WorldWideScience

Sample records for models 1-d 2-d

  1. Calibration of a 1D/1D urban flood model using 1D/2D model results in the absence of field data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leandro, J; Djordjević, S; Chen, A S; Savić, D A; Stanić, M

    2011-01-01

    Recently increased flood events have been prompting researchers to improve existing coupled flood-models such as one-dimensional (1D)/1D and 1D/two-dimensional (2D) models. While 1D/1D models simulate sewer and surface networks using a one-dimensional approach, 1D/2D models represent the surface network by a two-dimensional surface grid. However their application raises two issues to urban flood modellers: (1) stormwater systems planning/emergency or risk analysis demands for fast models, and the 1D/2D computational time is prohibitive, (2) and the recognized lack of field data (e.g. Hunter et al. (2008)) causes difficulties for the calibration/validation of 1D/1D models. In this paper we propose to overcome these issues by calibrating a 1D/1D model with the results of a 1D/2D model. The flood-inundation results show that: (1) 1D/2D results can be used to calibrate faster 1D/1D models, (2) the 1D/1D model is able to map the 1D/2D flood maximum extent well, and the flooding limits satisfactorily in each time-step, (3) the 1D/1D model major differences are the instantaneous flow propagation and overestimation of the flood-depths within surface-ponds, (4) the agreement in the volume surcharged by both models is a necessary condition for the 1D surface-network validation and (5) the agreement of the manholes discharge shapes measures the fitness of the calibrated 1D surface-network.

  2. Models of Late-Type Disk Galaxies: 1-D Versus 2-D

    CERN Document Server

    Mineikis, Tadas

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the effects of stochasticity on the observed galaxy parameters by comparing our stochastic star formation two-dimensional (2-D) galaxy evolution models with the commonly used one-dimensional (1-D) models with smooth star formation. The 2-D stochastic models predict high variability of the star formation rate and the surface photometric parameters across the galactic disks and in time.

  3. Coupled 1D-2D hydrodynamic inundation model for sewer overflow: Influence of modeling parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adeniyi Ganiyu Adeogun

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents outcome of our investigation on the influence of modeling parameters on 1D-2D hydrodynamic inundation model for sewer overflow, developed through coupling of an existing 1D sewer network model (SWMM and 2D inundation model (BREZO. The 1D-2D hydrodynamic model was developed for the purpose of examining flood incidence due to surcharged water on overland surface. The investigation was carried out by performing sensitivity analysis on the developed model. For the sensitivity analysis, modeling parameters, such as mesh resolution Digital Elevation Model (DEM resolution and roughness were considered. The outcome of the study shows the model is sensitive to changes in these parameters. The performance of the model is significantly influenced, by the Manning's friction value, the DEM resolution and the area of the triangular mesh. Also, changes in the aforementioned modeling parameters influence the Flood characteristics, such as the inundation extent, the flow depth and the velocity across the model domain.

  4. DEVELOPMENT OF COUPLED 1D-2D MATHEMATICAL MODELS FOR TIDAL RIVERS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Zu-xin; YIN Hai-long

    2004-01-01

    Some coupled 1D-2D hydrodynamic and water quality models depicting tidal water bodies with complex topography were presented. For the coupled models, finite element method was used to solve the governing equations so as to study tidal rivers with complex topography. Since the 1D and 2D models were coupled, the principle of model coupling was proposed to account appropriately for the factors of water level, flow and pollutant flux and the related dynamical behavior was simulated. Specifically the models were used to probe quantitative pollution contribution of receiving water from neighboring Jiangsu and Zhejiang Provinces to the pollution in the Huangpu River passing through Shanghai City. Numerical examples indicated that the developed coupled 1D-2D models are applicable in tidal river network region of Shanghai.

  5. Study on Development of 1D-2D Coupled Real-time Urban Inundation Prediction model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seungsoo

    2017-04-01

    In recent years, we are suffering abnormal weather condition due to climate change around the world. Therefore, countermeasures for flood defense are urgent task. In this research, study on development of 1D-2D coupled real-time urban inundation prediction model using predicted precipitation data based on remote sensing technology is conducted. 1 dimensional (1D) sewerage system analysis model which was introduced by Lee et al. (2015) is used to simulate inlet and overflow phenomena by interacting with surface flown as well as flows in conduits. 2 dimensional (2D) grid mesh refinement method is applied to depict road networks for effective calculation time. 2D surface model is coupled with 1D sewerage analysis model in order to consider bi-directional flow between both. Also parallel computing method, OpenMP, is applied to reduce calculation time. The model is estimated by applying to 25 August 2014 extreme rainfall event which caused severe inundation damages in Busan, Korea. Oncheoncheon basin is selected for study basin and observed radar data are assumed as predicted rainfall data. The model shows acceptable calculation speed with accuracy. Therefore it is expected that the model can be used for real-time urban inundation forecasting system to minimize damages.

  6. Numerical Methods and Comparisons for 1D and Quasi 2D Streamer Propagation Models

    CERN Document Server

    Huang, Mengmin; Guan, Huizhe; Zeng, Rong

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we propose four different strategies to simulate the one-dimensional (1D) and quasi two-dimensional (2D) model for streamer propagation. Each strategy involves of one numerical method for solving Poisson's equation and another method for solving continuity equations in the models, and a total variation diminishing three-stage Runge-Kutta method in temporal discretization. The numerical methods for Poisson's equation include finite volume method, discontinuous Galerkin methods, mixed finite element method and least-squared finite element method. The numerical method for continuity equations is chosen from the family of discontinuous Galerkin methods. The accuracy tests and comparisons show that all of these four strategies are suitable and competitive in streamer simulations from the aspects of accuracy and efficiency. By applying any strategy in real simulations, we can study the dynamics of streamer propagations and influences due to the change of parameters in both of 1D and quasi 2D models. T...

  7. Comparison between a coupled 1D-2D model and a fully 2D model for supercritical flow simulation in crossroads

    KAUST Repository

    Ghostine, Rabih

    2014-12-01

    In open channel networks, flow is usually approximated by the one-dimensional (1D) Saint-Venant equations coupled with an empirical junction model. In this work, a comparison in terms of accuracy and computational cost between a coupled 1D-2D shallow water model and a fully two-dimensional (2D) model is presented. The paper explores the ability of a coupled model to simulate the flow processes during supercritical flows in crossroads. This combination leads to a significant reduction in the computational time, as a 1D approach is used in branches and a 2D approach is employed in selected areas only where detailed flow information is essential. Overall, the numerical results suggest that the coupled model is able to accurately simulate the main flow processes. In particular, hydraulic jumps, recirculation zones, and discharge distribution are reasonably well reproduced and clearly identified. Overall, the proposed model leads to a 30% reduction in run times. © 2014 International Association for Hydro-Environment Engineering and Research.

  8. Dynamical Models of SAURON and CALIFA Galaxies: 1D and 2D Rotational Curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinova, Veselina; van de Ven, G.; Lyubenova, M.; Falcon-Barroso, J.; van den Bosch, R.

    2013-01-01

    The mass of a galaxy is the most important parameter to understand its structure and evolution. The total mass we can infer by constructing dynamical models that fit the motion of the stars and gas in the galaxy. The dark matter content then follows after subtracting the luminous matter inferred from colors and/or spectra. Here, we present the mass distribution of a sample of 18 late-type spiral (Sb-Sd) galaxies, using two-dimensional stellar kinematics obtained with the integral-field spectrograph SAURON. The observed second order velocity moments of these galaxies are fitted with solutions of the Axisymmetric Jeans equations and give us an accurate estimation of the mass-to-light ratio profiles and rotational curves. The rotation curves of the galaxies are obtained by the Asymmetric Drift Correction (ADC) and Multi-Gaussian Expansion (MGE) methods, corresponding to one- and two-dimensional mass distribution. Their comparison shows that the mass distribution based on the 2D stellar kinematics is much more reliable than 1D one. SAURON integral field of view looks at the inner parts of the galaxies in contrast with CALIFA survey. CALIFA survey provides PMAS/PPAK integral-field spectroscopic data of ~ 600 nearby galaxies as part of the Calar Alto Legacy Integral Field Area. We show the first CALIFA dynamical models of different morphological type of galaxies, giving the clue about the mass distribution of galaxies through the whole Hubble sequence and their evolution from the blue cloud to the red sequence.

  9. 1D and 2D urban dam-break flood modelling in Istanbul, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozdemir, Hasan; Neal, Jeffrey; Bates, Paul; Döker, Fatih

    2014-05-01

    Urban flood events are increasing in frequency and severity as a consequence of several factors such as reduced infiltration capacities due to continued watershed development, increased construction in flood prone areas due to population growth, the possible amplification of rainfall intensity due to climate change, sea level rise which threatens coastal development, and poorly engineered flood control infrastructure (Gallegos et al., 2009). These factors will contribute to increased urban flood risk in the future, and as a result improved modelling of urban flooding according to different causative factor has been identified as a research priority (Gallegos et al., 2009; Ozdemir et al. 2013). The flooding disaster caused by dam failures is always a threat against lives and properties especially in urban environments. Therefore, the prediction of dynamics of dam-break flows plays a vital role in the forecast and evaluation of flooding disasters, and is of long-standing interest for researchers. Flooding occurred on the Ayamama River (Istanbul-Turkey) due to high intensity rainfall and dam-breaching of Ata Pond in 9th September 2009. The settlements, industrial areas and transportation system on the floodplain of the Ayamama River were inundated. Therefore, 32 people were dead and millions of Euros economic loses were occurred. The aim of this study is 1 and 2-Dimensional flood modelling of the Ata Pond breaching using HEC-RAS and LISFLOOD-Roe models and comparison of the model results using the real flood extent. The HEC-RAS model solves the full 1-D Saint Venant equations for unsteady open channel flow whereas LISFLOOD-Roe is the 2-D shallow water model which calculates the flow according to the complete Saint Venant formulation (Villanueva and Wright, 2006; Neal et al., 2011). The model consists a shock capturing Godunov-type scheme based on the Roe Riemann solver (Roe, 1981). 3 m high resolution Digital Surface Model (DSM), natural characteristics of the pond

  10. Comparison of the 1D flux theory with a 2D hydrodynamic secondary settling tank model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekama, G A; Marais, P

    2004-01-01

    The applicability of the 1D idealized flux theory (1DFT) for design of secondary settling tanks (SSTs) is evaluated by comparing its predicted maximum surface overflow (SOR) and solids loading (SLR) rates with that calculated from the 2D hydrodynamic model SettlerCAD using as a basis 35 full scale SST stress tests conducted on different SSTs with diameters from 30 to 45m and 2.25 to 4.1 m side water depth, with and without Stamford baffles. From the simulations, a relatively consistent pattern appeared, i.e. that the 1DFT can be used for design but its predicted maximum SLR needs to be reduced by an appropriate flux rating, the magnitude of which depends mainly on SST depth and hydraulic loading rate (HLR). Simulations of the sloping bottom shallow (1.5-2.5 m SWD) Dutch SSTs tested by STOWa and the Watts et al. SST, all with doubled SWDs, and the Darvill new (4.1 m) and old (2.5 m) SSTs with interchanged depths, were run to confirm the sensitivity of the flux rating to depth and HLR. Simulations with and without a Stamford baffle were also done. While the design of the internal features of the SST, such as baffling, have a marked influence on the effluent SS concentration for underloaded SSTs, these features appeared to have only a small influence on the flux rating, i.e. capacity, of the SST, In the meantime until more information is obtained, it would appear that from the simulations so far that the flux rating of 0.80 of the 1DFT maximum SLR recommended by Ekama and Marais remains a reasonable value to apply in the design of full scale SSTs--for deep SSTs (4 m SWD) the flux rating could be increased to 0.85 and for shallow SSTs (2.5 m SWD) decreased to 0.75. It is recommended that (i) while the apparent interrelationship between SST flux rating and depth suggests some optimization of the volume of the SST, that this be avoided and that (ii) the depth of the SST be designed independently of the surface area as is usually the practice and once selected, the

  11. Multi-objective optimisation of cost-benefit of urban flood management using a 1D2D coupled model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delelegn, S W; Pathirana, A; Gersonius, B; Adeogun, A G; Vairavamoorthy, K

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a multi-objective optimisation (MOO) tool for urban drainage management that is based on a 1D2D coupled model of SWMM5 (1D sub-surface flow model) and BreZo (2D surface flow model). This coupled model is linked with NSGA-II, which is an Evolutionary Algorithm-based optimiser. Previously the combination of a surface/sub-surface flow model and evolutionary optimisation has been considered to be infeasible due to the computational demands. The 1D2D coupled model used here shows a computational efficiency that is acceptable for optimisation. This technological advance is the result of the application of a triangular irregular discretisation process and an explicit finite volume solver in the 2D surface flow model. Besides that, OpenMP based parallelisation was employed at optimiser level to further improve the computational speed of the MOO tool. The MOO tool has been applied to an existing sewer network in West Garforth, UK. This application demonstrates the advantages of using multi-objective optimisation by providing an easy-to-comprehend Pareto-optimal front (relating investment cost to expected flood damage) that could be used for decision making processes, without repeatedly going through the modelling-optimisation stage.

  12. Comparison between a 1D and a 2D numerical model of an active magnetic regenerative refrigerator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Thomas Frank; Engelbrecht, Kurt; Bahl, Christian Robert Haffenden

    2008-01-01

    a reciprocating AMR and can determine the cyclical steady-state temperature profile of the system as well as performance parameters such as the refrigeration capacity, the work input and the coefficient of performance (COP). The models are used to analyse an AMR with a regenerator made of flat parallel plates......The active magnetic regenerator (AMR) refrigeration system represents an environmentally attractive alternative to vapour-compression refrigeration. This paper compares the results of two numerical AMR models: (1) a 1D finite difference model and (2) a 2D finite element model. Both models simulate...

  13. 2D MHD AND 1D HD MODELS OF A SOLAR FLARE—A COMPREHENSIVE COMPARISON OF THE RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Falewicz, R.; Rudawy, P. [Astronomical Institute, University of Wrocław, 51-622 Wrocław, ul. Kopernika 11 (Poland); Murawski, K. [Group of Astrophysics, UMCS, ul. Radziszewskiego 10, 20-031 Lublin (Poland); Srivastava, A. K., E-mail: falewicz@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: rudawy@astro.uni.wroc.pl, E-mail: kmur@kft.umcs.lublin.pl, E-mail: asrivastava.app@iitbhu.ac.in [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology (Banaras Hindu University), Varanasi-221005 (India)

    2015-11-01

    Without any doubt, solar flaring loops possess a multithread internal structure that is poorly resolved, and there are no means to observe heating episodes and thermodynamic evolution of the individual threads. These limitations cause fundamental problems in numerical modeling of flaring loops, such as selection of a structure and a number of threads, and an implementation of a proper model of the energy deposition process. A set of one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic and two-dimensional (2D) magnetohydrodynamic models of a flaring loop are developed to compare energy redistribution and plasma dynamics in the course of a prototypical solar flare. Basic parameters of the modeled loop are set according to the progenitor M1.8 flare recorded in AR 10126 on 2002 September 20 between 09:21 UT and 09:50 UT. The nonideal 1D models include thermal conduction and radiative losses of the optically thin plasma as energy-loss mechanisms, while the nonideal 2D models take into account viscosity and thermal conduction as energy-loss mechanisms only. The 2D models have a continuous distribution of the parameters of the plasma across the loop and are powered by varying in time and space along and across the loop heating flux. We show that such 2D models are an extreme borderline case of a multithread internal structure of the flaring loop, with a filling factor equal to 1. Nevertheless, these simple models ensure the general correctness of the obtained results and can be adopted as a correct approximation of the real flaring structures.

  14. 2D MHD and 1D HD models of a solar flare -- a comprehensive comparison of the results

    CERN Document Server

    Falewicz, R; Murawski, K; Srivastava, A K

    2015-01-01

    Without any doubt solar flaring loops possess a multi-thread internal structure that is poorly resolved and there are no means to observe heating episodes and thermodynamic evolution of the individual threads. These limitations cause fundamental problems in numerical modelling of flaring loops, such as selection of a structure and a number of threads, and an implementation of a proper model of the energy deposition process. A set of 1D hydrodynamic and 2D magnetohydrodynamic models of a flaring loop are developed to compare energy redistribution and plasma dynamics in the course of a prototypical solar flare. Basic parameters of the modeled loop are set according to the progenitor M1.8 flare recorded in the AR10126 on September 20, 2002 between 09:21 UT and 09:50 UT. The non-ideal 1D models include thermal conduction and radiative losses of the optically thin plasma as energy loss mechanisms, while the non-ideal 2D models take into account viscosity and thermal conduction as energy loss mechanisms only. The 2...

  15. 1-D and 2-D resonances in an Alpine valley identified from ambient noise measurements and 3-D modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Roux, Olivier; Cornou, Cécile; Jongmans, Denis; Schwartz, Stéphane

    2012-09-01

    H/V spectral ratios are regularly used for estimating the bedrock depth in 1-D like basins exhibiting smooth lateral variations. In the case of 2-D or 3-D pronounced geometries, observational and numerical studies have shown that H/V curves exhibit peculiar shapes and that the H/V frequency generally overestimates 1-D theoretical resonance frequency. To investigate the capabilities of the H/V method in complex structures, a detailed comparison between measured and 3-D-simulated ambient vibrations was performed in the small-size lower Romanche valley (French Alps), which shows significant variations in geometry, downstream and upstream the Séchilienne basin. Analysing the H/V curve characteristics, two different wave propagation modes were identified along the valley. Relying on previous geophysical investigation, a power-law relationship was derived between the bedrock depth and the H/V peak frequency, which was used for building a 3-D model of the valley geometry. Simulated and experimental H/V curves were found to exhibit quite similar features in terms of curve shape and peak frequency values, validating the 3-D structure. This good agreement also evidenced two different propagation modes in the valley: 2-D resonance in the Séchilienne basin and 1-D resonance in the external parts. This study underlines the interest of H/V curves for investigating complex basin structures.

  16. Comparing 1D, 2D and 3D models for predicting root water uptake at the plant scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Willigen, Peter; van Dam, Jos; Heinen, Marius; Javaux, Mathieu

    2010-05-01

    Numerous modeling approaches exist to simulate soil water extraction by plant roots. They mainly differ in terms of dimensionality (from 1-D to 3-D) and in the degree of detail involved in the root geometry. One dimensional models consider 1-D root length density profiles and assume uniform horizontal soil water distribution and are very efficient regarding computation time. On the opposite, very detailed 3-D approaches, which consider explicitly the root architecture and the root water flow, may need more computation power and time. In between these two extreme cases, other approaches exist, which may be more accurate and less computationally demanding. Our objective is to compare different modeling approaches and check how their implicit or explicit simplifications or assumptions affect the root water uptake (RWU) predictions. Four models were subject to our comparison, all based on Richards equation. The first is a 1-D model solving Richards equation (SWAP) with the Feddes (1978) approach for RWU. The second one is also based on SWAP but with the root water uptake defined by a microscopic approach developed by de Jong van Lier (2008). The third one, FUSSIM, solves the Richards equation in 2-D based on a 2-D distribution of root length density (RLD). The fourth one is R-SWMS, a 3-D model simulating the water flow in the soil and in the roots, based on the complete root architecture description. A 45-day maize root was generated in 3-D and simplified in 2-D or 1-D RLD distributions. We simulated a constant uptake rate for 30 days with a 1-day rainfall at day 15 in three different soil types. We compared relative water uptake versus relative root length density profiles, and actual transpiration time series. On the one hand, the general trends of cumulative transpiration with time for the three soils were relatively similar for all models. On the other hand, some features like hydraulic lift are simulated by both FUSSIM and RSWMS models while other models do not

  17. 1D and 2D Numerical Modeling for Solving Dam-Break Flow Problems Using Finite Volume Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szu-Hsien Peng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to model the flow movement in an idealized dam-break configuration. One-dimensional and two-dimensional motion of a shallow flow over a rigid inclined bed is considered. The resulting shallow water equations are solved by finite volumes using the Roe and HLL schemes. At first, the one-dimensional model is considered in the development process. With conservative finite volume method, splitting is applied to manage the combination of hyperbolic term and source term of the shallow water equation and then to promote 1D to 2D. The simulations are validated by the comparison with flume experiments. Unsteady dam-break flow movement is found to be reasonably well captured by the model. The proposed concept could be further developed to the numerical calculation of non-Newtonian fluid or multilayers fluid flow.

  18. Using 1D2D Hydrodynamic Modeling to Inform Restoration Planning in the Atchafalaya River Basin, Louisiana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden-Lesmeister, A.; Remo, J. W.; Piazza, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Atchafalaya River (AR) in Louisiana is the principal distributary of the Mississippi River (MR), and its basin contains the largest contiguous area of baldcypress-water tupelo swamp forests in North America. After designation of the Atchafalaya River Basin (ARB) as a federal floodway following the destructive 1927 MR flood, it was extensively modified to accommodate a substantial portion of the MR flow (~25%) to mitigate flooding in southern Louisiana. These modifications and increased flows resulted in substantial incision along large portions of the AR, altering connectivity between the river and its associated waterbodies. As a result of incision, the hydroperiod has been substantially altered, which has contributed to a decline in ecological health of the ARB's baldcypress-water tupelo forests. While it is recognized that the altered hydroperiod has negatively affected natural baldcypress regeneration, it is unclear whether proposed projects designed to enhance flow connectivity will increase long-term survival of these forests. In this study, we have constructed a 1D2D hydrodynamic model using SOBEK 2.12 to realistically model key physical parameters such as residence times, inundation extent, water-surface elevations (WSELs), and flow velocities to increase our understanding of the ARB's altered hydroperiod and the consequences for baldcypress-water tupelo forests. While the model encompasses a majority of the ARB, our modeling effort is focused on the Flat Lake Water Management Unit located in the southern portion of the ARB, where it will also be used to evaluate flow connectivity enhancement projects within the management unit. We believe our 1D2D hybrid hydraulic modeling approach will provide the flexibility and accuracy needed to guide connectivity enhancement efforts in the ARB and may provide a model framework for guiding similar efforts along other highly-altered river systems.

  19. Development of 1D and 2D coupled model to simulate urban inundation: An application to Beijing Olympic Village

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI WeiFeng; CHEN QiuWen; MAO JingQiao

    2009-01-01

    Urban inundation due to anomalous storms is a serious problem for many cities worldwide. Therefore, it is important to accurately simulate urban hydrological processes and efficiently predict the potential risks of urban floods for the improvement of drainage designs and implementation of emergency ac-tions. However, the complexity of urban landforma and the diversity of hydraulic infrastructure pose particular challenges for the simulation and risk assessment of urban drainage processes. This study developed a methodology to comprehensively simulate inundation processes by dynamically coupling 1D and 2D hydrodynamic models. By allowing the simultaneous solution of the processes of rainfall and runoff, urban drainage, and flooding, this method can be used to estimate the potential inundation risks of any designed drainage system. Furthermore, a Geographical Information System (GIS) based platform was fully integrated with the model engine to effectively illustrate the context of the problem. The developed model was then demonstrated on the Beijing 2008 Olympic Village under the conditions of the 5-year and 50-year design storms. The sewer discharge, channel discharge, and flood propaga-tion (inundation initiation, extent, depths, and duration) were numerically validated and analyzed. The results identified the potential inundation risks. From the study, it is found that the coupled GIS and 1D and 2D hydrodynamic models have the potential to simulate urban inundation processes, and hence efficiently predict flood risks and support cost-effective drainage design and management. It also im-plies promising prospects about the wide availability of high quality digital data, GIS techniques, and well-developed monitoring infrastructure to develop online urban inundation forecasts.

  20. Assessing the impact of uncertainty on flood risk estimates with reliability analysis using 1-D and 2-D hydraulic models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Altarejos-García

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper addresses the use of reliability techniques such as Rosenblueth's Point-Estimate Method (PEM as a practical alternative to more precise Monte Carlo approaches to get estimates of the mean and variance of uncertain flood parameters water depth and velocity. These parameters define the flood severity, which is a concept used for decision-making in the context of flood risk assessment. The method proposed is particularly useful when the degree of complexity of the hydraulic models makes Monte Carlo inapplicable in terms of computing time, but when a measure of the variability of these parameters is still needed. The capacity of PEM, which is a special case of numerical quadrature based on orthogonal polynomials, to evaluate the first two moments of performance functions such as the water depth and velocity is demonstrated in the case of a single river reach using a 1-D HEC-RAS model. It is shown that in some cases, using a simple variable transformation, statistical distributions of both water depth and velocity approximate the lognormal. As this distribution is fully defined by its mean and variance, PEM can be used to define the full probability distribution function of these flood parameters and so allowing for probability estimations of flood severity. Then, an application of the method to the same river reach using a 2-D Shallow Water Equations (SWE model is performed. Flood maps of mean and standard deviation of water depth and velocity are obtained, and uncertainty in the extension of flooded areas with different severity levels is assessed. It is recognized, though, that whenever application of Monte Carlo method is practically feasible, it is a preferred approach.

  1. A COUPLED 1-D AND 2-D CHANNEL NETWORK MATHEMATICAL MODEL USED FOR FLOW CALCULATIONS IN THE MIDDLE REACHES OF THE YANGTZE RIVER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Dong; FANG Hong-wei; BAI Jing; HE Guo-jian

    2011-01-01

    A coupled one-dimensional(1-D)and two-dimensional(2-D)channel network mathematical model is proposed for flow calculations at nodes in a channel network system in this article.For the 1-D model,the finite difference method is used to discretize the Saint-Venant equations in all channels of a looped network.The Alternating Direction Implicit(ADI)method is adopted for the 2-D model at the nodes.In the coupled model,the 1-D model provides a good approximation with small computational effort,while the 2-D model is applied for complex topography to achieve a high accuracy.An Artificial Neural Network(ANN)method is used for the data exchange and the connectivity between the 1-D and 2-D models.The coupled model is applied to the Jingjiang-Dongting Lake region,to simulate the tremendous looped channel network system,and the results are compared with field data.The good agreement shows that the coupled hydraulic model is more effective than the conventional 1-D model.

  2. Using 1 -D and 2-D modelling of ground motion for seismic zonation criteria: results for the city of Rome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Caserta

    1995-06-01

    Full Text Available The geological information collected in the last years by the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica for the city of Rome is used to construct 1- and 2-D models of the nearsurface structure. These models are the basis for the numerical generation of synthetic accelerograms which can simulate the horizontal ground motion (SH waves produced in the different areas of the city by a large (M ? 7 potential earthquake 100 km away in Central Apennines. The proposed methodology yields earthquake engineering parameters (peak ground acceleration and velocity, Arias intensity, energy flux, response spectra whose spatial variations are consistent with the damage distribution caused by the strongest earthquakes felt in Rome during its long history. Based on the macroseismic inforination and the results of the numerical simulations, general criteria for seismic zonation of the city of Rome are proposed.

  3. Modeling seismic wave propagation and amplification in 1D/2D/3D linear and nonlinear unbounded media

    CERN Document Server

    Semblat, Jean-François

    2011-01-01

    To analyze seismic wave propagation in geological structures, it is possible to consider various numerical approaches: the finite difference method, the spectral element method, the boundary element method, the finite element method, the finite volume method, etc. All these methods have various advantages and drawbacks. The amplification of seismic waves in surface soil layers is mainly due to the velocity contrast between these layers and, possibly, to topographic effects around crests and hills. The influence of the geometry of alluvial basins on the amplification process is also know to be large. Nevertheless, strong heterogeneities and complex geometries are not easy to take into account with all numerical methods. 2D/3D models are needed in many situations and the efficiency/accuracy of the numerical methods in such cases is in question. Furthermore, the radiation conditions at infinity are not easy to handle with finite differences or finite/spectral elements whereas it is explicitely accounted in the B...

  4. Homogenization of 1D and 2D magnetoelastic lattices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schaeffer Marshall

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the equivalent in-plane mechanical properties of one dimensional (1D and two dimensional (2D, periodic magneto-elastic lattices. A lumped parameter model describes the lattices using magnetic dipole moments in combination with axial and torsional springs. The homogenization procedure is applied to systems linearized about stable configurations, which are identified by minimizing potential energy. Simple algebraic expressions are derived for the properties of 1D structures. Results for 1D lattices show that a variety of stiffness changes are possible through reconfiguration, and that magnetization can either stiffen or soften a structure. Results for 2D hexagonal and re-entrant lattices show that both reconfigurations and magnetization have drastic effects on the mechanical properties of lattice structures. Lattices can be stiffened or softened and the Poisson’s ratio can be tuned. Furthermore for certain hexagonal lattices the sign of Poisson’s ratio can change by varying the lattice magnetization. In some cases presented, analytical and numerically estimated equivalent properties are validated through numerical simulations that also illustrate the unique characteristics of the investigated configurations.

  5. Automatic simulation of 1D and 2D chaotic oscillators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tlelo-Cuautle, E; Munoz-Pacheco, J-M [Department of Electronics, INAOE, Luis Enrique Erro No. 1, Tonantzintla, Puebla, 72840 MEXICO (Mexico)], E-mail: e.tlelo@ieee.org, E-mail: mpacheco@inaoep.mx

    2008-02-15

    A new method is introduced for automatic simulation of three kinds of chaotic oscillators: Chua's circuit, generalized Chua's circuit and chaotic oscillator implemented with saturated functions. The former generates the double-scroll, and the others 1D n-scroll attractors. The third chaotic oscillator is modified to generate 2D n-scrolls attractors. The oscillators are modelled by applying state variables and piecewise-linear approximation. Basically, the method computes the eigenvalues of the oscillators to begin time simulation and to make control of step-size automatically.

  6. Improved Large-Scale Inundation Modelling by 1D-2D Coupling and Consideration of Hydrologic and Hydrodynamic Processes - a Case Study in the Amazon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, J. M.; Bierkens, M. F.; Van Beek, R.; Winsemius, H.; Haag, A.

    2015-12-01

    Understanding the dynamics of fluvial floods is paramount to accurate flood hazard and risk modeling. Currently, economic losses due to flooding constitute about one third of all damage resulting from natural hazards. Given future projections of climate change, the anticipated increase in the World's population and the associated implications, sound knowledge of flood hazard and related risk is crucial. Fluvial floods are cross-border phenomena that need to be addressed accordingly. Yet, only few studies model floods at the large-scale which is preferable to tiling the output of small-scale models. Most models cannot realistically model flood wave propagation due to a lack of either detailed channel and floodplain geometry or the absence of hydrologic processes. This study aims to develop a large-scale modeling tool that accounts for both hydrologic and hydrodynamic processes, to find and understand possible sources of errors and improvements and to assess how the added hydrodynamics affect flood wave propagation. Flood wave propagation is simulated by DELFT3D-FM (FM), a hydrodynamic model using a flexible mesh to schematize the study area. It is coupled to PCR-GLOBWB (PCR), a macro-scale hydrological model, that has its own simpler 1D routing scheme (DynRout) which has already been used for global inundation modeling and flood risk assessments (GLOFRIS; Winsemius et al., 2013). A number of model set-ups are compared and benchmarked for the simulation period 1986-1996: (0) PCR with DynRout; (1) using a FM 2D flexible mesh forced with PCR output and (2) as in (1) but discriminating between 1D channels and 2D floodplains, and, for comparison, (3) and (4) the same set-ups as (1) and (2) but forced with observed GRDC discharge values. Outputs are subsequently validated against observed GRDC data at Óbidos and flood extent maps from the Dartmouth Flood Observatory. The present research constitutes a first step into a globally applicable approach to fully couple

  7. A novel 1D/2D model for simulating conjugate heat transfer applied to flow boiling in tubes with external fins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocłoń, Paweł; Łopata, Stanisław; Nowak, Marzena

    2015-04-01

    This study presents a novel, simplified model for the time-efficient simulation of transient conjugate heat transfer in round tubes. The flow domain and the tube wall are modeled in 1D and 2D, respectively and empirical correlations are used to model the flow domain in 1D. The model is particularly useful when dealing with complex physics, such as flow boiling, which is the main focus of this study. The tube wall is assumed to have external fins. The flow is vertical upwards. Note that straightforward computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis of conjugate heat transfer in a system of tubes, leads to 3D modeling of fluid and solid domains. Because correlation is used and dimensionality reduced, the model is numerically more stable and computationally more time-efficient compared to the CFD approach. The benefit of the proposed approach is that it can be applied to large systems of tubes as encountered in many practical applications. The modeled equations are discretized in space using the finite volume method, with central differencing for the heat conduction equation in the solid domain, and upwind differencing of the convective term of the enthalpy transport equation in the flow domain. An explicit time discretization with forward differencing was applied to the enthalpy transport equation in the fluid domain. The conduction equation in the solid domain was time discretized using the Crank-Nicholson scheme. The model is applied in different boundary conditions and the predicted boiling patterns and temperature fields are discussed.

  8. Simulation of decay heat removal by natural convection in a pool type fast reactor model-ramona-with coupled 1D/2D thermal hydraulic code system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasinathan, N.; Rajakumar, A.; Vaidyanathan, G.; Chetal, S.C. [Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research, Kalpakkam (India)

    1995-09-01

    Post shutdown decay heat removal is an important safety requirement in any nuclear system. In order to improve the reliability of this function, Liquid metal (sodium) cooled fast breeder reactors (LMFBR) are equipped with redundant hot pool dipped immersion coolers connected to natural draught air cooled heat exchangers through intermediate sodium circuits. During decay heat removal, flow through the core, immersion cooler primary side and in the intermediate sodium circuits are also through natural convection. In order to establish the viability and validate computer codes used in making predictions, a 1:20 scale experimental model called RAMONA with water as coolant has been built and experimental simulation of decay heat removal situation has been performed at KfK Karlsruhe. Results of two such experiments have been compiled and published as benchmarks. This paper brings out the results of the numerical simulation of one of the benchmark case through a 1D/2D coupled code system, DHDYN-1D/THYC-2D and the salient features of the comparisons. Brief description of the formulations of the codes are also included.

  9. Comparative evaluation of 1D and quasi-2D hydraulic models based on benchmark and real-world applications for uncertainty assessment in flood mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Tegos, Aristoteles; Oikonomou, Athanasios; Pagana, Vassiliki; Koukouvinos, Antonios; Mamassis, Nikos; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris; Efstratiadis, Andreas

    2016-03-01

    One-dimensional and quasi-two-dimensional hydraulic freeware models (HEC-RAS, LISFLOOD-FP and FLO-2d) are widely used for flood inundation mapping. These models are tested on a benchmark test with a mixed rectangular-triangular channel cross section. Using a Monte-Carlo approach, we employ extended sensitivity analysis by simultaneously varying the input discharge, longitudinal and lateral gradients and roughness coefficients, as well as the grid cell size. Based on statistical analysis of three output variables of interest, i.e. water depths at the inflow and outflow locations and total flood volume, we investigate the uncertainty enclosed in different model configurations and flow conditions, without the influence of errors and other assumptions on topography, channel geometry and boundary conditions. Moreover, we estimate the uncertainty associated to each input variable and we compare it to the overall one. The outcomes of the benchmark analysis are further highlighted by applying the three models to real-world flood propagation problems, in the context of two challenging case studies in Greece.

  10. Subplane-based Control Rod Decusping Techniques for the 2D/1D Method in MPACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Aaron M [ORNL; Collins, Benjamin S [ORNL; Downar, Thomas [University of Michigan

    2017-01-01

    The MPACT transport code is being jointly developed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Michigan to serve as the primary neutron transport code for the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Core Simulator. MPACT uses the 2D/1D method to solve the transport equation by decomposing the reactor model into a stack of 2D planes. A fine mesh flux distribution is calculated in each 2D plane using the Method of Characteristics (MOC), then the planes are coupled axially through a 1D NEM-P$_3$ calculation. This iterative calculation is then accelerated using the Coarse Mesh Finite Difference method. One problem that arises frequently when using the 2D/1D method is that of control rod cusping. This occurs when the tip of a control rod falls between the boundaries of an MOC plane, requiring that the rodded and unrodded regions be axially homogenized for the 2D MOC calculations. Performing a volume homogenization does not properly preserve the reaction rates, causing an error known as cusping. The most straightforward way of resolving this problem is by refining the axial mesh, but this can significantly increase the computational expense of the calculation. The other way of resolving the partially inserted rod is through the use of a decusping method. This paper presents new decusping methods implemented in MPACT that can dynamically correct the rod cusping behavior for a variety of problems.

  11. Low band gap frequencies and multiplexing properties in 1D and 2D mass spring structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aly, Arafa H.; Mehaney, Ahmed

    2016-11-01

    This study reports on the propagation of elastic waves in 1D and 2D mass spring structures. An analytical and computation model is presented for the 1D and 2D mass spring systems with different examples. An enhancement in the band gap values was obtained by modeling the structures to obtain low frequency band gaps at small dimensions. Additionally, the evolution of the band gap as a function of mass value is discussed. Special attention is devoted to the local resonance property in frequency ranges within the gaps in the band structure for the corresponding infinite periodic lattice in the 1D and 2D mass spring system. A linear defect formed of a row of specific masses produces an elastic waveguide that transmits at the narrow pass band frequency. The frequency of the waveguides can be selected by adjusting the mass and stiffness coefficients of the materials constituting the waveguide. Moreover, we pay more attention to analyze the wave multiplexer and DE-multiplexer in the 2D mass spring system. We show that two of these tunable waveguides with alternating materials can be employed to filter and separate specific frequencies from a broad band input signal. The presented simulation data is validated through comparison with the published research, and can be extended in the development of resonators and MEMS verification.

  12. Optimal Control of 1D and 2D Circuit QED

    CERN Document Server

    Fisher, R; Glaser, S J; Marquardt, F; Schulte-Herbrueggen, T

    2009-01-01

    Optimal control can be used to significantly improve multi-qubit gates in quantum information processing hardware architectures based on superconducting circuit quantum electrodynamics. We apply this approach not only to dispersive gates of two qubits inside a cavity, but, more generally, to architectures based on two-dimensional arrays of cavities and qubits. For high-fidelity gate operations, simultaneous evolutions of controls and couplings in the two coupling dimensions of cavity grids are shown to be significantly faster than conventional sequential implementations. Even under experimentally realistic conditions speedups by a factor of three can be gained. The methods immediately scale to large grids and indirect gates between arbitrary pairs of qubits on the grid. They are anticipated to be paradigmatic for 2D arrays and lattices of controllable qubits.

  13. Evaluation of the causes of inundation in a repeatedly flooded zone in the city of Cheongju, Korea, using a 1D/2D model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, In-Hyeok; Lee, Jeong-Yong; Lee, Ji-Heon; Ha, Sung-Ryong

    2014-01-01

    Currently, unprecedented levels of damage arising from major weather events have been experienced in a number of major cities worldwide. Furthermore, the frequency and the scale of these disasters appear to be increasing and this is viewed by some as tangible proof of climate change. In the urbanized areas sewer overflows and resulting inundation are attributed to the conversion of previous surfaces into impervious surfaces, resulting in increased volumes of runoff which exceed the capacity of sewer systems and in particular combined sewer systems. In this study, the characteristics of sewer overflows and inundation have been analyzed in a repeatedly flooded zone in the city of Cheongju in Korea. This included an assessment of inundation in a 50-year storm event with total rainfall of 165 mm. A detailed XP-SWMM 2D model was assembled and run to simulate the interaction of the sewage system overflows and surface inundation to determine if inundation is due to hydraulic capacity limitations in the sewers or limitations in surface inlet capacities or a combination of both. Calibration was undertaken using observation at three locations (PT #1, PT #2, PT #3) within the study area. In the case of the subsurface flow calibration, R(2) value of 0.91 and 0.78 respectively were achieved at PT #1 and PT #2. Extremely good agreement between observed and predicted surface flow depths was achieved also at PT #1 and PT #2. However, at PT #3 the predicted flow depth was 4 cm lower than the observed depth, which was attributed to the impact of buildings on the local flow distribution. Areas subject to flooding were classified as either Type A (due to insufficient hydraulic capacity of a sewer), Type B (which is an area without flooding notwithstanding insufficient hydraulic capacity of a sewer) or Type C (due to inlet limitations, i.e. there is hydraulic capacity in a sewer which is not utilized). In the total flooded zone, 24% was classified as Type A (10.2 ha) and 25% was

  14. Polarons in endohedral Li+@C60- dimers and in 1D and 2D crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki; Belosludov, Vladimir R.; Zhdanov, Ravil K.; Belosludov, Rodion V.

    2017-10-01

    The electron charge distribution and polaron formation on the carbon sites of dimer clusters Li+@C60- and of 1D or 2D Li+@C60- periodic systems are studied with the use of the generalized Su-Schrieffer-Heeger model with respect to the intermolecular and intramolecular degrees of freedom. The charge distributions over the molecular surface and Jahn-Teller bond distortions of carbon atoms are calculated using the self-consistent iterative methods. Polarons formed in periodic 1D and 2D systems (chains and planar layers) as well as in dimer cluster system are examined. In the periodic systems polaron formation may be described by the cooperative Jahn-Teller effect. Orientation of the polarons on the molecule surface depends on the doping of the system, moreover, electron doping changes the energy levels in the system.

  15. A Review of Swarm-Based 1D/2D Signal Processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horia Mihail Teodorescu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available While swarming behavior, widely encountered in nature, has recently sparked numerous models and interest in domains as optimization, data clustering, and control, their application to signal processing remains sporadic. In this paper I provide a unitary treatment and a review of former results obtained in signal filtering and enhancement using swarms. General equations are presented for these procedures and stability issues are considered, with examples. The paper overviews several swarming model I introduced in previous papers and provides new evidence of the applicability of these models in signal processing. In all the models for 1D signal processing, the key idea is that the swarm hunts a prey that impersonates the filtered signal. In the 2D models, the signal (image represents the “landscape” over which the swarm moves at a distance, while the swarm interacts with the signal (landscape. I provide and discuss details of the underlying theory of the models for processing time-domain signals and images. While this paper partly follows and summarizes previous papers, it nevertheless includes supplementary theoretical and algorithmic considerations and new results for both 1D and 2D signal processing. Although following either biological models or physical models in swarm algorithms is not generally accepted for technical applications, we prefer to emphasize the analogies established by our biomimetic approach with these two groups of models.

  16. Regional subsidence modelling in Murcia city (SE Spain using 1-D vertical finite element analysis and 2-D interpolation of ground surface displacements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tessitore

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Subsidence is a hazard that may have natural or anthropogenic origin causing important economic losses. The area of Murcia city (SE Spain has been affected by subsidence due to groundwater overexploitation since the year 1992. The main observed historical piezometric level declines occurred in the periods 1982–1984, 1992–1995 and 2004–2008 and showed a close correlation with the temporal evolution of ground displacements. Since 2008, the pressure recovery in the aquifer has led to an uplift of the ground surface that has been detected by the extensometers. In the present work an elastic hydro-mechanical finite element code has been used to compute the subsidence time series for 24 geotechnical boreholes, prescribing the measured groundwater table evolution. The achieved results have been compared with the displacements estimated through an advanced DInSAR technique and measured by the extensometers. These spatio-temporal comparisons have showed that, in spite of the limited geomechanical data available, the model has turned out to satisfactorily reproduce the subsidence phenomenon affecting Murcia City. The model will allow the prediction of future induced deformations and the consequences of any piezometric level variation in the study area.

  17. Assessing the applicability of the 1D flux theory to full-scale secondary settling tank design with a 2D hydrodynamic model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekama, G A; Marais, P

    2004-02-01

    The applicability of the one-dimensional idealized flux theory (1DFT) for the design of secondary settling tanks (SSTs) is evaluated by comparing its predicted maximum surface overflow (SOR) and solids loading (SLR) rates with that calculated with the two-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model SettlerCAD using as a basis 35 full-scale SST stress tests conducted on different SSTs with diameters from 30 to 45m and 2.25-4.1m side water depth (SWD), with and without Stamford baffles. From the simulations, a relatively consistent pattern appeared, i.e. that the 1DFT can be used for design but its predicted maximum SLR needs to be reduced by an appropriate flux rating, the magnitude of which depends mainly on SST depth and hydraulic loading rate (HLR). Simulations of the Watts et al. (Water Res. 30(9)(1996)2112) SST, with doubled SWDs and the Darvill new (4.1m) and old (2.5m) SSTs with interchanged depths, were run to confirm the sensitivity of the flux rating to depth and HLR. Simulations with and without a Stamford baffle were also performed. While the design of the internal features of the SST, such as baffling, has a marked influence on the effluent SS concentration while the SST is underloaded, these features appeared to have only a small influence on the flux rating, i.e. capacity, of the SST. Until more information is obtained, it would appear from the simulations that the flux rating of 0.80 of the 1DFT maximum SLR recommended by Ekama and Marais (Water Pollut. Control 85(1)(1986)101) remains a reasonable value to apply in the design of full-scale SSTs-for deep SSTs (4m SWD) the flux rating could be increased to 0.85 and for shallow SSTs (2.5m SWD) decreased to 0.75. It is recommended that (i) while the apparent interrelationship between SST flux rating and depth suggests some optimization of the volume of the SST, this be avoided and (ii) the depth of the SST be designed independently of the surface area as is usually the practice and once selected, the

  18. Lacunarity analysis of raster datasets and 1D, 2D, and 3D point patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Pinliang

    2009-10-01

    Spatial scale plays an important role in many fields. As a scale-dependent measure for spatial heterogeneity, lacunarity describes the distribution of gaps within a set at multiple scales. In Earth science, environmental science, and ecology, lacunarity has been increasingly used for multiscale modeling of spatial patterns. This paper presents the development and implementation of a geographic information system (GIS) software extension for lacunarity analysis of raster datasets and 1D, 2D, and 3D point patterns. Depending on the application requirement, lacunarity analysis can be performed in two modes: global mode or local mode. The extension works for: (1) binary (1-bit) and grey-scale datasets in any raster format supported by ArcGIS and (2) 1D, 2D, and 3D point datasets as shapefiles or geodatabase feature classes. For more effective measurement of lacunarity for different patterns or processes in raster datasets, the extension allows users to define an area of interest (AOI) in four different ways, including using a polygon in an existing feature layer. Additionally, directionality can be taken into account when grey-scale datasets are used for local lacunarity analysis. The methodology and graphical user interface (GUI) are described. The application of the extension is demonstrated using both simulated and real datasets, including Brodatz texture images, a Spaceborne Imaging Radar (SIR-C) image, simulated 1D points on a drainage network, and 3D random and clustered point patterns. The options of lacunarity analysis and the effects of polyline arrangement on lacunarity of 1D points are also discussed. Results from sample data suggest that the lacunarity analysis extension can be used for efficient modeling of spatial patterns at multiple scales.

  19. Quasiperiodicity and 2D topology in 1D charge-ordered materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flicker, F.; van Wezel, J.

    2015-01-01

    The mathematical description of 1D quasicrystals has recently been linked to that of 2D quantum Hall states. The topological classification of 1D quasicrystals and the corresponding interpretation of their observed charge transport have been widely discussed. We demonstrate the equivalence of both 1

  20. On the Current Drive Capability of Low Dimensional Semiconductors: 1D versus 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y.; Appenzeller, J.

    2015-10-01

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  1. On the Current Drive Capability of Low Dimensional Semiconductors: 1D versus 2D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Y; Appenzeller, J

    2015-12-01

    Low-dimensional electronic systems are at the heart of many scaling approaches currently pursuit for electronic applications. Here, we present a comparative study between an array of one-dimensional (1D) channels and its two-dimensional (2D) counterpart in terms of current drive capability. Our findings from analytical expressions derived in this article reveal that under certain conditions an array of 1D channels can outperform a 2D field-effect transistor because of the added degree of freedom to adjust the threshold voltage in an array of 1D devices.

  2. Atomic layer deposition of 1D and 2D nickel nanostructures on graphite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Seung Wook; Yoon, Jaehong; Moon, Hyoung-Seok; Shong, Bonggeun; Kim, Hyungjun; Lee, Han-Bo-Ram

    2017-03-01

    One-dimensional (1D) nanowires (NWs) and two-dimensional (2D) thin films of Ni were deposited on highly ordered pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) by atomic layer deposition (ALD), using NH3 as a counter reactant. Thermal ALD using NH3 gas forms 1D NWs along step edges, while NH3 plasma enables the deposition of a continuous 2D film over the whole surface. The lateral and vertical growth rates of the Ni NWs are numerically modeled as a function of the number of ALD cycles. Pretreatment with NH3 gas promotes selectivity in deposition by the reduction of oxygenated functionalities on the HOPG surface. On the other hand, NH3 plasma pretreatment generates surface nitrogen species, and results in a morphological change in the basal plane of graphite, leading to active nucleation across the surface during ALD. The effects of surface nitrogen species on the nucleation of ALD Ni were theoretically studied by density functional theory calculations. Our results suggest that the properties of Ni NWs, such as their density and width, and the formation of Ni thin films on carbon surfaces can be controlled by appropriate use of NH3.

  3. Transparent Conducting Electrodes based on 1D and 2D Ag Nanogratings for Organic Photovoltaics

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Beibei; Bartoli, Filbert J

    2014-01-01

    The optical and electrical properties of optically-thin one-dimensional (1D) Ag nanogratings and two-dimensional (2D) Ag nanogrids are studied, and their use as transparent electrodes in organic photovoltaics are explored. A large broadband and polarization-insensitive optical absorption enhancement in the organic light-harvesting layers is theoretically and numerically demonstrated using either single-layer 2D Ag nanogrids or two perpendicular 1D Ag nanogratings, and is attributed to the excitation of surface plasmon resonances and plasmonic cavity modes. Total photon absorption enhancements of 150% and 200% are achieved for the optimized single-layer 2D Ag nanogrids and double (top and bottom) perpendicular 1D Ag nanogratings, respectively.

  4. Recent advances in bioactive 1D and 2D carbon nanomaterials for biomedical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Ozlem; Uyan, Idil; Hatip, Meryem; Yilmaz, Canelif; Tekinay, Ayse B; Guler, Mustafa O

    2017-05-26

    One-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and the two-dimensional (2D) graphene represent the most widely studied allotropes of carbon. Due to their unique structural, electrical, mechanical and optical properties, 1D and 2D carbon nanostructures are considered to be leading candidates for numerous applications in biomedical fields, including tissue engineering, drug delivery, bioimaging and biosensors. The biocompatibility and toxicity issues associated with these nanostructures have been a critical impediment for their use in biomedical applications. In this review, we present an overview of the various materials types, properties, functionalization strategies and characterization methods of 1D and 2D carbon nanomaterials and their derivatives in terms of their biomedical applications. In addition, we discuss various factors and mechanisms affecting their toxicity and biocompatibility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Computational Study and Analysis of Structural Imperfections in 1D and 2D Photonic Crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maskaly, Karlene Rosera [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology (MIT), Cambridge, MA (United States)

    2005-06-01

    Dielectric reflectors that are periodic in one or two dimensions, also known as 1D and 2D photonic crystals, have been widely studied for many potential applications due to the presence of wavelength-tunable photonic bandgaps. However, the unique optical behavior of photonic crystals is based on theoretical models of perfect analogues. Little is known about the practical effects of dielectric imperfections on their technologically useful optical properties. In order to address this issue, a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) code is employed to study the effect of three specific dielectric imperfections in 1D and 2D photonic crystals. The first imperfection investigated is dielectric interfacial roughness in quarter-wave tuned 1D photonic crystals at normal incidence. This study reveals that the reflectivity of some roughened photonic crystal configurations can change up to 50% at the center of the bandgap for RMS roughness values around 20% of the characteristic periodicity of the crystal. However, this reflectivity change can be mitigated by increasing the index contrast and/or the number of bilayers in the crystal. In order to explain these results, the homogenization approximation, which is usually applied to single rough surfaces, is applied to the quarter-wave stacks. The results of the homogenization approximation match the FDTD results extremely well, suggesting that the main role of the roughness features is to grade the refractive index profile of the interfaces in the photonic crystal rather than diffusely scatter the incoming light. This result also implies that the amount of incoherent reflection from the roughened quarterwave stacks is extremely small. This is confirmed through direct extraction of the amount of incoherent power from the FDTD calculations. Further FDTD studies are done on the entire normal incidence bandgap of roughened 1D photonic crystals. These results reveal a narrowing and red-shifting of the normal incidence bandgap with

  6. Transformation of 1-D Chiral-chained Titanium Phosphate to 2-D Layer Structure Through a 1-D Zigzag Chain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Chao; YANG Yu-lin; LI Wei-sheng; LIU Yun-ling; YI Zhuo; GUO Yang-hong; PANG Wen-qin

    2005-01-01

    The transformation of titanium phosphate from 1-D chiral- chain(JTP-A) to 2-D layer(TP-J1) has been carefully investigated. Through a hydrolysis-condensation self-assembly pathway, the crystals of TP-J1 can be obtained from the JTP-A phase under hydrothermal conditions. An intermediate material with zigzag chain during the transformation was observed by XRD characterization. A hypothesis of the transformation mechanism is also described in this article. It is noteworthy that ethylenediamine plays an important role in the transformation.

  7. Developing Sediment Transport and Dredging Prediction Model of Ohio River at Olmsted Locks and Dams Area using HEC-RAS (1D/2D)By Ganesh Raj Ghimire1 and Bruce A. Devantier 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghimire, G. R.

    2015-12-01

    Sediment deposition is a serious issue in the construction and operation of large reservoir and inland navigation projects in the United States and around the world. Olmsted Locks and Dams in the Ohio River navigation system is facing similar challenges of huge sediment deposition during the ongoing in-wet construction methodology since 1993. HEC-RAS 5.0 integrated with ArcGIS, will be used to yield unsteady 2D hydrodynamic model of Ohio River at Olmsted area. Velocity, suspended sediment, bed sediment and hydrographic survey data acquired from public archives of USGS and USACE Louisville District will be input into the model. Calibration and validation of model will be performed against the measured stage, flow and velocity data. It will be subjected to completely unsteady 1D sediment transport modeling new to HEC-RAS 5.0 which incorporates sediment load and bed gradation via a DSS file, commercial dredging and BSTEM model. Sediment model will be calibrated to replicate the historical bed volume changes. Excavated cross-sections at Olmsted area will also be used to predict the sediment volume trapped inside the ditch over the period between excavations and placement of dam shells at site. Model will attempt to replicate historical dredging volume data and compare with the deposition volume from simulation model to formulate the dredging prediction model. Hence, the results of this research will generate a model that can form a basis for scheduling the dredging event prior to the placement of off-shore cast shells replacing the current as and when required approach of dredging plan. 1 Graduate Student, Department of Civil Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale Carbondale, Illinois, 62901-6603 2 Professor, Department of Civil Engineering, Southern Illinois University Carbondale Carbondale, Illinois, 62901-6603

  8. Improvement of the 2D/1D Method in MPACT Using the Sub-Plane Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Aaron M [ORNL; Collins, Benjamin S [ORNL; Downar, Thomas [University of Michigan

    2017-01-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Michigan are jointly developing the MPACTcode to be the primary neutron transport code for the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications (VERA). To solve the transport equation, MPACT uses the 2D/1D method, which decomposes the problem into a stack of 2D planes that are then coupled with a 1D axial calculation. MPACT uses the Method of Characteristics for the 2D transport calculations and P3 for the 1D axial calculations, then accelerates the solution using the 3D Coarse mesh Finite Dierence (CMFD) method. Increasing the number of 2D MOC planes will increase the accuracy of the alculation, but will increase the computational burden of the calculations and can cause slow convergence or instability. To prevent these problems while maintaining accuracy, the sub-plane scheme has been implemented in MPACT. This method sub-divides the MOC planes into sub-planes, refining the 1D P3 and 3D CMFD calculations without increasing the number of 2D MOC planes. To test the sub-plane scheme, three of the VERA Progression Problems were selected: Problem 3, a single assembly problem; Problem 4, a 3x3 assembly problem with control rods and pyrex burnable poisons; and Problem 5, a quarter core problem. These three problems demonstrated that the sub-plane scheme can accurately produce intra-plane axial flux profiles that preserve the accuracy of the fine mesh solution. The eigenvalue dierences are negligibly small, and dierences in 3D power distributions are less than 0.1% for realistic axial meshes. Furthermore, the convergence behavior with the sub-plane scheme compares favorably with the conventional 2D/1D method, and the computational expense is decreased for all calculations due to the reduction in expensive MOC calculations.

  9. Plasma as a tool for growth of 1D and 2D nanomaterials and their conversions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cvelbar, Uros

    2015-09-01

    The growth of 1D and 2D nanostructures in low pressure oxygen plasma is presented with the special stress on metal-oxide nanowires and their deterministic growth mechanisms. Since the resulting nanostructures not always have required properties for applications their modifications are required. Therefore their conversions into different oxides or sulphites/nitrides are required with either molecules, atoms, electrons or photons.

  10. Activated sludge model No. 2d, ASM2d

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henze, M.

    1999-01-01

    The Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) presents a model for biological phosphorus removal with simultaneous nitrification-denitrification in activated sludge systems. ASM2d is based on ASM2 and is expanded to include the denitrifying activity of the phosphorus accumulating organisms (PAOs...

  11. Quantitative Multiscale Analysis using Different Wavelets in 1D Voice Signal and 2D Image

    CERN Document Server

    Shakhakarmi, Niraj

    2012-01-01

    Mutiscale analysis represents multiresolution scrutiny of a signal to improve its signal quality. Multiresolution analysis of 1D voice signal and 2D image is conducted using DCT, FFT and different wavelets such as Haar, Deubachies, Morlet, Cauchy, Shannon, Biorthogonal, Symmlet and Coiflet deploying the cascaded filter banks based decomposition and reconstruction. The outstanding quantitative analysis of the specified wavelets is done to investigate the signal quality, mean square error, entropy and peak-to-peak SNR at multiscale stage-4 for both 1D voice signal and 2D image. In addition, the 2D image compression performance is significantly found 93.00% in DB-4, 93.68% in bior-4.4, 93.18% in Sym-4 and 92.20% in Coif-2 during the multiscale analysis.

  12. Assembling carbon fiber-graphene-carbon fiber hetero-structures into 1D-2D-1D junction fillers and patterned structures for improved microwave absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huimin; Liu, Lin; Li, Hai-Bing; Song, Wei-Li; Bian, Xing-Ming; Zhao, Quan-Liang; Chen, Mingji; Yuan, Xujin; Chen, Haosen; Fang, Daining

    2017-04-01

    Since carbon-based structures of various dimensions, including one-dimensional (1D) carbon nanotubes, two-dimensional (2D) graphene and three-dimensional (3D) carbon foams, have attracted significant attention as microwave absorption fillers, we present an exceptional hetero-junction filler with a 1D-2D-1D feature, achieved by manipulating 2D graphene into 1D carbon fibers in the fiber-extruding process under the electric field. The as-fabricated 1D-2D-1D structural fillers exhibited much-improved dielectric properties and promoted microwave absorption performance in their composites, which is linked to the establishment of enhanced polarization capability, the generation of increased electric loss pathway and the creation of more favorable electromagnetic energy consumption conditions. The results suggest that employing 2D graphene in the 1D-2D-1D nanostructures played the critical role in tuning the electromagnetic response ability, because of its intrinsic electric advantages and dimensional features. To broaden the effective absorption bandwidth, periodic pattern-absorbing structures were designed, which showed combined absorption advantages for various thicknesses. Our strategy for fabricating 1D-2D-1D structural fillers illuminates a universal approach for manipulating dimensions and structures in the nanotechnology.

  13. Quantum Diffusion on Molecular Tubes: Universal Scaling of the 1D to 2D Transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuang, Chern; Lee, Chee Kong; Moix, Jeremy M.; Knoester, Jasper; Cao, Jianshu

    2016-05-01

    The transport properties of disordered systems are known to depend critically on dimensionality. We study the diffusion coefficient of a quantum particle confined to a lattice on the surface of a tube, where it scales between the 1D and 2D limits. It is found that the scaling relation is universal and independent of the temperature, disorder, and noise parameters, and the essential order parameter is the ratio between the localization length in 2D and the circumference of the tube. Phenomenological and quantitative expressions for transport properties as functions of disorder and noise are obtained and applied to real systems: In the natural chlorosomes found in light-harvesting bacteria the exciton transfer dynamics is predicted to be in the 2D limit, whereas a family of synthetic molecular aggregates is found to be in the homogeneous limit and is independent of dimensionality.

  14. A comparison of 1D and 2D LSTM architectures for the recognition of handwritten Arabic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Mohammad Reza; Soheili, Mohammad Reza; Breuel, Thomas M.; Stricker, Didier

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present an Arabic handwriting recognition method based on recurrent neural network. We use the Long Short Term Memory (LSTM) architecture, that have proven successful in different printed and handwritten OCR tasks. Applications of LSTM for handwriting recognition employ the two-dimensional architecture to deal with the variations in both vertical and horizontal axis. However, we show that using a simple pre-processing step that normalizes the position and baseline of letters, we can make use of 1D LSTM, which is faster in learning and convergence, and yet achieve superior performance. In a series of experiments on IFN/ENIT database for Arabic handwriting recognition, we demonstrate that our proposed pipeline can outperform 2D LSTM networks. Furthermore, we provide comparisons with 1D LSTM networks trained with manually crafted features to show that the automatically learned features in a globally trained 1D LSTM network with our normalization step can even outperform such systems.

  15. 1D and 2D economical FIR filters generated by Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragoljub Pavlović, Vlastimir; Stanojko Dončov, Nebojša; Gradimir Ćirić, Dejan

    2013-11-01

    Christoffel-Darboux formula for Chebyshev continual orthogonal polynomials of the first kind is proposed to find a mathematical solution of approximation problem of a one-dimensional (1D) filter function in the z domain. Such an approach allows for the generation of a linear phase selective 1D low-pass digital finite impulse response (FIR) filter function in compact explicit form by using an analytical method. A new difference equation and structure of corresponding linear phase 1D low-pass digital FIR filter are given here. As an example, one extremely economic 1D FIR filter (with four adders and without multipliers) is designed by the proposed technique and its characteristics are presented. Global Christoffel-Darboux formula for orthonormal Chebyshev polynomials of the first kind and for two independent variables for generating linear phase symmetric two-dimensional (2D) FIR digital filter functions in a compact explicit representative form, by using an analytical method, is proposed in this paper. The formula can be most directly applied for mathematically solving the approximation problem of a filter function of even and odd order. Examples of a new class of extremely economic linear phase symmetric selective 2D FIR digital filters obtained by the proposed approximation technique are presented.

  16. Electrochemical cortisol immunosensors based on sonochemically synthesized zinc oxide 1D nanorods and 2D nanoflakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vabbina, Phani Kiran; Kaushik, Ajeet; Pokhrel, Nimesh; Bhansali, Shekhar; Pala, Nezih

    2015-01-15

    We report on label free, highly sensitive and selective electrochemical immunosensors based on one-dimensional 1D ZnO nanorods (ZnO-NRs) and two-dimensional 2D ZnO nanoflakes (ZnO-NFs) which were synthesized on Au-coated substrates using simple one step sonochemical approach. Selective detection of cortisol using cyclic voltammetry (CV) is achieved by immobilizing anti-cortisol antibody (Anti-C(ab)) on the ZnO nanostructures (NSs). 1D ZnO-NRs and 2D ZnO-NFs provide unique sensing advantages over bulk materials. While 1D-NSs boast a high surface area to volume ratio, 2D-NSs with large area in polarized (0001) plane and high surface charge density could promote higher Anti-C(ab) loading and thus better sensing performance. Beside large surface area, ZnO-NSs also exhibit higher chemical stability, high catalytic activity, and biocompatibility. TEM studies showed that both ZnO-NSs are single crystalline oriented in (0001) plane. The measured sensing parameters are in the physiological range with a sensitivity of 11.86 µA/M exhibited by ZnO-NRs and 7.74 µA/M by ZnO-NFs with the lowest detection limit of 1 pM which is 100 times better than conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbant immunoassay (ELISA). ZnO-NSs based cortisol immunosensors were tested on human saliva samples and the performance were validated with conventional (ELISA) method which exhibits a remarkable correlation. The developed sensors can be integrated with microfluidic system and miniaturized potentiostat for point-of-care cortisol detection and such developed protocol can be used in personalized health monitoring/diagnostic.

