WorldWideScience

Sample records for modelling planetary albedo

  1. Planetary Temperatures : Early Estimates, Lowell, and the Albedo of the Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph

    2016-10-01

    While it was recognized by Huygens, as soon as the architecture of the solar system was understood, that outer planets would be much cooler than Earth, quantitative estimation of planetary temperatures only became possible with understanding of radiant heat, and specifically the Stefan law relating heat flux to the fourth power of absolute temperature. This relation appears to have been first applied to planetary temperatures by the Danish physicist Christiansen in 1885, and he derived results for Mars and Saturn of -40 and -180C, rather reasonable values. However, the separate values of the solar constant, absolute planetary albedos (including that of the Earth) and the short- and long-wave transparency of planetary atmospheres were not known, although mountaintop measurements by Langley made some first steps to quantifying these effects. Lowell recognized that the Martian atmosphere was thinner than ours, but had more carbon dioxide, and so considered these factors to cancel out. However, he suggested that the Earth had a reflectivity of some 75%, such that darker Mars would absorb a larger fraction of incident sunlight than the Earth, compensating for Mars' greater distance from the sun and thus allowing clement temperatures. It is difficult not to see this as pushing the numbers to obtain a desired result, and indeed a robust refutation of his calculations swiftly followed by Poynting and Alfred Russel Wallace. I present a brief review of these early days of planetary climate modeling.

  2. Modeling Earth Albedo for Satellites in Earth Orbit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan; Bak, Thomas

    2005-01-01

    Many satellite are influences by the Earthøs albedo, though very few model schemes exist.in order to predict this phenomenon. Earth albedo is often treated as noise, or ignored completely. When applying solar cells in the attitude hardware, Earth albedo can cause the attitude estimate to deviate...... with as much as 20 deg. Digital Sun sensors with Earth albedo correction in hardware exist, but are expensive. In addition, albedo estimates are necessary in thermal calculations and power budgets. We present a modeling scheme base4d on Eartht reflectance, measured by NASA's Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer......, in which the Earth Probe Satellite has recorded reflectivity data daily since mid 1996. The mean of these data can be used to calculate the Earth albedo given the positions of the satellite and the Sun. Our results show that the albedo varies highly with the solar angle to the satellite's field of view...

  3. Effective single scattering albedo estimation using regional climate model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Tesfaye, M

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, by modifying the optical parameterization of Regional Climate model (RegCM), the authors have computed and compared the Effective Single-Scattering Albedo (ESSA) which is a representative of VIS spectral region. The arid, semi...

  4. Using albedo to reform wind erosion modelling, mapping and monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, Adrian; Webb, Nicholas P.

    2016-12-01

    Wind erosion and dust emission models are used to assess the impacts of dust on radiative forcing in the atmosphere, cloud formation, nutrient fertilisation and human health. The models are underpinned by a two-dimensional geometric property (lateral cover; L) used to characterise the three-dimensional aerodynamic roughness (sheltered area or wakes) of the Earth's surface and calibrate the momentum it extracts from the wind. We reveal a fundamental weakness in L and demonstrate that values are an order of magnitude too small and significant aerodynamic interactions between roughness elements and their sheltered areas have been omitted, particularly under sparse surface roughness. We describe a solution which develops published work to establish a relation between sheltered area and the proportion of shadow over a given area; the inverse of direct beam directional hemispherical reflectance (black sky albedo; BSA). We show direct relations between shadow and wind tunnel measurements and thereby provide direct calibrations of key aerodynamic properties. Estimation of the aerodynamic parameters from albedo enables wind erosion assessments over areas, across platforms from the field to airborne and readily available satellite data. Our new approach demonstrated redundancy in existing wind erosion models and thereby reduced model complexity and improved fidelity. We found that the use of albedo enabled an adequate description of aerodynamic sheltering to characterise fluid dynamics and predict sediment transport without the use of a drag partition scheme (Rt) or threshold friction velocity (u∗t). We applied the calibrations to produce global maps of aerodynamic properties which showed very similar spatial patterns to each other and confirmed the redundancy in the traditional parameters of wind erosion modelling. We evaluated temporal patterns of predicted horizontal mass flux at locations across Australia which revealed variation between land cover types that would not

  5. Investigating the spread in surface albedo for snow-covered forests in CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libo; Cole, Jason N. S.; Bartlett, Paul; Verseghy, Diana; Derksen, Chris; Brown, Ross; Salzen, Knut

