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Sample records for modulates pulmonary transcription

  1. Transcriptional regulation by competing transcription factor modules.

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    Rutger Hermsen

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Gene regulatory networks lie at the heart of cellular computation. In these networks, intracellular and extracellular signals are integrated by transcription factors, which control the expression of transcription units by binding to cis-regulatory regions on the DNA. The designs of both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cis-regulatory regions are usually highly complex. They frequently consist of both repetitive and overlapping transcription factor binding sites. To unravel the design principles of these promoter architectures, we have designed in silico prokaryotic transcriptional logic gates with predefined input-output relations using an evolutionary algorithm. The resulting cis-regulatory designs are often composed of modules that consist of tandem arrays of binding sites to which the transcription factors bind cooperatively. Moreover, these modules often overlap with each other, leading to competition between them. Our analysis thus identifies a new signal integration motif that is based upon the interplay between intramodular cooperativity and intermodular competition. We show that this signal integration mechanism drastically enhances the capacity of cis-regulatory domains to integrate signals. Our results provide a possible explanation for the complexity of promoter architectures and could be used for the rational design of synthetic gene circuits.

  2. Modulation of transcription factors by curcumin.

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    Shishodia, Shishir; Singh, Tulika; Chaturvedi, Madan M

    2007-01-01

    Curcumin is the active ingredient of turmeric that has been consumed as a dietary spice for ages. Turmeric is widely used in traditional Indian medicine to cure biliary disorders, anorexia, cough, diabetic wounds, hepatic disorders, rheumatism, and sinusitis. Extensive investigation over the last five decades has indicated that curcumin reduces blood cholesterol, prevents low-density lipoprotein oxidation, inhibits platelet aggregation, suppresses thrombosis and myocardial infarction, suppresses symptoms associated with type II diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, multiple sclerosis, and Alzheimer's disease, inhibits HIV replication, enhances wound healing, protects from liver injury, increases bile secretion, protects from cataract formation, and protects from pulmonary toxicity and fibrosis. Evidence indicates that the divergent effects of curcumin are dependent on its pleiotropic molecular effects. These include the regulation of signal transduction pathways and direct modulation of several enzymatic activities. Most of these signaling cascades lead to the activation of transcription factors. Curcumin has been found to modulate the activity of several key transcription factors and, in turn, the cellular expression profiles. Curcumin has been shown to elicit vital cellular responses such as cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, and differentiation by activating a cascade of molecular events. In this chapter, we briefly review the effects of curcumin on transcription factors NF-KB, AP-1, Egr-1, STATs, PPAR-gamma, beta-catenin, nrf2, EpRE, p53, CBP, and androgen receptor (AR) and AR-related cofactors giving major emphasis to the molecular mechanisms of its action.

  3. Transcriptional blood signatures distinguish pulmonary tuberculosis, pulmonary sarcoidosis, pneumonias and lung cancers.

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    Bloom, Chloe I; Graham, Christine M; Berry, Matthew P R; Rozakeas, Fotini; Redford, Paul S; Wang, Yuanyuan; Xu, Zhaohui; Wilkinson, Katalin A; Wilkinson, Robert J; Kendrick, Yvonne; Devouassoux, Gilles; Ferry, Tristan; Miyara, Makoto; Bouvry, Diane; Valeyre, Dominique; Dominique, Valeyre; Gorochov, Guy; Blankenship, Derek; Saadatian, Mitra; Vanhems, Phillip; Beynon, Huw; Vancheeswaran, Rama; Wickremasinghe, Melissa; Chaussabel, Damien; Banchereau, Jacques; Pascual, Virginia; Ho, Ling-Pei; Lipman, Marc; O'Garra, Anne

    2013-01-01

    New approaches to define factors underlying the immunopathogenesis of pulmonary diseases including sarcoidosis and tuberculosis are needed to develop new treatments and biomarkers. Comparing the blood transcriptional response of tuberculosis to other similar pulmonary diseases will advance knowledge of disease pathways and help distinguish diseases with similar clinical presentations. To determine the factors underlying the immunopathogenesis of the granulomatous diseases, sarcoidosis and tuberculosis, by comparing the blood transcriptional responses in these and other pulmonary diseases. We compared whole blood genome-wide transcriptional profiles in pulmonary sarcoidosis, pulmonary tuberculosis, to community acquired pneumonia and primary lung cancer and healthy controls, before and after treatment, and in purified leucocyte populations. An Interferon-inducible neutrophil-driven blood transcriptional signature was present in both sarcoidosis and tuberculosis, with a higher abundance and expression in tuberculosis. Heterogeneity of the sarcoidosis signature correlated significantly with disease activity. Transcriptional profiles in pneumonia and lung cancer revealed an over-abundance of inflammatory transcripts. After successful treatment the transcriptional activity in tuberculosis and pneumonia patients was significantly reduced. However the glucocorticoid-responsive sarcoidosis patients showed a significant increase in transcriptional activity. 144-blood transcripts were able to distinguish tuberculosis from other lung diseases and controls. Tuberculosis and sarcoidosis revealed similar blood transcriptional profiles, dominated by interferon-inducible transcripts, while pneumonia and lung cancer showed distinct signatures, dominated by inflammatory genes. There were also significant differences between tuberculosis and sarcoidosis in the degree of their transcriptional activity, the heterogeneity of their profiles and their transcriptional response to treatment.

  4. The Transcriptional Signature of Active Tuberculosis Reflects Symptom Status in Extra-Pulmonary and Pulmonary Tuberculosis.

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    Simon Blankley

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection is a leading cause of infectious death worldwide. Gene-expression microarray studies profiling the blood transcriptional response of tuberculosis (TB patients have been undertaken in order to better understand the host immune response as well as to identify potential biomarkers of disease. To date most of these studies have focused on pulmonary TB patients with gene-expression profiles of extra-pulmonary TB patients yet to be compared to those of patients with pulmonary TB or sarcoidosis.A novel cohort of patients with extra-pulmonary TB and sarcoidosis was recruited and the transcriptional response of these patients compared to those with pulmonary TB using a variety of transcriptomic approaches including testing a previously defined 380 gene meta-signature of active TB.The 380 meta-signature broadly differentiated active TB from healthy controls in this new dataset consisting of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB. The top 15 genes from this meta-signature had a lower sensitivity for differentiating extra-pulmonary TB from healthy controls as compared to pulmonary TB. We found the blood transcriptional responses in pulmonary and extra-pulmonary TB to be heterogeneous and to reflect the extent of symptoms of disease.The transcriptional signature in extra-pulmonary TB demonstrated heterogeneity of gene expression reflective of symptom status, while the signature of pulmonary TB was distinct, based on a higher proportion of symptomatic individuals. These findings are of importance for the rational design and implementation of mRNA based TB diagnostics.

  5. Modulation of DNA binding by gene-specific transcription factors.

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    Schleif, Robert F

    2013-10-01

    The transcription of many genes, particularly in prokaryotes, is controlled by transcription factors whose activity can be modulated by controlling their DNA binding affinity. Understanding the molecular mechanisms by which DNA binding affinity is regulated is important, but because forming definitive conclusions usually requires detailed structural information in combination with data from extensive biophysical, biochemical, and sometimes genetic experiments, little is truly understood about this topic. This review describes the biological requirements placed upon DNA binding transcription factors and their consequent properties, particularly the ways that DNA binding affinity can be modulated and methods for its study. What is known and not known about the mechanisms modulating the DNA binding affinity of a number of prokaryotic transcription factors, including CAP and lac repressor, is provided.

  6. TALE-mediated modulation of transcriptional enhancers in vivo.

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    Crocker, Justin; Stern, David L

    2013-08-01

    We tested whether transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) could mediate repression and activation of endogenous enhancers in the Drosophila genome. TALE repressors (TALERs) targeting each of the five even-skipped (eve) stripe enhancers generated repression specifically of the focal stripes. TALE activators (TALEAs) targeting the eve promoter or enhancers caused increased expression primarily in cells normally activated by the promoter or targeted enhancer, respectively. This effect supports the view that repression acts in a dominant fashion on transcriptional activators and that the activity state of an enhancer influences TALE binding or the ability of the VP16 domain to enhance transcription. In these assays, the Hairy repression domain did not exhibit previously described long-range transcriptional repression activity. The phenotypic effects of TALER and TALEA expression in larvae and adults are consistent with the observed modulations of eve expression. TALEs thus provide a novel tool for detection and functional modulation of transcriptional enhancers in their native genomic context.

  7. Nitroprusside modulates pulmonary vein arrhythmogenic activity

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    Chen Yao-Chang

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pulmonary veins (PVs are the most important sources of ectopic beats with the initiation of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, or the foci of ectopic atrial tachycardia and focal atrial fibrillation. Elimination of nitric oxide (NO enhances cardiac triggered activity, and NO can decrease PV arrhythmogensis through mechano-electrical feedback. However, it is not clear whether NO may have direct electrophysiological effects on PV cardiomyocytes. This study is aimed to study the effects of nitroprusside (NO donor, on the ionic currents and arrhythmogenic activity of single cardiomyocytes from the PVs. Methods Single PV cardiomyocytes were isolated from the canine PVs. The action potential and ionic currents were investigated in isolated single canine PV cardiomyocytes before and after sodium nitroprusside (80 μM, using the whole-cell patch clamp technique. Results Nitroprusside decreased PV cardiomyocytes spontaneous beating rates from 1.7 ± 0.3 Hz to 0.5 ± 0.4 Hz in 9 cells (P Conclusion Nitroprusside regulates the electrical activity of PV cardiomyocytes, which suggests that NO may play a role in PV arrhythmogenesis.

  8. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently limited increased productivity of cultures. Four genes encoding nitrate reductase (NR) were identified, named ZmNR1–4. With the aim of evaluating NR activity and the transcriptional modulation of the ZmNR1, ZmNR2, ...

  9. Modulation of pulmonary fibrosis by IL-13Rα2.

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    Lumsden, Robert V; Worrell, Julie C; Boylan, Denise; Walsh, Sinead M; Cramton, Jennifer; Counihan, Ian; O'Beirne, Sarah; Medina, Maria Fe; Gauldie, Jack; Fabre, Aurelie; Donnelly, Seamas C; Kane, Rosemary; Keane, Michael P

    2015-04-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and fatal disease that involves the remodeling of the distal airspace and the lung parenchyma, which results in compromised gas exchange. The median survival time once diagnosed is less than three years. Interleukin (IL)-13 has been shown to play a role in a number of inflammatory and fibrotic diseases. IL-13 modulates its effector functions via a complex receptor system that includes the IL-4 receptor (R) α, IL-13Rα1, and the IL-13Rα2. IL-13Rα1 binds IL-13 with low affinity, yet, when it forms a complex with IL-4α, it binds with much higher affinity, inducing the effector functions of IL-13. IL-13Rα2 binds IL-13 with high affinity but has a short cytoplasmic tail and has been shown to act as a nonsignaling decoy receptor. Transfection of fibroblasts and epithelial cells with IL-13Rα2 inhibited the IL-13 induction of soluble collagen, TGF-β, and CCL17. Adenoviral overexpression of IL-13Rα2 in the lung reduced bleomycin-induced fibrosis. Our work shows that overexpression of IL-13Rα2 inhibits the IL-13 induction of fibrotic markers in vitro and inhibits bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In summary our study highlights the antifibrotic nature of IL-13Ra2. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Erythroid-specific transcriptional changes in PBMCs from pulmonary hypertension patients.

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    Chris Cheadle

    Full Text Available Gene expression profiling of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs is a powerful tool for the identification of surrogate markers involved in disease processes. The hypothesis tested in this study was that chronic exposure of PBMCs to a hypertensive environment in remodeled pulmonary vessels would be reflected by specific transcriptional changes in these cells.The transcript profiles of PBMCs from 30 idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension patients (IPAH, 19 patients with systemic sclerosis without pulmonary hypertension (SSc, 42 scleroderma-associated pulmonary arterial hypertensio patients (SSc-PAH, and 8 patients with SSc complicated by interstitial lung disease and pulmonary hypertension (SSc-PH-ILD were compared to the gene expression profiles of PBMCs from 41 healthy individuals. Multiple gene expression signatures were identified which could distinguish various disease groups from controls. One of these signatures, specific for erythrocyte maturation, is enriched specifically in patients with PH. This association was validated in multiple published datasets. The erythropoiesis signature was strongly correlated with hemodynamic measures of increasing disease severity in IPAH patients. No significant correlation of the same type was noted for SSc-PAH patients, this despite a clear signature enrichment within this group overall. These findings suggest an association of the erythropoiesis signature in PBMCs from patients with PH with a variable presentation among different subtypes of disease.In PH, the expansion of immature red blood cell precursors may constitute a response to the increasingly hypoxic conditions prevalent in this syndrome. A correlation of this erythrocyte signature with more severe hypertension cases may provide an important biomarker of disease progression.

  11. Transcriptional dysregulation causes altered modulation of inhibition by haloperidol.

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    Brady, Lillian J; Bartley, Aundrea F; Li, Qin; McMeekin, Laura J; Hablitz, John J; Cowell, Rita M; Dobrunz, Lynn E

    2016-12-01

    haloperidol are mimicked and occluded by a D2 receptor antagonist in slices from PGC-1α +/+ mice, and the effects of blocking D2 receptors are lost in slices from PGC-1α -/- mice, although there is no change in D2 receptor transcript levels. Together, our results show that hippocampal inhibitory synaptic transmission, CA1 circuit function, and hippocampal dependent behavior are modulated by the antipsychotic haloperidol, and that these effects of haloperidol are lost in PGC-1α -/- mice. These results have implications for the treatment of individuals with conditions involving PGC-1α deficiency. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Heterogeneous Pulmonary Phenotypes Associated With Mutations in the Thyroid Transcription Factor Gene NKX2-1

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    Deterding, Robin R.; Wert, Susan E.; White, Frances V.; Dishop, Megan K.; Alfano, Danielle N.; Halbower, Ann C.; Planer, Benjamin; Stephan, Mark J.; Uchida, Derek A.; Williames, Lee D.; Rosenfeld, Jill A.; Lebel, Robert Roger; Young, Lisa R.; Cole, F. Sessions; Nogee, Lawrence M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Mutations in the gene encoding thyroid transcription factor, NKX2-1, result in neurologic abnormalities, hypothyroidism, and neonatal respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) that together are known as the brain-thyroid-lung syndrome. To characterize the spectrum of associated pulmonary phenotypes, we identified individuals with mutations in NKX2-1 whose primary manifestation was respiratory disease. Methods: Retrospective and prospective approaches identified infants and children with unexplained diffuse lung disease for NKX2-1 sequencing. Histopathologic results and electron micrographs were assessed, and immunohistochemical analysis for surfactant-associated proteins was performed in a subset of 10 children for whom lung tissue was available. Results: We identified 16 individuals with heterozygous missense, nonsense, and frameshift mutations and five individuals with heterozygous, whole-gene deletions of NKX2-1. Neonatal RDS was the presenting pulmonary phenotype in 16 individuals (76%), interstitial lung disease in four (19%), and pulmonary fibrosis in one adult family member. Altogether, 12 individuals (57%) had the full triad of neurologic, thyroid, and respiratory manifestations, but five (24%) had only pulmonary symptoms at the time of presentation. Recurrent respiratory infections were a prominent feature in nine subjects. Lung histopathology demonstrated evidence of disrupted surfactant homeostasis in the majority of cases, and at least five cases had evidence of disrupted lung growth. Conclusions: Patients with mutations in NKX2-1 may present with pulmonary manifestations in the newborn period or during childhood when thyroid or neurologic abnormalities are not apparent. Surfactant dysfunction and, in more severe cases, disrupted lung development are likely mechanisms for the respiratory disease. PMID:23430038

  13. Suppressed Expression of T-Box Transcription Factors is Involved in Senescence in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

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    Acquaah-Mensah, George; Malhotra, Deepti; Vulimiri, Madhulika; McDermott, Jason E.; Biswal, Shyam

    2012-06-19

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a major global health problem. The etiology of COPD has been associated with apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation. However, understanding of the molecular interactions that modulate COPD pathogenesis remains only partly resolved. We conducted an exploratory study on COPD etiology to identify the key molecular participants. We used information-theoretic algorithms including Context Likelihood of Relatedness (CLR), Algorithm for the Reconstruction of Accurate Cellular Networks (ARACNE), and Inferelator. We captured direct functional associations among genes, given a compendium of gene expression profiles of human lung epithelial cells. A set of genes differentially expressed in COPD, as reported in a previous study were superposed with the resulting transcriptional regulatory networks. After factoring in the properties of the networks, an established COPD susceptibility locus and domain-domain interactions involving protein products of genes in the generated networks, several molecular candidates were predicted to be involved in the etiology of COPD. These include COL4A3, CFLAR, GULP1, PDCD1, CASP10, PAX3, BOK, HSPD1, PITX2, and PML. Furthermore, T-box (TBX) genes and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), which are in a direct transcriptional regulatory relationship, emerged as preeminent participants in the etiology of COPD by means of senescence. Contrary to observations in neoplasms, our study reveals that the expression of genes and proteins in the lung samples from patients with COPD indicate an increased tendency towards cellular senescence. The expression of the anti-senescence mediators TBX transcription factors, chromatin modifiers histone deacetylases, and sirtuins was suppressed; while the expression of TBX-regulated cellular senescence markers such as CDKN2A, CDKN1A, and CAV1 was elevated in the peripheral lung tissue samples from patients with COPD. The critical balance between senescence

  14. Acetaminophen modulates the transcriptional response to recombinant interferon-beta.

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    Aaron Farnsworth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant interferon treatment can result in several common side effects including fever and injection-site pain. Patients are often advised to use acetaminophen or other over-the-counter pain medications as needed. Little is known regarding the transcriptional changes induced by such co-administration. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We tested whether the administration of acetaminophen causes a change in the response normally induced by interferon-beta treatment. CD-1 mice were administered acetaminophen (APAP, interferon-beta (IFN-beta or a combination of IFN-beta+APAP and liver and serum samples were collected for analysis. Differential gene expression was determined using an Agilent 22 k whole mouse genome microarray. Data were analyzed by several methods including Gene Ontology term clustering and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis. We observed a significant change in the transcription profile of hepatic cells when APAP was co-administered with IFN-beta. These transcriptional changes included a marked up-regulation of genes involved in signal transduction and cell differentiation and down-regulation of genes involved in cellular metabolism, trafficking and the IkappaBK/NF-kappaB cascade. Additionally, we observed a large decrease in the expression of several IFN-induced genes including Ifit-3, Isg-15, Oasl1, Zbp1 and predicted gene EG634650 at both early and late time points. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A significant change in the transcriptional response was observed following co-administration of IFN-beta+APAP relative to IFN-beta treatment alone. These results suggest that administration of acetaminophen has the potential to modify the efficacy of IFN-beta treatment.

  15. Transcriptional profiling identifies physicochemical properties of nanomaterials that are determinants of the in vivo pulmonary response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Halappanavar, Sabina; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Decan, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    meta-analysis showed that the combination of smaller size, large deposited surface area, and surface amidation contributes to TiO2NP gene expression response. Embedding of TiO2NP in paint dampens the overall transcriptional effects. The magnitude of the expression changes associated with pulmonary...... inflammatory cytokines and chemokines were confirmed by ELISA. The data were collapsed to 659 differentially expressed genes (P ≤ 0.05; fold change ≥ 1.5). Unsupervised hierarchical clustering of these genes revealed that TiO2NPs clustered mainly by postexposure timepoint followed by particle type. A pathway-based...... in paint matrices. Adult C57BL/6 mice were exposed via single intratracheal instillations to free forms of TiO2NPs (10, 20.6, or 38 nm in diameter) with different surface coatings, or TiO2NPs embedded in paint matrices. Controls were exposed to dispersion medium devoid of NPs. TiO2NPs were characterized...

  16. In smokers, Sonic hedgehog modulates pulmonary endothelial function through vascular endothelial growth factor.

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    Henno, Priscilla; Grassin-Delyle, Stanislas; Belle, Emeline; Brollo, Marion; Naline, Emmanuel; Sage, Edouard; Devillier, Philippe; Israël-Biet, Dominique

    2017-05-23

    Tobacco-induced pulmonary vascular disease is partly driven by endothelial dysfunction. The Sonic hedgehog (SHH) pathway is involved in vascular physiology. We sought to establish whether the SHH pathway has a role in pulmonary endothelial dysfunction in smokers. The ex vivo endothelium-dependent relaxation of pulmonary artery rings in response to acetylcholine (Ach) was compared in 34 current or ex-smokers and 8 never-smokers. The results were expressed as a percentage of the contraction with phenylephrine. We tested the effects of SHH inhibitors (GANT61 and cyclopamine), an SHH activator (SAG) and recombinant VEGF on the Ach-induced relaxation. The level of VEGF protein in the pulmonary artery ring was measured in an ELISA. SHH pathway gene expression was quantified in reverse transcriptase-quantitative polymerase chain reactions. Ach-induced relaxation was much less intense in smokers than in never-smokers (respectively 24 ± 6% and 50 ± 7% with 10 -4 M Ach; p = 0.028). All SHH pathway genes were expressed in pulmonary artery rings from smokers. SHH inhibition by GANT61 reduced Ach-induced relaxation and VEGF gene expression in the pulmonary artery ring. Recombinant VEGF restored the ring's endothelial function. VEGF gene and protein expression levels in the pulmonary artery rings were positively correlated with the degree of Ach-induced relaxation and negatively correlated with the number of pack-years. SHH pathway genes and proteins are expressed in pulmonary artery rings from smokers, where they modulate endothelial function through VEGF.

  17. Hepcidin mediates transcriptional changes that modulate acute cytokine-induced inflammatory responses in mice.

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    De Domenico, Ivana; Zhang, Tian Y; Koening, Curry L; Branch, Ryan W; London, Nyall; Lo, Eric; Daynes, Raymond A; Kushner, James P; Li, Dean; Ward, Diane M; Kaplan, Jerry

    2010-07-01

    Hepcidin is a peptide hormone that regulates iron homeostasis and acts as an antimicrobial peptide. It is expressed and secreted by a variety of cell types in response to iron loading and inflammation. Hepcidin mediates iron homeostasis by binding to the iron exporter ferroportin, inducing its internalization and degradation via activation of the protein kinase Jak2 and the subsequent phosphorylation of ferroportin. Here we have shown that hepcidin-activated Jak2 also phosphorylates the transcription factor Stat3, resulting in a transcriptional response. Hepcidin treatment of ferroportin-expressing mouse macrophages showed changes in mRNA expression levels of a wide variety of genes. The changes in transcript levels for half of these genes were a direct effect of hepcidin, as shown by cycloheximide insensitivity, and dependent on the presence of Stat3. Hepcidin-mediated transcriptional changes modulated LPS-induced transcription in both cultured macrophages and in vivo mouse models, as demonstrated by suppression of IL-6 and TNF-alpha transcript and secreted protein. Hepcidin-mediated transcription in mice also suppressed toxicity and morbidity due to single doses of LPS, poly(I:C), and turpentine, which is used to model chronic inflammatory disease. Most notably, we demonstrated that hepcidin pretreatment protected mice from a lethal dose of LPS and that hepcidin-knockout mice could be rescued from LPS toxicity by injection of hepcidin. The results of our study suggest a new function for hepcidin in modulating acute inflammatory responses.

  18. Protocatechuic aldehyde ameliorates experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating HMGB1/RAGE pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Liang; Ji, Yunxia; Kang, Zechun; Lv, Changjun; Jiang, Wanglin

    2015-01-01

    An abnormal high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) activation and a decrease in receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) play a key role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Protocatechuic aldehyde (PA) is a naturally occurring compound, which is extracted from the degradation of phenolic acids. However, whether PA has anti-fibrotic functions is unknown. In this study, the effects of PA on the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells, on the apoptosis of human type I alveolar epithelial cells (AT I), on the proliferation of human lung fibroblasts (HLF-1) in vitro, and on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo were investigated. PA treatment resulted in a reduction of EMT in A549 cells with a decrease in vimentin and HMGB, an increase of E-cadherin and RAGE, a reduction of HLF-1 proliferation with a decrease of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Apoptosis of AT I was attenuated with an increase of RAGE. PA ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats with a reduction of histopathological scores and collagen deposition, and a lower FGF-2, PDGF, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and HMGB1 expression, whereas higher RAGE was found in BLM-instilled lungs. Through the decrease of HGMB1 and the regulation of RAGE, PA reversed the EMT, inhibited HLF-1 proliferation as well as reduced apoptosis in AT I, and prevented pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PA prevents experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating HMGB1/RAGE pathway. - Highlights: • PA prevents EMT, reduces the apoptosis of AT1 in vitro. • PA decreases proliferation of HLF-1, reduces PDGF and FGF expression in vitro. • PA prevents experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating the HMGB1/RAGE pathway

  19. Protocatechuic aldehyde ameliorates experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating HMGB1/RAGE pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Liang, E-mail: countryspring@sina.com; Ji, Yunxia, E-mail: 413499057@qq.com; Kang, Zechun, E-mail: davidjiangwl@163.com; Lv, Changjun, E-mail: Lucky_lcj@sina.com; Jiang, Wanglin, E-mail: jwl518@163.com

    2015-02-15

    An abnormal high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) activation and a decrease in receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) play a key role in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Protocatechuic aldehyde (PA) is a naturally occurring compound, which is extracted from the degradation of phenolic acids. However, whether PA has anti-fibrotic functions is unknown. In this study, the effects of PA on the transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells, on the apoptosis of human type I alveolar epithelial cells (AT I), on the proliferation of human lung fibroblasts (HLF-1) in vitro, and on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo were investigated. PA treatment resulted in a reduction of EMT in A549 cells with a decrease in vimentin and HMGB, an increase of E-cadherin and RAGE, a reduction of HLF-1 proliferation with a decrease of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF-2) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Apoptosis of AT I was attenuated with an increase of RAGE. PA ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats with a reduction of histopathological scores and collagen deposition, and a lower FGF-2, PDGF, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and HMGB1 expression, whereas higher RAGE was found in BLM-instilled lungs. Through the decrease of HGMB1 and the regulation of RAGE, PA reversed the EMT, inhibited HLF-1 proliferation as well as reduced apoptosis in AT I, and prevented pulmonary fibrosis in vivo. Collectively, our results demonstrate that PA prevents experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating HMGB1/RAGE pathway. - Highlights: • PA prevents EMT, reduces the apoptosis of AT1 in vitro. • PA decreases proliferation of HLF-1, reduces PDGF and FGF expression in vitro. • PA prevents experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating the HMGB1/RAGE pathway.

  20. Novel isoforms of the TFIID subunit TAF4 modulate nuclear receptor-mediated transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brunkhorst, Adrian; Neuman, Toomas; Hall, Anita; Arenas, Ernest; Bartfai, Tamas; Hermanson, Ola; Metsis, Madis

    2004-01-01

    The transcription factor TFIID consists of TATA-binding protein (TBP) and TBP-associated factors (TAFs). TAFs are essential for modulation of transcriptional activity but the regulation of TAFs is complex and many important aspects remain unclear. In this study, we have identified and characterized five novel truncated forms of the TFIID subunit TAF4 (TAF II 135). Analysis of the mouse gene structure revealed that all truncations were the results of alternative splicing and resulted in the loss of domains or parts of domains implicated in TAF4 functional interactions. Results from transcriptional assays showed that several of the TAF4 isoforms exerted dominant negative effects on TAF4 activity in nuclear receptor-mediated transcriptional activation. In addition, alternative TAF4 isoforms could be detected in specific cell types. Our results indicate an additional level of complexity in TAF4-mediated regulation of transcription and suggest context-specific roles for these new TAF4 isoforms in transcriptional regulation in vivo

  1. Transcriptional regulation of Caenorhabditis elegans FOXO/DAF-16 modulates lifespan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Ankita; Kwon, Eun-Soo; Conte, Darryl; Liu, Haibo; Gilchrist, Michael J; MacNeil, Lesley T; Tissenbaum, Heidi A

    2014-01-01

    Insulin/IGF-1 signaling plays a central role in longevity across phylogeny. In C. elegans, the forkhead box O (FOXO) transcription factor, DAF-16, is the primary target of insulin/IGF-1 signaling, and multiple isoforms of DAF-16 (a, b, and d/f) modulate lifespan, metabolism, dauer formation, and stress resistance. Thus far, across phylogeny modulation of mammalian FOXOs and DAF-16 have focused on post-translational regulation with little focus on transcriptional regulation. In C. elegans, we have previously shown that DAF-16d/f cooperates with DAF-16a to promote longevity. In this study, we generated transgenic strains expressing near-endogenous levels of either daf-16a or daf-16d/f, and examined temporal expression of the isoforms to further define how these isoforms contribute to lifespan regulation. Here, we show that DAF-16a is sensitive both to changes in gene dosage and to alterations in the level of insulin/IGF-1 signaling. Interestingly, we find that as worms age, the intestinal expression of daf-16d/f but not daf-16a is dramatically upregulated at the level of transcription. Preventing this transcriptional upregulation shortens lifespan, indicating that transcriptional regulation of daf-16d/f promotes longevity. In an RNAi screen of transcriptional regulators, we identify elt-2 (GATA transcription factor) and swsn-1 (core subunit of SWI/SNF complex) as key modulators of daf-16d/f gene expression. ELT-2 and another GATA factor, ELT-4, promote longevity via both DAF-16a and DAF-16d/f while the components of SWI/SNF complex promote longevity specifically via DAF-16d/f. Our findings indicate that transcriptional control of C. elegans FOXO/daf-16 is an essential regulatory event. Considering the conservation of FOXO across species, our findings identify a new layer of FOXO regulation as a potential determinant of mammalian longevity and age-related diseases such as cancer and diabetes.

  2. A nanobody modulates the p53 transcriptional program without perturbing its functional architecture

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    Bethuyne, Jonas; De Gieter, Steven; Zwaenepoel, Olivier; Garcia-Pino, Abel; Durinck, Kaat; Verhelle, Adriaan; Hassanzadeh-Ghassabeh, Gholamreza; Speleman, Frank; Loris, Remy; Gettemans, Jan

    2014-01-01

    The p53 transcription factor plays an important role in genome integrity. To perform this task, p53 regulates the transcription of genes promoting various cellular outcomes including cell cycle arrest, apoptosis or senescence. The precise regulation of this activity remains elusive as numerous mechanisms, e.g. posttranslational modifications of p53 and (non-)covalent p53 binding partners, influence the p53 transcriptional program. We developed a novel, non-invasive tool to manipulate endogenous p53. Nanobodies (Nb), raised against the DNA-binding domain of p53, allow us to distinctively target both wild type and mutant p53 with great specificity. Nb3 preferentially binds ‘structural’ mutant p53, i.e. R175H and R282W, while a second but distinct nanobody, Nb139, binds both mutant and wild type p53. The co-crystal structure of the p53 DNA-binding domain in complex with Nb139 (1.9 Å resolution) reveals that Nb139 binds opposite the DNA-binding surface. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nb139 does not disturb the functional architecture of the p53 DNA-binding domain using conformation-specific p53 antibody immunoprecipitations, glutaraldehyde crosslinking assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation. Functionally, the binding of Nb139 to p53 allows us to perturb the transactivation of p53 target genes. We propose that reduced recruitment of transcriptional co-activators or modulation of selected post-transcriptional modifications account for these observations. PMID:25324313

  3. Direct modulation of T-box riboswitch-controlled transcription by protein synthesis inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatopoulou, Vassiliki; Apostolidi, Maria; Li, Shuang; Lamprinou, Katerina; Papakyriakou, Athanasios; Zhang, Jinwei; Stathopoulos, Constantinos

    2017-09-29

    Recently, it was discovered that exposure to mainstream antibiotics activate numerous bacterial riboregulators that control antibiotic resistance genes including metabolite-binding riboswitches and other transcription attenuators. However, the effects of commonly used antibiotics, many of which exhibit RNA-binding properties, on the widespread T-box riboswitches, remain unknown. In Staphylococcus aureus, a species-specific glyS T-box controls the supply of glycine for both ribosomal translation and cell wall synthesis, making it a promising target for next-generation antimicrobials. Here, we report that specific protein synthesis inhibitors could either significantly increase T-box-mediated transcription antitermination, while other compounds could suppress it, both in vitro and in vivo. In-line probing of the full-length T-box combined with molecular modelling and docking analyses suggest that the antibiotics that promote transcription antitermination stabilize the T-box:tRNA complex through binding specific positions on stem I and the Staphylococcal-specific stem Sa. By contrast, the antibiotics that attenuate T-box transcription bind to other positions on stem I and do not interact with stem Sa. Taken together, our results reveal that the transcription of essential genes controlled by T-box riboswitches can be directly modulated by commonly used protein synthesis inhibitors. These findings accentuate the regulatory complexities of bacterial response to antimicrobials that involve multiple riboregulators. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Modulation of CRISPR locus transcription by the repeat-binding protein Cbp1 in Sulfolobus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deng, Ling; Kenchappa, Chandra Shekar; Peng, Xu

    2012-01-01

    CRISPR loci are essential components of the adaptive immune system of archaea and bacteria. They consist of long arrays of repeats separated by DNA spacers encoding guide RNAs (crRNA), which target foreign genetic elements. Cbp1 (CRISPR DNA repeat binding protein) binds specifically to the multiple...... direct repeats of CRISPR loci of members of the acidothermophilic, crenarchaeal order Sulfolobales. cbp1 gene deletion from Sulfolobus islandicus REY15A produced a strong reduction in pre-crRNA yields from CRISPR loci but did not inhibit the foreign DNA targeting capacity of the CRISPR/Cas system....... Conversely, overexpression of Cbp1 in S. islandicus generated an increase in pre-crRNA yields while the level of reverse strand transcripts from CRISPR loci remained unchanged. It is proposed that Cbp1 modulates production of longer pre-crRNA transcripts from CRISPR loci. A possible mechanism...

  5. Commensal Streptococcus salivarius Modulates PPARγ Transcriptional Activity in Human Intestinal Epithelial Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benoît Couvigny

    Full Text Available The impact of commensal bacteria in eukaryotic transcriptional regulation has increasingly been demonstrated over the last decades. A multitude of studies have shown direct effects of commensal bacteria from local transcriptional activity to systemic impact. The commensal bacterium Streptococcus salivarius is one of the early bacteria colonizing the oral and gut mucosal surfaces. It has been shown to down-regulate nuclear transcription factor (NF-кB in human intestinal cells, a central regulator of the host mucosal immune system response to the microbiota. In order to evaluate its impact on a further important transcription factor shown to link metabolism and inflammation in the intestine, namely PPARγ (peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor, we used human intestinal epithelial cell-lines engineered to monitor PPARγ transcriptional activity in response to a wide range of S. salivarius strains. We demonstrated that different strains from this bacterial group share the property to inhibit PPARγ activation independently of the ligand used. First attempts to identify the nature of the active compounds showed that it is a low-molecular-weight, DNase-, proteases- and heat-resistant metabolite secreted by S. salivarius strains. Among PPARγ-targeted metabolic genes, I-FABP and Angptl4 expression levels were dramatically reduced in intestinal epithelial cells exposed to S. salivarius supernatant. Both gene products modulate lipid accumulation in cells and down-regulating their expression might consequently affect host health. Our study shows that species belonging to the salivarius group of streptococci impact both host inflammatory and metabolic regulation suggesting a possible role in the host homeostasis and health.

  6. The cardiac calsequestrin gene transcription is modulated at the promoter by NFAT and MEF-2 transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Estrada-Avilés

    Full Text Available Calsequestrin-2 (CASQ2 is the main Ca2+-binding protein inside the sarcoplasmic reticulum of cardiomyocytes. Previously, we demonstrated that MEF-2 and SRF binding sites within the human CASQ2 gene (hCASQ2 promoter region are functional in neonatal cardiomyocytes. In this work, we investigated if the calcineurin/NFAT pathway regulates hCASQ2 expression in neonatal cardiomyocytes. The inhibition of NFAT dephosphorylation with CsA or INCA-6, reduced both the luciferase activity of hCASQ2 promoter constructs (-3102/+176 bp and -288/+176 bp and the CASQ2 mRNA levels in neonatal rat cardiomyocytes. Additionally, NFATc1 and NFATc3 over-expressing neonatal cardiomyocytes showed a 2-3-fold increase in luciferase activity of both hCASQ2 promoter constructs, which was prevented by CsA treatment. Site-directed mutagenesis of the -133 bp MEF-2 binding site prevented trans-activation of hCASQ2 promoter constructs induced by NFAT overexpression. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed NFAT and MEF-2 enrichment within the -288 bp to +76 bp of the hCASQ2 gene promoter. Besides, a direct interaction between NFAT and MEF-2 proteins was demonstrated by protein co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Taken together, these data demonstrate that NFAT interacts with MEF-2 bound to the -133 bp binding site at the hCASQ2 gene promoter. In conclusion, in this work, we demonstrate that the Ca2+-calcineurin/NFAT pathway modulates the transcription of the hCASQ2 gene in neonatal cardiomyocytes.

  7. Modulation of proteostasis by transcription factor NRF2 and impact in neurodegenerative diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Pajares

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Neurodegenerative diseases are linked to the accumulation of specific protein aggregates, suggesting an intimate connection between injured brain and loss of proteostasis. Proteostasis refers to all the processes by which cells control the abundance and folding of the proteome thanks to a wide network that integrates the regulation of signaling pathways, gene expression and protein degradation systems. This review attempts to summarize the most relevant findings about the transcriptional modulation of proteostasis exerted by the transcription factor NRF2 (nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2-like 2. NRF2 has been classically considered as the master regulator of the antioxidant cell response, although it is currently emerging as a key component of the transduction machinery to maintain proteostasis. As we will discuss, NRF2 could be envisioned as a hub that compiles emergency signals derived from misfolded protein accumulation in order to build a coordinated and perdurable transcriptional response. This is achieved by functions of NRF2 related to the control of genes involved in the maintenance of the endoplasmic reticulum physiology, the proteasome and autophagy.

  8. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih; Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott; Peng, Chih-Wen

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection

  9. pH modulates the binding of early growth response protein 1 transcription factor to DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikles, David C; Bhat, Vikas; Schuchardt, Brett J; Deegan, Brian J; Seldeen, Kenneth L; McDonald, Caleb B; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-08-01

    The transcription factor early growth response protein (EGR)1 orchestrates a plethora of signaling cascades involved in cellular homeostasis, and its downregulation has been implicated in the development of prostate cancer. Herein, using a battery of biophysical tools, we show that the binding of EGR1 to DNA is tightly regulated by solution pH. Importantly, the binding affinity undergoes an enhancement of more than an order of magnitude with an increase in pH from 5 to 8, implying that the deprotonation of an ionizable residue accounts for such behavior. This ionizable residue is identified as His382 by virtue of the fact that its replacement by nonionizable residues abolishes the pH dependence of the binding of EGR1 to DNA. Notably, His382 inserts into the major groove of DNA, and stabilizes the EGR1-DNA interaction via both hydrogen bonding and van der Waals contacts. Remarkably, His382 is mainly conserved across other members of the EGR family, implying that histidine protonation-deprotonation may serve as a molecular switch for modulating the protein-DNA interactions that are central to this family of transcription factors. Collectively, our findings reveal an unexpected but a key step in the molecular recognition of the EGR family of transcription factors, and suggest that they may act as sensors of pH within the intracellular environment. © 2013 FEBS.

  10. pH Modulates the Binding of EGR1 Transcription Factor to DNA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikles, David C.; Bhat, Vikas; Schuchardt, Brett J.; Deegan, Brian J.; Seldeen, Kenneth L.; McDonald, Caleb B.; Farooq, Amjad

    2013-01-01

    EGR1 transcription factor orchestrates a plethora of signaling cascades involved in cellular homeostasis and its down-regulation has been implicated in the development of prostate cancer. Herein, using a battery of biophysical tools, we show that the binding of EGR1 to DNA is tightly regulated by solution pH. Importantly, the binding affinity undergoes an enhancement of more than an order of magnitude with increasing pH from 5 to 8, implying that the deprotonation of an ionizable residue accounts for such behavior. This ionizable residue is identified as H382 by virtue of the fact that its substitution to non-ionizable residues abolishes pH-dependence of the binding of EGR1 to DNA. Notably, H382 inserts into the major groove of DNA and stabilizes the EGR1-DNA interaction via both hydrogen bonding and van der Waals contacts. Remarkably, H382 is predominantly conserved across other members of EGR1 family, implying that histidine protonation-deprotonation may serve as a molecular switch for modulating protein-DNA interactions central to this family of transcription factors. Collectively, our findings uncover an unexpected but a key step in the molecular recognition of EGR1 family of transcription factors and suggest that they may act as sensors of pH within the intracellular environment. PMID:23718776

  11. Modulation of Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen 2-dependent transcription by protein arginine methyltransferase 5

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cheng-Der; Cheng, Chi-Ping; Fang, Jia-Shih; Chen, Ling-Chih [Department of Life Sciences, Tzu-Chi University, 701 Chung-Yang Rd. Sec 3, Hualien 97004, Taiwan (China); Zhao, Bo; Kieff, Elliott [Department of Medicine and Microbiology and Molecular Genetics, Channing Laboratory, Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, 181 Longwood Ave., Boston 02115, MA (United States); Peng, Chih-Wen, E-mail: pengcw@mail.tcu.edu.tw [Department of Life Sciences, Tzu-Chi University, 701 Chung-Yang Rd. Sec 3, Hualien 97004, Taiwan (China)

    2013-01-18

    Highlights: ► Catalytic active PRMT5 substantially binds to the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 augments the EBNA2-dependent transcription. ► PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of the EBNA2 RG domain. ► PRMT5 enhances the promoter occupancy of EBNA2 on its target promoters. -- Abstract: Epstein–Barr Virus Nuclear Antigen (EBNA) 2 features an Arginine–Glycine repeat (RG) domain at amino acid positions 335–360, which is a known target for protein arginine methyltransferaser 5 (PRMT5). In this study, we performed protein affinity pull-down assays to demonstrate that endogenous PRMT5 derived from lymphoblastoid cells specifically associated with the protein bait GST-E2 RG. Transfection of a plasmid expressing PRMT5 induced a 2.5- to 3-fold increase in EBNA2-dependent transcription of both the LMP1 promoter in AKATA cells, which contain the EBV genome endogenously, and a Cp-Luc reporter plasmid in BJAB cells, which are EBV negative. Furthermore, we showed that there was a 2-fold enrichment of EBNA2 occupancy in target promoters in the presence of exogenous PRMT5. Taken together, we show that PRMT5 triggers the symmetric dimethylation of EBNA2 RG domain to coordinate with EBNA2-mediated transcription. This modulation suggests that PRMT5 may play a role in latent EBV infection.

  12. Dendrimer nanocarriers for transport modulation across models of the pulmonary epithelium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharatwaj, Balaji; Mohammad, Abdul Khader; Dimovski, Radovan; Cassio, Fernando L; Bazito, Reinaldo C; Conti, Denise; Fu, Qiang; Reineke, Joshua; da Rocha, Sandro R P

    2015-03-02

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of PEGylation on the interaction of poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) dendrimer nanocarriers (DNCs) with in vitro and in vivo models of the pulmonary epithelium. Generation-3 PAMAM dendrimers with varying surface densities of PEG 1000 Da were synthesized and characterized. The results revealed that the apical to basolateral transport of DNCs across polarized Calu-3 monolayers increases with an increase in PEG surface density. DNC having the greatest number of PEG groups (n = 25) on their surface traversed at a rate 10-fold greater than its non-PEGylated counterpart, in spite of their larger size. This behavior was attributed to a significant reduction in charge density upon PEGylation. We also observed that PEGylation can be used to modulate cellular internalization. The total uptake of PEG-free DNC into polarized Calu-3 monolayers was 12% (w/w) vs 2% (w/w) for that with 25 PEGs. Polarization is also shown to be of great relevance in studying this in vitro model of the lung epithelium. The rate of absorption of DNCs administered to mice lungs increased dramatically when conjugated with 25 PEG groups, thus supporting the in vitro results. The exposure obtained for the DNC with 25PEG was determined to be very high, with peak plasma concentrations reaching 5 μg·mL(-1) within 3 h. The combined in vitro and in vivo results shown here demonstrate that PEGylation can be potentially used to modulate the internalization and transport of DNCs across the pulmonary epithelium. Modified dendrimers thereby may serve as a valuable platform that can be tailored to target the lung tissue for treating local diseases, or the circulation, using the lung as pathway to the bloodstream, for systemic delivery.

  13. Stress-induced alterations in 5-HT1A receptor transcriptional modulators NUDR and Freud-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szewczyk, Bernadeta; Kotarska, Katarzyna; Daigle, Mireille; Misztak, Paulina; Sowa-Kucma, Magdalena; Rafalo, Anna; Curzytek, Katarzyna; Kubera, Marta; Basta-Kaim, Agnieszka; Nowak, Gabriel; Albert, Paul R

    2014-11-01

    The effect of stress on the mRNA and protein level of the 5-HT1A receptor and two of its key transcriptional modulators, NUDR and Freud-1, was examined in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and hippocampus (Hp) using rodent models: olfactory bulbectomy (OB) and prenatal stress (PS) in male and female rats; chronic mild stress in male rats (CMS) and pregnancy stress. In PFC, CMS induced the most widespread changes, with significant reduction in both mRNA and protein levels of NUDR, 5-HT1A receptor and in Freud-1 mRNA; while in Hp 5-HT1A receptor and Freud-1 protein levels were also decreased. In male, but not female OB rats PFC Freud-1 and 5-HT1A receptor protein levels were reduced, while in Hp 5-HT1A receptor, Freud-1 and NUDR mRNA's but not protein were reduced. In PS rats PFC 5-HT1A receptor protein was reduced more in females than males; while in Hp Freud-1 protein was increased in females. In pregnancy stress, PFC NUDR, Freud-1 and 5-HT1A protein receptor levels were reduced, and in HP 5-HT1A receptor protein levels were also reduced; in HP only NUDR and Freud-1 mRNA levels were reduced. Overall, CMS and stress during pregnancy produced the most salient changes in 5-HT1A receptor and transcription factor expression, suggesting a primary role for altered transcription factor expression in chronic regulation of 5-HT1A receptor expression. By contrast, OB (in males) and PS (in females) produced gender-specific reductions in PFC 5-HT1A receptor protein levels, suggesting a role for post-transcriptional regulation. These and previous data suggest that chronic stress might be a key regulator of NUDR/Freud-1 gene expression.

  14. RNF11 is a multifunctional modulator of growth factor receptor signalling and transcriptional regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azmi, Peter; Seth, Arun

    2005-11-01

    Our laboratory has found that the 154aa RING finger protein 11 (RNF11), has modular domains and motifs including a RING-H2 finger domain, a PY motif, an ubiquitin interacting motif (UIM), a 14-3-3 binding sequence and an AKT phosphorylation site. RNF11 represents a unique protein with no other known immediate family members yet described. Comparative genetic analysis has shown that RNF11 is highly conserved throughout evolution. This may indicate a conserved and non-redundant role for the RNF11 protein. Molecular binding assays using RNF11 have shown that RNF11 has important roles in growth factor signalling, ubiquitination and transcriptional regulation. RNF11 has been shown to interact with HECT-type E3 ubiquitin ligases Nedd4, AIP4, Smurf1 and Smurf2, as well as with Cullin1, the core protein in the multi-subunit SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Work done in our laboratory has shown that RNF11 is capable of antagonizing Smurf2-mediated inhibition of TGFbeta signalling. Furthermore, RNF11 is capable of degrading AMSH, a positive regulator of both TGFbeta and EGFR signalling pathways. Recently, we have found that RNF11 can directly enhance TGFbeta signalling through a direct association with Smad4, the common signal transducer and transcription factor in the TGFbeta, BMP, and Activin pathways. Through its association with Smad4 and other transcription factors, RNF11 may have a role in direct transcriptional regulation. Our laboratory and others have found nearly 80 protein interactions for RNF11, placing RNF11 at the cross-roads of cell signalling and transcriptional regulation. RNF11 is highly expressed in breast tumours. Deregulation of RNF11 function may prove to be harmful to patient therapeutic outcomes. RNF11 may therefore provide a novel target for cancer therapeutics. The purpose of this review is to discuss the role of RNF11 in cell signalling and transcription factor modulation with special attention given to the ubiquitin-proteasomal pathway, TGFbeta

  15. CITED2 modulates estrogen receptor transcriptional activity in breast cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Wen Min; Doucet, Michele; Huang, David; Weber, Kristy L.; Kominsky, Scott L.

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •The effects of elevated CITED2 on ER function in breast cancer cells are examined. •CITED2 enhances cell growth in the absence of estrogen and presence of tamoxifen. •CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co-activator of ER in breast cancer cells. -- Abstract: Cbp/p300-interacting transactivator with Glu/Asp-rich carboxy-terminal domain 2 (CITED2) is a member of the CITED family of non-DNA binding transcriptional co-activators of the p300/CBP-mediated transcription complex. Previously, we identified CITED2 as being overexpressed in human breast tumors relative to normal mammary epithelium. Upon further investigation within the estrogen receptor (ER)-positive subset of these breast tumor samples, we found that CITED2 mRNA expression was elevated in those associated with poor survival. In light of this observation, we investigated the effect of elevated CITED2 levels on ER function. While ectopic overexpression of CITED2 in three ER-positive breast cancer cell lines (MCF-7, T47D, and CAMA-1) did not alter cell proliferation in complete media, growth was markedly enhanced in the absence of exogenous estrogen. Correspondingly, cells overexpressing CITED2 demonstrated reduced sensitivity to the growth inhibitory effects of the selective estrogen receptor modulator, 4-hydroxytamoxifen. Subsequent studies revealed that basal ER transcriptional activity was elevated in CITED2-overexpressing cells and was further increased upon the addition of estrogen. Similarly, basal and estrogen-induced expression of the ER-regulated genes trefoil factor 1 (TFF1) and progesterone receptor (PGR) was higher in cells overexpressing CITED2. Concordant with this observation, ChIP analysis revealed higher basal levels of CITED2 localized to the TFF-1 and PGR promoters in cells with ectopic overexpression of CITED2, and these levels were elevated further in response to estrogen stimulation. Taken together, these data indicate that CITED2 functions as a transcriptional co

  16. Dendritic Cytoskeletal Architecture Is Modulated by Combinatorial Transcriptional Regulation in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Ravi; Bhattacharjee, Shatabdi; Patel, Atit A; Harris, Jenna M; Bhattacharya, Surajit; Letcher, Jamin M; Clark, Sarah G; Nanda, Sumit; Iyer, Eswar Prasad R; Ascoli, Giorgio A; Cox, Daniel N

    2017-12-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) have emerged as essential cell autonomous mediators of subtype specific dendritogenesis; however, the downstream effectors of these TFs remain largely unknown, as are the cellular events that TFs control to direct morphological change. As dendritic morphology is largely dictated by the organization of the actin and microtubule (MT) cytoskeletons, elucidating TF-mediated cytoskeletal regulatory programs is key to understanding molecular control of diverse dendritic morphologies. Previous studies in Drosophila melanogaster have demonstrated that the conserved TFs Cut and Knot exert combinatorial control over aspects of dendritic cytoskeleton development, promoting actin and MT-based arbor morphology, respectively. To investigate transcriptional targets of Cut and/or Knot regulation, we conducted systematic neurogenomic studies, coupled with in vivo genetic screens utilizing multi-fluor cytoskeletal and membrane marker reporters. These analyses identified a host of putative Cut and/or Knot effector molecules, and a subset of these putative TF targets converge on modulating dendritic cytoskeletal architecture, which are grouped into three major phenotypic categories, based upon neuromorphometric analyses: complexity enhancer, complexity shifter, and complexity suppressor. Complexity enhancer genes normally function to promote higher order dendritic growth and branching with variable effects on MT stabilization and F-actin organization, whereas complexity shifter and complexity suppressor genes normally function in regulating proximal-distal branching distribution or in restricting higher order branching complexity, respectively, with spatially restricted impacts on the dendritic cytoskeleton. Collectively, we implicate novel genes and cellular programs by which TFs distinctly and combinatorially govern dendritogenesis via cytoskeletal modulation. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Modulation of the nitrate reductase transcript by cytokinin and abscisic acid in etiolated barley seedlings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Jia-ling; Enl, J.R.; Chen, Chong-maw

    1989-01-01

    To investigate the molecular mechanism of the hormonal modulation of nitrate reductase (NR) activity, the influence of benzyladenine (BA) and/or abscisic acid (ABA) on the level of NR poly(A)RNA was studied in etiolated barley seedlings using a 32 P-labelled NR cDNA as a probe. Enhancement of NR activity by 2 x 10 -5 M BA was measurable only after 60 minutes of exposure of the seedlings to light, while a significant stimulatory effect on the transcript level could by clearly detected within 15 minutes. Northern blot analyses of the levels of NR poly(A)RNA indicate that the amount present is proportional to the concentration of BA applied to the seedlings. The stimulatory effects seen for BA were nullified by ABA. The counteractive effects of ABA on BA were dose-responsive, with greater inhibition at higher concentrations of ABA. Evidence suggests that the interaction of BA and ABA on NR activity is at the transcriptional level, however, is also possible that interactions occur at the postranscriptional level as well

  18. IGF2BP3 Modulates the Interaction of Invasion-Associated Transcripts with RISC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanane Ennajdaoui

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3 expression correlates with malignancy, but its role(s in pathogenesis remains enigmatic. We interrogated the IGF2BP3-RNA interaction network in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC cells. Using a combination of genome-wide approaches, we have identified 164 direct mRNA targets of IGF2BP3. These transcripts encode proteins enriched for functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and adhesion. Loss of IGF2BP3 reduced PDAC cell invasiveness and remodeled focal adhesion junctions. Individual nucleotide resolution crosslinking immunoprecipitation (iCLIP revealed significant overlap of IGF2BP3 and microRNA (miRNA binding sites. IGF2BP3 promotes association of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC with specific transcripts. Our results show that IGF2BP3 influences a malignancy-associated RNA regulon by modulating miRNA-mRNA interactions.

  19. Differential Modulation of Transcription Factors and Cytoskeletal Proteins in Prostate Carcinoma Cells by a Bacterial Lactone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil R. Kumar

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study tested the effect of a bacterial lactone N-(3-oxododecanoyl-homoserine lactone (C12-HSL on the cytoskeletal and transcriptional genes and proteins in prostate adenocarcinoma (PA cells (DU145 and LNCaP and prostate small cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (SCNC PC3 cells including their cellular viability and apoptosis. Our data indicate that cell migration and colony formation were affected in the presence of C12-HSL. C12-HSL induced apoptosis and altered viability of both PA and SCNC cells in a concentration dependent manner as measured by fluorescence and chemiluminescence assays. Compared to PCa cells, noncancerous prostate epithelial cells (RWPE1 were resistant to modification by C12-HSL. Further, the viability of PC3 cells in 3D matrix was suppressed by C12-HSL treatment as detected using calcein AM fluorescence in situ. C12-HSL treatment induced cytoskeletal associated protein expression of vinculin and RhoC, which may have implications in cancer cell motility, adhesion, and metastasis. IQGAP protein expression was reduced in DU145 and RWPE1 cells in the presence of C12-HSL. C12-HSL decreased STAT3 phosphorylation in DU145 cells but increased STAT1 protein phosphorylation in PC3 and LNCaP cells. Overall, these studies indicate that C12-HSL can trigger changes in transcription factors and cytoskeletal proteins and thereby modulate growth and migration properties of PCa cells.

  20. IGF2BP3 Modulates the Interaction of Invasion-Associated Transcripts with RISC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ennajdaoui, Hanane; Howard, Jonathan M; Sterne-Weiler, Timothy; Jahanbani, Fereshteh; Coyne, Doyle J; Uren, Philip J; Dargyte, Marija; Katzman, Sol; Draper, Jolene M; Wallace, Andrew; Cazarez, Oscar; Burns, Suzanne C; Qiao, Mei; Hinck, Lindsay; Smith, Andrew D; Toloue, Masoud M; Blencowe, Benjamin J; Penalva, Luiz O F; Sanford, Jeremy R

    2016-05-31

    Insulin-like growth factor 2 mRNA binding protein 3 (IGF2BP3) expression correlates with malignancy, but its role(s) in pathogenesis remains enigmatic. We interrogated the IGF2BP3-RNA interaction network in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) cells. Using a combination of genome-wide approaches, we have identified 164 direct mRNA targets of IGF2BP3. These transcripts encode proteins enriched for functions such as cell migration, proliferation, and adhesion. Loss of IGF2BP3 reduced PDAC cell invasiveness and remodeled focal adhesion junctions. Individual nucleotide resolution crosslinking immunoprecipitation (iCLIP) revealed significant overlap of IGF2BP3 and microRNA (miRNA) binding sites. IGF2BP3 promotes association of the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC) with specific transcripts. Our results show that IGF2BP3 influences a malignancy-associated RNA regulon by modulating miRNA-mRNA interactions. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Polymeric nanocarriers for transport modulation across the pulmonary epithelium: dendrimers, polymeric nanoparticles, and their nanoblends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bharatwaj, Balaji; Dimovski, Radovan; Conti, Denise S; da Rocha, Sandro R P

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to (a) Determine the cellular transport and uptake of amine-terminated generation 3 (G3) poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimers across an in vitro model of the pulmonary epithelium, and the ability to modulate their transport by forming nanoblends of the dendrimers with biodegradable solid polymeric nanoparticles (NPs) and (b) to formulate dendrimer nanocarriers in portable oral inhalation devices and evaluate their aerosol characteristics. To that end, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled G3 PAMAM dendrimer nanocarriers (DNCs) were synthesized, and also encapsulated within poly lactide-co-glycolide nanoparticles (NPs). Transport and uptake of both DNCs encapsulated within NPs (nanoblends) and unencapsulated DNCs were tracked across polarized monolayers of airway epithelial cells, Calu-3. DNCs were also formulated as core-shell microparticles in pressurized metered-dose inhalers (pMDIs) and their aerodynamic properties evaluated by Andersen cascade impaction. The apparent permeability of DNCs across the airway epithelial model was similar to that of a paracellular marker of comparable molar mass--order of 10(-7) cm s(-1). The transport and cellular internalization of the DNCs can be modulated by formulating them as nanoblends. The transport of the DNCs across the lung epithelium was completely suppressed within the time of the experiment (5 h) when formulated as blends. The encapsulation also prevents saturation of the cellular internalization profile. Nanoblending may be a potential strategy to modulate the rate of transport and cellular uptake of DNCs, and thus be used as a design strategy to achieve enhanced local or systemic drug delivery.

  2. Hierarchical structure and modules in the Escherichia coli transcriptional regulatory network revealed by a new top-down approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buer Jan

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cellular functions are coordinately carried out by groups of genes forming functional modules. Identifying such modules in the transcriptional regulatory network (TRN of organisms is important for understanding the structure and function of these fundamental cellular networks and essential for the emerging modular biology. So far, the global connectivity structure of TRN has not been well studied and consequently not applied for the identification of functional modules. Moreover, network motifs such as feed forward loop are recently proposed to be basic building blocks of TRN. However, their relationship to functional modules is not clear. Results In this work we proposed a top-down approach to identify modules in the TRN of E. coli. By studying the global connectivity structure of the regulatory network, we first revealed a five-layer hierarchical structure in which all the regulatory relationships are downward. Based on this regulatory hierarchy, we developed a new method to decompose the regulatory network into functional modules and to identify global regulators governing multiple modules. As a result, 10 global regulators and 39 modules were identified and shown to have well defined functions. We then investigated the distribution and composition of the two basic network motifs (feed forward loop and bi-fan motif in the hierarchical structure of TRN. We found that most of these network motifs include global regulators, indicating that these motifs are not basic building blocks of modules since modules should not contain global regulators. Conclusion The transcriptional regulatory network of E. coli possesses a multi-layer hierarchical modular structure without feedback regulation at transcription level. This hierarchical structure builds the basis for a new and simple decomposition method which is suitable for the identification of functional modules and global regulators in the transcriptional regulatory network of E

  3. Osteopontin is an endogenous modulator of the constitutively activated phenotype of pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anwar, Adil; Li, Min; Frid, Maria G.; Kumar, Binod; Gerasimovskaya, Evgenia V.; Riddle, Suzette R.; McKeon, B. Alexandre; Thukaram, Roopa; Meyrick, Barbara O.; Fini, Mehdi A.

    2012-01-01

    Increased cell proliferation and migration, of several cell types are key components of vascular remodeling observed in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Our previous data demonstrate that adventitial fibroblasts isolated from pulmonary arteries of chronically hypoxic hypertensive calves (termed PH-Fibs) exhibit a “constitutively activated” phenotype characterized by high proliferative and migratory potential. Osteopontin (OPN) has been shown to promote several cellular activities including growth and migration in cancer cells. We thus tested the hypothesis that elevated OPN expression confers the “activated” highly proproliferative and promigratory/invasive phenotype of PH-Fibs. Our results demonstrate that, both in vivo and ex vivo, PH-Fibs exhibited increased expression of OPN, as well as its cognate receptors, αVβ3 and CD44, compared with control fibroblasts (CO-Fibs). Augmented OPN expression in PH-Fibs corresponded to their high proliferative, migratory, and invasive properties and constitutive activation of ERK1/2 and AKT signaling. OPN silencing via small interfering RNA or sequestering OPN production by specific antibodies led to decreased proliferation, migration, invasion, and attenuated ERK1/2, AKT phosphorylation in PH-Fibs. Furthermore, increasing OPN levels in CO-Fibs via recombinant OPN resulted in significant increases in their proliferative, migratory, and invasive capabilities to the levels resembling those of PH-Fibs. Thus our data suggest OPN as an essential contributor to the activated (highly proliferative, migratory, and proinvasive) phenotype of pulmonary adventitial fibroblasts in hypoxic PH. PMID:22582113

  4. PI3K/AKT signaling modulates transcriptional expression of EWS/FLI1 through specificity protein 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, Chiara; Boro, Aleksandar; Rechfeld, Florian; Lopez-Garcia, Laura A; Gierisch, Maria E; Schäfer, Beat W; Niggli, Felix K

    2015-10-06

    Ewing sarcoma (ES) is the second most frequent bone cancer in childhood and is characterized by the presence of the balanced translocation t(11;22)(q24;q12) in more than 85% of cases, generating a dysregulated transcription factor EWS/FLI1. This fusion protein is an essential oncogenic component of ES development which is necessary for tumor cell maintenance and represents an attractive therapeutic target. To search for modulators of EWS/FLI1 activity we screened a library of 153 targeted compounds and identified inhibitors of the PI3K pathway to directly modulate EWS/FLI1 transcription. Surprisingly, treatment of four different ES cell lines with BEZ235 resulted in down regulation of EWS/FLI1 mRNA and protein by ~50% with subsequent modulation of target gene expression. Analysis of the EWS/FLI1 promoter region (-2239/+67) using various deletion constructs identified two 14 bp minimal elements as being important for EWS/FLI1 transcription. We identified SP1 as modulator of EWS/FLI1 gene expression and demonstrated direct binding to one of these regions in the EWS/FLI1 promoter by EMSA and ChIP experiments. These results provide the first insights on the transcriptional regulation of EWS/FLI1, an area that has not been investigated so far, and offer an additional molecular explanation for the known sensitivity of ES cell lines to PI3K inhibition.

  5. Modulation of Caenorhabditis elegans transcription factor activity by HIM-8 and the related Zinc-Finger ZIM proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hongliu; Nelms, Brian L; Sleiman, Sama F; Chamberlin, Helen M; Hanna-Rose, Wendy

    2007-10-01

    The previously reported negative regulatory activity of HIM-8 on the Sox protein EGL-13 is shared by the HIM-8-related ZIM proteins. Furthermore, mutation of HIM-8 can modulate the effects of substitution mutations in the DNA-binding domains of at least four other transcription factors, suggesting broad regulatory activity by HIM-8.

  6. Extracellular matrix of collagen modulates arrhythmogenic activity of pulmonary veins through p38 MAPK activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yen-Yu; Chen, Yao-Chang; Kao, Yu-Hsun; Chen, Shih-Ann; Chen, Yi-Jen

    2013-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is the most common sustained arrhythmia. Cardiac fibrosis with enhanced extracellular collagen plays a critical role in the pathophysiology of AF through structural and electrical remodeling. Pulmonary veins (PVs) are important foci for AF genesis. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether collagen can directly modulate PV arrhythmogenesis. Action potentials and ionic currents were investigated in isolated male New Zealand rabbit PV cardiomyocytes with and without collagen incubation (10μg/ml, 5-7h) using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Compared to control PV cardiomyocytes (n=25), collagen-treated PV cardiomyocytes (n=22) had a faster beating rate (3.2±04 vs. 1.9±0.2Hz, pcollagen-treated PV cardiomyocytes showed a larger transient outward potassium current, small-conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) current, inward rectifier potassium current, pacemaker current, and late sodium current than control PV cardiomyocytes, but amplitudes of the sodium current, sustained outward potassium current, and L-type calcium current were similar. Collagen increased the p38 MAPK phosphorylation in PV cardiomyocytes as compared to control. The change of the spontaneous activity and action potential morphology were ameliorated by SB203580 (the p38 MAPK catalytic activity inhibitor), indicating that collagen can directly increase PV cardiomyocyte arrhythmogenesis through p38 MAPK activation, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of AF. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. OsWRKY74, a WRKY transcription factor, modulates tolerance to phosphate starvation in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Xiaoyan; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Wen-Hao

    2016-02-01

    The WRKY transcription factor family has 109 members in the rice genome, and has been reported to be involved in the regulation of biotic and abiotic stress in plants. Here, we demonstrated that a rice OsWRKY74 belonging to group III of the WRKY transcription factor family was involved in tolerance to phosphate (Pi) starvation. OsWRKY74 was localized in the nucleus and mainly expressed in roots and leaves. Overexpression of OsWRKY74 significantly enhanced tolerance to Pi starvation, whereas transgenic lines with down-regulation of OsWRKY74 were sensitive to Pi starvation. Root and shoot biomass, and phosphorus (P) concentration in rice OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants were ~16% higher than those of wild-type (WT) plants in Pi-deficient hydroponic solution. In soil pot experiments, >24% increases in tiller number, grain weight and P concentration were observed in rice OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants compared to WT plants when grown in P-deficient medium. Furthermore, Pi starvation-induced changes in root system architecture were more profound in OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants than in WT plants. Expression patterns of a number of Pi-responsive genes were altered in the OsWRKY74-overexpressing and RNA interference lines. In addition, OsWRKY74 may also be involved in the response to deficiencies in iron (Fe) and nitrogen (N) as well as cold stress in rice. In Pi-deficient conditions, OsWRKY74-overexpressing plants exhibited greater accumulation of Fe and up-regulation of the cold-responsive genes than WT plants. These findings highlight the role of OsWRKY74 in modulation of Pi homeostasis and potential crosstalk between P starvation and Fe starvation, and cold stress in rice. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  8. The obesity-associated transcription factor ETV5 modulates circulating glucocorticoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez-Aguilar, Ruth; Thompson, Abigail; Marchand, Nathalie; Dumont, Patrick; Woods, Stephen C.; de Launoit, Yvan; Seeley, Randy J.; Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M.

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor E-twenty-six version 5 (ETV5) has been linked with obesity in genome-wide association studies. Moreover, ETV5-deficient mice (knockout; KO) have reduced body weight, lower fat mass, and are resistant to diet-induced obesity, directly linking ETV5 to the regulation of energy balance and metabolism. ETV5 is expressed in hypothalamic brain regions that regulate both metabolism and HPA axis activity, suggesting that ETV5 may also modulate HPA axis function. In order to test this possibility, plasma corticosterone levels were measured in ETV5 KO and wildtype (WT) mice before (pre-stress) and after (post-stress) a mild stressor (intraperitoneal injection). ETV5 deficiency increased both pre- and post-stress plasma corticosterone, suggesting that loss of ETV5 elevated glucocorticoid tone. Consistent with this idea, ETV5 KO mice have reduced thymus weight, suggestive of increased glucocorticoid-induced thymic involution. ETV5 deficiency also decreased the mRNA expression of glucocorticoid receptor (GR), mineralocorticoid receptor (MR), and vasopressin receptor 1A in the hypothalamus, without altering vasopressin, corticotropin-releasing hormone, or oxytocin mRNA expression. In order to test whether reduced MR and GR expression affected glucocorticoid negative feedback, a dexamethasone suppression test was performed. Dexamethasone reduced plasma corticosterone in both ETV5 KO and WT mice, suggesting that glucocorticoid negative feedback was unaltered by ETV5 deficiency. In summary, these data suggest that the obesity-associated transcription factor ETV5 normally acts to diminish circulating glucocorticoids. This might occur directly via ETV5 actions on HPA-regulatory brain circuitry, and/or indirectly via ETV5-induced alterations in metabolic factors that then influence the HPA axis. PMID:25813907

  9. Identifying modules of coexpressed transcript units and their organization of Saccharopolyspora erythraea from time series gene expression profiles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome sequence was released in 2007. In order to look at the gene regulations at whole transcriptome level, an expression microarray was specifically designed on the S. erythraea strain NRRL 2338 genome sequence. Based on these data, we set out to investigate the potential transcriptional regulatory networks and their organization. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In view of the hierarchical structure of bacterial transcriptional regulation, we constructed a hierarchical coexpression network at whole transcriptome level. A total of 27 modules were identified from 1255 differentially expressed transcript units (TUs across time course, which were further classified in to four groups. Functional enrichment analysis indicated the biological significance of our hierarchical network. It was indicated that primary metabolism is activated in the first rapid growth phase (phase A, and secondary metabolism is induced when the growth is slowed down (phase B. Among the 27 modules, two are highly correlated to erythromycin production. One contains all genes in the erythromycin-biosynthetic (ery gene cluster and the other seems to be associated with erythromycin production by sharing common intermediate metabolites. Non-concomitant correlation between production and expression regulation was observed. Especially, by calculating the partial correlation coefficients and building the network based on Gaussian graphical model, intrinsic associations between modules were found, and the association between those two erythromycin production-correlated modules was included as expected. CONCLUSIONS: This work created a hierarchical model clustering transcriptome data into coordinated modules, and modules into groups across the time course, giving insight into the concerted transcriptional regulations especially the regulation corresponding to erythromycin production of S. erythraea. This strategy may be extendable to studies

  10. Identifying modules of coexpressed transcript units and their organization of Saccharopolyspora erythraea from time series gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Xiao; Liu, Shuai; Yu, Yong-Tao; Li, Yi-Xue; Li, Yuan-Yuan

    2010-08-12

    The Saccharopolyspora erythraea genome sequence was released in 2007. In order to look at the gene regulations at whole transcriptome level, an expression microarray was specifically designed on the S. erythraea strain NRRL 2338 genome sequence. Based on these data, we set out to investigate the potential transcriptional regulatory networks and their organization. In view of the hierarchical structure of bacterial transcriptional regulation, we constructed a hierarchical coexpression network at whole transcriptome level. A total of 27 modules were identified from 1255 differentially expressed transcript units (TUs) across time course, which were further classified in to four groups. Functional enrichment analysis indicated the biological significance of our hierarchical network. It was indicated that primary metabolism is activated in the first rapid growth phase (phase A), and secondary metabolism is induced when the growth is slowed down (phase B). Among the 27 modules, two are highly correlated to erythromycin production. One contains all genes in the erythromycin-biosynthetic (ery) gene cluster and the other seems to be associated with erythromycin production by sharing common intermediate metabolites. Non-concomitant correlation between production and expression regulation was observed. Especially, by calculating the partial correlation coefficients and building the network based on Gaussian graphical model, intrinsic associations between modules were found, and the association between those two erythromycin production-correlated modules was included as expected. This work created a hierarchical model clustering transcriptome data into coordinated modules, and modules into groups across the time course, giving insight into the concerted transcriptional regulations especially the regulation corresponding to erythromycin production of S. erythraea. This strategy may be extendable to studies on other prokaryotic microorganisms.