  17. Membranes from nanoporous 1D and 2D materials: A review of opportunities, developments, and challenges

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Wun-gwi

    2013-12-01

    Membranes utilizing nanoporous one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) materials are emerging as attractive candidates for applications in molecular separations and related areas. Such nanotubular and nanolayered materials include carbon nanotubes, metal oxide nanotubes, layered zeolites, porous layered oxides, layered aluminophosphates, and porous graphenes. By virtue of their unique shape, size, and structure, they possess transport properties that are advantageous for membrane and thin film applications. These materials also have very different chemistry from more conventional porous 3D materials, due to the existence of a large, chemically active, external surface area. This feature also necessitates the development of innovative strategies to process these materials into membranes and thin films with high performance. This work provides the first comprehensive review of this emerging area. We first discuss approaches for the synthesis and structural characterization of nanoporous 1D and 2D materials. Thereafter, we elucidate different approaches for fabrication of membranes and thin films from these materials, either as multiphase (composite/hybrid) or single-phase membranes. The influence of surface chemistry and processing techniques on the membrane morphology is highlighted. We then discuss the applications of such membranes in areas relating to molecular transport and separation, e.g. gas and liquid-phase separations, water purification, and ion-conducting membranes. The review concludes with a discussion of the present outlook and some of the key scientific challenges to be addressed on the path to industrially applicable membranes containing nanoporous 1D and 2D materials. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  18. High Sensitivity 1-D and 2-D Microwave Spectroscopy via Cryogenic Buffer Gas Cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, David; Eibenberger, Sandra

    2017-06-01

    All rotationally resolved spectroscopic methods rely on sources of cold molecules. For the last three decades, the workhorse technique for producing highly supersaturated samples of cold molecules has been the pulsed supersonic jet. We present here progress on our alternative method, cryogenic buffer gas cooling. Our high density, continuous source, and low noise temperature allow us to record microwave spectra at unprecedented sensitivity, with a dynamic range in excess of 10^6 achievable in a few minutes of integration time. This high sensitivity enables new protocols in both 1-D and 2-D microwave spectroscopy, including sensitive chiral analysis via nonlinear three wave mixing and applications as an analytical chemistry tool

  19. Resolution-optimized NMR measurement of (1)D(CH), (1)D(CC) and (2)D(CH) residual dipolar couplings in nucleic acid bases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisbouvier, Jérôme; Bryce, David L; O'neil-Cabello, Erin; Nikonowicz, Edward P; Bax, Ad

    2004-11-01

    New methods are described for accurate measurement of multiple residual dipolar couplings in nucleic acid bases. The methods use TROSY-type pulse sequences for optimizing resolution and sensitivity, and rely on the E.COSY principle to measure the relatively small two-bond (2)D(CH) couplings at high precision. Measurements are demonstrated for a 24-nt stem-loop RNA sequence, uniformly enriched in (13)C, and aligned in Pf1. The recently described pseudo-3D method is used to provide homonuclear (1)H-(1)H decoupling, which minimizes cross-correlation effects and optimizes resolution. Up to seven (1)H-(13)C and (13)C-(13)C couplings are measured for pyrimidines (U and C), including (1)D(C5H5), (1)D(C6H6), (2)D(C5H6), (2)D(C6H5), (1)D(C5C4), (1)D(C5C6), and (2)D(C4H5). For adenine, four base couplings ((1)D(C2H2), (1)D(C8H8), (1)D(C4C5), and (1)D(C5C6)) are readily measured whereas for guanine only three couplings are accessible at high relative accuracy ((1)D(C8H8), (1)D(C4C5), and (1)D(C5C6)). Only three dipolar couplings are linearly independent in planar structures such as nucleic acid bases, permitting cross validation of the data and evaluation of their accuracies. For the vast majority of dipolar couplings, the error is found to be less than +/-3% of their possible range, indicating that the measurement accuracy is not limiting when using these couplings as restraints in structure calculations. Reported isotropic values of the one- and two-bond J couplings cluster very tightly for each type of nucleotide.

  20. Quantum simulation of 2D topological physics in a 1D array of optical cavities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi-Wang; Zhou, Xingxiang; Li, Chuan-Feng; Xu, Jin-Shi; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhou, Zheng-Wei

    2015-07-06

    Orbital angular momentum of light is a fundamental optical degree of freedom characterized by unlimited number of available angular momentum states. Although this unique property has proved invaluable in diverse recent studies ranging from optical communication to quantum information, it has not been considered useful or even relevant for simulating nontrivial physics problems such as topological phenomena. Contrary to this misconception, we demonstrate the incredible value of orbital angular momentum of light for quantum simulation by showing theoretically how it allows to study a variety of important 2D topological physics in a 1D array of optical cavities. This application for orbital angular momentum of light not only reduces required physical resources but also increases feasible scale of simulation, and thus makes it possible to investigate important topics such as edge-state transport and topological phase transition in a small simulator ready for immediate experimental exploration.

  1. A Stochastic Wavelet Finite Element Method for 1D and 2D Structures Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwu Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A stochastic finite element method based on B-spline wavelet on the interval (BSWI-SFEM is presented for static analysis of 1D and 2D structures in this paper. Instead of conventional polynomial interpolation, the scaling functions of BSWI are employed to construct the displacement field. By means of virtual work principle and BSWI, the wavelet finite elements of beam, plate, and plane rigid frame are obtained. Combining the Monte Carlo method and the constructed BSWI elements together, the BSWI-SFEM is formulated. The constructed BSWI-SFEM can deal with the problems of structural response uncertainty caused by the variability of the material properties, static load amplitudes, and so on. Taking the widely used Timoshenko beam, the Mindlin plate, and the plane rigid frame as examples, numerical results have demonstrated that the proposed method can give a higher accuracy and a better constringency than the conventional stochastic finite element methods.

  2. Quantum simulation of 2D topological physics in a 1D array of optical cavities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xi-Wang; Zhou, Xingxiang; Li, Chuan-Feng; Xu, Jin-Shi; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhou, Zheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum of light is a fundamental optical degree of freedom characterized by unlimited number of available angular momentum states. Although this unique property has proved invaluable in diverse recent studies ranging from optical communication to quantum information, it has not been considered useful or even relevant for simulating nontrivial physics problems such as topological phenomena. Contrary to this misconception, we demonstrate the incredible value of orbital angular momentum of light for quantum simulation by showing theoretically how it allows to study a variety of important 2D topological physics in a 1D array of optical cavities. This application for orbital angular momentum of light not only reduces required physical resources but also increases feasible scale of simulation, and thus makes it possible to investigate important topics such as edge-state transport and topological phase transition in a small simulator ready for immediate experimental exploration. PMID:26145177

  3. Topological defect formation in 1D and 2D spin chains realized by network of optical parametric oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Hamerly, Ryan; Inagaki, Takahiro; Takesue, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2016-01-01

    A network of optical parametric oscillators is used to simulate classical Ising and XY spin chains. The collective nonlinear dynamics of this network, driven by quantum noise rather than thermal fluctuations, seeks out the Ising / XY ground state as the system transitions from below to above the lasing threshold. We study the behavior of this "Ising machine" for three canonical problems: a 1D ferromagnetic spin chain, a 2D square lattice, and problems where next-nearest-neighbor couplings give rise to frustration. If the pump turn-on time is finite, topological defects form (domain walls for the Ising model, winding number and vortices for XY) and their density can be predicted from a numerical model involving a linear "growth stage" and a nonlinear "saturation stage". These predictions are compared against recent data for a 10,000-spin 1D Ising machine.

  4. Topological defect formation in 1D and 2D spin chains realized by network of optical parametric oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamerly, Ryan; Inaba, Kensuke; Inagaki, Takahiro; Takesue, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Yoshihisa; Mabuchi, Hideo

    2016-09-01

    A network of optical parametric oscillators (OPOs) is used to simulate classical Ising and XY spin chains. The collective nonlinear dynamics of this network, driven by quantum noise rather than thermal fluctuations, seeks out the Ising/XY ground state as the system transitions from below to above the lasing threshold. We study the behavior of this “Ising machine” for three canonical problems: a 1D ferromagnetic spin chain, a 2D square lattice and problems where next-nearest-neighbor couplings give rise to frustration. If the pump turn-on time is finite, topological defects form (domain walls for the Ising model, winding number and vortices for XY) and their density can be predicted from a numerical model involving a linear “growth stage” and a nonlinear “saturation stage”. These predictions are compared against recent data for a 10,000-spin 1D Ising machine.

  5. 1D and 2D ~1H NMR studies on bisantrene complexes with short DNA oligomers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姚世杰; WILSON.W.David

    1995-01-01

    The binding of bisantrene to four DNA tetramers,d(CGCG)2,d(GCGC)2,d(CATG)2,and d(GTAC)2,was investigated by 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy.Bisantrene is.a well knownanticancer drug and has been used clinically for years.DNA is believed to be one of its cellular targets.Re-suits from both ID and 2D 1H NMR are in agreement with an intercalation binding mode of bisantrene withthe four DNA tetramers in this study.The results further indicate that a threading intercalation birdingmode,in which one bisantrene side chain is in the minor groove and the other in the major groove of DNA,is preferred.The NMR results also suggest that bisantrene prefers binding at pyrimidine-(3’,5’)-purineintercalation sequences rather than at purine-(3’,5’)-pyrimidine sequences.The intramolecular andintermolecular NOE contacts of bisantrene-DNA tetramer complexes indicate that a C2’-endo uniform sugarpucker,rather than a mixed sugar conformation,is preferred by the intercalation site of both the 5’-(TA)-3’and the 5’-(CG)-3’ binding steps.

  6. A New 2D-Transport, 1D-Diffusion Approximation of the Boltzmann Transport equation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larsen, Edward

    2013-06-17

    The work performed in this project consisted of the derivation, implementation, and testing of a new, computationally advantageous approximation to the 3D Boltz- mann transport equation. The solution of the Boltzmann equation is the neutron flux in nuclear reactor cores and shields, but solving this equation is difficult and costly. The new “2D/1D” approximation takes advantage of a special geometric feature of typical 3D reactors to approximate the neutron transport physics in a specific (ax- ial) direction, but not in the other two (radial) directions. The resulting equation is much less expensive to solve computationally, and its solutions are expected to be sufficiently accurate for many practical problems. In this project we formulated the new equation, discretized it using standard methods, developed a stable itera- tion scheme for solving the equation, implemented the new numerical scheme in the MPACT code, and tested the method on several realistic problems. All the hoped- for features of this new approximation were seen. For large, difficult problems, the resulting 2D/1D solution is highly accurate, and is calculated about 100 times faster than a 3D discrete ordinates simulation.

  7. An FCT finite element scheme for ideal MHD equations in 1D and 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basting, Melanie; Kuzmin, Dmitri

    2017-06-01

    This paper presents an implicit finite element (FE) scheme for solving the equations of ideal magnetohydrodynamics in 1D and 2D. The continuous Galerkin approximation is constrained using a flux-corrected transport (FCT) algorithm. The underlying low-order scheme is constructed using a Rusanov-type artificial viscosity operator based on scalar dissipation proportional to the fast wave speed. The accuracy of the low-order solution can be improved using a shock detector which makes it possible to prelimit the added viscosity in a monotonicity-preserving iterative manner. At the FCT correction step, the changes of conserved quantities are limited in a way which guarantees positivity preservation for the density and thermal pressure. Divergence-free magnetic fields are extracted using projections of the FCT predictor into staggered finite element spaces forming exact sequences. In the 2D case, the magnetic field is projected into the space of Raviart-Thomas finite elements. Numerical studies for standard test problems are performed to verify the ability of the proposed algorithms to enforce relevant constraints in applications to ideal MHD flows.

  8. 1-D and 2-D electrophoresis protein profiles of the scorpion venom from Brotheas amazonicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Higa, A.M.; Noronha, M.D.N. [Universidade do Estado do Amazonas (UEA), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Rede Proteomica do Amazonas (Proteam). Lab. de Genomica e Proteomica; Rocha-Oliveira, F.; Lopez-Lozano, J.L.L. [Universidade Federal do Amazonas (UFAM), Manaus, AM (Brazil). Pos-Graduacao em Biotecnologia

    2008-07-01

    Full text: Introduction: Scorpions venoms show specific neurotoxins to insect or mammals. These toxins are very important molecular tools to development of news drugs or bioinsecticides. Brotheas amazonicus scorpion is an endemic specie in Amazonian Rain Forest, but your venom do not show toxicity in humans. Information about biological specific activity on insect of this venom is not known yet. Objectives: Molecular protein toxins profiles of the venom from Brotheas amazonicus scorpion by 1-D and 2-D electrophoresis methods to detected toxins with potential biotech applications. Results: Several spots 'families' with {approx} 60, 70 and 80 kDa were detected in gel acidic region with pI {approx} 4,5 - 6 range, in the same region 1-D zimography showed proteolytic activity on gelatin and fibrinogen and proteolytic activity was inhibited by PMSF, suggesting scorpion serine proteinases. 50 kDa proteins were detected with pI {approx} 6,5 - 7 range. In 23 - 50 kDa gel acid region were observed some proteins. In 23 - 14 kDa gel acidic region were detected proteins with pI 4 - 7 range. 1-D Tris-tricine gel showed proteins with {approx} 7 kDa, suggesting scorpion neurotoxins. In gel basic region only 14 kDa proteins were observed with pI {approx} 9 - 10 range. Conclusion: Molecular profile of the scorpion venom from B. amazonicus showed proteins with high and low molecular masses, mainly with acidic pI. Proteolytic activity suggest serine proteinases with high molecular masses and 7 kDa proteins in B. amazonicus venom suggest scorpion neurotoxins. Purification and molecular characterization of these toxins are in course.

  9. Determinare le aree inondabili del fiume Ofanto per mezzo di un modello idraulico 1D/2D su base Lidar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lia Romano

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Determination of Ofanto river flood risk areas through a 1D/2D Lidar hydraulic model The national emergency management services should lean on flood risk areas thematic maps in order to manage an eventual catastrophic event. The article, focused on the Ofanto river hydrographic basins, is a clear example of how an accurate knowledge of the terrain, obtained through the latest technological instruments as Lidar, could be important in these situations.

  10. IMPROVEMENTS OF RIVER MODELING 1D DATA PREPARATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ION-MARIAN MOISOIU

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Improvements of river modeling 1D data preparation. The importance of hydrographical networks data and the need for detailed studies do generate an increase of projects in this specialized area and a diversification of river mathematical modeling software. River mathematical modeling can be done in two ways, namely; the "2D mode" and the “1D mode”. The “2D mode” is where a digital terrain model of a full hydrographical basin must be produced and "1D mode" is where only cross sections, long sections and structures elevations needs to be presented in a graphical environment and in a specific formats for the mathematical modeling software. This paper will show the principle of a custom built GIS, specially created to help the preparation of 1D river modeling data. The benefits are; elimination of human errors, automated processing, increasing productivity, flexible output and cost reduction.

  11. Analytical solutions for some defect problems in 1D hexagonal and 2D octagonal quasicrystals

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    X Wang; E Pan

    2008-05-01

    We study some typical defect problems in one-dimensional (1D) hexagonal and two-dimensional (2D) octagonal quasicrystals. The first part of this investigation addresses in detail a uniformly moving screw dislocation in a 1D hexagonal piezoelectric quasicrystal with point group 6. A general solution is derived in terms of two functions 1, 2, which satisfy wave equations, and another harmonic function 3. Elementary expressions for the phonon and phason displacements, strains, stresses, electric potential, electric fields and electric displacements induced by the moving screw dislocation are then arrived at by employing the obtained general solution. The derived solution is verified by comparison with existing solutions. Also obtained in this part of the investigation is the total energy of the moving screw dislocation. The second part of this investigation is devoted to the study of the interaction of a straight dislocation with a semi-infinite crack in an octagonal quasicrystal. Here the crack penetrates through the solid along the period direction and the dislocation line is parallel to the period direction. We first derive a general solution in terms of four analytic functions for plane strain problem in octagonal quasicrystals by means of differential operator theory and the complex variable method. All the phonon and phason displacements and stresses can be expressed in terms of the four analytic functions. Then we derive the exact solution for a straight dislocation near a semi-infinite crack in an octagonal quasicrystal, and also present the phonon and phason stress intensity factors induced by the straight dislocation and remote loads.

  12. Analytical solutions for some defect problems in 1D hexagonal and 2D octagonal quasicrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, X.; Pan, E.

    2008-05-01

    We study some typical defect problems in one-dimensional (1D) hexagonal and two-dimensional (2D) octagonal quasicrystals. The first part of this investigation addresses in detail a uniformly moving screw dislocation in a 1D hexagonal piezoelectric quasicrystal with point group 6mm. A general solution is derived in terms of two functions \\varphi_1, \\varphi_2, which satisfy wave equations, and another harmonic function \\varphi_3. Elementary expressions for the phonon and phason displacements, strains, stresses, electric potential, electric fields and electric displacements induced by the moving screw dislocation are then arrived at by employing the obtained general solution. The derived solution is verified by comparison with existing solutions. Also obtained in this part of the investigation is the total energy of the moving screw dislocation. The second part of this investigation is devoted to the study of the interaction of a straight dislocation with a semi-infinite crack in an octagonal quasicrystal. Here the crack penetrates through the solid along the period direction and the dislocation line is parallel to the period direction. We first derive a general solution in terms of four analytic functions for plane strain problem in octagonal quasicrystals by means of differential operator theory and the complex variable method. All the phonon and phason displacements and stresses can be expressed in terms of the four analytic functions. Then we derive the exact solution for a straight dislocation near a semi-infinite crack in an octagonal quasicrystal, and also present the phonon and phason stress intensity factors induced by the straight dislocation and remote loads.

  13. Impact of Nanosize on Supercapacitance: Study of 1D Nanorods and 2D Thin-Films of Nickel Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Ranjit A; Chang, Cheng-Ping; Devan, Rupesh S; Liou, Yung; Ma, Yuan-Ron

    2016-04-20

    We synthesized unique one-dimensional (1D) nanorods and two-dimensional (2D) thin-films of NiO on indium-tin-oxide thin-films using a hot-filament metal-oxide vapor deposition technique. The 1D nanorods have an average width and length of ∼100 and ∼500 nm, respectively, and the densely packed 2D thin-films have an average thickness of ∼500 nm. The 1D nanorods perform as parallel units for charge storing. However, the 2D thin-films act as one single unit for charge storing. The 2D thin-films possess a high specific capacitance of ∼746 F/g compared to 1D nanorods (∼230 F/g) using galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements at a current density of 3 A/g. Because the 1D NiO nanorods provide more plentiful surface areas than those of the 2D thin-films, they are fully active at the first few cycles. However, the capacitance retention of the 1D nanorods decays faster than that of the 2D thin-films. Also, the 1D NiO nanorods suffer from instability due to the fast electrochemical dissolution and high nanocontact resistance. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy verifies that the low dimensionality of the 1D NiO nanorods induces the unavoidable effects that lead them to have poor supercapacitive performances. On the other hand, the slow electrochemical dissolution and small contact resistance in the 2D NiO thin-films favor to achieve high specific capacitance and great stability.

  14. Comparison of Transport Calculation Between 2D/1D synthesis and RAPTOR-M3G at Core Barrel of Korea Standard Nuclear Plant(KSNP), OPR-1000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeng, Young Jae; Kim, Byoung Chul; Lim, Mi Joung; Kim, Kyung Sik; Jeon, Young Kyou [Korea Reactor Integrity Surveillance Technology, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Yoo, Chun Sung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institutes, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    The DORT code for 2D/1D synthesis has been actively applied to calculate the fast neutron (E>1.0MeV) fluence exposure of RPV. RAPTOR-M3G code is also applied for the comparison of 2D/1D synthesis, and it was found that 2D/1D synthesis method generally provided more conservative results than RAPTOR-M3G at both RPV and surveillance capsule locations. As a result, definitely RAPTOR-M3G for 3D calculation must apply for accurate evaluation of the integrity and ageing of RPV and internal structures. Therefore, the purpose of this paper is to compare the differences in terms of geometric aspect of KSNP model between 2D/1D synthesis and RAPTOR-M3G at core barrel area. 2D/1D synthesis method shows still higher results at the shortest distance of bypass water region. The reason is that 2D/1D synthesis method has excessive conservatism because of having just one model of R-θ and R-Z separately. Angles (5, 25, 45, 65 and 90 degrees) that RAPTOR-M3G results are higher than 2D/1D synthesis results seem to have almost regular interval. The reason can be that neutron flux to reach to barrel is affected by the nearest core definitely and all of near core areas including bypass water. RAPTOR-M3G performing 3D calculation can be applied to various reactor structures, because the code can simulate the model realistically and reasonably in geometric view points. Understanding the phenomenon that 45 degree shows downward peak, in spite of baffle corner location, remains.

  15. Dimensional heterostructures of 1D CdS/2D ZnIn2S4 composited with 2D graphene: designed synthesis and superior photocatalytic performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Qingyong; Wu, Wei; Liu, Jun; Wu, Zhaohui; Yao, Weijing; Ding, Jin; Jiang, Changzhong

    2017-02-28

    The development of photocatalysts with superior photoactivity and stability for the degradation of organic dyes is very important for environmental remediation. In this study, we have presented a multidimensional (1D and 2D) structured CdS/ZnIn2S4/RGO photocatalyst with superior photocatalytic performance. The CdS/ZnIn2S4 helical dimensional heterostructures (DHS) were prepared via a facile solvothermal synthesis method to facilitate the epitaxial growth of 2D ZnIn2S4 nanosheets on 1D CdS nanowires. Ultrathin 2D ZnIn2S4 nanosheets have grown uniformly and perpendicular to the surface of 1D CdS nanowires. The as-obtained 1D/2D CdS/ZnIn2S4 helical DHS show good photocatalytic properties for malachite green (MG). Subsequently, 2D reduced graphene oxide (RGO) was introduced into the 1D/2D CdS/ZnIn2S4 helical DHS as a co-catalyst. The photoactivity and stability of the CdS/ZnIn2S4/RGO composites are significantly improved after 6 cycles. The enhanced photoactivity can be attributed to the high surface area of RGO, the improved adsorption of organic dyes and the efficient spatial separation of photo-induced charge carriers. The transfer of photo-generated electrons from the interface of CdS and ZnIn2S4 to RGO also restricted the photocorrosion of metal sulfide, suggesting an improved stability of the reused CdS/ZnIn2S4/RGO composited photocatalyst.

  16. Comparison of 1D, 2D and 2.5D Constrained Inversion of Electrical Resistivity Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catt, L. M.; West, J.; Clark, R. A.

    2007-05-01

    Clay-rich till plains cover much of the UK. Such sites are attractive locations for landfills, since the till cover lowers the risk of landfill leachate entering groundwater. However, such tills often contain discrete sand and gravel bodies that can act as leachate flow routes. Such bodies may not be detected by conventional site investigation techniques such as drilling boreholes and trial pitting. A combined geoelectrical survey was carried out at a study site typical of such till plains and close to cliff exposures, which allowed direct mapping of sand bodies. Electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), resistivity cone penetrometry (RCPT) and frequency-domain electromagnetic data were collected. In a previous study, the electromagnetic and RCPT data were used to construct reference models for 2D inversion of the ERT data. The use of these reference models improved the solution models produced by inversion. We showed that the best solution model produced by inversion with a range of reference models could be determined without a priori knowledge of the true geoelectrical structure. This was done by using the area-weighted L2 norm between the solution models and associated reference models as a proxy for the misfit between the solution models and the true geoelectrical structure of the ground. In order to assess the most suitable method for combining invasive and non-invasive measurements, we compare both constrained and unconstrained 1D, 2D and 2.5D inversions of resistivity data collected at the study site. Preliminary results suggest that for 2.5D inversion the true 3D geoelectrical structure of the ground at the field study site is not sufficiently well known for comparison between the solution models and the true geoelectrical structure of the ground to be made. The results of work in progress evaluating layer-depth- constrained 1D inversion will be presented at the meeting.

  17. Bimetallic nanostructures as active Raman markers: gold-nanoparticle assembly on 1D and 2D silver nanostructure surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunawidjaja, Ray; Kharlampieva, Eugenia; Choi, Ikjun; Tsukruk, Vladimir V

    2009-11-01

    It is demonstrated that bimetallic silver-gold anisotropic nanostructures can be easily assembled from various nanoparticle building blocks with well-defined geometries by means of electrostatic interactions. One-dimensional (1D) silver nanowires, two-dimensional (2D) silver nanoplates, and spherical gold nanoparticles are used as representative building blocks for bottom-up assembly. The gold nanoparticles are electrostatically bound onto the 1D silver nanowires and the 2D silver nanoplates to give bimetallic nanostructures. The unique feature of the resulting nanostructures is the particle-to-particle interaction that subjects absorbed analytes to an enhanced electromagnetic field with strong polarization dependence. The Raman activity of the bimetallic nanostructures is compared with that of the individual nanoparticle blocks by using rhodamine 6G solution as the model analyte. The Raman intensity of the best-performing silver-gold nanostructure is comparable with the dense array of silver nanowires and silver nanoplates that were prepared by means of the Langmuir-Blodgett technique. An optimized design of a single-nanostructure substrate for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS), based on a wet-assembly technique proposed here, can serve as a compact and low-cost alternative to fabricated nanoparticle arrays.

  18. Stability and accuracy of 3D neutron transport simulations using the 2D/1D method in MPACT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Benjamin; Stimpson, Shane; Kelley, Blake W.; Young, Mitchell T. H.; Kochunas, Brendan; Graham, Aaron; Larsen, Edward W.; Downar, Thomas; Godfrey, Andrew

    2016-12-01

    A consistent "2D/1D" neutron transport method is derived from the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, to calculate fuel-pin-resolved neutron fluxes for realistic full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) problems. The 2D/1D method employs the Method of Characteristics to discretize the radial variables and a lower order transport solution to discretize the axial variable. This paper describes the theory of the 2D/1D method and its implementation in the MPACT code, which has become the whole-core deterministic neutron transport solver for the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) core simulator VERA-CS. Several applications have been performed on both leadership-class and industry-class computing clusters. Results are presented for whole-core solutions of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 and compared to both continuous-energy Monte Carlo results and plant data.

  19. Electronic Properties of a 1D Intrinsic/p-Doped Heterojunction in a 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Semiconductor

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Zhibo

    2017-07-28

    Two-dimensional (2D) semiconductors offer a convenient platform to study 2D physics, for example, to understand doping in an atomically thin semiconductor. Here, we demonstrate the fabrication and unravel the electronic properties of a lateral doped/intrinsic heterojunction in a single-layer (SL) tungsten diselenide (WSe2), a prototype semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenide (TMD), partially covered with a molecular acceptor layer, on a graphite substrate. With combined experiments and theoretical modeling, we reveal the fundamental acceptor-induced p-doping mechanism for SL-WSe2. At the 1D border between the doped and undoped SL-WSe2 regions, we observe band bending and explain it by Thomas-Fermi screening. Using atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy, the screening length is determined to be in the few nanometer range, and we assess the carrier density of intrinsic SL-WSe2. These findings are of fundamental and technological importance for understanding and employing surface doping, for example, in designing lateral organic TMD heterostructures for future devices.

  20. Stability and accuracy of 3D neutron transport simulations using the 2D/1D method in MPACT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collins, Benjamin, E-mail: collinsbs@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Stimpson, Shane, E-mail: stimpsonsg@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kelley, Blake W., E-mail: kelleybl@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Young, Mitchell T.H., E-mail: youngmit@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kochunas, Brendan, E-mail: bkochuna@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Graham, Aaron, E-mail: aarograh@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Larsen, Edward W., E-mail: edlarsen@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Downar, Thomas, E-mail: downar@umich.edu [Department of Nuclear Engineering and Radiological Sciences, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Godfrey, Andrew, E-mail: godfreyat@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, One Bethel Valley Rd., Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States)

    2016-12-01

    A consistent “2D/1D” neutron transport method is derived from the 3D Boltzmann transport equation, to calculate fuel-pin-resolved neutron fluxes for realistic full-core Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) problems. The 2D/1D method employs the Method of Characteristics to discretize the radial variables and a lower order transport solution to discretize the axial variable. This paper describes the theory of the 2D/1D method and its implementation in the MPACT code, which has become the whole-core deterministic neutron transport solver for the Consortium for Advanced Simulations of Light Water Reactors (CASL) core simulator VERA-CS. Several applications have been performed on both leadership-class and industry-class computing clusters. Results are presented for whole-core solutions of the Watts Bar Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 and compared to both continuous-energy Monte Carlo results and plant data.

  1. Port Adriano, 2D-Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Jensen, Palle Meinert

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests (length scale 1:50) carried out in a waveflume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU).......This report present the results of 2D physical model tests (length scale 1:50) carried out in a waveflume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU)....

  2. Formation of Photonic Structures in Photorefractive Lithium Niobate by 1D and 2D Bessel-like Optical Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inyushov, A.; Safronova, P.; Trushnikov, I.; Sarkyt, A.; Shandarov, V.

    2017-06-01

    Both, one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) Bessel-like beams with different topology of 2D beam cross-sections are formed from Gaussian laser beams using the amplitude masks and Fresnel biprisms. These almost diffraction-free light fields with wavelengths of 532 and 633 nm can change the refractive indices of photorefractive lithium niobate samples and form within them the nonlinear photonic diffraction structures. The characteristics of photonic structures induced in this way are studied by diffraction of monochromatic light with wavelengths of 633 and 532 nm.

  3. Numerical model simulating water flow and contaminant and sediment transport in watershed systems of 1-d stream-river network, 2-d overland regime, and 3-d subsurface media (WASH123d: version 1.0). Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeh, G.; Cheng, H.; Cheng, J.; Lin, H.C.; Martin, W.D.

    1998-07-01

    This report presents the development of a numerical model simulating water flow and contaminant and sediment transport in watershed systems of one-dimensional river/stream network, two-dimensional overland regime, and three-dimensional subsurface media. The model is composed of two modules: flow and transport. Three options are provided in modeling the flow module in river/ stream network and overland regime: the kinematic wave approach, diffusion wave approach, and dynamic wave approach. The kinematic and diffusion wave approaches are known to be numerically robust in terms of numerical convergency and stability; i.e., they can generate convergent and stable simulations over a wide range of ground surface slopes in the entire watershed. The question is the accuracy of these simulations. The kinematic wave approach usually produces accurate solutions only over the region of steep slopes. The diffusion wave approach normally gives accurate solutions over the region of mild to steep slopes. However, neither approach has the ability to yield accurate solutions over the region of small slopes, in which the inertial forces are no longer negligible compared to the gravitational forces. The kinematic wave approach cannot address the problems of backwater effects. On the other hand, a dynamic wave approach, having included all forces, can theoretically have the potential to generate accurate simulations over all ranges of slopes in a watershed. The subsurface flow is described by Richard`s equation where water flow through saturated-unsaturated porous media is accounted for.

  4. In vivo 1D and 2D correlation MR spectroscopy of the soleus muscle at 7T

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Saadallah; Ratai, Eva-Maria; Wald, Lawrence L.; Mountford, Carolyn E.

    2010-05-01

    AimThis study aims to (1) undertake and analyse 1D and 2D MR correlation spectroscopy from human soleus muscle in vivo at 7T, and (2) determine T1 and T2 relaxation time constants at 7T field strength due to their importance in sequence design and spectral quantitation. MethodSix healthy, male volunteers were consented and scanned on a 7T whole-body scanner (Siemens AG, Erlangen, Germany). Experiments were undertaken using a 28 cm diameter detunable birdcage coil for signal excitation and an 8.5 cm diameter surface coil for signal reception. The relaxation time constants, T1 and T2 were recorded using a STEAM sequence, using the 'progressive saturation' method for the T1 and multiple echo times for T2. The 2D L-Correlated SpectroscopY (L-COSY) method was employed with 64 increments (0.4 ms increment size) and eight averages per scan, with a total time of 17 min. ResultsT1 and T2 values for the metabolites of interest were determined. The L-COSY spectra obtained from the soleus muscle provided information on lipid content and chemical structure not available, in vivo, at lower field strengths. All molecular fragments within multiple lipid compartments were chemically shifted by 0.20-0.26 ppm at this field strength. 1D and 2D L-COSY spectra were assigned and proton connectivities were confirmed with the 2D method. ConclusionIn vivo 1D and 2D spectroscopic examination of muscle can be successfully recorded at 7T and is now available to assess lipid alterations as well as other metabolites present with disease. T1 and T2 values were also determined in soleus muscle of male healthy volunteers.

  5. A numerical investigation of stability of 1D soliton solutions of Boussinesq paradigm equation in the 2D case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasileva, D.

    2014-11-01

    We investigate numerically the time evolution and stability of some known 1D soliton solutions of Boussinesq paradigm equation in 1D and in a 2D setting. A moving frame coordinate system helps us to keep the structures in the center of the computational domain, where the grid is much finer. The numerical experiments show that the stable 1D solutions preserve themselves for very large times. The corresponding solutions of the 2D problem for the same parameters and in narrow in the y-direction domains also preserve their shape for very large times. But the solutions of the 2D problem in wide in the y-direction domains seem to be not stable - the waves preserve their shape in relatively long intervals of time (depending on the parameters), but after that the waves lose their constant profile in the y-direction. The number of the maxima, which appear in the y-direction, strongly depends on the size of the domain in this direction, as well as on the problem's parameters.

  6. In situ fluid typing and quantification with 1D and 2D NMR logging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Boqin

    2007-05-01

    In situ nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) fluid typing has recently gained momentum due to data acquisition and inversion algorithm enhancement of NMR logging tools. T(2) distributions derived from NMR logging contain information on bulk fluids and pore size distributions. However, the accuracy of fluid typing is greatly overshadowed by the overlap between T(2) peaks arising from different fluids with similar apparent T(2) relaxation times. Nevertheless, the shapes of T(2) distributions from different fluid components are often different and can be predetermined. Inversion with predetermined T(2) distributions allows us to perform fluid component decomposition to yield individual fluid volume ratios. Another effective method for in situ fluid typing is two-dimensional (2D) NMR logging, which results in proton population distribution as a function of T(2) relaxation time and fluid diffusion coefficient (or T(1) relaxation time). Since diffusion coefficients (or T(1) relaxation time) for different fluid components can be very different, it is relatively easy to separate oil (especially heavy oil) from water signal in a 2D NMR map and to perform accurate fluid typing. Combining NMR logging with resistivity and/or neutron/density logs provides a third method for in situ fluid typing. We shall describe these techniques with field examples.

  7. Synthesis of 1D, 2D, and 3D ZnO Polycrystalline Nanostructures Using the Sol-Gel Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Kuan Tseng

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study employed various polyol solvents to synthesize zinc oxide polycrystalline nanostructures in the form of fibers (1D, rhombic flakes (2D, and spheres (3D. The synthetic process primarily involved the use of zinc acetate dihydrate in polyol solutions, which were used to derive precursors of zinc alkoxides. Following hydrolysis at 160°C, the zinc alkoxide particles self-assembled into polycrystalline nanostructures with different morphologies. Following calcination at 500°C for 1 h, polycrystalline ZnO with good crystallinity was obtained. FE-SEM explored variations in surface morphology; XRD was used to analyze the crystalline structures and crystallinity of the products, which were confirmed as ZnO wurtzite structures. FE-TEM verified that the ZnO nanostructures were polycrystalline. Furthermore, we employed TGA/DSC to observe the phase transition. According to the results of property analyses, we proposed models of the relevant formation mechanisms. Finally, various ZnO structures were applied in the degradation of methylene blue to compare their photocatalytic efficiency.

  8. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  9. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  10. Investigation of zinc alkali pyrophosphate glasses. Part II: Local and medium range orders analysed by 1D/2D NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rajbhandari, P. [UCCS UMR-CNRS 8181, Université de Lille1, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Chen, Y. [LASIR UMR-CNRS 8516, Université de Lille1, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Doumert, B. [IMMCL CNRS-FR2638, Université de Lille1, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Montagne, L. [UCCS UMR-CNRS 8181, Université de Lille1, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Tricot, G., E-mail: gregory.tricot@univ-lille1.fr [UCCS UMR-CNRS 8181, Université de Lille1, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); LASIR UMR-CNRS 8516, Université de Lille1, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France)

    2015-04-01

    The structure of the (66-x)ZnO-xNa{sub 2}O-33.4P{sub 2}O{sub 5} composition line, selected for the development of low-Tg and stable glasses, has been investigated by 1D/2D NMR spectroscopy. If standard 1D {sup 31}P MAS-NMR experiments give access to the Q{sup n} speciation and show the presence of Q{sup 0}, Q{sup 1} and Q{sup 2} sites within the glass structure, application of the homonuclear through-space correlation technique ({sup 31}P DQ-SQ) allows for a more accurate description of the phosphate units. Clear distinction between the Q{sup 1} sites involved in dimmers or in longer chains has been derived from 2D NMR correlation maps and leads to the re-assignment of Q{sup 1} into Q{sup 1,1} and Q{sup 1,2} species. {sup 23}Na and {sup 23}Na({sup 31}P) REDOR MAS-NMR experiments have been used to analyse the Na{sup +} ions distribution and its interaction with the phosphate network. {sup 67}Zn static NMR experiments, performed at very high field, were carried out and suggest a constant Zn{sup 2+} coordination state all along the composition line. The results have been used to discuss the impact of the Zn{sup 2+}/Na{sup +} ratio on the extent of disorder within the glass network expressed in terms of Q{sup n} dismutation equilibrium constant and phosphate chain length distribution. - Highlights: • Structure of zinc alkali pyrophosphate glasses have been analysed by 1D/2D NMR. • 2D {sup 31}P experiments allow to separate Q{sup 1,1} and Q{sup 1,2} species. • {sup 67}Zn static NMR shows a constant signal all along the composition line.

  11. 2D Models for Dust-driven AGB Star Winds

    CERN Document Server

    Woitke, P

    2006-01-01

    New axisymmetric (2D) models for dust-driven winds of C-stars are presented which include hydrodynamics with radiation pressure on dust, equilibrium chemistry and time-dependent dust formation with coupled grey Monte Carlo radiative transfer. Considering the most simple case without stellar pulsation (hydrostatic inner boundary condition) these models reveal a more complex picture of the dust formation and wind acceleration as compared to earlier published spherically symmetric (1D) models. The so-called exterior $\\kappa$-mechanism causes radial oscillations with short phases of active dust formation between longer phases without appreciable dust formation, just like in the 1D models. However, in 2D geometry, the oscillations can be out-of-phase at different places above the stellar atmosphere which result in the formation of dust arcs or smaller caps that only occupy a certain fraction of the total solid angle. These dust structures are accelerated outward by radiation pressure, expanding radially and tangen...

  12. YORP torques with 1D thermal model

    CERN Document Server

    Breiter, Slawomir; Czekaj, Maria

    2010-01-01

    A numerical model of the Yarkovsky-O'Keefe-Radzievskii-Paddack (YORP) effect for objects defined in terms of a triangular mesh is described. The algorithm requires that each surface triangle can be handled independently, which implies the use of a 1D thermal model. Insolation of each triangle is determined by an optimized ray-triangle intersection search. Surface temperature is modeled with a spectral approach; imposing a quasi-periodic solution we replace heat conduction equation by the Helmholtz equation. Nonlinear boundary conditions are handled by an iterative, FFT based solver. The results resolve the question of the YORP effect in rotation rate independence on conductivity within the nonlinear 1D thermal model regardless of the accuracy issues and homogeneity assumptions. A seasonal YORP effect in attitude is revealed for objects moving on elliptic orbits when a nonlinear thermal model is used.

  13. Fully digital 1-D, 2-D and 3-D multiscroll chaos as hardware pseudo random number generators

    KAUST Repository

    Mansingka, Abhinav S.

    2012-10-07

    This paper introduces the first fully digital implementation of 1-D, 2-D and 3-D multiscroll chaos using the sawtooth nonlinearity in a 3rd order ODE with the Euler approximation. Systems indicate chaotic behaviour through phase space boundedness and positive Lyapunov exponent. Low-significance bits form a PRNG and pass all tests in the NIST SP. 800-22 suite without post-processing. Real-time control of the number of scrolls allows distinct output streams with 2-D and 3-D multiscroll chaos enabling greater controllability. The proposed PRNGs are experimentally verified on a Xilinx Virtex 4 FPGA with logic utilization less than 1.25%, throughput up to 5.25 Gbits/s and up to 512 distinct output streams with low cross-correlation.

  14. 1D and 2D Occam's Inversion of Magnetotelluric Data Applied in Volcano-Geothermal Area In Central Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariani, Elsi; Srigutomo, Wahyu

    2016-08-01

    One-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) magnetotelluric data inversion were conducted to reveal the subsurface resistivity structure beneath the eastern part of a volcano in Central Java, Indonesia. Fifteen magnetotelluric sounding data spanning two lines of investigation were inverted using Occam's inversion scheme. The result depict that there are extensively conductive layer (2-10 ohm meter) below the volcanic overburden. This conductive layer is interpreted as the clay cap resulted from thermal alteration. A higher resistivity layer (10-80 ohm meter) underlies the clay cap and is interpreted as the reservoir whose top boundaries vary between 1000 m above and 2000 m below sea level.

  15. Styrylpyrylium Salts: 1H and 13C NMR High-Resolution Spectroscopy (1D and 2D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Claude W. Ouédraogo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available 1H and 13C NMR high-resolution spectroscopy (1D and 2D (1H, 1H-COSY, HSQC, HMBC for four styrylpyrylium perchlorates were carried out and signal attributions are reported. Chemical shifts observed on 13C NMR spectra for the styrylpyrylium salts were compared with net atomic charge for carbon obtained by AM1 semiempirical calculations. The position of the styryl group present low effect on chemical shifts for carbon atoms, while the presence of methyl group led to the unshielding of the substituted carbon.

  16. Head and Tail Deformations, Torsional Coriolis Coupling, and E(1d)-E(2d) Vibrational Mixing in Ethane-Like Molecules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzi; di Lauro C

    1999-12-01

    The mechanism of torsional Coriolis interaction of E(1d) and E(2d) vibrational modes in ethane-like molecules is investigated, and it is shown that this coupling can drastically affect the torsional splitting in the degenerate vibrational states. A basic point of our treatment is that the sets of coordinates of head and tail which combine with the + sign to generate E(1d) normal coordinates are in general different from those which combine with the - sign to generate E(2d) normal coordinates. It is shown that the zeta(gamma) torsional Coriolis coefficients calculated by the usual methods of normal mode analysis are related to the vibrational angular momenta within head and tail referred to the internal rotor axis systems. With knowledge of the L and L(-1) matrices it is possible to transform these coefficients for reference to the molecule-fixed frame. It is peculiar that torsional Coriolis matrix elements occur between E(1d) and E(2d) vibrational components with the same x or y orientation in the molecule-fixed frame. The matrix elements of the torsional Coriolis operator and other operators responsible for the end-to-end coupling are determined, and a method for calculating vibration-torsion energies, and then torsional splittings, in degenerate vibrational states is outlined. Detailed calculations require a global model, involving all the degenerate vibrational basis states in a complex mechanism of interactions, but it is shown that useful information can be obtained by means of simplified models. Our semiempirical rule that degenerate vibrational states with a large negative value of the diagonal vibration-rotation Coriolis coefficient are likely to deviate much from the behavior of E(1d) or E(2d) vibrational states, with a sensible decrease of the torsional splittings, is confirmed. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  17. 1D/2D Carbon Nanomaterial-Polymer Dielectric Composites with High Permittivity for Power Energy Storage Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Zhi-Min; Zheng, Ming-Sheng; Zha, Jun-Wei

    2016-04-06

    With the development of flexible electronic devices and large-scale energy storage technologies, functional polymer-matrix nanocomposites with high permittivity (high-k) are attracting more attention due to their ease of processing, flexibility, and low cost. The percolation effect is often used to explain the high-k characteristic of polymer composites when the conducting functional fillers are dispersed into polymers, which gives the polymer composite excellent flexibility due to the very low loading of fillers. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene nanosheets (GNs), as one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) carbon nanomaterials respectively, have great potential for realizing flexible high-k dielectric nanocomposites. They are becoming more attractive for many fields, owing to their unique and excellent advantages. The progress in dielectric fields by using 1D/2D carbon nanomaterials as functional fillers in polymer composites is introduced, and the methods and mechanisms for improving dielectric properties, breakdown strength and energy storage density of their dielectric nanocomposites are examined. Achieving a uniform dispersion state of carbon nanomaterials and preventing the development of conductive networks in their polymer composites are the two main issues that still need to be solved in dielectric fields for power energy storage. Recent findings, current problems, and future perspectives are summarized.

  18. Engineering of lead chalcogenide nanostructures for carrier multiplication: Core/shell, 1D, and 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Qianglu

    Near infrared emitting semiconductors have been used widely in industry especially in solar-cell fabrications. The efficiency of single junction solar-cell can reach the Shockley-Queisser limit by using optimum band gap material such as silicon and cadmium telluride. The theoretical efficiency can be further enhanced through carrier multiplication, in which a high energy photon is absorbed and more than one electron-hole pair can be generated, reaching more than 100% quantum efficiency in the high energy region of sunlight. The realization of more than unity external quantum efficiency in lead selenide quantum dots solar cell has motivated vast investigation on lowering the carrier multiplication threshold and further improving the efficiency. This dissertation focuses on synthesis of lead chalcogenide nanostructures for their optical spectroscopy studies. PbSe/CdSe core/shell quantum dots were synthesized by cation exchange to obtain thick shells (up to 14 monolayers) for studies of visible and near infrared dual band emissions and carrier multiplication efficiency. By examining the reaction mechanism, a thermodynamic and a kinetic model are introduced to explain the vacancy driven cation exchange. As indicated by the effective mass model, PbSe/CdSe core/shell quantum dots has quasi-type-II band alignment, possessing electron delocalized through the entire quantum dot and hole localized in the core, which breaks down the symmetry of energy levels in the conduction and valence band, leading to hot-hole-assisted efficient multi-exciton generation and a lower carrier multiplication threshold to the theoretical value. For further investigation of carrier multiplication study, PbTe, possessing the highest efficiency among lead chalcogenides due to slow intraband cooling, is synthesized in one-dimensional and two-dimensional nanostructures. By using dodecanethiol as the surfactant, PbTe NRs can be prepared with high uniformity in width and resulted in fine quantum

  19. Structural mapping and framework interconversions in 1D, 2D, and 3D divalent metal R,S-hydroxyphosphonoacetate hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colodrero, Rosario M P; Olivera-Pastor, Pascual; Cabeza, Aurelio; Papadaki, Maria; Demadis, Konstantinos D; Aranda, Miguel A G

    2010-01-18

    Reactions of divalent cations (Mg(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), and Zn(2+)) with R,S-hydroxyphosphonoacetic acid (HPAA) in aqueous solutions (pH values ranging 1.0-4.0) yielded a range of crystalline hydrated M-HPAA hybrids. One-dimensional (1D) chain compounds were formed at room temperature whereas reactions conducted under hydrothermal conditions resulted in two-dimensional (2D) layered frameworks or, in some cases, three-dimensional (3D) networks incorporating various alkaline cations. 1D phases with compositions [M{HO(3)PCH(OH)CO(2)}(H(2)O)(2)].2H(2)O (M = Mg, Co, and Zn) were isolated. These compounds were dehydrated in liquid water to yield the corresponding [M{HO(3)PCH(OH)CO(2)}(H(2)O)(2)] compounds lacking the lattice water between the 1D chains. [M{HO(3)PCH(OH)CO(2)}(H(2)O)(2)] (M = Mg, Ni, Co, Zn) compounds were formed by crystallization at room temperature (at higher pH values) or also by partial dehydration of 1D compounds with higher hydration degrees. Complete dehydration of these 1D solids at 240-270 degrees C led to 3D phases, [M{HO3PCH(OH)CO(2)}]. The 2D layered compound [Mg{HO(3)PCH(OH)CO(2)}(H(2)O)(2)] was obtained under hydrothermal conditions. For both synthesis methods, addition of alkali metal hydroxides to adjust the pH usually led to mixed phase materials, whereas direct reactions between the metal oxides and the hydroxyphosphonoacetic acid gave single phase materials. On the other hand, adjusting the pH with acetate salts and increasing the ratio M(2+)/HPAA and/or the A(+)/M(2+) ratio (A = Na, K) resulted in 3D networks, where the alkali cations were incorporated within the frameworks for charge compensation. The crystal structures of eight new M(II)-HPAA hybrids are reported herein and the thermal behavior related to dehydration/rehydration of some compounds are studied in detail.

  20. 1D and 2D annotation enrichment: a statistical method integrating quantitative proteomics with complementary high-throughput data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cox Juergen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Quantitative proteomics now provides abundance ratios for thousands of proteins upon perturbations. These need to be functionally interpreted and correlated to other types of quantitative genome-wide data such as the corresponding transcriptome changes. We describe a new method, 2D annotation enrichment, which compares quantitative data from any two 'omics' types in the context of categorical annotation of the proteins or genes. Suitable genome-wide categories are membership of proteins in biochemical pathways, their annotation with gene ontology terms, sub-cellular localization, the presence of protein domains or the membership in protein complexes. 2D annotation enrichment detects annotation terms whose members show consistent behavior in one or both of the data dimensions. This consistent behavior can be a correlation between the two data types, such as simultaneous up- or down-regulation in both data dimensions, or a lack thereof, such as regulation in one dimension but no change in the other. For the statistical formulation of the test we introduce a two-dimensional generalization of the nonparametric two-sample test. The false discovery rate is stringently controlled by correcting for multiple hypothesis testing. We also describe one-dimensional annotation enrichment, which can be applied to single omics data. The 1D and 2D annotation enrichment algorithms are freely available as part of the Perseus software.

  1. Horns Rev II, 2-D Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU), on behalf of Energy E2 A/S part of DONG Energy A/S, Denmark. The objective of the tests was: to investigate the combined influence of the pile...

  2. Síntesis y caracterización de nanomateriales 0D, 1D Y 2D

    OpenAIRE

    Berlanga Mora, Isadora

    2013-01-01

    Tesis doctoral inédita, leída en Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Facultad de Ciencias, Departamento de Química Inorgánica. Fecha de lectura: 13/09/2013 La presente tesis, realizada en el grupo de nanomateriales del Departamento de Quimica Inrogánica de la Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, está enfocada al estudio de la síntesis y caracterización de nanomateriales 0D, 1D y 2D. La memoria está dividida en 4 capítulos y 2 apéndices. En el primer capítulo se hace una introducción a la nanotecnol...

  3. Controlled Self-Assembly of Cyclophane Amphiphiles: From 1D Nanofibers to Ultrathin 2D Topological Structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Zhengxu; Li, Lianwei; Lo, Wai-Yip; Zhao, Donglin; Wu, Qinghe; Zhang, Na; Su, Yu-An; Chen, Wei; Yu, Luping

    2016-07-05

    A novel series of amphiphilic TC-PEG molecules were designed and synthesized based on the orthogonal cyclophane unit. These molecules were able to self-assemble from 1D nanofibers and nanobelts to 2D ultrathin nanosheets (3 nm thick) in a controlled way by tuning the length of PEG side chains. The special structure of the cyclophane moiety allowed control in construction of nanostructures through programmed noncovalent interactions (hydrophobic hydrophilic interaction and pi-pi interaction). The self-assembled nanostructures were characterized by combining real space imaging (TEM, SEM, and AFM) and reciprocal space scattering (GIWAXS) techniques. This unique supramolecular system may provide a new strategy for the design of materials with tunable nanomorphology and functionality.

  4. A 2D/1D coupling neutron transport method based on the matrix MOC and NEM methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H.; Zheng, Y.; Wu, H.; Cao, L. [School of Nuclear Science and Technology, Xi' an Jiaotong University, No. 28, Xianning West Road, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China)

    2013-07-01

    A new 2D/1D coupling method based on the matrix MOC method (MMOC) and nodal expansion method (NEM) is proposed for solving the three-dimensional heterogeneous neutron transport problem. The MMOC method, used for radial two-dimensional calculation, constructs a response matrix between source and flux with only one sweep and then solves the linear system by using the restarted GMRES algorithm instead of the traditional trajectory sweeping process during within-group iteration for angular flux update. Long characteristics are generated by using the customization of commercial software AutoCAD. A one-dimensional diffusion calculation is carried out in the axial direction by employing the NEM method. The 2D and ID solutions are coupled through the transverse leakage items. The 3D CMFD method is used to ensure the global neutron balance and adjust the different convergence properties of the radial and axial solvers. A computational code is developed based on these theories. Two benchmarks are calculated to verify the coupling method and the code. It is observed that the corresponding numerical results agree well with references, which indicates that the new method is capable of solving the 3D heterogeneous neutron transport problem directly. (authors)

  5. A Practical Deconvolution Computation Algorithm to Extract 1D Spectra from 2D Images of Optical Fiber Spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Guangwei; Bai, Zhongrui

    2015-01-01

    Bolton and Schlegel presented a promising deconvolution method to extract 1D spectra from a 2D optical fiber spectral CCD image. The method could eliminate the PSF difference between fibers, extract spectra to the photo noise level, as well as improve the resolution. But the method is limited by its huge computation requirement and thus cannot be implemented in actual data reduction. In this article, we develop a practical computation method to solve the computation problem. The new computation method can deconvolve a 2D fiber spectral image of any size with actual PSFs, which may vary with positions. Our method does not require large amounts of memory and can extract a 4k multi 4k noise-free CCD image with 250 fibers in 2 hr. To make our method more practical, we further consider the influence of noise, which is thought to be an intrinsic illposed problem in deconvolution algorithms. We modify our method with a Tikhonov regularization item to depress the method induced noise. Compared with the results of tra...

  6. Study of proton conductivity of a 2D flexible MOF and a 1D coordination polymer at higher temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanda, Suresh; Biswas, Soumava; Konar, Sanjit

    2015-02-16

    We report the proton conduction properties of a 2D flexible MOF and a 1D coordination polymer having the molecular formulas {[Zn(C10H2O8)0.5(C10S2N2H8)]·5H2O]}n (1) and {[Zn(C10H2O8)0.5(C10S2N2H8)]·2H2O]}n (2), respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 show high conductivity values of 2.55 × 10(-7) and 4.39 × 10(-4) S cm(-1) at 80 °C and 95% RH. The conductivity value of compound 1 is in the range of those for previously reported flexible MOFs, and compound 2 shows the highest proton conductivity among the carboxylate-based 1D CPs. The dimensionality and the internal hydrogen bonding connectivity play a vital role in the resultant conductivity. Variable-temperature experiments of both compounds at high humidity reveal that the conductivity values increase with increasing temperature, whereas the variable humidity studies signify the influence of relative humidity on high-temperature proton conductivity. The time-dependent measurements for both compounds demonstrate their ability to retain conductivity up to 10 h.

  7. Polarization-driven self-organization of silver nanoparticles in 1D and 2D subwavelength gratings for plasmonic photocatalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraldi, G.; Bakhti, S.; Liu, Z.; Reynaud, S.; Lefkir, Y.; Vocanson, F.; Destouches, N.

    2017-01-01

    One of the main challenges in plasmonics is to conceive large-scale, low-cost techniques suitable for the fabrication of metal nanoparticle patterns showing precise spatial organization. Here, we introduce a simple method based on continuous-wave laser illumination to induce the self-organization of silver nanoparticles within high-index thin films. We show that highly regular and homogeneous nanoparticle gratings can be produced on large areas using laser-controlled self-organization processes. This very versatile technique can provide 1D and 2D patterns at a subwavelength scale with tunable features. It does not need any stabilization or expensive devices, such as those required by optical or electron lithography, and is rapid to implement. Accurate in-plane and in-depth characterizations provide valuable information to explain the mechanisms that lead to pattern formation and especially how 2D self-organization can fall into place with successive laser scans. The regular and homogeneous 2D self-organization of metallic NPs with a single laser scan is also reported for the first time in this article. As the reported nanostructures are embedded in porous TiO2, we also theoretically explore the interesting potential of organization on the photocatalytic activity of Ag-NP-containing TiO2 porous films, which is one of the most promising materials for self-cleaning or remediation applications. Realistic electromagnetic simulations demonstrate that the periodic organization of silver nanoparticles can increase the light intensity within the film more than ten times that produced with randomly distributed nanoparticles, leading as expected to enhanced photocatalytic efficiency.

  8. Polarization-driven self-organization of silver nanoparticles in 1D and 2D subwavelength gratings for plasmonic photocatalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baraldi, G; Bakhti, S; Liu, Z; Reynaud, S; Lefkir, Y; Vocanson, F; Destouches, N

    2017-01-20

    One of the main challenges in plasmonics is to conceive large-scale, low-cost techniques suitable for the fabrication of metal nanoparticle patterns showing precise spatial organization. Here, we introduce a simple method based on continuous-wave laser illumination to induce the self-organization of silver nanoparticles within high-index thin films. We show that highly regular and homogeneous nanoparticle gratings can be produced on large areas using laser-controlled self-organization processes. This very versatile technique can provide 1D and 2D patterns at a subwavelength scale with tunable features. It does not need any stabilization or expensive devices, such as those required by optical or electron lithography, and is rapid to implement. Accurate in-plane and in-depth characterizations provide valuable information to explain the mechanisms that lead to pattern formation and especially how 2D self-organization can fall into place with successive laser scans. The regular and homogeneous 2D self-organization of metallic NPs with a single laser scan is also reported for the first time in this article. As the reported nanostructures are embedded in porous TiO2, we also theoretically explore the interesting potential of organization on the photocatalytic activity of Ag-NP-containing TiO2 porous films, which is one of the most promising materials for self-cleaning or remediation applications. Realistic electromagnetic simulations demonstrate that the periodic organization of silver nanoparticles can increase the light intensity within the film more than ten times that produced with randomly distributed nanoparticles, leading as expected to enhanced photocatalytic efficiency.

  9. Kondo effect at low electron density and high particle-hole asymmetry in 1D, 2D, and 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žitko, Rok; Horvat, Alen

    2016-09-01

    Using the perturbative scaling equations and the numerical renormalization group, we study the characteristic energy scales in the Kondo impurity problem as a function of the exchange coupling constant J and the conduction-band electron density. We discuss the relation between the energy gain (impurity binding energy) Δ E and the Kondo temperature TK. We find that the two are proportional only for large values of J , whereas in the weak-coupling limit the energy gain is quadratic in J , while the Kondo temperature is exponentially small. The exact relation between the two quantities depends on the detailed form of the density of states of the band. In the limit of low electron density the Kondo screening is affected by the strong particle-hole asymmetry due to the presence of the band-edge van Hove singularities. We consider the cases of one- (1D), two- (2D), and three-dimensional (3D) tight-binding lattices (linear chain, square lattice, cubic lattice) with inverse-square-root, step-function, and square-root onsets of the density of states that are characteristic of the respective dimensionalities. We always find two different regimes depending on whether TK is higher or lower than μ , the chemical potential measured from the bottom of the band. For 2D and 3D, we find a sigmoidal crossover between the large-J and small-J asymptotics in Δ E and a clear separation between Δ E and TK for TKband edge. Furthermore, we find that in 1D the particle-hole asymmetry leads to a large decrease of TK compared to the standard result obtained by approximating the density of states to be constant (flat-band approximation), while in 3D the opposite is the case; this is due to the nontrivial interplay of the exchange and potential scattering renormalization in the presence of particle-hole asymmetry. The 2D square-lattice density of states behaves to a very good approximation as a band with constant density of states.

  10. Monte Carlo Simulations of the Magnetic Behavior, Ordering Temperature and Magnetocaloric Effects in 1D, 2D and 3D Ferrimagnetic Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanica, Nicolae; Cimpoesu, Fanica; Radu, Cosmin; Chihaia, Viorel; Suh, Soong-Hyuck

    2015-01-01

    As for the systematic investigations of magnetic behaviors and its related properties, computer simulations in extended quantum spin networks have been performed in good conditions via the generalized Ising model using the Monte Carlo-Metropolis algorithm with proven efficiencies. The present work, starting from a real magnetic system, provides detailed insights into the finite size effects and the ferrimagnetic properties in various 1 D, 2D and 3D geometries such as the magnetic moment, ordering temperature, and magnetocaloric effects with the different values of spins localized on the different coordinated sites.

  11. Comparison between 1D and 1 1/2D Eulerian Vlasov codes for the numerical simulation of stimulated Raman scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghizzo, A.; Bertrand, P.; Lebas, J.; Shoucri, M.; Johnston, T.; Fijalkow, E.; Feix, M. R.

    1992-10-01

    The present 1 1/2D relativistic Euler-Vlasov code has been used to check the validity of a hydrodynamic description used in a 1D version of the Vlasov code. By these means, detailed numerical results can be compared; good agreement furnishes full support for the 1D electromagnetic Vlasov code, which runs faster than the 1 1/2D code. The results obtained assume a nonrelativistic v(y) velocity.

  12. Estimation of 2-D and 3-D Fracture Densities from 1-D Data Experimental and Field Results

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Jiandong; Robert D. JACOBI

    2003-01-01

    2-D and 3-D densities of fractures are commonly used in mining safety design, natural gas and oil productionin fractured reservoirs, and the characterization of subsurface flow and transportation systems in fractured rocks. However,many field data sets are collected in 1-D frequency (f) (e.g., scanlines and borehole data). We have developed an ARC/INFO-based technology to calculate fracture frequency and densities for a given fracture network. A series of numericalsimulations are performed in order to determine the optimal orientation of a scanline, along which the maximum fracturefrequency of a fracture network can be obtained. We calculated the frequency (f) and densities (both D1 and D2) of 36natural fracture trace maps, and investigated the statistical relationship between fracture frequency and fracture density D1,i.e. D1=l.340f + 0.034. We derived analytical solutions for converting dimensional density (D1) to non-dimensionaldensities (D2 and D3) assuming that fracture length distribution follows an exponential or power law. A comparisonbetween observed and calculated results based on the equations we developed shows that (1) there exists a linearrelationship between fracture frequency and fracture density (D1), and this relationship can be used to estimate fracturedensity (D1) if the fracture frequency is determined from a scanline survey or from borehole data; (2) the analyticalsolutions we derived can accurately determine the non-dimensional 2-D fracture density (D2) in practice and 3-D fracturedensity (D3) in theory if the fracture length distribution function is assumed.

  13. In-situ 1-D and 2-D mapping of soil core and rock samples using the LIBS long spark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodolfa, C. T. (Christopher T.); Cremers, D. A. (David A.); Ebinger, M. H. (Michael H.)

    2004-01-01

    LIBS is being developed for stand-off interrogation of samples up to 20 m from a lander or rover. Stand-off capability is important to access targets not conveniently located for in-situ analysis. On the other hand, in-situ techniques are still important and are being developed for future missions such as MSL. Retrieved samples may consist of loose soils, subsurface soil cores, drilled rock cores, and ice cores. For these sample types, it is possible to employ LIBS analysis and take advantage of LIBS capabilities. These include: (1) rapid analysis, (2) good detection sensitivity for many elements, (3) good spatial resolution (3-100 microns), and (4) ability to clean a surface prior to analysis. Using LIBS, it is possible to perform a 1-dimensional analysis, for example, determining element concentrations along a soil core, or a 2-dimensional mapping of the sample surface using a unique 'long' spark. Two-dimensional sampling has been developed previously by focusing the laser pulses as small spots on the sample and then moving the sample a short distance between sampling locations. Although demonstrated, this method is time consuming, requiring a large number of shots to span even a small region (for 3 micron resolution, an area 600 x 480 microns sampled in {approx} 30 min using a 20 Hz laser). For a spacecraft instrument, the ability to more rapidly prepare a 2D elemental spatial map will be desirable. Here they discuss the use of LIBS for sampling along a core in 1D (detection of carbon) and for 2D mapping of a rock face.

  14. Dosimetric comparisons of carbon ion treatment plans for 1D and 2D ripple filters with variable thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Printz Ringbæk, Toke; Weber, Uli; Santiago, Alina; Simeonov, Yuri; Fritz, Peter; Krämer, Michael; Wittig, Andrea; Bassler, Niels; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Zink, Klemens

    2016-06-01

    A ripple filter (RiFi)—also called mini-ridge filter—is a passive energy modulator used in particle beam treatments that broadens the Bragg peak (BP) as a function of its maximum thickness. The number of different energies requested from the accelerator can thus be reduced, which significantly reduces the treatment time. A new second generation RiFi with 2D groove shapes was developed using rapid prototyping, which optimizes the beam-modulating material and enables RiFi thicknesses of up to 6 mm. Carbon ion treatment plans were calculated using the standard 1D 3 mm thick RiFi and the new 4 and 6 mm 2D RiFis for spherical planning target volumes (PTVs) in water, eight stage I non-small cell lung cancer cases, four skull base chordoma cases and three prostate cancer cases. TRiP98 was used for treatment planning with facility-specific base data calculated with the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT12A. Dose-volume-histograms, spatial dose distributions and dosimetric indexes were used for plan evaluation. Plan homogeneity and conformity of thinner RiFis were slightly superior to thicker RiFis but satisfactory results were obtained for all RiFis investigated. For the 6 mm RiFi, fine structures in the dose distribution caused by the larger energy steps were observed at the PTV edges, in particular for superficial and/or very small PTVs but performances for all RiFis increased with penetration depth due to straggling and scattering effects. Plans with the new RiFi design yielded for the studied cases comparable dosimetric results to the standard RiFi while the 4 and 6 mm RiFis lowered the irradiation time by 25-30% and 45-49%, respectively.

