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Sample records for models worsens viral

  1. Viral marketing as epidemiological model

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, Helena Sofia; Fonseca, Manuel José

    2015-01-01

    In epidemiology, an epidemic is defined as the spread of an infectious disease to a large number of people in a given population within a short period of time. In the marketing context, a message is viral when it is broadly sent and received by the target market through person-to-person transmission. This specific marketing communication strategy is commonly referred as viral marketing. Due to this similarity between an epidemic and the viral marketing process and because the understanding of...

  2. Inhibition of γ-secretase worsens memory deficits in a genetically congruous mouse model of Danish dementia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamayev Robert

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A mutation in the BRI2/ITM2b gene causes familial Danish dementia (FDD. BRI2 is an inhibitor of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP processing, which is genetically linked to Alzheimer’s disease (AD pathogenesis. The FDD mutation leads to a loss of BRI2 protein and to increased APP processing. APP haplodeficiency and inhibition of APP cleavage by β-secretase rescue synaptic/memory deficits of a genetically congruous mouse model of FDD (FDDKI. β-cleavage of APP yields the β-carboxyl-terminal (β-CTF and the amino-terminal-soluble APPβ (sAPPβ fragments. γ-secretase processing of β-CTF generates Aβ, which is considered the main cause of AD. However, inhibiting Aβ production did not rescue the deficits of FDDKI mice, suggesting that sAPPβ/β-CTF, and not Aβ, are the toxic species causing memory loss. Results Here, we have further analyzed the effect of γ-secretase inhibition. We show that treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI results in a worsening of the memory deficits of FDDKI mice. This deleterious effect on memory correlates with increased levels of the β/α-CTFs APP fragments in synaptic fractions isolated from hippocampi of FDDKI mice, which is consistent with inhibition of γ-secretase activity. Conclusion This harmful effect of the GSI is in sharp contrast with a pathogenic role for Aβ, and suggests that the worsening of memory deficits may be due to accumulation of synaptic-toxic β/α-CTFs caused by GSI treatment. However, γ-secretase cleaves more than 40 proteins; thus, the noxious effect of GSI on memory may be dependent on inhibition of cleavage of one or more of these other γ-secretase substrates. These two possibilities do not need to be mutually exclusive. Our results are consistent with the outcome of a clinical trial with the GSI Semagacestat, which caused a worsening of cognition, and advise against targeting γ-secretase in the therapy of AD. Overall, the data also indicate that FDDKI

  3. Whole-food diet worsened cognitive dysfunction in an Alzheimer's disease mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, Matthew D; Winocur, Gordon; Bazinet, Richard P; Ma, David W L; Greenwood, Carol E

    2015-01-01

    Food combinations have been associated with lower incidence of Alzheimer's disease. We hypothesized that a combination whole-food diet containing freeze-dried fish, vegetables, and fruits would improve cognitive function in TgCRND8 mice by modulating brain insulin signaling and neuroinflammation. Cognitive function was assessed by a comprehensive battery of tasks adapted to the Morris water maze. Unexpectedly, a "Diet × Transgene" interaction was observed in which transgenic animals fed the whole-food diet exhibited even worse cognitive function than their transgenic counterparts fed the control diet on tests of spatial memory (p < 0.01) and strategic rule learning (p = 0.034). These behavioral deficits coincided with higher hippocampal gene expression of tumor necrosis factor-α (p = 0.013). There were no differences in cortical amyloid-β peptide species according to diet. These results indicate that a dietary profile identified from epidemiologic studies exacerbated cognitive dysfunction and neuroinflammation in a mouse model of familial Alzheimer's disease. We suggest that normally adaptive cellular responses to dietary phytochemicals were impaired by amyloid-beta deposition leading to increased oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and behavioral deficits. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Empagliflozin Prevents Worsening of Cardiac Function in an Experimental Model of Pressure Overload-Induced Heart Failure

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    Nikole J. Byrne, BSc

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available This study sought to determine whether the sodium/glucose cotransporter 2 (SGLT2 inhibitor empagliflozin improved heart failure (HF outcomes in nondiabetic mice. The EMPA-REG OUTCOME (Empagliflozin, Cardiovascular Outcome Event Trial in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus Patients trial demonstrated that empagliflozin markedly prevented HF and cardiovascular death in subjects with diabetes. However, despite ongoing clinical trials in HF patients without type 2 diabetes, there are no objective and translational data to support an effect of SGLT2 inhibitors on cardiac structure and function, particularly in the absence of diabetes and in the setting of established HF. Male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected to either sham or transverse aortic constriction surgery to induce HF. Following surgery, mice that progressed to HF received either vehicle or empagliflozin for 2 weeks. Cardiac function was then assessed in vivo using echocardiography and ex vivo using isolated working hearts. Although vehicle-treated HF mice experienced a progressive worsening of cardiac function over the 2-week treatment period, this decline was blunted in empagliflozin-treated HF mice. Treatment allocation to empagliflozin resulted in an improvement in cardiac systolic function, with no significant changes in cardiac remodeling or diastolic dysfunction. Moreover, isolated hearts from HF mice treated with empagliflozin displayed significantly improved ex vivo cardiac function compared to those in vehicle-treated controls. Empagliflozin treatment of nondiabetic mice with established HF blunts the decline in cardiac function both in vivo and ex vivo, independent of diabetes. These data provide important basic and translational clues to support the evaluation of SGLT2 inhibitors as a treatment strategy in a broad range of patients with established HF.

  5. The susceptible-infected-recovered (SIR) model for viral marketing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Siti Suhaila; Akil, Ku Azlina Ku; Chulan, Majdah; Sharif, Noorzila

    2017-11-01

    Viral marketing is a marketing strategy utilizes social media to spread information about a product or services provided. It is the most powerful way to share information in a short amount of time. The objective of this study is to investigate the dynamic of viral marketing within a time duration in the point of view of mathematics. This study used the epidemiological model known as Susceptible-Infected-Recovered (SIR). The model consists of a system of three differential equations with three state variables namely susceptible (S), infected (I) and recovered (R). It considers a case of SIR model with demography. Numerical experiments have been performed. The results show that viral marketing reaches its peak within two days. The online messages shared will become higher if the initial number of the infected individual has been increased.

  6. [Primate models of human viral hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poleshchuk, V F; Mikhaĭlov, M I; Zamiatina, N A

    2006-01-01

    The paper summarizes the updates available in the literature and the authors' own data on the etiology of hepatitis, its models, and experimental studies on susceptible simian types. A comparative analysis of the etiological agents--the causative agents of simian and human hepatitis will give a better insight into the evolution of its viruses.

  7. Everolimus improves memory and learning while worsening depressive- and anxiety-like behavior in an animal model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Emilio; Leo, Antonio; Crupi, Rosalia; Aiello, Rossana; Lippiello, Pellegrino; Spiga, Rosangela; Chimirri, Serafina; Citraro, Rita; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Constanti, Andrew; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2016-07-01

    Everolimus (EVR) is an orally-administered rapamycin analog that selectively inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase (mainly mTORC1 and likely mTORC2) and the related signaling pathway. mTOR is a serine/threonine protein kinase regulating multiple important cellular functions; dysfunction of mTOR signaling has also been implicated in the pathophysiology of several neurological, neurodegenerative, developmental and cognitive disorders. EVR is widely used as an anti-neoplastic therapy and more recently in children with tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC). However, no clear correlation exists between EVR use and development of central side effects e.g. depression, anxiety or cognitive impairment. We studied the effects of a 3 weeks administration of EVR in mice chronically treated with betamethasone 21-phosphate disodium (BTM) as a model of depression and cognitive decline. EVR treatment had detrimental effects on depressive- and anxiety-like behavior while improving cognitive performance in both control (untreated) and BTM-treated mice. Such effects were accompanied by an increased hippocampal neurogenesis and synaptogenesis. Our results therefore might support the proposed pathological role of mTOR dysregulation in depressive disorders and confirm some previous data on the positive effects of mTOR inhibition in cognitive decline. We also show that EVR, possibly through mTOR inhibition, may be linked to the development of anxiety. The increased hippocampal neurogenesis by EVR might explain its ability to improve cognitive function or protect from cognitive decline. Our findings suggest some caution in the use of EVR, particularly in the developing brain; patients should be carefully monitored for their psychiatric/neurological profiles in any clinical situation where an mTOR inhibitor and in particular EVR is used e.g. cancer treatment, TSC or immunosuppression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Toward Information Diffusion Model for Viral Marketing in Business

    OpenAIRE

    Lulwah AlSuwaidan; Mourad Ykhlef

    2016-01-01

    Current obstacles in the study of social media marketing include dealing with massive data and real-time updates have motivated to contribute solutions that can be adopted for viral marketing. Since information diffusion and social networks are the core of viral marketing, this article aims to investigate the constellation of diffusion methods for viral marketing. Studies on diffusion methods for viral marketing have applied different computational methods, but a systematic investigation of t...

  9. Interval Between Infections and Viral Hierarchy Are Determinants of Viral Interference Following Influenza Virus Infection in a Ferret Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurie, Karen L.; Guarnaccia, Teagan A.; Carolan, Louise A.; Yan, Ada W. C.; Aban, Malet; Petrie, Stephen; Cao, Pengxing; Heffernan, Jane M.; McVernon, Jodie; Mosse, Jennifer; Kelso, Anne; McCaw, James M.; Barr, Ian G.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Epidemiological studies suggest that, following infection with influenza virus, there is a short period during which a host experiences a lower susceptibility to infection with other influenza viruses. This viral interference appears to be independent of any antigenic similarities between the viruses. We used the ferret model of human influenza to systematically investigate viral interference. Methods. Ferrets were first infected then challenged 1–14 days later with pairs of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, influenza A(H3N2), and influenza B viruses circulating in 2009 and 2010. Results. Viral interference was observed when the interval between initiation of primary infection and subsequent challenge was infections. Ongoing shedding from the primary virus infection was associated with viral interference after the secondary challenge. Conclusions. The interval between infections and the sequential combination of viruses were important determinants of viral interference. The influenza viruses in this study appear to have an ordered hierarchy according to their ability to block or delay infection, which may contribute to the dominance of different viruses often seen in an influenza season. PMID:25943206

  10. Comparison of five bacteriophages as models for viral aerosol studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turgeon, Nathalie; Toulouse, Marie-Josée; Martel, Bruno; Moineau, Sylvain; Duchaine, Caroline

    2014-07-01

    Bacteriophages are perceived to be good models for the study of airborne viruses because they are safe to use, some of them display structural features similar to those of human and animal viruses, and they are relatively easy to produce in large quantities. Yet, only a few studies have investigated them as models. It has previously been demonstrated that aerosolization, environmental conditions, and sampling conditions affect viral infectivity, but viral infectivity is virus dependent. Thus, several virus models are likely needed to study their general behavior in aerosols. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of aerosolization and sampling on the infectivity of five tail-less bacteriophages and two pathogenic viruses: MS2 (a single-stranded RNA [ssRNA] phage of the Leviviridae family), Φ6 (a segmented double-stranded RNA [dsRNA] phage of the Cystoviridae family), ΦX174 (a single-stranded DNA [ssDNA] phage of the Microviridae family), PM2 (a double-stranded DNA [dsDNA] phage of the Corticoviridae family), PR772 (a dsDNA phage of the Tectiviridae family), human influenza A virus H1N1 (an ssRNA virus of the Orthomyxoviridae family), and the poultry virus Newcastle disease virus (NDV; an ssRNA virus of the Paramyxoviridae family). Three nebulizers and two nebulization salt buffers (with or without organic fluid) were tested, as were two aerosol sampling devices, a liquid cyclone (SKC BioSampler) and a dry cyclone (National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health two-stage cyclone bioaerosol sampler). The presence of viruses in collected air samples was detected by culture and quantitative PCR (qPCR). Our results showed that these selected five phages behave differently when aerosolized and sampled. RNA phage MS2 and ssDNA phage ΦX174 were the most resistant to aerosolization and sampling. The presence of organic fluid in the nebulization buffer protected phages PR772 and Φ6 throughout the aerosolization and sampling with dry cyclones. In this

  11. A Viral Branching Model for Predicting the Spread of Electronic Word-of-Mouth

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.J.A. van der Lans (Ralf); G.H. van Bruggen (Gerrit); J. Eliashberg (Jehoshua); B. Wierenga (Berend)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractIn a viral marketing campaign an organization develops a marketing message, and stimulates customers to forward this message to their contacts. Despite its increasing popularity, there are no models yet that help marketers to predict how many customers a viral marketing campaign will

  12. Advanced Maternal Age Worsens Postpartum Vascular Function

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    Jude S. Morton

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The age at which women experience their first pregnancy has increased throughout the decades. Pregnancy has an important influence on maternal short- and long-term cardiovascular outcomes. Pregnancy at an advanced maternal age increases maternal risk of gestational diabetes, preeclampsia, placenta previa and caesarian delivery; complications which predict worsened cardiovascular health in later years. Aging also independently increases the risk of cardiovascular disease; therefore, combined risk in women of advanced maternal age may lead to detrimental cardiovascular outcomes later in life. We hypothesized that pregnancy at an advanced maternal age would lead to postpartum vascular dysfunction. We used a reproductively aged rat model to investigate vascular function in never pregnant (virgin, previously pregnant (postpartum and previously mated but never delivered (nulliparous rats at approximately 13.5 months of age (3 months postpartum or equivalent. Nulliparous rats, in which pregnancy was spontaneously lost, demonstrated significantly reduced aortic relaxation responses (methylcholine [MCh] Emax: 54.2 ± 12.6% vs. virgin and postpartum rats (MCh Emax: 84.8 ± 3.5% and 84.7 ± 3.2% respectively; suggesting pregnancy loss causes a worsened vascular pathology. Oxidized LDL reduced relaxation to MCh in aorta from virgin and postpartum, but not nulliparous rats, with an increased contribution of the LOX-1 receptor in the postpartum group. Further, in mesenteric arteries from postpartum rats, endothelium-derived hyperpolarization (EDH-mediated vasodilation was reduced and a constrictive prostaglandin effect was apparent. In conclusion, aged postpartum rats exhibited vascular dysfunction, while rats which had pregnancy loss demonstrated a distinct vascular pathology. These data demonstrate mechanisms which may lead to worsened outcomes at an advanced maternal age; including early pregnancy loss and later life cardiovascular dysfunction.

  13. A stochastic model of latently infected cell reactivation and viral blip generation in treated HIV patients.

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    Jessica M Conway

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by viral persistence in HIV+ patients on long-term anti-retroviral treatment (ART, we present a stochastic model of HIV viral dynamics in the blood stream. We consider the hypothesis that the residual viremia in patients on ART can be explained principally by the activation of cells latently infected by HIV before the initiation of ART and that viral blips (clinically-observed short periods of detectable viral load represent large deviations from the mean. We model the system as a continuous-time, multi-type branching process. Deriving equations for the probability generating function we use a novel numerical approach to extract the probability distributions for latent reservoir sizes and viral loads. We find that latent reservoir extinction-time distributions underscore the importance of considering reservoir dynamics beyond simply the half-life. We calculate blip amplitudes and frequencies by computing complete viral load probability distributions, and study the duration of viral blips via direct numerical simulation. We find that our model qualitatively reproduces short small-amplitude blips detected in clinical studies of treated HIV infection. Stochastic models of this type provide insight into treatment-outcome variability that cannot be found from deterministic models.

  14. An HIV epidemic model based on viral load dynamics: value in assessing empirical trends in HIV virulence and community viral load.

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    Joshua T Herbeck

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Trends in HIV virulence have been monitored since the start of the AIDS pandemic, as studying HIV virulence informs our understanding of HIV epidemiology and pathogenesis. Here, we model changes in HIV virulence as a strictly evolutionary process, using set point viral load (SPVL as a proxy, to make inferences about empirical SPVL trends from longitudinal HIV cohorts. We develop an agent-based epidemic model based on HIV viral load dynamics. The model contains functions for viral load and transmission, SPVL and disease progression, viral load trajectories in multiple stages of infection, and the heritability of SPVL across transmissions. We find that HIV virulence evolves to an intermediate level that balances infectiousness with longer infected lifespans, resulting in an optimal SPVL∼4.75 log10 viral RNA copies/mL. Adaptive viral evolution may explain observed HIV virulence trends: our model produces SPVL trends with magnitudes that are broadly similar to empirical trends. With regard to variation among studies in empirical SPVL trends, results from our model suggest that variation may be explained by the specific epidemic context, e.g. the mean SPVL of the founding lineage or the age of the epidemic; or improvements in HIV screening and diagnosis that results in sampling biases. We also use our model to examine trends in community viral load, a population-level measure of HIV viral load that is thought to reflect a population's overall transmission potential. We find that community viral load evolves in association with SPVL, in the absence of prevention programs such as antiretroviral therapy, and that the mean community viral load is not necessarily a strong predictor of HIV incidence.

  15. Wake-promoting agent modafinil worsened attentional performance following REM sleep deprivation in a young-adult rat model of 5-choice serial reaction time task.

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    Liu, Yia-Ping; Tung, Che-Se; Lin, Yu-Lung; Chuang, Chia-Hsin

    2011-01-01

    Individuals who experience sleep loss may exhibit certain physiological abnormalities. Central stimulant drugs have been studied in sleep-loss conditions, and some of them might be therapeutically beneficial. Modafinil (diphenyl-methyl-sulfinyl-2-acetamide, MOD) has been increasingly employed for elevating alertness and vigilance in recent years, yet the underlying mechanism of actions for MOD is not fully understood. To examine the behavioral effect of MOD following rapid eye movement sleep deprivation (REMD) in rats. A five-choice serial reaction time task (5-CSRTT) was employed to investigate animals' attentional performance and impulsive reactivity. Rats of different ages were trained to learn the 5-CSRTT. REMD with the water platform method was applied for 96 h. The impacts of REMD on 5-CSRTT in middle-age (32-weeks-old) and young-adult (12-week-old) rats were compared with baseline or a condition with shorter visual stimulus duration. The results revealed that following REMD, young-adult but not middle-age rats were liable to be affected in their performances of the 5-CSRTT. In young-adult rats, while MOD had no contributions to the effect of REMD, it worsened rats' performance following REMD when the stimulus duration was shortened, as shown by the reduced number of correct responses and prolonged magazine latency. These results suggest that aging might be a crucial factor for the physiological impact following REMD. MOD should be used cautiously, particularly, in conditions that require REM sleep.

  16. Kupffer cells hasten resolution of liver immunopathology in mouse models of viral hepatitis.

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    Giovanni Sitia

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Kupffer cells (KCs are widely considered important contributors to liver injury during viral hepatitis due to their pro-inflammatory activity. Herein we utilized hepatitis B virus (HBV-replication competent transgenic mice and wild-type mice infected with a hepatotropic adenovirus to demonstrate that KCs do not directly induce hepatocellular injury nor do they affect the pathogenic potential of virus-specific CD8 T cells. Instead, KCs limit the severity of liver immunopathology. Mechanistically, our results are most compatible with the hypothesis that KCs contain liver immunopathology by removing apoptotic hepatocytes in a manner largely dependent on scavenger receptors. Apoptotic hepatocytes not readily removed by KCs become secondarily necrotic and release high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB-1 protein, promoting organ infiltration by inflammatory cells, particularly neutrophils. Overall, these results indicate that KCs resolve rather than worsen liver immunopathology.

  17. Piecewise mixed-effects models with skew distributions for evaluating viral load changes: A Bayesian approach.

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    Huang, Yangxin; Dagne, Getachew A; Zhou, Shumin; Wang, Zhongjun

    2015-12-01

    Studies of human immunodeficiency virus dynamics in acquired immuno deficiency syndrome (AIDS) research are very important in evaluating the effectiveness of antiretroviral (ARV) therapies. The potency of ARV agents in AIDS clinical trials can be assessed on the basis of a viral response such as viral decay rate or viral load change in plasma. Following ARV treatment, the profile of each subject's viral load tends to follow a 'broken stick'-like dynamic trajectory, indicating multiple phases of decline and increase in viral loads. Such multiple-phases (change-points) can be described by a random change-point model with random subject-specific parameters. One usually assumes a normal distribution for model error. However, this assumption may be unrealistic, obscuring important features of within- and among-subject variations. In this article, we propose piecewise linear mixed-effects models with skew-elliptical distributions to describe the time trend of a response variable under a Bayesian framework. This methodology can be widely applied to real problems for longitudinal studies. A real data analysis, using viral load data from an AIDS study, is carried out to illustrate the proposed method by comparing various candidate models. Biologically important findings are reported, and these findings also suggest that it is very important to assume a model with skew distribution in order to achieve reliable results, in particular, when the data exhibit skewness. © The Author(s) 2011.

  18. Modeling latently infected cell activation: viral and latent reservoir persistence, and viral blips in HIV-infected patients on potent therapy.

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    Libin Rong

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Although potent combination therapy is usually able to suppress plasma viral loads in HIV-1 patients to below the detection limit of conventional clinical assays, a low level of viremia frequently can be detected in plasma by more sensitive assays. Additionally, many patients experience transient episodes of viremia above the detection limit, termed viral blips, even after being on highly suppressive therapy for many years. An obstacle to viral eradication is the persistence of a latent reservoir for HIV-1 in resting memory CD4(+ T cells. The mechanisms underlying low viral load persistence, slow decay of the latent reservoir, and intermittent viral blips are not fully characterized. The quantitative contributions of residual viral replication to viral and the latent reservoir persistence remain unclear. In this paper, we probe these issues by developing a mathematical model that considers latently infected cell activation in response to stochastic antigenic stimulation. We demonstrate that programmed expansion and contraction of latently infected cells upon immune activation can generate both low-level persistent viremia and intermittent viral blips. Also, a small fraction of activated T cells revert to latency, providing a potential to replenish the latent reservoir. By this means, occasional activation of latently infected cells can explain the variable decay characteristics of the latent reservoir observed in different clinical studies. Finally, we propose a phenomenological model that includes a logistic term representing homeostatic proliferation of latently infected cells. The model is simple but can robustly generate the multiphasic viral decline seen after initiation of therapy, as well as low-level persistent viremia and intermittent HIV-1 blips. Using these models, we provide a quantitative and integrated prospective into the long-term dynamics of HIV-1 and the latent reservoir in the setting of potent antiretroviral therapy.

  19. Spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequence data faithfully describe HIV fitness landscapes.

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    Shekhar, Karthik; Ruberman, Claire F; Ferguson, Andrew L; Barton, John P; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K

    2013-12-01

    Mutational escape from vaccine-induced immune responses has thwarted the development of a successful vaccine against AIDS, whose causative agent is HIV, a highly mutable virus. Knowing the virus' fitness as a function of its proteomic sequence can enable rational design of potent vaccines, as this information can focus vaccine-induced immune responses to target mutational vulnerabilities of the virus. Spin models have been proposed as a means to infer intrinsic fitness landscapes of HIV proteins from patient-derived viral protein sequences. These sequences are the product of nonequilibrium viral evolution driven by patient-specific immune responses and are subject to phylogenetic constraints. How can such sequence data allow inference of intrinsic fitness landscapes? We combined computer simulations and variational theory á la Feynman to show that, in most circumstances, spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequences reflect the correct rank order of the fitness of mutant viral strains. Our findings are relevant for diverse viruses.

  20. An accurate two-phase approximate solution to the acute viral infection model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    During an acute viral infection, virus levels rise, reach a peak and then decline. Data and numerical solutions suggest the growth and decay phases are linear on a log scale. While viral dynamic models are typically nonlinear with analytical solutions difficult to obtain, the exponential nature of the solutions suggests approximations can be found. We derive a two-phase approximate solution to the target cell limited influenza model and illustrate the accuracy using data and previously established parameter values of six patients infected with influenza A. For one patient, the subsequent fall in virus concentration was not consistent with our predictions during the decay phase and an alternate approximation is derived. We find expressions for the rate and length of initial viral growth in terms of the parameters, the extent each parameter is involved in viral peaks, and the single parameter responsible for virus decay. We discuss applications of this analysis in antiviral treatments and investigating host and virus heterogeneities.

  1. Spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequence data faithfully describe HIV fitness landscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shekhar, Karthik; Ruberman, Claire F.; Ferguson, Andrew L.; Barton, John P.; Kardar, Mehran; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-12-01

    Mutational escape from vaccine-induced immune responses has thwarted the development of a successful vaccine against AIDS, whose causative agent is HIV, a highly mutable virus. Knowing the virus' fitness as a function of its proteomic sequence can enable rational design of potent vaccines, as this information can focus vaccine-induced immune responses to target mutational vulnerabilities of the virus. Spin models have been proposed as a means to infer intrinsic fitness landscapes of HIV proteins from patient-derived viral protein sequences. These sequences are the product of nonequilibrium viral evolution driven by patient-specific immune responses and are subject to phylogenetic constraints. How can such sequence data allow inference of intrinsic fitness landscapes? We combined computer simulations and variational theory á la Feynman to show that, in most circumstances, spin models inferred from patient-derived viral sequences reflect the correct rank order of the fitness of mutant viral strains. Our findings are relevant for diverse viruses.

  2. Cigarette smoke worsens lung inflammation and impairs resolution of influenza infection in mice

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    Jones Jessica E

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cigarette smoke has both pro-inflammatory and immunosuppressive effects. Both active and passive cigarette smoke exposure are linked to an increased incidence and severity of respiratory virus infections, but underlying mechanisms are not well defined. We hypothesized, based on prior gene expression profiling studies, that upregulation of pro-inflammatory mediators by short term smoke exposure would be protective against a subsequent influenza infection. Methods BALB/c mice were subjected to whole body smoke exposure with 9 cigarettes/day for 4 days. Mice were then infected with influenza A (H3N1, Mem71 strain, and analyzed 3 and 10 days later (d3, d10. These time points are the peak and resolution (respectively of influenza infection. Results Inflammatory cell influx into the bronchoalveolar lavage (BALF, inflammatory mediators, proteases, histopathology, viral titres and T lymphocyte profiles were analyzed. Compared to smoke or influenza alone, mice exposed to smoke and then influenza had more macrophages, neutrophils and total lymphocytes in BALF at d3, more macrophages in BALF at d10, lower net gelatinase activity and increased activity of tissue inhibitor of metalloprotease-1 in BALF at d3, altered profiles of key cytokines and CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes, worse lung pathology and more virus-specific, activated CD8+ T lymphocytes in BALF. Mice smoke exposed before influenza infection had close to 10-fold higher lung virus titres at d3 than influenza alone mice, although all mice had cleared virus by d10, regardless of smoke exposure. Smoke exposure caused temporary weight loss and when smoking ceased after viral infection, smoke and influenza mice regained significantly less weight than smoke alone mice. Conclusion Smoke induced inflammation does not protect against influenza infection. In most respects, smoke exposure worsened the host response to influenza. This animal model may be useful in studying how smoke worsens

  3. Intracellular hepatitis C modeling predicts infection dynamics and viral protein mechanisms.

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    Aunins, Thomas R; Marsh, Katherine A; Subramanya, Gitanjali; Uprichard, Susan L; Perelson, Alan S; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2018-03-21

    Hepatitis C virus infection is a global health problem, with nearly 2 million new infections occurring every year and up to 85% of these becoming chronic infections that pose serious long-term health risks. To effectively reduce the prevalence of HCV infection and associated diseases, it is important to understand the intracellular dynamics of the viral lifecycle. Here, we present a detailed mathematical model that represents the full hepatitis C lifecycle. It is the first full HCV model to be fit to acute intracellular infection data and the first to explore the functions of distinct viral proteins, probing multiple hypotheses of cis - and trans -acting mechanisms to provide insights for drug targeting. Model parameters were derived from the literature, experiments, and fitting to experimental intracellular viral RNA, extracellular viral titer, and HCV core and NS3 protein kinetic data from viral inoculation to steady-state. Our model predicts faster rates for protein translation and polyprotein cleavage than previous replicon models and demonstrates that the processes of translation and synthesis of viral RNA have the most influence on the levels of the species we tracked in experiments. Overall, our experimental data and the resulting mathematical infection model reveal information about the regulation of core protein during infection, produce specific insights into the roles of the viral core, NS5A, and NS5B proteins, and demonstrate the sensitivities of viral proteins and RNA to distinct reactions within the lifecycle. IMPORTANCE We have designed a model for the full lifecycle of hepatitis C virus. Past efforts have largely focused on modeling hepatitis C replicon systems, in which transfected subgenomic HCV RNA maintains autonomous replication in the absence of virion production or spread. We started with the general structure of these previous replicon models and expanded to create a model that incorporates the full virus lifecycle as well as additional

  4. A study of the spreading scheme for viral marketing based on a complex network model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianmei; Yao, Canzhong; Ma, Weicheng; Chen, Guanrong

    2010-02-01

    Buzzword-based viral marketing, known also as digital word-of-mouth marketing, is a marketing mode attached to some carriers on the Internet, which can rapidly copy marketing information at a low cost. Viral marketing actually uses a pre-existing social network where, however, the scale of the pre-existing network is believed to be so large and so random, so that its theoretical analysis is intractable and unmanageable. There are very few reports in the literature on how to design a spreading scheme for viral marketing on real social networks according to the traditional marketing theory or the relatively new network marketing theory. Complex network theory provides a new model for the study of large-scale complex systems, using the latest developments of graph theory and computing techniques. From this perspective, the present paper extends the complex network theory and modeling into the research of general viral marketing and develops a specific spreading scheme for viral marking and an approach to design the scheme based on a real complex network on the QQ instant messaging system. This approach is shown to be rather universal and can be further extended to the design of various spreading schemes for viral marketing based on different instant messaging systems.

  5. Manipulating 3D-Printed and Paper Models Enhances Student Understanding of Viral Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couper, Lisa; Johannes, Kristen; Powers, Jackie; Silberglitt, Matt; Davenport, Jodi

    2016-01-01

    Understanding key concepts in molecular biology requires reasoning about molecular processes that are not directly observable and, as such, presents a challenge to students and teachers. We ask whether novel interactive physical models and activities can help students understand key processes in viral replication. Our 3D tangible models are…

  6. ModeLang: a new approach for experts-friendly viral infections modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasik, Szymon; Prejzendanc, Tomasz; Blazewicz, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Computational modeling is an important element of systems biology. One of its important applications is modeling complex, dynamical, and biological systems, including viral infections. This type of modeling usually requires close cooperation between biologists and mathematicians. However, such cooperation often faces communication problems because biologists do not have sufficient knowledge to understand mathematical description of the models, and mathematicians do not have sufficient knowledge to define and verify these models. In many areas of systems biology, this problem has already been solved; however, in some of these areas there are still certain problematic aspects. The goal of the presented research was to facilitate this cooperation by designing seminatural formal language for describing viral infection models that will be easy to understand for biologists and easy to use by mathematicians and computer scientists. The ModeLang language was designed in cooperation with biologists and its computer implementation was prepared. Tests proved that it can be successfully used to describe commonly used viral infection models and then to simulate and verify them. As a result, it can make cooperation between biologists and mathematicians modeling viral infections much easier, speeding up computational verification of formulated hypotheses.

  7. Global analysis of viral infection in an archaeal model system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walid S. Maaty

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The origin and evolutionary relationship of viruses is poorly understood. This makes archaeal virus-host of particular interest because the hosts generally root near the base of phylogenetic trees, while some of the viruses have clear structural similarities to those that infect prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Despite the advantageous position for use in evolutionary studies, little is known about archaeal viruses or how they interact with their hosts, compared to viruses of bacteria and eukaryotes. In addition, many archaeal viruses have been isolated from extreme environments and present a unique opportunity for elucidating factors that are important for existence at the extremes.. In this article we focus on virus-host interactions using a proteomics approach to study Sulfolobus Turreted Icosahedral Virus (STIV infection of Sulfolobus solfataricus P2. Using cultures grown from the ATCC cell stock, a single cycle of STIV infection was sampled 6 times over a 72 hr period. More than 700 proteins were identified throughout the course of the experiments. Seventy one host proteins were found to change by nearly two-fold (p<0.05 with 40 becoming more abundant and 31 less abundant. The modulated proteins represent 30 different cell pathways and 14 COG groups. 2D gel analysis showed that changes in post translational modifications were a common feature of the affected proteins. The results from these studies showed that the prokaryotic antiviral adaptive immune system CRISPR associated proteins (CAS proteins were regulated in response to the virus infection. It was found that regulated proteins come from mRNAs with a shorter than average half-life. In addition, activity-based protein profiling (ABPP profiling on 2D gels showed caspase, hydrolase and tyrosine phosphatase enzyme activity labeling at the protein isoform level. Together, this data provides a more detailed global view of archaeal cellular responses to viral infection, demonstrates the

  8. Rainfall-runoff model for prediction of waterborne viral contamination in a small river catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelati, E.; Dommar, C.; Lowe, R.; Polcher, J.; Rodó, X.

    2013-12-01

    We present a lumped rainfall-runoff model aimed at providing useful information for the prediction of waterborne viral contamination in small rivers. Viral contamination of water bodies may occur because of the discharge of sewage effluents and of surface runoff over areas affected by animal waste loads. Surface runoff is caused by precipitation that cannot infiltrate due to its intensity and to antecedent soil water content. It may transport animal feces to adjacent water bodies and cause viral contamination. We model streamflow by separating it into two components: subsurface flow, which is produced by infiltrated precipitation; and surface runoff. The model estimates infiltrated and non-infiltrated precipitation and uses impulse-response functions to compute the corresponding fractions of streamflow. The developed methodologies are applied to the Glafkos river, whose catchment extends for 102 km2 and includes the city of Patra. Streamflow and precipitation observations are available at a daily time resolution. Waterborne virus concentration measurements were performed approximately every second week from the beginning of 2011 to mid 2012. Samples were taken at several locations: in river water upstream of Patras and in the urban area; in sea water at the river outlet and approximately 2 km south-west of Patras; in sewage effluents before and after treatment. The rainfall-runoff model was calibrated and validated using observed streamflow and precipitation data. The model contribution to waterborne viral contamination prediction was benchmarked by analyzing the virus concentration measurements together with the estimated surface runoff values. The presented methodology may be a first step towards the development of waterborne viral contamination alert systems. Predicting viral contamination of water bodies would benefit sectors such as water supply and tourism.

  9. Modelling viral infections using zebrafish: Innate immune response and antiviral research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Mónica; Figueras, Antonio; Novoa, Beatriz

    2017-03-01

    Zebrafish possess a highly developed immune system that is remarkably similar to the human one. Therefore, it is expected that the majority of the signalling pathways and molecules involved in the immune response of mammals exist and behave similarly in fish. The innate antiviral response depends on the recognition of viral components by host cells. Pattern recognition receptors initiate antimicrobial defence mechanisms via several well-conserved signalling pathways. In this paper, we review current knowledge of the antiviral innate immune response in zebrafish by considering the main molecules that have been characterized and the infection models used for the in vivo study of the antiviral innate immune response. We next summarize published studies in which larval and adult zebrafish were used to study viral diseases of fish, then provide a similar review of studies of human viral diseases in zebrafish and experience with antiviral drug screening in this model organism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Community-driven demand creation for the use of routine viral load testing: a model to scale up routine viral load testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killingo, Bactrin M; Taro, Trisa B; Mosime, Wame N

    2017-11-01

    HIV treatment outcomes are dependent on the use of viral load measurement. Despite global and national guidelines recommending the use of routine viral load testing, these policies alone have not translated into widespread implementation or sufficiently increased access for people living with HIV (PLHIV). Civil society and communities of PLHIV recognize the need to close this gap and to enable the scale up of routine viral load testing. The International Treatment Preparedness Coalition (ITPC) developed an approach to community-led demand creation for the use of routine viral load testing. Using this Community Demand Creation Model, implementers follow a step-wise process to capacitate and empower communities to address their most pressing needs. This includes utlizing a specific toolkit that includes conducting a baseline assessment, developing a treatment education toolkit, organizing mobilization workshops for knowledge building, provision of small grants to support advocacy work and conducting benchmark evaluations. The Community Demand Creation Model to increase demand for routine viral load testing services by PLHIV has been delivered in diverse contexts including in the sub-Saharan African, Asian, Latin American and the Caribbean regions. Between December 2015 and December 2016, ITPC trained more than 240 PLHIV activists, and disbursed US$90,000 to network partners in support of their national advocacy work. The latter efforts informed a regional, community-driven campaign calling for domestic investment in the expeditious implementation of national viral load testing guidelines. HIV treatment education and community mobilization are critical components of demand creation for access to optimal HIV treatment, especially for the use of routine viral load testing. ITPC's Community Demand Creation Model offers a novel approach to achieving this goal. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of the International AIDS Society published by John Wiley & sons Ltd on behalf of

  11. The high-density lipoprotein-adjusted SCORE model worsens SCORE-based risk classification in a contemporary population of 30 824 Europeans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Martin B; Afzal, Shoaib; Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: Recent European guidelines recommend to include high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in risk assessment for primary prevention of cardiovascular disease (CVD), using a SCORE-based risk model (SCORE-HDL). We compared the predictive performance of SCORE-HDL with SCORE in an independent.......8 years of follow-up, 339 individuals died of CVD. In the SCORE target population (age 40-65; n = 30,824), fewer individuals were at baseline categorized as high risk (≥5% 10-year risk of fatal CVD) using SCORE-HDL compared with SCORE (10 vs. 17% in men, 1 vs. 3% in women). SCORE-HDL did not improve...... discrimination of future fatal CVD, compared with SCORE, but decreased the detection rate (sensitivity) of the 5% high-risk threshold from 42 to 26%, yielding a negative net reclassification index (NRI) of -12%. Importantly, using SCORE-HDL, the sensitivity was zero among women. Both SCORE and SCORE...

  12. Azithromycin attenuates airway inflammation in a mouse model of viral bronchiolitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brody Steven L

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Viral bronchiolitis is the leading cause of hospitalization in young infants. It is associated with the development of childhood asthma and contributes to morbidity and mortality in the elderly. Currently no therapies effectively attenuate inflammation during the acute viral infection, or prevent the risk of post-viral asthma. We hypothesized that early treatment of a paramyxoviral bronchiolitis with azithromycin would attenuate acute and chronic airway inflammation. Methods Mice were inoculated with parainfluenza type 1, Sendai Virus (SeV, and treated daily with PBS or azithromycin for 7 days post-inoculation. On day 8 and 21 we assessed airway inflammation in lung tissue, and quantified immune cells and inflammatory mediators in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL. Results Compared to treatment with PBS, azithromycin significantly attenuated post-viral weight loss. During the peak of acute inflammation (day 8, azithromycin decreased total leukocyte accumulation in the lung tissue and BAL, with the largest fold-reduction in BAL neutrophils. This decreased inflammation was independent of changes in viral load. Azithromycin significantly attenuated the concentration of BAL inflammatory mediators and enhanced resolution of chronic airway inflammation evident by decreased BAL inflammatory mediators on day 21. Conclusions In this mouse model of paramyxoviral bronchiolitis, azithromycin attenuated acute and chronic airway inflammation. These findings demonstrate anti-inflammatory effects of azithromycin that are not related to anti-viral activity. Our findings support the rationale for future prospective randomized clinical trials that will evaluate the effects of macrolides on acute viral bronchiolitis and their long-term consequences.

  13. pH imaging reveals worsened tissue acidification in diffusion kurtosis lesion than the kurtosis/diffusion lesion mismatch in an animal model of acute stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Enfeng; Wu, Yin; Cheung, Jerry S; Zhou, Iris Yuwen; Igarashi, Takahiro; Zhang, XiaoAn; Sun, Phillip Zhe

    2017-10-01

    Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) has been commonly used in acute stroke examination, yet a portion of DWI lesion may be salvageable. Recently, it has been shown that diffusion kurtosis imaging (DKI) defines the most severely damaged DWI lesion that does not renormalize following early reperfusion. We postulated that the diffusion and kurtosis lesion mismatch experience heterogeneous hemodynamic and/or metabolic injury. We investigated tissue perfusion, pH, diffusion, kurtosis and relaxation from regions of the contralateral normal area, diffusion lesion, kurtosis lesion and their mismatch in an animal model of acute stroke. Our study revealed significant kurtosis and diffusion lesion volume mismatch (19.7 ± 10.7%, P mismatch, we showed lower pH in the kurtosis lesion (pH = 6.64 ± 0.12) from that of the kurtosis/diffusion lesion mismatch (6.84 ± 0.11, P mismatch agreed well with literature values for regions of ischemic core and penumbra, respectively. Our work documented initial evidence that DKI may reveal the heterogeneous metabolic derangement within the commonly used DWI lesion.

  14. Maternal high-fat diet worsens memory deficits in the triple-transgenic (3xTgAD mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah A L Martin

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is not normally diagnosed until later in life, although evidence suggests that the disease starts at a much earlier age. Risk factors for AD, such as diabetes, hypertension and obesity, are known to have their affects during mid-life, though events very early in life, including maternal over-nutrition, can predispose offspring to develop these conditions. This study tested whether over-nutrition during pregnancy and lactation affected the development of AD in offspring, using a transgenic AD mouse model. Female triple-transgenic AD dam mice (3xTgAD were exposed to a high-fat (60% energy from fat or control diet during pregnancy and lactation. After weaning (at 3 weeks of age, female offspring were placed on a control diet and monitored up until 12 months of age during which time behavioural tests were performed. A transient increase in body weight was observed in 4-week-old offspring 3xTgAD mice from dams fed a high-fat diet. However, by 5 weeks of age the body weight of 3xTgAD mice from the maternal high-fat fed group was no different when compared to control-fed mice. A maternal high-fat diet led to a significant impairment in memory in 2- and 12-month-old 3xTgAD offspring mice when compared to offspring from control fed dams. These effects of a maternal high-fat diet on memory were accompanied by a significant increase (50% in the number of tau positive neurones in the hippocampus. These data demonstrate that a high-fat diet during pregnancy and lactation increases memory impairments in female 3xTgAD mice and suggest that early life events during development might influence the onset and progression of AD later in life.

  15. A nonlinear delayed model for the immune response in the presence of viral mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messias, D.; Gleria, Iram; Albuquerque, S. S.; Canabarro, Askery; Stanley, H. E.

    2018-02-01

    We consider a delayed nonlinear model of the dynamics of the immune system against a viral infection that contains a wild-type virus and a mutant. We consider the finite response time of the immune system and find sustained oscillatory behavior as well as chaotic behavior triggered by the presence of delays. We present a numeric analysis and some analytical results.

  16. Hepatitis C virus evasion of adaptive immune responses: a model for viral persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Kelly P; Cox, Andrea L

    2010-07-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects over 170 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Approximately 20% [corrected] of those acutely infected clear the infection, whereas the remaining 80% [corrected] progress to chronic infection. Hepatitis C thus provides a model in which successful and unsuccessful responses can be compared to better understand the human response to viral infection. Our laboratory studies the strategies by which HCV evades the adaptive immune response. This review describes the impact of viral mutation on T cell recognition, the role of cell surface inhibitory receptors in recognition of HCV, and the development of antibodies that neutralize HCV infection. Understanding what constitutes an effective immune response in the control of HCV may enable the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines for HCV and other chronic viral infections.

  17. A pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic model to evaluate the treatment effectiveness of danoprevir against chronic HCV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canini, Laetitia; Chatterjee, Anushree; Guedj, Jeremie; Lemenuel-Diot, Annabelle; Brennan, Barbara; Smith, Patrick F; Perelson, Alan S

    2015-01-01

    Viral kinetic models have proven useful to characterize treatment effectiveness during HCV therapy with interferon (IFN) or with direct-acting antivirals. We use a pharmacokinetic/viral kinetic (PK/VK) model to describe HCV RNA kinetics during treatment with danoprevir, a protease inhibitor. In a Phase I study, danoprevir monotherapy was administered for 14 days in ascending doses ranging from 200 to 600 mg per day to 40 patients of whom 32 were treatment-naive and 8 were non-responders to prior pegylated IFN-α/ribavirin treatment. In all patients, a biphasic decline of HCV RNA during therapy was observed. A two-compartment PK model and a VK model that considered treatment effectiveness to vary with the predicted danoprevir concentration inside the second compartment provided a good fit to the viral load data. A time-varying effectiveness model was also used to fit the viral load data. The antiviral effectiveness increased in a dose-dependent manner, with a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.95 at the lowest dose (100 mg twice daily) and 0.99 at the highest dose (200 mg three times daily). Prior IFN non-responders exhibited a 14-day time-averaged effectiveness of 0.98 (300 mg twice daily). The second phase decline showed two different behaviours, with 30% of patients exhibiting a rapid decline of HCV RNA, comparable to that seen with other protease inhibitors (>0.3 day(-1)), whereas the viral decline was slower in the other patients. Our results are consistent with the modest SVR rates from the INFORM-SVR study where patients were treated with a combination of mericitabine and ritonavir-boosted danoprevir.

  18. A highly intensified ART regimen induces long-term viral suppression and restriction of the viral reservoir in a simian AIDS model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iart Luca Shytaj

    Full Text Available Stably suppressed viremia during ART is essential for establishing reliable simian models for HIV/AIDS. We tested the efficacy of a multidrug ART (highly intensified ART in a wide range of viremic conditions (10³-10⁷ viral RNA copies/mL in SIVmac251-infected rhesus macaques, and its impact on the viral reservoir. Eleven macaques in the pre-AIDS stage of the disease were treated with a multidrug combination (highly intensified ART consisting of two nucleosidic/nucleotidic reverse transcriptase inhibitors (emtricitabine and tenofovir, an integrase inhibitor (raltegravir, a protease inhibitor (ritonavir-boosted darunavir and the CCR5 blocker maraviroc. All animals stably displayed viral loads below the limit of detection of the assay (i.e. <40 RNA copies/mL after starting highly intensified ART. By increasing the sensitivity of the assay to 3 RNA copies/mL, viral load was still below the limit of detection in all subjects tested. Importantly, viral DNA resulted below the assay detection limit (<2 copies of DNA/5*10⁵ cells in PBMCs and rectal biopsies of all animals at the end of the follow-up, and in lymph node biopsies from the majority of the study subjects. Moreover, highly intensified ART decreased central/transitional memory, effector memory and activated (HLA-DR⁺ effector memory CD4⁺ T-cells in vivo, in line with the role of these subsets as the main cell subpopulations harbouring the virus. Finally, treatment with highly intensified ART at viral load rebound following suspension of a previous anti-reservoir therapy eventually improved the spontaneous containment of viral load following suspension of the second therapeutic cycle, thus leading to a persistent suppression of viremia in the absence of ART. In conclusion, we show, for the first time, complete suppression of viral load by highly intensified ART and a likely associated restriction of the viral reservoir in the macaque AIDS model, making it a useful platform for testing

  19. Modeling the winter-to-summer transition of prokaryotic and viral abundance in the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Christian; Payet, Jérôme P; Suttle, Curtis A

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges in oceanography is to understand the influence of environmental factors on the abundances of prokaryotes and viruses. Generally, conventional statistical methods resolve trends well, but more complex relationships are difficult to explore. In such cases, Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) offer an alternative way for data analysis. Here, we developed ANN-based models of prokaryotic and viral abundances in the Arctic Ocean. The models were used to identify the best predictors for prokaryotic and viral abundances including cytometrically-distinguishable populations of prokaryotes (high and low nucleic acid cells) and viruses (high- and low-fluorescent viruses) among salinity, temperature, depth, day length, and the concentration of Chlorophyll-a. The best performing ANNs to model the abundances of high and low nucleic acid cells used temperature and Chl-a as input parameters, while the abundances of high- and low-fluorescent viruses used depth, Chl-a, and day length as input parameters. Decreasing viral abundance with increasing depth and decreasing system productivity was captured well by the ANNs. Despite identifying the same predictors for the two populations of prokaryotes and viruses, respectively, the structure of the best performing ANNs differed between high and low nucleic acid cells and between high- and low-fluorescent viruses. Also, the two prokaryotic and viral groups responded differently to changes in the predictor parameters; hence, the cytometric distinction between these populations is ecologically relevant. The models imply that temperature is the main factor explaining most of the variation in the abundances of high nucleic acid cells and total prokaryotes and that the mechanisms governing the reaction to changes in the environment are distinctly different among the prokaryotic and viral populations.

  20. Modeling the Winter–to–Summer Transition of Prokaryotic and Viral Abundance in the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Christian; Payet, Jérôme P.; Suttle, Curtis A.

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges in oceanography is to understand the influence of environmental factors on the abundances of prokaryotes and viruses. Generally, conventional statistical methods resolve trends well, but more complex relationships are difficult to explore. In such cases, Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs) offer an alternative way for data analysis. Here, we developed ANN-based models of prokaryotic and viral abundances in the Arctic Ocean. The models were used to identify the best predictors for prokaryotic and viral abundances including cytometrically-distinguishable populations of prokaryotes (high and low nucleic acid cells) and viruses (high- and low-fluorescent viruses) among salinity, temperature, depth, day length, and the concentration of Chlorophyll-a. The best performing ANNs to model the abundances of high and low nucleic acid cells used temperature and Chl-a as input parameters, while the abundances of high- and low-fluorescent viruses used depth, Chl-a, and day length as input parameters. Decreasing viral abundance with increasing depth and decreasing system productivity was captured well by the ANNs. Despite identifying the same predictors for the two populations of prokaryotes and viruses, respectively, the structure of the best performing ANNs differed between high and low nucleic acid cells and between high- and low-fluorescent viruses. Also, the two prokaryotic and viral groups responded differently to changes in the predictor parameters; hence, the cytometric distinction between these populations is ecologically relevant. The models imply that temperature is the main factor explaining most of the variation in the abundances of high nucleic acid cells and total prokaryotes and that the mechanisms governing the reaction to changes in the environment are distinctly different among the prokaryotic and viral populations. PMID:23285186

  1. Modeling and simulation of the mechanical response from nanoindentation test of DNA-filled viral capsids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahadi, Aylin; Johansson, Dan; Evilevitch, Alex

    2013-03-01

    Viruses can be described as biological objects composed mainly of two parts: a stiff protein shell called a capsid, and a core inside the capsid containing the nucleic acid and liquid. In many double-stranded DNA bacterial viruses (aka phage), the volume ratio between the liquid and the encapsidated DNA is approximately 1:1. Due to the dominant DNA hydration force, water strongly mediates the interaction between the packaged DNA strands. Therefore, water that hydrates the DNA plays an important role in nanoindentation experiments of DNA-filled viral capsids. Nanoindentation measurements allow us to gain further insight into the nature of the hydration and electrostatic interactions between the DNA strands. With this motivation, a continuum-based numerical model for simulating the nanoindentation response of DNA-filled viral capsids is proposed here. The viral capsid is modeled as large- strain isotropic hyper-elastic material, whereas porous elasticity is adopted to capture the mechanical response of the filled viral capsid. The voids inside the viral capsid are assumed to be filled with liquid, which is modeled as a homogenous incompressible fluid. The motion of a fluid flowing through the porous medium upon capsid indentation is modeled using Darcy's law, describing the flow of fluid through a porous medium. The nanoindentation response is simulated using three-dimensional finite element analysis and the simulations are performed using the finite element code Abaqus. Force-indentation curves for empty, partially and completely DNA-filled capsids are directly compared to the experimental data for bacteriophage λ. Material parameters such as Young's modulus, shear modulus, and bulk modulus are determined by comparing computed force-indentation curves to the data from the atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments. Predictions are made for pressure distribution inside the capsid, as well as the fluid volume ratio variation during the indentation test.

  2. First insight into the viral community of the cnidarian model metaorganism Aiptasia using RNA-Seq data

    KAUST Repository

    Brüwer, Jan D.

    2018-03-01

    Current research posits that all multicellular organisms live in symbioses with associated microorganisms and form so-called metaorganisms or holobionts. Cnidarian metaorganisms are of specific interest given that stony corals provide the foundation of the globally threatened coral reef ecosystems. To gain first insight into viruses associated with the coral model system Aiptasia (sensu Exaiptasia pallida), we analyzed an existing RNA-Seq dataset of aposymbiotic, partially populated, and fully symbiotic Aiptasia CC7 anemones with Symbiodinium. Our approach included the selective removal of anemone host and algal endosymbiont sequences and subsequent microbial sequence annotation. Of a total of 297 million raw sequence reads, 8.6 million (∼3%) remained after host and endosymbiont sequence removal. Of these, 3,293 sequences could be assigned as of viral origin. Taxonomic annotation of these sequences suggests that Aiptasia is associated with a diverse viral community, comprising 116 viral taxa covering 40 families. The viral assemblage was dominated by viruses from the families Herpesviridae (12.00%), Partitiviridae (9.93%), and Picornaviridae (9.87%). Despite an overall stable viral assemblage, we found that some viral taxa exhibited significant changes in their relative abundance when Aiptasia engaged in a symbiotic relationship with Symbiodinium. Elucidation of viral taxa consistently present across all conditions revealed a core virome of 15 viral taxa from 11 viral families, encompassing many viruses previously reported as members of coral viromes. Despite the non-random selection of viral genetic material due to the nature of the sequencing data analyzed, our study provides a first insight into the viral community associated with Aiptasia. Similarities of the Aiptasia viral community with those of corals corroborate the application of Aiptasia as a model system to study coral holobionts. Further, the change in abundance of certain viral taxa across different

  3. Modeling ecological drivers in marine viral communities using comparative metagenomics and network analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurwitz, Bonnie L; Westveld, Anton H; Brum, Jennifer R; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2014-07-22

    Long-standing questions in marine viral ecology are centered on understanding how viral assemblages change along gradients in space and time. However, investigating these fundamental ecological questions has been challenging due to incomplete representation of naturally occurring viral diversity in single gene- or morphology-based studies and an inability to identify up to 90% of reads in viral metagenomes (viromes). Although protein clustering techniques provide a significant advance by helping organize this unknown metagenomic sequence space, they typically use only ∼75% of the data and rely on assembly methods not yet tuned for naturally occurring sequence variation. Here, we introduce an annotation- and assembly-free strategy for comparative metagenomics that combines shared k-mer and social network analyses (regression modeling). This robust statistical framework enables visualization of complex sample networks and determination of ecological factors driving community structure. Application to 32 viromes from the Pacific Ocean Virome dataset identified clusters of samples broadly delineated by photic zone and revealed that geographic region, depth, and proximity to shore were significant predictors of community structure. Within subsets of this dataset, depth, season, and oxygen concentration were significant drivers of viral community structure at a single open ocean station, whereas variability along onshore-offshore transects was driven by oxygen concentration in an area with an oxygen minimum zone and not depth or proximity to shore, as might be expected. Together these results demonstrate that this highly scalable approach using complete metagenomic network-based comparisons can both test and generate hypotheses for ecological investigation of viral and microbial communities in nature.

  4. A nonstandard finite difference scheme for a basic model of cellular immune response to viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korpusik, Adam

    2017-02-01

    We present a nonstandard finite difference scheme for a basic model of cellular immune response to viral infection. The main advantage of this approach is that it preserves the essential qualitative features of the original continuous model (non-negativity and boundedness of the solution, equilibria and their stability conditions), while being easy to implement. All of the qualitative features are preserved independently of the chosen step-size. Numerical simulations of our approach and comparison with other conventional simulation methods are presented.

  5. Hepatitis C Virus Evasion of Adaptive Immune Responses- A Model for Viral Persistence

    OpenAIRE

    Burke, Kelly P.; Cox, Andrea L.

    2010-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects over 170 million people worldwide and is a leading cause of cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Approximately 20% of those acutely infected clear the infection, whereas the remaining 80% progress to chronic infection. Hepatitis C thus provides a model in which successful and unsuccessful responses can be compared to better understand the human response to viral infection. Our laboratory studies the strategies by which HCV evades the adaptive immune response...

  6. Can We Predict Those With Osteoarthritis Who Will Worsen Following a Chronic Disease Management Program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, Jillian P; Mills, Kathryn; Lucas, Barbara R; Williams, Matthew J; Makovey, Joanna; Teoh, Laurence; Hunter, David J

    2016-09-01

    To identify predictors of worsening symptoms and overall health of the treated hip or knee joint following 26 weeks of a nonsurgical chronic disease management program for hip and knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to examine the consistency of these predictors across 3 definitions of worsening. This prospective cohort study followed 539 participants of the program for 26 weeks. The 3 definitions of worsening included symptomatic worsening based on change in the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index Global score (WOMAC-G) measuring pain, stiffness, and function; a transition scale that asked about overall health of the treated hip or knee joint; and a composite outcome including both. Multivariate logistic regression models were constructed for the 3 definitions of worsening. Complete data were available for 386 participants: mean age was 66.3 years, 69% were female, 85% reported knee joint pain as primary symptom (signal joint), 46% were waitlisted for total joint arthroplasty (TJA). TJA waitlist status, signal joint, 6-Minute Walk Test (6MWT), depressive symptoms, pain, and age were independently associated with at least 1 definition of worsening. TJA waitlist status and 6MWT remained in the multivariate models for the transition and composite definitions of worsening. Participants reporting worsening on the transition scale did not consistently meet the WOMAC-G definition of worsening symptoms. TJA waitlist status was predictive of the composite definition of worsening, a trend apparent for the transition definition. However, variables that predict worsening remain largely unknown. Further research is required to direct comprehensive and targeted management of patients with hip and knee OA. © 2016, American College of Rheumatology.

  7. Multiscale model for the effects of adaptive immunity suppression on the viral therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paiva, Leticia R; Silva, Hallan S; Ferreira, Silvio C; Martins, Marcelo L

    2013-01-01

    Oncolytic virotherapy—the use of viruses that specifically kill tumor cells—is an innovative and highly promising route for treating cancer. However, its therapeutic outcomes are mainly impaired by the host immune response to the viral infection. In this paper, we propose a multiscale mathematical model to study how the immune response interferes with the viral oncolytic activity. The model assumes that cytotoxic T cells can induce apoptosis in infected cancer cells and that free viruses can be inactivated by neutralizing antibodies or cleared at a constant rate by the innate immune response. Our simulations suggest that reprogramming the immune microenvironment in tumors could substantially enhance the oncolytic virotherapy in immune-competent hosts. Viable routes to such reprogramming are either in situ virus-mediated impairing of CD8 + T cells motility or blockade of B and T lymphocytes recruitment. Our theoretical results can shed light on the design of viral vectors or new protocols with neat potential impacts on the clinical practice. (paper)

  8. Worsening of memory deficit induced by energy-dense diet in a rat model of early-Alzheimer's disease is associated to neurotoxic Aβ species and independent of neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino Adami, Pamela V; Galeano, Pablo; Wallinger, Marina L; Quijano, Celia; Rabossi, Alejandro; Pagano, Eleonora S; Olivar, Natividad; Reyes Toso, Carlos; Cardinali, Daniel; Brusco, Luis I; Do Carmo, Sonia; Radi, Rafael; Gevorkian, Goar; Castaño, Eduardo M; Cuello, A Claudio; Morelli, Laura

    2017-03-01

    Diet is a modifiable risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), but the mechanisms linking alterations in peripheral metabolism and cognition remain unclear. Since it is especially difficult to study long-term effects of high-energy diet in individuals at risk for AD, we addressed this question by using the McGill-R-Thy1-APP transgenic rat model (Tg(+/-)) that mimics presymptomatic AD. Wild-type and Tg(+/-) rats were exposed during 6months to a standard diet or a Western diet (WD), high in saturated fat and sugar. Results from peripheral and hippocampal biochemical analysis and in situ respirometry showed that WD induced a metabolic syndrome and decreased presynaptic bioenergetic parameters without alterations in hippocampal insulin signaling or lipid composition. Cognitive tests, ELISA multiplex, Western blot, immunohistochemistry and RT-qPCR indicated that WD worsened cognition in Tg(+/-) rats, increased hippocampal levels of monomeric Aβ isoforms and oligomeric species, promoted deposits of N-Terminal pyroglutamate-Aβ (AβN3(pE)) in CA1 pyramidal neurons and interneurons, decreased transcript levels of genes involved in neuroprotective pathways such as Sirtuin-1 and increased nitrated proteins. Our results support the concept that in the presence of early Aβ pathology, diet-induced metabolic dysfunctions may contribute as a "second hit" to impair cognition. Noteworthy, such effect is not mediated by higher microglia activation or disruption of blood brain barrier. However, it may be attributed to increased amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein, generation of AβN3(pE) and dysregulation of pathways governed by Sirtuin-1. This evidence reinforces the implementation of prophylactic interventions in individuals at risk for AD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Acute Worsening of Tics on Varenicline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Shivam Om; Klassen, Bryan T; Hassan, Anhar; Bower, James H; Coon, Elizabeth A

    The aim of this study was to report worsening of Tourette syndrome (TS) in 2 patients treated with varenicline. Abnormal dopaminergic signaling is likely involved in the pathophysiology of TS. Varenicline is a partial α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine agonist that enhances dopamine release. Therefore, the use of varenicline may influence tics in patients with TS. We analyzed and described 2 case studies on patients with significant worsening of tics after treatment with varenicline. Patient 1 had motor tics in childhood, which completely resolved by the age of 20 years. At the age of 25 years, he started varenicline and stopped smoking. Within 2 weeks, he developed motor followed by vocal tics that persisted despite stopping varenicline and restarting smoking. The tics were complex, medically refractory, and caused severe disability at work and school (Yale Global Tic Severity Scale score, 86). Patient 2 developed motor and vocal tics in adolescence that persisted into her 20s and caused significant disability in association with psychiatric comorbidities. At the age of 31 years, she started varenicline to quit smoking, which led to a marked increase in tic frequency and severity. Varenicline was discontinued after 3 weeks with improvement to baseline tic severity (Yale Global Tic Severity Scale score, 94). Ultimately, both patients successfully underwent deep brain stimulation to bilateral centromedian/parafascicular complex thalamic nuclei for medically refractory TS. We report 2 patients with motor and/or vocal tics that had severe worsening of tics after varenicline use. This may be due to varenicline-induced increased striatal dopamine in conjunction with nicotine cessation, influencing dopamine receptor sensitivity in TS. Providers should be cautious in prescribing varenicline to patients with TS.

  10. Modeling viral genome fitness evolution associated with serial bottleneck events: evidence of stationary states of fitness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lázaro, Ester; Escarmís, Cristina; Domingo, Esteban; Manrubia, Susanna C

    2002-09-01

    Evolution of fitness values upon replication of viral populations is strongly influenced by the size of the virus population that participates in the infections. While large population passages often result in fitness gains, repeated plaque-to-plaque transfers result in average fitness losses. Here we develop a numerical model that describes fitness evolution of viral clones subjected to serial bottleneck events. The model predicts a biphasic evolution of fitness values in that a period of exponential decrease is followed by a stationary state in which fitness values display large fluctuations around an average constant value. This biphasic evolution is in agreement with experimental results of serial plaque-to-plaque transfers carried out with foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) in cell culture. The existence of a stationary phase of fitness values has been further documented by serial plaque-to-plaque transfers of FMDV clones that had reached very low relative fitness values. The statistical properties of the stationary state depend on several parameters of the model, such as the probability of advantageous versus deleterious mutations, initial fitness, and the number of replication rounds. In particular, the size of the bottleneck is critical for determining the trend of fitness evolution.

  11. Global Stability of Delayed Viral Infection Models with Nonlinear Antibody and CTL Immune Responses and General Incidence Rate

    OpenAIRE

    Miao, Hui; Teng, Zhidong; Li, Zhiming

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical behaviors for a five-dimensional viral infection model with three delays which describes the interactions of antibody, cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) immune responses, and nonlinear incidence rate are investigated. The threshold values for viral infection, antibody response, CTL immune response, CTL immune competition, and antibody competition, respectively, are established. Under certain assumptions, the threshold value conditions on the global stability of the infection-free, im...

  12. Stochastic simulation modeling to determine time to detect Bovine Viral Diarrhea antibodies in bulk tank milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foddai, Alessandro; Enøe, Claes; Krogh, Kaspar

    2014-01-01

    A stochastic simulation model was developed to estimate the time from introduction ofBovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) in a herd to detection of antibodies in bulk tank milk(BTM) samples using three ELISAs. We assumed that antibodies could be detected, after afixed threshold prevalence of seroco......A stochastic simulation model was developed to estimate the time from introduction ofBovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) in a herd to detection of antibodies in bulk tank milk(BTM) samples using three ELISAs. We assumed that antibodies could be detected, after afixed threshold prevalence...... of seroconverted milking cows was reached in the herd. Differentthresholds were set for each ELISA, according to previous studies. For each test, antibodydetection was simulated in small (70 cows), medium (150 cows) and large (320 cows)herds. The assays included were: (1) the Danish blocking ELISA, (2......, which was the most efficient ELISA, could detect antibodiesin the BTM of a large herd 280 days (95% prediction interval: 218; 568) after a transientlyinfected (TI) milking cow has been introduced into the herd. The estimated time to detectionafter introduction of one PI calf was 111 days (44; 605...

  13. Hepatitis B virus core antigen determines viral persistence in a C57BL/6 mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yi-Jiun; Huang, Li-Rung; Yang, Hung-Chih; Tzeng, Horng-Tay; Hsu, Ping-Ning; Wu, Hui-Lin; Chen, Pei-Jer; Chen, Ding-Shinn

    2010-05-18

    We recently developed a mouse model of hepatitis B virus (HBV) persistence, in which a single i.v. hydrodynamic injection of HBV DNA to C57BL/6 mice allows HBV replication and induces a partial immune response, so that about 20-30% of the mice carry HBV for more than 6 months. The model was used to identify the viral antigen crucial for HBV persistence. We knocked out individual HBV genes by introducing a premature termination codon to the HBV core, HBeAg, HBx, and polymerase ORFs. The specific-gene-deficient HBV mutants were hydrodynamically injected into mice and the HBV profiles of the mice were monitored. About 90% of the mice that received the HBcAg-mutated HBV plasmid exhibited high levels of hepatitis B surface antigenemia and maintained HBsAg expression for more than 6 months after injection. To map the region of HBcAg essential for viral clearance, we constructed a set of serial HBcAg deletion mutants for hydrodynamic injection. We localized the essential region of HBcAg to the carboxyl terminus, specifically to the 10 terminal amino acids (HBcAg176-185). The majority of mice receiving this HBV mutant DNA did not elicit a proper HBcAg-specific IFN-gamma response and expressed HBV virions for 6 months. These results indicate that the immune response triggered in mice by HBcAg during exposure to HBV is important in determining HBV persistence.

  14. Modelling hepatitis C virus kinetics: the relationship between the infected cell loss rate and the final slope of viral decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahari, Harel; Shudo, Emi; Cotler, Scott J; Layden, Thomas J; Perelson, Alan S

    2009-01-01

    Patients infected with hepatitis C virus (HCV) who respond to treatment with interferon-alpha plus ribavirin exhibit biphasic or triphasic viral load decreases. While the rapid first phase is indicative of the effectiveness of therapy in blocking viral production (epsilon), the slope of the final phase (lambda), that is, the second phase in biphasic decreases and the third phase in triphasic decreases, depends on the infected cell loss rate (delta). In standard models, lambda is approximately epsilondelta when the viral clearance rate c>delta, as has been previously estimated. The relationship among epsilon, delta, lambda and the baseline fraction of HCV-infected hepatocytes (pi) was investigated in a model that included proliferation of hepatocytes. We found that lambda was not proportional to epsilon, but rather obeyed a complex relationship that could lead to dramatic increases in estimates of delta as epsilon increased. In particular, when epsilon99%, delta approximately lambda regardless of pi. Our results indicated that in patients undergoing therapy who achieved a 2 log(10) reduction in viral load (epsilon99% should allow for a more accurate estimate of delta in HCV RNA kinetic studies. This might be important when using viral kinetics to estimate the effect of the immune response on viral elimination and the attainment of sustained virological response.

  15. An individual-based model of rabbit viral haemorrhagic disease on European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fa, John E.; Sharples, Colin M.; Bell, Diana J.; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2001-01-01

    We developed an individual-based model of Rabbit Viral Hemorrhagic Disease (RVHD) for European wild rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus L.), representing up to 1000 rabbits in four hectares. Model output for productivity and recruitment matched published values. The disease was density-dependent and virulence affected outcome. Strains that caused death after several days produced greater overall mortality than strains in which rabbits either died or recovered very quickly. Disease effect also depended on time of year. We also elaborated a larger scale model representing 25 km2 and 100,000+ rabbits, split into a number of grid-squares. This was a more traditional model that did not represent individual rabbits, but employed a system of dynamic equations for each grid-square. Disease spread depended on probability of transmission between neighboring grid-squares. Potential recovery from a major population crash caused by the disease relied on disease virulence and frequency of recurrence. The model's dependence on probability of disease transmission between grid-squares suggests the way that the model represents the spatial distribution of the population affects simulation. Although data on RVHD in Europe are lacking, our models provide a basis for describing the disease in realistic detail and for assessing influence of various social and spatial factors on spread.

  16. A discontinuous RNA platform mediates RNA virus replication: building an integrated model for RNA-based regulation of viral processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baodong Wu

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Plus-strand RNA viruses contain RNA elements within their genomes that mediate a variety of fundamental viral processes. The traditional view of these elements is that of local RNA structures. This perspective, however, is changing due to increasing discoveries of functional viral RNA elements that are formed by long-range RNA-RNA interactions, often spanning thousands of nucleotides. The plus-strand RNA genomes of tombusviruses exemplify this concept by possessing different long-range RNA-RNA interactions that regulate both viral translation and transcription. Here we report that a third fundamental tombusvirus process, viral genome replication, requires a long-range RNA-based interaction spanning approximately 3000 nts. In vivo and in vitro analyses suggest that the discontinuous RNA platform formed by the interaction facilitates efficient assembly of the viral RNA replicase. This finding has allowed us to build an integrated model for the role of global RNA structure in regulating the reproduction of a eukaryotic RNA virus, and the insights gained have extended our understanding of the multifunctional nature of viral RNA genomes.

  17. A multi-scale spatial model of hepatitis-B viral dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Cangelosi

    Full Text Available Chronic hepatitis B viral infection (HBV afflicts around 250 million individuals globally and few options for treatment exist. Once infected, the virus entrenches itself in the liver with a notoriously resilient colonisation of viral DNA (covalently-closed circular DNA, cccDNA. The majority of infections are cleared, yet we do not understand why 5% of adult immune responses fail leading to the chronic state with its collateral morbid effects such as cirrhosis and eventual hepatic carcinoma. The liver environment exhibits particularly complex spatial structures for metabolic processing and corresponding distributions of nutrients and transporters that may influence successful HBV entrenchment. We assembled a multi-scaled mathematical model of the fundamental hepatic processing unit, the sinusoid, into a whole-liver representation to investigate the impact of this intrinsic spatial heterogeneity on the HBV dynamic. Our results suggest HBV may be exploiting spatial aspects of the liver environment. We distributed increased HBV replication rates coincident with elevated levels of nutrients in the sinusoid entry point (the periportal region in tandem with similar distributions of hepatocyte transporters key to HBV invasion (e.g., the sodium-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide or NTCP, or immune system activity. According to our results, such co-alignment of spatial distributions may contribute to persistence of HBV infections, depending on spatial distributions and intensity of immune response as well. Moreover, inspired by previous HBV models and experimentalist suggestions of extra-hepatic HBV replication, we tested in our model influence of HBV blood replication and observe an overall nominal effect on persistent liver infection. Regardless, we confirm prior results showing a solo cccDNA is sufficient to re-infect an entire liver, with corresponding concerns for transplantation and treatment.