  11. Transcriptional Modulation of Human Endogenous Retroviruses in Primary CD4+ T Cells Following Vorinostat Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cory H. White

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The greatest obstacle to a cure for HIV is the provirus that integrates into the genome of the infected cell and persists despite antiretroviral therapy. A “shock and kill” approach has been proposed as a strategy for an HIV cure whereby drugs and compounds referred to as latency-reversing agents (LRAs are used to “shock” the silent provirus into active replication to permit “killing” by virus-induced pathology or immune recognition. The LRA most utilized to date in clinical trials has been the histone deacetylase (HDAC inhibitor—vorinostat. Potentially, pathological off-target effects of vorinostat may result from the activation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs, which share common ancestry with exogenous retroviruses including HIV. To explore the effects of HDAC inhibition on HERV transcription, an unbiased pharmacogenomics approach (total RNA-Seq was used to evaluate HERV expression following the exposure of primary CD4+ T cells to a high dose of vorinostat. Over 2,000 individual HERV elements were found to be significantly modulated by vorinostat, whereby elements belonging to the ERVL family (e.g., LTR16C and LTR33 were predominantly downregulated, in contrast to LTR12 elements of the HERV-9 family, which exhibited the greatest signal, with the upregulation of 140 distinct elements. The modulation of three different LTR12 elements by vorinostat was confirmed by droplet digital PCR along a dose–response curve. The monitoring of LTR12 expression during clinical trials with vorinostat may be indicated to assess the impact of this HERV on the human genome and host immunity.

  12. A trans-acting enhancer modulates estrogen-mediated transcription of reporter genes in osteoblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki-Iwaoka, H; Maruyama, K; Endoh, H; Komori, T; Kato, S; Kawashima, H

    1999-02-01

    The presence of bone-specific estrogen agonists and discovery of the osteoblast-specific transcription factor (TF), Cbfa1, together with the discovery of synergism between a TF Pit-1 and estrogen receptor alpha (ERalpha) on rat prolactin gene, led to investigation of Cbfa1 in the modulation of osteoblast-specific actions of estrogen. Reverse transcribed-polymerase chain reaction demonstrated expression of Cbfa1 in the osteoblastic cell lines, MG63, ROS17/2.8, and MC3T3E1, but not in nonosteoblastic cell lines, MCF7, C3H10T1/2, and HeLa. An ER expression vector and a series of luciferase (Luc) reporter plasmids harboring the Cbfa1 binding site OSE2 (the osteoblast-specific cis element in the osteocalcin promoter) and palindromic estrogen response elements (EREs) were cotransfected into both osteoblastic and nonosteoblastic cells. OSE2 worked as a cis- acting element in osteoblastic cells but not nonosteoblastic cells, whereas EREs were cis- acting in all cell lines. Synergistic transactivation was observed in osteoblastic cells only when both ERE and OSE2 were placed in juxtaposition to the promoter. Forced expression of Cbfa1 in C3H10T1/2 cells also induced synergism. Tamoxifen, a partial agonist/antagonist of estrogen, acted as an osteoblast-specific agonist in cells transfected with a promoter containing ERE and acted synergistically with a promoter containing the ERE-OSE2 enhancer combination. These results support the idea that bone-specific TFs modulate the actions of estrogen in a tissue-specific manner.

  13. Musa paradisiaca inflorescence induces human colon cancer cell death by modulating cascades of transcriptional events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    K B, Arun; Madhavan, Aravind; T R, Reshmitha; Thomas, Sithara; Nisha, P

    2018-01-24

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer death, and diet plays an important role in the etiology of CRC. Traditional medical practitioners in many South Asian countries use plantain inflorescence to treat various gastro-intestinal ailments. The aim of the present study was to investigate the anticancer effects of extracts of inflorescence of Musa paradisiaca against HT29 human colon cancer cells and elucidate the mechanism of these effects by studying the modulation of cascades of transcriptional events. In vitro assays depicted that methanol extract of Musa paradisiaca inflorescence (PIMET) was cytotoxic to HT29 cells. PIMET induced DNA damage and arrested the cell cycle at the G2/M phase. Expression studies showed that PIMET pretreatment upregulates pro-apoptotic Bcl2 and downregulates anti-apoptotic Bax proteins. Different assays showed that the deregulation of pro/antiapoptotic proteins reduces the mitochondrial membrane potential and ATP production; moreover, it enhances cytochrome c release, which triggers the apoptotic pathway, and further cleaves caspase 3 and PARP proteins, resulting in apoptosis. Changes in the protein expression profile of HT29 cells after PIMET treatment were analyzed using mass-spectrometry-based proteomics. PIMET treatment significantly altered the expression of HT29 protein; interestingly, X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein was also downregulated. Alteration in the expression of this protein has significant effects, leading to HT29 cell death.

  14. The AP2/ERF Transcription Factor DRNL Modulates Gynoecium Development and Affects Its Response to Cytokinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolanda Durán-Medina

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The gynoecium is the female reproductive system in flowering plants. It is a complex structure formed by different tissues, some that are essential for reproduction and others that facilitate the fertilization process and nurture and protect the developing seeds. The coordinated development of these different tissues during the formation of the gynoecium is important for reproductive success. Both hormones and genetic regulators guide the development of the different tissues. Auxin and cytokinin in particular have been found to play important roles in this process. On the other hand, the AP2/ERF2 transcription factor BOL/DRNL/ESR2/SOB is expressed at very early stages of aerial organ formation and has been proposed to be a marker for organ founder cells. In this work, we found that this gene is also expressed at later stages during gynoecium development, particularly at the lateral regions (the region related to the valves of the ovary. The loss of DRNL function affects gynoecium development. Some of the mutant phenotypes present similarities to those observed in plants treated with exogenous cytokinins, and AHP6 has been previously proposed to be a target of DRNL. Therefore, we explored the response of drnl-2 developing gynoecia to cytokinins, and found that the loss of DRNL function affects the response of the gynoecium to exogenously applied cytokinins in a developmental-stage-dependent manner. In summary, this gene participates during gynoecium development, possibly through the dynamic modulation of cytokinin homeostasis and response.

  15. Copine-I: Modulator of NF-kappa B Transcription and Prostate Cancer Survival

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mayo, Marty W; Creutz, Carl

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of our studies is to elucidate how Copine-I antagonizes NF-.B transcription. Nuclear factor-.B (NF-.B) is a dynamic transcription factor that regulates important biological processes involved in cancer initiation and progression...

  16. A pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex modulates androgen receptor-mediated transcription and associates with components of the splicing machinery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adegbola, Onikepe; Pasternack, Gary R.

    2005-01-01

    We have previously shown pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein interact. pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein are nuclear receptor transcriptional coregulators: the retinoblastoma protein is a coactivator for androgen receptor, the major regulator of prostate cancer growth, while pp32, which is highly expressed in prostate cancer, is a corepressor of the estrogen receptor. We now show pp32 increases androgen receptor-mediated transcription and the retinoblastoma protein modulates this activity. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we identify members of the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex as PSF and nonO/p54nrb, proteins implicated in coordinate regulation of nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and splicing. We show that the pp32-retinoblastoma protein complex is modulated during TPA-induced K562 differentiation. Present evidence suggests that nuclear receptors assemble multiprotein complexes to coordinately regulate transcription and mRNA processing. Our results suggest that pp32 and the retinoblastoma protein may be part of a multiprotein complex that coordinately regulates nuclear receptor-mediated transcription and mRNA processing

  17. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wada, Takeyoshi; Asahi, Toru; Sawamura, Naoya

    2016-01-01

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin. - Highlights: • We found that CRBN is a nucleocytoplasmic shutting protein and identified the key domain for nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. • CRBN associates with the transcription factor Ikaros via the N-terminal domain. • CRBN modulates Ikaros-mediated transcriptional regulation and its downstream target, enkephalin.

  18. Nuclear cereblon modulates transcriptional activity of Ikaros and regulates its downstream target, enkephalin, in human neuroblastoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wada, Takeyoshi [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Asahi, Toru [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Research Organization for Nano & Life Innovation, Waseda University #03C309, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Sawamura, Naoya, E-mail: naoya.sawamura@gmail.com [Faculty of Science and Engineering, Waseda University, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan); Research Organization for Nano & Life Innovation, Waseda University #03C309, TWIns, 2-2 Wakamatsu, Shinjuku, Tokyo, 162-8480 (Japan)

    2016-08-26

    The gene coding cereblon (CRBN) was originally identified in genetic linkage analysis of mild autosomal recessive nonsyndromic intellectual disability. CRBN has broad localization in both the cytoplasm and nucleus. However, the significance of nuclear CRBN remains unknown. In the present study, we aimed to elucidate the role of CRBN in the nucleus. First, we generated a series of CRBN deletion mutants and determined the regions responsible for the nuclear localization. Only CRBN protein lacking the N-terminal region was localized outside of the nucleus, suggesting that the N-terminal region is important for its nuclear localization. CRBN was also identified as a thalidomide-binding protein and component of the cullin-4-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. Thalidomide has been reported to be involved in the regulation of the transcription factor Ikaros by CRBN-mediated degradation. To investigate the nuclear functions of CRBN, we performed co-immunoprecipitation experiments and evaluated the binding of CRBN to Ikaros. As a result, we found that CRBN was associated with Ikaros protein, and the N-terminal region of CRBN was required for Ikaros binding. In luciferase reporter gene experiments, CRBN modulated transcriptional activity of Ikaros. Furthermore, we found that CRBN modulated Ikaros-mediated transcriptional repression of the proenkephalin gene by binding to its promoter region. These results suggest that CRBN binds to Ikaros via its N-terminal region and regulates transcriptional activities of Ikaros and its downstream target, enkephalin. - Highlights: • We found that CRBN is a nucleocytoplasmic shutting protein and identified the key domain for nucleocytoplasmic shuttling. • CRBN associates with the transcription factor Ikaros via the N-terminal domain. • CRBN modulates Ikaros-mediated transcriptional regulation and its downstream target, enkephalin.

  19. Autonomic nervous system modulation and clinical outcome after pulmonary vein isolation using the second-generation cryoballoon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Shinsuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki; Taniguchi, Hiroshi; Hachiya, Hitoshi; Kajiyama, Takatsugu; Watanabe, Tomonori; Igarashi, Miyako; Ichijo, Sadamitsu; Hirao, Kenzo; Iesaka, Yoshito

    2017-09-01

    The intrinsic cardiac autonomic nervous system (ANS) plays a significant role in atrial fibrillation (AF) mechanisms. This study evaluated the incidence and impact of intraprocedural vagal reactions and ANS modulation by pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) using second-generation cryoballoons on outcomes. One hundred three paroxysmal AF patients underwent PVI with one 28-mm second-generation balloon. The median follow-up was 15.0 (12.0-18.0) months. ANS modulation was defined as a >20% cycle length decrease on 3-minute resting electrocardiograms at 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postindex procedure relative to baseline if sinus rhythm was maintained. Marked sinus arrests/bradycardia and atrioventricular block (intraprocedural vagal reaction) occurred in 14 and 2 patients, and all sinus arrest/bradycardia occurred in 44 patients with left superior pulmonary veins (PVs) targeted before right PVs. ANS modulation was identified in 66 of 95 (69.5%) patients, and it persisted 12-month postprocedure in 36 (37.9%) patients. Additional β-blocker administration was required in 9 patients for sinus tachycardia. ANS modulation was similarly observed in patients with and without intraprocedural vagal reactions (P = 0.443). Forty-eight (46.6%) patients experienced early recurrences, and the single procedure success at 12 months was 72.7%. Neither intraprocedural vagal reactions nor ANS modulation predicted AF freedom within or after the blanking period. Thirty-three patients underwent second procedures, and reconnections were detected in 39 of 130 (30.0%) PVs among 23 (69.7%) patients. The incidence of reconnections was similar in patients with and without ANS modulation. Increased heart rate persisted in 37.9% of patients even at 12-month post-second-generation cryoballoon PVI. Neither intraprocedural vagal reactions nor increased heart rate predicted a single procedure clinical outcome. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. NFκBP65 transcription factor modulates resistance to doxorubicin through ABC transporters in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velaei, Kobra; Samadi, Nasser; Soltani, Sina; Barazvan, Balal; Soleimani Rad, Jafar

    2017-07-01

    Shedding light on chemoresistance biology of breast cancer could contribute to enhance the clinical outcome. Intrinsic or acquired resistance to chemotherapy is a major problem in breast cancer treatment. The NFκB pathway by siRNAP65 and JSH-23 as a translocational inhibitor of NFκBP65 in the doxorubicin-resistant MCF-7 (MCF-7/Dox) and MCF-7 cells was blocked. Then, the ABC transporter expression and function were assessed by real-time qRT-PCR and flow cytometry, respectively. Induction of apoptosis was evaluated after inhibition of the NFΚB pathway as well. Our study underlined the upregulation of NFκBP65 and anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 and downregulation of pro-apoptotic Bax in the MCF-7/Dox cells compared with control MCF-7 cells. Here, we showed that interplay between nuclear factor kappa B P65 (NFkBP65) as a transcriptional regulator and ABC transporters in the MCF-7/Dox cancer cells. We found that inhibition of the elevated expression of NFκBP65 in the resistant breast cancer, whether translocational inhibition or silencing by siRNA, decreased the expression and function of MDR1 and MRP1 efflux pumps. Furthermore, the blockade of NFκBP65 promoted apoptosis via modulating Bcl-2 and BAX expression. After inhibition of the NFκBP65 signaling pathway, elevated baseline expression of survival Bcl-2 gene in the resistant breast cells significantly decreased. Suppression of the NFκB pathway has a profound dual impact on promoting the intrinsic apoptotic pathway and reducing ABC transporter function and expression, which are some of the chemoresistance features. It was speculated that the NFκB pathway directly acts on doxorubicin-induced MDR1 and MRP1 expression in MCF-7/Dox cells.

  1. Modulation of CD11c+ lung dendritic cells in respect to TGF-β in experimental pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Kaustav; Chatterjee, Soumya; Bhattacharyya, Arindam

    2017-09-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a deadly, progressive lung disease with very few treatment options till now. Bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis (BIPF) is a commonly used mice model in IPF research. TGF-β1 has been shown to play a key role in pulmonary fibrosis (PF). Dendritic cell (DC) acts as a bridge between innate and adaptive immune systems. The coexistence of chronic inflammation sustained by mature DCs with fibrosis suggests that inflammatory phenomenon has key importance in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Here, we investigated the modulation of DCs phenotypic maturation, accumulation in lung tissue, and expression of other lung DC subsets in respect to TGF-β in PF. First, we established BIPF model in mice and blocked TGF-β expression by the use of inhibitor SB431542. Accumulation of lung CD11c+ DCs is significantly higher in both inflammatory and fibrotic phases of the disease but that percentages got reduced in the absence of TGF-β. TGF-β initiates up-regulation of costimulatory molecules CD86 and CD80 in the inflammatory phases of the disease but not so at fibrotic stage. Expression of lung DC subset CD11c+CD103+ is significantly increased in inflammatory phase and also in fibrotic phase of BIPF. Blocking of TGF-β causes decreased expression of CD11c+CD103+ DCs. Another important lung DC subset CD11c+CD11b+ expression is suppressed by the absence of TGF-β after bleomycin administration. CD11c+CD103+ DCs might have anti-inflammatory as well as anti-fibrotic nature in PF. All these data demonstrate differential modulation of CD11c+ lung DCs by TGF-β in experimental PF. © 2017 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  2. Adrenergic and steroid hormone modulation of ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rationale: We have shown that acute ozone inhalation promotes activation of the sympathetic and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis leading to release of cortisol and epinephrine from the adrenals. Adrenalectomy (ADREX) inhibits ozone-induced pulmonary vascular leakage and ...

  3. Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation are Modulated by Adrenal-Derived Stress Hormones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone exposure promotes pulmonary injury and inflammation. Previously we have characterized systemic changes that occur immediately after acute ozone exposure and are mediated by neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Both HPA axis and sympathetic tone alterations induce the rel...

  4. Metabolic Reprogramming Regulates the Proliferative and Inflammatory Phenotype of Adventitial Fibroblasts in Pulmonary Hypertension Through the Transcriptional Corepressor C-Terminal Binding Protein-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Riddle, Suzette; Zhang, Hui; D'Alessandro, Angelo; Flockton, Amanda; Serkova, Natalie J; Hansen, Kirk C; Moldvan, Radu; McKeon, B Alexandre; Frid, Maria; Kumar, Sushil; Li, Hong; Liu, Hongbing; Caánovas, Angela; Medrano, Juan F; Thomas, Milton G; Iloska, Dijana; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Ježek, Petr; Pullamsetti, Soni; Fini, Mehdi A; El Kasmi, Karim C; Zhang, QingHong; Stenmark, Kurt R

    2016-10-11

    Changes in metabolism have been suggested to contribute to the aberrant phenotype of vascular wall cells, including fibroblasts, in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Here, we test the hypothesis that metabolic reprogramming to aerobic glycolysis is a critical adaptation of fibroblasts in the hypertensive vessel wall that drives proliferative and proinflammatory activation through a mechanism involving increased activity of the NADH-sensitive transcriptional corepressor C-terminal binding protein 1 (CtBP1). RNA sequencing, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, 13 C-nuclear magnetic resonance, fluorescence-lifetime imaging, mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, and tracing experiments with U- 13 C-glucose were used to assess glycolytic reprogramming and to measure the NADH/NAD + ratio in bovine and human adventitial fibroblasts and mouse lung tissues. Immunohistochemistry was used to assess CtBP1 expression in the whole-lung tissues. CtBP1 siRNA and the pharmacological inhibitor 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid (MTOB) were used to abrogate CtBP1 activity in cells and hypoxic mice. We found that adventitial fibroblasts from calves with severe hypoxia-induced PH and humans with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PH-Fibs) displayed aerobic glycolysis when cultured under normoxia, accompanied by increased free NADH and NADH/NAD + ratios. Expression of the NADH sensor CtBP1 was increased in vivo and in vitro in fibroblasts within the pulmonary adventitia of humans with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and animals with PH and cultured PH-Fibs, respectively. Decreasing NADH pharmacologically with MTOB or genetically blocking CtBP1 with siRNA upregulated the cyclin-dependent genes (p15 and p21) and proapoptotic regulators (NOXA and PERP), attenuated proliferation, corrected the glycolytic reprogramming phenotype of PH-Fibs, and augmented transcription of the anti-inflammatory gene HMOX1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that CtBP1 directly

  5. Fine temporal analysis of DHT transcriptional modulation of the ATM/Gadd45g signaling pathways in the mouse uterus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanga, Mahinè; Labrie, Yvan; Calvo, Ezequiel; Belleau, Pascal; Martel, Céline; Pelletier, Georges; Morissette, Jean; Labrie, Fernand; Durocher, Francine

    2009-03-01

    In rodents, the uterus of a mature female undergoes changes during the uterine cycle, under the control of steroid hormones. 5alpha-Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is recognized to play an important role in the regulation of androgen action in normal endometrium. Using microarray technology, a screening analysis of genes responding to DHT in the uterus of ovariectomized mice, has allowed us to highlight multiple genes of the ATM/Gadd45g pathway that are modulated following exposure to DHT. Two phases of regulation were identified. In the early phase, the expression of genes involved in the G2/M arrest is rapidly increased, followed by the repression of genes of the G1/S checkpoint, and by the induction of transcriptional regulators. Later, i.e. from 12 to 24 hr, genes involved in G2/M transition, cytoarchitectural and lipid-related genes are stimulated by DHT while immunity-related genes appear to be differentially regulated by the hormone. These results show that a physiological dose of DHT induces the transcription of genes promoting the cell cycle progression in mice. Profile determination of temporal uterine gene expression at the transcriptional level enables us to suggest that the DHT modulation of genes involved in ATM/Gadd45g signaling in an ATM- or p53-independent manner, could play an important role in the cyclical changes of uterine cells in the mouse uterus.

  6. Comprehensive Interrogation of Natural TALE DNA Binding Modules and Transcriptional Repressor Domains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Le; Zhou, Ruhong; Kuo, Yu-chi; Cunniff, Margaret; Zhang, Feng

    2012-01-01

    Transcription activator-like effectors (TALE) are sequence-specific DNA binding proteins that harbor modular, repetitive DNA binding domains. TALEs have enabled the creation of customizable designer transcriptional factors and sequence-specific nucleases for genome engineering. Here we report two improvements of the TALE toolbox for achieving efficient activation and repression of endogenous gene expression in mammalian cells. We show that the naturally occurring repeat variable diresidue (RVD) Asn-His (NH) has high biological activity and specificity for guanine, a highly prevalent base in mammalian genomes. We also report an effective TALE transcriptional repressor architecture for targeted inhibition of transcription in mammalian cells. These findings will improve the precision and effectiveness of genome engineering that can be achieved using TALEs. PMID:22828628

  7. Dazap2 modulates transcription driven by the Wnt effector TCF-4

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Lukáš, Jan; Mazna, Petr; Valenta, Tomáš; Doubravská, Lenka; Pospíchalová, Vendula; Vojtěchová, Martina; Fafílek, Bohumil; Ivánek, Robert; Plachý, Jiří; Novák, Jakub; Kořínek, Vladimír

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 37, č. 9 (2009), s. 3007-3020 ISSN 0305-1048 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA204/07/1567; GA MŠk 2B06077 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : Wnt signaling * Tcf/Lef transcription factors * Dazap2/Prtb * transcriptional regulation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 7.479, year: 2009

  8. Frequency Modulation of Transcriptional Bursting Enables Sensitive and Rapid Gene Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Congxin; Cesbron, François; Oehler, Michael; Brunner, Michael; Höfer, Thomas

    2018-04-25

    Gene regulation is a complex non-equilibrium process. Here, we show that quantitating the temporal regulation of key gene states (transcriptionally inactive, active, and refractory) provides a parsimonious framework for analyzing gene regulation. Our theory makes two non-intuitive predictions. First, for transcription factors (TFs) that regulate transcription burst frequency, as opposed to amplitude or duration, weak TF binding is sufficient to elicit strong transcriptional responses. Second, refractoriness of a gene after a transcription burst enables rapid responses to stimuli. We validate both predictions experimentally by exploiting the natural, optogenetic-like responsiveness of the Neurospora GATA-type TF White Collar Complex (WCC) to blue light. Further, we demonstrate that differential regulation of WCC target genes is caused by different gene activation rates, not different TF occupancy, and that these rates are tuned by both the core promoter and the distance between TF-binding site and core promoter. In total, our work demonstrates the relevance of a kinetic, non-equilibrium framework for understanding transcriptional regulation. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Rational design of small molecules that modulate the transcriptional function of the response regulator PhoP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qing, Xiaoyu; De Weerdt, Ami; De Maeyer, Marc; Steenackers, Hans; Voet, Arnout

    2018-01-01

    The response regulator PhoP, which is part of the PhoP/PhoQ two-component system, regulates the expression of multiple genes involved in controlling virulence in Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and other species of Gram-negative bacteria. Modulating the phosphorylation-mediated dimerization in the receiver domain may interfere with the transcriptional function of PhoP. In this study, we analyzed the therapeutic potential of the PhoP receiver domain by exploring it as a potential target for drug design. The structural information was then applied to identify the first hit compounds from commercial chemical libraries by combining pharmacophore modelling and docking methods with a GFP (Green Fluorescent Protein)-based promoter-fusion bioassay. In total, one hundred and forty compounds were selected, purchased, and tested for biological activity. Several novel scaffolds showed acceptable potency to modulate the transcriptional function of PhoP, either by enhancing or inhibiting the expression of PhoP-dependent genes. These compounds may be used as the starting point for developing modulators that target the protein-protein interface of the PhoP protein as an alternative strategy against antibiotic resistance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Modulation of pulmonary inflammatory responses and anti-microbial defenses in mice exposed to diesel exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abstract: Diesel exhaust (DE) is a major component of urban air pollution and has been shown to increase the severity of infectious and allergic lung disease. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of DE exposure on pulmonary inflammation, mediator production and ...

  11. ATXN1L, CIC, and ETS Transcription Factors Modulate Sensitivity to MAPK Pathway Inhibition | Office of Cancer Genomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Intrinsic resistance and RTK-RAS-MAPK pathway reactivation has limited the effectiveness of MEK and RAF inhibitors (MAPKi) in RAS- and RAF-mutant cancers. To identify genes that modulate sensitivity to MAPKi, we performed genome-scale CRISPR-Cas9 loss-of-function screens in two KRAS mutant pancreatic cancer cell lines treated with the MEK1/2 inhibitor trametinib. Loss of CIC, a transcriptional repressor of ETV1, ETV4, and ETV5, promoted survival in the setting of MAPKi in cancer cells derived from several lineages.

  12. Bioinformatics Identification of Modules of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Alzheimer's Disease-Related Genes by In Silico Promoter Analysis and Microarrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina Augustin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms and genetic risk factors underlying Alzheimer's disease (AD pathogenesis are only partly understood. To identify new factors, which may contribute to AD, different approaches are taken including proteomics, genetics, and functional genomics. Here, we used a bioinformatics approach and found that distinct AD-related genes share modules of transcription factor binding sites, suggesting a transcriptional coregulation. To detect additional coregulated genes, which may potentially contribute to AD, we established a new bioinformatics workflow with known multivariate methods like support vector machines, biclustering, and predicted transcription factor binding site modules by using in silico analysis and over 400 expression arrays from human and mouse. Two significant modules are composed of three transcription factor families: CTCF, SP1F, and EGRF/ZBPF, which are conserved between human and mouse APP promoter sequences. The specific combination of in silico promoter and multivariate analysis can identify regulation mechanisms of genes involved in multifactorial diseases.

  13. Uncovering packaging features of co-regulated modules based on human protein interaction and transcriptional regulatory networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    He Weiming

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Network co-regulated modules are believed to have the functionality of packaging multiple biological entities, and can thus be assumed to coordinate many biological functions in their network neighbouring regions. Results Here, we weighted edges of a human protein interaction network and a transcriptional regulatory network to construct an integrated network, and introduce a probabilistic model and a bipartite graph framework to exploit human co-regulated modules and uncover their specific features in packaging different biological entities (genes, protein complexes or metabolic pathways. Finally, we identified 96 human co-regulated modules based on this method, and evaluate its effectiveness by comparing it with four other methods. Conclusions Dysfunctions in co-regulated interactions often occur in the development of cancer. Therefore, we focussed on an example co-regulated module and found that it could integrate a number of cancer-related genes. This was extended to causal dysfunctions of some complexes maintained by several physically interacting proteins, thus coordinating several metabolic pathways that directly underlie cancer.

  14. Modulation of pulmonary defense mechanisms by acute exposures to nitrogen dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jakab, G.J.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of acute exposures to NO 2 on the antibacterial defenses of the murine lung was assessed following inhalation challenges with Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Pasteurella pneumotropica. With S. aureus pulmonary antibacterial defenses were suppressed at NO 2 levels of 4.0 ppm and greater. Exposure to 10.0 ppm enhanced the intrapulmonary killing of P. mirabilis which correlated with an increase in the phagocytic cell populations lavaged from the lungs; at 20.0 ppm bactericidal activity against P. mirabilis was impaired. Pulmonary antibacterial defenses against P. pneumotropica were impaired at 10.0 ppm which correlated with a decrease in the retrieved phagocytic lung cell population. Reversing the order of treatment (ie., NO 2 exposure prior to bacterial challenge) raised the threshold concentration for NO 2 -induced impairment of intrapulmonary bacterial killing. With S. aureus the effect was not observed at 5.0 ppm but at 10.0 ppm and with P. mirabilis not at 20.0 ppm but at 30.0 ppm intrapulmonary killing was enhanced. Exposures up to 20.0 ppm of NO 2 did not effect the physical translocation mechanisms of the lung as quantitated by declines in pulmonary radiotracer activity following aerogenic challenge with 32 P-labeled staphylococci

  15. Acetylation-mediated suppression of transcription-independent memory: bidirectional modulation of memory by acetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katja Merschbaecher

    Full Text Available Learning induced changes in protein acetylation, mediated by histone acetyl transferases (HATs, and the antagonistic histone deacetylases (HDACs play a critical role in memory formation. The status of histone acetylation affects the interaction between the transcription-complex and DNA and thus regulates transcription-dependent processes required for long-term memory (LTM. While the majority of studies report on the role of elevated acetylation in memory facilitation, we address the impact of both, increased and decreased acetylation on formation of appetitive olfactory memory in honeybees. We show that learning-induced changes in the acetylation of histone H3 at aminoacid-positions H3K9 and H3K18 exhibit distinct and different dynamics depending on the training strength. A strong training that induces LTM leads to an immediate increase in acetylation at H3K18 that stays elevated for hours. A weak training, not sufficient to trigger LTM, causes an initial increase in acetylation at H3K18, followed by a strong reduction in acetylation at H3K18 below the control group level. Acetylation at position H3K9 is not affected by associative conditioning, indicating specific learning-induced actions on the acetylation machinery. Elevating acetylation levels by blocking HDACs after conditioning leads to an improved memory. While memory after strong training is enhanced for at least 2 days, the enhancement after weak training is restricted to 1 day. Reducing acetylation levels by blocking HAT activity after strong training leads to a suppression of transcription-dependent LTM. The memory suppression is also observed in case of weak training, which does not require transcription processes. Thus, our findings demonstrate that acetylation-mediated processes act as bidirectional regulators of memory formation that facilitate or suppress memory independent of its transcription-requirement.

  16. Interaction between HIV-1 Tat and DNA-PKcs modulates HIV transcription and class switch recombination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Meng; Zhang, He; Yang, Tian-Yi; Ying, Tian-Yi; Yang, Pei-Xiang; Liu, Xiao-Dan; Tang, Sheng-Jian; Zhou, Ping-Kun

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 tat targets a variety of host cell proteins to facilitate viral transcription and disrupts host cellular immunity by inducing lymphocyte apoptosis, but whether it influences humoral immunity remains unclear. Previously, our group demonstrated that tat depresses expression of DNA-PKcs, a critical component of the non-homologous end joining pathway (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks repair, immunoglobulin class switch recombination (CSR) and V(D)J recombination, and sensitizes cells to ionizing radiation. In this study, we demonstrated that HIV-1 Tat down-regulates DNA-PKcs expression by directly binding to the core promoter sequence. In addition, Tat interacts with and activates the kinase activity of DNA-PKcs in a dose-dependent and DNA independent manner. Furthermore, Tat inhibits class switch recombination (CSR) at low concentrations (≤ 4 µg/ml) and stimulates CSR at high concentrations (≥ 8 µg/ml). On the other hand, low protein level and high kinase activity of DNA-PKcs promotes HIV-1 transcription, while high protein level and low kinase activity inhibit HIV-1 transcription. Co-immunoprecipitation results revealed that DNA-PKcs forms a large complex comprised of Cyclin T1, CDK9 and Tat via direct interacting with CDK9 and Tat but not Cyclin T1. Taken together, our results provide new clues that Tat regulates host humoral immunity via both transcriptional depression and kinase activation of DNA-PKcs. We also raise the possibility that inhibitors and interventions directed towards DNA-PKcs may inhibit HIV-1 transcription in AIDS patients.

  17. Phosphorylation of the leukemic oncoprotein EVI1 on serine 196 modulates DNA binding, transcriptional repression and transforming ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J White

    Full Text Available The EVI1 (ecotropic viral integration site 1 gene at 3q26 codes for a transcriptional regulator with an essential role in haematopoiesis. Overexpression of EVI1 in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML is frequently associated with 3q26 rearrangements and confers extremely poor prognosis. EVI1 mediates transcriptional regulation, signalling, and epigenetic modifications by interacting with DNA, proteins and protein complexes. To explore to what extent protein phosphorylation impacts on EVI1 functions, we analysed endogenous EVI1 protein from a high EVI1 expressing Fanconi anaemia (FA derived AML cell line. Mass spectrometric analysis of immunoprecipitated EVI1 revealed phosphorylation at serine 196 (S196 in the sixth zinc finger of the N-terminal zinc finger domain. Mutated EVI1 with an aspartate substitution at serine 196 (S196D, which mimics serine phosphorylation of this site, exhibited reduced DNA-binding and transcriptional repression from a gene promotor selectively targeted by the N-terminal zinc finger domain. Forced expression of the S196D mutant significantly reduced EVI1 mediated transformation of Rat1 fibroblasts. While EVI1-mediated serial replating of murine haematopoietic progenitors was maintained by EVI1-S196D, this was associated with significantly higher Evi1-trancript levels compared with WT-EVI1 or EVI1-S196A, mimicking S196 non-phosphorylated EVI1. These data suggest that EVI1 function is modulated by phosphorylation of the first zinc finger domain.

  18. An Algorithm for Generating Small RNAs Capable of Epigenetically Modulating Transcriptional Gene Silencing and Activation in Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Ackley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Small noncoding antisense RNAs (sasRNAs guide epigenetic silencing complexes to target loci in human cells and modulate gene transcription. When these targeted loci are situated within a promoter, long-term, stable epigenetic silencing of transcription can occur. Recent studies suggest that there exists an endogenous form of such epigenetic regulation in human cells involving long noncoding RNAs. In this article, we present and validate an algorithm for the generation of highly effective sasRNAs that can mimic the endogenous noncoding RNAs involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression. We validate this algorithm by targeting several oncogenes including AKT-1, c-MYC, K-RAS, and H-RAS. We also target a long antisense RNA that mediates the epigenetic repression of the tumor suppressor gene DUSP6, silenced in pancreatic cancer. An algorithm that can efficiently design small noncoding RNAs for the epigenetic transcriptional silencing or activation of specific genes has potential therapeutic and experimental applications.

  19. The alpha-tocopherol form of vitamin E reverses age-associated susceptibility to Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infection by modulating pulmonary neutrophil recruitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Streptococcus pneumonia infections are an important cause of morbidity and mortality in older patients. Uncontrolled neutrophil-driven pulmonary inflammation exacerbates this disease. To test whether the alpha-tocopherol (alpha-Toc) form of vitamin E, a regulator of immunity, can modulate neutrophil...

  20. Modulation of global low-frequency motions underlies allosteric regulation: demonstration in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Thomas L; Townsend, Philip D; Burnell, David; Jones, Matthew L; Richards, Shane A; McLeish, Tom C B; Pohl, Ehmke; Wilson, Mark R; Cann, Martin J

    2013-09-01

    Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distinct site. There is growing evidence that allosteric cooperativity can be communicated by modulation of protein dynamics without conformational change. The mechanisms, however, for communicating dynamic fluctuations between sites are debated. We provide a foundational theory for how allostery can occur as a function of low-frequency dynamics without a change in structure. We have generated coarse-grained models that describe the protein backbone motions of the CRP/FNR family transcription factors, CAP of Escherichia coli and GlxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The latter we demonstrate as a new exemplar for allostery without conformation change. We observe that binding the first molecule of cAMP ligand is correlated with modulation of the global normal modes and negative cooperativity for binding the second cAMP ligand without a change in mean structure. The theory makes key experimental predictions that are tested through an analysis of variant proteins by structural biology and isothermal calorimetry. Quantifying allostery as a free energy landscape revealed a protein "design space" that identified the inter- and intramolecular regulatory parameters that frame CRP/FNR family allostery. Furthermore, through analyzing CAP variants from diverse species, we demonstrate an evolutionary selection pressure to conserve residues crucial for allosteric control. This finding provides a link between the position of CRP/FNR transcription factors within the allosteric free energy landscapes and evolutionary selection pressures. Our study therefore reveals significant features of the mechanistic basis for allostery. Changes in low-frequency dynamics correlate with allosteric effects on ligand binding without the requirement for a defined spatial pathway. In addition to evolving suitable three-dimensional structures, CRP/FNR family transcription factors have been selected to

  1. Modulation of global low-frequency motions underlies allosteric regulation: demonstration in CRP/FNR family transcription factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L Rodgers

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Allostery is a fundamental process by which ligand binding to a protein alters its activity at a distinct site. There is growing evidence that allosteric cooperativity can be communicated by modulation of protein dynamics without conformational change. The mechanisms, however, for communicating dynamic fluctuations between sites are debated. We provide a foundational theory for how allostery can occur as a function of low-frequency dynamics without a change in structure. We have generated coarse-grained models that describe the protein backbone motions of the CRP/FNR family transcription factors, CAP of Escherichia coli and GlxR of Corynebacterium glutamicum. The latter we demonstrate as a new exemplar for allostery without conformation change. We observe that binding the first molecule of cAMP ligand is correlated with modulation of the global normal modes and negative cooperativity for binding the second cAMP ligand without a change in mean structure. The theory makes key experimental predictions that are tested through an analysis of variant proteins by structural biology and isothermal calorimetry. Quantifying allostery as a free energy landscape revealed a protein "design space" that identified the inter- and intramolecular regulatory parameters that frame CRP/FNR family allostery. Furthermore, through analyzing CAP variants from diverse species, we demonstrate an evolutionary selection pressure to conserve residues crucial for allosteric control. This finding provides a link between the position of CRP/FNR transcription factors within the allosteric free energy landscapes and evolutionary selection pressures. Our study therefore reveals significant features of the mechanistic basis for allostery. Changes in low-frequency dynamics correlate with allosteric effects on ligand binding without the requirement for a defined spatial pathway. In addition to evolving suitable three-dimensional structures, CRP/FNR family transcription factors have

  2. Metabolic Reprogramming Regulates the Proliferative and Inflammatory Phenotype of Adventitial Fibroblasts in Pulmonary Hypertension Through the Transcriptional Co-Repressor C-terminal Binding Protein-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Min; Riddle, Suzette; Zhang, Hui; D’Alessandro, Angelo; Flockton, Amanda; Serkova, Natalie J.; Hansen, Kirk C.; Moldvan, Radu; McKeon, B. Alexandre; Frid, Maria; Kumar, Sushil; Li, Hong; Liu, Hongbing; Cánovas, Angela; Medrano, Juan F.; Thomas, Milton G.; Iloska, Dijana; Plecita-Hlavata, Lydie; Ježek, Petr; Pullamsetti, Soni; Fini, Mehdi A.; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Zhang, Qinghong; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    Background Changes in metabolism have been suggested to contribute to the aberrant phenotype of vascular wall cells including fibroblasts in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Herein, we test the hypothesis that metabolic reprogramming to aerobic glycolysis is a critical adaptation of fibroblasts in the hypertensive vessel wall that drives proliferative and pro-inflammatory activation through a mechanism involving increased activity of the NADH-sensitive transcriptional co-repressor C-terminal binding protein 1 (CtBP1). Methods RNA-Sequencing, qPCR, 13C-NMR, fluorescence-lifetime imaging, mass spectrometry-based metabolomics and tracing experiments with U-13C-glucose were used to assess glycolytic reprogramming and to measure NADH/NAD+ ratio in bovine and human adventitial fibroblasts, and mouse lung tissues. Immunohistochemistry was utilized to assess CtBP1 expression in the whole lung tissues. CtBP1 siRNA and the pharmacologic inhibitor 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid (MTOB) were utilized to abrogate CtBP1 activity in cells and hypoxic mice. Results We found adventitial fibroblasts from calves with severe hypoxia-induced PH and humans with IPAH (PH-Fibs) displayed aerobic glycolysis when cultured under normoxia, accompanied by increased free NADH and NADH/NAD+ ratios. Expression of the NADH sensor CtBP1 was increased in vivo and in vitro in fibroblasts within the pulmonary adventitia of humans with IPAH and animals with PH and cultured PH-Fibs, respectively. Decreasing NADH pharmacologically with MTOB, or genetically blocking CtBP1 using siRNA, upregulated the cyclin-dependent genes (p15 and p21) and pro-apoptotic regulators (NOXA and PERP), attenuated proliferation, corrected the glycolytic reprogramming phenotype of PH-Fibs, and augmented transcription of the anti-inflammatory gene HMOX1. ChIP analysis demonstrated that CtBP1 directly binds the HMOX1 promoter. Treatment of hypoxic mice with MTOB decreased glycolysis and expression of inflammatory genes, attenuated

  3. The Role of Estrogen Related Receptor in Modulating Estrogen Receptor Mediated Transcription in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-04-01

    tumors correlates with an unfavorable prognosis (Ariazi 2002; Lu 2001; Suzuki 2004; Vanacker 1999). The transcriptional activity of ERRa is not inhibited...SA. 101:6570-5. Needham, M ., S. Raines, J. McPheat, C. Stacey, J. Ellston, S. Hoare, and M . Parker. 2000. Differential interaction of steroid hormone...R. Graves, M . Wright, and B.M. Spiegelman. 1998. A cold- inducible coactivator of nuclear receptors linked to adaptive thermogenesis. Cell. 92:829- 39

  4. FoxA1 binding to the MMTV LTR modulates chromatin structure and transcription

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holmqvist, Per-Henrik; Belikov, Sergey; Zaret, Kenneth S.; Wrange, Oerjan

    2005-01-01

    Novel binding sites for the forkhead transcription factor family member Forkhead box A (FoxA), previously referred to as Hepatocyte Nuclear Factor 3 (HNF3), were found within the mouse mammary tumor virus long terminal repeat (MMTV LTR). The effect of FoxA1 on MMTV LTR chromatin structure, and expression was evaluated in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Mutagenesis of either of the two main FoxA binding sites showed that the distal site, -232/-221, conferred FoxA1-dependent partial inhibition of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) driven MMTV transcription. The proximal FoxA binding segment consisted of two individual FoxA sites at -57/-46 and -45/-34, respectively, that mediated an increased basal MMTV transcription. FoxA1 binding altered the chromatin structure of both the inactive- and the hormone-activated MMTV LTR. Hydroxyl radical foot printing revealed FoxA1-mediated changes in the nucleosome arrangement. Micrococcal nuclease digestion showed the hormone-dependent sub-nucleosome complex, containing ∼120 bp of DNA, to be expanded by FoxA1 binding to the proximal segment into a larger complex containing ∼200 bp. The potential function of the FoxA1-mediated expression of the MMTV provirus for maintenance of expression in different tissues is discussed

  5. Transcription-Replication Conflict Orientation Modulates R-Loop Levels and Activates Distinct DNA Damage Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamperl, Stephan; Bocek, Michael J; Saldivar, Joshua C; Swigut, Tomek; Cimprich, Karlene A

    2017-08-10

    Conflicts between transcription and replication are a potent source of DNA damage. Co-transcriptional R-loops could aggravate such conflicts by creating an additional barrier to replication fork progression. Here, we use a defined episomal system to investigate how conflict orientation and R-loop formation influence genome stability in human cells. R-loops, but not normal transcription complexes, induce DNA breaks and orientation-specific DNA damage responses during conflicts with replication forks. Unexpectedly, the replisome acts as an orientation-dependent regulator of R-loop levels, reducing R-loops in the co-directional (CD) orientation but promoting their formation in the head-on (HO) orientation. Replication stress and deregulated origin firing increase the number of HO collisions leading to genome-destabilizing R-loops. Our findings connect DNA replication to R-loop homeostasis and suggest a mechanistic basis for genome instability resulting from deregulated DNA replication, observed in cancer and other disease states. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Heat shock factor-1 modulates p53 activity in the transcriptional response to DNA damage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logan, Ian R.; McNeill, Hesta V.; Cook, Susan; Lu, Xiaohong; Meek, David W.; Fuller-Pace, Frances V.; Lunec, John; Robson, Craig N.

    2009-01-01

    Here we define an important role for heat shock factor 1 (HSF1) in the cellular response to genotoxic agents. We demonstrate for the first time that HSF1 can complex with nuclear p53 and that both proteins are co-operatively recruited to p53-responsive genes such as p21. Analysis of natural and synthetic cis elements demonstrates that HSF1 can enhance p53-mediated transcription, whilst depletion of HSF1 reduces the expression of p53-responsive transcripts. We find that HSF1 is required for optimal p21 expression and p53-mediated cell-cycle arrest in response to genotoxins while loss of HSF1 attenuates apoptosis in response to these agents. To explain these novel properties of HSF1 we show that HSF1 can complex with DNA damage kinases ATR and Chk1 to effect p53 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage. Our data reveal HSF1 as a key transcriptional regulator in response to genotoxic compounds widely used in the clinical setting, and suggest that HSF1 will contribute to the efficacy of these agents. PMID:19295133

  7. The AMPA receptor potentiator Org 26576 modulates stress-induced transcription of BDNF isoforms in rat hippocampus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fumagalli, Fabio; Calabrese, Francesca; Luoni, Alessia; Shahid, Mohammed; Racagni, Giorgio; Riva, Marco A

    2012-02-01

    Brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a key mediator of brain plasticity. The modulation of its expression and function is important for cognition and represents a key strategy to enhance neuronal resilience. Within this context, there exists a close interaction between glutamatergic neurotransmission and BDNF activity towards regulating cellular homeostasis and plasticity. The aim of the current study was to investigate the ability of the AMPA receptor potentiator Org 26576 to modulate BDNF expression in selected brain regions under basal conditions or in response to an acute swim stress. Rats subjected to a single intraperitoneal injection with Org 26576 (10mg/kg) or saline were exposed to a swim stress session (5 min) and sacrificed 15 min after the end of stress. Real-time PCR assay was used to determine changes in BDNF transcription in different brain regions. Total BDNF mRNA levels were significantly increased in the hippocampus of animals exposed to the combination of Org 26576 and stress whereas, in prefrontal and frontal cortices, BDNF mRNA levels were modulated by the acute stress, independently from drug treatment. The analysis of BDNF transcripts in the hippocampus revealed a major contribution of exons I and IV. Our results suggest that AMPA receptor potentiation by Org 26576 exerts a positive modulatory influence on BDNF expression during ongoing neuronal activity. Given that these mechanisms are critical for neuronal plasticity, we hypothesized that such changes may facilitate learning/coping mechanisms associated with a mild stressful experience. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Ancient mtDNA genetic variants modulate mtDNA transcription and replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarit Suissa

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Although the functional consequences of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA genetic backgrounds (haplotypes, haplogroups have been demonstrated by both disease association studies and cell culture experiments, it is not clear which of the mutations within the haplogroup carry functional implications and which are "evolutionary silent hitchhikers". We set forth to study the functionality of haplogroup-defining mutations within the mtDNA transcription/replication regulatory region by in vitro transcription, hypothesizing that haplogroup-defining mutations occurring within regulatory motifs of mtDNA could affect these processes. We thus screened >2500 complete human mtDNAs representing all major populations worldwide for natural variation in experimentally established protein binding sites and regulatory regions comprising a total of 241 bp in each mtDNA. Our screen revealed 77/241 sites showing point mutations that could be divided into non-fixed (57/77, 74% and haplogroup/sub-haplogroup-defining changes (i.e., population fixed changes, 20/77, 26%. The variant defining Caucasian haplogroup J (C295T increased the binding of TFAM (Electro Mobility Shift Assay and the capacity of in vitro L-strand transcription, especially of a shorter transcript that maps immediately upstream of conserved sequence block 1 (CSB1, a region associated with RNA priming of mtDNA replication. Consistent with this finding, cybrids (i.e., cells sharing the same nuclear genetic background but differing in their mtDNA backgrounds harboring haplogroup J mtDNA had a >2 fold increase in mtDNA copy number, as compared to cybrids containing haplogroup H, with no apparent differences in steady state levels of mtDNA-encoded transcripts. Hence, a haplogroup J regulatory region mutation affects mtDNA replication or stability, which may partially account for the phenotypic impact of this haplogroup. Our analysis thus demonstrates, for the first time, the functional impact of particular mt

  9. SnoN/SKIL modulates proliferation through control of hsa-miR-720 transcription in esophageal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shinozuka, Eriko; Miyashita, Masao; Mizuguchi, Yoshiaki; Akagi, Ichiro; Kikuchi, Kunio; Makino, Hiroshi; Matsutani, Takeshi; Hagiwara, Nobutoshi; Nomura, Tsutomu; Uchida, Eiji; Takizawa, Toshihiro

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► SnoN modulated miR-720, miR-1274A, and miR-1274B expression levels in TE-1 cells. ► miR-720 and miR-1274A suppressed the expression of target proteins p63 and ADAM9. ► Silencing of SnoN significantly upregulated cell proliferation in TE-1 cells. ► Esophageal cancer tissues have lower SnoN expression levels than normal tissues. ► Esophageal cancer tissues have higher miR-720 expression levels than normal tissues. -- Abstract: It is now evident that changes in microRNA are involved in cancer progression, but the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of miRNAs remain unknown. Ski-related novel gene (SnoN/SKIL), a transcription co-factor, acts as a potential key regulator within a complex network of p53 transcriptional repressors. SnoN has pro- and anti-oncogenic functions in the regulation of cell proliferation, senescence, apoptosis, and differentiation. We characterized the roles of SnoN in miRNA transcriptional regulation and its effects on cell proliferation using esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC) cells. Silencing of SnoN altered a set of miRNA expression profiles in TE-1cells, and the expression levels of miR-720, miR-1274A, and miR-1274B were modulated by SnoN. The expression of these miRNAs resulted in changes to the target protein p63 and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain 9 (ADAM9). Furthermore, silencing of SnoN significantly upregulated cell proliferation in TE-1 cells, indicating a potential anti-oncogenic function. These results support our observation that cancer tissues have lower expression levels of SnoN, miR-720, and miR-1274A compared to adjacent normal tissues from ESCC patients. These data demonstrate a novel mechanism of miRNA regulation, leading to changes in cell proliferation.

  10. The Rts1 regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A is required for control of G1 cyclin transcription and nutrient modulation of cell size.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Artiles

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The key molecular event that marks entry into the cell cycle is transcription of G1 cyclins, which bind and activate cyclin-dependent kinases. In yeast cells, initiation of G1 cyclin transcription is linked to achievement of a critical cell size, which contributes to cell-size homeostasis. The critical cell size is modulated by nutrients, such that cells growing in poor nutrients are smaller than cells growing in rich nutrients. Nutrient modulation of cell size does not work through known critical regulators of G1 cyclin transcription and is therefore thought to work through a distinct pathway. Here, we report that Rts1, a highly conserved regulatory subunit of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A, is required for normal control of G1 cyclin transcription. Loss of Rts1 caused delayed initiation of bud growth and delayed and reduced accumulation of G1 cyclins. Expression of the G1 cyclin CLN2 from an inducible promoter rescued the delayed bud growth in rts1Delta cells, indicating that Rts1 acts at the level of transcription. Moreover, loss of Rts1 caused altered regulation of Swi6, a key component of the SBF transcription factor that controls G1 cyclin transcription. Epistasis analysis revealed that Rts1 does not work solely through several known critical upstream regulators of G1 cyclin transcription. Cells lacking Rts1 failed to undergo nutrient modulation of cell size. Together, these observations demonstrate that Rts1 is a key player in pathways that link nutrient availability, cell size, and G1 cyclin transcription. Since Rts1 is highly conserved, it may function in similar pathways in vertebrates.

  11. Identification of Gene Transcription Start Sites and Enhancers Responding to Pulmonary Carbon Nanotube Exposure in Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bornholdt, Jette; Saber, Anne Thoustrup; Lilje, Bait

    2017-01-01

    Increased use of nanomaterials in industry, medicine, and consumer products has raised concerns over their toxicity. To ensure safe use of nanomaterials, understanding their biological effects at the molecular level is crucial. In particular, the regulatory mechanisms responsible for the cascade...... of genes activated by nanomaterial exposure are not well-characterized. To this end, we profiled the genome-wide usage of gene transcription start sites and linked active enhancer regions in lungs of C57BL/6 mice 24 h after intratracheal instillation of a single dose of the multiwalled carbon nanotube...

  12. Transcriptional profiles of pulmonary innate immune responses to isogenic antibiotic-susceptible and multidrug-resistant Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Vincent H; Pérez, Cynthia; Ledesma, Kimberly R; Lewis, Russell E

    2018-04-01

    The virulence of an isogenic pair of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains was studied under similar experimental conditions in two animal infection models. The time to death was significantly longer for the multidrug resistant (MDR) than the wild-type strain. The transcriptional profiles of 84 innate immune response genes in the lungs of immune competent Balb/C mice were further compared. Significantly weaker expression of genes involved in production of soluble pattern recognition receptor and complement were observed in animals infected with the MDR strain. Altered patterns of innate immune system activation may explain the attenuated virulence in MDR bacteria. © 2018 The Societies and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Identification and transcriptional modulation of the largemouth bass, Micropterus salmoides, vitellogenin receptor during oocyte development by insulin and sex steroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Gustavo A; Quattro, Joseph M; Denslow, Nancy D; Kroll, Kevin J; Prucha, Melinda S; Porak, Wesley F; Grier, Harry J; Sabo-Attwood, Tara L

    2012-09-01

    Fish vitellogenin synthesized and released from the liver of oviparous animals is taken up into oocytes by the vitellogenin receptor. This is an essential process in providing nutrient yolk to developing embryos to ensure successful reproduction. Here we disclose the full length vtgr cDNA sequence for largemouth bass (LMB) that reveals greater than 90% sequence homology with other fish vtgr sequences. We classify LMB Vtgr as a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor superfamily based on conserved domains and categorize as the short variant that is devoid of the O-glycan segment. Phylogenetic analysis places LMB Vtgr sequence into a well-supported monophyletic group of fish Vtgr. Real-time PCR showed that the greatest levels of LMB vtgr mRNA expression occurred in previtellogenic ovarian tissues. In addition, we reveal the effects of insulin, 17beta-estradiol (E(2)), and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) in modulation of vtgr, esr, and ar mRNAs in previtellogenic oocytes. Insulin increased vtgr expression levels in follicles ex vivo while exposure to E(2) or 11-KT did not result in modulation of expression. However, both steroids were able to repress insulin-induced vtgr transcript levels. Coexposure with insulin and E(2) or of insulin and 11-KT increased ovarian esr2b and ar mRNA levels, respectively, which suggest a role for these nuclear receptors in insulin-mediated signaling pathways. These data provide the first evidence for the ordered stage-specific expression of LMB vtgr during the normal reproductive process and the hormonal influence of insulin and sex steroids on controlling vtgr transcript levels in ovarian tissues.

  14. Arabidopsis WRKY2 and WRKY34 transcription factors interact with VQ20 protein to modulate pollen development and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Rihua; Li, Xiaoli; Ma, Zhenbing; Lv, Yan; Hu, Yanru; Yu, Diqiu

    2017-09-01

    Plant male gametogenesis is tightly regulated, and involves complex and precise regulations of transcriptional reprogramming. WRKY transcription factors have been demonstrated to play critical roles in plant development and stress responses. Several members of this family physically interact with VQ motif-containing proteins (VQ proteins) to mediate a plethora of programs in Arabidopsis; however, the involvement of WRKY-VQ complexes in plant male gametogenesis remains largely unknown. In this study, we found that WRKY2 and WKRY34 interact with VQ20 both in vitro and in vivo. Further experiments displayed that the conserved VQ motif of VQ20 is responsible for their physical interactions. The VQ20 protein localizes in the nucleus and specifically expresses in pollens. Phenotypic analysis showed that WRKY2, WRKY34 and VQ20 are crucial for pollen development and function. Mutations of WRKY2, WRKY34 and VQ20 simultaneously resulted in male sterility, with defects in pollen development, germination and tube growth. Further investigation revealed that VQ20 affects the transcriptional functions of its interacting WRKY partners. Complementation evidence supported that the VQ motif of VQ20 is essential for pollen development, as a mutant form of VQ20 in which LVQK residues in the VQ motif were replaced by EDLE did not rescue the phenotype of the w2-1 w34-1 vq20-1 triple-mutant plants. Further expression analysis indicated that WRKY2, WRKY34 and VQ20 co-modulate multiple genes involved in pollen development, germination and tube growth. Taken together, our study provides evidence that VQ20 acts as a key partner of WRKY2 and WKRY34 in plant male gametogenesis. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Cocoa procyanidins modulate transcriptional pathways linked to inflammation and metabolism in human dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Midttun, Helene L E; Ramsay, Aina; Mueller-Harvey, Irene

    2018-01-01

    the mechanistic basis of this inhibition, here we conducted transcriptomic analysis on DCs cultured with either LPS or LPS combined with oligomeric cocoa PC. Procyanidins suppressed a number of genes encoding cytokines and chemokines such as CXCL1, but also genes involved in the cGMP pathway such as GUCY1A3...... (encoding guanylate cyclase soluble subunit alpha-3). Upregulated genes were involved in diverse metabolic pathways, but notably two of the four most upregulated genes (NMB, encoding neuromedin B and ADCY3, encoding adenyl cyclase type 3) were involved in the cAMP signalling pathway. Gene-set enrichment...... analysis demonstrated that upregulated gene pathways were primarily involved in nutrient transport, carbohydrate metabolism and lysosome function, whereas down-regulated gene pathways involved cell cycle, signal transduction and gene transcription, as well as immune function. qPCR analysis verified...

  16. TMPRSS2-ERG -specific transcriptional modulation is associated with prostate cancer biomarkers and TGF-β signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brase, Jan C; Sirma, Hüseyin; Sauter, Guido; Simon, Ronald; Schlomm, Thorsten; Beißbarth, Tim; Korf, Ulrike; Kuner, Ruprecht; Sültmann, Holger; Johannes, Marc; Mannsperger, Heiko; Fälth, Maria; Metzger, Jennifer; Kacprzyk, Lukasz A; Andrasiuk, Tatjana; Gade, Stephan; Meister, Michael

    2011-01-01

    TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusions occur in about 50% of all prostate cancer cases and represent promising markers for molecular subtyping. Although TMPRSS2-ERG fusion seems to be a critical event in prostate cancer, the precise functional role in cancer development and progression is still unclear. We studied large-scale gene expression profiles in 47 prostate tumor tissue samples and in 48 normal prostate tissue samples taken from the non-suspect area of clinical low-risk tumors using Affymetrix GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST microarrays. Comparison of gene expression levels among TMPRSS2-ERG fusion-positive and negative tumors as well as benign samples demonstrated a distinct transcriptional program induced by the gene fusion event. Well-known biomarkers for prostate cancer detection like CRISP3 were found to be associated with the gene fusion status. WNT and TGF-β/BMP signaling pathways were significantly associated with genes upregulated in TMPRSS2-ERG fusion-positive tumors. The TMPRSS2-ERG gene fusion results in the modulation of transcriptional patterns and cellular pathways with potential consequences for prostate cancer progression. Well-known biomarkers for prostate cancer detection were found to be associated with the gene fusion. Our results suggest that the fusion status should be considered in retrospective and future studies to assess biomarkers for prostate cancer detection, progression and targeted therapy

  17. Salidroside Inhibits Myogenesis by Modulating p-Smad3-Induced Myf5 Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng Zhang

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Salidroside is an active compound extracted from Rhodiola rosea which is used to alleviate fatigue and enhance endurance in high altitude regions. Some studies have demonstrated that salidroside can affect precursor cell differentiation in hematopoietic stem cells, erythrocytes, and osteoblasts. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of salidroside on myoblast differentiation and to explore the underlying molecular mechanisms of this effect.Methods: C2C12 myoblast cells were treated with different concentrations of salidroside in differentiation media. Real-time PCR, Western blotting, and immunofluorescence assay were employed to evaluate the effects of salidroside on C2C12 differentiation. RNA interference was used to reveal the important role of Myf5 in myogenesis inhibited by salidroside. Chromatin Immunoprecipitation and dual-luciferase reporter assay were utilized to explore the underlying mechanisms of salidroside-induced upregulation of Myf5.Results: We found that salidroside inhibits myogenesis by downregulating MyoD and myogenin, preserves undifferentiated reserve cell pools by upregulating Myf5. Knocking down Myf5 expression significantly rescued the myogenesis inhibited by salidroside. The effect of salidroside on myogenesis was associated with increased phosphorylated Smad3 (p-Smad3. Both SIS3 (Specific inhibitor of p-Smad3 and dominant negative Smad3 plasmid (DN-Smad3 attenuated the inhibitory effect of salidroside on C2C12 differentiation. Moreover, the induction of Myf5 transcription by salidroside was dependent on a Smad-binding site in the promoter region of Myf5 gene.Conclusion and Implications: Our findings identify a novel role and mechanism for salidroside in regulating myogenesis through p-Smad3-induced Myf5 transcription, which may have implications for its further application in combating degenerative muscular diseases caused by depletion of muscle stem cells, such as Duchenne muscular dystrophy or

  18. Functional Characterization of a Novel R2R3-MYB Transcription Factor Modulating the Flavonoid Biosynthetic Pathway from Epimedium sagittatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenjun Huang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Epimedium species have been widely used both as traditional Chinese medicinal plants and ornamental perennials. Both flavonols, acting as the major bioactive components (BCs and anthocyanins, predominantly contributing to the color diversity of Epimedium flowers belong to different classes of flavonoids. It is well-acknowledged that flavonoid biosynthetic pathway is predominantly regulated by R2R3-MYB transcription factor (TF as well as bHLH TF and WD40 protein at the transcriptional level. MYB TFs specifically regulating anthocyanin or flavonol biosynthetic pathway have been already isolated and functionally characterized from Epimedium sagittatum, but a R2R3-MYB TF involved in regulating both these two pathways has not been functionally characterized to date in Epimedium plants. In this study, we report the functional characterization of EsMYB9, a R2R3-MYB TF previously isolated from E. sagittatum. The previous study indicated that EsMYB9 belongs to a small subfamily of R2R3-MYB TFs containing grape VvMYB5a and VvMYB5b TFs, which regulate flavonoid biosynthetic pathway. The present studies show that overexpression of EsMYB9 in tobacco leads to increased transcript levels of flavonoid pathway genes and increased contents of anthocyanins and flavonols. Yeast two-hybrid assay indicates that the C-terminal region of EsMYB9 contributes to the autoactivation activity, and EsMYB9 interacts with EsTT8 or AtTT8 bHLH regulator. Transient reporter assay shows that EsMYB9 slightly activates the expression of EsCHS (chalcone synthase promoter in transiently transformed leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana, but the addition of AtTT8 or EsTT8 bHLH regulator strongly enhances the transcriptional activation of EsMYB9 against five promoters of the flavonoid pathway genes except EsFLS (flavonol synthase. In addition, co-transformation of EsMYB9 and EsTT8 in transiently transfected tobacco leaves strongly induces the expressions of flavonoid biosynthetic genes. The

  19. Gibberellin modulates anther development in rice via the transcriptional regulation of GAMYB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aya, Koichiro; Ueguchi-Tanaka, Miyako; Kondo, Maki; Hamada, Kazuki; Yano, Kentaro; Nishimura, Mikio; Matsuoka, Makoto

    2009-05-01

    Gibberellins (GAs) play important roles in regulating reproductive development, especially anther development. Our previous studies revealed that the MYB transcriptional factor GAMYB, an important component of GA signaling in cereal aleurone cells, is also important for anther development. Here, we examined the physiological functions of GA during anther development through phenotypic analyses of rice (Oryza sativa) GA-deficient, GA-insensitive, and gamyb mutants. The mutants exhibited common defects in programmed cell death (PCD) of tapetal cells and formation of exine and Ubisch bodies. Microarray analysis using anther RNAs of these mutants revealed that rice GAMYB is involved in almost all instances of GA-regulated gene expression in anthers. Among the GA-regulated genes, we focused on two lipid metabolic genes, a cytochrome P450 hydroxylase CYP703A3 and beta-ketoacyl reductase, both of which might be involved in providing a substrate for exine and Ubisch body. GAMYB specifically interacted with GAMYB binding motifs in the promoter regions in vitro, and mutation of these motifs in promoter-beta-glucuronidase (GUS) transformants caused reduced GUS expression in anthers. Furthermore, a knockout mutant for CYP703A3 showed gamyb-like defects in exine and Ubisch body formation. Together, these results suggest that GA regulates exine formation and the PCD of tapetal cells and that direct activation of CYP703A3 by GAMYB is key to exine formation.

  20. The transcription factor GLI1 modulates the inflammatory response during pancreatic tissue remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathew, Esha; Collins, Meredith A; Fernandez-Barrena, Maite G; Holtz, Alexander M; Yan, Wei; Hogan, James O; Tata, Zachary; Allen, Benjamin L; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; di Magliano, Marina Pasca

    2014-10-03

    Pancreatic cancer, one of the deadliest human malignancies, is almost uniformly associated with a mutant, constitutively active form of the oncogene Kras. Studies in genetically engineered mouse models have defined a requirement for oncogenic KRAS in both the formation of pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias, the most common precursor lesions to pancreatic cancer, and in the maintenance and progression of these lesions. Previous work using an inducible model allowing tissue-specific and reversible expression of oncogenic Kras in the pancreas indicates that inactivation of this GTPase at the pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia stage promotes pancreatic tissue repair. Here, we extend these findings to identify GLI1, a transcriptional effector of the Hedgehog pathway, as a central player in pancreatic tissue repair upon Kras inactivation. Deletion of a single allele of Gli1 results in improper stromal remodeling and perdurance of the inflammatory infiltrate characteristic of pancreatic tumorigenesis. Strikingly, this partial loss of Gli1 affects activated fibroblasts in the pancreas and the recruitment of immune cells that are vital for tissue recovery. Analysis of the mechanism using expression and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays identified a subset of cytokines, including IL-6, mIL-8, Mcp-1, and M-csf (Csf1), as direct GLI1 target genes potentially mediating this phenomenon. Finally, we demonstrate that canonical Hedgehog signaling, a known regulator of Gli1 activity, is required for pancreas recovery. Collectively, these data delineate a new pathway controlling tissue repair and highlight the importance of GLI1 in regulation of the pancreatic microenvironment during this cellular process. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  1. Gap43 transcription modulation in the adult brain depends on sensory activity and synaptic cooperation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Rosskothen-Kuhl

    Full Text Available Brain development and learning is accompanied by morphological and molecular changes in neurons. The growth associated protein 43 (Gap43, indicator of neurite elongation and synapse formation, is highly expressed during early stages of development. Upon maturation of the brain, Gap43 is down-regulated by most neurons with the exception of subdivisions such as the CA3 region of hippocampus, the lateral superior olive (LSO and the central inferior colliculus (CIC. Little is known about the regulation of this mRNA in adult brains. We found that the expression of Gap43 mRNA in specific neurons can be modulated by changing sensory activity of the adult brain. Using the central auditory system of rats as a model, Gap43 protein and mRNA levels were determined in LSO and CIC of hearing-experienced rats unilaterally or bilaterally deafened or unilaterally stimulated by a cochlear implant (CI. Our data indicate that Gap43 is a marker useful beyond monitoring neuronal growth and synaptogenesis, reflecting also specific patterns of synaptic activities on specific neurons. Thus, unilateral loss of input to an adult auditory system directly causes asymmetrical expression of Gap43 mRNA between LSOs or CICs on both sides of the brainstem. This consequence can be prevented by simple-patterned stimulation of a dysfunctional ear by way of a CI. We suggest that as a function of input balance and activity pattern, Gap43 mRNA expression changes as cells associate converging afferent signals.

  2. Diverse modulation of spa transcription by cell wall active antibiotics in Staphylococcus aureus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lene Nørby; Roggenbuck, Michael; Haaber, Jakob Krause

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various classes of clinically relevant antibiotics at sub-lethal concentrations on virulence gene expression and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. FINDINGS: LacZ promoter fusions of genes related to staphylococ......ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of various classes of clinically relevant antibiotics at sub-lethal concentrations on virulence gene expression and biofilm formation in Staphylococcus aureus. FINDINGS: LacZ promoter fusions of genes related...... to staphylococcal virulence were used to monitor the effects of antibiotics on gene expression in a disc diffusion assay. The selected genes were hla and spa encoding alpha-hemolysin and Protein A, respectively and RNAIII, the effector molecule of the agr quorum sensing system. The results were confirmed...... by quantitative real-time PCR. Additionally, we monitored the effect of subinhibitory concentrations of antibiotics on the ability of S. aureus to form biofilm in a microtiter plate assay. The results show that sub-lethal antibiotic concentrations diversely modulate expression of RNAIII, hla and spa. Consistently...

