WorldWideScience

Sample records for modelling research practice

  1. From research to practice: one organisational model for promoting research based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitson, A

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes a framework used by the National Institute for Nursing in Oxford to integrate research, development and practice. With the increasing attention given to the topic of how research findings are implemented into clinical practice, it was felt important to share the challenges that have arisen in attempting to combine traditional research activities with more practice based development work. The emerging conceptual framework, structures and functions are described highlighting the variety of partnerships to be established in order to achieve the goal of integrating research into practice. While the underpinning principles of the framework--generating knowledge, implementing research into practice and evaluating the effectiveness of programmes--are not new, it is the way they have been combined within an organisational structure that could be helpful to others considering such a strategy. Both the strengths and weaknesses of the model are discussed, a number of conclusions drawn as to its robustness and consideration given to its replication.

  2. Sharing Research Models: Using Software Engineering Practices for Facilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Stephanie P; Solano, Eric; Cantor, Susanna; Cooley, Philip C; Wagener, Diane K

    2011-03-01

    Increasingly, researchers are turning to computational models to understand the interplay of important variables on systems' behaviors. Although researchers may develop models that meet the needs of their investigation, application limitations-such as nonintuitive user interface features and data input specifications-may limit the sharing of these tools with other research groups. By removing these barriers, other research groups that perform related work can leverage these work products to expedite their own investigations. The use of software engineering practices can enable managed application production and shared research artifacts among multiple research groups by promoting consistent models, reducing redundant effort, encouraging rigorous peer review, and facilitating research collaborations that are supported by a common toolset. This report discusses three established software engineering practices- the iterative software development process, object-oriented methodology, and Unified Modeling Language-and the applicability of these practices to computational model development. Our efforts to modify the MIDAS TranStat application to make it more user-friendly are presented as an example of how computational models that are based on research and developed using software engineering practices can benefit a broader audience of researchers.

  3. Bridging Research, Practice, and Policy: The "Evidence Academy" Conference Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohweder, Catherine L; Laping, Jane L; Diehl, Sandra J; Moore, Alexis A; Isler, Malika Roman; Scott, Jennifer Elissa; Enga, Zoe Kaori; Black, Molly C; Dave, Gaurav; Corbie-Smith, Giselle; Melvin, Cathy L

    2016-01-01

    Innovative models to facilitate more rapid uptake of research findings into practice are urgently needed. Community members who engage in research can accelerate this process by acting as adoption agents. We implemented an Evidence Academy conference model bringing together researchers, health care professionals, advocates, and policy makers across North Carolina to discuss high-impact, life-saving study results. The overall goal is to develop dissemination and implementation strategies for translating evidence into practice and policy. Each 1-day, single-theme, regional meeting focuses on a leading community-identified health priority. The model capitalizes on the power of diverse local networks to encourage broad, common awareness of new research findings. Furthermore, it emphasizes critical reflection and active group discussion on how to incorporate new evidence within and across organizations, health care systems, and communities. During the concluding session, participants are asked to articulate action plans relevant to their individual interests, work setting, or area of expertise.

  4. Treatment of Sexual Offenders: Research, Best Practices, and Emerging Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Pamela M.

    2013-01-01

    Treatment of sexual offenders has evolved substantially over the years; various theoretical and practice models of treatment been developed, modified, refined, and proposed over time. The predominant current recommended approach, supported by research, adheres to specific principles of effective correctional intervention, follows a…

  5. The Best Practice Unit: a model for learning, research and development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilken, Jean Pierre; Slagmaat, Carla van; Gijzel, Sascha van

    2013-01-01

    The Best Practice Unit (BPU) model constitutes a unique form of practice-based research. A variant of the Community of Practice model developed by Wenger, McDermott and Snyder (2002), the BPU has the specific aim of improving professional practice by combining innovation and research. The model is u

  6. The Best Practice Unit: a model for learning, research and development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr Jean Pierre Wilken; Carla van Slagmaat; Msc Sascha van Gijzel

    2013-01-01

    The Best Practice Unit (BPU) model constitutes a unique form of practice-based research. A variant of the Community of Practice model developed by Wenger, McDermott and Snyder (2002), the BPU has the specific aim of improving professional practice by combining innovation and research. The model is

  7. Design-Based Implementation Research: An Emerging Model for Transforming the Relationship of Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Barry J.; Penuel, William R.; Allen, Anna-Ruth; Cheng, Britte Haugan; Sabelli, Nora

    2013-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction to design-based implementation research (DBIR). We describe the need for DBIR as a research approach that challenges educational researchers and practitioners to transcend traditional research/practice barriers to facilitate the design of educational interventions that are effective, sustainable, and scalable.…

  8. Researching Practice and Practicing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPardo, Anne

    2011-01-01

    When works of teacher scholars were recognized with major National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) research awards, and the sections and conferences instituted research initiatives of their own, many were filled with the soaring hope that a new synergy was in the making. The "Research in the Teaching of English" (RTE) Alan C. Purves Award,…

  9. Researching Practice and Practicing Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPardo, Anne

    2011-01-01

    When works of teacher scholars were recognized with major National Council of Teachers of English (NCTE) research awards, and the sections and conferences instituted research initiatives of their own, many were filled with the soaring hope that a new synergy was in the making. The "Research in the Teaching of English" (RTE) Alan C. Purves Award,…

  10. Animating Research with Counseling Values: A Training Model to Address the Research-to-Practice Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kristi A.; Dewell, John A.; Holmes, Courtney M.

    2014-01-01

    The persistent research-to-practice gap poses a problem for counselor education. The gap may be caused by conflicts between the humanistic values that guide much of counseling and the values that guide research training. In this article, the authors address historical concerns regarding research training for students and the conducting of research…

  11. Connecting Practice & Research: A Shared Growth Professional Development Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampi, Jodi P.; Dimino, Renee K.; Taylor, Judi Salsburg

    2015-01-01

    The authors write here that they fundamentally believe that developmental education is about social justice. Professionals in this field are not only responsible to implement evidence-based best practices but also to ensure access to higher education. To meet this need, it is imperative that practitioners turn, as a supportive team, to…

  12. Teaching research in clinical pastoral education: a survey of model practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartaglia, Alexander; Fitchett, George; Dodd-McCue, Diane; Murphy, Patricia; Derrickson, Paul E

    2013-03-01

    The Association of Professional Chaplains (APC) developed Standards of Practice for Acute and Long-term settings. Standard 12 promotes research-literate chaplains as important for the profession. Since many chaplains receive training in clinical pastoral education (CPE) residency programs, the aim of this study was to identify model practices for the teaching of research in such programs. Using a purposeful sample, this study identified 11 programs that offered "consistent and substantive" education in research. Common features included the existence of a research champion, a culture supportive of research, and the availability of institutional resources. The study identified models and methodologies that CPE programs can adopt.

  13. Land use change modelling: current practice and research priorities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verburg, P.H.; Schot, P.; Dijst, M.J.; Veldkamp, A.

    2004-01-01

    Land use change models are tools to support the analysis of the causes and consequences of land use dynamics. Scenario analysis with land use models can support land use planning and policy. Numerous land use models are available, developed from different disciplinary backgrounds. This paper reviews

  14. Current Practice in Measuring the Quality of Conceptual Models:Challenges and Research%Current Practice in Measuring the Quality of Conceptual Models:Challenges and Research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Lei; WU Yu-feng; LI Xiao-jun

    2012-01-01

    How to measure the quality of conceptual models is an important issue in the IS field and related research. This paper conducts a review of research in measuring conceptual model quality and identifies the major theoretical and practical issues that need to be addressed in future studies. We review current classification frameworks for conceptual model quality and practice of measuring conceptual model quality. Based on the review, challenges for studies of measuring the quality of conceptual models are proposed and these challenges are also research points which should be strengthened in future studies.

  15. Modelling Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    This chapter deals with the practicalities of building, testing, deploying and maintaining models. It gives specific advice for each phase of the modelling cycle. To do this, a modelling framework is introduced which covers: problem and model definition; model conceptualization; model data...... requirements; model construction; model solution; model verification; model validation and finally model deployment and maintenance. Within the adopted methodology, each step is discussedthrough the consideration of key issues and questions relevant to the modelling activity. Practical advice, based on many...... years of experience is providing in directing the reader in their activities.Traps and pitfalls are discussed and strategies also given to improve model development towards “fit-for-purpose” models. The emphasis in this chapter is the adoption and exercise of a modelling methodology that has proven very...

  16. The Best Practice Unit: a model for learning, research and development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Pierre Wilken

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The Best Practice Unit: a model for learning, research and development The Best Practice Unit (BPU model constitutes a unique form of practice-based research. A variant of the Community of Practice model developed by Wenger, McDermott and Snyder (2002, the BPU has the specific aim of improving professional practice by combining innovation and research. The model is used as a way of working by a group of professionals, researchers and other relevant individuals, who over a period of one to two years, work together towards a desired improvement. The model is characterized by interaction between individual and collective learning processes, the development of new or improved working methods, and the implementation of these methods in daily practice. Multiple knowledge resources are used, including experiential knowledge, professional knowledge and scientific knowledge. The research serves diverse purposes: articulating tacit knowledge, documenting learning and innovation processes, systematically describing the working methods that have been revealed or developed, and evaluating the efficacy of the new methods. Each BPU is supported by a facilitator, whose main task is to optimize learning processes. An analysis of ten different BPUs in different professional fields shows that this is a successful model. The article describes the methodology and results of this study. De Best Practice Unit: een model voor leren, onderzoek en ontwikkeling Het model van de Best Practice Unit (BPU is een unieke vorm van praktijkgericht onderzoek. De Best Practice Unit is een variant van de Community of Practice zoals ontwikkeld door Wenger, McDermott en Snyder (2002 met als specifiek doel om de professionele praktijk te verbeteren door innovatie en onderzoek te combineren. Het model wordt gebruikt om in een periode van 1-2 jaar met een groep professionals, onderzoekers en andere betrokkenen te werken aan een gewenste verbetering. Kenmerkend is de wisselwerking tussen

  17. Towards a comprehensive model of scientific research and professional practice in psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Marian Brzeziński

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article I present a model of associations between two social domains: the scientific research domain (here psychology and the professional practice domain. In the former case, its quality is determined by social and individual methodological awareness (MA. I introduce my own definition of MA. What determines the validity and usefulness of practical actions undertaken by professionals (e.g., assessment, therapy in the practice domain is the accurately constructed empirical theory high in descriptive power, explanatory power and predictive power. I propose a model (my own conceptualization in which I analyze information flow between the domains of scientific research (psychology as a science and professional practice (psychology as a profession. In the subsequent and final part I discuss my own model which links theory and practice: Scientific Research and Professional Practice in Psychology (SRPPP. The article ends with a presentation of three contexts in which the interrelationship between theory and practice is immersed: the ethical, psychological and cultural contexts.

  18. Towards a comprehensive model of scientific research and professional practice in psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Marian Brzeziński

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article I present a model of associations between two social domains: the scientific research domain (here psychology and the professional practice domain. In the former case, its quality is determined by social and individual methodological awareness (MA. I introduce my own definition of MA. What determines the validity and usefulness of practical actions undertaken by professionals (e.g., assessment, therapy in the practice domain is the accurately constructed empirical theory high in descriptive power, explanatory power and predictive power. I propose a model (my own conceptualization in which I analyze information flow between the domains of scientific research (psychology as a science and professional practice (psychology as a profession. In the subsequent and final part I discuss my own model which links theory and practice: Scientific Research and Professional Practice in Psychology (SRPPP. The article ends with a presentation of three contexts in which the interrelationship between theory and practice is immersed: the ethical, psychological and cultural contexts.

  19. The Model Of Contemporary Marketing Practices (Cmp) In The Russian Market: Evidence From Empirical Research

    OpenAIRE

    Vera A. Rebiazina; Olga A. Tretyak

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that emerging markets represent a significant part of the world economy and are expanding their share. However, they are still not well examined in the marketing field. Russia is especially neglected in the academic discussion of overall marketing strategy. Previous research indicates that the model of “Contemporary marketing practices” (CMP) is commonly used as a classification scheme of marketing practices both in developed and developing markets. This article ex...

  20. Linking research to practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pinto-Correia, T.; Kristensen, L.

    2013-01-01

    , questions on the changes affecting the rural, addressed by society to the scientific community, are of a, new character and require novel research approaches. This paper argues that landscape based, approaches can be useful basis for the required conceptual innovation. The paper presents and, discusses...... a set of examples of practice driven research developments, in contrasting regions of Europe. And it proposes a conceptual model which aims to contextualize empirical research driven by, problems set up in practice, and combining the ecological and structural dimensions with the socioeconomic......, and cultural ones, all converging in the rural landscape, at multiple scales. The landscape, as, the spatial entity, in its material and immaterial dimensions, is presented in this paper as the most, comprehensive basis for the required step forward. This does not mean a disciplinary landscape, analysis...

  1. Mixing methodology, nursing theory and research design for a practice model of district nursing advocacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Frances M; Fitzgerald, Les; Rae, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    To highlight philosophical and theoretical considerations for planning a mixed methods research design that can inform a practice model to guide rural district nursing end of life care. Conceptual models of nursing in the community are general and lack guidance for rural district nursing care. A combination of pragmatism and nurse agency theory can provide a framework for ethical considerations in mixed methods research in the private world of rural district end of life care. Reflection on experience gathered in a two-stage qualitative research phase, involving rural district nurses who use advocacy successfully, can inform a quantitative phase for testing and complementing the data. Ongoing data analysis and integration result in generalisable inferences to achieve the research objective. Mixed methods research that creatively combines philosophical and theoretical elements to guide design in the particular ethical situation of community end of life care can be used to explore an emerging field of interest and test the findings for evidence to guide quality nursing practice. Combining philosophy and nursing theory to guide mixed methods research design increases the opportunity for sound research outcomes that can inform a nursing model of care.

  2. Educational models in academic research on the teaching practices in science education in elementary school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebeca Chiacchio Azevedo Fernandes

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We intended to identify the features and pedagogical trends of the school practices proposed and implemented in thesis and dissertations directed to science education at elementary school level from 1972 to 2005. Thirty studies were analysed regarding the teaching methodology, instructional resources, teacher-student relationships, evaluation, theoretical framework, and educational model (traditional, rediscovery, constructivist, technicist, STS, socio-cultural. We found that the constructivist model was dominant (63%, followed by the socio-cultural (20% and the rediscovery one (10%, and that the pedagogical practices were elaborated by researchers, applied by teachers and performed by students, showing a vertical hierarchy between university and school. However, the implemented practices (actual level usually were quite distant from the researchers discourse (proposed level. We also observed that the researchers didn’t find many difficulties in designing and applying a pedagogical proposal with innovative features, but to make changes in the school and social relations, as well as in the evaluation practices, is a barrier difficult to overcome.

  3. Aging and orthopedics: how a lifespan development model can inform practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautreau, Sylvia; Gould, Odette N; Forsythe, Michael E

    2016-08-01

    Orthopedic surgical care, like all health care today, is in flux owing to an aging population and to chronic medical conditions leading to an increased number of people with illnesses that need to be managed over the lifespan. The result is an ongoing shift from curing acute illnesses to the management and care of chronic illness and conditions. Theoretical models that provide a useful and feasible vision for the future of health care and health care research are needed. This review discusses how the lifespan development model used in some disciplines within the behavioural sciences can be seen as an extension of the biopsychosocial model. We posit that the lifespan development model provides useful perspectives for both orthopedic care and research. We present key concepts and recommendations, and we discuss how the lifespan development model can contribute to new and evolving perspectives on orthopedic outcomes and to new directions for research. We also offer practical guidelines on how to implement the model in orthopedic practice.

  4. A model to advance nursing science in trauma practice and injury outcomes research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richmond, Therese S; Aitken, Leanne M

    2011-12-01

    This discussion paper reports development of a model to advance nursing science and practice in trauma care based on an analysis of the literature and expert opinion. The continuum of clinical care provided to trauma patients extends from the time of injury through to long-term recovery and final outcomes. Nurses bring a unique expertise to meet the complex physical and psychosocial needs of trauma patients and their families to influence outcomes across this entire continuum. Literature was obtained by searching CINAHL, PubMed and OvidMedline databases for 1990-2010. Search terms included trauma, nursing, scope of practice and role, with results restricted to those published in English. Manual searches of relevant journals and websites were undertaken. Core concepts in this trauma outcomes model include environment, person/family, structured care settings, long-term outcomes and nursing interventions. The relationships between each of these concepts extend across all phases of care. Intermediate outcomes are achieved in each phase of care and influence and have congruence with long-term outcomes. Implications for policy and practice.  This model is intended to provide a framework to assist trauma nurses and researchers to consider the injured person in the context of the social, economic, cultural and physical environment from which they come and the long-term goals that each person has during recovery. The entire model requires testing in research and assessment of its practical contribution to practice. Planning and integrating care across the trauma continuum and recognition of the role of the injured person's background, family and resources will lead to improved long-term outcomes. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  5. Advancing Transdisciplinary and Translational Research Practice: Issues and Models of Doctoral Education in Public Health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Neuhauser

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Finding solutions to complex health problems, such as obesity, violence, and climate change, will require radical changes in cross-disciplinary education, research, and practice. The fundamental determinants of health include many interrelated factors such as poverty, culture, education, environment, and government policies. However, traditional public health training has tended to focus more narrowly on diseases and risk factors, and has not adequately leveraged the rich contributions of sociology, anthropology, economics, geography, communication, political science, and other disciplines. Further, students are often not sufficiently trained to work across sectors to translate research findings into effective, large-scale sustainable actions.During the past 2 decades, national and international organizations have called for more effective interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary, and translational approaches to graduate education. Although it has been difficult to work across traditional academic boundaries, some promising models draw on pedagogical theory and feature cross-disciplinary training focused on real-world problems, linkage between research, professional practice, community action, and cultivation of leadership skills.We describe the development the Doctor of Public Health program at the University of California, Berkeley, USA and its efforts to improve transdisciplinary and translational research education. We stress the need for international collaboration to improve educational approaches and better evaluate their impact.

  6. The development of a dynamic model for microvascular research and practice using human placenta: a preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waterhouse, N; Moss, A L; Townsend, P L

    1985-07-01

    Human placenta has been investigated in an attempt to develop a non-animal model for microvascular research and practice, with a dynamic artificial circulation. Initial work has been encouraging and further development is in progress.

  7. Reflectivity in Research Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luigina Mortari

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article grounds on the assumption that researchers, in order to be not mere technicians but competent practitioners of research, should be able to reflect in a deep way. That means they should reflect not only on the practical acts of research but also on the mental experience which constructs the meaning about practice. Reflection is a very important mental activity, both in private and professional life. Learning the practice of reflection is fundamental because it allows people to engage into a thoughtful relationship with the world-life and thus gain an awake stance about one’s lived experience. Reflection is a crucial cognitive practice in the research field. Reflexivity is largely practiced in qualitative research, where it is used to legitimate and validate research procedures. This study introduces different perspectives of analysis by focusing the discourse on the main philosophical approaches to reflection: pragmatistic, critical, hermeneutic, and finally phenomenological. The thesis of this study is that the phenomenological theory makes possible to analyze in depth the reflective activity and just by that to support an adequate process of training of the researcher.

  8. Architectural Practice as Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Anna Katrine

    2015-01-01

    , qualitative and quantitative, scientific and artistic methods pollinate each other, and an attempt to set up a span for ‘research by design’ to unfold in, rather than a rigid definition. In mutual exploitation architectural writing, drawing and potentially the construction of objects with properties embodied......The paper discusses a kind of research which lies between ‘research by design’ and ‘artistic research’. The term ‘research by design’ is reconstructed to include artistic ways of working, and the paper is an exemplification of a research practice, which seeks to let subjective and objective...

  9. [Research practices of conversion efficiency of resources utilization model of castoff from Chinese material medica industrialization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Jin-Ao; Su, Shu-Lan; Guo, Sheng; Liu, Pei; Qian, Da-Wei; Jiang, Shu; Zhu, Hua-Xu; Tang, Yu-Ping; Wu, Qi-Nan

    2013-12-01

    The industrialization chains and their products, which were formed from the process of the production of medicinal materials-prepared drug in pieces and deep processed product of Chinese material medica (CMM) resources, have generated large benefits of social and economic. However, The large of herb-medicine castoff of "non-medicinal parts" and "rejected materials" produced inevitably during the process of Chinese medicinal resources produce and process, and the residues, waste water and waste gas were produced during the manufactured and deep processed product of CMM. These lead to the waste of resources and environmental pollution. Our previous researches had proposed the "three utilization strategies" and "three types of resources models" of herb-medicine castoff according to the different physicochemical property of resources constitutes, resources potential and utility value of herb-medicine castoff. This article focus on the conversion efficiency of resources model and analysis the ways, technologies, practices, and application in herb-medicine cast off of the conversion efficiency of resources model based on the recycling economy theory of resources and thoughts of resources chemistry of CMM. These data may be promote and resolve the key problems limited the industrialization of Chinese material medica for long time and promote the realization of herb-medicine castoff resources utilization.

  10. A Scientist-Practitioner Model of Psychological Assessment: Implications for Training, Practice and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spengler, Paul M.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Proposes a prototypical model for psychological assessment that reformulates a model of the counselor-as-scientist. Integrates the model's theory and research on human inference, judgment, and decision making; research on threats to accurate clinical prediction; and findings about counselor characteristics associated with effective judgment…

  11. Planning Practice and Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    Urban planning has dramatically shifted when compared with its former logics and styles. Increasingly, the dynamics of large urban agglomerations spanning multiple boundaries put significant pressure on planning institutions to scale up. In this shifting context, how can both planning theory...... and practice co- evolve in adapting to the ever-increasing transformation of cities and urban regions? In this context, Planning Practice and Research (PPR) is seeking perspectives from the young academic community in planning. We propose to publish at least one special edition of PPR with a number of short...... papers from Young Academics. The contributions should address the question of how planning theory and practice can respond to the increasing complexity of cities and regions....

  12. The research and practice based on the full-time visitation model in clinical medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most of the higher medical colleges and universities teaching hospital carry certain clinical teaching tasks, but the traditional teaching pattern of "two stage", including the early stage of the theory of teaching, the late arrangement of clinical practice, had some drawbacks such as practice time is too concentrated and the chasm between students' theory and practice. It is suggested that students contact clinical diagnosis and treatment earlier, visit more patients and increase the ratio of visitation and course. But as more and more students flood into university, clinical visitation has turned into a difficulty to improve students’ ability. To resolve this problem, we have made some efficient practice and exploration in Rizhao City People's Hospital from September 2005 to July 2014. The students were divided into full-time visitation model group and “two stage” pattern group randomly. The single factors are of great difference between the two groups. The full-time visitation model in clinical medical education builds a new mode of practice of clinical practice teaching in the medical stuents' concept of doctor-patient communication, humanistic care to patients, basic theoretical knowledge, clinical practice skills and graduate admission rate increased significantly. Continuous improvement of OSCE exam is needed to make evaluation more scientific, objective and fair.

  13. Use of the Iowa Model of Research in Practice as a Curriculum Framework for Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Project Completion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Susan T; D'Errico, Ellen; Bristol, Shirley T

    2016-01-01

    Doctoral education requires academic motivation and persistence on the part of nursing students; commitment to the process is essential and should be linked to programmatic structure. Programmatic issues in doctor of nursing practice (DNP) programs may be barriers to completion of the final project and lead to attrition. A large, private health care university developed an infrastructure for the DNP curriculum and final project utilizing the Iowa Model of Research in Practice. The purpose was to ensure competency fulfillment, retention and timely completion, and implementation of evidence-based practice and translation science utilizing a leadership approach. The program has experienced a high completion rate to date.

  14. Practical Solutions for Pesticide Safety: A Farm and Research Team Participatory Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvin, Kit; Krenz, Jen; Harrington, Marcy; Palmández, Pablo; Fenske, Richard A

    2016-01-01

    Development of the Practical Solutions for Pesticide Safety guide used participatory research strategies to identify and evaluate solutions that reduce pesticide exposures for workers and their families and to disseminate these solutions. Project principles were (1) workplace chemicals belong in the workplace, and (2) pesticide handlers and farm managers are experts, with direct knowledge of production practices. The project's participatory methods were grounded in self-determination theory. Practical solutions were identified and evaluated based on five criteria: practicality, adaptability, health and safety, novelty, and regulatory compliance. Research activities that had more personal contact provided better outcomes. The Expert Working Group, composed of farm managers and pesticide handlers, was key to the identification of solutions, as were farm site visits. Audience participation, hands-on testing, and orchard field trials were particularly effective in the evaluation of potential solutions. Small work groups in a Regional Advisory Committee provided the best direction and guidance for a "user-friendly" translational document that provided evidence-based practical solutions. The "farmer to farmer" format of the guide was endorsed by both the Expert Working Group and the Regional Advisory Committee. Managers and pesticide handlers wanted to share their solutions in order to "help others stay safe," and they appreciated attribution in the guide. The guide is now being used in educational programs across the region. The fundamental concept that farmers and farmworkers are innovators and experts in agricultural production was affirmed by this study. The success of this process demonstrates the value of participatory industrial hygiene in agriculture.

  15. The Process of Empowerment: A Model for Use in Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, Lauren Bennett; Chapman, Aliya R.

    2010-01-01

    In this article, we propose a model of the process of empowerment. The notion of empowerment is compelling and much employed across many subfields inside and outside of psychology, but the lack of consistency in the ways prior literature has defined it is an obstacle to meaningful synthesis of findings and consistent application in practice. Our…

  16. Modeling the Skills and Practices of Scientists through an “All-Inclusive” Comparative Planetology Student Research Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, Paige; Bandfield, J.; Stefanov, W.; Vanderbloemen, L.; Willis, K.; Runco, S.

    2013-01-01

    To effectively prepare the nation's future Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) workforce, students in today's classrooms need opportunities to engage in authentic experiences that model skills and practices used by STEM professionals. Relevant, real-world authentic research experiences allow students to behave as scientists as they model the process of science. This enables students to get a true sense of STEM-related professions and also allows them to develop the requisite knowledge, skills, curiosity, and creativity necessary for success in STEM careers. Providing professional development and opportunities to help teachers infuse research in the classroom is one of the primary goals of the Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) program. EEAB, facilitated by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center, is an Earth and planetary science education program designed to inspire, engage, and educate teachers and students in grades 5-12 by getting them actively involved with exploration, discovery, and the process of science. The program combines the expertise of scientists and educators to ensure the professional development provided to classroom teachers is scientifically valid and also recognizes classroom constraints. For many teachers, facilitating research in the classroom can be challenging. In addition to addressing required academic standards and dealing with time constraints, challenges include structuring a research investigation the entire class can successfully complete. To build educator confidence, foster positive classroom research experiences, and enable teachers to help students model the skills and practices of scientists, EEAB has created an "allinclusive" comparative planetology research investigation activity. This activity addresses academic standards while recognizing students (and teachers) potentially lack experience with scientific practices involved in conducting

  17. Modeling the Skills and Practices of Scientists through an 'All-Inclusive' Comparative Planetology Student Research Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graff, P. V.; Bandfield, J. L.; Stefanov, W. L.; Vanderbloemen, L.; Willis, K. J.; Runco, S.

    2013-12-01

    To effectively prepare the nation's future Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) workforce, students in today's classrooms need opportunities to engage in authentic experiences that model skills and practices used by STEM professionals. Relevant, real-world authentic research experiences allow students to behave as scientists as they model the process of science. This enables students to get a true sense of STEM-related professions and also allows them to develop the requisite knowledge, skills, curiosity, and creativity necessary for success in STEM careers. Providing professional development and opportunities to help teachers infuse research in the classroom is one of the primary goals of the Expedition Earth and Beyond (EEAB) program. EEAB, facilitated by the Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science (ARES) Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center, is an Earth and planetary science education program designed to inspire, engage, and educate teachers and students in grades 5-12 by getting them actively involved with exploration, discovery, and the process of science. The program combines the expertise of scientists and educators to ensure the professional development provided to classroom teachers is scientifically valid and also recognizes classroom constraints. For many teachers, facilitating research in the classroom can be challenging. In addition to addressing required academic standards and dealing with time constraints, challenges include structuring a research investigation the entire class can successfully complete. To build educator confidence, foster positive classroom research experiences, and enable teachers to help students model the skills and practices of scientists, EEAB has created an 'all-inclusive' comparative planetology research investigation activity. This activity addresses academic standards while recognizing students (and teachers) potentially lack experience with scientific practices involved in conducting

  18. From Action Research to Practice Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Goran Goldkuhl

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Action research (AR has gained more acceptance as an approach to qualitative research in information systems (IS. The complexities of organisational and technical change makes this approach a suitable one in IS research. There are, however, still some controversies and confusions about the relation between “action” and “research”. The many types of AR and similar approaches (not labelled as AR that have emerged demands further conceptual clarification of AR. A conceptual inquiry of AR, presented in the paper, has led to the identification of several unresolved issues concerning intervention research like AR. An alternative research approach is presented: practice research. This research approach is well founded in pragmatism and it builds on the two premises: 1 to contribute to general practice through abstract and useful knowledge and 2 to study the empirical field as interconnected practices. Several important concepts of practice research are described as: local practice contribution vs. general practice contribution; theorizing vs. situational inquiry. Practice research is seen as a broader notion encompassing AR and other research approaches as e.g. design research and evaluation research. Two case examples of practice research are briefly presented and compared: one AR-based study in the social welfare sector and one evaluation study of a taxation e-service.

  19. Questionable research practices among italian research psychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnoli, Franca; Wicherts, Jelte M; Veldkamp, Coosje L S; Albiero, Paolo; Cubelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    A survey in the United States revealed that an alarmingly large percentage of university psychologists admitted having used questionable research practices that can contaminate the research literature with false positive and biased findings. We conducted a replication of this study among Italian research psychologists to investigate whether these findings generalize to other countries. All the original materials were translated into Italian, and members of the Italian Association of Psychology were invited to participate via an online survey. The percentages of Italian psychologists who admitted to having used ten questionable research practices were similar to the results obtained in the United States although there were small but significant differences in self-admission rates for some QRPs. Nearly all researchers (88%) admitted using at least one of the practices, and researchers generally considered a practice possibly defensible if they admitted using it, but Italian researchers were much less likely than US researchers to consider a practice defensible. Participants' estimates of the percentage of researchers who have used these practices were greater than the self-admission rates, and participants estimated that researchers would be unlikely to admit it. In written responses, participants argued that some of these practices are not questionable and they have used some practices because reviewers and journals demand it. The similarity of results obtained in the United States, this study, and a related study conducted in Germany suggest that adoption of these practices is an international phenomenon and is likely due to systemic features of the international research and publication processes.

  20. Questionable research practices among italian research psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicherts, Jelte M.; Veldkamp, Coosje L. S.; Albiero, Paolo; Cubelli, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    A survey in the United States revealed that an alarmingly large percentage of university psychologists admitted having used questionable research practices that can contaminate the research literature with false positive and biased findings. We conducted a replication of this study among Italian research psychologists to investigate whether these findings generalize to other countries. All the original materials were translated into Italian, and members of the Italian Association of Psychology were invited to participate via an online survey. The percentages of Italian psychologists who admitted to having used ten questionable research practices were similar to the results obtained in the United States although there were small but significant differences in self-admission rates for some QRPs. Nearly all researchers (88%) admitted using at least one of the practices, and researchers generally considered a practice possibly defensible if they admitted using it, but Italian researchers were much less likely than US researchers to consider a practice defensible. Participants’ estimates of the percentage of researchers who have used these practices were greater than the self-admission rates, and participants estimated that researchers would be unlikely to admit it. In written responses, participants argued that some of these practices are not questionable and they have used some practices because reviewers and journals demand it. The similarity of results obtained in the United States, this study, and a related study conducted in Germany suggest that adoption of these practices is an international phenomenon and is likely due to systemic features of the international research and publication processes. PMID:28296929

  1. Revisiting the continuum model of tendon pathology: what is its merit in clinical practice and research?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, J L; Rio, E; Purdam, C R; Docking, S I

    2016-10-01

    The pathogenesis of tendinopathy and the primary biological change in the tendon that precipitates pathology have generated several pathoaetiological models in the literature. The continuum model of tendon pathology, proposed in 2009, synthesised clinical and laboratory-based research to guide treatment choices for the clinical presentations of tendinopathy. While the continuum has been cited extensively in the literature, its clinical utility has yet to be fully elucidated. The continuum model proposed a model for staging tendinopathy based on the changes and distribution of disorganisation within the tendon. However, classifying tendinopathy based on structure in what is primarily a pain condition has been challenged. The interplay between structure, pain and function is not yet fully understood, which has partly contributed to the complex clinical picture of tendinopathy. Here we revisit and assess the merit of the continuum model in the context of new evidence. We (1) summarise new evidence in tendinopathy research in the context of the continuum, (2) discuss tendon pain and the relevance of a model based on structure and (3) describe relevant clinical elements (pain, function and structure) to begin to build a better understanding of the condition. Our goal is that the continuum model may help guide targeted treatments and improved patient outcomes. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  2. Researching the effect of the practical applications performed with cadaver dissection and anatomical models on anatomy education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vedat Sabancıoğulları

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The most important element in providing good quality of healthcare is well training of healthcare staff, particularly doctors. The way of being a good and successful healthcare staff is to learn the human anatomy accurately and permanently. Practical applications as well as theoretical courses are also highly important in learning human anatomy. In classical anatomy education, using cadaver is accepted to be indispensable. However, along with the new medical faculties, there has been an increase in the shortage of cadaver, and anatomy practices have mainly begun to be carried out on models or mock-ups. Therefore, we aimed to study with anatomic models in practical applications and to research the effect of cadaver dissection on learning anatomy. Method: In this study including 120-second grade students that their achievement levels are close together and participating in the theoretical courses of anatomy in medical faculty during 2015 – 2016 academic year. To realize this, students were divided into four groups (1st group were include students only listening to theoretical course, 2nd group theoretical course and performing application with anatomic models, 3rd group theoretical course and performing application with cadaver dissection, and 4th group theoretical course and performing application with anatomic models and cadaver dissection of 30 people. Degree of students’ understanding the subject was detected with written and practical exams consists of 10 questions after the theoretical and practical courses on each committee. The resulting data are loaded to SPSS 22.0 software and statistical evaluation One-way ANOVA, Mann-Whitney, chi-square test was used. Results: The average of students who practice on both models and cadavers were statistically significant (p 0.05. Conclusions: The results obtained from our study indicate that anatomy practical training is carried out with the dissection of cadavers that made it easier to

  3. PRIME – PRocess modelling in ImpleMEntation research: selecting a theoretical basis for interventions to change clinical practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitts Nigel

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biomedical research constantly produces new findings but these are not routinely translated into health care practice. One way to address this problem is to develop effective interventions to translate research findings into practice. Currently a range of empirical interventions are available and systematic reviews of these have demonstrated that there is no single best intervention. This evidence base is difficult to use in routine settings because it cannot identify which intervention is most likely to be effective (or cost effective in a particular situation. We need to establish a scientific rationale for interventions. As clinical practice is a form of human behaviour, theories of human behaviour that have proved useful in other similar settings may provide a basis for developing a scientific rationale for the choice of interventions to translate research findings into clinical practice. The objectives of the study are: to amplify and populate scientifically validated theories of behaviour with evidence from the experience of health professionals; to use this as a basis for developing predictive questionnaires using replicable methods; to identify which elements of the questionnaire (i.e., which theoretical constructs predict clinical practice and distinguish between evidence compliant and non-compliant practice; and on the basis of these results, to identify variables (based on theoretical constructs that might be prime targets for behaviour change interventions. Methods We will develop postal questionnaires measuring two motivational, three action and one stage theory to explore five behaviours with 800 general medical and 600 general dental practitioners. We will collect data on performance for each of the behaviours. The relationships between predictor variables (theoretical constructs and outcome measures (data on performance in each survey will be assessed using multiple regression analysis and structural equation

  4. Double helix of research and practice—developing a practice model for crisis resolution and home treatment through participatory action research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marit Borg

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Over the last five years Crisis Resolution/Home Treatment (CR/HT teams have been established in Norway. These teams provide an alternative to in-patient acute care services offering assessment as well as direct care. This paper addresses a method of examining the nature of practice models that are being developed in a CR/HT team incorporating the philosophy of open dialogue and the open lifeworld approach. The overall design of this research is action research applying a cooperative inquiry perspective. Multistage focus group interviews are used as a method for generating data, followed by phenomenological–hermeneutic approach in analyzing the data. Three themes were identified: (a “keeping the dialogue open” referring to the emphasis of openness in dialogues and opening up for a variety of perspectives on what's going on; (b “tolerance of uncertainty” referring to the need to accept and deal with uncertainty and multiplicity; and (c “nurturing everyday life issues” referring to the emphasis on illustrating clinical situations in detail through remaking of stories. The on-going co-processes of research and practice was a double helix that links the happenings in the practice with the findings in the research revealing the knowledge in practice and further developing that knowledge.

  5. Software Engineering Practices in the Development of NASA Unified Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R.; Zhou, S.; Syed, R.

    2010-12-01

    The NASA Unified Weather Research and Forecasting (NU-WRF) Model is an effort to unify several WRF variants developed at NASA and bring together NASA's existing earth science models and assimilation systems that simulate the interaction among clouds, aerosols, atmospheric gases, precipitation, and land surfaces. By developing NU-WRF, the NASA modeling community expects to: (1) facilitate better use of WRF for scientific research, (2) reduce redundancy in major WRF development, (3) prolong the serviceable life span of WRF, and (4) allow better use of NASA high-resolution satellite data for short term climate and weather research. This project involves multiple teams from different organizations and the research goals are still evolving. As a result, software engineering best practices are needed for software life-cycle management and testing, and to ensure reliability of the data being generated. NASA software engineers and scientists have worked together to develop software requirements, scientific use cases, automated regression tests, software release plans, and a revision control system. Nightly automated regression tests are being used on scaled-down versions of the use cases to test if any code changes have unintentionally changed the science results or made the software unstable. Revision control management is needed to track software changes that are made by the many developers involved in the project. The release planning helps to guide the release of NU-WRF versions to the NASA community and allows for making strategic changes in delivery dates and software features as needed. The team of software engineers and scientists have also worked on optimizing, generalizing, and testing existing model preprocessing codes and run scripts for the various models. Finally, the team developed model coupling tools to link WRF with NASA earth science models. NU-WRF 1.0 was based on WRF3.1.1 and was released to the NASA community in July 2010, providing the researchers

  6. Caregiving process and caregiver burden: Conceptual models to guide research and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brehaut Jamie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Parental care for a child with a developmental disability is an enormous responsibility, one that can far exceed that of typical parental care. While most parents adapt well to the situation of caring for a child with a disability, some do not. To understand parents' adaptations to their children's disabilities, the complex nature of stress processes must be accounted for and the constructs and factors that play a role in the caregiving must be considered. Discussion Evidence suggests that there is considerable variation in how caregivers adapt to their caregiving demands. Many studies have sought to qualify the association between caregiving and health outcomes of the caregivers. Contextual factors such as SES, child factors such as child behaviour problems and severity of disability, intra-psychic factors such as mastery and self-esteem, coping strategies and social supports have all been associated with psychological and/or physical outcome or parents or primary caregivers. In reviewing these issues, the literature appears to be limited by the use of traditional analytic approaches which examine the relationship between a factor and an outcome. It is clear, however, that changes to single factors, as represented in these studies, occur very rarely even in the experimental context. The literature has also been limited by lack of reliance on specific theoretical frameworks. Summary This conceptual paper documents the state of current knowledge and explores the current theoretical frameworks that have been used to describe the caregiving process from two diverse fields, pediatrics and geriatrics. Integration of these models into one comprehensive model suitable for this population of children with disabilities and their caregivers is proposed. This model may guide future research in this area.

  7. Model transparency and validation: a report of the ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force--7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, David M; Hollingworth, William; Caro, J Jaime; Tsevat, Joel; McDonald, Kathryn M; Wong, John B

    2012-01-01

    Trust and confidence are critical to the success of health care models. There are two main methods for achieving this: transparency (people can see how the model is built) and validation (how well the model reproduces reality). This report describes recommendations for achieving transparency and validation developed by a taskforce appointed by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research and the Society for Medical Decision Making. Recommendations were developed iteratively by the authors. A nontechnical description--including model type, intended applications, funding sources, structure, intended uses, inputs, outputs, other components that determine function, and their relationships, data sources, validation methods, results, and limitations--should be made available to anyone. Technical documentation, written in sufficient detail to enable a reader with necessary expertise to evaluate the model and potentially reproduce it, should be made available openly or under agreements that protect intellectual property, at the discretion of the modelers. Validation involves face validity (wherein experts evaluate model structure, data sources, assumptions, and results), verification or internal validity (check accuracy of coding), cross validity (comparison of results with other models analyzing the same problem), external validity (comparing model results with real-world results), and predictive validity (comparing model results with prospectively observed events). The last two are the strongest form of validation. Each section of this article contains a number of recommendations that were iterated among the authors, as well as among the wider modeling taskforce, jointly set up by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research and the Society for Medical Decision Making.

  8. Research-Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Desimone

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent attention on partnerships between researchers and practitioners highlights the potential of these relationships to provide high-quality usable knowledge for improving schools. But how do we translate guiding partnership principles into specific actionable steps? How do we build and maintain an effective partnership? How do we reconcile and integrate multiple partnership frameworks to establish a coherent set of partnership activities? How do we evaluate partnership progress and outcomes? Building on the recent insightful work on partnerships, we offer a framework for planning, building, implementing, and monitoring partnerships, based on the literature and our experiences in a partnership between a university-based school of education at a major research university and the research office of a big-city school district. Using a theory describing attributes that define a policy’s strength, we propose an organizing framework to transform insights about partnerships into concrete activities and mechanisms to help achieve the potential of these partnerships to use research to improve schooling.

  9. Model transparency and validation: a report of the ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force-7.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, David M; Hollingworth, William; Caro, J Jaime; Tsevat, Joel; McDonald, Kathryn M; Wong, John B

    2012-01-01

    Trust and confidence are critical to the success of health care models. There are two main methods for achieving this: transparency (people can see how the model is built) and validation (how well it reproduces reality). This report describes recommendations for achieving transparency and validation, developed by a task force appointed by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research (ISPOR) and the Society for Medical Decision Making (SMDM). Recommendations were developed iteratively by the authors. A nontechnical description should be made available to anyone-including model type and intended applications; funding sources; structure; inputs, outputs, other components that determine function, and their relationships; data sources; validation methods and results; and limitations. Technical documentation, written in sufficient detail to enable a reader with necessary expertise to evaluate the model and potentially reproduce it, should be made available openly or under agreements that protect intellectual property, at the discretion of the modelers. Validation involves face validity (wherein experts evaluate model structure, data sources, assumptions, and results), verification or internal validity (check accuracy of coding), cross validity (comparison of results with other models analyzing same problem), external validity (comparing model results to real-world results), and predictive validity (comparing model results with prospectively observed events). The last two are the strongest form of validation. Each section of this paper contains a number of recommendations that were iterated among the authors, as well as the wider modeling task force jointly set up by the International Society for Pharmacoeconomics and Outcomes Research and the Society for Medical Decision Making.

  10. Research versus educational practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Graaff, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Over the past years, the European Journal of Engineering Education (EJEE), the journal of the European Society for Engineering Education (SEFI) developed as a more research oriented journal. Bibliometric analyses show that EJEE keeps pace with other leading journals in the field of Engineering Ed...... for this phenomenon, it is argued that EJEE keeps on publishing papers that are appreciated by practitioners in the field, even if they do not generate a lot of citations in scientific journals.......Over the past years, the European Journal of Engineering Education (EJEE), the journal of the European Society for Engineering Education (SEFI) developed as a more research oriented journal. Bibliometric analyses show that EJEE keeps pace with other leading journals in the field of Engineering...

  11. Development of the quality assessment model of EHR software in family medicine practices: research based on user satisfaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damir Kralj

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background Family medicine practices (FMPs make the basis for the Croatian health care system. Use of electronic health record (EHR software is mandatory and it plays an important role in running these practices, but important functional features still remain uneven and largely left to the will of the software developers.Objective The objective of this study was to develop a novel and comprehensive model for functional evaluation of the EHR software in FMPs, based on current world standards, models and projects, as well as on actual user satisfaction and requirements.Methods Based on previous theoretical and experimental research in this area, we made the initial framework model consisting of six basic categories as a base for online survey questionnaire. Family doctors assessed perceived software quality by using a five-point Likert-type scale. Using exploratory factor analysis and appropriate statistical methods over the collected data, the final optimal structure of the novel model was formed. Special attention was focused on the validity and quality of the novel model.Results The online survey collected a total of 384 cases. The obtained results indicate both the quality of the assessed software and the quality in use of the novel model. The intense ergonomic orientation of the novel measurement model was particularly emphasised.Conclusions The resulting novel model is multiple validated, comprehensive and universal. It could be used to assess the user-perceived quality of almost all forms of the ambulatory EHR software and therefore useful to all stakeholders in this area of the health care informatisation. 