  18. Structural equation modelling of viral tropism reveals its impact on achieving viral suppression within 6 months in treatment-naive HIV-1-infected patients after combination antiretroviral therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mengoli, Carlo; Andreis, Samantha; Scaggiante, Renzo; Cruciani, Mario; Bosco, Oliviero; Ferretto, Roberto; Leoni, Davide; Maffongelli, Gaetano; Basso, Monica; Torti, Carlo; Sarmati, Loredana; Andreoni, Massimo; Palù, Giorgio; Parisi, Saverio Giuseppe

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the role of pre-treatment co-receptor tropism of plasma HIV on the achievement of viral suppression (plasma HIV RNA 1.69 log 10 copies/mL) at the sixth month of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in a cohort of naive patients using, for the first time in this context, a path analysis (PA) approach. Adult patients with chronic infection by subtype B HIV-1 were consecutively enrolled from the start of first-line cART (T0). Genotypic analysis of viral tropism was performed on plasma and interpreted using the bioinformatic tool Geno2pheno, with a false positive rate of 10%. A Bayesian network starting from the viro-immunological data at T0 and at the sixth month of treatment (T1) was set up and this model was evaluated using a PA approach. A total of 262 patients (22.1% bearing an X4 virus) were included; 178 subjects (67.9%) achieved viral suppression. A significant positive indirect effect of bearing X4 virus in plasma at T0 on log 10 HIV RNA at T1 was detected (P = 0.009), the magnitude of this effect was, however, over 10-fold lower than the direct effect of log 10 HIV RNA at T0 on log 10 HIV RNA at T1 (P = 0.000). Moreover, a significant positive indirect effect of bearing an X4 virus on log 10 HIV RNA at T0 (P = 0.003) was apparent. PA overcame the limitations implicit in common multiple regression analysis and showed the possible role of pre-treatment viral tropism at the recommended threshold on the outcome of plasma viraemia in naive patients after 6 months of therapy. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Antimicrobial Chemotherapy. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Modeling Viral Infectious Diseases and Development of Antiviral Therapies Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Trevisan

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent biotechnology breakthrough of cell reprogramming and generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, which has revolutionized the approaches to study the mechanisms of human diseases and to test new drugs, can be exploited to generate patient-specific models for the investigation of host–pathogen interactions and to develop new antimicrobial and antiviral therapies. Applications of iPSC technology to the study of viral infections in humans have included in vitro modeling of viral infections of neural, liver, and cardiac cells; modeling of human genetic susceptibility to severe viral infectious diseases, such as encephalitis and severe influenza; genetic engineering and genome editing of patient-specific iPSC-derived cells to confer antiviral resistance.

  20. Modeling Zika plasma viral dynamics in non-human primates: insights into viral pathogenesis and antiviral strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, Katharine [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Guedj, Jeremie [Univ. of Paris (France). IAME; Madelain, Vincent [Univ. of Paris (France); de Lamballerie, Xavier [Aix-Marseille Univ. (France); L, So-Yonim [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Virology and Vaccine Research; Osuna, Christa E [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Virology and Vaccine Research; Whitney, James [Harvard Univ., Cambridge, MA (United States). Center for Virology and Vaccine Research; Perelson, Alan S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-10-24

    The recent outbreak of Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated with fetal abnormalities and neurological complications, prompting global concern. Here we present the first mathematical analysis of the within-host dynamics of plasma ZiKV burden in a non-human primate model, allowing for characterization of the growth and clearance of ZIKV within an individual macaque.

  1. Viral persistence, latent reservoir, and blips: a review on HIV-1 dynamics and modeling during HAART and related treatment implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rong, Libin [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    HIV-1 eradication from infected individuals has not been achieved with the use of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for a prolonged period of time. The cellular reservoir for HIV-1 in resting memory CD4{sup +} T cells remains a major obstacle to viral elimination. The reservoir does not decay significantly over long periods of time as is able to release replication competent HIV-1 upon cell activation. Residual ongoing viral replication may likely occur in many patients because low levels of virus can be detected in plasma by sensitive assays and transient episodes of viremia, or HIV-1 blips, are often observed in patients even with successful viral suppression for many years. Here we review our current knowledge of the factors contributing to viral persistence, the latent reservoir, and blips, and mathematical models developed to explore them and their relationships. We show how mathematical modeling can help improve our understanding of HIV-1 dynamics in patients on HAART and the quantitative events underlying HIV-1 latency, reservoir stability, low-level viremic persistence, and emergence of intermittent viral blips. We also discuss treatment implications related to these studies.

  2. Concepts in viral pathogenesis II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Notkins, A.L.; Oldstone, M.B.A.

    1986-01-01

    This paper contains papers divided among 10 sections. The section titles are: Viral Structure and Function; Viral Constructs; Oncogenes, Transfection, and Differentiation; Viral Tropism and Entry into Cells; Immune Recognition of Viruses; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Plant and Animal Models; Evolving Concepts in Viral Pathogenesis Illustrated by Selected Diseases in Humans; New Trends in Diagnosis and Epidemiology; and Vaccines and Antiviral Therapy.

  3. Survival of viral pathogens in animal feed ingredients under transboundary shipping models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Scott A; Bauermann, Fernando V; Niederwerder, Megan C; Singrey, Aaron; Clement, Travis; de Lima, Marcelo; Long, Craig; Patterson, Gilbert; Sheahan, Maureen A; Stoian, Ana M M; Petrovan, Vlad; Jones, Cassandra K; De Jong, Jon; Ji, Ju; Spronk, Gordon D; Minion, Luke; Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Zimmerman, Jeff J; Rowland, Raymond R R; Nelson, Eric; Sundberg, Paul; Diel, Diego G

    2018-01-01

    The goal of this study was to evaluate survival of important viral pathogens of livestock in animal feed ingredients imported daily into the United States under simulated transboundary conditions. Eleven viruses were selected based on global significance and impact to the livestock industry, including Foot and Mouth Disease Virus (FMDV), Classical Swine Fever Virus (CSFV), African Swine Fever Virus (ASFV), Influenza A Virus of Swine (IAV-S), Pseudorabies virus (PRV), Nipah Virus (NiV), Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus (PRRSV), Swine Vesicular Disease Virus (SVDV), Vesicular Stomatitis Virus (VSV), Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2) and Vesicular Exanthema of Swine Virus (VESV). Surrogate viruses with similar genetic and physical properties were used for 6 viruses. Surrogates belonged to the same virus families as target pathogens, and included Senecavirus A (SVA) for FMDV, Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus (BVDV) for CSFV, Bovine Herpesvirus Type 1 (BHV-1) for PRV, Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) for NiV, Porcine Sapelovirus (PSV) for SVDV and Feline Calicivirus (FCV) for VESV. For the remaining target viruses, actual pathogens were used. Virus survival was evaluated using Trans-Pacific or Trans-Atlantic transboundary models involving representative feed ingredients, transport times and environmental conditions, with samples tested by PCR, VI and/or swine bioassay. SVA (representing FMDV), FCV (representing VESV), BHV-1 (representing PRV), PRRSV, PSV (representing SVDV), ASFV and PCV2 maintained infectivity during transport, while BVDV (representing CSFV), VSV, CDV (representing NiV) and IAV-S did not. Notably, more viruses survived in conventional soybean meal, lysine hydrochloride, choline chloride, vitamin D and pork sausage casings. These results support published data on transboundary risk of PEDV in feed, demonstrate survival of certain viruses in specific feed ingredients ("high-risk combinations") under conditions simulating transport between

  4. Next Generation Respiratory Viral Vaccine System: Advanced and Emerging Bioengineered Human Lung Epithelia Model (HLEM) Organoid Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Thomas J.; Schneider, Sandra L.; MacIntosh, Victor; Gibbons, Thomas F.

    2010-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections, including pneumonia and influenza, are the S t" leading cause of United States and worldwide deaths. Newly emerging pathogens signaled the need for an advanced generation of vaccine technology.. Human bronchial-tracheal epithelial tissue was bioengineered to detect, identify, host and study the pathogenesis of acute respiratory viral disease. The 3-dimensional (3D) human lung epithelio-mesechymal tissue-like assemblies (HLEM TLAs) share characteristics with human respiratory epithelium: tight junctions, desmosomes, microvilli, functional markers villin, keratins and production of tissue mucin. Respiratory Syntial Virus (RSV) studies demonstrate viral growth kinetics and membrane bound glycoproteins up to day 20 post infection in the human lung-orgainoid infected cell system. Peak replication of RSV occurred on day 10 at 7 log10 particles forming units per ml/day. HLEM is an advanced virus vaccine model and biosentinel system for emergent viral infectious diseases to support DoD global surveillance and military readiness.

  5. Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6: Models of Viral Genome Release from the Telomere and Impacts on Human Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Michael L; Royle, Nicola J

    2017-07-12

    Human herpesvirus 6A and 6B, alongside some other herpesviruses, have the striking capacity to integrate into telomeres, the terminal repeated regions of chromosomes. The chromosomally integrated forms, ciHHV-6A and ciHHV-6B, are proposed to be a state of latency and it has been shown that they can both be inherited if integration occurs in the germ line. The first step in full viral reactivation must be the release of the integrated viral genome from the telomere and here we propose various models of this release involving transcription of the viral genome, replication fork collapse, and t-circle mediated release. In this review, we also discuss the relationship between ciHHV-6 and the telomere carrying the insertion, particularly how the presence and subsequent partial or complete release of the ciHHV-6 genome may affect telomere dynamics and the risk of disease.

  6. Chromosomally Integrated Human Herpesvirus 6: Models of Viral Genome Release from the Telomere and Impacts on Human Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael L. Wood

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Human herpesvirus 6A and 6B, alongside some other herpesviruses, have the striking capacity to integrate into telomeres, the terminal repeated regions of chromosomes. The chromosomally integrated forms, ciHHV-6A and ciHHV-6B, are proposed to be a state of latency and it has been shown that they can both be inherited if integration occurs in the germ line. The first step in full viral reactivation must be the release of the integrated viral genome from the telomere and here we propose various models of this release involving transcription of the viral genome, replication fork collapse, and t-circle mediated release. In this review, we also discuss the relationship between ciHHV-6 and the telomere carrying the insertion, particularly how the presence and subsequent partial or complete release of the ciHHV-6 genome may affect telomere dynamics and the risk of disease.

  7. Human Neural Precursor Cells Promote Neurologic Recovery in a Viral Model of Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Chen

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Using a viral model of the demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis (MS, we show that intraspinal transplantation of human embryonic stem cell-derived neural precursor cells (hNPCs results in sustained clinical recovery, although hNPCs were not detectable beyond day 8 posttransplantation. Improved motor skills were associated with a reduction in neuroinflammation, decreased demyelination, and enhanced remyelination. Evidence indicates that the reduced neuroinflammation is correlated with an increased number of CD4+CD25+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs within the spinal cords. Coculture of hNPCs with activated T cells resulted in reduced T cell proliferation and increased Treg numbers. The hNPCs acted, in part, through secretion of TGF-β1 and TGF-β2. These findings indicate that the transient presence of hNPCs transplanted in an animal model of MS has powerful immunomodulatory effects and mediates recovery. Further investigation of the restorative effects of hNPC transplantation may aid in the development of clinically relevant MS treatments.

  8. Rapidly worsening bulbar symptoms in a patient with spinobulbar muscular atrophy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Montserrat Diaz-Abad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy (Kennedy’s disease affects muscles and motor neurons, manifesting as weakness and wasting of bulbar, facial, and proximal limb muscles due to loss of anterior horn cells in the brain and spinal cord. We present the case of a patient with X-linked spinobulbar muscular atrophy with rapidly worsening bulbar symptoms caused by laryngopharyngeal irritation associated with a viral upper respiratory tract infection, seasonal allergies and laryngopharyngeal reflux, who dramatically improved with multimodality therapy.

  9. Viral Polymerases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Kyung H.

    2016-01-01

    Viral polymerases play a central role in viral genome replication and transcription. Based on the genome type and the specific needs of particular virus, RNA-dependent RNA polymerase, RNA-dependent DNA polymerase, DNA-dependent RNA polymerase, and DNA-dependent RNA polymerases are found in various viruses. Viral polymerases are generally active as a single protein capable of carrying out multiple functions related to viral genome synthesis. Specifically, viral polymerases use variety of mechanisms to recognize initial binding sites, ensure processive elongation, terminate replication at the end of the genome, and also coordinate the chemical steps of nucleic acid synthesis with other enzymatic activities. This review focuses on different viral genome replication and transcription strategies, and the polymerase interactions with various viral proteins that are necessary to complete genome synthesis. PMID:22297518

  10. MicroRNA Expression during Viral Infection or PolyI:C Stimulation in a Fish Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, Lasse Bøgelund Juel; Schyth, Brian Dall; Lorenzen, Niels

    Fish are important as small vertebrate models for studying various aspects of development and disease. MicroRNA regulation in fish has so far received attention especially in studies of their expression and function during embryonic development. In the studies carried out at the National Veterinary...... Institute in Århus we aim at using fish models for studying microRNA regulation during viral infection. In the studies presented here we make use of a qPCR method to detect miRNAs in fish cells. We present results regarding the expression of the immunologically relevant microRNAs, miR-155, miR-146a and mi......R-146b in fish cells during infection with the fish pathogenic virus viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) and during immune stimulation with double stranded RNA (polyI:C). We highlight the need of finding stable normalization genes for microRNA detection....

  11. Pemasaran ViralViral Marketing

    OpenAIRE

    Situmorang, James Rianto

    2010-01-01

    Viral marketing is an extremely powerful and effective form of internet marketing. Itis a new form of word-of-mouth through internet. In viral marketing, someone passeson a marketing message to someone else and so on. Viral marketing proposes thatmessages can be rapidly disseminated from consumer to consumer leading to largescale market acceptance. The analogy of a virus is used to described the exponentialdiffusion of information in an electronic environment and should not be confusedwith th...

  12. Mouse Models for the Study of Viral Hepatitis : (intra)cellular innate immunity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.D.B. van de Garde (Martijn D.B.)

    2018-01-01

    markdownabstractLiver-residing leukocytes are essential in determining the outcome of infection with hepatitis viruses. Patient studies of liver innate immune cells during chronic viral hepatitis have been performed but are hampered by, amongst others, a lack of baseline data and unknown time of

  13. Dynamic modelling of viral impact on cyanobacterial populations in shallow lakes: Implications of burst size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gons, H.J.; Hoogveld, H.L.; Simis, S.G.H.; Tijdens, M.

    2006-01-01

    Laboratory experiments with whole water-columns from shallow, eutrophic lakes repeatedly showed collapse of the predominant filamentous cyanobacteria. The collapse could be due to viral activity, from the evidence of electron microscopy of infected cyanobacterial cells and observed dynamics of

  14. Predictors of disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokubaitis, Vilija G; Spelman, Tim; Kalincik, Tomas; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Grand'Maison, François; Duquette, Pierre; Girard, Marc; Lugaresi, Alessandra; Grammond, Pierre; Hupperts, Raymond; Cabrera-Gomez, José; Oreja-Guevara, Celia; Boz, Cavit; Giuliani, Giorgio; Fernández-Bolaños, Ricardo; Iuliano, Gerardo; Lechner-Scott, Jeannette; Verheul, Freek; van Pesch, Vincent; Petkovska-Boskova, Tatjana; Fiol, Marcela; Moore, Fraser; Cristiano, Edgardo; Alroughani, Raed; Bergamaschi, Roberto; Barnett, Michael; Slee, Mark; Vella, Norbert; Herbert, Joseph; Shaw, Cameron; Saladino, Maria Laura; Amato, Maria Pia; Liew, Danny; Paolicelli, Damiano; Butzkueven, Helmut; Trojano, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Objective To assess demographic, clinical, magnetic resonance imaging, and treatment exposure predictors of time to 3 or 12-month confirmed disability worsening in clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) and early multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods We utilized the MSBase Incident Study (MSBasis), a prospective cohort study of outcome after CIS. Predictors of time to first 3 and 12-month confirmed expanded disability status scale worsening were analyzed using Cox proportional hazards regression. Results About 1989 patients were analyzed, the largest seen-from-onset cohort reported to-date. A total of 391 patients had a first 3-month confirmed disability worsening event, of which 307 were sustained for 12 months. Older age at CIS onset (adjusted hazard ratio: aHR 1.17, 95% 1.06, 1.30), pyramidal (aHR 1.45, 95% CI 1.13, 1.89) and ambulation (HR 1.60, 95% CI 1.09, 2.34) system dysfunction, annualized relapse rate (aHR 1.20, 95% CI 1.18, 1.22), and lower proportion of observation time on treatment were associated with 3-month confirmed worsening. Predictors of time to 12-month sustained worsening included pyramidal system dysfunction (Hazard ratio: aHR 1.38, 95% CI 1.05, 1.83), and older age at CIS onset (aHR 1.17, 95% CI 1.04, 1.31). Greater proportion of follow-up time exposed to treatment was associated with greater reductions in the rate of worsening. Interpretation This study provides class IV evidence for a strong protective effect of disease-modifying treatment to reduce disability worsening events in patients with CIS and early MS, and confirms age and pyramidal dysfunction at onset as risk factors. PMID:26000321

  15. Pharyngitis - viral

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Pharyngitis - viral URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  16. Viral gastroenteritis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu) URL of this page: //medlineplus. ...

  17. Rate-equation modelling and ensemble approach to extraction of parameters for viral infection-induced cell apoptosis and necrosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Domanskyi, Sergii; Schilling, Joshua E.; Privman, Vladimir; Gorshkov, Vyacheslav; Libert, Sergiy

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theoretical approach that uses physiochemical kinetics modelling to describe cell population dynamics upon progression of viral infection in cell culture, which results in cell apoptosis (programmed cell death) and necrosis (direct cell death). Several model parameters necessary for computer simulation were determined by reviewing and analyzing available published experimental data. By comparing experimental data to computer modelling results, we identify the parameters that are the most sensitive to the measured system properties and allow for the best data fitting. Our model allows extraction of parameters from experimental data and also has predictive power. Using the model we describe interesting time-dependent quantities that were not directly measured in the experiment and identify correlations among the fitted parameter values. Numerical simulation of viral infection progression is done by a rate-equation approach resulting in a system of “stiff” equations, which are solved by using a novel variant of the stochastic ensemble modelling approach. The latter was originally developed for coupled chemical reactions.

  18. A viral dynamic model for treatment regimens with direct-acting antivirals for chronic hepatitis C infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bambang S Adiwijaya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose an integrative, mechanistic model that integrates in vitro virology data, pharmacokinetics, and viral response to a combination regimen of a direct-acting antiviral (telaprevir, an HCV NS3-4A protease inhibitor and peginterferon alfa-2a/ribavirin (PR in patients with genotype 1 chronic hepatitis C (CHC. This model, which was parameterized with on-treatment data from early phase clinical studies in treatment-naïve patients, prospectively predicted sustained virologic response (SVR rates that were comparable to observed rates in subsequent clinical trials of regimens with different treatment durations in treatment-naïve and treatment-experienced populations. The model explains the clinically-observed responses, taking into account the IC50, fitness, and prevalence prior to treatment of viral resistant variants and patient diversity in treatment responses, which result in different eradication times of each variant. The proposed model provides a framework to optimize treatment strategies and to integrate multifaceted mechanistic information and give insight into novel CHC treatments that include direct-acting antiviral agents.

  19. Activating receptor NKG2D targets RAE-1-expressing allogeneic neural precursor cells in a viral model of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinger, Jason G; Plaisted, Warren C; Maciejewski, Sonia M; Lanier, Lewis L; Walsh, Craig M; Lane, Thomas E

    2014-10-01

    Transplantation of major histocompatibility complex-mismatched mouse neural precursor cells (NPCs) into mice persistently infected with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) results in rapid rejection that is mediated, in part, by T cells. However, the contribution of the innate immune response to allograft rejection in a model of viral-induced neurological disease has not been well defined. Herein, we demonstrate that the natural killer (NK) cell-expressing-activating receptor NKG2D participates in transplanted allogeneic NPC rejection in mice persistently infected with JHMV. Cultured NPCs derived from C57BL/6 (H-2(b) ) mice express the NKG2D ligand retinoic acid early precursor transcript (RAE)-1 but expression was dramatically reduced upon differentiation into either glia or neurons. RAE-1(+) NPCs were susceptible to NK cell-mediated killing whereas RAE-1(-) cells were resistant to lysis. Transplantation of C57BL/6-derived NPCs into JHMV-infected BALB/c (H-2(d) ) mice resulted in infiltration of NKG2D(+) CD49b(+) NK cells and treatment with blocking antibody specific for NKG2D increased survival of allogeneic NPCs. Furthermore, transplantation of differentiated RAE-1(-) allogeneic NPCs into JHMV-infected BALB/c mice resulted in enhanced survival, highlighting a role for the NKG2D/RAE-1 signaling axis in allograft rejection. We also demonstrate that transplantation of allogeneic NPCs into JHMV-infected mice resulted in infection of the transplanted cells suggesting that these cells may be targets for infection. Viral infection of cultured cells increased RAE-1 expression, resulting in enhanced NK cell-mediated killing through NKG2D recognition. Collectively, these results show that in a viral-induced demyelination model, NK cells contribute to rejection of allogeneic NPCs through an NKG2D signaling pathway. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  20. Exposure to electronic cigarettes impairs pulmonary anti-bacterial and anti-viral defenses in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas E Sussan

    Full Text Available Electronic cigarettes (E-cigs have experienced sharp increases in popularity over the past five years due to many factors, including aggressive marketing, increased restrictions on conventional cigarettes, and a perception that E-cigs are healthy alternatives to cigarettes. Despite this perception, studies on health effects in humans are extremely limited and in vivo animal models have not been generated. Presently, we determined that E-cig vapor contains 7 x 10(11 free radicals per puff. To determine whether E-cig exposure impacts pulmonary responses in mice, we developed an inhalation chamber for E-cig exposure. Mice that were exposed to E-cig vapor contained serum cotinine concentrations that are comparable to human E-cig users. E-cig exposure for 2 weeks produced a significant increase in oxidative stress and moderate macrophage-mediated inflammation. Since, COPD patients are susceptible to bacterial and viral infections, we tested effects of E-cigs on immune response. Mice that were exposed to E-cig vapor showed significantly impaired pulmonary bacterial clearance, compared to air-exposed mice, following an intranasal infection with Streptococcus pneumonia. This defective bacterial clearance was partially due to reduced phagocytosis by alveolar macrophages from E-cig exposed mice. In response to Influenza A virus infection, E-cig exposed mice displayed increased lung viral titers and enhanced virus-induced illness and mortality. In summary, this study reports a murine model of E-cig exposure and demonstrates that E-cig exposure elicits impaired pulmonary anti-microbial defenses. Hence, E-cig exposure as an alternative to cigarette smoking must be rigorously tested in users for their effects on immune response and susceptibility to bacterial and viral infections.

  1. Odors as triggering and worsening factors for migraine in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A M Lima

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the role of odors in triggering or worsening migraine in men. METHOD: Ninety-eight male migraineurs from the general population were assessed individually through questionnaires. Environmental factors relating to their migraine were reported, with special focus on the role of odors. RESULTS: Odors were the second most frequent triggering factor for migraine attacks (48%, behind stressful situations (59%. Likewise, odors were the second most frequent worsening factor (73%, just behind excessive light (74%. Thirty-three individuals (33.4% stated that odors were both triggering and worsening factors for their migraine attacks. Perfume, cigarette smoke and cleaning products were the most frequent migraine-related odors reported by these male migraineurs. CONCLUSION: This was the first study to assess the role of odors in migraine exclusively in men. There was a high degree of odor-related migraine among these men, thus suggesting that patient education could alert such individuals to gender-related factors, since different triggering and worsening factors have been reported by males and females.

  2. The Ketogenic Diet Improves Recently Worsened Focal Epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villeneuve, Nathalie; Pinton, Florence; Bahi-Buisson, Nadia; Dulac, Olivier; Chiron, Catherine; Nabbout, Rima

    2009-01-01

    Aim: We observed a dramatic response to the ketogenic diet in several patients with highly refractory epilepsy whose seizure frequency had recently worsened. This study aimed to identify whether this characteristic was a useful indication for the ketogenic diet. Method: From the 70 patients who received the ketogenic diet during a 3-year period at…

  3. Short Report: Worsening and unmasking of tuberculosis in HIV-1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To determine the proportion of patients developing active tuberculosis (TB) versus that of patients who experience worsening of TB, after initiating highly active anti retroviral therapy (HAART). Methods: Charts of HAART naïve patients with or without clinically active TB who consecutively commenced HAART at ...

  4. Global cost modeling analysis of HIV-1 and HCV viral load assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elbeik, Tarek; Chen, Yi-Ming Arthur; Soutchkov, Serguei V; Loftus, Richard A; Beringer, Scott

    2003-08-01

    This review addresses hidden costs associated with the Bayer VERSANT assay, Roche AMPLICOR MONITOR test and COBAS AMPLICOR MONITOR test and how these influence the final per reportable cost to a testing laboratory in resource-rich and -poor countries. An in-depth evaluation and recommendation of the most cost-effective approach for these tests is presented. The analyses demonstrate the need for manufacturers to consider labor and supply costs when marketing a kit in resource-poor countries, noting that marketing strategies need to change. In the absence of any proven monitoring alternative, emphasis is placed on increasing market share to promote significant reduction in kit prices to suit the demands of markets in resource-poor countries. Finally, recommendations are made to improve the overall cost structure of viral load testing. This review is intended as a tool to optimize assay usage in attaining the lowest performance costs by assay and is not to endorse any test, as will become apparent.

  5. A measurement model of medication adherence to highly active antiretroviral therapy and its relation to viral load in HIV-positive adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llabre, Maria M; Weaver, Kathryn E; Durán, Ron E; Antoni, Michael H; McPherson-Baker, Shvawn; Schneiderman, Neil

    2006-10-01

    This study compared a multiple method measurement model of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) adherence with single-method models to determine optimal validity in predicting HIV viral load. Repeated measures of antiretroviral adherence were collected over a 15-month period using three different measurement methods: a self-report questionnaire, an adherence interview item, and electronic medication monitoring. The participants included HIV-positive men and women (n = 323) who were currently prescribed HAART. Single-factor models composed of multiple measurements over time were developed for each adherence method and HIV viral load. The three adherence methods were then combined in a second order factor measurement model. Structural equation modeling was used to test the models. Mean adherence, defined as percent of doses taken, was 92%, 90%, and 57% by self-report, interview, and electronic monitoring, respectively. Reliability of individual measurements of adherence was low. Four or seven assessments were needed to attain acceptable stability, depending on the method. The second-order factor model of adherence fit the data and explained 45% of the variability in HIV viral load. Models including only one method of assessing adherence explained between 20% and 24% of the variability. Models that included both self-report and electronic monitoring optimized predictive validity. Using at least two different methods of adherence measurement, each assessed at multiple times is recommended to derive reliable and valid measurement of medication adherence, which is predictive of biological outcomes such as HIV viral load.

  6. A mathematical model of hepatitis C virus dynamics in patients with high baseline viral loads or advanced liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahari, Harel; Layden-Almer, Jennifer E; Kallwitz, Eric; Ribeiro, Ruy M; Cotler, Scott J; Layden, Thomas J; Perelson, Alan S

    2009-04-01

    Patients with baseline hepatitis C virus-RNA levels (bHCV-RNA)>6 log IU/mL or cirrhosis have a reduced probability of a sustained-virologic response (SVR). We examined the relation between bHCV-RNA, cirrhosis, and SVR with a mathematical model that includes the critical-drug efficacy (epsilonc; the efficacy required for a drug to clear HCV), the infection-rate constant (beta), and the percentage of HCV-infected hepatocytes (pi). The relation between baseline factors and SVR was evaluated in 1000 in silico HCV-infected patients, generated by random assignment of realistic host and viral kinetic parameters. Model predictions were compared with clinical data from 170 noncirrhotic and 75 cirrhotic patients. The ranges chosen for beta and the viral production rate (p) resulted in bHCV-RNA levels that were in agreement with the distribution observed in US patients. With these beta and p values, higher bHCV-RNA levels led to higher epsilonc, resulting in lower SVR rates. However, higher beta values resulted in lower bHCV-RNA levels but higher pi and (epsilonc), predicting lower rates of SVR. Cirrhotic patients had lower bHCV-RNA levels than noncirrhotic patients (P=.013), and more had bHCV-RNA levels<6 log IU/mL (P<.001). Even cirrhotic patients with lower bHCV-RNA levels had lower SVR rates. An increase in beta could explain the results observed in cirrhotic patients. Our model predicts that higher bHCV-RNA levels lead to higher epsilonc, reducing the chance of achieving SVR; cirrhotic patients have lower SVR rates because of large pi values, caused by increased rates of hepatocyte infection.

  7. A stress and coping model of medication adherence and viral load in HIV-positive men and women on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Kathryn E; Llabre, María M; Durán, Ron E; Antoni, Michael H; Ironson, Gail; Penedo, Frank J; Schneiderman, Neil

    2005-07-01

    The authors tested a structural model that incorporated age, time since diagnosis, social support, coping, and negative mood as predictors of medication adherence and HIV viral load on 188 men and 134 women on highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). The authors used psychosocial latent factors formed from baseline measures to predict latent factors of adherence, as assessed by electronic monitoring and self-report, and viral load defined by indicators assessed over a 15-month period. Results from the model indicate that greater negative mood and lower social support are related to greater use of avoidance-oriented coping strategies. Use of these coping strategies by patients on HAART is related to poorer medication adherence and, subsequently, higher viral load. This model advances researchers' understanding of the contribution of psychosocial variables in predicting treatment adherence and disease progression in HIV-positive men and women.

  8. Study of Viral Vectors in a Three-dimensional Liver Model Repopulated with the Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line HepG2

    OpenAIRE

    Hiller, Thomas; R?hrs, Viola; Dehne, Eva-Maria; Wagner, Anke; Fechner, Henry; Lauster, Roland; Kurreck, Jens

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the generation of a three-dimensional (3D) ex vivo liver model and its application to the study and development of viral vector systems. The model is obtained by repopulating the extracellular matrix of a decellularized rat liver with a human hepatocyte cell line. The model permits studies in a vascularized 3D cell system, replacing potentially harmful experiments with living animals. Another advantage is the humanized nature of the model, which is closer to human phys...

  9. The cross-sectional association between severity of non-cognitive disability and self-reported worsening memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannell, M Brad; Bouldin, Erin D; Teigen, Kari; Akhtar, Wajiha Z; Andresen, Elena M

    2016-04-01

    Research has demonstrated a clear association between cognitive decline and non-cognitive disability; however, all of these studies focus on disability as a correlate or result of some level of cognitive impairment or dysfunction. The relationship between disability and cognition is likely a complex one, that is currently incompletely described in the literature. Our objective was to estimate the prevalence of long-term, non-cognitive disability using a population-representative sample of adults aged 18 and older, and then estimate the association between long-term, non-cognitive disability and self-reported worsening memory. Using the 2009 Florida Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), we measured the relationship between non-cognitive disability and worsening memory using multivariable logistic regression analysis weighted to account for the complex sampling design of the BRFSS. We also estimated the adjusted odds of worsening memory by disability severity, classified according to the types of assistance needed. Approximately 18% (95% confidence interval = (16%, 19%)) of Floridians were living with a long-term, non-cognitive disability in 2009. Among adults with no disability during or prior to the last year, only 5% reported worsening memory. The proportion of Floridians reporting worsening memory increases with increasing severity of disability-related limitations. In a multivariable logistic regression model, odds of worsening memory increased significantly with severity of disability-related limitations. These results highlight the association between non-cognitive disability and subsequent increased odds of worsening memory, independent of several other known risk factors, and a dose-response association with disability-related limitations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Going Multi-viral: Synthedemic Modelling of Internet-based Spreading Phenomena

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marily Nika

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Epidemics of a biological and technological nature pervade modern life. For centuries, scientific research focused on biological epidemics, with simple compartmental epidemiological models emerging as the dominant explanatory paradigm. Yet there has been limited translation of this effort to explain internet-based spreading phenomena. Indeed, single-epidemic models are inadequate to explain the multimodal nature of complex phenomena. In this paper we propose a novel paradigm for modelling internet-based spreading phenomena based on the composition of multiple compartmental epidemiological models. Our approach is inspired by Fourier analysis, but rather than trigonometric wave forms, our components are compartmental epidemiological models. We show results on simulated multiple epidemic data, swine flu data and BitTorrent downloads of a popular music artist. Our technique can characterise these multimodal data sets utilising a parsimonous number of subepidemic models.

  11. Recombination between poliovirus and coxsackie A viruses of species C: a model of viral genetic plasticity and emergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combelas, Nicolas; Holmblat, Barbara; Joffret, Marie-Line; Colbère-Garapin, Florence; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2011-08-01

    Genetic recombination in RNA viruses was discovered many years ago for poliovirus (PV), an enterovirus of the Picornaviridae family, and studied using PV or other picornaviruses as models. Recently, recombination was shown to be a general phenomenon between different types of enteroviruses of the same species. In particular, the interest for this mechanism of genetic plasticity was renewed with the emergence of pathogenic recombinant circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs), which were implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in several regions of the world with insufficient vaccination coverage. Most of these cVDPVs had mosaic genomes constituted of mutated poliovaccine capsid sequences and part or all of the non-structural sequences from other human enteroviruses of species C (HEV-C), in particular coxsackie A viruses. A study in Madagascar showed that recombinant cVDPVs had been co-circulating in a small population of children with many different HEV-C types. This viral ecosystem showed a surprising and extensive biodiversity associated to several types and recombinant genotypes, indicating that intertypic genetic recombination was not only a mechanism of evolution for HEV-C, but an usual mode of genetic plasticity shaping viral diversity. Results suggested that recombination may be, in conjunction with mutations, implicated in the phenotypic diversity of enterovirus strains and in the emergence of new pathogenic strains. Nevertheless, little is known about the rules and mechanisms which govern genetic exchanges between HEV-C types, as well as about the importance of intertypic recombination in generating phenotypic variation. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms of evolution of PV, in particular recombination events leading to the emergence of recombinant cVDPVs.

  12. Recombination between Poliovirus and Coxsackie A Viruses of Species C: A Model of Viral Genetic Plasticity and Emergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Delpeyroux

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Genetic recombination in RNA viruses was discovered many years ago for poliovirus (PV, an enterovirus of the Picornaviridae family, and studied using PV or other picornaviruses as models. Recently, recombination was shown to be a general phenomenon between different types of enteroviruses of the same species. In particular, the interest for this mechanism of genetic plasticity was renewed with the emergence of pathogenic recombinant circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs, which were implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in several regions of the world with insufficient vaccination coverage. Most of these cVDPVs had mosaic genomes constituted of mutated poliovaccine capsid sequences and part or all of the non-structural sequences from other human enteroviruses of species C (HEV-C, in particular coxsackie A viruses. A study in Madagascar showed that recombinant cVDPVs had been co-circulating in a small population of children with many different HEV-C types. This viral ecosystem showed a surprising and extensive biodiversity associated to several types and recombinant genotypes, indicating that intertypic genetic recombination was not only a mechanism of evolution for HEV-C, but an usual mode of genetic plasticity shaping viral diversity. Results suggested that recombination may be, in conjunction with mutations, implicated in the phenotypic diversity of enterovirus strains and in the emergence of new pathogenic strains. Nevertheless, little is known about the rules and mechanisms which govern genetic exchanges between HEV-C types, as well as about the importance of intertypic recombination in generating phenotypic variation. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms of evolution of PV, in particular recombination events leading to the emergence of recombinant cVDPVs.

  13. Recombination between Poliovirus and Coxsackie A Viruses of Species C: A Model of Viral Genetic Plasticity and Emergence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Combelas, Nicolas; Holmblat, Barbara; Joffret, Marie-Line; Colbère-Garapin, Florence; Delpeyroux, Francis

    2011-01-01

    Genetic recombination in RNA viruses was discovered many years ago for poliovirus (PV), an enterovirus of the Picornaviridae family, and studied using PV or other picornaviruses as models. Recently, recombination was shown to be a general phenomenon between different types of enteroviruses of the same species. In particular, the interest for this mechanism of genetic plasticity was renewed with the emergence of pathogenic recombinant circulating vaccine-derived polioviruses (cVDPVs), which were implicated in poliomyelitis outbreaks in several regions of the world with insufficient vaccination coverage. Most of these cVDPVs had mosaic genomes constituted of mutated poliovaccine capsid sequences and part or all of the non-structural sequences from other human enteroviruses of species C (HEV-C), in particular coxsackie A viruses. A study in Madagascar showed that recombinant cVDPVs had been co-circulating in a small population of children with many different HEV-C types. This viral ecosystem showed a surprising and extensive biodiversity associated to several types and recombinant genotypes, indicating that intertypic genetic recombination was not only a mechanism of evolution for HEV-C, but an usual mode of genetic plasticity shaping viral diversity. Results suggested that recombination may be, in conjunction with mutations, implicated in the phenotypic diversity of enterovirus strains and in the emergence of new pathogenic strains. Nevertheless, little is known about the rules and mechanisms which govern genetic exchanges between HEV-C types, as well as about the importance of intertypic recombination in generating phenotypic variation. This review summarizes our current knowledge of the mechanisms of evolution of PV, in particular recombination events leading to the emergence of recombinant cVDPVs. PMID:21994791

  14. Modeling the potential risk factors of bovine viral diarrhea prevalence in Egypt using univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelfattah M. Selim

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present cross-sectional study was conducted to determine the seroprevalence and potential risk factors associated with Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV disease in cattle and buffaloes in Egypt, to model the potential risk factors associated with the disease using logistic regression (LR models, and to fit the best predictive model for the current data. Materials and Methods: A total of 740 blood samples were collected within November 2012-March 2013 from animals aged between 6 months and 3 years. The potential risk factors studied were species, age, sex, and herd location. All serum samples were examined with indirect ELIZA test for antibody detection. Data were analyzed with different statistical approaches such as Chi-square test, odds ratios (OR, univariable, and multivariable LR models. Results: Results revealed a non-significant association between being seropositive with BVDV and all risk factors, except for species of animal. Seroprevalence percentages were 40% and 23% for cattle and buffaloes, respectively. OR for all categories were close to one with the highest OR for cattle relative to buffaloes, which was 2.237. Likelihood ratio tests showed a significant drop of the -2LL from univariable LR to multivariable LR models. Conclusion: There was an evidence of high seroprevalence of BVDV among cattle as compared with buffaloes with the possibility of infection in different age groups of animals. In addition, multivariable LR model was proved to provide more information for association and prediction purposes relative to univariable LR models and Chi-square tests if we have more than one predictor.

  15. Virus-induced asthma attack: The importance of allergic inflammation in response to viral antigen in an animal model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skappak, Christopher; Ilarraza, Ramses; Wu, Ying-Qi; Drake, Matthew G; Adamko, Darryl J

    2017-01-01

    Asthma exacerbation can be a life-threatening condition, and is most often triggered by common respiratory viruses. Poor asthma control and worsening of respiratory function is associated with increased airway inflammation, including eosinophilia. Prevention of asthma exacerbation relies on treatment with corticosteroids, which preferentially inhibit allergic inflammation like eosinophils. Human studies demonstrate that inactivated virus can trigger eosinophil activation in vitro through antigen presentation and memory CD4+ lymphocytes. We hypothesized that animals with immunologic memory to a respiratory virus would also develop airway hyperresponsiveness in response to a UV-inactivated form of the virus if they have pre-existing allergic airway inflammation. Guinea pigs were ovalbumin-sensitized, infected with live parainfluenza virus (PIV), aerosol-challenged with ovalbumin, and then re-inoculated 60 days later with live or UV-inactivated PIV. Some animals were either treated with dexamethasone prior to the second viral exposure. Lymphocytes were isolated from parabronchial lymph nodes to confirm immunologic memory to the virus. Airway reactivity was measured and inflammation was assessed using bronchoalveolar lavage and lung histology. The induction of viral immunologic memory was confirmed in infected animals. Allergen sensitized and challenged animals developed airway hyperreactivity with eosinophilic airway inflammation when re-exposed to UV-inactivated PIV, while non-sensitized animals did not. Airway hyperreactivity in the sensitized animals was inhibited by pre-treatment with dexamethasone. We suggest that the response of allergic inflammation to virus antigen is a significant factor causing asthma exacerbation. We propose that this is one mechanism explaining how corticosteroids prevent virus-induced asthma attack.

  16. Race, sex, and risk factors in radiographic worsening of knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vina, Ernest R; Ran, Di; Ashbeck, Erin L; Ratzlaff, Charles; Kwoh, C Kent

    2018-02-01

    Characterize radiographic worsening in knee osteoarthritis (KOA) by race and sex over 4 years and evaluate the role of established risk factors in observed race/sex differences. Whites (WHs) (694 males and 929 females) and African-Americans (AAs) (92 males and 167 females) at risk for radiographic KOA were eligible. Cox shared frailty models were used to estimate race and sex group differences in radiographic worsening, defined by Kellgren-Lawrence (K-L) and OARSI joint space narrowing (JSN). Mixed effect models for repeated measures were used to estimate race- and sex-specific mean medial and lateral fixed joint space width (fJSW) over 4 years of follow-up, as well as annual loss of fJSW. Risk of OARSI medial JSN grade worsening was higher among AA males than WH females [HR = 2.28, (95% CI: 1.14-4.57)], though adjustment for KOA risk factors attenuated the association. Compared to WH females, WH males had lower risk of K-L grade worsening [adjusted HR = 0.75 (95% CI: 0.58-0.96)]. Mean baseline medial fJSW (mm) was 6.49 in WH and AA males, 5.42 in WH females, and 5.41 in AA females. Annual change in mean medial fJSW was greater in AA males (-0.19mm/year) than in other subgroups (-0.09 WH males, -0.07 WH females, -0.10 AA females, p WHs, AAs had less lateral fJSW at baseline and throughout follow-up. Compared to WHs and AA females, AA males experienced higher risk of medial joint space loss. Controlling for established risk factors attenuated associations between race/sex and disease worsening, suggesting that risk factors such as obesity, history of knee injury, and bony finger joint enlargements largely explain race/sex variations in rates of KOA development and progression. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Mathematical Model on the Viral Load/Burden of HIV/AIDS in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We analyze a non-linear model of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection that considers the interaction between a replicating virus, CD4+ T cell and the cytotoxic-T-Lymphocytes (CTL) i.e. CD8+ T cell. The non-negative steady state of the model equation were obtained when P4 ≤ 1 and P4 >1, and further ...

  18. Predictors of Oswestry Disability Index worsening after lumbar fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gum, Jeffrey L; Carreon, Leah Y; Stimac, Jeffrey D; Glassman, Steven D

    2013-04-01

    The authors identified patients with an increase in their Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score after lumbar spine fusion to evaluate whether this is a plausible definition of deterioration and to determine whether any common patient characteristics exist.A total of 1054 patients who underwent lumbar spinal fusion and had 2-year follow-up data, including the Short Form 36, the ODI, and numeric rating scales for back and leg pain, were identified. Patients with worsening ODI were compared with the remaining cohort. Twenty-eight patients had an absolute increase (worse) in ODI at 1 year postoperatively. Participants with worsening ODI scores included 13 men and 15 women with an average age of 43.3 years; 15 (54%) were smokers. Common medical comorbidities included obesity and hypertension. Complications occurred in 5 (18%) patients and included wound infection, dural tear, and nerve root injury. Pseudarthrosis was common (n=8; 28%). Twenty-one patients required an additional intervention, including epidural injections, fusion revision, and cervical spine surgery.It is important to have a clear definition of deterioration to better provide informed consent or choice of treatment. Only 28 (2.6%) patients were identified as having an increase in ODI score at 2-year follow-up. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Mutational Effects and Population Dynamics During Viral Adaptation Challenge Current Models

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, Craig R.; Joyce, Paul; Wichman, Holly A.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptation in haploid organisms has been extensively modeled but little tested. Using a microvirid bacteriophage (ID11), we conducted serial passage adaptations at two bottleneck sizes (104 and 106), followed by fitness assays and whole-genome sequencing of 631 individual isolates. Extensive genetic variation was observed including 22 beneficial, several nearly neutral, and several deleterious mutations. In the three large bottleneck lines, up to eight different haplotypes were observed in sa...

  20. Adeno-associated viral vector serotype 5 poorly transduces liver in rat models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula S Montenegro-Miranda

    Full Text Available Preclinical studies in mice and non-human primates showed that AAV serotype 5 provides efficient liver transduction and as such seems a promising vector for liver directed gene therapy. An advantage of AAV5 compared to serotype 8 already shown to provide efficient correction in a phase 1 trial in patients suffering from hemophilia B, is its lower seroprevalence in the general population. Our goal is liver directed gene therapy for Crigler-Najjar syndrome type I, inherited severe unconjugated hyperbilirubinemia caused by UGT1A1 deficiency. In a relevant animal model, the Gunn rat, we compared the efficacy of AAV 5 and 8 to that of AAV1 previously shown to be effective. Ferrying a construct driving hepatocyte specific expression of UGT1A1, both AAV8 and AAV1 provided an efficient correction of hyperbilirubinemia. In contrast to these two and to other animal models AAV5 failed to provide any correction. To clarify whether this unexpected finding was due to the rat model used or due to a problem with AAV5, the efficacy of this serotype was compared in a mouse and two additional rat strains. Administration of an AAV5 vector expressing luciferase under the control of a liver specific promoter confirmed that this serotype poorly performed in rat liver, rendering it not suitable for proof of concept studies in this species.

  1. Study of Viral Vectors in a Three-dimensional Liver Model Repopulated with the Human Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Line HepG2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiller, Thomas; Röhrs, Viola; Dehne, Eva-Maria; Wagner, Anke; Fechner, Henry; Lauster, Roland; Kurreck, Jens

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the generation of a three-dimensional (3D) ex vivo liver model and its application to the study and development of viral vector systems. The model is obtained by repopulating the extracellular matrix of a decellularized rat liver with a human hepatocyte cell line. The model permits studies in a vascularized 3D cell system, replacing potentially harmful experiments with living animals. Another advantage is the humanized nature of the model, which is closer to human physiology than animal models. In this study, we demonstrate the transduction of this liver model with a viral vector derived from adeno-associated viruses (AAV vector). The perfusion circuit that supplies the 3D liver model with media provides an easy means to apply the vector. The system permits monitoring of the major metabolic parameters of the liver. For final analysis, tissue samples can be taken to determine the extent of recellularization by histological techniques. Distribution of the virus vector and expression of the delivered transgene can be analyzed by quantitative PCR (qPCR), Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Numerous applications of the vector model in basic research and in the development of gene therapeutic applications can be envisioned, including the development of novel antiviral therapeutics, cancer research, and the study of viral vectors and their potential side effects. PMID:27805597

  2. Stability of a viral infection model with state-dependent delay, CTL and antibody immune responses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rezunenko, Oleksandr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 4 (2017), s. 1547-1563 ISSN 1531-3492 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-06678S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : Evolution equations * Lyapunov stability * state-dependent delay * virus infection model Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory OBOR OECD: Computer sciences, information science, bioinformathics (hardware development to be 2.2, social aspect to be 5.8) Impact factor: 0.994, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2017/AS/rezunenko-0476128.pdf

  3. Mutational effects and population dynamics during viral adaptation challenge current models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Craig R; Joyce, Paul; Wichman, Holly A

    2011-01-01

    Adaptation in haploid organisms has been extensively modeled but little tested. Using a microvirid bacteriophage (ID11), we conducted serial passage adaptations at two bottleneck sizes (10(4) and 10(6)), followed by fitness assays and whole-genome sequencing of 631 individual isolates. Extensive genetic variation was observed including 22 beneficial, several nearly neutral, and several deleterious mutations. In the three large bottleneck lines, up to eight different haplotypes were observed in samples of 23 genomes from the final time point. The small bottleneck lines were less diverse. The small bottleneck lines appeared to operate near the transition between isolated selective sweeps and conditions of complex dynamics (e.g., clonal interference). The large bottleneck lines exhibited extensive interference and less stochasticity, with multiple beneficial mutations establishing on a variety of backgrounds. Several leapfrog events occurred. The distribution of first-step adaptive mutations differed significantly from the distribution of second-steps, and a surprisingly large number of second-step beneficial mutations were observed on a highly fit first-step background. Furthermore, few first-step mutations appeared as second-steps and second-steps had substantially smaller selection coefficients. Collectively, the results indicate that the fitness landscape falls between the extremes of smooth and fully uncorrelated, violating the assumptions of many current mutational landscape models.

  4. Frequent Zika Virus Sexual Transmission and Prolonged Viral RNA Shedding in an Immunodeficient Mouse Model

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    Nisha K. Duggal

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Circulation of Zika virus (ZIKV was first identified in the Western hemisphere in late 2014. Primarily transmitted through mosquito bite, ZIKV can also be transmitted through sex and from mother to fetus, and maternal ZIKV infection has been associated with fetal malformations. We assessed immunodeficient AG129 mice for their capacity to shed ZIKV in semen and to infect female mice via sexual transmission. Infectious virus was detected in semen between 7 and 21 days post-inoculation, and ZIKV RNA was detected in semen through 58 days post-inoculation. During mating, 73% of infected males transmitted ZIKV to uninfected females, and 50% of females became infected, with evidence of fetal infection in resulting pregnancies. Semen from vasectomized mice contained significantly lower levels of infectious virus, though sexual transmission still occurred. This model provides a platform for studying the kinetics of ZIKV sexual transmission and prolonged RNA shedding also observed in human semen.

  5. Breaking a virus: Identifying molecular level failure modes of a viral capsid by multiscale modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamani, V.; Globisch, C.; Peter, C.; Deserno, M.

    2016-10-01

    We use coarse-grained (CG) simulations to study the deformation of empty Cowpea Chlorotic Mottle Virus (CCMV) capsids under uniaxial compression, from the initial elastic response up to capsid breakage. Our CG model is based on the MARTINI force field and has been amended by a stabilizing elastic network, acting only within individual proteins, that was tuned to capture the fluctuation spectrum of capsid protein dimers, obtained from all atom simulations. We have previously shown that this model predicts force-compression curves that match AFM indentation experiments on empty CCMV capsids. Here we investigate details of the actual breaking events when the CCMV capsid finally fails. We present a symmetry classification of all relevant protein contacts and show that they differ significantly in terms of stability. Specifically, we show that interfaces which break readily are precisely those which are believed to form last during assembly, even though some of them might share the same contacts as other non-breaking interfaces. In particular, the interfaces that form pentamers of dimers never break, while the virtually identical interfaces within hexamers of dimers readily do. Since these units differ in the large-scale geometry and, most noticeably, the cone-angle at the center of the 5- or 6-fold vertex, we propose that the hexameric unit fails because it is pre-stressed. This not only suggests that hexamers of dimers form less frequently during the early stages of assembly; it also offers a natural explanation for the well-known β-barrel motif at the hexameric center as a post-aggregation stabilization mechanism. Finally, we identify those amino acid contacts within all key protein interfaces that are most persistent during compressive deformation of the capsid, thereby providing potential targets for mutation studies aiming to elucidate the key contacts upon which overall stability rests.

  6. Antiseptic mouthwashes could worsen xerostomia in patients taking polypharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Marlene; Sakarovitch, Charlotte; Precheur, Isabelle; Lamure, Julie; Pouyssegur-Rougier, Valerie

    2015-05-01

    Polypharmacy is a common cause of xerostomia. This study aimed to investigate whether xerostomia could be an adverse drug event of mouthwashes, when they are used for longer than 2 weeks by patients taking polypharmacy. This cross-sectional observational study included 120 hospitalized patients (60 middle-aged and 60 elderly patients), taking polypharmacy (≥4 drugs daily) and at risk of drug-induced xerostomia. Xerostomia was assessed by questioning participants. A total of 62.5% of patients complained of xerostomia. In the middle-aged group (mean age=44.0 (8.7) years; 35.0% women) xerostomia seemed independently associated to mouthwashes, at the limit of significance (OR=5.00, 95% CI=0.99-25.3, p=0.052). Active principles in mouthwashes were mainly quaternary ammonium compounds (91.9%). Mouthwashes may disturb the healthy balance of the biofilm moisturizing the oral mucosa. The biofilm contains mucins, salivary glycoproteins with oligosaccharides side chains able to sequester water and endogenous bacteria surrounded by a glycocalyx. Oral bacteria are fully susceptible to quaternary ammonium (chlorhexidine, hexetidine, cetylpyridinium chloride) and to other antiseptics used in mouthwashes, such as betain, resorcin, triclosan, essential oils and alcohol. However, caregivers currently recommend such dental plaque control products to patients suffering from xerostomia in order to reduce the risk of caries and periodontitis. This study is the first report that use of antiseptic mouthwashes for more than 2 weeks could worsen xerostomia in patients taking polypharmacy. Oral care protocols should avoid this iatrogenic practice, particularly when xerostomia alters the quality-of-life and worsens malnutrition.

  7. Improving ART programme retention and viral suppression are key to maximising impact of treatment as prevention - a modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreesh, Nicky; Andrianakis, Ioannis; Nsubuga, Rebecca N; Strong, Mark; Vernon, Ian; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Oakley, Jeremy E; Goldstein, Michael; Hayes, Richard; White, Richard G

    2017-08-09

    UNAIDS calls for fewer than 500,000 new HIV infections/year by 2020, with treatment-as-prevention being a key part of their strategy for achieving the target. A better understanding of the contribution to transmission of people at different stages of the care pathway can help focus intervention services at populations where they may have the greatest effect. We investigate this using Uganda as a case study. An individual-based HIV/ART model was fitted using history matching. 100 model fits were generated to account for uncertainties in sexual behaviour, HIV epidemiology, and ART coverage up to 2015 in Uganda. A number of different ART scale-up intervention scenarios were simulated between 2016 and 2030. The incidence and proportion of transmission over time from people with primary infection, post-primary ART-naïve infection, and people currently or previously on ART was calculated. In all scenarios, the proportion of transmission by ART-naïve people decreases, from 70% (61%-79%) in 2015 to between 23% (15%-40%) and 47% (35%-61%) in 2030. The proportion of transmission by people on ART increases from 7.8% (3.5%-13%) to between 14% (7.0%-24%) and 38% (21%-55%). The proportion of transmission by ART dropouts increases from 22% (15%-33%) to between 31% (23%-43%) and 56% (43%-70%). People who are currently or previously on ART are likely to play an increasingly large role in transmission as ART coverage increases in Uganda. Improving retention on ART, and ensuring that people on ART remain virally suppressed, will be key in reducing HIV incidence in Uganda.

  8. The Therapeutic Potential of CRISPR/Cas9 Systems in Oncogene-Addicted Cancer Types: Virally Driven Cancers as a Model System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luqman Jubair

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The field of gene editing is undergoing unprecedented growth. The first ex vivo human clinical trial in China started in 2016, more than 1000 US patents have been filed, and there is exponential growth in publications. The ability to edit genes with high fidelity is promising for the development of new treatments for a range of diseases, particularly inherited conditions, infectious diseases, and cancers. For cancer, a major issue is the identification of driver mutations and oncogenes to target for therapeutic effect, and this requires the development of robust models with which to prove their efficacy. The challenge is that there is rarely a single critical gene. However, virally driven cancers, in which cells are addicted to the expression of a single viral oncogene in some cases, may serve as model systems for CRISPR/Cas therapies, as they did for RNAi. These models and systems offer an excellent opportunity to test both preclinical models and clinical conditions to examine the effectiveness of gene editing, and here we review the options and offer a way forward. Keywords: CRISPR/Cas9, virally-driven cancers, cervical cancer, oncogene-addiction

  9. In vivo T2* weighted MRI visualizes cardiac lesions in murine models of acute and chronic viral myocarditis.

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    Xavier Helluy

    Full Text Available Acute and chronic forms of myocarditis are mainly induced by virus infections. As a consequence of myocardial damage and inflammation dilated cardiomyopathy and chronic heart failure may develop. The gold standard for the diagnosis of myocarditis is endomyocardial biopsies which are required to determine the etiopathogenesis of cardiac inflammatory processes. However, new non-invasive MRI techniques hold great potential in visualizing cardiac non-ischemic inflammatory lesions at high spatial resolution, which could improve the investigation of the pathophysiology of viral myocarditis.Here we present the discovery of a novel endogenous T2* MRI contrast of myocardial lesions in murine models of acute and chronic CVB3 myocarditis. The evaluation of infected hearts ex vivo and in vivo by 3D T2w and T2*w MRI allowed direct localization of virus-induced myocardial lesions without any MRI tracer or contrast agent. T2*w weighted MRI is able to detect both small cardiac lesions of acute myocarditis and larger necrotic areas at later stages of chronic myocarditis, which was confirmed by spatial correlation of MRI hypointensity in myocardium with myocardial lesions histologically. Additional in vivo and ex vivo MRI analysis proved that the contrast mechanism was due to a strong paramagnetic tissue alteration in the vicinity of myocardial lesions, effectively pointing towards iron deposits as the primary contributor of contrast. The evaluation of the biological origin of the MR contrast by specific histological staining and transmission electron microscopy revealed that impaired iron metabolism primarily in mitochondria caused iron deposits within necrotic myocytes, which induces strong magnetic susceptibility in myocardial lesions and results in strong T2* contrast.This T2*w MRI technique provides a fast and sensitive diagnostic tool to determine the patterns and the severity of acute and chronic enteroviral myocarditis and the precise localization of

  10. Disruption of Claudin-1 Expression by miRNA-182 Alters the Susceptibility to Viral Infectivity in HCV Cell Models

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    Sarah E. Riad

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available HCV entry involves a complex interplay between viral and host molecules. During post-binding interactions, the viral E2 complexes with CD81 receptor for delivery to the tight junction proteins CLDN1 and OCLN, which aid in viral internalization. Targeting HCV entry receptors represents an appealing approach to inhibit viral infectivity. This study aimed at investigating the impact of targeting CLDN1 by microRNAs on HCV infectivity. miR-155 was previously shown to target the 3′UTR of CLDN1 mRNA. Therefore, miR-155 was used as a control in this study. In-silico analysis and luciferase reporter assay were utilized to identify potential targeting miRNAs. The impact of the identified miRNAs on CLDN1 mRNA and protein expression was examined by qRT-PCR, indirect immunofluorescence and western blotting, respectively. The role of the selected miRNAs on HCV infectivity was assessed by measuring the viral load following the ectopic expression of the selected miRNAs. miR-182 was identified in-silico and by experimental validation to target CLDN1. Both miR-155 and miR-182 inhibited CLDN1 mRNA and protein expression in infected Huh7 cells. Ectopic expression of miR-155 increased, while miR-182 reduced the viral load. In conclusion, despite repressing CLDN1, the impact of miR-155 and miR-182 on HCV infectivity is contradictory. Ectopic miR-182 expression is suggested as an upstream regulator of the entry factor CLDN1, harnessing HCV infection.

  11. Subjective worsening of memory predicts dementia after three years

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    Anne Brækhus

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available  ABSTRACTStudy Objective:  Design:  Setting:  Paricipants:  Measurements:  Results:  Conclusions:  Key words:  aged, 75 years and over; subjective memory impairment; prospective study; dementiaElderly persons expressing a worsening of memory function are at increased risk ofdeveloping dementia.When adjusting for potential confounding by depressive symptoms, two of the GMSquestions scored at baseline, 'Is it more difficult to remember things than it used to be?' and 'Do youwrite reminders to yourself more often now than before?', were significant predictors of dementiawithin three years, OR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.2–8.6 and OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.0–7.6, respectively.Dementia (DSM-III and DSM-III-R criteria.285 non-demented persons aged 75 years and above at start of study, 77.5% women.Persons living at home.Prospective study of a random sample of older people with follow-ups after three, six, nineand twelve years.To assess whether complaining of memory impairment, as measured by the subjectivepart of the Geriatric Mental State examination (GMS, the Canberra community version, predictslater development of dementia.

  12. Immune Responses against Conserved and Variable Viral Epitopes

    OpenAIRE

    Bittner, B.; Wahl, L. M.

    2000-01-01

    We extend well-known mathematical models of viral infection to examine the response of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) to both conserved and variable viral epitopes. Because most viruses are subject to error-prone reproduction, CTL recognition may be faced with highly variable epitopes, while other CTL epitopes may remain conserved across viral strains. In this paper we examine the steady state conditions for a simple model of viral-immune system dynamics in which the viral strain can be limite...

  13. Evaluation of temporal surveillance system sensitivity and freedom from bovine viral diarrhea in Danish dairy herds using scenario tree modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Foddai, Alessandro; Stockmarr, Anders; Boklund, Anette

    2016-01-01

    The temporal sensitivity of the surveillance system (TemSSe) for Bovine Viral Diarrhea (BVD) in Danish dairy herds was evaluated. Currently, the Danish antibody blocking ELISA is used to test quarterly bulk tank milk (BTM). To optimize the surveillance system as an early warning system, we...

  14. A marginal structural model to estimate the causal effect of antidepressant medication treatment on viral suppression among homeless and marginally housed persons with HIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Alexander C; Weiser, Sheri D; Petersen, Maya L; Ragland, Kathleen; Kushel, Margot B; Bangsberg, David R

    2010-12-01

    Depression strongly predicts nonadherence to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antiretroviral therapy, and adherence is essential to maintaining viral suppression. This suggests that pharmacologic treatment of depression may improve virologic outcomes. However, previous longitudinal observational analyses have inadequately adjusted for time-varying confounding by depression severity, which could yield biased estimates of treatment effect. Application of marginal structural modeling to longitudinal observation data can, under certain assumptions, approximate the findings of a randomized controlled trial. To determine whether antidepressant medication treatment increases the probability of HIV viral suppression. Community-based prospective cohort study with assessments conducted every 3 months. Community-based research field site in San Francisco, California. One hundred fifty-eight homeless and marginally housed persons with HIV who met baseline immunologic (CD4+ T-lymphocyte count, 13) inclusion criteria, observed from April 2002 through August 2007. Probability of achieving viral suppression to less than 50 copies/mL. Secondary outcomes of interest were probability of being on an antiretroviral therapy regimen, 7-day self-reported percentage adherence to antiretroviral therapy, and probability of reporting complete (100%) adherence. Marginal structural models estimated a 2.03 greater odds of achieving viral suppression (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.15-3.58; P = .02) resulting from antidepressant medication treatment. In addition, antidepressant medication use increased the probability of antiretroviral uptake (weighted odds ratio, 3.87; 95% CI, 1.98-7.58; P effect is likely attributable to improved adherence to a continuum of HIV care, including increased uptake and adherence to antiretroviral therapy.

  15. Expression and In Silico Analysis of the Recombinant Bovine Papillomavirus E6 Protein as a Model for Viral Oncoproteins Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzuchelli-de-Souza, J.; Carvalho, R. F.; Ruiz, R. M.; Melo, T. C.; Araldi, R. P.; Carvalho, E.; Thompson, C. E.; Sircili, M. P.; Beçak, W.; Stocco, R. C.

    2013-01-01

    Bovine papillomaviruses (BPVs) are recognized as the causal agents of economical relevant diseases in cattle, associated with the development of tumors in skin and mucosa. The oncogenesis process is mainly associated with different viral oncoprotein expressions, which are involved in cell transformation. The expression and characterization of recombinant viral oncoproteins represent an attractive strategy to obtain biotechnological products as antibodies and potential vaccines, Thus, the aim of this work was to clone and express the BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins and perform in silico analysis in order to develop a strategy for the systematic study of other papillomaviruses oncoproteins. The results demonstrated that BPV-1 and BPV-2 E6 recombinant proteins were expressed and purified from bacterial system as well as its in silico analysis was performed in order to explore and predict biological characteristics of these proteins. PMID:23878806

  16. Estimating the timing of mother-to-child transmission of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 using a viral molecular evolution model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoine Chaillon

    Full Text Available Mother-to-child transmission (MTCT is responsible for most pediatric HIV-1 infections worldwide. It can occur during pregnancy, labor, or breastfeeding. Numerous studies have used coalescent and molecular clock methods to understand the epidemic history of HIV-1, but the timing of vertical transmission has not been studied using these methods. Taking advantage of the constant accumulation of HIV genetic variation over time and using longitudinally sampled viral sequences, we used a coalescent approach to investigate the timing of MTCT.Six-hundred and twenty-two clonal env sequences from the RNA and DNA viral population were longitudinally sampled from nine HIV-1 infected mother-and-child pairs [range: 277-1034 days]. For each transmission pair, timing of MTCT was determined using a coalescent-based model within a Bayesian statistical framework. Results were compared with available estimates of MTCT timing obtained with the classic biomedical approach based on serial HIV DNA detection by PCR assays.Four children were infected during pregnancy, whereas the remaining five children were infected at time of delivery. For eight out of nine pairs, results were consistent with the transmission periods assessed by standard PCR-based assay. The discordance in the remaining case was likely confused by co-infection, with simultaneous introduction of multiple maternal viral variants at the time of delivery.The study provided the opportunity to validate the Bayesian coalescent approach that determines the timing of MTCT of HIV-1. It illustrates the power of population genetics approaches to reliably estimate the timing of transmission events and deepens our knowledge about the dynamics of viral evolution in HIV-infected children, accounting for the complexity of multiple transmission events.

  17. The right to health in the courts of Brazil: worsening health inequities?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraz, Octavio Luiz Motta

    2009-01-01

    This article analyzes the recent and growing phenomenon of right-to-health litigation in Brazil from the perspective of health equity. It argues that the prevailing model of litigation is likely worsening the country's already pronounced health inequities. The model is characterized by a prevalence of individualized claims demanding curative medical treatment (most often drugs) and by a high success rate for the litigant. Both elements are largely a consequence of the way Brazilian judges have interpreted the scope of the right to health recognized in Article 6 and Article 196 of the Brazilian constitution, that is, as an entitlement of individuals to the satiSfaction of all their health needs with the most advanced treatment available, irrespective of its costs. Given that resources are always scarce in relation to the health needs of the population as a whole, this interpretation can only be sustained at the expense of universality, that is, so long as only a part of the population is granted this unlimited right at any given time. The individuals and (less often) groups who manage to access the judiciary and realize this right are therefore privileged over the rest of the population. This is potentially detrimental to health equity because the criterion for privileging litigants over the rest of the population is not based on any conception of need or justice but purely on their ability to access the judiciary, something that only a minority of citizens possess. This paper examines studies that are beginning to confirm that a majority of right-to-health litigants come from social groups that are already considerably advantaged in terms of all socioeconomic indicators, including health conditions. It is a plausible assumption that the model of right-to-health litigation currently prevalent in Brazil is likely worsening health inequities.

  18. Display of the Viral Epitopes on Lactococcus lactis: A Model for Food Grade Vaccine against EV71

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    Nadimpalli Ravi S. Varma

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have developed a system for display of antigens of Enterovirus type 71 (EV71 on the cell surface of L. lactis. The viral capsid protein (VP1 gene from a local viral isolate was utilized as the candidate vaccine for the development of oral live vaccines against EV71 using L. lactis as a carrier. We expressed fusion proteins in E. coli and purified fusion proteins were incubated with L. lactis. We confirmed that mice orally fed with L. lactis displaying these fusion proteins on its surface were able to mount an immune response against the epitopes of EV71. This is the first example of an EV71 antigen displayed on the surface of a food grade organism and opens a new perspective for alternative vaccine strategies against the EV71. We believe that the method of protein docking utilized in this study will allow for more flexible presentations of short peptides and proteins on the surface of L. lactis to be useful as a delivery vehicle.

  19. ELR chemokine signaling in host defense and disease in a viral model of central nervous system disease

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    Martin P Hosking

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial infection of the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV into the central nervous system (CNS of susceptible strains of mice results in an acute encephalomyelitis, accompanied by viral replication in glial cells and robust infiltration of virus-specific T cells that contribute to host defense through cytokine secretion and cytolytic activity. Mice that survive the acute stage of disease develop an immune-mediated demyelinating diseases characterized by viral persistence in white matter tracts and a chronic neuroinflammatory response dominated by T cells and macrophages. Early following JHMV infection, there is a dynamic expression of chemokines and chemokine receptors that contribute to neuroinflammation by regulating innate and adaptive immune responses as well influencing glial biology. In response to JHMV infection, we have shown that signaling through the chemokine receptor CXCR2 contributes to host defense through recruitment of polymorphonuclear cells (PMNs to the CNS that enhance permeability of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB and facilitating entry of virus-specific T cells into the parenchyma. Further, CXCR2 promotes the protection of oligodendroglia from cytokine-induced apoptosis and restricts the severity of demyelination. This review covers aspects related to the role of CXCR2 in host defense and disease in response to JHMV infection.

