; Kovačević, Jelena; Noh, Hae Young; Bielak, Jacobo

    2017-03-01

    We explore a data-driven approach for monitoring rail infrastructure from the dynamic response of a train in revenue-service. Presently, track inspection is performed either visually or with dedicated track geometry cars. In this study, we examine a more economical approach where track inspection is performed by analyzing vibration data collected from an operational passenger train. The high frequency with which passenger trains travel each section of track means that faults can be detected sooner than with dedicated inspection vehicles, and the large number of passes over each section of track makes a data-driven approach statistically feasible. We have deployed a test-system on a light-rail vehicle and have been collecting data for the past two years. The collected data underscores two of the main challenges that arise in train-based track monitoring: the speed of the train at a given location varies from pass to pass and the position of the train is not known precisely. In this study, we explore which feature representations of the data best characterize the state of the tracks despite these sources of uncertainty (i.e., in the spatial domain or frequency domain), and we examine how consistently change detection approaches can identify track changes from the data. We show the accuracy of these different representations, or features, and different change detection approaches on two types of track changes, track replacement and tamping (a maintenance procedure to improve track geometry), and two types of data, simulated data and operational data from our test-system. The sensing, signal processing, and data analysis we propose in the study could facilitate safer trains and more cost-efficient maintenance in the future. Moreover, the proposed approach is quite general and could be extended to other parts of the infrastructure, including bridges.

  7. Monitoring bottlenose dolphin leukocyte cytokine mRNA responsiveness by qPCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Ruth Hofstetter

    Full Text Available Both veterinarians caring for dolphins in managed populations and researchers monitoring wild populations use blood-based diagnostics to monitor bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus health. Quantitative PCR (qPCR can be used to assess cytokine transcription patterns of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. This can supplement currently available blood tests with information on immune status. Full realization of this potential requires establishment of normal ranges of cytokine gene transcription levels in bottlenose dolphins. We surveyed four dolphins over the span of seven months by serial bleeds. PBMC were stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (1, 5, and 10 μg/mL and concanavalin A (1 μg/mL for 48 H in vitro. RNA from these cultures was probed by qPCR using Tursiops truncatus-specific primers (IL-1α, IL-1β, IL-1RA, IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12p40, IL-13, IL-18, IFN-γ and TNF-α. Two blood samples from an additional bottlenose dolphin diagnosed with acute pulmonary disease add further perspective to the data. We observed that mitogen choice made a significant difference in the magnitude of gene transcription observed. On the other hand, most cytokines tested exhibited limited intra-animal variation. However, IL-6 and IL-12p40 differed between older and younger dolphins. Furthermore, the magnitude of mitogenic response clusters the tested cytokines into three groups. The data provide a reference for the selection of target cytokine mRNAs and their expected range of mitogen-stimulated cytokine gene transcription for future studies.

  8. In vitro validation of bioluminescent monitoring of disease progression and therapeutic response in leukaemia model animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, Yusuke; Okubo, Toshiyuki; Tojo, Arinobu; Sekine, Rieko; Soda, Yasushi; Kobayashi, Seiichiro; Nomura, Akiko; Izawa, Kiyoko; Kitamura, Toshio; Ohtomo, Kuni

    2006-01-01

    The application of in vivo bioluminescence imaging to non-invasive, quantitative monitoring of tumour models relies on a positive correlation between the intensity of bioluminescence and the tumour burden. We conducted cell culture studies to investigate the relationship between bioluminescent signal intensity and viable cell numbers in murine leukaemia model cells. Interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent murine pro-B cell line Ba/F3 was transduced with firefly luciferase to generate cells expressing luciferase stably under the control of a retroviral long terminal repeat. The luciferase-expressing cells were transduced with p190 BCR-ABL to give factor-independent proliferation. The cells were cultured under various conditions, and bioluminescent signal intensity was compared with viable cell numbers and the cell cycle stage. The Ba/F3 cells showed autonomous growth as well as stable luciferase expression following transduction with both luciferase and p190 BCR-ABL, and in vivo bioluminescence imaging permitted external detection of these cells implanted into mice. The bioluminescence intensities tended to reflect cell proliferation and responses to imatinib in cell culture studies. However, the luminescence per viable cell was influenced by the IL-3 concentration in factor-dependent cells and by the stage of proliferation and imatinib concentration in factor-independent cells, thereby impairing the proportionality between viable cell number and bioluminescent signal intensity. Luminescence per cell tended to vary in association with the fraction of proliferating cells. Although in vivo bioluminescence imaging would allow non-invasive monitoring of leukaemia model animals, environmental factors and therapeutic interventions may cause some discrepancies between tumour burden and bioluminescence intensity. (orig.)