  12. A New Model of Collaborative Action Research; Theorising from Inter-Professional Practice Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lofthouse, Rachel; Flanagan, Jo; Wigley, Bibiana

    2016-01-01

    The development of pedagogies to meet the needs of diverse communities can be supported through inter-professional practice development. This article explores one such experience, that of speech and language therapists developing a new video-based coaching approach for teachers and teaching assistants in multi-cultural settings with high numbers…

  13. Bibliotherapy: Practice and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Sarah J.; Ronan, Kevin R.

    2008-01-01

    Recent years have witnessed an upsurge in the therapeutic use of books. With its initial roots in psychodynamic theory, available models emphasize features of the relationship between the personality of a reader and the cognitive and affective experience offered through literature. This article explores the historical development of bibliotherapy…

  14. A critical feminist perspective of the health belief model: implications for nursing theory, research, practice, and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, L W

    1995-01-01

    The health care system is in a state of crisis, and nursing is in a unique position to influence the decisions that are made regarding health care reform. However, without transforming our ways of knowing and being, the changes that are needed to meet the challenges of the future may not become a reality. Nursing theory, research, and practice reflect the historical, social, and political ideologies of western tradition. Consequently, the knowledge gained from the majority of nursing research has primarily developed from an empiricism or logical positivist philosophy. The underlying assumption of this school of thought is that only empirically quantifiable and measurable matters yield the truth, suggesting that there is only one reality. Because one cannot be socially critical as an empiricist, nurse educators have begun to question the adequacy of the empiricist philosophy and method of research for meeting changing societal demands. Social behavioral theories in general and the Health Belief Model in particular have frequently guided nursing research in an attempt to increase knowledge of health-related behaviors. Too often these theories have done little to increase our knowledge of women and people of color. For the most part, they have contributed to the oppression of individuals and groups. A critical feminist perspective can be useful in the understanding of health practices that are based on contextual knowledge. The purpose of this article is to increase awareness and understanding of the underlying assumptions, constraints, and contradictions that are embedded within social behavioral theories such as the Health Belief Model.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  15. A postfoundationalist research paradigm of practical theology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Kyu Park

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Practical theology describes a context, interprets what has been discovered, brings in Christian norms, and constructs models of Christian practice. It is a process that involves epistemology and hermeneutics. For practical theology to be transformative, a postfoundational theological framework that allows interdisciplinary work and interpretation of experience in a given context is essential. Research in postfoundational practical theology can be conducted using narratives and social constructionism to obtain meaning from events or situations and to construct preferred realities.This article examines and argues for postfoundationalism – transversal reason, interdisciplinarity and interpreted experience – as a viable theological option against rigid foundationalism and relativistic nonfoundationalism. Also discussed are the process and the interdisciplinary nature of practical theology. It is suggested that narrative research and social constructionism should be part of the research paradigm of postfoundational practical theology.

  16. A logic model framework for evaluation and planning in a primary care practice-based research network (PBRN)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Holly; Parchman, Michael L.; Howard, Ray

    2012-01-01

    Evaluating effective growth and development of a Practice-Based Research Network (PBRN) can be challenging. The purpose of this article is to describe the development of a logic model and how the framework has been used for planning and evaluation in a primary care PBRN. An evaluation team was formed consisting of the PBRN directors, staff and its board members. After the mission and the target audience were determined, facilitated meetings and discussions were held with stakeholders to identify the assumptions, inputs, activities, outputs, outcomes and outcome indicators. The long-term outcomes outlined in the final logic model are two-fold: 1.) Improved health outcomes of patients served by PBRN community clinicians; and 2.) Community clinicians are recognized leaders of quality research projects. The Logic Model proved useful in identifying stakeholder interests and dissemination activities as an area that required more attention in the PBRN. The logic model approach is a useful planning tool and project management resource that increases the probability that the PBRN mission will be successfully implemented. PMID:21900441

  17. Faculty Research and Publication Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoellner, Kate; Hines, Samantha; Keenan, Teressa; Samson, Sue

    2015-01-01

    Understanding faculty work practices can translate into improved library services. This study documents how education and behavioral science faculty locate, retrieve, and use information resources for research and writing and how they publish and store their research materials. The authors interviewed twelve professors using a structured interview…

  18. An Assessment of Research Supervision: A Leadership Model Enhancing Current Practices in Business and Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, James L.; Oladunjoye, Ganiyu T.; Onyefulu, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    Students enrolled in business and management assessed the research supervisory process less favorably when compared with their counterparts. In this article, the authors found that there was considerable dissatisfaction with the interaction and relationships that students had with their supervisors, especially within the business program. As a…

  19. Framing the Universal Design of Information and Communication Technology: An Interdisciplinary Model for Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giannoumis, G Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Research has yet to provide an interdisciplinary framework for examining ICT accessibility as it relates to Universal Design. This article assesses the conceptualizations and interdisciplinarity of ICT accessibility and Universal Design research. This article uses a grounded theory approach to pose a multilevel framework for Universal Design. The macro level, consists of scholarship that examines the context of Universal Design, and is typified by legal and sociological studies that investigate social norms and environments. The meso level, which consists of scholarship that examines activity in Universal Design as an approach to removing barriers for use and participation. The meso level is typified by studies of computer science and engineering that investigate the use of technology as a mechanism of participation. The micro level consists of scholarship that examines individuals and groups in Universal Design as an approach to understanding human characteristics. The micro level is typified by studies of human factors and psychology. This article argues that the multilevel framework for Universal Design may help remove the artificial separation between disciplines concerned with ICT accessibility and promote more fruitful research and development.

  20. CAQDAS and Qualitative Research Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grzegorz Bryda

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this article is methodological reflection on dialectical relationship between the qualitative research process and the process of computer-assisted qualitative data analysis. Basing on many years of experience in the work with various CAQDAS tools, the author tries to show the impact they have on shifting the way of thinking on methodology, the process of data analysis and conducting qualitative research. The specificity of CAQDAS usage in research practice requires methodological rigor in the process of collection and archiving of data, as well as the accuracy and precision in the process of coding, analyzing, and visualizing data. The use of computer-aided analysis of qualitative data in research practice not only shapes a framework for the sociological interpretation but also changes the way of perceiving research problems. The essence of this process is a specific interaction between new technologies and traditional methodology, data analysis, and qualitative research. In this sense, the use of CAQDAS in qualitative research practice is shaping the personality and identity of qualitative researcher, his/her style of work, data analysis, and conducting the fieldwork; it develops his or her new analytical and computer skills without which it is difficult to imagine a modern qualitative sociological research.

  1. Medical Music Therapy: A Model Program for Clinical Practice, Education, Training and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Jayne

    2005-01-01

    This monograph evolved from the unique, innovative partnership between the Florida State University Music Therapy Program and Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare. Its purpose is to serve as a model for music therapy educators, students, clinicians, and the hospital administrators who might employ them. This book should prove a valuable resource for…

  2. Medical Music Therapy: A Model Program for Clinical Practice, Education, Training and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Standley, Jayne

    2005-01-01

    This monograph evolved from the unique, innovative partnership between the Florida State University Music Therapy Program and Tallahassee Memorial HealthCare. Its purpose is to serve as a model for music therapy educators, students, clinicians, and the hospital administrators who might employ them. This book should prove a valuable resource for…

  3. Best practices for cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in common large animal research models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Joni; Hampshire, Victoria

    2016-05-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging has proven to be useful for the study of cardiovascular physiology in health and disease; it provides important data and information about healthy and diseased states in humans and animals, and it facilitates the safe characterization and positioning of medical devices during cardiovascular applications. Looking to the future, magnetic resonance imaging will continue to play a formative role in biomedical research and applications. Here, we discuss how to avoid common pitfalls and provide safe transport, anesthetic support and physiologic support for animals that are used in dedicated or shared cardiovascular imaging facilities.

  4. EHRs Connect Research and Practice: Where Predictive Modeling, Artificial Intelligence, and Clinical Decision Support Intersect

    CERN Document Server

    Bennett, Casey; Selove, Rebecca

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: Electronic health records (EHRs) are only a first step in capturing and utilizing health-related data - the challenge is turning that data into useful information. Furthermore, EHRs are increasingly likely to include data relating to patient outcomes, functionality such as clinical decision support, and genetic information as well, and, as such, can be seen as repositories of increasingly valuable information about patients' health conditions and responses to treatment over time. Methods: We describe a case study of 423 patients treated by Centerstone within Tennessee and Indiana in which we utilized electronic health record data to generate predictive algorithms of individual patient treatment response. Multiple models were constructed using predictor variables derived from clinical, financial and geographic data. Results: For the 423 patients, 101 deteriorated, 223 improved and in 99 there was no change in clinical condition. Based on modeling of various clinical indicators at baseline, the high...

  5. Models for biological research: the theory and practice of Paul Ehrlich.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Travis, Anthony S

    2008-01-01

    In the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries, the study of the living world placed considerable reliance on applied chemistry and chemical concepts. Paul Ehrlich, the subject of this paper, adopted from the mid-1870s principles of organic chemistry to devise procedures for use in histology, to suggest features of cellular structure, and to draw up cartoons that explained the nature of immunity. From a distinctly molecular basis, he devised meaningful experimental strategies and was inspired to develop speculative but effective theoretical models along the same lines that chemists had used to resolve problems of molecular structure and behavior. Thus, Ehrlich suggested that combining power and toxicity were independent properties of the antigen toxin. He succeeded to classify synthetic dyestuffs as stains, to use them for investigating molecular combustion, to adapt theories of dyeing to develop models for both combustion and immunity, and to exploit the properties of dyes in the development of chemotherapy. Ehrlich not only speculated on the behavior of synthetic chemicals toward his model of the protoplasm but also invoked biological specificity, a concept that would have a tremendous impact on immunology, drug development, and molecular biology.

  6. Reflecting on Research Practices and Indigenous Community ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Reflecting on Research Practices and Indigenous Community Benefits for Poverty ... of various research projects within indigenous communities that brought forth ... Best research practices as well as practices that do not yield much success ...

  7. In vivo models for cancer stem cell research: a practical guide for frequently used animal models and available biomarkers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skidan, I; Steiniger, S C J

    2014-04-01

    The identification of a rare population of cancer stem cells whose presence in tumors is believed to determine their growth and metastatic activity, has provided a novel approach for targeted anti-cancer therapy. At the in vivo stage of the development of new therapeutic approaches for killing cancer stem cells, the most significant issues are the appropriate choice of rational animal models that offer the option to select animal species, strains and substrains, essential techniques for the inoculation of tumors, and methods of tumor detection in animals. The identification and validation of various types of cancer stem cell markers, which could serve as potential marker(s) of therapeutic efficacy of applied drugs, is a considerable challenge. The aim of this review is to provide a guide for the in vivo study of novel therapeutics that target cancer stem cells. This review describes frequently used mouse solid tumor models and evaluates their usefulness for cancer stem cell research. The classification of existing compounds that are used in today's experimental anti-cancer stem cell therapy and examples of exploratory first-in-human studies using these compounds for selective elimination of cancer stem cells will also be discussed. Finally, this review will examine the current status of available cancer stem cell markers, and highlight several important cancer stem cell properties that are still not well understood, but could influence the anti-cancer drug development process.

  8. Action research in pharmacy practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Sørensen, Ellen Westh

    2015-01-01

    -based study. Concepts related to AR are described; in addition, the multifaceted role of the action researcher is described, along with a set of data quality criteria for evaluating the quality of an AR-based study. Then follows a thorough description of a Danish AR-based pharmacy practice study. The chapter...

  9. Practice research under changing conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dreier, Ole

    particularly important in unraveling what is glossed over or reinterpreted beyond recognition. Doing so helps putting psychology back on its feet. But practice research was developed under other social, political and professional conditions and under other regimes of knowledge than we find today where...

  10. Sports teams as superorganisms: implications of sociobiological models of behaviour for research and practice in team sports performance analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Ricardo; Araújo, Duarte; Correia, Vanda; Davids, Keith

    2012-08-01

    Significant criticisms have emerged on the way that collective behaviours in team sports have been traditionally evaluated. A major recommendation has been for future research and practice to focus on the interpersonal relationships developed between team players during performance. Most research has typically investigated team game performance in subunits (attack or defence), rather than considering the interactions of performers within the whole team. In this paper, we offer the view that team performance analysis could benefit from the adoption of biological models used to explain how repeated interactions between grouping individuals scale to emergent social collective behaviours. We highlight the advantages of conceptualizing sports teams as functional integrated 'super-organisms' and discuss innovative measurement tools, which might be used to capture the superorganismic properties of sports teams. These tools are suitable for revealing the idiosyncratic collective behaviours underlying the cooperative and competitive tendencies of different sports teams, particularly their coordination of labour and the most frequent channels of communication and patterns of interaction between team players. The principles and tools presented here can serve as the basis for novel approaches and applications of performance analysis devoted to understanding sports teams as cohesive, functioning, high-order organisms exhibiting their own peculiar behavioural patterns.

  11. Practical Marginalized Multilevel Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griswold, Michael E; Swihart, Bruce J; Caffo, Brian S; Zeger, Scott L

    2013-01-01

    Clustered data analysis is characterized by the need to describe both systematic variation in a mean model and cluster-dependent random variation in an association model. Marginalized multilevel models embrace the robustness and interpretations of a marginal mean model, while retaining the likelihood inference capabilities and flexible dependence structures of a conditional association model. Although there has been increasing recognition of the attractiveness of marginalized multilevel models, there has been a gap in their practical application arising from a lack of readily available estimation procedures. We extend the marginalized multilevel model to allow for nonlinear functions in both the mean and association aspects. We then formulate marginal models through conditional specifications to facilitate estimation with mixed model computational solutions already in place. We illustrate the MMM and approximate MMM approaches on a cerebrovascular deficiency crossover trial using SAS and an epidemiological study on race and visual impairment using R. Datasets, SAS and R code are included as supplemental materials.

  12. [Research in theory and practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano Sastre, R; Narvaiza Solís, M J

    2000-03-01

    By means of a survey of international articles, the authors propose to demonstrate some factors which bear an influence on the development of research and investigation in nursing, some problems which affect it, and some strategies for its development inside a clinical-teaching environment. DEVELOPMENT OR RESEARCH AND INVESTIGATION IN NURSING: In the United States, Canada, United Kingdom, other European countries, especially Spain, the authors observed the strong relationship which exists between the development of research and investigation in Nursing and its incorporation in universities. RESEARCH AND INVESTIGATION IN CLINICS: In the opinion of many authors, the main field for research and investigation lies in clinical practice. The authors analyze seven basic requirements: academic curiosity; education in research and investigation; investigative activity; climate conducive to research and investigation; funds for research and investigation; dissemination of the results of research and investigation activities; and making use of the discoveries. TEACH AND INVESTIGATE: The authors point out strategies which enable a teacher to teach from an investigative approach and to stimulate students towards investigation at various levels according to the circumstances involved.

  13. Developing Empirically Based Models of Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blythe, Betty J.; Briar, Scott

    1985-01-01

    Over the last decade emphasis has shifted from theoretically based models of practice to empirically based models whose elements are derived from clinical research. These models are defined and a developing model of practice through the use of single-case methodology is examined. Potential impediments to this new role are identified. (Author/BL)

  14. Selecting a dynamic simulation modeling method for health care delivery research-part 2: report of the ISPOR Dynamic Simulation Modeling Emerging Good Practices Task Force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Deborah A; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten J; Crown, William; Padula, William V; Wong, Peter K; Pasupathy, Kalyan S; Higashi, Mitchell K; Osgood, Nathaniel D

    2015-03-01

    In a previous report, the ISPOR Task Force on Dynamic Simulation Modeling Applications in Health Care Delivery Research Emerging Good Practices introduced the fundamentals of dynamic simulation modeling and identified the types of health care delivery problems for which dynamic simulation modeling can be used more effectively than other modeling methods. The hierarchical relationship between the health care delivery system, providers, patients, and other stakeholders exhibits a level of complexity that ought to be captured using dynamic simulation modeling methods. As a tool to help researchers decide whether dynamic simulation modeling is an appropriate method for modeling the effects of an intervention on a health care system, we presented the System, Interactions, Multilevel, Understanding, Loops, Agents, Time, Emergence (SIMULATE) checklist consisting of eight elements. This report builds on the previous work, systematically comparing each of the three most commonly used dynamic simulation modeling methods-system dynamics, discrete-event simulation, and agent-based modeling. We review criteria for selecting the most suitable method depending on 1) the purpose-type of problem and research questions being investigated, 2) the object-scope of the model, and 3) the method to model the object to achieve the purpose. Finally, we provide guidance for emerging good practices for dynamic simulation modeling in the health sector, covering all aspects, from the engagement of decision makers in the model design through model maintenance and upkeep. We conclude by providing some recommendations about the application of these methods to add value to informed decision making, with an emphasis on stakeholder engagement, starting with the problem definition. Finally, we identify areas in which further methodological development will likely occur given the growing "volume, velocity and variety" and availability of "big data" to provide empirical evidence and techniques

  15. Dynamic transmission modeling: a report of the ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force Working Group-5.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitman, Richard; Fisman, David; Zaric, Gregory S; Postma, Maarten; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; Edmunds, John; Brisson, Marc; ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force, [No Value

    2012-01-01

    The transmissible nature of communicable diseases is what sets them apart from other diseases modeled by health economists. The probability of a susceptible individual becoming infected at any one point in time (the force of infection) is related to the number of infectious individuals in the popula

  16. Dynamic transmission modeling: a report of the ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force Working Group-5.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitman, Richard; Fisman, David; Zaric, Gregory S; Postma, Maarten; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; Edmunds, John; Brisson, Marc; ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force, [No Value

    2012-01-01

    The transmissible nature of communicable diseases is what sets them apart from other diseases modeled by health economists. The probability of a susceptible individual becoming infected at any one point in time (the force of infection) is related to the number of infectious individuals in the popula

  17. Dynamic transmission modeling: a report of the ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force Working Group-5.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pitman, Richard; Fisman, David; Zaric, Gregory S; Postma, Maarten; Kretzschmar, Mirjam; Edmunds, John; Brisson, Marc; ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices Task Force, [No Value

    2012-01-01

    The transmissible nature of communicable diseases is what sets them apart from other diseases modeled by health economists. The probability of a susceptible individual becoming infected at any one point in time (the force of infection) is related to the number of infectious individuals in the

  18. Representing Practice: Practice Models, Patterns, Bundles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falconer, Isobel; Finlay, Janet; Fincher, Sally

    2011-01-01

    This article critiques learning design as a representation for sharing and developing practice, based on synthesis of three projects. Starting with the findings of the Mod4L Models of Practice project, it argues that the technical origins of learning design, and the consequent focus on structure and sequence, limit its usefulness for sharing…

  19. Theorizing practice research in social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uggerhøj, Lars

    2011-01-01

    . To elaborate and define practice research in social work, it is necessary to consider connected approaches and theories. The article will show that practice research is both connected to and can use the theoretical frames of Actual science and Mode 2 knowledge production. To understand and develop research...... closely connected to practice it is necessary to define it in three different ways: practice research, practitioner research and user-controlled research. Examples from different Nordic approaches connected to these definitions will be presented. Although practice and research both need to develop......The article focuses on theories, definitions, interests, possibilities and barriers in practice research in social work. It points out that both practice and research will be influenced by participating in and developing practice research. – and that both parts must and will learn from the process...

  20. Exploring How to Walk the Talk: Examining the Practical Application of Models of Science Communication in Long-Term Ecological Research Sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartock, L.; Rickard, L. N.

    2014-12-01

    This research investigates the relationship between science communication at a theoretical level and the practice of science communication in long-term ecological research sites (LTERs). In particular, we examine if and how the work of LTER science communication practitioners, individuals with the responsibility to communicate, report, or interpret the findings of his/her LTER with any other group, excluding through K-12 educational programs, aligns with theoretically established models of science communication. Broadly speaking, as over two decades of research in science communication attests, these models tend to emphasize the deficit approach, dialogue with and between audiences, and/or audience participation. Does the practitioners' work fall neatly into these three "ideal type" categories, or do their practices blur the boundaries of established models? Do practitioners appeal to more than one type of model in the course of their work? Is there evidence of hybrid approaches, or other, new models that have not yet been identified in the literature? Participating organizations will be selected from the Long Term Ecological Research Network, an organization of LTERs funded by the National Science Foundation. The LTER network is actively involved in science communication, as shown by the most recent LTER Strategic Communication Plan. Science communicators may be involved in variety of practices, such as creating translational materials for policymakers to better understand the findings of LTERs, developing training courses for conservation professionals, or organizing site tours for journalists or funders. Practitioners will participate in semi-structured interviews covering how their practices relate to established models of science communication, how they view their roles and responsibilities, and how they view their audience(s). This presentation will cover emerging results from ongoing analysis of interviews conducted with a purposive sample of these

  1. Researching literacy practices in transition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Lars

    Researching literacy practices in transition Postmodern societies are characterized by constant, fast and unpredictable mobility of people, goods, ideas and values. These mobilities are often visualized as a movement from one place to another, as a temporary interference of the stability of fixed...... places. An alternative take on mobilty sees movement as the default and change as the normal way of being rather than the exception (Barton, 2012). This understanding of change is central to the framing concept of this symposium: transition. Transitional processes around literacy are significant because...... literacy is something that is taught and learned, that is adopted, transformed and appropriated and that is used to categorize and classify people (Holm & Pitkänen-Huhta, 2012). Based on detailed empirical studies in the Nordic countries, the aim of this symposium is to discuss how to explore and research...

  2. GLOBAL PRACTICES OF STUDENTS’ RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fedorova

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study is to consider the problem of students’ research both worldwide and in Russia.Methods. The methods involve review and analysis of the foreign and Russian scientific literature on studied subjects; surveys on the management and realisation of student’s scientific activity in different countries; comparative analysis of the data received during surveys.Results and scientific novelty. At the first stage literature concerning the question of doing research in different countries is analyzed. Then the problems existing in the sphere of students’ research worldwide are identified. Among them are students’ motivation, supervisors’ motivation, developing friendly scientific environment at various levels, communication in science. Then, two surveys were held to support the theoretical issues. The first concerned general aspects of students’ research internationally such as when they start doing it, how they are motivated, what are the relations with supervisors etc. The second included questions about general age of getting scientific degrees (bachelor, master, and PhD, and was divided into two parts: for international and Russian staff. Procedures and results of the surveys undertaken for revealing of scientists’ opinion on quality and features of the specified kind of students’ activity in different countries across the world are described. It is shown, that some problems are common for Russia and global scientific society.Practical significance. On the basis of world experience, some solutions on development of scientific activity of the Russian students have been proposed by the author.

  3. Research and clinical practice relationship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashammakhi N

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: I highly value and greet the authors for their editorial. Many important issues related to medical education and its future in Libya have been discussed in this paper [1]. One important point that has been addressed and I feel deserves attention is the “abnormal” relationship between clinical practice and research in Libya. From discussions with colleagues, this problem somehow has evolved from a misconception about educational and training systems that may have occurred in the past. It may also be related to the lack of attention to research that has long existed in Libya [2,3]. The other aspect, shared with many other developing countries, is the misconception of research as unimportant or a luxury aspect of medicine. When it comes to understanding how a system (including healthcare can be updated and developed, the answer is vague! One important reason is a lack of understanding of the impact that research has on developing methods. In developed countries, research is the main academic distinction that leads to appointments for coveted positions in the system and is an important factor for academic promotion. In Libya, there remain arguments about who will be awarded Chair of university clinical departments. Such a post should no doubt be given to those with established academic achievements. When highly qualified persons are at the top of the pyramid this leads to further progress and enhanced research and advancement. The authors have discussed the point of having proper search committees for leadership and faculty positions. I believe that it will help eliminate the current stagnation and help to create innovative solutions. This should lead to improved medical education, health services, and ultimately impact the quality of life of all Libyan citizens.

  4. Research to practice in addiction treatment: key terms and a field-driven model of technology transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    The transfer of new technologies (e.g., evidence-based practices) into substance abuse treatment organizations often occurs long after they have been developed and shown to be effective. Transfer is slowed, in part, due to a lack of clear understanding about all that is needed to achieve full implementation of these technologies. Such misunderstanding is exacerbated by inconsistent terminology and overlapping models of an innovation, including its development and validation, dissemination to the public, and implementation or use in the field. For this reason, a workgroup of the Addiction Technology Transfer Center (ATTC) Network developed a field-driven conceptual model of the innovation process that more precisely defines relevant terms and concepts and integrates them into a comprehensive taxonomy. The proposed definitions and conceptual framework will allow for improved understanding and consensus regarding the distinct meaning and conceptual relationships between dimensions of the technology transfer process and accelerate the use of evidence-based practices.

  5. Ethics and the practice of qualitative research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Ian Frank

    2016-01-01

    Ethics and the practice of qualitative research? Qualitative Social Work 7 (4): 400-414. Reprinted......Ethics and the practice of qualitative research? Qualitative Social Work 7 (4): 400-414. Reprinted...

  6. Research Practices of Marriage and Family Therapists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Lee N.; Sandberg, Jonathan G.; Miller, Richard B.

    1999-01-01

    A questionnaire assessed marital and family therapists' willingness to participate in research projects and their use of research in clinical practice. Results indicate a moderate level of research involvement among practitioners. The hypothesis that training in research practice would predict research involvement was only partially supported.…

  7. Research Making Its Way into Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Peter; Goatley, Virginia

    2015-01-01

    Identifying researchers whose work has influenced classroom practice, raises questions about the nature of research and its relationship with practice, and the means through which knowledge is distributed. We argue that normally, influence arises through lines of research more than individuals, that knowing-in-practice distribution systems should…

  8. Theorizing practice research in social work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uggerhøj, Lars

    2011-01-01

    The article focuses on theories, definitions, interests, possibilities and barriers in practice research in social work. It points out that both practice and research will be influenced by participating in and developing practice research. – and that both parts must and will learn from the process....... To elaborate and define practice research in social work, it is necessary to consider connected approaches and theories. The article will show that practice research is both connected to and can use the theoretical frames of Actual science and Mode 2 knowledge production. To understand and develop research...... practice research they do at the same time have different interests which will challenge both parts. Practice research must be looked upon as both an area of collaboration and a meeting point for different stakeholders: users, social workers, administrative management/organizers, politicians...

  9. An alignment model for the research higher degree supervision process using repertory grids - reflections on application in practice in built environment research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Aranda-Mena

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available From PhD-doing to PhD-done is not as from A to B. This paper aims to increasing the understanding of the complex relationship between the doctoral research and the supervisory process. The research method is that of repertory-grids where the authors discuss successful completions. The paper is argumentative in nature and provides insights to a complex process largely untested. A supervisory model previously presented by both authors (Aranda-Mena & Gameson, 2004 is tested in two areas: (1 the research process and (2 personality factors. The paper increases common understanding of what it takes to completing a PhD and supervisory challenges in such long process. Supervision is a key factor to completing a PhD and to developing the intellectual, analytical and research skills expected of PhD graduates. The authors call for more research, both theoretical and empirical, in this important area.

  10. Long-Term Engagement in Authentic Research with NASA (LEARN): Innovative Practices Suggested By a New Model for Teacher Research Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pippin, M. R.; Joseph, J. D.; Yang, M. M.; Omar, A. H.; Crecelius, S.; Harte, T.; Lewis, P. M., Jr.; Taylor, J.; Bujosa, R.; Moulton, C.; Haggard, C. S.; Hyater-Adams, S.; Kollmeyer, R.; Weisman, A.

    2014-12-01

    NASA's LEARN Project is an innovative program that provides long-term immersion in the practice of atmospheric science for middle and high school in-service teachers. Working alongside NASA scientists and using authentic NASA Science Mission Directorate research data, teachers develop individual research topics of interest during two weeks in the summer while on-site at NASA Langley. With continued, intensive mentoring by NASA scientists, the teachers further develop their research throughout the academic year through virtual group meetings and data team meetings mirroring scientific collaborations. At the end of the first year, LEARN teachers present scientific posters. The LEARN experience has had such an impact that multiple teachers from the first two cohorts have elected to continue their research. The LEARN project evaluation has provided insights into particularly effective elements of this new approach. Findings indicate that teachers' perceptions of the scientific enterprise have changed, and that LEARN provided substantial resources to help them take real-world research to their students. This presentation will focus on key factors from LEARN's implementation that inform best practices for the incorporation of authentic scientific research into teacher professional development experiences. We suggest that these factors should be considered in the development of other such experiences, including: (1) The involvement of a single scientist as both the project leader/manager and the project scientist, to ensure that the project can meet teachers' needs. (2) An emphasis on framing and approaching scientific research questions, so that teachers can learn to evaluate the feasibility of studies based on scope, scale, and availability of data. (3) Long term, ongoing relationships where teachers and scientists work as collaborators, beyond the workshop "mold." (4) A focus on meeting the needs of individual teachers, whether their needs relate to elements of

  11. Early Reading and Practice-Inspired Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale standardised, early reading assessments abound at the international and national levels, but research into urgent problems facing practitioners remains scarce. Practice-inspired research involves university-researchers in partnership with teacher-researchers undertaking high-quality research to provide relevant and useful knowledge.…

  12. Nutrition education: linking research, theory, and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Contento, Isobel R

    2008-01-01

    The increase in obesity and chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease worldwide reflects the complex interactions of biology, personal behaviour and environment. Consequently there has been a greater recognition of the importance of nutrition education. An analysis of the evidence from 300+ studies shows that nutrition education is more likely to be effective when it focuses on behaviour/ action (rather than knowledge only) and systematically links theory, research and practice. There are three essential components to nutrition education: 1. A motivational component, where the goal is to increase awareness and enhance motivation by addressing beliefs, attitudes through effective communication strategies. 2. An action component, where the goal is to facilitate people's ability to take action through goal setting and cognitive self-regulation skills. 3. An environmental component, where nutrition educators work with policymakers and others to promote environmental supports for action. Each component needs to be based on appropriate theory and research. The procedure for program design can use the logic model: Inputs are the resources needed as well as the needs analysis process. The outputs are the activities within the three components of nutrition education described above. Here the behavioural focus is selected and theory and research are used to design appropriate educational strategies to achieve the targeted behaviours. The outcomes are the short, medium or long-term impacts of the nutrition program. These are evaluated through the use of appropriate designs and instruments. Nutrition education programs that link research, theory, and practice are more likely to be effective.

  13. Future methods in pharmacy practice research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdottir, A B; Babar, Z U D

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the current and future practice of pharmacy scenario underpinning and guiding this research and then suggests future directions and strategies for such research. First, it sets the scene by discussing the key drivers which could influence the change in pharmacy practice...... of the trends for pharmacy practice research methods are discussed. © 2016, Springer International Publishing....... research. These are demographics, technology and professional standards. Second, deriving from this, it seeks to predict and forecast the future shifts in use of methodologies. Third, new research areas and availability of data impacting on future methods are discussed. These include the impact of aging...

  14. The research potential of practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Jacqueline; Heyman, Bob; Bryar, Rosamund; Graffy, Jonathan; Gunnell, Caroline; Lamb, Bryony; Morris, Lana

    2002-09-01

    Little is known about the research aspirations and experiences of practice nurses. The study discussed in the present paper had three main aims: (1) to assess the level of research interest among practice nurses working in Essex and East London, UK; (2) to identify practice nurses' research priorities; and (3) to explore factors which facilitate and impede the development of practice nursing research. All practice nurses (n = 1,054) in the above areas were sent a questionnaire, and a total of 40% (n = 426) responded after two follow-up letters. Fifty-five respondents who volunteered for further participation were interviewed, either individually or in focus groups. About half (n = 207) of the survey respondents expressed an interest in undertaking research. One-third (n = 145) reported previous participation in research, and 20% (n = 85) had initiated their own research. Logistic regression showed that practice nurses educated to graduate level, and those working in practices with nurse training or participation in external research, were most likely to want to undertake research. Working in a medical training practice was found to be a negative predictor of research interest. Respondents prioritised research into long-term health problems with a high prevalence in the local population; for example, diabetes. Their reasons for wishing to engage in research included improving the service, career development, making work more interesting and reducing isolation. The main barriers identified were lack of time, lack of support from some general practitioners and poor access to higher education resources outside formal courses. The development of practice nurse research would provide a distinctive perspective on health need and service provision. It would contribute to the achievement of the national strategic objective of improving the quality of primary care, enhance the status of the profession, utilise the enthusiasm of individuals, increase job satisfaction and

  15. The Influence of Research on Education Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerlinger, Fred N.

    1977-01-01

    Three major propositions discussed in this article include: (1) There are two major obstacles to research influencing educational practice in the long term. (2) These are the pragmatic-practical notion that research should pay off and that it should be relevant to contemporary social and educational problems. (Author/AM)

  16. Kevlar: Transitioning Helix from Research to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-04-01

    KEVLAR : TRANSITIONING HELIX FROM RESEARCH TO PRACTICE UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA APRIL 2015 FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT...DATES COVERED (From - To) FEB 2013 – NOV 2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE KEVLAR : TRANSITIONING HELIX FROM RESEARCH TO PRACTICE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...possible exploitation. Our technology, called Kevlar , includes key security technologies are protective transformations and targeted recovery. The

  17. P-12 Engineering Education Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Tamara; Richards, Larry G.

    2012-01-01

    This special issue of "Advances in Engineering Education" explores recent developments in P-12 Engineering Education. It includes papers devoted to research and practice, and reports some of the most exciting work in the field today. In our Call of Papers, we solicited two types of papers: Research papers and Practice papers. The former…

  18. Research and Practice in Three-Dimensional City Modeling%三维城市模型的研究与实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱庆; 胡明远; 张叶廷; 杜志强

    2009-01-01

    The way we interact with spatial data has been changed from 2D map to 3D Virtual Geographic Environment (VGE). Three-dimensional representations of geographic information on a computer are known as VGE, and in particular 3D city models provide an efficient way to integrate massive, heterogenous geospatial information and georeferenced information in urban areas. 3D city modeling (3DCM) is an active research and practice topic in distinct application areas. This paper intro-duces different modeling paradigms employed in 3D GIS, virtual environment, and AEC/FM. Up-to-date 3DCM technologies are evolving into a data integration and collaborative approach to represent the full spatial coverage of a city, to model both aboveground and underground, outdoor and indoor environments including man-made objects and natural features with 3D geometry, appearance, topology and semantics.

  19. Researching Practice Wisdom in Social Work

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson Chun-Sing Cheung

    2016-01-01

    Researching practice wisdom in social work Social workers, as skilled helpers who make professional decisions using intuitive actions rather than by following defined rules, deserve better recognition for their practice wisdom. However, since there is a tendency amongst practitioners who adhere to the evidence-based paradigm to disregard practitioners’ knowledge, empirical research on practice wisdom in social work needs to be encouraged. The author argues that the lack of a sound methodology...

  20. The future of pharmacy practice research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Babar, Zaheer Ud Din; Almarsdottir, Anna Birna

    2015-01-01

    The chapter starts by outlining the current and future scenario related to pharmacy practice research. This chapter then sets the scene by discussing issues that are pertinent for practice research. These issues are changes in population demographics; changes in technology, the role of the pharmacy...... as an institution and consumer behaviour; as well as changes in the pharmacy profession. It also outlines the major shifts in pharmacy practice research, which include interprofessional collaboration and teamwork with patients, describing and measuring outcomes of interventions as well as patients’ cultural...... diversity. It concludes by drawing attention to methodologies that would be most commonly used in future pharmacy practice research. Some of the future methodological challenges could be the emergence of big and complex data sets, dealing with electronic health records and pharmacy practice researchers...

  1. Research in dental practice: a 'SWOT' analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, F J T; Crisp, R J; McCord, J F

    2002-03-01

    Most dental treatment, in most countries, is carried out in general dental practice. There is therefore a potential wealth of research material, although clinical evaluations have generally been carried out on hospital-based patients. Many types of research, such as clinical evaluations and assessments of new materials, may be appropriate to dental practice. Principal problems are that dental practices are established to treat patients efficiently and to provide an income for the staff of the practice. Time spent on research therefore cannot be used for patient treatment, so there are cost implications. Critics of practice-based research have commented on the lack of calibration of operative diagnoses and other variables; however, this variability is the stuff of dental practice, the real-world situation. Many of the difficulties in carrying out research in dental practice may be overcome. For the enlightened, it may be possible to turn observations based on the volume of treatment carried out in practice into robust, clinically related and relevant research projects based in the real world of dental practice.

  2. An alignment model for the research higher degree supervision process using repertory grids - reflections on application in practice in built environment research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillermo Aranda-Mena

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available From PhD-doing to PhD-done is not as from A to B. This paper aims to increasing the understanding of the complex relationship between the doctoral research and the supervisory process. The research method is that of repertory-grids where the authors discuss successful completions. The paper is argumentative in nature and provides insights to a complex process largely untested. A supervisory model previously presented by both authors (Aranda-Mena & Gameson, 2004 is tested in two areas: (1 the research process and (2 personality factors. The paper increases common understanding of what it takes to completing a PhD and supervisory challenges in such long process. Supervision is a key factor to completing a PhD and to developing the intellectual, analytical and research skills expected of PhD graduates. The authors call for more research, both theoretical and empirical, in this important area.[ISD1] [ISD1]Suggest a bit more detail for the abstract for a journal paper. Will reflect on this and send suggestions

  3. Practical simplifications for radioimmunotherapy dosimetric models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shen, S.; DeNardo, G.L.; O`Donnell, R.T.; Yuan, A.; DeNardo, D.A.; Macey, D.J.; DeNardo, S.J. [Univ. of California, Sacramento, CA (United States). Davis Medical Center

    1999-01-01

    Radiation dosimetry is potentially useful for assessment and prediction of efficacy and toxicity for radionuclide therapy. The usefulness of these dose estimates relies on the establishment of a dose-response model using accurate pharmacokinetic data and a radiation dosimetric model. Due to the complexity in radiation dose estimation, many practical simplifications have been introduced in the dosimetric modeling for clinical trials of radioimmunotherapy. Although research efforts are generally needed to improve the simplifications used at each stage of model development, practical simplifications are often possible for specific applications without significant consequences to the dose-response model. In the development of dosimetric methods for radioimmunotherapy, practical simplifications in the dosimetric models were introduced. This study evaluated the magnitude of uncertainty associated with practical simplifications for: (1) organ mass of the MIRD phantom; (2) radiation contribution from target alone; (3) interpolation of S value; (4) macroscopic tumor uniformity; and (5) fit of tumor pharmacokinetic data.

  4. Social Innovation using the Best Practice Unit model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wilken, Jean Pierre

    2013-01-01

    The model of the Best Practice Unit (BPU) is a specific form of practice based research. It is a variation of the Community of Practice (CoP) as developed by Wenger, McDermott and Snyder (2002) with the specific aim to innovate a professional practice by combining learning, development and research.

  5. Teaching-Family Model: Insuring Quality Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McElgunn, Peggy

    2012-01-01

    The Teaching-Family Model was one of the earliest approaches to be supported by an extensive research base. As it has evolved over four decades, it retains the focus on teaching and learning but incorporates a strength- and relationship-based orientation. The model is also unique in gathering ongoing practice-based evidence to insure quality.

  6. From Research to Practical Application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Sabine; Bødker, Keld; Tøth, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    in India. We identify the three main knowledge transfer challenges experienced by the case company. The identified challenges inform the design of a systematic five-step approach to the company’s knowledge transfer. Our main contribution is to illustrate how extant research can be applied to understand...

  7. Teaching Reading: Research into Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macalister, John

    2014-01-01

    In pre-service and in-service language teacher education, and in curriculum-related projects in second and foreign language settings, a recurrent issue is the failure to relate the teaching of reading to reading as a meaning-making activity. In this paper, I will consider what current research on second language (L2) reading has actually succeeded…

  8. THE IMPENDING RESEARCH EXPLOSION AND EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    GUBA, EGON G.

    THE RAPID EXPANSION OF EDUCATIONAL RESEARCH HAS BEEN ACCOMPANIED BY THE FEELING THAT A CONNECTIVE LINK MUST BE ESTABLISHED BETWEEN THE AREAS OF RESEARCH AND EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE. THE INCREASED AVAILABILITY OF RESEARCH FUNDS NECESSITATES REFORMULATION AND CONCEPTUALIZATION OF SUITABLE MECHANISMS AND AGENCIES CAPABLE OF BRIDGING THE GAP BETWEEN…

  9. (Re)Searching for Persons in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huniche, Lotte

    2009-01-01

    This article explores the degree to which anthropological field work can contribute to constructively reconfigure approaches to the critical psychological study of persons in practice. We argue that a line of development within German/Danish critical psychological practice research ought...... to be consistent with a development of the critical psychological conception of subjects as persons in practice. Via an examination of anthropological notions of the field and discussions of concrete research projects in Nigeria and Denmark, the article considers what it means to appropriate field work methods...... to the critical psychological practice research tradition of studying subjects. The paper shows how the anthropological clarification of the socio-political contexts of subjects' lives qualifies the study of persons in practice. We also warn of the dangers of predefining and delimiting the field to such an extent...

  10. Bringing Research into Educational Practice: Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hille, Katrin

    2011-01-01

    Bringing research into educational practice is necessary but does not happen automatically. The Transfercenter for Neuroscience and Learning, at the University of Ulm in Germany, is set up to transfer (neuro)scientific knowledge into educational practice. In doing so we have learned why this does not happen automatically, and have tried to make…

  11. Turning Contemporary Reading Research into Instructional Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frager, Alan; Hahn, Amos

    1988-01-01

    Highlights contemporary reading research as well as some implied instructional practices in four areas, including direct teacher explanation, reading-writing connection, top-level text structure, and main idea identification. (ARH)

  12. a postfoundationalist research paradigm of practical theology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-07-18

    Jul 18, 2010 ... part of the research paradigm of postfoundational practical theology. ... appealing to some item of knowledge that is self-evident or indubitable' (Van Huyssteen .... individual or subjective construction, and emphasises the.

  13. Research Review: Magazine Editors and Editing Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolliffe, Lee

    1994-01-01

    Reviews and critiques literature in the subfield of magazine editing research, chiefly biographical studies of individual editors and various types of studies of editorial practices, including surveys, magazine content analyses, and close qualitative examinations of editors' relationships with others. (SR)

  14. Qualitative methods in pharmacy practice research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaae, Susanne; Traulsen, Janine Marie

    2015-01-01

    Qualitative research within pharmacy practice is concerned with understanding the behavior of actors such as pharmacy staff, pharmacy owners, patients, other healthcare professionals, and politicians to explore various types of existing practices and beliefs in order to improve them. As qualitative...... research attempts to answer the “why” questions, it is useful for describing, in rich detail, complex phenomena that are situated and embedded in local contexts. Typical methods include interviews, observation, document analysis, and netnography. Qualitative research has to live up to a set of rigid...... quality criteria of research conduct to provide trustworthy results that contribute to the further development of the area....

  15. Paying research participants: a study of current practices in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fry, C L; Ritter, A; Baldwin, S; Bowen, K J; Gardiner, P; Holt, T; Jenkinson, R; Johnston, J

    2005-09-01

    To examine current research payment practices and to inform development of clearer guidelines for researchers and ethics committees. Exploratory email based questionnaire study of current research participant reimbursement practices. A diverse sample of organisations and individuals were targeted. Australia. Contacts in 84 key research organisations and select electronic listservers across Australia. A total of 100 completed questionnaires were received with representations from a variety of research areas (for example, market, alcohol and drug, medical, pharmaceutical and social research). Open-ended and fixed alternative questions about type of research agency; type of research; type of population under study; whether payment is standard; amounts and mechanisms of payment; factors taken into account when deciding on payment practices; and whether payment policies exist. Reimbursement practice is highly variable. Where it occurs (most commonly for drug dependent rather than health professional or general population samples) it is largely monetary and is for time and out-of-pocket expenses. Ethics committees were reported to be often involved in decision making around reimbursement. Research subject payment practices vary in Australia. Researchers who do provide payments to research participants generally do so without written policy and procedures. Ethics committees have an important role in developing guidelines in this area. Specific guidelines are needed considering existing local policies and procedures; payment models and their application in diverse settings; case study examples of types and levels of reimbursement; applied definitions of incentive and inducement; and the rationale for diverse payment practices in different settings.

  16. Social Work Research in Practice: Lessons Learned.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trowbridge, Kelly; Mische Lawson, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    Using data and research to drive and evaluate clinical decision-making continues to slowly gain prominence across social work settings. This article shares insights and recommendations from a novice social work investigator to encourage other social workers to consider the value of researching while in practice. Practitioners new to research need encouragement and support. This article provides ideas for easing the first steps towards research to avoid potentially discouraging pitfalls.