    2016-02-01

    This study investigates the role of leaf/plant area index (LAI/PAI) specification on the large spread of winter albedo simulated by climate models. To examine the sensitivity of winter albedo to LAI, we perform a sensitivity analysis using two methods commonly used to compute albedo in snow-covered forests as well as diagnostic calculations within version 4.2 of the Canadian Atmospheric Model for which PAI is systematically varied. The results show that the simulated albedo is very sensitive to negative PAI biases, especially for smaller PAI values. The LAI and surface albedo of boreal forests in the presence of snow simulated by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models are evaluated using satellite observations. The evaluation of CMIP5 models suggest that inaccurate tree cover fraction due to improper plant functional type specification or erroneous LAI parameterization in some models explains, in part, an observed positive bias in winter albedo over boreal forest regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This contributes to a large intermodel spread in simulated surface albedo in the presence of snow over these regions and is largely responsible for uncertainties in simulated snow-albedo feedback strength. Errors are largest (+20-40%) in models with large underestimation of LAI but are typically within ±15% when simulated LAI is within the observed range. This study underscores the importance of accurate representation of vegetation distribution and parameters in realistic simulation of surface albedo.

  6. Investigating the spread of surface albedo in snow covered forests in CMIP5 models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Libo; Cole, Jason; Bartlett, Paul; Verseghy, Diana; Derksen, Chris; Brown, Ross; von Salzen, Knut

    2016-04-01

    This study investigates the role of leaf/plant area index (LAI/PAI) specification on the large spread of winter albedo simulated by climate models. To examine the sensitivity of winter albedo to LAI, we perform a sensitivity analysis using two methods commonly used to compute albedo in snow-covered forests as well as diagnostic calculations within version 4.2 of the Canadian Atmospheric Model for which PAI is systematically varied. The results show that the simulated albedo is very sensitive to negative PAI biases, especially for smaller PAI values. The LAI and surface albedo of boreal forests in the presence of snow simulated by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) models are evaluated using satellite observations. The evaluation of CMIP5 models suggest that inaccurate tree cover fraction due to improper plant functional type specification or erroneous LAI parameterization in some models explains, in part, an observed positive bias in winter albedo over boreal forest regions of the Northern Hemisphere. This contributes to a large intermodel spread in simulated surface albedo in the presence of snow over these regions and is largely responsible for uncertainties in simulated snow-albedo feedback strength. Errors are largest (+20-40 %) in models with large underestimation of LAI but are typically within ±15% when simulated LAI is within the observed range. This study underscores the importance of accurate representation of vegetation distribution and parameters in realistic simulation of surface albedo.

  7. Modeling Earth Albedo Currents on Sun Sensors for Improved Vector Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Earth albedo influences vector measurements of the solar line of sight vector, due to the induced current on in the photo voltaics of Sun sensors. Although advanced digital Sun sensors exist, these are typically expensive and may not be suited for satellites in the nano or pico-class. Previously...... data, showing significant improvement in the Earth albedo induced current estimates. Additionally an algorithm for utilizing the Earth albedo model in obtaining a vector observation pair which is superior to the solar line of sight vector pair. It is concluded that the Earth albedo model is valid...

  8. Anthropogenic desertification by high-albedo pollution Observations and modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otterman, J.; Rosenberg, N. W.; Rosenberg, E.

    1974-01-01

    ERTS-1 MSS albedo data of Western Negev, Sinai and the Gaza strip are presented. A sharp contrast in albedo exists across the Negev-Sinai and Negev-Gaza strip borders. Anthropogenic desertification has occurred on the Arab side due to overgrazing and Bedouin agriculture, whereas natural vegetation grows much more abundantly on the Israeli side.

  9. Neutron Albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Ignatovich, V K

    2005-01-01

    A new, algebraic, method is applied to calculation of neutron albedo from substance to check the claim that use of ultradispersive fuel and moderator of an active core can help to gain in size and mass of the reactor. In a model of isotropic distribution of incident and reflected neutrons it is shown that coherent scattering on separate grains in the case of thermal neutrons increases transport cross section negligibly, however it decreases albedo from a wall of finite thickness because of decrease of substance density. A visible increase of albedo takes place only for neutrons with wave length of the order of the size of a single grain.