  3. The HTLV-I tax protein transcriptionally modulates OX40 antigen expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankow, R; Dürkop, H; Latza, U; Krause, H; Kunzendorf, U; Pohl, T; Bulfone-Paus, S

    2000-07-01

    OX40 is a member of the TNF receptor family, expressed on activated T cells. It is the only costimulatory T cell molecule known to be specifically up-regulated in human T cell leukemia virus type-I (HTLV-I)-producing cells. In a T cell line, OX40 surface expression was shown to be induced by HTLV-I Tax alone. To understand molecular mechanisms of OX40 gene regulation and modulation by HTLV-I Tax, we have cloned the human OX40 gene and analyzed its 5'-flanking region. By reporter gene analysis with progressive 5' deletions from nucleotides -1259 to -64, we have defined a 157-bp DNA fragment as a minimal promoter for constitutive expression. In addition, we show that in the OX40+ cell line, Co, Tax is able to further increase OX40 surface expression. Up-regulation of OX40 promoter activity by Tax requires two upstream NF-kappaB sites, which are not active in the constitutive OX40 expression. Their deletion abrogates Tax responsiveness in reporter gene analysis. The site-directed mutagenesis of each NF-kappaB site demonstrates that cooperative NF-kappaB binding is a prerequisite for Tax-directed activity as neither site alone is sufficient for a full Tax responsiveness of the OX40 promoter. Upon Tax expression, both sites bind p65 and c-Rel. These data provide new insight into the direct regulation of OX40 by Tax and add to our understanding of the possible role of the OX40/OX40 ligand system in the proliferation of HTLV-I+ T cells.

  4. Lycopene Modulates THP1 and Caco2 Cells Inflammatory State through Transcriptional and Nontranscriptional Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makon-Sébastien, Njock; Francis, Fouchier; Eric, Seree; Henri, Villard Pierre; François, Landrier Jean; Laurent, Pechere; Yves, Barra; Serge, Champion

    2014-01-01

    We revisited the action of a carotenoid, the lycopene, on the expression of proinflammatory genes, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and metalloprotease (MMP9) activity. THP1 and Caco2 cell lines were used as in vitro models for the two main cell types found in intestine tissue, that is, monocytes and epithelial cells. Proinflammatory condition was induced using either phorbol ester acetate (PMA), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In THP1 cells, short term pretreatment (2 h) with a low concentration (2 μM) of lycopene reinforce proinflammatory gene expression. The extent of the effect of lycopene is dependent on the proinflammtory stimulus (PMA, LPS or TNF) used. Lycopene enhanced MMP9 secretion via a c-AMP-dependent process, and reduced ROS production at higher concentrations than 2 μM. Cell culture media, conditioned by PMA-treated monocytes and then transferred on CaCo-2 epithelial cells, induced a proinflammatory state in these cells. The extent of this inflammatory effect was reduced when cells has been pretreated (12 h) with lycopene. At low concentration (2 μM or less), lycopene appeared to promote an inflammatory state not correlated with ROS modulation. At higher concentration (5 μM–20 μM), an anti-inflammatory effect takes place as a decrease of ROS production was detected. So, both concentration and time have to be considered in order to define the exact issue of the effect of carotenoids present in meals. PMID:24891766

  5. A novel fluid resuscitation strategy modulates pulmonary transcription factor activation in a murine model of hemorrhagic shock

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd W. Costantini

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Combining the hemodynamic and immune benefits of hypertonic saline with the anti-inflammatory effects of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor pentoxifylline (HSPTX as a hemorrhagic shock resuscitation strategy reduces lung injury when compared with the effects of Ringer's lactate (RL. We hypothesized that HSPTX exerts its anti-inflammatory effects by interfering with nuclear factor kappa B/cAMP response element-binding protein (NF-κB-CREB competition for the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP in lung tissue, thus affecting pro-inflammatory mediator production. METHODS: Male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent 60 minutes of hemorrhagic shock to reach a mean arterial blood pressure of 35 mmHg followed by resuscitation with either RL or HSPTX (7.5% HS + 25 mg/kg PTX. After four hours, lung samples were collected. NF-κB activation was assessed by measuring the levels of phosphorylated cytoplasmic inhibitor of kappa B (I-κB and nuclear NF-κB p65 by western blot. NF-κB and CREB DNA-binding activity were measured by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA. Competition between NF-κB and CREB for the coactivator CBP was determined by immunoprecipitation. Interleukin-8 (IL-8 levels in the lung were measured by ELISA. RESULTS: RL resuscitation produced significantly higher levels of lung IL-8 levels, I-κB phosphorylation, p65 phosphorylation, and NF-κB DNA binding compared with HSPTX. NF-κB-CBP-binding activity was similar in both groups, whereas CREB-CBP-binding activity was significantly increased with HSPTX. CREB-DNA binding-activity increased to a greater level with HSPTX compared with RL. DISCUSSION: HSPTX decreases lung inflammation following hemorrhagic shock compared with conventional resuscitation using RL through attenuation of NF-κB signaling and increased CREB-DNA binding activity. HSPTX may have therapeutic potential in the attenuation of ischemia-reperfusion injury observed after severe hemorrhagic shock.

  6. Changes in Pulmonary Function After Three-Dimensional Conformal Radiotherapy, Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy, or Proton Beam Therapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Guerra, Jose L.; Gomez, Daniel R.; Zhuang Yan; Levy, Lawrence B.; Eapen, George; Liu, Hongmei; Mohan, Radhe; Komaki, Ritsuko; Cox, James D.; Liao Zhongxing

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the extent of change in pulmonary function over time after definitive radiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with modern techniques and to identify predictors of changes in pulmonary function according to patient, tumor, and treatment characteristics. Patients and Methods: We analyzed 250 patients who had received ≥60 Gy radio(chemo)therapy for primary NSCLC in 1998–2010 and had undergone pulmonary function tests before and within 1 year after treatment. Ninety-three patients were treated with three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy, 97 with intensity-modulated radiotherapy, and 60 with proton beam therapy. Postradiation pulmonary function test values were evaluated among individual patients compared with the same patient’s preradiation value at the following time intervals: 0–4 (T1), 5–8 (T2), and 9–12 (T3) months. Results: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO) was reduced in the majority of patients along the three time periods after radiation, whereas the forced expiratory volume in 1 s per unit of vital capacity (FEV1/VC) showed an increase and decrease after radiation in a similar percentage of patients. There were baseline differences (stage, radiotherapy dose, concurrent chemotherapy) among the radiation technology groups. On multivariate analysis, the following features were associated with larger posttreatment declines in DLCO: pretreatment DLCO, gross tumor volume, lung and heart dosimetric data, and total radiation dose. Only pretreatment DLCO was associated with larger posttreatment declines in FEV1/VC. Conclusions: Lung diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide is reduced in the majority of patients after radiotherapy with modern techniques. Multiple factors, including gross tumor volume, preradiation lung function, and dosimetric parameters, are associated with the DLCO decline. Prospective studies are needed to better understand whether new radiation technology, such as proton beam therapy

  7. Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART signaling within the paraventricular thalamus modulates cocaine-seeking behaviour.

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    Morgan H James

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART has been demonstrated to play a role in regulating the rewarding and reinforcing effects of various drugs of abuse. A recent study demonstrated that i.c.v. administration of CART negatively modulates reinstatement of alcohol seeking, however, the site(s of action remains unclear. We investigated the paraventricular thalamus (PVT as a potential site of relapse-relevant CART signaling, as this region is known to receive dense innervation from CART-containing hypothalamic cells and to project to a number of regions known to be involved in mediating reinstatement, including the nucleus accumbens (NAC, medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC and basolateral amygdala (BLA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Male rats were trained to self-administer cocaine before being extinguished to a set criterion. One day following extinction, animals received intra-PVT infusions of saline, tetrodotoxin (TTX; 2.5 ng, CART (0.625 µg or 2.5 µg or no injection, followed by a cocaine prime (10 mg/kg, i.p.. Animals were then tested under extinction conditions for one hour. Treatment with either TTX or CART resulted in a significant attenuation of drug-seeking behaviour following cocaine-prime, with the 2.5 µg dose of CART having the greatest effect. This effect was specific to the PVT region, as misplaced injections of both TTX and CART resulted in responding that was identical to controls. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We show for the first time that CART signaling within the PVT acts to inhibit drug-primed reinstatement of cocaine seeking behaviour, presumably by negatively modulating PVT efferents that are important for drug seeking, including the NAC, mPFC and BLA. In this way, we identify a possible target for future pharmacological interventions designed to suppress drug seeking.

  8. Natural blood feeding and temperature shift modulate the global transcriptional profile of Rickettsia rickettsii infecting its tick vector.

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    Maria Fernanda B M Galletti

    Full Text Available Rickettsia rickettsii is an obligate intracellular tick-borne bacterium that causes Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever (RMSF, the most lethal spotted fever rickettsiosis. When an infected starving tick begins blood feeding from a vertebrate host, R. rickettsii is exposed to a temperature elevation and to components in the blood meal. These two environmental stimuli have been previously associated with the reactivation of rickettsial virulence in ticks, but the factors responsible for this phenotype conversion have not been completely elucidated. Using customized oligonucleotide microarrays and high-throughput microfluidic qRT-PCR, we analyzed the effects of a 10°C temperature elevation and of a blood meal on the transcriptional profile of R. rickettsii infecting the tick Amblyomma aureolatum. This is the first study of the transcriptome of a bacterium in the genus Rickettsia infecting a natural tick vector. Although both stimuli significantly increased bacterial load, blood feeding had a greater effect, modulating five-fold more genes than the temperature upshift. Certain components of the Type IV Secretion System (T4SS were up-regulated by blood feeding. This suggests that this important bacterial transport system may be utilized to secrete effectors during the tick vector's blood meal. Blood feeding also up-regulated the expression of antioxidant enzymes, which might correspond to an attempt by R. rickettsii to protect itself against the deleterious effects of free radicals produced by fed ticks. The modulated genes identified in this study, including those encoding hypothetical proteins, require further functional analysis and may have potential as future targets for vaccine development.

  9. Does positive selection drive transcription factor binding site turnover? A test with Drosophila cis-regulatory modules.

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    Bin Z He

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Transcription factor binding site(s (TFBS gain and loss (i.e., turnover is a well-documented feature of cis-regulatory module (CRM evolution, yet little attention has been paid to the evolutionary force(s driving this turnover process. The predominant view, motivated by its widespread occurrence, emphasizes the importance of compensatory mutation and genetic drift. Positive selection, in contrast, although it has been invoked in specific instances of adaptive gene expression evolution, has not been considered as a general alternative to neutral compensatory evolution. In this study we evaluate the two hypotheses by analyzing patterns of single nucleotide polymorphism in the TFBS of well-characterized CRM in two closely related Drosophila species, Drosophila melanogaster and Drosophila simulans. An important feature of the analysis is classification of TFBS mutations according to the direction of their predicted effect on binding affinity, which allows gains and losses to be evaluated independently along the two phylogenetic lineages. The observed patterns of polymorphism and divergence are not compatible with neutral evolution for either class of mutations. Instead, multiple lines of evidence are consistent with contributions of positive selection to TFBS gain and loss as well as purifying selection in its maintenance. In discussion, we propose a model to reconcile the finding of selection driving TFBS turnover with constrained CRM function over long evolutionary time.

  10. RhoA signaling modulates cyclin D1 expression in human lung fibroblasts; implications for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

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    Hoban PR

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF is a debilitating disease characterized by exaggerated extracellular matrix deposition and aggressive lung structural remodeling. Disease pathogenesis is driven by fibroblastic foci formation, consequent on growth factor overexpression and myofibroblast proliferation. We have previously shown that both CTGF overexpression and myofibroblast formation in IPF cell lines are dependent on RhoA signaling. As RhoA-mediated regulation is also involved in cell cycle progression, we hypothesise that this pathway is key to lung fibroblast turnover through modulation of cyclin D1 kinetic expression. Methods Cyclin D1 expression was compared in primary IPF patient-derived fibroblasts and equivalent normal control cells. Quantitative real time PCR was employed to examine relative expression levels of cyclin D1 mRNA; protein expression was confirmed by western blotting. Effects of Rho signaling were investigated using transient transfection of constitutively active and dominant negative RhoA constructs as well as pharmacological inhibitors. Cellular proliferation of lung fibroblasts was determined by BrdU incorporation ELISA. To further explore RhoA regulation of cyclin D1 in lung fibroblasts and associated cell cycle progression, an established Rho inhibitor, Simvastatin, was incorporated in our studies. Results Cyclin D1 expression was upregulated in IPF compared to normal lung fibroblasts under exponential growth conditions (p Conclusion These findings report for the first time that cyclin D1 expression is deregulated in IPF through a RhoA dependent mechanism that influences lung fibroblast proliferation. This potentially unravels new molecular targets for future anti-IPF strategies; accordingly, Simvastatin inhibition of Rho-mediated cyclin D1 expression in IPF fibroblasts merits further exploitation.

  11. Alu-miRNA interactions modulate transcript isoform diversity in stress response and reveal signatures of positive selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Rajesh; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Bhardwaj, Vivek; Jha, Vineet; Mandal, Amit K.; Mukerji, Mitali

    2016-09-01

    Primate-specific Alus harbor different regulatory features, including miRNA targets. In this study, we provide evidence for miRNA-mediated modulation of transcript isoform levels during heat-shock response through exaptation of Alu-miRNA sites in mature mRNA. We performed genome-wide expression profiling coupled with functional validation of miRNA target sites within exonized Alus, and analyzed conservation of these targets across primates. We observed that two miRNAs (miR-15a-3p and miR-302d-3p) elevated in stress response, target RAD1, GTSE1, NR2C1, FKBP9 and UBE2I exclusively within Alu. These genes map onto the p53 regulatory network. Ectopic overexpression of miR-15a-3p downregulates GTSE1 and RAD1 at the protein level and enhances cell survival. This Alu-mediated fine-tuning seems to be unique to humans as evident from the absence of orthologous sites in other primate lineages. We further analyzed signatures of selection on Alu-miRNA targets in the genome, using 1000 Genomes Phase-I data. We found that 198 out of 3177 Alu-exonized genes exhibit signatures of selection within Alu-miRNA sites, with 60 of them containing SNPs supported by multiple evidences (global-FST > 0.3, pair-wise-FST > 0.5, Fay-Wu’s H  2.0, high ΔDAF) and implicated in p53 network. We propose that by affecting multiple genes, Alu-miRNA interactions have the potential to facilitate population-level adaptations in response to environmental challenges.

  12. miR-17-5p targets the p300/CBP-associated factor and modulates androgen receptor transcriptional activity in cultured prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Ai-Yu; Eischeid, Alex N; Xiao, Jing; Zhao, Jian; Chen, Dongqing; Wang, Zhao-Yi; Young, Charles YF; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Androgen receptor (AR) signalling is critical to the initiation and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). Transcriptional activity of AR involves chromatin recruitment of co-activators, including the p300/CBP-associated factor (PCAF). Distinct miRNA expression profiles have been identified in PCa cells during the development and progression of the disease. Whether miRNAs regulate PCAF expression in PCa cells to regulate AR transcriptional activity is still unclear. Expression of PCAF was investigated in several PCa cell lines by qRT-PCR, Western blot, and immunocytochemistry. The effects of PCAF expression on AR-regulated transcriptional activity and cell growth in PCa cells were determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation, reporter gene construct analysis, and MTS assay. Targeting of PCAF by miR-17-5p was evaluated using the luciferase reporter assay. PCAF was upregulated in several PCa cell lines. Upregulation of PCAF promoted AR transcriptional activation and cell growth in cultured PCa cells. Expression of PCAF in PCa cells was associated with the downregulation of miR-17-5p. Targeting of the 3’-untranslated region of PCAF mRNA by miR-17-5p caused translational suppression and RNA degradation, and, consequently, modulation of AR transcriptional activity in PCa cells. PCAF is upregulated in cultured PCa cells, and upregulation of PCAF is associated with the downregulation of miR-17-5p. Targeting of PCAF by miR-17-5p modulates AR transcriptional activity and cell growth in cultured PCa cells

  13. Small-Molecule Inhibition of Rho/MKL/SRF Transcription in Prostate Cancer Cells: Modulation of Cell Cycle, ER Stress, and Metastasis Gene Networks

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    Chris R. Evelyn

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Metastasis is the major cause of cancer deaths and control of gene transcription has emerged as a critical contributing factor. RhoA- and RhoC-induced gene transcription via the actin-regulated transcriptional co-activator megakaryocytic leukemia (MKL and serum response factor (SRF drive metastasis in breast cancer and melanoma. We recently identified a compound, CCG-1423, which blocks Rho/MKL/SRF-mediated transcription and inhibits PC-3 prostate cancer cell invasion. Here, we undertook a genome-wide expression study in PC-3 cells to explore the mechanism and function of this compound. There was significant overlap in the genes modulated by CCG-1423 and Latrunculin B (Lat B, which blocks the Rho/MKL/SRF pathway by preventing actin polymerization. In contrast, the general transcription inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-β-d-ribofuranosyl-1H-benzimidazole (DRB showed a markedly different pattern. Effects of CCG-1423 and Lat B on gene expression correlated with literature studies of MKL knock-down. Gene sets involved in DNA synthesis and repair, G1/S transition, and apoptosis were modulated by CCG-1423. It also upregulated genes involved in endoplasmic reticulum stress. Targets of the known Rho target transcription factor family E2F and genes related to melanoma progression and metastasis were strongly suppressed by CCG-1423. These results confirm the ability of our compound to inhibit expression of numerous Rho/MKL-dependent genes and show effects on stress pathways as well. This suggests a novel approach to targeting aggressive cancers and metastasis.

  14. Modulation of cGMP by human HO-1 retrovirus gene transfer in pulmonary microvessel endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Nader G; Quan, Shuo; Mieyal, Paul A; Yang, Liming; Burke-Wolin, Theresa; Mingone, Christopher J; Goodman, Alvin I; Nasjletti, Alberto; Wolin, Michael S

    2002-11-01

    Carbon monoxide (CO) stimulates guanylate cyclase (GC) and increases guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) levels. We transfected rat-lung pulmonary endothelial cells with a retrovirus-mediated human heme oxygenase (hHO)-1 gene. Pulmonary cells that expressed hHO-1 exhibited a fourfold increase in HO activity associated with decreases in the steady-state levels of heme and cGMP without changes in soluble GC (sGC) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS) proteins or basal nitrite production. Heme elicited significant increases in CO production and intracellular cGMP levels in both pulmonary endothelial and pulmonary hHO-1-expressing cells. N(omega)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), an inhibitor of NOS, significantly decreased cGMP levels in heme-treated pulmonary endothelial cells but not heme-treated hHO-1-expressing cells. In the presence of exogenous heme, CO and cGMP levels in hHO-1-expressing cells exceeded the corresponding levels in pulmonary endothelial cells. Acute exposure of endothelial cells to SnCl2, which is an inducer of HO-1, increased cGMP levels, whereas chronic exposure decreased heme and cGMP levels. These results indicate that prolonged overexpression of HO-1 ultimately decreases sGC activity by limiting the availability of cellular heme. Heme activates sGC and enhances cGMP levels via a mechanism that is largely insensitive to NOS inhibition.

  15. Gap junctional communication modulates gene transcription by altering the recruitment of Sp1 and Sp3 to connexin-response elements in osteoblast promoters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stains, Joseph P.; Lecanda, Fernando; Screen, Joanne; Towler, Dwight A.; Civitelli, Roberto

    2003-01-01

    Loss-of-function mutations of gap junction proteins, connexins, represent a mechanism of disease in a variety of tissues. We have shown that recessive (gene deletion) or dominant (connexin45 overexpression) disruption of connexin43 function results in osteoblast dysfunction and abnormal expression of osteoblast genes, including down-regulation of osteocalcin transcription. To elucidate the molecular mechanisms of gap junction-sensitive transcriptional regulation, we systematically analyzed the rat osteocalcin promoter for sensitivity to gap junctional intercellular communication. We identified an Sp1/Sp3 containing complex that assembles on a minimal element in the -70 to -57 region of the osteocalcin promoter in a gap junction-dependent manner. This CT-rich connexin-response element is necessary and sufficient to confer gap junction sensitivity to the osteocalcin proximal promoter. Repression of osteocalcin transcription occurs as a result of displacement of the stimulatory Sp1 by the inhibitory Sp3 on the promoter when gap junctional communication is perturbed. Modulation of Sp1/Sp3 recruitment also occurs on the collagen Ialpha1 promoter and translates into gap junction-sensitive transcriptional control of collagen Ialpha1 gene expression. Thus, regulation of Sp1/Sp3 recruitment to the promoter may represent a potential general mechanism for transcriptional control of target genes by signals passing through gap junctions.

  16. Identification and validation of differentially expressed transcripts by RNA-sequencing of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) lung tissue from patients with Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukmirovic, Milica; Herazo-Maya, Jose D; Blackmon, John; Skodric-Trifunovic, Vesna; Jovanovic, Dragana; Pavlovic, Sonja; Stojsic, Jelena; Zeljkovic, Vesna; Yan, Xiting; Homer, Robert; Stefanovic, Branko; Kaminski, Naftali

    2017-01-12

    Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal lung disease of unknown etiology. A major limitation in transcriptomic profiling of lung tissue in IPF has been a dependence on snap-frozen fresh tissues (FF). In this project we sought to determine whether genome scale transcript profiling using RNA Sequencing (RNA-Seq) could be applied to archived Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded (FFPE) IPF tissues. We isolated total RNA from 7 IPF and 5 control FFPE lung tissues and performed 50 base pair paired-end sequencing on Illumina 2000 HiSeq. TopHat2 was used to map sequencing reads to the human genome. On average ~62 million reads (53.4% of ~116 million reads) were mapped per sample. 4,131 genes were differentially expressed between IPF and controls (1,920 increased and 2,211 decreased (FDR < 0.05). We compared our results to differentially expressed genes calculated from a previously published dataset generated from FF tissues analyzed on Agilent microarrays (GSE47460). The overlap of differentially expressed genes was very high (760 increased and 1,413 decreased, FDR < 0.05). Only 92 differentially expressed genes changed in opposite directions. Pathway enrichment analysis performed using MetaCore confirmed numerous IPF relevant genes and pathways including extracellular remodeling, TGF-beta, and WNT. Gene network analysis of MMP7, a highly differentially expressed gene in both datasets, revealed the same canonical pathways and gene network candidates in RNA-Seq and microarray data. For validation by NanoString nCounter® we selected 35 genes that had a fold change of 2 in at least one dataset (10 discordant, 10 significantly differentially expressed in one dataset only and 15 concordant genes). High concordance of fold change and FDR was observed for each type of the samples (FF vs FFPE) with both microarrays (r = 0.92) and RNA-Seq (r = 0.90) and the number of discordant genes was reduced to four. Our results demonstrate that RNA sequencing of RNA

  17. Histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity of p300 modulates human T lymphotropic virus type 1 p30II-mediated repression of LTR transcriptional activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michael, Bindhu; Nair, Amrithraj M.; Datta, Antara; Hiraragi, Hajime; Ratner, Lee; Lairmore, Michael D.

    2006-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1) is a deltaretrovirus that causes adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma, and is implicated in a variety of lymphocyte-mediated inflammatory disorders. HTLV-1 provirus has regulatory and accessory genes in four pX open reading frames. HTLV-1 pX ORF-II encodes two proteins, p13 II and p30 II , which are incompletely defined in virus replication or pathogenesis. We have demonstrated that pX ORF-II mutations block virus replication in vivo and that ORF-II encoded p30 II , a nuclear-localizing protein that binds with CREB-binding protein (CBP)/p300, represses CREB and Tax responsive element (TRE)-mediated transcription. Herein, we have identified p30 II motifs important for p300 binding and in regulating TRE-mediated transcription in the absence and presence of HTLV-1 provirus. Within amino acids 100-179 of p30 II , a region important for repression of LTR-mediated transcription, we identified a single lysine residue at amino acid 106 (K3) that significantly modulates the ability of p30 II to repress TRE-mediated transcription. Exogenous p300, in a dose-responsive manner, reverses p30 II -dependent repression of TRE-mediated transcription, in the absence or presence of the provirus, In contrast to wild type p300, p300 HAT mutants (defective in histone acetyltransferase activity) only partially rescued p30 II -mediated LTR repression. Deacetylation by histone deacetylase-1 (HDAC-1) enhanced p30 II -mediated LTR repression, while inhibition of deacetylation by trichostatin A decreases p30 II -mediated LTR repression. Collectively, our data indicate that HTLV-1 p30 II modulates viral gene expression in a cooperative manner with p300-mediated acetylation

  18. Location of pulmonary modules prior to video thoracoscopic surgery by CT-guided hook wire placement: Preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreiras, J.; Salmeron, I.; Bustos Garcia de Castro, A.; Hernando, F.; Gomez, A.; Torres, A.

    1996-01-01

    Despite the efficacy of computerized tomography (CT) or radiologically-guided percutaneous biopsy and that offluoroscopically-guided trans bronchial biopsy in characterizing pulmonary nodules, it is not always possible to determine the etiology using these techniques, making it necessary to resort to thoracotomy. Recent developments in endoscopicsurgery equipment and the availability of advance video imaging technology have extended the indications for both diagnostic and therapeutic thoracoscopy. Thus, a number of procedures that previously could only be performed bymeans of thoracotomy, such as resection of peripheral pulmonary nodules, can nowbe carried out by means of video thoracoscopic (VT) surgery. Palpation orvisual location of pulmonary nodules by thoracoscopy is essential but is not always possible when the nodules measure less than 20 mm or when their location is not subpleural. In such cases, a procedure for their prior location is useful. In eight patients with pulmonary nodules who were to undergo subsequent VT surgery, the attempt was made to locate the nodules by CT-guided placementof a hook wire, similar to that employed in breast, and methylene blue injection. The hook wire was correctly introduced without significant complications in all eight cases. The eight nodules were successfully resected during the thoracoscopic procedure, in which the hook wire and methylene blue staining were of great assistance. In certain cases, the location of pulmonary nodules by means of CT-guidehook wire placement and methylene blue injection allows the video thoracoscopic resection of lesions of difficult access. (Author)

  19. Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT for pulmonary Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT in patients with lesions in close approximation to the chest wall

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    Thomas J. FitzGerald

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Chest wall pain and discomfort has been recognized as a significant late effect of radiation therapy in historical and modern treatment models. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT is becoming an important treatment tool in oncology care for patients with intrathoracic lesions. For lesions in close approximation to the chest wall including lesions requiring motion management, SBRT techniques can deliver high dose to the chest wall. As an unintended target of consequence, there is possibility of generating significant chest wall pain and discomfort as a late effect of therapy. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the potential role of Volume Modulated Arc Therapy (VMAT technologies in decreasing chest wall dose in SBRT treatment of pulmonary lesions in close approximation to the chest wall.Ten patients with pulmonary lesions of various sizes and topography in close approximation to the chest wall were selected for retrospective review. All volumes including target, chest wall, ribs, and lung were contoured with maximal intensity projection maps and four-dimensional computer tomography planning. Radiation therapy planning consisted of static techniques including Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy compared to VMAT therapy to a dose of 60Gy in 12Gy fractions. Dose volume histogram to rib, chest wall, and lung were compared between plans with statistical analysis.In all patients dose and volume were improved to ribs and chest wall using VMAT technologies compared to static field techniques. On average, volume receiving 30Gy to the chest wall was improved by 72%;the ribs by 60%. In only one patient did the VMAT treatment technique increase pulmonary volume receiving 20Gy (V20.VMAT technology has potential of limiting radiation dose to sensitive chest wall regions in patients with lesions in close approximation to this structure. This would also have potential value to lesions treated with SBRT in other body regions where targets abut critical

  20. Potential contribution of phenotypically modulated smooth muscle cells and related inflammation in the development of experimental obstructive pulmonary vasculopathy in rats.

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    Shoichiro Otsuki

    Full Text Available We tested the hypothesis that phenotypically modulated smooth muscle cells (SMCs and related inflammation are associated with the progression of experimental occlusive pulmonary vascular disease (PVD. Occlusive PVD was induced by combined exposure to a vascular endothelial growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor Sugen 5416 and hypobaric hypoxia for 3 weeks in rats, which were then returned to ambient air. Hemodynamic, morphometric, and immunohistochemical studies, as well as gene expression analyses, were performed at 3, 5, 8, and 13 weeks after the initial treatment (n = 78. Experimental animals developed pulmonary hypertension and right ventricular hypertrophy, and exhibited a progressive increase in indices of PVD, including cellular intimal thickening and intimal fibrosis. Cellular intimal lesions comprised α smooth muscle actin (α SMA+, SM1+, SM2+/-, vimentin+ immature SMCs that were covered by endothelial monolayers, while fibrous intimal lesions typically included α SMA+, SM1+, SM2+, vimentin+/- mature SMCs. Plexiform lesions comprised α SMA+, vimentin+, SM1-, SM2- myofibroblasts covered by endothelial monolayers. Immature SMC-rich intimal and plexiform lesions were proliferative and were infiltrated by macrophages, while fibrous intimal lesions were characterized by lower proliferative abilities and were infiltrated by few macrophages. Compared with controls, the number of perivascular macrophages was already higher at 3 weeks and progressively increased during the experimental period; gene expression of pulmonary hypertension-related inflammatory molecules, including IL6, MCP1, MMP9, cathepsin-S, and RANTES, was persistently or progressively up-regulated in lungs of experimental animals. We concluded that phenotypically modulated SMCs and related inflammation are potentially associated with the progression of experimental obstructive PVD.

  1. NF-Y recruits both transcription activator and repressor to modulate tissue- and developmental stage-specific expression of human γ-globin gene.

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    Xingguo Zhu

    Full Text Available The human embryonic, fetal and adult β-like globin genes provide a paradigm for tissue- and developmental stage-specific gene regulation. The fetal γ-globin gene is expressed in fetal erythroid cells but is repressed in adult erythroid cells. The molecular mechanism underlying this transcriptional switch during erythroid development is not completely understood. Here, we used a combination of in vitro and in vivo assays to dissect the molecular assemblies of the active and the repressed proximal γ-globin promoter complexes in K562 human erythroleukemia cell line and primary human fetal and adult erythroid cells. We found that the proximal γ-globin promoter complex is assembled by a developmentally regulated, general transcription activator NF-Y bound strongly at the tandem CCAAT motifs near the TATA box. NF-Y recruits to neighboring DNA motifs the developmentally regulated, erythroid transcription activator GATA-2 and general repressor BCL11A, which in turn recruit erythroid repressor GATA-1 and general repressor COUP-TFII to form respectively the NF-Y/GATA-2 transcription activator hub and the BCL11A/COUP-TFII/GATA-1 transcription repressor hub. Both the activator and the repressor hubs are present in both the active and the repressed γ-globin promoter complexes in fetal and adult erythroid cells. Through changes in their levels and respective interactions with the co-activators and co-repressors during erythroid development, the activator and the repressor hubs modulate erythroid- and developmental stage-specific transcription of γ-globin gene.

  2. The Transcription Factor OsWRKY45 Negatively Modulates the Resistance of Rice to the Brown Planthopper Nilaparvata lugens

    OpenAIRE

    Huangfu, Jiayi; Li, Jiancai; Li, Ran; Ye, Meng; Kuai, Peng; Zhang, Tongfang; Lou, Yonggen

    2016-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors play a central role not only in plant growth and development but also in plant stress responses. However, the role of WRKY transcription factors in herbivore-induced plant defenses and their underlying mechanisms, especially in rice, remains largely unclear. Here, we cloned a rice WRKY gene OsWRKY45, whose expression was induced by mechanical wounding, by infestation of the brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens) and by treatment with jasmonic acid (JA) or salic...

  3. Neuronal control of energy balance and modulation of muscle aging by the transcriptional coactivator PGC-1α

    OpenAIRE

    Gill, Jonathan François

    2016-01-01

    Cellular metabolic adaptations play a central role in the body's response to environmental changes and external stimuli and allow the maintenance of a proper energy balance. Transcriptional activators enable the integration of incoming signals and sensing of altered energy levels. Dysregulation of such metabolic pathways is a common mechanism of various tissue dysfunctions contributing to different diseases. A key player in cellular metabolism is the transcriptional coregulator Peroxisome pro...

  4. Pulmonary edema

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  5. Quantitative proteomics unravels that the post-transcriptional regulator Crc modulates the generation of vesicles and secreted virulence determinants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reales-Calderón, Jose Antonio; Corona, Fernando; Monteoliva, Lucía; Gil, Concha; Martínez, Jose Luis

    2015-09-08

    Recent research indicates that the post-transcriptional regulator Crc modulates susceptibility to antibiotics and virulence in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Several P. aeruginosa virulence factors are secreted or engulfed in vesicles. To decipher the Crc modulation of P. aeruginosa virulence, we constructed a crc deficient mutant and measure the proteome associated extracellular vesicles and the vesicle-free secretome using iTRAQ. Fifty vesicle-associated proteins were more abundant and 14 less abundant in the crc-defective strain, whereas 37 were more abundant and 17 less abundant in the vesicle-free secretome. Among them, virulence determinants, such as ToxA, protease IV, azurin, chitin-binding protein, PlcB and Hcp1, were less abundant in the crc-defective mutant. Transcriptomic analysis revealed that some of the observed changes were post-transcriptional and, thus, could be attributed to a direct Crc regulatory role; whereas, for other differentially secreted proteins, the regulatory role was likely indirect. We also observed that the crc mutant presented an impaired vesicle-associated secretion of quorum sensing signal molecules and less cytotoxicity than its wild-type strain. Our results offer new insights into the mechanisms by which Crc regulates P. aeruginosa virulence, through the modulation of vesicle formation and secretion of both virulence determinants and quorum sensing signals. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: HUPO 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Variants in the IFNγ transcription factor genes TBET, STAT1, STAT4, and HLX and the risk of pulmonary tuberculosis in a Colombian population: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Dulfary; Lefebvre, Céline; García, Luis F; Barrera, Luis F

    2013-01-01

    Interferon gamma (IFNγ) is the most potent cytokine involved in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the etiological agent of human tuberculosis (TB). Patients with active TB present reduced levels of IFNγ, which may explain the lack of effective immunity against Mtb in these patients. The diminished expression of or functional alterations in trans-acting factors that regulate IFNγ gene expression may explain the reduced levels of IFNγ in TB patients. To investigate the relationships of genetic variants in the transcription factors TBET, STAT1, STAT4, and HLX to susceptibility/resistance to pulmonary TB. Eight candidate single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected, and genotyped in 466 unrelated pulmonary TB patients and 300 healthy controls from Colombia, and the allelic and genetic associations with TB were analyzed. The results indicate that no SNP in the transcription factors studied is associated with TB. However, polymorphism rs11650354 in the TBET gene may be associated with a decreased risk of TB; the TT genotype was significantly associated with TB protection in a recessive genetic model (OR=0.089, 95% CI: 0.01-0.73, p=0.0069), although this association was not maintained after multiple test correction (EMP2= 0.61). In this study, the rs11650354 variant of TBET was suggested to promote resistance to TB in a Colombian population. A future replication case-control study using additional samples will be necessary to confirm this suggestive association.

  7. Pregnane and Xenobiotic Receptor gene expression in liver cells is modulated by Ets-1 in synchrony with transcription factors Pax5, LEF-1 and c-jun

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumari, Sangeeta; Saradhi, Mallampati; Rana, Manjul; Chatterjee, Swagata [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Aumercier, Marc [IRI, CNRS USR 3078, Université de Lille-Nord de France, Parc CNRS de la Haute Borne, 50 Avenue de Halley, BP 70478, 59658 Villeneuve d’Ascq Cedex (France); Mukhopadhyay, Gauranga [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India); Tyagi, Rakesh K., E-mail: rktyagi@yahoo.com [Special Centre for Molecular Medicine, Jawaharlal Nehru University, New Delhi 110067 (India)

    2015-01-15

    Nuclear receptor PXR is predominantly expressed in liver and intestine. Expression of PXR is observed to be dysregulated in various metabolic disorders indicating its involvement in disease development. However, information available on mechanisms of PXR self-regulation is fragmentary. The present investigation identifies some of the regulatory elements responsible for its tight regulation and low cellular expression. Here, we report that the PXR-promoter is a target for some key transcription factors like PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun. Interestingly, we observed that PXR-promoter responsiveness to Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, is considerably enhanced by Ets transcription factors (PU.1 and Ets-1). Co-transfection of cells with Ets-1, LEF-1 and c-Jun increased PXR-promoter activity by 5-fold and also induced expression of endogenous human PXR. Site-directed mutagenesis and transfection studies revealed that two Ets binding sites and two of the three LEF binding sites in the PXR-promoter are functional and have a positive effect on PXR transcription. Results suggest that expression of Ets family members, in conjunction with Pax5, LEF-1 and c-Jun, lead to coordinated up-regulation of PXR gene transcription. Insights obtained on the regulation of PXR gene have relevance in offering important cues towards normal functioning as well as development of several metabolic disorders via PXR signaling. - Highlights: • The study identified cis-regulatory elements in the nuclear receptor PXR promoter. • Several trans-acting factors modulating the PXR-promoter have been identified. • PU.1/Ets-1, Pax5, LEF-1, c-Jun, LyF-VI and NF-1 act as modulators of the PXR-promoter. • Ets-1 in conjunction with LEF-1 and c-Jun exhibit 5-fold activation of the PXR-promoter. • Insights into PXR-regulation have relevance in normal and pathological conditions.

  8. Experimental pulmonary schistosomiasis: lack of morphological evidence of modulation in schistosomal pulmonary granulomas Esquistossomose pulmonar experimental: falta de evidência morfológica de modulação nos granulomas esquistosomóticos pulmonares

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura R. F. Souza Vidal

    1993-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerous pulmonary schistosome egg granulomas were present in mice submitted to partial portal vein ligation (Warren's model. The granulomas were characterized by cellular aggregations formed within alveolar tissue. Main cellular types were macrophages (epithelioid cells, eosinophils, plasma cells and lymphocytes. These cells were supported by scanty fibrous stroma and exhibited close membrane contact points amongst themselves, but without forming specialized adhesion apparatus. When granulomas involved arterial structures, proliferation of cndothelial and smooth muscle cells occurred and fibrosis associated with angiogenesis became more evident. Granulomas formed around mature eggs in the pulmonary alveolar tissue presented approximately the same size and morphology regardless of the time of infection, the latter being 10, 18 and 25 weeks after cercarial exposure. This persistence of morphological appearance suggests that pulmonary granulomas do not undergo immunological modulation, as is the case with the granulomas in the liver and, to a lesser extent, in the intestines. Probably, besides general immunological factors, local (stromal factors play an important role in schistosomal granuloma modulation.Em camundongos submetidos à ligadura parcial da veia porta e infecção pelo Schistosoma mansoni, os granulomas periovulares apareceram em grande número nos pulmões, comprovando a validade do modelo de Warren. Histologicamente os granulomas eram representados por agregados celulares compactos no seio de escasso estroma. Os macrófagos (células epitelióides e eosinófilos eram os elementos celulares predominantes, vindo em seguida os linfóticos e plasmócitos. Ultraestruturalmenle, as células do granuloma exibiam íntimo contacto de suas membranas, com varios pontos de adesão, mas sem formar estruturas juncionais mais específicas. Os granulomas formados em torno a ovos maduros tinham tamanho, forma e composição celular similares ap

  9. Hyperosmotic stress regulates the distribution and stability of myocardin-related transcription factor, a key modulator of the cytoskeleton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ly, Donald L.; Waheed, Faiza; Lodyga, Monika

    2013-01-01

    Hyperosmotic stress initiates several adaptive responses, including the remodeling of the cytoskeleton. Besides maintaining structural integrity, the cytoskeleton has emerged as an important regulator of gene transcription. Myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), an actin-regulated coactiv......Hyperosmotic stress initiates several adaptive responses, including the remodeling of the cytoskeleton. Besides maintaining structural integrity, the cytoskeleton has emerged as an important regulator of gene transcription. Myocardin-related transcription factor (MRTF), an actin......-regulated coactivator of serum response factor, is a major link between the actin skeleton and transcriptional control. We therefore investigated whether MRTF is regulated by hyperosmotic stress. Here we show that hypertonicity induces robust, rapid, and transient translocation of MRTF from the cytosol to the nucleus...... in kidney tubular cells. We found that the hyperosmolarity-triggered MRTF translocation is mediated by the RhoA/Rho kinase (ROK) pathway. Moreover, the Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factor GEF-H1 is activated by hyperosmotic stress, and it is a key contributor to the ensuing RhoA activation and MRTF...

  10. Comprehensive meta-analysis of Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription (STAT genomic binding patterns discerns cell-specific cis-regulatory modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Keunsoo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cytokine-activated transcription factors from the STAT (Signal Transducers and Activators of Transcription family control common and context-specific genetic programs. It is not clear to what extent cell-specific features determine the binding capacity of seven STAT members and to what degree they share genetic targets. Molecular insight into the biology of STATs was gained from a meta-analysis of 29 available ChIP-seq data sets covering genome-wide occupancy of STATs 1, 3, 4, 5A, 5B and 6 in several cell types. Results We determined that the genomic binding capacity of STATs is primarily defined by the cell type and to a lesser extent by individual family members. For example, the overlap of shared binding sites between STATs 3 and 5 in T cells is greater than that between STAT5 in T cells and non-T cells. Even for the top 1,000 highly enriched STAT binding sites, ~15% of STAT5 binding sites in mouse female liver are shared by other STATs in different cell types while in T cells ~90% of STAT5 binding sites are co-occupied by STAT3, STAT4 and STAT6. In addition, we identified 116 cis-regulatory modules (CRM, which are recognized by all STAT members across cell types defining a common JAK-STAT signature. Lastly, in liver STAT5 binding significantly coincides with binding of the cell-specific transcription factors HNF4A, FOXA1 and FOXA2 and is associated with cell-type specific gene transcription. Conclusions Our results suggest that genomic binding of STATs is primarily determined by the cell type and further specificity is achieved in part by juxtaposed binding of cell-specific transcription factors.

  11. Modulation of pulmonary defense mechanisms by acute exposures to nitrogen dioxide. [Staphylococcus aureus; Proteus mirabilis; Pasteurella pneumotropica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakab, G.J.

    1987-02-01

    The effect of acute exposures to NO/sub 2/ on the antibacterial defenses of the murine lung was assessed following inhalation challenges with Staphylococcus aureus, Proteus mirabilis, and Pasteurella pneumotropica. With S. aureus pulmonary antibacterial defenses were suppressed at NO/sub 2/ levels of 4.0 ppm and greater. Exposure to 10.0 ppm enhanced the intrapulmonary killing of P. mirabilis which correlated with an increase in the phagocytic cell populations lavaged from the lungs; at 20.0 ppm bactericidal activity against P. mirabilis was impaired. Pulmonary antibacterial defenses against P. pneumotropica were impaired at 10.0 ppm which correlated with a decrease in the retrieved phagocytic lung cell population. Reversing the order of treatment (ie., NO/sub 2/ exposure prior to bacterial challenge) raised the threshold concentration for NO/sub 2/-induced impairment of intrapulmonary bacterial killing. With S. aureus the effect was not observed at 5.0 ppm but at 10.0 ppm and with P. mirabilis not at 20.0 ppm but at 30.0 ppm intrapulmonary killing was enhanced. Exposures up to 20.0 ppm of NO/sub 2/ did not effect the physical translocation mechanisms of the lung as quantitated by declines in pulmonary radiotracer activity following aerogenic challenge with /sup 32/P-labeled staphylococci.

  12. Metabolic Reprogramming Regulates the Proliferative and Inflammatory Phenotype of Adventitial Fibroblasts in Pulmonary Hypertension Through the Transcriptional Corepressor C-Terminal Binding Protein-1

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Li, M.; Riddle, S.; Zhang, H.; D'Alessandro, A.; Flockton, A.; Serkova, N. J.; Hansen, K. C.; Moldvan, R.; McKeon, B. A.; Frid, M.; Kumar, S.; Li, H.; Liu, H.; Canovas, A.; Medrano, J. F.; Thomas, M. G.; Iloska, D.; Plecitá-Hlavatá, Lydie; Ježek, Petr; Pullamsetti, S.; Fini, M. A.; El Kasmi, K. C.; Zhang, Q. H.; Stenmark, K. R.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 134, č. 15 (2016), s. 1105-1121 ISSN 0009-7322 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11055; GA MŠk(CZ) LH15071 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : arterial fibroblasts * pulmonary hypertension * metabolism * CtBP1 Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 19.309, year: 2016

  13. Phosphorylation of the Leukemic Oncoprotein EVI1 on Serine 196 Modulates DNA Binding, Transcriptional Repression and Transforming Ability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.J. White (Daniel); R.D. Unwin (Richard); E.M.J. Bindels (Eric); A. Pierce (Andrew); H.Y. Teng (Hsiang-Ying); J. Muter (Joanne); B. Greystoke (Brigit); T.D. Somerville (Tim); D.J. Griffiths (Derek); S. Lovell (Simon); T.C.P. Somervaille (Tim); H.R. Delwel (Ruud); A.D. Whetton (Anthony); S. Meyer (Stefan)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractThe EVI1 (ecotropic viral integration site 1) gene at 3q26 codes for a transcriptional regulator with an essential role in haematopoiesis. Overexpression of EVI1 in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) is frequently associated with 3q26 rearrangements and confers extremely poor prognosis. EVI1

  14. c-Abl phosphorylation of Yin Yang 1's conserved tyrosine 254 in the spacer region modulates its transcriptional activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daraiseh, Susan I; Kassardjian, Ari; Alexander, Karen E; Rizkallah, Raed; Hurt, Myra M

    2018-05-25

    Yin Yang 1 (YY1) is a multifunctional transcription factor that can activate or repress transcription depending on the promotor and/or the co-factors recruited. YY1 is phosphorylated in various signaling pathways and is critical for different biological functions including embryogenesis, apoptosis, proliferation, cell-cycle regulation and tumorigenesis. Here we report that YY1 is a substrate for c-Abl kinase phosphorylation at conserved residue Y254 in the spacer region. Pharmacological inhibition of c-Abl kinase by imatinib, nilotinib and GZD824, knock-down of c-Abl using siRNA, and the use of c-Abl kinase-dead drastically reduces tyrosine phosphorylation of YY1. Both radioactive and non-radioactive in vitro kinase assays, as well as co-immunoprecipitation in different cell lines, show that the target of c-Abl phosphorylation is tyrosine residue 254. c-Abl phosphorylation has little effect on YY1 DNA binding ability or cellular localization in asynchronous cells. However, functional studies reveal that c-Abl mediated phosphorylation of YY1 regulates YY1's transcriptional ability in vivo. In conclusion, we demonstrate the novel role of c-Abl kinase in regulation of YY1's transcriptional activity, linking YY1 regulation with c-Abl tyrosine kinase signaling pathways. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Transcription of Russian intonation ToRI, an interactive research tool and learning module on the internet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Odé, C.

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses a new system for the Transcription of Russian Intonation, ToRI, on the Internet. Section 1 presents a general outline of the system. The terminology used in ToRI is defined in an online glossary, from which Section 2 gives the following examples: pitch accent and

  16. Identification of HDA15-PIF1 as a key repression module directing the transcriptional network of seed germination in the dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Dachuan; Chen, Chia-Yang; Zhao, Minglei; Zhao, Linmao; Duan, Xuewu; Duan, Jun; Wu, Keqiang; Liu, Xuncheng

    2017-07-07

    Light is a major external factor in regulating seed germination. Photoreceptor phytochrome B (PHYB) plays a predominant role in promoting seed germination in the initial phase after imbibition, partially by repressing phytochrome-interacting factor1 (PIF1). However, the mechanism underlying the PHYB-PIF1-mediated transcription regulation remains largely unclear. Here, we identified that histone deacetylase15 (HDA15) is a negative component of PHYB-dependent seed germination. Overexpression of HDA15 in Arabidopsis inhibits PHYB-dependent seed germination, whereas loss of function of HDA15 increases PHYB-dependent seed germination. Genetic evidence indicated that HDA15 acts downstream of PHYB and represses seed germination dependent on PIF1. Furthermore, HDA15 interacts with PIF1 both in vitro and in vivo. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed that HDA15 and PIF1 co-regulate the transcription of the light-responsive genes involved in multiple hormonal signaling pathways and cellular processes in germinating seeds in the dark. In addition, PIF1 recruits HDA15 to the promoter regions of target genes and represses their expression by decreasing the histone H3 acetylation levels in the dark. Taken together, our analysis uncovered the role of histone deacetylation in the light-regulated seed germination process and identified that HDA15-PIF1 acts as a key repression module directing the transcription network of seed germination. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. A module of human peripheral blood mononuclear cell transcriptional network containing primitive and differentiation markers is related to specific cardiovascular health variables.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leni Moldovan

    Full Text Available Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, including rare circulating stem and progenitor cells (CSPCs, have important yet poorly understood roles in the maintenance and repair of blood vessels and perfused organs. Our hypothesis was that the identities and functions of CSPCs in cardiovascular health could be ascertained by analyzing the patterns of their co-expressed markers in unselected PBMC samples. Because gene microarrays had failed to detect many stem cell-associated genes, we performed quantitative real-time PCR to measure the expression of 45 primitive and tissue differentiation markers in PBMCs from healthy and hypertensive human subjects. We compared these expression levels to the subjects' demographic and cardiovascular risk factors, including vascular stiffness. The tested marker genes were expressed in all of samples and organized in hierarchical transcriptional network modules, constructed by a bottom-up approach. An index of gene expression in one of these modules (metagene, defined as the average standardized relative copy numbers of 15 pluripotency and cardiovascular differentiation markers, was negatively correlated (all p<0.03 with age (R2 = -0.23, vascular stiffness (R2 = -0.24, and central aortic pressure (R2 = -0.19 and positively correlated with body mass index (R2 = 0.72, in women. The co-expression of three neovascular markers was validated at the single-cell level using mRNA in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. The overall gene expression in this cardiovascular module was reduced by 72±22% in the patients compared with controls. However, the compactness of both modules was increased in the patients' samples, which was reflected in reduced dispersion of their nodes' degrees of connectivity, suggesting a more primitive character of the patients' CSPCs. In conclusion, our results show that the relationship between CSPCs and vascular function is encoded in modules of the PBMCs transcriptional

  18. Identification of Transcriptional Modules and Key Genes in Chickens Infected with Salmonella enterica Serovar Pullorum Using Integrated Coexpression Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bao-Hong Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Salmonella enterica Pullorum is one of the leading causes of mortality in poultry. Understanding the molecular response in chickens in response to the infection by S. enterica is important in revealing the mechanisms of pathogenesis and disease progress. There have been studies on identifying genes associated with Salmonella infection by differential expression analysis, but the relationships among regulated genes have not been investigated. In this study, we employed weighted gene coexpression network analysis (WGCNA and differential coexpression analysis (DCEA to identify coexpression modules by exploring microarray data derived from chicken splenic tissues in response to the S. enterica infection. A total of 19 modules from 13,538 genes were associated with the Jak-STAT signaling pathway, the extracellular matrix, cytoskeleton organization, the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, G-protein coupled receptor activity, Toll-like receptor signaling pathways, and immune system processes; among them, 14 differentially coexpressed modules (DCMs and 2,856 differentially coexpressed genes (DCGs were identified. The global expression of module genes between infected and uninfected chickens showed slight differences but considerable changes for global coexpression. Furthermore, DCGs were consistently linked to the hubs of the modules. These results will help prioritize candidate genes for future studies of Salmonella infection.

  19. Modulation of organic acids and sugar content in tomato fruits by an abscisic acid-regulated transcription factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastías, Adriana; López-Climent, María; Valcárcel, Mercedes; Rosello, Salvador; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio; Casaretto, José A

    2011-03-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) plays a role in fruit development. ABA signaling components of developmental programs and responses to stress conditions include the group of basic leucine zipper transcriptional activators known as ABA-response element binding factors (AREBs/ABFs). AREB transcription factors mediate ABA-regulated gene expression involved in desiccation tolerance and are expressed mainly in seeds and in vegetative tissues under stress; however, they are also expressed in some fruits such as tomato. In order to get an insight into the role of ABA signaling in fruit development, the expression of two AREB-like factors were investigated during different developmental stages. In addition, tomato transgenic lines that overexpress and downregulate one AREB-like transcription factor, SlAREB1, were used to determine its effect on the levels of some metabolites determining fruit quality. Higher levels of citric acid, malic acid, glutamic acid, glucose and fructose were observed in SlAREB1-overexpressing lines compared with those in antisense suppression lines in red mature fruit pericarp. The higher hexose concentration correlated with increased expression of genes encoding a vacuolar invertase (EC 3.2.1.26) and a sucrose synthase (EC 2.4.1.13). No significant changes were found in ethylene content which agrees with the normal ripening phenotype observed in transgenic fruits. These results suggest that an AREB-mediated ABA signal affects the metabolism of these compounds during the fruit developmental program. Copyright © Physiologia Plantarum 2010.

  20. Evolutionary conserved mechanisms pervade structure and transcriptional modulation of allograft inflammatory factor-1 from sea anemone Anemonia viridis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuttitta, Angela; Ragusa, Maria Antonietta; Costa, Salvatore; Bennici, Carmelo; Colombo, Paolo; Mazzola, Salvatore; Gianguzza, Fabrizio; Nicosia, Aldo

    2017-08-01

    Gene family encoding allograft inflammatory factor-1 (AIF-1) is well conserved among organisms; however, there is limited knowledge in lower organisms. In this study, the first AIF-1 homologue from cnidarians was identified and characterised in the sea anemone Anemonia viridis. The full-length cDNA of AvAIF-1 was of 913 bp with a 5' -untranslated region (UTR) of 148 bp, a 3'-UTR of 315 and an open reading frame (ORF) of 450 bp encoding a polypeptide with149 amino acid residues and predicted molecular weight of about 17 kDa. The predicted protein possesses evolutionary conserved EF hand Ca 2+ binding motifs, post-transcriptional modification sites and a 3D structure which can be superimposed with human members of AIF-1 family. The AvAIF-1 transcript was constitutively expressed in all tested tissues of unchallenged sea anemone, suggesting that AvAIF-1 could serve as a general protective factor under normal physiological conditions. Moreover, we profiled the transcriptional activation of AvAIF-1 after challenges with different abiotic/biotic stresses showing induction by warming conditions, heavy metals exposure and immune stimulation. Thus, mechanisms associated to inflammation and immune challenges up-regulated AvAIF-1 mRNA levels. Our results suggest its involvement in the inflammatory processes and immune response of A. viridis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Reverse engineering a mouse embryonic stem cell-specific transcriptional network reveals a new modulator of neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Cegli, Rossella; Iacobacci, Simona; Flore, Gemma; Gambardella, Gennaro; Mao, Lei; Cutillo, Luisa; Lauria, Mario; Klose, Joachim; Illingworth, Elizabeth; Banfi, Sandro; di Bernardo, Diego

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression profiles can be used to infer previously unknown transcriptional regulatory interaction among thousands of genes, via systems biology 'reverse engineering' approaches. We 'reverse engineered' an embryonic stem (ES)-specific transcriptional network from 171 gene expression profiles, measured in ES cells, to identify master regulators of gene expression ('hubs'). We discovered that E130012A19Rik (E13), highly expressed in mouse ES cells as compared with differentiated cells, was a central 'hub' of the network. We demonstrated that E13 is a protein-coding gene implicated in regulating the commitment towards the different neuronal subtypes and glia cells. The overexpression and knock-down of E13 in ES cell lines, undergoing differentiation into neurons and glia cells, caused a strong up-regulation of the glutamatergic neurons marker Vglut2 and a strong down-regulation of the GABAergic neurons marker GAD65 and of the radial glia marker Blbp. We confirmed E13 expression in the cerebral cortex of adult mice and during development. By immuno-based affinity purification, we characterized protein partners of E13, involved in the Polycomb complex. Our results suggest a role of E13 in regulating the division between glutamatergic projection neurons and GABAergic interneurons and glia cells possibly by epigenetic-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  2. Prospects of engineering thermotolerance in crops through modulation of heat stress transcription factor and heat shock protein networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Röth, Sascha; Schleiff, Enrico; Scharf, Klaus-Dieter

    2015-09-01

    Cell survival under high temperature conditions involves the activation of heat stress response (HSR), which in principle is highly conserved among different organisms, but shows remarkable complexity and unique features in plant systems. The transcriptional reprogramming at higher temperatures is controlled by the activity of the heat stress transcription factors (Hsfs). Hsfs allow the transcriptional activation of HSR genes, among which heat shock proteins (Hsps) are best characterized. Hsps belong to multigene families encoding for molecular chaperones involved in various processes including maintenance of protein homeostasis as a requisite for optimal development and survival under stress conditions. Hsfs form complex networks to activate downstream responses, but are concomitantly subjected to cell-type-dependent feedback regulation through factor-specific physical and functional interactions with chaperones belonging to Hsp90, Hsp70 and small Hsp families. There is increasing evidence that the originally assumed specialized function of Hsf/chaperone networks in the HSR turns out to be a complex central stress response system that is involved in the regulation of a broad variety of other stress responses and may also have substantial impact on various developmental processes. Understanding in detail the function of such regulatory networks is prerequisite for sustained improvement of thermotolerance in important agricultural crops. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Dynamic in vivo binding of transcription factors to cis-regulatory modules of cer and gsc in the stepwise formation of the Spemann–Mangold organizer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudou, Norihiro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Ogino, Hajime; Taira, Masanori

    2012-01-01

    How multiple developmental cues are integrated on cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) for cell fate decisions remains uncertain. The Spemann–Mangold organizer in Xenopus embryos expresses the transcription factors Lim1/Lhx1, Otx2, Mix1, Siamois (Sia) and VegT. Reporter analyses using sperm nuclear transplantation and DNA injection showed that cerberus (cer) and goosecoid (gsc) are activated by the aforementioned transcription factors through CRMs conserved between X. laevis and X. tropicalis. ChIP-qPCR analysis for the five transcription factors revealed that cer and gsc CRMs are initially bound by both Sia and VegT at the late blastula stage, and subsequently bound by all five factors at the gastrula stage. At the neurula stage, only binding of Lim1 and Otx2 to the gsc CRM, among others, persists, which corresponds to their co-expression in the prechordal plate. Based on these data, together with detailed expression pattern analysis, we propose a new model of stepwise formation of the organizer, in which (1) maternal VegT and Wnt-induced Sia first bind to CRMs at the blastula stage; then (2) Nodal-inducible Lim1, Otx2, Mix1 and zygotic VegT are bound to CRMs in the dorsal endodermal and mesodermal regions where all these genes are co-expressed; and (3) these two regions are combined at the gastrula stage to form the organizer. Thus, the in vivo dynamics of multiple transcription factors highlight their roles in the initiation and maintenance of gene expression, and also reveal the stepwise integration of maternal, Nodal and Wnt signaling on CRMs of organizer genes to generate the organizer. PMID:22492356

  4. Dynamic in vivo binding of transcription factors to cis-regulatory modules of cer and gsc in the stepwise formation of the Spemann-Mangold organizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudou, Norihiro; Yamamoto, Shinji; Ogino, Hajime; Taira, Masanori

    2012-05-01

    How multiple developmental cues are integrated on cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) for cell fate decisions remains uncertain. The Spemann-Mangold organizer in Xenopus embryos expresses the transcription factors Lim1/Lhx1, Otx2, Mix1, Siamois (Sia) and VegT. Reporter analyses using sperm nuclear transplantation and DNA injection showed that cerberus (cer) and goosecoid (gsc) are activated by the aforementioned transcription factors through CRMs conserved between X. laevis and X. tropicalis. ChIP-qPCR analysis for the five transcription factors revealed that cer and gsc CRMs are initially bound by both Sia and VegT at the late blastula stage, and subsequently bound by all five factors at the gastrula stage. At the neurula stage, only binding of Lim1 and Otx2 to the gsc CRM, among others, persists, which corresponds to their co-expression in the prechordal plate. Based on these data, together with detailed expression pattern analysis, we propose a new model of stepwise formation of the organizer, in which (1) maternal VegT and Wnt-induced Sia first bind to CRMs at the blastula stage; then (2) Nodal-inducible Lim1, Otx2, Mix1 and zygotic VegT are bound to CRMs in the dorsal endodermal and mesodermal regions where all these genes are co-expressed; and (3) these two regions are combined at the gastrula stage to form the organizer. Thus, the in vivo dynamics of multiple transcription factors highlight their roles in the initiation and maintenance of gene expression, and also reveal the stepwise integration of maternal, Nodal and Wnt signaling on CRMs of organizer genes to generate the organizer.

  5. Transcriptional Response of Human Neurospheres to Helper-Dependent CAV-2 Vectors Involves the Modulation of DNA Damage Response, Microtubule and Centromere Gene Groups.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Piersanti

    Full Text Available Brain gene transfer using viral vectors will likely become a therapeutic option for several disorders. Helper-dependent (HD canine adenovirus type 2 vectors (CAV-2 are well suited for this goal. These vectors are poorly immunogenic, efficiently transduce neurons, are retrogradely transported to afferent structures in the brain and lead to long-term transgene expression. CAV-2 vectors are being exploited to unravel behavior, cognition, neural networks, axonal transport and therapy for orphan diseases. With the goal of better understanding and characterizing HD-CAV-2 for brain therapy, we analyzed the transcriptomic modulation induced by HD-CAV-2 in human differentiated neurospheres derived from midbrain progenitors. This 3D model system mimics several aspects of the dynamic nature of human brain. We found that differentiated neurospheres are readily transduced by HD-CAV-2 and that transduction generates two main transcriptional responses: a DNA damage response and alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes. Future investigations on the biochemistry of processes highlighted by probe modulations will help defining the implication of HD-CAV-2 and CAR receptor binding in enchaining these functional pathways. We suggest here that the modulation of DNA damage genes is related to viral DNA, while the alteration of centromeric and microtubule probes is possibly enchained by the interaction of the HD-CAV-2 fibre with CAR.

  6. Vitamin C modulates cadmium-induced hepatic antioxidants' gene transcripts and toxicopathic changes in Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Sayed, Yasser S; El-Gazzar, Ahmed M; El-Nahas, Abeer F; Ashry, Khaled M

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium (Cd) is one of the naturally occurring heavy metals having adverse effects, while vitamin C (L-ascorbic acid) is an essential micronutrient for fish, which can attenuate tissue damage owing to its chain-breaking antioxidant and free radical scavenger properties. The adult Nile tilapia fish were exposed to Cd at 5 mg/l with and without vitamin C (500 mg/kg diet) for 45 days in addition to negative and positive controls fed with the basal diet and basal diet supplemented with vitamin C, respectively. Hepatic relative mRNA expression of genes involved in antioxidant function, metallothionein (MT), glutathione S-transferase (GST-α1), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx1), was assessed using real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Hepatic architecture was also histopathologically examined. Tilapia exposed to Cd exhibited upregulated antioxidants' gene transcript levels, GST-⍺1, GPx1, and MT by 6.10-, 4.60-, and 4.29-fold, respectively. Histopathologically, Cd caused severe hepatic changes of multifocal hepatocellular and pancreatic acinar necrosis, and lytic hepatocytes infiltrated with eosinophilic granular cells. Co-treatment of Cd-exposed fish with vitamin C overexpressed antioxidant enzyme-related genes, GST-⍺1 (16.26-fold) and GPx1 (18.68-fold), and maintained the expression of MT gene close to control (1.07-fold), averting the toxicopathic lesions induced by Cd. These results suggested that vitamin C has the potential to protect Nile tilapia from Cd hepatotoxicity via sustaining hepatic antioxidants' genes transcripts and normal histoarchitecture.

  7. Copper and hypoxia modulate transcriptional and mitochondrial functional-biochemical responses in warm acclimated rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sappal, Ravinder; Fast, Mark; Purcell, Sara; MacDonald, Nicole; Stevens, Don; Kibenge, Fred; Siah, Ahmed; Kamunde, Collins

    2016-01-01

    To survive in changing environments fish utilize a wide range of biological responses that require energy. We examined the effect of warm acclimation on the electron transport system (ETS) enzymes and transcriptional responses to hypoxia and copper (Cu) exposure in fish. Rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) were acclimated to cold (11 °C; control) and warm (20 °C) temperatures for 3 weeks followed by exposure to Cu, hypoxia or both for 24 h. Activities of ETS enzyme complexes I-IV (CI–CIV) were measured in liver and gill mitochondria. Analyses of transcripts encoding for proteins involved in mitochondrial respiration (cytochrome c oxidase subunits 4-1 and 2: COX4-1 and COX4-2), metal detoxification/stress response (metallothioneins A and B: MT-A and MT-B) and energy sensing (AMP-activated protein kinase α1: AMPKα1) were done in liver mitochondria, and in whole liver and gill tissues by RT-qPCR. Warm acclimation inhibited activities of ETS enzymes while effects of Cu and hypoxia depended on the enzyme and thermal acclimation status. The genes encoding for COX4-1, COX4-2, MT-A, MT-B and AMPKα1 were strongly and tissue-dependently altered by warm acclimation. While Cu and hypoxia clearly increased MT-A and MT-B transcript levels in all tissues, their effects on COX4-1, COX4-2 and AMPKα1 mRNA levels were less pronounced. Importantly, warm acclimation differentially altered COX4-2/COX4-1 ratio in liver mitochondria and gill tissue. The three stressors showed both independent and joint actions on activities of ETS enzymes and transcription of genes involved in energy metabolism, stress response and metals homeostasis. Overall, we unveiled novel interactive effects that should not be overlooked in real world situations wherein fish normally encounter multiple stress factors. - Highlights: • Joint and individual effects of copper, hypoxia and warm acclimation differ quantitatively. • Energy metabolism genes are differentially altered by multiple stressors.

  8. Effects of inspiratory muscle exercise in the pulmonary function, autonomic modulation, and hemodynamic variables in older women with metabolic syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feriani, Daniele Jardim; Coelho, Hélio José; Scapini, Kátia Bilhar; de Moraes, Oscar Albuquerque; Mostarda, Cristiano; Ruberti, Olivia Moraes; Uchida, Marco Carlos; Caperuto, Érico Chagas; Irigoyen, Maria Cláudia; Rodrigues, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects of inspiratory muscle exercise (IME) on metabolic and hemodynamic parameters, cardiac autonomic modulation and respiratory function of older women with metabolic syndrome (MS). For this, sixteen older women with MS and 12 aged-matched controls participated of the present study. Two days before and 2 days after the main experiment, fasting blood samples (i.e., total cholesterol, triglycerides and blood glucose), cardiac autonomic modulation (i.e., heart rate variability), and respiratory muscle function were obtained and evaluated. The sessions of physical exercise was based on a IME, which was performed during 7 days. Each session of IME was performed during 20 min, at 30% of maximal static inspiratory pressure. In the results, MS group presented higher levels of triglycerides, blood glucose, and systolic blood pressure when compared to control group. IME was not able to change these variables. However, although MS group showed impaired respiratory muscle strength and function, as well as cardiac autonomic modulation, IME was able to improve these parameters. Thus, the data showed that seven days of IME are capable to improve respiratory function and cardiac autonomic modulation of older women with MS. These results indicate that IME can be a profitable therapy to counteracting the clinical markers of MS, once repeated sessions of acute IME can cause chronical alterations on respiratory function and cardiac autonomic modulation. PMID:28503537

  9. Respiratory reovirus 1/L induction of diffuse alveolar damage: pulmonary fibrosis is not modulated by corticosteroids in acute respiratory distress syndrome in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    London, Lucille; Majeski, Elizabeth I; Altman-Hamamdzic, Sanja; Enockson, Candace; Paintlia, Manjeet K; Harley, Russell A; London, Steven D

    2002-06-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a clinical syndrome characterized by diffuse alveolar damage (DAD) secondary to an intense host inflammatory response of the lung to a pulmonary or extrapulmonary infectious or noninfectious insult. We have previously described a unique animal model in which CBA/J mice infected with reovirus 1/L develop ARDS. This model recapitulates the histopathological changes observed in human ARDS, which consist of the overlapping phases of exudation, including the formation of hyaline membranes, regeneration, and healing via repair with fibrosis. In this report, we show that the development of DAD in the acute phase of the disease and intraalveolar fibrosis in the late phase of the disease was not modulated by treatment with methylprednisolone (MPS). In the presence or absence of MPS, the majority of cells infiltrating the lungs after reovirus 1/L infection were polymorphonuclear leukocytes and macrophages. A number of key proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines that are observed in the BAL fluid of ARDS patients were also found in the lungs of mice after reovirus 1/L infection and were not modulated by MPS. These include interferon-gamma, interleukin-10, and monocyte chemoattractant protein. The histopathology, cytokine/chemokine expression, and response to corticosteroids in reovirus 1/L-induced ARDS are similar to what is observed in human patients, making this a clinically relevant model.

  10. The Transcription Factor OsWRKY45 Negatively Modulates the Resistance of Rice to the Brown Planthopper Nilaparvata lugens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huangfu, Jiayi; Li, Jiancai; Li, Ran; Ye, Meng; Kuai, Peng; Zhang, Tongfang; Lou, Yonggen

    2016-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors play a central role not only in plant growth and development but also in plant stress responses. However, the role of WRKY transcription factors in herbivore-induced plant defenses and their underlying mechanisms, especially in rice, remains largely unclear. Here, we cloned a rice WRKY gene OsWRKY45, whose expression was induced by mechanical wounding, by infestation of the brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens) and by treatment with jasmonic acid (JA) or salicylic acid (SA). The antisense expression of OsWRKY45 (as-wrky) enhanced BPH-induced levels of H2O2 and ethylene, reduced feeding and oviposition preference as well as the survival rate of BPH, and delayed the development of BPH nymphs. Consistently, lower population densities of BPH on as-wrky lines, compared to those on wild-type (WT) plants, were observed in field experiments. On the other hand, as-wrky lines in the field had lower susceptibility to sheath blight (caused by Rhizoctonia solani) but higher susceptibility to rice blast (caused by Magnaporthe oryzae) than did WT plants. These findings suggest that OsWRKY45 plays important but contrasting roles in regulating the resistance of rice to pathogens and herbivores, and attention should be paid if OsWRKY45 is used to develop disease or herbivore-resistant rice. PMID:27258255

  11. The Transcription Factor OsWRKY45 Negatively Modulates the Resistance of Rice to the Brown Planthopper Nilaparvata lugens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiayi Huangfu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available WRKY transcription factors play a central role not only in plant growth and development but also in plant stress responses. However, the role of WRKY transcription factors in herbivore-induced plant defenses and their underlying mechanisms, especially in rice, remains largely unclear. Here, we cloned a rice WRKY gene OsWRKY45, whose expression was induced by mechanical wounding, by infestation of the brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens and by treatment with jasmonic acid (JA or salicylic acid (SA. The antisense expression of OsWRKY45 (as-wrky enhanced BPH-induced levels of H2O2 and ethylene, reduced feeding and oviposition preference as well as the survival rate of BPH, and delayed the development of BPH nymphs. Consistently, lower population densities of BPH on as-wrky lines, compared to those on wild-type (WT plants, were observed in field experiments. On the other hand, as-wrky lines in the field had lower susceptibility to sheath blight (caused by Rhizoctonia solani but higher susceptibility to rice blast (caused by Magnaporthe oryzae than did WT plants. These findings suggest that OsWRKY45 plays important but contrasting roles in regulating the resistance of rice to pathogens and herbivores, and attention should be paid if OsWRKY45 is used to develop disease or herbivore-resistant rice.

