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Sample records for modulates pulmonary transcription

  1. Transcription factors, transcriptional coregulators, and epigenetic modulation in the control of pulmonary vascular cell phenotype: therapeutic implications for pulmonary hypertension (2015 Grover Conference series).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pullamsetti, Soni S; Perros, Frédéric; Chelladurai, Prakash; Yuan, Jason; Stenmark, Kurt

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a complex and multifactorial disease involving genetic, epigenetic, and environmental factors. Numerous stimuli and pathological conditions facilitate severe vascular remodeling in PH by activation of a complex cascade of signaling pathways involving vascular cell proliferation, differentiation, and inflammation. Multiple signaling cascades modulate the activity of certain sequence-specific DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) and coregulators that are critical for the transcriptional regulation of gene expression that facilitates PH-associated vascular cell phenotypes, as demonstrated by several studies summarized in this review. Past studies have largely focused on the role of the genetic component in the development of PH, while the presence of epigenetic alterations such as microRNAs, DNA methylation, histone levels, and histone deacetylases in PH is now also receiving increasing attention. Epigenetic regulation of chromatin structure is also recognized to influence gene expression in development or disease states. Therefore, a complete understanding of the mechanisms involved in altered gene expression in diseased cells is vital for the design of novel therapeutic strategies. Recent technological advances in DNA sequencing will provide a comprehensive improvement in our understanding of mechanisms involved in the development of PH. This review summarizes current concepts in TF and epigenetic control of cell phenotype in pulmonary vascular disease and discusses the current issues and possibilities in employing potential epigenetic or TF-based therapies for achieving complete reversal of PH.

  2. Long-range enhancers modulate Foxf1 transcription in blood vessels of pulmonary vascular network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Hyejin; Kim, Jinsun; Park, Gi-Hee; Kim, Yuri; Cho, Sung-Won

    2016-09-01

    Intimate crosstalk occurs between the pulmonary epithelium and the vascular network during lung development. The transcription factor forkhead box f1 (Foxf1) is expressed in the lung mesenchyme and plays an indispensable role in pulmonary angiogenesis. Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a signalling molecule, is expressed in lung epithelium and is required to establish proper angiogenesis. It has been suggested that Foxf1, a downstream target of the Shh signalling pathway, mediates interaction between angiogenesis and the epithelium in lung. However, there has been no clear evidence showing the mechanism how Foxf1 is regulated by Shh signalling pathway during lung development. In this study, we investigated the lung-specific enhancers of Foxf1 and the Gli binding on the enhancers. At first, we found three evolutionarily conserved Foxf1 enhancers, two of which were long-range enhancers. Of the long-range enhancers, one demonstrated tissue-specific activity in the proximal and distal pulmonary blood vessels, while the other one demonstrated activity only in distal blood vessels. At analogous positions in human, these long-range enhancers were included in a regulatory region that was reportedly repeatedly deleted in alveolar capillary dysplasia with misalignment of pulmonary vein patients, which indicates the importance of these enhancers in pulmonary blood vessel formation. We also determined that Gli increased the activity of one of these long-range enhancers, which was specific to distal blood vessel, suggesting that Shh regulates Foxf1 transcription in pulmonary distal blood vessel formation.

  3. Angiotensinogen Gene Transcription in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhal, Bruce D.; Dang, My-Trang T.; Li, Xiaopeng; Abdul-Hafez, Amal

    2012-01-01

    An established body of literature supports the hypothesis that activation of a local tissue angiotensin (ANG) system in the extravascular tissue compartment of the lungs is required for lung fibrogenesis. Transcriptional activation of the angiotensinogen (AGT) gene is believed to be a critical and necessary step in this activation. This paper summarizes the data in support of this theory and discusses transcriptional regulation of AGT, with an emphasis on lung AGT synthesis as a determinant of fibrosis severity. Genetic data linking AGT polymorphisms to the severity of disease in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis are also discussed. PMID:22500179

  4. Angiotensinogen Gene Transcription in Pulmonary Fibrosis

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    Bruce D. Uhal

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An established body of literature supports the hypothesis that activation of a local tissue angiotensin (ANG system in the extravascular tissue compartment of the lungs is required for lung fibrogenesis. Transcriptional activation of the angiotensinogen (AGT gene is believed to be a critical and necessary step in this activation. This paper summarizes the data in support of this theory and discusses transcriptional regulation of AGT, with an emphasis on lung AGT synthesis as a determinant of fibrosis severity. Genetic data linking AGT polymorphisms to the severity of disease in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis are also discussed.

  5. A developmental transcriptional network for maize defines coexpression modules.

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    Downs, Gregory S; Bi, Yong-Mei; Colasanti, Joseph; Wu, Wenqing; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Tong; Rothstein, Steven J; Lukens, Lewis N

    2013-04-01

    Here, we present a genome-wide overview of transcriptional circuits in the agriculturally significant crop species maize (Zea mays). We examined transcript abundance data at 50 developmental stages, from embryogenesis to senescence, for 34,876 gene models and classified genes into 24 robust coexpression modules. Modules were strongly associated with tissue types and related biological processes. Sixteen of the 24 modules (67%) have preferential transcript abundance within specific tissues. One-third of modules had an absence of gene expression in specific tissues. Genes within a number of modules also correlated with the developmental age of tissues. Coexpression of genes is likely due to transcriptional control. For a number of modules, key genes involved in transcriptional control have expression profiles that mimic the expression profiles of module genes, although the expression of transcriptional control genes is not unusually representative of module gene expression. Known regulatory motifs are enriched in several modules. Finally, of the 13 network modules with more than 200 genes, three contain genes that are notably clustered (P < 0.05) within the genome. This work, based on a carefully selected set of major tissues representing diverse stages of maize development, demonstrates the remarkable power of transcript-level coexpression networks to identify underlying biological processes and their molecular components.

  6. Increased Transcript Complexity in Genes Associated with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

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    Lackey, Lela; McArthur, Evonne; Laederach, Alain

    2015-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies aim to correlate genotype with phenotype. Many common diseases including Type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) are complex genetic traits with hundreds of different loci that are associated with varied disease risk. Identifying common features in the genes associated with each disease remains a challenge. Furthermore, the role of post-transcriptional regulation, and in particular alternative splicing, is still poorly understood in most multigenic diseases. We therefore compiled comprehensive lists of genes associated with Type II diabetes, Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and COPD in an attempt to identify common features of their corresponding mRNA transcripts within each gene set. The SERPINA1 gene is a well-recognized genetic risk factor of COPD and it produces 11 transcript variants, which is exceptional for a human gene. This led us to hypothesize that other genes associated with COPD, and complex disorders in general, are highly transcriptionally diverse. We found that COPD-associated genes have a statistically significant enrichment in transcript complexity stemming from a disproportionately high level of alternative splicing, however, Type II Diabetes, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease genes were not significantly enriched. We also identified a subset of transcriptionally complex COPD-associated genes (~40%) that are differentially expressed between mild, moderate and severe COPD. Although the genes associated with other lung diseases are not extensively documented, we found preliminary data that idiopathic pulmonary disease genes, but not cystic fibrosis modulators, are also more transcriptionally complex. Interestingly, complex COPD transcripts are more often the product of alternative acceptor site usage. To verify the biological importance of these alternative transcripts, we used RNA-sequencing analyses to determine that COPD-associated genes are frequently

  7. Modular Transcriptional Networks of the Host Pulmonary Response during Early and Late Pneumococcal Pneumonia.

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    Scicluna, Brendon P; van Lieshout, Miriam H; Blok, Dana C; Florquin, Sandrine; van der Poll, Tom

    2015-05-12

    Streptococcus pneumoniae (Spneu) remains the most lethal bacterial pathogen and the dominant agent of community-acquired pneumonia. Treatment has perennially focused on the use of antibiotics, albeit scrutinized due to the occurrence of antibiotic-resistant Spneu strains. Immunomodulatory strategies have emerged as potential treatment options. Although promising, immunomodulation can lead to improper tissue functions either at steady state or upon infectious challenge. This argues for the availability of tools to enable a detailed assessment of whole pulmonary functions during the course of infection, not only those functions biased to the defense response. Thus, through the use of an unbiased tissue microarray and bioinformatics approach, we aimed to construct a comprehensive map of whole-lung transcriptional activity and cellular pathways during the course of pneumococcal pneumonia. We performed genome-wide transcriptional analysis of whole lungs before and 6 and 48 h after Spneu infection in mice. The 4,000 most variable transcripts across all samples were used to assemble a gene coexpression network comprising 13 intercorrelating modules (clusters of genes). Fifty-four percent of this whole-lung transcriptional network was altered 6 and 48 h after Spneu infection. Canonical signaling pathway analysis uncovered known pathways imparting protection, including IL17A/IL17F signaling and previously undetected mechanisms that included lipid metabolism. Through in silico prediction of cell types, pathways were observed to enrich for distinct cell types such as a novel stromal cell lipid metabolism pathway. These cellular mechanisms were furthermore anchored at functional hub genes of cellular fate, differentiation, growth and transcription. Collectively, we provide a benchmark unsupervised map of whole-lung transcriptional relationships and cellular activity during early and late pneumococcal pneumonia.

  8. Nitroprusside modulates pulmonary vein arrhythmogenic activity

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    Chen Yao-Chang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary veins (PVs are the most important sources of ectopic beats with the initiation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, or the foci of ectopic atrial tachycardia and focal atrial fibrillation. Elimination of nitric oxide (NO enhances cardiac triggered activity, and NO can decrease PV arrhythmogensis through mechano-electrical feedback. However, it is not clear whether NO may have direct electrophysiological effects on PV cardiomyocytes. This study is aimed to study the effects of nitroprusside (NO donor, on the ionic currents and arrhythmogenic activity of single cardiomyocytes from the PVs. Methods Single PV cardiomyocytes were isolated from the canine PVs. The action potential and ionic currents were investigated in isolated single canine PV cardiomyocytes before and after sodium nitroprusside (80 μM, using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Results Nitroprusside decreased PV cardiomyocytes spontaneous beating rates from 1.7 ± 0.3 Hz to 0.5 ± 0.4 Hz in 9 cells (P Conclusion Nitroprusside regulates the electrical activity of PV cardiomyocytes, which suggests that NO may play a role in PV arrhythmogenesis.

  9. Modulation of DNA binding by gene-specific transcription factors.

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    Schleif, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    The transcription of many genes, particularly in prokaryotes, is controlled by transcription factors whose activity can be modulated by controlling their DNA binding affinity. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which DNA binding affinity is regulated is important, but because forming definitive conclusions usually requires detailed structural information in combination with data from extensive biophysical, biochemical, and sometimes genetic experiments, little is truly understood about this topic. This review describes the biological requirements placed upon DNA binding transcription factors and their consequent properties, particularly the ways that DNA binding affinity can be modulated and methods for its study. What is known and not known about the mechanisms modulating the DNA binding affinity of a number of prokaryotic transcription factors, including CAP and lac repressor, is provided.

  10. TALE-mediated modulation of transcriptional enhancers in vivo.

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    Crocker, Justin; Stern, David L

    2013-08-01

    We tested whether transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) could mediate repression and activation of endogenous enhancers in the Drosophila genome. TALE repressors (TALERs) targeting each of the five even-skipped (eve) stripe enhancers generated repression specifically of the focal stripes. TALE activators (TALEAs) targeting the eve promoter or enhancers caused increased expression primarily in cells normally activated by the promoter or targeted enhancer, respectively. This effect supports the view that repression acts in a dominant fashion on transcriptional activators and that the activity state of an enhancer influences TALE binding or the ability of the VP16 domain to enhance transcription. In these assays, the Hairy repression domain did not exhibit previously described long-range transcriptional repression activity. The phenotypic effects of TALER and TALEA expression in larvae and adults are consistent with the observed modulations of eve expression. TALEs thus provide a novel tool for detection and functional modulation of transcriptional enhancers in their native genomic context.

  11. Cohesin modulates transcription of estrogen-responsive genes.

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    Antony, Jisha; Dasgupta, Tanushree; Rhodes, Jenny M; McEwan, Miranda V; Print, Cristin G; O'Sullivan, Justin M; Horsfield, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    The cohesin complex has essential roles in cell division, DNA damage repair and gene transcription. The transcriptional function of cohesin is thought to derive from its ability to connect distant regulatory elements with gene promoters. Genome-wide binding of cohesin in breast cancer cells frequently coincides with estrogen receptor alpha (ER), leading to the hypothesis that cohesin facilitates estrogen-dependent gene transcription. We found that cohesin modulates the expression of only a subset of genes in the ER transcription program, either activating or repressing transcription depending on the gene target. Estrogen-responsive genes most significantly influenced by cohesin were enriched in pathways associated with breast cancer progression such as PI3K and ErbB1. In MCF7 breast cancer cells, cohesin depletion enhanced transcription of TFF1 and TFF2, and was associated with increased ER binding and increased interaction between TFF1 and its distal enhancer situated within TMPRSS3. In contrast, cohesin depletion reduced c-MYC mRNA and was accompanied by reduced interaction between a distal enhancer of c-MYC and its promoters. Our data indicates that cohesin is not a universal facilitator of ER-induced transcription and can even restrict enhancer-promoter communication. We propose that cohesin modulates transcription of estrogen-dependent genes to achieve appropriate directionality and amplitude of expression.

  12. Transcriptional Modulation of Heat-Shock Protein Gene Expression

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    Anastasis Stephanou; Latchman, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are molecular chaperones that are ubiquitously expressed but are also induced in cells exposed to stressful stimuli. Hsps have been implicated in the induction and propagation of several diseases. This paper focuses on regulatory factors that control the transcription of the genes encoding Hsps. We also highlight how distinct transcription factors are able to interact and modulate Hsps in different pathological states. Thus, a better understanding of the complex sig...

  13. Transcriptional modulation of heat-shock protein gene expression.

    OpenAIRE

    A. Stephanou; Latchman, D S

    2011-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are molecular chaperones that are ubiquitously expressed but are also induced in cells exposed to stressful stimuli. Hsps have been implicated in the induction and propagation of several diseases. This paper focuses on regulatory factors that control the transcription of the genes encoding Hsps. We also highlight how distinct transcription factors are able to interact and modulate Hsps in different pathological states. Thus, a better understanding of the complex sig...

  14. Transcription dynamics of inducible genes modulated by negative regulations.

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    Li, Yanyan; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2015-06-01

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process in single cells, in which genes transit randomly between active and inactive states. Transcription of many inducible genes is also tightly regulated: It is often stimulated by extracellular signals, activated through signal transduction pathways and later repressed by negative regulations. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the mean transcription level of inducible genes modulated by the interplay of the intrinsic transcriptional randomness and the repression by negative regulations. In our model, we integrate negative regulations into gene activation process, and make the conventional assumption on the production and degradation of transcripts. We show that, whether or not the basal transcription is temporarily terminated when cells are stimulated, the mean transcription level grows in the typical up and down pattern commonly observed in immune response genes. With the help of numerical simulations, we clarify the delicate impact of the system parameters on the transcription dynamics, and demonstrate how our model generates the distinct temporal gene-induction patterns in mouse fibroblasts discerned in recent experiments.

  15. Transcriptional regulation of topology modulators and transcription regulators of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

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    Ghosh, Soumitra; Padmanabhan, Bhavna; Godbole, Adwait Anand; Tare, Priyanka; Ahmed, Wareed; Vasu, Kommireddy; China, Arnab; Kumar, Rupesh; Mitra, Anirban; Nagaraja, Valakunja

    2016-07-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) is a formidable pathogen which has the ability to survive the hostile environment of the host by evading the host defense system. The re-configuration of its transcriptional and metabolic process allows the pathogen to confront the adverse environment within the host macrophages. The factors that assist the transcription and modulate the DNA topology would have to play a key role in the regulation of global gene expression of the organism. How transcription of these essential housekeeping genes alters in response to growth conditions and environmental stress has not been addressed together in a set of experimental conditions in Mtb. Now, we have mapped the transcription start sites (TSS) and promoters of several genes that play a central role in the regulation of DNA topology and transcription in Mtb. Using in vivo reporter assays, we validated the activity of the identified promoter elements in different growth conditions. The variation in transcript abundance of these essential genes was also analyzed in growth phase-dependent manner. These data provide the first glimpse into the specific adaptive changes in the expression of genes involved in transcription and DNA topology modulation in Mtb.

  16. Transcriptional Modulation of Heat-Shock Protein Gene Expression

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    Anastasis Stephanou

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat-shock proteins (Hsps are molecular chaperones that are ubiquitously expressed but are also induced in cells exposed to stressful stimuli. Hsps have been implicated in the induction and propagation of several diseases. This paper focuses on regulatory factors that control the transcription of the genes encoding Hsps. We also highlight how distinct transcription factors are able to interact and modulate Hsps in different pathological states. Thus, a better understanding of the complex signaling pathways regulating Hsp expression may lead to novel therapeutic targets.

  17. Transcriptional modulation of heat-shock protein gene expression.

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    Stephanou, Anastasis; Latchman, David S

    2011-01-01

    Heat-shock proteins (Hsps) are molecular chaperones that are ubiquitously expressed but are also induced in cells exposed to stressful stimuli. Hsps have been implicated in the induction and propagation of several diseases. This paper focuses on regulatory factors that control the transcription of the genes encoding Hsps. We also highlight how distinct transcription factors are able to interact and modulate Hsps in different pathological states. Thus, a better understanding of the complex signaling pathways regulating Hsp expression may lead to novel therapeutic targets.

  18. Transcriptional profiling identifies physicochemical properties of nanomaterials that are determinants of the in vivo pulmonary response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halappanavar, Sabina; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Decan, Nathalie;

    2015-01-01

    We applied transcriptional profiling to elucidate the mechanisms associated with pulmonary responses to titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles (NPs) of different sizes and surface coatings, and to determine if these responses are modified by NP size, surface area, surface modification, and embeddi...

  19. Identification of Post-Transcriptional Modulators of Breast Cancer Transcription Factor Activity Using MINDy

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    Campbell, Thomas M.; Castro, Mauro A. A.; Ponder, Bruce A. J.

    2016-01-01

    We have recently identified transcription factors (TFs) that are key drivers of breast cancer risk. To better understand the pathways or sub-networks in which these TFs mediate their function we sought to identify upstream modulators of their activity. We applied the MINDy (Modulator Inference by Network Dynamics) algorithm to four TFs (ESR1, FOXA1, GATA3 and SPDEF) that are key drivers of estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) breast cancer risk, as well as cancer progression. Our computational analysis identified over 500 potential modulators. We assayed 189 of these and identified 55 genes with functional characteristics that were consistent with a role as TF modulators. In the future, the identified modulators may be tested as potential therapeutic targets, able to alter the activity of TFs that are critical in the development of breast cancer. PMID:27997592

  20. Editing the epigenome: technologies for programmable transcription and epigenetic modulation.

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    Thakore, Pratiksha I; Black, Joshua B; Hilton, Isaac B; Gersbach, Charles A

    2016-02-01

    Gene regulation is a complex and tightly controlled process that defines cell identity, health and disease, and response to pharmacologic and environmental signals. Recently developed DNA-targeting platforms, including zinc finger proteins, transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) and the clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas9 system, have enabled the recruitment of transcriptional modulators and epigenome-modifying factors to any genomic site, leading to new insights into the function of epigenetic marks in gene expression. Additionally, custom transcriptional and epigenetic regulation is facilitating refined control over cell function and decision making. The unique properties of the CRISPR-Cas9 system have created new opportunities for high-throughput genetic screens and multiplexing targets to manipulate complex gene expression patterns. This Review summarizes recent technological developments in this area and their application to biomedical challenges. We also discuss remaining limitations and necessary future directions for this field.

  1. The modulation of WTI transcription function by cofactors.

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    Roberts, Stefan G E

    2006-01-01

    Wilms' tumour is a paediatric malignancy of the kidneys that affects one in every 10,000 live births, making it the most common solid tumour in the young. This cancer arises due to a failure of the metanephric mesenchyme to differentiate and form the kidney filtration units and tubules, which instead undergo uncontrolled proliferation. WT1 (Wilms' tumour 1) was identified as a factor that is frequently mutated in Wilms' tumours. WT1 plays a central role in the development of the genito-urinary organs and also other regions of the embryo. A major function of WT1 is to act as a regulator of transcription, controlling the expression of genes that are involved in proliferation and differentiation. WT1 can either activate or repress transcription of its target genes. Thus the transcription function of WT1 is highly context-specific, and can be modulated by a number of cofactors. Here, the known interaction partners of WT1 and the mechanisms by which they modulate WT1 transcription function will be discussed.

  2. Identifying genetic modulators of the connectivity between transcription factors and their transcriptional targets.

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    Fazlollahi, Mina; Muroff, Ivor; Lee, Eunjee; Causton, Helen C; Bussemaker, Harmen J

    2016-03-29

    Regulation of gene expression by transcription factors (TFs) is highly dependent on genetic background and interactions with cofactors. Identifying specific context factors is a major challenge that requires new approaches. Here we show that exploiting natural variation is a potent strategy for probing functional interactions within gene regulatory networks. We developed an algorithm to identify genetic polymorphisms that modulate the regulatory connectivity between specific transcription factors and their target genes in vivo. As a proof of principle, we mapped connectivity quantitative trait loci (cQTLs) using parallel genotype and gene expression data for segregants from a cross between two strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae We identified a nonsynonymous mutation in the DIG2 gene as a cQTL for the transcription factor Ste12p and confirmed this prediction empirically. We also identified three polymorphisms in TAF13 as putative modulators of regulation by Gcn4p. Our method has potential for revealing how genetic differences among individuals influence gene regulatory networks in any organism for which gene expression and genotype data are available along with information on binding preferences for transcription factors.

  3. A framework for discovering, designing, and testing microproteins to regulate synthetic transcriptional modules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiume, Elisa; de Klein, Niek; Rhee, Seung Yon; Magnani, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors often form protein complexes and give rise to intricate transcriptional networks. The regulation of transcription factor multimerization plays a key role in the fine-tuning of the underlying transcriptional pathways and can be exploited to modulate synthetic transcriptional mod

  4. Role of DNA Methylation in Modulating Transcription Factor Occupancy

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    Matthew T. Maurano

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Although DNA methylation is commonly invoked as a mechanism for transcriptional repression, the extent to which it actively silences transcription factor (TF occupancy sites in vivo is unknown. To study the role of DNA methylation in the active modulation of TF binding, we quantified the effect of DNA methylation depletion on the genomic occupancy patterns of CTCF, an abundant TF with known methylation sensitivity that is capable of autonomous binding to its target sites in chromatin. Here, we show that the vast majority (>98.5% of the tens of thousands of unoccupied, methylated CTCF recognition sequences remain unbound upon abrogation of DNA methylation. The small fraction of sites that show methylation-dependent binding in vivo are in turn characterized by highly variable CTCF occupancy across cell types. Our results suggest that DNA methylation is not a primary groundskeeper of genomic TF landscapes, but rather a specialized mechanism for stabilizing intrinsically labile sites.

  5. Erythroid-specific transcriptional changes in PBMCs from pulmonary hypertension patients.

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    Chris Cheadle

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs is a powerful tool for the identification of surrogate markers involved in disease processes. The hypothesis tested in this study was that chronic exposure of PBMCs to a hypertensive environment in remodeled pulmonary vessels would be reflected by specific transcriptional changes in these cells. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The transcript profiles of PBMCs from 30 idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension patients (IPAH, 19 patients with systemic sclerosis without pulmonary hypertension (SSc, 42 scleroderma-associated pulmonary arterial hypertensio patients (SSc-PAH, and 8 patients with SSc complicated by interstitial lung disease and pulmonary hypertension (SSc-PH-ILD were compared to the gene expression profiles of PBMCs from 41 healthy individuals. Multiple gene expression signatures were identified which could distinguish various disease groups from controls. One of these signatures, specific for erythrocyte maturation, is enriched specifically in patients with PH. This association was validated in multiple published datasets. The erythropoiesis signature was strongly correlated with hemodynamic measures of increasing disease severity in IPAH patients. No significant correlation of the same type was noted for SSc-PAH patients, this despite a clear signature enrichment within this group overall. These findings suggest an association of the erythropoiesis signature in PBMCs from patients with PH with a variable presentation among different subtypes of disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In PH, the expansion of immature red blood cell precursors may constitute a response to the increasingly hypoxic conditions prevalent in this syndrome. A correlation of this erythrocyte signature with more severe hypertension cases may provide an important biomarker of disease progression.

  6. Transcriptional modulation of apoptosis regulators by roscovitine and related compounds.

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    Garrofé-Ochoa, Xènia; Cosialls, Ana M; Ribas, Judit; Gil, Joan; Boix, Jacint

    2011-07-01

    Chemical inhibitors of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK), like roscovitine, are promising drugs in the context of new cancer therapies. Roscovitine and related compounds, like seliciclib and olomoucine, are effective inducers of apoptosis in many proliferating cells in culture. These compounds are known to activate the intrinsic or mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis. In order to better characterize this intrinsic pathway, a transcriptional analysis was performed using the reverse transcriptase-multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification procedure (RT-MLPA). In five cell lines, we detected an early and marked reduction of most transcripts, which is consistent with the disruption of transcription that results from the inhibition of CDK7 and CDK9. However, the mRNA of p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis (PUMA) gene escaped from this transcription inhibition in neuroblastoma cells with a functional p53 protein. The increase of PUMA mRNA was not found in roscovitine-treated cell lines defective in p53, which underwent apoptosis like their p53 proficient counterparts. In addition, in SH-SY5Y cells, sublethal and lethal concentrations of roscovitine produced equivalent increases of PUMA mRNA and protein. In conclusion, the increased expression of PUMA was not associated with apoptosis induction. On the contrary, mRNA and protein depletion of MCL-1 gene correlated the best with cell demise. Moreover, NOXA protein suffered a far minor decrease than MCL-1. Because of the selective neutralization of NOXA by MCL-1, we hypothesize that the disruption of this balance is a critical event in apoptosis induction by roscovitine and related compounds.

  7. Transcription Factor ets-2 Plays an Important Role in the Pathogenesis of Pulmonary Fibrosis

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    Baran, Christopher P.; Fischer, Sara N.; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Kabbout, Mohamed N.; Hitchcock, Charles L.; Bringardner, Benjamin D.; McMaken, Sara; Newland, Christie A.; Cantemir-Stone, Carmen Z.; Phillips, Gary S.; Ostrowski, Michael C.

    2011-01-01

    Ets-2 is a ubiquitous transcription factor activated after phosphorylation at threonine-72. Previous studies highlighted the importance of phosphorylated ets-2 in lung inflammation and extracellular matrix remodeling, two pathways involved in pulmonary fibrosis. We hypothesized that phosphorylated ets-2 played an important role in pulmonary fibrosis, and we sought to determine the role of ets-2 in its pathogenesis. We challenged ets-2 (A72/A72) transgenic mice (harboring a mutated form of ets-2 at phosphorylation site threonine-72) and ets-2 (wild-type/wild-type [WT/WT]) control mice with sequential intraperitoneal injections of bleomycin, followed by quantitative measurements of lung fibrosis and inflammation and primary cell in vitro assays. Concentrations of phosphorylated ets-2 were detected via the single and dual immunohistochemical staining of murine lungs and lung sections from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Ets-2 (A72/A72) mice were protected from bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, compared with ets-2 (WT/WT) mice. This protection was characterized by decreased lung pathological abnormalities and the fibrotic gene expression of Type I collagen, Type III collagen, α–smooth muscle actin, and connective tissue growth factor. Immunohistochemical staining of lung sections from bleomycin-treated ets-2 (WT/WT) mice and from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis demonstrated increased staining of phosphorylated ets-2 that colocalized with Type I collagen expression and to fibroblastic foci. Lastly, primary lung fibroblasts from ets-2 (A72/A72) mice exhibited decreased expression of Type I collagen in response to stimulation with TGF-β, compared with fibroblasts from ets-2 (WT/WT) mice. These data indicate the importance of phosphorylated ets-2 in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis through the expression of Type I collagen and (myo)fibroblast activation. PMID:21562315

  8. [Surfactant protein and thyroid transcription factor 1 in pleuro-pulmonary neoplasia. Immunohistochemical study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dessy, E; Falleni, M; Del Curto, B; Braidotti, P; Pietra, G G

    2000-12-01

    Aim of this work was to investigate the ability of the antibodies against Surfactant proteins (SP) and Thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1) to distinguish primary neoplasms of the lung from metastatic carcinomas to the lung and pleural mesotheliomas. We evaluated the immunohistochemical expression of the antibodies anti SP-A, SP-B, pro SP-C, SP-D, and TTF-1 in a series of 56 primary lung carcinomas, 9 metastatic carcinomas to the lung, 5 pleural mesotheliomas and 8 non-pulmonary carcinomas. Among primary lung neoplasms, only adenocarcinomas immunostained for all SP (specificity = 1; total sensitivity = 0.52). TTF-1 had an excellent specificity (= 1), but a weak sensitivity (= 0.34) in recognizing primary lung carcinomas. TTF-1 was present in lung adenocarcinomas which were negative for SPs; however it failed to distinguish the subtypes. Pleural mesotheliomas, pulmonary metastases and non-pulmonary carcinomas were not immunoreactive for SP-A, SP-B, SP-D, and TTF-1. Pro SP-C was positive also in the adenocarcinomas of the large bowel and in their pulmonary and nodal metastases. These results demonstrate that the combined use of antibodies anti SP-A, SP-B and TTF-1 is the best association in distinguishing primary lung carcinomas from metastatic carcinomas to the lung and pleural mesotheliomas.

  9. Integrative genetic analysis of transcription modules: towards filling the gap between genetic lociand inherited traits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hongqiang [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Chen, Hao [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Bao, Lei [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Manly, Kenneth [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Chesler, Elissa J [ORNL; Lu, Lu [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Wang, Jintao [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Zhou, Mi [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Williams, Robert [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis; Cui, Yan [University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis

    2005-01-01

    Genetic loci that regulate inherited traits are routinely identified using quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping methods. However, the genotype-phenotype associations do not provide information on the gene expression program through which the genetic loci regulate the traits. Transcription modules are 'selfconsistent regulatory units' and are closely related to the modular components of gene regulatory network [Ihmels, J., Friedlander, G., Bergmann, S., Sarig, O., Ziv, Y. and Barkai, N. (2002) Revealing modular organization in the yeast transcriptional network. Nat. Genet., 31, 370-377; Segal, E., Shapira, M., Regev, A., Pe'er, D., Botstein, D., Koller, D. and Friedman, N. (2003) Module networks: identifying regulatory modules and their condition-specific regulators from gene expression data. Nat. Genet., 34, 166-176]. We used genome-wide genotype and gene expression data of a genetic reference population that consists of mice of 32 recombinant inbred strains to identify the transcription modules and the genetic loci regulating them. Twenty-nine transcription modules defined by genetic variations were identified. Statistically significant associations between the transcription modules and 18 classical physiological and behavioral traits were found. Genome-wide interval mapping showed that major QTLs regulating the transcription modules are often co-localized with the QTLs regulating the associated classical traits. The association and the possible co-regulation of the classical trait and transcription module indicate that the transcription module may be involved in the gene pathways connecting the QTL and the classical trait. Our results show that a transcription module may associate with multiple seemingly unrelated classical traits and a classical trait may associate with different modules. Literature mining results provided strong independent evidences for the relations among genes of the transcription modules, genes in the regions of the QTLs

  10. Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Building gene expression signatures indicative of transcription factor activation to predict AOP modulation Adverse outcome pathways (AOPs) are a framework for predicting quantitative relationships between molecular initiatin...

  11. Role of DNA Methylation in Modulating Transcription Factor Occupancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurano, Matthew T; Wang, Hao; John, Sam; Shafer, Anthony; Canfield, Theresa; Lee, Kristen; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2015-08-18

    Although DNA methylation is commonly invoked as a mechanism for transcriptional repression, the extent to which it actively silences transcription factor (TF) occupancy sites in vivo is unknown. To study the role of DNA methylation in the active modulation of TF binding, we quantified the effect of DNA methylation depletion on the genomic occupancy patterns of CTCF, an abundant TF with known methylation sensitivity that is capable of autonomous binding to its target sites in chromatin. Here, we show that the vast majority (>98.5%) of the tens of thousands of unoccupied, methylated CTCF recognition sequences remain unbound upon abrogation of DNA methylation. The small fraction of sites that show methylation-dependent binding in vivo are in turn characterized by highly variable CTCF occupancy across cell types. Our results suggest that DNA methylation is not a primary groundskeeper of genomic TF landscapes, but rather a specialized mechanism for stabilizing intrinsically labile sites. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Modulation of pulmonary vasomotor tone in the fetus and neonate

    OpenAIRE

    2001-01-01

    Abstract The high pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) of atelectatic, hypoxic, fetal lungs limits intrauterine pulmonary blood flow (PBF) to less than 10% of combined right and left ventricular output. At birth, PVR decreases precipitously to accommodate the entire cardiac output. The present review focuses on the role of endothelium-derived nitric oxide (NO), prostacyclin, and vascular smooth muscle potassium channels in mediating the decrease in PVR that occurs at birth, and in maintaining ...

  13. Cu,Zn-Superoxide Dismutase-Mediated Redox Regulation of Jumonji Domain Containing 3 Modulates Macrophage Polarization and Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Chao; Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Gu, Linlin; Ryan, Alan J; Murthy, Shubha; Carter, A Brent

    2016-07-01

    M2 macrophages are implicated in the development of pulmonary fibrosis as they generate profibrotic signals. The polarization process, at least in part, is regulated by epigenetic modulation. Because Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase-induced H2O2 can polarize macrophages to a profibrotic M2 phenotype, we hypothesized that modulation of the redox state of the cell is involved in the epigenetic modulation of the macrophage phenotype. In this study, we show that signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (STAT6) regulates Jumonji domain containing (Jmjd) 3, a histone H3 lysine 27 demethylase, and mutation of a redox-sensitive cysteine in STAT6 attenuates jmjd3 expression. Moreover, Jmjd3 deficiency abrogates profibrotic M2 gene expression. Treatment with leflunomide, which reduces mitochondrial reactive oxygen species production and tyrosine phosphorylation, inhibits jmjd3 expression and M2 polarization, as well as development of a fibrotic phenotype. Taken together, these observations provide evidence that the redox regulation of Jmjd3 is a unique regulatory mechanism for Cu,Zn-superoxide dismutase-mediated profibrotic M2 polarization. Furthermore, leflunomide, which reduces reactive oxygen species production and tyrosine phosphorylation, may prove to be therapeutic in the treatment of asbestos-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

  14. Endothelial cell processing and alternatively spliced transcripts of factor VIII: potential implications for coagulation cascades and pulmonary hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire L Shovlin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Coagulation factor VIII (FVIII deficiency leads to haemophilia A. Conversely, elevated plasma levels are a strong predictor of recurrent venous thromboemboli and pulmonary hypertension phenotypes in which in situ thromboses are implicated. Extrahepatic sources of plasma FVIII are implicated, but have remained elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Immunohistochemistry of normal human lung tissue, and confocal microscopy, flow cytometry, and ELISA quantification of conditioned media from normal primary endothelial cells were used to examine endothelial expression of FVIII and coexpression with von Willebrand Factor (vWF, which protects secreted FVIII heavy chain from rapid proteloysis. FVIII transcripts predicted from database mining were identified by RT-PCR and sequencing. FVIII mAb-reactive material was demonstrated in CD31+ endothelial cells in normal human lung tissue, and in primary pulmonary artery, pulmonary microvascular, and dermal microvascular endothelial cells. In pulmonary endothelial cells, this protein occasionally colocalized with vWF, centered on Weibel Palade bodies. Pulmonary artery and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells secreted low levels of FVIII and vWF to conditioned media, and demonstrated cell surface expression of FVIII and vWF Ab-reacting proteins compared to an isotype control. Four endothelial splice isoforms were identified. Two utilize transcription start sites in alternate 5' exons within the int22h-1 repeat responsible for intron 22 inversions in 40% of severe haemophiliacs. A reciprocal relationship between the presence of short isoforms and full-length FVIII transcript suggested potential splice-switching mechanisms. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The pulmonary endothelium is confirmed as a site of FVIII secretion, with evidence of synthesis, cell surface expression, and coexpression with vWF. There is complex alternate transcription initiation from the FVIII gene. These findings provide a

  15. Suppressed Expression of T-Box Transcription Factors is Involved in Senescence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acquaah-Mensah, George; Malhotra, Deepti; Vulimiri, Madhulika; McDermott, Jason E.; Biswal, Shyam

    2012-06-19

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem. The etiology of COPD has been associated with apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. However, understanding of the molecular interactions that modulate COPD pathogenesis remains only partly resolved. We conducted an exploratory study on COPD etiology to identify the key molecular participants. We used information-theoretic algorithms including Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR), Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE), and Inferelator. We captured direct functional associations among genes, given a compendium of gene expression profiles of human lung epithelial cells. A set of genes differentially expressed in COPD, as reported in a previous study were superposed with the resulting transcriptional regulatory networks. After factoring in the properties of the networks, an established COPD susceptibility locus and domain-domain interactions involving protein products of genes in the generated networks, several molecular candidates were predicted to be involved in the etiology of COPD. These include COL4A3, CFLAR, GULP1, PDCD1, CASP10, PAX3, BOK, HSPD1, PITX2, and PML. Furthermore, T-box (TBX) genes and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), which are in a direct transcriptional regulatory relationship, emerged as preeminent participants in the etiology of COPD by means of senescence. Contrary to observations in neoplasms, our study reveals that the expression of genes and proteins in the lung samples from patients with COPD indicate an increased tendency towards cellular senescence. The expression of the anti-senescence mediators TBX transcription factors, chromatin modifiers histone deacetylases, and sirtuins was suppressed; while the expression of TBX-regulated cellular senescence markers such as CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and CAV1 was elevated in the peripheral lung tissue samples from patients with COPD. The critical balance between senescence

  16. Expression of tissue factor and forkhead box transcription factor O-1 in a rat model for chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Chaosheng; Wu, Dawen; Yang, Minxia; Chen, Yunfei; Wang, Caiyun; Zhong, Zhanghua; Lian, Ningfang; Chen, Hua; Wu, Shuang

    2016-11-01

    Few reports have examined tissue factor (TF) and forkhead box transcription factor O-1 (FoxO1) expression in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) animal models. To investigate the role of TF and FoxO1 and their interactions during CTEPH pathogenesis in a rat model. Autologous blood clots were repeatedly injected into the pulmonary arteries through right jugular vein to induce a rat model of CTEPH. Hemodynamic parameters, histopathology, and TF and FoxO1expression levels were detected. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP), pulmonary vascular resistance and vessel wall area/total area (WA/TA) ratio in the experiment group increased significantly than sham group (P model of CTEPH can be successfully established by the injection of autologous blood clots into the pulmonary artery. TF and FoxO1 may play a key role in vascular remodeling during CTEPH pathogenesis.

  17. Precisely modulated pathogenicity island interference with late phage gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ram, Geeta; Chen, John; Ross, Hope F; Novick, Richard P

    2014-10-07

    Having gone to great evolutionary lengths to develop resistance to bacteriophages, bacteria have come up with resistance mechanisms directed at every aspect of the bacteriophage life cycle. Most genes involved in phage resistance are carried by plasmids and other mobile genetic elements, including bacteriophages and their relatives. A very special case of phage resistance is exhibited by the highly mobile phage satellites, staphylococcal pathogenicity islands (SaPIs), which carry and disseminate superantigen and other virulence genes. Unlike the usual phage-resistance mechanisms, the SaPI-encoded interference mechanisms are carefully crafted to ensure that a phage-infected, SaPI-containing cell will lyse, releasing the requisite crop of SaPI particles as well as a greatly diminished crop of phage particles. Previously described SaPI interference genes target phage functions that are not required for SaPI particle production and release. Here we describe a SaPI-mediated interference system that affects expression of late phage gene transcription and consequently is required for SaPI and phage. Although when cloned separately, a single SaPI gene totally blocks phage production, its activity in situ is modulated accurately by a second gene, achieving the required level of interference. The advantage for the host bacteria is that the SaPIs curb excessive phage growth while enhancing their gene transfer activity. This activity is in contrast to that of the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs), which totally block phage growth at the cost of phage-mediated gene transfer. In staphylococci the SaPI strategy seems to have prevailed during evolution: The great majority of Staphylococcus aureus strains carry one or more SaPIs, whereas CRISPRs are extremely rare.

  18. Hyperosmolarity invokes distinct anti-inflammatory mechanisms in pulmonary epithelial cells: evidence from signaling and transcription layers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franklin L Wright

    Full Text Available Hypertonic saline (HTS has been used intravenously to reduce organ dysfunction following injury and as an inhaled therapy for cystic fibrosis lung disease. The role and mechanism of HTS inhibition was explored in the TNFα and IL-1β stimulation of pulmonary epithelial cells. Hyperosmolar (HOsm media (400 mOsm inhibited the production of select cytokines stimulated by TNFα and IL-1β at the level of mRNA translation, synthesis and release. In TNFα stimulated A549 cells, HOsm media inhibited I-κBα phosphorylation, NF-κB translocation into the nucleus and NF-κB nuclear binding. In IL-1β stimulated cells HOsm inhibited I-κBα phosphorylation without affecting NF-κB translocation or nuclear binding. Incubation in HOsm conditions inhibited both TNFα and IL-1β stimulated nuclear localization of interferon response factor 1 (IRF-1. Additional transcription factors such as AP-1, Erk-1/2, JNK and STAT-1 were unaffected by HOsm. HTS and sorbitol supplemented media produced comparable outcomes in all experiments, indicating that the effects of HTS were mediated by osmolarity, not by sodium. While not affecting MAPK modules discernibly in A549 cells, both HOsm conditions inhibit IRF-1 against TNFα or IL-1β, but inhibit p65 NF-kB translocation only against TNFα but not IL-1β. Thus, anti-inflammatory mechanisms of HTS/HOsm appear to disrupt cytokine signals at distinct intracellular steps.

  19. RNA Pol II Dynamics Modulate Co-transcriptional Chromatin Modification, CTD Phosphorylation, and Transcriptional Direction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Nova; Saldi, Tassa; Sheridan, Ryan M; Cortazar, Michael A; Bentley, David L

    2017-05-18

    Eukaryotic genes are marked by conserved post-translational modifications on the RNA pol II C-terminal domain (CTD) and the chromatin template. How the 5'-3' profiles of these marks are established is poorly understood. Using pol II mutants in human cells, we found that slow transcription repositioned specific co-transcriptionally deposited chromatin modifications; histone H3 lysine 36 trimethyl (H3K36me3) shifted within genes toward 5' ends, and histone H3 lysine 4 dimethyl (H3K4me2) extended farther upstream of start sites. Slow transcription also evoked a hyperphosphorylation of CTD Ser2 residues at 5' ends of genes that is conserved in yeast. We propose a "dwell time in the target zone" model to explain the effects of transcriptional dynamics on the establishment of co-transcriptionally deposited protein modifications. Promoter-proximal Ser2 phosphorylation is associated with a longer pol II dwell time at start sites and reduced transcriptional polarity because of strongly enhanced divergent antisense transcription at promoters. These results demonstrate that pol II dynamics help govern the decision between sense and divergent antisense transcription. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Protocatechuic aldehyde ameliorates experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating HMGB1/RAGE pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liang, E-mail: countryspring@sina.com; Ji, Yunxia, E-mail: 413499057@qq.com; Kang, Zechun, E-mail: davidjiangwl@163.com; Lv, Changjun, E-mail: Lucky_lcj@sina.com; Jiang, Wanglin, E-mail: jwl518@163.com

    2015-02-15

    An abnormal high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) activation and a decrease in receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) play a key role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Protocatechuic aldehyde (PA) is a naturally occurring compound, which is extracted from the degradation of phenolic acids. However, whether PA has anti-fibrotic functions is unknown. In this study, the effects of PA on the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells, on the apoptosis of human type I alveolar epithelial cells (AT I), on the proliferation of human lung fibroblasts (HLF-1) in vitro, and on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo were investigated. PA treatment resulted in a reduction of EMT in A549 cells with a decrease in vimentin and HMGB, an increase of E-cadherin and RAGE, a reduction of HLF-1 proliferation with a decrease of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Apoptosis of AT I was attenuated with an increase of RAGE. PA ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats with a reduction of histopathological scores and collagen deposition, and a lower FGF-2, PDGF, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and HMGB1 expression, whereas higher RAGE was found in BLM-instilled lungs. Through the decrease of HGMB1 and the regulation of RAGE, PA reversed the EMT, inhibited HLF-1 proliferation as well as reduced apoptosis in AT I, and prevented pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PA prevents experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating HMGB1/RAGE pathway. - Highlights: • PA prevents EMT, reduces the apoptosis of AT1 in vitro. • PA decreases proliferation of HLF-1, reduces PDGF and FGF expression in vitro. • PA prevents experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating the HMGB1/RAGE pathway.

  1. Reverse-engineering transcriptional modules from gene expression data

    OpenAIRE

    Michoel, Tom; De Smet, Riet; Joshi, Anagha; Marchal, Kathleen; de Peer, Yves Van

    2009-01-01

    "Module networks" are a framework to learn gene regulatory networks from expression data using a probabilistic model in which coregulated genes share the same parameters and conditional distributions. We present a method to infer ensembles of such networks and an averaging procedure to extract the statistically most significant modules and their regulators. We show that the inferred probabilistic models extend beyond the data set used to learn the models.

  2. TRANSFAC and its module TRANSCompel: transcriptional gene regulation in eukaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matys, V; Kel-Margoulis, O V; Fricke, E; Liebich, I; Land, S; Barre-Dirrie, A; Reuter, I; Chekmenev, D; Krull, M; Hornischer, K; Voss, N; Stegmaier, P; Lewicki-Potapov, B; Saxel, H; Kel, A E; Wingender, E

    2006-01-01

    The TRANSFAC database on transcription factors, their binding sites, nucleotide distribution matrices and regulated genes as well as the complementing database TRANSCompel on composite elements have been further enhanced on various levels. A new web interface with different search options and integrated versions of Match and Patch provides increased functionality for TRANSFAC. The list of databases which are linked to the common GENE table of TRANSFAC and TRANSCompel has been extended by: Ensembl, UniGene, EntrezGene, HumanPSD and TRANSPRO. Standard gene names from HGNC, MGI and RGD, are included for human, mouse and rat genes, respectively. With the help of InterProScan, Pfam, SMART and PROSITE domains are assigned automatically to the protein sequences of the transcription factors. TRANSCompel contains now, in addition to the COMPEL table, a separate table for detailed information on the experimental EVIDENCE on which the composite elements are based. Finally, for TRANSFAC, in respect of data growth, in particular the gain of Drosophila transcription factor binding sites (by courtesy of the Drosophila DNase I footprint database) and of Arabidopsis factors (by courtesy of DATF, Database of Arabidopsis Transcription Factors) has to be stressed. The here described public releases, TRANSFAC 7.0 and TRANSCompel 7.0, are accessible under http://www.gene-regulation.com/pub/databases.html.

  3. An Iterative Time Windowed Signature Algorithm for Time Dependent Transcription Module Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Jia; Gao, Shou-Jiang; Huang, Yufei

    2008-01-01

    An algorithm for the discovery of time varying modules using genome-wide expression data is present here. When applied to large-scale time serious data, our method is designed to discover not only the transcription modules but also their timing information, which is rarely annotated by the existing approaches. Rather than assuming commonly defined time constant transcription modules, a module is depicted as a set of genes that are co-regulated during a specific period of time, i.e., a time dependent transcription module (TDTM). A rigorous mathematical definition of TDTM is provided, which is serve as an objective function for retrieving modules. Based on the definition, an effective signature algorithm is proposed that iteratively searches the transcription modules from the time series data. The proposed method was tested on the simulated systems and applied to the human time series microarray data during Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) infection. The result has been verified by Expression Analysis Systematic Explorer.

  4. Modulation of p53's transcriptional function by small molecules

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    p53 tumour suppressor is a transcriptional factor which induces apoptosis or growth arrest in response to stress thus eliminating damaged cells. p53 function is frequently abrogated in tumours either via inactivation mutations in the TP53 gene or by elevated activity of p53 negative regulators HDM2 and HDMX. Therefore application of small molecules that reactivate p53 function is a promising strategy for anti-cancer therapy. In addition, small molecules can serve as valuable research tool to ...

  5. Modulation of Aanat gene transcription in the rat pineal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Anthony K; Chik, Constance L

    2010-01-01

    The main function of the rat pineal gland is to transform the circadian rhythm generated in the suprachiasmatic nucleus into a rhythmic signal of circulating melatonin characterized by a large nocturnal increase that closely reflects the duration of night period. This is achieved through the tight coupling between environmental lighting and the expression of arylalkylamine-N-acetyltransferase, the rhythm-controlling enzyme in melatonin synthesis. The initiation of Aanat transcription at night is controlled largely by the norepinephrine-stimulated phosphorylation of cAMP response element-binding protein by protein kinase A. However, to accurately reflect the duration of darkness, additional signaling mechanisms also participate to fine-tune the temporal profile of adrenergic-induced Aanat transcription. Here, we reviewed some of these signaling mechanisms, with emphasis on the more recent findings. These signaling mechanisms can be divided into two groups: those involving modification of constitutively expressed proteins and those requiring synthesis of new proteins. This review highlights the pineal gland as an excellent model system for studying neurotransmitter-regulated rhythmic gene expression.

  6. Transcriptional Modulation of Squalene Synthase Genes in Barley Treated with PGPR

    OpenAIRE

    Anam eYousaf; Abdul eQadir; Tehmina eAnjum; Aqeel eAhmad

    2015-01-01

    Phytosterol contents and food quality of plant produce is directly associated with transcription of gene Squalene Synthase (SS). In current study, barley plants were treated with different rhizobacterial strains under semi controlled (27±3°C) greenhouse conditions in order to modulate expression of SS gene. Plant samples were analysed through semi-quantitative PCR to evaluate effect of rhizobacterial application on transcriptional status of squalene synthase. Results revealed that among four ...

  7. Transcriptional modulation of squalene synthase genes in barley treated with PGPR

    OpenAIRE

    Yousaf, Anam; Qadir, Abdul; Anjum, Tehmina; Ahmad, Aqeel

    2015-01-01

    Phytosterol contents and food quality of plant produce is directly associated with transcription of gene squalene synthase (SS). In current study, barley plants were treated with different rhizobacterial strains under semi controlled (27 ± 3°C) greenhouse conditions in order to modulate expression of SS gene. Plant samples were analyzed through semi-quantitative PCR to evaluate effect of rhizobacterial application on transcriptional status of SS. Results revealed that among four SS genes (i.e...

  8. Global O-GlcNAc levels modulate transcription of the adipocyte secretome during chronic insulin resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edith E Wollaston-Hayden

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increased flux through the hexosamine biosynthetic pathway and the corresponding increase in intracellular glycosylation of proteins via O-linked β-N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc is sufficient to induce insulin resistance (IR in multiple systems. Previously, our group used shotgun proteomics to identify multiple rodent adipocytokines and secreted proteins whose levels are modulated upon the induction of IR by indirectly and directly modulating O-GlcNAc levels. We have validated the relative levels of several of these factors using immunoblotting. Since adipocytokines levels are regulated primarily at the level of transcription and O-GlcNAc alters the function of many transcription factors, we hypothesized that elevated O-GlcNAc levels on key transcription factors are modulating secreted protein expression. Here, we show that upon the elevation of O-GlcNAc levels and the induction of IR in mature 3T3-F442a adipocytes, the transcript levels of multiple secreted proteins reflect the modulation observed at the protein level. We validate the transcript levels in male mouse models of diabetes. Using inguinal fat pads from the severely IR db/db mouse model and the mildly IR diet-induced mouse model, we have confirmed that the secreted proteins regulated by O-GlcNAc modulation in cell culture are likewise modulated in the whole animal upon a shift to IR. By comparing the promoters of similarly regulated genes, we determine that Sp1 is a common cis-acting element. Furthermore, we show that the LPL and SPARC promoters are enriched for Sp1 and O-GlcNAc modified proteins during insulin resistance in adipocytes. Thus, the O-GlcNAc modification of proteins bound to promoters, including Sp1, is linked to adipocytokine transcription during insulin resistance.

  9. A role for phosphorylated Pol II CTD in modulating transcription coupled histone dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, Marla M; Govind, Chhabi K

    2011-03-01

    Histone acetylation modulates histone occupancy both at promoters and in coding sequences. Based on our recent observation that HDACs in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are co-transcriptionally recruited to coding regions by elongating polymerases, we propose a model in which Pol II facilitates recruitment of chromatin remodeling complexes as well as other factors required for productive elongation.

  10. The cyclic AMP response element modulator regulates transcription of the TCR zeta-chain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tenbrock, K; Kyttaris, VC; Ahlmann, M; Ehrchen, JA; Tolnay, M; Melkonyan, H; Mawrin, C; Roth, J; Sorg, C; Juang, YT; Tsokos, GC

    2005-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematusus T cells display decreased amounts of TCR zeta mRNA that results in part from limited binding of the transcriptional enhancer Elf-1 to the TCR zeta promoter. We have identified a new cis-binding site for the cAMP response element (CRE) modulator (CREM) on the TCR zeta pro

  11. Vagal Reactions during Cryoballoon-Based Pulmonary Vein Isolation: A Clue for Autonomic Nervous System Modulation?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaël Peyrol

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF is known to be initiated by rapid firing of pulmonary veins (PV and non-PV triggers, the crucial role of cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS in the initiation and maintenance of AF has long been appreciated in both experimental and clinical studies. The cardiac intrinsic ANS is composed of ganglionated plexi (GPs, located close to the left atrium-pulmonary vein junctions and a vast network of interconnecting neurons. Ablation strategies aiming for complete PV isolation (PVI remain the cornerstone of AF ablation procedures. However, several observational studies and few randomized studies have suggested that GP ablation, as an adjunctive strategy, might achieve better clinical outcomes in patients undergoing radiofrequency-based PVI for both paroxysmal and nonparoxysmal AF. In these patients, vagal reactions (VR such as vagally mediated bradycardia or asystole are thought to reflect intrinsic cardiac ANS modulation and/or denervation. Vagal reactions occurring during cryoballoon- (CB- based PVI have been previously reported; however, little is known on resulting ANS modulation and/or prevalence and significance of vagal reactions during PVI with the CB technique. We conducted a review of prevalence, putative mechanisms, and significance of VR during CB-based PVI.

  12. Gene Networks in the Wild: Identifying Transcriptional Modules that Mediate Coral Resistance to Experimental Heat Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Noah H; Seneca, Francois O; Palumbi, Stephen R

    2015-12-28

    Organisms respond to environmental variation partly through changes in gene expression, which underlie both homeostatic and acclimatory responses to environmental stress. In some cases, so many genes change in expression in response to different influences that understanding expression patterns for all these individual genes becomes difficult. To reduce this problem, we use a systems genetics approach to show that variation in the expression of thousands of genes of reef-building corals can be explained as variation in the expression of a small number of coexpressed "modules." Modules were often enriched for specific cellular functions and varied predictably among individuals, experimental treatments, and physiological state. We describe two transcriptional modules for which expression levels immediately after heat stress predict bleaching a day later. One of these early "bleaching modules" is enriched for sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins, particularly E26 transformation-specific (ETS)-family transcription factors. The other module is enriched for extracellular matrix proteins. These classes of bleaching response genes are clear in the modular gene expression analysis we conduct but are much more difficult to discern in single gene analyses. Furthermore, the ETS-family module shows repeated differences in expression among coral colonies grown in the same common garden environment, suggesting a heritable genetic or epigenetic basis for these expression polymorphisms. This finding suggests that these corals harbor high levels of gene-network variation, which could facilitate rapid evolution in the face of environmental change.

  13. ATXN1L, CIC, and ETS Transcription Factors Modulate Sensitivity to MAPK Pathway Inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Belinda; Krall, Elsa Beyer; Aguirre, Andrew James; Kim, Miju; Widlund, Hans Ragnar; Doshi, Mihir Bhavik; Sicinska, Ewa; Sulahian, Rita; Goodale, Amy; Cowley, Glenn Spencer; Piccioni, Federica; Doench, John Gerard; Root, David Edward; Hahn, William Chun

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Intrinsic resistance and RTK-RAS-MAPK pathway reactivation has limited the effectiveness of MEK and RAF inhibitors (MAPKi) in RAS- and RAF-mutant cancers. To identify genes that modulate sensitivity to MAPKi, we performed genome scale CRISPR-Cas9 loss-of-function screens in two KRAS-mutant pancreatic cancer cell lines treated with the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib. Loss of CIC, a transcriptional repressor of ETV1, 4, and 5, promoted survival in the setting of MAPKi in cancer cells derived from several lineages. ATXN1L deletion, which reduces CIC protein, or ectopic expression of ETV1, 4, or 5 also modulated sensitivity to trametinib. ATXN1L expression inversely correlates with response to MAPKi inhibition in clinical studies. These observations identify the ATXN1L-CIC-ETS transcription factor axis as a mediator of resistance to MAPKi. PMID:28178529

  14. STAT3-Interacting Proteins as Modulators of Transcription Factor Function: Implications to Targeted Cancer Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Jennifer E; Frank, David A

    2016-04-19

    The oncogenic transcription factor STAT3 is inappropriately activated in multiple hematopoietic and solid malignancies, in which it drives the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and angiogenesis. Thus far, strategies to inhibit the function of STAT3 have focused on blocking the function of its activating kinases or sequestering its DNA binding ability. A less well-explored aspect of STAT3 function is its interaction with other proteins, which can modulate the oncogenic activity of STAT3 via its subcellular localization, DNA binding ability, and recruitment of transcriptional machinery. Herein we summarize what is currently known about STAT3-interacting proteins and describe the utility of a proteomics-based approach for successfully identifying and characterizing novel STAT3-interacting proteins that affect STAT3 transcriptional activity and oncogenic function.

  15. IQGAP1 Binds to Yes-associated Protein (YAP) and Modulates Its Transcriptional Activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayedyahossein, Samar; Li, Zhigang; Hedman, Andrew C; Morgan, Chase J; Sacks, David B

    2016-09-09

    During development, the Hippo signaling pathway regulates key physiological processes, such as control of organ size, regeneration, and stem cell biology. Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a major transcriptional co-activator of the Hippo pathway. The scaffold protein IQGAP1 interacts with more than 100 binding partners to integrate diverse signaling pathways. In this study, we report that IQGAP1 binds to YAP and modulates its activity. IQGAP1 and YAP co-immunoprecipitated from cells. In vitro analysis with pure proteins demonstrated a direct interaction between IQGAP1 and YAP. Analysis with multiple fragments of each protein showed that the interaction occurs via the IQ domain of IQGAP1 and the TEAD-binding domain of YAP. The interaction between IQGAP1 and YAP has functional effects. Knock-out of endogenous IQGAP1 significantly increased the formation of nuclear YAP-TEAD complexes. Transcription assays were performed with IQGAP1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts and HEK293 cells with IQGAP1 knockdown by CRISPR/Cas9. Quantification demonstrated that YAP-TEAD-mediated transcription in cells lacking IQGAP1 was significantly greater than in control cells. These data reveal that IQGAP1 binds to YAP and modulates its co-transcriptional function, suggesting that IQGAP1 participates in Hippo signaling. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. IQGAP1 Binds to Yes-associated Protein (YAP) and Modulates Its Transcriptional Activity *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayedyahossein, Samar; Li, Zhigang; Hedman, Andrew C.; Morgan, Chase J.

    2016-01-01

    During development, the Hippo signaling pathway regulates key physiological processes, such as control of organ size, regeneration, and stem cell biology. Yes-associated protein (YAP) is a major transcriptional co-activator of the Hippo pathway. The scaffold protein IQGAP1 interacts with more than 100 binding partners to integrate diverse signaling pathways. In this study, we report that IQGAP1 binds to YAP and modulates its activity. IQGAP1 and YAP co-immunoprecipitated from cells. In vitro analysis with pure proteins demonstrated a direct interaction between IQGAP1 and YAP. Analysis with multiple fragments of each protein showed that the interaction occurs via the IQ domain of IQGAP1 and the TEAD-binding domain of YAP. The interaction between IQGAP1 and YAP has functional effects. Knock-out of endogenous IQGAP1 significantly increased the formation of nuclear YAP-TEAD complexes. Transcription assays were performed with IQGAP1-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts and HEK293 cells with IQGAP1 knockdown by CRISPR/Cas9. Quantification demonstrated that YAP-TEAD-mediated transcription in cells lacking IQGAP1 was significantly greater than in control cells. These data reveal that IQGAP1 binds to YAP and modulates its co-transcriptional function, suggesting that IQGAP1 participates in Hippo signaling. PMID:27440047

  17. Comparative analysis of module-based versus direct methods for reverse-engineering transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshi Anagha

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A myriad of methods to reverse-engineer transcriptional regulatory networks have been developed in recent years. Direct methods directly reconstruct a network of pairwise regulatory interactions while module-based methods predict a set of regulators for modules of coexpressed genes treated as a single unit. To date, there has been no systematic comparison of the relative strengths and weaknesses of both types of methods. Results We have compared a recently developed module-based algorithm, LeMoNe (Learning Module Networks, to a mutual information based direct algorithm, CLR (Context Likelihood of Relatedness, using benchmark expression data and databases of known transcriptional regulatory interactions for Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A global comparison using recall versus precision curves hides the topologically distinct nature of the inferred networks and is not informative about the specific subtasks for which each method is most suited. Analysis of the degree distributions and a regulator specific comparison show that CLR is 'regulator-centric', making true predictions for a higher number of regulators, while LeMoNe is 'target-centric', recovering a higher number of known targets for fewer regulators, with limited overlap in the predicted interactions between both methods. Detailed biological examples in E. coli and S. cerevisiae are used to illustrate these differences and to prove that each method is able to infer parts of the network where the other fails. Biological validation of the inferred networks cautions against over-interpreting recall and precision values computed using incomplete reference networks. Conclusion Our results indicate that module-based and direct methods retrieve largely distinct parts of the underlying transcriptional regulatory networks. The choice of algorithm should therefore be based on the particular biological problem of interest and not on global metrics which cannot be

  18. Aldosterone Inactivates the Endothelin-B Receptor via a Cysteinyl Thiol Redox Switch to Decrease Pulmonary Endothelial Nitric Oxide Levels and Modulate Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maron, Bradley A.; Zhang, Ying-Yi; White, Kevin; Chan, Stephen Y.; Handy, Diane E.; Mahoney, Christopher E.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized, in part, by decreased endothelial nitric oxide (NO•) production and elevated levels of endothelin-1. Endothelin-1 is known to stimulate endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) via the endothelin-B receptor (ETB), suggesting that this signaling pathway is perturbed in PAH. Endothelin-1 also stimulates adrenal aldosterone synthesis; in systemic blood vessels, hyperaldosteronism induces vascular dysfunction by increasing endothelial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and decreasing NO• levels. We hypothesized that aldosterone modulates PAH by disrupting ETB-eNOS signaling through a mechanism involving increased pulmonary endothelial oxidant stress. Methods and Results In rats with PAH, elevated endothelin-1 levels were associated with elevated aldosterone levels in plasma and lung tissue and decreased lung NO• metabolites in the absence of left heart failure. In human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs), endothelin-1 increased aldosterone levels via PGC-1α/steroidogenesis factor-1-dependent upregulation of aldosterone synthase. Aldosterone also increased ROS production, which oxidatively modified cysteinyl thiols in the eNOS-activating region of ETB to decrease endothelin-1-stimulated eNOS activity. Substitution of ETB-Cys405 with alanine improved ETB-dependent NO• synthesis under conditions of oxidant stress, confirming that Cys405 is a redox sensitive thiol that is necessary for ETB-eNOS signaling. In HPAECs, mineralocorticoid receptor antagonism with spironolactone decreased aldosterone-mediated ROS generation and restored ETB-dependent NO• production. Spironolactone or eplerenone prevented or reversed pulmonary vascular remodeling and improved cardiopulmonary hemodynamics in two animal models of PAH in vivo. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that aldosterone modulates an ETB cysteinyl thiol redox switch to decrease pulmonary endothelium-derived NO• and promote PAH

  19. Pulmonary multifunctional nano-oncological modules for lung cancer treatment and prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shete, Harshad K; Vyas, Swati S; Patravale, Vandana B; Disouza, John I

    2014-09-01

    Mortality associated with lung cancer and its metastasis has outnumbered those related to other forms of cancer. Despite being a directly accessible organ, conventional oncological strategies exhibiting prolific outcome in treatment and prevention of lung cancer is far from reality. This is attributed to numerous challenges posed by lung environment. The extracellular aura of lung comprises immensely complicated structures, ciliary escalators, omnipresence of mucus and alveolar fluid, and macrophagial uptake which presents an array of impediments to the arrival of therapeutic moiety at the tumor site. Besides these, intracellular obstacles viz enzymatic degradation, cell membrane translocation, endosomal escape and/or nuclear entry also limit superior therapeutic efficacy. The current review elaborates wide-ranging challenges to lung cancer treatment and its circumvention by latest developments in multifunctional nano-oncological modules delivered via the pulmonary route-which smartly deal with the abovementioned issues and bestow positivity to this complication.

  20. Dendrimer nanocarriers for transport modulation across models of the pulmonary epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharatwaj, Balaji; Mohammad, Abdul Khader; Dimovski, Radovan; Cassio, Fernando L; Bazito, Reinaldo C; Conti, Denise; Fu, Qiang; Reineke, Joshua; da Rocha, Sandro R P

    2015-03-02

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of PEGylation on the interaction of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer nanocarriers (DNCs) with in vitro and in vivo models of the pulmonary epithelium. Generation-3 PAMAM dendrimers with varying surface densities of PEG 1000 Da were synthesized and characterized. The results revealed that the apical to basolateral transport of DNCs across polarized Calu-3 monolayers increases with an increase in PEG surface density. DNC having the greatest number of PEG groups (n = 25) on their surface traversed at a rate 10-fold greater than its non-PEGylated counterpart, in spite of their larger size. This behavior was attributed to a significant reduction in charge density upon PEGylation. We also observed that PEGylation can be used to modulate cellular internalization. The total uptake of PEG-free DNC into polarized Calu-3 monolayers was 12% (w/w) vs 2% (w/w) for that with 25 PEGs. Polarization is also shown to be of great relevance in studying this in vitro model of the lung epithelium. The rate of absorption of DNCs administered to mice lungs increased dramatically when conjugated with 25 PEG groups, thus supporting the in vitro results. The exposure obtained for the DNC with 25PEG was determined to be very high, with peak plasma concentrations reaching 5 μg·mL(-1) within 3 h. The combined in vitro and in vivo results shown here demonstrate that PEGylation can be potentially used to modulate the internalization and transport of DNCs across the pulmonary epithelium. Modified dendrimers thereby may serve as a valuable platform that can be tailored to target the lung tissue for treating local diseases, or the circulation, using the lung as pathway to the bloodstream, for systemic delivery.

  1. Optogenetic Modulation of Intracellular Signalling and Transcription: Focus on Neuronal Plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eleftheriou, Cyril; Cesca, Fabrizia; Maragliano, Luca; Benfenati, Fabio; Maya-Vetencourt, Jose Fernando

    2017-01-01

    Several fields in neuroscience have been revolutionized by the advent of optogenetics, a technique that offers the possibility to modulate neuronal physiology in response to light stimulation. This innovative and far-reaching tool provided unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution to explore the activity of neural circuits underlying cognition and behaviour. With an exponential growth in the discovery and synthesis of new photosensitive actuators capable of modulating neuronal networks function, other fields in biology are experiencing a similar re-evolution. Here, we review the various optogenetic toolboxes developed to influence cellular physiology as well as the diverse ways in which these can be engineered to precisely modulate intracellular signalling and transcription. We also explore the processes required to successfully express and stimulate these photo-actuators in vivo before discussing how such tools can enlighten our understanding of neuronal plasticity at the systems level.

  2. The HY5-PIF regulatory module coordinates light and temperature control of photosynthetic gene transcription.

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    Gabriela Toledo-Ortiz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability to interpret daily and seasonal alterations in light and temperature signals is essential for plant survival. This is particularly important during seedling establishment when the phytochrome photoreceptors activate photosynthetic pigment production for photoautotrophic growth. Phytochromes accomplish this partly through the suppression of phytochrome interacting factors (PIFs, negative regulators of chlorophyll and carotenoid biosynthesis. While the bZIP transcription factor long hypocotyl 5 (HY5, a potent PIF antagonist, promotes photosynthetic pigment accumulation in response to light. Here we demonstrate that by directly targeting a common promoter cis-element (G-box, HY5 and PIFs form a dynamic activation-suppression transcriptional module responsive to light and temperature cues. This antagonistic regulatory module provides a simple, direct mechanism through which environmental change can redirect transcriptional control of genes required for photosynthesis and photoprotection. In the regulation of photopigment biosynthesis genes, HY5 and PIFs do not operate alone, but with the circadian clock. However, sudden changes in light or temperature conditions can trigger changes in HY5 and PIFs abundance that adjust the expression of common target genes to optimise photosynthetic performance and growth.

  3. The quassinoid isobrucein B reduces inflammatory hyperalgesia and cytokine production by post-transcriptional modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Rangel L; Lopes, Alexandre H; França, Rafael O; Vieira, Sílvio M; Silva, Ellen C C; Amorim, Rodrigo C N; Cunha, Fernando Q; Pohlit, Adrian M; Cunha, Thiago M

    2015-02-27

    Isobrucein B (1) is a quassinoid isolated from the Amazonian medicinal plant Picrolemma sprucei. Herein we investigate the anti-inflammatory and antihyperalgesic effects of this quassinoid. Isobrucein B (1) (0.5-5 mg/kg) inhibited carrageenan-induced inflammatory hyperalgesia in mice in a dose-dependent manner. Reduced hyperalgesia was associated with reduction in both neutrophil migration and pronociceptive cytokine production. Pretreatment with 1 inhibited in vitro production/release of cytokines TNF, IL-1β, and KC/CXCL1 by lipopolysaccharide-stimulated macrophages. To investigate its molecular mechanism, RAW 264.7 macrophages with a luciferase reporter gene controlled by the NF-κB promoter were used (RAW 264.7-Luc). Quassinoid 1 reduced the luminescence emission by RAW 264.7-Luc stimulated by different compounds. Unexpectedly, NF-κB translocation to macrophage nuclei was not inhibited by 1 when evaluated by Western blotting and immunofluorescence. Furthermore, quassinoid 1 did not change the levels of TNF mRNA transcription in stimulated macrophages, suggesting post-transcriptional modulation. In addition, constitutive expression of luciferase in RAW 264.7 cells transiently transfected with a plasmid containing a universal promoter was inhibited by 1. Thus, isobrucein B (1) displays anti-inflammatory and antihyperalgesic activities by nonselective post-transcriptional modulation, resulting in decreased production/release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and neutrophil migration.