  20. Barriers and facilitators to optimize function and prevent disability worsening: a content analysis of a nurse home visit intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebel, Dianne V; Powers, Bethel Ann; Friedman, Bruce; Watson, Nancy M

    2012-01-01

    This paper is a report of an analysis of how to better understand the results of the nurse home visit intervention in the Medicare Primary and Consumer-Directed Care Demonstration in terms of facilitators and barriers to disability improvement/maintenance as compared with disability worsening. There is a lack of literature describing how nurse home visit interventions are able to maintain/improve disability among older persons with disability. The present study is one of only six reporting beneficial disability outcomes. Cases were purposefully sampled to represent change in the disability construct leading to selection of ten cases each of disability maintenance/improvement (no change or decrease in total Activities of Daily Living score from baseline) and worsening (an increase in total Activities of Daily Living score from baseline). Data from nurses' progress notes and case studies (collected in March 1998-June 2002) were analysed using qualitative descriptive analysis (May 2009). These results remain relevant because the present study is one of the few studies to identify select nurse activities instrumental in postponing/minimizing disability worsening. Three primary themes captured the facilitators and barriers to effective disability maintenance/improvement: (1) building and maintaining patient-centred working relationships, (2) negotiating delivery of intervention components and (3) establishing balance between patients' acute and chronic care needs. Sub-themes illustrate nurse, patient and system factors associated with effective disability maintenance/improvement (e.g. nurse caring, communicating, facilitating interdisciplinary communication) and barriers associated with disability worsening (e.g. dementia, depression and recurring acute illnesses). This study provides new insights about the facilitators and barriers to effective disability maintenance/improvement experienced by patients receiving home visits. Potential opportunities exist to integrate

  1. The role of viral introductions in sustaining community-based HIV epidemics in rural Uganda: evidence from spatial clustering, phylogenetics, and egocentric transmission models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary K Grabowski

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available It is often assumed that local sexual networks play a dominant role in HIV spread in sub-Saharan Africa. The aim of this study was to determine the extent to which continued HIV transmission in rural communities--home to two-thirds of the African population--is driven by intra-community sexual networks versus viral introductions from outside of communities.We analyzed the spatial dynamics of HIV transmission in rural Rakai District, Uganda, using data from a cohort of 14,594 individuals within 46 communities. We applied spatial clustering statistics, viral phylogenetics, and probabilistic transmission models to quantify the relative contribution of viral introductions into communities versus community- and household-based transmission to HIV incidence. Individuals living in households with HIV-incident (n = 189 or HIV-prevalent (n = 1,597 persons were 3.2 (95% CI: 2.7-3.7 times more likely to be HIV infected themselves compared to the population in general, but spatial clustering outside of households was relatively weak and was confined to distances <500 m. Phylogenetic analyses of gag and env genes suggest that chains of transmission frequently cross community boundaries. A total of 95 phylogenetic clusters were identified, of which 44% (42/95 were two individuals sharing a household. Among the remaining clusters, 72% (38/53 crossed community boundaries. Using the locations of self-reported sexual partners, we estimate that 39% (95% CI: 34%-42% of new viral transmissions occur within stable household partnerships, and that among those infected by extra-household sexual partners, 62% (95% CI: 55%-70% are infected by sexual partners from outside their community. These results rely on the representativeness of the sample and the quality of self-reported partnership data and may not reflect HIV transmission patterns outside of Rakai.Our findings suggest that HIV introductions into communities are common and account for a significant

  2. Only adding stationary storage to vaccine supply chains may create and worsen transport bottlenecks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidari, Leila A; Connor, Diana L; Wateska, Angela R; Brown, Shawn T; Mueller, Leslie E; Norman, Bryan A; Schmitz, Michelle M; Paul, Proma; Rajgopal, Jayant; Welling, Joel S; Leonard, Jim; Claypool, Erin G; Weng, Yu-Ting; Chen, Sheng-I; Lee, Bruce Y

    2013-01-01

    Although vaccine supply chains in many countries require additional stationary storage and transport capacity to meet current and future needs, international donors tend to donate stationary storage devices far more often than transport equipment. To investigate the impact of only adding stationary storage equipment on the capacity requirements of transport devices and vehicles, we used HERMES (Highly Extensible Resource for Modeling Supply Chains) to construct a discrete event simulation model of the Niger vaccine supply chain. We measured the transport capacity requirement for each mode of transport used in the Niger vaccine cold chain, both before and after adding cold rooms and refrigerators to relieve all stationary storage constraints in the system. With the addition of necessary stationary storage, the average transport capacity requirement increased from 88% to 144% for cold trucks, from 101% to 197% for pickup trucks, and from 366% to 420% for vaccine carriers. Therefore, adding stationary storage alone may worsen or create new transport bottlenecks as more vaccines flow through the system, preventing many vaccines from reaching their target populations. Dynamic modeling can reveal such relationships between stationary storage capacity and transport constraints.

  3. A Quasi-Steady-State Approximation to the Basic Target-Cell-Limited Viral Dynamics Model with a Non-Cytopathic Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard A. Cangelosi

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Analysis of previously published target-cell limited viral dynamic models for pathogens such as HIV, hepatitis, and influenza generally rely on standard techniques from dynamical systems theory or numerical simulation. We use a quasi-steady-state approximation to derive an analytic solution for the model with a non-cytopathic effect, that is, when the death rates of uninfected and infected cells are equal. The analytic solution provides time evolution values of all three compartments of uninfected cells, infected cells, and virus. Results are compared with numerical simulation using clinical data for equine infectious anemia virus, a retrovirus closely related to HIV, and the utility of the analytic solution is discussed.

  4. Outcome in acute heart failure: prognostic value of acute kidney injury and worsening renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berra, Gregory; Garin, Nicolas; Stirnemann, Jérôme; Jannot, Anne-Sophie; Martin, Pierre-Yves; Perrier, Arnaud; Carballo, Sebastian

    2015-05-01

    The prognostic value of worsening renal function (WRF) in acute heart failure is debated. Moreover, it is not clear if the use of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors (ACEIs) and angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) in this context is detrimental. In a retrospective cohort study of 646 patients hospitalized for acute heart failure, the risk of death or readmission associated with acute kidney injury (AKI) present at admission, WRF during the 1st 7 days, and up-titration of ACEI/ARB were analyzed in a Cox proportional hazards model. AKI, WRF, hemoglobin concentration, ACEI/ARB up-titration, and use of loop diuretics before admission were significantly associated with the primary outcome in univariate analysis. In a multivariate model, the association remained significant for AKI (hazard ratio [HR] 1.29, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.13-1.47; P = .0002), WRF (HR 1.24, 95% CI 1.06-1.45; P = .0059), and ACEI/ARB up-titration (HR 0.79, 95% CI 0.64-0.97; P = .026). There was no excess mortality in patients with ACEI/ARB up-titration despite WRF. Both AKI and WRF are strongly associated with poor outcome in patients hospitalized for acute heart failure. ACEI/ARB up-titration seems to be protective. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Viral Haemorrhagic Septicaemia Virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen; Skall, Helle Frank

    2013-01-01

    This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus.......This chapter covers the genetics (genotypes and serotypes), clinical signs, host species, transmission, prevalence, diagnosis, control and prevention of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus....

  6. [Emergent viral infections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Galama, J.M.D.

    2001-01-01

    The emergence and re-emergence of viral infections is an ongoing process. Large-scale vaccination programmes led to the eradication or control of some viral infections in the last century, but new viruses are always emerging. Increased travel is leading to a rise in the importation of exotic

  7. Discovering hidden viral piracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eddo; Kliger, Yossef

    2005-12-01

    Viruses and developers of anti-inflammatory therapies share a common interest in proteins that manipulate the immune response. Large double-stranded DNA viruses acquire host proteins to evade host defense mechanisms. Hence, viral pirated proteins may have a therapeutic potential. Although dozens of viral piracy events have already been identified, we hypothesized that sequence divergence impedes the discovery of many others. We developed a method to assess the number of viral/human homologs and discovered that at least 917 highly diverged homologs are hidden in low-similarity alignment hits that are usually ignored. However, these low-similarity homologs are masked by many false alignment hits. We therefore applied a filtering method to increase the proportion of viral/human homologous proteins. The homologous proteins we found may facilitate functional annotation of viral and human proteins. Furthermore, some of these proteins play a key role in immune modulation and are therefore therapeutic protein candidates.

  8. Host sphingosine kinase 1 worsens pancreatic cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Hiroaki; Aoki, Masayo; Katsuta, Eriko; Ramanathan, Rajesh; Idowu, Michael O; Spiegel, Sarah; Takabe, Kazuaki

    2016-10-01

    There are no effective treatments for pancreatic cancer peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) or cancer dissemination in abdominal cavity. Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P), a bioactive lipid mediator produced by sphingosine kinases (SphK1 and SphK2), plays critical roles in cancer progression. We reported that SphK1, but not SphK2, is responsible for S1P export from breast cancer cells and recently discovered that S1P is linked to inflammation and cancer in colitis-associated cancer progression. Given the fact that inflammation is known to be essential for the establishment and progression of PC, we hypothesized that SphK1 in the host animals is involved in progression of pancreatic cancer PC. Murine pancreatic adenocarcinoma panc02-luc cells were intraperitoneally injected into wildtype or SphK1 knockout (KO) mice to generate a syngeneic PC model. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were determined by Ki67 and TUNEL staining, respectively. All the animals developed panc02-luc PC. SphK1 KO mice developed significantly less tumor burden, less total tumor weight, and fewer number of PC nodules at 14 d after implantation. Histologically, less inflammatory cell infiltration and less cancer cell proliferation were observed in the tumors. There was no difference in apoptosis. Our results raise an intriguing possibility that S1P generated by SphK1 in the host promotes pancreatic cancer PC progression by stimulation of proliferation of cancer cells. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Remyelination Is Correlated with Regulatory T Cell Induction Following Human Embryoid Body-Derived Neural Precursor Cell Transplantation in a Viral Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Warren C Plaisted

    Full Text Available We have recently described sustained clinical recovery associated with dampened neuroinflammation and remyelination following transplantation of neural precursor cells (NPCs derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs in a viral model of the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. The hNPCs used in that study were derived by a novel direct differentiation method (direct differentiation, DD-NPCs that resulted in a unique gene expression pattern when compared to hNPCs derived by conventional methods. Since the therapeutic potential of human NPCs may differ greatly depending on the method of derivation and culture, we wanted to determine whether NPCs differentiated using conventional methods would be similarly effective in improving clinical outcome under neuroinflammatory demyelinating conditions. For the current study, we utilized hNPCs differentiated from a human induced pluripotent cell line via an embryoid body intermediate stage (EB-NPCs. Intraspinal transplantation of EB-NPCs into mice infected with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV resulted in decreased accumulation of CD4+ T cells in the central nervous system that was concomitant with reduced demyelination at the site of injection. Dampened neuroinflammation and remyelination was correlated with a transient increase in CD4+FOXP3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs concentrated within the peripheral lymphatics. However, compared to our earlier study, pathological improvements were modest and did not result in significant clinical recovery. We conclude that the genetic signature of NPCs is critical to their effectiveness in this model of viral-induced neurologic disease. These comparisons will be useful for understanding what factors are critical for the sustained clinical improvement.

  10. Desiccating Stress-Induced MMP Production and Activity Worsens Wound Healing in Alkali-Burned Corneas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bian, Fang; Pelegrino, Flavia S. A.; Pflugfelder, Stephen C.; Volpe, Eugene A.; Li, De-Quan; de Paiva, Cintia S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the effects of dry eye on ocular surface protease activity and sight threatening corneal complications following ocular surface chemical injury. Methods C57BL/6 mice were subjected to unilateral alkali burn (AB) with or without concomitant dry eye for 2 or 5 days. Mice were observed daily for appearance of corneal perforation. Whole corneas were harvested and lysed for RNA extraction. Quantitative real-time PCR was performed to measure expression of inflammation cytokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMP). Matrix metalloproteinase–9 activity, gelatinase activity, and myeloperoxidase (MPO) activity were evaluated in corneal lysates. Presence of infiltrating neutrophils was evaluated by immunohistochemistry and flow cytometry. Results Eyes subjected to the combined model of AB and dry eye (CM) had 20% sterile corneal perforation rate as soon as 1 day after the initial injury, which increased to 35% by 5 days, delayed wound closure and increased corneal opacity. Increased levels of IL-1β, -6, and MMPs-1, -3, -8, -9, and -13, and chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand 1 (CSCL1) transcripts were found after 2 days in CM compared with AB corneas. Increased MMP-1, -3, -9, and -13 immunoreactivity and gelatinolytic activity were seen in CM corneas compared with AB. Increased neutrophil infiltration and MPO activity was noted in the CM group compared with AB 2 days post injury. Conclusions Desiccating stress worsens outcome of ocular AB, creating a cytokine and protease storm with greater neutrophil infiltration, increasing the risk of corneal perforation. PMID:26225631

  11. Hepatitis viral aguda

    OpenAIRE

    Héctor Rubén Hernández Garcés; René F. Espinosa Álvarez

    1998-01-01

    Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica de las hepatitis virales agudas sobre aspectos vinculados a su etiología. Se tuvieron en cuenta además algunos datos epidemiológicos, las formas clínicas más importantes, los exámenes complementarios con especial énfasis en los marcadores virales y el diagnóstico positivoA bibliographical review of acute viral hepatitis was made taking into account those aspects connected with its etiology. Some epidemiological markers, the most important clinical forms, ...

  12. Viral Gastroenteritis (Stomach Flu)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Viral gastroenteritis (stomach flu) Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  13. Hepatitis viral aguda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Héctor Rubén Hernández Garcés

    1998-10-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica de las hepatitis virales agudas sobre aspectos vinculados a su etiología. Se tuvieron en cuenta además algunos datos epidemiológicos, las formas clínicas más importantes, los exámenes complementarios con especial énfasis en los marcadores virales y el diagnóstico positivoA bibliographical review of acute viral hepatitis was made taking into account those aspects connected with its etiology. Some epidemiological markers, the most important clinical forms, and the complementary examinations with special emphasis on the viral markers and the positive diagnosis were also considered

  14. Viral pathogenesis in diagrams

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tremblay, Michel; Berthiaume, Laurent; Ackermann, Hans-Wolfgang

    2001-01-01

    .... The 268 diagrams in Viral Pathogenesis in Diagrams were selected from over 800 diagrams of English and French virological literature, including one derived from a famous drawing by Leonardo da Vinci...

  15. The Specifics and Non-Specifics of using Small Interfering RNAs for Targeting of Viral Genes in a Fish Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schyth, Brian Dall

    2007-01-01

    , and to a lesser degree naked siRNAs, primarily entered free intraperitoneal cells including macrophage-like cells. Furthermore uptake correlated with antiviral activity seen as reduced mortality of fish challenged with VHSV. Protection at the disease level was not dependent upon which one of three tested si......RNAs was used and protection correlated with up-regulation of an interferon-related gene in the liver indicating a systemic interferon response. The results show the validity of the fish model for testing delivery and non-specific effects of siRNAs in a high throughput vertebrate model. The purchase......A novel in vivo-model composed of small juvenile rainbow trout and a fish-pathogenic virus is suggested to analyze delivery and antiviral effect of formulated siRNAs. This model was used for testing delivery of intraperitoneally injected siRNAs formulated in polycationic liposomes. These...

  16. Prognostic value of worsening renal function in outpatients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pimentel, Rodrigo; Couto, Marta; Laszczyńska, Olga; Friões, Fernando; Bettencourt, Paulo; Azevedo, Ana

    2014-09-01

    Renal function impairment predicts poor survival in heart failure. Attention has recently shifted to worsening renal function, based mostly on serum creatinine and estimated glomerular filtration rate. We assessed the prognostic effect of worsening renal function in ambulatory heart failure patients. Data from 306 ambulatory patients were abstracted from medical files. Worsening renal function was based on the change in estimated glomerular filtration rate, serum creatinine and urea within 6 months of referral. Prognosis was assessed by the composite endpoint all-cause death or heart failure hospitalization, censored at 2 years. Hazard ratios were estimated for worsening renal function, adjusted for sex, age, diabetes, New York Heart Association class, left ventricular systolic dysfunction, medications and baseline renal function. The agreement among definitions was fair, with kappa coefficients generally not surpassing 0.5. Worsening renal function was associated with poor outcome with adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence interval) of 3.2 (1.8-5.9) for an increase of serum creatinine >0.3mg/dl; 2.2 (1.3-3.7) for an increase in serum urea >20mg/dl and 1.9 (1.1-3.3) for a decrease in estimated glomerular filtration rate >20%, independent of baseline renal function. The 2-year risk of death/heart failure hospitalization was approximately 50% in patients with an increase in serum creatinine or in serum urea; this positive predictive value was higher than for decreasing estimated glomerular filtration rate. In conclusion, worsening renal function was significantly associated with a worse outcome. Different definitions identified different patients at risk and increasing creatinine/urea performed better than decreasing estimated glomerular filtration rate. Copyright © 2014 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Myeloid leukemias and virally induced lymphomas in miniature inbred swine; development of a large animal tumor model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    RAIMON eDURAN-STRUUCK

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The lack of a large animal transplantable tumor model has limited the study of novel therapeutic strategies for the treatment of liquid cancers. Swine as a species provide a natural option based on their similarities with humans and their already extensive use in biomedical research. Specifically, the MGH miniature swine herd retains unique genetic characteristics that facilitate the study of hematopoietic cell and solid organ transplantation. Spontaneously arising liquid cancers in these swine, specifically myeloid leukemias and B cell lymphomas, closely resemble human malignancies. The ability to establish aggressive tumor cell lines in vitro from these naturally occurring malignancies makes a transplantable tumor model a close reality. Here, we discuss our experience with myeloid and lymphoid tumors in MHC characterized miniature swine and future approaches regarding the development of a large animal transplantable tumor model.

  18. Accelerating Influenza Research: Vaccines, Antivirals, Immunomodulators and Monoclonal Antibodies. The Manufacture of a New Wild-Type H3N2 Virus for the Human Viral Challenge Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Fullen

    Full Text Available Influenza and its associated diseases are a major cause of morbidity and mortality. The United States Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends influenza vaccination for everyone over 6 months of age. The failure of the flu vaccine in 2014-2015 demonstrates the need for a model that allows the rapid development of novel antivirals, universal/intra-seasonal vaccines, immunomodulators, monoclonal antibodies and other novel treatments. To this end we manufactured a new H3N2 influenza virus in compliance with Good Manufacturing Practice for use in the Human Viral Challenge Model.We chose an H3N2 influenza subtype, rather than H1N1, given that this strain has the most substantial impact in terms of morbidity or mortality annually as described by the Centre for Disease Control. We first subjected the virus batch to rigorous adventitious agent testing, confirmed the virus to be wild-type by Sanger sequencing and determined the virus titres appropriate for human use via the established ferret model. We built on our previous experience with other H3N2 and H1N1 viruses to develop this unique model.We conducted an initial safety and characterisation study in healthy adult volunteers, utilising our unique clinical quarantine facility in London, UK. In this study we demonstrated this new influenza (H3N2 challenge virus to be both safe and pathogenic with an appropriate level of disease in volunteers. Furthermore, by inoculating volunteers with a range of different inoculum titres, we established the minimum infectious titre required to achieve reproducible disease whilst ensuring a sensitive model that can be translated to design of subsequent field based studies.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02525055.

  19. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2003-01-01

    The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness.......The viral hepatitides are common causes of liver diseases globally. Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus was reached regarding their usefulness....

  20. A modeling approach to estimate the solar disinfection of viral indicator organisms in waste stabilization ponds and surface waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohn, Tamar; Mattle, Michael J; Minella, Marco; Vione, Davide

    2016-01-01

    Sunlight is known to be a pertinent factor governing the infectivity of waterborne viruses in the environment. Sunlight inactivates viruses via endogenous inactivation (promoted by absorption of solar light in the UVB range by the virus) and exogenous processes (promoted by adsorption of sunlight by external chromophores, which subsequently generate inactivating reactive species). The extent of inactivation is still difficult to predict, as it depends on multiple parameters including virus characteristics, solution composition, season and geographical location. In this work, we adapted a model typically used to estimate the photodegradation of organic pollutants, APEX, to explore the fate of two commonly used surrogates of human viruses (coliphages MS2 and ϕX174) in waste stabilization pond and natural surface water. Based on experimental data obtained in previous work, we modeled virus inactivation as a function of water depth and composition, as well as season and latitude, and we apportioned the contributions of the different inactivation processes to total inactivation. Model results showed that ϕX174 is inactivated more readily than MS2, except at latitudes >60°. ϕX174 inactivation varies greatly with both season (20-fold) and latitude (10-fold between 0 and 60°), and is dominated by endogenous inactivation under all solution conditions considered. In contrast, exogenous processes contribute significantly to MS2 inactivation. Because exogenous inactivation can be promoted by longer wavelengths, which are less affected by changes in season and latitude, MS2 exhibits smaller fluctuations in inactivation throughout the year (10-fold) and across the globe (3-fold between 0 and 60°) compared to ϕX174. While a full model validation is currently not possible due to the lack of sufficient field data, our estimated inactivation rates corresponded well to those reported in field studies. Overall, this study constitutes a step toward estimating microbial water

  1. Worsening renal function definition is insufficient for evaluating acute renal failure in acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirakabe, Akihiro; Hata, Noritake; Kobayashi, Nobuaki; Okazaki, Hirotake; Matsushita, Masato; Shibata, Yusaku; Nishigoori, Suguru; Uchiyama, Saori; Asai, Kuniya; Shimizu, Wataru

    2018-02-01

    Whether or not the definition of a worsening renal function (WRF) is adequate for the evaluation of acute renal failure in patients with acute heart failure is unclear. One thousand and eighty-three patients with acute heart failure were analysed. A WRF, indicated by a change in serum creatinine ≥0.3 mg/mL during the first 5 days, occurred in 360 patients while no-WRF, indicated by a change failure; n = 98). The patients were assigned to another set of four groups: no-WRF/no-AKI (n = 512), no-WRF/AKI (n = 211), WRF/no-AKI (n = 239), and WRF/AKI (n = 121). A multivariate logistic regression model found that no-WRF/AKI and WRF/AKI were independently associated with 365 day mortality (hazard ratio: 1.916; 95% confidence interval: 1.234-2.974 and hazard ratio: 3.622; 95% confidence interval: 2.332-5.624). Kaplan-Meier survival curves showed that the rate of any-cause death during 1 year was significantly poorer in the no-WRF/AKI and WRF/AKI groups than in the WRF/no-AKI and no-WRF/no-AKI groups and in Class I and Class F than in Class R and the no-AKI group. The presence of AKI on admission, especially Class I and Class F status, is associated with a poor prognosis despite the lack of a WRF within the first 5 days. The prognostic ability of AKI on admission may be superior to WRF within the first 5 days. © 2018 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  2. Regional cortical thinning and cerebrospinal biomarkers predict worsening daily functioning across the Alzheimer disease spectrum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Gad A.; Lorius, Natacha; Locascio, Joseph J.; Hyman, Bradley T.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Impairment in instrumental activities of daily living (IADL) heralds the transition from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia and is a major source of burden for both the patient and caregiver. Objective To investigate the relationship between IADL and regional cortical thinning and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) Alzheimer disease (AD) biomarkers cross-sectionally and longitudinally in clinically normal (CN) elderly, MCI, and mild AD dementia subjects. Methods Two hundred and twenty nine CN, 395 MCI, and 188 AD dementia subjects participating in the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative underwent baseline magnetic resonance imaging, baseline lumbar puncture, and clinical assessments, including the Functional Activities Questionnaire used to measure IADL, every 6 to 12 months up to 3 years. General linear regression and mixed effects models were employed. Results IADL impairment was associated with the interactions between lower inferior temporal cortical thickness and diagnosis (pdiagnosis (pdiagnosis (p=0.0002) at baseline (driven by AD dementia). Lower baseline supramarginal (p=0.02) and inferior temporal (p=0.05) cortical thickness, lower Aβ1-42 (p<0.0001), and greater total tau (t-tau) (p=0.02) were associated with greater rate of IADL impairment over time. Conclusions Temporal atrophy is associated with IADL impairment in mild AD dementia at baseline, while baseline parietal and temporal atrophy, lower CSF Aβ1-42, and greater t-tau predict worsening IADL impairment over time across the AD spectrum. These results emphasize the importance of assessing IADL at the stage of MCI and even at the transition from CN to MCI. PMID:24685624

  3. Does Viral Marketing really Effective?

    OpenAIRE

    Chien, Ho-shen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In this article, we examine the effectiveness of viral marketing toward young adults since the majority of Internet users are in this age group. It is also noted that we will only focus on video type of viral messages, which is the most common way to utilized viral marketing for firms. We will discuss how viral video influence consumer behavior in terms of brand images, brand choice, user experience and working memory in this paper. Our results illustrated viral video helps major...

  4. Viral mechanisms of immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcami, A; Koszinowski, U H

    2000-09-01

    During the millions of years they have coexisted with their hosts, viruses have learned how to manipulate host immune control mechanisms. Viral gene functions provide an overview of many relevant principles in cell biology and immunology. Our knowledge of viral gene functions must be integrated into virus-host interaction networks to understand viral pathogenesis, and could lead to new anti-viral strategies and the ability to exploit viral functions as tools in medicine.

  5. Effectiveness of donepezil in reducing clinical worsening in patients with mild-to-moderate alzheimer's disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wilkinson, David; Schindler, Rachel; Schwam, Elias

    2009-01-01

    plus Caregiver Input/Gottfries-Bråne-Steen scale) or (3) cognition, global ratings and function (various functional measures). RESULTS: At week 24, lower percentages of donepezil-treated patients than placebo patients met the criteria for clinical worsening, regardless of the definition. The odds...

  6. Psychosis or Obsessions? Clozapine Associated with Worsening Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan G. Leung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One underrecognized adverse event of clozapine is the emergence or worsening of obsessive-compulsive symptoms (OCS. OCS, particularly violent thoughts, can be inaccurately described as psychosis and result in a misdiagnosis. We report a case of a 42-year-old man, initially diagnosed with schizoaffective, who was placed on clozapine for the management of “violent delusions.” However, clozapine led to a worsening of these violent thoughts resulting in suicidal ideation and hospitalization. After exploration of the intrusive thoughts and noting these to be egodystonic, clearly disturbing, and time consuming, an alternative diagnosis of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD was made. Clozapine was inevitably discontinued resulting in a significant reduction of the intrusive thoughts without emergence of psychosis or adverse events. While an overlapping phenomenology between OCD and psychotic disorders has been described, clozapine and other antiserotonergic antipsychotics have been implicated with the emergence or worsening of OCS. Unique to our case is that the patient’s obsessions had been treated as psychosis leading to the inadequate treatment of his primary illness, OCD. This case highlights the potential for OCD to masquerade as a psychotic disorder and reminds clinicians that clozapine may worsen OCS.

  7. Antipsychotic drugs may worsen metabolic control in type 2 diabetes mellitus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spoelstra, JA; Stolk, RP; Cohen, D; Klungel, OH; Erkens, JA; Leufkens, HGM; Grobbee, DE

    (B)ackground: Several studies have indicated that type 2 diabetes mellitus is more common among schizophrenic patients than in the general population. In this study, we investigated whether the use of antipsychotic drugs in patients with diabetes leads to worsening of glycemic control. Method: In

  8. Enhancement of viral pathogenesis in mice maintained in an antiorthostatic suspension model - Coordination with effects on interferon production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, C. L.; Sonnenfeld, G.

    1987-01-01

    Both rodents and men returning from spaceflight have exhibited alterations in immune responses and, in particular, interferon production. This work utilizes a model for antiorthostatic (20-deg head-down tilt), hypokinetic, hypodynamic suspension of mice that simulates some aspects of weightlessness. Female Swiss/Webster mice that are normally resistant to infection with the D variant of encephalomyocarditis virus showed a marked increase in susceptibility to infection when suspended. This correlated with a drop in interferom production. Control, orthostatically suspended mice (no tilt) showed no increase in susceptibility to the virus.

  9. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 (HIV-1) Viral Protein R (Vpr)-Mediated Cell Cycle Arrest: An Analysis of Current Mechanistic Models

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sercovich, Mark J

    2006-01-01

    ...), the most globally devastating viral disease of the past 25 years. Development of effective HIV-1 preventative and therapeutic regimens have proven exceedingly difficult, as the virus has evolved sophisticated mechanisms for thwarting control efforts...

  10. Outcomes from monitoring of patients on antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings with viral load, CD4 cell count, or clinical observation alone: a computer simulation model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phillips, Andrew N; Pillay, Deenan; Miners, Alec H

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In lower-income countries, WHO recommends a population-based approach to antiretroviral treatment with standardised regimens and clinical decision making based on clinical status and, where available CD4 cell count, rather than viral load. Our aim was to study the potential consequences...... strategies-based on viral load, CD4 cell count, or clinical observation alone-for determining when to switch people starting antiretroviral treatment with the WHO-recommended first-line regimen of stavudine, lamivudine, and nevirapine to second-line antiretroviral treatment. FINDINGS: Over 5 years......, the predicted proportion of potential life-years survived was 83% with viral load monitoring (switch when viral load >500 copies per mL), 82% with CD4 cell count monitoring (switch at 50% drop from peak), and 82% with clinical monitoring (switch when two new WHO stage 3 events or a WHO stage 4 event occur...

  11. Characterization of New Zealand White Rabbit Gut-Associated Lymphoid Tissues and Use as Viral Oncology Animal Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Robyn A; Urbiztondo, Rebeccah A; Haynes, Rashade A H; Simpson, Elaine; Niewiesk, Stefan; Lairmore, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Rabbits have served as a valuable animal model for the pathogenesis of various human diseases, including those related to agents that gain entry through the gastrointestinal tract such as human T cell leukemia virus type 1. However, limited information is available regarding the spatial distribution and phenotypic characterization of major rabbit leukocyte populations in mucosa-associated lymphoid tissues. Herein, we describe the spatial distribution and phenotypic characterization of leukocytes from gut-associated lymphoid tissues (GALT) from 12-week-old New Zealand White rabbits. Our data indicate that rabbits have similar distribution of leukocyte subsets as humans, both in the GALT inductive and effector sites and in mesenteric lymph nodes, spleen, and peripheral blood. GALT inductive sites, including appendix, cecal tonsil, Peyer's patches, and ileocecal plaque, had variable B cell/T cell ratios (ranging from 4.0 to 0.8) with a predominance of CD4 T cells within the T cell population in all four tissues. Intraepithelial and lamina propria compartments contained mostly T cells, with CD4 T cells predominating in the lamina propria compartment and CD8 T cells predominating in the intraepithelial compartment. Mesenteric lymph node, peripheral blood, and splenic samples contained approximately equal percentages of B cells and T cells, with a high proportion of CD4 T cells compared with CD8 T cells. Collectively, our data indicate that New Zealand White rabbits are comparable with humans throughout their GALT and support future studies that use the rabbit model to study human gut-associated disease or infectious agents that gain entry by the oral route. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute for Laboratory Animal Research. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Solvent/Detergent Virally Inactivated Serum Eye Drops Restore Healthy Ocular Epithelium in a Rabbit Model of Dry-Eye Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ching-Li; Chen, Zhi-Yu; Renn, Ting-Yi; Hsiao, Shun-Hung; Burnouf, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Application of autologous serum eye drops (SEDs) is a recognized means to treat severe dry-eye syndrome (DES). Due to the inconvenience and difficulty of preparing SEDs from some patients, producing SEDs from allogeneic blood donations is gaining popularity. A major safety concern associated with allogeneic blood is virus transmission. We therefore herein evaluated the possibility of applying a solvent/detergent (S/D) treatment to inactivate viruses and studied the impacts of such treatment of SEDs to resolve DES in a rabbit model. Sera prepared from the blood of five rabbits were pooled and divided into two sub-pools. One was untreated (SEDs), while the other was virally-inactivated with 1% Tri-n-butyl phosphate/1% Triton X-45 at 31°C for 1 h (S/D-SEDs). DES was induced in rabbits using 0.1% benzalkonium chloride (BAC). Rabbits were divided into five groups of two rabbits each. One group was untreated (control), three were treated twice daily for 3 weeks using PBS, SEDs, or S/D-SEDs, and the last received an additional 0.1% BAC (as the negative control). The DES condition was determined by measuring aqueous tear secretion (Schirmer's test), corneal fluorescein staining, a corneal histologic examination, TUNEL stain apoptosis, and corneal inflammatory marker (tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, and IL-6) expressions. We first confirmed that SEDs and S/D-SEDs had similar protein profiles and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β contents. Animal experiments showed that tear secretion did not significantly differ between the SED and S/D-SED groups but was significantly higher than in the PBS group. Eye fluorescein staining revealed dramatic improvements in epithelial defects in groups treated with SEDs or S/D-SEDs, and hematoxylin/eosin staining revealed microscopic epithelial layers similar to those of the untreated controls. Inflammatory markers and TUNEL studies showed that healthy epithelium had been restored in groups treated with SEDs or S

  13. A novel homologous model for gene therapy of dwarfism by non-viral transfer of the mouse growth hormone gene into immunocompetent dwarf mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecchi, Claudia R; Higuti, Eliza; Oliveira, Nelio A J; Lima, Eliana R; Jakobsen, Maria; Dagnaes-Hansen, Frederick; Gissel, Hanne; Aagaard, Lars; Jensen, Thomas G; Jorge, Alexander A L; Bartolini, Paolo; Peroni, Cibele N

    2014-02-01

    The possibilities for non-viral GH gene therapy are studied in immunocompetent dwarf mice (lit/lit). As expression vector we used a plasmid previously employed in immunodeficient dwarf mice (pUBI-hGH-gDNA) by replacing the human GH gene with the genomic sequence of mouse-GH DNA (pUBI-mGH-gDNA). HEK-293 human cells transfected with pUBI-mGH-gDNA produced 3.0 µg mGH/10(6) cells/day compared to 3.7 µg hGH/10(6) cells/day for pUBIhGH- gDNA transfected cells. The weight of lit/lit mice treated with the same two plasmids (50 µg DNA/mouse) by electrotransfer into the quadriceps muscle was followed for 3 months. The weight increase up to 15 days for mGH, hGH and saline treated mice were 0.130, 0.112 and 0.027 g/mouse/day. Most sera from hGH-treated mice contained anti-hGH antibodies already on day 15, with the highest titers on day 45, while no significant anti-mGH antibodies were observed in mGH-treated mice. At the end of 3 months, the weight increase for mGH-treated mice was 34.3%, while the nose-to-tail and femur lengths increased 9.5% and 24.3%. Mouse-GH and hGH circulating levels were 4-5 ng/mL 15 days after treatment, versus control levels of ~0.7 ng GH/mL (P<0.001). In mGH-treated mice, mIGF-I determined on days 15, 45 and 94 were 1.5- to 3-fold higher than the control and 1.2- to 1.6-fold higher than hGH-treated mice. The described homologous model represents an important progress forming the basis for preclinical testing of non-viral gene therapy for GH deficiency.

  14. Virally mediated Kcnq1 gene replacement therapy in the immature scala media restores hearing in a mouse model of human Jervell and Lange-Nielsen deafness syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Qing; Wang, Jianjun; Li, Qi; Kim, Yeunjung; Zhou, Binfei; Wang, Yunfeng; Li, Huawei; Lin, Xi

    2015-08-01

    Mutations in the potassium channel subunit KCNQ1 cause the human severe congenital deafness Jervell and Lange-Nielsen (JLN) syndrome. We applied a gene therapy approach in a mouse model of JLN syndrome (Kcnq1(-/-) mice) to prevent the development of deafness in the adult stage. A modified adeno-associated virus construct carrying a Kcnq1 expression cassette was injected postnatally (P0-P2) into the endolymph, which resulted in Kcnq1 expression in most cochlear marginal cells where native Kcnq1 is exclusively expressed. We also found that extensive ectopic virally mediated Kcnq1 transgene expression did not affect normal cochlear functions. Examination of cochlear morphology showed that the collapse of the Reissner's membrane and degeneration of hair cells (HCs) and cells in the spiral ganglia were corrected in Kcnq1(-/-) mice. Electrophysiological tests showed normal endocochlear potential in treated ears. In addition, auditory brainstem responses showed significant hearing preservation in the injected ears, ranging from 20 dB improvement to complete correction of the deafness phenotype. Our results demonstrate the first successful gene therapy treatment for gene defects specifically affecting the function of the stria vascularis, which is a major site affected by genetic mutations in inherited hearing loss. © 2015 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  15. Generalized Linear Model (GLM) framework for the association of host variables and viral strains with liver fibrosis in HCV/HIV coinfected patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matas, Marina; Picornell, Antònia; Cifuentes, Carmen; Payeras, Antoni; Bassa, Antoni; Homar, Francesc; González-Candelas, Fernando; López-Labrador, F Xavier; Moya, Andrés; Ramon, Maria M; Castro, José A

    2013-01-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is the main cause of advanced and end-stage liver disease world-wide, and an important factor of morbidity and mortality in Human Immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) co-infected individuals. Whereas the genetic variability of HCV has been studied extensively in monoinfected patients, comprehensive analyses of both patient and virus characteristics are still scarce in HCV/HIV co-infection. In order to find correlates for liver damage, we sought to analyze demographic, epidemiological and clinical features of HCV/HIV co-infected patients along with the genetic makeup of HCV (viral subtypes and lineage studied by nucleotide sequencing and phylogenetic analysis of the NS5B region). We used the Generalized Linear Model (GLM) methodology in order to integrate data from the virus and the infected host to find predictors for liver damage. The degree of liver disease was evaluated indirectly by means of two indexes (APRI and FIB-4) and accounting for the time since infection, to estimate fibrosis progression rates. Our analyses identified a reduced number of variables (both from the virus and the host) implicated in liver damage, which included the stage of HIV infection, levels of gamma-glutamil transferase and cholesterol, and some distinct HCV phylogenetic clades. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. 3,4-Methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA) alters acute gammaherpesvirus burden and limits Interleukin 27 responses in a mouse model of viral infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Daniel A.; Singh, Sam J.; Young, Amy B.; Tolbert, Melanie D.; Bost, Kenneth L.

    2011-01-01

    Aims To test whether 3,4-methylenedioxymethamphetamine (MDMA, “Ecstasy”) abuse might increase the susceptibility, or alter the immune response, to murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (HV-68) and/or bacterial lipopolysaccharide. Methods Groups of experimental and control mice were subjected to three day binges of MDMA, and the effect of this drug abuse on acute and latent HV-68 viral burden were assessed. In vitro and in vivo studies were also performed to assess the MDMA effect on IL-27 expression in virally infected or LPS-exposed macrophages and dendritic cells, and latently infected animals, exposed to this drug of abuse. Results Acute viral burden was significantly increased in MDMA-treated mice when compared to controls. However the latent viral burden, and physiological and behavioral responses were not altered in infected mice despite repeated bingeing with MDMA. MDMA could limit the IL-27 response of HV-68 infected or LPS-exposed macrophages and dendritic cells in vitro and in vivo, demonstrating the ability of this drug to alter normal cytokine responses in the context of a viral infection and/or a TLR4 agonist. Conclusion MDMA bingeing could alter the host’s immune response resulting in greater acute viral replication and reductions in the production of the cytokine, IL-27 during immune responses. PMID:21269783

  17. Combination of Biological Screening in a Cellular Model of Viral Latency and Virtual Screening Identifies Novel Compounds That Reactivate HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallastegui, Edurne; Marshall, Brett; Vidal, David; Sanchez-Duffhues, Gonzalo; Collado, Juan A.; Alvarez-Fernández, Carmen; Luque, Neus; Terme, Jean-Michel; Gatell, Josep M.; Sánchez-Palomino, Sonsoles; Muñoz, Eduardo; Mestres, Jordi; Verdin, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Although highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) has converted HIV into a chronic disease, a reservoir of HIV latently infected resting T cells prevents the eradication of the virus from patients. To achieve eradication, HAART must be combined with drugs that reactivate the dormant viruses. We examined this problem in an established model of HIV postintegration latency by screening a library of small molecules. Initially, we identified eight molecules that reactivated latent HIV. Using them as templates, additional hits were identified by means of similarity-based virtual screening. One of those hits, 8-methoxy-6-methylquinolin-4-ol (MMQO), proved to be useful to reactivate HIV-1 in different cellular models, especially in combination with other known reactivating agents, without causing T-cell activation and with lower toxicity than that of the initial hits. Interestingly, we have established that MMQO produces Jun N-terminal protein kinase (JNK) activation and enhances the T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD3 stimulation of HIV-1 reactivation from latency but inhibits CD3-induced interleukin-2 (IL-2) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) gene transcription. Moreover, MMQO prevents TCR-induced cell cycle progression and proliferation in primary T cells. The present study documents that the combination of biological screening in a cellular model of viral latency with virtual screening is useful for the identification of novel agents able to reactivate HIV-1. Moreover, we set the bases for a hypothetical therapy to reactivate latent HIV by combining MMQO with physiological or pharmacological TCR/CD3 stimulation. PMID:22258251

  18. Definitive Management of Oligometastatic Melanoma in a Murine Model Using Combined Ablative Radiation Therapy and Viral Immunotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Miran [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Shim, Kevin G. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Grams, Michael P. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Rajani, Karishma; Diaz, Rosa M. [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Furutani, Keith M. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Thompson, Jill [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Olivier, Kenneth R.; Park, Sean S. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Markovic, Svetomir N. [Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Medical Oncology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Pandha, Hardev [The Postgraduate Medical School, University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Melcher, Alan [Leeds Institute of Cancer Studies and Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom); Harrington, Kevin [Targeted Therapy Laboratory, The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Zaidi, Shane [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Targeted Therapy Laboratory, The Institute of Cancer Research, London (United Kingdom); Vile, Richard, E-mail: vile.richard@mayo.edu [Department of Molecular Medicine, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Immunology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Leeds Institute of Cancer Studies and Pathology, University of Leeds, Leeds (United Kingdom)

    2015-11-01

    Purpose: The oligometastatic state is an intermediate state between a malignancy that can be completely eradicated with conventional modalities and one in which a palliative approach is undertaken. Clinically, high rates of local tumor control are possible with stereotactic ablative radiation therapy (SABR), using precisely targeted, high-dose, low-fraction radiation therapy. However, in oligometastatic melanoma, virtually all patients develop progression systemically at sites not initially treated with ablative radiation therapy that cannot be managed with conventional chemotherapy and immunotherapy. We have demonstrated in mice that intravenous administration of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) expressing defined tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) generates systemic immune responses capable of clearing established tumors. Therefore, in the present preclinical study, we tested whether the combination of systemic VSV-mediated antigen delivery and SABR would be effective against oligometastatic disease. Methods and Materials: We generated a model of oligometastatic melanoma in C57BL/6 immunocompetent mice and then used a combination of SABR and systemically administered VSV-TAA viral immunotherapy to treat both local and systemic disease. Results: Our data showed that SABR generates excellent control or cure of local, clinically detectable, and accessible tumor through direct cell ablation. Also, the immunotherapeutic activity of systemically administered VSV-TAA generated T-cell responses that cleared subclinical metastatic tumors. We also showed that SABR induced weak T-cell-mediated tumor responses, which, particularly if boosted by VSV-TAA, might contribute to control of local and systemic disease. In addition, VSV-TAA therapy alone had significant effects on control of both local and metastatic tumors. Conclusions: We have shown in the present preliminary murine study using a single tumor model that this approach represents an effective, complementary

  19. Estimating Vector-borne Viral Infections in the Urban Setting of the 2020 Tokyo Olympics, Japan, Using Mathematical Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furuya, Hiroyuki

    2017-12-20

    The first domestic outbreak of dengue fever in Japan since 1945 was reported in Tokyo in 2014. Meanwhile, daily mean summer temperatures are expected to continue to rise world-wide. Such conditions are expected to increase the risk of an arbovirus outbreak at the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games. To address this possibility, the present study compared estimates of the risk of infection by dengue, chikungunya, and Zika viruses in urban areas. To compare the risk of infection by arboviruses transmitted by Ae. albopictus mosquitoes, the reproduction number for each of three arboviruses was estimated under the environmental conditions associated with the 2014 dengue outbreak in Tokyo, and additionally under conditions assuming a daily mean temperature elevation of 2° C. For dengue, chikungunya, and Zika, the estimated distributions of R 0 were independently fitted to gamma distributions yielding median R 0 values of 1.00, 0.46, and 0.36, respectively. If the daily mean temperature were to rise from 28° C to 30° C, our model predicts increases of the median R 0 of 18% for dengue, 4.3% for chikungunya, and 11.1% for Zika. Strengthening of the public health responsivity for these emerging arboviral diseases will be needed in preparation for the 2020 Olympic Games in Tokyo.

  20. Validation of the AFP model as a predictor of HCC recurrence in patients with viral hepatitis-related cirrhosis who had received a liver transplant for HCC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notarpaolo, Andrea; Layese, Richard; Magistri, Paolo; Gambato, Maria; Colledan, Michele; Magini, Giulia; Miglioresi, Lucia; Vitale, Alessandro; Vennarecci, Giovanni; Ambrosio, Cecilia D; Burra, Patrizia; Di Benedetto, Fabrizio; Fagiuoli, Stefano; Colasanti, Marco; Maria Ettorre, Giuseppe; Andreoli, Arnoldo; Cillo, Umberto; Laurent, Alexis; Katsahian, Sandrine; Audureau, Etienne; Roudot-Thoraval, Françoise; Duvoux, Christophe

    2017-03-01

    The AFP model was shown to be superior to the Milan criteria for predicting hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) recurrence after liver transplantation in a French population. Our aim was to test the AFP model in a non-French, post-hepatitic cirrhosis-based population of HCC candidates. 574 patients transplanted for HCC in four Italian centers were studied. AFP score was assessed at the last evaluation before liver transplantation (LT). Probabilities of recurrence and survival were estimated by the log-rank test or competing risk analysis and compared according to the AFP model. 24.7% patients were beyond Milan criteria. HCC complicated hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV) cirrhosis in 58.7% and 24% of the cases, respectively. Five-year probabilities of recurrence differed according to AFP score ⩽2 vs. >2 in the whole population (13.2±1.8% vs. 49.8±8.7%, p2 were 71.7±2.2% vs. 42.2±8.3% (pHCC candidates at low risk of recurrence, otherwise excluded by Milan criteria in a population with a predominance of post-hepatitic-related HCC. The AFP score can be proposed for selection of HCC candidates in programs with a high proportion of viral/HCV-related cirrhosis. Selection criteria for liver transplantation of patients affected with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are based on the Milan criteria, which have been shown to be too restrictive, precluding access to liver transplantation for some patients who might be cured by this operation. Recently, a French group of researchers developed a new selection model called the AFP model, or AFP score, allowing some patients with HCC not meeting Milan criteria to be transplanted with excellent results. In the present work, the AFP score was tested in a population of non-French patients transplanted for HCC occurring mainly on post-hepatitic (HCV or HBV) cirrhosis. The results confirm that in this specific population, as in the original French population of patients, the AFP model better selects patients with HCC

  1. Retinal thickness measured with optical coherence tomography and risk of disability worsening in multiple sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinez-Lapiscina, Elena H; Arnow, Sam; Wilson, James A

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Most patients with multiple sclerosis without previous optic neuritis have thinner retinal layers than healthy controls. We assessed the role of peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (pRNFL) thickness and macular volume in eyes with no history of optic neuritis as a biomarker...... of disability worsening in a cohort of patients with multiple sclerosis who had at least one eye without optic neuritis available. METHODS: In this multicentre, cohort study, we collected data about patients (age ≥16 years old) with clinically isolated syndrome, relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis......, and progressive multiple sclerosis. Patients were recruited from centres in Spain, Italy, France, Germany, Czech Republic, Netherlands, Canada, and the USA, with the first cohort starting in 2008 and the latest cohort starting in 2013. We assessed disability worsening using the Expanded Disability Status Scale...

  2. Construction of a viral T2A-peptide based knock-in mouse model for enhanced Cre recombinase activity and fluorescent labeling of podocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehler, Sybille; Brähler, Sebastian; Braun, Fabian; Hagmann, Henning; Rinschen, Markus M; Späth, Martin R; Höhne, Martin; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Schermer, Bernhard; Benzing, Thomas; Brinkkoetter, Paul T

    2017-06-01

    Podocyte injury is a key event in glomerular disease leading to proteinuria and opening the path toward glomerular scarring. As a consequence, glomerular research strives to discover molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways affecting podocyte health. The hNphs2.Cre mouse model has been a valuable tool to manipulate podocyte-specific genes and to label podocytes for lineage tracing and purification. Here we designed a novel podocyte-specific tricistronic Cre mouse model combining codon improved Cre expression and fluorescent cell labeling with mTomato under the control of the endogenous Nphs2 promoter using viral T2A-peptides. Independent expression of endogenous podocin, codon improved Cre, and mTomato was confirmed by immunofluorescence, fluorescent activated cell sorting and protein analyses. Nphs2 pod.T2A.ciCre.T2A.mTomato/wild-type mice developed normally and did not show any signs of glomerular disease or off-target effects under basal conditions and in states of disease. Nphs2 pod.T2A.ciCre.T2A.mTomato/wild-type -mediated gene recombination was superior to conventional hNphs2.Cre mice-mediated gene recombination. Last, we compared Cre efficiency in a disease model by mating Nphs2 pod.T2A.ciCre.T2A.mTomato/wild-type and hNphs2.Cre mice to Phb2 fl/fl mice. The podocyte-specific Phb2 knockout by Nphs2 pod.T2A.ciCre.T2A.mTomato/wild-type mice resulted in an aggravated glomerular injury as compared to a podocyte-specific Phb2 gene deletion triggered by hNphs2.Cre. Thus, we generated the first tricistronic podocyte mouse model combining enhanced Cre recombinase efficiency and fluorescent labeling in podocytes without the need for additional matings with conventional reporter mouse lines. Copyright © 2016 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Worsening renal function in heart failure: the need for a consensus definition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheerin, Noella J; Newton, Phillip J; Macdonald, Peter S; Leung, Dominic Y C; Sibbritt, David; Spicer, Stephen Timothy; Johnson, Kay; Krum, Henry; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-07-01

    Acute decompensated heart failure is a common cause of hospitalisation. This is a period of vulnerability both in altered pathophysiology and also the potential for iatrogenesis due to therapeutic interventions. Renal dysfunction is often associated with heart failure and portends adverse outcomes. Identifying heart failure patients at risk of renal dysfunction is important in preventing progression to chronic kidney disease or worsening renal function, informing adjustment to medication management and potentially preventing adverse events. However, there is no working or consensus definition in international heart failure management guidelines for worsening renal function. In addition, there appears to be no concordance or adaptation of chronic kidney disease guidelines by heart failure guideline development groups for the monitoring of chronic kidney disease in heart failure. Our aim is to encourage the debate for an agreed definition given the prognostic impact of worsening renal function in heart failure. We present the case for the uptake of the Acute Kidney Injury Network criteria for acute kidney injury with some minor alterations. This has the potential to inform study design and meta-analysis thereby building the knowledgebase for guideline development. Definition consensus supports data element, clinical registry and electronic algorithm innovation as instruments for quality improvement and clinical research for better patient outcomes. In addition, we recommend all community managed heart failure patients have their baseline renal function classified and routinely monitored in accordance with established renal guidelines to help identify those at increased risk for worsening renal function or progression to chronic kidney disease. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Reversible worsening of Parkinson disease motor symptoms after oral intake of Uncaria tomentosa (cat's claw).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cosentino, Carlos; Torres, Luis

    2008-01-01

    Uncaria tomentosa (UT), also known as cat's claw, isa Peruvian Rubiaceae species widely used in traditional medicine for the treatment of a wide range of health problems. There is no report about the use, safety, and efficacy of UT in neurological disorders. We describe reversible worsening of motor signs in a patient with Parkinson disease after oral intake of UT, and some possible explanations are discussed.

  5. Prediction of worsening of skin fibrosis in patients with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis using the EUSTAR database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, Britta; Graf, Nicole; Michel, Beat A; Müller-Ladner, Ulf; Czirják, László; Denton, Christopher P; Tyndall, Alan; Metzig, Carola; Lanius, Vivian; Khanna, Dinesh; Distler, Oliver

    2015-06-01

    To identify predictive parameters for the progression of skin fibrosis within 1 year in patients with diffuse cutaneous SSc (dcSSc). An observational study using the EUSTAR database was performed. Inclusion criteria were dcSSc, American College of Rheumatology (ACR) criteria fulfilled, modified Rodnan skin score (MRSS) ≥7 at baseline visit, valid data for MRSS at 2nd visit, and available follow-up of 12±2 months. Worsening of skin fibrosis was defined as increase in MRSS >5 points and ≥25% from baseline to 2nd visit. In the univariate analysis, patients with progressive fibrosis were compared with non-progressors, and predictive markers with panalysis. The prediction models were then validated in a second cohort. A total of 637 dcSSc patients were eligible. Univariate analyses identified joint synovitis, short disease duration (≤15 months), short disease duration in females/patients without creatine kinase (CK) elevation, low baseline MRSS (≤22/51), and absence of oesophageal symptoms as potential predictors for progressive skin fibrosis. In the multivariate analysis, by employing combinations of the predictors, 17 models with varying prediction success were generated, allowing cohort enrichment from 9.7% progressive patients in the whole cohort to 44.4% in the optimised enrichment cohort. Using a second validation cohort of 188 dcSSc patients, short disease duration, low baseline MRSS and joint synovitis were confirmed as independent predictors of progressive skin fibrosis within 1 year resulting in a 4.5-fold increased prediction success rate. Our study provides novel, evidence-based criteria for the enrichment of dcSSc cohorts with patients who experience worsening of skin fibrosis which allows improved clinical trial design. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Deep gray matter volume loss drives disability worsening in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eshaghi, Arman; Prados, Ferran; Brownlee, Wallace J; Altmann, Daniel R; Tur, Carmen; Cardoso, M Jorge; De Angelis, Floriana; van de Pavert, Steven H; Cawley, Niamh; De Stefano, Nicola; Stromillo, M Laura; Battaglini, Marco; Ruggieri, Serena; Gasperini, Claudio; Filippi, Massimo; Rocca, Maria A; Rovira, Alex; Sastre-Garriga, Jaume; Vrenken, Hugo; Leurs, Cyra E; Killestein, Joep; Pirpamer, Lukas; Enzinger, Christian; Ourselin, Sebastien; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M Gandini; Chard, Declan; Thompson, Alan J; Alexander, Daniel C; Barkhof, Frederik; Ciccarelli, Olga

    2018-02-01

    Gray matter (GM) atrophy occurs in all multiple sclerosis (MS) phenotypes. We investigated whether there is a spatiotemporal pattern of GM atrophy that is associated with faster disability accumulation in MS. We analyzed 3,604 brain high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans from 1,417 participants: 1,214 MS patients (253 clinically isolated syndrome [CIS], 708 relapsing-remitting [RRMS], 128 secondary-progressive [SPMS], and 125 primary-progressive [PPMS]), over an average follow-up of 2.41 years (standard deviation [SD] = 1.97), and 203 healthy controls (HCs; average follow-up = 1.83 year; SD = 1.77), attending seven European centers. Disability was assessed with the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS). We obtained volumes of the deep GM (DGM), temporal, frontal, parietal, occipital and cerebellar GM, brainstem, and cerebral white matter. Hierarchical mixed models assessed annual percentage rate of regional tissue loss and identified regional volumes associated with time-to-EDSS progression. SPMS showed the lowest baseline volumes of cortical GM and DGM. Of all baseline regional volumes, only that of the DGM predicted time-to-EDSS progression (hazard ratio = 0.73; 95% confidence interval, 0.65, 0.82; p < 0.001): for every standard deviation decrease in baseline DGM volume, the risk of presenting a shorter time to EDSS worsening during follow-up increased by 27%. Of all longitudinal measures, DGM showed the fastest annual rate of atrophy, which was faster in SPMS (-1.45%), PPMS (-1.66%), and RRMS (-1.34%) than CIS (-0.88%) and HCs (-0.94%; p < 0.01). The rate of temporal GM atrophy in SPMS (-1.21%) was significantly faster than RRMS (-0.76%), CIS (-0.75%), and HCs (-0.51%). Similarly, the rate of parietal GM atrophy in SPMS (-1.24-%) was faster than CIS (-0.63%) and HCs (-0.23%; all p values <0.05). Only the atrophy rate in DGM in patients was significantly associated with disability accumulation (beta = 0.04; p < 0.001). This large

  7. Association between matrix metalloproteinase-9 and worsening heart failure events in patients with chronic heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Tetsuji; Uzui, Hiroyasu; Mitsuke, Yasuhiko; Amaya, Naoki; Kaseno, Kenichi; Ishida, Kentaro; Fukuoka, Yoshitomo; Ikeda, Hiroyuki; Tama, Naoki; Yamazaki, Taketoshi; Lee, Jong-Dae; Tada, Hiroshi

    2017-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) is up-regulated during heart failure (HF) and influences ventricular remodeling. We hypothesized that disparity between MMP-9 and tissue inhibitors of MMP-1 (TIMP-1) results in clinical manifestations and is related to prognostic risk in patients with chronic HF. Plasma levels of MMP-9, TIMP-1, and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured in 173 patients with chronic HF. Combined endpoints of worsening HF events were assessed during follow-up (median 109 months). MMP-9 and TIMP-1 levels and the MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio increased with increasing severity of the New York Heart Association class (P for trend = 0.003, 0.011, and 0.005, respectively). Patients with HF events (n = 35) had significantly higher MMP-9 than those without HF events (P = 0.004). Kaplan-Meier analysis demonstrated a higher probability of HF events with high MMP-9 values (>23.2 ng/mL; P = 0.005). A multivariate Cox proportional hazard model showed that high MMP-9 values were an independent predictor of HF events (hazard ratio, 3.73; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-13.46; P = 0.043). In patients with lower BNP levels (≤210 pg/mL), the adjusted hazard ratio for HF events was 3.63 (95% CI, 1.20-11.02; P = 0.023) among patients with high MMP-9 values compared with patients with low BNP and low MMP-9 values. MMP-9 and TIMP-1 levels correlate with the severity of chronic HF. MMP-9 is a strong predictor of HF events, suggesting that a disparity between MMP-9 and TIMP-1 levels and increased MMP-9 levels may help predict HF events. © 2017 The Authors. ESC Heart Failure published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  8. Bile acids for viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Weikeng; Liu, J; Gluud, C

    2007-01-01

    Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness.......Trials have assessed bile acids for patients with viral hepatitis, but no consensus has been reached regarding their usefulness....

  9. Patients with worsening chronic heart failure who present to a hospital emergency department require hospital care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shafazand Masoud

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chronic heart failure (CHF is a major public health problem characterised by progressive deterioration with disabling symptoms and frequent hospital admissions. To influence hospitalisation rates it is crucial to identify precipitating factors. To characterise patients with CHF who seek an emergency department (ED because of worsening symptoms and signs and to explore the reasons why they are admitted to hospital. Method Patients (n = 2,648 seeking care for dyspnoea were identified at the ED, Sahlgrenska University Hospital/Östra. Out of 2,648 patients, 1,127 had a previous diagnosis of CHF, and of these, 786 were included in the present study with at least one sign and one symptom of worsening CHF. Results Although several of the patients wanted to go home after acute treatment in the ED, only 2% could be sent home. These patients were enrolled in an interventional study, which evaluated the acute care at home compared to the conventional, in hospital care. The remaining patients were admitted to hospital because of serious condition, including pneumonia/respiratory disease, myocardial infarction, pulmonary oedema, anaemia, the need to monitor cardiac rhythm, pathological blood chemistry and difficulties to communicate. Conclusion The vast majority of patients with worsening CHF seeking the ED required hospital care, predominantly because of co-morbidities. Patients with CHF with symptomatic deterioration may be admitted to hospital without additional emergency room investigations.

  10. Worsened physical condition due to climate change contributes to the increasing hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Jiabi; Shen, Jian; Park, Kyeong; Wang, Ya Ping; Yu, Xin

    2018-07-15

    There are increasing concerns about the impact of worsened physical condition on hypoxia in a variety of coastal systems, especially considering the influence of changing climate. In this study, an EOF analysis of the DO data for 1985-2012, a long-term numerical simulation of vertical exchange, and statistical analysis were applied to understand the underlying mechanisms for the variation of DO condition in Chesapeake Bay. Three types of analysis consistently demonstrated that both biological and physical conditions contribute equally to seasonal and interannual variations of the hypoxic condition in Chesapeake Bay. We found the physical condition (vertical exchange+temperature) determines the spatial and seasonal pattern of the hypoxia in Chesapeake Bay. The EOF analysis showed that the first mode, which was highly related to the physical forcings and correlated with the summer hypoxia volume, can be well explained by seasonal and interannual variations of physical variables and biological activities, while the second mode is significantly correlated with the estuarine circulation and river discharge. The weakened vertical exchange and increased water temperature since the 1980s demonstrated a worsened physical condition over the past few decades. Under changing climate (e.g., warming, accelerated sea-level rise, altered precipitation and wind patterns), Chesapeake Bay is likely to experience a worsened physical condition, which will amplify the negative impact of anthropogenic inputs on eutrophication and consequently require more efforts for nutrient reduction to improve the water quality condition in Chesapeake Bay. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. MicroRNAs relate to early worsening of renal function in patients with acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Noemi; ter Maaten, Jozine M; Ovchinnikova, Ekaterina S; Vegter, Eline L; Valente, Mattia A E; van der Meer, Peter; de Boer, Rudolf A; van der Harst, Pim; Schmitter, Daniela; Metra, Marco; O'Connor, Christopher M; Ponikowski, Piotr; Teerlink, John R; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth; Cleland, John G; Givertz, Michael M; Bloomfield, Daniel M; Dittrich, Howard C; Pinto, Yigal M; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Hillege, Hans L; Berezikov, Eugene; Voors, Adriaan A

    2016-01-15

    Deregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) may be involved in the pathogenesis of heart failure (HF) and renal disease. Our aim is to describe miRNA levels related to early worsening renal function in acute HF patients. We studied the association between 12 circulating miRNAs and Worsening Renal Function (WRF; defined as an increase in the serum creatinine level of 0.3mg per deciliter or more from admission to day 3), absolute change in creatinine and Neutrophil Gelatinase Associated Lipocalin (NGAL) from admission to day 3 in 98 patients hospitalized for acute HF. At baseline, circulating levels of all miRNAs were lower in patients with WRF, with statistically significant decreased levels of miR-199a-3p, miR-423-3p, and miR-let-7i-5p (p-valueacute HF were consistently lower in patients who developed worsening of renal function. MiR-199a-3p was the best predictor of WRF in these patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Lung Adenocarcinoma Presenting as Worsening of Chronic Neck Pain—A Cautionary Tale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neeka N Akhavan

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neck pain is a common musculoskeletal problem that up to 70% of the world population will experience at some point in their lives. Intramedullary spinal cord metastasis is an exceedingly rare complication of malignancy that affects less than 1% of all patients with cancer. Case report: We report a case of a 61-year-old man who presented to primary care clinic with 1-month history of worsening neck pain with associated neurologic deficits. Despite initial conservative management, the patient continued to have progressive worsening of sensory and motor deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed vasogenic edema of the brain and spinal cord and nodularity at the C4-C5 level. A computed tomography of the chest showed a dense lesion in the left lower lobe of the lung; histopathology of the biopsied specimen was consistent with moderately differentiated lung adenocarcinoma. Conclusions: A high index of suspicion is necessary when chronic neck pain acutely worsens, changes in character, or is accompanied by neurologic deficits. These clinical signs warrant further investigation into a secondary cause of neck pain. Intramedullary spinal cord metastases are rare complications of systemic cancer that commonly present with neck pain and upper extremity paraesthesias; early diagnosis and management are necessary to prevent complications such as spinal cord hemisection syndrome or spinal cord transection.

  13. A simulation model to quantify the value of implementing whole-herd Bovine viral diarrhea virus testing strategies in beef cow-calf herds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickell, Jason S; White, Brad J; Larson, Robert L; Renter, David G; Sanderson, Mike W

    2011-03-01

    Although numerous diagnostic tests are available to identify cattle persistently infected (PI) with Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) in cow-calf herds, data are sparse when evaluating the economic viability of individual tests or diagnostic strategies. Multiple factors influence BVDV testing in determining if testing should be performed and which strategy to use. A stochastic model was constructed to estimate the value of implementing various whole-herd BVDV cow-calf testing protocols. Three common BVDV tests (immunohistochemistry, antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and polymerase chain reaction) performed on skin tissue were evaluated as single- or two-test strategies. The estimated testing value was calculated for each strategy at 3 herd sizes that reflect typical farm sizes in the United States (50, 100, and 500 cows) and 3 probabilities of BVDV-positive herd status (0.077, 0.19, 0.47) based upon the literature. The economic value of testing was the difference in estimated gross revenue between simulated cow-calf herds that either did or did not apply the specific testing strategy. Beneficial economic outcomes were more frequently observed when the probability of a herd being BVDV positive was 0.47. Although the relative value ranking of many testing strategies varied by each scenario, the two-test strategy composed of immunohistochemistry had the highest estimated value in all but one herd size-herd prevalence permutation. These data indicate that the estimated value of applying BVDV whole-herd testing strategies is influenced by the selected strategy, herd size, and the probability of herd BVDV-positive status; therefore, these factors should be considered when designing optimum testing strategies for cow-calf herds.

  14. Bicistronic lentiviruses containing a viral 2A cleavage sequence reliably co-express two proteins and restore vision to an animal model of LCA1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Verrier

    Full Text Available The disease processes underlying inherited retinal disease are complex and are not completely understood. Many of the corrective gene therapies designed to treat diseases linked to mutations in genes specifically expressed in photoreceptor cells restore function to these cells but fail to stop progression of the disease. There is growing consensus that effective treatments for these diseases will require delivery of multiple therapeutic proteins that will be selected to treat specific aspects of the disease process. The purpose of this study was to design a lentiviral transgene that reliably expresses all of the proteins it encodes and does so in a consistent manner among infected cells. We show, using both in vitro and in vivo analyses, that bicistronic lentiviral transgenes encoding two fluorescent proteins fused to a viral 2A-like cleavage peptide meet these expression criteria. To determine if this transgene design is suitable for therapeutic applications, we replaced one of the fluorescent protein genes with the gene encoding guanylate cyclase-1 (GC1 and delivered lentivirus carrying this transgene to the retinas of the GUCY1*B avian model of Leber congenital amaurosis-1 (LCA1. GUCY1*B chickens carry a null mutation in the GC1 gene that disrupts photoreceptor function and causes blindness at hatching, a phenotype that closely matches that observed in humans with LCA1. We found that treatment of these animals with the 2A lentivector encoding GC1 restored vision to these animals as evidenced by the presence of optokinetic reflexes. We conclude that 2A-like peptides, with proper optimization, can be successfully incorporated into therapeutic vectors designed to deliver multiple proteins to neural retinal. These results highlight the potential of this vector design to serve as a platform for the development of combination therapies designed to enhance or prolong the benefits of corrective gene therapies.

  15. Viral Marketing and Academic Institution

    OpenAIRE

    Koktová, Silvie

    2010-01-01

    This bachelor thesis examines modern and constantly developing kind of internet marketing -- the so called viral marketing. It deals with its origin, principle, process, advantages and disadvantages, types of viral marketing and presumptions of creating successful viral campaign. The aim of the theoretical part is especially the understanding of viral marketing as one of the effective instruments of contemporary marketing. In this theoretical part the thesis also elaborates a marketing school...

  16. UGGT1 enhances enterovirus 71 pathogenicity by promoting viral RNA synthesis and viral replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peng-Nien Huang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Positive-strand RNA virus infections can induce the stress-related unfolded protein response (UPR in host cells. This study found that enterovirus A71 (EVA71 utilizes host UDP-glucose glycoprotein glucosyltransferase 1 (UGGT1, a key endoplasmic reticulum protein (ER involved in UPR, to enhance viral replication and virulence. EVA71 forms replication complexes (RCs on cellular membranes that contain a mix of host and viral proteins to facilitate viral replication, but the components and processes involved in the assembly and function of RCs are not fully understood. Using EVA71 as a model, this study found that host UGGT1 and viral 3D polymerase co-precipitate along with other factors on membranous replication complexes to enhance viral replication. Increased UGGT1 levels elevated viral growth rates, while viral pathogenicity was observed to be lower in heterozygous knockout mice (Uggt1 +/- mice. These findings provide important insight on the role of UPR and host UGGT1 in regulating RNA virus replication and pathogenicity.

  17. Post-Discharge Worsening Renal Function in Patients with Type 2 Diabetes and Recent Acute Coronary Syndrome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morici, Nuccia; Savonitto, Stefano; Ponticelli, Claudio; Schrieks, Ilse C; Nozza, Anna; Cosentino, Francesco; Stähli, Barbara E; Perrone Filardi, Pasquale; Schwartz, Gregory G.; Mellbin, Linda; Lincoff, A. Michael; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Grobbee, Diederick E

    BACKGROUND: Worsening renal function during hospitalization for an acute coronary syndrome is strongly predictive of in-hospital and long-term outcome. However, the role of post-discharge worsening renal function has never been investigated in this setting. METHODS: We considered the placebo cohort

  18. Controlling viral outbreaks: Quantitative strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mummert, Anna; Weiss, Howard

    2017-01-01

    Preparing for and responding to outbreaks of serious livestock infectious diseases are critical measures to safeguard animal health, public health, and food supply. Almost all of the current control strategies are empirical, and mass culling or "stamping out" is frequently the principal strategy for controlling epidemics. However, there are ethical, ecological, and economic reasons to consider less drastic control strategies. Here we use modeling to quantitatively study the efficacy of different control measures for viral outbreaks, where the infectiousness, transmissibility and death rate of animals commonly depends on their viral load. We develop a broad theoretical framework for exploring and understanding this heterogeneity. The model includes both direct transmission from infectious animals and indirect transmission from an environmental reservoir. We then incorporate a large variety of control measures, including vaccination, antivirals, isolation, environmental disinfection, and several forms of culling, which may result in fewer culled animals. We provide explicit formulae for the basic reproduction number, R0, for each intervention and for combinations. We evaluate the control methods for a realistic simulated outbreak of low pathogenic avian influenza on a mid-sized turkey farm. In this simulated outbreak, culling results in more total dead birds and dramatically more when culling all of the infected birds.

  19. Hepatitis B virus DNA integration occurs early in the viral life cycle in an in vitro infection model via NTCP-dependent uptake of enveloped virus particles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Thomas; Budzinska, Magdalena A; Vondran, Florian W R; Shackel, Nicholas A; Urban, Stephan

    2018-02-07

    Chronic infection by the Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is the major contributor to liver disease worldwide. Though HBV replicates via a nuclear episomal DNA (cccDNA), integration of HBV DNA into the host cell genome is regularly observed in the liver of infected patients. While reported as a pro-oncogenic alteration, the mechanism(s) and timing of HBV DNA integration are not well-understood, chiefly due to the lack of in vitro infection models that have detectable integration events. Here, we have established an in vitro system in which integration can be reliably detected following HBV infection. We measured HBV DNA integration using inverse nested PCR in primary human hepatocytes, HepaRG-NTCP, HepG2-NTCP, and Huh7-NTCP cells after HBV infection. Integration was detected in all cell types at a rate of >1 per 10000 cells, with the most consistent detection in Huh7-NTCP cells. Integration rate remained stable between 3 and 9 days post-infection. HBV DNA integration was efficiently blocked by treatment with 200nM of the HBV entry inhibitor Myrcludex B, but not with 10μM Tenofovir, 100U Interferon alpha, or 1μM of the capsid assembly inhibitor GLS4. This suggests integration of HBV DNA occurs immediately after infection of hepatocytes and is likely independent of de novo HBV replication in this model. Site analysis revealed that HBV DNA integrations were distributed over the entire human genome. Further, integrated HBV DNA sequences were consistent with double-stranded linear HBV DNA being the major precursor. Thus, we have established an in vitro system to interrogate the mechanisms of HBV DNA integration. Importance Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) is a common blood-borne pathogen and, following a chronic infection, can cause liver cancer and liver cirrhosis. Integration of HBV DNA into the host genome occurs in all known members of the hepadnaviridae family, despite this form not being necessary for viral replication. HBV DNA integration has been reported to drive liver cancer

  20. Risk factors for worsened quality of life in patients on mechanical ventilation. A prospective multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busico, M; Intile, D; Sívori, M; Irastorza, N; Alvarez, A L; Quintana, J; Vazquez, L; Plotnikow, G; Villarejo, F; Desmery, P

    2016-10-01

    To identify risk factors for worsened quality of life (QoL) and activities of daily living (ADL) at 3 and 12 months after discharge from the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) in patients on mechanical ventilation (MV). A prospective, multicentric observational study was made. Three ICUs in Argentina. The study included a total of 84 out of 129 mainly clinical patients admitted between 2011-2012 and requiring over 24hours of MV. No interventions were carried out. Quality of life was assessed with the EQ-5D (version for Argentina), and ADL with the Barthel index. The EQ-5D and Barthel scores were assessed upon admission to the ICU (baseline) and after three months and one year of follow-up. Comorbidities, delirium, ICU acquired weakness (ICUAW), and medication received were daily assessed during ICU stay. The baseline QoL of the global sample showed a median index of [0.831 (IQR25-75% 0.527-0.931)], versus [0.513 (IQR0.245-0.838)] after three months and [0.850 (IQR0.573-1.00)] after one year. Significant differences were observed compared with QoL in the Argentinean general population [mean 0.880 (CI 0.872-0.888), p<0.001; p<0.001; p0.002]. Individual analysis showed that 67% of the patients had worsened their QoL at three months, while 33% had recovered their QoL. In the multivariate analysis, the variables found to be independent predictors of worsened QoL were a hospital stay ≥21 days [OR 12.57 (2.75-57.47)], age ≥50 years [OR 5.61 (1.27-24.83)], previous poor QoL [OR 0.11 (0.02-0.54)] and persistent ICUAW [OR 8.32 (1.22-56.74)]. Similar results were found for the worsening of ADL. Quality of life is altered after critical illness, and its recovery is gradual over time. Age, length of hospital stay, previous QoL and persistent ICUAW seem to be risk factors for worsened QoL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y SEMICYUC. All rights reserved.