  12. The Transcription Factor OsWRKY45 Negatively Modulates the Resistance of Rice to the Brown Planthopper Nilaparvata lugens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huangfu, Jiayi; Li, Jiancai; Li, Ran; Ye, Meng; Kuai, Peng; Zhang, Tongfang; Lou, Yonggen

    2016-05-31

    WRKY transcription factors play a central role not only in plant growth and development but also in plant stress responses. However, the role of WRKY transcription factors in herbivore-induced plant defenses and their underlying mechanisms, especially in rice, remains largely unclear. Here, we cloned a rice WRKY gene OsWRKY45, whose expression was induced by mechanical wounding, by infestation of the brown planthopper (BPH, Nilaparvata lugens) and by treatment with jasmonic acid (JA) or salicylic acid (SA). The antisense expression of OsWRKY45 (as-wrky) enhanced BPH-induced levels of H₂O₂ and ethylene, reduced feeding and oviposition preference as well as the survival rate of BPH, and delayed the development of BPH nymphs. Consistently, lower population densities of BPH on as-wrky lines, compared to those on wild-type (WT) plants, were observed in field experiments. On the other hand, as-wrky lines in the field had lower susceptibility to sheath blight (caused by Rhizoctonia solani) but higher susceptibility to rice blast (caused by Magnaporthe oryzae) than did WT plants. These findings suggest that OsWRKY45 plays important but contrasting roles in regulating the resistance of rice to pathogens and herbivores, and attention should be paid if OsWRKY45 is used to develop disease or herbivore-resistant rice.

  13. A large family of antivirulence regulators modulates the effects of transcriptional activators in Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Araceli E Santiago

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We have reported that transcription of a hypothetical small open reading frame (orf60 in enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC strain 042 is impaired after mutation of aggR, which encodes a global virulence activator. We have also reported that the cryptic orf60 locus was linked to protection against EAEC diarrhea in two epidemiologic studies. Here, we report that the orf60 product acts as a negative regulator of aggR itself. The orf60 protein product lacks homology to known repressors, but displays 44-100% similarity to at least fifty previously undescribed small (<10 kDa hypothetical proteins found in many gram negative pathogen genomes. Expression of orf60 homologs from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC repressed the expression of the AraC-transcriptional ETEC regulator CfaD/Rns and its regulon in ETEC strain H10407. Complementation in trans of EAEC 042orf60 by orf60 homologs from ETEC and the mouse pathogen Citrobacter rodentium resulted in dramatic suppression of aggR. A C. rodentium orf60 homolog mutant showed increased levels of activator RegA and increased colonization of the adult mouse. We propose the name Aar (AggR-activated regulator for the clinically and epidemiologically important orf60 product in EAEC, and postulate the existence of a large family of homologs among pathogenic Enterobacteriaceae and Pasteurellaceae. We propose the name ANR (AraC Negative Regulators for this family.

  14. ATF1 Modulates the Heat Shock Response by Regulating the Stress-Inducible Heat Shock Factor 1 Transcription Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takii, Ryosuke; Fujimoto, Mitsuaki; Tan, Ke; Takaki, Eiichi; Hayashida, Naoki; Nakato, Ryuichiro; Shirahige, Katsuhiko

    2014-01-01

    The heat shock response is an evolutionally conserved adaptive response to high temperatures that controls proteostasis capacity and is regulated mainly by an ancient heat shock factor (HSF). However, the regulation of target genes by the stress-inducible HSF1 transcription complex has not yet been examined in detail in mammalian cells. In the present study, we demonstrated that HSF1 interacted with members of the ATF1/CREB family involved in metabolic homeostasis and recruited them on the HSP70 promoter in response to heat shock. The HSF1 transcription complex, including the chromatin-remodeling factor BRG1 and lysine acetyltransferases p300 and CREB-binding protein (CBP), was formed in a manner that was dependent on the phosphorylation of ATF1. ATF1-BRG1 promoted the establishment of an active chromatin state and HSP70 expression during heat shock, whereas ATF1-p300/CBP accelerated the shutdown of HSF1 DNA-binding activity during recovery from acute stress, possibly through the acetylation of HSF1. Furthermore, ATF1 markedly affected the resistance to heat shock. These results revealed the unanticipated complexity of the primitive heat shock response mechanism, which is connected to metabolic adaptation. PMID:25312646

  15. Pulmonary tuberculosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    TB; Tuberculosis - pulmonary; Mycobacterium - pulmonary ... Pulmonary TB is caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M tuberculosis) . TB is contagious. This means the bacteria is easily spread from an infected person ...

  16. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease severity and its association with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: impact on cardiac autonomic modulation and functional capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zangrando KTL

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Katiany Thays Lopes Zangrando,1 Renata Trimer,2 Luiz Carlos Soares de Carvalho Jr,1 Guilherme Peixoto Tinoco Arêas,1 Flávia Cristina Rossi Caruso,1 Ramona Cabiddu,1 Meliza Goi Roscani,3 Fabíola Paula Galhardo Rizzatti,3 Audrey Borghi-Silva1 1Cardiopulmonary Physiotherapy Laboratory, Physiotherapy Department, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Physical Education and Health Department, University of Santa Cruz do Sul, Santa Cruz do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; 3Medicine Department, Federal University of São Carlos, São Carlos, São Paulo, Brazil Background: The study was conducted to determine the impact of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in association with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS on cardiac autonomic control and functional capacity. Subjects and methods: The study was a cross-sectional prospective controlled clinical study. Heart rate variability indices of 24 COPD (n = 12 and COPD+OSAS (n = 12 patients were evaluated and compared by electrocardiographic recordings acquired during rest, active postural maneuver (APM, respiratory sinus arrhythmia maneuver (RSA-m, and the 6-minute walk test (6MWT. Results: The COPD group presented higher parasympathetic modulation during APM when compared to the COPD+OSAS group (P = 0.02. The COPD+OSAS group presented higher sympathetic modulation during RSA-m when compared to the COPD group (P = 0.00. The performance during 6MWT was similarly impaired in both groups, despite the greater severity of the COPD group. Conclusion: Subjects with COPD+OSAS present marked sympathetic modulation, and the presence of OSAS in COPD subjects has a negative impact on functional capacity regardless of the severity of lung disease. Keywords: COPD, OSAS, COPD+OSAS, functional capacity

  17. Ascorbate oxidase-dependent changes in the redox state of the apoplast modulate gene transcript accumulation leading to modified hormone signaling and orchestration of defense processes in tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pignocchi, Cristina; Kiddle, Guy; Hernández, Iker; Foster, Simon J; Asensi, Amparo; Taybi, Tahar; Barnes, Jeremy; Foyer, Christine H

    2006-06-01

    The role of the redox state of the apoplast in hormone responses, signaling cascades, and gene expression was studied in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants with modified cell wall-localized ascorbate oxidase (AO). High AO activity specifically decreased the ascorbic acid (AA) content of the apoplast and altered plant growth responses triggered by hormones. Auxin stimulated shoot growth only when the apoplastic AA pool was reduced in wild-type or AO antisense lines. Oxidation of apoplastic AA in AO sense lines was associated with loss of the auxin response, higher mitogen-activated protein kinase activities, and susceptibility to a virulent strain of the pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. The total leaf glutathione pool, the ratio of reduced glutathione to glutathione disulfide, and glutathione reductase activities were similar in the leaves of all lines. However, AO sense leaves exhibited significantly lower dehydroascorbate reductase and ascorbate peroxidase activities than wild-type and antisense leaves. The abundance of mRNAs encoding antioxidant enzymes was similar in all lines. However, the day/night rhythms in the abundance of transcripts encoding the three catalase isoforms were changed in response to the AA content of the apoplast. Other transcripts influenced by AO included photorespiratory genes and a plasma membrane Ca(2+) channel-associated gene. We conclude that the redox state of the apoplast modulates plant growth and defense responses by regulating signal transduction cascades and gene expression patterns. Hence, AO activity, which modulates the redox state of the apoplastic AA pool, strongly influences the responses of plant cells to external and internal stimuli.

  18. Identification and Transcriptional Modulation of the Largemouth Bass, Micropterus salmoides, Vitellogenin Receptor During Oocyte Development by Insulin and Sex Steroids1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Gustavo A.; Quattro, Joseph M.; Denslow, Nancy D.; Kroll, Kevin J.; Prucha, Melinda S.; Porak, Wesley F.; Grier, Harry J.; Sabo-Attwood, Tara L.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Fish vitellogenin synthesized and released from the liver of oviparous animals is taken up into oocytes by the vitellogenin receptor. This is an essential process in providing nutrient yolk to developing embryos to ensure successful reproduction. Here we disclose the full length vtgr cDNA sequence for largemouth bass (LMB) that reveals greater than 90% sequence homology with other fish vtgr sequences. We classify LMB Vtgr as a member of the low density lipoprotein receptor superfamily based on conserved domains and categorize as the short variant that is devoid of the O-glycan segment. Phylogenetic analysis places LMB Vtgr sequence into a well-supported monophyletic group of fish Vtgr. Real-time PCR showed that the greatest levels of LMB vtgr mRNA expression occurred in previtellogenic ovarian tissues. In addition, we reveal the effects of insulin, 17beta-estradiol (E2), and 11-ketotestosterone (11-KT) in modulation of vtgr, esr, and ar mRNAs in previtellogenic oocytes. Insulin increased vtgr expression levels in follicles ex vivo while exposure to E2 or 11-KT did not result in modulation of expression. However, both steroids were able to repress insulin-induced vtgr transcript levels. Coexposure with insulin and E2 or of insulin and 11-KT increased ovarian esr2b and ar mRNA levels, respectively, which suggest a role for these nuclear receptors in insulin-mediated signaling pathways. These data provide the first evidence for the ordered stage-specific expression of LMB vtgr during the normal reproductive process and the hormonal influence of insulin and sex steroids on controlling vtgr transcript levels in ovarian tissues. PMID:22786822

  19. Linking high-resolution metabolic flux phenotypes and transcriptional regulation in yeast modulated by the global regulator Gcn4p

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moxley, Joel F.; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Antoniewicz, Maciek R.

    2009-01-01

    . However, the potential of systems biology approaches is limited by difficulties in integrating metabolic measurements across the functional levels of the cell despite their being most closely linked to cellular phenotype. To address this limitation, we developed a model-based approach to correlate m......RNA and metabolic flux data that combines information from both interaction network models and flux determination models. We started by quantifying 5,764 mRNAs, 54 metabolites, and 83 experimental C-13-based reaction fluxes in continuous cultures of yeast under stress in the absence or presence of global regulator...... of metabolic flux (i.e., use of different reaction pathways) by transcriptional regulation and metabolite interaction density (i.e., level of pairwise metabolite-protein interactions) as a key biosynthetic control determinant. Furthermore, this model predicted flux rewiring in studies of follow...

  20. Genome-wide Expression Analysis and Metabolite Profiling Elucidate Transcriptional Regulation of Flavonoid Biosynthesis and Modulation under Abiotic Stresses in Banana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Ashutosh; Alok, Anshu; Lakhwani, Deepika; Singh, Jagdeep; Asif, Mehar H; Trivedi, Prabodh K

    2016-08-19

    Flavonoid biosynthesis is largely regulated at the transcriptional level due to the modulated expression of genes related to the phenylpropanoid pathway in plants. Although accumulation of different flavonoids has been reported in banana, a staple fruit crop, no detailed information is available on regulation of the biosynthesis in this important plant. We carried out genome-wide analysis of banana (Musa acuminata, AAA genome) and identified 28 genes belonging to 9 gene families associated with flavonoid biosynthesis. Expression analysis suggested spatial and temporal regulation of the identified genes in different tissues of banana. Analysis revealed enhanced expression of genes related to flavonol and proanthocyanidin (PA) biosynthesis in peel and pulp at the early developmental stages of fruit. Genes involved in anthocyanin biosynthesis were highly expressed during banana fruit ripening. In general, higher accumulation of metabolites was observed in the peel as compared to pulp tissue. A correlation between expression of genes and metabolite content was observed at the early stage of fruit development. Furthermore, this study also suggests regulation of flavonoid biosynthesis, at transcriptional level, under light and dark exposures as well as methyl jasmonate (MJ) treatment in banana.

  1. Nucleolin modulates the subcellular localization of GDNF-inducible zinc finger protein 1 and its roles in transcription and cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dambara, Atsushi; Morinaga, Takatoshi; Fukuda, Naoyuki; Yamakawa, Yoshinori; Kato, Takuya; Enomoto, Atsushi; Asai, Naoya; Murakumo, Yoshiki; Matsuo, Seiichi; Takahashi, Masahide

    2007-01-01

    GZF1 is a zinc finger protein induced by glial cell-line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF). It is a sequence-specific transcriptional repressor with a BTB/POZ (Broad complex, Tramtrack, Bric a brac/Poxvirus and zinc finger) domain and ten zinc finger motifs. In the present study, we used immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify nucleolin as a GZF1-binding protein. Deletion analysis revealed that zinc finger motifs 1-4 of GZF1 mediate its association with nucleolin. When zinc fingers 1-4 were deleted from GZF1 or nucleolin expression was knocked down by short interference RNA (siRNA), nuclear localization of GZF1 was impaired. These results suggest that nucleolin is involved in the proper subcellular distribution of GZF1. In addition, overexpression of nucleolin moderately inhibited the transcriptional repressive activity of GZF1 whereas knockdown of nucleolin expression by siRNA enhanced its activity. Thus, the repressive activity of GZF1 is modulated by the level at which nucleolin is expressed. Finally, we found that knockdown of GZF1 and nucleolin expression markedly impaired cell proliferation. These findings suggest that the physiological functions of GZF1 may be regulated by the protein's association with nucleolin

  2. NF-κB Directly Regulates Fas Transcription to Modulate Fas-mediated Apoptosis and Tumor Suppression*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Feiyan; Bardhan, Kankana; Yang, Dafeng; Thangaraju, Muthusamy; Ganapathy, Vadivel; Waller, Jennifer L.; Liles, Georgia B.; Lee, Jeffrey R.; Liu, Kebin

    2012-01-01

    Fas is a member of the death receptor family. Stimulation of Fas leads to induction of apoptotic signals, such as caspase 8 activation, as well as “non-apoptotic” cellular responses, notably NF-κB activation. Convincing experimental data have identified NF-κB as a critical promoter of cancer development, creating a solid rationale for the development of antitumor therapy that suppresses NF-κB activity. On the other hand, compelling data have also shown that NF-κB activity enhances tumor cell sensitivity to apoptosis and senescence. Furthermore, although stimulation of Fas activates NF-κB, the function of NF-κB in the Fas-mediated apoptosis pathway remains largely undefined. In this study, we observed that deficiency of either Fas or FasL resulted in significantly increased incidence of 3-methylcholanthrene-induced spontaneous sarcoma development in mice. Furthermore, Fas-deficient mice also exhibited significantly greater incidence of azoxymethane and dextran sodium sulfate-induced colon carcinoma. In addition, human colorectal cancer patients with high Fas protein in their tumor cells had a longer time before recurrence occurred. Engagement of Fas with FasL triggered NF-κB activation. Interestingly, canonical NF-κB was found to directly bind to the FAS promoter. Blocking canonical NF-κB activation diminished Fas expression, whereas blocking alternate NF-κB increased Fas expression in human carcinoma cells. Moreover, although canonical NF-κB protected mouse embryo fibroblast (MEF) cells from TNFα-induced apoptosis, knocking out p65 diminished Fas expression in MEF cells, resulting in inhibition of FasL-induced caspase 8 activation and apoptosis. In contrast, knocking out p52 increased Fas expression in MEF cells. Our observations suggest that canonical NF-κB is a Fas transcription activator and alternate NF-κB is a Fas transcription repressor, and Fas functions as a suppressor of spontaneous sarcoma and colon carcinoma. PMID:22669972

  3. Modulation of T cell cytokine production by miR-144* with elevated expression in patients with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yanhua; Wang, Xinjing; Jiang, Jing; Cao, Zhihong; Yang, Bingfen; Cheng, Xiaoxing

    2011-05-01

    microRNAs have a critical role in regulating innate and adaptive immunity. To understand whether microRNAs play roles in regulating immune responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection in humans, microRNA expression profiling was performed in PBMCs from pulmonary tuberculosis patients and healthy controls. Analysis of expression profiles showed that expression of 30 microRNAs was significantly altered during active TB as compared with healthy controls, 28 microRNAs were up-regulated and 2 microRNAs down-regulated. miR-144* was one of the microRNAs that were overexpressed in active TB patients. Real-time RT-PCR analysis showed that miR-144* was mainly expressed in T cells. Transfection of T cells with miR-144* precursor demonstrated that miR-144* could inhibit TNF-α and IFN-γ production and T cell proliferation. It is concluded that miR-144* might involve in regulation of anti-TB immunity through modification of cytokine production and cell proliferation of T cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Alternative activation of macrophages and pulmonary fibrosis are modulated by scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Shubha; Larson-Casey, Jennifer L; Ryan, Alan J; He, Chao; Kobzik, Lester; Carter, A Brent

    2015-08-01

    Alternative activation of alveolar macrophages is linked to fibrosis following exposure to asbestos. The scavenger receptor, macrophage receptor with collagenous structure (MARCO), provides innate immune defense against inhaled particles and pathogens; however, a receptor for asbestos has not been identified. We hypothesized that MARCO acts as an initial signaling receptor for asbestos, polarizes macrophages to a profibrotic M2 phenotype, and is required for the development of asbestos-induced fibrosis. Compared with normal subjects, alveolar macrophages isolated from patients with asbestosis express higher amounts of MARCO and have greater profibrotic polarization. Arginase 1 (40-fold) and IL-10 (265-fold) were higher in patients. In vivo, the genetic deletion of MARCO attenuated the profibrotic environment and pulmonary fibrosis in mice exposed to chrysotile. Moreover, alveolar macrophages from MARCO(-/-) mice polarize to an M1 phenotype, whereas wild-type mice have higher Ym1 (>3.0-fold) and nearly 7-fold more active TGF-β1 in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid (BALF). Arg(432) and Arg(434) in domain V of MARCO are required for the polarization of macrophages to a profibrotic phenotype as mutation of these residues reduced FIZZ1 expression (17-fold) compared with cells expressing MARCO. These observations demonstrate that a macrophage membrane protein regulates the fibrotic response to lung injury and suggest a novel target for therapeutic intervention. © FASEB.

  5. Multi-tissue analysis of co-expression networks by higher-order generalized singular value decomposition identifies functionally coherent transcriptional modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiaolin; Moreno-Moral, Aida; Rotival, Maxime; Bottolo, Leonardo; Petretto, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    Recent high-throughput efforts such as ENCODE have generated a large body of genome-scale transcriptional data in multiple conditions (e.g., cell-types and disease states). Leveraging these data is especially important for network-based approaches to human disease, for instance to identify coherent transcriptional modules (subnetworks) that can inform functional disease mechanisms and pathological pathways. Yet, genome-scale network analysis across conditions is significantly hampered by the paucity of robust and computationally-efficient methods. Building on the Higher-Order Generalized Singular Value Decomposition, we introduce a new algorithmic approach for efficient, parameter-free and reproducible identification of network-modules simultaneously across multiple conditions. Our method can accommodate weighted (and unweighted) networks of any size and can similarly use co-expression or raw gene expression input data, without hinging upon the definition and stability of the correlation used to assess gene co-expression. In simulation studies, we demonstrated distinctive advantages of our method over existing methods, which was able to recover accurately both common and condition-specific network-modules without entailing ad-hoc input parameters as required by other approaches. We applied our method to genome-scale and multi-tissue transcriptomic datasets from rats (microarray-based) and humans (mRNA-sequencing-based) and identified several common and tissue-specific subnetworks with functional significance, which were not detected by other methods. In humans we recapitulated the crosstalk between cell-cycle progression and cell-extracellular matrix interactions processes in ventricular zones during neocortex expansion and further, we uncovered pathways related to development of later cognitive functions in the cortical plate of the developing brain which were previously unappreciated. Analyses of seven rat tissues identified a multi-tissue subnetwork of co

  6. Multi-tissue analysis of co-expression networks by higher-order generalized singular value decomposition identifies functionally coherent transcriptional modules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Xiao

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent high-throughput efforts such as ENCODE have generated a large body of genome-scale transcriptional data in multiple conditions (e.g., cell-types and disease states. Leveraging these data is especially important for network-based approaches to human disease, for instance to identify coherent transcriptional modules (subnetworks that can inform functional disease mechanisms and pathological pathways. Yet, genome-scale network analysis across conditions is significantly hampered by the paucity of robust and computationally-efficient methods. Building on the Higher-Order Generalized Singular Value Decomposition, we introduce a new algorithmic approach for efficient, parameter-free and reproducible identification of network-modules simultaneously across multiple conditions. Our method can accommodate weighted (and unweighted networks of any size and can similarly use co-expression or raw gene expression input data, without hinging upon the definition and stability of the correlation used to assess gene co-expression. In simulation studies, we demonstrated distinctive advantages of our method over existing methods, which was able to recover accurately both common and condition-specific network-modules without entailing ad-hoc input parameters as required by other approaches. We applied our method to genome-scale and multi-tissue transcriptomic datasets from rats (microarray-based and humans (mRNA-sequencing-based and identified several common and tissue-specific subnetworks with functional significance, which were not detected by other methods. In humans we recapitulated the crosstalk between cell-cycle progression and cell-extracellular matrix interactions processes in ventricular zones during neocortex expansion and further, we uncovered pathways related to development of later cognitive functions in the cortical plate of the developing brain which were previously unappreciated. Analyses of seven rat tissues identified a multi

  7. Structural dynamics of the cell nucleus: basis for morphology modulation of nuclear calcium signaling and gene transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Queisser, Gillian; Wiegert, Simon; Bading, Hilmar

    2011-01-01

    Neuronal morphology plays an essential role in signal processing in the brain. Individual neurons can undergo use-dependent changes in their shape and connectivity, which affects how intracellular processes are regulated and how signals are transferred from one cell to another in a neuronal network. Calcium is one of the most important intracellular second messengers regulating cellular morphologies and functions. In neurons, intracellular calcium levels are controlled by ion channels in the plasma membrane such as NMDA receptors (NMDARs), voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs) and certain α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid receptors (AMPARs) as well as by calcium exchange pathways between the cytosol and internal calcium stores including the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria. Synaptic activity and the subsequent opening of ligand and/or voltage-gated calcium channels can initiate cytosolic calcium transients which propagate towards the cell soma and enter the nucleus via its nuclear pore complexes (NPCs) embedded in the nuclear envelope. We recently described the discovery that in hippocampal neurons the morphology of the nucleus affects the calcium dynamics within the nucleus. Here we propose that nuclear infoldings determine whether a nucleus functions as an integrator or detector of oscillating calcium signals. We outline possible ties between nuclear mophology and transcriptional activity and discuss the importance of extending the approach to whole cell calcium signal modeling in order to understand synapse-to-nucleus communication in healthy and dysfunctional neurons.

  8. Copper oxide nanoparticles induce the transcriptional modulation of oxidative stress-related genes in Arbacia lixula embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannetto, Alessia; Cappello, Tiziana; Oliva, Sabrina; Parrino, Vincenzo; De Marco, Giuseppe; Fasulo, Salvatore; Mauceri, Angela; Maisano, Maria

    2018-06-14

    Copper oxide nanoparticles (CuO NPs) are widely used in various industrial applications, i.e. semiconductor devices, batteries, solar energy converter, gas sensor, microelectronics, heat transfer fluids, and have been recently recognized as emerging pollutants of increasing concern for human and marine environmental health. Therefore, the toxicity of CuO NPs needs to be thoroughly understood. In this study, we evaluated the potential role of oxidative stress in CuO NP toxicity by exploring the molecular response of Arbacia lixula embryos to three CuO NP concentrations (0.7, 10, 20 ppb) by investigating the transcriptional patterns of oxidative stress-related genes (catalase and superoxide dismutase) and metallothionein, here cloned and characterized for the first time. Time- and concentration-dependent changes in gene expression were detected in A. lixula embryos exposed to CuO NPs, up to pluteus stage (72 h post-fertilization, hpf), indicating that oxidative stress is one of the toxicity mechanisms for CuO NPs. These findings provide new insights into the comprehension of the molecular mechanisms underlying copper nanoparticle toxicity in A. lixula sea urchin and give new tools for monitoring of aquatic areas, thus corroborating the suitability of this embryotoxicity assay for future evaluation of impacted sites. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. The Arabidopsis Transcription Factor AtTCP15 Regulates Endoreduplication by Modulating Expression of Key Cell-cycle Genes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zi-Yu Li; Bin Li; Ai-Wu Dong

    2012-01-01

    Plant cells frequently undergo endoreduplication,a modified cell cycle in which genome is repeatedly replicated without cytokinesis.As the key step to achieve final size and function for cells,endoreduplication is prevalent during plant development.However,mechanisms to control the balance between endoreduplication and mitotic cell division are still poorly understood.Here,we show that the Arabidopsis TCP (CINCINNATA-like TEOSINTE BRANCHED1-CYCLOIDEA-PCF)-family transcription factor gene AtTCP15 is expressed in trichomes,as well as in rapidly dividing and vascular tissues.Expression of AtTCP15SRDX,AtTCP15 fused with a SRDX repressor domain,induces extra endoreduplication in trichomes and cotyledon cells in transgenic Arabidopsis.On the contrary,overexpression of AtTCP15 suppresses endoreduplication in trichomes and other examined cells.Misregulation of AtTCP15 affects the expression of several important genes involved in cell-cycle regulation.AtTCP15 protein binds directly to the promoter regions of CYCA2;3 and RETINOBLASTOMA-RELATED (RBR) genes,which play key roles in endoreduplication.Taken together,AtTCP15 plays an important role in regulating endoreduplication during Arabidopsis development.

  10. Food Components Modulate Obesity and Energy Metabolism via the Transcriptional Regulation of Lipid-Sensing Nuclear Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for chronic diseases such as diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and hypertension. Many modern people have a tendency to overeat owing to stress and loosening of self-control. Moreover, energy expenditure varies greatly among individuals. Scientific reduction of obesity is important under these circumstances. Furthermore, recent research on molecular levels has clarified the differentiation of adipocytes, the level of subsequent fat accumulation, and the secretion of the biologically active adipokines by adipocytes. Adipose tissues and obesity have become the most important target for the prevention and treatment of many chronic diseases. We have identified various food-derived compounds modulating nuclear receptors, especially peroxisome proliferators-activated receptor(PPAR), in the regulation of energy metabolism and obesity. In this review, we discuss the PPARs that are most important in obesity and energy metabolism.

  11. Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C targets p53 and modulates its transcriptional and apoptotic activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi Fuming; Saha, Abhik; Murakami, Masanao; Kumar, Pankaj; Knight, Jason S.; Cai Qiliang; Choudhuri, Tathagata; Robertson, Erle S.

    2009-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene is one of the most commonly mutated genes in human cancers and the corresponding encoded protein induces apoptosis or cell-cycle arrest at the G1/S checkpoint in response to DNA damage. To date, previous studies have shown that antigens encoded by human tumor viruses such as SV40 large T antigen, adenovirus E1A and HPV E6 interact with p53 and disrupt its functional activity. In a similar fashion, we now show that EBNA3C, one of the EBV latent antigens essential for the B-cell immortalization in vitro, interacts directly with p53. Additionally, we mapped the interaction of EBNA3C with p53 to the C-terminal DNA-binding and the tetramerization domain of p53, and the region of EBNA3C responsible for binding to p53 was mapped to the N-terminal domain of EBNA3C (residues 130-190), previously shown to interact with a number of important cell-cycle components, specifically SCF Skp2 , cyclin A, and cMyc. Furthermore, we demonstrate that EBNA3C substantially represses the transcriptional activity of p53 in luciferase based reporter assays, and rescues apoptosis induced by ectopic p53 expression in SAOS-2 (p53 -/- ) cells. Interestingly, we also show that the DNA-binding ability of p53 is diminished in the presence of EBNA3C. Thus, the interaction between the p53 and EBNA3C provides new insights into the mechanism(s) by which the EBNA3C oncoprotein can alter cellular gene expression in EBV associated human cancers.

  12. Functional Image-Guided Radiotherapy Planning in Respiratory-Gated Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lung Cancer Patients With Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kimura, Tomoki, E-mail: tkkimura@hiroshima-u.ac.jp [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan); Nishibuchi, Ikuno; Murakami, Yuji; Kenjo, Masahiro; Kaneyasu, Yuko; Nagata, Yasushi [Department of Radiation Oncology, Hiroshima University, Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Hiroshima City (Japan)

    2012-03-15

    Purpose: To investigate the incorporation of functional lung image-derived low attenuation area (LAA) based on four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT) into respiratory-gated intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) or volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) in treatment planning for lung cancer patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods and Materials: Eight lung cancer patients with COPD were the subjects of this study. LAA was generated from 4D-CT data sets according to CT values of less than than -860 Hounsfield units (HU) as a threshold. The functional lung image was defined as the area where LAA was excluded from the image of the total lung. Two respiratory-gated radiotherapy plans (70 Gy/35 fractions) were designed and compared in each patient as follows: Plan A was an anatomical IMRT or VMAT plan based on the total lung; Plan F was a functional IMRT or VMAT plan based on the functional lung. Dosimetric parameters (percentage of total lung volume irradiated with {>=}20 Gy [V20], and mean dose of total lung [MLD]) of the two plans were compared. Results: V20 was lower in Plan F than in Plan A (mean 1.5%, p = 0.025 in IMRT, mean 1.6%, p = 0.044 in VMAT) achieved by a reduction in MLD (mean 0.23 Gy, p = 0.083 in IMRT, mean 0.5 Gy, p = 0.042 in VMAT). No differences were noted in target volume coverage and organ-at-risk doses. Conclusions: Functional IGRT planning based on LAA in respiratory-guided IMRT or VMAT appears to be effective in preserving a functional lung in lung cancer patients with COPD.

  13. Baicalin Ameliorates Experimental Liver Cholestasis in Mice by Modulation of Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and NRF2 Transcription Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kezhen Shen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Experimental cholestatic liver fibrosis was performed by bile duct ligation (BDL in mice, and significant liver injury was observed in 15 days. Administration of baicalin in mice significantly ameliorates liver fibrosis. Experimental cholestatic liver fibrosis was associated with induced gene expression of fibrotic markers such as collagen I, fibronectin, alpha smooth muscle actin (SMA, and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF; increased inflammatory cytokines (TNFα, MIP1α, IL1β, and MIP2; increased oxidative stress and reactive oxygen species- (ROS- inducing enzymes (NOX2 and iNOS; dysfunctional mitochondrial electron chain complexes; and apoptotic/necrotic cell death markers (DNA fragmentation, caspase 3 activity, and PARP activity. Baicalin administration on alternate day reduced fibrosis along with profibrotic gene expression, proinflammatory cytokines, oxidative stress, and cell death whereas improving the function of mitochondrial electron transport chain. We observed baicalin enhanced NRF2 activation by nuclear translocation and induced its target genes HO-1 and GCLM, thus enhancing antioxidant defense. Interplay of oxidative stress/inflammation and NRF2 were key players for baicalin-mediated protection. Stellate cell activation is crucial for initiation of fibrosis. Baicalin alleviated stellate cell activation and modulated TIMP1, SMA, collagen 1, and fibronectin in vitro. This study indicates that baicalin might be beneficial for reducing inflammation and fibrosis in liver injury models.

  14. The DAF-16 FOXO transcription factor regulates natc-1 to modulate stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans, linking insulin/IGF-1 signaling to protein N-terminal acetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Warnhoff

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway plays a critical role in stress resistance and longevity, but the mechanisms are not fully characterized. To identify genes that mediate stress resistance, we screened for C. elegans mutants that can tolerate high levels of dietary zinc. We identified natc-1, which encodes an evolutionarily conserved subunit of the N-terminal acetyltransferase C (NAT complex. N-terminal acetylation is a widespread modification of eukaryotic proteins; however, relatively little is known about the biological functions of NATs. We demonstrated that loss-of-function mutations in natc-1 cause resistance to a broad-spectrum of physiologic stressors, including multiple metals, heat, and oxidation. The C. elegans FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 is a critical target of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway that mediates stress resistance, and DAF-16 is predicted to directly bind the natc-1 promoter. To characterize the regulation of natc-1 by DAF-16 and the function of natc-1 in insulin/IGF-1 signaling, we analyzed molecular and genetic interactions with key components of the insulin/IGF-1 pathway. natc-1 mRNA levels were repressed by DAF-16 activity, indicating natc-1 is a physiological target of DAF-16. Genetic studies suggested that natc-1 functions downstream of daf-16 to mediate stress resistance and dauer formation. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that natc-1 is directly regulated by the DAF-16 transcription factor, and natc-1 is a physiologically significant effector of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway that mediates stress resistance and dauer formation. These studies identify a novel biological function for natc-1 as a modulator of stress resistance and dauer formation and define a functionally significant downstream effector of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway. Protein N-terminal acetylation mediated by the NatC complex may play an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating stress resistance.

  15. Systematic Profiling of Poly(A)+ Transcripts Modulated by Core 3’ End Processing and Splicing Factors Reveals Regulatory Rules of Alternative Cleavage and Polyadenylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wencheng; You, Bei; Hoque, Mainul; Zheng, Dinghai; Luo, Wenting; Ji, Zhe; Park, Ji Yeon; Gunderson, Samuel I.; Kalsotra, Auinash; Manley, James L.; Tian, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA) results in mRNA isoforms containing different 3’ untranslated regions (3’UTRs) and/or coding sequences. How core cleavage/polyadenylation (C/P) factors regulate APA is not well understood. Using siRNA knockdown coupled with deep sequencing, we found that several C/P factors can play significant roles in 3’UTR-APA. Whereas Pcf11 and Fip1 enhance usage of proximal poly(A) sites (pAs), CFI-25/68, PABPN1 and PABPC1 promote usage of distal pAs. Strong cis element biases were found for pAs regulated by CFI-25/68 or Fip1, and the distance between pAs plays an important role in APA regulation. In addition, intronic pAs are substantially regulated by splicing factors, with U1 mostly inhibiting C/P events in introns near the 5’ end of gene and U2 suppressing those in introns with features for efficient splicing. Furthermore, PABPN1 inhibits expression of transcripts with pAs near the transcription start site (TSS), a property possibly related to its role in RNA degradation. Finally, we found that groups of APA events regulated by C/P factors are also modulated in cell differentiation and development with distinct trends. Together, our results support an APA code where an APA event in a given cellular context is regulated by a number of parameters, including relative location to the TSS, splicing context, distance between competing pAs, surrounding cis elements and concentrations of core C/P factors. PMID:25906188

  16. Systematic profiling of poly(A+ transcripts modulated by core 3' end processing and splicing factors reveals regulatory rules of alternative cleavage and polyadenylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wencheng Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Alternative cleavage and polyadenylation (APA results in mRNA isoforms containing different 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs and/or coding sequences. How core cleavage/polyadenylation (C/P factors regulate APA is not well understood. Using siRNA knockdown coupled with deep sequencing, we found that several C/P factors can play significant roles in 3'UTR-APA. Whereas Pcf11 and Fip1 enhance usage of proximal poly(A sites (pAs, CFI-25/68, PABPN1 and PABPC1 promote usage of distal pAs. Strong cis element biases were found for pAs regulated by CFI-25/68 or Fip1, and the distance between pAs plays an important role in APA regulation. In addition, intronic pAs are substantially regulated by splicing factors, with U1 mostly inhibiting C/P events in introns near the 5' end of gene and U2 suppressing those in introns with features for efficient splicing. Furthermore, PABPN1 inhibits expression of transcripts with pAs near the transcription start site (TSS, a property possibly related to its role in RNA degradation. Finally, we found that groups of APA events regulated by C/P factors are also modulated in cell differentiation and development with distinct trends. Together, our results support an APA code where an APA event in a given cellular context is regulated by a number of parameters, including relative location to the TSS, splicing context, distance between competing pAs, surrounding cis elements and concentrations of core C/P factors.

  17. HIV-1 Tat affects the programming and functionality of human CD8⁺ T cells by modulating the expression of T-box transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sforza, Fabio; Nicoli, Francesco; Gallerani, Eleonora; Finessi, Valentina; Reali, Eva; Cafaro, Aurelio; Caputo, Antonella; Ensoli, Barbara; Gavioli, Riccardo

    2014-07-31

    HIV infection is characterized by several immune dysfunctions of both CD8⁺ and CD4⁺ T cells as hyperactivation, impairment of functionality and expansion of memory T cells. CD8⁺ T-cell dysfunctions have been associated with increased expression of T-bet, Eomesdermin and pro-inflammatory cytokines, and with down-regulation of CD127. The HIV-1 trans-activator of transcription (Tat) protein, which is released by infected cells and detected in tissues of HIV-positive individuals, is known to contribute to the dysregulation of CD4⁺ T cells; however, its effects on CD8⁺ T cells have not been investigated. Thus, in this study, we sought to address whether Tat may affect CD8⁺ T-cell functionality and programming. CD8⁺ T cells were activated by T-cell receptor engagement in the presence or absence of Tat. Cytokine production, killing capacity, surface phenotype and expression of transcription factors important for T-cell programming were evaluated. Tat favors the secretion of interleukin-2, interferon-γ and granzyme B in CD8⁺ T cells. Behind this functional modulation we observed that Tat increases the expression of T-bet, Eomesdermin, Blimp-1, Bcl-6 and Bcl-2 in activated but not in unstimulated CD8⁺ T lymphocytes. This effect is associated with the down-regulation of CD127 and the up-regulation of CD27. Tat deeply alters the programming and functionality of CD8⁺ T lymphocytes.

  18. The DAF-16 FOXO transcription factor regulates natc-1 to modulate stress resistance in Caenorhabditis elegans, linking insulin/IGF-1 signaling to protein N-terminal acetylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnhoff, Kurt; Murphy, John T; Kumar, Sandeep; Schneider, Daniel L; Peterson, Michelle; Hsu, Simon; Guthrie, James; Robertson, J David; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2014-10-01

    The insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway plays a critical role in stress resistance and longevity, but the mechanisms are not fully characterized. To identify genes that mediate stress resistance, we screened for C. elegans mutants that can tolerate high levels of dietary zinc. We identified natc-1, which encodes an evolutionarily conserved subunit of the N-terminal acetyltransferase C (NAT) complex. N-terminal acetylation is a widespread modification of eukaryotic proteins; however, relatively little is known about the biological functions of NATs. We demonstrated that loss-of-function mutations in natc-1 cause resistance to a broad-spectrum of physiologic stressors, including multiple metals, heat, and oxidation. The C. elegans FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 is a critical target of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway that mediates stress resistance, and DAF-16 is predicted to directly bind the natc-1 promoter. To characterize the regulation of natc-1 by DAF-16 and the function of natc-1 in insulin/IGF-1 signaling, we analyzed molecular and genetic interactions with key components of the insulin/IGF-1 pathway. natc-1 mRNA levels were repressed by DAF-16 activity, indicating natc-1 is a physiological target of DAF-16. Genetic studies suggested that natc-1 functions downstream of daf-16 to mediate stress resistance and dauer formation. Based on these findings, we hypothesize that natc-1 is directly regulated by the DAF-16 transcription factor, and natc-1 is a physiologically significant effector of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway that mediates stress resistance and dauer formation. These studies identify a novel biological function for natc-1 as a modulator of stress resistance and dauer formation and define a functionally significant downstream effector of the insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway. Protein N-terminal acetylation mediated by the NatC complex may play an evolutionarily conserved role in regulating stress resistance.

  19. Integrated Genomics Reveals Convergent Transcriptomic Networks Underlying Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease and Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusko, Rebecca L; Brothers, John F; Tedrow, John; Pandit, Kusum; Huleihel, Luai; Perdomo, Catalina; Liu, Gang; Juan-Guardela, Brenda; Kass, Daniel; Zhang, Sherry; Lenburg, Marc; Martinez, Fernando; Quackenbush, John; Sciurba, Frank; Limper, Andrew; Geraci, Mark; Yang, Ivana; Schwartz, David A; Beane, Jennifer; Spira, Avrum; Kaminski, Naftali

    2016-10-15

    Despite shared environmental exposures, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are usually studied in isolation, and the presence of shared molecular mechanisms is unknown. We applied an integrative genomic approach to identify convergent transcriptomic pathways in emphysema and IPF. We defined the transcriptional repertoire of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, IPF, or normal histology lungs using RNA-seq (n = 87). Genes increased in both emphysema and IPF relative to control were enriched for the p53/hypoxia pathway, a finding confirmed in an independent cohort using both gene expression arrays and the nCounter Analysis System (n = 193). Immunohistochemistry confirmed overexpression of HIF1A, MDM2, and NFKBIB members of this pathway in tissues from patients with emphysema or IPF. Using reads aligned across splice junctions, we determined that alternative splicing of p53/hypoxia pathway-associated molecules NUMB and PDGFA occurred more frequently in IPF or emphysema compared with control and validated these findings by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and the nCounter Analysis System on an independent sample set (n = 193). Finally, by integrating parallel microRNA and mRNA-Seq data on the same samples, we identified MIR96 as a key novel regulatory hub in the p53/hypoxia gene-expression network and confirmed that modulation of MIR96 in vitro recapitulates the disease-associated gene-expression network. Our results suggest convergent transcriptional regulatory hubs in diseases as varied phenotypically as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and IPF and suggest that these hubs may represent shared key responses of the lung to environmental stresses.

  20. Pilot study of combination transcriptional modulation therapy with sodium phenylbutyrate and 5-azacytidine in patients with acute myeloid leukemia or myelodysplastic syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maslak, P; Chanel, S; Camacho, L H; Soignet, S; Pandolfi, P P; Guernah, I; Warrell, R; Nimer, S

    2006-02-01

    Epigenetic mechanisms underlying tumorigenesis have recently received much attention as potential therapeutic targets of human cancer. We designed a pilot study to target DNA methylation and histone deacetylation through the sequential administration of 5-azacytidine followed by sodium phenylbutyrate (PB) in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Ten evaluable patients (eight AML, two MDS) were treated with seven consecutive daily subcutaneous injections of 5-azacytidine at 75 mg/m2 followed by 5 days of sodium PB given intravenously at a dose of 200 mg/kg. Five patients (50%) were able to achieve a beneficial clinical response (partial remission or stable disease). One patient with MDS proceeded to allogeneic stem cell transplantation and is alive without evidence of disease 39 months later. The combination regimen was well tolerated with common toxicities of injection site skin reaction (90% of the patients) from 5-azacytidine, and somnolence/fatigue from the sodium PB infusion (80% of the patients). Correlative laboratory studies demonstrated the consistent reacetylation of histone H4, although no relationship with the clinical response could be demonstrated. Results from this pilot study demonstrate that a combination approach targeting different mechanisms of transcriptional modulation is clinically feasible with acceptable toxicity and measurable biologic and clinical outcomes.

  1. Estrogen receptor β (ERβ1) transactivation is differentially modulated by the transcriptional coregulator Tip60 in a cis-acting element-dependent manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Leung, Yuet-Kin; Chung, Irving; Tarapore, Pheruza; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2013-08-30

    Estrogen receptor (ER) β1 and ERα have overlapping and distinct functions despite their common use of estradiol as the physiological ligand. These attributes are explained in part by their differential utilization of coregulators and ligands. Although Tip60 has been shown to interact with both receptors, its regulatory role in ERβ1 transactivation has not been defined. In this study, we found that Tip60 enhances transactivation of ERβ1 at the AP-1 site but suppresses its transcriptional activity at the estrogen-response element (ERE) site in an estradiol-independent manner. However, different estrogenic compounds can modify the Tip60 action. The corepressor activity of Tip60 at the ERE site is abolished by diarylpropionitrile, genistein, equol, and bisphenol A, whereas its coactivation at the AP-1 site is augmented by fulvestrant (ICI 182,780). GRIP1 is an important tethering mediator for ERs at the AP-1 site. We found that coexpression of GRIP1 synergizes the action of Tip60. Although Tip60 is a known acetyltransferase, it is unable to acetylate ERβ1, and its coregulatory functions are independent of its acetylation activity. In addition, we showed the co-occupancy of ERβ1 and Tip60 at ERE and AP-1 sites of ERβ1 target genes. Tip60 differentially regulates the endogenous expression of the target genes by modulating the binding of ERβ1 to the cis-regulatory regions. Thus, we have identified Tip60 as the first dual-function coregulator of ERβ1.

  2. Pulmonary Hypertension and Pulmonary Vasodilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Roberta L

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in the perinatal period can present acutely (persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn) or chronically. Clinical and echocardiographic diagnosis of acute pulmonary hypertension is well accepted but there are no broadly validated criteria for echocardiographic diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension later in the clinical course, although there are significant populations of infants with lung disease at risk for this diagnosis. Contributing cardiovascular comorbidities are common in infants with pulmonary hypertension and lung disease. It is not clear who should be treated without confirmation of pulmonary vascular disease by cardiac catheterization, with concurrent evaluation of any contributing cardiovascular comorbidities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Introduction to Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: Introduction to Pulmonary Fibrosis What Is Pulmonary Fibrosis? Pulmonary fibrosis is a disease where there is scarring ... of pulmonary fibrosis. Learn more How Is Pulmonary Fibrosis Diagnosed? Pulmonary fibrosis can be difficult to diagnose, so it ...

  4. MicroRNA-27b plays a role in pulmonary arterial hypertension by modulating peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ dependent Hsp90-eNOS signaling and nitric oxide production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bi, Rui; Bao, Chunrong; Jiang, Lianyong; Liu, Hao; Yang, Yang; Mei, Ju; Ding, Fangbao, E-mail: dbcar126@126.com

    2015-05-01

    Pulmonary artery endothelial dysfunction is associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Based on recent studies showing that microRNA (miR)-27b is aberrantly expressed in PAH, we hypothesized that miR-27b may contribute to pulmonary endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling in PAH. The effect of miR-27b on pulmonary endothelial dysfunction and the underlying mechanism were investigated in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) in vitro and in a monocrotaline (MCT)-induced model of PAH in vivo. miR-27b expression was upregulated in MCT-induced PAH and inversely correlated with the levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-γ, and miR-27b inhibition attenuated MCT-induced endothelial dysfunction and remodeling and prevented PAH associated right ventricular hypertrophy and systolic pressure in rats. PPARγ was confirmed as a direct target of miR-27b in HPAECs and shown to mediate the effect of miR-27b on the disruption of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) coupling to Hsp90 and the suppression of NO production associated with the PAH phenotype. We showed that miR-27b plays a role endothelial function and NO release and elucidated a potential mechanism by which miR-27b regulates Hsp90-eNOS and NO signaling by modulating PPARγ expression, providing potential therapeutic targets for the treatment of PAH. - Highlights: • miR-27b plays a role in endothelial function and NO release. • miR-27b inhibition ameliorates MCT-induced endothelial dysfunction and PAH. • miR-27b targets PPARγ in HPAECs. • miR-27b regulates PPARγ dependent Hsp90-eNOS and NO signaling.

  5. Nicotine and caffeine modulate haloperidol-induced changes in postsynaptic density transcripts expression: Translational insights in psychosis therapy and treatment resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Bartolomeis, Andrea; Iasevoli, Felice; Marmo, Federica; Buonaguro, Elisabetta Filomena; Avvisati, Livia; Latte, Gianmarco; Tomasetti, Carmine

    2018-04-01

    Caffeine and nicotine are widely used by schizophrenia patients and may worsen psychosis and affect antipsychotic therapies. However, they have also been accounted as augmentation strategies in treatment-resistant schizophrenia. Despite both substances are known to modulate dopamine and glutamate transmission, little is known about the molecular changes induced by these compounds in association to antipsychotics, mostly at the level of the postsynaptic density (PSD), a site of dopamine-glutamate interplay. Here we investigated whether caffeine and nicotine, alone or combined with haloperidol, elicited significant changes in the levels of both transcripts and proteins of the PSD members Homer1 and Arc, which have been implicated in synaptic plasticity, schizophrenia pathophysiology, and antipsychotics molecular action. Homer1a mRNA expression was significantly reduced by caffeine and nicotine, alone or combined with haloperidol, compared to haloperidol. Haloperidol induced significantly higher Arc mRNA levels than both caffeine and caffeine plus haloperidol in the striatum. Arc mRNA expression was significantly higher by nicotine plus haloperidol vs. haloperidol in the cortex, while in striatum gene expression by nicotine was significantly lower than that by both haloperidol and nicotine plus haloperidol. Both Homer1a and Arc protein levels were significantly increased by caffeine, nicotine, and nicotine plus haloperidol. Homer1b mRNA expression was significantly increased by nicotine and nicotine plus haloperidol, while protein levels were unaffected. Locomotor activity was not significantly affected by caffeine, while it was reduced by nicotine. These data indicate that both caffeine and nicotine trigger relevant molecular changes in PSD sites when given in association with haloperidol. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. and ECNP. All rights reserved.

  6. Salacia oblonga root improves cardiac lipid metabolism in Zucker diabetic fatty rats: Modulation of cardiac PPAR-α-mediated transcription of fatty acid metabolic genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Tom H.-W.; Yang Qinglin; Harada, Masaki; Uberai, Jasna; Radford, Jane; Li, George Q.; Yamahara, Johji; Roufogalis, Basil D.; Li Yuhao

    2006-01-01

    Excess cardiac triglyceride accumulation in diabetes and obesity induces lipotoxicity, which predisposes the myocytes to death. On the other hand, increased cardiac fatty acid (FA) oxidation plays a role in the development of myocardial dysfunction in diabetes. PPAR-α plays an important role in maintaining homeostasis of lipid metabolism. We have previously demonstrated that the extract from Salacia oblonga root (SOE), an Ayurvedic anti-diabetic and anti-obesity medicine, improves hyperlipidemia in Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats (a genetic model of type 2 diabetes and obesity) and possesses PPAR-α activating properties. Here we demonstrate that chronic oral administration of SOE reduces cardiac triglyceride and FA contents and decreases the Oil red O-stained area in the myocardium of ZDF rats, which parallels the effects on plasma triglyceride and FA levels. Furthermore, the treatment suppressed cardiac overexpression of both FA transporter protein-1 mRNA and protein in ZDF rats, suggesting inhibition of increased cardiac FA uptake as the basis for decreased cardiac FA levels. Additionally, the treatment also inhibited overexpression in ZDF rat heart of PPAR-α mRNA and protein and carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1, acyl-CoA oxidase and 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase mRNAs and restored the downregulated acetyl-CoA carboxylase mRNA. These results suggest that SOE inhibits cardiac FA oxidation in ZDF rats. Thus, our findings suggest that improvement by SOE of excess cardiac lipid accumulation and increased cardiac FA oxidation in diabetes and obesity occurs by reduction of cardiac FA uptake, thereby modulating cardiac PPAR-α-mediated FA metabolic gene transcription

  7. Estrogen Receptor β (ERβ1) Transactivation Is Differentially Modulated by the Transcriptional Coregulator Tip60 in a cis-Acting Element-dependent Manner*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ming-Tsung; Leung, Yuet-Kin; Chung, Irving; Tarapore, Pheruza; Ho, Shuk-Mei

    2013-01-01

    Estrogen receptor (ER) β1 and ERα have overlapping and distinct functions despite their common use of estradiol as the physiological ligand. These attributes are explained in part by their differential utilization of coregulators and ligands. Although Tip60 has been shown to interact with both receptors, its regulatory role in ERβ1 transactivation has not been defined. In this study, we found that Tip60 enhances transactivation of ERβ1 at the AP-1 site but suppresses its transcriptional activity at the estrogen-response element (ERE) site in an estradiol-independent manner. However, different estrogenic compounds can modify the Tip60 action. The corepressor activity of Tip60 at the ERE site is abolished by diarylpropionitrile, genistein, equol, and bisphenol A, whereas its coactivation at the AP-1 site is augmented by fulvestrant (ICI 182,780). GRIP1 is an important tethering mediator for ERs at the AP-1 site. We found that coexpression of GRIP1 synergizes the action of Tip60. Although Tip60 is a known acetyltransferase, it is unable to acetylate ERβ1, and its coregulatory functions are independent of its acetylation activity. In addition, we showed the co-occupancy of ERβ1 and Tip60 at ERE and AP-1 sites of ERβ1 target genes. Tip60 differentially regulates the endogenous expression of the target genes by modulating the binding of ERβ1 to the cis-regulatory regions. Thus, we have identified Tip60 as the first dual-function coregulator of ERβ1. PMID:23857583

  8. Angiotensin II type 1 and 2 receptors and lymphatic vessels modulate lung remodeling and fibrosis in systemic sclerosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, Edwin Roger; Ruppert, Aline Domingos Pinto; Capelozzi, Vera Luiza

    2014-01-01

    To validate the importance of the angiotensin II receptor isotypes and the lymphatic vessels in systemic sclerosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We examined angiotensin II type 1 and 2 receptors and lymphatic vessels in the pulmonary tissues obtained from open lung biopsies of 30 patients with systemic sclerosis and 28 patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Their histologic patterns included cellular and fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia for systemic sclerosis and usual interstitial pneumonia for idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. We used immunohistochemistry and histomorphometry to evaluate the number of cells in the alveolar septae and the vessels stained by these markers. Survival curves were also used. We found a significantly increased percentage of septal and vessel cells immunostained for the angiotensin type 1 and 2 receptors in the systemic sclerosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients compared with the controls. A similar percentage of angiotensin 2 receptor positive vessel cells was observed in fibrotic non-specific interstitial pneumonia and usual interstitial pneumonia. A significantly increased percentage of lymphatic vessels was present in the usual interstitial pneumonia group compared with the non-specific interstitial pneumonia and control groups. A Cox regression analysis showed a high risk of death for the patients with usual interstitial pneumonia and a high percentage of vessel cells immunostained for the angiotensin 2 receptor in the lymphatic vessels. We concluded that angiotensin II receptor expression in the lung parenchyma can potentially control organ remodeling and fibrosis, which suggests that strategies aimed at preventing high angiotensin 2 receptor expression may be used as potential therapeutic target in patients with pulmonary systemic sclerosis and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

  9. Pulmonary agenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Oyola, Mercedes; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Gordillo, Gisel; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; García, Carlos A.; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Torres, David; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary agenesis is an infrequent pathology which occurs predominantly among females with no lateral preference. We report on the case of a newborn male diagnosed with prenatal diaphragm hernia though at birth seemed more likely either to be a congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (congenital pulmonary airway malformation) or pulmonary agenesis. The patient died six days after birth and necropsy confirmed pulmonary agenesis. La agenesia pulmonar es una alteración poco frecuente, con...

  10. Selective estrogen receptor modulators and betulinic acid act synergistically to target ERα and SP1 transcription factor dependent Pygopus expression in breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzenov, Youlian R; Andrews, Phillip; Voisey, Kim; Gai, Luis; Carter, Beverley; Whelan, Kathryn; Popadiuk, Catherine; Kao, Kenneth R

    2016-06-01

    Estrogen and progesterone hormone receptor (ER and PR) expression in invasive breast cancer predicts response to hormone disruptive therapy. Pygopus2 (hPYGO2) encodes a chromatin remodelling protein important for breast cancer growth and cell cycle progression. The aims of this study were to determine the mechanism of expression of hPYGO2 in breast cancer and to examine how this expression is affected therapeutically. hPYGO2 and ER protein expression was examined in a breast tumour microarray by immunohistochemistry. hPYGO2 RNA and protein expression was examined in ER+ and ER- breast cancer cell lines in the presence of selective estrogen hormone receptor modulator drugs and the specificity protein-1 (SP1) inhibitor, betulinic acid (BA). The effects of these drugs on the ability for ER and SP1 to bind the hPYGO2 promoter and affect cell cycle progression were studied using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. hPYGO2 was expressed in seven of eight lines and in nuclei of 98% of 65 breast tumours, including 3 Ductal carcinoma in situ and 62 invasive specimens representing ER-negative (22%) and ER-positive (78%) cases. Treatment with either 4-Hydroxytamoxifen (OHT) or fulvestrant reduced hPYGO2 mRNA 10-fold and protein 5-10-fold within 4 h. Promoter analysis indicated an ER/SP1 binding site at nt -225 to -531 of hPYGO2. SP1 RNA interference and BA reduced hPYGO2 protein and RNA expression by fivefold in both ER- and ER+ cells. Further attenuation was achieved by combining BA and 4-OHT resulting in eightfold reduction in cell growth. Our findings reveal a mechanistic link between hormone signalling and the growth transcriptional programme. The activation of its expression by ERα and/or SP1 suggests hPYGO2 as a theranostic target for hormone therapy responsive and refractory breast cancer. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Dietary Pectin-Derived Acidic Oligosaccharides Improve the Pulmonary Bacterial Clearance of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Lung Infection in Mice by Modulating Intestinal Microbiota and Immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bernard, H.; Desseyn, J.L.; Bartke, N.; Kleinjans, L.P.J.; Belzer, C.; Knol, J.; Gottrand, F.; Husson, M.O.

    2015-01-01

    Background. A predominantly T-helper type 2 (Th2) immune response is critical in the prognosis of pulmonary Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection. But the mucosal and systemic immune responses can be influenced by the intestinal microbiota. Methods. We assessed the effect of microbiota compositional

  12. A single amino acid change within the R2 domain of the VvMYB5b transcription factor modulates affinity for protein partners and target promoters selectivity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Granier Thierry

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Flavonoid pathway is spatially and temporally controlled during plant development and the transcriptional regulation of the structural genes is mostly orchestrated by a ternary protein complex that involves three classes of transcription factors (R2-R3-MYB, bHLH and WDR. In grapevine (Vitis vinifera L., several MYB transcription factors have been identified but the interactions with their putative bHLH partners to regulate specific branches of the flavonoid pathway are still poorly understood. Results In this work, we describe the effects of a single amino acid substitution (R69L located in the R2 domain of VvMYB5b and predicted to affect the formation of a salt bridge within the protein. The activity of the mutated protein (name VvMYB5bL, the native protein being referred as VvMYB5bR was assessed in different in vivo systems: yeast, grape cell suspensions, and tobacco. In the first two systems, VvMYB5bL exhibited a modified trans-activation capability. Moreover, using yeast two-hybrid assay, we demonstrated that modification of VvMYB5b transcriptional properties impaired its ability to correctly interact with VvMYC1, a grape bHLH protein. These results were further substantiated by overexpression of VvMYB5bR and VvMYB5bL genes in tobacco. Flowers from 35S::VvMYB5bL transgenic plants showed a distinct phenotype in comparison with 35S::VvMYB5bR and the control plants. Finally, significant differences in transcript abundance of flavonoid metabolism genes were observed along with variations in pigments accumulation. Conclusions Taken together, our findings indicate that VvMYB5bL is still able to bind DNA but the structural consequences linked to the mutation affect the capacity of the protein to activate the transcription of some flavonoid genes by modifying the interaction with its co-partner(s. In addition, this study underlines the importance of an internal salt bridge for protein conformation and thus for the establishment

  13. Pulmonary atresia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... another type of congenital heart defect called a patent ductus arteriosus (PDA). Pulmonary atresia may occur with ... known way to prevent this condition. All pregnant women should get routine prenatal care. Many congenital defects ...

  14. Pulmonary Embolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... increase the risk for PE, such as: Being bedridden or unable to move around much Having surgery ... of pulmonary embolism (PE) include unexplained shortness of breath, problems breathing, chest pain, coughing , or coughing up ...

  15. The bZIP transcription factor HY5 interacts with the promoter of the monoterpene synthase gene QH6 in modulating its rhythmic expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fei; Sun, Tian-Hu; Zhao, Lei; Pan, Xi-Wu; Lu, Shan

    2015-01-01

    The Artemisia annua L. β-pinene synthase QH6 was previously determined to be circadian-regulated at the transcriptional level, showing a rhythmic fluctuation of steady-state transcript abundances. Here we isolated both the genomic sequence and upstream promoter region of QH6. Different regulatory elements, such as G-box (TGACACGTGGCA, -421 bp from the translation initiation site) which might have effects on rhythmic gene expression, were found. Using the yeast one-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), we confirmed that the bZIP transcription factor HY5 binds to this motif of QH6. Studies with promoter truncations before and after this motif suggested that this G-box was important for the diurnal fluctuation of the transgenic β-glucuronidase gene (GUS) transcript abundance in Arabidopsis thaliana. GUS gene driven by the promoter region immediately after G-box showed an arrhythmic expression in both light/dark (LD) and constant dark (DD) conditions, whereas the control with G-box retained its fluctuation in both LD and DD. We further transformed A. thaliana with the luciferase gene (LUC) driven by an 1400 bp fragment upstream QH6 with its G-box intact or mutated, respectively. The luciferase activity assay showed that a peak in the early morning disappeared in the mutant. Gene expression analysis also demonstrated that the rhythmic expression of LUC was abolished in the hy5-1 mutant.

  16. The bZIP transcription factor HY5 interacts with the promoter of the monoterpene synthase gene QH6 in modulating its rhythmic expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei eZhou

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The Artemisia annua L. β-pinene synthase QH6 was previously determined to be circadian-regulated at the transcriptional level, showing a rhythmic fluctuation of steady-state transcript abundances. Here we isolated both the genomic sequence and upstream promoter region of QH6. Different regulatory elements, such as G-box (TGACACGTGGCA, -421 bp from the translation initiation site which might have effects on rhythmic gene expression, were found. Using the yeast one-hybrid and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, we confirmed that the bZIP transcription factor HY5 binds to this motif of QH6. Studies with promoter truncations before and after this motif suggested that this G-box was important for the diurnal fluctuation of the transgenic β-glucuronidase gene (GUS transcript abundance in Arabidopsis thaliana. GUS gene driven by the promoter region immediately after G-box showed an arrhythmic expression in both light/dark (LD and constant dark (DD conditions, whereas the control with G-box retained its fluctuation in both LD and DD. We further transformed A. thaliana with the luciferase gene (LUC driven by an 1400 bp fragment upstream QH6 with its G-box intact or mutated, respectively. The luciferase activity assay showed that a peak in the early morning disappeared in the mutant. Gene expression analysis also demonstrated that the rhythmic expression of LUC was abolished in the hy5-1 mutant.

  17. A third mode of surface‐associated growth: immobilization of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium modulates the RpoS‐directed transcriptional programme

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Gitte Maegaard; Nielsen, Maj‐Britt; Grassby, Terri

    2012-01-01

    environments in both food products and the GI tract. This immobilized mode of growth has not been widely studied. To develop our understanding of the effects of immobilization upon a food‐borne bacterial pathogen, we used the IFR Gel Cassette model. The transcriptional programme and metabolomic profile...

  18. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, PhFBH4, regulates flower senescence by modulating ethylene biosynthesis pathway in petunia

    Science.gov (United States)

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in regulating multiple biological processes in plants. However, there are few reports about the function of bHLHs in flower senescence. In this study, a bHLH TF, PhFBH4, was found to be dramatically upregulated during...

  19. Stimulation of p38 (HOG1) kinase pathway by ionizing radiation results in downstream modulation of ATF/CREB transcription factor activity in NIH-3T3 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stevenson, Mary Ann; Yao Jin

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective:p38 kinase, a member of the MAP kinase family, is activated in response to stresses such as high osmolarity and UV irradiation as well exposure to cytokines such as IL1β and TNFα. The kinase is part of a signal transduction pathway that leads from receptor activation through a three kinase cascade resulting in the activation of p38. p38 activation then leads to the phosphorylation of target proteins that include transcription factors such as nuclear factor of interleukin 6 and members of the activating transcription factor (ATF) family, and in addition, the stress protein, HSP27, via activation of MAPKAP2 kinase. In the present report, we have investigated the potential role of p38 in the response of NIH-3T3 cells to ionizing radiation. Materials and Methods:NIH-3T3 cells were grown to confluence in DMEM+10%CS and then serum deprived for 24 hours in DMEM+0.1%CS. Radiation exposures were delivered using a Philips RT250 (250Kvp X-ray tube). Activated forms of p38 kinase and ATF/CREB transcription factors were identified using immunoblotting techniques employing activation specific antibodies raised against the phosphorylated forms of the kinases/transcription factors. Kinase activity was directly measured using immunokinase assays. DNA binding of transcription factors to their respective consensus sequences was assayed by EMSA. Results:We found that p38 becomes rapidly phosphorylated and activated by exposure to ionizing radiation. Significantly, p38 is activated to a similar degree and with a similar time course by serum derpviation and entry of cells into a non-proliferating G 0 state, suggesting a causal role for p38 in quiescence. Phosphorylation of p38 directly correlated with phosphorylation and activation of ATF/CREB family members as well as DNA binding by these activated factors. Conclusion:Activation of p38 kinase and downstream transcription factors may play an important role in the response of cells to ionizing radiation. We are

  20. An oilseed rape WRKY-type transcription factor regulates ROS accumulation and leaf senescence in Nicotiana benthamiana and Arabidopsis through modulating transcription of RbohD and RbohF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Ye, Chaofei; Zhao, Yuting; Cheng, Xiaolin; Wang, Yiqiao; Jiang, Yuan-Qing; Yang, Bo

    2018-06-01

    Overexpression of BnaWGR1 causes ROS accumulation and promotes leaf senescence. BnaWGR1 binds to promoters of RbohD and RbohF and regulates their expression. Manipulation of leaf senescence process affects agricultural traits of crop plants, including biomass, seed yield and stress resistance. Since delayed leaf senescence usually enhances tolerance to multiple stresses, we analyzed the function of specific MAPK-WRKY cascades in abiotic and biotic stress tolerance as well as leaf senescence in oilseed rape (Brassica napus L.), one of the important oil crops. In the present study, we showed that expression of one WRKY gene from oilseed rape, BnaWGR1, induced an accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), cell death and precocious leaf senescence both in Nicotiana benthamiana and transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). BnaWGR1 regulates the transcription of two genes encoding key enzymes implicated in production of ROS, that is, respiratory burst oxidase homolog (Rboh) D and RbohF. A dual-luciferase reporter assay confirmed the transcriptional regulation of RbohD and RbohF by BnaWGR1. In vitro electrophoresis mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that BnaWGR1 could bind to W-box cis-elements within promoters of RbohD and RbohF. Moreover, RbohD and RbohF were significantly upregulated in transgenic Arabidopsis overexpressing BnaWGR1. In summary, these results suggest that BnaWGR1 could positively regulate leaf senescence through regulating the expression of RbohD and RbohF genes.

  1. Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... submissions. MORE We Imagine a World Without Pulmonary Fibrosis The Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation mobilizes people and resources to provide ... its battle against the deadly lung disease, pulmonary fibrosis (PF). PULMONARY FIBROSIS WALK SURPASSES PARTICIPATION AND FUNDRAISING GOALS Nearly ...

  2. Acrolein - a pulmonary hazard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bein, Kiflai; Leikauf, George D

    2011-09-01

    Acrolein is a respiratory irritant that can be generated during cooking and is in environmental tobacco smoke. More plentiful in cigarette smoke than polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), acrolein can adduct tumor suppressor p53 (TP53) DNA and may contribute to TP53-mutations in lung cancer. Acrolein is also generated endogenously at sites of injury, and excessive breath levels (sufficient to activate metalloproteinases and increase mucin transcripts) have been detected in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because of its reactivity with respiratory-lining fluid or cellular macromolecules, acrolein alters gene regulation, inflammation, mucociliary transport, and alveolar-capillary barrier integrity. In laboratory animals, acute exposures have lead to acute lung injury and pulmonary edema similar to that produced by smoke inhalation whereas lower concentrations have produced bronchial hyperreactivity, excessive mucus production, and alveolar enlargement. Susceptibility to acrolein exposure is associated with differential regulation of cell surface receptor, transcription factor, and ubiquitin-proteasome genes. Consequent to its pathophysiological impact, acrolein contributes to the morbidly and mortality associated with acute lung injury and COPD, and possibly asthma and lung cancer. Copyright © 2011 WILEY‐VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Modulation of inflammasome-mediated pulmonary immune activation by type I IFNs protects bone marrow homeostasis during systemic responses to Pneumocystis lung infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searles, Steve; Gauss, Katherine; Wilkison, Michelle; Hoyt, Teri R; Dobrinen, Erin; Meissner, Nicole

    2013-10-01

    Although acquired bone marrow failure (BMF) is considered a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease, possible innate immune defects as a cause for systemic immune deviations in response to otherwise innocuous infections have not been extensively explored. In this regard, we recently demonstrated an important role of type I IFNs in protecting hematopoiesis during systemic stress responses to the opportunistic fungal pathogen Pneumocystis in lymphocyte-deficient mice. Mice deficient in both lymphocytes and type I IFN receptor (IFrag(-/-) mice) develop rapidly progressing BMF due to accelerated bone marrow (BM) cell apoptosis associated with innate immune deviations in the BM in response to Pneumocystis lung infection. However, the communication pathway between lung and BM eliciting the induction of BMF in response to this strictly pulmonary infection has been unclear. In this study, we report that absence of an intact type I IFN system during Pneumocystis lung infection not only causes BMF in lymphocyte-deficient mice but also transient BM stress in lymphocyte-competent mice. This is associated with an exuberant systemic IFN-γ response. IFN-γ neutralization prevented Pneumocystis lung infection-induced BM depression in type I IFN receptor-deficient mice and prolonged neutrophil survival time in BM from IFrag(-/-) mice. IL-1β and upstream regulators of IFN-γ, IL-12, and IL-18 were also upregulated in lung and serum of IFrag(-/-) mice. In conjunction, there was exuberant inflammasome-mediated caspase-1 activation in pulmonary innate immune cells required for processing of IL-18 and IL-1β. Thus, absence of type I IFN signaling during Pneumocystis lung infection may result in deregulation of inflammasome-mediated pulmonary immune activation, causing systemic immune deviations triggering BMF in this model.