  17. Applying dynamic simulation modeling methods in health care delivery research-the SIMULATE checklist: report of the ISPOR simulation modeling emerging good practices task force.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Deborah A; Burgos-Liz, Lina; IJzerman, Maarten J; Osgood, Nathaniel D; Padula, William V; Higashi, Mitchell K; Wong, Peter K; Pasupathy, Kalyan S; Crown, William

    2015-01-01

    Health care delivery systems are inherently complex, consisting of multiple tiers of interdependent subsystems and processes that are adaptive to changes in the environment and behave in a nonlinear fashion. Traditional health technology assessment and modeling methods often neglect the wider health system impacts that can be critical for achieving desired health system goals and are often of limited usefulness when applied to complex health systems. Researchers and health care decision makers can either underestimate or fail to consider the interactions among the people, processes, technology, and facility designs. Health care delivery system interventions need to incorporate the dynamics and complexities of the health care system context in which the intervention is delivered. This report provides an overview of common dynamic simulation modeling methods and examples of health care system interventions in which such methods could be useful. Three dynamic simulation modeling methods are presented to evaluate system interventions for health care delivery: system dynamics, discrete event simulation, and agent-based modeling. In contrast to conventional evaluations, a dynamic systems approach incorporates the complexity of the system and anticipates the upstream and downstream consequences of changes in complex health care delivery systems. This report assists researchers and decision makers in deciding whether these simulation methods are appropriate to address specific health system problems through an eight-point checklist referred to as the SIMULATE (System, Interactions, Multilevel, Understanding, Loops, Agents, Time, Emergence) tool. It is a primer for researchers and decision makers working in health care delivery and implementation sciences who face complex challenges in delivering effective and efficient care that can be addressed with system interventions. On reviewing this report, the readers should be able to identify whether these simulation modeling

  18. Nurturing communities of practice for transdisciplinary research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgina Cundill

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Transdisciplinary research practice has become a core element of global sustainability science. Transdisciplinary research brings with it an expectation that people with different backgrounds and interests will learn together through collective problem solving and innovation. Here we introduce the concept of "transdisciplinary communities of practice, " and draw on both situated learning theory and transdisciplinary practice to identify three key lessons for people working in, managing, or funding such groups. (1 Opportunities need to be purposefully created for outsiders to observe activities in the core group. (2 Communities of practice cannot be artificially created, but they can be nurtured. (3 Power matters in transdisciplinary communities of practice. These insights challenge thinking about how groups of people come together in pursuit of transdisciplinary outcomes, and call for greater attention to be paid to the social processes of learning that are at the heart of our aspirations for global sustainability science.

  19. Researcher Practice: Embedding Creative Practice Within Doctoral Research in Industrial Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Evans

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the potential for a researcher to use their own creative practice as a method of data collection. Much of the published material in this field focuses on more theoretical positions, with limited use being made of specific PhDs that illustrate the context in which practice was undertaken by the researcher. It explores strategies for data collection and researcher motivation during what the author identifies as "researcher practice." This is achieved through the use of three PhD case studies. Methods of data collection focus on: (a the use of output from practice for quantitative data collection (i.e., for comparative analysis, (b the use of output from practice for qualitative data collection (i.e., reflection on new working practice, and (c the use of output from practice for data translation (i.e., using research output to produce a creative design solution for a tool that can be used for further data collection and validation. The article discusses the methodologies employed in the case studies to identify themes which enable the definition of a generic researcher practitioner methodology. It notes the significance of creative practice in support of data collection and the differences between researcher practice and commercial practice, and emphasises the contribution of researcher practice towards personal motivation.

  20. A Practical School Public Relations Research Primer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Edward H.

    2010-01-01

    Advances in communication technology have created many new tools for school communicators--as well as increasing complexities for their programs. As a result, solid school communication research programs offering practical research insights for planning, tracking, and assessing school communication efforts are more important than ever. Still, many…

  1. Doing Developmental Research: A Practical Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striano, Tricia

    2016-01-01

    Addressing practical issues rarely covered in methods texts, this user-friendly, jargon-free book helps students and beginning researchers plan infant and child development studies and get them done. The author provides step-by-step guidance for getting involved in a developmental laboratory and crafting effective research questions and proposals.…

  2. Practical Research: Planning and Design. Seventh Edition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leedy, Paul D.; Ormrod, Jeanne Ellis

    This book is a broad-spectrum guide, suitable for all courses in basic research. It guides the student from problem selection to completed research report with practical suggestions based on a solid theoretical framework and learning procedure. As a do-it-yourself guide, it is useful for students who are left to their own resources in executing…

  3. Performing high quality research into design practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rianne Valkenburg; Maaike Kleinsmann

    2009-01-01

    This paper deals with the complexity of doing research in design practice. More and more projects and papers appear dealing with this topic and the time has come to draw up the balance sheet. This paper starts with explaining the status of design research until now, in which we indicate the

  4. Methodologies of requirements engineering research and practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wieringa, Roel J.; Gervasi, V.; Zowghi, D.; Easterbrook, S.; Sim, S.E.

    2003-01-01

    In this position paper I argue that RE practice is the problem analysis part of a design problem, and that this problem analysis part is a knowledge problem in which the requirements engineer tries to build a theory of a problem domain. RE research is a knowledge problem too, in which the researcher

  5. Learning analytics from research to practice

    CERN Document Server

    Larusson, Johann Ari

    2014-01-01

    This book offers a comprehensive review of Learning Analytics (LA). It highlights the latest results, methodologies, tools, strategies, and models  and encompasses theoretical discussions as well as practical examples and strategies.

  6. Professional Practices in Undergraduate Research Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeling, Joni M; Choudhary, Madhusudan

    2016-05-01

    The undergraduate research experience (URE) is an important avenue within a college trajectory in which students enhance their critical thinking, learn about the scientific process, and develop the knowledge and values that will guide their future scientific and professional careers. Individual institutions, programs, departments, and faculty administer undergraduate research differently, but each should adhere to a common set of guidelines which govern the research mentoring process. Adherence to standard practices will enhance the research experience for both students and mentors. This article examines standards and guidelines for professional practices involving undergraduate research and scholarship, and will discuss lapses and limitations that students and faculty frequently confront. The growth, support, and proper management of undergraduate research programs (URPs) at primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs) is important for maintaining a talented pool of young scientists, as students benefit greatly from direct interactions with faculty mentors that predominate at PUIs.

  7. Professional Practices in Undergraduate Research Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joni M. Seeling

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The undergraduate research experience (URE is an important avenue within a college trajectory in which students enhance their critical thinking, learn about the scientific process, and develop the knowledge and values that will guide their future scientific and professional careers. Individual institutions, programs, departments, and faculty administer undergraduate research differently, but each should adhere to a common set of guidelines which govern the research mentoring process. Adherence to standard practices will enhance the research experience for both students and mentors. This article examines standards and guidelines for professional practices involving undergraduate research and scholarship, and will discuss lapses and limitations that students and faculty frequently confront. The growth, support, and proper management of undergraduate research programs (URPs at primarily undergraduate institutions (PUIs is important for maintaining a talented pool of young scientists, as students benefit greatly from direct interactions with faculty mentors that predominate at PUIs.

  8. Understanding Influence within the Context of Nursing: Development of the Adams Influence Model Using Practice, Research, and Theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jeffrey M; Natarajan, Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Acquiring influence, and knowing how to use it, is a required competency for nurse leaders, yet the concept of influence and how it works is not well described in the nursing literature. In this article, the authors examine what is known about influence and present an influence model specific to nurse leaders. The Adams Influence Model was developed through an iterative process and is based on a comprehensive review of the influence literature, expert commentary, multiple pilot studies, evaluation of nursing theories, and validation by an external data source. Rather than defining "how to" influence, the model serves as a guide for personal reflection, helping nurse leaders understand and reflect on the influence process and factors, tactics, and strategies they can use when seeking to influence others.

  9. Strategic Integration: The Practical Politics of Integrated Research in Context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorrae van Kerkhoff

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Designing an integrative research program requires that research leaders negotiate a balance between the scientific interest of research and the practical interests of non-scientific partners. This paper examines the ways integrated research is formally categorised, and analyses the tangible expressions of the practical politics involved in reconciling scientific and practical interests. Drawing on a comparative study of two Australian Cooperative Research Centres, I argue that categories used by the research leaders to describe the research programs embody three different strategies for structuring the relationships between researchers and their partners. These include matching research program categories to partners’ implementation program categories, reproducing existing integrative partnership models, and filling gaps in understanding with new technical approaches. These strategies offer different advantages and disadvantages. The cases suggest that the integrative approach favoured by each Centre depended on issues such as the geographic scope of policy arenas, sources of scientific credibility, and the political risks facing partners. The practical politics of research organisation offers a new lens for understanding both the practice and theory of integrated research.

  10. Science and Mathematics Education: International Innovations, Research, and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berlin, Donna F., Ed.; White, Arthur L., Ed.

    2011-01-01

    The chapters in this book reflect the work of science and mathematics educators who have worked for many years at the international level. As members of the International Consortium for Research in Science and Mathematics Education, their work provides readers with issues, models, practices, and research results that have applicability and…

  11. [Research and professional practice in speech therapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfort, Isabelle; Monfort, Marc; Juárez-Sánchez, Adoración

    2014-02-24

    The relationship between research and clinical practice is discussed based on the request of this last on new therapeutic perspectives and empirical confirmations of their decisions. Two examples of a clear and justified relation between theoretical research data and the later development of an intervention program illustrate the achievements and disappointments of these relationships. From this analysis, the proposal of evidence-based practice is discussed, the requirements involved and the difficulties in its practical application, especially in the intervention in aspects such as semantics and pragmatics. It finally points out the lack of research on an item that is considered crucial to the effectiveness of therapy: the characteristics and skills of the therapist.

  12. Toward ethical research practice with deaf participants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singleton, Jenny L; Jones, Gabrielle; Hanumantha, Shilpa

    2014-07-01

    In recent years, scholars have been critical of what they consider unethical conduct by researchers whose studies focus on members of the Deaf or signing communities. This is the first empirical study that investigates ethical concerns and recommendations from the perspective of three stakeholder groups (Deaf research participants, researchers, and Deaf studies experts). We analyzed focus group discussions using strategies from grounded theory and community-based participatory research. The themes we identified highlight the need for the broader scientific research community to include linguistically and culturally sensitive research procedures that more adequately protect the rights of Deaf research participants, as well as other marginalized groups. We address the need to increase the number of Deaf scientists and reconsider collaboration practices between Deaf and hearing researchers.

  13. Good science, bad science: Questioning research practices in psychological research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bakker, M.

    2014-01-01

    In this dissertation we have questioned the current research practices in psychological science and thereby contributed to the current discussion about the credibility of psychological research. We specially focused on the problems with the reporting of statistical results and showed that reporting

  14. ETHICAL CONSIDERATIONS IN MEDICAL PRACTICE AND RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ethics is governed by moral principles that define human conduct for an individual, group or society. Role of ethics has become extremely important in medical practice and research. Medical practice or any scientific act related to human participation in research should be carefully calibrated safeguarding the ethical interest of the patient/participant. The philosophy of medical intervention should be to integrate a transparent health care system that focuses on consistent delivery of evidence based care at the right time in the right environment and in right manner. In futuristic healthcare sector, upcoming professionals should be adequately sensitized to protect and respect the ethical interest of the patients.

  15. Researcher Practice: Embedding Creative Practice within Doctoral Research in Industrial Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Mark

    2010-01-01

    This article considers the potential for a researcher to use their own creative practice as a method of data collection. Much of the published material in this field focuses on more theoretical positions, with limited use being made of specific PhDs that illustrate the context in which practice was undertaken by the researcher. It explores…

  16. Cultural reflexivity in health research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aronowitz, Robert; Deener, Andrew; Keene, Danya; Schnittker, Jason; Tach, Laura

    2015-07-01

    Recent public health movements have invoked cultural change to improve health and reduce health disparities. We argue that these cultural discourses have sometimes justified and maintained health inequalities when those with power and authority designated their own social practices as legitimate and healthy while labeling the practices of marginalized groups as illegitimate or unhealthy. This "misrecognition," which creates seemingly objective knowledge without understanding historical and social conditions, sustains unequal power dynamics and obscures the fact that what is deemed legitimate and healthy can be temporally, geographically, and socially relative. We use examples from research across multiple disciplines to illustrate the potential consequences of cultural misrecognition, highlight instances in which culture was invoked in ways that overcame misrecognition, and discuss how cultural reflexivity can be used to improve health research and practice.

  17. Making Connections between Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Andrew; McMaken, Jennifer

    2009-01-01

    Strengthening connections between research and practice is an important goal in education. Making the connection has both a supply side and a demand side but the demand is often ignored in education. The authors offer six hypotheses about why this situation occurs.

  18. Embodied Experience in Educational Practice and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Jan

    2013-01-01

    The intention of this article is to make an educational analysis of Merleau-Ponty's theory of experience in order to see what it implicates for educational practice as well as educational research. In this way, we can attain an understanding what embodied experience might mean both in schools and other educational settings and in researching…

  19. Just in Time Research: Privacy Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grama, Joanna Lyn

    2014-01-01

    The January 2014 edition of the ECAR Update subscriber newsletter included an informal poll on information privacy practices. The poll was intended to collect a quick snapshot of the higher education community's thoughts on this important topic during Data Privacy Month. Results of the poll will be used to inform EDUCAUSE research, programs,…

  20. Knowledge Asymmetries Between Research and Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noe, Egon; Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted; Thorsøe, Martin Hvarregaard

    2015-01-01

    This article discusses the problem of implementing scientific knowledge in practice. The discussion is based on a case study of barriers to implementing research-based principles of sustainable organic arable farming. The current literature tends to see this problem either as a dissemination issu...

  1. Recent Changes in Humanistic Research Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Lasse Gøhler; Vikman, Jutta Maria; Liljenstrøm, Andreas Jan

    2016-01-01

    The present paper analyzes changes in research practices in the humanities around the turn of the millennium. The analysis is based on a reading of all humanistic PhD dissertations in Denmark between 1992 and 2012 (N=1,958). For every dissertation we recorded not only language, format, co-authors...

  2. Effective Teamwork Practical Lessons from Organizational Research

    CERN Document Server

    West, Michael A

    2012-01-01

    Updated to reflect the latest research evidence, the third edition of Effective Teamwork provides business managers with the necessary guidance and tools to build and maintain effective teamwork strategies. A new edition of a bestselling book on teamwork from an acknowledged leader in the fieldOffers a unique integration of rigorous research with practical guidance to develop effective leadership teamsFeatures new chapters on virtual teams and top management teams, plus contemporary themes of ethics and valuesUtilizes research based on positive psychology techniques

  3. Editorial: A Note on Good Research Practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dooley, James J.

    2013-07-01

    Good scientific practice and research misconduct have been concerns of mine for more than a decade (Dooley and Kerch, 2000) and in my role as an editor of the International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, I feel it is time to speak up and at the very least share my concerns and suggestions as they relate to the integrity of the research published in this journal. Rather than wait to write an editorial on good research practices in response to a major incident, I thought it might be best to be proactive and address some of the trends we see in submissions to this peer reviewed journal and to offer some suggestions for improvement improving the level of scholarship in some – but by no means all – of the papers submitted.

  4. Comprehension instruction research-based best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Parris, Sheri R

    2015-01-01

    All key issues of research and practice in comprehension instruction are addressed in this highly regarded professional resource and course text. Leading scholars examine the processes that enable students to make meaning from what they read--and how this knowledge can be applied to improve teaching at all grade levels. Best practices for meeting the needs of diverse elementary and secondary students are identified. Essential topics include strategies for comprehending different types of texts, the impact of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), cutting-edge assessment approaches, and the gr

  5. Comprehension instruction research-based best practices

    CERN Document Server

    Parris, Sheri R; Morrow, Lesley Mandel

    2015-01-01

    All key issues of research and practice in comprehension instruction are addressed in this highly regarded professional resource and course text. Leading scholars examine the processes that enable students to make meaning from what they read--and how this knowledge can be applied to improve teaching at all grade levels. Best practices for meeting the needs of diverse elementary and secondary students are identified. Essential topics include strategies for comprehending different types of texts, the impact of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS), cutting-edge assessment approaches, and the gr

  6. Improving the dependability of research in personality and social psychology: recommendations for research and educational practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funder, David C; Levine, John M; Mackie, Diane M; Morf, Carolyn C; Sansone, Carol; Vazire, Simine; West, Stephen G

    2014-02-01

    In this article, the Society for Personality and Social Psychology (SPSP) Task Force on Publication and Research Practices offers a brief statistical primer and recommendations for improving the dependability of research. Recommendations for research practice include (a) describing and addressing the choice of N (sample size) and consequent issues of statistical power, (b) reporting effect sizes and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), (c) avoiding "questionable research practices" that can inflate the probability of Type I error, (d) making available research materials necessary to replicate reported results, (e) adhering to SPSP's data sharing policy, (f) encouraging publication of high-quality replication studies, and (g) maintaining flexibility and openness to alternative standards and methods. Recommendations for educational practice include (a) encouraging a culture of "getting it right," (b) teaching and encouraging transparency of data reporting, (c) improving methodological instruction, and (d) modeling sound science and supporting junior researchers who seek to "get it right."

  7. Developing modelling lenses among practicing teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awawdeh Shahbari, Juhaina; Tabach, Michal

    2016-07-01

    Growing awareness of the importance of modelling activities in mathematics education has raised the question of whether teachers are prepared to facilitate the engagement of students in such activities. The current study investigates the effects of how teachers cope with modelling activities in developing their abilities to identify modelling cycles. The research was conducted among 34 practicing teachers studying for master's degrees at a college of education. The data were collected from two reports and one reflection provided by the participants about a modelling activity conducted by a group of five sixth-grade students. The first report was submitted before the participants themselves dealt with the modelling activities, while the second report and the reflection were submitted after their participation in the modelling activities. The findings indicate that prior to participating in the activity most of the teachers described the students' participation in modelling activity as a linear process. The participating teachers noticed the final mathematical model and the mathematical results obtained from applying the model, but most of them ignored the realistic results, the validating process and the cyclical nature of the mathematical model's progress. However, after the practicing teachers participated in modelling activities as learners, their reports indicated that most were able to recognize all the modelling phases and to distinguish the cyclical processes of the progress of the mathematical models. Moreover, according to the analyses of the reflections, the participating teachers are aware of the changes in their descriptions.

  8. Employing Interpretive Research to Build Theory of Information Systems Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Rowlands

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides guidance and an example for carrying out research using an interpretive framework. Until quite recently, there has been little available in the IS literature to guide the interpretive researcher to build theory of IS practice. While structured as a typical research paper, this paper is different in that the focus is on conceptual issues and the research methods rather than the findings. Unlike positivist research, there is no accepted general model for communicating interpretive research. Similarly, few guidelines exist for conducting the inductive process central to interpretive research. Throughout the paper, issues relating to the choice and application of the methods in terms of conducting inductive research are discussed. Overall, the focus provides an in-depth discussion of the particular interpretive research that I undertook so that other researchers can read of an example that may be similar to their own and therefore guide their work.

  9. FM research for practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    2012-01-01

    environment. FM started to be developed in practice with a strong focus on benchmarking and IT systems like CAFM. Around year 2000 a number of research and development project on Whole Life Costing was carried out and around 2005 there were some development projects and publications on new offices. Digital......Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of research and development in the area of Facilities Management (FM) in Denmark. Background: Research in FM is a fairly new activity in Denmark, but there have during the 1980’s and 1990’s been a number of development activities...... on national level, which have had importance to constitute and form a professional basis for FM. Approach (Theory/Methodology): The paper provides a chronological overview of research and development activities related to FM over the last 30 years in Denmark, including CFM’s ongoing research projects. Results...

  10. FM Research for Practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Per Anker

    environment. FM started to be developed in practice with a strong focus on benchmarking and IT systems like CAFM. Around year 2000 a number of research and development project on Whole Life Costing was carried out and around 2005 there were some development projects and publications on new offices. Digital......Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present an overview of research and development in the area of Facilities Management (FM) in Denmark. Background: Research in FM is a fairly new activity in Denmark, but there have during the 1980’s and 1990’s been a number of development activities...... on national level, which have had importance to constitute and form a professional basis for FM. Approach (Theory/Methodology): The paper provides a chronological overview of research and development activities related to FM over the last 30 years in Denmark, including CFM’s ongoing research projects. Results...

  11. Research Informing Practice--Practice Informing Research: Innovative Teaching Methologies for World Language Teachers. Research in Second Language Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarzer, David, Ed.; Petron, Mary, Ed.; Luke, Christopher, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    "Research Informing Practice--Practice Informing Research: Innovative Teaching Methodologies for World Language Educators" is an edited volume that focuses on innovative, nontraditional methods of teaching and learning world languages. Using teacher-research projects, each author in the volume guides readers through their own personal…

  12. A formalized teaching, practice, and research partnership with the Veterans Affairs North Texas Health Care System: a model for advancing academic partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Ronald G; Foslein-Nash, Cynthia; Singh, Dilpreet K; Zeiss, Robert A; Sanders, Karen M; Patry, Roland; Leff, Richard

    2009-12-17

    In 1999, the Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center School of Pharmacy expanded its Dallas/Fort Worth presence by creating a regional campus for pharmacy students in their third and fourth years (P3 and P4 years) of the program. This expansion was driven by the need for additional practice sites. The VANTHCS was an obvious choice for the school due to the similarity of missions for clinical practice, education, and research. The VANTHCS and pharmacy school renovated a 4,000 square foot building, which includes classrooms, conference rooms, a student lounge, and faculty offices (expanded to 8,000 square feet in 2003). To date, the school has invested $1 million in the building. From a practice perspective, VANTHCS purchases faculty professional services from the school to augment its clinical specialist staff. These professional practice contracts provide VANTHCS with 12 additional clinical pharmacy specialists serving 50% of their time in multiple specialty areas. The collaboration has also allowed for expansion of clinical teaching, benefitting both institutions. In addition to the pharmacy student interns on P3 and P4 practice experiences, the collaboration allows for 8 to 10 postgraduate pharmacy residents to train with VANTHCS clinical specialists and school faculty members each year. The VANTHCS/pharmacy school collaboration has clearly enhanced the ability of both institutions to exceed their teaching, research, and practice goals in a cost-effective manner.

  13. Moving research knowledge into dental hygiene practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobban, Sandra J; Edgington, Eunice M; Clovis, Joanne B

    2008-01-01

    Dental hygiene, as an emerging profession, needs to increase the number of intervention studies that identify improvements in oral health outcomes for clients. Historically, dental hygiene studies have typically been atheoretical, but the use of theoretical frameworks to guide these studies will increase their meaningfulness. Rogers' theory of diffusion of innovations has been used to study research utilization across many disciplines, and may offer insights to the study of research use in dental hygiene. Research use is an important component of evidence-based practice (EBP), and diffusion of research knowledge is an important process in implementing EBP. The purpose of this paper is to use diffusion of innovations theory to examine knowledge movement in dental hygiene, specifically through the example of the preventive practice of oral cancer screening by dental hygienists, considered as an innovation. Diffusion is considered to be the process by which an innovation moves through communication channels over time among a social network. We suggest diffusion theory holds promise for the study of knowledge movement in dental hygiene, but there are limitations including access to and understanding research studies as innovations. Nevertheless, using a theoretical framework such as Rogers' diffusion of innovations will strengthen the quality of intervention research in dental hygiene, and subsequently, health outcomes for clients.

  14. HONESTY AND GOOD PRACTICE IN SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jože Trontelj

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available In the field of science, we see cases of misconduct ranging from relatively minor departurefrom good manners and practice to more severe dishonesty and even criminal behaviour.Unethical experiments on human beings are among the worst abuses in scientific researchin medicine. Unethical research is usually also worthless from the scientific point of view.The commonest types of offence, however, include mismanagement of data, conscious misinterpretation,wrongful authorship, biased citation of work by others, plagiarism, misquotationor suppression of findings for the interests or upon the request of the sponsor or In the field of science, we see cases of misconduct ranging from relatively minor departurefrom good manners and practice to more severe dishonesty and even criminal behaviour.Unethical experiments on human beings are among the worst abuses in scientific researchin medicine. Unethical research is usually also worthless from the scientific point of view.The commonest types of offence, however, include mismanagement of data, conscious misinterpretation,wrongful authorship, biased citation of work by others, plagiarism, misquotationor suppression of findings for the interests or upon the request of the sponsor or In the field of science, we see cases of misconduct ranging from relatively minor departurefrom good manners and practice to more severe dishonesty and even criminal behaviour.Unethical experiments on human beings are among the worst abuses in scientific researchin medicine. Unethical research is usually also worthless from the scientific point of view.The commonest types of offence, however, include mismanagement of data, conscious misinterpretation,wrongful authorship, biased citation of work by others, plagiarism, misquotationor suppression of findings for the interests or upon the request of the sponsor or even a senior scientist in the team. Every case of misconduct and fraud may causedamage: it may undermine confidence of the

  15. Generalizing on best practices in image processing: a model for promoting research integrity: Commentary on: Avoiding twisted pixels: ethical guidelines for the appropriate use and manipulation of scientific digital images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benos, Dale J; Vollmer, Sara H

    2010-12-01

    Modifying images for scientific publication is now quick and easy due to changes in technology. This has created a need for new image processing guidelines and attitudes, such as those offered to the research community by Doug Cromey (Cromey 2010). We suggest that related changes in technology have simplified the task of detecting misconduct for journal editors as well as researchers, and that this simplification has caused a shift in the responsibility for reporting misconduct. We also argue that the concept of best practices in image processing can serve as a general model for education in best practices in research.

  16. Applying a Goal-Driven Model of Science Teacher Cognition to the Resolution of Two Anomalies in Research on the Relationship between Science Teacher Education and Classroom Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutner, Todd L.; Markman, Arthur B.

    2017-01-01

    Two anomalies continue to confound researchers and science teacher educators. First, new science teachers are quick to discard the pedagogy and practices that they learn in their teacher education programs in favor of a traditional, didactic approach to teaching science. Second, a discrepancy exists at all stages of science teachers' careers…

  17. Data management practices for collaborative research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles eSchmitt

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The success of research in the field of maternal-infant health, or in any scientific field, relies on the adoption of best practices for data and knowledge management. Prior work by our group and others has identified evidence-based solutions to many of the data management challenges that exist, including cost-effective practices for ensuring high-quality data entry and proper construction and maintenance of data standards and ontologies. Quality assurance practices for data entry and processing are necessary to ensure that data are not denigrated during processing, but the use of these practices has not been widely adopted in the fields of psychology and biology. Furthermore, collaborative research is becoming more common. Collaborative research often involves multiple laboratories, different scientific disciplines, numerous data sources, large data sets, and data sets from public and commercial sources. These factors present new challenges for data and knowledge management. Data security and privacy concerns are increased as data may be accessed by investigators affiliated with different institutions. Collaborative groups must address the challenges associated with federating data access between the data-collecting sites and a centralized data management site. The merging of ontologies between different data sets can become formidable, especially in fields with evolving ontologies. The increased use of automated data acquisition can yield more data, but it can also increase the risk of introducing error or systematic biases into data. In addition, the integration of data collected from different assay types often requires the development of new tools to analyze the data. All of these challenges act to increase the costs and time spent on data management for a given project, and they increase the likelihood of decreasing the quality of the data. In this paper, we review these issues and discuss theoretical and practical approaches for

  18. Researching media through practices: an ethnographic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antoni Roig

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Anthropological and ethnographic research on media have been largely focused on analyzing reception of media products (television, radio, press and film and media consumption related to domestic appropriation of technologies (Rothenbuhler et al., 2005. There is also a wide body of research devoted to the study of the political dimension of alternative and indigenous media (Ginsburg, 2002. However, there has been a separation between media and internet studies, and between the analysis of media reception and practices of self-production, such as family photography or home video. Current digital media practices urge reexamination of self-produced content and media flows from a broader perspective that cuts across divisions between public and private, corporative media products and people's releases, home production and cultural industry, political activism and everyday life.

  19. Evidence-based practice models for organizational change: overview and practical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaffer, Marjorie A; Sandau, Kristin E; Diedrick, Lee

    2013-05-01

    To provide an overview, summary of key features and evaluation of usefulness of six evidence-based practice models frequently discussed in the literature. The variety of evidence-based practice models and frameworks, complex terminology and organizational culture challenges nurses in selecting the model that best fits their practice setting. The authors: (1) initially identified models described in a predominant nursing text; (2) searched the literature through CINAHL from 1998 to current year, using combinations of 'evidence', 'evidence-based practice', 'models', 'nursing' and 'research'; (3) refined the list of selected models based on the initial literature review; and (4) conducted a second search of the literature on the selected models for all available years to locate both historical and recent articles on their use in nursing practice. Authors described model key features and provided an evaluation of model usefulness based on specific criteria, which focused on facilitating the evidence-based practice process and guiding practice change. The evaluation of model usefulness can be used to determine the best fit of the models to the practice setting. The Johns Hopkins Model and the Academic Center for Evidence-Based Practice Star Model emphasize the processes of finding and evaluating evidence that is likely to appeal to nursing educators. Organizations may prefer the Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services Framework, Advancing Research and Clinical Practice Through Close Collaboration, or Iowa models for their emphasis on team decision-making. An evidence-based practice model that is clear to the clinician and fits the organization will guide a systematic approach to evidence review and practice change. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Social Scholarship: Applying Social Networking Technologies to Research Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhow, Christine

    2009-01-01

    Participatory web-based technologies have the potential to change the way scholars engage in scholarship. One reason Web 2.0 technologies, such as online social networking, are not widely integrated in PreK-12 and postsecondary education is the lack of modeling by educators. Their lack of research-based best practices limits the ability to…

  1. Environmental practices for biomedical research facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlin, E L; Grupenhoff, J T

    2000-12-01

    As a result of the Leadership Conference on Biomedical Research and the Environment, the Facilities Committee focused its work on the development of best environmental practices at biomedical research facilities at the university and independent research facility level as well as consideration of potential involvement of for-profit companies and government agencies. The designation "facilities" includes all related buildings and grounds, "green auditing" of buildings and programs, purchasing of furnishings and sources, energy efficiency, and engineering services (lighting, heating, air conditioning), among other activities. The committee made a number of recommendations, including development of a national council for environmental stewardship in biomedical research, development of a system of green auditing of such research facilities, and creation of programs for sustainable building and use. In addition, the committee recommended extension of education and training programs for environmental stewardship, in cooperation with facilities managers, for all research administrators and researchers. These programs would focus especially on graduate fellows and other students, as well as on science labs at levels K--12.

  2. Practising Research, Researching Practice: Thinking Through Contemporary Dance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sally May Gardner

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Practice as research is now an accepted mode whereby artists can obtain a higher degree in our universities. But what conditions pertain for them there? Daily experiences of the misfit between the university, particularly in its current corporate guise, and the embodied practices upon which I draw have helped me, paradoxically, to clarify certain dance values which can perhaps have wider resonance. These values relate to concepts and ideas that can be found articulated by many practising artists and a number of other thinkers and practitioners including Winnicott, Alexander and Arendt. Focusing on here and now practicalities and issues, such as the nature of the studio floor, this article explores and argues for the importance of aesthetic experience and attention to life as we are living it: to experience, paradox, action, and sensation.

  3. Assessment of children's capacity to consent for research: a descriptive qualitative study of researchers' practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Barbara E; Stasiulis, Elaine; Gutfreund, Shawna; McDonald, Maria; Dade, Lauren

    2011-08-01

    In Canadian jurisdictions without specific legislation pertaining to research consent, the onus is placed on researchers to determine whether a child is capable of independently consenting to participate in a research study. Little, however, is known about how child health researchers are approaching consent and capacity assessment in practice. The aim of this study was to explore and describe researchers' current practices. The study used a qualitative descriptive design consisting of 14 face-to-face interviews with child health researchers and research assistants in Southern Ontario. Transcribed interviews were analysed for common themes. Procedures for assessing capacity varied considerably from the use of age cutoffs to in-depth engagement with each child. Three key issues emerged from the accounts: (1) requirements that consent be provided by a single person thwarted researchers' abilities to support family decision-making; (2) little practical distinction was made between assessing if a child was capable, versus determining if study information had been adequately explained by the researcher; and (3) participants' perceived that review boards' requirements may conflict with what they considered ethical consent practices. The results suggest that researchers' consent and capacity knowledge and skills vary considerably. Perceived discrepancies between ethical practice and ethics boards' requirements suggest the need for dialogue, education and possibly ethics board reforms. Furthermore we propose, where appropriate, a 'family decision-making' model that allows parents and their children to consent together, thereby shifting the focus from separate assent and consent procedures to approaches that appropriately engage the child and family.

  4. Research and Practical Trends in Geospatial Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpik, A. P.; Musikhin, I. A.

    2016-06-01

    In recent years professional societies have been undergoing fundamental restructuring brought on by extensive technological change and rapid evolution of geospatial science. Almost all professional communities have been affected. Communities are embracing digital techniques, modern equipment, software and new technological solutions at a staggering pace. In this situation, when planning financial investments and intellectual resource management, it is crucial to have a clear understanding of those trends that will be in great demand in 3-7 years. This paper reviews current scientific and practical activities of such non-governmental international organizations as International Federation of Surveyors, International Cartographic Association, and International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, analyzes and groups most relevant topics brought up at their scientific events, forecasts most probable research and practical trends in geospatial sciences, outlines topmost leading countries and emerging markets for further detailed analysis of their activities, types of scientific cooperation and joint implementation projects.

  5. Foundations of intervention research in instrumental practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Lunde Hatfield

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The goals of the present study are to evaluate, implement, and adapt psychological skills used in the realm of sports into music performance. This research project also aims to build foundations on how to implement future interventions to guide music students on how to optimize practice toward performance. A two-month psychological skills intervention was provided to two students from the national music academy’s bachelor program in music performance to better understand how to adapt and construct psychological skills training programs for performing music students. The program evaluated multiple intervention tools including the use of questionnaires, performance profiling, iPads, electronic practice logs, recording the perceived value of individual and combined work, as well as the effectiveness of different communication forms. Perceived effects of the intervention were collected through semi-structured interviews, observations, and logs.

  6. RESEARCH AND PRACTICAL TRENDS IN GEOSPATIAL SCIENCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. P. Karpik

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In recent years professional societies have been undergoing fundamental restructuring brought on by extensive technological change and rapid evolution of geospatial science. Almost all professional communities have been affected. Communities are embracing digital techniques, modern equipment, software and new technological solutions at a staggering pace. In this situation, when planning financial investments and intellectual resource management, it is crucial to have a clear understanding of those trends that will be in great demand in 3-7 years. This paper reviews current scientific and practical activities of such non-governmental international organizations as International Federation of Surveyors, International Cartographic Association, and International Society for Photogrammetry and Remote Sensing, analyzes and groups most relevant topics brought up at their scientific events, forecasts most probable research and practical trends in geospatial sciences, outlines topmost leading countries and emerging markets for further detailed analysis of their activities, types of scientific cooperation and joint implementation projects.

  7. Open Research Data: From Vision to Practice

    CERN Document Server

    Pampel, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    “To make progress in science, we need to be open and share.” This quote from Neelie Kroes (2012), vice president of the European Commission describes the growing public demand for an Open Science. Part of Open Science is, next to Open Access to peer-reviewed publications, the Open Access to research data, the basis of scholarly knowledge. The opportunities and challenges of Data Sharing are discussed widely in the scholarly sector. The cultures of Data Sharing differ within the scholarly disciplines. Well advanced are for example disciplines like biomedicine and earth sciences. Today, more and more funding agencies require a proper Research Data Management and the possibility of data re-use. Many researchers often see the potential of Data Sharing, but they act cautiously. This situation shows a clear ambivalence between the demand for Data Sharing and the current practice of Data Sharing. Starting from a baseline study on current discussions, practices and developments the article describe the challenges...

  8. Using Multilevel Modeling in Counseling Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Martin F.

    2012-01-01

    This conceptual and practical overview of multilevel modeling (MLM) for researchers in counseling and development provides guidelines on setting up SPSS to perform MLM and an example of how to present the findings. It also provides a discussion on how counseling and developmental researchers can use MLM to address their own research questions.…

  9. Health physics practices at research accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, R.H.

    1976-02-01

    A review is given of the uses of particle accelerators in health physics, the text being a short course given at the Health Physics Society Ninth Midyear Topical Symposium in February, 1976. Topics discussed include: (1) the radiation environment of high energy accelerators; (2) dosimetry at research accelerators; (3) shielding; (4) induced activity; (5) environmental impact of high energy accelerators; (6) population dose equivalent calculation; and (7) the application of the ''as low as practicable concept'' at accelerators. (PMA)

  10. Delivering research data management services fundamentals of good practice

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, Sarah; Whyte, Angus

    2014-01-01

    The research landscape is changing, with key global research funders now requiring institutions to demonstrate how they will preserve and share research data. However, the practice of structured research data management is very new, and the construction of services remains experimental and in need of models and standards of approach. This groundbreaking guide will lead researchers, institutions and policy makers through the processes needed to set up and run effective institutional research data management services. This book will provide a step-by-step explanation of the components for an institutional service - effectively a 'how to guide'. Case studies from the newly emerging service infrastructures in the UK, USA and Australia will draw out the lessons learnt from working (or near to delivery) exemplars. Different approaches are highlighted and compared, for example, a case study of a researcher-focused strategy from Australia contrasted with a national, top-down approach. A chapter on the redeveloped UK ...

  11. Evaluating a Community-School Model of Social Work Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Daniel; Frey, Andy

    2008-01-01

    While research has shown that social workers can have positive impacts on students' school adjustment, evaluations of overall practice models continue to be limited. This article evaluates a model of community-school social work practice by examining its effect on problem behaviors and concerns identified by teachers and parents at referral. As…

  12. What can we learn from corporate sustainability reporting? Deriving propositions for research and practice from over 9,500 corporate sustainability reports published between 1999 and 2015 using topic modelling technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    vom Brocke, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Organizations are increasingly using sustainability reports to inform their stakeholders and the public about their sustainability practices. We apply topic modelling to 9,514 sustainability reports published between 1999 and 2015 in order to identify common topics and, thus, the most common practices described in these reports. In particular, we identify forty-two topics that reflect sustainability and focus on the coverage and trends of economic, environmental, and social sustainability topics. Among the first to analyse such a large amount of data on organizations’ sustainability reporting, the paper serves as an example of how to apply natural language processing as a strategy of inquiry in sustainability research. The paper also derives from the data analysis ten propositions for future research and practice that are of immediate value for organizations and researchers. PMID:28403158

  13. What can we learn from corporate sustainability reporting? Deriving propositions for research and practice from over 9,500 corporate sustainability reports published between 1999 and 2015 using topic modelling technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Székely, Nadine; Vom Brocke, Jan

    2017-01-01

    Organizations are increasingly using sustainability reports to inform their stakeholders and the public about their sustainability practices. We apply topic modelling to 9,514 sustainability reports published between 1999 and 2015 in order to identify common topics and, thus, the most common practices described in these reports. In particular, we identify forty-two topics that reflect sustainability and focus on the coverage and trends of economic, environmental, and social sustainability topics. Among the first to analyse such a large amount of data on organizations' sustainability reporting, the paper serves as an example of how to apply natural language processing as a strategy of inquiry in sustainability research. The paper also derives from the data analysis ten propositions for future research and practice that are of immediate value for organizations and researchers.

  14. Prakriti-based research: Good reporting practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalerao, Supriya; Patwardhan, Kishor

    2016-03-01

    The recent advances in the fields of genomics, personalized medicine, and Ayurveda have motivated many researchers to look at the relationship between Prakriti (phenotype-based Ayurveda constitution) and various objective biological parameters. As a result, a number of studies reporting such a relationship have made their way into mainstream scholarly journals. However, when it comes to the protocols that these workers follow to identify one's Prakriti, there are several issues that are yet to be resolved. In this communication, we propose a few reporting practices that such workers are required to be encouraged to follow, while submitting their work on Prakriti to scholarly journals. We have arranged this proposal under the following domains that may serve as a preliminary checklist in this context: The textual references, validation process, assessment of characters, scoring pattern, weightage assignment, criterion for expressing the final Prakriti type, and a need to publish the complete Prakriti-determination tool. We advocate that only if the workers in the field adhere to these good reporting practices, one will be able to draw meaningful, generalizable, and applicable interpretations out of such studies. We also suggest that the editors of relevant scholarly journals may recommend these reporting practices while considering such reports for publication.

  15. Conceptual models used in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardle, M G; Mandle, C L

    1989-02-01

    Nurses' difficulties in articulation of conceptual models may be due to several factors--not the least of which are the existence of discrete theories for each area of nursing specialization, dissociation in curricula of theory from practice, a holistic conceptual framework that may be inadequately defined at the process level, and an impulse toward idealism on the part of the nurses themselves. These observations challenge both the theorists and the practitioners of modern nursing to describe more clearly the definition of quality for the science and art of nursing. Nurses are beginning to grasp the idea of holism. It is not the summation of parts to make a whole. Holism is the identification of life patterns, which are reflective of the whole. Nurses in practice and research are starting to create methods of inquiry that portray the wholeness of the autonomous person in continual, dynamic change and exchange with a changing universe. These initial explorations are leading to the evolution of the concepts of person, environment, and health into a distinctive theoretical base for nursing practice. In practice, research, and education, nurses must be committed to excellent, current descriptions of these human life patterns.

  16. Asset Building: integrating Research, Education and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Sherraden

    2000-05-01

    Full Text Available Asset building is an emerging concept in anti-poverty work in economically advanced nations. In the past, welfare states have defined poverty primarily in terms of income. While income is necessary to maintain consumption, saving and investment is also necessary if families and communities are to progress out of poverty over the long term. Asset building is a broad idea with many possible applications, including homeownership, microenterprise, and individual development accounts (IDAs. IDAs are matched saving accounts for low-wealth families. In this paper, the authors 1 describe asset building as a policy and practice innovation; 2 discuss results from two research projects, one on IDAs and a second on microenterprise; and 3 illustrate a strategy for education and advocacy. This work may serve as an example of simultaneous advances in research, education, and practice, wherein each aspect of the work is enriched by and contributes to the others. The strongest advances in social work proceed not by the separation of ideas, study, and application, but by their integration and mutual reinforcement.

  17. 动物学秦岭山地实践课程教学模式的探索%Research on the Mountain Practice Teaching Model of Zoology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑雪莉; 陈铁山; 唐福全; 卜书海

    2012-01-01

    从实习的准备、实施和整理等方面,探讨了动物学野外山地实习教学模式的改革,并分析了取得的教学效果.%The reform of mountain practice teaching model was discussed from the preparation,execution and readjustment phases,and the a-chieved teaching effects were analyzed.

  18. Research and Practice in Green Chemical Technologies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yin Yingwu

    2004-01-01

    Green chemistry is also called environment harmless or environment friendly chemistry.Green chemistry requires to use new synthetic methods, engineering technologies and processes to eliminate or reduce by-products, wastes or products that harmful to human health, community safety,and ecology environment. Green chemistry pursues to control the usage of the harmful and toxic materials, reduce waste emission, avoid necessity to treat the wastes; Green Chemistry advocates wastes management from the beginning, improving the efficiency of atoms, optimizing the use of resources and energy, lowering the cost of production. Green Chemistry technologies are the ultimate path to the clean chemical production in the future.Insight Co. takes "hospital of enterprises" and "bank of technologies" as our characteristics in business, and deems the development and spread of green chemistry as our mission. We developed an unique business model which combines education, research and production. In the past 8 years,we had applied and obtained more than 30 patents and received more than ten national and provincial awards in technology progress.We had made great progress in the manufacturing of organophosphorus pesticides, especially the production of omethoate, methamidophos, paraquat and glycyrrhizinic phosphor, etc., which made a stable foundation for INSIGHT's development. We had also achieved great success in the high efficiency low toxic pesticides, such as imidacloprid, etofenprox, metalaxyl and in the new synthetic methods in various amino acids as well as in the pharmaceutical intermediates. The new method of preparation indigo using N-phenylglycinonitrile is an advanced process in the world in terms of the clean production technology for Ferro cyanide and HCN's transformation rate improvement. We solved the pollution problem of the old route. The newly developed substituted product for indigo using a clean production technology which greatly reduced the material consumption and

  19. Best practice eye care models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Babar M; Mansur, Rabiu; Al-Rajhi, Abdulaziz; Lansingh, Van; Eckert, Kristen; Hassan, Kunle; Ravilla, Thulasiraj; Muhit, Mohammad; Khanna, Rohit C; Ismat, Chaudhry

    2012-01-01

    Since the launching of Global Initiative, VISION 2020 “the Right to Sight” many innovative, practical and unique comprehensive eye care services provision models have evolved targeting the underserved populations in different parts of the World. At places the rapid assessment of the burden of eye diseases in confined areas or utilizing the key informants for identification of eye diseases in the communities are promoted for better planning and evidence based advocacy for getting / allocation of resources for eye care. Similarly for detection and management of diabetes related blindness, retinopathy of prematurity and avoidable blindness at primary level, the major obstacles are confronted in reaching to them in a cost effective manner and then management of the identified patients accordingly. In this regard, the concept of tele-ophthalmology model sounds to be the best solution. Whereas other models on comprehensive eye care services provision have been emphasizing on surgical output through innovative scales of economy that generate income for the program and ensure its sustainability, while guaranteeing treatment of the poorest of the poor. PMID:22944741

  20. Leadership in research across academia and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John McRae

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Transcript of a keynote address delivered by John McRae at the 2009 ARCC Architectural Research Conference at the University of Texas San Antonio.I value very much the award and I certainly have truly enjoyed the time and the meeting these couple of days has been extremely stimulating. We were talking several of us ahead of time about the rigor and the intensity with which the programs are being presentedin each of the meetings. We really, I think, have the group here that’s going to be serving us well for thefuture.I want to also say today, in expressing my appreciation for this award, that the list of past awardees is stellarand includes several colleagues and personal friends towhom I owe a debt in my professional development and am grateful for the opportunity to address the conference and hope that my remarks with be of even a small benefit to our collective efforts to strengthen research across academia and practice. I started my career in both academia and practice in 1967, little more than the 30 years you were so gracious to give me, in Gainesville and at the University of Florida. Over this span of the last 42 years I have sought to develop my own research and creative work agenda and, through administrative roles, have made an effort to foster the research of colleagues when I could. So what was it like in the late 60’s and early70’s? Some of you may recall. In the interest of full disclosure, I have included a few images of my research work during my early years as a faculty member at the University of Florida. And so, here is another shot of our research team. Some of you may remember the Chicago 7. This is the rainbow 9 and, in fact, aside from myself, whom you will recognize, there are several other people there who are today in positions helping to lead this nation. That is kind of hard to imagine but there they are.