  10. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Wang

    Full Text Available Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the

  11. Impacts of Satellite-Based Snow Albedo Assimilation on Offline and Coupled Land Surface Model Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tao; Peng, Shushi; Krinner, Gerhard; Ryder, James; Li, Yue; Dantec-Nédélec, Sarah; Ottlé, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal snow cover in the Northern Hemisphere is the largest component of the terrestrial cryosphere and plays a major role in the climate system through strong positive feedbacks related to albedo. The snow-albedo feedback is invoked as an important cause for the polar amplification of ongoing and projected climate change, and its parameterization across models is an important source of uncertainty in climate simulations. Here, instead of developing a physical snow albedo scheme, we use a direct insertion approach to assimilate satellite-based surface albedo during the snow season (hereafter as snow albedo assimilation) into the land surface model ORCHIDEE (ORganizing Carbon and Hydrology In Dynamic EcosystEms) and assess the influences of such assimilation on offline and coupled simulations. Our results have shown that snow albedo assimilation in both ORCHIDEE and ORCHIDEE-LMDZ (a general circulation model of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique) improve the simulation accuracy of mean seasonal (October throughout May) snow water equivalent over the region north of 40 degrees. The sensitivity of snow water equivalent to snow albedo assimilation is more pronounced in the coupled simulation than the offline simulation since the feedback of albedo on air temperature is allowed in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ. We have also shown that simulations of air temperature at 2 meters in ORCHIDEE-LMDZ due to snow albedo assimilation are significantly improved during the spring in particular over the eastern Siberia region. This is a result of the fact that high amounts of shortwave radiation during the spring can maximize its snow albedo feedback, which is also supported by the finding that the spatial sensitivity of temperature change to albedo change is much larger during the spring than during the autumn and winter. In addition, the radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere induced by snow albedo assimilation during the spring is estimated to be -2.50 W m-2, the magnitude of

  12. Assimilation of satellite observed snow albedo in a land surface model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, M.J.; Velde, van der R.; Vekerdy, Z.; Su, Z.

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of assimilating satellite-observed snow albedo on the Noah land surface model (LSM)-simulated fluxes and snow properties. A direct insertion technique is developed to assimilate snow albedo into Noah and is applied to three intensive study areas in North Park (Colorado

  13. Assimilation of satellite observed snow albedo in a land surface model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, M.J.; van der Velde, R.; Vekerdy, Z.; Su, Zhongbo

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of assimilating satellite-observed snow albedo on the Noah land surface model (LSM)-simulated fluxes and snow properties. A direct insertion technique is developed to assimilate snow albedo into Noah and is applied to three intensive study areas in North Park

  14. Assimilation of satellite observed snow albedo in a land surface model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malik, M.J.; van der Velde, R.; Vekerdy, Z.; Su, Zhongbo

    2012-01-01

    This study assesses the impact of assimilating satellite-observed snow albedo on the Noah land surface model (LSM)-simulated fluxes and snow properties. A direct insertion technique is developed to assimilate snow albedo into Noah and is applied to three intensive study areas in North Park (Colorado

  15. The Alpine snow-albedo feedback in regional climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winter, Kevin J.-P. M.; Kotlarski, Sven; Scherrer, Simon C.; Schär, Christoph

    2017-02-01

    The effect of the snow-albedo feedback (SAF) on 2m temperatures and their future changes in the European Alps is investigated in the ENSEMBLES regional climate models (RCMs) with a focus on the spring season. A total of 14 re-analysis-driven RCM experiments covering the period 1961-2000 and 10 GCM-driven transient climate change projections for 1950-2099 are analysed. A positive springtime SAF is found in all RCMs, but the range of the diagnosed SAF is large. Results are compared against an observation-based SAF estimate. For some RCMs, values very close to this estimate are found; other models show a considerable overestimation of the SAF. Net shortwave radiation has the largest influence of all components of the energy balance on the diagnosed SAF and can partly explain its spatial variability. Model deficiencies in reproducing 2m temperatures above snow and ice and associated cold temperature biases at high elevations seem to contribute to a SAF overestimation in several RCMs. The diagnosed SAF in the observational period strongly influences the estimated SAF contribution to twenty first century temperature changes in the European Alps. This contribution is subject to a clear elevation dependency that is governed by the elevation-dependent change in the number of snow days. Elevations of maximum SAF contribution range from 1500 to 2000 m in spring and are found above 2000 m in summer. Here, a SAF contribution to the total simulated temperature change between 0 and 0.5 °C until 2099 (multi-model mean in spring: 0.26 °C) or 0 and 14 % (multi-model mean in spring: 8 %) is obtained for models showing a realistic SAF. These numbers represent a well-funded but only approximate estimate of the SAF contribution to future warming, and a remaining contribution of model-specific SAF misrepresentations cannot be ruled out.