  4. A WRKY transcription factor from Withania somnifera regulates triterpenoid withanolide accumulation and biotic stress tolerance through modulation of phytosterol and defense pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Anup Kumar; Kumar, Sarma Rajeev; Dwivedi, Varun; Rai, Avanish; Pal, Shaifali; Shasany, Ajit K; Nagegowda, Dinesh A

    2017-08-01

    Withania somnifera produces pharmacologically important triterpenoid withanolides that are derived via phytosterol pathway; however, their biosynthesis and regulation remain to be elucidated. A jasmonate- and salicin-inducible WRKY transcription factor from W. somnifera (WsWRKY1) exhibiting correlation with withaferin A accumulation was functionally characterized employing virus-induced gene silencing and overexpression studies combined with transcript and metabolite analyses, and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay. WsWRKY1 silencing resulted in stunted plant growth, reduced transcripts of phytosterol pathway genes with corresponding reduction in phytosterols and withanolides in W. somnifera. Its overexpression elevated the biosynthesis of triterpenoids in W. somnifera (phytosterols and withanolides), as well as tobacco and tomato (phytosterols). Moreover, WsWRKY1 binds to W-box sequences in promoters of W. somnifera genes encoding squalene synthase and squalene epoxidase, indicating its direct regulation of triterpenoid pathway. Furthermore, while WsWRKY1 silencing in W. somnifera compromised the tolerance to bacterial growth, fungal infection, and insect feeding, its overexpression in tobacco led to improved biotic stress tolerance. Together these findings demonstrate that WsWRKY1 has a positive regulatory role on phytosterol and withanolides biosynthesis, and defense against biotic stress, highlighting its importance as a metabolic engineering tool for simultaneous improvement of triterpenoid biosynthesis and plant defense. © 2017 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2017 New Phytologist Trust.

  5. An interplay among FIS, H-NS and guanosine tetraphosphate modulates transcription of the Escherichia coli cspA gene under physiological growth conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna eBrandi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available CspA, the most characterized member of the csp gene family of Escherichia coli, is highly expressed not only in response to cold stress, but also during the early phase of growth at 37°C. Here, we investigate at molecular level the antagonistic role played by the nucleoid proteins FIS and H-NS in the regulation of cspA expression under non-stress conditions. By means of both probing experiments and immunological detection, we demonstrate in vitro the existence of binding sites for these proteins on the cspA regulatory region, in which FIS and H-NS bind simultaneously to form composite DNA-protein complexes. While the in vitro promoter activity of cspA is stimulated by FIS and repressed by H-NS, a compensatory effect is observed when both proteins are added in the transcription assay. Consistently with these findings, inactivation of fis and hns genes reversely affect the in vivo amount of cspA mRNA. In addition, by means of strains expressing a high level of the alarmone guanosine tetraphosphate ((pppGpp and in vitro transcription assays, we show that the cspA promoter is sensitive to (pppGpp inhibition. The (pppGpp-mediated expression of fis and hns genes is also analyzed, thus clarifying some aspects of the regulatory loop governing cspA transcription.

  6. Gene transcript profiles of the TIA biosynthetic pathway in response to ethylene and copper reveal their interactive role in modulating TIA biosynthesis in Catharanthus roseus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ya-Jie; Liu, Jia; Guo, Xiao-Rui; Zu, Yuan-Gang; Tang, Zhong-Hua

    2015-05-01

    Research on transcriptional regulation of terpenoid indole alkaloid (TIA) biosynthesis of the medicinal plant, Catharanthus roseus, has largely been focused on gene function and not clustering analysis of multiple genes at the transcript level. Here, more than ten key genes encoding key enzyme of alkaloid synthesis in TIA biosynthetic pathways were chosen to investigate the integrative responses to exogenous elicitor ethylene and copper (Cu) at both transcriptional and metabolic levels. The ethylene-induced gene transcripts in leaves and roots, respectively, were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA) and the results showed the overall expression of TIA pathway genes indicated as the Q value followed a standard normal distribution after ethylene treatments. Peak gene expression was at 15-30 μM of ethephon, and the pre-mature leaf had a higher Q value than the immature or mature leaf and root. Treatment with elicitor Cu found that Cu up-regulated overall TIA gene expression more in roots than in leaves. The combined effects of Cu and ethephon on TIA gene expression were stronger than their separate effects. It has been documented that TIA gene expression is tightly regulated by the transcriptional factor (TF) ethylene responsive factor (ERF) and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade. The loading plot combination with correlation analysis for the genes of C. roseus showed that expression of the MPK gene correlated with strictosidine synthase (STR) and strictosidine b-D-glucosidase(SGD). In addition, ERF expression correlated with expression of secologanin synthase (SLS) and tryptophan decarboxylase (TDC), specifically in roots, whereas MPK and myelocytomatosis oncogene (MYC) correlated with STR and SGD genes. In conclusion, the ERF regulates the upstream pathway genes in response to heavy metal Cu mainly in C. roseus roots, while the MPK mainly participates in regulating the STR gene in response to ethylene in pre-mature leaf. Interestingly, the

  7. The human papillomavirus type 11 and 16 E6 proteins modulate the cell-cycle regulator and transcription cofactor TRIP-Br1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, Sanjay; Takhar, Param Parkash S; Degenkolbe, Roland; Heng Koh, Choon; Zimmermann, Holger; Maolin Yang, Christopher; Guan Sim, Khe; I-Hong Hsu, Stephen; Bernard, Hans-Ulrich

    2003-01-01

    The genital human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a taxonomic group including HPV types that preferentially cause genital and laryngeal warts ('low-risk types'), such as HPV-6 and HPV-11, or cancer of the cervix and its precursor lesions ('high-risk types'), such as HPV-16. The transforming processes induced by these viruses depend on the proteins E5, E6, and E7. Among these oncoproteins, the E6 protein stands out because it supports a particularly large number of functions and interactions with cellular proteins, some of which are specific for the carcinogenic HPVs, while others are shared among low- and high-risk HPVs. Here we report yeast two-hybrid screens with HPV-6 and -11 E6 proteins that identified TRIP-Br1 as a novel cellular target. TRIP-Br1 was recently detected by two research groups, which described two separate functions, namely that of a transcriptional integrator of the E2F1/DP1/RB cell-cycle regulatory pathway (and then named TRIP-Br1), and that of an antagonist of the cyclin-dependent kinase suppression of p16INK4a (and then named p34SEI-1). We observed that TRIP-Br1 interacts with low- and high-risk HPV E6 proteins in yeast, in vitro and in mammalian cell cultures. Transcription activation of a complex consisting of E2F1, DP1, and TRIP-Br1 was efficiently stimulated by both E6 proteins. TRIP-Br1 has an LLG E6 interaction motif, which contributed to the binding of E6 proteins. Apparently, E6 does not promote degradation of TRIP-Br1. Our observations imply that the cell-cycle promoting transcription factor E2F1/DP1 is dually targeted by HPV oncoproteins, namely (i) by interference of the E7 protein with repression by RB, and (ii) by the transcriptional cofactor function of the E6 protein. Our data reveal the natural context of the transcription activator function of E6, which has been predicted without knowledge of the E2F1/DP1/TRIP-Br/E6 complex by studying chimeric constructs, and add a function to the limited number of transforming properties shared

  8. Pulmonary abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valencia Chavez, Maria de la Cruz

    2000-01-01

    Pulmonary abscess is defined as a suppurative process and bounded, caused by piogens organisms that it progresses to central necrosis and it commits an or more areas of the pulmonary parenchyma. Initially it is impossible to differ of a located pneumonia, but when the lesion communicates with a bronchus, part of the neurotic tissue is replaced by air, producing the classic image radiological fluid-air. The presence of multiple lesions smaller than 2 cms of diameter cm is defined arbitrarily as necrotizing pneumonia it is indistinguishable of an abscess. The paper includes the pathogenesis and etiology, clinical course, diagnostic and treatment

  9. Eukaryote-like Ser/Thr protein kinase PrkA modulates sporulation via regulating the transcriptional factor σ(K) in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jinyuan; Zou, Wei; Fang, Juan; Huang, Xiaowei; Gao, Feng; He, Zeying; Zhang, Keqin; Zhao, Ninghui

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PrkA), also known as AMP-activated protein kinase, functions as a serine/threonine protein kinase (STPK), has been shown to be involved in a variety of important biologic processes, including pathogenesis of many important diseases in mammals. However, the biological functions of PrkA are less known in prokaryote cells. Here, we explored the function of PrkA as well as its underlying molecular mechanisms using the model bacterium Bacillus subtilis168. When PrkA is inhibited by 9-β-D-arabinofuranosyladenine (ara-A) in the wild type strain or deleted in the ΔprkA mutant strain, we observed sporulation defects in B. subtilis 168, suggesting that PrkA functions as a sporulation-related protein. Transcriptional analysis using the lacZ reporter gene demonstrated that deletion of prkA significantly reduced the expression of the transcriptional factor σ(K) and its downstream genes. Complementation of sigK gene in prkA knockout mutant partially rescued the phenotype of ΔprkA, further supporting the hypothesis that the decreased σ(K) expression should be one of the reasons for the sporulation defect resulting from prkA disruption. Finally, our data confirmed that Hpr (ScoC) negatively controlled the expression of transcriptional factor σ(K), and thus PrkA accelerated sporulation and the expression of σ(K) by suppression of Hpr (ScoC). Taken together, our study discovered a novel function of the eukaryotic-like STPK PrkA in spore development as well as its underlying molecular mechanism in B. subtilis.

  10. Intracellular Secretory Leukoprotease Inhibitor Modulates Inositol 1,4,5-Triphosphate Generation and Exerts an Anti-Inflammatory Effect on Neutrophils of Individuals with Cystic Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emer P. Reeves

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretory leukoprotease inhibitor (SLPI is an anti-inflammatory protein present in respiratory secretions. Whilst epithelial cell SLPI is extensively studied, neutrophil associated SLPI is poorly characterised. Neutrophil function including chemotaxis and degranulation of proteolytic enzymes involves changes in cytosolic calcium (Ca2+ levels which is mediated by production of inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3 in response to G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR stimuli. The aim of this study was to investigate the intracellular function of SLPI and the mechanism-based modulation of neutrophil function by this antiprotease. Neutrophils were isolated from healthy controls (n=10, individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF (n=5 or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD (n=5. Recombinant human SLPI significantly inhibited fMet-Leu-Phe (fMLP and interleukin(IL-8 induced neutrophil chemotaxis (P<0.05 and decreased degranulation of matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9, hCAP-18, and myeloperoxidase (MPO (P<0.05. The mechanism of inhibition involved modulation of cytosolic IP3 production and downstream Ca2+ flux. The described attenuation of Ca2+ flux was overcome by inclusion of exogenous IP3 in electropermeabilized cells. Inhibition of IP3 generation and Ca2+ flux by SLPI may represent a novel anti-inflammatory mechanism, thus strengthening the attractiveness of SLPI as a potential therapeutic molecule in inflammatory airway disease associated with excessive neutrophil influx including CF, non-CF bronchiectasis, and COPD.

  11. WRKY2/34–VQ20 Modules in Arabidopsis thaliana Negatively Regulate Expression of a Trio of Related MYB Transcription Factors During Pollen Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rihua Lei

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Male gametogenesis in plants is tightly controlled and involves the complex and precise regulation of transcriptional reprogramming. Interactions between WRKY proteins and VQ motif-containing proteins are required to control these complicated transcriptional networks. However, our understanding of the mechanisms by which these complexes affect downstream gene expression is quite limited. In this study, we found that WRKY2 and WKRY34 repress MYB97, MYB101, and MYB120 expression during male gametogenesis. MYB expression was up-regulated in the wrky2-1 wrky34-1 vq20-1 triple mutant during male gametogenesis. The expression levels of six potential targets of the three MYBs increased the most in the wrky2-1 wrky34-1 vq20-1 triple mutant, followed by the wrky2-1 wrky34-1 double mutant, compared with in wild-type. Yeast one-hybrid and dual luciferase reporter assays indicated that WRKY2 and WRKY34 recognized the MYB97 promoter by binding to its W-boxes. MYB97 overexpression caused defects in pollen germination and pollen tube length, which impacted male fertility. Thus, WRKY2/34–VQ20 complexes appear to negatively regulate the expression of certain MYBs during plant male gametogenesis.

  12. Modulation of transcription factor binding and epigenetic regulation of the MLH1 CpG island and shore by polymorphism rs1800734 in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savio, Andrea J; Bapat, Bharati

    2017-06-03

    The MLH1 promoter polymorphism rs1800734 is associated with MLH1 CpG island hypermethylation and expression loss in colorectal cancer (CRC). Conversely, variant rs1800734 is associated with MLH1 shore, but not island, hypomethylation in peripheral blood mononuclear cell DNA. To explore these distinct patterns, MLH1 CpG island and shore methylation was assessed in CRC cell lines stratified by rs1800734 genotype. Cell lines containing the variant A allele demonstrated MLH1 shore hypomethylation compared to wild type (GG). There was significant enrichment of transcription factor AP4 at the MLH1 promoter in GG and GA cell lines, but not the AA cell line, by chromatin immunoprecipitation studies. Preferential binding to the G allele was confirmed by sequencing in the GA cell line. The enhancer-associated histone modification H3K4me1 was enriched at the MLH1 shore; however, H3K27ac was not, indicating the shore is an inactive enhancer. These results demonstrate the role of variant rs1800734 in altering transcription factor binding as well as epigenetics at regions beyond the MLH1 CpG island in which it is located.

  13. HosA, a MarR Family Transcriptional Regulator, Represses Nonoxidative Hydroxyarylic Acid Decarboxylase Operon and Is Modulated by 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ajit; Ranjan, Akash

    2016-02-23

    Members of the Multiple antibiotic resistance Regulator (MarR) family of DNA binding proteins regulate transcription of a wide array of genes required for virulence and pathogenicity of bacteria. The present study reports the molecular characterization of HosA (Homologue of SlyA), a MarR protein, with respect to its target gene, DNA recognition motif, and nature of its ligand. Through a comparative genomics approach, we demonstrate that hosA is in synteny with nonoxidative hydroxyarylic acid decarboxylase (HAD) operon and is present exclusively within the mutS-rpoS polymorphic region in nine different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. Using molecular biology and biochemical approach, we demonstrate that HosA binds to a palindromic sequence downstream to the transcription start site of divergently transcribed nonoxidative HAD operon and represses its expression. Furthermore, in silico analysis showed that the recognition motif for HosA is highly conserved in the upstream region of divergently transcribed operon in different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. A systematic chemical search for the physiological ligand revealed that 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HBA) interacts with HosA and derepresses HosA mediated repression of the nonoxidative HAD operon. Based on our study, we propose a model for molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of nonoxidative HAD operon by HosA in Enterobacteriaceae family.

  14. Pulmonary circulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bongartz, G.; Boos, M.; Scheffler, K.; Steinbrich, W.

    1998-01-01

    Evaluation of the pulmonary vasculature is mainly indicated in patients with suspected pulmonary thromboembolism. The routine procedure so far is ventilation-perfusion scintigraphy alone or in combination with diagnostic assessment of the legs to rule out deep venous thrombosis. The results are still not reliable for the majority of patients. In the case of equivocal diagnosis, invasive conventional angiography is considered the gold standard. With steady improvements in tomographic imaging techniques, such as computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), non-invasive alternatives to the routine diagnostic work-up are given. Helical CT and CTA techniques are already in clinical use and estimated to sufficiently serve the demands for detection/exclusion of pulmonary thromboembolism. The disadvantages mainly concern peripheral disease and reconstruction artifacts. MRI and MR angiography have been implemented in the diagnosis of pulmonary vascular disease since the introduction of contrast-enhanced MRA. In breath-hold techniques, the entire lung vascularization can be delineated and thromboemboli can be detected. The clinical experience in this field is limited, but MRI has the potential to demonstrate its superiority over CT due to its improved delineation of the vascular periphery and the more comprehensive three-dimensional reconstruction. (orig.)

  15. Pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakido, Michio; Okuzaki, Takeshi

    1992-01-01

    When the chest is exposed to x radiation and Co-60 gamma radiation, radiation damage may occur in the lungs 2 to 10 weeks after irradiation. This condition is generally referred to as radiation pneumonitis, with the incidence ranging from 5.4% to 91.8% in the literature. Then radiation pneumonitis may develop into pulmonary fibrosis associated with roentgenologically diffuse linear and ring-like shadows and strong contraction 6 months to one year after irradiation. Until recently, little attention has been paid to pulmonary pneumonitis as a delayed effect of A-bomb radiation. The recent study using the population of 9,253 A-bomb survivors have suggested that the prevalence of pulmonary fibrosis tended to be high in heavily exposed A-bomb survivors. Two other studies using the cohort of 16,956 and 42,728 A-bomb survivors, respectively, have shown that the prevalence of roentgenologically proven pulmonary fibrosis was higher in men than women (1.82% vs 0.41%), was increased with aging and had a higher tendency in heavily exposed A-bomb survivors. (N.K.)

  16. Differential transcriptional modulation of duplicated fatty acid-binding protein genes by dietary fatty acids in zebrafish (Danio rerio: evidence for subfunctionalization or neofunctionalization of duplicated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denovan-Wright Eileen M

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Duplication-Degeneration-Complementation (DDC model, subfunctionalization and neofunctionalization have been proposed as important processes driving the retention of duplicated genes in the genome. These processes are thought to occur by gain or loss of regulatory elements in the promoters of duplicated genes. We tested the DDC model by determining the transcriptional induction of fatty acid-binding proteins (Fabps genes by dietary fatty acids (FAs in zebrafish. We chose zebrafish for this study for two reasons: extensive bioinformatics resources are available for zebrafish at zfin.org and zebrafish contains many duplicated genes owing to a whole genome duplication event that occurred early in the ray-finned fish lineage approximately 230-400 million years ago. Adult zebrafish were fed diets containing either fish oil (12% lipid, rich in highly unsaturated fatty acid, sunflower oil (12% lipid, rich in linoleic acid, linseed oil (12% lipid, rich in linolenic acid, or low fat (4% lipid, low fat diet for 10 weeks. FA profiles and the steady-state levels of fabp mRNA and heterogeneous nuclear RNA in intestine, liver, muscle and brain of zebrafish were determined. Result FA profiles assayed by gas chromatography differed in the intestine, brain, muscle and liver depending on diet. The steady-state level of mRNA for three sets of duplicated genes, fabp1a/fabp1b.1/fabp1b.2, fabp7a/fabp7b, and fabp11a/fabp11b, was determined by reverse transcription, quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR. In brain, the steady-state level of fabp7b mRNAs was induced in fish fed the linoleic acid-rich diet; in intestine, the transcript level of fabp1b.1 and fabp7b were elevated in fish fed the linolenic acid-rich diet; in liver, the level of fabp7a mRNAs was elevated in fish fed the low fat diet; and in muscle, the level of fabp7a and fabp11a mRNAs were elevated in fish fed the linolenic acid-rich or the low fat diets. In all cases

  17. Why do patients decline participation in offered pulmonary rehabilitation?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mathar, Helle; Fastholm, Pernille; Lange, Peter

    2017-01-01

    of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and among stable patients attending an outpatient clinic. Participants: Patients who decline participation in offered pulmonary rehabilitation, who speak Danish, who are able to give informed consent and to participate in a 1-hour interview. Method: The research...... question was answered through interviews with 19 patients. Data Analysis: The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The transcripts were condensed; categories were developed providing different types of explanations for declining...

  18. Transcription co-activator Arabidopsis ANGUSTIFOLIA3 (AN3) regulates water-use efficiency and drought tolerance by modulating stomatal density and improving root architecture by the transrepression of YODA (YDA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Lai-Sheng; Yao, Shun-Qiao

    2015-09-01

    One goal of modern agriculture is the improvement of plant drought tolerance and water-use efficiency (WUE). Although stomatal density has been linked to WUE, the causal molecular mechanisms and engineered alternations of this relationship are not yet fully understood. Moreover, YODA (YDA), which is a MAPKK kinase gene, negatively regulates stomatal development. BR-INSENSITIVE 2 interacts with phosphorylates and inhibits YDA. However, whether YDA is modulated in the transcriptional level is still unclear. Plants lacking ANGUSTIFOLIA3 (AN3) activity have high drought stress tolerance because of low stomatal densities and improved root architecture. Such plants also exhibit enhanced WUE through declining transpiration without a demonstrable reduction in biomass accumulation. AN3 negatively regulated YDA expression at the transcriptional level by target-gene analysis. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis indicated that AN3 was associated with a region of the YDA promoter in vivo. YDA mutation significantly decreased the stomatal density and root length of an3 mutant, thus proving the participation of YDA in an3 drought tolerance and WUE enhancement. These components form an AN3-YDA complex, which allows the integration of water deficit stress signalling into the production or spacing of stomata and cell proliferation, thus leading to drought tolerance and enhanced WUE. © 2015 Society for Experimental Biology, Association of Applied Biologists and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. A banana NAC transcription factor (MusaSNAC1) impart drought tolerance by modulating stomatal closure and H2O2 content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negi, Sanjana; Tak, Himanshu; Ganapathi, T R

    2018-03-01

    MusaSNAC1 function in H 2 O 2 mediated stomatal closure and promote drought tolerance by directly binding to CGT[A/G] motif in regulatory region of multiple stress-related genes. Drought is a abiotic stress-condition, causing reduced plant growth and diminished crop yield. Guard cells of the stomata control photosynthesis and transpiration by regulating CO 2 exchange and water loss, thus affecting growth and crop yield. Roles of NAC (NAM, ATAF1/2 and CUC2) protein in regulation of stress-conditions has been well documented however, their control over stomatal aperture is largely unknown. In this study we report a banana NAC protein, MusaSNAC1 which induced stomatal closure by elevating H 2 O 2 content in guard cells during drought stress. Overexpression of MusaSNAC1 in banana resulted in higher number of stomata closure causing reduced water loss and thus elevated drought-tolerance. During drought, expression of GUS (β-glucuronidase) under P MusaSNAC1 was remarkably elevated in guard cells of stomata which correlated with its function as a transcription factor regulating stomatal aperture closing. MusaSNAC1 is a transcriptional activator belonging to SNAC subgroup and its 5'-upstream region contain multiple Dof1 elements as well as stress-associated cis-elements. Moreover, MusaSNAC1 also regulate multiple stress-related genes by binding to core site of NAC-proteins CGT[A/G] in their 5'-upstream region. Results indicated an interesting mechanism of drought tolerance through stomatal closure by H 2 O 2 generation in guard cells, regulated by a NAC-protein in banana.

  20. Characterization of a transcriptional promoter of human papillomavirus 18 and modulation of its expression by simian virus 40 and adenovirus early antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thierry, F.; Heard, J.M.; Dartmann, K.; Yaniv, M.

    1987-01-01

    RNA present in cells derived from cervical carcinoma that contained human papillomavirus 18 genomes was initiated in the 1.053-kilobase BamHI fragment that covered the complete noncoding region of this virus. When cloned upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, this viral fragment directed the expression of the bacterial enzyme only in the sense orientation. Initiation sites were mapped around the ATG of open reading frame E6. This promoter was active in some human and simian cell lines, and its expression was modulated positively by simian virus 40 large T antigen and negatively by adenovirus type 5 E1a antigen

  1. Determination of specificity influencing residues for key transcription factor families

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Patel, Ronak Y.; Garde, Christian; Stormo, Gary D.

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are major modulators of transcription and subsequent cellular processes. The binding of TFs to specific regulatory elements is governed by their specificity. Considering the gap between known TFs sequence and specificity, specificity prediction frameworks are highly de...

  2. Transcriptional Modulation of Penicillin-Binding Protein 1b, Outer Membrane Protein P2 and Efflux Pump (AcrAB-TolC during Heat Stress Is Correlated to Enhanced Bactericidal Action of Imipenem on Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdessalam Cherkaoui

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of the present study was to investigate the penicillin binding proteins (PBPs, drug influx and efflux modulations during heat stress and their effects on the bactericidal action of imipenem on non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi.Methods: The two NTHi clinical isolates (GE47 and GE88, imipenem MICs by E-test > 32 μg/mL examined in this study were collected at Geneva University Hospitals. The imipenem killing activity was assessed after incubation of the NTHi strains at either 37 or 42°C for 3 h with increasing concentrations of imipenem. The detection of PBPs was carried out by Bocillin-FL. Global transcriptional changes were monitored by RNA-seq after pre-incubation of bacterial cells at either 37 or 42°C, and the expression levels of relevant target genes were confirmed by qRT-PCR.Results: Quantitation of NTHi viable cells after incubation with 0.25 μg/mL of imipenem for 3 h revealed more than a twofold decrease in GE47 and GE88 viable cells at 42°C as compared to 37°C. Transcriptome analysis showed that under heat stress conditions, there were 141 differentially expressed genes with a | log2(fold change| > 1, including 67 up-regulated and 74 down-regulated genes. The expression levels of ponB (encoding PBP1b and acrR (regulator of AcrAB-TolC efflux pump were significantly increased at 42°C. In contrast, the transcript levels of ompP2 (encoding the outer membrane protein P2 and acrB gene (encoding AcrB were significantly lower under heat stress condition.Conclusion: This study shows that the transcriptional modulation of ponB, ompP2, acrR, and acrB in the heat stress response is correlated to enhanced antimicrobial effects of imipenem on non-typeable H. influenzae.

  3. Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shawki, Hilal B.; Muhammad, Shakir M.; Reda, Amal N.; Abdulla, Thair S.; Ardalan, Delaram M.

    2007-01-01

    A 38-year-old Iraqi female, presented with one-year history of exertional dyspnea and exercise intolerance, without systemic or constitutional symptoms. Clinical examination revealed bilateral basal crackles with signs suggestive of left side pleural effusion, chest x-ray showed left sided pleural effusion, and diffuse bilateral basal pulmonary shadowing. Her biochemical analysis, hematological tests, electrocardiogram and echocardiography were normal, aspiration of the fluid revealed a chylothorax, the radiological shadowing was proved by computed tomography scan of the chest to be diffuse cystic lesions involving mostly lower lobes. Open lung biopsy showed dilated lymphatic vessels with surrounding inflammatory cells and smooth muscle fibers consistently with the diagnosis of pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis. (author)

  4. MicroRNA-143 Activation Regulates Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Cell Crosstalk in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lin; Blanco, Francisco J; Stevens, Hannah; Lu, Ruifang; Caudrillier, Axelle; McBride, Martin; McClure, John D; Grant, Jenny; Thomas, Matthew; Frid, Maria; Stenmark, Kurt; White, Kevin; Seto, Anita G; Morrell, Nicholas W; Bradshaw, Angela C; MacLean, Margaret R; Baker, Andrew H

    2015-10-23

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) remains unclear. The 4 microRNAs representing the miR-143 and miR-145 stem loops are genomically clustered. To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of the miR-143/145 cluster and the role of miR-143 in PAH. We identified the promoter region that regulates miR-143/145 microRNA expression in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). We mapped PAH-related signaling pathways, including estrogen receptor, liver X factor/retinoic X receptor, transforming growth factor-β (Smads), and hypoxia (hypoxia response element), that regulated levels of all pri-miR stem loop transcription and resulting microRNA expression. We observed that miR-143-3p is selectively upregulated compared with miR-143-5p during PASMC migration. Modulation of miR-143 in PASMCs significantly altered cell migration and apoptosis. In addition, we found high abundance of miR-143-3p in PASMC-derived exosomes. Using assays with pulmonary arterial endothelial cells, we demonstrated a paracrine promigratory and proangiogenic effect of miR-143-3p-enriched exosomes from PASMC. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction and in situ hybridization showed elevated expression of miR-143 in calf models of PAH and in samples from PAH patients. Moreover, in contrast to our previous findings that had not supported a therapeutic role in vivo, we now demonstrate a protective role of miR-143 in experimental pulmonary hypertension in vivo in miR-143-/- and anti-miR-143-3p-treated mice exposed to chronic hypoxia in both preventative and reversal settings. MiR-143-3p modulated both cellular and exosome-mediated responses in pulmonary vascular cells, whereas inhibition of miR-143-3p blocked experimental pulmonary hypertension. Taken together, these findings confirm an important role for the miR-143/145 cluster in PAH pathobiology. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  5. Expression of alpha V integrin is modulated by Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 3C and the metastasis suppressor Nm23-H1 through interaction with the GATA-1 and Sp1 transcription factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choudhuri, Tathagata; Verma, Subhash C.; Lan, Ke; Robertson, Erle S.

    2006-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a lymphotrophic herpesvirus infecting most of the world's population. It is associated with a number of human lymphoid and epithelial tumors and lymphoproliferative diseases in immunocompromised patients. A subset of latent EBV antigens is required for immortalization of primary B-lymphocytes. The metastatic suppressor Nm23-H1 which is downregulated in human invasive breast carcinoma reduces the migration and metastatic activity of breast carcinoma cells when expressed from a heterologous promoter. Interestingly, the EBV nuclear antigen 3C (EBNA3C) reverses these activities of Nm23-H1. The alpha V integrins recognize a variety of ligands for signaling and are involved in cell migration and proliferation and also serve as major receptors for extracellular-matrix-mediated cell adhesion and migration. The goal of this study was to determine if Nm23-H1 and EBNA3C can modulate alpha V integrin expression and downstream activities. The results of our studies indicate that Nm23-H1 downregulates alpha V intregrin expression in a dose responsive manner. In contrast, EBNA3C can upregulate alpha V integrin expression. Furthermore, the study showed that the association of the Sp1 and GATA transcription factors with Nm23-H1 is required for modulation of the alpha V integrin activity. Thus, these results suggest a direct correlation between the alpha V integrin expression and the interaction of Nm23-H1 with EBNA3C

  6. Modulation of haloperidol-induced patterns of the transcription factor Nur77 and Nor-1 expression by serotonergic and adrenergic drugs in the mouse brain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheux, Jérôme; Vuillier, Laura; Mahfouz, Mylène; Rouillard, Claude; Lévesque, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Different patterns of expression of the transcription factors of Nur77 and Nor-1 are induced following acute administration of typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs. The pharmacological profile of atypical antipsychotics suggests that serotonergic and/or adrenergic receptors might contribute to these reported differences. In order to test this possibility, we examined the abilities of serotonin 5-HT1A and 5-HT2A/2C, and α1- and α2-adrenergic receptor drugs to modify the pattern of Nur77 (NR4A1) and Nor-1 (NR4A3) mRNA expression induced by haloperidol. Various groups of mice were treated with either saline, DOI, a 5-HT2A/2C agonist, MDL11939, a 5-HT2A antagonist, 8-OH-DPAT, a 5-HT1A agonist, prazosin, an α1-adrenergic antagonist and idazoxan, an α2-adrenergic antagonist, alone or in combination with haloperidol. The 5-HT2A/2C agonist DOI alone significantly increased Nur77 expression in the medial striatum and nucleus accumbens. DOI reduced Nor-1 expression, while MDL11939 increased the expression of this transcript in the cortex. Prazosin reduced Nur77 expression in the dorsal striatum and nucleus accumbens. Interestingly, 8-OH-DPAT and MDL11939 partially prevented haloperidol-induced Nur77 up-regulation, while MDL11939 completely abolished Nor-1 expression in the striatum. In addition, MDL11939 decreased haloperidol-induced Nur77 and Nor-1 mRNA levels in the ventral tegmental area. On the contrary, idazoxan (α2 antagonist) consistently potentiated haloperidol-induced Nur77, but not Nor-1 mRNA levels in the striatum, whereas prazosin (α1 antagonist) remained without effect. Taken together, these results show the ability of a 5-HT1A agonist or a 5-HT2A antagonist to reduce haloperidol-induced Nur77 and Nor-1 striatal expression, suggesting that these serotonin receptor subtypes participate in the differential pattern of gene expression induced by typical and atypical antipsychotic drugs. PMID:21524335

  7. Terminalia catappa Exerts Antimetastatic Effects on Hepatocellular Carcinoma through Transcriptional Inhibition of Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 by Modulating NF-κB and AP-1 Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Bin Yeh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High mortality and morbidity rates for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in Taiwan primarily result from uncontrolled tumor metastasis. Previous studies have identified that Terminalia catappa leaf extracts (TCE exert hepatoprotective, antioxidative, antiinflammatory, anticancer, and antimetastatic activities. However, the effects of TCE on HCC and the underlying molecular mechanisms of its activities have yet to be fully elucidated. The present study's findings demonstrate that TCE concentration dependently inhibits human HCC migration/invasion. Zymographic and western blot analyses revealed that TCE inhibited the activities and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9. Assessment of mRNA levels, using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR and real-time PCR, and promoter assays confirmed the inhibitory effects of TCE on MMP-9 expression in HCC cells. The inhibitory effects of TCE on MMP-9 proceeded by upregulating tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1, as well as suppressing nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB and activating protein-1 (AP-1 on the MMP-9 promoter in Huh7 cells. In conclusion, TCE inhibits MMP-9 expression and HCC cell metastasis and, thus, has potential use as a chemopreventive agent. Its inhibitory effects are associated with downregulation of the binding activities of the transcription factors NF-κB and AP-1.

  8. The beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii modulates the expression of WRKY transcription factors in syncytia to favour its development in Arabidopsis roots.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Amjad Ali

    Full Text Available Cyst nematodes invade the roots of their host plants as second stage juveniles and induce a syncytium which is the only source of nutrients throughout their life. A recent transcriptome analysis of syncytia induced by the beet cyst nematode Heterodera schachtii in Arabidopsis roots has shown that thousands of genes are up-regulated or down-regulated in syncytia as compared to root segments from uninfected plants. Among the down-regulated genes are many which code for WRKY transcription factors. Arabidopsis contains 66 WRKY genes with 59 represented by the ATH1 GeneChip. Of these, 28 were significantly down-regulated and 6 up-regulated in syncytia as compared to control root segments. We have studied here the down-regulated genes WRKY6, WRKY11, WRKY17 and WRKY33 in detail. We confirmed the down-regulation in syncytia with promoter::GUS lines. Using various overexpression lines and mutants it was shown that the down-regulation of these WRKY genes is important for nematode development, probably through interfering with plant defense reactions. In case of WRKY33, this might involve the production of the phytoalexin camalexin.

  9. Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, John S.; McSweeney, Julia; Lee, Joanne; Ivy, Dunbar

    2015-01-01

    Objective Review the pharmacologic treatment options for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) in the cardiac intensive care setting and summarize the most-recent literature supporting these therapies. Data Sources and Study Selection Literature search for prospective studies, retrospective analyses, and case reports evaluating the safety and efficacy of PAH therapies. Data Extraction Mechanisms of action and pharmacokinetics, treatment recommendations, safety considerations, and outcomes for specific medical therapies. Data Synthesis Specific targeted therapies developed for the treatment of adult patients with PAH have been applied for the benefit of children with PAH. With the exception of inhaled nitric oxide, there are no PAH medications approved for children in the US by the FDA. Unfortunately, data on treatment strategies in children with PAH are limited by the small number of randomized controlled clinical trials evaluating the safety and efficacy of specific treatments. The treatment options for PAH in children focus on endothelial-based pathways. Calcium channel blockers are recommended for use in a very small, select group of children who are responsive to vasoreactivity testing at cardiac catheterization. Phosphodiesterase type 5 inhibitor therapy is the most-commonly recommended oral treatment option in children with PAH. Prostacyclins provide adjunctive therapy for the treatment of PAH as infusions (intravenous and subcutaneous) and inhalation agents. Inhaled nitric oxide is the first line vasodilator therapy in persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn, and is commonly used in the treatment of PAH in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). Endothelin receptor antagonists have been shown to improve exercise tolerance and survival in adult patients with PAH. Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulators are the first drug class to be FDA approved for the treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Conclusions Literature and data supporting the

  10. Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education & Training Home Conditions Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Familial Pulmonary Fibrosis Make an Appointment Find a Doctor Ask a ... more members within the same family have Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis (IPF) or any other form of Idiopathic Interstitial ...

  11. Pulmonary Hypertension Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... well as sleep apnea, are common causes of secondary pulmonary hypertension. Other causes include the following: Congestive heart failure Birth defects in the heart Chronic pulmonary thromboembolism (blood clots in the pulmonary arteries) Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome ( ...

  12. Pulmonary Hypertension in Scleroderma

    Science.gov (United States)

    PULMONARY HYPERTENSION IN SCLERODERMA PULMONARY HYPERTENSION Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the blood vessels of the lungs. If the high ... the right side of the heart. Patients with scleroderma are at increased risk for developing PH from ...

  13. HIV and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What do I need to know about pulmonary hypertension in connection with HIV? Although pulmonary hypertension and ... Should an HIV patient be tested for pulmonary hypertension? HIV patients know that medical supervision is critical ...

  14. Pulmonary arterial hypertension : an update

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoendermis, E. S.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), defined as group 1 of the World Heart Organisation (WHO) classification of pulmonary hypertension, is an uncommon disorder of the pulmonary vascular system. It is characterised by an increased pulmonary artery pressure, increased pulmonary vascular resistance

  15. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  16. Aboveground Whitefly Infestation Modulates Transcriptional Levels of Anthocyanin Biosynthesis and Jasmonic Acid Signaling-Related Genes and Augments the Cope with Drought Stress of Maize.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Soon Park

    Full Text Available Up to now, the potential underlying molecular mechanisms by which maize (Zea mays L. plants elicit defense responses by infestation with a phloem feeding insect whitefly [Bemisia tabaci (Genn.] have been barely elucidated against (abiotic stresses. To fill this gap of current knowledge maize plants were infested with whitefly and these plants were subsequently assessed the levels of water loss. To understand the mode of action, plant hormone contents and the stress-related mRNA expression were evaluated. Whitefly-infested maize plants did not display any significant phenotypic differences in above-ground tissues (infested site compared with controls. By contrast, root (systemic tissue biomass was increased by 2-fold by whitefly infestation. The levels of endogenous indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, jasmonic acid (JA, and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 were significantly higher in whitefly-infested plants. The biosynthetic or signaling-related genes for JA and anthocyanins were highly up-regulated. Additionally, we found that healthier plants were obtained in whitefly-infested plants under drought conditions. The weight of whitefly-infested plants was approximately 20% higher than that of control plants at 14 d of drought treatment. The drought tolerance-related genes, ZmbZIP72, ZmSNAC1, and ZmABA1, were highly expressed in the whitefly-infected plants. Collectively, our results suggest that IAA/JA-derived maize physiological changes and correlation of H2O2 production and water loss are modulated by above-ground whitefly infestation in maize plants.

  17. Pulmonary biomarkers in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barnes, Peter J.; Chowdhury, Badrul; Kharitonov, Sergei A.; Magnussen, Helgo; Page, Clive P.; Postma, Dirkje; Saetta, Marina

    2006-01-01

    There has been increasing interest in using pulmonary biomarkers to understand and monitor the inflammation in the respiratory tract of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). In this Pulmonary Perspective we discuss the merits of the various approaches by reviewing the current

  18. Intestinal DMBT1 expression is modulated by Crohn's disease-associated IL23R variants and by a DMBT1 variant which influences binding of the transcription factors CREB1 and ATF-2.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia Diegelmann

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: DMBT is an antibacterial pattern recognition and scavenger receptor. In this study, we analyzed the role of DMBT1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs regarding inflammatory bowel disease (IBD susceptibility and examined their functional impact on transcription factor binding and downstream gene expression. METHODS: Seven SNPs in the DMBT1 gene region were analyzed in 2073 individuals including 818 Crohn's disease (CD patients and 972 healthy controls in two independent case-control panels. Comprehensive epistasis analyses for the known CD susceptibility genes NOD2, IL23R and IL27 were performed. The influence of IL23R variants on DMBT1 expression was analyzed. Functional analysis included siRNA transfection, quantitative PCR, western blot, electrophoretic mobility shift and luciferase assays. RESULTS: IL-22 induces DMBT1 protein expression in intestinal epithelial cells dependent on STAT3, ATF-2 and CREB1. IL-22 expression-modulating, CD risk-associated IL23R variants influence DMBT1 expression in CD patients and DMBT1 levels are increased in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of CD patients. Several DMBT1 SNPs were associated with CD susceptibility. SNP rs2981804 was most strongly associated with CD in the combined panel (p = 3.0 × 10(-7, OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.24-1.63. All haplotype groups tested showed highly significant associations with CD (including omnibus P-values as low as 6.1 × 10(-18. The most strongly CD risk-associated, non-coding DMBT1 SNP rs2981804 modifies the DNA binding sites for the transcription factors CREB1 and ATF-2 and the respective genomic region comprising rs2981804 is able to act as a transcriptional regulator in vitro. Intestinal DMBT1 expression is decreased in CD patients carrying the rs2981804 CD risk allele. CONCLUSION: We identified novel associations of DMBT1 variants with CD susceptibility and discovered a novel functional role of rs2981804 in regulating DMBT1 expression. Our data suggest an important

  19. Intestinal DMBT1 expression is modulated by Crohn's disease-associated IL23R variants and by a DMBT1 variant which influences binding of the transcription factors CREB1 and ATF-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diegelmann, Julia; Czamara, Darina; Le Bras, Emmanuelle; Zimmermann, Eva; Olszak, Torsten; Bedynek, Andrea; Göke, Burkhard; Franke, Andre; Glas, Jürgen; Brand, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    DMBT is an antibacterial pattern recognition and scavenger receptor. In this study, we analyzed the role of DMBT1 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) regarding inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) susceptibility and examined their functional impact on transcription factor binding and downstream gene expression. Seven SNPs in the DMBT1 gene region were analyzed in 2073 individuals including 818 Crohn's disease (CD) patients and 972 healthy controls in two independent case-control panels. Comprehensive epistasis analyses for the known CD susceptibility genes NOD2, IL23R and IL27 were performed. The influence of IL23R variants on DMBT1 expression was analyzed. Functional analysis included siRNA transfection, quantitative PCR, western blot, electrophoretic mobility shift and luciferase assays. IL-22 induces DMBT1 protein expression in intestinal epithelial cells dependent on STAT3, ATF-2 and CREB1. IL-22 expression-modulating, CD risk-associated IL23R variants influence DMBT1 expression in CD patients and DMBT1 levels are increased in the inflamed intestinal mucosa of CD patients. Several DMBT1 SNPs were associated with CD susceptibility. SNP rs2981804 was most strongly associated with CD in the combined panel (p = 3.0 × 10(-7), OR 1.42; 95% CI 1.24-1.63). All haplotype groups tested showed highly significant associations with CD (including omnibus P-values as low as 6.1 × 10(-18)). The most strongly CD risk-associated, non-coding DMBT1 SNP rs2981804 modifies the DNA binding sites for the transcription factors CREB1 and ATF-2 and the respective genomic region comprising rs2981804 is able to act as a transcriptional regulator in vitro. Intestinal DMBT1 expression is decreased in CD patients carrying the rs2981804 CD risk allele. We identified novel associations of DMBT1 variants with CD susceptibility and discovered a novel functional role of rs2981804 in regulating DMBT1 expression. Our data suggest an important role of DMBT1 in CD pathogenesis.

  20. The Journey of a Transcription Factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pireyre, Marie

    Plants have developed astonishing networks regulating their metabolism to adapt to their environment. The complexity of these networks is illustrated by the expansion of families of regulators such as transcription factors in the plant kingdom. Transcription factors specifically impact...... transcriptional networks by integrating exogenous and endogenous stimuli and regulating gene expression accordingly. Regulation of transcription factors and their activation is thus highly important to modulate the transcriptional programs and increase fitness of the plant in a given environment. Plant metabolism....... The biosynthetic machinery of GLS is governed by interplay of six MYB and three bHLH transcription factors. MYB28, MYB29 and MYB76 regulate methionine-derived GLS, and MYB51, MYB34 and MYB122 regulate tryptophan-derived GLS. The three bHLH transcription factors MYC2, MYC3 and MYC4 physically interact with all six...

  1. Oxidative stress induced pulmonary endothelial cell proliferation is ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cellular hyper-proliferation, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress are hallmarks of the pathobiology of pulmonary hypertension. Indeed, pulmonary endothelial cells proliferation is susceptible to redox state modulation. Some studies suggest that superoxide stimulates endothelial cell proliferation while others have ...

  2. An ex vivo evaluation of the efficacy of andrographolide in modulating differential expression of transcription factors and target genes in periodontal cells and its potential role in treating periodontal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambili R; Janam, Prasanthila; Saneesh Babu, P S; Prasad, Manu; Vinod, D; Anil Kumar, P R; Kumary, T V; Asha Nair, S; Radhakrishna Pillai, M

    2017-01-20

    Andrographolide is a herbal extract traditionally used in South Asian countries for treating inflammatory diseases. To evaluate the efficacy of andrographolide in management of periodontal disease which is a highly prevalent oral disease. Periodontal ligament fibroblasts (PDLF) were cultured from healthy and diseased periodontium using explant culture methods. The safe dose of AG was determined using MTT assay. LPS (lipopolysaccharide) of the most important periodontopathogen, P gingivalis was used to activate NF-κB and STAT3 in PDLF. The efficacy of AG in inhibiting NF-κB and STAT3 was analyzed using immunofluorescence. Down regulation of expression of target genes of these transcription factors related to inflammation and bone resorption were analyzed using real time PCR. AG up to the concentration of 25μM was found to be safe as determined by MTT assay. Statistically significant activation of NF-κB and STAT3 in cultured PDLF was observed in diseased group compared to healthy controls before and after LPS challenge. 5μM AG pretreatment significantly inhibited activation of NF-κB and STAT3 and down regulated expression of inflammatory and bone resorptive genes in cultured PDLF. The findings of the present study propose the adjunctive use of a novel herbal drug andrographolide as a promising host modulation agent for periodontal therapy by inhibiting NF-κB and STAT3 activation and inhibition of inflammation and bone resorption related genes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Retrograde pulmonary arteriography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Calcaterra, G.; Lam, J.; Losekoot, T.G.

    1984-01-01

    The authors performed retrograde pulmonary arteriography by means of a pulmonary venous wedge injection in 10 patients with no demonstrable intrapericardial pulmonary arteries by 'conventional' angiographic techniques. In all cases but one, the procedure demonstrated the feasibility of a further operation. No complications were observed. Retrograde pulmonary arteriography is an important additional method for determining the existence of surgically accessible pulmonary arteries when other techniques have failed. (Auth.)

  4. Drug-induced Pulmonary Fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daba, Mohammad H.; Al-Arifi, Mohammad N; Gubar, Othman A.; El-Tahir, Kamal E.

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is characterized by the accumulation of excessive connective tissue in the lungs. Its causes include chronic administration of some drugs for example bleomycin, cyclophosphamide, amiodarone, procainamide, penicillamine, gold and nitrofurantoin; exposure to certain environmental factors such as gases, asbestos and silica and bacterial or fungal infections. Some systemic diseases also predispose to the disease for example rheumatoid arthritis and systemic lupus erythematosus. The disease is associated with release of oxygen radicals and some mediators such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha TNF-alpha, transforming growth factor-beta Tbgf-beta, PDGF, If-I, Et-I and interleukins 1, 4, 8 and 13. The symptoms of the disease include dyspne a, non-productive cough, fever and damage to the lung cells. It is diagnosed with the aid of chest radiography, high resolution computed tomographic scanning and the result of pulmonary function tests. Drug-induced pulmonary fibrosis may involve release of free oxygen radicals and various cytokines for example Il-I beta and TNF-alpha via activation of nuclear transcription factor Nf-beta as in the case of bleomycin and mitomycin or via release of TGF-beta as in case of tamoxifen or via inhibition of macrophages and lymphocytes phospholipases as in the case of amiodarone with the resultant accumulation of phospholipids and reduction of the immune system. (author)

  5. Modulation of Androgen Receptor Transcriptional Activity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.Y. Wong (Hao Yun)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractAndrogens, testosterone (T) and 5a-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), are important for male and female physiology, in particular for male sexual differentiation, development of secondary male characteristics and spermatogenesis. These hormones exert their actions by binding to the androgen

  6. Modulation of Cellular Transcription Factor Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2003-01-01

    A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker.......A novel class of compounds, known as peptide nucleic acids, form double-stranded structures with one another and with ssDNA. The peptide nucleic acids generally comprise ligands such as naturally occurring DNA bases attached to a peptide backbone through a suitable linker....

  7. Hypoxia, leukocytes, and the pulmonary circulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenmark, Kurt R; Davie, Neil J; Reeves, John T; Frid, Maria G

    2005-02-01

    Data are rapidly accumulating in support of the idea that circulating monocytes and/or mononuclear fibrocytes are recruited to the pulmonary circulation of chronically hypoxic animals and that these cells play an important role in the pulmonary hypertensive process. Hypoxic induction of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, stromal cell-derived factor-1, vascular endothelial growth factor-A, endothelin-1, and tumor growth factor-beta(1) in pulmonary vessel wall cells, either directly or indirectly via signals from hypoxic lung epithelial cells, may be a critical first step in the recruitment of circulating leukocytes to the pulmonary circulation. In addition, hypoxic stress appears to induce release of increased numbers of monocytic progenitor cells from the bone marrow, and these cells may have upregulated expression of receptors for the chemokines produced by the lung circulation, which thus facilitates their specific recruitment to the pulmonary site. Once present, macrophages/fibrocytes may exert paracrine effects on resident pulmonary vessel wall cells stimulating proliferation, phenotypic modulation, and migration of resident fibroblasts and smooth muscle cells. They may also contribute directly to the remodeling process through increased production of collagen and/or differentiation into myofibroblasts. In addition, they could play a critical role in initiating and/or supporting neovascularization of the pulmonary artery vasa vasorum. The expanded vasa network may then act as a conduit for further delivery of circulating mononuclear cells to the pulmonary arterial wall, creating a feedforward loop of pathological remodeling. Future studies will need to determine the mechanisms that selectively induce leukocyte/fibrocyte recruitment to the lung circulation under hypoxic conditions, their direct role in the remodeling process via production of extracellular matrix and/or differentiation into myofibroblasts, their impact on the phenotype of resident smooth muscle

  8. Solitary pulmonary nodule

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adenocarcinoma - chest x-ray Pulmonary nodule - front view chest x-ray Pulmonary nodule, solitary - CT scan Respiratory system References Gotway MB, Panse PM, Gruden JF, Elicker BM. Thoracic radiology: noninvasive diagnostic imaging. In: Broaddus VC, Mason RJ, ...

  9. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to Yosemite FAQ: Non-U.S. Visitors to Yosemite History of HPS Related Links Prevent Rodent Infestations Cleaning Up After Rodents Diseases From Rodent Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome (HPS) is ...

  10. Isorhynchophylline protects against pulmonary arterial hypertension and suppresses PASMCs proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Haipeng; Zhang, Xin [Department of Critical Care Medicine, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Cui, Yuqian [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Deng, Wei [Department of Cardiology, Renmin Hospital of Wuhan University, Wuhan 430060 (China); Xu, Dachun [Department of Cardiology, Shanghai Tenth People’s Hospital of Tongji University, Shanghai 200072 (China); Han, Hui; Wang, Hao [Department of Critical Care Medicine, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Chen, Yuguo [Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Li, Yu, E-mail: qlliyu@126.com [Department of Respiratory, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Wu, Dawei, E-mail: wdwu55@163.com [Department of Critical Care Medicine, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China); Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Remodeling and Function Research, Chinese Ministry of Education and Chinese Ministry of Health, Qilu Hospital of Shandong University, Jinan 250012 (China)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • We focus on PASMCs proliferation in the pathogenesis of PAH. • Isorhynchophylline inhibited PASMCs proliferation and alleviated PAH. • IRN blocked PDGF-Rβ phosphorylation and its downstream signal transduction. • IRN regulated cyclins and CDKs to arrest cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. • We reported IRN has the potential to be a candidate for PAH treatment. - Abstract: Increased pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) proliferation is a key pathophysiological component of pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Isorhynchophylline (IRN) is a tetracyclic oxindole alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herbal medicine Uncaria rhynchophylla. It has long been used clinically for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, very little is known about whether IRN can influence the development of PAH. Here we examined the effect of IRN on monocrotaline (MCT) induced PAH in rats. Our data demonstrated that IRN prevented MCT induced PAH in rats, as assessed by right ventricular (RV) pressure, the weight ratio of RV to (left ventricular + septum) and RV hypertrophy. IRN significantly attenuated the percentage of fully muscularized small arterioles, the medial wall thickness, and the expression of smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In vitro studies, IRN concentration-dependently inhibited the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation of PASMCs. Fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis showed that IRN caused G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest. IRN-induced growth inhibition was associated with downregulation of Cyclin D1 and CDK6 as well as an increase in p27Kip1 levels in PDGF-BB-stimulated PASMCs. Moreover, IRN negatively modulated PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of PDGF-Rβ, ERK1/2, Akt/GSK3β, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). These results demonstrate that IRN could inhibit PASMCs proliferation and

  11. Isorhynchophylline protects against pulmonary arterial hypertension and suppresses PASMCs proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Haipeng; Zhang, Xin; Cui, Yuqian; Deng, Wei; Xu, Dachun; Han, Hui; Wang, Hao; Chen, Yuguo; Li, Yu; Wu, Dawei

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We focus on PASMCs proliferation in the pathogenesis of PAH. • Isorhynchophylline inhibited PASMCs proliferation and alleviated PAH. • IRN blocked PDGF-Rβ phosphorylation and its downstream signal transduction. • IRN regulated cyclins and CDKs to arrest cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. • We reported IRN has the potential to be a candidate for PAH treatment. - Abstract: Increased pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) proliferation is a key pathophysiological component of pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Isorhynchophylline (IRN) is a tetracyclic oxindole alkaloid isolated from the Chinese herbal medicine Uncaria rhynchophylla. It has long been used clinically for treatment of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases. However, very little is known about whether IRN can influence the development of PAH. Here we examined the effect of IRN on monocrotaline (MCT) induced PAH in rats. Our data demonstrated that IRN prevented MCT induced PAH in rats, as assessed by right ventricular (RV) pressure, the weight ratio of RV to (left ventricular + septum) and RV hypertrophy. IRN significantly attenuated the percentage of fully muscularized small arterioles, the medial wall thickness, and the expression of smooth muscle α-actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). In vitro studies, IRN concentration-dependently inhibited the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced proliferation of PASMCs. Fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis showed that IRN caused G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest. IRN-induced growth inhibition was associated with downregulation of Cyclin D1 and CDK6 as well as an increase in p27Kip1 levels in PDGF-BB-stimulated PASMCs. Moreover, IRN negatively modulated PDGF-BB-induced phosphorylation of PDGF-Rβ, ERK1/2, Akt/GSK3β, and signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3). These results demonstrate that IRN could inhibit PASMCs proliferation and

  12. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart). This type of pulmonary hypertension was called “secondary pulmonary hypertension” but is now referred to as PH, because the cause is known to be from lung disease, heart disease, or chronic thromboemboli (blood clots). Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension (PAH) used to be ...

  13. Pulmonary manifestations of malaria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rauber, K.; Enkerlin, H.L.; Riemann, H.; Schoeppe, W.; Frankfurt Univ.

    1987-01-01

    We report on the two different types of pulmonary manifestations in acute plasmodium falciparum malaria. The more severe variant shows long standing interstitial pulmonary infiltrates, whereas in the more benign courses only short-term pulmonary edemas are visible. (orig.) [de

  14. Interleukin-6 overexpression induces pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steiner, M Kathryn; Syrkina, Olga L; Kolliputi, Narasaish; Mark, Eugene J; Hales, Charles A; Waxman, Aaron B

    2009-01-30

    Inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-6 is elevated in the serum and lungs of patients with pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). Several animal models of PAH cite the potential role of inflammatory mediators. We investigated role of IL-6 in the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular disease. Indices of pulmonary vascular remodeling were measured in lung-specific IL-6-overexpressing transgenic mice (Tg(+)) and compared to wild-type (Tg(-)) controls in both normoxic and chronic hypoxic conditions. The Tg(+) mice exhibited elevated right ventricular systolic pressures and right ventricular hypertrophy with corresponding pulmonary vasculopathic changes, all of which were exacerbated by chronic hypoxia. IL-6 overexpression increased muscularization of the proximal arterial tree, and hypoxia enhanced this effect. It also reproduced the muscularization and proliferative arteriopathy seen in the distal arteriolar vessels of PAH patients. The latter was characterized by the formation of occlusive neointimal angioproliferative lesions that worsened with hypoxia and were composed of endothelial cells and T-lymphocytes. IL-6-induced arteriopathic changes were accompanied by activation of proangiogenic factor, vascular endothelial growth factor, the proproliferative kinase extracellular signal-regulated kinase, proproliferative transcription factors c-MYC and MAX, and the antiapoptotic proteins survivin and Bcl-2 and downregulation of the growth inhibitor transforming growth factor-beta and proapoptotic kinases JNK and p38. These findings suggest that IL-6 promotes the development and progression of pulmonary vascular remodeling and PAH through proproliferative antiapoptotic mechanisms.

  15. The transcriptional landscape

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Henrik

    2011-01-01

    The application of new and less biased methods to study the transcriptional output from genomes, such as tiling arrays and deep sequencing, has revealed that most of the genome is transcribed and that there is substantial overlap of transcripts derived from the two strands of DNA. In protein coding...... regions, the map of transcripts is very complex due to small transcripts from the flanking ends of the transcription unit, the use of multiple start and stop sites for the main transcript, production of multiple functional RNA molecules from the same primary transcript, and RNA molecules made...... by independent transcription from within the unit. In genomic regions separating those that encode proteins or highly abundant RNA molecules with known function, transcripts are generally of low abundance and short-lived. In most of these cases, it is unclear to what extent a function is related to transcription...

  16. CHD chromatin remodelers and the transcription cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murawska, Magdalena

    2011-01-01

    It is well established that ATP-dependent chromatin remodelers modulate DNA access of transcription factors and RNA polymerases by “opening” or “closing” chromatin structure. However, this view is far too simplistic. Recent findings have demonstrated that these enzymes not only set the stage for the transcription machinery to act but also are actively involved at every step of the transcription process. As a consequence, they affect initiation, elongation, termination and RNA processing. In this review we will use the CHD family as a paradigm to illustrate the progress that has been made in revealing these new concepts. PMID:22223048

  17. DNA cytosine methylation in the bovine leukemia virus promoter is associated with latency in a lymphoma-derived B-cell line: potential involvement of direct inhibition of cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-binding protein/CRE modulator/activation transcription factor binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierard, Valérie; Guiguen, Allan; Colin, Laurence; Wijmeersch, Gaëlle; Vanhulle, Caroline; Van Driessche, Benoît; Dekoninck, Ann; Blazkova, Jana; Cardona, Christelle; Merimi, Makram; Vierendeel, Valérie; Calomme, Claire; Nguyên, Thi Liên-Anh; Nuttinck, Michèle; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Kettmann, Richard; Portetelle, Daniel; Burny, Arsène; Hirsch, Ivan; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2010-06-18

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) proviral latency represents a viral strategy to escape the host immune system and allow tumor development. Besides the previously demonstrated role of histone deacetylation in the epigenetic repression of BLV expression, we showed here that BLV promoter activity was induced by several DNA methylation inhibitors (such as 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine) and that overexpressed DNMT1 and DNMT3A, but not DNMT3B, down-regulated BLV promoter activity. Importantly, cytosine hypermethylation in the 5'-long terminal repeat (LTR) U3 and R regions was associated with true latency in the lymphoma-derived B-cell line L267 but not with defective latency in YR2 cells. Moreover, the virus-encoded transactivator Tax(BLV) decreased DNA methyltransferase expression levels, which could explain the lower level of cytosine methylation observed in the L267(LTaxSN) 5'-LTR compared with the L267 5'-LTR. Interestingly, DNA methylation inhibitors and Tax(BLV) synergistically activated BLV promoter transcriptional activity in a cAMP-responsive element (CRE)-dependent manner. Mechanistically, methylation at the -154 or -129 CpG position (relative to the transcription start site) impaired in vitro binding of CRE-binding protein (CREB) transcription factors to their respective CRE sites. Methylation at -129 CpG alone was sufficient to decrease BLV promoter-driven reporter gene expression by 2-fold. We demonstrated in vivo the recruitment of CREB/CRE modulator (CREM) and to a lesser extent activating transcription factor-1 (ATF-1) to the hypomethylated CRE region of the YR2 5'-LTR, whereas we detected no CREB/CREM/ATF recruitment to the hypermethylated corresponding region in the L267 cells. Altogether, these findings suggest that site-specific DNA methylation of the BLV promoter represses viral transcription by directly inhibiting transcription factor binding, thereby contributing to true proviral latency.

  18. Pulmonary capillary pressure in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, Rogerio; Amato, Marcelo Britto Passos; Demarzo, Sergio Eduardo; Deheinzelin, Daniel; Barbas, Carmen Silvia Valente; Schettino, Guilherme Paula Pinto; Carvalho, Carlos Roberto Ribeiro

    2005-04-01

    Pulmonary capillary pressure (PCP), together with the time constants of the various vascular compartments, define the dynamics of the pulmonary vascular system. Our objective in the present study was to estimate PCPs and time constants of the vascular system in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), and compare them with these measures in patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). We conducted the study in two groups of patients with pulmonary hypertension: 12 patients with IPAH and 11 with ARDS. Four methods were used to estimate the PCP based on monoexponential and biexponential fitting of pulmonary artery pressure decay curves. PCPs in the IPAH group were considerably greater than those in the ARDS group. The PCPs measured using the four methods also differed significantly, suggesting that each method measures the pressure at a different site in the pulmonary circulation. The time constant for the slow component of the biexponential fit in the IPAH group was significantly longer than that in the ARDS group. The PCP in IPAH patients is greater than normal but methodological limitations related to the occlusion technique may limit interpretation of these data in isolation. Different disease processes may result in different times for arterial emptying, with resulting implications for the methods available for estimating PCP.

  19. Management of Pulmonary Nodules

    OpenAIRE

    Arvin Aryan

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary nodule characterization is currently being redefined as new clinical, radiological and pathological data are reported, necessitating a reevaluation of the clinical management."nIn approach to an incidentally detected pulmonary nodule, we should consider that there are different risk situations, different lesion morphologies, and different sizes with various management options."nIn this session we will review the different risk situations for patients with pulmonary nodules...

  20. Cystic pulmonary hydatidosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malay Sarkar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic echinococcosis (CE is a zoonotic parasitic disease caused by the larval stages of the cestode Echinococcus granulosus. Worldwide, pulmonary hydatid cyst is a significant problem medically, socially, and economically. Surgery is the definitive therapy of pulmonary hydatidosis. Benzimidazoles may be considered in patients with a surgical contraindication. This review will focus on pathogenesis, lifecycle, clinical features, and management of pulmonary hydatid disease.

  1. Pulmonary vasculitis: imaging features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Joon Beom; Im, Jung Gi; Chung, Jin Wook; Goo, Jin Mo; Park, Jae Hyung; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Song, Jae Woo

    1999-01-01

    Vasculitis is defined as an inflammatory process involving blood vessels, and can lead to destruction of the vascular wall and ischemic damage to the organs supplied by these vessels. The lung is commonly affected. A number of attempts have been made to classify and organize pulmonary vasculitis, but because the clinical manifestations and pathologic features of the condition overlap considerably, these afforts have failed to achieve a consensus. We classified pulmonary vasculitis as belonging to either the angitiis-granulomatosis group, the diffuse pulmonary hemorrhage with capillaritis group, or 'other'. Characteristic radiographic and CT findings of the different types of pulmonary vasculitis are illustrated, with a brief discussion of the respective disease entities

  2. Molecular characterization of the porcine surfactant, pulmonary-associated protein C gene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cirera, S.; Nygård, A.B.; Jensen, H.E.

    2006-01-01

    The surfactant, pulmonary-associated protein C (SFTPC) is a peptide secreted by the alveolar type II pneumocytes of the lung. We have characterized the porcine SFTPC gene at genomic, transcriptional, and protein levels. The porcine SFTPC is a single-copy gene on pig chromosome 14. Two transcripts...

  3. Mitochondrial transcription factor A protects human retinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM), as a modulator of NF-κB, on proliferation of hypoxia-induced human retinal endothelial cell (HREC), and the probable mechanism. Methods: After exposure to hypoxia (1 % O2) for 5 days, cell proliferation and cell cycle of HREC were ...

  4. Regulation of pulmonary inflammation by mesenchymal cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkhouri, Hatem; Poppinga, Wilfred Jelco; Tania, Navessa Padma; Ammit, Alaina; Schuliga, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary inflammation and tissue remodelling are common elements of chronic respiratory diseases such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), and pulmonary hypertension (PH). In disease, pulmonary mesenchymal cells not only contribute to tissue

  5. PPARγ agonist pioglitazone reverses pulmonary hypertension and prevents right heart failure via fatty acid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legchenko, Ekaterina; Chouvarine, Philippe; Borchert, Paul; Fernandez-Gonzalez, Angeles; Snay, Erin; Meier, Martin; Maegel, Lavinia; Mitsialis, S Alex; Rog-Zielinska, Eva A; Kourembanas, Stella; Jonigk, Danny; Hansmann, Georg

    2018-04-25

    Right ventricular (RV) heart failure is the leading cause of death in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) acts as a vasoprotective metabolic regulator in smooth muscle and endothelial cells; however, its role in the heart is unclear. We report that deletion of PPARγ in cardiomyocytes leads to biventricular systolic dysfunction and intramyocellular lipid accumulation in mice. In the SU5416/hypoxia (SuHx) rat model, oral treatment with the PPARγ agonist pioglitazone completely reverses severe PAH and vascular remodeling and prevents RV failure. Failing RV cardiomyocytes exhibited mitochondrial disarray and increased intramyocellular lipids (lipotoxicity) in the SuHx heart, which was prevented by pioglitazone. Unbiased ventricular microRNA (miRNA) arrays, mRNA sequencing, and lipid metabolism studies revealed dysregulation of cardiac hypertrophy, fibrosis, myocardial contractility, fatty acid transport/oxidation (FAO), and transforming growth factor-β signaling in the failing RV. These epigenetic, transcriptional, and metabolic alterations were modulated by pioglitazone through miRNA/mRNA networks previously not associated with PAH/RV dysfunction. Consistently, pre-miR-197 and pre-miR-146b repressed genes that drive FAO ( Cpt1b and Fabp4 ) in primary cardiomyocytes. We recapitulated our major pathogenic findings in human end-stage PAH: (i) in the pressure-overloaded failing RV (miR-197 and miR-146b up-regulated), (ii) in peripheral pulmonary arteries (miR-146b up-regulated, miR-133b down-regulated), and (iii) in plexiform vasculopathy (miR-133b up-regulated, miR-146b down-regulated). Together, PPARγ activation can normalize epigenetic and transcriptional regulation primarily related to disturbed lipid metabolism and mitochondrial morphology/function in the failing RV and the hypertensive pulmonary vasculature, representing a therapeutic approach for PAH and other cardiovascular/pulmonary diseases. Copyright

  6. The Critical Role of Pulmonary Arterial Compliance in Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prins, Kurt W.; Pritzker, Marc R.; Scandurra, John; Volmers, Karl; Weir, E. Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    The normal pulmonary circulation is a low-pressure, high-compliance system. Pulmonary arterial compliance decreases in the presence of pulmonary hypertension because of increased extracellular matrix/collagen deposition in the pulmonary arteries. Loss of pulmonary arterial compliance has been consistently shown to be a predictor of increased mortality in patients with pulmonary hypertension, even more so than pulmonary vascular resistance in some studies. Decreased pulmonary arterial compliance causes premature reflection of waves from the distal pulmonary vasculature, leading to increased pulsatile right ventricular afterload and eventually right ventricular failure. Evidence suggests that decreased pulmonary arterial compliance is a cause rather than a consequence of distal small vessel proliferative vasculopathy. Pulmonary arterial compliance decreases early in the disease process even when pulmonary artery pressure and pulmonary vascular resistance are normal, potentially enabling early diagnosis of pulmonary vascular disease, especially in high-risk populations. With the recognition of the prognostic importance of pulmonary arterial compliance, its impact on right ventricular function, and its contributory role in the development and progression of distal small-vessel proliferative vasculopathy, pulmonary arterial compliance is an attractive target for the treatment of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:26848601

  7. Bilateral meandering pulmonary veins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thupili, Chakradhar R.; Udayasankar, Unni [Pediatric Imaging, Imaging Institute Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH (United States); Renapurkar, Rahul [Imaging Institute Cleveland Clinic, Thoracic Imaging, L10, Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Meandering pulmonary veins is a rare clinical entity that can be mistaken for more complex congenital syndromes such as hypogenetic lung syndrome. We report imaging findings in a rare incidentally detected case of bilateral meandering pulmonary veins. We briefly discuss the role of imaging in diagnosing this condition, with particular emphasis on contrast-enhanced CT. (orig.)

  8. pulmonary tuberculosis, jimma hospital

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and National Tuberculosis and Leprosy Control Program manual. RESULTS: A total of 112 extra pulmonary ... Key words: Clinical audit; extra pulmonary Tuberculosis; National Tuberculosis and. Leprosy Control manual. "Addis Ababa ..... intern influence drug regimen selection. Compliance to the 1997 NTLCP inanual is.

  9. Pulmonary artery aneurysm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Enrique

    Introduction. Pulmonary artery aneurysms are a rare finding in general radiological practice. The possible causes are myriad and diverse in pathophysiolo- gy. Patients with post-stenotic dilata- tion of the main pulmonary artery usually present fairly late with insidi- ous cardiorespiratory symptoms. Diagnosis requires ...