  1. Practice-based Research Network Research Good Practices (PRGPs): Summary of Recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolor, Rowena J; Campbell-Voytal, Kimberly; Daly, Jeanette; Nagykaldi, Zsolt J; O'Beirne, Maeve; Sterling, Pamela; Fagnan, Lyle J; Levy, Barcey; Michaels, LeAnn; Louks, Hannah A; Smith, Paul; Aspy, Cheryl B; Patterson, V Beth; Kano, Miria; Sussman, Andrew L; Williams, Robert; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2015-12-01

    Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) conduct research in community settings, which poses quality control challenges to the integrity of research, such as study implementation and data collection. A foundation for improving research processes within PBRNs is needed to ensure research integrity. Network directors and coordinators from seven U.S.-based PBRNs worked with a professional team facilitator during semiannual in-person meetings and monthly conference calls to produce content for a compendium of recommended research practices specific to the context of PBRNs. Participants were assigned to contribute content congruent with their expertise. Feedback on the draft document was obtained from attendees at the preconference workshop at the annual PBRN meeting in 2013. A revised document was circulated to additional PBRN peers prior to finalization. The PBRN Research Good Practices (PRGPs) document is organized into four chapters: (1) Building PBRN Infrastructure; (2) Study Development and Implementation; (3) Data Management, and (4) Dissemination Policies. Each chapter contains an introduction, detailed procedures for each section, and example resources with information links. The PRGPs is a PBRN-specific resource to facilitate PBRN management and staff training, to promote adherence to study protocols, and to increase validity and generalizability of study findings. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R N Beth

    2009-01-01

    Role modeling excellence in clinical nursing practice is the focus of this paper. The phenomenological research study reported involved a group of 8 nurses identified by their colleagues as exemplary. The major theme revealed in this study was that these exemplary nurses were also excellent role models in the clinical setting. This paper details approaches used by these nurses that made them excellent role models. Specifically, the themes of attending to the little things, making connections, maintaining a light-hearted attitude, modeling, and affirming others are presented. These themes are discussed within the framework of Watson [Watson, J., 1989. Human caring and suffering: a subjective model for health services. In: Watson, J., Taylor, R. (Eds.), They Shall Not Hurt: Human Suffering and Human Caring. Colorado University, Boulder, CO] "transpersonal caring" and [Bandura, A., 1997. Social Learning Theory. Prentice Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ] "Social Learning Theory." Particular emphasis in the discussion is on how positive role modeling by exemplary practitioners can contribute to the education of clinical nurses in the practice setting.

  3. Lessons for Research Policy and Practice: The Case of Co-enquiry Research With Rural Communities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily Caruso

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available This article explores the relationship between institutional funding for research and community-based or co-enquiry research practice. It examines the implementation of co-enquiry research in the COMBIOSERVE project, which was funded by the European Commission’s Seventh Framework Programme for research and innovation, between the years 2012 and 2015. Research partnerships between Latin American and European civil society organisations, research institutions, and Latin American rural communities are analysed. Challenges for effective collaboration in co-enquiry and lessons learned for research policy and practice are outlined. Based on our case study we suggest that: (1 the established values and practices of academia seem largely unfavourable towards alternative forms of research, such as co-enquiry; (2 the policies and administrative practices of this European Commission funding are unsuitable for adopting participatory forms of enquiry; and (3 the approach to research funding supports short engagements with communities whereas long-term collaborations are more desirable. Based on our case study, we propose more flexible funding models that support face-to-face meetings between researchers and communities from the time of proposal drafting, adaptation of research processes to local dynamics, adaptation of administrative processes to the capacities of all participants, and potential for long-term collaborations. Large-scale funding bodies such as European Commission research programmes are leaders in the evolution of research policy and practice. They have the power and the opportunity to publicly acknowledge the value of partnerships with civil society organisations and communities, actively support co-enquiry, and foment interest in innovative forms of research.

  4. Showcasing leadership exemplars to propel professional practice model implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Susan; Linden, Elizabeth; Fisher, Mary L

    2008-03-01

    Implementing a professional practice model is a highly complex organizational change that requires expert leadership to be successful. What are the aspects of successful leadership in implementing such a practice change, and how can those behaviors be transferred to other leaders? The authors describe qualitative research that examined this question by interviewing key leaders who are seen by peers as exemplifying the components and intent of one professional practice model. Using their responses to educate peers is seen as a method to expand their best practices. The authors recommend methods to disseminate these best practices in other organizations.

  5. PRACTICES AND TRADITIONAL SOCIAL ECONOMY MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Mihaela Mihalache

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This text is an analysis of the social economy practices as a means of reducing poverty. Besides the patterns of social economy of protected entities, we are seeking an extrapolation of social economy in traditional practices. We have analysed a series of interviews with people involved in the implementation and promotion of social economy projects and several possible models of traditional activities have been searched which may be the object of the social economy. Documentation made for this research suggests that there are models of traditional social economy in certain Romanian geographical areas not adequately promoted and shared with other communities. The analysis highlighted some weaknesses of the event and functioning of these practices and traditional social economy models. They concern the difficulties of traditional activities sustainability by lack of marketing, utilizing products, market and especially very small and occasional profit. Although profit is not found only in the last goals of social economy and is recommended for reinvestment, it remains important for covering minimum needs. In this context, these weaknesses constitute the risk factors in maintaining motivation to support these activities in the social economy.

  6. Elder self-neglect: research and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong XQ

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available XinQi Dong Rush Institute for Healthy Aging, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Elder self-neglect is a global public health and human rights issue that threatens older people’s health and safety. It commonly refers to refusal or failure to provide oneself with care and protection in areas of food, water, clothing, hygiene, medication, living environments, and safety precautions. While prevalent, the status of self-neglecting individuals remains largely unclear, in particular within community-dwelling populations. By reviewing the epidemiology of elder self-neglect (definition, prevalence, risk factors, and consequences to date, the present paper identifies key research gaps such as methodological inconsistency in case identification and measurement, and study designs that are inadequate to determine risk factors of self-neglect. More importantly, in light of the rapidly growing older population, relevant stakeholders (researchers, healthcare providers, social service providers, legal professionals, community organizations, and policymakers must be prepared for an expected increasing number of self-neglect cases and enlarging scope of the problem. Hence, in this article, I present an overview regarding the management issues of elderly self-neglect related to the detection, assessment, reporting and referral, and decision-making capacity. Based on the current literature, the paper is aimed to explore the present knowledge and challenges, and how they can pave the way for solutions to self-neglect research, practice, and policy. Keywords: elderly self-neglect, elder abuse, self-neglect future directions 

  7. Research mathematicians’ practices in selecting mathematical problems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Misfeldt, Morten; Johansen, Mikkel Willum

    2015-01-01

    Developing abilities to create, inquire into, qualify, and choose among mathematical problems is an important educational goal. In this paper, we elucidate how mathematicians work with mathematical problems in order to understand this mathematical process. More specifically, we investigate how...... mathematicians select and pose problems and discuss to what extent our results can be used to inform, criticize, and develop educational practice at various levels. Selecting and posing problems is far from simple. In fact, it is considered hard, complex, and of crucial importance. A number of criteria...... and suggest that mathematics education research could further investigate how students select and develop problems, work with multiple problems over a longer period of time, and use the solutions to problems to support the development of new problems. Furthermore, the negative emotional aspects of being stuck...

  8. Recent Changes in Humanistic Research Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, Lasse Gøhler; Vikman, Jutta Maria; Liljenstrøm, Andreas Jan

    2016-01-01

    and analytical methods/techniques such as qualitative interviews, participant observation, categorized coding and statistical analysis. With respect to theoretical sources, many humanistic PhD dissertations also converge with the social sciences. We discuss these findings in the light of the situation......The present paper analyzes changes in research practices in the humanities around the turn of the millennium. The analysis is based on a reading of all humanistic PhD dissertations in Denmark between 1992 and 2012 (N=1,958). For every dissertation we recorded not only language, format, co......-authors and supervisors but also the theoretical sources, data types and analytical methods/techniques used. We show that, while the share of article-based dissertations (as opposed to monographs) is relatively stable, the share of English dissertations grows from around 18 percent in the beginning of the period...

  9. Nursing research ethics, guidance and application in practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doody, Owen; Noonan, Maria

    2016-07-28

    Ethics is fundamental to good research practice and the protection of society. From a historical point of view, research ethics has had a chequered past and without due cognisance there is always the potential for research to do harm. Research ethics is fundamental to research practice, nurse education and the development of evidence. In conducting research, it is important to plan for and anticipate any potential or actual risks. To engage in research, researchers need to develop an understanding and knowledge of research ethics and carefully plan how to address ethics within their research. This article aims to enhance students' and novice researchers' research ethics understanding and its application to nursing research.

  10. Religion and health: public health research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatters, L M

    2000-01-01

    Research examining the relationships between religion and the health of individuals and populations has become increasingly visible in the social, behavioral, and health sciences. Systematic programs of research investigate religious phenomena within the context of coherent theoretical and conceptual frameworks that describe the causes and consequences of religious involvement for health outcomes. Recent research has validated the multidimensional aspects of religious involvement and investigated how religious factors operate through various biobehavioral and psychosocial constructs to affect health status through proposed mechanisms that link religion and health. Methodological and analytical advances in the field permit the development of more complex models of religion's effects, in keeping with proposed theoretical explanations. Investigations of religion and health have ethical and practical implications that should be addressed by the lay public, health professionals, the research community, and the clergy. Future research directions point to promising new areas of investigation that could bridge the constructs of religion and health.

  11. Strategic collaborative model for evidence-based nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olade, Rosaline A

    2004-01-01

    To describe a model that has been developed to guide nurses and other health professionals in collaborative efforts toward evidence-based nursing practice. A review of literature was conducted using MEDLINE and CINAHL to search for articles on research utilization for evidence-based practice in health care delivery. Empirical studies; reviews; and theoretical, opinion, and information articles were included in the review in order to provide a more comprehensive view of the state of evidence-based nursing internationally. Findings revealed a number of barriers to evidence-based nursing practice, which have persisted over the last two decades, including inadequate knowledge of research among practicing nurses, lack of administrative support for research activities in clinical settings, lack of empowerment of nurses, and lack of needed mentoring from nursing research consultants. Barriers in the areas of nursing education and administrative support appear to be major. A need was identified for a pragmatic model that encourages cooperation and collaboration between educators/researchers in academia and the administrative leaders in the clinical facilities if evidence-based nursing practice is to become the norm. FRAMEWORK OF MODEL: The Tyler Collaborative Model is based on an eclectic approach to planned change for creating evidence-based practice. This model identifies a step-by-step process for change, while allowing for the opportunity to integrate any of the previously available methods of critical appraisal to determine the best evidence for practice in each clinical setting.

  12. Exploring Forms of Triangulation to Facilitate Collaborative Research Practice: Reflections From a Multidisciplinary Research Group

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarja Tiainen

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available This article contains critical reflections of a multidisciplinary research group studying the human and technological dynamics around some newly offered electronic services in a specific rural area of Finland. For their research, the group adopted ethnography. On facing the challenges of doing ethnographic research in a multidisciplinary setting, the group evolved its own breed of research practice based on multiple forms of triangulation. This implied the use of multiple data sources, methods, theories, and researchers, in different combinations. One of the outcomes of the work is a model for collaborative research. It highlights, among others, the importance of creating a climate for collaboration within the research group and following a process of individual and collaborative writing to achieve the potential benefits of such research. The article also identifies a set of remaining challenges relevant to collaborative research.

  13. A Fresh Theoretical Perspective on Practice-Led Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Barbara; Wilson, Brett

    2017-01-01

    Practice-led research in art and design has now come of age and can take its place alongside other forms of research at the academic "high table". It no longer needs to be treated with "special consideration" as a new form of intellectual enquiry. The research craft developed by those involved in practice-led research admits…

  14. The Recursive Practice of Research and Teaching: Reframing Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Rebecca; Lemon, Narelle; Mathewson Mitchell, Donna; Reid, Jo-Anne

    2016-01-01

    As a field, Teacher Education has lived with continued criticism from governmental and research bodies on the quality of professional preparation and the lack of a strong research base. We respond to such criticisms by considering possibilities for further exploration of the "research of practice" and the "practice of research"…

  15. From theoretical model to practical use:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Ida Torunn; Lomborg, Kirsten; Nielsen, Carsten Munch

    2013-01-01

    passive diffusion strategies with interaction and teamwork between stakeholders. The use of knowledge creates feedback that might have consequences for the refinement and tailoring of that same knowledge itself. With end-users in mind, several heuristics were used by the research group to increase clarity...... of the model and to tailor the implementation of knowledge to the users. Implications for nursing. This article illustrates the need for enduring collaboration between stakeholders to promote the process of knowledge translation. Translation of research knowledge into practice is a time-consuming process...... that is enhanced when appropriate support is given by leaders in the involved facilities. Conclusion. Knowledge translation is a time-consuming and collaborative endeavour. On the basis of our experience we advocate the implementation and use of a conceptual framework for the entire process of knowledge...

  16. Metering Best Practices Applied in the National Renewable Energy Laboratory's Research Support Facility: A Primer to the 2011 Measured and Modeled Energy Consumption Datasets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheppy, M.; Beach, A.; Pless, S.

    2013-04-01

    Modern buildings are complex energy systems that must be controlled for energy efficiency. The Research Support Facility (RSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has hundreds of controllers -- computers that communicate with the building's various control systems -- to control the building based on tens of thousands of variables and sensor points. These control strategies were designed for the RSF's systems to efficiently support research activities. Many events that affect energy use cannot be reliably predicted, but certain decisions (such as control strategies) must be made ahead of time. NREL researchers modeled the RSF systems to predict how they might perform. They then monitor these systems to understand how they are actually performing and reacting to the dynamic conditions of weather, occupancy, and maintenance.

  17. Translating research to practice in bullying prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Catherine P

    2015-01-01

    Bullying continues to be a concern in schools and communities across the United States and worldwide, yet there is uncertainty regarding the most effective approaches for preventing it and addressing its impacts on children and youth. This paper synthesizes findings from a series of studies and meta-analyses examining the efficacy of bullying prevention programs. This paper considers some methodological issues encountered when testing the efficacy and effectiveness of bullying prevention and intervention approaches. It also identifies several areas requiring additional research in order to increase the effectiveness of bullying prevention efforts in real-world settings. Drawing upon a public health perspective and findings from the field of prevention science, this paper aims to inform potential future directions for enhancing the adoption, high quality implementation, and dissemination of evidence-based bullying prevention programs. It is concluded that although bullying prevention programs can be effective in reducing bullying and victimization among school-aged youth, there is a great need for more work to increase the acceptability, fidelity, and sustainability of the existing programs in order to improve bullying-related outcomes for youth. The findings from this review are intended to inform both policy and public health practice related to bullying prevention.

  18. Examining the Relationship between Physical Models and Students' Science Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Alison Riley

    Scientists engage with practices like model development and use, data analysis and interpretation, explanation construction, and argumentation in order to expand the frontiers of science, so it can be inferred that students' engagement with science practices may help them deepen their own science understanding. As one of three dimensions on which the Next Generation Science Standards is built, science practices are recognized as an important component of science instruction. However, the contexts in which these practices happen are under-researched. Furthermore, research on science practices among students tends to focus on one or two practices in isolation when, in reality, students and scientists tend to engage with multiple overlapping practices. This study focused on identifying and characterizing multiple science practices as eighth and ninth-grade Earth Science students participated in a small group collaborative problem solving activity both with and without the use of a physical model. This study found a range of sophistication in the observed science practices as well as a relationship between the frequency of those practices and the accuracy of the groups' outcomes. Based on this relationship, groups were assigned to one of three categories. Further analysis revealed that model use varied among the three categories of groups. Comparisons across these three group categories suggest that there may be a bootstrapping relationship between students' engagement with science practices and the development of their content understanding. This metaphor of bootstrapping is used to represent how students may develop deeper science content understanding through engagement with science practices and concurrently develop greater facility with science practices as they learn science content. Implications are presented for curriculum designers, teachers and teacher educators. These include recommendations for curriculum design that encourage structured opportunities for

  19. Practice to research: integrating evidence-based practices with culture and context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisner, Thomas S; Hay, M Cameron

    2015-04-01

    There are ways to integrate culturally competent services (CCS) and evidence-based practices (EBP) which can improve the experiences of patients and their families and communities when faced with health problems, as well as the effectiveness and positive experiences of practitioners. CCS and EBP evidence should be jointly deployed for helping patients and clinicians. Partnership research models are useful for achieving the integration of CCS and EBP, since they involve close observation of and participation by clinicians and practitioners in the research process, and often use integrated qualitative and quantitative mixed methods. We illustrate this with 3 examples of work that can help integrate CCS and EBP: ongoing collection of information from patients, clinicians and staff, or "evidence farming"; close study and continuous improvement of activities and accommodations; and use of evidence of tacit, implicit cultural scripts and norms, such as being "productive," as well as explicit scripts. From a research practice point of view, collaborative partnerships will likely produce research with culture and context bracketed in, and will contribute stronger research models, methods, and units of analysis.

  20. A Research Framework for Understanding the Practical Impact of Family Involvement in the Juvenile Justice System: The Juvenile Justice Family Involvement Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Sarah Cusworth; Bishop, Asia S; Pullmann, Michael D; Bauer, Grace

    2015-12-01

    Family involvement is recognized as a critical element of service planning for children's mental health, welfare and education. For the juvenile justice system, however, parents' roles in this system are complex due to youths' legal rights, public safety, a process which can legally position parents as plaintiffs, and a historical legacy of blaming parents for youth indiscretions. Three recent national surveys of juvenile justice-involved parents reveal that the current paradigm elicits feelings of stress, shame and distrust among parents and is likely leading to worse outcomes for youth, families and communities. While research on the impact of family involvement in the justice system is starting to emerge, the field currently has no organizing framework to guide a research agenda, interpret outcomes or translate findings for practitioners. We propose a research framework for family involvement that is informed by a comprehensive review and content analysis of current, published arguments for family involvement in juvenile justice along with a synthesis of family involvement efforts in other child-serving systems. In this model, family involvement is presented as an ascending, ordinal concept beginning with (1) exclusion, and moving toward climates characterized by (2) information-giving, (3) information-eliciting and (4) full, decision-making partnerships. Specific examples of how courts and facilities might align with these levels are described. Further, the model makes predictions for how involvement will impact outcomes at multiple levels with applications for other child-serving systems.

  1. Education(al) Research, Educational Policy-Making and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Charles

    2011-01-01

    Professor Whitty has endorsed the consensus that research into education is empirical social science, distinguishing "educational research" which seeks directly to influence practice, and "education research" that has substantive value but no necessary practical application. The status of the science here is problematic. The positivist approach is…

  2. Implementation as transfer between policy, research and practice in care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiligers, P.J.M.; Niet, A. van der

    2010-01-01

    Background: Health Services Research is policy related and results have an impact on practices. Implementation of research output into practices is performed with a variety of strategies. Type of policy intentions and research output create a specific context for implementation. The main question

  3. [Forest degradation/decline: research and practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jiao-Jun; Li, Feng-Qin

    2007-07-01

    As one of the most critical environmental problems in the 21st century, forest degradation has been facing worldwide. There are many definitions about forest degradation, but its common features are the permanent loss of forests, stand structure destructed, forest quality decreased, and forest functions lowered. Forest decline or tree decline in fact is one of the causes of forest degradation, which includes the general reduction of trees in vigor, low level growth of trees in productivity, death of trees, and even, decline of soil fertility. Many researches indicated that deforestation is the permanent loss of forests in area, which is shifted to other land uses. Deforestation is the product of the interactions between environmental, social, economic, cultural, and political forces at work in any given country/region, and thus, more and more attention is focused on the negative socioeconomic and environmental effects after forest degradation, especially on the reduction of forest area induced by deforestation. The effects of any decisions or policies in national and international levels on forest degradation induced by deforestation have been paid attention as well. How to make efforts and strengthen the worldwide cooperation to combat the forest degradation induced by deforestation must be challenged to find appropriate solutions. There are many researches on forest decline, because of its complexity and uncertainties. The major causes of forest decline include: 1) pollution from both industry and agriculture, 2) stress factors, e.g., desiccation, 3) changes in stand dynamics, 4) decline disease of forest or diseases of complex etiology, 5) degradation of productivity and/or soil fertility in pure plantation forests. Forest degradation in China is similar to that all over the world, but with the characteristics in forest components, i.e., 1) secondary forests are the major forest resources, 2) China has the most plantation forests in the world, some of which have

  4. Virtual Communities of Practice: Bridging Research and Practice Using Web 2.0

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Laura A.; Koston, Zoe; Quartley, Marjorie; Adsit, Jason

    2011-01-01

    A significant dilemma for the health and human service professions continues to be the question of how best to bridge the divide between academic research and practice. Communities of practice have traditionally been a vehicle for collaborative research and for information exchange (Moore, 2008). Through collaboration, communities of practice have…

  5. Research-Practice Integration in Real Practice Settings: Issues and Suggestions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Monit; Ma, Anny K.; Thyer, Bruce A.; Webb, Ann E.

    2015-01-01

    At the National Bridging the Research and Practice Gap Symposium to discuss evidence-based practice (EBP) in social work, 150 participants attended five breakout groups to address real practice setting applications. These participants from social work academia and practice communities addressed issues and looked for solutions to promote…

  6. A practical guide to big data research in psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Eric Evan; Wojcik, Sean P

    2016-12-01

    The massive volume of data that now covers a wide variety of human behaviors offers researchers in psychology an unprecedented opportunity to conduct innovative theory- and data-driven field research. This article is a practical guide to conducting big data research, covering data management, acquisition, processing, and analytics (including key supervised and unsupervised learning data mining methods). It is accompanied by walkthrough tutorials on data acquisition, text analysis with latent Dirichlet allocation topic modeling, and classification with support vector machines. Big data practitioners in academia, industry, and the community have built a comprehensive base of tools and knowledge that makes big data research accessible to researchers in a broad range of fields. However, big data research does require knowledge of software programming and a different analytical mindset. For those willing to acquire the requisite skills, innovative analyses of unexpected or previously untapped data sources can offer fresh ways to develop, test, and extend theories. When conducted with care and respect, big data research can become an essential complement to traditional research. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Making Theory Come Alive through Practice-based Design Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Markussen, Thomas; Knutz, Eva; Rind Christensen, Poul

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to demonstrate how practice-based design research is able not only to challenge, but also to push toward further development of some of the basic assumpstions in emotion theories as used within design research. In so doing, we wish to increase knolwedge on a central...... epistemological question for design research, namely how practice-based design research can be a vehicle for the construction of new theory for design research....

  8. Mathematical modeling in psychological researches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Zyolko

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The author considers the nature of mathematical modeling and its significance in psychological researches. The author distinguishes the types of mathematical models: deterministic, stochastic models and synergetic models. The system approach is proposed as an instrument of implementation of mathematical modelling in psychological research.

  9. General practices as emergent research organizations: a qualitative study into organizational development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, Fraser; Shaw, Sara; Greenhalgh, Trisha; Carter, Yvonne H

    2005-06-01

    An increasing proportion of research in primary care is locally undertaken in designated research practices. Capacity building to support high quality research at these grass roots is urgently needed and is a government priority. There is little previously published research on the process by which GP practices develop as research organizations or on their specific support needs at organizational level. Using in-depth qualitative interviews with 28 key informants in 11 research practices across the UK, we explored their historical accounts of the development of research activity. We analysed the data with reference to contemporary theories of organizational development. Participants identified a number of key events and processes, which allowed us to produce a five-phase model of practice development in relation to research activity (creative energy, concrete planning, transformation/differentiation, consolidation and collaboration). Movement between these phases was not linear or continuous, but showed emergent and adaptive properties in which specific triggers and set-backs were often critical. This developmental model challenges previous categorical taxonomies of research practices. It forms a theory-driven framework for providing appropriate support at the grass roots of primary care research, based on the practice's phase of development and the nature of external triggers and potential setbacks. Our findings have important implications for the strategic development of practice-based research in the UK, and could serve as a model for the wider international community.

  10. Partners in research: building academic-practice partnerships to educate and mentor advanced practice nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harbman, Patricia; Bryant-Lukosius, Denise; Martin-Misener, Ruth; Carter, Nancy; Covell, Christine L; Donald, Faith; Gibbins, Sharyn; Kilpatrick, Kelley; McKinlay, James; Rawson, Krista; Sherifali, Diana; Tranmer, Joan; Valaitis, Ruta

    2017-04-01

    Clinical practice is the primary focus of advanced practice nursing (APN) roles. However, with unprecedented needs for health care reform and quality improvement (QI), health care administrators are seeking new ways to utilize all dimensions of APN expertise, especially related to research and evidence-based practice. International studies reveal research as the most underdeveloped and underutilized aspect of these roles. To improve patient care by strengthening the capacity of advanced practice nurses to integrate research and evidence-based practice activities into their day-to-day practice. An academic-practice partnership was created among hospital-based advanced practice nurses, nurse administrators, and APN researchers to create an innovative approach to educate and mentor advanced practice nurses in conducting point-of-care research, QI, or evidence-based practice projects to improve patient, provider, and/or system outcomes. A practice-based research course was delivered to 2 cohorts of advanced practice nurses using a range of teaching strategies including 1-to-1 academic mentorship. All participants completed self-report surveys before and after course delivery. Through participation in this initiative, advanced practice nurses enhanced their knowledge, skills, and confidence in the design, implementation, and/or evaluation of research, QI, and evidence-based practice activities. Evaluation of this initiative provides evidence of the acceptability and feasibility of academic-practice partnerships to educate and mentor point-of-care providers on how to lead, implement, and integrate research, QI and evidence-based activities into their practices. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Conceptual models for Mental Distress among HIV-infected and uninfected individuals: A contribution to clinical practice and research in primary-health-care centers in Zambia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tuba Mary

    2011-01-01

    . Individuals receiving ARV were best adjusted to their status, expressed hope and valued counseling and support groups. Health care providers reported that 40% of mental distress cases were due to HIV infection. Conclusions Patient models concerning mental distress are critical to treatment-seeking decisions and coping mechanisms. Mental health interventions should be further researched and prioritized for HIV-infected individuals.

  12. Conceptual models for mental distress among HIV-infected and uninfected individuals: a contribution to clinical practice and research in primary-health-care centers in Zambia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chipimo, Peter J; Tuba, Mary; Fylkesnes, Knut

    2011-01-10

    status, expressed hope and valued counseling and support groups. Health care providers reported that 40% of mental distress cases were due to HIV infection. Patient models concerning mental distress are critical to treatment-seeking decisions and coping mechanisms. Mental health interventions should be further researched and prioritized for HIV-infected individuals.

  13. Ethics in data sharing: developing a model for best practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dietrich, Sven; van der Ham, Jeroen; Pras, Aiko; van Rijswijk-Deij, Roland; van Rijswijk, Roland M.; Shou, Darren; Sperotto, Anna; van Wynsberghe, Amy Louise; Zuck, Lenore D.

    2014-01-01

    As an outcome of a seminar on the 'Ethics in Data Sharing', we sketch a model of best practice for sharing data in research. We illustrate this model with two current and timely real-life cases from the context of computer and network security.

  14. An ontological model of the practice transformation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, Arun; Sinha, Atish P

    2016-06-01

    Patient-centered medical home is defined as an approach for providing comprehensive primary care that facilitates partnerships between individual patients and their personal providers. The current state of the practice transformation process is ad hoc and no methodological basis exists for transforming a practice into a patient-centered medical home. Practices and hospitals somehow accomplish the transformation and send the transformation information to a certification agency, such as the National Committee for Quality Assurance, completely ignoring the development and maintenance of the processes that keep the medical home concept alive. Many recent studies point out that such a transformation is hard as it requires an ambitious whole-practice reengineering and redesign. As a result, the practices suffer change fatigue in getting the transformation done. In this paper, we focus on the complexities of the practice transformation process and present a robust ontological model for practice transformation. The objective of the model is to create an understanding of the practice transformation process in terms of key process areas and their activities. We describe how our ontology captures the knowledge of the practice transformation process, elicited from domain experts, and also discuss how, in the future, that knowledge could be diffused across stakeholders in a healthcare organization. Our research is the first effort in practice transformation process modeling. To build an ontological model for practice transformation, we adopt the Methontology approach. Based on the literature, we first identify the key process areas essential for a practice transformation process to achieve certification status. Next, we develop the practice transformation ontology by creating key activities and precedence relationships among the key process areas using process maturity concepts. At each step, we employ a panel of domain experts to verify the intermediate representations of the

  15. Practical applications of structural genomics technologies for mutagen research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemla, Adam; Segelke, Brent W

    2011-06-17

    Here we present a perspective on a range of practical uses of structural genomics for mutagen research. Structural genomics is an overloaded term and requires some definition to bound the discussion; we give a brief description of public and private structural genomics endeavors, along with some of their objectives, their activities, their capabilities, and their limitations. We discuss how structural genomics might impact mutagen research in three different scenarios: at a structural genomics center, at a lab with modest resources that also conducts structural biology research, and at a lab that is conducting mutagen research without in-house experimental structural biology. Applications span functional annotation of single genes or SNP, to constructing gene networks and pathways, to an integrated systems biology approach. Structural genomics centers can take advantage of systems biology models to target high value targets for structure determination and in turn extend systems models to better understand systems biology diseases or phenomenon. Individual investigator run structural biology laboratories can collaborate with structural genomics centers, but can also take advantage of technical advances and tools developed by structural genomics centers and can employ a structural genomics approach to advancing biological understanding. Individual investigator-run non-structural biology laboratories can also collaborate with structural genomics centers, possibly influencing targeting decisions, but can also use structure based annotation tools enabled by the growing coverage of protein fold space provided by structural genomics. Better functional annotation can inform pathway and systems biology models.

  16. Theory in Educational Research and Practice in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higgs, Leonie G.

    2013-01-01

    A problem in education, that has long concerned philosophers of education, is the problem of the relationship between theory and practice in educational research and practice. Despite the fact that much has been written on the relationship between theory and practice in education, it would seem that teachers continue to cling to an image of theory…

  17. Visualisation in Archaeology: Connecting Research and Practice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garry Gibbons

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Visualisation in Archaeology (www.viarch.org.uk is a three-year research project funded by English Heritage. Established in December 2007, Visualisation in Archaeology (VIA has as its principal mission a commitment to providing a forum in which practitioners and researchers can contribute towards a critical (reassessment of visualising data resulting from archaeological research. This paper will present an overview of the VIA’s research aims and objectives, its methodology, and its proposed future directions.

  18. Survey Practices in Dental Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Kuster, Curtis G.

    1983-01-01

    The use of mailed questionnaires in research on dental education is examined, and several factors that researchers should consider when reporting mailed questionnaire research to journal editors are identified. Examples from the "Journal of Dental Education" are used. (Author/MLW)

  19. Survey Practices in Dental Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, John W.; Kuster, Curtis G.

    1983-01-01

    The use of mailed questionnaires in research on dental education is examined, and several factors that researchers should consider when reporting mailed questionnaire research to journal editors are identified. Examples from the "Journal of Dental Education" are used. (Author/MLW)

  20. Closing the Gap between Research Evidence and Clinical Practice: Jordanian Nurses' Perceived Barriers to Research Utilisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khalaileh, Murad; Al Qadire, Mohammad; Musa, Ahmad S.; Al-Khawaldeh, Omar A.; Al Qudah, Hani; Alhabahbeh, Atalla

    2016-01-01

    Background: The nursing profession is a combination of theory and practical skill, and nurses are required to generate and develop knowledge through implementing research into clinical practice. Considerable number of barriers could hind implementing research findings into practice. Barriers to research utilisation are not identified in the…

  1. Factors influencing pharmacy students’ attitudes towards pharmacy practice research and strategies for promoting research interest in pharmacy practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kritikos VS

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To (1 investigate the relationships between students’ characteristics and their (a perceptions of research in general and (b attitudes towards pharmacy practice research; (2 identify strategies that could be used by pharmacy educators to promote research interest in pharmacy practice; and (3 identify perceived barriers to the pursuit or completion of a pharmacy practice research degree. Methods: A survey was administered to all students enrolled in each year of the four-year pharmacy undergraduate program, University of Sydney, Australia. Perceptions of research in general were measured using 4 items on a five-point semantic-differential scale and attitudes towards pharmacy practice research were measured using 16 items on a five-point Likert scale. Student characteristics were also collected as were responses to open-ended questions which were analysed using content analysis. Results: In total 853 students participated and completed the survey (83% response rate. Participants’ characteristics were associated with some but not all aspects of research and pharmacy practice research. It appeared that positive attitudes and perspectives were influenced strongly by exposure to the ‘research’ process through projects, friends or mentors, previous degrees or having future intentions to pursue a research degree. Results from both the quantitative and qualitative analyses suggest positive attitudes and perceptions of research can be nurtured through the formal inclusion in research processes, particularly the utility of practice research in clinical practice across the four years of study. Participants indicated there was a lack of awareness of the needs, benefits and career opportunities associated with pharmacy practice research and voiced clear impediments in their career path with respect to the choice of practice research-related careers. Conclusions: Future research should investigate changes in perceptions and attitudes in a

  2. Rethinking Critically Reflective Research Practice: Beyond Popper’s Critical Rationalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Ulrich

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We all know that ships are safest in the harbor; but alas, that is not what ships are built for. They are destined to leave the harbor and to confront the challenges that are waiting beyond the harbor mole. A similar challenge confronts the practice of research. Research at work cannot play it safe and stay in whatever theoretical and methodological harbors in which it may have found shelter in the past. Still less can it examine and maintain its foundations in the dry dock. Research is more like a ship that must be repaired on the open sea. Yet foundationalist ideas persist in the practice of research. Counter to what is often assumed, today’s dominating model for research--the fallibilist model of critical rationalism--has not really overcome the empirical foundationalism of earlier, positivist research practices. This paper analyses two major foundationalist traps that are currently in the upswing and work against reflective research practice.

  3. Introduction to Bayesian modelling in dental research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilthorpe, M S; Maddick, I H; Petrie, A

    2000-12-01

    To explain the concepts and application of Bayesian modelling and how it can be applied to the analysis of dental research data. Methodological in nature, this article introduces Bayesian modelling through hypothetical dental examples. The synthesis of RCT results with previous evidence, including expert opinion, is used to illustrate full Bayesian modelling. Meta-analysis, in the form of empirical Bayesian modelling, is introduced. An example of full Bayesian modelling is described for the synthesis of evidence from several studies that investigate the success of root canal treatment. Hierarchical (Bayesian) modelling is demonstrated for a survey of childhood caries, where surface data is nested within subjects. Bayesian methods enhance interpretation of research evidence through the synthesis of information from multiple sources. Bayesian modelling is now readily accessible to clinical researchers and is able to augment the application of clinical decision making in the development of guidelines and clinical practice.

  4. Alternative models for academic family practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yarnall Kimberly SH

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Future of Family Medicine Report calls for a fundamental redesign of the American family physician workplace. At the same time, academic family practices are under economic pressure. Most family medicine departments do not have self-supporting practices, but seek support from specialty colleagues or hospital practice plans. Alternative models for academic family practices that are economically viable and consistent with the principles of family medicine are needed. This article presents several "experiments" to address these challenges. Methods The basis of comparison is a traditional academic family medicine center. Apart of the faculty practice plan, our center consistently operated at a deficit despite high productivity. A number of different practice types and alternative models of service delivery were therefore developed and tested. They ranged from a multi-specialty office arrangement, to a community clinic operated as part of a federally-qualified health center, to a team of providers based in and providing care for residents of an elderly public housing project. Financial comparisons using consistent accounting across models are provided. Results Academic family practices can, at least in some settings, operate without subsidy while providing continuity of care to a broad segment of the community. The prerequisites are that the clinicians must see patients efficiently, and be able to bill appropriately for their payer mix. Conclusion Experimenting within academic practice structure and organization is worthwhile, and can result in economically viable alternatives to traditional models.

  5. Predicting self-reported research misconduct and questionable research practices in university students using an augmented Theory of Planned Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajah-Kanagasabai, Camilla J; Roberts, Lynne D

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the utility of the Theory of Planned Behavior model, augmented by descriptive norms and justifications, for predicting self-reported research misconduct and questionable research practices in university students. A convenience sample of 205 research active Western Australian university students (47 male, 158 female, ages 18-53 years, M = 22, SD = 4.78) completed an online survey. There was a low level of engagement in research misconduct, with approximately one in seven students reporting data fabrication and one in eight data falsification. Path analysis and model testing in LISREL supported a parsimonious two step mediation model, providing good fit to the data. After controlling for social desirability, the effect of attitudes, subjective norms, descriptive norms and perceived behavioral control on student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices was mediated by justifications and then intention. This revised augmented model accounted for a substantial 40.8% of the variance in student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices, demonstrating its predictive utility. The model can be used to target interventions aimed at reducing student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices.

  6. Predicting self-reported research misconduct and questionable research practices in university students using an augmented Theory of Planned Behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla J. Rajah-Kanagasabai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the utility of the Theory of Planned Behavior model, augmented by descriptive norms and justifications, for predicting self-reported research misconduct and questionable research practices in university students. A convenience sample of 205 research active Western Australian university students (47 male, 158 female, ages 18 to 53 years, M=22, SD=4.78 completed an online survey. There was a low level of engagement in research misconduct, with approximately one in seven students reporting data fabrication and one in eight data falsification. Path analysis and model testing in LISREL supported a parsimonious two step mediation model, providing good fit to the data. After controlling for social desirability, the effect of attitudes, subjective norms, descriptive norms and perceived behavioral control on student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices was mediated by justifications and then intention. This revised augmented model accounted for a substantial 40.8% of the variance in student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices, demonstrating its predictive utility. The model can be used to target interventions aimed at reducing student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices.

  7. Predicting self-reported research misconduct and questionable research practices in university students using an augmented Theory of Planned Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajah-Kanagasabai, Camilla J.; Roberts, Lynne D.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the utility of the Theory of Planned Behavior model, augmented by descriptive norms and justifications, for predicting self-reported research misconduct and questionable research practices in university students. A convenience sample of 205 research active Western Australian university students (47 male, 158 female, ages 18–53 years, M = 22, SD = 4.78) completed an online survey. There was a low level of engagement in research misconduct, with approximately one in seven students reporting data fabrication and one in eight data falsification. Path analysis and model testing in LISREL supported a parsimonious two step mediation model, providing good fit to the data. After controlling for social desirability, the effect of attitudes, subjective norms, descriptive norms and perceived behavioral control on student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices was mediated by justifications and then intention. This revised augmented model accounted for a substantial 40.8% of the variance in student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices, demonstrating its predictive utility. The model can be used to target interventions aimed at reducing student engagement in research misconduct and questionable research practices. PMID:25983709

  8. Focus Groups: A Practical and Applied Research Approach for Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kress, Victoria E.; Shoffner, Marie F.

    2007-01-01

    Focus groups are becoming a popular research approach that counselors can use as an efficient, practical, and applied method of gathering information to better serve clients. In this article, the authors describe focus groups and their potential usefulness to professional counselors and researchers. Practical implications related to the use of…

  9. Theoretical Trajectories within Communities of Practice in Higher Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tummons, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the role of theory in higher education research is problematised using a communities of practice framework. Drawing on a case study derived from the author's own published work and doctoral study, the article concludes that the differential uses of theory within communities of research practice can be fruitfully explored, in part,…

  10. Education Research Australia: A Changing Ecology of Knowledge and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seddon, Terri; Bennett, Dawn; Bennett, Sue; Bobis, Janette; Chan, Philip; Harrison, Neil; Shore, Sue

    2013-01-01

    Processes of national research assessment, such as Excellence in Research for Australia (ERA) are a type of audit technology that confronts and steers established institutional identities and traditions. This nexus between policy and practice drives boundary work that diffracts prevailing policy logics, organisational practices, and habits of…

  11. Modeling Techniques: Theory and Practice

    OpenAIRE

    Odd A. Asbjørnsen

    1985-01-01

    A survey is given of some crucial concepts in chemical process modeling. Those are the concepts of physical unit invariance, of reaction invariance and stoichiometry, the chromatographic effect in heterogeneous systems, the conservation and balance principles and the fundamental structures of cause and effect relationships. As an example, it is shown how the concept of reaction invariance may simplify the homogeneous reactor modeling to a large extent by an orthogonal decomposition of the pro...

  12. Collaborative Learning. Research to Practice Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    A Fully Integrated Educational System practices collaborative learning among all peers. The study summarized in this report (Zhang, X., Anderson, R. C., Morris, J., Miller, B., Nguyen-Janiel, K. T., Lin, T., Zhang, J., Jadallah, M., Scott, T., Sun, J., Latawjec, B., Ma, S., Grabow, K., & Hsu, J. Y. (2016). "Improving children's competence…

  13. Research into Practice: Cultural and Intercultural Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Will

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the role of cultural awareness (CA) and intercultural awareness (ICA) in classroom theory and practice. CA and ICA can be roughly characterised as an awareness of the role of culture in communication with CA focused on national cultures and ICA on more dynamic and flexible relationships between languages and cultures. There…

  14. Generalizing and Skepticism: Bringing Research to Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yopp, David A.; Ellsworth, Jacob L.

    2016-01-01

    Empirical arguments rely on examples without necessarily addressing all cases. Students should be skeptical of empirical evidence and should seek more secure arguments for generalizations, such as those that explain why a generalization is true for all cases. Generalizing on the basis of patterns in data is an important mathematical practice;…

  15. Research into Practice: Cultural and Intercultural Awareness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Will

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the role of cultural awareness (CA) and intercultural awareness (ICA) in classroom theory and practice. CA and ICA can be roughly characterised as an awareness of the role of culture in communication with CA focused on national cultures and ICA on more dynamic and flexible relationships between languages and cultures. There…

  16. Sustainable practices in hospitality : A research framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rheede, van A.; Blomme, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    The hospitality industry is starting to take responsibility for environmental sustainability. A strong focus on energy, waste, and water usage is directly linked with financial benefits in the operation of the hoteliers. Practices connected to the social aspect of sustainability are less developed.

  17. Sustainable practices in hospitality : A research framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rheede, van A.; Blomme, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    The hospitality industry is starting to take responsibility for environmental sustainability. A strong focus on energy, waste, and water usage is directly linked with financial benefits in the operation of the hoteliers. Practices connected to the social aspect of sustainability are less developed.

  18. Review of In Vivo Bone Strain Studies and Finite Element Models of the Zygomatic Complex in Humans and Nonhuman Primates: Implications for Clinical Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Felippe Bevilacqua; Freire, Alexandre Rodrigues; Cláudia Rossi, Ana; Ledogar, Justin A; Smith, Amanda L; Dechow, Paul C; Strait, David S; Voigt, Tilman; Ross, Callum F

    2016-12-01

    The craniofacial skeleton is often described in the clinical literature as being comprised of vertical bony pillars, which transmit forces from the toothrow to the neurocranium as axial compressive stresses, reinforced transversely by buttresses. Here, we review the literature on bony microarchitecture, in vivo bone strain, and finite-element modeling of the facial skeleton of humans and nonhuman primates to address questions regarding the structural and functional existence of facial pillars and buttresses. Available bone material properties data do not support the existence of pillars and buttresses in humans or Sapajus apella. Deformation regimes in the zygomatic complex emphasize bending and shear, therefore conceptualizing the zygomatic complex of humans or nonhuman primates as a pillar obscures its patterns of stress, strain, and deformation. Human fossil relatives and chimpanzees exhibit strain regimes corroborating the existence of a canine-frontal pillar, but the notion of a zygomatic pillar has no support. The emerging consensus on patterns of strain and deformation in finite element models (FEMs) of the human facial skeleton corroborates hypotheses in the clinical literature regarding zygomatic complex function, and provide new insights into patterns of failure of titanium and resorbable plates in experimental studies. It is suggested that the "pillar and buttress" model of human craniofacial skeleton function be replaced with FEMs that more accurately and precisely represent in vivo function, and which can serve as the basis for future research into implants used in restoration of occlusal function and fracture repair. Anat Rec, 299:1753-1778, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Survey practices in dental education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creswell, J W; Kuster, C G

    1983-10-01

    Approximately 40 percent of the data-based articles reported in the Journal of Dental Education in the last five years have used survey research procedures. This study examines the use of one type of survey procedure, mailed questionnaires, in research on dental education. Specifically, the discussion identifies several factors that dental education researchers should consider when reporting mailed questionnaire research to journal editors. These factors are discussed using examples of adequate and inadequate procedures reported in the method sections of studies in the Journal of Dental Education in the last five years.

  20. Sustainability in care through an ethical practice model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyholm, Linda; Salmela, Susanne; Nyström, Lisbet; Koskinen, Camilla

    2017-01-01

    While sustainability is a key concept in many different domains today, it has not yet been sufficiently emphasized in the healthcare sector. Earlier research shows that ethical values and evidence-based care models create sustainability in care practice. The aim of this study was to gain further understanding of the ethical values central to the realization of sustainability in care and to create an ethical practice model whereby these basic values can be made perceptible and active in care practice. Part of the ongoing "Ethical Sustainable Caring Cultures" research project, a hermeneutical application research design was employed in this study. Dialogues were used, where scientific researchers and co-researchers were given the opportunity to reflect on ethical values in relation to sustainability in care. An ethical practice model with ethos as its core was created from the results of the dialogues. In the model, ethos is encircled by the ethical values central to sustainability: dignity, responsibility, respect, invitation, and vows. The model can be used as a starting point for ethical conversations that support carers' reflections on the ethical issues seen in day-to-day care work and the work community, allowing ethical values to become visible throughout the entire care culture. It is intended as a tool whereby carers can more deeply understand an organization's common basic values and what they entail in regard to sustainability in care.