  1. HIV community viral load trends in South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Hrishikesh; Weissman, Sharon; Duffus, Wayne A; Hossain, Akhtar; Varma Samantapudi, Ashok; Iyer, Medha; Albrecht, Helmut

    2017-03-01

    Community viral load is an aggregate measure of HIV viral load in a particular geographic location, community, or subgroup. Community viral load provides a measure of disease burden in a community and community transmission risk. This study aims to examine community viral load trend in South Carolina and identify differences in community viral load trends between selected population subgroups using a state-wide surveillance dataset that maintains electronic records of all HIV viral load measurements reported to the state health department. Community viral load trends were examined using random mixed effects models, adjusting for age, race, gender, residence, CD4 counts, HIV risk group, and initial antiretroviral regimen during the study period, and time. The community viral load gradually decreased from 2004 to 2013 ( p HIV risk group, and single-tablet regimen versus multiple-tablet regimen subgroups. Slower declines in community viral load among females, those in rural areas, and heterosexuals suggest possible disparities in care that require further exploration. The association between using single-tablet regimen and faster community viral load decline is noteworthy.

  2. Dengue viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Malavige, G; Fernando, S; Fernando, D; Seneviratne, S

    2004-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito borne diseases in the world. They may be asymptomatic or may give rise to undifferentiated fever, dengue fever, dengue haemorrhagic fever (DHF), or dengue shock syndrome. Annually, 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of DHF occur worldwide. Ninety percent of DHF subjects are children less than 15 years of age. At present, dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. No vaccine is available for preventing...

  3. Viral membrane fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harrison, Stephen C.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane fusion is an essential step when enveloped viruses enter cells. Lipid bilayer fusion requires catalysis to overcome a high kinetic barrier; viral fusion proteins are the agents that fulfill this catalytic function. Despite a variety of molecular architectures, these proteins facilitate fusion by essentially the same generic mechanism. Stimulated by a signal associated with arrival at the cell to be infected (e.g., receptor or co-receptor binding, proton binding in an endosome), they undergo a series of conformational changes. A hydrophobic segment (a “fusion loop” or “fusion peptide”) engages the target-cell membrane and collapse of the bridging intermediate thus formed draws the two membranes (virus and cell) together. We know of three structural classes for viral fusion proteins. Structures for both pre- and postfusion conformations of illustrate the beginning and end points of a process that can be probed by single-virion measurements of fusion kinetics. - Highlights: • Viral fusion proteins overcome the high energy barrier to lipid bilayer merger. • Different molecular structures but the same catalytic mechanism. • Review describes properties of three known fusion-protein structural classes. • Single-virion fusion experiments elucidate mechanism

  4. Hepatitis viral C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro A. Poma

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available El virus de la hepatitis C se trasmite por contacto directo con la sangre de la persona infectada. La mayoría de los pacientes no presenta síntomas en la fase aguda o crónica de la hepatitis. Dos a tres décadas después, algunos pacientes progresan a la cirrosis compensada, que también es asintomática. En un examen de sangre, los anticuerpos se presentan como una sorpresa, porque no se les relaciona con un episodio de contagio. Un embarazo ocasiona la posibilidad de efectos negativos de la infección en la madre o el niño. El tratamiento actual no ofrece la certeza de cura, dependiendo del genotipo viral, y presenta efectos adversos que pueden ser severos. La cirrosis descompensada causa la mayoría de muertes relacionadas con esta infección; algunos de estos pacientes desarrollan carcinoma hepatocelular. La reproducción viral causa partículas virales diferentes del virus original, característica que ha impedido el desarrollo de una vacuna. Actualmente, la prevención consiste en evitar el contacto con sangre infectada. Este artículo revisa la infección con el virus de la hepatitis C, incluyendo los últimos progresos en tratamiento. Es necesario educar a la comunidad acerca de los efectos de este virus en la salud pública.

  5. [History of viral hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, José Carlos Ferraz da

    2010-01-01

    The history of viral hepatitis goes back thousands of years and is a fascinating one. When humans were first infected by such agents, a natural repetitive cycle began, with the capacity to infect billions of humans, thus decimating the population and causing sequelae in thousands of lives. This article reviews the available scientific information on the history of viral hepatitis. All the information was obtained through extensive bibliographic review, including original and review articles and consultations on the internet. There are reports on outbreaks of jaundice epidemics in China 5,000 years ago and in Babylon more than 2,500 years ago. The catastrophic history of great jaundice epidemics and pandemics is well known and generally associated with major wars. In the American Civil War, 40,000 cases occurred among Union troops. In 1885, an outbreak of catarrhal jaundice affected 191 workers at the Bremen shipyard (Germany) after vaccination against smallpox. In 1942, 28,585 soldiers became infected with hepatitis after inoculation with the yellow fever vaccine. The number of cases of hepatitis during the Second World War was estimated to be 16 million. Only in the twentieth century were the main agents causing viral hepatitis identified. The hepatitis B virus was the first to be discovered. In this paper, through reviewing the history of major epidemics caused by hepatitis viruses and the history of discovery of these agents, singular peculiarities were revealed. Examples of this include the accidental or chance discovery of the hepatitis B and D viruses.

  6. Bioinformatics approaches for viral metagenomics in plants using short RNAs : model case of study and application to a Cicer arietinum population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walter ePirovano

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Over the past years deep sequencing experiments have opened novel doors to reconstruct viral populations in a high-throughput and cost-effective manner. Currently a substantial number of studies have been performed which employ Next Generation Sequencing (NGS techniques to either analyze known viruses by means of a reference-guided approach or to discover novel viruses using a de novo-based strategy. Taking advantage of the well-known Cymbidium ringspot virus we have carried out a comparison of different bioinformatics tools to reconstruct the viral genome based on 21-27 nt short (sRNA sequencing with the aim to identify the most efficient pipeline. The same approach was applied to a population of plants constituting an ancient variety of Cicer arietinum with red seeds. Among the discovered viruses, we describe the presence of a Tobamovirus referring to the Tomato mottle mosaic virus (NC_022230, which was not yet observed on C. arietinum nor revealed in Europe and a virod referring to Hop stunt viroid (NC_001351.1 never reported in chickpea. Notably, a reference sequence guided approach appeared the most efficient in such kind of investigation. Instead, the de novo assembly reached a non-appreciable coverage although the most prominent viral species could still be identified. Advantages and limitations of viral metagenomics analysis using sRNAs are discussed.

  7. Viral capsid assembly as a model for protein aggregation diseases: Active processes catalyzed by cellular assembly machines comprising novel drug targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marreiros, Rita; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas; Bader, Verian; Selvarajah, Suganya; Dey, Debendranath; Lingappa, Vishwanath R; Korth, Carsten

    2015-09-02

    Viruses can be conceptualized as self-replicating multiprotein assemblies, containing coding nucleic acids. Viruses have evolved to exploit host cellular components including enzymes to ensure their replicative life cycle. New findings indicate that also viral capsid proteins recruit host factors to accelerate their assembly. These assembly machines are RNA-containing multiprotein complexes whose composition is governed by allosteric sites. In the event of viral infection, the assembly machines are recruited to support the virus over the host and are modified to achieve that goal. Stress granules and processing bodies may represent collections of such assembly machines, readily visible by microscopy but biochemically labile and difficult to isolate by fractionation. We hypothesize that the assembly of protein multimers such as encountered in neurodegenerative or other protein conformational diseases, is also catalyzed by assembly machines. In the case of viral infection, the assembly machines have been modified by the virus to meet the virus' need for rapid capsid assembly rather than host homeostasis. In the case of the neurodegenerative diseases, it is the monomers and/or low n oligomers of the so-called aggregated proteins that are substrates of assembly machines. Examples for substrates are amyloid β peptide (Aβ) and tau in Alzheimer's disease, α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease, prions in the prion diseases, Disrupted-in-schizophrenia 1 (DISC1) in subsets of chronic mental illnesses, and others. A likely continuum between virus capsid assembly and cell-to-cell transmissibility of aggregated proteins is remarkable. Protein aggregation diseases may represent dysfunction and dysregulation of these assembly machines analogous to the aberrations induced by viral infection in which cellular homeostasis is pathologically reprogrammed. In this view, as for viral infection, reset of assembly machines to normal homeostasis should be the goal of protein aggregation

  8. HIV-1 infection, response to treatment and establishment of viral latency in a novel humanized T cell-only mouse (TOM) model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Jenna B; Wahl, Angela; Archin, Nancie; Choudhary, Shailesh; Margolis, David; Garcia, J Victor

    2013-10-24

    The major targets of HIV infection in humans are CD4⁺ T cells. CD4⁺ T cell depletion is a hallmark of AIDS. Previously, the SCID-hu thy/liv model was used to study the effect of HIV on thymopoeisis in vivo. However, these mice did not develop high levels of peripheral T cell reconstitution and required invasive surgery for infection and analysis. Here, we describe a novel variant of this model in which thy/liv implantation results in systemic reconstitution with human T cells in the absence of any other human hematopoietic lineages. NOD/SCID-hu thy/liv and NSG-hu thy/liv mice were created by implanting human fetal thymus and liver tissues under the kidney capsule of either NOD/SCID or NSG mice. In contrast to NOD/SCID-hu thy/liv mice that show little or no human cells in peripheral blood or tissues, substantial systemic human reconstitution occurs in NSG-hu thy/liv. These mice are exclusively reconstituted with human T cells (i.e. T-cell only mice or TOM). Despite substantial levels of human T cells no signs of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) were noted in these mice over a period of 14 months. TOM are readily infected after parenteral exposure to HIV-1. HIV replication is sustained in peripheral blood at high levels and results in modest reduction of CD4⁺ T cells. HIV-1 replication in TOM responds to daily administration of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) resulting in strong suppression of virus replication as determined by undetectable viral load in plasma. Latently HIV infected resting CD4⁺ T cells can be isolated from suppressed mice that can be induced to express HIV ex-vivo upon activation demonstrating the establishment of latency in vivo. NSG-hu thy/liv mice are systemically reconstituted with human T cells. No other human lymphoid lineages are present in these mice (i.e. monocytes/macrophages, B cells and DC are all absent). These T cell only mice do not develop GVHD, are susceptible to HIV-1 infection and can efficiently maintain virus

  9. Contagious Content: Viral Video Ads Identification of Content Characteristics that Help Online Video Advertisements Go Viral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yentl Knossenburg

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Why do some online video advertisements go viral while others remain unnoticed? What kind of video content keeps the viewer interested and motivated to share? Many companies have realized the need to innovate their marketing strategies and have embraced the newest ways of using technology, as the Internet, to their advantage as in the example of virality. Yet few marketers actually understand how, and academic literature on this topic is still in development. This study investigated which content characteristics distinguish successful from non-successful online viral video advertisements by analyzing 641 cases using Structural Equation Modeling. Results show that Engagement and Surprise are two main content characteristics that significantly increase the chance of online video advertisements to go viral.  

  10. Viral Dynamics of Acute HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Little, Susan J.; McLean, Angela R.; Spina, Celsa A.; Richman, Douglas D.; Havlir, Diane V.

    1999-01-01

    Viral dynamics were intensively investigated in eight patients with acute HIV infection to define the earliest rates of change in plasma HIV RNA before and after the start of antiretroviral therapy. We report the first estimates of the basic reproductive number (R 0), the number of cells infected by the progeny of an infected cell during its lifetime when target cells are not depleted. The mean initial viral doubling time was 10 h, and the peak of viremia occurred 21 d after reported HIV exposure. The spontaneous rate of decline (α) was highly variable among individuals. The phase 1 viral decay rate (δI = 0.3/day) in subjects initiating potent antiretroviral therapy during acute HIV infection was similar to estimates from treated subjects with chronic HIV infection. The doubling time in two subjects who discontinued antiretroviral therapy was almost five times slower than during acute infection. The mean basic reproductive number (R 0) of 19.3 during the logarithmic growth phase of primary HIV infection suggested that a vaccine or postexposure prophylaxis of at least 95% efficacy would be needed to extinguish productive viral infection in the absence of drug resistance or viral latency. These measurements provide a basis for comparison of vaccine and other strategies and support the validity of the simian immunodeficiency virus macaque model of acute HIV infection. PMID:10499922

  11. Non-random patterns in viral diversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Anthony, Simon J.; Islam, Ariful; Johnson, Christine

    2015-01-01

    ) or stochastic (not predictable) processes. We sample macaque faeces across nine sites in Bangladesh and use consensus PCR and sequencing to discover 184 viruses from 14 viral families. We then use network modelling and statistical null-hypothesis testing to show the presence of non-random deterministic patterns...... at different scales, between sites and within individuals. We show that the effects of determinism are not absolute however, as stochastic patterns are also observed. In showing that determinism is an important process in viral community assembly we conclude that it should be possible to forecast changes...

  12. Plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin and worsening renal function during everolimus therapy after heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imamura, Teruhiko; Kinugawa, Koichiro; Doi, Kent; Hatano, Masaru; Fujino, Takeo; Kinoshita, Osamu; Nawata, Kan; Noiri, Eisei; Kyo, Shunei; Ono, Minoru

    2015-01-01

    Recently, the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor everolimus (EVL) has been introduced as a novel immunosuppressant for heart transplant (HTx) recipients, and is expected to preserve renal function compared to conventional calcineurin inhibitors (CNIs). However, a considerable number of recipients treated with EVL were not free from worsening renal function regardless of CNI reduction. Data were collected retrospectively from 27 HTx recipients who had received EVL (trough concentration, 3.1-9.2 ng/mL) along with reduced CNIs (%decreases in trough concentration, 27.3 ± 13.0%) because of switching from mycophenolate mophetil due to digestive symptoms or neutropenia, progressive coronary artery vasculopathy, or persistent renal dysfunction, and had been followed over 1 year between August 2008 and January 2013. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) decreased in 5 recipients (18.5%) during the study period. Univariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that a higher plasma neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (P-NGAL) level was the only significant predictor for a decrease in eGFR over a 1-year EVL treatment period among all baseline parameters (P = 0.008). eGFR and proteinuria worsened almost exclusively in patients with baseline P-NGAL ≥ 85 ng/mL, which was the cutoff value calculated by an ROC analysis (area under the curve, 0.955; sensitivity, 1.000; specificity, 0.955). In conclusion, higher P-NGAL may be a novel predictor for the worsening of renal function after EVL treatment that is resistant to CNI reduction in HTx recipients.

  13. Metagenomic Analysis of the Ferret Fecal Viral Flora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.L. Smits (Saskia); V.S. Raj (Stalin); M. Oduber (Minoushka); C.M.E. Schapendonk (Claudia); R. Bodewes (Rogier); L.B.V. Provacia (Lisette); K.J. Stittelaar (Koert); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); B.L. Haagmans (Bart)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractFerrets are widely used as a small animal model for a number of viral infections, including influenza A virus and SARS coronavirus. To further analyze the microbiological status of ferrets, their fecal viral flora was studied using a metagenomics approach. Novel viruses from the families

  14. Clonal selection for transcriptionally active viral oncogenes during progression to cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tine, BA Van; Kappes, JC; Banerjee, NS; Knops, J; Lai, L; Steenbergen, R.D.M.; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Snijders, P.J.F.; Chatis, P; Broker, TR; Moen, PTJr; Chow, L.T.

    2004-01-01

    Primary keratinocytes immortalized by human papillomaviruses (HPVs), along with HPV-induced cervical carcinoma cell lines, are excellent models for investigating neoplastic progression to cancer. By simultaneously visualizing viral DNA and nascent viral transcripts in interphase nuclei, we

  15. [Acute hemorrhagic viral conjunctivitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haicl, P; Vanista, J; Danes, L

    1992-10-01

    Two cases of acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis are described, in which the enterovirus Coxsackie 24 was found by serological examination to be the etiological agent. The virus was important from Nigeria. The patients suffered by the acute hemorrhagic keratoconjuntivitis with transient iritic irritation without the systemic symptoms. Since now this disease with serological verification was not diagnosed in our country. The question of the viral hemorrhagic conjunctivitis and their treatment is discussed. The necessity of virological investigation in inflammations of the anterior segment is stressed.

  16. Complement and Viral Pathogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoermer, Kristina A.; Morrison, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The complement system functions as an immune surveillance system that rapidly responds to infection. Activation of the complement system by specific recognition pathways triggers a protease cascade, generating cleavage products that function to eliminate pathogens, regulate inflammatory responses, and shape adaptive immune responses. However, when dysregulated, these powerful functions can become destructive and the complement system has been implicated as a pathogenic effector in numerous diseases, including infectious diseases. This review highlights recent discoveries that have identified critical roles for the complement system in the pathogenesis of viral infection. PMID:21292294

  17. Dengue viral infections

    OpenAIRE

    Gurugama Padmalal; Garg Pankaj; Perera Jennifer; Wijewickrama Ananda; Seneviratne Suranjith

    2010-01-01

    Dengue viral infections are one of the most important mosquito-borne diseases in the world. Presently dengue is endemic in 112 countries in the world. It has been estimated that almost 100 million cases of dengue fever and half a million cases of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) occur worldwide. An increasing proportion of DHF is in children less than 15 years of age, especially in South East and South Asia. The unique structure of the dengue virus and the pathophysiologic responses of the host...

  18. Left ventricular diastolic dysfunction in pulmonary hypertension predicts functional capacity and clinical worsening: a tissue phase mapping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Daniel S; Steeden, Jennifer A; Moledina, Shahin; Jones, Alexander; Coghlan, J Gerry; Muthurangu, Vivek

    2015-12-29

    wave was the only independent predictor of clinical worsening (6.3× increased risk, p = 0.009) in a model including RVEF and septal curvature. TPM metrics of LV diastolic function are significantly abnormal in PH. More importantly, abnormal LV E wave velocities are the only independent predictors of functional capacity and clinical worsening in a model that includes conventional metrics of biventricular function.

  19. Worsening of coronary spasm during the perioperative period: A case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teragawa, Hiroki; Nishioka, Kenji; Fujii, Yuichi; Idei, Naomi; Hata, Takaki; Kurushima, Shuji; Shokawa, Tomoki; Kihara, Yasuki

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 65-year-old male with vasospastic angina (VSA) whose condition worsened during the perioperative period. He had been diagnosed with VSA 10 years prior. He was treated with two types of vasodilators and had not experienced any chest symptoms for 5 years. At this juncture, he underwent surgery for relapsed maxillary sublingual carcinoma. He had taken two vasodilators one day prior to surgery. Intravenous infusion of nitroglycerin (NTG) was initiated immediately before the surgery and continued the following day. Instead of stopping NTG, a dermal isosorbide dinitrate tape was applied on post-operative day 1. Two days later, a complete atrioventricular block with pulseless electrical activity appeared. After cardiopulmonary resuscitation, emergent coronary angiography showed severe coronary spasm in both the left and right coronary arteries. Intracoronary infusion of nitroglycerin and epinephrine with percutaneous cardiopulmonary support relieved the coronary spasm. During the perioperative period, several factors can trigger coronary vasospasm, including the discontinuation of vasodilators. Thus, surgeons, anesthetists, and cardiologists should watch for coronary vasospasm during this period and for worsening coronary spasm when discontinuing vasodilators in patients at risk for VSA. PMID:25068030

  20. Do seizures and epileptic activity worsen epilepsy and deteriorate cognitive function?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avanzini, Giuliano; Depaulis, Antoine; Tassinari, Alberto; de Curtis, Marco

    2013-11-01

    Relevant to the definition of epileptic encephalopathy (EE) is the concept that the epileptic activity itself may contribute to bad outcomes, both in terms of epilepsy and cognition, above and beyond what might be expected from the underlying pathology alone, and that these can worsen over time. The review of the clinical and experimental evidence that seizures or interictal electroencephalography (EEG) discharges themselves can induce a progression toward more severe epilepsy and a regression of brain function leads to the following conclusions: The possibility of seizure-dependent worsening is by no means a general one but is limited to some types of epilepsy, namely mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (MTLE) and EEs. Clinical and experimental data concur in indicating that prolonged seizures/status epilepticus (SE) are a risky initial event that can set in motion an epileptogenic process leading to persistent, possibly drug-refractory epilepsies. The mechanisms for SE-related epileptogenic process are incompletely known; they seem to involve inflammation and/or glutamatergic transmission. The evidence of the role of recurrent individual seizures in sustaining epilepsy progression is ambiguous. The correlation between high seizure frequency and bad outcome does not necessarily demonstrate a cause-effect relationship, rather high seizure frequency and bad outcome can both depend on a particularly aggressive epileptogenic process. The results of EE studies challenge the idea of a common seizure-dependent mechanism for epilepsy progression/intellectual deterioration. Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2013 International League Against Epilepsy.

  1. Varus thrust during walking and the risk of incident and worsening medial tibiofemoral MRI lesions: the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wink, A E; Gross, K D; Brown, C A; Guermazi, A; Roemer, F; Niu, J; Torner, J; Lewis, C E; Nevitt, M C; Tolstykh, I; Sharma, L; Felson, D T

    2017-06-01

    To determine the association of varus thrust during walking to incident and worsening medial tibiofemoral cartilage damage and bone marrow lesions (BMLs) over 2 years in older adults with or at risk for osteoarthritis (OA). Subjects from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis Study (MOST) were studied. Varus thrust was visually assessed from high-speed videos of forward walking trials. Baseline and two-year MRIs were acquired from one knee per subject and read for cartilage loss and BMLs. Logistic regression with generalized estimating equations was used to estimate the odds of incident and worsening cartilage loss and BMLs, adjusting for age, sex, race, body mass index (BMI), and clinic site. The analysis was repeated stratified by varus, neutral, and valgus alignment. 1007 participants contributed one knee each. Varus thrust was observed in 29.9% of knees. Knees with thrust had 2.17 [95% CI: 1.51, 3.11] times the odds of incident medial BML, 2.51 [1.85, 3.40] times the odds of worsening medial BML, and 1.85 [1.35, 2.55] times the odds of worsening medial cartilage loss. When stratified by alignment, varus knees also had significantly increased odds of these outcomes. Varus thrust observed during walking is associated with increased odds of incident and worsening medial BMLs and worsening medial cartilage loss. Increased odds of these outcomes persist in varus-aligned knees. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Shenqi Fuzheng Injection Alleviates the Transient Worsening Caused by Steroids Pulse Therapy in Treating Myasthenia Gravis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guo-Yan Qi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To evaluate the treatment effect and side effect of Shenqi Fuzheng Injection (SFI on alleviating transient worsening of myasthenia gravis (MG symptoms caused by high-dose steroids pulse therapy. Methods. Sixty-six consecutive patients with MG were randomly divided into two groups: the treatment group treated with SFI and methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPT and the control group treated with MPT alone. The severity of MG before, during, and after MPT and the duration of transient worsening (TW were evaluated and compared with the clinical absolute scoring (AS and relative scoring (RS system. Results. Twenty-nine patients experienced TW in each group. At TW, the AS was significantly increased (P<0.000 in both groups compared with baseline data, with the AS increase in the treatment group (16.8 ± 2 significantly smaller (P<0.05 than in the control group (24.9 ± 2.5. At the end of the treatment course, the AS for the treatment group was significantly decreased (7.5 ± 0.9 compared with at TW, although no significant difference compared with the control (9.7 ± 1.1. The TW lasted 1–6 days (mean 3.7 for the treatment group, significantly shorter (P<0.05 than 2–12 days (mean 7.8 for the control. The RS for the treatment group at the end of treatment was 43.8%–100% (mean 76.8% ± 2.6%, significantly better than the control group: 33.3%–100% (mean 67.2 ± 3.6%. Slight side effects (18.75% included maldigestion and rash in the treatment group. Conclusion. SFI has a better treatment effect and few side effects and can alleviate the severity and shorten the duration of the transient worsening of MG during steroids pulse therapy.

  3. Shenqi Fuzheng Injection Alleviates the Transient Worsening Caused by Steroids Pulse Therapy in Treating Myasthenia Gravis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Guo-Yan; Liu, Peng

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the treatment effect and side effect of Shenqi Fuzheng Injection (SFI) on alleviating transient worsening of myasthenia gravis (MG) symptoms caused by high-dose steroids pulse therapy. Methods. Sixty-six consecutive patients with MG were randomly divided into two groups: the treatment group treated with SFI and methylprednisolone pulse therapy (MPT) and the control group treated with MPT alone. The severity of MG before, during, and after MPT and the duration of transient worsening (TW) were evaluated and compared with the clinical absolute scoring (AS) and relative scoring (RS) system. Results. Twenty-nine patients experienced TW in each group. At TW, the AS was significantly increased (P < 0.000) in both groups compared with baseline data, with the AS increase in the treatment group (16.8 ± 2) significantly smaller (P < 0.05) than in the control group (24.9 ± 2.5). At the end of the treatment course, the AS for the treatment group was significantly decreased (7.5 ± 0.9) compared with at TW, although no significant difference compared with the control (9.7 ± 1.1). The TW lasted 1–6 days (mean 3.7) for the treatment group, significantly shorter (P < 0.05) than 2–12 days (mean 7.8) for the control. The RS for the treatment group at the end of treatment was 43.8%–100% (mean 76.8% ± 2.6%), significantly better than the control group: 33.3%–100% (mean 67.2 ± 3.6%). Slight side effects (18.75%) included maldigestion and rash in the treatment group. Conclusion. SFI has a better treatment effect and few side effects and can alleviate the severity and shorten the duration of the transient worsening of MG during steroids pulse therapy. PMID:24348721

  4. Reflecting the real value of health care resources in modelling and cost-effectiveness studies-The example of viral load informed differentiated care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Revill, Paul; Walker, Simon; Cambiano, Valentina; Phillips, Andrew; Sculpher, Mark J

    2018-01-01

    The WHO HIV Treatment Guidelines suggest routine viral-load monitoring can be used to differentiate antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery and reduce the frequency of clinic visits for patients stable on ART. This recommendation was informed by economic analysis that showed the approach is very likely to be cost-effective, even in the most resource constrained of settings. The health benefits were shown to be modest but the costs of introducing and scaling up viral load monitoring can be offset by anticipated reductions in the costs of clinic visits, due to these being less frequent for many patients. The cost-effectiveness of introducing viral-load informed differentiated care depends upon whether cost reductions are possible if the number of clinic visits is reduced and/or how freed clinic capacity is used for alternative priorities. Where freed resources, either physical or financial, generate large health gains (e.g. if committed to patients failing ART or to other high value health care interventions), the benefits of differentiated care are expected to be high; if however these freed physical resources are already under-utilized or financial resources are used less efficiently and would not be put to as beneficial an alternative use, the policy may not be cost-effective. The implication is that the use of conventional unit costs to value resources may not well reflect the latter's value in contributing to health improvement. Analyses intended to inform resource allocated decisions in a number of settings may therefore have to be interpreted with due consideration to local context. In this paper we present methods of how economic analyses can reflect the real value of health care resources rather than simply applying their unit costs. The analyses informing the WHO Guidelines are re-estimated by implementing scenarios using this framework, informing how differentiated care can be prioritized to generate greatest gains in population health. The findings have

  5. Viral/Host interaction in viral infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Grand, R.

    2006-01-01

    The major objectives of the Neuro-virology Department (SNV for 'Service de Neurovirologie') are related to the study of host/pathogen interactions, particularly during primate lentiviral infections. Various experimental models have been developed such as non-human primates infected with the HIV-related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV), as an animal model of human AIDS. The current research programs of the SNV following four main directions: 1) Study of the pathogenesis of primate lentiviral infection, including mucosal transmission of HIV/SIV, primary infection, dissemination to various reservoirs, neuro-pathogenesis and hematopoietic disorders; 2) Prevention of HIV transmission, particularly through vaccination but also by means of microbicides applied to genital mucosa and post-exposure treatment with antiviral drugs; 3) Cellular and molecular pharmacology of new antiviral compounds; 4) Development of new primate models of human hematological disorders like chronic myeloid leukemia cells and development on new gene transfer in hematopoietic cells based on the use of lentiviral vectors Main programs of the SNV will be presented as well as the perspective focused on the use of non invasive in vivo imaging approaches for the exploration of immune and hematopoietic cells

  6. Viral/Host interaction in viral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Grand, R. [CEA Fontenay-aux-Roses, Service de Neurovirologie, 92 (France)

    2006-07-01

    The major objectives of the Neuro-virology Department (SNV for 'Service de Neurovirologie') are related to the study of host/pathogen interactions, particularly during primate lentiviral infections. Various experimental models have been developed such as non-human primates infected with the HIV-related simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV), as an animal model of human AIDS. The current research programs of the SNV following four main directions: 1) Study of the pathogenesis of primate lentiviral infection, including mucosal transmission of HIV/SIV, primary infection, dissemination to various reservoirs, neuro-pathogenesis and hematopoietic disorders; 2) Prevention of HIV transmission, particularly through vaccination but also by means of microbicides applied to genital mucosa and post-exposure treatment with antiviral drugs; 3) Cellular and molecular pharmacology of new antiviral compounds; 4) Development of new primate models of human hematological disorders like chronic myeloid leukemia cells and development on new gene transfer in hematopoietic cells based on the use of lentiviral vectors Main programs of the SNV will be presented as well as the perspective focused on the use of non invasive in vivo imaging approaches for the exploration of immune and hematopoietic cells.

  7. Transient and persistent worsening renal function during hospitalization for acute heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamoorthy, Arun; Greiner, Melissa A; Sharma, Puza P; DeVore, Adam D; Johnson, Katherine Waltman; Fonarow, Gregg C; Curtis, Lesley H; Hernandez, Adrian F

    2014-12-01

    Transient and persistent worsening renal function (WRF) may be associated with different risks during hospitalization for acute heart failure. We compared outcomes of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure with transient, persistent, or no WRF. We identified patients 65 years or older hospitalized with acute heart failure from a clinical registry linked to Medicare claims data. We defined WRF as an increase in serum creatinine of ≥ 0.3 mg/dL after admission. We further classified patients with WRF by the difference between admission and last recorded serum creatinine levels into transient WRF (acute heart failure were associated with higher adjusted risks for 90-day all-cause postadmission mortality. Patients with persistent WRF had worse outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome with worsening cardiac function caused by pleiotropic rearrangement of mitochondrial DNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauch, Gabriele; Wilichowski, Ekkehard; Schmidt, Klaus G; Mayatepek, Ertan

    2002-06-01

    Pearson marrow-pancreas syndrome is a usually fatal disorder that involves the hematopoietic system, exocrine pancreas, liver, kidneys, and often presents clinically with failure to thrive. We report a 5-year-old patient who developed, in addition to the typical features of Pearson syndrome, worsening cardiac function, mainly affecting the left ventricle. The latter finding is particularly interesting because cardiac involvement has not yet been regarded as a major feature of Pearson syndrome. The diagnosis was proved by the finding of so far undescribed pleioplasmatic rearrangement of mitochondrial (mt)DNA (loss of 5,630 bp, 70% deleted and duplicated mtDNA) in blood cells. Our report demonstrates that patients with Pearson syndrome may also have impaired cardiac function. Thus, Pearson syndrome should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients with left ventricular dysfunction of unknown origin and other clinical findings suggestive of a mitochondrial disease. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Posttransplant Lymphoproliferative Disorder in a Patient with Worsening Ascites after Liver Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsh D. Patel

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Posttransplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD is a spectrum of diseases that involves abnormal lymphoid and/or plasmacytic proliferation in patients with solid organ or hematopoietic cell transplantation. It is a condition with a low incidence of 3.5–4.3% in liver transplant (LT recipients. This case involves a 63-year-old male with history of LT for chronic HCV induced cirrhosis who presented with abdominal distension related to worsening ascites. Cytological ascitic fluid analysis revealed EBV (+ malignant cells without a malignant focal point on imaging. Diagnosis of monomorphic PTLD with primary effusion lymphoma-like morphology and immunophenotype was established. This case highlights the complexity in diagnosis, different diagnostic modalities, and rare clinical presentations of PTLD.

  10. Weather conditions may worsen symptoms in rheumatoid arthritis patients: the possible effect of temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abasolo, Lydia; Tobías, Aurelio; Leon, Leticia; Carmona, Loreto; Fernandez-Rueda, Jose Luis; Rodriguez, Ana Belen; Fernandez-Gutierrez, Benjamin; Jover, Juan Angel

    2013-01-01

    Patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) complain that weather conditions aggravate their symptoms. We investigated the short-term effects of weather conditions on worsening of RA and determined possible seasonal fluctuations. We conducted a case-crossover study in Madrid, Spain. Daily cases of RA flares were collected from the emergency room of a tertiary level hospital between 2004 and 2007. 245 RA patients who visited the emergency room 306 times due to RA related complaints as the main diagnostic reason were included in the study. Patients from 50 to 65 years old were 16% more likely to present a flare with lower mean temperatures. Our results support the belief that weather influences rheumatic pain in middle aged patients. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  11. Failure of renal biomarkers to predict worsening renal function in high-risk patients presenting with oliguria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legrand, Matthieu; Jacquemod, Aurélien; Gayat, Etienne; Collet, Corinne; Giraudeaux, Veronique; Launay, Jean-Marie; Payen, Didier

    2015-01-01

    Oliguria is a common symptom in critically ill patients and puts patients in a high risk category for further worsening renal function (WRF). We performed this study to explore the predictive value of biomarkers to predict WRF in oliguric intensive care unit (ICU) patients. Single-center prospective observational study. ICU patients were included when they presented a first episode of oliguria. Plasma and urine biomarkers were measured: plasma and urine neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (pNGAL and uNGAL), urine α1-microglobulin, urine γ-glutamyl transferase, urine indices of tubular function, cystatin C, C terminal fragment of pro-arginine vasopressin (CT-ProAVP), and proadrenomedullin (MR-ProADM). One hundred eleven patients formed the cohort, of whom 41 [corrected] had worsening renal function. Simplified Acute Physiology Score (SAPS) II was 41 (31-51). WRF was associated with increased mortality (hazard ratio 8.65 [95 % confidence interval (CI) 3.0-24.9], p = 0.0002). pNGAL, MR-ProADM, and cystatin C had the best odds ratio and area under the receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC-ROC: 0.83 [0.75-0.9], 0.82 [0.71-0.91], and 0.83 [0.74-0.90]), but not different from serum creatinine (Screat, 0.80 [0.70-0.88]). A clinical model that included age, sepsis, SAPS II, and Screat had AUC-ROC of 0.79 [0.69-0.87]; inclusion of pNGAL increased the AUC-ROC to 0.86 (p = 0.03). The category-free net reclassification index improved with pNGAL (total net reclassification index for events to higher risk 61 % and nonevents to lower 82 %). All episodes of oliguria do not carry the same risk. No biomarker further improved prediction of WRF compared with Screat in this selected cohort of patients at increased risk defined by oliguria.

  12. Oxygen Administration Improves Survival but Worsens Cardiopulmonary Functions in Chlorine-exposed Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okponyia, Obiefuna C; McGraw, Matthew D; Dysart, Marilyn M; Garlick, Rhonda B; Rioux, Jacqueline S; Murphy, Angela L; Roe, Gates B; White, Carl W; Veress, Livia A

    2018-01-01

    Chlorine is a highly reactive gas that can cause significant injury when inhaled. Unfortunately, its use as a chemical weapon has increased in recent years. Massive chlorine inhalation can cause death within 4 hours of exposure. Survivors usually require hospitalization after massive exposure. No countermeasures are available for massive chlorine exposure and supportive-care measures lack controlled trials. In this work, adult rats were exposed to chlorine gas (LD 58-67 ) in a whole-body exposure chamber, and given oxygen (0.8 Fi O 2 ) or air (0.21 Fi O 2 ) for 6 hours after baseline measurements were obtained. Oxygen saturation, vital signs, respiratory distress and neuromuscular scores, arterial blood gases, and hemodynamic measurements were obtained hourly. Massive chlorine inhalation caused severe acute respiratory failure, hypoxemia, decreased cardiac output, neuromuscular abnormalities (ataxia and hypotonia), and seizures resulting in early death. Oxygen improved survival to 6 hours (87% versus 42%) and prevented observed seizure-related deaths. However, oxygen administration worsened the severity of acute respiratory failure in chlorine-exposed rats compared with controls, with increased respiratory acidosis (pH 6.91 ± 0.04 versus 7.06 ± 0.01 at 2 h) and increased hypercapnia (180.0 ± 19.8 versus 103.2 ± 3.9 mm Hg at 2 h). In addition, oxygen did not improve neuromuscular abnormalities, cardiac output, or respiratory distress associated with chlorine exposure. Massive chlorine inhalation causes severe acute respiratory failure and multiorgan damage. Oxygen administration can improve short-term survival but appears to worsen respiratory failure, with no improvement in cardiac output or neuromuscular dysfunction. Oxygen should be used with caution after massive chlorine inhalation, and the need for early assisted ventilation should be assessed in victims.

  13. Classification of capped tubular viral particles in the family of Papovaviridae

    OpenAIRE

    Keef, T.; Taormina, A.; Twarock, R.

    2005-01-01

    A vital constituent of a virus is its protein shell, called the viral capsid, that encapsulates and hence provides protection for the viral genome. Viral capsids are usually spherical, and for a significant number of viruses they exhibit overall icosahedral symmetry. The corresponding surface lattices, that encode the locations of the capsid proteins and intersubunit bonds, can be modelled by viral tiling theory. It has been shown in vitro that under a variation of the experimental boundary c...

  14. Plasma Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin and Predicting Clinically Relevant Worsening Renal Function in Acute Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damman, Kevin; Valente, Mattia A E; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J; Cleland, John G F; O'Connor, Christopher M; Metra, Marco; Ponikowski, Piotr; Cotter, Gad; Davison, Beth; Givertz, Michael M; Bloomfield, Daniel M; Hillege, Hans L; Voors, Adriaan A

    2017-07-08

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of Neutrophil Gelatinase-Associated Lipocalin (NGAL) to predict clinically relevant worsening renal function (WRF) in acute heart failure (AHF). Plasma NGAL and serum creatinine changes during the first 4 days of admission were investigated in 1447 patients hospitalized for AHF and enrolled in the Placebo-Controlled Randomized Study of the Selective A₁Adenosine Receptor Antagonist Rolofylline for Patients Hospitalized with Acute Decompensated Heart Failure and Volume Overload to Assess Treatment Effect on Congestion and Renal Function (PROTECT) study. WRF was defined as serum creatinine rise ≥ 0.3 mg/dL through day 4. Biomarker patterns were described using linear mixed models. WRF developed in 325 patients (22%). Plasma NGAL did not rise earlier than creatinine in patients with WRF. After multivariable adjustment, baseline plasma NGAL, but not creatinine, predicted WRF. AUCs for WRF prediction were modest (renal or cardiovascular rehospitalization by 60 days than patients with WRF and a low baseline plasma NGAL (p for interaction = 0.024). A rise in plasma NGAL after baseline was associated with a worse outcome in patients with WRF, but not in patients without WRF ( p = 0.007). On the basis of these results, plasma NGAL does not provide additional, clinically relevant information about the occurrence of WRF in patients with AHF.

  15. Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... DrugFacts » Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis) Drug Use and Viral Infections (HIV, Hepatitis) Email Facebook Twitter Revised April 2018 What's the relationship between drug use and viral infections? People who engage in ...

  16. Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis - United States, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Programs Resource Center Anonymous Feedback Viral Hepatitis Surveillance for Viral Hepatitis – United States, 2014 Recommend on ... demographic characteristics and laboratory tests – Enhanced Viral Hepatitis Surveillance Sites*, 2014 Category MA No. % MI No. % NYS† ...

  17. Viral triggers of multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakalacheva, Kristina; Münz, Christian; Lünemann, Jan D

    2011-02-01

    Genetic and environmental factors jointly determine the susceptibility to develop Multiple Sclerosis (MS). Collaborative efforts during the past years achieved substantial progress in defining the genetic architecture, underlying susceptibility to MS. Similar to other autoimmune diseases, HLA-DR and HLA-DQ alleles within the HLA class II region on chromosome 6p21 are the highest-risk-conferring genes. Less-robust susceptibility effects have been identified for MHC class I alleles and for non-MHC regions. The role of environmental risk factors and their interaction with genetic susceptibility alleles are much less well defined, despite the fact that infections have long been associated with MS development. Current data suggest that infectious triggers are most likely ubiquitous, i.e., highly prevalent in the general population, and that they require a permissive genetic trait which predisposes for MS development. In this review article, we illustrate mechanisms of infection-induced immunopathologies in experimental animal models of autoimmune CNS inflammation, discuss challenges for the translation of these experimental data into human immunology research, and provide future perspectives on how novel model systems could be utilized to better define the role of viral pathogens in MS. 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Woodchuck hepatitis virus core gene deletions and proliferative responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells stimulated by an immunodominant epitope: a viral immune escape in the woodchuck model of chronic hepatitis B?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taffon, Stefania; Kondili, Loreta A; Giuseppetti, Roberto; Ciccaglione, Anna Rita; Pulimanti, Barbara; Attili, Adolfo F; Rapicetta, Maria; D'Ugo, Emilio

    2015-04-01

    Marmota monax and its natural infection by woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) could be used as a predictive model for evaluating mechanisms of viral persistence during chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of viral variants in the core gene of chronically WHV-infected woodchucks that showed two different patterns of peripheral blood mononuclear cells' (PBMCs') responses after stimulation with a specific WHV core peptide. Sequences' analysis of the WHV core region from eight WHV chronically infected woodchucks have been performed after in vitro stimulation with an immunodominant epitope of the WHV core protein (amino acids [aa] 96-110). Following this stimulation, positive PBMC responses at each point of follow-up were observed for four animals (group A), and weak immune responses at one or a few points of follow-up were observed for the remaining four animals (group B). The WHV core gene sequences contained amino acid deletions (aa 84-126, aa 84-113) in three of four group A animals and in none of group B animals. In the group A animals, the same deletions were observed in liver specimens and in two of four tumor specimens. Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) was diagnosed in all group A animals and in one group B animal. In conclusion, internal deletions in the core region correlated with a sustained PBMC response to the immunogenic peptide (96-110) of the core protein. A possible role of this relationship in hepatocarcinogenesis could be hypothesized; however, this needs to be investigated in patients with chronic HBV infection. The evaluation of virus-specific T-cell responses and T-cell epitopes that are possibly related to the mechanisms of viral evasion should be further investigated in order to design combined antiviral and immune approaches to control chronic HBV infection.

  19. Encefalitis virales en la infancia

    OpenAIRE

    Monserrat Téllez de Meneses; Miguel T. Vila; Pedro Barbero Aguirre; José F. Montoya

    2013-01-01

    La encefalitis viral es una enfermedad grave que implica el compromiso inflamatorio del parénquima cerebral. Las infecciones virales del SNC ocurren con frecuencia como complicación de infecciones virales sistémicas. Más de 100 virus están implicados como agentes causales, entre los cuales el virus Herpes simplex tipo I, es el agente causal más frecuente de encefalitis no epidémica en todos los grupos poblacionales del mundo; es el responsable de los casos más graves en todas las edades. Much...

  20. Enfermedades virales emergentes y reemergentes

    OpenAIRE

    Jorge Eliécer Ossa Londoño; Ana Isabel Toro Montoya

    1996-01-01

    Los virus no son una excepción al principio de que toda forma de vida de hoyes el producto de la evolución de información gen ética preexistente. Tradicionalmente se ha reconocido que ta expresión clínica de las enfermedades virales cambia con el tiempo; molecularmente se ha demostrado que esos cambios fenotípicos son el producto de variaciones en el genoma viral. La tasa de cambio
    gen ético y fenotípico no es la misma en todos los agentes virales y ello está determinado, principal...

  1. Acute coronary syndrome and acute kidney injury: role of inflammation in worsening renal function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega-Hernández, Jorge; Springall, Rashidi; Sánchez-Muñoz, Fausto; Arana-Martinez, Julio-C; González-Pacheco, Héctor; Bojalil, Rafael

    2017-07-26

    Acute Kidney Injury (AKI), a common complication of acute coronary syndromes (ACS), is associated with higher mortality and longer hospital stays. The role of cytokines and other mediators is unknown in AKI induced by an ACS (ACS-AKI), leading to several unanswered questions. The worsening of renal function is usually seen as a dichotomous phenomenon instead of a dynamic change, so evaluating changes of the renal function in time may provide valuable information in the ACS-AKI setting. The aim of this study was to explore inflammatory factors associated to de novo kidney injury induced by de novo cardiac injury secondary to ACS. One hundred four consecutive patients with ACS were initially included on the time of admission to the Coronary Unit of the Instituto Nacional de Cardiología in Mexico City, from February to May 2016, before any invasive procedure, imaging study, diuretic or anti-platelet therapy. White blood count, hemoglobin, NT-ProBNP, troponin I, C-reactive protein, albumin, glucose, Na + , K + , blood urea nitrogen (BUN), total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, triglycerides, creatinine (Cr), endothelin-1 (ET-1), leukotriene-B4, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-1, resolvin-D1 (RvD1), lipoxin-A4 (LXA4), interleukin-1β, -6, -8, and -10 were measured. We finally enrolled 78 patients, and subsequently we identified 15 patients with ACS-AKI. Correlations were obtained by a Spearman rank test. Low-rank regression, splines regressions, and also protein-protein/chemical interactions and pathways analyses networks were performed. Positive correlations of ΔCr were found with BUN, admission Cr, GRACE score, IL-1β, IL-6, NT-ProBNP and age, and negative correlations with systolic blood pressure, mean-BP, diastolic-BP and LxA4. In the regression analyses IL-10 and RvD1 had positive non-linear associations with ΔCr. ET-1 had also a positive association. Significant non-linear associations were seen with NT-proBNP, admission Cr, BUN

  2. Neuroanatomy goes viral!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassi, Jonathan J.; Cepko, Constance L.; Born, Richard T.; Beier, Kevin T.

    2015-01-01

    The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist’s toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic spread, and

  3. Neuroanatomy goes viral!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan eNassi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The nervous system is complex not simply because of the enormous number of neurons it contains but by virtue of the specificity with which they are connected. Unraveling this specificity is the task of neuroanatomy. In this endeavor, neuroanatomists have traditionally exploited an impressive array of tools ranging from the Golgi method to electron microscopy. An ideal method for studying anatomy would label neurons that are interconnected, and, in addition, allow expression of foreign genes in these neurons. Fortuitously, nature has already partially developed such a method in the form of neurotropic viruses, which have evolved to deliver their genetic material between synaptically connected neurons while largely eluding glia and the immune system. While these characteristics make some of these viruses a threat to human health, simple modifications allow them to be used in controlled experimental settings, thus enabling neuroanatomists to trace multi-synaptic connections within and across brain regions. Wild-type neurotropic viruses, such as rabies and alpha-herpes virus, have already contributed greatly to our understanding of brain connectivity, and modern molecular techniques have enabled the construction of recombinant forms of these and other viruses. These newly engineered reagents are particularly useful, as they can target genetically defined populations of neurons, spread only one synapse to either inputs or outputs, and carry instructions by which the targeted neurons can be made to express exogenous proteins, such as calcium sensors or light-sensitive ion channels, that can be used to study neuronal function. In this review, we address these uniquely powerful features of the viruses already in the neuroanatomist's toolbox, as well as the aspects of their biology that currently limit their utility. Based on the latter, we consider strategies for improving viral tracing methods by reducing toxicity, improving control of transsynaptic

  4. Measures of hip morphology are related to development of worsening radiographic hip osteoarthritis over 6 to 13 year follow-up: the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, A E; Stiller, J L; Shi, X A; Leyland, K M; Renner, J B; Schwartz, T A; Arden, N K; Jordan, J M

    2016-03-01

    We sought to describe the effect of alterations in hip morphology with respect to worsening hip OA in a community-based sample including African American (AA) and white men and women. This nested case-control study defined case hips as Kellgren Lawrence grade (KLG) Oxford, UK). Descriptive means and standard errors were obtained from generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. Sex-stratified GEE regression models (accounting for within-person correlation), adjusted for age, race, BMI, and side were then employed. A total of 120 individuals (239 hips; 71 case/168 control) were included (25% male, 26% AA, mean age 62 years, BMI 30 kg/m(2)). Case hips tended to have greater baseline AP alpha angles, smaller minimum joint space width (mJSW) and more frequent triangular index signs. Adjusted results among men revealed that higher AP alpha angle, Gosvig ratio, and acetabular index were positively associated with case hips; coxa profunda was negatively associated. Among women, greater AP alpha angle, smaller mJSW, protrusio acetabuli, and triangular index sign were associated with case hips. We confirmed an increased risk of worsening hip OA due to baseline features of cam deformity among men and women, as well as protrusio acetabuli among women, and provide the first estimates of these measures in AAs. Copyright © 2015 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cytokine determinants of viral tropism

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFadden, Grant; Mohamed, Mohamed R.; Rahman, Masmudur M.; Bartee, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The specificity of a given virus for a ceil type, tissue or species — collectively known as viral tropism — is an important factor in determining the outcome of viral infection in any particular host. Owing to the increased prevalence of zoonotic infections and the threat of emerging and re-emerging pathogens, gaining a better understanding of the factors that determine viral tropism has become particularly important. In this Review, we summarize our current understanding of the central role of antiviral and pro-inflammatory cytokines, particularly the interferons and tumour necrosis factor, in dictating viral tropism and how these cytokine pathways can be exploited therapeutically for cancer treatment and to better counter future threats from emerging zoonotic pathogens. PMID:19696766

  6. Viral Evolution Core | FNLCR Staging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandon F. Keele, Ph.D. PI/Senior Principal Investigator, Retroviral Evolution Section Head, Viral Evolution Core Leidos Biomedical Research, Inc. Frederick National Laboratory for Cancer Research Frederick, MD 21702-1201 Tel: 301-846-173

  7. Worsening heart failure in 'real-world' clinical practice: predictors and prognostic impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AlFaleh, Hussam; Elasfar, Abdelfatah A; Ullah, Anhar; AlHabib, Khalid F; Hersi, Ahmad; Mimish, Layth; Almasood, Ali; Al Ghamdi, Saleh; Ghabashi, Abdullah; Malik, Asif; Hussein, Gamal A; Al-Murayeh, Mushabab; Abuosa, Ahmed; Al Habeeb, Waleed; Kashour, Tarek

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the clinical features, predictors, and clinical outcomes of patients hospitalized with acute heart failure (AHF), with and without worsening heart failure (WHF). We used data from a multicentre prospective registry of AHF patients created in Saudi Arabia. WHF was defined as recurrence of heart failure symptoms or signs-with or without cardiogenic shock. In-hospital short- and long-term outcomes, as well as predictors of WHF are described. Of the 2609 AHF patients enrolled, 33.8% developed WHF. WHF patients were more likely to have a history of heart failure and ischaemic heart disease. Use of intravenous vasodilators, inotropic agents, furosemide infusions, and discharge beta-blockers was significantly higher in WHF patients, while use of discharge ACE inhibitors was higher in patients without WHF. Length of hospital stay was significantly longer for WHF patients than for those without WHF [median (interquartile range) 13 (14) vs. 7 (7) days, P world clinical practice, WHF during hospitalization for AHF is a strong predictor for short- and intermediate-term mortality, and a cause for longer hospital stays. © 2016 The Authors. European Journal of Heart Failure © 2016 European Society of Cardiology.

  8. Hypoxia Worsens Affective Responses and Feeling of Fatigue During Prolonged Bed Rest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nektarios A. M. Stavrou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Previous research, although limited, suggests that both hypoxia and bed rest influence psychological responses by exaggerating negative psychological responses and attenuating positive emotions. The present study investigated the effect of a 21-day prolonged exposure to normobaric hypoxia and bed rest on affective responses and fatigue. Eleven healthy participants underwent three 21-day interventions using a cross-over design: (1 normobaric hypoxic ambulatory confinement (HAMB, (2 normobaric hypoxic bed rest (HBR and (3 normoxic bed rest (NBR. Affective and fatigue responses were investigated using the Activation Deactivation Adjective Check List, and the Multidimensional Fatigue Inventory, which were completed before (Pre, during (Day 7, Day 14, and Day 21 and after (Post the interventions. The most negative psychological profile appeared during the HBR intervention. Specifically, tiredness, tension, general and physical fatigue significantly increased on days 7, 14, and 21, as well as at Post. After the HBR intervention, general and physical fatigue remained higher compared to Pre values. Additionally, a deterioration of psychological responses was also noted following HAMB and NBR. In particular, both hypoxia and BR per se induced subjective fatigue and negative affective responses. BR seems to exert a moderate negative effect on the sensation of fatigue, whereas exercise attenuates the negative effects of hypoxia as noted during the HAMB condition. In conclusion, our data suggest that the addition of hypoxia to bed rest-induced inactivity significantly worsens affective responses and feeling of fatigue.

  9. Microbiological diagnostics of viral hepatitis

    OpenAIRE

    HASDEMİR, Ufuk

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is an infection that primarily affects the liverbut may also have systemic clinical manifestations. The vastmajority of viral hepatitis are caused by one of five hepatotropicviruses: hepatitis A virus (HAV), hepatitis B virus (HBV),hepatitis C virus (HCV), hepatitis D (delta) virus (HDV), andhepatitis E virus (HEV) (Table I) [1]. HBV, HCV, and HDValso cause chronic hepatitis, whereas HAV does not. HEVcauses acute hepatitis in normal hosts but can cause protractedand chronic he...

  10. Treatment of Acute Viral Bronchiolitis

    OpenAIRE

    Eber, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis represents the most common lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Respiratory syncytial virus is the most frequently identified virus, but many other viruses may also cause acute bronchiolitis. There is no common definition of acute viral bronchiolitis used internationally, and this may explain part of the confusion in the literature. Most children with bronchiolitis have a self limi...

  11. The Architecture of Viral Capsids Based on Tiling Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Twarock, R.

    2005-01-01

    A vital constituent of a virus is its protein shell, called the viral capsid, that encapsulates and hence protects the viral genome. The surface structures of a large number of icosahedral viruses can be modelled via Caspar-Klug Theory, which has hence become one of the fundamental concepts in virology. However, growing experimental evidence have shown that a significant fraction of viruses falls out of the remit of this theory. Among them are the Papovaviridae, which are of particular intere...

  12. Mechanism of RNA Translocation by a Viral Packaging Motor

    OpenAIRE

    Lisal, Jiri

    2006-01-01

    Molecular motors are proteins that convert chemical energy into mechanical work. The viral packaging ATPase P4 is a hexameric molecular motor that translocates RNA into preformed viral capsids. P4 belongs to the ubiquitous class of hexameric helicases. Although its structure is known, the mechanism of RNA translocation remains elusive. Here we present a detailed kinetic study of nucleotide binding, hydrolysis, and product release by P4. We propose a stochastic-sequential cooperative model to ...

  13. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral Transmission In Vivo

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arias Esteban, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa

    2016-01-01

    viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase...... and that maintaining diversity is important for the establishment of infection. This work supports the hypothesis that the reduced polymerase fidelity of the pandemic GII.4 human norovirus isolates may contribute to their global dominance....

  14. New Proof-of-Concept in Viral Inactivation: Virucidal Efficacy of 405 nm Light Against Feline Calicivirus as a Model for Norovirus Decontamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomb, Rachael M; Maclean, Michelle; Coia, John E; Graham, Elizabeth; McDonald, Michael; Atreya, Chintamani D; MacGregor, Scott J; Anderson, John G

    2017-06-01

    The requirement for novel decontamination technologies for use in hospitals is ever present. One such system uses 405 nm visible light to inactivate microorganisms via ROS-generated oxidative damage. Although effective for bacterial and fungal inactivation, little is known about the virucidal effects of 405 nm light. Norovirus (NoV) gastroenteritis outbreaks often occur in the clinical setting, and this study was designed to investigate potential inactivation effects of 405 nm light on the NoV surrogate, feline calicivirus (FCV). FCV was exposed to 405 nm light whilst suspended in minimal and organically-rich media to establish the virucidal efficacy and the effect biologically-relevant material may play in viral susceptibility. Antiviral activity was successfully demonstrated with a 4 Log 10 (99.99%) reduction in infectivity when suspended in minimal media evident after a dose of 2.8 kJ cm -2 . FCV exposed in artificial faeces, artificial saliva, blood plasma and other organically rich media exhibited an equivalent level of inactivation using between 50-85% less dose of the light, indicating enhanced inactivation when the virus is present in organically-rich biologically-relevant media. Further research in this area could aid in the development of 405 nm light technology for effective NoV decontamination within the hospital environment.

  15. Targeting Phosphatidylinositol 4-Kinase IIIα for Radiosensitization: A Potential Model of Drug Repositioning Using an Anti-Hepatitis C Viral Agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Jeanny [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Dan Hyo; Park, Ji Min [Medical Science Research Institute, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Hee [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Yeo Hyun [Medical Science Research Institute, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Wu, Hong-Gyun [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Kyung Hwan [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Ah, E-mail: inah228@snu.ac.kr [Department of Radiation Oncology, Graduate School of Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Medical Science Research Institute, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seongnam (Korea, Republic of); Institute of Radiation Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cancer Research Institute, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-15

    Purpose: To investigate which isotype of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI4K) may affect radiosensitivity and examine whether anti–hepatitis C viral (HCV) agents, some of which have been shown to inhibit PI4K IIIα activity, could be repositioned as a radiosensitizer in human cancer cells. Methods and Materials: U251, BT474, and HepG2 cell lines and normal human astrocyte were used. Ribonucleic acid interference, clonogenic assays, Western blotting, immunofluorescence, annexin V assay, lysotracker staining, and β-galactosidase assay were performed. Results: Of the 4 PI4K isotypes, specific inhibition of IIIα increased radiosensitivity. For pharmacologic inhibition of PI4K IIIα, we screened 9 anti-HCV agents by half-maximal inhibitory concentration assay. Simeprevir was selected, and its inhibition of PI4K IIIα activity was confirmed. Combination of simeprevir treatment and radiation significantly attenuated expression of phospho-phospho-PKC and phospho-Akt and increased radiation-induced cell death in tested cell lines. Pretreatment with simeprevir prolonged γH2AX foci formation and down-regulation of phospho-DNA-PKcs, indicating impairment of nonhomologous end-joining repair. Cells pretreated with simeprevir exhibited mixed modes of cell death, including apoptosis and autophagy. Conclusion: These data demonstrate that targeting PI4K IIIα using an anti-HCV agent is a viable approach to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of radiation therapy in various human cancers, such as glioma, breast, and hepatocellular carcinoma.

  16. Medial posterior meniscal root tears are associated with development or worsening of medial tibiofemoral cartilage damage: the multicenter osteoarthritis study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guermazi, Ali; Hayashi, Daichi; Jarraya, Mohamed; Roemer, Frank W; Zhang, Yuqing; Niu, Jingbo; Crema, Michel D; Englund, Martin; Lynch, John A; Nevitt, Michael C; Torner, James C; Lewis, Cora E; Felson, David T

    2013-09-01

    To assess the association of meniscal root tear with the development or worsening of tibiofemoral cartilage damage. Institutional review board approval and written informed consent from all subjects were obtained. A total of 596 knees with radiographically depicted osteoarthritis were randomly selected from the Multicenter Osteoarthritis study cohort. Cartilage damage was semiquantitatively assessed by using the Whole-Organ Magnetic Resonance Imaging Score (WORMS) system (grades 0-6). Subjects were separated into three groups: root tear only, meniscal tear without root tear, and neither meniscal nor root tear. A log-binomial regression model was used to calculate the relative risks for knees to develop incident or progressing cartilage damage in the root tear group and the meniscal tear group, with the no tear group serving as a reference. In the medial tibiofemoral joint, there were 37 knees with isolated medial posterior root tear, 294 with meniscal tear without root tear, and 264 without meniscal or root tear. There were only two lateral posterior root tears, and no anterior root tears were found. Thus, the focus was on the medial posterior root tear. The frequency of severe cartilage damage (WORMS ≥ 5) was higher in the group with root tear than in the group without root or meniscal tear (76.7% vs 19.7%, P meniscal but no root tear (76.7% vs 65.2%, P = .055). Longitudinal analyses included 33 knees with isolated medial posterior root tear, 270 with meniscal tear, and 245 with no tear. Adjusted relative risk of cartilage loss was 2.03 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.18, 3.48) for the root tear group and 1.84 (95% CI: 1.32, 2.58) for the meniscal tear group. Isolated medial posterior meniscal root tear is associated with incident and progressive medial tibiofemoral cartilage loss.

  17. Have health trends worsened in Greece as a result of the financial crisis? A quasi-experimental approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandoros, Sotiris; Hessel, Philipp; Leone, Tiziana; Avendano, Mauricio

    2013-10-01

    Health in Greece deteriorated after the recent financial crisis, but whether this decline was caused by the recent financial crisis has not been established. This article uses a quasi-experimental approach to examine the impact of the recent financial crisis on health in Greece. Data came from the European Union Statistics on Income and Living Conditions survey for the years 2006-09. We applied a difference-in-differences approach that compares health trends before and after the financial crisis in Greece with trends in a control population (Poland) that did not experience a recession and had health trends comparable with Greece before the crisis. We used logistic regression to model the impact of the financial crisis on poor self-rated health, controlling for demographic confounders. Results provide strong evidence of a statistically significant negative effect of the financial crisis on health trends. Relative to the control population, Greece experienced a significantly larger increase in the odds of reporting poor health after the crisis (odds ratio, 1.16; 95% confidence interval, 1.04-1.29). There was no difference in health trends between Poland and Greece before the financial crisis, supporting a causal interpretation of health declines in Greece as a result of the financial crisis. Results provide evidence that trends in self-rated health in Greece worsened as a result of the recent financial crisis. Findings stress the need for urgent health policy responses to the recent economic collapse in Greece as the full impact of austerity measures unfolds in the coming years.

  18. Partial meniscectomy is associated with increased risk of incident radiographic osteoarthritis and worsening cartilage damage in the following year

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roemer, Frank W. [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, Department of Radiology, Erlangen (Germany); Kwoh, C.K. [University of Arizona Arthritis Center and University of Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson, AZ (United States); Hannon, Michael J.; Grago, Jason [University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Division of Rheumatology and Clinical Immunology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Hunter, David J. [University of Sydney, Department of Rheumatology, Royal North Shore Hospital and Kolling Institute, St Leonards (Australia); Eckstein, Felix [Paracelsus Medical University, Institute of Anatomy, Salzburg (Austria); Boudreau, Robert M. [University of Pittsburgh Graduate School of Public Health, Department of Epidemiology, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Englund, Martin [Lund University, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Orthopaedics, Department of Clinical Sciences Lund, Lund (Sweden); Guermazi, Ali [Boston University School of Medicine, Quantitative Imaging Center, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    To assess whether partial meniscectomy is associated with increased risk of radiographic osteoarthritis (ROA) and worsening cartilage damage in the following year. We studied 355 knees from the Osteoarthritis Initiative that developed ROA (Kellgren-Lawrence grade ≥ 2), which were matched with control knees. The MR images were assessed using the semi-quantitative MOAKS system. Conditional logistic regression was applied to estimate risk of incident ROA. Logistic regression was used to assess the risk of worsening cartilage damage in knees with partial meniscectomy that developed ROA. In the group with incident ROA, 4.4 % underwent partial meniscectomy during the year prior to the case-defining visit, compared with none of the knees that did not develop ROA. All (n = 31) knees that had partial meniscectomy and 58.9 % (n = 165) of the knees with prevalent meniscal damage developed ROA (OR = 2.51, 95 % CI [1.73, 3.64]). In knees that developed ROA, partial meniscectomy was associated with an increased risk of worsening cartilage damage (OR = 4.51, 95 % CI [1.53, 13.33]). The probability of having had partial meniscectomy was higher in knees that developed ROA. When looking only at knees that developed ROA, partial meniscectomy was associated with greater risk of worsening cartilage damage. (orig.)

  19. Ophthalmic and clinical factors that predict four-year development and worsening of diabetic retinopathy in type 1 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Sangeetha; Dehghani, Cirous; Pritchard, Nicola; Edwards, Katie; Russell, Anthony W; Malik, Rayaz A; Efron, Nathan

    2018-01-01

    To investigate the role of ophthalmic imaging markers - namely retinal thickness measures and corneal nerve morphology - in predicting four-year development and worsening of diabetic retinopathy (DR) in type 1 diabetes (T1DM). 126 eyes of 126 participants with T1DM were examined at baseline and after four years. Diabetic retinopathy (DR) was graded using the Early Treatment Diabetic Retinopathy Study scale. HbA 1c , nephropathy, neuropathy, cardiovascular factors, and retinal thickness using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and corneal nerve fiber length (CNFL) using corneal confocal microscopy at baseline were assessed by univariate and step-wise multiple logistic regression, and their diagnostic capabilities for single and combined measures. Four-year development of DR was 19% (13 of 68 without DR at baseline). Worsening of DR was seen in 43% (25 of 58 with DR at baseline). When adjusted for potential confounders, a lower CNFL (AUC=0.637, p=0.040, 64% sensitivity and 64% specificity at 14.9mm/mm 2 cut-off), higher triglycerides (AUC=0.669, p=0.012, 64% sensitivity, 62% specificity at 0.85mmol/L) and an elevated vibration threshold (AUC=0.708, p=0.002, 96% sensitivity, 40% specificity at 3.55Hz) were significant predictors for four-year worsening of DR. Reduced CNFL, elevated vibration perception threshold and higher triglycerides can predict future worsening of DR. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. IVIG Versus PLEX in the Treatment of Worsening Myasthenia Gravis: What is the Evidence?: A Critically Appraised Topic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Priya S; Goodman, Brent P; Harper, Charles M; Bosch, Peter E; Hoffman-Snyder, Charlene R; Wellik, Kay E; Wingerchuk, Dean M; Demaerschalk, Bart M

    2015-05-01

    Immune therapies such as intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) and plasma exchange (PLEX) are first line in the treatment of worsening myasthenia gravis. Although PLEX is favored in myasthenic crisis, IVIG is increasingly used in exacerbations due to cost and ease of administration. To review and critically assess current evidence on the effects of IVIG and PLEX on functional outcomes in patients with worsening myasthenia gravis. A structured critical appraisal was conducted on the objective topic. This included a creation of a structured question based on a clinical scenario, comprehensive literature search, selection of evidence for review, and critical appraisal of selected evidence. Evidence was summarized and commentary provided. Participants included consultant and resident neurologists, a medical librarian, clinical epidemiologists, and content experts in the field of neuromuscular neurology. A single-blinded, randomized-controlled trial that compared IVIG and PLEX in 84 patients with worsening myasthenia gravis was selected for review. Primary outcome measure was functional status at 14 days after treatment, as assessed by the Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score. Change in Quantitative Myasthenia Gravis Score at day 14 for all subjects was 4.0, without statistically significant differences between IVIG and PLEX groups. IVIG and PLEX are equally effective in worsening myasthenia gravis. Treatment decisions may depend on several variables, including presence of respiratory distress, medical comorbidities, access to medication, and cost. PLEX will likely remain the treatment of choice in true myasthenic crisis.

  1. Predicting fibrosis worsening in obese patients with NASH through parenchymal fibronectin, HOMA-IR, and hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorrentino, Paolo; Terracciano, Luigi; D'Angelo, Salvatore; Ferbo, Umberto; Bracigliano, Alessandra; Vecchione, Raffaela

    2010-02-01

    Few published studies have examined the results obtained from repeat liver biopsies in obese patients with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). The progressive form of this disease may be largely limited to a subgroup of NAFLD patients with nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). The presence of intralobular fibronectin (Fn) and other variables was investigated in relation to subsequent fibrosis progression. In this prospective study, 271 obese patients admitted to the hospital with NAFLD and abnormal liver enzymes were scheduled to undergo a repeat liver biopsy at least 5 years after the initial biopsy. After excluding cirrhotic patients, basal biopsy specimens obtained from patients who underwent a second liver biopsy were stained with antibodies against Fn. The progression of fibrosis in the follow-up sample was correlated with the amount of Fn and other clinicopathological variables. We obtained a second liver biopsy from 149 patients after a median time of 6.4 years. Of these, 132 showed suitable Fn staining for semi-quantitative assessments. In all, 44 out of 83 patients (53%) with basal NASH showed fibrosis progression by at least one stage in the second liver biopsy. The amount of Fn (odds ratio=14.1; PHOMA-IR) scores (>8, odds ratio=1.9; P=0.004) were independent predictive factors of worsening fibrosis. A semi-quantitative assessment of the amount of parenchymal Fn present at an early stage in obese patients with NASH is valuable for predicting the progression of fibrosis. Similarly, lobular Fn deposition may be a sensitive and early indicator of active fibrogenetic processes in the liver. Hypertension and higher HOMA-IR scores are other clinical independent risk factors that predict the progression of fibrosis.