  10. Pulmonary hypertension CT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedevska, A.

    2013-01-01

    Full text: The right heart catheterization is the gold standard in the diagnosis and determines the severity of pulmonary hypertension. The significant technical progress of noninvasive diagnostic imaging methods significantly improves the pixel density and spatial resolution in the study of cardiovascular structures, thus changes their role and place in the overall diagnostic plan. Learning points: What is the etiology, clinical manifestation and general pathophysiological disorders in pulmonary hypertension. What are the established diagnostic methods in the diagnosis and follow-up of patients with pulmonary hypertension. What is the recommended protocol for CT scanning for patients with clinically suspected or documented pulmonary hypertension. What are the important diagnostic findings in CT scan of a patient with pulmonary hypertension. Discussion: The prospect of instantaneous complex - anatomical and functional cardiopulmonary and vascular diagnostics seems extremely attractive. The contrast enhanced multislice computed (CT ) and magnetic resonance imaging are very suitable methods for imaging the structures of the right heart, with the possibility of obtaining multiple projections and three-dimensional imaging reconstructions . There are specific morphological features that, if carefully analyzed, provide diagnostic information. Thus, it is possible to avoid or at least reduce the frequency of use of invasive diagnostic cardiac catheterization in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Conclusion: This review focuses on the use of contrast-enhanced CT for comprehensive evaluation of patients with pulmonary hypertension and presents the observed characteristic changes in the chest, lung parenchyma , the structures of the right half of the heart and pulmonary vessels

  11. miR-143 Activation Regulates Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Cell Crosstalk in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Hannah; Lu, Ruifang; Caudrillier, Axelle; McBride, Martin; McClure, John D; Grant, Jenny; Thomas, Matthew; Frid, Maria; Stenmark, Kurt; White, Kevin; Seto, Anita G.; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Bradshaw, Angela C; MacLean, Margaret R.; Baker, Andrew H.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale The pathogenesis of PAH remains unclear. The four microRNAs representing the miR-143 and miR-145 stem loops are genomically clustered. Objective To elucidate the transcriptional regulation of the miR-143/145 cluster, and the role of miR-143 in PAH. Methods and Results We identified the promoter region that regulates miR-143/145 miRNA expression in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). We mapped PAH-related signalling pathways, including estrogens receptor (ER), liver X factor/retinoic X receptor (LXR/RXR), TGF-β (Smads), and hypoxia (HRE) that regulated levels of all pri-miR stem loop transcription and resulting miRNA expression. We observed that miR-143-3p is selectively upregulated compared to miR-143-5p during PASMC migration. Modulation of miR-143 in PASMCs significantly altered cell migration and apoptosis. In addition, we found high abundance of miR-143-3p in PASMCs-derived exosomes. Using assays with pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (PAECs) we demonstrated a paracrine pro-migratory and pro-angiogenic effect of miR-143-3p enriched exosomes from PASMC. Quantitative PCR and in situ hybridisation showed elevated expression of miR-143 in calf models of PAH as well as in samples from PAH patients. Moreover, in contrast to our previous findings that had not supported a therapeutic role in vivo, we now demonstrate a protective role for miR-143 in experimental PH in vivo in miR-143−/− and antimiR143-3p-treated mice exposed to chronic hypoxia in both preventative and reversal settings. Conclusions miR-143-3p modulated both cellular and exosome-mediated responses in pulmonary vascular cells, while inhibition of miR-143-3p blocked experimental PH. Taken together these findings confirm an important role for the miR-143/145 cluster in PAH pathobiology. PMID:26311719

  12. The translational repressor T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a key modulator of Th2 and Th17 responses driving pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure to house dust mite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simarro, Maria; Giannattasio, Giorgio; Xing, Wei; Lundequist, Emma-Maria; Stewart, Samantha; Stevens, Richard L; Orduña, Antonio; Boyce, Joshua A; Anderson, Paul J

    2012-08-30

    T-cell intracellular antigen-1 (TIA-1) is a translational repressor that dampens the production of proinflammatory cytokines and enzymes. In this study we investigated the role of TIA-1 in a mouse model of pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure to the allergenic extract (Df) of the house dust mite Dermatophagoides farinae. When intranasally challenged with a low dose of Df, mice lacking TIA-1 protein (Tia-1(-/-)) showed more severe airway and tissue eosinophilia, infiltration of lung bronchovascular bundles, and goblet cell metaplasia than wild-type littermates. Tia-1(-/-) mice also had higher levels of Df-specific IgE and IgG(1) in serum and ex vivo restimulated Tia-1(-/-) lymph node cells and splenocytes transcribed and released more Th2/Th17 cytokines. To evaluate the site of action of TIA-1, we studied the response to Df in bone marrow chimeras. These experiments revealed that TIA-1 acts on both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells to dampen pulmonary inflammation. Our results identify TIA-1 as a negative regulator of allergen-mediated pulmonary inflammation in vivo. Thus, TIA-1 might be an important player in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Modulation of flavonoid metabolites in Arabidopsis thaliana through overexpression of the MYB75 transcription factor: role of kaempferol-3,7-dirhamnoside in resistance to the specialist insect herbivore Pieris brassicae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onkokesung, N.; Reichelt, M.; Doorn, van A.; Schuurink, R.C.; Loon, van J.J.A.; Dicke, M.

    2014-01-01

    Anthocyanins and flavonols are secondary metabolites that can function in plant defence against herbivores. In Arabidopsis thaliana, anthocyanin and flavonol biosynthesis are regulated by MYB transcription factors. Overexpression of MYB75 (oxMYB75) in Arabidopsis results in increasing anthocyanin

  14. Over-expression of the transcription factor HlMYB3 in transgenic hop (Humulus lupulus L. cv. Tettnanger) modulates the expression of genes involved in the biosynthesis of flavonoids and phloroglucinols

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gatica-Arias, A.; Stanke, M.; Häntzschel, K.R.; Matoušek, Jaroslav; Weber, G.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 2 (2013), s. 279-289 ISSN 0167-6857 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/08/0740 Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : Hop * R2R3 MYB transcription factors * Genetic transformation * Flavonoid biosynthesis Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.612, year: 2013

  15. Transcriptional Analysis of the MrpJ Network: Modulation of Diverse Virulence-Associated Genes and Direct Regulation of mrp Fimbrial and flhDC Flagellar Operons in Proteus mirabilis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Nadine J.; Debnath, Irina; Kuan, Lisa; Schulfer, Anjelique; Ty, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is associated with a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Strict regulation of the antagonistic processes of adhesion and motility, mediated by fimbriae and flagella, respectively, is essential for disease progression. Previously, the transcriptional regulator MrpJ, which is encoded by the mrp fimbrial operon, has been shown to repress both swimming and swarming motility. Here we show that MrpJ affects an array of cellular processes beyond adherence and motility. Microarray analysis found that expression of mrpJ mimicking levels observed during UTIs leads to differential expression of 217 genes related to, among other functions, bacterial virulence, type VI secretion, and metabolism. We probed the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MrpJ using transcriptional reporters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Binding of MrpJ to two virulence-associated target gene promoters, the promoters of the flagellar master regulator flhDC and mrp itself, appears to be affected by the condensation state of the native chromosome, although both targets share a direct MrpJ binding site proximal to the transcriptional start. Furthermore, an mrpJ deletion mutant colonized the bladders of mice at significantly lower levels in a transurethral model of infection. Additionally, we observed that mrpJ is widely conserved in a collection of recent clinical isolates. Altogether, these findings support a role of MrpJ as a global regulator of P. mirabilis virulence. PMID:25847961

  16. NFATc3 and VIP in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony M Szema

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD are both debilitating lung diseases which can lead to hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension (PH. Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT is a transcription factor implicated in the etiology of vascular remodeling in hypoxic PH. We have previously shown that mice lacking the ability to generate Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP develop spontaneous PH, pulmonary arterial remodeling and lung inflammation. Inhibition of NFAT attenuated PH in these mice suggesting a connection between NFAT and VIP. To test the hypotheses that: 1 VIP inhibits NFAT isoform c3 (NFATc3 activity in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells; 2 lung NFATc3 activation is associated with disease severity in IPF and COPD patients, and 3 VIP and NFATc3 expression correlate in lung tissue from IPF and COPD patients. NFAT activity was determined in isolated pulmonary arteries from NFAT-luciferase reporter mice. The % of nuclei with NFAT nuclear accumulation was determined in primary human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC cultures; in lung airway epithelia and smooth muscle and pulmonary endothelia and smooth muscle from IPF and COPD patients; and in PASMC from mouse lung sections by fluorescence microscopy. Both NFAT and VIP mRNA levels were measured in lungs from IPF and COPD patients. Empirical strategies applied to test hypotheses regarding VIP, NFATc3 expression and activity, and disease type and severity. This study shows a significant negative correlation between NFAT isoform c3 protein expression levels in PASMC, activity of NFATc3 in pulmonary endothelial cells, expression and activity of NFATc3 in bronchial epithelial cells and lung function in IPF patients, supporting the concept that NFATc3 is activated in the early stages of IPF. We further show that there is a significant positive correlation between NFATc3 mRNA expression and VIP RNA expression only in lungs from IPF patients

  17. Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis: a rare cause of pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babu, K Anand; Supraja, K; Singh, Raj B

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis (PCH) is a rare disorder of unknown aetiology, characterised by proliferating capillaries that invade the pulmonary interstitium, alveolar septae and the pulmonary vasculature. It is often mis-diagnosed as primary pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary veno-occlusive disease. Pulmonary capillary haemangiomatosis is a locally aggressive benign vascular neoplasm of the lung. We report the case of a 19-year-old female who was referred to us in the early post-partum period with severe pulmonary artery hypertension, which was diagnosed as PCH by open lung biopsy.

  18. Intravascular pulmonary metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shepard, J.A.O.; Moore, E.H.; Templeton, P.A.; McLoud, T.C.

    1988-01-01

    The diagnosis of intravascular metastatic tumor emboli to the lungs is rarely made. The authors present a characteristic radiographic finding of intravascular lung metastases that they observed in four patients with diagnoses or right atrial myoxoma, invasive renal cell carcinoma, invasive pelvic osteosarcoma, and recurrent pelvic chondrosarcoma. Substantiation of intravascular pulmonary metastases was achieved by means of autopsy, pulmonary artery biopsy, and surgical documentation of tumor invasion of the inferior vena cava or pelvic veins. In all four cases, chest computed tomography (CT) demonstrated branching, beaded opacities extending from the hila into the periphery of the lung in the distribution of pulmonary arteries. In one case, similar findings were observed in magnetic resonance (MR) images of the chest. Follow-up studies in three cases showed progressive enlargement and varicosity of the abnormal pulmonary artery consistent with proliferation of intravascular tumor. In the case of metastatic osteosarcoma, intraluminal ossification was also observed at CT. In three of four cases, pulmonary infarction was demonstrated in the distribution of the abnormal pulmonary arteries seen at CT as small, peripheral, wedge-shaped opacities. The demonstration of progressively dilated and beaded pulmonary arteries in patients with extrathoracic malignancies is suggestive of intravascular lung metastases, particularly when accompanied by peripheral infarction

  19. Pulmonary vascular imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fedullo, P.F.; Shure, D.

    1987-01-01

    A wide range of pulmonary vascular imaging techniques are available for the diagnostic evaluation of patients with suspected pulmonary vascular disease. The characteristics of any ideal technique would include high sensitivity and specificity, safety, simplicity, and sequential applicability. To date, no single technique meets these ideal characteristics. Conventional pulmonary angiography remains the gold standard for the diagnosis of acute thromboembolic disease despite the introduction of newer techniques such as digital subtraction angiography and magnetic resonance imaging. Improved noninvasive lower extremity venous testing methods, particularly impedance plethysmography, and ventilation-perfusion scanning can play significant roles in the noninvasive diagnosis of acute pulmonary emboli when properly applied. Ventilation-perfusion scanning may also be useful as a screening test to differentiate possible primary pulmonary hypertension from chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. And, finally, angioscopy may be a useful adjunctive technique to detect chronic thromboembolic disease and determine operability. Optimal clinical decision-making, however, will continue to require the proper interpretation of adjunctive information obtained from the less-invasive techniques, applied with an understanding of the natural history of the various forms of pulmonary vascular disease and with a knowledge of the capabilities and shortcomings of the individual techniques

  20. SPDEF is required for mouse pulmonary goblet cell differentiation and regulates a network of genes associated with mucus production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, G.; Korfhagen, T.R.; Xu, Y.; Kitzmiller, J.; Wert, S.E.; Maeda, Y.; Gregorieff, A.; Clevers, H.; Whitsett, J.A.

    2009-01-01

    Various acute and chronic inflammatory stimuli increase the number and activity of pulmonary mucus-producing goblet cells, and goblet cell hyperplasia and excess mucus production are central to the pathogenesis of chronic pulmonary diseases. However, little is known about the transcriptional

  1. Pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Gulati

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Leptospirosis has a spectrum of presentation which ranges from mild disease to a severe form comprising of jaundice and renal failure. Involvement of the lung can vary from subtle clinical features to deadly pulmonary hemorrhage and acute respiratory distress syndrome. Of late, it has been identified that leptospirosis can present atypically with predominant pulmonary manifestations. This can delay diagnosis making and hence optimum treatment. The purpose of this review is to bring together all the reported pulmonary manifestations of leptospirosis and the recent trends in the management.

  2. Transcriptional analysis of the MrpJ network: modulation of diverse virulence-associated genes and direct regulation of mrp fimbrial and flhDC flagellar operons in Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Nadine J; Debnath, Irina; Kuan, Lisa; Schulfer, Anjelique; Ty, Maureen; Pearson, Melanie M

    2015-06-01

    The enteric bacterium Proteus mirabilis is associated with a significant number of catheter-associated urinary tract infections (UTIs). Strict regulation of the antagonistic processes of adhesion and motility, mediated by fimbriae and flagella, respectively, is essential for disease progression. Previously, the transcriptional regulator MrpJ, which is encoded by the mrp fimbrial operon, has been shown to repress both swimming and swarming motility. Here we show that MrpJ affects an array of cellular processes beyond adherence and motility. Microarray analysis found that expression of mrpJ mimicking levels observed during UTIs leads to differential expression of 217 genes related to, among other functions, bacterial virulence, type VI secretion, and metabolism. We probed the molecular mechanism of transcriptional regulation by MrpJ using transcriptional reporters and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). Binding of MrpJ to two virulence-associated target gene promoters, the promoters of the flagellar master regulator flhDC and mrp itself, appears to be affected by the condensation state of the native chromosome, although both targets share a direct MrpJ binding site proximal to the transcriptional start. Furthermore, an mrpJ deletion mutant colonized the bladders of mice at significantly lower levels in a transurethral model of infection. Additionally, we observed that mrpJ is widely conserved in a collection of recent clinical isolates. Altogether, these findings support a role of MrpJ as a global regulator of P. mirabilis virulence. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  3. LncRNA MEG3 downregulation mediated by DNMT3b contributes to nickel malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells via modulating PHLPP1 transcription and HIF-1α translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, C; Huang, C; Wang, J; Huang, H; Li, J; Xie, Q; Liu, Y; Zhu, J; Li, Y; Zhang, D; Zhu, Q; Huang, C

    2017-07-06

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as key factors in various fundamental cellular biological processes, and many of them are likely to have functional roles in tumorigenesis. Maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3) is an imprinted gene located at 14q32 that encodes a lncRNA, and the decreased MEG3 expression has been reported in multiple cancer tissues. However, nothing is known about the alteration and role of MEG3 in environmental carcinogen-induced lung tumorigenesis. Our present study, for the first time to the best of our knowledge, discovered that environmental carcinogen nickel exposure led to MEG3 downregulation, consequently initiating c-Jun-mediated PHLPP1 transcriptional inhibition and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) protein translation upregulation, in turn resulting in malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells. Mechanistically, MEG3 downregulation was attributed to nickel-induced promoter hypermethylation via elevating DNMT3b expression, whereas PHLPP1 transcriptional inhibition was due to the decreasing interaction of MEG3 with its inhibitory transcription factor c-Jun. Moreover, HIF-1α protein translation was upregulated via activating the Akt/p70S6K/S6 axis resultant from PHLPP1 inhibition in nickel responses. Collectively, we uncover that nickel exposure results in DNMT3b induction and MEG3 promoter hypermethylation and expression inhibition, further reduces its binding to c-Jun and in turn increasing c-Jun inhibition of PHLPP1 transcription, leading to the Akt/p70S6K/S6 axis activation, and HIF-1α protein translation, as well as malignant transformation of human bronchial epithelial cells. Our studies provide a significant insight into understanding the alteration and role of MEG3 in nickel-induced lung tumorigenesis.

  4. The homeodomain-leucine zipper (HD-Zip) class I transcription factors ATHB7 and ATHB12 modulate abscisic acid signalling by regulating protein phosphatase 2C and abscisic acid receptor gene activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdés, Ana Elisa; Overnäs, Elin; Johansson, Henrik; Rada-Iglesias, Alvaro; Engström, Peter

    2012-11-01

    Plants perceiving drought activate multiple responses to improve survival, including large-scale alterations in gene expression. This article reports on the roles in the drought response of two Arabidopsis thaliana homeodomain-leucine zipper class I genes; ATHB7 and ATHB12, both strongly induced by water-deficit and abscisic acid (ABA). ABA-mediated transcriptional regulation of both genes is shown to depend on the activity of protein phosphatases type 2C (PP2C). ATHB7 and ATHB12 are, thus, targets of the ABA signalling mechanism defined by the PP2Cs and the PYR/PYL family of ABA receptors, with which the PP2C proteins interact. Our results from chromatin immunoprecipitation and gene expression analyses demonstrate that ATHB7 and ATHB12 act as positive transcriptional regulators of PP2C genes, and thereby as negative regulators of abscisic acid signalling. In support of this notion, our results also show that ATHB7 and ATHB12 act to repress the transcription of genes encoding the ABA receptors PYL5 and PYL8 in response to an ABA stimulus. In summary, we demonstrate that ATHB7 and ATHB12 have essential functions in the primary response to drought, as mediators of a negative feedback effect on ABA signalling in the plant response to water deficit.

  5. Control of cellulose biosynthesis by overexpression of a transcription factor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kyung-Hwan; Ko, Jae-Heung; Kim, Won-Chan; Kim; , Joo-Yeol

    2017-05-16

    The invention relates to the over-expression of a transcription factor selected from the group consisting of MYB46, HAM1, HAM2, MYB112, WRKY11, ERF6, and any combination thereof in a plant, which can modulate and thereby modulating the cellulose content of the plant.

  6. WRKY transcription factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakshi, Madhunita; Oelmüller, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    WRKY transcription factors are one of the largest families of transcriptional regulators found exclusively in plants. They have diverse biological functions in plant disease resistance, abiotic stress responses, nutrient deprivation, senescence, seed and trichome development, embryogenesis, as well as additional developmental and hormone-controlled processes. WRKYs can act as transcriptional activators or repressors, in various homo- and heterodimer combinations. Here we review recent progress on the function of WRKY transcription factors in Arabidopsis and other plant species such as rice, potato, and parsley, with a special focus on abiotic, developmental, and hormone-regulated processes. PMID:24492469

  7. Protective roles of pulmonary rehabilitation mixture in experimental pulmonary fibrosis in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, L.; Ji, Y.X.; Jiang, W.L.; Lv, C.J.

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal high mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) activation is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation mixture (PRM), which combines extracts from eight traditional Chinese medicines, has very good lung protection in clinical use. However, it is not known if PRM has anti-fibrotic activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of PRM on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated and bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. The effects of PRM on TGF-β1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells, on the proliferation of human lung fibroblasts (HLF-1) in vitro, and on BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo were investigated. PRM treatment resulted in a reduction of EMT in A549 cells that was associated with attenuating an increase of vimentin and a decrease of E-cadherin. PRM inhibited the proliferation of HLF-1 at an IC 50 of 0.51 µg/mL. PRM ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats, with reduction of histopathological scores and collagen deposition, and a decrease in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and HMGB1 expression. An increase in receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) expression was found in BLM-instilled lungs. PRM significantly decreased EMT and prevented pulmonary fibrosis through decreasing HMGB1 and regulating RAGE in vitro and in vivo. PRM inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT via decreased HMGB1 and vimentin and increased RAGE and E-cadherin levels. In summary, PRM prevented experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating the HMGB1/RAGE pathway

  8. Protective roles of pulmonary rehabilitation mixture in experimental pulmonary fibrosis in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, L.; Ji, Y.X.; Jiang, W.L.; Lv, C.J. [School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Binzhou Medical University, Yantai (China)

    2015-05-08

    Abnormal high mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1) activation is involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. Pulmonary rehabilitation mixture (PRM), which combines extracts from eight traditional Chinese medicines, has very good lung protection in clinical use. However, it is not known if PRM has anti-fibrotic activity. In this study, we investigated the effects of PRM on transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-mediated and bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vitro and in vivo. The effects of PRM on TGF-β1-mediated epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in A549 cells, on the proliferation of human lung fibroblasts (HLF-1) in vitro, and on BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in vivo were investigated. PRM treatment resulted in a reduction of EMT in A549 cells that was associated with attenuating an increase of vimentin and a decrease of E-cadherin. PRM inhibited the proliferation of HLF-1 at an IC{sub 50} of 0.51 µg/mL. PRM ameliorated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis in rats, with reduction of histopathological scores and collagen deposition, and a decrease in α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and HMGB1 expression. An increase in receptor for advanced glycation end-product (RAGE) expression was found in BLM-instilled lungs. PRM significantly decreased EMT and prevented pulmonary fibrosis through decreasing HMGB1 and regulating RAGE in vitro and in vivo. PRM inhibited TGF-β1-induced EMT via decreased HMGB1 and vimentin and increased RAGE and E-cadherin levels. In summary, PRM prevented experimental pulmonary fibrosis by modulating the HMGB1/RAGE pathway.

  9. Directed network modules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palla, Gergely; Farkas, Illes J; Pollner, Peter; Derenyi, Imre; Vicsek, Tamas

    2007-01-01

    A search technique locating network modules, i.e. internally densely connected groups of nodes in directed networks is introduced by extending the clique percolation method originally proposed for undirected networks. After giving a suitable definition for directed modules we investigate their percolation transition in the Erdos-Renyi graph both analytically and numerically. We also analyse four real-world directed networks, including Google's own web-pages, an email network, a word association graph and the transcriptional regulatory network of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The obtained directed modules are validated by additional information available for the nodes. We find that directed modules of real-world graphs inherently overlap and the investigated networks can be classified into two major groups in terms of the overlaps between the modules. Accordingly, in the word-association network and Google's web-pages, overlaps are likely to contain in-hubs, whereas the modules in the email and transcriptional regulatory network tend to overlap via out-hubs

  10. [Pulmonary Manifestations of Vasculitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Vietinghoff, S

    2016-11-01

    The variable symptoms and signs of pulmonary vasculitis are a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. Vasculitis should be considered in rapidly progressing, severe and unusual manifestations of pulmonary disease. Clinical examination of other organ systems typically affected by vasculitis such as skin and kidney and autoantibody measurements are complementary approaches to manage this situation. Pulmonary involvement is common in small vessel vasculitis including anti-GBM disease (Goodpasture syndrome) and the ANCA-associated vasculitides. Life threatening pulmonary hemorrhage and irreversible damage of other organs, frequently the kidney, are important complications necessitating rapid diagnosis of these conditions.Vasculitides are rare diseases of multiple organs and therapies including biologics are evolving rapidly, requiring cooperation of specialities and with specialized centres to achieve best patient care. All involved physicians should be aware of typical complications of immunosuppressive therapy. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medeiros Sobrinho, J.H. de; Kambara, A.M.

    1987-01-01

    Six cases of pulmonary arteriovenous fistulas, isolated, without hemorrhagic hereditary telangiectasia (Rendu-Osler-Weber Symdrome) are reported emphasizing the radiographic, tomographic and angiographic examinations, (M.A.C.) [pt

  12. Apical pulmonary abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mercado Ferrer, Cesar A; Serrano Vasquez, Francisco O

    2004-01-01

    We presented the case of a 54 year-old man with bilateral apical pulmonary abscess who consults due to fever and bronchorrhoea, isolating moraxella catharralis that is managed with ampicillin-sulbactam with an adequate clinical and radiological evolution

  13. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Echocardiogram Measurements of blood oxygen level (arterial blood gases) Pulmonary function tests 6-minute walk test Tests ... 2018, A.D.A.M., Inc. Duplication for commercial use must be authorized in writing by ADAM ...

  14. Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return in patients with pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sung, Won-kyung; Au, Virginia; Rose, Anand

    2012-01-01

    Anomalous pulmonary venous return is an uncommon congenital malformation, and may be partial or total. Partial anomalous pulmonary venous return (PAPVR) is more common than total anomalous pulmonary venous return, and is often associated with other congenital cardiac anomalies. Whilst many patients with PAPVR remain asymptomatic, some may present in later age with symptoms related to left-to-right shunt, right heart failure and pulmonary hypertension. We report two cases of PAPVR detected on Computed Tomography Pulmonary Angiogram (CTPA) for the work up of pulmonary hypertension. The cases demonstrate that, although uncommon, partial anomalous pulmonary venous return can be a contributing factor to pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary veins should be carefully examined when reading a CTPA study.

  15. [Immersion pulmonary edema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desgraz, Benoît; Sartori, Claudio; Saubade, Mathieu; Héritier, Francis; Gabus, Vincent

    2017-07-12

    Immersion pulmonary edema may occur during scuba diving, snorke-ling or swimming. It is a rare and often recurrent disease, mainly affecting individuals aged over 50 with high blood pressure. However it also occurs in young individuals with a healthy heart. The main symptoms are dyspnea, cough and hemoptysis. The outcome is often favorable under oxygen treatment but deaths are reported. A cardiac and pulmonary assessment is necessary to evaluate the risk of recurrence and possible contraindications to immersion.

  16. Role of secretory phospholipase A(2) in rhythmic contraction of pulmonary arteries of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Yoshiyuki; Saito-Tanji, Maki; Morikawa, Yuki; Kamataki, Akihisa; Sawai, Takashi; Nakayama, Koichi

    2012-01-01

    Excessive stretching of the vascular wall in accordance with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) induces a variety of pathogenic cellular events in the pulmonary arteries. We previously reported that indoxam, a selective inhibitor for secretory phospholipase A(2) (sPLA(2)), blocked the stretch-induced contraction of rabbit pulmonary arteries by inhibition of untransformed prostaglandin H(2) (PGH(2)) production. The present study was undertaken to investigate involvement of sPLA(2) and untransformed PGH(2) in the enhanced contractility of pulmonary arteries of experimental PAH in rats. Among all the known isoforms of sPLA(2), sPLA(2)-X transcript was most significantly augmented in the pulmonary arteries of rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension (MCT-PHR). The pulmonary arteries of MCT-PHR frequently showed two types of spontaneous contraction in response to stretch; 27% showed rhythmic contraction, which was sensitive to indoxam and SC-560 (selective COX-1 inhibitor), but less sensitive to NS-398 (selective COX-2 inhibitor); and 47% showed sustained incremental tension (tonic contraction), which was insensitive to indoxam and SC-560, but sensitive to NS-398 and was attenuated to 45% of the control. Only the rhythmically contracting pulmonary arteries of MCT-PHR produced a substantial amount of untransformed PGH(2), which was abolished by indoxam. These results suggest that sPLA(2)-mediated PGH(2) synthesis plays an important role in the rhythmic contraction of pulmonary arteries of MCT-PHR.

  17. CXCR1 regulates pulmonary anti-Pseudomonas host defense

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carevic, M.; Öz, H.; Fuchs, K.; Laval, J.; Schroth, C.; Frey, N.; Hector, A.; Bilich, T.; Haug, M.; Schmidt, A.; Autenrieth, S. E.; Bucher, K.; Beer-Hammer, S.; Gaggar, A.; Kneilling, M.; Benarafa, C.; Gao, J.; Murphy, P.; Schwarz, S.; Moepps, B.; Hartl, D.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a key opportunistic pathogen causing disease in cystic fibrosis (CF) and other lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). However, the pulmonary host defense mechanisms regulating anti-Pseudomonas aeruginosa immunity remain incompletely understood. Here we demonstrate, by studying an airway Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection model, in vivo bioluminescence imaging, neutrophil effector responses and human airway samples, that the chemokine receptor CXCR1 regulates pulmonary host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Mechanistically, CXCR1 regulated anti-Pseudomonas neutrophil responses through modulation of reactive oxygen species and interference with toll-like receptor 5 expression. These studies define CXCR1 as a novel non-canonical chemokine receptor that regulates pulmonary anti-Pseudomonas host defense with broad implications for CF, COPD and other infectious lung diseases. PMID:26950764

  18. Does exercise pulmonary hypertension exist?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Edmund M; Chemla, Denis; Whyte, Kenneth; Kovacs, Gabor; Olschewski, Horst; Herve, Philippe

    2016-09-01

    The exercise definition of pulmonary hypertension using a mean pulmonary artery pressure threshold of greater than 30 mmHg was abandoned following the 4th World Pulmonary Hypertension Symposium in 2008, as this definition was not supported by evidence and healthy individuals frequently exceed this threshold. Meanwhile, the clinical value of exercise pulmonary hemodynamic testing has also been questioned. Recent data support the notion that an abnormal pulmonary hemodynamic response during exercise (or exercise pulmonary hypertension) is associated with symptoms and exercise limitation. Pathophysiologic mechanisms accounting for the development of exercise pulmonary hypertension include increased vascular resistance, excessive elevation in left atrial pressure and/or increased volume of trapped air during exercise, resulting in a steep rise in pulmonary artery pressure relative to cardiac output. Recent evidence suggests that exercise pulmonary hypertension may be defined by a mean pulmonary artery pressure surpassing 30 mmHg together with a simultaneous total pulmonary resistance exceeding 3 WU. Exercise pulmonary hypertension is a clinically relevant entity and an improved definition has been suggested based on new evidence. Exercise pulmonary hemodynamics may help unmask early or latent disease, particularly in populations that are at high risk for the development of pulmonary hypertension.

  19. Transcriptional control in Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and associated genes, proteins, and methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brady Deneys; Thompson, David N; Apel, William A.; Thompson, Vicki Slavchev; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods of modulating transcription or transcription or transcriptional control using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  20. A comprehensive analysis of microProteins reveals their potentially widespread mechanism of transcriptional regulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Magnani, Enrico; de Klein, Niek; Nam, Hye-In; Kim, Jung-Gun; Pham, Kimberly; Fiume, Elisa; Mudgett, Mary Beth; Rhee, Seung Yon

    2014-01-01

    Truncated transcription factor-like proteins called microProteins (miPs) can modulate transcription factor activities, thereby increasing transcriptional regulatory complexity. To understand their prevalence, evolution, and function, we predicted over 400 genes that encode putative miPs from

  1. Transcriptional control in alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and associated genes, proteins, and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Brady D; Thompson, David N; Apel, William A; Thompson, Vicki S; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2016-11-22

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius are provided. Further provided are methods of modulating transcription or transcription or transcriptional control using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius.

  2. Short curcumin treatment modulates oxidative stress, arginase activity, aberrant crypt foci, and TGF-β1 and HES-1 transcripts in 1,2-dimethylhydrazine-colon carcinogenesis in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bounaama, Abdelkader; Djerdjouri, Bahia; Laroche-Clary, Audrey; Le Morvan, Valérie; Robert, Jacques

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► 1,2-Dimethylhydrazine (DMH) toxicity was driven by oxidative stress. ► Arginase activity correlated to aberrant crypt foci (ACF). ► Curcumin diet restored redox status and induced apoptosis of dysplastic ACF. ► Curcumin reduced arginase activity and up regulated TGF-β1 and HES-1 transcripts. -- Abstract: This study investigated the effect of short curcumin treatment, a natural antioxidant on 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH)-induced aberrant crypt foci (ACF) in mice. The incidence of aberrant crypt foci (ACF) was 100%, with 54 ± 6 per colon, 10 weeks after the first DMH injection and reached 67 ± 12 per colon after 12 weeks. A high level of undifferentiated goblet cells and a weak apoptotic activity were shown in dysplastic ACF. The morphological alterations of colonic mucosa were associated to severe oxidative stress ratio with 43% increase in malondialdehyde vs. 36% decrease in GSH. DMH also increased inducible nitric synthase (iNOS) mRNA transcripts (250%), nitrites level (240%) and arginase activity (296%), leading to nitrosative stress and cell proliferation. Curcumin treatment, starting at week 10 post-DMH injection for 14 days, reduced the number of ACF (40%), iNOS expression (25%) and arginase activity (73%), and improved redox status by approximately 46%, compared to DMH-treated mice. Moreover, curcumin induced apoptosis of dysplastic ACF cells without restoring goblet cells differentiation. Interestingly, curcumin induced a parallel increase in TGF-β1 and HES-1 transcripts (42% and 26%, respectively). In conclusion, the protective effect of curcumin was driven by the reduction of arginase activity and nitrosative stress. The up regulation of TGF-β1 and HES-1 expression by curcumin suggests for the first time, a potential interplay between these signalling pathways in the chemoprotective mechanism of curcumin.

  3. Plasma 25-hydroxyvitamin D, lung function and risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Afzal, Shoaib; Lange, Peter; Bojesen, Stig Egil

    2014-01-01

    25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) may be associated with lung function through modulation of pulmonary protease-antiprotease imbalance, airway inflammation, lung remodelling and oxidative stress. We examined the association of plasma 25(OH)D levels with lung function, lung function decline and risk o...... of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).......25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) may be associated with lung function through modulation of pulmonary protease-antiprotease imbalance, airway inflammation, lung remodelling and oxidative stress. We examined the association of plasma 25(OH)D levels with lung function, lung function decline and risk...

  4. CT appearance of pulmonary ligament

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Im, Jung Gi; Han, Man Chung; Chin, Soo Yil [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1984-03-15

    Pulmonary ligament consists of 2 serosal of pleura that connect the lower to the mediastinum. Author analyse and present CT appearance of pulmonary ligament of the 40 normal and abnormal patients on the basis of anatomic knowledge from the cross section of cadaver. Left pulmonary ligament is more frequency visualized than the right. The most important CT landmark in localizing pulmonary ligament is the esophagus where the ligament attaches on its lateral wall. Pitfalls in CT identification of pulmonary ligament are right phrenic nerve and right pericardiacophrenic vessels which emerge from lateral wall of the IVC and wall of the emphysematous bulla in the region of the pulmonary ligament.

  5. CT appearance of pulmonary ligament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Im, Jung Gi; Han, Man Chung; Chin, Soo Yil

    1984-01-01

    Pulmonary ligament consists of 2 serosal of pleura that connect the lower to the mediastinum. Author analyse and present CT appearance of pulmonary ligament of the 40 normal and abnormal patients on the basis of anatomic knowledge from the cross section of cadaver. Left pulmonary ligament is more frequency visualized than the right. The most important CT landmark in localizing pulmonary ligament is the esophagus where the ligament attaches on its lateral wall. Pitfalls in CT identification of pulmonary ligament are right phrenic nerve and right pericardiacophrenic vessels which emerge from lateral wall of the IVC and wall of the emphysematous bulla in the region of the pulmonary ligament

  6. CT findings of pulmonary aspergillosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheon, Jung Eun; Im, Jung Gi; Goo, Jin Mo; Kim, Hong Dae; Han, Man Chung

    1995-01-01

    The fungus aspergillus can cause a variety of pulmonary disorders. Aspergilloma is a noninvasive aspergillus colonization of virtually any type of preexisting pulmonary cavity or cystic space. Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis is serious, usually fatal infection in patients being treated with immunosuppressants or who have chronic debilitating disease. Allergic bronchopulmonary aspergillosis is characterized clinically by asthma, blood and sputum eosinophilia and positive immunologic reaction to aspergillus antigen. Awareness of the radiographic and CT findings of pulmonary aspergillosis is important in making the diagnosis of aspergillus-caused pulmonary disorders. In this pictorial essay, we illustrated various radiological findings of pulmonary aspergillosis focused on CT findings correlated with gross pathologic specimens

  7. Definition and classification of pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humbert, Marc; Montani, David; Evgenov, Oleg V; Simonneau, Gérald

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is defined as an increase of mean pulmonary arterial pressure ≥25 mmHg at rest as assessed by right heart catheterization. According to different combinations of values of pulmonary wedge pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance and cardiac output, a hemodynamic classification of pulmonary hypertension has been proposed. Of major importance is the pulmonary wedge pressure which allows to distinguish pre-capillary (pulmonary wedge pressure ≤15 mmHg) and post-capillary (pulmonary wedge pressure >15 mmHg) pulmonary hypertension. Pre-capillary pulmonary hypertension includes the clinical groups 1 (pulmonary arterial hypertension), 3 (pulmonary hypertension due to lung diseases and/or hypoxia), 4 (chronic thrombo-embolic pulmonary hypertension) and 5 (pulmonary hypertension with unclear and/or multifactorial mechanisms). Post-capillary pulmonary hypertension corresponds to the clinical group 2 (pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases).

  8. Battles and hijacks: Noncoding transcription in plants

    KAUST Repository

    Ariel, Federico

    2015-06-01

    Noncoding RNAs have emerged as major components of the eukaryotic transcriptome. Genome-wide analyses revealed the existence of thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in several plant species. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by the plant-specific RNA polymerases Pol IV and Pol V, leading to transcriptional gene silencing, as well as by Pol II. They are involved in a wide range of regulatory mechanisms impacting on gene expression, including chromatin remodeling, modulation of alternative splicing, fine-tuning of miRNA activity, and the control of mRNA translation or accumulation. Recently, dual noncoding transcription by alternative RNA polymerases was implicated in epigenetic and chromatin conformation dynamics. This review integrates the current knowledge on the regulatory mechanisms acting through plant noncoding transcription. © 2015 Elsevier Ltd.

  9. Pediatric Pulmonary Abscess

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle Barbour

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available History of present illness: A 6-year-old previously healthy male presented to the emergency department with three days of left upper quadrant abdominal pain. Family endorsed one week of fevers, cough productive of yellow sputum, and non-bilious, non-bloody emesis. He denied shortness of breath and chest pain. On exam, the patient was febrile with otherwise normal vital signs. He had diffuse tenderness to his abdomen but clear lungs. Laboratory studies revealed leukocytosis to 25,000/mm3 with a left shift. Significant findings: Upright posterior-anterior plain chest films show a left lower lobe consolidation with an air-fluid level and a single septation consistent with a pulmonary abscess (white arrows. A small left pleural effusion was also present, seen as blunting of the left costophrenic angle and obscuration of the left hemidiaphragm (black arrows. Discussion: Pediatric pulmonary abscesses are rare, most commonly caused by aspiration, and the majority consequently arise in dependent portions of the lung.1 The most common pathogens in children are Streptococcus pneumoniaeand Staphylococcus aureus.1 Immunocompromised patients and those with existing pulmonary disease more commonly contract Pseudomonas aeruginosaor Bacteroides, and fungal pathogens are possible.1 Common symptoms include tachypnea, fever, and cough. Imaging is necessary to distinguish pulmonary abscesses from pneumonia, empyema, pneumatocele, and other etiologies. Plain film radiography may miss up to 18% of pulmonary abscesses yet is often the first modality to visualize an intrathoracic abnormality.2 If seen, pulmonary abscesses most often appear as consolidations with air-fluid levels. Generally, pulmonary abscesses are round with irregular, thick walls, whereas empyemas are elliptical with smooth, thin walls.3 However, these characteristics cannot definitively distinguish these processes.2 Advantages of plain films include being low cost and easily obtained. Computed

  10. Pulmonary thromboembolism in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babyn, Paul S.; Gahunia, Harpal K. [Hospital for Sick Children, Department of Pediatric Diagnostic Imaging, Toronto, ON (Canada); Massicotte, Patricia [Stollery Children' s Hospital and University of Alberta, Departments of Pediatric Hematology and Cardiology, Edmonton, AB (Canada)

    2005-03-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is uncommonly diagnosed in the pediatric patient, and indeed often only discovered on autopsy. The incidence of pediatric PTE depends upon the associated underlying disease, diagnostic tests used, and index of suspicion. Multiple risk factors can be found including: peripartum asphyxia, dyspnea, haemoptysis, chest pain, dehydration, septicemia, central venous lines (CVLs), trauma, surgery, ongoing hemolysis, vascular lesions, malignancy, renal disease, foreign bodies or, uncommonly, intracranial venous sinus thrombosis, burns, or nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis. Other types of embolism can occur uncommonly in childhood and need to be recognized, as the required treatment will vary. These include pulmonary cytolytic thrombi, foreign bodies, tumor and septic emboli, and post-traumatic fat emboli. No single noninvasive test for pulmonary embolism is both sensitive and specific. A combination of diagnostic procedures must be used to identify suspect or confirmed cases of PTE. This article reviews the risk factors, clinical presentation and treatment of pulmonary embolism in children. It also highlights the current diagnostic tools and protocols used to evaluate pulmonary embolism in pediatric patients. (orig.)

  11. Pulmonary thromboembolism in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Babyn, Paul S.; Gahunia, Harpal K.; Massicotte, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is uncommonly diagnosed in the pediatric patient, and indeed often only discovered on autopsy. The incidence of pediatric PTE depends upon the associated underlying disease, diagnostic tests used, and index of suspicion. Multiple risk factors can be found including: peripartum asphyxia, dyspnea, haemoptysis, chest pain, dehydration, septicemia, central venous lines (CVLs), trauma, surgery, ongoing hemolysis, vascular lesions, malignancy, renal disease, foreign bodies or, uncommonly, intracranial venous sinus thrombosis, burns, or nonbacterial thrombotic endocarditis. Other types of embolism can occur uncommonly in childhood and need to be recognized, as the required treatment will vary. These include pulmonary cytolytic thrombi, foreign bodies, tumor and septic emboli, and post-traumatic fat emboli. No single noninvasive test for pulmonary embolism is both sensitive and specific. A combination of diagnostic procedures must be used to identify suspect or confirmed cases of PTE. This article reviews the risk factors, clinical presentation and treatment of pulmonary embolism in children. It also highlights the current diagnostic tools and protocols used to evaluate pulmonary embolism in pediatric patients. (orig.)

  12. Lung irradiation induces pulmonary vascular remodelling resembling pulmonary arterial hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ghobadi, G.; Bartelds, B.; van der Veen, S. J.; Dickinson, M. G.; Brandenburg, S.; Berger, R. M. F.; Langendijk, J. A.; Coppes, R. P.; van Luijk, P.

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a commonly fatal pulmonary vascular disease that is often diagnosed late and is characterised by a progressive rise in pulmonary vascular resistance resulting from typical vascular remodelling. Recent data suggest that vascular damage plays an

  13. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyeon Park

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor–DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein–protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1, c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf.

  14. Polyphenol Compound as a Transcription Factor Inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seyeon

    2015-10-30

    A target-based approach has been used to develop novel drugs in many therapeutic fields. In the final stage of intracellular signaling, transcription factor-DNA interactions are central to most biological processes and therefore represent a large and important class of targets for human therapeutics. Thus, we focused on the idea that the disruption of protein dimers and cognate DNA complexes could impair the transcriptional activation and cell transformation regulated by these proteins. Historically, natural products have been regarded as providing the primary leading compounds capable of modulating protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. Although their mechanism of action is not fully defined, polyphenols including flavonoids were found to act mostly as site-directed small molecule inhibitors on signaling. There are many reports in the literature of screening initiatives suggesting improved drugs that can modulate the transcription factor interactions responsible for disease. In this review, we focus on polyphenol compound inhibitors against dimeric forms of transcription factor components of intracellular signaling pathways (for instance, c-jun/c-fos (Activator Protein-1; AP-1), c-myc/max, Nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) and β-catenin/T cell factor (Tcf)).

  15. Transcriptional networks in epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christo Venkov

    Full Text Available Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT changes polarized epithelial cells into migratory phenotypes associated with loss of cell-cell adhesion molecules and cytoskeletal rearrangements. This form of plasticity is seen in mesodermal development, fibroblast formation, and cancer metastasis.Here we identify prominent transcriptional networks active during three time points of this transitional process, as epithelial cells become fibroblasts. DNA microarray in cultured epithelia undergoing EMT, validated in vivo, were used to detect various patterns of gene expression. In particular, the promoter sequences of differentially expressed genes and their transcription factors were analyzed to identify potential binding sites and partners. The four most frequent cis-regulatory elements (CREs in up-regulated genes were SRY, FTS-1, Evi-1, and GC-Box, and RNA inhibition of the four transcription factors, Atf2, Klf10, Sox11, and SP1, most frequently binding these CREs, establish their importance in the initiation and propagation of EMT. Oligonucleotides that block the most frequent CREs restrain EMT at early and intermediate stages through apoptosis of the cells.Our results identify new transcriptional interactions with high frequency CREs that modulate the stability of cellular plasticity, and may serve as targets for modulating these transitional states in fibroblasts.

  16. Neonatal Pulmonary Hemosiderosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Limme

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH is a rare complex entity characterized clinically by acute or recurrent episodes of hemoptysis secondary to diffuse alveolar hemorrhage. The radiographic features are variable, including diffuse alveolar-type infiltrates, and interstitial reticular and micronodular patterns. We describe a 3-week-old infant presenting with hemoptysis and moderate respiratory distress. Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis was the first working diagnosis at the Emergency Department and was confirmed, 2 weeks later, by histological studies (bronchoalveolar lavage. The immunosuppressive therapy by 1 mg/kg/d prednisone was immediately started, the baby returned home on steroid therapy at a dose of 0,5 mg/kg/d. The diagnosis of idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis should be evocated at any age, even in the neonate, when the clinical presentation (hemoptysis and abnormal radiological chest images is strongly suggestive.

  17. Pulmonary embolism; Lungenarterienembolie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sudarski, Sonja; Henzler, Thomas [Heidelberg Univ., Universitaetsmedizin Mannheim (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2016-09-15

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) requires a quick diagnostic algorithm, as the untreated disease has a high mortality and morbidity. Crucial for the diagnostic assessment chosen is the initial clinical likelihood of PE and the individual risk profile of the patient. The overall goal is to diagnose or rule out PE as quickly and safely as possible or to initiate timely treatment if necessary. CT angiography of the pulmonary arteries (CTPA) with multi-slice CT scanner systems presents the actual diagnostic reference standard. With CTPA further important diagnoses can be made, like presence of right ventricular dysfunction. There are different scan and contrast application protocols that can be applied in order to gain diagnostic examinations with sufficient contrast material enhancement in the pulmonary arteries while avoiding all kinds of artifacts. This review article is meant to be a practical guide to examine patients with suspected PE according to the actual guidelines.

  18. Chronicle pulmonary histoplasmosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llanos, Elkin; Ojeda, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    Histoplasmosis is an acquired mycotic disease produced by the histoplasma capsulatum very frequent in Colombia, primarily affecting lungs. The pathogenesis of the histoplasmosis is similar to the one of tuberculosis. From the clinical point of view, this disease has several manifestations including the primary acute and chronic pulmonary forms. Histoplasmoma pulmonary disseminated histoplasmosis, mediastinal compromise due to granulomatosis and fibrosis, as well as ocular histoplasmosis. A clinical case of a 33-year old man is presented who consults for dry coughing of one year of evolution, without any other symptomatology, with a normal chest x-ray and after several studies including chest cat and fiber-bronchoscopy. A pulmonary histoplasmosis was determined by histopathology

  19. Pulmonary artery-to-pulmonary artery anastomoses: angiographic demonstration in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hodson, J.; Graham, A.; Hughes, J.M.B.; Gibbs, J.S.R.; Jackson, J.E.

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To describe direct pulmonary artery-to-pulmonary artery anastomoses seen at pulmonary angiography in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and discuss their possible significance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 1 August 2000 and 31 July 2004 43 patients (male-to-female ratio 25:18) with a diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) underwent selective pulmonary angiography to assess the extent of disease and suitability for surgical pulmonary endarterectomy. The mean pulmonary artery pressure ranged from 27-84 mmHg (average of 51 mmHg). Selective bilateral digital subtraction pulmonary angiograms performed in all individuals were reviewed for the presence of intrapulmonary collaterals. RESULTS: In 15 of the 43 patients (male-to-female ratio =7:8) definite (n=12) or probable (n=3) pulmonary artery-to-pulmonary artery anastomoses were demonstrated. Of the remaining 28 patients in whom intrapulmonary collaterals were not seen it was felt that in 16 the angiograms were of insufficient diagnostic quality (grades 4-5) to exclude their presence. Twelve patients, eight of whom had angiograms of sufficient diagnostic quality (grades 1-3), demonstrated one or more areas of luxury perfusion but intrapulmonary collaterals were not seen. CONCLUSION: Direct pulmonary artery-to-pulmonary artery anastomoses were demonstrated in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, which to our knowledge have not been previously described. The importance of these collateral vessels is unclear but they may play a role in the maintenance of pulmonary parenchymal viability in patients with chronic pulmonary embolic disease. The rate of development of these collaterals and their prognostic significance in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension are areas worthy of further study

  20. Pulmonary artery-to-pulmonary artery anastomoses: angiographic demonstration in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodson, J. [Department of Imaging, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London (United Kingdom); Graham, A. [Department of Imaging, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London (United Kingdom); Hughes, J.M.B. [Department of Respiratory Medicine, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London (United Kingdom); Gibbs, J.S.R. [Department of Cardiology, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London (United Kingdom); Jackson, J.E. [Department of Imaging, Imperial College School of Medicine, Hammersmith Hospital, Du Cane Road, London (United Kingdom)]. E-mail: jejackson@hhnt.org

    2006-03-15

    AIM: To describe direct pulmonary artery-to-pulmonary artery anastomoses seen at pulmonary angiography in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and discuss their possible significance. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between 1 August 2000 and 31 July 2004 43 patients (male-to-female ratio 25:18) with a diagnosis of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) underwent selective pulmonary angiography to assess the extent of disease and suitability for surgical pulmonary endarterectomy. The mean pulmonary artery pressure ranged from 27-84 mmHg (average of 51 mmHg). Selective bilateral digital subtraction pulmonary angiograms performed in all individuals were reviewed for the presence of intrapulmonary collaterals. RESULTS: In 15 of the 43 patients (male-to-female ratio =7:8) definite (n=12) or probable (n=3) pulmonary artery-to-pulmonary artery anastomoses were demonstrated. Of the remaining 28 patients in whom intrapulmonary collaterals were not seen it was felt that in 16 the angiograms were of insufficient diagnostic quality (grades 4-5) to exclude their presence. Twelve patients, eight of whom had angiograms of sufficient diagnostic quality (grades 1-3), demonstrated one or more areas of luxury perfusion but intrapulmonary collaterals were not seen. CONCLUSION: Direct pulmonary artery-to-pulmonary artery anastomoses were demonstrated in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, which to our knowledge have not been previously described. The importance of these collateral vessels is unclear but they may play a role in the maintenance of pulmonary parenchymal viability in patients with chronic pulmonary embolic disease. The rate of development of these collaterals and their prognostic significance in patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension are areas worthy of further study.

  1. Adrenal-derived stress hormones modulate ozone-induced ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozone-induced systemic effects are modulated through activation of the neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Adrenal demedullation (DEMED)or bilateral total adrenalectomy (ADREX) inhibits systemic and pulmonary effect of acute ozone exposure. To understand the influence of adrenal-derived stress hormones in mediating ozone-induced lung injury/inflammation, we assessed global gene expression (mRNA sequencing) and selected proteins in lung tissues from male Wistar-Kyoto rats that underwent DEMED, ADREX, or sham surgery (SHAM)prior to their exposure to air or ozone (1 ppm),4 h/day for 1 or 2days. Ozone exposure significantly changed the expression of over 2300 genes in lungs of SHAM rats, and these changes were markedly reduced in DEMED and ADREX rats. SHAM surgery but not DEMED or ADREX resulted in activation of multiple ozone-responsive pathways, including glucocorticoid, acute phase response, NRF2, and Pl3K-AKT.Predicted targets from sequencing data showed a similarity between transcriptional changes induced by ozone and adrenergic and steroidal modulation of effects in SHAM but not ADREX rats. Ozone-induced Increases in lung 116 in SHAM rats coincided with neutrophilic Inflammation, but were diminished in DEMED and ADREX rats. Although ozone exposure in SHAM rats did not significantly alter mRNA expression of lfny and 11-4, the IL-4 protein and ratio of IL-4 to IFNy (IL-4/IFNy) proteins increased suggesting a tendency for a Th2 response. This did not occur

  2. Pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aguirre F, Carlos E; Torres D, Carlos A.

    2010-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is a relatively common complication of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Its appearance during the course of COPD is associated with a worsened prognosis, due to reduced life expectancy and greater use of health care resources. Although a well-defined lineal relationship has not been shown, the prevalence of PH in patients with COPD is higher in cases characterized by greater obstruction and severity. PH is infrequent in cases of mild and moderate COPD. In cases of COPD, PH is generally mild or moderate, and seldom impairs right ventricular function. In many cases it is not apparent during rest, and manifests itself during exercise. PH can be severe or out of proportion with the severity of COPD. In this situation, the possibility of associated conditions should be explored, although COPD might be the only final explanation. There is scarce knowledge about the prevalence and behavior of PH in patients with COPD residing at intermediate and high altitudes (>2.500 meters above sea level), which is a common situation in Latin America and Asia. PH in COPD is not exclusively related with hypoxia/hypoxaemia and hypercapnia. The mechanical disturbances related with COPD (hyper inflation and high alveolar pressure) and inflammation may prevail as causes of endothelial injury and remodeling of pulmonary circulation, which contribute to increased pulmonary vascular pressure and resistance. The appearance of signs of cor p ulmonale indicates advanced PH. This condition should therefore be suspected early when dyspnoea, hypoxaemia, and impairment of diffusion are not in keeping with the degree of obstruction. PH is confirmed by Doppler echocardiography. Right heart catheterization may be justified in selected cases. Long-term oxygen therapy is the only intervention proven to be temporarily useful. Conventional vasodilators do not produce medium- or long-term improvement and can be detrimental to the ventilation-perfusion relation

  3. Radiologic diagnosis of pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fink, C.; Ley, S.; Kauczor, H.U.

    2004-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a frequent and potentially life-threatening complication of venous thromboembolism. Despite numerous modern diagnostic methods, the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism remains problematic, especially in view of the nonspecific clinical presentation. In this educational review, current diagnostic methods and their role in the diagnostic workup of pulmonary embolism will be discussed. In addition, practical guidelines are given for the diagnostic cascade contingent on the clinical probability for pulmonary embolism. (orig.) [de

  4. Pulmonary lymphatics and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leeds, S.E.

    1976-01-01

    Knowledge of the anatomy and physiology of the respiratory system has been more difficult to acquire than that of other organ systems owing to the complexity of the respiratory function of the lungs and to the technical difficulties involved. This is especially true of the lymphatics of the lung and is illustrated by the fact that the first measurement of pulmonary lymph flow was in 1942 by Warren and Drinker. A review of the literature reveals that few experiments have been designed to study the pulmonary lymphatics per se in relation to the effects of external radiation or after the inhalation of radioactive particles. However, the documented involvement of hilar lymph nodes implies that the lung lymphatics have a role in transporting particles from the alveoli or malignant cells from the parenchyma. Information from clinical and experimental sources, though scattered, is fairly abundant and of value in assessing the role of the pulmonary lymphatics. Our method for collecting pulmonary lymph is presented. Studies on the pulmonary lymph flow in normal dogs and in dogs with experimental congestive heart failure are described. We irradiated (4000 to 5000 R) the medial one-third of both lungs of a series of dogs. The lymph flow of the lungs was measured immediately after the course of irradiation and after a period of about 5 months. Although lung biopsies showed characteristic radiation pneumonitis in many areas, alterations in the lung parenchyma were not quantitatively reflected in the pulmonary lymph flow either in the acute stage or after fibrosis had time to develop

  5. Pulmonary manifestation of AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blum, U.; Dinkel, E.; Laaff, H.; Wuertemberger, G.; Senn, H.; Vaith, P.; Kroepelin, T.; Freiburg Univ.; Freiburg Univ.; Freiburg Univ.; Freiburg Univ.

    1989-01-01

    We reviewed retrospectively the clinical records of 28 patients with AIDS staged group IV according to CDC-criteria. Among these, 19 had pulmonary disease: most of them (n=17) had pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (Pcp). 12/17 patients with proven Pcp displayed typical X-ray findings with diffuse perihilar interstitial infiltration sparing lung periphery. 3/17 had atypical features and 2 normal chest x-ray findings. These data are important to identify patients with pulmonary complications of AIDS. (orig.) [de

  6. Pulmonary Artery Dissection: A Fatal Complication of Pulmonary Hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuanchen Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery dissection is extremely rare but it is a really life-threatening condition when it happens. Most patients die suddenly from major bleeding or tamponade caused by direct rupture into mediastinum or retrograde into the pericardial sac. What we are reporting is a rare case of a 46-year-old female patient whose pulmonary artery dissection involves both the pulmonary valve and right pulmonary artery. The patient had acute chest pain and severe dyspnea, and the diagnosis of pulmonary artery dissection was confirmed by ultrasonography and CT angiography. Moreover, its etiology, clinical manifestations, and management are also discussed in this article.

  7. Pulmonary Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Cancer: Respirable Particulate Matter, Fibrous Dusts and Ozone as Major Causes of Lung Carcinogenesis through Reactive Oxygen Species Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spyridon Loridas

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS, RNS and oxidative stress in the respiratory system increase the production of mediators of pulmonary inflammation and initiate or promote mechanisms of carcinogenesis. The lungs are exposed daily to oxidants generated either endogenously or exogenously (air pollutants, cigarette smoke, etc.. Cells in aerobic organisms are protected against oxidative damage by enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems. Recent epidemiologic investigations have shown associations between increased incidence of respiratory diseases and lung cancer from exposure to low levels of various forms of respirable fibers and particulate matter (PM, at occupational or urban air polluting environments. Lung cancer increases substantially for tobacco smokers due to the synergistic effects in the generation of ROS, leading to oxidative stress and inflammation with high DNA damage potential. Physical and chemical characteristics of particles (size, transition metal content, speciation, stable free radicals, etc. play an important role in oxidative stress. In turn, oxidative stress initiates the synthesis of mediators of pulmonary inflammation in lung epithelial cells and initiation of carcinogenic mechanisms. Inhalable quartz, metal powders, mineral asbestos fibers, ozone, soot from gasoline and diesel engines, tobacco smoke and PM from ambient air pollution (PM10 and PM2.5 are involved in various oxidative stress mechanisms. Pulmonary cancer initiation and promotion has been linked to a series of biochemical pathways of oxidative stress, DNA oxidative damage, macrophage stimulation, telomere shortening, modulation of gene expression and activation of transcription factors with important role in carcinogenesis. In this review we are presenting the role of ROS and oxidative stress in the production of mediators of pulmonary inflammation and mechanisms of carcinogenesis.

  8. Host lung immunity is severely compromised during tropical pulmonary eosinophilia: role of lung eosinophils and macrophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pankaj; Sharma, Aditi; Vishwakarma, Achchhe Lal; Agnihotri, Promod Kumar; Sharma, Sharad; Srivastava, Mrigank

    2016-04-01

    Eosinophils play a central role in the pathogenesis of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia, a rare, but fatal, manifestation of filariasis. However, no exhaustive study has been done to identify the genes and proteins of eosinophils involved in the pathogenesis of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia. In the present study, we established a mouse model of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia that mimicked filarial manifestations of human tropical pulmonary eosinophilia pathogenesis and used flow cytometry-assisted cell sorting and real-time RT-PCR to study the gene expression profile of flow-sorted, lung eosinophils and lung macrophages during tropical pulmonary eosinophilia pathogenesis. Our results show that tropical pulmonary eosinophilia mice exhibited increased levels of IL-4, IL-5, CCL5, and CCL11 in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and lung parenchyma along with elevated titers of IgE and IgG subtypes in the serum. Alveolar macrophages from tropical pulmonary eosinophilia mice displayed decreased phagocytosis, attenuated nitric oxide production, and reduced T-cell proliferation capacity, and FACS-sorted lung eosinophils from tropical pulmonary eosinophilia mice upregulated transcript levels of ficolin A and anti-apoptotic gene Bcl2,but proapoptotic genes Bim and Bax were downregulated. Similarly, flow-sorted lung macrophages upregulated transcript levels of TLR-2, TLR-6, arginase-1, Ym-1, and FIZZ-1 but downregulated nitric oxide synthase-2 levels, signifying their alternative activation. Taken together, we show that the pathogenesis of tropical pulmonary eosinophilia is marked by functional impairment of alveolar macrophages, alternative activation of lung macrophages, and upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes by eosinophils. These events combine together to cause severe lung inflammation and compromised lung immunity. Therapeutic interventions that can boost host immune response in the lungs might thus provide relief to patients with tropical pulmonary eosinophilia.

  9. Radiological diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huebsch, P.; Jenny, C.; Schwaighofer, B.; Seidl, G.; Burghuber, O.C.

    1987-01-01

    In 43 patients with obstructive and restrictive lung disease a catheterisation of the right heart with measurement of pulmonary artery pressure was performed. In a retrospective study several radiological parameters of pulmonary hypertension were evaluated on the chest radiographs of these patients. Considering those parameters on the p.a. and lateral chest radiograph, the diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension in patients with elevated pulmonary artery pressure at rest can be made with great accuracy. When pulmonary artery pressure is elevated only during exercise, the accuracy of radiological diagnosis is much lower. (orig.) [de

  10. Pathogenesis of pulmonary vasculitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heeringa, P; Schreiber, A; Falk, RJ; Jennette, JC

    2004-01-01

    Vasculitis is inflammation of blood vessels and can affect any type of vessel in any organ. Pulmonary vasculitis usually is a component of a systemic small vessel vasculitis. Three major forms of small vessel vasculitis that often affect the lungs are Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic

  11. Pulmonary langerhans cell histiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suri Harpreet S

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Pulmonary Langerhans Cell Histiocytosis (PLCH is a relatively uncommon lung disease that generally, but not invariably, occurs in cigarette smokers. The pathologic hallmark of PLCH is the accumulation of Langerhans and other inflammatory cells in small airways, resulting in the formation of nodular inflammatory lesions. While the overwhelming majority of patients are smokers, mechanisms by which smoking induces this disease are not known, but likely involve a combination of events resulting in enhanced recruitment and activation of Langerhans cells in small airways. Bronchiolar inflammation may be accompanied by variable lung interstitial and vascular involvement. While cellular inflammation is prominent in early disease, more advanced stages are characterized by cystic lung destruction, cicatricial scarring of airways, and pulmonary vascular remodeling. Pulmonary function is frequently abnormal at presentation. Imaging of the chest with high resolution chest CT scanning may show characteristic nodular and cystic abnormalities. Lung biopsy is necessary for a definitive diagnosis, although may not be required in instances were imaging findings are highly characteristic. There is no general consensus regarding the role of immunosuppressive therapy in smokers with PLCH. All smokers must be counseled on the importance of smoking cessation, which may result in regression of disease and obviate the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. The prognosis for most patients is relatively good, particularly if longitudinal lung function testing shows stability. Complications like pneumothoraces and secondary pulmonary hypertension may shorten life expectancy. Patients with progressive disease may require lung transplantation.

  12. Imaging pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brauner, M.W.; Rety, F.; Naccache, J.M.; Girard, F.; Valeyre, D.F.

    2001-01-01

    Localized fibrosis of the lung is usually scar tissue while diffuse pulmonary fibrosis is more often a sign of active disease. Chronic infiltrative lung disease may be classified into four categories: idiopathic pneumonitis, collagen diseases, granulomatosis (sarcoidosis), and caused by known diseases (pneumoconiosis, hypersensitivity pneumonitis, drug-induced lung disease, radiation). (authors)

  13. Radiological case. Pulmonary Lymphangioleiomyomatosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rivera Bernal, Aura Lucia; Carrillo Bayona, Jorge Alberto; Ojeda Leon, Paulina

    2004-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis is a rare disorder, which affects principally the pulmonary parenchyma of young women at a reproductive age, and is pathologically characterized by the interstitial proliferation of smooth muscle and formation of cysts in the lung. We present the case of a 35-year-old woman that has a lymphangioleiomyomatosis diagnosis

  14. An unexpected pulmonary bystander

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wouthuyzen-Bakker, M.; Vorm, van der P. A.; Koning, K. J.; van der Werf, T. S.

    A 30-year-old man from Eritrea was admitted with a pulmonary bacterial abscess. Unexpectedly, histopathology of the resected lobe also revealed an infection with Schistosoma mansoni with surrounding granulomatous tissue and fibrosis. Patients from endemic areas are often asymptomatic with blood

  15. Outcome after pulmonary metastasectomy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hornbech, Kåre; Ravn, Jesper; Steinbrüchel, Daniel Andreas

    2011-01-01

    In this study, we analyze the results of management of pulmonary metastases in 5 years consecutive operations at our institution. We aim to define the patients who are most likely to benefit from surgery by investigating long-term survival and prognostic factors associated with prolonged survival....

  16. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xaubet, Antoni; Ancochea, Julio; Molina-Molina, María

    2017-02-23

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a fibrosing interstitial pneumonia associated with the radiological and/or histological pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia. Its aetiology is unknown, but probably comprises the action of endogenous and exogenous micro-environmental factors in subjects with genetic predisposition. Its diagnosis is based on the presence of characteristic findings of high-resolution computed tomography scans and pulmonary biopsies in absence of interstitial lung diseases of other aetiologies. Its clinical evolution is variable, although the mean survival rate is 2-5 years as of its clinical presentation. Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis may present complications and comorbidities which modify the disease's clinical course and prognosis. In the mild-moderate disease, the treatment consists of the administration of anti-fibrotic drugs. In severe disease, the best therapeutic option is pulmonary transplantation. In this paper we review the diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Pulmonary Hypertension - High Blood Pressure in the Heart-to-Lung System Updated:Jan ... Pressure" This content was last reviewed October 2016. High Blood Pressure • Home • Get the Facts About HBP Introduction What ...

  18. Hantavirus Pulmonary Syndrome

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-07-14

    Dr. Adam MacNeil, epidemiologist with Viral Special Pathogens Branch at CDC, discusses hantavirus pulmonary syndrome.  Created: 7/14/2011 by National Center for Emerging Zoonotic and Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/18/2011.

  19. Modulation of flavonoid metabolites in Arabidopsis thaliana through overexpression of the MYB75 transcription factor: role of kaempferol-3,7-dirhamnoside in resistance to the specialist insect herbivore Pieris brassicae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onkokesung, Nawaporn; Reichelt, Michael; van Doorn, Arjen; Schuurink, Robert C; van Loon, Joop J A; Dicke, Marcel

    2014-05-01

    Anthocyanins and flavonols are secondary metabolites that can function in plant defence against herbivores. In Arabidopsis thaliana, anthocyanin and flavonol biosynthesis are regulated by MYB transcription factors. Overexpression of MYB75 (oxMYB75) in Arabidopsis results in increasing anthocyanin and flavonol levels which enhances plant resistance to generalist caterpillars. However, how these metabolites affect specialist herbivores has remained unknown. Performance of a specialist aphid (Brevicoryne brassicae) was unaffected after feeding on oxMYB75 plants, whereas a specialist caterpillar (Pieris brassicae) gained significantly higher body mass when feeding on this plant. An increase in anthocyanin and total flavonol glycoside levels correlated negatively with the body mass of caterpillars fed on oxMYB75 plants. However, a significant reduction of kaempferol-3,7-dirhamnoside (KRR) corresponded to an increased susceptibility of oxMYB75 plants to caterpillar feeding. Pieris brassicae caterpillars also grew less on an artificial diet containing KRR or on oxMYB75 plants that were exogenously treated with KRR, supporting KRR's function in direct defence against this specialist caterpillar. The results show that enhancing the activity of the anthocyanin pathway in oxMYB75 plants results in re-channelling of quercetin/kaempferol metabolites which has a negative effect on the accumulation of KRR, a novel defensive metabolite against a specialist caterpillar.

  20. pH-Modulated Watson-Crick duplex-quadruplex equilibria of guanine-rich and cytosine-rich DNA sequences 140 base pairs upstream of the c-kit transcription initiation site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucek, Pavel; Jaumot, Joaquim; Aviñó, Anna; Eritja, Ramon; Gargallo, Raimundo

    2009-11-23

    Guanine-rich regions of DNA are sequences capable of forming G-quadruplex structures. The formation of a G-quadruplex structure in a region 140 base pairs (bp) upstream of the c-kit transcription initiation site was recently proposed (Fernando et al., Biochemistry, 2006, 45, 7854). In the present study, the acid-base equilibria and the thermally induced unfolding of the structures formed by a guanine-rich region and by its complementary cytosine-rich strand in c-kit were studied by means of circular dichroism and molecular absorption spectroscopies. In addition, competition between the Watson-Crick duplex and the isolated structures was studied as a function of pH value and temperature. Multivariate data analysis methods based on both hard and soft modeling were used to allow accurate quantification of the various acid-base species present in the mixtures. Results showed that the G-quadruplex and i-motif coexist with the Watson-Crick duplex over the pH range from 3.0 to 6.5, approximately, under the experimental conditions tested in this study. At pH 7.0, the duplex is practically the only species present.

  1. Herpes simplex virus induces the marked up-regulation of the zinc finger transcriptional factor INSM1, which modulates the expression and localization of the immediate early protein ICP0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimura Hiroshi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Herpes simplex viruses (HSVs rapidly shut off macromolecular synthesis in host cells. In contrast, global microarray analyses have shown that HSV infection markedly up-regulates a number of host cell genes that may play important roles in HSV-host cell interactions. To understand the regulatory mechanisms involved, we initiated studies focusing on the zinc finger transcription factor insulinoma-associated 1 (INSM1, a host cell protein markedly up-regulated by HSV infection. Results INSM1 gene expression in HSV-1-infected normal human epidermal keratinocytes increased at least 400-fold 9 h after infection; INSM1 promoter activity was also markedly stimulated. Expression and subcellular localization of the immediate early HSV protein ICP0 was affected by INSM1 expression, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays revealed binding of INSM1 to the ICP0 promoter. Moreover, the role of INSM1 in HSV-1 infection was further clarified by inhibition of HSV-1 replication by INSM1-specific siRNA. Conclusions The results suggest that INSM1 up-regulation plays a positive role in HSV-1 replication, probably by binding to the ICP0 promoter.