  1. Concept Modeling vs. Data modeling in Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Bodil Nistrup; Erdman Thomsen, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    account of the inheritance of characteristics and allows us to introduce a number of principles and constraints which render concept modeling more coherent than earlier approaches. Second, we explain how terminological ontologies can be used as the basis for developing conceptual and logical data models......This chapter shows the usefulness of terminological concept modeling as a first step in data modeling. First, we introduce terminological concept modeling with terminological ontologies, i.e. concept systems enriched with characteristics modeled as feature specifications. This enables a formal...

  2. Research on Improving Manufacturing Practice Quality in Mechanical Industrial Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaowei Jiang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available In order to solve the problems existing in the manufacturing practice of mechanical industrial design, a series of methods and concrete measures are proposed, so as to improve the quality of manufacturing practice of mechanical industrial design. In this study, the problems existing in the manufacturing practice of mechanical industrial design are analyzed detailedly. And the methods and concrete measures including establishing the new mode of manufacturing practice of mechanical industrial design, improving the understanding to manufacturing practice and knowing the major role, establishing a professional characteristic base of manufacturing practice and strengthening the construction of instructor troops of manufacturing practice are proposed, which will certainly have a profound theoretical and practical guiding significance. On this foundation, the research conclusion on improving manufacturing practice quality in mechanical industrial design is done.

  3. Modeling Techniques: Theory and Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Odd A. Asbjørnsen

    1985-07-01

    Full Text Available A survey is given of some crucial concepts in chemical process modeling. Those are the concepts of physical unit invariance, of reaction invariance and stoichiometry, the chromatographic effect in heterogeneous systems, the conservation and balance principles and the fundamental structures of cause and effect relationships. As an example, it is shown how the concept of reaction invariance may simplify the homogeneous reactor modeling to a large extent by an orthogonal decomposition of the process variables. This allows residence time distribution function parameters to be estimated with the reaction in situ, but without any correlation between the estimated residence time distribution parameters and the estimated reaction kinetic parameters. A general word of warning is given to the choice of wrong mathematical structure of models.

  4. Pharmacy Administration and Clinical Practice Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, Charles D.

    1987-01-01

    Research needs for pharmacy administration and clinical pharmacy include study of the relationship of pharmacists and society, management methods for providing health care services, pharmacist training and socialization, competence evaluation, formative and summative research on drug use control, and organizational decision making. (MSE)

  5. Pharmacy Administration and Clinical Practice Research Agenda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepler, Charles D.

    1987-01-01

    Research needs for pharmacy administration and clinical pharmacy include study of the relationship of pharmacists and society, management methods for providing health care services, pharmacist training and socialization, competence evaluation, formative and summative research on drug use control, and organizational decision making. (MSE)

  6. Research into Practice: Grammar Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This selective review of the second language acquisition and applied linguistics research literature on grammar learning and teaching falls into three categories: where research has had little impact (the non-interface position), modest impact (form-focused instruction), and where it potentially can have a large impact (reconceiving grammar).…

  7. Research into Practice: Grammar Learning and Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen-Freeman, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This selective review of the second language acquisition and applied linguistics research literature on grammar learning and teaching falls into three categories: where research has had little impact (the non-interface position), modest impact (form-focused instruction), and where it potentially can have a large impact (reconceiving grammar).…

  8. Network Modeling and Simulation A Practical Perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Guizani, Mohsen; Khan, Bilal

    2010-01-01

    Network Modeling and Simulation is a practical guide to using modeling and simulation to solve real-life problems. The authors give a comprehensive exposition of the core concepts in modeling and simulation, and then systematically address the many practical considerations faced by developers in modeling complex large-scale systems. The authors provide examples from computer and telecommunication networks and use these to illustrate the process of mapping generic simulation concepts to domain-specific problems in different industries and disciplines. Key features: Provides the tools and strate

  9. Exploring a Community of Practice Model for Professional Development to Address Challenges to Classroom Practices in Early Childhood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, Tanya; Wang, X. Christine

    2013-01-01

    This study explored whether or not, and how, an on-site and research-teacher community of practice model for professional development addressed the challenges to classroom practices in a Head Start program. Data sources included interviews with teachers, videos of planning and teaching sessions, and the researchers' fieldwork log and…

  10. [The practice of research in history].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Michel

    2013-11-01

    History is a discipline whose research methods present similarities with those of other human and social sciences, with certain specificities. The nursing profession can use these methods to showcase its history and the history of nursing care.

  11. Four simple recommendations to encourage best practices in research software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Rafael C.; Kuzak, Mateusz; Alhamdoosh, Monther; Barker, Michelle; Batut, Bérénice; Borg, Mikael; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador; Chue Hong, Neil; Cook, Martin; Corpas, Manuel; Flannery, Madison; Garcia, Leyla; Gelpí, Josep Ll.; Gladman, Simon; Goble, Carole; González Ferreiro, Montserrat; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Griffin, Philippa C.; Grüning, Björn; Hagberg, Jonas; Holub, Petr; Hooft, Rob; Ison, Jon; Katz, Daniel S.; Leskošek, Brane; López Gómez, Federico; Oliveira, Luis J.; Mellor, David; Mosbergen, Rowland; Mulder, Nicola; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Pergl, Robert; Pichler, Horst; Pope, Bernard; Sanz, Ferran; Schneider, Maria V.; Stodden, Victoria; Suchecki, Radosław; Svobodová Vařeková, Radka; Talvik, Harry-Anton; Todorov, Ilian; Treloar, Andrew; Tyagi, Sonika; van Gompel, Maarten; Vaughan, Daniel; Via, Allegra; Wang, Xiaochuan; Watson-Haigh, Nathan S.; Crouch, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Scientific research relies on computer software, yet software is not always developed following practices that ensure its quality and sustainability. This manuscript does not aim to propose new software development best practices, but rather to provide simple recommendations that encourage the adoption of existing best practices. Software development best practices promote better quality software, and better quality software improves the reproducibility and reusability of research. These recommendations are designed around Open Source values, and provide practical suggestions that contribute to making research software and its source code more discoverable, reusable and transparent. This manuscript is aimed at developers, but also at organisations, projects, journals and funders that can increase the quality and sustainability of research software by encouraging the adoption of these recommendations. PMID:28751965

  12. Four simple recommendations to encourage best practices in research software.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez, Rafael C; Kuzak, Mateusz; Alhamdoosh, Monther; Barker, Michelle; Batut, Bérénice; Borg, Mikael; Capella-Gutierrez, Salvador; Chue Hong, Neil; Cook, Martin; Corpas, Manuel; Flannery, Madison; Garcia, Leyla; Gelpí, Josep Ll; Gladman, Simon; Goble, Carole; González Ferreiro, Montserrat; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Griffin, Philippa C; Grüning, Björn; Hagberg, Jonas; Holub, Petr; Hooft, Rob; Ison, Jon; Katz, Daniel S; Leskošek, Brane; López Gómez, Federico; Oliveira, Luis J; Mellor, David; Mosbergen, Rowland; Mulder, Nicola; Perez-Riverol, Yasset; Pergl, Robert; Pichler, Horst; Pope, Bernard; Sanz, Ferran; Schneider, Maria V; Stodden, Victoria; Suchecki, Radosław; Svobodová Vařeková, Radka; Talvik, Harry-Anton; Todorov, Ilian; Treloar, Andrew; Tyagi, Sonika; van Gompel, Maarten; Vaughan, Daniel; Via, Allegra; Wang, Xiaochuan; Watson-Haigh, Nathan S; Crouch, Steve

    2017-01-01

    Scientific research relies on computer software, yet software is not always developed following practices that ensure its quality and sustainability. This manuscript does not aim to propose new software development best practices, but rather to provide simple recommendations that encourage the adoption of existing best practices. Software development best practices promote better quality software, and better quality software improves the reproducibility and reusability of research. These recommendations are designed around Open Source values, and provide practical suggestions that contribute to making research software and its source code more discoverable, reusable and transparent. This manuscript is aimed at developers, but also at organisations, projects, journals and funders that can increase the quality and sustainability of research software by encouraging the adoption of these recommendations.

  13. Change in stated clinical practice associated with participation in the Dental Practice-Based Research Network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Richman, Joshua S; Qvist, Vibeke

    2010-01-01

    Clinical researchers have attempted many methods to translate scientific evidence into routine clinical practice, with varying success. Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide an important, practitioner-friendly venue to test these methods. Dentist practitioner-investigators from the Den...

  14. Research into Practice: How Research Appears in Pronunciation Teaching Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Research into pronunciation has often disregarded its potential to inform pedagogy. This is due partly to the historical development of pronunciation teaching and research, but its effect is that there is often a mismatch between research and teaching. This paper looks at four areas in which the (mis)match is imperfect but in which a greater…

  15. Research into Practice: How Research Appears in Pronunciation Teaching Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levis, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Research into pronunciation has often disregarded its potential to inform pedagogy. This is due partly to the historical development of pronunciation teaching and research, but its effect is that there is often a mismatch between research and teaching. This paper looks at four areas in which the (mis)match is imperfect but in which a greater…

  16. Student Scientific Research within Communities-of-Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Russell; Armstrong, James; Blanko, Philip; Boyce, Grady Boyce, Pat; Brewer, Mark; Buchheim, Robert; Calanog, Jae; Castaneda, Diana Chamberlin, Rebecca; Clark, R. Kent; Collins, Dwight; Conti, Dennis Cormier, Sebastien; Fitzgerald, Michael; Estrada, Chris; Estrada, Reed; Freed, Rachel Gomez, Edward; Hardersen, Paul; Harshaw, Richard; Johnson, Jolyon Kafka, Stella; Kenney, John; Mohanan, Kakkala; Ridgely, John; Rowe, David Silliman, Mark; Stojimirovic, Irena; Tock, Kalee; Walker, Douglas; Wallen, Vera

    2017-06-01

    Social learning theory suggests that students who wish to become scientists will benefit by being active researchers early in their educational careers. As coauthors of published research, they identify themselves as scientists. This provides them with the inspiration, motivation, and staying power that many will need to complete the long educational process. This hypothesis was put to the test over the past decade by a one-semester astronomy research seminar where teams of students managed their own research. Well over a hundred published papers coauthored by high school and undergraduate students at a handful of schools substantiated this hypothesis. However, one could argue that this was a special case. Astronomy, after all, is supported by a large professional-amateur community-of-practice. Furthermore, the specific area of research-double star astrometry-was chosen because the observations could be quickly made, the data reduction and analysis was straight forward, and publication of the research was welcomed by the Journal of Double Star Observations. A recently initiated seminar development and expansion program-supported in part by the National Science Foundation-is testing a more general hypothesis that: (1) the seminar can be successfully adopted by many other schools; (2) research within astronomy can be extended from double star astrometry to time series photometry of variable stars, exoplanet transits, and asteroids; and (3) the seminar model can be extended to a science beyond astronomy: environmental science-specifically atmospheric science. If the more general hypothesis is also supported, seminars that similarly feature published high school and undergraduate student team research could have the potential to significantly improve science education by increasing the percentage of students who complete the education required to become professional scientists.

  17. Takaful Models and Global Practices

    OpenAIRE

    2010-01-01

    There is a global interest in Islamic finance in general and Takāful in particular. The main feature that differentiates Takāful services from conventional ones is Sharī‟ah compliance nature of these services. Investors are taking keen interest in this potential market as Muslims constitute about one fourth of the world population (Muslim population, 2006). To streamline operations of a Takāful company, management and Sharī‟ah experts have developed different operational models for Takāful bu...

  18. New Model of Energy and Environment Category Undergraduate Scientific Research Practical Training Courses%能源环境类专业本科生科研实践训练课程新模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    恽超

    2015-01-01

    Based on the existing energy and environmental systems engineering, energy and power engineering, building environ-ment and equipment engineering, energy and environment 3 Undergraduate research on practical training courses, schools cooper-ate actively with domestic enterprises and international cooperation, the establishment of new Model energy Environment class undergraduate research training, building innovative ability to practice new teaching system main line, so that the energy of Envi-ronmental undergraduate research practical training institutionalization, standardization and internationalization to meet the domes-tic job market innovative personnel requirements, the implementation of energy and environmental effects and professional training courses research for undergraduate students reached the international advanced level.%现有的能源与环境系统工程、热能与动力工程、建筑环境与设备工程等3个能源与环境类本科生科研实践训练课程的基础上,积极开展国际化合作和学校与国内企业的合作,建立能源环境类专业本科生科研训练的新模式,构建以创新能力培养为主线的实践教学新体系,使能源环境类专业本科生的科研实践训练制度化、规范化和国际化,以满足国内外人才市场对创新人才的要求,并使能源环境类专业本科生科研实践训练课程的实施效果达到国际先进水平.

  19. Physiotherapy practice in the private sector: organizational characteristics and models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perreault, Kadija; Dionne, Clermont E; Rossignol, Michel; Poitras, Stéphane; Morin, Diane

    2014-08-29

    Even if a large proportion of physiotherapists work in the private sector worldwide, very little is known of the organizations within which they practice. Such knowledge is important to help understand contexts of practice and how they influence the quality of services and patient outcomes. The purpose of this study was to: 1) describe characteristics of organizations where physiotherapists practice in the private sector, and 2) explore the existence of a taxonomy of organizational models. This was a cross-sectional quantitative survey of 236 randomly-selected physiotherapists. Participants completed a purpose-designed questionnaire online or by telephone, covering organizational vision, resources, structures and practices. Organizational characteristics were analyzed descriptively, while organizational models were identified by multiple correspondence analyses. Most organizations were for-profit (93.2%), located in urban areas (91.5%), and within buildings containing multiple businesses/organizations (76.7%). The majority included multiple providers (89.8%) from diverse professions, mainly physiotherapy assistants (68.7%), massage therapists (67.3%) and osteopaths (50.2%). Four organizational models were identified: 1) solo practice, 2) middle-scale multiprovider, 3) large-scale multiprovider and 4) mixed. The results of this study provide a detailed description of the organizations where physiotherapists practice, and highlight the importance of human resources in differentiating organizational models. Further research examining the influences of these organizational characteristics and models on outcomes such as physiotherapists' professional practices and patient outcomes are needed.

  20. Payment of research participants: current practice and policies of Irish research ethics committees.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Roche, Eric

    2013-09-01

    Payment of research participants helps to increase recruitment for research studies, but can pose ethical dilemmas. Research ethics committees (RECs) have a centrally important role in guiding this practice, but standardisation of the ethical approval process in Ireland is lacking.

  1. Invisible nursing research: thoughts about mixed methods research and nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fawcett, Jacqueline

    2015-04-01

    In this this essay, the author addresses the close connection between mixed methods research and nursing practice. If the assertion that research and practice are parallel processes is accepted, then nursing practice may be considered "invisible mixed methods research," in that almost every encounter between a nurse and a patient involves collection and integration of qualitative (word) and quantitative (number) information that actually is single-case mixed methods research. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. From Academic-Practice Partnership to Professional Nursing Practice Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudacek, Sharon Smith; DiMattio, Mary Jane K; Turkel, Marian C

    2017-03-01

    HOW TO OBTAIN CONTACT HOURS BY READING THIS ISSUE Instructions: 1.2 contact hours will be awarded by Villanova University College of Nursing upon successful completion of this activity. A contact hour is a unit of measurement that denotes 60 minutes of an organized learning activity. This is a learner-based activity. Villanova University College of Nursing does not require submission of your answers to the quiz. A contact hour certificate will be awarded after you register, pay the registration fee, and complete the evaluation form online at http://goo.gl/gMfXaf. In order to obtain contact hours you must: 1. Read the article, "From Academic-Practice Partnership to Professional Nursing Practice Model," found on pages 104-112, carefully noting any tables and other illustrative materials that are included to enhance your knowledge and understanding of the content. Be sure to keep track of the amount of time (number of minutes) you spend reading the article and completing the quiz. 2. Read and answer each question on the quiz. After completing all of the questions, compare your answers to those provided within this issue. If you have incorrect answers, return to the article for further study. 3. Go to the Villanova website to register for contact hour credit. You will be asked to provide your name, contact information, and a VISA, MasterCard, or Discover card number for payment of the $20.00 fee. Once you complete the online evaluation, a certificate will be automatically generated. This activity is valid for continuing education credit until February 28, 2020. CONTACT HOURS This activity is co-provided by Villanova University College of Nursing and SLACK Incorporated. Villanova University College of Nursing is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center's Commission on Accreditation. OBJECTIVES Describe the benefits and barriers to participation in a community-based academic-practice partnership. Identify three

  3. New Zealand needs a Practice Based Research Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitch, Sharon

    2016-03-01

    Practice Based Research Networks (PBRNs) are groups of general practices collaborating to produce research. Contemporary New Zealand health information technology systems are ideal for electronic data extraction for PBRN research. Stakeholders have a valuable, but typically underutilised, part to play in research. Development of an e-participation platform will facilitate stakeholder engagement. New Zealand is in a unique position to create an innovative, low cost, stakeholder-engaged PBRN. This type of PBRN would offer unparalleled research opportunities, and would strengthen New Zealand's general practice research capacity. The more research information we have based on our New Zealand population, the more appropriate care we can provide. Establishing a stakeholder-engaged PBRN in New Zealand will promote and support transformational change within our health system.

  4. Knowledge translation: translating research into policy and practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelly Donszelmann Oelke

    Full Text Available Objective: This paper provides a theoretical-reflective study of knowledge translation concepts and their implementation processes for using research evidence in policy and practice.Results: The process of translating research into practice is iterative and dynamic, with fluid boundaries between knowledge creation and action development. Knowledge translation focuses on co-creating knowledge with stakeholders and sharing that knowledge to ensure uptake of relevant research to facilitate informed decisions and changes in policy, practice, and health services delivery. In Brazil, many challenges exist in implementing knowledge translation: lack of awareness, lack of partnerships between researchers and knowledge-users, and low research budgets.Conclusions: An emphasis on knowledge translation has the potential to positively impact health outcomes. Future research in Brazil is needed to study approaches to improve the uptake of research results in the Brazilian context.

  5. Marital rape: history, research, and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennice, Jennifer A; Resick, Patricia A

    2003-07-01

    Despite the increased recognition that the topic of marital rape has generated in the past 2 decades, the literature in this area remains sparse. This article provides a comprehensive review of the current state of the marital rape literature. First, the lengthy history of legal, cultural, and professional invalidation of marital rape victims, and the resulting negative treatment implications, is discussed. Second, marital rape research is reviewed, including prevalence, descriptive, and comparison studies. This review highlights the seriousness of marital rape, in terms of prevalence and posttrauma distress, as well as the limitations of extant research. Finally, barriers to treatment and recommendations for professionals are discussed.

  6. Photonic Crystals Physics and Practical Modeling

    CERN Document Server

    Sukhoivanov, Igor A

    2009-01-01

    The great interest in photonic crystals and their applications in the past decade requires a thorough training of students and professionals who can practically apply the knowledge of physics of photonic crystals together with skills of independent calculation of basic characteristics of photonic crystals and modelling of various photonic crystal elements for application in all-optical communication systems. This book combines basic backgrounds in fiber and integrated optics with detailed analysis of mathematical models for 1D, 2D and 3D photonic crystals and microstructured fibers, as well as with descriptions of real algorithms and codes for practical realization of the models.

  7. Psychology and Health: Research, Practice, and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Norine G.

    2003-01-01

    Since World War II, American psychology's role in health care has significantly expanded. This was formally recognized in 2001 when the membership of the American Psychological Association (APA) approved a bylaw change in its mission statement to include the word health. An accumulating body of research demonstrates and recent reviews conclude…

  8. Contextualizing Theories and Practices of Bricolage Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Matt

    2012-01-01

    Within the last decade, bricolage, as an approach to qualitative inquiry, has gained popularity in academic circles. However, while conceptual and concrete precedents exist, the approach has remained relatively misunderstood, and unpopular, in broader research communities. This may be because the complexity of the approach has stymied widespread…

  9. Creativity and Innovation: Theory, Research, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plucker, Jonathan A., Ed.

    2016-01-01

    Creativity and innovation are frequently mentioned as key 21st-century skills for career and life success. Indeed, recent research provides evidence that the jobs of the future will increasingly require the ability to bring creative solutions to complex problems. And creativity is often the spice of life, that little extra something that makes the…

  10. Converging Paths: Creativity Research and Educational Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Michael Hanchett

    2014-01-01

    Education has long been a central issue for creativity research, and the integration of creativity and education has remained a goal and controversy. In spite of over sixty years of trying to bring creativity into education, education is often criticized for not teaching creative thinking, while also criticized from other quarters for not meeting…

  11. Borderline Clients: Practice Implications of Recent Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Harriette C.

    1991-01-01

    Reviews current research on treatment of borderline clients with medication, individual counseling, and family interventions. Notes that recent studies indicate that borderline personality is heterogeneous condition in which different underlying disorders (affective, schizotypal, and neurological) may be present. Reviews effectiveness of various…

  12. Developing research competence to support evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Lora E; Schlenk, Elizabeth A; Sereika, Susan M; Cohen, Susan M; Happ, Mary Beth; Dorman, Janice S

    2005-01-01

    This article describes one step in the process that was undertaken to prepare for the introduction of evidence-based practice (EBP) into the curriculum across the Bachelor of Science in Nursing, Master of Science in Nursing, and Doctor of Philosophy programs, as well as the programs that were under development, Clinical Nurse Leader and Doctor of Nursing Practice, at the University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing. Expected research competencies were identified for each level or academic year within each program. Based on these competencies, recommendations on how to modify the curriculum into one that would support students' acquisition and development of the skills necessary to be successful in matriculating through an EBP curriculum were developed. Evaluation mechanisms for the achievement of these competencies vary across the academic programs and will include performance on capstone projects, comprehensive examinations, and program milestones for doctoral students. The establishment of evidence-based competencies provided a foundation for the development of new teaching approaches and the curricular revisions across the three academic programs. Thus, the University of Pittsburgh model of educating for EBP is based on a sequential layering of research competencies throughout the curriculum.

  13. Impact of the Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative on Clinical Pharmacy Specialist Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobi, Judith; Ray, Shaunta'; Danelich, Ilya; Dodds Ashley, Elizabeth; Eckel, Stephen; Guharoy, Roy; Militello, Michael; O'Donnell, Paul; Sam, Teena; Crist, Stephanie M; Smidt, Danielle

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes the goals of the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists' Pharmacy Practice Model Initiative (PPMI) and its recommendations for health-system pharmacy practice transformation to meet future patient care needs and elevate the role of pharmacists as patient care providers. PPMI envisions a future in which pharmacists have greater responsibility for medication-related outcomes and technicians assume greater responsibility for product-related activities. Although the PPMI recommendations have elevated the level of practice in many settings, they also potentially affect existing clinical pharmacists, in general, and clinical pharmacy specialists, in particular. Moreover, although more consistent patient care can be achieved with an expanded team of pharmacist providers, the role of clinical pharmacy specialists must not be diminished, especially in the care of complex patients and populations. Specialist practitioners with advanced training and credentials must be available to model and train pharmacists in generalist positions, residents, and students. Indeed, specialist practitioners are often the innovators and practice leaders. Negotiation between hospitals and pharmacy schools is needed to ensure a continuing role for academic clinical pharmacists and their contributions as educators and researchers. Lessons can be applied from disciplines such as nursing and medicine, which have developed new models of care involving effective collaboration between generalists and specialists. Several different pharmacy practice models have been described to meet the PPMI goals, based on available personnel and local goals. Studies measuring the impact of these new practice models are needed.

  14. Extending Engineering Practice Research with Shared Qualitative Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevelyan, James

    2016-01-01

    Research on engineering practice is scarce and sharing of qualitative research data can reduce the effort required for an aspiring researcher to obtain enough data from engineering workplaces to draw generalizable conclusions, both qualitative and quantitative. This paper describes how a large shareable qualitative data set on engineering…

  15. Conducting research in clinical psychology practice: Barriers, facilitators, and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Kirsten V; Thew, Graham R

    2017-09-01

    The combination of clinical psychologists' therapeutic expertise and research training means that they are in an ideal position to be conducting high-quality research projects. However, despite these skills and the documented benefits of research to services and service users, research activity in practice remains low. This article aims to give an overview of the advantages of, and difficulties in conducting research in clinical practice. We reviewed the relevant literature on barriers to research and reflected on our clinical and research experiences in a range of contexts to offer practical recommendations. We considered factors involved in the planning, sourcing support, implementation, and dissemination phases of research, and outline suggestions to improve the feasibility of research projects in post-qualification roles. We suggest that research leadership is particularly important within clinical psychology to ensure the profession's continued visibility and influence within health settings. Clinical implications Emerging evidence suggests that clinical settings that foster research are associated with better patient outcomes. Suggestions to increase the feasibility of research projects in clinical settings are detailed. Limitations The present recommendations are drawn from the authors' practical experience and may need adaptation to individual practitioners' settings. This study does not attempt to assess the efficacy of the strategies suggested. © 2017 The Authors. British Journal of Clinical Psychology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of British Psychological Society.

  16. Adopting the Integrative Model of Behaviour Prediction to Explain Teachers' Willingness to Use ICT: A Perspective for Research on Teachers' ICT Usage in Pedagogical Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreijns, Karel; Vermeulen, Marjan; Kirschner, Paul A.; van Buuren, Hans; Van Acker, Frederik

    2013-01-01

    Information and communication technology (ICT) can enable, support, and reinforce the introduction of new pedagogical practices that comply with the educational demands of the twenty-first-century knowledge society. However, despite this potential and despite the delivering of skills-based professional development and the increase in the level of…

  17. Systems and practices in sustainable consumption research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røpke, Inge

    The financial crisis in 2007-2008 and the subsequent economic crisis served as a wake-up call for sustainable consumption studies. The literature on consumption and environment had little focus on finance, but the crisis made it clear that financial issues are important also from an environmental...... perspective. Credit plays an important role as a driver of unsustainable consumption, and financial mechanisms contribute to the widening inequalities as well as the build-up of macroeconomic instability. Looking ahead, transformation of finance is just as important for sustainability as transformation....... The intention with this paper is to highlight the importance of these other systems for sustainability transitions and to discuss various aspects of finance as an example. Simultaneously, the intention is to illustrate how a system perspective and a practice theory perspective can be combined when exploring...

  18. Revisiting practice-based research networks as a platform for mental health services research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis McMillen, J; Lenze, Shannon L; Hawley, Kristin M; Osborne, Victoria A

    2009-09-01

    Practice-based research networks (PBRNs)-collaborations of practice settings that work together to generate research knowledge-are underused in mental health services research. This article proposes an agenda for mental health services research that uses a variety of PBRN structures and that focuses on what really happens in practice, the effectiveness of practice innovations in real world care, the challenges of implementing evidence supported interventions, modification of clinician behavior, and assessment of the effect of mental health policy changes on practice. The challenges of conducting research within PBRNs are substantial, including difficulties in maintaining positive member relations, securing ongoing funding, sustaining productivity, overcoming IRB entanglements and achieving both scientific excellence in recruitment and measurement validity and utility for practitioner members. However, the awareness of these challenges allows researchers and practitioners to build networks that creatively overcome them and that infuse mental health services research with heavy doses of the realities of everyday clinical practice.

  19. The application of qualitative research findings to oncology nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuthbert, Colleen Ann; Moules, Nancy

    2014-11-01

    The Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) has established an ambitious research agenda and professional priorities based on a survey by LoBiondo-Wood et al. (2014). With the overall goal to "improve cancer care and the lives of individuals with cancer" (Moore & Badger, 2014, p. 93) through research activities, translating those research findings to direct clinical practice can be overwhelming. As clinicians, understanding how to critique research for quality prior to incorporating research findings into practice is important. The ultimate goal in this critique is to ensure that decisions made about patient care are based on strong evidence. However, the process for appraisal of qualitative research can be ambiguous and often contradictory as a result of the elusive aspect of quality in qualitative research methods (Seale, 1999). In addition, with more than 100 tools available to evaluate qualitative research studies (Higgins & Green, 2011), a lack of consensus exists on how to critically appraise research findings.

  20. Using Qualitative Research to Bridge Research, Policy, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret W.; Flood, Julee T.

    2012-01-01

    Too often, researchers get a bad name for engaging in inquiry that is inaccessible to the practitioner and policy communities who could most benefit from it. Although speaking to others in the scholarly community is important, researchers must also be able to translate their results into more accessible language for multiple audiences. This…

  1. Using Qualitative Research to Bridge Research, Policy, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallee, Margaret W.; Flood, Julee T.

    2012-01-01

    Too often, researchers get a bad name for engaging in inquiry that is inaccessible to the practitioner and policy communities who could most benefit from it. Although speaking to others in the scholarly community is important, researchers must also be able to translate their results into more accessible language for multiple audiences. This…

  2. A mixed-methods study of research dissemination across practice-based research networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipman, Paula Darby; Lange, Carol J; Cohen, Rachel A; Peterson, Kevin A

    2014-01-01

    Practice-based research networks may be expanding beyond research into rapid learning systems. This mixed-methods study uses Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality registry data to identify networks currently engaged in dissemination of research findings and to select a sample to participate in qualitative semistructured interviews. An adapted Diffusion of Innovations framework was used to organize concepts by characteristics of networks, dissemination activities, and mechanisms for rapid learning. Six regional networks provided detailed information about dissemination strategies, organizational context, role of practice-based research network, member involvement, and practice incentives. Strategies compatible with current practices and learning innovations that generate observable improvements may increase effectiveness of rapid learning approaches.

  3. Animal models in motion sickness research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daunton, Nancy G.

    1990-01-01

    Practical information on candidate animal models for motion sickness research and on methods used to elicit and detect motion sickness in these models is provided. Four good potential models for use in motion sickness experiments include the dog, cat, squirrel monkey, and rat. It is concluded that the appropriate use of the animal models, combined with exploitation of state-of-the-art biomedical techniques, should generate a great step forward in the understanding of motion sickness mechanisms and in the development of efficient and effective approaches to its prevention and treatment in humans.

  4. Automatic lexical classification: bridging research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Anna

    2010-08-13

    Natural language processing (NLP)--the automatic analysis, understanding and generation of human language by computers--is vitally dependent on accurate knowledge about words. Because words change their behaviour between text types, domains and sub-languages, a fully accurate static lexical resource (e.g. a dictionary, word classification) is unattainable. Researchers are now developing techniques that could be used to automatically acquire or update lexical resources from textual data. If successful, the automatic approach could considerably enhance the accuracy and portability of language technologies, such as machine translation, text mining and summarization. This paper reviews the recent and on-going research in automatic lexical acquisition. Focusing on lexical classification, it discusses the many challenges that still need to be met before the approach can benefit NLP on a large scale.

  5. Modeling business processes: theoretical and practical aspects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.V. Dubininа

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The essence of process-oriented enterprise management has been examined in the article. The content and types of information technology have been analyzed in the article, due to the complexity and differentiation of existing methods, as well as the specificity of language, terminology of the enterprise business processes modeling. The theoretical aspects of business processes modeling have been reviewed and the modern traditional modeling techniques received practical application in the visualization model of retailers activity have been studied in the article. In the process of theoretical analysis of the modeling methods found that UFO-toolkit method that has been developed by Ukrainian scientists due to it systemology integrated opportunities, is the most suitable for structural and object analysis of retailers business processes. It was designed visualized simulation model of the business process "sales" as is" of retailers using a combination UFO-elements with the aim of the further practical formalization and optimization of a given business process.

  6. Diversity and equity in science education research, policy, and practice

    CERN Document Server

    Lee, Okhee

    2010-01-01

    Provides a comprehensive, state-of-the-field analysis of current trends in the research, policy, and practice of science education. It offers valuable insights into why gaps in science achievement among racial, ethnic, cultural, linguistic, and socioeconomic groups persist, and points toward practical means of narrowing or eliminating these gaps. Lee and Buxton examine instructional practices, science-curriculum materials, assessment, teacher education, school organization, and home-school connections.

  7. Social research design: framework for integrating philosophical and practical elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Kathryn Burns

    2014-09-01

    To provide and elucidate a comprehensible framework for the design of social research. An abundance of information exists concerning the process of designing social research. The overall message that can be gleaned is that numerable elements - both philosophical (ontological and epistemological assumptions and theoretical perspective) and practical (issue to be addressed, purpose, aims and research questions) - are influential in the process of selecting a research methodology and methods, and that these elements and their inter-relationships must be considered and explicated to ensure a coherent research design that enables well-founded and meaningful conclusions. There is a lack of guidance concerning the integration of practical and philosophical elements, hindering their consideration and explication. The author's PhD research into loneliness and cancer. This is a methodology paper. A guiding framework that incorporates all of the philosophical and practical elements influential in social research design is presented. The chronological and informative relationships between the elements are discussed. The framework presented can be used by social researchers to consider and explicate the practical and philosophical elements influential in the selection of a methodology and methods. It is hoped that the framework presented will aid social researchers with the design and the explication of the design of their research, thereby enhancing the credibility of their projects and enabling their research to establish well-founded and meaningful conclusions.

  8. Caries treatment in a dental practice-based research network

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gilbert, Gregg H; Gordan, Valeria V; Funkhouser, Ellen M

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Practice-based research networks (PBRNs) provide a venue to foster evidence-based care. We tested the hypothesis that a higher level of participation in a dental PBRN is associated with greater stated change toward evidence-based practice. METHODS: A total of 565 dental PBRN...

  9. Double Blind: Supervising Women as Creative Practice-Led Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Courtney; Haynes, Rachael

    2015-01-01

    Many women creative practice-led researchers appear inhibited by a number of factors directly connected to their gender. This article discusses these factors, including the culture of visual arts professional practice, the circumstances surrounding women postgraduate students and unproductive self-theories about intelligence and creativity. A…

  10. Considering dance practices as unique cases in interdisciplinary research studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, Susanne

    The aim of this paper is to present interdisciplinary considerations of relevance to strengthen dance research in relation to – and in cooperation with - other academic disciplines. I firstly describe how dance practices can be handled as “extreme cases” and cases with “maximal variations...... combination of observations of dance practices and phenomenology....

  11. Need for Practice-Based Research in School Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Theodore J.; Place, A. Will; Edmister, Julie; Zigler, Ted

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: This article's first objective is to establish the need for elevating the quantity and quality of practice-based research in school administration. The requirement is addressed in relation to (a) persisting social demands for school reform, (b) heightened demands for evidence-based practice in all professions, and (c) persistent…

  12. Research and practice: The European High Speed Station

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Triggianese, M.

    2014-01-01

    The practices of planning and architecture are undergoing considerable transformation especially for urban developments asso-ciated to infrastructural changes. This paper considers the proliferation of high-speed railways in Europe as a research opportunity to better understand the practice of compl

  13. From Research to Practice: Tying It All Together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boehnert, Joanna B.; Moore, G. A. B.

    1985-01-01

    The University of Guelph's Office for Educational Practice, an administrative unit for instructional development that relies on faculty volunteer leadership and participation, is described and discussed in the context of research on improvement of instructional effectiveness. (MSE)

  14. Modelling in Accounting. Theoretical and Practical Dimensions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Szot-Gabryś

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Accounting in the theoretical approach is a scientific discipline based on specific paradigms. In the practical aspect, accounting manifests itself through the introduction of a system for measurement of economic quantities which operates in a particular business entity. A characteristic of accounting is its flexibility and ability of adaptation to information needs of information recipients. One of the main currents in the development of accounting theory and practice is to cover by economic measurements areas which have not been hitherto covered by any accounting system (it applies, for example, to small businesses, agricultural farms, human capital, which requires the development of an appropriate theoretical and practical model. The article illustrates the issue of modelling in accounting based on the example of an accounting model developed for small businesses, i.e. economic entities which are not obliged by law to keep accounting records.

  15. Research on Social Work Practice in Egypt and the Arab World

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megahead, Hamido A.

    2017-01-01

    This article aims at introducing the research on social work practice in Egypt and the Arab World as a thematic topic. It has started with the essence of the current Arab World and its definition. Social work practice and models of social work intervention in this specific region have been described in terms of its specific and topographic nature.…

  16. From Information-Seeking Behavior to Meaning Engagement Practice: Implications for Communication Theory and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokros, Hartmut B.; Aakhus, Mark

    2002-01-01

    Proposes an alternative formulation--meaning engagement practice--to question assumptions underpinning investigation of information-seeking behavior. Grounds the case for meaning engagement practice in four research contexts: modeling the user in information mediation; information access and browsing as relevant for understanding…

  17. An Investigation of Research-Based Teaching Practices through the Teacher Evaluations in Indiana Public Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Michael Steven

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify if a relationship existed between the implementation of professional evaluation processes and the use of research-based teaching practices, factoring in both perceptions of principals and practicing teachers. The variables of professional development on the evaluation model and the principal's years of…

  18. Relationships between the Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SORC) and self-reported research practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, A Lauren; Martinson, Brian C; Thrush, Carol R

    2013-09-01

    The Survey of Organizational Research Climate (SORC) is a validated tool to facilitate promotion of research integrity and research best practices. This work uses the SORC to assess shared and individual perceptions of the research climate in universities and academic departments and relate these perceptions to desirable and undesirable research practices. An anonymous web- and mail-based survey was administered to randomly selected biomedical and social science faculty and postdoctoral fellows in the United States. Respondents reported their perceptions of the research climates at their universities and primary departments, and the frequency with which they engaged in desirable and undesirable research practices. More positive individual perceptions of the research climate in one's university or department were associated with higher likelihoods of desirable, and lower likelihoods of undesirable, research practices. Shared perceptions of the research climate tended to be similarly predictive of both desirable and undesirable research practices as individuals' deviations from these shared perceptions. Study results supported the central prediction that more positive SORC-measured perceptions of the research climate were associated with more positive reports of research practices. There were differences with respect to whether shared or individual climate perceptions were related to desirable or undesirable practices but the general pattern of results provide empirical evidence that the SORC is predictive of self-reported research behavior.

  19. 基于地方资源的自然地理野外教学模式的研究与实践%Research and Practice of Practical Teaching Model in Physical Geography Based on the Local Resources

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    徐树建; 于兴修

    2012-01-01

    Field practice is an important component of physical geography.In order to enhance the field practice step of physical geography practical teaching,we should make fully use of the local resources about physical geography,and build the typical field practice teaching base.The practice teaching system may play an important role in consolidating basic know/edge, inspiring learning interest,illumining the student's innovation and practice ability and teamwork spirit and improving general quality of the undergraduate.In practical operation,the new system of field practices teaching is highly feasible,and with wider generalization.%立足地方资源实际,深入挖掘地方野外实践教学资源,强化自然地理学野外实践教学环节,建立与培养目标相适应的区域性示范基地,构建充分利用地方资源培养学生野外实践能力的教学模式,对巩固专业基础知识、激发学习兴趣、培养学生的创新性与团队精神、提高学生综合素质等方面具有重要作用。经过实际检验,该野外实习教学模式的可操作性强,具有较强的推广价值。

  20. REST advanced research topics and practical applications

    CERN Document Server

    Wilde, Erik; Alarcon, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This book serves as a starting point for people looking for a deeper principled understanding of REST, its applications, its limitations, and current research work in the area and as an architectural style. The authors focus on applying REST beyond Web applications (i.e., in enterprise environments), and in reusing established and well-understood design patterns. The book examines how RESTful systems can be designed and deployed, and what the results are in terms of benefits and challenges encountered in the process. This book is intended for information and service architects and designers who are interested in learning about REST, how it is applied, and how it is being advanced.

  1. Sustainable development education, practice, and research: an indigenous model of sustainable development at the College of Menominee Nation, Keshena, WI, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael J. Dockry; Katherine Hall; William Van Lopik; Christopher M. Caldwell

    2015-01-01

    The College of Menominee Nation Sustainable Development Institute's theoretical model (SDI model) conceptualizes sustainable development as the process of maintaining the balance and reconciling the inherent tensions among six dimensions of sustainability: land and sovereignty; natural environment #including human beings); institutions; technology; economy; and...

  2. Research utilisation in sonographic practice: Attitudes and barriers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliott, Vicki [Radiography, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge, CB1 9PT Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom)], E-mail: vicki.elliott@anglia.ac.uk; Wilson, Stephanie E. [University of London External System, University of London, Stewart House, 32, Russell Square, London WC1B 5DN (United Kingdom); Svensson, Jon [Radiography, Faculty of Health and Social Care, Anglia Ruskin University, East Road, Cambridge, CB1 9PT Cambridgeshire (United Kingdom); Brennan, Patrick [UCD School of Medicine and Medical Sciences, Health Science Building, Belfield, Dublin 4 (Ireland)

    2009-08-15

    Statutory agents have stipulated that research activity is a fundamental component of the healthcare professional's activity. Whilst the College of Radiographers have emphasised the importance of imaging personnel embracing this research ethos, there is little available data on the level of research activity within sonographic practice or on the factors that influence a sonographer's involvement in research activities. This work attempts to address these deficiencies. A questionnaire was sent to 300 UK-based sonographers of whom 218 responded (72%). The questionnaire was specifically designed to establish the level of involvement in research, the utilisation of research findings, attitudes towards research and perceived barriers to active research involvement. Responses were analysed investigating any correlations with the population demographics. The data collected showed the majority of sonographers (89%) were enthusiastic about research but with only 33% and 60% currently or previously performing research, respectively, and 73% using research findings to modify their clinical practice. Certain barriers to an active research involvement were shown, with 63%, 55% and 40% citing lack of time, education and collegial support, respectively. A range of statistical findings were linked to particular sonographer groups. The importance of good organisational structures and effective support from fellow health professionals was highlighted. The results confirm sonographers' appreciation of the benefits of research and it is suggested that if this enthusiasm is translated into effective research strategies, research output from ultrasound and other clinical departments should be enhanced.

  3. Researching Assessment as Social Practice: Implications for Research Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Suellen

    2008-01-01

    Recent educational journals on both sides of the Atlantic have seen a resurgence of debate about the nature of educational research. As a contribution to these debates, this paper draws on theoretical and methodological "thinking tools" of French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu. Specifically, the paper explores what Jenkins [Jenkins, R.…

  4. Researching Assessment as Social Practice: Implications for Research Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shay, Suellen

    2008-01-01

    Recent educational journals on both sides of the Atlantic have seen a resurgence of debate about the nature of educational research. As a contribution to these debates, this paper draws on theoretical and methodological "thinking tools" of French sociologist Pierre Bourdieu. Specifically, the paper explores what Jenkins [Jenkins, R. (2002).…

  5. Participatory Action Research: Integrating Community Occupational Therapy Practice and Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockburn, Lynn; Trentham, Barry

    2002-01-01

    Projects involving mental health clients receiving occupational therapy and senior citizens engaged in capacity building illustrate steps in the participatory action research (PAR) process: issue identification and planning; investigation and action; action, reflection, and modification cycles; and knowledge creation and change. Challenges and…

  6. Moving research into practice: lessons from the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's IDSRN program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taylor Erin

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The U.S. Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality's (AHRQ Integrated Delivery Systems Research Network (IDSRN program was established to foster public-private collaboration between health services researchers and health care delivery systems. Its broad goal was to link researchers and delivery systems to encourage implementation of research into practice. We evaluated the program to address two primary questions: 1 How successful was IDSRN in generating research findings that could be applied in practice? and 2 What factors facilitate or impede such success? Methods We conducted in-person and telephone interviews with AHRQ staff and nine IDSRN partner organizations and their collaborators, reviewed program documents, analyzed projects funded through the program, and developed case studies of four IDSRN projects judged promising in supporting research implementation. Results Participants reported that the IDSRN structure was valuable in creating closer ties between researchers and participating health systems. Of the 50 completed projects studied, 30 had an operational effect or use. Some kinds of projects were more successful than others in influencing operations. If certain conditions were met, a variety of partnership models successfully supported implementation. An internal champion was necessary for partnerships involving researchers based outside the delivery system. Case studies identified several factors important to success: responsiveness of project work to delivery system needs, ongoing funding to support multiple project phases, and development of applied products or tools that helped users see their operational relevance. Factors limiting success included limited project funding, competing demands on potential research users, and failure to reach the appropriate audience. Conclusion Forging stronger partnerships between researchers and delivery systems has the potential to make research more relevant to users

  7. An exemplar of naturalistic inquiry in general practice research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McInnes, Susan; Peters, Kath; Bonney, Andrew; Halcomb, Elizabeth

    2017-01-23

    Background Before beginning any research project, novice researchers must consider which methodological approach will best address their research questions. The paucity of literature describing a practical application of naturalistic inquiry adds to the difficulty they may experience. Aim To provide a practical example of how naturalistic inquiry was applied to a qualitative study exploring collaboration between registered nurses and general practitioners working in Australian general practice. Discussion Naturalistic inquiry is not without its critics and limitations. However, by applying the axioms and operational characteristics of naturalistic inquiry, the authors captured a detailed 'snapshot' of collaboration in general practice in the time and context that it occurred. Conclusion Using qualitative methods, naturalistic inquiry provides the scope to construct a comprehensive and contextual understanding of a phenomenon. No individual positivist paradigm could provide the level of detail achieved in a naturalistic inquiry. Implications for practice This paper presents a practical example of naturalistic inquiry for the novice researcher. It shows that naturalistic inquiry is appropriate when the researcher seeks a rich and contextual understanding of a phenomenon as it exists in its natural setting.