  4. Coincident helminth infection modulates systemic inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary tuberculosis.

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    Parakkal Jovvian George

    Full Text Available Helminth infections are known to modulate innate and adaptive immune responses in active and latent tuberculosis (TB. However, the role of helminth infections in modulating responses associated with inflammation and immune activation (reflecting disease activity and/or severity in TB is not known.We measured markers of inflammation and immune activation in active pulmonary TB individuals (ATB with co-incidental Strongyloides stercoralis (Ss infection. These included systemic levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases and their endogenous inhibitors and immune activation markers. As a control, we measured the systemic levels of the same molecules in TB-uninfected individuals (NTB with or without Ss infection.Our data confirm that ATB is associated with elevated levels of the various measured molecules when compared to those seen in NTB. Our data also reveal that co-incident Ss infection in ATB individuals is associated with significantly decreased circulating levels of acute phase proteins, matrix metalloproteinases, tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases as well as the systemic immune activation markers, sCD14 and sCD163. These changes are specific to ATB since they are absent in NTB individuals with Ss infection.Our data therefore reveal a profound effect of Ss infection on the markers associated with TB disease activity and severity and indicate that co-incidental helminth infections might dampen the severity of TB disease.

  5. Studying the functional conservation of cis-regulatory modules and their transcriptional output

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    Bailey Timothy L

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs are distinct, genomic regions surrounding the target gene that can independently activate the promoter to drive transcription. The activation of a CRM is controlled by the binding of a certain combination of transcription factors (TFs. It would be of great benefit if the transcriptional output mediated by a specific CRM could be predicted. Of equal benefit would be identifying in silico a specific CRM as the driver of the expression in a specific tissue or situation. We extend a recently developed biochemical modeling approach to manage both prediction tasks. Given a set of TFs, their protein concentrations, and the positions and binding strengths of each of the TFs in a putative CRM, the model predicts the transcriptional output of the gene. Our approach predicts the location of the regulating CRM by using predicted TF binding sites in regions near the gene as input to the model and searching for the region that yields a predicted transcription rate most closely matching the known rate. Results Here we show the ability of the model on the example of one of the CRMs regulating the eve gene, MSE2. A model trained on the MSE2 in D. melanogaster was applied to the surrounding sequence of the eve gene in seven other Drosophila species. The model successfully predicts the correct MSE2 location and output in six out of eight Drosophila species we examine. Conclusion The model is able to generalize from D. melanogaster to other Drosophila species and accurately predicts the location and transcriptional output of MSE2 in those species. However, we also show that the current model is not specific enough to function as a genome-wide CRM scanner, because it incorrectly predicts other genomic regions to be MSE2s.

  6. Studying the functional conservation of cis-regulatory modules and their transcriptional output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Denis C; Bailey, Timothy L

    2008-04-29

    Cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) are distinct, genomic regions surrounding the target gene that can independently activate the promoter to drive transcription. The activation of a CRM is controlled by the binding of a certain combination of transcription factors (TFs). It would be of great benefit if the transcriptional output mediated by a specific CRM could be predicted. Of equal benefit would be identifying in silico a specific CRM as the driver of the expression in a specific tissue or situation. We extend a recently developed biochemical modeling approach to manage both prediction tasks. Given a set of TFs, their protein concentrations, and the positions and binding strengths of each of the TFs in a putative CRM, the model predicts the transcriptional output of the gene. Our approach predicts the location of the regulating CRM by using predicted TF binding sites in regions near the gene as input to the model and searching for the region that yields a predicted transcription rate most closely matching the known rate. Here we show the ability of the model on the example of one of the CRMs regulating the eve gene, MSE2. A model trained on the MSE2 in D. melanogaster was applied to the surrounding sequence of the eve gene in seven other Drosophila species. The model successfully predicts the correct MSE2 location and output in six out of eight Drosophila species we examine. The model is able to generalize from D. melanogaster to other Drosophila species and accurately predicts the location and transcriptional output of MSE2 in those species. However, we also show that the current model is not specific enough to function as a genome-wide CRM scanner, because it incorrectly predicts other genomic regions to be MSE2s.

  7. Knockdown of BACE1-AS Nonprotein-Coding Transcript Modulates Beta-Amyloid-Related Hippocampal Neurogenesis

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    Farzaneh Modarresi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Alzheimer's disease (AD is a devastating neurological disorder and the main cause of dementia in the elderly population worldwide. Adult neurogenesis appears to be upregulated very early in AD pathogenesis in response to some specific aggregates of beta-amyloid (Aβ peptides, exhausting the neuronal stem cell pools in the brain. Previously, we characterized a conserved nonprotein-coding antisense transcript for β-secretase-1 (BACE1, a critical enzyme in AD pathophysiology. We showed that the BACE1-antisense transcript (BACE1-AS is markedly upregulated in brain samples from AD patients and promotes the stability of the (sense BACE1 transcript. In the current paper, we examine the relationship between BACE1, BACE1-AS, adult neurogenesis markers, and amyloid plaque formation in amyloid precursor protein (APP transgenic mice (Tg-19959 of various ages. Results. Consistent with previous publications in other APP overexpressing mouse models, we found adult neurogenesis markers to be noticeably upregulated in Tg-19959 mice very early in the development of the disease. Knockdown of either one of BACE1 or BACE1-AS transcripts by continuous infusion of locked nucleic acid- (LNA- modified siRNAs into the third ventricle over the period of two weeks caused concordant downregulation of both transcripts in Tg-19959 mice. Downregulation of BACE1 mRNA was followed by reduction of BACE1 protein and insoluble Aβ. Modulation of BACE1 and BACE1-AS transcripts also altered oligomeric Aβ aggregation pattern, which was in turn associated with an increase in neurogenesis markers at the RNA and protein level. Conclusion. We found alterations in the RNA and protein concentrations of several adult neurogenesis markers, as well as non-protein-coding BACE1-AS transcripts, in parallel with the course of β-amyloid synthesis and aggregation in the brain of Tg15999 mice. In addition, by knocking down BACE1 or BACE1-AS (thereby reducing Aβ production and plaque

  8. Identification of Gene Transcription Start Sites and Enhancers Responding to Pulmonary Carbon Nanotube Exposure in Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornholdt, Jette; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Lilje, Bait

    2017-01-01

    Increased use of nanomaterials in industry, medicine, and consumer products has raised concerns over their toxicity. To ensure safe use of nanomaterials, understanding their biological effects at the molecular level is crucial. In particular, the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the cascade...... of genes activated by nanomaterial exposure are not well-characterized. To this end, we profiled the genome-wide usage of gene transcription start sites and linked active enhancer regions in lungs of C57BL/6 mice 24 h after intratracheal instillation of a single dose of the multiwalled carbon nanotube...... (MWCNT) Mitsui-7. Our results revealed a massive gene regulatory response, where expression of key inflammatory genes (e.g., Csf3, Il24, and Fgf23) was increased >100-fold 24 h after Mitsui-7 exposure. Many of the Mitsui-7-responsive transcription start sites were alternative transcription start sites...

  9. Modulation of CP2 family transcriptional activity by CRTR-1 and sumoylation.

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    Sarah To

    Full Text Available CRTR-1 is a member of the CP2 family of transcription factors. Unlike other members of the family which are widely expressed, CRTR-1 expression shows specific spatio-temporal regulation. Gene targeting demonstrates that CRTR-1 plays a central role in the maturation and function of the salivary glands and the kidney. CRTR-1 has also recently been identified as a component of the complex transcriptional network that maintains pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES cells. CRTR-1 was previously shown to be a repressor of transcription. We examine the activity of CRTR-1 in ES and other cells and show that CRTR-1 is generally an activator of transcription and that it modulates the activity of other family members, CP2, NF2d9 and altNF2d9, in a cell specific manner. We also demonstrate that CRTR-1 activity is regulated by sumoylation at a single major site, residue K30. These findings imply that functional redundancy with other family members may mask important roles for CRTR-1 in other tissues, including the blastocyst stage embryo and embryonic stem cells.

  10. Modulation of CP2 family transcriptional activity by CRTR-1 and sumoylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, Sarah; Rodda, Stephen J; Rathjen, Peter D; Keough, Rebecca A

    2010-07-22

    CRTR-1 is a member of the CP2 family of transcription factors. Unlike other members of the family which are widely expressed, CRTR-1 expression shows specific spatio-temporal regulation. Gene targeting demonstrates that CRTR-1 plays a central role in the maturation and function of the salivary glands and the kidney. CRTR-1 has also recently been identified as a component of the complex transcriptional network that maintains pluripotency in embryonic stem (ES) cells. CRTR-1 was previously shown to be a repressor of transcription. We examine the activity of CRTR-1 in ES and other cells and show that CRTR-1 is generally an activator of transcription and that it modulates the activity of other family members, CP2, NF2d9 and altNF2d9, in a cell specific manner. We also demonstrate that CRTR-1 activity is regulated by sumoylation at a single major site, residue K30. These findings imply that functional redundancy with other family members may mask important roles for CRTR-1 in other tissues, including the blastocyst stage embryo and embryonic stem cells.

  11. Direct observation of frequency modulated transcription in single cells using light activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson, Daniel R; Fritzsch, Christoph; Sun, Liang; Meng, Xiuhau; Lawrence, David S; Singer, Robert H

    2013-01-01

    Single-cell analysis has revealed that transcription is dynamic and stochastic, but tools are lacking that can determine the mechanism operating at a single gene. Here we utilize single-molecule observations of RNA in fixed and living cells to develop a single-cell model of steroid-receptor mediated gene activation. We determine that steroids drive mRNA synthesis by frequency modulation of transcription. This digital behavior in single cells gives rise to the well-known analog dose response across the population. To test this model, we developed a light-activation technology to turn on a single steroid-responsive gene and follow dynamic synthesis of RNA from the activated locus. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00750.001 PMID:24069527

  12. Modulation of CRISPR locus transcription by the repeat-binding protein Cbp1 in Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Ling; Kenchappa, Chandra Shekar; Peng, Xu

    2012-01-01

    CRISPR loci are essential components of the adaptive immune system of archaea and bacteria. They consist of long arrays of repeats separated by DNA spacers encoding guide RNAs (crRNA), which target foreign genetic elements. Cbp1 (CRISPR DNA repeat binding protein) binds specifically to the multiple...... direct repeats of CRISPR loci of members of the acidothermophilic, crenarchaeal order Sulfolobales. cbp1 gene deletion from Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A produced a strong reduction in pre-crRNA yields from CRISPR loci but did not inhibit the foreign DNA targeting capacity of the CRISPR/Cas system....... Conversely, overexpression of Cbp1 in S. islandicus generated an increase in pre-crRNA yields while the level of reverse strand transcripts from CRISPR loci remained unchanged. It is proposed that Cbp1 modulates production of longer pre-crRNA transcripts from CRISPR loci. A possible mechanism...

  13. Nerves projecting from the intrinsic cardiac ganglia of the pulmonary veins modulate sinoatrial node pacemaker function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarzoso, Manuel; Rysevaite, Kristina; Milstein, Michelle L.; Calvo, Conrado J.; Kean, Adam C.; Atienza, Felipe; Pauza, Dainius H.; Jalife, José; Noujaim, Sami F.

    2013-01-01

    Aims Pulmonary vein ganglia (PVG) are targets for atrial fibrillation ablation. However, the functional relevance of PVG to the normal heart rhythm remains unclear. Our aim was to investigate whether PVG can modulate sinoatrial node (SAN) function. Methods and results Forty-nine C57BL and seven Connexin40+/EGFP mice were studied. We used tyrosine-hydroxylase (TH) and choline-acetyltransferase immunofluorescence labelling to characterize adrenergic and cholinergic neural elements. PVG projected postganglionic nerves to the SAN, which entered the SAN as an extensive, mesh-like neural network. PVG neurones were adrenergic, cholinergic, and biphenotypic. Histochemical characterization of two human embryonic hearts showed similarities between mouse and human neuroanatomy: direct neural communications between PVG and SAN. In Langendorff perfused mouse hearts, PVG were stimulated using 200–2000 ms trains of pulses (300 μs, 400 µA, 200 Hz). PVG stimulation caused an initial heart rate (HR) slowing (36 ± 9%) followed by acceleration. PVG stimulation in the presence of propranolol caused HR slowing (43 ± 13%) that was sustained over 20 beats. PVG stimulation with atropine progressively increased HR. Time-course effects were enhanced with 1000 and 2000 ms trains (P < 0.05 vs. 200 ms). In optical mapping, PVG stimulation shifted the origin of SAN discharges. In five paroxysmal AF patients undergoing pulmonary vein ablation, application of radiofrequency energy to the PVG area during sinus rhythm produced a decrease in HR similar to that observed in isolated mouse hearts. Conclusion PVG have functional and anatomical biphenotypic characteristics. They can have significant effects on the electrophysiological control of the SAN. PMID:23559611

  14. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma as modulator of inflammation in pulmonary sarcoidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pejčić Tatjana

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR includes the family of ligand-activated transcription factors which belong to the group of nuclear hormone receptors and are connected to retinoid, glucocorticoid and thyroid hormone receptors. There are three subtypes of PPARs: PPARα (also known as NR1C3, PPARγ (known as NR1C1 and PPARδ (known as PPARβ or NR1C2. All of them take part in the metabolism, cell proliferation and immune response. PPARγ and PPARα are identified as important immunomodulators and potentially represent an anti-inflammatory target for respiratory diseases. PPARγ deficiency in the lungs has been observed in the inflammatory diseases such as asthma, pulmonary alveolar proteinosis, fibrosis and sarcoidosis, as well as in the animal models of the lung inflammation. A small number of papers concerned with PPARγ in sarcoidosis point to the lowered activity of this factor in the alveolar macrophages and a lowered gene expression for the PPARγ, while the activity is preserved in healthy individuals. At the same time, an increased activity of the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kB in the bronchoalveolar lavage has been recorded in patients with sarcoidosis. The reason for the decrease in the production of PPARγ in sarcoidosis remains unknown. Several possible mechanisms are mentioned: genetic defect with lowered production, down-regulation due to the increased values of IFN-γ or an increased decomposition of PPARγ. Further investigation will explain the mechanisms regarding the decreased production of PPARγ in sarcoidosis.

  15. PGE2 modulates the transcriptional activity of ERRa in prostate stromal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ning, Zhaochen; Du, Xiaoling; Zhang, Ju; Yang, Kuo; Miao, Lin; Zhu, Yan; Yuan, Hui; Wang, Linlin; Klocker, Helmut; Shi, Jiandang

    2014-12-01

    The regulation of the transcriptional activity of the estrogen receptor-related receptor a (ERRa) has not yet been clearly documented. Aromatase is a direct target gene of ERRa, and we previously reported that prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) increased the expression of ERRa in the prostate stromal cell line WPMY-1, which ultimately promoted estradiol production by enhancing aromatase gene transcription. Here, we show that PGE2 also affects aromatase expression by regulating ERRa transcriptional activity in prostate stromal cells. When the cells were cultured in serum-free medium, the expression of aromatase was not proportional to the ERRa protein level, if no other stimulation occurred, indicating the absence of a factor that activates ERRa. PGE2 could upregulate aromatase and ERRa response element (ERRE)-reporter expression and also enhance ERRa phosphorylation and nuclear localization. PGE2 functions through the PGE2 receptors (EP) 2 and EP4, which couple to adenylate cyclase. The activation of adenylate cyclase with Forskolin mimicked the PGE2-mediated enhancement of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation and ERRa target gene expression. Experiments using specific signaling pathway inhibitors showed that both phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and ERK are involved in ERRa activation, and the PI3K inhibitor was shown to abolish ERK activation. Our results suggest that PGE2 is a modulator of ERRa transcriptional activity. Furthermore, PGE2 activates the EP2/EP4-cAMP-PI3K-ERK signaling pathway, which enhanced ERRa transcriptional potentiality by increasing ERRa phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, subsequently promoting the expression of its target genes, such as aromatase.

  16. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couvigny, Benoît; de Wouters, Tomas; Kaci, Ghalia; Jacouton, Elsa; Delorme, Christine; Doré, Joël; Renault, Pierre; Blottière, Hervé M; Guédon, Eric; Lapaque, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB) in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor), we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health.

  17. Overview Article: Identifying transcriptional cis-regulatory modules in animal genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryamohan, Kushal; Halfon, Marc S.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is regulated through the activity of transcription factors and chromatin modifying proteins acting on specific DNA sequences, referred to as cis-regulatory elements. These include promoters, located at the transcription initiation sites of genes, and a variety of distal cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), the most common of which are transcriptional enhancers. Because regulated gene expression is fundamental to cell differentiation and acquisition of new cell fates, identifying, characterizing, and understanding the mechanisms of action of CRMs is critical for understanding development. CRM discovery has historically been challenging, as CRMs can be located far from the genes they regulate, have few readily-identifiable sequence characteristics, and for many years were not amenable to high-throughput discovery methods. However, the recent availability of complete genome sequences and the development of next-generation sequencing methods has led to an explosion of both computational and empirical methods for CRM discovery in model and non-model organisms alike. Experimentally, CRMs can be identified through chromatin immunoprecipitation directed against transcription factors or histone post-translational modifications, identification of nucleosome-depleted “open” chromatin regions, or sequencing-based high-throughput functional screening. Computational methods include comparative genomics, clustering of known or predicted transcription factor binding sites, and supervised machine-learning approaches trained on known CRMs. All of these methods have proven effective for CRM discovery, but each has its own considerations and limitations, and each is subject to a greater or lesser number of false-positive identifications. Experimental confirmation of predictions is essential, although shortcomings in current methods suggest that additional means of validation need to be developed. PMID:25704908

  18. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

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    Benoît Couvigny

    Full Text Available The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health.

  19. SUMOylation modulates the transcriptional activity of androgen receptor in a target gene and pathway selective manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutinen, Päivi; Malinen, Marjo; Heikkinen, Sami; Palvimo, Jorma J

    2014-07-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) plays an important regulatory role in prostate cancer. AR's transcriptional activity is regulated by androgenic ligands, but also by post-translational modifications, such as SUMOylation. To study the role of AR SUMOylation in genuine chromatin environment, we compared androgen-regulated gene expression and AR chromatin occupancy in PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines stably expressing wild-type (wt) or doubly SUMOylation site-mutated AR (AR-K386R,K520R). Our genome-wide gene expression analyses reveal that the SUMOylation modulates the AR function in a target gene and pathway selective manner. The transcripts that are differentially regulated by androgen and SUMOylation are linked to cellular movement, cell death, cellular proliferation, cellular development and cell cycle. Fittingly, SUMOylation mutant AR cells proliferate faster and are more sensitive to apoptosis. Moreover, ChIP-seq analyses show that the SUMOylation can modulate the chromatin occupancy of AR on many loci in a fashion that parallels their differential androgen-regulated expression. De novo motif analyses reveal that FOXA1, C/EBP and AP-1 motifs are differentially enriched at the wtAR- and the AR-K386R,K520R-preferred genomic binding positions. Taken together, our data indicate that SUMOylation does not simply repress the AR activity, but it regulates AR's interaction with the chromatin and the receptor's target gene selection.

  20. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih [Department of Life Sciences, Tzu-Chi University, 701 Chung-Yang Rd. Sec 3, Hualien 97004, Taiwan (China); Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott [Department of Medicine and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Ave., Boston 02115, MA (United States); Peng, Chih-Wen, E-mail: pengcw@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Department of Life Sciences, Tzu-Chi University, 701 Chung-Yang Rd. Sec 3, Hualien 97004, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection.

  1. Modulation of proteostasis by transcription factor NRF2 and impact in neurodegenerative diseases

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    Marta Pajares

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are linked to the accumulation of specific protein aggregates, suggesting an intimate connection between injured brain and loss of proteostasis. Proteostasis refers to all the processes by which cells control the abundance and folding of the proteome thanks to a wide network that integrates the regulation of signaling pathways, gene expression and protein degradation systems. This review attempts to summarize the most relevant findings about the transcriptional modulation of proteostasis exerted by the transcription factor NRF2 (nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2. NRF2 has been classically considered as the master regulator of the antioxidant cell response, although it is currently emerging as a key component of the transduction machinery to maintain proteostasis. As we will discuss, NRF2 could be envisioned as a hub that compiles emergency signals derived from misfolded protein accumulation in order to build a coordinated and perdurable transcriptional response. This is achieved by functions of NRF2 related to the control of genes involved in the maintenance of the endoplasmic reticulum physiology, the proteasome and autophagy.

  2. S-Nitrosylation-Mediated Redox Transcriptional Switch Modulates Neurogenesis and Neuronal Cell Death

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    Shu-ichi Okamoto

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Redox-mediated posttranslational modifications represent a molecular switch that controls major mechanisms of cell function. Nitric oxide (NO can mediate redox reactions via S-nitrosylation, representing transfer of an NO group to a critical protein thiol. NO is known to modulate neurogenesis and neuronal survival in various brain regions in disparate neurodegenerative conditions. However, a unifying molecular mechanism linking these phenomena remains unknown. Here, we report that S-nitrosylation of myocyte enhancer factor 2 (MEF2 transcription factors acts as a redox switch to inhibit both neurogenesis and neuronal survival. Structure-based analysis reveals that MEF2 dimerization creates a pocket, facilitating S-nitrosylation at an evolutionally conserved cysteine residue in the DNA binding domain. S-Nitrosylation disrupts MEF2-DNA binding and transcriptional activity, leading to impaired neurogenesis and survival in vitro and in vivo. Our data define a molecular switch whereby redox-mediated posttranslational modification controls both neurogenesis and neurodegeneration via a single transcriptional signaling cascade.

  3. Evaluation of a thoracic ultrasound training module for the detection of pneumothorax and pulmonary edema by prehospital physician care providers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marx Jean-Sebastian

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While ultrasound (US has continued to expedite diagnosis and therapy for critical care physicians inside the hospital system, the technology has been slow to diffuse into the pre-hospital system. Given the diagnostic benefits of thoracic ultrasound (TUS, we sought to evaluate image recognition skills for two important TUS applications; the identification of B-lines (used in the US diagnosis of pulmonary edema and the identification of lung sliding and comet tails (used in the US diagnosis of pneumothorax. In particular we evaluated the impact of a focused training module in a pre-hospital system that utilizes physicians as pre-hospital providers. Methods 27 Paris Service D'Aide Médicale Urgente (SAMU physicians at the Hôpital Necker with varying levels of US experience were given two twenty-five image recognition pre-tests; the first test had examples of both normal and pneumothorax lung US and the second had examples of both normal and pulmonary edema lung US. All 27 physicians then underwent the same didactic training modules. A post-test was administered upon completing the training module and results were recorded. Results Pre and post-test scores were compared for both the pneumothorax and the pulmonary edema modules. For the pneumothorax module, mean test scores increased from 10.3 +/- 4.1 before the training to 20.1 +/- 3.5 after (p Conclusion This brief training module resulted in significant improvement of image recognition skills for physicians both with and without previous ultrasound experience. Given that rapid diagnosis of these conditions in the pre-hospital system can change therapy, especially in systems where physicians can integrate this information into treatment decisions, the further diffusion of this technology would seem to be beneficial and deserves further study.

  4. Modulation of epidermal transcription circuits in psoriasis: new links between inflammation and hyperproliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R Swindell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Whole-genome expression profiling has been used to characterize molecular-level differences between psoriasis lesions and normal skin. Pathway analysis, however, is complicated by the fact that expression profiles have been derived from bulk skin biopsies with RNA derived from multiple cell types. RESULTS: We analyzed gene expression across a large sample of psoriatic (PP and uninvolved/normal (PN skin biopsies (n = 215 patients. We identified 1975 differentially expressed genes, including 8 associated with psoriasis susceptibility loci. To facilitate pathway analysis, PP versus PN differences in gene expression were analyzed with respect to 235 gene modules, each containing genes with a similar expression pattern in keratinocytes and epidermis. We identified 30 differentially expressed modules (DEMs biased towards PP-increased or PP-decreased expression. These DEMs were associated with regulatory axes involving cytokines (e.g., IFN-γ, IL-17A, TNF-α, transcription factors (e.g., STAT1, NF-κB, E2F, RUNX1 and chromatin modifiers (SETDB1. We identified an interferon-induced DEM with genes encoding anti-viral proteins (designated "STAT1-57", which was activated in psoriatic epidermis but repressed following biologic therapy. Genes within this DEM shared a motif near the transcription start site resembling the interferon-stimulated response element (ISRE. CONCLUSIONS: We analyzed a large patient cohort and developed a new approach for delineating epidermis-specific pathways and regulatory mechanisms that underlie altered gene expression in psoriasis. Our findings highlight previously unrecognized "transcription circuits" that can provide targets for development of non-systemic therapies.

  5. Stress-induced alterations in 5-HT1A receptor transcriptional modulators NUDR and Freud-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Kotarska, Katarzyna; Daigle, Mireille; Misztak, Paulina; Sowa-Kucma, Magdalena; Rafalo, Anna; Curzytek, Katarzyna; Kubera, Marta; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Nowak, Gabriel; Albert, Paul R

    2014-11-01

    The effect of stress on the mRNA and protein level of the 5-HT1A receptor and two of its key transcriptional modulators, NUDR and Freud-1, was examined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (Hp) using rodent models: olfactory bulbectomy (OB) and prenatal stress (PS) in male and female rats; chronic mild stress in male rats (CMS) and pregnancy stress. In PFC, CMS induced the most widespread changes, with significant reduction in both mRNA and protein levels of NUDR, 5-HT1A receptor and in Freud-1 mRNA; while in Hp 5-HT1A receptor and Freud-1 protein levels were also decreased. In male, but not female OB rats PFC Freud-1 and 5-HT1A receptor protein levels were reduced, while in Hp 5-HT1A receptor, Freud-1 and NUDR mRNA's but not protein were reduced. In PS rats PFC 5-HT1A receptor protein was reduced more in females than males; while in Hp Freud-1 protein was increased in females. In pregnancy stress, PFC NUDR, Freud-1 and 5-HT1A protein receptor levels were reduced, and in HP 5-HT1A receptor protein levels were also reduced; in HP only NUDR and Freud-1 mRNA levels were reduced. Overall, CMS and stress during pregnancy produced the most salient changes in 5-HT1A receptor and transcription factor expression, suggesting a primary role for altered transcription factor expression in chronic regulation of 5-HT1A receptor expression. By contrast, OB (in males) and PS (in females) produced gender-specific reductions in PFC 5-HT1A receptor protein levels, suggesting a role for post-transcriptional regulation. These and previous data suggest that chronic stress might be a key regulator of NUDR/Freud-1 gene expression.

  6. Evaluation of a thoracic ultrasound training module for the detection of pneumothorax and pulmonary edema by prehospital physician care providers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Vicki E; Lamhaut, Lionel; Capp, Roberta; Bosson, Nichole; Liteplo, Andrew; Marx, Jean-Sebastian; Carli, Pierre

    2009-01-01

    Background While ultrasound (US) has continued to expedite diagnosis and therapy for critical care physicians inside the hospital system, the technology has been slow to diffuse into the pre-hospital system. Given the diagnostic benefits of thoracic ultrasound (TUS), we sought to evaluate image recognition skills for two important TUS applications; the identification of B-lines (used in the US diagnosis of pulmonary edema) and the identification of lung sliding and comet tails (used in the US diagnosis of pneumothorax). In particular we evaluated the impact of a focused training module in a pre-hospital system that utilizes physicians as pre-hospital providers. Methods 27 Paris Service D'Aide Médicale Urgente (SAMU) physicians at the Hôpital Necker with varying levels of US experience were given two twenty-five image recognition pre-tests; the first test had examples of both normal and pneumothorax lung US and the second had examples of both normal and pulmonary edema lung US. All 27 physicians then underwent the same didactic training modules. A post-test was administered upon completing the training module and results were recorded. Results Pre and post-test scores were compared for both the pneumothorax and the pulmonary edema modules. For the pneumothorax module, mean test scores increased from 10.3 +/- 4.1 before the training to 20.1 +/- 3.5 after (p < 0.0001), out of 25 possible points. The standard deviation decreased as well, indicating a collective improvement. For the pulmonary edema module, mean test scores increased from 14.1 +/- 5.2 before the training to 20.9 +/- 2.4 after (p < 0.0001), out of 25 possible points. The standard deviation decreased again by more than half, indicating a collective improvement. Conclusion This brief training module resulted in significant improvement of image recognition skills for physicians both with and without previous ultrasound experience. Given that rapid diagnosis of these conditions in the pre-hospital system

  7. CITED2 modulates estrogen receptor transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lau, Wen Min; Doucet, Michele; Huang, David; Weber, Kristy L.; Kominsky, Scott L., E-mail: kominsc@jhmi.edu

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •The effects of elevated CITED2 on ER function in breast cancer cells are examined. •CITED2 enhances cell growth in the absence of estrogen and presence of tamoxifen. •CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of ER in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Cbp/p300-interacting transactivator with Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2) is a member of the CITED family of non-DNA binding transcriptional co-activators of the p300/CBP-mediated transcription complex. Previously, we identified CITED2 as being overexpressed in human breast tumors relative to normal mammary epithelium. Upon further investigation within the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive subset of these breast tumor samples, we found that CITED2 mRNA expression was elevated in those associated with poor survival. In light of this observation, we investigated the effect of elevated CITED2 levels on ER function. While ectopic overexpression of CITED2 in three ER-positive breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, and CAMA-1) did not alter cell proliferation in complete media, growth was markedly enhanced in the absence of exogenous estrogen. Correspondingly, cells overexpressing CITED2 demonstrated reduced sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effects of the selective estrogen receptor modulator, 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Subsequent studies revealed that basal ER transcriptional activity was elevated in CITED2-overexpressing cells and was further increased upon the addition of estrogen. Similarly, basal and estrogen-induced expression of the ER-regulated genes trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) and progesterone receptor (PGR) was higher in cells overexpressing CITED2. Concordant with this observation, ChIP analysis revealed higher basal levels of CITED2 localized to the TFF-1 and PGR promoters in cells with ectopic overexpression of CITED2, and these levels were elevated further in response to estrogen stimulation. Taken together, these data indicate that CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co

  8. Bach1 siRNA attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis by modulating oxidative stress in mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; Zheng, Yi

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays an essential role in inflammation and fibrosis. Bach1 is an important transcriptional repressor that acts by modulating oxidative stress and represents a potential target in the treatment of pulmonary fibrosis (PF). In this study, we knocked down Bach1 using adenovirus-mediated small interfering RNA (siRNA) to determine whether the use of Bach1 siRNA is an effective therapeutic strategy in mice with bleomycin (BLM)-induced PF. Mouse lung fibroblasts (MLFs) were incubated with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 (5 ng/ml) and subsequently infected with recombined adenovirus-like Bach1 siRNA1 and Bach1 siRNA2, while an empty adenovirus vector was used as the negative control. The selected Bach1 siRNA with higher interference efficiency was used for the animal experiments. A mouse model of BLM-induced PF was established, and Bach1 siRNA (1×109 PFU) was administered to the mice via the tail vein. The results revealed that the Bach1 mRNA and protein levels were significantly downregulated by Bach1 siRNA. Furthermore, the MLFs infected with Bach1 siRNA exhibited increased mRNA and protein expression levels of heme oxygenase-1 and glutathione peroxidase 1, but decreased levels of TGF-β1 and interleukin-6 in the cell supernatants compared with the cells exposed to TGF-β1 alone. Bach1 knockdown by siRNA also enhanced the expression of antioxidant factors, but suppressed that of fibrosis-related cytokines in mice compared with the BLM group. Finally, the inflammatory infiltration of alveolar and interstitial cells and the destruction of lung structure were significantly attenuated in the mide administered Bach1 siRNA compared with those in the BLM group. On the whole, our findings demonstrate that Bach1 siRNA exerts protective effects against BLM-induced PF in mice. Our data may provide the basis for the development of novel targeted therapeutic strategies for PF. PMID:27959382

  9. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Avis E.; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B.; Lan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity. PMID:27048654

  10. Functional Domains of Autoimmune Regulator (AIRE) Modulate INS-VNTR Transcription in Human Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Avis E; Chen, Chiachen; Breslin, Mary B; Lan, Michael S

    2016-05-20

    INS-VNTR (insulin-variable number of tandem repeats) and AIRE (autoimmune regulator) have been associated with the modulation of insulin gene expression in thymus, which is essential to induce either insulin tolerance or the development of insulin autoimmunity and type 1 diabetes. We sought to analyze whether each functional domain of AIRE is critical for the activation of INS-VNTR in human thymic epithelial cells. Twelve missense or nonsense mutations in AIRE and two chimeric AIRE constructs were generated. A luciferase reporter assay and a pulldown assay using biotinylated INS-class I VNTR probe were performed to examine the transactivation and binding activities of WT, mutant, and chimeric AIREs on the INS-VNTR promoter. Confocal microscopy analysis was performed for WT or mutant AIRE cellular localization. We found that all of the AIRE mutations resulted in loss of transcriptional activation of INS-VNTR except mutant P252L. Using WT/mutant AIRE heterozygous forms to modulate the INS-VNTR target revealed five mutations (R257X, G228W, C311fsX376, L397fsX478, and R433fsX502) that functioned in a dominant negative fashion. The LXXLL-3 motif is identified for the first time to be essential for DNA binding to INS-VNTR, whereas the intact PHD1, PHD2, LXXLL-3, and LXXLL-4 motifs were important for successful transcriptional activation. AIRE nuclear localization in the human thymic epithelial cell line was disrupted by mutations in the homogenously staining region domain and the R257X mutation in the PHD1 domain. This study supports the notion that AIRE mutation could specifically affect human insulin gene expression in thymic epithelial cells through INS-VNTR and subsequently induce either insulin tolerance or autoimmunity.

  11. CarD integrates three functional modules to promote efficient transcription, antibiotic tolerance, and pathogenesis in mycobacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Ashley L; Weiss, Leslie A; Manzano, Ana Ruiz; Galburt, Eric A; Stallings, Christina L

    2014-08-01

    Although the basic mechanisms of prokaryotic transcription are conserved, it has become evident that some bacteria require additional factors to allow for efficient gene transcription. CarD is an RNA polymerase (RNAP)-binding protein conserved in numerous bacterial species and essential in mycobacteria. Despite the importance of CarD, its function at transcription complexes remains unclear. We have generated a panel of mutations that individually target three independent functional modules of CarD: the RNAP interaction domain, the DNA-binding domain, and a conserved tryptophan residue. We have dissected the roles of each functional module in CarD activity and built a model where each module contributes to stabilizing RNAP-promoter complexes. Our work highlights the requirement of all three modules of CarD in the obligate pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but not in Mycobacterium smegmatis. We also report divergent use of the CarD functional modules in resisting oxidative stress and pigmentation. These studies provide new information regarding the functional domains involved in transcriptional regulation by CarD while also improving understanding of the physiology of M. tuberculosis.

  12. CarD integrates three functional modules to promote efficient transcription, antibiotic tolerance, and pathogenesis in mycobacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Ashley L.; Weiss, Leslie A.; Manzano, Ana Ruiz; Galburt, Eric A.; Stallings, Christina L.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Although the basic mechanisms of prokaryotic transcription are conserved, it has become evident that some bacteria require additional factors to allow for efficient gene transcription. CarD is an RNA polymerase (RNAP) binding protein conserved in numerous bacterial species and essential in mycobacteria. Despite the importance of CarD, its function at transcription complexes remains unclear. We have generated a panel of mutations that individually target three independent functional modules of CarD: the RNAP interaction domain, the DNA binding domain, and a conserved tryptophan residue. We have dissected the roles of each functional module in CarD activity and built a model where each module contributes to stabilizing RNAP-promoter complexes. Our work highlights the requirement of all three modules of CarD in the obligate pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but not in Mycobacterium smegmatis. We also report divergent use of the CarD functional modules in resisting oxidative stress and pigmentation. These studies provide new information regarding the functional domains involved in transcriptional regulation by CarD while also improving understanding of the physiology of M. tuberculosis. PMID:24962732

  13. IGF2BP3 Modulates the Interaction of Invasion-Associated Transcripts with RISC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennajdaoui, Hanane; Howard, Jonathan M; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Coyne, Doyle J; Uren, Philip J; Dargyte, Marija; Katzman, Sol; Draper, Jolene M; Wallace, Andrew; Cazarez, Oscar; Burns, Suzanne C; Qiao, Mei; Hinck, Lindsay; Smith, Andrew D; Toloue, Masoud M; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Penalva, Luiz O F; Sanford, Jeremy R

    2016-05-31

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3) expression correlates with malignancy, but its role(s) in pathogenesis remains enigmatic. We interrogated the IGF2BP3-RNA interaction network in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. Using a combination of genome-wide approaches, we have identified 164 direct mRNA targets of IGF2BP3. These transcripts encode proteins enriched for functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and adhesion. Loss of IGF2BP3 reduced PDAC cell invasiveness and remodeled focal adhesion junctions. Individual nucleotide resolution crosslinking immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) revealed significant overlap of IGF2BP3 and microRNA (miRNA) binding sites. IGF2BP3 promotes association of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) with specific transcripts. Our results show that IGF2BP3 influences a malignancy-associated RNA regulon by modulating miRNA-mRNA interactions. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. IGF2BP3 Modulates the Interaction of Invasion-Associated Transcripts with RISC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanane Ennajdaoui

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3 expression correlates with malignancy, but its role(s in pathogenesis remains enigmatic. We interrogated the IGF2BP3-RNA interaction network in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells. Using a combination of genome-wide approaches, we have identified 164 direct mRNA targets of IGF2BP3. These transcripts encode proteins enriched for functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and adhesion. Loss of IGF2BP3 reduced PDAC cell invasiveness and remodeled focal adhesion junctions. Individual nucleotide resolution crosslinking immunoprecipitation (iCLIP revealed significant overlap of IGF2BP3 and microRNA (miRNA binding sites. IGF2BP3 promotes association of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC with specific transcripts. Our results show that IGF2BP3 influences a malignancy-associated RNA regulon by modulating miRNA-mRNA interactions.

  15. Insulin-FOXO3 signaling modulates circadian rhythms via regulation of clock transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaves, Inês; van der Horst, Gijsbertus T J; Schellevis, Raymond; Nijman, Romana M; Koerkamp, Marian Groot; Holstege, Frank C P; Smidt, Marten P; Hoekman, Marco F M

    2014-06-02

    Circadian rhythms are responsive to external and internal cues, light and metabolism being among the most important. In mammals, the light signal is sensed by the retina and transmitted to the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) master clock [1], where it is integrated into the molecular oscillator via regulation of clock gene transcription. The SCN synchronizes peripheral oscillators, an effect that can be overruled by incoming metabolic signals [2]. As a consequence, peripheral oscillators can be uncoupled from the master clock when light and metabolic signals are not in phase. The signaling pathways responsible for coupling metabolic cues to the molecular clock are being rapidly uncovered [3-5]. Here we show that insulin-phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-Forkhead box class O3 (FOXO3) signaling is required for circadian rhythmicity in the liver via regulation of Clock. Knockdown of FoxO3 dampens circadian amplitude, an effect that is rescued by overexpression of Clock. Subsequently, we show binding of FOXO3 to two Daf-binding elements (DBEs) located in the Clock promoter area, implicating Clock as a transcriptional target of FOXO3. Transcriptional oscillation of both core clock and output genes in the liver of FOXO3-deficient mice is affected, indicating a disrupted hepatic circadian rhythmicity. Finally, we show that insulin, a major regulator of FOXO activity [6-9], regulates Clock levels in a PI3K- and FOXO3-dependent manner. Our data point to a key role of the insulin-FOXO3-Clock signaling pathway in the modulation of circadian rhythms.

  16. MicroRNA-101 regulated transcriptional modulator SUB1 plays a role in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthi, B V S K; Goswami, M T; Pathi, S S; Robinson, A D; Cieślik, M; Chandrashekar, D S; Agarwal, S; Siddiqui, J; Daignault, S; Carskadon, S L; Jing, X; Chinnaiyan, A M; Kunju, L P; Palanisamy, N; Varambally, S

    2016-12-08

    MicroRNA-101, a tumor suppressor microRNA (miR), is often downregulated in cancer and is known to target multiple oncogenes. Some of the genes that are negatively regulated by miR-101 expression include histone methyltransferase EZH2 (enhancer of zeste homolog 2), COX2 (cyclooxygenase-2), POMP (proteasome maturation protein), CERS6, STMN1, MCL-1 and ROCK2, among others. In the present study, we show that miR-101 targets transcriptional coactivator SUB1 homolog (Saccharomyces cerevisiae)/PC4 (positive cofactor 4) and regulates its expression. SUB1 is known to have diverse role in vital cell processes such as DNA replication, repair and heterochromatinization. SUB1 is known to modulate transcription and acts as a mediator between the upstream activators and general transcription machinery. Expression profiling in several cancers revealed SUB1 overexpression, suggesting a potential role in tumorigenesis. However, detailed regulation and function of SUB1 has not been elucidated. In this study, we show elevated expression of SUB1 in aggressive prostate cancer. Knockdown of SUB1 in prostate cancer cells resulted in reduced cell proliferation, invasion and migration in vitro, and tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. Gene expression analyses coupled with chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that SUB1 binds to the promoter regions of several oncogenes such as PLK1 (Polo-like kinase 1), C-MYC, serine-threonine kinase BUB1B and regulates their expression. Additionally, we observed SUB1 downregulated CDKN1B expression. PLK1 knockdown or use of PLK1 inhibitor can mitigate oncogenic function of SUB1 in benign prostate cancer cells. Thus, our study suggests that miR-101 loss results in increased SUB1 expression and subsequent activation of known oncogenes driving prostate cancer progression and metastasis. This study therefore demonstrates functional role of SUB1 in prostate cancer, and identifies its regulation and potential downstream therapeutic targets of SUB1 in prostate

  17. Phosphate Modulates Transcription of Soybean VspB and Other Sugar-Inducible Genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadka, A.; DeWald, D. B.; May, G. D.; Park, W. D.; Mullet, J. E.

    1994-05-01

    The soybean vegetative storage protein genes VspA and VspB encode vacuolar glycoprotein acid phosphatases. Transcription of the Vsp is synergistically activated by jasmonic acid or methyl jasmonate (MeJA) and soluble sugars. The action of these modulators is mediated by two different DNA domains in the VspB promoter. In this study, we present new data regarding VspB regulation by sucrose and inorganic phosphate, which suggest a common mechanism of transcriptional control for Vsp and other sugar-inducible genes. We found that the sugar-mediated activation of VspB expression was inhibited by phosphate. Deletion analysis and transient assays in tobacco protoplasts identified a 130-bp DNA domain in the VspB promoter that mediates both sucrose induction and phosphate inhibition. Transcription mediated by this DNA domain was induced by phosphate elimination from the protoplast incubation medium, even in the absence of sucrose. The effect of sucrose and phosphate on VspB expression was studied in vivo in several ways. Depletion of phosphate from soybean cell cultures by the addition of mannose stimulated VspB expression, even in the absence of sucrose or MeJA. In illuminated soybean leaves treated with MeJA, inhibition of photosynthetic electron transport by DCMU decreased VspB expression. In contrast, VspB expression in soybean leaves stimulated by phosphate depletion was not influenced by DCMU. Moreover, sucrose-stimulated expression of the sugar-responsive genes lipoxygenase A and chalcone synthase of soybean and proteinase inhibitor II and class I patatin of potato was inhibited by phosphate. Like VspB, these genes were stimulated by phosphate depletion in the absence of exogenous sucrose. We propose that sugar-responsive genes are activated, in part, by accumulation of sugar-phosphates and concomitant reduction of cellular phosphate levels. These data may help explain recruitment of the Vsp, which encode acid phosphatases, as vegetative storage proteins.

  18. Hierarchical structure and modules in the Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory network revealed by a new top-down approach

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    Buer Jan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular functions are coordinately carried out by groups of genes forming functional modules. Identifying such modules in the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN of organisms is important for understanding the structure and function of these fundamental cellular networks and essential for the emerging modular biology. So far, the global connectivity structure of TRN has not been well studied and consequently not applied for the identification of functional modules. Moreover, network motifs such as feed forward loop are recently proposed to be basic building blocks of TRN. However, their relationship to functional modules is not clear. Results In this work we proposed a top-down approach to identify modules in the TRN of E. coli. By studying the global connectivity structure of the regulatory network, we first revealed a five-layer hierarchical structure in which all the regulatory relationships are downward. Based on this regulatory hierarchy, we developed a new method to decompose the regulatory network into functional modules and to identify global regulators governing multiple modules. As a result, 10 global regulators and 39 modules were identified and shown to have well defined functions. We then investigated the distribution and composition of the two basic network motifs (feed forward loop and bi-fan motif in the hierarchical structure of TRN. We found that most of these network motifs include global regulators, indicating that these motifs are not basic building blocks of modules since modules should not contain global regulators. Conclusion The transcriptional regulatory network of E. coli possesses a multi-layer hierarchical modular structure without feedback regulation at transcription level. This hierarchical structure builds the basis for a new and simple decomposition method which is suitable for the identification of functional modules and global regulators in the transcriptional regulatory network of E

  19. Deletion of Forkhead Box M1 transcription factor from respiratory epithelial cells inhibits pulmonary tumorigenesis.

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    I-Ching Wang

    Full Text Available The Forkhead Box m1 (Foxm1 protein is induced in a majority of human non-small cell lung cancers and its expression is associated with poor prognosis. However, specific requirements for the Foxm1 in each cell type of the cancer lesion remain unknown. The present study provides the first genetic evidence that the Foxm1 expression in respiratory epithelial cells is essential for lung tumorigenesis. Using transgenic mice, we demonstrated that conditional deletion of Foxm1 from lung epithelial cells (epFoxm1(-/- mice prior to tumor initiation caused a striking reduction in the number and size of lung tumors, induced by either urethane or 3-methylcholanthrene (MCA/butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT. Decreased lung tumorigenesis in epFoxm1(-/- mice was associated with diminished proliferation of tumor cells and reduced expression of Topoisomerase-2alpha (TOPO-2alpha, a critical regulator of tumor cell proliferation. Depletion of Foxm1 mRNA in cultured lung adenocarcinoma cells significantly decreased TOPO-2alpha mRNA and protein levels. Moreover, Foxm1 directly bound to and induced transcription of the mouse TOPO-2alpha promoter region, indicating that TOPO-2alpha is a direct target of Foxm1 in lung tumor cells. Finally, we demonstrated that a conditional deletion of Foxm1 in pre-existing lung tumors dramatically reduced tumor growth in the lung. Expression of Foxm1 in respiratory epithelial cells is critical for lung cancer formation and TOPO-2alpha expression in vivo, suggesting that Foxm1 is a promising target for anti-tumor therapy.

  20. Novel Peptide for Attenuation of Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension via Modulation of Nitric Oxide Release and Phosphodiesterase -5 Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Hanbo; Zharikov, Sergey; Patel, Jawaharlal M.

    2012-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS)-derived NO is the major stimulant of cyclic guanosine 5’ monophosphate (cGMP) production and NO/cGMP-dependent vasorelaxation in the pulmonary circulation. We recently synthesized multiple peptides and reported that an eleven amino acid (SSWRRKRKESS) peptide (P1) but not scrambled P1 stimulated the catalytic activity but not expression of eNOS and causes NO/cGMP-dependent sustained vasorelaxation in isolated pulmonary artery (PA) segments and in lung perfusion models. Since cGMP levels can also be elevated by inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 5 (PDE-5), this study was designed to test the hypothesis that P1-mediated vesorelaxation is due to its unique dual action as NO-releasing PDE-5 inhibitor in the pulmonary circulation. Treatment of porcine PA endothelial cells (PAEC) with P1 caused time-dependent increase in intracellular NO release and inhibition of the catalytic activity of cGMP-specific PDE-5 but not PDE-5 protein expression leading to increased levels of cGMP. Acute hypoxia-induced PA vasoconstriction ex-vivo and continuous telemetry monitoring of hypoxia (10% oxygen)-induced elevated PA pressure in freely moving rats were significantly restored by administration of P1. Chronic hypoxia (10% oxygen for 4 weeks)-induced alterations in PA perfusion pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular remodeling were attenuated by P1 treatment. These results demonstrate the potential therapeutic effects of P1 to prevent and/or arrest the progression of hypoxia-induced PAH via NO/cGMP-dependent modulation of hemodynamic and vascular remodeling in the pulmonary circulation. PMID:22465621

  1. Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation are Modulated by Adrenal-Derived Stress Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone exposure promotes pulmonary injury and inflammation. Previously we have characterized systemic changes that occur immediately after acute ozone exposure and are mediated by neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Both HPA axis and sympathetic tone alterations induce the rel...

  2. The A2B adenosine receptor modulates pulmonary hypertension associated with interstitial lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Zhong, Hongyan; Acero, Luis; Weng, Tingting; Melicoff, Ernestina; West, James D; Hemnes, Anna; Grenz, Almut; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackwell, Timothy S; Xia, Yang; Johnston, Richard A; Zeng, Dewan; Belardinelli, Luiz; Blackburn, Michael R

    2012-06-01

    Development of pulmonary hypertension is a common and deadly complication of interstitial lung disease. Little is known regarding the cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to pulmonary hypertension in patients with interstitial lung disease, and effective treatment options are lacking. The purpose of this study was to examine the adenosine 2B receptor (A(2B)R) as a regulator of vascular remodeling and pulmonary hypertension secondary to pulmonary fibrosis. To accomplish this, cellular and molecular changes in vascular remodeling were monitored in mice exposed to bleomycin in conjunction with genetic removal of the A(2B)R or treatment with the A(2B)R antagonist GS-6201. Results demonstrated that GS-6201 treatment or genetic removal of the A(2B)R attenuated vascular remodeling and hypertension in our model. Furthermore, direct A(2B)R activation on vascular cells promoted interleukin-6 and endothelin-1 release. These studies identify a novel mechanism of disease progression to pulmonary hypertension and support the development of A(2B)R antagonists for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension secondary to interstitial lung disease.

  3. Rational design of cyclic peptide modulators of the transcriptional coactivator CBP: a new class of p53 inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerona-Navarro, Guillermo; Yoel-Rodríguez; Mujtaba, Shiraz; Frasca, Antonio; Patel, Jigneshkumar; Zeng, Lei; Plotnikov, Alexander N; Osman, Roman; Zhou, Ming-Ming

    2011-02-23

    The CREB binding protein (CBP) is a human transcriptional coactivator consisting of several conserved functional modules, which interacts with distinct transcription factors including nuclear receptors, CREB, and STAT proteins. Despite the importance of CBP in transcriptional regulation, many questions regarding the role of its particular domains in CBP functions remain unanswered. Therefore, developing small molecules capable of selectively modulating a single domain of CBP is of invaluable aid at unraveling its prominent activities. Here we report the design, synthesis, and biological evaluation of conformationally restricted peptides as novel modulators for the acetyl-lysine binding bromodomain (BRD) of CBP. Utilizing a target structure-guided and computer-aided rational design approach, we developed a series of cyclic peptides with affinity for CBP BRD significantly greater than those of its biological ligands, including lysine-acetylated histones and tumor suppressor p53. The best cyclopeptide of the series exhibited a K(d) of 8.0 μM, representing a 24-fold improvement in affinity over that of the linear lysine 382-acetylated p53 peptide. This lead peptide is highly selective for CBP BRD over BRDs from other transcriptional proteins. Cell-based functional assays carried out in colorectal carcinoma HCT116 cells further demonstrated the efficacy of this compound to modulate p53 stability and function in response to DNA damage. Our results strongly argue that these CBP modulators can effectively inhibit p53 transcriptional activity by blocking p53K382ac binding to CBP BRD and promoting p53 instability by changes of its post-translational modification states, a different mechanism than that of the p53 inhibitors reported to date.

  4. The obesity-associated transcription factor ETV5 modulates circulating glucocorticoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Aguilar, Ruth; Thompson, Abigail; Marchand, Nathalie; Dumont, Patrick; Woods, Stephen C.; de Launoit, Yvan; Seeley, Randy J.; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor E-twenty-six version 5 (ETV5) has been linked with obesity in genome-wide association studies. Moreover, ETV5-deficient mice (knockout; KO) have reduced body weight, lower fat mass, and are resistant to diet-induced obesity, directly linking ETV5 to the regulation of energy balance and metabolism. ETV5 is expressed in hypothalamic brain regions that regulate both metabolism and HPA axis activity, suggesting that ETV5 may also modulate HPA axis function. In order to test this possibility, plasma corticosterone levels were measured in ETV5 KO and wildtype (WT) mice before (pre-stress) and after (post-stress) a mild stressor (intraperitoneal injection). ETV5 deficiency increased both pre- and post-stress plasma corticosterone, suggesting that loss of ETV5 elevated glucocorticoid tone. Consistent with this idea, ETV5 KO mice have reduced thymus weight, suggestive of increased glucocorticoid-induced thymic involution. ETV5 deficiency also decreased the mRNA expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and vasopressin receptor 1A in the hypothalamus, without altering vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing hormone, or oxytocin mRNA expression. In order to test whether reduced MR and GR expression affected glucocorticoid negative feedback, a dexamethasone suppression test was performed. Dexamethasone reduced plasma corticosterone in both ETV5 KO and WT mice, suggesting that glucocorticoid negative feedback was unaltered by ETV5 deficiency. In summary, these data suggest that the obesity-associated transcription factor ETV5 normally acts to diminish circulating glucocorticoids. This might occur directly via ETV5 actions on HPA-regulatory brain circuitry, and/or indirectly via ETV5-induced alterations in metabolic factors that then influence the HPA axis. PMID:25813907

  5. Sumoylation of bZIP transcription factor NRL modulates target gene expression during photoreceptor differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Jerome E; Nellissery, Jacob; Kim, Douglas S; Swaroop, Anand

    2010-08-13

    Development of rod photoreceptors in the mammalian retina is critically dependent on the basic motif-leucine zipper transcription factor NRL (neural retina leucine zipper). In the absence of NRL, photoreceptor precursors in mouse retina produce only cones that primarily express S-opsin. Conversely, ectopic expression of NRL in post-mitotic precursors leads to a rod-only retina. To explore the role of signaling molecules in modulating NRL function, we identified putative sites of post-translational modification in the NRL protein by in silico analysis. Here, we demonstrate the sumoylation of NRL in vivo and in vitro, with two small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) molecules attached to the Lys-20 residue. NRL-K20R and NRL-K20R/K24R sumoylation mutants show reduced transcriptional activation of Nr2e3 and rhodopsin promoters (two direct targets of NRL) in reporter assays when compared with wild-type NRL. Consistent with this, in vivo electroporation of the NRL-K20R/K24R mutant into newborn Nrl(-/-) mouse retina leads to reduced Nr2e3 activation and only a partial rescue of the Nrl(-/-) phenotype in contrast to the wild-type NRL that is able to convert cones to rod photoreceptors. Although PIAS3 (protein inhibitor of activated STAT3), an E3-SUMO ligase implicated in photoreceptor differentiation, can be immunoprecipitated with NRL, there appears to be redundancy in E3 ligases, and PIAS3 does not seem to be essential for NRL sumoylation. Our studies suggest an important role of sumoylation in fine-tuning the activity of NRL and thereby incorporating yet another layer of control in gene regulatory networks involved in photoreceptor development and homeostasis.

  6. Sumoylation of bZIP Transcription Factor NRL Modulates Target Gene Expression during Photoreceptor Differentiation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roger, Jerome E.; Nellissery, Jacob; Kim, Douglas S.; Swaroop, Anand

    2010-01-01

    Development of rod photoreceptors in the mammalian retina is critically dependent on the basic motif-leucine zipper transcription factor NRL (neural retina leucine zipper). In the absence of NRL, photoreceptor precursors in mouse retina produce only cones that primarily express S-opsin. Conversely, ectopic expression of NRL in post-mitotic precursors leads to a rod-only retina. To explore the role of signaling molecules in modulating NRL function, we identified putative sites of post-translational modification in the NRL protein by in silico analysis. Here, we demonstrate the sumoylation of NRL in vivo and in vitro, with two small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) molecules attached to the Lys-20 residue. NRL-K20R and NRL-K20R/K24R sumoylation mutants show reduced transcriptional activation of Nr2e3 and rhodopsin promoters (two direct targets of NRL) in reporter assays when compared with wild-type NRL. Consistent with this, in vivo electroporation of the NRL-K20R/K24R mutant into newborn Nrl−/− mouse retina leads to reduced Nr2e3 activation and only a partial rescue of the Nrl−/− phenotype in contrast to the wild-type NRL that is able to convert cones to rod photoreceptors. Although PIAS3 (protein inhibitor of activated STAT3), an E3-SUMO ligase implicated in photoreceptor differentiation, can be immunoprecipitated with NRL, there appears to be redundancy in E3 ligases, and PIAS3 does not seem to be essential for NRL sumoylation. Our studies suggest an important role of sumoylation in fine-tuning the activity of NRL and thereby incorporating yet another layer of control in gene regulatory networks involved in photoreceptor development and homeostasis. PMID:20551322

  7. Epigenetic modulation of Homer1a transcription regulation in amygdala and hippocampus with pavlovian fear conditioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahan, Amy L; Mou, Liping; Shah, Nirali; Hu, Jia-Hua; Worley, Paul F; Ressler, Kerry J

    2012-03-28

    The consolidation of conditioned fear involves upregulation of genes necessary for long-term memory formation. An important question remains as to whether this results in part from epigenetic regulation and chromatin modulation. We examined whether Homer1a, which is required for memory formation, is necessary for Pavlovian cued fear conditioning, whether it is downstream of BDNF-TrkB activation, and whether this pathway utilizes histone modifications for activity-dependent transcriptional regulation. We initially found that Homer1a knock-out mice exhibited deficits in cued fear conditioning (5 tone-shock presentations with 70 dB, 6 kHz tones and 0.5 s, 0.6 mA footshocks). We then demonstrated that: (1) Homer1a mRNA increases after fear conditioning in vivo within both amygdala and hippocampus of wild-type mice; (2) it increases after BDNF application to primary hippocampal and amygdala cultures in vitro; and (3) these increases are dependent on transcription and MAPK signaling. Furthermore, using chromatin immunoprecipitation we found that both in vitro and in vivo manipulations result in decreases in Homer1 promoter H3K9 methylation in amygdala cells but increases in Homer1 promoter H3 acetylation in hippocampal cells. However, no changes were observed in H4 acetylation or H3K27 dimethylation. Inhibition of histone deacetylation by sodium butyrate enhanced contextual but not cued fear conditioning and enhanced Homer1 H3 acetylation in the hippocampus. These data provide evidence for dynamic epigenetic regulation of Homer1a following BDNF-induced plasticity and during a BDNF-dependent learning process. Furthermore, upregulation of this gene may be regulated through distinct epigenetic modifications in the hippocampus and amygdala.

  8. Interplay of mevalonate and Hippo pathways regulates RHAMM transcription via YAP to modulate breast cancer cell motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhongyuan; Wu, Yanping; Wang, Haifeng; Zhang, Yangqing; Mei, Lin; Fang, Xuexun; Zhang, Xudong; Zhang, Fang; Chen, Hongbo; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Yuyang; Sun, Shengnan; Zheng, Yi; Li, Na; Huang, Laiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Expression of receptor for hyaluronan-mediated motility (RHAMM), a breast cancer susceptibility gene, is tightly controlled in normal tissues but elevated in many tumors, contributing to tumorigenesis and metastases. However, how the expression of RHAMM is regulated remains elusive. Statins, inhibitors of mevalonate metabolic pathway widely used for hypercholesterolemia, have been found to also have antitumor effects, but little is known of the specific targets and mechanisms. Moreover, Hippo signaling pathway plays crucial roles in organ size control and cancer development, yet its downstream transcriptional targets remain obscure. Here we show that RHAMM expression is regulated by mevalonate and Hippo pathways converging onto Yes-associated protein (YAP)/TEAD, which binds RHAMM promoter at specific sites and controls its transcription and consequently breast cancer cell migration and invasion (BCCMI); and that simvastatin inhibits BCCMI via targeting YAP-mediated RHAMM transcription. Required for ERK phosphorylation and BCCMI, YAP-activated RHAMM transcription is dependent on mevalonate and sensitive to simvastatin, which modulate RHAMM transcription by modulating YAP phosphorylation and nuclear-cytoplasmic localization. Further, modulation by mevalonate/simvastatin of YAP-activated RHAMM transcription requires geranylgeranylation, Rho GTPase activation, and actin cytoskeleton rearrangement, but is largely independent of MST and LATS kinase activity. These findings from in vitro and in vivo investigations link mevalonate and Hippo pathways with RHAMM as a downstream effector, a YAP-transcription and simvastatin-inhibition target, and a cancer metastasis mediator; uncover a mechanism regulating RHAMM expression and cancer metastases; and reveal a mode whereby simvastatin exerts anticancer effects; providing potential targets for cancer therapeutic agents. PMID:24367099

  9. Identifying modules of coexpressed transcript units and their organization of Saccharopolyspora erythraea from time series gene expression profiles.

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    Xiao Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome sequence was released in 2007. In order to look at the gene regulations at whole transcriptome level, an expression microarray was specifically designed on the S. erythraea strain NRRL 2338 genome sequence. Based on these data, we set out to investigate the potential transcriptional regulatory networks and their organization. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In view of the hierarchical structure of bacterial transcriptional regulation, we constructed a hierarchical coexpression network at whole transcriptome level. A total of 27 modules were identified from 1255 differentially expressed transcript units (TUs across time course, which were further classified in to four groups. Functional enrichment analysis indicated the biological significance of our hierarchical network. It was indicated that primary metabolism is activated in the first rapid growth phase (phase A, and secondary metabolism is induced when the growth is slowed down (phase B. Among the 27 modules, two are highly correlated to erythromycin production. One contains all genes in the erythromycin-biosynthetic (ery gene cluster and the other seems to be associated with erythromycin production by sharing common intermediate metabolites. Non-concomitant correlation between production and expression regulation was observed. Especially, by calculating the partial correlation coefficients and building the network based on Gaussian graphical model, intrinsic associations between modules were found, and the association between those two erythromycin production-correlated modules was included as expected. CONCLUSIONS: This work created a hierarchical model clustering transcriptome data into coordinated modules, and modules into groups across the time course, giving insight into the concerted transcriptional regulations especially the regulation corresponding to erythromycin production of S. erythraea. This strategy may be extendable to studies

  10. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) modulates adipocyte differentiation via MOF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Peng; Zhang, Yuchao; Liu, Yuantao; Chen, Jicui; Zong, Chen; Yu, Cong; Cui, Shang; Gao, Weina; Qin, Dandan; Sun, Wenchuan; Li, Xia; Wang, Xiangdong

    2015-12-01

    The role and mechanism of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5B (STAT5B) in adipogenesis remain unclear. In this study, our data showed that Males absent on the first (MOF) protein expression was increased during 3 T3-L1 preadipocytes differentiation accompanied with STAT5B expression increasing. Over-expression STAT5B enhanced MOF promoter trans-activation in HeLa cells. Mutagenesis assay and ChIP analysis exhibited that STAT5B was able to bind MOF promoter. Knocking-down STAT5B in 3 T3-L1 preadipocytes led to decreased expression of MOF, but resulted in increased expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein α (C/EBPα) and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (Fabp4), which were important factors or enzymes for adipogenesis. We also found that knocking-down MOF in 3 T3-L1 preadipocytes resulted in increased expression of PPARγ, C/EBPα and Fabp4, which was in the same trend as STAT5B knocking-down. Over-expression MOF resulted in reduced promoter trans-activation activity of C/EBPα. These results suggest that STAT5B and MOF work as negative regulators in adipogenesis, and STAT5B modulates preadipocytes differentiation partially by regulating MOF expression.

  11. The phytoestrogen genistein modulates lysosomal metabolism and transcription factor EB (TFEB) activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskot, Marta; Montefusco, Sandro; Jakóbkiewicz-Banecka, Joanna; Mozolewski, Paweł; Węgrzyn, Alicja; Di Bernardo, Diego; Węgrzyn, Grzegorz; Medina, Diego L; Ballabio, Andrea; Gabig-Cimińska, Magdalena

    2014-06-13

    Genistein (5,7-dihydroxy-3-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-4H-1-benzopyran-4-one) has been previously proposed as a potential drug for use in substrate reduction therapy for mucopolysaccharidoses, a group of inherited metabolic diseases caused by mutations leading to inefficient degradation of glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) in lysosomes. It was demonstrated that this isoflavone can cross the blood-brain barrier, making it an especially desirable potential drug for the treatment of neurological symptoms present in most lysosomal storage diseases. So far, no comprehensive genomic analyses have been performed to elucidate the molecular mechanisms underlying the effect elicited by genistein. Therefore, the aim of this work was to identify the genistein-modulated gene network regulating GAG biosynthesis and degradation, taking into consideration the entire lysosomal metabolism. Our analyses identified over 60 genes with known roles in lysosomal biogenesis and/or function whose expression was enhanced by genistein. Moreover, 19 genes whose products are involved in both GAG synthesis and degradation pathways were found to be remarkably differentially regulated by genistein treatment. We found a regulatory network linking genistein-mediated control of transcription factor EB (TFEB) gene expression, TFEB nuclear translocation, and activation of TFEB-dependent lysosome biogenesis to lysosomal metabolism. Our data indicate that the molecular mechanism of genistein action involves not only impairment of GAG synthesis but more importantly lysosomal enhancement via TFEB. These findings contribute to explaining the beneficial effects of genistein in lysosomal storage diseases as well as envisage new therapeutic approaches to treat these devastating diseases.

  12. Immune modulation mediated by cryptococcal laccase promotes pulmonary growth and brain dissemination of virulent Cryptococcus neoformans in mice.

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    Yafeng Qiu

    Full Text Available C. neoformans is a leading cause of fatal mycosis linked to CNS dissemination. Laccase, encoded by the LAC1 gene, is an important virulence factor implicated in brain dissemination yet little is known about the mechanism(s accounting for this observation. Here, we investigated whether the presence or absence of laccase altered the local immune response in the lungs by comparing infections with the highly virulent strain, H99 (which expresses laccase and mutant strain of H99 deficient in laccase (lac1Δ in a mouse model of pulmonary infection. We found that LAC1 gene deletion decreased the pulmonary fungal burden and abolished CNS dissemination at weeks 2 and 3. Furthermore, LAC1 deletion lead to: 1 diminished pulmonary eosinophilia; 2 increased accumulation of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells; 3 increased Th1 and Th17 cytokines yet decreased Th2 cytokines; and 4 lung macrophage shifting of the lung macrophage phenotype from M2- towards M1-type activation. Next, we used adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells isolated from pulmonary lymph nodes of mice infected with either lac1Δ or H99 to evaluate the role of laccase-induced immunomodulation on CNS dissemination. We found that in comparison to PBS treated mice, adoptively transferred CD4+ T cells isolated from lac1Δ-infected mice decreased CNS dissemination, while those isolated from H99-infected mice increased CNS dissemination. Collectively, our findings reveal that immune modulation away from Th1/Th17 responses and towards Th2 responses represents a novel mechanism through which laccase can contribute to cryptococcal virulence. Furthermore, our data support the hypothesis that laccase-induced changes in polarization of CD4+ T cells contribute to CNS dissemination.

  13. Amniotic fluid stem cells inhibit the progression of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis via CCL2 modulation in bronchoalveolar lavage.

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    Orquidea Garcia

    Full Text Available The potential for amniotic fluid stem cell (AFSC treatment to inhibit the progression of fibrotic lung injury has not been described. We have previously demonstrated that AFSC can attenuate both acute and chronic-fibrotic kidney injury through modification of the cytokine environment. Fibrotic lung injury, such as in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF, is mediated through pro-fibrotic and pro-inflammatory cytokine activity. Thus, we hypothesized that AFSC treatment might inhibit the progression of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis through cytokine modulation. In particular, we aimed to investigate the effect of AFSC treatment on the modulation of the pro-fibrotic cytokine CCL2, which is increased in human IPF patients and is correlated with poor prognoses, advanced disease states and worse fibrotic outcomes. The impacts of intravenous murine AFSC given at acute (day 0 or chronic (day 14 intervention time-points after bleomycin injury were analyzed at either day 3 or day 28 post-injury. Murine AFSC treatment at either day 0 or day 14 post-bleomycin injury significantly inhibited collagen deposition and preserved pulmonary function. CCL2 expression increased in bleomycin-injured bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL, but significantly decreased following AFSC treatment at either day 0 or at day 14. AFSC were observed to localize within fibrotic lesions in the lung, showing preferential targeting of AFSC to the area of fibrosis. We also observed that MMP-2 was transiently increased in BAL following AFSC treatment. Increased MMP-2 activity was further associated with cleavage of CCL2, rendering it a putative antagonist for CCL2/CCR2 signaling, which we surmise is a potential mechanism for CCL2 reduction in BAL following AFSC treatment. Based on this data, we concluded that AFSC have the potential to inhibit the development or progression of fibrosis in a bleomycin injury model during both acute and chronic remodeling events.

  14. Physical exercise and acute restraint stress differentially modulate hippocampal brain-derived neurotrophic factor transcripts and epigenetic mechanisms in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ieraci, Alessandro; Mallei, Alessandra; Musazzi, Laura; Popoli, Maurizio

    2015-11-01

    Physical exercise and stressful experiences have been shown to exert opposite effects on behavioral functions and brain plasticity, partly by involving the action of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Although epigenetic modifications are known to play a pivotal role in the regulation of the different BDNF transcripts, it is poorly understood whether epigenetic mechanisms are also implied in the BDNF modulation induced by physical exercise and stress. Here, we show that total BDNF mRNA levels and BDNF transcripts 1, 2, 3, 4, 6, and 7 were reduced immediately after acute restraint stress (RS) in the hippocampus of mice, and returned to control levels 24 h after the stress session. On the contrary, exercise increased BDNF mRNA expression and counteracted the stress-induced decrease of BDNF transcripts. Physical exercise-induced up-regulation of BDNF transcripts was accounted for by increase in histone H3 acetylated levels at specific BDNF promoters, whereas the histone H3 trimethylated lysine 27 and dimethylated lysine 9 levels were unaffected. Acute RS did not change the levels of acetylated and methylated histone H3 at the BDNF promoters. Furthermore, we found that physical exercise and RS were able to differentially modulate the histone deacetylases mRNA levels. Finally, we report that a single treatment with histone deacetylase inhibitors, prior to acute stress exposure, prevented the down-regulation of total BDNF and BDNF transcripts 1, 2, 3, and 6, partially reproducing the effect of physical exercise. Overall, these results suggest that physical exercise and stress are able to differentially modulate the expression of BDNF transcripts by possible different epigenetic mechanisms. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Takeyoshi [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Asahi, Toru [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Research Organization for Nano & Life Innovation, Waseda University #03C309, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Sawamura, Naoya, E-mail: naoya.sawamura@gmail.com [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Research Organization for Nano & Life Innovation, Waseda University #03C309, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin. - Highlights: • We found that CRBN is a nucleocytoplasmic shutting protein and identified the key domain for nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. • CRBN associates with the transcription factor Ikaros via the N-terminal domain. • CRBN modulates Ikaros-mediated transcriptional regulation and its downstream target, enkephalin.

