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Sample records for models compare favorably

  1. Using data from colloid transport experiments to parameterize filtration model parameters for favorable conditions

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    Kamai, Tamir; Nassar, Mohamed K.; Nelson, Kirk E.; Ginn, Timothy R.

    2017-04-01

    Colloid filtration in porous media spans across many disciplines and includes scenarios such as in-situ bioremediation, colloid-facilitated transport, water treatment of suspended particles and pathogenic bacteria, and transport of natural and engineered nanoparticles in the environment. Transport and deposition of colloid particles in porous media are determined by a combination of complex processes and forces. Given the convoluted physical, chemical, and biological processes involved, and the complexity of porous media in natural settings, it should not come as surprise that colloid filtration theory does not always sufficiently predict colloidal transport, and that there is still a pressing need for improved predictive capabilities. Here, instead of developing the macroscopic equation from pore-scale models, we parametrize the different terms in the macroscopic collection equation through fitting it to experimental data, by optimizing the parameters in the different terms of the equation. This way we combine a mechanistically-based filtration-equation with empirical evidence. The impact of different properties of colloids and porous media are studied by comparing experimental properties with different terms of the correlation equation. This comparison enables insight about different processes that occur during colloid transport and retention under in porous media under favorable conditions, and provides directions for future theoretical developments.

  2. Evidence of favorable sleep-EEG patterns in adolescent male vigorous football players compared to controls.

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    Brand, Serge; Beck, Johannes; Gerber, Markus; Hatzinger, Martin; Holsboer-Trachsler, Edith

    2010-03-01

    Sleep is crucial for psychological functioning and daily performance. Both lay and scientific opinion hold that physical activity encourages restorative sleep. However, research on this in adolescence is limited. The aim of the present study was to compare sleep-EEG patterns of vigorous exercisers and controls. Twelve adolescent male football players (14 h of vigorous exercise per week) and 12 controls (1.5 h of vigorous exercise per week) matched for gender, age (about 16 years), and educational level, took part in the study. Sleep-EEG registration was performed following a day without exercise. Sleep-EEG analyses revealed that, compared to controls, the football players showed greater sleep efficiency, shortened sleep onset latency, less awakenings after sleep onset, more stage 4, and less REM sleep. Importantly, this pattern of results emerged following a day without exercise. Moreover, vigorous football players reported better daily performance and displayed less weeknight (Sunday to Thursday) to weekend night (Friday and Saturday nights) variation. Findings suggest that for the football players, vigorous exercise seemed to lead to longer-lasting electrophysiological change in brain activity irrespective of acute bouts of exercise.

  3. Laparoscopic colectomy compares favorably with colectomy by laparotomy for reduction of postoperative ileus.

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    Chen, H H; Wexner, S D; Iroatulam, A J; Pikarsky, A J; Alabaz, O; Nogueras, J J; Nessim, A; Weiss, E G

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the length of postoperative ileus in patients undergoing colectomy by either laparotomy or laparoscopy. A total of 166 patients were studied. These patients were divided into two groups: Group 1, in which colectomy was done laparoscopically, and Group 2, consisting of patients undergoing laparotomy. Both groups contained 83 patients who were matched for disease severity, indications for surgery, and procedure. Indications for surgery included sigmoid diverticulitis in 12 (14 percent) patients, polyps in 22 (27 percent), Crohn's disease in 21 (25 percent), colorectal cancer in 11 (13 percent), stoma reversal in 8 (10 percent), rectal prolapse in 3 (4 percent), and other indications in 6 (7 percent) in each group. Operations were colectomy with anastomosis (42 ileocolic, 26 colorectal, 6 colocolic, 4 ileorectal, and 2 ileal J pouch) or without anastomosis (3 abdominoperineal resections) performed by the same surgeons during the same time period January 1993 to October 1996). The nasogastric tube was removed from all patients immediately after surgery in both groups. All patients received a clear liquid diet on the first postoperative day, followed by a regular diet as tolerated. The nasogastric tube was reinserted if two or more episodes of emesis of more than 200 ml occurred in the absence of bowel movement. Patients were discharged from the hospital when tolerating a regular diet without evidence of ileus. Statistical analysis was performed using unpaired t-test and Fisher's exact probability test. The male-to-female ratio was 38 to 45 in both groups. A total of 10 (12 percent) and 23 (28 percent) patients in Group 1 and Group 2 had emesis (P = 0.02), and the rate of nasogastric tube reinsertion was 5 (6 percent) and 13 (16 percent), respectively (P > 0.05). There were significant differences between Groups 1 and 2 relative to the lengths of ileus (3.5 +/- 1.3 vs. 5.4 +/- 1.7 days, respectively; P < 0.001), hospitalization (6

  4. The time-profile of cell growth in fission yeast: model selection criteria favoring bilinear models over exponential ones

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    Sveiczer Akos

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable controversy concerning the exact growth profile of size parameters during the cell cycle. Linear, exponential and bilinear models are commonly considered, and the same model may not apply for all species. Selection of the most adequate model to describe a given data-set requires the use of quantitative model selection criteria, such as the partial (sequential F-test, the Akaike information criterion and the Schwarz Bayesian information criterion, which are suitable for comparing differently parameterized models in terms of the quality and robustness of the fit but have not yet been used in cell growth-profile studies. Results Length increase data from representative individual fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells measured on time-lapse films have been reanalyzed using these model selection criteria. To fit the data, an extended version of a recently introduced linearized biexponential (LinBiExp model was developed, which makes possible a smooth, continuously differentiable transition between two linear segments and, hence, allows fully parametrized bilinear fittings. Despite relatively small differences, essentially all the quantitative selection criteria considered here indicated that the bilinear model was somewhat more adequate than the exponential model for fitting these fission yeast data. Conclusion A general quantitative framework was introduced to judge the adequacy of bilinear versus exponential models in the description of growth time-profiles. For single cell growth, because of the relatively limited data-range, the statistical evidence is not strong enough to favor one model clearly over the other and to settle the bilinear versus exponential dispute. Nevertheless, for the present individual cell growth data for fission yeast, the bilinear model seems more adequate according to all metrics, especially in the case of wee1Δ cells.

  5. Predicting favorable conditions for early leaf spot of peanut using output from the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model.

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    Olatinwo, Rabiu O; Prabha, Thara V; Paz, Joel O; Hoogenboom, Gerrit

    2012-03-01

    Early leaf spot of peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.), a disease caused by Cercospora arachidicola S. Hori, is responsible for an annual crop loss of several million dollars in the southeastern United States alone. The development of early leaf spot on peanut and subsequent spread of the spores of C. arachidicola relies on favorable weather conditions. Accurate spatio-temporal weather information is crucial for monitoring the progression of favorable conditions and determining the potential threat of the disease. Therefore, the development of a prediction model for mitigating the risk of early leaf spot in peanut production is important. The specific objective of this study was to demonstrate the application of the high-resolution Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model for management of early leaf spot in peanut. We coupled high-resolution weather output of the WRF, i.e. relative humidity and temperature, with the Oklahoma peanut leaf spot advisory model in predicting favorable conditions for early leaf spot infection over Georgia in 2007. Results showed a more favorable infection condition in the southeastern coastline of Georgia where the infection threshold were met sooner compared to the southwestern and central part of Georgia where the disease risk was lower. A newly introduced infection threat index indicates that the leaf spot threat threshold was met sooner at Alma, GA, compared to Tifton and Cordele, GA. The short-term prediction of weather parameters and their use in the management of peanut diseases is a viable and promising technique, which could help growers make accurate management decisions, and lower disease impact through optimum timing of fungicide applications.

  6. Arguments in Favor of Moving to a Sustainable Business Model in the Apiary Industry

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    Panța Nancy Diana

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Today’s society faces major challenges in meeting future global food demands and solving biodiversity loss, and it quickly needs to find ways in addressing these issues. The places to look for solutions come from the economic sectors that employ the most powerful pressure on these issues such as agriculture. Apiculture, as a branch of agriculture is being more and more recognized as sustaining human life and contributing to sustainability. However, the sector records a progressive decline of honey bees. Therefore, a rapid restructuring needs to take place in agricultural markets, in general, as well as in apiary agribusinesses. Although important, technological progress is insufficient in providing the necessary changes to achieve long-term economic, social and environmental sustainability, which should be considered both within and between generations. Consequently, sustainable business models encourage sustainable development through a triple bottom line approach and provide an analytical tool for firms into assessing the different aspects that are combined in order to create value. Since literature has paid little attention to the sustainable development in the apiary agribusiness, the present paper aims to link the two using a business model perspective and bring arguments in favor of moving to a sustainable business model.

  7. Comparing Active Vision Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croon, G.C.H.E. de; Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper, I.G.; Postma, E.O.

    2009-01-01

    Active vision models can simplify visual tasks, provided that they can select sensible actions given incoming sensory inputs. Many active vision models have been proposed, but a comparative evaluation of these models is lacking. We present a comparison of active vision models from two different

  8. Comparing active vision models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Croon, G.C.H.E. de; Sprinkhuizen-Kuyper, I.G.; Postma, E.O.

    2009-01-01

    Active vision models can simplify visual tasks, provided that they can select sensible actions given incoming sensory inputs. Many active vision models have been proposed, but a comparative evaluation of these models is lacking. We present a comparison of active vision models from two different

  9. Comprehensive analyses of ventricular myocyte models identify targets exhibiting favorable rate dependence.

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    Megan A Cummins

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Reverse rate dependence is a problematic property of antiarrhythmic drugs that prolong the cardiac action potential (AP. The prolongation caused by reverse rate dependent agents is greater at slow heart rates, resulting in both reduced arrhythmia suppression at fast rates and increased arrhythmia risk at slow rates. The opposite property, forward rate dependence, would theoretically overcome these parallel problems, yet forward rate dependent (FRD antiarrhythmics remain elusive. Moreover, there is evidence that reverse rate dependence is an intrinsic property of perturbations to the AP. We have addressed the possibility of forward rate dependence by performing a comprehensive analysis of 13 ventricular myocyte models. By simulating populations of myocytes with varying properties and analyzing population results statistically, we simultaneously predicted the rate-dependent effects of changes in multiple model parameters. An average of 40 parameters were tested in each model, and effects on AP duration were assessed at slow (0.2 Hz and fast (2 Hz rates. The analysis identified a variety of FRD ionic current perturbations and generated specific predictions regarding their mechanisms. For instance, an increase in L-type calcium current is FRD when this is accompanied by indirect, rate-dependent changes in slow delayed rectifier potassium current. A comparison of predictions across models identified inward rectifier potassium current and the sodium-potassium pump as the two targets most likely to produce FRD AP prolongation. Finally, a statistical analysis of results from the 13 models demonstrated that models displaying minimal rate-dependent changes in AP shape have little capacity for FRD perturbations, whereas models with large shape changes have considerable FRD potential. This can explain differences between species and between ventricular cell types. Overall, this study provides new insights, both specific and general, into the determinants of

  10. Loblolly pine growth following operational vegetation management treatments compares favorably to that achieved in complete vegetation control research trials

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    Dwight K. Lauer; Harold E. Quicke

    2010-01-01

    Different combinations of chemical site prep and post-plant herbaceous weed control installed at three Upper Coastal Plain locations were compared in terms of year 3 loblolly (Pinus taeda L.) pine response to determine the better vegetation management regimes. Site prep treatments were different herbicide rates applied in either July or October. Site...

  11. Comparing Review Strategies in the Classroom: Self-Testing Yields More Favorable Student Outcomes Relative to Question Generation

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    Lloyd, E. Paige; Walker, Ryan J.; Metz, Molly A.; Diekman, Amanda B.

    2018-01-01

    Although previous research has demonstrated that guided testing (i.e., self-testing) and question generation effectively increase retention compared to control methods, no work has simultaneously implemented both strategies in the classroom. In a semester-long study designed to maximize experimental control in a naturalistic setting, we adapted…

  12. Favorable acceptance of mini-tablets compared with syrup: a randomized controlled trial in infants and preschool children.

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    Klingmann, Viviane; Spomer, Natalie; Lerch, Christian; Stoltenberg, Ines; Frömke, Cornelia; Bosse, Hans Martin; Breitkreutz, Jörg; Meissner, Thomas

    2013-12-01

    To evaluate acceptability of 2 mm solid dosage forms (mini-tablets) as an alternative administration modality in young children in comparison with syrup. Three hundred six pediatric in- and outpatients aged 6 months-5 years (51 in each of 6 age groups) were recruited. An open, randomized cross-over study was conducted to compare acceptability and capability to swallow 2 mm uncoated or coated mini-tablets vs 3 mL syrup. In the overall patient population of 306 children, the acceptability of uncoated mini-tablets was superior to syrup (difference in proportions 14.8%, 95% CI 10.2-19.4; P syrup as well (difference in proportions 12.3%, 95% CI 5.4-19.3; P = .0008). All 3 pharmaceutical formulations were well tolerated, and none of the 306 children inhaled or coughed because of the syrup or the uncoated mini-tablet; only 2 of the 306 children (both in age group 0.5-1 year) coughed because of the coated mini-tablet, in both cases without clinical relevance. Mini-tablets are a valuable alternative to syrup for children 6 months-6 years of age and are more acceptable compared with liquid formulation. Regulatory bodies such as Food and Drug Administration and European Medicine Agency are encouraged to take our data into account for guideline updates and future drug approval processes. Copyright © 2013 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Acceptability of a low-fat vegan diet compares favorably to a step II diet in a randomized, controlled trial.

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    Barnard, Neal D; Scialli, Anthony R; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Lanou, Amy J

    2004-01-01

    This study aimed to assess the acceptability of a low-fat vegan diet, as compared with a more typical fat-modified diet, among overweight and obese adults. Through newspaper advertisements, 64 overweight, postmenopausal women were recruited, 59 of whom completed the study. The participants were assigned randomly to a low-fat vegan diet or, for comparison, to a National Cholesterol Education Program Step II (NCEP) diet. At baseline and 14 weeks later, dietary intake, dietary restraint, disinhibition, and hunger, as well as the acceptability and perceived benefits and adverse effects of each diet were assessed. Dietary restraint increased in the NCEP group (P vegan group. Disinhibition and hunger scores fell in each group (P vegan group participants rated their diet as less easy to prepare than their usual diets (P vegan diet is high and not demonstrably different from that of a more moderate low-fat diet among well-educated, postmenopausal women in a research environment.

  14. Linguistic inter-understanding gives evidence in favor of the mental models theory: Induction and comprehension

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    Miguel López-Astorga

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Linguistic inter-understanding is a communicative phenomenon that is well known and that has been studied in detail. It basically consists of the fact that an individual speaking a language is able to understand another person speaking a different language, and this without deeply knowing this last language or being able to express himself/herself in it. The phenomenon, which is especially frequent in the case of very similar languages, occurs because of certain inferential processes that can happen in the human mind when people try to interpret information in a distinct language. In this way, the main aim of this paper is to show how such processes are very akin to some of those that the mental models theory attributes to the human reasoning ability, and that hence linguistic inter-understanding can be considered as evidence that this last theory is, at least partially, correct.

  15. Comparing root architectural models

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    Schnepf, Andrea; Javaux, Mathieu; Vanderborght, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Plant roots play an important role in several soil processes (Gregory 2006). Root architecture development determines the sites in soil where roots provide input of carbon and energy and take up water and solutes. However, root architecture is difficult to determine experimentally when grown in opaque soil. Thus, root architectural models have been widely used and been further developed into functional-structural models that are able to simulate the fate of water and solutes in the soil-root system (Dunbabin et al. 2013). Still, a systematic comparison of the different root architectural models is missing. In this work, we focus on discrete root architecture models where roots are described by connected line segments. These models differ (a) in their model concepts, such as the description of distance between branches based on a prescribed distance (inter-nodal distance) or based on a prescribed time interval. Furthermore, these models differ (b) in the implementation of the same concept, such as the time step size, the spatial discretization along the root axes or the way stochasticity of parameters such as root growth direction, growth rate, branch spacing, branching angles are treated. Based on the example of two such different root models, the root growth module of R-SWMS and RootBox, we show the impact of these differences on simulated root architecture and aggregated information computed from this detailed simulation results, taking into account the stochastic nature of those models. References Dunbabin, V.M., Postma, J.A., Schnepf, A., Pagès, L., Javaux, M., Wu, L., Leitner, D., Chen, Y.L., Rengel, Z., Diggle, A.J. Modelling root-soil interactions using three-dimensional models of root growth, architecture and function (2013) Plant and Soil, 372 (1-2), pp. 93 - 124. Gregory (2006) Roots, rhizosphere and soil: the route to a better understanding of soil science? European Journal of Soil Science 57: 2-12.

  16. Atomistic modeling to investigate the favored composition for metallic glass formation in the Ca-Mg-Ni ternary system.

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    Zhao, S; Li, J H; An, S M; Li, S N; Liu, B X

    2017-05-17

    A realistic interatomic potential was first constructed for the Ca-Mg-Ni system and then applied to Monte Carlo simulations to predict the favored composition for metallic glass formation in the ternary system. The simulations not only predict a hexagonal composition region, within which the Ca-Mg-Ni metallic glass formation is energetically favored, but also pinpoint an optimized sub-region within which the amorphization driving force, i.e. the energy difference between the solid solution and disordered phase, is larger than that outside. The simulations further reveal that the physical origin of glass formation is the solid solution collapsing when the solute atom exceeds the critical solid solubility. Further structural analysis indicates that the pentagonal bi-pyramids dominate in the optimized sub-region. The large atomic size difference between Ca, Mg and Ni extends the short-range landscape and facilitates the development of a hybridized packing model in the medium-range, and eventually enhancing the glass formation in the system. The predictions are well supported by the experimental observations reported so far, and could be of help for designing the ternary glass formation.

  17. Treatment tolerance and patient-reported outcomes favor online hemodiafiltration compared to high-flux hemodialysis in the elderly.

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    Morena, Marion; Jaussent, Audrey; Chalabi, Lotfi; Leray-Moragues, Hélène; Chenine, Leila; Debure, Alain; Thibaudin, Damien; Azzouz, Lynda; Patrier, Laure; Maurice, Francois; Nicoud, Philippe; Durand, Claude; Seigneuric, Bruno; Dupuy, Anne-Marie; Picot, Marie-Christine; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Canaud, Bernard

    2017-06-01

    Large cohort studies suggest that high convective volumes associated with online hemodiafiltration may reduce the risk of mortality/morbidity compared to optimal high-flux hemodialysis. By contrast, intradialytic tolerance is not well studied. The aim of the FRENCHIE (French Convective versus Hemodialysis in Elderly) study was to compare high-flux hemodialysis and online hemodiafiltration in terms of intradialytic tolerance. In this prospective, open-label randomized controlled trial, 381 elderly chronic hemodialysis patients (over age 65) were randomly assigned in a one-to-one ratio to either high-flux hemodialysis or online hemodiafiltration. The primary outcome was intradialytic tolerance (day 30-day 120). Secondary outcomes included health-related quality of life, cardiovascular risk biomarkers, morbidity, and mortality. During the observational period for intradialytic tolerance, 85% and 84% of patients in high-flux hemodialysis and online hemodiafiltration arms, respectively, experienced at least one adverse event without significant difference between groups. As exploratory analysis, intradialytic tolerance was also studied, considering the sessions as a statistical unit according to treatment actually received. Over a total of 11,981 sessions, 2,935 were complicated by the occurrence of at least one adverse event, with a significantly lower occurrence in online hemodiafiltration with fewer episodes of intradialytic symptomatic hypotension and muscle cramps. By contrast, health-related quality of life, morbidity, and mortality were not different in both groups. An improvement in the control of metabolic bone disease biomarkers and β2-microglobulin level without change in serum albumin concentration was observed with online hemodiafiltration. Thus, overall outcomes favor online hemodiafiltration over high-flux hemodialysis in the elderly. Copyright © 2017 International Society of Nephrology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Mucosal tolerance disruption favors disease progression in an extraorbital lacrimal gland excision model of murine dry eye.

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    Guzmán, Mauricio; Keitelman, Irene; Sabbione, Florencia; Trevani, Analía S; Giordano, Mirta N; Galletti, Jeremías G

    2016-10-01

    Dry eye is a highly prevalent immune disorder characterized by a dysfunctional tear film and a Th1/Th17 T cell response at the ocular surface. The specificity of these pathogenic effector T cells remains to be determined, but auto-reactivity is considered likely. However, we have previously shown that ocular mucosal tolerance to an exogenous antigen is disrupted in a scopolamine-induced murine dry eye model and that it is actually responsible for disease progression. Here we report comparable findings in an entirely different murine model of dry eye that involves resection of the extraorbital lacrimal glands but no systemic muscarinic receptor blockade. Upon ocular instillation of ovalbumin, a delayed breakdown in mucosal tolerance to this antigen was observed in excised but not in sham-operated mice, which was mediated by interferon γ- and interleukin 17-producing antigen-specific T cells. Consistently, antigen-specific regulatory T cells were detectable in sham-operated but not in excised mice. As for other models of ocular surface disorders, epithelial activation of the NF-κB pathway by desiccating stress was determinant in the mucosal immune outcome. Underscoring the role of mucosal tolerance disruption in dry eye pathogenesis, its prevention by a topical NF-κB inhibitor led to reduced corneal damage in excised mice. Altogether these results show that surgically originated desiccating stress also initiates an abnormal Th1/Th17 T cell response to harmless exogenous antigens that reach the ocular surface. This event might actually contribute to corneal damage and challenges the conception of dry eye as a strictly autoimmune disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Are Fit Indices Biased in Favor of Bi-Factor Models in Cognitive Ability Research?: A Comparison of Fit in Correlated Factors, Higher-Order, and Bi-Factor Models via Monte Carlo Simulations

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    Grant B. Morgan

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bi-factor confirmatory factor models have been influential in research on cognitive abilities because they often better fit the data than correlated factors and higher-order models. They also instantiate a perspective that differs from that offered by other models. Motivated by previous work that hypothesized an inherent statistical bias of fit indices favoring the bi-factor model, we compared the fit of correlated factors, higher-order, and bi-factor models via Monte Carlo methods. When data were sampled from a true bi-factor structure, each of the approximate fit indices was more likely than not to identify the bi-factor solution as the best fitting. When samples were selected from a true multiple correlated factors structure, approximate fit indices were more likely overall to identify the correlated factors solution as the best fitting. In contrast, when samples were generated from a true higher-order structure, approximate fit indices tended to identify the bi-factor solution as best fitting. There was extensive overlap of fit values across the models regardless of true structure. Although one model may fit a given dataset best relative to the other models, each of the models tended to fit the data well in absolute terms. Given this variability, models must also be judged on substantive and conceptual grounds.

  20. Is Model-Based Development a Favorable Approach for Complex and Safety-Critical Computer Systems on Commercial Aircraft?

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    Torres-Pomales, Wilfredo

    2014-01-01

    A system is safety-critical if its failure can endanger human life or cause significant damage to property or the environment. State-of-the-art computer systems on commercial aircraft are highly complex, software-intensive, functionally integrated, and network-centric systems of systems. Ensuring that such systems are safe and comply with existing safety regulations is costly and time-consuming as the level of rigor in the development process, especially the validation and verification activities, is determined by considerations of system complexity and safety criticality. A significant degree of care and deep insight into the operational principles of these systems is required to ensure adequate coverage of all design implications relevant to system safety. Model-based development methodologies, methods, tools, and techniques facilitate collaboration and enable the use of common design artifacts among groups dealing with different aspects of the development of a system. This paper examines the application of model-based development to complex and safety-critical aircraft computer systems. Benefits and detriments are identified and an overall assessment of the approach is given.

  1. We favor formal models of heuristics rather than lists of loose dichotomies: a reply to Evans and Over

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    Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2009-01-01

    In their comment on Marewski et al. (good judgments do not require complex cognition, 2009) Evans and Over (heuristic thinking and human intelligence: a commentary on Marewski, Gaissmaier and Gigerenzer, 2009) conjectured that heuristics can often lead to biases and are not error free. This is a most surprising critique. The computational models of heuristics we have tested allow for quantitative predictions of how many errors a given heuristic will make, and we and others have measured the amount of error by analysis, computer simulation, and experiment. This is clear progress over simply giving heuristics labels, such as availability, that do not allow for quantitative comparisons of errors. Evans and Over argue that the reason people rely on heuristics is the accuracy-effort trade-off. However, the comparison between heuristics and more effortful strategies, such as multiple regression, has shown that there are many situations in which a heuristic is more accurate with less effort. Finally, we do not see how the fast and frugal heuristics program could benefit from a dual-process framework unless the dual-process framework is made more precise. Instead, the dual-process framework could benefit if its two “black boxes” (Type 1 and Type 2 processes) were substituted by computational models of both heuristics and other processes. PMID:19784854

  2. Comparing the Discrete and Continuous Logistic Models

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    Gordon, Sheldon P.

    2008-01-01

    The solutions of the discrete logistic growth model based on a difference equation and the continuous logistic growth model based on a differential equation are compared and contrasted. The investigation is conducted using a dynamic interactive spreadsheet. (Contains 5 figures.)

  3. Korean ethnicity as compared with white ethnicity is an independent favorable prognostic factor for overall survival in non-small cell lung cancer before and after the oral epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor era.

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    Ahn, Myung-Ju; Lee, Jeeyun; Park, Yun-Hee; Ahn, Jin-Seok; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zell, Jason A; Park, Keunchil; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius

    2010-08-01

    We have previously demonstrated, using a regional California Cancer Registry database, that Asian ethnicity is an independent favorable prognostic factor for overall survival (OS) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Retrospective population-based analysis of Korean and US white patients with NSCLC with known smoking status from Samsung Cancer Center, Seoul, South Korea, and a Southern California Regional Cancer Registry between 1998 and 2005 with follow-up through February 2008 to allow for even case ascertainment periods before and after 2002, when epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors were introduced in Korea and considered as the year of reference. A total of 4622 Korean and 8846 US white patients were analyzed. Median age of diagnosis was 63 years versus 71 years for Korean and white patients, respectively (P white patients were never-smokers. There was significant OS improvement in never-smokers when compared with ever-smokers among either Korean patients (p white (p white patients (p = 0.5641). Except for stage II patients (p = 0.0723), univariate analysis revealed Korean patients had improved OS compared with US white patients among stages I, III, and IV, respectively (all p white; hazard ratio (HR) = 0.869; p white ethnicity improved during 2002-2005 (HR = 0.795; p white ethnicity is an independent favorable prognostic factor for OS in NSCLC. In addition, greater survival benefit among Korean patients with NSCLC was noted in the postepidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor era (2002 and after) compared with US white ethnicity.

  4. Favorable ratings of providers' communication behaviors among U.S. women with depression: a population-based study applying the behavioral model of health services use.

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    Keller, Abiola O; Gangnon, Ronald; Witt, Whitney P

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the relationships between sociodemographic characteristics and ratings of provider communication behavior among women with depression in the United States. This study uses the Andersen Behavioral Model to examine the relationships among predisposing, enabling, and need factors and ratings of perceived patient-provider communication in women with depression. The sample consisted of women with depression who visited any provider in the previous 12 months in the 2002-2008 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (n = 3,179; weighted n = 4,707,255). Multivariate logistic regression was used to examine the independent contribution of predisposing, enabling, and need factors on providers' communication behavior measures. Black (non-Hispanic) women were more likely to report that providers always listened carefully (odds ratio [OR], 1.40; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.01-1.94), explained so they understood (OR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.10-2.11), and showed respect for what they had to say (OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.01-1.92). Women participating in the paid workforce and those without a usual source of care were at increased risk for less favorable experiences. Participation in the paid workforce and lack of a usual source of care were associated with an increased likelihood of less optimal communication experiences. Ensuring that women with depression have reliable access to a continuous source of care and expanding the availability of nonemergent, after-hours care may be instrumental for improving patient-provider communication in this population. Copyright © 2013 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Bofu-tsu-shosan, an oriental herbal medicine, exerts a combinatorial favorable metabolic modulation including antihypertensive effect on a mouse model of human metabolic disorders with visceral obesity.

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    Kengo Azushima

    Full Text Available Accumulating evidence indicates that metabolic dysfunction with visceral obesity is a major medical problem associated with the development of hypertension, type 2 diabetes (T2DM and dyslipidemia, and ultimately severe cardiovascular and renal disease. Therefore, an effective anti-obesity treatment with a concomitant improvement in metabolic profile is important for the treatment of metabolic dysfunction with visceral obesity. Bofu-tsu-shosan (BOF is one of oriental herbal medicine and is clinically available to treat obesity in Japan. Although BOF is a candidate as a novel therapeutic strategy to improve metabolic dysfunction with obesity, the mechanism of its beneficial effect is not fully elucidated. Here, we investigated mechanism of therapeutic effects of BOF on KKAy mice, a model of human metabolic disorders with obesity. Chronic treatment of KKAy mice with BOF persistently decreased food intake, body weight gain, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and systolic blood pressure. In addition, both tissue weight and cell size of white adipose tissue (WAT were decreased, with concomitant increases in the expression of adiponectin and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors genes in WAT as well as the circulating adiponectin level by BOF treatment. Furthermore, gene expression of uncoupling protein-1, a thermogenesis factor, in brown adipose tissue and rectal temperature were both elevated by BOF. Intriguingly, plasma acylated-ghrelin, an active form of orexigenic hormone, and short-term food intake were significantly decreased by single bolus administration of BOF. These results indicate that BOF exerts a combinatorial favorable metabolic modulation including antihypertensive effect, at least partially, via its beneficial effect on adipose tissue function and its appetite-inhibitory property through suppression on the ghrelin system.

  6. Is it Worth Comparing Different Bankruptcy Models?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Dolejšová

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to compare the performance of small enterprises in the Zlín and Olomouc Regions. These enterprises were assessed using the Altman Z-Score model, the IN05 model, the Zmijewski model and the Springate model. The batch selected for this analysis included 16 enterprises from the Zlín Region and 16 enterprises from the Olomouc Region. Financial statements subjected to the analysis are from 2006 and 2010. The statistical data analysis was performed using the one-sample z-test for proportions and the paired t-test. The outcomes of the evaluation run using the Altman Z-Score model, the IN05 model and the Springate model revealed the enterprises to be financially sound, but the Zmijewski model identified them as being insolvent. The one-sample z-test for proportions confirmed that at least 80% of these enterprises show a sound financial condition. A comparison of all models has emphasized the substantial difference produced by the Zmijewski model. The paired t-test showed that the financial performance of small enterprises had remained the same during the years involved. It is recommended that small enterprises assess their financial performance using two different bankruptcy models. They may wish to combine the Zmijewski model with any bankruptcy model (the Altman Z-Score model, the IN05 model or the Springate model to ensure a proper method of analysis.

  7. Wellness Model of Supervision: A Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, A. Stephen; Sangganjanavanich, Varunee Faii; Balkin, Richard S.; Oliver, Marvarene; Smith, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    This quasi-experimental study compared the effectiveness of the Wellness Model of Supervision (WELMS; Lenz & Smith, 2010) with alternative supervision models for developing wellness constructs, total personal wellness, and helping skills among counselors-in-training. Participants were 32 master's-level counseling students completing their…

  8. Comparing models of Red Knot population dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGowan, Conor P.

    2015-01-01

    Predictive population modeling contributes to our basic scientific understanding of population dynamics, but can also inform management decisions by evaluating alternative actions in virtual environments. Quantitative models mathematically reflect scientific hypotheses about how a system functions. In Delaware Bay, mid-Atlantic Coast, USA, to more effectively manage horseshoe crab (Limulus polyphemus) harvests and protect Red Knot (Calidris canutus rufa) populations, models are used to compare harvest actions and predict the impacts on crab and knot populations. Management has been chiefly driven by the core hypothesis that horseshoe crab egg abundance governs the survival and reproduction of migrating Red Knots that stopover in the Bay during spring migration. However, recently, hypotheses proposing that knot dynamics are governed by cyclical lemming dynamics garnered some support in data analyses. In this paper, I present alternative models of Red Knot population dynamics to reflect alternative hypotheses. Using 2 models with different lemming population cycle lengths and 2 models with different horseshoe crab effects, I project the knot population into the future under environmental stochasticity and parametric uncertainty with each model. I then compare each model's predictions to 10 yr of population monitoring from Delaware Bay. Using Bayes' theorem and model weight updating, models can accrue weight or support for one or another hypothesis of population dynamics. With 4 models of Red Knot population dynamics and only 10 yr of data, no hypothesis clearly predicted population count data better than another. The collapsed lemming cycle model performed best, accruing ~35% of the model weight, followed closely by the horseshoe crab egg abundance model, which accrued ~30% of the weight. The models that predicted no decline or stable populations (i.e. the 4-yr lemming cycle model and the weak horseshoe crab effect model) were the most weakly supported.

  9. Piecewise Structural Equation Model (SEM) Disentangles the Environmental Conditions Favoring Diatom Diazotroph Associations (DDAs) in the Western Tropical North Atlantic (WTNA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenegren, Marcus; Berg, Carlo; Padilla, Cory C; David, Stefan-Sebastian; Montoya, Joseph P; Yager, Patricia L; Foster, Rachel A

    2017-01-01

    Diatom diazotroph associations (DDAs) are important components in the world's oceans, especially in the western tropical north Atlantic (WTNA), where blooms have a significant impact on carbon and nitrogen cycling. However, drivers of their abundances and distribution patterns remain unknown. Here, we examined abundance and distribution patterns for two DDA populations in relation to the Amazon River (AR) plume in the WTNA. Quantitative PCR assays, targeting two DDAs (het-1 and het-2) by their symbiont's nifH gene, served as input in a piecewise structural equation model (SEM). Collections were made during high (spring 2010) and low (fall 2011) flow discharges of the AR. The distributions of dissolved nutrients, chlorophyll- a , and DDAs showed coherent patterns indicative of areas influenced by the AR. A symbiotic Hemiaulus hauckii-Richelia (het-2) bloom (>10 6 cells L -1 ) occurred during higher discharge of the AR and was coincident with mesohaline to oceanic (30-35) sea surface salinities (SSS), and regions devoid of dissolved inorganic nitrogen (DIN), low concentrations of both DIP (>0.1 μmol L -1 ) and Si (>1.0 μmol L -1 ). The Richelia (het-1) associated with Rhizosolenia was only present in 2010 and at lower densities (10-1.76 × 10 5 nifH copies L -1 ) than het-2 and limited to regions of oceanic SSS (>36). The het-2 symbiont detected in 2011 was associated with H. membranaceus (>10 3 nifH copies L -1 ) and were restricted to regions with mesohaline SSS (31.8-34.3), immeasurable DIN, moderate DIP (0.1-0.60 μmol L -1 ) and higher Si (4.19-22.1 μmol L -1 ). The piecewise SEM identified a profound direct negative effect of turbidity on the het-2 abundance in spring 2010, while DIP and water turbidity had a more positive influence in fall 2011, corroborating our observations of DDAs at subsurface maximas. We also found a striking difference in the influence of salinity on DDA symbionts suggesting a niche differentiation and preferences in oceanic and

  10. Comparing flood loss models of different complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröter, Kai; Kreibich, Heidi; Vogel, Kristin; Riggelsen, Carsten; Scherbaum, Frank; Merz, Bruno

    2013-04-01

    Any deliberation on flood risk requires the consideration of potential flood losses. In particular, reliable flood loss models are needed to evaluate cost-effectiveness of mitigation measures, to assess vulnerability, for comparative risk analysis and financial appraisal during and after floods. In recent years, considerable improvements have been made both concerning the data basis and the methodological approaches used for the development of flood loss models. Despite of that, flood loss models remain an important source of uncertainty. Likewise the temporal and spatial transferability of flood loss models is still limited. This contribution investigates the predictive capability of different flood loss models in a split sample cross regional validation approach. For this purpose, flood loss models of different complexity, i.e. based on different numbers of explaining variables, are learned from a set of damage records that was obtained from a survey after the Elbe flood in 2002. The validation of model predictions is carried out for different flood events in the Elbe and Danube river basins in 2002, 2005 and 2006 for which damage records are available from surveys after the flood events. The models investigated are a stage-damage model, the rule based model FLEMOps+r as well as novel model approaches which are derived using data mining techniques of regression trees and Bayesian networks. The Bayesian network approach to flood loss modelling provides attractive additional information concerning the probability distribution of both model predictions and explaining variables.

  11. Comparing linear probability model coefficients across groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Anders; Ejrnæs, Mette; Karlson, Kristian Bernt

    2015-01-01

    This article offers a formal identification analysis of the problem in comparing coefficients from linear probability models between groups. We show that differences in coefficients from these models can result not only from genuine differences in effects, but also from differences in one or more...... of the following three components: outcome truncation, scale parameters and distributional shape of the predictor variable. These results point to limitations in using linear probability model coefficients for group comparisons. We also provide Monte Carlo simulations and real examples to illustrate...... these limitations, and we suggest a restricted approach to using linear probability model coefficients in group comparisons....

  12. Comparative study of void fraction models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, R.C.; Freitas, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Some models for the calculation of void fraction in water in sub-cooled boiling and saturated vertical upward flow with forced convection have been selected and compared with experimental results in the pressure range of 1 to 150 bar. In order to know the void fraction axial distribution it is necessary to determine the net generation of vapour and the fluid temperature distribution in the slightly sub-cooled boiling region. It was verified that the net generation of vapour was well represented by the Saha-Zuber model. The selected models for the void fraction calculation present adequate results but with a tendency to super-estimate the experimental results, in particular the homogeneous models. The drift flux model is recommended, followed by the Armand and Smith models. (F.E.) [pt

  13. Using occupancy modeling and logistic regression to assess the distribution of shrimp species in lowland streams, Costa Rica: Does regional groundwater create favorable habitat?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Marcia; Freeman, Mary C.; Purucker, S. Thomas; Pringle, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    Freshwater shrimps are an important biotic component of tropical ecosystems. However, they can have a low probability of detection when abundances are low. We sampled 3 of the most common freshwater shrimp species, Macrobrachium olfersii, Macrobrachium carcinus, and Macrobrachium heterochirus, and used occupancy modeling and logistic regression models to improve our limited knowledge of distribution of these cryptic species by investigating both local- and landscape-scale effects at La Selva Biological Station in Costa Rica. Local-scale factors included substrate type and stream size, and landscape-scale factors included presence or absence of regional groundwater inputs. Capture rates for 2 of the sampled species (M. olfersii and M. carcinus) were sufficient to compare the fit of occupancy models. Occupancy models did not converge for M. heterochirus, but M. heterochirus had high enough occupancy rates that logistic regression could be used to model the relationship between occupancy rates and predictors. The best-supported models for M. olfersii and M. carcinus included conductivity, discharge, and substrate parameters. Stream size was positively correlated with occupancy rates of all 3 species. High stream conductivity, which reflects the quantity of regional groundwater input into the stream, was positively correlated with M. olfersii occupancy rates. Boulder substrates increased occupancy rate of M. carcinus and decreased the detection probability of M. olfersii. Our models suggest that shrimp distribution is driven by factors that function at local (substrate and discharge) and landscape (conductivity) scales.

  14. Comparative Study of Bancruptcy Prediction Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isye Arieshanti

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Early indication of bancruptcy is important for a company. If companies aware of  potency of their bancruptcy, they can take a preventive action to anticipate the bancruptcy. In order to detect the potency of a bancruptcy, a company can utilize a a model of bancruptcy prediction. The prediction model can be built using a machine learning methods. However, the choice of machine learning methods should be performed carefully. Because the suitability of a model depends on the problem specifically. Therefore, in this paper we perform a comparative study of several machine leaning methods for bancruptcy prediction. According to the comparative study, the performance of several models that based on machine learning methods (k-NN, fuzzy k-NN, SVM, Bagging Nearest Neighbour SVM, Multilayer Perceptron(MLP, Hybrid of MLP + Multiple Linear Regression, it can be showed that fuzzy k-NN method achieve the best performance with accuracy 77.5%

  15. Comparing coefficients of nested nonlinear probability models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohler, Ulrich; Karlson, Kristian Bernt; Holm, Anders

    2011-01-01

    In a series of recent articles, Karlson, Holm and Breen have developed a method for comparing the estimated coeffcients of two nested nonlinear probability models. This article describes this method and the user-written program khb that implements the method. The KHB-method is a general decomposi......In a series of recent articles, Karlson, Holm and Breen have developed a method for comparing the estimated coeffcients of two nested nonlinear probability models. This article describes this method and the user-written program khb that implements the method. The KHB-method is a general...

  16. Commentary: Monotremes and marsupials: Comparative models to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 37; Issue 4. Commentary: Monotremes and marsupials: Comparative models to better understand the function of milk. Sanjana Kuruppath Swathi Bisana Julie A Sharp Christophe Lefevre Satish Kumar Kevin R Nicholas. Volume 37 Issue 4 September 2012 pp 581-588 ...

  17. “Covalent Hydration” Reactions in Model Monomeric Ru 2,2'-Bipyridine Complexes: Thermodynamic Favorability as a Function of Metal Oxidation and Overall Spin States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozkanlar, Abdullah; Cape, Jonathan L.; Hurst, James K.; Clark, Aurora E.

    2011-09-05

    Density functional theory (DFT) has been used to investigate the plausibility of water addition to the simple mononuclear ruthenium complexes, [(NH{sub 3}){sub 3}(bpy)Ru=O]{sup 2+}/{sup 3+} and [(NH{sub 3}){sub 3}(bpy)RuOH]{sup 3+}, in which the OH fragment adds to the 2,2{prime}-bipyridine (bpy) ligand. Activation of bpy toward water addition has frequently been postulated within the literature, although there exists little definitive experimental evidence for this type of 'covalent hydration'. In this study, we examine the energetic dependence of the reaction upon metal oxidation state, overall spin state of the complex, as well as selectivity for various positions on the bipyridine ring. The thermodynamic favorability is found to be highly dependent upon all three parameters, with free energies of reaction that span favorable and unfavorable regimes. Aqueous addition to [(NH{sub 3}){sub 3}(bpy)Ru=O]{sup 3+} was found to be highly favorable for the S = 1/2 state, while reduction of the formal oxidation state on the metal center makes the reaction highly unfavorable. Examination of both facial and meridional isomers reveals that when bipyridine occupies the position trans to the ruthenyl oxo atom, reactivity toward OH addition decreases and the site preferences are altered. The electronic structure and spectroscopic signatures (EPR parameters and simulated spectra) have been determined to aid in recognition of 'covalent hydration' in experimental systems. EPR parameters are found to uniquely characterize the position of the OH addition to the bpy as well as the overall spin state of the system.

  18. Comparing numerically exact and modelled static friction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krengel Dominik

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Currently there exists no mechanically consistent “numerically exact” implementation of static and dynamic Coulomb friction for general soft particle simulations with arbitrary contact situations in two or three dimension, but only along one dimension. We outline a differential-algebraic equation approach for a “numerically exact” computation of friction in two dimensions and compare its application to the Cundall-Strack model in some test cases.

  19. Comparative analysis of Goodwin's business cycle models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonova, A. O.; Reznik, S.; Todorov, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    We compare the behavior of solutions of Goodwin's business cycle equation in the form of neutral delay differential equation with fixed delay (NDDE model) and in the form of the differential equations of 3rd, 4th and 5th orders (ODE model's). Such ODE model's (Taylor series expansion of NDDE in powers of θ) are proposed in N. Dharmaraj and K. Vela Velupillai [6] for investigation of the short periodic sawthooth oscillations in NDDE. We show that the ODE's of 3rd, 4th and 5th order may approximate the asymptotic behavior of only main Goodwin's mode, but not the sawthooth modes. If the order of the Taylor series expansion exceeds 5, then the approximate ODE becomes unstable independently of time lag θ.

  20. A Comparative Analysis of Task Modeling Notations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Vanderdonckt

    2012-03-01

    paper a comparative analysis of selected models involving multiple users in an interaction is provided in order to identify concepts which are underexplored in today's multi-user interaction task modeling. This comparative analysis is based on three families of criteria: information criteria, conceptual coverage, and expressiveness. Merging the meta-models of the selected models enables to come up with a broader meta-model that could be instantiated in most situations involving multi-user interaction, like workflow information systems, CSCW.

  1. When and why are reliable organizations favored?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ethiraj, Sendil; Yi, Sangyoon

    of the ensuing work examined only corollary implications of this observation. We treat the observation as a research question and ask: when and why are reliable organizations favored by evolutionary forces? Using a simple theoretical model, we direct attention at a minimal set of variables that are implicated...... a representation of reality. Thus, our attempt is best characterized as shining a spotlight on a small part of the larger canvas that constitutes the literature on organizational change....

  2. Comparing holographic dark energy models with statefinder

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui, Jing-Lei; Zhang, Jing-Fei

    2014-01-01

    We apply the statefinder diagnostic to the holographic dark energy models, including the original holographic dark energy (HDE) model, the new holographic dark energy model, the new agegraphic dark energy (NADE) model, and the Ricci dark energy model. In the low-redshift region the holographic dark energy models are degenerate with each other and with the ΛCDM model in the H(z) and q(z) evolutions. In particular, the HDE model is highly degenerate with the ΛCDM model, and in the HDE model the cases with different parameter values are also in strong degeneracy. Since the observational data are mainly within the low-redshift region, it is very important to break this lowredshift degeneracy in the H(z) and q(z) diagnostics by using some quantities with higher order derivatives of the scale factor. It is shown that the statefinder diagnostic r(z) is very useful in breaking the low-redshift degeneracies. By employing the statefinder diagnostic the holographic dark energy models can be differentiated efficiently in the low-redshift region. The degeneracy between the holographic dark energy models and the ΛCDM model can also be broken by this method. Especially for the HDE model, all the previous strong degeneracies appearing in the H(z) and q(z) diagnostics are broken effectively. But for the NADE model, the degeneracy between the cases with different parameter values cannot be broken, even though the statefinder diagnostic is used. A direct comparison of the holographic dark energy models in the r-s plane is also made, in which the separations between the models (including the ΛCDM model) can be directly measured in the light of the current values {r 0 , s 0 } of the models. (orig.)

  3. Patterns of glacier ablation across North-Central Chile: Identifying the limits of empirical melt models under sublimation-favorable conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, A.; Pellicciotti, F.; MacDonell, S.; McPhee, J.; Burlando, P.

    2017-07-01

    We investigate the energy balance and ablation regimes of glaciers in high-elevation, dry environments using glaciometeorological data collected on six glaciers in the semiarid Andes of North-Central Chile (29-34°S, 3127-5324 m). We use a point-scale physically based energy balance (EB) model and an enhanced Temperature-Index (ETI) model that calculates melt rates only as a function of air temperature and net shortwave radiation. At all sites, the largest energy inputs are net shortwave and incoming longwave radiation, which are controlled by surface albedo and elevation, respectively. Turbulent fluxes cancel each other out at the lower sites, but as elevation increases, cold, dry and wind-exposed conditions increase the magnitude of negative latent heat fluxes, associated with large surface sublimation rates. In midsummer (January), ablation rates vary from 67.9 mm w.e. d-1 at the lowest site (˜100% corresponding to melt), to 2.3 mm w.e. d-1 at the highest site (>85% corresponding to surface sublimation). At low-elevation, low-albedo, melt-dominated sites, the ETI model correctly reproduces melt using a large range of possible parameters, but both the performance and parameter transferability decrease with elevation for two main reasons: (i) the air temperature threshold approach for melt onset does not capture the diurnal variability of melt in cold and strong irradiated environments and (ii) energy losses decrease the correlation between melt and net shortwave radiation. We summarize our results by means of an elevation profile of ablation components that can be used as reference in future studies of glacier ablation in the semiarid Andes.

  4. Intrinsic up-regulation of 2-AG favors an area specific neuronal survival in different in vitro models of neuronal damage.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonja Kallendrusch

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG acts as a retrograde messenger and modulates synaptic signaling e. g. in the hippocampus. 2-AG also exerts neuroprotective effects under pathological situations. To better understand the mechanism beyond physiological signaling we used Organotypic Entorhino-Hippocampal Slice Cultures (OHSC and investigated the temporal regulation of 2-AG in different cell subsets during excitotoxic lesion and dendritic lesion of long range projections in the enthorhinal cortex (EC, dentate gyrus (DG and the cornu ammonis region 1 (CA1.2-AG levels were elevated 24 h after excitotoxic lesion in CA1 and DG (but not EC and 24 h after perforant pathway transection (PPT in the DG only. After PPT diacylglycerol lipase alpha (DAGL protein, the synthesizing enzyme of 2-AG was decreased when Dagl mRNA expression and 2-AG levels were enhanced. In contrast to DAGL, the 2-AG hydrolyzing enzyme monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL showed no alterations in total protein and mRNA expression after PPT in OHSC. MAGL immunoreaction underwent a redistribution after PPT and excitotoxic lesion since MAGL IR disappeared in astrocytes of lesioned OHSC. DAGL and MAGL immunoreactions were not detectable in microglia at all investigated time points. Thus, induction of the neuroprotective endocannabinoid 2-AG might be generally accomplished by down-regulation of MAGL in astrocytes after neuronal lesions.Increase in 2-AG levels during secondary neuronal damage reflects a general neuroprotective mechanism since it occurred independently in both different lesion models. This intrinsic up-regulation of 2-AG is synergistically controlled by DAGL and MAGL in neurons and astrocytes and thus represents a protective system for neurons that is involved in dendritic reorganisation.

  5. Comparing models of offensive cyber operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grant, T

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available would be needed by a Cyber Security Operations Centre in order to perform offensive cyber operations?". The analysis was performed, using as a springboard seven models of cyber-attack, and resulted in the development of what is described as a canonical...

  6. Comparative Distributions of Hazard Modeling Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana Abdul Wajid

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the comparison among the distributions used in hazard analysis. Simulation technique has been used to study the behavior of hazard distribution modules. The fundamentals of Hazard issues are discussed using failure criteria. We present the flexibility of the hazard modeling distribution that approaches to different distributions.

  7. Comparing models of offensive cyber operations

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Grant, T

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available system, few represent target selection, attack planning, and Denial of Service attacks, and none specifically represent attack coordination within distributed groups. Finally, a canonical model has been constructed by rational reconstruction (Habermas... logical form? (Habermas, 1976). RR has been applied in computing research to redesign a seminal expert system (Cendrowski & Bramer, 1984) and to formalise Boyd?s (1996) Observe-Orient-Decide-Act (OODA) loop (Grant & Kooter, 2005). In the research...

  8. Comparing National Water Model Inundation Predictions with Hydrodynamic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egbert, R. J.; Shastry, A.; Aristizabal, F.; Luo, C.

    2017-12-01

    The National Water Model (NWM) simulates the hydrologic cycle and produces streamflow forecasts, runoff, and other variables for 2.7 million reaches along the National Hydrography Dataset for the continental United States. NWM applies Muskingum-Cunge channel routing which is based on the continuity equation. However, the momentum equation also needs to be considered to obtain better estimates of streamflow and stage in rivers especially for applications such as flood inundation mapping. Simulation Program for River NeTworks (SPRNT) is a fully dynamic model for large scale river networks that solves the full nonlinear Saint-Venant equations for 1D flow and stage height in river channel networks with non-uniform bathymetry. For the current work, the steady-state version of the SPRNT model was leveraged. An evaluation on SPRNT's and NWM's abilities to predict inundation was conducted for the record flood of Hurricane Matthew in October 2016 along the Neuse River in North Carolina. This event was known to have been influenced by backwater effects from the Hurricane's storm surge. Retrospective NWM discharge predictions were converted to stage using synthetic rating curves. The stages from both models were utilized to produce flood inundation maps using the Height Above Nearest Drainage (HAND) method which uses the local relative heights to provide a spatial representation of inundation depths. In order to validate the inundation produced by the models, Sentinel-1A synthetic aperture radar data in the VV and VH polarizations along with auxiliary data was used to produce a reference inundation map. A preliminary, binary comparison of the inundation maps to the reference, limited to the five HUC-12 areas of Goldsboro, NC, yielded that the flood inundation accuracies for NWM and SPRNT were 74.68% and 78.37%, respectively. The differences for all the relevant test statistics including accuracy, true positive rate, true negative rate, and positive predictive value were found

  9. FAVORING PARTIES BY GENERAL LINEAR DIVISOR METHOD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion BOLUN

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspects of General Linear Divisor (GLDmethod favoring of parties, when distributing seats, are investigated. They are identified predisposing conditions of a particular party to favor parties and also the fact that predisposition of favoring smaller parties is increasing, and of favoring of larger parties is decreasing with the increase of constant c value. The condition of Hamilton equilibrium between two parties is defined and special cases of Hamilton equilibriumand quasi-equilibrium are described. Are identified areas of GLD method favoring of larger and of smaller parties depending on the number of parties and on values of constant c and ΔM. Onaverage, GLD method favors large parties at c 2 and did not favor any party at c = 2.

  10. Localization of adenovirus morphogenesis players, together with visualization of assembly intermediates and failed products, favor a model where assembly and packaging occur concurrently at the periphery of the replication center.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela N Condezo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Adenovirus (AdV morphogenesis is a complex process, many aspects of which remain unclear. In particular, it is not settled where in the nucleus assembly and packaging occur, and whether these processes occur in a sequential or a concerted manner. Here we use immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy (immunoEM to trace packaging factors and structural proteins at late times post infection by either wildtype virus or a delayed packaging mutant. We show that representatives of all assembly factors are present in the previously recognized peripheral replicative zone, which therefore is the AdV assembly factory. Assembly intermediates and abortive products observed in this region favor a concurrent assembly and packaging model comprising two pathways, one for capsid proteins and another one for core components. Only when both pathways are coupled by correct interaction between packaging proteins and the genome is the viral particle produced. Decoupling generates accumulation of empty capsids and unpackaged cores.

  11. Localization of adenovirus morphogenesis players, together with visualization of assembly intermediates and failed products, favor a model where assembly and packaging occur concurrently at the periphery of the replication center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condezo, Gabriela N; San Martín, Carmen

    2017-04-01

    Adenovirus (AdV) morphogenesis is a complex process, many aspects of which remain unclear. In particular, it is not settled where in the nucleus assembly and packaging occur, and whether these processes occur in a sequential or a concerted manner. Here we use immunofluorescence and immunoelectron microscopy (immunoEM) to trace packaging factors and structural proteins at late times post infection by either wildtype virus or a delayed packaging mutant. We show that representatives of all assembly factors are present in the previously recognized peripheral replicative zone, which therefore is the AdV assembly factory. Assembly intermediates and abortive products observed in this region favor a concurrent assembly and packaging model comprising two pathways, one for capsid proteins and another one for core components. Only when both pathways are coupled by correct interaction between packaging proteins and the genome is the viral particle produced. Decoupling generates accumulation of empty capsids and unpackaged cores.

  12. Comparative Studies of Population Synthesis Models in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Comparative Studies of Population Synthesis Models in the Framework of Modified Strömgren Filters ... The study conveys a good agreement of GALEV models with modified Strömgren colours but with poor UV model predictions and observed globular cluster data, while the spectroscopic models perform badly because of ...

  13. Comparative analysis of design models for concrete corbels

    OpenAIRE

    Araújo, D. L.; Silva Neto, A. P.; Lobo, F. A.; Debs, M. K. El

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The main objective of this paper is performing a comparative analysis of some design models for precast concrete corbels. For this, it was analyzed design models from Brazilian (NBR 9062) and European (EUROCODE 2) Codes and a US design handbook (PCI). Moreover, three analytical models showed in the literature are analyzed. The objective of this comparative is identifying the best design models to represent the failure load of concrete corbels by the tie yields or by the concrete crus...

  14. COMPARING OF DEPOSIT MODEL AND LIFE INSURANCE MODEL IN MACEDONIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TATJANA ATANASOVA-PACHEMSKA

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In conditions of the continuous decline of the interest rates for bank deposits, and at a time when uncertainty about the future is increasing, physical and legal persons have doubts how to secure their future or how and where to invest their funds and thus to “fertilize” and increase their savings. Individuals usually choose to put their savings in the bank for a certain period, and for that period to receive certain interest, or decide to invest their savings in different types of life insurance and thus to "take care" of their life, their future and the future of their families. In mathematics are developed many models that relate to the compounding and the insurance. This paper is a comparison of the deposit model and the model of life insurance

  15. Parmodel: a web server for automated comparative modeling of proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchôa, Hugo Brandão; Jorge, Guilherme Eberhart; Freitas Da Silveira, Nelson José; Camera, João Carlos; Canduri, Fernanda; De Azevedo, Walter Filgueira

    2004-12-24

    Parmodel is a web server for automated comparative modeling and evaluation of protein structures. The aim of this tool is to help inexperienced users to perform modeling, assessment, visualization, and optimization of protein models as well as crystallographers to evaluate structures solved experimentally. It is subdivided in four modules: Parmodel Modeling, Parmodel Assessment, Parmodel Visualization, and Parmodel Optimization. The main module is the Parmodel Modeling that allows the building of several models for a same protein in a reduced time, through the distribution of modeling processes on a Beowulf cluster. Parmodel automates and integrates the main softwares used in comparative modeling as MODELLER, Whatcheck, Procheck, Raster3D, Molscript, and Gromacs. This web server is freely accessible at .

  16. Comparative Study of Smeared Cracking Models for Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuel Silva Penna

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article shows how the constitutive modeling of concrete has evolved since the initial attempts to characterize the medium cracked as continuous, moving from smeared cracking, damage and microplane models, until the current tendency to design different models according to a single theoretical framework. A generic formulation for smeared cracking models, including fixed and rotational models, as well as degradation in tension and in compression, is provided. Using this formulation, three models are generated by specifying the laws of degradation. A comparative study of models, based on computer simulations of a beam subjected to shear at four points, is presented. The results are compared, between themselves and with experimental results, providing a critical analysis of the models.

  17. Family models: comparing and contrasting the Olson Circumplex Model with the Beavers Systems Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, W R; Voeller, M N

    1983-03-01

    There is an increasing interest in and need for family models. One such model is the Olson Circumplex Model, previously reported in this journal (18). This model is compared and contrasted with the Beavers Systems Model, which was also developed from empirical data and has had extensive use in family assessment. Though both are cross-sectional, process-oriented, and capable of providing structure for family research, we believe there are certain short-comings in the Olson model that make it less clinically useful than the Beavers Systems Model. These include definitional problems and a total reliance on curvilinear dimensions with a grid approach to family typology that does not acknowledge a separation/individuation continuum. Our model avoids these deficiencies and includes a continuum of functional competence that reflects the development and differentiation of many living systems, including the family.

  18. Great Basin geologic framework and uranium favorability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Larson, L.T.; Beal, L.H.

    1978-01-01

    Work on this report has been done by a team of seven investigators assisted over the project span by twenty-three undergraduate and graduate students from May 18, 1976 to August 19, 1977. The report is presented in one volume of text, one volume or Folio of Maps, and two volumes of bibliography. The bibliography contains approximately 5300 references on geologic subjects pertinent to the search for uranium in the Great Basin. Volume I of the bibliography lists articles by author alphabetically and Volume II cross-indexes these articles by location and key word. Chapters I through IV of the Text volume and accompanying Folio Map Sets 1, 2, 3, 4, and 5, discuss the relationship of uranium to rock and structural environments which dominate the Great Basin. Chapter 5 and Map Sets 6 and 7 provide a geochemical association/metallogenic grouping of mineral occurrences in the Great Basin along with information on rock types hosting uranium. Chapter VI summarizes the results of a court house claim record search for 'new' claiming areas for uranium, and Chapter VII along with Folio Map Set 8 gives all published geochronological data available through April 1, 1977 on rocks of the Great Basin. Chapter VIII provides an introduction to a computer analysis of characteristics of certain major uranium deposits in crystalline rocks (worldwide) and is offered as a suggestion of what might be done with uranium in all geologic environments. We believe such analysis will assist materially in constructing exploration models. Chapter IX summarizes criteria used and conclusions reached as to the favorability of uranium environments which we believe to exist in the Great Basin and concludes with recommendations for both exploration and future research. A general summary conclusion is that there are several geologic environments within the Great Basin which have considerable potential and that few, if any, have been sufficiently tested

  19. Comparative analysis of design models for concrete corbels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Araújo

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The main objective of this paper is performing a comparative analysis of some design models for precast concrete corbels. For this, it was analyzed design models from Brazilian (NBR 9062 and European (EUROCODE 2 Codes and a US design handbook (PCI. Moreover, three analytical models showed in the literature are analyzed. The objective of this comparative is identifying the best design models to represent the failure load of concrete corbels by the tie yields or by the concrete crushing. Moreover, it is intended to evaluate the contribution of horizontal stirrups to resistance of concrete corbels. For this, a database was assembled from test results of concrete corbels carried out by several researchers and they are showed in the literature. The design models were applied to this database and from statistical tools, adjustments coefficients are recommended to be applied on these design models to take into account the results dispersion found in the analysis.

  20. Methods and models used in comparative risk studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Devooght, J.

    1983-01-01

    Comparative risk studies make use of a large number of methods and models based upon a set of assumptions incompletely formulated or of value judgements. Owing to the multidimensionality of risks and benefits, the economic and social context may notably influence the final result. Five classes of models are briefly reviewed: accounting of fluxes of effluents, radiation and energy; transport models and health effects; systems reliability and bayesian analysis; economic analysis of reliability and cost-risk-benefit analysis; decision theory in presence of uncertainty and multiple objectives. Purpose and prospect of comparative studies are assessed in view of probable diminishing returns for large generic comparisons [fr

  1. A comparative review of radiation-induced cancer risk models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hee; Kim, Ju Youl [FNC Technology Co., Ltd., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seok Jung [Risk and Environmental Safety Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    With the need for a domestic level 3 probabilistic safety assessment (PSA), it is essential to develop a Korea-specific code. Health effect assessments study radiation-induced impacts; in particular, long-term health effects are evaluated in terms of cancer risk. The objective of this study was to analyze the latest cancer risk models developed by foreign organizations and to compare the methodology of how they were developed. This paper also provides suggestions regarding the development of Korean cancer risk models. A review of cancer risk models was carried out targeting the latest models: the NUREG model (1993), the BEIR VII model (2006), the UNSCEAR model (2006), the ICRP 103 model (2007), and the U.S. EPA model (2011). The methodology of how each model was developed is explained, and the cancer sites, dose and dose rate effectiveness factor (DDREF) and mathematical models are also described in the sections presenting differences among the models. The NUREG model was developed by assuming that the risk was proportional to the risk coefficient and dose, while the BEIR VII, UNSCEAR, ICRP, and U.S. EPA models were derived from epidemiological data, principally from Japanese atomic bomb survivors. The risk coefficient does not consider individual characteristics, as the values were calculated in terms of population-averaged cancer risk per unit dose. However, the models derived by epidemiological data are a function of sex, exposure age, and attained age of the exposed individual. Moreover, the methodologies can be used to apply the latest epidemiological data. Therefore, methodologies using epidemiological data should be considered first for developing a Korean cancer risk model, and the cancer sites and DDREF should also be determined based on Korea-specific studies. This review can be used as a basis for developing a Korean cancer risk model in the future.

  2. Disaggregation of Rainy Hours: Compared Performance of Various Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Haha, M.; Hingray, B.; Musy, A.

    In the urban environment, the response times of catchments are usually short. To de- sign or to diagnose waterworks in that context, it is necessary to describe rainfall events with a good time resolution: a 10mn time step is often necessary. Such in- formation is not always available. Rainfall disaggregation models have thus to be applied to produce from rough rainfall data that short time resolution information. The communication will present the performance obtained with several rainfall dis- aggregation models that allow for the disaggregation of rainy hours into six 10mn rainfall amounts. The ability of the models to reproduce some statistical character- istics of rainfall (mean, variance, overall distribution of 10mn-rainfall amounts; ex- treme values of maximal rainfall amounts over different durations) is evaluated thanks to different graphical and numerical criteria. The performance of simple models pre- sented in some scientific papers or developed in the Hydram laboratory as well as the performance of more sophisticated ones is compared with the performance of the basic constant disaggregation model. The compared models are either deterministic or stochastic; for some of them the disaggregation is based on scaling properties of rainfall. The compared models are in increasing complexity order: constant model, linear model (Ben Haha, 2001), Ormsbee Deterministic model (Ormsbee, 1989), Ar- tificial Neuronal Network based model (Burian et al. 2000), Hydram Stochastic 1 and Hydram Stochastic 2 (Ben Haha, 2001), Multiplicative Cascade based model (Olsson and Berndtsson, 1998), Ormsbee Stochastic model (Ormsbee, 1989). The 625 rainy hours used for that evaluation (with a hourly rainfall amount greater than 5mm) were extracted from the 21 years chronological rainfall series (10mn time step) observed at the Pully meteorological station, Switzerland. The models were also evaluated when applied to different rainfall classes depending on the season first and on the

  3. A comparative study of seven human cochlear filter models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saremi, Amin; Beutelmann, Rainer; Dietz, Mathias; Ashida, Go; Kretzberg, Jutta; Verhulst, Sarah

    2016-09-01

    Auditory models have been developed for decades to simulate characteristics of the human auditory system, but it is often unknown how well auditory models compare to each other or perform in tasks they were not primarily designed for. This study systematically analyzes predictions of seven publicly-available cochlear filter models in response to a fixed set of stimuli to assess their capabilities of reproducing key aspects of human cochlear mechanics. The following features were assessed at frequencies of 0.5, 1, 2, 4, and 8 kHz: cochlear excitation patterns, nonlinear response growth, frequency selectivity, group delays, signal-in-noise processing, and amplitude modulation representation. For each task, the simulations were compared to available physiological data recorded in guinea pigs and gerbils as well as to human psychoacoustics data. The presented results provide application-oriented users with comprehensive information on the advantages, limitations and computation costs of these seven mainstream cochlear filter models.