  15. Dosimetric comparisons of carbon ion treatment plans for 1D and 2D ripple filters with variable thicknesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ringbæk, Toke Printz; Weber, Uli; Santiago, Alina; Simeonov, Yuri; Fritz, Peter; Krämer, Michael; Wittig, Andrea; Bassler, Niels; Engenhart-Cabillic, Rita; Zink, Klemens

    2016-06-01

    A ripple filter (RiFi)-also called mini-ridge filter-is a passive energy modulator used in particle beam treatments that broadens the Bragg peak (BP) as a function of its maximum thickness. The number of different energies requested from the accelerator can thus be reduced, which significantly reduces the treatment time. A new second generation RiFi with 2D groove shapes was developed using rapid prototyping, which optimizes the beam-modulating material and enables RiFi thicknesses of up to 6 mm. Carbon ion treatment plans were calculated using the standard 1D 3 mm thick RiFi and the new 4 and 6 mm 2D RiFis for spherical planning target volumes (PTVs) in water, eight stage I non-small cell lung cancer cases, four skull base chordoma cases and three prostate cancer cases. TRiP98 was used for treatment planning with facility-specific base data calculated with the Monte Carlo code SHIELD-HIT12A. Dose-volume-histograms, spatial dose distributions and dosimetric indexes were used for plan evaluation. Plan homogeneity and conformity of thinner RiFis were slightly superior to thicker RiFis but satisfactory results were obtained for all RiFis investigated. For the 6 mm RiFi, fine structures in the dose distribution caused by the larger energy steps were observed at the PTV edges, in particular for superficial and/or very small PTVs but performances for all RiFis increased with penetration depth due to straggling and scattering effects. Plans with the new RiFi design yielded for the studied cases comparable dosimetric results to the standard RiFi while the 4 and 6 mm RiFis lowered the irradiation time by 25-30% and 45-49%, respectively.

  16. Another solution of 2D Ising model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vergeles, S. N.

    2009-04-01

    The partition function of the Ising model on a two-dimensional regular lattice is calculated by using the matrix representation of a Clifford algebra (the Dirac algebra), with number of generators equal to the number of lattice sites. It is shown that the partition function over all loops in a 2D lattice including self-intersecting ones is the trace of a polynomial in terms of Dirac matrices. The polynomial is an element of the rotation group in the spinor representation. Thus, the partition function is a function of a character on an orthogonal group of a high degree in the spinor representation.

  17. Quality control and stability studies with the monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab: application of 1D- vs. 2D-gel electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nebija, Dashnor; Noe, Christian R; Urban, Ernst; Lachmann, Bodo

    2014-04-15

    Recombinant monoclonal antibodies (rmAbs) are medicinal products obtained by rDNA technology. Consequently, like other biopharmaceuticals, they require the extensive and rigorous characterization of the quality attributes, such as identity, structural integrity, purity and stability. The aim of this work was to study the suitability of gel electrophoresis for the assessment of charge heterogeneity, post-translational modifications and the stability of the therapeutic, recombinant monoclonal antibody, trastuzumab. One-dimensional, SDS-PAGE, under reducing and non-reducing conditions, and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis were used for the determination of molecular mass (Mr), the isoelectric point (pI), charge-related isoform patterns and the stability of trastuzumab, subjected to stressed degradation and long-term conditions. For the assessment of the influence of glycosylation in the charge heterogeneity pattern of trastuzumab, an enzymatic deglycosylation study has been performed using N-glycosidase F and sialidase, whereas carboxypeptidase B was used for the lysine truncation study. Experimental data documented that 1D and 2D gel electrophoresis represent fast and easy methods to evaluate the quality of biological medicinal products. Important stability parameters, such as the protein aggregation, can be assessed, as well.

  18. Characterization of saturated MHD instabilities through 2D electron temperature profile reconstruction from 1D ECE measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sertoli, M.; Horváth, L.; Pokol, G. I.; Igochine, V.; Barrera, L.

    2013-05-01

    A new method for the reconstruction of two-dimensional (2D) electron temperature profiles in the presence of saturated magneto-hydro-dynamic (MHD) modes from the one-dimensional (1D) electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostic is presented. The analysis relies on harmonic decomposition of the electron temperature oscillations through short time Fourier transforms and requires rigid poloidal mode rotation as the only assumption. The method is applicable to any magnetic perturbation as long as the poloidal and toroidal mode numbers m and n are known. Its application to the case of a (m, n) = (1, 1) internal kink mode on ASDEX Upgrade is presented and a new way to estimate the mode displacement is explained. For such modes, it is shown that the higher order harmonics usually visible in the ECE spectrogram arise also for the pure m = n = 1 mode and that they cannot be directly associated with m = n > 1 magnetic perturbations. This method opens up new possibilities for electron heat transport studies in the presence of saturated MHD modes and a way to disentangle the impurity density contributions from electron temperature effects in the analysis of the soft x-ray data.

  19. Direct Printing of 1-D and 2-D Electronically Conductive Structures by Molten Lead-Free Solder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chien-Hsun Wang

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine the effects of appropriate experimental parameters on the thermophysical properties of molten micro droplets, Sn-3Ag-0.5Cu solder balls with an average droplet diameter of 50 μm were prepared. The inkjet printing parameters of the molten micro droplets, such as the dot spacing, stage velocity and sample temperature, were optimized in the 1D and 2D printing of metallic microstructures. The impact and mergence of molten micro droplets were observed with a high-speed digital camera. The line width of each sample was then calculated using a formula over a temperature range of 30 to 70 °C. The results showed that a metallic line with a width of 55 μm can be successfully printed with dot spacing (50 μm and the stage velocity (50 mm∙s−1 at the substrate temperature of 30 °C. The experimental results revealed that the height (from 0.63 to 0.58 and solidification contact angle (from 72° to 56° of the metallic micro droplets decreased as the temperature of the sample increased from 30 to 70 °C. High-speed digital camera (HSDC observations showed that the quality of the 3D micro patterns improved significantly when the droplets were deposited at 70 °C.

  20. Photon-dressed quasiparticle states in 1D and 2D materials: a many-body Floquet approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghi, Franca; Puviani, Matteo

    We studiy the interplay between electron-electron interactions and non-equilibrium conditions associated to time-dependent external fields. Exploring phases of quantum matter away from equilibrium may give access to regimes inaccessible under equilibrium conditions. What makes this field particularly interesting is the possibility to engineer new phases of matter by an external tunable control. We have developed a scheme that allows to treat photo-induced phenomena in the presence of electron-electron many body interactions, where both the nonlinear effects of the external field and the electron-electron correlation are treated simultaneously and in a non-perturbative way. The Floquet approach is used to include the effects of the external time periodic field, and the Cluster Perturbation Theory to describe interacting electrons in a lattice. They are merged in a Floquet-Green function method that allows to calculate photon dressed quasiparticle excitation. For 1D systems we show that an unconventional Mott insulator-to-metal transition occurs for given characteristics of the applied field (intensity and frequency). The method has also been applied to the 2D honeycomb lattice (graphene), where in the presence of realistic values of electron-electron interaction, we show that linearly polarized light may give rise to non-dissipative edge states associated to a non-trivial topological behavior.

  1. Identifying seawater intrusion in coastal areas by means of 1D and quasi-2D joint inversion of TDEM and VES data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moreno, F. J.; Monteiro-Santos, F. A.; Bernardo, I.; Farzamian, M.; Nascimento, C.; Fernandes, J.; Casal, B.; Ribeiro, J. A.

    2017-09-01

    Seawater intrusion is an increasingly widespread problem in coastal aquifers caused by climate changes -sea-level rise, extreme phenomena like flooding and droughts- and groundwater depletion near to the coastline. To evaluate and mitigate the environmental risks of this phenomenon it is necessary to characterize the coastal aquifer and the salt intrusion. Geophysical methods are the most appropriate tool to address these researches. Among all geophysical techniques, electrical methods are able to detect seawater intrusions due to the high resistivity contrast between saltwater, freshwater and geological layers. The combination of two or more geophysical methods is recommended and they are more efficient when both data are inverted jointly because the final model encompasses the physical properties measured for each methods. In this investigation, joint inversion of vertical electric and time domain soundings has been performed to examine seawater intrusion in an area within the Ferragudo-Albufeira aquifer system (Algarve, South of Portugal). For this purpose two profiles combining electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) and time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) methods were measured and the results were compared with the information obtained from exploration drilling. Three different inversions have been carried out: single inversion of the ERT and TDEM data, 1D joint inversion and quasi-2D joint inversion. Single inversion results identify seawater intrusion, although the sedimentary layers detected in exploration drilling were not well differentiated. The models obtained with 1D joint inversion improve the previous inversion due to better detection of sedimentary layer and the seawater intrusion appear to be better defined. Finally, the quasi-2D joint inversion reveals a more realistic shape of the seawater intrusion and it is able to distinguish more sedimentary layers recognised in the exploration drilling. This study demonstrates that the quasi-2D joint

  2. Versatile structures of group 13 metal halide complexes with 4,4'-bipy: from 1D coordination polymers to 2D and 3D metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevastianova, Tatiana N; Bodensteiner, Michael; Maulieva, Albina F; Davydova, Elena I; Virovets, Alexander V; Peresypkina, Eugenia V; Balázs, Gábor; Graßl, Christian; Seidl, Michael; Scheer, Manfred; Frenking, Gernot; Berezovskaya, Ekaterina A; Kazakov, Igor V; Khoroshilova, Olesya V; Timoshkin, Alexey Y

    2015-12-21

    A systematic structural study of complexes formed by aluminium and gallium trihalides with 4,4'-bipyridine (bipy) in 2 : 1, 1 : 1, and 1 : 2 stoichiometric ratios has been performed. Molecular structures of 11 complexes in the solid state have been determined for the first time. Complexes of 2 : 1 composition are molecular, while complexes of 1 : 1 composition form metal-organic frameworks of different kinds: an ionic 3D network (three interpenetrated lvt nets for AlCl3bipy), an ionic 2D network for AlBr3bipy and GaBr3bipy and a 1D coordination polymer in the case of GaCl3bipy. Thus, the nature of the Lewis acid plays a critical role in the structural type of the complex in the solid state. Incorporation of excess bipy molecules into (GaCl3bipy)∞ (formation of crystallosolvate) leads to an unprecedented change of the molecular structure from a non-ionic 1D coordination polymer to an ionic 2D metal organic framework [GaCl2bipy2](+)[GaCl4](-)·2bipy. As indicated by the temperature-dependent XRD study, removal of bipy by heating in a vacuum restores the non-ionic 1D structure. Quantum chemical computations for simple cluster model systems (up to eight Al and Ga atoms) reveal that ionic forms are slightly favourable, although the energy differences between the ionic and non-ionic structures are not large. These theoretical predictions are in good agreement with experimental findings. Thus, even relatively simple cluster models may be used to indicate the structural preferences in the solid state. Both experimental and computational IR frequency shifts of the in-plane ring bending mode of bipy upon complexation correlate well with the M-N bond distances in the complexes.

  3. Benchmarking of a 1D Scrape-off layer code SOLF1D with SOLPS and its use in modelling long-legged divertors

    CERN Document Server

    Havlickova, E; Subba, F; Coster, D; Wischmeier, M; Fishpool, G

    2013-01-01

    A 1D code modelling SOL transport parallel to the magnetic field (SOLF1D) is benchmarked with 2D simulations of MAST-U SOL performed via the SOLPS code for two different collisionalities. Based on this comparison, SOLF1D is then used to model the effects of divertor leg stretching in 1D, in support of the planned Super-X divertor on MAST. The aim is to separate magnetic flux expansion from volumetric power losses due to recycling neutrals by stretching the divertor leg either vertically or radially.

  4. 2-D Model Test of Dolosse Breakwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Liu, Zhou

    1994-01-01

    The rational design diagram for Dolos armour should incorporate both the hydraulic stability and the structural integrity. The previous tests performed by Aalborg University (AU) made available such design diagram for the trunk of Dolos breakwater without superstructures (Burcharth et al. 1992......). To extend the design diagram to cover Dolos breakwaters with superstructure, 2-D model tests of Dolos breakwater with wave wall is included in the project Rubble Mound Breakwater Failure Modes sponsored by the Directorate General XII of the Commission of the European Communities under Contract MAS-CT92...... was on the Dolos breakwater with a high superstructure, where there was almost no overtopping. This case is believed to be the most dangerous one. The test of the Dolos breakwater with a low superstructure was also performed. The objective of the last part of the experiment is to investigate the influence...

  5. 2-D Model Test of Dolosse Breakwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Liu, Zhou

    1994-01-01

    The rational design diagram for Dolos armour should incorporate both the hydraulic stability and the structural integrity. The previous tests performed by Aalborg University (AU) made available such design diagram for the trunk of Dolos breakwater without superstructures (Burcharth et al. 1992......). To extend the design diagram to cover Dolos breakwaters with superstructure, 2-D model tests of Dolos breakwater with wave wall is included in the project Rubble Mound Breakwater Failure Modes sponsored by the Directorate General XII of the Commission of the European Communities under Contract MAS-CT92......-0042. Furthermore, Task IA will give the design diagram for Tetrapod breakwaters without a superstructure. The more complete research results on Dolosse can certainly give some insight into the behaviour of Tetrapods armour layer of the breakwaters with superstructure. The main part of the experiment...

  6. 2D+1D Runup Estimations compared with field data of the three recent Chilean Events; the 2010 Maule, the 2014 Iquique and the 2015 Illapel tsunamis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wronna, Martin; Kanoǧlu, Utku; Baptista, Maria Ana

    2017-04-01

    In tsunami sciences, it is a desirable goal to forecast the inundation areas quickly after an event. A promising approach is to combine numerical modelling by applying nonlinear shallow water wave equations with one-dimensional (1-D) analytical solution. Here we use synthetic waveforms as input for 1-D analytical runup estimation and compare the results with the measured runup values of the 2010 Mw 8.8 Maule, the 2014 Mw 8.2 Iquique and the 2015 Mw 8.3 Illapel tsunamis. The three earthquakes occurred along the Peru-Chile Trench with the most damaging Maule event on February 27th, 2010 on the southern part between the Nazca and South American plate. After that event, maximum runup values reach 29 m at the city of Constitutiòn. We compute the waveforms of the events using their co-seismic deformations as the initial conditions in the nonlinear shallow water numerical model. We trace profiles orthogonal to the source at the points of runup measurements and extract the synthetic waveform and the slope of the bathymetry. We then use the synthetic waveforms and bathymetric profiles as input for the 1-D long wave runup theory. The comparison reveals that the 2D+1D runup estimations deliver reasonable results compared to measured runup. But in some cases over- and underestimation occurs. Especially underestimation is a critical issue for early warning purposes, and additional fine tuning of the methodology is needed. This study received funding from project ASTARTE- Assessment Strategy and Risk Reduction for Tsunamis in Europe a collaborative project Grant 603839, FP7-ENV2013 6.4-3.

  7. Self-Assembly of 1D/2D Hybrid Nanostructures Consisting of a Cd(II Coordination Polymer and NiAl-Layered Double Hydroxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Abellán

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The preparation and characterization of a novel hybrid material based on the combination of a 2D-layered double hydroxide (LDH nanosheets and a 1D-coordination polymer (1D-CP has been achieved through a simple mixture of suspensions of both building blocks via an exfoliation/restacking approach. The hybrid material has been thoroughly characterized demonstrating that the 1D-CP moieties are intercalated as well as adsorbed on the surface of the LDH, giving rise to a layered assembly with the coexistence of the functionalities of their initial constituents. This hybrid represents the first example of the assembly of 1D/2D nanomaterials combining LDH with CP and opens the door for a plethora of different functional hybrid systems.

  8. 2-D Chemical-Dynamical Modeling of Venus's Sulfur Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bierson, Carver J.; Zhang, Xi

    2016-10-01

    Over the last decade a combination of ground based and Venus Express observations have been made of the concentration of sulfur species in Venus's atmosphere, both above [1, 2] and below the clouds [3, 4]. These observations put constraints on both the vertical and meridional variations of the major sulfur species in Venus's atmosphere.. It has also been observed that SO2 concentrations varies on both timescales of hours and years [1,4]. The spatial and temporal distribution of tracer species is owing to two possibilities: mutual chemical interaction and dynamical tracer transport.Previous Chemical modeling of Venus's middle atmosphere has only been explored in 1-D. We will present the first 2-D (altitude and latitude) chemical-dynamical model for Venus's middle atmosphere. The sulfur chemistry is based on of the 1D model of Zhang et al. 2012 [5]. We do model runs over multiple Venus decades testing two scenarios: first one with varying sulfur fluxes from below, and second with secular dynamical perturbations in the atmosphere [6]. By comparing to Venus Express and ground based observations, we put constraints on the dynamics of Venus's middle atmosphere.References: [1] Belyaev et al. Icarus 2012 [2] Marcq et al. Nature geoscience, 2013 [3] Marcq et al. JGR:Planets, 2008 [4] Arney et al. JGR:Planets, 2014 [5] Zhang et al. Icarus 2012 [6] Parish et al. Icarus 2012

  9. Strain-Gated Field Effect Transistor of a MoS2-ZnO 2D-1D Hybrid Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Libo; Xue, Fei; Li, Xiaohui; Huang, Xin; Wang, Longfei; Kou, Jinzong; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-01-26

    Two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) is an exciting material due to its unique electrical, optical, and piezoelectric properties. Owing to an intrinsic band gap of 1.2-1.9 eV, monolayer or a-few-layer MoS2 is used for fabricating field effect transistors (FETs) with high electron mobility and on/off ratio. However, the traditional FETs are controlled by an externally supplied gate voltage, which may not be sensitive enough to directly interface with a mechanical stimulus for applications in electronic skin. Here we report a type of top-pressure/force-gated field effect transistors (PGFETs) based on a hybrid structure of a 2D MoS2 flake and 1D ZnO nanowire (NW) array. Once an external pressure is applied, the piezoelectric polarization charges created at the tips of ZnO NWs grown on MoS2 act as a gate voltage to tune/control the source-drain transport property in MoS2. At a 6.25 MPa applied stimulus on a packaged device, the source-drain current can be tuned for ∼25%, equivalent to the results of applying an extra -5 V back gate voltage. Another type of PGFET with a dielectric layer (Al2O3) sandwiched between MoS2 and ZnO also shows consistent results. A theoretical model is proposed to interpret the received data. This study sets the foundation for applying the 2D material-based FETs in the field of artificial intelligence.

  10. WFR-2D: an analytical model for PWAS-generated 2D ultrasonic guided wave propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yanfeng; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents WaveFormRevealer 2-D (WFR-2D), an analytical predictive tool for the simulation of 2-D ultrasonic guided wave propagation and interaction with damage. The design of structural health monitoring (SHM) systems and self-aware smart structures requires the exploration of a wide range of parameters to achieve best detection and quantification of certain types of damage. Such need for parameter exploration on sensor dimension, location, guided wave characteristics (mode type, frequency, wavelength, etc.) can be best satisfied with analytical models which are fast and efficient. The analytical model was constructed based on the exact 2-D Lamb wave solution using Bessel and Hankel functions. Damage effects were inserted in the model by considering the damage as a secondary wave source with complex-valued directivity scattering coefficients containing both amplitude and phase information from wave-damage interaction. The analytical procedure was coded with MATLAB, and a predictive simulation tool called WaveFormRevealer 2-D was developed. The wave-damage interaction coefficients (WDICs) were extracted from harmonic analysis of local finite element model (FEM) with artificial non-reflective boundaries (NRB). The WFR-2D analytical simulation results were compared and verified with full scale multiphysics finite element models and experiments with scanning laser vibrometer. First, Lamb wave propagation in a pristine aluminum plate was simulated with WFR-2D, compared with finite element results, and verified by experiments. Then, an inhomogeneity was machined into the plate to represent damage. Analytical modeling was carried out, and verified by finite element simulation and experiments. This paper finishes with conclusions and suggestions for future work.

  11. Determination of magnitudes and relative signs of 1H-19F coupling constants through 1D- and 2D-TOCSY experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Juan F

    2013-12-20

    A novel methodology based on 1D- and 2D-TOCSY experiments is described for a quick and accurate measurement of proton-fluorine coupling constants in fluorinated organic compounds. The magnitude of the (1)H-(19)F coupling was measured from the displacement between the relayed peaks associated with the α or β spin state of the fluorine, and its relative sign was derived from the sense of the displacement.

  12. Titanium trisulfide (TiS3): a 2D semiconductor with quasi-1D optical and electronic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Island, Joshua O.; Biele, Robert; Barawi, Mariam; Clamagirand, José M.; Ares, José R.; Sánchez, Carlos; van der Zant, Herre S. J.; Ferrer, Isabel J.; D'Agosta, Roberto; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2016-03-01

    We present characterizations of few-layer titanium trisulfide (TiS3) flakes which, due to their reduced in-plane structural symmetry, display strong anisotropy in their electrical and optical properties. Exfoliated few-layer flakes show marked anisotropy of their in-plane mobilities reaching ratios as high as 7.6 at low temperatures. Based on the preferential growth axis of TiS3 nanoribbons, we develop a simple method to identify the in-plane crystalline axes of exfoliated few-layer flakes through angle resolved polarization Raman spectroscopy. Optical transmission measurements show that TiS3 flakes display strong linear dichroism with a magnitude (transmission ratios up to 30) much greater than that observed for other anisotropic two-dimensional (2D) materials. Finally, we calculate the absorption and transmittance spectra of TiS3 in the random-phase-approximation (RPA) and find that the calculations are in qualitative agreement with the observed experimental optical transmittance.

  13. Extending the Nonlinear-Beam-Dynamics Concept of 1D Fixed Points to 2D Fixed Lines

    CERN Document Server

    Franchetti, G.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of nonlinear dynamics traces back to the study of the dynamics of planets with the seminal work of Poincaré at the end of the nineteenth century: Les Méthodes Nouvelles de la Mécanique Céleste, Vols. 1–3 (Gauthier Villars, Paris, 1899). In his work he introduced a methodology fruitful for investigating the dynamical properties of complex systems, which led to the so-called “Poincaré surface of section,” which allows one to capture the global dynamical properties of a system, characterized by fixed points and separatrices with respect to regular and chaotic motion. For two-dimensional phase space (one degree of freedom) this approach has been extremely useful and applied to particle accelerators for controlling their beam dynamics as of the second half of the twentieth century.We describe here an extension of the concept of 1D fixed points to fixed lines in two dimensions. These structures become the fundamental entities for characterizing the nonlinear motion in the four-dimensional phas...

  14. Symmetries and solvable models for evaporating 2D black holes

    CERN Document Server

    Cruz, J; Navarro-Salas, J; Talavera, C F

    1997-01-01

    We study the evaporation process of a 2D black hole in thermal equilibrium when the ingoing radiation is switched off suddenly. We also introduce global symmetries of generic 2D dilaton gravity models which generalize the extra symmetry of the CGHS model.

  15. Bond diluted Ising model in 2D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bouamrane Rachid

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The bond diluted Ising model is studied by Monte Carlo method. The simulation is carried out on a two dimensional square lattice with missing bonds and free boundary conditions. The aim of this work is to investigate the thermodynamical properties of this model for different disorder degree parameter σ. The critical temperature is determined from the Binder cumulant and is shown to decreases as the disorder parameter σ increases linearly.

  16. Advanced Nodal P3/SP3 Axial Transport Solvers for the MPACT 2D/1D Scheme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stimpson, Shane G [ORNL; Collins, Benjamin S [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    As part of its initiative to provide multiphysics simulations of nuclear reactor cores, the Consortium for Advanced Simulation of Light Water Reactors (CASL) is developing the Virtual Environment for Reactor Applications Core Simulator (VERA-CS). The MPACT code, which is the primary neutron transport solver of VERA-CS, employs the two-dimensional/one-dimensional (2D/1D) method to solve 3-dimensional neutron transport problems and provide sub-pin-level resolution of the power distribution. While 2D method of characteristics is used to solve for the transport effects within each plane, 1D-nodal methods are used axially. There have been extensive studies of the 2D/1D method with a variety nodal methods, and the P3/SP3 solver has proved to be an effective method of providing higher-fidelity solutions while maintaining a low computational burden.The current implementation in MPACT wraps a one-node nodal expansion method (NEM) kernel for each moment, iterating between them and performing multiple sweeps to resolve flux distributions. However, it has been observed that this approach is more sensitive to convergence problems. This paper documents the theory and application two new nodal P3/SP3 approaches to be used within the 2D/1D method in MPACT. These two approaches aim to provide enhanced stability compared with the pre-existing one-node approach. Results from the HY-NEM-SP3 solver show that the accuracy is consistent with the one-node formulations and provides improved convergence for some problems; but the solver has issues with cases in thin planes. Although the 2N-SENM-SP3 solver is still under development, it is intended to resolve the issues with HY-NEM-SP3 but it will incur some additional computational burden by necessitating an additional 1D-CMFD-P3 solver to generate the second moment cell-averaged scalar flux.

  17. GIS-BASED 1-D DIFFUSIVE WAVE OVERLAND FLOW MODEL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    KALYANAPU, ALFRED [Los Alamos National Laboratory; MCPHERSON, TIMOTHY N. [Los Alamos National Laboratory; BURIAN, STEVEN J. [NON LANL

    2007-01-17

    This paper presents a GIS-based 1-d distributed overland flow model and summarizes an application to simulate a flood event. The model estimates infiltration using the Green-Ampt approach and routes excess rainfall using the 1-d diffusive wave approximation. The model was designed to use readily available topographic, soils, and land use/land cover data and rainfall predictions from a meteorological model. An assessment of model performance was performed for a small catchment and a large watershed, both in urban environments. Simulated runoff hydrographs were compared to observations for a selected set of validation events. Results confirmed the model provides reasonable predictions in a short period of time.

  18. Port Adriano, 2D-Model tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burcharth, Hans F.; Meinert, Palle; Andersen, Thomas Lykke

    the crown wall have been measured. The model has been subjected to irregular waves corresponding to typical conditions offshore from the intended prototype location. Characteristic situations have been video recorded. The stability of the toe has been investigated. The wave-generated forces on the caisson...... and the crown have been recorded. The maximum of horizontal wave force and the related tilting moment together with the pressure distribution are documented for waves in the range of design conditions. The parameters and results in the report are given in full-scale values, if nothing else is stated....

  19. Cosmological model in 2d dilaton gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Mishima, T; Mishima, Takashi; Nakamichi, Akika

    1993-01-01

    We apply CGHS-type dilaton gravity model to (1+1)-dimensional cosmological situations. First the behavior of a compact 1-dimensional universe (i.e. like a closed string) is classified on the assumption of homogeneity of universe. Several interesting solutions are found, which include a Misner-type universe having closed time-like curves, and an asymptotically de Sitter universe first pointed out by Yoshimura. In the second half of this talk, we discuss the modification of the classical homogeneous solutions, considering inhomogeneity of classical conformal matters and also quantum back-reaction respectively. (An expanded version of the talk presented by T. Mishima at Yukawa Institute of Theoretical Physics workshop `Quantum Gravity' 24-27, November 1992.)

  20. Comparison of Analysis Results Between 2D/1D Synthesis and RAPTOR-M3G in the Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joung Lim, Mi; Maeng, Young Jae; Fero, Arnold H.; Anderson, Stanwood L.

    2016-02-01

    The 2D/1D synthesis methodology has been used to calculate the fast neutron (E > 1.0 MeV) exposure to the beltline region of the reactor pressure vessel. This method uses the DORT 3.1 discrete ordinates code and the BUGLE-96 cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VI. RAPTOR-M3G (RApid Parallel Transport Of Radiation-Multiple 3D Geometries) which performs full 3D calculations was developed and is based on domain decomposition algorithms, where the spatial and angular domains are allocated and processed on multi-processor computer architecture. As compared to traditional single-processor applications, this approach reduces the computational load as well as the memory requirement per processor. Both methods are applied to surveillance test results for the Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP)-OPR (Optimized Power Reactor) 1000 MW. The objective of this paper is to compare the results of the KSNP surveillance program between 2D/1D synthesis and RAPTOR-M3G. Each operating KSNP has a reactor vessel surveillance program consisting of six surveillance capsules located between the core and the reactor vessel in the downcomer region near the reactor vessel wall. In addition to the In-Vessel surveillance program, an Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry (EVND) program has been implemented. In order to estimate surveillance test results, cycle-specific forward transport calculations were performed by 2D/1D synthesis and by RAPTOR-M3G. The ratio between measured and calculated (M/C) reaction rates will be discussed. The current plan is to install an EVND system in all of the Korea PWRs including the new reactor type, APR (Advanced Power Reactor) 1400 MW. This work will play an important role in establishing a KSNP-specific database of surveillance test results and will employ RAPTOR-M3G for surveillance dosimetry location as well as positions in the KSNP reactor vessel.

  1. Application of 1D and 2D MFR reactor technology for the isolation of insecticidal and anti-microbial properties from pyrolysis bio-oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Mohammad M; Scott, Ian M; Berruti, Franco; Briens, Cedric

    2016-12-01

    Valuable chemicals can be separated from agricultural residues by chemical or thermochemical processes. The application of pyrolysis has already been demonstrated as an efficient means to produce a liquid with a high concentration of desired product. The objective of this study was to apply an insect and microorganism bioassay-guided approach to separate and isolate pesticidal compounds from bio-oil produced through biomass pyrolysis. Tobacco leaf (Nicotianata bacum), tomato plant (Solanum lycopersicum), and spent coffee (Coffea arabica) grounds were pyrolyzed at 10°C/min from ambient to 565°C using the mechanically fluidized reactor (MFR). With one-dimensional (1D) MFR pyrolysis, the composition of the product vapors varied as the reactor temperature was raised allowing for the selection of the temperature range that corresponds to vapors with a high concentration of pesticidal properties. Further product separation was performed in a fractional condensation train, or 2D MFR pyrolysis, thus allowing for the separation of vapor components according to their condensation temperature. The 300-400°C tobacco and tomato bio-oil cuts from the 1D MFR showed the highest insecticidal and anti-microbial activity compared to the other bio-oil cuts. The 300-350 and 350-400°C bio-oil cuts produced by 2D MFR had the highest insecticidal activity when the bio-oil was collected from the 210°C condenser. The tobacco and tomato bio-oil had similar insecticidal activity (LC50 of 2.1 and 2.2 mg/mL) when the bio-oil was collected in the 210°C condenser from the 300-350°C reactor temperature gases. The 2D MFR does concentrate the pesticidal products compared to the 1D MFR and thus can reduce the need for further separation steps such as solvent extraction.

  2. Quasi 2D hydrodynamic modelling of the flooded hinterland due to dyke breaching on the Elbe River

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Huang

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available In flood modeling, many 1D and 2D combination and 2D models are used to simulate diversion of water from rivers through dyke breaches into the hinterland for extreme flood events. However, these models are too demanding in data requirements and computational resources which is an important consideration when uncertainty analysis using Monte Carlo techniques is used to complement the modeling exercise. The goal of this paper is to show the development of a quasi-2D modeling approach, which still calculates the dynamic wave in 1D but the discretisation of the computational units are in 2D, allowing a better spatial representation of the flow in the hinterland due to dyke breaching without a large additional expenditure on data pre-processing and computational time. A 2D representation of the flow and velocity fields is required to model sediment and micro-pollutant transport. The model DYNHYD (1D hydrodynamics from the WASP5 modeling package was used as a basis for the simulations. The model was extended to incorporate the quasi-2D approach and a Monte-Carlo Analysis was used to conduct a flood sensitivity analysis to determine the sensitivity of parameters and boundary conditions to the resulting water flow. An extreme flood event on the Elbe River, Germany, with a possible dyke breach area was used as a test case. The results show a good similarity with those obtained from another 1D/2D modeling study.

  3. Structure and Coordination Determination of Peptide-metal Complexes Using 1D and 2D 1H NMR

    OpenAIRE

    Shoshan, Michal S.; Tshuva, Edit Y.; Shalev, Deborah E.

    2013-01-01

    Copper (I) binding by metallochaperone transport proteins prevents copper oxidation and release of the toxic ions that may participate in harmful redox reactions. The Cu (I) complex of the peptide model of a Cu (I) binding metallochaperone protein, which includes the sequence MTCSGCSRPG (underlined is conserved), was determined in solution under inert conditions by NMR spectroscopy.

  4. Kalman Filter for Generalized 2-D Roesser Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHENG Mei; ZOU Yun

    2007-01-01

    The design problem of the state filter for the generalized stochastic 2-D Roesser models, which appears when both the state and measurement are simultaneously subjected to the interference from white noise, is discussed. The wellknown Kalman filter design is extended to the generalized 2-D Roesser models. Based on the method of "scanning line by line", the filtering problem of generalized 2-D Roesser models with mode-energy reconstruction is solved. The formula of the optimal filtering, which minimizes the variance of the estimation error of the state vectors, is derived. The validity of the designed filter is verified by the calculation steps and the examples are introduced.

  5. Consistent Energy-Based Atomistic/Continuum Coupling for Two-Body Potential: 1D and 2D Case

    CERN Document Server

    Shapeev, Alexander V

    2010-01-01

    This paper concerns the problem of consistent energy-based coupling of atomistic and continuum models of materials, limited to zero-temperature statics of simple crystalline materials. It has been widely recognized that the most practical coupled methods exhibit finite errors on the atomistic/continuum interface (which are often attributed to spurious forces called "ghost forces"). There are only few existing works that propose a coupling which is sufficiently accurate near the interface under certain limitations. In this paper a novel coupling that is free from "ghost forces" is proposed for a two-body interaction potential under the assumptions of either (i) one spatial dimension, or (ii) two spatial dimensions and piecewise affine finite elements for describing the continuum deformation. The computational efficiency of the proposed coupling is demonstrated with numerical experiments. The coupling strategy is based on judiciously defining the contributions of the atomistic bonds to the discrete and the cont...

  6. PBE–DFT theoretical study of organic photovoltaic materials based on thiophene with 1D and 2D periodic boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saïl, K., E-mail: sailkari7@yahoo.com; Bassou, G. [Université Djillali Liabès, Laboratoire de Microscopie, Microanalyse de la Matière et Spectroscopie Moléculaire (L2MSM), Faculté des Sciences Exactes (Algeria); Gafour, M. H. [Centre Universitaire Ahmed Zabana de Rélizane, Institut des Sciences Exactes et Sciences de la Nature et de la Vie, Département de Chimie (Algeria); Miloua, F. [Université Djillali Liabès, Laboratoire de Microscopie, Microanalyse de la Matière et Spectroscopie Moléculaire (L2MSM), Faculté des Sciences Exactes (Algeria)

    2015-12-15

    Conjugated organic systems such as thiophene are interesting topics in the field of organic solar cells. We theoretically investigate π-conjugated polymers constituted by n units (n = 1–11) based on the thiophene (Tn) molecule. The computations of the geometries and electronic structures of these compounds are performed using the density functional theory (DFT) at the 6–31 G(d, p) level of theory and the Perdew–Burke–Eenzerhof (PBE) formulation of the generalized gradient approximation with periodic boundary conditions (PBCs) in one (1D) and two (2D) dimensions. Moreover, the electronic properties (HOCO, LUCO, E{sub gap}, V{sub oc}, and V{sub bi}) are determined from 1D and 2D PBC to understand the effect of the number of rings in polythiophene. The absorption properties—excitation energies (E{sub ex}), the maximal absorption wavelength (λ{sub max}), oscillator strengths, and light harvesting—efficiency are studied using the time-dependent DFT method. Our studies show that changing the number of thiophene units can effectively modulate the electronic and optical properties. On the other hand, our work demonstrates the efficiency of theoretical calculation in the PBCs.

  7. Data of the recombination loss mechanisms analysis on Al2O3 PERC cell using PC1D and PC2D simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haibing; Lv, Jun; Bao, Yameng; Xuan, Rongwei; Sun, Shenghua; Sneck, Sami; Li, Shuo; Modanese, Chiara; Savin, Hele; Wang, Aihua; Zhao, Jianhua

    2017-04-01

    This data article is related to our recently published article ('20.8% industrial PERC solar cell: ALD Al2O3 rear surface passivation, efficiency loss mechanisms analysis and roadmap to 24%', Huang et al., 2017 [1]) where we have presented a systematic evaluation of the overall cell processing and a cost-efficient industrial roadmap for PERC cells. Aside from the information already presented in Huang et al., 2017 [1], here we provide data related to Sectin 3 in Huang et al., 2017 [1] concerning the analysis of the recombination losses׳ mechanisms by PC1D V5.9 and PC2D simulations (Clugston and Basore, 1997, Basore and Cabanas-Holmen, 2011, Cabanas-Holmen and Basore, 2012 and Cabanas-Holmen and Basore, 2012.) [2], [3], [4], [5] on our current industrial Al2O3 PERC cell. The data include: i) PC2D simulations on J02, ii) the calculation of series resistance and back surface recombination velocity (BSRV) on the rear side metallization of PERC cell for the case of a point contact, and iii) the PC1D simulation on the cumulative photo-generation and recombination along the distance from the front surface. Finally, the roadmap of the solar cell efficiency for an industrial PERC technology up to 24% is presented, with the aim of providing a potential guideline for industrial researchers.

  8. Effects on the Thermo-Mechanical and Crystallinity Properties of Nylon 6,6 Electrospun Fibres Reinforced with One Dimensional (1D and Two Dimensional (2D Carbon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Medellín-Rodríguez

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Electrospun one dimensional (1D and two dimensional (2D carbon based polymer nanocomposites are studied in order to determine the effect provided by the two differently structured nanofillers on crystallinity and thermo-mechanical properties of the nanofibres. The nanomaterials studied are pristine carbon nanotubes, oxidised carbon nanotubes, reduced graphene oxide and graphene oxide. Functional groups associated with the order structure of the polymers are analysed by infrared and Raman spectroscopies; the morphology is studied by scanning electron microscopy and the crystallinity properties are investigated by differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction. Differences in crystallisation behaviour between 1D and 2D carbon based nanofibres are shown by their crystallinity degree and their crystal sizes. The nanocomposite crystal sizes perpendicular to the plane (100 decrease with nanofiller content in all cases. The crystallinity trend and crystal sizes are in accordance with storage modulus response. The results also suggest that functionalisation favours interfacial bonding and dispersion of the nanomaterials within the polymer matrix. As a consequence the number of nucleating sites increases which in turn decreases the crystal size in the nanocomposites. These features explain the improved thermo-mechanical properties in the nanocomposites.

  9. 1D-2D carbon heterostructure with low Pt loading as a superior cathode electrode for dye-sensitized solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nechiyil, Divya; Ramaprabhu, S.

    2017-02-01

    Cost-effective counter electrode (CE) with high electrocatalytic performance is very much essential for the wide application of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC). The 1D-2D carbon heterostructure (Pt/GR@CNT) with low platinum (Pt) loading has been synthesized by a facile in situ microwave-assisted polyol-reduction method. The excellent electrocatalytic activity as well as photovoltaic performance was achieved due to the combination of 2D graphene nanoribbons (GR) and 1D multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNT) with high catalytically active Pt nanoparticles. Microwave-assisted longitudinal unzipping of few outer layers of CNTs along with co-reduction of Pt nanoparticles is an effective method to create electrochemically active defective edge sites, which have a crucial role in enhancing electrochemical performance. Synergistic effect of ultra-fine Pt nanoparticles, partially unzipped graphene nanoribbons and inner core tubes of CNTs modulates the power conversion efficiency of solar cell to 5.57% ± 0.03 as compared with 4.73% ± 0.13 of CNTs. Pt/GR@CNT CE even with low Pt loading of 14 μg cm-2 showcases equivalent performance with that of pure Pt counter electrode.

  10. A 2D spring model for the simulation of ultrasonic wave propagation in nonlinear hysteretic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delsanto, P P; Gliozzi, A S; Hirsekorn, M; Nobili, M

    2006-07-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) approach to the simulation of ultrasonic wave propagation in nonclassical nonlinear (NCNL) media is presented. The approach represents the extension to 2D of a previously proposed one dimensional (1D) Spring Model, with the inclusion of a PM space treatment of the intersticial regions between grains. The extension to 2D is of great practical relevance for its potential applications in the field of quantitative nondestructive evaluation and material characterization, but it is also useful, from a theoretical point of view, to gain a better insight of the interaction mechanisms involved. The model is tested by means of virtual 2D experiments. The expected NCNL behaviors are qualitatively well reproduced.

  11. Molecular tectonics: p-H-thiacalix[4]arene pyridyl appended positional isomers as tectons for the formation of 1D and 2D mercury coordination networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ovsyannikov, A; Ferlay, S; Solovieva, S E; Antipin, I S; Konovalov, A I; Kyritsakas, N; Hosseini, M W

    2013-07-21

    Three p-H-thiacalix[4]arene pyridyl appended coordinating tectons (2-4) in a 1,3-alternate conformation have been prepared and structurally characterised in the solid state. These compounds are positional isomers differing only by the position of the nitrogen atom on the pyridyl ring. Their combinations with HgCl2 lead to the formation of 1- and 2-D neutral mercury coordination networks. Whereas for tecton 2 (ortho isomer) a 2D architecture resulting from the bridging of consecutive tectons by the mononuclear HgCl2 unit is obtained, for tecton 3 (meta isomer) again a 2D network is formed. However, in that case, the interconnection of consecutive organic tectons 3 takes place through a binuclear Hg2Cl4 species. Finally, in the case of tecton 4 (para position), a 1D ribbon type double chain arrangement resulting from the bridging of consecutive tectons by trinuclear Hg3Cl6 units followed by the interconnection of two chains through the fusion of the trinuclear centres into a hexanuclear node is observed.

  12. Multiple biological functions of novel basic proteins isolated from duck egg white: duck basic protein small 1 (dBPS1) and 2 (dBPS2).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naknukool, Supaporn; Hayakawa, Shigeru; Ogawa, Masahiro

    2011-05-11

    Biological functions of duck basic protein small 1 (dBPS(1)) and 2 (dBPS(2)) were investigated by in vitro experiments. Results of agarose gel retardation assay indicated that dBPS(1) and dBPS(2) associate with RNA. Addition of NaCl or urea induced partial dissociation of dBPS(1)/dBPS(2)-RNA complex, implying that electrostatic interaction, hydrophobic interaction, and hydrogen bonds are involved in the association of dBPS(1)/dBPS(2) to RNA. dBPS(1) and dBPS(2) inhibited pancreatic lipase activity with the fifty percent inhibitory concentration (IC(50)) of 250 and 100 μg/mL, respectively. Peptic hydrolysates of dBPS(1) and those of dBPS(2) showed a potent angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition with an IC(50) of 22.5 and 49.6 mg/L. The most potent ACE-inhibitory peptide was a nanopeptide (EKKGFCAGY) from dBPS(1) and an octapeptide (KYCPKVGY) from dBPS(2). These multiple biological functions of dBPS(1) and dBPS(2) may contribute to reducing the risk of lifestyle diseases.

  13. Stochastic 2-D Models of Galaxy Disk Evolution. The Galaxy M33

    CERN Document Server

    Mineikis, Tadas

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a fast numerical 2-D model of galaxy disk evolution (resolved along the galaxy radius and azimuth) by adopting a scheme of parameterized stochastic self-propagating star formation. We explore the parameter space of the model and demonstrate its capability to reproduce 1-D radial profiles of the galaxy M33: gas surface density, surface brightness in the i and GALEX FUV passbands, and metallicity.

  14. Comparison of Analysis Results Between 2D/1D Synthesis and RAPTOR-M3G in the Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lim Mi Joung

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The 2D/1D synthesis methodology has been used to calculate the fast neutron (E > 1.0 MeV exposure to the beltline region of the reactor pressure vessel. This method uses the DORT 3.1 discrete ordinates code and the BUGLE-96 cross-section library based on ENDF/B-VI. RAPTOR-M3G (RApid Parallel Transport Of Radiation-Multiple 3D Geometries which performs full 3D calculations was developed and is based on domain decomposition algorithms, where the spatial and angular domains are allocated and processed on multi-processor computer architecture. As compared to traditional single-processor applications, this approach reduces the computational load as well as the memory requirement per processor. Both methods are applied to surveillance test results for the Korea Standard Nuclear Plant (KSNP-OPR (Optimized Power Reactor 1000 MW. The objective of this paper is to compare the results of the KSNP surveillance program between 2D/1D synthesis and RAPTOR-M3G. Each operating KSNP has a reactor vessel surveillance program consisting of six surveillance capsules located between the core and the reactor vessel in the downcomer region near the reactor vessel wall. In addition to the In-Vessel surveillance program, an Ex-Vessel Neutron Dosimetry (EVND program has been implemented. In order to estimate surveillance test results, cycle-specific forward transport calculations were performed by 2D/1D synthesis and by RAPTOR-M3G. The ratio between measured and calculated (M/C reaction rates will be discussed. The current plan is to install an EVND system in all of the Korea PWRs including the new reactor type, APR (Advanced Power Reactor 1400 MW. This work will play an important role in establishing a KSNP-specific database of surveillance test results and will employ RAPTOR-M3G for surveillance dosimetry location as well as positions in the KSNP reactor vessel.

  15. Collins Model and Phase Diagram of 2D Ternary System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIE Chuan-Mei; CHEN Li-Rong

    2004-01-01

    The Collins model is introduced into the two-dimensional (2D) alternative ternary system having the Lennard-Jones (L-J) potential. The Gibbs free energy of this ternary system is calculated, and according to thermodynamic theory, a group of equations that determine the solid-liquid diagram of ternary system are derived, some isothermal sectional diagrams of the 2D ternary system are obtained. The results are quite similar to the behavior of three-dimensional substances.

  16. QSAR Models for P-450 (2D6) Substrate Activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringsted, Tine; Nikolov, Nikolai Georgiev; Jensen, Gunde Egeskov;

    2009-01-01

    activity relationship (QSAR) modelling systems. They cross validated (leave-groups-out) with concordances of 71%, 81% and 82%, respectively. Discrete organic European Inventory of Existing Commercial Chemical Substances (EINECS) chemicals were screened to predict an approximate percentage of CYP 2D6...... substrates. These chemicals are potentially present in the environment. The biological importance of the CYP 2D6 and the use of the software mentioned above were discussed....

  17. Quantum simulation of 2d topological physics using orbital-angular-momentum-carrying photons in a 1d array of cavities

    CERN Document Server

    Luo, Xi-Wang; Li, Chuan-Feng; Xu, Jin-Shi; Guo, Guang-Can; Zhou, Zheng-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Orbital angular momentum (OAM) of light is a fundamental optical degree of freedom that has recently motivated much exciting research in diverse fields ranging from optical communication to quantum information. We show for the first time that it is also a unique and valuable resource for quantum simulation, by demonstrating theoretically how \\emph{2d} topological physics can be simulated in a \\emph{1d} array of optical cavities using OAM-carrying photons. Remarkably, this newly discovered application of OAM states not only reduces required physical resources but also increases feasible scale of simulation. By showing how important topics such as edge-state transport and topological phase transition can be studied in a small simulator with just a few cavities ready for immediate experimental exploration, we demonstrate the prospect of photonic OAM for quantum simulation which can have a significant impact on the research of topological physics.

  18. ZnO Nanorods on a LaAlO 3 -SrTiO 3 Interface: Hybrid 1D-2D Diodes with Engineered Electronic Properties

    KAUST Repository

    Bera, Ashok

    2015-12-28

    Integrating nanomaterials with different dimensionalities and properties is a versatile approach toward realizing new functionalities in advanced devices. Here, a novel diode-type heterostructure is reported consisting of 1D semiconducting ZnO nanorods and 2D metallic LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface. Tunable insulator-to-metal transitions, absent in the individual components, are observed as a result of the competing temperature-dependent conduction mechanisms. Detailed transport analysis reveals direct tunneling at low bias, Fowler-Nordheim tunneling at high forward bias, and Zener breakdown at high reverse bias. Our results highlight the rich electronic properties of such artificial diodes with hybrid dimensionalities, and the design principle may be generalized to other nanomaterials. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. ZnO Nanorods on a LaAlO3 -SrTiO3 Interface: Hybrid 1D-2D Diodes with Engineered Electronic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Ashok; Lin, Weinan; Yao, Yingbang; Ding, Junfeng; Lourembam, James; Wu, Tom

    2016-02-10

    Integrating nanomaterials with different dimensionalities and properties is a versatile approach toward realizing new functionalities in advanced devices. Here, a novel diode-type heterostructure is reported consisting of 1D semiconducting ZnO nanorods and 2D metallic LaAlO3-SrTiO3 interface. Tunable insulator-to-metal transitions, absent in the individual components, are observed as a result of the competing temperature-dependent conduction mechanisms. Detailed transport analysis reveals direct tunneling at low bias, Fowler-Nordheim tunneling at high forward bias, and Zener breakdown at high reverse bias. Our results highlight the rich electronic properties of such artificial diodes with hybrid dimensionalities, and the design principle may be generalized to other nanomaterials.

  20. 2D-model of oxygen emissions lines for Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cessateur, Gaël; Barthelemy, Mathieu; Lilensten, Jean; Rubin, Martin; Maggiolo, Romain; De Keyser, Johan

    2017-04-01

    The Jovian moon Europa is an interesting case study as an archetype for icy satellites, and will be one of the primary targets of the ESA JUICE mission which should be launched in 2022. Hosting a thin neutral gas atmosphere mainly composed of O2 and H2O, Europa can be studied by its airglow and dayglow emissions. A 1D photochemistry model has first been developed to assess the impact of the solar UV flux on the visible emission, such as the red and green oxygen lines (Cessateur et al. 2016). For limb polar viewing, red line emissions can reach a few hundreds of Rayleigh close to the surface. The impact of the precipitating electrons has also been studied. The density and temperature of the electrons are first derived from the multifluid MHD model from Rubin et al. (2015). A 2D emission model has thus been developed to estimate the airglow emissions. When electrons are the major source of the visible emissions, the solar UV flux can be responsible for up to 15% of those emissions for some specific line of sight. Oxygen emission lines in the UV have also been considered, such as 130.5 and 135.6 nm. For the latter, we did estimate some significant line emissions reaching 700 Rayleigh for a polar limb viewing angle close to the surface. Oxygen emission lines are significant (higher than 10 R) for altitudes lower than 100 km for all lines, except for the red line emissions where emissions are still above 10 R up to 200 km from the surface. A sensitivity study has also been performed in order to assess the impact of the uncertainties relative to the dissociative-excitation cross sections. Cessateur G, Barthelemy M & Peinke I. Photochemistry-emission coupled model for Europa and Ganymede. J. Space Weather Space Clim., 6, A17, 2016 Rubin, M., et al. Self-consistent multifluid MHD simulations of Europa's exospheric interaction with Jupiter's magnetosphere, J. Geophys. Res. Space Physics, 120, 3503-3524, 2015

  1. 1D and 2D diffusion pore imaging on a preclinical MR system using adaptive rephasing: Feasibility and pulse sequence comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertleff, Marco; Domsch, Sebastian; Laun, Frederik B.; Kuder, Tristan A.; Schad, Lothar R.

    2017-05-01

    Diffusion pore imaging (DPI) has recently been proposed as a means to acquire images of the average pore shape in an image voxel or region of interest. The highly asymmetric gradient scheme of its sequence makes it substantially demanding in terms of the hardware of the NMR system. The aim of this work is to show the feasibility of DPI on a preclinical 9.4 T animal scanner. Using water-filled capillaries with an inner radius of 10 μm, four different variants of the DPI sequence were compared in 1D and 2D measurements. The pulse sequences applied cover the basic implementation using one long and one temporally narrow gradient pulse, a CPMG-like variant with multiple refocusing RF pulses as well as two variants splitting up the long gradient and distributing it on either side of the refocusing pulse. Substantial differences between the methods were found in terms of signal-to-noise ratio, contrast, blurring, deviations from the expected results and sensitivity to gradient imperfections. Each of the tested sequences was found to produce characteristic gradient mismatches dependent on the absolute value, direction and sign of the applied q-value. Read gradients were applied to compensate these mismatches translating them into time shifts, which enabled 1D DPI yielding capillary radius estimations within the tolerances specified by the manufacturer. For a successful DPI application in 2D, a novel gradient amplitude adaption scheme was implemented to correct for the occurring time shifts. Using this adaption, higher conformity to the expected pore shape, reduced blurring and enhanced contrast were achieved. Images of the phantom's pore shape could be acquired with a nominal resolution of 2.2 μm.

  2. Plasmonic spectrum on 1D and 2D periodic arrays of rod-shape metal nanoparticle pairs with different core patterns for biosensor and solar cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumara, N. T. R. N.; Chou Chau, Yuan-Fong; Huang, Jin-Wei; Huang, Hung Ji; Lin, Chun-Ting; Chiang, Hai-Pang

    2016-11-01

    Simulations of surface plasmon resonance (SPR) on the near field intensity and absorption spectra of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) periodic arrays of rod-shape metal nanoparticle (MNP) pairs using the finite element method (FEM) and taking into account the different core patterns for biosensor and solar cell applications are investigated. A tunable optical spectrum corresponding to the transverse SPR modes is observed. The peak resonance wavelength (λ res) can be shifted to red as the core patterns in rod-shape MNPs have been changed. We find that the 2D periodic array of core-shell MNP pairs (case 2) exhibit a red shifted SPR that can be tuned the gap enhancement and absorption efficiency simultaneously over an extended wavelength range. The tunable optical performances give us a qualitative idea of the geometrical properties of the periodic array of rod-shape MNP pairs on SPRs that can be as a promising candidate for plasmonic biosensor and solar cell applications.

  3. Syntheses, crystal structures, and characterization of three 1D, 2D and 3D complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Huai-Xia, E-mail: yanghuaixia886@163.com [Pharmacy College, Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhengzhou 450008 (China); Liang, Zhen; Hao, Bao-Lian [Pharmacy College, Henan University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Zhengzhou 450008 (China); Meng, Xiang-Ru, E-mail: mxr@zzu.edu.cn [The College of Chemistry and Molecular Engineering, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou 450001 (China)

    2014-10-15

    Three new 1D to 3D complexes, namely, ([Ni(btec)(Himb){sub 2}(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]·6H{sub 2}O){sub n} (1), ([Cd(btec){sub 0.5}(imb)(H{sub 2}O)]·1.5H{sub 2}O){sub n} (2), and ([Zn(btec){sub 0.5}(imb)]·H{sub 2}O){sub n} (3) (H{sub 4}btec=1,2,4,5-benzenetetracarboxylic acid, imb=2-(1H-imidazol-1-methyl)-1H-benzimidazole) have been synthesized by adjusting the central metal ions. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses reveal that complex 1 possesses a 1D chain structure which is further extended into the 3D supramolecular architecture via hydrogen bonds. Complex 2 features a 2D network with Schla¨fli symbol (5{sup 3}·6{sup 2}·7)(5{sup 2}·6{sup 4}). Complex 3 presents a 3D framework with a point symbol of (4·6{sup 4}·8)(4{sup 2}·6{sup 2}·8{sup 2}). Moreover, their IR spectra, PXRD patterns, thermogravimetric curves, and luminescent emissions were studied at room temperature. - Graphical abstract: Three new 1D to 3D complexes with different structural and topological motifs have been obtained by modifying the central metal ions. Additionally, their IR, TG analyses and fluorescent properties are also investigated. - Highlights: • Three complexes based on mixed multidentate N- and O-donor ligands. • The complexes are characterized by IR, luminescence and TGA techniques. • Benzenetetracarboxylates display different coordination modes in complexes 1–3. • Changing the metal ions can result in complexes with completely different structures.

  4. Novel inorganic-organic hybrids constructed from multinuclear copper cluster and Keggin polyanions: from 1D wave-like chain to 2D network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuli; Wang, Yufei; Liu, Guocheng; Tian, Aixiang; Zhang, Juwen; Lin, Hongyan

    2011-09-28

    Two novel inorganic-organic hybrids constructed from Keggin-type polyanions and multinuclear copper clusters based on 1-H-1,2,3-benzotriazole (HBTA), [Cu(I)(8)(BTA)(4)(HBTA)(8)(SiMo(12)O(40))]·2H(2)O (1) and [Cu(II)(6)(OH)(4)(BTA)(4)(SiW(12)O(40))(H(2)O)(6)]·6H(2)O (2), have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction, elemental analyses, IR spectra and thermogravimetric (TG) analyses. In compound 1, eight Cu(I) ions were linked by twelve HBTA/BTA ligands to form an octanuclear Cu(I) cluster, which is connected by SiMo(12)O(40)(4-) anion with two bridging O atoms and two terminal O atoms to construct a one-dimensional (1D) wave-like chain. The octanuclear copper unit represents the maximum subunit linked just by amine ligands in the POMs system. In 2, four BTA ligands linked five Cu(II) ions constructing a pentanuclear "porphyrin-like" subunit, which is connected by another Cu(II) ion to form a 1D metal-organic band. The SiW(12)O(40)(4-) polyanions as tetradentate inorganic linkages extend the 1D band into a two-dimensional (2D) network with (8(3))(2)(8(5)·10) topology. To the best of our knowledge, compounds 1 and 2 represent the first examples of inorganic-organic hybrids based on metal-HBTA multinuclear subunits and polyoxometalates. The photocatalysis and electrochemical properties have been investigated in this paper.

  5. UPLAND EROSION MODELING WITH CASC2D-SED

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Pierre JULIEN; Rosalía ROJAS

    2002-01-01

    Developed at Colorado State University, CASC2D-SED is a physically-based model simulating the hydrologic response of a watershed to a distributed rainfall field. The time-dependent processes include:precipitation, interception, infiltration, surface runoff and channel routing, upland erosion, transport and sedimentation. CASC2D-SED is applied to Goodwin Creek, Mississippi. The watershed covers 21 km2and has been extensively monitored both at the outlet and at several internal locations by the ARS-NSL at Oxford, MS. The model has been calibrated and validated using rainfall data from 16 meteorological stations, 6 stream gauging stations and 6 sediment gauging stations. Sediment erosion/deposition rates by size fraction are predicted both in space and time. Geovisualization, a powerful data exploration technique based on GIS technology, is used to analyze and display the dynamic output time series generated by the CASC2D-SED model.

  6. A VARIATIONAL MODEL FOR 2-D MICROPOLAR BLOOD FLOW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Ji-huan

    2003-01-01

    The micropolar fluid model is an essential generalization of the well-established Navier-Stokes model in the sense that it takes into account the microstructure of the fluid.This paper is devolted to establishing a variational principle for 2-D incompressible micropolar blood flow.

  7. Cyano-bridged coordination polymer hydrogel-derived Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids with structural diversity: from 3D, 2D, to 2D/1D and enhanced lithium-storage performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weiyu; Zhu, Xiaoshu; Chen, Xuguang; Zhou, Yiming; Tang, Yawen; Ding, Liangxin; Wu, Ping

    2016-05-01

    Metal oxide nanohybrids with uniform dimensions and controlled architectures possess unique compositional and structural superiorities, and thus harbor promising potential for a series of applications in energy, catalysis, and sensing systems. Herein, we propose a facile, general, and scalable cyano-bridged coordination polymer hydrogel-derived thermal-oxidation route for the construction of main-group metal and transition-metal heterometallic oxide nanohybrids with controlled constituents and architectures. The formation of Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids has been demonstrated as an example by using cyano-bridged Sn(iv)-Fe(ii) bimetallic coordination polymer hydrogels (i.e., SnCl4-K4Fe(CN)6 cyanogels, Sn-Fe cyanogels) as precursors. The physicochemical properties of Sn-Fe cyanogels with different Sn/Fe ratios have been systematically examined, and it is found that perfect Sn-Fe cyanogels without unbridged Sn(iv) or Fe(ii) can be formed with Sn/Fe ratios from 2 : 1 to 1 : 2. More importantly, the simple adjustment of Sn/Fe ratios in the Sn-Fe cyanogel precursors can realize flexible dimensional control of the Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids, and 2D/1D SnO2-Fe2O3 hierarchitectures, 2D SnO2-Fe2O3 nanosheets, and 3D SnO2-Fe2O3 networks have been synthesized using the Sn-Fe 1 : 2, Sn-Fe 1 : 1, and Sn-Fe 2 : 1 cyanogels as precursors, respectively. To demonstrate their compositional/structural superiorities and potential applications, the lithium-storage utilization of the Sn-Fe binary oxide nanohybrids has been selected as an objective application, and the nanohybrids exhibit Sn/Fe ratio-dependent lithium-storage performance. As a representative example, the 2D/1D SnO2-Fe2O3 hierarchitectures manifest markedly enhanced Li-storage performance in terms of reversible capacities and cycling stability in comparison with their constituent units, i.e., bare SnO2 nanosheets and Fe2O3 nanorods. The proposed cyanogel-derived thermal-oxidation strategy could open up new

  8. DEVELOPMENT OF 2D HUMAN BODY MODELING USING THINNING ALGORITHM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Srinivasan

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring the behavior and activities of people in Video surveillance has gained more applications in Computer vision. This paper proposes a new approach to model the human body in 2D view for the activity analysis using Thinning algorithm. The first step of this work is Background subtraction which is achieved by the frame differencing algorithm. Thinning algorithm has been used to find the skeleton of the human body. After thinning, the thirteen feature points like terminating points, intersecting points, shoulder, elbow, and knee points have been extracted. Here, this research work attempts to represent the body model in three different ways such as Stick figure model, Patch model and Rectangle body model. The activities of humans have been analyzed with the help of 2D model for the pre-defined poses from the monocular video data. Finally, the time consumption and efficiency of our proposed algorithm have been evaluated.

  9. Horns Rev II, 2D-Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Brorsen, Michael

    This report is an extension of the study presented in Lykke Andersen and Brorsen, 2006 and includes results from the irregular wave tests, where Lykke Andersen & Brorsen, 2006 focused on regular waves. The 2D physical model tests were carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil...

  10. Preliminary 2D numerical modeling of common granular problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyser, Emmanuel; Jaboyedoff, Michel

    2017-04-01

    Granular studies received an increasing interest during the last decade. Many scientific investigations were successfully addressed to acknowledge the ubiquitous behavior of granular matter. We investigate liquid impacts onto granular beds, i.e. the influence of the packing and compaction-dilation transition. However, a physically-based model is still lacking to address complex microscopic features of granular bed response during liquid impacts such as compaction-dilation transition or granular bed uplifts (Wyser et al. in review). We present our preliminary 2D numerical modeling based on the Discrete Element Method (DEM) using nonlinear contact force law (the Hertz-Mindlin model) for disk shape particles. The algorithm is written in C programming language. Our 2D model provides an analytical tool to address granular problems such as i) granular collapses and ii) static granular assembliy problems. This provides a validation framework of our numerical approach by comparing our numerical results with previous laboratory experiments or numerical works. Inspired by the work of Warnett et al. (2014) and Staron & Hinch (2005), we studied i) the axisymetric collapse of granular columns. We addressed the scaling between the initial aspect ratio and the final runout distance. Our numerical results are in good aggreement with the previous studies of Warnett et al. (2014) and Staron & Hinch (2005). ii) Reproducing static problems for regular and randomly stacked particles provides a valid comparison to results of Egholm (2007). Vertical and horizontal stresses within the assembly are quite identical to stresses obtained by Egholm (2007), thus demonstating the consistency of our 2D numerical model. Our 2D numerical model is able to reproduce common granular case studies such as granular collapses or static problems. However, a sufficient small timestep should be used to ensure a good numerical consistency, resulting in higher computational time. The latter becomes critical

  11. Maximizing entropy of image models for 2-D constrained coding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forchhammer, Søren; Danieli, Matteo; Burini, Nino

    2010-01-01

    This paper considers estimating and maximizing the entropy of two-dimensional (2-D) fields with application to 2-D constrained coding. We consider Markov random fields (MRF), which have a non-causal description, and the special case of Pickard random fields (PRF). The PRF are 2-D causal finite...... context models, which define stationary probability distributions on finite rectangles and thus allow for calculation of the entropy. We consider two binary constraints and revisit the hard square constraint given by forbidding neighboring 1s and provide novel results for the constraint that no uniform 2...... £ 2 squares contains all 0s or all 1s. The maximum values of the entropy for the constraints are estimated and binary PRF satisfying the constraint are characterized and optimized w.r.t. the entropy. The maximum binary PRF entropy is 0.839 bits/symbol for the no uniform squares constraint. The entropy...

  12. Construction of copper-based coordination polymers with 1D chain, 2D plane and wavy networks: Syntheses, structures, thermal behaviors and photoluminescence properties

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Jianghua Li; Chi Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Three Cu-based coordination polymers (CPs), including [CuII ( -1 -NCS)2 (O-1 -DMF)2 (2 -3,3’-bptz)] (1), [CuI (1,3-2-NCS)(2-3,3’-bptz)] (2) and [(CuI (1,3-μ2- NCS))(2-4,4’-bptz)] (3) (DMF = , -dimethyl formamide, 3,3’-bptz = 3,6-bis(3-pyridyl)tetrazine and 4,4’-bptz = 3,6-bis(4-pyridyl)tetrazine) have been successfully constructed by solution diffusion reactions by using Cu(NO3)2 ·3H2O or CuNCS and KNCS with 3,3’-bptz / 4,4’-bptz ligands, respectively. The resulting crystalline materials have been characterized by the single-crystal X-ray diffraction analyses, elemental analyses, FT-IR spectra, thermogravimetric analyses and powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD). Single crystal X-ray analyses revealed that CP 1 is organized in one-dimensional (1D) chain in which the Cu(II) ions are coordinated by 1 -NCS− anions and 1-DMF molecules, and linked by 2-3,3’-bptz bridging ligands. CPs ,2 and 3 are structural isomers. CP 2 exhibits two-dimensional (2D) (4,4)-plane-like network in which Cu(I) ions are linked by 2-NCS − and 2-3,3’-bptz ligands. In CP 3, Cu(I) ions are connected by 2 -NCS − and 2-4,4’-bptz ligands to form 2D saw-tooth wavy network. In addition, the photoluminescence properties of CPs 1-3 were also investigated in the solid state at room temperature.