  16. Macrophage Akt1 Kinase-Mediated Mitophagy Modulates Apoptosis Resistance and Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Deshane, Jessy S; Ryan, Alan J; Thannickal, Victor J; Carter, A Brent

    2016-03-15

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a devastating lung disorder with increasing incidence. Mitochondrial oxidative stress in alveolar macrophages is directly linked to pulmonary fibrosis. Mitophagy, the selective engulfment of dysfunctional mitochondria by autophagasomes, is important for cellular homeostasis and can be induced by mitochondrial oxidative stress. Here, we show Akt1 induced macrophage mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) and mitophagy. Mice harboring a conditional deletion of Akt1 in macrophages (Akt1(-/-)Lyz2-cre) and Park2(-/-) mice had impaired mitophagy and reduced active transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1). Although Akt1 increased TGF-β1 expression, mitophagy inhibition in Akt1-overexpressing macrophages abrogated TGF-β1 expression and fibroblast differentiation. Importantly, conditional Akt1(-/-)Lyz2-cre mice and Park2(-/-) mice had increased macrophage apoptosis and were protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Moreover, IPF alveolar macrophages had evidence of increased mitophagy and displayed apoptosis resistance. These observations suggest that Akt1-mediated mitophagy contributes to alveolar macrophage apoptosis resistance and is required for pulmonary fibrosis development.

  17. mTOR Modulates Lymphocyte Differentiation through T-bet and Eomesodermin in Response to Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis in Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Na Cui; Long-Xiang Su; Hao Wang; Meng Xiao; Fei Yang; Min Zheng; Xin Li

    2016-01-01

    .751,respectively,P < 0.001).Conclusions:mTOR may regulate transcription factors of EOMES and T-bet,and by which mechanism,it may modulate lymphocytes differentiation in animals with immune suppression and fungal infection.

  18. A systematic survey in Arabidopsis thaliana of transcription factors that modulate circadian parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merkle Thomas

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plant circadian systems regulate various biological processes in harmony with daily environmental changes. In Arabidopsis thaliana, the underlying clock mechanism is comprised of multiple integrated transcriptional feedbacks, which collectively lead to global patterns of rhythmic gene expression. The transcriptional networks are essential within the clock itself and in its output pathway. Results Here, to expand understanding of transcriptional networks within and associated to the clock, we performed both an in silico analysis of transcript rhythmicity of transcription factor genes, and a pilot assessment of functional phenomics on the MYB, bHLH, and bZIP families. In our in silico analysis, we defined which members of these families express a circadian waveform of transcript abundance. Up to 20% of these families were over-represented as clock-controlled genes. To detect members that contribute to proper oscillator function, we systematically measured rhythmic growth via an imaging system in hundreds of misexpression lines targeting members of the transcription-factor families. Three transcription factors were found that conferred aberrant circadian rhythms when misexpressed: MYB3R2, bHLH69, and bHLH92. Conclusion Transcript abundance of many transcription factors in Arabidopsis oscillates in a circadian manner. Further, a developed pipeline assessed phenotypic contribution of a panel of transcriptional regulators in the circadian system.

  19. Transcription factors of Schizophyllum commune involved in mushroom formation and modulation of vegetative growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelkmans, Jordi F; Patil, Mohini B; Gehrmann, Thies; Reinders, Marcel J T; Wösten, Han A B; Lugones, Luis G

    2017-03-22

    Mushrooms are the most conspicuous fungal structures. Transcription factors (TFs) Bri1 and Hom1 of the model fungus Schizophyllum commune are involved in late stages of mushroom development, while Wc-2, Hom2, and Fst4 function early in development. Here, it is shown that Bri1 and Hom1 also stimulate vegetative growth, while biomass formation is repressed by Wc-2, Hom2, and Fst4. The Δbri1Δbri1 and the Δhom1Δhom1 strains formed up to 0.6 fold less biomass when compared to wild-type, while Δwc-2Δwc-2, Δhom2Δhom2, and Δfst4Δfst4 strains formed up to 2.8 fold more biomass. Inactivation of TF gene tea1, which was downregulated in the Δwc-2Δwc-2, Δhom2Δhom2, and Δfst4Δfst4 strains, resulted in a strain that was severely affected in mushroom development and that produced 1.3 fold more biomass than the wild-type. In contrast, introducing a constitutive active version of hom2 that had 4 predicted phosphorylation motifs eliminated resulted in radial growth inhibition and prompt fructification in both Δhom2 and wild-type strains, even in sterile monokaryons. Together, it is concluded that TFs involved in mushroom formation also modulate vegetative growth. Among these TFs is the homeodomain protein Hom2, being the first time that this class of regulatory proteins is implicated in repression of vegetative growth in a eukaryote.

  20. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Takeyoshi; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin.

  1. Cystatin D locates in the nucleus at sites of active transcription and modulates gene and protein expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer-Mayorga, Gemma; Alvarez-Díaz, Silvia; Valle, Noelia; De Las Rivas, Javier; Mendes, Marta; Barderas, Rodrigo; Canals, Francesc; Tapia, Olga; Casal, J Ignacio; Lafarga, Miguel; Muñoz, Alberto

    2015-10-30

    Cystatin D is an inhibitor of lysosomal and secreted cysteine proteases. Strikingly, cystatin D has been found to inhibit proliferation, migration, and invasion of colon carcinoma cells indicating tumor suppressor activity that is unrelated to protease inhibition. Here, we demonstrate that a proportion of cystatin D locates within the cell nucleus at specific transcriptionally active chromatin sites. Consistently, transcriptomic analysis show that cystatin D alters gene expression, including that of genes encoding transcription factors such as RUNX1, RUNX2, and MEF2C in HCT116 cells. In concordance with transcriptomic data, quantitative proteomic analysis identified 292 proteins differentially expressed in cystatin D-expressing cells involved in cell adhesion, cytoskeleton, and RNA synthesis and processing. Furthermore, using cytokine arrays we found that cystatin D reduces the secretion of several protumor cytokines such as fibroblast growth factor-4, CX3CL1/fractalkine, neurotrophin 4 oncostatin-M, pulmonary and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL18, and transforming growth factor B3. These results support an unanticipated role of cystatin D in the cell nucleus, controlling the transcription of specific genes involved in crucial cellular functions, which may mediate its protective action in colon cancer.

  2. IgA modulates respiratory dysfunction as a sequela to pulmonary chlamydial infection as neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanka, Gopala Krishna Koundinya; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Gong, Siqi; Gupta, Rishein; Mustafa, Shamimunisa B; Murthy, Ashlesh K; Zhong, Guangming; Chambers, James P; Guentzel, M Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P

    2016-04-01

    Neonatal Chlamydia lung infections are associated with serious sequelae such as asthma and airway hyper-reactivity in children and adults. Our previous studies demonstrated the importance of Th-1 type cytokines, IL-12 and IFN-γ in protection against neonatal pulmonary chlamydial challenge; however, the role of the humoral arm of defense has not been elucidated. We hypothesized that B-cells and IgA, the major mucosal antibody, play a protective role in newborns against development of later life respiratory sequelae to Chlamydia infection. Our studies using neonatal mice revealed that all WT and IgA-deficient (IgA(-/-)) animals survived a sublethal pulmonary Chlamydia muridarum challenge at one day after birth with similar reduction in bacterial burdens over time. In contrast, all B-cell-deficient (μMT) mice succumbed to infection at the same challenge dose correlating to failure to control bacterial burdens in the lungs. Although IgA may not be important for bacterial clearance, we observed IgA(-/-) mice displayed greater respiratory dysfunction 5 weeks post challenge. Specifically, comparative respiratory functional analyses revealed a significant shift upward in P-V loops, and higher dynamic resistance in IgA(-/-) animals. This study provides insight(s) into the protective role of IgA in neonates against pulmonary chlamydial infection induced respiratory pathological sequelae observed later in life.

  3. Transcriptional regulation of RACK1 and modulation of its expression: Role of steroid hormones and significance in health and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buoso, Erica; Galasso, Marilisa; Serafini, Melania Maria; Ronfani, Melania; Lanni, Cristina; Corsini, Emanuela; Racchi, Marco

    2017-02-09

    The Receptor for Activated C Kinase 1 (RACK1) is a scaffold protein for different kinases and membrane receptors. RACK1 can shuttle proteins to their sites of action, facilitate cross-talk among distinct signaling pathways or recruit other signaling proteins into the complexes. Therefore, it is a key mediator of various pathways and is involved in various biological events including development, immune response, brain activity and cancer. Because of its importance, it is of extreme significance to understand the transcriptional mechanisms governing its expression. The identification of regulatory elements in the promoter of RACK1 shed some light on its transcriptional modulation in physiological and pathological context. Literature data support the existence of a complex hormonal balance, between glucocorticoids and androgens, in the control of RACK1 expression due to specific and complex interactions on the RACK1 promoter. These and other informations suggest that a better understanding of RACK1 transcriptional regulation is essential to unravel its role. Furthermore, the modulation of its expression in physiological or pathological conditions may be of interest in different context, such as aging and cancer.

  4. Fine temporal analysis of DHT transcriptional modulation of the ATM/Gadd45g signaling pathways in the mouse uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanga, Mahinè; Labrie, Yvan; Calvo, Ezequiel; Belleau, Pascal; Martel, Céline; Pelletier, Georges; Morissette, Jean; Labrie, Fernand; Durocher, Francine

    2009-03-01

    In rodents, the uterus of a mature female undergoes changes during the uterine cycle, under the control of steroid hormones. 5alpha-Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is recognized to play an important role in the regulation of androgen action in normal endometrium. Using microarray technology, a screening analysis of genes responding to DHT in the uterus of ovariectomized mice, has allowed us to highlight multiple genes of the ATM/Gadd45g pathway that are modulated following exposure to DHT. Two phases of regulation were identified. In the early phase, the expression of genes involved in the G2/M arrest is rapidly increased, followed by the repression of genes of the G1/S checkpoint, and by the induction of transcriptional regulators. Later, i.e. from 12 to 24 hr, genes involved in G2/M transition, cytoarchitectural and lipid-related genes are stimulated by DHT while immunity-related genes appear to be differentially regulated by the hormone. These results show that a physiological dose of DHT induces the transcription of genes promoting the cell cycle progression in mice. Profile determination of temporal uterine gene expression at the transcriptional level enables us to suggest that the DHT modulation of genes involved in ATM/Gadd45g signaling in an ATM- or p53-independent manner, could play an important role in the cyclical changes of uterine cells in the mouse uterus.

  5. Quercetin reverses experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension by modulating the TrkA pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Yuanzhou; Cao, Xiaopei; Liu, Xiansheng; Li, Xiaochen; Xu, Yongjian; Liu, Jin; Shi, Jing

    2015-11-15

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by excessive proliferation, resistance to apoptosis, and increased migration of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). We hypothesized that quercetin exerts protective effects against this disease; thus, a chronic hypoxia model of PAH was generated using male Sprague-Dawley rats, which were treated with quercetin. In this model, quercetin prevented the development of PAH, right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular remodeling after exposure to hypoxia. Quercetin inhibited PASMC proliferation and increased the apoptosis of PASMCs in vivo. In vitro, quercetin significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced PASMC proliferation, arrested cells in G1/G0 and inhibited cell migration in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, our results showed that quercetin increased cyclin D1 protein levels and decreased the protein expression of cyclin B1 and Cdc2. Additionally, quercetin altered the Bax/Bcl-2 ratio and reduced MMP2, MMP9, CXCR4, integrin β1, and integrin α5 expression. Using genome-wide microarray analysis, we found that factors regulating proliferation, apoptosis, cell cycle, and migration were related to the tyrosine receptor kinase A (TrkA) pathway. In addition, activation of the TrkA/AKT signaling cascade during hypoxia was inhibited by quercetin in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, quercetin alone inhibited the TrkA/AKT signaling pathway, resulting in decreased PASMC migration, cell cycle arrest and the induction of apoptosis. Our data suggest that quercetin is a potential candidate for the treatment of hypoxia-induced PAH.

  6. Type 2 diabetes mellitus coincident with pulmonary or latent tuberculosis results in modulation of adipocytokines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavan Kumar, Nathella; Nair, Dina; Banurekha, V V; Dolla, Chandrakumar; Kumaran, Paul; Sridhar, Rathinam; Babu, Subash

    2016-03-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is recognized as major risk factor for the progress of active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), although the mechanistic link between diabetes and tuberculosis remains poorly characterized. Moreover, the influence of poorly controlled diabetes on the baseline levels of adipocytokines in the context of tuberculosis has not been explored in detail. To characterize the influence of coexistent DM on adipocytokine levels in pulmonary or latent TB (LTB), we examined circulating levels of adipocytokines in the plasma of individuals with PTB-DM or LTB-DM and compared them with those without DM (PTB or LTB). PTB-DM or LTB-DM is characterized by diminished circulating levels of adiponectin and adipsin and/or heightened circulating levels of leptin, visfatin and PAI-1. In addition, adiponectin and adipsin exhibit a significant negative correlation, whereas leptin, visfatin and PAI-1 display a significant positive correlation with HbA1C levels and random blood glucose levels. Therefore, our data reveal that PTB-DM or LTB-DM is characterized by alterations in the systemic levels of adipocytokines, indicating that altered adipose tissue inflammation underlying Type 2 diabetes potentially contributes to pathogenesis of TB disease.

  7. [Effects of acupoint injection of autoblood on expression of pulmonary transcription factor GATA 3 and T-bet proteins and genes in asthma rats].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Lü; Li, Jun-Xiong; Kravitz, Julia; Tang, Chun-Zhi; Guo, Ze-Kai; Li, Pei-Yong; Guo, Feng-Mei

    2012-10-01

    To observe the effect of autoblood acupoint-injection (ABAI) on expression levels of pulmonary transacting T-cell-specific transcription factor GATA 3 (involving Th 2 cytokine expression), Th 1-specific T-box transcription factor T-box expressed in T-cells (T-bet) proteins and genes in asthmatic rats so as to explore its mechanisms underlying asthma relief. Forty-eight male SD rats were randomized into normal control (n = 8), model (n = 10), saline acupoint-injection (SAI, n = 10), ABAI (n = 10), and Dexamethasone (DXM, n = 10) groups. Asthma model was established during 28 days by 10% Ovalbumin + 10% aluminium hydroxide solution injection (i. p.) and vapourized 2% Ovalbumin inhaling for 14 days. For rats of the ABAI group, 0.4 mL autoblood was injected into the bilateral "Feishu" (BL 13) or "Shenshu" (BL 23) alternately, once every other day for six times. For rats of the DXM group, 50% DXM solution (0.5 mg/kg, i. p.) was given from the 17th day on after starting the modeling, once every other day for 11 days. Pulmonary GATA 3 and T-bet protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry, and GATA 3 mRNA and T-bet mRNA expression detected by real time-PCR. In comparison with the normal group, pulmonary GATA 3 protein and mRNA expression levels in the model group were up-regulated significantly (P model group was down-regulated obviously (P model group, GATA 3 protein and mRNA expression levels were down-regulated significantly in both ABAI and DXM groups (P model and SAI groups, and between ABAI and DXM groups in GATA 3 protein expression levels; and between ABAI and DXM groups in GATA 3 mRNA expression levels; between normal and model groups, and between SAI and ABAI groups in T-bet protein expression levels; between model and SAI groups and between ABAI and DXM groups in T-bet mRNA expression levels (P > 0.05). The ratio of GATA 3 mRNA/T-bet mRNA expression was significantly higher in the model group than in the normal group (P model group (P 0

  8. pRB binds to and modulates the transrepressing activity of the E1A-regulated transcription factor p120E4F

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fajas, L.; Paul, C.; Zugasti, O.; Cam, L. Le; Polanowska, J.; Fabbrizio, E.; Medema, R.H.; Vignais, M.-L.; Sardet, C.

    2000-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein pRB is involved in the transcriptional control of genes essential for cell cycle progression and differentiation. pRB interacts with different transcription factors and thereby modulates their activity by sequestration, corepression, or activation. We report that pRB, but

  9. Developmental regulators containing the I-mfa domain interact with T cyclins and Tat and modulate transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qi; Young, Tara M; Mathews, Michael B; Pe'ery, Tsafi

    2007-03-30

    Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) complexes, composed of cyclin-dependent kinase 9 (CDK9) and cyclin T1 or T2, are engaged by many cellular transcription regulators that activate or inhibit transcription from specific promoters. The related I-mfa (inhibitor of MyoD family a) and HIC (human I-mfa-domain-containing) proteins function in myogenic differentiation and embryonic development by participating in the Wnt signaling pathway. We report that I-mfa is a novel regulator of P-TEFb. Both HIC and I-mfa interact through their homologous I-mfa domains with cyclin T1 and T2 at two binding sites. One site is the regulatory histidine-rich domain that interacts with CDK9 substrates including RNA polymerase II. The second site contains a lysine and arginine-rich motif that is highly conserved between the two T cyclins. This site overlaps and includes the previously identified Tat/TAR recognition motif of cyclin T1 required for activation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transcription. HIC and I-mfa can serve as substrates for P-TEFb. Their I-mfa domains also bind the activation domain of HIV-1 Tat and inhibit Tat- and P-TEFb-dependent transcription from the HIV-1 promoter. This transcriptional repression is cell-type specific and can operate via Tat and cyclin T1. Genomic and sequence comparisons indicate that the I-mf and HIC genes, as well as flanking genes, diverged from a duplicated chromosomal region. Our findings link I-mfa and HIC to viral replication, and suggest that P-TEFb is modulated in the Wnt signaling pathway.

  10. HuR interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase, and modulates reverse transcription in infected cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ennifar Eric

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reverse transcription of the genetic material of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is a critical step in the replication cycle of this virus. This process, catalyzed by reverse transcriptase (RT, is well characterized at the biochemical level. However, in infected cells, reverse transcription occurs in a multiprotein complex – the reverse transcription complex (RTC – consisting of viral genomic RNA associated with viral proteins (including RT and, presumably, as yet uncharacterized cellular proteins. Very little is known about the cellular proteins interacting with the RTC, and with reverse transcriptase in particular. We report here that HIV-1 reverse transcription is affected by the levels of a nucleocytoplasmic shuttling protein – the RNA-binding protein HuR. A direct protein-protein interaction between RT and HuR was observed in a yeast two-hybrid screen and confirmed in vitro by homogenous time-resolved fluorescence (HTRF. We mapped the domain interacting with HuR to the RNAse H domain of RT, and the binding domain for RT to the C-terminus of HuR, partially overlapping the third RRM RNA-binding domain of HuR. HuR silencing with specific siRNAs greatly impaired early and late steps of reverse transcription, significantly inhibiting HIV-1 infection. Moreover, by mutagenesis and immunoprecipitation studies, we could not detect the binding of HuR to the viral RNA. These results suggest that HuR may be involved in and may modulate the reverse transcription reaction of HIV-1, by an as yet unknown mechanism involving a protein-protein interaction with HIV-1 RT.

  11. Conserved region 2.1 of Escherichia coli heat shock transcription factor sigma32 is required for modulating both metabolic stability and transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Mina; Yura, Takashi; Tsuchimoto, Sachie; Fukumori, Yoshihiro; Kanemori, Masaaki

    2004-11-01

    Escherichia coli heat shock transcription factor sigma32 is rapidly degraded in vivo, with a half-life of about 1 min. A set of proteins that includes the DnaK chaperone team (DnaK, DnaJ, GrpE) and ATP-dependent proteases (FtsH, HslUV, etc.) are involved in degradation of sigma32. To gain further insight into the regulation of sigma32 stability, we isolated sigma32 mutants that were markedly stabilized. Many of the mutants had amino acid substitutions in the N-terminal half (residues 47 to 55) of region 2.1, a region highly conserved among bacterial sigma factors. The half-lives ranged from about 2-fold to more than 10-fold longer than that of the wild-type protein. Besides greater stability, the levels of heat shock proteins, such as DnaK and GroEL, increased in cells producing stable sigma32. Detailed analysis showed that some stable sigma32 mutants have higher transcriptional activity than the wild type. These results indicate that the N-terminal half of region 2.1 is required for modulating both metabolic stability and the activity of sigma32. The evidence suggests that sigma32 stabilization does not result from an elevated affinity for core RNA polymerase. Region 2.1 may, therefore, be involved in interactions with the proteolytic machinery, including molecular chaperones.

  12. Analysis of autonomic modulation after an acute session of resistance exercise at different intensities in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolino J

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Juliana Nicolino,1 Dionei Ramos,1 Marceli Rocha Leite,1 Fernanda Maria Machado Rodrigues,1 Bruna Spolador de Alencar Silva,1 Guilherme Yassuyuki Tacao,1 Alessandra Choqueta de Toledo,2 Luiz Carlos Marques Vanderlei,1 Ercy Mara Cipulo Ramos1 1Department of Physiotherapy, Paulista State University (UNESP, Presidente Prudente, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Department of Pathology, School of Medicine of the University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Purpose: Physical exercises are employed as part of the treatment of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD; however information regarding cardiac autonomic modulation after an acute session of resistance exercise (RE is unknown. The aim of this study was to evaluate the cardiac autonomic modulation, via heart rate variability after an acute session of RE applied at different intensities in COPD patients. Patients and methods: Twelve COPD patients underwent an acute session of RE with an intensity of 60% and another of 90% of the one repetition maximum test. For analysis of autonomic modulation, heart rate was recorded beat-by-beat for 20 minutes at rest and after the training session. Heart rate variability indexes were obtained in the time and frequency domains for the assessment of autonomic modulation. Results: Regardless of exercise intensity, RE acute sessions influenced the autonomic modulation when the recovery period was compared with the baseline. An increase in standard deviation of normal to normal RR intervals was observed throughout recovery time after the RE, as compared to baseline in both protocols: 60% and 90% of the one repetition maximum test. The spectral component of low frequency index (ms was higher throughout recovery when compared to baseline in both protocols. The same was also observed in the spectral component of high frequency index (ms for the protocols of 60% and 90%. Conclusion: RE sessions impact on the autonomic modulation of COPD patients by promoting

  13. KAYAK-α modulates circadian transcriptional feedback loops in Drosophila pacemaker neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jinli; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Emery, Patrick

    2012-11-21

    Circadian rhythms are generated by well-conserved interlocked transcriptional feedback loops in animals. In Drosophila, the dimeric transcription factor CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC) promotes period (per), timeless (tim), vrille (vri), and PAR-domain protein 1 (Pdp1) transcription. PER and TIM negatively feed back on CLK/CYC transcriptional activity, whereas VRI and PDP1 negatively and positively regulate Clk transcription, respectively. Here, we show that the α isoform of the Drosophila FOS homolog KAYAK (KAY) is required for normal circadian behavior. KAY-α downregulation in circadian pacemaker neurons increases period length by 1.5 h. This behavioral phenotype is correlated with decreased expression of several circadian proteins. The strongest effects are on CLK and the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR, which are both under VRI and PDP1 control. Consistently, KAY-α can bind to VRI and inhibit its interaction with the Clk promoter. Interestingly, KAY-α can also repress CLK activity. Hence, in flies with low KAY-α levels, CLK derepression would partially compensate for increased VRI repression, thus attenuating the consequences of KAY-α downregulation on CLK targets. We propose that the double role of KAY-α in the two transcriptional loops controlling Drosophila circadian behavior brings precision and stability to their oscillations.

  14. Transcriptional regulation of the bovine leukemia virus promoter by the cyclic AMP-response element modulator tau isoform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyên, Thi Lien-Anh; de Walque, Stéphane; Veithen, Emmanuelle; Dekoninck, Ann; Martinelli, Valérie; de Launoit, Yvan; Burny, Arsène; Harrod, Robert; Van Lint, Carine

    2007-07-20

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) expression is controlled at the transcriptional level through three Tax(BLV)-responsive elements (TxREs) responsive to the viral transactivator Tax(BLV). The cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-binding protein (CREB) has been shown to interact with CRE-like sequences present in the middle of each of these TxREs and to play critical transcriptional roles in both basal and Tax(BLV)-transactivated BLV promoter activity. In this study, we have investigated the potential involvement of the cAMP-response element modulator (CREM) in BLV transcriptional regulation, and we have demonstrated that CREM proteins were expressed in BLV-infected cells and bound to the three BLV TxREs in vitro. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays using BLV-infected cell lines demonstrated in the context of chromatin that CREM proteins were recruited to the BLV promoter TxRE region in vivo. Functional studies, in the absence of Tax(BLV), indicated that ectopic CREMtau protein had a CRE-dependent stimulatory effect on BLV promoter transcriptional activity. Cross-link of the B-cell receptor potentiated CREMtau transactivation of the viral promoter. Further experiments supported the notion that this potentiation involved CREMtau Ser-117 phosphorylation and recruitment of CBP/p300 to the BLV promoter. Although CREB and Tax(BLV) synergistically transactivated the BLV promoter, CREMtau repressed this Tax(BLV)/CREB synergism, suggesting that a modulation of the level of Tax(BLV) transactivation through opposite actions of CREB and CREMtau could facilitate immune escape and allow tumor development.

  15. Synergistic enhansons located within an acute phase responsive enhancer modulate glucocorticoid induction of angiotensinogen gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasier, A R; Ron, D; Tate, J E; Habener, J F

    1990-12-01

    The hepatic transcription of the angiotensinogen gene is regulated by both glucocorticoids and cytokines generated as products of the acute phase reaction. We have identified a multimodular enhancer in the 5'-flanking region of the rat angiotensinogen gene that mediates these responses and consists of an acute phase response element (APRE) flanked on both sides by adjacent glucocorticoid response element consensus motifs (GREs). Induction of transcription by the cytokine interleukin-1 (IL-1) is glucocorticoid dependent and mediated through the APRE. The APRE binds in a mutually exclusive manner a cytokine/phorbol ester-inducible protein (BPi), indistinguishable from nuclear factor kB, and a family of constitutive liver proteins (BPcs) related to the heat-stable transcription factor C/EBP. Using mutated 5'-flanking sequences of the angiotensinogen gene fused to a firefly luciferase reporter gene transfected into hepatoblastoma (HepG2) cells, we have mapped enhanson sequences required for the transcriptional response to glucocorticoids. Two functionally distinct GREs are identified by deletion and site-directed mutagenesis, both of which mediate glucocorticoid-stimulated transcription in vivo. Glucocorticoid-induced transcription mediated by the angiotensinogen gene enhancer is, furthermore, dependent on the occupancy of the APRE by either the BPi or a member of the BPc family because a mutant APRE that binds neither BPi nor BPc exhibits an attenuated glucocorticoid responsiveness. Mutant APREs that permit exclusive binding of either BPi or BPc synergistically transmit the glucocorticoid response mediated by one or the other of the adjacent GREs. Thus, the induction of angiotensinogen gene transcription involves interaction between the glucocorticoid receptor and either one of the APRE-binding proteins: either the cytokine-inducible NFkB or the constitutive family of C/EBP-like proteins, bound to adjacent enhansons in a mutually synergistic enhancer complex.

  16. Endothelial follistatin-like 1 regulates the maturation of the pulmonary vasculature by modulating BMP/SMAD signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tania, Navessa Padma; Maarsingh, Harm; Bos, Sophie T.; Mattiotti, Andrea; Prakash, Stuti; Timens, Wim; Schmidt, Martina; Van Den Hoff, Maurice; Gosens, Reinoud

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive disease that is characterized by vascular remodeling and sustained vasoconstriction which consequently lead to high blood pressure in the pulmonary vasculature and right ventricle remodeling. Altered bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling ha

  17. Microbiota modulate transcription in the intestinal epithelium without remodeling the accessible chromatin landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, J. Gray; Frank, Christopher L.; Lickwar, Colin R.; Guturu, Harendra; Rube, Tomas; Wenger, Aaron M.; Chen, Jenny; Bejerano, Gill; Crawford, Gregory E.

    2014-01-01

    Microbiota regulate intestinal physiology by modifying host gene expression along the length of the intestine, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unresolved. Transcriptional specificity occurs through interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and cis-regulatory regions (CRRs) characterized by nucleosome-depleted accessible chromatin. We profiled transcriptome and accessible chromatin landscapes in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from mice reared in the presence or absence of microbiota. We show that regional differences in gene transcription along the intestinal tract were accompanied by major alterations in chromatin accessibility. Surprisingly, we discovered that microbiota modify host gene transcription in IECs without significantly impacting the accessible chromatin landscape. Instead, microbiota regulation of host gene transcription might be achieved by differential expression of specific TFs and enrichment of their binding sites in nucleosome-depleted CRRs near target genes. Our results suggest that the chromatin landscape in IECs is preprogrammed by the host in a region-specific manner to permit responses to microbiota through binding of open CRRs by specific TFs. PMID:24963153

  18. Microbiota modulate transcription in the intestinal epithelium without remodeling the accessible chromatin landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, J Gray; Frank, Christopher L; Lickwar, Colin R; Guturu, Harendra; Rube, Tomas; Wenger, Aaron M; Chen, Jenny; Bejerano, Gill; Crawford, Gregory E; Rawls, John F

    2014-09-01

    Microbiota regulate intestinal physiology by modifying host gene expression along the length of the intestine, but the underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unresolved. Transcriptional specificity occurs through interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and cis-regulatory regions (CRRs) characterized by nucleosome-depleted accessible chromatin. We profiled transcriptome and accessible chromatin landscapes in intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) from mice reared in the presence or absence of microbiota. We show that regional differences in gene transcription along the intestinal tract were accompanied by major alterations in chromatin accessibility. Surprisingly, we discovered that microbiota modify host gene transcription in IECs without significantly impacting the accessible chromatin landscape. Instead, microbiota regulation of host gene transcription might be achieved by differential expression of specific TFs and enrichment of their binding sites in nucleosome-depleted CRRs near target genes. Our results suggest that the chromatin landscape in IECs is preprogrammed by the host in a region-specific manner to permit responses to microbiota through binding of open CRRs by specific TFs. © 2014 Camp et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  19. The yeast prefoldin-like URI-orthologue Bud27 associates with the RSC nucleosome remodeler and modulates transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirón-García, María Carmen; Garrido-Godino, Ana Isabel; Martínez-Fernández, Verónica; Fernández-Pevida, Antonio; Cuevas-Bermúdez, Abel; Martín-Expósito, Manuel; Chávez, Sebastián; de la Cruz, Jesús; Navarro, Francisco

    2014-09-01

    Bud27, the yeast orthologue of human URI/RMP, is a member of the prefoldin-like family of ATP-independent molecular chaperones. It has recently been shown to mediate the assembly of the three RNA polymerases in an Rpb5-dependent manner. In this work, we present evidence of Bud27 modulating RNA pol II transcription elongation. We show that Bud27 associates with RNA pol II phosphorylated forms (CTD-Ser5P and CTD-Ser2P), and that its absence affects RNA pol II occupancy of transcribed genes. We also reveal that Bud27 associates in vivo with the Sth1 component of the chromatin remodeling complex RSC and mediates its association with RNA pol II. Our data suggest that Bud27, in addition of contributing to Rpb5 folding within the RNA polymerases, also participates in the correct assembly of other chromatin-associated protein complexes, such as RSC, thereby modulating their activity.

  20. Anti-tumor efficacy of a transcriptional replication-competent adenovirus, Ad-OC-E1a, for osteosarcoma pulmonary metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiong; Jung, Chaeyong; Liu, You-Hong; Bae, Kyung-Hee; Zhang, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Hong-Ji; Vanderputten, Dale; Jeng, Meei-Huey; Gardner, Thomas A; Kao, Chinghai

    2006-06-01

    Osteosarcoma (OSA) is the most frequent type of primary malignant bone tumor and is apt to occur in children and young adults. Pulmonary metastasis (OSPM) is the major reason for its fatal outcome. Osteocalcin (OC) is a major noncollagenous bone protein whose expression is limited almost exclusively to bone marrow and osteotropic tumors. OC is also known to express in cell lines with bone metastasis feathers. Gene therapy strategies with the OC promoter directing the replication of adenovirus in a tumor-specific manner are a potential modality for OSPM therapy. We detected OC mRNA expression by RNA in situ hybridization in OSA and OSPM samples from patients, and tested OC promoter transcriptional activity in OSA and non-OSA cell lines. Then we used a transcriptional replication-competent adenovirus, Ad-OC-E1a, to treat OSPM, and evaluated its tumor-specific replication and killing activities in vitro as well as anti-OSPM efficacy in vivo via systemic delivery. OC mRNA was detected in all types of OSA tissues, including OSPM tissues. The transcriptional activity of the OC promoter was much higher in a OSPM cell line SAOS-2LM7 and primary OSA cell line MG63 than in non-OSA cell lines, including cell lines from breast cancer, colon cancer, and liver cancer. Ad-OC-E1a expressed E1a protein only in MG63 and SAOS-2LM7, which indicated that adenovirus E1a was under strict control by the OC promoter. Ad-OC-E1a demonstrated killing and viral replication activity close to wild-type adenovirus levels in MG63 and SAOS-2LM7, but the killing and viral replication activities were attenuated significantly in cells expressing low OC transcriptional activity. To test whether Ad-OC-E1a could be used to target human OSPM in vivo, SAOS-2LM7 pulmonary metastasis models in nude mice were induced and treated by tail-vein injection with Ad-OC-E1a. Compared to tumor nodules in the lung in groups treated with PBS or control virus, the quantity of metastasized tumor nodules decreased

  1. Bioinformatics Identification of Modules of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Genes by In Silico Promoter Analysis and Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Augustin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms and genetic risk factors underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis are only partly understood. To identify new factors, which may contribute to AD, different approaches are taken including proteomics, genetics, and functional genomics. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach and found that distinct AD-related genes share modules of transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a transcriptional coregulation. To detect additional coregulated genes, which may potentially contribute to AD, we established a new bioinformatics workflow with known multivariate methods like support vector machines, biclustering, and predicted transcription factor binding site modules by using in silico analysis and over 400 expression arrays from human and mouse. Two significant modules are composed of three transcription factor families: CTCF, SP1F, and EGRF/ZBPF, which are conserved between human and mouse APP promoter sequences. The specific combination of in silico promoter and multivariate analysis can identify regulation mechanisms of genes involved in multifactorial diseases.

  2. Histone deacetylases regulate gonadotropin-releasing hormone I gene expression via modulating Otx2-driven transcriptional activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Gan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Precise coordination of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis orchestrates the normal reproductive function. As a central regulator, the appropriate synthesis and secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone I (GnRH-I from the hypothalamus is essential for the coordination. Recently, emerging evidence indicates that histone deacetylases (HDACs play an important role in maintaining normal reproductive function. In this study, we identify the potential effects of HDACs on Gnrh1 gene transcription. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Inhibition of HDACs activities by trichostatin A (TSA and valproic acid (VPA promptly and dramatically repressed transcription of Gnrh1 gene in the mouse immortalized mature GnRH neuronal cells GT1-7. The suppression was connected with a specific region of Gnrh1 gene promoter, which contains two consensus Otx2 binding sites. Otx2 has been known to activate the basal and also enhancer-driven transcription of Gnrh1 gene. The transcriptional activity of Otx2 is negatively modulated by Grg4, a member of the Groucho-related-gene (Grg family. In the present study, the expression of Otx2 was downregulated by TSA and VPA in GT1-7 cells, accompanied with the opposite changes of Grg4 expression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the DNA-binding activity of Otx2 to Gnrh1 gene was suppressed by TSA and VPA. Overexpression of Otx2 partly abolished the TSA- and VPA-induced downregulation of Gnrh1 gene expression. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data indicate that HDAC inhibitors downregulate Gnrh1 gene expression via repressing Otx2-driven transcriptional activity. This study should provide an insight for our understanding on the effects of HDACs in the reproductive system and suggests that HDACs could be potential novel targets for the therapy of GnRH-related diseases.

  3. HBx truncation mutants differentially modulate SREBP-1a and -1c transcription and HBV replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Qi; Liu, Qiang

    2015-12-01

    As master transcription factors for lipogenesis, sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1 (SREBP-1) has two isoforms, SREBP-1a and SREBP-1c. Hepatitis B virus X (HBx) can up-regulate the transcription of both SREBP-1a and SREBP-1c. HBx is a small protein consisting of 154 amino acids. Truncated forms of HBx, often found in the tissues after HBV infection, may have a role in the pathogenesis associated with HBV infection. In this study, we examined the effects of two HBx truncation mutants, HBx aa. 1-127 and HBx aa. 43-154, on the transcription of SREBP-1a and SREBP-1c. HBx 1-127 can up-regulate SREBP-1c, but not SREBP-1a transcription, whereas HBx 43-154 can activate SREBP-1a, but not SREBP-1c transcription. We further determined the activities of two HBV enhancers after the expression of the truncated HBx proteins. HBx 1-127 and HBx 43-154 can only up-regulate HBV enhancer I or HBV enhancer II, respectively. Knocking down SREBP-1 abrogates enhancer activation by HBx proteins, suggesting a role of SREBP-1. In addition, using HBV enhancer mutants, we found that the binding sequence for AP-1 on enhancer I is essential for its activation by HBx 1-127, whereas C/EBP and Sp1 sites are required for enhancer II activation by HBx 43-154. Finally, we showed that both HBx 1-127 and HBx 43-154 can increase HBV transcription and HBV replication dependent upon SREBP-1 because knocking down SREBP-1 abrogates the up-regulation. Furthermore, upon ectopic expression of either SREBP-1a or SREBP-1c, we showed that SREBP-1a is involved in HBV transcription and replication up-regulation by HBx 43-154, whereas SREBP-1c is involved in HBV transcription and replication up-regulation by HBx 1-127. Our results should help understand the interactions between HBV and the SREBP-1-mediated lipogenic pathway.

  4. Modulation of pulmonary NA+ pump gene expression during cold storage and reperfusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J D; Baker, C J; Danto, S I; Starnes, V A; Barr, M L

    2000-10-15

    Reperfusion injury with pulmonary edema continues to be a major complication after lung transplantation. Alveolar fluid homeostasis is regulated by Na+/K+-ATPase activity on the basolateral surface of alveolar epithelial cells. Intact Na+/K+-ATPase is essential to the resolution of pulmonary edema. We characterized the effects of cold ischemia and reperfusion on expression of Na+/K+-ATPase mRNA and protein. Baseline values for Na+/K+-ATPase mRNA and protein were determined from freshly harvested lungs with no cold storage time or reperfusion (group I). Group II lungs were analyzed after cold storage times of 12 or 24 hr without subsequent reperfusion. Group III lungs were analyzed after cold storage times of 12 or 24 hr with subsequent reperfusion. Lungs were flushed with either Euro-Collins (EC) or University of Wisconsin (UW) solution in each group. All samples were quantified for Na+/K+-ATPase mRNA and Na+/K+-ATPase protein. Physiological parameters including oxygenation and compliance were also measured. There were no significant differences in the level of mRNA and protein for samples that were cold stored without reperfusion (group II). With reperfusion (group III) there was a significant increase in the level of the Na+/K+-ATPase mRNA after 12 hr of storage for both EC and UW. After 24 hr of storage and subsequent reperfusion, lungs flushed with EC had significantly decreased Na+/K+-ATPase protein and mRNA, although lungs preserved with UW maintained their increased levels of Na+/K+-ATPase protein and mRNA. Our data suggest that ischemia-reperfusion injury results in an initial up-regulation of Na+/K+-ATPase mRNA. With prolonged injury in lungs preserved with EC, the level of the mRNA decreased with a corresponding decrease in the Na+/K+-ATPase protein. The different response seen in EC versus UW may be explained by better preservation of pump function with UW than EC and correlates with improved physiological function in lungs preserved with UW solution.

  5. Nitric oxide modulates hypoxic pulmonary smooth muscle cell proliferation and apoptosis by regulating carbon monoxide pathway

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan-fei WANG; Hong TIAN; Chao-shu TANG; Hong-fang JIN; Jun-bao DU

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To explore the role of carbon monoxide (CO) in the regulation of hypoxic pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation and apoptosis by nitric oxide (NO). Methods: PASMC of Wistar rats was cultured in vitro in the presence of a NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, or an inhibitor of heme oxygenase (HO), zinc protoporphyrin-IX, or under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions.Nitrite and carboxyhemoglobin in PASMC medium were detected with spectrophotometry. The proliferating and apoptotic percentage of PASMC was measured by flow cytometry. The expression of HO-1 mRNA in PASMC was analyzed by fluorescent real-time quantitative PCR, and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen and caspase-3 were examined by immunocytochemical analysis. Results: The results showed that hypoxia suppressed NO generation from PASMC, which promoted hypoxic PASMC proliferation and induced apoptosis. Meanwhile, hy-poxia induced HO-1 expression in PASMC and promoted CO production from PASMC, which inhibited PASMC proliferation and regulated PASMC apoptosis. NO upregulated the expression of HO-1 mRNA in hypoxic PASMC; NO also inhib-ited proliferation and promoted apoptosis of hypoxic PASMC, possibly by regu-lating the production of CO. Conclusion: The results indicated that CO could inhibit proliferation and regulate apoptosis of PASMC, and NO inhibited prolifera-tion and promoted apoptosis of hypoxic PASMC, possibly by regulating the pro-duction of CO.

  6. Chemically Modified Oligonucleotides Modulate an Epigenetically Varied and Transient Form of Transcription Silencing of HIV-1 in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Knowling

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Small noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs have been shown to guide epigenetic silencing complexes to target loci in human cells. When targeted to gene promoters, these small RNAs can lead to long-term stable epigenetic silencing of gene transcription. To date, small RNAs have been shown to modulate transcriptional gene silencing (TGS of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 as well as several other disease-related genes, but it has remained unknown as to what extent particular chemistries can be used to generate single-stranded backbone-modified oligonucleotides that are amenable to this form of gene targeting and regulation. Here, we present data indicating that specific combinations of backbone modifications can be used to generate single-stranded antisense oligonucleotides that can functionally direct TGS of HIV-1 in a manner that is however, independent of epigenetic changes at the target loci. Furthermore, this functionality appears contingent on the absence of a 5′ phosphate in the oligonucleotide. These data suggest that chemically modified oligonucleotide based approaches could be implemented as a means to regulate gene transcription in an epigenetically independent manner.

  7. Phosphorylation of the leukemic oncoprotein EVI1 on serine 196 modulates DNA binding, transcriptional repression and transforming ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J White

    Full Text Available The EVI1 (ecotropic viral integration site 1 gene at 3q26 codes for a transcriptional regulator with an essential role in haematopoiesis. Overexpression of EVI1 in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML is frequently associated with 3q26 rearrangements and confers extremely poor prognosis. EVI1 mediates transcriptional regulation, signalling, and epigenetic modifications by interacting with DNA, proteins and protein complexes. To explore to what extent protein phosphorylation impacts on EVI1 functions, we analysed endogenous EVI1 protein from a high EVI1 expressing Fanconi anaemia (FA derived AML cell line. Mass spectrometric analysis of immunoprecipitated EVI1 revealed phosphorylation at serine 196 (S196 in the sixth zinc finger of the N-terminal zinc finger domain. Mutated EVI1 with an aspartate substitution at serine 196 (S196D, which mimics serine phosphorylation of this site, exhibited reduced DNA-binding and transcriptional repression from a gene promotor selectively targeted by the N-terminal zinc finger domain. Forced expression of the S196D mutant significantly reduced EVI1 mediated transformation of Rat1 fibroblasts. While EVI1-mediated serial replating of murine haematopoietic progenitors was maintained by EVI1-S196D, this was associated with significantly higher Evi1-trancript levels compared with WT-EVI1 or EVI1-S196A, mimicking S196 non-phosphorylated EVI1. These data suggest that EVI1 function is modulated by phosphorylation of the first zinc finger domain.

  8. An Algorithm for Generating Small RNAs Capable of Epigenetically Modulating Transcriptional Gene Silencing and Activation in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Ackley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small noncoding antisense RNAs (sasRNAs guide epigenetic silencing complexes to target loci in human cells and modulate gene transcription. When these targeted loci are situated within a promoter, long-term, stable epigenetic silencing of transcription can occur. Recent studies suggest that there exists an endogenous form of such epigenetic regulation in human cells involving long noncoding RNAs. In this article, we present and validate an algorithm for the generation of highly effective sasRNAs that can mimic the endogenous noncoding RNAs involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. We validate this algorithm by targeting several oncogenes including AKT-1, c-MYC, K-RAS, and H-RAS. We also target a long antisense RNA that mediates the epigenetic repression of the tumor suppressor gene DUSP6, silenced in pancreatic cancer. An algorithm that can efficiently design small noncoding RNAs for the epigenetic transcriptional silencing or activation of specific genes has potential therapeutic and experimental applications.

  9. Post-transcriptional modifications modulate conformational dynamics in human U2-U6 snRNA complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunatilaka, Krishanthi S; Rueda, David

    2014-01-01

    The spliceosome catalyzes precursor-mRNA splicing in all eukaryotes. It consists of over 100 proteins and five small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), including U2 and U6 snRNAs, which are essential for catalysis. Human and yeast snRNAs share structural similarities despite the fact that human snRNAs contain numerous post-transcriptional modifications. Although functions for these modifications have been proposed, their exact roles are still not well understood. To help elucidate these roles in pre-mRNA splicing, we have used single-molecule fluorescence to characterize the effect of several post-transcriptional modifications in U2 snRNA on the conformation and dynamics of the U2-U6 complex in vitro. Consistent with yeast, the human U2-U6 complex reveals the presence of a magnesium-dependent dynamic equilibrium among three conformations. Interestingly, our data show that modifications in human U2 stem I modulate the dynamic equilibrium of the U2-U6 complex by stabilizing the four-helix structure. However, the small magnitude of this effect suggests that post-transcriptional modifications in human snRNAs may have a primary role in the mediation of specific RNA-protein interactions in vivo.

  10. Post-transcriptional modifications modulate conformational dynamics in human U2–U6 snRNA complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karunatilaka, Krishanthi S.; Rueda, David

    2014-01-01

    The spliceosome catalyzes precursor-mRNA splicing in all eukaryotes. It consists of over 100 proteins and five small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), including U2 and U6 snRNAs, which are essential for catalysis. Human and yeast snRNAs share structural similarities despite the fact that human snRNAs contain numerous post-transcriptional modifications. Although functions for these modifications have been proposed, their exact roles are still not well understood. To help elucidate these roles in pre-mRNA splicing, we have used single-molecule fluorescence to characterize the effect of several post-transcriptional modifications in U2 snRNA on the conformation and dynamics of the U2–U6 complex in vitro. Consistent with yeast, the human U2–U6 complex reveals the presence of a magnesium-dependent dynamic equilibrium among three conformations. Interestingly, our data show that modifications in human U2 stem I modulate the dynamic equilibrium of the U2–U6 complex by stabilizing the four-helix structure. However, the small magnitude of this effect suggests that post-transcriptional modifications in human snRNAs may have a primary role in the mediation of specific RNA–protein interactions in vivo. PMID:24243115

  11. The transcription factor GATA6 is essential for branching morphogenesis and epithelial cell differentiation during fetal pulmonary development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Keijzer (Richard); W.G. van Tuyl (Minke); C. Meijers (Carel); M.R. Post (Martin); D. Tibboel (Dick); M. Koutsourakis (Manousos); F.G. Grosveld (Frank)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractRecent loss-of-function studies in mice show that the transcription factor GATA6 is important for visceral endoderm differentiation. It is also expressed in early bronchial epithelium and the observation that this tissue does not receive any contribution from Gata6 double mutant embryoni

  12. Modulation of global low-frequency motions underlies allosteric regulation: demonstration in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L Rodgers

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distinct site. There is growing evidence that allosteric cooperativity can be communicated by modulation of protein dynamics without conformational change. The mechanisms, however, for communicating dynamic fluctuations between sites are debated. We provide a foundational theory for how allostery can occur as a function of low-frequency dynamics without a change in structure. We have generated coarse-grained models that describe the protein backbone motions of the CRP/FNR family transcription factors, CAP of Escherichia coli and GlxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The latter we demonstrate as a new exemplar for allostery without conformation change. We observe that binding the first molecule of cAMP ligand is correlated with modulation of the global normal modes and negative cooperativity for binding the second cAMP ligand without a change in mean structure. The theory makes key experimental predictions that are tested through an analysis of variant proteins by structural biology and isothermal calorimetry. Quantifying allostery as a free energy landscape revealed a protein "design space" that identified the inter- and intramolecular regulatory parameters that frame CRP/FNR family allostery. Furthermore, through analyzing CAP variants from diverse species, we demonstrate an evolutionary selection pressure to conserve residues crucial for allosteric control. This finding provides a link between the position of CRP/FNR transcription factors within the allosteric free energy landscapes and evolutionary selection pressures. Our study therefore reveals significant features of the mechanistic basis for allostery. Changes in low-frequency dynamics correlate with allosteric effects on ligand binding without the requirement for a defined spatial pathway. In addition to evolving suitable three-dimensional structures, CRP/FNR family transcription factors have

  13. Transcriptional profiles discriminate patients with pulmonary tuberculosis from non-tuberculous individuals depending on the presence of non-insulin diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, Carmen J; Cuevas-Córdoba, Betzaida; Macías-Segura, Noé; González-Curiel, Rosa Angélica; Martínez-Balderas, Víctor Yordani; Enciso-Moreno, Leonor; Small, Peter; Hernández-Pando, Rogelio; Enciso-Moreno, José Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Our objective was to identify transcriptional biomarkers in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that discriminate individuals with latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) from those with pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in subjects with non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) and in individuals without NIDDM. Using gene expression microarrays we identified differentially expressed genes from lungs of mice infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) or a mutant (ΔsigH) representing a non-inflammatory model. Genes expressed in blood, with inflammatory related functions were evaluated in humans by RT-qPCR. NCF1 and ORM transcripts have the better discriminatory capacity to identify PTB subjects from LTBI and non-infected controls (NICs) independently of the presence of NIDDM. The sequential evaluation of the mRNA levels of NCF1 and ORM as multiple diagnostic tests showed 95% Sensitivity (Se) and 80% Specificity (Sp). In addition, FPR2 promises to be a good biomarker for the PTB detection in subjects with NIDDM (Se=100%; Sp=90%).

  14. CXC CHEMOKINE RECEPTOR 3 MODULATES BLEOMYCIN-INDUCED PULMONARY INJURY VIA INVOLVING INFLAMMATORY PROCESS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin-ming Gao; Bao Lu; Zi-jian Guo

    2006-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of CXC chemokine receptor 3(CXCR3 ) in bleomycin-induced lung injury by using CXCR3 gene deficient mice.Methods Sex-, age-, and weight-matched C57BL/6 CXCR3 gene knockout mice and C57BL/6 wide type mice were challenged by injection of bleomycin via trachea. Lung tissue was stained with HE method. Airway resistance was measured. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was performed using phosphate buffered saline twice, cell number and differentials were counted by Diff-Qnick staining. Interleukin(IL)-4, IL-5, IL-12p40, and interfon-γ in BAL fluid and lung homogenate were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Unpaired t test was explored to compare the difference between two groups.Results On day 7 after bleomycin injection via trachea, CXCR3 knockout mice were protected from bleomycininduced lung injury as evidenced by fewer accumulation of inflammatory cells in the airway and lung interstitium compared with their wild type littermates ( P<0.05 ). Airway resistance was also lower in CXCR3 knockout mice compared with wild type mice (P<0.01 ). Significantly lower level of inflammatory cytokines release, including the altered production of IL-4 and IL-5 both in BAL fluid and lung tissue was seen in CXCR3 knockout mice than in wild type mice (both P<0.05).Conclusion CXCR3 signaling promotes inflammatory cells recruiting and initiates inflammatory cytokines cascade following endotracheal bleomycin administration, indicating that CXCR3 might be a therapeutic target for pulmonary injury.

  15. Cardiac resynchronization therapy modulation of exercise left ventricular function and pulmonary O₂ uptake in heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomczak, Corey R; Paterson, Ian; Haykowsky, Mark J; Lawrance, Richard; Martellotto, Andres; Pantano, Alfredo; Gulamhusein, Sajad; Haennel, Robert G

    2012-06-15

    To better understand the mechanisms contributing to improved exercise capacity with cardiac resynchronization therapy (CRT), we studied the effects of 6 mo of CRT on pulmonary O(2) uptake (Vo(2)) kinetics, exercise left ventricular (LV) function, and peak Vo(2) in 12 subjects (age: 56 ± 15 yr, peak Vo(2): 12.9 ± 3.2 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1), ejection fraction: 18 ± 3%) with heart failure. We hypothesized that CRT would speed Vo(2) kinetics due to an increase in stroke volume secondary to a reduction in LV end-systolic volume (ESV) and that the increase in peak Vo(2) would be related to an increase in cardiac output reserve. We found that Vo(2) kinetics were faster during the transition to moderate-intensity exercise after CRT (pre-CRT: 69 ± 21 s vs. post-CRT: 54 ± 17 s, P exercise, LV ESV reserve (exercise - resting) increased 9 ± 7 ml (vs. a 3 ± 9-ml decrease pre-CRT, P increased (pre-CRT: 42 ± 8 ml vs. post-CRT: 61 ± 12 ml, P exercise post-CRT (P > 0.05). CRT improved heart rate, measured as a lower resting and steady-state exercise heart rate and as faster heart rate kinetics after CRT (pre-CRT: 89 ± 12 s vs. post-CRT: 69 ± 21 s, P exercise, cardiac output reserve increased significantly post-CRT and was 22% higher at peak exercise post-CRT (both P increase in cardiac output was due to both a significant increase in peak and reserve stroke volume and to a nonsignificant increase in heart rate reserve. Similar patterns in LV volumes as moderate-intensity exercise were observed at peak exercise. Cardiac output reserve was related to peak Vo(2) (r = 0.48, P increase in peak Vo(2) in clinically stable heart failure patients.

  16. Statistical inference of transcriptional module-based gene networks from time course gene expression profiles by using state space models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirose, Osamu; Yoshida, Ryo; Imoto, Seiya; Yamaguchi, Rui; Higuchi, Tomoyuki; Charnock-Jones, D Stephen; Print, Cristin; Miyano, Satoru

    2008-04-01

    Statistical inference of gene networks by using time-course microarray gene expression profiles is an essential step towards understanding the temporal structure of gene regulatory mechanisms. Unfortunately, most of the current studies have been limited to analysing a small number of genes because the length of time-course gene expression profiles is fairly short. One promising approach to overcome such a limitation is to infer gene networks by exploring the potential transcriptional modules which are sets of genes sharing a common function or involved in the same pathway. In this article, we present a novel approach based on the state space model to identify the transcriptional modules and module-based gene networks simultaneously. The state space model has the potential to infer large-scale gene networks, e.g. of order 10(3), from time-course gene expression profiles. Particularly, we succeeded in the identification of a cell cycle system by using the gene expression profiles of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in which the length of the time-course and number of genes were 24 and 4382, respectively. However, when analysing shorter time-course data, e.g. of length 10 or less, the parameter estimations of the state space model often fail due to overfitting. To extend the applicability of the state space model, we provide an approach to use the technical replicates of gene expression profiles, which are often measured in duplicate or triplicate. The use of technical replicates is important for achieving highly-efficient inferences of gene networks with short time-course data. The potential of the proposed method has been demonstrated through the time-course analysis of the gene expression profiles of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) undergoing growth factor deprivation-induced apoptosis. Supplementary Information and the software (TRANS-MNET) are available at http://daweb.ism.ac.jp/~yoshidar/software/ssm/.

  17. Bryostatin 1 modulates beta-catenin subcellular localization and transcription activity through protein kinase D1 activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C; Du, Cheng; Balaji, K C

    2008-09-01

    In recent years, the use of natural products for cancer prevention and treatment has received considerable attention. Bryostatin 1 is a natural macrocyclic lactone and a protein kinase D (PKD) modulator with potent antineoplastic properties that has been used to treat human cancers in clinical trials with limited success. Further understanding the mechanistic basis of Bryostatin 1 action may provide opportunities to improve clinical results of treatment with Bryostatin 1. We identified that PKD1, founding member of PKD family of serine/threonine kinases, modulates E-cadherin/beta-catenin activity, which plays an important role in cell integrity, polarity, growth, and morphogenesis. An aberrant expression and localization of E-cadherin/beta-catenin has been strongly associated with cancer progression and metastasis. In this study, we examined the effect of Bryostatin 1 treatment on PKD1 activation, beta-catenin translocation and transcription activity, and malignant phenotype of prostate cancer cells. Initial activation of PKD1 with Bryostatin 1 leads to colocalization of the cytoplasmic pool of beta-catenin with PKD1, trans-Golgi network markers, and proteins involved in vesicular trafficking. Activation of PKD1 by Bryostatin 1 decreases nuclear beta-catenin expression and beta-catenin/TCF transcription activity. Activation of PKD1 alters cellular aggregation and proliferation in prostate cancer cells associated with subcellular redistribution of E-cadherin and beta-catenin. For the first time, we have identified that Bryostatin 1 modulates beta-catenin signaling through PKD1, which identifies a novel mechanism to improve efficacy of Bryostatin 1 in clinical settings.

  18. Modulation of the sis Gene Transcript during Endothelial Cell Differentiation in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaye, Michael; McConathy, Evelyn; Drohan, William; Tong, Benton; Deuel, Thomas; Maciag, Thomas

    1985-05-01

    Endothelial cells, which line the interior walls of blood vessels, proliferate at the site of blood vessel injury. Knowledge of the factors that control the proliferation of these cells would help elucidate the role of endothelial cells in wound healing, tumor growth, and arteriosclerosis. In vitro, endothelial cells organize into viable, three-dimensional tubular structures in environments that limit cell proliferation. The process of endothelial cell organization was found to result in decreased levels of the sis messenger RNA transcript and increased levels of the messenger RNA transcript for fibronectin. This situation was reversed on transition from the organized structure to a proliferative monolayer. These results suggest a reciprocity for two biological response modifiers involved in the regulation of endothelial cell proliferation and differentiation in vitro.

  19. A numerical model of the respiratory modulation of pulmonary shunt and PaO2 oscillations for acute lung injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beda, Alessandro; Jandre, Frederico C; Giannella-Neto, Antonio

    2010-03-01

    It is an accepted hypothesis that the amplitude of the respiratory-related oscillations of arterial partial pressure of oxygen (DeltaPaO2) is primarily modulated by fluctuations of pulmonary shunt (Deltas), the latter generated mainly by cyclic alveolar collapse/reopening, when present. A better understanding of the relationship between DeltaPaO2, Deltas, and cyclic alveolar collapse/reopening can have clinical relevance for minimizing the severe lung damage that the latter can cause, for example during mechanical ventilation (MV) of patients with acute lung injury (ALI). To this aim, we numerically simulated the effect of such a relationship on an animal model of ALI under MV, using a combination of a model of lung gas exchange during tidal ventilation with a model of time dependence of shunt on alveolar collapse/opening. The results showed that: (a) the model could adequately replicate published experimental results regarding the complex dependence of DeltaPaO2 on respiratory frequency, driving pressure (DeltaP), and positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), while simpler models could not; (b) such a replication strongly depends on the value of the model parameters, especially of the speed of alveolar collapse/reopening; (c) the relationship between DeltaPaO2 and Deltas was overall markedly nonlinear, but approximately linear for PEEP>or=6 cmH2O, with very large DeltaPaO2 associated with relatively small Deltas.

  20. Monocyte to macrophage differentiation goes along with modulation of the plasmalogen pattern through transcriptional regulation.

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    Stefan Wallner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dysregulation of monocyte-macrophage differentiation is a hallmark of vascular and metabolic diseases and associated with persistent low grade inflammation. Plasmalogens represent ether lipids that play a role in diabesity and previous data show diminished plasmalogen levels in obese subjects. We therefore analyzed transcriptomic and lipidomic changes during monocyte-macrophage differentiation in vitro using a bioinformatic approach. METHODS: Elutriated monocytes from 13 healthy donors were differentiated in vitro to macrophages using rhM-CSF under serum-free conditions. Samples were taken on days 0, 1, 4 and 5 and analyzed for their lipidomic and transcriptomic profiles. RESULTS: Gene expression analysis showed strong regulation of lipidome-related transcripts. Enzymes involved in fatty acid desaturation and elongation were increasingly expressed, peroxisomal and ER stress related genes were induced. Total plasmalogen levels remained unchanged, while the PE plasmalogen species pattern became more similar to circulating granulocytes, showing decreases in PUFA and increases in MUFA. A partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS/DA revealed that PE plasmalogens discriminate the stage of monocyte-derived macrophage differentiation. Partial correlation analysis could predict novel potential key nodes including DOCK1, PDK4, GNPTAB and FAM126A that might be involved in regulating lipid and especially plasmalogen homeostasis during differentiation. An in silico transcription analysis of lipid related regulation revealed known motifs such as PPAR-gamma and KLF4 as well as novel candidates such as NFY, RNF96 and Zinc-finger proteins. CONCLUSION: Monocyte to macrophage differentiation goes along with profound changes in the lipid-related transcriptome. This leads to an induction of fatty-acid desaturation and elongation. In their PE-plasmalogen profile macrophages become more similar to granulocytes than monocytes, indicating terminal

  1. Copine-I: Modulator of NF-kappa B Transcription and Prostate Cancer Survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    presence of Copine-I expression. Electromobility shift assays (EMSAs) were performed on nuclear extracts to elucidate whether Copine-I altered the...of the DNA-binding domain converts p65 to a transcriptional repressor. A) p65(51–551) does not bind DNA. Electromobility shift assay (EMSA) was...extracts. (b) p65(51–551) does not bind DNA. Electromobility shift assay (EMSA) was performed using nuclear extracts described in (a) DNA–protein complexes

  2. Transcription-Replication Conflict Orientation Modulates R-Loop Levels and Activates Distinct DNA Damage Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamperl, Stephan; Bocek, Michael J; Saldivar, Joshua C; Swigut, Tomek; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2017-08-10

    Conflicts between transcription and replication are a potent source of DNA damage. Co-transcriptional R-loops could aggravate such conflicts by creating an additional barrier to replication fork progression. Here, we use a defined episomal system to investigate how conflict orientation and R-loop formation influence genome stability in human cells. R-loops, but not normal transcription complexes, induce DNA breaks and orientation-specific DNA damage responses during conflicts with replication forks. Unexpectedly, the replisome acts as an orientation-dependent regulator of R-loop levels, reducing R-loops in the co-directional (CD) orientation but promoting their formation in the head-on (HO) orientation. Replication stress and deregulated origin firing increase the number of HO collisions leading to genome-destabilizing R-loops. Our findings connect DNA replication to R-loop homeostasis and suggest a mechanistic basis for genome instability resulting from deregulated DNA replication, observed in cancer and other disease states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The Protein Kinase A Pathway Regulates Zearalenone Production by Modulating Alternative ZEB2 Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ae Ran; Fu, Minmin; Shin, Ji Young; Son, Hokyoung; Lee, Yin-Won

    2016-05-28

    Zearalenone (ZEA) is an estrogenic mycotoxin that is produced by several Fusarium species, including Fusarium graminearum. One of the ZEA biosynthetic genes, ZEB2, encodes two isoforms of Zeb2 by alternative transcription, forming an activator (Zeb2L-Zeb2L homooligomer) and an inhibitor (Zeb2L-Zeb2S heterodimer) that directly regulate the ZEA biosynthetic genes in F. graminearum. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) signaling regulates secondary metabolic processes in several filamentous fungi. In this study, we investigated the effects of the PKA signaling pathway on ZEA biosynthesis. Through functional analyses of PKA catalytic and regulatory subunits (CPKs and PKR), we found that the PKA pathway negatively regulates ZEA production. Genetic and biochemical evidence further demonstrated that the PKA pathway specifically represses ZEB2L transcription and also takes part in posttranscriptional regulation of ZEB2L during ZEA production. Our findings reveal the intriguing mechanism that the PKA pathway regulates secondary metabolite production by reprograming alternative transcription.

  4. TraR, a homolog of a RNAP secondary channel interactor, modulates transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew D Blankschien

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent structural and biochemical studies have identified a novel control mechanism of gene expression mediated through the secondary channel of RNA Polymerase (RNAP during transcription initiation. Specifically, the small nucleotide ppGpp, along with DksA, a RNAP secondary channel interacting factor, modifies the kinetics of transcription initiation, resulting in, among other events, down-regulation of ribosomal RNA synthesis and up-regulation of several amino acid biosynthetic and transport genes during nutritional stress. Until now, this mode of regulation of RNAP was primarily associated with ppGpp. Here, we identify TraR, a DksA homolog that mimics ppGpp/DksA effects on RNAP. First, expression of TraR compensates for dksA transcriptional repression and activation activities in vivo. Second, mutagenesis of a conserved amino acid of TraR known to be critical for DksA function abolishes its activity, implying both structural and functional similarity to DksA. Third, unlike DksA, TraR does not require ppGpp for repression of the rrnB P1 promoter in vivo and in vitro or activation of amino acid biosynthesis/transport genes in vivo. Implications for DksA/ppGpp mechanism and roles of TraR in horizontal gene transfer and virulence are discussed.

  5. MINCR is a MYC-induced lncRNA able to modulate MYC's transcriptional network in Burkitt lymphoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doose, Gero; Haake, Andrea; Bernhart, Stephan H; López, Cristina; Duggimpudi, Sujitha; Wojciech, Franziska; Bergmann, Anke K; Borkhardt, Arndt; Burkhardt, Birgit; Claviez, Alexander; Dimitrova, Lora; Haas, Siegfried; Hoell, Jessica I; Hummel, Michael; Karsch, Dennis; Klapper, Wolfram; Kleo, Karsten; Kretzmer, Helene; Kreuz, Markus; Küppers, Ralf; Lawerenz, Chris; Lenze, Dido; Loeffler, Markus; Mantovani-Löffler, Luisa; Möller, Peter; Ott, German; Richter, Julia; Rohde, Marius; Rosenstiel, Philip; Rosenwald, Andreas; Schilhabel, Markus; Schneider, Markus; Scholz, Ingrid; Stilgenbauer, Stephan; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Szczepanowski, Monika; Trümper, Lorenz; Weniger, Marc A; Hoffmann, Steve; Siebert, Reiner; Iaccarino, Ingram

    2015-09-22

    Despite the established role of the transcription factor MYC in cancer, little is known about the impact of a new class of transcriptional regulators, the long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs), on MYC ability to influence the cellular transcriptome. Here, we have intersected RNA-sequencing data from two MYC-inducible cell lines and a cohort of 91 B-cell lymphomas with or without genetic variants resulting in MYC overexpression. We identified 13 lncRNAs differentially expressed in IG-MYC-positive Burkitt lymphoma and regulated in the same direction by MYC in the model cell lines. Among them, we focused on a lncRNA that we named MYC-induced long noncoding RNA (MINCR), showing a strong correlation with MYC expression in MYC-positive lymphomas. To understand its cellular role, we performed RNAi and found that MINCR knockdown is associated with an impairment in cell cycle progression. Differential gene expression analysis after RNAi showed a significant enrichment of cell cycle genes among the genes down-regulated after MINCR knockdown. Interestingly, these genes are enriched in MYC binding sites in their promoters, suggesting that MINCR acts as a modulator of the MYC transcriptional program. Accordingly, MINCR knockdown was associated with a reduction in MYC binding to the promoters of selected cell cycle genes. Finally, we show that down-regulation of Aurora kinases A and B and chromatin licensing and DNA replication factor 1 may explain the reduction in cellular proliferation observed on MINCR knockdown. We, therefore, suggest that MINCR is a newly identified player in the MYC transcriptional network able to control the expression of cell cycle genes.