  9. Performance Evaluation of wastewater treatment plant of Noosh Azar company by online monitoring station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    leila haddadi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Background& Objective: One of the reuses of wastewater in industries is irrigation of green space. Therefore, with proper treatment and reduction of environmental pollution of wastewater and in compliance with environmental standards, it can be used for irrigation purposes. The present study was aimed to evaluate the performance of Noosh Azar Wastewater Treatment Plant by the online monitoring station in 2016.   Materials and Methods: This descriptive cross-sectional study was performed at Noosh Azar Waste Water Treatment Plant (WWTP in Tehran. The effluent outlet parameters include COD, BOD, TSS, TOC, Turbidity, pH and temperature which were measured 12 times/day by the online monitoring station of the refinery according to the standard methods (the Examinations of Water and Wastewater, and reported at the end of each month. Data were entered into SPSS software and analyzed using statistical indices including mean and standard deviation. Results: The average total of BOD/COD ratio in the wastewater was 0.8. The results of the study showed that the average concentration of COD, BOD and TSS of the wastewater was 1624.91 ±134.85, 1310±75.38 and 283.58± 39.76 mg/L, respectively. The average of total outlet parameters of turbidity, COD, BOD, TSS and TOC were 12.78±2.21, 83.73±12.90, 41.26±6.65, 6.70±2.14, 46.03±7.08 mg/L, and pH=7.80±0.35. The total average of removal efficiencies of COD, BOD and TSS were 93.92±3.62, 96.57±1.002 and 97.57±0.936, respectively. Conclusion: Regarding the proper performance of the activated sludge system of Noosh Azar Company, the effluent  parameters such as COD, BOD, TSS, TOC, turbidity and pH, were in accordance with the standard of the Iranian Environmental Protection Agency for irrigation use. However in order to ensure the quality of the wastewater for reuse, the microbial parameters should also be considered.

  10. Alizarin Complexone Functionalized Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles: A Smart System Integrating Glucose-Responsive Double-Drugs Release and Real-Time Monitoring Capabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Zhen; He, Dinggeng; Cai, Linli; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Yang, Xue; Li, Liling; Li, Siqi; Su, Xiaoya

    2016-04-06

    The outstanding progress of nanoparticles-based delivery systems capable of releasing hypoglycemic drugs in response to glucose has dramatically changed the outlook of diabetes management. However, the developed glucose-responsive systems have not offered real-time monitoring capabilities for accurate quantifying hypoglycemic drugs released. In this study, we present a multifunctional delivery system that integrates both delivery and monitoring issues using glucose-triggered competitive binding scheme on alizarin complexone (ALC) functionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN). In this system, ALC is modified on the surface of MSN as the signal reporter. Gluconated insulin (G-Ins) is then introduced onto MSN-ALC via benzene-1,4-diboronic acid (BA) mediated esterification reaction, where G-Ins not only blocks drugs inside the mesopores but also works as a hypoglycemic drug. In the absence of glucose, the sandwich-type boronate ester structure formed by BA binding to the diols of ALC and G-Ins remains intact, resulting in an fluorescence emission peak at 570 nm and blockage of pores. Following a competitive binding, the presence of glucose cause the dissociation of boronate ester between ALC and BA, which lead to the pores opening and disappearance of fluorescence. As proof of concept, rosiglitazone maleate (RSM), an insulin-sensitizing agent, was doped into the MSN to form a multifunctional MSN (RSM@MSN-ALC-BA-Ins), integrating with double-drugs loading, glucose-responsive performance, and real-time monitoring capability. It has been demonstrated that the glucose-responsive release behaviors of insulin and RSM in buffer or in human serum can be quantified in real-time through evaluating the changes of fluorescence signal. We believe that this developed multifunctional system can shed light on the invention of a new generation of smart nanoformulations for optical diagnosis, individualized treatment, and noninvasive monitoring of diabetes management.

  11. Multifunctional devices based on SnO2@rGO-coated fibers for human motion monitoring, ethanol detection, and photo response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Qing; Wang, Qi; Zang, Siyao; Chai, Zhaoer; Zhang, Jinnan; Ren, Xiaomin

    2018-05-01

    In this study, we developed a multifunctional device based on SnO2@rGO-coated fibers utilizing plasma treatment, dip coating, and microwave irradiation in sequence, and finally realized highly sensitive human motion monitoring, relatively good ethanol detection, and an obvious photo response. Moreover, the high level of comfort and compactness derived from highly elastic and comfortable fabrics contributes to the long-term availability and test accuracy. As an attempt at multifunctional integration of smart clothing, this work provides an attractive and relatively practical research direction.