  13. A longitudinal observational study of brain atrophy rate reflecting four decades of multiple sclerosis: a comparison of serial 1D, 2D, and volumetric measurements from MRI images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martola, Juha; Zhang, Yi; Aspelin, Peter; Kristoffersen Wiberg, Maria [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Radiology, Department of Clinical Science, Intervention, and Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Bergstroem, Jakob [Karolinska Institutet, The Medical Statistics Unit, Department of Learning, Informatics, Management and Ethics (LIME), Stockholm (Sweden); Fredrikson, Sten; Stawiarz, Leszek; Hillert, Jan [Karolinska Institutet, Division of Neurology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Flodmark, Olof; Lilja, Anders [Karolinska University Hospital, Department of Neuroradiology, Department of Clinical Neuroscience, Stockholm (Sweden); Ekbom, Anders [Karolinska Institutet, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2010-02-15

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) has a variable progression with an early onset of atrophy. Individual longitudinal radiological evaluations (over decades) are difficult to perform due to the limited availability of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the past, patients lost in follow-up, and the continuous updating of scanners. We studied a cohort with widespread disease duration at baseline. The observed individual atrophy rates over time of 10 years represented four decades of disease span. Thirty-seven MS patients (age range 24-65 years with disease duration 1-33 years) were consecutively selected and evaluated with MRI at baseline 1995 and in 1996. They were followed up for a decade (mean of 9.25 years, range 7.3-10 years) up to 2003-2005. Brain parenchymal volume and volumes of the supratentorial ventricles were analyzed with semi-automated volumetric measurements at three time points (1995, 1996, and 2003-2005). Volumetric differences were found over shorter periods of time (1-7 months); however, differences vanished by the end of follow-up. A uniform longitudinal decrease in brain volume and increase in ventricle volumes were found. Frontal horn width (1D) correlated strongest to 3D measures. No statistical differences of atrophy rates between MS courses were found. Supratentorial ventricular volumes were associated with disability and this association persisted during follow-up. Despite variable clinical courses, the degenerative effects of MS progression expressed in brain atrophy seem to uniformly progress over longer periods of time. These volumetric changes can be detected using 1D and 2D measurements performed on a routine PACS workstation. (orig.)

  14. Nonlocal order parameters for the 1D Hubbard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montorsi, Arianna; Roncaglia, Marco

    2012-12-07

    We characterize the Mott-insulator and Luther-Emery phases of the 1D Hubbard model through correlators that measure the parity of spin and charge strings along the chain. These nonlocal quantities order in the corresponding gapped phases and vanish at the critical point U(c)=0, thus configuring as hidden order parameters. The Mott insulator consists of bound doublon-holon pairs, which in the Luther-Emery phase turn into electron pairs with opposite spins, both unbinding at U(c). The behavior of the parity correlators is captured by an effective free spinless fermion model.

  15. Instantons in 2D U(1) Higgs model and 2D CP(N-1) sigma models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Yaogang

    2007-12-01

    In this thesis I present the results of a study of the topological structures of 2D U(1) Higgs model and 2D CP N-1 sigma models. Both models have been studied using the overlap Dirac operator construction of topological charge density. The overlap operator provides a more incisive probe into the local topological structure of gauge field configurations than the traditional plaquette-based operator. In the 2D U(1) Higgs model, we show that classical instantons with finite sizes violate the negativity of topological charge correlator by giving a positive contribution to the correlator at non-zero separation. We argue that instantons in 2D U(1) Higgs model must be accompanied by large quantum fluctuations in order to solve this contradiction. In 2D CPN-1 sigma models, we observe the anomalous scaling behavior of the topological susceptibility chi t for N ≤ 3. The divergence of chi t in these models is traced to the presence of small instantons with a radius of order a (= lattice spacing), which are directly observed on the lattice. The observation of these small instantons provides detailed confirmation of Luscher's argument that such short-distance excitations, with quantized topological charge, should be the dominant topological fluctuations in CP1 and CP 2, leading to a divergent topological susceptibility in the continuum limit. For the CPN-1 models with N > 3 the topological susceptibility is observed to scale properly with the mass gap. Another topic presented in this thesis is an implementation of the Zolotarev optimal rational approximation for the overlap Dirac operator. This new implementation has reduced the time complexity of the overlap routine from O(N3 ) to O(N), where N is the total number of sites on the lattice. This opens up a door to more accurate lattice measurements in the future.

  16. 2-D Magnetohydrodynamic Modeling of A Pulsed Plasma Thruster

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thio, Y. C. Francis; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Experiments are being performed on the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) MK-1 pulsed plasma thruster. Data produced from the experiments provide an opportunity to further understand the plasma dynamics in these thrusters via detailed computational modeling. The detailed and accurate understanding of the plasma dynamics in these devices holds the key towards extending their capabilities in a number of applications, including their applications as high power (greater than 1 MW) thrusters, and their use for producing high-velocity, uniform plasma jets for experimental purposes. For this study, the 2-D MHD modeling code, MACH2, is used to provide detailed interpretation of the experimental data. At the same time, a 0-D physics model of the plasma initial phase is developed to guide our 2-D modeling studies.

  17. Horns Rev II, 2D-Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Brorsen, Michael

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU), Denmark. The starting point for the present report is the previously carried out run-up tests described in Lykke Andersen & Frigaard, 2006......-shaped access platforms on piles. The Model tests include mainly regular waves and a few irregular wave tests. These tests have been conducted at Aalborg University from 9. November, 2006 to 17. November, 2006....

  18. Strengthening of Ceramic-based Artificial Nacre via Synergistic Interactions of 1D Vanadium Pentoxide and 2D Graphene Oxide Building Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöller, Andrea; Lampa, Christian P.; Cube, Felix von; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Bell, David C.; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Burghard, Zaklina; Bill, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Nature has evolved hierarchical structures of hybrid materials with excellent mechanical properties. Inspired by nacre’s architecture, a ternary nanostructured composite has been developed, wherein stacked lamellas of 1D vanadium pentoxide nanofibres, intercalated with water molecules, are complemented by 2D graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets. The components self-assemble at low temperature into hierarchically arranged, highly flexible ceramic-based papers. The papers’ mechanical properties are found to be strongly influenced by the amount of the integrated GO phase. Nanoindentation tests reveal an out-of-plane decrease in Young’s modulus with increasing GO content. Furthermore, nanotensile tests reveal that the ceramic-based papers with 0.5 wt% GO show superior in-plane mechanical performance, compared to papers with higher GO contents as well as to pristine V2O5 and GO papers. Remarkably, the performance is preserved even after stretching the composite material for 100 nanotensile test cycles. The good mechanical stability and unique combination of stiffness and flexibility enable this material to memorize its micro- and macroscopic shape after repeated mechanical deformations. These findings provide useful guidelines for the development of bioinspired, multifunctional systems whose hierarchical structure imparts tailored mechanical properties and cycling stability, which is essential for applications such as actuators or flexible electrodes for advanced energy storage. PMID:28102338

  19. Reconstruction of multidimensional carbon hosts with combined 0D, 1D and 2D networks for enhanced lithium-sulfur batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S. H.; Xia, X. H.; Wang, Y. D.; Wang, X. L.; Tu, J. P.

    2017-02-01

    It is a core task to find solutions to suppress the "shuttle effect" of polysulfides and improve high rate capability at the sulfur cathode of lithium sulfur batteries. Herein we first time propose a concept of multileveled blocking "dams" to suppress the diffusion of polysulfides. We report a facile and effective strategy to construct multidimensional conductive carbon hosts for accommodation of active sulfur. Multidimensional ternary carbon networks (MTCNs) with 0D nanospheres, 1D nanotubes and 2D nanoflakes are organically combined together to provide multileveled conductive channels to reserve active sulfur and promote stable sustained reactions. In the light of enhanced conductivity and multileveled blocking "dams" for polysulfides, the designed MTCNs/S cathode has been demonstrated with noticeable improvement in discharge capacity (1472 mAh g-1 at 0.l C) and long-term cycling stability (65% retention at 5.0 C after 500 cycles). Our research may provide a new insight in the gradient blocking of polysulfides with the help of multidimensional carbon networks.

  20. Fabrication of Novel 2D NiO Nanosheet Branched on 1D-ZnO Nanorod Arrays for Gas Sensor Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Le Thuy Hoa

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Fabrication of 3D structures composed of 1D n-type ZnO nanorods (NRs and 2D p-type NiO nanosheets (NSs by a low-cost, low-temperature, and large-area scalable hydrothermal process and its use in highly sensitive NO2 gas sensors were studied. The p-n heterojunctions formed by NiO-ZnO interfaces as well as large area two-dimensional NiO NSs themselves increased the adsorption of NO2. Moreover, the charge transfer between NiO and ZnO enhanced the responsivity and sensitivity of NO2 sensing even at a concentration of 1 ppm. The 30-min NiO NS growth on ZnO NRs in the hybrid sensor showed the highest sensitivity due to the formation of optimum p-n heterojunctions between ZnO NRs and NiO NSs for gas adsorption and carrier transport. Low responsivity toward reducing gases was also observed.

  1. Hydrogen-bonded 1D and 2D Assemblies of Tetra- iso-butyl-resorcin[4]arene in the Crystalline State

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Xiang; LIU Yu-Jie; ZHANG Qian-Feng

    2005-01-01

    X-ray crystal structures of co-crystals involving tetra-iso-butyl-resorcin[4]arene 1 with both acetone and acetonitrile solvents were reported. The component 1(2(CH3)2CO 2 assembles such that the resorcin[4]arene adopts a C2v conformation and the acetone serves as hydrogen bond acceptors, forming a 1D hydrogen-bonded polymer. 2 (C50H68O10) crystallizes in the triclinic, space group P with a = 10.0440(7), b = 13.7498(9), c = 17.6374(12) (A), α = 77.726(2), β = 86.733(2), γ = 88.634(2)°, V = 2376.1(3) (A)3, Dc = 1.159 g/cm3, and Z = 2. The assembly process of component 1(2CH3CN(H2O 3 yields a 2D hydrogen-bonded polymer formed by intermolecular hydrogen bonds between resorcin[4]arene and water molecules. In the case of component 3, the acetonitrile molecule serves as guest inside the bowl of resorcin[4]arene host. 3 (C48H64N2O9) crystallizes in the monoclinic, space group P2/n with a = 13.7570(18), b = 9.0961(12), c = 19.453(3) (A), β = 103.017(3)°, V = 2371.7(5) (A)3, Dc = 1.138 g/cm3, and Z = 2.

  2. Strengthening of Ceramic-based Artificial Nacre via Synergistic Interactions of 1D Vanadium Pentoxide and 2D Graphene Oxide Building Blocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knöller, Andrea; Lampa, Christian P.; Cube, Felix Von; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Bell, David C.; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.; Burghard, Zaklina; Bill, Joachim

    2017-01-01

    Nature has evolved hierarchical structures of hybrid materials with excellent mechanical properties. Inspired by nacre’s architecture, a ternary nanostructured composite has been developed, wherein stacked lamellas of 1D vanadium pentoxide nanofibres, intercalated with water molecules, are complemented by 2D graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets. The components self-assemble at low temperature into hierarchically arranged, highly flexible ceramic-based papers. The papers’ mechanical properties are found to be strongly influenced by the amount of the integrated GO phase. Nanoindentation tests reveal an out-of-plane decrease in Young’s modulus with increasing GO content. Furthermore, nanotensile tests reveal that the ceramic-based papers with 0.5 wt% GO show superior in-plane mechanical performance, compared to papers with higher GO contents as well as to pristine V2O5 and GO papers. Remarkably, the performance is preserved even after stretching the composite material for 100 nanotensile test cycles. The good mechanical stability and unique combination of stiffness and flexibility enable this material to memorize its micro- and macroscopic shape after repeated mechanical deformations. These findings provide useful guidelines for the development of bioinspired, multifunctional systems whose hierarchical structure imparts tailored mechanical properties and cycling stability, which is essential for applications such as actuators or flexible electrodes for advanced energy storage.

  3. Numerical modelling of spallation in 2D hydrodynamics codes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maw, J. R.; Giles, A. R.

    1996-05-01

    A model for spallation based on the void growth model of Johnson has been implemented in 2D Lagrangian and Eulerian hydrocodes. The model has been extended to treat complete separation of material when voids coalesce and to describe the effects of elevated temperatures and melting. The capabilities of the model are illustrated by comparison with data from explosively generated spall experiments. Particular emphasis is placed on the prediction of multiple spall effects in weak, low melting point, materials such as lead. The correlation between the model predictions and observations on the strain rate dependence of spall strength is discussed.

  4. A "Necklace" Model for Vesicles Simulations in 2D

    CERN Document Server

    Ismail, Mourad

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to propose a new numerical model to simulate 2D vesicles interacting with a newtonian fluid. The inextensible membrane is modeled by a chain of circular rigid particles which are maintained in cohesion by using two different type of forces. First, a spring force is imposed between neighboring particles in the chain. Second, in order to model the bending of the membrane, each triplet of successive particles is submitted to an angular force. Numerical simulations of vesicles in shear flow have been run using Finite Element Method and the FreeFem++[1] software. Exploring different ratios of inner and outer viscosities, we recover the well known "Tank-Treading" and "Tumbling" motions predicted by theory and experiments. Moreover, for the first time, 2D simulations of the "Vacillating-Breathing" regime predicted by theory in [2] and observed experimentally in [3] are done without special ingredient like for example thermal fluctuations used in [4].

  5. Modeling atrazine transport in soil columns with HYDRUS-1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Leju CELESTINO LADU

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Both physical and chemical processes affect the fate and transport of herbicides. It is useful to simulate these processes with computer programs to predict solute movement. Simulations were run with HYDRUS-1D to identify the sorption and degradation parameters of atrazine through calibration from the breakthrough curves (BTCs. Data from undisturbed and disturbed soil column experiments were compared and analyzed using the dual-porosity model. The study results show that the values of dispersivity are slightly lower in disturbed columns, suggesting that the more heterogeneous the structure is, the higher the dispersivity. Sorption parameters also show slight variability, which is attributed to the differences in soil properties, experimental conditions and methods, or other ecological factors. For both of the columns, the degradation rates were similar. Potassium bromide was used as a conservative non-reactive tracer to characterize the water movement in columns. Atrazine BTCs exhibited significant tailing and asymmetry, indicating non-equilibrium sorption during solute transport. The dual-porosity model was verified to best fit the BTCs of the column experiments. Greater or lesser concentration of atrazine spreading to the bottom of the columns indicated risk of groundwater contamination. Overall, HYDRUS-1D successfully simulated the atrazine transport in soil columns.

  6. Multi-dimensional transition-metal coordination polymers of 4,4'-bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide: 1D chains and 2D sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Junhua; Blake, Alexander J; Champness, Neil R; Hubberstey, Peter; Wilson, Claire; Schröder, Martin

    2008-10-06

    Reaction of 4,4'-bipyridine -N, N' -dioxide (L) with a variety of transition-metal salts in MeOH affords a range of coordination polymer products. For the complexes [FeCl 3(mu-L)] infinity, 1, and ([Cu(L) 2(OHMe) 2(mu-L)].2PF 6. n(solv)) infinity, 2, 1D chain structures are observed, whereas ([Mn(mu-L) 3].2ClO 4) infinity, 3, and ([Cu(mu-L) 3].2BF 4) infinity, 4, both show 2D sheet architectures incorporating an unusual 3 (6)- hxl topology. The more common 4 (4)- sql topology is observed in [Cd(ONO 2) 2(mu-L) 2] infinity, 5, ([Cu(OHMe) 2(mu-L) 2].2ZrF 5) infinity, 6, ([Cu(L) 2(mu-L) 2].2EF 6) infinity ( 7 E = P; 8 E = Sb), and ([Et 4N][Cu(OHMe) 0.5(mu-L) 2(mu-FSiF 4F) 0.5].2SbF 6. n(solv)) infinity, 9. In 6, the [ZrF 5] (-) anion, formed in situ from [ZrF 6] (2-), forms 1D anionic chains ([ZrF 5] (-)) infinity of vertex-linked octahedra, and these chains thread through a pair of inclined polycatenated ([Cu(OHMe) 2(mu-L) 2] (2+)) infinity 4 (4)- sql grids to give a rare example of a triply intertwined coordination polymer. 9 also shows a 3D matrix structure with 4 (4)- sql sheets of stoichiometry ([Cu(L) 2] (2+)) infinity coordinatively linked by bridging [SiF 6] (2-) anions to give a structure of 5-c 4 (4).6 (6)- sqp topology. The mononuclear [Cu(L) 6].2BF 4 ( 10) and [Cd(L) 6].2NO 3 ( 11) and binuclear complexes [(Cu(L)(OH 2)) 2(mu-L) 2)].2SiF 6. n(solv), 12, are also reported. The majority of the coordination polymers are free of solvent and are nonporous. Thermal treatment of materials that do contain solvent results in structural disintegration of the complex structures giving no permanent porosity.

  7. Assembly of 1D nanofibers into a 2D bi-layered composite nanofibrous film with different functionalities at the two layers via layer-by-layer electrospinning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zijiao; Ma, Qianli; Dong, Xiangting; Li, Dan; Xi, Xue; Yu, Wensheng; Wang, Jinxian; Liu, Guixia

    2016-12-21

    A two-dimensional (2D) bi-layered composite nanofibrous film assembled by one-dimensional (1D) nanofibers with trifunctionality of electrical conduction, magnetism and photoluminescence has been successfully fabricated by layer-by-layer electrospinning. The composite film consists of a polyaniline (PANI)/Fe3O4 nanoparticle (NP)/polyacrylonitrile (PAN) tuned electrical-magnetic bifunctional layer on one side and a Tb(TTA)3(TPPO)2/polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) photoluminescent layer on the other side, and the two layers are tightly combined face-to-face together into the novel bi-layered composite film of trifunctionality. The brand-new film has totally different characteristics at the double layers. The electrical conductivity and magnetism of the electrical-magnetic bifunctional layer can be, respectively, tunable via modulating the PANI and Fe3O4 NP contents, and the highest electrical conductivity can reach up to the order of 10(-2) S cm(-1), and predominant intense green emission at 545 nm is obviously observed in the photoluminescent layer under the excitation of 357 nm single-wavelength ultraviolet light. More importantly, the luminescence intensity of the photoluminescent layer remains almost unaffected by the electrical-magnetic bifunctional layer because the photoluminescent materials have been successfully isolated from dark-colored PANI and Fe3O4 NPs. By comparing with the counterpart single-layered composite nanofibrous film, it is found that the bi-layered composite nanofibrous film has better performance. The novel bi-layered composite nanofibrous film with trifunctionality has potential in the fields of nanodevices, molecular electronics and biomedicine. Furthermore, the design conception and fabrication technique for the bi-layered multifunctional film provide a new and facile strategy towards other films of multifunctionality.

  8. Horns Rev II, 2D-Model Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Frigaard, Peter

    This report present the results of 2D physical model tests carried out in the shallow wave flume at Dept. of Civil Engineering, Aalborg University (AAU). The objective of the tests was: To investigate the combined influence of the pile diameter to water depth ratio and the wave height to water...... on the front side of the pile (0 to 90 degrees). These tests have been conducted at Aalborg University from 9. October, 2006 to 8. November, 2006. Unless otherwise mentioned, all values given in this report are in model scale....

  9. Fracture surfaces of heterogeneous materials: A 2D solvable model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzav, E.; Adda-Bedia, M.; Derrida, B.

    2007-05-01

    Using an elastostatic description of crack growth based on the Griffith criterion and the principle of local symmetry, we present a stochastic model describing the propagation of a crack tip in a 2D heterogeneous brittle material. The model ensures the stability of straight cracks and allows for the study of the roughening of fracture surfaces. When neglecting the effect of the nonsingular stress, the problem becomes exactly solvable and yields analytic predictions for the power spectrum of the paths. This result suggests an alternative to the conventional power law analysis often used in the analysis of experimental data.

  10. 2-D Electromagnetic Model of Fast-Ramping Superconducting Magnets

    CERN Document Server

    Auchmann, B; Kurz, S; Russenschuck, Stephan

    2006-01-01

    Fast-ramping superconducting (SC) accelerator magnets are the subject of R&D efforts by magnet designers at various laboratories. They require modifications of magnet design tools such as the ROXIE program at CERN, i.e. models of dynamic effects in superconductors need to be implemented and validated. In this paper we present the efforts towards a dynamic 2-D simulation of fast-ramping SC magnets with the ROXIE tool. Models are introduced and simulation results are compared to measurements of the GSI001 magnet of a GSI test magnet constructed and measured at BNL.

  11. Examination of 1D Solar Cell Model Limitations Using 3D SPICE Modeling: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahon, W. E.; Olson, J. M.; Geisz, J. F.; Friedman, D. J.

    2012-06-01

    To examine the limitations of one-dimensional (1D) solar cell modeling, 3D SPICE-based modeling is used to examine in detail the validity of the 1D assumptions as a function of sheet resistance for a model cell. The internal voltages and current densities produced by this modeling give additional insight into the differences between the 1D and 3D models.

  12. Cavitation Influence in 1D Part-load Vortex Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörfler, P. K.

    2016-11-01

    Residual swirl in the draft tube of Francis turbines may cause annoying low- frequency pulsation of pressure and power output, in particular during part-load operation. A 1D analytical model for these dynamic phenomena would enable simulation by some conventional method for computing hydraulic transients. The proper structure of such a model has implications for the prediction of prototype behaviour based on laboratory tests. The source of excitation as well as the dynamic transmission behaviour of the draft tube flow may both be described either by lumped or distributed parameters. The distributed version contains more information and, due to limited possibilities of identification, some data must be estimated. The distributed cavitation compliance is an example for this dilemma. In recent publications, the customary assumption of a constant wave speed has produced dubious results. The paper presents a more realistic model for distributed compressibility. The measured influence of the Thoma number is applied with the local cavitation factor. This concept is less sensitive to modelling errors and explains both the Thoma and Froude number influence. The possible effect of the normally unknown non-condensable gas content in the vortex cavity is shortly commented. Its measurement in future tests is recommended. It is also recommended to check the available analytical vortex models for possible dispersion effects.

  13. Co-nucleus 1D/2D Heterostructures with Bi2S3 Nanowire and MoS2 Monolayer: One-Step Growth and Defect-Induced Formation Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongtao; Huang, Le; Li, Bo; Wang, Xiaoting; Zhou, Ziqi; Li, Jingbo; Wei, Zhongming

    2016-09-27

    Heterostructures constructed by low-dimensional (such as 0D, 1D, and 2D) materials have opened up opportunities for exploring interesting physical properties and versatile (opto)electronics. Recently, 2D/2D heterostructures, in particular, atomically thin graphene and transition-metal dichalcogenides, including graphene/MoS2, WSe2/MoS2, and WS2/WSe2, were efficiently prepared (by transfer techniques, chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth, etc.) and systematically studied. In contrast, investigation of 1D/2D heterostructures was still very challenging and rarely reported, and the understanding of such heterostructures was also not well established. Herein, we demonstrate the one-step growth of a heterostructure on the basis of a 1D-Bi2S3 nanowire and a 2D-MoS2 monolayer through the CVD method. Multimeans were employed, and the results proved the separated growth of a Bi2S3 nanowire and a MoS2 sheet in the heterostructure rather than forming a BixMo1-xSy alloy due to their large lattice mismatch. Defect-induced co-nucleus growth, which was an important growth mode in 1D/2D heterostructures, was also experimentally confirmed and systematically investigated in our research. Such 1D/2D heterostructures were further fabricated and utilized in (opto)electronic devices, such as field-effect transistors and photodetectors, and revealed their potential for multifunctional design in electrical properties. The direct growth of such nanostructures will help us to gain a better comprehension of these specific configurations and allow device functionalities in potential applications.

  14. Modeling of 1D Anomalous Diffusion in Fractured Nanoporous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albinali Ali

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Fractured nanoporous reservoirs include multi-scale and discontinuous fractures coupled with a complex nanoporous matrix. Such systems cannot be described by the conventional dual-porosity (or multi-porosity idealizations due to the presence of different flow mechanisms at multiple scales. More detailed modeling approaches, such as Discrete Fracture Network (DFN models, similarly suffer from the extensive data requirements dictated by the intricacy of the flow scales, which eventually deter the utility of these models. This paper discusses the utility and construction of 1D analytical and numerical anomalous diffusion models for heterogeneous, nanoporous media, which is commonly encountered in oil and gas production from tight, unconventional reservoirs with fractured horizontal wells. A fractional form of Darcy’s law, which incorporates the non-local and hereditary nature of flow, is coupled with the classical mass conservation equation to derive a fractional diffusion equation in space and time. Results show excellent agreement with established solutions under asymptotic conditions and are consistent with the physical intuitions.

  15. Brane Brick Models and 2d (0,2) Triality

    CERN Document Server

    Franco, Sebastian; Seong, Rak-Kyeong

    2016-01-01

    We provide a brane realization of 2d (0,2) Gadde-Gukov-Putrov triality in terms of brane brick models. These are Type IIA brane configurations that are T-dual to D1-branes over singular toric Calabi-Yau 4-folds. Triality translates into a local transformation of brane brick models, whose simplest representative is a cube move. We present explicit examples and construct their triality networks. We also argue that the classical mesonic moduli space of brane brick model theories, which corresponds to the probed Calabi-Yau 4-fold, is invariant under triality. Finally, we discuss triality in terms of phase boundaries, which play a central role in connecting Calabi-Yau 4-folds to brane brick models.

  16. 2D numerical modelling of meandering channel formation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Y Xiao; G Zhou; F S Yang

    2016-03-01

    A 2D depth-averaged model for hydrodynamic sediment transport and river morphological adjustment was established. The sediment transport submodel takes into account the influence of non-uniform sediment with bed surface armoring and considers the impact of secondary flow in the direction of bed-loadtransport and transverse slope of the river bed. The bank erosion submodel incorporates a simple simulation method for updating bank geometry during either degradational or aggradational bed evolution. Comparison of the results obtained by the extended model with experimental and field data, and numericalpredictions validate that the proposed model can simulate grain sorting in river bends and duplicate the characteristics of meandering river and its development. The results illustrate that by using its control factors, the improved numerical model can be applied to simulate channel evolution under differentscenarios and improve understanding of patterning processes.

  17. 2-D Composite Model for Numerical Simulations of Nonlinear Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    - A composite model, which is the combination of Boussinesq equations and Volume of Fluid (VOF) method, has been developed for 2-D time-domain computations of nonlinear waves in a large region. The whole computational region Ω is divided into two subregions. In the near-field around a structure, Ω2, the flow is governed by 2-D Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes equations with a turbulence closure model of k-ε equations and numerically solved by the improved VOF method; whereas in the subregion Ω1 (Ω1 = Ω - Ω2) the flow is governed by one-D Boussinesq equations and numerically solved with the predictor-corrector algorithm. The velocity and the wave surface elevation are matched on the common boundary of the two subregions. Numerical tests have been conducted for the case of wave propagation and interaction with a wave barrier. It is shown that the composite model can help perform efficient computation of nonlinear waves in a large region with the complicated flow fields near structures taken into account.

  18. 1-D Modeling of Massive Particle Injection (MPI) in Tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, W.; Parks, P. B.; Izzo, V. A.

    2008-11-01

    A 1-D Fast Current Quench (FCQ) model is developed to study current evolution and runaway electron suppression under massive density increase. The model consists of coupled toroidal electric field and energy equations, and it is solved numerically for DIII-D and ITER operating conditions. Simulation results suggest that fast shutdown by D2 liquid jet/pellet injection is in principle achievable for the desired plasma cooling time (˜15 ms for DIII-D and ˜50 ms for ITER) under ˜150x or higher densification. The current density and pressure profile are practically unaltered during the initial phase of jet propagation when dilution cooling dominates. With subsequent radiation cooling, the densified discharge enters the strongly collisional regime where Pfirsch-Schluter thermal diffusion can inhibit current contraction on the magnetic axis. Often the 1/1 kink instability, addressed by Kadomtsev's magnetic reconnection model, can be prevented. Our results are compared with NIMROD simulations in which the plasma is suddenly densified by ˜100x and experiences instantaneous dilution cooling, allowing for use of actual (lower) Lundquist numbers.

  19. Sulfur chemistry: 1D modeling in massive dense cores

    CERN Document Server

    Wakelam, V; Herpin, F

    2011-01-01

    The main sulfur-bearing molecules OCS, H2S, SO, SO2, and CS have been observed in four high mass dense cores (W43-MM1, IRAS 18264, IRAS 05358, and IRAS 18162). Our goal is to put some constraints on the relative evolutionary stage of these sources by comparing these observations with time-dependent chemical modeling. We used the chemical model Nahoon, which computes the gas-phase chemistry and gas-grain interactions of depletion and evaporation. Mixing of the different chemical compositions shells in a 1D structure through protostellar envelope has been included since observed lines suggest nonthermal supersonic broadening. Observed radial profiles of the temperature and density are used to compute the chemistry as a function of time. With our model, we underproduce CS by several orders of magnitude compared to the other S-bearing molecules, which seems to contradict observations, although some uncertainties in the CS abundance observed at high temperature remain. The OCS/SO2, SO/SO2, and H2S/SO2 abundance ra...

  20. 2D model for melt progression through rods and debris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fichot, F. [IPSN/DRS, CEA Cadarache, St. Paul-lez-Durance (France)

    2001-07-01

    During the degradation of a nuclear core in a severe accident scenario, the high temperatures reached lead to the melting of materials. The formation of liquid mixtures at various elevations is followed by the flow of molten materials through the core. Liquid mixture may flow under several configurations: axial relocation along the rods, horizontal motion over a plane surface such as the core support plate or a blockage of material, 2D relocation through a debris bed, etc.. The two-dimensional relocation of molten material through a porous debris bed, implemented for the simulation of late degradation phases, has opened a new way to the elaboration of the relocation model for the flow of liquid mixture along the rods. It is based on a volume averaging method, where wall friction and capillary effects are taken into account by introducing effective coefficients to characterize the solid matrix (rods, grids, debris, etc.). A local description of the liquid flow is necessary to derive the effective coefficients. Heat transfers are modelled in a similar way. The derivation of the conservation equations for the liquid mixture falling flow (momentum) in two directions (axial and radial-horizontal) and for the heat exchanges (energy) are the main points of this new model for simulating melt progression. In this presentation, the full model for the relocation and solidification of liquid materials through a rod bundle or a debris bed is described. It is implemented in the ICARE/CATHARE code, developed by IPSN in Cadarache. The main improvements and advantages of the new model are: A single formulation for liquid mixture relocation, in 2D, either through a rod bundle or a porous debris bed, Extensions to complex structures (grids, by-pass, etc..), The modeling of relocation of a liquid mixture over plane surfaces. (author)

  1. A depth-averaged 2-D model of flow and sediment transport in coastal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Alejandro; Wu, Weiming; Beck, Tanya M.

    2016-11-01

    A depth-averaged 2-D model has been developed to simulate unsteady flow and nonuniform sediment transport in coastal waters. The current motion is computed by solving the phase-averaged 2-D shallow water flow equations reformulated in terms of total-flux velocity, accounting for the effects of wave radiation stresses and general diffusion or mixing induced by current, waves, and wave breaking. The cross-shore boundary conditions are specified by assuming fully developed longshore current and wave setup that are determined using the reduced 1-D momentum equations. A 2-D wave spectral transformation model is used to calculate the wave height, period, direction, and radiation stresses, and a surface wave roller model is adopted to consider the effects of surface roller on the nearshore currents. The nonequilibrium transport of nonuniform total-load sediment is simulated, considering sediment entrainment by current and waves, the lag of sediment transport relative to the flow, and the hiding and exposure effect of nonuniform bed material. The flow and sediment transport equations are solved using an implicit finite volume method on a variety of meshes including nonuniform rectangular, telescoping (quadtree) rectangular, and hybrid triangular/quadrilateral meshes. The flow and wave models are integrated through a carefully designed steering process. The model has been tested in three field cases, showing generally good performance.

  2. Generic 2-D River Network Modeling of Flow and Sediment Transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, W.; Wang, C.; Xiang, X.; Ma, T.

    2012-04-01

    A generic 2D river network model of flow and sediment transports is proposed for the flow and sediment simulation in the complex river network. The paper expands the three-step method adopted in the 1D river network to the 2D river network simulation. A 2D river network model is divided into several cells, including single river cell, "tree-like" river cell, "ring-like" river cell and "cross-like" river cell, which can reflect the interactive influence of flow field in the bifurcated channel and applies to generic 2D simulation. Based on equation of the 2D shallow water and unsteady non-uniform suspended sediment, the relationship between the variables (water level, discharge and sediment concentration) of each section and those of the boundaries are obtained through the full implicit matrix chase-after method. Through the conservation of water and sediment on the boundaries, the water level and sediment concentration on the nodes can be got by solving the irregular sparse matrix of conservation equation, so as to implement the coupled simulation of flow and sediment in the whole river network. The paper take the Chengtong River Reach located in the low reaches of Yangtze River as the example of "cross-like" river to verify the algorithm. The model is calibrated using the measured data. A comparison of calculated water level, discharge and sediment concentration shows that the generic model can reflex the interactive influence of flow field, with reasonable accuracy, especially in the bifurcated channel.

  3. A stochastic model of cascades in 2D turbulence

    CERN Document Server

    Ditlevsen, Peter D

    2012-01-01

    The dual cascade of energy and enstrophy in 2D turbulence cannot easily be understood in terms of an analog to the Richardson-Kolmogorov scenario describing the energy cascade in 3D turbulence. The coherent up- and downscale fluxes points to non-locality of interactions in spectral space, and thus the specific spatial structure of the flow could be important. Shell models, which lack spacial structure and have only local interactions in spectral space, indeed fail in reproducing the correct scaling for the inverse cascade of energy. In order to exclude the possibility that non-locality of interactions in spectral space is crucial for the dual cascade, we introduce a stochastic spectral model of the cascades which is local in spectral space and which shows the correct scaling for both the direct enstrophy - and the inverse energy cascade.

  4. 2D Quantum Transport Modeling in Nanoscale MOSFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    With the onset of quantum confinement in the inversion layer in nanoscale MOSFETs, behavior of the resonant level inevitably determines all device characteristics. While most classical device simulators take quantization into account in some simplified manner, the important details of electrostatics are missing. Our work addresses this shortcoming and provides: (a) a framework to quantitatively explore device physics issues such as the source-drain and gate leakage currents, DIBL, and threshold voltage shift due to quantization, and b) a means of benchmarking quantum corrections to semiclassical models (such as density- gradient and quantum-corrected MEDICI). We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions, oxide tunneling and phase-breaking scattering are treated on equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Quantum simulations are focused on MIT 25, 50 and 90 nm "well- tempered" MOSFETs and compared to classical and quantum corrected models. The important feature of quantum model is smaller slope of Id-Vg curve and consequently higher threshold voltage. These results are quantitatively consistent with I D Schroedinger-Poisson calculations. The effect of gate length on gate-oxide leakage and sub-threshold current has been studied. The shorter gate length device has an order of magnitude smaller current at zero gate bias than the longer gate length device without a significant trade-off in on-current. This should be a device design consideration.

  5. An implicit solver for 1D arterial network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Jason; Van Loon, Raoul

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the 1D blood flow equations are solved using a newly proposed enhanced trapezoidal rule method (ETM), which is an extension to the simplified trapezoidal rule method. At vessel junctions, the conservation of mass and conservation of total pressure are held as system constraints using Lagrange multipliers that can be physically interpreted as external flow rates. The ETM scheme is compared with published arterial network benchmark problems and a dam break problem. Strengths of the ETM scheme include being simple to implement, intuitive connection to lumped parameter models, and no restrictive stability criteria such as the Courant-Friedrichs-Lewy (CFL) number. The ETM scheme does not require the use of characteristics at vessel junctions, or for inlet and outlet boundary conditions. The ETM forms an implicit system of equations, which requires only one global solve per time step for pressure, followed by flow rate update on the elemental system of equations; thus, no iterations are required per time step. Consistent results are found for all benchmark cases, and for a 56-vessel arterial network problem, it gives very satisfactory solutions at a spatial and time discretization that results in a maximum CFL of 3, taking 4.44 seconds per cardiac cycle. By increasing the time step and element size to produce a maximum CFL number of 15, the method takes only 0.39 second per cardiac cycle with only a small compromise on accuracy. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Modeling shear band interaction in 1D torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partom, Yehuda; Hanina, Erez

    2017-01-01

    When two shear bands are being formed at close distance from each other they interact, and further development of one of them may be quenched down. As a result there should be a minimum distance between shear bands. In the literature there are at least three analytical models for this minimum distance. Predictions of these models do not generally agree with each other and with test results. Recently we developed a 1D numerical scheme to predict the formation of shear bands in a torsion test of a thin walled pipe. We validated our code by reproducing results of the pioneering experiments of Marchand and Duffy, and then used it to investigate the mechanics of shear localization and shear band formation. We describe our shear band code in a separate publication, and here we use it only as a tool to investigate the interaction between two neighboring shear bands during the process of their formation. We trigger the formation of shear bands by specifying two perturbations of the initial strength. We vary the perturbations in terms of their amplitude and/or their width. Usually, the stronger perturbation triggers a faster developing shear band, which then prevails and quenches the development of the other shear band. We change the distance between the two shear bands and find, that up to a certain distance one of the shear bands becomes fully developed, and the other stays only partially developed. Beyond this distance the two shear bands are both fully developed. Finally, we check the influence of certain material and loading parameters on the interaction between the two shear bands, and compare the results to predictions of the analytical models from the literature.

  7. Topological Lattice Actions for the 2d XY Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bietenholz, W; Niedermayer, F; Pepe, M; Rejón-Barrera, F G; Wiese, U -J

    2012-01-01

    We consider the 2d XY Model with topological lattice actions, which are invariant against small deformations of the field configuration. These actions constrain the angle between neighbouring spins by an upper bound, or they explicitly suppress vortices (and anti-vortices). Although topological actions do not have a classical limit, they still lead to the universal behaviour of the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless (BKT) phase transition - at least up to moderate vortex suppression. Thus our study underscores the robustness of universality, which persists even when basic principles of classical physics are violated. In the massive phase, the analytically known Step Scaling Function (SSF) is reproduced in numerical simulations. In the massless phase, the BKT value of the critical exponent eta_c is confirmed. Hence, even though for some topological actions vortices cost zero energy, they still drive the standard BKT transition. In addition we identify a vortex-free transition point, which deviates from the BKT be...

  8. Generalization Technique for 2D+SCALE Dhe Data Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Hairi; Rahman, Alias Abdul; Boguslawski, Pawel

    2016-10-01

    Different users or applications need different scale model especially in computer application such as game visualization and GIS modelling. Some issues has been raised on fulfilling GIS requirement of retaining the details while minimizing the redundancy of the scale datasets. Previous researchers suggested and attempted to add another dimension such as scale or/and time into a 3D model, but the implementation of scale dimension faces some problems due to the limitations and availability of data structures and data models. Nowadays, various data structures and data models have been proposed to support variety of applications and dimensionality but lack research works has been conducted in terms of supporting scale dimension. Generally, the Dual Half Edge (DHE) data structure was designed to work with any perfect 3D spatial object such as buildings. In this paper, we attempt to expand the capability of the DHE data structure toward integration with scale dimension. The description of the concept and implementation of generating 3D-scale (2D spatial + scale dimension) for the DHE data structure forms the major discussion of this paper. We strongly believed some advantages such as local modification and topological element (navigation, query and semantic information) in scale dimension could be used for the future 3D-scale applications.

  9. 2D scaled model of the TURBOPROP wing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adrian DOBRE

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The 2D Turbo Prop wing is part of the European Clean Sky JTI GRA Low Noise programme. For this, the model is equipped with interchangeable T.E. noise reducing systems.The scope of the tests in the INCAS Subsonic wind tunnel is to investigate and compare the aerodynamic and aero acoustic performances of a series of different T.E. High Lift Devices noise reducing systems of the “Turbo Prop wing configuration”. For this, the distribution of the pressure at the surface of the model should be determined. The measurement of the pressure is classically made through orifices of small size connected to a common transducer via a tubing system and a scanning device. The aerodynamic forces and moments are obtained by integration of the pressure and shear stress distributions. The wing span of the model is equal to the width of the test section.Due to the large wing span B = 2500 mm and the testing speed V = 90 m/s, the aerodynamic forces and moments occurring on the model exceed more than two times the measuring capacity of the TEM external balance of the INCAS Subsonic wind tunnel. This imposes attaching the model to supports situated outside the wind tunnel.

  10. 2-D Model for Normal and Sickle Cell Blood Microcirculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekleab, Yonatan; Harris, Wesley

    2011-11-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a genetic disorder that alters the red blood cell (RBC) structure and function such that hemoglobin (Hb) cannot effectively bind and release oxygen. Previous computational models have been designed to study the microcirculation for insight into blood disorders such as SCD. Our novel 2-D computational model represents a fast, time efficient method developed to analyze flow dynamics, O2 diffusion, and cell deformation in the microcirculation. The model uses a finite difference, Crank-Nicholson scheme to compute the flow and O2 concentration, and the level set computational method to advect the RBC membrane on a staggered grid. Several sets of initial and boundary conditions were tested. Simulation data indicate a few parameters to be significant in the perturbation of the blood flow and O2 concentration profiles. Specifically, the Hill coefficient, arterial O2 partial pressure, O2 partial pressure at 50% Hb saturation, and cell membrane stiffness are significant factors. Results were found to be consistent with those of Le Floch [2010] and Secomb [2006].

  11. VAM2D: Variably saturated analysis model in two dimensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huyakorn, P.S.; Kool, J.B.; Wu, Y.S. (HydroGeoLogic, Inc., Herndon, VA (United States))

    1991-10-01

    This report documents a two-dimensional finite element model, VAM2D, developed to simulate water flow and solute transport in variably saturated porous media. Both flow and transport simulation can be handled concurrently or sequentially. The formulation of the governing equations and the numerical procedures used in the code are presented. The flow equation is approximated using the Galerkin finite element method. Nonlinear soil moisture characteristics and atmospheric boundary conditions (e.g., infiltration, evaporation and seepage face), are treated using Picard and Newton-Raphson iterations. Hysteresis effects and anisotropy in the unsaturated hydraulic conductivity can be taken into account if needed. The contaminant transport simulation can account for advection, hydrodynamic dispersion, linear equilibrium sorption, and first-order degradation. Transport of a single component or a multi-component decay chain can be handled. The transport equation is approximated using an upstream weighted residual method. Several test problems are presented to verify the code and demonstrate its utility. These problems range from simple one-dimensional to complex two-dimensional and axisymmetric problems. This document has been produced as a user's manual. It contains detailed information on the code structure along with instructions for input data preparation and sample input and printed output for selected test problems. Also included are instructions for job set up and restarting procedures. 44 refs., 54 figs., 24 tabs.

  12. Synthesis and structure elucidation of a series of pyranochromene chalcones and flavanones using 1D and 2D NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawar, Sunayna S; Koorbanally, Neil A

    2014-06-01

    A series of novel pyranochromene chalcones and corresponding flavanones were synthesized. This is the first report on the confirmation of the absolute configuration of chromene-based flavanones using X-ray crystallography. These compounds were characterized by 2D NMR spectroscopy, and their assignments are reported herein. The 3D structure of the chalcone 3b and flavanone 4g was determined by X-ray crystallography, and the structure of the flavanone was confirmed to be in the S configuration at C-2.

  13. A 2D simulation model for urban flood management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Roland; van der Wielen, Jonathan; Velickov, Slavco; Galvao, Diogo

    2014-05-01

    The European Floods Directive, which came into force on 26 November 2007, requires member states to assess all their water courses and coast lines for risk of flooding, to map flood extents and assets and humans at risk, and to take adequate and coordinated measures to reduce the flood risk in consultation with the public. Flood Risk Management Plans are to be in place by 2015. There are a number of reasons for the promotion of this Directive, not least because there has been much urban and other infrastructural development in flood plains, which puts many at risk of flooding along with vital societal assets. In addition there is growing awareness that the changing climate appears to be inducing more frequent extremes of rainfall with a consequent increases in the frequency of flooding. Thirdly, the growing urban populations in Europe, and especially in the developing countries, means that more people are being put at risk from a greater frequency of urban flooding in particular. There are urgent needs therefore to assess flood risk accurately and consistently, to reduce this risk where it is important to do so or where the benefit is greater than the damage cost, to improve flood forecasting and warning, to provide where necessary (and possible) flood insurance cover, and to involve all stakeholders in decision making affecting flood protection and flood risk management plans. Key data for assessing risk are water levels achieved or forecasted during a flood. Such levels should of course be monitored, but they also need to be predicted, whether for design or simulation. A 2D simulation model (PriceXD) solving the shallow water wave equations is presented specifically for determining flood risk, assessing flood defense schemes and generating flood forecasts and warnings. The simulation model is required to have a number of important properties: -Solve the full shallow water wave equations using a range of possible solutions; -Automatically adjust the time step and

  14. A Markov state modeling analysis of sliding dynamics of a 2D model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teruzzi, M.; Pellegrini, F.; Laio, A.; Tosatti, E.

    2017-10-01

    Non-equilibrium Markov State Modeling (MSM) has recently been proposed by Pellegrini et al. [Phys. Rev. E 94, 053001 (2016)] as a possible route to construct a physical theory of sliding friction from a long steady state atomistic simulation: the approach builds a small set of collective variables, which obey a transition-matrix-based equation of motion, faithfully describing the slow motions of the system. A crucial question is whether this approach can be extended from the original 1D small size demo to larger and more realistic size systems, without an inordinate increase of the number and complexity of the collective variables. Here we present a direct application of the MSM scheme to the sliding of an island made of over 1000 harmonically bound particles over a 2D periodic potential. Based on a totally unprejudiced phase space metric and without requiring any special doctoring, we find that here too the scheme allows extracting a very small number of slow variables, necessary and sufficient to describe the dynamics of island sliding.

  15. Enhanced Collective Magnetic Properties in 2D Monolayers of Iron Oxide Nanoparticles Favored by Local Order and Local 1D Shape Anisotropy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toulemon, Delphine; Liu, Yu; Cattoën, Xavier; Leuvrey, Cédric; Bégin-Colin, Sylvie; Pichon, Benoit P

    2016-02-16

    Magnetic nanoparticle arrays represent a very attractive research field because their collective properties can be efficiently modulated as a function of the structure of the assembly. Nevertheless, understanding the way dipolar interactions influence the intrinsic magnetic properties of nanoparticles still remains a great challenge. In this study, we report on the preparation of 2D assemblies of iron oxide nanoparticles as monolayers deposited onto substrates. Assemblies have been prepared by using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique and the SAM assisted assembling technique combined to CuAAC "click" reaction. These techniques afford to control the formation of well-defined monolayers of nanoparticles on large areas. The LB technique controls local ordering of nanoparticles, while adjusting the kinetics of CuAAC "click" reaction strongly affects the spatial arrangement of nanoparticles in monolayers. Fast kinetics favor disordered assemblies while slow kinetics favor the formation of chain-like structures. Such anisotropic assemblies are induced by dipolar interactions between nanoparticles as no magnetic field is applied and no solvent evaporation is performed. The collective magnetic properties of monolayers are studied as a function of average interparticle distance, local order and local shape anisotropy. We demonstrate that local control on spatial arrangement of nanoparticles in monolayers significantly strengthens dipolar interactions which enhances collective properties and results in possible super ferromagnetic order.

  16. Identification and quantificaton of endogenous gibberellins in the vegetative shoots of normal, d1, d2, d3, and d5 Zea mays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fujioka, S.; Yamane, H.; Spray, C.; Phinney, B.; Gaskin, P.; MacMillan, J.

    1987-04-01

    The authors now have determined the levels of seven endogenous GAs previously identified as native to vegetative shoots of maize. These gibberellins, GA/sub 1/, GA/sub 8/, GA/sub 19/, GA/sub 20/, GA/sub 29/, GA/sub 44/ and GA/sub 53/ are members of the early-13-hydroxylation pathway which leads to the biologically active gibberellin, GA/sub 1/. The quantification data come from the use of (/sup 13/C, /sup 3/H)-, (/sup 2/H)- or (/sup 14/C)-labeled GAs, added as internal standards to the aqueous residues. Capillary GC-MS was used to compare the peak intensities of the labeled internal standards to those of the endogenous GA(s). Gibberellin levels in the Normals ranged from 425 ng/100 g f.w. (GA/sub 19/) to 12 ng/100 g f.w. (GA/sub 1/ and GA/sub 29/). Essentially no Gas (i.e. less than 0.2 ng/100 g f.w.) were detected in the d2, d3 and d5 mutants (mutants that block steps prior to GA/sub 53/). The d1 mutant (blocked between GA/sub 20/ and GA/sub 1/) was found to have 3% the level of the GA/sub 1/ found in Normals. Interestingly, GA/sub 20/ accumulated in the d1 mutant to a level over ten times that of the Normals.

  17. Angular emission from 1D and 2D meso- and nano-structures: Probed by dual-channel Fourier-plane microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Danveer; Sharma, Deepak Kumar; Chaubey, Shailendra Kumar; Kumar, G. V. Pavan

    2017-09-01

    The optical emission characteristics from individual nanostructures such as organic waveguides, plasmonic nanowires and 2D materials such as MoS2 can vary depending on the nature of interface on which they are grown or deposited. We constructed a dual-channel Fourier-plane microscopy, and studied the directional emission characteristics of an individual organic mesowires, Ag nanowires and MoS2 nanolayers through the glass substrate or air superstrate. Specifically, we show the ability of our microscope to quantitatively probe the radial and azimuthal angular spread in the waveguided PL from the distal ends of the mesowire across the interface without changing its position or orientation. Furthermore, from the guided PL spectral signatures, we show that the finesse of the waveguided Fabry-Perot resonance depends on whether the measurement was performed through the substrate or superstrate. To reveal the versatility of our microscope, we have quantified angular distribution of directional light scattering from the distal end of Ag nanowire at an interface, and angular distribution of excitonic emission from MoS2 nanolayers through a glass substrate. Our work highlights the capability of dual-channel Fourier microscope in quantifying the angular emission characteristics from individual optical antenna structures at an interface, and can be extrapolated to nonlinear organic nanophotonic regimes.

  18. Contrasting 1D tunnel-structured and 2D layered polymorphs of V2O5: relating crystal structure and bonding to band gaps and electronic structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolhurst, Thomas M; Leedahl, Brett; Andrews, Justin L; Marley, Peter M; Banerjee, Sarbajit; Moewes, Alexander

    2016-06-21

    New V2O5 polymorphs have risen to prominence as a result of their open framework structures, cation intercalation properties, tunable electronic structures, and wide range of applications. The application of these materials and the design of new, useful polymorphs requires understanding their defining structure-property relationships. We present a characterization of the band gap and electronic structure of nanowires of the novel ζ-phase and the orthorhombic α-phase of V2O5 using X-ray spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations. The band gap is found to decrease from 1.90 ± 0.20 eV in the α-phase to 1.50 ± 0.20 eV in the ζ-phase, accompanied by the loss of the α-phase's characteristic split-off dxy band in the ζ-phase. States of dxy origin continue to dominate the conduction band edge in the new polymorph but the inequivalence of the vanadium atoms and the increased local symmetry of [VO6] octahedra results in these states overlapping with the rest of the V 3d conduction band. ζ-V2O5 exhibits anisotropic conductivity along the b direction, defining a 1D tunnel, in contrast to α-V2O5 where the anisotropic conductivity is along the ab layers. We explain the structural origins of the differences in electronic properties that exist between the α- and ζ-phase.

  19. Bioinspired, Highly Stretchable, and Conductive Dry Adhesives Based on 1D-2D Hybrid Carbon Nanocomposites for All-in-One ECG Electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taehoon; Park, Junyong; Sohn, Jongmoo; Cho, Donghwi; Jeon, Seokwoo

    2016-04-26

    Here we propose a concept of conductive dry adhesives (CDA) combining a gecko-inspired hierarchical structure and an elastomeric carbon nanocomposite. To complement the poor electrical percolation of 1D carbon nanotube (CNT) networks in an elastomeric matrix at a low filler content (∼1 wt %), a higher dimensional carbon material (i.e., carbon black, nanographite, and graphene nanopowder) is added into the mixture as an aid filler. The co-doped graphene and CNT in the composite show the lowest volume resistance (∼100 ohm·cm) at an optimized filler ratio (1:9, total filler content: 1 wt %) through a synergetic effect in electrical percolation. With an optimized conductive elastomer, gecko-inspired high-aspect-ratio (>3) microstructures over a large area (∼4 in.(2)) are successfully replicated from intaglio-patterned molds without collapse. The resultant CDA pad shows a high normal adhesion force (∼1.3 N/cm(2)) even on rough human skin and an excellent cycling property for repeatable use over 30 times without degradation of adhesion force, which cannot be achieved by commercial wet adhesives. The body-attachable CDA can be used as a metal-free, all-in-one component for measuring biosignals under daily activity conditions (i.e., underwater, movements) because of its superior conformality and water-repellent characteristic.

  20. Quantitative assessment of soil parameter (KD and TC) estimation using DGT measurements and the 2D DIFS model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, N J; Sochaczewski, L; Davison, W; Tych, W; Zhang, H

    2008-03-01

    Diffusive gradients in thin films (DGT) is a dynamic, in situ measuring technique that can be used to supply diverse information on concentrations and behaviour of solutes. When deployed in soils and sediments, quantitative interpretation of DGT measurements requires the use of a numerical model. An improved version of the DGT induced fluxes in soils and sediments model (DIFS), working in two dimensions (2D DIFS), was used to investigate the accuracy with which DGT measurements can be used to estimate the distribution coefficient for labile metal (KD) and the response time of the soil to depletion (TC). The 2D DIFS model was used to obtain values of KD and TC for Cd, Zn and Ni in three different soils, which were compared to values determined previously using 1D DIFS for these cases. While the 1D model was shown to provide reasonable estimates of KD, the 2D model refined the estimates of the kinetic parameters. Desorption rate constants were shown to be similar for all three metals and lower than previously thought. Calculation of an error function as KD and TC are systematically varied showed the spread of KD and TC values that fit the experimental data equally well. These automatically generated error maps reflected the quality of the data and provided an appraisal of the accuracy of parameter estimation. They showed that in some cases parameter accuracy could be improved by fitting the model to a sub-set of data.

  1. Topologiacl Models of 2D Fractal Cellular Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Caër, G.; Delannay, R.

    1995-11-01

    In space-filling 2D cellular structures with trivalent vertices and in which each cell is constrained to share at most one side with any cell and no side with itself, the maximum fraction of three-sided cells is produced by a decoration of vertices of any initial structure by three-sided cells. Fractal cellular structures are obtained if the latter decoration process is iterated indefinitely. Other methods of constructions of fractal structures are also described. The probability distribution P(n) of the number n of cell sides and some two-cell topological properties of a 2D fractal cellular structure constructed from the triangular Sierpinski gasket are investigated. On the whole, the repartition of cells in 2D structures with n geq 3 and P(3) ne 0 evolve regularly when topological disorder, conveniently measured by the variance μ2 of P(n), increases. The strong correlations which exist among cells, in particular in natural structures (μ2lesssim 5), decrease progressively when μ2 increases, a cell repartition close to a random one being reached for μ2sim 12. We argue that the structures finally evolve to fractal structures (for which μ2 is infinite) but we have not characterized the latter transition. Dans des structures cellulaires 2D à sommets trivalents qui remplissent l'espace et dans lesquelles une cellule partage au plus un côté avec toute autre cellule et aucun avec elle-même, la proportion maximum admissible de cellules à trois côtés est obtenue par une décoration de tous les sommets d'une structure initiale quelconque par des cellules à trois côtés. Des structures cellulaires “fractales” 2D sont ainsi engendrées si le processus précédent est répété à l'infini. D'autres méthodes de constructions de structures fractales sont également décrites. La distribution de probabilité P(n) du nombre n de côtés des cellules ainsi que des corrélations de paires sont étudiées pour une structure cellulaire fractale construite à partir

  2. 1-D Radiative-Convective Model for Terrestrial Exoplanet Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Cecilia W. S.; Robinson, Tyler D.

    2016-10-01

    We present a one dimensional radiative-convective model to study the thermal structure of terrestrial exoplanetary atmospheres. The radiative transfer and equilibrium chemistry in our model is based on similar methodologies in models used for studying Extrasolar Giant Planets (Fortney et al. 2005b.) We validated our model in the optically thin and thick limits, and compared our pressure-temperature profiles against the analytical solutions of Robinson & Catling (2012). For extrasolar terrestrial planets with pure hydrogen atmospheres, we evaluated the effects of H2-H2 collision induced absorption and identified the purely roto-translational band in our modeled spectra. We also examined how enhanced atmospheric metallicities affect the temperature structure, chemistry, and spectra of terrestrial exoplanets. For a terrestrial extrasolar planet whose atmospheric compostion is 100 times solar orbiting a sun-like star at 2 AU, our model resulted in a reducing atmosphere with H2O, CH4, and NH3 as the dominant greenhouse gases.

  3. 2D co-catalytic MoS2 nanosheets embedded with 1D TiO2 nanoparticles for enhancing photocatalytic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xiaohui; Qi, Xiang; Shen, Yongzhen; Xiao, Si; Xu, Guanghua; Zhang, Zhen; Huang, Zongyu; Zhong, Jianxin

    2016-08-01

    2D photocatalytic TiO2/MoS2 hybrid nanosheets (HNs) have been prepared via a facile hydrothermal process. X-ray diffraction patterns and Raman spectra are carried out and confirm a well crystalized anatase and 2H-MoS2 hybridization. Additional morphological and microstructural tests verify a distinct MoS2 framework, indicating the relatively stability of the MoS2 nanosheet platform with a high specific surface area. UV-vis spectra and electrochemical impedance spectra exhibit an enhanced light absorption ability and conductivity of TiO2/MoS2 compared to that of just TiO2. Photoelectrochemical (PEC) tests also demonstrate the photocurrent of 20 : 1 TiO2/MoS2 HNs is greatly improved compared to that of as-prepared TiO2. The saturation current density is about 33 µA cm-2 when the applied potential is 0.2 V, which is nearly twice that of pure TiO2 and four times as high as 5 : 1 TiO2/MoS2 HNs and 1 : 1 TiO2/MoS2 HNs. Besides that, the duration test exhibits no detectable distinction after processing 25 cycles. The improved photocatalytic activities are perhaps derived from the high conductivity and the increased active sites for the introduction of co-catalytic MoS2 nanosheets as well as the positive synergetic effect between the TiO2 and MoS2. This work demonstrates that the as-prepared TiO2/MoS2 HNs may have a great potential application in PEC hydrogen production.

  4. A 1D model for tides waves and fine sediment in short tidal basins—Application to the Wadden Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Prooijen, Bram Christiaan; Wang, Zheng Bing

    2013-12-01

    In order to simulate the dynamics of fine sediments in short tidal basins, like the Wadden Sea basins, a 1D cross-sectional averaged model is constructed to simulate tidal flow, depth-limited waves, and fine sediment transport. The key for this 1D model lies in the definition of the geometry (width and depth as function of the streamwise coordinate). The geometry is computed by implementing the water level and flow data, from a 2D flow simulation, and the hypsometric curve in the continuity equation. By means of a finite volume method, the shallow-water equations and sediment transport equations are solved. The bed shear stress consists of the sum of shear stresses by waves and flow, in which the waves are computed with a depth-limited growth equation for wave height and wave frequency. A new formulation for erosion of fines from a sandy bed is proposed in the transport equation for fine sediment. It is shown by comparison with 2D simulations and field measurements that a 1D schematization gives a proper representation of the dynamics in short tidal basins.

  5. Using a 1-D model to reproduce diurnal SST signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna; Høyer, Jacob L.

    2014-01-01

    of measurement. A generally preferred approach to bridge the gap between in situ and remotely obtained measurements is through modelling of the upper ocean temperature. This ESA supported study focuses on the implementation of the 1 dimensional General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), in order to resolve...... profiles, along with the selection of the coefficients for the 2-band parametrisation of light’s penetration in the water column, hold a key role in the agreement of the modelled output with observations. To improve the surface heat budget and the distribution of heat, the code was modified to include...... Institution Upper Ocean Processes Group archive. The successful implementation of the new parametrisations is verified while the model reproduces the diurnal signals seen from in situ measurements. Special focus is given to testing and validation of different set-ups using campaign data from the Atlantic...

  6. Potential and limitations of 1D modelling of urban flooding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Ole; Weesakul, Sutat; Apirumanekul, Chusit; Aroonnet, Surajate Boonya; Djordjević, Slobodan

    2004-12-01

    Urban flooding is an inevitable problem for many cities around the world. In the present paper, modelling approaches and principles for analyses of urban flooding are outlined. The paper shows how urban flooding can be simulated by one-dimensional hydrodynamic modelling incorporating the interaction between (i) the buried pipe system, (ii) the streets (with open channel flow) and (iii) the areas flooded with stagnant water. The modelling approach is generic in the sense that it handles both urban flooding with and without flood water entry into houses. In order to visualize flood extent and impact, the modelling results are presented in the form of flood inundation maps produced in GIS. In this paper, only flooding from local rainfall is considered together with the impact in terms of flood extent, flood depth and flood duration. Finally, the paper discusses the data requirement for verification of urban flood models together with an outline of a simple cost function for estimation of the cost of the flood damages.

  7. Kinetic and Stochastic Models of 1D yeast ``prions"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunes, Kay

    2005-03-01

    Mammalian prion proteins (PrP) are of public health interest because of mad cow and chronic wasting diseases. Yeasts have proteins, which can undergo similar reconformation and aggregation processes to PrP; yeast ``prions" are simpler to experimentally study and model. Recent in vitro studies of the SUP35 protein (1), showed long aggregates and pure exponential growth of the misfolded form. To explain this data, we have extended a previous model of aggregation kinetics along with our own stochastic approach (2). Both models assume reconformation only upon aggregation, and include aggregate fissioning and an initial nucleation barrier. We find for sufficiently small nucleation rates or seeding by small dimer concentrations that we can achieve the requisite exponential growth and long aggregates.

  8. Application of particle trajectory model in 1D planar ejection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘坤; 柏劲松; 李平

    2008-01-01

    A simple one-dimensional planar model for ejection was set up based on experiments.And numerical simulation was performed on this model with particle trajectory model method.An Eulerian finite volume method was conducted to resolve gas field.And Lagrangian method was imposed to track each particle.The interaction between gas and particles was responded as source terms in governing equations which were induced by forces.The effects of total spraying mass,particle size and other factors on the mixture of particles and gas were investigated.The spatial distributions of particle mass and velocity at different time were presented.The result shows that the numerical results are qualitatively consistent to those of experiments.

  9. Kinetic Model for 1D aggregation of yeast ``prions''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunes, Kay; Cox, Daniel; Singh, Rajiv

    2004-03-01

    Mammalian prion proteins (PrP) are of public health interest because of mad cow and chronic wasting diseases. Yeast have proteins which can undergo similar reconformation and aggregation processes to PrP; yeast forms are simpler to experimentally study and model. Recent in vitro studies of the SUP35 protein(1), showed long aggregates and pure exponential growth of the misfolded form. To explain this data, we have extended a previous model of aggregation kinetics(2). The model assumes reconformation only upon aggregation, and includes aggregate fissioning and an initial nucleation barrier. We find for sufficiently small nucleation rates or seeding by small dimer concentrations that we can achieve the requisite exponential growth and long aggregates. We will compare to a more realistic stochastic kinetics model and present prelimary attempts to describe recent experiments on SUP35 strains. *-Supported by U.S. Army Congressionally Mandated Research Fund. 1) P. Chien and J.S. Weissman, Nature 410, 223 (2001); http://online.kitp.ucsb.edu/online/bionet03/collins/. 2) J. Masel, V.A.> Jansen, M.A. Nowak, Biophys. Chem. 77, 139 (1999).

  10. 3D, 2D and 1D networks via N-H…O and N-H…N hydrogen bonding by the bis-amide analogues: Effect of chain lengths and odd-even spacers

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gargi Mukherjee; Kumar Biradha

    2014-09-01

    The synthesis, crystal structures and hydrogen bonding networks of four members of the bis(pyridinecarboxamido)alkane and bis(pyridyl)alkanediamides series (1 ≤ ≤ 8), where the amide moieties are separated by alkyl chain (-(CH2)-) having even or odd number of -(CH2)-groups are explored and correlated with the previously reported structures. The odd members (n= odd) of both the series are found to adopt three-dimensional networks in contrast to the 1D or 2D structures of the even members (n= even). This odd-even effect on the dimensionality of the networks however disappears with increase in chain length.

  11. An Incompressible 2D Didactic Model with Singularity and Explicit Solutions of the 2D Boussinesq Equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Dongho; Constantin, Peter; Wu, Jiahong

    2014-09-01

    We give an example of a well posed, finite energy, 2D incompressible active scalar equation with the same scaling as the surface quasi-geostrophic equation and prove that it can produce finite time singularities. In spite of its simplicity, this seems to be the first such example. Further, we construct explicit solutions of the 2D Boussinesq equations whose gradients grow exponentially in time for all time. In addition, we introduce a variant of the 2D Boussinesq equations which is perhaps a more faithful companion of the 3D axisymmetric Euler equations than the usual 2D Boussinesq equations.