  2. Liver Perilipin 5 Expression Worsens Hepatosteatosis But Not Insulin Resistance in High Fat-Fed Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevino, Michelle B.; Mazur-Hart, David; Machida, Yui; King, Timothy; Nadler, Joseph; Galkina, Elena V.; Poddar, Arjun; Dutta, Sucharita

    2015-01-01

    Perilipin 5 (PLIN5) is a lipid droplet (LD) protein highly expressed in oxidative tissues, including the fasted liver. However, its expression also increases in nonalcoholic fatty liver. To determine whether PLIN5 regulates metabolic phenotypes of hepatosteatosis under nutritional excess, liver targeted overexpression of PLIN5 was achieved using adenoviral vector (Ad-PLIN5) in male C57BL/6J mice fed high-fat diet. Mice treated with adenovirus expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) (Ad-GFP) served as control. Ad-PLIN5 livers increased LD in the liver section, and liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry revealed increases in lipid classes associated with LD, including triacylglycerol, cholesterol ester, and phospholipid classes, compared with Ad-GFP liver. Lipids commonly associated with hepatic lipotoxicity, diacylglycerol, and ceramides, were also increased in Ad-PLIN5 liver. The expression of genes in lipid metabolism regulated by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-α was reduced suggestive of slower mobilization of stored lipids in Ad-PLIN5 mice. However, the increase of hepatosteatosis by PLIN5 overexpression did not worsen glucose homeostasis. Rather, serum insulin levels were decreased, indicating better insulin sensitivity in Ad-PLIN5 mice. Moreover, genes associated with liver injury were unaltered in Ad-PLIN5 steatotic liver compared with Ad-GFP control. Phosphorylation of protein kinase B was increased in Ad-PLIN5-transduced AML12 hepatocyte despite of the promotion of fatty acid incorporation to triacylglycerol as well. Collectively, our data indicates that the increase in liver PLIN5 during hepatosteatosis drives further lipid accumulation but does not adversely affect hepatic health or insulin sensitivity. PMID:26296152

  3. Lung-specific loss of α3 laminin worsens bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Nebreda, Luisa I; Rogel, Micah R; Eisenberg, Jessica L; Hamill, Kevin J; Soberanes, Saul; Nigdelioglu, Recep; Chi, Monica; Cho, Takugo; Radigan, Kathryn A; Ridge, Karen M; Misharin, Alexander V; Woychek, Alex; Hopkinson, Susan; Perlman, Harris; Mutlu, Gokhan M; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moises; Jones, Jonathan C R; Budinger, G R Scott

    2015-04-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric proteins that are secreted by the alveolar epithelium into the basement membrane, and their expression is altered in extracellular matrices from patients with pulmonary fibrosis. In a small number of patients with pulmonary fibrosis, we found that the normal basement membrane distribution of the α3 laminin subunit was lost in fibrotic regions of the lung. To determine if these changes play a causal role in the development of fibrosis, we generated mice lacking the α3 laminin subunit specifically in the lung epithelium by crossing mice expressing Cre recombinase driven by the surfactant protein C promoter (SPC-Cre) with mice expressing floxed alleles encoding the α3 laminin gene (Lama3(fl/fl)). These mice exhibited no developmental abnormalities in the lungs up to 6 months of age, but, compared with control mice, had worsened mortality, increased inflammation, and increased fibrosis after the intratracheal administration of bleomycin. Similarly, the severity of fibrosis induced by an adenovirus encoding an active form of transforming growth factor-β was worse in mice deficient in α3 laminin in the lung. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss of α3 laminin in the lung epithelium does not affect lung development, but plays a causal role in the development of fibrosis in response to bleomycin or adenovirally delivered transforming growth factor-β. Thus, we speculate that the loss of the normal basement membrane organization of α3 laminin that we observe in fibrotic regions from the lungs of patients with pulmonary fibrosis contributes to their disease progression.

  4. Trans-oral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy does not worsen the speech after cleft palate repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Aziz, Mosaad; Khalifa, Badawy; Shawky, Ahmed; Rashed, Mohammed; Naguib, Nader; Abdel-Hameed, Asmaa

    2016-01-01

    Adenoid hypertrophy may play a role in velopharyngeal closure especially in patients with palatal abnormality; adenoidectomy may lead to velopharyngeal insufficiency and hyper nasal speech. Patients with cleft palate even after repair should not undergo adenoidectomy unless absolutely needed, and in such situations, conservative or partial adenoidectomy is performed to avoid the occurrence of velopharyngeal insufficiency. Trans-oral endoscopic adenoidectomy enables the surgeon to inspect the velopharyngeal valve during the procedure. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy on the speech of children with repaired cleft palate. Twenty children with repaired cleft palate underwent transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy to relieve their airway obstruction. The procedure was completely visualized with the use of a 70° 4mm nasal endoscope; the upper part of the adenoid was removed using adenoid curette and St. Claire Thompson forceps, while the lower part was retained to maintain the velopharyngeal competence. Preoperative and postoperative evaluation of speech was performed, subjectively by auditory perceptual assessment, and objectively by nasometric assessment. Speech was not adversely affected after surgery. The difference between preoperative and postoperative auditory perceptual assessment and nasalance scores for nasal and oral sentences was insignificant (p=0.231, 0.442, 0.118 respectively). Transoral endoscopic partial adenoidectomy is a safe method; it does not worsen the speech of repaired cleft palate patients. It enables the surgeon to strictly inspect the velopharyngeal valve during the procedure with better determination of the adenoidal part that may contribute in velopharyngeal closure. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  5. Worsening calcification propensity precedes all-cause and cardiovascular mortality in haemodialyzed patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Georg; Steubl, Dominik; Kemmner, Stephan; Pasch, Andreas; Koch-Sembdner, Wilhelm; Pham, Dang; Haller, Bernhard; Bachmann, Quirin; Mayer, Christopher C; Wassertheurer, Siegfried; Angermann, Susanne; Lech, Maciej; Moog, Philipp; Bauer, Axel; Heemann, Uwe; Schmaderer, Christoph

    2017-10-17

    A novel in-vitro test (T 50 -test) assesses ex-vivo serum calcification propensity which predicts mortality in HD patients. The association of longitudinal changes of T 50 with all-cause and cardiovascular mortality has not been investigated. We assessed T 50 in paired sera collected at baseline and at 24 months in 188 prevalent European HD patients from the ISAR cohort, most of whom were Caucasians. Patients were followed for another 19 [interquartile range: 11-37] months. Serum T 50 exhibited a significant decline between baseline and 24 months (246 ± 64 to 190 ± 68 minutes; p < 0.001). With serum Δ-phosphate showing the strongest independent association with declining T 50 (r = -0.39; p < 0.001) in multivariable linear regression. The rate of decline of T 50 over 24 months was a significant predictor of all-cause (HR = 1.51 per 1SD decline, 95% CI: 1.04 to 2.2; p = 0.03) and cardiovascular mortality (HR = 2.15; 95% CI: 1.15 to 3.97; p = 0.02) in Kaplan Meier and multivariable Cox-regression analysis, while cross-sectional T 50 at inclusion and 24 months were not. Worsening serum calcification propensity was an independent predictor of mortality in this small cohort of prevalent HD patients. Prospective larger scaled studies are needed to assess the value of calcification propensity as a longitudinal parameter for risk stratification and monitoring of therapeutic interventions.

  6. Smoking and worsening disability in multiple sclerosis: A meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heydarpour, P; Manouchehrinia, A; Beiki, O; Mousavi, S E; Abdolalizadeh, A; -Lakeh, M Moradi; Sahraian, M A

    2018-03-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic demyelinating disorder affecting young adults. Environmental factors and lifestyle behaviors are pivotal in MS pathophysiology. Smoking has been considered as an important risk factor in MS. Various recent studies have been conducted to measure the role of smoking on worsening disability in patients with MS, thus we intended to systematically assess effect of smoking on evolution of disability in this study. We queried MEDLINE, EMBASE and Cochrane Library with following keywords "Multiple Sclerosis, Smoking, Tobacco Use, Disability" on December 1st 2016. Original articles were included when smoking history was mentioned, disability was measured via expanded disability status scale (EDSS) or multiple sclerosis severity score (MSSS). Studies with insufficient outcome data, non-human, or in other languages than English were excluded. Through literature review after duplicate removals, 268 articles were retrieved. A total of 56 articles were screened and 15 articles were assessed for eligibility, finally, eleven articles were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. Ever smoking was significantly associated with increased EDSS (standardized mean difference (SMD) = 0.15, 95% CI = 0.01-0.28), but had no significant association with risk of reaching EDSS 4 (HR = 1.24, 95% CI = 0.89-1.72) or EDSS 6 (HR = 1.17, 95% CI = 0.88-1.57). Smoking had no effect on MSSS (SMD = 0.14, 95% CI = -0.04-0.32) or T2 lesion volume (SMD = 0.07, 95% CI = -0.08-0.22). This meta-analysis showed smoking increased EDSS, insignificant findings were possibly due to the small number of studies, significant differences in methodologies, and variations in reporting of disability outcomes. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Cellular sensing of viral DNA and viral evasion mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orzalli, Megan H; Knipe, David M

    2014-01-01

    Mammalian cells detect foreign DNA introduced as free DNA or as a result of microbial infection, leading to the induction of innate immune responses that block microbial replication and the activation of mechanisms that epigenetically silence the genes encoded by the foreign DNA. A number of DNA sensors localized to a variety of sites within the cell have been identified, and this review focuses on the mechanisms that detect viral DNA and how the resulting responses affect viral infections. Viruses have evolved mechanisms that inhibit these host sensors and signaling pathways, and the study of these antagonistic viral strategies has provided insight into the mechanisms of these host responses. The field of cellular sensing of foreign DNA is in its infancy, but our currently limited knowledge has raised a number of important questions for study.

  8. [Pathology and viral metagenomics, a recent history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardo, Pauline; Albina, Emmanuel; Eloit, Marc; Roumagnac, Philippe

    2013-05-01

    Human, animal and plant viral diseases have greatly benefited from recent metagenomics developments. Viral metagenomics is a culture-independent approach used to investigate the complete viral genetic populations of a sample. During the last decade, metagenomics concepts and techniques that were first used by ecologists progressively spread into the scientific field of viral pathology. The sample, which was first for ecologists a fraction of ecosystem, became for pathologists an organism that hosts millions of microbes and viruses. This new approach, providing without a priori high resolution qualitative and quantitative data on the viral diversity, is now revolutionizing the way pathologists decipher viral diseases. This review describes the very last improvements of the high throughput next generation sequencing methods and discusses the applications of viral metagenomics in viral pathology, including discovery of novel viruses, viral surveillance and diagnostic, large-scale molecular epidemiology, and viral evolution. © 2013 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  9. Motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neuronal circuitry may involve in modulation of nociception: a virally mediated transsynaptic tracing study in spinally transected transgenic mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da-Wei Ye

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that motor cortex stimulation provided pain relief by motor cortex plasticity and activating descending inhibitory pain control systems. Recent evidence indicated that the melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R in the periaqueductal gray played an important role in neuropathic pain. This study was designed to assess whether MC4R signaling existed in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neuronal circuitry modulated the activity of sympathetic pathway by a virally mediated transsynaptic tracing study. Pseudorabies virus (PRV-614 was injected into the left gastrocnemius muscle in adult male MC4R-green fluorescent protein (GFP transgenic mice (n = 15. After a survival time of 4-6 days, the mice (n = 5 were randomly assigned to humanely sacrifice, and spinal cords and brains were removed and sectioned, and processed for PRV-614 visualization. Neurons involved in the efferent control of the left gastrocnemius muscle were identified following visualization of PRV-614 retrograde tracing. The neurochemical phenotype of MC4R-GFP-positive neurons was identified using fluorescence immunocytochemical labeling. PRV-614/MC4R-GFP dual labeled neurons were detected in spinal IML, periaqueductal gray and motor cortex. Our findings support the hypothesis that MC4R signaling in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neural pathway may participate in the modulation of the melanocortin-sympathetic signaling and contribute to the descending modulation of nociceptive transmission, suggesting that MC4R signaling in motor cortex-periaqueductal gray-spinal cord neural pathway may modulate the activity of sympathetic outflow sensitive to nociceptive signals.

  10. Deep brain stimulation may reduce the relative risk of clinically important worsening in early stage Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Mallory L; Tonascia, James; Turchan, Maxim; Currie, Amanda; Heusinkveld, Lauren; Konrad, Peter E; Davis, Thomas L; Neimat, Joseph S; Phibbs, Fenna T; Hedera, Peter; Wang, Lily; Shi, Yaping; Shade, David M; Sternberg, Alice L; Drye, Lea T; Charles, David

    2015-10-01

    The Vanderbilt pilot trial of deep brain stimulation (DBS) in early Parkinson's disease (PD) enrolled patients on medications six months to four years without motor fluctuations or dyskinesias. We conducted a patient-centered analysis based on clinically important worsening of motor symptoms and complications of medical therapy for all subjects and a subset of subjects with a more focused medication duration. Continuous outcomes were also analyzed for this focused cohort. A post hoc analysis was conducted on all subjects from the pilot and a subset of subjects taking PD medications 1-4 years at enrollment. Clinically important worsening is defined as both a ≥ 3 point increase in UPDRS Part III and a ≥ 1 point increase in Part IV. DBS plus optimal drug therapy (DBS + ODT) subjects experienced a 50-80% reduction in the relative risk of worsening after two years. The DBS + ODT group was improved compared to optimal drug therapy (ODT) at each time point on Total UPDRS and Part III (p = 0.04, p = 0.02, respectively, at 24 months). Total UPDRS, Part IV, and PDQ-39 scores significantly worsened in the ODT group after two years (p early PD may reduce the risk of clinically important worsening. These findings further confirm the need to determine if DBS + ODT is superior to medical therapy for managing symptoms, reducing the complications of medications, and improving quality of life. The FDA has approved the conduct of a large-scale, pivotal clinical trial of DBS in early stage PD. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Frequency of worsening liver function in severe dengue hepatitis patients receiving paracetamol: A retrospective analysis of hospital data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Syed, A.A.; Aslam, F.; Hakeem, H.; Siddiqui, F.; Nasir, N.

    2017-01-01

    To determine the frequency of worsening liver function among hospital in-patients with severe dengue hepatitis receiving paracetamol. Methods: This retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Medicine, Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, and comprised records of dengue patients with severe hepatitis who received paracetamol for control of fever between June 2007 and December 2014. Alanine aminotransferase at baseline and following paracetamol administration was noted, as well as dosage and duration of paracetamol, along with participants' demographic details. Frequency of patients who developed worsening or improvement of alanine aminotransferase was also noted. SPSS 19 was used for data analysis. Results: Of the 113 subjects, 73(64.6%) were male and 40(35.4%) were female. Overall improvement was observed in subsequent alanine aminotransferase levels (491 units per litre, IQR 356.5 TO 775 vs 151 units per litre, IQR 49.5 to 299.5). Most commonly prescribed dose of paracetamol was 2g (IQR 1 to 5 grams), which was taken for a median duration of 1 day (IQR 1 to 3 days). Moreover, 100(88.5 %) patients showed improvement in alanine aminotransferase. Only 13(11.5 %) patients developed worsening of alanine aminotransferase. Of those with worsening liver function, 8(61.5 %) were discharged home with no clinical deterioration and 5(38.5 %) deaths were observed. However, causes of deaths were unrelated to liver dysfunction. Conclusion: The frequency of worsening liver function following paracetamol administration in patients with severe dengue hepatitis was relatively low. (author)

  12. Evaluation of the predictive value of a clinical worsening definition using 2-year outcomes in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension: a REVEAL Registry analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Adaani E; Badesch, David B; Miller, Dave P; Benza, Raymond L; Meltzer, Leslie A; McGoon, Michael D

    2013-11-01

    Time to clinical worsening has been proposed as a primary end point in clinical trials of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH); however, neither standardized nor validated definitions of clinical worsening across PAH trials exist. This study aims to evaluate a proposed definition of clinical worsening within a large prospective, observational registry of patients with PAH with respect to its value as a predictor of proximate (within 1 year) risk for subsequent major events (ie, death, transplantation, or atrial septostomy). We assessed overall 2-year survival and survival free from major events to determine the relationship between clinical worsening and major events among adults with hemodynamically defined PAH (N = 3,001). Freedom from clinical worsening was defined as freedom from worsening functional class (FC), a ≥ 15% reduction in 6-min walk distance (6MWD), all-cause hospitalization, or the introduction of parenteral prostacyclin analog therapy. In the 2 years of follow-up, 583 patients died. Four hundred twenty-six died after a documented clinical worsening event, including FC worsening (n = 128), a ≥ 15% reduction in 6MWD (n = 118), all-cause hospitalization (n = 370), or introduction of a prostacyclin analog (n = 91). Patients who experienced clinical worsening had significantly poorer subsequent 1-year survival postworsening than patients who did not worsen (P < .001). Clinical worsening was highly predictive of subsequent proximate mortality in this analysis from an observational study. These results validate the use of clinical worsening as a meaningful prognostic tool in clinical practice and as a primary end point in clinical trial design. ClinicalTrials.gov; No.: NCT00370214; URL: www.clinicaltrials.gov.

  13. Beyond viral suppression of HIV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lazarus, Jeffrey V.; Safreed-Harmon, Kelly; Barton, Simon E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In 2016, the World Health Organization (WHO) adopted a new Global Health Sector Strategy on HIV for 2016-2021. It establishes 15 ambitious targets, including the '90-90-90' target calling on health systems to reduce under-diagnosis of HIV, treat a greater number of those diagnosed......, and ensure that those being treated achieve viral suppression. DISCUSSION: The WHO strategy calls for person-centered chronic care for people living with HIV (PLHIV), implicitly acknowledging that viral suppression is not the ultimate goal of treatment. However, it stops short of providing an explicit target...... for health-related quality of life. It thus fails to take into account the needs of PLHIV who have achieved viral suppression but still must contend with other intense challenges such as serious non-communicable diseases, depression, anxiety, financial stress, and experiences of or apprehension about HIV...

  14. Enfermedades virales emergentes y reemergentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Eliécer Ossa Londoño

    1996-03-01

    Full Text Available Los virus no son una excepción al principio de que toda forma de vida de hoyes el producto de la evolución de información gen ética preexistente. Tradicionalmente se ha reconocido que ta expresión clínica de las enfermedades virales cambia con el tiempo; molecularmente se ha demostrado que esos cambios fenotípicos son el producto de variaciones en el genoma viral. La tasa de cambio
    gen ético y fenotípico no es la misma en todos los agentes virales y ello está determinado, principalmente, por factores intrínsecos del virus, como la naturaleza de su ácido nucleico, y por la longevidad
    y tasa reproductiva del huésped.

  15. Avances recientes en HIV/SIDA: Patogénesis, historia natural y carga viral

    OpenAIRE

    Rafael E Campo; Ernesto G Scerpella

    1996-01-01

    Results of recent investigations have given us a new understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV infection. This findings provide us with a kinetic model of pathogenesis in which continuous, high-grade viral replication. This findings provide us with a kinetic model of pathogenesis in which continuous, high-grade viral replication is the principal force driving the destruction of CD4 lymphocytes. This knowledge will lead us to design better treatment strategies directed to curtail viral replicat...

  16. Dynamics of viral replication in blood and lymphoid tissues during SIVmac251 infection of macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mannioui Abdelkrim

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive studies of primary infection are crucial to our understanding of the course of HIV disease. In SIV-infected macaques, a model closely mimicking HIV pathogenesis, we used a combination of three markers -- viral RNA, 2LTR circles and viral DNA -- to evaluate viral replication and dissemination simultaneously in blood, secondary lymphoid tissues, and the gut during primary and chronic infections. Subsequent viral compartmentalization in the main target cells of the virus in peripheral blood during the chronic phase of infection was evaluated by cell sorting and viral quantification with the three markers studied. Results The evolutions of viral RNA, 2LTR circles and DNA levels were correlated in a given tissue during primary and early chronic infection. The decrease in plasma viral load principally reflects a large decrease in viral replication in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT, with viral RNA and DNA levels remaining stable in the spleen and peripheral lymph nodes. Later, during chronic infection, a progressive depletion of central memory CD4+ T cells from the peripheral blood was observed, accompanied by high levels of viral replication in the cells of this subtype. The virus was also found to replicate at this point in the infection in naive CD4+ T cells. Viral RNA was frequently detected in monocytes, but no SIV replication appeared to occur in these cells, as no viral DNA or 2LTR circles were detected. Conclusion We demonstrated the persistence of viral replication and dissemination, mostly in secondary lymphoid tissues, during primary and early chronic infection. During chronic infection, the central memory CD4+ T cells were the major site of viral replication in peripheral blood, but viral replication also occurred in naive CD4+ T cells. The role of monocytes seemed to be limited to carrying the virus as a cargo because there was an observed lack of replication in these cells. These data may have important

  17. Inhibition of IKKß in enterocytes exacerbates sepsis-induced intestinal injury and worsens mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Jessica A.; Samocha, Alexandr J.; Liang, Zhe; Burd, Eileen M.; Farris, Alton B.; Coopersmith, Craig M.

    2013-01-01

    -kB has a beneficial role in sepsis by partially preventing sepsis-induced increases in apoptosis and permeability, which are associated with worsening mortality. PMID:23939348

  18. Inhibition of IKKβ in enterocytes exacerbates sepsis-induced intestinal injury and worsens mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Jessica A; Samocha, Alexandr J; Liang, Zhe; Burd, Eileen M; Farris, Alton B; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2013-10-01

    -specific NF-kB has a beneficial role in sepsis by partially preventing sepsis-induced increases in apoptosis and permeability, which are associated with worsening mortality.

  19. Increased red blood cell transfusions are associated with worsening outcomes in pediatric heart transplant patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Quijano, Kimberly; Schwarzenberger, Johanna C; Scovotti, Jennifer C; Alejos, Alexandra; Ngo, Jason; Gornbein, Jeffrey; Mahajan, Aman

    2013-06-01

    Red blood cell (RBC) transfusions are associated with increased morbidity. Children receiving heart transplants constitute a unique group of patients due to their risk factors. Although previous studies in nontransplant patients have focused primarily on the effects of postoperative blood transfusions, a significant exposure to blood occurs during the intraoperative period, and a larger percentage of heart transplant patients require intraoperative blood transfusions when compared with general cardiac surgery patients. We investigated the relationship between clinical outcomes and the amount of blood transfused both during and after heart transplantation. We hypothesized that larger amounts of RBC transfusions are associated with worsening clinical outcomes in pediatric heart transplant patients. A database comprising 108 pediatric patients undergoing heart transplantation from 2004 to 2010 was queried. Preoperative and postoperative clinical risk factors, including the amount of blood transfused intraoperatively and 48 hours postoperatively, were analyzed. The outcome measures were length of hospital stay, duration of tracheal intubation, inotrope score, and major adverse events. Bivariate and multivariate analyses were performed to control for simultaneous risk factors and determine outcomes in which the amount of blood transfused was an independent risk factor. Ninety-four patients with complete datasets were included in the final analysis. Eighty-eight percent received RBC transfusions, with a median transfusion amount of 38.7 mL/kg. A multivariate analysis correcting for 8 covariate risk factors, including the Index for Mortality Prediction After Cardiac Transplantation, age, weight, United Network for Organ Sharing status, warm and cold ischemia time, repeat sternotomy, and pretransplant hematocrit, showed RBC transfusions were independently associated with increased length of intensive care unit stay (means ratio = 1.34; 95% confidence interval, 1.03-1.76; P

  20. A unified framework of immunological and epidemiological dynamics for the spread of viral infections in a simple network-based population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vickers David M

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The desire to better understand the immuno-biology of infectious diseases as a broader ecological system has motivated the explicit representation of epidemiological processes as a function of immune system dynamics. While several recent and innovative contributions have explored unified models across cellular and organismal domains, and appear well-suited to describing particular aspects of intracellular pathogen infections, these existing immuno-epidemiological models lack representation of certain cellular components and immunological processes needed to adequately characterize the dynamics of some important epidemiological contexts. Here, we complement existing models by presenting an alternate framework of anti-viral immune responses within individual hosts and infection spread across a simple network-based population. Results Our compartmental formulation parsimoniously demonstrates a correlation between immune responsiveness, network connectivity, and the natural history of infection in a population. It suggests that an increased disparity between people's ability to respond to an infection, while maintaining an average immune responsiveness rate, may worsen the overall impact of an outbreak within a population. Additionally, varying an individual's network connectivity affects the rate with which the population-wide viral load accumulates, but has little impact on the asymptotic limit in which it approaches. Whilst the clearance of a pathogen in a population will lower viral loads in the short-term, the longer the time until re-infection, the more severe an outbreak is likely to be. Given the eventual likelihood of reinfection, the resulting long-run viral burden after elimination of an infection is negligible compared to the situation in which infection is persistent. Conclusion Future infectious disease research would benefit by striving to not only continue to understand the properties of an invading microbe, or

  1. Structure of Viral Aggregates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Stephen; Luijten, Erik

    2010-03-01

    The aggregation of virus particles is a particular form of colloidal self-assembly, since viruses of a give type are monodisperse and have identical, anisotropic surface charge distributions. In small-angle X-ray scattering experiments, the Qbeta virus was found to organize in different crystal structures in the presence of divalent salt and non-adsorbing polymer. Since a simple isotropic potential cannot explain the occurrence of all observed phases, we employ computer simulations to investigate how the surface charge distribution affects the virus interactions. Using a detailed model of the virus particle, we find an asymmetric ion distribution around the virus which gives rise to the different phases observed.

  2. Development of oral microencapsulated forms for delivering viral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechaeva, Elena

    2002-10-01

    Rapid development in biotechnology during the last decade has allowed novel ideas in the development of antiviral vaccines to be considered and provides interesting technological approaches to their realization. Designing of microencapsulated forms for delivering bacterial and viral antigens or antigenic complexes using biodegradable biopolymers is an important novel direction. This approach involves the production of polymeric spherical particles with a diameter of 1 microm to 3 mm, containing isolated viral antigens or whole viral particles. Microencapsulated antigens administered orally are protected from low pH values of the gastric juice, bile acids, their salts and proteolytic enzymes of the gastrointestinal tract. The ability to drastically potentiate the immune response to encapsulated antigens, together with the ability to penetrate into the intestinal and respiratory mucosae upon oral and tracheal administrations, respectively, with induction of local and systemic immune reactions are the special merits of such polymers. However, the majority of data on microencapsulated viral vaccines has so far been obtained in animal models, as well as a limited number of studies on the protective effect they elicit. Certain success in the development of vaccines against a number of human viral infections, such as hepatitis B, cytomegalovirus and rotavirus, gives hope to successful completion of this research. Presumably, such vaccines will be safe and innocuous, simple in administration and capable of inducing both the systemic and local immune responses at the primary portal of viral infection.

  3. The role of viral persistence in flavivirus biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlera, Luwanika; Melik, Wessam; Bloom, Marshall E.

    2014-01-01

    In nature, vector-borne flaviviruses are persistently cycled between either the tick or mosquito vector and small mammals such as rodents, skunks, and swine. These viruses account for considerable human morbidity and mortality worldwide. Increasing and substantial evidence of viral persistence in humans, which includes the isolation of RNA by RT-PCR and infectious virus by culture, continues to be reported. Viral persistence can also be established in vitro in various human, animal, arachnid and insect cell lines in culture. Although some research has focused on the potential roles of defective virus particles, evasion of the immune response through the manipulation of autophagy and/or apoptosis, the precise mechanism of flavivirus persistence is still not well understood. We propose additional research for further understanding of how viral persistence is established in different systems. Avenues for additional studies include determining if the multifunctional flavivirus protein NS5 has a role in viral persistence, the development of relevant animal models of viral persistence as well as investigating the host responses that allow vector borne flavivirus replication without detrimental effects on infected cells. Such studies might shed more light on the viral-host relationships, and could be used to unravel the mechanisms for establishment of persistence. PMID:24737600

  4. Non-Viral Deoxyribonucleoside Kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Louise Slot; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases (dNKs) phosphorylate deoxyribonucleosides to their corresponding monophosphate compounds. dNks also phosphorylate deoxyribonucleoside analogues that are used in the treatment of cancer or viral infections. The study of the mammalian dNKs has therefore always been of gr...

  5. Viral Infection and Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Li (Juan)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractMuch of liver pathology is related to infection with HBV and HCV and it is important to define factors associated with clinical behavior of disease following infection with these viruses. Thus in this thesis I first focus on the natural history of chronic viral diseases associated

  6. Virally encoded 7TM receptors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenkilde, M M; Waldhoer, M; Lüttichau, H R

    2001-01-01

    expression of this single gene in certain lymphocyte cell lineages leads to the development of lesions which are remarkably similar to Kaposi's sarcoma, a human herpesvirus 8 associated disease. Thus, this and other virally encoded 7TM receptors appear to be attractive future drug targets....

  7. Are de novo acute heart failure and acutely worsened chronic heart failure two subgroups of the same syndrome?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banović Marko

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Acute heart failure (AHF is one of the most common diseases in emergency medicine, associated with poor prognosis and high in-hospital and long-term mortality. Objective. To investigate clinical presentation of patients with de novo AHF and acute worsening of chronic heart failure (CHF and to identify differences in blood levels of biomarkers and echocardiography findings. Methods. This prospective study comprised 64 consecutive patients being grouped according to the onset of the disease into patients with the de novo AHF (45.3%, and patients with acute worsening of CHF (54.7%. Results. Acute congestion (60% was the most common manifestation of de novo AHF, whereas pulmonary oedema (43.1% was the most common manifestation of acutely decompensated CHF. Patients with acutely decompensated CHF had significantly higher blood values of creatinine (147.10 vs 113.16 μmol/l; p<0.05, urea (12.63 vs 7.82 mmol/l; p<0.05, BNP (1440.11 vs 712.24 pg/ml; p<001 and NTproBNP (9097.00 vs 2827.70 pg/ml; p<0.01 on admission, and lower values of M-mode left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF during hospitalization (49.44% vs 42.94%; p<0.05. The follow-up after one year revealed still significantly higher BNP (365.49 vs 164.02 pg/ ml; p<0.05 and lower average values of both LVEF in patients with acutely worsened CHF (46.62% vs 54.41% and 39.52% vs 47.88%; p<0.05. Conclusion. Considering differences in clinical severity on admission, echocardiography and natriuretic peptide values during hospitalization and after one year follow-up, de novo AHF and acutely worsened CHF are two different subgroups of the same syndrome.

  8. Mast cells in viral infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piotr Witczak

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available  There are some premises suggesting that mast cells are involved in the mechanisms of anti-virus defense and in viral disease pathomechanisms. Mast cells are particularly numerous at the portals of infections and thus may have immediate and easy contact with the external environment and invading pathogens. These cells express receptors responsible for recognition of virus-derived PAMP molecules, mainly Toll-like receptors (TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9, but also RIG-I-like and NOD-like molecules. Furthermore, mast cells generate various mediators, cytokines and chemokines which modulate the intensity of inflammation and regulate the course of innate and adaptive anti-viral immunity. Indirect evidence for the role of mast cells in viral infections is also provided by clinical observations and results of animal studies. Currently, more and more data indicate that mast cells can be infected by some viruses (dengue virus, adenoviruses, hantaviruses, cytomegaloviruses, reoviruses, HIV-1 virus. It is also demonstrated that mast cells can release pre formed mediators as well as synthesize de novo eicosanoids in response to stimulation by viruses. Several data indicate that virus-stimulated mast cells secrete cytokines and chemokines, including interferons as well as chemokines with a key role in NK and Tc lymphocyte influx. Moreover, some information indicates that mast cell stimulation via TLR3, TLR7/8 and TLR9 can affect their adhesion to extracellular matrix proteins and chemotaxis, and influence expression of some membrane molecules. Critical analysis of current data leads to the conclusion that it is not yet possible to make definitive statements about the role of mast cells in innate and acquired defense mechanisms developing in the course of viral infection and/or pathomechanisms of viral diseases.

  9. Using Participatory System Dynamics Modeling to Examine the Local HIV Test and Treatment Care Continuum in Order to Reduce Community Viral Load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Margaret R; Li, Jianghong; Lounsbury, David; Green, Helena Danielle; Abbott, Maryann; Berman, Marcie; Rohena, Lucy; Gonzalez, Rosely; Lang, Shawn; Mosher, Heather

    2017-12-01

    Achieving community-level goals to eliminate the HIV epidemic requires coordinated efforts through community consortia with a common purpose to examine and critique their own HIV testing and treatment (T&T) care system and build effective tools to guide their efforts to improve it. Participatory system dynamics (SD) modeling offers conceptual, methodological, and analytical tools to engage diverse stakeholders in systems conceptualization and visual mapping of dynamics that undermine community-level health outcomes and identify those that can be leveraged for systems improvement. We recruited and engaged a 25-member multi-stakeholder Task Force, whose members provide or utilize HIV-related services, to participate in SD modeling to examine and address problems of their local HIV T&T service system. Findings from the iterative model building sessions indicated Task Force members' increasingly complex understanding of the local HIV care system and demonstrated their improved capacity to visualize and critique multiple models of the HIV T&T service system and identify areas of potential leverage. Findings also showed members' enhanced communication and consensus in seeking deeper systems understanding and options for solutions. We discuss implications of using these visual SD models for subsequent simulation modeling of the T&T system and for other community applications to improve system effectiveness. © Society for Community Research and Action 2017.

  10. Avances recientes en HIV/SIDA: Patogénesis, historia natural y carga viral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael E Campo

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Results of recent investigations have given us a new understanding of the pathogenesis of HIV infection. This findings provide us with a kinetic model of pathogenesis in which continuous, high-grade viral replication. This findings provide us with a kinetic model of pathogenesis in which continuous, high-grade viral replication is the principal force driving the destruction of CD4 lymphocytes. This knowledge will lead us to design better treatment strategies directed to curtail viral replication and prevent the emergence of viral resistance, and the use of combination antiretroviral therapy is a first example of these new strategies. The concept of viral load is introduced, and we discuss the usefulness of viral load in the clinical prognosis of this disease, and its use as an aid in the decision-making process when starling or mordifyng antiretroviral therapy in our patients. (Rev Med Hered 1996; 7: 182-188.

  11. Effect of Vericiguat, a Soluble Guanylate Cyclase Stimulator, on Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Patients With Worsening Chronic Heart Failure and Reduced Ejection Fraction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gheorghiade, Mihai; Greene, Stephen J; Butler, Javed

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE: Worsening chronic heart failure (HF) is a major public health problem. OBJECTIVE: To determine the optimal dose and tolerability of vericiguat, a soluble guanylate cyclase stimulator, in patients with worsening chronic HF and reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). DESIGN, ...

  12. A diagnostic study in patients with sciatica establishing the importance of localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining to assess nerve root compression on MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verwoerd, Annemieke J H; Mens, Jan; El Barzouhi, Abdelilah; Peul, Wilco C; Koes, Bart W; Verhagen, Arianne P

    2016-05-01

    To test whether the localization of worsening of pain during coughing, sneezing and straining matters in the assessment of lumbosacral nerve root compression or disc herniation on MRI. Recently the diagnostic accuracy of history items to assess disc herniation or nerve root compression on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was investigated. A total of 395 adult patients with severe sciatica of 6-12 weeks duration were included in this study. The question regarding the influence of coughing, sneezing and straining on the intensity of pain could be answered on a 4 point scale: no worsening of pain, worsening of back pain, worsening of leg pain, worsening of back and leg pain. Diagnostic odds ratio's (DORs) were calculated for the various dichotomization options. The DOR changed into significant values when the answer option was more narrowed to worsening of leg pain. The highest DOR was observed for the answer option 'worsening of leg pain' with a DOR of 2.28 (95 % CI 1.28-4.04) for the presence of nerve root compression and a DOR of 2.50 (95 % CI 1.27-4.90) for the presence of a herniated disc on MRI. Worsening of leg pain during coughing, sneezing or straining has a significant diagnostic value for the presence of nerve root compression and disc herniation on MRI in patients with sciatica. This study also highlights the importance of the formulation of answer options in history taking.

  13. VirSorter: mining viral signal from microbial genomic data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Roux

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Viruses of microbes impact all ecosystems where microbes drive key energy and substrate transformations including the oceans, humans and industrial fermenters. However, despite this recognized importance, our understanding of viral diversity and impacts remains limited by too few model systems and reference genomes. One way to fill these gaps in our knowledge of viral diversity is through the detection of viral signal in microbial genomic data. While multiple approaches have been developed and applied for the detection of prophages (viral genomes integrated in a microbial genome, new types of microbial genomic data are emerging that are more fragmented and larger scale, such as Single-cell Amplified Genomes (SAGs of uncultivated organisms or genomic fragments assembled from metagenomic sequencing. Here, we present VirSorter, a tool designed to detect viral signal in these different types of microbial sequence data in both a reference-dependent and reference-independent manner, leveraging probabilistic models and extensive virome data to maximize detection of novel viruses. Performance testing shows that VirSorter’s prophage prediction capability compares to that of available prophage predictors for complete genomes, but is superior in predicting viral sequences outside of a host genome (i.e., from extrachromosomal prophages, lytic infections, or partially assembled prophages. Furthermore, VirSorter outperforms existing tools for fragmented genomic and metagenomic datasets, and can identify viral signal in assembled sequence (contigs as short as 3kb, while providing near-perfect identification (>95% Recall and 100% Precision on contigs of at least 10kb. Because VirSorter scales to large datasets, it can also be used in “reverse” to more confidently identify viral sequence in viral metagenomes by sorting away cellular DNA whether derived from gene transfer agents, generalized transduction or contamination. Finally, VirSorter is made

  14. LARGE ANIMAL PARKINSONS DISEASE MODELS USING VIRAL VECTORS AND INOCULATION OF PREFORMED FIBRILS TO MEDIATE ALPHA-SYNUCLEIN OVEREXPRESSION AND MISFOLDING IN THE GOTTINGEN MINIPIG CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glud, Andreas Nørgaard; Landau, A.M.; Johnsen, Erik Lisbjerg

    2015-01-01

    Animal models towards understanding and treating Parkinson’s disease (PD) are important translational steps toward clinical applications. The Göttingen minipig(GM), fits progressional neurological models due to an relative low adult weight between 20-40 kg, and has a large gyrencephalic brain (6x 5...... x 4 cm) that can be examined at sufficient resolution using both conventional clinical scanning modalities and preclinical testing of deep brain stimulation, stem cell grafting and other neuromodulatory devices. Aim: Using inoculating of human or pig alpha-synuclein(aSYN) fibrils or overexpressing a......SYN using Lenti virus(LV) and Adeno Assosiated Virus(AAV) vectors in the nigrostriatal system, we hope to create a new porcine model for PD. Methods: Using conventional human-intended stereotaxic neurosurgery methods, we apply aSYN in the catecholamine nigrostriatal system of 13 GM. The changes...

  15. Viral O-GalNAc peptide epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olofsson, Sigvard; Blixt, Klas Ola; Bergström, Tomas

    2016-01-01

    meningitis patients, CSF antibodies are focussed to only one single glycoform peptide of a major viral glycoprotein. Thus, dependent on the viral disease, the serological response may be variable or constant with respect to the number of targeted peptide glycoforms. Mapping of these epitopes relies......Viral envelope glycoproteins are major targets for antibodies that bind to and inactivate viral particles. The capacity of a viral vaccine to induce virus-neutralizing antibodies is often used as a marker for vaccine efficacy. Yet the number of known neutralization target epitopes is restricted...... owing to various viral escape mechanisms. We expand the range of possible viral glycoprotein targets, by presenting a previously unknown type of viral glycoprotein epitope based on a short peptide stretch modified with small O-linked glycans. Besides being immunologically active, these epitopes have...

  16. An Odyssey to Viral Pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldstone, Michael B A

    2016-05-23

    This odyssey is mine from early junior high school, where my dreams for adventure were shaped by Arthur Conan Doyle's Sherlock Holmes, Percival Christopher Wren's Beau Geste, and best of all the remarkable explorers in Paul de Kruif's Microbe Hunters. My birth site was in Manhattan (my mother was a Vogue model and my father worked in retail), and I traveled to college at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, where my love of history and English literature was shaped along with a sufficient exposure to biology, chemistry, and genetics to meet requirements for entering medical school. By the second year at the University of Maryland School of Medicine, through expert teachers such as Theodore (Ted) Woodward and Sheldon (Shelly) Greisman in medicine and Charles Weissmann in virology and microbiology, I found that understanding why and how people became ill was more my cup of tea than identifying and treating their illnesses. Although I was becoming competent in diagnosis and treatment, I left medical school at the end of my sophomore year to seek a more basic understanding of biology and chemistry. I achieved this by working toward a PhD in biochemistry at Johns Hopkins McCollum-Pratt Institute combined with study of rickettsial toxin at Maryland. This was a very important time in my life, because it convinced me that addressing biologic and medical questions in a disciplined scientific manner was what my life voyage should be. That voyage led me initially, through Woodward's contact, to work a summer in Joe Smadel's unit at Walter Reed (Smadel being one of the deans of American virology) and to meet several times with Carleton Gajdusek and then John Enders at Harvard, who pointed me to Frank Dixon at Scripps in La Jolla, California, for postdoctoral training. Dixon was among the founders of modern immunology and a pathfinder for immunopathology. Training by and association with Dixon and his other postdoctoral fellows, my independent position at Scripps, early

  17. Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Brain-Specific Anti-RNA Viral Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-30

    TITLE (Include Securrty Clasification ) Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Brain Specific Anti-RNA Viral Agents 12. PERSONAL. AUTHOR(S) Marcus E...AD (FRONT COVER Contract No.: DAMD17-88-C-8011 Title: Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Brain-Specific Anti-RNA Viral Agents Principal...matr s---. Further in vivo testing included tissue distribution studies and antiviral activity studies performed in a murine viral encephalitic model. 20

  18. PROTEIN AGREGATION MODELS OF PARKINSONS DISEASE USING VIRAL VECTORS, PROTEASOME INHIBITION AND INOCULATION OF PREFORMED FIBRILS IN THE GOTTINGEN MINIPIG CNS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Glud, Andreas Nørgaard; Lillethorup, Thea Pinholt; Landeck, Natalie

    SYN) fibrils, overexpressing aSYN using Lentivirus (LV) and Adeno Assosiated Virus (AAV) vectors or proteasome inhibition in the nigrostriatal system, we hope to create a new porcine models for PD. Methods: Using conventional human-intended stereotaxic neurosurgery methods, we apply aSYN or preformed fibrils...

  19. Statistical Mechanics and Thermodynamics of Viral Evolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara A Jones

    Full Text Available This paper uses methods drawn from physics to study the life cycle of viruses. The paper analyzes a model of viral infection and evolution using the "grand canonical ensemble" and formalisms from statistical mechanics and thermodynamics. Using this approach we enumerate all possible genetic states of a model virus and host as a function of two independent pressures-immune response and system temperature. We prove the system has a real thermodynamic temperature, and discover a new phase transition between a positive temperature regime of normal replication and a negative temperature "disordered" phase of the virus. We distinguish this from previous observations of a phase transition that arises as a function of mutation rate. From an evolutionary biology point of view, at steady state the viruses naturally evolve to distinct quasispecies. This paper also reveals a universal relationship that relates the order parameter (as a measure of mutational robustness to evolvability in agreement with recent experimental and theoretical work. Given that real viruses have finite length RNA segments that encode proteins which determine virus fitness, the approach used here could be refined to apply to real biological systems, perhaps providing insight into immune escape, the emergence of novel pathogens and other results of viral evolution.

  20. Viral commercials: the consumer as marketeer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ketelaar, P.E.; Lucassen, P.; Kregting, G.H.J.

    2010-01-01

    Research into the reasons why consumers pass along viral commercials: their motives, the content characteristics of viral commercials and the medium context in which viral commercials appear. Based on the uses and gratifications perspective this study has determined which motives of consumers,

  1. Continuous solutions to a viral infection model with general incidence rate, discrete state-dependent delay, CTL and antibody immune responses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rezunenko, Oleksandr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 2016, č. 79 (2016), s. 1-15 ISSN 1417-3875 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-06678S Institutional support: RVO:67985556 Keywords : evolution equations * Lyapunov stability * state-dependent delay * virus infection model Subject RIV: BC - Control Systems Theory Impact factor: 0.926, year: 2016 http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2016/AS/rezunenko-0464066.pdf

  2. Prospects for new viral vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmion, B P

    1980-08-11

    Animal virology has made outstanding contributions to preventive medicine by the development of vaccines for the control of infectious disease in man and animals. Cost-benefit analysis indicates substantial savings in health care costs from the control of diseases such as smallpox, poliomyelitis, yellow fever and measels. Areas for further development include vaccines for influenza (living, attenuated virus), the herpes group (varicella: cytomegalovirus), respiratory syncytial virus, rotavirus and hepatitis A, B, and non A/non B. The general options for vaccine formulation are discussed with particular emphasis on approaches with the use of viral genetics to 'tailor make' vaccine viruses with defined growth potential in laboratory systems, low pathogenicity, and defined antigens. Current progress with the development of an inactivated hepatitis B vaccine is reviewed as a case study in vaccine development. The impact of recent experiments in cloning hepatitis B virus DNA in E. coli on the production of a purified viral polypeptide vaccine is assessed.

  3. Viral diseases and human evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leal Élcio de Souza

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish long-lasting associations with man. Although not all viral agents cause disease and some may in fact be considered beneficial, the present situation of overpopulation, poverty and ecological inbalance may have devastating effets on human progress. Recently emerged diseases causing massive pandemics (eg., HIV-1 and HCV, dengue, etc. are becoming formidable challenges, which may have a direct impact on the fate of our species.

  4. Viral diseases and human evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, E de S; Zanotto, P M

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish long-lasting associations with man. Although not all viral agents cause disease and some may in fact be considered beneficial, the present situation of overpopulation, poverty and ecological inbalance may have devastating effects on human progress. Recently emerged diseases causing massive pandemics (e.g., HIV-1 and HCV, dengue, etc.) are becoming formidable challenges, which may have a direct impact on the fate of our species.

  5. Viral diseases and human evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Leal, Elcio de Souza [UNIFESP; Zanotto, Paolo Marinho de Andrade [UNIFESP

    2000-01-01

    The interaction of man with viral agents was possibly a key factor shaping human evolution, culture and civilization from its outset. Evidence of the effect of disease, since the early stages of human speciation, through pre-historical times to the present suggest that the types of viruses associated with man changed in time. As human populations progressed technologically, they grew in numbers and density. As a consequence different viruses found suitable conditions to thrive and establish l...

  6. Viral exanthems in the tropics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Sueli Coelho da Silva; Cestari, Tania; Allen, Samuel H; Ramos e-Silva, Marcia

    2007-01-01

    Viral exanthems are a common problem in tropical regions, particularly affecting children. Most exanthems are transient and harmless, but some are potentially very dangerous. Pregnant women and malnourished or immunocompromised infants carry the greatest risk of adverse outcome. In this article, parvovirus B19; dengue and yellow fever; West Nile, Barmah Forest, Marburg, and Ebola viruses, and human herpesviruses; asymmetric periflexural exanthema of childhood; measles; rubella; enteroviruses; Lassa fever; and South American hemorrhagic fevers will be discussed.

  7. Treatment of acute viral bronchiolitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eber, Ernst

    2011-01-01

    Acute viral bronchiolitis represents the most common lower respiratory tract infection in infants and young children and is associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Respiratory syncytial virus is the most frequently identified virus, but many other viruses may also cause acute bronchiolitis. There is no common definition of acute viral bronchiolitis used internationally, and this may explain part of the confusion in the literature. Most children with bronchiolitis have a self limiting mild disease and can be safely managed at home with careful attention to feeding and respiratory status. Criteria for referral and admission vary between hospitals as do clinical practice in the management of acute viral bronchiolitis, and there is confusion and lack of evidence over the best treatment for this condition. Supportive care, including administration of oxygen and fluids, is the cornerstone of current treatment. The majority of infants and children with bronchiolitis do not require specific measures. Bronchodilators should not be routinely used in the management of acute viral bronchiolitis, but may be effective in some patients. Most of the commonly used management modalities have not been shown to have a clear beneficial effect on the course of the disease. For example, inhaled and systemic corticosteroids, leukotriene receptor antagonists, immunoglobulins and monoclonal antibodies, antibiotics, antiviral therapy, and chest physiotherapy should not be used routinely in the management of bronchiolitis. The potential effect of hypertonic saline on the course of the acute disease is promising, but further studies are required. In critically ill children with bronchiolitis, today there is little justification for the use of surfactant and heliox. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure may be beneficial in children with severe bronchiolitis but a large trial is needed to determine its value. Finally, very little is known on the effect of the various

  8. Acral manifestations of viral infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adışen, Esra; Önder, Meltem

    Viruses are considered intracellular obligates with a nucleic acid RNA or DNA. They have the ability to encode proteins involved in viral replication and production of the protective coat within the host cells but require host cell ribosomes and mitochondria for translation. The members of the families Herpesviridae, Poxviridae, Papovaviridae, and Picornaviridae are the most commonly known agents for cutaneous viral diseases, but other virus families, such as Adenoviridae, Togaviridae, Parvoviridae, Paramyxoviridae, Flaviviridae, and Hepadnaviridae, can also infect the skin. Herpetic whitlow should be considered under the title of special viral infections of the acral region, where surgical incision is not recommended; along with verruca plantaris with its resistance to treatment and the search for a new group of treatments, including human papillomavirus vaccines; HIV with maculopapular eruptions and palmoplantar desquamation; orf and milker's nodule with its nodular lesions; papular-purpuric gloves and socks syndrome with its typical clinical presentation; necrolytic acral erythema with its relationship with zinc; and hand, foot, and mouth disease with its characteristics of causing infection with its strains, with high risk for complication. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Pediatric Asthma and Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Garcia, M Luz; Calvo Rey, Cristina; Del Rosal Rabes, Teresa

    2016-05-01

    Respiratory viral infections, particularly respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) and rhinovirus, are the most importance risk factors for the onset of wheezing in infants and small children. Bronchiolitis is the most common acute respiratory infection in children under 1year of age, and the most common cause of hospitalization in this age group. RSV accounts for approximately 70% of all these cases, followed by rhinovirus, adenovirus, metapneumovirus and bocavirus. The association between bronchiolitis caused by RSV and the development of recurrent wheezing and/or asthma was first described more than 40years ago, but it is still unclear whether bronchiolitis causes chronic respiratory symptoms, or if it is a marker for children with a genetic predisposition for developing asthma in the medium or long term. In any case, sufficient evidence is available to corroborate the existence of this association, which is particularly strong when the causative agent of bronchiolitis is rhinovirus. The pathogenic role of respiratory viruses as triggers for exacerbations in asthmatic patients has not been fully characterized. However, it is clear that respiratory viruses, and in particular rhinovirus, are the most common causes of exacerbation in children, and some type of respiratory virus has been identified in over 90% of children hospitalized for an episode of wheezing. Changes in the immune response to viral infections in genetically predisposed individuals are very likely to be the main factors involved in the association between viral infection and asthma. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. Neutrophil extracellular traps go viral

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Günther Schönrich

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are the most numerous immune cells. Their importance as a first line of defense against bacterial and fungal pathogens is well described. In contrast, the role of neutrophils in controlling viral infections is less clear. Bacterial and fungal pathogens can stimulate neutrophils to produce extracellular traps (NETs in a process called NETosis. Although NETosis has previously been described as a special form of programmed cell, there are forms of NET production that do not end with the demise of neutrophils. As an end result of NETosis, genomic DNA complexed with microbicidal proteins is expelled from neutrophils. These structures can kill pathogens or at least prevent their local spread within host tissue. On the other hand disproportionate NET formation can cause local or systemic damage. Only recently was it recognized that viruses can also induce NETosis. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms by which NETs are produced in the context of viral infection and how this may contribute to both antiviral immunity and immunopathology. Finally, we shed light on viral immune evasion mechanisms targeting NETs.

  11. Contrasting roles for CD4 vs. CD8 T-cells in a murine model of virally induced "T1 black hole" formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirko, Istvan; Chen, Yi; Lohrey, Anne K; McDole, Jeremiah; Gamez, Jeffrey D; Allen, Kathleen S; Pavelko, Kevin D; Lindquist, Diana M; Dunn, R Scott; Macura, Slobodan I; Johnson, Aaron J

    2012-01-01

    MRI is sensitive to tissue pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS); however, most lesional MRI findings have limited correlation with disability. Chronic T1 hypointense lesions or "T1 black holes" (T1BH), observed in a subset of MS patients and thought to represent axonal damage, show moderate to strong correlation with disability. The pathogenesis of T1BH remains unclear. We previously reported the first and as of yet only model of T1BH formation in the Theiler's murine encephalitis virus induced model of acute CNS neuroinflammation induced injury, where CD8 T-cells are critical mediators of axonal damage and related T1BH formation. The purpose of this study was to further analyze the role of CD8 and CD4 T-cells through adoptive transfer experiments and to determine if the relevant CD8 T-cells are classic epitope specific lymphocytes or different subsets. C57BL/6 mice were used as donors and RAG-1 deficient mice as hosts in our adoptive transfer experiments. In vivo 3-dimensional MRI images were acquired using a 7 Tesla small animal MRI system. For image analysis, we used semi-automated methods in Analyze 9.1; transfer efficiency was monitored using FACS of brain infiltrating lymphocytes. Using a peptide depletion method, we demonstrated that the majority of CD8 T-cells are classic epitope specific cytotoxic cells. CD8 T-cell transfer successfully restored the immune system's capability to mediate T1BH formation in animals that lack adaptive immune system, whereas CD4 T-cell transfer results in an attenuated phenotype with significantly less T1BH formation. These findings demonstrate contrasting roles for these cell types, with additional evidence for a direct pathogenic role of CD8 T-cells in our model of T1 black hole formation.

  12. Contrasting roles for CD4 vs. CD8 T-cells in a murine model of virally induced "T1 black hole" formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istvan Pirko

    Full Text Available MRI is sensitive to tissue pathology in multiple sclerosis (MS; however, most lesional MRI findings have limited correlation with disability. Chronic T1 hypointense lesions or "T1 black holes" (T1BH, observed in a subset of MS patients and thought to represent axonal damage, show moderate to strong correlation with disability. The pathogenesis of T1BH remains unclear. We previously reported the first and as of yet only model of T1BH formation in the Theiler's murine encephalitis virus induced model of acute CNS neuroinflammation induced injury, where CD8 T-cells are critical mediators of axonal damage and related T1BH formation. The purpose of this study was to further analyze the role of CD8 and CD4 T-cells through adoptive transfer experiments and to determine if the relevant CD8 T-cells are classic epitope specific lymphocytes or different subsets. C57BL/6 mice were used as donors and RAG-1 deficient mice as hosts in our adoptive transfer experiments. In vivo 3-dimensional MRI images were acquired using a 7 Tesla small animal MRI system. For image analysis, we used semi-automated methods in Analyze 9.1; transfer efficiency was monitored using FACS of brain infiltrating lymphocytes. Using a peptide depletion method, we demonstrated that the majority of CD8 T-cells are classic epitope specific cytotoxic cells. CD8 T-cell transfer successfully restored the immune system's capability to mediate T1BH formation in animals that lack adaptive immune system, whereas CD4 T-cell transfer results in an attenuated phenotype with significantly less T1BH formation. These findings demonstrate contrasting roles for these cell types, with additional evidence for a direct pathogenic role of CD8 T-cells in our model of T1 black hole formation.

  13. Life cycle synchronization is a viral drug resistance mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iulia A Neagu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Viral infections are one of the major causes of death worldwide, with HIV infection alone resulting in over 1.2 million casualties per year. Antiviral drugs are now being administered for a variety of viral infections, including HIV, hepatitis B and C, and influenza. These therapies target a specific phase of the virus's life cycle, yet their ultimate success depends on a variety of factors, such as adherence to a prescribed regimen and the emergence of viral drug resistance. The epidemiology and evolution of drug resistance have been extensively characterized, and it is generally assumed that drug resistance arises from mutations that alter the virus's susceptibility to the direct action of the drug. In this paper, we consider the possibility that a virus population can evolve towards synchronizing its life cycle with the pattern of drug therapy. The periodicity of the drug treatment could then allow for a virus strain whose life cycle length is a multiple of the dosing interval to replicate only when the concentration of the drug is lowest. This process, referred to as "drug tolerance by synchronization", could allow the virus population to maximize its overall fitness without having to alter drug binding or complete its life cycle in the drug's presence. We use mathematical models and stochastic simulations to show that life cycle synchronization can indeed be a mechanism of viral drug tolerance. We show that this effect is more likely to occur when the variability in both viral life cycle and drug dose timing are low. More generally, we find that in the presence of periodic drug levels, time-averaged calculations of viral fitness do not accurately predict drug levels needed to eradicate infection, even if there is no synchronization. We derive an analytical expression for viral fitness that is sufficient to explain the drug-pattern-dependent survival of strains with any life cycle length. We discuss the implications of these findings for

  14. An In-Depth Comparison of Latency-Reversing Agent Combinations in Various In Vitro and Ex Vivo HIV-1 Latency Models Identified Bryostatin-1+JQ1 and Ingenol-B+JQ1 to Potently Reactivate Viral Gene Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Darcis

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of latently infected cells in patients under combinatory antiretroviral therapy (cART is a major hurdle to HIV-1 eradication. Strategies to purge these reservoirs are needed and activation of viral gene expression in latently infected cells is one promising strategy. Bromodomain and Extraterminal (BET bromodomain inhibitors (BETi are compounds able to reactivate latent proviruses in a positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb-dependent manner. In this study, we tested the reactivation potential of protein kinase C (PKC agonists (prostratin, bryostatin-1 and ingenol-B, which are known to activate NF-κB signaling pathway as well as P-TEFb, used alone or in combination with P-TEFb-releasing agents (HMBA and BETi (JQ1, I-BET, I-BET151. Using in vitro HIV-1 post-integration latency model cell lines of T-lymphoid and myeloid lineages, we demonstrated that PKC agonists and P-TEFb-releasing agents alone acted as potent latency-reversing agents (LRAs and that their combinations led to synergistic activation of HIV-1 expression at the viral mRNA and protein levels. Mechanistically, combined treatments led to higher activations of P-TEFb and NF-κB than the corresponding individual drug treatments. Importantly, we observed in ex vivo cultures of CD8+-depleted PBMCs from 35 cART-treated HIV-1+ aviremic patients that the percentage of reactivated cultures following combinatory bryostatin-1+JQ1 treatment was identical to the percentage observed with anti-CD3+anti-CD28 antibodies positive control stimulation. Remarkably, in ex vivo cultures of resting CD4+ T cells isolated from 15 HIV-1+ cART-treated aviremic patients, the combinations bryostatin-1+JQ1 and ingenol-B+JQ1 released infectious viruses to levels similar to that obtained with the positive control stimulation. The potent effects of these two combination treatments were already detected 24 hours post-stimulation. These results constitute the first demonstration of LRA

  15. An In-Depth Comparison of Latency-Reversing Agent Combinations in Various In Vitro and Ex Vivo HIV-1 Latency Models Identified Bryostatin-1+JQ1 and Ingenol-B+JQ1 to Potently Reactivate Viral Gene Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcis, Gilles; Kula, Anna; Bouchat, Sophie; Fujinaga, Koh; Corazza, Francis; Ait-Ammar, Amina; Delacourt, Nadège; Melard, Adeline; Kabeya, Kabamba; Vanhulle, Caroline; Van Driessche, Benoit; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Cherrier, Thomas; Pianowski, Luiz F; Gama, Lucio; Schwartz, Christian; Vila, Jorge; Burny, Arsène; Clumeck, Nathan; Moutschen, Michel; De Wit, Stéphane; Peterlin, B Matija; Rouzioux, Christine; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2015-07-01

    The persistence of latently infected cells in patients under combinatory antiretroviral therapy (cART) is a major hurdle to HIV-1 eradication. Strategies to purge these reservoirs are needed and activation of viral gene expression in latently infected cells is one promising strategy. Bromodomain and Extraterminal (BET) bromodomain inhibitors (BETi) are compounds able to reactivate latent proviruses in a positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb)-dependent manner. In this study, we tested the reactivation potential of protein kinase C (PKC) agonists (prostratin, bryostatin-1 and ingenol-B), which are known to activate NF-κB signaling pathway as well as P-TEFb, used alone or in combination with P-TEFb-releasing agents (HMBA and BETi (JQ1, I-BET, I-BET151)). Using in vitro HIV-1 post-integration latency model cell lines of T-lymphoid and myeloid lineages, we demonstrated that PKC agonists and P-TEFb-releasing agents alone acted as potent latency-reversing agents (LRAs) and that their combinations led to synergistic activation of HIV-1 expression at the viral mRNA and protein levels. Mechanistically, combined treatments led to higher activations of P-TEFb and NF-κB than the corresponding individual drug treatments. Importantly, we observed in ex vivo cultures of CD8+-depleted PBMCs from 35 cART-treated HIV-1+ aviremic patients that the percentage of reactivated cultures following combinatory bryostatin-1+JQ1 treatment was identical to the percentage observed with anti-CD3+anti-CD28 antibodies positive control stimulation. Remarkably, in ex vivo cultures of resting CD4+ T cells isolated from 15 HIV-1+ cART-treated aviremic patients, the combinations bryostatin-1+JQ1 and ingenol-B+JQ1 released infectious viruses to levels similar to that obtained with the positive control stimulation. The potent effects of these two combination treatments were already detected 24 hours post-stimulation. These results constitute the first demonstration of LRA combinations

  16. An In-Depth Comparison of Latency-Reversing Agent Combinations in Various In Vitro and Ex Vivo HIV-1 Latency Models Identified Bryostatin-1+JQ1 and Ingenol-B+JQ1 to Potently Reactivate Viral Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchat, Sophie; Fujinaga, Koh; Corazza, Francis; Ait-Ammar, Amina; Delacourt, Nadège; Melard, Adeline; Kabeya, Kabamba; Vanhulle, Caroline; Van Driessche, Benoit; Gatot, Jean-Stéphane; Cherrier, Thomas; Pianowski, Luiz F.; Gama, Lucio; Schwartz, Christian; Vila, Jorge; Burny, Arsène; Clumeck, Nathan; Moutschen, Michel; De Wit, Stéphane; Peterlin, B. Matija; Rouzioux, Christine; Rohr, Olivier; Van Lint, Carine

    2015-01-01

    The persistence of latently infected cells in patients under combinatory antiretroviral therapy (cART) is a major hurdle to HIV-1 eradication. Strategies to purge these reservoirs are needed and activation of viral gene expression in latently infected cells is one promising strategy. Bromodomain and Extraterminal (BET) bromodomain inhibitors (BETi) are compounds able to reactivate latent proviruses in a positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb)-dependent manner. In this study, we tested the reactivation potential of protein kinase C (PKC) agonists (prostratin, bryostatin-1 and ingenol-B), which are known to activate NF-κB signaling pathway as well as P-TEFb, used alone or in combination with P-TEFb-releasing agents (HMBA and BETi (JQ1, I-BET, I-BET151)). Using in vitro HIV-1 post-integration latency model cell lines of T-lymphoid and myeloid lineages, we demonstrated that PKC agonists and P-TEFb-releasing agents alone acted as potent latency-reversing agents (LRAs) and that their combinations led to synergistic activation of HIV-1 expression at the viral mRNA and protein levels. Mechanistically, combined treatments led to higher activations of P-TEFb and NF-κB than the corresponding individual drug treatments. Importantly, we observed in ex vivo cultures of CD8+-depleted PBMCs from 35 cART-treated HIV-1+ aviremic patients that the percentage of reactivated cultures following combinatory bryostatin-1+JQ1 treatment was identical to the percentage observed with anti-CD3+anti-CD28 antibodies positive control stimulation. Remarkably, in ex vivo cultures of resting CD4+ T cells isolated from 15 HIV-1+ cART-treated aviremic patients, the combinations bryostatin-1+JQ1 and ingenol-B+JQ1 released infectious viruses to levels similar to that obtained with the positive control stimulation. The potent effects of these two combination treatments were already detected 24 hours post-stimulation. These results constitute the first demonstration of LRA combinations

  17. The 1-year and 3-month prognostic utility of the AST/ALT ratio and model for end-stage liver disease score in patients with viral liver cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannini, Edoardo; Botta, Federica; Testa, Emanuela; Romagnoli, Paola; Polegato, Simone; Malfatti, Federica; Fumagalli, Alessandra; Chiarbonello, Bruno; Risso, Domenico; Testa, Roberto

    2002-11-01

    The AST/ALT ratio has shown good diagnostic accuracy in patients with chronic viral liver disease. However, its prognostic utility has never been tested. Recently, the Model for End-Stage Liver Disease (MELD) has been proposed as a simple and effective tool to predict survival in patients with liver cirrhosis. The aims of this study were to assess the 3-month and 1-yr prognostic ability of the AST/ALT ratio in a series of patients with virus-related liver cirrhosis, and to evaluate the relationship between the AST/ALT ratio and the MELD score and to compare their prognostic ability. The AST/ALT ratios and MELD scores of 99 patients with liver cirrhosis of viral etiology (73 patients with hepatitis C virus and 26 with hepatitis B virus) who had been followed-up for at least 1 yr were retrospectively calculated and correlated with the patients' 3-month and 1-yr prognosis. Receiver operating characteristic curves were used to determine the AST/ALT ratio and the MELD score cut-offs with the best sensitivity (SS) and specificity (SP) in discriminating between patients who survived and those who died. Univariate survival curves were estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method using the cut-offs identified by means of receiver operating characteristic curves. AST/ALT ratios and MELD scores showed a significant correlation (r(s) = 0.503, p = 0.0001). In all, 8% and 30% of the patients had died after 3 months and 1 yr of follow-up, respectively. AST/ALT ratios and MELD scores were significantly higher among the patients who died during both 3-month and 1-yr follow-up. An AST/ALT ratio cut-off of 1.17 had 87% SS and 52% SP, whereas a MELD cut-off of 9 had 57% SS and 74% SP in discriminating between patients who survived and those who died after I yr. The combined assessment of the AST/ALT ratio and/or MELD score had 90% SS and 78% SP. Survival curves of the patients showed that both parameters clearly discriminated between patients who survived and those who died in the short term

  18. Worsening anatomic outcomes following aflibercept for neovascular age-related macular degeneration in eyes previously well controlled with ranibizumab

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nudleman E

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Eric Nudleman,1 Jeremy D Wolfe,2,3 Maria A Woodward,4 Yoshihiro Yonekawa,2,3 George A Williams,2,3 Tarek S Hassan2,3 1Department of Ophthalmology, Shiley Eye Center, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, CA, 2Beaumont Eye Institute, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, 3Associated Retinal Consultants, Royal Oak, 4Kellogg Eye Center, University of Michigan Medical School, Ann Arbor, MI, USA Purpose: Antivascular endothelial growth factor injection is the mainstay of treating neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD. Previous studies have shown that switching treatment from ranibizumab to aflibercept led to an improvement in eyes with recalcitrant activity. Herein, we identify a unique subset of patients whose eyes with neovascular AMD were previously well controlled with ranibizumab injections were then worsened after being switched to aflibercept. Methods: This is a retrospective interventional case series. Eyes with neovascular AMD, previously well controlled with monthly injections of ranibizumab, which then developed worsening of subretinal fluid after being switched to aflibercept were included. Results: A total of 17 eyes were included. All eyes developed increased subretinal fluid when switched from ranibizumab to aflibercept. Fourteen patients were switched back to ranibizumab after a single injection of aflibercept and had subsequent rapid resolution of subretinal fluid. Three patients continued with monthly aflibercept injections for two subsequent months and demonstrated the persistence of the increased subretinal fluid until they were switched back to treatment with ranibizumab at which time the fluid resolved. No eye had persistent decline in visual acuity. Conclusion: Switching from intravitreal ranibizumab to aflibercept in eyes with well-controlled neovascular AMD may result in worsening in a subset of patients and resolves when therapy is switched back to ranibizumab. Keywords: anti

  19. Prognostic Impact of BNP Variations in Patients Admitted for Acute Decompensated Heart Failure with In-Hospital Worsening Renal Function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolfo, D; Stenner, E; Merlo, M; Porto, A G; Moras, C; Barbati, G; Aleksova, A; Buiatti, A; Sinagra, G

    2017-03-01

    The significance of worsening renal function (WRF) in patients admitted for acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) is still controversial. We hypothesised that changes in brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) might identify patients with optimal diuretic responsiveness resulting in transient WRF, not negatively affecting the prognosis. Our aim was to verify if in-hospital trends of BNP might be helpful in the stratification of patients with WRF after treatment for ADHF. 122 consecutive patients admitted for ADHF were enrolled. Brain natriuretic peptide and eGFR were evaluated at admission and discharge. A 20% relative decrease in eGFR defined WRF, whereas a BNP reduction ≥40% was considered significant. The primary combined endpoint was death/urgent heart transplantation and re-hospitalisation for ADHF. Worsening renal function occurred in 23% of patients without differences in outcome between patients with and without WRF (43% vs. 45%, p=0.597). A significant reduction in BNP levels over the hospitalisation occurred in 59% of the overall population and in 71% of patients with WRF. At a median follow-up of 13.0 (IQR 6-36) months, WRF patients with ≥40% BNP reduction had a lower rate of death/urgent heart transplantation/re-hospitalisation compared to WRF patients without BNP reduction (30% and 75%, respectively; p=0.007). Favourable BNP trend was the strongest variable in predicting the outcome in WRF patients (HR 0.222, 95% CI 0.066-0.753, p=0.016). Worsening renal function does not affect the prognosis of ADHF and, when associated with a significant BNP reduction, identifies patients with adequate decongestion at discharge and favourable outcome. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Enrichment of Ly6Chi monocytes by multiple GM-CSF injections with HBV vaccine contributes to viral clearance in a HBV mouse model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Weidong; Zhou, Xian; Zhao, Gan; Lin, Qing; Wang, Xianzheng; Yu, Xueping; Wang, Bin

    2017-12-02

    Adjuvants are considered a necessary component for HBV therapeutic vaccines but few are licensed in clinical practice due to concerns about safety or efficiency. In our recent study, we established that a combination protocol of 3-day pretreatments with GM-CSF before a vaccination (3 × GM-CSF+VACCINE) into the same injection site could break immune tolerance and cause over 90% reduction of HBsAg level in the HBsAg transgenic mouse model. Herein, we further investigated the therapeutic potential of the combination in AAV8-1.3HBV-infected mice. After 4 vaccinations, both serum HBeAg and HBsAg were cleared and there was a 95% reduction of HBV-positive hepatocytes, in addition to the presence of large number of infiltrating CD8 + T cells in the livers. Mechanistically, the HBV-specific T-cell responses were elicited via a 3 × GM-CSF+VACCINE-induced conversion of CCR2-dependent CD11b + Ly6C hi monocytes into CD11b + CD11c + DCs. Experimental depletion of Ly6C hi monocytes resulted in a defective HBV-specific immune response thereby abrogating HBV eradication. This vaccination strategy could lead to development of an effective therapeutic protocol against chronic HBV in infected patients.

  1. Conditions for Viral Influence Spreading through Multiplex Correlated Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yanqing; Havlin, Shlomo; Makse, Hernán A.

    2014-04-01

    A fundamental problem in network science is to predict how certain individuals are able to initiate new networks to spring up "new ideas." Frequently, these changes in trends are triggered by a few innovators who rapidly impose their ideas through "viral" influence spreading, producing cascades of followers and fragmenting an old network to create a new one. Typical examples include the rise of scientific ideas or abrupt changes in social media, like the rise of Facebook to the detriment of Myspace. How this process arises in practice has not been conclusively demonstrated. Here, we show that a condition for sustaining a viral spreading process is the existence of a multiplex-correlated graph with hidden "influence links." Analytical solutions predict percolation-phase transitions, either abrupt or continuous, where networks are disintegrated through viral cascades of followers, as in empirical data. Our modeling predicts the strict conditions to sustain a large viral spreading via a scaling form of the local correlation function between multilayers, which we also confirm empirically. Ultimately, the theory predicts the conditions for viral cascading in a large class of multiplex networks ranging from social to financial systems and markets.