  2. MicroRNA mimicry blocks pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Rusty L; Yu, Guoying; Latimer, Paul A; Stack, Christianna; Robinson, Kathryn; Dalby, Christina M; Kaminski, Naftali; van Rooij, Eva

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, great enthusiasm has evolved for microRNA (miRNA) therapeutics. Part of the excitement stems from the fact that a miRNA often regulates numerous related mRNAs. As such, modulation of a single miRNA allows for parallel regulation of multiple genes involved in a particular disease. While many studies have shown therapeutic efficacy using miRNA inhibitors, efforts to restore or increase the function of a miRNA have been lagging behind. The miR-29 family has gained a lot of attention for its clear function in tissue fibrosis. This fibroblast-enriched miRNA family is downregulated in fibrotic diseases which induces a coordinate increase of many extracellular matrix genes. Here, we show that intravenous injection of synthetic RNA duplexes can increase miR-29 levels in vivo for several days. Moreover, therapeutic delivery of these miR-29 mimics during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis restores endogenous miR-29 function whereby decreasing collagen expression and blocking and reversing pulmonary fibrosis. Our data support the feasibility of using miRNA mimics to therapeutically increase miRNAs and indicate miR-29 to be a potent therapeutic miRNA for treating pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:25239947

  3. Three cases of pulmonary varix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takishima, Teruo; Sakuma, Hajime; Tajima, Tsunemi; Okimoto, Takao; Yamamoto, Keiichiro; Dohi, Yutaka (Saitama Medical School (Japan))

    1982-06-01

    Three cases of pulmonary varix associated with valvular heart disease were reported. Round shadows were clearer on first oblique or lateral films of chest x-ray in all 3 cases. On chest tomograms, the shadows were substantial and round-elliptical. RI angiography with sup(99m)Tc-RBC demonstrated these shadows in agreement with the site of influx of the pulmonary vein into the left atrium in Cases 1 and 3 and with the pulmonary vein slightly apart from the left atrium in Case 2. On CT scans in Cases 1 and 3, enhancement with a contrast medium visualized dilatation of the pulmonary vein close to, and in continuation with, the shadow of the left atrium. The diagnosis of pulmonary varix in agreement with the venous phase of pulmonary angiography was made for all 3 cases. Non-surgical examinations (especially CT scan) proved highly useful for the diagnosis of pulmonary varix.

  4. Three cases of pulmonary varix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takishima, Teruo; Sakuma, Hajime; Tajima, Tsunemi; Okimoto, Takao; Yamamoto, Keiichiro; Dohi, Yutaka

    1982-01-01

    Three cases of pulmonary varix associated with valvular heart disease were reported. Round shadows were clearer on first oblique or lateral films of chest x-ray in all 3 cases. On chest tomograms, the shadows were substantial and round-elliptical. RI angiography with sup(99m)Tc-RBC demonstrated these shadows in agreement with the site of influx of the pulmonary vein into the left atrium in Cases 1 and 3 and with the pulmonary vein slightly apart from the left atrium in Case 2. On CT scans in Cases 1 and 3, enhancement with a contrast medium visualized dilatation of the pulmonary vein close to, and in continuation with, the shadow of the left atrium. The diagnosis of pulmonary varix in agreement with the venous phase of pulmonary angiography was made for all 3 cases. Non-surgical examinations (especially CT scan) proved highly useful for the diagnosis of pulmonary varix. (Chiba, N.)

  5. Pulmonary function in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, J. B.; Elliott, A. R.; Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.

    1997-01-01

    The lung is exquisitely sensitive to gravity, and so it is of interest to know how its function is altered in the weightlessness of space. Studies on National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Spacelabs during the last 4 years have provided the first comprehensive data on the extensive changes in pulmonary function that occur in sustained microgravity. Measurements of pulmonary function were made on astronauts during space shuttle flights lasting 9 and 14 days and were compared with extensive ground-based measurements before and after the flights. Compared with preflight measurements, cardiac output increased by 18% during space flight, and stroke volume increased by 46%. Paradoxically, the increase in stroke volume occurred in the face of reductions in central venous pressure and circulating blood volume. Diffusing capacity increased by 28%, and the increase in the diffusing capacity of the alveolar membrane was unexpectedly large based on findings in normal gravity. The change in the alveolar membrane may reflect the effects of uniform filling of the pulmonary capillary bed. Distributions of blood flow and ventilation throughout the lung were more uniform in space, but some unevenness remained, indicating the importance of nongravitational factors. A surprising finding was that airway closing volume was approximately the same in microgravity and in normal gravity, emphasizing the importance of mechanical properties of the airways in determining whether they close. Residual volume was unexpectedly reduced by 18% in microgravity, possibly because of uniform alveolar expansion. The findings indicate that pulmonary function is greatly altered in microgravity, but none of the changes observed so far will apparently limit long-term space flight. In addition, the data help to clarify how gravity affects pulmonary function in the normal gravity environment on Earth.

  6. Radiotherapy and pulmonary fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sone, S; Miyata, Y; Tachiiri, H [Osaka Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine

    1975-04-01

    Clinical findings of radiation pneumonitis and pulmonary fibrosis were outlined, and the relationship between occurence of these disorders and radiotherapy, clinical findings and X-ray picture were studied. Standard radiation dose as cell lethal response of carcinoma of the lung were 4,500 to 5,500 rad in 4 to 5.5 weeks in undifferentiated carcinoma, 6,000 to 7,000 rad in 6 to 7 weeks in squamous cell carcinoma, 7,000 to 9,000 rad in 7 to 9 weeks in adenocarcinoma, 4,500 to 5,000 rad in 4 to 5 weeks in the large sized cancer of the esophagus, 6,500 to 7,000 rad in 5 to 7 weeks in the small sized cancer of the esophagus, and irradiation of these amount of dose caused hazards in pulmonary function. Pathological and clinical findings of pulmonary hazards within 6 month period after irradiation, factors causing them and changes in X-ray pictures before and after irradiation were observed and discussed in clinical cases: the case of breast cancer in which 3,000 R/6 times/18 days of 5.5 MeV Liniac electron was irradiated to the chest wall, and the case of pulmonary cancer in which 5,000 rad/25 times/34 days of 6 MeV Liniac X-ray was irradiated in opposite 2 ports radiation beam treatment. The former revealed alveolar lesion and interlobular pleuritis at 4 month later, and remarkable lesion of pulmonary fibrosis was followed at 9 month after radiotherapy. The later developed radiation pneumonitis 1 month after radiotherapy, of which lesion extended to the upper part by 3 months later, and cancer recurred 6.5 month later.

  7. Endothelial cell energy metabolism, proliferation, and apoptosis in pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weiling; Erzurum, Serpil C

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a fatal disease characterized by impaired regulation of pulmonary hemodynamics and excessive growth and dysfunction of the endothelial cells that line the arteries in PAH lungs. Establishment of methods for culture of pulmonary artery endothelial cells from PAH lungs has provided the groundwork for mechanistic translational studies that confirm and extend findings from model systems and spontaneous pulmonary hypertension in animals. Endothelial cell hyperproliferation, survival, and alterations of biochemical-metabolic pathways are the unifying endothelial pathobiology of the disease. The hyperproliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype of PAH endothelial cells is dependent upon the activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3, a fundamental regulator of cell survival and angiogenesis. Animal models of PAH, patients with PAH, and human PAH endothelial cells produce low nitric oxide (NO). In association with the low level of NO, endothelial cells have reduced mitochondrial numbers and cellular respiration, which is associated with more than a threefold increase in glycolysis for energy production. The shift to glycolysis is related to low levels of NO and likely to the pathologic expression of the prosurvival and proangiogenic signal transducer, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1, and the reduced mitochondrial antioxidant manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD). In this article, we review the phenotypic changes of the endothelium in PAH and the biochemical mechanisms accounting for the proliferative, glycolytic, and strongly proangiogenic phenotype of these dysfunctional cells, which consequently foster the panvascular progressive pulmonary remodeling in PAH. © 2011 American Physiological Society.

  8. Cyclin D3 interacts with human activating transcription factor 5 and potentiates its transcription activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Wenjin; Sun Maoyun; Jiang Jianhai; Shen Xiaoyun; Sun Qing; Liu Weicheng; Shen Hailian; Gu Jianxin

    2004-01-01

    The Cyclin D3 protein is a member of the D-type cyclins. Besides serving as cell cycle regulators, D-type cyclins have been reported to be able to interact with several transcription factors and modulate their transcriptional activations. Here we report that human activating transcription factor 5 (hATF5) is a new interacting partner of Cyclin D3. The interaction was confirmed by in vivo coimmunoprecipitation and in vitro binding analysis. Neither interaction between Cyclin D1 and hATF5 nor interaction between Cyclin D2 and hATF5 was observed. Confocal microscopy analysis showed that Cyclin D3 could colocalize with hATF5 in the nuclear region. Cyclin D3 could potentiate hATF5 transcriptional activity independently of its Cdk4 partner. But Cyclin D1 and Cyclin D2 had no effect on hATF5 transcriptional activity. These data provide a new clue to understand the new role of Cyclin D3 as a transcriptional regulator

  9. Pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Myung Jin; Goo, Jin Mo E-mail: jmgoo@plaza.snu.ac.kr; Im, Jung-Gi

    2004-11-01

    Objectives: Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have an increased risk of pulmonary tuberculosis. However, detecting pulmonary tuberculosis may be difficult due to the underlying fibrosis. The aim of this report is to describe the radiological and clinical findings of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Materials and methods: We reviewed 143 consecutive patients in whom IPF was diagnosed by either the histological or radio-clinical criteria. Among them, nine patients were histologically (n=2) or bacteriologically (n=7) confirmed to have active pulmonary tuberculosis. The location and patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis were examined on a thin section CT scan. Results: The most common thin section CT findings were subpleural nodules (n=6; mean diameter, 3.2 cm) and a lobar or segmental consolidation (n=3). The lesions were located most commonly in the right lower lobe (n=4). The incidence of tuberculosis in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was more than five times higher than that of the general population. Conclusion: The atypical manifestation of pulmonary tuberculosis is common in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, which may mimic lung cancer or bacterial pneumonia.

  10. Pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Myung Jin; Goo, Jin Mo; Im, Jung-Gi

    2004-01-01

    Objectives: Patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have an increased risk of pulmonary tuberculosis. However, detecting pulmonary tuberculosis may be difficult due to the underlying fibrosis. The aim of this report is to describe the radiological and clinical findings of pulmonary tuberculosis in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Materials and methods: We reviewed 143 consecutive patients in whom IPF was diagnosed by either the histological or radio-clinical criteria. Among them, nine patients were histologically (n=2) or bacteriologically (n=7) confirmed to have active pulmonary tuberculosis. The location and patterns of pulmonary tuberculosis were examined on a thin section CT scan. Results: The most common thin section CT findings were subpleural nodules (n=6; mean diameter, 3.2 cm) and a lobar or segmental consolidation (n=3). The lesions were located most commonly in the right lower lobe (n=4). The incidence of tuberculosis in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis was more than five times higher than that of the general population. Conclusion: The atypical manifestation of pulmonary tuberculosis is common in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, which may mimic lung cancer or bacterial pneumonia

  11. Genome wide expression analysis suggests perturbation of vascular homeostasis during high altitude pulmonary edema.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manish Sharma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: High altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE is a life-threatening form of non-cardiogenic edema which occurs in unacclimatized but otherwise normal individuals within two to four days after rapid ascent to altitude beyond 3000 m. The precise pathoetiology and inciting mechanisms regulating HAPE remain unclear. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: We performed global gene expression profiling in individuals with established HAPE compared to acclimatized individuals. Our data suggests concurrent modulation of multiple pathways which regulate vascular homeostasis and consequently lung fluid dynamics. These pathways included those which regulate vasoconstriction through smooth muscle contraction, cellular actin cytoskeleton rearrangements and endothelial permeability/dysfunction. Some notable genes within these pathways included MYLK; rho family members ARGEF11, ARHGAP24; cell adhesion molecules such as CLDN6, CLDN23, PXN and VCAM1 besides other signaling intermediates. Further, several important regulators of systemic/pulmonary hypertension including ADRA1D, ECE1, and EDNRA were upregulated in HAPE. We also observed significant upregulation of genes involved in paracrine signaling through chemokines and lymphocyte activation pathways during HAPE represented by transcripts of TNF, JAK2, MAP2K2, MAP2K7, MAPK10, PLCB1, ARAF, SOS1, PAK3 and RELA amongst others. Perturbation of such pathways can potentially skew vascular homeostatic equilibrium towards altered vascular permeability. Additionally, differential regulation of hypoxia-sensing, hypoxia-response and OXPHOS pathway genes in individuals with HAPE were also observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our data reveals specific components of the complex molecular circuitry underlying HAPE. We show concurrent perturbation of multiple pathways regulating vascular homeostasis and suggest multi-genic nature of regulation of HAPE.

  12. Pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a chronic and progressive disease leading to right heart failure and ultimately death if untreated. The first classification of PH was proposed in 1973. In 2008, the fourth World Symposium on PH held in Dana Point (California, USA) revised previous classifications. Currently, PH is devided into five subgroups. Group 1 includes patients suffering from idiopathic or familial PAH with or without germline mutations. Patients with a diagnosis of PAH should systematically been screened regarding to underlying mutations of BMPR2 gene (bone morphogenetic protein receptor type 2) or more rarely of ACVRL1 (activine receptor-like kinase type 1), ENG (endogline) or Smad8 genes. Pulmonary veno occusive disease and pulmonary capillary hemagiomatosis are individualized and designated as clinical group 1'. Group 2 'Pulmonary hypertension due to left heart diseases' is divided into three sub-groups: systolic dysfonction, diastolic dysfonction and valvular dysfonction. Group 3 'Pulmonary hypertension due to respiratory diseases' includes a heterogenous subgroup of respiratory diseases like PH due to pulmonary fibrosis, COPD, lung emphysema or interstitial lung disease for exemple. Group 4 includes chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension without any distinction of proximal or distal forms. Group 5 regroup PH patients with unclear multifactorial mechanisms. Invasive hemodynamic assessment with right heart catheterization is requested to confirm the definite diagnosis of PH showing a resting mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) of ≥ 25 mmHg and a normal pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (PCWP) of ≤ 15 mmHg. The assessment of PCWP may allow the distinction between pre-capillary and post-capillary PH (PCWP > 15 mmHg). Echocardiography is an important tool in the management of patients with underlying suspicion of PH. The European Society of Cardiology and the European Respiratory Society (ESC-ERS) guidelines specify its role

  13. Progenitor cells in pulmonary vascular remodeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeager, Michael E.; Frid, Maria G.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by cellular and structural changes in the walls of pulmonary arteries. Intimal thickening and fibrosis, medial hypertrophy and fibroproliferative changes in the adventitia are commonly observed, as is the extension of smooth muscle into the previously non-muscularized vessels. A majority of these changes are associated with the enhanced presence of α-SM-actin+ cells and inflammatory cells. Atypical abundances of functionally distinct endothelial cells, particularly in the intima (plexiform lesions), and also in the perivascular regions, are also described. At present, neither the origin(s) of these cells nor the molecular mechanisms responsible for their accumulation, in any of the three compartments of the vessel wall, have been fully elucidated. The possibility that they arise from either resident vascular progenitors or bone marrow–derived progenitor cells is now well established. Resident vascular progenitor cells have been demonstrated to exist within the vessel wall, and in response to certain stimuli, to expand and express myofibroblastic, endothelial or even hematopoietic markers. Bone marrow–derived or circulating progenitor cells have also been shown to be recruited to sites of vascular injury and to assume both endothelial and SM-like phenotypes. Here, we review the data supporting the contributory role of vascular progenitors (including endothelial progenitor cells, smooth muscle progenitor cells, pericytes, and fibrocytes) in vascular remodeling. A more complete understanding of the processes by which progenitor cells modulate pulmonary vascular remodeling will undoubtedly herald a renaissance of therapies extending beyond the control of vascular tonicity and reduction of pulmonary artery pressure. PMID:22034593

  14. The Transcription Factor Encyclopedia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yusuf, Dimas; Butland, Stefanie L; Swanson, Magdalena I

    2012-01-01

    mini review articles on pertinent human, mouse and rat TFs. Notable features of the TFe website include a high-quality PDF generator and web API for programmatic data retrieval. TFe aims to rapidly educate scientists about the TFs they encounter through the delivery of succinct summaries written......ABSTRACT: Here we present the Transcription Factor Encyclopedia (TFe), a new web-based compendium of mini review articles on transcription factors (TFs) that is founded on the principles of open access and collaboration. Our consortium of over 100 researchers has collectively contributed over 130...

  15. When a pulmonary embolism is not a pulmonary embolism: a rare case of primary pulmonary leiomyosarcoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nargiz Muganlinskaya

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Arterial leiomyosarcomas account for up to 21% of vascular leiomyosarcomas, with 56% of arterial leiomyosarcomas occurring in the pulmonary artery. While isolated cases of primary pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma document survival up to 36 months after treatment, these uncommon, aggressive tumors are highly lethal, with 1-year survival estimated at 20% from the onset of symptoms. We discuss a rare case of a pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma that was originally diagnosed as a pulmonary embolism (PE. A 72-year-old Caucasian female was initially diagnosed with ‘saddle pulmonary embolism’ based on computerized tomographic angiography of the chest 2 months prior to admission and placed on anticoagulation. Dyspnea escalated, and serial computed tomography scans showed cardiomegaly with pulmonary emboli involving the right and left main pulmonary arteries with extension into the right and left upper and lower lobe branches. An echocardiogram on admission showed severe pulmonary hypertension with a pulmonary artery pressure of 82.9 mm Hg, and a severely enlarged right ventricle. Respiratory distress and multiorgan failure developed and, unfortunately, the patient expired. Autopsy showed a lobulated, yellow mass throughout the main pulmonary arteries measuring 13 cm in diameter. The mass extended into the parenchyma of the right upper lobe. On microscopy, the mass was consistent with a high-grade primary pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma. Median survival of patients with primary pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma without surgery is one and a half months, and mortality is usually due to right-sided heart failure. Pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma is a rare but highly lethal disease commonly mistaken for PE. Thus, we recommend clinicians to suspect this malignancy when anticoagulation fails to relieve initial symptoms. In conclusion, early detection and suspicion of pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma should be considered in patients refractory to anticoagulation

  16. Pulmonary hypertension of the newborn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stayer, Stephen A; Liu, Yang

    2010-09-01

    Pulmonary hypertension presenting in the neonatal period can be due to congenital heart malformations (most commonly associated with obstruction to pulmonary venous drainage), high output cardiac failure from large arteriovenous malformations and persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn (PPHN). Of these, the most common cause is PPHN. PPHN develops when pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) remains elevated after birth, resulting in right-to-left shunting of blood through foetal circulatory pathways. The PVR may remain elevated due to pulmonary hypoplasia, like that seen with congenital diaphragmatic hernia; maldevelopment of the pulmonary arteries, seen in meconium aspiration syndrome; and maladaption of the pulmonary vascular bed as occurs with perinatal asphyxia. These newborn patients typically require mechanical ventilatory support and those with underlying lung disease may benefit from high-frequency oscillatory ventilation or extra-corporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO). Direct pulmonary vasodilators, such as inhaled nitric oxide, have been shown to improve the outcome and reduce the need for ECMO. However, there is very limited experience with other pulmonary vasodilators. The goals for anaesthetic management are (1) to provide an adequate depth of anaesthesia to ablate the rise in PVR associated with surgical stimuli; (2) to maintain adequate ventilation and oxygenation; and (3) to be prepared to treat a pulmonary hypertensive crisis--an acute rise in PVR with associated cardiovascular collapse.

  17. Pulmonary histiocytosis X - imaging aspects of pulmonary involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabedotti, Ismail Fernando; Maeda, Lucimara; Ferreira, Daniel Miranda; Montandon, Cristiano; Marins, Jose Luiz C.

    1999-01-01

    Pulmonary histiocytosis X is an idiopathic disease which is and uncommon but important cause of pulmonary fibrosis in young adults. Chest radiographs and high resolution computed tomographic (HRCT) scans of the lungs of 7 patients diagnosed as pulmonary histiocytosis X were examined retrospectively. The authors reviewed the pathologic, clinical and radiographic features of pulmonary histiocytosis X, focusing on differential diagnosis and disease progression. Pulmonary histiocytosis X can be suspected on the basis of chest radiographic findings; predominantly upper lobe nodules and cysts present an increased sensitivity and are virtually pathognomonic of this disorder. Chest HRCT allows good assessment of the evolution of pulmonary histiocytosis X and is also valuable in distinguishing histiocytosis from other disorders that produces nodules or cysts. (author)

  18. Solitary pulmonary nodule by pulmonary hematoma under warfarin therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheppach, W.; Kulke, H.; Liebau, G.; Braun, H.; Wuerzburg Univ.

    1983-01-01

    Pulmonary hematoma is a rare cause of a pulmonary nodule. Mostly it results from penetrating or blunt chest injuries. The case of a patient is reported, whose chest X-ray showed a pulmonary nodule suspected of malignancy. This patient was maintained permanently on anticoagulants (warfarin derivates) after cardiac valve replacement with a prosthesis. A definite diagnosis could not be established by non-invasive methods. A needle biopsy of the lung was impracticable because of the location of the pulmonary lesion; an exploratory thoracotomy could not be carried out due to a general indication of nonoperability. Control examinations showed that the pulmonary nodule had vanished completely within four months. In consideration of the patient's clinical situation it can be concluded that the pulmonary lesion was caused by a hematoma of the lung. (orig.) [de

  19. Solitary pulmonary nodule by pulmonary hematoma under warfarin therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheppach, W.; Kulke, H.; Liebau, G.; Braun, H.

    1983-06-01

    Pulmonary hematoma is a rare cause of a pulmonary nodule. Mostly it results from penetrating or blunt chest injuries. The case of a patient is reported, whose chest X-ray showed a pulmonary nodule suspected of malignancy. This patient was maintained permanently on anticoagulants (warfarin derivates) after cardiac valve replacement with a prosthesis. A definite diagnosis could not be established by non-invasive methods. A needle biopsy of the lung was impracticable because of the location of the pulmonary lesion; an exploratory thoracotomy could not be carried out due to a general indication of nonoperability. Control examinations showed that the pulmonary nodule had vanished completely within four months. In consideration of the patient's clinical situation it can be concluded that the pulmonary lesion was caused by a hematoma of the lung.

  20. Neurochemical evidence that cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) 55-102 peptide modulates the dopaminergic reward system by decreasing the dopamine release in the mouse nucleus accumbens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakovska, Angelina; Baranyi, Maria; Windisch, Katalin; Petkova-Kirova, Polina; Gagov, Hristo; Kalfin, Reni

    2017-09-01

    CART (Cocaine- and Amphetamine-Regulated Transcript) peptide is a neurotransmitter naturally occurring in the CNS and found mostly in nucleus accumbens, ventrotegmental area, ventral pallidum, amygdalae and striatum, brain regions associated with drug addiction. In the nucleus accumbens, known for its significant role in motivation, pleasure, reward and reinforcement learning, CART peptide inhibits cocaine and amphetamine-induced dopamine-mediated increases in locomotor activity and behavior, suggesting a CART peptide interaction with the dopaminergic system. Thus in the present study, we examined the effect of CART (55-102) peptide on the basal, electrical field stimulation-evoked (EFS-evoked) (30V, 2Hz, 120 shocks) and returning basal dopamine (DA) release and on the release of the DA metabolites 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl acetaldehyde (DOPAL), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA), 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethanol (DOPET), 3-methoxytyramine (3-MT) as well as on norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine-o-quinone (Daq) in isolated mouse nucleus accumbens, in a preparation, in which any CART peptide effects on the dendrites or soma of ventral tegmental projection neurons have been excluded. We further extended our study to assess the effect of CART (55-102) peptide on basal cocaine-induced release of dopamine and its metabolites DOPAL, DOPAC, HVA, DOPET and 3-MT as well as on NE and Daq. To analyze the amount of [ 3 H]dopamine, dopamine metabolites, Daq and NE in the nucleus accumbens superfusate, a high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), coupled with electrochemical, UV and radiochemical detections was used. CART (55-102) peptide, 0.1μM, added alone, exerted: (i) a significant decrease in the basal and EFS-evoked levels of extracellular dopamine (ii) a significant increase in the EFS-evoked and returning basal levels of the dopamine metabolites DOPAC and HVA, major products of dopamine degradation and (iii) a significant decrease in the returning basal

  1. Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis as a pulmonary manifestation of tuberous sclerosis - a case report-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Young Rahn; Kang, Eun Young; Lee, Nam Joon; Suh, Won Hyuck

    1991-01-01

    Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis is a very rare disease mainly arising in reproductive-aged women. Pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis as a pulmonary involvement of tuberous sclerosis is found in only 1 out of 100 patients. Pulmonary involvement in pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis itself and that as a pulmonary manifestation of tuberous sclerosis has been considered very similar with regard to clinical, radiologic, and pathologic manifestations. We report 1 case of pulmonary lymphangioleiomyomatosis as a pulmonary manifestation of tuberous sclerosis in a 39-year-old Korean woman

  2. Persistent diffuse pulmonary interstitial emphysema mimicking pulmonary emphysema

    OpenAIRE

    Demura, Y; Ishizaki, T; Nakanishi, M; Ameshima, S; Itoh, H

    2009-01-01

    A 69-year-old male non-smoker with a history of atopic asthma presented with symptoms suggestive of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and this appeared to be corroborated by lung function testing and a chest radiograph. However, a chest CT showed no evidence of pulmonary emphysema and instead demonstrated free air along the bronchovascular sheaths indicative of pulmonary interstistial emphysema, possibly caused by repeated prior exacerbations of asthma. His lung function tests and symptom...

  3. Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary artery presenting as pulmonary embolism

    OpenAIRE

    Plata, María Camila; Rey, Diana Lucía; Villaquirán, Claudio; Rosselli, Diego

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY Pulmonary artery sarcomas are extremely rare; due to their insidious growth, diagnosis occurs late and prognosis is poor. We present the case of a 33-year-old woman with a history of dyspnea, chest pain and syncope. An obstructing mass on the right ventricle, main pulmonary artery and right branch were interpreted as a possible pulmonary embolism. RESUMEN Los sarcomas de la arteria pulmonar son extremadamente raros; debido a su crecimiento lento y silencioso, el diagnóstico suele s...

  4. Pulmonary endarterectomy outputs in chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López Gude, María Jesús; Pérez de la Sota, Enrique; Pérez Vela, Jose Luís; Centeno Rodríguez, Jorge; Muñoz Guijosa, Christian; Velázquez, María Teresa; Alonso Chaterina, Sergio; Hernández González, Ignacio; Escribano Subías, Pilar; Cortina Romero, José María

    2017-07-07

    Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy surgery is the treatment of choice for patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension; extremely high pulmonary vascular resistance constitutes a risk factor for hospital mortality. The objective of this study was to analyze the immediate and long-term results of the surgical treatment of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension in patients with very severe pulmonary hypertension. Since February 1996, we performed 160 pulmonary thromboendarterectomies. We divided the patient population in 2 groups: group 1, which included 40 patients with pulmonary vascular resistance≥1090dyn/sec/cm -5 , and group 2, which included the remaining 120 patients. Hospital mortality (15 vs. 2.5%), reperfusion pulmonary edema (33 vs. 14%) and heart failure (23 vs. 3.3%) were all higher in group 1; however, after one year of follow-up, there were no significant differences in the clinical, hemodynamic and echocardiographic conditions of both groups. Survival rate after 5 years was 77% in group 1 and 92% in group 2 (P=.033). After the learning curve including the 46 first patients, there was no difference in hospital mortality (3.8 vs. 2.3%) or survival rate after 5 years (96.2% in group 1 and 96.2% in group 2). Pulmonary thromboendarterectomy is linked to significantly higher morbidity and mortality rates in patients with severe chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension. Nevertheless, these patients benefit the same from the procedure in the mid-/long-term. In our experience, after the learning curve, this surgery is safe in severe pulmonary hypertension and no level of pulmonary vascular resistance should be an absolute counter-indication for this surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Sputum is a surrogate for bronchoalveolar lavage for monitoring Mycobacterium tuberculosis transcriptional profiles in TB patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Benjamin J; Loxton, Andre G; Dolganov, Gregory M; Van, Tran T; Davis, J Lucian; de Jong, Bouke C; Voskuil, Martin I; Leach, Sonia M; Schoolnik, Gary K; Walzl, Gerhard; Strong, Michael; Walter, Nicholas D

    2016-09-01

    Pathogen-targeted transcriptional profiling in human sputum may elucidate the physiologic state of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) during infection and treatment. However, whether M. tuberculosis transcription in sputum recapitulates transcription in the lung is uncertain. We therefore compared M. tuberculosis transcription in human sputum and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from 11 HIV-negative South African patients with pulmonary tuberculosis. We additionally compared these clinical samples with in vitro log phase aerobic growth and hypoxic non-replicating persistence (NRP-2). Of 2179 M. tuberculosis transcripts assayed in sputum and BAL via multiplex RT-PCR, 194 (8.9%) had a p-value <0.05, but none were significant after correction for multiple testing. Categorical enrichment analysis indicated that expression of the hypoxia-responsive DosR regulon was higher in BAL than in sputum. M. tuberculosis transcription in BAL and sputum was distinct from both aerobic growth and NRP-2, with a range of 396-1020 transcripts significantly differentially expressed after multiple testing correction. Collectively, our results indicate that M. tuberculosis transcription in sputum approximates M. tuberculosis transcription in the lung. Minor differences between M. tuberculosis transcription in BAL and sputum suggested lower oxygen concentrations or higher nitric oxide concentrations in BAL. M. tuberculosis-targeted transcriptional profiling of sputa may be a powerful tool for understanding M. tuberculosis pathogenesis and monitoring treatment responses in vivo. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Pulmonary exposure to carbonaceous nanomaterials and sperm quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovmand, Astrid; Lauvas, Anna Jacobsen; Christensen, Preben

    2018-01-01

    . Pulmonary inflammation was determined by differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Epididymal sperm concentration and motility were measured by computer-assisted sperm analysis. Epididymal sperm viability and morphological abnormalities were assessed manually using Hoechst 33,342/PI...... inflammation is a potential modulator of endocrine function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pulmonary exposure to carbonaceous nanomaterials on sperm quality parameters in an experimental mouse model.Methods: Effects on sperm quality after pulmonary inflammation induced by carbonaceous...... flourescent and Spermac staining, respectively. Epididymal sperm were assessed with regard to sperm DNA integrity (damage). Daily sperm production was measured in the testis, and testosterone levels were measured in blood plasma by ELISA.Results: Neutrophil numbers in the bronchoalveolar fluid showed...

  7. Pulmonary exposure to carbonaceous nanomaterials and sperm quality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovmand, Astrid; Lauvas, Anna Jacobsen; Christensen, Preben

    2018-01-01

    Background: Semen quality parameters are potentially affected by nanomaterials in several ways: Inhaled nanosized particles are potent inducers of pulmonary inflammation, leading to the release of inflammatory mediators. Small amounts of particles may translocate from the lungs into the lung...... inflammation is a potential modulator of endocrine function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pulmonary exposure to carbonaceous nanomaterials on sperm quality parameters in an experimental mouse model.Methods: Effects on sperm quality after pulmonary inflammation induced by carbonaceous...... nanomaterials were investigated by intratracheally instilling sexually mature male NMRI mice with four different carbonaceous nanomaterials dispersed in nanopure water: graphene oxide (18 mu g/mouse/i.t.), Flammruss 101, Printex 90 and SRM1650b (0.1 mg/mouse/i.t. each) weekly for seven consecutive weeks...

  8. Detection of pulmonary emboli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sostman, H.D.; Gottschalk, A.

    1988-01-01

    The imaging evaluation of patients who may have pulmonary embolism (PE) is discussed. It is generally accomplished in two stages. In the first stage, clinical suspicion of PE leads to performance of an initial screening test. In current practice, this is the ventilation-perfusion (V/Q) scintigram, which is the safest and most sensitive noninvasive test. In the second stage, the results of the V/Q scan are considered in light of the clinical picture-degree of suspicion of PE, presence of alternate explanations for the clinical and scintigraphic findings, probability level and confidence of the scintigraphic diagnosis, and the likely consequences of therapy, misdiagnosis, or performance of a more invasive test. In some instances, this evaluation leads to performance of pulmonary angiography, an invasive test, for proof of the diagnosis. Although there are exceptions and special cases that do not follow this sequence, it is accurate for the majority of patients

  9. Acute pulmonary infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Juhl, J.H.

    1987-01-01

    Acute pulmonary infection may be caused by a variety of organisms. In some instances they produce a reasonably characteristic, gross pathologic pattern and, therefore, a recognizable roentgenographic pattern. In the subsequent discussions the most common gross anatomic findings in the pneumonias of various causes as reflected in chest roentgenograms will be described. The roentgenographic manifestations of pulmonary infections are so varied that the pattern observed often gives us little information regarding the causative organism. Therefore, in each instance it should be remembered that roentgenographic findings must be correlated with clinical, bacteriological, and laboratory data to ascertain the correct etiologic diagnosis upon which treatment is based. The role of the radiologist is to locate and define the extent of the disease and any complicating findings such as lung abscess and pleural effusion or empyema

  10. Pulmonary ablation: a primer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberton, Benjamin J; Liu, David; Power, Mark; Wan, John M C; Stuart, Sam; Klass, Darren; Yee, John

    2014-05-01

    Percutaneous image-guided thermal ablation is safe and efficacious in achieving local control and improving outcome in the treatment of both early stage non-small-cell lung cancer and pulmonary metastatic disease, in which surgical treatment is precluded by comorbidity, poor cardiorespiratory reserve, or unfavorable disease distribution. Radiofrequency ablation is the most established technology, but new thermal ablation technologies such as microwave ablation and cryoablation may offer some advantages. The use of advanced techniques, such as induced pneumothorax and the popsicle stick technique, or combining thermal ablation with radiotherapy, widens the treatment options available to the multidisciplinary team. The intent of this article is to provide the reader with a practical knowledge base of pulmonary ablation by concentrating on indications, techniques, and follow-up. Copyright © 2014 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Acute neurogenic pulmonary edema].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquefeuil, B

    1975-01-01

    Neurogenic edema, in the strict sense of the term, has at the present time practically not benefitted from precise hemodynamic investigations in human clinical practice, and owing to this fact, authors still classify them under the heading "mixed edema or of unknown pathogenesis". In contrast with this lack of information in man, animal experimental works are surprising by their coherence and the experimental facility of producing neurogenic edema (cranial hypertension by a small inflatable balloon and cisternal infection of fibrin). If one excludes the now ancient vagal theories (CAMERON 1949; CAMPBELL, 1949) which were never confirmed, all of the most recent experimental works (SARNOFF, 1952; DUCKER, 1968; LUISADA, 1967; MORITZ, 1974) confirm the adrenergic disorder of central origin during neurogenic A.P.E. which from the hemodynamic standpoint is like an authentic hemodynamic A.P.E. with raised left atrial pressure, pulmonary venous pressure and pulmonary capillary pressure.

  12. Thromboembolic chronicle pulmonary Hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ovalle, Amador

    2003-01-01

    The thromboembolic chronicle pulmonary Hypertension, also well known as chronic lung thromboembolism not resolved; it is a form not very common of lung thromboembolism. Until very recently was considered a rare curiosity of autopsy, but as the methods of diagnoses have improved and our attitude has changed, the incidence of this nosological entity has experienced a notable increment, but the most excellent in this illness is maybe that it is a form of lung hypertension, potentially recoverable

  13. [Invasive nosocomial pulmonary aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Germaud, P; Haloun, A

    2001-04-01

    Immunodepressed patients, particularly those with neutropenia or bone marrow or organ grafts, are at risk of developing nosocomial invasive pulmonary aspergilosis. The favoring factors, early diagnostic criteria and curative treatment protocols are well known. Prognosis remains however quite severe with a death rate above 50%. Preventive measures are required for the treatment of these high-risk patients and epidemiology surveillance is needed in case of aspergillosis acquired in the hospital.

  14. Basal transcription machinery

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-03-29

    Mar 29, 2007 ... The holoenzyme of prokaryotic RNA polymerase consists of the core enzyme, made of two , , ' and subunits, which lacks promoter selectivity and a sigma () subunit which enables the core enzyme to initiate transcription in a promoter dependent fashion. A stress sigma factor s, in prokaryotes ...

  15. Machine Dictation and Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harvey, Evelyn; And Others

    This instructional package contains both an instructor's manual and a student's manual for a course in machine dictation and transcription. The instructor's manual contains an overview with tips on teaching the course, letters for dictation, and a key to the letters. The student's manual contains an overview of the course and of the skills needed…

  16. Transcriptional Regulation in Haematopoiesis:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Felicia K B

    with the capacity to both self-renew and differentiate. This thesis is built upon two studies, which investigate two different aspects of the haematopoietic system; heterogeneity within the HSC compartment (presented in manuscript I), and the interplay between transcription factors controlling granulocyte/ monocyte...

  17. Right pulmonary aplasia, aberrant left pulmonary artery, and bronchopulmonary sequestration with an esophageal bronchus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Peter; McCauley, Roy; Westra, Sjirk; Baba, Timothy

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary aplasia and bronchopulmonary foregut malformations in which a patent communication between the foregut and the pulmonary system is present are rare congenital abnormalities. Pulmonary aplasia associated with a pulmonary sling is an even rarer abnormality. We report a unique case of right pulmonary aplasia, aberrant left pulmonary artery, and bronchopulmonary sequestration with an esophageal bronchus diagnosed by multidetector helical CT. (orig.)

  18. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karabulut, N.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: Chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) denote progressive lung diseases characterized by airway obstruction. COPD exhibits specific morphologic changes in the lung parenchyma, central and peripheral airways and pulmonary vasculature. A person with COPD may have either emphysema or chronic bronchitis, but most have both. Some people with COPD may also have an asthma-like or reactive component. Imaging modalities play important role in the detection or exclusion of COPD, distribution and extent of disease processes. Combined inspiratory and expiratory high resolution CT allows phenotyping of COPD (emphysema predominant, airway predominant, or mixed) and quantification of severity. Magnetic resonance imaging enables functional evaluation and demonstrates ventilation defects correlating closely with pulmonary function tests. Imaging techniques are also helpful in guiding the treatment, such as bullectomy in patients with bullous emphysema, lung volume reduction surgery or endoscopic interventions in those with severe emphysema, and smoking cessation and medical treatment designed to stop lung destruction in patients with mild or moderate emphysema or bronchiectasis.

  19. Leptospirose pulmonar Pulmonary leptospirosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Cláudio Barroso Pereira

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available No presente artigo, os autores discutem brevemente sobre a leptospirose, realçando a forma pulmonar da doença. Revê-se a patologia, achados clínicos, diagnóstico por métodos de imagem e broncoscopia e tratamento da leptospirose pulmonar. É também lembrado o diagnóstico clínico e radiológico precoces, para que se possa iniciar terapêutica adequada. Os autores concluem que a forma pulmonar da leptospirose deve ser sempre considerada como causa e diagnóstico diferencial da hemorragia alveolar difusa e síndroma de dificuldade respiratória do adulto.In this article, the authors discuss briefly the leptospirosis, emphasizing mainly the pulmonary form of disease. The authors review pathology, clinical findings, imaging and broncoscopy diagnosis, treatment of pulmonary leptospirosis. It is also remembered about early clinics and radiology diagnosis to start therapeutics. The authors conclude that pulmonary form of disease must always be remembered and considered as cause and differential diagnosis of Diffuse Alveolar Hemorrhage and Adult Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

  20. Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vallejo, Franco Javier; Vallejo, Alejandro; Parra, Maximiliano

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary alveolar microlithiasis (PAM) is a rare disease characterized by the diffuse and bilateral presence of calcium phosphate microlite in the alveolar spaces. The progression of this potentially lethal disease is show and most of the patients remain asymptomatic during years or decades, resulting in a show deterioration of the pulmonary function. The typical finding of the sand storm in the chest X-ray is characteristic of this entity. Mutations in the SLC34A2 gene that does the coding for the type II co-transporter of sodium phosphate were identified as responsible for this disease. Of the almost 600 cases, only 6 have been reported in Colombia. We are presenting a case of pulmonary alveolar microlite in a 27 year old man, with progressive respiratory distress whose diagnosis was made by the X-ray findings and confirmed by trans bronchial biopsy. In the 2 years follow-up, shows evolution towards deterioration of his respiratory function making him a candidate for lung transplantation.

  1. Transcriptional control in the segmentation gene network of Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D Schroeder

    2004-09-01

    Full Text Available The segmentation gene network of Drosophila consists of maternal and zygotic factors that generate, by transcriptional (cross- regulation, expression patterns of increasing complexity along the anterior-posterior axis of the embryo. Using known binding site information for maternal and zygotic gap transcription factors, the computer algorithm Ahab recovers known segmentation control elements (modules with excellent success and predicts many novel modules within the network and genome-wide. We show that novel module predictions are highly enriched in the network and typically clustered proximal to the promoter, not only upstream, but also in intronic space and downstream. When placed upstream of a reporter gene, they consistently drive patterned blastoderm expression, in most cases faithfully producing one or more pattern elements of the endogenous gene. Moreover, we demonstrate for the entire set of known and newly validated modules that Ahab's prediction of binding sites correlates well with the expression patterns produced by the modules, revealing basic rules governing their composition. Specifically, we show that maternal factors consistently act as activators and that gap factors act as repressors, except for the bimodal factor Hunchback. Our data suggest a simple context-dependent rule for its switch from repressive to activating function. Overall, the composition of modules appears well fitted to the spatiotemporal distribution of their positive and negative input factors. Finally, by comparing Ahab predictions with different categories of transcription factor input, we confirm the global regulatory structure of the segmentation gene network, but find odd skipped behaving like a primary pair-rule gene. The study expands our knowledge of the segmentation gene network by increasing the number of experimentally tested modules by 50%. For the first time, the entire set of validated modules is analyzed for binding site composition under a

  2. Digital angiography in pulmonary embolism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjoerk, L.

    1986-01-01

    Pulmonary digital subtraction angiography was diagnostic in 98.3% of patients with possible acute pulmonary embolism. The procedure was well tolerated even in severely ill patients. A large image intensifier made simultaneous imaging of both lungs possible reducing the number of contrast injections necessary. Small volumes of low iso-osmolar concentration of modern contrast media were used. There was no need for catherization of the pulmonary artery. Theoretical considerations and our limited experience indicate that this will reduce the number of complications compared with conventional pulmonary angiography. The procedure is rapidly performed and the diagnostic accuracy high. This makes digital subtraction angiography cost effective. Digital pulmonary angiography can be recommended as the primary diagnostic method in most patients with possible pulmonary embolism. (orig.)

  3. Pulmonary edema: radiographic differential diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Dong Soo; Choi, Young Hi; Kim, Seung Cheol; An, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jee Young; Park, Hee Hong

    1997-01-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of using chest radiography to differentiate between three different etiologies of pulmonary edema. Plain chest radiographs of 77 patients, who were clinically confirmed as having pulmonary edema, were retrospectively reviewed. The patients were classified into three groups : group 1 (cardiogenic edema : n = 35), group 2 (renal pulmonary edema : n = 16) and group 3 (permeability edema : n = 26). We analyzed the radiologic findings of air bronchogram, heart size, peribronchial cuffing, septal line, pleural effusion, vascular pedicle width, pulmonary blood flow distribution and distribution of pulmonary edema. In a search for radiologic findings which would help in the differentiation of these three etiologies, each finding was assessed. Cardiogenic and renal pulmonary edema showed overlapping radiologic findings, except for pulmonary blood flow distribution. In cardiogenic pulmonary edema (n=35), cardiomegaly (n=29), peribronchial cuffing (n=29), inverted pulmonary blood flow distribution (n=21) and basal distribution of edema (n=20) were common. In renal pulmonary edema (n=16), cardiomegaly (n=15), balanced blood flow distribution (n=12), and central (n=9) or basal distribution of edema (n=7) were common. Permeability edema (n=26) showed different findings. Air bronchogram (n=25), normal blood flow distribution (n=14) and peripheral distribution of edema (n=21) were frequent findings, while cardiomegaly (n=7), peribronchial cuffing (n=7) and septal line (n=5) were observed in only a few cases. On plain chest radiograph, permeability edema can be differentiated from cardiogenic or renal pulmonary edema. The radiographic findings which most reliably differentiated these two etiologies were air bronchogram, distribution of pulmonary edema, peribronchial cuffing and heart size. Only blood flow distribution was useful for radiographic differentiation of cardiogenic and renal edema

  4. Changing patterns in pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tytle, T.L.; Johnson, T.H.

    1984-01-01

    The authors reviewed the initial chest roentgenograms of 182 consecutive adult patients with proven active tuberculosis. Less than 50% of all cases were known or suspected at the time of initial presentation. There is a low degree of correlation between radiologically discernible active pulmonary tuberculosis and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. A high percentage of cases represent uncommon pulmonary locations. The frequency of occurrence of four common pulmonary patterns is presented. 21 references, 4 figures, 5 tables

  5. Pulmonary infection in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seog Joon; Im, Jung Gi; Seong, Chang Kyu; Yeon, Kyung Mo; Han, Man Chung; Song, Jae Woo

    1998-01-01

    To analyze the clinical and radiological manifestations of pulmonary infection in patients with AIDS. We reviewed the medical records and analyzed retrospectively analysed the chest radiographs(n=3D24) and CT scans(n=3D11) of 26 patients with AIDS who had been followed up at our institute from 1987 to June 1998. Pulmonary infections were confirmed by sputum smear and culture(n=3D18), pleural examination(n=3D3), bronchoalveolar lavage(n=3D3), autopsy(n=3D4), transbronchial lung biopsy(n=3D1) or clinical history(n=3D9). The study group included 23 men and three women aged 25-54(average 35.2) years. We correlated the radiologic findings with CD4 lymphocyte counts. Pulmonary infections included tuberculosis(n=3D22), pneumocystis carinii pneumonia(n=3D9), cytomegalovirus(n=3D3), and unidentified bacterial pneumonia(n=3D2). Radiologically pulmonary tuberculosis was classified as primary tuberculosis(n=3D11;mean CD4 counts:41.3 cells/mm 3 ) and post-primary tuberculosis(n=3D11;mean CD4 counts:251.3cells/mm 3 ). CT findings of tuberculosis included lymphadenitis(n=3D6), bronchogenic spread(n=3D5), large consolidation(n=3D4), esophago-mediastinal fistula(n=3D2), and cavity(n=3D1). Tuberculosis in AIDS responded rapidly to anti-TB medication with complete or marked resolution of lesions within three months. Radiologic findings of Pneumocystis carinii pneumonia included diffuse ground glass opacities, cysts, and reticular opacities. Tuberculosis was the most common infection in patients with AIDS in Korea, and this is attributed to the high prevalence of tuberculosis. Radiological findings varied with CD4+cell count, showing those of primary tuberculosis as a patient's CD4+ cell count decreased. Pulmonary tuberculosis in AIDS responded rapidly to anti-Tb medication. =20

  6. Recent advances in understanding idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daccord, Cécile; Maher, Toby M.

    2016-01-01

    Despite major research efforts leading to the recent approval of pirfenidone and nintedanib, the dismal prognosis of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) remains unchanged. The elaboration of international diagnostic criteria and disease stratification models based on clinical, physiological, radiological, and histopathological features has improved the accuracy of IPF diagnosis and prediction of mortality risk. Nevertheless, given the marked heterogeneity in clinical phenotype and the considerable overlap of IPF with other fibrotic interstitial lung diseases (ILDs), about 10% of cases of pulmonary fibrosis remain unclassifiable. Moreover, currently available tools fail to detect early IPF, predict the highly variable course of the disease, and assess response to antifibrotic drugs. Recent advances in understanding the multiple interrelated pathogenic pathways underlying IPF have identified various molecular phenotypes resulting from complex interactions among genetic, epigenetic, transcriptional, post-transcriptional, metabolic, and environmental factors. These different disease endotypes appear to confer variable susceptibility to the condition, differing risks of rapid progression, and, possibly, altered responses to therapy. The development and validation of diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers are necessary to enable a more precise and earlier diagnosis of IPF and to improve prediction of future disease behaviour. The availability of approved antifibrotic therapies together with potential new drugs currently under evaluation also highlights the need for biomarkers able to predict and assess treatment responsiveness, thereby allowing individualised treatment based on risk of progression and drug response. This approach of disease stratification and personalised medicine is already used in the routine management of many cancers and provides a potential road map for guiding clinical care in IPF. PMID:27303645

  7. Computational Investigations of Post-Transcriptional Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Simon Horskjær

    and miRNA regulation was studied by cross-linking immunoprecipitation (CLIP) and RBP double knockdown experiments. A comprehensive analysis of 107 CLIP datasets of 49 RBPs demonstrated that RBPs modulate miRNA regulation. Results suggest it is mediated by RBP-binding hotspots that likely...... investigated using high-throughput data. Analysis of IMP RIP-seq, iCLIP and RNA-seq datasets identified transcripts associated with cytoplasmic IMP ribonucleoproteins. Many of these transcripts were functionally involved in actin cytoskeletal remodeling. Further analyses of this data permitted estimation...... of a bipartite motif, composed of an AU-rich and a CA-rich domain. In addition, a regulatory motif discovery method was developed and applied to identify motifs using differential expression data and CLIP-data in the above investigations. This thesis increased the understanding of the role of RBPs in mi...

  8. Eosinofilia pulmonar Pulmonary eosinophilia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Eduardo Mendes Campos

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available As formas de eosinofilia pulmonar constituem um grupo heterogêneo definido pela presença de um ou dois critérios: infiltrado pulmonar com eosinofilia sanguínea e/ou eosinofilia tissular caracterizada por eosinófilos demonstrados na biópsia pulmonar ou no lavado broncoalveolar. Embora o infiltrado inflamatório seja composto de macrófagos, linfócitos, neutrófilos e eosinófilos, a presença de eosinofilia é um marcador importante para o diagnóstico e tratamento. A apresentação clínica e radiológica pode revelar eosinofilia pulmonar simples, pneumonia eosinofílica crônica, pneumonia eosinofílica aguda, aspergilose broncopulmonar alérgica e eosinofilia pulmonar associada à doença sistêmica, como na síndrome de Churg-Strauss e na síndrome hipereosinofílica. A asma está frequentemente associada, podendo ser um pré-requisito, como na aspergilose broncopulmonar alérgica e na síndrome de Churg-Strauss. Nas doenças com acometimento sistêmico, a pele, o coração e o sistema nervoso são os órgãos mais comprometidos. A apresentação radiológica pode ser considerada como típica, ou pelo menos sugestiva, para três formas de eosinofilia pulmonar: pneumonia eosinofílica crônica, aspergilose broncopulmonar alérgica e pneumonia eosinofílica aguda. A etiologia da eosinofilia pulmonar pode ser de causa primária (idiopática ou secundária, compreendendo causas conhecidas, como drogas, parasitas, infecções por fungos e micobactérias, irradiação e toxinas. A eosinofilia pulmonar pode também estar associada a doenças pulmonares difusas, doenças do tecido conectivo e neoplasias.Pulmonary eosinophilia comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases defined by eosinophilia in pulmonary infiltrates (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid or in tissue (lung biopsy specimens. Although the inflammatory infiltrate is composed of macrophages, lymphocytes, neutrophils and eosinophils, eosinophilia is an important marker for the diagnosis

  9. Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bray, T.J.P.; Mortensen, K.H.; Gopalan, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A plethora of pulmonary and systemic disorders, often associated with grave outcomes, may cause pulmonary infarction. • A stereotypical infarct is a peripheral wedge shaped pleurally based opacity but imaging findings can be highly variable. • Multimodality imaging is key to diagnosing the presence, aetiology and complications of pulmonary infarction. • Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction together with any ancillary features often guide to early targeted treatment. • CT remains the principal imaging modality with MRI increasingly used alongside nuclear medicine studies and ultrasound. - Abstract: The impact of absent pulmonary arterial and venous flow on the pulmonary parenchyma depends on a host of factors. These include location of the occlusive insult, the speed at which the occlusion develops and the ability of the normal dual arterial supply to compensate through increased bronchial arterial flow. Pulmonary infarction occurs when oxygenation is cut off secondary to sudden occlusion with lack of recruitment of the dual supply arterial system. Thromboembolic disease is the commonest cause of such an insult but a whole range of disease processes intrinsic and extrinsic to the pulmonary arterial and venous lumen may also result in infarcts. Recognition of the presence of infarction can be challenging as imaging manifestations often differ from the classically described wedge shaped defect and a number of weighty causes need consideration. This review highlights aetiologies and imaging appearances of pulmonary infarction, utilising cases to illustrate the essential role of a multimodality imaging approach in order to arrive at the appropriate diagnosis

  10. Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bray, T.J.P., E-mail: timothyjpbray@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom); Mortensen, K.H., E-mail: mortensen@doctors.org.uk [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom); University Department of Radiology, Addenbrookes Hospital, Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, Hills Road, Box 318, Cambridge CB2 0QQ (United Kingdom); Gopalan, D., E-mail: deepa.gopalan@btopenworld.com [Department of Radiology, Papworth Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Ermine Street, Papworth Everard, Cambridge CB23 3RE (United Kingdom)

    2014-12-15

    Highlights: • A plethora of pulmonary and systemic disorders, often associated with grave outcomes, may cause pulmonary infarction. • A stereotypical infarct is a peripheral wedge shaped pleurally based opacity but imaging findings can be highly variable. • Multimodality imaging is key to diagnosing the presence, aetiology and complications of pulmonary infarction. • Multimodality imaging of pulmonary infarction together with any ancillary features often guide to early targeted treatment. • CT remains the principal imaging modality with MRI increasingly used alongside nuclear medicine studies and ultrasound. - Abstract: The impact of absent pulmonary arterial and venous flow on the pulmonary parenchyma depends on a host of factors. These include location of the occlusive insult, the speed at which the occlusion develops and the ability of the normal dual arterial supply to compensate through increased bronchial arterial flow. Pulmonary infarction occurs when oxygenation is cut off secondary to sudden occlusion with lack of recruitment of the dual supply arterial system. Thromboembolic disease is the commonest cause of such an insult but a whole range of disease processes intrinsic and extrinsic to the pulmonary arterial and venous lumen may also result in infarcts. Recognition of the presence of infarction can be challenging as imaging manifestations often differ from the classically described wedge shaped defect and a number of weighty causes need consideration. This review highlights aetiologies and imaging appearances of pulmonary infarction, utilising cases to illustrate the essential role of a multimodality imaging approach in order to arrive at the appropriate diagnosis.

  11. Pulmonary hypertension in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArdle, John R; Trow, Terence K; Lerz, Kathryn

    2007-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a frequently encountered problem in older patients. True idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension can also be seen and requires careful exclusion in older patients. Institution of therapies must be tempered with an appreciation of individual comorbidities and functional limitations that may affect patients' ability to comply and benefit from the complex treatments available for pulmonary arterial hypertension. This article reviews the existing data on the various forms of pulmonary hypertension presenting in older patients and on appropriate therapy in this challenging population.

  12. Pulmonary complications in 110 consecutive renal transplant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pulmonary embolism in 5, and lung abscess in 1. Sixty- nine patients ... The incidence of pulmonary complications after renal ... the factors that influence the development of these .... mobilisation have reduced the risk of pulmonary embolism.

  13. Genetics Home Reference: pulmonary arterial hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home Health Conditions Pulmonary arterial hypertension Pulmonary arterial hypertension Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... view the expand/collapse boxes. Description Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a progressive disorder characterized by abnormally high ...

  14. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation in planta via synthetic dCas9-based transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2014-11-14

    Targeted genomic regulation is a powerful approach to accelerate trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Bacteria and archaea use clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) regulatory systems for adaptive molecular immunity against foreign nucleic acids introduced by invading phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing in many cell types and organisms. A recent study used the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide-RNAs (gRNAs) as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate gene expression in bacterial, yeast, and human cells. Here, we modified this DNA-targeting platform for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based transcriptional activators and repressors. To generate transcriptional activators, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors. To generate a transcriptional repressor, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the SRDX repression domain. Our data demonstrate that dCas9 fusion with the EDLL activation domain (dCas9:EDLL) and the TAL activation domain (dCas9:TAD), guided by gRNAs complementary to selected promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on Bs3

  15. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation in planta via synthetic dCas9-based transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna; Ali, Zahir; Baazim, Hatoon; Li, Lixin; Abulfaraj, Aala A.; Alshareef, Sahar; Aouida, Mustapha; Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2014-01-01

    Targeted genomic regulation is a powerful approach to accelerate trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Bacteria and archaea use clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) regulatory systems for adaptive molecular immunity against foreign nucleic acids introduced by invading phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing in many cell types and organisms. A recent study used the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide-RNAs (gRNAs) as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate gene expression in bacterial, yeast, and human cells. Here, we modified this DNA-targeting platform for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based transcriptional activators and repressors. To generate transcriptional activators, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors. To generate a transcriptional repressor, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the SRDX repression domain. Our data demonstrate that dCas9 fusion with the EDLL activation domain (dCas9:EDLL) and the TAL activation domain (dCas9:TAD), guided by gRNAs complementary to selected promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on Bs3

  16. Clinical manifestations of pulmonary and extra-pulmonary tuberculosis

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    85% of reported tuberculosis cases were pulmonary ... Both pulmonary and nonpulmonary 32% ... 10% of patients with apparently localized tuberculosis ... mycetoma) in a cavity or erosion into an airway ... Dyspnoea is unusual unless there is extensive disease and ... via the airways into other parts of the lungs, causing a.

  17. DNA Topoisomerases in Transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rødgaard, Morten Terpager

    2015-01-01

    This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most of the ex......This Ph.D. thesis summarizes the main results of my studies on the interplay between DNA topoisomerases and transcription. The work was performed from 2011 to 2015 at Aarhus University in the Laboratory of Genome Research, and was supervised by associate professor Anni H. Andersen. Most...... topoisomerase-DNA cleavage complex. The second study is an investigation of how topoisomerases influence gene regulation by keeping the genome in an optimal topological state....

  18. Deciphering Transcriptional Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Valen, Eivind

    The myriad of cells in the human body are all made from the same blueprint: the human genome. At the heart of this diversity lies the concept of gene regulation, the process in which it is decided which genes are used where and when. Genes do not function as on/off buttons, but more like a volume...... mostly near the start of the gene known as the promoter. This region contains patterns scattered in the DNA that the TFs can recognize and bind to. Such binding can prompt the assembly of the pre-initiation complex which ultimately leads to transcription of the gene. In order to achieve the regulation...... on what characterizes a hippocampus promoter. Pairing CAGE with TF binding site prediction we identi¿ed a likely key regulator of hippocampus. Finally, we developed a method for CAGE exploration. While the DeepCAGE library characterized a full 1.4 million transcription initiation events it did not capture...

  19. Transcriptional landscape of glomerular parietal epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina A Gharib

    Full Text Available Very little is known about the function of glomerular parietal epithelial cells (PECs. In this study, we performed genome-wide expression analysis on PEC-enriched capsulated vs. PEC-deprived decapsulated rat glomeruli to determine the transcriptional state of PECs under normal conditions. We identified hundreds of differentially expressed genes that mapped to distinct biologic modules including development, tight junction, ion transport, and metabolic processes. Since developmental programs were highly enriched in PECs, we characterized several of their candidate members at the protein level. Collectively, our findings confirm that PECs are multifaceted cells and help define their diverse functional repertoire.

  20. Transcriptional networks controlling adipocyte differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siersbæk, R; Mandrup, Susanne

    2011-01-01

    " of the transcription factor networks operating at specific time points during adipogenesis. Using such global "snapshots," we have demonstrated that dramatic remodeling of the chromatin template occurs within the first few hours following adipogenic stimulation and that many of the early transcription factors bind...... in a cooperative fashion to transcription factor hotspots. Such hotspots are likely to represent key chromatin nodes, where many adipogenic signaling pathways converge to drive the adipogenic transcriptional reprogramming....

  1. Pulmonary function in microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guy, H. J.; Prisk, G. K.; West, J. B.

    1992-01-01

    We report the successful collection of a large quantity of human resting pulmonary function data on the SLS-1 mission. Preliminary analysis suggests that cardiac stroke volumes are high on orbit, and that an adaptive reduction takes at least several days, and in fact may still be in progress after 9 days on orbit. It also suggests that pulmonary capillary blood volumes are high, and remain high on orbit, but that the pulmonary interstitium is not significantly impacted. The data further suggest that the known large gravitational gradients of lung function have only a modest influence on single breath tests such as the SBN washout. They account for only approximately 25% of the phase III slope of nitrogen, on vital capacity SBN washouts. These gradients are only a moderate source of the cardiogenic oscillations seen in argon (bolus gas) and nitrogen (resident gas), on such tests. They may have a greater role in generating the normal CO2 oscillations, as here the phase relationship to argon and nitrogen reverses in microgravity, at least at mid exhalation in those subjects studied to date. Microgravity may become a useful tool in establishing the nature of the non-gravitational mechanisms that can now be seen to play such a large part in the generation of intra-breath gradients and oscillations of expired gas concentration. Analysis of microgravity multibreath nitrogen washouts, single breath washouts from more physiological pre-inspiratory volumes, both using our existing SLS-1 data, and data from the upcoming D-2 and SLS-2 missions, should be very fruitful in this regard.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS).

  2. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V K Vijayan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec to FVC (forced vital capacity ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure, hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity, bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia, stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

  3. Imaging of pulmonary tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Dyck, P.; De Schepper, A.M.; Vanhoenacker, F.M.; Van den Brande, P.

    2003-01-01

    Tuberculosis, more than any other infectious disease, has always been a challenge, since it has been responsible for a great amount of morbidity and mortality in humans. After a steady decline in the number of new cases during the twentieth century, due to improved social and environmental conditions, early diagnosis, and the development of antituberculous medication, a stagnation and even an increase in the number of new cases was noted in the mid-1980s. The epidemiological alteration is multifactorial: global increase in developing countries; minority groups (HIV and other immunocompromised patients); and elderly patients due to an altered immune status. Other factors that may be responsible are a delayed diagnosis, especially in elderly patients, incomplete or inadequate therapy, and the emergence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. The course of the disease and its corresponding clinicoradiological pattern depends on the interaction between the organism and the host response. Classically, pulmonary tuberculosis has been classified in primary tuberculosis, which occurred previously in children, and postprimary tuberculosis, occurring in adult patients. In industrialized countries, however, there seems to be a shift of primary tuberculosis towards adults. Furthermore, due to an altered immunological response in certain groups, such as immunocompromised and elderly patients, an atypical radioclinical pattern may occur. The changing landscape, in which tuberculosis occurs, as well as the global resurgence, and the changed spectrum of the clinical and radiological presentation, justify a renewed interest of radiologists for the imaging features of pulmonary tuberculosis. This article deals with the usual imaging features of pulmonary tuberculosis as well as the atypical patterns encountered in immunodepressed and elderly patients. (orig.)

  4. SUMO-, MAPK- and resistance protein-signaling converge at transcription complexes that regulate plant innate immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burg, van den H.A.; Takken, F.L.W.

    2010-01-01

    Upon pathogen perception plant innate immune receptors activate various signaling pathways that trigger host defenses. PAMP-triggered defense signaling requires mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, which modulate the activity of transcription factors through phosphorylation. Here, we

  5. SUMO-, MAPK-, and resistance protein-signaling converge at transcription complexes that regulate plant innate immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Burg, H.A.; Takken, F.L.W.

    2010-01-01

    Upon pathogen perception plant innate immune receptors activate various signaling pathways that trigger host defenses. PAMP-triggered defense signaling requires mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways, which modulate the activity of transcription factors through phosphorylation. Here, we

  6. Detection of pulmonary nodules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanzulli, A.; Zanello, A.; DelMaschio, M.; Paesano, P.; Panizza, P.; DelMaschio, A.

    1989-01-01

    The authors have prospectively studied 203 pulmonary nodules in 91 patients, selected by CT (gold standard), with both subtraction digital radiography (SDR) and conventional plain film. Subtracted images were obtained by using copper filter inserted between two photostimulable imaging plates. Five radiologists randomly analyzed all conventional and subtracted images. The authors calculated sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values for both conventional radiography and SDR. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curves were calculated by plotting the number of nodules detected with different degrees of confidence. SDR detected 12% more nodules than conventional radiography. ROC curves demonstrated that the level of confidence was better for SDR (P <.05)

  7. Circulating RNA transcripts identify therapeutic response in cystic fibrosis lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saavedra, Milene T; Hughes, Grant J; Sanders, Linda A; Carr, Michelle; Rodman, David M; Coldren, Christopher D; Geraci, Mark W; Sagel, Scott D; Accurso, Frank J; West, James; Nick, Jerry A

    2008-11-01

    Circulating leukocyte RNA transcripts are systemic markers of inflammation, which have not been studied in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Although the standard assessment of pulmonary treatment response is FEV(1), a measure of airflow limitation, the lack of systemic markers to reflect changes in lung inflammation critically limits the testing of proposed therapeutics. We sought to prospectively identify and validate peripheral blood leukocyte genes that could mark resolution of pulmonary infection and inflammation using a model by which RNA transcripts could increase the predictive value of spirometry. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells were isolated from 10 patients with CF and acute pulmonary exacerbations before and after therapy. RNA expression profiling revealed that 10 genes significantly changed with treatment when compared with matched non-CF and control subjects with stable CF to establish baseline transcript abundance. Peripheral blood mononuclear cell RNA transcripts were prospectively validated, using real-time polymerase chain reaction amplification, in an independent cohort of acutely ill patients with CF (n = 14). Patients who responded to therapy were analyzed using general estimating equations and multiple logistic regression, such that changes in FEV(1)% predicted were regressed with transcript changes. Three genes, CD64, ADAM9, and CD36, were significant and independent predictors of a therapeutic response beyond that of FEV(1) alone (P < 0.05). In both cohorts, receiver operating characteristic analysis revealed greater accuracy when genes were combined with FEV(1). Circulating mononuclear cell transcripts characterize a response to the treatment of pulmonary exacerbations. Even in small patient cohorts, changes in gene expression in conjunction with FEV(1) may enhance current outcomes measures for treatment response.

  8. Thrombolytic therapy in pulmonary embolism.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Nagi, D

    2010-01-01

    Massive pulmonary embolism carries a high mortality. Potential treatment includes anticoagulation, thrombolytic therapy and embolectomy. We report a case of deep vein thrombosis leading to progressive massive pulmonary embolism despite appropriate anticoagulation, where thrombolysis with IVC filter placement resulted in a successful outcome.

  9. Pulmonary complications in neurosurgical patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randeep Guleria

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary complications are a major cause of morbidity and mortality in neurosurgical patients. The common pulmonary complications in neurosurgical patients include pneumonia, postoperative atelectasis, respiratory failure, pulmonary embolism, and neurogenic pulmonary edema. Postoperative lung expansion strategies have been shown to be useful in prevention of the postoperative complications in surgical patients. Low tidal volume ventilation should be used in patients who develop acute respiratory distress syndrome. An antibiotic use policy should be put in practice depending on the local patterns of antimicrobial resistance in the hospital. Thromboprophylactic strategies should be used in nonambulatory patients. Meticulous attention should be paid to infection control with a special emphasis on hand-washing practices. Prevention and timely management of these complications can help to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with pulmonary complications.

  10. Network modules uncover mechanisms of skeletal muscle dysfunction in COPD patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ákos Tényi

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients often show skeletal muscle dysfunction that has a prominent negative impact on prognosis. The study aims to further explore underlying mechanisms of skeletal muscle dysfunction as a characteristic systemic effect of COPD, potentially modifiable with preventive interventions (i.e. muscle training. The research analyzes network module associated pathways and evaluates the findings using independent measurements. Methods We characterized the transcriptionally active network modules of interacting proteins in the vastus lateralis of COPD patients (n = 15, FEV1 46 ± 12% pred, age 68 ± 7 years and healthy sedentary controls (n = 12, age 65 ± 9  years, at rest and after an 8-week endurance training program. Network modules were functionally evaluated using experimental data derived from the same study groups. Results At baseline, we identified four COPD specific network modules indicating abnormalities in creatinine metabolism, calcium homeostasis, oxidative stress and inflammatory responses, showing statistically significant associations with exercise capacity (VO2 peak, Watts peak, BODE index and blood lactate levels (P < 0.05 each, but not with lung function (FEV1. Training-induced network modules displayed marked differences between COPD and controls. Healthy subjects specific training adaptations were significantly associated with cell bioenergetics (P < 0.05 which, in turn, showed strong relationships with training-induced plasma metabolomic changes; whereas, effects of training in COPD were constrained to muscle remodeling. Conclusion In summary, altered muscle bioenergetics appears as the most striking finding, potentially driving other abnormal skeletal muscle responses. Trial registration The study was based on a retrospectively registered trial (May 2017, ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT03169270

  11. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-06-07

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin.