  6. Ancient mtDNA genetic variants modulate mtDNA transcription and replication.

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    Sarit Suissa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the functional consequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genetic backgrounds (haplotypes, haplogroups have been demonstrated by both disease association studies and cell culture experiments, it is not clear which of the mutations within the haplogroup carry functional implications and which are "evolutionary silent hitchhikers". We set forth to study the functionality of haplogroup-defining mutations within the mtDNA transcription/replication regulatory region by in vitro transcription, hypothesizing that haplogroup-defining mutations occurring within regulatory motifs of mtDNA could affect these processes. We thus screened >2500 complete human mtDNAs representing all major populations worldwide for natural variation in experimentally established protein binding sites and regulatory regions comprising a total of 241 bp in each mtDNA. Our screen revealed 77/241 sites showing point mutations that could be divided into non-fixed (57/77, 74% and haplogroup/sub-haplogroup-defining changes (i.e., population fixed changes, 20/77, 26%. The variant defining Caucasian haplogroup J (C295T increased the binding of TFAM (Electro Mobility Shift Assay and the capacity of in vitro L-strand transcription, especially of a shorter transcript that maps immediately upstream of conserved sequence block 1 (CSB1, a region associated with RNA priming of mtDNA replication. Consistent with this finding, cybrids (i.e., cells sharing the same nuclear genetic background but differing in their mtDNA backgrounds harboring haplogroup J mtDNA had a >2 fold increase in mtDNA copy number, as compared to cybrids containing haplogroup H, with no apparent differences in steady state levels of mtDNA-encoded transcripts. Hence, a haplogroup J regulatory region mutation affects mtDNA replication or stability, which may partially account for the phenotypic impact of this haplogroup. Our analysis thus demonstrates, for the first time, the functional impact of particular mt

  7. Early teatment with hepatocyte growth factor improves pulmonary artery and right ventricular remodeling in rats with pulmonary artery hypertension by modulating cytokines expression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王晓林

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of early treatment with hepatocyte growth factor(HGF)on the cytokine expression and pulmonary artery,right ventricular(RV)remodeling in the rat model of pulmonary artery hypertension(PAH).Methods The rat model of PAH was produced by injecting monocrotaline,and the model rats were randomly divided into empty adenovirus transfection group(MCT group,n=10)and HGF gene transfection group(HGF group,n=10).Another group of rats served as the Sham operation group(Sham group n=10).After 4 weeks of HGF gene transfection,the histological sections of the lungs and right ventricular(RV)

  8. Can geometric indices of heart rate variability predict improvement in autonomic modulation after resistance training in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, Ana Alice Soares Dos; Ricci-Vitor, Ana Laura; Bragatto, Vanessa Santa Rosa; Santos, Ana Paula Soares Dos; Ramos, Ercy Mara Cipulo; Vanderlei, Luiz Carlos Marques

    2017-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with autonomic dysfunctions that can be evaluated through heart rate variability (HRV). Resistance training promotes improvement in autonomic modulation; however, studies that evaluate this scenario using geometric indices, which include nonlinear evaluation, thus providing more accurate information for physiological interpretation of HRV, are unknown. This study aimed to investigate the influence of resistance training on autonomic modulation, using geometric indices of HRV, and peripheral muscle strength in individuals with COPD. Fourteen volunteers with COPD were submitted to resistance training consisting of 24 sessions lasting 60 min each, with a frequency of three times a week. The intensity was determined as 60% of one maximum repetition and was progressively increased until 80% for the upper and lower limbs. The HRV and dynamometry were performed at two moments, the beginning and the end of the experimental protocol. Significant increases were observed in the RRtri (4·81 ± 1·60 versus 6·55 ± 2·69, P = 0·033), TINN (65·36 ± 35·49 versus 101·07 ± 63·34, P = 0·028), SD1 (7·48 ± 3·17 versus 11·04 ± 6·45, P = 0·038) and SD2 (22·30 ± 8·56 versus 32·92 ± 18·78, P = 0·022) indices after the resistance training. Visual analysis of the Poincare plot demonstrated greater dispersion beat-to-beat and in the long-term interval between consecutive heart beats. Regarding muscle strength, there was a significant increase in the shoulder abduction and knee flexion. In conclusion, geometric indices of HRV can predict improvement in autonomic modulation after resistance training in individuals with COPD; improvement in peripheral muscle strength in patients with COPD was also observed. © 2015 Scandinavian Society of Clinical Physiology and Nuclear Medicine. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. SnoN/SKIL modulates proliferation through control of hsa-miR-720 transcription in esophageal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinozuka, Eriko; Miyashita, Masao [Department of Surgery for Organ Function and Biological Regulation, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8602 (Japan); Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki, E-mail: yoshi1224@gmail.com [Department of Surgery for Organ Function and Biological Regulation, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8602 (Japan); Akagi, Ichiro [Department of Surgery for Organ Function and Biological Regulation, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8602 (Japan); Kikuchi, Kunio [Department of Molecular Anatomy and Medicine, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8602 (Japan); Makino, Hiroshi; Matsutani, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Nomura, Tsutomu; Uchida, Eiji [Department of Surgery for Organ Function and Biological Regulation, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8602 (Japan); Takizawa, Toshihiro, E-mail: t-takizawa@nms.ac.jp [Department of Molecular Anatomy and Medicine, Nippon Medical School, 1-1-5 Sendagi, Bunkyo-Ku, Tokyo 113-8602 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SnoN modulated miR-720, miR-1274A, and miR-1274B expression levels in TE-1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-720 and miR-1274A suppressed the expression of target proteins p63 and ADAM9. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of SnoN significantly upregulated cell proliferation in TE-1 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Esophageal cancer tissues have lower SnoN expression levels than normal tissues. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Esophageal cancer tissues have higher miR-720 expression levels than normal tissues. -- Abstract: It is now evident that changes in microRNA are involved in cancer progression, but the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of miRNAs remain unknown. Ski-related novel gene (SnoN/SKIL), a transcription co-factor, acts as a potential key regulator within a complex network of p53 transcriptional repressors. SnoN has pro- and anti-oncogenic functions in the regulation of cell proliferation, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation. We characterized the roles of SnoN in miRNA transcriptional regulation and its effects on cell proliferation using esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells. Silencing of SnoN altered a set of miRNA expression profiles in TE-1cells, and the expression levels of miR-720, miR-1274A, and miR-1274B were modulated by SnoN. The expression of these miRNAs resulted in changes to the target protein p63 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 9 (ADAM9). Furthermore, silencing of SnoN significantly upregulated cell proliferation in TE-1 cells, indicating a potential anti-oncogenic function. These results support our observation that cancer tissues have lower expression levels of SnoN, miR-720, and miR-1274A compared to adjacent normal tissues from ESCC patients. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism of miRNA regulation, leading to changes in cell proliferation.

  10. Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose L. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Hospitales Universitarios Virgen del Rocio, Seville (Spain); Department of Medicine, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Gomez, Daniel R., E-mail: dgomez@mdanderson.org [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B. [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Eapen, George [Department of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States); Liu, Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas (United States)

    2012-07-15

    Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received {>=}60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998-2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient's preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0-4 (T1), 5-8 (T2), and 9-12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy or

  11. Alleviation of selenium toxicity in Brassica juncea L.: salicylic acid-mediated modulation in toxicity indicators, stress modulators, and sulfur-related gene transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Shikha; Gupta, Meetu

    2016-11-01

    The present work reveals the response of different doses of selenium (Se) and alleviating effect of salicylic acid (SA) on Se-stressed Brassica juncea seedlings. Selenium, a micronutrient, is essential for both humans and animals but is toxic at higher doses. Its beneficial role for the survival of plants, however, is still debatable. On the other hand, SA, a phenolic compound, is known to have specific responses under environmental stresses. Experiments were conducted using leaves of hydroponically grown seedlings of Pusa bold (PB) variety of B. juncea, treated with different concentrations of Se (50, 150, 300 μM) for 24- and 96-h exposure times. Increasing Se concentrations inhibited growth and, caused lipid peroxidation, concomitantly increased stress modulators (proline, cysteine, SOD, CAT) along with sulfur-related gene transcripts (LAST, APS, APR, GR, OASL, MT-2, PCS) in Brassica seedlings. On the basis of the above studied parameters, maximum inhibition in growth was observed at 300 μM Se after 96-h exposure time. Further, co-application of SA along with 300 μM Se helped to mitigate Se stress, as shown by improved levels of growth parameters, toxicity indicators (chlorophyll, protein, MDA), stress modulators (proline, cysteine, SOD, and CAT), and expression of sulfur-related genes as compared to Se-treated seedlings alone. Altogether, this study revealed that Se + SA combinations improved seedling morphology and were effective in alleviation of Se stress in PB variety of B. juncea.

  12. Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) enhances human β-defensin-1 gene transcription in human pulmonary gland epithelial cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUBing-Dong; FENGYun; HUANGNing,; WUQi; WANGBo-Yao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To examine the stimulatory effect of bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) cell wall components on human [β-defensin-1 (hBD-1)gene expression and analyze the response element in the 5'-flanking region of the gene. METHODS:BCG cell wall proteins were fractionated by Sephadex G-150 chromatography. Using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Northern hybridization analysis, hBD-1 mRNA expression was detected in ahuman pulmonary gland epithelial cell line SPC-A-1 cells. Progressive deletions of 5'-flanking region of hBD-1 genewere produced by PCR and ligated into promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) expression plasmidto construct pCAT reporter plasmids. Reporter gene expression was determined by ELISA. RESULTS: Therewas an obvious enhancement of hBD-1 mRNA expression after stimulation with heat-inactivated BCG whole cells(50mg/L), or the cell wall components with a molecular weight of 18-30 kDa (3mg/L) for 8 h. The upstreamsequence between -314 bp and +54 bp had the inducible activity by BCG, which contained CCAAT/enhancerbinding protein-β (C/EBPβ), activator protein-1 (AP-1), and CP2 cis element. CONCLUSION: BCG cell wallcomponents (18-30 kDa) can stimulate hBD-1 mRNA expression in pulmonary gland epithelial cells. The sequence(-314/+54) containing C/EBPβ, AP-1, and CP2 binding sites in the upstream of hBD-1 is involved in this induction.

  13. Modulation of NF-кB transcription factor activation by Molluscum contagiosum virus proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna Struzik

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Molluscum contagiosum virus is a human and animal dermatotropic pathogen, which causes a severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. MCV belongs to the Poxviridae family whose members exert immunomodulatory effects on the host antiviral response. Poxviruses interfere with cell signaling pathways that lead to the activation of nuclear factor кB, a pleiotropic transcription factor which is crucial for regulation of the immune response, the cell cycle and apoptosis. In resting cells, NF-κB is present in the cytoplasm, where it is associated with inhibitor κB. Upon stimulation by activators, such as proinflammatory cytokines and bacterial or viral products, the inhibitory protein undergoes phosphorylation and proteasomal degradation. NF-κB, in turn, translocates to the nucleus, where it regulates the transcription of various genes that are essential for processes mentioned above. Since poxviruses replicate exclusively in the cell cytoplasm, NF-кB became a good target for poxviral immunomodulation. MCV encodes various proteins which interfere with the signaling pathways that lead to the activation of NF-κB. Ligand inhibitor encoded by MCV, MC54, binds interleukin-18 and inhibits interferon-γ production. Other MCV proteins, MC159 and MC160, belong to intracellular inhibitors of NF-κB and are members of viral FLICE-inhibitory proteins (vFLIPs. MC159 protein encoded by MCV was shown to inhibit apoptosis of virus-infected cells. Such interactions serve immune evasion and are responsible for the persistence of MCV.

  14. Luteolin modulates 6-hydroxydopamine-induced transcriptional changes of stress response pathways in PC12 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling-Wei Hu

    Full Text Available The neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA, which causes transcriptional changes associated with oxidative and proteotoxic stress, has been widely used to generate an experimental model of Parkinson's disease. The food-derived compound luteolin has multi-target actions including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and neurotrophic activities. The aim of this study is to investigate how luteolin affects 6-OHDA-mediated stress response pathways. The results showed that when PC12 cells were pre-treated with luteolin (20 µM 30 min prior to 6-OHDA (100 µM exposure, 6-OHDA-induced ROS overproduction, cytotoxicity, caspase-3 activation, and mRNA expression of BIM, TRB3 and GADD34 were significantly attenuated. Moreover, 6-OHDA-mediated cell cycle arrest and transcription of p53 target genes, p21, GADD45α and PUMA, were reduced by luteolin. Luteolin also significantly down-regulated 6-OHDA-mediated unfolded protein response (UPR, leading to decreases in phospho-eIF2α, ATF4, GRP78 and CHOP. In addition, luteolin attenuated 6-OHDA-induced Nrf2-mediated HO-1 and GCLC. Taken together, these results suggest that diminishing intracellular ROS formation and down-regulation of p53, UPR and Nrf2-ARE pathways may be involved in the neuroprotective effect of luteolin.

  15. Extracellular calcium triggers unique transcriptional programs and modulates staurosporine-induced cell death in Neurospora crassa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pedro Gonçalves

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Alterations in the intracellular levels of calcium are a common response to cell death stimuli in animals and fungi and, particularly, in the Neurospora crassa response to staurosporine. We highlight the importance of the extracellular availability of Ca2+ for this response. Limitation of the ion in the culture medium further sensitizes cells to the drug and results in increased accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Conversely, an approximately 30-fold excess of external Ca2+ leads to increased drug tolerance and lower ROS generation. In line with this, distinct staurosporine-induced cytosolic Ca2+ signaling profiles were observed in the absence or presence of excessive external Ca2+. High-throughput RNA sequencing revealed that different concentrations of extracellular Ca2+ define distinct transcriptional programs. Our transcriptional profiling also pointed to two putative novel Ca2+-binding proteins, encoded by the NCU08524 and NCU06607 genes, and provides a reference dataset for future investigations on the role of Ca2+ in fungal biology.

  16. TMPRSS2-ERG -specific transcriptional modulation is associated with prostate cancer biomarkers and TGF-β signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brase Jan C

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions occur in about 50% of all prostate cancer cases and represent promising markers for molecular subtyping. Although TMPRSS2-ERG fusion seems to be a critical event in prostate cancer, the precise functional role in cancer development and progression is still unclear. Methods We studied large-scale gene expression profiles in 47 prostate tumor tissue samples and in 48 normal prostate tissue samples taken from the non-suspect area of clinical low-risk tumors using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST microarrays. Results Comparison of gene expression levels among TMPRSS2-ERG fusion-positive and negative tumors as well as benign samples demonstrated a distinct transcriptional program induced by the gene fusion event. Well-known biomarkers for prostate cancer detection like CRISP3 were found to be associated with the gene fusion status. WNT and TGF-β/BMP signaling pathways were significantly associated with genes upregulated in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion-positive tumors. Conclusions The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion results in the modulation of transcriptional patterns and cellular pathways with potential consequences for prostate cancer progression. Well-known biomarkers for prostate cancer detection were found to be associated with the gene fusion. Our results suggest that the fusion status should be considered in retrospective and future studies to assess biomarkers for prostate cancer detection, progression and targeted therapy.

  17. Thyroid hormone receptors bind to the promoter of the mouse histone H10 gene and modulate its transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer-Hofmann, R; Alonso, A

    1995-01-01

    It has been shown that the mouse histone H10 promoter contains a DNA element, composed of a direct repeat of the sequence GGTGACC separated by 7 nt, which is able to bind retinoic acid receptors and to modulate transcription of reporter genes following treatment with retinoic acid. We have now investigated whether this DNA motif is also responsive to thyroid hormone. We co-transfected CV-1 monkey kidney cells with chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) expression plasmids containing either 740 bp of the H10 wild-type promoter or five copies of the repeat element cloned in front of the thymidine kinase promoter and expression vectors for human thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) alpha or beta and retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha). Treatment of transfected cells with triiodothyronine led to a dose-dependent increase in CAT activity. Transfection experiments with increasing amounts of expression vectors for either TR alpha or RXR alpha resulted in up to 6-fold enhancement of CAT transcription. Furthermore, point mutations within the half-sites of the response element of the H10 promoter, as well as deletions within the interspace region, lowered CAT activity to 60-80% of that of the wild-type control. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that the repeat element was able to form retarded complexes with TR alpha homodimers, as well as with TR alpha-RXR alpha heterodimers. Our results suggest that thyroid hormone receptors are involved in the regulation of mouse histone H10 expression. Images PMID:8559662

  18. Partners in crime: The role of tandem modules in gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rajal; Zhou, Ming-Ming

    2015-09-01

    Histones and their modifications play an important role in the regulation of gene transcription. Numerous modifications, such as acetylation, phosphorylation, methylation, ubiquitination, and SUMOylation, have been described. These modifications almost always co-occur and thereby increase the combinatorial complexity of post-translational modification detection. The domains that recognize these histone modifications often occur in tandem in the context of larger proteins and complexes. The presence of multiple modifications can positively or negatively regulate the binding of these tandem domains, influencing downstream cellular function. Alternatively, these tandem domains can have novel functions from their independent parts. Here we summarize structural and functional information known about major tandem domains and their histone binding properties. An understanding of these interactions is key for the development of epigenetic therapy.

  19. WIP modulates dendritic spine actin cytoskeleton by transcriptional control of lipid metabolic enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Villanueva, Ana; Fernández-López, Estefanía; Gabandé-Rodríguez, Enrique; Bañón-Rodríguez, Inmaculada; Esteban, Jose Antonio; Antón, Inés M; Ledesma, María Dolores

    2014-08-15

    We identify Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP)-interacting protein (WIP) as a novel component of neuronal synapses whose absence increases dendritic spine size and filamentous actin levels in an N-WASP/Arp2/3-independent, RhoA/ROCK/profilinIIa-dependent manner. These effects depend on the reduction of membrane sphingomyelin (SM) due to transcriptional upregulation of neutral sphingomyelinase (NSM) through active RhoA; this enhances RhoA binding to the membrane, raft partitioning and activation in steady state but prevents RhoA changes in response to stimulus. Inhibition of NSM or SM addition reverses RhoA, filamentous actin and functional anomalies in synapses lacking WIP. Our findings characterize WIP as a link between membrane lipid composition and actin cytoskeleton at dendritic spines. They also contribute to explain cognitive deficits shared by individuals bearing mutations in the region assigned to the gene encoding for WIP.

  20. RhoA signaling modulates cyclin D1 expression in human lung fibroblasts; implications for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hoban PR

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF is a debilitating disease characterized by exaggerated extracellular matrix deposition and aggressive lung structural remodeling. Disease pathogenesis is driven by fibroblastic foci formation, consequent on growth factor overexpression and myofibroblast proliferation. We have previously shown that both CTGF overexpression and myofibroblast formation in IPF cell lines are dependent on RhoA signaling. As RhoA-mediated regulation is also involved in cell cycle progression, we hypothesise that this pathway is key to lung fibroblast turnover through modulation of cyclin D1 kinetic expression. Methods Cyclin D1 expression was compared in primary IPF patient-derived fibroblasts and equivalent normal control cells. Quantitative real time PCR was employed to examine relative expression levels of cyclin D1 mRNA; protein expression was confirmed by western blotting. Effects of Rho signaling were investigated using transient transfection of constitutively active and dominant negative RhoA constructs as well as pharmacological inhibitors. Cellular proliferation of lung fibroblasts was determined by BrdU incorporation ELISA. To further explore RhoA regulation of cyclin D1 in lung fibroblasts and associated cell cycle progression, an established Rho inhibitor, Simvastatin, was incorporated in our studies. Results Cyclin D1 expression was upregulated in IPF compared to normal lung fibroblasts under exponential growth conditions (p Conclusion These findings report for the first time that cyclin D1 expression is deregulated in IPF through a RhoA dependent mechanism that influences lung fibroblast proliferation. This potentially unravels new molecular targets for future anti-IPF strategies; accordingly, Simvastatin inhibition of Rho-mediated cyclin D1 expression in IPF fibroblasts merits further exploitation.

  1. Case report of anti-transcription intermediary factor-1-γ/α antibody-positive dermatomyositis associated with gastric cancer and immunoglobulin G4-positive pulmonary inflammatory pseudotumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kotaro; Imafuku, Shinichi; Hamaguchi, Yasuhito; Fujimoto, Manabu; Nakayama, Juichiro

    2013-07-01

    Dermatomyositis is a rare connective tissue disease often associated with internal malignancy and interstitial pneumonitis. Serologically, various auto-antibodies (Ab) are associated with dermatomyositis. Anti-transcription intermediary factor-1-γ/α (TIF-1-γ/α) Ab was recently identified as an auto-Ab and was observed mostly in cancer-associated dermatomyositis. IgG4-related disease is a newly described entity characterized by increased serum IgG4 levels and IgG4-positive plasma cell infiltration with fibrosis in organs such as the pancreas and parotid gland. IgG4-related disease also includes inflammatory pseudotumors in various organs. We report herein a 59-year-old Japanese man who had dermatomyositis complicated with a gastric cancer and an IgG4-related pulmonary inflammatory pseudotumor. He manifested typical classical Gottron's papules on the fingers, V-sign erythema on the chest, flagellate erythema on the back, nail fold bleeding and facial erythema. Serum levels of anti-TIF-1-γ/α Ab were positive as assessed by immunoprecipitation assay. He also had bilateral swelling of the parotid gland, and an excised specimen of the lung showed inflammatory pseudotumor with IgG4-positive plasma cells. As far as we know, this case is the first to report the association of IgG4-related disease and TIF-1-γ/α-positive dermatomyositis. Further accumulation of such cases is required to elucidate the mechanism of this association.

  2. Annexin A2 Modulates Radiation-Sensitive Transcriptional Programming and Cell Fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Stenoien, David L.; Sowa, Marianne B.; von Neubeck, Claere; Chrisler, William B.; Tan, Ruimin; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    There is considerable public interest in the health effects of low doses of radiation (LDR) that fall below the doses that can be plausibly investigated in epidemiological studies. At these low doses, experimental models can detect perturbations in signaling pathways and use this information to define functional consequences of LDR exposures prospectively. In this study, we show increased nuclear annexin A2 (AnxA2) levels in human skin organotypic culture and murine progenitor cell model systems following exposure to X-radiation (10-200 cGy). LDR (2-20 cGy) inhibits cell transformation responses following epidermal growth factor (EGF) or 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) exposures, indicating LDR may have a protective component mediated in part by nuclear localization of AnxA2. Oncogenic protein kinase C epsilon (PKC) levels are increased in nuclear extracts from AnxA2 silenced [shRNA] cells, suggesting that AnxA2 may contribute to PKC nuclear export, perhaps reducing oncogenic potential. Coordinately, silencing AnxA2 results in a sensitive phenotype and cells grow constitutively in soft agar. Using global microarray analysis, we show that silencing AnxA2 fundamentally alters transcriptional programming, changing the radioresponsive transcriptome and revealing biological processes that are induced in the absence of AnxA2. These observations suggest that AnxA2 plays a fundamental role in the sensitivity of cellular and tissue response to ionizing radiation, and deficiency of AnxA2 could result in a permissive environment for radiation-induced health effects.

  3. GALNT3, a gene associated with hyperphosphatemic familial tumoral calcinosis, is transcriptionally regulated by extracellular phosphate and modulates matrix metalloproteinase activity

    OpenAIRE

    2008-01-01

    GALNT3, a gene associated with Hyperphosphatemic Familial Tumoral Calcinosis, is transcriptionally regulated by extracellular phosphate and modulates matrix metalloproteinase activity correspondence: Corresponding author. Laboratory of Molecular Dermatology Department of Dermatology Rambam Medical Center POB 9602, Haifa 31096, Israel. Tel.: +972 4 8541919; fax: +972 4 8542951. (Sprecher, Eli) (Sprecher, Eli) Labo...

  4. Diverse modulation of spa transcription by cell wall active antibiotics in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Roggenbuck, Michael; Haaber, Jakob Krause

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various classes of clinically relevant antibiotics at sub-lethal concentrations on virulence gene expression and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. FINDINGS: LacZ promoter fusions of genes related to staphylococ......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various classes of clinically relevant antibiotics at sub-lethal concentrations on virulence gene expression and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. FINDINGS: LacZ promoter fusions of genes related...... to staphylococcal virulence were used to monitor the effects of antibiotics on gene expression in a disc diffusion assay. The selected genes were hla and spa encoding alpha-hemolysin and Protein A, respectively and RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. The results were confirmed...... by quantitative real-time PCR. Additionally, we monitored the effect of subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics on the ability of S. aureus to form biofilm in a microtiter plate assay. The results show that sub-lethal antibiotic concentrations diversely modulate expression of RNAIII, hla and spa. Consistently...

  5. Negative feedback regulation of auxin signaling by ATHB8/ACL5-BUD2 transcription module.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baima, Simona; Forte, Valentina; Possenti, Marco; Peñalosa, Andrés; Leoni, Guido; Salvi, Sergio; Felici, Barbara; Ruberti, Ida; Morelli, Giorgio

    2014-06-01

    The role of auxin as main regulator of vascular differentiation is well established, and a direct correlation between the rate of xylem differentiation and the amount of auxin reaching the (pro)cambial cells has been proposed. It has been suggested that thermospermine produced by ACAULIS5 (ACL5) and bushy and dwarf2 (BUD2) is one of the factors downstream to auxin contributing to the regulation of this process in Arabidopsis. Here, we provide an in-depth characterization of the mechanism through which ACL5 modulates xylem differentiation. We show that an increased level of ACL5 slows down xylem differentiation by negatively affecting the expression of homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-ZIP) III and key auxin signaling genes. This mechanism involves the positive regulation of thermospermine biosynthesis by the HD-ZIP III protein Arabidopsis thaliana homeobox8 tightly controlling the expression of ACL5 and BUD2. In addition, we show that the HD-ZIP III protein REVOLUTA contributes to the increased leaf vascularization and long hypocotyl phenotype of acl5 likely by a direct regulation of auxin signaling genes such as like auxin resistant2 (LAX2) and LAX3. We propose that proper formation and differentiation of xylem depend on a balance between positive and negative feedback loops operating through HD-ZIP III genes.

  6. Cobalt and nickel stabilize stem cell transcription factor OCT4 through modulating its sumoylation and ubiquitination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin Yao

    Full Text Available Stem cell research can lead to the development of treatments for a wide range of ailments including diabetes, heart disease, aging, neurodegenerative diseases, spinal cord injury, and cancer. OCT4 is a master regulator of self-renewal of undifferentiated embryonic stem cells. OCT4 also plays a crucial role in reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells. Given known vivo reproductive toxicity of cobalt and nickel metals, we examined the effect of these metals on expression of several stem cell factors in embryonic Tera-1 cells, as well as stem cells. Cobalt and nickel induced a concentration-dependent increase of OCT4 and HIF-1α, but not NANOG or KLF4. OCT4 induced by cobalt and nickel was due primarily to protein stabilization because MG132 stabilized OCT4 in cells treated with either metals and because neither nickel nor cobalt significantly modulated its steady-state mRNA level. OCT4 stabilization by cobalt and nickel was mediated largely through reactive oxygen species (ROS as co-treatment with ascorbic acid abolished OCT4 increase. Moreover, nickel and cobalt treatment increased sumoylation and mono-ubiquitination of OCT4 and K123 was crucial for mediating these modifications. Combined, our observations suggest that nickel and cobalt may exert their reproductive toxicity through perturbing OCT4 activity in the stem cell compartment.

  7. Calcium modulates promoter occupancy by the Entamoeba histolytica Ca2+-binding transcription factor URE3-BP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilchrist, Carol A; Leo, Megan; Line, C Genghis; Mann, Barbara J; Petri, William A

    2003-02-14

    The Entamoeba histolytica upstream regulatory element 3-binding protein (URE3-BP) binds to the URE3 sequence of the Gal/GalNAc-inhibitable lectin hgl5 and ferredoxin 1 (fdx) gene promoters. This binding can be inhibited in vitro by addition of calcium. Two EF-hand motifs, which are associated with the ability to bind calcium, are present in the amino acid sequence of URE3-BP. Mutation of the second EF-hand motif in URE3-BP resulted in the loss of calcium inhibition of DNA binding as monitored by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that URE3-BP was physically bound to the hgl5 and fdx promoters in vivo. Parasite intracellular calcium concentrations were altered by changes in extracellular calcium. Promoter occupancy was lost when intracellular calcium levels were increased by coordinate increases in extracellular calcium. Increased intracellular calcium also resulted in decreased levels of URE3-BP mRNA. Together these results demonstrate that changes in extracellular calcium result in changes in URE3-BP mRNA and in the ability of URE3-BP to bind to URE3-containing promoters. Modulation of URE3-BP by calcium may represent an important mechanism of control of gene expression in E. histolytica.

  8. Cobalt and Nickel Stabilize Stem Cell Transcription Factor OCT4 through Modulating Its Sumoylation and Ubiquitination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Yixin; Lu, Yinghua; Chen, Wen-chi; Jiang, Yongping; Cheng, Tao; Ma, Yupo; Lu, Lou; Dai, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Stem cell research can lead to the development of treatments for a wide range of ailments including diabetes, heart disease, aging, neurodegenerative diseases, spinal cord injury, and cancer. OCT4 is a master regulator of self-renewal of undifferentiated embryonic stem cells. OCT4 also plays a crucial role in reprogramming of somatic cells into induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. Given known vivo reproductive toxicity of cobalt and nickel metals, we examined the effect of these metals on expression of several stem cell factors in embryonic Tera-1 cells, as well as stem cells. Cobalt and nickel induced a concentration-dependent increase of OCT4 and HIF-1α, but not NANOG or KLF4. OCT4 induced by cobalt and nickel was due primarily to protein stabilization because MG132 stabilized OCT4 in cells treated with either metals and because neither nickel nor cobalt significantly modulated its steady-state mRNA level. OCT4 stabilization by cobalt and nickel was mediated largely through reactive oxygen species (ROS) as co-treatment with ascorbic acid abolished OCT4 increase. Moreover, nickel and cobalt treatment increased sumoylation and mono-ubiquitination of OCT4 and K123 was crucial for mediating these modifications. Combined, our observations suggest that nickel and cobalt may exert their reproductive toxicity through perturbing OCT4 activity in the stem cell compartment. PMID:24497960

  9. Lycopene Modulates THP1 and Caco2 Cells Inflammatory State through Transcriptional and Nontranscriptional Processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Njock Makon-Sébastien

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We revisited the action of a carotenoid, the lycopene, on the expression of proinflammatory genes, reactive oxygen species (ROS production, and metalloprotease (MMP9 activity. THP1 and Caco2 cell lines were used as in vitro models for the two main cell types found in intestine tissue, that is, monocytes and epithelial cells. Proinflammatory condition was induced using either phorbol ester acetate (PMA, lipopolysaccharide (LPS or tumor necrosis factor (TNF. In THP1 cells, short term pretreatment (2 h with a low concentration (2 μM of lycopene reinforce proinflammatory gene expression. The extent of the effect of lycopene is dependent on the proinflammtory stimulus (PMA, LPS or TNF used. Lycopene enhanced MMP9 secretion via a c-AMP-dependent process, and reduced ROS production at higher concentrations than 2 μM. Cell culture media, conditioned by PMA-treated monocytes and then transferred on CaCo-2 epithelial cells, induced a proinflammatory state in these cells. The extent of this inflammatory effect was reduced when cells has been pretreated (12 h with lycopene. At low concentration (2 μM or less, lycopene appeared to promote an inflammatory state not correlated with ROS modulation. At higher concentration (5 μM–20 μM, an anti-inflammatory effect takes place as a decrease of ROS production was detected. So, both concentration and time have to be considered in order to define the exact issue of the effect of carotenoids present in meals.

  10. Cycle training modulates satellite cell and transcriptional responses to a bout of resistance exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murach, Kevin A; Walton, R Grace; Fry, Christopher S; Michaelis, Sami L; Groshong, Jason S; Finlin, Brian S; Kern, Philip A; Peterson, Charlotte A

    2016-09-01

    This investigation evaluated whether moderate-intensity cycle ergometer training affects satellite cell and molecular responses to acute maximal concentric/eccentric resistance exercise in middle-aged women. Baseline and 72 h postresistance exercise vastus lateralis biopsies were obtained from seven healthy middle-aged women (56 ± 5 years, BMI 26 ± 1, VO2max 27 ± 4) before and after 12 weeks of cycle training. Myosin heavy chain (MyHC) I- and II-associated satellite cell density and cross-sectional area was determined via immunohistochemistry. Expression of 93 genes representative of the muscle-remodeling environment was also measured via NanoString. Overall fiber size increased ~20% with cycle training (P = 0.052). MyHC I satellite cell density increased 29% in response to acute resistance exercise before endurance training and 50% with endurance training (P training, MyHC I satellite cell density decreased by 13% in response to acute resistance exercise (acute resistance × training interaction, P trained state in response to resistance exercise. Similar satellite cell and gene expression response patterns indicate coordinated regulation of the muscle environment to promote adaptation. Moderate-intensity endurance cycle training modulates the response to acute resistance exercise, potentially conditioning the muscle for more intense concentric/eccentric activity. These results suggest that cycle training is an effective endurance exercise modality for promoting growth in middle-aged women, who are susceptible to muscle mass loss with progressing age.

  11. Diverse modulation of spa transcription by cell wall active antibiotics in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, Lene N; Roggenbuck, Michael; Haaber, Jakob; Ifrah, Dan; Ingmer, Hanne

    2012-08-25

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various classes of clinically relevant antibiotics at sub-lethal concentrations on virulence gene expression and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. LacZ promoter fusions of genes related to staphylococcal virulence were used to monitor the effects of antibiotics on gene expression in a disc diffusion assay. The selected genes were hla and spa encoding α-hemolysin and Protein A, respectively and RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. The results were confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR. Additionally, we monitored the effect of subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics on the ability of S. aureus to form biofilm in a microtiter plate assay. The results show that sub-lethal antibiotic concentrations diversely modulate expression of RNAIII, hla and spa. Consistently, expression of all three genes were repressed by aminoglycosides and induced by fluoroquinolones and penicillins. In contrast, the β-lactam sub-group cephalosporins enhanced expression of RNAIII and hla but diversely affected expression of spa. The compounds cefalotin, cefamandole, cefoxitin, ceftazidime and cefixine were found to up-regulate spa, while down-regulation was observed for cefuroxime, cefotaxime and cefepime. Interestingly, biofilm assays demonstrated that the spa-inducing cefalotin resulted in less biofilm formation compared to the spa-repressing cefotaxime. We find that independently of the cephalosporin generation, cephalosporins oppositely regulate spa expression and biofilm formation. Repression of spa expression correlates with the presence of a distinct methyloxime group while induction correlates with an acidic substituted oxime group. As cephalosporines target the cell wall penicillin binding proteins we speculate that subtle differences in this interaction fine-tunes spa expression independently of agr.

  12. Modulation of cGMP by human HO-1 retrovirus gene transfer in pulmonary microvessel endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nader G; Quan, Shuo; Mieyal, Paul A; Yang, Liming; Burke-Wolin, Theresa; Mingone, Christopher J; Goodman, Alvin I; Nasjletti, Alberto; Wolin, Michael S

    2002-11-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) stimulates guanylate cyclase (GC) and increases guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) levels. We transfected rat-lung pulmonary endothelial cells with a retrovirus-mediated human heme oxygenase (hHO)-1 gene. Pulmonary cells that expressed hHO-1 exhibited a fourfold increase in HO activity associated with decreases in the steady-state levels of heme and cGMP without changes in soluble GC (sGC) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) proteins or basal nitrite production. Heme elicited significant increases in CO production and intracellular cGMP levels in both pulmonary endothelial and pulmonary hHO-1-expressing cells. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NOS, significantly decreased cGMP levels in heme-treated pulmonary endothelial cells but not heme-treated hHO-1-expressing cells. In the presence of exogenous heme, CO and cGMP levels in hHO-1-expressing cells exceeded the corresponding levels in pulmonary endothelial cells. Acute exposure of endothelial cells to SnCl2, which is an inducer of HO-1, increased cGMP levels, whereas chronic exposure decreased heme and cGMP levels. These results indicate that prolonged overexpression of HO-1 ultimately decreases sGC activity by limiting the availability of cellular heme. Heme activates sGC and enhances cGMP levels via a mechanism that is largely insensitive to NOS inhibition.

  13. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART signaling within the paraventricular thalamus modulates cocaine-seeking behaviour.

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    Morgan H James

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART has been demonstrated to play a role in regulating the rewarding and reinforcing effects of various drugs of abuse. A recent study demonstrated that i.c.v. administration of CART negatively modulates reinstatement of alcohol seeking, however, the site(s of action remains unclear. We investigated the paraventricular thalamus (PVT as a potential site of relapse-relevant CART signaling, as this region is known to receive dense innervation from CART-containing hypothalamic cells and to project to a number of regions known to be involved in mediating reinstatement, including the nucleus accumbens (NAC, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and basolateral amygdala (BLA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male rats were trained to self-administer cocaine before being extinguished to a set criterion. One day following extinction, animals received intra-PVT infusions of saline, tetrodotoxin (TTX; 2.5 ng, CART (0.625 µg or 2.5 µg or no injection, followed by a cocaine prime (10 mg/kg, i.p.. Animals were then tested under extinction conditions for one hour. Treatment with either TTX or CART resulted in a significant attenuation of drug-seeking behaviour following cocaine-prime, with the 2.5 µg dose of CART having the greatest effect. This effect was specific to the PVT region, as misplaced injections of both TTX and CART resulted in responding that was identical to controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show for the first time that CART signaling within the PVT acts to inhibit drug-primed reinstatement of cocaine seeking behaviour, presumably by negatively modulating PVT efferents that are important for drug seeking, including the NAC, mPFC and BLA. In this way, we identify a possible target for future pharmacological interventions designed to suppress drug seeking.

  14. MicroRNA and transcription factor mediated regulatory network analysis reveals critical regulators and regulatory modules in myocardial infarction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guangde Zhang

    Full Text Available Myocardial infarction (MI is a severe coronary artery disease and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide. However, the molecular mechanisms of MI have yet to be fully elucidated. In this study, we compiled MI-related genes, MI-related microRNAs (miRNAs and known human transcription factors (TFs, and we then identified 1,232 feed-forward loops (FFLs among these miRNAs, TFs and their co-regulated target genes through integrating target prediction. By merging these FFLs, the first miRNA and TF mediated regulatory network for MI was constructed, from which four regulators (SP1, ESR1, miR-21-5p and miR-155-5p and three regulatory modules that might play crucial roles in MI were then identified. Furthermore, based on the miRNA and TF mediated regulatory network and literature survey, we proposed a pathway model for miR-21-5p, the miR-29 family and SP1 to demonstrate their potential co-regulatory mechanisms in cardiac fibrosis, apoptosis and angiogenesis. The majority of the regulatory relations in the model were confirmed by previous studies, which demonstrated the reliability and validity of this miRNA and TF mediated regulatory network. Our study will aid in deciphering the complex regulatory mechanisms involved in MI and provide putative therapeutic targets for MI.

  15. In vivo treatment with epigenetic modulating agents induces transcriptional alterations associated with prognosis and immunomodulation in multiple myeloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, Ken; De Smedt, Eva; Kassambara, Alboukadel; Hose, Dirk; Seckinger, Anja; Van Valckenborgh, Els; Menu, Eline; Klein, Bernard; Vanderkerken, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors (DNMTi) are in early clinical development for multiple myeloma (MM) therapy. Despite all encouraging pre-clinical data, clinical activity of HDACi and DNMTi is mostly lacking. To optimize the trials, characterization of the in vivo response towards HDACi and DNMTi will be crucial. Therefore, we investigated the transcriptional response after in vivo treatment with the HDACi quisinostat or DNMTi decitabine using the murine 5T33MM model. We identified 504 and 154 genes deregulated by quisinostat and decitabine, respectively. Of interest, MM patients' gene expression levels of 62 quisinostat- and 25 decitabine-deregulated genes were predictive for overall survival of patients. This prognostic information was implemented in a DNA methylation and histone acetylation score. A high score was related to a high proliferative and immature phenotype of MM cells. Furthermore, highly scored MM patients had an adverse overall survival. Interestingly, bio-informatic prediction tools revealed an association of quisinostat-deregulated genes with lymphocyte activation, proliferation, immune-effector mechanisms and T-helper-1 development. Overall, treatment of 5T33MM mice with epigenetic modulating agents led to the translation of gene signatures to predict overall survival of MM patients. HDACi mainly deregulated tumoral immunomodulatory pathways, supporting the rationale to combine HDACi with immunomodulatory therapies. PMID:25669970

  16. Critical role of transcription factor cyclic AMP response element modulator in beta1-adrenoceptor-mediated cardiac dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewin, Geertje; Matus, Marek; Basu, Abhijit; Frebel, Karin; Rohsbach, Sebastian Pius; Safronenko, Andrej; Seidl, Matthias Dodo; Stümpel, Frank; Buchwalow, Igor; König, Simone; Engelhardt, Stefan; Lohse, Martin J; Schmitz, Wilhelm; Müller, Frank Ulrich

    2009-01-06

    Chronic stimulation of the beta(1)-adrenoceptor (beta(1)AR) plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of heart failure; however, underlying mechanisms remain to be elucidated. The regulation by transcription factors cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB) and cyclic AMP response element modulator (CREM) represents a fundamental mechanism of cyclic AMP-dependent gene control possibly implicated in beta(1)AR-mediated cardiac deterioration. We studied the role of CREM in beta(1)AR-mediated cardiac effects, comparing transgenic mice with heart-directed expression of beta(1)AR in the absence and presence of functional CREM. CREM inactivation protected from cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, fibrosis, and left ventricular dysfunction in beta(1)AR-overexpressing mice. Transcriptome and proteome analysis revealed a set of predicted CREB/CREM target genes including the cardiac ryanodine receptor, tropomyosin 1alpha, and cardiac alpha-actin as altered on the mRNA or protein level along with the improved phenotype in CREM-deficient beta(1)AR-transgenic hearts. The results imply the regulation of genes by CREM as an important mechanism of beta(1)AR-induced cardiac damage in mice.

  17. Modulation of heat shock transcription factor 1 as a therapeutic target for small molecule intervention in neurodegenerative disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel W Neef

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington disease are devastating disorders with no therapeutic approaches to ameliorate the underlying protein misfolding defect inherent to poly-glutamine (polyQ proteins. Given the mounting evidence that elevated levels of protein chaperones suppress polyQ protein misfolding, the master regulator of protein chaperone gene transcription, HSF1, is an attractive target for small molecule intervention. We describe a humanized yeast-based high-throughput screen to identify small molecule activators of human HSF1. This screen is insensitive to previously characterized activators of the heat shock response that have undesirable proteotoxic activity or that inhibit Hsp90, the central chaperone for cellular signaling and proliferation. A molecule identified in this screen, HSF1A, is structurally distinct from other characterized small molecule human HSF1 activators, activates HSF1 in mammalian and fly cells, elevates protein chaperone expression, ameliorates protein misfolding and cell death in polyQ-expressing neuronal precursor cells and protects against cytotoxicity in a fly model of polyQ-mediated neurodegeneration. In addition, we show that HSF1A interacts with components of the TRiC/CCT complex, suggesting a potentially novel regulatory role for this complex in modulating HSF1 activity. These studies describe a novel approach for the identification of new classes of pharmacological interventions for protein misfolding that underlies devastating neurodegenerative disease.

  18. Does positive selection drive transcription factor binding site turnover? A test with Drosophila cis-regulatory modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Z He

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site(s (TFBS gain and loss (i.e., turnover is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time.

  19. The Gut-Liver-Lung Axis. Modulation of the Innate Immune Response and Its Possible Role in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Robert P; Hopkins, Raewyn J; Marsland, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    Evidence from epidemiological studies suggests that a diet high in fiber is associated with better lung function and reduced risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). The mechanism for this benefit remains unknown, but, as fiber is not absorbed by the gut, this finding suggests that the gut may play an active role in pathogenic pathways underlying COPD. There is a growing awareness that aberrant activity of the innate immune system, characterized by increased neutrophil and macrophage activation, may contribute to the development or progression of COPD. Innate immunity is modulated in large part by the liver, where hepatic cells function in immune surveillance of the portal circulation, as well as providing a rich source of systemic inflammatory cytokines and immune mediators (notably, IL-6 and C-reactive protein). We believe that the beneficial effect of dietary fiber on lung function is through modulation of innate immunity and subsequent attenuation of the pulmonary response to inflammatory stimuli, most apparent in current or former smokers. We propose that the "gut-liver-lung axis" may play a modifying role in the pathogenesis of COPD. In this review, we summarize lines of evidence that include animal models, large prospective observational studies, and clinical trials, supporting the hypothesis that the gut-liver-lung axis plays an integral part in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of COPD.

  20. Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for pulmonary Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT in patients with lesions in close approximation to the chest wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. FitzGerald

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall pain and discomfort has been recognized as a significant late effect of radiation therapy in historical and modern treatment models. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT is becoming an important treatment tool in oncology care for patients with intrathoracic lesions. For lesions in close approximation to the chest wall including lesions requiring motion management, SBRT techniques can deliver high dose to the chest wall. As an unintended target of consequence, there is possibility of generating significant chest wall pain and discomfort as a late effect of therapy. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the potential role of Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT technologies in decreasing chest wall dose in SBRT treatment of pulmonary lesions in close approximation to the chest wall.Ten patients with pulmonary lesions of various sizes and topography in close approximation to the chest wall were selected for retrospective review. All volumes including target, chest wall, ribs, and lung were contoured with maximal intensity projection maps and four-dimensional computer tomography planning. Radiation therapy planning consisted of static techniques including Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy compared to VMAT therapy to a dose of 60Gy in 12Gy fractions. Dose volume histogram to rib, chest wall, and lung were compared between plans with statistical analysis.In all patients dose and volume were improved to ribs and chest wall using VMAT technologies compared to static field techniques. On average, volume receiving 30Gy to the chest wall was improved by 72%;the ribs by 60%. In only one patient did the VMAT treatment technique increase pulmonary volume receiving 20Gy (V20.VMAT technology has potential of limiting radiation dose to sensitive chest wall regions in patients with lesions in close approximation to this structure. This would also have potential value to lesions treated with SBRT in other body regions where targets abut critical

  1. Cellular Levels of Signaling Factors Are Sensed by β-actin Alleles to Modulate Transcriptional Pulse Intensity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alon Kalo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptional response of β-actin to extra-cellular stimuli is a paradigm for transcription factor complex assembly and regulation. Serum induction leads to a precisely timed pulse of β-actin transcription in the cell population. Actin protein is proposed to be involved in this response, but it is not known whether cellular actin levels affect nuclear β-actin transcription. We perturbed the levels of key signaling factors and examined the effect on the induced transcriptional pulse by following endogenous β-actin alleles in single living cells. Lowering serum response factor (SRF protein levels leads to loss of pulse integrity, whereas reducing actin protein levels reveals positive feedback regulation, resulting in elevated gene activation and a prolonged transcriptional response. Thus, transcriptional pulse fidelity requires regulated amounts of signaling proteins, and perturbations in factor levels eliminate the physiological response, resulting in either tuning down or exaggeration of the transcriptional pulse.

  2. Asymmetric bidirectional transcription from the FSHD-causing D4Z4 array modulates DUX4 production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory J Block

    Full Text Available Facioscapulohumeral Disease (FSHD is a dominantly inherited progressive myopathy associated with aberrant production of the transcription factor, Double Homeobox Protein 4 (DUX4. The expression of DUX4 depends on an open chromatin conformation of the D4Z4 macrosatellite array and a specific haplotype on chromosome 4. Even when these requirements are met, DUX4 transcripts and protein are only detectable in a subset of cells indicating that additional constraints govern DUX4 production. Since the direction of transcription, along with the production of non-coding antisense transcripts is an important regulatory feature of other macrosatellite repeats, we developed constructs that contain the non-coding region of a single D4Z4 unit flanked by genes that report transcriptional activity in the sense and antisense directions. We found that D4Z4 contains two promoters that initiate sense and antisense transcription within the array, and that antisense transcription predominates. Transcriptional start sites for the antisense transcripts, as well as D4Z4 regions that regulate the balance of sense and antisense transcripts were identified. We show that the choice of transcriptional direction is reversible but not mutually exclusive, since sense and antisense reporter activity was often present in the same cell and simultaneously upregulated during myotube formation. Similarly, levels of endogenous sense and antisense D4Z4 transcripts were upregulated in FSHD myotubes. These studies offer insight into the autonomous distribution of muscle weakness that is characteristic of FSHD.

  3. Pulmonary edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  4. Characterization of human constitutive photomorphogenesis protein 1, a RING finger ubiquitin ligase that interacts with Jun transcription factors and modulates their transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianchi, Elisabetta; Denti, Simona; Catena, Raffaella; Rossetti, Grazisa; Polo, Simona; Gasparian, Sona; Putignano, Stella; Rogge, Lars; Pardi, Ruggero

    2003-05-30

    RING finger proteins have been implicated in many fundamental cellular processes, including the control of gene expression. A key regulator of light-dependent development in Arabidopsis thaliana is the constitutive photomorphogenesis protein 1 (atCOP1), a RING finger protein that plays an essential role in translating light/dark signals into specific changes in gene transcription. atCOP1 binds the basic leucine zipper factor HY5 and suppresses its transcriptional activity through a yet undefined mechanism that results in HY5 degradation in response to darkness. Furthermore, the pleiotropic phenotype of atCOP1 mutants indicates that atCOP1 may be a central regulator of several transcriptional pathways. Here we report the cloning and characterization of the human orthologue of atCOP1. Human COP1 (huCOP1) distributes both to the cytoplasm and the nucleus of cells and shows a striking degree of sequence conservation with atCOP1, suggesting the possibility of a functional conservation as well. In co-immunoprecipitation assays huCOP1 specifically binds basic leucine zipper factors of the Jun family. As a functional consequence of this interaction, expression of huCOP1 in mammalian cells down-regulates c-Jun-dependent transcription and the expression of the AP-1 target genes, urokinase and matrix metalloproteinase 1. The RING domain of huCOP1 displays ubiquitin ligase activity in an autoubiquitination assay in vitro; however, suppression of AP-1-dependent transcription by huCOP1 occurs in the absence of changes in c-Jun protein levels, suggesting that this inhibitory effect is independent of c-Jun degradation. Our findings indicate that huCOP1 is a novel regulator of AP-1-dependent transcription sharing the important properties of Arabidopsis COP1 in the control of gene expression.

  5. The circadian clock regulates rhythmic activation of the NRF2/glutathionemediated antioxidant defense pathway to modulate pulmonary fibrosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    V. Pekovic-Vaughan (Vanja); J. Gibbs (Raphael); H. Yoshitane (Hikari); N. Yang (Nan); D. Pathiranage (Dharshika); B. Guo (Boliang); A. Sagami (Aya); K. Taguchi (Keiko); D. Bechtold (David); S.E. Loudon (Sjoukje); M. Yamamoto (Masayuki); J. Chan (Jefferson); G.T.J. van der Horst (Gijsbertus); Y. Fukada (Yoshitaka); Q. Meng (Qingyue)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractThe disruption of the NRF2 (nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2)/glutathione-mediated antioxidant defense pathway is a critical step in the pathogenesis of several chronic pulmonary diseases and cancer. While the mechanism of NRF2 activation upon oxidative stress has been widely

  6. Novel Peptide for Attenuation of Hyperoxia-induced Disruption of Lung Endothelial Barrier and Pulmonary Edema via Modulating Peroxynitrite Formation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondrikov, Dmitry; Gross, Christine; Black, Stephen M.; Su, Yunchao

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary damages of oxygen toxicity include vascular leakage and pulmonary edema. We have previously reported that hyperoxia increases the formation of NO and peroxynitrite in lung endothelial cells via increased interaction of endothelial nitric oxide (eNOS) with β-actin. A peptide (P326TAT) with amino acid sequence corresponding to the actin binding region of eNOS residues 326–333 has been shown to reduce the hyperoxia-induced formation of NO and peroxynitrite in lung endothelial cells. In the present study, we found that exposure of pulmonary artery endothelial cells to hyperoxia (95% oxygen and 5% CO2) for 48 h resulted in disruption of monolayer barrier integrity in two phases, and apoptosis occurred in the second phase. NOS inhibitor NG-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester attenuated the endothelial barrier disruption in both phases. Peroxynitrite scavenger uric acid did not affect the first phase but ameliorated the second phase of endothelial barrier disruption and apoptosis. P326TAT inhibited hyperoxia-induced disruption of monolayer barrier integrity in two phases and apoptosis in the second phase. More importantly, injection of P326TAT attenuated vascular leakage, pulmonary edema, and endothelial apoptosis in the lungs of mice exposed to hyperoxia. P326TAT also significantly reduced the increase in eNOS-β-actin association and protein tyrosine nitration. Together, these results indicate that peptide P326TAT ameliorates barrier dysfunction of hyperoxic lung endothelial monolayer and attenuates eNOS-β-actin association, peroxynitrite formation, endothelial apoptosis, and pulmonary edema in lungs of hyperoxic mice. P326TAT can be a novel therapeutic agent to treat or prevent acute lung injury in oxygen toxicity. PMID:25315770

  7. Piwil2 modulates the proliferation and metastasis of colon cancer via regulation of matrix metallopeptidase 9 transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dawei; Sun, Xing; Yan, Dongwang; Huang, Jianfeng; Luo, Qiongzhen; Tang, Huamei; Peng, Zhihai

    2012-10-01

    Piwi-like protein 2 (Piwil2) has recently emerged as a putative oncogene which is amplified in several human malignancies. However, the role of Piwil2 in colon cancer remains poorly understood. The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical and pathological significance of Piwil2, and the possible role in the proliferation and metastasis of colon cancer. Primary colon cancer paired with adjacent normal colon tissue and lymph node metastasis (LNM) lesions in 66 patients' tissue microarrays (TMA) were used to determine the expression of Piwil2. Knocked down Piwil2 expression in SW620 and SW480 colon cancer cell lines was performed to evaluate the role of Piwil2 in cell proliferation, invasion, metastasis in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo. The possible roles of Piwil2 in the regulation of a 2 kb matrix metallopeptidase 9 (MMP9) promoter fragment and on the regulation of apoptotic pathways were evaluated by using a luciferase reporter construct and Western blots, respectively. Significantly higher expression levels of Piwil2 were observed in primary colon cancer tissue and in LNM in comparison with normal colon mucosa. Piwil2 expression significantly correlated with more aggressive clinical and pathological parameters with poorer five-year metastasis-free survival and overall survival. Piwil2 silencing significantly reduced cancer cell proliferation, colony formation ability and increased apoptosis in vitro and inhibited tumor growth in vivo. Piwil2 knockdown also attenuated migration and invasion of colon cancer cells via modulation of MMP9 transcriptional activities. Our results indicate that Piwil2 moderates the proliferation and metastasis potential of colon cancer.

  8. The cardiac transcription network modulated by Gata4, Mef2a, Nkx2.5, Srf, histone modifications, and microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jenny Schlesinger

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The transcriptome, as the pool of all transcribed elements in a given cell, is regulated by the interaction between different molecular levels, involving epigenetic, transcriptional, and post-transcriptional mechanisms. However, many previous studies investigated each of these levels individually, and little is known about their interdependency. We present a systems biology study integrating mRNA profiles with DNA-binding events of key cardiac transcription factors (Gata4, Mef2a, Nkx2.5, and Srf, activating histone modifications (H3ac, H4ac, H3K4me2, and H3K4me3, and microRNA profiles obtained in wild-type and RNAi-mediated knockdown. Finally, we confirmed conclusions primarily obtained in cardiomyocyte cell culture in a time-course of cardiac maturation in mouse around birth. We provide insights into the combinatorial regulation by cardiac transcription factors and show that they can partially compensate each other's function. Genes regulated by multiple transcription factors are less likely differentially expressed in RNAi knockdown of one respective factor. In addition to the analysis of the individual transcription factors, we found that histone 3 acetylation correlates with Srf- and Gata4-dependent gene expression and is complementarily reduced in cardiac Srf knockdown. Further, we found that altered microRNA expression in Srf knockdown potentially explains up to 45% of indirect mRNA targets. Considering all three levels of regulation, we present an Srf-centered transcription network providing on a single-gene level insights into the regulatory circuits establishing respective mRNA profiles. In summary, we show the combinatorial contribution of four DNA-binding transcription factors in regulating the cardiac transcriptome and provide evidence that histone modifications and microRNAs modulate their functional consequence. This opens a new perspective to understand heart development and the complexity cardiovascular disorders.

  9. Long non-coding RNA NEAT1 is a transcriptional target of p53 and modulates p53-induced transactivation and tumor-suppressor function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idogawa, Masashi; Ohashi, Tomoko; Sasaki, Yasushi; Nakase, Hiroshi; Tokino, Takashi

    2017-03-14

    p53 is one of the most important tumor suppressor genes and the direct transcriptional targets of p53 must be explored to elucidate its functional mechanisms. Thus far, the p53 targets that have been primarily studied are protein-coding genes. Our previous study revealed that several long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are direct transcriptional targets of p53, and knockdown of specific lncRNAs modulates p53-induced apoptosis. In this study, analysis of next-generation chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) data for p53 revealed that the lncRNA NEAT1 is a direct transcriptional target of p53. The suppression of NEAT1 induction by p53 attenuates the inhibitory effect of p53 on cancer cell growth and also modulates gene transactivation, including that of many lncRNAs. Furthermore, low expression of NEAT1 is related to poor prognosis in several cancers. These results indicate that the induction of NEAT1 expression contributes to the tumor-suppressor function of p53 and suggest that p53 and NEAT1 constitute a transcriptional network contributing to various biological functions and tumor suppression. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. The Neuronal-Specific SGK1.1 (SGK1_v2 Kinase as a Transcriptional Modulator of BAG4, Brox, and PPP1CB Genes Expression

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    Rebeca González-Fernández

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Serum- and Glucocorticoid-induced Kinase 1, SGK1, exhibits a broad range of cellular functions that include regulation of the number of ion channels in plasma membrane and modulation of signaling pathways of cell survival. This diversity of functions is made possible by various regulatory processes acting upon the SGK1 gene, giving rise to various isoforms: SGK1_v1–5, each with distinct properties and distinct aminotermini that serve to target proteins to different subcellular compartments. Among cellular effects of SGK1 expression is to indirectly modulate gene transcription by phosphorylating transcriptional factors of the FOXO family. Here we examined if SGK1.1 (SGK1_v2; NM_001143676, which associates primarily to the plasma membrane, is also able to regulate gene expression. Using a differential gene expression approach we identified six genes upregulated by SGK1.1 in HeLa cells. Further analysis of transcript and protein levels validated two genes: BCL2-associated athanogene 4 (BAG-4 and Brox. The results indicate that SGK1.1 regulates gene transcription upon a different set of genes some of which participate in cell survival pathways (BAG-4 and others in intracellular vesicular traffic (Brox.

  11. The Neuronal-Specific SGK1.1 (SGK1_v2) Kinase as a Transcriptional Modulator of BAG4, Brox, and PPP1CB Genes Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Fernández, Rebeca; Ávila, Julio; Arteaga, María F.; Canessa, Cecilia M.; Martín-Vasallo, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    The Serum- and Glucocorticoid-induced Kinase 1, SGK1, exhibits a broad range of cellular functions that include regulation of the number of ion channels in plasma membrane and modulation of signaling pathways of cell survival. This diversity of functions is made possible by various regulatory processes acting upon the SGK1 gene, giving rise to various isoforms: SGK1_v1–5, each with distinct properties and distinct aminotermini that serve to target proteins to different subcellular compartments. Among cellular effects of SGK1 expression is to indirectly modulate gene transcription by phosphorylating transcriptional factors of the FOXO family. Here we examined if SGK1.1 (SGK1_v2; NM_001143676), which associates primarily to the plasma membrane, is also able to regulate gene expression. Using a differential gene expression approach we identified six genes upregulated by SGK1.1 in HeLa cells. Further analysis of transcript and protein levels validated two genes: BCL2-associated athanogene 4 (BAG-4) and Brox. The results indicate that SGK1.1 regulates gene transcription upon a different set of genes some of which participate in cell survival pathways (BAG-4) and others in intracellular vesicular traffic (Brox). PMID:25849655

  12. Nutrition modulates Fto and Irx3 gene transcript levels, but does not alter their DNA methylation profiles in rat white adipose tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowacka-Woszuk, Joanna; Pruszynska-Oszmalek, Ewa; Szydlowski, Maciej; Szczerbal, Izabela

    2017-02-05

    The fat mass and obesity associated (Fto) and iroquois homeobox 3 (Irx3) genes have been recognised as important obesity-related genes. Studies on the expression of these genes in the fat tissue of human and mouse have produced inconsistent results, while similar data on rat are limited. Environmental factors such as diet, should be considered as potential modulators of gene transcript levels through epigenetic mechanisms including DNA methylation. The aim of this study was to evaluate transcription levels and DNA methylation profiles of rat Fto and Irx3 genes in two white adipose tissue depots in response to high-fat and high-protein diets. The relative transcript levels of Fto and Irx3 were shown to be tissue-specific with higher levels detected in subcutaneous fat tissue than in abdominal fat tissue. Moreover, negative correlations between the transcripts of both genes were observed for subcutaneous fat tissue. The identified interactions (e.g. diet×duration of diet regimen) indicated that the diet had an impact on the transcript level; however, this effect was dependent on the duration of the diet regimen. The high-fat diet led to upregulation of Fto and Irx3 linearly with time across the two tissues. DNA methylation of the regulatory regions of the studied genes was very low and not related with the tissue, diet, or duration of diet regimen. Our study revealed that diet was an important factor modulating transcription of Fto and Irx3, but its affect depended on its duration. In contrast, the DNA methylation profiles of Fto and Irx3 were not altered by nutrition, which may indicate that the feeding type, when applied postnatally, did not affect DNA methylation of these genes.

  13. Small-Molecule Inhibition of Rho/MKL/SRF Transcription in Prostate Cancer Cells: Modulation of Cell Cycle, ER Stress, and Metastasis Gene Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris R. Evelyn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the major cause of cancer deaths and control of gene transcription has emerged as a critical contributing factor. RhoA- and RhoC-induced gene transcription via the actin-regulated transcriptional co-activator megakaryocytic leukemia (MKL and serum response factor (SRF drive metastasis in breast cancer and melanoma. We recently identified a compound, CCG-1423, which blocks Rho/MKL/SRF-mediated transcription and inhibits PC-3 prostate cancer cell invasion. Here, we undertook a genome-wide expression study in PC-3 cells to explore the mechanism and function of this compound. There was significant overlap in the genes modulated by CCG-1423 and Latrunculin B (Lat B, which blocks the Rho/MKL/SRF pathway by preventing actin polymerization. In contrast, the general transcription inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-1H-benzimidazole (DRB showed a markedly different pattern. Effects of CCG-1423 and Lat B on gene expression correlated with literature studies of MKL knock-down. Gene sets involved in DNA synthesis and repair, G1/S transition, and apoptosis were modulated by CCG-1423. It also upregulated genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress. Targets of the known Rho target transcription factor family E2F and genes related to melanoma progression and metastasis were strongly suppressed by CCG-1423. These results confirm the ability of our compound to inhibit expression of numerous Rho/MKL-dependent genes and show effects on stress pathways as well. This suggests a novel approach to targeting aggressive cancers and metastasis.

  14. Small-Molecule Inhibition of Rho/MKL/SRF Transcription in Prostate Cancer Cells: Modulation of Cell Cycle, ER Stress, and Metastasis Gene Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evelyn, Chris R; Lisabeth, Erika M; Wade, Susan M; Haak, Andrew J; Johnson, Craig N; Lawlor, Elizabeth R; Neubig, Richard R

    2016-05-28

    Metastasis is the major cause of cancer deaths and control of gene transcription has emerged as a critical contributing factor. RhoA- and RhoC-induced gene transcription via the actin-regulated transcriptional co-activator megakaryocytic leukemia (MKL) and serum response factor (SRF) drive metastasis in breast cancer and melanoma. We recently identified a compound, CCG-1423, which blocks Rho/MKL/SRF-mediated transcription and inhibits PC-3 prostate cancer cell invasion. Here, we undertook a genome-wide expression study in PC-3 cells to explore the mechanism and function of this compound. There was significant overlap in the genes modulated by CCG-1423 and Latrunculin B (Lat B), which blocks the Rho/MKL/SRF pathway by preventing actin polymerization. In contrast, the general transcription inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-1H-benzimidazole (DRB) showed a markedly different pattern. Effects of CCG-1423 and Lat B on gene expression correlated with literature studies of MKL knock-down. Gene sets involved in DNA synthesis and repair, G1/S transition, and apoptosis were modulated by CCG-1423. It also upregulated genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress. Targets of the known Rho target transcription factor family E2F and genes related to melanoma progression and metastasis were strongly suppressed by CCG-1423. These results confirm the ability of our compound to inhibit expression of numerous Rho/MKL-dependent genes and show effects on stress pathways as well. This suggests a novel approach to targeting aggressive cancers and metastasis.

  15. Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Modulation of SPI1 and SPI2 Expression by ppGpp, RpoS and DksA in Salmonella enterica sv Typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Christopher J; Ramachandran, Vinoy K; Shearer, Neil; Thompson, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    The expression of genes within Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands 1 and 2 (SPI1, SPI2) is required to facilitate invasion and intracellular replication respectively of S. Typhimurium in host cell lines. Control of their expression is complex and occurs via a variety of factors operating at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in response to the environmental stimuli found within the host. Several of the factors that modulate SPI1 and SPI2 expression are involved in the redistribution or modification of RNA polymerase (RNAP) specificity. These factors include the bacterial alarmone, ppGpp, the alternative sigma factor, RpoS, and the RNAP accessory protein, DksA. In this report we show not only how these three factors modulate SPI1 and SPI2 expression but also how they contribute to the 'phased' expression of SPI1 and SPI2 during progress through late-log and stationary phase in aerobic rich broth culture conditions. In addition, we demonstrate that the expression of at least one SPI1-encoded protein, SipC is subject to DksA-dependent post-transcriptional control.

  16. Transcriptional and Post-Transcriptional Modulation of SPI1 and SPI2 Expression by ppGpp, RpoS and DksA in Salmonella enterica sv Typhimurium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Rice

    Full Text Available The expression of genes within Salmonella Pathogenicity Islands 1 and 2 (SPI1, SPI2 is required to facilitate invasion and intracellular replication respectively of S. Typhimurium in host cell lines. Control of their expression is complex and occurs via a variety of factors operating at transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels in response to the environmental stimuli found within the host. Several of the factors that modulate SPI1 and SPI2 expression are involved in the redistribution or modification of RNA polymerase (RNAP specificity. These factors include the bacterial alarmone, ppGpp, the alternative sigma factor, RpoS, and the RNAP accessory protein, DksA. In this report we show not only how these three factors modulate SPI1 and SPI2 expression but also how they contribute to the 'phased' expression of SPI1 and SPI2 during progress through late-log and stationary phase in aerobic rich broth culture conditions. In addition, we demonstrate that the expression of at least one SPI1-encoded protein, SipC is subject to DksA-dependent post-transcriptional control.

  17. Gap junctional communication modulates gene transcription by altering the recruitment of Sp1 and Sp3 to connexin-response elements in osteoblast promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stains, Joseph P.; Lecanda, Fernando; Screen, Joanne; Towler, Dwight A.; Civitelli, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of gap junction proteins, connexins, represent a mechanism of disease in a variety of tissues. We have shown that recessive (gene deletion) or dominant (connexin45 overexpression) disruption of connexin43 function results in osteoblast dysfunction and abnormal expression of osteoblast genes, including down-regulation of osteocalcin transcription. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of gap junction-sensitive transcriptional regulation, we systematically analyzed the rat osteocalcin promoter for sensitivity to gap junctional intercellular communication. We identified an Sp1/Sp3 containing complex that assembles on a minimal element in the -70 to -57 region of the osteocalcin promoter in a gap junction-dependent manner. This CT-rich connexin-response element is necessary and sufficient to confer gap junction sensitivity to the osteocalcin proximal promoter. Repression of osteocalcin transcription occurs as a result of displacement of the stimulatory Sp1 by the inhibitory Sp3 on the promoter when gap junctional communication is perturbed. Modulation of Sp1/Sp3 recruitment also occurs on the collagen Ialpha1 promoter and translates into gap junction-sensitive transcriptional control of collagen Ialpha1 gene expression. Thus, regulation of Sp1/Sp3 recruitment to the promoter may represent a potential general mechanism for transcriptional control of target genes by signals passing through gap junctions.

  18. Structural insights into acetylated-histone H4 recognition by the bromodomain-PHD finger module of human transcriptional coactivator CBP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plotnikov, Alexander N; Yang, Shuai; Zhou, Thomas Jiachi; Rusinova, Elena; Frasca, Antonio; Zhou, Ming-Ming

    2014-02-01

    Bromodomain functions as the acetyl-lysine binding domains to regulate gene transcription in chromatin. Bromodomains are rapidly emerging as new epigenetic drug targets for human diseases. However, owing to their transient nature and modest affinity, histone-binding selectivity of bromodomains has remained mostly elusive. Here, we report high-resolution crystal structures of the bromodomain-PHD tandem module of human transcriptional coactivator CBP bound to lysine-acetylated histone H4 peptides. The structures reveal that the PHD finger serves a structural role in the tandem module and that the bromodomain prefers lysine-acetylated motifs comprising a hydrophobic or aromatic residue at -2 and a lysine or arginine at -3 or -4 position from the acetylated lysine. Our study further provides structural insights into distinct modes of singly and diacetylated histone H4 recognition by the bromodomains of CBP and BRD4 that function differently as a transcriptional coactivator and chromatin organizer, respectively, explaining their distinct roles in control of gene expression in chromatin.

  19. NF-Y recruits both transcription activator and repressor to modulate tissue- and developmental stage-specific expression of human γ-globin gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingguo Zhu

    Full Text Available The human embryonic, fetal and adult β-like globin genes provide a paradigm for tissue- and developmental stage-specific gene regulation. The fetal γ-globin gene is expressed in fetal erythroid cells but is repressed in adult erythroid cells. The molecular mechanism underlying this transcriptional switch during erythroid development is not completely understood. Here, we used a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays to dissect the molecular assemblies of the active and the repressed proximal γ-globin promoter complexes in K562 human erythroleukemia cell line and primary human fetal and adult erythroid cells. We found that the proximal γ-globin promoter complex is assembled by a developmentally regulated, general transcription activator NF-Y bound strongly at the tandem CCAAT motifs near the TATA box. NF-Y recruits to neighboring DNA motifs the developmentally regulated, erythroid transcription activator GATA-2 and general repressor BCL11A, which in turn recruit erythroid repressor GATA-1 and general repressor COUP-TFII to form respectively the NF-Y/GATA-2 transcription activator hub and the BCL11A/COUP-TFII/GATA-1 transcription repressor hub. Both the activator and the repressor hubs are present in both the active and the repressed γ-globin promoter complexes in fetal and adult erythroid cells. Through changes in their levels and respective interactions with the co-activators and co-repressors during erythroid development, the activator and the repressor hubs modulate erythroid- and developmental stage-specific transcription of γ-globin gene.

  20. Schisandrin B exhibits anti-inflammatory activity through modulation of the redox-sensitive transcription factors Nrf2 and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checker, Rahul; Patwardhan, Raghavendra S; Sharma, Deepak; Menon, Jisha; Thoh, Maikho; Bhilwade, Hari N; Konishi, Tetsuya; Sandur, Santosh K

    2012-10-01

    Schisandrin B (SB), a dibenzocyclooctadiene derivative isolated from Schisandra chinensis and used commonly in traditional Chinese medicine for the treatment of hepatitis and myocardial disorders, has been recently shown to modulate cellular redox balance. Since we have shown that cellular redox plays an important role in the modulation of immune responses, the present studies were undertaken to study the effects of SB on activation and effector functions of lymphocytes. SB altered the redox status of lymphocytes by enhancing the basal reactive oxygen species levels and altering the GSH/GSSG ratio in lymphocytes. It also induced nuclear translocation of redox sensitive transcription factor Nrf2 and increased the transcription of its dependent genes. SB inhibited mitogen-induced proliferation and cytokine secretion by lymphocytes. SB also significantly inhibited mitogen-induced upregulation of T cell costimulatory molecules and activation markers. It was observed that SB inhibited mitogen-induced phosphorylation of c-Raf, MEK, ERK, JNK, and p38. It suppressed IκBα degradation and nuclear translocation of NF-κB in activated lymphocytes. Anti-inflammatory effects of SB were significantly abrogated by the inhibitors of Nrf2 and HO-1, suggesting the involvement of this pathway. Similar anti-inflammatory effects of SB on lymphocyte proliferation and cytokine secretion were also observed in vivo. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that the anti-inflammatory effects of SB are mediated via modulation of Nrf2 and NF-κB in lymphocytes.