  2. Viral diversity threshold for adaptive immunity in prokaryotes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Ariel D; Wolf, Yuri I; Lobkovsky, Alexander E; Gilmore, Michael S; Koonin, Eugene V

    2012-12-04

    Bacteria and archaea face continual onslaughts of rapidly diversifying viruses and plasmids. Many prokaryotes maintain adaptive immune systems known as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated genes (Cas). CRISPR-Cas systems are genomic sensors that serially acquire viral and plasmid DNA fragments (spacers) that are utilized to target and cleave matching viral and plasmid DNA in subsequent genomic invasions, offering critical immunological memory. Only 50% of sequenced bacteria possess CRISPR-Cas immunity, in contrast to over 90% of sequenced archaea. To probe why half of bacteria lack CRISPR-Cas immunity, we combined comparative genomics and mathematical modeling. Analysis of hundreds of diverse prokaryotic genomes shows that CRISPR-Cas systems are substantially more prevalent in thermophiles than in mesophiles. With sequenced bacteria disproportionately mesophilic and sequenced archaea mostly thermophilic, the presence of CRISPR-Cas appears to depend more on environmental temperature than on bacterial-archaeal taxonomy. Mutation rates are typically severalfold higher in mesophilic prokaryotes than in thermophilic prokaryotes. To quantitatively test whether accelerated viral mutation leads microbes to lose CRISPR-Cas systems, we developed a stochastic model of virus-CRISPR coevolution. The model competes CRISPR-Cas-positive (CRISPR-Cas+) prokaryotes against CRISPR-Cas-negative (CRISPR-Cas-) prokaryotes, continually weighing the antiviral benefits conferred by CRISPR-Cas immunity against its fitness costs. Tracking this cost-benefit analysis across parameter space reveals viral mutation rate thresholds beyond which CRISPR-Cas cannot provide sufficient immunity and is purged from host populations. These results offer a simple, testable viral diversity hypothesis to explain why mesophilic bacteria disproportionately lack CRISPR-Cas immunity. More generally, fundamental limits on the adaptability of biological sensors

  3. Estimating Initial Viral Levels during Simian Immunodeficiency Virus/Human Immunodeficiency Virus Reactivation from Latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinkevych, Mykola; Fennessey, Christine M; Cromer, Deborah; Tolstrup, Martin; Søgaard, Ole S; Rasmussen, Thomas A; Keele, Brandon F; Davenport, Miles P

    2018-01-15

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viremia rebounds rapidly after treatment interruption, and a variety of strategies are being explored to reduce or control viral reactivation posttreatment. This viral rebound arises from reactivation of individual latently infected cells, which spread during ongoing rounds of productive infection. The level of virus produced by the initial individual reactivating cells is not known, although it may have major implications for the ability of different immune interventions to control viral rebound. Here we use data from both HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) treatment interruption studies to estimate the initial viral load postinterruption and thereby the initial individual reactivation event. Using a barcoded virus (SIVmac239M) to track reactivation from individual latent cells, we use the observed viral growth rates and frequency of reactivation to model the dynamics of reactivation to estimate that a single reactivated latent cell can produce an average viral load equivalent to ∼0.1 to 0.5 viral RNA (vRNA) copies/ml. Modeling of treatment interruption in HIV suggests an initial viral load equivalent of ∼0.6 to 1 vRNA copies/ml. These low viral loads immediately following latent cell reactivation provide a window of opportunity for viral control by host immunity, before further replication allows viral spread. This work shows the initial levels of viral production that must be controlled in order to successfully suppress HIV reactivation following treatment interruption. IMPORTANCE Current treatment for HIV is able to suppress viral replication and prevent disease progression. However, treatment cannot eradicate infection, because the virus lies silent within latently infected cells. If treatment is stopped, the virus usually rebounds above the level of detection within a few weeks. There are a number of approaches being tested aimed at either eradicating latently infected cells or controlling the virus if it

  4. Possible mechanisms underlying bacterial-viral interactions in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Materials and method: For this review, PubMed and Google search engines were used to select about 45 publications on bacterial-viral interactions in respiratory conditions. Studies on animal models were also included in the review. The publications were compared and summarized using a narrative review approach and ...

  5. The importance of lytic and nonlytic immune responses in viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wodarz, Dominik; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2002-01-01

    of the two types of component depend on the cytopathicity of the virus relative to its rate of replication. If the viral cytopathicity is low relative to the rate of viral replication, the model predicts that a combination of lytic and nonlytic effector mechanisms is likely to be required to resolve...... the disease, particularly if the virus replicates at a fast rate. By contrast, if viral cytopathicity is high relative to the replication rate of the virus, then lytic and nonlytic mechanisms can, in principle, resolve the infection independently. We discuss our findings in the context of specific viral......Antiviral immune effector mechanisms can be divided broadly into lytic and nonlytic components. We use mathematical models to investigate the fundamental question of which type of response is required to combat different types of viral infection. According to our model, the relative roles...

  6. Encefalitis virales en la infancia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monserrat Téllez de Meneses

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available La encefalitis viral es una enfermedad grave que implica el compromiso inflamatorio del parénquima cerebral. Las infecciones virales del SNC ocurren con frecuencia como complicación de infecciones virales sistémicas. Más de 100 virus están implicados como agentes causales, entre los cuales el virus Herpes simplex tipo I, es el agente causal más frecuente de encefalitis no epidémica en todos los grupos poblacionales del mundo; es el responsable de los casos más graves en todas las edades. Muchos de los virus para los cuales existe vacunas también pueden causar encefalitis como: sarampión, paperas, polio, rabia, rubéola, varicela. El virus produce una inflamación del tejido cerebral, la cual puede evolucionar a una destrucción de neuronas, provocar hemorragia y daño cerebral, dando lugar a encefalitis graves, como la encefalitis necrotizante o hemorrágica, con mucho peor pronóstico, produciendo secuelas graves, incluso la muerte. El cuadro clínico, incluye la presencia de cefalea, fiebre y alteración de la conciencia, de rápida progresión. El pronóstico de las encefalitis víricas es variable, algunos casos son leves, con recuperación completa, sin embargo existen casos graves que pueden ocasionar secuelas importantes a nivel cerebral. Es fundamental realizar un diagnóstico lo antes posible, a través de pruebas de laboratorio (bioquímica, PCR, cultivos y de neuroimagen (TAC, RM y ante todo, la instauración de un tratamiento precoz para evitar la evolución del proceso y sus posibles complicaciones. El pronóstico empeora si se retrasa la instauración del tratamiento.

  7. Evaluation of Viral Meningoencephalitis Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Handan Ilhan

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate retrospectively adult cases of viral encephalitis. METHOD: Fifteen patients described viral encephalitis hospitalized between the years 2006-2011 follow-up and treatment at the infectious diseases clinic were analyzed retrospectively. RESULTS: Most of the patients (%60 had applied in the spring. Fever (87%, confusion (73%, neck stiffness (73%, headache (73%, nausea-vomiting (33%, loss of consciousness (33%, amnesia (33%, agitation (20%, convulsion (%20, focal neurological signs (13%, Brudzinski-sign (13% were most frequently encountered findings. Electroencephalography test was applied to 13 of 14 patients, and pathological findings compatible with encephalitis have been found. Radiological imaging methods such as CT and MRI were performed in 9 of the 14 patients, and findings consistent with encephalitis were reported. All of initial cerebrospinal fluid (CSF samples were abnormal. The domination of the first examples was lymphocytes in 14 patients; only one patient had an increase in neutrophilic cells have been found. CSF protein level was high in nine patients, and low glucose level was detected in two patients. Herpes simplex virus polymerized chain reaction (PCR analyze was performed to fourteen patients CSF. Only two of them (14% were found positive. One of the patients sample selectively examined was found to be Parvovirus B19 (+, the other patient urine sample Jacobs-creutzfeld virus PCR was found to be positively. Empiric acyclovir therapy was given to all patients. Neuropsychiatric squeal developed at the one patient. CONCLUSION: The cases in the forefront of change in mental status viral meningoencephalitis should be considered and empirical treatment with acyclovir should be started. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2012; 11(4.000: 447-452

  8. Selective alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor agonists worsen disease in experimental colitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, Susanne A.; Verstege, Marleen I.; van der Zanden, Esmerij P.; Deeks, Nigel; Bulmer, David C.; Skynner, Michael; Lee, Kevin; te Velde, Anje A.; Boeckxstaens, Guy E.; de Jonge, Wouter J.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: In various models vagus nerve activation has been shown to ameliorate intestinal inflammation, via nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) expressed on immune cells. As the alpha7 nAChR has been put forward to mediate this effect, we studied the effect of nicotine and two

  9. Mechanisms of tramadol-related neurotoxicity in the rat: Does diazepam/tramadol combination play a worsening role in overdose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagard, Camille; Chevillard, Lucie; Malissin, Isabelle; Risède, Patricia; Callebert, Jacques; Labat, Laurence; Launay, Jean-Marie; Laplanche, Jean-Louis; Mégarbane, Bruno

    2016-11-01

    Poisoning with opioid analgesics including tramadol represents a challenge. Tramadol may induce respiratory depression, seizures and serotonin syndrome, possibly worsened when in combination to benzodiazepines. Our objectives were to investigate tramadol-related neurotoxicity, consequences of diazepam/tramadol combination, and mechanisms of drug-drug interactions in rats. Median lethal-doses were determined using Dixon-Bruce's up-and-down method. Sedation, seizures, electroencephalography and plethysmography parameters were studied. Concentrations of tramadol and its metabolites were measured using liquid-chromatography-high-resolution-mass-spectrometry. Plasma, platelet and brain monoamines were measured using liquid-chromatography coupled to fluorimetry. Median lethal-doses of tramadol and diazepam/tramadol combination did not significantly differ, although time-to-death was longer with combination (P=0.04). Tramadol induced dose-dependent sedation (Pdiazepam/tramadol combination abolished seizures but significantly enhanced sedation (Pdiazepam/tramadol combination. Interestingly neither pretreatment with cyproheptadine (a serotonin-receptor antagonist) nor a benserazide/5-hydroxytryptophane combination (enhancing brain serotonin) reduced tramadol-induced seizures. Our study shows that diazepam/tramadol combination does not worsen tramadol-induced fatality risk but alters its toxicity pattern with enhanced respiratory depression but abolished seizures. Drug-drug interaction is mainly pharmacodynamic but increased plasma M1 and M5 metabolites may also contribute to enhancing respiratory depression. Tramadol-induced seizures are independent of brain serotonin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Reduction in body weight but worsening renal function with late ultrafiltration for treatment of acute decompensated heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dev, Sandesh; Shirolkar, Shailesh C; Stevens, Susanna R; Shaw, Linda K; Adams, Patricia A; Felker, G Michael; Rogers, Joseph G; O'Connor, Christopher M

    2012-01-01

    The safety, effectiveness and indications for ultrafiltration (UF) are not well established. We hypothesized that UF would not worsen renal function in patients with heart failure (HF) who were not responding to medical therapy. Data was collected for patients who underwent UF between 2006 and 2010 (n = 72, median age 61 years, 54% males, 61% Caucasian, 54% left ventricular ejection fraction ≥ 40%). Baseline GFR was 38 ml/min/1.73 m2. All patients were initially treated with loop diuretics and 58% required a thiazide-like diuretic or vasoactive agent. UF resulted in total fluid removal of 11.3 liters and weight loss was 9.7 kg. The median decrease in eGFR during UF was 4.5 ml/min/m2 (IQR--13, 0; p < 0.01) and 43% of patients experienced a ≥ 20% decrease in eGFR. Ten percent of patients required dialysis and 13% died, received a ventricular assist device/cardiac transplant or were discharged to hospice. In a cohort of HF patients who did not respond to medical therapy, UF was associated not only with a significant reduction of body weight and fluid removal, but also acute worsening of renal function. Further research to identify the appropriate population for UF, long-term outcomes and the intensity of treatment is required if UF is to gain wide acceptance for HF management. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Analysis of hepatitis C viral dynamics using Latin hypercube sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pachpute, Gaurav; Chakrabarty, Siddhartha P.

    2012-12-01

    We consider a mathematical model comprising four coupled ordinary differential equations (ODEs) to study hepatitis C viral dynamics. The model includes the efficacies of a combination therapy of interferon and ribavirin. There are two main objectives of this paper. The first one is to approximate the percentage of cases in which there is a viral clearance in absence of treatment as well as percentage of response to treatment for various efficacy levels. The other is to better understand and identify the parameters that play a key role in the decline of viral load and can be estimated in a clinical setting. A condition for the stability of the uninfected and the infected steady states is presented. A large number of sample points for the model parameters (which are physiologically feasible) are generated using Latin hypercube sampling. An analysis of the simulated values identifies that, approximately 29.85% cases result in clearance of the virus during the early phase of the infection. Results from the χ2 and the Spearman's tests done on the samples, indicate a distinctly different distribution for certain parameters for the cases exhibiting viral clearance under the combination therapy.

  12. Worsening diastolic function is associated with elevated fasting plasma glucose and increased left ventricular mass in a supra-additive fashion in an elderly, healthy, Swedish population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pareek, Manan; Nielsen, Mette Lundgren; Gerke, Oke

    2015-01-01

    AIMS: To examine whether increasing fasting plasma glucose (FPG) levels were associated with worsening left ventricular (LV) diastolic function, independently of LV mass index (LVMI) in elderly, otherwise healthy subjects. METHODS AND RESULTS: We tested cross-sectional associations between...

  13. Worsening Cognitive Impairment and Neurodegenerative Pathology Progressively Increase Risk for Delirium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Daniel H.J.; Skelly, Donal T.; Murray, Carol; Hennessy, Edel; Bowen, Jordan; Norton, Samuel; Brayne, Carol; Rahkonen, Terhi; Sulkava, Raimo; Sanderson, David J.; Rawlins, J. Nicholas; Bannerman, David M.; MacLullich, Alasdair M.J.; Cunningham, Colm

    2015-01-01

    Background Delirium is a profound neuropsychiatric disturbance precipitated by acute illness. Although dementia is the major risk factor this has typically been considered a binary quantity (i.e., cognitively impaired versus cognitively normal) with respect to delirium risk. We used humans and mice to address the hypothesis that the severity of underlying neurodegenerative changes and/or cognitive impairment progressively alters delirium risk. Methods Humans in a population-based longitudinal study, Vantaa 85+, were followed for incident delirium. Odds for reporting delirium at follow-up (outcome) were modeled using random-effects logistic regression, where prior cognitive impairment measured by Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) (exposure) was considered. To address whether underlying neurodegenerative pathology increased susceptibility to acute cognitive change, mice at three stages of neurodegenerative disease progression (ME7 model of neurodegeneration: controls, 12 weeks, and 16 weeks) were assessed for acute cognitive dysfunction upon systemic inflammation induced by bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 100 μg/kg). Synaptic and axonal correlates of susceptibility to acute dysfunction were assessed using immunohistochemistry. Results In the Vantaa cohort, 465 persons (88.4 ± 2.8 years) completed MMSE at baseline. For every MMSE point lost, risk of incident delirium increased by 5% (p = 0.02). LPS precipitated severe and fluctuating cognitive deficits in 16-week ME7 mice but lower incidence or no deficits in 12-week ME7 and controls, respectively. This was associated with progressive thalamic synaptic loss and axonal pathology. Conclusion A human population-based cohort with graded severity of existing cognitive impairment and a mouse model with progressing neurodegeneration both indicate that the risk of delirium increases with greater severity of pre-existing cognitive impairment and neuropathology. PMID:25239680

  14. CD4 T cell knockout does not protect against kidney injury and worsens cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravichandran, Kameswaran; Wang, Qian; Ozkok, Abdullah; Jani, Alkesh; Li, Howard; He, Zhibin; Ljubanovic, Danica; Weiser-Evans, Mary C; Nemenoff, Raphael A; Edelstein, Charles L

    2016-04-01

    Most previous studies of cisplatin-induced acute kidney injury (AKI) have been in models of acute, high-dose cisplatin administration that leads to mortality in non-tumor-bearing mice. The aim of the study was to determine whether CD4 T cell knockout protects against AKI and cancer in a clinically relevant model of low-dose cisplatin-induced AKI in mice with cancer. Kidney function, serum neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL), acute tubular necrosis (ATN), and tubular apoptosis score were the same in wild-type and CD4 -/- mice with AKI. The lack of protection against AKI in CD4 -/- mice was associated with an increase in extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38, CXCL1, and TNF-α, mediators of AKI and fibrosis, in both cisplatin-treated CD4 -/- mice and wild-type mice. The lack of protection was independent of the presence of cancer or not. Tumor size was double, and cisplatin had an impaired therapeutic effect on the tumors in CD4 -/- vs. wild-type mice. Mice depleted of CD4 T cells using the GK1.5 antibody were not protected against AKI and had larger tumors and lesser response to cisplatin. In summary, in a clinically relevant model of cisplatin-induced AKI in mice with cancer, (1) CD4 -/- mice were not protected against AKI; (2) ERK, p38, CXCL1, and TNF-α, known mediators of AKI, and interstitial fibrosis were increased in CD4 -/- kidneys; and (3) CD4 -/- mice had faster tumor growth and an impaired therapeutic effect of cisplatin on the tumors. The data warns against the use of CD4 T cell inhibition to attenuate cisplatin-induced AKI in patients with cancer. A clinically relevant low-dose cisplatin model of AKI in mice with cancer was used. CD4 -/- mice were not functionally or histologically protected against AKI. CD4 -/- mice had faster tumor growth. CD4 -/- mice had an impaired therapeutic effect of cisplatin on the tumors. Mice depleted of CD4 T cells were not protected against AKI and had larger tumors.

  15. Viral Infection in Renal Transplant Recipients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovana Cukuranovic

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Viruses are among the most common causes of opportunistic infection after transplantation. The risk for viral infection is a function of the specific virus encountered, the intensity of immune suppression used to prevent graft rejection, and other host factors governing susceptibility. Although cytomegalovirus is the most common opportunistic pathogen seen in transplant recipients, numerous other viruses have also affected outcomes. In some cases, preventive measures such as pretransplant screening, prophylactic antiviral therapy, or posttransplant viral monitoring may limit the impact of these infections. Recent advances in laboratory monitoring and antiviral therapy have improved outcomes. Studies of viral latency, reactivation, and the cellular effects of viral infection will provide clues for future strategies in prevention and treatment of viral infections. This paper will summarize the major viral infections seen following transplant and discuss strategies for prevention and management of these potential pathogens.

  16. T Cell Exhaustion During Persistent Viral Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahan, Shannon M.; Wherry, E. John; Zajac, Allan J.

    2015-01-01

    Although robust and highly effective anti-viral T cells contribute to the clearance of many acute infections, viral persistence is associated with the development of functionally inferior, exhausted, T cell responses. Exhaustion develops in a step-wise and progressive manner, ranges in severity, and can culminate in the deletion of the anti-viral T cells. This disarming of the response is consequential as it compromises viral control and potentially serves to dampen immune-mediated damage. Exhausted T cells are unable to elaborate typical anti-viral effector functions. They are characterized by the sustained upregulation of inhibitory receptors and display a gene expression profile that distinguishes them from prototypic effector and memory T cell populations. In this review we discuss the properties of exhausted T cells; the virological and immunological conditions that favor their development; the cellular and molecular signals that sustain the exhausted state; and strategies for preventing and reversing exhaustion to favor viral control. PMID:25620767

  17. CXCL12 expression promotes esophageal squamous cell carcinoma proliferation and worsens the prognosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchi, Yusuke; Takeuchi, Hiroya; Matsuda, Sachiko; Saikawa, Yoshiro; Kawakubo, Hirofumi; Wada, Norihito; Takahashi, Tsunehiro; Nakamura, Rieko; Fukuda, Kazumasa; Omori, Tai; Kitagawa, Yuko

    2016-01-01

    The chemokine CXCL12 and its corresponding receptor CXCR4 are key players in the development of several cancers. Therefore, we hypothesized that there is a functional causality between CXCL12 expression and tumor progression in patients with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). We performed an immunohistochemical analysis in 79 consecutive patients with ESCC. We performed in vitro and in vivo cell proliferation assays using ESCC cell lines and a newly established transfectant stably overexpressing CXCL12. Immunohistochemistry revealed positive CXCR4 and CXCL12 expression in 48 (61 %) and 62 (78 %) patients, respectively. Additionally, the expression levels did not significantly correlate with any clinicopathological factors. The MIB-1 proliferation index was markedly higher in ESCC with a positive expression of CXCR4 or CXCL12. Positive CXCL12 expression was significantly correlated with lower recurrence-free survival (RFS, p = 0.02). Cox’s hazard models revealed CXCL12 expression as an independent predictive factor for recurrence. In vitro, CXCL12 exposure or overexpression enhanced ESCC proliferation; and AMD3100, a specific inhibitor of CXCR4, equally decreased proliferation irrespective of CXCL12 exposure or overexpression. In the mouse model, AMD3100 significantly decreased ESCC tumor size (p = 0.03). CXCL12 stimulates ESCC proliferation, and its expression levels are related to lower RFS in patients with ESCC. Our findings indicate that positive CXCL12 expression may be a useful marker for predicting the outcome in patients with ESCC and is a potentially new therapeutic target for ESCC

  18. Acute Viral Hepatitis in Pediatric Age Groups

    OpenAIRE

    Sudhamshu KC; Dilip Sharma; Nandu Silwal; Bhupendra Kumar Basnet

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Our clinical experience showed that there has been no decrease in pediatric cases of acute viral hepatitis in Kathmandu. The objective of the study was to analyze the etiology, clinical features, laboratory parameters, sonological findings and other to determine the probable prognostic factors of Acute Viral Hepatitis in pediatric population. Methods: Consecutive patients of suspected Acute Viral Hepatitis, below the age of 15 years, attending the liver clinic between Januar...

  19. Consumers’ attitude towards viral marketing in Pakistan

    OpenAIRE

    Kiani Irshad ZERNIGAH; Kamran SOHAIL

    2012-01-01

    The rapid advancement of technology has opened many costeffective avenues for marketers to promote their products. One of the emerging techniques of products promotion through the use of technology is viral marketing that is becoming a popular direct marketing tool for marketers across the world. Therefore, marketers should understand factors that result in increased acceptance of viral marketing by consumers. The present research was conducted to investigate consumers’ attitude towards viral...

  20. Viral Advertising on Facebook in Vietnam

    OpenAIRE

    Tran, Phuong

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to explore which factors affect the effectiveness of viral advertising on Facebook in Vietnam. The quantitative research method is applied in this research and the sample is Vietnamese Facebook users. After the data analysis stage using SPSS, it became clear that weak ties, perceptual affinity and emotions have an impact on the effectiveness of viral advertising. The results provide a pratical implication of how to make an Ad which can go viral on Facebook. Moreo...

  1. Viral Advertising: Branding Effects from Consumers’ Perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Jiang, Yueqing

    2012-01-01

    Viral advertising is popular for its high viral transmission results online. Its increased impacts on the social media users have been noticed by the author. At the same time, viewers’ negative attitudes toward traditional advertisements become obvious which can be regarded as the phenomenon of advertisement avoidance. It arouses author’s interests to know how the viral advertising reduces the viewers’ negative emotions and its performances in branding online. This paper is going to look into...

  2. [Workshop on Molecular Epidemiology of Viral Diseases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, B; Cabrera, L; Arias, C F

    1997-01-01

    A workshop on viral epidemiology was held on September 29, 1995 at the Medical School of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de Mexico. The aim of this workshop was to promote interaction among scientists working in viral epidemiology. Eighteen scientists from ten institutions presented their experiences and work. General aspects of the epidemiology of meaningful viral diseases in the country were discussed, and lectures presented on the rota, polio, respiratory syncytial, dengue, papiloma, rabies, VIH and hepatitis viruses.

  3. The importance of lytic and nonlytic immune responses in viral infections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wodarz, Dominik; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Thomsen, Allan Randrup

    2002-01-01

    Antiviral immune effector mechanisms can be divided broadly into lytic and nonlytic components. We use mathematical models to investigate the fundamental question of which type of response is required to combat different types of viral infection. According to our model, the relative roles...... the disease, particularly if the virus replicates at a fast rate. By contrast, if viral cytopathicity is high relative to the replication rate of the virus, then lytic and nonlytic mechanisms can, in principle, resolve the infection independently. We discuss our findings in the context of specific viral...... infections and use our model to interpret empirical data....

  4. Hepatitis A through E (Viral Hepatitis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Nutrition Clinical Trials Primary Biliary Cholangitis Definition & Facts Symptoms & Causes Diagnosis Treatment Eating, Diet, & Nutrition Clinical Trials Wilson Disease Hepatitis (Viral) View or Print All Sections What ...

  5. Worsening dual-task gait costs after concussion and their association with subsequent sport-related injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, David Robert; Buckley, Thomas; Lynall, Robert C; Meehan, William

    2018-02-28

    Prior studies suggest that concussion may lead to an increased risk of a subsequent time-loss sport-related injury, but the mechanisms responsible are unknown. We measured the symptom and dual-task gait outcomes for athletes initially post-concussion and after clinical recovery. Participants then self-reported any additional injuries incurred in the year after their concussion. Forty-two athletes (52% female, mean age=16.8±3.2 years) completed the study. They underwent a dual-task gait evaluation and symptom inventory within 21 days post-concussion, and again after they were deemed clinically recovered. Approximately one year later, participants documented if they had sustained any subsequent sport-related injuries. Repeated measures ANOVAs were used to evaluate changes in dual-task gait and symptoms across time and between groups. A significant group*time interaction (p=0.02) indicated that the group who went on to sustain a subsequent time-loss injury after returning to sports (n=15) demonstrated significant average walking speed dual-task cost worsening across time (-17.9±9.1% vs. -25.1±12.5%; p=0.007). In contrast, the group who did not sustain an additional injury walked with consistent dual-task cost values across time (-25.2±9.2% vs. -24.6±8.4%; p=0.76). Symptoms improved for all participants (main effect of time p<0.001; PCSS= 25.0±16.9 vs. 2.8±7.5; p<0.001), but did not differ between groups (p=0.77). Significant dual-task gait cost worsening throughout concussion recovery was associated with time-loss injuries during sports in the year after a concussion. These findings indicate that worsening ability to execute a concurrent gait and cognitive task may relate to the risk of incurring an injury during sports after clinical concussion recovery.

  6. Viral diseases of northern ungulates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Frölich

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes viral diseases reported in northern ungulates and those that are a potential threat to these species. The following diseases are discussed: bovine viral diarrhoea/mucosal disease (BVD/MD, alphaherpesvirus infections, malignant catarrhal fever (MCF, poxvirus infections, parainfluenza type 3 virus infection, Alvsborg disease, foot-and-mouth disease, epizootic haemorrhage disease of deer and bluetongue disease, rabies, respiratory syncytial virus infection, adenovirus infection, hog-cholera, Aujeszky's disease and equine herpesvirus infections. There are no significant differences in antibody prevalence to BVDV among deer in habitats with high, intermediate and low density of cattle. In addition, sequence analysis from the BVDV isolated from roe deer (Capreolus capreolus showed that this strain was unique within BVDV group I. Distinct BVDV strains might circulate in free-ranging roe deer populations in Germany and virus transmission may be independent of domestic livestock. Similar results have been obtained in a serological survey of alpha-herpesviruses in deer in Germany. Malignant catarrhal fever was studied in fallow deer (Cervus dama in Germany: the seroprevalence and positive PCR results detected in sheep originating from the same area as the antibody-positive deer might indicate that sheep are the main reservoir animals. Contagious ecthyma (CE is a common disease in domestic sheep and goats caused by the orf virus. CE has been diagnosed in Rocky Mountain bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis, mountain goats (Oreamnos americanus, Dall sheep (Ovis dalli, chamois (Rupkapra rupi-capra, muskox {Ovibos moschatus and reindeer (Rangifer tarandus. Most parainfluenza type 3 virus infections are mild or clinically undetectable. Serological surveys in wildlife have been successfully conducted in many species. In 1985, a new disease was identified in Swedish moose (Alces alces, designated as Alvsborg disease. This wasting syndrome probably

  7. Baseline predictors of worsening apathy in Parkinson's disease: A prospective longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wee, Natalie; Kandiah, Nagaendran; Acharyya, Sanchalika; Chander, Russell J; Ng, Aloysius; Au, Wing Lok; Tan, Louis C S

    2016-02-01

    Apathy is one of the most common behavioural disorders in Parkinson's disease (PD) and contributes significantly to a reduced quality of life in PD patients. We conducted a prospective longitudinal study of 89 mild PD patients over 18 months, measuring apathy symptoms at 6-monthly intervals using the Starkstein Apathy Scale, as well as measures of motor and non-motor symptoms, cognitive function, and functional disability at baseline. Mixed-effects models were used to characterise the individual trajectories of apathy symptom severity, and linear regression with stepwise elimination procedure was used to select significant baseline predictors. Clinically significant levels of apathy were present in 42.7% of our sample at baseline, with symptom severity remaining relatively stable on average over the course of 18 months. Male gender, lower educational attainment, higher depression symptom severity, more severe functional disability, and the presence of dyskinesias at study entry predicted increasing apathy over the subsequent 18 months. Patients with these factors are at risk for progression of apathy, which may be prevented by treating depression and functional disability. Further studies are needed to address both the specific neurobiological pathways and psychosocial factors underpinning apathy in PD. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Does lower limb exercise worsen renal artery hemodynamics in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysm?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anqiang Sun

    Full Text Available Renal artery stenosis (RAS and renal complications emerge in some patients after endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR to treat abdominal aorta aneurysm (AAA. The mechanisms for the causes of these problems are not clear. We hypothesized that for EVAR patients, lower limb exercise could negatively influence the physiology of the renal artery and the renal function, by decreasing the blood flow velocity and changing the hemodynamics in the renal arteries. To evaluate this hypothesis, pre- and post-operative models of the abdominal aorta were reconstructed based on CT images. The hemodynamic environment was numerically simulated under rest and lower limb exercise conditions. The results revealed that in the renal arteries, lower limb exercise decreased the wall shear stress (WSS, increased the oscillatory shear index (OSI and increased the relative residence time (RRT. EVAR further enhanced these effects. Because these parameters are related to artery stenosis and atherosclerosis, this preliminary study concluded that lower limb exercise may increase the potential risk of inducing renal artery stenosis and renal complications for AAA patients. This finding could help elucidate the mechanism of renal artery stenosis and renal complications after EVAR and warn us to reconsider the management and nursing care of AAA patients.

  9. DNA cleavage enzymes for treatment of persistent viral infections: Recent advances and the pathway forward

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Nicholas D., E-mail: nweber@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Aubert, Martine, E-mail: maubert@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Dang, Chung H., E-mail: cdang@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Stone, Daniel, E-mail: dstone2@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Jerome, Keith R., E-mail: kjerome@fhcrc.org [Vaccine and Infectious Disease Division, Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center, 1100 Fairview Ave N, E5-110, Seattle, WA 98109 (United States); Department of Laboratory Medicine, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Department of Microbiology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States)

    2014-04-15

    Treatment for most persistent viral infections consists of palliative drug options rather than curative approaches. This is often because long-lasting viral DNA in infected cells is not affected by current antivirals, providing a source for viral persistence and reactivation. Targeting latent viral DNA itself could therefore provide a basis for novel curative strategies. DNA cleavage enzymes can be used to induce targeted mutagenesis of specific genes, including those of exogenous viruses. Although initial in vitro and even in vivo studies have been carried out using DNA cleavage enzymes targeting various viruses, many questions still remain concerning the feasibility of these strategies as they transition into preclinical research. Here, we review the most recent findings on DNA cleavage enzymes for human viral infections, consider the most relevant animal models for several human viral infections, and address issues regarding safety and enzyme delivery. Results from well-designed in vivo studies will ideally provide answers to the most urgent remaining questions, and allow continued progress toward clinical application. - Highlights: • Recent in vitro and in vivo results for DNA cleavage enzymes targeting persistent viral infections. • Analysis of the best animal models for testing enzymes for HBV, HSV, HIV and HPV. • Challenges facing in vivo delivery of therapeutic enzymes for persistent viral infections. • Safety issues to be addressed with proper animal studies.

  10. DNA cleavage enzymes for treatment of persistent viral infections: Recent advances and the pathway forward

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weber, Nicholas D.; Aubert, Martine; Dang, Chung H.; Stone, Daniel; Jerome, Keith R.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment for most persistent viral infections consists of palliative drug options rather than curative approaches. This is often because long-lasting viral DNA in infected cells is not affected by current antivirals, providing a source for viral persistence and reactivation. Targeting latent viral DNA itself could therefore provide a basis for novel curative strategies. DNA cleavage enzymes can be used to induce targeted mutagenesis of specific genes, including those of exogenous viruses. Although initial in vitro and even in vivo studies have been carried out using DNA cleavage enzymes targeting various viruses, many questions still remain concerning the feasibility of these strategies as they transition into preclinical research. Here, we review the most recent findings on DNA cleavage enzymes for human viral infections, consider the most relevant animal models for several human viral infections, and address issues regarding safety and enzyme delivery. Results from well-designed in vivo studies will ideally provide answers to the most urgent remaining questions, and allow continued progress toward clinical application. - Highlights: • Recent in vitro and in vivo results for DNA cleavage enzymes targeting persistent viral infections. • Analysis of the best animal models for testing enzymes for HBV, HSV, HIV and HPV. • Challenges facing in vivo delivery of therapeutic enzymes for persistent viral infections. • Safety issues to be addressed with proper animal studies

  11. Coarse-grained Simulations of Viral Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elrad, Oren M.

    2011-12-01

    The formation of viral capsids is a marvel of natural engineering and design. A large number (from 60 to thousands) of protein subunits assemble into complete, reproducible structures under a variety of conditions while avoiding kinetic and thermodynamic traps. Small single-stranded RNA viruses not only assemble their coat proteins in this fashion but also package their genome during the self-assembly process. Recent experiments have shown that the coat proteins are competent to assemble not merely around their own genomes but heterologous RNA, synthetic polyanions and even functionalized gold nanoparticles. Remarkably these viruses can even assemble around cargo not commensurate with their native state by adopting different morphologies. Understanding the properties that confer such exquisite precision and flexibility to the assembly process could aid biomedical research in the search for novel antiviral remedies, drug-delivery vehicles and contrast agents used in bioimaging. At the same time, viral assembly provides an excellent model system for the development of a statistical mechanical understanding of biological self-assembly, in the hopes of that we will identify some universal principles that underly such processes. This work consists of computational studies using coarse-grained representations of viral coat proteins and their cargoes. We find the relative strength of protein-cargo and protein-protein interactions has a profound effect on the assembly pathway, in some cases leading to assembly mechanisms that are markedly different from those found in previous work on the assembly of empty capsids. In the case of polymeric cargo, we find the first evidence for a previously theorized mechanism in which the polymer actively participates in recruiting free subunits to the assembly process through cooperative polymer-protein motions. We find that successful assembly is non-monotonic in protein-cargo affinity, such affinity can be detrimental to assembly if it

  12. The Great Recession worsened blood pressure and blood glucose levels in American adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeman, Teresa; Thomas, Duncan; Merkin, Sharon Stein; Moore, Kari; Watson, Karol; Karlamangla, Arun

    2018-03-27

    Longitudinal, individual-specific data from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) provide support for the hypothesis that the 2008 to 2010 Great Recession (GR) negatively impacted the health of US adults. Results further advance understanding of the relationship by ( i ) illuminating hypothesized greater negative impacts in population subgroups exposed to more severe impacts of the GR and ( ii ) explicitly controlling for confounding by individual differences in age-related changes in health over time. Analyses overcome limitations of prior work by ( i ) employing individual-level data that avoid concerns about ecological fallacy associated with prior reliance on group-level data, ( ii ) using four waves of data before the GR to estimate and control for underlying individual-level age-related trends, ( iii ) focusing on objective, temporally appropriate health outcomes rather than mortality, and ( iv ) leveraging a diverse cohort to investigate subgroup differences in the GR's impact. Innovative individual fixed-effects modeling controlling for individual-level age-related trajectories yielded substantively important insights: ( i ) significant elevations post-GR for blood pressure and fasting glucose, especially among those on medication pre-GR, and ( ii ) reductions in prevalence and intensity of medication use post-GR. Important differences in the effects of the GR are seen across subgroups, with larger effects among younger adults (who are likely still in the labor force) and older homeowners (whose declining home wealth likely reduced financial security, with less scope for recouping losses during their lifetime); least affected were older adults without a college degree (whose greater reliance on Medicare and Social Security likely provided more protection from the recession).

  13. Recent improvement and projected worsening of weather in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egan, Patrick J.; Mullin, Megan

    2016-04-01

    As climate change unfolds, weather systems in the United States have been shifting in patterns that vary across regions and seasons. Climate science research typically assesses these changes by examining individual weather indicators, such as temperature or precipitation, in isolation, and averaging their values across the spatial surface. As a result, little is known about population exposure to changes in weather and how people experience and evaluate these changes considered together. Here we show that in the United States from 1974 to 2013, the weather conditions experienced by the vast majority of the population improved. Using previous research on how weather affects local population growth to develop an index of people’s weather preferences, we find that 80% of Americans live in counties that are experiencing more pleasant weather than they did four decades ago. Virtually all Americans are now experiencing the much milder winters that they typically prefer, and these mild winters have not been offset by markedly more uncomfortable summers or other negative changes. Climate change models predict that this trend is temporary, however, because US summers will eventually warm more than winters. Under a scenario in which greenhouse gas emissions proceed at an unabated rate (Representative Concentration Pathway 8.5), we estimate that 88% of the US public will experience weather at the end of the century that is less preferable than weather in the recent past. Our results have implications for the public’s understanding of the climate change problem, which is shaped in part by experiences with local weather. Whereas weather patterns in recent decades have served as a poor source of motivation for Americans to demand a policy response to climate change, public concern may rise once people’s everyday experiences of climate change effects start to become less pleasant.

  14. Depletion of Cultivatable Gut Microbiota by Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Pretreatment Worsens Outcome After Murine Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winek, Katarzyna; Engel, Odilo; Koduah, Priscilla; Heimesaat, Markus M.; Fischer, André; Bereswill, Stefan; Dames, Claudia; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D.; Curato, Caterina; Oyama, Naoki; Meisel, Christian; Meisel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Antibiotics disturbing microbiota are often used in treatment of poststroke infections. A bidirectional brain–gut microbiota axis was recently suggested as a modulator of nervous system diseases. We hypothesized that gut microbiota may be an important player in the course of stroke. Methods— We investigated the outcome of focal cerebral ischemia in C57BL/6J mice after an 8-week decontamination with quintuple broad-spectrum antibiotic cocktail. These microbiota-depleted animals were subjected to 60 minutes middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham operation. Infarct volume was measured using magnetic resonance imaging, and mice were monitored clinically throughout the whole experiment. At the end point, tissues were preserved for further analysis, comprising histology and immunologic investigations using flow cytometry. Results— We found significantly decreased survival in the middle cerebral artery occlusion microbiota-depleted mice when the antibiotic cocktail was stopped 3 days before surgery (compared with middle cerebral artery occlusion specific pathogen-free and sham-operated microbiota-depleted mice). Moreover, all microbiota-depleted animals in which antibiotic treatment was terminated developed severe acute colitis. This phenotype was rescued by continuous antibiotic treatment or colonization with specific pathogen-free microbiota before surgery. Further, infarct volumes on day one did not differ between any of the experimental groups. Conclusions— Conventional microbiota ensures intestinal protection in the mouse model of experimental stroke and prevents development of acute and severe colitis in microbiota-depleted mice not given antibiotic protection after cerebral ischemia. Our experiments raise the clinically important question as to whether microbial colonization or specific microbiota are crucial for stroke outcome. PMID:27056982

  15. [Social isolation during old age worsens cognitive, behavioral and immune impairment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arranz, Lorena; Giménez-Llort, Lydia; De Castro, Nuria M; Baeza, Isabel; De la Fuente, Mónica

    2009-01-01

    Several studies by the World Health Organization indicate that widows and widowers show lower physical and mental health indexes than the age-matched general population. In addition, widowhood and social isolation are common in the elderly, with women being more affected than men due to their longer life span. Thus, the aim of the present study was to create an animal model of solitude in old age to study the behavioral, cognitive and immunological changes induced by social isolation at this late stage of life. Twenty female C57b/129sv mice, housed in groups of 4-5 until their old age (18 months), remained in groups (controls, n=10) or were isolated after reaching the age of 18 months and until they reached the age of 24 months (isolated, n=10). At this advanced age, the animals were submitted to a battery of tests to assess neophobia (corner test), anxiety (open-field test), and learning and memory (Morris water maze). Thereafter, the animals were sacrificed and the thymus was removed. The natural killer (NK) activity of the thymic cells against the YAC-1 murine tumor cell line was evaluated. Animals isolated during old age showed functional and cognitive decline, with increased neophobia and anxiety as well as learning and memory deficits. In addition, isolation reduced the NK activity of thymic cells. We demonstrate the importance of social isolation and solitude during old age. Both social isolation and solitude exacerbate mental and immunological involution during this period, despite normal social life during previous stages of life.

  16. Viral Diversity Threshold for Adaptive Immunity in Prokaryotes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Ariel D.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Lobkovsky, Alexander E.; Gilmore, Michael S.; Koonin, Eugene V.

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bacteria and archaea face continual onslaughts of rapidly diversifying viruses and plasmids. Many prokaryotes maintain adaptive immune systems known as clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated genes (Cas). CRISPR-Cas systems are genomic sensors that serially acquire viral and plasmid DNA fragments (spacers) that are utilized to target and cleave matching viral and plasmid DNA in subsequent genomic invasions, offering critical immunological memory. Only 50% of sequenced bacteria possess CRISPR-Cas immunity, in contrast to over 90% of sequenced archaea. To probe why half of bacteria lack CRISPR-Cas immunity, we combined comparative genomics and mathematical modeling. Analysis of hundreds of diverse prokaryotic genomes shows that CRISPR-Cas systems are substantially more prevalent in thermophiles than in mesophiles. With sequenced bacteria disproportionately mesophilic and sequenced archaea mostly thermophilic, the presence of CRISPR-Cas appears to depend more on environmental temperature than on bacterial-archaeal taxonomy. Mutation rates are typically severalfold higher in mesophilic prokaryotes than in thermophilic prokaryotes. To quantitatively test whether accelerated viral mutation leads microbes to lose CRISPR-Cas systems, we developed a stochastic model of virus-CRISPR coevolution. The model competes CRISPR-Cas-positive (CRISPR-Cas+) prokaryotes against CRISPR-Cas-negative (CRISPR-Cas−) prokaryotes, continually weighing the antiviral benefits conferred by CRISPR-Cas immunity against its fitness costs. Tracking this cost-benefit analysis across parameter space reveals viral mutation rate thresholds beyond which CRISPR-Cas cannot provide sufficient immunity and is purged from host populations. These results offer a simple, testable viral diversity hypothesis to explain why mesophilic bacteria disproportionately lack CRISPR-Cas immunity. More generally, fundamental limits on the adaptability of biological

  17. Viral ancestors of antiviral systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villarreal, Luis P

    2011-10-01

    All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the 'Big Bang' theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  18. Viral Ancestors of Antiviral Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis P. Villarreal

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available All life must survive their corresponding viruses. Thus antiviral systems are essential in all living organisms. Remnants of virus derived information are also found in all life forms but have historically been considered mostly as junk DNA. However, such virus derived information can strongly affect host susceptibility to viruses. In this review, I evaluate the role viruses have had in the origin and evolution of host antiviral systems. From Archaea through bacteria and from simple to complex eukaryotes I trace the viral components that became essential elements of antiviral immunity. I conclude with a reexamination of the ‘Big Bang’ theory for the emergence of the adaptive immune system in vertebrates by horizontal transfer and note how viruses could have and did provide crucial and coordinated features.

  19. Financial crisis 2007-2009. How real estate bubble and transparency and accountability issues generated and worsen the crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bilal Aziz

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper seeks to explain some main factors behind the Financial Crisis 2007–2009 with a special focus on the Real Estate Bubble and Transparency and Accountability Issues in US Financial System and how these two factors generated and worsen the crisis. Financial Crisis 2007–2009, which starts from the United States sub–prime mortgage market and spread to US financial sector and later on spread to the rest of world, is said to be an even bigger crisis than the Great Depression of 1929. This crisis is unique in this way and we haven’t seen such a bigger impact world wide from any other crisis. This paper would empirically prove the main causes which are right in the heart of the crisis and least discussed

  20. Obesity increases the prevalence and the incidence of asthma and worsens asthma severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barros, R; Moreira, P; Padrão, P; Teixeira, V H; Carvalho, P; Delgado, L; Moreira, A

    2017-08-01

    We aimed to explore the association between obesity and asthma prevalence, incidence and severity. The study included 32,644 adults, 52.6% female, from a representative sample of the 4th Portuguese National Health Survey. The following asthma definitions were used: ever asthma (ever medical doctor asthma diagnosis), current asthma (asthma within the last 12 months), current persistent asthma (required asthma medication within the last 12 months), current severe asthma (attending an emergency department because of asthma within the last 12 months), and incident asthma (asthma diagnosis within the last 12 months). Body mass index was calculated based on self-reported weight and height and categorised according to WHO classification. Logistic regression models adjusted for confounders were performed. Prevalence of ever asthma was 5.3%, current asthma 3.5%, current persistent asthma 3.0%, current severe asthma 1.4%, and incident asthma 0.2%. Prevalence of obesity was 16%, overweight 37.6%, normal weight 44.6% and underweight 0.2%. Being overweight, obesity class I and II, and obesity class III were associated with an OR (95% CI) with ever asthma 1.22 (1.21-1.24), 1.39 (1.36-1.41), 3.24 (3.08-3.40) respectively; current asthma 1.16 (1.14-1.18), 1.86 (1.82-1.90), 4.73 (4.49-4.98) respectively; current persistent asthma 1.08 (1.06-1.10), 2.06 (2.01-2.10), 5.24 (4.96-5.53), and current severe asthma 1.36 (1.32-1.40), 1.50 (1.45-1.55) and 3.70 (3.46-3.95), respectively. Considering the incidence of asthma, obesity more than quadrupled the odds (OR = 4.46, 95% CI 4.30, 4.62). Obesity is associated in a dose dependent way with an increase of prevalent and incident asthma, and it seems to increase the odds of a more persistent and severe asthma phenotype independently of socio-demographic determinants, physical activity, and dietary patterns. Our results provide rational for future lifestyle intervention studies for weight reduction in the obesity-asthma phenotype. Copyright

  1. Cigarette Smoke Exposure Worsens Endotoxin-Induced Lung Injury and Pulmonary Edema in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotts, Jeffrey E; Abbott, Jason; Fang, Xiaohui; Yanagisawa, Haru; Takasaka, Naoki; Nishimura, Stephen L; Calfee, Carolyn S; Matthay, Michael A

    2017-09-01

    Cigarette smoking (CS) remains a major public health concern and has recently been associated with an increased risk of developing acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) experiments in human volunteers have demonstrated that active smokers develop increased alveolar-epithelial barrier permeability to protein after inhaling lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Here we tested the hypothesis that short-term whole-body CS exposure would increase LPS-induced lung edema in mice. Adult mice were exposed in a Teague TE-10 machine to CS from 3R4F cigarettes at 100 mg/m3 total suspended particulates for 12 days, then given LPS or saline intratracheally. Control mice were housed in the same room without CS exposure. Post-mortem measurements included gravimetric lung water and BAL protein, cell counts, and lung histology. Cytokines were measured in lung homogenate by ELISA and in plasma by Luminex and ELISA. In CS-exposed mice, intratracheal LPS caused greater increases in pulmonary edema by gravimetric measurement and histologic scoring. CS-exposed mice also had an increase in BAL neutrophilia, lung IL-6, and plasma CXCL9, a T-cell chemoattractant. Intratracheal LPS concentrated blood hemoglobin to a greater degree in CS-exposed mice, consistent with an increase in systemic vascular permeability. These results demonstrate that CS exposure in endotoxin injured mice increases the severity of acute lung injury. The increased lung IL-6 in CS-exposed LPS-injured mice indicates that this potent cytokine, previously shown to predict mortality in patients with ARDS, may play a role in exacerbating lung injury in smokers and may have utility as a biomarker of tobacco-related lung injury. Our results suggest that short-term CS exposure at levels that cause no overt lung injury may still prime the lung for acute inflammatory damage from a "second hit", a finding that mirrors the increased risk of developing ARDS in patients who smoke. This model may be useful for

  2. Lansoprazole Is Associated with Worsening Asthma Control in Children with the CYP2C19 Poor Metabolizer Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Jason E; Holbrook, Janet T; Mougey, Edward B; Wei, Christine Y; Wise, Robert A; Teague, W Gerald; Lima, John J

    2015-06-01

    Gastric acid blockade in children with asymptomatic acid reflux has not improved asthma control in published studies. There is substantial population variability regarding metabolism of and response to proton pump inhibitors based on metabolizer phenotype. How metabolizer phenotype affects asthma responses to acid blockage is not known. To determine how metabolizer phenotype based on genetic analysis of CYP2C19 affects asthma control among children treated with a proton pump inhibitor. Asthma control as measured by the Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) and other questionnaires from a 6-month clinical trial of lansoprazole in children with asthma was analyzed for associations with surrogates of lansoprazole exposure (based on treatment assignment and metabolizer phenotype). Groups included placebo-treated children; lansoprazole-treated extensive metabolizers (EMs); and lansoprazole-treated poor metabolizers (PMs). Metabolizer phenotypes were based on CYP2C19 haplotypes. Carriers of the CYP2C19*2, *3, *8, *9, or *10 allele were PMs; carriers of two wild-type alleles were extensive metabolizers (EMs). Asthma control through most of the treatment period was unaffected by lansoprazole exposure or metabolizer phenotype. At 6 months, PMs displayed significantly worsened asthma control compared with EMs (+0.16 vs. -0.13; P = 0.02) and placebo-treated children (+0.16 vs. -0.23; P lansoprazole-treated PMs. Children with the PM phenotype developed worse asthma control after 6 months of lansoprazole treatment for poorly controlled asthma. Increased exposure to proton pump inhibitor may worsen asthma control by altering responses to respiratory infections. Clinical trial registered with www.clinicaltrials.gov (NCT00604851).

  3. HIV-1 transmitting couples have similar viral load set-points in Rakai, Uganda.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Déirdre Hollingsworth

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available It has been hypothesized that HIV-1 viral load set-point is a surrogate measure of HIV-1 viral virulence, and that it may be subject to natural selection in the human host population. A key test of this hypothesis is whether viral load set-points are correlated between transmitting individuals and those acquiring infection. We retrospectively identified 112 heterosexual HIV-discordant couples enrolled in a cohort in Rakai, Uganda, in which HIV transmission was suspected and viral load set-point was established. In addition, sequence data was available to establish transmission by genetic linkage for 57 of these couples. Sex, age, viral subtype, index partner, and self-reported genital ulcer disease status (GUD were known. Using ANOVA, we estimated the proportion of variance in viral load set-points which was explained by the similarity within couples (the 'couple effect'. Individuals with suspected intra-couple transmission (97 couples had similar viral load set-points (p = 0.054 single factor model, p = 0.0057 adjusted and the couple effect explained 16% of variance in viral loads (23% adjusted. The analysis was repeated for a subset of 29 couples with strong genetic support for transmission. The couple effect was the major determinant of viral load set-point (p = 0.067 single factor, and p = 0.036 adjusted and the size of the effect was 27% (37% adjusted. Individuals within epidemiologically linked couples with genetic support for transmission had similar viral load set-points. The most parsimonious explanation is that this is due to shared characteristics of the transmitted virus, a finding which sheds light on both the role of viral factors in HIV-1 pathogenesis and on the evolution of the virus.

  4. Worsening atrioventricular conduction after hospital discharge in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention: the HORIZONS-AMI trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmidou, Ioanna; Redfors, Björn; McAndrew, Thomas; Embacher, Monica; Mehran, Roxana; Dizon, José M; Ben-Yehuda, Ori; Mintz, Gary S; Stone, Gregg W

    2017-11-01

    The chronic effects of ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) on the atrioventricular conduction (AVC) system have not been elucidated. This study aimed to evaluate the incidence, predictors, and outcomes of worsened AVC post-STEMI in patients treated with a primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). The current analysis included patients from the HORIZONS-AMI trial who underwent primary PCI and had available ECGs. Patients with high-grade atrioventricular block or pacemaker implant at baseline were excluded. Analysis of ECGs excluding the acute hospitalization period indicated worsened AVC in 131 patients (worsened AVC group) and stable AVC in 2833 patients (stable AVC group). Patients with worsened AVC were older, had a higher frequency of hypertension, diabetes, renal insufficiency, previous coronary artery bypass grafting, and predominant left anterior descending culprit lesions. Predictors of worsened AVC included age, hypertension, and previous history of coronary artery disease. Worsened AVC was associated with an increased rate of all-cause death and major adverse cardiac events (death, myocardial infarction, ischemic target vessel revascularization, and stroke) as well as death or reinfarction at 3 years. On multivariable analysis, worsened AVC remained an independent predictor of all-cause death (hazard ratio: 2.005, confidence interval: 1.051-3.827, P=0.0348) and major adverse cardiac events (hazard ratio 1.542, confidence interval: 1.059-2.244, P=0.0238). Progression of AVC system disease in patients with STEMI treated with primary PCI is uncommon, occurs primarily in the setting of anterior myocardial infarction, and portends a high risk for death and major adverse cardiac events.

  5. Acute Pancreatitis in acute viral hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S K.C.

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The association of acute viral hepatitis and acute pancreatitis is well described. This study was conducted to find out the frequency of pancreatic involvement in acute viral hepatitis in the Nepalese population. Methods: Consecutive patients of acute viral hepatitis presenting with severe abdominal pain between January 2005 and April 2010 were studied. Patients with history of significant alcohol consumption and gall stones were excluded. Acute viral hepatitis was diagnosed by clinical examination, liver function test, ultrasound examination and confirmed by viral serology. Pancreatitis was diagnosed by clinical presentation, biochemistry, ultrasound examination and CT scan. Results: Severe abdominal pain was present in 38 of 382 serologically-confirmed acute viral hepatitis patients. Twenty five patients were diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. The pancreatitis was mild in 14 and severe in 11 patients. The etiology of pancreatitis was hepatitis E virus in 18 and hepatitis A virus in 7 patients. Two patients died of complications secondary to shock. The remaining patients recovered from both pancreatitis and hepatitis on conservative treatment. Conclusions: Acute pancreatitis occurred in 6.5 % of patients with acute viral hepatitis. Cholelithiasis and gastric ulcers are the other causes of severe abdominal pain. The majority of the patients recover with conservative management. Keywords: acute viral hepatitis, acute pancreatitis, pain abdomen, hepatitis E, hepatitis A, endemic zone

  6. (Npro) protein of bovine viral d

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important pathogen of cattle and sheep, and causes significant respiratory and reproductive disease worldwide. Bovine viral diarrhoea virus type 1 (BVDV-1), BVDV-2 along with the border disease virus (BDV) and classical swine fever virus (CSFV) belong to the genus ...

  7. Viral reproductive pathogens of dogs and cats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decaro, Nicola; Carmichael, Leland E; Buonavoglia, Canio

    2012-05-01

    This article reviews the current literature on the viral agents that cause reproductive failures in domestic carnivores (dogs and cats). A meaningful update is provided on the etiologic, clinical, pathologic, diagnostic, and prophylactic aspects of the viral infections impacting canine and feline reproduction as a consequence of either direct virus replication or severe debilitation of pregnant animals.

  8. Ethical Considerations in Research Participation Virality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis-Barton, Carol

    2016-07-01

    This article seeks to commence and encourage discussion around the upcoming ethical challenges of virality in network structures. When the call for participation in a research project on lupus in Ireland went from an advertisement in a newsletter to a meme (unit of transmissible information) on a closed Facebook page, the ethical considerations of virality were raised. The article analyzes the Association of Internet Researchers guidelines, Facebook policies, and the context of privacy in relation to virality. Virality creates the leverage for methodological pluralism. The nature of the inquiry can determine the method rather than the other way around. Viral ethical considerations are evolving due to the cyber world becoming the primary meme of communication, with flexibility in the researcher's protocol providing opportunities for efficient, cost-effective, and diverse recruitment. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Origins and challenges of viral dark matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Siddharth R; Wang, David

    2017-07-15

    The accurate classification of viral dark matter - metagenomic sequences that originate from viruses but do not align to any reference virus sequences - is one of the major obstacles in comprehensively defining the virome. Depending on the sample, viral dark matter can make up from anywhere between 40 and 90% of sequences. This review focuses on the specific nature of dark matter as it relates to viral sequences. We identify three factors that contribute to the existence of viral dark matter: the divergence and length of virus sequences, the limitations of alignment based classification, and limited representation of viruses in reference sequence databases. We then discuss current methods that have been developed to at least partially circumvent these limitations and thereby reduce the extent of viral dark matter. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Immunization with viral antigens: viral diseases of carp and catfish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, P

    1997-01-01

    The viral diseases of carp and catfish for which vaccines have been produced are spring viraemia of carp (SVC), grass carp haemorrhage disease (GCHD) and channel catfish virus disease (CCVD). Field trials of a commercially produced injectable vaccine conducted over several years have shown that carp can be protected against SVC. However the supporting data were predominantly qualitative rather than quantitative. Large-scale field trials of an experimental oral attenuated vaccine against SVC virus over a five year period were successful, and no reversion to virulence of the vaccine was recorded. Injectable inactivated and attenuated vaccines against GCHD have predominantly been tested under laboratory conditions, although a small number of field trials have been reported. In such trials of bath and injectable vaccines, survival rates of 50-90% were achieved. In China, commercially available vaccines are being used against GCHD. Only laboratory trials of vaccines against CCVD have been reported. Bath vaccination of eggs of fry with a subunit vaccine and bath immunisation of fingerlings with an attenuated virus vaccine have been successful. Problems with current approaches and areas for research are discussed.

  11. Information Overload and Viral Marketing: Countermeasures and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jiesi; Sun, Aaron; Zeng, Daniel

    Studying information diffusion through social networks has become an active research topic with important implications in viral marketing applications. One of the fundamental algorithmic problems related to viral marketing is the Influence Maximization (IM) problem: given an social network, which set of nodes should be considered by the viral marketer as the initial targets, in order to maximize the influence of the advertising message. In this work, we study the IM problem in an information-overloaded online social network. Information overload occurs when individuals receive more information than they can process, which can cause negative impacts on the overall marketing effectiveness. Many practical countermeasures have been proposed for alleviating the load of information on recipients. However, how these approaches can benefit viral marketers is not well understood. In our work, we have adapted the classic Information Cascade Model to incorporate information overload and study its countermeasures. Our results suggest that effective control of information overload has the potential to improve marketing effectiveness, but the targeting strategy should be re-designed in response to these countermeasures.

  12. Illuminating structural proteins in viral "dark matter" with metaproteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brum, Jennifer R; Ignacio-Espinoza, J Cesar; Kim, Eun-Hae; Trubl, Gareth; Jones, Robert M; Roux, Simon; VerBerkmoes, Nathan C; Rich, Virginia I; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2016-03-01

    Viruses are ecologically important, yet environmental virology is limited by dominance of unannotated genomic sequences representing taxonomic and functional "viral dark matter." Although recent analytical advances are rapidly improving taxonomic annotations, identifying functional dark matter remains problematic. Here, we apply paired metaproteomics and dsDNA-targeted metagenomics to identify 1,875 virion-associated proteins from the ocean. Over one-half of these proteins were newly functionally annotated and represent abundant and widespread viral metagenome-derived protein clusters (PCs). One primarily unannotated PC dominated the dataset, but structural modeling and genomic context identified this PC as a previously unidentified capsid protein from multiple uncultivated tailed virus families. Furthermore, four of the five most abundant PCs in the metaproteome represent capsid proteins containing the HK97-like protein fold previously found in many viruses that infect all three domains of life. The dominance of these proteins within our dataset, as well as their global distribution throughout the world's oceans and seas, supports prior hypotheses that this HK97-like protein fold is the most abundant biological structure on Earth. Together, these culture-independent analyses improve virion-associated protein annotations, facilitate the investigation of proteins within natural viral communities, and offer a high-throughput means of illuminating functional viral dark matter.

  13. Phage and Nucleocytoplasmic Large Viral Sequences Dominate Coral Viromes from the Arabian Gulf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huda Mahmoud

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Corals that naturally thrive under extreme conditions are gaining increasing attention due to their importance as living models to understand the impact of global warming on world corals. Here, we present the first metagenomic study of viral communities in corals thriving in a thermally variable water body in which the temperature fluctuates between 11 and 39°C in different seasons. The viral assemblages of two of the most abundant massive (Porites harrisoni and branching (Acropora downingi corals in offshore and inshore reef systems in the northern Arabian Gulf were investigated. Samples were collected from five reef systems during summer, autumn and winter of 2011/2012. The two coral viromes contain 12 viral families, including 10 dsDNA viral families [Siphoviridae, Podoviridae, Myoviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Baculoviridae, Herpesviridae, Adenoviridae, Alloherpesviridae, Mimiviridae and one unclassified family], one-ssDNA viral family (Microviridae and one RNA viral family (Retroviridae. Overall, sequences significantly similar to Podoviridae were the most abundant in the P. harrisoni and A. downingi viromes. Various morphological types of virus-like particles (VLPs were confirmed in the healthy coral tissue by transmission electron microscopy, including large tailless VLPs and electron-dense core VLPs. Tailed bacteriophages were isolated from coral tissue using a plaque assay. Higher functional gene diversity was recorded in A. downingi than in P. harrisoni, and comparative metagenomics revealed that the Gulf viral assemblages are functionally distinct from Pacific Ocean coral viral communities.

  14. Phage and Nucleocytoplasmic Large Viral Sequences Dominate Coral Viromes from the Arabian Gulf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Huda; Jose, Liny

    2017-01-01

    Corals that naturally thrive under extreme conditions are gaining increasing attention due to their importance as living models to understand the impact of global warming on world corals. Here, we present the first metagenomic study of viral communities in corals thriving in a thermally variable water body in which the temperature fluctuates between 11 and 39°C in different seasons. The viral assemblages of two of the most abundant massive ( Porites harrisoni ) and branching ( Acropora downingi ) corals in offshore and inshore reef systems in the northern Arabian Gulf were investigated. Samples were collected from five reef systems during summer, autumn and winter of 2011/2012. The two coral viromes contain 12 viral families, including 10 dsDNA viral families [Siphoviridae, Podoviridae, Myoviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Baculoviridae, Herpesviridae, Adenoviridae, Alloherpesviridae, Mimiviridae and one unclassified family], one-ssDNA viral family (Microviridae) and one RNA viral family (Retroviridae). Overall, sequences significantly similar to Podoviridae were the most abundant in the P. harrisoni and A. downingi viromes. Various morphological types of virus-like particles (VLPs) were confirmed in the healthy coral tissue by transmission electron microscopy, including large tailless VLPs and electron-dense core VLPs. Tailed bacteriophages were isolated from coral tissue using a plaque assay. Higher functional gene diversity was recorded in A. downingi than in P. harrisoni , and comparative metagenomics revealed that the Gulf viral assemblages are functionally distinct from Pacific Ocean coral viral communities.

  15. Interplay Among Constitutes of Ebola Virus: Nucleoprotein, Polymerase L, Viral Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Minchuan; He, Peiming; Su, Jing; Singh, Dadabhai T.; Su, Hailei; Su, Haibin

    Ebola virus is a highly lethal filovirus, claimed thousands of people in its recent outbreak. Seven viral proteins constitute ebola viral structure, and four of them (nucleoprotein (NP), polymerase L, VP35 and VP30) participate majorly in viral replication and transcription. We have elucidated a conformation change of NP cleft by VP35 NP-binding protein domains through superimposing two experimental NP structure images and discussed the function of this conformation change in the replication and transcription with polymerase complex (L, VP35 and VP30). The important roles of VP30 in viral RNA synthesis have also been discussed. A “tapping” model has been proposed in this paper for a better understanding of the interplay among the four viral proteins (NP, polymerase L, VP35 and VP30). Moreover, we have pinpointed some key residue changes on NP (both NP N- and C-terminal) and L between Reston and Zaire by computational studies. Together, this paper provides a description of interactions among ebola viral proteins (NP, L, VP35, VP30 and VP40) in viral replication and transcription, and sheds light on the complex system of viral reproduction.

  16. Tianeptine is associated with lower risk of suicidal ideation worsening during the first weeks of treatment onset compared with other antidepressants: A naturalistic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobile, B; Jaussent, I; Gorwood, Ph; Lopez Castroman, J; Olié, E; Guillaume, S; Courtet, Ph

    2018-01-01

    Worsening of suicidal ideation during the first weeks of antidepressant treatment is a poorly understood phenomenon that prompted regulatory bodies to issue specific warnings. To better understand the causes of this phenomenon, this study compared the risk of suicidal ideation worsening in patients taking different types of antidepressant medications. To this aim, 4017 depressed adult outpatients were followed by general practitioners and psychiatrists throughout France for 6 weeks after prescription of an antidepressant treatment. The main study outcomes were to monitor changes (worsening or improvement) in suicidal ideation between baseline (treatment onset) and the study end (week 6) and to determine the remission rates according to the treatment type. Depression severity was assessed with the patient-administered Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale and suicidal ideation with the 9-item Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale and the Hopelessness Scale. Use of tianeptine, a mu-opioid receptor agonist was significantly associated with a lower risk of suicidal ideation worsening compared with other antidepressants in the first 6 weeks of treatment. Conversely, remission rates were not significantly affected by the treatment type. Our results highlight a potential interest of opioid agonists to reduce the risk of worsening of suicidal ideation at antidepressant initiation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Atypical viral dynamics from transport through popular places

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manrique, Pedro D.; Xu, Chen; Hui, Pak Ming; Johnson, Neil F.

    2016-08-01

    The flux of visitors through popular places undoubtedly influences viral spreading—from H1N1 and Zika viruses spreading through physical spaces such as airports, to rumors and ideas spreading through online spaces such as chat rooms and social media. However, there is a lack of understanding of the types of viral dynamics that can result. Here we present a minimal dynamical model that focuses on the time-dependent interplay between the mobility through and the occupancy of such spaces. Our generic model permits analytic analysis while producing a rich diversity of infection profiles in terms of their shapes, durations, and intensities. The general features of these theoretical profiles compare well to real-world data of recent social contagion phenomena.

  18. Viral infections of the folds (intertriginous areas).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adışen, Esra; Önder, Meltem

    2015-01-01

    Viruses are considered intracellular obligates with a nucleic acid, either RNA or DNA. They have the ability to encode proteins involved in viral replication and production of the protective coat within the host cells but require host cell ribosomes and mitochondria for translation. The members of the families Herpesviridae, Poxviridae, Papovaviridae, and Picornaviridae are the most commonly known agents for the cutaneous viral diseases, but other virus families, such as Adenoviridae, Togaviridae, Parvoviridae, Paramyxoviridae, Flaviviridae, and Hepadnaviridae, can also infect the skin. Though the cutaneous manifestations of viral infections are closely related to the type and the transmission route of the virus, viral skin diseases may occur in almost any part of the body. In addition to friction caused by skin-to-skin touch, skin folds are warm and moist areas of the skin that have limited air circulation. These features provide a fertile breeding ground for many kinds of microorganisms, including bacteria and fungi. In contrast to specific bacterial and fungal agents that have an affinity for the skin folds, except for viral diseases of the anogenital area, which have well-known presentations, viral skin infections that have a special affinity to the skin folds are not known. Many viral exanthems may affect the skin folds during the course of the infection, but here we focus only on the ones that usually affect the fold areas and also on the less well-known conditions or recently described associations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Host and viral translational mechanisms during cricket paralysis virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrey, Julianne L; Lee, Yun-Young; Au, Hilda H T; Bushell, Martin; Jan, Eric

    2010-01-01

    The dicistrovirus is a positive-strand single-stranded RNA virus that possesses two internal ribosome entry sites (IRES) that direct translation of distinct open reading frames encoding the viral structural and nonstructural proteins. Through an unusual mechanism, the intergenic region (IGR) IRES responsible for viral structural protein expression mimics a tRNA to directly recruit the ribosome and set the ribosome into translational elongation. In this study, we explored the mechanism of host translational shutoff in Drosophila S2 cells infected by the dicistrovirus, cricket paralysis virus (CrPV). CrPV infection of S2 cells results in host translational shutoff concomitant with an increase in viral protein synthesis. CrPV infection resulted in the dissociation of eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G) and eIF4E early in infection and the induction of deIF2alpha phosphorylation at 3 h postinfection, which lags after the initial inhibition of host translation. Forced dephosphorylation of deIF2alpha by overexpression of dGADD34, which activates protein phosphatase I, did not prevent translational shutoff nor alter virus production, demonstrating that deIF2alpha phosphorylation is dispensable for host translational shutoff. However, premature induction of deIF2alpha phosphorylation by thapsigargin treatment early in infection reduced viral protein synthesis and replication. Finally, translation mediated by the 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) and the IGR IRES were resistant to impairment of eIF4F or eIF2 in translation extracts. These results support a model by which the alteration of the deIF4F complex contribute to the shutoff of host translation during CrPV infection, thereby promoting viral protein synthesis via the CrPV 5'UTR and IGR IRES.

  20. Functional Role of Infective Viral Particles on Metal Reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coates, John D.

    2014-04-01

    A proposed strategy for the remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sites was based on the immobilization of U by reducing the oxidized soluble U, U(VI), to form a reduced insoluble end product, U(IV). Previous studies identified Geobacter sp., including G. sulfurreducens and G. metallireducens, as predominant U(VI)-reducing bacteria under acetate-oxidizing and U(VI)-reducing conditions. Examination of the finished genome sequence annotation of the canonical metal reducing species Geobacter sulfurreducens strain PCA and G. metallireduceans strain GS-15 as well as the draft genome sequence of G. uraniumreducens strain Rf4 identified phage related proteins. In addition, the completed genome for Anaeromyxobacter dehalogenans and the draft genome sequence of Desulfovibrio desulfuricans strain G20, two more model metal-reducing bacteria, also revealed phage related sequences. The presence of these gene sequences indicated that Geobacter spp., Anaeromyxobacter spp., and Desulfovibrio spp. are susceptible to viral infection. Furthermore, viral populations in soils and sedimentary environments in the order of 6.4×10{sup 6}–2.7×10{sup 10} VLP’s cm{sup -3} have been observed. In some cases, viral populations exceed bacterial populations in these environments suggesting that a relationship may exist between viruses and bacteria. Our preliminary screens of samples collected from the ESR FRC indicated that viral like particles were observed in significant numbers. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential functional role viruses play in metal reduction specifically Fe(III) and U(VI) reduction, the environmental parameters affecting viral infection of metal reducing bacteria, and the subsequent effects on U transport.