  12. The Implementation of C-ID, R2D2 Model on Learning Reading Comprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rayanto, Yudi Hari; Rusmawan, Putu Ngurah

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this research are to find out, (1) whether C-ID, R2D2 model is effective to be implemented on learning Reading comprehension, (2) college students' activity during the implementation of C-ID, R2D2 model on learning Reading comprehension, and 3) college students' learning achievement during the implementation of C-ID, R2D2 model on…

  13. Improving 1D Stellar Models with 3D Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Mosumgaard, Jakob Rørsted; Weiss, Achim; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jørgen; Trampedach, Regner

    2016-01-01

    Stellar evolution codes play a major role in present-day astrophysics, yet they share common issues. In this work we seek to remedy some of those by the use of results from realistic and highly detailed 3D hydrodynamical simulations of stellar atmospheres. We have implemented a new temperature stratification extracted directly from the 3D simulations into the Garching Stellar Evolution Code to replace the simplified atmosphere normally used. Secondly, we have implemented the use of a variable mixing-length parameter, which changes as a function of the stellar surface gravity and temperature -- also derived from the 3D simulations. Furthermore, to make our models consistent, we have calculated new opacity tables to match the atmospheric simulations. Here, we present the modified code and initial results on stellar evolution using it.

  14. Exotic quantum phase transitions of 2+1d Dirac fermions, and connections to 2d and 3d topological insulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagle, Kevin

    2015-03-01

    Using determinant quantum Monte Carlo simulations, we demonstrate that an extended Hubbard model on a bilayer honeycomb lattice has two novel quantum phase transitions, each with connections to symmetry protected topological states. 1) The first is a continuous phase transition between the weakly interacting gapless Dirac fermion phase and a strongly interacting fully gapped and symmetric trivial phase. Because there is no spontaneous symmetry breaking, this transition cannot be described by the standard Gross-Neveu model. We argue that this phase transition is related to the Z16 classification of the topological superconductor 3He-B phase with interactions. 2) The second is a quantum critical point between a quantum spin Hall insulator with spin Sz conservation and the previously mentioned strongly interacting gapped phase. At the critical point the single particle excitations remain gapped, while spin and charge gaps close. We argue that this transition is described by a bosonic O(4) nonlinear sigma model field theory with a topological Θ-term.

  15. Completeness of the classical 2D Ising model and universal quantum computation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van den Nest, M; Dür, W; Briegel, H J

    2008-03-21

    We prove that the 2D Ising model is complete in the sense that the partition function of any classical q-state spin model (on an arbitrary graph) can be expressed as a special instance of the partition function of a 2D Ising model with complex inhomogeneous couplings and external fields. In the case where the original model is an Ising or Potts-type model, we find that the corresponding 2D square lattice requires only polynomially more spins with respect to the original one, and we give a constructive method to map such models to the 2D Ising model. For more general models the overhead in system size may be exponential. The results are established by connecting classical spin models with measurement-based quantum computation and invoking the universality of the 2D cluster states.

  16. Size Effect on the Infrared Spectra of Condensed Media under Conditions of 1D, 2D, and 3D Dielectric Confinement

    KAUST Repository

    Shaganov, Igor I.

    2010-10-07

    The effect of dielectric confinement on the peak position of intramolecular and a lattice vibration in the infrared spectra of various condensed media is investigated. Liquid benzene, carbon disulfide, and chloroform, as well as amorphous SiO2 and microcrystalline MgO particles, were characterized in this study. The absorption spectra of organic liquids and aqueous solutions of a silica submicrometer powder were measured under a variety of dielectric confinement configurations using Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy. A significant shift of the resonant absorption band of liquid mesoparticles has been observed under dielectric confinement, which is in good agreement with model predictions. A corresponding expression for the dielectric loss spectrum of an absorbing composite medium was obtained using a Maxwell-Garnett generalized equation for the cases of one, two, and three-dimensional dielectric confinement in both ordered and disordered thin layers (disks), rods (wires or needles), and spheres of an absorbing medium. The experimental data on peak positions obtained from the infrared spectra of the organic liquids investigated in this work, as well as from the infrared spectra of amorphous quartz spherical particles and rods, are in good agreement with the calculated data. It is shown using simulations of the absorption spectrum of MgO powder that the approach suggested can be applied under certain conditions to the modeling of the spectra of microcrystalline particles of nonspheroidal shape. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  17. A comprehensive explanation and exercise of the source terms in hyperbolic systems using Roe type solutions. Application to the 1D-2D shallow water equations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murillo, J.; Navas-Montilla, A.

    2016-12-01

    Powerful numerical methods have to consider the presence of source terms of different nature, that intensely compete among them and may lead to strong spatiotemporal variations in the flow. When applied to shallow flows, numerical preservation of quiescent equilibrium, also known as the well-balanced property, is still nowadays the keystone for the formulation of novel numerical schemes. But this condition turns completely insufficient when applied to problems of practical interest. Energy balanced methods (E-schemes) can overcome all type of situations in shallow flows, not only under arbitrary geometries, but also with independence of the rheological shear stress model selected. They must be able to handle correctly transient problems including modeling of starting and stopping flow conditions in debris flow and other flows with a non-Newtonian rheological behavior. The numerical solver presented here satisfies these properties and is based on an approximate solution defined in a previous work. Given the relevant capabilities of this weak solution, it is fully theoretically derived here for a general set of equations. This useful step allows providing for the first time an E-scheme, where the set of source terms is fully exercised under any flow condition involving high slopes and arbitrary shear stress. With the proposed solver, a Roe type first order scheme in time and space, positivity conditions are explored under a general framework and numerical simulations can be accurately performed recovering an appropriate selection of the time step, allowed by a detailed analysis of the approximate solver. The use of case-dependent threshold values is unnecessary and exact mass conservation is preserved.

  18. Cluster-based networks: 1D and 2D coordination polymers based on {MnFe2(μ3-O)}-type clusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulcevscaia, Galina M; Filippova, Irina G; Speldrich, Manfred; van Leusen, Jan; Kravtsov, Victor Ch; Baca, Svetlana G; Kögerler, Paul; Liu, Shi-Xia; Decurtins, Silvio

    2012-05-07

    A straightforward approach to heterometallic Mn-Fe cluster-based coordination polymers is presented. By employing a mixed-valent μ(3)-oxo trinuclear manganese(II/III) pivalate cluster, isolated as [Mn(II)Mn(III)(2)O(O(2)CCMe(3))(6)(hmta)(3)]·(solvent) (hmta = hexamethylenetetramine; solvent = n-propanol (1), toluene (2)) in the reaction with a μ(3)-oxo trinuclear iron(III) pivalate cluster compound, [Fe(3)O(O(2)CCMe(3))(6)(H(2)O)(3)]O(2)CCMe(3)·2Me(3)CCO(2)H, three new heterometallic {Mn(II)Fe(III)(2)} cluster-based coordination polymers were obtained: the one-dimensional polymer chain compounds {[MnFe(2)O(O(2)CCMe(3))(6)(hmta)(2)]·0.5MeCN}(n) (3) and {[MnFe(2)O(O(2)CCMe(3))(6)(hmta)(2)]·Me(3)CCO(2)H·(n-hexane)}(n) (4) and the two-dimensional layer compound {[MnFe(2)O(O(2)CCMe(3))(6)(hmta)(1.5)]·(toluene)}(n) (5). Single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis reveals a μ(3)-oxo trinuclear pivalate cluster building block as the main constituent in all polymer compounds. Different M:hmta ratios in 1-5 are related to the different structural functions of the N-containing ligand. In clusters 1 and 2, three hmta ligands are monodentate, whereas in chains 3 and 4 two hmta ligands act as bridging ligands and one is a monodentate ligand; in 5, all hmta molecules act as bidentate bridges. Magnetic studies indicate dominant antiferromagnetic interactions between the metal centers in both homometallic {Mn(3)}-type clusters 1 and 2 and heterometallic {MnFe(2)}-type coordination polymers 3-5. Modeling of the magnetic susceptibility data to a isotropic model Hamiltonian yields least-squares fits for the following parameters: J(1)(Mn(II)-Mn(III)) = -6.6 cm(-1) and J(2)(Mn(III)-Mn(III)) = -5.4 cm(-1) for 1; J(1) = -5.5 cm(-1) and J(2)(Mn(III)-Mn(III)) = -3.9 cm(-1) for 2; J(1)(Mn(II)-Fe(III)) = -17.1 cm(-1) and J(2)(Fe(III)-Fe(III)) = -43.7 cm(-1) for 3; J(1) = -23.8 cm(-1) and J(2) = -53.4 cm(-1) for 4; J(1) = -13.3 cm(-1) and J(2) = -35.4 cm(-1) for 5. Intercluster coupling

  19. CO2 conversion in a gliding arc plasma: 1D cylindrical discharge model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Weizong; Berthelot, Antonin; Kolev, Stanimir; Tu, Xin; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2016-12-01

    CO2 conversion by a gliding arc plasma is gaining increasing interest, but the underlying mechanisms for an energy-efficient process are still far from understood. Indeed, the chemical complexity of the non-equilibrium plasma poses a challenge for plasma modeling due to the huge computational load. In this paper, a one-dimensional (1D) gliding arc model is developed in a cylindrical frame, with a detailed non-equilibrium CO2 plasma chemistry set, including the CO2 vibrational kinetics up to the dissociation limit. The model solves a set of time-dependent continuity equations based on the chemical reactions, as well as the electron energy balance equation, and it assumes quasi-neutrality in the plasma. The loss of plasma species and heat due to convection by the transverse gas flow is accounted for by using a characteristic frequency of convective cooling, which depends on the gliding arc radius, the relative velocity of the gas flow with respect to the arc and on the arc elongation rate. The calculated values for plasma density and plasma temperature within this work are comparable with experimental data on gliding arc plasma reactors in the literature. Our calculation results indicate that excitation to the vibrational levels promotes efficient dissociation in the gliding arc, and this is consistent with experimental investigations of the gliding arc based CO2 conversion in the literature. Additionally, the dissociation of CO2 through collisions with O atoms has the largest contribution to CO2 splitting under the conditions studied. In addition to the above results, we also demonstrate that lumping the CO2 vibrational states can bring a significant reduction of the computational load. The latter opens up the way for 2D or 3D models with an accurate description of the CO2 vibrational kinetics.

  20. 2D Poisson sigma models with gauged vectorial supersymmetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonezzi, Roberto; Sundell, Per; Torres-Gomez, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    In this note, we gauge the rigid vectorial supersymmetry of the two-dimensional Poisson sigma model presented in arXiv:1503.05625. We show that the consistency of the construction does not impose any further constraints on the differential Poisson algebra geometry than those required for the ungauged model. We conclude by proposing that the gauged model provides a first-quantized framework for higher spin gravity.

  1. 2D Poisson sigma models with gauged vectorial supersymmetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonezzi, Roberto [Dipartimento di Fisica ed Astronomia, Università di Bologna and INFN, Sezione di Bologna,via Irnerio 46, I-40126 Bologna (Italy); Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andres Bello,Republica 220, Santiago (Chile); Sundell, Per [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andres Bello,Republica 220, Santiago (Chile); Torres-Gomez, Alexander [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andres Bello,Republica 220, Santiago (Chile); Instituto de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad Austral de Chile-UACh,Valdivia (Chile)

    2015-08-12

    In this note, we gauge the rigid vectorial supersymmetry of the two-dimensional Poisson sigma model presented in arXiv:1503.05625. We show that the consistency of the construction does not impose any further constraints on the differential Poisson algebra geometry than those required for the ungauged model. We conclude by proposing that the gauged model provides a first-quantized framework for higher spin gravity.

  2. 2D Poisson sigma models with gauged vectorial supersymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    In this note, we gauge the rigid vectorial supersymmetry of the two-dimensional Poisson sigma model presented in arXiv:1503.05625. We show that the consistency of the construction does not impose any further constraints on the differential Poisson algebra geometry than those required for the ungauged model. We conclude by proposing that the gauged model provides a first-quantized framework for higher spin gravity.

  3. 2D Poisson Sigma Models with Gauged Vectorial Supersymmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Bonezzi, Roberto; Torres-Gomez, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    In this note, we gauge the rigid vectorial supersymmetry of the two-dimensional Poisson sigma model presented in arXiv:1503.05625. We show that the consistency of the construction does not impose any further constraints on the differential Poisson algebra geometry than those required for the ungauged model. We conclude by proposing that the gauged model provides a first-quantized framework for higher spin gravity.

  4. 2-D Model Test Study of the Suape Breakwater, Brazil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Thomas Lykke; Burcharth, Hans F.; Sopavicius, A.;

    This report deals with a two-dimensional model test study of the extension of the breakwater in Suape, Brazil. One cross-section was tested for stability and overtopping in various sea conditions. The length scale used for the model tests was 1:35. Unless otherwise specified all values given...

  5. 2D sigma models and differential Poisson algebras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Cesar; Boulanger, Nicolas; Sundell, Per; Torres-Gomez, Alexander

    2015-08-01

    We construct a two-dimensional topological sigma model whose target space is endowed with a Poisson algebra for differential forms. The model consists of an equal number of bosonic and fermionic fields of worldsheet form degrees zero and one. The action is built using exterior products and derivatives, without any reference to a worldsheet metric, and is of the covariant Hamiltonian form. The equations of motion define a universally Cartan integrable system. In addition to gauge symmetries, the model has one rigid nilpotent supersymmetry corresponding to the target space de Rham operator. The rigid and local symmetries of the action, respectively, are equivalent to the Poisson bracket being compatible with the de Rham operator and obeying graded Jacobi identities. We propose that perturbative quantization of the model yields a covariantized differential star product algebra of Kontsevich type. We comment on the resemblance to the topological A model.

  6. 2D sigma models and differential Poisson algebras

    CERN Document Server

    Arias, Cesar; Sundell, Per; Torres-Gomez, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    We construct a two-dimensional topological sigma model whose target space is endowed with a Poisson algebra for differential forms. The model consists of an equal number of bosonic and fermionic fields of worldsheet form degrees zero and one. The action is built using exterior products and derivatives, without any reference to any worldsheet metric, and is of the covariant Hamiltonian form. The equations of motion define a universally Cartan integrable system. In addition to gauge symmetries, the model has one rigid nilpotent supersymmetry corresponding to the target space de Rham operator. The rigid and local symmetries of the action, respectively, are equivalent to the Poisson bracket being compatible with the de Rham operator and obeying graded Jacobi identities. We propose that perturbative quantization of the model yields a covariantized differential star product algebra of Kontsevich type. We comment on the resemblance to the topological A model.

  7. 2D sigma models and differential Poisson algebras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arias, Cesar [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andres Bello,Republica 220, Santiago (Chile); Boulanger, Nicolas [Service de Mécanique et Gravitation, Université de Mons - UMONS,20 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Laboratoire de Mathématiques et Physique Théorique,Unité Mixte de Recherche 7350 du CNRS, Fédération de Recherche 2964 Denis Poisson,Université François Rabelais, Parc de Grandmont, 37200 Tours (France); Sundell, Per [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andres Bello,Republica 220, Santiago (Chile); Torres-Gomez, Alexander [Departamento de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Andres Bello,Republica 220, Santiago (Chile); Instituto de Ciencias Físicas y Matemáticas, Universidad Austral de Chile-UACh,Valdivia (Chile)

    2015-08-18

    We construct a two-dimensional topological sigma model whose target space is endowed with a Poisson algebra for differential forms. The model consists of an equal number of bosonic and fermionic fields of worldsheet form degrees zero and one. The action is built using exterior products and derivatives, without any reference to a worldsheet metric, and is of the covariant Hamiltonian form. The equations of motion define a universally Cartan integrable system. In addition to gauge symmetries, the model has one rigid nilpotent supersymmetry corresponding to the target space de Rham operator. The rigid and local symmetries of the action, respectively, are equivalent to the Poisson bracket being compatible with the de Rham operator and obeying graded Jacobi identities. We propose that perturbative quantization of the model yields a covariantized differential star product algebra of Kontsevich type. We comment on the resemblance to the topological A model.

  8. Potent neutralizing anti-CD1d antibody reduces lung cytokine release in primate asthma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nambiar, Jonathan; Clarke, Adam W; Shim, Doris; Mabon, David; Tian, Chen; Windloch, Karolina; Buhmann, Chris; Corazon, Beau; Lindgren, Matilda; Pollard, Matthew; Domagala, Teresa; Poulton, Lynn; Doyle, Anthony G

    2015-01-01

    CD1d is a receptor on antigen-presenting cells involved in triggering cell populations, particularly natural killer T (NKT) cells, to release high levels of cytokines. NKT cells are implicated in asthma pathology and blockade of the CD1d/NKT cell pathway may have therapeutic potential. We developed a potent anti-human CD1d antibody (NIB.2) that possesses high affinity for human and cynomolgus macaque CD1d (KD ∼100 pM) and strong neutralizing activity in human primary cell-based assays (IC50 typically <100 pM). By epitope mapping experiments, we showed that NIB.2 binds to CD1d in close proximity to the interface of CD1d and the Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain. Together with data showing that NIB.2 inhibited stimulation via CD1d loaded with different glycolipids, this supports a mechanism whereby NIB.2 inhibits NKT cell activation by inhibiting Type 1 NKT cell receptor β-chain interactions with CD1d, independent of the lipid antigen in the CD1d antigen-binding cleft. The strong in vitro potency of NIB.2 was reflected in vivo in an Ascaris suum cynomolgus macaque asthma model. Compared with vehicle control, NIB.2 treatment significantly reduced bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) levels of Ascaris-induced cytokines IL-5, IL-8 and IL-1 receptor antagonist, and significantly reduced baseline levels of GM-CSF, IL-6, IL-15, IL-12/23p40, MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and VEGF. At a cellular population level NIB.2 also reduced numbers of BAL lymphocytes and macrophages, and blood eosinophils and basophils. We demonstrate that anti-CD1d antibody blockade of the CD1d/NKT pathway modulates inflammatory parameters in vivo in a primate inflammation model, with therapeutic potential for diseases where the local cytokine milieu is critical.

  9. 2D - Finite element model of a CIGS module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janssen, G.J.M.; Slooff, L.H.; Bende, E.E. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2012-09-15

    The performance of thin-film CIGS modules is often limited due to inhomogeneities in CIGS layers. A 2-dimensional Finite Element Model for CIGS modules is demonstrated that predicts the impact of such inhomogeneities on the module performance. Results are presented of a module with a region of poor diode characteristics. It is concluded that according to this model the effects of poor diodes depend strongly on their location in the module and on their dispersion over the module surface. Due to its generic character the model can also be applied to other series connections of photovoltaic cells.

  10. Quasicomplex N=2, d=1 Supersymmetric Sigma Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny A. Ivanov

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available We derive and discuss a new type of N=2 supersymmetric quantum mechanical sigma models which appear when the superfield action of the (1,2,1 multiplets is modified by adding an imaginary antisymmetric tensor to the target space metric, thus completing the latter to a non-symmetric Hermitian metric. These models are not equivalent to the standard de Rham sigma models, but are related to them through a certain special similarity transformation of the supercharges. On the other hand, they can be obtained by a Hamiltonian reduction from the complex supersymmetric N=2 sigma models built on the multiplets (2,2,0 and describing the Dolbeault complex on the manifolds with proper isometries. We study in detail the extremal two-dimensional case, when the target space metric is defined solely by the antisymmetric tensor, and show that the corresponding quantum systems reveal a hidden N=4 supersymmetry.

  11. Vibration induced flow in hoppers: DEM 2D polygon model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A two-dimensional discrete element model (DEM) simulation of cohesive polygonal particles has been developed to assess the benefit of point source vibration to induce flow in wedge-shaped hoppers. The particle-particle interaction model used is based on a multi-contact principle.The first part of the study investigated particle discharge under gravity without vibration to determine the critical orifice size (Be) to just sustain flow as a function of particle shape. It is shown that polygonal-shaped particles need a larger orifice than circular particles. It is also shown that Be decreases as the number of particle vertices increases. Addition of circular particles promotes flow of polygons in a linear manner.The second part of the study showed that vibration could enhance flow, effectively reducing Be. The model demonstrated the importance of vibrator location (height), consistent with previous continuum model results, and vibration amplitude in enhancing flow.

  12. 2D Ising Model with a Defect Line

    CERN Document Server

    Cabra, D C

    1994-01-01

    We study the two-dimensional Ising model with a defect line and evaluate multipoint energy correlation functions using non-perturbative field-theoretical methods. We also discuss the evaluation of the two spin correlator on the defect line.

  13. Simulations of Quantum Spin Models on 2D Frustrated Lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melko, Roger

    2006-03-01

    Algorithmic advances in quantum Monte Carlo techniques have opened up the possibility of studying models in the general class of the S=1/2 XXZ model (equivalent to hard-core bosons) on frustrated lattices. With an antiferromagnetic diagonal interaction (Jz), these models can be solved exactly with QMC, albeit with some effort required to retain ergodicity in the near-degenerate manifold of states that exists for large Jz. The application of the quantum (ferromagnetic off-diagonal) interaction to this classically degenerate manifold produces a variety of intriguing physics, including an order-by-disorder supersolid phase, novel insulating states, and possible exotic quantum critical phenomena. We discuss numerical results for the triangular and kagome lattices with nearest and next-nearest neighbor exchange interactions, and focus on the relevance of the simulations to related areas of physics, such as experiments of cold trapped atomic gasses and the recent theory of deconfined quantum criticality.

  14. Modeling 2-D jets impinging on Stirling regenerators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedeon, David

    1989-01-01

    The extent to which flow leaving Stirling coolers or heaters in the form of high-velocity jets penetrate the regenerator matrix is visually modeled using a computer program. Two-dimensional laminar jets are shown impinging on regenerator samples of variable permeability ranging from no matrix at all to matrices dense enough to stop the jet dead on. The results lend credibility to a simple tension for flow uniformity as a function of penetration depth.

  15. Conservation laws and LETKF with 2D Shallow Water Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Yuefei; Janjic, Tijana

    2016-04-01

    Numerous approaches have been proposed to maintain physical conservation laws in the numerical weather prediction models. However, to achieve a reliable prediction, adequate initial conditions are also necessary, which are produced by a data assimilation algorithm. If an ensemble Kalman filters (EnKF) is used for this purpose, it has been shown that it could yield unphysical analysis ensemble that for example violates principles of mass conservation and positivity preservation (e.g. Janjic et al 2014) . In this presentation, we discuss the selection of conservation criteria for the analysis step, and start with testing the conservation of mass, energy and enstrophy. The simple experiments deal with nonlinear shallow water equations and simulated observations that are assimilated with LETKF (Localized Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter, Hunt et al. 2007). The model is discretized in a specific way to conserve mass, angular momentum, energy and enstrophy. The effects of the data assimilation on the conserved quantities (of mass, energy and enstrophy) depend on observation covarage, localization radius, observed variable and observation operator. Having in mind that Arakawa (1966) and Arakawa and Lamb (1977) showed that the conservation of both kinetic energy and enstrophy by momentum advection schemes in the case of nondivergent flow prevents systematic and unrealistic energy cascade towards high wave numbers, a cause of excessive numerical noise and possible eventual nonlinear instability, we test the effects on prediction depending on the type of errors in the initial condition. The performance with respect to nonlinear energy cascade is assessed as well.

  16. SToRM: A Model for 2D environmental hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Francisco J. M.

    2017-01-01

    A two-dimensional (depth-averaged) finite volume Godunov-type shallow water model developed for flow over complex topography is presented. The model, SToRM, is based on an unstructured cell-centered finite volume formulation and on nonlinear strong stability preserving Runge-Kutta time stepping schemes. The numerical discretization is founded on the classical and well established shallow water equations in hyperbolic conservative form, but the convective fluxes are calculated using auto-switching Riemann and diffusive numerical fluxes. Computational efficiency is achieved through a parallel implementation based on the OpenMP standard and the Fortran programming language. SToRM’s implementation within a graphical user interface is discussed. Field application of SToRM is illustrated by utilizing it to estimate peak flow discharges in a flooding event of the St. Vrain Creek in Colorado, U.S.A., in 2013, which reached 850 m3/s (~30,000 f3 /s) at the location of this study.

  17. Point Contacts in Modeling Conducting 2D Planar Structures

    CERN Document Server

    Thiel, David V; Hettenhausen, Jan; Lewis, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Use of an optimization algorithm to improve performance of antennas and electromagnetic structures usually ends up in planar unusual shapes. Using rectangular conducting elements the proposed structures sometimes have connections with only one single point in common between two neighboring areas. The single point connections (point crossing) can affect the electromagnetic performance of the structure. In this letter, we illustrate the influence of point crossing on dipole and loop antennas using MoM, FDTD, and FEM solvers. Current distribution, radiation pattern, and impedance properties for different junctions are different. These solvers do not agree in the modeling of the point crossing junctions which is a warning about uncertainty in using such junctions. However, solvers agree that a negligible change in the junction would significantly change the antenna performance. We propose that one should consider both bridging and chamfering of the conflicting cells to find optimized structures. This reduces the ...

  18. A 2D model to design MHD induction pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stieglitz, R.; Zeininger, J.

    2006-09-01

    Technical liquid metal systems accompanied by a thermal transfer of energy such as reactor systems, metallurgical processes, metal refinement, casting, etc., require a forced convection of the fluid. The increased temperatures and more often the environmental conditions as, e.g., in a nuclear environment, pumping principles are required, in which rotating parts are absent. Additionally, in many applications a controlled atmosphere is indispensable, in order to ensure the structural integrity of the duct walls. An interesting option to overcome the sealing problem of a mechanical pump towards the surrounding is offered by induction systems. Although their efficiency compared to that of turbo machines is quite low, they have several advantages, which are attractive to the specific requirements in liquid metal applications such as: - low maintenance costs due to the absence of sealings, bearings and moving parts; - low degradation rate of the structural material; - simple replacement of the inductor without cut of the piping system; - fine regulation of flow rate by different inductor connections; - change of pump characteristics without change of the mechanical set-up. Within the article, general design requirements of electromagnetic pumps (EMP) are elaborated. The design of two annular linear induction pumps operating with sodium and lead-bismuth are presented and the calculated pump characteristics and experimentally obtained data are compared. In this context, physical effects leading to deviations between the model and the real data are addressed. Finally, the main results are summarized. Tables 4, Figs 4, Refs 12.

  19. Dynamics of intraoceanic subduction initiation: 2D thermomechanical modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X.; Gerya, T.; LI, Z.; Stern, R. J.

    2016-12-01

    Intraoceanic subduction initiation occurs in previous weak zones which could be transform faults or old fracture zones, and concurrents with the change of plate motions. It is an important process to understand the beginning of plate tectonics. However, the dynamic process during (after) subduction initiation remain obscure. The process of suducting slabs move from down to downdip is also not revealed clearly. In order to obtain better understanding of the transitional process of subducting slab motion, we use finite difference and marker-in-cell methods to establish a series of self-sustainable subduction initiation models and explore many visco-plastic parameters to qualify the dynamical process of subduction initiation. The following parameters are systematic tested: (1) the age of the subducting slab; (2) friction coefficient of the mantle material; (3) the mantle potential temperature; (4) the age of the overriding slab. We find out the critical age of the oceanic lithosphere which can produce subduction initiation. And the age of subducting slab plays important roles during subduction initiation. The young subducting slab induces fast trench retreat and then trench begin to advance. For the old subducting slab, it induces relative slower trench retreat and then stop moving. The age of overriding slabs impacts coupling with the subducting slab. The friction coefficient of lithosphere also impacts the backarc spreading and subduction velocity. Stronger subducted plate gives lower subduction velocity and faster trench retreat velocity. The mantle potential temperature changes the critical age of subducted slabs.

  20. Modelling and simulation of 2D stokesian Squirmers*

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aguillon Nina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Direct numerical simulations of the individual and collective dynamics of neutral squirmers are presented. “Squirmer” refers to a class of swimmers driven by prescribed tangential deformations at their surface, and “cneutral” means that the swimmer does not apply a force dipole on the fluid. The squirmer model is used in this article to describe self-propelled liquid droplets. Each swimmer is a fluid sphere in Stokes flow without radial velocity and with a prescribed tangential velocity, which is constant in time in the swimmer frame. The interaction between two or more swimmers is taken into account through the relaxation of their translational and angular velocities. The algorithm presented for solving the fluid flow and the motion of the liquid particles is based on a variational formulation written on the whole domain (including the external fluid and the liquid particles and on a fictitious domain approach. The constraint on the tangential velocity of swimmers can be enforced using two different methods: penalty approach of the strain rate tensor on the particles domain, or a saddle-point formulation involving a Lagrange multiplier associated to the constraint. This leads to a minimization problem over unconstrained functional spaces that can be implemented straightforwardly in a finiteelement multi-purpose solver. In order to ensure robustness, a projection algorithm is used to deal with contacts between particles. Two-dimensional numerical simulations implemented with FreeFem++ are presented.

  1. Simulation of subgrid orographic precipitation with an embedded 2-D cloud-resolving model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Joon-Hee; Arakawa, Akio

    2016-03-01

    By explicitly resolving cloud-scale processes with embedded two-dimensional (2-D) cloud-resolving models (CRMs), superparameterized global atmospheric models have successfully simulated various atmospheric events over a wide range of time scales. Up to now, however, such models have not included the effects of topography on the CRM grid scale. We have used both 3-D and 2-D CRMs to simulate the effects of topography with prescribed "large-scale" winds. The 3-D CRM is used as a benchmark. The results show that the mean precipitation can be simulated reasonably well by using a 2-D representation of topography as long as the statistics of the topography such as the mean and standard deviation are closely represented. It is also shown that the use of a set of two perpendicular 2-D grids can significantly reduce the error due to a 2-D representation of topography.

  2. Estimating regional conductivity in 2D disc head model by multidemensional support vector regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xueqin; Yan, Hui; Yan, Weili; Guo, Lei

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce multidimensional support vector regression (MSVR) with iterative re-weight least square (IRWLS) based procedure to estimating the regional conductivity in 2D disc head model. The results show that the method is capable of determining for the regional location of the disturbed conductivity in the 2D disc head model with single tissue and estimating for the tissue conductivities in the 2D disc head model with four kinds of tissue. The estimation errors are all within a few percent.

  3. REAL-TIME FLOOD FORECASTING METHOD WITH 1-D UNSTEADY FLOW MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MU Jin-bin; ZHANG Xiao-feng

    2007-01-01

    A real-time forecasting method coupled with the 1-D unsteady flow model with the recursive least-square method was developed. The 1-D unsteady flow model was modified by using the time-variant parameter and revising it dynamically through introducing a variable weighted forgetting factor, such that the output of the model could be adjusted for the real time forecasting of floods. The application of the new real time forecasting model in the reach from Yichang to Luoshan of the Yangtze River was demonstrated. Computational result shows that the forecasting accuracy of the new model is much higher than that of the original 1-D unsteady flow model. The method developed is effective for flood forecasting, and can be used for practical operation in the flood forecasting.

  4. A HORIZONTAL 2-D HYDRAULIC NUMERICAL MODEL AND IT'S APPLICATIONS TO FLOOD FORECAST

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Minghui YU; Guolu YANG; Jinjun XU

    2002-01-01

    In this paper,a horizontal 2-D numerical model has been developed to simulate flow processes in dike burst. The finite difference method is used in computation. The model employs 2-D flow equations and can simulate complex flows when supercritical flow and sub-critical flow exist simultaneously such as hydraulic jumps. Several simulated results are worked out to demonstrate the applicability of the numerical model,such as flood propagation on a dry bed of a complex terrain.

  5. Benchmarks and models for 1-D radiation transport in stochastic participating media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miller, D S

    2000-08-21

    Benchmark calculations for radiation transport coupled to a material temperature equation in a 1-D slab and 1-D spherical geometry binary random media are presented. The mixing statistics are taken to be homogeneous Markov statistics in the 1-D slab but only approximately Markov statistics in the 1-D sphere. The material chunk sizes are described by Poisson distribution functions. The material opacities are first taken to be constant and then allowed to vary as a strong function of material temperature. Benchmark values and variances for time evolution of the ensemble average of material temperature energy density and radiation transmission are computed via a Monte Carlo type method. These benchmarks are used as a basis for comparison with three other approximate methods of solution. One of these approximate methods is simple atomic mix. The second approximate model is an adaptation of what is commonly called the Levermore-Pomraning model and which is referred to here as the standard model. It is shown that recasting the temperature coupling as a type of effective scattering can be useful in formulating the third approximate model, an adaptation of a model due to Su and Pomraning which attempts to account for the effects of scattering in a stochastic context. This last adaptation shows consistent improvement over both the atomic mix and standard models when used in the 1-D slab geometry but shows limited improvement in the 1-D spherical geometry. Benchmark values are also computed for radiation transmission from the 1-D sphere without material heating present. This is to evaluate the performance of the standard model on this geometry--something which has never been done before. All of the various tests demonstrate the importance of stochastic structure on the solution. Also demonstrated are the range of usefulness and limitations of a simple atomic mix formulation.

  6. Deconvolution of Complex 1D NMR Spectra Using Objective Model Selection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Travis S Hughes

    Full Text Available Fluorine (19F NMR has emerged as a useful tool for characterization of slow dynamics in 19F-labeled proteins. One-dimensional (1D 19F NMR spectra of proteins can be broad, irregular and complex, due to exchange of probe nuclei between distinct electrostatic environments; and therefore cannot be deconvoluted and analyzed in an objective way using currently available software. We have developed a Python-based deconvolution program, decon1d, which uses Bayesian information criteria (BIC to objectively determine which model (number of peaks would most likely produce the experimentally obtained data. The method also allows for fitting of intermediate exchange spectra, which is not supported by current software in the absence of a specific kinetic model. In current methods, determination of the deconvolution model best supported by the data is done manually through comparison of residual error values, which can be time consuming and requires model selection by the user. In contrast, the BIC method used by decond1d provides a quantitative method for model comparison that penalizes for model complexity helping to prevent over-fitting of the data and allows identification of the most parsimonious model. The decon1d program is freely available as a downloadable Python script at the project website (https://github.com/hughests/decon1d/.

  7. Dopamine D1/D5, But not D2/D3, Receptor Dependency of Synaptic Plasticity at Hippocampal Mossy Fiber Synapses that Is Enabled by Patterned Afferent Stimulation, or Spatial Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagena, Hardy; Manahan-Vaughan, Denise

    2016-01-01

    Although the mossy fiber (MF) synapses of the hippocampal CA3 region display quite distinct properties in terms of the molecular mechanisms that underlie synaptic plasticity, they nonetheless exhibit persistent (>24 h) synaptic plasticity that is akin to that observed at the Schaffer collateral (SCH)-CA1 and perforant path (PP)-dentate gyrus (DG) synapses of freely behaving rats. In addition, they also respond to novel spatial learning with very enduring forms of long-term potentiation (LTP) and long-term depression (LTD). These latter forms of synaptic plasticity are directly related to the learning behavior: novel exploration of generalized changes in space facilitates the expression of LTP at MF-CA3 synapses, whereas exploration of novel configurations of large environmental features facilitates the expression of LTD. In the absence of spatial novelty, synaptic plasticity is not expressed. Motivation is a potent determinant of whether learning about the spatial experience effectively occurs and the neuromodulator dopamine (DA) plays a key role in motivation-based learning. Prior research on the regulation by DA receptors of long-term synaptic plasticity in CA1 and DG synapses in vivo suggests that whereas D2/D3 receptors may modulate a general predisposition toward expressing plasticity, D1/D5 receptors may directly regulate the direction of change in synaptic strength that occurs during learning. Although the CA3 region is believed to play a pivotal role in many forms of learning, the role of dopamine receptors in persistent (>24 h) forms of synaptic plasticity at MF-CA3 synapses is unknown. Here, we report that whereas pharmacological antagonism of D2/D3 receptors had no impact on LTP or LTD, antagonism of D1/D5 receptors significantly impaired LTP and LTD that were induced by solely by means of patterned afferent stimulation, or LTP/LTD that are typically enhanced by the conjunction of afferent stimulation and novel spatial learning. These data indicate an

  8. Dopamine D1/D5, but not D2/D3, receptor dependency of synaptic plasticity at hippocampal mossy fiber synapses that is enabled by patterned afferent stimulation, or spatial learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hardy Hagena

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Although the mossy fiber (MF synapses of the hippocampal CA3 region display quite distinct properties in terms of the molecular mechanisms that underlie synaptic plasticity, they nonetheless exhibit persistent (>24h synaptic plasticity that is akin to that observed at the Schaffer collateral (SCH-CA1 and perforant path (PP-dentate gyrus (DG synapses of freely behaving rats. In addition, they also respond to novel spatial learning with very enduring forms of long-term potentiation (LTP and long-term depression (LTD. These latter forms of synaptic plasticity are directly related to the learning behavior: novel exploration of generalized changes in space facilitates the expression of LTP at MF-CA3 synapses, whereas exploration of novel configurations of large environmental features facilitates the expression of LTD. In the absence of spatial novelty, synaptic plasticity is not expressed. Motivation is a potent determinant of whether learning about spatial experience effectively occurs and the neuromodulator dopamine plays a key role in motivation-based learning. Prior research on the regulation by dopamine receptors of long-term synaptic plasticity in CA1 and dentate gyrus synapses in vivo suggests that whereas D2/D3 receptors may modulate a general predisposition toward expressing plasticity, D1/D5 receptors may directly regulate the direction of change in synaptic strength that occurs during learning. Although the CA3 region is believed to play a pivotal role in many forms of learning, the role of these receptors in persistent (>24h forms of synaptic plasticity at MF-CA3 synapses is unknown. Here, we report that whereas pharmacological antagonism of D2/D3 receptors had no impact on LTP or LTD, antagonism of D1/D5 receptors significantly impaired LTP and LTD that were induced by solely by means of patterned afferent stimulation, or LTP/LTD that are typically enhanced by the conjunction of afferent stimulation and novel spatial learning. These data

  9. Towards the development of a fully coupled arterial-venous 1D model: suitability of using a 1D finite volume method with staggered spatial discretization

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Bogaers, Alfred EJ

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we outline the development of a 1D finite volume model to solve for blood flow through the arterial system. The model is based on a staggered spatial discretization which leads to a stable solution scheme. This scheme can accurately...

  10. RANS computations for identification of 1-D cavitation model parameters: application to full load cavitation vortex rope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alligné, S.; Decaix, J.; Müller, A.; Nicolet, C.; Avellan, F.; Münch, C.

    2017-04-01

    Due to the massive penetration of alternative renewable energies, hydropower is a key energy conversion technology for stabilizing the electrical power network by using hydraulic machines at off design operating conditions. At full load, the axisymmetric cavitation vortex rope developing in Francis turbines acts as an internal source of energy, leading to an instability commonly referred to as self-excited surge. 1-D models are developed to predict this phenomenon and to define the range of safe operating points for a hydropower plant. These models require a calibration of several parameters. The present work aims at identifying these parameters by using CFD results as objective functions for an optimization process. A 2-D Venturi and 3-D Francis turbine are considered.

  11. Statistics of Eigenfunctions in 1D Tight Binding Model: Distribution of Riccati Variable

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wen-Ge

    2001-01-01

    For energy eigenfunctions in 1D tight binding model, the distribution of ratios of the nearest components (Riccati variable), denoted by f(p), gives information on their fluctuation properties. The shape of f(p) is studied numerically for three versions of the 1D tight binding model. It is shown that when perturbation is strong the shape of f(p) is usually quite close to that of the Lorentzian distribution and in the case of weak perturbation the shape of the central part of f(p) is model-dependent while the shape of tails are still close to the Lorentzian form.``

  12. Analyzing 2D THz-Raman spectroscopy using a non-Markovian Brownian oscillator model with nonlinear system-bath interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Ikeda, Tatsushi; Tanimura, Yoshitaka

    2015-01-01

    We explore and describe the roles of inter-molecular vibrations in terms of a Brownian oscillator (BO) model with linear-linear (LL) and square-linear (SL) system-bath interactions, which we use to analyze two-dimensional (2D) THz-Raman spectra obtained by means of molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In addition to linear absorption (1D IR), we calculate 2D Raman-THz-THz, THz-Raman-THz, and THz-THz-Raman signals for liquid formamide, water, and methanol using an equilibrium non-equilibrium hybrid MD simulation. The calculated 1D IR and 2D THz-Raman signals are then accounted by the LL+SL BO model with the use of the hierarchal Fokker-Planck equations for a non-perturbative and non-Markovian noise. All of the characteristic 2D profiles of the simulated signals are reproduced using the LL+SL BO model, indicating that the present model captures the essential features of the inter-molecular motion. We analyze the fitted the 2D profiles in terms of anharmonicity, nonlinear polarizability, and dephasing time. The ...

  13. Periodic Properties of 1D FE Discrete Models in High Frequency Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Żak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Finite element discrete models of various engineering 1D structures may be considered as structures of certain periodic characteristics. The source of this periodicity comes from the discontinuity of stress/strain field between the elements. This behaviour remains unnoticeable, when low frequency dynamics of these structures is investigated. At high frequency regimes, however, its influence may be strong enough to dominate calculated structural responses distorting or even falsifying them completely. In this paper, certain computational aspects of structural periodicity of 1D FE discrete models are discussed by the authors. In this discussion, the authors focus their attention on an exemplary problem of 1D rod modelled according to the elementary theory.

  14. New 2D diffraction model and its applications to terahertz parallel-plate waveguide power splitters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fan; Song, Kaijun; Fan, Yong

    2017-02-01

    A two-dimensional (2D) diffraction model for the calculation of the diffraction field in 2D space and its applications to terahertz parallel-plate waveguide power splitters are proposed in this paper. Compared with the Huygens-Fresnel principle in three-dimensional (3D) space, the proposed model provides an approximate analytical expression to calculate the diffraction field in 2D space. The diffraction filed is regarded as the superposition integral in 2D space. The calculated results obtained from the proposed diffraction model agree well with the ones by software HFSS based on the element method (FEM). Based on the proposed 2D diffraction model, two parallel-plate waveguide power splitters are presented. The splitters consist of a transmitting horn antenna, reflectors, and a receiving antenna array. The reflector is cylindrical parabolic with superimposed surface relief to efficiently couple the transmitted wave into the receiving antenna array. The reflector is applied as computer-generated holograms to match the transformed field to the receiving antenna aperture field. The power splitters were optimized by a modified real-coded genetic algorithm. The computed results of the splitters agreed well with the ones obtained by software HFSS verify the novel design method for power splitter, which shows good applied prospects of the proposed 2D diffraction model.

  15. Comparison of 2D numerical models for river flood hazard assessment: simulation of the Secchia River flood in January, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shustikova, Iuliia; Domeneghetti, Alessio; Neal, Jeffrey; Bates, Paul; Castellarin, Attilio

    2017-04-01

    Hydrodynamic modeling of inundation events still brings a large array of uncertainties. This effect is especially evident in the models run for geographically large areas. Recent studies suggest using fully two-dimensional (2D) models with high resolution in order to avoid uncertainties and limitations coming from the incorrect interpretation of flood dynamics and an unrealistic reproduction of the terrain topography. This, however, affects the computational efficiency increasing the running time and hardware demands. Concerning this point, our study evaluates and compares numerical models of different complexity by testing them on a flood event that occurred in the basin of the Secchia River, Northern Italy, on 19th January, 2014. The event was characterized by a levee breach and consequent flooding of over 75 km2 of the plain behind the dike within 48 hours causing population displacement, one death and economic losses in excess of 400 million Euro. We test the well-established TELEMAC 2D, and LISFLOOD-FP codes, together with the recently launched HEC-RAS 5.0.3 (2D model), all models are implemented using different grid size (2-200 m) based on the 1 m digital elevation model resolution. TELEMAC is a fully 2D hydrodynamic model which is based on the finite-element or finite-volume approach. Whereas HEC-RAS 5.0.3 and LISFLOOD-FP are both coupled 1D-2D models. All models are calibrated against observed inundation extent and maximum water depths, which are retrieved from remotely sensed data and field survey reports. Our study quantitatively compares the three modeling strategies highlighting differences in terms of the ease of implementation, accuracy of representation of hydraulic processes within floodplains and computational efficiency. Additionally, we look into the different grid resolutions in terms of the results accuracy and computation time. Our study is a preliminary assessment that focuses on smaller areas in order to identify potential modeling schemes

  16. Activated sludge models ASM1, ASM2, ASM2d and ASM3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henze, Mogens; Gujer, W.; Mino, T.;

    This book has been produced to give a total overview of the Activated Sludge Model (ASM) family at the start of 2000 and to give the reader easy access to the different models in their original versions. It thus presents ASM1, ASM2, ASM2d and ASM3 together for the first time.Modelling of activated...... sludge processes has become a common part of the design and operation of wastewater treatment plants. Today models are being used in design, control, teaching and research.ContentsASM3: Introduction, Comparison of ASM1 and ASM3, ASM3: Definition of compounds in the model, ASM3: Definition of processes...... in the Model, ASM3: Stoichiometry, ASM3: Kinetics, Limitations of ASM3, Aspects of application of ASM3, ASM3C: A Carbon based model, Conclusion ASM 2d: Introduction, Conceptual Approach, ASM 2d, Typical Wastewater Characteristics and Kinetic and Stoichiometric Constants, Limitations, Conclusion ASM 2...

  17. Column Testing and 1D Reactive Transport Modeling to Evaluate Uranium Plume Persistence Processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Raymond H. [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc.; Morrison, Stan [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc.; Morris, Sarah [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc.; Tigar, Aaron [Navarro Research and Engineering, Inc.; Dam, William [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management; Dayvault, Jalena [U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Legacy Management

    2016-04-26

    Motivation for Study: Natural flushing of contaminants at various U.S. Department of Energy Office of Legacy Management sites is not proceeding as quickly as predicted (plume persistence) Objectives: Help determine natural flushing rates using column tests. Use 1D reactive transport modeling to better understand the major processes that are creating plume persistence Approach: Core samples from under a former mill tailings area Tailings have been removed. Column leaching using lab-prepared water similar to nearby Gunnison River water. 1D reactive transport modeling to evaluate processes

  18. Modelling turbulent vertical mixing sensitivity using a 1-D version of NEMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Reffray

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Through two numerical experiments, a 1-D vertical model called NEMO1D was used to investigate physical and numerical turbulent-mixing behaviour. The results show that all the turbulent closures tested (k + l from Blanke and Delecluse, 1993 and two equation models: Generic Lengh Scale closures from Umlauf and Burchard, 2003 are able to correctly reproduce the classical test of Kato and Phillips (1969 under favourable numerical conditions while some solutions may diverge depending on the degradation of the spatial and time discretization. The performances of turbulence models were then compared with data measured over a one-year period (mid-2010 to mid-2011 at the PAPA station, located in the North Pacific Ocean. The modelled temperature and salinity were in good agreement with the observations, with a maximum temperature error between −2 and 2 °C during the stratified period (June to October. However the results also depend on the numerical conditions. The vertical RMSE varied, for different turbulent closures, from 0.1 to 0.3 °C during the stratified period and from 0.03 to 0.15 °C during the homogeneous period. This 1-D configuration at the PAPA station (called PAPA1D is now available in NEMO as a reference configuration including the input files and atmospheric forcing set described in this paper. Thus, all the results described can be recovered by downloading and launching PAPA1D. The configuration is described on the NEMO site (http://www.nemo-ocean.eu/Using-NEMO/Configurations/C1D_PAPA. This package is a good starting point for further investigation of vertical processes.

  19. Wake effects characterization using wake oscillator model. Comparison on 2D response with experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Gaurier, Benoît; Cébron, David

    2010-01-01

    A model using wake oscillators is developed to predict the 2D motion in a transverse plan of two rigid cylinders in tandem arrangement. This model of the wake dynamics is validated with experimental data from previous trials which took place at the Ifremer flume tank in Boulogne-sur-Mer, France. The agreement between the model and the experimental results allows using this model as a simple computational tool in the prediction of 2D Vortex-Induced Vibrations (VIV) and, after some futher developments, Wake-Induced Oscillations (WIO) effects.

  20. Tidal regime in Gulf of Kutch, west coast of India, by 2D model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Unnikrishnan, A; Gouveia, A; Vethamony, P.

    A 2D barotropic numerical model is developed for the Gulf of Kutch with a view to synthesize available information on tides and currents in the Gulf. A comparison of model results with moored current meter observations shows that the model...

  1. Analysis of vegetation effect on waves using a vertical 2-D RANS model

    Science.gov (United States)

    A vertical two-dimensional (2-D) model has been applied in the simulation of wave propagation through vegetated water bodies. The model is based on an existing model SOLA-VOF which solves the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations with the finite difference method on a staggered rectangula...

  2. Simulation of Cardiac Arrhythmias Using a 2D Heterogeneous Whole Heart Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Minimol; Chakravarthy, V Srinivasa; Guhathakurta, Soma

    2015-01-01

    Simulation studies of cardiac arrhythmias at the whole heart level with electrocardiogram (ECG) gives an understanding of how the underlying cell and tissue level changes manifest as rhythm disturbances in the ECG. We present a 2D whole heart model (WHM2D) which can accommodate variations at the cellular level and can generate the ECG waveform. It is shown that, by varying cellular-level parameters like the gap junction conductance (GJC), excitability, action potential duration (APD) and frequency of oscillations of the auto-rhythmic cell in WHM2D a large variety of cardiac arrhythmias can be generated including sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinus pause, junctional rhythm, Wolf Parkinson White syndrome and all types of AV conduction blocks. WHM2D includes key components of the electrical conduction system of the heart like the SA (Sino atrial) node cells, fast conducting intranodal pathways, slow conducting atriovenctricular (AV) node, bundle of His cells, Purkinje network, atrial, and ventricular myocardial cells. SA nodal cells, AV nodal cells, bundle of His cells, and Purkinje cells are represented by the Fitzhugh-Nagumo (FN) model which is a reduced model of the Hodgkin-Huxley neuron model. The atrial and ventricular myocardial cells are modeled by the Aliev-Panfilov (AP) two-variable model proposed for cardiac excitation. WHM2D can prove to be a valuable clinical tool for understanding cardiac arrhythmias.

  3. Assembly of 1D, 2D and 3D lanthanum(iii) coordination polymers with perchlorinated benzenedicarboxylates: positional isomeric effect, structural transformation and ring-opening polymerisation of glycolide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng-Chun; Dai, An-Qi; Huang, Kun-Lin; Zhang, Zhi-Hui; Cui, Ai-Jun; He, Ming-Yang; Chen, Qun

    2016-02-28

    Utilizing a series of positional isomers of tetrachlorinated benzenedicarboxylic acid ligands, seven La(iii)-based coordination polymers were solvothermally synthesized and structurally characterized. Their structural dimensionalities varying from 1D double chains, to the 2D 3,4,5-connected network, to 3D 6-connected pcu topological nets are only governed by the positions of carboxyl groups on the tetrachlorinated benzene ring. A comprehensive analysis and comparison reveals that the size of the carbonyl solvent molecules (DMF, DEF, DMA, and NMP) can affect the coordination geometries around the La(iii) ions, the coordination modes of carboxylate groups, the packing arrangements, and the void volumes of the overall crystal lattices. One as-synthesized framework further shows an unprecedented structural transformation from a 3D 6-connected network to a 3D 4,5-connected net through the dissolution and reformation pathway in water, suggesting that these easily hydrolyzed lanthanide complexes may serve as precursors to produce new high-dimensional frameworks. The bulk solvent-free melt polymerisation of glycolide utilizing these La(iii) complexes as initiators has been reported herein for the first time. All complexes were found to promote the polymerization of glycolide over a temperature range of 200 to 220 °C, producing poly(glycolic acid) (PGA) with a molecular weight up to 93,280. Under the same experimental conditions, the different catalytic activities for these complexes may result from their structural discrepancy.

  4. Hydrothermal syntheses and characterization of two novel luminescent Cadmium(II) frameworks: From 1D infinite triple Cd-(trz)-Cd bridges to a rare I2O0 network with 2D Cd-Br-Cd inorganic connectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shi Xin; Li, Jian Hui; Wang, You You; Wu, Xiang Xia; Huo, Jian Zhong; Ding, Bin; Wang, Xiu Guang; Zhu, Zhao Zhou; Xia, Jun

    2015-05-01

    Using the 4-substituted-1,2,4-triazole derivate ligand 4-p-tolyl-1,2,4-triazole (L), two novel luminescent Cadmium(II) frameworks, namely {[Cd(μ2-L)3]·(NO3)2·L}n (1) and [Cd1.5(μ2-L)(μ2-Br)2(μ3-Br)]n (2) have been isolated under hydrothermal conditions. The structural analysis reveals that 1 presents a one-dimensional (1D) chain structural motif containing novel infinite triple Cd-(trz)-Cd bridges (triply trz-bridged M-M species). While 2 presents a rare I2O0 type framework, in which the infinite 2D Cd-Br-Cd inorganic connectivity with a 4-connected Kagome topology can be observed. The FT-IR, PXRD and thermal stabilities of 1-2 have investigated. The solid-state photo-luminescent spectra of organic ligand L and 1-2 also have been measured indicating strong emission bands.

  5. Dynamics of the 1D Heisenberg model and optical absorption of spinons in cuprate antiferromagnetic chains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lorenzana, J.; Eder, R.

    1996-01-01

    Published in: Phys. Rev. B 55 (1997) 3358-3361 Citing articles (CrossRef) citations recorded in [Science Citation Index] Abstract: We use numerical and analytical results to construct a simple ansatz for the energy dynamical correlation function of the 1D antiferromagnetic Heisenberg model. This is

  6. GLOBAL EXISTENCE AND ASYMPTOTIC BEHAVIOR OF THE SOLUTION TO 1-D ENERGY TRANSPORT MODEL FOR SEMICONDUCTORS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黎勇; 陈丽

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, we study the asymptotic behavior of global smooth solution to the initial boundary problem for the 1-D energy transport model in semiconductor science. We prove that the smooth solution of the problem converges to a stationary solution exponentially fast as t - ∞ when the initial data is a small perturbation of the stationary solution.

  7. From Spin Ladders to the 2-d O(3) Model at Non-Zero Density

    CERN Document Server

    Chandrasekharan, S; Wiese, U J

    2002-01-01

    The numerical simulation of various field theories at non-zero chemical potential suffers from severe complex action problems. In particular, QCD at non-zero quark density can presently not be simulated for that reason. A similar complex action problem arises in the 2-d O(3) model -- a toy model for QCD. Here we construct the 2-d O(3) model at non-zero density via dimensional reduction of an antiferromagnetic quantum spin ladder in a magnetic field. The complex action problem of the 2-d O(3) model manifests itself as a sign problem of the ladder system. This sign problem is solved completely with a meron-cluster algorithm.

  8. Study of the 2-d CP(N-1) models at \\theta=0 and \\pi

    CERN Document Server

    Beard, B B; Riederer, S; Wiese, U J

    2005-01-01

    We present numerical results for 2-d CP(N-1) models at \\theta=0 and \\pi obtained in the D-theory formulation. In this formulation we construct an efficient cluster algorithm and we show numerical evidence for a first order transition for CP(N-1\\geq 2) models at \\theta = \\pi. By a finite size scaling analysis, we also discuss the equivalence in the continuum limit of the D-theory formulation of the 2-d CP(N-1) models and the usual lattice definition.

  9. 2D and 3D modelling of magnetic and resistivity data from Aespoe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattsson, Haakan (GeoVista AB, Luleaa (Sweden))

    2011-05-15

    This report presents results from modelling of geophysical data. Ground magnetic and geo electric data were collected in 1988 as part of the pre-investigations carried out before the construction of the Aespoe Hard Rock Laboratory (HRL). The work presented in this report is an evaluation of the magnetic and geo electric data with the focus on estimating variations in geometry and dip of some of the possible deformation zones indicated in lineament interpretations presented earlier. This was done by 2D forward magnetic modelling, 2D forward resistivity modelling and 3D inversion of the magnetic data. The specific aims of this work are: 1. Produce magnetic 2D forward models across 12 selected linked lineaments. 2. Produce a 3D susceptibility model of the entire data set of Aespoe. 3. Use 2D forward resistivity modelling to produce electric anomaly response diagrams for a dipole-dipole survey across low resistivity zones with various dips. The results of the modelling work will mainly be used as supportive information for deterministic geological modelling of deformation zones and rock units in the vicinity of the Aespoe HRL. The results of the 2D forward modelling of magnetic data show geologically reasonable solutions, and in most cases it is possible to make reliable estimates of the width and orientation of the cause of the targeted lineament. The possible deformation zones generally dip steeply (80 deg-90 deg) and have a width of c. 30-50 m. In some cases the modelled lineament has a diffuse character with low amplitude, which makes the model solution uncertain. Two 3D susceptibility models were created by use of inversion of the ground magnetic data; one coarse model of the entire Island of Aespoe and one more detailed model of the south-eastern peninsula of the Island, covering the volume of the Aespoe HRL. The two models fit nicely to the measured data and they are geologically realistic. It is possible to identify well-defined bodies (rock volumes) of

  10. 2D/3D velocity model for the high resolution 2D and 3D seismic data from the CO2SINK Ketzin Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, A.; Asch, G.; Lueth, S.; Goetz, J.

    2009-04-01

    Seismic traveltime inversion, traveltime tomography and seismic reflection techniques have been applied for two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) data acquired in conjunction with characterization and monitoring aspects at a carbon dioxide (CO2) geological storage site at Ketzin, Germany (the CO2SINK project) (S.Yordkayhun, 2008). A seismic source comparison from the 2D pilot study regarding acquisition parameters have been tested at the side has shown the weight drop source is suitable concerning the signal penetration, frequency content of the data and minimizing time and costs for the 3D data acquisition. For the Ketzin seismic data, the ability to obtain an accurate 2D/3D interval velocity model is limited by the acquisition geometry, source-generated noise and time shifts due to the near-surface effects producing severe distortions in the data. Moreover, these time shifts are comparable to the dominant periods of the reflections and to the size of structures to be imaged. Therefore, a combination of seismic refraction and state-of-the-art processing techniques, including careful static corrections and more accurate velocity analysis, has resulted in key improvements of the images and has allowed new information about the 2D/3D interval velocities. The results from these studies together with borehole information, hydrogeologic models and seismic modeling will be combined into an integrated 2D/3D velocity model. After that a careful 2D/3D depth migration is to be provided. It can be used as a database for the future monitoring program at the site.

  11. 2-D magnetotelluric modeling using finite element method incorporating unstructured quadrilateral elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarakorn, Weerachai

    2017-04-01

    In this research, the finite element (FE) method incorporating quadrilateral elements for solving 2-D MT modeling was presented. The finite element software was developed, employing a paving algorithm to generate the unstructured quadrilateral mesh. The accuracy, efficiency, reliability, and flexibility of our FE forward modeling are presented, compared and discussed. The numerical results indicate that our FE codes using an unstructured quadrilateral mesh provide good accuracy when the local mesh refinement is applied around sites and in the area of interest, with superior results when compared to other FE methods. The reliability of the developed codes was also confirmed when comparing both analytical solutions and COMMEMI2D model. Furthermore, our developed FE codes incorporating an unstructured quadrilateral mesh showed useful and powerful features such as handling irregular and complex subregions and providing local refinement of the mesh for a 2-D domain as closely as unstructured triangular mesh but it requires less number of elements in a mesh.

  12. Bringing Kano’s Perspective to AHP: The 2D-AHP Decision Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Uk

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available AHP and the Kano model are such prevalent TQM tools that it may be surprising that a true hybrid decision-making model has so far eluded researchers. The quest for a hybrid approach is complicated by the differing output perspective of each model, namely discrete ranking (AHP versus a multi-dimensional picture (Kano. This paper presents a hybrid model of AHP and Kano model, so called two-dimension AHP (2D-AHP.

  13. Evaluation of 2D shallow-water model for spillway flow with a complex geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Although the two-dimensional (2D) shallow water model is formulated based on several assumptions such as hydrostatic pressure distribution and vertical velocity is negligible, as a simple alternative to the complex 3D model, it has been used to compute water flows in which these assumptions may be ...

  14. Comparison between 2D turbulence model ESEL and experimental data from AUG and COMPASS tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ondac, Peter; Horacek, Jan; Seidl, Jakub;

    2015-01-01

    In this article we have used the 2D fluid turbulence numerical model, ESEL, to simulate turbulent transport in edge tokamak plasma. Basic plasma parameters from the ASDEX Upgrade and COMPASS tokamaks are used as input for the model, and the output is compared with experimental observations obtained...

  15. Validity of Mixed 2D and 3D Cadastral Parcels in the Land Administration Domain Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thompson, R.J.; Van Oosterom, P.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    In the move towards a 3D Cadastre, many jurisdictions are considering a hybrid 2D/3D database as either a stage of development or as a target in itself (van Oosterom, Stoter, Ploeger, Thompson and Karki 2011). The Land Administration Domain Model (LADM), which is the underlying model for the ISO 191

  16. New Scotogenic Model of Neutrino Mass with $U(1)_D$ Gauge Interaction

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Ernest; Radovcic, Branimir

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new realization of the one-loop radiative model of neutrino mass generated by dark matter (scotogenic), where the particles in the loop have an additional $U(1)_D$ gauge symmetry, which may be exact or broken to $Z_2$. This model is relevant to a number of astrophysical observations, including AMS-02 and the dark matter distribution in dwarf galactic halos.

  17. Image segmentation and classification based on a 2D distributed hidden Markov model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Xiang; Schonfeld, Dan; Khokhar, Ashfaq

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a two-dimensional distributed hidden Markovmodel (2D-DHMM), where dependency of the state transition probability on any state is allowed as long as causality is preserved. The proposed 2D-DHMM model is result of a novel solution to a more general non-causal two-dimensional hidden Markovmodel (2D-HMM) that we proposed. Our proposed models can capture, for example, dependency among diagonal states, which can be critical in many image processing applications, for example, image segmentation. A new sets of basic image patterns are designed to enrich the variability of states, which in return largely improves the accuracy of state estimations and segmentation performance. We provide three algorithms for the training and classification of our proposed model. A new Expectation-Maximization (EM) algorithm suitable for estimation of the new model is derived, where a novel General Forward-Backward (GFB) algorithm is proposed for recursive estimation of the model parameters. A new conditional independent subset-state sequence structure decomposition of state sequences is proposed for the 2D Viterbi algorithm. Application to aerial image segmentation shows the superiority of our model compared to the existing models.

  18. Non-trivial \\theta-Vacuum Effects in the 2-d O(3) Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bögli, Michael; Pepe, Michele; Wiese, Uwe-Jens

    2011-01-01

    We study \\theta-vacua in the 2-d lattice O(3) model using the standard action and an optimized constraint action with very small cut-off effects, combined with the geometric topological charge. Remarkably, dislocation lattice artifacts do not spoil the non-trivial continuum limit at \\theta\\ non-zero, and there are different continuum theories for each value of \\theta. A very precise Monte Carlo study of the step scaling function indirectly confirms the exact S-matrix of the 2-d O(3) model at \\theta = \\pi.

  19. Implementation and validation of a 1D fluid model for collapsible channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Peter; Fels, Sidney; Green, Sheldon

    2013-11-01

    A 1D fluid model is implemented for the purpose of fluid-structure interaction (FSI) simulations in complex and completely collapsible geometries, particularly targeting the case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The fluid mechanics are solved separately from any solid mechanics, making possible the use of a highly complex and/or black-box solver for the solid mechanics. The fluid model is temporally discretized with a second-order scheme and spatially discretized with an asymmetrical fourth-order scheme that is robust in highly uneven geometries. A completely collapsing and reopening geometry is handled smoothly using a modified area function. The numerical implementation is tested with two driven-geometry cases: (1) an inviscid analytical solution and (2) a completely closing geometry with viscous flow. Three-dimensional fluid simulations in static geometries are performed to examine the assumptions of the 1D model, and with a well-defined pressure-recovery constant the 1D model agrees well with 3D models. The model is very fast computationally, is robust, and is recommended for OSA simulations where the bulk flow pressure is primarily of interest.