  1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa pyocyanin activates NRF2-ARE-mediated transcriptional response via the ROS-EGFR-PI3K-AKT/MEK-ERK MAP kinase signaling in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ying; Duan, Chaohui; Kuang, Zhizhou; Hao, Yonghua; Jeffries, Jayme L; Lau, Gee W

    2013-01-01

    The redox-active pyocyanin (PCN) secreted by the respiratory pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa generates reactive oxygen species (ROS) and causes oxidative stress to pulmonary epithelial cells. Nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (NRF2) confers protection against ROS-mediated cell death by inducing the expression of detoxifying enzymes and proteins via its binding to the cis-acting antioxidant response element (ARE). However, a clear relationship between NRF2 and PCN-mediated oxidative stress has not been established experimentally. In this study, we investigated the induction of NRF2-ARE response by PCN in the pulmonary epithelial cells. We analyzed the effect of PCN on NRF2 expression and nuclear translocation in cultured human airway epithelial cells, and in a mouse model of chronic PCN exposure. NRF2-dependent transcription of antioxidative enzymes was also assessed. Furthermore, we used inhibitors to examine the involvement of EGFR and its downstream signaling components that mediate NRF2-ARE-activation in response to PCN. PCN enhances the nuclear NRF2 accumulation and activates the transcription of ARE-mediated antioxidant genes. Furthermore, PCN activates NRF2 by inducing the EGFR-phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) signaling pathway and its main downstream effectors, AKT and MEK1/2-ERK1/2 MAP kinases. Inhibition of the EGFR-PI3K signaling markedly attenuates PCN-stimulated NRF2 accumulation in the nucleus. We demonstrate for the first time that PCN-mediated oxidative stress activates the EGFR-PI3K-AKT/MEK1/2-ERK1/2 MAP kinase signaling pathway, leading to nuclear NRF2 translocation and ARE responsiveness in pulmonary epithelial cells.

  2. Modulation of the pro-inflammatory molecules E-selectin and TNF-α gene transcription in Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae-infected primary caprine host endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, D; Ruiz, A; Muñoz, M C; Molina, J M; Hermosilla, C; López, A M; Matos, L; Ortega, L; Martín, S; Taubert, A

    2015-10-01

    Eimeria ninakohlyakimovae is an important coccidian parasite of goats which causes severe hemorrhagic typhlocolitis in young animals, thereby leading to high economic losses in goat industry worldwide. The first merogony of E. ninakohlyakimovae occurs within host endothelial cells (ECs) of the lacteal capillaries of the villi of the distal ileum resulting in the formation of macromeronts (up to 170 μm) within 10-12 days post-infection (p.i.) and releasing >120,000 merozoites I. The E. ninakohlyakimovae-macromeront formation within highly immunoreactive host endothelial cells (ECs) should rely on several regulatory processes to fulfill this massive replication. Here host EC-parasite interactions were investigated to determine the extent of modulation carried out by E. ninakohlyakimovae in primary caprine umbilical vein endothelial cells (CUVEC) during the first merogony. Gene transcription of the adhesion molecule E-selectin and the cytokine TNF-α were significantly enhanced in the first hours and days p.i. in E. ninakohlyakimovae-infected CUVEC. The activation of CUVEC was also demonstrated by enhanced chemokine CCL2 and cytokine GM-CSF gene transcription, whereas no differences of the eNOS gene transcription were observed in E. ninakohlyakimovae-infected CUVEC when compared to un-infected controls. The data presented here suggest that infection of caprine host ECs by E. ninakohlyakimovae results in EC activation associated with enhanced gene transcription encoding for pro-inflammatory as well as immunomodulatory molecules, which might be important for the defense against this intracellular parasite.

  3. AHR promoter variant modulates its transcription and downstream effectors by allele-specific AHR-SP1 interaction functioning as a genetic marker for vitiligo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaowen; Li, Kai; Liu, Ling; Shi, Qiong; Song, Pu; Jian, Zhe; Guo, Sen; Wang, Gang; Li, Chunying; Gao, Tianwen

    2015-09-15

    Vitiligo is an acquired depigmentation disorder largely caused by defective melanocyte- or autoimmunity-induced melanocyte destruction. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is essential for melanocyte homeostasis and immune process, and abnormal AHR was observed in vitiligo. We previously identified the T allele of AHR -129C > T variant as a protective factor against vitiligo. However, biological characterization underlying such effects is not fully certain, further validation by mechanistic research is warranted and was conducted in the present study. We showed that -129T allele promoted AHR transcriptional activity through facilitating its interaction with SP1 transcription factor (SP1) compared with -129C allele. We subsequently found reduced peripheral AHR and SP1 transcript expressions in vitiligo and a negative correlation of AHR level with disease duration. We also investigated AHR-related cytokines and observed increased serum TNF-α concentration and diminished serum levels of IL-10 and TGF-β1 in vitiligo. Further genetic analysis showed that -129T carriers possessed higher levels of AHR and IL-10 than -129C carriers. Therefore, our study indicates that the modulation of AHR transcription by a promoter variant has a profound influence on vitiligo, not only advancing our understanding on AHR function but also providing novel insight into the pathogenesis of degenerative or autoimmune diseases including vitiligo.

  4. Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor gene expression in liver cells is modulated by Ets-1 in synchrony with transcription factors Pax5, LEF-1 and c-jun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Sangeeta; Saradhi, Mallampati; Rana, Manjul; Chatterjee, Swagata [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Aumercier, Marc [IRI, CNRS USR 3078, Université de Lille-Nord de France, Parc CNRS de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley, BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Tyagi, Rakesh K., E-mail: rktyagi@yahoo.com [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear receptor PXR is predominantly expressed in liver and intestine. Expression of PXR is observed to be dysregulated in various metabolic disorders indicating its involvement in disease development. However, information available on mechanisms of PXR self-regulation is fragmentary. The present investigation identifies some of the regulatory elements responsible for its tight regulation and low cellular expression. Here, we report that the PXR-promoter is a target for some key transcription factors like PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun. Interestingly, we observed that PXR-promoter responsiveness to Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, is considerably enhanced by Ets transcription factors (PU.1 and Ets-1). Co-transfection of cells with Ets-1, LEF-1 and c-Jun increased PXR-promoter activity by 5-fold and also induced expression of endogenous human PXR. Site-directed mutagenesis and transfection studies revealed that two Ets binding sites and two of the three LEF binding sites in the PXR-promoter are functional and have a positive effect on PXR transcription. Results suggest that expression of Ets family members, in conjunction with Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, lead to coordinated up-regulation of PXR gene transcription. Insights obtained on the regulation of PXR gene have relevance in offering important cues towards normal functioning as well as development of several metabolic disorders via PXR signaling. - Highlights: • The study identified cis-regulatory elements in the nuclear receptor PXR promoter. • Several trans-acting factors modulating the PXR-promoter have been identified. • PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1, c-Jun, LyF-VI and NF-1 act as modulators of the PXR-promoter. • Ets-1 in conjunction with LEF-1 and c-Jun exhibit 5-fold activation of the PXR-promoter. • Insights into PXR-regulation have relevance in normal and pathological conditions.

  5. mTOR signaling regulates myotube hypertrophy by modulating protein synthesis, rDNA transcription, and chromatin remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Walden, Ferdinand; Liu, Chang; Aurigemma, Nicole; Nader, Gustavo A

    2016-10-01

    Ribosome production is an early event during skeletal muscle hypertrophy and precedes muscle protein accretion. Signaling via mTOR is crucial for ribosome production and hypertrophy; however, the mechanisms by which it regulates these processes remain to be identified. Herein, we investigated the activation of mTOR signaling in hypertrophying myotubes and determined that mTOR coordinates various aspects of gene expression important for ribosome production. First, inhibition of translation with cycloheximide had a more potent effect on protein synthesis than rapamycin indicating that mTOR function during hypertrophy is not on general, but rather on specific protein synthesis. Second, blocking Pol II transcription had a similar effect as Rapamycin and, unexpectedly, revealed the necessity of Pol II transcription for Pol I transcription, suggesting that mTOR may regulate ribosome production also by controlling Class II genes at the transcriptional level. Third, Pol I activity is essential for rDNA transcription and, surprisingly, for protein synthesis as selective Pol I inhibition blunted rDNA transcription, protein synthesis, and the hypertrophic response of myotubes. Finally, mTOR has nuclear localization in muscle, which is not sensitive to rapamycin. Inhibition of mTOR signaling by rapamycin disrupted mTOR-rDNA promoter interaction and resulted in altered histone marks indicative of repressed transcription and formation of higher-order chromatin structure. Thus mTOR signaling appears to regulate muscle hypertrophy by affecting protein synthesis, Class I and II gene expression, and chromatin remodeling. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Modulation of Re-initiation of Measles Virus Transcription at Intergenic Regions by PXD to NTAIL Binding Strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloyet, Louis-Marie; Brunel, Joanna; Dosnon, Marion; Hamon, Véronique; Erales, Jenny; Gruet, Antoine; Lazert, Carine; Bignon, Christophe; Roche, Philippe; Longhi, Sonia; Gerlier, Denis

    2016-12-01

    Measles virus (MeV) and all Paramyxoviridae members rely on a complex polymerase machinery to ensure viral transcription and replication. Their polymerase associates the phosphoprotein (P) and the L protein that is endowed with all necessary enzymatic activities. To be processive, the polymerase uses as template a nucleocapsid made of genomic RNA entirely wrapped into a continuous oligomer of the nucleoprotein (N). The polymerase enters the nucleocapsid at the 3'end of the genome where are located the promoters for transcription and replication. Transcription of the six genes occurs sequentially. This implies ending and re-initiating mRNA synthesis at each intergenic region (IGR). We explored here to which extent the binding of the X domain of P (XD) to the C-terminal region of the N protein (NTAIL) is involved in maintaining the P/L complex anchored to the nucleocapsid template during the sequential transcription. Amino acid substitutions introduced in the XD-binding site on NTAIL resulted in a wide range of binding affinities as determined by combining protein complementation assays in E. coli and human cells and isothermal titration calorimetry. Molecular dynamics simulations revealed that XD binding to NTAIL involves a complex network of hydrogen bonds, the disruption of which by two individual amino acid substitutions markedly reduced the binding affinity. Using a newly designed, highly sensitive dual-luciferase reporter minigenome assay, the efficiency of re-initiation through the five measles virus IGRs was found to correlate with NTAIL/XD KD. Correlatively, P transcript accumulation rate and F/N transcript ratios from recombinant viruses expressing N variants were also found to correlate with the NTAIL to XD binding strength. Altogether, our data support a key role for XD binding to NTAIL in maintaining proper anchor of the P/L complex thereby ensuring transcription re-initiation at each intergenic region.

  7. Chromium histidinate protects against heat stress by modulating the expression of hepatic nuclear transcription factors in quail.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orhan, C; Akdemir, F; Sahin, N; Tuzcu, M; Komorowski, J R; Hayirli, A; Sahin, K

    2012-01-01

    stress depressed performance variables and augmented lipid peroxidation and supplemental CrHis alleviated oxidative stress through modulating expressions of stress-related hepatic nuclear transcription factors (NF-κB and IκBα).

  8. Spironolactone attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary injury partially via modulating mononuclear phagocyte phenotype switching in circulating and alveolar compartments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen-Jie Ji

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent experimental studies provide evidence indicating that manipulation of the mononuclear phagocyte phenotype could be a feasible approach to alter the severity and persistence of pulmonary injury and fibrosis. Mineralocorticoid receptor (MR has been reported as a target to regulate macrophage polarization. The present work was designed to investigate the therapeutic potential of MR antagonism in bleomycin-induced acute lung injury and fibrosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We first demonstrated the expression of MR in magnetic bead-purified Ly6G-/CD11b+ circulating monocytes and in alveolar macrophages harvested in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF from C57BL/6 mice. Then, a pharmacological intervention study using spironolactone (20 mg/kg/day by oral gavage revealed that MR antagonism led to decreased inflammatory cell infiltration, cytokine production (downregulated monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, transforming growth factor β1, and interleukin-1β at mRNA and protein levels and collagen deposition (decreased lung total hydroxyproline content and collagen positive area by Masson' trichrome staining in bleomycin treated (2.5 mg/kg, via oropharyngeal instillation male C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, serial flow cytometry analysis in blood, BALF and enzymatically digested lung tissue, revealed that spironolactone could partially inhibit bleomycin-induced circulating Ly6C(hi monocyte expansion, and reduce alternative activation (F4/80+CD11c+CD206+ of mononuclear phagocyte in alveoli, whereas the phenotype of interstitial macrophage (F4/80+CD11c- remained unaffected by spironolactone during investigation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The present work provides the experimental evidence that spironolactone could attenuate bleomycin-induced acute pulmonary injury and fibrosis, partially via inhibition of MR-mediated circulating monocyte and alveolar macrophage phenotype switching.

  9. Pulmonary embolus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood clot - lung; Embolus; Tumor embolus; Embolism - pulmonary; DVT-pulmonary embolism; Thrombosis - pulmonary embolism ... area). This type of clot is called a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) . The blood clot breaks off and travels ...

  10. Alternative Splicing Generates a Diacylglycerol Kinase α Transcript That Acts as a Dominant-Negative Modulator of Superoxide Production in Localized Aggressive Periodontitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batista, Eraldo L.; Kantarci, Alpdogan I.; Hasturk, Hatice; Van Dyke, Thomas E.

    2015-01-01

    Background Diacylglycerol (DAG), levels of which are tightly regulated by diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs), is a lipid mediator linked to key biologic functions. Members of the DGK family undergo alternative splicing, generating the protein diversity necessary to control different intracellular DAG pools. DGKα function is altered in polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) of patients with localized aggressive periodontitis (LAgP), suggesting a genetic basis. Here, the authors assess DGKα spliced transcripts in human LAgP neutrophils. Methods In an expression library of a patient with LAgP, PMNs were screened for different DGKα transcripts. Real-time polymerase chain reaction and in vitro expression assays were performed to assess the fate of different transcripts on protein translocation and superoxide production in human leukemia cells (HL-60) and COS-7 cells. Results A DGKα transcript that lacks exon 10 (DGKαΔ10) and generates a premature stop codon and a truncated protein was identified as being upregulated in LAgP neutrophils. In vitro assays revealed that DGKαΔ10 translocation occurred even in the absence of important regulatory motifs. Transfection of HL-60 neutrophil-like cells with the DGKαΔ10 spliced variant induced an increase in the stimulated production of su-peroxide anion replicating the phenotype of LAgP PMNs. Conclusion DGKαΔ10 can act as a dominant-negative transcript that can modulate superoxide production and provides an example of genetic regulation of the inflammatory response that may be relevant to human inflammatory diseases such as LAgP. J Periodontol 2014;85:934-943. PMID:24171497

  11. Hyperosmotic stress regulates the distribution and stability of myocardin-related transcription factor, a key modulator of the cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ly, Donald L.; Waheed, Faiza; Lodyga, Monika;

    2013-01-01

    through the cis-element CArG box. Silencing or pharmacological inhibition of MRTF prevents the osmotic stimulation of CArG-dependent transcription and renders the cells susceptible to osmotic shock-induced structural damage. Interestingly, strong hyperosmolarity promotes proteasomal degradation of MRTF......, concomitant with apoptosis. Thus, MRTF is an osmosensitive and osmoprotective transcription factor, whose intracellular distribution is regulated by the GEF-H1/RhoA/ROK and p38 pathways. However, strong osmotic stress destabilizes MRTF, concomitant with apoptosis, implying that hyperosmotically induced cell...

  12. MicroRNA as type I interferon-regulated transcripts and modulators of the innate immune response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel C Forster

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Type I interferons (IFNs are an important family of cytokines that regulate innate and adaptive immune responses to pathogens, in cancer and inflammatory diseases. While the regulation and role of protein-coding genes involved in these responses are well characterized, the role of non-coding microRNAs in the IFN responses is less developed. We review the emerging picture of microRNA regulation of the IFN response at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. This response forms an important regulatory loop, several microRNAs target transcripts encoding components at many steps of the type I IFN response, both production and action, at the receptor, signaling, transcription factor and regulated gene level. Not only do IFNs regulate positive signaling molecules, but also negative regulators such as SOCS1. In total, 36 microRNA are reported as IFN regulated. Given this apparent multipronged targeting of the IFN response by microRNAs and their well characterized capacity to buffer responses in other situations, the prospects of improved sequencing and microRNA targeting technologies will facilitate the elucidation of the broader regulatory networks of microRNA in this important biological context, and their therapeutic and diagnostic potential.

  13. Transcription of Russian intonation ToRI, an interactive research tool and learning module on the internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odé, C.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a new system for the Transcription of Russian Intonation, ToRI, on the Internet. Section 1 presents a general outline of the system. The terminology used in ToRI is defined in an online glossary, from which Section 2 gives the following examples: pitch accent and

  14. A module of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptional network containing primitive and differentiation markers is related to specific cardiovascular health variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leni Moldovan

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, including rare circulating stem and progenitor cells (CSPCs, have important yet poorly understood roles in the maintenance and repair of blood vessels and perfused organs. Our hypothesis was that the identities and functions of CSPCs in cardiovascular health could be ascertained by analyzing the patterns of their co-expressed markers in unselected PBMC samples. Because gene microarrays had failed to detect many stem cell-associated genes, we performed quantitative real-time PCR to measure the expression of 45 primitive and tissue differentiation markers in PBMCs from healthy and hypertensive human subjects. We compared these expression levels to the subjects' demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, including vascular stiffness. The tested marker genes were expressed in all of samples and organized in hierarchical transcriptional network modules, constructed by a bottom-up approach. An index of gene expression in one of these modules (metagene, defined as the average standardized relative copy numbers of 15 pluripotency and cardiovascular differentiation markers, was negatively correlated (all p<0.03 with age (R2 = -0.23, vascular stiffness (R2 = -0.24, and central aortic pressure (R2 = -0.19 and positively correlated with body mass index (R2 = 0.72, in women. The co-expression of three neovascular markers was validated at the single-cell level using mRNA in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. The overall gene expression in this cardiovascular module was reduced by 72±22% in the patients compared with controls. However, the compactness of both modules was increased in the patients' samples, which was reflected in reduced dispersion of their nodes' degrees of connectivity, suggesting a more primitive character of the patients' CSPCs. In conclusion, our results show that the relationship between CSPCs and vascular function is encoded in modules of the PBMCs transcriptional

  15. Gene Co-Expression Analysis Inferring the Crosstalk of Ethylene and Gibberellin in Modulating the Transcriptional Acclimation of Cassava Root Growth in Different Seasons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Treenut Saithong

    Full Text Available Cassava is a crop of hope for the 21st century. Great advantages of cassava over other crops are not only the capacity of carbohydrates, but it is also an easily grown crop with fast development. As a plant which is highly tolerant to a poor environment, cassava has been believed to own an effective acclimation process, an intelligent mechanism behind its survival and sustainability in a wide range of climates. Herein, we aimed to investigate the transcriptional regulation underlying the adaptive development of a cassava root to different seasonal cultivation climates. Gene co-expression analysis suggests that AP2-EREBP transcription factor (ERF1 orthologue (D142 played a pivotal role in regulating the cellular response to exposing to wet and dry seasons. The ERF shows crosstalk with gibberellin, via ent-Kaurene synthase (D106, in the transcriptional regulatory network that was proposed to modulate the downstream regulatory system through a distinct signaling mechanism. While sulfur assimilation is likely to be a signaling regulation for dry crop growth response, calmodulin-binding protein is responsible for regulation in the wet crop. With our initiative study, we hope that our findings will pave the way towards sustainability of cassava production under various kinds of stress considering the future global climate change.

  16. The human I-mfa domain-containing protein, HIC, interacts with cyclin T1 and modulates P-TEFb-dependent transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Tara M; Wang, Qi; Pe'ery, Tsafi; Mathews, Michael B

    2003-09-01

    Positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) hyperphosphorylates the carboxy-terminal domain of RNA polymerase II, permitting productive transcriptional elongation. The cyclin T1 subunit of P-TEFb engages cellular transcription factors as well as the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) transactivator Tat. To identify potential P-TEFb regulators, we conducted a yeast two-hybrid screen with cyclin T1 as bait. Among the proteins isolated was the human I-mfa domain-containing protein (HIC). HIC has been reported to modulate expression from both cellular and viral promoters via its C-terminal cysteine-rich domain, which is similar to the inhibitor of MyoD family a (I-mfa) protein. We show that HIC binds cyclin T1 in yeast and mammalian cells and that it interacts with intact P-TEFb in mammalian cell extracts. The interaction involves the I-mfa domain of HIC and the regulatory histidine-rich region of cyclin T1. HIC also binds Tat via its I-mfa domain, although the sequence requirements are different. HIC colocalizes with cyclin T1 in nuclear speckle regions and with Tat in the nucleolus. Expression of the HIC cDNA modulates Tat transactivation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) in a cell type-specific fashion. It is mildly inhibitory in CEM cells but stimulates gene expression in HeLa, COS, and NIH 3T3 cells. The isolated I-mfa domain acts as a dominant negative inhibitor. Activation of the HIV-1 LTR by HIC in NIH 3T3 cells occurs at the RNA level and is mediated by direct interactions with P-TEFb.

  17. Linking high-resolution metabolic flux phenotypes and transcriptional regulation in yeast modulated by the global regulator Gcn4p

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moxley, Joel F.; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.

    2009-01-01

    Genome sequencing dramatically increased our ability to understand cellular response to perturbation. Integrating system-wide measurements such as gene expression with networks of protein protein interactions and transcription factor binding revealed critical insights into cellular behavior. Howe...... that an integrated approach focusing on metabolic measurements will facilitate construction of more realistic models of cellular regulation for understanding diseases and constructing strains for industrial applications.......RNA and metabolic flux data that combines information from both interaction network models and flux determination models. We started by quantifying 5,764 mRNAs, 54 metabolites, and 83 experimental C-13-based reaction fluxes in continuous cultures of yeast under stress in the absence or presence of global regulator...... of metabolic flux (i.e., use of different reaction pathways) by transcriptional regulation and metabolite interaction density (i.e., level of pairwise metabolite-protein interactions) as a key biosynthetic control determinant. Furthermore, this model predicted flux rewiring in studies of follow...

  18. Modulation of Sinorhizobium meliloti quorum sensing by Hfq-mediated post-transcriptional regulation of ExpR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Mengsheng; Tang, Ming; Guerich, Lois; Salas-Gonzalez, Isai; Teplitski, Max

    2015-02-01

    In Sinorhizobium meliloti, the timing of quorum sensing (QS)-dependent gene expression is controlled at multiple levels. RNA binding protein Hfq contributes to the regulation of QS signal production, and this regulation is exerted both in the manner that involves the acyl homoserine lactone receptor ExpR, and via expR-independent mechanisms. In the expR+ strain of S. meliloti, deletion of hfq resulted in the hyper-accumulation of QS signals at low population densities, increased diversity of the QS signals in mid-to-late exponential phase and then led to a sharp decrease in QS signal accumulation in stationary phase. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction revealed that the accumulation of expR and sinI (but not sinR) mRNA was increased in the late exponential phase in an hfq-dependent manner. A translational, but not transcriptional, expR-uidA reporter was controlled by hfq, while both transcriptional and translational sinI-uidA reporters were regulated in the hfq-dependent manner. In co-immunoprecipation experiments, expR mRNA was bound to and then released from Hfq, similar to the positive controls (small regulatory RNA SmrC9, SmrC15, SmrC16 and SmrC45). Neither sinI nor sinR transcripts were detected in the pool of RNA heat-released from Hfq-RNA complexes. Therefore, post-transcriptional regulator Hfq controls the production and perception of QS signals, and at higher population densities this control is mediated directly via interactions with expR.

  19. A Novel Peroxisome Proliferator Response Element Modulates Hepatic Low Density Lipoprotein Receptor Gene Transcription in Response to PPARδ Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, Vikram R.; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2016-01-01

    The hepatic expression of LDLR gene is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level by a sterol-regulatory element (SRE) in its proximal promoter region which is the site of action of SRE-binding protein 2 (SREBP2). However whether additional cis-regulatory elements contribute to LDLR transcription has not been fully explored. We investigated the function of a putative PPAR-response element (PPRE) sequence motif located at −768 to −752 bases upstream of the transcription start site of human LDLR gene in response to PPARδ activation. Promoter luciferase reporter analyses showed that treating HepG2 cells with PPARδ agonist L165041 markedly increased the activity of a full-length LDLR promoter construct (pLDLR-1192) without any effects on the shorter promoter reporter pLDLR-234 that contains only the core regulatory elements SRE-1 and SP1 sites. Importantly, mutation of the PPRE sequence greatly attenuated the induction of the full-length LDLR promoter activity by L165041 without affecting rosuvastatin mediated transactivation. Electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays further confirmed the binding of PPARδ to the LDLR-PPRE site. Treating HepG2 cells with L165041 elevated the mRNA and protein expressions of LDLR without affecting the LDLR mRNA decay rate. The induction of LDLR expression by PPARδ agonist was further observed in liver tissue of mice and hamsters treated with L165041. Altogether, our studies identify a novel PPRE-mediated regulatory mechanism for LDLR transcription and suggest that combined treatment of statin with PPARδ agonists may have advantageous effects on LDLR expression. PMID:26443862

  20. A novel peroxisome proliferator response element modulates hepatic low-density lipoprotein receptor gene transcription in response to PPARδ activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shende, Vikram R; Singh, Amar Bahadur; Liu, Jingwen

    2015-12-15

    The hepatic expression of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor (LDLR) gene is regulated primarily at the transcriptional level by a sterol-regulatory element (SRE) in its proximal promoter region which is the site of action of SRE-binding protein 2 (SREBP2). However whether additional cis-regulatory elements contribute to LDLR transcription has not been fully explored. We investigated the function of a putative peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-response element (PPRE) sequence motif located at -768 to -752 bases upstream of the transcription start site of human LDLR gene in response to PPARδ activation. Promoter luciferase reporter analyses showed that treating HepG2 cells with PPARδ agonist L165041 markedly increased the activity of a full-length LDLR promoter construct (pLDLR-1192) without any effects on the shorter promoter reporter pLDLR-234 that contains only the core regulatory elements SRE-1 and SP1 sites. Importantly, mutation of the PPRE sequence greatly attenuated the induction of the full-length LDLR promoter activity by L165041 without affecting rosuvastatin (RSV)-mediated transactivation. EMSA and ChIP assay further confirmed the binding of PPARδ to the LDLR-PPRE site. Treating HepG2 cells with L165041 elevated the mRNA and protein expressions of LDLR without affecting the LDLR mRNA decay rate. The induction of LDLR expression by PPARδ agonist was further observed in liver tissue of mice and hamsters treated with L165041. Altogether, our studies identify a novel PPRE-mediated regulatory mechanism for LDLR transcription and suggest that combined treatment of statin with PPARδ agonists may have advantageous effects on LDLR expression.

  1. Role of fatty acid binding proteins and long chain fatty acids in modulating nuclear receptors and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, Friedhelm; Petrescu, Anca D; Huang, Huan; Atshaves, Barbara P; McIntosh, Avery L; Martin, Gregory G; Hostetler, Heather A; Vespa, Aude; Landrock, Danilo; Landrock, Kerstin K; Payne, H Ross; Kier, Ann B

    2008-01-01

    Abnormal energy regulation may significantly contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular disease, and cancer. For rapid control of energy homeostasis, allosteric and posttranslational events activate or alter activity of key metabolic enzymes. For longer impact, transcriptional regulation is more effective, especially in response to nutrients such as long chain fatty acids (LCFA). Recent advances provide insights into how poorly water-soluble lipid nutrients [LCFA; retinoic acid (RA)] and their metabolites (long chain fatty acyl Coenzyme A, LCFA-CoA) reach nuclei, bind their cognate ligand-activated receptors, and regulate transcription for signaling lipid and glucose catabolism or storage: (i) while serum and cytoplasmic LCFA levels are in the 200 mircroM-mM range, real-time imaging recently revealed that LCFA and LCFA-CoA are also located within nuclei (nM range); (ii) sensitive fluorescence binding assays show that LCFA-activated nuclear receptors [peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-alpha (PPARalpha) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4alpha)] exhibit high affinity (low nM KdS) for LCFA (PPARalpha) and/or LCFA-CoA (PPARalpha, HNF4alpha)-in the same range as nuclear levels of these ligands; (iii) live and fixed cell immunolabeling and imaging revealed that some cytoplasmic lipid binding proteins [liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP), acyl CoA binding protein (ACBP), cellular retinoic acid binding protein-2 (CRABP-2)] enter nuclei, bind nuclear receptors (PPARalpha, HNF4alpha, CRABP-2), and activate transcription of genes in fatty acid and glucose metabolism; and (iv) studies with gene ablated mice provided physiological relevance of LCFA and LCFA-CoA binding proteins in nuclear signaling. This led to the hypothesis that cytoplasmic lipid binding proteins transfer and channel lipidic ligands into nuclei for initiating nuclear receptor transcriptional activity to provide new lipid nutrient signaling pathways that

  2. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan); Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  3. Reverse engineering a mouse embryonic stem cell-specific transcriptional network reveals a new modulator of neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cegli, Rossella; Iacobacci, Simona; Flore, Gemma; Gambardella, Gennaro; Mao, Lei; Cutillo, Luisa; Lauria, Mario; Klose, Joachim; Illingworth, Elizabeth; Banfi, Sandro; di Bernardo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiles can be used to infer previously unknown transcriptional regulatory interaction among thousands of genes, via systems biology 'reverse engineering' approaches. We 'reverse engineered' an embryonic stem (ES)-specific transcriptional network from 171 gene expression profiles, measured in ES cells, to identify master regulators of gene expression ('hubs'). We discovered that E130012A19Rik (E13), highly expressed in mouse ES cells as compared with differentiated cells, was a central 'hub' of the network. We demonstrated that E13 is a protein-coding gene implicated in regulating the commitment towards the different neuronal subtypes and glia cells. The overexpression and knock-down of E13 in ES cell lines, undergoing differentiation into neurons and glia cells, caused a strong up-regulation of the glutamatergic neurons marker Vglut2 and a strong down-regulation of the GABAergic neurons marker GAD65 and of the radial glia marker Blbp. We confirmed E13 expression in the cerebral cortex of adult mice and during development. By immuno-based affinity purification, we characterized protein partners of E13, involved in the Polycomb complex. Our results suggest a role of E13 in regulating the division between glutamatergic projection neurons and GABAergic interneurons and glia cells possibly by epigenetic-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  4. Glutathione Regulates 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Synthase Transcription via WRKY33 and 1-Aminocyclopropane-1-Carboxylate Oxidase by Modulating Messenger RNA Stability to Induce Ethylene Synthesis during Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Riddhi; Kumar, Deepak; Sultana, Asma; Hazra, Saptarshi; Bhattacharyya, Dipto; Chattopadhyay, Sharmila

    2015-12-01

    Glutathione (GSH) plays a fundamental role in plant defense-signaling network. Recently, we have established the involvement of GSH with ethylene (ET) to combat environmental stress. However, the mechanism of GSH-ET interplay still remains unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GSH induces ET biosynthesis by modulating the transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulations of its key enzymes, 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate synthase (ACS) and 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACO). Transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) plants with enhanced GSH content (AtECS) exhibited remarkable up-regulation of ACS2, ACS6, and ACO1 at transcript as well as protein levels, while they were down-regulated in the GSH-depleted phytoalexin deficient2-1 (pad2-1) mutant. We further observed that GSH induced ACS2 and ACS6 transcription in a WRKY33-dependent manner, while ACO1 transcription remained unaffected. On the other hand, the messenger RNA stability for ACO1 was found to be increased by GSH, which explains our above observations. In addition, we also identified the ACO1 protein to be a subject for S-glutathionylation, which is consistent with our in silico data. However, S-glutathionylation of ACS2 and ACS6 proteins was not detected. Further, the AtECS plants exhibited resistance to necrotrophic infection and salt stress, while the pad2-1 mutant was sensitive. Exogenously applied GSH could improve stress tolerance in wild-type plants but not in the ET-signaling mutant ethylene insensitive2-1, indicating that GSH-mediated resistance to these stresses occurs via an ET-mediated pathway. Together, our investigation reveals a dual-level regulation of ET biosynthesis by GSH during stress.

  5. Arabidopsis inositol pentakisphosphate 2-kinase, AtIPK1, is required for growth and modulates phosphate homeostasis at the transcriptional level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Hui-Fen; Chang, Tzu-Yun; Chiang, Su-Fen; Wang, Wei-Di; Charng, Yee-Yung; Chiou, Tzyy-Jen

    2014-11-01

    Inositol hexakisphosphate (IP6 ) provides a phosphorous reservoir in plant seeds; in addition, along with its biosynthesis intermediates and derivatives, IP6 also plays important roles in diverse developmental and physiological processes. Disruption of the Arabidopsis inositol pentakisphosphate 2-kinase coding gene AtIPK1 was previously shown to reduce IP6 content in vegetative tissues and affect phosphate (Pi) sensing. Here we show that AtIPK1 is required for sustaining plant growth, as null mutants are non-viable. An incomplete loss-of-function mutant, atipk1-1, exhibited disturbed Pi homeostasis and overaccumulated Pi as a consequence of increased Pi uptake activity and root-to-shoot Pi translocation. The atipk1-1 mutants also showed a Pi deficiency-like root system architecture with reduced primary root and enhanced lateral root growth. Transcriptome analysis indicated that a subset of Pi starvation-responsive genes was transcriptionally perturbed in the atipk1-1 mutants and the expression of multiple genes involved in Pi uptake, allocation, and remobilization was increased. Genetic and transcriptional analyses suggest that disturbance of Pi homeostasis caused by atipk1 mutation involved components in addition to PHR1(-like) transcription factors. Notably, the transcriptional increase of a number of Pi starvation-responsive genes in the atipk1-1 mutants is correlated with the reduction of histone variant H2A.Z occupation in chromatin. The myo-inositol-1-phosphate synthase mutants, atmips1 and atmips2 with comparable reduction in vegetative IP6 to that in the atipk1-1 mutants did not overaccumulate Pi, suggesting that Pi homeostasis modulated by AtIPK1 is not solely attributable to IP6 level. This study reveals that AtIPK1 has important roles in growth and Pi homeostasis.

  6. Angiotensin II induces apoptosis of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells in acute aortic dissection complicated with lung injury patients through modulating the expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhiyong; Dai, Feifeng; Ren, Wei; Liu, Huagang; Li, Bowen; Chang, Jinxing

    2016-01-01

    Patients with acute aortic dissection (AAD) usually showed acute lung injury (ALI). However, its pathogenesis is still not well defined. Apoptosis of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) is closely related to the alveolus-capillary barrier injury and the increased vascular permeability. In this study, we aim to investigate the human PMVECs (hPMVECs) apoptosis induced by angiotensin II (AngII) and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and their potential interaction in the pathogenesis of AAD complicated with ALI. Fifty-eight newly diagnosed AAD, 12 matched healthy individuals were included. Pulmonary tissues of AAD complicated with lung injury were obtained from 2 cadavers to determine the levels of AngII type 1 receptor (AT1-R) and MCP-1. Serum AngII was measured using commercial ELISA kit. H&E staining and immunohistostaining were performed to determine the expression of AT1-R and MCP-1. For the in vitro experiment, hPMVECs were divided into control, AngII group, AngII+Bindarit group and Bindarit group, respectively. Flow cytometry was performed to analyze the apoptosis in each group. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction was performed to determine the mRNA expression of MCP-1. Western blot analysis was performed to evaluate the expression of MCP-1 and apoptosis related protein. Apoptosis of hPMVECs was observed in the lung tissues in the cadavers with AAD complicated with ALI. Besides, the expression of AT1-R and MCP-1 was remarkably elevated. Compared with normal individuals and the non-lung injury AAD patients, the expression of serum AngII was remarkably elevated in AAD patients complicated with ALI. In vitro experiments showed AngII contributed to the apoptosis and elevation of MCP1 in hPMVECs. Besides, it involved in the down-regulation of Bcl-2 protein, and up-regulation of Bax and Caspase-3. Such phenomenon was completely reversed after administration of MCP-1 inhibitor (Bindarit). The production of MCP-1 and cellular

  7. Histone deacetylase inhibition modulates histone acetylation at gene promoter regions and affects genome-wide gene transcription in Schistosoma mansoni

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Letícia; Gomes, Monete Rajão; daSilva, Lucas Ferreira; Pereira, Adriana da Silva Andrade; Mourão, Marina M.; Romier, Christophe; Pierce, Raymond

    2017-01-01

    Background Schistosomiasis is a parasitic disease infecting hundreds of millions of people worldwide. Treatment depends on a single drug, praziquantel, which kills the Schistosoma spp. parasite only at the adult stage. HDAC inhibitors (HDACi) such as Trichostatin A (TSA) induce parasite mortality in vitro (schistosomula and adult worms), however the downstream effects of histone hyperacetylation on the parasite are not known. Methodology/Principal findings TSA treatment of adult worms in vitro increased histone acetylation at H3K9ac and H3K14ac, which are transcription activation marks, not affecting the unrelated transcription repression mark H3K27me3. We investigated the effect of TSA HDACi on schistosomula gene expression at three different time points, finding a marked genome-wide change in the transcriptome profile. Gene transcription activity was correlated with changes on the chromatin acetylation mark at gene promoter regions. Moreover, combining expression data with ChIP-Seq public data for schistosomula, we found that differentially expressed genes having the H3K4me3 mark at their promoter region in general showed transcription activation upon HDACi treatment, compared with those without the mark, which showed transcription down-regulation. Affected genes are enriched for DNA replication processes, most of them being up-regulated. Twenty out of 22 genes encoding proteins involved in reducing reactive oxygen species accumulation were down-regulated. Dozens of genes encoding proteins with histone reader motifs were changed, including SmEED from the PRC2 complex. We targeted SmEZH2 methyltransferase PRC2 component with a new EZH2 inhibitor (GSK343) and showed a synergistic effect with TSA, significantly increasing schistosomula mortality. Conclusions/Significance Genome-wide gene expression analyses have identified important pathways and cellular functions that were affected and may explain the schistosomicidal effect of TSA HDACi. The change in expression

  8. Transcriptional Response of Human Neurospheres to Helper-Dependent CAV-2 Vectors Involves the Modulation of DNA Damage Response, Microtubule and Centromere Gene Groups.

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    Stefania Piersanti

    Full Text Available Brain gene transfer using viral vectors will likely become a therapeutic option for several disorders. Helper-dependent (HD canine adenovirus type 2 vectors (CAV-2 are well suited for this goal. These vectors are poorly immunogenic, efficiently transduce neurons, are retrogradely transported to afferent structures in the brain and lead to long-term transgene expression. CAV-2 vectors are being exploited to unravel behavior, cognition, neural networks, axonal transport and therapy for orphan diseases. With the goal of better understanding and characterizing HD-CAV-2 for brain therapy, we analyzed the transcriptomic modulation induced by HD-CAV-2 in human differentiated neurospheres derived from midbrain progenitors. This 3D model system mimics several aspects of the dynamic nature of human brain. We found that differentiated neurospheres are readily transduced by HD-CAV-2 and that transduction generates two main transcriptional responses: a DNA damage response and alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes. Future investigations on the biochemistry of processes highlighted by probe modulations will help defining the implication of HD-CAV-2 and CAR receptor binding in enchaining these functional pathways. We suggest here that the modulation of DNA damage genes is related to viral DNA, while the alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes is possibly enchained by the interaction of the HD-CAV-2 fibre with CAR.

  9. A module of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptional network containing primitive and differentiation markers is related to specific cardiovascular health variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldovan, Leni; Anghelina, Mirela; Kantor, Taylor; Jones, Desiree; Ramadan, Enass; Xiang, Yang; Huang, Kun; Kolipaka, Arunark; Malarkey, William; Ghasemzadeh, Nima; Mohler, Peter J; Quyyumi, Arshed; Moldovan, Nicanor I

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), including rare circulating stem and progenitor cells (CSPCs), have important yet poorly understood roles in the maintenance and repair of blood vessels and perfused organs. Our hypothesis was that the identities and functions of CSPCs in cardiovascular health could be ascertained by analyzing the patterns of their co-expressed markers in unselected PBMC samples. Because gene microarrays had failed to detect many stem cell-associated genes, we performed quantitative real-time PCR to measure the expression of 45 primitive and tissue differentiation markers in PBMCs from healthy and hypertensive human subjects. We compared these expression levels to the subjects' demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, including vascular stiffness. The tested marker genes were expressed in all of samples and organized in hierarchical transcriptional network modules, constructed by a bottom-up approach. An index of gene expression in one of these modules (metagene), defined as the average standardized relative copy numbers of 15 pluripotency and cardiovascular differentiation markers, was negatively correlated (all ptranscriptional network. Furthermore, the coordinated gene expression in these modules can be linked to cardiovascular risk factors and subclinical cardiovascular disease; thus, this measure may be useful for their diagnosis and prognosis.

  10. Interactions among Vascular-Tone Modulators Contribute to High Altitude Pulmonary Edema and Augmented Vasoreactivity in Highlanders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Zahara; Mishra, Aastha; Kumar, Rahul; Alam, Perwez; Pandey, Priyanka; Ram, Rekhbala; Thinlas, Tashi; Mohammad, Ghulam; Pasha, M. A. Qadar

    2012-01-01

    Background The interactions among various biomarkers remained unexplored under the stressful environment of high-altitude. Present study evaluated interactions among biomarkers to study susceptibility for high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) in HAPE-patients (HAPE-p) and adaptation in highland natives (HLs); both in comparison to HAPE-free sojourners (HAPE-f). Methodology/Principal Findings All the subjects were recruited at 3500 m. We measured clinical parameters, biochemical levels in plasma and gene expression using RNA from blood; analyzed various correlations between and among the clinical parameters, especially arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and mean arterial pressure (MAP) and biochemical parameters like, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), serotonin (5-HT), 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-isoPGF2α), endothelin-1 (ET-1), plasma renin activity (PRA), plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC), superoxide dismutase (SOD) and nitric oxide (NO) in HAPE-p, HAPE-f and HLs. ADMA, 5-HT, 8-isoPGF2α, ET-1 levels, and PAC were significantly higher (p0.05) lower in HLs than HAPE-f. The expression of respective genes differed in the three groups. In the correlations, SaO2 inversely correlated with ADMA, 5-HT and 8-isoPGF2α and positively with SOD in HAPE-p (p≤0.009). MAP correlated positively with 5-HT and 8-isoPGF2α in HAPE-p and HLs (p≤0.004). A strong positive correlation was observed between ADMA and 5-HT, 5-HT and 8-isoPGF2α (p≤0.001), whereas inverse correlation of SOD with ET-1 in HAPE-p and HLs (p≤0.004), with 5-HT and 8-isoPGF2α in HAPE-p (p = 0.01) and with 5-HT in HLs (p = 0.05). Conclusions/Significance The interactions among these markers confer enhanced vascular activity in HLs and HAPE in sojourners. PMID:22984459

  11. Interactions among vascular-tone modulators contribute to high altitude pulmonary edema and augmented vasoreactivity in highlanders.

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    Zahara Ali

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The interactions among various biomarkers remained unexplored under the stressful environment of high-altitude. Present study evaluated interactions among biomarkers to study susceptibility for high altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE in HAPE-patients (HAPE-p and adaptation in highland natives (HLs; both in comparison to HAPE-free sojourners (HAPE-f. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: All the subjects were recruited at 3500 m. We measured clinical parameters, biochemical levels in plasma and gene expression using RNA from blood; analyzed various correlations between and among the clinical parameters, especially arterial oxygen saturation (SaO(2 and mean arterial pressure (MAP and biochemical parameters like, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA, serotonin (5-HT, 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α (8-isoPGF2α, endothelin-1 (ET-1, plasma renin activity (PRA, plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC, superoxide dismutase (SOD and nitric oxide (NO in HAPE-p, HAPE-f and HLs. ADMA, 5-HT, 8-isoPGF2α, ET-1 levels, and PAC were significantly higher (p0.05 lower in HLs than HAPE-f. The expression of respective genes differed in the three groups. In the correlations, SaO(2 inversely correlated with ADMA, 5-HT and 8-isoPGF2α and positively with SOD in HAPE-p (p≤0.009. MAP correlated positively with 5-HT and 8-isoPGF2α in HAPE-p and HLs (p ≤ 0.004. A strong positive correlation was observed between ADMA and 5-HT, 5-HT and 8-isoPGF2α (p≤0.001, whereas inverse correlation of SOD with ET-1 in HAPE-p and HLs (p ≤ 0.004, with 5-HT and 8-isoPGF2α in HAPE-p (p = 0.01 and with 5-HT in HLs (p = 0.05. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The interactions among these markers confer enhanced vascular activity in HLs and HAPE in sojourners.

  12. PLCz functional haplotypes modulating promoter transcriptional activity are associated with semen quality traits in Chinese Holstein bulls.

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    Qing Pan

    Full Text Available The sperm-specific phospholipase C zeta (PLCz is a candidate sperm-borne oocyte-activating factor that triggers a characteristic series of physiological stimuli via cytoplasmic Ca(2+ oscillations during fertilization. The molecular mechanisms involved in the regulation of PLCz gene expression remain largely unknown. To explore the genetic variations in the 5'-flanking region of the PLCz gene and their common haplotypes in Chinese Holstein bulls, as well as to determine whether these variations affect bovine semen quality traits and transcriptional activity, DNA samples were collected from Chinese Holstein bulls and sequenced for the identification of genetic variants in the 5'-flanking region of PLCz. Two genetic variants were identified, and their haplotypic profiles were constructed. The two novel genetic variations (g. -456 G>A and g. +65 T>C were genotyped in 424 normal Chinese Holstein bulls. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that both loci are in transcription factor binding sites of the core promoter region. The association studies revealed that the two genetic variations and their haplotype combinations significantly affected semen quality traits. Using serially truncated constructs of the bovine PLCz promoters and the luciferase reporter, we found that a 726 bp (-641 nt to +112 nt fragment constitutes the core promoter region. Furthermore, four haplotypes, H1H1 (GTGT, H2H2 (GCGC, H3H3 (ATAT, and H4H4 (ACAC, were significantly associated with semen quality traits and successfully transfected into MLTC-1 cell lines. The luciferase reporter assay showed that the different haplotypes exhibited distinct promoter activities. Maximal promoter activity was demonstrated by the H2H2 haplotypes, as compared with the other haplotypes. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first report on genetic variants and their respective haplotypes in the 5'-flanking region of PLCz gene that can influence the semen quality of Chinese Holstein bulls as

  13. Vitamin C modulates cadmium-induced hepatic antioxidants' gene transcripts and toxicopathic changes in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Yasser S; El-Gazzar, Ahmed M; El-Nahas, Abeer F; Ashry, Khaled M

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the naturally occurring heavy metals having adverse effects, while vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) is an essential micronutrient for fish, which can attenuate tissue damage owing to its chain-breaking antioxidant and free radical scavenger properties. The adult Nile tilapia fish were exposed to Cd at 5 mg/l with and without vitamin C (500 mg/kg diet) for 45 days in addition to negative and positive controls fed with the basal diet and basal diet supplemented with vitamin C, respectively. Hepatic relative mRNA expression of genes involved in antioxidant function, metallothionein (MT), glutathione S-transferase (GST-α1), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx1), was assessed using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Hepatic architecture was also histopathologically examined. Tilapia exposed to Cd exhibited upregulated antioxidants' gene transcript levels, GST-⍺1, GPx1, and MT by 6.10-, 4.60-, and 4.29-fold, respectively. Histopathologically, Cd caused severe hepatic changes of multifocal hepatocellular and pancreatic acinar necrosis, and lytic hepatocytes infiltrated with eosinophilic granular cells. Co-treatment of Cd-exposed fish with vitamin C overexpressed antioxidant enzyme-related genes, GST-⍺1 (16.26-fold) and GPx1 (18.68-fold), and maintained the expression of MT gene close to control (1.07-fold), averting the toxicopathic lesions induced by Cd. These results suggested that vitamin C has the potential to protect Nile tilapia from Cd hepatotoxicity via sustaining hepatic antioxidants' genes transcripts and normal histoarchitecture.

  14. Correlation of the level of full-length CFTR transcript with pulmonary phenotype in patients carrying R117H and 1342-1,-2delAG mutations

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    Hamosh, A.; Cutting, G.R. [Johns Hopkins Univ. School of Medicine, Balitmore, MD (United States); Oates, R.; Amos, J. [Boston Univ. School of Medicine, Boston, MA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The R117H mutation occurs on two chromosome backgrounds, one associated with a 7 thymidine tract (7T-R11H) in the splice-acceptor site of intron 8, the other with a 5 thymidine tract (5T-R117H). We examined exon 9 splicing efficiency in 5 patients of genotype R117H/{delta}F508 and one carrying 1342-1,-2delAG{delta}F508, an obligate exon 9 slice site mutation. Four patients carried R117H on a 7T background -- three adult men with congenital bilateral absence of the vas deferens and one adolescent female with pancreatitis and borderline sweat chloride concentration. The patient with R117H on a 5T background had pancreatic sufficient CF (PS-CF). The 1342-1,-2delAG patient has classic pancreatic insufficient CF (PI-CF). cDNA was synthesized from total RNA extracted from nasal epithlial cells and analyzed for CFTR splicing by 35 cycle PCR using primers in exon 7 and 11. The quantity of full length transcript derived from the R117H or {delta}F508 alleles was assessed by allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization. While 91.4% of transcript from the 5T-R117H allele was full-length, only 42.2% of CFTR transcript from the 5T-R117H allele was full length. Since CBAVD patients have no lung disease and PS-CF patients do, this indicates that the threshold of developing CF lung disease is crossed when the amount of CFTR transcript bearing R117H is reduced by half. Interestingly, 17.1% of transcript derived from the 1342-1,-2delAG allele (or 8.6% of total CFTR transcript) was normal and full length. This suggests that up to 9% of full length wild-type CFTR transcript may be inadequate to escape the lung disease of CF and that a 9 thymidine tract followed by AAC (the result of the AG deletion) can be used as a splice donor with 2-9% efficiency.

  15. Cytoplasmic and nuclear quality control and turnover of single-stranded RNA modulate post-transcriptional gene silencing in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Ana Beatriz; Martínez de Alba, Angel Emilio; Bardou, Florian; Crespi, Martin D.; Vaucheret, Hervé; Maizel, Alexis; Mallory, Allison C.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA quality control (RQC) uses both endonucleolytic and exonucleolytic degradation to eliminate dysfunctional RNAs. In addition, endogenous and exogenous RNAs are degraded through post-transcriptional gene silencing (PTGS), which is triggered by the production of double-stranded (ds)RNAs and proceeds through short-interfering (si)RNA-directed ARGONAUTE-mediated endonucleolytic cleavage. Compromising cytoplasmic or nuclear 5′–3′ exoribonuclease function enhances sense-transgene (S)-PTGS in Arabidopsis, suggesting that these pathways compete for similar RNA substrates. Here, we show that impairing nonsense-mediated decay, deadenylation or exosome activity enhanced S-PTGS, which requires host RNA-dependent RNA polymerase 6 (RDR6/SGS2/SDE1) and SUPPRESSOR OF GENE SILENCING 3 (SGS3) for the transformation of single-stranded RNA into dsRNA to trigger PTGS. However, these RQC mutations had no effect on inverted-repeat–PTGS, which directly produces hairpin dsRNA through transcription. Moreover, we show that these RQC factors are nuclear and cytoplasmic and are found in two RNA degradation foci in the cytoplasm: siRNA-bodies and processing-bodies. We propose a model of single-stranded RNA tug-of-war between RQC and S-PTGS that ensures the correct partitioning of RNA substrates among these RNA degradation pathways. PMID:23482394

  16. Cholesterol supply and SREBPs modulate transcription of the Niemann-Pick C-1 gene in steroidogenic tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gévry, Nicolas; Schoonjans, Kristina; Guay, Fréderic; Murphy, Bruce D

    2008-05-01

    We tested whether sterol-regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs) mediate sterol-regulated transactivation of the Niemann-Pick C-1 (NPC-1) gene. Loading granulosa cells with 22- or 25-hydroxycholesterol decreased NPC-1 mRNA, whereas culturing in cholesterol-depleted medium or inhibition of cholesterol biosynthesis increased NPC-1 promoter activity and NPC-1 mRNA abundance. Cotransfection of SREBP1a, SREBP1c, and SREBP2 and the NPC-1 promoter-luciferase reporter into granulosa cell lines increased the transcriptional activity of porcine, human, and mouse NPC-1 promoters. Deletion analysis of the 5' flanking region of the pig NPC-1 gene demonstrated significant promoter activity between fragments -934 and -636 bp upstream from the transcription initiation site. Sequence analysis revealed three sterol-regulatory elements (SREs) clustered between -558 and -650 bp. Each site, along with E-box sequences, bound recombinant SREBP in electromobility shift assays. Mutation of all three sites attenuated the SREBP induction of promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays revealed that cholesterol depletion enriched the association of both SREBP and acetylated histone H3 with the NPC-1 promoter fragment containing the three SREs. ChIP analysis confirmed that SREBP's association with SRE and the E-box was enriched in cells cultured in cholesterol-depleted medium. We conclude that NPC-1 is sterol-regulated, achieved by SREBP acting via SRE and the E-box sequences.

  17. The Natural Product Resveratrol Inhibits Yeast Cell Separation by Extensively Modulating the Transcriptional Landscape and Reprogramming the Intracellular Metabolome.

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    Zhe Wang

    Full Text Available An increasing number of studies have shown that the promising compound resveratrol treats multiple diseases, such as cancer and aging; however, the resveratrol mode-of-action (MoA remains largely unknown. Here, by virtue of multiple omics approaches, we adopted fission yeast as a model system with the goal of dissecting the common MoA of the anti-proliferative activity of resveratrol. We found that the anti-proliferative activity of resveratrol is mainly due to its unique role of inhibiting the separation of sister cells, similar phenotype with the C2H2 zinc finger transcription factor Ace2 knock-out strain. Microarray analysis shown that resveratrol has extensive impact on the fission yeast transcription levels. Among the changed gene's list, 40% of up-regulated genes are Core Environmental Stress Responses genes, and 57% of the down-regulated genes are periodically expressed. Moreover, resveratrol leverages the metabolome, which unbalances the intracellular pool sizes of several classes of amino acids, nucleosides, sugars and lipids, thus reflecting the remodulated metabolic networks. The complexity of the resveratrol MoA displayed in previous reports and our work demonstrates that multiple omics approaches must be applied together to obtain a complete picture of resveratrol's anti-proliferative function.

  18. The Arabidopsis AP2/ERF Transcription Factor RAP2.11 Modulates Plant Response to Low-Potassium Conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Jung Kim; Daniel Ruzicka; Ryoung Shin; Daniel P.Schachtman

    2012-01-01

    Plants respond to low-nutrient conditions through metabolic and morphology changes that increase their ability to survive and grow.The transcription factor RAP2.11 was identified as a component in the response to low potassium through regulation of the high-affinity K+ uptake transporter AtHAK5 and other components of the lowpotassium signal transduction pathway.RAP2.11 was identified through the activation tagging of Arabidopsis lines that contained a luciferase marker driven by the AtHAK5 promoter that is normally only induced by low potassium.This factor bound to a GCC-box of the AtHAK5 promoter in vitro and in vivo.Transcript profiling revealed that a large number of genes were up-regulated in roots by RAP2.11 overexpression.Many regulated genes were identified to be in functional categories that are important in low-K+ signaling.These categories included ethylene signaling,reactive oxygen species production,and calcium signaling.Promoter regions of the up-regulated genes were enriched in the GCCGGC motif also contained in the AtHAK5 promoter.These results suggest that RAP2.11 regulates AtHAK5 expression under low-K+ conditions and also contributes to a coordinated response to low-potassium conditions through the regulation of other genes in the low-K+ signaling cascade.

  19. Transcriptional regulation of 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase (NCED) gene by putrescine accumulation positively modulates ABA synthesis and drought tolerance in Lotus tenuis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espasandin, Fabiana D; Maiale, Santiago J; Calzadilla, Pablo; Ruiz, Oscar A; Sansberro, Pedro A

    2014-03-01

    The accumulation of putrescine (Put) and increased arginine decarboxylase (ADC, EC 4.1.1.19) activity levels in response to osmotic stress has been reported; however, the biological meaning of this increase remains unclear. To obtain new insights into these questions, we studied the drought response of a transgenic Lotus tenuis line that expresses the oat ADC gene, which is driven by the stress-inducible pRD29A promoter. This line contains high levels of Put with no changes in spermidine and spermine contents, even under water deficits. Our results indicate that the biochemical and morphological responses to dehydration correlate with the Put level and provide evidence that Put controls the ABA content in response to drought by modulating ABA biosynthesis at the transcriptional level.

  20. Conjugated bilirubin affects cytokine profiles in hepatitis A virus infection by modulating function of signal transducer and activator of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-García, Flor P; Corral-Jara, Karla F; Escobedo-Melendez, Griselda; Sandoval-Hernandez, Monserrat A; Rosenstein, Yvonne; Roman, Sonia; Panduro, Arturo; Fierro, Nora A

    2014-12-01

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) infection is the major cause of acute liver failure in paediatric patients. The clinical spectrum of infection is variable, and liver injury is determined by altered hepatic enzyme function and bilirubin concentration. We recently reported differences in cytokine profiles between distinct HAV-induced clinical courses, and bilirubin has been recognized as a potential immune-modulator. However, how bilirubin may affect cytokine profiles underlying the variability in the course of infection has not been determined. Herein, we used a transcription factor (TF) binding site identification approach to retrospectively analyse cytokine expression in HAV-infected children and to predict the entire set of TFs associated with the expression of specific cytokine profiles. The results suggested that modulation of the activity of signal transducers and activators of transcription proteins (STATs) may play a central role during HAV infection. This led us to compare the degree of STAT phosphorylation in peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBLCs) from paediatric patients with distinct levels of conjugated bilirubin (CB). Low CB levels in sera were associated with increased STAT-1 and STAT-5 phosphorylation. A positive correlation was observed between the serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) content and CB values, whereas higher levels of CB correlated with reduced serum IL-8 values and with a reduction in the proportion of PBLCs positive for STAT-5 phosphorylation. When CB was used to stimulate patients' PBLCs in vitro, the levels of IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor-α were increased. The data showed that bilirubin plays a role in STAT function and affects cytokine profile expression during HAV infection.

  1. Temperature stress differentially modulates transcription in meiotic anthers of heat-tolerant and heat-sensitive tomato plants

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    Pezzotti Mario

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Fluctuations in temperature occur naturally during plant growth and reproduction. However, in the hot summers this variation may become stressful and damaging for the molecular mechanisms involved in proper cell growth, impairing thus plant development and particularly fruit-set in many crop plants. Tolerance to such a stress can be achieved by constitutive gene expression or by rapid changes in gene expression, which ultimately leads to protection against thermal damage. We have used cDNA-AFLP and microarray analyses to compare the early response of the tomato meiotic anther transcriptome to moderate heat stress conditions (32°C in a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype. In the light of the expected global temperature increases, elucidating such protective mechanisms and identifying candidate tolerance genes can be used to improve breeding strategies for crop tolerance to heat stress. Results The cDNA-AFLP analysis shows that 30 h of moderate heat stress (MHS alter the expression of approximately 1% of the studied transcript-derived fragments in a heat-sensitive genotype. The major effect is gene down-regulation after the first 2 h of stress. The microarray analysis subsequently applied to elucidate early responses of a heat-tolerant and a heat-sensitive tomato genotype, also shows about 1% of the genes having significant changes in expression after the 2 h of stress. The tolerant genotype not only reacts with moderate transcriptomic changes but also exhibits constitutively higher expression levels of genes involved in protection and thermotolerance. Conclusion In contrast to the heat-sensitive genotype, the heat-tolerant genotype exhibits moderate transcriptional changes under moderate heat stress. Moreover, the heat-tolerant genotype also shows a different constitutive gene expression profile compared to the heat-sensitive genotype, indicating genetic differences in adaptation to increased temperatures. In

  2. Dietary flavanols modulate the transcription of genes associated with cardiovascular pathology without changes in their DNA methylation state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Milenkovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In a recent intervention study, the daily supplementation with 200 mg monomeric and oligomeric flavanols (MOF from grape seeds for 8 weeks revealed a vascular health benefit in male smokers. The objective of the present study was to determine the impact of MOF consumption on the gene expression profile of leukocytes and to assess changes in DNA methylation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene expression profiles were determined using whole genome microarrays (Agilent and DNA methylation was assessed using HumanMethylation450 BeadChips (Illumina. MOF significantly modulated the expression of 864 genes. The majority of the affected genes are involved in chemotaxis, cell adhesion, cell infiltration or cytoskeleton organisation, suggesting lower immune cell adhesion to endothelial cells. This was corroborated by in vitro experiments showing that MOF exposure of monocytes attenuates their adhesion to TNF-α-stimulated endothelial cells. Nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB reporter gene assays confirmed that MOF decrease the activity of NF-κB. Strong inter-individual variability in the leukocytes' DNA methylation was observed. As a consequence, on group level, changes due to MOF supplementation could not be found. CONCLUSION: Our study revealed that an 8 week daily supplementation with 200 mg MOF modulates the expression of genes associated with cardiovascular disease pathways without major changes of their DNA methylation state. However, strong inter-individual variation in leukocyte DNA methylation may obscure the subtle epigenetic response to dietary flavanols. Despite the lack of significant changes in DNA methylation, the modulation of gene expression appears to contribute to the observed vascular health effect of MOF in humans.

  3. Apigenin Ameliorates Dyslipidemia, Hepatic Steatosis and Insulin Resistance by Modulating Metabolic and Transcriptional Profiles in the Liver of High-Fat Diet-Induced Obese Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Un Ju; Cho, Yun-Young; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2016-05-19

    Several in vitro and in vivo studies have reported the anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic and anti-obesity effects of the flavonoid apigenin. However, the long-term supplementary effects of low-dose apigenin on obesity are unclear. Therefore, we investigated the protective effects of apigenin against obesity and related metabolic disturbances by exploring the metabolic and transcriptional responses in high-fat diet (HFD)-induced obese mice. C57BL/6J mice were fed an HFD or apigenin (0.005%, w/w)-supplemented HFD for 16 weeks. In HFD-fed mice, apigenin lowered plasma levels of free fatty acid, total cholesterol, apolipoprotein B and hepatic dysfunction markers and ameliorated hepatic steatosis and hepatomegaly, without altering food intake and adiposity. These effects were partly attributed to upregulated expression of genes regulating fatty acid oxidation, tricarboxylic acid cycle, oxidative phosphorylation, electron transport chain and cholesterol homeostasis, downregulated expression of lipolytic and lipogenic genes and decreased activities of enzymes responsible for triglyceride and cholesterol ester synthesis in the liver. Moreover, apigenin lowered plasma levels of pro-inflammatory mediators and fasting blood glucose. The anti-hyperglycemic effect of apigenin appeared to be related to decreased insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia and hepatic gluconeogenic enzymes activities. Thus, apigenin can ameliorate HFD-induced comorbidities via metabolic and transcriptional modulations in the liver.

  4. Genome-wide Expression Analysis and Metabolite Profiling Elucidate Transcriptional Regulation of Flavonoid Biosynthesis and Modulation under Abiotic Stresses in Banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ashutosh; Alok, Anshu; Lakhwani, Deepika; Singh, Jagdeep; Asif, Mehar H; Trivedi, Prabodh K

    2016-08-19

    Flavonoid biosynthesis is largely regulated at the transcriptional level due to the modulated expression of genes related to the phenylpropanoid pathway in plants. Although accumulation of different flavonoids has been reported in banana, a staple fruit crop, no detailed information is available on regulation of the biosynthesis in this important plant. We carried out genome-wide analysis of banana (Musa acuminata, AAA genome) and identified 28 genes belonging to 9 gene families associated with flavonoid biosynthesis. Expression analysis suggested spatial and temporal regulation of the identified genes in different tissues of banana. Analysis revealed enhanced expression of genes related to flavonol and proanthocyanidin (PA) biosynthesis in peel and pulp at the early developmental stages of fruit. Genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis were highly expressed during banana fruit ripening. In general, higher accumulation of metabolites was observed in the peel as compared to pulp tissue. A correlation between expression of genes and metabolite content was observed at the early stage of fruit development. Furthermore, this study also suggests regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis, at transcriptional level, under light and dark exposures as well as methyl jasmonate (MJ) treatment in banana.

  5. Dietary Oil Source and Selenium Supplementation Modulate Fads2 and Elovl5 Transcriptional Levels in Liver and Brain of Meagre (Argyrosomus regius).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva-Brito, Francisca; Magnoni, Leonardo J; Fonseca, Sthelio Braga; Peixoto, Maria João; Castro, L Filipe C; Cunha, Isabel; de Almeida Ozório, Rodrigo Otávio; Magalhães, Fernando Antunes; Gonçalves, José Fernando Magalhães

    2016-06-01

    The meagre (Argyrosomus regius) is taking on increasing importance in the aquaculture industry. In view of the limited supply of fish oil (FO) as a feed ingredient, the study of the capacity to biosynthesize long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-PUFA) from alternative dietary oil sources is important. We analyzed changes in fatty acid (FA) desaturase 2 (fads2) and FA elongase 5 (elovl5) mRNA levels in livers and brains in response to FO replacement with a blend of vegetable oils (VO) and selenium (Se) supplementation. Fish were fed for 60 days with either a diet containing FO or a diet including VO, each supplemented or not with organic Se. Results showed that fads2 and elovl5 transcription was higher in liver when fish were fed VO diets. The brain mRNA levels of both genes were not affected by the dietary replacement of FO by VO. FA composition in the liver and skeletal muscle was altered by FO replacement, particularly by decreasing eicosapentaenoic acid and docosahexaenoic acid contents. The α-linolenic, linoleic, and arachidonic acid contents increased in both liver and brain of fish fed VO diets. The effect of Se supplementation on lipid metabolism was evident only in fish fed FO, showing a decrease in the transcription of hepatic fads2. Results indicate that the total replacement of FO by VO in diets modulates the expression of genes involved in LC-PUFA biosynthesis in meagre, affecting the FA profile of the fish flesh.

  6. Genome-wide Expression Analysis and Metabolite Profiling Elucidate Transcriptional Regulation of Flavonoid Biosynthesis and Modulation under Abiotic Stresses in Banana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ashutosh; Alok, Anshu; Lakhwani, Deepika; Singh, Jagdeep; Asif, Mehar H.; Trivedi, Prabodh K.

    2016-01-01

    Flavonoid biosynthesis is largely regulated at the transcriptional level due to the modulated expression of genes related to the phenylpropanoid pathway in plants. Although accumulation of different flavonoids has been reported in banana, a staple fruit crop, no detailed information is available on regulation of the biosynthesis in this important plant. We carried out genome-wide analysis of banana (Musa acuminata, AAA genome) and identified 28 genes belonging to 9 gene families associated with flavonoid biosynthesis. Expression analysis suggested spatial and temporal regulation of the identified genes in different tissues of banana. Analysis revealed enhanced expression of genes related to flavonol and proanthocyanidin (PA) biosynthesis in peel and pulp at the early developmental stages of fruit. Genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis were highly expressed during banana fruit ripening. In general, higher accumulation of metabolites was observed in the peel as compared to pulp tissue. A correlation between expression of genes and metabolite content was observed at the early stage of fruit development. Furthermore, this study also suggests regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis, at transcriptional level, under light and dark exposures as well as methyl jasmonate (MJ) treatment in banana. PMID:27539368

  7. NECK LEAF 1, a GATA type transcription factor, modulates organogenesis by regulating the expression of multiple regulatory genes during reproductive development in rice

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liping Wang; Hengfu Yin; Qian Qian; Jun Yang; Chaofeng Huang; Xiaohe Hu; Da Luo

    2009-01-01

    In the monocot rice species Oryza sativa L., one of the most striking morphological processes during reproductive development is the concurrence of panicle development with the sequential elongation of upper internodes (UPIs). To elucidate the underlying molecular mechanisms, we cloned the rice gene NECK LEAF 1 (NL1), which when mutated results in delays in flowering time, smaller panicles with overgrown bracts and abnormal UPI elongation patterns. The NL1 gene encodes a GATA-type transcription factor with a single zinc finger domain, and its transcripts are de-tected predominantly in the bract primordia, which normally degenerate in the wild-type plants. Overexpression of NL1 in transgenic plants often gives rise to severe growth retardation, less vegetative phytomers and smaller leaves, suggesting that NL1 plays an important role in organ differentiation. A novel mutant allele of PLASTOCHRON1 (PLA1), a gene known to play a key role in regulating leaf initiation, was identified in this study. Genetic analysis demonstrated an interaction between nll and plal, with NL1 acting upstream of PLA1. The expression level and spatial pattern of PLA1 were found to be altered in the nll mutant. Furthermore, the expression of two regulators of flowering, Hd3a and OsMADS1, was also affected in the nll mutant. On the basis of these findings, we propose that NL1 is an intrinsic factor that modulates and coordinates organogenesis through regulating the expression of PLA1 and other regulatory genes during reproductive development in rice.

  8. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 modulates the transcriptional activity of the mineralocorticoid receptor and regulates expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kino, Tomoshige; Jaffe, Howard; Amin, Niranjana D; Chakrabarti, Mayukh; Zheng, Ya-Li; Chrousos, George P; Pant, Harish C

    2010-05-01

    Glucocorticoids, major end effectors of the stress response, play an essential role in the homeostasis of the central nervous system (CNS) and contribute to memory consolidation and emotional control through their intracellular receptors, the glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors. Cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (CDK5), on the other hand, plays important roles in the morphogenesis and functions of the central nervous system, and its aberrant activation has been associated with development of neurodegenerative disorders. We previously reported that CDK5 phosphorylated the glucocorticoid receptor and modulated its transcriptional activity. Here we found that CDK5 also regulated mineralocorticoid receptor-induced transcriptional activity by phosphorylating multiple serine and threonine residues located in its N-terminal domain through physical interaction. Aldosterone and dexamethasone, respectively, increased and suppressed mRNA/protein expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in rat cortical neuronal cells, whereas the endogenous glucocorticoid corticosterone showed a biphasic effect. CDK5 enhanced the effect of aldosterone and dexamethasone on BDNF expression. Because this neurotrophic factor plays critical roles in neuronal viability, synaptic plasticity, consolidation of memory, and emotional changes, we suggest that aberrant activation of CDK5 might influence these functions through corticosteroid receptors/BDNF.