  8. Digital Modeling and Shaping of Design Practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reijonen, Satu

    This paper focuses on the role of digital modeling in shaping coordinative practices between architects and energy engineers in construction design. The paper presents a case study of the use of an energy performance calculation programme, a numeric digital modeling tool, that not only enables......, 2010), and the socio-material constructivist studies of technology (Akrich 1992, Akrich et al. 2000, Latour 1991). The programme influences the coordinative practices in following ways: it shapes the modus of interaction between energy engineers and architects and enforces particular jurisdictional...... of this study suggest that generative potential of digital modeling tools such as the calculation programme resides in their ability to restrictively define the possible roles in, focus of and sequence of working. In addition, digital modeling provides a separate medium with the help of which the design object...

  9. Knowledge, attitudes, practices, and barriers related to research utilization: a survey among pharmacists in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Sin Yee; Hatah, Ernieda

    2017-04-01

    Background Research utilization is part of evidence-based practice referring to the process of reviewing and critiquing scientific research and applying the findings to one's own clinical practice. Many studies on research utilization have been conducted with doctors and nurses, but to our knowledge, none have been investigated amongst pharmacists. Objective To assess research utilization and its barriers among pharmacists and identify potential influencing factors. Setting Malaysia. Methods This cross-sectional survey was administered online and by mail to a convenient sample of pharmacists working in hospitals, health clinics, and retail pharmacies in rural and urban areas. Main outcome measure Pharmacists' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices. Results Six hundred surveys were mailed to potential respondents, and 466 were returned (77.7% response rate). Twenty-eight respondents completed the survey online. The respondents' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices were found to be moderate. Research utilization was associated with respondents' knowledge and attitude scores (P research utilization were modelled, higher educational level was associated with higher level of research utilization (P research utilization, respectively. The main reported barrier to research utilization was lack of sufficient authority to change patient care procedures. Conclusion Pharmacists' research utilization knowledge, attitudes, and practices can be improved by encouraging pharmacists to pursue higher degrees, promoting active participation in institutions' journal clubs, and introducing senior clinical pharmacist specialization.

  10. 基于依托项目模式的商务英语专业实训研究与实践%Business English professional practical research and practice based on relying on the project model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    冯巧丽

    2015-01-01

    作为一种以学习者为中心的教学方法,因其能够培养学生的创新能力、批判性思维的能力和合作学习的能力,依托项目模式在外语教学领域有着很大的发展潜力.本文以基于依托项目的商务英语专业实训课程为例,使用定性研究方法,结合定量数据,介绍了依托项目的语言实训教学的具体实施过程,并通过与传统教学方法的比较,指出其在学习者能力培养和反思,以及促进教师各方面提高等方面的特点与优势.%As a learner centered teaching methods, to cultivate students' innovation ability, critical thinking ability and cooperative learning ability, based on a project model has great potential for development in the field of foreign language teaching. In this paper, based on relying on the project of business English professional training courses, for example, using qualitative research methods, combined with the quantitative data, this paper introduces the implementation process of the relying on language training teaching project, and comparing with the traditional teaching methods, points out that the learners ability training and reflection, and improve teachers' various aspects.

  11. Poetry Therapy within a Therapist's Practice Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ospina-Kammerer, Veronika

    1999-01-01

    Demonstrates that poetry is a valuable tool in individual and couples therapy; specifically, that the Bowen Family Systems Theory and attachment theory are useful paradigms for including poetry. Offers several case examples demonstrating the usefulness of poetry within a therapist's practice model. (SR)

  12. Rethinking Critically Reflective Research Practice: Beyond Popper's Critical Rationalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulrich, Werner

    2006-01-01

    We all know that ships are safest in the harbor; but alas, that is not what ships are built for. They are destined to leave the harbor and to confront the challenges that are waiting beyond the harbor mole. A similar challenge confronts the practice of research. Research at work cannot play it safe and stay in whatever theoretical and…

  13. Improving product development practice: An action-research based approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harmsen, Hanne

    the widely published normative advice. While there may be several reasons for discrepancies between research results and prac-tice this paper focuses on problems of implementation of the identified success factors. Within the research area of NPD-management there has been numerous surveys as well as case...

  14. Focus on Basics: Connecting Research & Practice. Volume 8, Issue D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Barbara, Ed.

    2007-01-01

    Learning disabilities is the theme of the latest issue of "Focus on Basics," the World Education publication that brings together research, policy, and practice in adult basic education. Starting with an update on research on neurobiology and dyslexia, this issue also examines how the adult basic education system supports students with…

  15. Adaptive research supervision : Exploring expert thesis supervisors' practical knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kleijn, Renske A M; Meijer, Paulien C.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Pilot, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested the importance of being responsive to students' needs in research supervision. Adapting support strategies to students' needs in light of the goals of a task is referred to as adaptivity. In the present study, the practice of adaptivity is explored by interviewing

  16. A Review of Practical Reasoning in Child and Youth Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljungdalh, Anders Kruse

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the review is to investigate various relations between the concepts of competence and participation found within child and youth research with the aim of identifying differences in practical reasoning of the various kinds of child research. The search identified 260 articles, and an in-depth analysis of 39 articles was conducted,…

  17. Finding Nexus: Connecting Youth Work and Research Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gormally, Sinéad; Coburn, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Participation in educational and social research helps to develop understanding of how young people learn and to consider wider aspects of their lives to enable their voices to be heard and acted upon. Research also facilitates the articulation and sharing of methodologies across a range of professional practices. We assert that theory and…

  18. Counseling Adopted Persons in Adulthood: Integrating Practice and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baden, Amanda L.; O'Leary Wiley, Mary

    2007-01-01

    For the past 50 years, adults who were adopted during infancy have been research participants for empirical studies with goals ranging from twin studies for heritability, to adjustment following adoption, to attachment. While the research body is broad, it has given little attention to counseling practices with adopted adults. Because empirical…

  19. Silent Conversations in the Labyrinth of Artistic Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eis, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    This essay explores silent conversations with the past, but also navigates through the labyrinth of artistic process, with its manifold passages of research, chance occurrence and aesthetic experimentation. The double metaphors of silent conversations and labyrinths apply to the essay and the artwork within it, to the research and to the practice.…

  20. Adaptive research supervision : Exploring expert thesis supervisors' practical knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Kleijn, Renske A M; Meijer, Paulien C.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Pilot, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested the importance of being responsive to students' needs in research supervision. Adapting support strategies to students' needs in light of the goals of a task is referred to as adaptivity. In the present study, the practice of adaptivity is explored by interviewing

  1. Adaptive Research Supervision: Exploring Expert Thesis Supervisors' Practical Knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kleijn, Renske A. M.; Meijer, Paulien C.; Brekelmans, Mieke; Pilot, Albert

    2015-01-01

    Several researchers have suggested the importance of being responsive to students' needs in research supervision. Adapting support strategies to students' needs in light of the goals of a task is referred to as "adaptivity." In the present study, the practice of adaptivity is explored by interviewing expert thesis supervisors about…

  2. DUDOC as symbiosis of educational research and educational practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goedhart, M.

    2013-01-01

    DUDOC as symbiosis of educational research and educational practice In the DUDOC programme, which started in 2007, nineteen secondary school teachers conducted PhD research projects, supporting the present context-oriented reform of mathematics and science in the higher grades of secondary schools.

  3. Anatomy of Professional Practice: Promising Research Perspectives on Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    English, Fenwick W.

    2007-01-01

    This is the first book to bring into focus the full scope of professional practice in educational leadership. This book probes the limitations of traditional research in fully comprehending the true nature of leadership, and points out how future research must be expanded to deal with understanding the complexity of educational leadership…

  4. Researching contexts, practices and pedagogies in English for academic purposes

    CERN Document Server

    Blaj-Ward, L

    2014-01-01

    This book is a point of reference for EAP professionals planning to conduct or commission research into learning, teaching, professional development or quality assurance in EAP. It draws on academic and professional debates to inspire further research and practical initiatives to enhance EAP provision.

  5. Research, Practice, and Policy Connections: The Artplay Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Robert; Jeanneret, Neryl

    2017-01-01

    This article explores the nexus between arts-based research, theory, practice, and policy. It does so through reference to a longitudinal study of ArtPlay, a unique Australian community arts center that offers artist-led workshops involving young people aged 3-13 years. The ethnographic and action research study investigated how children responded…

  6. Evaluation of a Cape Town Safety Intervention as a Model for Good Practice: A Partnership between Researchers, Community and Implementing Agency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tali Cassidy

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available VPUU has a wealth of experience to share and is engaged with broader national and international policymakers and implementing agencies. Researchers are grappling with the difficulty of providing a rigorous project evaluation for these collaborations which could identify project elements that work with a view to their replication. This paper traces the evolution of an evidence-based approach to violence prevention in the Western Cape Province of South Africa. The Violence Prevention through Urban Upgrading (VPUU project in Cape Town uses such an approach, and relies on a ‘whole-of-society’ methodology as well. The project and the difficulty of its evaluation are discussed. A partnership between VPUU, researchers, the community and local government has revealed both opportunities and obstacles, which are the subjects of a case study described here.

  7. A Practical Philosophy of Complex Climate Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.; Sherwood, Steven

    2014-01-01

    We give an overview of the practice of developing and using complex climate models, as seen from experiences in a major climate modelling center and through participation in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP).We discuss the construction and calibration of models; their evaluation, especially through use of out-of-sample tests; and their exploitation in multi-model ensembles to identify biases and make predictions. We stress that adequacy or utility of climate models is best assessed via their skill against more naive predictions. The framework we use for making inferences about reality using simulations is naturally Bayesian (in an informal sense), and has many points of contact with more familiar examples of scientific epistemology. While the use of complex simulations in science is a development that changes much in how science is done in practice, we argue that the concepts being applied fit very much into traditional practices of the scientific method, albeit those more often associated with laboratory work.

  8. A Practical Philosophy of Complex Climate Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Gavin A.; Sherwood, Steven

    2014-01-01

    We give an overview of the practice of developing and using complex climate models, as seen from experiences in a major climate modelling center and through participation in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP).We discuss the construction and calibration of models; their evaluation, especially through use of out-of-sample tests; and their exploitation in multi-model ensembles to identify biases and make predictions. We stress that adequacy or utility of climate models is best assessed via their skill against more naive predictions. The framework we use for making inferences about reality using simulations is naturally Bayesian (in an informal sense), and has many points of contact with more familiar examples of scientific epistemology. While the use of complex simulations in science is a development that changes much in how science is done in practice, we argue that the concepts being applied fit very much into traditional practices of the scientific method, albeit those more often associated with laboratory work.

  9. Group Organization and Communities of Practice in Translational Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor J. Krawczyk

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The collective lived experience of translational research teams requires further appreciation, particularly at the stages of group formation. To achieve this, we conducted a case study of a translational research team (n = 16. Through the case description and then discussing case-based themes with community of practice theory, themes such as “Being Open” and “Working as a Group” found that this team’s mutual respect, cooperation, and their sharing of knowledge uncovered an alternative way that professionals organize themselves for translational research projects. In conjunction to this finding, our analysis showed that the team has qualities of a community of practice.

  10. Assertiveness in nursing practice: an action research and reflection project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Beverley; Edwards, Paul; Holroyd, Beth; Unwin, Anna; Rowley, Joanne

    2005-12-01

    This article describes an action research project that highlighted reflective processes, so hospital nurses could work systematically through problem solving processes to uncover constraints against effective nursing care; and to improve the quality of their care in light of the identified constraints and possibilities. Four Registered Nurses (RNs) co-researched their practice with the facilitator and over the research period identified the thematic concern of the need for assertiveness in their work. The RNs planned, implemented and evaluated an action plan and, as a direct result of their reflections and collaborative action, they improved their nursing practice in relation to becoming more effective in assertiveness in work situations.

  11. Premises, principles, and practices in qualitative research: revisiting the foundations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charmaz, Kathy

    2004-09-01

    In this keynote address, the author focuses on what we bring to qualitative inquiry and how we conduct our research. What we do, why we do it, and how we do it remain contested issues. She proposes that we look at our methodological premises anew, revisit our principles, and revise our practices. Throughout this address, she draws on Goffman's methodological insights to provide a foundation for reassessing qualitative inquiry. She argues that researchers can build on Goffman's ideas to strengthen their methodological practices and research products. Last, she counters current institutional scrutiny of qualitative inquiry and suggests unacknowledged benefits of this work.

  12. Helicobacter Pylori eradication therapy: getting research into practice.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McDonnell, R

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter Pylori (H. Pylori) is the primary cause of duodenal ulcer (DU). Guidelines recommend that all patients with DU be considered for Helicobacter Pylori Eradication Therapy (HPET). However, the proportion of patients with DU on long term anti-ulcer medication receiving HPET is small. This study examined the effectiveness of the continuing medical education (CME) network of the Irish College of General Practitioners (ICGP) in promoting best practice in DU treatment among GPs in an eastern region of Ireland. Ninty eight GPs recruited from the CME network of the ICGP were randomised in two cohorts. Cohort 1 received an (early) intervention; GPs were asked to identify their patients with DU receiving long term anti-ulcer medication and prescribe HPET according to defined criteria. Cohort 2 received the intervention later. Prescribing of HPET was monitored using routine prescribing data. Twenty per cent (286\\/1,422) of patients in cohort 1 and 19.2% (127\\/661) in cohort 2 had a DU. After exclusions, 53% (152\\/286) in cohort 1 and 30.7% (39\\/127) in cohort 2, were eligible for HPET. A significantly higher proportion of patients in cohort 1 received HPET compared with cohort 2 during the early intervention period (13.8% vs 0.0%, p<0.05). Reasons for not prescribing HPET included concurrent illness in patients, failure to comply with treatment. Best practice guidelines on HPET treatment of DU can be successfully applied using CME networks. This model could be repeated in another therapeutic area where established research is not yet current practice.

  13. Curating research data a handbook of current practice

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Lisa R

    2017-01-01

    Curating Research Data, Volume Two: A Handbook of Current Practice guides you across the data lifecycle through the practical strategies and techniques for curating research data in a digital repository setting. The data curation steps for receiving, appraising, selecting, ingesting, transforming, describing, contextualizing, disseminating, and preserving digital research data are each explored, and then supplemented with detailed case studies written by more than forty international practitioners from national, disciplinary, and institutional data repositories. The steps in this volume detail the sequential actions that you might take to curate a data set from receiving the data (Step 1) to eventual reuse (Step 8). Data curators, archivists, research data management specialists, subject librarians, institutional repository managers, and digital library staff will benefit from these current and practical approaches to data curation.

  14. Practical Qualitative Research Strategies: Training Interviewers and Coders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodell, L Suzanne; Stage, Virginia C; Cooke, Natalie K

    2016-09-01

    The increased emphasis on incorporating qualitative methodologies into nutrition education development and evaluation underscores the importance of using rigorous protocols to enhance the trustworthiness of the findings. A 5-phase protocol for training qualitative research assistants (data collectors and coders) was developed as an approach to increase the consistency of the data produced. This training provides exposure to the core principles of qualitative research and then asks the research assistant to apply those principles through practice in a setting structured on critical reflection.

  15. Themes and methods of research presented at European General Practice Research Network conferences.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruschinski, C.; Lange, Maaike; Lionis, C.; Weel, C. van; Hummers-Pradier, E.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The World Organization of Family Doctors (Wonca) defined core characteristics of general practice and general practitioners' competencies. It is unclear to which extent research has addressed these issues so far. OBJECTIVE: To determine themes and research methods of general practice res

  16. The Gap between Educational Research and Practice: Views of Teachers, School Leaders, Intermediaries and Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlinde, Ruben; van Braak, Johan

    2010-01-01

    The relation between educational research and practice is a growing point of interest and has produced numerous lively debates. Although many reports and position papers have been published on this topic, little empirical data are available. The aim of this study is to explore the gap between educational research and practice and to assess the…

  17. Using the World Wide Web to Connect Research and Professional Practice: Towards Evidence-Based Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Moody

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available In most professional (applied disciplines, research findings take a long time to filter into practice, if they ever do at all. The result of this is under-utilisation of research results and sub-optimal practices. There are a number of reasons for the lack of knowledge transfer. On the "demand side", people working in professional practice have little time available to keep up with the latest research in their field. In addition, the volume of research published each year means that the average practitioner would not have time to read all the research articles in their area of interest even if they devoted all their time to it. From the "supply side", academic research is primarily focused on the production rather than distribution of knowledge. While they have highly developed mechanisms for transferring knowledge among themselves, there is little investment in the distribution of research results be-yond research communities. The World Wide Web provides a potential solution to this problem, as it provides a global information infrastructure for connecting those who produce knowledge (researchers and those who need to apply this knowledge (practitioners. This paper describes two projects which use the World Wide Web to make research results directly available to support decision making in the workplace. The first is a successful knowledge management project in a health department which provides medical staff with on-line access to the latest medical research at the point of care. The second is a project currently in progress to implement a similar system to support decision making in IS practice. Finally, we draw some general lessons about how to improve transfers of knowledge from research and practice, which could be applied in any discipline.

  18. Research and Reflective Practice in the ESL Classroom: Voices from Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirocki, Andrzej; Tennekoon, Sujeewa; Calvo, Alicia Pena

    2014-01-01

    Modern language education favours the model of a reflective teacher-researcher who is engaged in both individual and collaborative curriculum revision and teaching-learning environment improvement. The present paper addresses the issue of classroom research and reflective practice in current ESL pedagogy and teacher professional development. The…

  19. Economics of Distance and Online Learning Theory, Practice and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    reviewed by TOJDE

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Economics of Distance and Online LearningTheory, Practice and ResearchBy William Bramble & Santosh PandaPrice: $125.00ISBN: 978-0-415-96388-6, Binding: Hardback, Publishedby: Routledge, New York, Publication Date: March 2008, Pages: 312TOJDEABOUT THE BOOKThis book provides a comprehensive overview of theorganizational models of distance and online learning froman international perspective and from the point of view ofeconomic planning, costing and management decisionmaking.The book points to directions for the further research anddevelopment in this area, and will promote furtherunderstanding and critical reflection on the part ofadministrators, practitioners and researchers of distanceeducation.The experiences and perspectives in distance education inthe US are balanced with those in other areas of the world.Table of ContentsPrefaceSECTION ONE: INTRODUCTIONChapter 1: Organizational and Cost Structures for Distanceand Online Learning, William J. Bramble and Santosh PandaSECTION TWO: PLANNING AND MANAGEMENTChapter 2: Changing Distance Education andChanging Organizational Issues, D. Randy Garrison and Heather KanukaChapter 3: Online Learning and the University, Chris Curran217Chapter 4: Virtual Schooling and Basic Education, Thomas ClarkChapter 5: Historical Perspectives on Distance Education in the United States, Paul J.Edelson and Von PittmanSECTION THREE: FUNDINGChapter 6: Funding of Distance and Online Learning in the United States, Mark J. Smithand William J. BrambleChapter 7: Funding Distance Education: A Regional Perspective, Santosh Panda andAshok GabaSECTION FOUR: COST STRUCTURES AND MODELSChapter 8: Costs and Quality of Online Learning, Alistair InglisChapter 9: Costing Virtual University Education, Insung JungChapter 10: Cost-Benefit of Student Retention Policies and Practices, Ormond SimpsonSECTION FIVE: DISTANCE TRAININGChapter 11: Cost Benefit of Online Learning, Zane Berge and Charlotte DonaldsonChapter 12: Transforming Workplace

  20. Lessons for Research Policy and Practice: The Case of Co-Enquiry Research with Rural Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caruso, Emily; Schunko, Christoph; Corbera, Esteve; Ruiz Mallén, Isabel; Vogl, Christian R.; Martin, Gary; Arrázola, Susana; Bandeira, Fábio Pedro; Calvo Boyero, Diana; Camacho Benavides, Claudia; Cardoso, Thiago Mota; Chan-Dzul, Albert; Conde, Esther; del Campo García, Carlos; Huanca, Tomás; Sampaio, José Augusto Laranjeiras; Oliveros Lopez, Sara; Porter-Bolland, Luciana; Ruiz Betancourt, Olga

    2016-01-01

    This article explores the relationship between institutional funding for research and community-based or co-enquiry research practice. It examines the implementation of co-enquiry research in the COMBIOSERVE project, which was funded by the European Commission's Seventh Framework Programme for research and innovation, between the years 2012 and…

  1. Professional ethics in biomedical engineering practice and research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monzon, Jorge E; Monzon-Wyngaard, Alvaro

    2008-01-01

    This paper discusses some guidelines for use with the accepted fundamental canons of ethics for engineers. We present some rules of practice and professional obligations emerging from these canons. Basic recommendations for engineers dissenting on ethical grounds are also presented. Ethical issues relating to Biomedical Engineering research are illustrated. We mention some cases that could be used to further understanding the ethical implications of biomedical engineering practice.

  2. Implications of translating research into practice: a medication management intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkema, Gretchen E; Frey, Dennee

    2006-01-01

    Through programs such as the Administration on Aging's Evidence-Based Prevention Initiative, researchers and practitioners are developing translational research studies seeking to implement rigorously tested, evidence-based interventions in new practice settings and evaluate the continuing effectiveness of these interventions. One such translational study is the Community-Based Medications Management Intervention (CBM Intervention), a collaborative effort to implement a medication management screening and intervention protocol in community-based waiver care management programs. The overall goals of the CBM Intervention are to implement an evidence-based medication management intervention in a California Medicaid waiver care management program, and to evaluate the effect of client-, intervention-, and organizational-level characteristics on resolving identified medication problems. This article presents the need for improved medication management in a frail, community-dwelling, older adult population and describes the CBM Intervention as an example of translating an evidence-based practice beyond its original efficacy trial in a home healthcare program into a care management program. It discusses critical factors involved in translating research into practice using a translational research framework, Promoting Action on Research Implementation in Health Services (PARIHS). Our experience suggests that although implementing research into practice can positively impact client care, professional skill enhancement and organizational effectiveness, this is very challenging work requiring signification facilitation for successful outcomes.

  3. A Framework for Understanding Physics Students' Computational Modeling Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunk, Brandon Robert

    With the growing push to include computational modeling in the physics classroom, we are faced with the need to better understand students' computational modeling practices. While existing research on programming comprehension explores how novices and experts generate programming algorithms, little of this discusses how domain content knowledge, and physics knowledge in particular, can influence students' programming practices. In an effort to better understand this issue, I have developed a framework for modeling these practices based on a resource stance towards student knowledge. A resource framework models knowledge as the activation of vast networks of elements called "resources." Much like neurons in the brain, resources that become active can trigger cascading events of activation throughout the broader network. This model emphasizes the connectivity between knowledge elements and provides a description of students' knowledge base. Together with resources resources, the concepts of "epistemic games" and "frames" provide a means for addressing the interaction between content knowledge and practices. Although this framework has generally been limited to describing conceptual and mathematical understanding, it also provides a means for addressing students' programming practices. In this dissertation, I will demonstrate this facet of a resource framework as well as fill in an important missing piece: a set of epistemic games that can describe students' computational modeling strategies. The development of this theoretical framework emerged from the analysis of video data of students generating computational models during the laboratory component of a Matter & Interactions: Modern Mechanics course. Student participants across two semesters were recorded as they worked in groups to fix pre-written computational models that were initially missing key lines of code. Analysis of this video data showed that the students' programming practices were highly influenced by

  4. Web indicators for research evaluation a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    Thelwall, Michael

    2017-01-01

    In recent years there has been an increasing demand for research evaluation within universities and other research-based organisations. In parallel, there has been an increasing recognition that traditional citation-based indicators are not able to reflect the societal impacts of research and are slow to appear. This has led to the creation of new indicators for different types of research impact as well as timelier indicators, mainly derived from the Web. These indicators have been called altmetrics, webometrics or just web metrics. This book describes and evaluates a range of web indicators for aspects of societal or scholarly impact, discusses the theory and practice of using and evaluating web indicators for research assessment and outlines practical strategies for obtaining many web indicators. In addition to describing impact indicators for traditional scholarly outputs, such as journal articles and monographs, it also covers indicators for videos, datasets, software and other non-standard scholarly out...

  5. Practice-Based Interdisciplinary Approach and Environmental Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ranjan Kumar Datta

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Interdisciplinary researchers and educators, as community members, creators of knowledge, and environmental activists and practitioners, have a responsibility to build a bridge between community practice, academic scholarship, and professional contributions aimed at establishing environmental sustainability. In this paper, I focus on an undervalued area of environmental politics, practices, and often unarticulated assumptions which underlie human–environmental relations. This article challenges interdisciplinary studies that are not connected with practice by reconfiguring the meaning of a community-based, interdisciplinary approach. Drawing from works by Foucault, Latour, and Haraway, this paper first shows how to reconfigure the meaning of an interdisciplinary approach. Second, using Bourdieu and Brightman’s ethnographic studies as a framework, the paper situates practice as central to our efforts to deconstruct and replace current interdisciplinary initiatives with a practice-based approach. Through a practice-based interdisciplinary approach (PIA, environmental educators and researchers gain an awareness of and learn to make an investment in sustainable communities. As teams of environmental researchers practising in the local community, they are meaningfully involved with the community, with each other, and with the environment.

  6. 基于SOA的BPO工作流模型研究与实践%Research of an SOA-Based BPO Workflow Model and Its Practical Application

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    秦凤梅; 张桂华; 邱玉辉

    2013-01-01

    With the development of enterprise information technology,enterprises pay more and more attention to their core business and outsource their non-core business to other professional companies.As a result,BPO (business process outsourcing) arises at the historic moment.This article gives an introduction to BPO workflow,analyzes the structure characteristics of current BPO workflow and,based on the SOA (service-oriented architecture),presents a description of the methods and steps of BPO business logic service encapsulation with the service-workflow mapping model.Then a BPO complaints workflow management system model is designed in the case of SOA architecture,which is characterized by loosely coupling,extensibility,re-usability and easiness for maintenance.%随着企业信息化技术不断发展,企业越来越重视其核心业务,将非核心业务外包给其它专业化企业,业务流程外包(Business Process Outsourcing,BPO)应运而生.从介绍BPO工作流入手,通过当前BPO工作流构成特点分析,结合面向服务架构(SOA),采用服务一工作流映射模型,对BPO业务逻辑服务封装的方法及步骤进行描述,并设计了一个SOA架构下的BPO投诉管理系统工作流模型,具有松散耦合、可扩展、复用、易维护等特点.

  7. Nursing students learning to utilize nursing research in clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattila, Lea-Riitta; Eriksson, Elina

    2007-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the significance of a learning assignment in relation to research skills and learning of nursing students in clinical practice. The learning assignment included an oral presentation of a nursing research article, which the students gave to their fellow students and ward nurses. The students also chaired the discussion after the presentation. The target group for the study was nursing students of a Finnish polytechnic who had been studying for 2-2 1/2 years and had accomplished a minimum of 120 ECTS credits of the total of 210 ECTS credits. When participating in the study, the students were completing a six-week clinical practice of optional studies. The data were collected with a questionnaire designed for the study. It consisted of six open-ended questions. Three of the questions were related to learning of research skills. Two questions were concerned with learning during the ongoing clinical practice. The final question inquired the students' views on the development of the learning assignment. The students received the questionnaire before the commencement of their clinical practice, and they returned it to the other researcher after their clinical practice. The questionnaire was given to 80 students, of which 50 returned it; the response rate was 63%. The data were analysed by content analysis question by question. According to the results, the learning assignment advanced the understanding of research concepts for the majority of the students. In particular, the students reported that the oral presentation clarified the research concepts, and the structure of a scientific article was also elucidated. The students stated that the assignment generated ideas concerning the development of nursing care. In relation to the ongoing clinical practice, the assignment advanced patient encounters and interaction, and bearing responsibility the most. Proposals for the further development of the learning assignment were expressed by

  8. Practice based research networks impacting periodontal care: PEARL Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curro, Frederick A; Thompson, Van P; Grill, Ashley; Vena, Don; Terracio, Louis; Naftolin, Frederick

    2013-05-01

    In 2005, the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research /National Institutes of Health funded the largest initiative to date to affect change in the delivery of oral care. This commentary provides the background for the first study related to periodontics in a Practice Based Research Network (PBRN). It was conducted in the Practitioners Engaged in Applied Research & Learning (PEARL) Network. The PEARL Network is headquartered at New York University College of Dentistry. The basic tenet of the PBRN initiative is to engage clinicians to participate in clinical studies, where they will be more likely to accept the results and to incorporate the findings into their practices. This process may reduce the translational gap that exists between new findings and the time it takes for them to be incorporated into clinical practice. The cornerstone of the PBRN studies is to conduct comparative effectiveness research studies to disseminate findings to the profession and improve care. This is particularly important because the majority of dentists practice independently. Having practitioners generate clinical data allows them to contribute in the process of knowledge development and incorporate the results in their practice to assist in closing the translational gap. With the advent of electronic health systems on the horizon, dentistry may be brought into the mainstream health care paradigm and the PBRN concept can serve as the skeletal framework for advancing the profession provided there is consensus on the terminology used.

  9. Design-based research – issues in connecting theory, research and practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette

    2015-01-01

    indicate several key issues at both the scientific and personal level. Scientifically, the main issues are contribution to theory and the role of the researcher. At the personal level, it is an investment beyond normal research procedures to involve yourself as a researcher in curriculum change.......During the last 20 years, design-based research (DBR) has become a popular methodology for connecting educational theory, research and practice. The missing link between educational theory, research and educational practice is an ongoing issue and DBR is seen as an integrated methodology to bridge...

  10. Best Practice Examples of Circular Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldmann, Eva

    , and to look for circular business opportunities in this flow of goods and value, is key in a circular economy. Establishing new or closer collaboration with stakeholders within or beyond the traditional supply chain is another important skill in creating circular business models. Many of the examined......Best practice examples of circular business models are presented in this report. The purpose is to inform and inspire interested readers, in particular companies that aspire to examine the potentials of the circular economy. Circular business models in two different sectors are examined, namely...... the textile and clothing sector as well as the durable goods sector. In order to appreciate the notion of circular business models, the basics of the circular economy are outlined along with three frameworks for categorizing the various types of circular business models. The frameworks take point of departure...

  11. An economic model of large Medicaid practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cromwell, J; Mitchell, J B

    1984-06-01

    Public attention given to Medicaid "mills" prompted this more general investigation of the origins of large Medicaid practices. A dual market demand model is proposed showing how Medicaid competes with private insurers for scarce physician time. Various program parameters--fee schedules, coverage, collection costs--are analyzed along with physician preferences, specialties, and other supply-side characteristics. Maximum likelihood techniques are used to test the model. The principal finding is that in raising Medicaid fees, as many physicians opt into the program as expand their Medicaid caseloads to exceptional levels, leaving the maldistribution of patients unaffected while notably improving access. Still, the fact that Medicaid fees are lower than those of private insurers does lead to reduced access to more qualified practitioners. Where anti-Medicaid sentiment is stronger, access is also reduced and large Medicaid practices more likely to flourish.

  12. Building bridges between research, policy and practice in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosi, Maria Lúcia Magalhães; Gastaldo, Denise

    2011-12-01

    The article examines core elements of the national and international discussion on the required integration between research, policy and practice in public health, and provides input for this integration. Some conceptual barriers and other barriers at different spheres that interfere with the desired integration are discussed. Evidence has shown that research, policy and practice in health are not continuous, homogenous areas but rather involve different levels and actors. Their processes develop in different grounds supported by a variety of actions, paradigms and interests that are not conflict-free. Thus, this integration is a major challenge given its complexity and multiplicity of objective and subjective aspects.

  13. Studies on Presence: prolegomena for the research on performative practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilberto Icle

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available This text presents a few notes about the manner through which the Studies on Presence define and delimit themselves from an epistemological point of view. It presents the university context of the research to which this perspective belongs and the self-referential mode of studying performative practices. It also discusses presence in the work of performers and its relation to meaning in order to delimit a field of problematisation on the inadequacy of interpretation as the only wayfor having access to knowledge. We propose, from Michel Foucault and Hans Ulrich Gumbrecht, other modes of research on performative practices.

  14. Research and Practice on the Teaching Model of Outstanding Engineers%卓越工程师教学模式的研究与实践

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    吴寿煜; 张宇红

    2011-01-01

    培养卓越工程师的教学模式由三部分组成:首先采用抛锚式教学,从源头呈现教学内容产生的情景,强化学生的实际应用能力,引导学生从历史角度研究科学发现的规律,运用TRIZ培养学生探索自然界规律的原始创新能力;其次采用支架式教学,围绕教学内容联系当今科学技术,呈现新技术和新仪器产生的情景,运用TRIZ培养学生的集成创新能力;最后采用随机进入式教学,从教学内容的研究方式进入科学难题,呈现科学家探索问题和使用方法的情景,运用TRIZ培养毕生的引进消化吸收再创新能力。%The teaching mode of training outstanding engineers is composed of three parts. First, by using anchored instruction, the present teaching content is to be presented from the source students' application ability is to be strengthened; students are to be instructed to find the laws from the historical perspective and TRIZ is applied to cultivate their innovative ability in exploring natural laws. Second, by using scaffolding instruction, scenes produced by new technology and equipments are to be presented by relating the teaching contents with the latest development in science and technology by applying TRIZ, students' integrated innovation ability is to be trained. Last, by using random access teaching, the problems in teaching are to be presented in the research way and by applying TRIZ, students' ability of introduction, digestion, absorption and innovation is to be trained.

  15. Opportunities and challenges in social pharmacy and pharmacy practice research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, Anna Birna; Kaae, Susanne; Traulsen, Janine M

    2014-01-01

    Pharmacy practice and social pharmacy are two important research areas within pharmaceutical and health sciences. As the disciplines have undergone and are still undergoing changes, it is useful to reflect on the current state of their research as the basis for discussing further development....... The two areas are currently beset by a lack of consensus and charged all too often with evaluating narrowly focused pharmacy services. With the added challenge of diminished funding for research and the pressures to publish results, these fields have to accommodate a much broader research framework than...

  16. A community of practice: librarians in a biomedical research network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager-Loftus, Danielle P; Midyette, J David; Harvey, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Providing library and reference services within a biomedical research community presents special challenges for librarians, especially those in historically lower-funded states. These challenges can include understanding needs, defining and communicating the library's role, building relationships, and developing and maintaining general and subject specific knowledge. This article describes a biomedical research network and the work of health sciences librarians at the lead intensive research institution with librarians from primarily undergraduate institutions and tribal colleges. Applying the concept of a community of practice to a collaborative effort suggests how librarians can work together to provide effective reference services to researchers in biomedicine.

  17. Adapting authentic science practices into contexts for learning: The case of models and modelling in pre-university chemistry education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, G.T.; Pilot, A.

    2013-01-01

    This research study explores the potential benefits of using authentic modelling practices as contexts for learning in chemistry education. An authentic modelling practice is characterized as professionals sharing common purposes, working to a similar type of modelling procedure, while applying rele

  18. Continuum modeling an approach through practical examples

    CERN Document Server

    Muntean, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    This book develops continuum modeling skills and approaches the topic from three sides: (1) derivation of global integral laws together with the associated local differential equations, (2) design of constitutive laws and (3) modeling boundary processes. The focus of this presentation lies on many practical examples covering aspects such as coupled flow, diffusion and reaction in porous media or microwave heating of a pizza, as well as traffic issues in bacterial colonies and energy harvesting from geothermal wells. The target audience comprises primarily graduate students in pure and applied mathematics as well as working practitioners in engineering who are faced by nonstandard rheological topics like those typically arising in the food industry.

  19. A BLENDED LEARNING MODEL FOR TEACHING PRACTICE COURSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa CANER

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study is to introduce a blended learning environment and a model for pre-service teaching practice course in English Language Teacher Training Program at Anadolu University. It is supposed that providing a blended learning environment for teaching practice course would improve the practice and contribute to the professional growth of pre-service teachers. Since it will increase the contact hours among students and university supervisors and facilitate peer feedback among pre-service teachers, which in turn, create a productive learning environment for them. Thus, the present paper aimed at providing a blended learning model for teaching practice courses at teacher training institutions and give impetus for the researchers or instructors who would like to implement blended learning in their own teaching environments. Additionally, the present study intends to contribute expanded understanding to the way blending the learning environments, and contribute additional understanding to the knowledge base about the implementation of blended learning for a teaching practice course. Finally, through illustrating a blended learning environment for teaching practice course, it is hoped that this study might contribute to the growing body of knowledge of blended delivery and blended learning in higher education.

  20. Expanding the concept of acculturation in Mexican American rehabilitation psychology research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Linda G; Caver, Kelly A

    2009-11-01

    The acculturation process is increasingly being viewed as an important variable that provides a context for understanding Mexican American health disparities. Although rehabilitation psychologists have noted the importance of utilizing acculturation in research and practice, scholars continue to use out-dated conceptualizations and models of acculturation. The authors provide a brief overview of current trends in acculturation theory and research. Limitations of current rehabilitation research and how acculturation theory can help explain Mexican American health outcomes are discussed. Finally, recommendations for rehabilitation research and practice are provided. The authors recommend that rehabilitation scholars develop and test theoretical models that incorporate multiple dimensions of acculturation in order to understand how it influences Mexican American health outcomes. Rehabilitation professionals should incorporate acculturation theory and culturally informed interventions into rehabilitation practice with Mexican Americans.

  1. Information Governance: A Model for Security in Medical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia A.H. Williams

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Information governance is becoming an important aspect of organisational accountability. In consideration that information is an integral asset of most organisations, the protection of this asset will increasingly rely on organisational capabilities in security.  In the medical arena this information is primarily sensitive patient-based information. Previous research has shown that application of security measures is a low priority for primary care medical practice and that awareness of the risks are seriously underestimated. Consequently, information security governance will be a key issue for medical practice in the future. Information security governance is a relatively new term and there is little existing research into how to meet governance requirements. The limited research that exists describes information security governance frameworks at a strategic level. However, since medical practice is already lagging in the implementation of appropriate security, such definition may not be practical although it is obviously desirable. This paper describes an on-going action research project undertaken in the area of medical information security, and presents a tactical approach model aimed at addressing information security governance and the protection of medical data. 

  2. Research into practice: Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC) for Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire (NDL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowley, Emma; Morriss, Richard; Currie, Graeme; Schneider, Justine

    2012-05-03

    To address the problem of translation from research-based evidence to routine healthcare practice, the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, and Lincolnshire (CLAHRC-NDL) was funded by the National Institute for Health Research as one of nine CLAHRCs across England. This paper outlines the underlying theory and its application that CLAHRC-NDL has adopted, as a case example that might be generalised to practice outside the CLAHRC, in comparison to alternative models of implementation. Conventional approaches to health research frequently generate evidence in isolation from the environment in which it is intended for use. The premise of the CLAHRC-NDL model is that barriers to implementation can be overcome if knowledge is co-produced by academic and clinical service staff, taking account of the organisational context in which it is to be applied. This approach is founded on organisational learning theory, recognising that change is a social and political phenomenon. Evidence is produced in real time, taking full account of the environment in which it is to be implemented. To support this process, senior health service staff are seconded to the CLAHRC as 'diffusion fellows' (DFs) to actively bridge the research to practice gap by being a full member of both the research team and their area of clinical practice. To facilitate innovation and embed change in the local health community, existing communities of practice are enhanced and new ones are fostered around specific themes. Our approach has been adopted by 16 clinical research studies in the areas of mental health, children and young people, primary care, and stroke rehabilitation. The CLAHRC-NDL model of implementation applies organisational learning theory by addressing the social and situational barriers and enablers to implementation, and adopting a philosophy of co-production. Two key mechanisms for translation of innovation have been utilised: DFs

  3. Research into practice: Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care (CLAHRC for Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, Lincolnshire (NDL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowley Emma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To address the problem of translation from research-based evidence to routine healthcare practice, the Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care for Nottinghamshire, Derbyshire, and Lincolnshire (CLAHRC-NDL was funded by the National Institute for Health Research as one of nine CLAHRCs across England. This paper outlines the underlying theory and its application that CLAHRC-NDL has adopted, as a case example that might be generalised to practice outside the CLAHRC, in comparison to alternative models of implementation. Discussion Conventional approaches to health research frequently generate evidence in isolation from the environment in which it is intended for use. The premise of the CLAHRC-NDL model is that barriers to implementation can be overcome if knowledge is co-produced by academic and clinical service staff, taking account of the organisational context in which it is to be applied. This approach is founded on organisational learning theory, recognising that change is a social and political phenomenon. Evidence is produced in real time, taking full account of the environment in which it is to be implemented. To support this process, senior health service staff are seconded to the CLAHRC as ‘diffusion fellows’ (DFs to actively bridge the research to practice gap by being a full member of both the research team and their area of clinical practice. To facilitate innovation and embed change in the local health community, existing communities of practice are enhanced and new ones are fostered around specific themes. Our approach has been adopted by 16 clinical research studies in the areas of mental health, children and young people, primary care, and stroke rehabilitation. Summary The CLAHRC-NDL model of implementation applies organisational learning theory by addressing the social and situational barriers and enablers to implementation, and adopting a philosophy of co-production. Two key

  4. A review of practical reasoning in child and youth research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ljungdalh, Anders Kruse

    2016-01-01

    , and an in-depth analysis of 39 articles was conducted, elaborating the conceptual differences inherent in the different child research fields. Based on a philosophy of practice, the analysis identified 3 different causal connections between the concepts of competence and participation, indicating 3......The purpose of the review is to investigate various relations between the concepts of competence and participation found within child and youth research with the aim of identifying differences in practical reasoning of the various kinds of child research. The search identified 260 articles...... different ways of understanding means and ends in child research. The review thereby offers an understanding of how and why interdisciplinary problems sometimes occur in education and child care....

  5. Public health: disconnections between policy, practice and research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kok Gerjo

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Public health includes policy, practice and research but to sufficiently connect academic research, practice and public health policy appears to be difficult. Collaboration between policy, practice and research is imperative to obtaining more solid evidence in public health. However, the three domains do not easily work together because they emanate from three more or less independent 'niches'. Work cycles of each niche have the same successive steps: problem recognition, approach formulation, implementation, and evaluation, but are differently worked out. So far, the research has focused on agenda-setting which belongs to the first step, as expressed by Kingdon, and on the use of academic knowledge in policy makers' decision-making processes which belongs to the fourth step, as elaborated by Weiss. In addition, there are more steps in the policy-making process where exchange is needed. Method A qualitative descriptive research was conducted by literature search. We analyzed the four steps of the policy, practice and research work cycles. Next, we interpreted the main conflicting aspects as disconnections for each step. Results There are some conspicuous differences that strengthen the niche character of each domain and hamper integration and collaboration. Disconnections ranged from formulating priorities in problem statements to power roles, appraisal of evidence, work attitudes, work pace, transparency of goals, evaluation and continuation strategies and public accountability. Creating awareness of these disconnections may result in more compatibility between researchers, policy makers and practitioners. Conclusion We provide an analysis that can be used by public health services-related researchers, practitioners and policy makers to be aware of the risk for disconnections. A synthesis of the social, practical and scientific relevance of public health problems should be the starting point for a dialogue that seeks to

  6. Toward a Course Conversion Model for Distance Learning: A Review of Best Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Agustino, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The current literature examining the design of effective online learning opportunities recommends an array of best practices but no agreed upon and unifying model. The purpose of this paper is to survey the existing research of effective design models for online learning in an attempt to identify best practices and present a new model.…

  7. Drosophila models for cancer research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal, Marcos; Cagan, Ross L

    2006-02-01

    Drosophila is a model system for cancer research. Investigation with fruit flies has facilitated a number of important recent discoveries in the field: the hippo signaling pathway, which coordinates cell proliferation and death to achieve normal tissue size; 'social' behaviors of cells, including cell competition and apoptosis-induced compensatory proliferation, that help ensure normal tissue size; and a growing understanding of how oncogenes and tumor suppressors cooperate to achieve tumor growth and metastasis in situ. In the future, Drosophila models can be extended beyond basic research in the search for human therapeutics.

  8. Integrating research, clinical practice and translation: the Singapore experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiang; Wong, Damon Wing Kee; Zhang, Zhuo; Lee, Beng-Hai; Gao, Xinting; Yin, Fengshou; Zhang, Jielin; Htoo, Min Thet

    2013-01-01

    We introduce the experiences of the Singapore ocular imaging team, iMED, in integrating image processing and computer-aided diagnosis research with clinical practice and knowledge, towards the development of ocular image processing technologies for clinical usage with potential impact. In this paper, we outline key areas of research with their corresponding image modalities, as well as providing a systematic introduction of the datasets used for validation.

  9. Enacting the 'mobile' in tourism studies - Unraveling research practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Martin Trandberg

    the conceptual ambiguousness of the term ‘mobile methods’. In order to explore this ambiguousness the chapter provides a number of examples deriving from tourism research, to explore how mobile methods are always entangled in ideologies, predispositions, conventions and practice-realities. Accordingly...... for a deeper sensitivity to the all-but-purposive, occasionally unintentional, even vulnerable, role of embodiment in critical mobilities research....

  10. e-Learning and action research as transformative practice

    OpenAIRE

    Farren, Margaret

    2008-01-01

    As a reflective practitioner of higher education, Margaret Farren seeks to contribute to a knowledge base of professional practice by using a "living educational theory" form of action research in her approach to teaching and learning. She focuses her research on the Masters program in e-learning at Dublin City University where professional educators from a variety of private and public institutions seek to transform their pedagogy and their students' learning experiences through the ...