  4. Comparing the staffing models of outsourcing in selected companies

    OpenAIRE

    Chaloupková, Věra

    2010-01-01

    This thesis deals with problems of takeover of employees in outsourcing. The capital purpose is to compare the staffing model of outsourcing in selected companies. To compare in selected companies I chose multi-criteria analysis. This thesis is dividend into six chapters. The first charter is devoted to the theoretical part. In this charter describes the basic concepts as outsourcing, personal aspects, phase of the outsourcing projects, communications and culture. The rest of thesis is devote...

  5. What controls biological production in coastal upwelling systems? Insights from a comparative modeling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Lachkar

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The magnitude of net primary production (NPP in Eastern Boundary Upwelling Systems (EBUS is traditionally viewed as directly reflecting the wind-driven upwelling intensity. Yet, different EBUS show different sensitivities of NPP to upwelling-favorable winds (Carr and Kearns, 2003. Here, using a comparative modeling study of the California Current System (California CS and Canary Current System (Canary CS, we show how physical and environmental factors, such as light, temperature and cross-shore circulation modulate the response of NPP to upwelling strength. To this end, we made a series of eddy-resolving simulations of the two upwelling systems using the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS, coupled to a nitrogen-based Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton-Detritus (NPZD ecosystem model. Using identical ecological/biogeochemical parameters, our coupled model simulates a level of NPP in the California CS that is 50 % smaller than that in the Canary CS, in agreement with observationally based estimates. We find this much lower NPP in the California CS despite phytoplankton in this system having nearly 20 % higher nutrient concentrations available to fuel their growth. This conundrum can be explained by: (1 phytoplankton having a faster nutrient-replete growth in the Canary CS relative to the California CS; a consequence of more favorable light and temperature conditions in the Canary CS, and (2 the longer nearshore water residence times in the Canary CS, which permit a larger buildup of biomass in the upwelling zone, thereby enhancing NPP. The longer residence times in the Canary CS appear to be a result of the wider continental shelves and the lower mesoscale activity characterizing this upwelling system. This results in a weaker offshore export of nutrients and organic matter, thereby increasing local nutrient recycling and reducing the spatial decoupling between new and export production in the Canary CS. Our results suggest that climate change

  6. Bayesian models for comparative analysis integrating phylogenetic uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Uncertainty in comparative analyses can come from at least two sources: a) phylogenetic uncertainty in the tree topology or branch lengths, and b) uncertainty due to intraspecific variation in trait values, either due to measurement error or natural individual variation. Most phylogenetic comparative methods do not account for such uncertainties. Not accounting for these sources of uncertainty leads to false perceptions of precision (confidence intervals will be too narrow) and inflated significance in hypothesis testing (e.g. p-values will be too small). Although there is some application-specific software for fitting Bayesian models accounting for phylogenetic error, more general and flexible software is desirable. Methods We developed models to directly incorporate phylogenetic uncertainty into a range of analyses that biologists commonly perform, using a Bayesian framework and Markov Chain Monte Carlo analyses. Results We demonstrate applications in linear regression, quantification of phylogenetic signal, and measurement error models. Phylogenetic uncertainty was incorporated by applying a prior distribution for the phylogeny, where this distribution consisted of the posterior tree sets from Bayesian phylogenetic tree estimation programs. The models were analysed using simulated data sets, and applied to a real data set on plant traits, from rainforest plant species in Northern Australia. Analyses were performed using the free and open source software OpenBUGS and JAGS. Conclusions Incorporating phylogenetic uncertainty through an empirical prior distribution of trees leads to more precise estimation of regression model parameters than using a single consensus tree and enables a more realistic estimation of confidence intervals. In addition, models incorporating measurement errors and/or individual variation, in one or both variables, are easily formulated in the Bayesian framework. We show that BUGS is a useful, flexible general purpose tool for

  7. Image based 3D city modeling : Comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Singh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available 3D city model is a digital representation of the Earth’s surface and it’s related objects such as building, tree, vegetation, and some manmade feature belonging to urban area. The demand of 3D city modeling is increasing rapidly for various engineering and non-engineering applications. Generally four main image based approaches were used for virtual 3D city models generation. In first approach, researchers were used Sketch based modeling, second method is Procedural grammar based modeling, third approach is Close range photogrammetry based modeling and fourth approach is mainly based on Computer Vision techniques. SketchUp, CityEngine, Photomodeler and Agisoft Photoscan are the main softwares to represent these approaches respectively. These softwares have different approaches & methods suitable for image based 3D city modeling. Literature study shows that till date, there is no complete such type of comparative study available to create complete 3D city model by using images. This paper gives a comparative assessment of these four image based 3D modeling approaches. This comparative study is mainly based on data acquisition methods, data processing techniques and output 3D model products. For this research work, study area is the campus of civil engineering department, Indian Institute of Technology, Roorkee (India. This 3D campus acts as a prototype for city. This study also explains various governing parameters, factors and work experiences. This research work also gives a brief introduction, strengths and weakness of these four image based techniques. Some personal comment is also given as what can do or what can’t do from these softwares. At the last, this study shows; it concluded that, each and every software has some advantages and limitations. Choice of software depends on user requirements of 3D project. For normal visualization project, SketchUp software is a good option. For 3D documentation record, Photomodeler gives good

  8. Comparative assessment of PV plant performance models considering climate effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tina, Giuseppe; Ventura, Cristina; Sera, Dezso

    2017-01-01

    . The methodological approach is based on comparative tests of the analyzed models applied to two PV plants installed respectively in north of Denmark (Aalborg) and in the south of Italy (Agrigento). The different ambient, operating and installation conditions allow to understand how these factors impact the precision...

  9. a comparative study of models for correlated binary data with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    significance. Next, several subsets of predictors are compared through the AIC criterion, whenever applicable. Key words/phrases: Beta-binomial, bootstrap, correlated binary data, model selection, overdispersion. *. Current address: University of Hannover, Bioinformatic Unit, Herrenhauser Strasse 2, D-30419 Hannover, ...

  10. A comparative study of models for correlated binary data with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Various methods of modeling correlated binary data are compared as applied to data from health services research. The methods include the standard logistic regression, a simple adjustment of the standard errors of logistic regression by a single inflator, the weighted logistic regression, the generalized estimating equation ...

  11. Design of thermolabile bacteriophage repressor mutants by comparative molecular modeling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nauta, A; vandenBurg, B; Karsens, H; Venema, G; Kok, J; Burg, Bertus van den

    1997-01-01

    Comparative molecular modeling was performed with repressor protein Rro of the temperate Lactococcus lactis bacteriophage r1t using the known 3D-structures of related repressors in order to obtain thermolabile derivatives of Rro. Rro residues presumed to stabilize a nonhomologous but structurally

  12. Conceptualizations of Creativity: Comparing Theories and Models of Giftedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Angie L.

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews seven different theories of giftedness that include creativity as a component, comparing and contrasting how each one conceptualizes creativity as a part of giftedness. The functions of creativity vary across the models, suggesting that while the field of gifted education often cites the importance of creativity, the…

  13. Comparative analysis of Vening-Meinesz Moritz isostatic models ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We compare three different numerical schemes of treating the Moho density contrast in gravimetric inverse problems for finding the Moho depths. The results are validated using the global crustal model. CRUST2.0, which is determined based purely on seismic data. Firstly, the gravimetric recovery of the. Moho depths is ...

  14. Mathematical modelling of human growth: A comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Shumei; Siervogel, Roger M; Roche, Alex F; Chumlea, Wm Cameron

    1992-01-01

    Kernel regression is a nonparametric procedure that provides good approximations to individual serial data. The method is useful and flexible when a parametric method is inappropriate due to restricted assumptions on the shape of the curve. In the present study, we compared kernel regression in fitting human stature growth with two models, one of which incorporates the possible existence of the midgrowth spurt while the other does not. Two families of mathematical functions and a nonparametric kernel regression were fitted to serial measures of stature on 227 participants enrolled in the Fels Longitudinal Study. The growth parameters that describe the timing, magnitude, and duration of the growth spurt, such as midgrowth spurt and pubertal spurts, were derived from the fitted models and kernel regression for each participant. The two parametric models and kernel regression were compared in regard to their overall goodness of fit and their capabilities to quantify the timing, rate of increase, and duration of the growth events. The Preece-Baines model does not describe the midgrowth spurt. The dervied growth parameters from the Preece-Baines model show an earlier onset and a longer duration of the pubertal spurt, and a slower increase in velocity. The kernel regression with bandwidth 2 years and a second-order polynomial kernel function yields relatively good fits compared with the triple logistic model. The derived biological parameters for the pubertal spurt are similar between the kernel regression and the triple logistic model. Kernel regression estimates an earlier onset and a more rapid increase of velocity for the midgrowth spurt. Copyright © 1992 Wiley-Liss, Inc., A Wiley Company.

  15. Comparative modeling of InP solar cell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, R. K.; Weinberg, I.; Flood, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The comparative modeling of p(+)n and n(+)p indium phosphide solar cell structures is studied using a numerical program PC-1D. The optimal design study has predicted that the p(+)n structure offers improved cell efficiencies as compared to n(+)p structure, due to higher open-circuit voltage. The various cell material and process parameters to achieve the maximum cell efficiencies are reported. The effect of some of the cell parameters on InP cell I-V characteristics was studied. The available radiation resistance data on n(+)p and p(+)p InP solar cells are also critically discussed.

  16. Comparative testing of dark matter models with 15 HSB and 15 LSB galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kun, E.; Keresztes, Z.; Simkó, A.; Szűcs, G.; Gergely, L. Á.

    2017-12-01

    Context. We assemble a database of 15 high surface brightness (HSB) and 15 low surface brightness (LSB) galaxies, for which surface brightness density and spectroscopic rotation curve data are both available and representative for various morphologies. We use this dataset to test the Navarro-Frenk-White, the Einasto, and the pseudo-isothermal sphere dark matter models. Aims: We investigate the compatibility of the pure baryonic model and baryonic plus one of the three dark matter models with observations on the assembled galaxy database. When a dark matter component improves the fit with the spectroscopic rotational curve, we rank the models according to the goodness of fit to the datasets. Methods: We constructed the spatial luminosity density of the baryonic component based on the surface brightness profile of the galaxies. We estimated the mass-to-light (M/L) ratio of the stellar component through a previously proposed color-mass-to-light ratio relation (CMLR), which yields stellar masses independent of the photometric band. We assumed an axissymetric baryonic mass model with variable axis ratios together with one of the three dark matter models to provide the theoretical rotational velocity curves, and we compared them with the dataset. In a second attempt, we addressed the question whether the dark component could be replaced by a pure baryonic model with fitted M/L ratios, varied over ranges consistent with CMLR relations derived from the available stellar population models. We employed the Akaike information criterion to establish the performance of the best-fit models. Results: For 7 galaxies (2 HSB and 5 LSB), neither model fits the dataset within the 1σ confidence level. For the other 23 cases, one of the models with dark matter explains the rotation curve data best. According to the Akaike information criterion, the pseudo-isothermal sphere emerges as most favored in 14 cases, followed by the Navarro-Frenk-White (6 cases) and the Einasto (3 cases) dark

  17. Comparing Neural Networks and ARMA Models in Artificial Stock Market

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Krtek, Jiří; Vošvrda, Miloslav

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 28 (2011), s. 53-65 ISSN 1212-074X R&D Projects: GA ČR GD402/09/H045 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : neural networks * vector ARMA * artificial market Subject RIV: AH - Economics http://library.utia.cas.cz/separaty/2011/E/krtek-comparing neural networks and arma models in artificial stock market.pdf

  18. Estimating, Testing, and Comparing Specific Effects in Structural Equation Models: The Phantom Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Siegfried; Ledermann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The phantom model approach for estimating, testing, and comparing specific effects within structural equation models (SEMs) is presented. The rationale underlying this novel method consists in representing the specific effect to be assessed as a total effect within a separate latent variable model, the phantom model that is added to the main…

  19. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism: a comparative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiren Karathia

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Model organisms are used for research because they provide a framework on which to develop and optimize methods that facilitate and standardize analysis. Such organisms should be representative of the living beings for which they are to serve as proxy. However, in practice, a model organism is often selected ad hoc, and without considering its representativeness, because a systematic and rational method to include this consideration in the selection process is still lacking. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this work we propose such a method and apply it in a pilot study of strengths and limitations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism. The method relies on the functional classification of proteins into different biological pathways and processes and on full proteome comparisons between the putative model organism and other organisms for which we would like to extrapolate results. Here we compare S. cerevisiae to 704 other organisms from various phyla. For each organism, our results identify the pathways and processes for which S. cerevisiae is predicted to be a good model to extrapolate from. We find that animals in general and Homo sapiens in particular are some of the non-fungal organisms for which S. cerevisiae is likely to be a good model in which to study a significant fraction of common biological processes. We validate our approach by correctly predicting which organisms are phenotypically more distant from S. cerevisiae with respect to several different biological processes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The method we propose could be used to choose appropriate substitute model organisms for the study of biological processes in other species that are harder to study. For example, one could identify appropriate models to study either pathologies in humans or specific biological processes in species with a long development time, such as plants.

  20. Atterberg Limits Prediction Comparing SVM with ANFIS Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Murtaza Sherzoy

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Support Vector Machine (SVM and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy inference Systems (ANFIS both analytical methods are used to predict the values of Atterberg limits, such as the liquid limit, plastic limit and plasticity index. The main objective of this study is to make a comparison between both forecasts (SVM & ANFIS methods. All data of 54 soil samples are used and taken from the area of Peninsular Malaysian and tested for different parameters containing liquid limit, plastic limit, plasticity index and grain size distribution and were. The input parameter used in for this case are the fraction of grain size distribution which are the percentage of silt, clay and sand. The actual and predicted values of Atterberg limit which obtained from the SVM and ANFIS models are compared by using the correlation coefficient R2 and root mean squared error (RMSE value.  The outcome of the study show that the ANFIS model shows higher accuracy than SVM model for the liquid limit (R2 = 0.987, plastic limit (R2 = 0.949 and plastic index (R2 = 0966. RMSE value that obtained for both methods have shown that the ANFIS model has represent the best performance than SVM model to predict the Atterberg Limits as a whole.

  1. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON MAIN SOLVENCY ASSESSMENT MODELS FOR INSURANCE FIELD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Nicoleta SAHLIAN

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available During the recent financial crisis of insurance domain, there were imposed new aspects that have to be taken into account concerning the risks management and surveillance activity. The insurance societies could develop internal models in order to determine the minimum capital requirement imposed by the new regulations that are to be adopted on 1 January 2016. In this respect, the purpose of this research paper is to offer a real presentation and comparing with the main solvency regulation systems used worldwide, the accent being on their common characteristics and current tendencies. Thereby, we would like to offer a better understanding of the similarities and differences between the existent solvency regimes in order to develop the best regime of solvency for Romania within the Solvency II project. The study will show that there are clear differences between the existent Solvency I regime and the new approaches based on risk and will also point out the fact that even the key principles supporting the new solvency regimes are convergent, there are a lot of approaches for the application of these principles. In this context, the question we would try to find the answer is "how could the global solvency models be useful for the financial surveillance authority of Romania for the implementation of general model and for the development of internal solvency models according to the requirements of Solvency II" and "which would be the requirements for the implementation of this type of approach?". This thing makes the analysis of solvency models an interesting exercise.

  2. Cognitive models of choice: comparing decision field theory to the proportional difference model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheibehenne, Benjamin; Rieskamp, Jörg; González-Vallejo, Claudia

    2009-07-01

    People often face preferential decisions under risk. To further our understanding of the cognitive processes underlying these preferential choices, two prominent cognitive models, decision field theory (DFT; Busemeyer & Townsend, 1993) and the proportional difference model (PD; González-Vallejo, 2002), were rigorously tested against each other. In two consecutive experiments, the participants repeatedly had to choose between monetary gambles. The first experiment provided the reference to estimate the models' free parameters. From these estimations, new gamble pairs were generated for the second experiment such that the two models made maximally divergent predictions. In the first experiment, both models explained the data equally well. However, in the second generalization experiment, the participants' choices were much closer to the predictions of DFT. The results indicate that the stochastic process assumed by DFT, in which evidence in favor of or against each option accumulates over time, described people's choice behavior better than the trade-offs between proportional differences assumed by PD. Copyright © 2009 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  3. Comparing pharmacophore models derived from crystallography and NMR ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanakota, Phani; Carlson, Heather A.

    2017-11-01

    NMR and X-ray crystallography are the two most widely used methods for determining protein structures. Our previous study examining NMR versus X-Ray sources of protein conformations showed improved performance with NMR structures when used in our Multiple Protein Structures (MPS) method for receptor-based pharmacophores (Damm, Carlson, J Am Chem Soc 129:8225-8235, 2007). However, that work was based on a single test case, HIV-1 protease, because of the rich data available for that system. New data for more systems are available now, which calls for further examination of the effect of different sources of protein conformations. The MPS technique was applied to Growth factor receptor bound protein 2 (Grb2), Src SH2 homology domain (Src-SH2), FK506-binding protein 1A (FKBP12), and Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ). Pharmacophore models from both crystal and NMR ensembles were able to discriminate between high-affinity, low-affinity, and decoy molecules. As we found in our original study, NMR models showed optimal performance when all elements were used. The crystal models had more pharmacophore elements compared to their NMR counterparts. The crystal-based models exhibited optimum performance only when pharmacophore elements were dropped. This supports our assertion that the higher flexibility in NMR ensembles helps focus the models on the most essential interactions with the protein. Our studies suggest that the "extra" pharmacophore elements seen at the periphery in X-ray models arise as a result of decreased protein flexibility and make very little contribution to model performance.

  4. Ionospheric topside models compared with experimental electron density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Radicella

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently an increasing number of topside electron density profiles has been made available to the scientific community on the Internet. These data are important for ionospheric modeling purposes, since the experimental information on the electron density above the ionosphere maximum of ionization is very scarce. The present work compares NeQuick and IRI models with the topside electron density profiles available in the databases of the ISIS2, IK19 and Cosmos 1809 satellites. Experimental electron content from the F2 peak up to satellite height and electron densities at fixed heights above the peak have been compared under a wide range of different conditions. The analysis performed points out the behavior of the models and the improvements needed to be assessed to have a better reproduction of the experimental results. NeQuick topside is a modified Epstein layer, with thickness parameter determined by an empirical relation. It appears that its performance is strongly affected by this parameter, indicating the need for improvements of its formulation. IRI topside is based on Booker's approach to consider two parts with constant height gradients. It appears that this formulation leads to an overestimation of the electron density in the upper part of the profiles, and overestimation of TEC.

  5. Comparing Productivity Simulated with Inventory Data Using Different Modelling Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopf, M.; Pietsch, S. A.; Hasenauer, H.

    2009-04-01

    The Lime Stone National Park in Austria was established in 1997 to protect sensible lime stone soils from degradation due to heavy forest management. Since 1997 the management activities were successively reduced and standing volume and coarse woody debris (CWD) increased and degraded soils began to recover. One option to study the rehabilitation process towards natural virgin forest state is the use of modelling technology. In this study we will test two different modelling approaches for their applicability to Lime Stone National Park. We will compare standing tree volume simulated resulting from (i) the individual tree growth model MOSES, and (ii) the species and management sensitive adaptation of the biogeochemical-mechanistic model Biome-BGC. The results from the two models are compared with filed observations form repeated permanent forest inventory plots of the Lime Stone National Park in Austria. The simulated CWD predictions of the BGC-model were compared with dead wood measurements (standing and lying dead wood) recorded at the permanent inventory plots. The inventory was established between 1994 and 1996 and remeasured from 2004 to 2005. For this analysis 40 plots of this inventory were selected which comprise the required dead wood components and are dominated by a single tree species. First we used the distance dependant individual tree growth model MOSES to derive the standing timber and the amount of mortality per hectare. MOSES is initialized with the inventory data at plot establishment and each sampling plot is treated as forest stand. The Biome-BGC is a process based biogeochemical model with extensions for Austrian tree species, a self initialization and a forest management tool. The initialization for the actual simulations with the BGC model was done as follows: We first used spin up runs to derive a balanced forest vegetation, similar to an undisturbed forest. Next we considered the management history of the past centuries (heavy clear cuts

  6. A Two-Step Model for Assessing Relative Interest in E-Books Compared to Print

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knowlton, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Librarians often wish to know whether readers in a particular discipline favor e-books or print books. Because print circulation and e-book usage statistics are not directly comparable, it can be hard to determine the relative interest of readers in the two types of books. This study demonstrates a two-step method by which librarians can assess…

  7. Domain analysis and modeling to improve comparability of health statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, M; Hashimoto, H; Ohida, T

    2001-01-01

    Health statistics is an essential element to improve the ability of managers of health institutions, healthcare researchers, policy makers, and health professionals to formulate appropriate course of reactions and to make decisions based on evidence. To ensure adequate health statistics, standards are of critical importance. A study on healthcare statistics domain analysis is underway in an effort to improve usability and comparability of health statistics. The ongoing study focuses on structuring the domain knowledge and making the knowledge explicit with a data element dictionary being the core. Supplemental to the dictionary are a domain term list, a terminology dictionary, and a data model to help organize the concepts constituting the health statistics domain.

  8. Comparing Numerical and Analog Models of Oblique Convergence With Nature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koster, K.; Haq, S. S.; Flesch, L. M.

    2011-12-01

    Relative plate motion at convergent plate boundaries is rarely perfectly margin-normal, instead it typically exhibits some obliquity to the overlying plate. The resulting margin-parallel component of plate motion can have a considerable influence in determining the distribution and style of large-scale deformation at the margin. In accretionary prisms and fold and thrust belts oblique plate motion and the resulting deformation frequently results in spatially segregated dip-slip and strike-slip faulting in the deforming wedge. Analog modeling has demonstrated that the type of shearing structures that occur in response to this motion is strongly correlated with the vertical variation in rheology, where ductile layers at depth will localize strike-slip deformation. Additionally, we have performed numerical simulations where we solve force-balance equations for Stokes flow for oblique wedges with similar geometries and rheologies using the finite element software COMSOL. Using frictional and layered, frictional over viscous, rheologies we further constrain the role that rheological complexity plays in determining the style and distribution of deformation and of stress. In our numerical models, we have simulated a range of obliquities as well as layered rheologies to determine internal stresses in actively deforming wedges. Results from our numerical experiments are in agreement with available kinematic data from comparable analog experiments, suggesting our numerical method is also viable and suitable for modeling natural settings. Numerical models that simulated frictional wedges were characterized by diffusely distributed shear throughout the pro-wedge at low obliquities, and weakly partitioned strain, similar to analog results. However, the localization of shear in rheologically complex numerical models occurred across a narrower zone at comparable obliquities in both numerical and analog results, corresponding to the location where there the transition in basal

  9. THE FLAT TAX - A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE EXISTING MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schiau (Macavei Laura - Liana

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In the two last decades the flat tax systems have spread all around the globe from East and Central Europe to Asia and Central America. Many specialists consider this phenomenon a real fiscal revolution, but others see it as a mistake as long as the new systems are just a feint of the true flat tax designed by the famous Stanford University professors Robert Hall and Alvin Rabushka. In this context this paper tries to determine which of the existing flat tax systems resemble the true flat tax model by comparing and contrasting their main characteristics with the features of the model proposed by Hall and Rabushka. The research also underlines the common features and the differences between the existing models. The idea of this kind of study is not really new, others have done it but the comparison was limited to one country. For example Emil Kalchev from New Bulgarian University has asses the Bulgarian income system, by comparing it with the flat tax and concluding that taxation in Bulgaria is not simple, neutral and non-distortive. Our research is based on several case studies and on compare and contrast qualitative and quantitative methods. The study starts form the fiscal design drawn by the two American professors in the book The Flat Tax. Four main characteristics of the flat tax system were chosen in order to build the comparison: fiscal design, simplicity, avoidance of double taxation and uniformity of the tax rates. The jurisdictions chosen for the case study are countries all around the globe with fiscal systems which are considered flat tax systems. The results obtained show that the fiscal design of Hong Kong is the only flat tax model which is built following an economic logic and not a legal sense, being in the same time a simple and transparent system. Others countries as Slovakia, Albania, Macedonia in Central and Eastern Europe fulfill the requirement regarding the uniformity of taxation. Other jurisdictions avoid the double

  10. Comparative examination of two methods for modeling autoimmune uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana V. Aksenova

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Uveitis is a disease of the uveal tract, characterized by a variety of causes and clinical manifestations. The internal antigens prevail often in the pathogenesis of the disease and develop the so-called autoimmune reactions. The uveitis treatment has an important medico-social significance because of the high prevalence of uveitis, the significant rate of the disease in young people, and high disability. The article compares the efficiency of two methods for modeling autoimmune uveitis. Materials and Methods: The research was conducted on 6 rabbits of the Chinchilla breed (12 eyes. Two models of experimental uveitis were reproduced on rabbits using normal horse serum during the research. A clinical examination of the inflammatory process course in the eyes was carried out by biomicroscopy using a slit lamp, and a direct ophthalmoscope. Histological and immunological examinations were conducted by the authors of the article. Results: The faster-reproducing and vivid clinical picture of the disease was observed in the second group. The obvious changes in the immunological status of the animals were noted also: an increase in the number of leukocytes, neutrophils, HCT-active neutrophils, and activation of phagocytosis. Discussion and Conclusions: The research has showed that the second model of uveitis is the most convenient working variant, which is characterized by high activity and duration of the inflammatory process in the eye.

  11. Curriculum inventory: Modeling, sharing and comparing medical education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Albright, Susan; Smothers, Valerie; Cameron, Terri; Willett, Timothy

    2014-03-01

    Abstract descriptions of how curricula are structured and run. The American National Standards Institute (ANSI) MedBiquitous Curriculum Inventory Standard provides a technical syntax through which a wide range of different curricula can be expressed and subsequently compared and analyzed. This standard has the potential to shift curriculum mapping and reporting from a somewhat disjointed and institution-specific undertaking to something that is shared among multiple medical schools and across whole medical education systems. Given the current explosion of different models of curricula (time-free, competency-based, socially accountable, distributed, accelerated, etc.), the ability to consider this diversity using a common model has particular value in medical education management and scholarship. This article describes the development and structure of the Curriculum Inventory Standard as a way of standardizing the modeling of different curricula for audit, evaluation and research purposes. It also considers the strengths and limitations of the current standard and the implications for a medical education world in which this level of commonality, precision, and accountability for curricular practice is the norm rather than the exception.

  12. Appeals court reverses verdict favoring drug companies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-06-02

    An appeals court reversed a verdict favoring drug companies after the widow of a hemophiliac, whose death was linked to HIV-tainted blood products, sued four pharmaceutical companies to pay damages. The four companies, Alpha Therapeutic Corp., Miles Laboratories Inc., Armour Pharmaceutical Co., and Baxter Travenol Laboratories Inc., provided Factor VIII, a clotting concentrate, to [name removed] [name removed], the plaintiff's husband, from 1972 until his death in 1987. [Name removed]'s wife sued the companies, alleging that the defendants negligently solicited blood plasma from paid donors who had a high risk of having HIV, failed to determine whether any lots of Factor VIII contained plasma from an at-risk donor, failed to warn consumers of possible risks, and failed to heat-treat HIV and other viruses in Factor VIII, despite industry-wide knowledge of the risk of infection. The three-judge panel said the trial judge's decision to avoid ruling on the antigenic stimulation theory, based on insufficient evidence, was improper. In addition, the appeals court said a retrial is necessary because of improper remarks made by Alpha's attorney.

  13. Children's need for favorable acoustics in schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Peggy B.

    2003-10-01

    Children continue to improve their understanding of speech in noise and reverberation throughout childhood and adolescence. They do not typically achieve adult performance levels until their late teenage years. As a result, schools that are designed to be acoustically adequate for adult understanding may be insufficient for full understanding by young children. In addition, children with hearing loss, those with attention problems, and those learning in a non-native language require even more favorable signal-to-noise ratios. This tutorial will review the literature gathered by the ANSl/ASA working group on classroom acoustics that shaped the recommendations of the working group. Special topics will include speech perception data from typically developing infants and children, from children with hearing loss, and from adults and children listening in a non-native language. In addition, the tutorial will overview recommendations contained within ANSI standard 12.60-2002: Acoustical Performance Criteria, Design Requirements, and Guidelines for Schools. The discussion will also include issues related to designing quiet classrooms and working with local schools and professionals.

  14. Comparing Transformation Possibilities of Topological Functioning Model and BPMN in the Context of Model Driven Architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solomencevs Artūrs

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The approach called “Topological Functioning Model for Software Engineering” (TFM4SE applies the Topological Functioning Model (TFM for modelling the business system in the context of Model Driven Architecture. TFM is a mathematically formal computation independent model (CIM. TFM4SE is compared to an approach that uses BPMN as a CIM. The comparison focuses on CIM modelling and on transformation to UML Sequence diagram on the platform independent (PIM level. The results show the advantages and drawbacks the formalism of TFM brings into the development.

  15. A comparative study of machine learning models for ethnicity classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trivedi, Advait; Bessie Amali, D. Geraldine

    2017-11-01

    This paper endeavours to adopt a machine learning approach to solve the problem of ethnicity recognition. Ethnicity identification is an important vision problem with its use cases being extended to various domains. Despite the multitude of complexity involved, ethnicity identification comes naturally to humans. This meta information can be leveraged to make several decisions, be it in target marketing or security. With the recent development of intelligent systems a sub module to efficiently capture ethnicity would be useful in several use cases. Several attempts to identify an ideal learning model to represent a multi-ethnic dataset have been recorded. A comparative study of classifiers such as support vector machines, logistic regression has been documented. Experimental results indicate that the logical classifier provides a much accurate classification than the support vector machine.

  16. Medaka: a promising model animal for comparative population genomics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watanabe Koji

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Within-species genome diversity has been best studied in humans. The international HapMap project has revealed a tremendous amount of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs among humans, many of which show signals of positive selection during human evolution. In most of the cases, however, functional differences between the alleles remain experimentally unverified due to the inherent difficulty of human genetic studies. It would therefore be highly useful to have a vertebrate model with the following characteristics: (1 high within-species genetic diversity, (2 a variety of gene-manipulation protocols already developed, and (3 a completely sequenced genome. Medaka (Oryzias latipes and its congeneric species, tiny fresh-water teleosts distributed broadly in East and Southeast Asia, meet these criteria. Findings Using Oryzias species from 27 local populations, we conducted a simple screening of nonsynonymous SNPs for 11 genes with apparent orthology between medaka and humans. We found medaka SNPs for which the same sites in human orthologs are known to be highly differentiated among the HapMap populations. Importantly, some of these SNPs show signals of positive selection. Conclusion These results indicate that medaka is a promising model system for comparative population genomics exploring the functional and adaptive significance of allelic differentiations.

  17. Static response of deformable microchannels: a comparative modelling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shidhore, Tanmay C.; Christov, Ivan C.

    2018-02-01

    We present a comparative modelling study of fluid–structure interactions in microchannels. Through a mathematical analysis based on plate theory and the lubrication approximation for low-Reynolds-number flow, we derive models for the flow rate-pressure drop relation for long shallow microchannels with both thin and thick deformable top walls. These relations are tested against full three-dimensional two-way-coupled fluid–structure interaction simulations. Three types of microchannels, representing different elasticity regimes and having been experimentally characterized previously, are chosen as benchmarks for our theory and simulations. Good agreement is found in most cases for the predicted, simulated and measured flow rate-pressure drop relationships. The numerical simulations performed allow us to also carefully examine the deformation profile of the top wall of the microchannel in any cross section, showing good agreement with the theory. Specifically, the prediction that span-wise displacement in a long shallow microchannel decouples from the flow-wise deformation is confirmed, and the predicted scaling of the maximum displacement with the hydrodynamic pressure and the various material and geometric parameters is validated.

  18. Catalytically favorable surface patterns in Pt-Au nanoclusters

    KAUST Repository

    Mokkath, Junais Habeeb

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by recent experimental demonstrations of novel PtAu nanoparticles with highly enhanced catalytic properties, we present a systematic theoretical study that explores principal catalytic indicators as a function of the particle size and composition. We find that Pt electronic states in the vicinity of the Fermi level combined with a modified electron distribution in the nanoparticle due to Pt-to-Au charge transfer are the origin of the outstanding catalytic properties. From our model we deduce the catalytically favorable surface patterns that induce ensemble and ligand effects. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2013.

  19. Does PEEK/HA Enhance Bone Formation Compared With PEEK in a Sheep Cervical Fusion Model?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, William R; Pelletier, Matthew H; Bertollo, Nicky; Christou, Chris; Tan, Chris

    2016-11-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has a wide range of clinical applications but does not directly bond to bone. Bulk incorporation of osteoconductive materials including hydroxyapatite (HA) into the PEEK matrix is a potential solution to address the formation of a fibrous tissue layer between PEEK and bone and has not been tested. Using in vivo ovine animal models, we asked: (1) Does PEEK-HA improve cortical and cancellous bone ongrowth compared with PEEK? (2) Does PEEK-HA improve bone ongrowth and fusion outcome in a more challenging functional ovine cervical fusion model? The in vivo responses of PEEK-HA Enhanced and PEEK-OPTIMA ® Natural were evaluated for bone ongrowth in the form of dowels implanted in the cancellous and cortical bone of adult sheep and examined at 4 and 12 weeks as well as interbody cervical fusion at 6, 12, and 26 weeks. The bone-implant interface was evaluated with radiographic and histologic endpoints for a qualitative assessment of direct bone contact of an intervening fibrous tissue later. Gamma-irradiated cortical allograft cages were evaluated as well. Incorporating HA into the PEEK matrix resulted in more direct bone apposition as opposed to the fibrous tissue interface with PEEK alone in the bone ongrowth as well as interbody cervical fusions. No adverse reactions were found at the implant-bone interface for either material. Radiography and histology revealed resorption and fracture of the allograft devices in vivo. Incorporating HA into PEEK provides a more favorable environment than PEEK alone for bone ongrowth. Cervical fusion was improved with PEEK-HA compared with PEEK alone as well as allograft bone interbody devices. Improving the bone-implant interface with a PEEK device by incorporating HA may improve interbody fusion results and requires further clinical studies.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Some Crop Yield Prediction Models ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A computer program was adopted from the work of Hill et al. (1982) to calibrate and test three of the existing yield prediction models using tropical cowpea yieldÐweather data. The models tested were Hanks Model (first and second versions). Stewart Model (first and second versions) and HallÐButcher Model. Three sets of ...

  1. Comparative Evaluation of Some Crop Yield Prediction Models ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    (1982) to calibrate and test three of the existing yield prediction models using tropical cowpea yieldÐweather data. The models tested were Hanks Model (first and second versions). Stewart Model (first and second versions) and HallÐButcher Model. Three sets of cowpea yield-water use and weather data were collected.

  2. Comparing interval estimates for small sample ordinal CFA models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natesan, Prathiba

    2015-01-01

    Robust maximum likelihood (RML) and asymptotically generalized least squares (AGLS) methods have been recommended for fitting ordinal structural equation models. Studies show that some of these methods underestimate standard errors. However, these studies have not investigated the coverage and bias of interval estimates. An estimate with a reasonable standard error could still be severely biased. This can only be known by systematically investigating the interval estimates. The present study compares Bayesian, RML, and AGLS interval estimates of factor correlations in ordinal confirmatory factor analysis models (CFA) for small sample data. Six sample sizes, 3 factor correlations, and 2 factor score distributions (multivariate normal and multivariate mildly skewed) were studied. Two Bayesian prior specifications, informative and relatively less informative were studied. Undercoverage of confidence intervals and underestimation of standard errors was common in non-Bayesian methods. Underestimated standard errors may lead to inflated Type-I error rates. Non-Bayesian intervals were more positive biased than negatively biased, that is, most intervals that did not contain the true value were greater than the true value. Some non-Bayesian methods had non-converging and inadmissible solutions for small samples and non-normal data. Bayesian empirical standard error estimates for informative and relatively less informative priors were closer to the average standard errors of the estimates. The coverage of Bayesian credibility intervals was closer to what was expected with overcoverage in a few cases. Although some Bayesian credibility intervals were wider, they reflected the nature of statistical uncertainty that comes with the data (e.g., small sample). Bayesian point estimates were also more accurate than non-Bayesian estimates. The results illustrate the importance of analyzing coverage and bias of interval estimates, and how ignoring interval estimates can be misleading

  3. COMPAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuefner, K.

    1976-01-01

    COMPAR works on FORTRAN arrays with four indices: A = A(i,j,k,l) where, for each fixed k 0 ,l 0 , only the 'plane' [A(i,j,k 0 ,l 0 ), i = 1, isub(max), j = 1, jsub(max)] is held in fast memory. Given two arrays A, B of this type COMPAR has the capability to 1) re-norm A and B ind different ways; 2) calculate the deviations epsilon defined as epsilon(i,j,k,l): =[A(i,j,k,l) - B(i,j,k,l)] / GEW(i,j,k,l) where GEW (i,j,k,l) may be chosen in three different ways; 3) calculate mean, standard deviation and maximum in the array epsilon (by several intermediate stages); 4) determine traverses in the array epsilon; 5) plot these traverses by a printer; 6) simplify plots of these traverses by the PLOTEASY-system by creating input data blocks for this system. The main application of COMPAR is given (so far) by the comparison of two- and three-dimensional multigroup neutron flux-fields. (orig.) [de

  4. `Dem DEMs: Comparing Methods of Digital Elevation Model Creation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezza, C.; Phillips, C. B.; Cable, M. L.

    2017-12-01

    Topographic details of Europa's surface yield implications for large-scale processes that occur on the moon, including surface strength, modification, composition, and formation mechanisms for geologic features. In addition, small scale details presented from this data are imperative for future exploration of Europa's surface, such as by a potential Europa Lander mission. A comparison of different methods of Digital Elevation Model (DEM) creation and variations between them can help us quantify the relative accuracy of each model and improve our understanding of Europa's surface. In this work, we used data provided by Phillips et al. (2013, AGU Fall meeting, abs. P34A-1846) and Schenk and Nimmo (2017, in prep.) to compare DEMs that were created using Ames Stereo Pipeline (ASP), SOCET SET, and Paul Schenk's own method. We began by locating areas of the surface with multiple overlapping DEMs, and our initial comparisons were performed near the craters Manannan, Pwyll, and Cilix. For each region, we used ArcGIS to draw profile lines across matching features to determine elevation. Some of the DEMs had vertical or skewed offsets, and thus had to be corrected. The vertical corrections were applied by adding or subtracting the global minimum of the data set to create a common zero-point. The skewed data sets were corrected by rotating the plot so that it had a global slope of zero and then subtracting for a zero-point vertical offset. Once corrections were made, we plotted the three methods on one graph for each profile of each region. Upon analysis, we found relatively good feature correlation between the three methods. The smoothness of a DEM depends on both the input set of images and the stereo processing methods used. In our comparison, the DEMs produced by SOCET SET were less smoothed than those from ASP or Schenk. Height comparisons show that ASP and Schenk's model appear similar, alternating in maximum height. SOCET SET has more topographic variability due to its

  5. Comparing Entrepreneurship Intention: A Multigroup Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina O. Sihombing

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Unemployment is one of the main social and economic problems that many countries face nowadays. One strategic way to overcome this problem is by fostering entrepreneurship spirit especially for unem-ployment graduates. Entrepreneurship is becoming an alternative Job for students after they graduate. This is because entrepreneurship of fers major benefits, such as setting up one’s own business and the pos sibility of having significant financial rewards than working for others. Entrepreneurship is then offered by many universities. This research applies the theory of planned behavior (TPB by incorporating attitude toward success as an antecedent variable of the attitude to examine students’ intention to become an entrepreneur. The objective of this research is to compare entrepreneurship intention between business students and non-business students. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data for this study. Questionnaires were distributed to respondents by applying the drop-off/pick-up method. A number of 294 by questionnaires were used in the analysis. Data were analyzed by using structural equation modeling. Two out of four hypotheses were confirmed. These hypotheses are the relationship between the attitude toward becoming an entrepreneur and the intention to try becoming an entrepreneur, and the relationship perceived behavioral control and intention to try becoming an entrepreneur. This paper also provides a discussion and offers directions for future research.

  6. Comparing Entrepreneurship Intention: A Multigroup Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sabrina O. Sihombing

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Unemployment is one of the main social and economic problems that many countries face nowadays. One strategic way to overcome this problem is by fostering entrepreneurship spirit especially for unem ployment graduates. Entrepreneurship is becoming an alternative Job for students after they graduate. This is because entrepreneurship of-fers major benefits, such as setting up one’s own business and the pos-sibility of having significant financial rewards than working for others. Entrepreneurship is then offered by many universities. This research applies the theory of planned behavior (TPB by incorporating attitude toward success as an antecedent variable of the attitude to examine students’ intention to become an entrepreneur. The objective of this research is to compare entrepreneurship intention between business students and non-business students. A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data for this study. Questionnaires were distributed to respondents by applying the drop-off/pick-up method. A number of 294 by questionnaires were used in the analysis. Data were analyzed by using structural equation modeling. Two out of four hypotheses were confirmed. These hypotheses are the relationship between the attitude toward becoming an entrepreneur and the intention to try becoming an entrepreneur, and the relationship perceived behavioral control and intention to try becoming an entrepreneur. This paper also provides a discussion and offers directions for future research.

  7. Donepezil regulates energy metabolism and favors bone mass accrual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eimar, Hazem; Alebrahim, Sharifa; Manickam, Garthiga; Al-Subaie, Ahmed; Abu-Nada, Lina; Murshed, Monzur; Tamimi, Faleh

    2016-03-01

    The autonomous nervous system regulates bone mass through the sympathetic and parasympathetic arms. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) favors bone loss whereas the parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) promotes bone mass accrual. Donepezil, a central-acting cholinergic agonist, has been shown to down-regulate SNS and up-regulate PNS signaling tones. Accordingly, we hypothesize that the use of donepezil could have beneficial effects in regulating bone mass. To test our hypothesis, two groups of healthy female mice were treated either with donepezil or saline. Differences in body metabolism and bone mass of the treated groups were compared. Body and visceral fat weights as well as serum leptin level were increased in donepezil-treated mice compared to control, suggesting that donepezil effects on SNS influenced metabolic activity. Donepezil-treated mice had better bone quality than controls due to a decrease in osteoclasts number. These results indicate that donepezil is able to affect whole body energy metabolism and favors bone mass in young female WT mice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Comparative analysis of business rules and business process modeling languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Audrius Rima

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available During developing an information system is important to create clear models and choose suitable modeling languages. The article analyzes the SRML, SBVR, PRR, SWRL, OCL rules specifying language and UML, DFD, CPN, EPC and IDEF3 BPMN business process modeling language. The article presents business rules and business process modeling languages theoretical comparison. The article according to selected modeling aspects of the comparison between different business process modeling languages ​​and business rules representation languages sets. Also, it is selected the best fit of language set for three layer framework for business rule based software modeling.

  9. GEOQUIMICO : an interactive tool for comparing sorption conceptual models (surface complexation modeling versus K[D])

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammond, Glenn E.; Cygan, Randall Timothy

    2007-01-01

    Within reactive geochemical transport, several conceptual models exist for simulating sorption processes in the subsurface. Historically, the K D approach has been the method of choice due to ease of implementation within a reactive transport model and straightforward comparison with experimental data. However, for modeling complex sorption phenomenon (e.g. sorption of radionuclides onto mineral surfaces), this approach does not systematically account for variations in location, time, or chemical conditions, and more sophisticated methods such as a surface complexation model (SCM) must be utilized. It is critical to determine which conceptual model to use; that is, when the material variation becomes important to regulatory decisions. The geochemical transport tool GEOQUIMICO has been developed to assist in this decision-making process. GEOQUIMICO provides a user-friendly framework for comparing the accuracy and performance of sorption conceptual models. The model currently supports the K D and SCM conceptual models. The code is written in the object-oriented Java programming language to facilitate model development and improve code portability. The basic theory underlying geochemical transport and the sorption conceptual models noted above is presented in this report. Explanations are provided of how these physicochemical processes are instrumented in GEOQUIMICO and a brief verification study comparing GEOQUIMICO results to data found in the literature is given

  10. Balancing selection favors guarding resistance proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoorn, Van der R.A.L.; Wit, De P.J.G.M.; Joosten, M.H.A.J.

    2002-01-01

    The co-evolutionary arms race model for plant–pathogen interactions implies that resistance (R) genes are relatively young and monomorphic. However, recent reports show R gene longevity and co-existence of multiple R genes in natural populations. This indicates that R genes are maintained by

  11. Predicting the fate of biodiversity using species' distribution models: enhancing model comparability and repeatability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Genoveva Rodríguez-Castañeda

    Full Text Available Species distribution modeling (SDM is an increasingly important tool to predict the geographic distribution of species. Even though many problems associated with this method have been highlighted and solutions have been proposed, little has been done to increase comparability among studies. We reviewed recent publications applying SDMs and found that seventy nine percent failed to report methods that ensure comparability among studies, such as disclosing the maximum probability range produced by the models and reporting on the number of species occurrences used. We modeled six species of Falco from northern Europe and demonstrate that model results are altered by (1 spatial bias in species' occurrence data, (2 differences in the geographic extent of the environmental data, and (3 the effects of transformation of model output to presence/absence data when applying thresholds. Depending on the modeling decisions, forecasts of the future geographic distribution of Falco ranged from range contraction in 80% of the species to no net loss in any species, with the best model predicting no net loss of habitat in Northern Europe. The fact that predictions of range changes in response to climate change in published studies may be influenced by decisions in the modeling process seriously hampers the possibility of making sound management recommendations. Thus, each of the decisions made in generating SDMs should be reported and evaluated to ensure conclusions and policies are based on the biology and ecology of the species being modeled.

  12. A Comparative Metroscope Model for Urban Information Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, J. H.; Shandas, V.; Beaudoin, F.

    2011-12-01

    One of the most promising ways to achieve global sustainability goals of climate stabilization, poverty reduction, and biodiversity preservation is to make the world's cities more efficient, equitable, and healthful. While each city must follow a unique and somewhat idiosyncratic path toward these linked goals based on its history, geography, demography, and politics, movement in this direction can accelerate if cities can learn from each other more effectively. Such learning requires the identification of common characteristics and methodologies. We have created a framework for organizing and applying urban information flows, which we refer to as "Metroscopes." Metroscopes, which are analogous to the large instruments that have advanced the physical and life sciences, integrate six elements: data collection and input; classification through the use of metrics; data storage and retrieval; analytics and modeling; decision support including visualization and scenario generation; and assessment of the effectiveness of policy choices. Standards for each of these elements can be agreed upon by relevant urban science and policy sub-communities, and then can evolve as technologies and practices advance. We are implementing and calibrating this approach using data and relationships from Portland (OR), Phoenix (AZ) and London (UK). Elements that are being integrated include the Global City Indicators Facility at University of Toronto, the J-Earth database system and Decision Theater from Arizona State University, urban mobility analyses performed by the SENSEable City Lab at MIT, and Portland's Ecodistrict approach for urban management. Individual Metroscopes can be compared directly from one city to another, or with larger assemblages of cities like those being classified by ICLEI's STAR program, the Clinton Climate Initiative's C40, and Siemens Green Cities Index. This large-scale integration of urban data sets and approaches and its systematic comparison are key steps

  13. Lithium-ion battery models: a comparative study and a model-based powerline communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Saidani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this work, various Lithium-ion (Li-ion battery models are evaluated according to their accuracy, complexity and physical interpretability. An initial classification into physical, empirical and abstract models is introduced. Also known as white, black and grey boxes, respectively, the nature and characteristics of these model types are compared. Since the Li-ion battery cell is a thermo-electro-chemical system, the models are either in the thermal or in the electrochemical state-space. Physical models attempt to capture key features of the physical process inside the cell. Empirical models describe the system with empirical parameters offering poor analytical, whereas abstract models provide an alternative representation. In addition, a model selection guideline is proposed based on applications and design requirements. A complex model with a detailed analytical insight is of use for battery designers but impractical for real-time applications and in situ diagnosis. In automotive applications, an abstract model reproducing the battery behavior in an equivalent but more practical form, mainly as an equivalent circuit diagram, is recommended for the purpose of battery management. As a general rule, a trade-off should be reached between the high fidelity and the computational feasibility. Especially if the model is embedded in a real-time monitoring unit such as a microprocessor or a FPGA, the calculation time and memory requirements rise dramatically with a higher number of parameters. Moreover, examples of equivalent circuit models of Lithium-ion batteries are covered. Equivalent circuit topologies are introduced and compared according to the previously introduced criteria. An experimental sequence to model a 20 Ah cell is presented and the results are used for the purposes of powerline communication.

  14. Comparing satellite SAR and wind farm wake models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Vincent, P.; Husson, R.

    2015-01-01

    . These extend several tens of kilometres downwind e.g. 70 km. Other SAR wind maps show near-field fine scale details of wake behind rows of turbines. The satellite SAR wind farm wake cases are modelled by different wind farm wake models including the PARK microscale model, the Weather Research and Forecasting...... (WRF) model in high resolution and WRF with coupled microscale parametrization....

  15. 12 CFR 560.110 - Most favored lender usury preemption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Most favored lender usury preemption. 560.110... INVESTMENT Lending and Investment Provisions Applicable to all Savings Associations § 560.110 Most favored... permits its most favored lender to charge late fees, then a savings association located in that state may...

  16. A comparative analysis of pricing models for enterprise cloud platforms

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mvelase, P

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available virtual enterprise (VE)-enabled cloud enterprise architecture for small medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs) against EC2 pricing model to prove that our pricing model is more suitable for small medium and micro enterprises (SMMEs). This model is based...

  17. Comparing Intrinsic Connectivity Models for the Primary Auditory Cortices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Khairiah Abdul; Yusoff, Ahmad Nazlim; Mohamad, Mazlyfarina; Hamid, Aini Ismafairus Abd; Manan, Hanani Abd

    2010-07-01

    This fMRI study is about modeling the intrinsic connectivity between Heschl' gyrus (HG) and superior temporal gyrus (STG) in human primary auditory cortices. Ten healthy male subjects participated and required to listen to white noise stimulus during the fMRI scans. Two intrinsic connectivity models comprising bilateral HG and STG were constructed using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and dynamic causal modeling (DCM). Group Bayes factor (GBF), positive evidence ratio (PER) and Bayesian model selection (BMS) for group studies were used in model comparison. Group results indicated significant bilateral asymmetrical activation (puncorr < 0.001) in HG and STG. Comparison results showed strong evidence of Model 2 as the preferred model (STG as the input center) with GBF value of 5.77 × 1073 The model is preferred by 6 out of 10 subjects. The results were supported by BMS results for group studies. One-sample t-test on connection values obtained from Model 2 indicates unidirectional parallel connections from STG to bilateral HG (p<0.05). Model 2 was determined to be the most probable intrinsic connectivity model between bilateral HG and STG when listening to white noise.

  18. Comparative performance of high-fidelity training models for flexible ureteroscopy: Are all models effective?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashikant Mishra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: We performed a comparative study of high-fidelity training models for flexible ureteroscopy (URS. Our objective was to determine whether high-fidelity non-virtual reality (VR models are as effective as the VR model in teaching flexible URS skills. Materials and Methods: Twenty-one trained urologists without clinical experience of flexible URS underwent dry lab simulation practice. After a warm-up period of 2 h, tasks were performed on a high-fidelity non-VR (Uro-scopic Trainer TM ; Endo-Urologie-Modell TM and a high-fidelity VR model (URO Mentor TM . The participants were divided equally into three batches with rotation on each of the three stations for 30 min. Performance of the trainees was evaluated by an expert ureteroscopist using pass rating and global rating score (GRS. The participants rated a face validity questionnaire at the end of each session. Results: The GRS improved statistically at evaluation performed after second rotation (P<0.001 for batches 1, 2 and 3. Pass ratings also improved significantly for all training models when the third and first rotations were compared (P<0.05. The batch that was trained on the VR-based model had more improvement on pass ratings on second rotation but could not achieve statistical significance. Most of the realistic domains were higher for a VR model as compared with the non-VR model, except the realism of the flexible endoscope. Conclusions: All the models used for training flexible URS were effective in increasing the GRS and pass ratings irrespective of the VR status.

  19. Towards consensus in comparative chemical characterization modeling for LCIA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauschild, Michael Zwicky; Bachmann, Till; Huijbregts, Mark

    2006-01-01

    The Task Force on Toxic Impacts under the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative is developing recommendations on characterization models and characterization factors for human toxicity and ecotoxicity impacts in Life Cycle Impact Assessment (LCIA). Building on experience from earlier model development...... unnecessary differences. Based on the adapted set of models and their outcomes, and on the earlier guidelines for fate modeling, overall guidelines for toxicity modeling in LCIA were developed. In line with these overall guidelines, a simple consensus model was developed. This model is collectively owned...... and to be the basis of the “recommended practice” for calculation of characterization factors for chemicals under authority of the UNEP/SETAC Life Cycle Initiative....

  20. Integrating coalescent and ecological niche modeling in comparative phylogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carstens, Bryan C; Richards, Corinne L

    2007-06-01

    Understanding the factors that contribute to the formation of population genetic structure is a central goal of phylogeographic research, but achieving this goal can be complicated by the stochastic variance inherent to genetic processes. Statistical approaches to testing phylogeographic hypotheses accommodate this stochasticity by evaluating competing models of putative historical population structure, often by simulating null distributions of the expected variance. The effectiveness of these tests depends on the biological realism of the models. Information from the fossil record can aid in reconstructing the historical distributions of some taxa. However, for the majority of taxa, which lack sufficient fossils, paleodistributional modeling can provide valuable spatial-geographic data concerning ancestral distributions. Paleodistributional models are generated by projecting ecological niche models, which predict the current distribution of each species, onto a model of past climatic conditions. Here, we generate paleodistributional models describing the suitable habitat during the last glacial maximum for lineages from the mesic forests of the Pacific Northwest of North America, and use these models to generate alternative phylogeographic hypotheses. Coalescent simulations are then used to test these hypotheses to improve our understanding of the historical events that promoted the formation of population genetic structure in this ecosystem. Results from Pacific Northwest mesic forest organisms demonstrate the utility of these combined approaches. Paleodistribution models and population genetic structure are congruent across three amphibian lineages, suggesting that they have responded in a concerted manner to environmental change. Two other species, a willow and a water vole, despite being currently codistributed and having similar population genetic structure, were predicted by the paleodistributional model to have had markedly different distributions during

  1. Mathematical model comparing of the multi-level economics systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brykalov, S. M.; Kryanev, A. V.

    2017-12-01

    The mathematical model (scheme) of a multi-level comparison of the economic system, characterized by the system of indices, is worked out. In the mathematical model of the multi-level comparison of the economic systems, the indicators of peer review and forecasting of the economic system under consideration can be used. The model can take into account the uncertainty in the estimated values of the parameters or expert estimations. The model uses the multi-criteria approach based on the Pareto solutions.

  2. Reduced solar activity favors twin maternities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melnikov, Vladimir N

    2012-02-01

    Mechanisms underlying effects of physical factors on twin births are unclear. The present work studied an association between monthly and yearly multiple birth rates (MBRs) in the Novosibirsk region, south-west Siberia, in relation to solar activity (sunspot numbers) and geomagnetic activity (Ap index) from 1957 to 2008. The difference was verified by comparing the yearly MBR observed in 3-year peaks (M = 7.36, SD = 0.33 per 1,000 births) and 3-year troughs (M = 8.10, SD = 0.31 per 1,000 births, p twin maternities. The results show that elevated solar activity within the 11-year cycle coinciding with the time of conception inhibits multiple births in a manner depending on geomagnetic activity. It is hypothesized that the likely mechanism underlying the association is early fetal loss induced by solar radiation/flux and its terrestrial mediators.

  3. Favorable results after total wrist arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boeckstyns, Michel E. H.; Herzberg, G.; Merser, Søren

    2013-01-01

    survival was 0.9 at 5–9 years. Interpretation The clinical results in terms of pain, motion, strength, and function were similar to those in previous reports. The implant survival was 0.9 at 9 years, both in rheumatoid and non-rheumatoid cases, which is an important improvement compared to the earlier......Background and purpose During the past 40 years, several attempts have been made with total wrist arthroplasty to avoid fusion in severely destroyed wrists. The results have often been disappointing. There is only modest clinical documentation due to the small number of patients (especially non......-rheumatoid cases) and short follow-up times. Here we report a multicenter series using a third-generation implant with a minimum follow-up time of 5 years. Methods In 2012, data were retrieved from a registry of consecutive wrist operations at 7 centers with units specialized in hand surgery, between 2003 and 2007...

  4. Retail value: A more favorable offer?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Alirio Ramírez Rusinque

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The most important transformation introduced by Law 1150 of 2007 in public procurement was the determination of goodwill as the absolute best deal for State entities, when concerned with the acquisition or provision of godos and services of uniform technical characteristics and common use. Therefore, an analysis from the point of legal and policy perspective is needed in order to establish whether the reform brought the concept of absolute best deal; or whether the solution was detrimental by affecting the duty of objective selection, the principles of equality, effectiveness, transparency, planning, and financial equilibrium of the contract and the constitutional principle of competition. Is the model of goodwill as a criterion for the absolute best deal legally effective in the field of public procurement?

  5. comparative analysis of two mathematical models for prediction

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. A mathematical modeling for prediction of compressive strength of sandcrete blocks was performed using statistical analysis for the sandcrete block data ob- tained from experimental work done in this study. The models used are Scheffes and Osadebes optimization theories to predict the compressive strength of ...

  6. Comparative homology modeling of human rhodopsin with several ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The molecular structure of rhodopsin has been studied by cryo-electron microscopic, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and X-ray crystallographic techniques in bovine. A humble effort has been ... Key words: Homology modeling, human rhodopsin, bovine templates, sequence alignment, model building, energy profiles.

  7. Comparative analysis of Vening-Meinesz Moritz isostatic models ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    global gravity model and the DTM2006.0 global topographic/bathymetric model are used to generate the isostatic gravity anomalies. The comparison of numerical results reveals that the optimal isostatic inverse scheme should take into consideration both the variable depth and density of compensation. This is achieved by ...

  8. Mental Models about Seismic Effects: Students' Profile Based Comparative Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moutinho, Sara; Moura, Rui; Vasconcelos, Clara

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, meaningful learning takes a central role in science education and is based in mental models that allow the representation of the real world by individuals. Thus, it is essential to analyse the student's mental models by promoting an easier reconstruction of scientific knowledge, by allowing them to become consistent with the curricular…

  9. A comparative study of click models for web search

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grotov, A.; Chuklin, A.; Markov, I.; Stout, L.; Xumara, F.; de Rijke, M.; Mothe, J.; Savoy, J.; Kamps, J.; Pinel-Sauvagnat, K.; Jones, G.J.F.; SanJuan, E.; Cappellato, L.; Ferro, N.

    2015-01-01

    Click models have become an essential tool for understanding user behavior on a search engine result page, running simulated experiments and predicting relevance. Dozens of click models have been proposed, all aiming to tackle problems stemming from the complexity of user behavior or of contemporary

  10. Criteria for comparing economic impact models of tourism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klijs, J.; Heijman, W.J.M.; Korteweg Maris, D.; Bryon, J.

    2012-01-01

    There are substantial differences between models of the economic impacts of tourism. Not only do the nature and precision of results vary, but data demands, complexity and underlying assumptions also differ. Often, it is not clear whether the models chosen are appropriate for the specific situation

  11. A comparative study of explicit and implicit modelling of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Further, for both speaker identification and verification tasks the explicit modelling provides relatively more complimentary information to the state-of-the-art vocal tract features. The contribution of the explicit features is relatively more robust against noise. We suggest that the explicit approach can be used to model the ...

  12. Comparative Studies of Population Synthesis Models in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-08

    Jan 8, 2014 ... Strömgren photometry to measure reliable parameter-sensitive colours and estimate precise model ages and metallicities. The assessment of. Rakos/Schulz ... Overall, the assessment finds modified Strömgren photometry ... The history of stellar population modelling dates back to the attempts by Crampin.

  13. Comparative study of Moore and Mealy machine models adaptation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information and Communications Technology has influenced the need for automated machines that can carry out important production procedures and, automata models are among the computational models used in design and construction of industrial processes. The production process of the popular African Black Soap ...

  14. comparative study of moore and mealy machine models adaptation

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Information and Communications Technology has influenced the need for automated machines that can carry out important production procedures and, automata models are among the computational models used in design and construction of industrial processes. The production process of the popular African Black Soap ...

  15. Comparative Analysis of Two Mathematical Models for Prediction of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A mathematical modeling for prediction of compressive strength of sandcrete blocks was performed using statistical analysis for the sandcrete block data obtained from experimental work done in this study. The models used are Scheffe's and Osadebe's optimization theories to predict the compressive strength of sandcrete ...

  16. Diabetic Retinopathy and Clinical Parameters Favoring the Presence of Diabetic Nephropathy could Predict Renal Outcome in Patients with Diabetic Kidney Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Chi-Chih; Lin, Hugo You-Hsien; Hwang, Daw-Yang; Kuo, I-Ching; Chiu, Yi-Wen; Lim, Lee-Moay; Hwang, Shang-Jyh; Chen, Hung-Chun

    2017-04-21

    Diabetes duration, diabetic retinopathy (DR), and a diagnostic model have been proposed as clinical parameters favoring the presence of diabetic nephropathy (DN) in biopsied patients with diabetic kidney disease. DN, compared with non-diabetic renal disease, had poorer renal outcomes. We tested whether these clinical parameters favoring DN are associated with poorer renal outcomes in non-biopsied patients. In this study, 1330 patients with type 2 diabetes and chronic kidney disease stages 1-4 were included and divided according to diabetes mellitus (DM) duration >8 years, DR, or a diagnostic model for DN. These clinical parameters favoring DN were found in 62-77% of patients and associated with higher levels of proteinuria. In a Cox survival analysis, DR and the diagnostic model favoring DN were associated with an increased risk for end-stage renal disease with adjusted hazard ratios of 1.69 (95% CI: 1.16-2.45, P = 0.006) and 1.66 (95% CI: 1.05-2.61, P = 0.029), respectively. DR was associated with an increased risk for rapid renal disease progression. DM >8 years was not associated with renal outcome. Propensity score-matched analyses also showed similar results. In conclusion, DR and the diagnostic model favoring DN were associated with poorer renal outcomes.

  17. Comparative study of stability in different TCP/RED models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nga, J.H.C.; Iu, H.H.C.; Ling, S.H.; Lam, H.K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper studies the stability issue of the average queue length of a Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) model when interacting with Random Early Detection (RED). The model used for the study has shown period doubling bifurcation (PDB) and border collision bifurcation (BCB) in the average queue size at certain values of parameters when original RED is deployed. In this paper, we adopt a gentle version of RED and a newly derived RED algorithm into the model to study the improvement in stability of average queue size of the system

  18. Competition favors elk over beaver in a riparian willow ecosystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B.W.; Peinetti, H.R.; Coughenour, M.C.; Johnson, T.L.