  9. [Inhibition of histone deacetylases in the chick brain modulates expression of c-Fos and ZENK transcription factors and facilitates establishment of long-term memory].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toropova, K A; Anokhin, K V; Tiunova, A A

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the work was to examine the role of histone acetylation in memory consolidation in newborn chicks. We studied the effects of histone deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) on a "weak" memory for passive avoidance and on expression of two transcription factors c-Fos and ZENK known to play a role in neuronal plasticity in the chick brain. Intraventricular administration of trichostatin A prior to training produced a dose-dependent enhancement of memory when tested 24 hours after the training. It also increased neuronal expression of c-Fos and ZENK proteins: the density of ZENK immunopositive cells increased in the hippocampus and intermediate medial mesopallium and the density of c-Fos immunopositive cells increased in intermediate arcopallium and dorsocaudal nidopallium. Weak passive avoidance training did not produce further enhancement of c-Fos and ZENK expression in any of these brain areas. These data demonstrate possibility of facilitating long-term memory in day-old chicks by a histone deacetylases inhibitor, thus supporting the hypothesis on the role of histone acetylation in long-term memory formation. They also suggest that these effects might be mediated through modulation of transcriptional response in brain areas involved in consolidation of this form of memory.

  10. PARP1 promotes gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by modulating the RNA-binding protein HuR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Yueshuang; Han, Yanlong; Guo, Xiaolan; Wen, Jitao; Wang, Ke; Jiang, Xue; Tian, Xue; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan; Zeng, Xianlu

    2017-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) is mainly catalysed by poly-ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1), whose role in gene transcription modulation has been well established. Here we show that, in response to LPS exposure, PARP1 interacts with the adenylateuridylate-rich element-binding protein embryonic lethal abnormal vision-like 1 (Elavl1)/human antigen R (HuR), resulting in its PARylation, primarily at site D226. PARP inhibition and the D226 mutation impair HuR's PARylation, nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and mRNA binding. Increases in mRNA level or stability of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines are abolished by PARP1 ablation or inhibition, or blocked in D226A HuR-expressing cells. The present study demonstrates a mechanism to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, and suggests that blocking the interaction of PARP1 with HuR could be a strategy to treat inflammation-related diseases that involve increased mRNA stability. PMID:28272405

  11. SEUSS Integrates Gibberellin Signaling with Transcriptional Inputs from the SHR-SCR-SCL3 Module to Regulate Middle Cortex Formation in the Arabidopsis Root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xue; Flores-Vergara, Miguel A; Hong, Jing Han; Chu, Huangwei; Lim, Jun; Franks, Robert G; Liu, Zhongchi; Xu, Jian

    2016-03-01

    A decade of studies on middle cortex (MC) formation in the root endodermis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) have revealed a complex regulatory network that is orchestrated by several GRAS family transcription factors, including SHORT-ROOT (SHR), SCARECROW (SCR), and SCARECROW-LIKE3 (SCL3). However, how their functions are regulated remains obscure. Here we show that mutations in the SEUSS (SEU) gene led to a higher frequency of MC formation. seu mutants had strongly reduced expression of SHR, SCR, and SCL3, suggesting that SEU positively regulates these genes. Our results further indicate that SEU physically associates with upstream regulatory sequences of SHR, SCR, and SCL3; and that SEU has distinct genetic interactions with these genes in the control of MC formation, with SCL3 being epistatic to SEU. Similar to SCL3, SEU was repressed by the phytohormone GA and induced by the GA biosynthesis inhibitor paclobutrazol, suggesting that SEU acts downstream of GA signaling to regulate MC formation. Consistently, we found that SEU mediates the regulation of SCL3 by GA signaling. Together, our study identifies SEU as a new critical player that integrates GA signaling with transcriptional inputs from the SHR-SCR-SCL3 module to regulate MC formation in the Arabidopsis root.

  12. Structural basis for phosphorylated autoinducer-2 modulation of the oligomerization state of the global transcription regulator LsrR from Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Minhao; Tao, Yue; Liu, Xiaotian; Zang, Jianye

    2013-05-31

    Quorum-sensing systems are widely used by bacteria to control behavior in response to fluctuations in cell density. Several small diffusible molecules called autoinducers act as signaling molecules in quorum-sensing processes through interplay with sensors. Autoinducers modulate vital physiological functions such as nutrient acquisition, gene transcription, and virulence factor production. In Escherichia coli, LsrR serves as a global transcription regulator that responds to autoinducer-2 to regulate the expression of a variety of genes, including the lsr operon and the lsrR gene. Here, we report the crystal structure of full-length LsrR from E. coli, which has an N-terminal DNA-binding domain and a C-terminal ligand-binding domain connected by a β-strand. Although only two molecules are found in one asymmetric unit, two neighboring dimers pack to form a tetramer that is consistent with the oligomerization state of LsrR in solution. Mutagenesis experiments and gel shift assays indicated that Gln-33 and Tyr-26 might be involved in interactions between LsrR and DNA. The LsrR-binding site for phosphorylated autoinducer-2 was predicted by structural comparisons of LsrR with CggR and SorC. Cross-linking, size exclusion chromatography, and gel shift assays determined that phosphorylated autoinducer-2 triggered the disassembly of the LsrR tetramer into dimers and reduced the DNA binding ability of LsrR. Our findings reveal a mechanism for the change in the oligomerization state of LsrR in the presence of phosphorylated autoinducer-2. Based on these observations, we propose that phosphorylated autoinducer-2 triggers the disassembly of the LsrR tetramer to activate the transcription of its target genes.

  13. Changes in the Expression of Transcription Factors Involved in Modulating the Expression of EPO-R in Activated Human CD4-Positive Lymphocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisowska, Katarzyna A; Frackowiak, Joanna E; Mikosik, Anna; Witkowski, Jacek M

    2013-01-01

    We have recently described the presence of the erythropoietin receptor (EPO-R) on CD4(+) lymphocytes and demonstrated that its expression increases during their activation, reaching a level reported to be typical for erythroid progenitors. This observation suggests that EPO-R expression is modulated during lymphocyte activation, which may be important for the cells' function. Here we investigated whether the expression of GATA1, GATA3 and Sp1 transcription factors is correlated with the expression of EPO-R in human CD4(+) lymphocytes stimulated with monoclonal anti-CD3 antibody. The expression of GATA1, GATA3 and Sp1 transcription factors in CD4(+) cells was estimated before and after stimulation with anti-CD3 antibody by Western Blot and flow cytometry. The expression of EPO-R was measured using real-time PCR and flow cytometry. There was no change in the expression of GATA1 and GATA3 in CD4(+) lymphocytes after stimulation with anti-CD3 antibody. However, stimulation resulted in the significantly increased expression of the Sp1 factor. CD4(+) lymphocytes stimulated with anti-CD3 antibody exhibited an increase in both the expression level of EPOR gene and the number of EPO-R molecules on the cells' surface, the latter being significantly correlated with the increased expression of Sp1. Sp1 is noted to be the single transcription factor among the ones studied whose level changes as a result of CD4(+) lymphocyte stimulation. It seems that Sp1 may significantly affect the number of EPO-R molecules present on the surface of activated CD4(+) lymphocytes.

  14. Quantitative proteomics unravels that the post-transcriptional regulator Crc modulates the generation of vesicles and secreted virulence determinants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reales-Calderón, Jose Antonio; Corona, Fernando; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha; Martínez, Jose Luis

    2015-01-01

    Crc is a post-transcriptional regulator in Pseudomonas aeruginosa that modulates its metabolism, but also its susceptibility to antibiotics and virulence. Most of P. aeruginosa virulence factors are secreted or engulfed in vesicles. A Crc deficient mutant was created and the extracellular vesicles associated exoproteome and the vesicle-free secretome was quantified using iTRAQ. Fifty vesicles-associated proteins were more abundant and 14 less abundant in the Crc-defective strain, whereas 37 were more abundant and 17 less abundant in the vesicle-free secretome. Different virulence determinants, such as ToxA, protease IV, azurin, chitin-binding protein, PlcB and Hcp1, were less abundant in the Crc-defective mutant. We also observed that the crc mutant presented an impaired vesicle-associated secretion of quorum sensing signal molecules and less cytotoxicity than its wild-type strain, in agreement with the low secretion of proteins related to virulence. Our results offer new insights into the mechanisms by which Crc regulates P. aeruginosa virulence, through the modulation of vesicle formation and secretion of both virulence determinants and quorum sensing signals. PMID:26306318

  15. Respiratory syncytial virus-like nanoparticle vaccination induces long-term protection without pulmonary disease by modulating cytokines and T-cells partially through alveolar macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee YT

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Young-Tae Lee,1,* Eun-Ju Ko,1,2,* Hye Suk Hwang,1,2 Jong Seok Lee,1,3 Ki-Hye Kim,1 Young-Man Kwon,1 Sang-Moo Kang1,2 1Center for Inflammation, Immunity and Infection, Institute for Biomedical Sciences, 2Department of Biology, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA, USA; 3National Institute of Biological Resources, Incheon, South Korea *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: The mechanisms of protection against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV are poorly understood. Virus-like nanoparticles expressing RSV glycoproteins (eg, a combination of fusion and glycoprotein virus-like nanoparticles [FG VLPs] have been suggested to be a promising RSV vaccine candidate. To understand the roles of alveolar macrophages (AMs in inducing long-term protection, mice that were 12 months earlier vaccinated with formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV or FG VLPs were treated with clodronate liposome prior to RSV infection. FI-RSV immune mice with clodronate liposome treatment showed increases in eosinophils, plasmacytoid dendritic cells, interleukin (IL-4+ T-cell infiltration, proinflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and, in particular, mucus production upon RSV infection. In contrast to FI-RSV immune mice with severe pulmonary histopathology, FG VLP immune mice showed no overt sign of histopathology and significantly lower levels of eosinophils, T-cell infiltration, and inflammatory cytokines, but higher levels of interferon-γ, which are correlated with protection against RSV disease. FG VLP immune mice with depletion of AMs showed increases in inflammatory cytokines and chemokines, as well as eosinophils. The results in this study suggest that FG nanoparticle vaccination induces long-term protection against RSV and that AMs play a role in the RSV protection by modulating eosinophilia, mucus production, inflammatory cytokines, and T-cell infiltration. Keywords: alveolar macrophage, nanoparticle vaccine, VLP, FI-RSV, RSV disease

  16. Dry powders based on PLGA nanoparticles for pulmonary delivery of antibiotics: modulation of encapsulation efficiency, release rate and lung deposition pattern by hydrophilic polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungaro, Francesca; d'Angelo, Ivana; Coletta, Ciro; d'Emmanuele di Villa Bianca, Roberta; Sorrentino, Raffaella; Perfetto, Brunella; Tufano, Maria Antonietta; Miro, Agnese; La Rotonda, Maria Immacolata; Quaglia, Fabiana

    2012-01-10

    Although few experimental studies have been handled so far to exploit the potential of poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles (NPs) in the production of dry powders for antibiotic inhalation, there has been no comprehensive study on the role played by NP composition. In this work, we try to shed light on this aspect by designing and developing a pulmonary delivery system for antibiotics, such as tobramycin (Tb), based on PLGA NPs embedded in an inert microcarrier made of lactose, referred to as nano-embedded micro-particles (NEM). At nanosize level, helper hydrophilic polymers were used to impart the desired surface, bulk and release properties to PLGA NPs prepared by a modified emulsion-solvent diffusion technique. Results showed that poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) and chitosan (CS) are essential to optimise the size and modulate the surface properties of Tb-loaded PLGA NPs, whereas the use of alginate (Alg) allows efficient Tb entrapment within NPs and its release up to one month. Optimized formulations display good in vitro antimicrobial activity against P. aeruginosa planktonic cells. Furthermore, spray-drying of the NPs with lactose yielded NEM with peculiar but promising flow and aerosolization properties, while preserving the peculiar NP features. Nonetheless, in vivo biodistribution studies showed that PVA-modified Alg/PLGA NPs reached the deep lung, while CS-modified NPs were found in great amounts in the upper airways, lining lung epithelial surfaces. In conclusion, PLGA NP composition appears to play a crucial role in determining not only the technological features of NPs but, once processed in the form of NEM, also their in vitro/in vivo deposition pattern.

  17. Roles of reactive oxygen species and heme oxygenase-1 in modulation of alveolar macrophage-mediated pulmonary immune responses to Listeria monocytogenes by diesel exhaust particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xuejun J; Ma, Jane Y C; Antonini, James M; Castranova, Vincent; Ma, Joseph K H

    2004-11-01

    Diesel exhaust particles (DEP) have been shown to suppress alveolar macrophage (AM)-mediated pulmonary immune responses to Listeria monocytogenes in vivo. In this study, effects of DEP-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) and heme oxygenase (HO)-1 on AM-mediated immune responses to L. monocytogenes were investigated. Brown Norway rats were intratracheally inoculated with 100,000 L. monocytogenes, and AM were isolated at 7 days post-infection. Exposure to DEP or their organic extract (eDEP), but not the washed DEP (wDEP) or carbon black, increased intracellular ROS and HO-1 expression in AM. Induction of ROS and HO-1 by eDEP was partially reversed by alpha-naphthoflavone, a cytochrome P450 1A1 inhibitor, and totally blocked by N-acetylcysteine. In addition, exposure to eDEP, but not wDEP, inhibited lipopolysacchride-stimulated secretion of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-12 (IL-12), but augmented production of IL-10 by AM. Kinetic studies showed that modulation of cytokines by eDEP was preceded by ROS and HO-1 induction. Furthermore, pretreatment of AM with superoxide dismutase (SOD) or zinc protoporphrin IX (Znpp), which attenuated eDEP-induced HO-1 expression/activity, substantially inhibited eDEP effect on IL-10. Finally, direct stimulation with pyrogallol (PYR), a superoxide donor, upregulated HO-1 and IL-10 but decreased secretion of IL-12 in L. monocytogenes-infected AM. These results show that DEP, through eDEP-mediated ROS, induce HO-1 expression and IL-10 production and at the same time inhibit AM production of TNF-alpha and IL-12 to dampen the host immune responses. The results also suggest that HO-1 may play an important role in regulating production of IL-10 by DEP-exposed and L. monocytogenes-infected AM.

  18. Pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... clots in the lung ( pulmonary embolism ) Heart failure Heart valve disease HIV infection Low oxygen levels in the blood for a long time (chronic) Lung disease, such as COPD or pulmonary fibrosis Medicines (for example, certain diet drugs) Obstructive sleep ...

  19. Pulmonary Edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Accessed March 13, 2014. Pinto DS, et al. Pathophysiology of cardiogenic pulmonary edema. http://www.uptodate.com/ ... hvd/. Accessed March 10, 2014. What is pulmonary hypertension? National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. http://www. ...

  20. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This ... blood may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  1. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... shortness of breath and increase your ability to exercise. You may have heard that pulmonary rehabilitation is only for people with COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). We now know that ...

  2. Food Components Modulate Obesity and Energy Metabolism via the Transcriptional Regulation of Lipid-Sensing Nuclear Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and hypertension. Many modern people have a tendency to overeat owing to stress and loosening of self-control. Moreover, energy expenditure varies greatly among individuals. Scientific reduction of obesity is important under these circumstances. Furthermore, recent research on molecular levels has clarified the differentiation of adipocytes, the level of subsequent fat accumulation, and the secretion of the biologically active adipokines by adipocytes. Adipose tissues and obesity have become the most important target for the prevention and treatment of many chronic diseases. We have identified various food-derived compounds modulating nuclear receptors, especially peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor(PPAR), in the regulation of energy metabolism and obesity. In this review, we discuss the PPARs that are most important in obesity and energy metabolism.

  3. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  4. Genomic analysis of host - Peste des petits ruminants vaccine viral transcriptome uncovers transcription factors modulating immune regulatory pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manjunath, Siddappa; Kumar, Gandham Ravi; Mishra, Bishnu Prasad; Mishra, Bina; Sahoo, Aditya Prasad; Joshi, Chaitanya G; Tiwari, Ashok K; Rajak, Kaushal Kishore; Janga, Sarath Chandra

    2015-02-24

    Peste des petits ruminants (PPR), is an acute transboundary viral disease of economic importance, affecting goats and sheep. Mass vaccination programs around the world resulted in the decline of PPR outbreaks. Sungri 96 is a live attenuated vaccine, widely used in Northern India against PPR. This vaccine virus, isolated from goat works efficiently both in sheep and goat. Global gene expression changes under PPR vaccine virus infection are not yet well defined. Therefore, in this study we investigated the host-vaccine virus interactions by infecting the peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from goat with PPRV (Sungri 96 vaccine virus), to quantify the global changes in the transcriptomic signature by RNA-sequencing. Viral genome of Sungri 96 vaccine virus was assembled from the PPRV infected transcriptome confirming the infection and demonstrating the feasibility of building a complete non-host genome from the blood transcriptome. Comparison of infected transcriptome with control transcriptome revealed 985 differentially expressed genes. Functional analysis showed enrichment of immune regulatory pathways under PPRV infection. Key genes involved in immune system regulation, spliceosomal and apoptotic pathways were identified to be dysregulated. Network analysis revealed that the protein - protein interaction network among differentially expressed genes is significantly disrupted in infected state. Several genes encoding TFs that govern immune regulatory pathways were identified to co-regulate the differentially expressed genes. These data provide insights into the host - PPRV vaccine virus interactome for the first time. Our findings suggested dysregulation of immune regulatory pathways and genes encoding Transcription Factors (TFs) that govern these pathways in response to viral infection.

  5. MicroRNA-27b plays a role in pulmonary arterial hypertension by modulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ dependent Hsp90-eNOS signaling and nitric oxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Rui; Bao, Chunrong; Jiang, Lianyong; Liu, Hao; Yang, Yang; Mei, Ju; Ding, Fangbao, E-mail: dbcar126@126.com

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary artery endothelial dysfunction is associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Based on recent studies showing that microRNA (miR)-27b is aberrantly expressed in PAH, we hypothesized that miR-27b may contribute to pulmonary endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling in PAH. The effect of miR-27b on pulmonary endothelial dysfunction and the underlying mechanism were investigated in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) in vitro and in a monocrotaline (MCT)-induced model of PAH in vivo. miR-27b expression was upregulated in MCT-induced PAH and inversely correlated with the levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, and miR-27b inhibition attenuated MCT-induced endothelial dysfunction and remodeling and prevented PAH associated right ventricular hypertrophy and systolic pressure in rats. PPARγ was confirmed as a direct target of miR-27b in HPAECs and shown to mediate the effect of miR-27b on the disruption of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) coupling to Hsp90 and the suppression of NO production associated with the PAH phenotype. We showed that miR-27b plays a role endothelial function and NO release and elucidated a potential mechanism by which miR-27b regulates Hsp90-eNOS and NO signaling by modulating PPARγ expression, providing potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of PAH. - Highlights: • miR-27b plays a role in endothelial function and NO release. • miR-27b inhibition ameliorates MCT-induced endothelial dysfunction and PAH. • miR-27b targets PPARγ in HPAECs. • miR-27b regulates PPARγ dependent Hsp90-eNOS and NO signaling.

  6. High-throughput screening for modulators of ACVR1 transcription: discovery of potential therapeutics for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cappato, Serena; Tonachini, Laura; Giacopelli, Francesca; Tirone, Mario; Galietta, Luis J V; Sormani, Martina; Giovenzana, Anna; Spinelli, Antonello E; Canciani, Barbara; Brunelli, Silvia; Ravazzolo, Roberto; Bocciardi, Renata

    2016-06-01

    The ACVR1 gene encodes a type I receptor of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Activating mutations in ACVR1 are responsible for fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), a rare disease characterized by congenital toe malformation and progressive heterotopic endochondral ossification leading to severe and cumulative disability. Until now, no therapy has been available to prevent soft-tissue swelling (flare-ups) that trigger the ossification process. With the aim of finding a new therapeutic strategy for FOP, we developed a high-throughput screening (HTS) assay to identify inhibitors of ACVR1 gene expression among drugs already approved for the therapy of other diseases. The screening, based on an ACVR1 promoter assay, was followed by an in vitro and in vivo test to validate and characterize candidate molecules. Among compounds that modulate the ACVR1 promoter activity, we selected the one showing the highest inhibitory effect, dipyridamole, a drug that is currently used as a platelet anti-aggregant. The inhibitory effect was detectable on ACVR1 gene expression, on the whole Smad-dependent BMP signaling pathway, and on chondrogenic and osteogenic differentiation processes by in vitro cellular assays. Moreover, dipyridamole reduced the process of heterotopic bone formation in vivo Our drug repositioning strategy has led to the identification of dipyridamole as a possible therapeutic tool for the treatment of FOP. Furthermore, our study has also defined a pipeline of assays that will be useful for the evaluation of other pharmacological inhibitors of heterotopic ossification.

  7. Pulmonary vasculitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lally, Lindsay; Spiera, Robert F

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary vasculitis encompasses inflammation in the pulmonary vasculature with involved vessels varying in caliber from large elastic arteries to capillaries. Small pulmonary capillaries are the vessels most commonly involved in vasculitis affecting the lung. The antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitides, which include granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Wegener granulomatosis), microscopic polyangiitis, and eosinophilic granulomatosis with polyangiitis (formerly Churg-Strauss syndrome), are the small vessel vasculitides in which pulmonary vasculitis is most frequently observed and are the major focus of this review. Vasculitic involvement of the large pulmonary vessels as may occur in Behçet syndrome and Takayasu arteritis is also discussed.

  8. Extent of liver resection modulates the activation of transcription factors and the production of cytokines involved in liver regeneration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the molecular events involved in liver regeneration following subtotal hepatectomy (SH) as previous studies have largely focused on partial hepatectomy (PH).METHODS: Male Wistar rats were subjected to 70% PH or 90% SH, respectively, and sacrificed at different times after surgery. Untreated and sham-operated animals served as controls. Serum and liver samples were obtained to investigate liver function, apoptosis (TUNEL assay) and transcription factors (NF-κB, Stat3; ELISA) or cytokines (HGF, TNF-α, IL-6, TGF-α, TGF-β; quantitative RT-PCR) involved in liver regeneration. RESULTS: Serum levels of ALT and AST in animals with 70% PH differed significantly from sham-operated and control animals. We found that the peak concentration 12 h after surgery returned to control levels 7 d after surgery. LDH was increased only at 12 h after 70% PH compared to sham. Bilirubin showed no differences between the sham and 70% resection. After PH, early NF-κB activation was detected 12 h after surgery (313.21 ± 17.22 ng/mL), while there was no activation after SH (125.22 ± 44.36 ng/mL) compared to controls (111.43 ± 32.68 ng/mL) at this time point. In SH, however, NF-κB activation was delayed until 24 h (475.56 ± 144.29 ng/mL). Star3 activation was similar in both groups. These findings correlated with suppressed and delayed induction of regenerative genes after SH (i.e. TNF-α 24 h postoperatively: 2375 ± 1220 in 70% and 88±31 in 90%; IL-6 12 h postoperatively: 2547 ± 441 in 70% and 173 ± 82 in 90%). TUNEL staining revealed elevated apoptosis rates in SH (0.44% at 24 h; 0.63% at 7 d) compared to PH (0.27% at 24 h; 0.15% at 7 d). CONCLUSION: The molecular events involved in liver regeneration are significantly influenced by the extent of resection as SH leads to suppression and delay of liver regeneration compared to PH, which is associated with delayed activation of NF-κB and suppression of proregenerative cytokines.

  9. Comparative Analysis of mRNA Isoform Expression in Cardiac Hypertrophy and Development Reveals Multiple Post-Transcriptional Regulatory Modules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Ji Yeon; Li, Wencheng; Zheng, Dinghai; Zhai, Peiyong; Zhao, Yun; Matsuda, Takahisa; Vatner, Stephen F.; Sadoshima, Junichi; Tian, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is enlargement of the heart in response to physiological or pathological stimuli, chiefly involving growth of myocytes in size rather than in number. Previous studies have shown that the expression pattern of a group of genes in hypertrophied heart induced by pressure overload resembles that at the embryonic stage of heart development, a phenomenon known as activation of the “fetal gene program”. Here, using a genome-wide approach we systematically defined genes and pathways regulated in short- and long-term cardiac hypertrophy conditions using mice with transverse aortic constriction (TAC), and compared them with those regulated at different stages of embryonic and postnatal development. In addition, exon-level analysis revealed widespread mRNA isoform changes during cardiac hypertrophy resulting from alternative usage of terminal or internal exons, some of which are also developmentally regulated and may be attributable to decreased expression of Fox-1 protein in cardiac hypertrophy. Genes with functions in certain pathways, such as cell adhesion and cell morphology, are more likely to be regulated by alternative splicing. Moreover, we found 3′UTRs of mRNAs were generally shortened through alternative cleavage and polyadenylation in hypertrophy, and microRNA target genes were generally de-repressed, suggesting coordinated mechanisms to increase mRNA stability and protein production during hypertrophy. Taken together, our results comprehensively delineated gene and mRNA isoform regulation events in cardiac hypertrophy and revealed their relations to those in development, and suggested that modulation of mRNA isoform expression plays an importance role in heart remodeling under pressure overload. PMID:21799842

  10. Transcriptional responses to loss or gain of function of the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 (LRRK2) gene uncover biological processes modulated by LRRK2 activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikonova, Elena V.; Xiong, Yulan; Tanis, Keith Q.; Dawson, Valina L.; Vogel, Robert L.; Finney, Eva M.; Stone, David J.; Reynolds, Ian J.; Kern, Jonathan T.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the leucine-rich repeat kinase 2 gene (LRRK2) are the most common genetic cause of Parkinson's disease (PD) and cause both autosomal dominant familial and sporadic PD. Currently, the physiological and pathogenic activities of LRRK2 are poorly understood. To decipher the biological functions of LRRK2, including the genes and pathways modulated by LRRK2 kinase activity in vivo, we assayed genome-wide mRNA expression in the brain and peripheral tissues from LRRK2 knockout (KO) and kinase hyperactive G2019S (G2019S) transgenic mice. Subtle but significant differences in mRNA expression were observed relative to wild-type (WT) controls in the cortex, striatum and kidney of KO animals, but only in the striatum in the G2019S model. In contrast, robust, consistent and highly significant differences were identified by the direct comparison of KO and G2019S profiles in the cortex, striatum, kidney and muscle, indicating opposite effects on mRNA expression by the two models relative to WT. Ribosomal and glycolytic biological functions were consistently and significantly up-regulated in LRRK2 G2019S compared with LRRK2 KO tissues. Genes involved in membrane-bound organelles, oxidative phosphorylation, mRNA processing and the endoplasmic reticulum were down-regulated in LRRK2 G2019S mice compared with KO. We confirmed the expression patterns of 35 LRRK2-regulated genes using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. These findings provide the first description of the transcriptional responses to genetically modified LRRK2 activity and provide preclinical target engagement and/or pharmacodynamic biomarker strategies for LRRK2 and may inform future therapeutic strategies for LRRK2-associated PD. PMID:21972245

  11. AICAR Sustains J1 Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Self-Renewal and Pluripotency by Regulating Transcription Factor and Epigenetic Modulator Expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Shi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Backgroud/Aims: Embryonic stem cells (ES cells have the capacity to propagate indefinitely, maintain pluripotency, and differentiate into any cell type under defined conditions. As a result, they are considered to be the best model system for research into early embryonic development. AICA ribonucleotide (AICAR is an activator of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK that is thought to affect ES cell function, but its role in ES cell fate decision is unclear. Methods: In this study, we performed microarray analysis to investigate AICAR downstream targets and further understand its effect on ES cells. Results: Our microarray data demonstrated that AICAR can significantly up-regulate pluripotency-associated genes and down-regulate differentiation-associated transcription factors. Although AICAR cannot maintain ES cell identity without LIF, it can antagonize the action of RA-induced differentiation. Using those differentially expressed genes identified, we performed gene ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analysis with the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery (DAVID online system. AICAR was not only shown to influence the AMPK pathway, but also act on other signaling pathways such as BMP, MAPK and TGF-β, to maintain the stemness of J1 ES cells. Furthermore, AICAR modulated ES cell epigenetic modification by altering the expression of epigenetic-associated proteins, including Dnmt3a, Dnmt3b, Smarca2, Mbd3, and Arid1a, or through regulating the transcription of long intervening non-coding RNA (lincRNA. Conclusion: Taken together, our work suggests that AICAR is capable of maintaining ES cell self-renewal and pluripotency, which could be useful in future medical treatment.

  12. Systematic profiling of poly(A+ transcripts modulated by core 3' end processing and splicing factors reveals regulatory rules of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencheng Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA results in mRNA isoforms containing different 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs and/or coding sequences. How core cleavage/polyadenylation (C/P factors regulate APA is not well understood. Using siRNA knockdown coupled with deep sequencing, we found that several C/P factors can play significant roles in 3'UTR-APA. Whereas Pcf11 and Fip1 enhance usage of proximal poly(A sites (pAs, CFI-25/68, PABPN1 and PABPC1 promote usage of distal pAs. Strong cis element biases were found for pAs regulated by CFI-25/68 or Fip1, and the distance between pAs plays an important role in APA regulation. In addition, intronic pAs are substantially regulated by splicing factors, with U1 mostly inhibiting C/P events in introns near the 5' end of gene and U2 suppressing those in introns with features for efficient splicing. Furthermore, PABPN1 inhibits expression of transcripts with pAs near the transcription start site (TSS, a property possibly related to its role in RNA degradation. Finally, we found that groups of APA events regulated by C/P factors are also modulated in cell differentiation and development with distinct trends. Together, our results support an APA code where an APA event in a given cellular context is regulated by a number of parameters, including relative location to the TSS, splicing context, distance between competing pAs, surrounding cis elements and concentrations of core C/P factors.

  13. Phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors augment the ability of formoterol to enhance glucocorticoid-dependent gene transcription in human airway epithelial cells: a novel mechanism for the clinical efficacy of roflumilast in severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moodley, Thunicia; Wilson, Sylvia M; Joshi, Taruna; Rider, Christopher F; Sharma, Pawan; Yan, Dong; Newton, Robert; Giembycz, Mark A

    2013-04-01

    Post-hoc analysis of two phase III clinical studies found that the phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitor, roflumilast, reduced exacerbation frequency in patients with severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) who were taking inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) concomitantly, whereas patients not taking ICS derived no such benefit. In contrast, in two different trials also performed in patients with severe COPD, roflumilast reduced exacerbation rates in the absence of ICS, indicating that PDE4 inhibition alone is sufficient for therapeutic activity to be realized. Given that roflumilast is recommended as an "add-on" medication to patients with severe disease who will inevitably be taking a long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA)/ICS combination therapy, we tested the hypothesis that roflumilast augments the ability of glucocorticoids to induce genes with anti-inflammatory activity. Using a glucocorticoid response element (GRE) luciferase reporter transfected into human airway epithelial cells [both bronchial epithelium + adenovirus 12 - SV40 hybrid (BEAS-2B) cells and primary cultures], roflumilast enhanced fluticasone propionate-induced GRE-dependent transcription. Roflumilast also produced a sinistral displacement of the concentration-response curves that described the augmentation of GRE-dependent transcription by the LABA formoterol. In BEAS-2B cells and primary airway epithelia, roflumilast interacted with formoterol in a positive cooperative manner to enhance the expression of several glucocorticoid-inducible genes that have anti-inflammatory potential. We suggest that the ability of roflumilast and formoterol to interact in this way supports the concept that these drugs together may impart clinical benefit beyond that achievable by an ICS alone, a PDE4 inhibitor alone, or an ICS/LABA combination therapy. Roflumilast may, therefore, be especially effective in patients with severe COPD.

  14. Epithelium-specific ets transcription factor 2 upregulates cytokeratin 18 expression in pulmonary epithelial cells through an interaction with cytokeratin 18 intron 1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deanna YANIW; Jim HU

    2005-01-01

    The role of Ese-2, an Ets family transcription factor, in gene regulation is not known. In this study, the interaction between Ese-2 and cytokeratin 18 (K18) intron 1 was characterized in lung epithelial cells. Reporter gene assays showed Ese-2 was able to upregulate K18 intron 1 enhanced reporter gene expression by approximately 2-fold. We found that full length Ese-2 did not bind DNA strongly, therefore truncated versions of the protein, containing the ETS domain or Pointed domain, were created and tested in electrophoresis mobility shift assays. Multiple interactions between the ETS domain and putative DNA binding sites within K18 intron 1 were observed, which led to the determination of a possible Ese-2 DNA binding consensus sequence. These experiments suggest that Ese-2 could play a role in the regulation of K18 expression in lung epithelial cells.

  15. Exploring the active site of acyl homoserine lactones-dependent transcriptional regulators with bacterial quorum sensing modulators using molecular mechanics and docking studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulère, Laurent; Frezza, Marine; Queneau, Yves; Doutheau, Alain

    2007-09-01

    A comparative molecular modelling study of acyl homoserine lactones-dependent transcriptional regulators (TraR, SdiA, LuxR and LasR) involved in bacterial quorum sensing (QS) revealed a high structural homology of their active site. Docking studies within the active site of TraR of fixed conformations obtained using molecular mechanics calculations showed that TraR, for which the crystalline structure is known, is a relevant model for the study of other protein-ligand interactions in the same protein family. Structure-activity relationships of AHLs derived QS modulators including carboxamides, sulfonamides and ureas were thus investigated. The results show that Tyr61, a residue conserved in the LuxR-proteins family, is involved in attractive interactions with aromatic carboxamide antagonists. Tyr53, Tyr61 and Asp70, conserved residues, are implicated in both the development of additional hydrogen bonds and attractive interactions with the N-sulfonyl homoserine lactones and AHLs derived ureas antagonists.

  16. Pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauro Martins Júnior

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension is a pathological condition associated with various diseases, which must be remembered by the physicians, since early diagnosis may anticipate and avoid dangerous complications and even death if appropriate measures were not taken. The relationship with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, important pathological process that is in increasing prevalence in developing countries, and leading position as cause of death, emphasizes its importance. Here are presented the classifications, pathophysiology, and general rules of treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  17. CCL3 and Viral Chemokine-Binding Protein gG Modulate Pulmonary Inflammation and Virus Replication during Equine Herpesvirus 1 Infection▿

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    CCL3 is a proinflammatory chemokine that mediates many of the cellular changes occurring in pulmonary disease. Here, CCL3−/− mice were used to investigate the role of this chemokine during respiratory herpesvirus infection. Compared to wild-type mice, CCL3−/− mice infected with the alphaherpesvirus equine herpesvirus 1 (EHV-1) displayed reduced body weight loss but had higher pulmonary viral loads. Lungs from infected CCL3−/− mice suffered a milder interstitial pneumonia, and fewer immune cel...

  18. In Helicobacter pylori auto-inducer-2, but not LuxS/MccAB catalysed reverse transsulphuration, regulates motility through modulation of flagellar gene transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doherty Neil

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LuxS may function as a metabolic enzyme or as the synthase of a quorum sensing signalling molecule, auto-inducer-2 (AI-2; hence, the mechanism underlying phenotypic changes upon luxS inactivation is not always clear. In Helicobacter pylori, we have recently shown that, rather than functioning in recycling methionine as in most bacteria, LuxS (along with newly-characterised MccA and MccB, synthesises cysteine via reverse transsulphuration. In this study, we investigated whether and how LuxS controls motility of H. pylori, specifically if it has its effects via luxS-required cysteine metabolism or via AI-2 synthesis only. Results We report that disruption of luxS renders H. pylori non-motile in soft agar and by microscopy, whereas disruption of mccAHp or mccBHp (other genes in the cysteine provision pathway does not, implying that the lost phenotype is not due to disrupted cysteine provision. The motility defect of the ΔluxSHp mutant was complemented genetically by luxSHp and also by addition of in vitro synthesised AI-2 or 4, 5-dihydroxy-2, 3-pentanedione (DPD, the precursor of AI-2. In contrast, exogenously added cysteine could not restore motility to the ΔluxSHp mutant, confirming that AI-2 synthesis, but not the metabolic effect of LuxS was important. Microscopy showed reduced number and length of flagella in the ΔluxSHp mutant. Immunoblotting identified decreased levels of FlaA and FlgE but not FlaB in the ΔluxSHp mutant, and RT-PCR showed that the expression of flaA, flgE, motA, motB, flhA and fliI but not flaB was reduced. Addition of DPD but not cysteine to the ΔluxSHp mutant restored flagellar gene transcription, and the number and length of flagella. Conclusions Our data show that as well as being a metabolic enzyme, H. pylori LuxS has an alternative role in regulation of motility by modulating flagellar transcripts and flagellar biosynthesis through production of the signalling molecule AI-2.

  19. Modulation of the transcriptional response of innate immune and RNAi genes upon exposure to dsRNA and LPS in silkmoth-derived Bm5 cells overexpressing BmToll9-1 receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jisheng; Kolliopoulou, Anna; Smagghe, Guy; Swevers, Luc

    2014-07-01

    Injection or feeding of dsRNA is commonly used to induce specific gene silencing by RNAi in insects but very little research has been carried out to investigate non-specific effects on gene expression of dsRNA as pathogen-associated molecular pattern (PAMP). This study focuses on the potential role of the BmToll9-1 receptor to modulate the transcriptional response of innate immune and RNAi genes to dsRNA and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), which was used for comparison. To study this role, we took advantage of the silkmoth-derived Bm5 cell line, which does not express BmToll9-1 endogenously, and engineered a transformed cell line that permanently expresses BmToll9-1. Quantitative mRNA expression studies showed that BmToll9-1 can significantly alter the transcriptional response to dsRNA and LPS: (1) BmToll9-1 promotes the transcriptional response of Dicer2, encoding a key component of the RNAi machinery, and, to a lesser extent, that of transcription factors in the Jak-STAT and Toll pathways; and (2) BmToll9-1 represses the transcriptional induction of the IMD and Jak-STAT pathway genes, as well as the antimicrobial peptide (AMP) effector genes, by LPS. Thus, BmToll9-1 was identified as a modulator of innate immune and RNAi machinery gene expression that could be related to its preferential expression in the larval gut, the major barrier of pathogen entry. While BmToll9-1 was found to modulate RNAi-related gene expression, a reporter-based RNAi assay established no evidence for a direct interaction of BmToll9-1 with the intracellular RNAi machinery.

  20. Epigallocatechin-3-gallate prevents lipid peroxidation and enhances antioxidant defense system via modulating hepatic nuclear transcription factors in heat-stressed quails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, K; Orhan, C; Tuzcu, M; Ali, S; Sahin, N; Hayirli, A

    2010-10-01

    -way treatment interactions revealed that the degree of restorations in all response variables was more notable under the HS environment than under the TN environment as supplemental EGCG level was increased. Moreover, levels of oxidative biomarkers were strongly correlated with expressions of hepatic nuclear transcription factors. In conclusion, supplemental EGCG alleviates oxidative stress through modulating the hepatic nuclear transcription factors in heat-stressed quails.

  1. Enhanced expression of Fas and FasL modulates apoptosis in the lungs of severe P. falciparum malaria patients with pulmonary edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punsawad, Chuchard; Viriyavejakul, Parnpen; Setthapramote, Chayanee; Palipoch, Sarawoot

    2015-01-01

    Apoptosis mediated by Fas/FasL has been implicated in pulmonary disorders. However, little is known about the relationship between Fas and FasL in the process of lung injury during malaria infection. Paraffin-embedded lung tissues from malaria patients were divided into two groups: those with pulmonary edema (PE) and those without pulmonary edema (non-PE). Normal lung tissues were used as the control group. Cellular expression of Fas, FasL, and the markers of apoptotic caspases, including cleaved caspase-3 and cleaved caspase-8 in the lung tissues were investigated by the immunohistochemistry (IHC) method. Semi-quantitative analysis of IHC staining revealed that cellular expression of Fas, FasL, cleaved caspase-8, and cleaved caspase-3 were significantly increased in the lungs of patients with PE compared with the lungs of patients with non-PE and control groups (all P < 0.05). In addition, significant positive correlations were obtained between Fas and apoptosis (rs = 0.937, P < 0.001) and FasL and apoptosis (rs = 0.808, P < 0.001). Significant positive correlations were found between Fas and FasL expression (rs = 0.827, P < 0.001) and between cleaved caspase-8 and cleaved caspase-3 expression (rs = 0.823, P < 0.001), which suggests that Fas-dependent initiator and effector caspases, including cleaved caspase-8 and caspase-3, are necessary for inducing apoptosis in the lungs of patients with severe P. falciparum malaria. The Fas/FasL system and downstream activation of caspases are important mediators of apoptosis and may be involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary edema in severe P. falciparum malaria patients. The proper regulation of the Fas/FasL pathway can be a potential treatment for pulmonary complications in falciparum malaria patients. PMID:26617708

  2. Transforming growth factor-β plays divergent roles in modulating vascular remodeling, inflammation, and pulmonary fibrosis in a murine model of scleroderma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsujino, Kazuyuki; Reed, Nilgun Isik; Atakilit, Amha; Ren, Xin; Sheppard, Dean

    2017-01-01

    The efficacy and feasibility of targeting transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) in pulmonary fibrosis and lung vascular remodeling in systemic sclerosis (SSc) have not been well elucidated. In this study we analyzed how blocking TGFβ signaling affects pulmonary abnormalities in Fos-related antigen 2 (Fra-2) transgenic (Tg) mice, a murine model that manifests three important lung pathological features of SSc: fibrosis, inflammation, and vascular remodeling. To interrupt TGFβ signaling in the Fra-2 Tg mice, we used a pan-TGFβ-blocking antibody, 1D11, and Tg mice in which TGFβ receptor type 2 (Tgfbr2) is deleted from smooth muscle cells and myofibroblasts (α-SMA-Cre(ER);Tgfbr2(flox/flox)). Global inhibition of TGFβ by 1D11 did not ameliorate lung fibrosis histologically or biochemically, whereas it resulted in a significant increase in the number of immune cells infiltrating the lungs. In contrast, 1D11 treatment ameliorated the severity of pulmonary vascular remodeling in Fra-2 Tg mice. Similarly, genetic deletion of Tgfbr2 from smooth muscle cells resulted in improvement of pulmonary vascular remodeling in the Fra-2 Tg mice, as well as a decrease in the number of Ki67-positive vascular smooth muscle cells, suggesting that TGFβ signaling contributes to development of pulmonary vascular remodeling by promoting the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells. Deletion of Tgfbr2 from α-smooth muscle actin-expressing cells had no effect on fibrosis or inflammation in this model. These results suggest that efforts to target TGFβ in SSc will likely require more precision than simply global inhibition of TGFβ function. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  3. Activity of transcription factor JACKDAW is essential for SHR/SCR-dependent activation of SCARECROW and MAGPIE and is modulated by reciprocal interactions with MAGPIE, SCARECROW and SHORT ROOT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Hiromi; Kaimi, Ryuji; Colasanti, Joseph; Kozaki, Akiko

    2011-11-01

    Two GRAS family transcription factors, SHORT-ROOT (SHR) and SCARECROW (SCR), are required for ground tissue and quiescent center formation in Arabidopsis roots. The action of SHR and SCR is regulated by two INDETERMINATE DOMAIN (IDD) family proteins, JACKDAW (JKD) and MAGPIE (MGP). Although the reciprocal interaction of these transcription factors is considered to be involved in the modulation of SHR and SCR action by JKD and MGP, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. In this study, we use a transient assay with Arabidopsis culture cells to show that the physical interaction of these transcription factors modulate their transcriptional activity. Transient expression of LUC reporter genes with the proximal sequences upstream from the ATG codon of SCR and MGP in protoplasts were activated by JKD. Moreover, promoter activities were enhanced further by the addition of SHR and SCR to JKD, but not by the combination of SHR and SCR in the absence of JKD. Yeast one-hybrid analysis showed that JKD binds to the SCR and MGP promoter sequences, indicating the existence of another binding sequences of JKD different from the previously determined IDD binding sequence. Our findings suggest that JKD directly regulates SCR and MGP expression in cooperation with SHR, SCR and MGP.

  4. Vascular stiffness mechanoactivates YAP/TAZ-dependent glutaminolysis to drive pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertero, Thomas; Oldham, William M.; Cottrill, Katherine A.; Pisano, Sabrina; Vanderpool, Rebecca R.; Yu, Qiujun; Zhao, Jingsi; Tai, Yiyin; Tang, Ying; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Rehman, Sofiya; Sugahara, Masataka; Qi, Zhi; Gorcsan, John; Vargas, Sara O.; Saggar, Rajan; Saggar, Rajeev; Wallace, W. Dean; Ross, David J.; Haley, Kathleen J.; Parikh, Victoria N.; De Marco, Teresa; Hsue, Priscilla Y.; Morris, Alison; Simon, Marc A.; Norris, Karen A.; Gaggioli, Cedric; Loscalzo, Joseph; Fessel, Joshua; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of vascular stiffness and cellular metabolism occurs early in pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, the mechanisms by which biophysical properties of the vascular extracellular matrix (ECM) relate to metabolic processes important in PH remain undefined. In this work, we examined cultured pulmonary vascular cells and various types of PH-diseased lung tissue and determined that ECM stiffening resulted in mechanoactivation of the transcriptional coactivators YAP and TAZ (WWTR1). YAP/TAZ activation modulated metabolic enzymes, including glutaminase (GLS1), to coordinate glutaminolysis and glycolysis. Glutaminolysis, an anaplerotic pathway, replenished aspartate for anabolic biosynthesis, which was critical for sustaining proliferation and migration within stiff ECM. In vitro, GLS1 inhibition blocked aspartate production and reprogrammed cellular proliferation pathways, while application of aspartate restored proliferation. In the monocrotaline rat model of PH, pharmacologic modulation of pulmonary vascular stiffness and YAP-dependent mechanotransduction altered glutaminolysis, pulmonary vascular proliferation, and manifestations of PH. Additionally, pharmacologic targeting of GLS1 in this model ameliorated disease progression. Notably, evaluation of simian immunodeficiency virus–infected nonhuman primates and HIV-infected subjects revealed a correlation between YAP/TAZ–GLS activation and PH. These results indicate that ECM stiffening sustains vascular cell growth and migration through YAP/TAZ-dependent glutaminolysis and anaplerosis, and thereby link mechanical stimuli to dysregulated vascular metabolism. Furthermore, this study identifies potential metabolic drug targets for therapeutic development in PH. PMID:27548520

  5. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... grows on dead leaves, stored grain, bird droppings, compost piles, and other decaying vegetation. Cavities in the ... Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Sarcoidosis Review Date 8/31/2014 Updated by: Jatin M. ...

  6. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ray Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan Miliary tuberculosis Tuberculosis of the lungs Erythema nodosum associated with sarcoidosis Respiratory system Tuberculin skin test References Fitzgerald DW, Sterling TR, Haas DW. ...

  7. Pulmonary hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    In 2015, more than 800 papers were published in the field of pulmonary hypertension. A Clinical Year in Review article cannot possibly incorporate all this work and needs to be selective. The recently published European guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hypertension contain an inclusive summary of all published clinical studies conducted until very recently. Here, we provide an overview of papers published after the finalisation of the guideline. In addition, we summaris...

  8. Pulmonary Agenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawla, Rakesh K; Madan, Arun; Chawla, Aditya; Arora, Harsh Nandini; Chawla, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral opaque lung with ipsilateral mediastinal shift is an uncommon cause of respiratory distress in newborn which can be found on simple radiograph of the chest. Pulmonary agenesis is a rare cause of unilateral opaque lung in the newborn. Nearly 50% cases of pulmonary agenesis are associated with other congenital defects including cardiovascular, skeletal, gastrointestinal or genitourinary systems. We report an infant with agenesis of the right lung associated with other congenital anomalies.

  9. Pulmonary Edema

    OpenAIRE

    Tanser, Paul H.

    1981-01-01

    The physician who deals with pulmonary edema from a pathophysiologic basis will seldom make a diagnostic or therapeutic error. Recent additions to preload and afterload therapy have greatly helped in the emergency and ambulatory treatment of pulmonary edema due to left heart failure. Careful follow-up and patient self-monitoring are the most effective means of reducing hospitalization of chronic heart failure patients.

  10. ICAT Inhibits beta-Catenin Binding to Tcf/Lef-Family Transcription Factors and in the General Coactivator p300 Using Independent Structural Modules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniels, D. L.

    2002-01-01

    In the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, {beta}-catenin activates target genes through its interactions with Tcf/Lef-family transcription factors and additional transcriptional coactivators. The crystal structure of ICAT, an inhibitor of {beta}-catenin-mediated transcription, bound to the armadillo repeat domain of {beta}-catenin, has been determined. ICAT contains an N-terminal helilical domain that binds to repeats 11 and 12 of {beta}-catenin, and an extended C-terminal region that binds to repeats 5-10 in a manner similar that of Tcfs and other {beta}-catenin ligands. Full-length ICAT dissociates complexes of {beta}-catenin, Lef-1, and the transcriptional coactivator p300, whereas the helical domain alone selectively blocks binding to p300. The C-terminal armadillo repeats of {beta}-catenin may be an attractive target for compounds designed to disrupt aberrant {beta}-catenin-mediated transcription associated with various cancers.

  11. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Types of Pulmonary Hypertension The World Health Organization divides pulmonary hypertension (PH) ... are called pulmonary hypertension.) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 PAH includes: PAH that has no ...

  12. CTCF and Rad21 act as host cell restriction factors for Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV lytic replication by modulating viral gene transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Jiang Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV is a human herpesvirus that causes Kaposi's sarcoma and is associated with the development of lymphoproliferative diseases. KSHV reactivation from latency and virion production is dependent on efficient transcription of over eighty lytic cycle genes and viral DNA replication. CTCF and cohesin, cellular proteins that cooperatively regulate gene expression and mediate long-range DNA interactions, have been shown to bind at specific sites in herpesvirus genomes. CTCF and cohesin regulate KSHV gene expression during latency and may also control lytic reactivation, although their role in lytic gene expression remains incompletely characterized. Here, we analyze the dynamic changes in CTCF and cohesin binding that occur during the process of KSHV viral reactivation and virion production by high resolution chromatin immunoprecipitation and deep sequencing (ChIP-Seq and show that both proteins dissociate from viral genomes in kinetically and spatially distinct patterns. By utilizing siRNAs to specifically deplete CTCF and Rad21, a cohesin component, we demonstrate that both proteins are potent restriction factors for KSHV replication, with cohesin knockdown leading to hundred-fold increases in viral yield. High-throughput RNA sequencing was used to characterize the transcriptional effects of CTCF and cohesin depletion, and demonstrated that both proteins have complex and global effects on KSHV lytic transcription. Specifically, both proteins act as positive factors for viral transcription initially but subsequently inhibit KSHV lytic transcription, such that their net effect is to limit KSHV RNA accumulation. Cohesin is a more potent inhibitor of KSHV transcription than CTCF but both proteins are also required for efficient transcription of a subset of KSHV genes. These data reveal novel effects of CTCF and cohesin on transcription from a relatively small genome that resemble their effects on the cellular

  13. Genome-wide transcriptional analysis of grapevine berry ripening reveals a set of genes similarly modulated during three seasons and the occurrence of an oxidative burst at vèraison

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    Dal Ri Antonio

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Grapevine (Vitis species is among the most important fruit crops in terms of cultivated area and economic impact. Despite this relevance, little is known about the transcriptional changes and the regulatory circuits underlying the biochemical and physical changes occurring during berry development. Results Fruit ripening in the non-climacteric crop species Vitis vinifera L. has been investigated at the transcriptional level by the use of the Affymetrix Vitis GeneChip® which contains approximately 14,500 unigenes. Gene expression data obtained from berries sampled before and after véraison in three growing years, were analyzed to identify genes specifically involved in fruit ripening and to investigate seasonal influences on the process. From these analyses a core set of 1477 genes was found which was similarly modulated in all seasons. We were able to separate ripening specific isoforms within gene families and to identify ripening related genes which appeared strongly regulated also by the seasonal weather conditions. Transcripts annotation by Gene Ontology vocabulary revealed five overrepresented functional categories of which cell wall organization and biogenesis, carbohydrate and secondary metabolisms and stress response were specifically induced during the ripening phase, while photosynthesis was strongly repressed. About 19% of the core gene set was characterized by genes involved in regulatory processes, such as transcription factors and transcripts related to hormonal metabolism and signal transduction. Auxin, ethylene and light emerged as the main stimuli influencing berry development. In addition, an oxidative burst, previously not detected in grapevine, characterized by rapid accumulation of H2O2 starting from véraison and by the modulation of many ROS scavenging enzymes, was observed. Conclusion The time-course gene expression analysis of grapevine berry development has identified the occurrence of two well

  14. Artesunate modulates expression of matrix metalloproteinases and their inhibitors as well as collagen-IV to attenuate pulmonary fibrosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Huang, G; Mo, B; Wang, C

    2016-06-03

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of artesunate on extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation and the expression of collagen-IV, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP) to understand the pharmacological role of artesunate in pulmonary fibrosis. Eighty Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups that were administered saline alone, bleomycin (BLM) alone, BLM + artesunate, or artesunate alone for 28 days. Lung tissues from 10 rats in each group were used to obtain lung fibroblast (LF) primary cells, and the rest were used to analyze protein expression. The mRNA expression of collagen-IV, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 in lung fibroblasts was detected by real-time quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. The protein levels of collagen-IV, MMP-2, MMP-9, TIMP-1, and TIMP-2 protein in lung tissues were analyzed by western blotting. Artesunate treatment alleviated alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin in rats, as indicated by a decreased lung coefficient and improvement of lung tissue morphology. Artesunate treatment also led to decreased collagen-IV protein levels, which might be a result of its downregulated expression and increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 protein and mRNA levels. Increased TIMP-1 and TIMP- 2 protein and mRNA levels were detected after artesunate treatment in lung tissues and primary lung fibroblast cells and may contribute to enhanced activity of MMP-2 and -9. These findings suggested that artesunate attenuates alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis by regulating expression of collagen-IV, TIMP-1 and 2, as well as MMP-2 and -9, to reduce ECM accumulation.

  15. A systems approach to mapping transcriptional networks controlling surfactant homeostasis

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    Dave Vrushank

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary surfactant is required for lung function at birth and throughout life. Lung lipid and surfactant homeostasis requires regulation among multi-tiered processes, coordinating the synthesis of surfactant proteins and lipids, their assembly, trafficking, and storage in type II cells of the lung. The mechanisms regulating these interrelated processes are largely unknown. Results We integrated mRNA microarray data with array independent knowledge using Gene Ontology (GO similarity analysis, promoter motif searching, protein interaction and literature mining to elucidate genetic networks regulating lipid related biological processes in lung. A Transcription factor (TF - target gene (TG similarity matrix was generated by integrating data from different analytic methods. A scoring function was built to rank the likely TF-TG pairs. Using this strategy, we identified and verified critical components of a transcriptional network directing lipogenesis, lipid trafficking and surfactant homeostasis in the mouse lung. Conclusions Within the transcriptional network, SREBP, CEBPA, FOXA2, ETSF, GATA6 and IRF1 were identified as regulatory hubs displaying high connectivity. SREBP, FOXA2 and CEBPA together form a common core regulatory module that controls surfactant lipid homeostasis. The core module cooperates with other factors to regulate lipid metabolism and transport, cell growth and development, cell death and cell mediated immune response. Coordinated interactions of the TFs influence surfactant homeostasis and regulate lung function at birth.

  16. Genomic organization of the Neurospora crassa gsn gene: possible involvement of the STRE and HSE elements in the modulation of transcription during heat shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, F Zanolli; Bertolini, M C

    2004-12-01

    Glycogen synthase, an enzyme involved in glycogen biosynthesis, is regulated by phosphorylation and by the allosteric ligand glucose-6-phosphate (G6P). In addition, enzyme levels can be regulated by changes in gene expression. We recently cloned a cDNA for glycogen synthase ( gsn) from Neurospora crassa, and showed that gsn transcription decreased when cells were exposed to heat shock (shifted from 30 degrees C to 45 degrees C). In order to understand the mechanisms that control gsn expression, we isolated the gene, including its 5' and 3' flanking regions, from the genome of N. crassa. An ORF of approximately 2.4 kb was identified, which is interrupted by four small introns (II-V). Intron I (482 bp) is located in the 5'UTR region. Three putative Transcription Initiation Sites (TISs) were mapped, one of which lies downstream of a canonical TATA-box sequence (5'-TGTATAAA-3'). Analysis of the 5'-flanking region revealed the presence of putative transcription factor-binding sites, including Heat Shock Elements (HSEs) and STress Responsive Elements (STREs). The possible involvement of these motifs in the negative regulation of gsn transcription was investigated using Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assays (EMSA) with nuclear extracts of N. crassa mycelium obtained before and after heat shock, and DNA fragments encompassing HSE and STRE elements from the 5'-flanking region. While elements within the promoter region are involved in transcription under heat shock, elements in the 5'UTR intron may participate in transcription during vegetative growth. The results thus suggest that N. crassa possesses trans -acting elements that interact with the 5'-flanking region to regulate gsn transcription during heat shock and vegetative growth.

  17. Intracellular Secretory Leukoprotease Inhibitor Modulates Inositol 1,4,5-Triphosphate Generation and Exerts an Anti-Inflammatory Effect on Neutrophils of Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emer P. Reeves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI is an anti-inflammatory protein present in respiratory secretions. Whilst epithelial cell SLPI is extensively studied, neutrophil associated SLPI is poorly characterised. Neutrophil function including chemotaxis and degranulation of proteolytic enzymes involves changes in cytosolic calcium (Ca2+ levels which is mediated by production of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 in response to G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate the intracellular function of SLPI and the mechanism-based modulation of neutrophil function by this antiprotease. Neutrophils were isolated from healthy controls (n=10, individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF (n=5 or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (n=5. Recombinant human SLPI significantly inhibited fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLP and interleukin(IL-8 induced neutrophil chemotaxis (P<0.05 and decreased degranulation of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9, hCAP-18, and myeloperoxidase (MPO (P<0.05. The mechanism of inhibition involved modulation of cytosolic IP3 production and downstream Ca2+ flux. The described attenuation of Ca2+ flux was overcome by inclusion of exogenous IP3 in electropermeabilized cells. Inhibition of IP3 generation and Ca2+ flux by SLPI may represent a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism, thus strengthening the attractiveness of SLPI as a potential therapeutic molecule in inflammatory airway disease associated with excessive neutrophil influx including CF, non-CF bronchiectasis, and COPD.

  18. Coordinated modulation of circulating miR-21 in HIV, HIV-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension, and HIV/HCV co-infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Victoria N.; Park, Joseph; Nikolic, Ivana; Channick, Richard; Yu, Paul B.; De Marco, Teresa; Hsue, Priscilla; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of microRNA-21 (miR-21) is independently associated with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection. To assess expression of miR-21 in these overlapping comorbidities, we measured plasma miR-21 in HIV with and without PAH and then stratified by concomitant HCV infection. miR-21 was increased in HIV and HIV-PAH versus uninfected subjects, but did not differ between these groups. HIV/HCV co-infection correlated with even higher miR-21 levels within the HIV-infected population. These data reveal specific regulation of plasma miR-21 in HIV, HIV/HCV co-infection, and PAH and suggest that miR-21 may integrate complex disease-specific signaling in the setting of HIV infection. PMID:26473639

  19. cAMP stimulation of StAR expression and cholesterol metabolism is modulated by co-expression of labile suppressors of transcription and mRNA turnover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jefcoate, Colin R; Lee, Jinwoo; Cherradi, Nadia; Takemori, Hiroshi; Duan, Haichuan

    2011-04-10

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory (StAR) protein is generated in rodents from 1.6 kb and 3.5 kb mRNA formed by alternative polyadenylation. The zinc finger protein, TIS11B (also Znf36L1), is elevated by cAMP in adrenal cells in parallel with StAR mRNA. TIS11b selectively destabilizes the 3.5 kb mRNA through AU-rich sequences at the end of the 3'UTR. siRNA suppression shows that TIS11b surprisingly increases StAR protein and cholesterol metabolism. StAR transcription is directly activated by PKA phosphorylation. cAMP responsive element binding (CREB) protein 1 phosphorylation is a key step leading to recruitment of the co-activator, CREB binding protein (CBP). A second protein, CREB regulated transcription coactivator (TORC/CRTC), enhances this recruitment, but is inhibited by salt inducible kinase (SIK). Basal StAR transcription is constrained through this phosphorylation of TORC. PKA provides an alternative stimulation by phosphorylating SIK, which prevents TORC inactivation. PKA stimulation of StAR nuclear transcripts substantially precedes TORC recruitment to the StAR promoter, which may, therefore, mediate a later step in mRNA production. Inhibition of SIK by staurosporine elevates StAR transcription and TORC recruitment to maximum levels, but without CREB phosphorylation. TORC suppression by SIK evidently limits basal StAR transcription. Staurosporine and cAMP stimulate synergistically. SIK targets the phosphatase, PP2a (activation), and Type 2 histone de-acetylases (inhibition), which may each contribute to suppression. Staurosporine stimulation through SIK inhibition is repeated in cAMP stimulation of many steroidogenic genes regulated by steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) and CREB. TIS11b and SIK may combine to attenuate StAR expression when hormonal stimuli decline.

  20. A single amino acid change within the R2 domain of the VvMYB5b transcription factor modulates affinity for protein partners and target promoters selectivity

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    Granier Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flavonoid pathway is spatially and temporally controlled during plant development and the transcriptional regulation of the structural genes is mostly orchestrated by a ternary protein complex that involves three classes of transcription factors (R2-R3-MYB, bHLH and WDR. In grapevine (Vitis vinifera L., several MYB transcription factors have been identified but the interactions with their putative bHLH partners to regulate specific branches of the flavonoid pathway are still poorly understood. Results In this work, we describe the effects of a single amino acid substitution (R69L located in the R2 domain of VvMYB5b and predicted to affect the formation of a salt bridge within the protein. The activity of the mutated protein (name VvMYB5bL, the native protein being referred as VvMYB5bR was assessed in different in vivo systems: yeast, grape cell suspensions, and tobacco. In the first two systems, VvMYB5bL exhibited a modified trans-activation capability. Moreover, using yeast two-hybrid assay, we demonstrated that modification of VvMYB5b transcriptional properties impaired its ability to correctly interact with VvMYC1, a grape bHLH protein. These results were further substantiated by overexpression of VvMYB5bR and VvMYB5bL genes in tobacco. Flowers from 35S::VvMYB5bL transgenic plants showed a distinct phenotype in comparison with 35S::VvMYB5bR and the control plants. Finally, significant differences in transcript abundance of flavonoid metabolism genes were observed along with variations in pigments accumulation. Conclusions Taken together, our findings indicate that VvMYB5bL is still able to bind DNA but the structural consequences linked to the mutation affect the capacity of the protein to activate the transcription of some flavonoid genes by modifying the interaction with its co-partner(s. In addition, this study underlines the importance of an internal salt bridge for protein conformation and thus for the establishment

  1. Modulation of p53 activity by IκBα: Evidence suggesting a common phylogeny between NF-κB and p53 transcription factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelfand Erwin W

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this work we present evidence that the p53 tumor suppressor protein and NF-κB transcription factors could be related through common descent from a family of ancestral transcription factors regulating cellular proliferation and apoptosis. P53 is a homotetrameric transcription factor known to interact with the ankyrin protein 53BP2 (a fragment of the ASPP2 protein. NF-κB is also regulated by ankyrin proteins, the prototype of which is the IκB family. The DNA binding sequences of the two transcription factors are similar, sharing 8 out of 10 nucleotides. Interactions between the two proteins, both direct and indirect, have been noted previously and the two proteins play central roles in the control of proliferation and apoptosis. Results Using previously published structure data, we noted a significant degree of structural alignment between p53 and NF-κB p65. We also determined that IκBα and p53 bind in vitro through a specific interaction in part involving the DNA binding region of p53, or a region proximal to it, and the amino terminus of IκBα independently or cooperatively with the ankyrin 3 domain of IκBα In cotransfection experiments, κBα could significantly inhibit the transcriptional activity of p53. Inhibition of p53-mediated transcription was increased by deletion of the ankyrin 2, 4, or 5 domains of IκBα Co-precipitation experiments using the stably transfected ankyrin 5 deletion mutant of κBα and endogenous wild-type p53 further support the hypothesis that p53 and IκBα can physically interact in vivo. Conclusion The aggregate results obtained using bacterially produced IκBα and p53 as well as reticulocyte lysate produced proteins suggest a correlation between in vitro co-precipitation in at least one of the systems and in vivo p53 inhibitory activity. These observations argue for a mechanism involving direct binding of IκBα to p53 in the inhibition of p53 transcriptional activity, analogous to

  2. Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor gene expression in liver cells is modulated by Ets-1 in synchrony with transcription factors Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Sangeeta; Saradhi, Mallampati; Rana, Manjul; Chatterjee, Swagata; Aumercier, Marc; Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga; Tyagi, Rakesh K

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear receptor PXR is predominantly expressed in liver and intestine. Expression of PXR is observed to be dysregulated in various metabolic disorders indicating its involvement in disease development. However, information available on mechanisms of PXR self-regulation is fragmentary. The present investigation identifies some of the regulatory elements responsible for its tight regulation and low cellular expression. Here, we report that the PXR-promoter is a target for some key transcription factors like PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun. Interestingly, we observed that PXR-promoter responsiveness to Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, is considerably enhanced by Ets transcription factors (PU.1 and Ets-1). Co-transfection of cells with Ets-1, LEF-1 and c-Jun increased PXR-promoter activity by 5-fold and also induced expression of endogenous human PXR. Site-directed mutagenesis and transfection studies revealed that two Ets binding sites and two of the three LEF binding sites in the PXR-promoter are functional and have a positive effect on PXR transcription. Results suggest that expression of Ets family members, in conjunction with Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, lead to coordinated up-regulation of PXR gene transcription. Insights obtained on the regulation of PXR gene have relevance in offering important cues towards normal functioning as well as development of several metabolic disorders via PXR signaling. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. The activity of Mblk-1, a mushroom body-selective transcription factor from the honeybee, is modulated by the ras/MAPK pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jung-Min; Kunieda, Takekazu; Kubo, Takeo

    2003-05-16

    We previously identified a gene, termed Mblk-1, that encodes a putative transcription factor with two DNA-binding motifs expressed preferentially in the mushroom body of the honeybee brain, and its preferred binding sequence, termed Mblk-1-binding element (MBE) (Takeuchi, H., Kage, E., Sawata, M., Kamikouchi, A., Ohashi, K., Ohara, M., Fujiyuki, T., Kunieda, T., Sekimizu, K., Natori, S., and Kubo, T. (2001) Insect Mol Biol 10, 487-494; Park, J.-M., Kunieda. T., Takeuchi, H., and Kubo, T. (2002) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 291, 23-28). In the present study, the effect of Mblk-1 on transcription of genes containing MBE in Drosophila Schneider's Line 2 cells was examined using a luciferase assay. Mblk-1 expression transactivated promoters containing MBEs approximately 2-7-fold. Deletion experiments revealed that RHF2, the second DNA-binding domain of Mblk-1, was necessary for the transcriptional activity. Furthermore, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) phosphorylated Mblk-1 at Ser-444 in vitro, and the Mblk-1-induced transactivation was stimulated by phosphorylation of Ser-444 by the Ras/MAPK pathway in the luciferase assay. These results suggest that Mblk-1 is a transcription factor that might function in the mushroom body neuronal circuits downstream of the Ras/MAPK pathway in the honeybee brain.

  4. A third mode of surface‐associated growth: immobilization of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium modulates the RpoS‐directed transcriptional programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Nielsen, Maj‐Britt; Grassby, Terri

    2012-01-01

    environments in both food products and the GI tract. This immobilized mode of growth has not been widely studied. To develop our understanding of the effects of immobilization upon a food‐borne bacterial pathogen, we used the IFR Gel Cassette model. The transcriptional programme and metabolomic profile...

  5. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should

  6. Pulmonary hypertension complicating pulmonary sarcoidosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huitema, M P; Grutters, J C; Rensing, B J W M; Reesink, H J; Post, M C

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a severe complication of sarcoidosis, with an unknown prevalence. The aetiology is multifactorial, and the exact mechanism of PH in the individual patient is often difficult to establish. The diagnostic work-up and treatment of PH in sarcoidosis is complex, and should

  7. Msa1 and Msa2 Modulate G1-Specific Transcription to Promote G1 Arrest and the Transition to Quiescence in Budding Yeast.

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    Shawna Miles

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Yeast that naturally exhaust their glucose source can enter a quiescent state that is characterized by reduced cell size, and high cell density, stress tolerance and longevity. The transition to quiescence involves highly asymmetric cell divisions, dramatic reprogramming of transcription and global changes in chromatin structure and chromosome topology. Cells enter quiescence from G1 and we find that there is a positive correlation between the length of G1 and the yield of quiescent cells. The Swi4 and Swi6 transcription factors, which form the SBF transcription complex and promote the G1 to S transition in cycling cells, are also critical for the transition to quiescence. Swi6 forms a second complex with Mbp1 (MBF, which is not required for quiescence. These are the functional analogues of the E2F complexes of higher eukaryotes. Loss of the RB analogue, Whi5, and the related protein Srl3/Whi7, delays G1 arrest, but it also delays recovery from quiescence. Two MBF- and SBF-Associated proteins have been identified that have little effect on SBF or MBF activity in cycling cells. We show that these two related proteins, Msa1 and Msa2, are specifically required for the transition to quiescence. Like the E2F complexes that are quiescence-specific, Msa1 and Msa2 are required to repress the transcription of many SBF target genes, including SWI4, the CLN2 cyclin and histones, specifically after glucose is exhausted from the media. They also activate transcription of many MBF target genes. msa1msa2 cells fail to G1 arrest and rapidly lose viability upon glucose exhaustion. msa1msa2 mutants that survive this transition are very large, but they attain the same thermo-tolerance and longevity of wild type quiescent cells. This indicates that Msa1 and Msa2 are required for successful transition to quiescence, but not for the maintenance of that state.

  8. WW domain-containing proteins, WWOX and YAP, compete for interaction with ErbB-4 and modulate its transcriptional function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqeilan, Rami I; Donati, Valentina; Palamarchuk, Alexey; Trapasso, Francesco; Kaou, Mohamed; Pekarsky, Yuri; Sudol, Marius; Croce, Carlo M

    2005-08-01

    The WW domain-containing oxidoreductase, WWOX, is a tumor suppressor that is deleted or altered in several cancer types. We recently showed that WWOX interacts with p73 and AP-2gamma and suppresses their transcriptional activity. Yes-associated protein (YAP), also containing WW domains, was shown to associate with p73 and enhance its transcriptional activity. In addition, YAP interacts with ErbB-4 receptor tyrosine kinase and acts as transcriptional coactivator of the COOH-terminal fragment (CTF) of ErbB-4. Stimulation of ErbB-4-expressing cells with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) results in the proteolytic cleavage of its cytoplasmic domain and translocation of this domain to the nucleus. Here we report that WWOX physically associates with the full-length ErbB-4 via its first WW domain. Coexpression of WWOX and ErbB-4 in HeLa cells followed by treatment with TPA results in the retention of ErbB-4 in the cytoplasm. Moreover, in MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells, expressing high levels of endogenous WWOX, endogenous ErbB-4 is also retained in the cytoplasm. In addition, our results show that interaction of WWOX and ErbB-4 suppresses transcriptional coactivation of CTF by YAP in a dose-dependent manner. A mutant form of WWOX lacking interaction with ErbB-4 has no effect on this coactivation of ErbB-4. Furthermore, WWOX is able to inhibit coactivation of p73 by YAP. In summary, our data indicate that WWOX antagonizes the function of YAP by competing for interaction with ErbB-4 and other targets and thus affect its transcriptional activity.