  16. Time-variable Earth's albedo model characteristics and applications to satellite sampling errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartman, F. L.

    1981-01-01

    Characteristics of the time variable Earth albedo model are described. With the cloud cover multiplying factor adjusted to produce a global annual average albedo of 30.3, the global annual average cloud cover is 45.5 percent. Global annual average sunlit cloud cover is 48.5 percent; nighttime cloud cover is 42.7 percent. Month-to-month global average albedo is almost sinusoidal with maxima in June and December and minima in April and October. Month-to-month variation of sunlit cloud cover is similar, but not in all details. The diurnal variation of global albedo is greatest from November to March; the corresponding variation of sunlit cloud cover is greatest from May to October. Annual average zonal albedos and monthly average zonal albedos are in good agreement with satellite-measured values, with notable differences in the polar regions in some months and at 15 S. The albedo of some 10 deg by 10 deg. areas of the Earth versus zenith angle are described. Satellite albedo measurement sampling effects are described in local time and in Greenwich mean time.

  17. Empirical models of monthly and annual surface albedo in managed boreal forests of Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Ryan M.; Astrup, Rasmus; Strømman, Anders H.

    2013-04-01

    As forest management activities play an increasingly important role in climate change mitigation strategies of Nordic regions such as Norway, Sweden, and Finland -- the need for a more comprehensive understanding of the types and magnitude of biogeophysical climate effects and their various tradeoffs with the global carbon cycle becomes essential to avoid implementation of sub-optimal policy. Forest harvest in these regions reduces the albedo "masking effect" and impacts Earth's radiation budget in opposing ways to that of concomitant carbon cycle perturbations; thus, policies based solely on biogeochemical considerations in these regions risk being counterproductive. There is therefore a need to better understand how human disturbances (i.e., forest management activities) affect important biophysical factors like surface albedo. An 11-year remotely sensed surface albedo dataset coupled with stand-level forest management data for a variety of stands in Norway's most productive logging region are used to develop regression models describing temporal changes in monthly and annual forest albedo following clear-cut harvest disturbance events. Datasets are grouped by dominant tree species and site indices (productivity), and two alternate multiple regression models are developed and tested following a potential plus modifier approach. This resulted in an annual albedo model with statistically significant parameters that explains a large proportion of the observed variation, requiring as few as two predictor variables: i) average stand age - a canopy modifier predictor of albedo, and ii) stand elevation - a local climate predictor of a forest's potential albedo. The same model structure is used to derive monthly albedo models, with models for winter months generally found superior to summer models, and conifer models generally outperforming deciduous. We demonstrate how these statistical models can be applied to routine forest inventory data to predict the albedo

  18. Deriving albedo maps for HAPEX-Sahel from ASAS data using kernel-driven BRDF models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Lewis

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the application and testing of a method for deriving spatial estimates of albedo from multi-angle remote sensing data. Linear kernel-driven models of surface bi-directional reflectance have been inverted against high spatial resolution multi-angular, multi- spectral airborne data of the principal cover types within the HAPEX-Sahel study site in Niger, West Africa. The airborne data are obtained from the NASA Airborne Solid-state Imaging Spectrometer (ASAS instrument, flown in Niger in September and October 1992. The maps of model parameters produced are used to estimate integrated reflectance properties related to spectral albedo. Broadband albedo has been estimated from this by weighting the spectral albedo for each pixel within the map as a function of the appropriate spectral solar irradiance and proportion of direct and diffuse illumination. Partial validation of the results was performed by comparing ASAS reflectance and derived directional-hemispherical reflectance with simulations of a millet canopy made with a complex geometric canopy reflectance model, the Botanical Plant Modelling System (BPMS. Both were found to agree well in magnitude. Broadband albedo values derived from the ASAS data were compared with ground-based (point sample albedo measurements and found to agree extremely well. These results indicate that the linear kernel-driven modelling approach, which is to be used operationally to produce global 16 day, 1 km albedo maps from forthcoming NASA Earth Observing System spaceborne data, is both sound and practical for the estimation of angle-integrated spectral reflectance quantities related to albedo. Results for broadband albedo are dependent on spectral sampling and on obtaining the correct spectral weigthings.

  19. Impact of Dust on Mars Surface Albedo and Energy Flux with LMD General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, D.; Flanner, M.; Millour, E.; Martinez, G.