  20. The simulation of 3D mass models in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shaheen, Eman, E-mail: eman.shaheen@uzleuven.be; De Keyzer, Frederik; Bosmans, Hilde; Ongeval, Chantal Van [Department of Radiology, University Hospitals Leuven, Herestraat 49, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Dance, David R.; Young, Kenneth C. [National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: This work proposes a new method of building 3D breast mass models with different morphological shapes and describes the validation of the realism of their appearance after simulation into 2D digital mammograms and breast tomosynthesis images. Methods: Twenty-five contrast enhanced MRI breast lesions were collected and each mass was manually segmented in the three orthogonal views: sagittal, coronal, and transversal. The segmented models were combined, resampled to have isotropic voxel sizes, triangularly meshed, and scaled to different sizes. These masses were referred to as nonspiculated masses and were then used as nuclei onto which spicules were grown with an iterative branching algorithm forming a total of 30 spiculated masses. These 55 mass models were projected into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. The realism of the appearance of these mass models was assessed by five radiologists via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis when compared to 54 real masses. All lesions were also given a breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) score. The data sets of 2D mammography and tomosynthesis were read separately. The Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used for the interrater observer agreement assessment for the BIRADS scores per modality. Further paired analysis, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, of the BIRADS assessment between 2D and tomosynthesis was separately performed for the real masses and for the simulated masses. Results: The area under the ROC curves, averaged over all observers, was 0.54 (95% confidence interval [0.50, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.67 (95% confidence interval [0.55, 0.79]) for the tomosynthesis study. According to the BIRADS scores, the nonspiculated and the spiculated masses varied in their degrees of malignancy from normal (BIRADS 1) to highly

  1. The simulation of 3D mass models in 2D digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Eman; De Keyzer, Frederik; Bosmans, Hilde; Dance, David R; Young, Kenneth C; Van Ongeval, Chantal

    2014-08-01

    This work proposes a new method of building 3D breast mass models with different morphological shapes and describes the validation of the realism of their appearance after simulation into 2D digital mammograms and breast tomosynthesis images. Twenty-five contrast enhanced MRI breast lesions were collected and each mass was manually segmented in the three orthogonal views: sagittal, coronal, and transversal. The segmented models were combined, resampled to have isotropic voxel sizes, triangularly meshed, and scaled to different sizes. These masses were referred to as nonspiculated masses and were then used as nuclei onto which spicules were grown with an iterative branching algorithm forming a total of 30 spiculated masses. These 55 mass models were projected into 2D projection images to obtain mammograms after image processing and into tomographic sequences of projection images, which were then reconstructed to form 3D tomosynthesis datasets. The realism of the appearance of these mass models was assessed by five radiologists via receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis when compared to 54 real masses. All lesions were also given a breast imaging reporting and data system (BIRADS) score. The data sets of 2D mammography and tomosynthesis were read separately. The Kendall's coefficient of concordance was used for the interrater observer agreement assessment for the BIRADS scores per modality. Further paired analysis, using the Wilcoxon signed rank test, of the BIRADS assessment between 2D and tomosynthesis was separately performed for the real masses and for the simulated masses. The area under the ROC curves, averaged over all observers, was 0.54 (95% confidence interval [0.50, 0.66]) for the 2D study, and 0.67 (95% confidence interval [0.55, 0.79]) for the tomosynthesis study. According to the BIRADS scores, the nonspiculated and the spiculated masses varied in their degrees of malignancy from normal (BIRADS 1) to highly suggestive for malignancy (BIRADS 5

  2. Impact of high speed civil transports on stratospheric ozone. A 2-D model investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kinnison, D.E.; Connell, P.S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    This study investigates the effect on stratospheric ozone from a fleet of proposed High Speed Civil Transports (HSCTs). The new LLNL 2-D operator-split chemical-radiative-transport model of the troposphere and stratosphere is used for this HSCT investigation. This model is integrated in a diurnal manner, using an implicit numerical solver. Therefore, rate coefficients are not modified by any sort of diurnal average factor. This model also does not make any assumptions on lumping of chemical species into families. Comparisons to previous model-derived HSCT assessment of ozone change are made, both to the previous LLNL 2-D model and to other models from the international assessment modeling community. The sensitivity to the NO{sub x} emission index and sulfate surface area density is also explored. (author) 7 refs.

  3. Hemodynamic simulation of the heart using a 2D model and MR data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adeler, Pernille Thorup

    2002-01-01

    Computational models of the blood flow in the heart are a useful tool for studying the functioning of the heart. The purpose of this thesis is to achieve a better understanding of hemodynamics of the normal and diseased hearts through the use of a computational model and magnetic resonance (MR......) data. We present a 2D computational model of the blood flow in the left side of the heart. The work is based on Peskin and McQueen's 2D model dimensioned to data on the dog heart, which we improve and adjust using physiological knowledge and MR velocity data to achieve a model of the human heart...... parameter values. This is our reference model, which gives representative simulation results. We compare a simulation using our reference model with an MR velocity data set obtained from a healthy human. The comparison is carried out for the intraventricular velocity field and the velocity time curves over...

  4. A two-layer $\\alpha\\omega$ dynamo model, and its implications for 1-D dynamos

    CERN Document Server

    Roald, C B

    1999-01-01

    I will discuss an attempt at representing an interface dynamo in a simplified, essentially 1D framework. The operation of the dynamo is broken up into two 1D layers, one containing the $\\alpha$ effect and the other containing the $\\omega$ effect, and these two layers are allowed to communicate with each other by the simplest possible representation of diffusion, an analogue of Newton's law of cooling. Dynamical back-reaction of the magnetic field on them with diagrams I computed for a comparable purely 1D model. The bifurcation structure shows remarkable similarity, but a couple of subtle changes imply dramatically different physical behaviour for the model. In particular, the solar-like dynamo mode found in the 1-layer model is not stable in the 2-layer version; instead there is an (apparent) homoclinic bifurcation and a sequence of periodic, quasiperiodic, and chaotic modes. I argue that the fragility of these models makes them effectively useless as predictors or interpreters of more complex dynamos.

  5. Strict System Equivalence of 2D Linear Discrete State Space Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed S. Boudellioua

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The connection between the polynomial matrix descriptions (PMDs of the well-known regular and singular 2D linear discrete state space models is considered. It is shown that the transformation of strict system equivalence in the sense of Fuhrmann provides the basis for this connection. The exact form of the transformation is established for both the regular and singular cases.

  6. Breach modelling by overflow with TELEMAC 2D: Comparison with large-scale experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    An erosion law has been implemented in TELEMAC 2D to represent the surface erosion process to model the breach formation of a levee. We focus on homogeneous and earth fill levee to simplify this first implementation. The first part of this study reveals the ability of this method to represent simu...

  7. Parallelized CCHE2D flow model with CUDA Fortran on Graphics Process Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper presents the CCHE2D implicit flow model parallelized using CUDA Fortran programming technique on Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). A parallelized implicit Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI) solver using Parallel Cyclic Reduction (PCR) algorithm on GPU is developed and tested. This solve...

  8. Multiple Ising models coupled to 2-d gravity: a CSD analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowick, Mark; Falcioni, Marco; Harris, Geoffrey; Marinari, Enzo

    1994-04-01

    We simulate single and multiple Ising models coupled to 2-d gravity and we measure critical slowing down (CSD) with the standard methods. We find that the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff cluster algorithms do not eliminate CSD. We interpret the result as an effect of the mesh dynamics.

  9. Analysis of Korean Students' International Mobility by 2-D Model: Driving Force Factor and Directional Factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Elisa L.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the dynamics of Korean students' international mobility to study abroad by using the 2-D Model. The first D, "the driving force factor," explains how and what components of the dissatisfaction with domestic higher education perceived by Korean students drives students' outward mobility to seek…

  10. New technologies of 2-D and 3-D modeling for analysis and management of natural resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheremisina, E. N.; Lyubimova, A. V.; Kirpicheva, E. Yu.

    2016-09-01

    For ensuring technological support of research and administrative activity in the sphere of environmental management a specialized modular program complex was developed. The special attention in developing a program complex is focused to creation of convenient and effective tools for creation and visualization 2d and 3D models providing the solution of tasks of the analysis and management of natural resources.

  11. Modelling Hydrology of a Single Bioretention System with HYDRUS-1D

    OpenAIRE

    Yingying Meng; Huixiao Wang; Jiangang Chen; Shuhan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    A study was carried out on the effectiveness of bioretention systems to abate stormwater using computer simulation. The hydrologic performance was simulated for two bioretention cells using HYDRUS-1D, and the simulation results were verified by field data of nearly four years. Using the validated model, the optimization of design parameters of rainfall return period, filter media depth and type, and surface area was discussed. And the annual hydrologic performance of bioretention systems was ...

  12. Scotogenic $Z_2$ or $U(1)_D$ Model of Neutrino Mass with $\\Delta(27)$ Symmetry

    CERN Document Server

    Ma, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    The scotogenic model of radiative neutrino mass with $Z_2$ or $U(1)_D$ dark matter is shown to accommodate $\\Delta(27)$ symmetry naturally. The resulting neutrino mass matrix is identical to either of two forms, one proposed in 2006, the other in 2008. These two structures are studied in the context of present neutrino data, with predictions of $CP$ violation and neutrinoless double beta decay.

  13. 2D Modelling of Mechanical Stress Evolution and Electromigration in Confined Aluminium Interconnects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Petrescu, V.; Mouthaan, A.J.

    1997-01-01

    A complete description for mechanical stress evolution and electromigration in confined Al interconnects, taking into account the microstructure features, is presented in this paper. In the last years there were proposed several 1D models for the time-dependent evolution of the mechanical stress in

  14. Coupled BOUSS-2D and CMS-Wave Modeling Approach for Harbor Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    al. 2011; Demirbilek et al. 2007) is part of the Coastal Modeling System ( CMS ) for simulating combined waves, currents, sediment transport, and...III. 2011. Verification and Validation of the Coastal Modeling System : Report 2, CMS -Wave, Tech. Report ERDC/CHL-TR-11-10, U.S. Army Engineer R&D...ERDC/CHL CHETN-IV-84 August 2012 Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Coupled BOUSS-2D and CMS -Wave Modeling Approach for

  15. Structure of a model salt bridge in solution investigated with 2D-IR spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Huerta-Viga, Adriana; Amirjalayer, Saeed; Woutersen, Sander

    2013-01-01

    Salt bridges are known to be important for the stability of protein conformation, but up to now it has been difficult to study their geometry in solution. Here we characterize the spatial structure of a model salt bridge between guanidinium (Gdm+) and acetate (Ac-) using two-dimensional vibrational (2D-IR) spectroscopy. We find that as a result of salt bridging the infrared response of Gdm+ and Ac- change significantly, and in the 2D-IR spectrum, salt bridging of the molecules appears as cross peaks. From the 2D-IR spectrum we determine the relative orientation of the transition-dipole moments of the vibrational modes involved in the salt bridge, as well as the coupling between them. In this manner we reconstruct the geometry of the solvated salt bridge.

  16. Soil salt leaching under different irrigation regimes:HYDRUS-1D modelling and analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WenZhi ZENG; Chi XU; JingWei WU; JieSheng HUANG

    2014-01-01

    Field irrigation experiments were conducted in the Hetao Irrigation District of Inner Mongolia, China, to study the effects of irrigation regimes on salt leaching in the soil profile. The data were used to calibrate and validate the HYDRUS-1D model. The results demonstrated that the model can accurately simulate the water and salt dy-namics in the soil profile. The HYDRUS-1D model was then used to simulate 15 distinct irrigation scenarios. The results of the simulation indicated that irrigation amount did not have a significant effect on soil water storage but that increases in irrigation amount could accelerate salt leaching. However, when the irrigation amount was larger than 20 cm, the acceleration was not obvious. Compared with irrigating only once, intermittent irrigation had a better effect on increasing soil water storage and salt leaching, but excessive irrigation times and intervals did not improve salt leaching. In addition, we found that the irrigation regime of 20 cm, irrigated twice at 1-d intervals, might signifi-cantly increase salt leaching in the plough layer and decrease the risks of deep seepage and groundwater con-tamination.

  17. A novel explicit 2D+t cyclic shape model applied to echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casero, Ramón; Noble, J Alison

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel explicit 2D+t cyclic shape model that extends the Point Distribution Model (PDM) to shapes like myocardial contours with cyclic dynamics. We also propose an extension to Procrustes alignment that removes pose and subject size variability while maintaining dynamic effects. Our model draws on ideas from Principal Component Analysis (PCA), Multidimensional Scaling (MDS) and Kernel PCA (KPCA) and solves 3 shortcomings of previous implicit models: (1) cardiac cycles in the data set do not each need to have the same number of frames, (2) the required number of subjects for statistically significant results is substantially reduced and (3) the displacement of contour points incorporates time as an explicit variable. We illustrate our method by computing models of the myocardium in the 4 principal planes of 2D+t echocardiography data.

  18. Modeling Overlapping Laminations in Magnetic Core Materials Using 2-D Finite-Element Analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Bogi Bech; Guest, Emerson David; Mecrow, Barrie C.

    2015-01-01

    and a composite material is created, which has the same magnetization characteristic. The benefit of this technique is that it allows a designer to perform design and optimization of magnetic cores with overlapped laminations using a 2-D FE model rather than a 3-D FE model, which saves modeling and simulation...... time. The modeling technique is verified experimentally by creating a composite material of a lap joint with a 3-mm overlapping region and using it in a 2-D FE model of a ring sample made up of a stack of 20 laminations. The B-H curve of the simulated ring sample is compared with the B-H curve obtained...

  19. 1D-Var temperature retrievals from microwave radiometer and convective scale model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pauline Martinet

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies the potential of ground-based microwave radiometers (MWR for providing accurate temperature retrievals by combining convective scale numerical models and brightness temperatures (BTs. A one-dimensional variational (1D-Var retrieval technique has been tested to optimally combine MWR and 3-h forecasts from the French convective scale model AROME. A microwave profiler HATPRO (Humidity and Temperature PROfiler was operated during 6 months at the meteorological station of Bordeaux (Météo France. MWR BTs were monitored against simulations from the Atmospheric Radiative Transfer Simulator 2 radiative transfer model. An overall good agreement was found between observations and simulations for opaque V-band channels but large errors were observed for channels the most affected by liquid water and water vapour emissions (51.26 and 52.28 GHz. 1D-Var temperature retrievals are performed in clear-sky and cloudy conditions using a screening procedure based on cloud base height retrieval from ceilometer observations, infrared radiometer temperature and liquid water path derived from the MWR observations. The 1D-Var retrievals were found to improve the AROME forecasts up to 2 km with a maximum gain of approximately 50 % in root-mean-square-errors (RMSE below 500 m. They were also found to outperform neural network retrievals. A static bias correction was proposed to account for systematic instrumental errors. This correction was found to have a negligible impact on the 1D-Var retrievals. The use of low elevation angles improves the retrievals up to 12 % in RMSE in cloudy-sky in the first layers. The present implementation achieved a RMSE with respect to radiosondes within 1 K in clear-sky and 1.3 K in cloudy-sky conditions for temperature.

  20. MAST-1D, a Model to Route Sediment and Tracers in Channel-Floodplain Complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viparelli, E.; Lauer, J. W.; Belmont, P.

    2014-12-01

    Sediment exchange between the channel and floodplain can occur via meander migration, overbank deposition or erosion, and channel widening or narrowing. Depending on channel and floodplain history, floodplains can act either as sources or sinks of bed material and/or wash load. The Morphodynamics And Sediment Tracers in 1D program (MAST-1D) is a numerical model built to describe grain size specific transport of sediment and tracers and the long-term - i.e. decadal and longer - evolution of channel floodplain complexes. MAST-1D differs from other 1D numerical models because it allows for 1) uneven exchange of sediment and tracers between the river channel and the floodplain, 2) temporal changes in channel geometry, bed elevation and floodplain thickness, which result in changes in the channel hydraulic capacity, and 3) temporal changes of size distribution and tracer content in the floodplain, in the load and in the underlying substrate. Under conditions of constant base level, water and sediment supply, the main assumptions in the model result in the system evolving asymptotically toward a steady state wherein channel bed erosion is balanced by channel bed deposition. When at this condition, the amount of sediment deposited on the floodplain through point bar deposition and overbank sedimentation is balanced by the erosion of sediment from the floodplain through lateral migration. However, imbalances in floodplain storage can persist for many years even when the channel bed elevation and size distribution are near steady state. The MAST-1D program is applied to study the long term response of a sand bed river, an 80 km long reach of the Minnesota River between Mankato and Jordan, Minnesota, to changes in flow regime and the sediment load due to the development of intensive agriculture in the watershed. The simulations are performed in successive phases, the model is first set up so that under the best estimates available for pre-agriculture conditions, channel

  1. A SPLIT-CHARACTERISTIC FINITE ELEMENT MODEL FOR 1-D UNSTEADY FLOWS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Yi-lin; TANG Hong-wu; LIU Xiao-hua

    2007-01-01

    An efficient and accurate solution algorithm was proposed for 1-D unsteady flow problems widely existing in hydraulic engineering. Based on the split-characteristic finite element method, the numerical model with the Saint-Venant equations of 1-D unsteady flows was established. The assembled finite element equations were solved with the tri-diagonal matrix algorithm. In the semi-implicit and explicit scheme, the critical time step of the method was dependent on the space step and flow velocity, not on the wave celerity. The method was used to eliminate the restriction due to the wave celerity for the computational analysis of unsteady open-channel flows. The model was verified by the experimental data and theoretical solution and also applied to the simulation of the flow in practical river networks. It shows that the numerical method has high efficiency and accuracy and can be used to simulate 1-D steady flows, and unsteady flows with shock waves or flood waves. Compared with other numerical methods, the algorithm of this method is simpler with higher accuracy, less dissipation, higher computation efficiency and less computer storage.

  2. Approximate 2D inversion of airborne TEM data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, N.B.; Wolfgram, Peter

    2006-01-01

    We propose an approximate two-dimensional inversion procedure for transient electromagnetic data. The method is a two-stage procedure, where data are first inverted with 1D multi-layer models. The 1D model section is then considered as data for the next inversion stage that produces the 2D model...

  3. Verification and comparison of four numerical schemes for a 1D viscoelastic blood flow model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofei; Fullana, Jose-Maria; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    2015-01-01

    A reliable and fast numerical scheme is crucial for the 1D simulation of blood flow in compliant vessels. In this paper, a 1D blood flow model is incorporated with a Kelvin-Voigt viscoelastic arterial wall. This leads to a nonlinear hyperbolic-parabolic system, which is then solved with four numerical schemes, namely: MacCormack, Taylor-Galerkin, monotonic upwind scheme for conservation law and local discontinuous Galerkin. The numerical schemes are tested on a single vessel, a simple bifurcation and a network with 55 arteries. The numerical solutions are checked favorably against analytical, semi-analytical solutions or clinical observations. Among the numerical schemes, comparisons are made in four important aspects: accuracy, ability to capture shock-like phenomena, computational speed and implementation complexity. The suitable conditions for the application of each scheme are discussed.

  4. Reliability analysis of diesel engine crankshaft based on 2D stress strength interference model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A 2D stress strength interference model (2D-SSIM) considering that the fatigue reliability of engineering structural components has close relationship to load asymmetric ratio and its variability to some extent is put forward. The principle, geometric schematic and limit state equation of this model are presented. Reliability evaluation for a kind of diesel engine crankshaft was made based on this theory, in which multi-axial loading fatigue criteria was employed. Because more important factors, i.e.stress asymmetric ratio and its variability, are considered, it theoretically can make more accurate evaluation for structural component reliability than the traditional interference model. Correspondingly, a Monte-Carlo Method simulation solution is also given. The computation suggests that this model can yield satisfactory reliability evaluation.

  5. Reliability of a Novel Model for Drug Release from 2D HPMC-Matrices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rumiana Blagoeva

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available A novel model of drug release from 2D-HPMC matrices is considered. Detailed mathematical description of matrix swelling and the effect of the initial drug loading are introduced. A numerical approach to solution of the posed nonlinear 2D problem is used on the basis of finite element domain approximation and time difference method. The reliability of the model is investigated in two steps: numerical evaluation of the water uptake parameters; evaluation of drug release parameters under available experimental data. The proposed numerical procedure for fitting the model is validated performing different numerical examples of drug release in two cases (with and without taking into account initial drug loading. The goodness of fit evaluated by the coefficient of determination is presented to be very good with few exceptions. The obtained results show better model fitting when accounting the effect of initial drug loading (especially for larger values.

  6. Simplified 2D Bidomain Model of Whole Heart Electrical Activity and ECG Generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovilj, Siniša; Magjarević, Ratko; Abed, Amr Al; Lovell, Nigel H.; Dokos, Socrates

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this study was the development of a geometrically simple and highly computationally-efficient two dimensional (2D) biophysical model of whole heart electrical activity, incorporating spontaneous activation of the sinoatrial node (SAN), the specialized conduction system, and realistic surface ECG morphology computed on the torso. The FitzHugh-Nagumo (FHN) equations were incorporated into a bidomain finite element model of cardiac electrical activity, which was comprised of a simplified geometry of the whole heart with the blood cavities, the lungs and the torso as an extracellular volume conductor. To model the ECG, we placed four electrodes on the surface of the torso to simulate three Einthoven leads VI, VII and VIII from the standard 12-lead system. The 2D model was able to reconstruct ECG morphology on the torso from action potentials generated at various regions of the heart, including the sinoatrial node, atria, atrioventricular node, His bundle, bundle branches, Purkinje fibers, and ventricles. Our 2D cardiac model offers a good compromise between computational load and model complexity, and can be used as a first step towards three dimensional (3D) ECG models with more complex, precise and accurate geometry of anatomical structures, to investigate the effect of various cardiac electrophysiological parameters on ECG morphology.

  7. Ice shelf flexures modeled with a 2-D elastic flow line model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. V. Konovalov

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ice shelf flexures modeling was performed using a 2-D finite-difference elastic model, which takes into account sub-ice-shelf sea water flow. The sub-ice water flow was described by the wave equation for the sub-ice-shelf pressure perturbations (Holdsworth and Glynn, 1978. In the model ice shelf flexures result from variations in ocean pressure due to changes in prescribed sea levels. The numerical experiments were performed for a flow line down one of the fast flowing ice streams of the Academy of Sciences Ice Cap. The profile includes a part of the adjacent ice shelf. The numerical experiments were carried out for harmonic incoming pressure perturbations P' and the ice shelf flexures were obtained for a wide spectrum of the pressure perturbations frequencies, ranging from tidal periods down to periods of a few seconds (0.004..0.02 Hz. The amplitudes of the ice shelf deflections obtained by the model achieve a maxima at about T ≈ 165 s in concordance with previous investigations of the impact of waves on Antarctic ice shelves (Bromirski et al., 2010. The explanation of the effect is found in the solution of the corresponding eigenvalue problem revealing the existence of a resonance at these high frequencies.

  8. A Bayesian model for classifying all differentially expressed proteins simultaneously in 2D PAGE gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Steven H

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D PAGE is commonly used to identify differentially expressed proteins under two or more experimental or observational conditions. Wu et al (2009 developed a univariate probabilistic model which was used to identify differential expression between Case and Control groups, by applying a Likelihood Ratio Test (LRT to each protein on a 2D PAGE. In contrast to commonly used statistical approaches, this model takes into account the two possible causes of missing values in 2D PAGE: either (1 the non-expression of a protein; or (2 a level of expression that falls below the limit of detection. Results We develop a global Bayesian model which extends the previously described model. Unlike the univariate approach, the model reported here is able treat all differentially expressed proteins simultaneously. Whereas each protein is modelled by the univariate likelihood function previously described, several global distributions are used to model the underlying relationship between the parameters associated with individual proteins. These global distributions are able to combine information from each protein to give more accurate estimates of the true parameters. In our implementation of the procedure, all parameters are recovered by Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC integration. The 95% highest posterior density (HPD intervals for the marginal posterior distributions are used to determine whether differences in protein expression are due to differences in mean expression intensities, and/or differences in the probabilities of expression. Conclusions Simulation analyses showed that the global model is able to accurately recover the underlying global distributions, and identify more differentially expressed proteins than the simple application of a LRT. Additionally, simulations also indicate that the probability of incorrectly identifying a protein as differentially expressed (i.e., the False

  9. Comparison between 2D and 3D Modelling of Induction Machine Using Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelmira Ferkova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper compares two different ways (2D and 3D of modelling of two-phase squirrel-cage induction machine using the finite element method (FEM. It focuses mainly on differences between starting characteristics given from both types of the model. It also discusses influence of skew rotor slots on harmonic content in air gap flux density and summarizes some issues of both approaches.

  10. Evaluation of Fish Passage at Whitewater Parks Using 2D and 3D Hydraulic Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardee, T.; Nelson, P. A.; Kondratieff, M.; Bledsoe, B. P.

    2016-12-01

    In-stream whitewater parks (WWPs) are increasingly popular recreational amenities that typically create waves by constricting flow through a chute to increase velocities and form a hydraulic jump. However, the hydraulic conditions these structures create can limit longitudinal habitat connectivity and potentially inhibit upstream fish migration, especially of native fishes. An improved understanding of the fundamental hydraulic processes and potential environmental effects of whitewater parks is needed to inform management decisions about Recreational In-Channel Diversions (RICDs). Here, we use hydraulic models to compute a continuous and spatially explicit description of velocity and depth along potential fish swimming paths in the flow field, and the ensemble of potential paths are compared to fish swimming performance data to predict fish passage via logistic regression analysis. While 3d models have been shown to accurately predict trout movement through WWP structures, 2d methods can provide a more cost-effective and manager-friendly approach to assessing the effects of similar hydraulic structures on fish passage when 3d analysis in not feasible. Here, we use 2d models to examine the hydraulics in several WWP structures on the North Fork of the St. Vrain River at Lyons, Colorado, and we compare these model results to fish passage predictions from a 3d model. Our analysis establishes a foundation for a practical, transferable and physically-rigorous 2d modeling approach for mechanistically evaluating the effects of hydraulic structures on fish passage.

  11. Complex-Temperature Phase Diagrams of 1D Spin Models with Next-Nearest-Neighbor Couplings

    OpenAIRE

    1997-01-01

    We study the dependence of complex-temperature phase diagrams on details of the Hamiltonian, focusing on the effect of non-nearest-neighbor spin-spin couplings. For this purpose, we consider a simple exactly solvable model, the 1D Ising model with nearest-neighbor (NN) and next-to-nearest-neighbor (NNN) couplings. We work out the exact phase diagrams for various values of $J_{nnn}/J_{nn}$ and compare these with the case of pure nearest-neighbor (NN) couplings. We also give some similar result...

  12. 1D-3D Hybrid Modelling - From Multi-Compartment Models to Full Resolution Models in Space and Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephan eGrein

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of cellular and network dynamics in the brain by means of modeling & simulation has evolved into a highly interdisciplinary field, that uses sophisticated modeling & simulation approaches to understand distinct areas of brain function. Depending on the underlying complexity, these models vary in level of detail to cope with the attached computational cost. Hence for large network simulations, single neurons are typically reduced to time-dependent signal processors, dismissing spatial aspects of the cells. For single cell or small-world networks, general purpose simulators allow for space and time-dependent simulations of electrical signal processing, based on the cable equation theory. An emerging field in Computational Neuroscience encompasses a new level of detail by incorporating the 3D morphology of cells and organelles into 3D space and time-dependent simulations. Every approach has its advantages and limitations, such as computational cost, integrated and methods-spanning simulation approaches, depending on the network size could establish new ways to investigate the brain. We present a hybrid simulation approach, that makes use of reduced 1D-models using e.g. the NEURON which couples to fully resolved models for simulating cellular and sub-cellular dynamics, including the detailed 3D-morphology of neurons and organelles. To couple 1D- & 3D-simulations, we present a geometry and membrane potential mapping framework, with which graph-based morphologies, e.g. in swc-/hoc-format, are mapped to full surface and volume representations of the neuron; membrane potential data from 1D-simulations are used as boundary conditions for full 3D simulations. Thus, established models and data, based on general purpose 1D-simulators, can be directly coupled to the emerging field of fully resolved highly detailed 3D-modeling approaches. The new framework is applied to investigate electrically active neurons and their intracellular spatio

  13. Observation and simulation of heterogeneous 2D water and solute flow processes in ditch beds for subsequent catchment modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dages, Cecile; Samouelian, Anatja; Lanoix, Marthe; Dollinger, Jeanne; Chakkour, Sara; Chovelon, Gabrielle; Trabelsi, Khouloud; Voltz, Marc

    2015-04-01

    Ditches are involved in the transfer of pesticide to surface and groundwaters (e.g. Louchart et al., 2001). Soil horizons underlying ditch beds may present specific soil characteristics compared to neighbouring field soils due to erosion/deposition processes, to the specific biological activities (rooting dynamic and animal habitat) in the ditches (e.g. Vaughan et al., 2008) and to management practices (burning, dredging, mowing,...). Moreover, in contrast to percolation processes in field soils that can be assumed to be mainly 1D vertical, those occurring in the ditch beds are by essence 2D or even 3D. Nevertheless, due to a lake of knowledge, these specific aspects of transfer within ditch beds are generally omitted for hydrological simulation at the catchment scale (Mottes et al., 2014). Accordingly, the aims of this study were i) to characterize subsurface solute transfer through ditch beds and ii) to determine equivalent hydraulic parameters of the ditch beds for use in catchment scale hydrological simulations. A complementary aim was to evaluate the error in predictions performed when percolation in ditches is assumed to be similar to that in the neighbouring field soil. First, bromide transfer experiments were performed on undisturbed soil column (15 cm long with a 15 cm inner-diameter), horizontally and vertically sampled within each soil horizon underlying a ditch bed and within the neighboring field. Columns were sampled at the Roujan catchment (Hérault, France), which belongs to the long term Mediterranean hydrological observatory OMERE (Voltz and Albergel, 2002). Second, for each column, a set of parameters was determined by inverse optimization with mobile-immobile or dual permeability models, with CXTFIT (Toride et al., 1999) or with HYDRUS (Simunek et al., 1998). Third, infiltration and percolation in the ditch was simulated by a 2D flow domain approach considering the 2D variation in hydraulic properties of the cross section of a ditch bed. Last

  14. 3D Modeling of Transformer Substation Based on Mapping and 2D Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Sun

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method for building 3D models of transformer substation based on mapping and 2D images is proposed in this paper. This method segments objects of equipment in 2D images by using k-means algorithm in determining the cluster centers dynamically to segment different shapes and then extracts feature parameters from the divided objects by using FFT and retrieves the similar objects from 3D databases and then builds 3D models by computing the mapping data. The method proposed in this paper can avoid the complex data collection and big workload by using 3D laser scanner. The example analysis shows the method can build coarse 3D models efficiently which can meet the requirements for hazardous area classification and constructions representations of transformer substation.

  15. Mechanical Modelling of Pultrusion Process: 2D and 3D Numerical Approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baran, Ismet; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Akkerman, Remko

    2015-01-01

    The process induced variations such as residual stresses and distortions are a critical issue in pultrusion, since they affect the structural behavior as well as the mechanical properties and geometrical precision of the final product. In order to capture and investigate these variations......, a mechanical analysis should be performed. In the present work, the two dimensional (2D) quasi-static plane strain mechanical model for the pultrusion of a thick square profile developed by the authors is further improved using generalized plane strain elements. In addition to that, a more advanced 3D thermo......-chemical-mechanical analysis is carried out using 3D quadratic elements which is a novel application for the numerical modelling of the pultrusion process. It is found that the 2D mechanical models give relatively reasonable and accurate stress and displacement evolutions in the transverse direction as compared to the 3D...

  16. Numerical Modeling of Imploding Plasma liners Using the 1D Radiation-Hydrodynamics Code HELIOS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, J. S.; Hanna, D. S.; Awe, T. J.; Hsu, S. C.; Stanic, M.; Cassibry, J. T.; Macfarlane, J. J.

    2010-11-01

    The Plasma Liner Experiment (PLX) is attempting to form imploding plasma liners to reach 0.1 Mbar upon stagnation, via 30--60 spherically convergent plasma jets. PLX is partly motivated by the desire to develop a standoff driver for magneto-inertial fusion. The liner density, atomic makeup, and implosion velocity will help determine the maximum pressure that can be achieved. This work focuses on exploring the effects of atomic physics and radiation on the 1D liner implosion and stagnation dynamics. For this reason, we are using Prism Computational Science's 1D Lagrangian rad-hydro code HELIOS, which has both equation of state (EOS) table-lookup and detailed configuration accounting (DCA) atomic physics modeling. By comparing a series of PLX-relevant cases proceeding from ideal gas, to EOS tables, to DCA treatments, we aim to identify how and when atomic physics effects are important for determining the peak achievable stagnation pressures. In addition, we present verification test results as well as brief comparisons to results obtained with RAVEN (1D radiation-MHD) and SPHC (smoothed particle hydrodynamics).

  17. Modeling of subsurface structures in Telomoyo Volcano geothermal area, Magelang using 1-D magnetotelluric method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarjan, Achmad Fajar Narotama; Niasari, Sintia Windhi

    2017-07-01

    There are some of geothermal prospects around Java Island. One of them are located in Telomoyo Volcano area, Magelang, Central Java. The existence of hot spring manifestations in Telomoyo Volcano area shows the presence of geothermal system. The upflow zone of this geothermal system was formed in the caldera of Telomoyo Volcano area, while the outflow zone was formed around Candi Umbul. In addition, from the geological map shows a geological structure assumed as a normal fault with southwest-northeast orientation that was caused by the volcanic activity. The aim of this research is to give a brief introduction about subsurface resistivity beneath Telomoyo Volcano area using 1-D magnetotelluric forward model. Thus, we can determine the possibility of data that will obtained during the acquisition process based on the geological model that was made. The apparent resistivity, phase, and period values were obtained from the forward modeling process. The result from this study is a 1-D resistivity section with synthetics curves of each geothermal model. In each model the presence of clay cap characterized by a low resistivity layer. A layer below the clay cap with a medium resistivity value interpreted as the reservoir of this geothermal system. The heat source of this geothermal area is characterized by a low resistivity that is located at depth 4000-5500m. This study is still in progress to acquire the exact values of resistivity from each layer from the field data acquisition in Telomoyo Volcano area, Magelang.

  18. TRENT2D WG: a smart web infrastructure for debris-flow modelling and hazard assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zorzi, Nadia; Rosatti, Giorgio; Zugliani, Daniel; Rizzi, Alessandro; Piffer, Stefano

    2016-04-01

    Mountain regions are naturally exposed to geomorphic flows, which involve large amounts of sediments and induce significant morphological modifications. The physical complexity of this class of phenomena represents a challenging issue for modelling, leading to elaborate theoretical frameworks and sophisticated numerical techniques. In general, geomorphic-flows models proved to be valid tools in hazard assessment and management. However, model complexity seems to represent one of the main obstacles to the diffusion of advanced modelling tools between practitioners and stakeholders, although the UE Flood Directive (2007/60/EC) requires risk management and assessment to be based on "best practices and best available technologies". Furthermore, several cutting-edge models are not particularly user-friendly and multiple stand-alone software are needed to pre- and post-process modelling data. For all these reasons, users often resort to quicker and rougher approaches, leading possibly to unreliable results. Therefore, some effort seems to be necessary to overcome these drawbacks, with the purpose of supporting and encouraging a widespread diffusion of the most reliable, although sophisticated, modelling tools. With this aim, this work presents TRENT2D WG, a new smart modelling solution for the state-of-the-art model TRENT2D (Armanini et al., 2009, Rosatti and Begnudelli, 2013), which simulates debris flows and hyperconcentrated flows adopting a two-phase description over a mobile bed. TRENT2D WG is a web infrastructure joining advantages offered by the software-delivering model SaaS (Software as a Service) and by WebGIS technology and hosting a complete and user-friendly working environment for modelling. In order to develop TRENT2D WG, the model TRENT2D was converted into a service and exposed on a cloud server, transferring computational burdens from the user hardware to a high-performing server and reducing computational time. Then, the system was equipped with an

  19. A Convective Vorticity Vector Associated With Tropical Convection: A 2D Cloud-Resolving Modeling Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Shou-Ting; Ping, Fan; Li, Xiao-Fan; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2004-01-01

    Although dry/moist potential vorticity is a useful physical quantity for meteorological analysis, it cannot be applied to the analysis of 2D simulations. A convective vorticity vector (CVV) is introduced in this study to analyze 2D cloud-resolving simulation data associated with 2D tropical convection. The cloud model is forced by the vertical velocity, zonal wind, horizontal advection, and sea surface temperature obtained from the TOGA COARE, and is integrated for a selected 10-day period. The CVV has zonal and vertical components in the 2D x-z frame. Analysis of zonally-averaged and mass-integrated quantities shows that the correlation coefficient between the vertical component of the CVV and the sum of the cloud hydrometeor mixing ratios is 0.81, whereas the correlation coefficient between the zonal component and the sum of the mixing ratios is only 0.18. This indicates that the vertical component of the CVV is closely associated with tropical convection. The tendency equation for the vertical component of the CVV is derived and the zonally-averaged and mass-integrated tendency budgets are analyzed. The tendency of the vertical component of the CVV is determined by the interaction between the vorticity and the zonal gradient of cloud heating. The results demonstrate that the vertical component of the CVV is a cloud-linked parameter and can be used to study tropical convection.

  20. Nanoelectronic Modeling (NEMO): Moving from commercial grade 1-D simulation to prototype 3-D simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimeck, Gerhard

    2001-03-01

    The quantum mechanical functionality of commercially pursued heterostructure devices such as resonant tunneling diodes (RTDs), quantum well infrared photodetectors, and quantum well lasers are enabled by material variations on an atomic scale. The creation of these heterostructure devices is realized in a vast design space of material compositions, layer thicknesses and doping profiles. The full experimental exploration of this design space is unfeasible and a reliable design tool is needed. The Nanoelectronic Modeling tool (NEMO) is one of the first commercial grade attempts for such a modeling tool. NEMO was developed as a general-purpose quantum mechanics-based 1-D device design and analysis tool from 1993-97 by the Central Research Laboratory of Texas Instruments (later Raytheon Systems). NEMO enables(R. Lake, G. Klimeck, R. C. Bowen, and D. Jovanovic, J. Appl. Phys. 81), 7845 (1997). the fundamentally sound inclusion of the required(G. Klimeck et al.), in the 1997 55th Annual Device Research Conference Digest, (IEEE, NJ, 1997), p. 92^,(R. C. Bowen et al.), J. Appl. Phys 81, 3207 (1997). physics: bandstructure, scattering, and charge self-consistency based on the non-equilibrium Green function approach. A new class of devices which require full 3-D quantum mechanics based models is starting to emerge: quantum dots, or in general semiconductor based deca-nano devices. We are currently building a 3-D modeling tool based on NEMO to include the important physics to understand electronic stated in such superscaled structures. This presentation will overview various facets of the NEMO 1-D tool such electron transport physics in RTDs, numerical technology, software engineering and graphical user interface. The lessons learned from that work are now entering the NEMO 3-D development and first results using the NEMO 3-D prototype will be shown. More information about the publically available NEMO 1-D executables can be found at http://hpc.jpl.nasa.gov/ PEP/gekco/nemo

  1. Parameterising root system growth models using 2D neutron radiography images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnepf, Andrea; Felderer, Bernd; Vontobel, Peter; Leitner, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Root architecture is a key factor for plant acquisition of water and nutrients from soil. In particular in view of a second green revolution where the below ground parts of agricultural crops are important, it is essential to characterise and quantify root architecture and its effect on plant resource acquisition. Mathematical models can help to understand the processes occurring in the soil-plant system, they can be used to quantify the effect of root and rhizosphere traits on resource acquisition and the response to environmental conditions. In order to do so, root architectural models are coupled with a model of water and solute transport in soil. However, dynamic root architectural models are difficult to parameterise. Novel imaging techniques such as x-ray computed tomography, neutron radiography and magnetic resonance imaging enable the in situ visualisation of plant root systems. Therefore, these images facilitate the parameterisation of dynamic root architecture models. These imaging techniques are capable of producing 3D or 2D images. Moreover, 2D images are also available in the form of hand drawings or from images of standard cameras. While full 3D imaging tools are still limited in resolutions, 2D techniques are a more accurate and less expensive option for observing roots in their environment. However, analysis of 2D images has additional difficulties compared to the 3D case, because of overlapping roots. We present a novel algorithm for the parameterisation of root system growth models based on 2D images of root system. The algorithm analyses dynamic image data. These are a series of 2D images of the root system at different points in time. Image data has already been adjusted for missing links and artefacts and segmentation was performed by applying a matched filter response. From this time series of binary 2D images, we parameterise the dynamic root architecture model in the following way: First, a morphological skeleton is derived from the binary

  2. Characteristic polynomial assignment in F-M model Ⅱ of 2-D systems

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐万生; 亢京力

    2004-01-01

    The problems of characteristic polynomial assignment in Fornasini-Marchesini (F-M) model Ⅱ of 2-D systems are investigated. The corresponding closed-loop systems described by F-M model Ⅱ are obtained via the state feedback.Using the algebraic geometry method, the characteristic polynomial assignment in the closed-loop systems is discussed. In terms of the theory of algebraic geometry, the problem of characteristic polynomial assignment is transferred to the one whether a rational mapping is onto. Sufficient conditions for almost arbitrary assignment coefficients of characteristic polynomial in F-M model Ⅱ of 2-D systems via state feedback are derived, and they are available for multi-input cases. It also has been shown that this method can be applied to assign the characteristic polynomial with output feedback. The sufficient conditions for almost arbitrary assignment coefficients of characteristic polynomial of multi-input 2-D systems described by F-M model Ⅱ with output feedback are established.

  3. Laser irradiated fluorescent perfluorocarbon microparticles in 2-D and 3-D breast cancer cell models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chengcheng; Wang, Long; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Yan; Hu, Yihe; Peng, Qinghai

    2017-03-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) droplets were studied as new generation ultrasound contrast agents via acoustic or optical droplet vaporization (ADV or ODV). Little is known about the ODV irradiated vaporization mechanisms of PFC-microparticle complexs and the stability of the new bubbles produced. In this study, fluorescent perfluorohexane (PFH) poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles were used as a model to study the process of particle vaporization and bubble stability following excitation in two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cell models. We observed localization of the fluorescent agent on the microparticle coating material initially and after vaporization under fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, the stability and growth dynamics of the newly created bubbles were observed for 11 min following vaporization. The particles were co-cultured with 2-D cells to form 3-D spheroids and could be vaporized even when encapsulated within the spheroids via laser irradiation, which provides an effective basis for further work.

  4. Study of theta-Vacua in the 2-d O(3) Model

    CERN Document Server

    Bögli, Michael; Pepe, Michele; Wiese, Uwe-Jens

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the continuum limit of the step scaling function in the 2-d O(3) model with different theta-vacua. Since we find a different continuum value of the step scaling function for each value of theta, we can conclude that theta indeed is a relevant parameter of the theory and does not get renormalized non-perturbatively. Furthermore, we confirm the result of the conjectured exact S-matrix theory, which predicts the continuum value at theta = pi. To obtain high precision data, we use a modified Hasenbusch improved estimator and an action with an optimized constraint, which has very small cut-off effects. The optimized constraint action combines the standard action of the 2-d O(3) model with a topological action. The topological action constrains the angle between neighboring spins and is therefore invariant against small deformations of the field.

  5. Hybrid 2D-3D modelling of GTA welding with filler wire addition

    KAUST Repository

    Traidia, Abderrazak

    2012-07-01

    A hybrid 2D-3D model for the numerical simulation of Gas Tungsten Arc welding is proposed in this paper. It offers the possibility to predict the temperature field as well as the shape of the solidified weld joint for different operating parameters, with relatively good accuracy and reasonable computational cost. Also, an original approach to simulate the effect of immersing a cold filler wire in the weld pool is presented. The simulation results reveal two important observations. First, the weld pool depth is locally decreased in the presence of filler metal, which is due to the energy absorption by the cold feeding wire from the hot molten pool. In addition, the weld shape, maximum temperature and thermal cycles in the workpiece are relatively well predicted even when a 2D model for the arc plasma region is used. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Neural-FEM tool for the 2-D magnetic hysteresis modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cardelli, E. [University of Perugia, Department of Engineering, Via G. Duranti 93, 06125 Perugia (Italy); Faba, A., E-mail: antonio.faba@unipg.it [University of Perugia, Department of Engineering, Via G. Duranti 93, 06125 Perugia (Italy); Laudani, A.; Lozito, G.M.; Riganti Fulginei, F.; Salvini, A. [Department of Engineering, Roma Tre University, Via V. Volterra 62, 00146 Rome (Italy)

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this work is to present a new tool for the analysis of magnetic field problems considering 2-D magnetic hysteresis. In particular, this tool makes use of the Finite Element Method to solve the magnetic field problem in real device, and fruitfully exploits a neural network (NN) for the modeling of 2-D magnetic hysteresis of materials. The NS has as input the magnetic inductions components B at the k-th simulation step and returns as output the corresponding values of the magnetic field H corresponding to the input pattern. It is trained by vector measurements performed on the magnetic material to be modeled. This input/output scheme is directly implemented in a FEM code employing the magnetic potential vector A formulation. Validations through measurements on a real device have been performed.

  7. 2D edge plasma modeling extended up to the main chamber

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dekeyser, W., E-mail: wouter.dekeyser@mech.kuleuven.be [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 300A, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Baelmans, M. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 300A, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Reiter, D.; Boerner, P.; Kotov, V. [Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH, EURATOM-Association, Trilateral Euregio Cluster, D-52425 Juelich (Germany)

    2011-08-01

    Far SOL plasma flow, and hence main chamber recycling and plasma surface interaction, are today still only very poorly described by current 2D fluid edge codes, such as B2, UEDGE or EDGE2D, due to a common technical limitation. We have extended the B2 plasma fluid solver in the current ITER version of B2-EIRENE (SOLPS4.3) to allow plasma solutions to be obtained up to the 'real vessel wall', at least on the basis of ad hoc far SOL transport models. We apply here the kinetic Monte Carlo Code EIRENE on such plasma solutions to study effects of this model refinement on main chamber fluxes and sputtering, for an ITER configuration. We show that main chamber sputtering may be significantly modified both due to thermalization of CX neutrals in the far SOL and poloidally highly asymmetric plasma wall contact, as compared to hitherto applied teleportation of particle fluxes across this domain.

  8. Modeling Root Growth, Crop Growth and N Uptake of Winter Wheat Based on SWMS_2D: Model and Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejun Yang

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Simulations for root growth, crop growth, and N uptake in agro-hydrological models are of significant concern to researchers. SWMS_2D is one of the most widely used physical hydrologically related models. This model solves equations that govern soil-water movement by the finite element method, and has a public access source code. Incorporating key agricultural components into the SWMS_2D model is of practical importance, especially for modeling some critical cereal crops such as winter wheat. We added root growth, crop growth, and N uptake modules into SWMS_2D. The root growth model had two sub-models, one for root penetration and the other for root length distribution. The crop growth model used was adapted from EU-ROTATE_N, linked to the N uptake model. Soil-water limitation, nitrogen limitation, and temperature effects were all considered in dry-weight modeling. Field experiments for winter wheat in Bouwing, the Netherlands, in 1983-1984 were selected for validation. Good agreements were achieved between simulations and measurements, including soil water content at different depths, normalized root length distribution, dry weight and nitrogen uptake. This indicated that the proposed new modules used in the SWMS_2D model are robust and reliable. In the future, more rigorous validation should be carried out, ideally under 2D situations, and attention should be paid to improve some modules, including the module simulating soil N mineralization.

  9. Anisotropy effects and friction maps in the framework of the 2d PT model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fajardo, O.Y. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón and Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Gnecco, E. [Instituto Madrileño de Estudios Avanzados, IMDEA Nanociencia, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Mazo, J.J., E-mail: juanjo@unizar.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Aragón and Departamento de Física de la Materia Condensada, CSIC-Universidad de Zaragoza, E-50009 Zaragoza (Spain)

    2014-12-15

    We present a series of numerical simulations on the friction–anisotropy behavior and stick–slip dynamics of a point mass in the framework of a 2d Prandtl–Tomlinson model. Results for three representative surface lattice are shown: square, hexagonal and honeycomb. Curves for scan angle dependence of static friction force, and kinetic one at T=0 K and T=300 K are shown. Friction force maps are computed at different directions.

  10. Size distribution of islands according to 2D growth model with 2 kinds of diffusion atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Yamauchi, R; Koyama, M; Sasakura, H; Nakata, Y; Muto, S

    2015-01-01

    We simulated the growth of 2D islands with 2 kinds of diffusion atoms using the kinetic Monte- Carlo (kMC) method. As a result, we found that the slow atoms tend to create nuclei and determine the island volume distribution, along with additional properties such as island density. We also conducted a theoretical analysis using the rate equation of the point-island model to confirm these results.

  11. Snapshot Observation for 2D Classical Lattice Models by Corner Transfer Matrix Renormalization Group

    OpenAIRE

    Ueda, K.; Otani, R.; Nishio, Y; Gendiar, A.; Nishino, T

    2004-01-01

    We report a way of obtaining a spin configuration snapshot, which is one of the representative spin configurations in canonical ensemble, in a finite area of infinite size two-dimensional (2D) classical lattice models. The corner transfer matrix renormalization group (CTMRG), a variant of the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG), is used for the numerical calculation. The matrix product structure of the variational state in CTMRG makes it possible to stochastically fix spins each by ea...

  12. Critical slowing down of cluster algorithms for Ising models coupled to 2-d gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowick, Mark; Falcioni, Marco; Harris, Geoffrey; Marinari, Enzo

    1994-02-01

    We simulate single and multiple Ising models coupled to 2-d gravity using both the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff algorithms to update the spins. We study the integrated autocorrelation time and find that there is considerable critical slowing down, particularly in the magnetization. We argue that this is primarily due to the local nature of the dynamical triangulation algorithm and to the generation of a distribution of baby universes which inhibits cluster growth.

  13. Critical Slowing Down of Cluster Algorithms for Ising Models Coupled to 2-d Gravity

    CERN Document Server

    Bowick, M; Harris, G; Marinari, E

    1994-01-01

    We simulate single and multiple Ising models coupled to 2-d gravity using both the Swendsen-Wang and Wolff algorithms to update the spins. We study the integrated autocorrelation time and find that there is considerable critical slowing down, particularly in the magnetization. We argue that this is primarily due to the local nature of the dynamical triangulation algorithm and to the generation of a distribution of baby universes which inhibits cluster growth.

  14. Simulations of Edge Effect in 1D Spin Crossover Compounds by Atom-Phonon Coupling Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, J.; Chiruta, D.; Jureschi, C. M.; Alayli, Y.; Turcu, C. O.; Dahoo, P. R.

    2016-08-01

    We used the atom-phonon coupling model to explain and illustrate the behaviour of a linear nano-chain of molecules. The analysis of the system's behaviour was performed using Free Energy method, and by applying Monte Carlo Metropolis (MCM) method which take into account the phonon contribution. In particular we tested both the MCM algorithm and the dynamic-matrix method and we expose how the thermal behaviour of a 1D spin crossover system varies as a function of different factors. Furthermore we blocked the edge atoms of the chain in its high spin state to study the effect on the system's behaviour.

  15. Exponentially long Equilibration times in a 1-D Collisional Model of a classical gas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjorth, Poul; Benettin, G.

    1999-01-01

    separation between the time scale for the vibration and the time scale associated with a typical binary collision in the gas. We consider here a simple 1-D model, and show how, when these time scales are well separated, the collisional dynamics is constrained by a many-particle adiabatic invariant....... The effect is that the collisional energy exchanges between the translational and the vibrational degrees of freedom are slowed down by an exponential factor (as Jeans conjectured). A metastable situation thus occurs, in which the fast vibrational degrees of freedom effectivly do not contribute...

  16. Results and limits in the 1-D analytical modeling for the asymmetric DG SOI MOSFET

    OpenAIRE

    O. Cobianu; M. Glesner

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents the results and the limits of 1-D analytical modeling of electrostatic potential in the low-doped p type silicon body of the asymmetric n-channel DG SOI MOSFET, where the contribution to the asymmetry comes only from p- and n-type doping of polysilicon used as the gate electrodes. Solving Poisson's equation with boundary conditions based on the continuity of normal electrical displacement at interfaces and the presence of a minimum electrostatic potential by using the...

  17. 488-1D Ash Basin closure cap help modeling- Microdrain® liner option

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dyer, J. A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-08-03

    At the request of Area Completion Engineering and in support of the 488-1D Ash Basin closure, the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) performed hydrologic simulations of the revised 488-1D Ash Basin closure cap design using the Hydrologic Evaluation of Landfill Performance (HELP) model. The revised design substitutes a MicroDrain Liner®—60-mil low-density polyethylene geomembrane structurally integrated with 130-mil drainage layer—for the previously planned drainage/barrier system—300-mil geosynthetic drainage layer (GDL), 300-mil geosynthetic clay liner (GCL), and 6-inch common fill soil layer. For a 25-year, 24-hour storm event, HELP model v3.07 was employed to (1) predict the peak maximum daily hydraulic head for the geomembrane layer, and (2) ensure that South Carolina Department of Health and Environmental Control (SCDHEC) requirements for the barrier layer (i.e., ≤ 12 inches hydraulic head on top of a barrier having a saturated hydraulic conductivity ≤ 1.0E-05 cm/s) will not be exceeded. A 25-year, 24-hour storm event at the Savannah River Site (SRS) is 6.1 inches rainfall (Weber 1998). HELP model v3.07 results based upon the new planned cap design suggest that the peak maximum daily hydraulic head on the geomembrane barrier layer will be 0.15 inches for a minimum slope equal to 3%, which is two orders of magnitude below the SCDHEC upper limit of 12 inches.

  18. 1-D air-snowpack modeling of atmospheric nitrous acid at South Pole during ANTCI 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Liao

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A 1-D air-snowpack model of HONO has been developed and constrained by observed chemistry and meteorology data. The 1-D model includes molecular diffusion and mechanical dispersion, windpumping in snow, gas phase to quasi-liquid layer phase HONO transfer and quasi-liquid layer nitrate and interstitial air HONO photolysis. Photolysis of nitrate is important as a dominant HONO source inside the snowpack, however, the observed HONO emission from the snowpack was triggered mainly by the equilibrium between quasi liquid layer nitrite and firn air HONO deep down the snow surface (i.e. 30 cm below snow surface. The high concentration of HONO in the firn air is subsequently transported above the snowpack by diffusion and windpumping. The model uncertainties come mainly from lack of measurements and the interpretation of the QLL properties based on the bulk snow measurements. One critical factor is the ionic strength of QLL nitrite, which is estimated here by the bulk snow pH, nitrite concentration, and QLL to bulk snow volume ratio.

  19. 1-D Air-snowpack modeling of atmospheric nitrous acid at South Pole during ANTCI 2003

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Liao

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A 1-D air-snowpack model of HONO has been developed and constrained by observed chemistry and meteorology data. The 1-D model includes molecular diffusion and mechanical dispersion, windpumping in snow, gas phase to quasi-liquid layer phase HONO transfer and quasi-liquid layer nitrate and interstitial air HONO photolysis. Photolysis of nitrate is important as a dominant HONO source inside the snowpack, however, the observed HONO emission from the snowpack was triggered mainly by the equilibrium between quasi liquid layer nitrite and firn air HONO deep down the snow surface (i.e. 30 cm below snow surface. The high concentration of HONO in the firn air is subsequently transported above the snowpack by diffusion and windpumping. The model uncertainties come mainly from lack of measurements and the interpretation of the QLL properties based on the bulk snow measurements. One critical factor is the ionic strength of QLL nitrite, which is estimated here by the bulk snow pH, nitrite concentration, and QLL to bulk snow volume ratio.

  20. Optimizing the transverse thermal conductivity of 2D-SiCf/SiC composites, I. Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youngblood, Gerald E.; Senor, David J.; Jones, Russell H.

    2002-12-31

    For potential fusion applications, considerable fabrication efforts have been directed to obtaining transverse thermal conductivity (Keff) values in excess of 30 W/mK (unirradiated) in the 800-1000°C temperature range for 2D-SiCf/SiC composites. To gain insight into the factors affecting Keff, at PNNL we have tested three different analytic models for predicting Keff in terms of constituent (fiber, matrix and interphase) properties. The tested models were: the Hasselman-Johnson (H-J) “2-Cylinder” model, which examines the effects of fiber-matrix (f/m) thermal barriers; the Markworth “3-Cylinder” model, which specifically examines the effects of interphase thickness and thermal conductivity; and a newly-developed Anisotropic “3-Square” model, which examines the potential effect of introducing a fiber coating with anisotropic properties to enhance (or diminish) f/m thermal coupling. The first two models are effective medium models, while the third model is a simple combination of parallel and series conductances. Model predictions suggest specific designs and/or development efforts directed to optimize the overall thermal transport performance of 2D-SiCf/SiC.

  1. A simple 2-D inundation model for incorporating flood damage in urban drainage planning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pathirana

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a new inundation model code is developed and coupled with Storm Water Management Model, SWMM, to relate spatial information associated with urban drainage systems as criteria for planning of storm water drainage networks. The prime objective is to achive a model code that is simple and fast enough to be consistently be used in planning stages of urban drainage projects.

    The formulation for the two-dimensional (2-D surface flow model algorithms is based on the Navier Stokes equation in two dimensions. An Alternating Direction Implicit (ADI finite difference numerical scheme is applied to solve the governing equations. This numerical scheme is used to express the partial differential equations with time steps split into two halves. The model algorithm is written using C++ computer programming language.

    This 2-D surface flow model is then coupled with SWMM for simulation of both pipe flow component and surcharge induced inundation in urban areas. In addition, a damage calculation block is integrated within the inundation model code.

    The coupled model is shown to be capable of dealing with various flow conditions, as well as being able to simulate wetting and drying processes that will occur as the flood flows over an urban area. It has been applied under idealized and semi-hypothetical cases to determine detailed inundation zones, depths and velocities due to surcharged water on overland surface.

  2. Survey of Multi-Material Closure Models in 1D Lagrangian Hydrodynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maeng, Jungyeoul Brad [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hyde, David Andrew Bulloch [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-07-28

    Accurately treating the coupled sub-cell thermodynamics of computational cells containing multiple materials is an inevitable problem in hydrodynamics simulations, whether due to initial configurations or evolutions of the materials and computational mesh. When solving the hydrodynamics equations within a multi-material cell, we make the assumption of a single velocity field for the entire computational domain, which necessitates the addition of a closure model to attempt to resolve the behavior of the multi-material cells’ constituents. In conjunction with a 1D Lagrangian hydrodynamics code, we present a variety of both the popular as well as more recently proposed multi-material closure models and survey their performances across a spectrum of examples. We consider standard verification tests as well as practical examples using combinations of fluid, solid, and composite constituents within multi-material mixtures. Our survey provides insights into the advantages and disadvantages of various multi-material closure models in different problem configurations.

  3. A 1-D modelling of streaming potential dependence on water content during drainage experiment in sand

    CERN Document Server

    Allègre, Vincent; Ackerer, Philippe; Jouniaux, Laurence; Sailhac, Pascal; 10.1111/j.1365-246X.2012.05371.x

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of electrokinetics for unsaturated conditions is crucial for numerous of geophysical data interpretation. Nevertheless, the behaviour of the streaming potential coefficient C as a function of the water saturation Sw is still discussed. We propose here to model both the Richards' equation for hydrodynamics and the Poisson's equation for electrical potential for unsaturated conditions using 1-D finite element method. The equations are first presented and the numerical scheme is then detailed for the Poisson's equation. Then, computed streaming potentials (SPs) are compared to recently published SP measurements carried out during drainage experiment in a sand column. We show that the apparent measurement of DV / DP for the dipoles can provide the SP coefficient in these conditions. Two tests have been performed using existing models for the SP coefficient and a third one using a new relation. The results show that existing models of unsaturated SP coefficients C(Sw) provide poor results in term...

  4. REAL-TIME FLOOD FORECASTING MODELING OF 1D UNSTEADY CHANNEL FLOW AND KALMAN FILTER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The model of 1D unsteady channel flow combined with the Kalmanfilter for real-time channel flood forecasting was attempted in this study. The suitable upstream and downstream boundary conditions were suggested. The system equation was given by the linearization of the finitedifference equations of the mass conservation and momentum equations as well as the boundary conditions. In the Kalman filter updating model, because the number of measurement variable is less then that of state-space variables, the measurement error covariance matrix could be estimated in real time through the innovation sequence, and the system error covariance matrix needs to be estimated preliminarily. A real example of flood forecasting in the Huaihe River was given to explain how the method works. The results show that the model is reasonable and effective.

  5. A 1-D evolutionary model for icy satellites, applied to Enceladus

    CERN Document Server

    Prialnik, Uri Malamud Dina

    2015-01-01

    We develop a long-term 1-D evolution model for icy satellites that couples multiple processes: water migration and differentiation, geochemical reactions and silicate phase transitions, compaction by self-gravity, and ablation. The model further considers the following energy sources and sinks: tidal heating, radiogenic heating, geochemical energy released by serpentinization or absorbed by mineral dehydration, gravitational energy and insolation, and heat transport by conduction, convection, and advection. We apply the model to Enceladus, by guessing the initial conditions that would render a structure compatible with present-day observations, assuming the initial structure to have been homogeneous. Assuming the satellite has been losing water continually along its evolution, we postulate that it was formed as a more massive, more icy and more porous satellite, and gradually transformed into its present day state due to sustained long-term tidal heating. We consider several initial compositions and evolution...

  6. Micropolar curved rods. 2-D, high order, Timoshenko’s and Euler-Bernoulli models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zozulya V.V.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available New models for micropolar plane curved rods have been developed. 2-D theory is developed from general 2-D equations of linear micropolar elasticity using a special curvilinear system of coordinates related to the middle line of the rod and special hypothesis based on assumptions that take into account the fact that the rod is thin.High order theory is based on the expansion of the equations of the theory of elasticity into Fourier series in terms of Legendre polynomials. First stress and strain tensors,vectors of displacements and rotation and body force shave been expanded into Fourier series in terms of Legendre polynomials with respect to a thickness coordinate.Thereby all equations of elasticity including Hooke’s law have been transformed to the corresponding equations for Fourier coefficients. Then in the same way as in the theory of elasticity, system of differential equations in term of displacements and boundary conditions for Fourier coefficients have been obtained. The Timoshenko’s and Euler-Bernoulli theories are based on the classical hypothesis and 2-D equations of linear micropolar elasticity in a special curvilinear system. The obtained equations can be used to calculate stress-strain and to model thin walled structures in macro, micro and nano scale when taking in to account micropolar couple stress and rotation effects.

  7. Edge-Corrected Mean-Field Hubbard Model: Principle and Applications in 2D Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhang

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This work reviews the current progress of tight-binding methods and the recent edge-modified mean-field Hubbard model. Undercoordinated atoms (atoms not fully coordinated exist at a high rate in nanomaterials with their impact overlooked. A quantum theory was proposed to calculate electronic structure of nanomaterials by incorporating bond order-length-strength (BOLS correlation to mean-field Hubbard model, i.e., BOLS-HM. Consistency between the BOLS-HM calculation and density functional theory (DFT calculation on 2D materials verified that (i bond contractions and potential well depression occur at the edge of graphene, phosphorene, and antimonene nanoribbons; (ii the physical origin of the band gap opening of graphene, phosphorene, and antimonene nanoribbons lays in the enhancement of edge potentials and hopping integrals due to the shorter and stronger bonds between undercoordinated atoms; (iii the band gap of 2D material nanoribbons expand as the width decreases due to the increasing under-coordination effects of edges which modulates the conductive behaviors; and (iv non-bond electrons at the edges and atomic vacancies of 2D material accompanied with the broken bond contribute to the Dirac-Fermi polaron (DFP with a local magnetic moment.

  8. Modelling the water balance of irrigated fields in tropical floodplain soils using Hydrus-1D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyene, Abebech; Frankl, Amaury; Verhoest, Niko E. C.; Tilahun, Seifu; Alamirew, Tena; Adgo, Enyew; Nyssen, Jan

    2017-04-01

    Accurate estimation of evaporation, transpiration and deep percolation is crucial in irrigated agriculture and the sustainable management of water resources. Here, the Hydrus-1D process-based numerical model was used to estimate the actual transpiration, soil evaporation and deep percolation from irrigated fields of floodplain soils. Field experiments were conducted from Dec 2015 to May 2016 in a small irrigation scheme (50 ha) called 'Shina' located in the Lake Tana floodplains of Ethiopia. Six experimental plots (three for onion and three for maize) were selected along a topographic transect to account for soil and groundwater variability. Irrigation amount (400 to 550 mm during the growing period) was measured using V-notches installed at each plot boundary and daily groundwater levels were measured manually from piezometers. There was no surface runoff observed in the growing period and rainfall was measured using a manual rain gauge. All daily weather data required for the evapotranspiration calculation using Pen Man Monteith equation were collected from a nearby metrological station. The soil profiles were described for each field to include the vertical soil heterogeneity in the soil water balance simulations. The soil texture, organic matter, bulk density, field capacity, wilting point and saturated moisture content were measured for all the soil horizons. Soil moisture monitoring at 30 and 60 cm depths was performed. The soil hydraulic parameters for each horizon was estimated using KNN pedotransfer functions for tropical soils and were effectively fitted using the RETC program (R2= 0.98±0.011) for initial prediction. A local sensitivity analysis was performed to select and optimize the most important hydraulic parameters for soil water flow in the unsaturated zone. The most sensitive parameters were saturated hydraulic conductivity (Ks), saturated moisture content (θs) and pore size distribution (n). Inverse modelling using Hydrus-1D further optimized

  9. Brane Brick Models, Toric Calabi-Yau 4-Folds and 2d (0,2) Quivers

    CERN Document Server

    Franco, Sebastian; Seong, Rak-Kyeong

    2015-01-01

    We introduce brane brick models, a novel type of Type IIA brane configurations consisting of D4-branes ending on an NS5-brane. Brane brick models are T-dual to D1-branes over singular toric Calabi-Yau 4-folds. They fully encode the infinite class of 2d (generically) N=(0,2) gauge theories on the worldvolume of the D1-branes and streamline their connection to the probed geometries. For this purpose, we also introduce new combinatorial procedures for deriving the Calabi-Yau associated to a given gauge theory and vice versa.