  12. Pulmonary emphysema and smoking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Satoh, Katashi; Murota, Makiko [Kagawa Medical Univ., Miki (Japan); Mitani, Masahiro (and others)

    2001-12-01

    We assessed the relation between PE and smoking in 1,563 cases (1,068 men and 495 women) who underwent CT scaring for suspicion of respiratory disease on chest radiograph or some respiratory complaints. PE was diagnosed by the existence of low attenuation areas in CT scan and not by pulmonary function tests. CT was performed with 10 mm collimation in a standard algorithm. There were 2 subtypes of pulmonary emphysema: centrilobular and paraseptal emphysema. PE, regardless of the grade, was seen: in 189 out of 348 (54.3%) cases in males smokers and in only 2 out of 63 (3.2%) cases in male non-smokers; and in 5 out of 25 (20.0%) in female smokers and in 4 out of 203 (2.0%) in female non-smokers. PE was observed in more than half of male smokers. High incidence of PE was also observed in even younger generation, and severity would progress with advancing age and smoking. Both types of emphysema progress with age and amount of cigarette smoking. (author)

  13. [Pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, Martine; Vieira, Thibault; Fallet, Vincent; Hamard, Cécile; Duruisseaux, Michael; Cadranel, Jacques; Wislez, Marie

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinomas are a rare group of tumors accounting for about one percent of non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). In 2015, the World Health Organization classification united under this name all the carcinomas with sarcomatous-like component with spindle cell or giant cell appearance, or associated with a sarcomatous component sometimes heterologous. There are five subtypes: pleomorphic carcinoma, spindle cell carcinoma, giant cell carcinoma, carcinosarcoma and pulmonary blastoma. Clinical characteristics are not specific from the other subtypes of NSCLC. Epithelial to mesenchymal transition pathway may play a key role. Patients, usually tobacco smokers, are frequently symptomatic. Tumors are voluminous more often peripherical than central, with strong fixation on FDG TEP CT. Distant metastases are frequent with atypical visceral locations. These tumors have poorer prognosis than the other NSCLC subtypes because of great aggressivity, and frequent chemoresistance. Here we present pathological description and a review of literature with molecular features in order to better describe these tumors and perhaps introduce new therapeutics. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  14. Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campisi Corradino

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Congenital pulmonary lymphangiectasia (PL is a rare developmental disorder involving the lung, and characterized by pulmonary subpleural, interlobar, perivascular and peribronchial lymphatic dilatation. The prevalence is unknown. PL presents at birth with severe respiratory distress, tachypnea and cyanosis, with a very high mortality rate at or within a few hours of birth. Most reported cases are sporadic and the etiology is not completely understood. It has been suggested that PL lymphatic channels of the fetal lung do not undergo the normal regression process at 20 weeks of gestation. Secondary PL may be caused by a cardiac lesion. The diagnostic approach includes complete family and obstetric history, conventional radiologic studies, ultrasound and magnetic resonance studies, lymphoscintigraphy, lung functionality tests, lung biopsy, bronchoscopy, and pleural effusion examination. During the prenatal period, all causes leading to hydrops fetalis should be considered in the diagnosis of PL. Fetal ultrasound evaluation plays a key role in the antenatal diagnosis of PL. At birth, mechanical ventilation and pleural drainage are nearly always necessary to obtain a favorable outcome of respiratory distress. Home supplemental oxygen therapy and symptomatic treatment of recurrent cough and wheeze are often necessary during childhood, sometimes associated with prolonged pleural drainage. Recent advances in intensive neonatal care have changed the previously nearly fatal outcome of PL at birth. Patients affected by PL who survive infancy, present medical problems which are characteristic of chronic lung disease.

  15. Plant Mediator complex and its critical functions in transcription regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan; Li, Ling; Qu, Li-Jia

    2016-02-01

    The Mediator complex is an important component of the eukaryotic transcriptional machinery. As an essential link between transcription factors and RNA polymerase II, the Mediator complex transduces diverse signals to genes involved in different pathways. The plant Mediator complex was recently purified and comprises conserved and specific subunits. It functions in concert with transcription factors to modulate various responses. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding the plant Mediator complex and its diverse roles in plant growth, development, defense, non-coding RNA production, response to abiotic stresses, flowering, genomic stability and metabolic homeostasis. In addition, the transcription factors interacting with the Mediator complex are also highlighted. © 2015 Institute of Botany, Chinese Academy of Sciences.

  16. The Mitochondrial Cardiolipin Remodeling Enzyme Lysocardiolipin Acyltransferase Is a Novel Target in Pulmonary Fibrosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Long Shuang; Mathew, Biji; Zhao, Yutong; Noth, Imre; Reddy, Sekhar P.; Harijith, Anantha; Usatyuk, Peter V.; Berdyshev, Evgeny V.; Kaminski, Naftali; Zhou, Tong; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yanmin; Rehman, Jalees; Kotha, Sainath R.; Gurney, Travis O.; Parinandi, Narasimham L.; Lussier, Yves A.; Garcia, Joe G. N.

    2014-01-01

    Rationale: Lysocardiolipin acyltransferase (LYCAT), a cardiolipin-remodeling enzyme regulating the 18:2 linoleic acid pattern of mammalian mitochondrial cardiolipin, is necessary for maintaining normal mitochondrial function and vascular development. We hypothesized that modulation of LYCAT expression in lung epithelium regulates development of pulmonary fibrosis. Objectives: To define a role for LYCAT in human and murine models of pulmonary fibrosis. Methods: We analyzed the correlation of LYCAT expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with the outcomes of pulmonary functions and overall survival, and used the murine models to establish the role of LYCAT in fibrogenesis. We studied the LYCAT action on cardiolipin remodeling, mitochondrial reactive oxygen species generation, and apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells under bleomycin challenge. Measurements and Main Results: LYCAT expression was significantly altered in PBMCs and lung tissues from patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), which was confirmed in two preclinical murine models of IPF, bleomycin- and radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis. LYCAT mRNA expression in PBMCs directly and significantly correlated with carbon monoxide diffusion capacity, pulmonary function outcomes, and overall survival. In both bleomycin- and radiation-induced pulmonary fibrosis murine models, hLYCAT overexpression reduced several indices of lung fibrosis, whereas down-regulation of native LYCAT expression by siRNA accentuated fibrogenesis. In vitro studies demonstrated that LYCAT modulated bleomycin-induced cardiolipin remodeling, mitochondrial membrane potential, reactive oxygen species generation, and apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells, potential mechanisms of LYCAT-mediated lung protection. Conclusions: This study is the first to identify modulation of LYCAT expression in fibrotic lungs and offers a novel therapeutic approach for ameliorating lung inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID

  17. Pulmonary venous remodeling in COPD-pulmonary hypertension and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Kasper Hasseriis; Andersen, Claus Bøgelund; Gustafsson, Finn

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular arterial remodeling is an integral and well-understood component of pulmonary hypertension (PH). In contrast, morphological alterations of pulmonary veins in PH are scarcely described. Explanted lungs (n = 101) from transplant recipients with advanced chronic obstructive...... pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) were analyzed for venous vascular involvement according to a pre-specified, semi-quantitative grading scheme, which categorizes the intensity of venous remodeling in three groups of incremental severity: venous hypertensive (VH......) grade 0 = characterized by an absence of venous vascular remodeling; VH grade 1 = defined by a dominance of either arterialization or intimal fibrosis; and VH grade 2 = a substantial composite of arterialization and intimal fibrosis. Patients were grouped according to clinical and hemodynamic...

  18. Prevalence of transcription promoters within archaeal operons and coding sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Tie; Reiss, David J; Bare, J Christopher; Pang, Wyming Lee; Facciotti, Marc T; Schmid, Amy K; Pan, Min; Marzolf, Bruz; Van, Phu T; Lo, Fang-Yin; Pratap, Abhishek; Deutsch, Eric W; Peterson, Amelia; Martin, Dan; Baliga, Nitin S

    2009-01-01

    Despite the knowledge of complex prokaryotic-transcription mechanisms, generalized rules, such as the simplified organization of genes into operons with well-defined promoters and terminators, have had a significant role in systems analysis of regulatory logic in both bacteria and archaea. Here, we have investigated the prevalence of alternate regulatory mechanisms through genome-wide characterization of transcript structures of approximately 64% of all genes, including putative non-coding RNAs in Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1. Our integrative analysis of transcriptome dynamics and protein-DNA interaction data sets showed widespread environment-dependent modulation of operon architectures, transcription initiation and termination inside coding sequences, and extensive overlap in 3' ends of transcripts for many convergently transcribed genes. A significant fraction of these alternate transcriptional events correlate to binding locations of 11 transcription factors and regulators (TFs) inside operons and annotated genes-events usually considered spurious or non-functional. Using experimental validation, we illustrate the prevalence of overlapping genomic signals in archaeal transcription, casting doubt on the general perception of rigid boundaries between coding sequences and regulatory elements.

  19. Transcriptional and posttranscriptional regulation of cyanobacterial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Annegret; Hihara, Yukako

    2016-03-01

    Cyanobacteria are well established model organisms for the study of oxygenic photosynthesis, nitrogen metabolism, toxin biosynthesis, and salt acclimation. However, in comparison to other model bacteria little is known about regulatory networks, which allow cyanobacteria to acclimate to changing environmental conditions. The current work has begun to illuminate how transcription factors modulate expression of different photosynthetic regulons. During the past few years, the research on other regulatory principles like RNA-based regulation showed the importance of non-protein regulators for bacterial lifestyle. Investigations on modulation of photosynthetic components should elucidate the contributions of all factors within the context of a larger regulatory network. Here, we focus on regulation of photosynthetic processes including transcriptional and posttranscriptional mechanisms, citing examples from a limited number of cyanobacterial species. Though, the general idea holds true for most species, important differences exist between various organisms, illustrating diversity of acclimation strategies in the very heterogeneous cyanobacterial clade. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Organization and dynamics of bioenergetic systems in bacteria, edited by Prof Conrad Mullineaux. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The Mediator complex and transcription regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poss, Zachary C.; Ebmeier, Christopher C.

    2013-01-01

    The Mediator complex is a multi-subunit assembly that appears to be required for regulating expression of most RNA polymerase II (pol II) transcripts, which include protein-coding and most non-coding RNA genes. Mediator and pol II function within the pre-initiation complex (PIC), which consists of Mediator, pol II, TFIIA, TFIIB, TFIID, TFIIE, TFIIF and TFIIH and is approximately 4.0 MDa in size. Mediator serves as a central scaffold within the PIC and helps regulate pol II activity in ways that remain poorly understood. Mediator is also generally targeted by sequence-specific, DNA-binding transcription factors (TFs) that work to control gene expression programs in response to developmental or environmental cues. At a basic level, Mediator functions by relaying signals from TFs directly to the pol II enzyme, thereby facilitating TF-dependent regulation of gene expression. Thus, Mediator is essential for converting biological inputs (communicated by TFs) to physiological responses (via changes in gene expression). In this review, we summarize an expansive body of research on the Mediator complex, with an emphasis on yeast and mammalian complexes. We focus on the basics that underlie Mediator function, such as its structure and subunit composition, and describe its broad regulatory influence on gene expression, ranging from chromatin architecture to transcription initiation and elongation, to mRNA processing. We also describe factors that influence Mediator structure and activity, including TFs, non-coding RNAs and the CDK8 module. PMID:24088064

  1. Clinical worsening in Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schölzel, B.E.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is defined as a raised mean pulmonary artery pressure (of at least 25 mmHg at rest) caused by persistent obstruction of pulmonary arteries after pulmonary embolism that has not resolved despite at least 3 months of therapeutic anticoagulation.

  2. Celiac disease with pulmonary haemosiderosis and cardiomyopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Işikay, Sedat; Yilmaz, Kutluhan; Kilinç, Metin

    2012-01-01

    Celiac disease or pulmonary haemosiderosis can be associated with several distinguished conditions. Pulmonary haemosiderosis is a rare, severe and fatal disease characterised by recurrent episodes of alveolar haemorrhage, haemoptysis and anaemia. Association of pulmonary haemosiderosis and celiac disease is extremely rare. We describe a case of celiac disease presented with dilated cardiomyopathy and pulmonary haemosiderosis without gastrointestinal symptoms of celiac disease. In addition, vi...

  3. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noble Paul W

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF is a non-neoplastic pulmonary disease that is characterized by the formation of scar tissue within the lungs in the absence of any known provocation. IPF is a rare disease which affects approximately 5 million persons worldwide. The prevalence is estimated to be slightly greater in men (20.2/100,000 than in women (13.2/100,000. The mean age at presentation is 66 years. IPF initially manifests with symptoms of exercise-induced breathless and dry coughing. Auscultation of the lungs reveals early inspiratory crackles, predominantly located in the lower posterior lung zones upon physical exam. Clubbing is found in approximately 50% of IPF patients. Cor pulmonale develops in association with end-stage disease. In that case, classic signs of right heart failure may be present. Etiology remains incompletely understood. Some environmental factors may be associated with IPF (cigarette smoking, exposure to silica and livestock. IPF is recognized on high-resolution computed tomography by peripheral, subpleural lower lobe reticular opacities in association with subpleural honeycomb changes. IPF is associated with a pathological lesion known as usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP. The UIP pattern consists of normal lung alternating with patches of dense fibrosis, taking the form of collagen sheets. The diagnosis of IPF requires correlation of the clinical setting with radiographic images and a lung biopsy. In the absence of lung biopsy, the diagnosis of IPF can be made by defined clinical criteria that were published in guidelines endorsed by several professional societies. Differential diagnosis includes other idiopathic interstitial pneumonia, connective tissue diseases (systemic sclerosis, polymyositis, rheumatoid arthritis, forme fruste of autoimmune disorders, chronic hypersensitivity pneumonitis and other environmental (sometimes occupational exposures. IPF is typically progressive and leads to significant

  4. Pulmonary complications in renal transplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Jung Bin; Choi, Yo Won; Jeon, Seok Chol; Park, Choong Ki; Lee, Seung Rho; Hahm, Chang Kok; Joo, Kyung Bin [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-04-01

    To evaluate the radiographic and CT findings of pulmonary complications other than pulmonary edema arising from renal transplantation. Among 393 patients who had undergone renal transplantation at our hospital during a previous ten-year period, 23 with pulmonary complications other than pulmonary edema were included in this study. The complications involved were infection caused by CMV (n=6), bacteria (n=4), fungus (n=4), tuberculosis (n=2), varicella (n=1) or chlamydia (n=1), and malignancy involving lung cancer (n=4) or Kaposi's sarcoma (n=1). Two chest radiologists reviewed all images. The complications manifesting mainly as pulmonary nodules were lung cancer (4/4), tuberculosis (1/2), and Kaposi's sarcoma (1/1). Pulmonary consolidation was a main feature in bacterial infection (4/4), fungal infection (3/4), tuberculosis (1/2), chlamydial infection (1/1), and varicellar pneumonia (1/1). Ground-glass attenuation was a main CT feature in CMV pneumonia (4/6), and increased interstitial making was a predominant radiographic feature in CMV pneumonia (2/6). The main radiologic features described above can be helpful for differential diagnosis of the pulmonary complications of renal transplantation.

  5. Transcript structure and domain display: a customizable transcript visualization tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kenneth A; Ma, Kaiwang; Homayouni, Arielle; Rushton, Paul J; Shen, Qingxi J

    2016-07-01

    Transcript Structure and Domain Display (TSDD) is a publicly available, web-based program that provides publication quality images of transcript structures and domains. TSDD is capable of producing transcript structures from GFF/GFF3 and BED files. Alternatively, the GFF files of several model organisms have been pre-loaded so that users only needs to enter the locus IDs of the transcripts to be displayed. Visualization of transcripts provides many benefits to researchers, ranging from evolutionary analysis of DNA-binding domains to predictive function modeling. TSDD is freely available for non-commercial users at http://shenlab.sols.unlv.edu/shenlab/software/TSD/transcript_display.html : jeffery.shen@unlv.nevada.edu. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Variable pulmonary manifestations in hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Yoo Kyung; Shim, Sung Shine; Shin, Jung Hee; Choi, Gyu Bock; Lee, Kyung Soo; Yi, Chin A; Oh, Yu Whan

    2003-01-01

    A wide variety of pulmonary disorders related to hemodialysis or pre-existing renal disease occurs in hemodialysis patients. The disorders may be classified as 1) pulmonary abnormalities associated with chronic renal failures; 2) pulmonary complications arising during hemodialysis; 3) pulmonary infection; or 4) pulmonary-renal syndrome. An awareness of the various possible pulmonary disorders arising in hemodialysis patients may be helpful for the proper and timely management of such patients. We describe and illustrate various radiographic and CT findings of variable pulmonary disorders in hemodialysis patients

  7. The Mediator Complex: At the Nexus of RNA Polymerase II Transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeronimo, Célia; Robert, François

    2017-10-01

    Mediator is an essential, large, multisubunit, transcriptional co-activator highly conserved across eukaryotes. Mediator interacts with gene-specific transcription factors at enhancers as well as with the RNA polymerase II (RNAPII) transcription machinery bound at promoters. It also interacts with several other factors involved in various aspects of transcription, chromatin regulation, and mRNA processing. Hence, Mediator is at the nexus of RNAPII transcription, regulating its many steps and connecting transcription with co-transcriptional events. To achieve this flexible role, Mediator, which is divided into several functional modules, reorganizes its conformation and composition while making transient contacts with other components. Here, we review the mechanisms of action of Mediator and propose a unifying model for its function. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pulmonary Edema: Classification, Mechanisms of Development, Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Moroz

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary edema remains a topical problem of modern reanimatology. In clinical practice, there is a need for continuous monitoring of the content of extravascular water in the lung and the pulmonary vascular permeability index for the timely detection and treatment of pulmonary edema. This literature review considers the minor mechanisms of pulmonary extravas-cular water exchange in health and in different types of pulmonary edema (acute lung injury, pneumonia, sepsis, postoperative period, burns, injuries etc., as well as the most accessible current (irradiation and dilution studies permitting an estimate of the level of pulmonary extravascular water and the pulmonary vascular permeability index in clinical practice. Key words: pulmonary edema, acute lung injury, pulmonary extravascular water, pulmonary vascular permeability index.

  9. Pulmonary nocardiosis with osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechet, R.; Granier, P.; Mourad, M.; Dufranc, A.; Adoue, D.

    2007-01-01

    We report a case of a 49-year-old female who developed a bronchopneumonia associated with atelectasis of the upper right lobe and back pain of bone origin. Bronchoscopy revealed an endobronchial mass at the origin of the right upper lobe bronchus. Scintigraphy showed three paravertebral spots of the seventh and eighth thoracic vertebrae, without any radiological modification. Culture of lung tissue obtained by trans-parietal punction under CT scan control became positive to Nocardia belonging to the pneumoniae complex. Positive diagnosis of pulmonary nocardiosis associated with two rare localizations was set, one was an endobronchial mass, the other was osteomyelitis of the posterior chest wall. The patient was treated with Trimethoprim ulfamethoxazole and recovered completely. (author)

  10. Mast Cell Inhibition Improves Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bartelds, Beatrijs; van Loon, Rosa Laura E.; Mohaupt, Saffloer; Wijnberg, Hans; Dickinson, Michael G.; Takens, Janny; van Albada, Mirjam; Berger, Rolf M. F.; Boersma, B.

    Background: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive angioproliferative disease with high morbidity and mortality. Although the histopathology is well described, its pathogenesis is largely unknown. We previously identified the increased presence of mast cells and their markers in a

  11. Prediction of tissue-specific cis-regulatory modules using Bayesian networks and regression trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Xiaoyu

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In vertebrates, a large part of gene transcriptional regulation is operated by cis-regulatory modules. These modules are believed to be regulating much of the tissue-specificity of gene expression. Results We develop a Bayesian network approach for identifying cis-regulatory modules likely to regulate tissue-specific expression. The network integrates predicted transcription factor binding site information, transcription factor expression data, and target gene expression data. At its core is a regression tree modeling the effect of combinations of transcription factors bound to a module. A new unsupervised EM-like algorithm is developed to learn the parameters of the network, including the regression tree structure. Conclusion Our approach is shown to accurately identify known human liver and erythroid-specific modules. When applied to the prediction of tissue-specific modules in 10 different tissues, the network predicts a number of important transcription factor combinations whose concerted binding is associated to specific expression.

  12. Macrogenomic engineering via modulation of the scaling of chromatin packing density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almassalha, Luay M; Bauer, Greta M; Wu, Wenli; Cherkezyan, Lusik; Zhang, Di; Kendra, Alexis; Gladstein, Scott; Chandler, John E; VanDerway, David; Seagle, Brandon-Luke L; Ugolkov, Andrey; Billadeau, Daniel D; O'Halloran, Thomas V; Mazar, Andrew P; Roy, Hemant K; Szleifer, Igal; Shahabi, Shohreh; Backman, Vadim

    2017-11-01

    Many human diseases result from the dysregulation of the complex interactions between tens to thousands of genes. However, approaches for the transcriptional modulation of many genes simultaneously in a predictive manner are lacking. Here, through the combination of simulations, systems modelling and in vitro experiments, we provide a physical regulatory framework based on chromatin packing-density heterogeneity for modulating the genomic information space. Because transcriptional interactions are essentially chemical reactions, they depend largely on the local physical nanoenvironment. We show that the regulation of the chromatin nanoenvironment allows for the predictable modulation of global patterns in gene expression. In particular, we show that the rational modulation of chromatin density fluctuations can lead to a decrease in global transcriptional activity and intercellular transcriptional heterogeneity in cancer cells during chemotherapeutic responses to achieve near-complete cancer cell killing in vitro. Our findings represent a 'macrogenomic engineering' approach to modulating the physical structure of chromatin for whole-scale transcriptional modulation.

  13. Transcriptional modulation of genes encoding nitrate reductase in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-10-26

    Oct 26, 2016 ... The free aluminum (Al) content in soil can reach levels that are toxic to plants, and this has frequently .... To prepare the standard curve, .... parts of young plants of sugar cane cultivar IAC91-5155 .... 5155 de cana-de-açúcar.

  14. Nuclear scan of pulmonary hemorrhage in radiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miller, T.; Tanaka, T.

    1979-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis, a disease of unknown etiology most often occuring in children, is characterized by recurring episodes of alveolar consolidation. Exacerbations of pulmonary hemorrhage coincide with episodes of alveolar filling; repeated episodes lead to progressive interstitial fibrosis and eventually to corpulmonale. Serial nuclear scans of the lungs after injection of radiolabeled red blood cells should parallel the pathologic and radiographic findings. We observed the accumulation of radiolabeled red blood cells in the lungs on scan images, a finding not previously reported

  15. Pulmonary endarterectomy in the management of chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Jenkins

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH is a type of pulmonary hypertension, resulting from fibrotic transformation of pulmonary artery clots causing chronic obstruction in macroscopic pulmonary arteries and associated vascular remodelling in the microvasculature. Pulmonary endarterectomy (PEA offers the best chance of symptomatic and prognostic improvement in eligible patients; in expert centres, it has excellent results. Current in-hospital mortality rates are 90% at 1 year and >70% at 10 years. However, PEA, is a complex procedure and relies on a multidisciplinary CTEPH team led by an experienced surgeon to decide on an individual's operability, which is determined primarily by lesion location and the haemodynamic parameters. Therefore, treatment of patients with CTEPH depends largely on subjective judgements of eligibility for surgery by the CTEPH team. Other controversies discussed in this article include eligibility for PEA versus balloon pulmonary angioplasty, the new treatment algorithm in the European Society of Cardiology/European Respiratory Society guidelines and the definition of an “expert centre” for the management of this condition.

  16. [Pulmonary function in patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedov, V B; Popova, L A; Shergina, E A

    2007-01-01

    Vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/VC%, PEF, MEF25, MEF50, MEF75, TLC, TGV, pulmonary residual volume (PRV), R(aw), R(in),, R(ex), DLCO-SB, DLCO-SS, PaO2, and PaCO2 were determined in 103 patients with infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis. Pulmonary dysfunction was detected in 83.5% of the patients. Changes were found in lung volumes and capacities in 63.1%, impaired bronchial patency and pulmonary gas exchange dysfunction were in 60.2 and 41.7%, respectively. The changes in pulmonary volumes and capacities appeared as increased PRV, decreased VC and FVC, and decreased and increased TGV and TLC; impaired bronchial patency presented as decreased PEF, MEF25, MEF50, MEF75, FEV1/VC% and increased R(aw) R(in), and R(ex); pulmonary gas exchange dysfunction manifested itself as reduced DLCO-SB, DLCO-SS, and PaO2 and decreased and increased PaCO2. The magnitude of the observed functional changes was generally slight. Significant disorders were observed rarely and very pronounced ones were exceptional.

  17. [Pulmonary function in patients with disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nefedov, V B; Shergina, E A; Popova, L A

    2007-01-01

    Vital capacity (VC), forced vital capacity (FVC), forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1), FEV1/VC%, PEF, MEF25%, MEF50%, MEF75%, TLS, TGV, pulmonary residual volume (PRV), Raw, Rin, Rex, DLCO-SB, DLCO-SS, PaO2, and PaCO2 were determined in 29 patients with disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis. Pulmonary dysfunction was detected in 93.1% of the patients. Changes were found in lung volumes and capacities in 65.5%, impaired bronchial patency and pulmonary gas exchange dysfunction were in 79.3 and 37.9%, respectively. The changes in pulmonary volumes and capacities appeared as increased PRV, decreased VC, FVC, and TLS, decreased and increased TGV; impaired bronchial patency presented as decreased PEF, MEF25%, MEF50%, MEF75%, and FEV1/VC% and increased Raw, Rin, and Rex; pulmonary gas exchange dysfunction manifested itself as reduced DLCO-SS and PaO2 and decreased and increased PaCO2. The observed functional changes varied from slight to significant and pronounced with a preponderance of small disorders, a lower detection rate of significant disorders, and rare detection of very pronounced ones.

  18. Acrolein effects in pulmonary cells: relevance to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moretto, Nadia; Volpi, Giorgia; Pastore, Fiorella; Facchinetti, Fabrizio

    2012-07-01

    Acrolein (2-propenal) is a highly reactive α,β-unsaturated aldehyde and a respiratory irritant that is ubiquitously present in the environment but that can also be generated endogenously at sites of inflammation. Acrolein is abundant in tobacco smoke, which is the major environmental risk factor for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), and elevated levels of acrolein are found in the lung fluids of COPD patients. Its high electrophilicity makes acrolein notorious for its facile reaction with biological nucleophiles, leading to the modification of proteins and DNA and depletion of antioxidant defenses. As a consequence, acrolein results in oxidative stress as well as altered intracellular signaling and gene transcription/translation. In pulmonary cells, acrolein, at subtoxic concentrations, can activate intracellular stress kinases, alter the production of inflammatory mediators and proteases, modify innate immune response, induce mucus hypersecretion, and damage airway epithelium. A better comprehension of the mechanisms underlying acrolein effects in the airways may suggest novel treatment strategies in COPD. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. Transcriptional regulators of Na, K-ATPase subunits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqin eLi

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic alpha-subunit, the beta-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits have been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease.

  20. Nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cartwright, P; Helin, K

    2000-01-01

    To elicit the transcriptional response following intra- or extracellular stimuli, the signals need to be transmitted to their site of action within the nucleus. The nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of transcription factors is a mechanism mediating this process. The activation and inactivation...... of the transcriptional response is essential for cells to progress through the cell cycle in a normal manner. The involvement of cytoplasmic and nuclear accessory molecules, and the general nuclear membrane transport components, are essential for this process. Although nuclear import and export for different...... transcription factor families are regulated by similar mechanisms, there are several differences that allow for the specific activation of each transcription factor. This review discusses the general import and export pathways found to be common amongst many different transcription factors, and highlights...

  1. Transcriptional Silencing of Retroviral Vectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Anders Henrik; Duch, M.; Pedersen, F.S.

    1996-01-01

    . Extinction of long-term vector expression has been observed after implantation of transduced hematopoietic cells as well as fibroblasts, myoblasts and hepatocytes. Here we review the influence of vector structure, integration site and cell type on transcriptional silencing. While down-regulation of proviral...... transcription is known from a number of cellular and animal models, major insight has been gained from studies in the germ line and embryonal cells of the mouse. Key elements for the transfer and expression of retroviral vectors, such as the viral transcriptional enhancer and the binding site for the t......RNA primer for reverse transcription may have a major influence on transcriptional silencing. Alterations of these elements of the vector backbone as well as the use of internal promoter elements from housekeeping genes may contribute to reduce transcriptional silencing. The use of cell culture and animal...

  2. Pulmonary artery pulse pressure and wave reflection in chronic pulmonary thromboembolism and primary pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelain, V; Hervé, P; Lecarpentier, Y; Duroux, P; Simonneau, G; Chemla, D

    2001-03-15

    The purpose of this time-domain study was to compare pulmonary artery (PA) pulse pressure and wave reflection in chronic pulmonary thromboembolism (CPTE) and primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH). Pulmonary artery pressure waveform analysis provides a simple and accurate estimation of right ventricular afterload in the time-domain. Chronic pulmonary thromboembolism and PPH are both responsible for severe pulmonary hypertension. Chronic pulmonary thromboembolism and PPH predominantly involve proximal and distal arteries, respectively, and may lead to differences in PA pressure waveform. High-fidelity PA pressure was recorded in 14 patients (7 men/7 women, 46 +/- 14 years) with CPTE (n = 7) and PPH (n = 7). We measured thermodilution cardiac output, mean PA pressure (MPAP), PA pulse pressure (PAPP = systolic - diastolic PAP) and normalized PAPP (nPAPP = PPAP/MPAP). Wave reflection was quantified by measuring Ti, that is, the time between pressure upstroke and the systolic inflection point (Pi), deltaP, that is, the systolic PAP minus Pi difference, and the augmentation index (deltaP/PPAP). At baseline, CPTE and PPH had similar cardiac index (2.4 +/- 0.4 vs. 2.5 +/- 0.5 l/min/m2), mean PAP (59 +/- 9 vs. 59 +/- 10 mm Hg), PPAP (57 +/- 13 vs. 53 +/- 13 mm Hg) and nPPAP (0.97 +/- 0.16 vs. 0.89 +/- 0.13). Chronic pulmonary thromboembolism had shorter Ti (90 +/- 17 vs. 126 +/- 16 ms, p PPAP (0.26 +/- 0.01 vs. 0.09 +/- 0.07, p < 0.01). Our study indicated that: 1) CPTE and PPH with severe pulmonary hypertension had similar PA pulse pressure, and 2) wave reflection is elevated in both groups, and CPTE had increased and anticipated wave reflection as compared with PPH, thus suggesting differences in the pulsatile component of right ventricular afterload.

  3. DNA topology and transcription

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouzine, Fedor; Levens, David; Baranello, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Chromatin is a complex assembly that compacts DNA inside the nucleus while providing the necessary level of accessibility to regulatory factors conscripted by cellular signaling systems. In this superstructure, DNA is the subject of mechanical forces applied by variety of molecular motors. Rather than being a rigid stick, DNA possesses dynamic structural variability that could be harnessed during critical steps of genome functioning. The strong relationship between DNA structure and key genomic processes necessitates the study of physical constrains acting on the double helix. Here we provide insight into the source, dynamics, and biology of DNA topological domains in the eukaryotic cells and summarize their possible involvement in gene transcription. We emphasize recent studies that might inspire and impact future experiments on the involvement of DNA topology in cellular functions. PMID:24755522

  4. Eukaryotic transcription factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Staby, Lasse; O'Shea, Charlotte; Willemoës, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Gene-specific transcription factors (TFs) are key regulatory components of signaling pathways, controlling, for example, cell growth, development, and stress responses. Their biological functions are determined by their molecular structures, as exemplified by their structured DNA-binding domains...... regions with function-related, short sequence motifs and molecular recognition features with structural propensities. This review focuses on molecular aspects of TFs, which represent paradigms of ID-related features. Through specific examples, we review how the ID-associated flexibility of TFs enables....... It is furthermore emphasized how classic biochemical concepts like allostery, conformational selection, induced fit, and feedback regulation are undergoing a revival with the appreciation of ID. The review also describes the most recent advances based on computational simulations of ID-based interaction mechanisms...

  5. Cardiovascular function in pulmonary emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visca, Dina; Aiello, Marina; Chetta, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic cardiovascular disease, such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias, have a strong influence on each other, and systemic inflammation has been considered as the main linkage between them. On the other hand, airflow limitation may markedly affect lung mechanics in terms of static and dynamic hyperinflation, especially in pulmonary emphysema, and they can in turn influence cardiac performance as well. Skeletal mass depletion, which is a common feature in COPD especially in pulmonary emphysema patients, may have also a role in cardiovascular function of these patients, irrespective of lung damage. We reviewed the emerging evidence that highlights the role of lung mechanics and muscle mass impairment on ventricular volumes, stroke volume, and stroke work at rest and on exercise in the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Patients with emphysema may differ among COPD population even in terms of cardiovascular function.

  6. Occupational chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omland, Oyvind; Würtz, Else Toft; Aasen, Tor Børvig

    2014-01-01

    Occupational-attributable chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) presents a substantial health challenge. Focusing on spirometric criteria for airflow obstruction, this review of occupational COPD includes both population-wide and industry-specific exposures....

  7. Etiopathogenesis of neurogenic pulmonary edema

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šedý, Jiří

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 160, 5-6 (2010), s. 152-154 ISSN 0043-5341 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : neurogenic pulmonary edema * intracranial pressure * sympathetic system Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  8. Pulmonary embolism and nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peltier, P.; Planchon, B.; Faucal, P. de; Touze, M.D.; Dupas, B.

    1988-01-01

    Risks related to pulmonary embolism require use of diagnostic procedures with good sensitivity, and the potential complications of effective anticoagulant therapy require procedures with good specificity. Clinical signs are not more accurate for diagnosis of pulmonary than are ECG, blood gas and chest X ray examinations. Perfusion-ventilation scintigraphy has good diagnostic accuracy approaching that of pulmonary angiography which remains the gold standard. Since pulmonary embolism is usually a complication of deep venous thrombosis, distal clot detection should be associated with lung explorations. Plethysmography, ultrasonography, doppler studies and scintigraphy of the lower limbs could provide data supplementing those of contrast venography. The value and role of these examinations are analyzed and discussed in terms of different clinical situations [fr

  9. Liver Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube About PHA Contact Join Careers Store My Account Donate Patients About PH Diagnosis Treatments Newly ... areas © 2017 Pulmonary Hypertension Association. All Rights Reserved. Facebook Twitter Instagram YouTube

  10. Pulmonary manifestations from systemic vasculitides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, M.; Both, M.; Schnabel, A.

    2007-01-01

    Pulmonary vasculitides predominantly involve the small arterioles, capillaries and venules and include Wegener's granulomatosis, microscopic polyangiitis and the Churg-Strauss syndrome. Takayasu's arteriitis is a large vessel disease and may affect the main pulmonary arteries causing stenoses and occlusions. Knowledge of the natural course of disease and of clinical manifestations of pulmonary disease is helpful for an understanding of imaging findings. For this reason this article gives an overview not only of radiologic findings in chest X-ray and high resolution CT of the lungs but as well of clinical aspects of pulmonary vasculitides. Next to determination of disease extension the determination of disease activity is in the foreground of diagnostic imaging in vasculitides. Within this context principals of immunosuppressive therapy will be recognized. (orig.)

  11. CT of diffuse pulmonary diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Itoh, Harumi; Murata, Kiyoshi; Todo, Giro

    1987-01-01

    While the theory of chest radiographic interpretation in diagnosing diffuse pulmonary diseases has not yet been established, X-ray computed tomography (CT), having intrinsic high contrast resolution and improved spatial resolution, has proved to offer important imformation concerning the location and invasion of diffuse pulmonary lesions. This study related to CT-pathologic correlation, focusing on perivascular interstitial space and secondary pulmonary lobule at macroscopic levels. The perivascular interstitial space was thickened as a result of the infiltration of cancer, granulomas, and inflammatory cells. This finding appeared as irregular contour of the blood vessel on CT. Centrilobular nodules were distributed at the tip of the bronchus or pulmonary artery on CT. The distance from the terminal and respiratory bronchioles to the lobular border was 2 to 3 mm. Lobular lesions were delineated as clear margin on CT. Contribution of these CT features to chest radiographic interpretation must await further studies. (Namekawa, K.)

  12. Nontuberculous pulmonary mycobacteriosis in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andréjak, Claire; Thomsen, Vibeke Ø; Johansen, Isik Somuncu

    2010-01-01

    RATIONALE: Few population-based data are available regarding nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) pulmonary disease epidemiology and prognosis. OBJECTIVES: To examine NTM pulmonary colonization incidence, disease incidence, and prognostic factors. METHODS: All adults in Denmark with at least one NTM......-positive pulmonary specimen during 1997 to 2008 were identified using national medical databases and were categorized as having possible or definite NTM disease or colonization. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: We calculated annual age-standardized NTM incidence rates and adjusted hazard ratios (HR) of death...... associated with patient age, sex, comorbidity, NTM species, and NTM disease status. Of 1,282 adults with 2,666 NTM-positive pulmonary specimens, 335 (26%) had definite NTM disease, 238 (19%) possible disease, and 709 (55%) colonization only. NTM incidence rates decreased until 2002, followed by an increase...

  13. Total anomalous pulmonary venous return

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pulmonary venous return, x-ray References Fraser CD, Kane LC. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend CM Jr, ... 62. Review Date 10/17/2017 Updated by: Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, ...

  14. Rhabdomyosarcoma of the pulmonary artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barth, J.; Lehmann, H.; Thermann, M.; Horny, H.P.; Stein, H.; Kiel Univ.; Kiel Univ.; Kiel Univ.

    1982-01-01

    A case of a 55-year-old man with the histological diagnosis rhabdomyosarcoma of the left pulmonary artery has been seen. Lung scanning and pulmonary arteriography are the clues for the diagnostical procedure. 55 cases from the literature are reviewed and clinical findings of the early and late stages of the diseases are discussed. Surgical treatment is the therapy of choice if ever possible; aggressive chemotherapy might be an acceptable alternative. (orig.) [de

  15. Spontaneous regression of pulmonary bullae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Satoh, H.; Ishikawa, H.; Ohtsuka, M.; Sekizawa, K.

    2002-01-01

    The natural history of pulmonary bullae is often characterized by gradual, progressive enlargement. Spontaneous regression of bullae is, however, very rare. We report a case in which complete resolution of pulmonary bullae in the left upper lung occurred spontaneously. The management of pulmonary bullae is occasionally made difficult because of gradual progressive enlargement associated with abnormal pulmonary function. Some patients have multiple bulla in both lungs and/or have a history of pulmonary emphysema. Others have a giant bulla without emphysematous change in the lungs. Our present case had treated lung cancer with no evidence of local recurrence. He had no emphysematous change in lung function test and had no complaints, although the high resolution CT scan shows evidence of underlying minimal changes of emphysema. Ortin and Gurney presented three cases of spontaneous reduction in size of bulla. Interestingly, one of them had a marked decrease in the size of a bulla in association with thickening of the wall of the bulla, which was observed in our patient. This case we describe is of interest, not only because of the rarity with which regression of pulmonary bulla has been reported in the literature, but also because of the spontaneous improvements in the radiological picture in the absence of overt infection or tumor. Copyright (2002) Blackwell Science Pty Ltd

  16. Treatment of pediatric pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Hawkins

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Amy Hawkins, Robert TullohDepartment of Congenital Heart Disease, Bristol Royal Hospital for Children, Bristol UKAbstract: Pulmonary hypertension was once thought to be a rare condition and only managed in specialized centers. Now however, with the advent of echocardiography, it is found in many clinical scenarios, in the neonate with chronic lung disease, in the acute setting in the intensive care unit, in connective tissue disease and in cardiology pre- and postoperatively. We have a better understanding of the pathological process and have a range of medication which is starting to be able to palliate this previously fatal condition. This review describes the areas that are known in this condition and those that are less familiar. The basic physiology behind pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary vascular disease is explained. The histopathologic process and the various diagnostic tools are described and are followed by the current and future therapy at our disposal.Keywords: pulmonary hypertension, congenital heart disease, pulmonary vascular resistance, pulmonary vasodilators

  17. Lung imaging in pulmonary disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taplin, G.V.; Chopra, S.K.

    1976-01-01

    Although it has been recognized for several years that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can cause lung perfusion defects which may simulate pulmonary embolism, relatively little use has been made of either the radioxenon or the radioaerosol inhalation lung imaging procedures until the last few years as a means of distinguishing pulmonary embolism (P.E.) from COPD is reported. Recent experience is reported with the use of both of these procedures in comparison with pulmonary function tests for the early detection of COPD in population studies and also in P.E. suspects. Equal emphasis is given to simultaneous aerosol ventilation-perfusion (V/P) imaging in the differential diagnosis of P.E. Finally, this paper is concerned with new developments in regional lung diffusion imaging following the inhalation of radioactive gases and rapidly absorbed radioaerosols. Their experimental basis is presented and their potential clinical applications in pulmonary embolism are discussed. As a result of these investigations, a functional (V/P) diagnosis of pulmonary embolism in patients may be possible in the near future with a sequential radioaerosol inhalation procedure alone

  18. Pulmonary agenesis: two cases reported

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denis Yaraví Solano-Vázquez

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary agenesis is a rare anomaly (1 in 15 000 live births which consists in a total absence or severe hypoplasia of one or both lungs. The clinical spectrum of the unilateral agenesis could vary from early and severe respiratory distress, recurrent pneumonia to being an incidental finding. The prognosis is based on the presence of associated congenital abnormalities. Material and methods: We present two cases of unilateral pulmonary agenesis in patients at Tlaxcala’s Children Hospital during 2012. Results: Report details the case of a one-month old boy with left pulmonary agenesis and interatrial communication and mild pulmonary arterial hypertension. He had two resolved pneumonia incidents. The other case was a one-month old girl with right pulmonary agenesis, associated to multiple heart malformations who evolved to respiratory failure, heart failure and death.Conclusions: Pulmonary agenesis is a rare anomaly. Its outcome and prognosis varies with the hemodynamics related to its location and associated malformations.

  19. Balloon pulmonary angioplasty: a treatment option for inoperable patients with chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiko eOgawa

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available In chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, stenoses or obstructions of the pulmonary arteries due to organized thrombi can cause an elevation in pulmonary artery resistance, which in turn can result in pulmonary hypertension. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension can be cured surgically by pulmonary endarterectomy; however, patients deemed unsuitable for pulmonary endarterectomy due to lesion, advanced age, or comorbidities have a poor prognosis and limited treatment options. Recently, advances have been made in balloon pulmonary angioplasty for these patients, and this review highlights this recent progress.

  20. [Expression of high mobility group box-1 in the lung tissue and serum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiao-min; Yang, Hua

    2013-07-01

    To explore the expression of high mobility group box-1 (HMGB1) in the lung tissue and serum of patients with pulmonary tuberculosis and to explore its relationship with tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interleukin(IL)-1β. Sixty samples of lung tissues were obtained from patients with pulmonary tuberculosis who had underwent pneumonectomy in Department of Chest Surgery, First Affiliated Hospital of Zunyi Medical College from June 2010 to December 2011. At the same period, 40 normal lung samples were also obtained from patients with pulmonary contusion and lung cancer by surgical resections as the control group. The mRNA expressions of HMGB1 was detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and the protein level of HMGB1 was measured by immunohistochemical staining of tissue microarrays in lung tissue. Blood samples were taken from 89 patients with active pulmonary tuberculosis (pulmonary tuberculosis group), including hematogenous disseminated pulmonary tuberculosis (type II) in 35 cases and secondary pulmonary tuberculosis (type III) in 54 cases, and 50 healthy volunteers (control group). Furthermore, the 54 patients with secondary pulmonary tuberculosis were divided into different subgroups according to cavity formation and the lung fields involved: patients without lung cavity (35 cases) vs those with lung cavity (19 cases), patients with involvement of pulmonary tuberculosis (69 ± 29) was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (22 ± 12) (t = 2.389, P pulmonary tuberculosis (786 ± 86) was significantly higher than that in normal lung tissue (202 ± 60) (t = 3.872, P pulmonary tuberculosis group were (5.0 ± 3.2) µg/L, (118 ± 77) ng/L and (33 ± 20) ng/L, respectively, which were significantly higher than those in the control group [(1.7 ± 1.0) µg/L, (40 ± 11) ng/L and (18 ± 12) ng/L, respectively], the respective t values being -0.928, 4.268 and 11.064, all P pulmonary tuberculosis, the serum concentration of HMGB

  1. [Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchard, E; Gabriel, F; Jeanne-Leroyer, C; Servant, V; Dumas, P-Y

    2018-02-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is an important cause of morbidity and mortality in a wide range of patients. Early recognition and diagnosis have become a major focus in improving the management and outcomes of this life-threatening disease. IPA typically occurs during a period of severe and prolonged neutropenia. However, solid organ transplant recipients, patients under immunosuppressive therapy or hospitalized in intensive care units are also at risk. The diagnosis is suspected in the presence of a combination of clinical, biological and CT scan evidence. The microbiological diagnostic strategy should be adapted to the patient's profile. Conventional methods with culture and species identification remain the standard but early diagnosis has been improved by the use of biomarkers such as galactomannan antigen in serum or in bronchoalveolar lavage. The epidemiology of IPA should change with the increased use of antifungal prophylactic regimens and the arrival of targeted therapies. Other microbiological tools, such as PCR and other biomarkers, are currently being assessed. IPA must be considered in a wide range of patients. Its prognosis remains poor despite progress in the microbiological diagnosis and therapeutic management. Copyright © 2018 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Measurement of regional pulmonary blood volume in patients with increased pulmonary blood flow or pulmonary arterial hypertension

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wollmer, P.; Rozcovek, A.; Rhodes, C.G.; Allan, R.M.; Maseri, A.

    1984-01-01

    The effects of chronic increase in pulmonary blood flow and chronic pulmonary hypertension on regional pulmonary blood volume was measured in two groups of patients. One group of patients had intracardiac, left-to-right shunts without appreciable pulmonary hypertension, and the other consisted of patients with Eisenmenger's syndrome or primary pulmonary hypertension, i.e. patients with normal or reduced blood flow and severe pulmonary hypertension. A technique based on positron tomography was used to measure lung density (by transmission scanning) and regional pulmonary blood volume (after inhalation of /sup 11/CO). The distribution of pulmonary blood volume was more uniform in patients with chronic increase in pulmonary blood flow than in normal subjects. There were also indications of an absolute increase in intrapulmonary blood volume by about 15%. In patients with chronic pulmonary arterial hypertension, the distribution of pulmonary blood volume was also abnormally uniform. There was, however, no indication that overall intrapulmonary blood volume was substantially different from normal subjects. The abnormally uniform distribution of pulmonary blood volume can be explained by recruitment and/or dilatation of vascular beds. Intrapulmonary blood volume appears to be increased in patients with intracardiac, left-to-right shunts. With the development of pulmonary hypertension, intrapulmonary blood volume falls, which may be explained by reactive changes in the vasculature and/or obliteration of capillaries

  3. Statistical significance of cis-regulatory modules

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smith Andrew D

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is becoming increasingly important for researchers to be able to scan through large genomic regions for transcription factor binding sites or clusters of binding sites forming cis-regulatory modules. Correspondingly, there has been a push to develop algorithms for the rapid detection and assessment of cis-regulatory modules. While various algorithms for this purpose have been introduced, most are not well suited for rapid, genome scale scanning. Results We introduce methods designed for the detection and statistical evaluation of cis-regulatory modules, modeled as either clusters of individual binding sites or as combinations of sites with constrained organization. In order to determine the statistical significance of module sites, we first need a method to determine the statistical significance of single transcription factor binding site matches. We introduce a straightforward method of estimating the statistical significance of single site matches using a database of known promoters to produce data structures that can be used to estimate p-values for binding site matches. We next introduce a technique to calculate the statistical significance of the arrangement of binding sites within a module using a max-gap model. If the module scanned for has defined organizational parameters, the probability of the module is corrected to account for organizational constraints. The statistical significance of single site matches and the architecture of sites within the module can be combined to provide an overall estimation of statistical significance of cis-regulatory module sites. Conclusion The methods introduced in this paper allow for the detection and statistical evaluation of single transcription factor binding sites and cis-regulatory modules. The features described are implemented in the Search Tool for Occurrences of Regulatory Motifs (STORM and MODSTORM software.

  4. Successful treatment of idiopathic pulmonary capillaritis with intravenous cyclophosphamide.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flanagan, Frances

    2013-03-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary hemosiderosis (IPH), a subtype of diffuse alveolar hemorrhage is a rare condition, first described by Virchow in 1864. Historically, it manifests in children in the first decade of life with the combination of hemoptysis, iron deficiency anemia, and alveolar infiltrates on chest radiograph. More recently, diffuse alveolar hemorrhage has been classified by the absence or presence of pulmonary capillaritis (PC), the latter carrying a potential for a poorer outcome. While systemic corticosteroids remain the first line treatment option, other immune modulators have been trailed including hydroxychloroquine, azathioprine, 6-mercaptopurine, and cyclophosphamide with varying results. Our case demonstrates for the first time, the successful use of intravenous cyclophosphamide in the management of chronic idiopathic PC.

  5. Growth factors in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: relative roles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen Jeremy T

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Treatment of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients has evolved very slowly; the fundamental approach of corticosteroids alone or in combination with other immunosuppressive agents has had little impact on long-term survival. The continued use of corticosteroids is justified because of the lack of a more effective alternative. Current research indicates that the mechanisms driving idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis reflect abnormal, dysregulated wound healing within the lung, involving increased activity and possibly exaggerated responses by a spectrum of profibrogenic growth factors. An understanding of the roles of these growth factors, and the way in which they modulate events at cellular level, could lead to more targeted therapeutic strategies, improving patients' quality of life and survival.

  6. Pulmonary arterial hypertension secondary to chronic thromboemboli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crysikopoulos, H.; Forrest, J.V.; Olson, L.K.; Roberts, A.C.

    1989-01-01

    The authors report their experience in 150 patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension secondary to chronic pulmonary embolism (CPE). Plain film findings are variable, commonly nonspecific. Occasionally nonuniformity of pulmonary perfusion or truncation of central pulmonary arteries suggest CPE. Multiple, large, unmatched perfusion defects are the most common scintigraphic observations. CT can exclude conditions mimicking CPE, particularly fibrosing mediastinitis. Pulmonary arteriography depicts the location and distribution of emboli. CPE is becoming an increasingly important entity to recognize because of available surgical treatment. Thromboendarterectomy may improve functional status and survival. The diagnosis should be considered in any patient with pulmonary arterial hypertension

  7. An Optogenetic Platform for Real-Time, Single-Cell Interrogation of Stochastic Transcriptional Regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rullan, Marc; Benzinger, Dirk; Schmidt, Gregor W; Milias-Argeitis, Andreas; Khammash, Mustafa

    2018-05-17

    Transcription is a highly regulated and inherently stochastic process. The complexity of signal transduction and gene regulation makes it challenging to analyze how the dynamic activity of transcriptional regulators affects stochastic transcription. By combining a fast-acting, photo-regulatable transcription factor with nascent RNA quantification in live cells and an experimental setup for precise spatiotemporal delivery of light inputs, we constructed a platform for the real-time, single-cell interrogation of transcription in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that transcriptional activation and deactivation are fast and memoryless. By analyzing the temporal activity of individual cells, we found that transcription occurs in bursts, whose duration and timing are modulated by transcription factor activity. Using our platform, we regulated transcription via light-driven feedback loops at the single-cell level. Feedback markedly reduced cell-to-cell variability and led to qualitative differences in cellular transcriptional dynamics. Our platform establishes a flexible method for studying transcriptional dynamics in single cells. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Transcriptional Programs Controlling Perinatal Lung Maturation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Yanhua; Besnard, Valérie; Ikegami, Machiko; Wert, Susan E.; Heffner, Caleb; Murray, Stephen A.; Donahue, Leah Rae; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    The timing of lung maturation is controlled precisely by complex genetic and cellular programs. Lung immaturity following preterm birth frequently results in Respiratory Distress Syndrome (RDS) and Broncho-Pulmonary Dysplasia (BPD), which are leading causes of mortality and morbidity in preterm infants. Mechanisms synchronizing gestational length and lung maturation remain to be elucidated. In this study, we designed a genome-wide mRNA expression time-course study from E15.5 to Postnatal Day 0 (PN0) using lung RNAs from C57BL/6J (B6) and A/J mice that differ in gestational length by ∼30 hr (B6controlling lung maturation. We identified both temporal and strain dependent gene expression patterns during lung maturation. For time dependent changes, cell adhesion, vasculature development, and lipid metabolism/transport were major bioprocesses induced during the saccular stage of lung development at E16.5–E17.5. CEBPA, PPARG, VEGFA, CAV1 and CDH1 were found to be key signaling and transcriptional regulators of these processes. Innate defense/immune responses were induced at later gestational ages (E18.5–20.5), STAT1, AP1, and EGFR being important regulators of these responses. Expression of RNAs associated with the cell cycle and chromatin assembly was repressed during prenatal lung maturation and was regulated by FOXM1, PLK1, chromobox, and high mobility group families of transcription factors. Strain dependent lung mRNA expression differences peaked at E18.5. At this time, mRNAs regulating surfactant and innate immunity were more abundantly expressed in lungs of B6 (short gestation) than in A/J (long gestation) mice, while expression of genes involved in chromatin assembly and histone modification were expressed at lower levels in B6 than in A/J mice. The present study systemically mapped key regulators, bioprocesses, and transcriptional networks controlling lung maturation, providing the basis for new therapeutic strategies to enhance lung function in preterm

  9. Identification of unstable network modules reveals disease modules associated with the progression of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masataka Kikuchi

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD, the most common cause of dementia, is associated with aging, and it leads to neuron death. Deposits of amyloid β and aberrantly phosphorylated tau protein are known as pathological hallmarks of AD, but the underlying mechanisms have not yet been revealed. A high-throughput gene expression analysis previously showed that differentially expressed genes accompanying the progression of AD were more down-regulated than up-regulated in the later stages of AD. This suggested that the molecular networks and their constituent modules collapsed along with AD progression. In this study, by using gene expression profiles and protein interaction networks (PINs, we identified the PINs expressed in three brain regions: the entorhinal cortex (EC, hippocampus (HIP and superior frontal gyrus (SFG. Dividing the expressed PINs into modules, we examined the stability of the modules with AD progression and with normal aging. We found that in the AD modules, the constituent proteins, interactions and cellular functions were not maintained between consecutive stages through all brain regions. Interestingly, the modules were collapsed with AD progression, specifically in the EC region. By identifying the modules that were affected by AD pathology, we found the transcriptional regulation-associated modules that interact with the proteasome-associated module via UCHL5 hub protein, which is a deubiquitinating enzyme. Considering PINs as a system made of network modules, we found that the modules relevant to the transcriptional regulation are disrupted in the EC region, which affects the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

  10. Pulmonary arteriography by digital subtraction angiographic method in cyanotic heart disease with pulmonary stenosis or pulmonary atresia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobayashi, Junjiro; Hirose, Hajime; Nakano, Susumu

    1985-01-01

    Pulmonary arteriography was performed by digital subtraction angiographic (DSA) method in 10 patients with cyanotic heart disease associated with pulmonary stenosis or pulmonary atresia. Ten patients consisted of five patients with tetralogy of Fallot, three with single ventricle and pulmonary stenosis, and two with pseudotruncus arteriosus. Hepato-clavicular position was taken in four patients. Pulmonary artery and its main branches were opacified and recognized clearly, and their diameter could be measured accurately with a small amount of contrast medium. There was a good correlation between the diameter of pulmonary artery measured by DSA and that measured by conventional pulmonary arteriography. DSA is a useful method for evaluating the size and the stenosis of pulmonary artery especially in small cyanotic infants. (author)

  11. Increased IgD milk antibody responses in a patient with Down's syndrome, pulmonary hemosiderosis and cor pulmonale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galant, S; Nussbaum, E; Wittner, R; DeWeck, A L; Heiner, D C

    1983-10-01

    IgD antibody responses to cow's milk were investigated in a two-year-old black boy with evidence of pulmonary hemosiderosis and pulmonary hypertension. Initially a broad spectrum of immunologic responses to cow's milk were observed including IgD, IgE, and precipitin antibodies. Specific IgD antibody responses to cow's milk could be modulated in terms of challenge or elimination and correlated with the clinical course. It is possible that IgD antibodies may be important in milk-related pulmonary hemosiderosis.

  12. Autoregulation of Co-Chaperone BAG3 Gene Transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Gentilella, Antonio; Khalili, Kamel

    2009-01-01

    The Bcl-2-associated athanogene, BAG, protein family through their BAG domain associates with the heat shock protein 70 (HSP-70) and modulates its chaperone activity. One member of this family, BAG3, appears to play an important role in protein homeostasis, as its expression promotes cell survival by preventing polyubiquitination of Hsp-70 client proteins. Expression of BAG3 is enhanced by a variety of stress-inducing agents. Here we describe a role for BAG3 to modulate transcription of its o...

  13. Elastin receptor (S-gal) occupancy by elastin peptides modulates T-cell response during murine emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghraoui-Kheddar, Aïda; Pierre, Alexandre; Sellami, Mehdi; Audonnet, Sandra; Lemaire, Flora; Le Naour, Richard

    2017-09-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and emphysema are associated with increased elastin peptides (EP) production because of excessive breakdown of lung connective tissue. We recently reported that exposure of mice to EP elicited hallmark features of emphysema. EP effects are largely mediated through a receptor complex that includes the elastin-binding protein spliced-galactosidase (S-gal). In previous studies, we established a correlation between cytokine production and S-gal protein expression in EP-treated immune cells. In this study, we investigated the S-gal-dependent EP effects on T-helper (Th) and T-cytotoxic (Tc) responses during murine EP-triggered pulmonary inflammation. C57BL/6J mice were endotracheally instilled with the valine-glycine-valine-alanine-proline-glycine (VGVAPG) elastin peptide, and, 21 days after treatment, local and systemic T-lymphocyte phenotypes were analyzed at cytokine and transcription factor expression levels by multicolor flow cytometry. Exposure of mice to the VGVAPG peptide resulted in a significant increase in the proportion of the CD4 + and CD8 + T cells expressing the cytokines IFN-γ or IL-17a and the transcription factors T-box expressed in T cells or retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt) without effects on IL-4 and Gata-binding protein 3 to DNA sequence [A/T]GATA[A/G] expression. These effects were maximized when each T-cell subpopulation was challenged ex vivo with EP, and they were inhibited in vivo when an analogous peptide antagonizing the EP/S-gal interactions was instilled together with the VGVAPG peptide. This study demonstrates that, during murine emphysema, EP-S-gal interactions contribute to a Th-1 and Th-17 proinflammatory T-cell response combined with a Tc-1 response. Our study also highlights the S-gal receptor as a putative pharmacological target to modulate such an immune response. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Pulmonary exposure to carbonaceous nanomaterials and sperm quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skovmand, Astrid; Jacobsen Lauvås, Anna; Christensen, Preben; Vogel, Ulla; Sørig Hougaard, Karin; Goericke-Pesch, Sandra

    2018-01-31

    Semen quality parameters are potentially affected by nanomaterials in several ways: Inhaled nanosized particles are potent inducers of pulmonary inflammation, leading to the release of inflammatory mediators. Small amounts of particles may translocate from the lungs into the lung capillaries, enter the systemic circulation and ultimately reach the testes. Both the inflammatory response and the particles may induce oxidative stress which can directly affect spermatogenesis. Furthermore, spermatogenesis may be indirectly affected by changes in the hormonal milieu as systemic inflammation is a potential modulator of endocrine function. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of pulmonary exposure to carbonaceous nanomaterials on sperm quality parameters in an experimental mouse model. Effects on sperm quality after pulmonary inflammation induced by carbonaceous nanomaterials were investigated by intratracheally instilling sexually mature male NMRI mice with four different carbonaceous nanomaterials dispersed in nanopure water: graphene oxide (18 μg/mouse/i.t.), Flammruss 101, Printex 90 and SRM1650b (0.1 mg/mouse/i.t. each) weekly for seven consecutive weeks. Pulmonary inflammation was determined by differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Epididymal sperm concentration and motility were measured by computer-assisted sperm analysis. Epididymal sperm viability and morphological abnormalities were assessed manually using Hoechst 33,342/PI flourescent and Spermac staining, respectively. Epididymal sperm were assessed with regard to sperm DNA integrity (damage). Daily sperm production was measured in the testis, and testosterone levels were measured in blood plasma by ELISA. Neutrophil numbers in the bronchoalveolar fluid showed sustained inflammatory response in the nanoparticle-exposed groups one week after the last instillation. No significant changes in epididymal sperm parameters, daily sperm production or plasma testosterone levels

  15. Negative-Pressure Pulmonary Edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Mallar; Kallet, Richard H; Ware, Lorraine B; Matthay, Michael A

    2016-10-01

    Negative-pressure pulmonary edema (NPPE) or postobstructive pulmonary edema is a well-described cause of acute respiratory failure that occurs after intense inspiratory effort against an obstructed airway, usually from upper airway infection, tumor, or laryngospasm. Patients with NPPE generate very negative airway pressures, which augment transvascular fluid filtration and precipitate interstitial and alveolar edema. Pulmonary edema fluid collected from most patients with NPPE has a low protein concentration, suggesting hydrostatic forces as the primary mechanism for the pathogenesis of NPPE. Supportive care should be directed at relieving the upper airway obstruction by endotracheal intubation or cricothyroidotomy, institution of lung-protective positive-pressure ventilation, and diuresis unless the patient is in shock. Resolution of the pulmonary edema is usually rapid, in part because alveolar fluid clearance mechanisms are intact. In this review, we discuss the clinical presentation, pathophysiology, and management of negative-pressure or postobstructive pulmonary edema. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Aerobic exercise in pulmonary rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Brasileiro de Vasconcelos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review on the usefulness of aerobic exercise in pulmonary rehabilitation. This is an exploratory study of literature through the electronic databases Medline, Lilacs, Scielo, Pubmed and Google Scholar, published between 1996 and 2012, conducted during the period February to May 2012 with the following keywords: COPD, pulmonary rehabilitation, aerobic exercises, physical training, quality of life. The change in pulmonary function and dysfunction of skeletal muscles that result in exercise intolerance and reduced fitness and may cause social isolation, depression, anxiety and addiction. The training exercise is the most important component of the program of pulmonary rehabilitation where the aerobic training provides consistent results in clinical improvement in levels of exercise tolerance and decreased dyspnea generating more benefits to the body, reducing the chance of cardiovascular disease and improves quality and expectation of life. We demonstrated that the use of aerobic exercise in pulmonary rehabilitation program, allows an improvement of motor skills, decreased muscle fatigue and deconditioning, reducing sedentary lifestyle; however, has little or no effect on the reduction of strength and atrophy muscle.

  17. AEROBIC EXERCISE IN PULMONARY REHABILITATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiago Brasileiro de Vasconcelos

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to conduct a literature review on the usefulness of aerobic exercise in pulmonary rehabilitation. This is an exploratory study of literature through the electronic databases Medline, Lilacs, Scielo, Pubmed and Google Scholar, published between 1996 and 2012, conducted during the period February to May 2012 with the following keywords: COPD, pulmonary rehabilitation, aerobic exercises, physical training, quality of life. The change in pulmonary function and dysfunction of skeletal muscles that result in exercise intolerance and reduced fitness and may cause social isolation, depression, anxiety and addiction. The training exercise is the most important component of the program of pulmonary rehabilitation where the aerobic training provides consistent results in clinical improvement in levels of exercise tolerance and decreased dyspnea generating more benefits to the body, reducing the chance of cardiovascular disease and improves quality and expectation of life. We demonstrated that the use of aerobic exercise in pulmonary rehabilitation program, allows an improvement of motor skills, decreased muscle fatigue and deconditioning, reducing sedentary lifestyle; however, has little or no effect on the reduction of strength and atrophy muscle.

  18. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  19. SPDEF is required for mouse pulmonary goblet cell differentiation and regulates a network of genes associated with mucus production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Gang; Korfhagen, Thomas R; Xu, Yan; Kitzmiller, Joseph; Wert, Susan E; Maeda, Yutaka; Gregorieff, Alexander; Clevers, Hans; Whitsett, Jeffrey A

    2009-10-01

    Various acute and chronic inflammatory stimuli increase the number and activity of pulmonary mucus-producing goblet cells, and goblet cell hyperplasia and excess mucus production are central to the pathogenesis of chronic pulmonary diseases. However, little is known about the transcriptional programs that regulate goblet cell differentiation. Here, we show that SAM-pointed domain-containing Ets-like factor (SPDEF) controls a transcriptional program critical for pulmonary goblet cell differentiation in mice. Initial cell-lineage-tracing analysis identified nonciliated secretory epithelial cells, known as Clara cells, as the progenitors of goblet cells induced by pulmonary allergen exposure in vivo. Furthermore, in vivo expression of SPDEF in Clara cells caused rapid and reversible goblet cell differentiation in the absence of cell proliferation. This was associated with enhanced expression of genes regulating goblet cell differentiation and protein glycosylation, including forkhead box A3 (Foxa3), anterior gradient 2 (Agr2), and glucosaminyl (N-acetyl) transferase 3, mucin type (Gcnt3). Consistent with these findings, levels of SPDEF and FOXA3 were increased in mouse goblet cells after sensitization with pulmonary allergen, and the proteins were colocalized in goblet cells lining the airways of patients with chronic lung diseases. Deletion of the mouse Spdef gene resulted in the absence of goblet cells in tracheal/laryngeal submucosal glands and in the conducting airway epithelium after pulmonary allergen exposure in vivo. These data show that SPDEF plays a critical role in regulating a transcriptional network mediating the goblet cell differentiation and mucus hyperproduction associated with chronic pulmonary disorders.

  20. Irreducible Specht modules are signed Young modules

    OpenAIRE

    Hemmer, David J.

    2005-01-01

    Recently Donkin defined signed Young modules as a simultaneous generalization of Young and twisted Young modules for the symmetric group. We show that in odd characteristic, if a Specht module $S^\\lambda$ is irreducible, then $S^\\lambda$ is a signed Young module. Thus the set of irreducible Specht modules coincides with the set of irreducible signed Young modules. This provides evidence for our conjecture that the signed Young modules are precisely the class of indecomposable self-dual module...

  1. Strawberry: Fast and accurate genome-guided transcript reconstruction and quantification from RNA-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruolin; Dickerson, Julie

    2017-11-01

    We propose a novel method and software tool, Strawberry, for transcript reconstruction and quantification from RNA-Seq data under the guidance of genome alignment and independent of gene annotation. Strawberry consists of two modules: assembly and quantification. The novelty of Strawberry is that the two modules use different optimization frameworks but utilize the same data graph structure, which allows a highly efficient, expandable and accurate algorithm for dealing large data. The assembly module parses aligned reads into splicing graphs, and uses network flow algorithms to select the most likely transcripts. The quantification module uses a latent class model to assign read counts from the nodes of splicing graphs to transcripts. Strawberry simultaneously estimates the transcript abundances and corrects for sequencing bias through an EM algorithm. Based on simulations, Strawberry outperforms Cufflinks and StringTie in terms of both assembly and quantification accuracies. Under the evaluation of a real data set, the estimated transcript expression by Strawberry has the highest correlation with Nanostring probe counts, an independent experiment measure for transcript expression. Strawberry is written in C++14, and is available as open source software at https://github.com/ruolin/strawberry under the MIT license.

  2. Study of pulmonary dysfunctions in liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amr M. Helmy

    2014-10-01

    Conclusion: Liver cirrhosis is associated with unique pulmonary complications. The early identification of pulmonary dysfunctions in cirrhotic patients is crucial as it affects the prognosis and guides the future management by speeding up orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT recommendations.

  3. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis and tuberous sclerosis with pulmonary involvement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedrosa, I.; Saiz, A.; Bustos, A.; Hernando, F.

    2000-01-01

    We present two cases of pulmonary lumphangioleiomyomatosis and one case of tuberous sclerosis with pulmonary involvement describing the most characteristic features according to plain chest X-ray and high-resolution computed tomography (HRCT). (Author) 14 refs

  4. Effects of posture on postoperative pulmonary function

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, K G; Holte, Kathrine; Kehlet, H

    2003-01-01

    effect on postoperative pulmonary function in the sitting or standing position compared with the supine. Thus, avoidance of the supine position may improve postoperative pulmonary function. Three of six studies showed a positive effect on postoperative pulmonary function of the lateral side compared......BACKGROUND: Pulmonary morbidity is still a relevant complication to major surgery despite improvements in surgical technique and anaesthetic methods. Postoperative posture may be a pathogenic factor, but the effects of changes in postoperative posture on pulmonary function have not been reviewed...... with the supine. Thus, the lateral position has limited effects on pulmonary function. CONCLUSION: Changes of postoperative position from supine to sitting or standing are of major importance in the interpretation of postoperative pulmonary outcome studies and in future strategies to improve pulmonary outcome....

  5. PULMONARY HEMORRHAGE. ENDOSCOPIC DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Gasanov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the article, we report the incidence and etiology of pulmonary hemorrhage, and modern classifications according to the literature data. Methods of endoscopic diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary hemorrhage are analyzed.

  6. Sickle Cell Disease and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... My doctor wants to screen me for pulmonary hypertension. Why is this? Sickle cell disease (SCD), a ... What are some of the symptoms of pulmonary hypertension? Because they are somewhat general symptoms, the characteristics ...

  7. Hereditary Hemorrhagic Telangiectasia (HHT) and Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... has said these might be symptoms of pulmonary hypertension. How does this relate to my HHT? About ... differences are significant. In HHT-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension, abnormal blood flow through the blood vessels in ...

  8. Lung Transplantation in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 00:00 Lung Transplantation in Patients with Pulmonary Hypertension Consensus Statements Issued by the Scientific Leadership Council ... a treatment option for selected patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) when medical therapy is no longer effective. ...

  9. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia-associated pulmonary hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harting, Matthew T

    2017-06-01

    Congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) is a complex entity wherein a diaphragmatic defect allows intrathoracic herniation of intra-abdominal contents and both pulmonary parenchymal and vascular development are stifled. Pulmonary pathology and pathophysiology, including pulmonary hypoplasia and pulmonary hypertension, are hallmarks of CDH and are associated with disease severity. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is sustained, supranormal pulmonary arterial pressure, and among patients with CDH (CDH-PH), is driven by hypoplastic pulmonary vasculature, including alterations at the molecular, cellular, and tissue levels, along with pathophysiologic pulmonary vasoreactivity. This review addresses the basic mechanisms, altered anatomy, definition, diagnosis, and management of CDH-PH. Further, emerging therapies targeting CDH-PH and PH are explored. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Epidemiology of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ley B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Brett Ley, Harold R Collard Department of Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, USA Abstract: Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic fibrotic lung disease of unknown cause that occurs in adults and has a poor prognosis. Its epidemiology has been difficult to study because of its rarity and evolution in diagnostic and coding practices. Though uncommon, it is likely underappreciated both in terms of its occurrence (ie, incidence, prevalence and public health impact (ie, health care costs and resource utilization. Incidence and mortality appear to be on the rise, and prevalence is expected to increase with the aging population. Potential risk factors include occupational and environmental exposures, tobacco smoking, gastroesophageal reflux, and genetic factors. An accurate understanding of its epidemiology is important, especially as novel therapies are emerging. Keywords: idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, epidemiology, incidence, prevalence, mortality, risk factors

  11. Pulmonary involvement of secondary syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Yoshihiko; Imai, Yuichiro; Yoshihara, Shingo; Fujikura, Hiroyuki; Hirai, Nobuyasu; Sato, Masatoshi; Ogawa, Taku; Uno, Kenji; Kasahara, Kei; Yano, Hisakazu; Mikasa, Keiichi

    2018-01-01