    2015-12-01

    Mars, just like Earth experience different seasons because of its axial tilt (about 25°). This causes growth and retreat of snow cover (primarily CO2) in Martian Polar regions. The perennial caps are the only place on the planet where condensed H2O is available at surface. On Mars, as much as 30% atmospheric CO2 deposits in each hemisphere depending upon the season. This leads to a significant variation on planet's surface albedo and hence effecting the amount of solar flux absorbed or reflected at the surface. General Circulation Model (GCM) of Laboratoire de Météorologie Dynamique (LMD) currently uses observationally derived surface albedo from Thermal Emission Spectrometer (TES) instrument for the polar caps. These TES albedo values do not have any inter-annual variability, and are independent of presence of any dust/impurity on surface. Presence of dust or other surface impurities can significantly reduce the surface albedo especially during and right after a dust storm. This change will also be evident in the surface energy flux interactions. Our work focuses on combining earth based Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) model with current state of GCM to incorporate the impact of dust on Martian surface albedo, and hence the energy flux. Inter-annual variability of surface albedo and planet's top of atmosphere (TOA) energy budget along with their correlation with currently available mission data will be presented.

  20. Computer Modeling of Planetary Surface Temperatures in Introductory Astronomy Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Timothy; Goodman, J.

    2013-01-01

    Barker, T., and Goodman, J. C., Wheaton College, Norton, MA Computer modeling is an essential part of astronomical research, and so it is important that students be exposed to its powers and limitations in the first (and, perhaps, only) astronomy course they take in college. Building on the ideas of Walter Robinson (“Modeling Dynamic Systems,” Springer, 2002) we have found that STELLA software (ISEE Systems) allows introductory astronomy students to do sophisticated modeling by the end of two classes of instruction, with no previous experience in computer programming or calculus. STELLA’s graphical interface allows students to visualize systems in terms of “flows” in and out of “stocks,” avoiding the need to invoke differential equations. Linking flows and stocks allows feedback systems to be constructed. Students begin by building an easily understood system: a leaky bucket. This is a simple negative feedback system in which the volume in the bucket (a “stock”) depends on a fixed inflow rate and an outflow that increases in proportion to the volume in the bucket. Students explore how changing inflow rate and feedback parameters affect the steady-state volume and equilibration time of the system. This model is completed within a 50-minute class meeting. In the next class, students are given an analogous but more sophisticated problem: modeling a planetary surface temperature (“stock”) that depends on the “flow” of energy from the Sun, the planetary albedo, the outgoing flow of infrared radiation from the planet’s surface, and the infrared return from the atmosphere. Students then compare their STELLA model equilibrium temperatures to observed planetary temperatures, which agree with model ones for worlds without atmospheres, but give underestimates for planets with atmospheres, thus introducing students to the concept of greenhouse warming. We find that if we give the students part of this model at the start of a 50-minute class they are

  1. A minimal, statistical model for the surface albedo of Vestfonna ice cap, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Möller

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The ice cap Vestfonna is located in Northeastern Svalbard and forms one of the largest ice bodies of the Eurasian Arctic. Its surface albedo plays a key role in understanding and modelling of its energy and mass balance. The principle governing factors for albedo evolution, i.e. precipitation and air temperature and therewith snowdepth and melt duration, were found to vary almost exclusively with terrain elevation throughout the ice cap. Hence, surface albedo can be expected to develop a comparable pattern. A new statistical model is presented that estimates this mean altitudinal albedo profile of the ice cap on the basis of a minimal set of meteorological variables on a monthly resolution. Model calculations are based on a logistic function of the artificial quantity rain-snow ratio and a linear function of cumulative snowfall and cumulative positive degree days. Surface albedo fields of the MODIS snow product MOD10A1 of the period March to October of the years 2001–2008 serve as a basis for both calibration and cross-validation of the model. The meteorological model input covers the period September 2000 until October 2008 and is based on ERA-Interim data of a grid point located close to the ice cap. The albedo model shows a good performance. The root mean square error between observed and modelled albedo values along the altitudinal profile is 0.057 ± 0.028 (mean ± one standard deviation. The area weighted mean even reduces to a value of 0.053. Distinctly higher deviations (0.07–0.09 are only present throughout the very lowest and uppermost parts of the ice cap that are either small in area or hardly affected by surface melt. Thus, the new, minimal, statistical albedo model presented in this study is found to reproduce the albedo evolution on Vestfonna ice cap on a high level of accuracy and is thus suggested to be fully suitable for further application in broader energy or mass-balance studies of the ice cap.