  12. Monitoring early response to chemoradiotherapy with "1"8F-FMISO dynamic PET in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grkovski, Milan; Beattie, Bradley J.; O'Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L.; Lee, Nancy Y.; Riaz, Nadeem; Leeman, Jonathan E.; Schoeder, Heiko; Carlin, Sean D.

    2017-01-01

    There is growing recognition that biologic features of the tumor microenvironment affect the response to cancer therapies and the outcome of cancer patients. In head and neck cancer (HNC) one such feature is hypoxia. We investigated the utility of "1"8F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) for monitoring the early microenvironmental response to chemoradiotherapy in HNC. Seventy-two HNC patients underwent FMISO dPET scans in a customized immobilization mask (0-30 min dynamic acquisition, followed by 10 min static acquisitions starting at ∝95 min and ∝160 min post-injection) at baseline and early into treatment where patients have already received one cycle of chemotherapy and anywhere from five to ten fractions of 2 Gy per fraction radiation therapy. Voxelwise pharmacokinetic modeling was conducted using an irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartment model to calculate surrogate biomarkers of tumor hypoxia (k_3 and Tumor-to-Blood Ratio (TBR)), perfusion (K_1) and FMISO distribution volume (DV). Additionally, Tumor-to-Muscle Ratios (TMR) were derived by visual inspection by an experienced nuclear medicine physician, with TMR > 1.2 defining hypoxia. One hundred and thirty-five lesions in total were analyzed. TBR, k_3 and DV decreased on early response scans, while no significant change was observed for K_1. The k_3 -TBR correlation decreased substantially from baseline scans (Pearson's r = 0.72 and 0.76 for mean intratumor and pooled voxelwise values, respectively) to early response scans (Pearson's r = 0.39 and 0.40, respectively). Both concordant and discordant examples of changes in intratumor k_3 and TBR were identified; the latter partially mediated by the change in DV. In 13 normoxic patients according to visual analysis (all having lesions with TMR = 1.2), subvolumes were identified where k_3 indicated the presence of hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic modeling of FMISO dynamic PET reveals a more detailed characterization of the

  13. Monitoring early response to chemoradiotherapy with {sup 18}F-FMISO dynamic PET in head and neck cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grkovski, Milan; Beattie, Bradley J.; O' Donoghue, Joseph A.; Humm, John L. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Medical Physics, New York, NY (United States); Lee, Nancy Y.; Riaz, Nadeem; Leeman, Jonathan E. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiation Oncology, New York, NY (United States); Schoeder, Heiko; Carlin, Sean D. [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Department of Radiology, New York, NY (United States)

    2017-09-15

    There is growing recognition that biologic features of the tumor microenvironment affect the response to cancer therapies and the outcome of cancer patients. In head and neck cancer (HNC) one such feature is hypoxia. We investigated the utility of {sup 18}F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) for monitoring the early microenvironmental response to chemoradiotherapy in HNC. Seventy-two HNC patients underwent FMISO dPET scans in a customized immobilization mask (0-30 min dynamic acquisition, followed by 10 min static acquisitions starting at ∝95 min and ∝160 min post-injection) at baseline and early into treatment where patients have already received one cycle of chemotherapy and anywhere from five to ten fractions of 2 Gy per fraction radiation therapy. Voxelwise pharmacokinetic modeling was conducted using an irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartment model to calculate surrogate biomarkers of tumor hypoxia (k{sub 3} and Tumor-to-Blood Ratio (TBR)), perfusion (K{sub 1}) and FMISO distribution volume (DV). Additionally, Tumor-to-Muscle Ratios (TMR) were derived by visual inspection by an experienced nuclear medicine physician, with TMR > 1.2 defining hypoxia. One hundred and thirty-five lesions in total were analyzed. TBR, k{sub 3} and DV decreased on early response scans, while no significant change was observed for K{sub 1}. The k{sub 3} -TBR correlation decreased substantially from baseline scans (Pearson's r = 0.72 and 0.76 for mean intratumor and pooled voxelwise values, respectively) to early response scans (Pearson's r = 0.39 and 0.40, respectively). Both concordant and discordant examples of changes in intratumor k{sub 3} and TBR were identified; the latter partially mediated by the change in DV. In 13 normoxic patients according to visual analysis (all having lesions with TMR = 1.2), subvolumes were identified where k{sub 3} indicated the presence of hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic modeling of FMISO dynamic PET