    2012-01-01

    Beaver (Castor spp.) conservation requires an understanding of their complex interactions with competing herbivores. Simulation modeling offers a controlled environment to examine long-term dynamics in ecosystems driven by uncontrollable variables. We used a new version of the SAVANNA ecosystem model to investigate beaver (C. Canadensis) and elk (Cervus elapses) competition for willow (Salix spp.). We initialized the model with field data from Rocky Mountain National Park, Colorado, USA, to simulate a 4-ha riparian ecosystem containing beaver, elk, and willow. We found beaver persisted indefinitely when elk density was or = 30 elk km_2. The loss of tall willow preceded rapid beaver declines, thus willow condition may predict beaver population trajectory in natural environments. Beaver were able to persist with slightly higher elk densities if beaver alternated their use of foraging sites in a rest-rotation pattern rather than maintained continuous use. Thus, we found asymmetrical competition for willow strongly favored elk over beaver in a simulated montane ecosystem. Finally, we discuss application of the SAVANNA model and mechanisms of competition relative to beaver persistence as metapopulations, ecological resistance and alternative state models, and ecosystem regulation.

  19. Comparative flood damage model assessment: towards a European approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jongman, B.; Kreibich, H.; Apel, H.; Barredo, J. I.; Bates, P. D.; Feyen, L.; Gericke, A.; Neal, J.; Aerts, J. C. J. H.; Ward, P. J.

    2012-12-01

    There is a wide variety of flood damage models in use internationally, differing substantially in their approaches and economic estimates. Since these models are being used more and more as a basis for investment and planning decisions on an increasingly large scale, there is a need to reduce the uncertainties involved and develop a harmonised European approach, in particular with respect to the EU Flood Risks Directive. In this paper we present a qualitative and quantitative assessment of seven flood damage models, using two case studies of past flood events in Germany and the United Kingdom. The qualitative analysis shows that modelling approaches vary strongly, and that current methodologies for estimating infrastructural damage are not as well developed as methodologies for the estimation of damage to buildings. The quantitative results show that the model outcomes are very sensitive to uncertainty in both vulnerability (i.e. depth-damage functions) and exposure (i.e. asset values), whereby the first has a larger effect than the latter. We conclude that care needs to be taken when using aggregated land use data for flood risk assessment, and that it is essential to adjust asset values to the regional economic situation and property characteristics. We call for the development of a flexible but consistent European framework that applies best practice from existing models while providing room for including necessary regional adjustments.

  20. A Comparative Study of Three Methodologies for Modeling Dynamic Stall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sankar, L.; Rhee, M.; Tung, C.; ZibiBailly, J.; LeBalleur, J. C.; Blaise, D.; Rouzaud, O.

    2002-01-01

    During the past two decades, there has been an increased reliance on the use of computational fluid dynamics methods for modeling rotors in high speed forward flight. Computational methods are being developed for modeling the shock induced loads on the advancing side, first-principles based modeling of the trailing wake evolution, and for retreating blade stall. The retreating blade dynamic stall problem has received particular attention, because the large variations in lift and pitching moments encountered in dynamic stall can lead to blade vibrations and pitch link fatigue. Restricting to aerodynamics, the numerical prediction of dynamic stall is still a complex and challenging CFD problem, that, even in two dimensions at low speed, gathers the major difficulties of aerodynamics, such as the grid resolution requirements for the viscous phenomena at leading-edge bubbles or in mixing-layers, the bias of the numerical viscosity, and the major difficulties of the physical modeling, such as the turbulence models, the transition models, whose both determinant influences, already present in static maximal-lift or stall computations, are emphasized by the dynamic aspect of the phenomena.

  1. Comparative Analysis Of Three Largest World Models Of Business Excellence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasminka Samardžija

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Business excellence has become the strongest means of achieving competitive advantage of companies while total management of quality has become the road that ensures support of excellent results recognized by many world companies. Despite many differences, we can conclude that models have many common elements. By the audit in 2005, the DP and MBNQA moved the focus from excellence of product, i.e service, onto the excellence of quality of the entire organization process. Thus, the quality got strategic dimension instead of technical one and the accent passed from the technical quality on the total excellence of all organization processes. The joint movement goes to the direction of good management and appreciation of systems thinking. The very structure of EFOM model criteria itself is adjusted to strategic dimension of quality and that is why the model underwent only short audits within the criteria themselves. Essentially, the model remained unchanged. In all models, the accent is on the satisfaction of buyers, employees and community. National rewards for quality have an important role in promotion and giving a prize to excellence in organization performances. Moreover, they raise quality standards of companies and the country profile as a whole. Considering the GDP per capita and the percentage of certification level of companies, Croatia has all the predispositions for introduction the EFQM model of business excellence with the basic aim of deficit decrease in foreign trade balance and strengthening of competitiveness as the necessary preliminary work for the entrance in the competitive market of the EU. Quality management was introduced in many organizations. The methods used at that time developed in the course of years, and what are to predict is the continuation of the evolution road model as well as the method of business excellence.

  2. River suspended sediment modelling using the CART model: A comparative study of machine learning techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choubin, Bahram; Darabi, Hamid; Rahmati, Omid; Sajedi-Hosseini, Farzaneh; Kløve, Bjørn

    2018-02-15

    Suspended sediment load (SSL) modelling is an important issue in integrated environmental and water resources management, as sediment affects water quality and aquatic habitats. Although classification and regression tree (CART) algorithms have been applied successfully to ecological and geomorphological modelling, their applicability to SSL estimation in rivers has not yet been investigated. In this study, we evaluated use of a CART model to estimate SSL based on hydro-meteorological data. We also compared the accuracy of the CART model with that of the four most commonly used models for time series modelling of SSL, i.e. adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS), multi-layer perceptron (MLP) neural network and two kernels of support vector machines (RBF-SVM and P-SVM). The models were calibrated using river discharge, stage, rainfall and monthly SSL data for the Kareh-Sang River gauging station in the Haraz watershed in northern Iran, where sediment transport is a considerable issue. In addition, different combinations of input data with various time lags were explored to estimate SSL. The best input combination was identified through trial and error, percent bias (PBIAS), Taylor diagrams and violin plots for each model. For evaluating the capability of the models, different statistics such as Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE), Kling-Gupta efficiency (KGE) and percent bias (PBIAS) were used. The results showed that the CART model performed best in predicting SSL (NSE=0.77, KGE=0.8, PBIAS<±15), followed by RBF-SVM (NSE=0.68, KGE=0.72, PBIAS<±15). Thus the CART model can be a helpful tool in basins where hydro-meteorological data are readily available. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Microbial comparative pan-genomics using binomial mixture models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ussery, David; Snipen, L; Almøy, T

    2009-01-01

    The size of the core- and pan-genome of bacterial species is a topic of increasing interest due to the growing number of sequenced prokaryote genomes, many from the same species. Attempts to estimate these quantities have been made, using regression methods or mixture models. We extend the latter...... occurring genes in the population. CONCLUSION: Analyzing pan-genomics data with binomial mixture models is a way to handle dependencies between genomes, which we find is always present. A bottleneck in the estimation procedure is the annotation of rarely occurring genes....

  4. Energy modeling and comparative assessment beyond the market

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rogner, H.-H.; Langlois, L.; McDonald, A.; Jalal, I.

    2004-01-01

    Market participants engage in constant comparative assessment of prices, available supplies, consumer options. Such implicit comparative assessment is a sine qua non for decision making in, and the smooth function of, competitive markets, but it is not always sufficient for policy makers who make decisions based on priorities other than or in addition to market prices. Supplementary mechanisms are needed to make explicit, to expose for consideration and to incorporate into their decision making processes, broader factors that are not necessarily reflected directly in the market price of a good or service. These would include, for example, employment, environment, national security or trade considerations. They would include long-term considerations, e.g., global warming or greatly diminished future supplies of oil and gas. This paper explores different applications of comparative assessment beyond the market, reviews different approaches for accomplishing such evaluations, and presents some tools available for conducting various types of extra-market comparative assessment, including those currently in use by Member States of the IAEA.(author)

  5. Comparing observed and modelled growth of larval herring (Clupea harengusz: Testing individual-based model parameterisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena M. Hauss

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Experiments that directly test larval fish individual-based model (IBM growth predictions are uncommon since it is difficult to simultaneously measure all relevant metabolic and behavioural attributes. We compared observed and modelled somatic growth of larval herring (Clupea harengus in short-term (50 degree-day laboratory trials conducted at 7 and 13°C in which larvae were either unfed or fed ad libitum on different prey sizes (~100 to 550 µm copepods, Acartia tonsa. The larval specific growth rate (SGR, % DW d-1 was generally overestimated by the model, especially for larvae foraging on large prey items. Model parameterisations were adjusted to explore the effect of 1 temporal variability in foraging of individuals, and 2 reduced assimilation efficiency due to rapid gut evacuation at high feeding rates. With these adjustments, the model described larval growth well across temperatures, prey sizes, and larval sizes. Although the experiments performed verified the growth model, variability in growth and foraging behaviour among larvae shows that it is necessary to measure both the physiology and feeding behaviour of the same individual. This is a challenge for experimentalists but will ultimately yield the most valuable data to adequately model environmental impacts on the survival and growth of marine fish early life stages.

  6. Comparing the performance of species distribution models of

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Valle , M.; van Katwijk, M.M.; de Jong, D.J.; Bouma, T.; Schipper, A.M.; Chust, G.; Benito, B.M.; Garmendia, J.M.; Borja, A.

    2013-01-01

    Intertidal seagrasses show high variability in their extent and location, with local extinctions and (re-)colonizations being inherent in their population dynamics. Suitable habitats are identified usually using Species Distribution Models (SDM), based upon the overall distribution of the species;

  7. Modeling blood pressure: Comparative study of seemingly unrelated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Most authors have focused on Systolic Blood Pressure(SBP) and Diastolic Blood Pressure(DBP) separately. The effect of some identified risk factors on SBP and DBP can be estimated separately since they are affected by different factors.This study is aimed at developing a model that can appropriately capture the ...

  8. A Mathematical Model for the Comparative Study of the Blast ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper presents a mathematical model of the study of the blast response of aluminium and steel panels. These panels are deemed sufficient to provided protective barrier against explosions, especially from terrorists. With the maximum deflection being the damage criteria used, the behaviour of both panel is studied.

  9. Comparing State SAT Scores Using a Mixture Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, YoungKoung Rachel

    2009-01-01

    Presented at the national conference for AERA (American Educational Research Association) in April 2009. The large variability of SAT taker population across states makes state-by-state comparisons of the SAT scores challenging. Using a mixture modeling approach, therefore, the current study presents a method of identifying subpopulations in terms…

  10. A comparative study of explicit and implicit modelling of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tion to the state-of-the-art vocal tract features. The contribution of the explicit features is relatively more robust against noise. We suggest that the explicit approach can be used to model the subsegmental excitation information for speaker recognition. Keywords. Speaker-specific excitation source information; subsegmental; ...

  11. comparative analysis of path loss prediction models for urban

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A. Obota, O. Simeonb, J. Afolayanc. Department of Electrical/Electronics & Computer Engineering, University of Uyo, Akwa. Ibom State .... assignments, proper determination of electric field strength, interference analysis, handover .... model based on extensive drive test measure- ments made in Japan at several frequencies.

  12. Classifying and comparing spatial models of fire dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geoffrey J. Cary; Robert E. Keane; Mike D. Flannigan

    2007-01-01

    Wildland fire is a significant disturbance in many ecosystems worldwide and the interaction of fire with climate and vegetation over long time spans has major effects on vegetation dynamics, ecosystem carbon budgets, and patterns of biodiversity. Landscape-Fire-Succession Models (LFSMs) that simulate the linked processes of fire and vegetation development in a spatial...

  13. Locating Pleistocene Refugia: Comparing Phylogeographic and Ecological Niche Model Predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-01

    how well ‘back- casting ’ of ecological niche models can complement phylogeo- graphic approaches in identifying refugia. A clear advantage of the ENM...records: a test case using cryptic geckos in Madagascar. Journal of Biogeography 34: 102–117. 47. Araújo MB, Whittaker RJ, Ladle RJ, Erhard M (2005

  14. Nature of Science and Models: Comparing Portuguese Prospective Teachers' Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Joana; Vasconcelos, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Despite the relevance of nature of science and scientific models in science education, studies reveal that students do not possess adequate views regarding these topics. Bearing in mind that both teachers' views and knowledge strongly influence students' educational experiences, the main scope of this study was to evaluate Portuguese prospective…

  15. A comparative study of independent particle model based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We find that among these three independent particle model based methods, the ss-VSCF method provides most accurate results in the thermal averages followed by t-SCF and the v-VSCF is the least accurate. However, the ss-VSCF is found to be computationally very expensive for the large molecules. The t-SCF gives ...

  16. Comparative study of various models of experimental hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, S; Hirayama, A; Yamasaki, S; Shirataki, K; Fujiwara, K

    1975-01-01

    The authors present morphological findings in the brains of rabbits, dogs, cats, rats, and mice that have been used as experimental hydrocephalic models. The methods used were as follows: (1) silicone oil injection into the cisterna magna and the neighboring basal cisterns in rabbits by the method of Wisniewski; (2) kaolin administration into the cisterna magna in rabbits and dogs (Dixon); (3) ballooning method with Foley's catheter into the 4th ventricle in rabbits (Milho-rat); (4) plug formation with small pieces of laminalia into the cisterna magna in rabbits by our method; (5) Hy-3 hereditary hydrocephalic mouse bred by Gruenberg; (6) ligation of the placental vessels of the pregnant rat at 13 days of gestation by our method, and (7) transplacental intraperitoneal administration of ethylnitrosourea in a pregnant rat at 9.5 days of gestation. The models with silicone oil, kaolin, laminalia, and ballooning methods produced obstructive hydrocephalus with various grades of ventricular dilatation. The models with the ethylnitrosourea-induced method, ligation of placental vessels, and Hy-3 mouse produced prenatal hydrocephalus. Dilatation of the ventricular system and histological abnormalities do not occur as a uniform process.

  17. Achieving interoperability for metadata registries using comparative object modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yu Rang; Kim, Ju Han

    2010-01-01

    Achieving data interoperability between organizations relies upon agreed meaning and representation (metadata) of data. For managing and registering metadata, many organizations have built metadata registries (MDRs) in various domains based on international standard for MDR framework, ISO/IEC 11179. Following this trend, two pubic MDRs in biomedical domain have been created, United States Health Information Knowledgebase (USHIK) and cancer Data Standards Registry and Repository (caDSR), from U.S. Department of Health & Human Services and National Cancer Institute (NCI), respectively. Most MDRs are implemented with indiscriminate extending for satisfying organization-specific needs and solving semantic and structural limitation of ISO/IEC 11179. As a result it is difficult to address interoperability among multiple MDRs. In this paper, we propose an integrated metadata object model for achieving interoperability among multiple MDRs. To evaluate this model, we developed an XML Schema Definition (XSD)-based metadata exchange format. We created an XSD-based metadata exporter, supporting both the integrated metadata object model and organization-specific MDR formats.

  18. Preliminary study of the uranium favorability of Malheur County, Oregon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erikson, E.H.

    1977-11-01

    A reconnaissance study of middle and upper Tertiary volcaniclastic sedimentary and silicic volcanic rocks in Malheur County, Oregon, indicates that, based upon the data available: (1) it is unlikely that sandstone-type uranium deposits exist in sedimentary rocks of north-central Malheur County; and (2) favorable uranium environments are more likely to exist in and adjacent to uraniferous silicic eruptive centers and plugs. Some rhyolites in the northern part of the county contain marginally anomalous uranium abundances (6 to 8 +- 2 ppM U 3 O 8 ), compared with similar rocks in southeastern Oregon. Available uranium from these rocks, as determined by nitric-acid leaching, approaches 50 to 75 percent of the total chemical U 3 O 8 present. One Pliocene rhyolite vitrophyre sample from Duck Butte in western Malheur County contains 9 +- 2 ppM U 3 O 8 . The uranium contents of these rhyolites approach those found in silicic plugs spatially related to uranium deposits in the Lakeview district, Oregon (Erikson and Curry, 1977). It is possible that undiscovered epithermal and (or) supergene uranium deposits may exist in favorable wall rocks subjacent to uraniferous silicic eruptive centers (Duck Butte), calderas (McDermitt caldera to the south and others identified in western Owyhee County, Idaho), and silicic plugs (as in the Lakeview district). With the exception of one small uranium anomaly found in unconsolidated sands in the Grassy Mountain Formation, the sedimentary rocks observed in the study area did not possess abnormal radioactivity or exhibit evidence of uranium mobility and enrichment. Carbonaceous trash is uncommon in these rocks. Gently dipping sandstone members of the Deer Butte Formation (upper Miocene) and local channel sands in the Grassy Mountain Formation (Pliocene) may have once been the most permeable rocks in the Tertiary section; but, there is no evidence to suggest that they were conduits for uranium-bearing solutions

  19. High nevus counts confer a favorable prognosis in melanoma patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribero, Simone; Davies, John R; Requena, Celia; Carrera, Cristina; Glass, Daniel; Rull, Ramon; Vidal-Sicart, Sergi; Vilalta, Antonio; Alos, Lucia; Soriano, Virtudes; Quaglino, Pietro; Traves, Victor; Newton-Bishop, Julia A; Nagore, Eduardo; Malvehy, Josep; Puig, Susana; Bataille, Veronique

    2015-10-01

    A high number of nevi is the most significant phenotypic risk factor for melanoma and is in part genetically determined. The number of nevi decreases from middle age onward but this senescence can be delayed in patients with melanoma. We investigated the effects of nevus number count on sentinel node status and melanoma survival in a large cohort of melanoma cases. Out of 2,184 melanoma cases, 684 (31.3%) had a high nevus count (>50). High nevus counts were associated with favorable prognostic factors such as lower Breslow thickness, less ulceration and lower mitotic rate, despite adjustment for age. Nevus count was not predictive of sentinel node status. The crude 5- and 10-year melanoma-specific survival rate was higher in melanomas cases with a high nevus count compared to those with a low nevus count (91.2 vs. 86.4% and 87.2 vs. 79%, respectively). The difference in survival remained significant after adjusting for all known melanoma prognostic factors (hazard ratio [HR] = 0.43, confidence interval [CI] = 0.21-0.89). The favorable prognostic value of a high nevus count was also seen within the positive sentinel node subgroup of patients (HR = 0.22, CI = 0.08-0.60). High nevus count is associated with a better melanoma survival, even in the subgroup of patients with positive sentinel lymph node. This suggests a different biological behavior of melanoma tumors in patients with an excess of nevi. © 2015 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  20. A Multi-model Study on Warm Precipitation Biases in Global Models Compared to Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, X.; Suzuki, K.; Guo, H.; Goto, D.; Ogura, T.; Koshiro, T.; Mulmenstadt, J.

    2017-12-01

    The cloud-to-precipitation transition process in warm clouds simulated by state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs), including both traditional climate models and a global cloud-resolving model, is evaluated against A-Train satellites observations. The models and satellite observations are compared in the form of the statistics obtained from combined analysis of multiple satellite observables that probe signatures of the cloud-to-precipitation transition process. One common problem identified among these models is the too frequent occurrence of warm precipitation. The precipitation is found to form when the cloud particle size and the liquid water path (LWP) are both much smaller than those in observations. The too efficient formation of precipitation is found to be compensated for by errors of cloud microphysical properties, such as underestimated cloud particle size and LWP, to an extent that varies among the models. However, this does not completely cancel the precipitation formation bias. Robust errors are also found in the evolution of cloud microphysical properties in precipitation process in some GCMs, implying unrealistic interaction between precipitation and cloud water. Nevertheless, auspicious information is found for future improvement of warm precipitation representations: the adoption of more realistic autoconversion scheme or subgrid variability scheme is shown to improve the triggering of precipitation and evolution of cloud microphysical properties.

  1. Clinical Prediction Models for Cardiovascular Disease: Tufts Predictive Analytics and Comparative Effectiveness Clinical Prediction Model Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wessler, Benjamin S; Lai Yh, Lana; Kramer, Whitney; Cangelosi, Michael; Raman, Gowri; Lutz, Jennifer S; Kent, David M

    2015-07-01

    Clinical prediction models (CPMs) estimate the probability of clinical outcomes and hold the potential to improve decision making and individualize care. For patients with cardiovascular disease, there are numerous CPMs available although the extent of this literature is not well described. We conducted a systematic review for articles containing CPMs for cardiovascular disease published between January 1990 and May 2012. Cardiovascular disease includes coronary heart disease, heart failure, arrhythmias, stroke, venous thromboembolism, and peripheral vascular disease. We created a novel database and characterized CPMs based on the stage of development, population under study, performance, covariates, and predicted outcomes. There are 796 models included in this database. The number of CPMs published each year is increasing steadily over time. Seven hundred seventeen (90%) are de novo CPMs, 21 (3%) are CPM recalibrations, and 58 (7%) are CPM adaptations. This database contains CPMs for 31 index conditions, including 215 CPMs for patients with coronary artery disease, 168 CPMs for population samples, and 79 models for patients with heart failure. There are 77 distinct index/outcome pairings. Of the de novo models in this database, 450 (63%) report a c-statistic and 259 (36%) report some information on calibration. There is an abundance of CPMs available for a wide assortment of cardiovascular disease conditions, with substantial redundancy in the literature. The comparative performance of these models, the consistency of effects and risk estimates across models and the actual and potential clinical impact of this body of literature is poorly understood. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  2. Comparing the MOLAP the ROLAP storage models Marysol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Tamayo

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Data Warehouses (DWs, supported by OLAP, have played a key role in helping company decision-making du- ring the last few years. DWs can be stored in ROLAP and/or MOLAP data storage systems. Data is stored in a relational database in ROLAP and in multidimensional matrices in MOLAP. This paper presents a comparative example, analysing the performance and advantages and disadvantages of ROLAP and MOLAP in a specific database management system (DBMS. An overview of DBMS is also given to see how these technologies are being incorporated.

  3. Comparing droplet activation parameterisations against adiabatic parcel models using a novel inverse modelling framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partridge, Daniel; Morales, Ricardo; Stier, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Many previous studies have compared droplet activation parameterisations against adiabatic parcel models (e.g. Ghan et al., 2001). However, these have often involved comparisons for a limited number of parameter combinations based upon certain aerosol regimes. Recent studies (Morales et al., 2014) have used wider ranges when evaluating their parameterisations, however, no study has explored the full possible multi-dimensional parameter space that would be experienced by droplet activations within a global climate model (GCM). It is important to be able to efficiently highlight regions of the entire multi-dimensional parameter space in which we can expect the largest discrepancy between parameterisation and cloud parcel models in order to ascertain which regions simulated by a GCM can be expected to be a less accurate representation of the process of cloud droplet activation. This study provides a new, efficient, inverse modelling framework for comparing droplet activation parameterisations to more complex cloud parcel models. To achieve this we couple a Markov Chain Monte Carlo algorithm (Partridge et al., 2012) to two independent adiabatic cloud parcel models and four droplet activation parameterisations. This framework is computationally faster than employing a brute force Monte Carlo simulation, and allows us to transparently highlight which parameterisation provides the closest representation across all aerosol physiochemical and meteorological environments. The parameterisations are demonstrated to perform well for a large proportion of possible parameter combinations, however, for certain key parameters; most notably the vertical velocity and accumulation mode aerosol concentration, large discrepancies are highlighted. These discrepancies correspond for parameter combinations that result in very high/low simulated values of maximum supersaturation. By identifying parameter interactions or regimes within the multi-dimensional parameter space we hope to guide

  4. Microbial comparative pan-genomics using binomial mixture models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ussery David W

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The size of the core- and pan-genome of bacterial species is a topic of increasing interest due to the growing number of sequenced prokaryote genomes, many from the same species. Attempts to estimate these quantities have been made, using regression methods or mixture models. We extend the latter approach by using statistical ideas developed for capture-recapture problems in ecology and epidemiology. Results We estimate core- and pan-genome sizes for 16 different bacterial species. The results reveal a complex dependency structure for most species, manifested as heterogeneous detection probabilities. Estimated pan-genome sizes range from small (around 2600 gene families in Buchnera aphidicola to large (around 43000 gene families in Escherichia coli. Results for Echerichia coli show that as more data become available, a larger diversity is estimated, indicating an extensive pool of rarely occurring genes in the population. Conclusion Analyzing pan-genomics data with binomial mixture models is a way to handle dependencies between genomes, which we find is always present. A bottleneck in the estimation procedure is the annotation of rarely occurring genes.

  5. Comparative analysis of calculation models of railway subgrade

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.O. Sviatko

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. In transport engineering structures design, the primary task is to determine the parameters of foundation soil and nuances of its work under loads. It is very important to determine the parameters of shear resistance and the parameters, determining the development of deep deformations in foundation soils, while calculating the soil subgrade - upper track structure interaction. Search for generalized numerical modeling methods of embankment foundation soil work that include not only the analysis of the foundation stress state but also of its deformed one. Methodology. The analysis of existing modern and classical methods of numerical simulation of soil samples under static load was made. Findings. According to traditional methods of analysis of ground masses work, limitation and the qualitative estimation of subgrade deformations is possible only indirectly, through the estimation of stress and comparison of received values with the boundary ones. Originality. A new computational model was proposed in which it will be applied not only classical approach analysis of the soil subgrade stress state, but deformed state will be also taken into account. Practical value. The analysis showed that for accurate analysis of ground masses work it is necessary to develop a generalized methodology for analyzing of the rolling stock - railway subgrade interaction, which will use not only the classical approach of analyzing the soil subgrade stress state, but also take into account its deformed one.

  6. Comparative study of cost models for tokamak DEMO fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oishi, Tetsutarou; Yamazaki, Kozo; Arimoto, Hideki; Ban, Kanae; Kondo, Takuya; Tobita, Kenji; Goto, Takuya

    2012-01-01

    Cost evaluation analysis of the tokamak-type demonstration reactor DEMO using the PEC (physics-engineering-cost) system code is underway to establish a cost evaluation model for the DEMO reactor design. As a reference case, a DEMO reactor with reference to the SSTR (steady state tokamak reactor) was designed using PEC code. The calculated total capital cost was in the same order of that proposed previously in cost evaluation studies for the SSTR. Design parameter scanning analysis and multi regression analysis illustrated the effect of parameters on the total capital cost. The capital cost was predicted to be inside the range of several thousands of M$s in this study. (author)

  7. Comparative digital cartilage histology for human and common osteoarthritis models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen DR

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Douglas R Pedersen, Jessica E Goetz, Gail L Kurriger, James A MartinDepartment of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA, USAPurpose: This study addresses the species-specific and site-specific details of weight-bearing articular cartilage zone depths and chondrocyte distributions among humans and common osteoarthritis (OA animal models using contemporary digital imaging tools. Histological analysis is the gold-standard research tool for evaluating cartilage health, OA severity, and treatment efficacy. Historically, evaluations were made by expert analysts. However, state-of-the-art tools have been developed that allow for digitization of entire histological sections for computer-aided analysis. Large volumes of common digital cartilage metrics directly complement elucidation of trends in OA inducement and concomitant potential treatments.Materials and methods: Sixteen fresh human knees, 26 adult New Zealand rabbit stifles, and 104 bovine lateral plateaus were measured for four cartilage zones and the cell densities within each zone. Each knee was divided into four weight-bearing sites: the medial and lateral plateaus and femoral condyles.Results: One-way analysis of variance followed by pairwise multiple comparisons (Holm–Sidak method at a significance of 0.05 clearly confirmed the variability between cartilage depths at each site, between sites in the same species, and between weight-bearing articular cartilage definitions in different species.Conclusion: The present study clearly demonstrates multisite, multispecies differences in normal weight-bearing articular cartilage, which can be objectively quantified by a common digital histology imaging technique. The clear site-specific differences in normal cartilage must be taken into consideration when characterizing the pathoetiology of OA models. Together, these provide a path to consistently analyze the volume and variety of histologic slides necessarily generated

  8. Building v/s Exploring Models: Comparing Learning of Evolutionary Processes through Agent-based Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagh, Aditi

    Two strands of work motivate the three studies in this dissertation. Evolutionary change can be viewed as a computational complex system in which a small set of rules operating at the individual level result in different population level outcomes under different conditions. Extensive research has documented students' difficulties with learning about evolutionary change (Rosengren et al., 2012), particularly in terms of levels slippage (Wilensky & Resnick, 1999). Second, though building and using computational models is becoming increasingly common in K-12 science education, we know little about how these two modalities compare. This dissertation adopts agent-based modeling as a representational system to compare these modalities in the conceptual context of micro-evolutionary processes. Drawing on interviews, Study 1 examines middle-school students' productive ways of reasoning about micro-evolutionary processes to find that the specific framing of traits plays a key role in whether slippage explanations are cued. Study 2, which was conducted in 2 schools with about 150 students, forms the crux of the dissertation. It compares learning processes and outcomes when students build their own models or explore a pre-built model. Analysis of Camtasia videos of student pairs reveals that builders' and explorers' ways of accessing rules, and sense-making of observed trends are of a different character. Builders notice rules through available blocks-based primitives, often bypassing their enactment while explorers attend to rules primarily through the enactment. Moreover, builders' sense-making of observed trends is more rule-driven while explorers' is more enactment-driven. Pre and posttests reveal that builders manifest a greater facility with accessing rules, providing explanations manifesting targeted assembly. Explorers use rules to construct explanations manifesting non-targeted assembly. Interviews reveal varying degrees of shifts away from slippage in both

  9. Autoras africanas: A favor de las mujeres=African authors: In favor of women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Socorro Suárez Lafuente

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen: La cultura occidental produce binomios de poder fuertemente inscritos en el lenguaje y el imaginario colectivo. Las subversiones aparecen primero en la zona dominante, como el feminismo, que se extiende, posteriormente, a otros feminismos, igualmente lógicos y reivindicativos, pero con menos capacidad de visibilización en un mundo globalizado. Las mujeres de grupos minorizados que han conseguido acceder a la educación han levantado sus voces y utilizado su potencial creativo a favor de las silenciadas de su cultura, a las que no alcanzaban el feminismo blanco occidental. Amma Darko, Bessie Head y Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie son algunos de los nombres que encabezan un movimiento africano feminista, que prioriza la libertad individual de las mujeres y les hace sentirse orgullosas de ser africanas.   Abstract Western culture produces binaries of power that are deeply inscribed both in language and in the collective imaginarium. Subversions tend to appear in the more affluent class, as is the case with feminism, which later extend to other feminisms, equally important and vindicatory, but with fewer opportunities to become visible within a globalized world. Many women from minoritized groups have had access to education, have been able to use their creative force and have become the voice of many silent women who were not included in the successive waves of Western feminisms. Amma Darko, Bessie Head and Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie are but a few names at the forefront of African feminism, a movement that fights for the individual rights of women and makes them feel proud of their Africanism.

  10. Comparing Three-Dimensional Geophysical Models of Mount St. Helens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creager, K. C.; Ulberg, C. W.; Vidale, J. E.; Levander, A.; Kiser, E.; Abers, G. A.; Crosbie, K.; Mann, M. E.; Moran, S. C.; Denlinger, R. P.; Thelen, W. A.; Hansen, S. M.; Schmandt, B.; Schultz, A.; Bowles-martinez, E.; Bedrosian, P.; Peacock, J.; Hill, G.

    2017-12-01

    The iMUSH project integrates active- and passive-source seismic experiments with magnetotelluric (MT) observations and petrology to better understand the structure and dynamics of the Mount St. Helens (MSH) magmatic system from the subducted plate to the surface. The geophysical experiments included a two-year, 70-element broadband array with 10-km station spacing within 50 km of the MSH edifice, 23 shots recorded by geophones at 6000 sites including 900 Nodal stations, and 147 wideband MT stations with 6-km nominal station spacing. We have determined 3-D models of P-wave, S-wave and P/S-wave velocity as well as 3-D electrical resistivity. Our models from independent data sets and methodologies exhibit remarkable similarity. A narrow low-VP and VS anomaly as well as a high VP/VS and conductivity anomaly is well imaged by nearly all methods at about 6-15 km beneath MSH and coincides with a previously inferred magma storage volume. The St. Helens seismic zone (SHZ), which cuts through MSH with a NNW-SSE orientation, coincides with a narrow, vertical, planar zone of high electrical conductivity and low VP from the near surface to 15 km depth where we lose resolution. The continental Moho shows strong reflectivity east of the SHZ, but is weak to non-existent to the west, perhaps because this marks the eastern edge of hydrous mineral stability in the cold mantle wedge. Farther north, a similar high-conductivity feature is imaged along the west Rainer seismic zone. High Vp/Vs and high electrical conductivity extend under the Indian Heaven volcanic field at depths of 5-15 km, potentially associated with regions of partial melt and/or fluids. Mid- to lower-crustal velocities are generally fast to the west of MSH, consistent with the presence of the accreted Siletz terrane, and slow to the east suggesting both a change in composition and higher temperatures. Moderate lower-crustal resistivity is also present to the east, and is consistent with a small degree of partial melt

  11. A Comparative Analysis of Community Wind Power DevelopmentModels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bolinger, Mark; Wiser, Ryan; Wind, Tom; Juhl, Dan; Grace, Robert; West, Peter

    2005-05-20

    For years, farmers in the United States have looked with envy on their European counterparts ability to profitably farm the wind through ownership of distributed, utility-scale wind projects. Only within the past few years, however, has farmer- or community-owned windpower development become a reality in the United States. The primary hurdle to this type of development in the United States has been devising and implementing suitable business and legal structures that enable such projects to take advantage of tax-based federal incentives for windpower. This article discusses the limitations of such incentives in supporting farmer- or community-owned wind projects, describes four ownership structures that potentially overcome such limitations, and finally conducts comparative financial analysis on those four structures, using as an example a hypothetical 1.5 MW farmer-owned project located in the state of Oregon. We find that material differences in the competitiveness of each structure do exist, but that choosing the best structure for a given project will largely depend on the conditions at hand; e.g., the ability of the farmer(s) to utilize tax credits, preference for individual versus cooperative ownership, and the state and utility service territory in which the project will be located.

  12. Spheroid model study comparing the biocompatibility of Biodentine and MTA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérard, Matthieu; Le Clerc, Justine; Watrin, Tanguy; Meary, Fleur; Pérez, Fabienne; Tricot-Doleux, Sylvie; Pellen-Mussi, Pascal

    2013-06-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the biological effects of a new dentine substitute based on Ca₃SiO₅ (Biodentine™) for use in pulp-capping treatment, on pseudo-odontoblastic (MDPC-23) and pulp (Od-21) cells. The secondary objective was to evaluate the effects of Biodentine and mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) on gene expression in cultured spheroids. We used the acid phosphatase assay to compare the biocompatibility of Biodentine and MTA. Cell differentiation was investigated by RT-qPCR. We investigated the expression of genes involved in odontogenic differentiation (Runx2), matrix secretion (Col1a1, Spp1) and mineralisation (Alp). ANOVA and PLSD tests were used for data analysis. MDPC-23 cells cultured in the presence of MTA had higher levels of viability than those cultured in the presence of Biodentine and control cells on day 7 (P = 0.0065 and P = 0.0126, respectively). For Od-21 cells, proliferation rates on day 7 were significantly lower in the presence of Biodentine or MTA than for control (P Biodentine and in control cells. Biodentine and MTA may modify the proliferation of pulp cell lines. Their effects may fluctuate over time, depending on the cell line considered. The observed similarity between Biodentine and MTA validates the indication for direct pulp-capping claimed by the manufacturers.

  13. National Models of Technological Development: a Comparative Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeniy V. Balatskiy

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article, suggestions are made for the development of methodological approaches to using factor analysis of technological development of countries and revealing the related weaknesses. The article presents an overview of the ideas for the study of such categories as national innovation system, its elements – the scientific and technological sector and approaches to efficiency measurement and comparative analysis of national innovation systems of different countries. For the purposes of assessing the scientific and technological potential of countries, a method of constructing a scientific-technological balance which links the efficiency of the national economy to the sphere of generation of knowledge and technologies, is proposed. Analysis of the relative scientific and technological parameters showed that each country has its advantages and disadvantages for research and technological development. In particular, in China, the scale of research sector is not adequate to the scale of the national economy and its growth rate; Poland has been experiencing low returns from the sphere of applied research; in Russia the bottleneck for scientific and technological development is low efficiency of the scientific work expressed in the publication activity. Overall, the study showed that the scientific and technological balance constructing method is a successful one in assessing the impact of knowledge generation and technology development on the level of productivity in the economy.

  14. Activity Modelling and Comparative Evaluation of WSN MAC Security Attacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pawar, Pranav M.; Nielsen, Rasmus Hjorth; Prasad, Neeli R.

    2012-01-01

    Applications of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are growing tremendously in the domains of habitat, tele-health, industry monitoring, vehicular networks, home automation and agriculture. This trend is a strong motivation for malicious users to increase their focus on WSNs and to develop and initi......Applications of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are growing tremendously in the domains of habitat, tele-health, industry monitoring, vehicular networks, home automation and agriculture. This trend is a strong motivation for malicious users to increase their focus on WSNs and to develop...... and initiate security attacks that disturb the normal functioning of the network in a severe manner. Such attacks affect the performance of the network by increasing the energy consumption, by reducing throughput and by inducing long delays. Of all existing WSN attacks, MAC layer attacks are considered...... the most harmful as they directly affect the available resources and thus the nodes’ energy consumption. The first endeavour of this paper is to model the activities of MAC layer security attacks to understand the flow of activities taking place when mounting the attack and when actually executing it...

  15. Characterizing cavities in model inclusion molecules: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrens, F; Sánchez-Marín, J; Nebot-Gil, I

    1998-04-01

    We have selected fullerene-60 and -70 cavities as model systems in order to test several methods for characterizing inclusion molecules. The methods are based on different technical foundations such as a square and triangular tessellation of the molecule taken as a unitary sphere, spherical tessellation of the molecular surface, numerical integration of the atomic volumes and surfaces, triangular tessellation of the molecular surface, and a cubic lattice approach to a molecular space. Accurate measures of the molecular volume and surface area have been performed with the pseudo-random Monte Carlo (MCVS) and uniform Monte Carlo (UMCVS) methods. These calculations serve as a reference for the rest of the methods. The SURMO2 and MS methods have not recognized the cavities and may not be convenient for intercalation compounds. The programs that have detected the cavities never exceed 5% deviation relative to the reference values for molecular volume and surface area. The GEPOL algorithm, alone or combined with TOPO, shows results in good agreement with those of the UMCVS reference. The uniform random number generator provides the fastest convergence for UMCVS and a correct estimate of the standard deviations. The effect of the internal cavity on the accessible surfaces has been calculated.

  16. Comparative Modeling of a Parabolic Trough Collectors Solar Power Plant with MARS Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Ramón Rogada

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Power plants producing energy through solar fields use a heat transfer fluid that lends itself to be influenced and changed by different variables. In solar power plants, a heat transfer fluid (HTF is used to transfer the thermal energy of solar radiation through parabolic collectors to a water vapor Rankine cycle. In this way, a turbine is driven that produces electricity when coupled to an electric generator. These plants have a heat transfer system that converts the solar radiation into heat through a HTF, and transfers that thermal energy to the water vapor heat exchangers. The best possible performance in the Rankine cycle, and therefore in the thermal plant, is obtained when the HTF reaches its maximum temperature when leaving the solar field (SF. In addition, it is necessary that the HTF does not exceed its own maximum operating temperature, above which it degrades. The optimum temperature of the HTF is difficult to obtain, since the working conditions of the plant can change abruptly from moment to moment. Guaranteeing that this HTF operates at its optimal temperature to produce electricity through a Rankine cycle is a priority. The oil flowing through the solar field has the disadvantage of having a thermal limit. Therefore, this research focuses on trying to make sure that this fluid comes out of the solar field with the highest possible temperature. Modeling using data mining is revealed as an important tool for forecasting the performance of this kind of power plant. The purpose of this document is to provide a model that can be used to optimize the temperature control of the fluid without interfering with the normal operation of the plant. The results obtained with this model should be necessarily contrasted with those obtained in a real plant. Initially, we compare the PID (proportional–integral–derivative models used in previous studies for the optimization of this type of plant with modeling using the multivariate adaptive

  17. Pore water pressure variations in Subpermafrost groundwater : Numerical modeling compared with experimental modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivière, Agnès.; Goncalves, Julio; Jost, Anne; Font, Marianne

    2010-05-01

    Development and degradation of permafrost directly affect numerous hydrogeological processes such as thermal regime, exchange between river and groundwater, groundwater flows patterns and groundwater recharge (Michel, 1994). Groundwater in permafrost area is subdivided into two zones: suprapermafrost and subpermafrost which are separated by permafrost. As a result of the volumetric expansion of water upon freezing and assuming ice lenses and frost heave do not form freezing in a saturated aquifer, the progressive formation of permafrost leads to the pressurization of the subpermafrost groundwater (Wang, 2006). Therefore disappearance or aggradation of permafrost modifies the confined or unconfined state of subpermafrost groundwater. Our study focuses on modifications of pore water pressure of subpermafrost groundwater which could appear during thawing and freezing of soil. Numerical simulation allows elucidation of some of these processes. Our numerical model accounts for phase changes for coupled heat transport and variably saturated flow involving cycles of freezing and thawing. The flow model is a combination of a one-dimensional channel flow model which uses Manning-Strickler equation and a two-dimensional vertically groundwater flow model using Richards equation. Numerical simulation of heat transport consisted in a two dimensional model accounting for the effects of latent heat of phase change of water associated with melting/freezing cycles which incorporated the advection-diffusion equation describing heat-transfer in porous media. The change of hydraulic conductivity and thermal conductivity are considered by our numerical model. The model was evaluated by comparing predictions with data from laboratory freezing experiments. Experimental design was undertaken at the Laboratory M2C (Univesité de Caen-Basse Normandie, CNRS, France). The device consisted of a Plexiglas box insulated on all sides except on the top. Precipitation and ambient temperature are

  18. What favors the occurrence of subduction mega-earthquakes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brizzi, Silvia; Funiciello, Francesca; Corbi, Fabio; Sandri, Laura; van Zelst, Iris; Heuret, Arnauld; Piromallo, Claudia; van Dinther, Ylona

    2017-04-01

    Most of mega-earthquakes (MEqs; Mw > 8.5) occur at shallow depths along the subduction thrust fault (STF). The contribution of each subduction zone to the globally released seismic moment is not homogenous, as well as the maximum recorded magnitude MMax. Highlighting the ingredients likely responsible for MEqs nucleation has great implications for hazard assessment. In this work, we investigate the conditions favoring the occurrence of MEqs with a multi-disciplinary approach based on: i) multivariate statistics, ii) analogue- and iii) numerical modelling. Previous works have investigated the potential dependence between STF seismicity and various subduction zone parameters using simple regression models. Correlations are generally weak due to the limited instrumental seismic record and multi-parameter influence, which make the forecasting of the potential MMax rather difficult. To unravel the multi-parameter influence, we perform a multivariate statistical study (i.e., Pattern Recognition, PR) of the global database on convergent margins (Heuret et al., 2011), which includes seismological, geometrical, kinematic and physical parameters of 62 subduction segments. PR is based on the classification of objects (i.e., subduction segments) belonging to different classes through the identification of possible repetitive patterns. Tests have been performed using different MMax datasets and combination of inputs to indirectly test the stability of the identified patterns. Results show that the trench-parallel width of the subducting slab (Wtrench) and the sediment thickness at the trench (Tsed) are the most recurring parameters for MEqs occurrence. These features are mostly consistent, independently of the MMax dataset and combination of inputs used for the analysis. MEqs thus seem to be promoted for high Wtrench and Tsed, as their combination may potentially favor extreme (i.e., in the order of thousands of km) trench-parallel rupture propagation. To tackle the

  19. Immunosuppression with cyclophosphamide favors reinfection with recombinant Toxoplasma gondii strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva L.A.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to verify the effect of immunosuppression by cyclophosphamide (Cy on susceptibility of BALB/c mice subjected to challenge with recombinant strains of Toxoplasma gondii. Animals were prime infected with the D8 (recombinant I/III or the ME49 (type II non-virulent strains, weekly immunosuppressed with Cy and challenged with the CH3 or EGS virulent strains (I/III. Parasites recovered from surviving mice were submitted to PCR-RFLP analysis to confirm co-infection. Prime-infection with the D8 strain conferred more protection against challenge with the CH3 and EGS strains when compared with ME49 prime infection. Cy treatment caused significant leukopenia in the infected mice, what probably favors reinfection after challenge. Reinfection was associated with increased levels of IgA. Otherwise, Cy-treated mice presented significantly lower IgA levels after challenge, suggesting involvement of this immunoglobulin on protection against reinfection. In conclusion, BALB/c mice susceptibility to reinfection by T. gondii is related to genetic differences among the strains used for primary and challenge infections. Alteration of the host’s immune integrity by Cy probably compromises the protection previously established by primary infection.

  20. Model parameterization to simulate and compare the PAR absorption potential of two competing plant species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendix, Jörg; Silva, Brenner; Roos, Kristin; Göttlicher, Dietrich Otto; Rollenbeck, Rütger; Nauss, Thomas; Beck, Erwin

    2010-05-01

    Mountain pastures dominated by the pasture grass Setaria sphacelata in the Andes of southern Ecuador are heavily infested by southern bracken (Pteridium arachnoideum), a major problem for pasture management. Field observations suggest that bracken might outcompete the grass due to its competitive strength with regard to the absorption of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). To understand the PAR absorption potential of both species, the aims of the current paper are to (1) parameterize a radiation scheme of a two-big-leaf model by deriving structural (LAI, leaf angle parameter) and optical (leaf albedo, transmittance) plant traits for average individuals from field surveys, (2) to initialize the properly parameterized radiation scheme with realistic global irradiation conditions of the Rio San Francisco Valley in the Andes of southern Ecuador, and (3) to compare the PAR absorption capabilities of both species under typical local weather conditions. Field data show that bracken reveals a slightly higher average leaf area index (LAI) and more horizontally oriented leaves in comparison to Setaria. Spectrometer measurements reveal that bracken and Setaria are characterized by a similar average leaf absorptance. Simulations with the average diurnal course of incoming solar radiation (1998-2005) and the mean leaf-sun geometry reveal that PAR absorption is fairly equal for both species. However, the comparison of typical clear and overcast days show that two parameters, (1) the relation of incoming diffuse and direct irradiance, and (2) the leaf-sun geometry play a major role for PAR absorption in the two-big-leaf approach: Under cloudy sky conditions (mainly diffuse irradiance), PAR absorption is slightly higher for Setaria while under clear sky conditions (mainly direct irradiance), the average bracken individual is characterized by a higher PAR absorption potential. (approximately 74 MJ m(-2) year(-1)). The latter situation which occurs if the maximum daily

  1. Pig as a Favorable Animal for Taenia Saginata Asiatica Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping-Chin Fan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The epidemiology of Taenia saginata in some parts of Asia is confusing, in that beef does not appear to be the source of infection. In some areas, beef is either not available or not eaten raw, whereas pork at times is eaten uncooked. In light of this situation, we have exposed pigs and other animals to infection with strains of T. saginata to establish their ability to serve as intermediate hosts. Eggs of Taiwan Taenia, Korea Taenia, Indonesia Taenia, Thailand Taenia, Philippines Taenia, Ethiopia Taenia, and Madagascar Taenia were fed to 83 pigs of three strains: 43 Small-Ear Miniature (SEM, 34 Landrace Small-Ear Miniature (L-SEM, and 6 Duroc-Yorkshire-Landrace (DYL. We also fed the eggs to 10 Holstein calves, 17 Sannean goats, and 4 monkeys (Macaca cyclopis. We succeeded in infecting SEM (infection rate 88%, cysticercus recovery rate 19.1%, L-SEM (83%, 1.1%, and DYL (100%, 0.3% pigs with Taiwan Taenia; SEM (100%, 1.7%, L-SEM (100%, 5.6%, and DYL (100%, 0.06% pigs with Korea Taenia; SEM (100%, 22% and L-SEM (100%, 1.6% pigs with Indonesia Taenia; SEM (75%, 0.06% pigs with Thailand Taenia SEM (100%, 11% pigs with Philippines Taenia; SEM (80%, 0.005% pigs with Ethiopia Taenia; SEM (100%, 0.2% pigs with Madagascar Taenia. Holstein calves became infected with Taenia from Taiwan (100%, 1.1%, Korea (100%, 0.03%, Thailand (100%, 0.2%, and the Philippines (100%, 6%; however, the cysticerci of Taenia from Korea, Thailand, and the Philippines were degenerated and/or calcified. Sannean goats became infected with Taenia from Taiwan (33%, 0.01% and Korea (50%, 0.02%, while monkeys became infected with Taenia from Taiwan (50%, 0.01%. However, the cysticerci were degenerated and/or calcified. Therefore, these strains of pig seem to be favorable animal models for experimental studies of T. saginata-like tapeworms, with the SEM pig the most favorable.

  2. Pig as a favorable animal for Taenia saginata asiatica infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Ping-Chin; Chung, Win-Cheng; Lin, Chung-Yung; Wu, Chin-Cheng

    2006-01-01

    The epidemiology of Taenia saginata in some parts of Asia is confusing, in that beef does not appear to be the source of infection. In some areas, beef is either not available or not eaten raw, whereas pork at times is eaten uncooked. In light of this situation, we have exposed pigs and other animals to infection with strains of T. saginata to establish their ability to serve as intermediate hosts. Eggs of Taiwan Taenia, Korea Taenia, Indonesia Taenia, Thailand Taenia, Philippines Taenia, Ethiopia Taenia, and Madagascar Taenia were fed to 83 pigs of three strains: 43 Small-Ear Miniature (SEM), 34 Landrace Small-Ear Miniature (L-SEM), and 6 Duroc-Yorkshire-Landrace (DYL). We also fed the eggs to 10 Holstein calves, 17 Sannean goats, and 4 monkeys (Macaca cyclopis). We succeeded in infecting SEM (infection rate 88%, cysticercus recovery rate 19.1%), L-SEM (83%, 1.1%), and DYL (100%, 0.3%) pigs with Taiwan Taenia; SEM (100%, 1.7%), L-SEM (100%, 5.6%), and DYL (100%, 0.06%) pigs with Korea Taenia; SEM (100%, 22%) and L-SEM (100%, 1.6%) pigs with Indonesia Taenia; SEM (75%, 0.06%) pigs with Thailand Taenia SEM (100%, 11%) pigs with Philippines Taenia; SEM (80%, 0.005%) pigs with Ethiopia Taenia; SEM (100%, 0.2%) pigs with Madagascar Taenia. Holstein calves became infected with Taenia from Taiwan (100%, 1.1%), Korea (100%, 0.03%), Thailand (100%, 0.2%), and the Philippines (100%, 6%); however, the cysticerci of Taenia from Korea, Thailand, and the Philippines were degenerated and/or calcified. Sannean goats became infected with Taenia from Taiwan (33%, 0.01%) and Korea (50%, 0.02%), while monkeys became infected with Taenia from Taiwan (50%, 0.01%). However, the cysticerci were degenerated and/ or calcified. Therefore, these strains of pig seem to be favorable animal models for experimental studies of T. saginata-like tapeworms, with the SEM pig the most favorable.

  3. Development of an instrument to assess the impact of an enhanced experiential model on pharmacy students' learning opportunities, skills and attitudes: A retrospective comparative-experimentalist study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collins John B

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pharmacy schools across North America have been charged to ensure their students are adequately skilled in the principles and practices of pharmaceutical care. Despite this mandate, a large percentage of students experience insufficient opportunities to practice the activities, tasks and processes essential to pharmaceutical care. The objective of this retrospective study of pharmacy students was to: (1 as "proof of concept", test the overall educational impact of an enhanced advanced pharmacy practice experiential (APPE model on student competencies; (2 develop an instrument to measure students' and preceptors' experiences; and (3 assess the psychometric properties of the instrument. Methods A comparative-experimental design, using student and preceptor surveys, was used to evaluate the impact of the enhanced community-based APPE over the traditional APPE model. The study was grounded in a 5-stage learning model: (1 an enhanced learning climate leads to (2 better utilization of learning opportunities, including (3 more frequent student/patient consultation, then to (4 improved skills acquisition, thence to (5 more favorable attitudes toward pharmaceutical care practice. The intervention included a one-day preceptor workshop, a comprehensive on-site student orientation and extending the experience from two four-week experiences in different pharmacies to one eight-week in one pharmacy. Results The 35 student and 38 preceptor survey results favored the enhanced model; with students conducting many more patient consultations and reporting greater skills improvement. In addition, the student self-assessment suggested changes in attitudes favoring pharmaceutical care principles. Psychometric testing showed the instrument to be sensitive, valid and reliable in ascertaining differences between the enhanced and traditional arms. Conclusion The enhanced experiential model positively affects learning opportunities and competency

  4. Modeling Nonlinear Power Amplifiers in OFDM Systems from Subsampled Data: A Comparative Study Using Real Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santamaría Ignacio

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study among several nonlinear high-power amplifier (HPA models using real measurements is carried out. The analysis is focused on specific models for wideband OFDM signals, which are known to be very sensitive to nonlinear distortion. Moreover, unlike conventional techniques, which typically use a single-tone test signal and power measurements, in this study the models are fitted using subsampled time-domain data. The in-band and out-of-band (spectral regrowth performances of the following models are evaluated and compared: Saleh's model, envelope polynomial model (EPM, Volterra model, the multilayer perceptron (MLP model, and the smoothed piecewise-linear (SPWL model. The study shows that the SPWL model provides the best in-band characterization of the HPA. On the other hand, the Volterra model provides a good trade-off between model complexity (number of parameters and performance.

  5. A Comparative Structural Equation Modeling Investigation of the Relationships among Teaching, Cognitive and Social Presence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozan, Kadir

    2016-01-01

    The present study investigated the relationships among teaching, cognitive, and social presence through several structural equation models to see which model would better fit the data. To this end, the present study employed and compared several different structural equation models because different models could fit the data equally well. Among…

  6. Comparing Apples to Apples: Paleoclimate Model-Data comparison via Proxy System Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dee, Sylvia; Emile-Geay, Julien; Evans, Michael; Noone, David

    2014-05-01

    The wealth of paleodata spanning the last millennium (hereinafter LM) provides an invaluable testbed for CMIP5-class GCMs. However, comparing GCM output to paleodata is non-trivial. High-resolution paleoclimate proxies generally contain a multivariate and non-linear response to regional climate forcing. Disentangling the multivariate environmental influences on proxies like corals, speleothems, and trees can be complex due to spatiotemporal climate variability, non-stationarity, and threshold dependence. Given these and other complications, many paleodata-GCM comparisons take a leap of faith, relating climate fields (e.g. precipitation, temperature) to geochemical signals in proxy data (e.g. δ18O in coral aragonite or ice cores) (e.g. Braconnot et al., 2012). Isotope-enabled GCMs are a step in the right direction, with water isotopes providing a connector point between GCMs and paleodata. However, such studies are still rare, and isotope fields are not archived as part of LM PMIP3 simulations. More importantly, much of the complexity in how proxy systems record and transduce environmental signals remains unaccounted for. In this study we use proxy system models (PSMs, Evans et al., 2013) to bridge this conceptual gap. A PSM mathematically encodes the mechanistic understanding of the physical, geochemical and, sometimes biological influences on each proxy. To translate GCM output to proxy space, we have synthesized a comprehensive, consistently formatted package of published PSMs, including δ18O in corals, tree ring cellulose, speleothems, and ice cores. Each PSM is comprised of three sub-models: sensor, archive, and observation. For the first time, these different components are coupled together for four major proxy types, allowing uncertainties due to both dating and signal interpretation to be treated within a self-consistent framework. The output of this process is an ensemble of many (say N = 1,000) realizations of the proxy network, all equally plausible

  7. A Comparative Study of Neural Networks and Fuzzy Systems in Modeling of a Nonlinear Dynamic System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Demirtas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to compare the neural networks and fuzzy modeling approaches on a nonlinear system. We have taken Permanent Magnet Brushless Direct Current (PMBDC motor data and have generated models using both approaches. The predictive performance of both methods was compared on the data set for model configurations. The paper describes the results of these tests and discusses the effects of changing model parameters on predictive and practical performance. Modeling sensitivity was used to compare for two methods.

  8. Favorability for uranium in tertiary sedimentary rocks, southwestern Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wopat, M.A.; Curry, W.E.; Robins, J.W.; Marjaniemi, D.K.

    1977-10-01

    Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the basins of southwestern Montana were studied to determine their favorability for potential uranium resources. Uranium in the Tertiary sedimentary rocks was probably derived from the Boulder batholith and from silicic volcanic material. The batholith contains numerous uranium occurrences and is the most favorable plutonic source for uranium in the study area. Subjective favorability categories of good, moderate, and poor, based on the number and type of favorable criteria present, were used to classify the rock sequences studied. Rocks judged to have good favorability for uranium deposits are (1) Eocene and Oligocene strata and undifferentiated Tertiary rocks in the western Three Forks basin and (2) Oligocene rocks in the Helena basin. Rocks having moderate favorability consist of (1) Eocene and Oligocene strata in the Jefferson River, Beaverhead River, and lower Ruby River basins, (2) Oligocene rocks in the Townsend and Clarkston basins, (3) Miocene and Pliocene rocks in the Upper Ruby River basin, and (4) all Tertiary sedimentary formations in the eastern Three Forks basin, and in the Grasshopper Creek, Horse Prairie, Medicine Lodge Creek, Big Sheep Creek, Deer Lodge, Big Hole River, and Bull Creek basins. The following have poor favorability: (1) the Beaverhead Conglomerate in the Red Rock and Centennial basins, (2) Eocene and Oligocene rocks in the Upper Ruby River basin, (3) Miocene and Pliocene rocks in the Townsend, Clarkston, Smith River, and Divide Creek basins, (4) Miocene through Pleistocene rocks in the Jefferson River, Beaverhead River, and Lower Ruby River basins, and (5) all Tertiary sedimentary rocks in the Boulder River, Sage Creek, Muddy Creek, Madison River, Flint Creek, Gold Creek, and Bitterroot basins

  9. Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes and their uranium favorability. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coney, P.J.; Reynolds, S.J.

    1980-11-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a descriptive body of knowledge on Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes including their lithologic and structural characteristics, their distribution within the Cordillera, and their evolutionary history and tectonic setting. The occurrence of uranium in the context of possibility for uranium concentration is also examined. Chapter 1 is an overview of Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes which describes their physical characteristics, tectonic setting and geologic history. This overview is accompanied by a tectonic map. Chapter 2 is a discussion of the mantled gneiss dome concept. The purpose of including this work is to provide a basic history of this concept and to describe the characteristics and distribution of gneiss domes throughout the world to enable one to compare and contrast them with the metamorphic core complexes as discussed in this report. Some gneiss domes are known producers of uranium (as are also some core complexes). Chapter 3 is an examination of the effects of the core complex process on adjacent sedimentary and volcanic cover terranes. Also included is a discussion of the kinematic significance of these cover terranes as they are related to process within the cores of the complexes. Some of the cover terranes have uranium prospects in them. Chapter 4 is a detailed discussion of uranium in Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes and includes the conceptual basis for the various types of occurrences and the processes that might favor concentration of uranium. The report is supported by a 5-part Appendix. The majority of the core complexes discussed in this report either do not appear or are not recognizable on existing published geologic maps

  10. Survey of the Favorable Conditions for Magnetosonic Wave Excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Chan; Shprits, Yuri

    2018-01-01

    The ratio of the proton ring velocity (VR) to the local Alfven speed (VA), in addition to proton ring distributions, plays a key factor in the excitation of magnetosonic waves at frequencies between the proton cyclotron frequency fcp and the lower hybrid resonance frequency fLHR in the Earth's magnetosphere. Here we investigate whether there is a statistically significant relationship between occurrences of proton rings and magnetosonic waves both outside and inside the plasmapause using particle and wave data from Van Allen Probe-A during the time period of October 2012 to December 2015. We also perform a statistical survey of the ratio of the ring energy (ER, corresponding to VR) to the Alfven energy (EA, corresponding to VA) to determine the favorable conditions under which magnetosonic waves in each of two frequency bands (fcp 0.5 fLHR and 0.5 fLHR LHR) can be excited. The results show that the magnetosonic waves in both frequency bands occur around the postnoon (12-18 magnetic local time, MLT) sector outside the plasmapause when ER is comparable to or lower than EA, and those in lower-frequency bands (fcp 0.5 fLHR) occur around the postnoon sector inside the plasmapause when ER/EA > 9. However, there is one discrepancy between occurrences of proton rings and magnetosonic waves in low-frequency bands around the prenoon sector (6-12 MLT) outside the plasmapause, which suggests either that the waves may have propagated during active time from the postnoon sector after being excited during quiet time, or they may have locally excited in the prenoon sector during active time.

  11. Applying fuzzy logic to comparative distribution modelling: a case study with two sympatric amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, A Márcia; Real, Raimundo

    2012-01-01

    We modelled the distributions of two toads (Bufo bufo and Epidalea calamita) in the Iberian Peninsula using the favourability function, which makes predictions directly comparable for different species and allows fuzzy logic operations to relate different models. The fuzzy intersection between individual models, representing favourability for the presence of both species simultaneously, was compared with another favourability model built on the presences shared by both species. The fuzzy union between individual models, representing favourability for the presence of any of the two species, was compared with another favourability model based on the presences of either or both of them. The fuzzy intersections between favourability for each species and the complementary of favourability for the other (corresponding to the logical operation "A and not B") were compared with models of exclusive presence of one species versus the exclusive presence of the other. The results of modelling combined species data were highly similar to those of fuzzy logic operations between individual models, proving fuzzy logic and the favourability function valuable for comparative distribution modelling. We highlight several advantages of fuzzy logic over other forms of combining distribution models, including the possibility to combine multiple species models for management and conservation planning.

  12. Comparing i-Tree modeled ozone deposition with field measurements in a periurban Mediterranean forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Morani; D. Nowak; S. Hirabayashi; G. Guidolotti; M. Medori; V. Muzzini; S. Fares; G. Scarascia Mugnozza; C. Calfapietra

    2014-01-01

    Ozone flux estimates from the i-Tree model were compared with ozone flux measurements using the Eddy Covariance technique in a periurban Mediterranean forest near Rome (Castelporziano). For the first time i-Tree model outputs were compared with field measurements in relation to dry deposition estimates. Results showed generally a...

  13. Comparative evaluation of life cycle assessment models for solid waste management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winkler, Joerg; Bilitewski, Bernd

    2007-01-01

    This publication compares a selection of six different models developed in Europe and America by research organisations, industry associations and governmental institutions. The comparison of the models reveals the variations in the results and the differences in the conclusions of an LCA study done with these models. The models are compared by modelling a specific case - the waste management system of Dresden, Germany - with each model and an in-detail comparison of the life cycle inventory results. Moreover, a life cycle impact assessment shows if the LCA results of each model allows for comparable and consecutive conclusions, which do not contradict the conclusions derived from the other models' results. Furthermore, the influence of different level of detail in the life cycle inventory of the life cycle assessment is demonstrated. The model comparison revealed that the variations in the LCA results calculated by the models for the case show high variations and are not negligible. In some cases the high variations in results lead to contradictory conclusions concerning the environmental performance of the waste management processes. The static, linear modelling approach chosen by all models analysed is inappropriate for reflecting actual conditions. Moreover, it was found that although the models' approach to LCA is comparable on a general level, the level of detail implemented in the software tools is very different

  14. Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes and their uranium favorability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coney, P.J.; Reynolds, S.J.

    1980-11-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a descriptive body of knowledge on Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes including their lithologic and structural characteristics, their distribution within the Cordillera, and their evolutionary history and tectonic setting. The occurrence of uranium in the context of possibility for uranium concentration is also examined. This volume contains appendices of the following: annotated bibliography of Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes; annotated bibliography of the uranium favorability of Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes; uranium occurrences in the Cordilleran metamorphic core complex belt; and geology, uranium favorability, uranium occurrences and tectonic maps of individual Cordilleran metamorphic core complexes; and locations, lithologic descriptions, petrographic information and analytical data for geochemical samples

  15. A model of the statistical power of comparative genome sequence analysis.

    OpenAIRE

    Sean R Eddy

    2005-01-01

    Comparative genome sequence analysis is powerful, but sequencing genomes is expensive. It is desirable to be able to predict how many genomes are needed for comparative genomics, and at what evolutionary distances. Here I describe a simple mathematical model for the common problem of identifying conserved sequences. The model leads to some useful rules of thumb. For a given evolutionary distance, the number of comparative genomes needed for a constant level of statistical stringency in identi...

  16. Favorable Street Canyon Aspect Ratios for Pollutant Removal- a Large-Eddy Simulation Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, T. N.; Liu, C.