  2. A minimal, statistical model for the surface albedo of Vestfonna ice cap, Svalbard

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Möller

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The ice cap Vestfonna is located in northeastern Svalbard and forms one of the largest ice bodies of the Eurasian Arctic. Its surface albedo plays a key role in the understanding and modelling of its energy and mass balance. The principle governing factors for albedo evolution, i.e. precipitation and air temperature and therewith snow depth and melt duration, were found to vary almost exclusively with terrain elevation throughout the ice cap. Hence, surface albedo can be expected to develop a comparable pattern. A new statistical model is presented that estimates this mean altitudinal albedo profile of the ice cap on the basis of a minimal set of meteorological variables on a monthly resolution. Model calculations are based on a sigmoid function of the artificial quantity rain-snow ratio and a linear function of cumulative snowfall and cumulative positive degree days. Surface albedo fields of the MODIS snow product MOD10A1 from the period March to October in the years 2001–2008 serve as a basis for both calibration and cross-validation of the model. The meteorological model input covers the period September 2000 until October 2008 and is based on ERA-Interim data of a grid point located close to the ice cap. The albedo model shows a good performance. The root mean square error between observed and modelled albedo values along the altitudinal profile is 0.057±0.028 (mean ± one standard deviation. The area weighted mean even reduces to a value of 0.054. Distinctly higher deviations (0.07–0.09 are only present throughout the very lowest and uppermost parts of the ice cap that are either small in area or hardly affected by surface melt. Thus, the new, minimal, statistical albedo model presented in this study is found to reproduce the albedo evolution on Vestfonna ice cap on a high level of accuracy and is thus suggested to be fully suitable for further application in broader energy or mass-balance studies of the ice cap.

  3. Modeling Earth Albedo Currents on Sun Sensors for Improved Vector Observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    2006-01-01

    Earth albedo influences vector measurements of the solar line of sight vector, due to the induced current on in the photo voltaics of Sun sensors. Although advanced digital Sun sensors exist, these are typically expensive and may not be suited for satellites in the nano or pico-class. Previously...... for modeling Sun sensor output by incorporating the Earth albedo model is presented. This model utilizes the directional information of in the Earth albedo model, which is achieved by Earth surface partitioning. This allows accurate simulation of the Sun sensor output and the results are consistent with Ørsted...... and useful for space environment simulations, and may be utilized to improve attitude estimation algorithms applying Sun sensor vector observations....

  4. An evaluation of high-resolution regional climate model simulations of snow cover and albedo over the Rocky Mountains, with implications for the simulated snow-albedo feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minder, Justin R.; Letcher, Theodore W.; Skiles, S. McKenzie

    2016-08-01

    The snow-albedo feedback (SAF) strongly influences climate over midlatitude mountainous regions. However, over these regions the skill of regional climate models (RCMs) at simulating properties such as snow cover and surface albedo is poorly characterized. These properties are evaluated in a pair of 7 year long high-resolution RCM simulations with the Weather Research and Forecasting model over the central Rocky Mountains. Key differences between the simulations include the computational domain (regional versus continental) and land surface model used (Noah versus Noah-MP). Simulations are evaluated against high-resolution satellite estimates of snow cover and albedo from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer. Both simulations generally reproduce the observed seasonal and spatial variability of snow cover and also exhibit important biases. One simulation substantially overpredicts subpixel fractional snow cover over snowy pixels (by up to 0.4) causing large positive biases in surface albedo, likely due in part to inadequate representation of canopy effects. The other simulation exhibits a negative bias in areal snow extent (as much as 19% of the analysis domain). Surface measurements reveal large positive biases in snow albedo (exceeding 0.2) during late spring caused by neglecting radiative effects of impurities deposited onto snow. Semi-idealized climate change experiments show substantially different magnitudes of SAF-enhanced warming in the two simulations that can be tied to the differences in snow cover in their control climates. More confident projections of regional climate change over mountains will require further work to evaluate and improve representation of snow cover and albedo in RCMs.

  5. Modelled climate sensitivity of the mass balance of Morteratschgletscher and its dependence on albedo parameterization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klok, E.J.; Oerlemans, J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the climate sensitivity of the mass balance of Morteratschgletscher in Switzerland, estimated from a two-dimensional mass balance model. Since the albedo scheme chosen is often the largest error source in mass balance models, we investigated the impact of using differe

  6. Sensitivity of Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance to surface albedo parameterization: a study with a regional climate model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Angelen, J.H.; Lenaerts, J.T.M.; Lhermitte, S.; Fettweis, X.; Kuipers Munneke, P.; van den Broeke, M.R.; van Meijgaard, E.; Smeets, C.J.P.P.