  14. Monitoring early response to chemoradiotherapy with 18F-FMISO dynamic PET in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grkovski, Milan; Lee, Nancy Y; Schöder, Heiko; Carlin, Sean D; Beattie, Bradley J; Riaz, Nadeem; Leeman, Jonathan E; O'Donoghue, Joseph A; Humm, John L

    2017-09-01

    There is growing recognition that biologic features of the tumor microenvironment affect the response to cancer therapies and the outcome of cancer patients. In head and neck cancer (HNC) one such feature is hypoxia. We investigated the utility of 18 F-fluoromisonidazole (FMISO) dynamic positron emission tomography (dPET) for monitoring the early microenvironmental response to chemoradiotherapy in HNC. Seventy-two HNC patients underwent FMISO dPET scans in a customized immobilization mask (0-30 min dynamic acquisition, followed by 10 min static acquisitions starting at ∼95 min and ∼160 min post-injection) at baseline and early into treatment where patients have already received one cycle of chemotherapy and anywhere from five to ten fractions of 2 Gy per fraction radiation therapy. Voxelwise pharmacokinetic modeling was conducted using an irreversible one-plasma two-tissue compartment model to calculate surrogate biomarkers of tumor hypoxia (k 3 and Tumor-to-Blood Ratio (TBR)), perfusion (K 1 ) and FMISO distribution volume (DV). Additionally, Tumor-to-Muscle Ratios (TMR) were derived by visual inspection by an experienced nuclear medicine physician, with TMR > 1.2 defining hypoxia. One hundred and thirty-five lesions in total were analyzed. TBR, k 3 and DV decreased on early response scans, while no significant change was observed for K 1 . The k 3 -TBR correlation decreased substantially from baseline scans (Pearson's r = 0.72 and 0.76 for mean intratumor and pooled voxelwise values, respectively) to early response scans (Pearson's r = 0.39 and 0.40, respectively). Both concordant and discordant examples of changes in intratumor k 3 and TBR were identified; the latter partially mediated by the change in DV. In 13 normoxic patients according to visual analysis (all having lesions with TMR = 1.2), subvolumes were identified where k 3 indicated the presence of hypoxia. Pharmacokinetic modeling of FMISO dynamic PET reveals a more detailed

  15. Independent verification of monitor unit calculation for radiation treatment planning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Li; Chen, Li-Xin; Huang, Shao-Min; Sun, Wen-Zhao; Sun, Hong-Qiang; Deng, Xiao-Wu

    2010-02-01

    To ensure the accuracy of dose calculation for radiation treatment plans is an important part of quality assurance (QA) procedures for radiotherapy. This study evaluated the Monitor Units (MU) calculation accuracy of a third-party QA software and a 3-dimensional treatment planning system (3D TPS), to investigate the feasibility and reliability of independent verification for radiation treatment planning. Test plans in a homogenous phantom were designed with 3-D TPS, according to the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Technical Report No. 430, including open, blocked, wedge, and multileaf collimator (MLC) fields. Test plans were delivered and measured in the phantom. The delivered doses were input to the QA software and the independent calculated MUs were compared with delivery. All test plans were verified with independent calculation and phantom measurements separately, and the differences of the two kinds of verification were then compared. The deviation of the independent calculation to the measurements was (0.1 +/- 0.9)%, the biggest difference fell onto the plans that used block and wedge fields (2.0%). The mean MU difference between the TPS and the QA software was (0.6 +/- 1.0)%, ranging from -0.8% to 2.8%. The deviation in dose of the TPS calculation compared to the measurements was (-0.2 +/- 1.7)%, ranging from -3.9% to 2.9%. MU accuracy of the third-party QA software is clinically acceptable. Similar results were achieved with the independent calculations and the phantom measurements for all test plans. The tested independent calculation software can be used as an efficient tool for TPS plan verification.

  16. Effect of oral levamisole treatment of cockerels on their responses to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was conducted to evaluate the effect of oral levamisole treatment of cockerels on their responses to experimental intraocular infection with velogenic Newcastle disease virus (NDV) and to assess whether the treatment would affect the course of the disease process by altering the immune response. There were 3 ...