  10. Brane brick models, toric Calabi-Yau 4-folds and 2d (0,2) quivers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franco, Sebastián [Physics Department, The City College of the CUNY, 160 Convent Avenue, New York, NY 10031 (United States); The Graduate School and University Center, The City University of New York,365 Fifth Avenue, New York NY 10016 (United States); Lee, Sangmin [Center for Theoretical Physics, Seoul National University,Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University,Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); College of Liberal Studies, Seoul National University,Seoul 08826 (Korea, Republic of); School of Natural Sciences, Institute for Advanced Study,Princeton, NJ 08540 (United States); Seong, Rak-Kyeong [School of Physics, Korea Institute for Advanced Study,Seoul 02455 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-02-08

    We introduce brane brick models, a novel type of Type IIA brane configurations consisting of D4-branes ending on an NS5-brane. Brane brick models are T-dual to D1-branes over singular toric Calabi-Yau 4-folds. They fully encode the infinite class of 2d (generically) N=(0,2) gauge theories on the worldvolume of the D1-branes and streamline their connection to the probed geometries. For this purpose, we also introduce new combinatorial procedures for deriving the Calabi-Yau associated to a given gauge theory and vice versa.

  11. Uncertainties in modelling Mt. Pinatubo eruption with 2-D AER model and CCM SOCOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenzelmann, P.; Weisenstein, D.; Peter, T.; Luo, B. P.; Rozanov, E.; Fueglistaler, S.; Thomason, L. W.

    2009-04-01

    Large volcanic eruptions may introduce a strong forcing on climate. They challenge the skills of climate models. In addition to the short time attenuation of solar light by ashes the formation of stratospheric sulphate aerosols, due to volcanic sulphur dioxide injection into the lower stratosphere, may lead to a significant enhancement of the global albedo. The sulphate aerosols have a residence time of about 2 years. As a consequence of the enhanced sulphate aerosol concentration both the stratospheric chemistry and dynamics are strongly affected. Due to absorption of longwave and near infrared radiation the temperature in the lower stratosphere increases. So far chemistry climate models overestimate this warming [Eyring et al. 2006]. We present an extensive validation of extinction measurements and model runs of the eruption of Mt. Pinatubo in 1991. Even if Mt. Pinatubo eruption has been the best quantified volcanic eruption of this magnitude, the measurements show considerable uncertainties. For instance the total amount of sulphur emitted to the stratosphere ranges from 5-12 Mt sulphur [e.g. Guo et al. 2004, McCormick, 1992]. The largest uncertainties are in the specification of the main aerosol cloud. SAGE II, for instance, could not measure the peak of the aerosol extinction for about 1.5 years, because optical termination was reached. The gap-filling of the SAGE II [Thomason and Peter, 2006] using lidar measurements underestimates the total extinctions in the tropics for the first half year after the eruption by 30% compared to AVHRR [Rusell et. al 1992]. The same applies to the optical dataset described by Stenchikov et al. [1998]. We compare these extinction data derived from measurements with extinctions derived from AER 2D aerosol model calculations [Weisenstein et al., 2007]. Full microphysical calculations with injections of 14, 17, 20 and 26 Mt SO2 in the lower stratosphere were performed. The optical aerosol properties derived from SAGE II

  12. A New Approach to Calculate Indirect GWPs using the UIUC 2-D CRT and RTM Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Youn, D.; Patten, K.; Wuebbles, D.

    2006-12-01

    Global warming potentials (GWPs) are defined to be the total impact over time of adding a unit mass of a greenhouse gas to the atmosphere. Indirect GWPs are due to ozone depletion effects in the stratosphere for a certain compound and therefore stand for the long-term global cooling effects. Previously, indirect GWPs were calculated using a box model, which was not able to consider the complex processes in the atmosphere. As a step towards obtaining indirect GWPs through a more robust approach, the UIUC 2-D CRT model was used as the computational tool to derive ozone changes. The 2-D model has more realistic chemical, physical, and dynamical processes in the atmosphere and a relatively complete transport system, which makes it useful for a more accurate analysis. Furthermore, the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (UIUC) radiative transfer model (RTM) is employed to derive the corresponding time-dependent radiative forcings from the 2-D CRT outputs. Two Halon compounds, Halon-1211 and Halon-1301, were selected to be studied for their indirect GWPs. The results showed that instantaneous and stratospheric adjusted indirect GWPs for a 100-year horizon are -10004.8 and -10237.1 for Halon-1211, while for Halon-1301 they are -19218.0 and -19627.6. The indirect GWPs for Halon-1211 and -1301 presented here are two to three times smaller compared to the results in WMO (2006) draft. Further analysis on indirect GWPs will be carried out using our 3-D MOZART-3 model.

  13. Fluid friction and wall viscosity of the 1D blood flow model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiao-Fei; Matsukawa, Mami; Ghigo, Arthur; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves; Fullana, Jose-Maria

    2015-01-01

    We study the behavior of the pulse waves of water into a flexible tube for application to blood flow simulations. In pulse waves both fluid friction and wall viscosity are damping factors, and difficult to evaluate separately. In this paper, the coefficients of fluid friction and wall viscosity are estimated by fitting a nonlinear 1D flow model to experimental data. In the experimental setup, a distensible tube is connected to a piston pump at one end and closed at another end. The pressure and wall displacements are measured simultaneously. A good agreement between model predictions and experiments was achieved. For amplitude decrease, the effect of wall viscosity on the pulse wave has been shown as important as that of fluid viscosity.

  14. One-electron singular spectral features of the 1D Hubbard model at finite magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmelo, J. M. P.; Čadež, T.

    2017-01-01

    The momentum, electronic density, spin density, and interaction dependences of the exponents that control the (k , ω)-plane singular features of the σ = ↑ , ↓ one-electron spectral functions of the 1D Hubbard model at finite magnetic field are studied. The usual half-filling concepts of one-electron lower Hubbard band and upper Hubbard band are defined in terms of the rotated electrons associated with the model Bethe-ansatz solution for all electronic density and spin density values and the whole finite repulsion range. Such rotated electrons are the link of the non-perturbative relation between the electrons and the pseudofermions. Our results further clarify the microscopic processes through which the pseudofermion dynamical theory accounts for the one-electron matrix elements between the ground state and excited energy eigenstates.

  15. Stratocumulus over SouthEast Pacific: Idealized 2D simulations with the Lagrangian Cloud Model

    CERN Document Server

    Andrejczuk, M; Blyth, A

    2012-01-01

    In this paper a LES model with Lagrangian representation of microphysics is used to simulate stratucumulus clouds in idealized 2D set-up based on the VOCALS observations. The general features of the cloud simulated by the model, such as cloud water mixing ratio and cloud droplet number profile agree well with the observations. The model can capture observed relation between aerosol distribution and concentration measured below the cloud and cloud droplet number. Averaged over the whole cloud droplet spectrum from the numerical model and observed droplet spectrum are similar, with the observations showing a higher concentration of droplets bigger than 25 {\\mu}m. Much bigger differences are present when comparing modelled and observed droplet spectrum on specific model level. Despite the fact that microphysics is formulated in a Lagrangian framework the standard deviation of the cloud droplet distribution is larger than 1 {\\mu}m. There is no significant narrowing of the cloud droplet distribution in the up-draf...

  16. 2D-3D Registration of CT Vertebra Volume to Fluoroscopy Projection: A Calibration Model Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allen R

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study extends a previous research concerning intervertebral motion registration by means of 2D dynamic fluoroscopy to obtain a more comprehensive 3D description of vertebral kinematics. The problem of estimating the 3D rigid pose of a CT volume of a vertebra from its 2D X-ray fluoroscopy projection is addressed. 2D-3D registration is obtained maximising a measure of similarity between Digitally Reconstructed Radiographs (obtained from the CT volume and real fluoroscopic projection. X-ray energy correction was performed. To assess the method a calibration model was realised a sheep dry vertebra was rigidly fixed to a frame of reference including metallic markers. Accurate measurement of 3D orientation was obtained via single-camera calibration of the markers and held as true 3D vertebra position; then, vertebra 3D pose was estimated and results compared. Error analysis revealed accuracy of the order of 0.1 degree for the rotation angles of about 1 mm for displacements parallel to the fluoroscopic plane, and of order of 10 mm for the orthogonal displacement.

  17. EFDC1D - A ONE DIMENSIONAL HYDRODYNAMIC AND SEDIMENT TRANSPORT MODEL FOR RIVER AND STREAM NETWORKS: MODEL THEORY AND USERS GUIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    This technical report describes the new one-dimensional (1D) hydrodynamic and sediment transport model EFDC1D. This model that can be applied to stream networks. The model code and two sample data sets are included on the distribution CD. EFDC1D can simulate bi-directional unstea...

  18. Hypocenter determination using simulated annealing, updated 1D seismic velocity model and focal mechanism analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, Akhmad Fanani; Nugraha, Andri Dian; Sule, Rachmat; Juanda, Aditya Abdurrahman

    2013-09-01

    Hypocenter determination of micro-earthquakes of Mount "X-1" geothermal field has been conducted using simulated annealing and guided error search method using a 1D seismic velocity model. In order to speed up the hypocenter determination process a three-circle intersection method has been used to guide the simulated annealing and guided error search process. We used P and S arrival time's microseismic data. In the simulated annealing and guided error search processes, the minimum travel time from a source to a receiver has been calculated by employing ray tracing with shooting method. The resulting hypocenters from the above process occurred at depths of 3-4 km below mean sea level. These hypocenter distributions are correlated with previous study which was concluded that the most active microseismic area in which the site of many fractures and also vertical circulation place. Later on, resulting hypocenters location was used as input to determine 1-D seismic velocity using joint hypocenter determination method. The results of VELEST indicate show low Vp/Vs ratio value at depths of 3-4 km. Our interpretation is this anomaly may be related to a rock layer which is saturated by vapor (gas or steam). Another feature is high Vp/Vs ratio value at depths of 1-3 km that may related to a rock layer which is saturated by fluid or partial melting. We also analyze the focal mechanism of microseismic using ISOLA method to determine the source characteristic of this event.

  19. A world-line framework for 1D Topological Conformal sigma-models

    CERN Document Server

    Baulieu, L; Toppan, F

    2015-01-01

    We use world-line methods for pseudo-supersymmetry to construct $sl(2|1)$-invariant actions for the $(2,2,0)$ chiral and ($1,2,1)$ real supermultiplets of the twisted $D$-module representations of the $sl(2|1)$ superalgebra. The derived one-dimensional topological conformal $\\sigma$-models are invariant under nilpotent operators. The actions are constructed for both parabolic and hyperbolic/trigonometric realizations (with extra potential terms in the latter case). The scaling dimension $\\lambda$ of the supermultiplets defines a coupling constant, $2\\lambda+1$, the free theories being recovered at $\\lambda=-\\frac{1}{2}$. We also present, generalizing previous works, the $D$-module representations of one-dimensional superconformal algebras induced by ${\\cal N}=(p,q)$ pseudo-supersymmetry acting on $(k,n,n-k)$ supermultiplets. Besides $sl(2|1)$, we obtain the superalgebras $A(1,1)$, $D(2,1;\\alpha)$, $D(3,1)$, $D(4,1)$, $A(2,1)$ from $(p,q)= (1,1), (2,2), (3,3), (4,4), (5,1)$, at given $k,n$ and critical values ...

  20. A world-line framework for 1D topological conformal σ-models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baulieu, L.; Holanda, N. L.; Toppan, F.

    2015-11-01

    We use world-line methods for pseudo-supersymmetry to construct sl(2|1)-invariant actions for the (2, 2, 0) chiral and (1, 2, 1) real supermultiplets of the twisted D-module representations of the sl(2|1) superalgebra. The derived one-dimensional topological conformal σ-models are invariant under nilpotent operators. The actions are constructed for both parabolic and hyperbolic/trigonometric realizations (with extra potential terms in the latter case). The scaling dimension λ of the supermultiplets defines a coupling constant, 2λ + 1, the free theories being recovered at λ = - /1 2 . We also present, generalizing previous works, the D-module representations of one-dimensional superconformal algebras induced by N = ( p , q ) pseudo-supersymmetry acting on (k, n, n - k) supermultiplets. Besides sl(2|1), we obtain the superalgebras A(1, 1), D(2, 1; α), D(3, 1), D(4, 1), A(2, 1) from (p, q) = (1, 1), (2, 2), (3, 3), (4, 4), (5, 1), at given k, n and critical values of λ.

  1. Scaled, patient-specific 3D vertebral model reconstruction based on 2D lateral fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Guoyan; Nolte, Lutz-P; Ferguson, Stephen J

    2011-05-01

    Accurate three-dimensional (3D) models of lumbar vertebrae are required for image-based 3D kinematics analysis. MRI or CT datasets are frequently used to derive 3D models but have the disadvantages that they are expensive, time-consuming or involving ionizing radiation (e.g., CT acquisition). An alternative method using 2D lateral fluoroscopy was developed. A technique was developed to reconstruct a scaled 3D lumbar vertebral model from a single two-dimensional (2D) lateral fluoroscopic image and a statistical shape model of the lumbar vertebrae. Four cadaveric lumbar spine segments and two statistical shape models were used for testing. Reconstruction accuracy was determined by comparison of the surface models reconstructed from the single lateral fluoroscopic images to the ground truth data from 3D CT segmentation. For each case, two different surface-based registration techniques were used to recover the unknown scale factor, and the rigid transformation between the reconstructed surface model and the ground truth model before the differences between the two discrete surface models were computed. Successful reconstruction of scaled surface models was achieved for all test lumbar vertebrae based on single lateral fluoroscopic images. The mean reconstruction error was between 0.7 and 1.6 mm. A scaled, patient-specific surface model of the lumbar vertebra from a single lateral fluoroscopic image can be synthesized using the present approach. This new method for patient-specific 3D modeling has potential applications in spine kinematics analysis, surgical planning, and navigation.

  2. What causes the large extensions of red-supergiant atmospheres? Comparisons of interferometric observations with 1-D hydrostatic, 3-D convection, and 1-D pulsating model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Arroyo-Torres, B; Chiavassa, A; Scholz, M; Freytag, B; Marcaide, J M; Hauschildt, P H; Wood, P R; Abellan, F J

    2015-01-01

    We present the atmospheric structure and the fundamental parameters of three red supergiants, increasing the sample of RSGs observed by near-infrared spectro-interferometry. Additionally, we test possible mechanisms that may explain the large observed atmospheric extensions of RSGs. We carried out spectro-interferometric observations of 3 RSGs in the near-infrared K-band with the VLTI/AMBER instrument at medium spectral resolution. To comprehend the extended atmospheres, we compared our observational results to predictions by available hydrostatic PHOENIX, available 3-D convection, and new 1-D self-excited pulsation models of RSGs. Our near-infrared flux spectra are well reproduced by the PHOENIX model atmospheres. The continuum visibility values are consistent with a limb-darkened disk as predicted by the PHOENIX models, allowing us to determine the angular diameter and the fundamental parameters of our sources. Nonetheless, in the case of V602 Car and HD 95686, the PHOENIX model visibilities do not predict ...

  3. 2D cellular automaton model for the evolution of active region coronal plasmas

    CERN Document Server

    Fuentes, Marcelo López

    2016-01-01

    We study a 2D cellular automaton (CA) model for the evolution of coronal loop plasmas. The model is based on the idea that coronal loops are made of elementary magnetic strands that are tangled and stressed by the displacement of their footpoints by photospheric motions. The magnetic stress accumulated between neighbor strands is released in sudden reconnection events or nanoflares that heat the plasma. We combine the CA model with the Enthalpy Based Thermal Evolution of Loops (EBTEL) model to compute the response of the plasma to the heating events. Using the known response of the XRT telescope on board Hinode we also obtain synthetic data. The model obeys easy to understand scaling laws relating the output (nanoflare energy, temperature, density, intensity) to the input parameters (field strength, strand length, critical misalignment angle). The nanoflares have a power-law distribution with a universal slope of -2.5, independent of the input parameters. The repetition frequency of nanoflares, expressed in t...

  4. Quenched bond randomness in marginal and non-marginal Ising spin models in 2D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fytas, N. G.; Malakis, A.; Hadjiagapiou, I. A.

    2008-11-01

    We investigate and contrast, via entropic sampling based on the Wang-Landau algorithm, the effects of quenched bond randomness on the critical behavior of two Ising spin models in 2D. The random bond version of the superantiferromagnetic (SAF) square model with nearest- and next-nearest-neighbor competing interactions and the corresponding version of the simple Ising model are studied, and their general universality aspects are inspected by means of a detailed finite size scaling (FSS) analysis. We find that the random bond SAF model obeys weak universality, hyperscaling, and exhibits a strong saturating behavior of the specific heat due to the competing nature of interactions. On the other hand, for the random Ising model we encounter some difficulties as regards a definite discrimination between the two well-known scenarios of the logarithmic corrections versus the weak universality. However, a careful FSS analysis of our data favors the field theoretically predicted logarithmic corrections.

  5. A solidification constitutive model for NIKE2D and NIKE3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raboin, P.J.

    1994-03-17

    This memo updates the current status of a solidification material model development which has been underway for more than a year. Significant modeling goals such as predicting cut-off stresses, thermo-elasto-plasticity, strain rate dependent plasticity and dynamic recovery have been completed. The model is called SOLMAT for solidification material model, and while developed for NIKE2D, it has already been implemented in NIKE3D and NIT03D by B. Maker. This memo details the future development strategy of SOLMAT including liquid and solid constitutive improvements, coupling of deviatoric and dilatational deformation and a plan to switch between constitutive theories. It explains some of the difficulties associated solidification modeling and proposes two experiments to measure properties for using SOLMAT. Due to the sensitive nature of these plans in relation to programmatic and CRADA concerns, this memo should be treated as confidential document.

  6. 75 FR 3127 - Airworthiness Directives; Thrush Aircraft, Inc. Model 600 S2D and S2R Series Airplanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... wing front lower spar caps in Thrush Aircraft, Inc. Model 600 S2D and S2R (S-2R) series airplanes (type..., which applies to Thrush Aircraft, Inc. Model 600 S2D and S2R (S-2R) series airplanes (type certificate... Environmental Conditions Avenger Aircraft and Services (Avenger) states the life limits for the wing front...

  7. 1D numerical model of muddy subaqueous and subaerial debris flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imran, J.; Parker, G.; Locat, J.; Lee, H.

    2001-01-01

    A 1D numerical model of the downslope flow and deposition of muddy subaerial and subaqueous debris flows is presented. The model incorporates the Herschel-Bulkley and bilinear rheologies of viscoplastic fluid. The more familiar Bingham model is integrated into the Herschel-Bulkley rheological model. The conservation equations of mass and momentum of single-phase laminar debris flow are layer-integrated using the slender flow approximation. They are then expressed in a Lagrangian framework and solved numerically using an explicit finite difference scheme. Starting from a given initial shape, a debris flow is allowed to collapse and propagate over a specified topography. Comparison between the model predictions and laboratory experiments shows reasonable agreement. The model is used to study the effect of the ambient fluid density, initial shape of the failed mass, and rheological model on the simulated propagation of the front and runout characteristics of muddy debris flows. It is found that initial failure shape influence the front velocity but has little bearing on the final deposit shape. In the Bingham model, the excess of shear stress above the yield strength is proportional to the strain rate to the first power. This exponent is free to vary in the Herschel-Bulkley model. When it is set at a value lower than unity, the resulting final deposits are thicker and shorter than in the case of the Bingham rheology. The final deposit resulting from the bilinear model is longer and thinner than that from the Bingham model due to the fact that the debris flow is allowed to act as a Newtonian fluid at low shear rate in the bilinear model.

  8. 2D lattice model of a lipid bilayer: Microscopic derivation and thermodynamic exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, Davit; Heuer, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Based on all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of a lipid bilayer we present a systematic mapping on a 2D lattice model. Keeping the lipid type and the chain order parameter as key variables we derive a free energy functional, containing the enthalpic interaction of adjacent lipids as well as the tail entropy. The functional form of both functions is explicitly determined for saturated and polyunsaturated lipids. By studying the lattice model via Monte Carlo simulations it is possible to reproduce the temperature dependence of the distribution of order parameters of the pure lipids, including the prediction of the gel transition. Furthermore, application to a mixture of saturated and polyunsaturated lipids yields the correct phase separation behavior at lower temperatures with a simulation time reduced by approximately 7 orders of magnitude as compared to the corresponding MD simulations. Even the time-dependence of the de-mixing is reproduced on a semi-quantitative level. Due to the generality of the approach we envisage a large number of further applications, ranging from modeling larger sets of lipids, sterols, and solvent proteins to predicting nucleation barriers for the melting of lipids. Particularly, from the properties of the 2D lattice model one can directly read off the enthalpy and entropy change of the 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine gel-to-liquid transition in excellent agreement with experimental and MD results.

  9. Bernstein copula approach to model direction-length dependency for 2D discrete fracture network simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Torres, F.; Diaz-Viera, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    In many natural fractured porous media, such as aquifers, soils, oil and geothermal reservoirs, fractures play a crucial role in their flow and transport properties. An approach that has recently gained popularity for modeling fracture systems is the Discrete Fracture Network (DFN) model. This approach consists in applying a stochastic boolean simulation method, also known as object simulation method, where fractures are represented as simplified geometric objects (line segments in 2D and polygons in 3D). One of the shortcomings of this approach is that it usually does not consider the dependency relationships that may exist between the geometric properties of fractures (direction, length, aperture, etc), that is, each property is simulated independently. In this work a method for modeling such dependencies by copula theory is introduced. In particular, a nonparametric model using Bernstein copulas for direction-length fracture dependency in 2D is presented. The application of this method is illustrated in a case study for a fractured rock sample from a carbonate reservoir outcrop.

  10. 2D-HIDDEN MARKOV MODEL FEATURE EXTRACTION STRATEGY OF ROTATING MACHINERY FAULT DIAGNOSIS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A new feature extraction method based on 2D-hidden Markov model(HMM) is proposed.Meanwhile the time index and frequency index are introduced to represent the new features. The new feature extraction strategy is tested by the experimental data that collected from Bently rotor experiment system. The results show that this methodology is very effective to extract the feature of vibration signals in the rotor speed-up course and can be extended to other non-stationary signal analysis fields in the future.

  11. Comparative analysis of 2D and 3D model of a PEMFC in COMSOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, R. Bakiya; Harikrishnan, N. P.; Juliet, A. Vimala

    2017-10-01

    In this article, 2D and 3D model of a PEMFC has been simulated in order to study their performance when subjected to similar operating conditions. The comparison reveals interesting phenomena of performance enhancement of the fuel cell. Design of fuel cell channel and stationary studies were done in COMSOL. Variations in current density and electrolyte potential from simulation results were observed when operated at a temperature of 120 °C. The electrolyte potential was found to have increased from 1 to 2.5 V and the surface pressure due to fluid flow was found to have increased from 3 to 9.58 Pa.

  12. Entanglement entropy through conformal interfaces in the 2D Ising model

    CERN Document Server

    Brehm, Enrico M

    2015-01-01

    We consider the entanglement entropy for the 2D Ising model at the conformal fixed point in the presence of interfaces. More precisely, we investigate the situation where the two subsystems are separated by a defect line that preserves conformal invariance. Using the replica trick, we compute the entanglement entropy between the two subsystems. We observe that the entropy, just like in the case without defects, shows a logarithmic scaling behavior with respect to the size of the system. Here, the prefactor of the logarithm depends on the strength of the defect encoded in the transmission coefficient. We also commend on the supersymmetric case.

  13. JetCurry: Modeling 3D geometry of AGN jets from 2D images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosak, Katie; Li, KunYang; Avachat, Sayali S.; Perlman, Eric S.

    2017-02-01

    Written in Python, JetCurry models the 3D geometry of jets from 2-D images. JetCurry requires NumPy and SciPy and incorporates emcee (ascl:1303.002) and AstroPy (ascl:1304.002), and optionally uses VPython. From a defined initial part of the jet that serves as a reference point, JetCurry finds the position of highest flux within a bin of data in the image matrix and fits along the x axis for the general location of the bends in the jet. A spline fitting is used to smooth out the resulted jet stream.

  14. Boundary field induced first-order transition in the 2D Ising model: exact study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clusel, Maxime [Institut Laue-Langevin, 6 rue Horowitz BP156 X, 38042 Grenoble Cedex (France); Fortin, Jean-Yves [Laboratoire Poncelet, 119002, Bolshoy Vlasyevskiy Pereulok 11, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2006-02-03

    We present in this paper an exact study of a first-order transition induced by an inhomogeneous boundary magnetic field in the 2D Ising model. From a previous analysis of the interfacial free energy in the discrete case (Clusel and Fortin 2005 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 38 2849) we identify, using an asymptotic expansion in the thermodynamic limit, the line of transition that separates the regime where the interface is localized near the boundary from the one where it is propagating inside the bulk. In particular, the transition line has a strong dependence on the aspect ratio of the lattice.

  15. Transport Properties near Quantum Critical Point in 2D Hubbard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuang-Shing; Pathak, Sandeep; Yang, Shuxiang; Su, Shi-Quan; Galanakis, Dimitris; Mikelsons, Karlis; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2011-03-01

    We obtain high quality estimates of the self energy Σ (K , ω) by direct analytic continuation of Σ (K , iωn) obtained from Continuous-Time Quantum Monte Carlo. We use these results to investigate the transport properties near the quantum critical point found in the 2D Hubbard model at finite doping. Resistivity, thermal conductivity, Wiedemann-Franz Law, and thermopower are examined in the Fermi liquid, Marginal Fermi liquid (MFL), and pseudo-gap regions. Σ (k , ω) with k along the nodal direction displays temperature-dependent scaling similar to that seen in the experiment. A next-nearest neighbor hopping tOISE-0730290.

  16. On the origin of quantum criticality found at finite doping in 2D Hubbard model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shuxiang; Fotso, Herbert; Moreno, Juana; Jarrell, Mark

    2011-03-01

    To better understand the excitations responsible for quantum criticality (QC) found at finite doping in the 2D Hubbard model, we analyze the vertices for different scattering channels obtained from the Dynamical Cluster Continuous-Time Quantum Monte Carlo simulation. By decomposing these vertices using the parquet equations we find that both superconductivity and the charge instabilities responsible for the QC come from the crossed spin channel contribution, and thus are driven by the spin-fluctuations. On contrast, the spin instability comes from the fully irreducible spin vertex contribution. We acknowledge the support from NSF OISE-0730290 and DOE SciDAC DE-FC02-06ER25792.

  17. Initial Stage of the Microwave Ionization Wave Within a 1D Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, V. E.; Rakova, E. I.; Glyavin, M. Yu.; Nusinovich, G. S.

    2016-05-01

    The dynamics of the microwave breakdown in a gas is simulated numerically within a simple 1D model which takes into account such processes as the impact ionization of gas molecules, the attachment of electrons to neutral molecules, and plasma diffusion. Calculations are carried out for different spatial distributions of seed electrons with account for reflection of the incident electromagnetic wave from the plasma. The results reveal considerable dependence of the ionization wave evolution on the relation between the field frequency and gas pressure, as well as on the existence of extended rarefied halo of seed electrons. At relatively low gas pressures (or high field frequencies), the breakdown process is accompanied by the stationary ionization wave moving towards the incident electromagnetic wave. In the case of a high gas pressure (or a relatively low field frequency), the peculiarities of the breakdown are associated with the formation of repetitive jumps of the ionization front.

  18. Verification and comparison of four numerical schemes for a 1D viscoelastic blood flow model

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Xiaofei; Lagrée, Pierre-Yves

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present four numerical schemes for a 1D viscoelastic blood flow model. In the case with a small nonlinearity (small amplitude of wave), asymptotic analysis predicts several behaviours of the wave: propagation in a uniform tube, attenuation of the amplitude due to the skin friction, diffusion due to the viscosity of the wall, and reflection and transmission at a branching point. These predictions are compared very favorably with all of the numerical solutions. The schemes are also tested in case with a larger nonlinearity. Finally, we apply all of the schemes on a relatively realistic arterial system with 55 arteries. The schemes are compared in four aspects: the spatial and temporal convergence speed, the ability to capture shock phenomena, the computation speed and the complexity of the implementation. The suitable conditions for the application of the various schemes are discussed.

  19. A 2D Axisymmetric Mixture Multiphase Model for Bottom Stirring in a BOF Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruskopf, Ari

    2017-02-01

    A process model for basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel converter is in development. The model will take into account all the essential physical and chemical phenomena, while achieving real-time calculation of the process. The complete model will include a 2D axisymmetric turbulent multiphase flow model for iron melt and argon gas mixture, a steel scrap melting model, and a chemical reaction model. A novel liquid mass conserving mixture multiphase model for bubbling gas jet is introduced in this paper. In-house implementation of the model is tested and validated in this article independently from the other parts of the full process model. Validation data comprise three different water models with different volume flow rates of air blown through a regular nozzle and a porous plug. The water models cover a wide range of dimensionless number R_{{p}} , which include values that are similar for industrial-scale steel converter. The k- ɛ turbulence model is used with wall functions so that a coarse grid can be utilized. The model calculates a steady-state flow field for gas/liquid mixture using control volume method with staggered SIMPLE algorithm.

  20. A 2D Axisymmetric Mixture Multiphase Model for Bottom Stirring in a BOF Converter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruskopf, Ari

    2016-11-01

    A process model for basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel converter is in development. The model will take into account all the essential physical and chemical phenomena, while achieving real-time calculation of the process. The complete model will include a 2D axisymmetric turbulent multiphase flow model for iron melt and argon gas mixture, a steel scrap melting model, and a chemical reaction model. A novel liquid mass conserving mixture multiphase model for bubbling gas jet is introduced in this paper. In-house implementation of the model is tested and validated in this article independently from the other parts of the full process model. Validation data comprise three different water models with different volume flow rates of air blown through a regular nozzle and a porous plug. The water models cover a wide range of dimensionless number R_{p} , which include values that are similar for industrial-scale steel converter. The k-ɛ turbulence model is used with wall functions so that a coarse grid can be utilized. The model calculates a steady-state flow field for gas/liquid mixture using control volume method with staggered SIMPLE algorithm.

  1. Image restoration using 2D autoregressive texture model and structure curve construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voronin, V. V.; Marchuk, V. I.; Petrosov, S. P.; Svirin, I.; Agaian, S.; Egiazarian, K.

    2015-05-01

    In this paper an image inpainting approach based on the construction of a composite curve for the restoration of the edges of objects in an image using the concepts of parametric and geometric continuity is presented. It is shown that this approach allows to restore the curved edges and provide more flexibility for curve design in damaged image by interpolating the boundaries of objects by cubic splines. After edge restoration stage, a texture restoration using 2D autoregressive texture model is carried out. The image intensity is locally modeled by a first spatial autoregressive model with support in a strongly causal prediction region on the plane. Model parameters are estimated by Yule-Walker method. Several examples considered in this paper show the effectiveness of the proposed approach for large objects removal as well as recovery of small regions on several test images.

  2. Improving object detection in 2D images using a 3D world model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viggh, Herbert E. M.; Cho, Peter L.; Armstrong-Crews, Nicholas; Nam, Myra; Shah, Danelle C.; Brown, Geoffrey E.

    2014-05-01

    A mobile robot operating in a netcentric environment can utilize offboard resources on the network to improve its local perception. One such offboard resource is a world model built and maintained by other sensor systems. In this paper we present results from research into improving the performance of Deformable Parts Model object detection algorithms by using an offboard 3D world model. Experiments were run for detecting both people and cars in 2D photographs taken in an urban environment. After generating candidate object detections, a 3D world model built from airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) and aerial photographs was used to filter out false alarm using several types of geometric reasoning. Comparison of the baseline detection performance to the performance after false alarm filtering showed a significant decrease in false alarms for a given probability of detection.

  3. Modeling of lamps through a diffuser with 2D and 3D picket-fence backlight models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belshaw, Richard J.; Wilmott, Roger; Thomas, John T.

    2002-08-01

    Laboratory photometric measurements are taken of a display backlight one metre away from the emission surface (diffuser) with a whole acceptance angle on the photometer of about 0.125 degrees (2.182mm spot size at emission surface). A simulation method was sought to be able to obtain the brightness uniformity (luminance peak to trough ratio from above one lamp to the null between lamps in a picket-fence backlight). A 3D raytrace BackLight model in TracePro and a 2D Mathematical model in Matlab have been developed. With a specimen backlight in the laboratory, a smooth luminance profile was measured by the photometer on the diffuser surface. Ray Trace models in both 3D and 2D take too long to produce smooth 'continuous filled' distributions. The Mathematical 2D approach, although with limitations, yielded smooth solutions in a very reasonable time frame.

  4. Kinetic study of run-away burn in ICF capsule using a quasi-1D model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chengkun; Molvig, K.; Albright, B. J.; Dodd, E. S.; Hoffman, N. M.; Vold, E. L.; Kagan, G.

    2016-10-01

    The effect of reduced fusion reactivity resulting from the loss of fuel ions in the Gamow peak in the ignition, run-away burn and disassembly stages of an inertial confinement fusion D-T capsule is investigated with a quasi-1D hybrid model that includes kinetic ions, fluid electrons and Planckian radiation photons. The fuel ion loss through the Knudsen effect at the fuel-pusher interface is accounted for by a local-loss model developed in Molvig et al.. The tail refilling and relaxation of the fuel ion distribution are evolved with a nonlinear Fokker-Planck solver. The Krokhin & Rozanov model is used for the finite alpha range beyond the fuel region, while alpha heating to the fuel ions and the fluid electrons is modeled kinetically. For an energetic pusher (40kJ), the simulation shows that the reduced fusion reactivity can lead to substantially lower ion temperature during run-away burn, while the final yield decreases more modestly. Possible improvements to the present model, including the non-Planckian radiation emission and alpha-driven fuel disassembly, are discussed. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. DOE by the LANS, LLC, Los Alamos National Laboratory under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25396. Work supported by the ASC TBI project at LANL.

  5. Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for Magnetotelluric (MT) 1D Inversion Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandis, Hendra; Maulana, Yahya

    2017-04-01

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) is one of nature-inspired optimization algorithms that adopts swarm (insects, school of fish, flock of birds etc.) behaviour in search for food or common target in a collaborative manner. The particles (or agents) in the swarm learn from their neighbours as well as themselves regarding the promising area in the search space. The information is then used to update their position in order to reach the target. The search algorithm of a particle is dictated by the best position of that particle during the process (individual learning term) and the best particle in its surroundings (social learning term) at a particular iteration. In terms of optimization, the particles are models defined by their parameters, while the promising area in the model space is characterized by a low misfit associated with optimum models. Being a global search approach, PSO is suitable for nonlinear inverse problem resolution. The algorithm was applied to a simple minimization problem for illustration purpose. The application of PSO in geophysical inverse problem is demonstrated by inversion of synthetic magnetotelluric (MT) data associated with simple 1D models with satisfactory results in terms of model recovery as well as data misfit.

  6. Stochastic dynamics of phase singularities under ventricular fibrillation in 2D Beeler-Reuter model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Akio; Konno, Hidetoshi

    2011-09-01

    The dynamics of ventricular fibrillation (VF) has been studied extensively, and the initiation mechanism of VF has been elucidated to some extent. However, the stochastic dynamical nature of sustained VF remains unclear so far due to the complexity of high dimensional chaos in a heterogeneous system. In this paper, various statistical mechanical properties of sustained VF are studied numerically in 2D Beeler-Reuter-Drouhard-Roberge (BRDR) model with normal and modified ionic current conductance. The nature of sustained VF is analyzed by measuring various fluctuations of spatial phase singularity (PS) such as velocity, lifetime, the rates of birth and death. It is found that the probability density function (pdf) for lifetime of PSs is independent of system size. It is also found that the hyper-Gamma distribution serves as a universal pdf for the counting number of PSs for various system sizes and various parameters of our model tissue under VF. Further, it is demonstrated that the nonlinear Langevin equation associated with a hyper-Gamma process can mimic the pdf and temporal variation of the number of PSs in the 2D BRDR model.

  7. CFHTLenS: Combined probe cosmological model comparison using 2D weak gravitational lensing

    CERN Document Server

    Kilbinger, Martin; Heymans, Catherine; Simpson, Fergus; Benjamin, Jonathan; Erben, Thomas; Harnois-Deraps, Joachim; Hoekstra, Henk; Hildebrandt, Hendrik; Kitching, Thomas D; Mellier, Yannick; Miller, Lance; Van Waerbeke, Ludovic; Benabed, Karim; Bonnett, Christopher; Coupon, Jean; Hudson, Michael J; Kuijken, Konrad; Rowe, Barnaby; Schrabback, Tim; Semboloni, Elisabetta; Vafaei, Sanaz; Velander, Malin

    2012-01-01

    We present cosmological constraints from 2D weak gravitational lensing by the large-scale structure in the Canada-France Hawaii Telescope Lensing Survey (CFHTLenS) which spans 154 square degrees in five optical bands. Using accurate photometric redshifts and measured shapes for 4.2 million galaxies between redshifts of 0.2 and 1.3, we compute the 2D cosmic shear correlation function over angular scales ranging between 0.8 and 350 arcmin. Using non-linear models of the dark-matter power spectrum, we constrain cosmological parameters by exploring the parameter space with Population Monte Carlo sampling. The best constraints from lensing alone are obtained for the small-scale density-fluctuations amplitude sigma_8 scaled with the total matter density Omega_m. For a flat LambdaCDM model we obtain sigma_8(Omega_m/0.27)^0.6 = 0.79+-0.03. We combine the CFHTLenS data with WMAP7, BOSS and an HST distance-ladder prior on the Hubble constant to get joint constraints. For a flat LambdaCDM model, we find Omega_m = 0.283+...

  8. Stochastic dynamics of phase singularities under ventricular fibrillation in 2D Beeler-Reuter model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akio Suzuki

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The dynamics of ventricular fibrillation (VF has been studied extensively, and the initiation mechanism of VF has been elucidated to some extent. However, the stochastic dynamical nature of sustained VF remains unclear so far due to the complexity of high dimensional chaos in a heterogeneous system. In this paper, various statistical mechanical properties of sustained VF are studied numerically in 2D Beeler-Reuter-Drouhard-Roberge (BRDR model with normal and modified ionic current conductance. The nature of sustained VF is analyzed by measuring various fluctuations of spatial phase singularity (PS such as velocity, lifetime, the rates of birth and death. It is found that the probability density function (pdf for lifetime of PSs is independent of system size. It is also found that the hyper-Gamma distribution serves as a universal pdf for the counting number of PSs for various system sizes and various parameters of our model tissue under VF. Further, it is demonstrated that the nonlinear Langevin equation associated with a hyper-Gamma process can mimic the pdf and temporal variation of the number of PSs in the 2D BRDR model.

  9. Self-Organization in 2D Traffic Flow Model with Jam-Avoiding Drive

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Takashi

    1995-04-01

    A stochastic cellular automaton (CA) model is presented to investigate the traffic jam by self-organization in the two-dimensional (2D) traffic flow. The CA model is the extended version of the 2D asymmetric exclusion model to take into account jam-avoiding drive. Each site contains either a car moving to the up, a car moving to the right, or is empty. A up car can shift right with probability p ja if it is blocked ahead by other cars. It is shown that the three phases (the low-density phase, the intermediate-density phase and the high-density phase) appear in the traffic flow. The intermediate-density phase is characterized by the right moving of up cars. The jamming transition to the high-density jamming phase occurs with higher density of cars than that without jam-avoiding drive. The jamming transition point p 2c increases with the shifting probability p ja. In the deterministic limit of p ja=1, it is found that a new jamming transition occurs from the low-density synchronized-shifting phase to the high-density moving phase with increasing density of cars. In the synchronized-shifting phase, all up cars do not move to the up but shift to the right by synchronizing with the move of right cars. We show that the jam-avoiding drive has an important effect on the dynamical jamming transition.

  10. Adaptive finite element modeling of direct current resistivity in 2-D generally anisotropic structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Bo; Li, Yuguo; Liu, Ying

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present an adaptive finite element (FE) algorithm for direct current (DC) resistivity modeling in 2-D generally anisotropic conductivity structures. Our algorithm is implemented on an unstructured triangular mesh that readily accommodates complex structures such as topography and dipping layers and so on. We implement a self-adaptive, goal-oriented grid refinement algorithm in which the finite element analysis is performed on a sequence of refined grids. The grid refinement process is guided by an a posteriori error estimator. The problem is formulated in terms of total potentials where mixed boundary conditions are incorporated. This type of boundary condition is superior to the Dirichlet type of conditions and improves numerical accuracy considerably according to model calculations. We have verified the adaptive finite element algorithm using a two-layered earth with azimuthal anisotropy. The FE algorithm with incorporation of mixed boundary conditions achieves high accuracy. The relative error between the numerical and analytical solutions is less than 1% except in the vicinity of the current source location, where the relative error is up to 2.4%. A 2-D anisotropic model is used to demonstrate the effects of anisotropy upon the apparent resistivity in DC soundings.

  11. Sensitivity of transpiration to subsurface properties: Exploration with a 1-D model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrettas, Michail D.; Fung, Inez Y.

    2017-06-01

    The amount of moisture transpired by vegetation is critically tied to the moisture supply accessible to the root zone. In a Mediterranean climate, integrated evapotranspiration (ET) is typically greater in the dry summer when there is an uninterrupted period of high insolation. We present a 1-D model to explore the subsurface factors that may sustain ET through the dry season. The model includes a stochastic parameterization of hydraulic conductivity, root water uptake efficiency, and hydraulic redistribution by plant roots. Model experiments vary the precipitation, the magnitude and seasonality of ET demand, as well as rooting profiles and rooting depths of the vegetation. The results show that the amount of subsurface moisture remaining at the end of the wet winter is determined by the competition among abundant precipitation input, fast infiltration, and winter ET demand. The weathered bedrock retains ˜30% of the winter rain and provides a substantial moisture reservoir that may sustain ET of deep-rooted (>8 m) trees through the dry season. A small negative feedback exists in the root zone, where the depletion of moisture by ET decreases hydraulic conductivity and enhances the retention of moisture. Hence, hydraulic redistribution by plant roots is impactful in a dry season, or with a less conductive subsurface. Suggestions for implementing the model in the CESM are discussed.

  12. Assessing soil fluxes using meteoric 10Be: development and application of the Be2D model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Govers, Gerard; Vanacker, Veerle; Baken, Stijn; Smolders, Erik; Vanderborght, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Meteoric 10Be is a promising and increasingly popular tool to better understand soil fluxes at different timescales. Unlike other, more classical, methods such as the study of sedimentary archives it enables a direct coupling between eroding and deposition sites. However, meteoric 10Be can be mobilized within the soil. Therefore, spatial variations in meteoric 10Be inventories cannot directly be translated into spatial variations in erosion and sedimentation rates: a correct interpretation of measured 10Be inventories requires that both lateral and vertical movement of meteoric 10Be are accounted for. Here, we present a spatially explicit 2D model that allows to simulate the behaviour of meteoric 10Be in the soil system over timescales of up to 1 million year and use the model to investigate the impact of accelerated erosion on meteoric 10Be inventories. The model consists of two parts. A first component deals with advective and diffusive mobility within the soil profile, whereas a second component describes lateral soil (and meteoric 10Be) fluxes over the hillslope. Soil depth is calculated dynamically, accounting for soil production through weathering and lateral soil fluxes. Different types of erosion such as creep, water and tillage erosion are supported. Model runs show that natural soil fluxes can be well reconstructed based on meteoric 10Be inventories, and this for a wide range of geomorphological and pedological conditions. However, extracting signals of human impact and distinguishing them from natural soil fluxes is only feasible when the soil has a rather high retention capacity so that meteoric 10Be is retained in the top soil layer. Application of the Be2D model to an existing data set in the Appalachian Mountains [West et al.,2013] using realistic parameter values for the soil retention capacity as well as for vertical advection resulted in a good agreement between simulated and observed 10Be inventories. This confirms the robustness of the model. We

  13. A coupled $2\\times2$D Babcock-Leighton solar dynamo model. II. Reference dynamo solutions

    CERN Document Server

    Lemerle, Alexandre

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we complete the presentation of a new hybrid $2\\times2$D flux transport dynamo (FTD) model of the solar cycle based on the Babcock-Leighton mechanism of poloidal magnetic field regeneration via the surface decay of bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs). This hybrid model is constructed by allowing the surface flux transport (SFT) simulation described in Lemerle et al. 2015 to provide the poloidal source term to an axisymmetric FTD simulation defined in a meridional plane, which in turn generates the BMRs required by the SFT. A key aspect of this coupling is the definition of an emergence function describing the probability of BMR emergence as a function of the spatial distribution of the internal axisymmetric magnetic field. We use a genetic algorithm to calibrate this function, together with other model parameters, against observed cycle 21 emergence data. We present a reference dynamo solution reproducing many solar cycle characteristics, including good hemispheric coupling, phase relationship betwe...

  14. 2-D IMAGE-BASED VOLUMETRIC MODELING FOR PARTICLE OF RANDOM SHAPE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ken; Larry E. Banta; Jiang Gangyi

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, an approach to predicting randomly-shaped particle volume based on its twoDimensional (2-D) digital image is explored. Conversion of gray-scale image of the particles to its binary counterpart is first performed using backlighting technique. The silhouette of particle is thus obtained, and consequently, informative features such as particle area, centroid and shape-related descriptors are collected. Several dimensionless parameters are defined, and used as regressor variables in a multiple linear regression model to predict particle volume. Regressor coefficients are found by fitting to a randomly selected sample of 501 particles ranging in size from 4.75mm to 25mm. The model testing experiment is conducted against a different aggregate sample of the similar statistical properties, the errors of the model-predicted volume of the batch is within ±2%.

  15. Observation of spatial charge and spin correlations in the 2D Fermi-Hubbard model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheuk, Lawrence W; Nichols, Matthew A; Lawrence, Katherine R; Okan, Melih; Zhang, Hao; Khatami, Ehsan; Trivedi, Nandini; Paiva, Thereza; Rigol, Marcos; Zwierlein, Martin W

    2016-09-16

    Strong electron correlations lie at the origin of high-temperature superconductivity. Its essence is believed to be captured by the Fermi-Hubbard model of repulsively interacting fermions on a lattice. Here we report on the site-resolved observation of charge and spin correlations in the two-dimensional (2D) Fermi-Hubbard model realized with ultracold atoms. Antiferromagnetic spin correlations are maximal at half-filling and weaken monotonically upon doping. At large doping, nearest-neighbor correlations between singly charged sites are negative, revealing the formation of a correlation hole, the suppressed probability of finding two fermions near each other. As the doping is reduced, the correlations become positive, signaling strong bunching of doublons and holes, in agreement with numerical calculations. The dynamics of the doublon-hole correlations should play an important role for transport in the Fermi-Hubbard model.

  16. Well-posedness and generalized plane waves simulations of a 2D mode conversion model

    CERN Document Server

    Imbert-Gérard, Lise-Marie

    2015-01-01

    Certain types of electro-magnetic waves propagating in a plasma can undergo a mode conversion process. In magnetic confinement fusion, this phenomenon is very useful to heat the plasma, since it permits to transfer the heat at or near the plasma center. This work focuses on a mathematical model of wave propagation around the mode conversion region, from both theoretical and numerical points of view. It aims at developing, for a well-posed equation, specific basis functions to study a wave mode conversion process. These basis functions, called generalized plane waves, are intrinsically based on variable coefficients. As such, they are particularly adapted to the mode conversion problem. The design of generalized plane waves for the proposed model is described in detail. Their implementation within a discontinuous Galerkin method then provides numerical simulations of the process. These first 2D simulations for this model agree with qualitative aspects studied in previous works.

  17. Interchange turbulence model for the edge plasma in SOLEDGE2D-EIRENE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bufferand, H.; Marandet, Y. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, PIIM, Marseille (France); Ciraolo, G.; Ghendrih, P.; Bucalossi, J.; Fedorczak, N.; Gunn, J.; Tamain, P. [CEA, IRFM, Saint-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Colin, C.; Galassi, D.; Leybros, R.; Serre, E. [Aix-Marseille Universite, CNRS, M2P2, Marseille (France)

    2016-08-15

    Cross-field transport in edge tokamak plasmas is known to be dominated by turbulent transport. A dedicated effort has been made to simulate this turbulent transport from first principle models but the numerical cost to run these simulations on the ITER scale remains prohibitive. Edge plasma transport study relies mostly nowadays on so-called transport codes where the turbulent transport is taken into account using effective ad-hoc diffusion coefficients. In this contribution, we propose to introduce a transport equation for the turbulence intensity in SOLEDGE2D-EIRENE to describe the interchange turbulence properties. Going beyond the empirical diffusive model, this system automatically generates profiles for the turbulent transport and hence reduces the number of degrees of freedom for edge plasma transport codes. We draw inspiration from the k-epsilon model widely used in the neutral fluid community. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  18. Drastic Reduction of Cutoff Effects in 2-d Lattice O(N) Models

    CERN Document Server

    Balog, J; Pepe, M; Weisz, P; Wiese, U -J

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the cutoff effects in 2-d lattice O(N) models for a variety of lattice actions, and we identify a class of very simple actions for which the lattice artifacts are extremely small. One action agrees with the standard action, except that it constrains neighboring spins to a maximal relative angle delta. We fix delta by demanding that a particular value of the step scaling function agrees with its continuum result already on a rather coarse lattice. Remarkably, the cutoff effects of the entire step scaling function are then reduced to the per mille level. This also applies to the theta-vacuum effects of the step scaling function in the 2-d O(3) model. The cutoff effects of other physical observables including the renormalized coupling and the mass in the isotensor channel are also reduced drastically. Another choice, the mixed action, which combines the standard quadratic with an appropriately tuned large quartic term, also has extremely small cutoff effects. The size of cutoff effects is also inv...

  19. Laser irradiated fluorescent perfluorocarbon microparticles in 2-D and 3-D breast cancer cell models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Chengcheng; Wang, Long; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Yan; Hu, Yihe; Peng, Qinghai

    2017-01-01

    Perfluorocarbon (PFC) droplets were studied as new generation ultrasound contrast agents via acoustic or optical droplet vaporization (ADV or ODV). Little is known about the ODV irradiated vaporization mechanisms of PFC-microparticle complexs and the stability of the new bubbles produced. In this study, fluorescent perfluorohexane (PFH) poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) particles were used as a model to study the process of particle vaporization and bubble stability following excitation in two-dimensional (2-D) and three-dimensional (3-D) cell models. We observed localization of the fluorescent agent on the microparticle coating material initially and after vaporization under fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, the stability and growth dynamics of the newly created bubbles were observed for 11 min following vaporization. The particles were co-cultured with 2-D cells to form 3-D spheroids and could be vaporized even when encapsulated within the spheroids via laser irradiation, which provides an effective basis for further work. PMID:28262671

  20. A 2D Electromechanical Model of Human Atrial Tissue Using the Discrete Element Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, Paul; Adeniran, Ismail; Yang, Dongmin; Sheng, Yong; Zhang, Henggui; Ye, Jianqiao

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac tissue is a syncytium of coupled cells with pronounced intrinsic discrete nature. Previous models of cardiac electromechanics often ignore such discrete properties and treat cardiac tissue as a continuous medium, which has fundamental limitations. In the present study, we introduce a 2D electromechanical model for human atrial tissue based on the discrete element method (DEM). In the model, single-cell dynamics are governed by strongly coupling the electrophysiological model of Courtemanche et al. to the myofilament model of Rice et al. with two-way feedbacks. Each cell is treated as a viscoelastic body, which is physically represented by a clump of nine particles. Cell aggregations are arranged so that the anisotropic nature of cardiac tissue due to fibre orientations can be modelled. Each cell is electrically coupled to neighbouring cells, allowing excitation waves to propagate through the tissue. Cell-to-cell mechanical interactions are modelled using a linear contact bond model in DEM. By coupling cardiac electrophysiology with mechanics via the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration, the DEM model successfully simulates the conduction of cardiac electrical waves and the tissue's corresponding mechanical contractions. The developed DEM model is numerically stable and provides a powerful method for studying the electromechanical coupling problem in the heart.

  1. On constitutive functions for hindered settling velocity in 1-D settler models: Selection of appropriate model structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torfs, Elena; Balemans, Sophie; Locatelli, Florent; Diehl, Stefan; Bürger, Raimund; Laurent, Julien; François, Pierre; Nopens, Ingmar

    2017-03-01

    Advanced 1-D models for Secondary Settling Tanks (SSTs) explicitly account for several phenomena that influence the settling process (such as hindered settling and compression settling). For each of these phenomena a valid mathematical expression needs to be selected and its parameters calibrated to obtain a model that can be used for operation and control. This is, however, a challenging task as these phenomena may occur simultaneously. Therefore, the presented work evaluates several available expressions for hindered settling based on long-term batch settling data. Specific attention is paid to the behaviour of these hindered settling functions in the compression region in order to evaluate how the modelling of sludge compression is influenced by the choice of a certain hindered settling function. The analysis shows that the exponential hindered settling forms, which are most commonly used in traditional SST models, not only account for hindered settling but partly lump other phenomena (compression) as well. This makes them unsuitable for advanced 1-D models that explicitly include each phenomenon in a modular way. A power-law function is shown to be more appropriate to describe the hindered settling velocity in advanced 1-D SST models.

  2. Using the activated sludge model 2d (ASM2d) to understand and predict the phosphorus accumulating organisms mechanism in enhanced biological phosphorus removal in relation to disintegrated sludge as a carbon source

    OpenAIRE

    Boontian, Nittaya

    2012-01-01

    Carbon sources are considered as one of the most important factors in the performance of enhanced biological phosphorus removal (EBPR). Disintegrated sludge (DS) can act as carbon source to increase the efficiency of EBPR. This research explores the influence of DS upon phosphorus removal efficiency using mathematical simulation modeling. Activated Sludge Model No. 2d (ASM2d) is one of the most useful of activated sludge (AS) models. This is because ASM2d can express the integrated mechanisms...

  3. 2-D Modeling of Nanoscale MOSFETs: Non-Equilibrium Green's Function Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svizhenko, Alexei; Anantram, M. P.; Govindan, T. R.; Biegel, Bryan

    2001-01-01

    We have developed physical approximations and computer code capable of realistically simulating 2-D nanoscale transistors, using the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) method. This is the most accurate full quantum model yet applied to 2-D device simulation. Open boundary conditions and oxide tunneling are treated on an equal footing. Electrons in the ellipsoids of the conduction band are treated within the anisotropic effective mass approximation. Electron-electron interaction is treated within Hartree approximation by solving NEGF and Poisson equations self-consistently. For the calculations presented here, parallelization is performed by distributing the solution of NEGF equations to various processors, energy wise. We present simulation of the "benchmark" MIT 25nm and 90nm MOSFETs and compare our results to those from the drift-diffusion simulator and the quantum-corrected results available. In the 25nm MOSFET, the channel length is less than ten times the electron wavelength, and the electron scattering time is comparable to its transit time. Our main results are: (1) Simulated drain subthreshold current characteristics are shown, where the potential profiles are calculated self-consistently by the corresponding simulation methods. The current predicted by our quantum simulation has smaller subthreshold slope of the Vg dependence which results in higher threshold voltage. (2) When gate oxide thickness is less than 2 nm, gate oxide leakage is a primary factor which determines off-current of a MOSFET (3) Using our 2-D NEGF simulator, we found several ways to drastically decrease oxide leakage current without compromising drive current. (4) Quantum mechanically calculated electron density is much smaller than the background doping density in the poly silicon gate region near oxide interface. This creates an additional effective gate voltage. Different ways to. include this effect approximately will be discussed.

  4. Dynamical modeling of sub-grid scales in 2D turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laval, Jean-Philippe; Dubrulle, Bérengère; Nazarenko, Sergey

    2000-08-01

    We develop a new numerical method which treats resolved and sub-grid scales as two different fluid components evolving according to their own dynamical equations. These two fluids are nonlinearly interacting and can be transformed one into another when their scale becomes comparable to the grid size. Equations describing the two-fluid dynamics were rigorously derived from Euler equations [B. Dubrulle, S. Nazarenko, Physica D 110 (1997) 123-138] and they do not involve any adjustable parameters. The main assumption of such a derivation is that the large-scale vortices are so strong that they advect the sub-grid scales as a passive scalar, and the interactions of small scales with small and intermediate scales can be neglected. As a test for our numerical method, we performed numerical simulations of 2D turbulence with a spectral gap, and we found a good agreement with analytical results obtained for this case by Nazarenko and Laval [Non-local 2D turbulence and passive scalars in Batchelor’s regime, J. Fluid Mech., in press]. We used the two-fluid method to study three typical problems in 2D dynamics of incompressible fluids: decaying turbulence, vortex merger and forced turbulence. The two-fluid simulations performed on at 128 2 and 256 2 resolution were compared with pseudo-spectral simulations using hyperviscosity performed at the same and at much higher resolution. This comparison shows that performance of the two-fluid method is much better than one of the pseudo-spectral method at the same resolution and comparable computational cost. The most significant improvement is observed in modeling of the small-scale component, so that effective inertial interval increases by about two decades compared to the high-resolution pseudo-spectral method. Using the two-fluid method, we demonstrated that the k-3 tail always exists for the energy spectrum, although its amplitude is slowly decreasing in decaying turbulence.

  5. The optimization of high resolution topographic data for 1D hydrodynamic models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ales, Ronovsky, E-mail: ales.ronovsky@vsb.cz; Michal, Podhoranyi [IT4Innovations National Supercomputing Center, VŠB-Technical University of Ostrava, Studentská 6231/1B, 708 33 Ostrava (Czech Republic)

    2016-06-08

    The main focus of our research presented in this paper is to optimize and use high resolution topographical data (HRTD) for hydrological modelling. Optimization of HRTD is done by generating adaptive mesh by measuring distance of coarse mesh and the surface of the dataset and adapting the mesh from the perspective of keeping the geometry as close to initial resolution as possible. Technique described in this paper enables computation of very accurate 1-D hydrodynamic models. In the paper, we use HEC-RAS software as a solver. For comparison, we have chosen the amount of generated cells/grid elements (in whole discretization domain and selected cross sections) with respect to preservation of the accuracy of the computational domain. Generation of the mesh for hydrodynamic modelling is strongly reliant on domain size and domain resolution. Topographical dataset used in this paper was created using LiDAR method and it captures 5.9km long section of a catchment of the river Olše. We studied crucial changes in topography for generated mesh. Assessment was done by commonly used statistical and visualization methods.

  6. Monte Carlo Uncertainty Quantification Using Quasi-1D SRM Ballistic Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Viganò

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Compactness, reliability, readiness, and construction simplicity of solid rocket motors make them very appealing for commercial launcher missions and embarked systems. Solid propulsion grants high thrust-to-weight ratio, high volumetric specific impulse, and a Technology Readiness Level of 9. However, solid rocket systems are missing any throttling capability at run-time, since pressure-time evolution is defined at the design phase. This lack of mission flexibility makes their missions sensitive to deviations of performance from nominal behavior. For this reason, the reliability of predictions and reproducibility of performances represent a primary goal in this field. This paper presents an analysis of SRM performance uncertainties throughout the implementation of a quasi-1D numerical model of motor internal ballistics based on Shapiro’s equations. The code is coupled with a Monte Carlo algorithm to evaluate statistics and propagation of some peculiar uncertainties from design data to rocker performance parameters. The model has been set for the reproduction of a small-scale rocket motor, discussing a set of parametric investigations on uncertainty propagation across the ballistic model.

  7. 1-D-ice flow modelling at EPICA Dome C and Dome Fuji, East Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Parrenin

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available One-dimensional (1-D ice flow models are used to construct the age scales at the Dome C and Dome Fuji drilling sites (East Antarctica. The poorly constrained glaciological parameters at each site are recovered by fitting independent age markers identified within each core. We reconstruct past accumulation rates, that are larger than those modelled using the classical vapour saturation pressure relationship during glacial periods by up to a factor 1.5. During the Early Holocene, changes in reconstructed accumulation are not linearly related to changes in ice isotopic composition. A simple model of past elevation changes is developed and shows an amplitude variation of 110–120 m at both sites. We suggest that there is basal melting at Dome C (0.56±0.19 mm/yr. The reconstructed velocity profile is highly non-linear at both sites, which suggests complex ice flow effects. This induces a non-linear thinning function in both drilling sites, which is also characterized by bumps corresponding to variations in ice thickness with time.

  8. Assessing the habitability of planets with Earth-like atmospheres with 1D and 3D climate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godolt, M.; Grenfell, J. L.; Kitzmann, D.; Kunze, M.; Langematz, U.; Patzer, A. B. C.; Rauer, H.; Stracke, B.

    2016-07-01

    Context. The habitable zone (HZ) describes the range of orbital distances around a star where the existence of liquid water on the surface of an Earth-like planet is in principle possible. The applicability of one-dimensional (1D) climate models for the estimation of the HZ boundaries has been questioned by recent three-dimensional (3D) climate studies. While 3D studies can calculate the water vapor, ice albedo, and cloud feedback self-consistently and therefore allow for a deeper understanding and the identification of relevant climate processes, 1D model studies rely on fewer model assumptions and can be more easily applied to the large parameter space possible for extrasolar planets. Aims: We evaluate the applicability of 1D climate models to estimate the potential habitability of Earth-like extrasolar planets by comparing our 1D model results to those of 3D climate studies in the literature. We vary the two important planetary properties, surface albedo and relative humidity, in the 1D model. These depend on climate feedbacks that are not treated self-consistently in most 1D models. Methods: We applied a cloud-free 1D radiative-convective climate model to calculate the climate of Earth-like planets around different types of main-sequence stars with varying surface albedo and relative humidity profile. We compared the results to those of 3D model calculations available in the literature and investigated to what extent the 1D model can approximate the surface temperatures calculated by the 3D models. Results: The 1D parameter study results in a large range of climates possible for an Earth-sized planet with an Earth-like atmosphere and water reservoir at a certain stellar insolation. At some stellar insolations the full spectrum of climate states could be realized, i.e., uninhabitable conditions due to surface temperatures that are too high or too low as well as habitable surface conditions, depending only on the relative humidity and surface albedo assumed. When

  9. A Bayesian approach to modeling 2D gravity data using polygon states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Titus, W. J.; Titus, S.; Davis, J. R.

    2015-12-01

    We present a Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method for the 2D gravity inversion of a localized subsurface object with constant density contrast. Our models have four parameters: the density contrast, the number of vertices in a polygonal approximation of the object, an upper bound on the ratio of the perimeter squared to the area, and the vertices of a polygon container that bounds the object. Reasonable parameter values can be estimated prior to inversion using a forward model and geologic information. In addition, we assume that the field data have a common random uncertainty that lies between two bounds but that it has no systematic uncertainty. Finally, we assume that there is no uncertainty in the spatial locations of the measurement stations. For any set of model parameters, we use MCMC methods to generate an approximate probability distribution of polygons for the object. We then compute various probability distributions for the object, including the variance between the observed and predicted fields (an important quantity in the MCMC method), the area, the center of area, and the occupancy probability (the probability that a spatial point lies within the object). In addition, we compare probabilities of different models using parallel tempering, a technique which also mitigates trapping in local optima that can occur in certain model geometries. We apply our method to several synthetic data sets generated from objects of varying shape and location. We also analyze a natural data set collected across the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge in New Mexico, where the object (i.e. the air below the bridge) is known and the canyon is approximately 2D. Although there are many ways to view results, the occupancy probability proves quite powerful. We also find that the choice of the container is important. In particular, large containers should be avoided, because the more closely a container confines the object, the better the predictions match properties of object.