  9. Potassium channels in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucherat, Olivier; Chabot, Sophie; Antigny, Fabrice; Perros, Frédéric; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2015-10-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating cardiopulmonary disorder with various origins. All forms of PAH share a common pulmonary arteriopathy characterised by vasoconstriction, remodelling of the pre-capillary pulmonary vessel wall, and in situ thrombosis. Although the pathogenesis of PAH is recognised as a complex and multifactorial process, there is growing evidence that potassium channels dysfunction in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells is a hallmark of PAH. Besides regulating many physiological functions, reduced potassium channels expression and/or activity have significant effects on PAH establishment and progression. This review describes the molecular mechanisms and physiological consequences of potassium channel modulation. Special emphasis is placed on KCNA5 (Kv1.5) and KCNK3 (TASK1), which are considered to play a central role in determining pulmonary vascular tone and may represent attractive therapeutic targets in the treatment of PAH.

  10. Cables links Robo-bound Abl kinase to N-cadherin-bound beta-catenin to mediate Slit-induced modulation of adhesion and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhee, Jinseol; Buchan, Tim; Zukerberg, Lawrence; Lilien, Jack; Balsamo, Janne

    2007-08-01

    Binding of the secreted axon guidance cue Slit to its Robo receptor results in inactivation of the neural, calcium-dependent cell-cell adhesion molecule N-cadherin, providing a rapid epigenetic mechanism for integrating guidance and adhesion information. This requires the formation of a multimolecular complex containing Robo, Abl tyrosine kinase and N-cadherin. Here we show that on binding of Slit to Robo, the adaptor protein Cables is recruited to Robo-associated Abl and forms a multimeric complex by binding directly to N-cadherin-associated beta-catenin. Complex formation results in Abl-mediated phosphorylation of beta-catenin on tyrosine 489, leading to a decrease in its affinity for N-cadherin, loss of N-cadherin function, and targeting of phospho-Y489-beta-catenin to the nucleus. Nuclear beta-catenin combines with the transcription factor Tcf/Lef and activates transcription. Thus, Slit-induced formation of the Robo-N-cadherin complex results in a rapid loss of cadherin-mediated adhesion and has more lasting effects on gene transcription.

  11. An Interplay among FIS, H-NS, and Guanosine Tetraphosphate Modulates Transcription of the Escherichia coli cspA Gene under Physiological Growth Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandi, Anna; Giangrossi, Mara; Giuliodori, Anna M.; Falconi, Maurizio

    2016-01-01

    CspA, the most characterized member of the csp gene family of Escherichia coli, is highly expressed not only in response to cold stress, but also during the early phase of growth at 37°C. Here, we investigate at molecular level the antagonistic role played by the nucleoid proteins FIS and H-NS in the regulation of cspA expression under non-stress conditions. By means of both probing experiments and immunological detection, we demonstrate in vitro the existence of binding sites for these proteins on the cspA regulatory region, in which FIS and H-NS bind simultaneously to form composite DNA-protein complexes. While the in vitro promoter activity of cspA is stimulated by FIS and repressed by H-NS, a compensatory effect is observed when both proteins are added in the transcription assay. Consistently with these findings, inactivation of fis and hns genes reversely affect the in vivo amount of cspA mRNA. In addition, by means of strains expressing a high level of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate ((p)ppGpp) and in vitro transcription assays, we show that the cspA promoter is sensitive to (p)ppGpp inhibition. The (p)ppGpp-mediated expression of fis and hns genes is also analyzed, thus clarifying some aspects of the regulatory loop governing cspA transcription. PMID:27252944

  12. An interplay among FIS, H-NS and guanosine tetraphosphate modulates transcription of the Escherichia coli cspA gene under physiological growth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eBrandi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available CspA, the most characterized member of the csp gene family of Escherichia coli, is highly expressed not only in response to cold stress, but also during the early phase of growth at 37°C. Here, we investigate at molecular level the antagonistic role played by the nucleoid proteins FIS and H-NS in the regulation of cspA expression under non-stress conditions. By means of both probing experiments and immunological detection, we demonstrate in vitro the existence of binding sites for these proteins on the cspA regulatory region, in which FIS and H-NS bind simultaneously to form composite DNA-protein complexes. While the in vitro promoter activity of cspA is stimulated by FIS and repressed by H-NS, a compensatory effect is observed when both proteins are added in the transcription assay. Consistently with these findings, inactivation of fis and hns genes reversely affect the in vivo amount of cspA mRNA. In addition, by means of strains expressing a high level of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate ((pppGpp and in vitro transcription assays, we show that the cspA promoter is sensitive to (pppGpp inhibition. The (pppGpp-mediated expression of fis and hns genes is also analyzed, thus clarifying some aspects of the regulatory loop governing cspA transcription.

  13. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout your body. While the heart is one organ, it ...

  14. Erythropoietin attenuates renal and pulmonary injury in polymicrobial induced-sepsis through EPO-R, VEGF and VEGF-R2 modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitrich, Mauro; García, Daiana Maria de Los Ángeles; Stoyanoff, Tania Romina; Rodríguez, Juan Pablo; Todaro, Juan Santiago; Aguirre, María Victoria

    2016-08-01

    Sepsis remains the most important cause of acute kidney injury (AKI) and acute lung injury (ALI) in critically ill patients. The cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) model in experimental mice reproduces most of the clinical features of sepsis. Erythropoietin (EPO) is a well-known cytoprotective multifunctional hormone, which exerts anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidant, anti-apoptotic and pro-angiogenic effects in several tissues. The aim of this study was to evaluate the underlying mechanisms of EPO protection through the expression of the EPO/EPO receptor (EPO-R) and VEGF/VEF-R2 systems in kidneys and lungs of mice undergoing CLP-induced sepsis. Male inbred Balb/c mice were divided in three experimental groups: Sham, CLP, and CLP+EPO (3000IU/kg sc). Assessment of renal functional parameters, survival, histological examination, immunohistochemistry and/or Western blottings of EPO-R, VEGF and VEGF-R2 were performed at 18h post-surgery. Mice demonstrated AKI by elevation of serum creatinine and renal histologic damage. EPO treatment attenuates renal dysfunction and ameliorates kidney histopathologic changes. Additionally, EPO administration attenuates deleterious septic damage in renal cortex through the overexpression of EPO-R in tubular interstitial cells and the overexpression of the pair VEGF/VEGF-R2. Similarly CLP- induced ALI, as evidenced by parenchymal lung histopathologic alterations, was ameliorated through pulmonary EPO-R, VEGF and VEGF-R2 over expression suggesting and improvement in endothelial survival and functionality. This study demonstrates that EPO exerts protective effects in kidneys and lungs in mice with CLP-induced sepsis through the expression of EPO-R and the regulation of the VEGF/VEGF-R2 pair.

  15. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Pulmonary Hypertension Treated? Pulmonary hypertension (PH) has no cure. However, ... Types of Pulmonary Hypertension." ) Group 1 Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Group 1 pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) includes PH ...

  16. Pulmonary arterial hypertension : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoendermis, E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), defined as group 1 of the World Heart Organisation (WHO) classification of pulmonary hypertension, is an uncommon disorder of the pulmonary vascular system. It is characterised by an increased pulmonary artery pressure, increased pulmonary vascular resistance

  17. Simple pulmonary eosinophilia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pulmonary infiltrates with eosinophilia; Loffler syndrome; Eosinophilic pneumonia; Pneumonia - eosinophilic ... A rare complication of simple pulmonary eosinophilia is a severe type of pneumonia called acute idiopathic eosinophilic pneumonia.

  18. Regulated assembly of transcription factors and control of transcription initiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckett, D

    2001-11-30

    Proteins that function in regulation of transcription initiation are typically homo or hetero-oligomeric. Results of recent biophysical studies of transcription regulators indicate that the assembly of these proteins is often subject to regulation. This regulation of assembly dictates the frequency of transcription initiation via its influence on the affinity of a transcription regulator for DNA and its affect on target site selection. Factors that modulate transcription factor assembly include binding of small molecules, post-translational modification, DNA binding and interactions with other proteins. Here, the results of recent structural and/or thermodynamic studies of a number of transcription regulators that are subject to regulated assembly are reviewed. The accumulated data indicate that this phenomenon is ubiquitous and that mechanisms utilized in eukaryotes and prokaryotes share common features. Copyright 2001 Academic Press.

  19. Cold-induced modulation and functional analyses of the DRE-binding transcription factor gene, GmDREB3, in soybean (Glycine max L.)

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Ming; Xu, Zhaoshi; Xia, Lanqin; Li, Liancheng; Cheng, Xianguo; Dong, Jianhui; Wang, Qiaoyan; Ma, Youzhi

    2008-01-01

    DREB (dehydration-responsive element-binding protein) transcription factors have important roles in the stress-related regulation network in plants. A DREB orthologue, GmDREB3, belonging to the A-5 subgroup of the DREB subfamily, was isolated from soybean using the RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) method. Northern blot analysis showed that expression of GmDREB3 in soybean seedlings was induced following cold stress treatment for 0.5 h and was not detected after 3 h. However, it was not...

  20. [Pulmonary strongyloidiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozada, Heiler; Daza, Jorge E

    2016-10-01

    Strongyloidiasis is an infection caused by the parasite Strongyloides stercoralis, which can be asymptomatic and means a high morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts, severe malnutrition and coinfection with HTLV-1 virus. The parasite has the potential to produce and multiply internal autoinfection in humans, thus an hyperinfection can be developed. A case of pulmonary infection by this parasite is presented in this study, infection which advanced into a respiratory failure and required mechanical ventilation and hemodynamic support in an intensive care unit. The standard treatment combined with ivermectin and albendazole was provided, achieving an appropriate response.

  1. Smad transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massagué, Joan; Seoane, Joan; Wotton, David

    2005-12-01

    Smad transcription factors lie at the core of one of the most versatile cytokine signaling pathways in metazoan biology-the transforming growth factor-beta (TGFbeta) pathway. Recent progress has shed light into the processes of Smad activation and deactivation, nucleocytoplasmic dynamics, and assembly of transcriptional complexes. A rich repertoire of regulatory devices exerts control over each step of the Smad pathway. This knowledge is enabling work on more complex questions about the organization, integration, and modulation of Smad-dependent transcriptional programs. We are beginning to uncover self-enabled gene response cascades, graded Smad response mechanisms, and Smad-dependent synexpression groups. Our growing understanding of TGFbeta signaling through the Smad pathway provides general principles for how animal cells translate complex inputs into concrete behavior.

  2. Modulation of light-driven arousal by LIM-homeodomain transcription factor Apterous in large PDF-positive lateral neurons of the Drosophila brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Naoto; Inami, Show; Sato, Shoma; Kitamoto, Toshihiro; Sakai, Takaomi

    2016-11-17

    Apterous (Ap), the best studied LIM-homeodomain transcription factor in Drosophila, cooperates with the cofactor Chip (Chi) to regulate transcription of specific target genes. Although Ap regulates various developmental processes, its function in the adult brain remains unclear. Here, we report that Ap and Chi in the neurons expressing PDF, a neuropeptide, play important roles in proper sleep/wake regulation in adult flies. PDF-expressing neurons consist of two neuronal clusters: small ventral-lateral neurons (s-LNvs) acting as the circadian pacemaker and large ventral-lateral neurons (l-LNvs) regulating light-driven arousal. We identified that Ap localizes to the nuclei of s-LNvs and l-LNvs. In light-dark (LD) cycles, RNAi knockdown or the targeted expression of dominant-negative forms of Ap or Chi in PDF-expressing neurons or l-LNvs promoted arousal. In contrast, in constant darkness, knockdown of Ap in PDF-expressing neurons did not promote arousal, indicating that a reduced Ap function in PDF-expressing neurons promotes light-driven arousal. Furthermore, Ap expression in l-LNvs showed daily rhythms (peaking at midnight), which are generated by a direct light-dependent mechanism rather than by the endogenous clock. These results raise the possibility that the daily oscillation of Ap expression in l-LNvs may contribute to the buffering of light-driven arousal in wild-type flies.

  3. FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism may affect the clinical stage of patients with lung cancer by modulating the transcriptional profile of normal lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falvella, Felicia S; Frullanti, Elisa; Galvan, Antonella; Spinola, Monica; Noci, Sara; De Cecco, Loris; Nosotti, Mario; Santambrogio, Luigi; Incarbone, Matteo; Alloisio, Marco; Calabrò, Elisa; Pastorino, Ugo; Skaug, Vidar; Haugen, Aage; Taioli, Emanuela; Dragani, Tommaso A

    2009-06-15

    The association of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 4 (FGFR4) Gly388Arg polymorphism with clinical stage and overall survival in a series of 541 Italian lung adenocarcinoma (ADCA) patients indicated a significantly decreased survival in patients carrying the rare Arg388 allele as compared to that in Gly/Gly homozygous patients [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.5; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.1-1.9], with the decrease related to the association of the same polymorphism with clinical stage (HR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.3-2.6). By contrast, no significant association was detected in small series of either Norwegian lung ADCA patients or Italian lung squamous cell carcinoma (SQCC) patients. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of known FGFR4 ligands expressed in lung (FGF9, FGF18 and FGF19) were not associated with clinical stage or survival and showed no interaction with FGFR4. Analysis of gene expression profile in normal lungs according to FGFR4 genotype indicated a specific transcript pattern associated with the allele carrier status, suggesting a functional role for the FGFR4 polymorphism already detectable in normal lung. These findings confirm the significant association of the FGFR4 Gly388Arg polymorphism with clinical stage and overall survival in an Italian lung ADCA population and demonstrate a FGFR4 genotype-dependent transcriptional profile present in normal lung tissue.

  4. HosA, a MarR Family Transcriptional Regulator, Represses Nonoxidative Hydroxyarylic Acid Decarboxylase Operon and Is Modulated by 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ajit; Ranjan, Akash

    2016-02-23

    Members of the Multiple antibiotic resistance Regulator (MarR) family of DNA binding proteins regulate transcription of a wide array of genes required for virulence and pathogenicity of bacteria. The present study reports the molecular characterization of HosA (Homologue of SlyA), a MarR protein, with respect to its target gene, DNA recognition motif, and nature of its ligand. Through a comparative genomics approach, we demonstrate that hosA is in synteny with nonoxidative hydroxyarylic acid decarboxylase (HAD) operon and is present exclusively within the mutS-rpoS polymorphic region in nine different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. Using molecular biology and biochemical approach, we demonstrate that HosA binds to a palindromic sequence downstream to the transcription start site of divergently transcribed nonoxidative HAD operon and represses its expression. Furthermore, in silico analysis showed that the recognition motif for HosA is highly conserved in the upstream region of divergently transcribed operon in different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. A systematic chemical search for the physiological ligand revealed that 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HBA) interacts with HosA and derepresses HosA mediated repression of the nonoxidative HAD operon. Based on our study, we propose a model for molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of nonoxidative HAD operon by HosA in Enterobacteriaceae family.

  5. The bHLH142 Transcription Factor Coordinates with TDR1 to Modulate the Expression of EAT1 and Regulate Pollen Development in Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Swee-Suak; Li, Min-Jeng; Sun-Ben Ku, Maurice; Ho, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Yi-Jyun; Chuang, Ming-Hsing; Hsing, Hong-Xian; Lien, Yi-Chen; Yang, Hui-Ting; Chang, Hung-Chia; Chan, Ming-Tsair

    2014-06-01

    Male sterility plays an important role in F1 hybrid seed production. We identified a male-sterile rice (Oryza sativa) mutant with impaired pollen development and a single T-DNA insertion in the transcription factor gene bHLH142. Knockout mutants of bHLH142 exhibited retarded meiosis and defects in tapetal programmed cell death. RT-PCR and in situ hybridization analyses showed that bHLH142 is specifically expressed in the anther, in the tapetum, and in meiocytes during early meiosis. Three basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors, UDT1 (bHLH164), TDR1 (bHLH5), and EAT1/DTD1 (bHLH141) are known to function in rice pollen development. bHLH142 acts downstream of UDT1 and GAMYB but upstream of TDR1 and EAT1 in pollen development. In vivo and in vitro assays demonstrated that bHLH142 and TDR1 proteins interact. Transient promoter assays demonstrated that regulation of the EAT1 promoter requires bHLH142 and TDR1. Consistent with these results, 3D protein structure modeling predicted that bHLH142 and TDR1 form a heterodimer to bind to the EAT1 promoter. EAT1 positively regulates the expression of AP37 and AP25, which induce tapetal programmed cell death. Thus, in this study, we identified bHLH142 as having a pivotal role in tapetal programmed cell death and pollen development.

  6. Sestrin 2 protein regulates platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (Pdgfrβ) expression by modulating proteasomal and Nrf2 transcription factor functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomasovic, Ana; Kurrle, Nina; Sürün, Duran; Heidler, Juliana; Husnjak, Koraljka; Poser, Ina; Schnütgen, Frank; Scheibe, Susan; Seimetz, Michael; Jaksch, Peter; Hyman, Anthony; Weissmann, Norbert; von Melchner, Harald

    2015-04-10

    We recently identified the antioxidant protein Sestrin 2 (Sesn2) as a suppressor of platelet-derived growth factor receptor β (Pdgfrβ) signaling and Pdgfrβ signaling as an inducer of lung regeneration and injury repair. Here, we identified Sesn2 and the antioxidant gene inducer nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) as positive regulators of proteasomal function. Inactivation of Sesn2 or Nrf2 induced reactive oxygen species-mediated proteasomal inhibition and Pdgfrβ accumulation. Using bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenic HeLa and mouse embryonic stem cells stably expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein-tagged Sesn2 at nearly endogenous levels, we also showed that Sesn2 physically interacts with 2-Cys peroxiredoxins and Nrf2 albeit under different reductive conditions. Overall, we characterized a novel, redox-sensitive Sesn2/Pdgfrβ suppressor pathway that negatively interferes with lung regeneration and is up-regulated in the emphysematous lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  7. Differential transcriptional modulation of duplicated fatty acid-binding protein genes by dietary fatty acids in zebrafish (Danio rerio: evidence for subfunctionalization or neofunctionalization of duplicated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denovan-Wright Eileen M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Duplication-Degeneration-Complementation (DDC model, subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization have been proposed as important processes driving the retention of duplicated genes in the genome. These processes are thought to occur by gain or loss of regulatory elements in the promoters of duplicated genes. We tested the DDC model by determining the transcriptional induction of fatty acid-binding proteins (Fabps genes by dietary fatty acids (FAs in zebrafish. We chose zebrafish for this study for two reasons: extensive bioinformatics resources are available for zebrafish at zfin.org and zebrafish contains many duplicated genes owing to a whole genome duplication event that occurred early in the ray-finned fish lineage approximately 230-400 million years ago. Adult zebrafish were fed diets containing either fish oil (12% lipid, rich in highly unsaturated fatty acid, sunflower oil (12% lipid, rich in linoleic acid, linseed oil (12% lipid, rich in linolenic acid, or low fat (4% lipid, low fat diet for 10 weeks. FA profiles and the steady-state levels of fabp mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear RNA in intestine, liver, muscle and brain of zebrafish were determined. Result FA profiles assayed by gas chromatography differed in the intestine, brain, muscle and liver depending on diet. The steady-state level of mRNA for three sets of duplicated genes, fabp1a/fabp1b.1/fabp1b.2, fabp7a/fabp7b, and fabp11a/fabp11b, was determined by reverse transcription, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. In brain, the steady-state level of fabp7b mRNAs was induced in fish fed the linoleic acid-rich diet; in intestine, the transcript level of fabp1b.1 and fabp7b were elevated in fish fed the linolenic acid-rich diet; in liver, the level of fabp7a mRNAs was elevated in fish fed the low fat diet; and in muscle, the level of fabp7a and fabp11a mRNAs were elevated in fish fed the linolenic acid-rich or the low fat diets. In all cases

  8. [Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis with dendriform pulmonary ossification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera, Ana Madeleine; Vargas, Leslie

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary ossification is a rare and usually asymptomatic finding reported as incidental in lung biopsies. Similarly, idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis is a rare cause of pulmonary infiltrates. We report the case of a 64-year old man with chronic respiratory symptoms in whom these two histopathological findings converged.

  9. Pulmonary biomarkers in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnes, Peter J.; Chowdhury, Badrul; Kharitonov, Sergei A.; Magnussen, Helgo; Page, Clive P.; Postma, Dirkje; Saetta, Marina

    2006-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in using pulmonary biomarkers to understand and monitor the inflammation in the respiratory tract of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this Pulmonary Perspective we discuss the merits of the various approaches by reviewing the current l

  10. Transcription co-activator Arabidopsis ANGUSTIFOLIA3 (AN3) regulates water-use efficiency and drought tolerance by modulating stomatal density and improving root architecture by the transrepression of YODA (YDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lai-Sheng; Yao, Shun-Qiao

    2015-09-01

    One goal of modern agriculture is the improvement of plant drought tolerance and water-use efficiency (WUE). Although stomatal density has been linked to WUE, the causal molecular mechanisms and engineered alternations of this relationship are not yet fully understood. Moreover, YODA (YDA), which is a MAPKK kinase gene, negatively regulates stomatal development. BR-INSENSITIVE 2 interacts with phosphorylates and inhibits YDA. However, whether YDA is modulated in the transcriptional level is still unclear. Plants lacking ANGUSTIFOLIA3 (AN3) activity have high drought stress tolerance because of low stomatal densities and improved root architecture. Such plants also exhibit enhanced WUE through declining transpiration without a demonstrable reduction in biomass accumulation. AN3 negatively regulated YDA expression at the transcriptional level by target-gene analysis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that AN3 was associated with a region of the YDA promoter in vivo. YDA mutation significantly decreased the stomatal density and root length of an3 mutant, thus proving the participation of YDA in an3 drought tolerance and WUE enhancement. These components form an AN3-YDA complex, which allows the integration of water deficit stress signalling into the production or spacing of stomata and cell proliferation, thus leading to drought tolerance and enhanced WUE.

  11. AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are Involved in Determining the Poly(A) Length of Granule-bound starch synthase 1 Transcript and Modulating Sucrose and Starch Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Yuya; Arae, Toshihiro; Green, Pamela J; Yamaguchi, Junji; Chiba, Yukako

    2015-05-01

    Removing the poly(A) tail is the first and rate-limiting step of mRNA degradation and apparently an effective step not only for modulating mRNA stability but also for translation of many eukaryotic transcripts. Carbon catabolite repressor 4 (CCR4) has been identified as a major cytoplasmic deadenylase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The Arabidopsis thaliana homologs of the yeast CCR4, AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b, were identified by sequence-based analysis; however, their role and physiological significance in plants remain to be elucidated. In this study, we revealed that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are localized to cytoplasmic mRNA processing bodies, which are specific granules consisting of many enzymes involved in mRNA turnover. Double mutants of AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b exhibited tolerance to sucrose application but not to glucose. The levels of sucrose in the seedlings of the atccr4a/4b double mutants were reduced, whereas no difference was observed in glucose levels. Further, amylose levels were slightly but significantly increased in the atccr4a/4b double mutants. Consistent with this observation, we found that the transcript encoding granule-bound starch synthase 1 (GBSS1), which is responsible for amylose synthesis, is accumulated to a higher level in the atccr4a/4b double mutant plants than in the control plants. Moreover, we revealed that GBSS1 has a longer poly(A) tail in the double mutant than in the control plant, suggesting that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b can influence the poly(A) length of transcripts related to starch metabolism. Our results collectively suggested that AtCCR4a and AtCCR4b are involved in sucrose and starch metabolism in A. thaliana.

  12. The bHLH transcription factor bHLH104 interacts with IAA-LEUCINE RESISTANT3 and modulates iron homeostasis in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Liu, Bing; Li, Mengshu; Feng, Dongru; Jin, Honglei; Wang, Peng; Liu, Jun; Xiong, Feng; Wang, Jinfa; Wang, Hong-Bin

    2015-03-01

    Iron (Fe) is an indispensable micronutrient for plant growth and development. The regulation of Fe homeostasis in plants is complex and involves a number of transcription factors. Here, we demonstrate that a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factor, bHLH104, belonging to the IVc subgroup of bHLH family, acts as a key component positively regulating Fe deficiency responses. Knockout of bHLH104 in Arabidopsis thaliana greatly reduced tolerance to Fe deficiency, whereas overexpression of bHLH104 had the opposite effect and led to accumulation of excess Fe in soil-grown conditions. The activation of Fe deficiency-inducible genes was substantially suppressed by loss of bHLH104. Further investigation showed that bHLH104 interacted with another IVc subgroup bHLH protein, IAA-LEUCINE RESISTANT3 (ILR3), which also plays an important role in Fe homeostasis. Moreover, bHLH104 and ILR3 could bind directly to the promoters of Ib subgroup bHLH genes and POPEYE (PYE) functioning in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses. Interestingly, genetic analysis showed that loss of bHLH104 could decrease the tolerance to Fe deficiency conferred by the lesion of BRUTUS, which encodes an E3 ligase and interacts with bHLH104. Collectively, our data support that bHLH104 and ILR3 play pivotal roles in the regulation of Fe deficiency responses via targeting Ib subgroup bHLH genes and PYE expression.

  13. Nicotinic stimulation modulates tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA half-life and protein binding to the 3'UTR in a manner that requires transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roe, David F; Craviso, Gale L; Waymire, Jack C

    2004-01-05

    Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression increases in adrenal chromaffin cells treated with the nicotinic agonist, dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP; 1 microM). We are using this response as a model of the changes in TH level that occur during increased cholinergic neural activity. Here we report a 4-fold increase in TH mRNA half-life in DMPP-treated cells chromaffin cells that is apparent when using a pulse-chase analysis to measure TH mRNA half-life. No increase is apparent using actinomycin D to measure half-life, indicating a requirement for ongoing transcription. Characterization of protein binding to the TH 3'UTR responsible for stabilization using labeled TH 3'UTR probes and electro-mobility shift assays shows the presence of two complexes both of which are increased by DMPP-treatment. The faster migrating complex (FMC) increases 2.5-fold and the slower migrating complex (SMC) increases 1.5-fold. Both changes are prevented by actinomycin D. Characterization of the protein binding to the TH UTR probes indicates SMC is disrupted by polyribonucleotides, poly (A) and poly (U), while binding to FMC is reduced by poly (CU). Separation of UV crosslinked RNA-protein complexes on SDS polyacrylamide gels shows FMC to contain a single protein whereas SMC contains three proteins. Northwesterns yielded similar results. Comparison of DMPP-induced protein binding with the poly C binding protein (PCBP) involved in hypoxia induced rat PC12 TH mRNA stability indicates none of the bovine UTR binding proteins are the PCBP. Thus, nicotinic stimulation produces a transcription-dependent increase in TH mRNA half-life that is mediated by previously unrecognized TH mRNA binding proteins.

  14. The Epigenetic Regulator HDAC1 Modulates Transcription of a Core Cardiogenic Program in Human Cardiac Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Through a p53-Dependent Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Joseph B; Zhao, John; Keith, Matthew C L; Amraotkar, Alok R; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Hong, Kyung U; Bolli, Roberto

    2016-12-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) regulation is an essential process in myogenic differentiation. Inhibitors targeting the activity of specific HDAC family members have been shown to enhance the cardiogenic differentiation capacity of discrete progenitor cell types; a key property of donor cell populations contributing to their afforded benefits in cardiac cell therapy applications. The influence of HDAC inhibition on cardiac-derived mesenchymal stromal cell (CMC) transdifferentiation or the role of specific HDAC family members in dictating cardiovascular cell lineage specification has not been investigated. In the current study, the consequences of HDAC inhibition on patient-derived CMC proliferation, cardiogenic program activation, and cardiovascular differentiation/cell lineage specification were investigated using pharmacologic and genetic targeting approaches. Here, CMCs exposed to the pan-HDAC inhibitor sodium butyrate exhibited induction of a cardiogenic transcriptional program and heightened expression of myocyte and endothelial lineage-specific markers when coaxed to differentiate in vitro. Further, shRNA knockdown screens revealed CMCs depleted of HDAC1 to promote the induction of a cardiogenic transcriptional program characterized by enhanced expression of cardiomyogenic- and vasculogenic-specific markers, a finding which depended on and correlated with enhanced acetylation and stabilization of p53. Cardiogenic gene activation and elevated p53 expression levels observed in HDAC1-depleted CMCs were associated with improved aptitude to assume a cardiomyogenic/vasculogenic cell-like fate in vitro. These results suggest that HDAC1 depletion-induced p53 expression alters CMC cell fate decisions and identify HDAC1 as a potential exploitable target to facilitate CMC-mediated myocardial repair in ischemic cardiomyopathy. Stem Cells 2016;34:2916-2929.

  15. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schölzel, B E; Snijder, R J; Mager, J J; van Es, H W; Plokker, H W M; Reesink, H J; Morshuis, W J; Post, M C

    2014-12-01

    Chronic pulmonary thromboembolic disease is an important cause of severe pulmonary hypertension, and as such is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis of this condition reflects the degree of associated right ventricular dysfunction, with predictable mortality related to the severity of the underlying pulmonary hypertension. Left untreated, the prognosis is poor. Pulmonary endarterectomy is the treatment of choice to relieve pulmonary artery obstruction in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and has been remarkably successful. Advances in surgical techniques along with the introduction of pulmonary hypertension-specific medication provide therapeutic options for the majority of patients afflicted with the disease. However, a substantial number of patients are not candidates for pulmonary endarterectomy due to either distal pulmonary vascular obstruction or significant comorbidities. Therefore, careful selection of surgical candidates in expert centres is paramount. The current review focuses on the diagnostic approach to chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and the available surgical and medical therapeutic options.

  16. Transcription factories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, Dietmar; Trajanoski, Zlatko; McNally, James G.

    2012-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that transcription does not occur homogeneously or diffusely throughout the nucleus, but rather at a number of specialized, discrete sites termed transcription factories. The factories are composed of ~4–30 RNA polymerase molecules, and are associated with many other molecules involved in transcriptional activation and mRNA processing. Some data suggest that the polymerase molecules within a factory remain stationary relative to the transcribed DNA, which is thought to be reeled through the factory site. There is also some evidence that transcription factories could help organize chromatin and nuclear structure, contributing to both the formation of chromatin loops and the clustering of active and co-regulated genes. PMID:23109938

  17. Apelin and pulmonary hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Charlotte Uggerhøj; Hilberg, Ole; Mellemkjær, Søren;

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease characterized by pulmonary vasoconstriction, pulmonary arterial remodeling, abnormal angiogenesis and impaired right ventricular function. Despite progress in pharmacological therapy, there is still no cure for PAH. The peptide apelin...... vasoconstriction, and has positive inotropic and cardioprotective effects. Apelin attenuates vasoconstriction in isolated rat pulmonary arteries, and chronic treatment with apelin attenuates the development of pulmonary hypertension in animal models. The existing literature thus renders APLNR an interesting...

  18. Alpha-Tocopherol Alters Transcription Activities that Modulates Tumor Necrosis Factor Alpha (TNF-α) Induced Inflammatory Response in Bovine Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cong-Jun; Li, Robert W; Kahl, Stanislaw; Elsasser, Theodore H

    2012-01-01

    To further investigate the potential role of α-tocopherol in maintaining immuno-homeostasis in bovine cells (Madin-Darby bovine kidney epithelial cell line), we undertook in vitro experiments using recombinant TNF-α as an immuno-stimulant to simulate inflammation response in cells with or without α-tocopherol pre-treatment. Using microarray global-profiling and IPA (Ingenuity Pathways Analysis, Ingenuity(®) Systems, http://www.ingenuity.com) data analysis on TNF-α-induced gene perturbation in those cells, we focused on determining whether α-tocopherol treatment of normal bovine cells in a standard cell culture condition can modify cell's immune response induced by TNF-α challenge. When three datasets were filtered and compared using IPA, there were a total of 1750 genes in all three datasets for comparison, 97 genes were common in all three sets; 615 genes were common in at least two datasets; there were 261 genes unique in TNF-α challenge, 399 genes were unique in α-tocopherol treatment, and 378 genes were unique in the α-tocopherol plus TNF-α treatment. TNF-α challenge induced significant change in gene expression. Many of those genes induced by TNF-α are related to the cells immune and inflammatory responses. The results of IPA data analysis showed that α-tocopherol-pretreatment of cells modulated cell's response to TNF-α challenge. In most of the canonical pathways, α-tocopherol pretreatment showed the antagonistic effect against the TNF-α-induced pro-inflammatory responses. We concluded that α-tocopherol pre-treatment has a significant antagonistic effect that modulates the cell's response to the TNF-α challenge by altering the gene expression activities of some important signaling molecules.

  19. Chemokine transcription in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) is differently modulated in response to viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) or infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montero, Jana; Chaves-Pozo, Elena; Cuesta, Alberto; Tafalla, Carolina

    2009-12-01

    Chemokines not only act as chemoattractants for immune cells, but also exert immunomodulatory actions, thus modulating the immune functions of their target cells. In rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), twenty-four chemokines have been identified to date. Even though their sequences have been reported, their biological role has been scarcely elucidated and the role that these chemokines have on the antiviral response in fish has been poorly studied. In this sense, in the current work, we have determined the levels of expression of several of these rainbow trout chemokines (CXCd, gammaIP, CK1, CK3, CK5B, CK6, CK7A, CK9 and CK12) in head kidney and spleen during the course of a viral infection using two different viruses, viral hemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) and infectious pancreatic necrosis virus (IPNV), comparing them to the levels induced by poly I:C. We also determined the effects that the two viruses and poly I:C provoked on the levels of expression of these chemokines in vitro in head kidney leucocytes. Overall, VHSV was capable of modulating gammaIP, CXCd, CK1, CK3, CK5B, CK6 and CK12, while IPNV induced a very different chemokine profile and affected CK1, CK5B, CK6, CK7A, CK9 and CK12. On the other hand, a viral mimic such as poly I:C was capable of up-regulating gammaIP, CXCd, CK1, CK3, CK5B, CK7A and CK12. As more information becomes available concerning the immune role and target cells that these chemokines have on rainbow trout, we would be able to better interpret the importance of these differences in the pathogenicity of these two viruses.

  20. Rac1 modulates the formation of primordial follicles by facilitating STAT3-directed Jagged1, GDF9 and BMP15 transcription in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Lihua; Du, Xinhua; Huang, Kun; Zhang, Tuo; Teng, Zhen; Niu, Wanbao; Wang, Chao; Xia, Guoliang

    2016-04-06

    The size of the primordial follicle pool determines the reproductive potential of mammalian females, and establishment of the pool is highly dependent on specific genes expression. However, the molecular mechanisms by which the essential genes are regulated coordinately to ensure primordial follicle assembly remain a mystery. Here, we show that the small GTPase Rac1 plays an indispensable role in controlling the formation of primordial follicles in mouse ovary. Employing fetal mouse ovary organ culture system, we demonstrate that disruption of Rac1 retarded the breakdown of germline cell cysts while Rac1 overexpression accelerated the formation of primordial follicles. In addition, in vivo inhibitor injection resulted in the formation of multi-oocyte follicles. Subsequent investigation showed that Rac1 induced nuclear import of STAT3 by physical binding. In turn, nuclear STAT3 directly activated the transcription of essential oocyte-specific genes, including Jagged1, GDF9, BMP15 and Nobox. Further, GDF9 and BMP15 regulated the translation of Notch2 via mTORC1 activation in pregranulosa cells. Overexression or addition of Jagged1, GDF9 and BMP15 not only reversed the effect of Rac1 disruption, but also accelerated primordial follicle formation via Notch2 signaling activation. Collectively, these results indicate that Rac1 plays important roles as a key regulator in follicular assembly.

  1. The rice R2R3-MYB transcription factor OsMYB55 is involved in the tolerance to high temperature and modulates amino acid metabolism.

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    Ashraf El-Kereamy

    Full Text Available Temperatures higher than the optimum negatively affects plant growth and development. Tolerance to high temperature is a complex process that involves several pathways. Understanding this process, especially in crops such as rice, is essential to prepare for predicted climate changes due to global warming. Here, we show that OsMYB55 is induced by high temperature and overexpression of OsMYB55 resulted in improved plant growth under high temperature and decreased the negative effect of high temperature on grain yield. Transcriptome analysis revealed an increase in expression of several genes involved in amino acids metabolism. We demonstrate that OsMYB55 binds to the promoter regions of target genes and directly activates expression of some of those genes including glutamine synthetase (OsGS1;2 glutamine amidotransferase (GAT1 and glutamate decarboxylase 3 (GAD3. OsMYB55 overexpression resulted in an increase in total amino acid content and of the individual amino acids produced by the activation of the above mentioned genes and known for their roles in stress tolerance, namely L-glutamic acid, GABA and arginine especially under high temperature condition. In conclusion, overexpression of OsMYB55 improves rice plant tolerance to high temperature, and this high tolerance is associated with enhanced amino acid metabolism through transcription activation.

  2. Silibinin modulates caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2), an intestine specific tumor suppressor to abrogate colon cancer in experimental rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangeetha, N; Nalini, N

    2015-01-01

    To authenticate the colon cancer preventive potential of silibinin, the efficacy of silibinin needs to be tested by evaluating an organ-specific biomarker. The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of silibinin on the colonic expression of the caudal-type homeobox transcription factor (CDX2) an intestine specific tumor suppressor gene and its downstream targets in the colon of rats challenged with 1,2 dimethyl hydrazine (DMH). Rats of groups 1 and 2 were treated as control and silibinin control. Rats under groups 3 and 4 were given DMH (20 mg/kg body weight (b.w.) subcutaneously) once a week for 15 consecutive weeks from the 4th week of the experimental period. In addition, group 4 rats alone were treated with silibinin (50 mg/kg b.w. per os) everyday throughout the study period of 32 weeks. Histological investigation and messenger RNA and protein expression studies were performed in the colonic tissues of experimental rats. Findings of the study revealed that DMH administration significantly decreased the expression of CDX2 and Guanylyl cyclase C (GCC) in the colon of experimental rats. Further the decreased levels of CDX2 protein, colonic mucin content, and increased number of mast cells in the colon of DMH alone-administered rats reflects the onset of carcinogenesis. The pathological changes caused due to CDX2 suppression were attenuated by silibinin supplementation. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. The ratio between CcdA and CcdB modulates the transcriptional repression of the ccd poison-antidote system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afif, H; Allali, N; Couturier, M; Van Melderen, L

    2001-07-01

    The ccd operon of the F plasmid encodes CcdB, a toxin targeting the essential gyrase of Escherichia coli, and CcdA, the unstable antidote that interacts with CcdB to neutralize its toxicity. Although work from our group and others has established that CcdA and CcdB are required for transcriptional repression of the operon, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The results presented here indicate that, although CcdA is the DNA-binding element of the CcdA-CcdB complex, the stoichiometry of the two proteins determines whether or not the complex binds to the ccd operator-promoter region. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we show that a (CcdA)2-(CcdB)2 complex binds DNA. The addition of extra CcdB to that protein-DNA complex completely abolishes DNA retardation. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the ratio between CcdA and CcdB regulates the repression state of the ccd operon. When the level of CcdA is superior or equal to that of CcdB, repression results. In contrast, derepression occurs when CcdB is in excess of CcdA. By ensuring an antidote-toxin ratio greater than one, this mechanism could prevent the harmful effect of CcdB in plasmid-containing bacteria.

  4. Collagen XVI induces expression of MMP9 via modulation of AP-1 transcription factors and facilitates invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

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    Konstanze B Bedal

    Full Text Available Collagen XVI belongs to the family of fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices (FACIT. It is overexpressed during the progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. The present data show a strong collagen XVI-dependent induction of MMP9 and an increase in OSCC cell invasion. We found activated integrin-linked kinase (ILK in a complex with kindlin-1 and activation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt to be responsible for MMP9 induction. Inhibition of the formation of focal adhesions reduced MMP9 expression. Moreover, collagen XVI overexpressing OSCC cell clones (COLXVI cell clones transfected with vectors containing different MMP9 promoter fragments adjacent to a luciferase reporter revealed an increase in luciferase signal dependent on AP-1 binding sites. Deletion of the AP-1 binding site 98 bp upstream of the reported transcription start site and inhibition of AP-1 with Tanshinone IIA resulted in decreased MMP9 expression. The AP-1 subunit JunB showed differential expression between COLXVI cell clones and mock control cells. Additionally, mass spectrometric analysis of immunoprecipitates revealed that c-Fos interacted strongly with dyskerin in COLXVI cell clones compared to mock controls.

  5. Collagen XVI induces expression of MMP9 via modulation of AP-1 transcription factors and facilitates invasion of oral squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedal, Konstanze B; Grässel, Susanne; Oefner, Peter J; Reinders, Joerg; Reichert, Torsten E; Bauer, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Collagen XVI belongs to the family of fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices (FACIT). It is overexpressed during the progression of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The present data show a strong collagen XVI-dependent induction of MMP9 and an increase in OSCC cell invasion. We found activated integrin-linked kinase (ILK) in a complex with kindlin-1 and activation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) to be responsible for MMP9 induction. Inhibition of the formation of focal adhesions reduced MMP9 expression. Moreover, collagen XVI overexpressing OSCC cell clones (COLXVI cell clones) transfected with vectors containing different MMP9 promoter fragments adjacent to a luciferase reporter revealed an increase in luciferase signal dependent on AP-1 binding sites. Deletion of the AP-1 binding site 98 bp upstream of the reported transcription start site and inhibition of AP-1 with Tanshinone IIA resulted in decreased MMP9 expression. The AP-1 subunit JunB showed differential expression between COLXVI cell clones and mock control cells. Additionally, mass spectrometric analysis of immunoprecipitates revealed that c-Fos interacted strongly with dyskerin in COLXVI cell clones compared to mock controls.

  6. The beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii modulates the expression of WRKY transcription factors in syncytia to favour its development in Arabidopsis roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Muhammad Amjad; Wieczorek, Krzysztof; Kreil, David P; Bohlmann, Holger

    2014-01-01

    Cyst nematodes invade the roots of their host plants as second stage juveniles and induce a syncytium which is the only source of nutrients throughout their life. A recent transcriptome analysis of syncytia induced by the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots has shown that thousands of genes are up-regulated or down-regulated in syncytia as compared to root segments from uninfected plants. Among the down-regulated genes are many which code for WRKY transcription factors. Arabidopsis contains 66 WRKY genes with 59 represented by the ATH1 GeneChip. Of these, 28 were significantly down-regulated and 6 up-regulated in syncytia as compared to control root segments. We have studied here the down-regulated genes WRKY6, WRKY11, WRKY17 and WRKY33 in detail. We confirmed the down-regulation in syncytia with promoter::GUS lines. Using various overexpression lines and mutants it was shown that the down-regulation of these WRKY genes is important for nematode development, probably through interfering with plant defense reactions. In case of WRKY33, this might involve the production of the phytoalexin camalexin.

  7. The beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii modulates the expression of WRKY transcription factors in syncytia to favour its development in Arabidopsis roots.

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    Muhammad Amjad Ali

    Full Text Available Cyst nematodes invade the roots of their host plants as second stage juveniles and induce a syncytium which is the only source of nutrients throughout their life. A recent transcriptome analysis of syncytia induced by the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots has shown that thousands of genes are up-regulated or down-regulated in syncytia as compared to root segments from uninfected plants. Among the down-regulated genes are many which code for WRKY transcription factors. Arabidopsis contains 66 WRKY genes with 59 represented by the ATH1 GeneChip. Of these, 28 were significantly down-regulated and 6 up-regulated in syncytia as compared to control root segments. We have studied here the down-regulated genes WRKY6, WRKY11, WRKY17 and WRKY33 in detail. We confirmed the down-regulation in syncytia with promoter::GUS lines. Using various overexpression lines and mutants it was shown that the down-regulation of these WRKY genes is important for nematode development, probably through interfering with plant defense reactions. In case of WRKY33, this might involve the production of the phytoalexin camalexin.

  8. Lipoic acid restores age-associated impairment of brain energy metabolism through the modulation of Akt/JNK signaling and PGC1α transcriptional pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tianyi; Yin, Fei; Yao, Jia; Brinton, Roberta D; Cadenas, Enrique

    2013-12-01

    This study examines the progress of a hypometabolic state inherent in brain aging with an animal model consisting of Fischer 344 rats of young, middle, and old ages. Dynamic microPET scanning demonstrated a significant decline in brain glucose uptake at old ages, which was associated with a decrease in the expression of insulin-sensitive neuronal glucose transporters GLUT3/4 and of microvascular endothelium GLUT1. Brain aging was associated with an imbalance between the PI3K/Akt pathway of insulin signaling and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling and a downregulation of the PGC1α-mediated transcriptional pathway of mitochondrial biogenesis that impinged on multiple aspects of energy homeostasis. R-(+)-lipoic acid treatment increased glucose uptake, restored the balance of Akt/JNK signaling, and enhanced mitochondrial bioenergetics and the PGC1α-driven mitochondrial biogenesis. It may be surmised that impairment of a mitochondria-cytosol-nucleus communication is underlying the progression of the age-related hypometabolic state in brain; the effects of lipoic acid are not organelle-limited, but reside on the functional and effective coordination of this communication that results in improved energy metabolism.

  9. Holding our breath: The emerging and anticipated roles of microRNA in pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Kevin; Loscalzo, Joseph; Chan, Stephen Y.

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, the importance of non-coding RNA such as microRNA has been established in numerous processes that drive human pathogenesis. These crucial molecular regulators modulate networks of target gene transcripts that, in turn, orchestrate cellular phenotypes such as cell survival, differentiation, proliferation, and metabolism among others and thus affect cardiopulmonary vascular disease conditions. Many of these same pathophenotypes figure prominently in the complex pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension, an enigmatic vascular disorder characterized by a histological panvasculopathy and driven by disparate upstream triggers such as hypoxia, inflammation, and bone morphogenetic protein signaling. Yet, the importance of just a few microRNAs in pulmonary hypertension has been recognized, and we are only beginning to understand the integrative functions of these molecules in this disease. By combining systems biology with traditional experimental approaches, more direct insight into the pleiotropy of microRNA should not only further reveal the spectrum of molecular pathways that cause pulmonary hypertension, but also offer novel and much needed diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. PMID:23130098

  10. Diabetic Microvascular Disease and Pulmonary Fibrosis: The Contribution of Platelets and Systemic Inflammation

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    Rekha Jagadapillai

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is strongly associated with systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, but its effect on pulmonary vascular disease and lung function has often been disregarded. Several studies identified restrictive lung disease and fibrotic changes in diabetic patients and in animal models of diabetes. While microvascular dysfunction is a well-known complication of diabetes, the mechanisms leading to diabetes-induced lung injury have largely been disregarded. We described the potential involvement of diabetes-induced platelet-endothelial interactions in perpetuating vascular inflammation and oxidative injury leading to fibrotic changes in the lung. Changes in nitric oxide synthase (NOS activation and decreased NO bioavailability in the diabetic lung increase platelet activation and vascular injury and may account for platelet hyperreactivity reported in diabetic patients. Additionally, the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT pathway has been reported to mediate pancreatic islet damage, and is implicated in the onset of diabetes, inflammation and vascular injury. Many growth factors and diabetes-induced agonists act via the JAK/STAT pathway. Other studies reported the contribution of the JAK/STAT pathway to the regulation of the pulmonary fibrotic process but the role of this pathway in the development of diabetic lung fibrosis has not been considered. These observations may open new therapeutic perspectives for modulating multiple pathways to mitigate diabetes onset or its pulmonary consequences.

  11. Transcription factor WRKY46 modulates the development of Arabidopsis lateral roots in osmotic/salt stress conditions via regulation of ABA signaling and auxin homeostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Zhong Jie; Yan, Jing Ying; Li, Chun Xiao; Li, Gui Xin; Wu, Yun Rong; Zheng, Shao Jian

    2015-10-01

    The development of lateral roots (LR) is known to be severely inhibited by salt or osmotic stress. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying LR development in osmotic/salt stress conditions are poorly understood. Here we show that the gene encoding the WRKY transcription factor WRKY46 (WRKY46) is expressed throughout lateral root primordia (LRP) during early LR development and that expression is subsequently restricted to the stele of the mature LR. In osmotic/salt stress conditions, lack of WRKY46 (in loss-of-function wrky46 mutants) significantly reduces, while overexpression of WRKY46 enhances, LR development. We also show that exogenous auxin largely restores LR development in wrky46 mutants, and that the auxin transport inhibitor 2,3,5-triiodobenzoic acid (TIBA) inhibits LR development in both wild-type (WT; Col-0) and in a line overexpressing WRKY46 (OV46). Subsequent analysis of abscisic acid (ABA)-related mutants indicated that WRKY46 expression is down-regulated by ABA signaling, and up-regulated by an ABA-independent signal induced by osmotic/salt stress. Next, we show that expression of the DR5:GUS auxin response reporter is reduced in roots of wrky46 mutants, and that both wrky46 mutants and OV46 display altered root levels of free indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and IAA conjugates. Subsequent RT-qPCR and ChIP-qPCR experiments indicated that WRKY46 directly regulates the expression of ABI4 and of genes regulating auxin conjugation. Finally, analysis of wrky46 abi4 double mutant plants confirms that ABI4 acts downstream of WRKY46. In summary, our results demonstrate that WRKY46 contributes to the feedforward inhibition of osmotic/salt stress-dependent LR inhibition via regulation of ABA signaling and auxin homeostasis.

  12. Low-Molecular-Weight Fucoidan Induces Endothelial Cell Migration via the PI3K/AKT Pathway and Modulates the Transcription of Genes Involved in Angiogenesis

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    Claire Bouvard

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Low-molecular-weight fucoidan (LMWF is a sulfated polysaccharide extracted from brown seaweed that presents antithrombotic and pro-angiogenic properties. However, its mechanism of action is not well-characterized. Here, we studied the effects of LMWF on cell signaling and whole genome expression in human umbilical vein endothelial cells and endothelial colony forming cells. We observed that LMWF and vascular endothelial growth factor had synergistic effects on cell signaling, and more interestingly that LMWF by itself, in the absence of other growth factors, was able to trigger the activation of the PI3K/AKT pathway, which plays a crucial role in angiogenesis and vasculogenesis. We also observed that the effects of LMWF on cell migration were PI3K/AKT-dependent and that LMWF modulated the expression of genes involved at different levels of the neovessel formation process, such as cell migration and cytoskeleton organization, cell mobilization and homing. This provides a better understanding of LMWF’s mechanism of action and confirms that it could be an interesting therapeutic approach for vascular repair.

  13. Discovery of the selective androgen receptor modulator MK-0773 using a rational development strategy based on differential transcriptional requirements for androgenic anabolism versus reproductive physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Azriel; Kimmel, Donald B; Bai, Chang; Scafonas, Angela; Rutledge, Sujane; Vogel, Robert L; McElwee-Witmer, Sheila; Chen, Fang; Nantermet, Pascale V; Kasparcova, Viera; Leu, Chih-Tai; Zhang, Hai-Zhuan; Duggan, Mark E; Gentile, Michael A; Hodor, Paul; Pennypacker, Brenda; Masarachia, Patricia; Opas, Evan E; Adamski, Sharon A; Cusick, Tara E; Wang, Jiabing; Mitchell, Helen J; Kim, Yuntae; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Perkins, James J; Meissner, Robert S; Hartman, George D; Freedman, Leonard P; Harada, Shun-ichi; Ray, William J

    2010-05-28

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are androgen receptor (AR) ligands that induce anabolism while having reduced effects in reproductive tissues. In various experimental contexts SARMs fully activate, partially activate, or even antagonize the AR, but how these complex activities translate into tissue selectivity is not known. Here, we probed receptor function using >1000 synthetic AR ligands. These compounds produced a spectrum of activities in each assay ranging from 0 to 100% of maximal response. By testing different classes of compounds in ovariectomized rats, we established that ligands that transactivated a model promoter 40-80% of an agonist, recruited the coactivator GRIP-1 <15%, and stabilized the N-/C-terminal interdomain interaction <7% induced bone formation with reduced effects in the uterus and in sebaceous glands. Using these criteria, multiple SARMs were synthesized including MK-0773, a 4-aza-steroid that exhibited tissue selectivity in humans. Thus, AR activated to moderate levels due to reduced cofactor recruitment, and N-/C-terminal interactions produce a fully anabolic response, whereas more complete receptor activation is required for reproductive effects. This bimodal activation provides a molecular basis for the development of SARMs.

  14. Discovery of the Selective Androgen Receptor Modulator MK-0773 Using a Rational Development Strategy Based on Differential Transcriptional Requirements for Androgenic Anabolism Versus Reproductive Physiology*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Azriel; Kimmel, Donald B.; Bai, Chang; Scafonas, Angela; Rutledge, SuJane; Vogel, Robert L.; McElwee-Witmer, Sheila; Chen, Fang; Nantermet, Pascale V.; Kasparcova, Viera; Leu, Chih-tai; Zhang, Hai-Zhuan; Duggan, Mark E.; Gentile, Michael A.; Hodor, Paul; Pennypacker, Brenda; Masarachia, Patricia; Opas, Evan E.; Adamski, Sharon A.; Cusick, Tara E.; Wang, Jiabing; Mitchell, Helen J.; Kim, Yuntae; Prueksaritanont, Thomayant; Perkins, James J.; Meissner, Robert S.; Hartman, George D.; Freedman, Leonard P.; Harada, Shun-ichi; Ray, William J.

    2010-01-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are androgen receptor (AR) ligands that induce anabolism while having reduced effects in reproductive tissues. In various experimental contexts SARMs fully activate, partially activate, or even antagonize the AR, but how these complex activities translate into tissue selectivity is not known. Here, we probed receptor function using >1000 synthetic AR ligands. These compounds produced a spectrum of activities in each assay ranging from 0 to 100% of maximal response. By testing different classes of compounds in ovariectomized rats, we established that ligands that transactivated a model promoter 40–80% of an agonist, recruited the coactivator GRIP-1 <15%, and stabilized the N-/C-terminal interdomain interaction <7% induced bone formation with reduced effects in the uterus and in sebaceous glands. Using these criteria, multiple SARMs were synthesized including MK-0773, a 4-aza-steroid that exhibited tissue selectivity in humans. Thus, AR activated to moderate levels due to reduced cofactor recruitment, and N-/C-terminal interactions produce a fully anabolic response, whereas more complete receptor activation is required for reproductive effects. This bimodal activation provides a molecular basis for the development of SARMs. PMID:20356837

  15. Giant infantile pulmonary hemangioma

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    Pandya, Rajul; Tummala, Venkat [Hurley Medical Center One Hurley Plaza, Department of Radiology, Flint, MI (United States)

    2010-12-15

    We present a very unusual case of giant infantile pulmonary hemangioma presenting as a large solitary pulmonary mass. This was successfully managed with surgical resection. Histological examination revealed that the mass was positive for GLUT-1 receptor, a marker for infantile hemangioma. To our knowledge only a few cases of pulmonary hemangioma have been described previously in the literature. Pulmonary hemangiomas are very rare lesions, most of them presenting as a pulmonary mass. This case emphasizes the fact that this rare lesion should be considered in the differential of an enhancing pulmonary mass in an infant. (orig.)

  16. Berberine modulates AP-1 activity to suppress HPV transcription and downstream signaling to induce growth arrest and apoptosis in cervical cancer cells

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    Husain Syed A

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background- Specific types of high risk Human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs particularly, HPV types 16 and 18 cause cervical cancer and while the two recently developed vaccines against these HPV types are prophylactic in nature, therapeutic options for treatment and management of already existing HPV infection are not available as yet. Because transcription factor, Activator Protein-1 (AP-1 plays a central role in HPV-mediated cervical carcinogenesis, we explored the possibility of its therapeutic targeting by berberine, a natural alkaloid derived from a medicinal plant species, Berberis which has been shown to possess anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties with no known toxicity; however, the effect of berberine against HPV has not been elucidated. Results- We studied the effect of berberine on HPV16-positive cervical cancer cell line, SiHa and HPV18-positive cervical cancer cell line, HeLa using electrophoretic mobility gel shift assays, western and northern blotting which showed that berberine could selectively inhibit constitutively activated AP-1 in a dose- and time-dependent manner and downregulates HPV oncogenes expression. Inhibition of AP-1 was also accompanied by changes in the composition of their DNA-binding complex. Berberine specifically downregulated expression of oncogenic c-Fos which was also absent in the AP-1 binding complex. Treatment with berberine resulted in repression of E6 and E7 levels and concomitant increase in p53 and Rb expression in both cell types. Berberine also suppressed expression of telomerase protein, hTERT, which translated into growth inhibition of cervical cancer cells. Interestingly, a higher concentration of berberine was found to reduce the cell viability through mitochondria-mediated pathway and induce apoptosis by activating caspase-3. Conclusion- These results indicate that berberine can effectively target both the host and viral factors responsible for development of cervical cancer

  17. Aboveground Whitefly Infestation Modulates Transcriptional Levels of Anthocyanin Biosynthesis and Jasmonic Acid Signaling-Related Genes and Augments the Cope with Drought Stress of Maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yong-Soon; Bae, Dong-Won; Ryu, Choong-Min

    2015-01-01

    Up to now, the potential underlying molecular mechanisms by which maize (Zea mays L.) plants elicit defense responses by infestation with a phloem feeding insect whitefly [Bemisia tabaci (Genn.)] have been barely elucidated against (a)biotic stresses. To fill this gap of current knowledge maize plants were infested with whitefly and these plants were subsequently assessed the levels of water loss. To understand the mode of action, plant hormone contents and the stress-related mRNA expression were evaluated. Whitefly-infested maize plants did not display any significant phenotypic differences in above-ground tissues (infested site) compared with controls. By contrast, root (systemic tissue) biomass was increased by 2-fold by whitefly infestation. The levels of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), jasmonic acid (JA), and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were significantly higher in whitefly-infested plants. The biosynthetic or signaling-related genes for JA and anthocyanins were highly up-regulated. Additionally, we found that healthier plants were obtained in whitefly-infested plants under drought conditions. The weight of whitefly-infested plants was approximately 20% higher than that of control plants at 14 d of drought treatment. The drought tolerance-related genes, ZmbZIP72, ZmSNAC1, and ZmABA1, were highly expressed in the whitefly-infected plants. Collectively, our results suggest that IAA/JA-derived maize physiological changes and correlation of H2O2 production and water loss are modulated by above-ground whitefly infestation in maize plants.

  18. Aboveground Whitefly Infestation Modulates Transcriptional Levels of Anthocyanin Biosynthesis and Jasmonic Acid Signaling-Related Genes and Augments the Cope with Drought Stress of Maize.

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    Yong-Soon Park

    Full Text Available Up to now, the potential underlying molecular mechanisms by which maize (Zea mays L. plants elicit defense responses by infestation with a phloem feeding insect whitefly [Bemisia tabaci (Genn.] have been barely elucidated against (abiotic stresses. To fill this gap of current knowledge maize plants were infested with whitefly and these plants were subsequently assessed the levels of water loss. To understand the mode of action, plant hormone contents and the stress-related mRNA expression were evaluated. Whitefly-infested maize plants did not display any significant phenotypic differences in above-ground tissues (infested site compared with controls. By contrast, root (systemic tissue biomass was increased by 2-fold by whitefly infestation. The levels of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, jasmonic acid (JA, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 were significantly higher in whitefly-infested plants. The biosynthetic or signaling-related genes for JA and anthocyanins were highly up-regulated. Additionally, we found that healthier plants were obtained in whitefly-infested plants under drought conditions. The weight of whitefly-infested plants was approximately 20% higher than that of control plants at 14 d of drought treatment. The drought tolerance-related genes, ZmbZIP72, ZmSNAC1, and ZmABA1, were highly expressed in the whitefly-infected plants. Collectively, our results suggest that IAA/JA-derived maize physiological changes and correlation of H2O2 production and water loss are modulated by above-ground whitefly infestation in maize plants.

  19. O-Linked N-Acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) Expression Levels Epigenetically Regulate Colon Cancer Tumorigenesis by Affecting the Cancer Stem Cell Compartment via Modulating Expression of Transcriptional Factor MYBL1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huabei; Zhang, Bing; Nairn, Alison V; Nagy, Tamas; Moremen, Kelley W; Buckhaults, Phillip; Pierce, Michael

    2017-03-10

    To study the regulation of colorectal adenocarcinoma progression by O-GlcNAc, we have focused on the O-GlcNAc-mediated epigenetic regulation of human colon cancer stem cells (CCSC). Xenograft tumors from colon tumor cells with O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase (OGT) knockdown grew significantly slower than those formed from control cells, indicating a reduced proliferation of tumor cells due to inhibition of OGT expression. Significant reduction of the CCSC population was observed in the tumor cells after OGT knockdown, whereas tumor cells treated with the O-GlcNAcase inhibitor showed an increased CCSC population, indicating that O-GlcNAc levels regulated the CCSC compartment. When grown in suspension, tumor cells with OGT knockdown showed a reduced ability to form tumorspheres, indicating a reduced self-renewal of CCSC due to reduced levels of O-GlcNAc. ChIP-sequencing experiments using an anti-O-GlcNAc antibody revealed significant chromatin enrichment of O-GlcNAc-modified proteins at the promoter of the transcription factor MYBL1, which was also characterized by the presence of H3K27me3. RNA-sequencing analysis showed an increased expression of MYBL1 in tumor cells with OGT knockdown. Forced overexpression of MYBL1 led to a reduced population of CCSC and tumor growth in vivo, similar to the effects of OGT silencing. Moreover, two CpG islands near the transcription start site of MYBL1 were identified, and O-GlcNAc levels regulated their methylation status. These results strongly argue that O-GlcNAc epigenetically regulates MYBL1, functioning similarly to H3K27me3. The aberrant CCSC compartment observed after modulating O-GlcNAc levels is therefore likely to result, at least in part, from the epigenetic regulation of MYBL1 expression by O-GlcNAc, thereby significantly affecting tumor progression.

  20. Overexpression of PtrABF gene, a bZIP transcription factor isolated from Poncirus trifoliata, enhances dehydration and drought tolerance in tobacco via scavenging ROS and modulating expression of stress-responsive genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Ji-Hong

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses affecting plant growth, development and crop productivity. ABA responsive element binding factor (ABF plays an important role in stress responses via regulating the expression of stress-responsive genes. Results In this study, a gene coding for ABF (PtrABF was isolated from Poncirus trifoliata (L. Raf. PtrABF had a complete open reading frame of 1347 bp, encoding a 448 amino acid peptide, and shared high sequence identities with ABFs from other plants. PtrABF was subcellularly targeted to the nucleus, exhibited transactivation activity in yeast cell and could bind to ABRE, supporting its role as a transcription factor. Expression levels of PtrABF were induced by treatments with dehydration, low temperature and ABA. Ectopic expression of PtrABF under the control of a CaMV 35S promoter in transgenic tobacco plants enhanced tolerance to both dehydration and drought. Under dehydration and drought conditions, the transgenic plants accumulated lower levels of reactive oxygen species compared with wild type, accompanied by higher activities and expression levels of three antioxidant enzymes. In addition, steady-state mRNA levels of nine stress-responsive genes coding for either functional or regulatory proteins were induced to higher levels in the transgenic lines with or without drought stress. Conclusions PtrABF is a bZIP transcription factor and functions in positive modulation of drought stress tolerance. It may be an important candidate gene for molecular breeding of drought- tolerant plants.

  1. Intestinal DMBT1 expression is modulated by Crohn's disease-associated IL23R variants and by a DMBT1 variant which influences binding of the transcription factors CREB1 and ATF-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Diegelmann

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: DMBT is an antibacterial pattern recognition and scavenger receptor. In this study, we analyzed the role of DMBT1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs regarding inflammatory bowel disease (IBD susceptibility and examined their functional impact on transcription factor binding and downstream gene expression. METHODS: Seven SNPs in the DMBT1 gene region were analyzed in 2073 individuals including 818 Crohn's disease (CD patients and 972 healthy controls in two independent case-control panels. Comprehensive epistasis analyses for the known CD susceptibility genes NOD2, IL23R and IL27 were performed. The influence of IL23R variants on DMBT1 expression was analyzed. Functional analysis included siRNA transfection, quantitative PCR, western blot, electrophoretic mobility shift and luciferase assays. RESULTS: IL-22 induces DMBT1 protein expression in intestinal epithelial cells dependent on STAT3, ATF-2 and CREB1. IL-22 expression-modulating, CD risk-associated IL23R variants influence DMBT1 expression in CD patients and DMBT1 levels are increased in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of CD patients. Several DMBT1 SNPs were associated with CD susceptibility. SNP rs2981804 was most strongly associated with CD in the combined panel (p = 3.0 × 10(-7, OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.24-1.63. All haplotype groups tested showed highly significant associations with CD (including omnibus P-values as low as 6.1 × 10(-18. The most strongly CD risk-associated, non-coding DMBT1 SNP rs2981804 modifies the DNA binding sites for the transcription factors CREB1 and ATF-2 and the respective genomic region comprising rs2981804 is able to act as a transcriptional regulator in vitro. Intestinal DMBT1 expression is decreased in CD patients carrying the rs2981804 CD risk allele. CONCLUSION: We identified novel associations of DMBT1 variants with CD susceptibility and discovered a novel functional role of rs2981804 in regulating DMBT1 expression. Our data suggest an important

  2. Intestinal DMBT1 expression is modulated by Crohn's disease-associated IL23R variants and by a DMBT1 variant which influences binding of the transcription factors CREB1 and ATF-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegelmann, Julia; Czamara, Darina; Le Bras, Emmanuelle; Zimmermann, Eva; Olszak, Torsten; Bedynek, Andrea; Göke, Burkhard; Franke, Andre; Glas, Jürgen; Brand, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    DMBT is an antibacterial pattern recognition and scavenger receptor. In this study, we analyzed the role of DMBT1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) regarding inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) susceptibility and examined their functional impact on transcription factor binding and downstream gene expression. Seven SNPs in the DMBT1 gene region were analyzed in 2073 individuals including 818 Crohn's disease (CD) patients and 972 healthy controls in two independent case-control panels. Comprehensive epistasis analyses for the known CD susceptibility genes NOD2, IL23R and IL27 were performed. The influence of IL23R variants on DMBT1 expression was analyzed. Functional analysis included siRNA transfection, quantitative PCR, western blot, electrophoretic mobility shift and luciferase assays. IL-22 induces DMBT1 protein expression in intestinal epithelial cells dependent on STAT3, ATF-2 and CREB1. IL-22 expression-modulating, CD risk-associated IL23R variants influence DMBT1 expression in CD patients and DMBT1 levels are increased in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of CD patients. Several DMBT1 SNPs were associated with CD susceptibility. SNP rs2981804 was most strongly associated with CD in the combined panel (p = 3.0 × 10(-7), OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.24-1.63). All haplotype groups tested showed highly significant associations with CD (including omnibus P-values as low as 6.1 × 10(-18)). The most strongly CD risk-associated, non-coding DMBT1 SNP rs2981804 modifies the DNA binding sites for the transcription factors CREB1 and ATF-2 and the respective genomic region comprising rs2981804 is able to act as a transcriptional regulator in vitro. Intestinal DMBT1 expression is decreased in CD patients carrying the rs2981804 CD risk allele. We identified novel associations of DMBT1 variants with CD susceptibility and discovered a novel functional role of rs2981804 in regulating DMBT1 expression. Our data suggest an important role of DMBT1 in CD pathogenesis.

  3. Modulation of cytokines and transcription factors (T-Bet and GATA3 in CD4 enriched cervical cells of Chlamydia trachomatis infected fertile and infertile women upon stimulation with chlamydial inclusion membrane proteins B and C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salhan Sudha

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chlamydial Inclusion membrane proteins (Incs, are involved in biochemical interactions with host cells and infecting Chlamydiae. We have previously reported the role of two Chlamydia trachomatis (CT Incs, namely IncB and IncC in generating host immunity in CT infected women. Emerging data shows involvement of Inc stimulated CD4 positive T cells in aiding host immunity in infected fertile and infertile women through the secretion of interferon gamma. However the lack of data on the intra-cytokine interplay to these Incs in infected cell milieu prompted us to investigate further. Methods A total of 14 CT-positive fertile, 18 CT-positive infertile women and 25 uninfected controls were enrolled in this study. CD8 depleted, CD4 enriched cervical cells were isolated and upon stimulation with IncB and IncC, modulation of cytokines (Interleukin (IL-1 Beta, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-10, Interferon-gamma, IL-12, IL-23, Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha and Granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF and T cell lineage regulating transcription factors T-Bet and GATA3 was determined by real-time reverse-transcriptase (RT-PCR and ELISA. Results Significant higher expression (P Conclusion Overall our data shows that CT IncB and IncC are able to upregulate expression of cytokines, namely interferon-gamma, IL-12, IL-23 and GM-CSF in CT-positive fertile women while expression of IL-1 Beta, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6 and IL-10 were upregulated in CT-positive infertile women. Our study also suggests that Incs are able to modulate expression of T cell lineage determinants indicating their involvement in regulation of immune cells.

  4. Pulmonary Hemorrhage in Cryoglobulinemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G Kirkpatrick

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary manifestations of cryoglobulinemia are uncommon and their clinical behaviour is unpredictable, ranging from mild dyspnea to life-threatening presentations. A patient with cryoglobulinemia who presented with hypoxic respiratory failure attributed to pulmonary hemorrhage is reported.

  5. Pregnancy and pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, Petronella G.; Lameijer, Heleen; Hoendermis, Elke S.

    Pulmonary hypertension during pregnancy is associated with considerable risks of maternal mortality and morbidity. Our systematic review of the literature on the use of targeted treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension during pregnancy indicates a considerable decrease of mortality since a

  6. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 03-13T18:29:11+00:00 PH and HIV Print PH and HIV Brochure (PDF) Order Copies ... to know about pulmonary hypertension in connection with HIV? Although pulmonary hypertension and HIV are two separate ...

  7. Miliary pulmonary cryptococcosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shane Kelly

    2014-10-01

    Imaging features of pulmonary cryptococcosis are generally of well-defined pleural-based nodules and less commonly alveolar infiltrates, lymphadenopathy, pleural effusions or cavitating lesions. Miliary pulmonary infiltrates are an exceptionally rare presentation.

  8. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001090.htm Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistula is an abnormal connection between an artery and ...