    2010-12-01

    Given the limited land resource, urbanization is one of the solutions to the current rapid economic development and population growth. Narrow streets flanked by high-rise buildings, also known as street canyons, are commonly found in metropolises nowadays. In recent years, this issue has been aroused the public awareness that the air pollutants from domestic sources and vehicular emissions are unable to be removed but trapped inside the street canopy level threatening human health and our living environment. A thorough understanding of the pollutant removal mechanism is the key step to rectify the current poor urban air quality. This study is therefore conceived to examine how the pollutant removal is related to the street width and building height. Large-eddy simulation (LES) with the one-equation subgrid-scale (SGS) turbulence model is employed to investigate the characteristic ventilation and pollutant transport in idealized two-dimensional (2D) street canyons of different building-height-to-street-width (aspect) ratios (ARs) h/b. Model validation is performed by comparing the LES results with those of k-ɛ turbulence model and laboratory experiments. A consistent trend of the pollutant exchange rate (PCH) among the LES, k-ɛ turbulence model, and experimental results is obtained. While its drag is largest, the street canyon of AR = 0.5 is found to be most favorable in the pollutant removal perspective. This finding seems contradict with the presumption that the smaller the AR (wider the street), the more efficient the pollutants removal. In the isolated roughness regime the flows in (wider) street canyons, the entrainment from the prevailing flow aloft down into the ground level purging pollutant away. On the contrary in the skimming flow regime, in (narrower) street canyons, the recirculating flows inside the street canyon are isolated from the prevailing flow in which the (vertical) pollutant removal is governed by roof-level intermittency. Unexpectedly, in

  17. Comparative Analysis of Smart Meters Deployment Business Models on the Example of the Russian Federation Markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daminov, Ildar; Tarasova, Ekaterina; Andreeva, Tatyana; Avazov, Artur

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the comparison of smart meter deployment business models to determine the most suitable option providing smart meters deployment. Authors consider 3 main business model of companies: distribution grid company, energy supplier (energosbyt) and metering company. The goal of the article is to compare the business models of power companies from massive smart metering roll out in power system of Russian Federation.

  18. A computational approach to compare regression modelling strategies in prediction research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pajouheshnia, R.; Pestman, W.R.; Teerenstra, S.; Groenwold, R.H.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is often unclear which approach to fit, assess and adjust a model will yield the most accurate prediction model. We present an extension of an approach for comparing modelling strategies in linear regression to the setting of logistic regression and demonstrate its application in

  19. Comparing the effect of aqueous extract of green tea and catechin on gonadotropins, β-estradiol, Progesterone, testosterone and ovarian follicle in polycystic ovarian syndrome rat model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayed Damoon Sadoughi

    2017-09-01

    Conclusion: Compared with green tea, catechin has a more favorable effect on improving hormonal parameters, especially FSH hormone and increasing the number of ovarian follicles in rats with polycystic ovary syndrome.

  20. 11 CFR 7.8 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... affected by the performance or nonperformance of the Commissioner or employee's official duty. (b... Employees or Commissioners § 7.8 Gifts, entertainment, and favors. (a) A Commissioner or employee of the... persons concerned which are the motivating factors; (2) To the acceptance of food, refreshments, and...

  1. 22 CFR 1203.735-305 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 1203.735-305 Section 1203.735-305 Foreign Relations UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION AGENCY EMPLOYEE RESPONSIBILITIES AND CONDUCT Ethical and Other Conduct and Responsibilities of Special Government Employees § 1203...

  2. 22 CFR 1203.735-202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 22 Foreign Relations 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 1203.735-202 Section 1203.735-202 Foreign Relations UNITED STATES INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT COOPERATION AGENCY EMPLOYEE..., contractual or other business or financial relations with the employee's agency; (2) Conducts operations or...

  3. Preschoolers Reduce Inequality While Favoring Individuals with More

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Vivian; Spitzer, Brian; Olson, Kristina R.

    2014-01-01

    Inequalities are everywhere, yet little is known about how children respond to people affected by inequalities. This article explores two responses--minimizing inequalities and favoring those who are advantaged by them. In Studies 1a (N = 37) and 1b (N = 38), 4- and 5-year-olds allocated a resource to a disadvantaged recipient, but judged…

  4. 18 CFR 706.202 - Gifts, entertainment, and favors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Gifts, entertainment, and favors. 706.202 Section 706.202 Conservation of Power and Water Resources WATER RESOURCES COUNCIL... loans from banks or other financial institutions on customary terms to finance proper and usual...

  5. Comparing the effect of modeled climatic variables on the distribution of African horse sickness in South Africa and Namibia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebenberg, Danica; van Hamburg, Huib; Piketh, Stuart; Burger, Roelof

    2015-12-01

    Africa horse sickness (AHS) is a lethal disease of horses with a seasonal occurrence that is influenced by environmental conditions that favor the development of Culicoides midges (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae). This study compared and evaluated the relationship of various modeled climatic variables with the distribution and abundance of AHS in South Africa and Namibia. A comprehensive literature review of the historical AHS reported data collected from the Windhoek archives as well as annual reports from the Directorate of Veterinary services in Namibia were conducted. South African AHS reported data were collected from the South African Department of Agriculture, Forestry, and Fisheries. Daily climatic data were extracted for the time period 1993-2011 from the ERA-interim re-analysis dataset. The principal component analysis of the complete dataset indicated a significant statistical difference between Namibia and South Africa for the various climate variables and the outbreaks of AHS. The most influential parameters in the distribution of AHS included humidity, precipitation, evaporation, and minimum temperature. In South Africa, temperature had the most significant effect on the outbreaks of AHS, whereas in Namibia, humidity and precipitation were the main drivers. The maximum AHS cases in South Africa occurred at temperatures of 20-22° C and relative humidity between 50-70%. Furthermore, anthropogenic effects must be taken into account when trying to understand the distribution of AHS. © 2015 The Society for Vector Ecology.

  6. Non-invasive tumescent cryolipolysis using a new 4D handpiece: a comparative study with a porcine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S Y; Kwon, T R; Seok, J; Park, K Y; Kim, B J

    2017-02-01

    The growing demand for a youthful appearance, including a favorable body shape, has motivated recent developments in noninvasive body contouring techniques. Our aim was to investigate the efficacy and safety of a new version of a 4D handpiece-mounted cooling device for cryolipolysis with or without tumescent injections. We conducted a side-by-side comparative study using two female porcine models. Two areas of each pig's left abdomen were treated using a conventional device and the new cooling device, and two areas of the right abdomen were also treated using the conventional and new cooling device, but both were combined with tumescent-solution injections. The conventional method alone yielded a 75.25% reduction in skin thickness, while the new cooling device alone yielded a 81.63% reduction. When paired with tumescent injections, the conventional device yielded a 86.3% reduction in skin thickness and the cooling device yielded a 85.9% reduction. Using histological analysis with H&E, oil red O, and toluidine blue stain, we confirmed that selective cryolipolysis was able to induce selective apoptosis of fat cells. This in vivo study presents a new 4D handpiece-assisted cooling device with tumescent anesthesia that is safe and effective for fat reduction. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Comparative Research on RC Equivalent Circuit Models for Lithium-Ion Batteries of Electric Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijun Zhang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Equivalent circuit models are a hot research topic in the field of lithium-ion batteries for electric vehicles, and scholars have proposed a variety of equivalent circuit models, from simple to complex. On one hand, a simple model cannot simulate the dynamic characteristics of batteries; on the other hand, it is difficult to apply a complex model to a real-time system. At present, there are few systematic comparative studies on equivalent circuit models of lithium-ion batteries. The representative first-order resistor-capacitor (RC model and second-order RC model commonly used in the literature are studied comparatively in this paper. Firstly, the parameters of the two models are identified experimentally; secondly, the simulation model is built in Matlab/Simulink environment, and finally the output precision of these two models is verified by the actual data. The results show that in the constant current condition, the maximum error of the first-order RC model is 1.65% and the maximum error for the second-order RC model is 1.22%. In urban dynamometer driving schedule (UDDS condition, the maximum error of the first-order RC model is 1.88%, and for the second-order RC model the maximum error is 1.69%. This is of great instructional significance to the application in practical battery management systems for the equivalent circuit model of lithium-ion batteries of electric vehicles.

  8. Prospective comparative effectiveness cohort study comparing two models of advance care planning provision for Australian community aged care clients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detering, Karen Margaret; Carter, Rachel Zoe; Sellars, Marcus William; Lewis, Virginia; Sutton, Elizabeth Anne

    2017-12-01

    Conduct a prospective comparative effectiveness cohort study comparing two models of advance care planning (ACP) provision in community aged care: ACP conducted by the client's case manager (CM) ('Facilitator') and ACP conducted by an external ACP service ('Referral') over a 6-month period. This Australian study involved CMs and their clients. Eligible CM were English speaking, ≥18 years, had expected availability for the trial and worked ≥3 days per week. CMs were recruited via their organisations, sequentially allocated to a group and received education based on the group allocation. They were expected to initiate ACP with all clients and to facilitate ACP or refer for ACP. Outcomes were quantity of new ACP conversations and quantity and quality of new advance care directives (ACDs). 30 CMs (16 Facilitator, 14 Referral) completed the study; all 784 client's files (427 Facilitator, 357 Referral) were audited. ACP was initiated with 508 (65%) clients (293 Facilitator, 215 Referral; p<0.05); 89 (18%) of these (53 Facilitator, 36 Referral) and 41 (46%) (13 Facilitator, 28 Referral; p<0.005) completed ACDs. Most ACDs (71%) were of poor quality/not valid. A further 167 clients (facilitator 124; referral 43; p<0.005) reported ACP was in progress at study completion. While there were some differences, overall, models achieved similar outcomes. ACP was initiated with 65% of clients. However, fewer clients completed ACP, there was low numbers of ACDs and document quality was generally poor. The findings raise questions for future implementation and research into community ACP provision. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Exploration of freely available web-interfaces for comparative homology modelling of microbial proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nema, Vijay; Pal, Sudhir Kumar

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to find the best suited freely available software for modelling of proteins by taking a few sample proteins. The proteins used were small to big in size with available crystal structures for the purpose of benchmarking. Key players like Phyre2, Swiss-Model, CPHmodels-3.0, Homer, (PS)2, (PS)(2)-V(2), Modweb were used for the comparison and model generation. Benchmarking process was done for four proteins, Icl, InhA, and KatG of Mycobacterium tuberculosis and RpoB of Thermus Thermophilus to get the most suited software. Parameters compared during analysis gave relatively better values for Phyre2 and Swiss-Model. This comparative study gave the information that Phyre2 and Swiss-Model make good models of small and large proteins as compared to other screened software. Other software was also good but is often not very efficient in providing full-length and properly folded structure.

  10. Comparing large-scale computational approaches to epidemic modeling: Agent-based versus structured metapopulation models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merler Stefano

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In recent years large-scale computational models for the realistic simulation of epidemic outbreaks have been used with increased frequency. Methodologies adapt to the scale of interest and range from very detailed agent-based models to spatially-structured metapopulation models. One major issue thus concerns to what extent the geotemporal spreading pattern found by different modeling approaches may differ and depend on the different approximations and assumptions used. Methods We provide for the first time a side-by-side comparison of the results obtained with a stochastic agent-based model and a structured metapopulation stochastic model for the progression of a baseline pandemic event in Italy, a large and geographically heterogeneous European country. The agent-based model is based on the explicit representation of the Italian population through highly detailed data on the socio-demographic structure. The metapopulation simulations use the GLobal Epidemic and Mobility (GLEaM model, based on high-resolution census data worldwide, and integrating airline travel flow data with short-range human mobility patterns at the global scale. The model also considers age structure data for Italy. GLEaM and the agent-based models are synchronized in their initial conditions by using the same disease parameterization, and by defining the same importation of infected cases from international travels. Results The results obtained show that both models provide epidemic patterns that are in very good agreement at the granularity levels accessible by both approaches, with differences in peak timing on the order of a few days. The relative difference of the epidemic size depends on the basic reproductive ratio, R0, and on the fact that the metapopulation model consistently yields a larger incidence than the agent-based model, as expected due to the differences in the structure in the intra-population contact pattern of the approaches. The age

  11. Comparing large-scale computational approaches to epidemic modeling: agent-based versus structured metapopulation models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ajelli, Marco; Gonçalves, Bruno; Balcan, Duygu; Colizza, Vittoria; Hu, Hao; Ramasco, José J; Merler, Stefano; Vespignani, Alessandro

    2010-06-29

    In recent years large-scale computational models for the realistic simulation of epidemic outbreaks have been used with increased frequency. Methodologies adapt to the scale of interest and range from very detailed agent-based models to spatially-structured metapopulation models. One major issue thus concerns to what extent the geotemporal spreading pattern found by different modeling approaches may differ and depend on the different approximations and assumptions used. We provide for the first time a side-by-side comparison of the results obtained with a stochastic agent-based model and a structured metapopulation stochastic model for the progression of a baseline pandemic event in Italy, a large and geographically heterogeneous European country. The agent-based model is based on the explicit representation of the Italian population through highly detailed data on the socio-demographic structure. The metapopulation simulations use the GLobal Epidemic and Mobility (GLEaM) model, based on high-resolution census data worldwide, and integrating airline travel flow data with short-range human mobility patterns at the global scale. The model also considers age structure data for Italy. GLEaM and the agent-based models are synchronized in their initial conditions by using the same disease parameterization, and by defining the same importation of infected cases from international travels. The results obtained show that both models provide epidemic patterns that are in very good agreement at the granularity levels accessible by both approaches, with differences in peak timing on the order of a few days. The relative difference of the epidemic size depends on the basic reproductive ratio, R0, and on the fact that the metapopulation model consistently yields a larger incidence than the agent-based model, as expected due to the differences in the structure in the intra-population contact pattern of the approaches. The age breakdown analysis shows that similar attack rates are

  12. The canine 'groove' model, compared with the ACLT model of osteoarthritis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marijnissen, A.C.A.; Roermund, P.M. van; TeKoppele, J.M.; Bijlsma, J.W.J.; Lafeber, F.P.J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Objective: The frequently used anterior cruciate ligament transection (ACLT) model of osteoarthritis (OA) in the dog, makes use of a permanent trigger (joint instability) for inducing degenerative changes. The present study evaluates a canine model of degenerative cartilage damage, mimicking OA,

  13. The utility of comparative models and the local model quality for protein crystal structure determination by Molecular Replacement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawlowski Marcin

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Computational models of protein structures were proved to be useful as search models in Molecular Replacement (MR, a common method to solve the phase problem faced by macromolecular crystallography. The success of MR depends on the accuracy of a search model. Unfortunately, this parameter remains unknown until the final structure of the target protein is determined. During the last few years, several Model Quality Assessment Programs (MQAPs that predict the local accuracy of theoretical models have been developed. In this article, we analyze whether the application of MQAPs improves the utility of theoretical models in MR. Results For our dataset of 615 search models, the real local accuracy of a model increases the MR success ratio by 101% compared to corresponding polyalanine templates. On the contrary, when local model quality is not utilized in MR, the computational models solved only 4.5% more MR searches than polyalanine templates. For the same dataset of the 615 models, a workflow combining MR with predicted local accuracy of a model found 45% more correct solution than polyalanine templates. To predict such accuracy MetaMQAPclust, a “clustering MQAP” was used. Conclusions Using comparative models only marginally increases the MR success ratio in comparison to polyalanine structures of templates. However, the situation changes dramatically once comparative models are used together with their predicted local accuracy. A new functionality was added to the GeneSilico Fold Prediction Metaserver in order to build models that are more useful for MR searches. Additionally, we have developed a simple method, AmIgoMR (Am I good for MR?, to predict if an MR search with a template-based model for a given template is likely to find the correct solution.

  14. A generalização a partir do tratamento com fricativas: ambientes favoráveis versus ambientes pouco favoráveis e neutros The generalization through the treatment with fricatives: favorable environments versus unfavorable and neutral environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Marafiga Wiethan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar e comparar a ocorrência e os tipos de generalização observados a partir do tratamento das fricativas /z/, /ζ/ e /k/ em dois grupos de crianças, um utilizando palavras com contextos fonológicos favoráveis e outro os contextos pouco favoráveis e neutros. Seis crianças com desvio fonológico e idades entre 4:7 e 7:8 participaram do estudo com a autorização dos responsáveis. Realizaram-se avaliações fonoaudiológicas e complementares para o diagnóstico do desvio fonológico. Os sujeitos foram pareados de acordo com a gravidade do desvio, sexo, faixa etária e aspectos do sistema fonológico em relação aos fonemas alterados. Metade das crianças foi tratada com palavras em que os fonemas /z/, /ζ/ e /k/ encontravam-se em ambientes fonológicos favoráveis e a outra metade com ambientes pouco favoráveis e neutros. Foram realizadas oito sessões e, após estas, nova avaliação de fala foi realizada para verificar os tipos de generalização obtidos. Os percentuais de generalizações foram comparados entre os grupos por meio do teste estatístico de Mann-Whitney (pThe aim of this study was to analyze and compare the occurrence and the types of generalization observed through the treatment of the fricatives /z/, /ζ/ and /k/ in two groups of children, one using words with favorable phonological contexts and another with unfavorable and neutral contexts. Six children with phonological disorder between 4:7 and 7:8 year-old participated in the study, with their parents' authorization. There were speech-language and complementary evaluations to diagnose the phonological disorder. The subjects were matched according to the severity of the phonological disorder, sex, age and aspects of the phonological system in relation to the altered phonemes. Half the children were treated with words in which the phonemes /z/, /ζ/ and /k/ were in favorable phonological environments and the other half with unfavorable

  15. AeroCom INSITU Project: Comparing modeled and measured aerosol optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Elisabeth; Schmeisser, Lauren; Schulz, Michael; Fiebig, Markus; Ogren, John; Bian, Huisheng; Chin, Mian; Easter, Richard; Ghan, Steve; Kokkola, Harri; Laakso, Anton; Myhre, Gunnar; Randles, Cynthia; da Silva, Arlindo; Stier, Phillip; Skeie, Ragnehild; Takemura, Toshihiko; van Noije, Twan; Zhang, Kai

    2016-04-01

    AeroCom, an open international collaboration of scientists seeking to improve global aerosol models, recently initiated a project comparing model output to in-situ, surface-based measurements of aerosol optical properties. The model/measurement comparison project, called INSITU, aims to evaluate the performance of a suite of AeroCom aerosol models with site-specific observational data in order to inform iterative improvements to model aerosol modules. Surface in-situ data has the unique property of being traceable to physical standards, which is an asset in accomplishing the overall goal of bettering the accuracy of aerosols processes and the predicative capability of global climate models. Here we compare dry, in-situ aerosol scattering and absorption data from ~75 surface, in-situ sites from various global aerosol networks (including NOAA, EUSAAR/ACTRIS and GAW) with a simulated optical properties from a suite of models participating in the AeroCom project. We report how well models reproduce aerosol climatologies for a variety of time scales, aerosol characteristics and behaviors (e.g., aerosol persistence and the systematic relationships between aerosol optical properties), and aerosol trends. Though INSITU is a multi-year endeavor, preliminary phases of the analysis suggest substantial model biases in absorption and scattering coefficients compared to surface measurements, though the sign and magnitude of the bias varies with location. Spatial patterns in the biases highlight model weaknesses, e.g., the inability of models to properly simulate aerosol characteristics at sites with complex topography. Additionally, differences in modeled and measured systematic variability of aerosol optical properties suggest that some models are not accurately capturing specific aerosol behaviors, for example, the tendency of in-situ single scattering albedo to decrease with decreasing aerosol extinction coefficient. The endgoal of the INSITU project is to identify specific

  16. Comparative study of boron transport models in NRC Thermal-Hydraulic Code Trace

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olmo-Juan, Nicolás; Barrachina, Teresa; Miró, Rafael; Verdú, Gumersindo; Pereira, Claubia, E-mail: nioljua@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: tbarrachina@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: rmiro@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: gverdu@iqn.upv.es, E-mail: claubia@nuclear.ufmg.br [Institute for Industrial, Radiophysical and Environmental Safety (ISIRYM). Universitat Politècnica de València (Spain); Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear

    2017-07-01

    Recently, the interest in the study of various types of transients involving changes in the boron concentration inside the reactor, has led to an increase in the interest of developing and studying new models and tools that allow a correct study of boron transport. Therefore, a significant variety of different boron transport models and spatial difference schemes are available in the thermal-hydraulic codes, as TRACE. According to this interest, in this work it will be compared the results obtained using the different boron transport models implemented in the NRC thermal-hydraulic code TRACE. To do this, a set of models have been created using the different options and configurations that could have influence in boron transport. These models allow to reproduce a simple event of filling or emptying the boron concentration in a long pipe. Moreover, with the aim to compare the differences obtained when one-dimensional or three-dimensional components are chosen, it has modeled many different cases using only pipe components or a mix of pipe and vessel components. In addition, the influence of the void fraction in the boron transport has been studied and compared under close conditions to BWR commercial model. A final collection of the different cases and boron transport models are compared between them and those corresponding to the analytical solution provided by the Burgers equation. From this comparison, important conclusions are drawn that will be the basis of modeling the boron transport in TRACE adequately. (author)

  17. Animal Models for Evaluation of Bone Implants and Devices: Comparative Bone Structure and Common Model Uses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wancket, L M

    2015-09-01

    Bone implants and devices are a rapidly growing field within biomedical research, and implants have the potential to significantly improve human and animal health. Animal models play a key role in initial product development and are important components of nonclinical data included in applications for regulatory approval. Pathologists are increasingly being asked to evaluate these models at the initial developmental and nonclinical biocompatibility testing stages, and it is important to understand the relative merits and deficiencies of various species when evaluating a new material or device. This article summarizes characteristics of the most commonly used species in studies of bone implant materials, including detailed information about the relevance of a particular model to human bone physiology and pathology. Species reviewed include mice, rats, rabbits, guinea pigs, dogs, sheep, goats, and nonhuman primates. Ultimately, a comprehensive understanding of the benefits and limitations of different model species will aid in rigorously evaluating a novel bone implant material or device. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Learning acceleration for gifted students: Favorable and unfavorable arguments

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues Maia-Pinto, Renata; Souza Fleith, Denise de

    2012-01-01

    This paper analyzes acceleration in education as a practice for meeting the educational needs of gifted students, and points out favorable and unfavorable arguments on the use of this practice. Acceleration is an educational practice consisting of several teaching strategies designed to encourage academically gifted students and reduce their time spent in school. It promotes faster learning by matching the curriculum to the student’s level of knowledge, interest and motivation. There are seve...

  19. Experience gained with the application of the MODIS diffusion model compared with the ATMOS Gauss-function-based model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, A.

    1985-01-01

    The advantage of the Gauss-function-based models doubtlessly consists in their proven propagation parameter sets and empirical stack plume rise formulas and in their easy matchability and handability. However, grid models based on trace matter transport equation are more convincing concerning their fundamental principle. Grid models of the MODIS type are to acquire a practical applicability comparable to Gauss models by developing techniques allowing to consider the vertical self-movement of the plumes in grid models and to secure improved diffusion co-efficient determination. (orig./PW) [de

  20. Comparative Analysis of Behavioral Models for Adaptive Learning in Changing Environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marković, Dimitrije; Kiebel, Stefan J

    2016-01-01

    Probabilistic models of decision making under various forms of uncertainty have been applied in recent years to numerous behavioral and model-based fMRI studies. These studies were highly successful in enabling a better understanding of behavior and delineating the functional properties of brain areas involved in decision making under uncertainty. However, as different studies considered different models of decision making under uncertainty, it is unclear which of these computational models provides the best account of the observed behavioral and neuroimaging data. This is an important issue, as not performing model comparison may tempt researchers to over-interpret results based on a single model. Here we describe how in practice one can compare different behavioral models and test the accuracy of model comparison and parameter estimation of Bayesian and maximum-likelihood based methods. We focus our analysis on two well-established hierarchical probabilistic models that aim at capturing the evolution of beliefs in changing environments: Hierarchical Gaussian Filters and Change Point Models. To our knowledge, these two, well-established models have never been compared on the same data. We demonstrate, using simulated behavioral experiments, that one can accurately disambiguate between these two models, and accurately infer free model parameters and hidden belief trajectories (e.g., posterior expectations, posterior uncertainties, and prediction errors) even when using noisy and highly correlated behavioral measurements. Importantly, we found several advantages of Bayesian inference and Bayesian model comparison compared to often-used Maximum-Likelihood schemes combined with the Bayesian Information Criterion. These results stress the relevance of Bayesian data analysis for model-based neuroimaging studies that investigate human decision making under uncertainty.

  1. Comparing habitat suitability and connectivity modeling methods for conserving pronghorn migrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E Poor

    Full Text Available Terrestrial long-distance migrations are declining globally: in North America, nearly 75% have been lost. Yet there has been limited research comparing habitat suitability and connectivity models to identify migration corridors across increasingly fragmented landscapes. Here we use pronghorn (Antilocapra americana migrations in prairie habitat to compare two types of models that identify habitat suitability: maximum entropy (Maxent and expert-based (Analytic Hierarchy Process. We used distance to wells, distance to water, NDVI, land cover, distance to roads, terrain shape and fence presence to parameterize the models. We then used the output of these models as cost surfaces to compare two common connectivity models, least-cost modeling (LCM and circuit theory. Using pronghorn movement data from spring and fall migrations, we identified potential migration corridors by combining each habitat suitability model with each connectivity model. The best performing model combination was Maxent with LCM corridors across both seasons. Maxent out-performed expert-based habitat suitability models for both spring and fall migrations. However, expert-based corridors can perform relatively well and are a cost-effective alternative if species location data are unavailable. Corridors created using LCM out-performed circuit theory, as measured by the number of pronghorn GPS locations present within the corridors. We suggest the use of a tiered approach using different corridor widths for prioritizing conservation and mitigation actions, such as fence removal or conservation easements.

  2. Comparing habitat suitability and connectivity modeling methods for conserving pronghorn migrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poor, Erin E; Loucks, Colby; Jakes, Andrew; Urban, Dean L

    2012-01-01

    Terrestrial long-distance migrations are declining globally: in North America, nearly 75% have been lost. Yet there has been limited research comparing habitat suitability and connectivity models to identify migration corridors across increasingly fragmented landscapes. Here we use pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) migrations in prairie habitat to compare two types of models that identify habitat suitability: maximum entropy (Maxent) and expert-based (Analytic Hierarchy Process). We used distance to wells, distance to water, NDVI, land cover, distance to roads, terrain shape and fence presence to parameterize the models. We then used the output of these models as cost surfaces to compare two common connectivity models, least-cost modeling (LCM) and circuit theory. Using pronghorn movement data from spring and fall migrations, we identified potential migration corridors by combining each habitat suitability model with each connectivity model. The best performing model combination was Maxent with LCM corridors across both seasons. Maxent out-performed expert-based habitat suitability models for both spring and fall migrations. However, expert-based corridors can perform relatively well and are a cost-effective alternative if species location data are unavailable. Corridors created using LCM out-performed circuit theory, as measured by the number of pronghorn GPS locations present within the corridors. We suggest the use of a tiered approach using different corridor widths for prioritizing conservation and mitigation actions, such as fence removal or conservation easements.

  3. Effects of stimulus order on discrimination processes in comparative and equality judgements: data and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyjas, Oliver; Ulrich, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    In typical discrimination experiments, participants are presented with a constant standard and a variable comparison stimulus and their task is to judge which of these two stimuli is larger (comparative judgement). In these experiments, discrimination sensitivity depends on the temporal order of these stimuli (Type B effect) and is usually higher when the standard precedes rather than follows the comparison. Here, we outline how two models of stimulus discrimination can account for the Type B effect, namely the weighted difference model (or basic Sensation Weighting model) and the Internal Reference Model. For both models, the predicted psychometric functions for comparative judgements as well as for equality judgements, in which participants indicate whether they perceived the two stimuli to be equal or not equal, are derived and it is shown that the models also predict a Type B effect for equality judgements. In the empirical part, the models' predictions are evaluated. To this end, participants performed a duration discrimination task with comparative judgements and with equality judgements. In line with the models' predictions, a Type B effect was observed for both judgement types. In addition, a time-order error, as indicated by shifts of the psychometric functions, and differences in response times were observed only for the equality judgement. Since both models entail distinct additional predictions, it seems worthwhile for future research to unite the two models into one conceptual framework.

  4. What can be learned from computer modeling? Comparing expository and modeling approaches to teaching dynamic systems behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Borkulo, S.P.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/297554727; van Joolingen, W.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/073458872; Savelsbergh, E.R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/17345853X; de Jong, T.

    2012-01-01

    Computer modeling has been widely promoted as a means to attain higher order learning outcomes. Substantiating these benefits, however, has been problematic due to a lack of proper assessment tools. In this study, we compared computer modeling with expository instruction, using a tailored assessment

  5. Comparing Video Modeling and Graduated Guidance Together and Video Modeling Alone for Teaching Role Playing Skills to Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akmanoglu, Nurgul; Yanardag, Mehmet; Batu, E. Sema

    2014-01-01

    Teaching play skills is important for children with autism. The purpose of the present study was to compare effectiveness and efficiency of providing video modeling and graduated guidance together and video modeling alone for teaching role playing skills to children with autism. The study was conducted with four students. The study was conducted…

  6. Menor valor: ¿oferta más favorable?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iván Alirio Ramírez Rusinque

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available La más importante transformación establecida por la Ley 1150 de 2007 en la contratación estatal radicó en la determinación del menor valor como la oferta más favorable para las entidades estatales, cuando se trate de la adquisición o suministro de bienes y servicios de características técnicas uniformes y de común utilización. Por ello, reviste de gran importancia realizar un análisis desde el punto de vista jurídico y normativo, que permita establecer si la mutación sufrida al concepto de oferta más favorable trajo consigo los fines perseguidos por la reforma, o en su defecto fue perjudicial la solución, al afectar el deber de selección objetiva, los principios de la contratación estatal de igualdad, eficacia, transparencia, planeación y equilibrio financiero del contrato y el principio constitucional de la libre competencia. Para de esta forma establecer si el modelo del menor valor como criterio de la oferta más favorable resulta eficiente jurídicamente en el campo de la contratación estatal, y si las reglas establecidas en la actualidad permiten el desarrollo armónico del sistema establecido por la Ley 1150 de 2007.

  7. A Comparative Study of Spectral Auroral Intensity Predictions From Multiple Electron Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grubbs, Guy; Michell, Robert; Samara, Marilia; Hampton, Donald; Hecht, James; Solomon, Stanley; Jahn, Jorg-Micha

    2018-01-01

    It is important to routinely examine and update models used to predict auroral emissions resulting from precipitating electrons in Earth's magnetotail. These models are commonly used to invert spectral auroral ground-based images to infer characteristics about incident electron populations when in situ measurements are unavailable. In this work, we examine and compare auroral emission intensities predicted by three commonly used electron transport models using varying electron population characteristics. We then compare model predictions to same-volume in situ electron measurements and ground-based imaging to qualitatively examine modeling prediction error. Initial comparisons showed differences in predictions by the GLobal airglOW (GLOW) model and the other transport models examined. Chemical reaction rates and radiative rates in GLOW were updated using recent publications, and predictions showed better agreement with the other models and the same-volume data, stressing that these rates are important to consider when modeling auroral processes. Predictions by each model exhibit similar behavior for varying atmospheric constants, energies, and energy fluxes. Same-volume electron data and images are highly correlated with predictions by each model, showing that these models can be used to accurately derive electron characteristics and ionospheric parameters based solely on multispectral optical imaging data.

  8. Comparative study of surrogate models for groundwater contamination source identification at DNAPL-contaminated sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zeyu; Lu, Wenxi

    2018-05-01

    Knowledge of groundwater contamination sources is critical for effectively protecting groundwater resources, estimating risks, mitigating disaster, and designing remediation strategies. Many methods for groundwater contamination source identification (GCSI) have been developed in recent years, including the simulation-optimization technique. This study proposes utilizing a support vector regression (SVR) model and a kernel extreme learning machine (KELM) model to enrich the content of the surrogate model. The surrogate model was itself key in replacing the simulation model, reducing the huge computational burden of iterations in the simulation-optimization technique to solve GCSI problems, especially in GCSI problems of aquifers contaminated by dense nonaqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). A comparative study between the Kriging, SVR, and KELM models is reported. Additionally, there is analysis of the influence of parameter optimization and the structure of the training sample dataset on the approximation accuracy of the surrogate model. It was found that the KELM model was the most accurate surrogate model, and its performance was significantly improved after parameter optimization. The approximation accuracy of the surrogate model to the simulation model did not always improve with increasing numbers of training samples. Using the appropriate number of training samples was critical for improving the performance of the surrogate model and avoiding unnecessary computational workload. It was concluded that the KELM model developed in this work could reasonably predict system responses in given operation conditions. Replacing the simulation model with a KELM model considerably reduced the computational burden of the simulation-optimization process and also maintained high computation accuracy.

  9. A comparative study between EGB gravity and GTR by modeling compact stars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhar, Piyali [Government General Degree College, Department of Mathematics, Hooghly, West Bengal (India); Govender, Megan [Durban University of Technology, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Durban (South Africa); Sharma, Ranjan [P. D. Women' s College, Department of Physics, Jalpaiguri (India)

    2017-02-15

    In this paper we utilise the Krori-Barua ansatz to model compact stars within the framework of Einstein-Gauss-Bonnet (EGB) gravity. The thrust of our investigation is to carry out a comparative analysis of the physical properties of our models in EGB and classical general relativity theory with the help of graphical representation. From our analysis we have shown that the central density and central pressure of EGB star model is higher than the GTR star model. The most notable feature is that for both GTR and the EGB star model the compactness factor crosses the Buchdahl (Phys Rev 116:1027, 1959) limit. (orig.)

  10. Somatic mutations favorable to patient survival are predominant in ovarian carcinomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Somatic mutation accumulation is a major cause of abnormal cell growth. However, some mutations in cancer cells may be deleterious to the survival and proliferation of the cancer cells, thus offering a protective effect to the patients. We investigated this hypothesis via a unique analysis of the clinical and somatic mutation datasets of ovarian carcinomas published by the Cancer Genome Atlas. We defined and screened 562 macro mutation signatures (MMSs for their associations with the overall survival of 320 ovarian cancer patients. Each MMS measures the number of mutations present on the member genes (except for TP53 covered by a specific Gene Ontology (GO term in each tumor. We found that somatic mutations favorable to the patient survival are predominant in ovarian carcinomas compared to those indicating poor clinical outcomes. Specially, we identified 19 (3 predictive MMSs that are, usually by a nonlinear dose-dependent effect, associated with good (poor patient survival. The false discovery rate for the 19 "positive" predictors is at the level of 0.15. The GO terms corresponding to these MMSs include "lysosomal membrane" and "response to hypoxia", each of which is relevant to the progression and therapy of cancer. Using these MMSs as features, we established a classification tree model which can effectively partition the training samples into three prognosis groups regarding the survival time. We validated this model on an independent dataset of the same disease (Log-rank p-value < 2.3 × 10(-4 and a dataset of breast cancer (Log-rank p-value < 9.3 × 10(-3. We compared the GO terms corresponding to these MMSs and those enriched with expression-based predictive genes. The analysis showed that the GO term pairs with large similarity are mainly pertinent to the proteins located on the cell organelles responsible for material transport and waste disposal, suggesting the crucial role of these proteins in cancer mortality.

  11. Comparing Multidimensional and Continuum Models of Vocabulary Acquisition: An Empirical Examination of the Vocabulary Knowledge Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Jeffrey; Batty, Aaron Olaf; Bovee, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    Second language vocabulary acquisition has been modeled both as multidimensional in nature and as a continuum wherein the learner's knowledge of a word develops along a cline from recognition through production. In order to empirically examine and compare these models, the authors assess the degree to which the Vocabulary Knowledge Scale (VKS;…

  12. A comparative study of two fast nonlinear free-surface water wave models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ducrozet, Guillaume; Bingham, Harry B.; Engsig-Karup, Allan Peter

    2012-01-01

    simply directly solves the three-dimensional problem. Both models have been well validated on standard test cases and shown to exhibit attractive convergence properties and an optimal scaling of the computational effort with increasing problem size. These two models are compared for solution of a typical...

  13. On Applications of Rasch Models in International Comparative Large-Scale Assessments: A Historical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, Heike; Bos, Wilfried; Goy, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Several current international comparative large-scale assessments of educational achievement (ICLSA) make use of "Rasch models", to address functions essential for valid cross-cultural comparisons. From a historical perspective, ICLSA and Georg Rasch's "models for measurement" emerged at about the same time, half a century ago. However, the…

  14. Comparing fire spread algorithms using equivalence testing and neutral landscape models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian R. Miranda; Brian R. Sturtevant; Jian Yang; Eric J. Gustafson

    2009-01-01

    We demonstrate a method to evaluate the degree to which a meta-model approximates spatial disturbance processes represented by a more detailed model across a range of landscape conditions, using neutral landscapes and equivalence testing. We illustrate this approach by comparing burn patterns produced by a relatively simple fire spread algorithm with those generated by...

  15. How do farm models compare when estimating greenhouse gas emissions from dairy cattle production?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hutchings, Nicholas John; Özkan, Şeyda; de Haan, M

    2018-01-01

    feed imported. This was because the models differed in their description of biophysical responses and feedback mechanisms, and in the extent to which management functions were internalised. We conclude that comparing the results of different farm-scale models when applied to a range of scenarios would...

  16. Comparative nonlinear modeling of renal autoregulation in rats: Volterra approach versus artificial neural networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chon, K H; Holstein-Rathlou, N H; Marsh, D J

    1998-01-01

    In this paper, feedforward neural networks with two types of activation functions (sigmoidal and polynomial) are utilized for modeling the nonlinear dynamic relation between renal blood pressure and flow data, and their performance is compared to Volterra models obtained by use of the leading...... kernel estimation method based on Laguerre expansions. The results for the two types of artificial neural networks and the Volterra models are comparable in terms of normalized mean square error (NMSE) of the respective output prediction for independent testing data. However, the Volterra models obtained...... via the Laguerre expansion technique achieve this prediction NMSE with approximately half the number of free parameters relative to either neural-network model. However, both approaches are deemed effective in modeling nonlinear dynamic systems and their cooperative use is recommended in general....

  17. The Consensus String Problem and the Complexity of Comparing Hidden Markov Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngsø, Rune Bang; Pedersen, Christian Nørgaard Storm

    2002-01-01

    The basic theory of hidden Markov models was developed and applied to problems in speech recognition in the late 1960s, and has since then been applied to numerous problems, e.g. biological sequence analysis. Most applications of hidden Markov models are based on efficient algorithms for computing...... the probability of generating a given string, or computing the most likely path generating a given string. In this paper we consider the problem of computing the most likely string, or consensus string, generated by a given model, and its implications on the complexity of comparing hidden Markov models. We show...... that computing the consensus string, and approximating its probability within any constant factor, is NP-hard, and that the same holds for the closely related labeling problem for class hidden Markov models. Furthermore, we establish the NP-hardness of comparing two hidden Markov models under the L∞- and L1...

  18. Comparative Analysis of Smart Meters Deployment Business Models on the Example of the Russian Federation Markets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daminov Ildar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the comparison of smart meter deployment business models to determine the most suitable option providing smart meters deployment. Authors consider 3 main business model of companies: distribution grid company, energy supplier (energosbyt and metering company. The goal of the article is to compare the business models of power companies from massive smart metering roll out in power system of Russian Federation.

  19. Modelling carbon stocks and fluxes in the wood product sector: a comparative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet-Navarro, Pau; Jochheim, Hubert; Muys, Bart

    2016-07-01

    In addition to forest ecosystems, wood products are carbon pools that can be strategically managed to mitigate climate change. Wood product models (WPMs) simulating the carbon balance of wood production, use and end of life can complement forest growth models to evaluate the mitigation potential of the forest sector as a whole. WPMs can be used to compare scenarios of product use and explore mitigation strategies. A considerable number of WPMs have been developed in the last three decades, but there is no review available analysing their functionality and performance. This study analyses and compares 41 WPMs. One surprising initial result was that we discovered the erroneous implementation of a few concepts and assumptions in some of the models. We further described and compared the models using six model characteristics (bucking allocation, industrial processes, carbon pools, product removal, recycling and substitution effects) and three model-use characteristics (system boundaries, model initialization and evaluation of results). Using a set of indicators based on the model characteristics, we classified models using a hierarchical clustering technique and differentiated them according to their increasing degrees of complexity and varying levels of user support. For purposes of simulating carbon stock in wood products, models with a simple structure may be sufficient, but to compare climate change mitigation options, complex models are needed. The number of models has increased substantially over the last ten years, introducing more diversity and accuracy. Calculation of substitution effects and recycling has also become more prominent. However, the lack of data is still an important constraint for a more realistic estimation of carbon stocks and fluxes. Therefore, if the sector wants to demonstrate the environmental quality of its products, it should make it a priority to provide reliable life cycle inventory data, particularly regarding aspects of time and

  20. Comparing predictive models of glioblastoma multiforme built using multi-institutional and local data sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Kyle W; Hsu, William; Bui, Alex A T

    2012-01-01

    The growing amount of electronic data collected from patient care and clinical trials is motivating the creation of national repositories where multiple institutions share data about their patient cohorts. Such efforts aim to provide sufficient sample sizes for data mining and predictive modeling, ultimately improving treatment recommendations and patient outcome prediction. While these repositories offer the potential to improve our understanding of a disease, potential issues need to be addressed to ensure that multi-site data and resultant predictive models are useful to non-contributing institutions. In this paper we examine the challenges of utilizing National Cancer Institute datasets for modeling glioblastoma multiforme. We created several types of prognostic models and compared their results against models generated using data solely from our institution. While overall model performance between the data sources was similar, different variables were selected during model generation, suggesting that mapping data resources between models is not a straightforward issue.

  1. Comparative analysis of diffused solar radiation models for optimum tilt angle determination for Indian locations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yadav, P.; Chandel, S.S.

    2014-01-01

    Tilt angle and orientation greatly are influenced on the performance of the solar photo voltaic panels. The tilt angle of solar photovoltaic panels is one of the important parameters for the optimum sizing of solar photovoltaic systems. This paper analyses six different isotropic and anisotropic diffused solar radiation models for optimum tilt angle determination. The predicted optimum tilt angles are compared with the experimentally measured values for summer season under outdoor conditions. The Liu and Jordan model is found to exhibit t lowest error as compared to other models for the location. (author)

  2. Antibiotic Resistances in Livestock: A Comparative Approach to Identify an Appropriate Regression Model for Count Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke Hüls

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Antimicrobial resistance in livestock is a matter of general concern. To develop hygiene measures and methods for resistance prevention and control, epidemiological studies on a population level are needed to detect factors associated with antimicrobial resistance in livestock holdings. In general, regression models are used to describe these relationships between environmental factors and resistance outcome. Besides the study design, the correlation structures of the different outcomes of antibiotic resistance and structural zero measurements on the resistance outcome as well as on the exposure side are challenges for the epidemiological model building process. The use of appropriate regression models that acknowledge these complexities is essential to assure valid epidemiological interpretations. The aims of this paper are (i to explain the model building process comparing several competing models for count data (negative binomial model, quasi-Poisson model, zero-inflated model, and hurdle model and (ii to compare these models using data from a cross-sectional study on antibiotic resistance in animal husbandry. These goals are essential to evaluate which model is most suitable to identify potential prevention measures. The dataset used as an example in our analyses was generated initially to study the prevalence and associated factors for the appearance of cefotaxime-resistant Escherichia coli in 48 German fattening pig farms. For each farm, the outcome was the count of samples with resistant bacteria. There was almost no overdispersion and only moderate evidence of excess zeros in the data. Our analyses show that it is essential to evaluate regression models in studies analyzing the relationship between environmental factors and antibiotic resistances in livestock. After model comparison based on evaluation of model predictions, Akaike information criterion, and Pearson residuals, here the hurdle model was judged to be the most appropriate

  3. Canis familiaris As a Model for Non-Invasive Comparative Neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunford, Nóra; Andics, Attila; Kis, Anna; Miklósi, Ádám; Gácsi, Márta

    2017-07-01

    There is an ongoing need to improve animal models for investigating human behavior and its biological underpinnings. The domestic dog (Canis familiaris) is a promising model in cognitive neuroscience. However, before it can contribute to advances in this field in a comparative, reliable, and valid manner, several methodological issues warrant attention. We review recent non-invasive canine neuroscience studies, primarily focusing on (i) variability among dogs and between dogs and humans in cranial characteristics, and (ii) generalizability across dog and dog-human studies. We argue not for methodological uniformity but for functional comparability between methods, experimental designs, and neural responses. We conclude that the dog may become an innovative and unique model in comparative neuroscience, complementing more traditional models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Comparing spatial diversification and meta-population models in the Indo-Australian Archipelago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalmandrier, Loïc; Albouy, Camille; Descombes, Patrice; Sandel, Brody; Faurby, Soren; Svenning, Jens-Christian; Zimmermann, Niklaus E; Pellissier, Loïc

    2018-03-01

    Reconstructing the processes that have shaped the emergence of biodiversity gradients is critical to understand the dynamics of diversification of life on Earth. Islands have traditionally been used as model systems to unravel the processes shaping biological diversity. MacArthur and Wilson's island biogeographic model predicts diversity to be based on dynamic interactions between colonization and extinction rates, while treating islands themselves as geologically static entities. The current spatial configuration of islands should influence meta-population dynamics, but long-term geological changes within archipelagos are also expected to have shaped island biodiversity, in part by driving diversification. Here, we compare two mechanistic models providing inferences on species richness at a biogeographic scale: a mechanistic spatial-temporal model of species diversification and a spatial meta-population model. While the meta-population model operates over a static landscape, the diversification model is driven by changes in the size and spatial configuration of islands through time. We compare the inferences of both models to floristic diversity patterns among land patches of the Indo-Australian Archipelago. Simulation results from the diversification model better matched observed diversity than a meta-population model constrained only by the contemporary landscape. The diversification model suggests that the dynamic re-positioning of islands promoting land disconnection and reconnection induced an accumulation of particularly high species diversity on Borneo, which is central within the island network. By contrast, the meta-population model predicts a higher diversity on the mainlands, which is less compatible with empirical data. Our analyses highlight that, by comparing models with contrasting assumptions, we can pinpoint the processes that are most compatible with extant biodiversity patterns.

  5. A computational approach to compare regression modelling strategies in prediction research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajouheshnia, Romin; Pestman, Wiebe R; Teerenstra, Steven; Groenwold, Rolf H H

    2016-08-25

    It is often unclear which approach to fit, assess and adjust a model will yield the most accurate prediction model. We present an extension of an approach for comparing modelling strategies in linear regression to the setting of logistic regression and demonstrate its application in clinical prediction research. A framework for comparing logistic regression modelling strategies by their likelihoods was formulated using a wrapper approach. Five different strategies for modelling, including simple shrinkage methods, were compared in four empirical data sets to illustrate the concept of a priori strategy comparison. Simulations were performed in both randomly generated data and empirical data to investigate the influence of data characteristics on strategy performance. We applied the comparison framework in a case study setting. Optimal strategies were selected based on the results of a priori comparisons in a clinical data set and the performance of models built according to each strategy was assessed using the Brier score and calibration plots. The performance of modelling strategies was highly dependent on the characteristics of the development data in both linear and logistic regression settings. A priori comparisons in four empirical data sets found that no strategy consistently outperformed the others. The percentage of times that a model adjustment strategy outperformed a logistic model ranged from 3.9 to 94.9 %, depending on the strategy and data set. However, in our case study setting the a priori selection of optimal methods did not result in detectable improvement in model performance when assessed in an external data set. The performance of prediction modelling strategies is a data-dependent process and can be highly variable between data sets within the same clinical domain. A priori strategy comparison can be used to determine an optimal logistic regression modelling strategy for a given data set before selecting a final modelling approach.

  6. Adaptation to Climate Change: A Comparative Analysis of Modeling Methods for Heat-Related Mortality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, Simon N; Hondula, David M; Bunker, Aditi; Ibarreta, Dolores; Liu, Junguo; Zhang, Xinxin; Sauerborn, Rainer

    2017-08-16

    Multiple methods are employed for modeling adaptation when projecting the impact of climate change on heat-related mortality. The sensitivity of impacts to each is unknown because they have never been systematically compared. In addition, little is known about the relative sensitivity of impacts to "adaptation uncertainty" (i.e., the inclusion/exclusion of adaptation modeling) relative to using multiple climate models and emissions scenarios. This study had three aims: a ) Compare the range in projected impacts that arises from using different adaptation modeling methods; b ) compare the range in impacts that arises from adaptation uncertainty with ranges from using multiple climate models and emissions scenarios; c ) recommend modeling method(s) to use in future impact assessments. We estimated impacts for 2070-2099 for 14 European cities, applying six different methods for modeling adaptation; we also estimated impacts with five climate models run under two emissions scenarios to explore the relative effects of climate modeling and emissions uncertainty. The range of the difference (percent) in impacts between including and excluding adaptation, irrespective of climate modeling and emissions uncertainty, can be as low as 28% with one method and up to 103% with another (mean across 14 cities). In 13 of 14 cities, the ranges in projected impacts due to adaptation uncertainty are larger than those associated with climate modeling and emissions uncertainty. Researchers should carefully consider how to model adaptation because it is a source of uncertainty that can be greater than the uncertainty in emissions and climate modeling. We recommend absolute threshold shifts and reductions in slope. https://doi.org/10.1289/EHP634.

  7. Software Cost Estimating Models: A Comparative Study of What the Models Estimate

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-09-01

    generate good cost estimates. One model developer best summed up this sentiment by stating: Estimation is not a mechanical process. Art, skill, and...Allocation Perc.uinta~es for SASEY Development Phases Sysieni Conce~pt 7.5% yseS/W Requ~irements Anlysis _________%__ S/W Raq;iirements Analysis 9.0

  8. Comparative Analysis of River Flow Modelling by Using Supervised Learning Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, Shuhaida; Mohamad Pandiahi, Siraj; Shabri, Ani; Mustapha, Aida

    2018-04-01

    The goal of this research is to investigate the efficiency of three supervised learning algorithms for forecasting monthly river flow of the Indus River in Pakistan, spread over 550 square miles or 1800 square kilometres. The algorithms include the Least Square Support Vector Machine (LSSVM), Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and Wavelet Regression (WR). The forecasting models predict the monthly river flow obtained from the three models individually for river flow data and the accuracy of the all models were then compared against each other. The monthly river flow of the said river has been forecasted using these three models. The obtained results were compared and statistically analysed. Then, the results of this analytical comparison showed that LSSVM model is more precise in the monthly river flow forecasting. It was found that LSSVM has he higher r with the value of 0.934 compared to other models. This indicate that LSSVM is more accurate and efficient as compared to the ANN and WR model.

  9. A Comparative Study of Theoretical Graph Models for Characterizing Structural Networks of Human Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaojin Li

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies have investigated both structural and functional brain networks via graph-theoretical methods. However, there is an important issue that has not been adequately discussed before: what is the optimal theoretical graph model for describing the structural networks of human brain? In this paper, we perform a comparative study to address this problem. Firstly, large-scale cortical regions of interest (ROIs are localized by recently developed and validated brain reference system named Dense Individualized Common Connectivity-based Cortical Landmarks (DICCCOL to address the limitations in the identification of the brain network ROIs in previous studies. Then, we construct structural brain networks based on diffusion tensor imaging (DTI data. Afterwards, the global and local graph properties of the constructed structural brain networks are measured using the state-of-the-art graph analysis algorithms and tools and are further compared with seven popular theoretical graph models. In addition, we compare the topological properties between two graph models, namely, stickiness-index-based model (STICKY and scale-free gene duplication model (SF-GD, that have higher similarity with the real structural brain networks in terms of global and local graph properties. Our experimental results suggest that among the seven theoretical graph models compared in this study, STICKY and SF-GD models have better performances in characterizing the structural human brain network.

  10. Comparative Analysis of ANN and SVM Models Combined with Wavelet Preprocess for Groundwater Depth Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Zhou

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Reliable prediction of groundwater depth fluctuations has been an important component in sustainable water resources management. In this study, a data-driven prediction model combining discrete wavelet transform (DWT preprocess and support vector machine (SVM was proposed for groundwater depth forecasting. Regular artificial neural networks (ANN, regular SVM, and wavelet preprocessed artificial neural networks (WANN models were also developed for comparison. These methods were applied to the monthly groundwater depth records over a period of 37 years from ten wells in the Mengcheng County, China. Relative absolute error (RAE, Pearson correlation coefficient (r, root mean square error (RMSE, and Nash-Sutcliffe efficiency (NSE were adopted for model evaluation. The results indicate that wavelet preprocess extremely improved the training and test performance of ANN and SVM models. The WSVM model provided the most precise and reliable groundwater depth prediction compared with ANN, SVM, and WSVM models. The criterion of RAE, r, RMSE, and NSE values for proposed WSVM model are 0.20, 0.97, 0.18 and 0.94, respectively. Comprehensive comparisons and discussion revealed that wavelet preprocess extremely improves the prediction precision and reliability for both SVM and ANN models. The prediction result of SVM model is superior to ANN model in generalization ability and precision. Nevertheless, the performance of WANN is superior to SVM model, which further validates the power of data preprocess in data-driven prediction models. Finally, the optimal model, WSVM, is discussed by comparing its subseries performances as well as model performance stability, revealing the efficiency and universality of WSVM model in data driven prediction field.

  11. Comparing the engineering program feeders from SiF and convention models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roongruangsri, Warawaran; Moonpa, Niwat; Vuthijumnonk, Janyawat; Sangsuwan, Kampanart

    2018-01-01

    This research aims to compare the relationship between two types of engineering program feeder models within the technical education systems of Rajamangala University of Technology Lanna (RMUTL), Chiangmai, Thailand. To illustrate, the paper refers to two typologies of feeder models, which are the convention and the school in factory (SiF) models. The new SiF model is developed through a collaborative educational process between the sectors of industry, government and academia, using work-integrated learning. The research methodology were use to compared features of the the SiF model with conventional models in terms of learning outcome, funding budget for the study, the advantages and disadvantages from the point of view of students, professors, the university, government and industrial partners. The results of this research indicate that the developed SiF feeder model is the most pertinent ones as it meet the requirements of the university, the government and the industry. The SiF feeder model showed the ability to yield positive learning outcomes with low expenditures per student for both the family and the university. In parallel, the sharing of knowledge between university and industry became increasingly important in the process, which resulted in the improvement of industrial skills for professors and an increase in industrial based research for the university. The SiF feeder model meets its demand of public policy in supporting a skilled workforce for the industry, which could be an effective tool for the triple helix educational model of Thailand.

  12. Classical and recent free-volume models for polymer solutions: A comparative evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radfarnia, H.R.; Kontogeorgis, Georgios; Ghotbi, C.

    2007-01-01

    In this work, two "classical" (UNIFAC-FV, Entropic-FV) and two "recent" free-volume (FV) models (Kannan-FV, Freed-FV) are comparatively evaluated for polymer-solvent vapor-liquid equilibria including both aqueous and non-aqueous solutions. Moreover, some further developments are presented here...... by the modified Freed-FV model for athermal and non-athermal polymer systems are compared to other "recent" and "classical" FV models, indicating an improvement for the modified Freed-FV model for aqueous polymer solutions. Second, for the original Freed-FV model, new UNIFAC group energy parameters are regressed...... to using the classical UNIFAC parameters, for VLE of aqueous and alcohol polymer systems....

  13. Comparative Validation of Realtime Solar Wind Forecasting Using the UCSD Heliospheric Tomography Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeice, Peter; Taktakishvili, Alexandra; Jackson, Bernard; Clover, John; Bisi, Mario; Odstrcil, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    The University of California, San Diego 3D Heliospheric Tomography Model reconstructs the evolution of heliospheric structures, and can make forecasts of solar wind density and velocity up to 72 hours in the future. The latest model version, installed and running in realtime at the Community Coordinated Modeling Center(CCMC), analyzes scintillations of meter wavelength radio point sources recorded by the Solar-Terrestrial Environment Laboratory(STELab) together with realtime measurements of solar wind speed and density recorded by the Advanced Composition Explorer(ACE) Solar Wind Electron Proton Alpha Monitor(SWEPAM).The solution is reconstructed using tomographic techniques and a simple kinematic wind model. Since installation, the CCMC has been recording the model forecasts and comparing them with ACE measurements, and with forecasts made using other heliospheric models hosted by the CCMC. We report the preliminary results of this validation work and comparison with alternative models.

  14. Comparative study between single core model and detail core model of CFD modelling on reactor core cooling behaviour

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darmawan, R.

    2018-01-01

    Nuclear power industry is facing uncertainties since the occurrence of the unfortunate accident at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant. The issue of nuclear power plant safety becomes the major hindrance in the planning of nuclear power program for new build countries. Thus, the understanding of the behaviour of reactor system is very important to ensure the continuous development and improvement on reactor safety. Throughout the development of nuclear reactor technology, investigation and analysis on reactor safety have gone through several phases. In the early days, analytical and experimental methods were employed. For the last four decades 1D system level codes were widely used. The continuous development of nuclear reactor technology has brought about more complex system and processes of nuclear reactor operation. More detailed dimensional simulation codes are needed to assess these new reactors. Recently, 2D and 3D system level codes such as CFD are being explored. This paper discusses a comparative study on two different approaches of CFD modelling on reactor core cooling behaviour.

  15. COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS BETWEEN THE TRADITIONAL MODEL OF CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND ISLAMIC MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DAN ROXANA LOREDANA

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Corporate governance represents a set of processes and policies by which a company is administered, controlled and directed to achieve the predetermined management objectives settled by the shareholders. The most important benefits of the corporate governance to the organisations are related to business success, investor confidence and minimisation of wastage. For business, the improved controls and decision-making will aid corporate success as well as growth in revenues and profits. For the investor confidence, corporate governance will mean that investors are more likely to trust that the company is being well run. This will not only make it easier and cheaper for the company to raise finance, but also has a positive effect on the share price. When we talk about the minimisation of wastage we relate to the strong corporate governance that should help to minimise waste within the organisation, as well as the corruption, risks and mismanagement. Thus, in our research, we are trying to determine the common elements, and also, the differences that have occured between two well known models of corporate governance, the traditional Anglo – Saxon model and also, the Islamic model of corporate governance.

  16. Towards a systemic functional model for comparing forms of discourse in academic writing Towards a systemic functional model for comparing forms of discourse in academic writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meriel Bloor

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on research into the variation of texts across disciplines and considers the implications of this work for the teaching of writing. The research was motivated by the need to improve students’ academic writing skills in English and the limitations of some current pedagogic advice. The analysis compares Methods sections of research articles across four disciplines, including applied and hard sciences, on a cline, or gradient, termed slow to fast. The analysis considers the characteristics the texts share, but more importantly identifies the variation between sets of linguistic features. Working within a systemic functional framework, the texts are analysed for length, sentence length, lexical density, readability, grammatical metaphor, Thematic choice, as well as various rhetorical functions. Contextually relevant reasons for the differences are considered and the implications of the findings are related to models of text and discourse. Recommendations are made for developing domain models that relate clusters of features to positions on a cline. This article reports on research into the variation of texts across disciplines and considers the implications of this work for the teaching of writing. The research was motivated by the need to improve students’ academic writing skills in English and the limitations of some current pedagogic advice. The analysis compares Methods sections of research articles across four disciplines, including applied and hard sciences, on a cline, or gradient, termed slow to fast. The analysis considers the characteristics the texts share, but more importantly identifies the variation between sets of linguistic features. Working within a systemic functional framework, the texts are analysed for length, sentence length, lexical density, readability, grammatical metaphor, Thematic choice, as well as various rhetorical functions. Contextually relevant reasons for the differences are considered

  17. A comparative study of turbulence models for dissolved air flotation flow analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Min A; Lee, Kyun Ho; Chung, Jae Dong [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seo, Seung Ho [Tops Engineering Co, Ltd., Gwangmyeong (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-07-15

    The dissolved air flotation (DAF) system is a water treatment process that removes contaminants by attaching micro bubbles to them, causing them to float to the water surface. In the present study, two-phase flow of air-water mixture is simulated to investigate changes in the internal flow analysis of DAF systems caused by using different turbulence models. Internal micro bubble distribution, velocity, and computation time are compared between several turbulence models for a given DAF geometry and condition. As a result, it is observed that the standard κ-ε model, which has been frequently used in previous research, predicts somewhat different behavior than other turbulence models.

  18. A comparative study of turbulence models for dissolved air flotation flow analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Min A; Lee, Kyun Ho; Chung, Jae Dong; Seo, Seung Ho

    2015-01-01

    The dissolved air flotation (DAF) system is a water treatment process that removes contaminants by attaching micro bubbles to them, causing them to float to the water surface. In the present study, two-phase flow of air-water mixture is simulated to investigate changes in the internal flow analysis of DAF systems caused by using different turbulence models. Internal micro bubble distribution, velocity, and computation time are compared between several turbulence models for a given DAF geometry and condition. As a result, it is observed that the standard κ-ε model, which has been frequently used in previous research, predicts somewhat different behavior than other turbulence models

  19. Comparative performance of Bayesian and AIC-based measures of phylogenetic model uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Michael E; Huelsenbeck, John P

    2006-02-01

    Reversible-jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJ-MCMC) is a technique for simultaneously evaluating multiple related (but not necessarily nested) statistical models that has recently been applied to the problem of phylogenetic model selection. Here we use a simulation approach to assess the performance of this method and compare it to Akaike weights, a measure of model uncertainty that is based on the Akaike information criterion. Under conditions where the assumptions of the candidate models matched the generating conditions, both Bayesian and AIC-based methods perform well. The 95% credible interval contained the generating model close to 95% of the time. However, the size of the credible interval differed with the Bayesian credible set containing approximately 25% to 50% fewer models than an AIC-based credible interval. The posterior probability was a better indicator of the correct model than the Akaike weight when all assumptions were met but both measures performed similarly when some model assumptions were violated. Models in the Bayesian posterior distribution were also more similar to the generating model in their number of parameters and were less biased in their complexity. In contrast, Akaike-weighted models were more distant from the generating model and biased towards slightly greater complexity. The AIC-based credible interval appeared to be more robust to the violation of the rate homogeneity assumption. Both AIC and Bayesian approaches suggest that substantial uncertainty can accompany the choice of model for phylogenetic analyses, suggesting that alternative candidate models should be examined in analysis of phylogenetic data. [AIC; Akaike weights; Bayesian phylogenetics; model averaging; model selection; model uncertainty; posterior probability; reversible jump.].

  20. More evidence in favor of light dark matter particles?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehm, Celine; Ascasibar, Yago

    2004-01-01

    In a previous work, it was found that the light dark matter scenario could be a possible explanation to the 511 keV emission line detected at the center of our galaxy. Here, we show that hints of this scenario may also have been discovered in particle physics experiments. This could explain the discrepancy between the measurement of the fine structure constant and the value referenced in the CODATA. Finally, our results indicate that some of the light dark matter features could be tested in accelerators. Their discovery might favor N=2 supersymmetry

  1. Comparative evaluation of statistical and mechanistic models of Escherichia coli at beaches in southern Lake Michigan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safaie, Ammar; Wendzel, Aaron; Ge, Zhongfu; Nevers, Meredith; Whitman, Richard L.; Corsi, Steven R.; Phanikumar, Mantha S.

    2016-01-01

    Statistical and mechanistic models are popular tools for predicting the levels of indicator bacteria at recreational beaches. Researchers tend to use one class of model or the other, and it is difficult to generalize statements about their relative performance due to differences in how the models are developed, tested, and used. We describe a cooperative modeling approach for freshwater beaches impacted by point sources in which insights derived from mechanistic modeling were used to further improve the statistical models and vice versa. The statistical models provided a basis for assessing the mechanistic models which were further improved using probability distributions to generate high-resolution time series data at the source, long-term “tracer” transport modeling based on observed electrical conductivity, better assimilation of meteorological data, and the use of unstructured-grids to better resolve nearshore features. This approach resulted in improved models of comparable performance for both classes including a parsimonious statistical model suitable for real-time predictions based on an easily measurable environmental variable (turbidity). The modeling approach outlined here can be used at other sites impacted by point sources and has the potential to improve water quality predictions resulting in more accurate estimates of beach closures.

  2. Reactive transport in porous media: Pore-network model approach compared to pore-scale model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varloteaux, Clément; Vu, Minh Tan; Békri, Samir; Adler, Pierre M.