  1. Green Tea Catechin-Inactivated Viral Vaccine Platform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yun H. Lee

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, chemical agents such as formalin (FA and β-propiolactone (BPL have long been used for the preparation of inactivated vaccines or toxoids. It has been shown that FA extensively modifies vaccine antigens and thus affects immunogenicity profiles, sometimes compromising the protective efficacy of the vaccines or even exacerbating the disease upon infection. In this study, we show that natural catechins from green tea extracts (GT can be used as an inactivating agent to prepare inactivated viral vaccines. GT treatment resulted in complete and irreversible inactivation of influenza virus as well as dengue virus. In contrast to FA that reacted extensively with multiple amino acids including lysine, a major anchor residue for epitope binding to MHC molecules, GT catechin epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG crosslinked primarily with cysteine residues and thus preserved the major epitopes of the influenza hemagglutinin. In a mouse model, vaccination with GT-inactivated influenza virus (GTi virus elicited higher levels of viral neutralizing antibodies than FA-inactivated virus (FAi virus. The vaccination completely protected the mice from a lethal challenge and restricted the challenge viral replication in the lungs. Of note, the quality of antibody responses of GTi virus was superior to that with FAi virus, in terms of the magnitude of antibody titer, cross-reactivity to hetero-subtypes of influenza viruses, and the avidity to viral antigens. As the first report of using non-toxic natural compounds for the preparation of inactivated viral vaccines, the present results could be translated into a clinically relevant vaccine platform with improved efficacy, safety, productivity, and public acceptance.

  2. Relationship Dynamics and Partner Beliefs About Viral Suppression: A Longitudinal Study of Male Couples Living with HIV/AIDS (The Duo Project).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conroy, Amy A; Gamarel, Kristi E; Neilands, Torsten B; Dilworth, Samantha E; Darbes, Lynae A; Johnson, Mallory O

    2016-07-01

    Accurate beliefs about partners' viral suppression are important for HIV prevention and care. We fit multilevel mixed effects logistic regression models to examine associations between partners' viral suppression beliefs and objective HIV RNA viral load tests, and whether relationship dynamics were associated with accurate viral suppression beliefs over time. Male couples (N = 266 couples) with at least one HIV-positive partner on antiretroviral therapy completed five assessments over 2 years. Half of the 407 HIV-positive partners were virally suppressed. Of the 40 % who had inaccurate viral load beliefs, 80 % assumed their partner was suppressed. The odds of having accurate viral load beliefs decreased over time (OR = 0.83; p = 0.042). Within-couple differences in dyadic adjustment (OR = 0.66; p Couple-based approaches are warranted to improve knowledge of partners' viral load.

  3. Vaccines in the Prevention of Viral Pneumonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraser, Clementine S; Jha, Akhilesh; Openshaw, Peter J M

    2017-03-01

    Pneumonia is of great global public health importance. Viral infections play both direct and indirect parts in its cause across the globe. Influenza is a leading cause of viral pneumonia in both children and adults, and respiratory syncytial virus is increasingly recognized as causing disease at both extremes of age. Vaccination offers the best prospect for prevention but current influenza vaccines do not provide universal and durable protection, and require yearly reformulation. In the future, it is hoped that influenza vaccines will give better and universal protection, and that new vaccines can be found for other causes of viral pneumonia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Viral Evasion of Natural Killer Cell Activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yi; Li, Xiaojuan; Kuang, Ersheng

    2016-04-12

    Natural killer (NK) cells play a key role in antiviral innate defenses because of their abilities to kill infected cells and secrete regulatory cytokines. Additionally, NK cells exhibit adaptive memory-like antigen-specific responses, which represent a novel antiviral NK cell defense mechanism. Viruses have evolved various strategies to evade the recognition and destruction by NK cells through the downregulation of the NK cell activating receptors. Here, we review the recent findings on viral evasion of NK cells via the impairment of NK cell-activating receptors and ligands, which provide new insights on the relationship between NK cells and viral actions during persistent viral infections.

  5. A skeptical look at viral immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, I A; Rouse, B T

    1997-12-01

    In the past several years, many viral gene products have been found to encode proteins which interfere with immune defense mechanisms. Whether these interactions between virus and immune system components are actually evasion mechanisms used during viral infections in their natural hosts remains to be proven. In vitro studies do, however, reveal several tactics which may aid viral replication and dissemination by interfering with components of both the innate and adaptive immune systems. In this manuscript, we discuss the more intensively studied of these putative in vitro evasion tactics and ponder their relevance in in vivo situations.

  6. Viral Marketing -­ How can a campaign succeed in going viral? What are the pros and cons of viral marketing?

    OpenAIRE

    Guyot, Maëlle

    2016-01-01

    This research contains an in-­depth analysis of viral marketing used by modern firms as a tool to advertise their offerings and increase brand exposure. Initially, the current marketing environment has been analyzed, in order to understand modern consumer behavior and what is trending (or not) in terms of marketing techniques. Subsequently, the relevant theory about viral marketing was explored, to have a deep understanding of the phenomenon (of its characteristics, forms and objectives). ...

  7. Baseline albumin is associated with worsening renal function in patients with acute decompensated heart failure receiving continuous infusion loop diuretics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Megan M; Dorsch, Michael P; Kim, Susie; Aaronson, Keith D; Koelling, Todd M; Bleske, Barry E

    2013-06-01

    To identify baseline predictors of worsening renal function (WRF) in an acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) patient population receiving continuous infusion loop diuretics. Retrospective observational analysis. Academic tertiary medical center. A total of 177 patients with ADHF receiving continuous infusion loop diuretics from January 2006 through June 2009. The mean patient age was 61 years, 63% were male, ~45% were classified as New York Heart Association functional class III, and the median length of loop diuretic infusion was 4 days. Forty-eight patients (27%) developed WRF, and 34 patients (19%) died during hospitalization. Cox regression time-to-event analysis was used to determine the time to WRF based on different demographic and clinical variables. Baseline serum albumin 3 g/dl or less was the only significant predictor of WRF (hazard ratio [HR] 2.87, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.60-5.16, p=0.0004), which remained significant despite adjustments for other covariates. Serum albumin 3 g/dl or less is a practical baseline characteristic associated with the development of WRF in patients with ADHF receiving continuous infusion loop diuretics. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  8. CO inhalation at dose corresponding to tobacco smoke worsens cardiac remodeling after experimental myocardial infarction in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Alain; Eder, Véronique; Rochefort, Gaël Y; Hyvelin, Jean-Marc; Machet, Marie Christine; Fauchier, Laurent; Bonnet, Pierre

    2005-06-01

    We hypothesized that inhalation of carbon monoxide (CO) (500 ppm), similar to that in tobacco smoke, disturbs the cardiovascular adaptation after myocardial infarction by increasing remodeling. Four groups of rats were assessed. Two groups had myocardial infarction induced by the ligation of the left coronary artery: the first group was exposed to air (infarcted air group, n = 12), and the second was exposed to CO (infarcted CO group, n = 11). They were compared to two sham-operated groups, a control air group (n = 10), and a control CO group (n = 7) exposed (3 weeks) to CO. Aerobic endurance capacity was assessed in both the infarct CO and infarct air group (endurance capacity = 0.043 +/- 0.006 m.min(-1).g(-1) vs. 0.042 +/- 0.005 m.min(-1).g(-1), not significant). In the infarcted CO group compared to the infarcted air group, the dilatation of the left ventricle observed 3 weeks after infarction was increased, (left ventricular diastolic (LVD) diameter (D) = 9 +/- 0.4 vs. 7 +/- 0.4 mm, p infarcted CO group, the infarct size increased. Echocardiography and histology showed hypertrophy of the contralateral wall similar to that observed in the noninfarcted control CO group. In conclusion, chronic CO inhalation worsens heart failure in rats with myocardial infarction by an increase in the infarct size and hypertrophy remodeling.

  9. EXPERIMENTAL LIPOSOMAL VIRAL VACCINE SAFETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romanova OA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. With the transport links development there is rather important issue respiratory viral infections spread, especially influenza. The only method controlling influenza is vaccination. Search and development effective and safe vaccines is important. Material and methods. In base SO "Mechnikov Institute Microbiology and Immunology National Ukrainian Academy Medical Sciences" in the scientific theme "Developing new approaches to creating viral vaccines and study specific activity depending of type and degree component`s modification" was created several experimental influenza vaccine with subsequent component`s modification for selecting the most optimal pattern of safety and immunogenicity. In assessing the influenza vaccine safety is using a few criteria, including, reactivity, as measured by the frequency of local and systemic adverse (negative effects, which due to its introduction, and for lipid content drugs, ability to influence oxidation processes. At present study phase was determined: a systemic reaction and local reaction of delayed-type hypersensitivity (foot pad swelling assay;b lipids and proteins peroxidation processes after administration officinal and experimental vaccines (content protein’s carbonyl groups, lipid’s hydroperoxides, activity of glutathione-peroxidase.Study objects were trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine, "Vaxigrip" (Sanofi Pasteur, S.A., France, "Inflexal V" (Biotech Ltd. Berne, Switzerland and experimental vaccine samples. Highest immunogenicity vaccines had undergone improvements and modifications using adjuvant systems and acylation influenza proteins. Liposomes 2 – the experimental influenza vaccine with a liposome negative charge and antigenic composition like split vaccines "Vaksihryp". Liposomes 2.1 - the adjuvantexperimental influenza vaccine with modifications liposomal components (etoniy and chlorophyllipt molecules embedded in liposomal membrane. Liposomes 2.2 - the adjuvant

  10. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  11. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2014.In this Table, all conditions with a 5-year average annual national total of more than or equals 1,000 cases but...

  12. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) C - 2017. In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  13. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2016. In this Table, provisional* cases of selected† notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding...

  14. NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — NNDSS - Table II. Hepatitis (viral, acute) - 2015.In this Table, provisional cases of selected notifiable diseases (≥1,000 cases reported during the preceding year),...

  15. Dynamical Implications of Viral Tiling Theory

    OpenAIRE

    ElSawy, K. M.; Taormina, A.; Twarock, R.; Vaughan, L.

    2007-01-01

    The Caspar–Klug classification of viruses whose protein shell, called viral capsid, exhibits icosahedral symmetry, has recently been extended to incorporate viruses whose capsid proteins are exclusively organised in pentamers. The approach, named ‘Viral Tiling Theory’, is inspired by the theory of quasicrystals, where aperiodic Penrose tilings enjoy 5-fold and 10-fold local symmetries. This paper analyses the extent to which this classification approach informs dynamical properties of the vir...

  16. Rapid and highly fieldable viral diagnostic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKnight, Timothy E.

    2016-12-20

    The present invention relates to a rapid, highly fieldable, nearly reagentless diagnostic to identify active RNA viral replication in a live, infected cells, and more particularly in leukocytes and tissue samples (including biopsies and nasal swabs) using an array of a plurality of vertically-aligned nanostructures that impale the cells and introduce a DNA reporter construct that is expressed and amplified in the presence of active viral replication.

  17. [Liver hemosiderosis study in chronic viral hepatitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cojocariu, Camelia; Trifan, Anca; Mihailovici, Maria Sultana; Danciu, M; Stanciu, C

    2008-01-01

    In chronic viral hepatitis the histopathological exam can reveal the presence of liver iron deposits in 10 to 73% of patients. Iron deposits are usually found in Kupffer cells, in endothelial cells and portal macrophages, and extremely rarely in hepatocytes. To evaluate the incidence of hepatic hemosiderosis in chronic viral hepatitis. 549 morphopathological features of liver biopsy specimens performed in the Gastroenterology and Hepatology Institute IaSi, between January 1 2003 and December 31 2007 have been analyzed. Semiquantitative assessment of the degree of hepatic iron overload was performed and the localization of haemosiderin deposits: at the level of hepatocytes, the reticuloendothelial system or mixedly. The same anatomopathologist examined the blades and interpreted the results. The medium age of patients who underwent liver biopsy was 45.08 years +/- 10.045. Positive iron staining was found in 22.8% of cases, more frequently in males (31%), and in 91.82% of cases iron deposits were grade 1-2. The association of alcoholic etiology did not influence the incidence of hemosiderosis: 23% in patients with hepatitis and no ethanol exposure vs 25% in cases of strictly viral etiology. Deposits of haemosiderin were more frequent in viral hepatitis B (38.6%) than in viral hepatitis C (26.9%). In 34% of cases stainable iron was found only in reticuloendothelial system and in 46% of cases both in Kupffer cells and hepatocytes. Almost a quarter of chronic viral hepatitis cases are associated with liver deposits of haemosiderin, with features of secondary iron overload (deposits localized in the mesenchymal areas or mixedly). There is a higher risk of hemosiderosis in men, especially for those between 30 and 50. Liver iron overload levels in chronic viral hepatitis are, in most cases, low or medium, and the association with an alcoholic etiology does not influence the incidence of hemosiderosis in chronic viral hepatitis.

  18. The fecal viral flora of wild rodents.

    OpenAIRE

    Tung G Phan; Beatrix Kapusinszky; Chunlin Wang; Robert K Rose; Howard L Lipton; Eric L Delwart

    2011-01-01

    The frequent interactions of rodents with humans make them a common source of zoonotic infections. To obtain an initial unbiased measure of the viral diversity in the enteric tract of wild rodents we sequenced partially purified, randomly amplified viral RNA and DNA in the feces of 105 wild rodents (mouse, vole, and rat) collected in California and Virginia. We identified in decreasing frequency sequences related to the mammalian viruses families Circoviridae, Picobirnaviridae, Picornaviridae...

  19. Institute of Medicine's Report on Viral Hepatitis

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-05-18

    In this podcast, Dr. John Ward, Director of CDC’s Division of Viral Hepatitis, discusses the 2010 report, Hepatitis and Liver Cancer: A National Strategy for Prevention and Control of Hepatitis B and C, from the Institute of Medicine.  Created: 5/18/2010 by National Center for HIV/AIDS, Viral Hepatitis, STD, and TB Prevention (NCHHSTP).   Date Released: 5/18/2010.

  20. Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-11-1-0387 TITLE: Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Mikhail Papisov, PhD...SUBTITLE Viral Oncolytic Therapeutics for Neoplastic Meningitis 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-11-1-0387 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR...for neoplastic meningitis ( meningeal metastasis of breast cancer). The proposed therapy will be based on direct (intrathecal) administration of

  1. [Viral interactions with the host's immune system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humlová, Z

    2001-01-01

    Viruses are obligatory intracellular parasites, which differ in their structure and strategy of replication. The establishment of an antiviral state in uninfected cells and the elimination of virally infected cells are critical tasks in the host defence. Against the extensive array of immune modalities, viruses have successfully learned how to manipulate host immune control mechanisms. The study of viral strategies of immune evasion can provide insights into host-virus interactions and also illuminates essential functions of the immune system.

  2. Evolution of viral virulence: empirical studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurath, Gael; Wargo, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    The concept of virulence as a pathogen trait that can evolve in response to selection has led to a large body of virulence evolution theory developed in the 1980-1990s. Various aspects of this theory predict increased or decreased virulence in response to a complex array of selection pressures including mode of transmission, changes in host, mixed infection, vector-borne transmission, environmental changes, host vaccination, host resistance, and co-evolution of virus and host. A fundamental concept is prediction of trade-offs between the costs and benefits associated with higher virulence, leading to selection of optimal virulence levels. Through a combination of observational and experimental studies, including experimental evolution of viruses during serial passage, many of these predictions have now been explored in systems ranging from bacteriophage to viruses of plants, invertebrates, and vertebrate hosts. This chapter summarizes empirical studies of viral virulence evolution in numerous diverse systems, including the classic models myxomavirus in rabbits, Marek's disease virus in chickens, and HIV in humans. Collectively these studies support some aspects of virulence evolution theory, suggest modifications for other aspects, and show that predictions may apply in some virus:host interactions but not in others. Finally, we consider how virulence evolution theory applies to disease management in the field.

  3. Pediatric knowledge about acute viral hepatitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Franca

    Full Text Available Knowledge about hepatotropic viruses is crucial for pediatricians because of the high prevalence of viral hepatitis during childhood. The multiplicity of hepatotropic viruses, the spectrum of acute and chronic infections, and the sequels of viral hepatitis result in a need for physicians to better understand the clinical and epidemiological context of patients with viral hepatitis, as well as the importance of prevention measures for hepatitis. A descriptive cross-sectional study was made of pediatrician's knowledge about viral hepatitis, through questionnaires to 574 pediatricians, with no obligation of identification. The pediatricians were recruited among those who attended a national Congress of Pediatrics in Brasília, Brazil. Among these pediatricians, 50.1% frequently treated cases of hepatitis, and 74.7% indicated that they had knowledge of the existence of five hepatotropic viruses; 14.5% knew about at least four types of hepatitis complications, while only 7.7% and 4.3% were able to correctly diagnose viral hepatitis A and B, respectively. Many (28.4% did not know how to treat the patients adequately. Only 37.5% had already recommended vaccination against hepatitis B. Only 50.2% of the pediatricians had been vaccinated against hepatitis B. We concluded that it is crucial to make pediatricians more knowledgeable about viral hepatitis, through continued education programs, especially emphasizing prevention procedures.

  4. Generating viral metagenomes from the coral holobiont

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Dawn Weynberg

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Reef-building corals comprise multipartite symbioses where the cnidarian animal is host to an array of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, and the viruses that infect them. These viruses are critical elements of the coral holobiont, serving not only as agents of mortality, but also as potential vectors for lateral gene flow, and as elements encoding a variety of auxiliary metabolic functions. Consequently, understanding the functioning and health of the coral holobiont requires detailed knowledge of the associated viral assemblage and its function. Currently, the most tractable way of uncovering viral diversity and function is through metagenomic approaches, which is inherently difficult in corals because of the complex holobiont community, an extracellular mucus layer that all corals secrete, and the variety of sizes and structures of nucleic acids found in viruses. Here we present the first protocol for isolating, purifying and amplifying viral nucleic acids from corals based on mechanical disruption of cells. This method produces at least 50% higher yields of viral nucleic acids, has very low levels of cellular sequence contamination and captures wider viral diversity than previously used chemical-based extraction methods. We demonstrate that our mechanical-based method profiles a greater diversity of DNA and RNA genomes, including virus groups such as Retro-transcribing and ssRNA viruses, which are absent from metagenomes generated via chemical-based methods. In addition, we briefly present (and make publically available the first paired DNA and RNA viral metagenomes from the coral Acropora tenuis.

  5. Viral Metagenomics: MetaView Software

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, C; Smith, J

    2007-10-22

    The purpose of this report is to design and develop a tool for analysis of raw sequence read data from viral metagenomics experiments. The tool should compare read sequences of known viral nucleic acid sequence data and enable a user to attempt to determine, with some degree of confidence, what virus groups may be present in the sample. This project was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 we surveyed the literature and examined existing metagenomics tools to educate ourselves and to more precisely define the problem of analyzing raw read data from viral metagenomic experiments. In phase 2 we devised an approach and built a prototype code and database. This code takes viral metagenomic read data in fasta format as input and accesses all complete viral genomes from Kpath for sequence comparison. The system executes at the UNIX command line, producing output that is stored in an Oracle relational database. We provide here a description of the approach we came up with for handling un-assembled, short read data sets from viral metagenomics experiments. We include a discussion of the current MetaView code capabilities and additional functionality that we believe should be added, should additional funding be acquired to continue the work.

  6. Oxygen tension level and human viral infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morinet, Frédéric, E-mail: frederic.morinet@sls.aphp.fr [Centre des Innovations Thérapeutiques en Oncologie et Hématologie (CITOH), CHU Saint-Louis, Paris (France); Université Denis Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité Paris, Paris (France); Casetti, Luana [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); François, Jean-Hugues; Capron, Claude [Institut Cochin INSERM U1016, Paris (France); Laboratoire d' Hématologie, Hôpital Ambroise Paré, Boulogne (France); Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin en Yvelynes, Versailles (France); Pillet, Sylvie [Laboratoire de Bactériologie-Virologie-Hygiène, CHU de Saint-Etienne, Saint-Etienne (France); Université de Lyon et Université de Saint-Etienne, Jean Monnet, GIMAP EA3064, F-42023 Saint-Etienne, Lyon (France)

    2013-09-15

    The role of oxygen tension level is a well-known phenomenon that has been studied in oncology and radiotherapy since about 60 years. Oxygen tension may inhibit or stimulate propagation of viruses in vitro as well as in vivo. In turn modulating oxygen metabolism may constitute a novel approach to treat viral infections as an adjuvant therapy. The major transcription factor which regulates oxygen tension level is hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α). Down-regulating the expression of HIF-1α is a possible method in the treatment of chronic viral infection such as human immunodeficiency virus infection, chronic hepatitis B and C viral infections and Kaposi sarcoma in addition to classic chemotherapy. The aim of this review is to supply an updating concerning the influence of oxygen tension level in human viral infections and to evoke possible new therapeutic strategies regarding this environmental condition. - Highlights: • Oxygen tension level regulates viral replication in vitro and possibly in vivo. • Hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α) is the principal factor involved in Oxygen tension level. • HIF-1α upregulates gene expression for example of HIV, JC and Kaposi sarcoma viruses. • In addition to classical chemotherapy inhibition of HIF-1α may constitute a new track to treat human viral infections.

  7. Host and viral ecology determine bat rabies seasonality and maintenance

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, D.B.; Webb, C.T.; Farnsworth, Matthew L.; O'Shea, T.J.; Bowen, R.A.; Smith, D.L.; Stanley, T.R.; Ellison, L.E.; Rupprecht, C.E.

    2011-01-01

    Rabies is an acute viral infection that is typically fatal. Most rabies modeling has focused on disease dynamics and control within terrestrial mammals (e.g., raccoons and foxes). As such, rabies in bats has been largely neglected until recently. Because bats have been implicated as natural reservoirs for several emerging zoonotic viruses, including SARS-like corona viruses, henipaviruses, and lyssaviruses, understanding how pathogens are maintained within a population becomes vital. Unfortunately, little is known about maintenance mechanisms for any pathogen in bat populations. We present a mathematical model parameterized with unique data from an extensive study of rabies in a Colorado population of big brown bats (Eptesicus fuscus) to elucidate general maintenance mechanisms. We propose that life history patterns of many species of temperate-zone bats, coupled with sufficiently long incubation periods, allows for rabies virus maintenance. Seasonal variability in bat mortality rates, specifically low mortality during hibernation, allows long-term bat population viability. Within viable bat populations, sufficiently long incubation periods allow enough infected individuals to enter hibernation and survive until the following year, and hence avoid an epizootic fadeout of rabies virus. We hypothesize that the slowing effects of hibernation on metabolic and viral activity maintains infected individuals and their pathogens until susceptibles from the annual birth pulse become infected and continue the cycle. This research provides a context to explore similar host ecology and viral dynamics that may explain seasonal patterns and maintenance of other bat-borne diseases.

  8. MOOCs: Hope and Hype in Viral Technologies and Policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maureen W. McClure

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Massive open online courses (MOOCs have emerged in the last couple of years as Internet-based vehicles providinglow cost global access to quality education. They come in two basic forms: expert and self-organizing. Thedominant expert model provides access to expertise through centralized software platforms with expert-designedshort lecture videos, free online reading materials, discussion forums and a strong emphasis on measurable assessments.Self-organizing models focus on problems that may be too new for well-developed expertise, but are tooimportant to ignore. Their rapid (viral growth has resulted in related “viral policies” created by administrators andothers who feel under competitive pressure to act quickly. MOOC interest is growing in many countries, openingnew opportunities for international education partnerships. Backlashes have taken the form of: (a unresolvedproblems with course perseverance, (b assessment procedures to reduce cheating and improve peer review, and (cfaculty resistance to viral governance. While low course completion rates remains problematic, rapidly developingtechnologies and competitive networks are likely to influence higher education institutional policy for some timeto come.

  9. An intranasal selective antisense oligonucleotide impairs lung cyclooxygenase-2 production and improves inflammation, but worsens airway function, in house dust mite sensitive mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pujols Laura

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite its reported pro-inflammatory activity, cyclooxygenase (COX-2 has been proposed to play a protective role in asthma. Accordingly, COX-2 might be down-regulated in the airway cells of asthmatics. This, together with results of experiments to assess the impact of COX-2 blockade in ovalbumin (OVA-sensitized mice in vivo, led us to propose a novel experimental approach using house dust mite (HDM-sensitized mice in which we mimicked altered regulation of COX-2. Methods Allergic inflammation was induced in BALBc mice by intranasal exposure to HDM for 10 consecutive days. This model reproduces spontaneous exposure to aeroallergens by asthmatic patients. In order to impair, but not fully block, COX-2 production in the airways, some of the animals received an intranasal antisense oligonucleotide. Lung COX-2 expression and activity were measured along with bronchovascular inflammation, airway reactivity, and prostaglandin production. Results We observed impaired COX-2 mRNA and protein expression in the lung tissue of selective oligonucleotide-treated sensitized mice. This was accompanied by diminished production of mPGE synthase and PGE2 in the airways. In sensitized mice, the oligonucleotide induced increased airway hyperreactivity (AHR to methacholine, but a substantially reduced bronchovascular inflammation. Finally, mRNA levels of hPGD synthase remained unchanged. Conclusion Intranasal antisense therapy against COX-2 in vivo mimicked the reported impairment of COX-2 regulation in the airway cells of asthmatic patients. This strategy revealed an unexpected novel dual effect: inflammation was improved but AHR worsened. This approach will provide insights into the differential regulation of inflammation and lung function in asthma, and will help identify pharmacological targets within the COX-2/PG system.

  10. Co-Activation of Glucocorticoid Receptor and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ in Murine Skin Prevents Worsening of Atopic March.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deckers, Julie; Bougarne, Nadia; Mylka, Viacheslav; Desmet, Sofie; Luypaert, Astrid; Devos, Michael; Tanghe, Giel; Van Moorleghem, Justine; Vanheerswynghels, Manon; De Cauwer, Lode; Thommis, Jonathan; Vuylsteke, Marnik; Tavernier, Jan; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida; De Bosscher, Karolien

    2017-12-27

    Children with atopic dermatitis show an increased risk to develop asthma later in life, a phenomenon referred to as "atopic march," which emphasizes the need for secondary prevention therapies. This study aimed to investigate whether relief of skin inflammation by glucocorticoids and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor agonists might influence the subsequent development of asthma in a murine model for the atopic march in which mice were repeatedly exposed to house dust mite via the skin, followed by exposure to house dust mite in lungs. To abrogate atopic dermatitis, mice received topical treatment with glucocorticoid receptor/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists. Nuclear receptor ligand effects were assessed on primary keratinocytes and dendritic cells, as central players in skin inflammation. Prior house dust mite-induced skin inflammation aggravates allergic airway inflammation and induces a mixed T helper type 2/T helper type 17 response in the lungs. Cutaneous combined activation of glucocorticoid receptor/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ reduced skin inflammation to a higher extent compared to single activation. Additive anti-inflammatory effects were more prominent in dendritic cells, as compared to keratinocytes. Alleviation of allergic skin inflammation by activation of glucocorticoid receptor/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ appeared insufficient to avoid the allergic immune response in the lungs, but efficiently reduced asthma severity by counteracting the Th17 response. Glucocorticoid receptor/peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ co-activation represents a potent remedy against allergic skin inflammation and worsening of atopic march. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Adsorption of viral particles from the blood plasma of patients with viral hepatitis on nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, A V; Osipov, N V; Yashchenko, S V; Kokotukha, Yu A; Baron, I J; Puzyr, A P; Olkhovskiy, I A; Bondar, V S

    2016-07-01

    Adsorption of viral particles from the blood plasma of patients with viral hepatitis B and C on modified nanodiamonds (MNDs) was shown in the in vitro experiments. PCR method showed the treatment of plasma with MNDs leads to a decrease in the viral load by 2-3 orders of magnitude or more in both cases studied. These results make it possible to predict the applicability of MNDs for the development of new technologies of hemodialysis and plasmapheresis for binding and removal of viral particles from the blood of infected patients.

  12. Effects of interferon-α/β on HBV replication determined by viral load.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjun Tian

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Interferons α and β (IFN-α/β are type I interferons produced by the host to control microbial infections. However, the use of IFN-α to treat hepatitis B virus (HBV patients generated sustained response to only a minority of patients. By using HBV transgenic mice as a model and by using hydrodynamic injection to introduce HBV DNA into the mouse liver, we studied the effect of IFN-α/β on HBV in vivo. Interestingly, our results indicated that IFN-α/β could have opposite effects on HBV: they suppressed HBV replication when viral load was high and enhanced HBV replication when viral load was low. IFN-α/β apparently suppressed HBV replication via transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations. In contrast, IFN-α/β enhanced viral replication by inducing the transcription factor HNF3γ and activating STAT3, which together stimulated HBV gene expression and replication. Further studies revealed an important role of IFN-α/β in stimulating viral growth and prolonging viremia when viral load is low. This use of an innate immune response to enhance its replication and persistence may represent a novel strategy that HBV uses to enhance its growth and spread in the early stage of viral infection when the viral level is low.

  13. Effects of Interferon-α/β on HBV Replication Determined by Viral Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yongjun; Chen, Wen-ling; Ou, Jing-hsiung James

    2011-01-01

    Interferons α and β (IFN-α/β) are type I interferons produced by the host to control microbial infections. However, the use of IFN-α to treat hepatitis B virus (HBV) patients generated sustained response to only a minority of patients. By using HBV transgenic mice as a model and by using hydrodynamic injection to introduce HBV DNA into the mouse liver, we studied the effect of IFN-α/β on HBV in vivo. Interestingly, our results indicated that IFN-α/β could have opposite effects on HBV: they suppressed HBV replication when viral load was high and enhanced HBV replication when viral load was low. IFN-α/β apparently suppressed HBV replication via transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulations. In contrast, IFN-α/β enhanced viral replication by inducing the transcription factor HNF3γ and activating STAT3, which together stimulated HBV gene expression and replication. Further studies revealed an important role of IFN-α/β in stimulating viral growth and prolonging viremia when viral load is low. This use of an innate immune response to enhance its replication and persistence may represent a novel strategy that HBV uses to enhance its growth and spread in the early stage of viral infection when the viral level is low. PMID:21829354

  14. Viral vectors: a look back and ahead on gene transfer technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannucci, Laura; Lai, Michele; Chiuppesi, Flavia; Ceccherini-Nelli, Luca; Pistello, Mauro

    2013-01-01

    No matter what their origin, strain and family, viruses have evolved exquisite strategies to reach and penetrate specific target cells where they hijack the cellular machinery to express viral genes and produce progeny particles. The ability to deliver and express genetic information to cells is the basis for exploiting viruses as "Trojan horses" to genetically modify the natural cell target or, upon manipulation of the viral receptor to retarget the virus, to genetically engineer different cell types. This process, known as transduction, is accomplished using viral vectors derived from parental wild type viruses whose viral genes, essential for replication and virulence, have been replaced with the heterologous gene(s) required for cell manipulation. Rearrangement of the viral genome to impede replication or generation of infectious virions but maintaining the ability to deliver nucleic acids has been the object of intense research since the early 1980s. Technological advances and the ever-growing knowledge of molecular virology and virus-host cell relationships have constantly improved the safety profile of viral vectors that are now used in vitro and in vivo to study cellular gene function, correct genetic defects (gene therapy), express therapeutic proteins, vaccinate against infectious agents and tumors, produce experimental animal models, and for other purposes. This review illustrates the strategies used to generate some of the most used viral vectors, and their advantages, limitations and principal applications.

  15. Genetic disruption of CD8+ Treg activity enhances the immune response to viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Holderried, Tobias A. W.; Lang, Philipp A.; Kim, Hye-Jung; Cantor, Harvey

    2013-01-01

    Cellular interactions that regulate the immune response of T cells to viral infection are poorly understood. Here we report that in the absence of activity of CD8 regulatory T-cells (CD8 Treg cells), antiviral immunity is enhanced and the deleterious effects of viral infection are constrained. Using a genetically modified mouse model that displays defective regulatory activity of CD8 Treg cells, the immune response against viruses was substantially enhanced during the acute and chronic phase ...

  16. The Toll-Dorsal Pathway Is Required for Resistance to Viral Oral Infection in Drosophila

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Álvaro Gil; Naylor, Huw; Esteves, Sara Santana; Pais, Inês Silva; Martins, Nelson Eduardo; Teixeira, Luis

    2014-01-01

    Pathogen entry route can have a strong impact on the result of microbial infections in different hosts, including insects. Drosophila melanogaster has been a successful model system to study the immune response to systemic viral infection. Here we investigate the role of the Toll pathway in resistance to oral viral infection in D. melanogaster. We show that several Toll pathway components, including Spätzle, Toll, Pelle and the NF-kB-like transcription factor Dorsal, are required to resist or...

  17. Worsening of myasthenia gravis after administration of injectable long-acting risperidone for treatment of schizophrenia; first case report and a call for caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hashel, Jasem Y; Ismail, Ismail Ibrahim; John, John K; Ibrahim, Mohammed; Ali, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune disease characterized by muscle weakness due to autoantibodies affecting the neuromuscular junction. Co-occurrence of myasthenia gravis and schizophrenia is very rare and raises a challenge in management of both diseases. Antipsychotic drugs exhibit anticholinergic side effects and have the potentials of worsening myasthenia. Long-acting risperidone is an injectable atypical antipsychotic drug that has not been previously reported to worsen myasthenia gravis in literature. We report the first case report of worsening of myasthenia after receiving long-acting risperidone injection for schizophrenia in a 29-year-old female with both diseases. She started to have worsening 2 weeks following the first injection and her symptoms persisted despite receiving plasma exchange. This could be explained by the pharmacokinetics of the drug. We recommend that long-acting risperidone should be used with caution in patients with myasthenia gravis, and clinicians must be aware of the potential risks of this therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Monitoring fetal electrocortical activity during labour for predicting worsening acidemia: a prospective study in the ovine fetus near term.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin G Frasch

    Full Text Available Severe fetal acidemia during labour with arterial pH below 7.00 is associated with increased risk of hypoxic-ischemic brain injury. Electronic fetal heart rate (FHR monitoring, the mainstay of intrapartum surveillance, has poor specificity for detecting fetal acidemia. We studied brain electrical activity measured with electrocorticogram (ECOG in the near term ovine fetus subjected to repetitive umbilical cord occlusions (UCO inducing FHR decelerations, as might be seen in human labour, to delineate the time-course for ECOG changes with worsening acidemia and thereby assess the potential clinical utility of fetal ECOG.Ten chronically catheterized fetal sheep were studied through a series of mild, moderate and severe UCO until the arterial pH was below 7.00. At a pH of 7.24 ± 0.04, 52 ± 13 min prior to the pH dropping <7.00, spectral edge frequency (SEF increased to 23 ± 2 Hz from 3 ± 1 Hz during each FHR deceleration (p<0.001 and was correlated to decreases in FHR and in fetal arterial blood pressure during each FHR deceleration (p<0.001.The UCO-related changes in ECOG occurred in advance of the pH decreasing below 7.00. These ECOG changes may be a protective mechanism suppressing non-essential energy needs when oxygen supply to the fetal brain is decreased acutely. By detecting such "adaptive brain shutdown," the need for delivery in high risk pregnant patients may be more accurately predicted than with FHR monitoring alone. Therefore, monitoring fetal electroencephalogram (EEG, the human equivalent of ECOG during human labour may be a useful adjunct to FHR monitoring.

  19. Pamidronate Attenuates Oxidative Stress and Energetic Metabolism Changes but Worsens Functional Outcomes in Acute Doxorubicin-Induced Cardiotoxicity in Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Bernardo de Carvalho

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cardiotoxicity is the major side effect of doxorubicin. As mechanisms that are involved in cardiotoxicity are ambiguous, new methods for attenuating cardiotoxicity are needed. Recent studies have shown that bisphosphonates can decrease oxidative stress. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pamidronate on preventing acute doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. Methods: Sixty-four male Wistar rats were allocated into four groups: the control group (C, the pamidronate group (P, the doxorubicin group (D and the doxorubicin/pamidronate group (DP. The rats in the P and DP groups received pamidronate injections (3 mg/kg, IP. After 24 hours, the rats in the D and DP groups received doxorubicin injections (20 mg/kg, IP. Forty-eight hours after doxorubicin injection, the rats were killed. Echocardiography, isolated heart study and biochemical analysis were performed. Results: Doxorubicin-induced acute cardiotoxicity showed increased matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 activation, oxidative damage and induced alterations in myocardial energetic metabolism. Pamidronate did not inhibit MMP-2 activation but attenuated oxidative stress and improved myocardial energetic metabolism. Regarding cardiac function, the DP group exhibited a decrease in the left ventricular ejection fraction in the echocardiography and a decrease in +dP/dt in the isolated heart study compared with other groups. The same DP group presented serum hypocalcaemia. Conclusions: Despite its ability to reduce oxidative stress and improve energy metabolism in the heart, pamidronate worsened systolic function in rats treated with doxorubicin, and therefore we cannot recommend its use in conjunction with anthracycline chemotherapy.

  20. Infrared Warming Reduced Winter Wheat Yields and Some Physiological Parameters, Which Were Mitigated by Irrigation and Worsened by Delayed Sowing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shibo; Su, Hua; Liu, Wei; Tan, Kaiyan; Ren, Sanxue

    2013-01-01

    Winter wheat has a central role in ensuring the food security and welfare of 1.3 billion people in China. Extensive previous studies have concluded that winter wheat yields would decrease with higher temperatures, owing to warming-induced soil drying or shortening of phenophase. Temperature in China is predicted to increase by 1–5°C by 2100, which may greatly impact plant production and cause other negative effects. We performed a manipulative field experiment, creating diverse growth regimes for wheat by infrared radiation (IR) warming day and night, including IR warming only (DW), IR warming + delayed sowing dates (DS), IR warming + increased irrigation (IW), and a control (CK). The results show that IR warming increased daily average wheat canopy and soil temperatures by 2.0°C and 2.3°C, respectively. DW was associated with an advanced maturity of 10 days and yield reduction of 8.2%. IR-warming effects on the photosynthetic apparatus of wheat varied with season as well as significant differences were found in the booting stage. DS represented a worsened situation, lowering yield per plant by 16.4%, with a significant decline in aboveground biomass and functional leaf area. Wheat under DS showed double-peak patterns of diurnal gas exchange during booting stages and, consequently, lower photosynthetic capacity with high transpiration for cooling. Significantly lower actual water use efficiency and intrinsic water use efficiency from jointing to anthesis stages were also found under DS. However, IW had no significant difference from CK, irrespective of yield and photosynthesis. Therefore, we concluded that delayed sowing date may not be a good choice for winter wheat, whereas a thoroughly-watered wheat agroecosystem should be promoted in the context of global warming. PMID:23874424

  1. Infrared warming reduced winter wheat yields and some physiological parameters, which were mitigated by irrigation and worsened by delayed sowing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Shibo; Su, Hua; Liu, Wei; Tan, Kaiyan; Ren, Sanxue

    2013-01-01

    Winter wheat has a central role in ensuring the food security and welfare of 1.3 billion people in China. Extensive previous studies have concluded that winter wheat yields would decrease with higher temperatures, owing to warming-induced soil drying or shortening of phenophase. Temperature in China is predicted to increase by 1-5°C by 2100, which may greatly impact plant production and cause other negative effects. We performed a manipulative field experiment, creating diverse growth regimes for wheat by infrared radiation (IR) warming day and night, including IR warming only (DW), IR warming + delayed sowing dates (DS), IR warming + increased irrigation (IW), and a control (CK). The results show that IR warming increased daily average wheat canopy and soil temperatures by 2.0°C and 2.3°C, respectively. DW was associated with an advanced maturity of 10 days and yield reduction of 8.2%. IR-warming effects on the photosynthetic apparatus of wheat varied with season as well as significant differences were found in the booting stage. DS represented a worsened situation, lowering yield per plant by 16.4%, with a significant decline in aboveground biomass and functional leaf area. Wheat under DS showed double-peak patterns of diurnal gas exchange during booting stages and, consequently, lower photosynthetic capacity with high transpiration for cooling. Significantly lower actual water use efficiency and intrinsic water use efficiency from jointing to anthesis stages were also found under DS. However, IW had no significant difference from CK, irrespective of yield and photosynthesis. Therefore, we concluded that delayed sowing date may not be a good choice for winter wheat, whereas a thoroughly-watered wheat agroecosystem should be promoted in the context of global warming.

  2. Infrared warming reduced winter wheat yields and some physiological parameters, which were mitigated by irrigation and worsened by delayed sowing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shibo Fang

    Full Text Available Winter wheat has a central role in ensuring the food security and welfare of 1.3 billion people in China. Extensive previous studies have concluded that winter wheat yields would decrease with higher temperatures, owing to warming-induced soil drying or shortening of phenophase. Temperature in China is predicted to increase by 1-5°C by 2100, which may greatly impact plant production and cause other negative effects. We performed a manipulative field experiment, creating diverse growth regimes for wheat by infrared radiation (IR warming day and night, including IR warming only (DW, IR warming + delayed sowing dates (DS, IR warming + increased irrigation (IW, and a control (CK. The results show that IR warming increased daily average wheat canopy and soil temperatures by 2.0°C and 2.3°C, respectively. DW was associated with an advanced maturity of 10 days and yield reduction of 8.2%. IR-warming effects on the photosynthetic apparatus of wheat varied with season as well as significant differences were found in the booting stage. DS represented a worsened situation, lowering yield per plant by 16.4%, with a significant decline in aboveground biomass and functional leaf area. Wheat under DS showed double-peak patterns of diurnal gas exchange during booting stages and, consequently, lower photosynthetic capacity with high transpiration for cooling. Significantly lower actual water use efficiency and intrinsic water use efficiency from jointing to anthesis stages were also found under DS. However, IW had no significant difference from CK, irrespective of yield and photosynthesis. Therefore, we concluded that delayed sowing date may not be a good choice for winter wheat, whereas a thoroughly-watered wheat agroecosystem should be promoted in the context of global warming.

  3. HIV Exploits Antiviral Host Innate GCN2-ATF4 Signaling for Establishing Viral Replication Early in Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Guochun; Santos Rocha, Clarissa; Hirao, Lauren A; Mendes, Erica A; Tang, Yuyang; Thompson, George R; Wong, Joseph K; Dandekar, Satya

    2017-05-02

    Antiviral innate host defenses against acute viral infections include suppression of host protein synthesis to restrict viral protein production. Less is known about mechanisms by which viral pathogens subvert host antiviral innate responses for establishing their replication and dissemination. We investigated early innate defense against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection and viral evasion by utilizing human CD4 + T cell cultures in vitro and a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) model of AIDS in vivo Our data showed that early host innate defense against the viral infection involves GCN2-ATF4 signaling-mediated suppression of global protein synthesis, which is exploited by the virus for supporting its own replication during early viral infection and dissemination in the gut mucosa. Suppression of protein synthesis and induction of protein kinase GCN2-ATF4 signaling were detected in the gut during acute SIV infection. These changes diminished during chronic viral infection. HIV replication induced by serum deprivation in CD4 + T cells was linked to the induction of ATF4 that was recruited to the HIV long terminal repeat (LTR) to promote viral transcription. Experimental inhibition of GCN2-ATF4 signaling either by a specific inhibitor or by amino acid supplementation suppressed the induction of HIV expression. Enhancing ATF4 expression through selenium administration resulted in reactivation of latent HIV in vitro as well as ex vivo in the primary CD4 + T cells isolated from patients receiving suppressive antiretroviral therapy (ART). In summary, HIV/SIV exploits the early host antiviral response through GCN2-ATF4 signaling by utilizing ATF4 for activating the viral LTR transcription to establish initial viral replication and is a potential target for HIV prevention and therapy. IMPORTANCE Understanding how HIV overcomes host antiviral innate defense response in order to establish infection and dissemination is critical for developing prevention and

  4. Classification of capped tubular viral particles in the family of Papovaviridae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keef, T.; Taormina, A.; Twarock, R.

    2006-04-01

    A vital constituent of a virus is its protein shell, called the viral capsid, that encapsulates and hence provides protection for the viral genome. Viral capsids are usually spherical, and for a significant number of viruses they exhibit overall icosahedral symmetry. The corresponding surface lattices, that encode the locations of the capsid proteins and intersubunit bonds, can be modelled by viral tiling theory. It has been shown in vitro that under a variation of the experimental boundary conditions, such as the pH value and salt concentration, tubular particles may appear instead of, or in addition to, spherical ones. In order to develop models that describe the simultaneous assembly of both spherical and tubular variants, and hence study the possibility of triggering tubular malformations as a means of interference with the replication mechanism, viral tiling theory has to be extended to include tubular lattices with end caps. We focus here on the case of Papovaviridae, which play a distinguished role from the viral structural point of view as they correspond to all pentamer lattices, i.e. lattices formed from clusters of five protein subunits throughout. These results pave the way for a generalization of recently developed assembly models.

  5. The impact of cell regeneration on the dynamics of viral coinfection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinky, Lubna; Dobrovolny, Hana M.

    2017-06-01

    Many mathematical models of respiratory viral infections do not include regeneration of cells within the respiratory tract, arguing that the infection is resolved before there is significant cellular regeneration. However, recent studies have found that ˜40% of patients hospitalized with influenza-like illness are infected with at least two different viruses, which could potentially lead to longer-lasting infections. In these longer infections, cell regeneration might affect the infection dynamics, in particular, allowing for the possibility of chronic coinfections. Several mathematical models have been used to describe cell regeneration in infection models, though the effect of model choice on the predicted time course of viral coinfections is not clear. We investigate four mathematical models incorporating different mechanisms of cell regeneration during respiratory viral coinfection to determine the effect of cell regeneration on infection dynamics. We perform linear stability analysis for each of the models and find the steady states analytically. The analysis suggests that chronic illness is possible but only with one viral species; chronic coexistence of two different viral species is not possible with the regeneration models considered here.

  6. Molecular piracy: the viral link to carcinogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flaitz, C M; Hicks, M J

    1998-11-01

    The vast majority of the human experience with viral infections is associated with acute symptoms, such as malaise, fever, chills, rhinitis and diarrhea. With this acute or lytic phase, the immune system mounts a response and eliminates the viral agent while acquiring antibodies to that specific viral subtype. With latent or chronic infections, the viral agent becomes incorporated into the human genome. Viral agents capable of integration into the host's genetic material are particularly dangerous and may commandeer the host's ability to regulate normal cell growth and proliferation. The oncogenic viruses may immortalize the host cell, and facilitate malignant transformation. Cell growth and proliferation may be enhanced by viral interference with tumor suppressor gene function (p53 and pRb). Viruses may act as vectors for mutated proto-oncogenes (oncogenes). Overexpression of these oncogenes in viral-infected cells interferes with normal cell function and allows unregulated cell growth and proliferation, which may lead to malignant transformation and tumour formation. Development of oral neoplasms, both benign and malignant, has been linked to several viruses. Epstein-Barr virus is associated with oral hairy leukoplakia, lymphoproliferative disease, lymphoepithelial carcinoma, B-cell lymphomas, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Human herpesvirus-8 has been implicated in all forms of Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphomas, multiple myeloma, angioimmunoblastic lymphadenopathy, and Castleman's disease. Human herpesvirus-6 has been detected in lymphoproliferative disease, lymphomas, Hodgkin's disease, and oral squamous cell carcinoma. The role of human papillomavirus in benign (squamous papilloma, focal epithelial hyperplasia, condyloma acuminatum, verruca vulgaris), premalignant (oral epithelial dysplasia), and malignant (squamous cell carcinoma) neoplasms within the oral cavity is well recognized. Herpes simplex virus may participate as a cofactor in oral squamous

  7. Raw Sewage Harbors Diverse Viral Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantalupo, Paul G.; Calgua, Byron; Zhao, Guoyan; Hundesa, Ayalkibet; Wier, Adam D.; Katz, Josh P.; Grabe, Michael; Hendrix, Roger W.; Girones, Rosina; Wang, David; Pipas, James M.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT At this time, about 3,000 different viruses are recognized, but metagenomic studies suggest that these viruses are a small fraction of the viruses that exist in nature. We have explored viral diversity by deep sequencing nucleic acids obtained from virion populations enriched from raw sewage. We identified 234 known viruses, including 17 that infect humans. Plant, insect, and algal viruses as well as bacteriophages were also present. These viruses represented 26 taxonomic families and included viruses with single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), positive-sense ssRNA [ssRNA(+)], and dsRNA genomes. Novel viruses that could be placed in specific taxa represented 51 different families, making untreated wastewater the most diverse viral metagenome (genetic material recovered directly from environmental samples) examined thus far. However, the vast majority of sequence reads bore little or no sequence relation to known viruses and thus could not be placed into specific taxa. These results show that the vast majority of the viruses on Earth have not yet been characterized. Untreated wastewater provides a rich matrix for identifying novel viruses and for studying virus diversity. Importance At this time, virology is focused on the study of a relatively small number of viral species. Specific viruses are studied either because they are easily propagated in the laboratory or because they are associated with disease. The lack of knowledge of the size and characteristics of the viral universe and the diversity of viral genomes is a roadblock to understanding important issues, such as the origin of emerging pathogens and the extent of gene exchange among viruses. Untreated wastewater is an ideal system for assessing viral diversity because virion populations from large numbers of individuals are deposited and because raw sewage itself provides a rich environment for the growth of diverse host species and thus their viruses. These studies suggest that

  8. Dicer-2 processes diverse viral RNA species.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leah R Sabin

    Full Text Available RNA silencing pathways play critical roles in gene regulation, virus infection, and transposon control. RNA interference (RNAi is mediated by small interfering RNAs (siRNAs, which are liberated from double-stranded (dsRNA precursors by Dicer and guide the RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC to targets. Although principles governing small RNA sorting into RISC have been uncovered, the spectrum of RNA species that can be targeted by Dicer proteins, particularly the viral RNAs present during an infection, are poorly understood. Dicer-2 potently restricts viral infection in insects by generating virus-derived siRNAs from viral RNA. To better characterize the substrates of Dicer-2, we examined the virus-derived siRNAs produced during the Drosophila antiviral RNAi response to four different viruses using high-throughput sequencing. We found that each virus was uniquely targeted by the RNAi pathway; dicing substrates included dsRNA replication intermediates and intramolecular RNA stem loops. For instance, a putative intergenic RNA hairpin encoded by Rift Valley Fever virus generates abundant small RNAs in both Drosophila and mosquito cells, while repetitive sequences within the genomic termini of Vaccinia virus, which give rise to abundant small RNAs in Drosophila, were found to be transcribed in both insect and mammalian cells. Moreover, we provide evidence that the RNA species targeted by Dicer-2 can be modulated by the presence of a viral suppressor of RNAi. This study uncovered several novel, heavily targeted features within viral genomes, offering insight into viral replication, viral immune evasion strategies, and the mechanism of antiviral RNAi.

  9. Viral video: Live imaging of virus-host encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Son, Kwangmin; Guasto, Jeffrey S.; Cubillos-Ruiz, Andres; Chisholm, Sallie W.; Sullivan, Matthew B.; Stocker, Roman

    2014-11-01

    Viruses are non-motile infectious agents that rely on Brownian motion to encounter and subsequently adsorb to their hosts. Paradoxically, the viral adsorption rate is often reported to be larger than the theoretical limit imposed by the virus-host encounter rate, highlighting a major gap in the experimental quantification of virus-host interactions. Here we present the first direct quantification of the viral adsorption rate, obtained using live imaging of individual host cells and viruses for thousands of encounter events. The host-virus pair consisted of Prochlorococcus MED4, a 800 nm small non-motile bacterium that dominates photosynthesis in the oceans, and its virus PHM-2, a myovirus that has a 80 nm icosahedral capsid and a 200 nm long rigid tail. We simultaneously imaged hosts and viruses moving by Brownian motion using two-channel epifluorescent microscopy in a microfluidic device. This detailed quantification of viral transport yielded a 20-fold smaller adsorption efficiency than previously reported, indicating the need for a major revision in infection models for marine and likely other ecosystems.

  10. Viral vaccines for bony fish: past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado-Miranda, Celene; Loza-Rubio, Elizabeth; Rojas-Anaya, Edith; García-Espinosa, Gary

    2013-05-01

    Since 1970, aquaculture production has grown. In 2010, it had an annual average rate of 6.3% with 59.9 million tons of product and soon could exceed capture fisheries as a source of fishery products. However, the occurrence of viral diseases continues to be a significant limiting factor and its control is important for the development of this sector. In aquaculture farms, fish are reared under intensive culture conditions, and the use of viral vaccines has enabled an increase in production. Several types of vaccines and strategies of vaccination have been developed; however, this approach has not reached the expected goals in the most susceptible stage (fingerlings). Currently, there are inactivated and recombinant commercial vaccines, mainly for salmonids and cyprinids. In addition, updated genomic and proteomic technology has expedited the research and expansion of new vaccine models, such as those comprised of subunits or DNA. The objective of this review is to cover the various types of viral vaccines that have been developed and are available for bony fishes, as well as the advantages and challenges that DNA vaccines present for massive administration in a growing aquaculture, possible risks for the environment, the controversy regarding genetically modified organisms and possible acceptance by consumers.

  11. Questing for an optimal, universal viral agent for oncolytic virotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paiva, L. R.; Martins, M. L.; Ferreira, S. C.

    2011-10-01

    One of the most promising strategies to treat cancer is attacking it with viruses designed to exploit specific altered pathways. Here, the effects of oncolytic virotherapy on tumors having compact, papillary, and disconnected morphologies are investigated through computer simulations of a multiscale model coupling macroscopic reaction-diffusion equations for the nutrients with microscopic stochastic rules for the actions of individual cells and viruses. The interaction among viruses and tumor cells involves cell infection, intracellular virus replication, and the release of new viruses in the tissue after cell lysis. The evolution over time of both the viral load and cancer cell population, as well as the probabilities for tumor eradication, were evaluated for a range of multiplicities of infection, viral entries, and burst sizes. It was found that in immunosuppressed hosts, the antitumor efficacy of a virus is primarily determined by its entry efficiency, its replicative capacity within the tumor, and its ability to spread over the tissue. However, the optimal traits for oncolytic viruses depend critically on the tumor growth dynamics and do not necessarily include rapid replication, cytolysis, or spreading, currently assumed as necessary conditions for a successful therapeutic outcome. Our findings have potential implications on the design of new vectors for the viral therapy of cancer.

  12. Massive Activation of Archaeal Defense Genes during Viral Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voet, Marleen; Sismeiro, Odile; Dillies, Marie-Agnes; Jagla, Bernd; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Sezonov, Guennadi; Forterre, Patrick; van der Oost, John; Lavigne, Rob

    2013-01-01

    Archaeal viruses display unusually high genetic and morphological diversity. Studies of these viruses proved to be instrumental for the expansion of knowledge on viral diversity and evolution. The Sulfolobus islandicus rod-shaped virus 2 (SIRV2) is a model to study virus-host interactions in Archaea. It is a lytic virus that exploits a unique egress mechanism based on the formation of remarkable pyramidal structures on the host cell envelope. Using whole-transcriptome sequencing, we present here a global map defining host and viral gene expression during the infection cycle of SIRV2 in its hyperthermophilic host S. islandicus LAL14/1. This information was used, in combination with a yeast two-hybrid analysis of SIRV2 protein interactions, to advance current understanding of viral gene functions. As a consequence of SIRV2 infection, transcription of more than one-third of S. islandicus genes was differentially regulated. While expression of genes involved in cell division decreased, those genes playing a role in antiviral defense were activated on a large scale. Expression of genes belonging to toxin-antitoxin and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems was specifically pronounced. The observed different degree of activation of various CRISPR-Cas systems highlights the specialized functions they perform. The information on individual gene expression and activation of antiviral defense systems is expected to aid future studies aimed at detailed understanding of the functions and interplay of these systems in vivo. PMID:23698312

  13. Viral immune evasion: Lessons in MHC class I antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Weijer, Michael L; Luteijn, Rutger D; Wiertz, Emmanuel J H J

    2015-03-01

    The MHC class I antigen presentation pathway enables cells infected with intracellular pathogens to signal the presence of the invader to the immune system. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes are able to eliminate the infected cells through recognition of pathogen-derived peptides presented by MHC class I molecules at the cell surface. In the course of evolution, many viruses have acquired inhibitors that target essential stages of the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway. Studies on these immune evasion proteins reveal fascinating strategies used by viruses to elude the immune system. Viral immunoevasins also constitute great research tools that facilitate functional studies on the MHC class I antigen presentation pathway, allowing the investigation of less well understood routes, such as TAP-independent antigen presentation and cross-presentation of exogenous proteins. Viral immunoevasins have also helped to unravel more general cellular processes. For instance, basic principles of ER-associated protein degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway have been resolved using virus-induced degradation of MHC class I as a model. This review highlights how viral immunoevasins have increased our understanding of MHC class I-restricted antigen presentation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Intracellular Detection of Viral Transcription and Replication Using RNA FISH

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    Chapter 14. Intracellular detection of viral transcription and replication using RNA FISH i. Summary/Abstract Many hemorrhagic fever viruses...resolution. However, viral RNA tends to cluster in specific subcellular sites (e.g. viral replication factories). Thus while true single-molecule...assays [4]. Detection of viral RNA allows for in depth interrogation of the subcellular sites of viral replication and such experiments will help further

  15. View and review on viral oncology research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parolin Cristina

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract To date, almost one and a half million cases of cancer are diagnosed every year in the US and nearly 560,000 Americans are expected to die of cancer in the current year, more than 1,500 people a day (data from the American Cancer Society at http://www.cancer.org/. According to the World Health Organization (WHO, roughly 20% of all cancers worldwide results from chronic infections; in particular, up to 15% of human cancers is characterized by a viral aetiology with higher incidence in Developing Countries. The link between viruses and cancer was one of the pivotal discoveries in cancer research during the past Century. Indeed, the infectious nature of specific tumors has important implications in terms of their prevention, diagnosis, and therapy. In the 21st Century, the research on viral oncology field continues to be vigorous, with new significant and original studies on viral oncogenesis and translational research from basic virology to treatment of cancer. This review will cover different viral oncology aspects, starting from the history of viral oncology and moving to the peculiar features of oncogenic RNA and DNA viruses, with a special focus on human pathogens.

  16. Molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Haddad

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses have made their mark on the cancer world as a potential therapeutic option, with the possible advantages of reduced side effects and strengthened treatment efficacy due to higher tumor selectivity. Results have been so promising, that oncolytic viral treatments have now been approved for clinical trials in several countries. However, clinical studies may benefit from the ability to noninvasively and serially identify sites of viral targeting via molecular imaging in order to provide safety, efficacy, and toxicity information. Furthermore, molecular imaging of oncolytic viral therapy may provide a more sensitive and specific diagnostic technique to detect tumor origin and, more importantly, presence of metastases. Several strategies have been investigated for molecular imaging of viral replication broadly categorized into optical and deep tissue imaging, utilizing several reporter genes encoding for fluorescence proteins, conditional enzymes, and membrane protein and transporters. Various imaging methods facilitate molecular imaging, including computer tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography, single photon emission CT, gamma-scintigraphy, and photoacoustic imaging. In addition, several molecular probes are used for medical imaging, which act as targeting moieties or signaling agents. This review will explore the preclinical and clinical use of in vivo molecular imaging of replication-competent oncolytic viral therapy.

  17. Recombination-dependent concatemeric viral DNA replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Piano, Ambra; Martínez-Jiménez, María I; Zecchi, Lisa; Ayora, Silvia

    2011-09-01

    The initiation of viral double stranded (ds) DNA replication involves proteins that recruit and load the replisome at the replication origin (ori). Any block in replication fork progression or a programmed barrier may act as a factor for ori-independent remodelling and assembly of a new replisome at the stalled fork. Then replication initiation becomes dependent on recombination proteins, a process called recombination-dependent replication (RDR). RDR, which is recognized as being important for replication restart and stability in all living organisms, plays an essential role in the replication cycle of many dsDNA viruses. The SPP1 virus, which infects Bacillus subtilis cells, serves as a paradigm to understand the links between replication and recombination in circular dsDNA viruses. SPP1-encoded initiator and replisome assembly proteins control the onset of viral replication and direct the recruitment of host-encoded replisomal components at viral oriL. SPP1 uses replication fork reactivation to switch from ori-dependent θ-type (circle-to-circle) replication to σ-type RDR. Replication fork arrest leads to a double strand break that is processed by viral-encoded factors to generate a D-loop into which a new replisome is assembled, leading to σ-type viral replication. SPP1 RDR proteins are compared with similar proteins encoded by other viruses and their possible in vivo roles are discussed. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Viral miRNAs and immune evasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boss, Isaac W; Renne, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Viral miRNAs, ~22nt RNA molecules which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression, are emerging as important tools in immune evasion. Viral infection is a complex process that requires immune evasion in order to establish persistent life-long infection of the host. During this process viruses express both protein-coding and non-coding genes, which help to modulate the cellular environment making it more favorable for infection. In the last decade, it was uncovered that DNA viruses express a diverse and abundant pool of small non-coding RNA molecules, called microRNAs (miRNAs). These virally encoded miRNAs are non-immunogenic and therefore are important tools used to evade both innate and adaptive immune responses. This review aims to summarize our current knowledge of herpesvirus- and polyomavirus-encoded miRNAs, and how they contribute to immune evasion by targeting viral and/or host cellular genes. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: MicroRNAs in viral gene regulation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanism of membranous tunnelling nanotube formation in viral genome delivery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bibiana Peralta

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In internal membrane-containing viruses, a lipid vesicle enclosed by the icosahedral capsid protects the genome. It has been postulated that this internal membrane is the genome delivery device of the virus. Viruses built with this architectural principle infect hosts in all three domains of cellular life. Here, using a combination of electron microscopy techniques, we investigate bacteriophage PRD1, the best understood model for such viruses, to unveil the mechanism behind the genome translocation across the cell envelope. To deliver its double-stranded DNA, the icosahedral protein-rich virus membrane transforms into a tubular structure protruding from one of the 12 vertices of the capsid. We suggest that this viral nanotube exits from the same vertex used for DNA packaging, which is biochemically distinct from the other 11. The tube crosses the capsid through an aperture corresponding to the loss of the peripentonal P3 major capsid protein trimers, penton protein P31 and membrane protein P16. The remodeling of the internal viral membrane is nucleated by changes in osmolarity and loss of capsid-membrane interactions as consequence of the de-capping of the vertices. This engages the polymerization of the tail tube, which is structured by membrane-associated proteins. We have observed that the proteo-lipidic tube in vivo can pierce the gram-negative bacterial cell envelope allowing the viral genome to be shuttled to the host cell. The internal diameter of the tube allows one double-stranded DNA chain to be translocated. We conclude that the assembly principles of the viral tunneling nanotube take advantage of proteo-lipid interactions that confer to the tail tube elastic, mechanical and functional properties employed also in other protein-membrane systems.

  20. Dissecting innate immune signaling in viral evasion of cytokine production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junjie; Zhu, Lining; Feng, Pinghui

    2014-03-02

    In response to a viral infection, the host innate immune response is activated to up-regulate gene expression and production of antiviral cytokines. Conversely, viruses have evolved intricate strategies to evade and exploit host immune signaling for survival and propagation. Viral immune evasion, entailing host defense and viral evasion, provides one of the most fascinating and dynamic interfaces to discern the host-virus interaction. These studies advance our understanding in innate immune regulation and pave our way to develop novel antiviral therapies. Murine γHV68 is a natural pathogen of murine rodents. γHV68 infection of mice provides a tractable small animal model to examine the antiviral response to human KSHV and EBV of which perturbation of in vivo virus-host interactions is not applicable. Here we describe a protocol to determine the antiviral cytokine production. This protocol can be adapted to other viruses and signaling pathways. Recently, we have discovered that γHV68 hijacks MAVS and IKKβ, key innate immune signaling components downstream of the cytosolic RIG-I and MDA5, to abrogate NFΚB activation and antiviral cytokine production. Specifically, γHV68 infection activates IKKβ and that activated IKKβ phosphorylates RelA to accelerate RelA degradation. As such, γHV68 efficiently uncouples NFΚB activation from its upstream activated IKKβ, negating antiviral cytokine gene expression. This study elucidates an intricate strategy whereby the upstream innate immune activation is intercepted by a viral pathogen to nullify the immediate downstream transcriptional activation and evade antiviral cytokine production.

  1. Translating HIV sequences into quantitative fitness landscapes predicts viral vulnerabilities for rational immunogen design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Andrew L.; Mann, Jaclyn K.; Omarjee, Saleha; Ndung’u, Thumbi; Walker, Bruce D.; Chakraborty, Arup K.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine offers the best hope to curb the HIV-AIDS epidemic gripping sub-Saharan Africa, but remains elusive. A major challenge is the extreme viral sequence variability among strains. Systematic means to guide immunogen design for highly variable pathogens like HIV are not available. Using computational models, we have developed an approach to translate available viral sequence data into quantitative landscapes of viral fitness as a function of the amino acid sequences of its constituent proteins. Predictions emerging from our computationally defined landscapes for the proteins of HIV-1 clade B Gag were positively tested against new in vitro fitness measurements, and were consistent with previously defined in vitro measurements and clinical observations. These landscapes chart the peaks and valleys of viral fitness as protein sequences change, and inform the design of immunogens and therapies that can target regions of the virus most vulnerable to selection pressure. PMID:23521886

  2. Viral control of bacterial biodiversity - Evidence from a nutrient enriched mesocosm experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandaa, R.-A.; Gómez-Consarnau, L.; Pinhassi, J.

    2009-01-01

    . As predicted, the total number of viral populations was the same in all treatments, while the composition of the viral community varied. Our results support the theoretical prediction that there is one control mechanism for the number of niches for coexisting virus-host pairs (top-down control), and another......We demonstrate here results showing that bottom-up and top-down control mechanisms can operate simultaneously and in concert in marine microbial food webs, controlling prokaryote diversity by a combination of viral lysis and substrate limitation. Models in microbial ecology predict that a shift...... in the type of bacterial growth rate limitation is expected to have a major effect on species composition within the community of bacterial hosts, with a subsequent shift in the composition of the viral community. Only moderate effects would, however, be expected in the absolute number of coexisting virus...

  3. Worsening Renal Function in Acute Heart Failure Patients Undergoing Aggressive Diuresis is Not Associated with Tubular Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, Tariq; Jackson, Keyanna; Rao, Veena S; Tang, W H Wilson; Brisco-Bacik, Meredith A; Chen, Horng H; Felker, G Michael; Hernandez, Adrian F; O'Connor, Christopher M; Sabbisetti, Venkata S; Bonventre, Joseph V; Wilson, F Perry; Coca, Steven G; Testani, Jeffrey M

    2018-01-19

    Background -Worsening renal function (WRF) in the setting of aggressive diuresis for acute heart failure (AHF) treatment may reflect renal tubular injury or simply indicate a hemodynamic or functional change in glomerular filtration. Well-validated tubular injury biomarkers-NAG, NGAL, and KIM-1- are now available that can quantify the degree of renal tubularinjury. The ROSE-AHF trial provides an experimental platform for the study of mechanisms of WRF during aggressive diuresis for AHF, as the ROSE-AHF protocol dictated high dose loop diuretic therapy in all patients. We sought to determine whether tubular injury biomarkers are associated with WRF in the setting of aggressive diuresis and its association with prognosis. Methods -Patients in the multicenter ROSE-AHF trial with baseline and 72-hour urine tubular injury biomarkers were analyzed ( N =283). WRF was defined as a ≥20% decrease in glomerular filtration rate estimated using cystatin C. Results -Consistent with protocol driven aggressive dosing of loop diuretics, participants received a median 560 mg of IV furosemide equivalents (IQR 300-815 mg) which induced a urine output of 8425 mL (IQR 6341-10528 ml) over the 72-hour intervention period. Levels of NAG and KIM-1 did not change with aggressive diuresis ( P >0.59, both), whereas levels of NGAL decreased slightly [-8.7 ng/mg (-169, 35 ng/mg), P renal tubular injury: NGAL ( P =0.21), NAG ( P =0.46), or KIM-1 ( P =0.22). Increases in NGAL, NAG, and KIM-1 were paradoxically associated with improved survival (adjusted HR: 0.80 per 10 percentile increase, 95% CI: 0.69-0.91; P =0.001). Conclusions -Kidney tubular injury does not appear to have an association with WRF in the context of aggressive diuresis of AHF patients. These findings reinforce the notion that the small to moderate deteriorations in renal function commonly encountered with aggressive diuresis are dissimilar from traditional causes of acute kidney injury.

  4. Induction of hemeoxygenase-1 expression after inhibition of hemeoxygenase activity promotes inflammation and worsens ischemic brain damage in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-de-Puig, I; Martín, A; Gorina, R; de la Rosa, X; Martinez, E; Planas, A M

    2013-07-23

    Hemeoxygenase (HO) is an enzymatic system that degrades heme. HO-1 is an inducible isoform whereas HO-2 is constitutive. Stroke strongly induces HO-1 expression but the underlying mechanisms are not fully elucidated. Cytokines that are up-regulated after ischemia, like interleukin (IL)-10, can induce HO-1 gene expression, which is positively regulated by the transcriptional activator nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2 (Nrf2) and negatively regulated by the transcriptional repressor breast cancer type 1 susceptibility protein (BRCA1) associated C-terminal helicase 1 (Bach-1). While Nrf2 is activated after ischemia and drugs promoting Nrf2 activation increase HO-1 and are beneficial, the involvement of Bach-1 is unknown. Here we investigated mechanisms involved in HO-1 induction and evaluated the effects of HO activity inhibition in mouse permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion (pMCAO). HO-1 was induced after ischemia in IL-10-deficient mice suggesting that post-ischemic HO-1 induction was IL-10-independent. Attenuation of Bach-1 gene repression after ischemia was associated to enhanced HO-1 induction. Administration of the HO activity inhibitor zinc proto-porphyrin IX (ZnPP) i.p. 24h before pMCAO exacerbated ischemia-induced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and IL-1β, nitro-oxidative stress, and the presence of neutrophils at 8h, and increased infarct volume at day 4. However, ZnPP did not worsen ischemic damage when given 30min before pMCAO. ZnPP induced HO-1 expression in the cerebral vasculature at 24h, when it was still detected by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in plasma. While ZnPP was not found in brain tissue extracts of controls, it could be detected after ischemia, supporting that a small fraction of the injected drug can reach the tissue following blood-brain barrier breakdown. The deleterious effect of inhibiting HO activity in ischemia became apparent in the presence of ZnPP-induced HO-1, which is known to exert effects

  5. Beta blocker use in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and systolic heart failure does not worsen glycaemic control

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai Bryan

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The prognostic benefits of beta-blockers (BB in patients with systolic heart failure (SHF are known but despite this, in patients with diabetes they are underutilized. The aim of this study was to assess the effect of beta-blockers (BB on glycaemic control in patients with Type 2 Diabetes (T2DM and systolic heart failure (SHF stratified to beta-1 selective (Bisoprolol vs. nonselective BB (Carvedilol. Methods This observational, cohort study was conducted in patients with T2DM and SHF attending an Australian tertiary teaching hospital's heart failure services. The primary endpoint was glycaemic control measured by glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c at initiation and top dose of BB. Secondary endpoints included microalbuminuria, changes in lipid profile and estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR. Results 125 patients were assessed. Both groups were well matched for gender, NYHA class and use of guideline validated heart failure and diabetic medications. The mean treatment duration was 1.9 ± 1.1 years with carvedilol and 1.4 ± 1.0 years with bisoprolol (p = ns. The carvedilol group achieved a reduction in HbA1c (7.8 ± 0.21% to 7.3 ± 0.17%, p = 0.02 whereas the bisoprolol group showed no change in HbA1c (7.0 ± 0.20% to 6.9 ± 0.23%, p = 0.92. There was no significant difference in the change in HbA1c from baseline to peak BB dose in the carvedilol group compared to the bisoprolol group. There was a similar deterioration in eGFR, but no significant changes in lipid profile or microalbuminuria in both groups (p = ns. Conclusion BB use did not worsen glycaemic control, lipid profile or albuminuria status in subjects with SHF and T2DM. Carvedilol significantly improved glycemic control in subjects with SHF and T2DM and this improvement was non significantly better than that obtained with bisoprolol. BB's should not be withheld from patients with T2DM and SHF.