    2012-01-01

    We present a sensitivity study of the surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as modeled using a regional atmospheric climate model, to various parameter settings in the albedo scheme. The snow albedo scheme uses grain size as a prognostic variable and further depends on cloud cover,

  7. Spatial distribution of mineral dust single scattering albedo based on DREAM model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanoski, Maja; Ničković, Slobodan; Ilić, Luka

    2016-04-01

    Mineral dust comprises a significant part of global aerosol burden. There is a large uncertainty in estimating role of dust in Earth's climate system, partly due to poor characterization of its optical properties. Single scattering albedo is one of key optical properties determining radiative effects of dust particles. While it depends on dust particle sizes, it is also strongly influenced by dust mineral composition, particularly the content of light-absorbing iron oxides and the mixing state (external or internal). However, an assumption of uniform dust composition is typically used in models. To better represent single scattering albedo in dust atmospheric models, required to increase accuracy of dust radiative effect estimates, it is necessary to include information on particle mineral content. In this study, we present the spatial distribution of dust single scattering albedo based on the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (DREAM) with incorporated particle mineral composition. The domain of the model covers Northern Africa, Middle East and the European continent, with horizontal resolution set to 1/5°. It uses eight particle size bins within the 0.1-10 μm radius range. Focusing on dust episode of June 2010, we analyze dust single scattering albedo spatial distribution over the model domain, based on particle sizes and mineral composition from model output; we discuss changes in this optical property after long-range transport. Furthermore, we examine how the AERONET-derived aerosol properties respond to dust mineralogy. Finally we use AERONET data to evaluate model-based single scattering albedo. Acknowledgement We would like to thank the AERONET network and the principal investigators, as well as their staff, for establishing and maintaining the AERONET sites used in this work.

  8. Analytic expressions for the black-sky and white-sky albedos of the cosine lobe model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodin, Christopher

    2013-05-01

    The cosine lobe model is a bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) that is commonly used in computer graphics to model specular reflections. The model is both simple and physically plausible, but physical quantities such as albedo have not been related to the parameterization of the model. In this paper, analytic expressions for calculating the black-sky and white-sky albedos from the cosine lobe BRDF model with integer exponents will be derived, to the author's knowledge for the first time. These expressions for albedo can be used to place constraints on physics-based simulations of radiative transfer such as high-fidelity ray-tracing simulations.

  9. Analysis of an Arctic sea ice loss model in the limit of a discontinuous albedo

    CERN Document Server

    Hill, Kaitlin; Silber, Mary

    2015-01-01

    As Arctic sea ice extent decreases with increasing greenhouse gases, there is a growing interest in whether there could be a bifurcation associated with its loss, and whether there is significant hysteresis associated with that bifurcation. A challenge in answering this question is that the bifurcation behavior of certain Arctic energy balance models have been shown to be sensitive to how ice-albedo feedback is parameterized. We analyze an Arctic energy balance model in the limit as a smoothing parameter associated with ice-albedo feedback tends to zero, which makes the system piecewise-smooth. Our analysis provides a case study where we use the piecewise-smooth system to explore bifurcation behavior of the smooth system. In this case study, we demonstrate that certain qualitative bifurcation behaviors of the smooth system can have nonsmooth counterparts. We use this perspective to systematically search parameter space. For example, we uncover parameter sets for which the largest transition, with increasing g...

  10. A model-based framework for the quality assessment of surface albedo in situ measurement protocols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jennifer; Gobron, Nadine; Widlowski, Jean-Luc; Mio, Corrado

    2016-09-01

    Satellite-based retrievals of land surface albedo are essential for climate and environmental modelling communities. To be of use, satellite-retrievals are required to comply to given accuracy requirements, mainly achieved through comparison with in situ measurements. Differences between in situ and satellite-based retrievals depend on their actual difference and their associated uncertainties. It is essential that these uncertainties can be computed to properly understand the differences between satellite-based and in situ measurements of albedo, however quantifying the individual contributions of uncertainty is difficult. This study introduces a model-based framework for assessing the quality of in situ albedo measurements. A 3D Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) radiative transfer model is used to simulate field measurements of surface albedo, and is able to identify and quantify potential sources of error in the field measurement. Compliance with the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) requirement for 3% accuracy is tested. 8 scenarios were investigated, covering a range of ecosystem types and canopy structures, seasons, illumination angles and tree heights. Results indicate that height of measurement above the canopy is the controlling factor in accuracy, with each canopy scenario reaching the WMO requirement at different heights. Increasing canopy heterogeneity and tree height noticeably reduces the accuracy, whereas changing seasonality from summer to winter in a deciduous forest increases accuracy. For canopies with a row structure, illumination angle can significantly impact accuracy as a result of shadowing effects. Tests were made on the potential use of multiple in situ measurements, indicating considerably increased accuracy if two or more in situ measurements can be made.