    2013-02-01

    Accurate determination of three macroscopic parameters governing reactive transport in porous media, namely, the apparent solute velocity, the dispersion, and the apparent reaction rate, is of key importance for predicting solute migration through reservoir aquifers. Two methods are proposed to calculate these parameters as functions of the Péclet and the Péclet-Dahmköhler numbers. In the first method called the pore-scale model (PSM), the porous medium is discretized by the level set method; the Stokes and convection-diffusion equations with reaction at the wall are solved by a finite-difference scheme. In the second method, called the pore-network model (PNM), the void space of the porous medium is represented by an idealized geometry of pore bodies joined by pore throats; the flow field is computed by solving Kirchhoff's laws and transport calculations are performed in the asymptotic regime where the solute concentration undergoes an exponential evolution with time. Two synthetic geometries of porous media are addressed by using both numerical codes. The first geometry is constructed in order to validate the hypotheses implemented in PNM. PSM is also used for a better understanding of the various reaction patterns observed in the asymptotic regime. Despite the PNM approximations, a very good agreement between the models is obtained, which shows that PNM is an accurate description of reactive transport. PNM, which can address much larger pore volumes than PSM, is used to evaluate the influence of the concentration distribution on macroscopic properties of a large irregular network reconstructed from microtomography images. The role of the dimensionless numbers and of the location and size of the largest pore bodies is highlighted.

  3. DIDEM - An integrated model for comparative health damage costs calculation of air pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravina, Marco; Panepinto, Deborah; Zanetti, Maria Chiara

    2018-01-01

    Air pollution represents a continuous hazard to human health. Administration, companies and population need efficient indicators of the possible effects given by a change in decision, strategy or habit. The monetary quantification of health effects of air pollution through the definition of external costs is increasingly recognized as a useful indicator to support decision and information at all levels. The development of modelling tools for the calculation of external costs can provide support to analysts in the development of consistent and comparable assessments. In this paper, the DIATI Dispersion and Externalities Model (DIDEM) is presented. The DIDEM model calculates the delta-external costs of air pollution comparing two alternative emission scenarios. This tool integrates CALPUFF's advanced dispersion modelling with the latest WHO recommendations on concentration-response functions. The model is based on the impact pathway method. It was designed to work with a fine spatial resolution and a local or national geographic scope. The modular structure allows users to input their own data sets. The DIDEM model was tested on a real case study, represented by a comparative analysis of the district heating system in Turin, Italy. Additional advantages and drawbacks of the tool are discussed in the paper. A comparison with other existing models worldwide is reported.

  4. Effects of Personality Disorders on Self-Other Agreement and Favorableness in Personality Descriptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tandler, Nancy; Mosch, Alice; Wolf, Annegret; Borkenau, Peter

    2016-10-01

    The authors studied effects of self-reported personality disorder (PD) symptoms on interpersonal perception, particularly self-other agreement and favorableness. Using a round-robin design, 52 groups of four well-acquainted students described themselves and each other on a measure of the Five-Factor model of personality and were administered a self-report screening instrument for DSM-IV (Axis 2). Using the Social Accuracy Model, the peer reports were predicted, across items, from either (a) the target person's self-reports plus the self-report item means, or (b) the items' social desirability. This resulted in separate coefficients for each peer-target dyad, indicating either self-other agreement or favorableness. These coefficients were then predicted from the PD scores of the target and the peer, using multilevel modeling. Main findings were that persons scoring high on PD measures agreed less with their peers on their unique personality characteristics, and that such persons were described by, and described their peers, less favorably.

  5. Anatomy of the Andean subduction zone: three-dimensional density model upgraded and compared against global-scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tassara, Andrés.; Echaurren, Andrés.

    2012-04-01

    We present an upgraded version of a previously published 3-D density model of the Andean subduction zone between 18°S and 45°S. This model consists of 3-D bodies of constant density, which geometry is constrained by independent seismic data and is triangulated from vertical cross-sections. These bodies define the first-order morphology and internal structure of the subducted Nazca slab and South American Plate. The new version of the density model results after forward modelling the Bouguer anomaly as computed from the most recent version of the Earth Gravitational Model (EGM2008). The 3-D density model incorporates new seismic information to better constrain the geometry of the subducted slab and continental Moho (CMH) and has a trench-parallel resolution doubling the resolution of the previous model. As an example of the potential utility of our model, we compare the geometry of the subducted slab and CMH against the corresponding global models Slab1.0 and Crust2.0, respectively. This exercise demonstrates that, although global models provide a good first-order representation of the slab and upper-plate crustal geometries, they show large discrepancies (up to ±40 km) with our upgraded model for some well-constrained areas. The geometries of the slab, lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary below the continent, CMH and intracrustal density discontinuity that we present here as Supporting Information can be used to study Andean geodynamic processes from a wide range of quantitative approaches.

  6. A comparative study of changes of autophagy in rat models of CLP versus LPS induced sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Binglun; Liu, Chunfeng; Yang, Ni; Wang, Xiangdie

    2017-09-01

    In the present study, two different rat models of sepsis, cecal ligation and puncture (CLP), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS), were established. Changes in autophagy in both models were compared using transmission electron microscopy (TEM), immunohistochemistry, western blotting, and quantitative polymerase chain reaction techniques. Consequently, TEM analysis revealed autophagic bodies in the CLP and LPS sepsis models. In addition, autophagy-related protein LC3 A-specific staining was detected in the cytoplasm. However, analysis of protein and gene expression levels revealed a statistically significant increase in autophagic activity 12 and 24 h following induction of the CLP group, and 2 h following induction of the LPS group. Thus, it was concluded that both models of sepsis exhibited increased autophagic activity of the cardiomyocytes over time. The LPS model was superior to the CLP model in perturbation of molecular biological mechanisms, while the latter would be more likely suited for the study of physiological functions.

  7. Comparative Study of Fatigue Damage Models Using Different Number of Classes Combined with the Rainflow Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Zengah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue damage increases with applied load cycles in a cumulative manner. Fatigue damage models play a key role in life prediction of components and structures subjected to random loading. The aim of this paper is the examination of the performance of the “Damaged Stress Model”, proposed and validated, against other fatigue models under random loading before and after reconstruction of the load histories. To achieve this objective, some linear and nonlinear models proposed for fatigue life estimation and a batch of specimens made of 6082T6 aluminum alloy is subjected to random loading. The damage was cumulated by Miner’s rule, Damaged Stress Model (DSM, Henry model and Unified Theory (UT and random cycles were counted with a rain-flow algorithm. Experimental data on high-cycle fatigue by complex loading histories with different mean and amplitude stress values are analyzed for life calculation and model predictions are compared.

  8. Comparative evaluation of kinetic, equilibrium and semi-equilibrium models for biomass gasification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buragohain, Buljit [Center for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Chakma, Sankar; Kumar, Peeush [Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Mahanta, Pinakeswar [Center for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Moholkar, Vijayanand S. [Center for Energy, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India); Department of Chemical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Guwahati, Guwahati – 781 039, Assam (India)

    2013-07-01

    Modeling of biomass gasification has been an active area of research for past two decades. In the published literature, three approaches have been adopted for the modeling of this process, viz. thermodynamic equilibrium, semi-equilibrium and kinetic. In this paper, we have attempted to present a comparative assessment of these three types of models for predicting outcome of the gasification process in a circulating fluidized bed gasifier. Two model biomass, viz. rice husk and wood particles, have been chosen for analysis, with gasification medium being air. Although the trends in molar composition, net yield and LHV of the producer gas predicted by three models are in concurrence, significant quantitative difference is seen in the results. Due to rather slow kinetics of char gasification and tar oxidation, carbon conversion achieved in single pass of biomass through the gasifier, calculated using kinetic model, is quite low, which adversely affects the yield and LHV of the producer gas. Although equilibrium and semi-equilibrium models reveal relative insensitivity of producer gas characteristics towards temperature, the kinetic model shows significant effect of temperature on LHV of the gas at low air ratios. Kinetic models also reveal volume of the gasifier to be an insignificant parameter, as the net yield and LHV of the gas resulting from 6 m and 10 m riser is same. On a whole, the analysis presented in this paper indicates that thermodynamic models are useful tools for quantitative assessment of the gasification process, while kinetic models provide physically more realistic picture.

  9. Is there a relationship between patient satisfaction and favorable outcomes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Gregory D; Tevis, Sarah E; Kent, K Craig

    2014-10-01

    Patient satisfaction with the health care experience has become a top priority for Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. With resources and efforts directed at patient satisfaction, we evaluated whether high patient satisfaction measured by HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) surveys correlates with favorable outcomes. Medical centers were identified from the University HealthSystem Consortium database from 2011 to 2012. Variables included hospital characteristics, process measure compliance, and surgical outcomes. Chi-squared analysis was used to evaluate for variables associated with high patient satisfaction (defined as hospitals that scored above the 50th percentile of top box scores). We identified 171 hospitals with complete data. The following variables were significantly associated with high overall patient satisfaction: large hospitals, high surgical volume, and low mortality (P patient satisfaction. Low mortality index was consistently found to be associated with high satisfaction across 9 of 10 HCAHPS domains. We found that hospital size, surgical volume, and low mortality were associated with high overall patient satisfaction. However, with the exception of low mortality, favorable surgical outcomes were not consistently associated with high HCAHPS scores. With existing satisfaction surveys, we conclude that factors outside of surgical outcomes appear to influence patients' perceptions of their care.

  10. Can multivariable risk-benefit profiling be used to select treatment-favorable patients for thrombolysis in stroke in the 3- to 6-hour time window?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kent, David M; Selker, Harry P; Ruthazer, Robin; Bluhmki, Erich; Hacke, Werner

    2006-12-01

    The Stroke-Thrombolytic Predictive Instrument (Stroke-TPI) uses multivariate equations to predict outcomes with and without thrombolysis. We sought to examine whether such a multivariate predictive instrument might be useful in selecting patients with a favorable risk-benefit treatment profile for therapy after 3 hours. We explored outcomes in patients from 5 major randomized clinical trials testing intravenous recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) classified by the Stroke-TPI as "treatment-favorable" or "treatment-unfavorable." We used iterative bootstrap re-sampling to estimate how such a model would perform on independent test data. Among patients treated within the 3- to 6-hour window, 67% of patients were classified by Stroke-TPI predicted outcomes as "treatment-favorable" and 33% were classified as "treatment-unfavorable." Outcomes in the treatment-favorable group demonstrated benefit for thrombolysis (modified Rankin Scale score < or =1: 44.0% with rt-PA versus 34.2 with placebo, P=0.005), whereas harm was demonstrated in the treatment-unfavorable group (modified Rankin Scale score < or =1: 31.3% with rt-PA versus 38.3% with placebo; P=0.004). Bootstrap resampling with complete cross-validation showed that the absolute margin of benefit in the treatment-favorable group diminished on average by 36% between derivation and independent validation sets, but still represented a significant tripling of improvement in benefit compared with conventional inclusion criteria (5.2% [interquartile range, 1.7% to 8.6%] versus 1.8% [interquartile range, -0.5 to 4.1], P<0.0001). Such multivariable risk-benefit profiling may be useful in the selection of acute stroke patients for rt-PA therapy even more than 3 hours after symptom onset. Prospective testing is indicated.

  11. Comparative analysis of zonal systems for macro-level crash modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Qing; Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Lee, Jaeyoung; Eluru, Naveen

    2017-06-01

    Macro-level traffic safety analysis has been undertaken at different spatial configurations. However, clear guidelines for the appropriate zonal system selection for safety analysis are unavailable. In this study, a comparative analysis was conducted to determine the optimal zonal system for macroscopic crash modeling considering census tracts (CTs), state-wide traffic analysis zones (STAZs), and a newly developed traffic-related zone system labeled traffic analysis districts (TADs). Poisson lognormal models for three crash types (i.e., total, severe, and non-motorized mode crashes) are developed based on the three zonal systems without and with consideration of spatial autocorrelation. The study proposes a method to compare the modeling performance of the three types of geographic units at different spatial configurations through a grid based framework. Specifically, the study region is partitioned to grids of various sizes and the model prediction accuracy of the various macro models is considered within these grids of various sizes. These model comparison results for all crash types indicated that the models based on TADs consistently offer a better performance compared to the others. Besides, the models considering spatial autocorrelation outperform the ones that do not consider it. Based on the modeling results and motivation for developing the different zonal systems, it is recommended using CTs for socio-demographic data collection, employing TAZs for transportation demand forecasting, and adopting TADs for transportation safety planning. The findings from this study can help practitioners select appropriate zonal systems for traffic crash modeling, which leads to develop more efficient policies to enhance transportation safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd and National Safety Council. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative systems biology between human and animal models based on next-generation sequencing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yu-Qi; Li, Gong-Hua; Huang, Jing-Fei

    2013-04-01

    Animal models provide myriad benefits to both experimental and clinical research. Unfortunately, in many situations, they fall short of expected results or provide contradictory results. In part, this can be the result of traditional molecular biological approaches that are relatively inefficient in elucidating underlying molecular mechanism. To improve the efficacy of animal models, a technological breakthrough is required. The growing availability and application of the high-throughput methods make systematic comparisons between human and animal models easier to perform. In the present study, we introduce the concept of the comparative systems biology, which we define as "comparisons of biological systems in different states or species used to achieve an integrated understanding of life forms with all their characteristic complexity of interactions at multiple levels". Furthermore, we discuss the applications of RNA-seq and ChIP-seq technologies to comparative systems biology between human and animal models and assess the potential applications for this approach in the future studies.

  13. Comparing Euler-Euler and Euler-Lagrange based modelling approaches for gas-particle flows

    OpenAIRE

    Braun, Markus; Lamert, Markus; Ozarkar, Shailesh; Sanyal, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Comparative assessment of Euler-Euler and Euler-Lagrange modelling approaches for gas-particle flows is performed by comparing their predictions against experimental data of two fluidization challenge problems put forth by National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL), Morgantown, WV, USA. The first fluidization challenge problem is based on a laboratory scale fluidized bed while the second fluidization challenge problem is based on a pilot scale circulating fluidized bed. It is found that bot...

  14. Comparing artificial neural networks, general linear models and support vector machines in building predictive models for small interfering RNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyle A McQuisten

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous short interfering RNAs (siRNAs induce a gene knockdown effect in cells by interacting with naturally occurring RNA processing machinery. However not all siRNAs induce this effect equally. Several heterogeneous kinds of machine learning techniques and feature sets have been applied to modeling siRNAs and their abilities to induce knockdown. There is some growing agreement to which techniques produce maximally predictive models and yet there is little consensus for methods to compare among predictive models. Also, there are few comparative studies that address what the effect of choosing learning technique, feature set or cross validation approach has on finding and discriminating among predictive models.Three learning techniques were used to develop predictive models for effective siRNA sequences including Artificial Neural Networks (ANNs, General Linear Models (GLMs and Support Vector Machines (SVMs. Five feature mapping methods were also used to generate models of siRNA activities. The 2 factors of learning technique and feature mapping were evaluated by complete 3x5 factorial ANOVA. Overall, both learning techniques and feature mapping contributed significantly to the observed variance in predictive models, but to differing degrees for precision and accuracy as well as across different kinds and levels of model cross-validation.The methods presented here provide a robust statistical framework to compare among models developed under distinct learning techniques and feature sets for siRNAs. Further comparisons among current or future modeling approaches should apply these or other suitable statistically equivalent methods to critically evaluate the performance of proposed models. ANN and GLM techniques tend to be more sensitive to the inclusion of noisy features, but the SVM technique is more robust under large numbers of features for measures of model precision and accuracy. Features found to result in maximally predictive models are

  15. COMPARATIVE STUDY ON METHODS FOR 3D MODELLING OF URBAN AREAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Oniga

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article presents (comparatively the methodology for creating a 3D model of the urban area, based on terrestrial laser scanner, traditional technologies of terrestrial photogrammetry and aerial images. We are reviewing the data sources, their preliminary processing to be brought in a common system and the software used for this purpose. The case study presents the comparative results obtained using the methods listed above. To obtain the 3D models with terrestrial laser scanner systems have been used the dates achieved with ScanStation 2. To obtain the 3D model drawn by traditional photogrammetric methods using the UMK terrestrial camera, have been used auxiliary dates from topographic measurements with GPS systems and total stations as well as the current topographic plans. For the 3D model creation based on the dates taken with aerial digital cameras, were used the aerial images, taken with the ADS40 photogrammetric aerial camera. The comparative study between the three methods was accomplished by analyzing the object space representation fidelity, the precision of the 3D models obtained by comparison of the distances, areas and volumes, comparing the execution time and execution costs. The article presents the conclusions, the advantages and disadvantages of the three technologies based on the criteria listed above.

  16. Comparing dark matter models, modified Newtonian dynamics and modified gravity in accounting for galaxy rotation curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Tang, Li; Lin, Hai-Nan

    2017-05-01

    We compare six models (including the baryonic model, two dark matter models, two modified Newtonian dynamics models and one modified gravity model) in accounting for galaxy rotation curves. For the dark matter models, we assume NFW profile and core-modified profile for the dark halo, respectively. For the modified Newtonian dynamics models, we discuss Milgrom’s MOND theory with two different interpolation functions, the standard and the simple interpolation functions. For the modified gravity, we focus on Moffat’s MSTG theory. We fit these models to the observed rotation curves of 9 high-surface brightness and 9 low-surface brightness galaxies. We apply the Bayesian Information Criterion and the Akaike Information Criterion to test the goodness-of-fit of each model. It is found that none of the six models can fit all the galaxy rotation curves well. Two galaxies can be best fitted by the baryonic model without involving nonluminous dark matter. MOND can fit the largest number of galaxies, and only one galaxy can be best fitted by the MSTG model. Core-modified model fits about half the LSB galaxies well, but no HSB galaxies, while the NFW model fits only a small fraction of HSB galaxies but no LSB galaxies. This may imply that the oversimplified NFW and core-modified profiles cannot model the postulated dark matter haloes well. Supported by Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities (106112016CDJCR301206), National Natural Science Fund of China (11305181, 11547305 and 11603005), and Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China (Y5KF181CJ1)

  17. Substorm Electric And Magnetic Fields In The Earth's Magnetotail: Observations Compared To The WINDMI Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivas, P. G.; Spencer, E. A.; Vadepu, S. K.; Horton, W., Jr.

    2017-12-01

    We compare satellite observations of substorm electric fields and magnetic fields to the output of a low dimensional nonlinear physics model of the nightside magnetosphere called WINDMI. The electric and magnetic field satellite data are used to calculate the E X B drift, which is one of the intermediate variables of the WINDMI model. The model uses solar wind and IMF measurements from the ACE spacecraft as input into a system of 8 nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The state variables of the differential equations represent the energy stored in the geomagnetic tail, central plasma sheet, ring current and field aligned currents. The output from the model is the ground based geomagnetic westward auroral electrojet (AL) index, and the Dst index.Using ACE solar wind data, IMF data and SuperMAG identification of substorm onset times up to December 2015, we constrain the WINDMI model to trigger substorm events, and compare the model intermediate variables to THEMIS and GEOTAIL satellite data in the magnetotail. By forcing the model to be consistent with satellite electric and magnetic field observations, we are able to track the magnetotail energy dynamics, the field aligned current contributions, energy injections into the ring current, and ensure that they are within allowable limts. In addition we are able to constrain the physical parameters of the model, in particular the lobe inductance, the plasma sheet capacitance, and the resistive and conductive parameters in the plasma sheet and ionosphere.

  18. Encoding Sequential Information in Vector Space Models of Semantics: Comparing Holographic Reduced Representation and Random Permutation

    OpenAIRE

    Recchia, Gabriel; Jones, Michael; Sahlgren, Magnus; Kanerva, Pentti

    2010-01-01

    Encoding information about the order in which words typically appear has been shown to improve the performance of high-dimensional semantic space models. This requires an encoding operation capable of binding together vectors in an order-sensitive way, and efficient enough to scale to large text corpora. Although both circular convolution and random permutations have been enlisted for this purpose in semantic models, these operations have never been systematically compared. In Experiment 1 we...

  19. Comparing exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis: A study on the five-factor model of personality

    OpenAIRE

    Borkenau, Peter; Ostendorf, Fritz

    1990-01-01

    Several authors claim that widespread support exists for a 5-factor model of personality ratings. In the present study, structural equation modeling was used to investigate this issue. The subjects (128 males and 128 females) were administered Costa and McCrae's NEO Personality Inventory, and they rated themselves, and were rated by three acquaintances, on the 20 adjective scales suggested by Norman as marker variables for the Big Five. Coefficients of factor comparability indicated that a 5-...

  20. Comparative Analysis of Yeast Metabolic Network Models Highlights Progress, Opportunities for Metabolic Reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin D Heavner

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We have compared 12 genome-scale models of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network published since 2003 to evaluate progress in reconstruction of the yeast metabolic network. We compared the genomic coverage, overlap of annotated metabolites, predictive ability for single gene essentiality with a selection of model parameters, and biomass production predictions in simulated nutrient-limited conditions. We have also compared pairwise gene knockout essentiality predictions for 10 of these models. We found that varying approaches to model scope and annotation reflected the involvement of multiple research groups in model development; that single-gene essentiality predictions were affected by simulated medium, objective function, and the reference list of essential genes; and that predictive ability for single-gene essentiality did not correlate well with predictive ability for our reference list of synthetic lethal gene interactions (R = 0.159. We conclude that the reconstruction of the yeast metabolic network is indeed gradually improving through the iterative process of model development, and there remains great opportunity for advancing our understanding of biology through continued efforts to reconstruct the full biochemical reaction network that constitutes yeast metabolism. Additionally, we suggest that there is opportunity for refining the process of deriving a metabolic model from a metabolic network reconstruction to facilitate mechanistic investigation and discovery. This comparative study lays the groundwork for developing improved tools and formalized methods to quantitatively assess metabolic network reconstructions independently of any particular model application, which will facilitate ongoing efforts to advance our understanding of the relationship between genotype and cellular phenotype.

  1. Comparing the performance of SIMD computers by running large air pollution models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brown, J.; Hansen, Per Christian; Wasniewski, J.

    1996-01-01

    To compare the performance and use of three massively parallel SIMD computers, we implemented a large air pollution model on these computers. Using a realistic large-scale model, we gained detailed insight about the performance of the computers involved when used to solve large-scale scientific...... problems that involve several types of numerical computations. The computers used in our study are the Connection Machines CM-200 and CM-5, and the MasPar MP-2216...

  2. A comparative analisys of i*-based agent-oriented modeling languages

    OpenAIRE

    Quer Bosor, Maria Carme; Ayala Martínez, Claudia Patricia; Cares, Carlos; Carvallo Vega, Juan Pablo; Grau Colom, Gemma; Haya, Mariela; Salazar, Guadalupe; Franch Gutiérrez, Javier; Mayol Sarroca, Enric

    2005-01-01

    Agent-oriented models are frequently used in disciplines such as requirements engineering and organizational process modelling. i* is currently one of the most widespread notations used for this purpose. Due to its strategic nature, instead of a single definition, there exist several versions and variants, often not totally defined and even contradictory. In this paper we present a comparative study of the three most widespread i* variants: Eric Yu’s seminal proposal, the Goal-oriented Requir...

  3. Roadmap for Lean implementation in Indian automotive component manufacturing industry: comparative study of UNIDO Model and ISM Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, J. R.; Mantha, S. S.; Rane, S. B.

    2014-07-01

    The demands for automobiles increased drastically in last two and half decades in India. Many global automobile manufacturers and Tier-1 suppliers have already set up research, development and manufacturing facilities in India. The Indian automotive component industry started implementing Lean practices to fulfill the demand of these customers. United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) has taken proactive approach in association with Automotive Component Manufacturers Association of India (ACMA) and the Government of India to assist Indian SMEs in various clusters since 1999 to make them globally competitive. The primary objectives of this research are to study the UNIDO-ACMA Model as well as ISM Model of Lean implementation and validate the ISM Model by comparing with UNIDO-ACMA Model. It also aims at presenting a roadmap for Lean implementation in Indian automotive component industry. This paper is based on secondary data which include the research articles, web articles, doctoral thesis, survey reports and books on automotive industry in the field of Lean, JIT and ISM. ISM Model for Lean practice bundles was developed by authors in consultation with Lean practitioners. The UNIDO-ACMA Model has six stages whereas ISM Model has eight phases for Lean implementation. The ISM-based Lean implementation model is validated through high degree of similarity with UNIDO-ACMA Model. The major contribution of this paper is the proposed ISM Model for sustainable Lean implementation. The ISM-based Lean implementation framework presents greater insight of implementation process at more microlevel as compared to UNIDO-ACMA Model.

  4. Roadmap for Lean implementation in Indian automotive component manufacturing industry: comparative study of UNIDO Model and ISM Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadhav, J. R.; Mantha, S. S.; Rane, S. B.

    2015-06-01

    The demands for automobiles increased drastically in last two and half decades in India. Many global automobile manufacturers and Tier-1 suppliers have already set up research, development and manufacturing facilities in India. The Indian automotive component industry started implementing Lean practices to fulfill the demand of these customers. United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) has taken proactive approach in association with Automotive Component Manufacturers Association of India (ACMA) and the Government of India to assist Indian SMEs in various clusters since 1999 to make them globally competitive. The primary objectives of this research are to study the UNIDO-ACMA Model as well as ISM Model of Lean implementation and validate the ISM Model by comparing with UNIDO-ACMA Model. It also aims at presenting a roadmap for Lean implementation in Indian automotive component industry. This paper is based on secondary data which include the research articles, web articles, doctoral thesis, survey reports and books on automotive industry in the field of Lean, JIT and ISM. ISM Model for Lean practice bundles was developed by authors in consultation with Lean practitioners. The UNIDO-ACMA Model has six stages whereas ISM Model has eight phases for Lean implementation. The ISM-based Lean implementation model is validated through high degree of similarity with UNIDO-ACMA Model. The major contribution of this paper is the proposed ISM Model for sustainable Lean implementation. The ISM-based Lean implementation framework presents greater insight of implementation process at more microlevel as compared to UNIDO-ACMA Model.

  5. A Comparative Data-Based Modeling Study on Respiratory CO2 Gas Exchange during Mechanical Ventilation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang-Sei eKim

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this study is to derive a minimally complex but credible model of respiratory CO2 gas exchange that may be used in systematic design and pilot testing of closed-loop end-tidal CO2 controllers in mechanical ventilation. We first derived a candidate model that captures the essential mechanisms involved in the respiratory CO2 gas exchange process. Then, we simplified the candidate model to derive two lower-order candidate models. We compared these candidate models for predictive capability and reliability using experimental data collected from 25 pediatric subjects undergoing dynamically varying mechanical ventilation during surgical procedures. A two-compartment model equipped with transport delay to account for CO2 delivery between the lungs and the tissues showed modest but statistically significant improvement in predictive capability over the same model without transport delay. Aggregating the lungs and the tissues into a single compartment further degraded the predictive fidelity of the model. In addition, the model equipped with transport delay demonstrated superior reliability to the one without transport delay. Further, the respiratory parameters derived from the model equipped with transport delay, but not the one without transport delay, were physiologically plausible. The results suggest that gas transport between the lungs and the tissues must be taken into account to accurately reproduce the respiratory CO2 gas exchange process under conditions of wide-ranging and dynamically varying mechanical ventilation conditions.

  6. The case for the comparator model as an explanation of the sense of agency and its breakdowns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carruthers, Glenn

    2012-03-01

    I compare Frith and colleagues' influential comparator account of how the sense of agency is elicited to the multifactorial weighting model advocated by Synofzik and colleagues. I defend the comparator model from the common objection that the actual sensory consequences of action are not needed to elicit the sense of agency. I examine the comparator model's ability to explain the performance of healthy subjects and those suffering from delusions of alien control on various self-attribution tasks. It transpires that the comparator model needs case-by-case adjustment to deal with problematic data. In response to this, the multifactorial weighting model of Synofzik and colleagues is introduced. Although this model is incomplete, it is more naturally constrained by the cases that are problematic for the comparator model. However, this model may be untestable. I conclude that currently the comparator model approach has stronger support than the multifactorial weighting model approach. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparative study for different statistical models to optimize cutting parameters of CNC end milling machines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Berry, A.; El-Berry, A.; Al-Bossly, A.

    2010-01-01

    In machining operation, the quality of surface finish is an important requirement for many work pieces. Thus, that is very important to optimize cutting parameters for controlling the required manufacturing quality. Surface roughness parameter (Ra) in mechanical parts depends on turning parameters during the turning process. In the development of predictive models, cutting parameters of feed, cutting speed, depth of cut, are considered as model variables. For this purpose, this study focuses on comparing various machining experiments which using CNC vertical machining center, work pieces was aluminum 6061. Multiple regression models are used to predict the surface roughness at different experiments.

  8. The Fracture Mechanical Markov Chain Fatigue Model Compared with Empirical Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gansted, L.; Brincker, Rune; Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    The applicability of the FMF-model (Fracture Mechanical Markov Chain Fatigue Model) introduced in Gansted, L., R. Brincker and L. Pilegaard Hansen (1991) is tested by simulations and compared with empirical data. Two sets of data have been used, the Virkler data (aluminium alloy) and data...... established at the Laboratory of Structural Engineering at Aalborg University, the AUC-data, (mild steel). The model, which is based on the assumption, that the crack propagation process can be described by a discrete Space Markov theory, is applicable to constant as well as random loading. It is shown...

  9. Senior student nurse proficiency: A comparative study of two clinical immersion models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumm, Sharon; Godfrey, Nelda; Richards, Veronica; Hulen, Jennifer; Ray, Kristin

    2016-09-01

    This study focused on identifying the best clinical learning model that would support nursing practice readiness following each immersion experience. Practicum preceptors completed surveys in which evaluated student preparation/readiness by assessing clinical knowledge, technical skills, critical thinking, communication, professionalism, management of responsibilities, and overall performance. The study results yielded no statistical significance when comparing both models. Future research is needed to analyze the impact of clinical hours offered in the senior immersion experience along with the curriculum content differences among various models of clinical experiences in undergraduate nursing programs to ensure practice readiness of nursing graduates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A comparative study of spherical and flat-Earth geopotential modeling at satellite elevations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrott, M. H.; Hinze, W. J.; Braile, L. W.

    1985-01-01

    Flat-Earth and spherical-Earth geopotential modeling of crustal anomaly sources at satellite elevations are compared by computing gravity and scalar magnetic anomalies perpendicular to the strike of variably dimensioned rectangular prisms at altitudes of 150, 300, and 450 km. Results indicate that the error caused by the flat-Earth approximation is less than 10% in most geometric conditions. Generally, error increase with larger and wider anomaly sources at higher altitudes. For most crustal source modeling applications at conventional satellite altitudes, flat-Earth modeling can be justified and is numerically efficient.

  11. [Comparison of the quick Gram stain method to the B&M modified and favor methods].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osawa, Kayo; Kataoka, Nobumasa; Maruo, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The Gram stain is an established method for bacterial identification, but the time needed to carry out this stain is 2-3 min. We attempted to shorten this time and stained a total of 70 clinical specimens isolated from using the Bartholomew & Mittwer (B&M) modified or Favor methods with a 3 s duration for washing and staining steps. Results were plotted and analyzed using a Hue Saturation Intensity (HSI) model. The range based on a plot of the two methods with the HSI model was presented as a reference interval. Our results indicated that 100% (35/35) of strains were Gram positive and 97.1% (34/35) were Gram negative for the quick B&M modified method. In the quick Favor method, 80.0% (28/35) were Gram positive and 68.6% (24/35) of strains were Gram negative. We propose that the quick B&M modified method is equivalent to the standard Gram staining method and is superior to the quick Favor method.

  12. The new ICRP respiratory model for radiation protection (ICRP 66) : applications and comparative evaluations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castellani, C.M.; Luciani, A.

    1996-02-01

    The aim of this report is to present the New ICRP Respiratory Model Tract for Radiological Protection. The model allows considering anatomical and physiological characteristics, giving reference values for children aged 3 months, 1, 5,10, and 15 years for adults; it also takes into account aerosol and gas characteristics. After a general description of the model structure, deposition, clearance and dosimetric models are presented. To compare the new and previous model (ICRP 30), dose coefficients (committed effective dose for unit intake) foe inhalation of radionuclides by workers are calculated considering aerosol granulometries with activity median aerodynamic of 1 and 5 μm, reference values for the respective publications. Dose coefficients and annual limits of intakes concerning respective dose limits (50 and 20 mSv respectively for ICRP 26 and 60) for workers and for members of population in case of dispersion of fission products aerosols, are finally calculated

  13. Writ in water, lines in sand: Ancient trade routes, models and comparative evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eivind Heldaas Seland

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Historians and archaeologists often take connectivity for granted, and fail to address the problems of documenting patterns of movement. This article highlights the methodological challenges of reconstructing trade routes in prehistory and early history. The argument is made that these challenges are best met through the application of modern models of connectivity, in combination with the conscious use of comparative approaches.

  14. A Comparative Study of Singapore's School Excellence Model with Hong Kong's School-Based Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Pak Tee; Chan, David

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to examine and compare the school excellence model (SEM) approach adopted by Singapore and the school-based management (SBM) approach adopted by Hong Kong. It discusses the implications of such a strategy and the challenges that both Singapore and Hong Kong schools face in navigating a new paradigm of managerialism while…

  15. Multiple data sets and modelling choices in a comparative LCA of disposable beverage cups

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harst, van der E.J.M.; Potting, J.; Kroeze, C.

    2014-01-01

    This study used multiple data sets and modelling choices in an environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) to compare typical disposable beverage cups made from polystyrene (PS), polylactic acid (PLA; bioplastic) and paper lined with bioplastic (biopaper). Incineration and recycling were considered as

  16. Comparing mixing-length models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2010-01-01

    Models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain for the entire atmospheric boundary layer are developed using mixing-length theory and are compared to wind speed observations up to 300 m at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The measurements are performed...

  17. Using ROC curves to compare neural networks and logistic regression for modeling individual noncatastrophic tree mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan L. King

    2003-01-01

    The performance of two classifiers, logistic regression and neural networks, are compared for modeling noncatastrophic individual tree mortality for 21 species of trees in West Virginia. The output of the classifier is usually a continuous number between 0 and 1. A threshold is selected between 0 and 1 and all of the trees below the threshold are classified as...

  18. Comparative mRNA analysis of behavioral and genetic mouse models of aggression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malki, Karim; Tosto, Maria G.; Pain, Oliver; Sluyter, Frans; Mineur, Yann S.; Crusio, Wim E.; de Boer, Sietse; Sandnabba, Kenneth N.; Kesserwani, Jad; Robinson, Edward; Schalkwyk, Leonard C.; Asherson, Philip

    Mouse models of aggression have traditionally compared strains, most notably BALB/cJ and C57BL/6. However, these strains were not designed to study aggression despite differences in aggression-related traits and distinct reactivity to stress. This study evaluated expression of genes differentially

  19. Comparing Infants' Preference for Correlated Audiovisual Speech with Signal-Level Computational Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollich, George; Prince, Christopher G.

    2009-01-01

    How much of infant behaviour can be accounted for by signal-level analyses of stimuli? The current paper directly compares the moment-by-moment behaviour of 8-month-old infants in an audiovisual preferential looking task with that of several computational models that use the same video stimuli as presented to the infants. One type of model…

  20. Feeding Behavior of Aplysia: A Model System for Comparing Cellular Mechanisms of Classical and Operant Conditioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Douglas A.; Byrne, John H.

    2006-01-01

    Feeding behavior of Aplysia provides an excellent model system for analyzing and comparing mechanisms underlying appetitive classical conditioning and reward operant conditioning. Behavioral protocols have been developed for both forms of associative learning, both of which increase the occurrence of biting following training. Because the neural…

  1. Supporting custom quality models to analyse and compare open-source software

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Di Ruscio (Davide); D.S. Kolovos (Dimitrios); I. Korkontzelos (Ioannis); N. Matragkas (Nicholas); J.J. Vinju (Jurgen)

    2017-01-01

    textabstractThe analysis and comparison of open source software can be improved by means of quality models supporting the evaluation of the software systems being compared and the final decision about which of them has to be adopted. Since software quality can mean different things in different

  2. A Comparative Analysis of Spatial Visualization Ability and Drafting Models for Industrial and Technology Education Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsioloudis, Petros; Jovanovic, Vukica; Jones, Mildred

    2014-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to determine significant positive effects among the use of three different types of drafting models, and to identify whether any differences exist towards promotion of spatial visualization ability for students in Industrial Technology and Technology Education courses. In particular, the study compared the use of…

  3. Comparative genome-scale metabolic modeling of actinomycetes : The topology of essential core metabolism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alam, Mohammad Tauqeer; Medema, Marnix H.; Takano, Eriko; Breitling, Rainer; Gojobori, Takashi

    2011-01-01

    Actinomycetes are highly important bacteria. On one hand, some of them cause severe human and plant diseases, on the other hand, many species are known for their ability to produce antibiotics. Here we report the results of a comparative analysis of genome-scale metabolic models of 37 species of

  4. Comparative genome-scale metabolic modeling of actinomycetes: the topology of essential core metabolism.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alam, M.T.; Medema, M.H.; Takano, E.; Breitling, R.

    2011-01-01

    Actinomycetes are highly important bacteria. On one hand, some of them cause severe human and plant diseases, on the other hand, many species are known for their ability to produce antibiotics. Here we report the results of a comparative analysis of genome-scale metabolic models of 37 species of

  5. Development of a finite element model for comparing metal and composite fuselage section drop testing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gransden, D.I.; Alderliesten, R.C.

    2017-01-01

    Part of the work of AircraftFire, a project investigating the effects of fire and crash on aircraft survivability, is presented. This work compares the effect of changing the material model from metallic to composite on the impact damage and floor acceleration characteristics. First, the metallic

  6. Comparative analysis of the planar capacitor and IDT piezoelectric thin-film micro-actuator models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Myers, Oliver J; Anjanappa, M; Freidhoff, Carl B

    2011-01-01

    A comparison of the analysis of similarly developed microactuators is presented. Accurate modeling and simulation techniques are vital for piezoelectrically actuated microactuators. Coupling analytical and numerical modeling techniques with variational design parameters, accurate performance predictions can be realized. Axi-symmetric two-dimensional and three-dimensional static deflection and harmonic models of a planar capacitor actuator are presented. Planar capacitor samples were modeled as unimorph diaphragms with sandwiched piezoelectric material. The harmonic frequencies were calculated numerically and compared well to predicted values and deformations. The finite element modeling reflects the impact of the d 31 piezoelectric constant. Two-dimensional axi-symmetric models of circularly interdigitated piezoelectrically membranes are also presented. The models include the piezoelectric material and properties, the membrane materials and properties, and incorporates various design considerations of the model. These models also include the electro-mechanical coupling for piezoelectric actuation and highlight a novel approach to take advantage of the higher d 33 piezoelectric coupling coefficient. Performance is evaluated for varying parameters such as electrode pitch, electrode width, and piezoelectric material thickness. The models also showed that several of the design parameters were naturally coupled. The static numerical models correlate well with the maximum static deflection of the experimental devices. Finally, this paper deals with the development of numerical harmonic models of piezoelectrically actuated planar capacitor and interdigitated diaphragms. The models were able to closely predict the first two harmonics, conservatively predict the third through sixth harmonics and predict the estimated values of center deflection using plate theory. Harmonic frequency and deflection simulations need further correlation by conducting extensive iterative

  7. [Communication with patients in palliative care: favoring cheerfulness and optimism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Araújo, Monica Martins Trovo; da Silva, Maria Júlia Paes

    2007-12-01

    The objective of this study was to know the expectations of patients who are in palliative care regarding communication with the nursing team. The data were collected during the first semester of 2005 through half-structured interviews among 39 oncological patients with no healing prognosis subjected to palliative chemotherapy in a hospital institution of the city of São Paulo. After transcription of the speeches, the data were analyzed according to the methodology of content analysis. From the interviewees' speeches four categories emerged. Interpersonal communication proved to be an important attribution to palliative care, with particular attention given to the professional's nonverbal signs for establishing a link of trust, the need for a compassionate presence, the desire not to focus the interaction and the relationship only on the disease and on death and to concentrate instead on cheerful verbal communication favoring optimism and good humor.

  8. Comparative Analysis of Soft Computing Models in Prediction of Bending Rigidity of Cotton Woven Fabrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guruprasad, R.; Behera, B. K.

    2015-10-01

    Quantitative prediction of fabric mechanical properties is an essential requirement for design engineering of textile and apparel products. In this work, the possibility of prediction of bending rigidity of cotton woven fabrics has been explored with the application of Artificial Neural Network (ANN) and two hybrid methodologies, namely Neuro-genetic modeling and Adaptive Neuro-Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) modeling. For this purpose, a set of cotton woven grey fabrics was desized, scoured and relaxed. The fabrics were then conditioned and tested for bending properties. With the database thus created, a neural network model was first developed using back propagation as the learning algorithm. The second model was developed by applying a hybrid learning strategy, in which genetic algorithm was first used as a learning algorithm to optimize the number of neurons and connection weights of the neural network. The Genetic algorithm optimized network structure was further allowed to learn using back propagation algorithm. In the third model, an ANFIS modeling approach was attempted to map the input-output data. The prediction performances of the models were compared and a sensitivity analysis was reported. The results show that the prediction by neuro-genetic and ANFIS models were better in comparison with that of back propagation neural network model.

  9. Application of numerical model of the photovoltaic module to the practical comparative analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krzesimowski, Damian; Pawelec, Artur

    2017-10-01

    This paper includes a model of photovoltaic module based on a basic catalogue data, taking into account the analysis of series and shunt resistance. These resistances are searched with accuracy 0.001 Ohms, but their influence is taken into account in the electrical parameters for each iteration. In addition, the model takes into account changes in environmental parameters: solar radiation intensity and the operating temperature, for which is sought the optimal operating point of the module. This allows to perform a step towards practical applications of the model, including comparative analysis. In the literature numerical models are used to verify the functioning of the PV modules as a function of voltage or current. In the paper is included description of searching the voltage at which the operating point will achieve maximum power for given environmental parameters. This approach to the issue allows to determine the power plane, on which the inverter should move, and this was the first aim of the work. Moreover, it is therefore possible to compare different PV modules without necessity to build the test stands. The output numerical data for different PV modules can be compared with each other and the best model can be chosen to fulfil the condition of the maximum power per day for the desired geographical location. The ability to perform this kind of analysis is the second aim of the work.

  10. A Comparative Assessment of Aerodynamic Models for Buffeting and Flutter of Long-Span Bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Kavrakov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Wind-induced vibrations commonly represent the leading criterion in the design of long-span bridges. The aerodynamic forces in bridge aerodynamics are mainly based on the quasi-steady and linear unsteady theory. This paper aims to investigate different formulations of self-excited and buffeting forces in the time domain by comparing the dynamic response of a multi-span cable-stayed bridge during the critical erection condition. The bridge is selected to represent a typical reference object with a bluff concrete box girder for large river crossings. The models are viewed from a perspective of model complexity, comparing the influence of the aerodynamic properties implied in the aerodynamic models, such as aerodynamic damping and stiffness, fluid memory in the buffeting and self-excited forces, aerodynamic nonlinearity, and aerodynamic coupling on the bridge response. The selected models are studied for a wind-speed range that is typical for the construction stage for two levels of turbulence intensity. Furthermore, a simplified method for the computation of buffeting forces including the aerodynamic admittance is presented, in which rational approximation is avoided. The critical flutter velocities are also compared for the selected models under laminar flow. Keywords: Buffeting, Flutter, Long-span bridges, Bridge aerodynamics, Bridge aeroelasticity, Erection stage

  11. Quantum discord as a tool for comparing collapse models and decoherence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Banerjee, Shreya; Bera, Sayantani; Singh, Tejinder P.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Collapse and decoherence models have been compared using quantum discord. • A macroscopic entanglement experimental set up has been used for this purpose. • Detection of the above effects with present experimental time not possible. • Bounds on the collapse parameters have been obtained from this analysis. - Abstract: The quantum to classical transition maybe caused by decoherence or by dynamical collapse of the wave-function. We propose quantum discord as a tool, (1) for comparing and contrasting the role of a collapse model (Continuous Spontaneous Localisation) and various sources of decoherence (environmental and fundamental), (2) for detecting collapse model and fundamental decoherence for an experimentally demonstrated macroscopic entanglement. We discuss the experimental times which will lead to the detection of either Continuous Spontaneous Localisation or fundamental decoherence. We further put bounds on the collapse parameters from this experiment for quantum discord.

  12. The experience of freedom in decisions - Questioning philosophical beliefs in favor of psychological determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Stephan; Hiemisch, Anette; Baumeister, Roy F

    2015-05-01

    Six experiments tested two competing models of subjective freedom during decision-making. The process model is mainly based on philosophical conceptions of free will and assumes that features of the process of choosing affect subjective feelings of freedom. In contrast, the outcome model predicts that subjective freedom is due to positive outcomes that can be expected or are achieved by a decision. Results heavily favored the outcome model over the process model. For example, participants felt freer when choosing between two equally good than two equally bad options. Process features including number of options, complexity of decision, uncertainty, having the option to defer the decision, conflict among reasons, and investing high effort in choosing generally had no or even negative effects on subjective freedom. In contrast, participants reported high freedom with good outcomes and low freedom with bad outcomes, and ease of deciding increased subjective freedom, consistent with the outcome model. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Comparing sensitivity analysis methods to advance lumped watershed model identification and evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available This study seeks to identify sensitivity tools that will advance our understanding of lumped hydrologic models for the purposes of model improvement, calibration efficiency and improved measurement schemes. Four sensitivity analysis methods were tested: (1 local analysis using parameter estimation software (PEST, (2 regional sensitivity analysis (RSA, (3 analysis of variance (ANOVA, and (4 Sobol's method. The methods' relative efficiencies and effectiveness have been analyzed and compared. These four sensitivity methods were applied to the lumped Sacramento soil moisture accounting model (SAC-SMA coupled with SNOW-17. Results from this study characterize model sensitivities for two medium sized watersheds within the Juniata River Basin in Pennsylvania, USA. Comparative results for the 4 sensitivity methods are presented for a 3-year time series with 1 h, 6 h, and 24 h time intervals. The results of this study show that model parameter sensitivities are heavily impacted by the choice of analysis method as well as the model time interval. Differences between the two adjacent watersheds also suggest strong influences of local physical characteristics on the sensitivity methods' results. This study also contributes a comprehensive assessment of the repeatability, robustness, efficiency, and ease-of-implementation of the four sensitivity methods. Overall ANOVA and Sobol's method were shown to be superior to RSA and PEST. Relative to one another, ANOVA has reduced computational requirements and Sobol's method yielded more robust sensitivity rankings.

  14. Comparing the data-driven and the model-dependent strategies for improving filtered GRACE signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutt Vishwakarma, Bramha; Sneeuw, Nico

    2017-04-01

    The noisy level 02 GRACE products from various groups need to be filtered in order to obtain meaningful information about water mass transport within the Earth system. Filtering affects signal, which increases the uncertainty in the filtered GRACE observed total water storage time series. The signal loss is counter acted using a correction strategy that typically makes use of models. The accuracy of model-dependent methods is dependent on the accuracy of the model, which raises doubts on accuracy of corrected GRACE products over poorly modeled regions. This led to the development of data-driven methods. Although research contributions using a model-dependent method or a data-driven method claim that the corrected GRACE products are superior to filtered products, a comparison of model dependent methods and the data-driven methods is essential to choose the best one. In this contribution, we compare the three most popular model-dependent approaches: additive approach, multiplicative approach, scaling approach, and two data-driven methods proposed recently. In order to be comprehensive, we analyze the performance of these correction strategies over 32 catchments of different sizes located in different climate zones. In a realistic closed-loop simulation, we find that the data-driven methods are consistently superior to the model-dependent approaches. At last we analyze the desiccation of Aral Sea and lake Urmia with the GRACE products, and compare the corrected total water storage change with reports and contributions from different groups. We find that the model-dependent approaches have a tendency to overestimate the rate of water mass loss recorded by GRACE satellites.

  15. Comparative Aspects of Electronic Government Service Maturity and “E-Diamond” Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Limba

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays electronic government starts dominating in all world countries. Some states are more experienced, while others have just started implementing it. Nevertheless, regardless of which models the country had reached, all of them should make the progress. It is important to try to overlook and analyze in essence the e-government services maturity and “E-Diamond” models at the public administration level, that are used in various countries. Having studied the peculiarities of stage models of electronic government services and having carried out their comparative analysis, the work shows the main similarities and differences of the models. Implementation of electronic government services in stage models is grounded on the complexity of service integration—a deeper integration of electronic government services is possible only having stepped through the lower integration stage. Swedish scientists A. Persson and G. Goldkuhl consider this policy of stage integration of services to be a disadvantage and they developed a contrapositional model “E-Diamond” which provides conditions to set free the stages and let them operate individually, not dependent on each other. Stages’ models have different requirements for self-identification in information systems. “ANAO,” “SAFAD,” “Hiller&Belanger” stages’ models require self-identification passing from the second to the third levels, while in stages’ models “Lee&Layne” and “Recreation of Public Sector Processes” requirements for self-identification appear in the second stages of providing electronic government services. Having carried out comparative analysis of all models of electronic government services six key features of the model are distinguished, such as possible levels of implementation, attributes of different levels, targeting the customer, targeting the inside processes, possibility to evaluate services, technological background. However, out of six features

  16. Comparative Aspects of Electronic Government Service Maturity and “E-Diamond” Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadas Limba

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Summary. Nowadays electronic government starts dominating in all world countries. Some states are more experienced, while others have just started implementing it. Nevertheless, regardless of which models the country had reached, all of them should make the progress. It is important to try to overlook and analyze in essence the e-government services maturity and “E-Diamond” models at the public administration level, that are used in various countries.Having studied the peculiarities of stage models of electronic government services and having carried out their comparative analysis, the work shows the main similarities and differences of the models. Implementation of electronic government services in stage models is grounded on the complexity of service integration—a deeper integration of electronic government services is possible only having stepped through the lower integration stage. Swedish scientists A. Persson and G. Goldkuhl consider this policy of stage integration of services to be a disadvantage and they developed a contrapositional model “E-Diamond” which provides conditions to set free the stages and let them operate individually, not dependent on each other. Stages’ models have different requirements for self-identification in information systems. “ANAO,” “SAFAD,” “Hiller&Belanger” stages’ models require self-identification passing from the second to the third levels, while in stages’ models “Lee&Layne” and “Recreation of Public Sector Processes” requirements for self-identification appear in the second stages ofproviding electronic government services.Having carried out comparative analysis of all models of electronic government services six key features of the model are distinguished, such as possible levels of implementation, attributes of different levels, targeting the customer, targeting the inside processes, possibility to evaluate services, technological background. However, out of six

  17. Comparing and Validating Machine Learning Models for Mycobacterium tuberculosis Drug Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Thomas; Russo, Daniel P; Zorn, Kimberley M; Clark, Alex M; Korotcov, Alexandru; Tkachenko, Valery; Reynolds, Robert C; Perryman, Alexander L; Freundlich, Joel S; Ekins, Sean

    2018-04-26

    Tuberculosis is a global health dilemma. In 2016, the WHO reported 10.4 million incidences and 1.7 million deaths. The need to develop new treatments for those infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis ( Mtb) has led to many large-scale phenotypic screens and many thousands of new active compounds identified in vitro. However, with limited funding, efforts to discover new active molecules against Mtb needs to be more efficient. Several computational machine learning approaches have been shown to have good enrichment and hit rates. We have curated small molecule Mtb data and developed new models with a total of 18,886 molecules with activity cutoffs of 10 μM, 1 μM, and 100 nM. These data sets were used to evaluate different machine learning methods (including deep learning) and metrics and to generate predictions for additional molecules published in 2017. One Mtb model, a combined in vitro and in vivo data Bayesian model at a 100 nM activity yielded the following metrics for 5-fold cross validation: accuracy = 0.88, precision = 0.22, recall = 0.91, specificity = 0.88, kappa = 0.31, and MCC = 0.41. We have also curated an evaluation set ( n = 153 compounds) published in 2017, and when used to test our model, it showed the comparable statistics (accuracy = 0.83, precision = 0.27, recall = 1.00, specificity = 0.81, kappa = 0.36, and MCC = 0.47). We have also compared these models with additional machine learning algorithms showing Bayesian machine learning models constructed with literature Mtb data generated by different laboratories generally were equivalent to or outperformed deep neural networks with external test sets. Finally, we have also compared our training and test sets to show they were suitably diverse and different in order to represent useful evaluation sets. Such Mtb machine learning models could help prioritize compounds for testing in vitro and in vivo.

  18. Comparability of results from pair and classical model formulations for different sexually transmitted infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jimmy Boon Som Ong

    Full Text Available The "classical model" for sexually transmitted infections treats partnerships as instantaneous events summarized by partner change rates, while individual-based and pair models explicitly account for time within partnerships and gaps between partnerships. We compared predictions from the classical and pair models over a range of partnership and gap combinations. While the former predicted similar or marginally higher prevalence at the shortest partnership lengths, the latter predicted self-sustaining transmission for gonorrhoea (GC and Chlamydia (CT over much broader partnership and gap combinations. Predictions on the critical level of condom use (C(c required to prevent transmission also differed substantially when using the same parameters. When calibrated to give the same disease prevalence as the pair model by adjusting the infectious duration for GC and CT, and by adjusting transmission probabilities for HIV, the classical model then predicted much higher C(c values for GC and CT, while C(c predictions for HIV were fairly close. In conclusion, the two approaches give different predictions over potentially important combinations of partnership and gap lengths. Assuming that it is more correct to explicitly model partnerships and gaps, then pair or individual-based models may be needed for GC and CT since model calibration does not resolve the differences.

  19. Comparing flow-through and static ice cave models for Shoshone Ice Cave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaj E. Williams

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we suggest a new ice cave type: the “flow-through” ice cave. In a flow-through ice cave external winds blow into the cave and wet cave walls chill the incoming air to the wet-bulb temperature, thereby achieving extra cooling of the cave air. We have investigated an ice cave in Idaho, located in a lava tube that is reported to have airflow through porous wet end-walls and could therefore be a flow-through cave. We have instrumented the site and collected data for one year. In order to determine the actual ice cave type present at Shoshone, we have constructed numerical models for static and flow-through caves (dynamic is not relevant here. The models are driven with exterior measurements of air temperature, relative humidity and wind speed. The model output is interior air temperature and relative humidity. We then compare the output of both models to the measured interior air temperatures and relative humidity. While both the flow-through and static cave models are capable of preserving ice year-round (a net zero or positive ice mass balance, both models show very different cave air temperature and relative humidity output. We find the empirical data support a hybrid model of the static and flow-through models: permitting a static ice cave to have incoming air chilled to the wet-bulb temperature fits the data best for the Shoshone Ice Cave.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Bulge Deformation between 2D and 3D Finite Element Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Qin

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Bulge deformation of the slab is one of the main factors that affect slab quality in continuous casting. This paper describes an investigation into bulge deformation using ABAQUS to model the solidification process. A three-dimensional finite element analysis model of the slab solidification process has been first established because the bulge deformation is closely related to slab temperature distributions. Based on slab temperature distributions, a three-dimensional thermomechanical coupling model including the slab, the rollers, and the dynamic contact between them has also been constructed and applied to a case study. The thermomechanical coupling model produces outputs such as the rules of bulge deformation. Moreover, the three-dimensional model has been compared with a two-dimensional model to discuss the differences between the two models in calculating the bulge deformation. The results show that the platform zone exists in the wide side of the slab and the bulge deformation is affected strongly by the ratio of width-to-thickness. The indications are also that the difference of the bulge deformation for the two modeling ways is little when the ratio of width-to-thickness is larger than six.

  1. Comparing ESC and iPSC—Based Models for Human Genetic Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomer Halevy

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, human disorders were studied using animal models or somatic cells taken from patients. Such studies enabled the analysis of the molecular mechanisms of numerous disorders, and led to the discovery of new treatments. Yet, these systems are limited or even irrelevant in modeling multiple genetic diseases. The isolation of human embryonic stem cells (ESCs from diseased blastocysts, the derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs from patients’ somatic cells, and the new technologies for genome editing of pluripotent stem cells have opened a new window of opportunities in the field of disease modeling, and enabled studying diseases that couldn’t be modeled in the past. Importantly, despite the high similarity between ESCs and iPSCs, there are several fundamental differences between these cells, which have important implications regarding disease modeling. In this review we compare ESC-based models to iPSC-based models, and highlight the advantages and disadvantages of each system. We further suggest a roadmap for how to choose the optimal strategy to model each specific disorder.

  2. A comparative analysis of 9 multi-model averaging approaches in hydrological continuous streamflow simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arsenault, Richard; Gatien, Philippe; Renaud, Benoit; Brissette, François; Martel, Jean-Luc

    2015-10-01

    This study aims to test whether a weighted combination of several hydrological models can simulate flows more accurately than the models taken individually. In addition, the project attempts to identify the most efficient model averaging method and the optimal number of models to include in the weighting scheme. In order to address the first objective, streamflow was simulated using four lumped hydrological models (HSAMI, HMETS, MOHYSE and GR4J-6), each of which were calibrated with three different objective functions on 429 watersheds. The resulting 12 hydrographs (4 models × 3 metrics) were weighted and combined with the help of 9 averaging methods which are the simple arithmetic mean (SAM), Akaike information criterion (AICA), Bates-Granger (BGA), Bayes information criterion (BICA), Bayesian model averaging (BMA), Granger-Ramanathan average variant A, B and C (GRA, GRB and GRC) and the average by SCE-UA optimization (SCA). The same weights were then applied to the hydrographs in validation mode, and the Nash-Sutcliffe Efficiency metric was measured between the averaged and observed hydrographs. Statistical analyses were performed to compare the accuracy of weighted methods to that of individual models. A Kruskal-Wallis test and a multi-objective optimization algorithm were then used to identify the most efficient weighted method and the optimal number of models to integrate. Results suggest that the GRA, GRB, GRC and SCA weighted methods perform better than the individual members. Model averaging from these four methods were superior to the best of the individual members in 76% of the cases. Optimal combinations on all watersheds included at least one of each of the four hydrological models. None of the optimal combinations included all members of the ensemble of 12 hydrographs. The Granger-Ramanathan average variant C (GRC) is recommended as the best compromise between accuracy, speed of execution, and simplicity.

  3. Metal accumulation in the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus. Model predictions compared to field data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veltman, Karin; Huijbregts, Mark A.J.; Vijver, Martina G.; Peijnenburg, Willie J.G.M.; Hobbelen, Peter H.F.; Koolhaas, Josee E.; Gestel, Cornelis A.M. van; Vliet, Petra C.J. van; Jan Hendriks, A.

    2007-01-01

    The mechanistic bioaccumulation model OMEGA (Optimal Modeling for Ecotoxicological Applications) is used to estimate accumulation of zinc (Zn), copper (Cu), cadmium (Cd) and lead (Pb) in the earthworm Lumbricus rubellus. Our validation to field accumulation data shows that the model accurately predicts internal cadmium concentrations. In addition, our results show that internal metal concentrations in the earthworm are less than linearly (slope < 1) related to the total concentration in soil, while risk assessment procedures often assume the biota-soil accumulation factor (BSAF) to be constant. Although predicted internal concentrations of all metals are generally within a factor 5 compared to field data, incorporation of regulation in the model is necessary to improve predictability of the essential metals such as zinc and copper. - Earthworm metal concentrations are less than linearly related to total soil concentrations and predicted pore water concentrations

  4. Comparing photo modeling methodologies and techniques: the instance of the Great Temple of Abu Simbel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Di Tondo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available After fifty years from the Salvage of the Abu Simbel Temples it has been possible to experiment the contemporary photo-modeling tools beginning from the original data of the photogrammetrical survey carried out in the 1950s. This produced a reflection on “Image Based” methods and modeling techniques, comparing strict 3d digital photogrammetry with the latest Structure From Motion (SFM systems. The topographic survey data, the original photogrammetric stereo couples, the points coordinates and their representation in contour lines, allowed to obtain a model of the monument in his configuration before the moving of the temples. The impossibility to carry out a direct survey led to touristic shots to create SFM models to use for geometric comparisons.

  5. Comparative study of neuroprotective effect of tricyclics vs. trazodone on animal model of depressive disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinescu, Ileana P; Predescu, Anca; Udriştoiu, T; Marinescu, D

    2012-01-01

    The neurobiological model of depressive disorder may be correlated with the animal model on rat, hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, the increase of cortisol level being specific to the model of depression in women. The neurobiological model of depression in women presents vulnerabilities for some cerebral structures (hippocampus, frontal cortex, cerebral amygdala). A decrease of frontal cortex and hippocampus volumes are recognized in depressive disorder in women, depending on duration of disease and antidepressant therapy. Neurobiological vulnerability may be pronounced through cholinergic blockade. The purpose of the study was to highlight the cytoarchitectural changes in the frontal cortex and hippocampus by comparing two antidepressant substances: amitriptyline with a strong anticholinergic effect and trazodone, without anticholinergic effect. The superior neuroprotective qualities of trazodone for the frontal cortex, hippocampus and dentate gyrus are revealed. The particular neurobiological vulnerability of depression in women requires a differentiated therapeutic approach, avoiding the use of antidepressants with anticholinergic action.

  6. The handicap process favors exaggerated, rather than reduced, sexual ornaments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tazzyman, Samuel J; Iwasa, Yoh; Pomiankowski, Andrew

    2014-09-01

    Why are traits that function as secondary sexual ornaments generally exaggerated in size compared to the naturally selected optimum, and not reduced? Because they deviate from the naturally selected optimum, traits that are reduced in size will handicap their bearer, and could thus provide an honest signal of quality to a potential mate. Thus if secondary sexual ornaments evolve via the handicap process, current theory suggests that reduced ornamentation should be as frequent as exaggerated ornamentation, but this is not the case. To try to explain this discrepancy, we analyze a simple model of the handicap process. Our analysis shows that asymmetries in costs of preference or ornament with regard to exaggeration and reduction cannot fully explain the imbalance. Rather, the bias toward exaggeration can be best explained if either the signaling efficacy or the condition dependence of a trait increases with size. Under these circumstances, evolution always leads to more extreme exaggeration than reduction: although the two should occur just as frequently, exaggerated secondary sexual ornaments are likely to be further removed from the naturally selected optimum than reduced ornaments. © 2014 The Authors. Evolution published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  7. Comparing the reliability and accuracy of clinical measurements using plaster model and the digital model system based on crowding severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Yu-Ming; Rutchakitprakarn, Lalita; Kuang, Shou-Hsin; Wu, Tzu-Ying

    2018-01-25

    This study aims to clarify whether 3Shape™ digital model system could be applied in orthodontic diagnostic analysis with certainty, especially under different crowding condition. Reliability, accuracy and efficiency of 3Shape™ digital model system were assessed by comparing them with traditional plaster cast. 29 plaster casts with permanent dentition were transformed into digital models by 3Shape™ D800 scanner. All 29 models were categorized into mild-crowding (arch length discrepancy 3 mm and 8 mm). Fourteen linear measurements were made manually using a digital caliper on plaster casts and virtually using the 3Shape™ Ortho Analyzer software by two examiners. Intra-class Correlation Coefficient (ICC) was used to evaluate intra-examiner reliability, inter-examiner reliability and reliability between two model systems. Paired t test was used to evaluate accuracy between two model systems. Kruskal-Wallis test followed by Mann-Whitney U test was used to evaluate the measurement differences between 3 groups in two model systems. Both intra-examiner and inter-examiner reliability were generally excellent for all measurements made on 3Shape™ digital model and plaster cast (ICC: 0.752-0.993). Reliability between different model systems was also excellent (ICC: 0.897-0.998). Half of the accuracy test showed statistically significant differences (p systems, the mandibular required space showed significant difference (p = 0.012) between mild crowding group (0.27 + 0.01 mm) and severe crowding group (0.20 + 0.09 mm). However, the differences were less than 0.5 mm and would not affect clinical decision. Using 3Shape™ digital model system instead of plaster casts for orthodontic diagnostic measurements is clinically acceptable. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Taiwan LLC.