  17. Neural Mechanisms of Improvements in Social Motivation after Pivotal Response Treatment: Two Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voos, Avery C.; Pelphrey, Kevin A.; Tirrell, Jonathan; Bolling, Danielle Z.; Vander Wyk, Brent; Kaiser, Martha D.; McPartland, James C.; Volkmar, Fred R.; Ventola, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    Pivotal response treatment (PRT) is an empirically validated behavioral treatment that has widespread positive effects on communication, behavior, and social skills in young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). For the first time, functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to identify the neural correlates of successful response to…

  18. A study on monitoring of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in livestock wastewater and treatment by radiation techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myung, Seung Woon [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-05-15

    In this study, and effective monitoring and the investigation of treatment efficiency of pharmaceuticals from the influent and effluent of livestock wastewater treatment plant (WWTPs) and by-product with radiation processing by LC/ESI-MS/MS was performed. Thirteen pharmaceuticals including antibiotics, growth promoters and disinfectants were assayed from twelve WWTPs in South Korea. The established method could be used to determine low concentration levels of pharmaceuticals in environmental samples. From few influents of live-stock WWTPs, chlortetracycline and acetaminophen were detected with the highest concentration among the monitoring pharmaceuticals. And also lincomycin, sufathiazole, sulfamethazine, trimethoprim, acetyl salicylic acid, tylosin, glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde were detected from the influents of WWTPs

  19. A study on monitoring of pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs) in livestock wastewater and treatment by radiation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myung, Seung Woon

    2010-05-01

    In this study, and effective monitoring and the investigation of treatment efficiency of pharmaceuticals from the influent and effluent of livestock wastewater treatment plant (WWTPs) and by-product with radiation processing by LC/ESI-MS/MS was performed. Thirteen pharmaceuticals including antibiotics, growth promoters and disinfectants were assayed from twelve WWTPs in South Korea. The established method could be used to determine low concentration levels of pharmaceuticals in environmental samples. From few influents of live-stock WWTPs, chlortetracycline and acetaminophen were detected with the highest concentration among the monitoring pharmaceuticals. And also lincomycin, sufathiazole, sulfamethazine, trimethoprim, acetyl salicylic acid, tylosin, glutaraldehyde and formaldehyde were detected from the influents of WWTPs

  20. Oestrogen: an overlooked mediator in the neuropsychopharmacology of treatment response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keating, Charlotte; Tilbrook, Alan; Kulkarni, Jayashri

    2011-05-01

    Major depression (MD) and anorexia nervosa (AN) often present comorbidly and both share some affective symptoms, despite obvious phenotypic differences. In the illness phase, pathophysiological evidence indicates similar abnormalities in both clinical groups including dysfunction in the serotonin (5-HT) system (of which some abnormalities persist following recovery) and between 60% and 80% of patients in both groups present with significant hyperactivity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. First-line approach to treatment for MD involves modulation of the 5-HT system using selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs). For AN, treatment with SSRIs has been shown to be considerably less effective compared to MD. Both illnesses show marked dysregulation in the HPA axis. A consequence of SSRI treatment is a reduction and/or normalization of indices of the HPA axis [i.e. cortisol, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)], which is consistent with recovery levels in both clinical groups. Oestrogen (in high doses) has been shown to exert antidepressant effects and positively impact on MD symptoms as a treatment in its own right, or in combination with antidepressants, in women of menopausal age. It is proposed that a combination of SSRIs and oestrogen therapy may facilitate physiological normalization in MD in women of non-menopausal age and in AN. Preliminary evidence suggests oestrogen treatment alone is of some benefit to patients and it is proposed that a combination of SSRI and oestrogen will precipitate and potentially accelerate symptomatic remission. Should this approach be successful, it offers the capacity for improvement over traditional antidepressant use in women diagnosed with MD and a novel strategy for the treatment of AN, a serious clinical illness associated with the highest mortality of any psychiatric condition.

  1. Ultrasound and MRI of nerves for monitoring disease activity and treatment effects in chronic dysimmune neuropathies - Current concepts and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Décard, Bernhard F; Pham, Mirko; Grimm, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    New imaging modalities like high-resolution-ultrasound (HRUS) and MR-Neurography (MRN) are increasingly used for the evaluation of the peripheral nervous system. The increasing knowledge on morphological changes observed in different neuropathies has led to a better understanding of underlying pathophysiological processes. The diagnosis of acquired chronic dysimmune neuropathies (CDN) like chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), Lewis-Sumner Syndrome (LSS) or multifocal motor neuropathy (MMN) can be challenging. The current diagnostic criteria and outcome parameters are mainly based on clinical and electrophysiological parameters. Especially in CDN cases with atypical presentation or during early disease stages, the diagnostic accuracy is low and standardized protocols for the evaluation of disease activity and treatment response are lacking. The establishment of combined diagnostic cr