  9. Histoplasmosis - acute (primary) pulmonary

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000098.htm Histoplasmosis - acute (primary) pulmonary To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis is a respiratory infection that is caused by ...

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... chest X-ray, a breathing test called a pulmonary function test and an echocardiogram (sometimes called an “echo”). Your doctor may also need to do other tests to find out whether another medical condition is causing your pulmonary hypertension. TreatmentHow is pulmonary hypertension treated?If the ...

  11. Pulmonary Hypertension Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... at www.AHeartCures.org . Help Kickoff November’s Pulmonary Hypertension Awareness Month Want to help raise awareness for ... Heart2CurePH | Help promote Awareness Month Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension (CTEPH) Awareness Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is ...

  12. Time course of pulmonary vascular response to an acutely repetitive pulmonary microembolism in dogs--an analysis using pulmonary vascular impedance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tobise, K; Tosaka, S; Onodera, S

    1992-05-01

    To understand the mechanism leading to progressive pulmonary hypertension, we investigated the time course of vascular response to an acutely repetitive pulmonary microembolism in dogs by using pulmonary vascular impedance. In a normal state, the mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mPAP) was transiently increased by emboli, and the impedance moduli of 0 Hz (= Rin), 1.5 Hz and 3 Hz were slightly increased. A four-element electrical vascular model showed the transient increase in peripheral pulmonary vascular resistance (R2) and inertia, and reduction in compliance (C). In contrast, in a state of a slight pulmonary hypertension, mPAP was continuously increased by the same amount of emboli, and the impedance moduli of both 0 Hz and 3 Hz were significantly increased. By a four-element model, a severe increase in R2 and reduction in C were observed, and these changes continued. Therefore, although the vascular response to pulmonary microembolism basically depends on the degree of mechanical obstruction, this response is thought to be modulated by the responsiveness of pulmonary vessels at that time, which is involved in the alteration in the local characteristics of pulmonary vessels, and/or the recruitment of a new blood flow.

  13. The essential role of p53-up-regulated modulator of apoptosis (Puma) and its regulation by FoxO3a transcription factor in β-amyloid-induced neuron death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhter, Rumana; Sanphui, Priyankar; Biswas, Subhas Chandra

    2014-04-11

    Neurodegeneration underlies the pathology of Alzheimer disease (AD). The molecules responsible for such neurodegeneration in AD brain are mostly unknown. Recent findings indicate that the BH3-only proteins of the Bcl-2 family play an essential role in various cell death paradigms, including neurodegeneration. Here we report that Puma (p53-up-regulated modulator of apoptosis), an important member of the BH3-only protein family, is up-regulated in neurons upon toxic β-amyloid 1-42 (Aβ(1-42)) exposure both in vitro and in vivo. Down-regulation of Puma by specific siRNA provides significant protection against neuron death induced by Aβ(1-42). We further demonstrate that the activation of p53 and inhibition of PI3K/Akt pathways induce Puma. The transcription factor FoxO3a, which is activated when PI3K/Akt signaling is inhibited, directly binds with the Puma gene and induces its expression upon exposure of neurons to oligomeric Aβ(1-42). Moreover, Puma cooperates with another BH3-only protein, Bim, which is already implicated in AD. Our results thus suggest that Puma is activated by both p53 and PI3K/Akt/FoxO3a pathways and cooperates with Bim to induce neuron death in response to Aβ(1-42).

  14. Domain analyses of the Runx1 transcription factor responsible for modulating T-cell receptor-β/CD4 and interleukin-4/interferon-γ expression in CD4+ peripheral T lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Ryuji

    2009-01-01

    The Runx1 transcription factor is one of the master regulators of T-lymphocyte differentiation. There have been several reports trying to assign a domain within the Runx1 protein that is responsible for gene expression in thymocytes. The Runx1 domains involved in regulating the expression of several genes in peripheral CD4+ T cells were analysed. It was observed that Runx1 over-expression enhanced the surface expression of CD4 and CD69 molecules via its activation domain and VWRPY domain, and decreased that of T-cell receptor-β via its activation domain. Runx1 over-expression enhanced interferon-γ expression via its activation and VWRPY domains, and abolished interleukin-4 expression through its activation domain. Transduction of Runx1 did not down-regulate CD4 expression until 72 hr of culture, but the repression of CD4 expression became evident after 96 hr. The main region responsible for repressing CD4 expression was the inhibitory domain of Runx1. Taken together, these results lead to a proposal that the regions in Runx1 responsible for modulating gene expression are distinct in thymocytes and in peripheral CD4+ T cells. PMID:19689732

  15. Isorhynchophylline protects against pulmonary arterial hypertension and suppresses PASMCs proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Haipeng; Zhang, Xin [Department of Critical Care Medicine, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Cui, Yuqian [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Deng, Wei [Department of Cardiology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China); Xu, Dachun [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Han, Hui; Wang, Hao [Department of Critical Care Medicine, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Chen, Yuguo [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Yu, E-mail: qlliyu@126.com [Department of Respiratory, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Wu, Dawei, E-mail: wdwu55@163.com [Department of Critical Care Medicine, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We focus on PASMCs proliferation in the pathogenesis of PAH. • Isorhynchophylline inhibited PASMCs proliferation and alleviated PAH. • IRN blocked PDGF-Rβ phosphorylation and its downstream signal transduction. • IRN regulated cyclins and CDKs to arrest cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. • We reported IRN has the potential to be a candidate for PAH treatment. - Abstract: Increased pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) proliferation is a key pathophysiological component of pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Isorhynchophylline (IRN) is a tetracyclic oxindole alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herbal medicine Uncaria rhynchophylla. It has long been used clinically for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, very little is known about whether IRN can influence the development of PAH. Here we examined the effect of IRN on monocrotaline (MCT) induced PAH in rats. Our data demonstrated that IRN prevented MCT induced PAH in rats, as assessed by right ventricular (RV) pressure, the weight ratio of RV to (left ventricular + septum) and RV hypertrophy. IRN significantly attenuated the percentage of fully muscularized small arterioles, the medial wall thickness, and the expression of smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In vitro studies, IRN concentration-dependently inhibited the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation of PASMCs. Fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis showed that IRN caused G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest. IRN-induced growth inhibition was associated with downregulation of Cyclin D1 and CDK6 as well as an increase in p27Kip1 levels in PDGF-BB-stimulated PASMCs. Moreover, IRN negatively modulated PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of PDGF-Rβ, ERK1/2, Akt/GSK3β, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). These results demonstrate that IRN could inhibit PASMCs proliferation and

  16. Transcription elongation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashimizu, Masahiko; Shimamoto, Nobuo; Oshima, Taku; Kashlev, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    Regulation of transcription elongation via pausing of RNA polymerase has multiple physiological roles. The pausing mechanism depends on the sequence heterogeneity of the DNA being transcribed, as well as on certain interactions of polymerase with specific DNA sequences. In order to describe the mechanism of regulation, we introduce the concept of heterogeneity into the previously proposed alternative models of elongation, power stroke and Brownian ratchet. We also discuss molecular origins and physiological significances of the heterogeneity. PMID:25764114

  17. Pulmonary hypertension and metabolic syndrome: Possible connection, PPARγ and Caveolin-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Rajamma

    2014-08-26

    A number of disparate diseases can lead to pulmonary hypertension (PH), a serious disorder with a high morbidity and mortality rate. Recent studies suggest that the associated metabolic dysregulation may be an important factor adversely impacting the prognosis of PH. Furthermore, metabolic syndrome is associated with vascular diseases including PH. Inflammation plays a significant role both in PH and metabolic syndrome. Adipose tissue modulates lipid and glucose metabolism, and also produces pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines that modulate vascular function and angiogenesis, suggesting a close functional relationship between the adipose tissue and the vasculature. Both caveolin-1, a cell membrane scaffolding protein and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) γ, a ligand-activated transcription factor are abundantly expressed in the endothelial cells and adipocytes. Both caveolin-1 and PPARγ modulate proliferative and anti-apoptotic pathways, cell migration, inflammation, vascular homeostasis, and participate in lipid transport, triacylglyceride synthesis and glucose metabolism. Caveolin-1 and PPARγ regulate the production of adipokines and in turn are modulated by them. This review article summarizes the roles and inter-relationships of caveolin-1, PPARγ and adipokines in PH and metabolic syndrome.

  18. Pulmonary hypertension and metabolic syndrome: Possible connection, PPARγ and Caveolin-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rajamma; Mathew

    2014-01-01

    A number of disparate diseases can lead to pulmonary hypertension(PH), a serious disorder with a high morbidity and mortality rate. Recent studies suggest that the associated metabolic dysregulation may be an important factor adversely impacting the prognosis of PH. Furthermore, metabolic syndrome is associated with vascular diseases including PH. Inflammation plays a significant role both in PH and metabolic syndrome. Adipose tissue modulates lipid and glucose metabolism, and also produces pro-and anti-inflammatory adipokines that modulate vascular function and angiogenesis, suggesting a close functional relationship between the adipose tissue and the vasculature. Both caveolin-1, a cell membrane scaffolding protein and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor(PPAR) γ, a ligandactivated transcription factor are abundantly expressed in the endothelial cells and adipocytes. Both caveolin-1 and PPARγ modulate proliferative and anti-apoptotic pathways, cell migration, inflammation, vascular homeostasis, and participate in lipid transport, triacylglyceride synthesis and glucose metabolism. Caveolin-1 and PPARγ regulate the production of adipokines and in turn are modulated by them. This review article summarizes the roles and inter-relationships of caveolin-1,PPARγ and adipokines in PH and metabolic syndrome.

  19. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  20. HIF2α–arginase axis is essential for the development of pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowburn, Andrew S.; Crosby, Alexi; Macias, David; Branco, Cristina; Colaço, Renato D. D. R.; Southwood, Mark; Toshner, Mark; Crotty Alexander, Laura E.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Chilvers, Edwin R.; Johnson, Randall S.

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction is correlated with pulmonary vascular remodeling. The hypoxia-inducible transcription factors (HIFs) HIF-1α and HIF-2α are known to contribute to the process of hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling; however, the specific role of pulmonary endothelial HIF expression in this process, and in the physiological process of vasoconstriction in response to hypoxia, remains unclear. Here we show that pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α is a critical regulator of hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension. The rise in right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP) normally observed following chronic hypoxic exposure was absent in mice with pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α deletion. The RVSP of mice lacking HIF-2α in pulmonary endothelium after exposure to hypoxia was not significantly different from normoxic WT mice and much lower than the RVSP values seen in WT littermate controls and mice with pulmonary endothelial deletion of HIF-1α exposed to hypoxia. Endothelial HIF-2α deletion also protected mice from hypoxia remodeling. Pulmonary endothelial deletion of arginase-1, a downstream target of HIF-2α, likewise attenuated many of the pathophysiological symptoms associated with hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. We propose a mechanism whereby chronic hypoxia enhances HIF-2α stability, which causes increased arginase expression and dysregulates normal vascular NO homeostasis. These data offer new insight into the role of pulmonary endothelial HIF-2α in regulating the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia. PMID:27432976

  1. Multidetector computed tomography pulmonary angiography in childhood acute pulmonary embolism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Chun Xiang; Zhang, Long Jiang; Lu, Guang Ming [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Schoepf, U.J. [Medical School of Nanjing University, Department of Medical Imaging, Jinling Hospital, Nanjing, Jiangsu (China); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States); Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Pediatrics, Charleston, SC (United States); Chowdhury, Shahryar M. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Pediatrics, Charleston, SC (United States); Fox, Mary A. [Medical University of South Carolina, Department of Radiology and Radiological Science, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2015-09-15

    Pulmonary embolism is a life-threatening condition affecting people of all ages. Multidetector row CT pulmonary angiography has improved the imaging of pulmonary embolism in both adults and children and is now regarded as the routine modality for detection of pulmonary embolism. Advanced CT pulmonary angiography techniques developed in recent years, such as dual-energy CT, have been applied as a one-stop modality for pulmonary embolism diagnosis in children, as they can simultaneously provide anatomical and functional information. We discuss CT pulmonary angiography techniques, common and uncommon findings of pulmonary embolism in both conventional and dual-energy CT pulmonary angiography, and radiation dose considerations. (orig.)

  2. Mechanisms responsible for pulmonary hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    @@ Pulmonary hypertension is a pathophysiologic process characterized by progressive elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance and right heart failure, which is a common complication of many diseases. Pulmonary hypertension with no apparent causes (unknown etiology) is termed primary pulmonary hypertension or, more recently, idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH).

  3. Pulmonary arterial hypertension : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoendermis, E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), defined as group 1 of the World Heart Organisation (WHO) classification of pulmonary hypertension, is an uncommon disorder of the pulmonary vascular system. It is characterised by an increased pulmonary artery pressure, increased pulmonary vascular resistance a

  4. Modulation of Cellular Transcription Factor Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  5. Thematic Minireview Series: Inflammatory transcription confronts homeostatic disruptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, Nicolas G; Carman, George M

    2017-07-28

    In this Thematic Minireview Series, three stimulating articles are presented: one on long non-coding RNAs, another on the ligand-activated transcription factor aryl hydrocarbon receptor, and the third on how docosanoids modulate transcriptionally modulated homeostasis and ultimately cell survival in the retina and brain. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Matrix Remodeling Promotes Pulmonary Hypertension through Feedback Mechanoactivation of the YAP/TAZ-miR-130/301 Circuit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Bertero

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypertension (PH is a deadly vascular disease with enigmatic molecular origins. We found that vascular extracellular matrix (ECM remodeling and stiffening are early and pervasive processes that promote PH. In multiple pulmonary vascular cell types, such ECM stiffening induced the microRNA-130/301 family via activation of the co-transcription factors YAP and TAZ. MicroRNA-130/301 controlled a PPARγ-APOE-LRP8 axis, promoting collagen deposition and LOX-dependent remodeling and further upregulating YAP/TAZ via a mechanoactive feedback loop. In turn, ECM remodeling controlled pulmonary vascular cell crosstalk via such mechanotransduction, modulation of secreted vasoactive effectors, and regulation of associated microRNA pathways. In vivo, pharmacologic inhibition of microRNA-130/301, APOE, or LOX activity ameliorated ECM remodeling and PH. Thus, ECM remodeling, as controlled by the YAP/TAZ-miR-130/301 feedback circuit, is an early PH trigger and offers combinatorial therapeutic targets for this devastating disease.

  7. Transcription Factor Families Regulate the Anthocyanin Biosynthetic Pathway in Capsicum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthocyanin structural gene transcription requires the expression of at least one member of each of three transcription factor families - MYC, MYB and WD40. These transcription factors form a complex that binds to structural gene promoters, thereby modulating gene expression. Capsicum annuum display...

  8. Handbook of pulmonary emergencies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spaquolo, S.V.; Medinger, A

    1986-01-01

    This book presents information on the following topics: clinical assessment of the patient with pulmonary disease; interpretation of arterial blood gases in the emergency patient; life-threatening pneumonia; extrapulmonic ventilatory failure; acute inhalation lung disease; pulmonary edema; near drowning; chest trauma; upper airway emergencies; chronic lung disease with acute respiratory decompensation; acute respiratory failure in the patient with chronic airflow obstruction; asthma; hemoptysis; embolic pulmonary disease; superior vena cava syndrome; catastrophic pleural disease; ventilatory assistance and its complications; and ventilator emergencies.

  9. Miliary pulmonary cryptococcosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Shane; Marriott, Deborah

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old HIV positive male presents with fevers and a non-productive cough. Initial X-ray and subsequent computerised tomography of the chest shows a bilateral miliary pattern of pulmonary infiltration highly suggestive of disseminated tuberculosis. However subsequent results were consistent with disseminated cryptococcosis, including pulmonary involvement, with cryptococcus identified on transbronchial tissue biopsy, and on blood and cerebrospinal fluid cultures. Imaging features of pulmonary cryptococcosis are generally of well-defined pleural-based nodules and less commonly alveolar infiltrates, lymphadenopathy, pleural effusions or cavitating lesions. Miliary pulmonary infiltrates are an exceptionally rare presentation. PMID:25379393

  10. Idiopathic pulmonary artery aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotwica, Tomasz; Szumarska, Joanna; Staniszewska-Marszalek, Edyta; Mazurek, Walentyna; Kosmala, Wojciech

    2009-05-01

    Pulmonary artery aneurysm (PAA) is an uncommon lesion, which may be associated with different etiologies including congenital cardiovascular diseases, systemic vasculitis, connective tissue diseases, infections, and trauma. Idiopathic PAA is sporadically diagnosed by exclusion of concomitant major pathology. We report a case of a 56-year-old female with an idiopathic pulmonary artery dilatation identified fortuitously by echocardiography and confirmed by contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Neither significant pulmonary valve dysfunction nor pulmonary hypertension and other cardiac abnormalities which might contribute to the PAA development were found. Here, we describe echocardiographic and computed tomography findings and review the literature on PAA management.

  11. Regulation of pulmonary inflammation by mesenchymal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkhouri, Hatem; Poppinga, Wilfred Jelco; Tania, Navessa Padma; Ammit, Alaina; Schuliga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary inflammation and tissue remodelling are common elements of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). In disease, pulmonary mesenchymal cells not only contribute to tissue

  12. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Običan, Sarah G; Cleary, Kirsten L

    2014-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a medical condition characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and secondary right heart failure. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a subset of pulmonary hypertension, which is characterized by an underlying disorder of the pulmonary arterial vasculature. Pulmonary hypertension can also occur secondarily to structural cardiac disease, autoimmune disorders, and toxic exposures. Although pregnancies affected by pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension are rare, the pathophysiology exacerbated by pregnancy confers both high maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. In light of new treatment modalities and the use of a multidisciplinary approach to care, maternal outcomes may be improving.

  13. Unilateral pulmonary hypoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albay S

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary hypoplasia represents a broad range of malformations characterized by incomplete development of lung tissue. The severity of the lesion depends on the appearance time of the malformation during the timeline of lung development, and the presence of further anatomic anomalies. In this report, we present a case of pulmonary hypoplasia in a 27-year old woman.

  14. Pregnancy and pulmonary hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pieper, Petronella G.; Lameijer, Heleen; Hoendermis, Elke S.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension during pregnancy is associated with considerable risks of maternal mortality and morbidity. Our systematic review of the literature on the use of targeted treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension during pregnancy indicates a considerable decrease of mortality since a pre

  15. Pulmonary Hypertension in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is a reduced diffusing capacity (DL CO ) on pulmonary function tests (PFTs). The DL CO measures the ability of ... catheterization to measure the actual pressure in the pulmonary ... the PH; to assess the function of the left side of the heart; and ...

  16. Pulmonary Function Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Ranu, H; Wilde, M.; Madden, B

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary function tests are valuable investigations in the management of patients with suspected or previously diagnosed respiratory disease. They aid diagnosis, help monitor response to treatment and can guide decisions regarding further treatment and intervention. The interpretation of pulmonary functions tests requires knowledge of respiratory physiology. In this review we describe investigations routinely used and discuss their clinical implications.

  17. [Mediastino-pulmonary sarcoidosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaval, P; Desrues, B; Quinquenel, M L; Lineau, C; Lena, H

    1993-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is diffuse granulomatosis disease. The aetiology and pathogenesis are unknown. Many different localizations have been described together with immunological disturbances. Generally, the prognosis is favourable. Here we describe the pulmonary manifestations and their staging. Extra-pulmonary manifestations are then presented. Finally, the principle elements of the diagnosis and the treatment of sarcoidosis are discussed.

  18. BEND3 mediates transcriptional repression and heterochromatin organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abid; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2015-01-01

    Transcription repression plays a central role in gene regulation. Transcription repressors utilize diverse strategies to mediate transcriptional repression. We have recently demonstrated that BEND3 (BANP, E5R and Nac1 domain) protein represses rDNA transcription by stabilizing a NoRC component. We discuss the role of BEND3 as a global regulator of gene expression and propose a model whereby BEND3 associates with chromatin remodeling complexes to modulate gene expression and heterochromatin organization.

  19. Gpr177 regulates pulmonary vasculature development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Ming; Ku, Wei-yao; Fu, Jiang; Offermanns, Stefan; Hsu, Wei; Que, Jianwen

    2013-09-01

    Establishment of the functional pulmonary vasculature requires intimate interaction between the epithelium and mesenchyme. Previous genetic studies have led to inconsistent conclusions about the contribution of epithelial Wnts to pulmonary vasculature development. This discrepancy is possibly due to the functional redundancy among different Wnts. Here, we use Shh-Cre to conditionally delete Gpr177 (the mouse ortholog of Drosophila Wntless, Wls), a chaperon protein important for the sorting and secretion of Wnt proteins. Deletion of epithelial Gpr177 reduces Wnt signaling activity in both the epithelium and mesenchyme, resulting in severe hemorrhage and abnormal vasculature, accompanied by branching defects and abnormal epithelial differentiation. We then used multiple mouse models to demonstrate that Wnt/β-catenin signaling is not only required for the proliferation and differentiation of mesenchyme, but also is important for the maintenance of smooth muscle cells through the regulation of the transcription factor Kruppel-like factor 2 (Klf2). Together, our studies define a novel mechanism by which epithelial Wnts regulate the normal development and maintenance of pulmonary vasculature. These findings provide insight into the pathobiology of congenital lung diseases, such as alveolar capillary dysplasia (ACD), that have abnormal alveolar development and dysmorphic pulmonary vasculature.

  20. Pharmacokinetics and Pulmonary Distribution of Clarithromycin and Rifampicin after Concomitant and Consecutive Administration in Foals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Sarah; Spieckermann, Lena; Oswald, Stefan; Keiser, Markus; Lumpe, Stefan; Ullrich, Anett; Grube, Markus; Hasan, Mahmoud; Venner, Monica; Siegmund, Werner

    2016-03-07

    Drug interactions often result from multiple pharmacokinetic changes, such as after rifampicin (RIF) and clarithromycin (CLA) in the treatment of abscessing lung diseases. Comedication of RIF may interact with CLA disposition by either induction of presystemic elimination processes and/or inhibition of uptake mechanisms because it regulates gene transcription and modulates function of various CYP enzymes, multidrug efflux and uptake transporters for which CLA is a substrate. To distinguish the transcriptional changes from the modulating interaction components upon CLA absorption and pulmonary distribution, we initiated a repeated-dose study in 12 healthy foals with CLA (7.5 mg/kg, p.o., b.i.d.) in comedication with RIF (10 mg/kg, p.o., b.i.d.) given either concomitantly with CLA or consecutively 4 h after CLA. Affinity of CLA to human P-gp, MRP2, and MRP3 and to OCT1, OCT3, and PEPT1 was measured using Sf9-derived inside-out membrane vesicles and transfected HEK293 cells, respectively. ABCB1 (P-gp) induction by RIF and affinity of CLA to equine P-gp were studied using primary equine hepatocytes. Absolute bioavailability of CLA was reduced from ∼40% to below 5% after comedication of RIF in both schedules of administration, and Tmax occurred ∼2-3 h earlier. The loss of bioavailability was not associated with increased 14-hydroxyclarithromycin (14-OH-CLA) exposure. After consecutive dosing, absolute bioavailability and pulmonary penetration of CLA increased ∼2-fold compared to concomitant use. In vitro, CLA showed affinity to human and equine P-gp. Expression of ABCB1 mRNA was upregulated by RIF in 7 of 8 duodenal biopsy specimens and in primary equine hepatocytes. In conclusion, the major undesired influence of RIF on oral absorption and pulmonary distribution of CLA is associated with induction of intestinal P-gp. Consecutive administration to avoid competition with its intestinal uptake transport results in significantly, although not clinically relevant

  1. NFATc3 and VIP in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szema, Anthony M.; Forsyth, Edward; Ying, Benjamin; Hamidi, Sayyed A.; Chen, John J.; Hwang, Sonya; Li, Jonathan C.; Sabatini Dwyer, Debra; Ramiro-Diaz, Juan M.; Giermakowska, Wieslawa; Gonzalez Bosc, Laura V.

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are both debilitating lung diseases which can lead to hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT) is a transcription factor implicated in the etiology of vascular remodeling in hypoxic PH. We have previously shown that mice lacking the ability to generate Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) develop spontaneous PH, pulmonary arterial remodeling and lung inflammation. Inhibition of NFAT attenuated PH in these mice suggesting a connection between NFAT and VIP. To test the hypotheses that: 1) VIP inhibits NFAT isoform c3 (NFATc3) activity in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells; 2) lung NFATc3 activation is associated with disease severity in IPF and COPD patients, and 3) VIP and NFATc3 expression correlate in lung tissue from IPF and COPD patients. NFAT activity was determined in isolated pulmonary arteries from NFAT-luciferase reporter mice. The % of nuclei with NFAT nuclear accumulation was determined in primary human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) cultures; in lung airway epithelia and smooth muscle and pulmonary endothelia and smooth muscle from IPF and COPD patients; and in PASMC from mouse lung sections by fluorescence microscopy. Both NFAT and VIP mRNA levels were measured in lungs from IPF and COPD patients. Empirical strategies applied to test hypotheses regarding VIP, NFATc3 expression and activity, and disease type and severity. This study shows a significant negative correlation between NFAT isoform c3 protein expression levels in PASMC, activity of NFATc3 in pulmonary endothelial cells, expression and activity of NFATc3 in bronchial epithelial cells and lung function in IPF patients, supporting the concept that NFATc3 is activated in the early stages of IPF. We further show that there is a significant positive correlation between NFATc3 mRNA expression and VIP RNA expression only in lungs from IPF patients. In

  2. Pulmonary mycoses among the clinically suspected cases of pulmonary tuberculosis

    OpenAIRE

    Tshering Ongmu Bhutia; Luna Adhikari

    2015-01-01

    Background: This study was carried with the main objectives: (1) to find out the occurrence of pulmonary mycoses in clinically suspected pulmonary tuberculosis cases at central referral hospital, Tadong, Sikkim. (2) To find out the various fungi causing pulmonary mycoses in clinically suspected pulmonary tuberculosis cases. Methods: 200 clinically suspected pulmonary tuberculosis cases who visited the department of microbiology for the diagnostic microscopic examination of sputum sample f...

  3. Functional consequences of splicing of the antisense transcript COOLAIR on FLC transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marquardt, Sebastian; Raitskin, Oleg; Wu, Zhe

    2014-01-01

    perturbs a cotranscriptional feedback mechanism linking COOLAIR processing to FLC gene body histone demethylation and reduced FLC transcription. The importance of COOLAIR splicing in this repression mechanism was confirmed by disrupting COOLAIR production and mutating the COOLAIR proximal splice acceptor...... site. Our findings suggest that altered splicing of a long noncoding transcript can quantitatively modulate gene expression through cotranscriptional coupling mechanisms.......Antisense transcription is widespread in many genomes; however, how much is functional is hotly debated. We are investigating functionality of a set of long noncoding antisense transcripts, collectively called COOLAIR, produced at Arabidopsis FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). COOLAIR initiates just...

  4. Pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Gulati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis has a spectrum of presentation which ranges from mild disease to a severe form comprising of jaundice and renal failure. Involvement of the lung can vary from subtle clinical features to deadly pulmonary hemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Of late, it has been identified that leptospirosis can present atypically with predominant pulmonary manifestations. This can delay diagnosis making and hence optimum treatment. The purpose of this review is to bring together all the reported pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis and the recent trends in the management.

  5. Anesthesia and pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlothlin, Dana; Ivascu, Natalia; Heerdt, Paul M

    2012-01-01

    Anesthesia and surgery are associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension due mainly to right ventricular failure, arrhythmias, postoperative hypoxemia, and myocardial ischemia. Preoperative risk assessment and successful management of patients with pulmonary hypertension undergoing cardiac surgery involve an understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease, screening of patients at-risk for pulmonary arterial hypertension, analysis of preoperative and operative risk factors, thorough multidisciplinary planning, careful intraoperative management, and early recognition and treatment of postoperative complications. This article will cover each of these aspects with particular focus on the anesthetic approach for non-cardiothoracic surgeries.

  6. Isolated pulmonary Goodpasture syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrity, P; Gilbert-Barness, E; Cabalka, A; Hong, R; Zimmerman, J

    1991-01-01

    The case of a 13-year-old girl with Goodpasture syndrome is reported. The presentation at this age with only pulmonary hemorrhage is unusual among Goodpasture syndrome patients. The case illustrates well the diagnostic difficulties in Goodpasture syndrome. The choices of treatment modalities available for this disease and the results and risks of such treatment options are reviewed. A discussion and classification of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage is presented. The case emphasizes that Goodpasture syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage in spite of a lack of renal abnormalities and that serum anti-glomerular basement membrane antibody testing can be of great help in confirming the diagnosis.

  7. In Vitro Transcription Assays and Their Application in Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao; Ma, Cong

    2016-09-20

    In vitro transcription assays have been developed and widely used for many years to study the molecular mechanisms involved in transcription. This process requires multi-subunit DNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RNAP) and a series of transcription factors that act to modulate the activity of RNAP during gene expression. Sequencing gel electrophoresis of radiolabeled transcripts is used to provide detailed mechanistic information on how transcription proceeds and what parameters can affect it. In this paper we describe the protocol to study how the essential elongation factor NusA regulates transcriptional pausing, as well as a method to identify an antibacterial agent targeting transcription initiation through inhibition of RNAP holoenzyme formation. These methods can be used a as platform for the development of additional approaches to explore the mechanism of action of the transcription factors which still remain unclear, as well as new antibacterial agents targeting transcription which is an underutilized drug target in antibiotic research and development.

  8. Protective roles of pulmonary rehabilitation mixture in experimental pulmonary fibrosis in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, L; Ji, Y X; Jiang, W L; Lv, C J

    2015-06-01

    Abnormal high mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) activation is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation mixture (PRM), which combines extracts from eight traditional Chinese medicines, has very good lung protection in clinical use. However, it is not known if PRM has anti-fibrotic activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of PRM on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated and bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. The effects of PRM on TGF-β1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells, on the proliferation of human lung fibroblasts (HLF-1) in vitro, and on BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo were investigated. PRM treatment resulted in a reduction of EMT in A549 cells that was associated with attenuating an increase of vimentin and a decrease of E-cadherin. PRM inhibited the proliferation of HLF-1 at an IC50 of 0.51 µg/mL. PRM ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats, with reduction of histopathological scores and collagen deposition, and a decrease in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and HMGB1 expression. An increase in receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) expression was found in BLM-instilled lungs. PRM significantly decreased EMT and prevented pulmonary fibrosis through decreasing HMGB1 and regulating RAGE in vitro and in vivo. PRM inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT via decreased HMGB1 and vimentin and increased RAGE and E-cadherin levels. In summary, PRM prevented experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating the HMGB1/RAGE pathway.

  9. Protective roles of pulmonary rehabilitation mixture in experimental pulmonary fibrosis in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L.; Ji, Y.X.; Jiang, W.L.; Lv, C.J. [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai (China)

    2015-05-08

    Abnormal high mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) activation is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation mixture (PRM), which combines extracts from eight traditional Chinese medicines, has very good lung protection in clinical use. However, it is not known if PRM has anti-fibrotic activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of PRM on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated and bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. The effects of PRM on TGF-β1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells, on the proliferation of human lung fibroblasts (HLF-1) in vitro, and on BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo were investigated. PRM treatment resulted in a reduction of EMT in A549 cells that was associated with attenuating an increase of vimentin and a decrease of E-cadherin. PRM inhibited the proliferation of HLF-1 at an IC{sub 50} of 0.51 µg/mL. PRM ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats, with reduction of histopathological scores and collagen deposition, and a decrease in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and HMGB1 expression. An increase in receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) expression was found in BLM-instilled lungs. PRM significantly decreased EMT and prevented pulmonary fibrosis through decreasing HMGB1 and regulating RAGE in vitro and in vivo. PRM inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT via decreased HMGB1 and vimentin and increased RAGE and E-cadherin levels. In summary, PRM prevented experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating the HMGB1/RAGE pathway.

  10. Management of pulmonary aspiration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janda, Matthias; Scheeren, Thomas W L; Nöldge-Schomburg, Gabriele F E

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary aspiration of gastric contents in the perioperative phase is associated with increased postoperative morbidity and mortality. For the management of aspiration, differentiation between acid-associated aspiration pneumonitis and aspiration pneumonia as a consequence of a secondary bacterial

  11. Pulmonary neuroendocrine (carcinoid) tumors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caplin, M E; Baudin, E; Ferolla, P

    2015-01-01

    carried out in PubMed for the terms 'pulmonary neuroendocrine tumors', 'bronchial neuroendocrine tumors', 'bronchial carcinoid tumors', 'pulmonary carcinoid', 'pulmonary typical/atypical carcinoid', and 'pulmonary carcinoid and diagnosis/treatment/epidemiology/prognosis'. A systematic review...... of the relevant literature was carried out, followed by expert review. RESULTS: PCs are well-differentiated neuroendocrine tumors and include low- and intermediate-grade malignant tumors, i.e. typical (TC) and atypical carcinoid (AC), respectively. Contrast CT scan is the diagnostic gold standard for PCs......, particularly of low-grade TC and AC. Locoregional or radiotargeted therapies should be considered for metastatic disease. Systemic chemotherapy is used for progressive PCs, although cytotoxic regimens have demonstrated limited effects with etoposide and platinum combination the most commonly used, however...

  12. Pulmonary valve stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... valvuloplasty - pulmonary Images Heart valves References Carabello BA. Valvular heart disease. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ... Saunders; 2016:chap 69. Otto CM, Bownow RO. Valvular heart disease. In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow ...

  13. Pulmonary Arteriovenous Malformations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjeldsen, A D; Oxhøj, H; Andersen, P E

    1999-01-01

    Hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is a dominantly inherited disease with a high prevalence of pulmonary arteriovenous malformations (PAVMs). The first symptom of HHT may be stroke or fatal hemoptysis associated with the presence of PAVM....

  14. Neonatal pulmonary artery thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangesh Jadhav

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery thrombosis in neonates is a rare entity. We describe two neonates with this diagnosis; their presentation, evaluation, and management. These cases highlight the importance of this differential diagnosis when evaluating the cyanotic neonate.

  15. Pulmonary Valve Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... growths called carcinoid tumors in the digestive system. Rheumatic fever. This complication of an infection caused by streptococcus ... valve stenosis later in life, including: Carcinoid syndrome Rheumatic fever Noonan's syndrome Mild to moderate pulmonary valve stenosis ...

  16. [Pulmonary Manifestations of Vasculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Vietinghoff, S

    2016-11-01

    The variable symptoms and signs of pulmonary vasculitis are a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Vasculitis should be considered in rapidly progressing, severe and unusual manifestations of pulmonary disease. Clinical examination of other organ systems typically affected by vasculitis such as skin and kidney and autoantibody measurements are complementary approaches to manage this situation. Pulmonary involvement is common in small vessel vasculitis including anti-GBM disease (Goodpasture syndrome) and the ANCA-associated vasculitides. Life threatening pulmonary hemorrhage and irreversible damage of other organs, frequently the kidney, are important complications necessitating rapid diagnosis of these conditions.Vasculitides are rare diseases of multiple organs and therapies including biologics are evolving rapidly, requiring cooperation of specialities and with specialized centres to achieve best patient care. All involved physicians should be aware of typical complications of immunosuppressive therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Reperfusion pulmonary edema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klausner, J.M.; Paterson, I.S.; Mannick, J.A.; Valeri, C.R.; Shepro, D.; Hechtman, H.B. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1989-02-17

    Reperfusion following lower-torso ischemia in humans leads to respiratory failure manifest by pulmonary hypertension, hypoxemia, and noncardiogenic pulmonary edema. The mechanism of injury has been studied in the sheep lung lymph preparation, where it has been demonstrated that the reperfusion resulting in pulmonary edema is due to an increase in microvascular permeability of the lung to protein. This respiratory failure caused by reperfusion appears to be an inflammatory reaction associated with intravascular release of the chemoattractants leukotriene B{sub 4} and thromboxane. Histological studies of the lung in experimental animals revealed significant accumulation of neutrophils but not platelets in alveolar capillaries. The authors conclude that thromboxane generated and released from the ischemic tissue is responsible for the transient pulmonary hypertension. Second, it is likely that the chemoattractants are responsible for leukosequestration, and third, neutrophils, oxygen-derived free radicals, and thromboxane moderate the altered lung permeability.

  18. CHD chromatin remodelers and the transcription cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Magdalena; Brehm, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers modulate DNA access of transcription factors and RNA polymerases by "opening" or "closing" chromatin structure. However, this view is far too simplistic. Recent findings have demonstrated that these enzymes not only set the stage for the transcription machinery to act but are actively involved at every step of the transcription process. As a consequence, they affect initiation, elongation, termination and RNA processing. In this review we will use the CHD family as a paradigm to illustrate the progress that has been made in revealing these new concepts.

  19. SPDEF is required for mouse pulmonary goblet cell differentiation and regulates a network of genes associated with mucus production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, G.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Xu, Y.; Kitzmiller, J.; Wert, S.E.; Maeda, Y.; Gregorieff, A.; Clevers, H.; Whitsett, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Various acute and chronic inflammatory stimuli increase the number and activity of pulmonary mucus-producing goblet cells, and goblet cell hyperplasia and excess mucus production are central to the pathogenesis of chronic pulmonary diseases. However, little is known about the transcriptional program

  20. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    Plants have developed astonishing networks regulating their metabolism to adapt to their environment. The complexity of these networks is illustrated by the expansion of families of regulators such as transcription factors in the plant kingdom. Transcription factors specifically impact...... transcriptional networks by integrating exogenous and endogenous stimuli and regulating gene expression accordingly. Regulation of transcription factors and their activation is thus highly important to modulate the transcriptional programs and increase fitness of the plant in a given environment. Plant metabolism...... is regulated to allocate resources to growth and/or defense at different time points. Among plant chemical defenses are the amino acid-derived glucosinolates (GLS). Their absolute and relative accumulation is tightly regulated at basal level, but also in response to e.g. pathogen attack and hormone stimuli...

  1. Histone variants in plant transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Danhua; Berger, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin based organization of eukaryotic genome plays a profound role in regulating gene transcription. Nucleosomes form the basic subunits of chromatin by packaging DNA with histone proteins, impeding the access of DNA to transcription factors and RNA polymerases. Exchange of histone variants in nucleosomes alters the properties of nucleosomes and thus modulates DNA exposure during transcriptional regulation. Growing evidence indicates the important function of histone variants in programming transcription during developmental transitions and stress response. Here we review how histone variants and their deposition machineries regulate the nucleosome stability and dynamics, and discuss the link between histone variants and transcriptional regulation in plants. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Plant Gene Regulatory Mechanisms and Networks, edited by Dr. Erich Grotewold and Dr. Nathan Springer.

  2. Pulmonary mycosis in AIDS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Busi Rizzi, Elisa; Schinina, Vincenzo; Bellussi, Angelo; De Santis, Andrea; Mazzuoli, Giovanna; Giosue, Sandro; Bibbolino, Corrado

    2001-01-01

    We retrospectively reviewed our series of 35 pulmonary mycosis in patients with AIDS, observed from 1987 to 1999, to correlate the imaging and pathologic findings. We further evaluated the frequency of fungal pneumonia before and after the use of a highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). Early recognition of pulmonary mycosis is imperative in these patients and improved survival can be achieved with early CT detection and prompt institution of high-dose antifungal therapy.

  3. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    2008430 Effect of gas exchange at maximal intensity on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. WANG Haoyan(王浩彦), et al. Dept Respir Dis, Beijing Friendship Hosp, Capital Med Sci Univ, Beijing 100050. Chin J Tuberc Respir Dis 2008;31(6):414-416. Objective To investigate the effect of gas exchange at maximal intensity on exercise capacity in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

  4. Reexpansion pulmonary edema

    OpenAIRE

    Genofre Eduardo Henrique; Vargas Francisco S.; Teixeira Lisete R.; Vaz Marcelo Alexandre Costa; Marchi Evaldo

    2003-01-01

    Reexpansion pulmonary edema (RPE) is a rare, but frequently lethal, clinical condition. The precise pathophysiologic abnormalities associated with this disorder are still unknown, though decreased pulmonary surfactant levels and a pro-inflammatory status are putative mechanisms. Early diagnosis is crucial, since prognosis depends on early recognition and prompt treatment. Considering the high mortality rates related to RPE, preventive measures are still the best available strategy for patient...

  5. Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Neeraj; George, Jacob; Gupta, Rakesh C; Dixit, Ramakant

    2013-04-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma manifests in various ways, depending on the structures injured and type of injury. Commonly manifested as parenchymal contusion, at times, pseudacavitation may also been seen on the chest X ray. They are to be differentiated from other causes of pulmonary cavitations which are often done based on history. The so called pulmonary pseudo cysts usually have a benign course and needs only observation.

  6. Traumatic pulmonary pseudocyst

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Neeraj; George, Jacob; Gupta, Rakesh C; Dixit, Ramakant

    2013-01-01

    Blunt thoracic trauma manifests in various ways, depending on the structures injured and type of injury. Commonly manifested as parenchymal contusion, at times, pseudacavitation may also been seen on the chest X ray. They are to be differentiated from other causes of pulmonary cavitations which are often done based on history. The so called pulmonary pseudo cysts usually have a benign course and needs only observation.

  7. Heritable change caused by transient transcription errors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair J E Gordon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Transmission of cellular identity relies on the faithful transfer of information from the mother to the daughter cell. This process includes accurate replication of the DNA, but also the correct propagation of regulatory programs responsible for cellular identity. Errors in DNA replication (mutations and protein conformation (prions can trigger stable phenotypic changes and cause human disease, yet the ability of transient transcriptional errors to produce heritable phenotypic change ('epimutations' remains an open question. Here, we demonstrate that transcriptional errors made specifically in the mRNA encoding a transcription factor can promote heritable phenotypic change by reprogramming a transcriptional network, without altering DNA. We have harnessed the classical bistable switch in the lac operon, a memory-module, to capture the consequences of transient transcription errors in living Escherichia coli cells. We engineered an error-prone transcription sequence (A9 run in the gene encoding the lac repressor and show that this 'slippery' sequence directly increases epigenetic switching, not mutation in the cell population. Therefore, one altered transcript within a multi-generational series of many error-free transcripts can cause long-term phenotypic consequences. Thus, like DNA mutations, transcriptional epimutations can instigate heritable changes that increase phenotypic diversity, which drives both evolution and disease.

  8. Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) enhances human β-defensin-1 gene transcription in human pulmonary gland epithelial cells%卡介苗增强人肺腺上皮细胞β-防御素-1基因的转录

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    祝秉东; 冯云; 黄宁; 吴琦; 王伯瑶

    2003-01-01

    目的:检测卡介苗(BCG)胞壁蛋白对人β-防御素-1(hBD-1)基因表达的影响,并初步分析该基因5′-端旁侧区中的BCG作用元件.方法:经Sephadex G-150层析柱分离得到BCG细胞壁蛋白组份.用逆转录多聚酶链反应(RT-PCR)和Northern杂交分析法检测hBD-1 mRNA在肺腺上皮细胞的表达.一系列逐渐缩短的hBD-1基因5′-端序列被连接入无启动子的pCAT Basic质粒,构建了CAT报告质粒.ELISA法检测报告基因表达.结果:热灭活的BCG全菌(50 mg/L)及分子量在18-30 kDa的胞壁蛋白组份(3 mg/L)刺激SPC-A-1细胞8 h后,hBD-1 mRNA表达明显增强.hBD-1基因-314到+54区域具有BCG诱导的转录活性,其中含有转录因子C/EBPβ、AP-1、CP2结合位点.结论:BCG胞壁蛋白组份(18-30 kDa)能够增强SPC-A-1细胞hBD-1 mRNA表达,其基因上游序列(-314/+54)含有C/EBPβ、AP-1、CP2结合位点,与BCG的诱导作用有关.%AIM: To examine the stimulatory effect of bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) cell wall components on human β-defensin-1 (hBD- 1) gene expression and analyze the response element in the 5'-flanking region of the gene. METHODS:BCG cell wall proteins were fractionated by Sephadex G-150 chromatography. Using reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Northern hybridization analysis, hBD-1 mRNA expression was detected in a human pulmonary gland epithelial cell line SPC-A-1 cells. Progressive deletions of 5'-flanking region of hBD-1 gene were produced by PCR and ligated into promoterless chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) expression plasmid to construct pCAT reporter plasmids. Reporter gene expression was determined by ELISA. RESULTS: There was an obvious enhancement of hBD- 1 mRNA expression after stimulation with heat-inactivated BCG whole cells (50 mg/L), or the cell wall components with a molecular weight of 18-30 kDa (3 mg/L) for 8 h. The upstream sequence between -314 bp and +54 bp had the inducible activity by BCG, which contained CCAAT

  9. Inflammatory reaction and alterations of pulmonary surfactant in Pseudomonas Aeruginosa pneumonia in immunocompromised rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    瞿介明; 李倬哲; 何礼贤; 孙波; 陈雪华

    2002-01-01

    Pulmonary surfactant (PS) compromises lipids and surfactant proteins (SP) and lines on the alveolar air-liquid interface. It can reduce surface tension, prevent alveoli from collapse and reduce alveoli edema by disaturated dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine.1 It also modulates the pulmonary immunology by SP-A and SP-D.2 In this study, we established a rat model of immunocompromised host (ICH) with pulmonary infection of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), then studied its pulmonary inflammatory reaction and analyzed the concentration of lipids and SP-A in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) during infection.

  10. Contrasting effects of ascorbate and iron on the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talbot, Nick P; Croft, Quentin P; Curtis, M Kate; Turner, Brandon E; Dorrington, Keith L; Robbins, Peter A; Smith, Thomas G

    2014-12-01

    Hypoxia causes an increase in pulmonary artery pressure. Gene expression controlled by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family of transcription factors plays an important role in the underlying pulmonary vascular responses. The hydroxylase enzymes that regulate HIF are highly sensitive to varying iron availability, and iron status modifies the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia, possibly through its effects on HIF. Ascorbate (vitamin C) affects HIF hydroxylation in a similar manner to iron and may therefore have similar pulmonary effects. This study investigated the possible contribution of ascorbate availability to hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in humans. Seven healthy volunteers undertook a randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover protocol which studied the effects of high-dose intravenous ascorbic acid (total 6 g) on the pulmonary vascular response to 5 h of sustained hypoxia. Systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) was assessed during hypoxia by Doppler echocardiography. Results were compared with corresponding data from a similar study investigating the effect of intravenous iron, in which SPAP was measured in seven healthy volunteers during 8 h of sustained hypoxia. Consistent with other studies, iron supplementation profoundly inhibited hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (P ascorbate did not affect the increase in pulmonary artery pressure induced by several hours of hypoxia (P = 0.61). We conclude that ascorbate does not interact with hypoxia and the pulmonary circulation in the same manner as iron. Whether the effects of iron are HIF-mediated remains unknown, and the extent to which ascorbate contributes to HIF hydroxylation in vivo is also unclear.

  11. Role of secretory phospholipase A(2) in rhythmic contraction of pulmonary arteries of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Yoshiyuki; Saito-Tanji, Maki; Morikawa, Yuki; Kamataki, Akihisa; Sawai, Takashi; Nakayama, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Excessive stretching of the vascular wall in accordance with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induces a variety of pathogenic cellular events in the pulmonary arteries. We previously reported that indoxam, a selective inhibitor for secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)), blocked the stretch-induced contraction of rabbit pulmonary arteries by inhibition of untransformed prostaglandin H(2) (PGH(2)) production. The present study was undertaken to investigate involvement of sPLA(2) and untransformed PGH(2) in the enhanced contractility of pulmonary arteries of experimental PAH in rats. Among all the known isoforms of sPLA(2), sPLA(2)-X transcript was most significantly augmented in the pulmonary arteries of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension (MCT-PHR). The pulmonary arteries of MCT-PHR frequently showed two types of spontaneous contraction in response to stretch; 27% showed rhythmic contraction, which was sensitive to indoxam and SC-560 (selective COX-1 inhibitor), but less sensitive to NS-398 (selective COX-2 inhibitor); and 47% showed sustained incremental tension (tonic contraction), which was insensitive to indoxam and SC-560, but sensitive to NS-398 and was attenuated to 45% of the control. Only the rhythmically contracting pulmonary arteries of MCT-PHR produced a substantial amount of untransformed PGH(2), which was abolished by indoxam. These results suggest that sPLA(2)-mediated PGH(2) synthesis plays an important role in the rhythmic contraction of pulmonary arteries of MCT-PHR.

  12. 博来霉素致肺纤维化大鼠不同时间点吸人STAT1反义寡核苷酸的疗效比较%Therapeutic effects of aerosolized signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 antisense oligonucleotide administered at different time points on bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis: experiment with rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李晶; 曾鸣; 朱晨; 王文军; 湛晓勤; 范贤明

    2009-01-01

    目的 探讨雾化吸入信号转导和转录活化因子1(STAT1)反义寡核苷酸(ASON)干预肺纤维化的最佳给药时机.方法 Wistar雌性大鼠25只随机均分为博来霉素(BLM)组、ASON 0 d组、ASON 7 d组、ASON 14 d组和生理盐水(NS)组,前4组气管内灌注BLM建立肺纤维化模型,NS组气管内灌注NS.ASON 0、7、14 d组分别于气管内灌注BLM后立即、第7和14天开始雾化吸入STATI ASON;NS组和BLM组雾化吸入NS.气管内灌注BLM后第28天处死各组大鼠,取肺组织分别行HE和Masson染色,观察肺泡炎和纤维化情况并评分;酶联免疫吸附试验(ELISA)测定支气管肺泡灌洗液(BALF)中转化生长因子β(TGF-β)和肿瘤坏死因子α(TNF-α)浓度.结果 肺组织病理学观察显示ASON 0 d组大鼠肺泡炎和肺纤维化程度明显轻于BLM组和ASON 14 d组,肺泡炎评分(1.80±0.84)和肺纤维化评分(2.60±0.55)均明显低于BLM组(2.40±0.55、4.40±0.55)、ASON 7 d组(2.20±0.45、3.00 ±0.71)和ASON 14 d组(2.20±0.84、4.00±1.00)(均P<0.05);ASON 7 d组肺纤维化评分也明显低于BLM组和ASON 14 d组(均P<0.05).ASON 0 d组BALF中TGF-β与TNF-α浓度[(48.11±3.46)pg/ml、(1.93±0.14)ng/ml]均明显低于BLM组[(57.67±2.46)pg/ml、(2.45±0.25)ng/ml,均P<0.05],TGF-β浓度明显低于ASON 7 d组[(51.42±3.57)pg/ml]和ASON 14 d组[(55.83±1.79)pg/ml](均P<0.05);ASON 7 d组BALF中TGF-β浓度也明显低于BLM组和ASON 14d组(均P<0.05).结论 早期雾化吸入STAT1 ASON对BLM致肺纤维化大鼠的肺纤维化形成有明显阻抑作用,用药越早效果越好,提示雾化吸入STAT1 ASON有可能成为肺纤维化的早期干预手段.%Objective To investigate the curative effects of inhaling signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1) antisense oligonucleotide (ASON) on alveolitis and pulmonary fibrosis and the best administration time. Methods Twenty-five adult female Wistar rats were randomly divided into 5 equal groups: BLM group, undergoing intra

  13. CT findings of pulmonary aspergillosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheon, Jung Eun; Im, Jung Gi; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Hong Dae; Han, Man Chung [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    The fungus aspergillus can cause a variety of pulmonary disorders. Aspergilloma is a noninvasive aspergillus colonization of virtually any type of preexisting pulmonary cavity or cystic space. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is serious, usually fatal infection in patients being treated with immunosuppressants or who have chronic debilitating disease. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is characterized clinically by asthma, blood and sputum eosinophilia and positive immunologic reaction to aspergillus antigen. Awareness of the radiographic and CT findings of pulmonary aspergillosis is important in making the diagnosis of aspergillus-caused pulmonary disorders. In this pictorial essay, we illustrated various radiological findings of pulmonary aspergillosis focused on CT findings correlated with gross pathologic specimens.

  14. Boosting transcription by transcription: enhancer-associated transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Chadwick, Brian P

    2013-12-01

    Enhancers are traditionally viewed as DNA sequences located some distance from a promoter that act in cis and in an orientation-independent fashion to increase utilization of specific promoters and thereby regulate gene expression. Much progress has been made over the last decade toward understanding how these distant elements interact with target promoters, but how transcription is enhanced remains an object of active inquiry. Recent reports convey the prevalence and diversity of enhancer transcription and transcripts and support both as key factors with mechanistically distinct, but not mutually exclusive roles in enhancer function. Decoupling the causes and effects of transcription on the local chromatin landscape and understanding the role of enhancer transcripts in the context of long-range interactions are challenges that require additional attention. In this review, we focus on the possible functions of enhancer transcription by highlighting several recent enhancer RNA papers and, within the context of other enhancer studies, speculate on the role of enhancer transcription in regulating differential gene expression.

  15. Gene Expression Profiling of Pulmonary Artery in a Rabbit Model of Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jianfei; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Xie, Hao; Zhu, Qilin; Huang, Minjie

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) refers to the obstruction of thrombus in pulmonary artery or its branches. Recent studies have suggested that PTE-induced endothelium injury is the major physiological consequence of PTE. And it is reasonal to use PTE-induced endothelium injury to stratify disease severity. According to the massive morphologic and histologic findings, rabbit models could be applied to closely mimic the human PE. Genomewide gene expression profiling has not been attempted in PTE. In this study, we determined the accuracy of rabbit autologous thrombus PTE model for human PTE disease, then we applied gene expression array to identify gene expression changes in pulmonary arteries under PTE to identify potential molecular biomarkers and signaling pathways for PTE. We detected 1343 genes were upregulated and 923 genes were downregulated in PTE rabbits. The expression of several genes (IL-8, TNF-α, and CXCL5) with functional importance were further confirmed in transcript and protein levels. The most significantly differentially regulated genes were related to inflammation, immune disease, pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular diseases. Totally 87 genes were up-regulated in the inflammatory genes. We conclude that gene expression profiling in rabbit PTE model could extend the understanding of PTE pathogenesis at the molecular level. Our study provides the fundamental framework for future clinical research on human PTE, including identification of potential biomarkers for prognosis or therapeutic targets for PTE. PMID:27798647

  16. Gene Expression Profiling of Pulmonary Artery in a Rabbit Model of Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Xudong; Huang, Jianfei; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Xie, Hao; Zhu, Qilin; Huang, Minjie; Ni, Songshi

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) refers to the obstruction of thrombus in pulmonary artery or its branches. Recent studies have suggested that PTE-induced endothelium injury is the major physiological consequence of PTE. And it is reasonal to use PTE-induced endothelium injury to stratify disease severity. According to the massive morphologic and histologic findings, rabbit models could be applied to closely mimic the human PE. Genomewide gene expression profiling has not been attempted in PTE. In this study, we determined the accuracy of rabbit autologous thrombus PTE model for human PTE disease, then we applied gene expression array to identify gene expression changes in pulmonary arteries under PTE to identify potential molecular biomarkers and signaling pathways for PTE. We detected 1343 genes were upregulated and 923 genes were downregulated in PTE rabbits. The expression of several genes (IL-8, TNF-α, and CXCL5) with functional importance were further confirmed in transcript and protein levels. The most significantly differentially regulated genes were related to inflammation, immune disease, pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular diseases. Totally 87 genes were up-regulated in the inflammatory genes. We conclude that gene expression profiling in rabbit PTE model could extend the understanding of PTE pathogenesis at the molecular level. Our study provides the fundamental framework for future clinical research on human PTE, including identification of potential biomarkers for prognosis or therapeutic targets for PTE.

  17. Transcriptional analysis of the MrpJ network: modulation of diverse virulence-associated genes and direct regulation of mrp fimbrial and flhDC flagellar operons in Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Nadine J; Debnath, Irina; Kuan, Lisa; Schulfer, Anjelique; Ty, Maureen; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-06-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is associated with a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Strict regulation of the antagonistic processes of adhesion and motility, mediated by fimbriae and flagella, respectively, is essential for disease progression. Previously, the transcriptional regulator MrpJ, which is encoded by the mrp fimbrial operon, has been shown to repress both swimming and swarming motility. Here we show that MrpJ affects an array of cellular processes beyond adherence and motility. Microarray analysis found that expression of mrpJ mimicking levels observed during UTIs leads to differential expression of 217 genes related to, among other functions, bacterial virulence, type VI secretion, and metabolism. We probed the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MrpJ using transcriptional reporters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Binding of MrpJ to two virulence-associated target gene promoters, the promoters of the flagellar master regulator flhDC and mrp itself, appears to be affected by the condensation state of the native chromosome, although both targets share a direct MrpJ binding site proximal to the transcriptional start. Furthermore, an mrpJ deletion mutant colonized the bladders of mice at significantly lower levels in a transurethral model of infection. Additionally, we observed that mrpJ is widely conserved in a collection of recent clinical isolates. Altogether, these findings support a role of MrpJ as a global regulator of P. mirabilis virulence.

  18. [The Effect of Transcription on Enhancer Activity in Drosophila melanogaster].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erokhin, M M; Davydova, A I; Lomaev, D V; Georgiev, P G; Chetverina, D A

    2016-01-01

    In higher eukaryotes, the level of gene transcription is under the control of DNA regulatory elements, such as promoter, from which transcription is initiated with the participation of RNA polymerase II and general transcription factors, as well as the enhancer, which increase the rate of transcription with the involvement of activator proteins and cofactors. It was demonstrated that enhancers are often located in the transcribed regions of the genome. We showed earlier that transcription negatively affected the activity of enhancers in Drosophila in model transgenic systems. In this study, we tested the effect of the distance between the leading promoter, enhancer, and target promoter on the inhibitory effect of transcriptions of different strengths. It was demonstrated that the negative effect of transcription remained, but weakened with increased distance between the leading promoter and enhancer and with decreased distance between the enhancer and target promoter. Thus, transcription can modulate the activity of enhancers by controlling its maximum level.

  19. The Lrp family of transcriptional regulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brinkman, A.B.; Ettema, T.J.G.; Vos, de W.M.; Oost, van der J.

    2003-01-01

    Genome analysis has revealed that members of the Lrp family of transcriptional regulators are widely distributed among prokaryotes, both bacteria and archaea. The archetype Leucine-responsive Regulatory Protein from Escherichia coli is a global regulator involved in modulating a variety of metabolic

  20. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keshtkar Jahromi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Tuberculosis (TB is the most common cause of infection-related death worldwide. Children represent 5 to 15% of all TB cases around the world and are more frequently infected and more easily affected by the most severe forms of the disease such as meningitis and disseminated form .Here, we reviewed TB in children with impact on the routes of transmission, clinical manifestations, treatment, control, and prophylaxis. Electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus were searched from June1995 to May 2014 by using key words (pulmonaryTB,epidemiology,transmission,clinical manifestations,treatment,control, and prophylaxis . Pulmonary tuberculosis may manifest in several forms, including endobronchial TB with focal lymphadenopathy, progressive pulmonary disease, pleural involvement, and reactivated pulmonary disease . Symptoms of primary pulmonary disease in the pediatric population are often insignificant. Gastric aspirates are used instead of sputum in children younger than 6 years. BCG vaccination is used in many parts of the world and the major role of vaccination is the prevention of life-threatening illness such as disseminated TB and meningitis in children.Treatment is the same as for adults. Most people infected with M .tuberculosis do not develop active disease. In healthy individuals, the lifetime risk of developing infection to disease is 5-10%. Reactivation of TB often occurs in older children and adolescent and is more common in patients who acquire TB at age 7 years and older.

  1. Pulmonary thromboembolism in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babyn, Paul S.; Gahunia, Harpal K. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Pediatric Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Massicotte, Patricia [Stollery Children' s Hospital and University of Alberta, Departments of Pediatric Hematology and Cardiology, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2005-03-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is uncommonly diagnosed in the pediatric patient, and indeed often only discovered on autopsy. The incidence of pediatric PTE depends upon the associated underlying disease, diagnostic tests used, and index of suspicion. Multiple risk factors can be found including: peripartum asphyxia, dyspnea, haemoptysis, chest pain, dehydration, septicemia, central venous lines (CVLs), trauma, surgery, ongoing hemolysis, vascular lesions, malignancy, renal disease, foreign bodies or, uncommonly, intracranial venous sinus thrombosis, burns, or nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis. Other types of embolism can occur uncommonly in childhood and need to be recognized, as the required treatment will vary. These include pulmonary cytolytic thrombi, foreign bodies, tumor and septic emboli, and post-traumatic fat emboli. No single noninvasive test for pulmonary embolism is both sensitive and specific. A combination of diagnostic procedures must be used to identify suspect or confirmed cases of PTE. This article reviews the risk factors, clinical presentation and treatment of pulmonary embolism in children. It also highlights the current diagnostic tools and protocols used to evaluate pulmonary embolism in pediatric patients. (orig.)

  2. Lung irradiation induces pulmonary vascular remodelling resembling pulmonary arterial hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghobadi, G.; Bartelds, B.; van der Veen, S. J.; Dickinson, M. G.; Brandenburg, S.; Berger, R. M. F.; Langendijk, J. A.; Coppes, R. P.; van Luijk, P.

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a commonly fatal pulmonary vascular disease that is often diagnosed late and is characterised by a progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting from typical vascular remodelling. Recent data suggest that vascular damage plays an impo

  3. Hantavirus Fever without Pulmonary Syndrome in Panama

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armien, Blas; Pascale, Juan M.; Muñoz, Carlos; Mariñas, Jamileth; Núñez, Heydy; Herrera, Milagro; Trujillo, José; Sánchez, Deyanira; Mendoza, Yaxelis; Hjelle, Brian; Koster, Frederick

    2013-01-01

    In Panama, hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) is caused by Choclo virus, a species phylogenetically related to Andes and Maporal viruses. Up to 60% of the population has been positive for specific serum antibody in community-based surveys, but mortality is very uncommon. In four western Panama clinics, we tested individuals presenting with a severe febrile prodrome for acute hantavirus (HV) infection by immunoglobulin M enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction as well as clinically similar infections, such as dengue and leptospirosis. From 2006 to 2009, at least 21% of 117 patients diagnosed with HV infection had HV Fever (HF) with no evidence of pulmonary edema (no respiratory distress or radiographic lung infiltrates), and 44% of patients had very mild HPS (radiographic pulmonary edema but no respiratory insufficiency). HV infection caused by Choclo virus in Panama presents often as HF, which contrasts with HV in the Americas but is consistent with the high seroprevalence in endemic regions. PMID:23836565

  4. Pulmonary Hypertension: Diagnosis and Treatment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dunlap, Beth; Weyer, George

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a common, complex group of disorders that result from different pathophysiologic mechanisms but are all defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure of 25 mm Hg or greater...

  5. Update in pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía Chew, C R; Alcolea Batres, S; Ríos Blanco, J J

    2016-11-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a rare and progressive disease that mainly affects the pulmonary arterioles (precapillary), regardless of the triggering aetiology. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension in Spain is estimated at 19.2 and 16 cases per million inhabitants, respectively. The diagnosis of pulmonary arterial hypertension is based on haemodynamic criteria (mean pulmonary artery pressure ≥25mmHg, pulmonary capillary wedge pressure ≤15mmHg and pulmonary vascular resistance >3 Wood units) and therefore requires the implementation of right cardiac catheterisation. Sequential therapy with a single drug has been used in clinical practice. However, recent European guidelines recommend combined initial therapy in some situations. This review conducts a critical update of our knowledge of this disease according to the latest guidelines and recommendations.

  6. Lung Transplantation for Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the page. Answers about Lung Transplantation for PULMONARY HYPERTENSION Part One: Overview From the development of epoprostenol ... decades, expansion of medical treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) has improved survival and quality of life ...

  7. Pulmonary embolism; Lungenarterienembolie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarski, Sonja; Henzler, Thomas [Heidelberg Univ., Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2016-09-15

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) requires a quick diagnostic algorithm, as the untreated disease has a high mortality and morbidity. Crucial for the diagnostic assessment chosen is the initial clinical likelihood of PE and the individual risk profile of the patient. The overall goal is to diagnose or rule out PE as quickly and safely as possible or to initiate timely treatment if necessary. CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries (CTPA) with multi-slice CT scanner systems presents the actual diagnostic reference standard. With CTPA further important diagnoses can be made, like presence of right ventricular dysfunction. There are different scan and contrast application protocols that can be applied in order to gain diagnostic examinations with sufficient contrast material enhancement in the pulmonary arteries while avoiding all kinds of artifacts. This review article is meant to be a practical guide to examine patients with suspected PE according to the actual guidelines.

  8. Pulmonary manifestations of heartworm disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, C A; Rawlings, C A

    1985-09-01

    The clinical signs associated with heartworm disease are the result of changes in the pulmonary arterial system. These clinical signs are the result of either pulmonary hypertension or lung parenchymal disease associated with vascular changes. An increase in pulmonary arterial pressure produces an increase in right ventricular afterload, which may lead to exercise intolerance, syncope, and right-sided congestive heart failure. Coughing, dyspnea, and hemoptysis are the results of pulmonary parenchymal disease.

  9. Pulmonary artery sling: Case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Gil Hyun; Lee, Sun Wha; Cha, Sung Ho [Kyunghee University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-15

    Aberrant left-sided pulmonary artery(pulmonary artery sling) is an uncommon anomaly,which may cause significant respiratory abnormality. We report a case of pulmonary artery sling which is combined with persistent left superior vena cava and dextrocardia. This case were identified by esophagogram and CT and confirmed by MRI and angiography. We consider that MRI is a valuable new method for the diagnosis of aberrant left-sided pulmonary artery.

  10. The effects of sufentanil in the feline pulmonary vascular bed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Alan D; Phelps, James; Baluch, Amir; Ibrahim, Ikhlass N; Hoover, Jason M; Baber, Syed R; Zhang, Cuihua; Armstrong, Christopher; Huffman, Shane; Fields, Aaron

    2006-03-18

    The purpose of this prospective vehicle controlled study was to test the hypothesis that sufentanil induces a depressor response in the pulmonary vascular bed of the cat and identify the receptors involved in the mediation or modulation of these effects. In separate experiments, the effects of diphenydramine (histamine receptor blocker), glibenclamide (ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker), L-N5-(1-Iminoethyl) ornithine hydrochloride (L-NIO) (nitric oxide synthase inhibitor), nimesulide (selective cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 inhibitor), and naloxone (opiate receptor antagonist) were investigated on pulmonary arterial responses to sufentanil and other agonists in the feline pulmonary vascular bed. The lobar arterial perfusion pressures were continuously monitored, electronically averaged, and recorded. In the feline pulmonary vascular bed of the isolated left lower lobe, sufentanil induced a dose-dependent vasodepressor response that was not significantly altered after administration of glibenclamide, L-NIO, and nimesulide. However, the responses to sufentanil were significantly attenuated following administration of diphenhydramine and naloxone. The results of the present study suggest that sufentanil has potent vasodepressor activity in the pulmonary vascular bed of the cat and that this response may be mediated or modulated by both histaminergic and opioid receptor sensitive pathways.

  11. Methamphetamine Use and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... other problems, diagnosing a case of pulmonary hyper- tension can be difficult and may require a specialist. Once pulmonary hyperten- sion is diagnosed, however, treatment can begin immediately. One form of PH is called pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In PAH, the blood vessels that ...

  12. Pulmonary Artery Dissection: A Fatal Complication of Pulmonary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanchen Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery dissection is extremely rare but it is a really life-threatening condition when it happens. Most patients die suddenly from major bleeding or tamponade caused by direct rupture into mediastinum or retrograde into the pericardial sac. What we are reporting is a rare case of a 46-year-old female patient whose pulmonary artery dissection involves both the pulmonary valve and right pulmonary artery. The patient had acute chest pain and severe dyspnea, and the diagnosis of pulmonary artery dissection was confirmed by ultrasonography and CT angiography. Moreover, its etiology, clinical manifestations, and management are also discussed in this article.

  13. Transcription in archaea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyrpides, N. C.; Ouzounis, C. A.; Woese, C. R. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Using the sequences of all the known transcription-associated proteins from Bacteria and Eucarya (a total of 4,147), we have identified their homologous counterparts in the four complete archaeal genomes. Through extensive sequence comparisons, we establish the presence of 280 predicted transcription factors or transcription-associated proteins in the four archaeal genomes, of which 168 have homologs only in Bacteria, 51 have homologs only in Eucarya, and the remaining 61 have homologs in both phylogenetic domains. Although bacterial and eukaryotic transcription have very few factors in common, each exclusively shares a significantly greater number with the Archaea, especially the Bacteria. This last fact contrasts with the obvious close relationship between the archaeal and eukaryotic transcription mechanisms per se, and in particular, basic transcription initiation. We interpret these results to mean that the archaeal transcription system has retained more ancestral characteristics than have the transcription mechanisms in either of the other two domains.

  14. Different approaches in the treatment of obstructive pulmonary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabir, Eva Rahman; Morshed, Nabila

    2015-10-05

    Advances in drug formulation, inhalation device design and disease management are generating new opportunities for patients suffering from obstructive pulmonary diseases. This article provides a comprehensive review of the different promising pulmonary drug delivery technologies in the treatment of obstructive pulmonary diseases, particularly with regard to the treatment of asthma and chronic pulmonary diseases (COPD), which are increasing day by day due to increasing environmental pollution and its harmful and toxic contaminants. In the recent years, a better knowledge has been gained regarding the mechanism of action of glucocorticoids and how they suppress the chronic inflammation. New etiology has been brought into light regarding the inactivity of glucocorticoids in some patients having asthma and COPDs even though the inflammatory genes are triggered by similar molecules in both the diseases. This new knowledge has given a new platform to improve glucocorticoids and their resistance also how other combination therapy can be used for these diseases. It has also led to the quest for improving and developing other alternatives such as anti-leukotriene agents, muscarinic inhibitors, combination therapy, as well as biologic immune-modulators in the treatment of the different pulmonary diseases. Several new combinations of glucocorticoids are available in the global market for the use in pulmonary diseases especially asthma although their availability fluctuates between continents. There has been several studies done regarding the variation of effectiveness of the different inhaled glucocorticoids and hence it is important to take into consideration the different delivery systems and the methods which are used to treat the patients.

  15. Endothelial GATA-6 Deficiency Promotes Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatnekar, Angela; Chrobak, Izabela; Reese, Charlie; Stawski, Lukasz; Seta, Francesca; Wirrig, Elaine; Paez-Cortez, Jesus; Markiewicz, Margaret; Asano, Yoshihide; Harley, Russell; Silver, Richard; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Trojanowska, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease characterized by pulmonary vasculopathy with elevation of pulmonary artery pressure, often culminating in right ventricular failure. GATA-6, a member of the GATA family of zinc-finger transcription factors, is highly expre