  8. A Comparative Study of the Proposed Models for the Components of the National Health Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Damanabi, Shahla; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: National Health Information System plays an important role in ensuring timely and reliable access to Health information, which is essential for strategic and operational decisions that improve health, quality and effectiveness of health care. In other words, using the National Health information system you can improve the quality of health data, information and knowledge used to support decision making at all levels and areas of the health sector. Since full identification of the components of this system – for better planning and management influential factors of performanceseems necessary, therefore, in this study different attitudes towards components of this system are explored comparatively. Methods: This is a descriptive and comparative kind of study. The society includes printed and electronic documents containing components of the national health information system in three parts: input, process and output. In this context, search for information using library resources and internet search were conducted, and data analysis was expressed using comparative tables and qualitative data. Results: The findings showed that there are three different perspectives presenting the components of national health information system Lippeveld and Sauerborn and Bodart model in 2000, Health Metrics Network (HMN) model from World Health Organization in 2008, and Gattini’s 2009 model. All three models outlined above in the input (resources and structure) require components of management and leadership, planning and design programs, supply of staff, software and hardware facilities and equipment. Plus, in the “process” section from three models, we pointed up the actions ensuring the quality of health information system, and in output section, except for Lippeveld Model, two other models consider information products and use and distribution of information as components of the national health information system. Conclusion: the results showed that all the

  9. A comparative study of the proposed models for the components of the national health information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Maryam; Damanabi, Shahla; Sadoughi, Farahnaz

    2014-04-01

    National Health Information System plays an important role in ensuring timely and reliable access to Health information, which is essential for strategic and operational decisions that improve health, quality and effectiveness of health care. In other words, using the National Health information system you can improve the quality of health data, information and knowledge used to support decision making at all levels and areas of the health sector. Since full identification of the components of this system - for better planning and management influential factors of performanceseems necessary, therefore, in this study different attitudes towards components of this system are explored comparatively. This is a descriptive and comparative kind of study. The society includes printed and electronic documents containing components of the national health information system in three parts: input, process and output. In this context, search for information using library resources and internet search were conducted, and data analysis was expressed using comparative tables and qualitative data. The findings showed that there are three different perspectives presenting the components of national health information system Lippeveld and Sauerborn and Bodart model in 2000, Health Metrics Network (HMN) model from World Health Organization in 2008, and Gattini's 2009 model. All three models outlined above in the input (resources and structure) require components of management and leadership, planning and design programs, supply of staff, software and hardware facilities and equipment. Plus, in the "process" section from three models, we pointed up the actions ensuring the quality of health information system, and in output section, except for Lippeveld Model, two other models consider information products and use and distribution of information as components of the national health information system. the results showed that all the three models have had a brief discussion about the

  10. Financial impact of errors in business forecasting: a comparative study of linear models and neural networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudimar Pereira da Veiga

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The importance of demand forecasting as a management tool is a well documented issue. However, it is difficult to measure costs generated by forecasting errors and to find a model that assimilate the detailed operation of each company adequately. In general, when linear models fail in the forecasting process, more complex nonlinear models are considered. Although some studies comparing traditional models and neural networks have been conducted in the literature, the conclusions are usually contradictory. In this sense, the objective was to compare the accuracy of linear methods and neural networks with the current method used by the company. The results of this analysis also served as input to evaluate influence of errors in demand forecasting on the financial performance of the company. The study was based on historical data from five groups of food products, from 2004 to 2008. In general, one can affirm that all models tested presented good results (much better than the current forecasting method used, with mean absolute percent error (MAPE around 10%. The total financial impact for the company was 6,05% on annual sales.

  11. Alfven waves in the auroral ionosphere: A numerical model compared with measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knudsen, D.J.; Kelley, M.C.; Vickrey, J.F.

    1992-01-01

    The authors solve a linear numerical model of Alfven waves reflecting from the high-latitude ionosphere, both to better understanding the role of the ionosphere in the magnetosphere/ionosphere coupling process and to compare model results with in situ measurements. They use the model to compute the frequency-dependent amplitude and phase relations between the meridional electric and the zonal magnetic fields due to Alfven waves. These relations are compared with measurements taken by an auroral sounding rocket flow in the morningside oval and by the HILAT satellite traversing the oval at local noon. The sounding rocket's trajectory was mostly parallel to the auroral oval, and is measured enhanced fluctuating field energy in regions of electron precipitation. The rocket-measured phase data are in excellent agreement with the Alfven wave model, and the relation between the modeled and the measured by HILAT are related by the height-integrated Pedersen conductivity Σ p , indicating that the measured field fluctuations were due mainly to structured field-aligned current systems. A reason for the relative lack of Alfven wave energy in the HILAT measurements could be the fact that the satellite traveled mostly perpendicular to the oval and therefore quickly traversed narrow regions of electron precipitation and associated wave activity

  12. The Comparative Study of Collaborative Learning and SDLC Model to develop IT Group Projects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorapak Pukdesree

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this research were to compare the attitudes of learners between applying SDLC model with collaborative learning and typical SDLC model and to develop electronic courseware as group projects. The research was a quasi-experimental research. The populations of the research were students who took Computer Organization and Architecture course in the academic year 2015. There were 38 students who participated to the research. The participants were divided voluntary into two groups including an experimental group with 28 students using SDLC model with collaborative learning and a control group with 10 students using typical SDLC model. The research instruments were attitude questionnaire, semi-structured interview and self-assessment questionnaire. The collected data was analysed by arithmetic mean, standard deviation, and independent sample t-test. The results of the questionnaire revealed that the attitudes of the learners using collaborative learning and SDLC model were statistically significant difference between the mean score for experimental group and control group at a significance level of 0.05. The independent statistical analyses were significantly different between the two groups at a significance level of 0.05. The results of the interviewing revealed that most of the learners had the corresponding opinions that collaborative learning was very useful with highest level of their attitudes comparing with the previous methodology. Learners had left some feedbacks that collaborative learning should be applied to other courses.

  13. Psychobiological model of temperament and character: Validation and cross-cultural comparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Džamonja-Ignjatović Tamara

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents research results regarding Psychobiological model of personality by Robert Cloninger. The primary research goal was to test the new TCI-5 inventory and compare our results with US normative data. We also analyzed the factor structure of the model and the reliability of basic TCI-5 scales and sub-scales. The sample consisted of 473 subjects from the normal population, age range between 18-50 years. Results showed significant differences between Serbian and American samples. Compared to the American sample, Novelty seeking was higher in the Serbian sample, while Persistence Self-directedness and Cooperativeness were lower. For the most part results of the present study confirmed a seven factor structure model although some sub-scales did not coincide with basic dimensions as predicted by the theoretical model. Therefore certain theoretical revisions of the model are required in order to fit in the empirical findings. Similarly, the discrepancy between the theoretical and empirical was also noticed regarding the reliability of TCI-5 scales. They also need to be re-examined. Thus the results of the study showed satisfactory reliability of Persistence (.90, Self-directedness (.89 and Harm avoidance (.87, but low reliability of the Novelty seeking (.78, Reward dependence (.79 and Self-transcendence (.78.

  14. Climate change adaptation: Comparing climate model projections of flooding against flood estimation by continuous simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A.; Bates, P. D.; Freer, J. E.

    2012-12-01

    Modelled assessments of climate change impacts on flooding are now increasingly used to inform adaptation and mitigation policy. These modelled assessments are typically driven by Global and Regional Climate Models (GCM/RCM). However, opinion is divided on how best to proceed, particularly with regards to the feasibility and practicality of using climate model outputs to inform management strategies. Here RCM driven projections of extreme discharges are compared against the uncertainty present in the observed record. The run-off model HBV_light is applied, within the Generalised Likelihood Uncertainty Estimation (GLUE) framework, to the Upper Avon catchment in the Midlands of England, in the U.K. A 48 year observational record of rainfall and discharge was used, with non-behavioural parameter sets being rejected through an evaluation of continuous hydrograph simulation and annual maximum discharge. The output of an RCM ensemble was used, with differing ensemble approaches, to assess climate change impacts on extreme discharge. A daily stochastic rainfall generator was then applied to the observational record and used to simulate 2000 years of discharge. RCM driven changes in extreme discharge could then be compared against the variability present in the observed record. The results suggest that coping with present uncertainty in the observed record is already a significant challenge, with the range of uncertainty in a 1 in 100 year event eclipsing the uncertainty present in climate projections.

  15. Comparing and Contrasting View-Based and 3D Models of Navigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Glennerster

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available What does it mean to store a 3D location and hence to navigate towards it? Participants in our experiment carried out a homing task on the scale of a room (ie, 3-4m square in an immersive virtual reality environment. In interval one, they were shown three very long coloured vertical poles from one viewing location with some head movement permitted. The poles were easily distinguishable and designed to have constant angular width irrespective of viewing distance. Participants were then transported (virtually to another location in the scene, and in interval two they tried to navigate to the initial viewing point relative to the poles. The distributions of end-point errors on the ground plane differed significantly in shape and extent depending on pole configuration and goal location. We compared the ability of two types of models to predict these variations in the distribution of errors: (i view-based models, based on simple features such as angles between poles from the cyclopean point, ratios of these angles, or various disparity measures and (ii Cartesian models based on a probabilistic 3D reconstruction of the scene geometry. For our data, we find that view-based models capture important characteristics of the end-point distributions very well whereas 3D-based models fare less well. In some ways, a Cartesian model is a very particular case of a view-based model: the two are not as different from one another as they first appear.

  16. A simplified MHD model of capillary Z-Pinch compared with experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapolov, A.A.; Kiss, M.; Kukhlevsky, S.V. [Institute of Physics, University of Pecs (Hungary)

    2016-11-15

    The most accurate models of the capillary Z-pinches used for excitation of soft X-ray lasers and photolithography XUV sources currently are based on the magnetohydrodynamics theory (MHD). The output of MHD-based models greatly depends on details in the mathematical description, such as initial and boundary conditions, approximations of plasma parameters, etc. Small experimental groups who develop soft X-ray/XUV sources often use the simplest Z-pinch models for analysis of their experimental results, despite of these models are inconsistent with the MHD equations. In the present study, keeping only the essential terms in the MHD equations, we obtained a simplified MHD model of cylindrically symmetric capillary Z-pinch. The model gives accurate results compared to experiments with argon plasmas, and provides simple analysis of temporal evolution of main plasma parameters. The results clarify the influence of viscosity, heat flux and approximations of plasma conductivity on the dynamics of capillary Z-pinch plasmas. The model can be useful for researchers, especially experimentalists, who develop the soft X-ray/XUV sources. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  17. Comparative analysis of hourly and dynamic power balancing models for validating future energy scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pillai, Jayakrishnan R.; Heussen, Kai; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2011-01-01

    , the model is verified on the basis of the existing energy mix on Bornholm as an islanded energy system. Future energy scenarios for the year 2030 are analysed to study a feasible technology mix for a higher share of wind power. Finally, the results of the hourly simulations are compared to dynamic frequency...... simulations incorporating the Vehicle-to-grid technology. The results indicate how the EnergyPLAN model may be improved in terms of intra-hour variability, stability and ancillary services to achieve a better reflection of energy and power capacity requirements....

  18. Kinetic theory model predictions compared with low-thrust axisymmetric nozzle plume data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, B. R.; Fuhrman, S. J.; Penko, P. F.

    1993-01-01

    A system of nonlinear integral equations equivalent to the steady-state Krook kinetic equation was used to model the flow from a low-thrust axisymmetric nozzle. The mathematical model was used to numerically calculate the number density, temperature, and velocity of a simple gas as it expands into a near vacuum. With these quantities the gas pressure and flow directions of the gas near the exit plane were calculated and compared with experimental values for a low-thrust nozzle of the same geometry and mass flow rate.

  19. Comparative study on the wake deflection behind yawed wind turbine models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schottler, Jannik; Mühle, Franz; Bartl, Jan; Peinke, Joachim; Adaramola, Muyiwa S.; Sætran, Lars; Hölling, Michael

    2017-05-01

    In this wind tunnel campaign, detailed wake measurements behind two different model wind turbines in yawed conditions were performed. The wake deflections were quantified by estimating the rotor-averaged available power within the wake. By using two different model wind turbines, the influence of the rotor design and turbine geometry on the wake deflection caused by a yaw misalignment of 30° could be judged. It was found that the wake deflections three rotor diameters downstream were equal while at six rotor diameters downstream insignificant differences were observed. The results compare well with previous experimental and numerical studies.

  20. Cold Nuclear Matter effects on J/psi production at RHIC: comparing shadowing models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreiro, E.G.; /Santiago de Compostela U.; Fleuret, F.; /Ecole Polytechnique; Lansberg, J.P.; /SLAC; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; /SPhN, DAPNIA, Saclay

    2009-06-19

    We present a wide study on the comparison of different shadowing models and their influence on J/{psi} production. We have taken into account the possibility of different partonic processes for the c{bar c}-pair production. We notice that the effect of shadowing corrections on J/{psi} production clearly depends on the partonic process considered. Our results are compared to the available data on dAu collisions at RHIC energies. We try different break up cross section for each of the studied shadowing models.

  1. Allozyme marker loci associated with favorable alleles for grain yield in maize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mišević, D; Gerić, I; Tadić, B

    1990-10-01

    The evaluation of germplasm to identify its potential as a source of new favorable alleles is a time-consuming phase of maize hybrid breeding programs. The objective of this paper was to study the relationship between allozyme diversity and quantitative estimators of the relative number of new favorable alleles for grain yield, present in donor lines but not present in the elite hybrid. Twenty-two maize inbred lines representing heterotic groups from the United States (US) and Yugoslavia (YU) were used as donors to estimate the presence of new favorable alleles for grain yield improvement for the hybrid B73 x Mo17. In a second experiment, a 15-line diallel was grown, and 13 single crosses differing in allozyme relatedness measure (ARM) and heterotic grouping were considered as targets to be improved by the remaining 13 lines. Minimally biased estimates of new favorable alleles for grain yield (μG) and ARM values were made for all donor lines within each target hybrid. Donor lines were grouped in four allozyme-pedigree classes for each target hybrid to compare the effect of allozyme diversity with pedigree diversity. Pedigree dissimilarities had significant effects on μG estimates. Dissimilar pedigree classes had higher μG estimates than similar pedigree classes. Allozyme differences between donor inbred lines and target hybrids had inconsistent effects on μG estimates. Significant differences in μG estimates among allozyme classes were found for 31% of the target hybrids. Classes with similar allozymes had higher μG estimates more frequently than classes with disimilar allozymes. Correlation coefficients between μG estimates and ARM values were low and not significant for 12 of the 14 target hybrids.

  2. Annealing to sequences within the primer binding site loop promotes an HIV-1 RNA conformation favoring RNA dimerization and packaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Elias; Niu, Meijuan; Kleiman, Lawrence

    2013-01-01

    The 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR) of HIV-1 genomic RNA (gRNA) includes structural elements that regulate reverse transcription, transcription, translation, tRNALys3 annealing to the gRNA, and gRNA dimerization and packaging into viruses. It has been reported that gRNA dimerization and packaging are regulated by changes in the conformation of the 5′-UTR RNA. In this study, we show that annealing of tRNALys3 or a DNA oligomer complementary to sequences within the primer binding site (PBS) loop of the 5′ UTR enhances its dimerization in vitro. Structural analysis of the 5′-UTR RNA using selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension (SHAPE) shows that the annealing promotes a conformational change of the 5′ UTR that has been previously reported to favor gRNA dimerization and packaging into virus. The model predicted by SHAPE analysis is supported by antisense experiments designed to test which annealed sequences will promote or inhibit gRNA dimerization. Based on reports showing that the gRNA dimerization favors its incorporation into viruses, we tested the ability of a mutant gRNA unable to anneal to tRNALys3 to be incorporated into virions. We found a ∼60% decrease in mutant gRNA packaging compared with wild-type gRNA. Together, these data further support a model for viral assembly in which the initial annealing of tRNALys3 to gRNA is cytoplasmic, which in turn aids in the promotion of gRNA dimerization and its incorporation into virions. PMID:23960173

  3. Feedforward Object-Vision Models Only Tolerate Small Image Variations Compared to Human

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoud eGhodrati

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Invariant object recognition is a remarkable ability of primates' visual system that its underlying mechanism has constantly been under intense investigations. Computational modelling is a valuable tool toward understanding the processes involved in invariant object recognition. Although recent computational models have shown outstanding performances on challenging image databases, they fail to perform well when images with more complex variations of the same object are applied to them. Studies have shown that making sparse representation of objects by extracting more informative visual features through a feedforward sweep can lead to higher recognition performances. Here, however, we show that when the complexity of image variations is high, even this approach results in poor performance compared to humans. To assess the performance of models and humans in invariant object recognition tasks, we built a parametrically controlled image database consisting of several object categories varied in different dimensions and levels, rendered from 3D planes. Comparing the performance of several object recognition models with human observers shows that only in low-level image variations the models perform similar to humans in categorization tasks. Furthermore, the results of our behavioral experiments demonstrate that, even under difficult experimental conditions (i.e. briefly presented masked stimuli with complex image variations, human observers performed outstandingly well, suggesting that the models are still far from resembling humans in invariant object recognition. Taken together, we suggest that learning sparse informative visual features, although desirable, is not a complete solution for future progresses in object-vision modelling. We show that this approach is not of significant help in solving the computational crux of object recognition (that is invariant object recognition when the identity-preserving image variations become more complex.

  4. Modelling and Comparative Performance Analysis of a Time-Reversed UWB System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popovski K

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of multipath propagation lead to a significant decrease in system performance in most of the proposed ultra-wideband communication systems. A time-reversed system utilises the multipath channel impulse response to decrease receiver complexity, through a prefiltering at the transmitter. This paper discusses the modelling and comparative performance of a UWB system utilising time-reversed communications. System equations are presented, together with a semianalytical formulation on the level of intersymbol interference and multiuser interference. The standardised IEEE 802.15.3a channel model is applied, and the estimated error performance is compared through simulation with the performance of both time-hopped time-reversed and RAKE-based UWB systems.

  5. Comparative analysis of cognitive tasks for modeling mental workload with electroencephalogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Taeho; Kim, Miyoung; Hwangbo, Minsu; Oh, Eunmi

    2014-01-01

    Previous electroencephalogram (EEG) studies have shown that cognitive workload can be estimated by using several types of cognitive tasks. In this study, we attempted to characterize cognitive tasks that have been used to manipulate workload for generating classification models. We carried out a comparative analysis between two representative types of working memory tasks: the n-back task and the mental arithmetic task. Based on experiments with 7 healthy subjects using Emotiv EPOC, we compared the consistency, robustness, and efficiency of each task in determining cognitive workload in a short training session. The mental arithmetic task seems consistent and robust in manipulating clearly separable high and low levels of cognitive workload with less training. In addition, the mental arithmetic task shows consistency despite repeated usage over time and without notable task adaptation in users. The current study successfully quantifies the quality and efficiency of cognitive workload modeling depending on the type and configuration of training tasks.

  6. Comparing different CFD wind turbine modelling approaches with wind tunnel measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalvig, Siri; Manger, Eirik; Hjertager, Bjørn

    2014-12-01

    The performance of a model wind turbine is simulated with three different CFD methods: actuator disk, actuator line and a fully resolved rotor. The simulations are compared with each other and with measurements from a wind tunnel experiment. The actuator disk is the least accurate and most cost-efficient, and the fully resolved rotor is the most accurate and least cost-efficient. The actuator line method is believed to lie in between the two ends of the scale. The fully resolved rotor produces superior wake velocity results compared to the actuator models. On average it also produces better results for the force predictions, although the actuator line method had a slightly better match for the design tip speed. The open source CFD tool box, OpenFOAM, was used for the actuator disk and actuator line calculations, whereas the market leading commercial CFD code, ANSYS/FLUENT, was used for the fully resolved rotor approach.

  7. Using RosettaLigand for small molecule docking into comparative models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristian W Kaufmann

    Full Text Available Computational small molecule docking into comparative models of proteins is widely used to query protein function and in the development of small molecule therapeutics. We benchmark RosettaLigand docking into comparative models for nine proteins built during CASP8 that contain ligands. We supplement the study with 21 additional protein/ligand complexes to cover a wider space of chemotypes. During a full docking run in 21 of the 30 cases, RosettaLigand successfully found a native-like binding mode among the top ten scoring binding modes. From the benchmark cases we find that careful template selection based on ligand occupancy provides the best chance of success while overall sequence identity between template and target do not appear to improve results. We also find that binding energy normalized by atom number is often less than -0.4 in native-like binding modes.

  8. [Incidence of factors favoring recurrent foot ulcers in diabetic patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diouri, A; Slaoui, Z; Chadli, A; El Ghomari, H; Kebbou, M; Marouan, F; Farouqi, A; Ababou, M R

    2002-12-01

    Patients with foot ulcers have a high risk of relapse and amputation. Several studies have reported that 28 to 51% of amputated diabetics will have a second amputation of the lower limb within five years of the first amputation. The purpose of this study was to assess the incidence of factors favoring relapse within two years. One hundred ten diabetic patients were treated for foot lesions in the Casablanca Ibn Rochd university hospital between 1997 and 2000. Ninety of these patients attended review consultations. There were 42 cases of relapse (46.6%). Male gender predominated in the relapse patients with a sex ratio of 3.2. Mean age at relapse was 55 years; 71.5% of the patients had type 2 diabetes. Lesions observed were neuropathic ulcer (n=23), arterial ulcer (n=6), infected wounds (n=13). Revealing factors were burns and wounds. The main risk factors were neuropathy (n=23, 52%), neuroarteriopathy (n=12, 31%), peur arteriopathy (n=6, 12%). Patients who relapsed (n=42) were significantly different from patients who did not relapse (n=48) for gender, presence or absence of neuropathy, and presence or absence of arteriopathy. Secondary preventive measures against these risk factors, medical care, and specialized follow-up were satisfactory in these patients. our findings illustrate the importance of specialized management of diabetic patients with foot lesions. Adequate care of the lesions and preventive measures against risk factors are needed.

  9. Paleozoic unconformities favorable for uranium concentration in northern Appalachian basin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dennison, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    Unconformities can redistribute uranium from protore rock as ground water moves through poorly consolidated strata beneath the erosion surface, or later moves along the unconformity. Groundwater could migrate farther than in present-day lithified Paleozoic strata in the Appalachian basin, now locally deformed by the Taconic and Allegheny orogenies. Several paleoaquifer systems could have developed uranium geochemical cells. Sandstone mineralogy, occurrences of fluvial strata, and reduzate facies are important factors. Other possibilities include silcrete developed during desert exposure, and uranium concentrated in paleokarst. Thirteen unconformities are evaluated to determine favorable areas for uranium concentration. Cambrian Potsdam sandstone (New York) contains arkoses and possible silcretes just above crystalline basement. Unconformities involving beveled sandstones and possible fluvial strata include Cambrian Hardyston sandstone (New Jersey), Cambrian Potsdam Sandstone (New York), Ordovician Oswego and Juniata formations (Pennsylvania and New York), Silurian Medina Group (New York), and Silurian Vernon, High Falls, and Longwood formations (New York and New Jersey). Devonian Catskill Formation is beveled by Pennsylvanian strata (New York and Pennsylvania). The pre-Pennsylvanian unconformity also bevels Lower Mississippian Pocono, Knapp, and Waverly strata (Pennsylvania, New York, and Ohio), truncates Upper Mississippian Mauch Chunk Formation (Pennsylvania), and forms paleokarst on Mississippian Loyalhanna Limestone (Pennsylvania) and Maxville Limestone (Ohio). Strata associated with these unconformities contain several reports of uranium. Unconformities unfavorable for uranium concentration occur beneath the Middle Ordovician (New York), Middle Devonian (Ohio and New York), and Upper Devonian (Ohio and New York); these involve marine strata overlying marine strata and probably much submarine erosion

  10. Musical FAVORS: Reintroducing music to adult cochlear implant users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Geoff

    2015-09-01

    Music represents a considerable challenge for many adult users of cochlear implants (CIs). Around half of adult CI users report that they do not find music enjoyable, and, in some cases, despite enhanced speech perception skills, this leads to considerable frustration and disappointment for the CI user. This paper presents suggestions to improve the musical experiences of deafened adults with CIs. Interviews with a number of adult CI users revealed that there were a number of factors which could lead to enhanced music experiences. The acronym FAVORS (familiar music, auditory-visual access, open-mindedness, and simple arrangements) summarizes the factors that have been identified, which can help CI users in their early music listening experiences. Each of these factors is discussed in detail, along with suggestions for how they can be used in therapy sessions. The use of a group approach (music focus groups) is also discussed and an overview of the approach and exercises used is presented. The importance of live music experiences is also discussed.

  11. Heterolytic dissociative adsorption state of dihydrogen favored by interfacial defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Zhenjun; Hu, Hanshi; Xu, Hu; Li, Yong; Cheng, Peng; Zhao, Bin

    2018-03-01

    The atomic-scale insight into dihydrogen on MgO(001) surface deposited on molybdenum substrate with interfacial defects was investigated in detail by employing density functional methods Here we report novel dissociative adsorption behaviors of single hydrogen molecule on the usually inert oxide surfaces, with consideration of two types of dissociation schemes. The heterolytic dissociation state -Mg(H)-O(H)- of dihydrogen is impossible to obtain on neighboring O-Mg sites of perfect bulk MgO(001) terraces. Unusually, the hydrogen molecule can form heterolytic fragmentation states on metal supported MgO(001) films with very low activation barrier (0.398 eV), and the heterolytic dissociation state is much more favorable than homolytic dissociation state both energetically and kinetically in all cases. Electronic properties and bonding attribution of adsorbates and the oxide-metal hybrid structure are revealed by analyzing density of states, differential charge densities, orbital interaction and electron localization function. The characteristic changes to the property and activity of magnesia (001) can have potential application in catalytic reactions.

  12. Computations for the 1:5 model of the THTR pressure vessel compared with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangenberg, F.

    1972-01-01

    In this report experimental results measured at the 1:5-model of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel of the THTR-nuclear power station Schmehausen in 1971, are compared with the results of axis-symmetrical computations. Linear-elastic computations were performed as well as approximate computations for overload pressures taking into consideration the influences of the load history (prestressing, temperature, creep) and the effects of the steel components. (orig.) [de

  13. Comparative efficacy of two daily use mouthrinses: randomized clinical trial using an experimental gingivitis model

    OpenAIRE

    Charles, Christine Ann; McGuire, James Anthony; Sharma, Naresh Chandra; Qaqish, James

    2011-01-01

    Two antimicrobial agents, a fixed combination of essential oils (EOs) and 0.07% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) are found in commercially available mouthrinses, Listerine® Antiseptic and Crest® Pro HealthTM, respectively. Both mouthrinses have been shown to control dental plaque and gingivitis in short and longer term studies. The aim of this study was to determine the comparative effectiveness of these two mouthrinses using a 2-week experimental gingivitis model. Qualified subjects were rando...

  14. Comparative Analysis of Market Volatility in Indian Banking and IT Sectors by using Average Decline Model

    OpenAIRE

    Kirti AREKAR; Rinku JAIN

    2017-01-01

    The stock market volatility is depends on three major features, complete volatility, volatility fluctuations, and volatility attention and they are calculate by the statistical techniques. Comparative analysis of market volatility for two major index i.e. banking & IT sector in Bombay stock exchange (BSE) by using average decline model. The average degeneration process in volatility has being used after very high and low stock returns. The results of this study explain significant decline in...

  15. Comparative Analysis of Photogrammetric Methods for 3D Models for Museums

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hafstað Ármannsdottir, Unnur Erla; Antón Castro, Francesc/François; Mioc, Darka

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to make a comparative analysis and selection of methodologies for making 3D models of historical items, buildings and cultural heritage and how to preserve information such as temporary exhibitions and archaeological findings. Two of the methodologies analyzed correspond...... matrix has been used. Prototypes are made partly or fully and evaluated from the point of view of preservation of information by a museum....

  16. A comparative study of two prediction models for brain tumor progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Deqi; Tran, Loc; Wang, Jihong; Li, Jiang

    2015-03-01

    MR diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) technique together with traditional T1 or T2 weighted MRI scans supplies rich information sources for brain cancer diagnoses. These images form large-scale, high-dimensional data sets. Due to the fact that significant correlations exist among these images, we assume low-dimensional geometry data structures (manifolds) are embedded in the high-dimensional space. Those manifolds might be hidden from radiologists because it is challenging for human experts to interpret high-dimensional data. Identification of the manifold is a critical step for successfully analyzing multimodal MR images. We have developed various manifold learning algorithms (Tran et al. 2011; Tran et al. 2013) for medical image analysis. This paper presents a comparative study of an incremental manifold learning scheme (Tran. et al. 2013) versus the deep learning model (Hinton et al. 2006) in the application of brain tumor progression prediction. The incremental manifold learning is a variant of manifold learning algorithm to handle large-scale datasets in which a representative subset of original data is sampled first to construct a manifold skeleton and remaining data points are then inserted into the skeleton by following their local geometry. The incremental manifold learning algorithm aims at mitigating the computational burden associated with traditional manifold learning methods for large-scale datasets. Deep learning is a recently developed multilayer perceptron model that has achieved start-of-the-art performances in many applications. A recent technique named "Dropout" can further boost the deep model by preventing weight coadaptation to avoid over-fitting (Hinton et al. 2012). We applied the two models on multiple MRI scans from four brain tumor patients to predict tumor progression and compared the performances of the two models in terms of average prediction accuracy, sensitivity, specificity and precision. The quantitative performance metrics were

  17. Assessment and challenges of ligand docking into comparative models of G-protein coupled receptors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Dong Nguyen

    Full Text Available The rapidly increasing number of high-resolution X-ray structures of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs creates a unique opportunity to employ comparative modeling and docking to provide valuable insight into the function and ligand binding determinants of novel receptors, to assist in virtual screening and to design and optimize drug candidates. However, low sequence identity between receptors, conformational flexibility, and chemical diversity of ligands present an enormous challenge to molecular modeling approaches. It is our hypothesis that rapid Monte-Carlo sampling of protein backbone and side-chain conformational space with Rosetta can be leveraged to meet this challenge. This study performs unbiased comparative modeling and docking methodologies using 14 distinct high-resolution GPCRs and proposes knowledge-based filtering methods for improvement of sampling performance and identification of correct ligand-receptor interactions. On average, top ranked receptor models built on template structures over 50% sequence identity are within 2.9 Å of the experimental structure, with an average root mean square deviation (RMSD of 2.2 Å for the transmembrane region and 5 Å for the second extracellular loop. Furthermore, these models are consistently correlated with low Rosetta energy score. To predict their binding modes, ligand conformers of the 14 ligands co-crystalized with the GPCRs were docked against the top ranked comparative models. In contrast to the comparative models themselves, however, it remains difficult to unambiguously identify correct binding modes by score alone. On average, sampling performance was improved by 10(3 fold over random using knowledge-based and energy-based filters. In assessing the applicability of experimental constraints, we found that sampling performance is increased by one order of magnitude for every 10 residues known to contact the ligand. Additionally, in the case of DOR, knowledge of a single specific

  18. Water Management in the Camargue Biosphere Reserve: Insights from Comparative Mental Models Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Mathevet

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Mental models are the cognitive representations of the world that frame how people interact with the world. Learning implies changing these mental models. The successful management of complex social-ecological systems requires the coordination of actions to achieve shared goals. The coordination of actions requires a level of shared understanding of the system or situation; a shared or common mental model. We first describe the elicitation and analysis of mental models of different stakeholder groups associated with water management in the Camargue Biosphere Reserve in the Rhône River delta on the French Mediterranean coast. We use cultural consensus analysis to explore the degree to which different groups shared mental models of the whole system, of stakeholders, of resources, of processes, and of interactions among these last three. The analysis of the elicited data from this group structure enabled us to tentatively explore the evidence for learning in the nonstatute Water Board; comprising important stakeholders related to the management of the central Rhône delta. The results indicate that learning does occur and results in richer mental models that are more likely to be shared among group members. However, the results also show lower than expected levels of agreement with these consensual mental models. Based on this result, we argue that a careful process and facilitation design can greatly enhance the functioning of the participatory process in the Water Board. We conclude that this methodology holds promise for eliciting and comparing mental models. It enriches group-model building and participatory approaches with a broader view of social learning and knowledge-sharing issues.

  19. Task decomposition: a framework for comparing diverse training models in human brain plasticity studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily B. J. Coffey

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Training studies, in which the structural or functional neurophysiology is compared before and after expertise is acquired, are increasingly being used as models for understanding the human brain’s potential for reorganization. It is proving difficult to use these results to answer basic and important questions like how task training leads to both specific and general changes in behaviour and how these changes correspond with modifications in the brain. The main culprit is the diversity of paradigms used as complex task models. An assortment of activities ranging from juggling to deciphering Morse code has been reported. Even when working in the same general domain, few researchers use similar training models. New ways to meaningfully compare complex tasks are needed. We propose a method for characterizing and deconstructing the task requirements of complex training paradigms, which is suitable for application to both structural and functional neuroimaging studies. We believe this approach will aid brain plasticity research by making it easier to compare training paradigms, identify ‘missing puzzle pieces’, and encourage researchers to design training protocols to bridge these gaps.

  20. NTCP modelling of lung toxicity after SBRT comparing the universal survival curve and the linear quadratic model for fractionation correction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wennberg, Berit M.; Baumann, Pia; Gagliardi, Giovanna

    2011-01-01

    Background. In SBRT of lung tumours no established relationship between dose-volume parameters and the incidence of lung toxicity is found. The aim of this study is to compare the LQ model and the universal survival curve (USC) to calculate biologically equivalent doses in SBRT to see if this will improve knowledge on this relationship. Material and methods. Toxicity data on radiation pneumonitis grade 2 or more (RP2+) from 57 patients were used, 10.5% were diagnosed with RP2+. The lung DVHs were corrected for fractionation (LQ and USC) and analysed with the Lyman- Kutcher-Burman (LKB) model. In the LQ-correction α/β = 3 Gy was used and the USC parameters used were: α/β = 3 Gy, D 0 = 1.0 Gy, n = 10, α 0.206 Gy-1 and d T = 5.8 Gy. In order to understand the relative contribution of different dose levels to the calculated NTCP the concept of fractional NTCP was used. This might give an insight to the questions of whether 'high doses to small volumes' or 'low doses to large volumes' are most important for lung toxicity. Results and Discussion. NTCP analysis with the LKB-model using parameters m = 0.4, D50 = 30 Gy resulted for the volume dependence parameter (n) with LQ correction n = 0.87 and with USC correction n = 0.71. Using parameters m = 0.3, D 50 = 20 Gy n = 0.93 with LQ correction and n 0.83 with USC correction. In SBRT of lung tumours, NTCP modelling of lung toxicity comparing models (LQ,USC) for fractionation correction, shows that low dose contribute less and high dose more to the NTCP when using the USC-model. Comparing NTCP modelling of SBRT data and data from breast cancer, lung cancer and whole lung irradiation implies that the response of the lung is treatment specific. More data are however needed in order to have a more reliable modelling

  1. Comparing supply and demand models for future photovoltaic power generation in the USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basore, Paul A. [US Department of Energy, Washington DC 20585 USA; Cole, Wesley J. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden CO 80401 USA

    2018-02-22

    We explore the plausible range of future deployment of photovoltaic generation capacity in the USA using a supply-focused model based on supply-chain growth constraints and a demand-focused model based on minimizing the overall cost of the electricity system. Both approaches require assumptions based on previous experience and anticipated trends. For each of the models, we assign plausible ranges for the key assumptions and then compare the resulting PV deployment over time. Each model was applied to 2 different future scenarios: one in which PV market penetration is ultimately constrained by the uncontrolled variability of solar power and one in which low-cost energy storage or some equivalent measure largely alleviates this constraint. The supply-focused and demand-focused models are in substantial agreement, not just in the long term, where deployment is largely determined by the assumed market penetration constraints, but also in the interim years. For the future scenario without low-cost energy storage or equivalent measures, the 2 models give an average plausible range of PV generation capacity in the USA of 150 to 530 GWdc in 2030 and 260 to 810 GWdc in 2040. With low-cost energy storage or equivalent measures, the corresponding ranges are 160 to 630 GWdc in 2030 and 280 to 1200 GWdc in 2040. The latter range is enough to supply 10% to 40% of US electricity demand in 2040, based on current demand growth.

  2. Comparing GIS-based habitat models for applications in EIA and SEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gontier, Mikael; Moertberg, Ulla; Balfors, Berit

    2010-01-01

    Land use changes, urbanisation and infrastructure developments in particular, cause fragmentation of natural habitats and threaten biodiversity. Tools and measures must be adapted to assess and remedy the potential effects on biodiversity caused by human activities and developments. Within physical planning, environmental impact assessment (EIA) and strategic environmental assessment (SEA) play important roles in the prediction and assessment of biodiversity-related impacts from planned developments. However, adapted prediction tools to forecast and quantify potential impacts on biodiversity components are lacking. This study tested and compared four different GIS-based habitat models and assessed their relevance for applications in environmental assessment. The models were implemented in the Stockholm region in central Sweden and applied to data on the crested tit (Parus cristatus), a sedentary bird species of coniferous forest. All four models performed well and allowed the distribution of suitable habitats for the crested tit in the Stockholm region to be predicted. The models were also used to predict and quantify habitat loss for two regional development scenarios. The study highlighted the importance of model selection in impact prediction. Criteria that are relevant for the choice of model for predicting impacts on biodiversity were identified and discussed. Finally, the importance of environmental assessment for the preservation of biodiversity within the general frame of biodiversity conservation is emphasised.

  3. Comparing modeled isoprene with aircraft-based measurements in the atmospheric boundary layer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doskey, P.; Gao, W.

    1997-12-12

    Nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs) are involved in a complex series of reactions that regulate the levels of oxidants in the troposphere. Isoprene (C{sub 5}H{sub 8}), the primary NMHC emitted from deciduous trees, is one of the most important reactive hydrocarbons in the troposphere. The amount of isoprene entering the free troposphere is regulated by the compound's rate of emission from leaves and by chemical and physical processes in the forest canopy and the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). This study uses a coupled canopy-ABL model to simulate these complex processes and compares calculated isoprene concentration profiles with those measured during aircraft flights above a forested region in the northeastern US. Land use information is coupled with satellite remote sensing data to describe spatial changes in canopy density during the field measurements. The high-resolution transport-chemistry model of Gao et al. (1993) for the ABL and the forest canopy layer is used to simulate vertical changes in isoprene concentration due to turbulent mixing and chemical reactions. The one-dimensional (1-D) ABL model includes detailed radiation transfer, turbulent diffusion, biogenic emissions, dry deposition, and chemical processes within the forest canopy and the ABL. The measured profiles are compared with the model simulations to investigate the biological, physical, and chemical processes that regulate the levels of isoprene within the ABL.

  4. Comparing Models of Nature of Science Dimensionality Based on the Next Generation Science Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, George M.; Seraphin, Kanesa Duncan; Philippoff, Joanna; Vallin, Lisa M.; Brandon, Paul R.

    2015-05-01

    Instruments measuring understanding of the nature of science (NOS) are required if educational institutions intend to use benchmarks or examine the effects of interventions targeting students' NOS development. Compared to other constructs, NOS understanding is complex, having been the subject of debate among scholars in both its substance and its dimensionality. This complexity invites challenges in defining what is to be measured. Drawing from the perspective that policy reform documents provide pragmatic consensus-based definitions of NOS, this study investigated how well the dimensionality described in the NOS component of the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) framework matched the empirical structure of data collected from a set of secondary-school students' responses to an NOS instrument comprising multiple-choice and Likert-scale items. Using multidimensional item response modeling to compare structures of NOS dimensionality, we found that treating NOS as comprising multiple dimensions-as defined by the themes in the NGSS NOS framework-resulted in a better fitting model than when treating NOS as a single dimension. The multidimensional model also had fewer poorly functioning items and revealed NOS profiles that otherwise would have been masked in a model treating NOS as a single dimension. These results provide support for the NOS NGSS framework and contribute to the ongoing discussion about the dimensionality of NOS.

  5. State regulation of nuclear sector: comparative study of Argentina and Brazil models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monteiro Filho, Joselio Silveira

    2004-08-01

    This research presents a comparative assessment of the regulation models of the nuclear sector in Argentina - under the responsibility of the Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear (ARN), and Brazil - under the responsibility of Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), trying to identify which model is more adequate aiming the safe use of nuclear energy. Due to the methodology adopted, the theoretical framework resulted in criteria of analysis that corresponds to the characteristics of the Brazilian regulatory agencies created for other economic sector during the State reform staring in the middle of the nineties. Later, these criteria of analysis were used as comparison patterns between the regulation models of the nuclear sectors of Argentina and Brazil. The comparative assessment showed that the regulatory structure of the nuclear sector in Argentina seems to be more adequate, concerning the safe use of nuclear energy, than the model adopted in Brazil by CNEN, because its incorporates the criteria of functional, institutional and financial independence, competence definitions, technical excellence and transparency, indispensable to the development of its functions with autonomy, ethics, exemption and agility. (author)

  6. Comparative study: TQ and Lean Production ownership models in health services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiro, Natalia Yuri; Torres-Junior, Alvair Silveira

    2015-01-01

    compare the application of Total Quality (TQ) models used in processes of a health service, cases of lean healthcare and literature from another institution that has also applied this model. this is a qualitative research that was conducted through a descriptive case study. through critical analysis of the institutions studied it was possible to make a comparison between the traditional quality approach checked in one case and the theoretical and practice lean production approach used in another case and the specifications are described below. the research identified that the lean model was better suited for people that work systemically and generate the flow. It also pointed towards some potential challenges in the introduction and implementation of lean methods in health.

  7. Comparative Results on 3D Navigation of Quadrotor using two Nonlinear Model based Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Y.; Siguerdidjane, H.; Bestaoui, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Recently the quadrotors are being increasingly employed in both military and civilian areas where a broad range of nonlinear flight control techniques are successfully implemented. With this advancement, it has become necessary to investigate the efficiency of these flight controllers by studying theirs features and compare their performance. In this paper, the control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) quadrotor, using two different approaches, is presented. The first controller is Nonlinear PID (NLPID) whilst the second one is Nonlinear Internal Model Control (NLIMC) that are used for the stabilization as well as for the 3D trajectory tracking. The numerical simulations have shown satisfactory results using nominal system model or disturbed model for both of them. The obtained results are analyzed with respect to several criteria for the sake of comparison.

  8. Comparative study: TQ and Lean Production ownership models in health services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Yuri Eiro

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective: compare the application of Total Quality (TQ models used in processes of a health service, cases of lean healthcare and literature from another institution that has also applied this model.Method: this is a qualitative research that was conducted through a descriptive case study.Results:through critical analysis of the institutions studied it was possible to make a comparison between the traditional quality approach checked in one case and the theoretical and practice lean production approach used in another case and the specifications are described below.Conclusion: the research identified that the lean model was better suited for people that work systemically and generate the flow. It also pointed towards some potential challenges in the introduction and implementation of lean methods in health.

  9. Review of colorectal cancer and its metastases in rodent models: comparative aspects with those in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kobaek-Larsen, M; Thorup, I; Diederichsen, Axel Cosmus Pyndt

    2000-01-01

    models approximate many of the characteristics of human colonic carcinogenesis and metastasis. So far few comparative evaluations of the various animal models of CRC have been made. CONCLUSION: Animal studies cannot replace human clinical trials, but they can be used as a pre-screening tool, so...... that human trials become more directed, with greater chances of success. The orthotopic transplantation of colon cancer cells into the cecum of syngeneic animals or intraportal inoculation appears to resemble the human metastatic disease most closely, providing a model for study of the treatment......BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Colorectal cancer (CRC) remains one of the most common cancer forms developing in industrialized countries, and its incidence appears to be rising. Studies of human population groups provide insufficient information about carcinogenesis, pathogenesis, and treatment of CRC...

  10. The Evolution of the Solar Magnetic Field: A Comparative Analysis of Two Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMichael, K. D.; Karak, B. B.; Upton, L.; Miesch, M. S.; Vierkens, O.

    2017-12-01

    Understanding the complexity of the solar magnetic cycle is a task that has plagued scientists for decades. However, with the help of computer simulations, we have begun to gain more insight into possible solutions to the plethora of questions inside the Sun. STABLE (Surface Transport and Babcock Leighton) is a newly developed 3D dynamo model that can reproduce features of the solar cycle. In this model, the tilted bipolar sunspots are formed on the surface (based on the toroidal field at the bottom of the convection zone) and then decay and disperse, producing the poloidal field. Since STABLE is a 3D model, it is able to solve the full induction equation in the entirety of the solar convection zone as well as incorporate many free parameters (such as spot depth and turbulent diffusion) which are difficult to observe. In an attempt to constrain some of these free parameters, we compare STABLE to a surface flux transport model called AFT (Advective Flux Transport) which solves the radial component of the magnetic field on the solar surface. AFT is a state-of-the-art surface flux transport model that has a proven record of being able to reproduce solar observations with great accuracy. In this project, we implement synthetic bipolar sunspots into both models, using identical surface parameters, and run the models for comparison. We demonstrate that the 3D structure of the sunspots in the interior and the vertical diffusion of the sunspot magnetic field play an important role in establishing the surface magnetic field in STABLE. We found that when a sufficient amount of downward magnetic pumping is included in STABLE, the surface magnetic field from this model becomes insensitive to the internal structure of the sunspot and more consistent with that of AFT.

  11. Representing macropore flow at the catchment scale: a comparative modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, D.; Li, H. Y.; Tian, F.; Leung, L. R.

    2017-12-01

    Macropore flow is an important hydrological process that generally enhances the soil infiltration capacity and velocity of subsurface water. Up till now, macropore flow is mostly simulated with high-resolution models. One possible drawback of this modeling approach is the difficulty to effectively represent the overall typology and connectivity of the macropore networks. We hypothesize that modeling macropore flow directly at the catchment scale may be complementary to the existing modeling strategy and offer some new insights. Tsinghua Representative Elementary Watershed model (THREW model) is a semi-distributed hydrology model, where the fundamental building blocks are representative elementary watersheds (REW) linked by the river channel network. In THREW, all the hydrological processes are described with constitutive relationships established directly at the REW level, i.e., catchment scale. In this study, the constitutive relationship of macropore flow drainage is established as part of THREW. The enhanced THREW model is then applied at two catchments with deep soils but distinct climates, the humid Asu catchment in the Amazon River basin, and the arid Wei catchment in the Yellow River basin. The Asu catchment has an area of 12.43km2 with mean annual precipitation of 2442mm. The larger Wei catchment has an area of 24800km2 but with mean annual precipitation of only 512mm. The rainfall-runoff processes are simulated at a hourly time step from 2002 to 2005 in the Asu catchment and from 2001 to 2012 in the Wei catchment. The role of macropore flow on the catchment hydrology will be analyzed comparatively over the Asu and Wei catchments against the observed streamflow, evapotranspiration and other auxiliary data.

  12. Comparing Free-Free and Shaker Table Model Correlation Methods Using Jim Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristow, James; Smith, Kenneth Wayne, Jr.; Johnson, Nathaniel; Kinney, Jackson

    2018-01-01

    Finite element model correlation as part of a spacecraft program has always been a challenge. For any NASA mission, the coupled system response of the spacecraft and launch vehicle can be determined analytically through a Coupled Loads Analysis (CLA), as it is not possible to test the spacecraft and launch vehicle coupled system before launch. The value of the CLA is highly dependent on the accuracy of the frequencies and mode shapes extracted from the spacecraft model. NASA standards require the spacecraft model used in the final Verification Loads Cycle to be correlated by either a modal test or by comparison of the model with Frequency Response Functions (FRFs) obtained during the environmental qualification test. Due to budgetary and time constraints, most programs opt to correlate the spacecraft dynamic model during the environmental qualification test, conducted on a large shaker table. For any model correlation effort, the key has always been finding a proper definition of the boundary conditions. This paper is a correlation case study to investigate the difference in responses of a simple structure using a free-free boundary, a fixed boundary on the shaker table, and a base-drive vibration test, all using identical instrumentation. The NAVCON Jim Beam test structure, featured in the IMAC round robin modal test of 2009, was selected as a simple, well recognized and well characterized structure to conduct this investigation. First, a free-free impact modal test of the Jim Beam was done as an experimental control. Second, the Jim Beam was mounted to a large 20,000 lbf shaker, and an impact modal test in this fixed configuration was conducted. Lastly, a vibration test of the Jim Beam was conducted on the shaker table. The free-free impact test, the fixed impact test, and the base-drive test were used to assess the effect of the shaker modes, evaluate the validity of fixed-base modeling assumptions, and compare final model correlation results between these

  13. A comparative verification of high resolution precipitation forecasts using model output statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Plas, Emiel; Schmeits, Maurice; Hooijman, Nicolien; Kok, Kees

    2017-04-01

    Verification of localized events such as precipitation has become even more challenging with the advent of high-resolution meso-scale numerical weather prediction (NWP). The realism of a forecast suggests that it should compare well against precipitation radar imagery with similar resolution, both spatially and temporally. Spatial verification methods solve some of the representativity issues that point verification gives rise to. In this study a verification strategy based on model output statistics is applied that aims to address both double penalty and resolution effects that are inherent to comparisons of NWP models with different resolutions. Using predictors based on spatial precipitation patterns around a set of stations, an extended logistic regression (ELR) equation is deduced, leading to a probability forecast distribution of precipitation for each NWP model, analysis and lead time. The ELR equations are derived for predictands based on areal calibrated radar precipitation and SYNOP observations. The aim is to extract maximum information from a series of precipitation forecasts, like a trained forecaster would. The method is applied to the non-hydrostatic model Harmonie (2.5 km resolution), Hirlam (11 km resolution) and the ECMWF model (16 km resolution), overall yielding similar Brier skill scores for the 3 post-processed models, but larger differences for individual lead times. Besides, the Fractions Skill Score is computed using the 3 deterministic forecasts, showing somewhat better skill for the Harmonie model. In other words, despite the realism of Harmonie precipitation forecasts, they only perform similarly or somewhat better than precipitation forecasts from the 2 lower resolution models, at least in the Netherlands.

  14. A Multimodel Study on Warm Precipitation Biases in Global Models Compared to Satellite Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Xianwen; Suzuki, Kentaroh; Guo, Huan; Goto, Daisuke; Ogura, Tomoo; Koshiro, Tsuyoshi; Mülmenstädt, Johannes

    2017-11-01

    The cloud-to-precipitation transition process in warm clouds simulated by state-of-the-art global climate models (GCMs), including both traditional climate models and a high-resolution model, is evaluated against A-Train satellite observations. The models and satellite observations are compared in the form of the statistics obtained from combined analysis of multiple-satellite observables that probe signatures of the cloud-to-precipitation transition process. One common problem identified among these models is the too-frequent occurrence of warm precipitation. The precipitation is found to form when the cloud particle size and the liquid water path (LWP) are both much smaller than those in observations. The too-efficient formation of precipitation is found to be compensated for by errors of cloud microphysical properties, such as underestimated cloud particle size and LWP, to an extent that varies among the models. However, this does not completely cancel the precipitation formation bias. Robust errors are also found in the evolution of cloud microphysical properties from nonprecipitating to drizzling and then to raining clouds in some GCMs, implying unrealistic interaction between precipitation and cloud water. Nevertheless, auspicious information is found for future improvement of warm precipitation representations: the adoption of more realistic autoconversion scheme in the high-resolution model improves the triggering of precipitation, and the introduction of a sophisticated subgrid variability scheme in a traditional model improves the simulated precipitation frequency over subtropical eastern ocean. However, deterioration in other warm precipitation characteristics is also found accompanying these improvements, implying the multisource nature of warm precipitation biases in GCMs.

  15. Comparative analysis of mathematical models of the ship from the standpoint of controllability of the variances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pashentsev S. V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper has shown the choice of the mathematical model of the ship with the help of which in the future will be investigated the process of control of the vessel from deviations of two spaced points of the ship's diametric plane from certain lines called aiming. Two mathematical models of the tanker differing structurally are considered: by type and set of differential equations for their description, which are identified parametrically, i. e. the coefficients describing the model equations have been found. To assess the adequacy of the models, their work on the example of the standard maneuver "Zigzag" with the comparative analysis of results between the data and full-scale tests has been tested. The type of maneuver has been chosen on the basis of proximity of the ship characteristic movements to those that occur when the vessel is steered by deviation. Further research has been carried out by performing the managing for deviations in relation to the set of aiming lines. The control quality indicator of quadratic form which assesses the management effectiveness of each model has been introduced. In this calculation case, a mathematical model of the "speed – drift angle – angular speed of rotation" type presented by Japanese engineers has been proposed for the study of complex controls of the tanker of Project 214 on deviations. The model has given estimates of the quality of controls going to "stock". This will allow in further works on the subject on the basis of this mathematical model to obtain results and make the decisions that lead to fewer managerial risks.

  16. Comparative Study of Injury Models for Studying Muscle Regeneration in Mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hardy

    Full Text Available A longstanding goal in regenerative medicine is to reconstitute functional tissues or organs after injury or disease. Attention has focused on the identification and relative contribution of tissue specific stem cells to the regeneration process. Relatively little is known about how the physiological process is regulated by other tissue constituents. Numerous injury models are used to investigate tissue regeneration, however, these models are often poorly understood. Specifically, for skeletal muscle regeneration several models are reported in the literature, yet the relative impact on muscle physiology and the distinct cells types have not been extensively characterised.We have used transgenic Tg:Pax7nGFP and Flk1GFP/+ mouse models to respectively count the number of muscle stem (satellite cells (SC and number/shape of vessels by confocal microscopy. We performed histological and immunostainings to assess the differences in the key regeneration steps. Infiltration of immune cells, chemokines and cytokines production was assessed in vivo by Luminex®.We compared the 4 most commonly used injury models i.e. freeze injury (FI, barium chloride (BaCl2, notexin (NTX and cardiotoxin (CTX. The FI was the most damaging. In this model, up to 96% of the SCs are destroyed with their surrounding environment (basal lamina and vasculature leaving a "dead zone" devoid of viable cells. The regeneration process itself is fulfilled in all 4 models with virtually no fibrosis 28 days post-injury, except in the FI model. Inflammatory cells return to basal levels in the CTX, BaCl2 but still significantly high 1-month post-injury in the FI and NTX models. Interestingly the number of SC returned to normal only in the FI, 1-month post-injury, with SCs that are still cycling up to 3-months after the induction of the injury in the other models.Our studies show that the nature of the injury model should be chosen carefully depending on the experimental design and desired

  17. Bayesian meta-analysis models for microarray data: a comparative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Joon J

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the growing abundance of microarray data, statistical methods are increasingly needed to integrate results across studies. Two common approaches for meta-analysis of microarrays include either combining gene expression measures across studies or combining summaries such as p-values, probabilities or ranks. Here, we compare two Bayesian meta-analysis models that are analogous to these methods. Results Two Bayesian meta-analysis models for microarray data have recently been introduced. The first model combines standardized gene expression measures across studies into an overall mean, accounting for inter-study variability, while the second combines probabilities of differential expression without combining expression values. Both models produce the gene-specific posterior probability of differential expression, which is the basis for inference. Since the standardized expression integration model includes inter-study variability, it may improve accuracy of results versus the probability integration model. However, due to the small number of studies typical in microarray meta-analyses, the variability between studies is challenging to estimate. The probability integration model eliminates the need to model variability between studies, and thus its implementation is more straightforward. We found in simulations of two and five studies that combining probabilities outperformed combining standardized gene expression measures for three comparison values: the percent of true discovered genes in meta-analysis versus individual studies; the percent of true genes omitted in meta-analysis versus separate studies, and the number of true discovered genes for fixed levels of Bayesian false discovery. We identified similar results when pooling two independent studies of Bacillus subtilis. We assumed that each study was produced from the same microarray platform with only two conditions: a treatment and control, and that the data sets

  18. Preliminary study of uranium favorability of the Boulder batholith, Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castor, S.B.; Robins, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The Boulder batholith of southwestern Montana is a composite Late Cretaceous intrusive mass, mostly composed of quartz monzonite and granodiorite. This study was not restricted to the plutonic rocks; it also includes younger rocks that overlie the batholith, and older rocks that it intrudes. The Boulder batholith area has good overall potential for economic uranium deposits, because its geology is similar to that of areas that contain economic deposits elsewhere in the world, and because at least 35 uranium occurrences of several different types are present. Potential is greatest for the occurrence of small uranium deposits in chalcedony veins and base-metal sulfide veins. Three areas may be favorable for large, low-grade deposits consisting of a number of closely spaced chalcedony veins and enriched wall rock; the Mooney claims, the Boulder area, and the Clancy area. In addition, there is a good possibility of by-product uranium production from phosphatic black shales in the project area. The potential for uranium deposits in breccia masses that cut prebatholith rocks, in manganese-quartz veins near Butte, and in a shear zone that cuts Tertiary rhyolite near Helena cannot be determined on the basis of available information. Low-grade, disseminated, primary uranium concentrations similar to porphyry deposits proposed by Armstrong (1974) may exist in the Boulder batholith, but the primary uranium content of most batholith rocks is low. The geologic environment adjacent to the Boulder batholith is similar in places to that at the Midnite mine in Washington. Some igneous rocks in the project area contain more than 10 ppM U/sub 3/O/sub 8/, and some metasedimentary rocks near the batholith contain reductants such as sulfides and carbonaceous material.

  19. Preliminary study of uranium favorability of the Boulder batholith, Montana

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castor, S.B.; Robins, J.W.

    1978-01-01

    The Boulder batholith of southwestern Montana is a composite Late Cretaceous intrusive mass, mostly composed of quartz monzonite and granodiorite. This study was not restricted to the plutonic rocks; it also includes younger rocks that overlie the batholith, and older rocks that it intrudes. The Boulder batholith area has good overall potential for economic uranium deposits, because its geology is similar to that of areas that contain economic deposits elsewhere in the world, and because at least 35 uranium occurrences of several different types are present. Potential is greatest for the occurrence of small uranium deposits in chalcedony veins and base-metal sulfide veins. Three areas may be favorable for large, low-grade deposits consisting of a number of closely spaced chalcedony veins and enriched wall rock; the Mooney claims, the Boulder area, and the Clancy area. In addition, there is a good possibility of by-product uranium production from phosphatic black shales in the project area. The potential for uranium deposits in breccia masses that cut prebatholith rocks, in manganese-quartz veins near Butte, and in a shear zone that cuts Tertiary rhyolite near Helena cannot be determined on the basis of available information. Low-grade, disseminated, primary uranium concentrations similar to porphyry deposits proposed by Armstrong (1974) may exist in the Boulder batholith, but the primary uranium content of most batholith rocks is low. The geologic environment adjacent to the Boulder batholith is similar in places to that at the Midnite mine in Washington. Some igneous rocks in the project area contain more than 10 ppM U 3 O 8 , and some metasedimentary rocks near the batholith contain reductants such as sulfides and carbonaceous material

  20. Comparing the Goodness of Different Statistical Criteria for Evaluating the Soil Water Infiltration Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Mirzaee

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The infiltration process is one of the most important components of the hydrologic cycle. Quantifying the infiltration water into soil is of great importance in watershed management. Prediction of flooding, erosion and pollutant transport all depends on the rate of runoff which is directly affected by the rate of infiltration. Quantification of infiltration water into soil is also necessary to determine the availability of water for crop growth and to estimate the amount of additional water needed for irrigation. Thus, an accurate model is required to estimate infiltration of water into soil. The ability of physical and empirical models in simulation of soil processes is commonly measured through comparisons of simulated and observed values. For these reasons, a large variety of indices have been proposed and used over the years in comparison of infiltration water into soil models. Among the proposed indices, some are absolute criteria such as the widely used root mean square error (RMSE, while others are relative criteria (i.e. normalized such as the Nash and Sutcliffe (1970 efficiency criterion (NSE. Selecting and using appropriate statistical criteria to evaluate and interpretation of the results for infiltration water into soil models is essential because each of the used criteria focus on specific types of errors. Also, descriptions of various goodness of fit indices or indicators including their advantages and shortcomings, and rigorous discussions on the suitability of each index are very important. The objective of this study is to compare the goodness of different statistical criteria to evaluate infiltration of water into soil models. Comparison techniques were considered to define the best models: coefficient of determination (R2, root mean square error (RMSE, efficiency criteria (NSEI and modified forms (such as NSEjI, NSESQRTI, NSElnI and NSEiI. Comparatively little work has been carried out on the meaning and

  1. IMPACT OF ISLAMIC RELIGIOUS SYMBOL IN PRODUCING FAVORABLE ATTITUDE TOWARD ADVERTISEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas NASERI

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available A review of the literature on religion and advertisement led to the identification of three lines of studies examining the influence of religion on advertising. These three lines of studies focused on attitude toward advertising of controversial products, presence of religious values in advertisements executions, and the consumers’ reactions to advertisement containing religious cues or symbols. The latter line has been followed modestly in Christian context but not in Islamic context of advertising. Hijab as a significant religious cue might peripherally generates a favorable attitude toward advertisement among Muslims. It is suggested that information processing theories like Elaboration Likelihood Model provides a pertinent theoretical framework to examine this effect empirically.

  2. Selection of comparative cases in land appraisal based on cloud model and gray relevancy theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Liu; Liu, Yanfang; Liu, Wei; Song, Xinying; Xu, Xiongjie

    2008-10-01

    There is a traditional approach named market comparative method, which is used to appraise land price by putting a focus on comparing cases. A review of the developing history of this method highlights some persistent challenges. In this paper, this existing approach is extended through coupling the cloud model, a data-mining technique, with gray relevancy theory. This approach allows the construction of quantitative measurement according to qualitative concept (attribute), simulating human cognizing process. This novel method admits hierarchical describing and exploration of the relationship and proximity between district factors and individual factors. By 1-D cloud generator, we obtain several rules in terms of linguistic atom which confirm the number of overlap cloud. Each rule corresponds to a rule's rear that achieves uncertainty ratiocination. In order to prove applicability of this method, it is applied to the selection of comparative cases in land appraisal of Wuhan City. Experimental results show most cases can be correctly discriminated and the better comparative cases are acceptable. Compared with other approaches, this method has better performance in land appraisal.

  3. Comparative Study on a Solving Model and Algorithm for a Flush Air Data Sensing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanbin Liu

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available With the development of high-performance aircraft, precise air data are necessary to complete challenging tasks such as flight maneuvering with large angles of attack and high speed. As a result, the flush air data sensing system (FADS was developed to satisfy the stricter control demands. In this paper, comparative stuides on the solving model and algorithm for FADS are conducted. First, the basic principles of FADS are given to elucidate the nonlinear relations between the inputs and the outputs. Then, several different solving models and algorithms of FADS are provided to compute the air data, including the angle of attck, sideslip angle, dynamic pressure and static pressure. Afterwards, the evaluation criteria of the resulting models and algorithms are discussed to satisfy the real design demands. Futhermore, a simulation using these algorithms is performed to identify the properites of the distinct models and algorithms such as the measuring precision and real-time features. The advantages of these models and algorithms corresponding to the different flight conditions are also analyzed, furthermore, some suggestions on their engineering applications are proposed to help future research.

  4. Tuning supersymmetric models at the LHC: A comparative analysis at two-loop level

    CERN Document Server

    Ghilencea, D M; Park, M

    2012-01-01

    We provide a comparative study of the fine tuning amount (Delta) at the two-loop leading log level in supersymmetric models commonly used in SUSY searches at the LHC. These are the constrained MSSM (CMSSM), non-universal Higgs masses models (NUHM1, NUHM2), non-universal gaugino masses model (NUGM) and GUT related gaugino masses models (NUGMd). Two definitions of the fine tuning are used, the first (Delta_{max}) measures maximal fine-tuning wrt individual parameters while the second (Delta_q) adds their contribution in "quadrature". As a direct result of two theoretical constraints (the EW minimum conditions), fine tuning (Delta_q) emerges as a suppressing factor (effective prior) of the averaged likelihood (under the priors), under the integral of the global probability of measuring the data (Bayesian evidence p(D)). For each model, there is little difference between Delta_q, Delta_{max} in the region allowed by the data, with similar behaviour as functions of the Higgs, gluino, stop mass or SUSY scale (m_{su...

  5. Comparing risk of failure models in water supply networks using ROC curves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debon, A.; Carrion, A.; Cabrera, E.; Solano, H.

    2010-01-01

    The problem of predicting the failure of water mains has been considered from different perspectives and using several methodologies in engineering literature. Nowadays, it is important to be able to accurately calculate the failure probabilities of pipes over time, since water company profits and service quality for citizens depend on pipe survival; forecasting pipe failures could have important economic and social implications. Quantitative tools (such as managerial or statistical indicators and reliable databases) are required in order to assess the current and future state of networks. Companies managing these networks are trying to establish models for evaluating the risk of failure in order to develop a proactive approach to the renewal process, instead of using traditional reactive pipe substitution schemes. The main objective of this paper is to compare models for evaluating the risk of failure in water supply networks. Using real data from a water supply company, this study has identified which network characteristics affect the risk of failure and which models better fit data to predict service breakdown. The comparison using the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) graph leads us to the conclusion that the best model is a generalized linear model. Also, we propose a procedure that can be applied to a pipe failure database, allowing the most appropriate decision rule to be chosen.