  10. Be2D: A model to understand the distribution of meteoric 10Be in soilscapes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campforts, Benjamin; Vanacker, Veerle; Vanderborght, Jan; Govers, Gerard

    2016-04-01

    Cosmogenic nuclides have revolutionised our understanding of earth surface process rates. They have become one of the standard tools to quantify soil production by weathering, soil redistribution and erosion. Especially Beryllium-10 has gained much attention due to its long half-live and propensity to be relatively conservative in the landscape. The latter makes 10Be an excellent tool to assess denudation rates over the last 1000 to 100 × 103 years, bridging the anthropogenic and geological time scale. Nevertheless, the mobility of meteoric 10Be in soil systems makes translation of meteoric 10Be inventories into erosion and deposition rates difficult. Here we present a coupled soil hillslope model, Be2D, that is applied to synthetic and real topography to address the following three research questions. (i) What is the influence of vertical meteoric Be10 mobility, caused by chemical mobility, clay translocation and bioturbation, on its lateral redistribution over the soilscape, (ii) How does vertical mobility influence erosion rates and soil residence times inferred from meteoric 10Be inventories and (iii) To what extent can a tracer with a half-life of 1.36 Myr be used to distinguish between natural and human-disturbed soil redistribution rates? The model architecture of Be2D is designed to answer these research questions. Be2D is a dynamic model including physical processes such as soil formation, physical weathering, clay migration, bioturbation, creep, overland flow and tillage erosion. Pathways of meteoric 10Be mobility are simulated using a two step approach which is updated each timestep. First, advective and diffusive mobility of meteoric 10Be is simulated within the soil profile and second, lateral redistribution because of lateral soil fluxes is calculated. The performance and functionality of the model is demonstrated through a number of synthetic and real model runs using existing datasets of meteoric 10Be from case-studies in southeastern US. Brute

  11. Estimating nitrogen losses in furrow irrigated soil amended by compost using HYDRUS-2D model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Shahid; Guber, Andrey; Zaman Khan, Haroon; ullah, Ehsan

    2014-05-01

    Furrow irrigation commonly results in high nitrogen (N) losses from soil profile via deep infiltration. Estimation of such losses and their reduction is not a trivial task because furrow irrigation creates highly nonuniform distribution of soil water that leads to preferential water and N fluxes in soil profile. Direct measurements of such fluxes are impractical. The objective of this study was to assess applicability of HYDRUS-2D model for estimating nitrogen balance in manure amended soil under furrow irrigation. Field experiments were conducted in a sandy loam soil amended by poultry manure compost (PMC) and pressmud compost (PrMC) fertilizers. The PMC and PrMC contained 2.5% and 0.9% N and were applied at 5 rates: 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 ton/ha. Plots were irrigated starting from 26th day from planting using furrows with 1x1 ridge to furrow aspect ratio. Irrigation depths were 7.5 cm and time interval between irrigations varied from 8 to 15 days. Results of the field experiments showed that approximately the same corn yield was obtained with considerably higher N application rates using PMC than using PrMC as a fertilizer. HYDRUS-2D model was implemented to evaluate N fluxes in soil amended by PMC and PrMC fertilizers. Nitrogen exchange between two pools of organic N (compost and soil) and two pools of mineral N (soil NH4-N and soil NO3-N) was modeled using mineralization and nitrification reactions. Sources of mineral N losses from soil profile included denitrification, root N uptake and leaching with deep infiltration of water. HYDRUS-2D simulations showed that the observed increases in N root water uptake and corn yields associated with compost application could not be explained by the amount of N added to soil profile with the compost. Predicted N uptake by roots significantly underestimated the field data. Good agreement between simulated and field-estimated values of N root uptake was achieved when the rate of organic N mineralization was increased

  12. Destabilization of survival factor MEF2D mRNA by neurotoxin in models of Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao; Cai, Zhibiao; Lu, Fangfang; Li, Chen; Zhu, Xiaofei; Su, Linna; Gao, Guodong; Yang, Qian

    2014-09-01

    Progressive loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons in the substantial nigra pars compacta (SNc) is an important pathological feature in Parkinson's disease (PD). Loss of transcription factor myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D), a key neuronal survival factor, has been shown to underlie the loss of DA neurons in SNc and the pathogenic process of PD. It is known that PD-associated neurotoxins reduce the level of MEF2D protein to trigger neuronal death. Although neurotoxins clearly destabilize MEF2D by post-translational mechanisms, it is not known whether regulation of MEF2D mRNA contributes to neurotoxin-induced decrease in MEF2D protein. In this work, we showed that MPP(+), the toxic metabolite of MPTP, caused a significant decrease in the half-life and total level of MEF2D mRNA in a DA neuronal cell line, SN4741 cells. Quantitative PCR analysis of the SNc DA neurons captured by immune-laser capture microdissection showed that exposure to MPTP led to a marked reduction in the level of MEF2D mRNA in SNc DA neurons compared to controls. Down-regulation of MEF2D mRNA alone reduced the viability of SN4741 cells and sensitized the cells to MPP(+)-induced toxicity. These results suggest that destabilization and reduction in MEF2D mRNA is in part responsible for neurotoxin-induced decrease in MEF2D protein and neuronal viability. Myocyte enhancer factor 2D (MEF2D) plays an important role in neuronal survival. How MEF2D mRNA is deregulated under toxic stress is unclear. We found that PD-associated neurotoxins destabilize MEF2D mRNA and reduce its level in vitro and in vivo. Reduction in MEF2D mRNA is sufficient to sensitize model cells to neurotoxin-induced toxicity, suggesting that destabilization of MEF2D mRNA is part of the mechanism by which neurotoxins trigger deregulation of neuronal survival.

  13. Comparative modeling of vertical and planar organic phototransistors with 2D drift-diffusion simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezzeccheri, E.; Colasanti, S.; Falco, A.; Liguori, R.; Rubino, A.; Lugli, P.

    2016-05-01

    Vertical Organic Transistors and Phototransistors have been proven to be promising technologies due to the advantages of reduced channel length and larger sensitive area with respect to planar devices. Nevertheless, a real improvement of their performance is subordinate to the quantitative description of their operation mechanisms. In this work, we present a comparative study on the modeling of vertical and planar Organic Phototransistor (OPT) structures. Computer-based simulations of the devices have been carried out with Synopsys Sentaurus TCAD in a 2D Drift-Diffusion framework. The photoactive semiconductor material has been modeled using the virtual semiconductor approach as the archetypal P3HT:PC61BM bulk heterojunction. It has been found that both simulated devices have comparable electrical and optical characteristics, accordingly to recent experimental reports on the subject.

  14. Complex-temperature properties of the Ising model on 2D heteropolygonal lattices

    CERN Document Server

    Matveev, V; Matveev, Victor; Shrock, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Using exact results, we determine the complex-temperature phase diagrams of the 2D Ising model on three regular heteropolygonal lattices, (3 \\cdot 6 \\cdot 3 \\cdot 6) (kagom\\'{e}), (3 \\cdot 12^2), and (4 \\cdot 8^2) (bathroom tile), where the notation denotes the regular n-sided polygons adjacent to each vertex. We also work out the exact complex-temperature singularities of the spontaneous magnetisation. A comparison with the properties on the square, triangular, and hexagonal lattices is given. In particular, we find the first case where, even for isotropic spin-spin exchange couplings, the nontrivial non-analyticities of the free energy of the Ising model lie in a two-dimensional, rather than one-dimensional, algebraic variety in the z=e^{-2K} plane.

  15. Spin-spin interaction effect in 2D Extended Hubbard Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zouhair, A.; Harir, S.; Bennai, M.; Boughaleb, Y.

    2014-09-01

    Using an exact diagonlization for finite square lattice and taking into account the periodic boundary conditions in the two directions, we study the spin-spin interaction effect on some local electronic properties for antiferromagnetic correlated electrons system. We have considered an Extended Hubbard Model (EHM) including on-site coulomb interaction energy U and spin-spin interaction term J. The diagonlization of this 2D EHM model allows us to study J effect on some local properties for finite square lattice. The analysis of the obtained results shows that the introduction of spin-spin interaction induces a supplementary conductivity for antiferromagnetic correlated electrons system, even in the strong on-site interaction regime.

  16. A VERTICAL 2D MATHEMATICAL MODEL FOR HYDRODYNAMIC FLOWS WITH FREE SURFACE IN σ COORDINATE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Numerical models with hydrostatic pressure have been widely utilized in studying flows in rivers, estuaries and coastal areas. The hydrostatic assumption is valid for the large-scale surface flows where the vertical acceleration can be ignored, but for some particular cases the hydrodynamic pressure is important. In this paper, a vertical 2D mathematical model with non-hydrostatic pressure was implemented in the σ coordinate. A fractional step method was used to enable the pressure to be decomposed into hydrostatic and hydrodynamic components and the predictor-corrector approach was applied to integration in time domain. Finally, several computational cases were studied to validate the importance of contributions of the hydrodynamic pressure.

  17. 2D photochemical modeling of Saturn's stratosphere. Part II: Feedback between composition and temperature

    CERN Document Server

    Hue, V; Cavalié, T; Dobrijevic, M; Hersant, F

    2015-01-01

    Saturn's axial tilt produces seasons in a similar way as on Earth. Both the stratospheric temperature and composition are affected by this latitudinally varying insolation along the seasons. The thermal structure is controlled and regulated by the amount of hydrocarbons in the stratosphere, which act as absorbers and coolants from the UV to the far-IR spectral range, and this structure influences the amount of hydrocarbons. We study here the feedback between the chemical composition and the thermal structure by coupling a latitudinal and seasonal photochemical model with a radiative seasonal model. Our results show that the seasonal temperature peak in the higher stratosphere, associated with the seasonal increase of insolation, is shifted earlier than the maximum insolation peak. This shift is increased with increasing latitudes and is caused by the low amount of stratospheric coolants in the spring season. At 80$^{\\circ}$ in both hemispheres, the temperature peak at 1d-2mbar is seen to occur half a season e...

  18. Protein expression profiles of human lymph and plasma mapped by 2D-DIGE and 1D SDS–PAGE coupled with nanoLC–ESI–MS/MS bottom-up proteomics

    OpenAIRE

    Clement, Cristina C.; Aphkhazava, David; Nieves, Edward; Callaway, Myrasol; Olszewski, Waldemar; Rotzschke, Olaf; Santambrogio, Laura

    2012-01-01

    In this study a proteomic approach was used to define the protein content of matched samples of afferent prenodal lymph and plasma derived from healthy volunteers. The analysis was performed using two analytical methodologies coupled with nanoliquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry: one-dimensional gel electrophoresis (1DEF nanoLC Orbitrap–ESI–MS/MS), and two-dimensional fluorescence difference-in-gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE nanoLC–ESI–MS/MS). The 253 significantly identified proteins...

  19. A grid of 1D low-mass star formation collapse models

    CERN Document Server

    Vaytet, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The current study was developed to provide a database of relatively simple numerical simulations of protostellar collapse, as a template library for observations of cores and very young protostars, and for researchers who wish to test their chemical modeling under dynamic astrophysical conditions. It was also designed to identify statistical trends that may appear when running many models of the formation of low-mass stars by varying the initial conditions. A large set of 143 calculations of the gravitational collapse of an isolated sphere of gas with uniform temperature and a Bonnor-Ebert like density profile was undertaken using a 1D fully implicit Lagrangian radiation hydrodynamics code. The parameter space covered initial masses from 0.2 to 8 Msun, temperatures of 5-30 K and radii between 3000 and 30,000 AU. A spread in the thermal evolutionary tracks of the runs was found, due to differing initial conditions and optical depths. Within less than an order of magnitude, all first and second Larson cores had...

  20. Calibrating the Micromechanical Parameters of the PFC2D(3D Models Using the Improved Simulated Annealing Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available PFC2D(3D is commercial software, which is commonly used to model the crack initiation of rock and rock-like materials. For the PFC2D(3D numerical simulation, a proper set of microparameters need to be determined before the numerical simulation. To obtain a proper set of microparameters for PFC2D(3D model based on the macroparameters obtained from physical experiments, a novel technique has been carried out in this paper. The improved simulated annealing algorithm was employed to calibrate the microparameters of the numerical simulation model of PFC2D(3D. A Python script completely controls the calibration process, which can terminate automatically based on a termination criterion. The microparameter calibration process is not based on establishing the relationship between microparameters and macroparameters; instead, the microparameters are calibrated according to the improved simulated annealing algorithm. By using the proposed approach, the microparameters of both the contact-bond model and parallel-bond model in PFC2D(3D can be determined. To verify the validity of calibrating the microparameters of PFC2D(3D via the improved simulated annealing algorithm, some examples were selected from the literature. The corresponding numerical simulations were performed, and the numerical simulation results indicated that the proposed method is reliable for calibrating the microparameters of PFC2D(3D model.

  1. The development and testing of a 2D laboratory seismic modelling system for heterogeneous structure investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Yike; Greenhalgh, Stewart A.; Robertsson, Johan O. A.; Karaman, Hakki

    2015-05-01

    Lateral velocity variations and low velocity near-surface layers can produce strong scattered and guided waves which interfere with reflections and lead to severe imaging problems in seismic exploration. In order to investigate these specific problems by laboratory seismic modelling, a simple 2D ultrasonic model facility has been recently assembled within the Wave Propagation Lab at ETH Zurich. The simulated geological structures are constructed from 2 mm thick metal and plastic sheets, cut and bonded together. The experiments entail the use of a piezoelectric source driven by a pulse amplifier at ultrasonic frequencies to generate Lamb waves in the plate, which are detected by piezoelectric receivers and recorded digitally on a National Instruments recording system, under LabVIEW software control. The 2D models employed were constructed in-house in full recognition of the similitude relations. The first heterogeneous model features a flat uniform low velocity near-surface layer and deeper dipping and flat interfaces separating different materials. The second model is comparable but also incorporates two rectangular shaped inserts, one of low velocity, the other of high velocity. The third model is identical to the second other than it has an irregular low velocity surface layer of variable thickness. Reflection as well as transmission experiments (crosshole & vertical seismic profiling) were performed on each model. The two dominant Lamb waves recorded are the fundamental symmetric mode (non-dispersive) and the fundamental antisymmetric (flexural) dispersive mode, the latter normally being absent when the source transducer is located on a model edge but dominant when it is on the flat planar surface of the plate. Experimental group and phase velocity dispersion curves were determined and plotted for both modes in a uniform aluminium plate. For the reflection seismic data, various processing techniques were applied, as far as pre-stack Kirchhoff migration. The

  2. Several tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs of FANCG are required for assembly of the BRCA2/D1-D2-G-X3 complex, FANCD2 monoubiquitylation and phleomycin resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, James B; Blom, Eric; Cunningham, Ryan; Xiao, Yuxuan; Kupfer, Gary M; Jones, Nigel J

    2010-07-01

    The Fanconi anaemia (FA) FANCG protein is an integral component of the FA nuclear core complex that is required for monoubiquitylation of FANCD2. FANCG is also part of another protein complex termed D1-D2-G-X3 that contains FANCD2 and the homologous recombination repair proteins BRCA2 (FANCD1) and XRCC3. Formation of the D1-D2-G-X3 complex is mediated by serine-7 phosphorylation of FANCG and occurs independently of the FA core complex and FANCD2 monoubiquitylation. FANCG contains seven tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs that mediate protein-protein interactions and here we show that mutation of several of the TPR motifs at a conserved consensus residue ablates the in vivo binding activity of FANCG. Expression of mutated TPR1, TPR2, TPR5 and TPR6 in Chinese hamster fancg mutant NM3 fails to functionally complement its hypersensitivities to mitomycin C (MMC) and phleomycin and fails to restore FANCD2 monoubiquitylation. Using co-immunoprecipitation analysis, we demonstrate that these TPR-mutated FANCG proteins fail to interact with BRCA2, XRCC3, FANCA or FANCF. The interactions of other proteins in the D1-D2-G-X3 complex are also absent, including the interaction of BRCA2 with both the monoubiquitylated (FANCD2-L) and non-ubiquitylated (FANCD2-S) isoforms of FANCD2. Interestingly, a mutation of TPR7 (R563E), that complements the MMC and phleomycin hypersensitivity of human FA-G EUFA316 cells, fails to complement NM3, despite the mutated FANCG protein co-precipitating with FANCA, BRCA2 and XRCC3. Whilst interaction of TPR7-mutated FANCG with FANCF does appear to be reduced in NM3, FANCD2 is monoubiquitylated suggesting that sub-optimal interactions of FANCG in the core complex and the D1-D2-G-X3 complex are responsible for the observed MMC- and phleomycin-hypersensitivity, rather than a defect in FANCD2 monoubiquitylation. Our data demonstrate that FANCG functions as a mediator of protein-protein interactions and is vital for the assembly of multi-protein complexes

  3. Several tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs of FANCG are required for assembly of the BRCA2/D1-D2-G-X3 complex, FANCD2 monoubiquitylation and phleomycin resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, James B. [Molecular Oncology and Stem Cell Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Blom, Eric [Department of Clinical Genetics and Human Genetics, VU University Medical Center, Van der Boechorststraat 7, NL-1081 BT Amsterdam (Netherlands); Cunningham, Ryan; Xiao, Yuxuan [Molecular Oncology and Stem Cell Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom); Kupfer, Gary M. [Departments of Pediatrics and Pathology, Yale University School of Medicine, Section of Hematology/Oncology, 333 Cedar Street, New Haven, CT 0652 (United States); Jones, Nigel J., E-mail: njjones@liv.ac.uk [Molecular Oncology and Stem Cell Research Group, School of Biological Sciences, University of Liverpool, Biosciences Building, Crown Street, Liverpool L69 7ZB (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-07

    The Fanconi anaemia (FA) FANCG protein is an integral component of the FA nuclear core complex that is required for monoubiquitylation of FANCD2. FANCG is also part of another protein complex termed D1-D2-G-X3 that contains FANCD2 and the homologous recombination repair proteins BRCA2 (FANCD1) and XRCC3. Formation of the D1-D2-G-X3 complex is mediated by serine-7 phosphorylation of FANCG and occurs independently of the FA core complex and FANCD2 monoubiquitylation. FANCG contains seven tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs that mediate protein-protein interactions and here we show that mutation of several of the TPR motifs at a conserved consensus residue ablates the in vivo binding activity of FANCG. Expression of mutated TPR1, TPR2, TPR5 and TPR6 in Chinese hamster fancg mutant NM3 fails to functionally complement its hypersensitivities to mitomycin C (MMC) and phleomycin and fails to restore FANCD2 monoubiquitylation. Using co-immunoprecipitation analysis, we demonstrate that these TPR-mutated FANCG proteins fail to interact with BRCA2, XRCC3, FANCA or FANCF. The interactions of other proteins in the D1-D2-G-X3 complex are also absent, including the interaction of BRCA2 with both the monoubiquitylated (FANCD2-L) and non-ubiquitylated (FANCD2-S) isoforms of FANCD2. Interestingly, a mutation of TPR7 (R563E), that complements the MMC and phleomycin hypersensitivity of human FA-G EUFA316 cells, fails to complement NM3, despite the mutated FANCG protein co-precipitating with FANCA, BRCA2 and XRCC3. Whilst interaction of TPR7-mutated FANCG with FANCF does appear to be reduced in NM3, FANCD2 is monoubiquitylated suggesting that sub-optimal interactions of FANCG in the core complex and the D1-D2-G-X3 complex are responsible for the observed MMC- and phleomycin-hypersensitivity, rather than a defect in FANCD2 monoubiquitylation. Our data demonstrate that FANCG functions as a mediator of protein-protein interactions and is vital for the assembly of multi-protein complexes

  4. 1D-coupled photochemical model of neutrals, cations and anions in the atmosphere of Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrijevic, M.; Loison, J. C.; Hickson, K. M.; Gronoff, G.

    2016-04-01

    Many models with different characteristics have been published so far to study the chemical processes at work in Titan's atmosphere. Some models focus on neutral species in the stratosphere or ionic species in the ionosphere, but few of them couple all the species throughout the whole atmosphere. Very few of these emphasize the importance of uncertainties in the chemical scheme and study their propagation in the model. We have developed a new 1D-photochemical model of Titan's atmosphere coupling neutral species with positive and negative ions from the lower atmosphere up to the ionosphere and have compared our results with observations to have a comprehensive view of the chemical processes driving the composition of the stratosphere and ionosphere of Titan. We have updated the neutral, positive ion and negative ion chemistry and have improved the description of N2 photodissociation by introducing high resolution N2 absorption cross sections. We performed for the first time an uncertainty propagation study in a fully coupled ion-neutral model. We determine how uncertainties on rate constants on both neutral and ionic reactions influence the model results and pinpoint the key reactions responsible for this behavior. We find very good agreement between our model results and observations in both the stratosphere and in the ionosphere for most neutral compounds. Our results are also in good agreement with an average INMS mass spectrum and specific flybys in the dayside suggesting that our chemical model (for both neutral and ions) provides a good approximation of Titan's atmospheric chemistry as a whole. Our uncertainty propagation study highlights the difficulty to interpret the INMS mass spectra for masses 14, 31, 41 and we identified the key reactions responsible for these ambiguities. Despite an overall improvement in the chemical model, disagreement for some specific compounds (HC3N, C2H5CN, C2H4) highlights the role that certain physical processes could play

  5. Accelerating numerical modeling of wave propagation through 2-D anisotropic materials using OpenCL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molero, Miguel; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula

    2013-03-01

    We present an implementation of the numerical modeling of elastic waves propagation, in 2D anisotropic materials, using the new parallel computing devices (PCDs). Our study is aimed both to model laboratory experiments and explore the capabilities of the emerging PCDs by discussing performance issues. In the experiments a sample plate of an anisotropic material placed inside a water tank is rotated and, for every angle of rotation it is subjected to an ultrasonic wave (produced by a large source transducer) that propagates in the water and through the material producing some reflection and transmission signals that are recording by a "point-like" receiver. This experiment is numerically modeled by running a finite difference code covering a set of angles θ∈[-50°, 50°], and recorded the signals for the transmission and reflection results. Transversely anisotropic and weakly orthorhombic materials are considered. We accelerated the computation using an open-source toolkit called PyOpenCL, which lets one to easily access the OpenCL parallel computation API's from the high-level programming environment of Python. A speedup factor over 19 using the GPU is obtained when compared with the execution of the same program in parallel using a CPU multi-core (in this case we use the 4-cores that has the CPU). The performance for different graphic cards and operating systems is included together with the full 2-D finite difference code with PyOpenCL. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A 2-D Analytical Threshold Voltage Model for Symmetric Double Gate MOSFET's Using Green’s Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Garg

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new two dimensional (2D analytical solution of Threshold Voltage for undoped (or lightly doped Double Gate MOSFETs. We have used Green’s function technique to solve the 2D Poisson equation, and derived the threshold voltage model using minimum surface potential concept. This model is assumed uniform doping profile in Si region. The proposed model compared with existing literature and experimental data and we obtain excellent agreements with previous techniques.

  7. The combined effect of attraction and orientation zones in 2D flocking models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iliass, Tarras; Cambui, Dorilson

    2016-01-01

    In nature, many animal groups, such as fish schools or bird flocks, clearly display structural order and appear to move as a single coherent entity. In order to understand the complex motion of these systems, we study the Vicsek model of self-propelled particles (SPP) which is an important tool to investigate the behavior of collective motion of live organisms. This model reproduces the biological behavior patterns in the two-dimensional (2D) space. Within the framework of this model, the particles move with the same absolute velocity and interact locally in the zone of orientation by trying to align their direction with that of the neighbors. In this paper, we model the collective movement of SPP using an agent-based model which follows biologically motivated behavioral rules, by adding a second region called the attraction zone, where each particles move towards each other avoiding being isolated. Our main goal is to present a detailed numerical study on the effect of the zone of attraction on the kinetic phase transition of our system. In our study, the consideration of this zone seems to play an important role in the cohesion. Consequently, in the directional orientation, the zone that we added forms the compact particle group. In our simulation, we show clearly that the model proposed here can produce two collective behavior patterns: torus and dynamic parallel group. Implications of these findings are discussed.

  8. Robust autonomous model learning from 2D and 3D data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langs, Georg; Donner, René; Peloschek, Philipp; Bischof, Horst

    2007-01-01

    In this paper we propose a weakly supervised learning algorithm for appearance models based on the minimum description length (MDL) principle. From a set of training images or volumes depicting examples of an anatomical structure, correspondences for a set of landmarks are established by group-wise registration. The approach does not require any annotation. In contrast to existing methods no assumptions about the topology of the data are made, and the topology can change throughout the data set. Instead of a continuous representation of the volumes or images, only sparse finite sets of interest points are used to represent the examples during optimization. This enables the algorithm to efficiently use distinctive points, and to handle texture variations robustly. In contrast to standard elasticity based deformation constraints the MDL criterion accounts for systematic deformations typical for training sets stemming from medical image data. Experimental results are reported for five different 2D and 3D data sets.

  9. Frustrating a correlated superconductor: the 2D Attractive Hubbard Model in an external magnetic field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongbo; Engelbrecht, Jan R.

    2000-03-01

    At the Mean Field level (G. Murthy and R. Shankar, J. Phys. Condens. Matter, 7) (1995), the frustration due to an external field first makes the uniform BCS ground state unstable to an incommensurate (qne0) superconducting state and then to a spin-polarized Fermi Liquid state. Our interest is how fluctuations modify this picture, as well as the normal state of this system which has a quantum critical point. We use the Fluctuation-Exchange Approximation for the 2D Attractive Hubbard Model, to study this system beyond the Mean-Field level. Earlier work in zero field has shown that this numerical method successfully captures the critical scaling of the KT superconducting transition upon cooling in the normal state. Here we investigate how the pair-breaking external field modifies this picture, and the development of incommensurate pairing.

  10. The strong-weak coupling symmetry in 2D Φ4 field models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.N.Shalaev

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available It is found that the exact beta-function β(g of the continuous 2D gΦ4 model possesses two types of dual symmetries, these being the Kramers-Wannier (KW duality symmetry and the strong-weak (SW coupling symmetry f(g, or S-duality. All these transformations are explicitly constructed. The S-duality transformation f(g is shown to connect domains of weak and strong couplings, i.e. above and below g*. Basically it means that there is a tempting possibility to compute multiloop Feynman diagrams for the β-function using high-temperature lattice expansions. The regular scheme developed is found to be strongly unstable. Approximate values of the renormalized coupling constant g* found from duality symmetry equations are in an agreement with available numerical results.

  11. Entire solutions for a mono-stable delay population model in a 2D lattice strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Qin Zhao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This article concerns the entire solutions of a mono-stable age-structured population model in a 2D lattice strip. In a previous publication, we established the existence of entire solutions related to traveling wave solutions with speeds larger than the minimal wave speed $c_{\\rm min}$. However, the existence of entire solutions related to the minimal wave fronts remains open open question. In this article, we first establish a new comparison theorem. Then, applying the theorem we obtain the existence of entire solutions by mixing any finite number of traveling wave fronts with speeds $c\\geq c_{\\rm min}$, and a solution without the $j$ variable. In particular, we show the relationship between the entire solution and the traveling wave fronts that they originate.

  12. Time domain numerical modeling of wave propagation in 2D acoustic / porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Chiavassa, Guillaume

    2011-01-01

    Numerical methods are developed to simulate the wave propagation in 2D heterogeneous fluid / poroelastic media. Wave propagation is described by the usual acoustics equations (in the fluid medium) and by the low-frequency Biot's equations (in the porous medium). Interface conditions are introduced to model various hydraulic contacts between the two media: open pores, sealed pores, and imperfect pores. Well-possedness of the initial-boundary value problem is proven. Cartesian grid numerical methods previously developed in porous heterogeneous media are adapted to the present context: a fourth-order ADER scheme with Strang splitting for time-marching; a space-time mesh-refinement to capture the slow compressional wave predicted by Biot's theory; and an immersed interface method to discretize the interface conditions and to introduce a subcell resolution. Numerical experiments and comparisons with exact solutions are proposed for the three types of interface conditions, demonstrating the accuracy of the approach...

  13. A simple model for 2D image upconversion of incoherent light

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Pedersen, Christian; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple theoretical model for 2 dimensional (2-D) image up-conversion of incoherent light. While image upconversion has been known for more than 40 years, the technology has been hindered by very low conversion quantum efficiency (~10-7). We show that our implementation compared...... to previous work can result in a feasible system: Using intracavity upconversion and Quasi Phase Matching (QPM) nonlinear materials provide increased conversion efficiency. Using a QPM crystal and choosing the wavelengths so the first order term in the phasematch wavelength acceptance vanishes, results...... in very large wavelength acceptance. This work describes how the bandwidth acceptance can be predicted and designed. This gives promise of a new way to make infrared imaging devices with tunable spectral sensitivity....

  14. Modelling Hydrology of a Single Bioretention System with HYDRUS-1D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yingying; Wang, Huixiao; Chen, Jiangang; Zhang, Shuhan

    2014-01-01

    A study was carried out on the effectiveness of bioretention systems to abate stormwater using computer simulation. The hydrologic performance was simulated for two bioretention cells using HYDRUS-1D, and the simulation results were verified by field data of nearly four years. Using the validated model, the optimization of design parameters of rainfall return period, filter media depth and type, and surface area was discussed. And the annual hydrologic performance of bioretention systems was further analyzed under the optimized parameters. The study reveals that bioretention systems with underdrains and impervious boundaries do have some detention capability, while their total water retention capability is extremely limited. Better detention capability is noted for smaller rainfall events, deeper filter media, and design storms with a return period smaller than 2 years, and a cost-effective filter media depth is recommended in bioretention design. Better hydrologic effectiveness is achieved with a higher hydraulic conductivity and ratio of the bioretention surface area to the catchment area, and filter media whose conductivity is between the conductivity of loamy sand and sandy loam, and a surface area of 10% of the catchment area is recommended. In the long-term simulation, both infiltration volume and evapotranspiration are critical for the total rainfall treatment in bioretention systems. PMID:25133240

  15. Modeling Soil Salt and Nitrogen Transport under Different Fertigation Practices with Hydrus-1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeng Wen-zhi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study the effects of different fertigation practices on salt and nitrogen dynamics were analyzed in the Hetao District, China by using the Hydrus-1D model. The results indicated that the soil electrical conductivity increased gradually with depth after irrigation and the electrical conductivity of 0~60 cm depth changed faster than that of 60~100 cm depth. However, the soil ammonium nitrogen concentration decreased with depth and high irrigation intensity could promote the increase of ammonium nitrogen while reducing the differences of their distributions in soil profile. In addition, when the initial urea application was in a small amount (10 g, the nitrate nitrogen concentration increased with soil depth while decreased with irrigation intensity after irrigation. Furthermore, both ammonium and nitrate nitrogen content of soil profile rose with increasing initial urea application amount, which played a more important role in the changes of soil ammonium (0~100 cm and nitrate (0~80 cm nitrogen content than irrigation intensity.

  16. Modelling Hydrology of a Single Bioretention System with HYDRUS-1D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingying Meng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A study was carried out on the effectiveness of bioretention systems to abate stormwater using computer simulation. The hydrologic performance was simulated for two bioretention cells using HYDRUS-1D, and the simulation results were verified by field data of nearly four years. Using the validated model, the optimization of design parameters of rainfall return period, filter media depth and type, and surface area was discussed. And the annual hydrologic performance of bioretention systems was further analyzed under the optimized parameters. The study reveals that bioretention systems with underdrains and impervious boundaries do have some detention capability, while their total water retention capability is extremely limited. Better detention capability is noted for smaller rainfall events, deeper filter media, and design storms with a return period smaller than 2 years, and a cost-effective filter media depth is recommended in bioretention design. Better hydrologic effectiveness is achieved with a higher hydraulic conductivity and ratio of the bioretention surface area to the catchment area, and filter media whose conductivity is between the conductivity of loamy sand and sandy loam, and a surface area of 10% of the catchment area is recommended. In the long-term simulation, both infiltration volume and evapotranspiration are critical for the total rainfall treatment in bioretention systems.

  17. Modelling hydrology of a single bioretention system with HYDRUS-1D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Yingying; Wang, Huixiao; Chen, Jiangang; Zhang, Shuhan

    2014-01-01

    A study was carried out on the effectiveness of bioretention systems to abate stormwater using computer simulation. The hydrologic performance was simulated for two bioretention cells using HYDRUS-1D, and the simulation results were verified by field data of nearly four years. Using the validated model, the optimization of design parameters of rainfall return period, filter media depth and type, and surface area was discussed. And the annual hydrologic performance of bioretention systems was further analyzed under the optimized parameters. The study reveals that bioretention systems with underdrains and impervious boundaries do have some detention capability, while their total water retention capability is extremely limited. Better detention capability is noted for smaller rainfall events, deeper filter media, and design storms with a return period smaller than 2 years, and a cost-effective filter media depth is recommended in bioretention design. Better hydrologic effectiveness is achieved with a higher hydraulic conductivity and ratio of the bioretention surface area to the catchment area, and filter media whose conductivity is between the conductivity of loamy sand and sandy loam, and a surface area of 10% of the catchment area is recommended. In the long-term simulation, both infiltration volume and evapotranspiration are critical for the total rainfall treatment in bioretention systems.

  18. Investigating the Response of Greenland Outlet Glaciers to Perturbations Using a 1D Flowline Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrakopoulos, K.; Stearns, L. A.; van der Veen, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past two decades, the behavior of many Greenland tidewater outlet glaciers has been characterized by dramatic acceleration, thinning, and retreat. In some cases this behavior is followed by re-advance, thickening and deceleration. The mechanisms that control glacier stability are not fully understood, and hinder ice sheet mass balance projections. Many studies suggest that accelerations are caused exclusively by processes at the terminus, namely by mechanisms that result in increases in iceberg calving rates. In this study we investigate whether comparable accelerations can initiate at different places along the glacier trunk due to changes in subglacial processes or shear margin evolution. We begin our experiments using a prognostic depth integrated (1-D) flowline model applied to Helheim Glacier, and investigate its flow response to perturbations at the terminus and up-flow. Our work shows that large-scale accelerations could have initiated up-flow far from the terminus. The results of this study will contribute to the long-lasting debate about the role of terminus dynamics, and thus ocean conditions, in modulating ice sheet mass balance.

  19. Open boundary conditions for the Diffuse Interface Model in 1-D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmarais, J. L.; Kuerten, J. G. M.

    2014-04-01

    New techniques are developed for solving multi-phase flows in unbounded domains using the Diffuse Interface Model in 1-D. They extend two open boundary conditions originally designed for the Navier-Stokes equations. The non-dimensional formulation of the DIM generalizes the approach to any fluid. The equations support a steady state whose analytical approximation close to the critical point depends only on temperature. This feature enables the use of detectors at the boundaries switching between conventional boundary conditions in bulk phases and a multi-phase strategy in interfacial regions. Moreover, the latter takes advantage of the steady state approximation to minimize the interface-boundary interactions. The techniques are applied to fluids experiencing a phase transition and where the interface between the phases travels through one of the boundaries. When the interface crossing the boundary is fully developed, the technique greatly improves results relative to cases where conventional boundary conditions can be used. Limitations appear when the interface crossing the boundary is not a stable equilibrium between the two phases: the terms responsible for creating the true balance between the phases perturb the interior solution. Both boundary conditions present good numerical stability properties: the error remains bounded when the initial conditions or the far field values are perturbed. For the PML, the influence of its main parameters on the global error is investigated to make a compromise between computational costs and maximum error. The approach can be extended to multiple spatial dimensions.

  20. Testing the Early Mars H2-CO2 Greenhouse Hypothesis with a 1-D Photochemical Model

    CERN Document Server

    Batalha, Natasha; Ramirez, Ramses; Kasting, James

    2015-01-01

    A recent study by Ramirez et al. (2014) demonstrated that an atmosphere with 1.3-4 bar of CO2 and H2O, in addition to 5-20% H2, could have raised the mean annual and global surface temperature of early Mars above the freezing point of water. Such warm temperatures appear necessary to generate the rainfall (or snowfall) amounts required to carve the ancient martian valleys. Here, we use our best estimates for early martian outgassing rates, along with a 1-D photochemical model, to assess the conversion efficiency of CO, CH4, and H2S to CO2, SO2, and H2. Our outgassing estimates assume that Mars was actively recycling volatiles between its crust and interior, as Earth does today. H2 production from serpentinization and deposition of banded iron-formations is also considered. Under these assumptions, maintaining an H2 concentration of ~1-2% by volume is achievable, but reaching 5% H2 requires additional H2 sources or a slowing of the hydrogen escape rate below the diffusion limit. If the early martian atmosphere...

  1. Results and limits in the 1-D analytical modeling for the asymmetric DG SOI MOSFET

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Cobianu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results and the limits of 1-D analytical modeling of electrostatic potential in the low-doped p type silicon body of the asymmetric n-channel DG SOI MOSFET, where the contribution to the asymmetry comes only from p- and n-type doping of polysilicon used as the gate electrodes. Solving Poisson's equation with boundary conditions based on the continuity of normal electrical displacement at interfaces and the presence of a minimum electrostatic potential by using the Matlab code we have obtained a minimum potential with a slow variation in the central zone of silicon with the value pinned around 0.46 V, where the applied VGS voltage varies from 0.45 V to 0.95 V. The paper states clearly the validity domain of the analytical solution and the important effect of the localization of the minimum electrostatic potential value on the potential variation at interfaces as a function of the applied VGS voltage.

  2. Results and limits in the 1-D analytical modeling for the asymmetric DG SOI MOSFET

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobianu, O.; Glesner, M.

    2008-05-01

    This paper presents the results and the limits of 1-D analytical modeling of electrostatic potential in the low-doped p type silicon body of the asymmetric n-channel DG SOI MOSFET, where the contribution to the asymmetry comes only from p- and n-type doping of polysilicon used as the gate electrodes. Solving Poisson's equation with boundary conditions based on the continuity of normal electrical displacement at interfaces and the presence of a minimum electrostatic potential by using the Matlab code we have obtained a minimum potential with a slow variation in the central zone of silicon with the value pinned around 0.46 V, where the applied VGS voltage varies from 0.45 V to 0.95 V. The paper states clearly the validity domain of the analytical solution and the important effect of the localization of the minimum electrostatic potential value on the potential variation at interfaces as a function of the applied VGS voltage.

  3. An application of the distributed hydrologic model CASC2D to a tropical montane watershed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsik, Matt; Waylen, Peter

    2006-11-01

    SummaryIncreased stormflow in the Quebrada Estero watershed (2.5 km 2), in the northwestern Central Valley tectonic depression of Costa Rica, reportedly has caused flooding of the city of San Ramón in recent decades. Although scientifically untested, urban expansion was deemed the cause and remedial measures were recommended by the Programa de Investigación en Desarrollo Humano Sostenible (ProDUS). CASC2D, a physically-based, spatially explicit hydrologic model, was constructed and calibrated to a June 10th 2002 storm that delivered 110.5 mm of precipitation in 4.5 h visibly exceeded the bankfull stage (0.9 m) of the Quebrada flooding portions of San Ramón. The calibrated hydrograph showed a peak discharge 16.68% (2.5 m 3 s -1) higher, an above flood stage duration 20% shorter, and time to peak discharge 11 min later than the same observed discharge hydrograph characteristics. Simulations of changing land cover conditions from 1979 to 1999 showed an increase also in the peak discharge, above flood stage duration, and time to peak discharge. Analysis using a modified location quotient identified increased urbanization in lower portions of the watershed over the time period studied. These results suggest that increased urbanization in the Quebrada Estero watershed have increased flooding peaks, and durations above threshold, confirming the ProDUS report. These results and the CASC2D model offer an easy-to-use, pragmatic planning tool for policymakers in San Ramón to assess future development scenarios and their potential flooding impacts to San Ramón.

  4. Chemometric modelling based on 2D-fluorescence spectra without a calibration measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solle, D; Geissler, D; Stärk, E; Scheper, T; Hitzmann, B

    2003-01-22

    2D fluorescence spectra provide information from intracellular compounds. Fluorophores like trytophan, tyrosine and phenylalanin as well as NADH and flavins make the corresponding measurement systems very important for bioprocess supervision and control. The evaluation is usually based on chemometric modelling using for their calibration procedure off-line measurements of the desired process variables. Due to the data driven approach lots of off-line measurements are required. Here a methodology is presented, which enables to perform a calibration procedure of chemometric models without any further measurement. The necessary information for the calibration procedure is provided by means of the a priori knowledge about the process, i.e. a mathematical model, whose model parameters are estimated during the calibration procedure, as well as the fact that the substrate should be consumed at the end of the process run. The new methodology for chemometric calibration is applied for a batch cultivation of aerobically grown S. cerevisiae on the glucose Schatzmann medium. As will be presented the chemometric models, which are determined by this method, can be used for prediction during new process runs. The MATHLAB routine is free available on request from the authors.

  5. Model-based segmentation and quantification of subcellular structures in 2D and 3D fluorescent microscopy images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wörz, Stefan; Heinzer, Stephan; Weiss, Matthias; Rohr, Karl

    2008-03-01

    We introduce a model-based approach for segmenting and quantifying GFP-tagged subcellular structures of the Golgi apparatus in 2D and 3D microscopy images. The approach is based on 2D and 3D intensity models, which are directly fitted to an image within 2D circular or 3D spherical regions-of-interest (ROIs). We also propose automatic approaches for the detection of candidates, for the initialization of the model parameters, and for adapting the size of the ROI used for model fitting. Based on the fitting results, we determine statistical information about the spatial distribution and the total amount of intensity (fluorescence) of the subcellular structures. We demonstrate the applicability of our new approach based on 2D and 3D microscopy images.

  6. 2-D Finite Difference Modeling of the D'' Structure Beneath the Eastern Cocos Plate: Part I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmberger, D. V.; Song, T. A.; Sun, D.

    2005-12-01

    The discovery of phase transition from Perovskite (Pv) to Post-Perovskite (PPv) at depth nears the lowermost mantle has revealed a new view of the earth's D'' layer (Oganov et al. 2004; Murakami et al. 2004). Hernlund et al. (2004) recently pusposed that, depending on the geotherm at the core-mantle boundary (CMB), a double-crossing of the phase boundary by the geotherm at two different depths may also occur. To explore these new findings, we adopt 2-D finite difference scheme (Helmberger and Vidale, 1988) to model wave propagation in rapidly varying structure. We collect broadband waveform data recorded by several Passcal experiments, such as La Ristra transect and CDROM transect in the southwest US to constrain the lateral variations in D'' structure. These data provide fairly dense sampling (~ 20 km) in the lowermost mantle beneath the eastern Cocos plate. Since the source-receiver paths are mostly in the same azimuth, we make 2-D cross-sections from global tomography model (Grand, 2002) and compute finite difference synthetics. We modify the lowermost mantle below 2500 km with constraints from transverse-component waveform data at epicentral distances of 70-82 degrees in the time window between S and ScS, essentially foward modeling waveforms. Assuming a velocity jump of 3 % at D'', our preferred model shows that the D'' topography deepens from the north to the south by about 120 km over a lateral distance of 300 km. Such large topography jumps have been proposed by Thomas et al. (2004) using data recorded by TriNet. In addition, there is a negative velocity jump (-3 %) 100 km above the CMB in the south. This simple model compare favorably with results from a study by Sun, Song and Helmberger (2005), who follow Sidorin et al. (1999) approach and produce a thermodynamically consistent velocity model with Pv-PPv phase boundary. It appears that much of this complexity exists in Grand's tomographic maps with rapid variation in velocities just above the D''. We also

  7. Study of the seasonal cycle of the biogeochemical processes in the Ligurian Sea using a 1D interdisciplinary model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raick, C.; Delhez, E.J.M.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Grégoire, M.

    2005-01-01

    A one-dimensional coupled physical–biogeochemical model has been built to study the pelagic food web of the Ligurian Sea (NW Mediterranean Sea). The physical model is the turbulent closure model (version 1D) developed at the GeoHydrodynamics and Environmental Laboratory (GHER) of the University of L

  8. A 1-D radiative conductive model to study the SOIR/VEx thermal profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahieux, Arnaud; Erwin, Justin T.; Chamberlain, Sarah; Robert, Séverine; Carine Vandaele, Ann; Wilquet, Valérie; Thomas, Ian; Yelle, Roger V.; Bertaux, Jean-Loup

    2015-04-01

    SOIR is an infrared spectrometer on board Venus Express that probes the Venus terminator region since 2006. The measurements are taken on the morning and evening sides of the terminator, covering all latitudes from the North Pole to the South Pole. Its wavelength range - 2.2 to 4.3 μm - allows a detailed chemical inventory of the Venus atmosphere [1-5], such as CO2, CO, H2O, HCl, HF, SO2 and aerosols. CO2 is detected from 70 km up to 165 km, CO from 70 km to 140 km, and the minor species typically below 110 km down to 70 km. Number density profiles of these species are computed from the measured spectra. Temperature profiles are obtained while computing the spectral inversion of the CO2 spectra combined with the hydrostatic law [6]. These temperature measurements show a striking permanent temperature minimum (at 125 km) and a weaker temperature maximum (over 100-115 km). The time variability of the CO2 density profiles spans over two orders of magnitude, and a clear trend is seen with latitude. The temperature variations are also important, of the order of 35 K for a given pressure level, but the latitude variation are small. Miss-RT, a 1D radiative transfer model has been developed to reproduce the SOIR terminator profiles, derived from the Mars thermosphere code presented in [7]. This model has been expanded to better account for the CO2, CO, and O non-LTE radiative heating and cooling processes which have to be considered in the dense atmosphere of Venus. Radiative cooling by minor species detected by SOIR (e.g. HCl, SO2, and H2O) are found to be small in comparison to the 15 μm CO2 cooling. Aerosol cooling in the 60-90km altitude range may be important to the thermal balance. There is a good agreement between the 1D model temperature profile and the mean SOIR temperature profile. Further we can suggest parameters that can be adjusted to improve the agreement between the model and measurements. The remaining differences can be attributed to the atmosphere

  9. Forsmark Site: M3 modelling and 2D visualisation of the hydrochemical parameters in Forsmark groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gurban, Ioana (3D Terra (Canada))

    2008-08-15

    This work represents the stage 2.3 of the hydrochemical evaluation and modelling of the Forsmark data. This comprises M3 modelling and 2D visualisation of the data along the boreholes. The following conclusions can be drawn: - M3 modelling helped to summarise and understand the data, by using as variables the major elements and the isotopes delta18O and deltaD. - Previous alternative models and the experience from Forsmark 1.2, 2.1 and 2.2, helped to clarify different previously unsolved issues such as: the use of variables, tests with different endmembers, the use of only groundwater data in order to build a bedrock hydrochemical model. - The visualisation of the mixing proportions along the boreholes helps to understand the distribution of the data in the domain and to check and compare the results of different models; and therefore to chose the model which best describes the measured data. - The different M3 modelling tests resulted in the following conclusions: a) When calculating mixing proportions only samples from the boreholes will be used, b) the altered meteoric end-member which best describes the more shallow groundwater compositions is defined by a representative upper bedrock sample; the Littorina end-member employed the existing modelled compositions; the Deep saline and glacial end-members compositions were tested by means of a feasibility study and employed in the modelling. - Three models were presented. All the models are good and can be used, but the best is to use the one that fits the conceptual model best and the hydrogeochemical understanding. - The use of Littorina, Glacial, Deep Saline and Altered Meteoric end-members makes possible the comparison of different sites such as Laxemar and Forsmark. - All the data used in the M3 modelling and the results of the modelling and visualisation along the boreholes are presented in SKB database SIMON. - The extended data do not affect the results of the modelling of the Forsmark 2.3 dataset (the

  10. Distributed and coupled 2D electro-thermal model of power semiconductor devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkacem, Ghania; Lefebvre, Stéphane; Joubert, Pierre-Yves; Bouarroudj-Berkani, Mounira; Labrousse, Denis; Rostaing, Gilles

    2014-05-01

    The development of power electronics in the field of transportations (automotive, aeronautics) requires the use of power semiconductor devices providing protection and diagnostic functions. In the case of series protections power semiconductor devices which provide protection may operate in shortcircuit and act as a current limiting device. This mode of operations is very constraining due to the large dissipation of power. In these particular conditions of operation, electro-thermal models of power semiconductor devices are of key importance in order to optimize their thermal design and increase their reliability. The development of such an electro-thermal model for power MOSFET transistors based on the coupling between two computation softwares (Matlab and Cast3M) is described in this paper. The 2D electro-thermal model is able to predict (i) the temperature distribution on chip surface well as in the volume under short-circuit operations, (ii) the effect of the temperature on the distribution of the current flowing within the die and (iii) the effects of the ageing of the metallization layer on the current density and the temperature. In this paper, the electrical and thermal models are described as well as the implemented coupling scheme.

  11. A new model for two-dimensional numerical simulation of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Tingwen; Zhang, Yongmin

    2013-10-11

    Pseudo-two dimensional (pseudo-2D) fluidized beds, for which the thickness of the system is much smaller than the other two dimensions, is widely used to perform fundamental studies on bubble behavior, solids mixing, or clustering phenomenon in different gas-solids fluidization systems. The abundant data from such experimental systems are very useful for numerical model development and validation. However, it has been reported that two-dimensional (2D) computational fluid dynamic (CFD) simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds usually predict poor quantitative agreement with the experimental data, especially for the solids velocity field. In this paper, a new model is proposed to improve the 2D numerical simulations of pseudo-2D gas-solids fluidized beds by properly accounting for the frictional effect of the front and back walls. Two previously reported pseudo-2D experimental systems were simulated with this model. Compared to the traditional 2D simulations, significant improvements in the numerical predictions have been observed and the predicted results are in better agreement with the available experimental data.

  12. Relationship between Pulmonary Airflow and Resistance in Patients with Airway Narrowing Using An 1-D Network Resistance and Compliance Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Sanghun; Choi, Jiwoong; Hoffman, Eric; Lin, Ching-Long

    2016-11-01

    To predict the proper relationship between airway resistance and regional airflow, we proposed a novel 1-D network model for airway resistance and acinar compliance. First, we extracted 1-D skeletons at inspiration images, and generated 1-D trees of CT unresolved airways with a volume filling method. We used Horsfield order with random heterogeneity to create diameters of the generated 1-D trees. We employed a resistance model that accounts for kinetic energy and viscous dissipation (Model A). The resistance model is further coupled with a regional compliance model estimated from two static images (Model B). For validation, we applied both models to a healthy subject. The results showed that Model A failed to provide airflows consistent with air volume change, whereas Model B provided airflows consistent with air volume change. Since airflows shall be regionally consistent with air volume change in patients with normal airways, Model B was validated. Then, we applied Model B to severe asthmatic subjects. The results showed that regional airflows were significantly deviated from air volume change due to airway narrowing. This implies that airway resistance plays a major role in determining regional airflows of patients with airway narrowing. Support for this study was provided, in part, by NIH Grants U01 HL114494, R01 HL094315, R01 HL112986, and S10 RR022421.

  13. Anti-TGF-β Antibody, 1D11, Ameliorates Glomerular Fibrosis in Mouse Models after the Onset of Proteinuria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Xiaoyan; Schnaper, H William; Matsusaka, Taiji; Pastan, Ira; Ledbetter, Steve; Hayashida, Tomoko

    2016-01-01

    Fibrosis is a final common pathway leading to loss of kidney function, in which the fibrogenic cytokine, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β), plays a central role. While previous studies showed that TGF-β antagonism by various means prevents fibrosis in mouse models, clinical approaches based on these findings remain elusive. 1D11 is a neutralizing antibody to all three isoforms of TGF-β. In both adriamycin (ADR)-induced nephropathy and NEP25 podocyte ablation nephropathy, thrice-weekly intraperitoneal administration of 1D11 from the day of disease induction until the mice were sacrificed (day 14 for ADR and day 28 for NEP25), significantly reduced glomerular COL1A2 mRNA accumulation and histological changes. Consistent with our previous findings, proteinuria remained overt in the mice treated with 1D11, suggesting distinct mechanisms for proteinuria and fibrogenesis. Podocyte numbers determined by WT1 staining were significantly reduced in NEP25-model glomeruli as expected, while WT1-positive cells were preserved in mice receiving 1D11. Even when 1D11 was administered after the onset of proteinuria on day 3, 1D11 preserved WT1-positive cell numbers in glomeruli and significantly reduced glomerular scar score (2.5 ± 0.2 [control IgG] vs. 1.8 ± 0.2 [1D11], P proteinuria. While overt proteinuria and podocyte effacement persist, 1D11 prevents total podocytes detachment, which might be a key event activating fibrogenic events in glomeruli.

  14. Transectional heat transfer in thermoregulating bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus) - a 2D heat flux model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boye, Jess; Musyl, Michael; Brill, Richard; Malte, Hans

    2009-11-01

    We developed a 2D heat flux model to elucidate routes and rates of heat transfer within bigeye tuna Thunnus obesus Lowe 1839 in both steady-state and time-dependent settings. In modeling the former situation, we adjusted the efficiencies of heat conservation in the red and the white muscle so as to make the output of the model agree as closely as possible with observed cross-sectional isotherms. In modeling the latter situation, we applied the heat exchanger efficiencies from the steady-state model to predict the distribution of temperature and heat fluxes in bigeye tuna during their extensive daily vertical excursions. The simulations yielded a close match to the data recorded in free-swimming fish and strongly point to the importance of the heat-producing and heat-conserving properties of the white muscle. The best correspondence between model output and observed data was obtained when the countercurrent heat exchangers in the blood flow pathways to the red and white muscle retained 99% and 96% (respectively) of the heat produced in these tissues. Our model confirms that the ability of bigeye tuna to maintain elevated muscle temperatures during their extensive daily vertical movements depends on their ability to rapidly modulate heating and cooling rates. This study shows that the differential cooling and heating rates could be fully accounted for by a mechanism where blood flow to the swimming muscles is either exclusively through the heat exchangers or completely shunted around them, depending on the ambient temperature relative to the body temperature. Our results therefore strongly suggest that such a mechanism is involved in the extensive physiological thermoregulatory abilities of endothermic bigeye tuna.

  15. In vitro systems to study nephropharmacology : 2D versus 3D models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sánchez-Romero, Natalia; Schophuizen, Carolien M S; Giménez, Ignacio; Masereeuw, Rosalinde

    2016-01-01

    The conventional 2-dimensional (2D) cell culture is an invaluable tool in, amongst others, cell biology and experimental pharmacology. However, cells cultured in 2D, on the top of stiff plastic plates lose their phenotypical characteristics and fail in recreating the physiological environment found

  16. Anti-TGF-β Antibody, 1D11, Ameliorates Glomerular Fibrosis in Mouse Models after the Onset of Proteinuria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Liang

    Full Text Available Fibrosis is a final common pathway leading to loss of kidney function, in which the fibrogenic cytokine, transforming growth factor β (TGF-β, plays a central role. While previous studies showed that TGF-β antagonism by various means prevents fibrosis in mouse models, clinical approaches based on these findings remain elusive. 1D11 is a neutralizing antibody to all three isoforms of TGF-β. In both adriamycin (ADR-induced nephropathy and NEP25 podocyte ablation nephropathy, thrice-weekly intraperitoneal administration of 1D11 from the day of disease induction until the mice were sacrificed (day 14 for ADR and day 28 for NEP25, significantly reduced glomerular COL1A2 mRNA accumulation and histological changes. Consistent with our previous findings, proteinuria remained overt in the mice treated with 1D11, suggesting distinct mechanisms for proteinuria and fibrogenesis. Podocyte numbers determined by WT1 staining were significantly reduced in NEP25-model glomeruli as expected, while WT1-positive cells were preserved in mice receiving 1D11. Even when 1D11 was administered after the onset of proteinuria on day 3, 1D11 preserved WT1-positive cell numbers in glomeruli and significantly reduced glomerular scar score (2.5 ± 0.2 [control IgG] vs. 1.8 ± 0.2 [1D11], P < 0.05 and glomerular COL1A2 mRNA expression (19.3 ± 4.4 [control IgG] vs. 8.4 ± 2.4 [1D11] fold increase over the healthy control, P < 0.05. Transmission electron microscopy revealed loss of podocytes and denuded glomerular basement membrane in NEP25 mice with disease, whereas podocytes remained attached to the basement membrane, though effaced and swollen, in those receiving 1D11 from day 3. Together, these data suggest that TGF-β neutralization by 1D11 prevents glomerular fibrosis even when started after the onset of proteinuria. While overt proteinuria and podocyte effacement persist, 1D11 prevents total podocytes detachment, which might be a key event activating fibrogenic events

  17. Field-induced magnetization jumps and quantum criticality in the 2D J-Q model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaizzi, Adam; Sandvik, Anders

    The J-Q model is a `designer hamiltonian' formed by adding a four spin `Q' term to the standard antiferromagnetic S = 1 / 2 Heisenberg model. The Q term drives a quantum phase transition to a valence-bond solid (VBS) state: a non-magnetic state with a pattern of local singlets which breaks lattice symmetries. The elementary excitations of the VBS are triplons, i.e. gapped S=1 quasiparticles. There is considerable interest in the quantum phase transition between the Néel and VBS states as an example of deconfined quantum criticality. Near the phase boundary, triplons deconfine into pairs of bosonic spin-1/2 excitations known as spinons. Using exact diagonalization and the stochastic series expansion quantum monte carlo method, we study the 2D J-Q model in the presence of an external magnetic field. We use the field to force a nonzero density of magnetic excitations at T=0 and look for signatures of Bose-Einstein condensation of spinons. At higher magnetic fields, there is a jump in the induced magnetization caused by the onset of an effective attractive interaction between magnons on a ferromagnetic background. We characterize the first order quantum phase transition and determine the minimum value of the coupling ratio q ≡ Q / J required to produce this jump. Funded by NSF DMR-1410126.

  18. 2d Affine XY-Spin Model/4d Gauge Theory Duality and Deconfinement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anber, Mohamed M.; Poppitz, Erich; /Toronto U.; Unsal, Mithat; /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /San Francisco State U.

    2012-08-16

    We introduce a duality between two-dimensional XY-spin models with symmetry-breaking perturbations and certain four-dimensional SU(2) and SU(2) = Z{sub 2} gauge theories, compactified on a small spatial circle R{sup 1,2} x S{sup 1}, and considered at temperatures near the deconfinement transition. In a Euclidean set up, the theory is defined on R{sup 2} x T{sup 2}. Similarly, thermal gauge theories of higher rank are dual to new families of 'affine' XY-spin models with perturbations. For rank two, these are related to models used to describe the melting of a 2d crystal with a triangular lattice. The connection is made through a multi-component electric-magnetic Coulomb gas representation for both systems. Perturbations in the spin system map to topological defects in the gauge theory, such as monopole-instantons or magnetic bions, and the vortices in the spin system map to the electrically charged W-bosons in field theory (or vice versa, depending on the duality frame). The duality permits one to use the two-dimensional technology of spin systems to study the thermal deconfinement and discrete chiral transitions in four-dimensional SU(N{sub c}) gauge theories with n{sub f} {ge} 1 adjoint Weyl fermions.

  19. 1D fluid model of the dielectric barrier discharge in chlorine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avtaeva, Svetlana

    2016-09-01

    The 1D fluid model of the dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) in pure chlorine is developed. The discharge is excited in 8 mm gas gap between quartz dielectric layers of 2 mm thickness covered metallic electrodes. The source voltage US =U0 sin ωt with a frequency 100 kHz and amplitude 8 kV is applied to the electrodes. Chlorine pressure is varied from 15 to 100 Torr. At pressure of 15 Torr a breakdown appears with voltage drop across the discharge gap about 1 kV whereas at 100 Torr it appears with voltage drop about 2 kV. After the first current spike some lower current spikes are observes with chlorine pressure of 100 Torr and large in number current spikes of about identical magnitude are observed with the pressure of 15 Torr. The maximal current density at all pressures reaches about 4 mA/cm.2Total density of surface charge deposited on the electrodes during a half-cycle decreases with chlorine pressure because duration of the current spike discharge phase reduces with chlorine pressure. The average power density inputted in the discharge is 2.5-5.8 W/cm3 per a cycle. The Cl2 plasma is electronegative, the most abundant ions are Cl2+and Cl-. It is shown, that ions get about 95% of the discharge power as electrons get about 5% of the discharge power. 67-97% of the electron power is spending for dissociation and ionization of Cl2 molecules. Emission of Cl* atoms and Cl2*molecules is weak.

  20. Diesel Engine performance improvement in a 1-D engine model using Particle Swarm Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karra, Prashanth

    2015-12-01

    A particle swarm optimization (PSO) technique was implemented to improve the engine development and optimization process to simultaneously reduce emissions and improve the fuel efficiency. The optimization was performed on a 4-stroke 4-cylinder GT-Power based 1-D diesel engine model. To achieve the multi-objective optimization, a merit function was defined which included the parameters to be optimized: Nitrogen Oxides (NOx), Nonmethyl hydro carbons (NMHC), Carbon Monoxide (CO), Brake Specific Fuel Consumption (BSFC). EPA Tier 3 emissions standards for non-road diesel engines between 37 and 75 kW of output were chosen as targets for the optimization. The combustion parameters analyzed in this study include: Start of main Injection, Start of Pilot Injection, Pilot fuel quantity, Swirl, and Tumble. The PSO was found to be very effective in quickly arriving at a solution that met the target criteria as defined in the merit function. The optimization took around 40-50 runs to find the most favourable engine operating condition under the constraints specified in the optimization. In a favourable case with a high merit function values, the NOx+NMHC and CO values were reduced to as low as 2.9 and 0.014 g/kWh, respectively. The operating conditions at this point were: 10 ATDC Main SOI, -25 ATDC Pilot SOI, 0.25 mg of pilot fuel, 0.45 Swirl and 0.85 tumble. These results indicate that late main injections preceded by a close, small pilot injection are most favourable conditions at the operating condition tested.

  1. On the assimilation of SWOT type data into 2D shallow-water models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frédéric, Couderc; Denis, Dartus; Pierre-André, Garambois; Ronan, Madec; Jérôme, Monnier; Jean-Paul, Villa

    2013-04-01

    In river hydraulics, assimilation of water level measurements at gauging stations is well controlled, while assimilation of images is still delicate. In the present talk, we address the richness of satellite mapped information to constrain a 2D shallow-water model, but also related difficulties. 2D shallow models may be necessary for small scale modelling in particular for low-water and flood plain flows. Since in both cases, the dynamics of the wet-dry front is essential, one has to elaborate robust and accurate solvers. In this contribution we introduce robust second order, stable finite volume scheme [CoMaMoViDaLa]. Comparisons of real like tests cases with more classical solvers highlight the importance of an accurate flood plain modelling. A preliminary inverse study is presented in a flood plain flow case, [LaMo] [HoLaMoPu]. As a first step, a 0th order data processing model improves observation operator and produces more reliable water level derived from rough measurements [PuRa]. Then, both model and flow behaviours can be better understood thanks to variational sensitivities based on a gradient computation and adjoint equations. It can reveal several difficulties that a model designer has to tackle. Next, a 4D-Var data assimilation algorithm used with spatialized data leads to improved model calibration and potentially leads to identify river discharges. All the algorithms are implemented into DassFlow software (Fortran, MPI, adjoint) [Da]. All these results and experiments (accurate wet-dry front dynamics, sensitivities analysis, identification of discharges and calibration of model) are currently performed in view to use data from the future SWOT mission. [CoMaMoViDaLa] F. Couderc, R. Madec, J. Monnier, J.-P. Vila, D. Dartus, K. Larnier. "Sensitivity analysis and variational data assimilation for geophysical shallow water flows". Submitted. [Da] DassFlow - Data Assimilation for Free Surface Flows. Computational software http

  2. Application of an Ensemble Kalman filter to a 1-D coupled hydrodynamic-ecosystem model of the Ligurian Sea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenartz, F.; Raick, C.; Soetaert, K.E.R.; Grégoire, M.

    2007-01-01

    The Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) has been applied to a 1-D complex ecosystem model coupled with a hydrodynamic model of the Ligurian Sea. In order to improve the performance of the EnKF, an ensemble subsampling strategy has been used to better represent the covariance matrices and a pre-analysis st

  3. 2D spectral element modeling of GPR wave propagation in inhomogeneous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarei, Sajad; Oskooi, Behrooz; Amini, Navid; Dalkhani, Amin Rahimi

    2016-10-01

    We present a spectral element method, for simulation of ground-penetrating radar (GPR) in two dimensions. The technique is based upon a weak formulation of the equations of Maxwell and combines the flexibility of the elemental-based methods with the accuracy of the spectral based methods. The wave field on the elements is discretized using high-degree Lagrange interpolation and integration over an element is accomplished based upon the Gauss-Lobatto-Legendre integration rule. As a result, the mass matrix and the damping matrix are always diagonal, which drastically reduces the computational cost. We first develop the formulation of 2D spectral element method (SEM) in the time-domain based on Maxwell's equations. The presented formulation is with matrix notation that simplifies the implementation of the relations in computer programs, especially in MATLAB application. We discuss the differences between spectral element method and finite-element method in the time-domain. Also, we show that the SEM numerical dispersion is much lower than FEM. To absorb waves at the edges of the modeling domain, we implement first order Clayton and Engquist absorbing boundary conditions (CE-ABC) introduced in numerical finite-difference modeling of seismic wave propagation. We used the SEM to simulate a complex model to show its abilities and limitations. As well as, one distinct advantage of SEM is that we can easily define our model features in nodal points, because the integration points and the interpolation points are similar that makes it very flexible in simulation of complex models.

  4. Optimal implicit 2-D finite differences to model wave propagation in poroelastic media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itzá, Reymundo; Iturrarán-Viveros, Ursula; Parra, Jorge O.

    2016-08-01

    Numerical modeling of seismic waves in heterogeneous porous reservoir rocks is an important tool for the interpretation of seismic surveys in reservoir engineering. We apply globally optimal implicit staggered-grid finite differences (FD) to model 2-D wave propagation in heterogeneous poroelastic media at a low-frequency range (<10 kHz). We validate the numerical solution by comparing it to an analytical-transient solution obtaining clear seismic wavefields including fast P and slow P and S waves (for a porous media saturated with fluid). The numerical dispersion and stability conditions are derived using von Neumann analysis, showing that over a wide range of porous materials the Courant condition governs the stability and this optimal implicit scheme improves the stability of explicit schemes. High-order explicit FD can be replaced by some lower order optimal implicit FD so computational cost will not be as expensive while maintaining the accuracy. Here, we compute weights for the optimal implicit FD sc