  6. Subclinical hypothyroidism might worsen the effects of aging on serum lipid profiles: a population-based case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Meng; Yang, Tao; Chen, Li; Tang, Xulei; Guan, Qingbo; Zhang, Bingchang; Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Haiqing; Wang, Chenggang; Xu, Jin; Hou, Xinguo; Li, Qiu; Yu, Chunxiao; Zhao, Yuanfei; Fang, Li; Yuan, Zhongshang; Xue, Fuzhong; Ning, Guang; Gao, Ling; Xu, Chao; Zhao, Jiajun

    2015-05-01

    Dyslipidemia is an important global health problem, particularly in the elderly population. Traditionally, the high prevalence of dyslipidemia in elderly people is considered a "natural condition." Notably, subclinical hypothyroidism (SCH) is one of the most important risk factors for dyslipidemia. Few studies have assessed whether SCH plays a role in the increase in age-related dyslipidemia. This study aimed to explore the association between SCH and lipid profiles in different age groups. This was a large-scale, population-based, case-control study. The population was derived from the REACTION study conducted across China. A total of 17,046 individuals (8827 cases and 8219 controls) aged 40 years or older were enrolled in the final analyses. The relationships between SCH and serum lipid parameters in each age group were evaluated after adjustment for thyroid hormones and common confounding factors. In the entire population, thyrotropin (TSH), the key indicator of SCH, was positively associated with cholesterol parameters (total cholesterol [TC] and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C]) through the sixth decade of life. After adjusting for common confounding factors and thyroid hormones, each 1 mIU/L increase in TSH was estimated to elevate the TC level by 0.0147 mmol/L and 0.0551 mmol/L, respectively, in individuals aged 40-49 years and 60-69 years. Similarly, with each 1 mIU/L increase in TSH, the LDL-C level tended to show gradually greater increases as age increased. In moderately old subjects (60-69 years), mild (TSH≤10 mIU/L) and significant (TSH>10 mIU/L) SCH increased the concentration of TC approximately 1.03- and 1.36-fold, and the concentration of LDL-C approximately 1.19- and 1.65-fold, respectively, when compared with younger subjects. TSH exhibited a stronger effect on the TC and LDL-C level in moderately old subjects than in younger subjects. SCH might augment and worsen the effects of aging on serum lipid profiles.

  7. Aeromedical evacuation-relevant hypobaria worsens axonal and neurologic injury in rats after underbody blast-induced hyperacceleration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Julie L; Mello, Kaitlin T; Fang, Raymond; Puche, Adam C; Rosenthal, Robert E; Fourney, William L; Leiste, Ulrich H; Fiskum, Gary

    2017-07-01

    Occupants of military vehicles targeted by explosive devices often suffer from traumatic brain injury (TBI) and are typically transported by the aeromedical evacuation (AE) system to a military medical center within a few days. This study tested the hypothesis that exposure of rats to AE-relevant hypobaria worsens cerebral axonal injury and neurologic impairment caused by underbody blasts. Anesthetized adult male rats were secured within cylinders attached to a metal plate, simulating the hull of an armored vehicle. An explosive located under the plate was detonated, resulting in a peak vertical acceleration force on the plate and occupant rats of 100G. Rats remained under normobaria or were exposed to hypobaria equal to 8,000 feet in an altitude chamber for 6 hours, starting at 6 hours to 6 days after blast. At 7 days, rats were tested for vestibulomotor function using the balance beam walking task and euthanized by perfusion. The brains were then analyzed for axonal fiber injury. The number of internal capsule silver-stained axonal fibers was greater in animals exposed to 100G blast than in shams. Animals exposed to hypobaria starting at 6 hours to 6 days after blast exhibited more silver-stained fibers than those not exposed to hypobaria. Rats exposed to 100% oxygen (O2) during hypobaria at 24 hours postblast displayed greater silver staining and more balance beam foot-faults, in comparison with rats exposed to hypobaria under 21% O2. Exposure of rats to blast-induced acceleration of 100G increases cerebral axonal injury, which is significantly exacerbated by exposure to hypobaria as early as 6 hours and as late as 6 days postblast. Rats exposed to underbody blasts and then to hypobaria under 100% O2 exhibit increased axonal damage and impaired motor function compared to those subjected to blast and hypobaria under 21% O2. These findings raise concern about the effects of AE-related hypobaria on TBI victims, the timing of AE after TBI, and whether these effects

  8. Viral vector-based influenza vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rory D.; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses and the occasional introduction of influenza viruses of novel subtypes into the human population complicate the timely production of effective vaccines that antigenically match the virus strains that cause epidemic or pandemic outbreaks. The development of game-changing vaccines that induce broadly protective immunity against a wide variety of influenza viruses is an unmet need, in which recombinant viral vectors may provide. Use of viral vectors allows the delivery of any influenza virus antigen, or derivative thereof, to the immune system, resulting in the optimal induction of virus-specific B- and T-cell responses against this antigen of choice. This systematic review discusses results obtained with vectored influenza virus vaccines and advantages and disadvantages of the currently available viral vectors. PMID:27455345

  9. Viral vector-based influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vries, Rory D; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F

    2016-11-01

    Antigenic drift of seasonal influenza viruses and the occasional introduction of influenza viruses of novel subtypes into the human population complicate the timely production of effective vaccines that antigenically match the virus strains that cause epidemic or pandemic outbreaks. The development of game-changing vaccines that induce broadly protective immunity against a wide variety of influenza viruses is an unmet need, in which recombinant viral vectors may provide. Use of viral vectors allows the delivery of any influenza virus antigen, or derivative thereof, to the immune system, resulting in the optimal induction of virus-specific B- and T-cell responses against this antigen of choice. This systematic review discusses results obtained with vectored influenza virus vaccines and advantages and disadvantages of the currently available viral vectors.

  10. Vertebral artery dissection associated with viral meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Xudong

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Vertebral artery dissection (VAD is often associated with trauma or occurs spontaneously, inevitably causing some neurological deficits. Even though acute infection can be related to the development of spontaneous VAD (sVAD, VAD associated with viral meningitis has never been reported in the literature. Case presentation A 42-year-old man with fever, sore throat, and runny nose developed sudden onset of occipital headache, vertigo, transient confusion, diplopia, and ataxia. Brain stem encephalitis was diagnosed initially because the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF study showed inflammatory changes. However, subsequent diffusion-weighted (DWI magnetic resonance imaging of his brain demonstrated left lateral medullary infarction, and the digital subtraction angiography (DSA confirmed VAD involving left V4 segment of the artery. Consequently, the patient was diagnosed as VAD accompanied by viral meningitis. Conclusion This case suggests that viral meningitis might lead to inflammatory injury of the vertebral arterial wall, even sVAD with multiple neurological symptoms.

  11. V-GAP: Viral genome assembly pipeline

    KAUST Repository

    Nakamura, Yoji

    2015-10-22

    Next-generation sequencing technologies have allowed the rapid determination of the complete genomes of many organisms. Although shotgun sequences from large genome organisms are still difficult to reconstruct perfect contigs each of which represents a full chromosome, those from small genomes have been assembled successfully into a very small number of contigs. In this study, we show that shotgun reads from phage genomes can be reconstructed into a single contig by controlling the number of read sequences used in de novo assembly. We have developed a pipeline to assemble small viral genomes with good reliability using a resampling method from shotgun data. This pipeline, named V-GAP (Viral Genome Assembly Pipeline), will contribute to the rapid genome typing of viruses, which are highly divergent, and thus will meet the increasing need for viral genome comparisons in metagenomic studies.

  12. CT images of infantile viral encephalitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugimoto, Tateo; Okazaki, Hitoshi; Woo, Man

    1985-01-01

    Cranial CT scanning was undertaken in 40 patients with infantile viral encephalitis seen from 1977 to 1983. According to the pathogenic viruses, abnormal CT findings were detected most frequently in cases of herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE), followed by non-eruptive viral encephalitis, measles encephalitis, and rubella encephalitis in that order, which coincided well with neurological prognosis. Although CT findings lay within a normal range in cases of measles encephalitis, except a case in which cerebral ventricle was slightly dilated, the degree of consciousness disturbance was unfavorable and it persisted long. This revealed that there is no distinct correlation between the degree of consciousness disturbance and CT findings. Normal CT findings were detected in 13% of patients aged less than 5 years and 76.5% of patients aged 5 years or more. In many patients who had an attack of viral encephalitis at the age of 5 years or more, epileptic seizures occurred frequently, even though CT findings were normal. (Namekawa, K.)

  13. Norovirus Polymerase Fidelity Contributes to Viral TransmissionIn Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Armando; Thorne, Lucy; Ghurburrun, Elsa; Bailey, Dalan; Goodfellow, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Intrahost genetic diversity and replication error rates are intricately linked to RNA virus pathogenesis, with alterations in viral polymerase fidelity typically leading to attenuation during infections in vivo . We have previously shown that norovirus intrahost genetic diversity also influences viral pathogenesis using the murine norovirus model, as increasing viral mutation frequency using a mutagenic nucleoside resulted in clearance of a persistent infection in mice. Given the role of replication fidelity and genetic diversity in pathogenesis, we have now investigated whether polymerase fidelity can also impact virus transmission between susceptible hosts. We have identified a high-fidelity norovirus RNA-dependent RNA polymerase mutant (I391L) which displays delayed replication kinetics in vivo but not in cell culture. The I391L polymerase mutant also exhibited lower transmission rates between susceptible hosts than the wild-type virus and, most notably, another replication defective mutant that has wild-type levels of polymerase fidelity. These results provide the first experimental evidence that norovirus polymerase fidelity contributes to virus transmission between hosts and that maintaining diversity is important for the establishment of infection. This work supports the hypothesis that the reduced polymerase fidelity of the pandemic GII.4 human norovirus isolates may contribute to their global dominance. IMPORTANCE Virus replication fidelity and hence the intrahost genetic diversity of viral populations are known to be intricately linked to viral pathogenesis and tropism as well as to immune and antiviral escape during infection. In this study, we investigated whether changes in replication fidelity can impact the ability of a virus to transmit between susceptible hosts by the use of a mouse model for norovirus. We show that a variant encoding a high-fidelity polymerase is transmitted less efficiently between mice than the wild-type strain. This constitutes

  14. Clinical significance of worsening versus stable preradiographic MRI lesions in a cohort study of persons at higher risk for knee osteoarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Leena; Nevitt, Michael; Hochberg, Marc; Guermazi, Ali; Roemer, Frank W; Crema, Michel; Eaton, Charles; Jackson, Rebecca; Kwoh, Kent; Cauley, Jane; Almagor, Orit; Chmiel, Joan S

    2016-09-01

    Whether preradiographic lesions in knees at risk for osteoarthritis are incidental versus disease is unclear. We hypothesised, in persons without but at higher risk for knee osteoarthritis, that: 12-48 month MRI lesion status worsening is associated with 12-48 month incident radiographic osteoarthritis (objective component of clinical definition of knee osteoarthritis) and 48-84 month persistent symptoms. In 849 Osteoarthritis Initiative participants Kellgren/Lawrence (KL) 0 in both knees, we assessed cartilage damage, bone marrow lesions (BMLs), and menisci on 12 month (baseline) and 48 month MRIs. Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate associations between 12-48 month worsening versus stable status and outcome (12-48 month incident KL ≥1 and KL ≥2, and 48-84 month persistent symptoms defined as frequent symptoms or medication use most days of ≥1 month in past 12 month, at consecutive visits 48-84 months), adjusting for age, gender, body mass index (BMI), injury and surgery. Mean age was 59.6 (8.8), BMI 26.7 (4.2) and 55.9% were women. 12-48 month status worsening of cartilage damage, meniscal tear, meniscal extrusion, and BMLs was associated with 12-48 month incident radiographic outcomes, and worsening of cartilage damage and BMLs with 48-84 month persistent symptoms. There was a dose-response association for magnitude of worsening of cartilage damage, meniscal tear, meniscal extrusion, and BMLs and radiographic outcomes, and cartilage damage and BMLs and persistent symptoms. In persons at higher risk, worsening MRI lesion status was associated with concurrent incident radiographic osteoarthritis and subsequent persistent symptoms. These findings suggest that such lesions represent early osteoarthritis, and add support for a paradigm shift towards investigation of intervention effectiveness at this stage. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a

  15. Mechanisms of viral clearance and persistence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borrow, P

    1997-01-01

    Using examples predominantly drawn from study of the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) model system, this review describes the mechanisms involved in control of virus infections by the cell-mediated immune response, and some of the different strategies viruses have evolved to evade such immune clearance so that they can persist in their hosts. The important role played by the CD8+ cytotoxic lymphocyte (CTL) response in clearance of many systemic virus infections is discussed; and it is emphasized that although CD8+ CTL are classically thought of as lymphocytes which mediate lysis of virus-infected target cells, the principal mechanism by which CD8+ T cells effect clearance of persistent and many acute virus infections via production of antiviral cytokines such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, not via destruction of virus-producing cells. To avoid immune-mediated clearance, viruses frequently use a combination of several different strategies. These can be grouped into mechanisms for avoiding recognition by the immune response (such as establishing latent infections, replicating in immune-privileged sites, down-regulating the expression of immune recognition signals on the surface of infected cells, or undergoing antigenic variation); and mechanisms for suppressing the immune response. The latter include generalized immune suppression mechanisms, and strategies for more precisely disabling the specific immune response such as inducing tolerance or exhaustion of virus-specific CTL. The value of understanding both immune clearance mechanisms and viral evasion strategies in the rational design of immune-based therapies to combat persistent virus infections is discussed.

  16. Acute Viral Hepatitis in Pediatric Age Groups

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhamshu KC

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Our clinical experience showed that there has been no decrease in pediatric cases of acute viral hepatitis in Kathmandu. The objective of the study was to analyze the etiology, clinical features, laboratory parameters, sonological findings and other to determine the probable prognostic factors of Acute Viral Hepatitis in pediatric population. Methods: Consecutive patients of suspected Acute Viral Hepatitis, below the age of 15 years, attending the liver clinic between January 2006 and December2010were studied. After clinical examination they were subjected to blood tests and ultrasound examination of abdomen. The patients were divided in 3 age groups; 0–5, 5–10 and 5–15 years. Clinical features, laboratory parameters, ultrasound findings were compared in three age groups. Results: Etiology of Acute Viral Hepatitis was Hepatitis A virus 266 (85%, Hepatitis E virus in 24 (8%, Hepatitis B virus in 15 (5%. In 7(2% patients etiology was unknown. Three patients went to acute liver failure but improved with conservative treatment. There was no statistical difference in most of the parameters studied in different age groups. Ascites was more common in 5-10 years age group. Patients with secondary bacterial infection, ultrasound evidence of prominent biliary tree and ascites were associated with increased duration of illness. Patients with history of herbal medications had prolonged cholestasis. Conclusions: Hepatitis A is most common cause of Acute Viral Hepatitis in pediatric population. Improper use of herbal medications, secondary bacterial infection and faulty dietary intake was associated with prolonged illness. Patients with prominent biliary radicals should be treated with antibiotics even with normal blood counts for earlier recovery. Keywords: Acute viral hepatitis; hepatitis A; hepatitis E; herbal medications.

  17. The fecal viral flora of wild rodents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung G Phan

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequent interactions of rodents with humans make them a common source of zoonotic infections. To obtain an initial unbiased measure of the viral diversity in the enteric tract of wild rodents we sequenced partially purified, randomly amplified viral RNA and DNA in the feces of 105 wild rodents (mouse, vole, and rat collected in California and Virginia. We identified in decreasing frequency sequences related to the mammalian viruses families Circoviridae, Picobirnaviridae, Picornaviridae, Astroviridae, Parvoviridae, Papillomaviridae, Adenoviridae, and Coronaviridae. Seventeen small circular DNA genomes containing one or two replicase genes distantly related to the Circoviridae representing several potentially new viral families were characterized. In the Picornaviridae family two new candidate genera as well as a close genetic relative of the human pathogen Aichi virus were characterized. Fragments of the first mouse sapelovirus and picobirnaviruses were identified and the first murine astrovirus genome was characterized. A mouse papillomavirus genome and fragments of a novel adenovirus and adenovirus-associated virus were also sequenced. The next largest fraction of the rodent fecal virome was related to insect viruses of the Densoviridae, Iridoviridae, Polydnaviridae, Dicistroviriade, Bromoviridae, and Virgaviridae families followed by plant virus-related sequences in the Nanoviridae, Geminiviridae, Phycodnaviridae, Secoviridae, Partitiviridae, Tymoviridae, Alphaflexiviridae, and Tombusviridae families reflecting the largely insect and plant rodent diet. Phylogenetic analyses of full and partial viral genomes therefore revealed many previously unreported viral species, genera, and families. The close genetic similarities noted between some rodent and human viruses might reflect past zoonoses. This study increases our understanding of the viral diversity in wild rodents and highlights the large number of still uncharacterized viruses in

  18. Viral Innovation, Sustainability, and Excellence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Edgeman, Rick; Eskildsen, Jacob Kjær

    Enterprises strive to be economically sustainable. In doing so, they either contribute to or detract from environmental and social sustainability. Sustainability is hence multi-dimensional with formulations that include the familiar triple-bottom-line and BEST models. Any assessment regimen for t...

  19. Viral pneumonias: Typical and atypical findings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westhoff-Bleck, M.; Bleck, J.S.; Schirg, E.

    1987-10-01

    The clinical and radiological features of viral pneumonias are summarized and discussed. Although viral infections of the lung belong to atypical pneumonias they demonstrate not always the radiographic pattern of an interstitial pneumonia. Characteristic radiographic findings are quite rare. In most cases the microbial etiology cannot be predicted from chest radiographs. The appearance varies depending on the virulence of the organism and the resistence of the host. In this regard knowledge of epidemiological data as well as patients condition and underlying disease is of utmost importance. Differentiation between community- and hospital-acquired infection may be very helpful.

  20. Broad-Spectrum Drugs Against Viral Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P. Wong

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of antivirals has focused primarily on vaccines and on treatments for specific viral agents. Although effective, these approaches may be limited in situations where the etiologic agent is unknown or when the target virus has undergone mutation, recombination or reassortment. Augmentation of the innate immune response may be an effective alternative for disease amelioration. Nonspecific, broad-spectrum immune responses can be induced by double-stranded (dsRNAs such as poly (ICLC, or oligonucleotides (ODNs containing unmethylated deocycytidyl-deoxyguanosinyl (CpG motifs. These may offer protection against various bacterial and viral pathogens regardless of their genetic makeup, zoonotic origin or drug resistance.

  1. Viral diseases in honey bee queens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Francis, Roy Mathew

    Honey bees are important insects for human welfare, due to pollination as well as honey production. Viral diseases strongly impact honey bee health, especially since the spread of varroa mites. This dissertation deals with the interactions between honey bees, viruses and varroa mites. A new tool...... was developed to diagnose three viruses in honey bees. Quantitative PCR was used to investigate the distribution of two popular viruses in five different tissues of 86 honey bee queens. Seasonal variation of viral infection in honey bee workers and varroa mites were determined by sampling 23 colonies under...

  2. Viral pneumonias: Typical and atypical findings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Westhoff-Bleck, M.; Bleck, J.S.; Schirg, E.

    1987-01-01

    The clinical and radiological features of viral pneumonias are summarized and discussed. Although viral infections of the lung belong to atypical pneumonias they demonstrate not always the radiographic pattern of an interstitial pneumonia. Characteristic radiographic findings are quite rare. In most cases the microbial etiology cannot be predicted from chest radiographs. The appearance varies depending on the virulence of the organism and the resistence of the host. In this regard knowledge of epidemiological data as well as patients condition and underlying disease is of utmost importance. Differentiation between community- and hospital-acquired infection may be very helpful. (orig.) [de

  3. Structure of viral hepatitis in infants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.V. Sorokman

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Many current studies are devoted to the study of hepatitis caused by viral infections, which are qualified as TORCH-infection. In infants TORCH-induced lesions prevail in the structure of viral hepatitis, the largest proportion is hepatitis of cytomegalovirus etiology. The purpose was to study the structure of viral hepatitis in infants. Materials and methods. The study included sixty-two children (mean age 1.8 ± 0.9 years born in 2007–2016 treated in Chernivtsi Regional Children’s Clinical Hospital. The comparison group consisted of 36 healthy children of the same age. The pathogens of viral hepatitis B, C, TORCH infections were verified by enzyme immunoassay and polymerase chain reaction. The results of the research were analyzed using computer package Statistica StatSoft Inc. and Excel XP for Windows for a personal computer. Results. The results of the analysis of the liver diseases structure in 62 young children, according to hospital statistics, determined that the overwhelming majority (38 children; 61.3 % had viral hepatitis (VH, the other 24 (38.7 % patients were divided by the etiological structure of liver damage as follows: 8 (12.9 % patients had prolonged conjunctive jaundice, 7 (11.3 % patients had congenital metabolic disorders, 9 (14.5 % patients had congenital hepatobiliary abnomalities. 16.6 % of young children had hepatitis B and C viruses. In 5.8 % of cases VH was caused by viruses of the TORCH group of infections. Conclusions. In the structure of hepatobiliary diseases in infants, viral hepatitis (68.4 % is on the first ranked place. Among the viral hepatitis in children in the first year of life, CMV-hepatitis (68.4 % is most common, in children over 1 year old chronic hepatitis B and C. Severe obstetrical anamnesis, violations of pregnancy, placental infection are rather significant in the group of children with viral hepatitis. The main clinical signs of CMV-hepatitis are prolonged jaundice, cholestasis

  4. Importance of viral diseases in irradiated persons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blaha, M.; Jebavy, L.; Merka, V.; Horacek, J.

    1988-01-01

    A preliminary study was performed aimed at establishing the incidence of some viral diseases in radiation syndrome patients and the significance of the diseases for prognosis. In the study, 77 patients with syndromologically identical acute hematological forms of radiation sickness, mainly leukemic patients suffering from severe blood formation suppression and/or hematoblastosis were examined for concurrent herpes simplex virus and cytomegalovirus infections. Active viruses were isolated in almost 30% of the patients; nearly 90% of the patients were serologically positive, shedding antibodies. The findings thus confirmed the view that viral disease, especially in immunocompromised patients, has a critical effect on the survival of radiation sickness sufferers. (L.O.). 12 refs

  5. Tissue interactions of avian viral attachment proteins

    OpenAIRE

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, I.N.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses can infect a wide range of hosts; varying from bacteria and plants to animals and humans. While many viral infections may pass unnoticed, some are of major importance due to their implications on health and welfare of plants, animals and/or humans. In particular, viruses that can infect avian hosts have been studied intensively due the occurrence of the pandemics of highly pathogenic influenza A virus infection or “bird flu’’. Viral infections in domesticated birds can result in huge ...

  6. Viral miRNAs and immune evasion

    OpenAIRE

    Boss, Isaac W.; Renne, Rolf

    2011-01-01

    Viral miRNAs, ∼22nt RNA molecules which post-transcriptionally regulate gene expression, are emerging as important tools in immune evasion. Viral infection is a complex process that requires immune evasion in order to establish persistent life-long infection of the host. During this process viruses express both protein-coding and non-coding genes, which help to modulate the cellular environment making it more favorable for infection. In the last decade, it was uncovered that DNA viruses expre...

  7. HIV-1 viral diversity and its implications for viral load testing: review of current platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luft, LeeAnne M; Gill, M John; Church, Deirdre L

    2011-10-01

    The 2008 Recommendations for care of the International AIDS Society reaffirmed the importance of both accurate and sensitive viral load assessment, and by necessity, access to viral load assays. HIV-1 viral load testing is considered essential when initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART), when monitoring ART response, and when considering switching ART regimens. The demand for accurate, reproducible, and cost-effective viral load assays is therefore a global issue. Although the North American and Western European experience has historically been with HIV-1 group M subtype B virus, this paradigm is changing rapidly as migrants and refugees from developing countries with non-B subtype infections often now present for care in the developed world, and travelers to developing countries acquire non-B subtype infection abroad and present for care at home. Awareness of any clinical or laboratory differences between the common HIV-1 group M subtype B and the newer HIV-1 strains being seen in practice is therefore increasingly important. This review of current HIV-1 viral load testing is focused on the potential value of a standardized genotype assignment for HIV-1 viral subtypes, regular monitoring of the performance of available commercial HIV viral load assays on emerging non-B HIV subtypes, circulating recombinant forms (CRFs) and unique recombinant forms (URFs), and a discussion of the implications for resource-limited settings. Copyright © 2011 International Society for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. ViralORFeome: an integrated database to generate a versatile collection of viral ORFs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellet, J; Tafforeau, L; Lucas-Hourani, M; Navratil, V; Meyniel, L; Achaz, G; Guironnet-Paquet, A; Aublin-Gex, A; Caignard, G; Cassonnet, P; Chaboud, A; Chantier, T; Deloire, A; Demeret, C; Le Breton, M; Neveu, G; Jacotot, L; Vaglio, P; Delmotte, S; Gautier, C; Combet, C; Deleage, G; Favre, M; Tangy, F; Jacob, Y; Andre, P; Lotteau, V; Rabourdin-Combe, C; Vidalain, P O

    2010-01-01

    Large collections of protein-encoding open reading frames (ORFs) established in a versatile recombination-based cloning system have been instrumental to study protein functions in high-throughput assays. Such 'ORFeome' resources have been developed for several organisms but in virology, plasmid collections covering a significant fraction of the virosphere are still needed. In this perspective, we present ViralORFeome 1.0 (http://www.viralorfeome.com), an open-access database and management system that provides an integrated set of bioinformatic tools to clone viral ORFs in the Gateway(R) system. ViralORFeome provides a convenient interface to navigate through virus genome sequences, to design ORF-specific cloning primers, to validate the sequence of generated constructs and to browse established collections of virus ORFs. Most importantly, ViralORFeome has been designed to manage all possible variants or mutants of a given ORF so that the cloning procedure can be applied to any emerging virus strain. A subset of plasmid constructs generated with ViralORFeome platform has been tested with success for heterologous protein expression in different expression systems at proteome scale. ViralORFeome should provide our community with a framework to establish a large collection of virus ORF clones, an instrumental resource to determine functions, activities and binding partners of viral proteins.

  9. A proteomics perspective on viral DNA sensors in host defense and viral immune evasion mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crow, Marni S; Javitt, Aaron; Cristea, Ileana M

    2015-06-05

    The sensing of viral DNA is an essential step of cellular immune response to infections with DNA viruses. These human pathogens are spread worldwide, triggering a wide range of virus-induced diseases, and are associated with high levels of morbidity and mortality. Despite similarities between DNA molecules, mammalian cells have the remarkable ability to distinguish viral DNA from their own DNA. This detection is carried out by specialized antiviral proteins, called DNA sensors. These sensors bind to foreign DNA to activate downstream immune signaling pathways and alert neighboring cells by eliciting the expression of antiviral cytokines. The sensing of viral DNA was shown to occur both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus of infected cells, disproving the notion that sensing occurred by simple spatial separation of viral and host DNA. A number of omic approaches, in particular, mass-spectrometry-based proteomic methods, have significantly contributed to the constantly evolving field of viral DNA sensing. Here, we review the impact of omic methods on the identification of viral DNA sensors, as well as on the characterization of mechanisms involved in host defense or viral immune evasion. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  10. The worsening factors of dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) based on cohort study with nested case-control in a tertiary hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lardo, S.; Soesatyo, M. H. N. E.; Juffrie; Umniyati, S. R.

    2018-03-01

    The clinical pathway of DHF has a broad pathophysiological and pathogenesis spectrum. Clinical and laboratory characteristics are some of the parameters to determine the factors that contribute to the worsening of the disease. The objective of this study is to determine the clinical and laboratory characteristics which contribute to the worsening of DHF. The study had been conducted from January 2012-December 2014 at the general ward of the Internal Medicine Department, Indonesia Army Central Hospital Gatot Soebroto. There were 101 male patients (64.7%) and 55 female patients (35.3 %) ages ranging from 14 - 62 years old. The diagnosis was divided into: 124 patients DHF grade I, 6 DHF grade II, 20 DHF grade III and 6 with dengue shock syndrome (DSS) patients. Clinically and statistically, there were 4 variables apparently found with the severity of DHF, as follows: decreased appetite with p = 0.007 (OR 4.87), hepatomegaly with p = 0.009 (OR 27.00), systolic blood pressure with p = 0.037 (OR 0.95), and initial thrombocyte with p = 0.000 (OR 0.97). This cohort and nested case-control study found that worsening of DHF is related with decreased appetite, hepatomegaly, systolic blood pressure and initial thrombocyte count.

  11. Do changes in subjective sleep and biological rhythms predict worsening in postpartum depressive symptoms? A prospective study across the perinatal period.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczak, Elizabeth M; Minuzzi, Luciano; Hidalgo, Maria Paz; Frey, Benicio N

    2016-08-01

    Abnormalities of sleep and biological rhythms have been widely implicated in the pathophysiology of major depressive disorder (MDD) and bipolar disorder (BD). However, less is known about the influence of biological rhythm disruptions across the perinatal period on postpartum depression (PPD). The objective of this study was to prospectively evaluate the relationship between subjective changes in both sleep and biological rhythms and worsening of depressive symptoms from pregnancy to the postpartum period in women with and without mood disorders. Eighty-three participants (38 euthymic women with a history of a mood disorder and 45 healthy controls) were studied. Participants completed subjective assessments of sleep (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index), biological rhythm disturbances (Biological Rhythms Interview of Assessment in Neuropsychiatry), and depressive symptoms (Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale) prospectively at two time points: third trimester of pregnancy and at 6-12 weeks postpartum. Multivariate regression analyses showed that changes in biological rhythms across the perinatal period predicted worsening of depressive symptoms in both groups. Moreover, women with a history of a mood disorder showed higher levels of sleep and biological rhythm disruption during both pregnancy and the postpartum period. These findings suggest that disruptions in biological rhythms during the perinatal period increase the risk for postpartum mood worsening in healthy pregnant as well as in pregnant women with a history of mood disorders.

  12. Long-Term Treatment of Restless Legs Syndrome (RLS): An Approach to Management of Worsening Symptoms, Loss of Efficacy, and Augmentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Susan; Winkelman, John W

    2015-05-01

    Restless legs syndrome (RLS) is a common, frequently chronic, sensorimotor neurological disorder characterized by nocturnal leg dysesthesias and an irresistible urge to move the legs, usually resulting in sleep disturbance. Dopaminergic agonists, alpha-2-delta calcium-channel ligands, and opioids have all demonstrated efficacy to relieve symptoms of RLS and improve sleep. However, long-term treatment with dopamine agonists (the most commonly prescribed agents) is often characterized by worsening symptoms and loss of efficacy. A more worrisome complication of dopaminergic agents is augmentation, an iatrogenic worsening of RLS symptoms that can produce progressively more severe symptoms resulting in around-the-clock restlessness and near sleeplessness. Recent research has yielded consensus regarding a precise definition of augmentation and has contributed to improved knowledge regarding strategies for preventing this complication. When RLS symptoms worsen during the course of treatment, the clinician must consider the myriad of environmental, medical, pharmacologic, and psychiatric factors that can exacerbate RLS. In the absence of fully developed, evidence-based guidelines there remains uncertainty regarding the optimal management strategy if augmentation develops. However, we discuss several key principles based on the available published data and the authors' clinical experience. We also explore the recent increasing interest in alternative initial treatment strategies that avoid dopamine agonists and their associated complications altogether.

  13. Elevated HERV-K Expression in Soft Tissue Sarcoma Is Associated with Worsened Relapse-Free Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giebler, Maria; Staege, Martin S; Blauschmidt, Sindy; Ohm, Lea I; Kraus, Matthias; Würl, Peter; Taubert, Helge; Greither, Thomas

    2018-01-01

    A wide variety of endogenous retroviral sequences has been demonstrated in the human genome so far, divided into several different families according to the sequence homology to viral strains. While increased expression of human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) elements has already been linked to unfavorable prognosis in hepatocellular carcinoma, breast cancer, and ovarian carcinoma yet less is known about the impact of the expression of different HERV elements on sarcomagenesis in general as well as the outcome of soft tissue sarcoma (STS) patients. Therefore, in this study the association between expression of HERV-K and HERV-F and the clinicopathological characteristics in a cohort of STSs as well as the patients' prognosis was evaluated. HERV-K and HERV-F expression was assessed by quantitative real-time PCR in 120 patient specimens. HERV-K and HERV-F expression was significantly correlated ( r S = 0.5; p = 6.4 × 10 -9 ; Spearman's rank bivariate correlation). Also, tumor diameter exhibited a significant negative association to HERV-K and HERV-F expression. Levels of several hypoxia-related RNAs like HIF-1α and miR-210 showed a significant positive correlation with both HERV-K and HERV-F expression. Although in survival analyses no impact of HERV expression on disease-specific survival could be detected, patients with elevated HERV-K expression had a significantly shorter relapse-free survival ( p = 0.014, log-rank analysis). In conclusion, we provide evidence for the first time that the increased expression of HERV-K in tumors is associated with STS patients' prognosis.

  14. Infliximab Does Not Worsen Outcomes During Flare-ups Associated with Cytomegalovirus Infection in Patients with Ulcerative Colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillet, Sylvie; Jarlot, Camille; Courault, Mathilde; Del Tedesco, Emilie; Chardon, Renaud; Saint-Sardos, Pierre; Presles, Emilie; Phelip, Jean-Marc; Berthelot, Philippe; Pozzetto, Bruno; Roblin, Xavier

    2015-07-01

    Immunosuppressive therapies used for treating ulcerative colitis are known to favor chronic and latent viral diseases. This study aimed at evaluating prospectively the association between colonic cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation and anti-tumor necrosis factor (TNF) monoclonal antibodies (mabs) by comparison to azathioprine (AZA) in a series of flare-ups occurring in consecutive ulcerative colitis patients. A total of 109 flare-ups were recorded in 73 patients receiving a maintenance therapy by anti-TNF mabs (n = 69) or AZA (n = 40). The CMV DNA load in colonic tissue was determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction on a pair of biopsies. The number of CMV reactivation was of 35% and 38% in patients receiving anti-TNF mabs and AZA, respectively. The median of CMV DNA load was 378 [10-29,800] and 8300 [10-3,25,000] copies/mg of tissue in patients treated by anti-TNF mabs and AZA, respectively (P = 0.11 by Mann-Whitney U test). In a subgroup of 45 patients under anti-TNF mabs requiring an optimized treatment by infliximab, clinical remission (partial Mayo score up (P = 0.52). Twenty of these patients underwent a second colonic biopsy 8 weeks after the initiation of flare-up therapy; except for 3 patients, the colonic CMV DNA load was stable or decreased. Patients under anti-TNF maintenance therapy are not at higher risk of CMV reactivation in case of flare-up. No reciprocal adverse influence was observed between anti-TNF mabs and CMV infection, suggesting that these drugs must be considered for treating flare-ups associated to CMV reactivation.

  15. Stimulation of viral infection of bacterioplankton during a mesoscale iron fertilization experiment in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinbauer, M. G.; Arrieta, J.-M.; Herndl, G. J.

    2003-04-01

    A mesoscale iron fertilization in the Southern Ocean (Eisenex ) induced a phytoplankton bloom within three weeks observation as well as in an increased bacterial abundance and production. Viral abundance and viral production were stimulated as well. A virus-dilution approach was used to estimate the frequency of infected cells (FIC) and the frequency of lysogenic cells (FLC), i.e. cells with a dormant viral genome. While the FLC did not vary strongly within the iron-enriched patch and did not differ from waters outside the patch, FIC increased significantly within the iron fertilized patch. This suggests that induction of the lytic cycle in lysogenic cells was not significant. Rather, the stimulated bacterial production and abundance within the patch resulted in higher and more successful encounters between viruses and hosts and thus in higher FIC values. Consequently, the iron fertilization enhanced the influence of viral infection in the microbial food web. According to the current model, this should result a stimulation of bacterial production, since lysed bacterial cells cannot be consumed up by protists and transferred to higher trophic level; lysis products can be taken up by bacteria and thus organic carbon spins within this viral loop. Viral infection is a significant and previously overlooked factor in the carbon flow during iron fertilization experiments.

  16. Meta-analyses on viral hepatitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gluud, Lise L; Gluud, Christian

    2009-01-01

    This article summarizes the meta-analyses of interventions for viral hepatitis A, B, and C. Some of the interventions assessed are described in small trials with unclear bias control. Other interventions are supported by large, high-quality trials. Although attempts have been made to adjust...

  17. Content Recommendation for Viral Social Influence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanov, Sergei; Theocharidis, Konstantinos; Terrovitis, Manolis

    2017-01-01

    How do we create content that will become viral in a whole network after we share it with friends or followers? Significant research activity has been dedicated to the problem of strategically selecting a seed set of initial adopters so as to maximize a meme’s spread in a network. This line of wo...

  18. Sanitation of viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Niels Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    A sanitation programme for stamping-out viral haemorrhagic septicaemia (VHS) was implemented in Denmark in 1965. The programme has resulted in a dramatic reduction in the number of infected rainbow trout farms, from approximate to 400 to 26. The programme is carried out on a voluntary basis...

  19. Neurons under viral attack: victims or warriors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakraborty, Swarupa; Nazmi, Arshed; Dutta, Kallol; Basu, Anirban

    2010-01-01

    When the central nervous system (CNS) is under viral attack, defensive antiviral responses must necessarily arise from the CNS itself to rapidly and efficiently curb infections with minimal collateral damage to the sensitive, specialized and non-regenerating neural tissue. This presents a unique challenge because an intact blood-brain barrier (BBB) and lack of proper lymphatic drainage keeps the CNS virtually outside the radar of circulating immune cells that are at constant vigilance for antigens in peripheral tissues. Limited antigen presentation skills of CNS cells in comparison to peripheral tissues is because of a total lack of dendritic cells and feeble expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins in neurons and glia. However, research over the past two decades has identified immune effector mechanisms intrinsic to the CNS for immediate tackling, attenuating and clearing of viral infections, with assistance pouring in from peripheral circulation in the form of neutralizing antibodies and cytotoxic T cells at a later stage. Specialized CNS cells, microglia and astrocytes, were regarded as sole sentinels of the brain for containing a viral onslaught but neurons held little recognition as a potential candidate for protecting itself from the proliferation and pathogenesis of neurotropic viruses. Accumulating evidence however indicates that extracellular insult causes neurons to express immune factors characteristic of lymphoid tissues. This article aims to comprehensively analyze current research on this conditional alteration in the protein expression repertoire of neurons and the role it plays in CNS innate immune response to counter viral infections. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Viral mimicry of the complement system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The complement system is a potent innate immune mechanism consisting of cascades of proteins which are designed to fight against and annul intrusion of all the ... of cell-free viruses, phagocytosis of C3b-coated viral particles, lysis of virus-infected cells, and generation of inflammatory and specific immune responses.

  1. Bovine viral diarrhea virus: biosecurity and control

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper discusses the recommended procedures involved in setting up biosecurity and control programs designed to limit bovine viral diarrhea virus infections in beef cattle operations. For the purpose of these discussions, a working definition of a biosecurity plan was considered to be an organiz...

  2. Recombinant viruses as vaccines against viral diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P.D. Souza

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Vaccine approaches to infectious diseases are widely applied and appreciated. Amongst them, vectors based on recombinant viruses have shown great promise and play an important role in the development of new vaccines. Many viruses have been investigated for their ability to express proteins from foreign pathogens and induce specific immunological responses against these antigens in vivo. Generally, gene-based vaccines can stimulate potent humoral and cellular immune responses and viral vectors might be an effective strategy for both the delivery of antigen-encoding genes and the facilitation and enhancement of antigen presentation. In order to be utilized as a vaccine carrier, the ideal viral vector should be safe and enable efficient presentation of required pathogen-specific antigens to the immune system. It should also exhibit low intrinsic immunogenicity to allow for its re-administration in order to boost relevant specific immune responses. Furthermore, the vector system must meet criteria that enable its production on a large-scale basis. Several viral vaccine vectors have thus emerged to date, all of them having relative advantages and limits depending on the proposed application, and thus far none of them have proven to be ideal vaccine carriers. In this review we describe the potential, as well as some of the foreseeable obstacles associated with viral vaccine vectors and their use in preventive medicine.

  3. Viral Hepatitis and Thrombosis: A Narrative Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Squizzato, Alessandro; Gerdes, Victor E. A.

    2012-01-01

    Venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a multicausal disease. Among minor risk factors, acute infections in general are associated with a transient increased risk of VTE. However, acute hepatitis is usually not reported as a potential risk factor for VTE. Recent studies suggest a possible role of viral

  4. Microbial oceanography: Viral strategies at sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thingstad, T. Frede; Bratbak, Gunnar

    2016-03-01

    The finding that marine environments with high levels of host microbes have fewer viruses per host than when host abundance is low challenges a theory on the relative roles of lysogenic and lytic viral-survival strategies. See Article p.466

  5. Vaccination of cattle against bovine viral diarrhoea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oirschot, van J.T.; Bruschke, C.J.M.; Rijn, van P.A.

    1999-01-01

    This brief review describes types and quality (efficacy and safety) of bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) vaccines that are in the market or under development. Both conventional live and killed vaccines are available. The primary aim of vaccination is to prevent congenital infection, but the few

  6. Viral hepatitis among prisoners in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlen, B; Siebke, J C; Stensland, A

    1980-12-01

    The present survey reveals high frequencies of hepatitis B surface antigen and antibody in criminals committed to prison in Norway compared to the general population. The high rate of antigen carriers and the intramural supply of illicit drugs constitute a threat to fellow prisoners regarding viral hepatitis as well as drug addiction.

  7. Viral immune evasion: a masterpiece of evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vossen, Mireille T. M.; Westerhout, Ellen M.; Söderberg-Nauclér, Cécilia; Wiertz, Emmanuel J. H. J.

    2002-01-01

    Coexistence of viruses and their hosts imposes an evolutionary pressure on both the virus and the host immune system. On the one hand, the host has developed an immune system able to attack viruses and virally infected cells, whereas on the other hand, viruses have developed an array of immune

  8. Tissue interactions of avian viral attachment proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ambepitiya Wickramasinghe, I.N.

    2015-01-01

    Viruses can infect a wide range of hosts; varying from bacteria and plants to animals and humans. While many viral infections may pass unnoticed, some are of major importance due to their implications on health and welfare of plants, animals and/or humans. In particular, viruses that can infect

  9. Viral mimicry of the complement system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    et al 1978) and gp41 (Ebenbichler et al 1991) and gp120. (Susal et al 1994) of human immunodeficiency virus. (HIV-1) .... Blocks binding of properdin and C5 to C3b. Friedman et al 1984; Fries et al. 1986; Kostavasil .... respective viral genomes (Zezulak and Spear 1984;. Swain et al 1985). It is important to note that none of.

  10. Transmission of single and multiple viral variants in primary HIV-1 subtype C infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir Novitsky

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available To address whether sequences of viral gag and env quasispecies collected during the early post-acute period can be utilized to determine multiplicity of transmitted HIV's, recently developed approaches for analysis of viral evolution in acute HIV-1 infection [1,2] were applied. Specifically, phylogenetic reconstruction, inter- and intra-patient distribution of maximum and mean genetic distances, analysis of Poisson fitness, shape of highlighter plots, recombination analysis, and estimation of time to the most recent common ancestor (tMRCA were utilized for resolving multiplicity of HIV-1 transmission in a set of viral quasispecies collected within 50 days post-seroconversion (p/s in 25 HIV-infected individuals with estimated time of seroconversion. The decision on multiplicity of HIV infection was made based on the model's fit with, or failure to explain, the observed extent of viral sequence heterogeneity. The initial analysis was based on phylogeny, inter-patient distribution of maximum and mean distances, and Poisson fitness, and was able to resolve multiplicity of HIV transmission in 20 of 25 (80% cases. Additional analysis involved distribution of individual viral distances, highlighter plots, recombination analysis, and estimation of tMRCA, and resolved 4 of the 5 remaining cases. Overall, transmission of a single viral variant was identified in 16 of 25 (64% cases, and transmission of multiple variants was evident in 8 of 25 (32% cases. In one case multiplicity of HIV-1 transmission could not be determined. In primary HIV-1 subtype C infection, samples collected within 50 days p/s and analyzed by a single-genome amplification/sequencing technique can provide reliable identification of transmission multiplicity in 24 of 25 (96% cases. Observed transmission frequency of a single viral variant and multiple viral variants were within the ranges of 64% to 68%, and 32% to 36%, respectively.

  11. Staphylococcus aureus α-toxin modulates skin host response to viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bin, Lianghua; Kim, Byung Eui; Brauweiler, Anne; Goleva, Elena; Streib, Joanne; Ji, Yinduo; Schlievert, Patrick M; Leung, Donald Y M

    2012-09-01

    Patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) with a history of eczema herpeticum have increased staphylococcal colonization and infections. However, whether Staphylococcus aureus alters the outcome of skin viral infection has not been determined. We investigated whether S aureus toxins modulated host response to herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and vaccinia virus (VV) infections in normal human keratinocytes (NHKs) and in murine infection models. NHKs were treated with S aureus toxins before incubation of viruses. BALB/c mice were inoculated with S aureus 2 days before VV scarification. Viral loads of HSV-1 and VV were evaluated by using real-time PCR, a viral plaque-forming assay, and immunofluorescence staining. Small interfering RNA duplexes were used to knockdown the gene expression of the cellular receptor of α-toxin, a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10). ADAM10 protein and α-toxin heptamers were detected by using Western blot assays. We demonstrate that sublytic staphylococcal α-toxin increases viral loads of HSV-1 and VV in NHKs. Furthermore, we demonstrate in vivo that the VV load is significantly greater (P skin inoculated with an α-toxin-producing S aureus strain compared with murine skin inoculated with the isogenic α-toxin-deleted strain. The viral enhancing effect of α-toxin is mediated by ADAM10 and is associated with its pore-forming property. Moreover, we demonstrate that α-toxin promotes viral entry in NHKs. The current study introduces the novel concept that staphylococcal α-toxin promotes viral skin infection and provides a mechanism by which S aureus infection might predispose the host toward disseminated viral infections. Copyright © 2012 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. The population impact of eliminating homelessness on HIV viral suppression among people who use drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Brandon D L; Elston, Beth; Dobrer, Sabina; Parashar, Surita; Hogg, Robert S; Montaner, Julio S G; Kerr, Thomas; Wood, Evan; Milloy, M-J

    2016-03-27

    We sought to estimate the change in viral suppression prevalence if homelessness were eliminated from a population of HIV-infected people who use drugs. Community-recruited prospective cohort of HIV-infected people who use drugs in Vancouver, Canada. Behavioural information was collected at baseline and linked to a province-wide HIV/AIDS treatment database. The primary outcome was viral suppression (homelessness and viral suppression (adjusting for sociodemographics, substance use, addiction treatment, and other confounders). Then, we imputed an outcome probability for each individual while manipulating the exposure (homelessness). Population viral suppression prevalence under realized and 'housed' scenarios were obtained by averaging these probabilities across the study population. Bootstrapping was conducted to calculate 95% confidence limits. Of 706 individuals interviewed between January 2005 and December 2013, the majority were men (66.0%), of white race/ethnicity (55.1%), and had a history of injection drug use (93.6%). At first study visit, 223 (31.6%) reported recent homelessness, and 37.8% were subsequently identified as virally suppressed. Adjusted marginal models estimated a 15.1% relative increase [95% confidence interval (CI) 9.0-21.7%) in viral suppression in the entire population - to 43.5% (95% CI 39.4-48.2%) - if all homeless individuals were housed. Among those homeless, eliminating this exposure would increase viral suppression from 22.0 to 40.1% (95% CI 35.1-46.1%), an 82.3% relative increase. Interventions to house homeless, HIV-positive individuals who use drugs could significantly increase population viral suppression. Such interventions should be implemented as a part of renewed HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment efforts.

  13. Alpha-Synuclein Expression Restricts RNA Viral Infections in the Brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatman, Erica L; Massey, Aaron; Shives, Katherine D; Burrack, Kristina S; Chamanian, Mastooreh; Morrison, Thomas E; Beckham, J David

    2015-12-30

    We have discovered that native, neuronal expression of alpha-synuclein (Asyn) inhibits viral infection, injury, and disease in the central nervous system (CNS). Enveloped RNA viruses, such as West Nile virus (WNV), invade the CNS and cause encephalitis, yet little is known about the innate neuron-specific inhibitors of viral infections in the CNS. Following WNV infection of primary neurons, we found that Asyn protein expression is increased. The infectious titer of WNV and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV) TC83 in the brains of Asyn-knockout mice exhibited a mean increase of 10(4.5) infectious viral particles compared to the titers in wild-type and heterozygote littermates. Asyn-knockout mice also exhibited significantly increased virus-induced mortality compared to Asyn heterozygote or homozygote control mice. Virus-induced Asyn localized to perinuclear, neuronal regions expressing viral envelope protein and the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-associated trafficking protein Rab1. In Asyn-knockout primary neuronal cultures, the levels of expression of ER signaling pathways, known to support WNV replication, were significantly elevated before and during viral infection compared to those in Asyn-expressing primary neuronal cultures. We propose a model in which virus-induced Asyn localizes to ER-derived membranes, modulates virus-induced ER stress signaling, and inhibits viral replication, growth, and injury in the CNS. These data provide a novel and important functional role for the expression of native alpha-synuclein, a protein that is closely associated with the development of Parkinson's disease. Neuroinvasive viruses such as West Nile virus are able to infect neurons and cause severe disease, such as encephalitis, or infection of brain tissue. Following viral infection in the central nervous system, only select neurons are infected, implying that neurons exhibit innate resistance to viral infections. We discovered that native neuronal expression of alpha

  14. Host factors influencing viral persistence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Allan Randrup; Nansen, A; Ørding Andreasen, Susanne

    2000-01-01

    With the aim of characterizing the antiviral immune response to a non-cytocidal virus, we studied the outcome of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection in a number of gene knockout mouse strains. Two virus strains differing markedly in their capacity to spread and replicate inside the murine....... Reappearance of virus is associated with impaired long-term CD8+ T-cell mediated immune surveillance, and the time to virus resurgence is inversely correlated to the replication rate of the virus. Our studies also reveal that interferon-gamma is a central cytokine, and depending on the rate of virus...... replication, mice lacking the ability to produce interferon-gamma may develop either a severe, mostly fatal, T-cell mediated wasting syndrome or a chronic infection characterized by long-term coexistence of antiviral cytotoxic T lymphocytes and infectious virus. Mathematical modelling indicates...

  15. Acute Viral Hepatitis in Pediatric Age Groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kc, Sudhamshu; Sharma, Dilip; Poudyal, Nandu; Basnet, Bhupendra Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Our clinical experience showed that there has been no decrease in pediatric cases of acute viral hepatitis in Kathmandu. The objective of the study was to analyze the etiology, clinical features, laboratory parameters, sonological findings and other to determine the probable prognostic factors of Acute Viral Hepatitis in pediatric population. Consecutive patients of suspected Acute Viral Hepatitis, below the age of 15 years, attending the liver clinic between January 2006 and December 2010 were studied. After clinical examination they were subjected to blood tests and ultrasound examination of abdomen. The patients were divided in 3 age groups; 0-5, 5-10 and 5-15 years. Clinical features, laboratory parameters, ultrasound findings were compared in three age groups. Etiology of Acute Viral Hepatitis was Hepatitis A virus 266 (85%), Hepatitis E virus in 24 (8%), Hepatitis B virus in 15 (5%). In 7(2%) patients etiology was unknown. Three patients went to acute liver failure but improved with conservative treatment. There was no statistical difference in most of the parameters studied in different age groups. Ascites was more common in 5-10 years age group. Patients with secondary bacterial infection, ultrasound evidence of prominent biliary tree and ascites were associated with increased duration of illness. Patients with history of herbal medications had prolonged cholestasis. Hepatitis A is most common cause of Acute Viral Hepatitis in pediatric population. Improper use of herbal medications, secondary bacterial infection and faulty dietary intake was associated with prolonged illness. Patients with prominent biliary radicals should be treated with antibiotics even with normal blood counts for earlier recovery.

  16. Plant viral vectors for delivery by Agrobacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleba, Yuri Y; Tusé, Daniel; Giritch, Anatoli

    2014-01-01

    Plant viral vectors delivered by Agrobacterium are the basis of several manufacturing processes that are currently in use for producing a wide range of proteins for multiple applications, including vaccine antigens, antibodies, protein nanoparticles such as virus-like particles (VLPs), and other protein and protein-RNA scaffolds. Viral vectors delivered by agrobacterial T-DNA transfer (magnifection) have also become important tools in research. In recent years, essential advances have been made both in the development of second-generation vectors designed using the 'deconstructed virus' approach, as well as in the development of upstream manufacturing processes that are robust and fully scalable. The strategy relies on Agrobacterium as a vector to deliver DNA copies of one or more viral RNA/DNA replicons; the bacteria are delivered into leaves by vacuum infiltration, and the viral machinery takes over from the point of T-DNA transfer to the plant cell nucleus, driving massive RNA and protein production and, if required, cell-to-cell spread of the replicons. Among the most often used viral backbones are those of the RNA viruses Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), Potato virus X (PVX) and Cowpea mosaic virus (CPMV), and the DNA geminivirus Bean yellow dwarf virus. Prototypes of industrial processes that provide for high yield, rapid scale up and fast manufacturing cycles have been designed, and several GMP-compliant and GMP-certified manufacturing facilities are in place. These efforts have been successful as evidenced by the fact that several antibodies and vaccine antigens produced by magnifection are currently in clinical development.

  17. Viral interference with antigen presentation: trapping TAP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ressing, Maaike E; Luteijn, Rutger D; Horst, Daniëlle; Wiertz, Emmanuel J

    2013-09-01

    Following primary infection, herpesviruses persist for life in their hosts, even when vigorous anti-viral immunity has been induced. Failure of the host immune system to eliminate infected cells is facilitated by highly effective immune evasion strategies acquired by these herpesviruses during millions of years of co-evolution with their hosts. Here, we review the mechanisms of action of viral gene products that lead to cytotoxic T cell evasion through interference with the function of the transporter associated with antigen processing, TAP. The viral TAP inhibitors impede transport of peptides from the cytosol into the ER lumen, thereby preventing peptide loading onto MHC class I complexes. Recent insights have revealed a pattern of functional convergent evolution. In every herpesvirus subfamily, inhibitors of TAP function have been identified that are, surprisingly, unrelated in genome location, structure, and mechanism of action. Recently, cowpox virus has also been found to encode a TAP inhibitor. Expanding our knowledge on how viruses perturb antigen presentation, in particular by targeting TAP, not only provides information on viral pathogenesis, but also reveals novel aspects of the cellular processes corrupted by these viruses, notably the translocation of peptides by the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter TAP. As the various TAP inhibitors are anticipated to impede discrete conformational transitions it is expected that crystal structures of TAP-inhibitor complexes will reveal valuable structural information on the actual mechanism of peptide translocation by TAP. Viral TAP inhibitors are also used for various (clinical) applications, for example, as effective tools in antigen presentation studies and as immunomodulators in immunotherapy for cancer, heterologous vaccination, and transplant protection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Persisting Viral Sequences Shape Microbial CRISPR-based Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberger, Ariel D.; Sun, Christine L.; Pluciński, Mateusz M.; Denef, Vincent J.; Thomas, Brian C.; Horvath, Philippe; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Gilmore, Michael S.; Getz, Wayne M.; Banfield, Jillian F.

    2012-01-01

    Well-studied innate immune systems exist throughout bacteria and archaea, but a more recently discovered genomic locus may offer prokaryotes surprising immunological adaptability. Mediated by a cassette-like genomic locus termed Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR), the microbial adaptive immune system differs from its eukaryotic immune analogues by incorporating new immunities unidirectionally. CRISPR thus stores genomically recoverable timelines of virus-host coevolution in natural organisms refractory to laboratory cultivation. Here we combined a population genetic mathematical model of CRISPR-virus coevolution with six years of metagenomic sequencing to link the recoverable genomic dynamics of CRISPR loci to the unknown population dynamics of virus and host in natural communities. Metagenomic reconstructions in an acid-mine drainage system document CRISPR loci conserving ancestral immune elements to the base-pair across thousands of microbial generations. This ‘trailer-end conservation’ occurs despite rapid viral mutation and despite rapid prokaryotic genomic deletion. The trailer-ends of many reconstructed CRISPR loci are also largely identical across a population. ‘Trailer-end clonality’ occurs despite predictions of host immunological diversity due to negative frequency dependent selection (kill the winner dynamics). Statistical clustering and model simulations explain this lack of diversity by capturing rapid selective sweeps by highly immune CRISPR lineages. Potentially explaining ‘trailer-end conservation,’ we record the first example of a viral bloom overwhelming a CRISPR system. The polyclonal viruses bloom even though they share sequences previously targeted by host CRISPR loci. Simulations show how increasing random genomic deletions in CRISPR loci purges immunological controls on long-lived viral sequences, allowing polyclonal viruses to bloom and depressing host fitness. Our results thus link documented

  19. Sendai virus intra-host population dynamics and host immunocompetence influence viral virulence duringin vivopassage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peña, José; Chen-Harris, Haiyin; Allen, Jonathan E; Hwang, Mona; Elsheikh, Maher; Mabery, Shalini; Bielefeldt-Ohmann, Helle; Zemla, Adam T; Bowen, Richard A; Borucki, Monica K

    2016-01-01

    In vivo serial passage of non-pathogenic viruses has been shown to lead to increased viral virulence, and although the precise mechanism(s) are not clear, it is known that both host and viral factors are associated with increased pathogenicity. Under- or overnutrition leads to a decreased or dysregulated immune response and can increase viral mutant spectrum diversity and virulence. The objective of this study was to identify the role of viral mutant spectra dynamics and host immunocompetence in the development of pathogenicity during in vivo passage. Because the nutritional status of the host has been shown to affect the development of viral virulence, the diet of animal model reflected two extremes of diets which exist in the global population, malnutrition and obesity. Sendai virus was serially passaged in groups of mice with differing nutritional status followed by transmission of the passaged virus to a second host species, guinea pigs. Viral population dynamics were characterized using deep sequence analysis and computational modeling. Histopathology, viral titer and cytokine assays were used to characterize viral virulence. Viral virulence increased with passage and the virulent phenotype persisted upon passage to a second host species. Additionally, nutritional status of mice during passage influenced the phenotype. Sequencing revealed the presence of several non-synonymous changes in the consensus sequence associated with passage, a majority of which occurred in the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase and polymerase genes, as well as the presence of persistent high frequency variants in the viral population. In particular, an N1124D change in the consensus sequences of the polymerase gene was detected by passage 10 in a majority of the animals. In vivo comparison of an 1124D plaque isolate to a clone with 1124N genotype indicated that 1124D was associated with increased virulence.

  20. Contagious Content: Viral Video Ads Identification of Content Characteristics that Help Online Video Advertisements Go Viral

    OpenAIRE

    Yentl Knossenburg; Roberto Nogueira; Paula Chimenti

    2016-01-01

    Why do some online video advertisements go viral while others remain unnoticed? What kind of video content keeps the viewer interested and motivated to share? Many companies have realized the need to innovate their marketing strategies and have embraced the newest ways of using technology, as the Internet, to their advantage as in the example of virality. Yet few marketers actually understand how, and academic literature on this topic is still in development. This study investigated which con...

  1. Kinetics of viral shedding provide insights into the epidemiology of viral hemorrhagic septicemia in Pacific herring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hershberger, Paul K.; Gregg, Jacob L.; Winton, James R.; Grady, Courtney; Collins, Rachael

    2010-01-01

    Losses from infectious diseases are an important component of natural mortality among marine fish species, but factors controlling the ecology of these diseases and their potential responses to anthropogenic changes are poorly understood. We used viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) and a laboratory stock of Pacific herring Clupea pallasii to investigate the kinetics of viral shedding and its effect on disease transmission and host mortality. Outbreaks of acute disease, accompanied by mortality and viral shedding, were initiated after waterborne exposure of herring to concentrations of VHSV as low as 101 plaque-forming units (pfu) ml–1. Shed virus in flow-through tanks was first detected 4 to 5 d post-exposure, peaked after 6 to 10 d, and was no longer detected after 16 d. Shedding rates, calculated from density, flow and waterborne virus titer reached 1.8 to 5.0 × 108 pfu fish–1 d–1. Onset of viral shedding was dose-dependent and preceded initial mortality by 2 d. At 21 d, cumulative mortality in treatment groups ranged from 81 to 100% and was dependent not on challenge dose, but on the kinetics and level of viral shedding by infected fish in the tank. Possible consequences of the viral shedding and disease kinetics are discussed in the context of epizootic initiation and perpetuation among populations of wild Pacific herring.

  2. Halting angiogenesis by non-viral somatic gene therapy alleviates psoriasis and murine psoriasiform skin lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zibert, John Robert; Wallbrecht, Katrin; Schön, Margarete

    2011-01-01

    with epidermal expression of human TGF-ß1, we have demonstrated that antiangiogenic non-viral somatic gene therapy reduces the cutaneous microvasculature and alleviates chronic inflammatory skin disorders. Transient muscular expression of the recombinant disintegrin domain (RDD) of metargidin (also known as ADAM...... in all models. Thus, non-viral antiangiogenic gene therapy can alleviate psoriasis and may do so in other angiogenesis-related inflammatory skin disorders.......-15) by in vivo electroporation reduced cutaneous angiogenesis and vascularization in all 3 models. As demonstrated using red fluorescent protein-coupled RDD, the treatment resulted in muscular expression of the gene product and its deposition within the cutaneous hyperangiogenic connective tissue...

  3. THE POPULATION IMPACT OF ELIMINATING HOMELESSNESS ON HIV VIRAL SUPPRESSION AMONG PEOPLE WHO USE DRUGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Brandon D.L.; Elston, Beth; Dobrer, Sabina; Parashar, Surita; Hogg, Robert S.; Montaner, Julio S.G.; Kerr, Thomas; Wood, Evan; Milloy, M-J

    2015-01-01

    Objective We sought to estimate the change in viral suppression prevalence if homelessness were eliminated from a population of HIV-infected people who use drugs (PWUD). Design Community-recruited prospective cohort of HIV-infected PWUD in Vancouver, Canada. Behavioral information was collected at baseline and linked to a province-wide HIV/AIDS treatment database. The primary outcome was viral suppression (<50 copies/mL) measured during subsequent routine clinical care. Methods We employed an imputation-based marginal modelling approach. First, we used modified Poisson regression to obtain effect estimates (adjusting for sociodemographics, substance use, addiction treatment, and other confounders). Then, we imputed an outcome probability for each individual while manipulating the exposure (homelessness). Population viral suppression prevalence under realized and “housed” scenarios were obtained by averaging these probabilities across the population. Bootstrapping was conducted to calculate 95% confidence limits. Results Of 706 individuals interviewed between January 2005 and December 2015, the majority was male (66.0%), of Caucasian race/ethnicity (55.1%), and had a history of injection (93.6%). At first study visit, 223 (31.6%) reported recent homelessness, and 37.8% were subsequently identified as virally suppressed. Adjusted marginal models estimated a 15.1% relative increase (95%CI: 9.0%, 21.7%) in viral suppression in the entire population—to 43.5% (95%CI: 39.4%, 48.2%)—if all homeless individuals were housed. Among those homeless, eliminating this exposure would increase viral suppression from 22.0% to 40.1% (95%CI: 35.1%, 46.1%), an 82.3% relative increase. Conclusions Interventions to house homeless, HIV-positive individuals who use drugs could significantly increase population viral suppression. Such interventions should be implemented as a part of renewed HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment efforts. PMID:26636924

  4. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor is a modulator of anti-viral immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Jennifer L.; Lawrence, B. Paige

    2009-01-01

    Although immune modulation by AhR ligands has been studied for many years, the impact of AhR activation on host defenses against viral infection has not, until recently, garnered much attention. The development of novel reagents and model systems, new information regarding antiviral immunity, and a growing appreciation for the global health threat posed by viruses have invigorated interest in understanding how environmental signals affect susceptibility to and pathological consequences of viral infection. Using influenza A virus as a model of respiratory viral infection, recent studies show that AhR activation cues signaling events in both leukocytes and non-immune cells. Functional alterations include suppressed lymphocyte responses and increased inflammation in the infected lung. AhR-mediated events within and extrinsic to hematopoietic cells has been investigated using bone marrow chimeras, which show that AhR alters different elements of the immune response by affecting different tissue targets. In particular, suppressed CD8+ T cell responses are due to deregulated events within leukocytes themselves, whereas increased neutrophil recruitment to and IFN-γ levels in the lung result from AhR-regulated events extrinsic to bone marrow-derived cells. This latter discovery suggests that epithelial and endothelial cells are overlooked targets of AhR-mediated changes in immune function. Further support that AhR influences host cell responses to viral infection are provided by several studies demonstrating that AhR interacts directly with viral proteins and affects viral latency. While AhR clearly modulates host responses to viral infection, we still have much to understand about the complex interactions between immune cells, viruses, and the host environment. PMID:19027719

  5. Attitudinal Factors Affecting Viral Advertising Pass-On Behaviour of Online Consumers in Food Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohd Salleh, Nurhidayah; Ariff, Mohd Shoki Md; Zakuan, Norhayati; Sulaiman, Zuraidah; Zameri Mat Saman, Muhamad

    2016-05-01

    The increase number of active users of social media, especially Facebook, stimulates viral advertising behaviour among them, thus attracting e-marketers to focus on viral advertising in promoting their products. In global market, use of Facebook platform indicated that food services/restaurant of food industry is ranked number 11 with 18.8% users’ response rate within the platform. This development calls for e-marketers in Malaysia to use Facebook as their viral advertising channel. Attitudinal factors affecting the viral advertising pass-on behaviour (VAPB) especially among members of social media is of interest to many researchers. The typical attitudinal factors used were attitude toward social media (ATSM), attitude toward advertising in social media (AASM) and attitude toward advertising in general (AAIG). Attitude toward advertised brand (ATAB) is important in fast food industry because users of social media tend to share their experience about tastes and features of the food. However, ATAB is less emphasized in the conceptual model between attitudinal factors and VAPB. These four factors of consumer attitude served as independent variables in the conceptual model of this study and their effect on viral advertising pass-on behaviour among members of Domino's Pizza Malaysia Facebook page was examined. Online survey using a set of questionnaire which was sent to the members of this group via private message was employed. A total of 254 sets of usable questionnaires were collected from the respondents. All the attitudinal factors, except for AASM, were found to have positive and significant effect on VAPB. AAIG exerted the strongest effect on VAPB. Therefore, e-marketers should emphasize on developing a favourable attitude toward advertising in general among members of a social media to get them involve in viral advertising. In addition, instilling a favourable attitude towards advertised brand is also vital as it influences the members to viral the brand

  6. Contrasting life strategies of viruses that infect photo- and heterotrophic bacteria, as revealed by viral tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Li; Gregory, Ann; Yilmaz, Suzan; Poulos, Bonnie T; Hugenholtz, Philip; Sullivan, Matthew B

    2012-10-30

    Ocean viruses are ubiquitous and abundant and play important roles in global biogeochemical cycles by means of their mortality, horizontal gene transfer, and manipulation of host metabolism. However, the obstacles involved in linking viruses to their hosts in a high-throughput manner bottlenecks our ability to understand virus-host interactions in complex communities. We have developed a method called viral tagging (VT), which combines mixtures of host cells and fluorescent viruses with flow cytometry. We investigated multiple viruses which infect each of two model marine bacteria that represent the slow-growing, photoautotrophic genus Synechococcus (Cyanobacteria) and the fast-growing, heterotrophic genus Pseudoalteromonas (Gammaproteobacteria). Overall, viral tagging results for viral infection were consistent with plaque and liquid infection assays for cyanobacterial myo-, podo- and siphoviruses and some (myo- and podoviruses) but not all (four siphoviruses) heterotrophic bacterial viruses. Virus-tagged Pseudoalteromonas organisms were proportional to the added viruses under varied infection conditions (virus-bacterium ratios), while no more than 50% of the Synechococcus organisms were virus tagged even at viral abundances that exceeded (5 to 10×) that of their hosts. Further, we found that host growth phase minimally impacts the fraction of virus-tagged Synechococcus organisms while greatly affecting phage adsorption to Pseudoalteromonas. Together these findings suggest that at least two contrasting viral life strategies exist in the oceans and that they likely reflect adaptation to their host microbes. Looking forward to the point at which the virus-tagging signature is well understood (e.g., for Synechococcus), application to natural communities should begin to provide population genomic data at the proper scale for predictively modeling two of the most abundant biological entities on Earth. Viral study suffers from an inability to link viruses to hosts en

  7. Viral Hepatitis: Retrospective Review in a Canadian Pediatric Hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Cybulska, Paulina; Ni, Andy; Jimenez-Rivera, Carolina

    2011-01-01

    Introduction. Clinical presentation of viral hepatitis ranges from mild symptoms to fulminant hepatitis. Our aim is to describe clinical presentation and outcomes of children with viral hepatitis from the Eastern Ontario/Western Quebec regions of Canada. Methods. Retrospective chart review of children diagnosed with viral hepatitis at our institution from January 1, 1998, to December 31, 2007. Results. There were 261 charts reviewed, only 64 had a confirmed viral etiology: 34 (53%) hepatitis ...

  8. ViPTree: the viral proteomic tree server

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Yosuke; Yoshida, Takashi; Kuronishi, Megumi; Uehara, Hideya; Ogata, Hiroyuki; Goto, Susumu

    2017-01-01

    ViPTree is a web server provided through GenomeNet to generate viral proteomic trees for classification of viruses based on genome-wide similarities. Users can upload viral genomes sequenced either by genomics or metagenomics. ViPTree generates proteomic trees for the uploaded genomes together with flexibly selected reference viral genomes. ViPTree also serves as a platform to visually investigate genomic alignments and automatically annotated gene functions for the uploaded viral g