  6. Comparing risk of failure models in water supply networks using ROC curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debon, A., E-mail: andeau@eio.upv.e [Centro de Gestion de la Calidad y del Cambio, Dpt. Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa Aplicadas y Calidad, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, E-46022 Valencia (Spain); Carrion, A. [Centro de Gestion de la Calidad y del Cambio, Dpt. Estadistica e Investigacion Operativa Aplicadas y Calidad, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, E-46022 Valencia (Spain); Cabrera, E. [Dpto. De Ingenieria Hidraulica Y Medio Ambiente, Instituto Tecnologico del Agua, Universidad Politecnica de Valencia, E-46022 Valencia (Spain); Solano, H. [Universidad Diego Portales, Santiago (Chile)

    2010-01-15

    The problem of predicting the failure of water mains has been considered from different perspectives and using several methodologies in engineering literature. Nowadays, it is important to be able to accurately calculate the failure probabilities of pipes over time, since water company profits and service quality for citizens depend on pipe survival; forecasting pipe failures could have important economic and social implications. Quantitative tools (such as managerial or statistical indicators and reliable databases) are required in order to assess the current and future state of networks. Companies managing these networks are trying to establish models for evaluating the risk of failure in order to develop a proactive approach to the renewal process, instead of using traditional reactive pipe substitution schemes. The main objective of this paper is to compare models for evaluating the risk of failure in water supply networks. Using real data from a water supply company, this study has identified which network characteristics affect the risk of failure and which models better fit data to predict service breakdown. The comparison using the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) graph leads us to the conclusion that the best model is a generalized linear model. Also, we propose a procedure that can be applied to a pipe failure database, allowing the most appropriate decision rule to be chosen.

  7. Comparing the model-simulated global warming signal to observations using empirical estimates of unforced noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick T; Li, Wenhong; Cordero, Eugene C; Mauget, Steven A

    2015-04-21

    The comparison of observed global mean surface air temperature (GMT) change to the mean change simulated by climate models has received much public and scientific attention. For a given global warming signal produced by a climate model ensemble, there exists an envelope of GMT values representing the range of possible unforced states of the climate system (the Envelope of Unforced Noise; EUN). Typically, the EUN is derived from climate models themselves, but climate models might not accurately simulate the correct characteristics of unforced GMT variability. Here, we simulate a new, empirical, EUN that is based on instrumental and reconstructed surface temperature records. We compare the forced GMT signal produced by climate models to observations while noting the range of GMT values provided by the empirical EUN. We find that the empirical EUN is wide enough so that the interdecadal variability in the rate of global warming over the 20(th) century does not necessarily require corresponding variability in the rate-of-increase of the forced signal. The empirical EUN also indicates that the reduced GMT warming over the past decade or so is still consistent with a middle emission scenario's forced signal, but is likely inconsistent with the steepest emission scenario's forced signal.

  8. Comparing the model-simulated global warming signal to observations using empirical estimates of unforced noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Patrick T.; Li, Wenhong; Cordero, Eugene C.; Mauget, Steven A.

    2015-01-01

    The comparison of observed global mean surface air temperature (GMT) change to the mean change simulated by climate models has received much public and scientific attention. For a given global warming signal produced by a climate model ensemble, there exists an envelope of GMT values representing the range of possible unforced states of the climate system (the Envelope of Unforced Noise; EUN). Typically, the EUN is derived from climate models themselves, but climate models might not accurately simulate the correct characteristics of unforced GMT variability. Here, we simulate a new, empirical, EUN that is based on instrumental and reconstructed surface temperature records. We compare the forced GMT signal produced by climate models to observations while noting the range of GMT values provided by the empirical EUN. We find that the empirical EUN is wide enough so that the interdecadal variability in the rate of global warming over the 20th century does not necessarily require corresponding variability in the rate-of-increase of the forced signal. The empirical EUN also indicates that the reduced GMT warming over the past decade or so is still consistent with a middle emission scenario's forced signal, but is likely inconsistent with the steepest emission scenario's forced signal. PMID:25898351

  9. Optimal-foraging predator favors commensalistic Batesian mimicry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Honma

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Mimicry, in which one prey species (the Mimic imitates the aposematic signals of another prey (the Model to deceive their predators, has attracted the general interest of evolutionary biologists. Predator psychology, especially how the predator learns and forgets, has recently been recognized as an important factor in a predator-prey system. This idea is supported by both theoretical and experimental evidence, but is also the source of a good deal of controversy because of its novel prediction that in a Model/Mimic relationship even a moderately unpalatable Mimic increases the risk of the Model (quasi-Batesian mimicry. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We developed a psychology-based Monte Carlo model simulation of mimicry that incorporates a "Pavlovian" predator that practices an optimal foraging strategy, and examined how various ecological and psychological factors affect the relationships between a Model prey species and its Mimic. The behavior of the predator in our model is consistent with that reported by experimental studies, but our simulation's predictions differed markedly from those of previous models of mimicry because a more abundant Mimic did not increase the predation risk of the Model when alternative prey were abundant. Moreover, a quasi-Batesian relationship emerges only when no or very few alternative prey items were available. Therefore, the availability of alternative prey rather than the precise method of predator learning critically determines the relationship between Model and Mimic. Moreover, the predation risk to the Model and Mimic is determined by the absolute density of the Model rather than by its density relative to that of the Mimic. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Although these predictions are counterintuitive, they can explain various kinds of data that have been offered in support of competitive theories. Our model results suggest that to understand mimicry in nature it is important to consider the likely

  10. Interaction of ordinary Portland cement and Opalinus Clay: Dual porosity modelling compared to experimental data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenni, A.; Gimmi, T.; Alt-Epping, P.; Mäder, U.; Cloet, V.

    2017-06-01

    Interactions between concrete and clays are driven by the strong chemical gradients in pore water and involve mineral reactions in both materials. In the context of a radioactive waste repository, these reactions may influence safety-relevant clay properties such as swelling pressure, permeability or radionuclide retention. Interfaces between ordinary Portland cement and Opalinus Clay show weaker, but more extensive chemical disturbance compared to a contact between low-pH cement and Opalinus Clay. As a consequence of chemical reactions porosity changes occur at cement-clay interfaces. These changes are stronger and may lead to complete pore clogging in the case of low-pH cements. The prediction of pore clogging by reactive transport simulations is very sensitive to the magnitude of diffusive solute fluxes, cement clinker chemistry, and phase reaction kinetics. For instance, the consideration of anion-depleted porosity in clays substantially influences overall diffusion and pore clogging at interfaces. A new concept of dual porosity modelling approximating Donnan equilibrium is developed and applied to an ordinary Portland cement - Opalinus Clay interface. The model predictions are compared with data from the cement-clay interaction (CI) field experiment in the Mt Terri underground rock laboratory (Switzerland), which represent 5 y of interaction. The main observations such as the decalcification of the cement at the interface, the Mg enrichment in the clay detached from the interface, and the S enrichment in the cement detached from the interface, are qualitatively predicted by the new model approach. The model results reveal multiple coupled processes that create the observed features. The quantitative agreement of modelled and measured data can be improved if uncertainties of key input parameters (tortuosities, reaction kinetics, especially of clay minerals) can be reduced.

  11. Beware the black box: investigating the sensitivity of FEA simulations to modelling factors in comparative biomechanics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher W. Walmsley

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Finite element analysis (FEA is a computational technique of growing popularity in the field of comparative biomechanics, and is an easily accessible platform for form-function analyses of biological structures. However, its rapid evolution in recent years from a novel approach to common practice demands some scrutiny in regards to the validity of results and the appropriateness of assumptions inherent in setting up simulations. Both validation and sensitivity analyses remain unexplored in many comparative analyses, and assumptions considered to be ‘reasonable’ are often assumed to have little influence on the results and their interpretation.Here we report an extensive sensitivity analysis where high resolution finite element (FE models of mandibles from seven species of crocodile were analysed under loads typical for comparative analysis: biting, shaking, and twisting. Simulations explored the effect on both the absolute response and the interspecies pattern of results to variations in commonly used input parameters. Our sensitivity analysis focuses on assumptions relating to the selection of material properties (heterogeneous or homogeneous, scaling (standardising volume, surface area, or length, tooth position (front, mid, or back tooth engagement, and linear load case (type of loading for each feeding type.Our findings show that in a comparative context, FE models are far less sensitive to the selection of material property values and scaling to either volume or surface area than they are to those assumptions relating to the functional aspects of the simulation, such as tooth position and linear load case. Results show a complex interaction between simulation assumptions, depending on the combination of assumptions and the overall shape of each specimen. Keeping assumptions consistent between models in an analysis does not ensure that results can be generalised beyond the specific set of assumptions used. Logically, different

  12. Match and mismatch - comparing plant phenological metrics from ground-observations and from a prognostic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutishauser, This; Stöckli, Reto; Jeanneret, François; Peñuelas, Josep

    2010-05-01

    Changes in the seasonality of life cycles of plants as recorded in phenological observations have been widely analysed at the species level with data available for many decades back in time. At the same time, seasonality changes in satellite-based observations and prognostic phenology models comprise information at the pixel-size or landscape scale. Change analysis of satellite-based records is restricted due to relatively short satellite records that further include gaps while model-based analyses are biased due to current model deficiencies., At 30 selected sites across Europe, we analysed three different sources of plant seasonality during the 1971-2000 period. Data consisted of (1) species-specific development stages of flowering and leave-out with different species observed at each site. (2) We used a synthetic phenological metric that integrates the common interannual phenological signal across all species at one site. (3) We estimated daily Leaf Area Index with a prognostic phenology model. The prior uncertainties of the model's empirical parameter space are constrained by assimilating the Fraction of Photosynthetically Active Radiation absorbed by vegetation (FPAR) and Leaf Area Index (LAI) from the MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). We extracted the day of year when the 25%, 50% and 75% thresholds were passed each spring. The question arises how the three phenological signals compare and correlate across climate zones in Europe. Is there a match between single species observations, species-based ground-observed metrics and the landscape-scale prognostic model? Are there single key-species across Europe that best represent a landscape scale measure from the prognostic model? Can one source substitute another and serve as proxy-data? What can we learn from potential mismatches? Focusing on changes in spring this contribution presents first results of an ongoing comparison study from a number of European test sites that will be extended to

  13. Compare Energy Use in Variable Refrigerant Flow Heat Pumps Field Demonstration and Computer Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, Chandan; Raustad, Richard

    2013-07-01

    Variable Refrigerant Flow (VRF) heat pumps are often regarded as energy efficient air-conditioning systems which offer electricity savings as well as reduction in peak electric demand while providing improved individual zone setpoint control. One of the key advantages of VRF systems is minimal duct losses which provide significant reduction in energy use and duct space. However, there is limited data available to show their actual performance in the field. Since VRF systems are increasingly gaining market share in the US, it is highly desirable to have more actual field performance data of these systems. An effort was made in this direction to monitor VRF system performance over an extended period of time in a US national lab test facility. Due to increasing demand by the energy modeling community, an empirical model to simulate VRF systems was implemented in the building simulation program EnergyPlus. This paper presents the comparison of energy consumption as measured in the national lab and as predicted by the program. For increased accuracy in the comparison, a customized weather file was created by using measured outdoor temperature and relative humidity at the test facility. Other inputs to the model included building construction, VRF system model based on lab measured performance, occupancy of the building, lighting/plug loads, and thermostat set-points etc. Infiltration model inputs were adjusted in the beginning to tune the computer model and then subsequent field measurements were compared to the simulation results. Differences between the computer model results and actual field measurements are discussed. The computer generated VRF performance closely resembled the field measurements.

  14. ACEt: An R Package for Estimating Dynamic Heritability and Comparing Twin Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Liang; Pitkäniemi, Janne; Silventoinen, Karri; Sillanpää, Mikko J

    2017-11-01

    Estimating dynamic effects of age on the genetic and environmental variance components in twin studies may contribute to the investigation of gene-environment interactions, and may provide more insights into more accurate and powerful estimation of heritability. Existing parametric models for estimating dynamic variance components suffer from various drawbacks such as limitation of predefined functions. We present ACEt, an R package for fast estimating dynamic variance components and heritability that may change with respect to age or other moderators. Building on the twin models using penalized splines, ACEt provides a unified framework to incorporate a class of ACE models, in which each component can be modeled independently and is not limited by a linear or quadratic function. We demonstrate that ACEt is robust against misspecification of the number of spline knots, and offers a refined resolution of dynamic behavior of the genetic and environmental components and thus a detailed estimation of age-specific heritability. Moreover, we develop resampling methods for testing twin models with different variance functions including splines, log-linearity and constancy, which can be easily employed to verify various model assumptions. We evaluated the type I error rate and statistical power of the proposed hypothesis testing procedures under various scenarios using simulated datasets. Potential numerical issues and computational cost were also assessed through simulations. We applied the ACEt package to a Finnish twin cohort to investigate age-specific heritability of body mass index and height. Our results show that the age-specific variance components of these two traits exhibited substantially different patterns despite of comparable estimates of heritability. In summary, the ACEt R package offers a useful tool for the exploration of age-dependent heritability and model comparison in twin studies.

  15. Comparing stream-specific to generalized temperature models to guide salmonid management in a changing climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrew K. Carlson,; William W. Taylor,; Hartikainen, Kelsey M.; Dana M. Infante,; Beard, Douglas; Lynch, Abigail

    2017-01-01

    Global climate change is predicted to increase air and stream temperatures and alter thermal habitat suitability for growth and survival of coldwater fishes, including brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis), brown trout (Salmo trutta), and rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). In a changing climate, accurate stream temperature modeling is increasingly important for sustainable salmonid management throughout the world. However, finite resource availability (e.g. funding, personnel) drives a tradeoff between thermal model accuracy and efficiency (i.e. cost-effective applicability at management-relevant spatial extents). Using different projected climate change scenarios, we compared the accuracy and efficiency of stream-specific and generalized (i.e. region-specific) temperature models for coldwater salmonids within and outside the State of Michigan, USA, a region with long-term stream temperature data and productive coldwater fisheries. Projected stream temperature warming between 2016 and 2056 ranged from 0.1 to 3.8 °C in groundwater-dominated streams and 0.2–6.8 °C in surface-runoff dominated systems in the State of Michigan. Despite their generally lower accuracy in predicting exact stream temperatures, generalized models accurately projected salmonid thermal habitat suitability in 82% of groundwater-dominated streams, including those with brook charr (80% accuracy), brown trout (89% accuracy), and rainbow trout (75% accuracy). In contrast, generalized models predicted thermal habitat suitability in runoff-dominated streams with much lower accuracy (54%). These results suggest that, amidst climate change and constraints in resource availability, generalized models are appropriate to forecast thermal conditions in groundwater-dominated streams within and outside Michigan and inform regional-level salmonid management strategies that are practical for coldwater fisheries managers, policy makers, and the public. We recommend fisheries professionals reserve resource

  16. Comparing stochastic differential equations and agent-based modelling and simulation for early-stage cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueredo, Grazziela P; Siebers, Peer-Olaf; Owen, Markus R; Reps, Jenna; Aickelin, Uwe

    2014-01-01

    There is great potential to be explored regarding the use of agent-based modelling and simulation as an alternative paradigm to investigate early-stage cancer interactions with the immune system. It does not suffer from some limitations of ordinary differential equation models, such as the lack of stochasticity, representation of individual behaviours rather than aggregates and individual memory. In this paper we investigate the potential contribution of agent-based modelling and simulation when contrasted with stochastic versions of ODE models using early-stage cancer examples. We seek answers to the following questions: (1) Does this new stochastic formulation produce similar results to the agent-based version? (2) Can these methods be used interchangeably? (3) Do agent-based models outcomes reveal any benefit when compared to the Gillespie results? To answer these research questions we investigate three well-established mathematical models describing interactions between tumour cells and immune elements. These case studies were re-conceptualised under an agent-based perspective and also converted to the Gillespie algorithm formulation. Our interest in this work, therefore, is to establish a methodological discussion regarding the usability of different simulation approaches, rather than provide further biological insights into the investigated case studies. Our results show that it is possible to obtain equivalent models that implement the same mechanisms; however, the incapacity of the Gillespie algorithm to retain individual memory of past events affects the similarity of some results. Furthermore, the emergent behaviour of ABMS produces extra patters of behaviour in the system, which was not obtained by the Gillespie algorithm.

  17. Comparative analysis of elements and models of implementation in local-level spatial plans in Serbia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanović Nebojša

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Implementation of local-level spatial plans is of paramount importance to the development of the local community. This paper aims to demonstrate the importance of and offer further directions for research into the implementation of spatial plans by presenting the results of a study on models of implementation. The paper describes the basic theoretical postulates of a model for implementing spatial plans. A comparative analysis of the application of elements and models of implementation of plans in practice was conducted based on the spatial plans for the local municipalities of Arilje, Lazarevac and Sremska Mitrovica. The analysis includes four models of implementation: the strategy and policy of spatial development; spatial protection; the implementation of planning solutions of a technical nature; and the implementation of rules of use, arrangement and construction of spaces. The main results of the analysis are presented and used to give recommendations for improving the elements and models of implementation. Final deliberations show that models of implementation are generally used in practice and combined in spatial plans. Based on the analysis of how models of implementation are applied in practice, a general conclusion concerning the complex character of the local level of planning is presented and elaborated. [Project of the Serbian Ministry of Education, Science and Technological Development, Grant no. TR 36035: Spatial, Environmental, Energy and Social Aspects of Developing Settlements and Climate Change - Mutual Impacts and Grant no. III 47014: The Role and Implementation of the National Spatial Plan and Regional Development Documents in Renewal of Strategic Research, Thinking and Governance in Serbia

  18. Favorable Vascular Actions of Angiotensin-(1-7) in Human Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schinzari, Francesca; Tesauro, Manfredi; Veneziani, Augusto; Mores, Nadia; Di Daniele, Nicola; Cardillo, Carmine

    2018-01-01

    Obese patients have vascular dysfunction related to impaired insulin-stimulated vasodilation and increased endothelin-1-mediated vasoconstriction. In contrast to the harmful vascular actions of angiotensin (Ang) II, the angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 product Ang-(1-7) has shown to exert cardiovascular and metabolic benefits in experimental models through stimulation of the Mas receptor. We, therefore, examined the effects of exogenous Ang-(1-7) on vasodilator tone and endothelin-1-dependent vasoconstriction in obese patients. Intra-arterial infusion of Ang-(1-7) (10 nmol/min) resulted in significant increase in unstimulated forearm flow ( P =0.03), an effect that was not affected by the Mas receptor antagonist A779 (10 nmol/min; P >0.05). In the absence of hyperinsulinemia, however, forearm flow responses to graded doses of acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were not different during Ang-(1-7) administration compared with saline (both P >0.05). During infusion of regular insulin (0.15 mU/kg per minute), by contrast, endothelium-dependent vasodilator response to acetylcholine was significantly enhanced by Ang-(1-7) ( P =0.04 versus saline), whereas endothelium-independent response to sodium nitroprusside was not modified ( P =0.91). Finally, Ang-(1-7) decreased the vasodilator response to endothelin A receptor blockade (BQ-123; 10 nmol/min) compared with saline (6±1% versus 93±17%; P <0.001); nitric oxide inhibition by l- N -monomethylarginine (4 µmol/min) during concurrent endothelin A antagonism resulted in similar vasoconstriction in the absence or presence of Ang-(1-7 Ang-(1-7) ( P =0.69). Our findings indicate that in obese patients Ang-(1-7) has favorable effects not only to improve insulin-stimulated endothelium-dependent vasodilation but also to blunt endothelin-1-dependent vasoconstrictor tone. These findings provide support for targeting Ang-(1-7) to counteract the hemodynamic abnormalities of human obesity. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. Comparing regional precipitation and temperature extremes in climate model and reanalysis products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Angélil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available A growing field of research aims to characterise the contribution of anthropogenic emissions to the likelihood of extreme weather and climate events. These analyses can be sensitive to the shapes of the tails of simulated distributions. If tails are found to be unrealistically short or long, the anthropogenic signal emerges more or less clearly, respectively, from the noise of possible weather. Here we compare the chance of daily land-surface precipitation and near-surface temperature extremes generated by three Atmospheric Global Climate Models typically used for event attribution, with distributions from six reanalysis products. The likelihoods of extremes are compared for area-averages over grid cell and regional sized spatial domains. Results suggest a bias favouring overly strong attribution estimates for hot and cold events over many regions of Africa and Australia, and a bias favouring overly weak attribution estimates over regions of North America and Asia. For rainfall, results are more sensitive to geographic location. Although the three models show similar results over many regions, they do disagree over others. Equally, results highlight the discrepancy amongst reanalyses products. This emphasises the importance of using multiple reanalysis and/or observation products, as well as multiple models in event attribution studies.

  20. Comparing thixotropic and Herschel–Bulkley parameterizations for continuum models of avalanches and subaqueous debris flows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.-H. Jeon

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Avalanches and subaqueous debris flows are two cases of a wide range of natural hazards that have been previously modeled with non-Newtonian fluid mechanics approximating the interplay of forces associated with gravity flows of granular and solid–liquid mixtures. The complex behaviors of such flows at unsteady flow initiation (i.e., destruction of structural jamming and flow stalling (restructuralization imply that the representative viscosity–stress relationships should include hysteresis: there is no reason to expect the timescale of microstructure destruction is the same as the timescale of restructuralization. The non-Newtonian Herschel–Bulkley relationship that has been previously used in such models implies complete reversibility of the stress–strain relationship and thus cannot correctly represent unsteady phases. In contrast, a thixotropic non-Newtonian model allows representation of initial structural jamming and aging effects that provide hysteresis in the stress–strain relationship. In this study, a thixotropic model and a Herschel–Bulkley model are compared to each other and to prior laboratory experiments that are representative of an avalanche and a subaqueous debris flow. A numerical solver using a multi-material level-set method is applied to track multiple interfaces simultaneously in the simulations. The numerical results are validated with analytical solutions and available experimental data using parameters selected based on the experimental setup and without post hoc calibration. The thixotropic (time-dependent fluid model shows reasonable agreement with all the experimental data. For most of the experimental conditions, the Herschel–Bulkley (time-independent model results were similar to the thixotropic model, a critical exception being conditions with a high yield stress where the Herschel–Bulkley model did not initiate flow. These results indicate that the thixotropic relationship is promising for

  1. Comparative In Vivo Efficacies of Tedizolid in Neutropenic versus Immunocompetent Murine Streptococcus pneumoniae Lung Infection Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelraouf, Kamilia; Nicolau, David P

    2017-01-01

    Given that tedizolid exhibits substantial lung penetration, we hypothesize that it could achieve good efficacy against Streptococcus pneumoniae lung infections. We evaluated the pharmacodynamics of tedizolid for treatment of S. pneumoniae lung infections and compared the efficacies of tedizolid human-simulated epithelial lining fluid (ELF) exposures in immunocompetent and neutropenic murine lung infection models. ICR mice were rendered neutropenic via intraperitoneal cyclophosphamide injections and then inoculated intranasally with S. pneumoniae suspensions. Immunocompetent CBA/J mice were inoculated similarly. Single daily tedizolid doses were administered 4 h postinoculation (termed 0 h). Changes in log 10 CFU at 24 h compared with 0-h controls were estimated. Ratios of area under the free-drug concentration-time curve to MIC (fAUC 0-24 /MIC) required to achieve various efficacy endpoints against each isolate were estimated using the Hill equation. Tedizolid doses in neutropenic and immunocompetent mice that mimic the human-simulated ELF exposure were examined. Stasis, 1-log reduction, and 2-log reduction were achieved at fAUC 0-24 /MIC of 8.96, 24.62, and 48.34, respectively, in immunocompetent mice and 19.21, 48.29, and 103.95, respectively, in neutropenic mice. Tedizolid at 40 mg/kg of body weight/day and 55 mg/kg/day in immunocompetent and neutropenic mice, respectively, resulted in ELF AUC 0-24 comparable to that achieved in humans following a 200-mg once-daily clinical dose. These human-simulated ELF exposures were adequate to attain >2-log reduction in bacterial burden at 24 h in 3 out of 4 isolates in both models and 1.58- and 0.74-log reductions with the fourth isolate in immunocompetent and neutropenic mice, respectively. Tedizolid showed potent in vivo efficacy against S. pneumoniae in both immunocompetent and neutropenic lung infection models, which support its consideration for S. pneumoniae lung infections. Copyright © 2016 American Society for

  2. Comparative Study of Elastic Network Model and Protein Contact Network for Protein Complexes: The Hemoglobin Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Hu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The overall topology and interfacial interactions play key roles in understanding structural and functional principles of protein complexes. Elastic Network Model (ENM and Protein Contact Network (PCN are two widely used methods for high throughput investigation of structures and interactions within protein complexes. In this work, the comparative analysis of ENM and PCN relative to hemoglobin (Hb was taken as case study. We examine four types of structural and dynamical paradigms, namely, conformational change between different states of Hbs, modular analysis, allosteric mechanisms studies, and interface characterization of an Hb. The comparative study shows that ENM has an advantage in studying dynamical properties and protein-protein interfaces, while PCN is better for describing protein structures quantitatively both from local and from global levels. We suggest that the integration of ENM and PCN would give a potential but powerful tool in structural systems biology.

  3. Comparative Analysis of Pain Behaviours in Humanized Mouse Models of Sickle Cell Anemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianxun Lei

    Full Text Available Pain is a hallmark feature of sickle cell anemia (SCA but management of chronic as well as acute pain remains a major challenge. Mouse models of SCA are essential to examine the mechanisms of pain and develop novel therapeutics. To facilitate this effort, we compared humanized homozygous BERK and Townes sickle mice for the effect of gender and age on pain behaviors. Similar to previously characterized BERK sickle mice, Townes sickle mice show more mechanical, thermal, and deep tissue hyperalgesia with increasing age. Female Townes sickle mice demonstrate more hyperalgesia compared to males similar to that reported for BERK mice and patients with SCA. Mechanical, thermal and deep tissue hyperalgesia increased further after hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R treatment in Townes sickle mice. Together, these data show BERK sickle mice exhibit a significantly greater degree of hyperalgesia for all behavioral measures as compared to gender- and age-matched Townes sickle mice. However, the genetically distinct "knock-in" strategy of human α and β transgene insertion in Townes mice as compared to BERK mice, may provide relative advantage for further genetic manipulations to examine specific mechanisms of pain.

  4. Comparative modeling of Bronze Age land use in the Malatya Plain (Turkey)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arıkan, Bülent; Restelli, Francesca Balossi; Masi, Alessia

    2016-03-01

    Computational modeling in archeology has proven to be a useful tool in quantifying changes in the paleoenvironment. This especially useful method combines data from diverse disciplines to answer questions focusing on the complex and non-linear aspects of human-environment interactions. The research presented here uses various proxy records to compare the changes in climate during the Bronze Age in the Malatya Plain in eastern Anatolia, which is situated at the northern extremity of northern Mesopotamia. Extensive agropastoral land use modeling was applied to three sites of different size and function in the Malatya Plain during the Early Bronze Age I period to simulate the varying scale and intensity of human impacts in relation to changes in the level of social organization, demography, and temporal length. The results suggest that even in land use types subjected to a light footprint, the scale and intensity of anthropogenic impacts change significantly in relation to the level of social organization.

  5. From neurons to nests: nest-building behaviour as a model in behavioural and comparative neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Zachary J; Meddle, Simone L; Healy, Susan D

    Despite centuries of observing the nest building of most extant bird species, we know surprisingly little about how birds build nests and, specifically, how the avian brain controls nest building. Here, we argue that nest building in birds may be a useful model behaviour in which to study how the brain controls behaviour. Specifically, we argue that nest building as a behavioural model provides a unique opportunity to study not only the mechanisms through which the brain controls behaviour within individuals of a single species but also how evolution may have shaped the brain to produce interspecific variation in nest-building behaviour. In this review, we outline the questions in both behavioural and comparative neuroscience that nest building could be used to address, summarize recent findings regarding the neurobiology of nest building in lab-reared zebra finches and across species building different nest structures, and suggest some future directions for the neurobiology of nest building.

  6. A Comparative study of two RVE modelling methods for chopped carbon fiber SMC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Zhangxing; Li, Yi; Shao, Yimin; Huang, Tianyu; Xu, Hongyi; Li, Yang; Chen, Wei; Zeng, Danielle; Avery, Katherine; Kang, HongTae; Su, Xuming

    2017-04-06

    To achieve vehicle light-weighting, the chopped carbon fiber sheet molding compound (SMC) is identified as a promising material to replace metals. However, there are no effective tools and methods to predict the mechanical property of the chopped carbon fiber SMC due to the high complexity in microstructure features and the anisotropic properties. In this paper, the Representative Volume Element (RVE) approach is used to model the SMC microstructure. Two modeling methods, the Voronoi diagram-based method and the chip packing method, are developed for material RVE property prediction. The two methods are compared in terms of the predicted elastic modulus and the predicted results are validated using the Digital Image Correlation (DIC) tensile test results. Furthermore, the advantages and shortcomings of these two methods are discussed in terms of the required input information and the convenience of use in the integrated processing-microstructure-property analysis.

  7. Modeling and comparative study of various detection techniques for FMCW LIDAR using optisystem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elghandour, Ahmed H.; Ren, Chen D.

    2013-09-01

    In this paper we investigated the different detection techniques especially direct detection, coherent heterodyne detection and coherent homodyne detection on FMCW LIDAR system using Optisystem package. A model for target, propagation channel and various detection techniques were developed using Optisystem package and then a comparative study among various detection techniques for FMCW LIDAR systems is done analytically and simulated using the developed model. Performance of direct detection, heterodyne detection and homodyne detection for FMCW LIDAR system was calculated and simulated using Optisystem package. The output simulated performance was checked using simulated results of MATLAB simulator. The results shows that direct detection is sensitive to the intensity of the received electromagnetic signal and has low complexity system advantage over the others detection architectures at the expense of the thermal noise is the dominant noise source and the sensitivity is relatively poor. In addition to much higher detection sensitivity can be achieved using coherent optical mixing which is performed by heterodyne and homodyne detection.

  8. Mobile Agent-Based Software Systems Modeling Approaches: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aissam Belghiat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Mobile agent-based applications are special type of software systems which take the advantages of mobile agents in order to provide a new beneficial paradigm to solve multiple complex problems in several fields and areas such as network management, e-commerce, e-learning, etc. Likewise, we notice lack of real applications based on this paradigm and lack of serious evaluations of their modeling approaches. Hence, this paper provides a comparative study of modeling approaches of mobile agent-based software systems. The objective is to give the reader an overview and a thorough understanding of the work that has been done and where the gaps in the research are.

  9. Comparing wall modeled LES and prescribed boundary layer approach in infinite wind farm simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarlak, Hamid; Mikkelsen, Robert; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims at presenting a simple and computationally fast method for simulation of the Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) and comparing the results with the commonly used wall-modelled Large Eddy Simulation (WMLES). The simple method, called Prescribed Mean Shear and Turbulence (PMST) hereafter...... inexpensive, is high flexibility meaning that the imposed boundary layer can be read from another CFD simulation, or from site measurements. For fundamental studies focusing on the wake structures rather than ABL for example, the grid can be refined in the rotor region and any desired shear layer can...

  10. Comparative Analysis of Market Volatility in Indian Banking and IT Sectors by using Average Decline Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirti AREKAR

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The stock market volatility is depends on three major features, complete volatility, volatility fluctuations, and volatility attention and they are calculate by the statistical techniques. Comparative analysis of market volatility for two major index i.e. banking & IT sector in Bombay stock exchange (BSE by using average decline model. The average degeneration process in volatility has being used after very high and low stock returns. The results of this study explain significant decline in volatility fluctuations, attention, and level between epochs of pre and post particularly high stock returns.

  11. Comparing modelling techniques when designing VPH gratings for BigBOSS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poppett, Claire; Edelstein, Jerry; Lampton, Michael; Jelinsky, Patrick; Arns, James

    2012-09-01

    BigBOSS is a Stage IV Dark Energy instrument based on the Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) and Red Shift Distortions (RSD) techniques using spectroscopic data of 20 million ELG and LRG galaxies at 0.5VPH) gratings have been identified as a key technology which will enable the efficiency requirement to be met, however it is important to be able to accurately predict their performance. In this paper we quantitatively compare different modelling techniques in order to assess the parameter space over which they are more capable of accurately predicting measured performance. Finally we present baseline parameters for grating designs that are most suitable for the BigBOSS instrument.

  12. A comparative modeling and molecular docking study on Mycobacterium tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fakhar, Zeynab; Naiker, Suhashni; Alves, Claudio N; Govender, Thavendran; Maguire, Glenn E M; Lameira, Jeronimo; Lamichhane, Gyanu; Kruger, Hendrik G; Honarparvar, Bahareh

    2016-11-01

    An alarming rise of multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains and the continuous high global morbidity of tuberculosis have reinvigorated the need to identify novel targets to combat the disease. The enzymes that catalyze the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan in M. tuberculosis are essential and noteworthy therapeutic targets. In this study, the biochemical function and homology modeling of MurI, MurG, MraY, DapE, DapA, Alr, and Ddl enzymes of the CDC1551 M. tuberculosis strain involved in the biosynthesis of peptidoglycan cell wall are reported. Generation of the 3D structures was achieved with Modeller 9.13. To assess the structural quality of the obtained homology modeled targets, the models were validated using PROCHECK, PDBsum, QMEAN, and ERRAT scores. Molecular dynamics simulations were performed to calculate root mean square deviation (RMSD) and radius of gyration (Rg) of MurI and MurG target proteins and their corresponding templates. For further model validation, RMSD and Rg for selected targets/templates were investigated to compare the close proximity of their dynamic behavior in terms of protein stability and average distances. To identify the potential binding mode required for molecular docking, binding site information of all modeled targets was obtained using two prediction algorithms. A docking study was performed for MurI to determine the potential mode of interaction between the inhibitor and the active site residues. This study presents the first accounts of the 3D structural information for the selected M. tuberculosis targets involved in peptidoglycan biosynthesis.

  13. An Analysis Technique/Automated Tool for Comparing and Tracking Analysis Modes of Different Finite Element Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towner, Robert L.; Band, Jonathan L.

    2012-01-01

    An analysis technique was developed to compare and track mode shapes for different Finite Element Models. The technique may be applied to a variety of structural dynamics analyses, including model reduction validation (comparing unreduced and reduced models), mode tracking for various parametric analyses (e.g., launch vehicle model dispersion analysis to identify sensitivities to modal gain for Guidance, Navigation, and Control), comparing models of different mesh fidelity (e.g., a coarse model for a preliminary analysis compared to a higher-fidelity model for a detailed analysis) and mode tracking for a structure with properties that change over time (e.g., a launch vehicle from liftoff through end-of-burn, with propellant being expended during the flight). Mode shapes for different models are compared and tracked using several numerical indicators, including traditional Cross-Orthogonality and Modal Assurance Criteria approaches, as well as numerical indicators obtained by comparing modal strain energy and kinetic energy distributions. This analysis technique has been used to reliably identify correlated mode shapes for complex Finite Element Models that would otherwise be difficult to compare using traditional techniques. This improved approach also utilizes an adaptive mode tracking algorithm that allows for automated tracking when working with complex models and/or comparing a large group of models.

  14. Comparing mechanistic and empirical approaches to modeling the thermal niche of almond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lauren E.; Abatzoglou, John T.

    2017-09-01

    Delineating locations that are thermally viable for cultivating high-value crops can help to guide land use planning, agronomics, and water management. Three modeling approaches were used to identify the potential distribution and key thermal constraints on on almond cultivation across the southwestern United States (US), including two empirical species distribution models (SDMs)—one using commonly used bioclimatic variables (traditional SDM) and the other using more physiologically relevant climate variables (nontraditional SDM)—and a mechanistic model (MM) developed using published thermal limitations from field studies. While models showed comparable results over the majority of the domain, including over existing croplands with high almond density, the MM suggested the greatest potential for the geographic expansion of almond cultivation, with frost susceptibility and insufficient heat accumulation being the primary thermal constraints in the southwestern US. The traditional SDM over-predicted almond suitability in locations shown by the MM to be limited by frost, whereas the nontraditional SDM showed greater agreement with the MM in these locations, indicating that incorporating physiologically relevant variables in SDMs can improve predictions. Finally, opportunities for geographic expansion of almond cultivation under current climatic conditions in the region may be limited, suggesting that increasing production may rely on agronomical advances and densifying current almond plantations in existing locations.

  15. SPSS macros to compare any two fitted values from a regression model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Bruce; Dubois, Sacha

    2012-12-01

    In regression models with first-order terms only, the coefficient for a given variable is typically interpreted as the change in the fitted value of Y for a one-unit increase in that variable, with all other variables held constant. Therefore, each regression coefficient represents the difference between two fitted values of Y. But the coefficients represent only a fraction of the possible fitted value comparisons that might be of interest to researchers. For many fitted value comparisons that are not captured by any of the regression coefficients, common statistical software packages do not provide the standard errors needed to compute confidence intervals or carry out statistical tests-particularly in more complex models that include interactions, polynomial terms, or regression splines. We describe two SPSS macros that implement a matrix algebra method for comparing any two fitted values from a regression model. The !OLScomp and !MLEcomp macros are for use with models fitted via ordinary least squares and maximum likelihood estimation, respectively. The output from the macros includes the standard error of the difference between the two fitted values, a 95% confidence interval for the difference, and a corresponding statistical test with its p-value.

  16. Groundwater Development Stress: Global-Scale Indices Compared to Regional Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, William M; Clark, Brian R; Ely, David M; Faunt, Claudia C

    2018-03-01

    The increased availability of global datasets and technologies such as global hydrologic models and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites have resulted in a growing number of global-scale assessments of water availability using simple indices of water stress. Developed initially for surface water, such indices are increasingly used to evaluate global groundwater resources. We compare indices of groundwater development stress for three major agricultural areas of the United States to information available from regional water budgets developed from detailed groundwater modeling. These comparisons illustrate the potential value of regional-scale analyses to supplement global hydrological models and GRACE analyses of groundwater depletion. Regional-scale analyses allow assessments of water stress that better account for scale effects, the dynamics of groundwater flow systems, the complexities of irrigated agricultural systems, and the laws, regulations, engineering, and socioeconomic factors that govern groundwater use. Strategic use of regional-scale models with global-scale analyses would greatly enhance knowledge of the global groundwater depletion problem. © 2017, National Ground Water Association.

  17. Screening of persistent organic pollutants by QSPR classification models: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papa, Ester; Gramatica, Paola

    2008-08-01

    A Quantitative Structure-Property Relationships (QSPRs) study for the prediction of the environmental persistence of a set of 250 heterogeneous organic compounds is here presented. Three a priori defined classes of environmental persistence were generated, by Hierarchical Cluster Analysis, from the combination of half-life data in air, water, soil and sediment available for all the studied compounds. QSPR classification models were successfully developed using different techniques (k-NN, CART and CP-ANN) and three interpretable theoretical molecular descriptors. Robust external validation was provided by statistical splitting and also on completely new data. The good performances of all these models were compared and their structural domains were analyzed. The analysis of the errors highlights a slight tendency of persistence overestimation, misclassifying chemicals from a lower to a higher class of persistence, in line with the precautionary principle. Finally, the reliability of the proposed QSPR models was verified further with new data from the literature. The structure-based classification models, applicable for the prediction of potential persistence of heterogeneous organic compounds, could be useful as preliminary support tools for the identification and prioritization of new potential POPs among already existing chemicals as well as "screening prior to synthesis" procedures to avoid the production, and consequent release into the environment, of new POPs.

  18. Comparing distribution models for small samples of overdispersed counts of freshwater fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudor, Lise; Lamouroux, Nicolas; Olivier, Jean-Michel

    2011-05-01

    The study of species abundance often relies on repeated abundance counts whose number is limited by logistic or financial constraints. The distribution of abundance counts is generally right-skewed (i.e. with many zeros and few high values) and needs to be modelled for statistical inference. We used an extensive dataset involving about 100,000 fish individuals of 12 freshwater fish species collected in electrofishing points (7 m 2) during 350 field surveys made in 25 stream sites, in order to compare the performance and the generality of four distribution models of counts (Poisson, negative binomial and their zero-inflated counterparts). The negative binomial distribution was the best model (Bayesian Information Criterion) for 58% of the samples (species-survey combinations) and was suitable for a variety of life histories, habitat, and sample characteristics. The performance of the models was closely related to samples' statistics such as total abundance and variance. Finally, we illustrated the consequences of a distribution assumption by calculating confidence intervals around the mean abundance, either based on the most suitable distribution assumption or on an asymptotical, distribution-free (Student's) method. Student's method generally corresponded to narrower confidence intervals, especially when there were few (≤3) non-null counts in the samples.

  19. Groundwater development stress: Global-scale indices compared to regional modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alley, William; Clark, Brian R.; Ely, Matt; Faunt, Claudia

    2018-01-01

    The increased availability of global datasets and technologies such as global hydrologic models and the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellites have resulted in a growing number of global-scale assessments of water availability using simple indices of water stress. Developed initially for surface water, such indices are increasingly used to evaluate global groundwater resources. We compare indices of groundwater development stress for three major agricultural areas of the United States to information available from regional water budgets developed from detailed groundwater modeling. These comparisons illustrate the potential value of regional-scale analyses to supplement global hydrological models and GRACE analyses of groundwater depletion. Regional-scale analyses allow assessments of water stress that better account for scale effects, the dynamics of groundwater flow systems, the complexities of irrigated agricultural systems, and the laws, regulations, engineering, and socioeconomic factors that govern groundwater use. Strategic use of regional-scale models with global-scale analyses would greatly enhance knowledge of the global groundwater depletion problem.

  20. Comparative modelling and molecular docking of nitrate reductase from Bacillus weihenstephanensis (DS45

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Seenivasagan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitrate reductase catalyses the oxidation of NAD(PH and the reduction of nitrate to nitrite. NR serves as a central point for the integration of metabolic pathways by governing the flux of reduced nitrogen through several regulatory mechanisms in plants, algae and fungi. Bacteria express nitrate reductases that convert nitrate to nitrite, but mammals lack these specific enzymes. The microbial nitrate reductase reduces toxic compounds to nontoxic compounds with the help of NAD(PH. In the present study, our results revealed that Bacillus weihenstephanensis expresses a nitrate reductase enzyme, which was made to generate the 3D structure of the enzyme. Six different modelling servers, namely Phyre2, RaptorX, M4T Server, HHpred, SWISS MODEL and Mod Web, were used for comparative modelling of the structure. The model was validated with standard parameters (PROCHECK and Verify 3D. This study will be useful in the functional characterization of the nitrate reductase enzyme and its docking with nitrate molecules, as well as for use with autodocking.

  1. Comparative morphometry of L4 vertebrae: comparison of large animal models for the human lumbar spine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLain, Robert F; Yerby, Scott A; Moseley, Timothy A

    2002-04-15

    Anatomic analysis of L4 vertebral morphometry comparing specimens harvested from humans and five common large animal species. To compare fundamental structural similarities and differences in the vertebral bodies of commonly used experimental animals relative to human vertebrae. Animal models are commonly used for assessment of spine fusion, instrumentation techniques, and vertebral bone biology. Among the animals used, the lumbar vertebrae exhibit considerable anatomic variability. The goal of this study was to determine which of the animals commonly used for spine research is best suited as an anatomic model for the human lumbar spine. Morphometric features of the L4 vertebrae of five common research animals were compared with those of the human L4 vertebrae. Mature canines, immature pigs, mature micropigs, mature dairy goats, and mature sheep were analyzed. These species were chosen because they are commonly selected research animals, and most research facilities do not need to be modified to use them. The samples included ten L4 vertebrae of each animal species and seven human L4 vertebrae. Each specimen was meticulously cleaned of all soft tissue. The measurements were grouped into vertebral body parameters, neural canal dimensions, and pedicle and facet morphometery. The mean of each anatomic measurement was compared using a single factor analysis of variance and a Scheffe's post hoc test, with 0.05 denoting significance. The human vertebral body was significantly wider and deeper in the anteroposterior plane than any of the animals studied. However, the mean vertebral body height of the sheep and goat significantly exceeded that of the human specimens. The mean pedicle angle of every animal species was significantly greater than that of the human. The mean pedicle width of the micropig and goat were significantly narrower than the human pedicles, and the dog specimens lacked a definable pedicle altogether. There was no significant difference in mean pedicle

  2. Multiple data sets and modelling choices in a comparative LCA of disposable beverage cups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Harst, Eugenie; Potting, José; Kroeze, Carolien

    2014-10-01

    This study used multiple data sets and modelling choices in an environmental life cycle assessment (LCA) to compare typical disposable beverage cups made from polystyrene (PS), polylactic acid (PLA; bioplastic) and paper lined with bioplastic (biopaper). Incineration and recycling were considered as waste processing options, and for the PLA and biopaper cup also composting and anaerobic digestion. Multiple data sets and modelling choices were systematically used to calculate average results and the spread in results for each disposable cup in eleven impact categories. The LCA results of all combinations of data sets and modelling choices consistently identify three processes that dominate the environmental impact: (1) production of the cup's basic material (PS, PLA, biopaper), (2) cup manufacturing, and (3) waste processing. The large spread in results for impact categories strongly overlaps among the cups, however, and therefore does not allow a preference for one type of cup material. Comparison of the individual waste treatment options suggests some cautious preferences. The average waste treatment results indicate that recycling is the preferred option for PLA cups, followed by anaerobic digestion and incineration. Recycling is slightly preferred over incineration for the biopaper cups. There is no preferred waste treatment option for the PS cups. Taking into account the spread in waste treatment results for all cups, however, none of these preferences for waste processing options can be justified. The only exception is composting, which is least preferred for both PLA and biopaper cups. Our study illustrates that using multiple data sets and modelling choices can lead to considerable spread in LCA results. This makes comparing products more complex, but the outcomes more robust. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. How does Poisson kriging compare to the popular BYM model for mapping disease risks?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gebreab Samson

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Geostatistical techniques are now available to account for spatially varying population sizes and spatial patterns in the mapping of disease rates. At first glance, Poisson kriging represents an attractive alternative to increasingly popular Bayesian spatial models in that: 1 it is easier to implement and less CPU intensive, and 2 it accounts for the size and shape of geographical units, avoiding the limitations of conditional auto-regressive (CAR models commonly used in Bayesian algorithms while allowing for the creation of isopleth risk maps. Both approaches, however, have never been compared in simulation studies, and there is a need to better understand their merits in terms of accuracy and precision of disease risk estimates. Results Besag, York and Mollie's (BYM model and Poisson kriging (point and area-to-area implementations were applied to age-adjusted lung and cervix cancer mortality rates recorded for white females in two contrasted county geographies: 1 state of Indiana that consists of 92 counties of fairly similar size and shape, and 2 four states in the Western US (Arizona, California, Nevada and Utah forming a set of 118 counties that are vastly different geographical units. The spatial support (i.e. point versus area has a much smaller impact on the results than the statistical methodology (i.e. geostatistical versus Bayesian models. Differences between methods are particularly pronounced in the Western US dataset: BYM model yields smoother risk surface and prediction variance that changes mainly as a function of the predicted risk, while the Poisson kriging variance increases in large sparsely populated counties. Simulation studies showed that the geostatistical approach yields smaller prediction errors, more precise and accurate probability intervals, and allows a better discrimination between counties with high and low mortality risks. The benefit of area-to-area Poisson kriging increases as the county

  4. Programed Death is Favored by Natural Selection in Spatial Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werfel, Justin; Ingber, Donald E; Bar-Yam, Yaneer

    2015-06-12

    Standard evolutionary theories of aging and mortality, implicitly based on mean-field assumptions, hold that programed mortality is untenable, as it opposes direct individual benefit. We show that in spatial models with local reproduction, programed deaths instead robustly result in long-term benefit to a lineage, by reducing local environmental resource depletion via spatiotemporal patterns causing feedback over many generations. Results are robust to model variations, implying that direct selection for shorter life span may be quite widespread in nature.

  5. Properties of the vacuum in models for QCD. Holography vs. resummed field theory. A comparative study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zayakin, Andrey V.

    2011-01-17

    This Thesis is dedicated to a comparison of the two means of studying the electromagnetic properties of the QCD vacuum - holography and resummed field theory. I compare two classes of distinct models for the dynamics of the condensates. The first class consists of the so-called holographic models of QCD. Based upon the Maldacena conjecture, it tries to establish the properties of QCD correlation functions from the behavior of classical solutions of field equations in a higher-dimensional theory. Yet in many aspects the holographic approach has been found to be in an excellent agreement with data. These successes are the prediction of the very small viscosity-to-entropy ratio and the predictions of meson spectra up to 5% accuracy in several models. On the other hand, the resummation methods in field theory have not been discarded so far. Both classes of methods have access to condensates. Thus a comprehensive study of condensates becomes possible, in which I compare my calculations in holography and resummed field theory with each other, as well as with lattice results, field theory and experiment. I prove that the low-energy theorems of QCD keep their validity in holographic models with a gluon condensate in a non-trivial way. I also show that the so-called decoupling relation holds in holography models with chiral and gluon condensates, whereas this relation fails in the Dyson-Schwinger approach. On the contrary, my results on the chiral magnetic effect in holography disagree with the weak-field prediction; the chiral magnetic effect (that is, the electric current generation in a magnetic field) is three times less than the current in the weakly-coupled QCD. The chiral condensate behavior is found to be quadratic in external field both in the Dyson-Schwinger approach and in holography, yet we know that in the exact limit the condensate must be linear, thus both classes of models are concluded to be deficient for establishing the correct condensate behaviour in the

  6. Properties of the vacuum in models for QCD. Holography vs. resummed field theory. A comparative study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zayakin, Andrey V.

    2011-01-01

    This Thesis is dedicated to a comparison of the two means of studying the electromagnetic properties of the QCD vacuum - holography and resummed field theory. I compare two classes of distinct models for the dynamics of the condensates. The first class consists of the so-called holographic models of QCD. Based upon the Maldacena conjecture, it tries to establish the properties of QCD correlation functions from the behavior of classical solutions of field equations in a higher-dimensional theory. Yet in many aspects the holographic approach has been found to be in an excellent agreement with data. These successes are the prediction of the very small viscosity-to-entropy ratio and the predictions of meson spectra up to 5% accuracy in several models. On the other hand, the resummation methods in field theory have not been discarded so far. Both classes of methods have access to condensates. Thus a comprehensive study of condensates becomes possible, in which I compare my calculations in holography and resummed field theory with each other, as well as with lattice results, field theory and experiment. I prove that the low-energy theorems of QCD keep their validity in holographic models with a gluon condensate in a non-trivial way. I also show that the so-called decoupling relation holds in holography models with chiral and gluon condensates, whereas this relation fails in the Dyson-Schwinger approach. On the contrary, my results on the chiral magnetic effect in holography disagree with the weak-field prediction; the chiral magnetic effect (that is, the electric current generation in a magnetic field) is three times less than the current in the weakly-coupled QCD. The chiral condensate behavior is found to be quadratic in external field both in the Dyson-Schwinger approach and in holography, yet we know that in the exact limit the condensate must be linear, thus both classes of models are concluded to be deficient for establishing the correct condensate behaviour in the

  7. DISSECTING GALAXY FORMATION. II. COMPARING SUBSTRUCTURE IN PURE DARK MATTER AND BARYONIC MODELS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Shlosman, Isaac; Heller, Clayton; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2010-01-01

    We compare the substructure evolution in pure dark matter (DM) halos with those in the presence of baryons, hereafter PDM and BDM models, respectively. The prime halos have been analyzed in the previous work. Models have been evolved from identical initial conditions which have been constructed by means of the constrained realization method. The BDM model includes star formation and feedback from stellar evolution onto the gas. A comprehensive catalog of subhalo populations has been compiled and individual and statistical properties of subhalos analyzed, including their orbital differences. We find that subhalo population mass functions in PDM and BDM are consistent with a single power law, M α sbh , for each of the models in the mass range of ∼2 x 10 8 M sun -2 x 10 11 M sun . However, we detect a nonnegligible shift between these functions, the time-averaged α ∼ -0.86 for the PDM and -0.98 for the BDM models. Overall, α appears to be a nearly constant in time, with variations of ±15%. Second, we find that the radial mass distribution of subhalo populations can be approximated by a power law, R γ sbh with a steepening that occurs at the radius of a maximal circular velocity, R vmax , in the prime halos. Here we find that γ sbh ∼ -1.5 for the PDM and -1 for the BDM models, when averaged over time inside R vmax . The slope is steeper outside this region and approaches -3. We detect little spatial bias (less than 10%) between the subhalo populations and the DM distribution of the main halos. Also, the subhalo population exhibits much less triaxiality in the presence of baryons, in tandem with the shape of the prime halo. Finally, we find that, counter-intuitively, the BDM population is depleted at a faster rate than the PDM one within the central 30 kpc of the prime halo. The reason for this is that although the baryons provide a substantial glue to the subhalos, the main halo exhibits the same trend. This assures a more efficient tidal disruption of the

  8. Spatial heterogeneity in human activities favors the persistence of wolves in agroecosystems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mohsen; López-Bao, José Vicente; Kaboli, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    As human populations expand, there is increasing demand and pressure for land. Under this scenario, behavioural flexibility and adaptation become important processes leading to the persistence of large carnivores in human-dominated landscapes such as agroecosystems. A growing interest has recently emerged on the outcome of the coexistence between wolves and humans in these systems. It has been suggested that spatial heterogeneity in human activities would be a major environmental factor modulating vulnerability and persistence of this contentious species in agroecosystems. Here, we combined information from 35 den sites detected between 2011 and 2012 in agroecosystems of western Iran (Hamedan province), a set of environmental variables measured at landscape and fine spatial scales, and generalized linear models to identify patterns of den site selection by wolves in a highly-modified agroecosystem. On a landscape level, wolves selected a mixture of rangelands with scattered dry-farms on hillsides (showing a low human use) to locate their dens, avoiding areas with high densities of settlements and primary roads. On a fine spatial scale, wolves primarily excavated dens into the sides of elevated steep-slope hills with availability of water bodies in the vicinity of den sites, and wolves were relegated to dig in places with coarse-soil particles. Our results suggest that vulnerability of wolves in human-dominated landscapes could be compensated by the existence of spatial heterogeneity in human activities. Such heterogeneity would favor wolf persistence in agroecosystems favoring a land sharing model of coexistence between wolves and people.

  9. Resource allocation in offspring provisioning: an evaluation of the conditions favoring the evolution of matrotrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trexler, Joel C; DeAngelis, Donald L

    2003-11-01

    We used analytic and simulation models to determine the ecological conditions favoring evolution of a matrotrophic fish from a lecithotrophic ancestor given a complex set of trade-offs. Matrotrophy is the nourishment of viviparous embryos by resources provided between fertilization and parturition, while lecithotrophy describes embryo nourishment provided before fertilization. In fishes and reptiles, embryo nourishment encompasses a continuum from solely lecithotrophic to primarily matrotrophic. Matrotrophy has evolved independently from lecithotrophic ancestors many times in many groups. We assumed matrotrophy increased the number of offspring a viviparous female could gestate and evaluated conditions of food availability favoring lecithotrophy or matrotrophy. The matrotrophic strategy was superior when food resources exceeded demand during gestation but at a risk of overproduction and reproductive failure if food intake was limited. Matrotrophic females were leaner during gestation than lecithotrophic females, yielding shorter life spans. Our models suggest that matrotrophic embryo nourishment evolved in environments with high food availability, consistently exceeding energy requirements for maintaining relatively large broods. Embryo abortion with some resorption of invested energy is a necessary preadaptation to the evolution of matrotrophy. Future work should explore trade-offs of age-specific mortality and reproductive output for females maintaining different levels of fat storage during gestation.

  10. Criteria for uranium occurrences in Saskatchewan and Australia as guides to favorability for similar deposits in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalliokoski, J.; Langford, F.F.; Ojakangas, R.W.

    1978-07-01

    The objective of this study was to explain the occurrence of the large uranium deposits that have been found in northern Saskatchewan and the Northern Territory of Australia, to provide criteria to evaluate the favorability of Proterozoic rocks in the United States for similar deposits. All of these deposits belong to the class known as the Proterozoic unconformity-type pitchblende deposits. Chapters are devoted to: uranium deposits in Saskatchewan; uranium deposits of the Darwin and Arnhem Land area, Northern Territory of Australia; model for the Proterozoic unconformity-type pitchblende deposits; and evaluation of the geology of selected states for its favorability for Proterozoic unconformity-type pitchblende deposits

  11. Comparative modeling analyses of Cs-137 fate in the rivers impacted by Chernobyl and Fukushima accidents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheleznyak, M.; Kivva, S. [Institute of Environmental Radioactivity, Fukushima University (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    The consequences of two largest nuclear accidents of the last decades - at Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant (ChNPP) (1986) and at Fukushima Daiichi NPP (FDNPP) (2011) clearly demonstrated that radioactive contamination of water bodies in vicinity of NPP and on the waterways from it, e.g., river- reservoir water after Chernobyl accident and rivers and coastal marine waters after Fukushima accident, in the both cases have been one of the main sources of the public concerns on the accident consequences. The higher weight of water contamination in public perception of the accidents consequences in comparison with the real fraction of doses via aquatic pathways in comparison with other dose components is a specificity of public perception of environmental contamination. This psychological phenomenon that was confirmed after these accidents provides supplementary arguments that the reliable simulation and prediction of the radionuclide dynamics in water and sediments is important part of the post-accidental radioecological research. The purpose of the research is to use the experience of the modeling activities f conducted for the past more than 25 years within the Chernobyl affected Pripyat River and Dnieper River watershed as also data of the new monitoring studies in Japan of Abukuma River (largest in the region - the watershed area is 5400 km{sup 2}), Kuchibuto River, Uta River, Niita River, Natsui River, Same River, as also of the studies on the specific of the 'water-sediment' {sup 137}Cs exchanges in this area to refine the 1-D model RIVTOX and 2-D model COASTOX for the increasing of the predictive power of the modeling technologies. The results of the modeling studies are applied for more accurate prediction of water/sediment radionuclide contamination of rivers and reservoirs in the Fukushima Prefecture and for the comparative analyses of the efficiency of the of the post -accidental measures to diminish the contamination of the water bodies. Document

  12. Tumor affinity of radiolabeled peanut agglutinin compared with that of Ga-67 citrate in animal models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, K.; Aburano, T.; Watanabe, N.; Kawabata, S.; Ishida, H.; Mukai, K.; Tonami, N.; Hisada, K.

    1985-01-01

    Peanut agglutinin (PNA) binds avidly to the immunodominant group of the tumor associated T antigen. The purpose of this study was to evaluate oncodiagnostic potential of radiolabeled PNA in animal models. PNA was labeled with I-125 or I-131 by Iodogen and also with In-111 by cyclic DTPA anhydride. The biological activity of PNA was examined by a hemaglutination titer with a photometer before and after labeling. Animal tumor models used were Lewis Lung Cancer(LLC), B-16 Melanotic Melanoma(MM), Yoshida Sarcoma(YS), Ehrlich Ascites Tumor(EAT and Hepatoma AH109A(HAH). Inflammatory tissue induced by turpentine oil was used as an abscess model. Serial scintigraphic images were obtained following IV injections of 100 μCi of I-131 or In-111-DTPA-PNA. The tumor affinity of Ga-67 citrate was studied to compare that of radiolabeled PNA. Tissue biodistribution was studied in EAT bearing mice. All of these tumor models except HAH were clearly visible by radiolabeled PNA without subtraction techniques. In the models of LLC and EAT, PNA showed the better accumulation into the tumor tissue than Ga-67 citrate. In YS and MM, PNA represented almost the same accumulation as Ga-67 citrate. The localization of PNA into abscess tissue wasn't found although Ga-67 citrate markedly accumulated into abscess tissue as well as tumor tissue. The clearance of PNA from tumor was slower than those from any other organs. Tumor to muscle ratio was 5.1 at 48hrs. and tumor to blood ratio increased with time to 2.3 at 96hrs. These results suggested that radiolabeled PNA may have a potential in the detection of tumor

  13. Prediction of favorable outcome by percent improvement in patients with acute ischemic stroke treated with endovascular stent thrombectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yuezhou; Wang, Shuiping; Sun, Wen; Dai, Qiliang; Li, Wei; Cai, Jin; Fan, Xinying; Zhu, Wusheng; Xiong, Yunyun; Han, Yunfei; Zi, Wenjie; Yang, Shiquan; Chen, Jia; Liu, Xinfeng

    2017-04-01

    Our objective was to investigate a method for assessing early improvement and its predictive value for 3-month functional outcome in patients treated with EST. A total of 97 consecutive AIS patients undergoing EST were prospectively collected and retrospective reviewed. Data on demographics, vascular risk factors, admission National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale (NIHSS) score, 24-h NIHSS score, reperfusion and collateral formation were collected. Percent improvement was defined as ([baseline NIHSS score-24-h NIHSS score]/baseline NIHSS score×100%), while absolute improvement was calculated by the difference between scores (baseline NIHSS score-24-h NIHSS score). A 3-month functional outcome was assessed using the modified Rankin Scale (mRS). Favorable outcome was defined as a mRS score of 0-2. Areas under the receiver-operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUC) for percent improvement and absolute improvement in predicting favorable outcome was compared. Finally, we investigated the independent predictors of improvement at 24h after EST and its relationship with favorable outcome. Pairwise comparison of ROC curves revealed that percent improvement had larger AUC than absolute improvement (p=0.004). Rapid neurological improvement (RNI), defined as percent improvement ⩾30%, was a powerful predictor of favorable outcome (odds ratio [OR] 7.63, confidence interval [CI]: 2.65-21.96; pRNI. RNI predicted 3-month favorable outcome in AIS patients treated with EST. Good collaterals and short ORT are independent predictors of RNI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Self-Directed Learning Favors Local, Rather Than Global, Uncertainty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markant, Douglas B; Settles, Burr; Gureckis, Todd M

    2016-01-01

    Collecting (or "sampling") information that one expects to be useful is a powerful way to facilitate learning. However, relatively little is known about how people decide which information is worth sampling over the course of learning. We describe several alternative models of how people might decide to collect a piece of information inspired by "active learning" research in machine learning. We additionally provide a theoretical analysis demonstrating the situations under which these models are empirically distinguishable, and we report a novel empirical study that exploits these insights. Our model-based analysis of participants' information gathering decisions reveals that people prefer to select items which resolve uncertainty between two possibilities at a time rather than items that have high uncertainty across all relevant possibilities simultaneously. Rather than adhering to strictly normative or confirmatory conceptions of information search, people appear to prefer a "local" sampling strategy, which may reflect cognitive constraints on the process of information gathering. Copyright © 2015 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  15. Comparative and Evolutionary Analysis of Grass Pollen Allergens Using Brachypodium distachyon as a Model System.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akanksha Sharma

    Full Text Available Comparative genomics have facilitated the mining of biological information from a genome sequence, through the detection of similarities and differences with genomes of closely or more distantly related species. By using such comparative approaches, knowledge can be transferred from the model to non-model organisms and insights can be gained in the structural and evolutionary patterns of specific genes. In the absence of sequenced genomes for allergenic grasses, this study was aimed at understanding the structure, organisation and expression profiles of grass pollen allergens using the genomic data from Brachypodium distachyon as it is phylogenetically related to the allergenic grasses. Combining genomic data with the anther RNA-Seq dataset revealed 24 pollen allergen genes belonging to eight allergen groups mapping on the five chromosomes in B. distachyon. High levels of anther-specific expression profiles were observed for the 24 identified putative allergen-encoding genes in Brachypodium. The genomic evidence suggests that gene encoding the group 5 allergen, the most potent trigger of hay fever and allergic asthma originated as a pollen specific orphan gene in a common grass ancestor of Brachypodium and Triticiae clades. Gene structure analysis showed that the putative allergen-encoding genes in Brachypodium either lack or contain reduced number of introns. Promoter analysis of the identified Brachypodium genes revealed the presence of specific cis-regulatory sequences likely responsible for high anther/pollen-specific expression. With the identification of putative allergen-encoding genes in Brachypodium, this study has also described some important plant gene families (e.g. expansin superfamily, EF-Hand family, profilins etc for the first time in the model plant Brachypodium. Altogether, the present study provides new insights into structural characterization and evolution of pollen allergens and will further serve as a base for their

  16. Comparative efficacy of two daily use mouthrinses: randomized clinical trial using an experimental gingivitis model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christine Ann Charles

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Two antimicrobial agents, a fixed combination of essential oils (EOs and 0.07% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC are found in commercially available mouthrinses, Listerine® Antiseptic and Crest® Pro HealthTM, respectively. Both mouthrinses have been shown to control dental plaque and gingivitis in short and longer term studies. The aim of this study was to determine the comparative effectiveness of these two mouthrinses using a 2-week experimental gingivitis model. Qualified subjects were randomly assigned to one of three mouthrinse groups: a fixed combination of EOs, 0.07% CPC, or negative control (C rinse. Following baseline clinical assessments and a dental prophylaxis, subjects began a two-week period in which they rinsed twice daily with their assigned rinse and abstained from any mechanical oral hygiene procedures or other oral care products. Subjects were reassessed at the end of the two-week period. One hundred and forty-seven subjects were randomized and 142 completed this study. After two weeks use, the EOs rinse was superior (p < 0.011 to the CPC rinse in inhibiting the development of gingivitis, plaque, and bleeding, with 9.4% and 6.6% reductions compared to CPC for gingivitis and plaque, respectively. Both rinses were superior to the negative control rinse (p < 0.001. This study demonstrates that the essential oil-containing mouthrinse has superior antiplaque/antigingivitis effectiveness compared to the 0.07% CPC-containing mouthrinse without mechanical oral hygiene influence.