  11. Prognosis Research Strategy (PROGRESS 3: prognostic model research.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewout W Steyerberg

    Full Text Available Prognostic models are abundant in the medical literature yet their use in practice seems limited. In this article, the third in the PROGRESS series, the authors review how such models are developed and validated, and then address how prognostic models are assessed for their impact on practice and patient outcomes, illustrating these ideas with examples.

  12. Research's Practice and Barriers of Knowledge Translation in Iran.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saharnaz Nedjat

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge Translation is a process that includes synthesis, dissemination, exchange and application of knowledge to improve the health, services and products In this study we have attempted to examine the knowledge translation practice and its perceived barriers on the universalities and research institutes (research sector in Iran.Both qualitative and quantitative approaches were used. In the quantitative section, a questionnaire had prepared for this study was completed by 88 authors country wide from randomly selected papers. In the qualitative section 13 in-depth interviews and 6 focus group discussions were held with managers and policy makers, clinical and health service providers, and researchers.Twenty four percent of the authors had no interaction whatsoever with the target audience. Lack of expectation toward creating change in the target audience, researchers' incentives, low level of trust among researchers and decision makers, absence of a predefined mechanism for delivery of research results and inappropriate research priorities were among the most important barriers identified in the qualitative section.Translation of research findings into some concrete outputs which can affect health of people is not in mandate of researchers and subsequently they are not prepared for this as well. Based on the barriers identified, it seems that the following interventions are necessary: cooperation among policy makers at macro and meso (organizational level and the research sector; establishing networks for researchers and decision makers in choosing the research topic, priority setting, and building trust among researchers and policy makers.

  13. Practice and model of embedded subject service for research in nursing science in hospital library%医院图书馆嵌入护理科研的学科化服务实践及模式

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    田杰; 罗志宏

    2015-01-01

    介绍了重庆医科大学附属第一医院图书馆嵌入护理科研过程的学科化服务实践经验,如面向护理人员建设和推介资源,辅助其搜集和阅读相关资料,提供论文撰写的培训服务,并为其投稿提供选刊服务等。结合这些经验,总结出资源建设和推介并重、嵌入过程的系统服务、团队协同攻关等嵌入护理科研的学科化服务模式。%After the practical experiences with embedded subject service for research in nursing science in Library , The First Affiliated Hospital of Chongqing Medical University was described , such as constructing and recommending resources for nursing staff , helping them to search and read related resources , providing training service of how to write and submit papers , the models of embedded subject service for research in nursing science were summarized , such as laying equal stress on construction and recommendation of resources , systematic service in the embedding processes , and tackling problems by groups in coordination .

  14. Energy research for practice; Energieforschung fuer die Praxis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lang, Johannes (ed.) [FIZ Karlsruhe, Bonn (Germany). BINE Informationsdienst

    2006-07-01

    The BINE editorial team, experts with a background in engineering and journalism, provide information in an independent, experienced and critical manner. Current information from research and pilot projects is thoroughly researched and prepared in a target-group-oriented way. The three series of brochures (Projektinfo, Themeninfo and basisEnergie), which describe results and experience gathered from research projects, are geared toward those who could potentially apply this information in practice, i.e. developers, planners, consultants, investors, energy suppliers and occupants. These publications, as well as the BINE newsletter, can be subscribed to at no cost. At www.bine.info, the information provided is systematically interconnected with additional information. The BINE Information Service facilitates the transfer of knowledge and information from energy research to practice, while cooperating closely with companies and institutions which, within the framework of sponsored projects, work to make efficiency technologies and renewable energy sources ready for use. Numerous collaborations with establishments in the fields of research, education and practice, as well as with trade press and politicians, serve to accelerate the application of energy research topics. The BINE Information Service is provided by FIZ Karlsruhe and sponsored by the German Federal Ministry of Economics and Technology. (orig.)

  15. Researching Design, Experience and Practice of Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodgson, Vivien; de Laat, Maarten; McConnell, David;

    2014-01-01

    In the introductory chapter, we explore how networked learning has developed in recent years by summarising and discussing the research presented in the chapters of the book. The chapters are structured in three sections, each highlighting a particular aspect of practice. The first section focuse...... and spaces); the agency and active role of technology within networked learning; and the messy, often chaotic and always political nature of the design, experience and practice of networked learning....... on the relationship between design and its influence on how networked learning practices are implemented. The second section extends this discussion by raising the notion of experiencing networked learning practices. Here the expected and unexpected effects of design and its implementation are scrutinised. The third...

  16. Arts Practice and Research: Locating Alterity and Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grennan, Simon

    2015-01-01

    There is still no agreed pedagogic definition of practice-based research. However, there is not a dearth of definitions, but rather a wide variety, predicated upon the developing programmes of individual places of study. This article will examine these definitions in terms of underlying concepts of intentionality and alterity and the ways in which…

  17. Research Student and Supervisor. An Approach to Good Supervisory Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council of Graduate Schools in the U.S., Washington, DC.

    The lack of a planned, disciplined, and well-supervised approach to research which frustrates a student's timely completion of a Ph.D. program is addressed. Some practices are discussed which, if adopted, could lead many more students to complete their Ph.D. expeditiously. A framework is presented that is intended to help the student and the…

  18. Teen Pregnancy and Education: Politics of Knowledge, Research, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillow, Wanda

    2006-01-01

    This article explores the politics surrounding the education of pregnant/mothering students. Utilizing Title IX, which guarantees the rights of pregnant/mothering students to an education equal to her peers, as an analytical lens, the author specifically identifies how absences in knowledge, research, and practice about the education of…

  19. The Practice and Promise of Prison Programming. Research Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Sarah; Mears, Daniel P.; Dubin, Glenn; Travis, Jeremy

    This study focused on employment-related programs in prison, exploring what the research literature tells about the effectiveness of prison-based education, vocational training, and prison industry on postrelease outcomes. Also studied was the state of practice of such programs and strategic opportunities for improving existing employment-related…

  20. Management of bibliographic information by Dutch researchers in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, AAH; Jong, BMD

    1997-01-01

    Background. As a result of changes in information technology and the rapid growth of publications methods of searching the literature have changed. Systematic searching of the growing literature has become very important. It is not known whether researchers in general practice search systematically,

  1. Applying Current Theory and Research in Career Exploration to Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blustein, David L.

    1992-01-01

    Provides selected review of two lines of recent research on career exploration (identifying antecedents of exploratory activity and application of information processes biases to career exploration), with specific focus on applications for counseling practice. Describes relevant counseling interventions and concludes with summary of six goals to…

  2. Research into Practice: Listening Strategies in an Instructed Classroom Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Suzanne

    2017-01-01

    This paper considers research and practice relating to listening in instructed classroom settings, limiting itself to what might be called unidirectional listening (Macaro, Graham & Vanderplank 2007)--in other words, where learners listen to a recording, a TV or radio clip or lecture, but where there is no communication back to the speaker(s).…

  3. Vygotsky's Legacy: A Foundation for Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gredler, Margaret E.; Shields, Carolyn Claytor

    2007-01-01

    Most educators are familiar with Lev Vygotsky's concept of the "zone of proximal development," yet the bulk of Vygotsky's pioneering theory of cognitive development largely remains unknown. This volume provides a systematic, authoritative overview of Vygotsky's work and its implications for educational research and practice. Major topics include…

  4. Beauty: A Concept with Practical Implications for Teacher Researchers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winston, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Hillman's (2001) simple affirmation that "an idea of beauty is useful, functional, practical" is one this article attempts to pursue with teacher researchers in mind, based on the belief that to move from the "re"pression of beauty to its "ex"pression--or, at the very least, to its articulation--will enlighten rather than distract individuals. The…

  5. Children's Career Development: Metaphorical Images of Theory, Research, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Mark; McMahon, Mary

    2008-01-01

    This summative article discusses 5 invited contributions on children's career development. The authors of these articles were asked to consider the status quo of children's career development, issues facing this field, and future directions. Several emergent themes focused on theory, research, and practice and their interactive potential in…

  6. Sustaining Sustainability: The Pedagogical Drift of Art Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garoian, Charles R.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the philosophical theories of Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari are juxtaposed with the research and practice of environmental artists Helen Mayer Harrison and Newton Harrison in order to explore and examine correspondences between their respective ways of thinking and performing sustainability. The complex and contradictory…

  7. Arts Practice and Research: Locating Alterity and Expertise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grennan, Simon

    2015-01-01

    There is still no agreed pedagogic definition of practice-based research. However, there is not a dearth of definitions, but rather a wide variety, predicated upon the developing programmes of individual places of study. This article will examine these definitions in terms of underlying concepts of intentionality and alterity and the ways in which…

  8. Developments in research on mathematical practice and cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pease, Alison; Guhe, Markus; Smaill, Alan

    2013-04-01

    We describe recent developments in research on mathematical practice and cognition and outline the nine contributions in this special issue of topiCS. We divide these contributions into those that address (a) mathematical reasoning: patterns, levels, and evaluation; (b) mathematical concepts: evolution and meaning; and (c) the number concept: representation and processing.

  9. Management of bibliographic information by Dutch researchers in general practice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhoeven, AAH; Jong, BMD

    Background. As a result of changes in information technology and the rapid growth of publications methods of searching the literature have changed. Systematic searching of the growing literature has become very important. It is not known whether researchers in general practice search systematically,

  10. Female Teachers' Professional Development through Action Research Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassen, Rukya

    2016-01-01

    This is a study on teachers' professional development through action research practice. The participants of the study were 23 English Language Teachers (ELT) who teach in high schools, preparatory schools and colleges in Debre Markos, in Dessie and around in 2014. The methods of data collection were teacher reflection, and in-depth interview. The…

  11. Behavioral Marital Therapy: Current Trends in Research, Assessment and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Neil S.

    1980-01-01

    Behavioral Marital Therapy (BMT) is clinically useful because it includes elaborating procedures, modifying the spouse's self-defeating cognitions, and moving toward early intervention and prevention. Each article in this issue of American Journal of Family Therapy focuses on innovations in BMT, either in research or practice. (Author/NRB)

  12. Next Steps for Research and Practice in Career Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynes, Kathryn

    2012-01-01

    Career programming is a useful framework for thinking about how to support youth development across schools and multiple out-of-school-time contexts. The articles in this issue of "New Directions for Youth Development" highlight the broad research base relevant to career programming from which policy and practice can draw. This concluding article…

  13. The Moral Vacuum in Teacher Education Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanger, Matthew; Osguthorpe, Richard

    2013-01-01

    This chapter examines the gap between the widespread acknowledgment that teaching is a moral endeavor, on the one hand, and the lack of explicit, systematic teacher education research and practice to support preparing teachers for the moral aspects of teaching. After providing an initial description of the aforementioned gap, the chapter surveys…

  14. Theory Development: A Bridge between Practice and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southern, Stephen; Devlin, James

    2010-01-01

    Theory development is an intentional process by which marriage and family counselors may bridge the gap between research and practice. The theory building process includes inductive and deductive forms of reasoning, qualitative and quantitative approaches to knowledge development, and diffusion of innovations. Grounded theory provides an…

  15. Collaborative Practices in Dance Research: Unpacking the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Sherrie

    2015-01-01

    This essay explores the numerous and diverse ways collaborative practices in dance research can unfold. Strengths and challenges within the collaborative process are discussed as emphasis is given to the multiple perspectives and types of relationships that evolve from and within the process. These core elements offer scholars a rich array of…

  16. Collaborative Practices in Dance Research: Unpacking the Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Sherrie

    2015-01-01

    This essay explores the numerous and diverse ways collaborative practices in dance research can unfold. Strengths and challenges within the collaborative process are discussed as emphasis is given to the multiple perspectives and types of relationships that evolve from and within the process. These core elements offer scholars a rich array of…

  17. Practical Considerations for Using Exploratory Factor Analysis in Educational Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beavers, Amy S.; Lounsbury, John W.; Richards, Jennifer K.; Huck, Schuyler W.; Skolits, Gary J.; Esquivel, Shelley L.

    2013-01-01

    The uses and methodology of factor analysis are widely debated and discussed, especially the issues of rotational use, methods of confirmatory factor analysis, and adequate sample size. The variety of perspectives and often conflicting opinions can lead to confusion among researchers about best practices for using factor analysis. The focus of the…

  18. Research Perspectives and Best Practices in Educational Technology Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keengwe, Jared

    2013-01-01

    With advancements in technology continuing to influence all areas of society, students in current classrooms have a different understanding and perspective of learning than the educational system has been designed to teach. Research Perspectives and Best Practices in Educational Technology Integration highlights the emerging digital age, its…

  19. Practice and Research in Career Counseling and Development--2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chope, Robert C.

    2008-01-01

    This annual review of the research and practice literature related to career counseling and development during 2007 is presented in 9 areas: professional issues, career assessment, career development, career theory and concepts, career interventions, advances in technology, personnel selection and job placement, international perspectives, and…

  20. Linking Theory to Practice in Learning Technology Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Cathy; Steel, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    We present a case to reposition theory so that it plays a pivotal role in learning technology research and helps to build an ecology of learning. To support the case, we present a critique of current practice based on a review of articles published in two leading international journals from 2005 to 2010. Our study reveals that theory features only…

  1. Educational Research in Educational Practice: Predictors of Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lysenko, Larysa V.; Abrami, Philip C.; Dagenais, Christian; Janosz, Michel

    2014-01-01

    This study investigates the predictors of school practitioners' (N = 2,425) use of educational research. The suggested model explained significantly but modestly the infrequent use of educational research by practitioners. Of the four factors in the study, "opinions about research" had the most explanatory power. The results are…

  2. The Other in Educational Research: Some Postmodern Implications for Educational Practice, Theory, Research and Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenthal, Del

    2003-01-01

    This article explores various questions through examining such postmodern thinkers as Derrida, Lacan and, in particular, Levinas. Can educational research be an ethical practice? Should educational research be about putting the other first? What is the responsibility of the educational researcher for the educators' responsibility? What is the…

  3. Research-practice interactions as reported in recent design research studies: Still promising, still hazy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, Bart; Pareja Roblin, Natalie; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke; Pieters, Jules

    2012-01-01

    Ormel, B., Pareja Roblin, N., McKenney, S., Voogt, J., & Pieters, J. (2012). Research-practice interactions as reported in recent design research studies: Still promising, still hazy. Educational Technology Research & Development, 60(6), 967-986. doi:10.1007/s11423-012-9261-6

  4. Knowledge Translation Research: The Science of Moving Research into Policy and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Janet A.; Grimshaw, Jeremy M.; Hayden, Jill A.; Campbell, Barbara

    2011-01-01

    Research findings will not change health outcomes unless health care organizations, systems, and professionals adopt them in practice. Knowledge translation research is the scientific study of the methods to promote the uptake of research findings by patients, health care providers, managers, and policy makers. Many forms of enquiry addressing…

  5. Auto-Photography as Research Practice: Identity and Self-Esteem Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noland, Carey M.

    2006-01-01

    This paper explores auto-photography as a form of research practice in the area of identity and self-esteem research. It allows researchers to capture and articulate the ways identity guides human action and thought. It involves the generation and examination of the static images that participants themselves believe best represent them.…

  6. Research-practice interactions as reported in recent design research studies: Still promising, still hazy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ormel, Bart; Pareja Roblin, Natalie; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke; Pieters, Jules

    2012-01-01

    Ormel, B., Pareja Roblin, N., McKenney, S., Voogt, J., & Pieters, J. (2012). Research-practice interactions as reported in recent design research studies: Still promising, still hazy. Educational Technology Research & Development, 60(6), 967-986. doi:10.1007/s11423-012-9261-6

  7. The Other in Educational Research: Some Postmodern Implications for Educational Practice, Theory, Research and Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenthal, Del

    2003-01-01

    This article explores various questions through examining such postmodern thinkers as Derrida, Lacan and, in particular, Levinas. Can educational research be an ethical practice? Should educational research be about putting the other first? What is the responsibility of the educational researcher for the educators' responsibility? What is the…

  8. Bourdieu's theory of practice and its potential in nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhynas, Sarah J

    2005-04-01

    This paper seeks to consider the utility of Bourdieu's "Theory of Practice" in nursing, and considers specifically its use as a framework for research exploring nurses' conceptualizations of illness and the patients in their care. Bourdieu's work uses the concepts of field, capital and habitus to explain interactions within the social world. This paper describes these concepts and their relationship with nursing is discussed using dementia care as an example. The work of French scholar Pierre Bourdieu has contributed to debates throughout the social sciences, but has had relatively little attention in the nursing literature. Pierre Bourdieu's work developed against a backdrop of change in the academic world. The emergence of the social sciences and the debate around objective and subjective styles of research were influential in the development of his "Theory of Practice". The importance of the conceptualization process is discussed, and the considerable potential influence of conceptualization on patient care is highlighted. Reflexivity is a cornerstone of Bourdieu's work, and is an important feature of nursing research. Examples of health care research using his work as a framework are discussed, and some of the challenges of the approach are outlined. The use of Bourdieu's "Theory of Practice" as a research framework could allow nurse researchers to explore the interactions of nurses with the structures, agents and symbols of illness within the field of care. This work could enhance understanding of how nurses view and react to patients in their care, and promote the development of practice innovations and policy change. The theory may, therefore, have much to offer future nursing research.

  9. [From the production to the use of research results in care practice: a consolidating experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Carvalho, Emília Campos; Laus, Ana Maria; Caliri, Maria Helena Larcher; Rossi, Luci Grupioni

    2010-01-01

    Although it is desirable that professionals use research results, often they are not prepared for that. This article aims to present the process of development and establishment of innovations, based on Rogers' model, through strategies to train nurses to use the best evidences for a quality clinical practice. It is a partnership between a educational institution and a hospital care institution. Following identification of problems from nurses' own practice in a health institution research proposals were developed to search for evidences and to test interventions. Results of this experience evidenced the viability of use of a model presented as a methodological framework what contributed to reach the institutions' goal.

  10. Process research on Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) for couples: linking theory to practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenman, Paul S; Johnson, Susan M

    2013-03-01

    The focus of this article is on the link among theory, process, and outcome in the practice of Emotionally Focused Therapy (EFT) for couples. We describe the EFT model of change and the EFT perspective on adult love as the reflection of underlying attachment processes. We outline the manner in which theory and research inform EFT interventions. This leads into a detailed review of the literature on the processes of change in EFT. We highlight the client responses and therapist operations that have emerged from process research and their relation to treatment outcomes. We discuss the implications of this body of research for clinical practice and training.

  11. Limitations and potentials of design materials within collaborative research practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunn, Wendy; Said Mosleh, Wafa

    The workshop explores the limitations and potentials of design materials to instigate cross-disciplinary research across a university’s technical, humanities and social science faculties. Our aim is to understand possibilities for wider participation within research processes and practices...... and to propose future directions for involving a broader grouping of peoples. During the workshop we will engage participants in the co-analysis of documentation generated through a series of open space research seminars, whereby design was the process of inquiry (2013 – ongoing at SDU Design Research). SDU...... Design Research, University of Southern Denmark attempts to provide a collaborative research environment, which embraces design from a set of complementary methods and methodologies. Findings from the workshop will contribute to a wider debate focusing on the affects of design materials in collaborations...

  12. Practical methods for generating alternating magnetic fields for biomedical research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Michael G.; Howe, Christina M.; Bono, David C.; Perreault, David J.; Anikeeva, Polina

    2017-08-01

    Alternating magnetic fields (AMFs) cause magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) to dissipate heat while leaving surrounding tissue unharmed, a mechanism that serves as the basis for a variety of emerging biomedical technologies. Unfortunately, the challenges and costs of developing experimental setups commonly used to produce AMFs with suitable field amplitudes and frequencies present a barrier to researchers. This paper first presents a simple, cost-effective, and robust alternative for small AMF working volumes that uses soft ferromagnetic cores to focus the flux into a gap. As the experimental length scale increases to accommodate animal models (working volumes of 100s of cm3 or greater), poor thermal conductivity and volumetrically scaled core losses render that strategy ineffective. Comparatively feasible strategies for these larger volumes instead use low loss resonant tank circuits to generate circulating currents of 1 kA or greater in order to produce the comparable field amplitudes. These principles can be extended to the problem of identifying practical routes for scaling AMF setups to humans, an infrequently acknowledged challenge that influences the extent to which many applications of MNPs may ever become clinically relevant.

  13. The role of relationships in connecting social work research and evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Johnny M; Sherr, Michael E

    2014-01-01

    Critics of evidence-based practice (EBP) often challenge the efficacy of applying social work research in practice. Such skepticism underscores the historic chasm that still exists between social work researchers and practitioners. If taught and implemented consistently, the EBP model can mend the connection between researchers and practitioners by merging their roles. Merging their roles, however, requires a renewed emphasis on relationships in the research process. This article explores the role of relationships in social work research. Using a researcher/practitioner continuum, we assess the types of interactions faculty have with stakeholders. We then offer strategies for cultivating relationships with stakeholders that lead to community-derived and implemented research that is critical to advancing the widespread use of EBP in social work.

  14. Team Science Approach to Developing Consensus on Research Good Practices for Practice-Based Research Networks: A Case Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell-Voytal, Kimberly; Daly, Jeanette M; Nagykaldi, Zsolt J; Aspy, Cheryl B; Dolor, Rowena J; Fagnan, Lyle J; Levy, Barcey T; Palac, Hannah L; Michaels, LeAnn; Patterson, V Beth; Kano, Miria; Smith, Paul D; Sussman, Andrew L; Williams, Robert; Sterling, Pamela; O'Beirne, Maeve; Neale, Anne Victoria

    2015-12-01

    Using peer learning strategies, seven experienced PBRNs working in collaborative teams articulated procedures for PBRN Research Good Practices (PRGPs). The PRGPs is a PBRN-specific resource to facilitate PBRN management and staff training, to promote adherence to study protocols, and to increase validity and generalizability of study findings. This paper describes the team science processes which culminated in the PRGPs. Skilled facilitators used team science strategies and methods from the Technology of Participation (ToP®), and the Consensus Workshop Method to support teams to codify diverse research expertise in practice-based research. The participatory nature of "sense-making" moved through identifiable stages. Lessons learned include (1) team input into the scope of the final outcome proved vital to project relevance; (2) PBRNs with diverse domains of research expertise contributed broad knowledge on each topic; and (3) ToP® structured facilitation techniques were critical for establishing trust and clarifying the "sense-making" process.

  15. Guidance for using mixed methods design in nursing practice research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiang-Hanisko, Lenny; Newman, David; Dyess, Susan; Piyakong, Duangporn; Liehr, Patricia

    2016-08-01

    The mixed methods approach purposefully combines both quantitative and qualitative techniques, enabling a multi-faceted understanding of nursing phenomena. The purpose of this article is to introduce three mixed methods designs (parallel; sequential; conversion) and highlight interpretive processes that occur with the synthesis of qualitative and quantitative findings. Real world examples of research studies conducted by the authors will demonstrate the processes leading to the merger of data. The examples include: research questions; data collection procedures and analysis with a focus on synthesizing findings. Based on experience with mixed methods studied, the authors introduce two synthesis patterns (complementary; contrasting), considering application for practice and implications for research.

  16. Research Circles - a method for developing guidance practices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2012-01-01

    This video reports on our work with using research circles to improve our understanding of how to provide guidance and counseling to help young people in danger of dropping out of school. The video is based on the paper: Research Circles -- a method for developing guidance practices......, and was presented at the Conference for Social Justice, Prosperity and Sustainable Employment 2012 by assistant professor Helle Merete Nordentoft from DPU (http://edu.au.dk/). The film communicating the research paper was created by Mie Nørgaard...

  17. Introducing a Concept Hierarchy for the Journal of Research Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Ulrich

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available With this issue of the Journal of Research Practice, we initiate a conceptual framework for thinking and writing about research, defining areas of editorial focus, and indexing work published in the journal. The framework takes the form of a concept hierarchy that offers index terms at three interrelated levels: (1 focus areas for reflection on research practice within which the journal aims to achieve excellence and strengthen its profile and visibility, (2 subject areas relevant to research practice that the journal aims to cover and in terms of which it defines its focus areas, and (3 keywords for capturing the content of research work done in these subject areas or for reflecting and writing about it. Focus areas are characterized by assigned subject areas; subject areas are characterized by assigned keywords. The concept hierarchy is part of a more comprehensive initiative to strengthen the journal's profile and visibility, an initiative that will also include a restructuring of the editorial team and new roles for the journal's dedicated reviewers and active readers. The article introduces an initial version of the concept hierarchy, explains its intended use and further development, and situates it in the larger effort of which it is a part.

  18. Methodological criteria for the internal validity and utility of practice oriented research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenbergh, I.L.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Verschuren, P.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    For conducting practice oriented research different research strategies are available. In this paper a typology is developed for differentiating between practice oriented research strategies that are data based and participatory research strategies. The former category involves quantitative and

  19. Methodological criteria for the internal validity and utility of practice oriented research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bleijenbergh, I.L.; Korzilius, H.P.L.M.; Verschuren, P.J.M.

    2011-01-01

    For conducting practice oriented research different research strategies are available. In this paper a typology is developed for differentiating between practice oriented research strategies that are data based and participatory research strategies. The former category involves quantitative and qual

  20. Joint research and the development of social work practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulf-Andersen, Trine Østergaard; Hovland, Wenche

    - and on discussions of how the knowledge produced can contribute in the development of social work practice. We take two research projects as our point of departure, one from Denmark and one from Norway. In the Danish study, young people in contact with different social services (for young people experiencing self...... of how these studies and research processes can inform each other, and how this kind of knowledge (productions) can contribute in the development of social work practice across different national contexts. We would like workshop participants to actively discuss central questions – like for instance: What...... researchers, service users and social work practitioners? We suggest facilitating an exercise (of about 30-35 minutes) where central questions are written on cards. Each workshop participant draws a card, finds a conversation partner in the room and asks the question on the card. They have a discussion...

  1. Neural network models: Insights and prescriptions from practical applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samad, T. [Honeywell Technology Center, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Neural networks are no longer just a research topic; numerous applications are now testament to their practical utility. In the course of developing these applications, researchers and practitioners have been faced with a variety of issues. This paper briefly discusses several of these, noting in particular the rich connections between neural networks and other, more conventional technologies. A more comprehensive version of this paper is under preparation that will include illustrations on real examples. Neural networks are being applied in several different ways. Our focus here is on neural networks as modeling technology. However, much of the discussion is also relevant to other types of applications such as classification, control, and optimization.

  2. Mouse models for cancer research

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Zhang; Lynette Moore; Ping Ji

    2011-01-01

    Mouse models of cancer enable researchers to leamn about tumor biology in complicated and dynamic physiological systems. Since the development of gene targeting in mice, cancer biologists have been among the most frequent users of transgenic mouse models, which have dramatically increased knowledge about how cancers form and grow. The Chinese Joumnal of Cancer will publish a series of papers reporting the use of mouse models in studying genetic events in cancer cases. This editorial is an overview of the development and applications of mouse models of cancer and directs the reader to upcoming papers describing the use of these models to be published in coming issues, beginning with three articles in the current issue.

  3. Research ethics consultation: ethical and professional practice challenges and recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Richard R; Taylor, Holly A; Brinich, Margaret A; Boyle, Mary M; Cho, Mildred; Coors, Marilyn; Danis, Marion; Havard, Molly; Magnus, David; Wilfond, Benjamin

    2015-05-01

    The complexity of biomedical research has increased considerably in the last decade, as has the pace of translational research. This complexity has generated a number of novel ethical issues for clinical investigators, institutional review boards (IRBs), and other oversight committees. In response, many academic medical centers have created formal research ethics consultation (REC) services to help clinical investigators and IRBs navigate ethical issues in biomedical research. Key functions of a REC service include assisting with research design and implementation, providing a forum for deliberative exploration of ethical issues, and supplementing regulatory oversight. As increasing numbers of academic research institutions establish REC services, there is a pressing need for consensus about the primary aims and policies that should guide these activities. Establishing clear expectations about the aims and policies of REC services is important if REC programs are to achieve their full potential. Drawing on the experiences of a Clinical and Translational Science Award Research Ethics Consultation Working Group, this article describes three major ethical and professional practice challenges associated with the provision of REC: (1) managing multiple institutional roles and responsibilities, (2) managing sensitive information, and (3) communicating with consultation requestors about how these issues are managed. The paper also presents several practical strategies for addressing these challenges and enhancing the quality of REC services.

  4. Research Ethics Consultation: Ethical and Professional Practice Challenges and Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Richard R.; Taylor, Holly A.; Brinich, Margaret A.; Boyle, Mary M.; Cho, Mildred; Coors, Marilyn; Danis, Marion; Havard, Molly; Magnus, David; Wilfond, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    The complexity of biomedical research has increased considerably in the last decade, as has the pace of translational research. This complexity has generated a number of novel ethical issues for clinical investigators, institutional review boards (IRBs), and other oversight committees. In response, many academic medical centers have created formal research ethics consultation (REC) services to help clinical investigators and IRBs navigate ethical issues in biomedical research. Key functions of a REC service include: assisting with research design and implementation, providing a forum for deliberative exploration of ethical issues, and supplementing regulatory oversight. As increasing numbers of academic research institutions establish REC services, there is a pressing need for consensus about the primary aims and policies that should guide these activities. Establishing clear expectations about the aims and policies of REC services is important if REC programs are to achieve their full potential. Drawing on the experiences of a Clinical Translational Science Award (CTSA) Research Ethics Consultation Working Group, this article describes three major ethical and professional practice challenges associated with the provision of REC: 1) managing multiple institutional roles and responsibilities, 2) managing sensitive information, and 3) communicating with consultation requestors about how these issues are managed. The paper also presents several practical strategies for addressing these challenges and enhancing the quality of REC services. PMID:25607942

  5. Dilemmas in international research and the value of practical wisdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, Kimberly

    2016-07-18

    When conducting research in an international setting, in a country different than that of the researcher, unpredictable circumstances can arise. A study conducted by a novice North American researcher with a vulnerable population in northern Ghana highlights these happenings with an emphasis placed on the ethical challenges encountered. An illustration from the research is used to highlight an ethical dilemma while in the field, and how utilizing a moral decision-making framework can assist in making choices about a participant's right to autonomy, privacy, and confidentiality during the research process. Moral frameworks, however, can never be enough to solve a dilemma since guidelines only describe what to aim for and not how to interpret or use them. Researchers must therefore strive to move beyond these frameworks to employ practical wisdom or phronesis so to combine the right thing to do with the skill required to figure out what the right choice is. The skill of practical wisdom must be acquired because without it international researchers indecisively fumble around with good intentions, often leaving a situation in worse shape than they found it.

  6. "Practice oriented" model of social work education model research importance%“实务导向”型社会工作教育模式重要性研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    柏莉娟

    2015-01-01

    addition to the theoretical localization in one of the most urgent to solve the problem. How to efficiently cultivate professional theory with practice ability of professionals, with professional characteristics and forms of social work talent education mode is the key of the current social work in Chinese colleges and professional development. By over-packaging "practice guide" type of social work education model is an innovative, namely cooperation with social services departments of colleges and universities. The type of social work education refers to the practice the direction to the social work profession into target qualification education, specifically for jobs are practical ability as the core concept of talent training, pay attention to practice, practice and practice education. Professional social work is a field as the ultimate objective of professional, professor theory and ideas of conduction is the basis of professional teaching, but ultimately want to return to the specific service projects, and project establishment and execution by effective service as fundamental, social workers and workers, volunteers to provide social services industry difference, namely, theoretical and professional specialization. China in the social work professional teaching in colleges and universities, however, for a long time in the traditional classroom teaching theory as a major means of training, even if a few colleges and universities begin to pay close attention to social work professional solid exercise training, but due to the lack of real operating platform, hardware facilities, training, and the lagging behind of the classroom teaching of class conflict, etc. There is a problem, are reminded to promote the development of overall level of social services, training of high-quality professional talents, social workers to "professional social work practice oriented" new education pattern transformation is imminent.

  7. Models and design principles for teacher research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Smit, Ben; Zwart, Rosanne|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/298981823

    2014-01-01

    Teacher research is a way to bridge the gap between theory and teaching practice. Various types of teacher research can be distinguished, including most commonly: action research, selfstudy, lesson study, design-based research, and scholarship of teaching and learning. All types of teacher research

  8. Models and design principles for teacher research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Admiraal, Wilfried; Smit, Ben; Zwart, Rosanne

    2014-01-01

    Teacher research is a way to bridge the gap between theory and teaching practice. Various types of teacher research can be distinguished, including most commonly: action research, selfstudy, lesson study, design-based research, and scholarship of teaching and learning. All types of teacher research

  9. The teacher as researcher and transformer of his own practice: The action research in education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colunga, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a reflection and analysis of action research as an alternative of qualitative and socio-critic paradigm by presenting the corresponding theoretical account and its role in educational environment. It highlights not only the comprehension and interpretation but transformation of the teaching practice under study. The need of studying and researching the teaching process from the perspective of the teacher performance is portrayed as a primary way of improving teaching practice.

  10. Researching Design, Experience and Practice of Networked Learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    and final section draws attention to a growing topic of interest within networked learning: that of networked learning in informal practices. In addition, we provide a reflection on the theories, methods and settings featured in the networked learning research of the chapters. We conclude the introduction...... by discussing four main themes that have emerged from our reading of the chapters and which we believe are important in taking forward the theory of networked learning. They are as follows: practice as epistemology; the coupling of learning contexts (the relationship and connection of learning contexts...

  11. Guidance for researchers developing and conducting clinical trials in practice-based research networks (PBRNs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolor, Rowena J; Schmit, Kristine M; Graham, Deborah G; Fox, Chester H; Baldwin, Laura Mae

    2014-01-01

    There is increased interest nationally in multicenter clinical trials to answer questions about clinical effectiveness, comparative effectiveness, and safety in real-world community settings. Primary care practice-based research networks (PBRNs), comprising community- and/or academically affiliated practices committed to improving medical care for a range of health problems, offer ideal settings for these trials, especially pragmatic clinical trials. However, many researchers are not familiar with working with PBRNs. Experts in practice-based research identified solutions to challenges that researchers and PBRN personnel experience when collaborating on clinical trials in PBRNs. These were organized as frequently asked questions in a draft document presented at a 2013 Agency for Health care Research and Quality PBRN conference workshop, revised based on participant feedback, then shared with additional experts from the DARTNet Institute, Clinical Translational Science Award PBRN, and North American Primary Care Research Group PBRN workgroups for further input and modification. The "Toolkit for Developing and Conducting Multi-site Clinical Trials in Practice-Based Research Networks" offers guidance in the areas of recruiting and engaging practices, budgeting, project management, and communication, as well as templates and examples of tools important in developing and conducting clinical trials. Ensuring the successful development and conduct of clinical trials in PBRNs requires a highly collaborative approach between academic research and PBRN teams. © Copyright 2014 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  12. Surgery and Research: A Practical Approach to Managing the Research Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatek, Peter R; Chung, Kevin C; Mahmoudi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Following a practical project management method is essential in completing a research project on time and within budget. Although this concept is well developed in the business world, it has yet to be explored in academic surgical research. Defining and adhering to a suitable workflow would increase portability, reusability, and therefore efficiency of the research process. In this article, the authors briefly review project management techniques. The authors specifically underline four main steps of project management-definition and organization, planning, execution, and evaluation-using practical examples from their own multidisciplinary plastic surgery research team.

  13. Surgery and Research: A Practical Approach to Managing the Research Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swiatek, Peter R.; Chung, Kevin C.; Mahmoudi, Elham

    2016-01-01

    Following a practical project management method is essential in completing a research project on time and within budget. Although this concept is well developed in the business world, it has yet to be explored in academic surgical research. Defining and adhering to a suitable workflow would increase portability, reusability, and therefore, efficiency of the research process. In this article, we briefly review project management techniques. We specifically underline four main steps of project management: (1) definition and organization, (2) planning, (3) execution, and (4) evaluation, using practical examples from our own multidisciplinary plastic surgery research team. PMID:26710037

  14. Model validation in soft systems practice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Checkland, P. [Univ. of Lancaster (United Kingdom)

    1995-03-01

    The concept of `a model` usually evokes the connotation `model of part of the real world`. That is an almost automatic response. It makes sense especially in relation to the way the concept has been developed and used in natural science. Classical operational research (OR), with its scientific aspirations, and systems engineering, use the concept in the same way and in addition use models as surrogates for the real world, on which experimentation is cheap. In these fields the key feature of a model is representativeness. In soft systems methodology (SSM) models are not of part of the world; they are only relevant to debate about the real world and are used in a cyclic learning process. The paper shows how the different concepts of validation in classical OR and SSM lead to a way of sharply defining the nature of `soft OR`. 21 refs.

  15. Altmetrics a practical guide for librarians, researchers and academics

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book gives an overview of altmetrics, their tools and how to implement them successfully to boost your research output. New methods of scholarly communication and dissemination of information are having a huge impact on how academics and researchers build profiles and share research. This groundbreaking and highly practical guide looks at the role that library and information professionals can play in facilitating these new ways of working and demonstrating impact and influence. The book explains the theory behind the growing altmetrics – alternative metrics for measuring scholarly impact, from social networks such as Twitter and blogs to online platforms such as Mendeley, ResearchGate and Altmetrics.org – movement, how it came about, why it can help improve academics and their research profiles and where it sits amongst current measurements of impact. Drawing on the expertise of leading altmetric innovators and the LIS professionals using their tools, the book explains the connections between r...

  16. An Evolution in Research Practice for Investigating International Business Relationships

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne HAMPTON

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to discuss the development and rationale of research methodology for a specific topic of research. The topic in question is an investigation into international business relationships, a complex subject and one that is very topical in the growing world of international business. It is intended to examine the logical development of research practice in our study and to show the changing thought processes and justifications we have made over a period of time. It is hoped that this discussion paper will be helpful to academics and students alike, as so often research methodology is only discussed in terms of the final method/techniques chosen with an emphasis on the technical aspects of the methods rather than relating them to the subject to be researched.

  17. Linking research and practice through teacher communities: a place where formal and practical knowledge meet?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pareja Roblin, Natalie N.; Ormel, Bart J.B.; McKenney, Susan E.; Voogt, Joke M.; Pieters, Jules M.

    2014-01-01

    This study characterises the links between research and practice across 12 projects concerned with the collaborative design of lesson plans by teacher communities (TCs). Analyses focused on sources of knowledge used to inform lesson design, participants’ roles and knowledge generated by the teacher

  18. Linking research and practice through teacher communities: A place where formal and practical knowledge meet?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pareja Roblin, Natalie; Ormel, Bart; McKenney, Susan; Voogt, Joke; Pieters, Jules

    2015-01-01

    This study characterizes the links between research and practice across twelve projects concerned with the collaborative design of lesson plans by teacher communities. Analyses focused on sources of knowledge used to inform lesson design, participants’ roles, and knowledge generated by the teacher c

  19. Linking Research and Practice through Teacher Communities: A Place Where Formal and Practical Knowledge Meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja Roblin, Natalie N.; Ormel, Bart J. B.; McKenney, Susan E.; Voogt, Joke M.; Pieters, Jules M.

    2014-01-01

    This study characterises the links between research and practice across 12 projects concerned with the collaborative design of lesson plans by teacher communities (TCs). Analyses focused on sources of knowledge used to inform lesson design, participants' roles and knowledge generated by the teacher community. Three patterns emerged pertaining…

  20. Linking Research and Practice through Teacher Communities: A Place Where Formal and Practical Knowledge Meet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pareja Roblin, Natalie N.; Ormel, Bart J. B.; McKenney, Susan E.; Voogt, Joke M.; Pieters, Jules M.

    2014-01-01

    This study characterises the links between research and practice across 12 projects concerned with the collaborative design of lesson plans by teacher communities (TCs). Analyses focused on sources of knowledge used to inform lesson design, participants' roles and knowledge generated by the teacher community. Three patterns emerged pertaining…

  1. Business model in research-development activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koszałka Jerzy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The partners and allies of business practice in the processes of modernization of the economy are scientific-research institutions, such as scientific institutes, research-development units and universities. A market on which companies can look for the solutions they need and scientific-research institutions can look for inspiration, partners and capital is being formed. The market provides conditions for operation, development and implementation of developed solutions. Taking into consideration the complexity of market, technical, legal, financial, or intellectual property protection issues, research-development units are more and more frequently unable to function efficiently without a clear and unequivocal definition of goals, methods and conditions of activity. Their market offer has to take into consideration not just scientific-research, or methodological aspects. Taking into consideration continuously growing demands of the clients and pressure of the competition, scientific-research institutions have to pay attention also to market, information, personnel, or financial aspects typical of strictly commercial ventures. What may support a comprehensive preparation and implementation of scientific-research activities under market conditions are tools successfully used in trade and economy, such as business models. These issues are the basis of deliberations contained in this work.

  2. Dentists' dietary perception and practice patterns in a dental practice-based research network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoko Yokoyama

    Full Text Available Dental caries are largely preventable, and epidemiological evidence for a relationship between diet and oral health is abundant. To date, however, dentists' perceptions about the role of diet and dentists' practice patterns regarding diet counseling have not been clarified.THE PURPOSES OF THIS STUDY WERE TO: (1 examine discordance between dentists' perception of the importance of diet in caries treatment planning and their actual provision of diet counseling to patients, and (2 identify dentists' characteristics associated with their provision of diet counseling.The study used a cross-sectional study design consisting of a questionnaire survey in Japan.The study queried dentists working in outpatient dental practices who were affiliated with the Dental Practice-Based Research Network Japan (JDPBRN, which aims to allow dentists to investigate research questions and share experiences and expertise (n = 282.Dentists were asked about their perceptions on the importance of diet and their practice patterns regarding diet counseling, as well as patient, practice, and dentist background data.The majority of participants (n = 116, 63% recognized that diet is "more important" to oral health. However, among participants who think diet is "more important" (n = 116, only 48% (n = 56 provide diet counseling to more than 20% of their patients. Multiple logistic regression analysis suggested that several variables were associated with providing diet counseling; dentist gender, practice busyness, percentage of patients interested in caries prevention, caries risk assessment, and percentage of patients who receive blood pressure screening.Some discordance exists between dentists' perception of the importance of diet in caries treatment planning and their actual practice pattern regarding diet counseling to patients. Reducing this discordance may require additional dentist education, including nutritional and systemic disease concepts; patient

  3. Introduction to Small Telescope Research Communities of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Russell M.

    2016-06-01

    Communities of practice are natural, usually informal groups of people who work together. Experienced members teach new members the “ropes.” Social learning theorist Etienne Wenger’s book, Communities of Practice: Learning, Meaning, and Identity, defined the field. There are, in astronomy, many communities of practice. One set of communities uses relatively small telescopes to observe brighter objects such as eclipsing binaries, intrinsically variable stars, transiting exoplanets, tumbling asteroids, and the occultation of background stars by asteroids and the Moon. Advances in low cost but increasingly powerful instrumentation and automation have greatly increased the research capabilities of smaller telescopes. These often professional-amateur (pro-am) communities engage in research projects that require a large number of observers as exemplified by the American Association of Variable Star Observers. For high school and community college students with an interest in science, joining a student-centered, small telescope community of practice can be both educational and inspirational. An example is the now decade-long Astronomy Research Seminar offered by Cuesta College in San Luis Obispo, California. Each student team is required to plan a project, obtain observations (either locally or via a remote robotic telescope), analyze their data, write a paper, and submit it for external review and publication. Well over 100 students, composed primarily of high school juniors and seniors, have been coauthors of several dozen published papers. Being published researchers has boosted these students’ educational careers with admissions to choice schools, often with scholarships. This seminar was recently expanded to serve multiple high schools with a volunteer assistant instructor at each school. The students meet regularly with their assistant instructor and also meet online with other teams and the seminar’s overall community college instructor. The seminar

  4. Brokering the Research-Practice Gap: A typology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Jennifer Watling; Neal, Zachary P; Kornbluh, Mariah; Mills, Kristen J; Lawlor, Jennifer A

    2015-12-01

    Despite widespread recognition of a research-practice gap in multiple service sectors, less is known about how pre-existing communication channels facilitate the flow of information between researchers and practitioners. In the current study, we applied an existing typology of brokerage developed by Gould and Fernandez (Sociol Methodol 19:89-126, 1989) to examine what types of brokerage facilitate information spread between researchers and educational practitioners. Specifically, we conducted semi-structured interviews with 19 school administrators and staff in two public school districts regarding their experiences searching for information about instructional, health, and social skills programs. Using deductive content analysis, we found evidence of all five types of brokerage identified by Gould and Fernandez (1989). However, only three types of brokerage-gatekeepers, representatives, and liaisons-were involved in the flow of information between school administrators and researchers. Moreover, information transfer often occurred in longer chains that involved multiple, distinct types of brokerage. We conclude with the broad implications of our findings for narrowing the research-practice gap by improving researchers' dissemination efforts and practitioners' search for information.