  17. Transcriptomic immunologic signature associated with favorable clinical outcome in basal-like breast tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Martínez-Canales

    Full Text Available Most patients with early stage triple negative breast cancer (TNBC receive adjuvant chemotherapy. Activation of the immune system is associated with tumor response and may help identify TNBC with favorable outcome.Gene expression data were obtained from the GEO Dataset GDS2250/GSE3744. Affymetrix CEL files were downloaded and analyzed with Affymetrix Transcriptome Analysis Console 3.0. Functional genomics was implemented with David Bioinformatics Resources 6.8. Data contained at Oncomine were used to identify genes upregulated in basal-like cancer compared to normal breast tissue. Data contained at cBioportal were used to assess for molecular alterations. The KMPlotter online tool, METABRIC and GSE25066 datasets were used to associate gene signatures with clinical outcome.1564 upregulated genes were identified as differentially expressed between normal and basal-like tumors. Of these, 16 genes associated with immune function were linked with clinical outcome. HLA-C, HLA-F, HLA-G and TIGIT were associated with both improved relapse-free survival (RFS and overall survival (OS. The combination of HLA-F/TIGIT and HLA-C/HLA-F/TIGIT showed the most favorable outcome (HR for RFS 0.44, p<0.001; HR for OS 0.22, p<0.001; and HR for RFS 0.46, p<0.001; HR for OS 0.15, p<0.001; respectively. The association of HLA-C/HLA-F with outcome was confirmed using the METABRIC and GSE25066 datasets. No copy number alterations of these genes were identified.We describe a gene signature associated with immune function and favorable outcome in basal-like breast cancer. Incorporation of this signature in prospective studies may help to stratify risk of early stage TNBC.

  18. Compare pilot-scale and industry-scale models of pulverized coal combustion in an ironmaking blast furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yansong; Yu, Aibing; Zulli, Paul

    2013-07-01

    In order to understand the complex phenomena of pulverized coal injection (PCI) process in blast furnace (BF), mathematical models have been developed at different scales: pilot-scale model of coal combustion and industry-scale model (in-furnace model) of coal/coke combustion in a real BF respectively. This paper compares these PCI models in aspects of model developments and model capability. The model development is discussed in terms of model formulation, their new features and geometry/regions considered. The model capability is then discussed in terms of main findings followed by the model evaluation on their advantages and limitations. It is indicated that these PCI models are all able to describe PCI operation qualitatively. The in-furnace model is more reliable for simulating in-furnace phenomena of PCI operation qualitatively and quantitatively. These models are useful for understanding the flow-thermo-chemical behaviors and then optimizing the PCI operation in practice.

  19. COMPARATIVE MODELLING AND LIGAND BINDING SITE PREDICTION OF A FAMILY 43 GLYCOSIDE HYDROLASE FROM Clostridium thermocellum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadab Ahmed

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The phylogenetic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum family 43 glycoside hydrolase (CtGH43 showed close evolutionary relation with carbohydrate binding family 6 proteins from C. cellulolyticum, C. papyrosolvens, C. cellulyticum, and A. cellulyticum. Comparative modeling of CtGH43 was performed based on crystal structures with PDB IDs 3C7F, 1YIF, 1YRZ, 2EXH and 1WL7. The structure having lowest MODELLER objective function was selected. The three-dimensional structure revealed typical 5-fold beta–propeller architecture. Energy minimization and validation of predicted model with VERIFY 3D indicated acceptability of the proposed atomic structure. The Ramachandran plot analysis by RAMPAGE confirmed that family 43 glycoside hydrolase (CtGH43 contains little or negligible segments of helices. It also showed that out of 301 residues, 267 (89.3% were in most favoured region, 23 (7.7% were in allowed region and 9 (3.0% were in outlier region. IUPred analysis of CtGH43 showed no disordered region. Active site analysis showed presence of two Asp and one Glu, assumed to form a catalytic triad. This study gives us information about three-dimensional structure and reaffirms the fact that it has the similar core 5-fold beta–propeller architecture and so probably has the same inverting mechanism of action with the formation of above mentioned catalytic triad for catalysis of polysaccharides.

  20. Comparing Models GRM, Refraction Tomography and Neural Network to Analyze Shallow Landslide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstrong F. Sompotan

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Detailed investigations of landslides are essential to understand fundamental landslide mechanisms. Seismic refraction method has been proven as a useful geophysical tool for investigating shallow landslides. The objective of this study is to introduce a new workflow using neural network in analyzing seismic refraction data and to compare the result with some methods; that are general reciprocal method (GRM and refraction tomography. The GRM is effective when the velocity structure is relatively simple and refractors are gently dipping. Refraction tomography is capable of modeling the complex velocity structures of landslides. Neural network is found to be more potential in application especially in time consuming and complicated numerical methods. Neural network seem to have the ability to establish a relationship between an input and output space for mapping seismic velocity. Therefore, we made a preliminary attempt to evaluate the applicability of neural network to determine velocity and elevation of subsurface synthetic models corresponding to arrival times. The training and testing process of the neural network is successfully accomplished using the synthetic data. Furthermore, we evaluated the neural network using observed data. The result of the evaluation indicates that the neural network can compute velocity and elevation corresponding to arrival times. The similarity of those models shows the success of neural network as a new alternative in seismic refraction data interpretation.

  1. Comparing Dynamic Treatment Regimes Using Repeated-Measures Outcomes: Modeling Considerations in SMART Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xi; Nahum-Shani, Inbal; Kasari, Connie; Lynch, Kevin G.; Oslin, David W.; Pelham, William E.; Fabiano, Gregory; Almirall, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    A dynamic treatment regime (DTR) is a sequence of decision rules, each of which recommends a treatment based on a patient’s past and current health status. Sequential, multiple assignment, randomized trials (SMARTs) are multi-stage trial designs that yield data specifically for building effective DTRs. Modeling the marginal mean trajectories of a repeated-measures outcome arising from a SMART presents challenges, because traditional longitudinal models used for randomized clinical trials do not take into account the unique design features of SMART. We discuss modeling considerations for various forms of SMART designs, emphasizing the importance of considering the timing of repeated measures in relation to the treatment stages in a SMART. For illustration, we use data from three SMART case studies with increasing level of complexity, in autism, child attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), and adult alcoholism. In all three SMARTs we illustrate how to accommodate the design features along with the timing of the repeated measures when comparing DTRs based on mean trajectories of the repeated-measures outcome. PMID:26638988

  2. Comparative analysis of different methods in mathematical modelling of the recuperative heat exchangers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debeljkovic, D.Lj.; Stevic, D.Z.; Simeunovic, G.V.; Misic, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    The heat exchangers are frequently used as constructive elements in various plants and their dynamics is very important. Their operation is usually controlled by manipulating inlet fluid temperatures or mass flow rates. On the basis of the accepted and critically clarified assumptions, a linearized mathematical model of the cross-flow heat exchanger has been derived, taking into account the wall dynamics. The model is based on the fundamental law of energy conservation, covers all heat accumulation storages in the process, and leads to the set of partial differential equations (PDE), which solution is not possible in closed form. In order to overcome the solutions difficulties in this paper are analyzed different methods for modeling the heat exchanger: approach based on Laplace transformation, approximation of partial differential equations based on finite differences, the method of physical discretization and the transport approach. Specifying the input temperatures and output variables, under the constant initial conditions, the step transient responses have been simulated and presented in graphic form in order to compare these results for the four characteristic methods considered in this paper, and analyze its practical significance. (author)

  3. Comparative modeling of exposure to airborne nanoparticles released by consumer spray products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riebeling, Christian; Luch, Andreas; Götz, Mario Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Consumer exposure to sprays containing nano-objects is a continuing concern as a potential health hazard. One potential hazard has been formulated in the overload hypothesis. It describes a volume fraction of the macrophages that is occupied by deposited nanoparticles that leads to reduced macrophage mobility. Subsequent chronic inflammation may then lead to severe health consequences including cancer. To calculate lung deposition of spherical particles, the Multiple-Path Particle Dosimetry (MPPD) model (ARA, Albuquerque, NM) provides different kinds of lung models and age settings. Using the MPPD v 2.11 software, we modeled several consumer-related exposure scenarios. Different body orientations and age groups were investigated. Moreover, a number of materials representing different densities were used, and the exposure calculated using MPPD is compared to the hazard derived from the overload hypothesis. Conditions leading to macrophage overload were found for exposures to high particle doses for prolonged times and repeated exposure. Such conditions are unlikely in the context of regular consumer exposure. The overload hypothesis assumes the particles to be inert and biopersistent, a condition that currently lacks a clear regulatory definition and is valid only for a few selected materials. Furthermore, because of material-specific effects and the possibility of surface adsorption of hazardous chemicals, nano-objects in propellant sprays remain of concern for consumer health.

  4. A comparative behavioural study of mechanical hypersensitivity in 2 pain models in rats and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitz, Marie-Céline; Hrncic, Dragan; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Caspani, Ombretta

    2016-06-01

    The assessment of pain sensitivity in humans has been standardized using quantitative sensory testing, whereas in animals mostly paw withdrawal thresholds to diverse stimuli are measured. This study directly compares tests used in quantitative sensory testing (pinpricks, pressure algometer) with tests used in animal studies (electronic von Frey test: evF), which we applied to the dorsal hind limbs of humans after high frequency stimulation and rats after tibial nerve transection. Both experimental models induce profound mechanical hypersensitivity. At baseline, humans and rats showed a similar sensitivity to evF with 0.2 mm diameter tips, but significant differences for other test stimuli (all P pain models (P pain sensitivity, but probe size and shape should be standardized. Hypersensitivity to blunt pressure-the leading positive sensory sign after peripheral nerve injury in humans-is a novel finding in the tibial nerve transection model. By testing outside the primary zone of nerve damage (rat) or activation (humans), our methods likely involve effects of central sensitization in both species.

  5. Comparing Reasons for Quitting Substance Abuse with the Constructs of Behavioral Models: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamid Tavakoli Ghouchani

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: The world population has reached over seven billion people. Of these, 230 million individuals abuse substances. Therefore, substance abuse prevention and treatment programs have received increasing attention during the past two decades. Understanding people’s motivations for quitting drug abuse is essential to the success of treatment. This study hence sought to identify major motivations for quitting and to compare them with the constructs of health education models. Materials and Methods: In the present study, qualitative content analysis was used to determine the main motivations for quitting substance abuse. Overall, 22 patients, physicians, and psychotherapists were selected from several addiction treatment clinics in Bojnord (Iran during 2014. Purposeful sampling method was applied and continued until data saturation was achieved. Data were collected through semi-structured, face-to-face interviews and field notes. All interviews were recorded and transcribed. Results: Content analysis revealed 33 sub-categories and nine categories including economic problems, drug-related concerns, individual problems, family and social problems, family expectations, attention to social status, beliefs about drug addiction, and valuing the quitting behavior. Accordingly, four themes, i.e. perceived threat, perceived barriers, attitude toward the behavior, and subjective norms, were extracted. Conclusion: Reasons for quitting substance abuse match the constructs of different behavioral models (e.g. the health belief model and the theory of planned behavior.

  6. Comparing smoothing techniques in Cox models for exposure-response relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindarajulu, Usha S; Spiegelman, Donna; Thurston, Sally W; Ganguli, Bhaswati; Eisen, Ellen A

    2007-09-10

    To allow for non-linear exposure-response relationships, we applied flexible non-parametric smoothing techniques to models of time to lung cancer mortality in two occupational cohorts with skewed exposure distributions. We focused on three different smoothing techniques in Cox models: penalized splines, restricted cubic splines, and fractional polynomials. We compared standard software implementations of these three methods based on their visual representation and criterion for model selection. We propose a measure of the difference between a pair of curves based on the area between them, standardized by the average of the areas under the pair of curves. To capture the variation in the difference over the range of exposure, the area between curves was also calculated at percentiles of exposure and expressed as a percentage of the total difference. The dose-response curves from the three methods were similar in both studies over the denser portion of the exposure range, with the difference between curves up to the 50th percentile less than 1 per cent of the total difference. A comparison of inverse variance weighted areas applied to the data set with a more skewed exposure distribution allowed us to estimate area differences with more precision by reducing the proportion attributed to the upper 1 per cent tail region. Overall, the penalized spline and the restricted cubic spline were closer to each other than either was to the fractional polynomial. (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. An Evaluation of Turkish Teacher Education System Compared to Other Models in Different Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tayyip DUMAN

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Teachers and their education, as the most important elements in educational systems, have been one of the mostly debated issues in Turkish national education system. The success of an education system largely depends on the quality of the teachers who plan and practice teaching and learning process. Reviewing Turkish educational history with a well-established tradition of education reveals a rich experience in teacher training within this tradition. The main objective of this study is to examine teacher training policies and practices from 1848 to these days in Turkey, and to compare the Turkish teacher training system to the current teacher training models applied in different countries. This survey research has been conducted based on the literature review. Not yet completed, some of its recent results obtained are as follows: Teachers in Turkey were regarded as the main agent of educational innovation, and teacher education was discussed as an issue within educational reform. Turkey, to the present day from 1848, the date when first teacher training institution was founded in the country, during the Republican era in particular, had many teacher training institutions and practiced many different training models considering the socio-economic, cultural and political conditions. In spite of some similarities to other models in different countries, Turkish teacher training system shows originality and richness in terms of its features

  8. Self-directed Learning Favors Local, Rather than Global, Uncertainty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markant, Douglas B.; Settles, Burr; Gureckis, Todd M.

    2016-01-01

    Collecting (or "sampling") information that one expects to be useful is a powerful way to facilitate learning. However, relatively little is known about how people decide which information is worth sampling over the course of learning. We describe several alternative models of how people might decide to collect a piece of information…

  9. Precise regulation of gene expression dynamics favors complex promoter architectures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dirk Müller

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Promoters process signals through recruitment of transcription factors and RNA polymerase, and dynamic changes in promoter activity constitute a major noise source in gene expression. However, it is barely understood how complex promoter architectures determine key features of promoter dynamics. Here, we employ prototypical promoters of yeast ribosomal protein genes as well as simplified versions thereof to analyze the relations among promoter design, complexity, and function. These promoters combine the action of a general regulatory factor with that of specific transcription factors, a common motif of many eukaryotic promoters. By comprehensively analyzing stationary and dynamic promoter properties, this model-based approach enables us to pinpoint the structural characteristics underlying the observed behavior. Functional tradeoffs impose constraints on the promoter architecture of ribosomal protein genes. We find that a stable scaffold in the natural design results in low transcriptional noise and strong co-regulation of target genes in the presence of gene silencing. This configuration also exhibits superior shut-off properties, and it can serve as a tunable switch in living cells. Model validation with independent experimental data suggests that the models are sufficiently realistic. When combined, our results offer a mechanistic explanation for why specific factors are associated with low protein noise in vivo. Many of these findings hold for a broad range of model parameters and likely apply to other eukaryotic promoters of similar structure.

  10. Dynamics of osseointegration in various human and animal models - a comparative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botticelli, Daniele; Lang, Niklaus P

    2017-06-01

    To investigate the sequential events of osseointegration in various model situations. A series of eight recent sequential studies on the early phases of osseointegration performed in various species analyzing new bone apposition and parent bone resorption at the implant surfaces have been studied. One human, six dog and one rabbit studies were analyzed for old and new bone percentages, assessed at least at 4 periods of the early osseointegration. Data on new and old parent bone in contact with the implant surfaces were collected. The interception point of the two proportions of new and old bone was calculated in terms of osseointegration (y; %) and period of the interceptions (x; days). It has been shown that the interception point of old and new bone proportions was strongly influenced by the choice of the model adopted (human, dog, rabbit), by the density of the surrounding bone (cortical, spongy, trabecular) and by the implant geometry. Implant surface configuration, time of implantation and load influenced the interception point to a lesser degree. The fastest rate of osseointegration was observed in the rabbit model followed by the dog model. The slowest osseointegration rate was seen in humans. Osseointegration was documented best in spongiosa bone when compared to cortical bone. The moderately rough surfaces gave rise to faster osseointegration than did the turned implant surfaces. The interception points may provide information on efficacy of early osseointegration. The slope of the line (m) is related to the efficacy of bone appositions. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. The Pollution Effect: Optimizing Keyword Auctions by Favoring Relevant Advertising

    OpenAIRE

    Linden, Greg; Meek, Christopher; Chickering, Max

    2011-01-01

    Most search engines sell slots to place advertisements on the search results page through keyword auctions. Advertisers offer bids for how much they are willing to pay when someone enters a search query, sees the search results, and then clicks on one of their ads. Search engines typically order the advertisements for a query by a combination of the bids and expected clickthrough rates for each advertisement. In this paper, we extend a model of Yahoo's and Google's advertising auctions to inc...

  12. Comparing in Cylinder Pressure Modelling of a DI Diesel Engine Fuelled on Alternative Fuel Using Two Tabulated Chemistry Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngayihi Abbe, Claude Valery; Nzengwa, Robert; Danwe, Raidandi

    2014-01-01

    The present work presents the comparative simulation of a diesel engine fuelled on diesel fuel and biodiesel fuel. Two models, based on tabulated chemistry, were implemented for the simulation purpose and results were compared with experimental data obtained from a single cylinder diesel engine. The first model is a single zone model based on the Krieger and Bormann combustion model while the second model is a two-zone model based on Olikara and Bormann combustion model. It was shown that both models can predict well the engine's in-cylinder pressure as well as its overall performances. The second model showed a better accuracy than the first, while the first model was easier to implement and faster to compute. It was found that the first method was better suited for real time engine control and monitoring while the second one was better suited for engine design and emission prediction.

  13. Changes in catchment hydrology in relation to vegetation recovery: a comparative modelling experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana-Renault, Noemí; Karssenberg, Derek; Latron, Jérôme; Serrano, Mā Pilar; Regüés, David; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2010-05-01

    Mediterranean mountains have been largely affected by land abandonment and subsequent vegetation recovery, with a general expansion of shrubs and forests. Such a large scale land-cover change has modified the hydrological behavior of these areas, with significant impact on runoff production. Forecasting the trend of water resources under future re-vegetation scenarios is of paramount importance in Mediterranean basins, where water management relies on runoff generated in these areas. With this purpose, a modelling experiment was designed based on the information collected in two neighbouring research catchments with a different history of land use in the central Spanish Pyrenees. One (2.84 km2) is an abandoned agricultural catchment subjected to plant colonization and at present mainly covered by shrubs. The other (0.92 km2) is a catchment covered by dense natural forest, representative of undisturbed environments. Here we present the results of the analysis of the hydrological differences between the two catchments, and a description of the approach and results of the modelling experiment. In a statistical analysis of the field data, significant differences were observed in the streamflow response of the two catchments. The forested catchment recorded fewer floods per year compared to the old agricultural catchment, and its hydrological response was characterised by a marked seasonality, with autumn and spring as the only high flow periods. Stormflow was generally higher in the old agricultural catchment, especially for low to intermediate size events; only for large events the stormflow in the forested catchment was sometimes greater. Under drier conditions, the relative differences in the stormflow between the two catchments tended to increase whereas under wet conditions they tended to be similar. The forested catchment always reacted more slowly to rainfall, with lower peakflows (generally one order of magnitude lower) and longer recession limbs. The modelling

  14. Comparative analysis of economic models in selected solar energy computer programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. W.; Barnes, K. A.

    1982-01-01

    The economic evaluation models in five computer programs widely used for analyzing solar energy systems (F-CHART 3.0, F-CHART 4.0, SOLCOST, BLAST, and DOE-2) are compared. Differences in analysis techniques and assumptions among the programs are assessed from the point of view of consistency with the Federal requirements for life cycle costing (10 CFR Part 436), effect on predicted economic performance, and optimal system size, case of use, and general applicability to diverse systems types and building types. The FEDSOL program developed by the National Bureau of Standards specifically to meet the Federal life cycle cost requirements serves as a basis for the comparison. Results of the study are illustrated in test cases of two different types of Federally owned buildings: a single family residence and a low rise office building.

  15. Modeling and comparative study of linear and nonlinear controllers for rotary inverted pendulum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Byron; Cajo, Ricardo; Huilcapi, Víctor; Agila, Wilton

    2017-01-01

    The rotary inverted pendulum (RIP) is a problem difficult to control, several studies have been conducted where different control techniques have been applied. Literature reports that, although problem is nonlinear, classical PID controllers presents appropriate performances when applied to the system. In this paper, a comparative study of the performances of linear and nonlinear PID structures is carried out. The control algorithms are evaluated in the RIP system, using indices of performance and power consumption, which allow the categorization of control strategies according to their performance. This article also presents the modeling system, which has been estimated some of the parameters involved in the RIP system, using computer-aided design tools (CAD) and experimental methods or techniques proposed by several authors attended. The results indicate a better performance of the nonlinear controller with an increase in the robustness and faster response than the linear controller.

  16. Molecular modeling studies of structural properties of polyvinyl alcohol: a comparative study using INTERFACE force field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radosinski, Lukasz; Labus, Karolina

    2017-10-05

    Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) is a material with a variety of applications in separation, biotechnology, and biomedicine. Using combined Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques, we present an extensive comparative study of second- and third-generation force fields Universal, COMPASS, COMPASS II, PCFF, and the newly developed INTERFACE, as applied to this system. In particular, we show that an INTERFACE force field provides a possibility of composing a reliable atomistic model to reproduce density change of PVA matrix in a narrow temperature range (298-348 K) and calculate a thermal expansion coefficient with reasonable accuracy. Thus, the INTERFACE force field may be used to predict mechanical properties of the PVA system, being a scaffold for hydrogels, with much greater accuracy than latter approaches. Graphical abstract Molecular Dynamics and Monte Carlo studies indicate that it is possible to predict properties of the PVA in narrow temperature range by using the INTERFACE force field.

  17. Comparative analysis of national and regional models of the silver economy in the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrzej Klimczuk

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The approach to analysing population ageing and its impacts on the economy has evolved in recent years. There is increasing interest in the development and use of products and services related to gerontechnology as well as other social innovations that may be considered as central parts of the "silver economy." However, the concept of silver economy is still being formed and requires detailed research. This article proposes a typology of models of the silver economy in the European Union (EU at the national and regional levels. This typology was created by comparing the Active Ageing Index to the typology of varieties and cultures of capitalism and typology of the welfare states. Practical recommendations for institutions of the EU and directions for further research are discussed.

  18. Comparing the radiosensitivity of cervical and thoracic spinal cord using the relative seriality model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamus-Gorka, M.; Lind, B.K.; Brahme, A.

    2003-01-01

    Spinal cord is one of the most important normal tissues that are aimed to be spared during radiation therapy of cancer. This organ has been known for its strongly serial character and its high sensitivity to radiation. In order to compare the sensitivity of different parts of spinal cord, the early data (1970's) for radiation myelopathy available in the literature could be used. In the present study the relative seriality model (Kallman et al. 1992) has been fitted to two different sets of clinical data for spinal cord irradiation: radiation myelitis of cervical spinal cord after treating 248 patients for malignant disease of head and neck (Abbatucci et al. 1978) and radiation myelitis of thoracic spinal cord after radiation treating 43 patients with lung carcinoma (Reinhold et al. 1976). The maximum likelihood method was applied for the fitting and the corresponding parameters together with their 68% confidence intervals calculated for each of the datasets respectively. The alpha-beta ratio for the thoracic survival was also obtained. On the basis of the present study the following conclusions can be drawn: 1. radiation myelopathy is a strongly serial endpoint, 2. it appears to be differences in radiosensitivity between the cervical and thoracic region of spinal cord, 3. thoracic spinal cord revealed very serial characteristic of dose response, while the cervical myelopathy seems to be a bit less serial endpoint, 4. the dose-response curve is much steeper in case of myelopathy of cervical spinal cord, due to the much higher gamma value for this region. This work compares the fitting of NTCP model to the cervical and thoracic regions of the spinal cord and shows quite different responses. In the future more data should be tested for better understanding the mechanism of spinal cord sensitivity to radiation

  19. Models for comparing lung-cancer risks in radon- and plutonium-exposed experimental animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gilbert, E.S.; Cross, F.T.; Sanders, C.L.; Dagle, G.E.

    1990-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies of radon-exposed underground miners have provided the primary basis for estimating human lung-cancer risks resulting from radon exposure. These studies are sometimes used to estimate lung-cancer risks resulting from exposure to other alpha- emitters as well. The latter use, often referred to as the dosimetric approach, is based on the assumption that a specified dose to the lung produces the same lung-tumor risk regardless of the substance producing the dose. At Pacific Northwest Laboratory, experiments have been conducted in which laboratory rodents have been given inhalation exposures to radon and to plutonium ( 239 PuO 2 ). These experiments offer a unique opportunity to compare risks, and thus to investigate the validity of the dosimetric approach. This comparison is made most effectively by modeling the age-specific risk as a function of dose in a way that is comparable to analyses of human data. Such modeling requires assumptions about whether tumors are the cause of death or whether they are found incidental to death from other causes. Results based on the assumption that tumors are fatal indicate that the radon and plutonium dose-response curves differ, with a linear function providing a good description of the radon data, and a pure quadratic function providing a good description of the plutonium data. However, results based on the assumption that tumors are incidental to death indicate that the dose-response curves for the two exposures are very similar, and thus support the dosimetric approach. 14 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs

  20. Does Spontaneous Favorability to Power (vs. Universalism) Values Predict Spontaneous Prejudice and Discrimination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souchon, Nicolas; Maio, Gregory R; Hanel, Paul H P; Bardin, Brigitte

    2017-10-01

    We conducted five studies testing whether an implicit measure of favorability toward power over universalism values predicts spontaneous prejudice and discrimination. Studies 1 (N = 192) and 2 (N = 86) examined correlations between spontaneous favorability toward power (vs. universalism) values, achievement (vs. benevolence) values, and a spontaneous measure of prejudice toward ethnic minorities. Study 3 (N = 159) tested whether conditioning participants to associate power values with positive adjectives and universalism values with negative adjectives (or inversely) affects spontaneous prejudice. Study 4 (N = 95) tested whether decision bias toward female handball players could be predicted by spontaneous attitude toward power (vs. universalism) values. Study 5 (N = 123) examined correlations between spontaneous attitude toward power (vs. universalism) values, spontaneous importance toward power (vs. universalism) values, and spontaneous prejudice toward Black African people. Spontaneous positivity toward power (vs. universalism) values was associated with spontaneous negativity toward minorities and predicted gender bias in a decision task, whereas the explicit measures did not. These results indicate that the implicit assessment of evaluative responses attached to human values helps to model value-attitude-behavior relations. © 2016 The Authors. Journal of Personality Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Hyperosmolar irrigation compared with a standard solution in a canine shoulder arthroscopy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capito, Nicholas M; Smith, Matthew J; Stoker, Aaron M; Werner, Nikki; Cook, James L

    2015-08-01

    A hyperosmolar irrigation solution may decrease fluid extravasation during arthroscopic procedures. Demonstrating the safety of a hyperosmolar irrigation solution with respect to chondrocyte viability and cartilage water content was deemed necessary before designing a clinical efficacy study. We designed a translational animal model study in which hyperosmolar arthroscopy irrigation fluid (1.8%, 600 mOsm/L) was compared with normal saline (0.9%, 300 mOsm/L). Purpose-bred research dogs (n = 5) underwent bilateral shoulder arthroscopy. Irrigation fluid was delivered to each shoulder joint (n = 10) at 40 mm Hg for 120 minutes using standard ingress and egress portals. The percentage change in shoulder girth was documented at the completion of 120 minutes. Articular cartilage sections from the glenoid and humeral head were harvested from both shoulders. Chondrocyte viability and tissue water content were evaluated. Differences between groups and compared with time 0 controls were determined, with significance set at P irrigation solution used for arthroscopy was not associated with any detrimental effects on chondrocyte viability or tissue water content after 2 hours of arthroscopic irrigation. On the basis of potential benefits in conjunction with the safety demonstrated in these data, clinical evaluation of a hyperosmolar solution for irrigation during shoulder arthroscopy appears warranted. Copyright © 2015 Journal of Shoulder and Elbow Surgery Board of Trustees. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Culture-related service expectations: a comparative study using the Kano model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hejaili, Fayez F; Assad, Lina; Shaheen, Faissal A; Moussa, Dujana H; Karkar, Ayman; AlRukhaimi, Mona; Barhamein, Majdah; Al Suwida, Abdulkareem; Al Alhejaili, Faris F; Al Harbi, Ali S; Al Homrany, Mohamed; Attar, Bisher; Al-Sayyari, Abdulla A

    2009-01-01

    To compare service expectations between Arab and Austrian patients. We used a Kano model-based questionnaire with 20 service attributes of relevance to the dialysis patient. We analyzed 530, 172, 60, and 68 responses from Saudi, Austrian, Syrian, and UAE patients, respectively. We compared the customer satisfaction coefficient and the frequencies of response categories ("must be," "attractive," "one-dimensional," and "indifferent") for each of the 20 service attributes and in each of the 3 national groups of patients. We also investigated whether any differences seen were related to sex, age, literacy rate, or duration on dialysis. We observed higher satisfaction coefficients and "one-directional" responses among Arab patients and higher dissatisfaction coefficients and "must be" and "attractive" responses among Austrian patients. These were not related to age or duration on dialysis but were related to literacy rate. We speculate that these discrepancies between Austrian and Arab patients might be related to underdeveloped sophistication in market competitive forces and to cultural influences.

  3. Comparative efficacy of two daily use mouthrinses: randomized clinical trial using an experimental gingivitis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charles, Christine Ann; McGuire, James Anthony; Sharma, Naresh Chandra; Qaqish, James

    2011-01-01

    Two antimicrobial agents, a fixed combination of essential oils (EOs) and 0.07% cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) are found in commercially available mouthrinses, Listerine® Antiseptic and Crest® Pro HealthTM, respectively. Both mouthrinses have been shown to control dental plaque and gingivitis in short and longer term studies. The aim of this study was to determine the comparative effectiveness of these two mouthrinses using a 2-week experimental gingivitis model. Qualified subjects were randomly assigned to one of three mouthrinse groups: a fixed combination of EOs, 0.07% CPC, or negative control (C) rinse. Following baseline clinical assessments and a dental prophylaxis, subjects began a two-week period in which they rinsed twice daily with their assigned rinse and abstained from any mechanical oral hygiene procedures or other oral care products. Subjects were reassessed at the end of the two-week period. One hundred and forty-seven subjects were randomized and 142 completed this study. After two weeks use, the EOs rinse was superior (p plaque, and bleeding, with 9.4% and 6.6% reductions compared to CPC for gingivitis and plaque, respectively. Both rinses were superior to the negative control rinse (p mechanical oral hygiene influence.

  4. Modeling and comparative assessment of municipal solid waste gasification for energy production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arafat, Hassan A; Jijakli, Kenan

    2013-08-01

    Gasification is the thermochemical conversion of organic feedstocks mainly into combustible syngas (CO and H(2)) along with other constituents. It has been widely used to convert coal into gaseous energy carriers but only has been recently looked at as a process for producing energy from biomass. This study explores the potential of gasification for energy production and treatment of municipal solid waste (MSW). It relies on adapting the theory governing the chemistry and kinetics of the gasification process to the use of MSW as a feedstock to the process. It also relies on an equilibrium kinetics and thermodynamics solver tool (Gasify(®)) in the process of modeling gasification of MSW. The effect of process temperature variation on gasifying MSW was explored and the results were compared to incineration as an alternative to gasification of MSW. Also, the assessment was performed comparatively for gasification of MSW in the United Arab Emirates, USA, and Thailand, presenting a spectrum of socioeconomic settings with varying MSW compositions in order to explore the effect of MSW composition variance on the products of gasification. All in all, this study provides an insight into the potential of gasification for the treatment of MSW and as a waste to energy alternative to incineration. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Analytic model comparing the cost utility of TVT versus duloxetine in women with urinary stress incontinence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacklin, Paul; Duckett, Jonathan; Renganathan, Arasee

    2010-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess cost utility of duloxetine versus tension-free vaginal tape (TVT) as a second-line treatment for urinary stress incontinence. A Markov model was used to compare the cost utility based on a 2-year follow-up period. Quality-adjusted life year (QALY) estimation was performed by assuming a disutility rate of 0.05. Under base-case assumptions, although duloxetine was a cheaper option, TVT gave a considerably higher QALY gain. When a longer follow-up period was considered, TVT had an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of pound 7,710 ($12,651) at 10 years. If the QALY gain from cure was 0.09, then the ICER for duloxetine and TVT would both fall within the indicative National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence willingness to pay threshold at 2 years, but TVT would be the cost-effective option having extended dominance over duloxetine. This model suggests that TVT is a cost-effective treatment for stress incontinence.

  6. Comparative Study of Lectin Domains in Model Species: New Insights into Evolutionary Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofie Van Holle

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Lectins are present throughout the plant kingdom and are reported to be involved in diverse biological processes. In this study, we provide a comparative analysis of the lectin families from model species in a phylogenetic framework. The analysis focuses on the different plant lectin domains identified in five representative core angiosperm genomes (Arabidopsis thaliana, Glycine max, Cucumis sativus, Oryza sativa ssp. japonica and Oryza sativa ssp. indica. The genomes were screened for genes encoding lectin domains using a combination of Basic Local Alignment Search Tool (BLAST, hidden Markov models, and InterProScan analysis. Additionally, phylogenetic relationships were investigated by constructing maximum likelihood phylogenetic trees. The results demonstrate that the majority of the lectin families are present in each of the species under study. Domain organization analysis showed that most identified proteins are multi-domain proteins, owing to the modular rearrangement of protein domains during evolution. Most of these multi-domain proteins are widespread, while others display a lineage-specific distribution. Furthermore, the phylogenetic analyses reveal that some lectin families evolved to be similar to the phylogeny of the plant species, while others share a closer evolutionary history based on the corresponding protein domain architecture. Our results yield insights into the evolutionary relationships and functional divergence of plant lectins.

  7. Creating, generating and comparing random network models with NetworkRandomizer [version 3; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriele Tosadori

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Biological networks are becoming a fundamental tool for the investigation of high-throughput data in several fields of biology and biotechnology. With the increasing amount of information, network-based models are gaining more and more interest and new techniques are required in order to mine the information and to validate the results. To fill the validation gap we present an app, for the Cytoscape platform, which aims at creating randomised networks and randomising existing, real networks. Since there is a lack of tools that allow performing such operations, our app aims at enabling researchers to exploit different, well known random network models that could be used as a benchmark for validating real, biological datasets. We also propose a novel methodology for creating random weighted networks, i.e. the multiplication algorithm, starting from real, quantitative data. Finally, the app provides a statistical tool that compares real versus randomly computed attributes, in order to validate the numerical findings. In summary, our app aims at creating a standardised methodology for the validation of the results in the context of the Cytoscape platform.

  8. Comparative Study for Modeling Reactor Internal Geometry in CFD Simulation of PHWR Internal Flow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Gong Hee; Woo, Sweng Woong; Cheong, Ae Ju [Korea Institute of Nuclear Safety, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The main objective of the present study is to compare the results predicted by using either the real geometry of tubes or porous medium assumption and to assess the prediction performance of both methods. Estimating the local subcooling of the moderator in a CANDU calandria under transient conditions is one of the major concerns in the CANDU safety analysis. Therefore extensive CFD analyses have been performed for predicting the moderator temperature in a CANDU calandria or its similar shape. However most of previous studies used a porous medium assumption instead of considering the real geometry of calandria tube. A porous medium assumption has some possible weaknesses; The increased production of turbulence due to vortex shedding in the wake of the individual tubes is not considered in the turbulence model. It is difficult to identify the true effects of the outer ring of calandria tubes on the generation of the highly non-uniform flows in the reflector region. It is not clear how well the pressure loss models quantitatively represent the three-dimensional effects of the turbulent flows through the calandria tubes.

  9. Comparative evaluation of two models of UPQC for suitable interface to enhance power quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basu, Malabika [Department of Electrical Engineering, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Das, Shyama P.; Dubey, Gopal K. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur (India)

    2007-05-15

    Majority of the dispersed generations from renewable energy sources are connected to the grid through power electronic interface, which introduce additional harmonics in the distribution systems. Research is being carried out to integrate active filtering with specific interface such that a common power quality (PQ) platform could be achieved. For generalized solution, a unified power quality conditioner (UPQC) could be the most comprehensive PQ protecting device for sensitive non-linear loads, which require quality input supply. Also, load current harmonic isolation needs to be ensured for maintaining the quality of the supply current. The present paper describes two control scheme models for UPQC, for enhancing PQ of sensitive non-linear loads. Based on two different kinds of voltage compensation strategy, two control schemes have been designed, which are termed as UPQC-Q and UPQC-P. A comparative loading analysis has developed useful insight in finding the typical application of the two different control schemes. The effectiveness of the two control schemes is verified through extensive simulation using the software SABER. As the power circuit configuration of UPQC remains same for both the model, with modification of control scheme only, the utility of UPQC can be optimized depending upon the application requirement. (author)

  10. Forecasting production of fossil fuel sources in Turkey using a comparative regression and ARIMA model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ediger, Volkan S.; Akar, Sertac; Ugurlu, Berkin

    2006-01-01

    This study aims at forecasting the most possible curve for domestic fossil fuel production of Turkey to help policy makers to develop policy implications for rapidly growing dependency problem on imported fossil fuels. The fossil fuel dependency problem is international in scope and context and Turkey is a typical example for emerging energy markets of the developing world. We developed a decision support system for forecasting fossil fuel production by applying a regression, ARIMA and SARIMA method to the historical data from 1950 to 2003 in a comparative manner. The method integrates each model by using some decision parameters related to goodness-of-fit and confidence interval, behavior of the curve, and reserves. Different forecasting models are proposed for different fossil fuel types. The best result is obtained for oil since the reserve classifications used it is much better defined them for the others. Our findings show that the fossil fuel production peak has already been reached; indicating the total fossil fuel production of the country will diminish and theoretically will end in 2038. However, production is expected to end in 2019 for hard coal, in 2024 for natural gas, in 2029 for oil and 2031 for asphaltite. The gap between the fossil fuel consumption and production is growing enormously and it reaches in 2030 to approximately twice of what it is in 2000

  11. Comparing Fourier optics and contrast transfer function modeling of image formation in low energy electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, K M; Locatelli, A; Altman, M S

    2017-12-01

    A theoretical understanding of image formation in cathode lens microscopy can facilitate image interpretation. We compare Fourier Optics (FO) and Contrast Transfer Function (CTF) approaches that were recently adapted from other realms of microscopy to model image formation in low energy electron microscopy (LEEM). Although these two approaches incorporate imaging errors from several sources similarly, they differ in the way that the image intensity is calculated. The simplification that is used in the CTF calculation advantageously leads to its computational efficiency. However, we find that lens aberrations, and spatial and temporal coherence may affect the validity of the CTF approach to model LEEM image formation under certain conditions. In particular, these effects depend strongly on the nature of the object being imaged and also become more pronounced with increasing defocus. While the use of the CTF approach appears to be justified for objects that are routinely imaged with LEEM, comparison of theory to experimental observations of a focal image series for rippled, suspended graphene reveals one example where FO works, but CTF does not. This work alerts us to potential pitfalls and guides the effective use of FO and CTF approaches. It also lays the foundation for quantitative image evaluation using these methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparative behaviour of organochlorine insecticides and related chemical residues in model ecosystems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, W.; Anagnostopoulos, M.; Begum, S.; Elsner, E.; Freitag, D.; Gaeb, W.; Greb, W.; Haque, A.; Hustert, K.; Kilzer, L.; Kohli, J.; Korte, F.; Kotzias, D.; Lay, J.P.; Moza, P.N.; Mueller, H.; Mueller, Werner; Mueller, Wolfgang; Nohynek, G.; Parlar, A.; Prestel, D.; Sandrock, K.; Sotiriou, N.; Viswanathan, P.; Viswanathan, S.; Vockel, D.; Weisgerber, I.

    1975-01-01

    A comprehensive series of isotopictracer-aided studies of the behaviour of organochlorine residues in model ecosystems is reported. Studies of the fate of 14 C-labelled aldrin or dieldrin in soil supporting carrots and potatoes under simulated conditions of agricultural practice have been extended. The formation of the polar metabolite dihydrochlordene dicarboxylic acid was confirmed. The metabolism of these compounds, and of 14 C-heptachlor and 14 C-lindane by green algae were also studied. Aldrin and heptachlor underwent epoxidation and lindane dehydrochlorination. Comparative studies were made of the metabolism of 14 C-PCBs in rat, monkey, microorganisms, higher plants and of their movement from contaminated soil into crops. Experiments on abiotic transformation of organochlorine residues by ultraviolet radiation are reported. The significance of some of the ratios observed in the context of environmental behaviour is discussed. The fate of dieldrin in soil-plant-food-animal systems is discussed as a model ''trace contaminant'' in view of the relative wealth of data now available, some as a result of experiments initiated 20 years ago. (author)

  13. Computer-Aided Modelling and Analysis of PV Systems: A Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charalambos Koukouvaos

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Modern scientific advances have enabled remarkable efficacy for photovoltaic systems with regard to the exploitation of solar energy, boosting them into having a rapidly growing position among the systems developed for the production of renewable energy. However, in many cases the design, analysis, and control of photovoltaic systems are tasks which are quite complex and thus difficult to be carried out. In order to cope with this kind of problems, appropriate software tools have been developed either as standalone products or parts of general purpose software platforms used to model and simulate the generation, transmission, and distribution of solar energy. The utilization of this kind of software tools may be extremely helpful to the successful performance evaluation of energy systems with maximum accuracy and minimum cost in time and effort. The work presented in this paper aims on a first level at the performance analysis of various configurations of photovoltaic systems through computer-aided modelling. On a second level, it provides a comparative evaluation of the credibility of two of the most advanced graphical programming environments, namely, Simulink and LabVIEW, with regard to their application in photovoltaic systems.

  14. Superior Suppressive Capacity of Skin Tregs Compared with Lung Tregs in a Model of Epicutaneous Priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Subhashree; Albrecht, Melanie; Baru, Abdul M; Sparwasser, Tim; Herrick, Christina; Dittrich, Anna M

    2015-10-01

    We have previously shown that T helper type 2 (Th2)-polarized airway inflammation can facilitate priming to new antigens in the lungs, which we called "collateral priming". To investigate whether allergic skin inflammation can also facilitate priming toward new antigens, we developed an allergic skin inflammation model based on an allergic lung inflammation model. Mice were sensitized intraperitoneally toward the primary antigen, ovalbumin. Challenge was subsequently performed intranasally or epicutaneously with ovalbumin and a secondary antigen, keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH). Re-challenge consisted of local application of either antigen alone. Analysis of KLH-specific antibody responses, KLH-specific cytokines, and local inflammation demonstrated tolerance induction toward the secondary antigen in the skin, whereas in the lung priming had occurred. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed increased numbers of regulatory T cells (Tregs), increased cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 (CTLA-4) expression, and an enhanced suppressive capacity of Tregs from skin-draining lymph nodes when compared with Tregs from the lung-draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, depletion of Tregs resulted in restoration of collateral priming in the skin. These results demonstrate crucial local differences between the Treg function in the skin and lung to repetitive antigen exposure, which can decisively influence the immune response toward new antigens.

  15. Comparative Evaluation of Modeling Methods for Harmonic Stability Analysis of Three-Phase Voltage Source Converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kwon, Jun Bum; Wang, Xiongfei; Bak, Claus Leth

    2015-01-01

    As the increasing of power electronics based systems, not only the component-based analysis but also a systematic interaction analysis with each other systems are being important. Especially studies about the stability and the harmonics interaction are critical in order to establish the required ...... for the AC-DC converters with a low ratio of switching to the fundamental frequency, and it provides an effective way to reveal the harmonic interaction and stability analysis for the future power electronics based power systems.......As the increasing of power electronics based systems, not only the component-based analysis but also a systematic interaction analysis with each other systems are being important. Especially studies about the stability and the harmonics interaction are critical in order to establish the required...... performance in a power network. However, the traditional small-signal modeling approaches are not enough to represent the complexity of the interaction due to the time varying components of such systems. This paper compares the small-signal modeling methods for harmonic analysis of AC - DC converters...

  16. Identification of favorable environments for thunderstorms in reanalysis data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anja T. Westermayer

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The relations between lightning occurrence over Europe from the EUCLID network (2008–2013 and parameters derived from ERA-Interim reanalysis data were studied to increase the understanding of the conditions under which thunderstorms form. The objective was to identify relevant factors beyond instability and convective inhibition, in order to better model thunderstorms using numerical weather prediction or climate model data. It was found that latent instability is only required up to a certain amount of approximately 200–400 J kg-1 CAPE. For higher values of CAPE (~800$\\sim800$–2800 J kg-1, the relative frequency of lightning is rather constant. Relative humidity in the low to mid-troposphere has a major influence on storm occurrence with low relative humidity strongly suppressing thunderstorm development. For an average 850–500 hPa relative humidity below 50 %, the frequency of lightning decreases to below 15 %, even when CIN is negligible and CAPE sufficient. A subtle dependency on wind shear was found in which two regimes of higher frequency of lightning were identified. For very weak and for high shear the probability was higher than for intermediate values of both deep-layer and low-level shear.

  17. Atmospheric Dispersion Models for the Calculation of Environmental Impact: A Comparative Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caputo, Marcelo; Gimenez, Marcelo; Felicelli, Sergio; Schlamp, Miguel

    2000-01-01

    In this paper some new comparisons are presented between the codes AERMOD, HPDM and HYSPLIT.The first two are Gaussian stationary plume codes and they were developed to calculate environmental impact produced by chemical contaminants.HYSPLIT is a hybrid code because it uses a Lagrangian reference system to describe the transport of a puff center of mass and uses an Eulerian system to describe the dispersion within the puff.The meteorological and topographic data used in the present work were obtained from runs of the prognostic code RAMS, provided by NOAA. The emission was fixed in 0.3 g/s , 284 K and 0 m/s .The surface rough was fixed in 0.1m and flat terrain was considered.In order to analyze separate effects and to go deeper in the comparison, the meteorological data was split into two, depending on the atmospheric stability class (F to B), and the wind direction was fixed to neglect its contribution to the contaminant dispersion.The main contribution of this work is to provide recommendations about the validity range of each code depending on the model used.In the case of Gaussian models the validity range is fixed by the distance in which the atmospheric condition can be consider homogeneous.In the other hand the validity range of HYSPLIT's model is determined by the spatial extension of the meteorological data.The results obtained with the three codes are comparable if the emission is in equilibrium with the environment.This means that the gases were emitted at the same temperature of the medium with zero velocity.There was an important difference between the dispersion parameters used by the Gaussian codes

  18. Quantitative rainfall metrics for comparing volumetric rainfall retrievals to fine scale models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collis, Scott; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Giangrande, Scott; Fridlind, Ann; Theisen, Adam; Jensen, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Precipitation processes play a significant role in the energy balance of convective systems for example, through latent heating and evaporative cooling. Heavy precipitation "cores" can also be a proxy for vigorous convection and vertical motions. However, comparisons between rainfall rate retrievals from volumetric remote sensors with forecast rain fields from high-resolution numerical weather prediction simulations are complicated by differences in the location and timing of storm morphological features. This presentation will outline a series of metrics for diagnosing the spatial variability and statistical properties of precipitation maps produced both from models and retrievals. We include existing metrics such as Contoured by Frequency Altitude Diagrams (Yuter and Houze 1995) and Statistical Coverage Products (May and Lane 2009) and propose new metrics based on morphology, cell and feature based statistics. Work presented focuses on observations from the ARM Southern Great Plains radar network consisting of three agile X-Band radar systems with a very dense coverage pattern and a C Band system providing site wide coverage. By combining multiple sensors resolutions of 250m2 can be achieved, allowing improved characterization of fine-scale features. Analyses compare data collected during the Midlattitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E) with simulations of observed systems using the NASA Unified Weather Research and Forecasting model. May, P. T., and T. P. Lane, 2009: A method for using weather radar data to test cloud resolving models. Meteorological Applications, 16, 425-425, doi:10.1002/met.150, 10.1002/met.150. Yuter, S. E., and R. A. Houze, 1995: Three-Dimensional Kinematic and Microphysical Evolution of Florida Cumulonimbus. Part II: Frequency Distributions of Vertical Velocity, Reflectivity, and Differential Reflectivity. Mon. Wea. Rev., 123, 1941-1963, doi:10.1175/1520-0493(1995)1232.0.CO;2.

  19. Digital Elevation Model from Non-Metric Camera in Uas Compared with LIDAR Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayamit, O. M.; Pedro, M. F.; Ernesto, R. R.; Fernando, B. L.

    2015-08-01

    Digital Elevation Model (DEM) data as a representation of surface topography is highly demanded for use in spatial analysis and modelling. Aimed to that issue many methods of acquisition data and process it are developed, from traditional surveying until modern technology like LIDAR. On the other hands, in a past four year the development of Unamend Aerial System (UAS) aimed to Geomatic bring us the possibility to acquire data about surface by non-metric digital camera on board in a short time with good quality for some analysis. Data collectors have attracted tremendous attention on UAS due to possibility of the determination of volume changes over time, monitoring of the breakwaters, hydrological modelling including flood simulation, drainage networks, among others whose support in DEM for proper analysis. The DEM quality is considered as a combination of DEM accuracy and DEM suitability so; this paper is aimed to analyse the quality of the DEM from non-metric digital camera on UAS compared with a DEM from LIDAR corresponding to same geographic space covering 4 km2 in Artemisa province, Cuba. This area is in a frame of urban planning whose need to know the topographic characteristics in order to analyse hydrology behaviour and decide the best place for make roads, building and so on. Base on LIDAR technology is still more accurate method, it offer us a pattern for test DEM from non-metric digital camera on UAS, whose are much more flexible and bring a solution for many applications whose needs DEM of detail.

  20. On- and off-grid operation of hybrid renewable power plants: When are the economics favorable?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakopoulou, F.; Santana, D.

    2016-12-01

    Hybrid renewable energy conversion systems offer a good alternative to conventional systems in locations where the extension of the electrical grid is difficult or not economical or where the cost of electricity is high. However, stand-alone operation implies net energy output restrictions (limited to exclusively serve the energy demand of a region), capacity oversizing and large storage facilities. In interconnected areas, on the other hand, the operational restrictions of the power stations change significantly and the efficiencies and costs of renewable technologies become more favorable. In this paper, the operation of three main renewable technologies (CSP, PV and wind) is studied assuming both hybrid and individual operation for both autonomous and inter-connected operation. The case study used is a Mediterranean island of ca. 3,000 inhabitants. Each system is optimized to fully cover the energy demand of the community. In addition, in the on-grid operation cases, it is required that the annual energy generated from the renewable sources is net positive (i.e., the island generates at least as much energy as it uses). It is found that when connected to the grid, hybridization of more than one technology is not required to satisfy the energy demand, as expected. Each of the renewable technologies investigated can satisfy the annual energy demand individually, without significant complications. In addition, the cost of electricity generated with the three studied technologies drops significantly for on-grid applications, when compared to off-grid operation. However, when compared to business-as-usual scenarios in both the on- and off-grid cases, both investigated hybrid and single-technology renewable scenarios are found to be economically viable. A sensitivity analysis reveals the limits of the acceptable costs that make the technologies favorable when compared to conventional alternatives.

  1. Cirrus Cloud Properties from a Cloud-Resolving Model Simulation Compared to Cloud Radar Observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yali; Krueger, Steven K.; Mace, Gerald G.; Xu, Kuan-Man

    2003-02-01

    Cloud radar data collected at the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Southern Great Plains site were used to evaluate the properties of cirrus clouds that occurred in a cloud-resolving model (CRM) simulation of the 29-day summer 1997 intensive observation period (IOP). The simulation was `forced' by the large-scale advective temperature and water vapor tendencies, horizontal wind velocity, and turbulent surface fluxes observed at the Southern Great Plains site. The large-scale advective condensate tendency was not observed. The correlation of CRM cirrus amount with Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) high cloud amount was 0.70 for the subperiods during which cirrus formation and decay occurred primarily locally, but only 0.30 for the entire IOP. This suggests that neglecting condensate advection has a detrimental impact on the ability of a model (CRM or single-column model) to properly simulate cirrus cloud occurrence.The occurrence, vertical location, and thickness of cirrus cloud layers, as well as the bulk microphysical properties of thin cirrus cloud layers, were determined from the cloud radar measurements for June, July, and August 1997. The composite characteristics of cirrus clouds derived from this dataset are well suited for evaluating CRMs because of the close correspondence between the timescales and space scales resolved by the cloud radar measurements and by CRMs. The CRM results were sampled at eight grid columns spaced 64 km apart using the same definitions of cirrus and thin cirrus as the cloud radar dataset. The composite characteristics of cirrus clouds obtained from the CRM were then compared to those obtained from the cloud radar.Compared with the cloud radar observations, the CRM cirrus clouds occur at lower heights and with larger physical thicknesses. The ice water paths in the CRM's thin cirrus clouds are similar to those observed. However, the corresponding cloud-layer-mean ice water contents are

  2. A comparative study of deep learning models for medical image classification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Suvajit; Manideep, B. C. S.; Rai, Shalva; Vijayarajan, V.

    2017-11-01

    Deep Learning(DL) techniques are conquering over the prevailing traditional approaches of neural network, when it comes to the huge amount of dataset, applications requiring complex functions demanding increase accuracy with lower time complexities. Neurosciences has already exploited DL techniques, thus portrayed itself as an inspirational source for researchers exploring the domain of Machine learning. DL enthusiasts cover the areas of vision, speech recognition, motion planning and NLP as well, moving back and forth among fields. This concerns with building models that can successfully solve variety of tasks requiring intelligence and distributed representation. The accessibility to faster CPUs, introduction of GPUs-performing complex vector and matrix computations, supported agile connectivity to network. Enhanced software infrastructures for distributed computing worked in strengthening the thought that made researchers suffice DL methodologies. The paper emphases on the following DL procedures to traditional approaches which are performed manually for classifying medical images. The medical images are used for the study Diabetic Retinopathy(DR) and computed tomography (CT) emphysema data. Both DR and CT data diagnosis is difficult task for normal image classification methods. The initial work was carried out with basic image processing along with K-means clustering for identification of image severity levels. After determining image severity levels ANN has been applied on the data to get the basic classification result, then it is compared with the result of DNNs (Deep Neural Networks), which performed efficiently because of its multiple hidden layer features basically which increases accuracy factors, but the problem of vanishing gradient in DNNs made to consider Convolution Neural Networks (CNNs) as well for better results. The CNNs are found to be providing better outcomes when compared to other learning models aimed at classification of images. CNNs are

  3. The structure of personality disorders: comparing the DSM-IV-TR Axis II classification with the five-factor model framework using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastiaansen, Leen; Rossi, Gina; Schotte, Christiaan; De Fruyt, Filip

    2011-06-01

    Earlier factor analytical studies on the empirical validity of the DSM-IV-TR (American Psychological Association, 2000) Axis II classification have offered little support for the current three-cluster structure. In his large-scale meta-analysis of previously published personality disorder correlation matrices, O'Connor (2005) found four factors, corresponding to the neuroticism, extraversion, agreeableness, and conscientiousness domains of the five-factor model of personality. In the present study, this dimensional four-factor model and the categorical DSM three-cluster structure were fitted to the Assessment of DSM-IV Personality Disorders questionnaire (ADP-IV; Schotte & De Doncker, 1994) scale scores using structural equation modelling. The results strongly favored the dimensional model, which also resembled other well-founded four-factor proposals (Livesley, Jang, & Vernon, 1998; Widiger & Simonsen, 2005). Moreover, a multigroup confirmatory factor analysis showed that this model was highly invariant and thus generalizable across two large clinical (n = 1,029) and general population (n = 659) samples.

  4. The Effects of a Model-Based Physics Curriculum Program with a Physics First Approach: A Causal-Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ling L.; Fulmer, Gavin W.; Majerich, David M.; Clevenstine, Richard; Howanski, Raymond

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the effects of a model-based introductory physics curriculum on conceptual learning in a Physics First (PF) Initiative. This is the first comparative study in physics education that applies the Rasch modeling approach to examine the effects of a model-based curriculum program combined with PF in the United…

  5. Comparing administered and market-based water allocation systems using an agent-based modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, J.; Cai, X.; Wang, Z.

    2009-12-01

    It also has been well recognized that market-based systems can have significant advantages over administered systems for water allocation. However there are not many successful water markets around the world yet and administered systems exist commonly in water allocation management practice. This paradox has been under discussion for decades and still calls for attention for both research and practice. This paper explores some insights for the paradox and tries to address why market systems have not been widely implemented for water allocation. Adopting the theory of agent-based system we develop a consistent analytical model to interpret both systems. First we derive some theorems based on the analytical model, with respect to the necessary conditions for economic efficiency of water allocation. Following that the agent-based model is used to illustrate the coherence and difference between administered and market-based systems. The two systems are compared from three aspects: 1) the driving forces acting on the system state, 2) system efficiency, and 3) equity. Regarding economic efficiency, penalty on the violation of water use permits (or rights) under an administered system can lead to system-wide economic efficiency, as well as being acceptable by some agents, which follows the theory of the so-call rational violation. Ideal equity will be realized if penalty equals incentive with an administered system and if transaction costs are zero with a market system. The performances of both agents and the over system are explained with an administered system and market system, respectively. The performances of agents are subject to different mechanisms of interactions between agents under the two systems. The system emergency (i.e., system benefit, equilibrium market price, etc), resulting from the performance at the agent level, reflects the different mechanism of the two systems, the “invisible hand” with the market system and administrative measures (penalty

  6. Distinct effects of dietary flax compared to fish oil, soy protein compared to casein, and sex on the renal oxylipin profile in models of polycystic kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devassy, Jessay G; Yamaguchi, Tamio; Monirujjaman, Md; Gabbs, Melissa; Ravandi, Amir; Zhou, Jing; Aukema, Harold M

    2017-08-01

    Oxylipins are bioactive lipids derived from polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) that are important regulators of kidney function and health. Targeted lipidomic analyses of renal oxylipins from four studies of rodent models of renal disease were performed to investigate the differential effects of dietary flax compared to fish oil, soy protein compared to casein, and sex. Across all studies, dietary fish oil was more effective than flax oil in reducing n-6 PUFA derived oxylipins and elevating eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) derived oxylipins, whereas dietary flax oil resulted in higher α-linolenic acid (ALA) oxylipins. Dietary soy protein compared to casein resulted in higher linoleic acid (LA) derived oxylipins. Kidneys from females had higher levels of arachidonic acid (AA) oxylipins, but similar or lower levels of oxylipins from other PUFA. Modulation of the oxylipin profile by diet and sex may help elucidate their effects on renal physiology and health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Timing of birth: Parsimony favors strategic over dysregulated parturition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalano, Ralph; Goodman, Julia; Margerison-Zilko, Claire; Falconi, April; Gemmill, Alison; Karasek, Deborah; Anderson, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The "dysregulated parturition" narrative posits that the human stress response includes a cascade of hormones that "dysregulates" and accelerates parturition but provides questionable utility as a guide to understand or prevent preterm birth. We offer and test a "strategic parturition" narrative that not only predicts the excess preterm births that dysregulated parturition predicts but also makes testable, sex-specific predictions of the effect of stressful environments on the timing of birth among term pregnancies. We use interrupted time-series modeling of cohorts conceived over 101 months to test for lengthening of early term male gestations in stressed population. We use an event widely reported to have stressed Americans and to have increased the incidence of low birth weight and fetal death across the country-the terrorist attacks of September 2001. We tested the hypothesis that the odds of male infants conceived in December 2000 (i.e., at term in September 2001) being born early as opposed to full term fell below the value expected from those conceived in the 50 prior and 50 following months. We found that term male gestations exposed to the terrorist attacks exhibited 4% lower likelihood of early, as opposed to full or late, term birth. Strategic parturition explains observed data for which the dysregulated parturition narrative offers no prediction-the timing of birth among gestations stressed at term. Our narrative may help explain why findings from studies examining associations between population- and/or individual-level stressors and preterm birth are generally mixed. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Comparative performance of transcriptome assembly methods for non-model organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Chen, Xiao-Guang; Armbruster, Peter A

    2016-07-27

    The technological revolution in next-generation sequencing has brought unprecedented opportunities to study any organism of interest at the genomic or transcriptomic level. Transcriptome assembly is a crucial first step for studying the molecular basis of phenotypes of interest using RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq). However, the optimal strategy for assembling vast amounts of short RNA-Seq reads remains unresolved, especially for organisms without a sequenced genome. This study compared four transcriptome assembly methods, including a widely used de novo assembler (Trinity), two transcriptome re-assembly strategies utilizing proteomic and genomic resources from closely related species (reference-based re-assembly and TransPS) and a genome-guided assembler (Cufflinks). These four assembly strategies were compared using a comprehensive transcriptomic database of Aedes albopictus, for which a genome sequence has recently been completed. The quality of the various assemblies was assessed by the number of contigs generated, contig length distribution, percent paired-end read mapping, and gene model representation via BLASTX. Our results reveal that de novo assembly generates a similar number of gene models relative to genome-guided assembly with a fragmented reference, but produces the highest level of redundancy and requires the most computational power. Using a closely related reference genome to guide transcriptome assembly can generate biased contig sequences. Increasing the number of reads used in the transcriptome assembly tends to increase the redundancy within the assembly and decrease both median contig length and percent identity between contigs and reference protein sequences. This study provides general guidance for transcriptome assembly of RNA-Seq data from organisms with or without a sequenced genome. The optimal transcriptome assembly strategy will depend upon the subsequent downstream analyses. However, our results emphasize the efficacy of de novo assembly

  9. BIRDS AS A MODEL TO STUDY ADULT NEUROGENESIS: BRIDGING EVOLUTIONARY, COMPARATIVE AND NEUROETHOLOGICAL APPROCHES

    Science.gov (United States)

    BARNEA, ANAT; PRAVOSUDOV, VLADIMIR

    2011-01-01

    During the last few decades evidence has demonstrated that adult neurogenesis is a well-preserved feature throughout the animal kingdom. In birds, ongoing neuronal addition occurs rather broadly, to a number of brain regions. This review describes adult avian neurogenesis and neuronal recruitment, discusses factors that regulate these processes, and touches upon the question of their genetic control. Several attributes make birds an extremely advantageous model to study neurogenesis. First, song learning exhibits seasonal variation that is associated with seasonal variation in neuronal turnover in some song control brain nuclei, which seems to be regulated via adult neurogenesis. Second, food-caching birds naturally use memory-dependent behavior in learning locations of thousands of food caches scattered over their home ranges. In comparison with other birds, food-caching species have relatively enlarged hippocampi with more neurons and intense neurogenesis, which appears to be related to spatial learning. Finally, migratory behavior and naturally occurring social systems in birds also provide opportunities to investigate neurogenesis. Such diversity of naturally-occurring memory-based behaviors, combined with the fact that birds can be studied both in the wild and in the laboratory, make them ideal for investigation of neural processes underlying learning. This can be done by using various approaches, from evolutionary and comparative to neuroethological and molecular. Finally, we connect the avian arena to a broader view by providing a brief comparative and evolutionary overview of adult neurogenesis and by discussing the possible functional role of the new neurons. We conclude by indicating future directions and possible medical applications. PMID:21929623

  10. A comparative study of longitudinal dispersion models in rigid vegetated compound meandering channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzadkhoo, Maryam; Keshavarzi, Alireza; Hamidifar, Hossein; Javan, Mahmood

    2018-03-26

    Releasing and mixing of pollutants in rivers can cause serious threats for downstream users. Longitudinal dispersion is an important factor in describing pollutant transport process in rivers. The focus of this study is on the effect of floodplain rigid vegetation characteristics including its arrangement, density and relative depth (the ratio of the flow depth i