  5. Mental health triage: towards a model for nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sands, N

    2007-05-01

    Mental health triage/duty services play a pivotal role in the current framework for mental health service delivery in Victoria and other states of Australia. Australia is not alone in its increasing reliance on mental health triage as a model of psychiatric service provision; at a global level, there appears to be an emerging trend to utilize mental health triage services staffed by nurses as a cost-effective means of providing mental health care to large populations. At present, nurses comprise the greater proportion of the mental health triage workforce in Victoria and, as such, are performing the majority of point-of-entry mental health assessment across the state. Although mental health triage/duty services have been operational for nearly a decade in some regional healthcare sectors of Victoria, there is little local or international research on the topic, and therefore a paucity of established theory to inform and guide mental health triage practice and professional development. The discussion in this paper draws on the findings and recommendations of PhD research into mental health triage nursing in Victoria, to raise discussion on the need to develop theoretical models to inform and guide nursing practice. The paper concludes by presenting a provisional model for mental health triage nursing practice.

  6. Nurses’ Research Behavior and Barriers to Research Utilization Into Clinical Nursing Practice: a Closer Look

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Efstratios Athanasakis

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is widely accepted that utilization of the best-known research evidence in nursing practice entails improvement of nursing care received by patients and strengthening of nursing profession.Aim: The aim of this paper was the review of nurses’ research behavior and the barriers that nurses meet in order to utilize research evidence into clinical nursing practice.Methodology: There has been conducted a literature search in Pubmed and Science Direct libraries, using specific search terms. An important inclusion criterion for the studies was the use of barriers to research utilization scale (BRUS, along or combined with another instrument.Results: A total of 37 original papers included in the present article. A table of the top five barriers to research utilization scale has been conducted. Data from the table indicate that the existence of barriers to incorporation of evidence into practice comes mainly from clinical settings characteristics. In addition, issues about nursing education, nurses’ research and reading habits, facilitators of research utilization and their relevance for nursing staff and clinical practice are also discussed.Conclusions: Since the barriers to research utilization are well identified in the nursing literature and there is a wealth of information on this subject, the next step is to find ways to overcome them and value the impact of the relevant interventions towards research utilization behavior.

  7. Developing a Teaching Model Using an Online Collaboration Approach for a Digital Technique Practical Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muchlas

    2015-01-01

    This research is aimed to produce a teaching model and its supporting instruments using a collaboration approach for a digital technique practical work attended by higher education students. The model is found to be flexible and relatively low cost. Through this research, feasibility and learning impact of the model will be determined. The model…

  8. 野战文化服务保障综合演练教学模式探研%Exploration of and Research on the Teaching Model of Comprehensive Practice of Field Cultural Support

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    温晋让; 段盛斌

    2015-01-01

    野战条件下文化服务保障综合演练教学训练模式,是文化管理系深化任职教育和士官职业技术教育改革的重要成果体现。该模式的组织实施步骤分别是:确定演练主题、构设演练条件、设置演练组织、安排演练内容、组织演练实施、开展演练总结。通过近几年的实践检验,全系师生理顺了理论教学、实践教学与装备教学的关系,促进了院校教育与部队工作的结合,增强了学员对部队文化工作的认识,提高了学员岗位工作的综合能力。%The teaching model of comprehensive practice of field cultural support is an important reform achievement of in-service education and technical education for noncommissioned officers, which is accomplished by Cultural Management Department. The steps to organize and implement the model are respectively the followings: to determine practice theme, to structure practice conditions, to set practice organization, to arrange practice content, to perform implementation, and to carry out practice summary. Recent years’ practice has justified the model. Consequently, the teaching staff and the students in the Department have straightened out the relationship among theory teaching, practice teaching and equipment teaching. With the closer combination of college education and army work, the students’ understanding of military cultural work has been deepened, and their comprehensive ability has been improved.

  9. Generalized linear models with coarsened covariates: a practical Bayesian approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Timothy R; Wiest, Michelle M

    2014-06-01

    Coarsened covariates are a common and sometimes unavoidable phenomenon encountered in statistical modeling. Covariates are coarsened when their values or categories have been grouped. This may be done to protect privacy or to simplify data collection or analysis when researchers are not aware of their drawbacks. Analyses with coarsened covariates based on ad hoc methods can compromise the validity of inferences. One valid method for accounting for a coarsened covariate is to use a marginal likelihood derived by summing or integrating over the unknown realizations of the covariate. However, algorithms for estimation based on this approach can be tedious to program and can be computationally expensive. These are significant obstacles to their use in practice. To overcome these limitations, we show that when expressed as a Bayesian probability model, a generalized linear model with a coarsened covariate can be posed as a tractable missing data problem where the missing data are due to censoring. We also show that this model is amenable to widely available general-purpose software for simulation-based inference for Bayesian probability models, providing researchers a very practical approach for dealing with coarsened covariates.

  10. Multidisciplinary research of geothermal modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    -Ing. Ulvi Arslan, Univ., ., Dr. _., Prof.; Heiko Huber, Dipl.-Ing.

    2010-05-01

    KEYWORDS Geothermal sciences, geothermics, research, theory and application, numerical calculation, geothermal modeling, Technical University Darmstadt, Ministry of Economics and Technology (BMWi) INTRODUCTION In times of global warming renewable, green energies are getting more and more important. The development of application of geothermal energy as a part of renewable energies in Germany is a multidisciplinary process of fast growing research and improvements. Geothermal energy is the energy, which is stored below earth's surface. The word geothermal derives from the Greek words geo (earth) and thermos (heat), so geothermal is a synonym to earth heat. Geothermal energy is one of the auspicious renewable energies. In average the temperature increases 3°C every 100 m of depth, which is termed as geothermal gradient. Therefore 99 percent of our planet is hotter than 1.000°C, while 99 percent of that last percent is even hotter than 100°C. Already in a depth of about 1 kilometer temperatures of 35 - 40°C can be achieved. While other renewable energies arise less or more from the sun, geothermal energy sources its heat from the earth's interior, which is caused mostly by radioactive decay of persistent isotopes. This means a possibility of a base-loadable form of energy supply. Especially efficient is the use of deep geothermal energy of high-enthalpie reservoirs, which means a high energy potential in low depths. In Germany no high-enthalpie reservoirs are given. To use the given low-enthalpie potential and to generate geothermal power efficiently inventions and improvements need to be performed. An important part of geothermal progresses is performed by universities with multidisciplinary research of geothermal modeling. Especially in deep geothermal systems numerical calculations are essential for a correct dimensioning of the geothermal system. Therefore German universities and state aided organizations are developing numerical programs for a detailed use of

  11. Practical issues in 'writing up' a research thesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, P

    2000-07-01

    Beginning to 'write up' your research thesis can seem a daunting prospect. While the experience can be stressful, with careful planning, the process can be managed effectively, and prove both rewarding and pleasurable. Paula Roberts offers a practical guide to managing the process of writing-up. Three distinct phases are discussed: the input phase of planning the write-up; the process phase of writing-up; and the output phase ofpreparing the finished document for submission.

  12. Applying thematic analysis theory to practice: a researcher's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuckett, Anthony G

    2005-01-01

    This article describes an experience of thematic analysis. In order to answer the question 'What does analysis look like in practice?' it describes in brief how the methodology of grounded theory, the epistemology of social constructionism, and the theoretical stance of symbolic interactionism inform analysis. Additionally, analysis is examined by evidencing the systematic processes--here termed organising, coding, writing, theorising, and reading--that led the researcher to develop a final thematic schema.

  13. Lean in the supply chain : research and practice

    OpenAIRE

    Ugochukwu, Paschal

    2012-01-01

    Lean is a management philosophy that enhances customer value through waste elimination and continuous improvement in a system by applying lean principles, practices, and techniques. The focus on lean implementations and research had been typically a single company without extension to the entire supply chain. When the concept of lean is implemented across the entire supply chain, however, it is referred to as lean supply chain. The purpose of this thesis is to create a structure from theory a...

  14. Best Practices for Data Sharing in Phylogenetic Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cranston, Karen; Harmon, Luke J.; O'Leary, Maureen A.; Lisle, Curtis

    2014-01-01

    As phylogenetic data becomes increasingly available, along with associated data on species’ genomes, traits, and geographic distributions, the need to ensure data availability and reuse become more and more acute. In this paper, we provide ten “simple rules” that we view as best practices for data sharing in phylogenetic research. These rules will help lead towards a future phylogenetics where data can easily be archived, shared, reused, and repurposed across a wide variety of projects. PMID:24987572

  15. Nomadic Research Practices in Early Childhood: Interrupting Racisms and Colonialisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Pacini-Ketchabaw

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers how research practices on racialization in early childhood education might be reconceptualized when racialization is placed within relational intricacies and affects in multiple encounters. By foregrounding race and its emergence in multifarious, unpredictable ways in everyday encounters between human and non-human bodies, space, and discourse, the paper investigates how a movement toward research analyses that engage with both the materiality of race and its systemic and discursive formations might be used to constantly seek new ethical ways of responding to and acting against racisms and colonialism in early childhood.

  16. Experiences in Reflective Action Research with Practice Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Federman Muñoz Giraldo

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available This article presents processes and results of experiments conducted by a group of teachers and students in teacher-training programs at the University of Caldas (Colombia. The purpose of the article is to present the results of a consultancy process for educators in training during their practice teaching in public schools, using cycles of reflective action research. Participation, collaborative work, decision-making and critical reflection of the action are evidences that allow showing how a teacher in training learns to do research while learning to teach.

  17. Integrating Behavioral Economics into Nutrition Education Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guthrie, Joanne F

    2017-09-01

    Nutrition education has a long history of being informed by economic thinking, with the earliest nutrition education guides incorporating household food budgeting into nutrition advice. Behavioral economics research goes beyond that traditional role to provide new insights into how consumers make choices. These insights have numerous potential applications for nutrition interventions to promote healthy food choices consistent with the US Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Research to test the value of such applications can contribute to the development of evidence-based nutrition education practice called for in federal nutrition education programs. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Linking theory to practice in learning technology research

    OpenAIRE

    Gunn, Cathy; Steel, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    We present a case to reposition theory so that it plays a pivotal role in learning technology research and helps to build an ecology of learning. To support the case, we present a critique of current practice based on a review of articles published in two leading international journals from 2005 to 2010. Our study reveals that theory features only incidentally or not at all in many cases. We propose theory development as a unifying theme for learning technology research study design and repor...

  19. A Student-Centered Astronomical Research Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genet, Russell; Johnson, Jolyon; Boyce, Pat; Boyce, Grady; Buchheim, obert; Harshaw, Richard; Kenney, John; Collins, Dwight; Rowe, David; Brewer, Mark; Estrada, Reed; Estrada, Chris; Gillette, Sean; Ridgely, John; McNab, Christine; Freed, Rachel; Wallen, Vera

    2016-05-01

    For over a decade, students from Cuesta College and number of high schools have engaged in astronomical research during one-term seminars. A community of practice - consisting of students, educators, and astronomers - has formed that is centered on supporting the students' astronomical research. The seminar has recently adopted distance education technology and automated telescopes in a hybrid form of on-line and inperson collaborations between students, educators, and astronomers. This hybridization is not only resulting in new areas of growth and opportunity, but has created a number of challenges. For example, as more schools joined this seminar, standardized teaching materials such as a textbook and self-paced, online learning units had to be developed. Automated telescopes devoted to expanding student research opportunities within this community of practice are being brought on line by Concordia University and the Boyce Research Initiatives and Educational Foundation. The Institute for Student Astronomical Research supports this growing community in many ways including maintaining a website and editing books of student papers published through the Collins Foundation Press.

  20. Community Informatics Studio: Designing Experiential Learning to Support Teaching, Research, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolske, Martin; Rhinesmith, Colin; Kumar, Beth

    2014-01-01

    This paper introduces a model of experiential learning to support teaching, research, and practice in library and information science (LIS). The concept we call "Community Informatics (CI) Studio" uses studio-based learning (SBL) to support enculturation into the field of CI. The SBL approach, closely related to John Dewey's…

  1. Bringing Open Educational Practice to a Research-Intensive University: Prospects and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masterman, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    This article describes a small-scale study that explored the relationship between the pedagogical practices characterised as "open" and the existing model of undergraduate teaching and learning at a large research-intensive university (RIU). The aim was to determine the factors that might enable (conversely impede) the greater uptake of…

  2. Developing a Reflective Practitioner through the Connection between Educational Research and Reflective Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Carlo, Dawn; Hinkhouse, Holly; Isbell, Leah

    2010-01-01

    This paper outlines the connection between qualitative research methods in education and teacher reflective practices as they relate to Valli's ("Reflective teacher education: cases and critiques." State University of New York Press, Albany, 1992; "Peabody J Educ" 72(1): 67-88, 1997) model of reflection. Using the authors' own experiences in…

  3. Postgraduate Research Supervision: A Critical Review of Current Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCallin, Antoinette; Nayar, Shoba

    2012-01-01

    Changes in the funding and delivery of research programmes at the university level have, in recent years, resulted in significant changes to research supervision. This paper critically reviews key influences effecting postgraduate supervision. Analysis draws on literature spanning 2000-2010 to determine the appropriateness of traditional models of…

  4. Community science, philosophy of science, and the practice of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tebes, Jacob Kraemer

    2005-06-01

    Embedded in community science are implicit theories on the nature of reality (ontology), the justification of knowledge claims (epistemology), and how knowledge is constructed (methodology). These implicit theories influence the conceptualization and practice of research, and open up or constrain its possibilities. The purpose of this paper is to make some of these theories explicit, trace their intellectual history, and propose a shift in the way research in the social and behavioral sciences, and community science in particular, is conceptualized and practiced. After describing the influence and decline of logical empiricism, the underlying philosophical framework for science for the past century, I summarize contemporary views in the philosophy of science that are alternatives to logical empiricism. These include contextualism, normative naturalism, and scientific realism, and propose that a modified version of contextualism, known as perspectivism, affords the philosophical framework for an emerging community science. I then discuss the implications of perspectivism for community science in the form of four propositions to guide the practice of research.

  5. Mapping Usability: A Critical Research Analysis of Trends in Software Usability Research, Theory, and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Morgan Margaret

    2009-01-01

    The impetus for this project stemmed from a curiosity about two particular areas in the history of usability research. For one, I began research for this project with a desire to learn about patterns in the theory, practice, attitude, and perception about usability work, both in academic contexts and in corporate contexts, with a focus on the…

  6. Research, Policy, and Practice in Action: The Office of Community College Research and Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamani-Gallaher, Eboni M.; Bragg, Debra D.

    2015-01-01

    The Office for Community College Research and Leadership (OCCRL) founded in 1989 focuses on P-20 education and the role of community colleges in facilitating educational access and equity. This article highlights the work of OCCRL as a research center that bridges inquiry, policy, and practice in contributing to the national dialogue on relevant…

  7. Researching Religious Education Pedagogy through an Action Research Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Grady, Kevin

    2010-01-01

    The Warwick REDCo community of practice was a group of religious education researchers operating in several contexts: English secondary schools and universities, English and European collaborations on religious education. The group undertook action research, seeking to illustrate and critically assess the interpretive approach to religious…

  8. Justice in human research ethics. A conceptual and practical guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieper, Ian; Thomson, Colin J H

    2013-03-01

    One of the core values to be applied by a body reviewing the ethics of human research is justice. The inclusion of justice as a requirement in the ethical review of human research is relatively recent and its utility had been largely unexamined until debates arose about the conduct of international biomedical research in the late 1990s. The subsequent amendment of authoritative documents in ways that appeared to shift the meaning of conceptions of justice generated a great deal of controversy. Another difficulty has been that both the theory and the substance of justice that are applied by researchers or reviewers can be frequently seen to be subjective. Both the concept of justice--hether distributive or commutative--and what counts as a just distribution or exchange--are given different weight and meanings by different people. In this paper, the origins and more recent debates about the requirement to consider justice as a criterion in the ethical review of human research are traced, relevant conceptions of justice are distinguished, and the manner in which they can be applied meaningfully in the ethical review of all human research is identified. We also explain the way that these concepts are articulated in, and the intent and function of, specific paragraphs of the National Statement on Ethical Conduct in Human Research (2007). The National Statement identifies a number of issues that should be considered when a human research ethics committee is reviewing the justice aspects of an application. We provide guidance to researchers as to how they can show that there is a fair distribution of burdens and benefits in the participant experience and the research outcomes. We also provide practical guidance to researches on how to think through issues of justice so that they can demonstrate that the design of their research projects meets this ethical requirement.

  9. Research Reproducibility in Geosciences: Current Landscape, Practices and Perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, An

    2016-04-01

    Reproducibility of research can gauge the validity of its findings. Yet currently we lack understanding of how much of a problem research reproducibility is in geosciences. We developed an online survey on faculty and graduate students in geosciences, and received 136 responses from research institutions and universities in Americas, Asia, Europe and other parts of the world. This survey examined (1) the current state of research reproducibility in geosciences by asking researchers' experiences with unsuccessful replication work, and what obstacles that lead to their replication failures; (2) the current reproducibility practices in community by asking what efforts researchers made to try to reproduce other's work and make their own work reproducible, and what the underlying factors that contribute to irreproducibility are; (3) the perspectives on reproducibility by collecting researcher's thoughts and opinions on this issue. The survey result indicated that nearly 80% of respondents who had ever reproduced a published study had failed at least one time in reproducing. Only one third of the respondents received helpful feedbacks when they contacted the authors of a published study for data, code, or other information. The primary factors that lead to unsuccessful replication attempts are insufficient details of instructions in published literature, and inaccessibility of data, code and tools needed in the study. Our findings suggest a remarkable lack of research reproducibility in geoscience. Changing the incentive mechanism in academia, as well as developing policies and tools that facilitate open data and code sharing are the promising ways for geosciences community to alleviate this reproducibility problem.

  10. Double Star Research: A Student-Centered Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jolyon

    2016-06-01

    Project and team-based pedagogies are increasingly augmenting lecture-style science classrooms. Occasionally, university professors will invite students to tangentially partcipate in their research. Since 2006, Dr. Russ Genet has led an astronomy research seminar for community college and high school students that allows participants to work closely with a melange of professional and advanced amatuer researchers. The vast majority of topics have centered on measuring the position angles and searations of double stars which can be readily published in the Journal of Double Star Observations. In the intervening years, a collaborative community of practice (Wenger, 1998) formed with the students as lead researchers on their projects with the guidance of experienced astronomers and educators. The students who join the research seminar are often well prepared for further STEM education in college and career. Today, the research seminar involves multile schools in multiple states with a volunteer educator acting as an assistant instructor at each location. These assistant instructors interface with remote observatories, ensure progress is made, and recruit students. The key deliverables from each student team include a published research paper and a public presentation online or in-person. Citing a published paper on scholarship and college applications gives students' educational carreers a boost. Recently the Journal of Double Star Observations published its first special issue of exlusively student-centered research.

  11. Adapting Project Management Practices to Research-Based Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahr, P.; Baker, T.; Corbin, B.; Keith, L.; Loerch, L.; Mullenax, C.; Myers, R.; Rhodes, B.; Skytland, N.

    2007-01-01

    From dealing with the inherent uncertainties in outcomes of scientific research to the lack of applicability of current NASA Procedural Requirements guidance documentation, research-based projects present challenges that require unique application of classical project management techniques. If additionally challenged by the creation of a new program transitioning from basic to applied research in a technical environment often unfamiliar with the cost and schedule constraints addressed by project management practices, such projects can find themselves struggling throughout their life cycles. Finally, supplying deliverables to a prime vehicle customer, also in the formative stage, adds further complexity to the development and management of research-based projects. The Biomedical Research and Countermeasures Projects Branch at NASA Johnson Space Center encompasses several diverse applied research-based or research-enabling projects within the newly-formed Human Research Program. This presentation will provide a brief overview of the organizational structure and environment in which these projects operate and how the projects coordinate to address and manage technical requirements. We will identify several of the challenges (cost, technical, schedule, and personnel) encountered by projects across the Branch, present case reports of actions taken and techniques implemented to deal with these challenges, and then close the session with an open forum discussion of remaining challenges and potential mitigations.

  12. Activist Research Practice: Exploring Research and Knowledge Production for Social Action

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aziz Choudry

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Research is a major aspect and fundamental component of many social struggles and movements for change. Understanding social movement networks as significant sites of knowledge production, this article situates and discusses processes and practice of activist research produced outside of academia in these milieus in the broader context of the ‘knowledge-practice’ of social movements. In dialogue with scholarly literature on activist research, it draws from the author’s work as an activist researcher, and a current study of small activist research non-governmental organizations (NGOs with examples from movement research on transnational corporate power and resistance to capitalist globalization.. It explicates research processes arising from, and embedded in, relationships and dialogue with other activists and organizations that develop through collaboration in formal and informal networks; it contends that building relationships is central to effective activist research practice. In addition to examining how activist researchers practice, understand and validate their research, this paper also shows how this knowledge is constructed, disseminated and mobilized as a tool for effective social action/organizing.

  13. Decision Making in the Practical Domain: A Model of Practical Conceptual Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Allan

    2000-01-01

    Considers teaching as an activity in which teachers deliberate in the practical domain to decide on actions and goals. Argues that because practical reasoning is similar to scientific reasoning, a model of practical conceptual change can be developed that is analogous to the conceptual change model. Examines two case studies of teachers using the…

  14. Are pedagogies used in nurse education research evident in practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allan, H T; Smith, P

    2010-07-01

    This paper considers two questions: what pedagogies for teaching nursing are used in nurse education research? Are these pedagogies transferred to learning in the workplace? We argue that there are underpinning pedagogies identified in nurse education research in the area of workplace and work based learning which are broadly qualitative, action orientated and focused on knowledge generation. Such pedagogies are rooted in a philosophy of teaching and learning where learning is seen as active, reflective and socially constructed. We consider possible answers to these questions through an exploration of empirical work by Evans et al. (2009) which has focused on knowledge transfer in the workplace. Their work offers insights into how pedagogies can be applied to nurse education research which in turn may be transferred into the workplace. In particular, they argue that the concept of knowledge transfer is outdated and we should focus instead on how knowledge learnt in one context (the academy) is re-contextualised in another (the workplace). We also draw on Aranda and Law's (2007) paper on the debates concerning the use of sociology in nurse education to explore competing narratives. We conclude that the pedagogies identified in educational research are not transferred to nurse education and practice yet offer an alternative view of knowledge transfer as illustrated by Evans et al.'s work which explores how learning in the workplace may be facilitated more effectively. We conclude that the lack of transfer of nurse education research pedagogies to practice learning undermines the position of nurse teachers within the academy as nurse education becomes a practice or professional discipline without a discrete disciplinary base. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Technology transfer from biomedical research to clinical practice: measuring innovation performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balas, E Andrew; Elkin, Peter L

    2013-12-01

    Studies documented 17 years of transfer time from clinical trials to practice of care. Launched in 2002, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) translational research initiative needs to develop metrics for impact assessment. A recent White House report highlighted that research and development productivity is declining as a result of increased research spending while the new drugs output is flat. The goal of this study was to develop an expanded model of research-based innovation and performance thresholds of transfer from research to practice. Models for transfer of research to practice have been collected and reviewed. Subsequently, innovation pathways have been specified based on common characteristics. An integrated, intellectual property transfer model is described. The central but often disregarded role of research innovation disclosure is highlighted. Measures of research transfer and milestones of progress have been identified based on the Association of University Technology Managers 2012 performance reports. Numeric milestones of technology transfer are recommended at threshold (top 50%), target (top 25%), and stretch goal (top 10%) performance levels. Transfer measures and corresponding target levels include research spending to disclosure (0.81), patents to start-up (>0.1), patents to licenses (>2.25), and average per license income (>$48,000). Several limitations of measurement are described. Academic institutions should take strategic steps to bring innovation to the center of scholarly discussions. Research on research, particularly on pathways to disclosures, is needed to improve R&D productivity. Researchers should be informed about the technology transfer performance of their institution and regulations should better support innovators.

  16. Practice based 3D Biomimetry Design Research: Sea Star Lamp Concept

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, Andrew; Unver, Ertu

    2012-01-01

    The research explores biomimetic for surface, textiles and product design. The Sea Star lamp is one of a series of practice based collaborations; nature design experiments, product development and exhibition installations created between textile surface design researchers and 3D digital design practitioners. \\ud \\ud The strategic search for role models in nature is what discerns biomimetic from the ever existing inspiration from nature. While bio-inspiration may be limited to a morphological ...

  17. FABASOFT BEST PRACTICES AND TEST METRICS MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadica Hrgarek

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Software companies have to face serious problems about how to measure the progress of test activities and quality of software products in order to estimate test completion criteria, and if the shipment milestone will be reached on time. Measurement is a key activity in testing life cycle and requires established, managed and well documented test process, defined software quality attributes, quantitative measures, and using of test management and bug tracking tools. Test metrics are a subset of software metrics (product metrics, process metrics and enable the measurement and quality improvement of test process and/or software product. The goal of this paper is to briefly present Fabasoft best practices and lessons learned during functional and system testing of big complex software products, and to describe a simple test metrics model applied to the software test process with the purpose to better control software projects, measure and increase software quality.

  18. Bridging research and practice through the Nursing Research Facilitator Program in British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plamondon, Katrina; Ronquillo, Charlene; Axen, Linda; Black, Agnes; Cummings, Lynn; Chakraborty, Bubli

    2013-12-01

    As Canadian health systems transform to meet changing needs, grounding nursing practice in evidence remains an essential goal for providing safe, high-quality care. nursing research facilitators (NRFs) are strengthening the use of evidence in nursing practice across the province of British Columbia. NRFs are nurses with a research background, whose work is focused on supporting people within health systems to use and do research in their practice and decision-making. Since this role was established in 2009, NRFs have provided facilitative support to over 50 funded research projects, led numerous workshops and journal clubs, and conducted more than 600 research-related consultations. In this paper, we discuss the role and offer exemplars of creative ways in which NRFs are strengthening nurses' engagement in doing and using research by developing capacity for research and evidence-informed practice, building meaningful partnerships and cultivating a culture of curiosity among nurses and other healthcare providers. We reflect on factors contributing to the success of this role and some of the challenges of integration. The paper concludes with a comment on the strategic value of the role.

  19. International psychological research that matters for policy and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torney-Purta, Judith V

    2009-11-01

    After a brief history of the Committee on International Relations of the American Psychological Association, 3 points are made about international psychological research that matters. First, it matters when the definition of the research problem area and the findings can potentially be reflected in policy change, in the practice of educators or psychologists, or in the mindsets of a new generation of researchers. Person-centered analysis of adolescents' social and political attitudes has this potential and can complement variable-centered analysis. A cluster analysis of the IEA Civic Education Study's data in 5 Western European and 5 Eastern European countries illustrates this. The following 5 clusters of adolescents were identified: those supportive of social justice but not participative, those active in conventional politics and the community, those indifferent, those disaffected, and a problematic cluster of alienated adolescents. Second, research that matters is situated in a cultural context. It is proposed that publications using data from any single country be required to include information about the cultural context in which the research was conducted. Finally, it matters that attention be given to the dynamics of the collaborative international research process, not only to research results.

  20. Creative arts as a public health resource: moving from practice-based research to evidence-based practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clift, Stephen

    2012-05-01

    There is growing international acceptance of the notion that participation in the creative arts can be beneficial for well-being and health. For over 30 years practical arts for health projects have been developed to support health care and promote health and well-being in communities. An increasing body of evaluation and research evidence lends weight to the value of such initiatives. However, the field of arts and health is complex and multi-faceted and there are challenges in moving beyond 'practice-based' research, towards building a progressive body of knowledge that can provide a basis for future 'evidence-based' practice in health care and public health. This paper reviews some of the population-level evidence from epidemiological studies on cultural participation and health, before considering research on active initiatives that draw on the creative arts in health care settings and communities to support health and well-being. The notion of a hierarchy of evidence is discussed in relation to arts for health initiatives and a plea is made for recognising the value of concrete case studies, qualitative research and the testimonies of participants and professionals alike in assessing both the value of creative arts activities and for understanding their impacts. Nevertheless, the need for robust controlled studies with precise measurable health outcomes is clear if we are to move towards the scaling up of arts interventions to achieve public health-level impacts from creative arts participation. A brief account of the current programme of research on singing and health that is underway at the Sidney De Haan Research Centre for Arts and Health is presented as a possible model for future research on arts and health.

  1. Integrating research into clinical internship training bridging the science/practice gap in pediatric psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuaid, Elizabeth L; Spirito, Anthony

    2012-03-01

    Existing literature highlights a critical gap between science and practice in clinical psychology. The internship year is a "capstone experience"; training in methods of scientific evaluation should be integrated with the development of advanced clinical competencies. We provide a rationale for continued exposure to research during the clinical internship year, including, (a) critical examination and integration of the literature regarding evidence-based treatment and assessment, (b) participation in faculty-based and independent research, and (c) orientation to the science and strategy of grantsmanship. Participation in research provides exposure to new empirical models and can foster the development of applied research questions. Orientation to grantsmanship can yield an initial sense of the "business of science." Internship provides an important opportunity to examine the challenges to integrating the clinical evidence base into professional practice; for that reason, providing research exposure on internship is an important strategy in training the next generation of pediatric psychologists.

  2. Integrating Research Into Clinical Internship Training Bridging the Science/Practice Gap in Pediatric Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spirito, Anthony

    2012-01-01

    Existing literature highlights a critical gap between science and practice in clinical psychology. The internship year is a “capstone experience”; training in methods of scientific evaluation should be integrated with the development of advanced clinical competencies. We provide a rationale for continued exposure to research during the clinical internship year, including, (a) critical examination and integration of the literature regarding evidence-based treatment and assessment, (b) participation in faculty-based and independent research, and (c) orientation to the science and strategy of grantsmanship. Participation in research provides exposure to new empirical models and can foster the development of applied research questions. Orientation to grantsmanship can yield an initial sense of the “business of science.” Internship provides an important opportunity to examine the challenges to integrating the clinical evidence base into professional practice; for that reason, providing research exposure on internship is an important strategy in training the next generation of pediatric psychologists. PMID:22286345

  3. Auto-Photography as Research Practice: Identity and Self-Esteem Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carey M. Noland

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores auto-photography as a form of research practice in the area of identity and self-esteem research. It allows researchers to capture and articulate the ways identity guides human action and thought. It involves the generation and examination of the static images that participants themselves believe best represent them. Auto-photography is an important tool for building bridges with marginalized groups in the research process, since it offers researchers a way to let participants speak for themselves. Furthermore, by using this method researchers can avoid exclusive reliance on survey questionnaires and other such research instruments that may be culturally biased. I present two research projects using auto-photography: one involving adolescent Latina girls and one involving Indian women. Based on the experience of these projects, I discuss auto-photography's importance in identity and self-esteem research. Finally, I discuss some of the benefits and challenges of working with this method.

  4. Research to Practice in School Psychology: Challenges Ahead and the Role of NASP's "School Psychology Forum"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Steven R.

    2016-01-01

    The goal of "School Psychology Forum" is to promote and disseminate research-to-practice scholarship for the benefit of school psychologists in their clinical practice. This goal has evolved from a desired practice to a mandatory component of any clinical practice. Research to practice is of importance as the concept of evidence-based…

  5. Research that matters: bridging the gap between research and practice in thanatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, J R

    2000-09-01

    This article serves as an Introduction to this two-issue special series of Death Studies on the integration of research and practice in thanatology. After discussing the lack of dialogue between researchers and practitioners in the field, the author identifies some common elements of the research and clinical processes in thanatology. These include the central role of pragmatic theory building and the universal human encounter with loss. The author then offers suggestions for enhancing the exchange between researchers and clinicians, including improvements in theory, methodology, and the dissemination of research findings. Lastly, the individual articles in the series are introduced to the reader.

  6. 5D Building Information Modelling – A Practicability Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Xia Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quality, time and cost are the three most important elements in any construction project. Building information that comes timely and accurately in multiple dimensions will facilitate a refined decision making process which can improve the construction quality, time and cost. 5 dimensional Building Information Modelling or 5D BIM is an emerging trend in the construction industry that integrates all the major information starting from the initial design to the final construction stage. After that, the integrated information is arranged and communicated through Virtual Design and Construction (VDC. This research is to gauge the practicability of 5D BIM with an action research type pilot study by the means of hands-on modelling of a conceptual bungalow design based on one of the most popular BIM tools. A bungalow is selected as a study subject to simulate the major stages of 5D BIM digital workflow. The whole process starts with developing drawings (2D into digital model (3D, and is followed by the incorporation of time (4D and cost (5D. Observations are focused on the major factors that will affect the practicability of 5D BIM, including the modelling effort, inter-operability, information output and limitations. This research concludes that 5D BIM certainly has high level practicability which further differentiates BIM from Computer Aided Design (CAD. The integration of information not only enhanced the efficiency and accuracy of process in all stages, but also enabled decision makers to have a sophisticated interpretation of information which is almost impossible with the conventional 2D CAD workflow. Although it is possible to incorporate more than 5 dimensions of information, it is foreseeable that excessive information may escalate the complexity unfavourably for BIM implementation. 5D BIM has achieved a significant level of practicability; further research should be conducted to streamline implementation. Once 5D BIM is matured and widely

  7. A proposal for enhancement of research capacities in Croatian general practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davorka Vrdoljak

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Research in family medicine contributes to the increase of knowledge, and its practical application improves the work of family physicians. Although research in family medicine in the Republic of Croatia has a long tradition, no sustainable research network exists as yet. Enhancing such a network is essential to efficaciously conduct research that is specific and important for family practice. This article describes the experiences of other countries and offers a proposal for a conceptual model for the development of a permanent research network in family medicine through three key elements: recognition of research as an indicator of quality of care that is specifically funded, introducing a continuing cycle of education for family physicians/researchers in the field of scientific research and building the capacity of academic family medicine and the success of their applications for domestic and international projects and funding sources. Conclusion. The application of the conceptual model from Australian primary health care research, adjusted to our circumstances, could further enhance research capacity building in Croatian family medicine.

  8. Peer relations, adolescent behavior, and public health research and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosnoe, Robert; McNeely, Clea

    2008-01-01

    Peer relations are central to adolescent life and, therefore, are crucial to understanding adolescents' engagement in various behaviors. In recent years, public health research has increasingly devoted attention to the implications of peer relations for the kinds of adolescent behaviors that have a direct impact on health. This article advocates for a continuation of this trend. With this aim, we highlight key themes in the rich literature on the general developmental significance of adolescent-peer relations, provide an overview of how these themes have been incorporated into public health research and practice, and suggest future avenues for peer-focused public health research that can inform adolescent health promotion in the United States.

  9. Reporting and interpreting research in PSPB: practices, principles, and pragmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashy, Deborah A; Donnellan, M Brent; Ackerman, Robert A; Russell, Daniel W

    2009-09-01

    This article is designed to provide psychologists who publish articles in Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin (PSPB) with a set of basic issues to consider when reporting their analyses and results. We first assessed the current reporting practices of social and personality psychologists by conducting an analysis of PSPB articles published in the first half of 2007. We evaluated the completeness of these reports with respect to the level of detail in both the Method and Results sections. We then used this information to develop recommendations that we hope will enhance the reporting of quantitative research in social and personality psychology. These suggestions emphasize ways to increase transparency in research reports. Transparency facilitates replication and a critical evaluation of research, thereby promoting scientific progress.

  10. Human subject research for engineers a practical guide

    CERN Document Server

    de Winter, Joost C F

    2017-01-01

    This Brief introduces engineers to the main principles in ethics, research design, statistics, and publishing of human subject research. In recent years, engineering has become strongly connected to disciplines such as biology, medicine, and psychology. Often, engineers (and engineering students) are expected to perform human subject research. Typical human subject research topics conducted by engineers include human-computer interaction (e.g., evaluating the usability of software), exoskeletons, virtual reality, teleoperation, modelling of human behaviour and decision making (often within the framework of ‘big data’ research), product evaluation, biometrics, behavioural tracking (e.g., of work and travel patterns, or mobile phone use), transport and planning (e.g., an analysis of flows or safety issues), etc. Thus, it can be said that knowledge on how to do human subject research is indispensable for a substantial portion of engineers. Engineers are generally well trained in calculus and mechanics, but m...

  11. Research to policy and practice change: is capacity building in operational research delivering the goods?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, Rony; Guillerm, Nathalie; Berger, Selma; Kumar, Ajay M V; Satyanarayana, Srinath; Bissell, Karen; Edginton, Mary; Hinderaker, Sven Gudmund; Tayler-Smith, Katie; Van den Bergh, Rafael; Khogali, Mohammed; Manzi, Marcel; Reid, Anthony J; Ramsay, Andrew; Reeder, John C; Harries, Anthony D

    2014-09-01

    Between 2009 and 2012, eight operational research capacity building courses were completed in Paris (3), Luxembourg (1), India (1), Nepal (1), Kenya (1) and Fiji (1). Courses had strict milestones that were subsequently adopted by the Structured Operational Research and Training InitiaTive (SORT IT) of the World Health Organization. We report on the numbers of enrolled participants who successfully completed courses, the number of papers published and their reported effect on policy and/or practice. Retrospective cohort study including a survey. Participant selection criteria ensured that only those proposing specific programme-related and relevant operational research questions were selected. Effects on policy and/or practice were assessed in a standardised manner by two independent reviewers. Of 93 enrolled participants from 31 countries (14 in Africa, 13 in Asia, two in Latin America and two in South Pacific), 83 (89%) completed their courses. A total of 96 papers were submitted to scientific journals of which 89 (93%) were published and 88 assessed for effect on policy and practice. There was a reported effect in 65 (74%) studies including changes to programme implementation (27), adaptation of monitoring tools (24) and changes to existing guidelines (20). Three quarters of published operational research studies from these structured courses had reported effects on policy and/or practice. It is important that this type of tracking becomes a standard component of operational research and research in general. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. At the Intersection Between Art and Research. Practice-Based Research in the Performing Arts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of themes and discussions that exist around Practice-Based Research. Most of the contributers bring up their own artistic work for closer examination, and they all share the common premise of making neither just art nor just research. To address divergences between these two activities, and surpass them...... of three years. The contributors to this anthology are artists and academics. They each present their particular angle to the field based partly on debates that arose in the study circle. What is the difference between theory and practice? Of what nature is the knowledge of the performing artist? Can...... artistic work be original, political, ethical? How is the work disseminated? How can art as research have an impact on different art forms and on other types of research? What questions of identity does the researching artist face? Can his/her work be compared to a journey? The articles reflect a plurality...

  13. At the Intersection Between Art and Research. Practice-Based Research in the Performing Arts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    of three years. The contributors to this anthology are artists and academics. They each present their particular angle to the field based partly on debates that arose in the study circle. What is the difference between theory and practice? Of what nature is the knowledge of the performing artist? Can......As an emerging field within the Nordic countries, the 'intersection' between art and research is still in the process of being named and renamed. Practice-Based Research within the Performing Arts was the concept that framed the investigation of the field in a NSU study circle during a period...... artistic work be original, political, ethical? How is the work disseminated? How can art as research have an impact on different art forms and on other types of research? What questions of identity does the researching artist face? Can his/her work be compared to a journey? The articles reflect a plurality...

  14. Research into practice: postsecondary success in the Chicago Public Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David W; Moeller, Eliza; Holsapple, Mathew

    2013-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors describe nearly a decade of research examining postsecondary outcomes of students in the Chicago Public Schools conducted by the Consortium on Chicago School Research (CCSR). These analyses include both long-term trends in college going and findings on the dimensions of students' postsecondary transition experiences that shape those outcomes. The authors describe the evolution of research at CCSR, which emphasizes a specific type of partnership between researchers, district officials, and practitioners that builds the capacity of practitioners and district officials to think critically about big problems and utilize data to inform decision-making and evaluation. In addition to describing these findings, the authors discuss the development and operation of the Network for College Success, a research-based, integrated and intensive support for school improvement to principals, their instructional leadership teams, grade level teams, and counselors. The authors describe how NCS builds the capacity of school leaders to work together and to use data to improve practice in the postsecondary transition. Finally, the authors discuss ongoing challenges and new directions for ongoing and future research.

  15. Disciplinary differences in faculty research data management practices and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine G. Akers

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Academic librarians are increasingly engaging in data curation by providing infrastructure (e.g., institutional repositories and offering services (e.g., data management plan consultations to support the management of research data on their campuses. Efforts to develop these resources may benefit from a greater understanding of disciplinary differences in research data management needs. After conducting a survey of data management practices and perspectives at our research university, we categorized faculty members into four research domains—arts and humanities, social sciences, medical sciences, and basic sciences—and analyzed variations in their patterns of survey responses. We found statistically significant differences among the four research domains for nearly every survey item, revealing important disciplinary distinctions in data management actions, attitudes, and interest in support services. Serious consideration of both the similarities and dissimilarities among disciplines will help guide academic librarians and other data curation professionals in developing a range of data-management services that can be tailored to the unique needs of different scholarly researchers.

  16. Virtual Environments: Issues and Opportunities for Researching Inclusive Educational Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehy, Kieron

    This chapter argues that virtual environments offer new research areas for those concerned with inclusive education. Further, it proposes that they also present opportunities for developing increasingly inclusive research processes. This chapter considers how researchers might approach researching some of these affordances. It discusses the relationship between specific features of inclusive pedagogy, derived from an international systematic literature review, and the affordances of different forms of virtual characters and environments. Examples are drawn from research in Second LifeTM (SL), virtual tutors and augmented reality. In doing this, the chapter challenges a simplistic notion of isolated physical and virtual worlds and, in the context of inclusion, between the practice of research and the research topic itself. There are a growing number of virtual worlds in which identified educational activities are taking place, or whose activities are being noted for their educational merit. These encompasses non-themed worlds such as SL and Active Worlds, game based worlds such as World of Warcraft and Runescape, and even Club Penguin, a themed virtual where younger players interact through a variety of Penguin themed environments and activities. It has been argued that these spaces, outside traditional education, are able to offer pedagogical insights (Twining 2009) i.e. that these global virtual communities have been identified as being useful as creative educational environments (Delwiche 2006; Sheehy 2009). This chapter will explore how researchers might use these spaces to investigative and create inclusive educational experiences for learners. In order to do this the chapter considers three interrelated issues: What is inclusive education?; How might inclusive education influence virtual world research? And, what might inclusive education look like in virtual worlds?

  17. Research Data Practices in Veterinary Medicine: A Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin E. Kerby

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To determine trends in research data output, reuse, and sharing of the college of veterinary medicine faculty members at a large academic research institution. METHODS: This bibliographic study was conducted by examining original research articles for indication of the types of data produced, as well as evidence that the authors reused data or made provision for sharing their own data. Findings were recorded in the categories of research type, data type, data reuse, data sharing, author collaboration, and grants/funding and were analyzed to determine trends. RESULTS: A variety of different data types were encountered in this study, even within a single article, resulting primarily from clinical and laboratory animal studies. All of the articles resulted from author collaboration, both within the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as well as with researchers outside the institution. There was little indication that data was reused, except some instances where the authors acknowledged that data was obtained directly from a colleague. There was even less indication that the research data was shared, either as a supplementary file on the publisher’s website or by submission to a repository, except in the case of genetic data. CONCLUSIONS: Veterinary researchers are prolific producers and users of a wide variety of data. Despite the large amount of collaborative research occurring in veterinary medicine, this study provided little evidence that veterinary researchers are reusing or sharing their data, except in an informal manner. Wider adoption of data management plans may serve to improve researchers’ data management practices.

  18. Internet Addiction: A Brief Summary of Research and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Hilarie; Rae, Cosette D; Steel, Ann H; Winkler, Alexander

    2012-11-01

    Problematic computer use is a growing social issue which is being debated worldwide. Internet Addiction Disorder (IAD) ruins lives by causing neurological complications, psychological disturbances, and social problems. Surveys in the United States and Europe have indicated alarming prevalence rates between 1.5 and 8.2% [1]. There are several reviews addressing the definition, classification, assessment, epidemiology, and co-morbidity of IAD [2-5], and some reviews [6-8] addressing the treatment of IAD. The aim of this paper is to give a preferably brief overview of research on IAD and theoretical considerations from a practical perspective based on years of daily work with clients suffering from Internet addiction. Furthermore, with this paper we intend to bring in practical experience in the debate about the eventual inclusion of IAD in the next version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM).

  19. Internet Addiction: A Brief Summary of Research and Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Hilarie; Rae, Cosette D; Steel, Ann H; Winkler, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Problematic computer use is a growing social issue which is being debated worldwide. Internet Addiction Disorder (IAD) ruins lives by causing neurological complications, psychological disturbances, and social problems. Surveys in the United States and Europe have indicated alarming prevalence rates between 1.5 and 8.2% [1]. There are several reviews addressing the definition, classification, assessment, epidemiology, and co-morbidity of IAD [2-5], and some reviews [6-8] addressing the treatment of IAD. The aim of this paper is to give a preferably brief overview of research on IAD and theoretical considerations from a practical perspective based on years of daily work with clients suffering from Internet addiction. Furthermore, with this paper we intend to bring in practical experience in the debate about the eventual inclusion of IAD in the next version of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM). PMID:23125561

  20. Curating research data practical strategies for your digital repository

    CERN Document Server

    Johnston, Lisa R

    2017-01-01

    Volume One of Curating Research Data explores the variety of reasons, motivations, and drivers for why data curation services are needed in the context of academic and disciplinary data repository efforts. Twelve chapters, divided into three parts, take an in-depth look at the complex practice of data curation as it emerges around us. Part I sets the stage for data curation by describing current policies, data sharing cultures, and collaborative efforts currently underway that impact potential services. Part II brings several key issues, such as cost recovery and marketing strategy, into focus for practitioners when considering how to put data curation services in action. Finally, Part III describes the full lifecycle of data by examining the ethical and practical reuse issues that data curation practitioners must consider as we strive to prepare data for the future.