  11. Sensitivity of Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance to surface albedo parameterization: a study with a regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. van Angelen

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a sensitivity study of the surface mass balance (SMB of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as modeled using a regional atmospheric climate model, to various parameter settings in the albedo parameterization. The snow albedo parameterization uses grain size as a prognostic variable and further depends on cloud cover, solar zenith angle and black carbon concentration. For the control experiment the overestimation of absorbed shortwave radiation (+6 % at the K-transect (West Greenland for the period 2004–2009 is considerably reduced compared to the previous density-dependent albedo parameterization (+22 %. To simulate realistic snow albedo values, a small concentration of black carbon is needed. A background ice albedo field derived from MODIS imagery improves the agreement between the modeled and observed SMB gradient along the K-transect. The effect of enhanced retention and refreezing is a decrease of the albedo due to an increase in snow grain size. As a secondary effect of refreezing the snowpack is heated, enhancing melt and further lowering the albedo. Especially in a warmer climate this process is important, since it reduces the refreezing potential of the firn layer covering the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  12. Sensitivity of Greenland Ice Sheet surface mass balance to surface albedo parameterization: a study with a regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. van Angelen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available We present a sensitivity study of the surface mass balance (SMB of the Greenland Ice Sheet, as modeled using a regional atmospheric climate model, to various parameter settings in the albedo scheme. The snow albedo scheme uses grain size as a prognostic variable and further depends on cloud cover, solar zenith angle and black carbon concentration. For the control experiment the overestimation of absorbed shortwave radiation (+6% at the K-transect (west Greenland for the period 2004–2009 is considerably reduced compared to the previous density-dependent albedo scheme (+22%. To simulate realistic snow albedo values, a small concentration of black carbon is needed, which has strongest impact on melt in the accumulation area. A background ice albedo field derived from MODIS imagery improves the agreement between the modeled and observed SMB gradient along the K-transect. The effect of enhanced meltwater retention and refreezing is a decrease of the albedo due to an increase in snow grain size. As a secondary effect of refreezing the snowpack is heated, enhancing melt and further lowering the albedo. Especially in a warmer climate this process is important, since it reduces the refreezing potential of the firn layer that covers the Greenland Ice Sheet.

  13. Estimating Crop Albedo in the Application of a Physical Model Based on the Law of Energy Conservation and Spectral Invariants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingjing Peng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Albedo characterizes the radiometric interface of land surfaces, especially vegetation, and the atmosphere. Albedo is a critical input to many models, such as crop growth models, hydrological models and climate models. For the extensive attention to crop monitoring, a physical albedo model for crops is developed based on the law of energy conservation and spectral invariants, which is derived from a prior forest albedo model. The model inputs have been efficiently and physically parameterized, including the dependency of albedo on the solar zenith/azimuth angle, the fraction of diffuse skylight in the incident radiance, the canopy structure, the leaf reflectance/transmittance and the soil reflectance characteristics. Both the anisotropy of soil reflectance and the clumping effect of crop leaves at the canopy scale are considered, which contribute to the improvement of the model accuracy. The comparison between the model results and Monte Carlo simulation results indicates that the canopy albedo has high accuracy with an RMSE < 0.005. The validation using ground measurements has also demonstrated the reliability of the model and that it can reflect the interaction mechanism between radiation and the canopy-soil system.

  14. NASA Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Brian; Law, Emily

    2016-10-01

    NASA's Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling Portals provide web-based suites of interactive visualization and analysis tools to enable mission planners, planetary scientists, students, and the general public to access mapped lunar data products from past and current missions for the Moon, Mars, and Vesta. New portals for additional planetary bodies are being planned. This presentation will recap some of the enhancements to these products during the past year and preview work currently being undertaken.New data products added to the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP) include both generalized products as well as polar data products specifically targeting potential sites for the Resource Prospector mission. New tools being developed include traverse planning and surface potential analysis. Current development work on LMMP also includes facilitating mission planning and data management for lunar CubeSat missions. Looking ahead, LMMP is working with the NASA Astromaterials Office to integrate with their Lunar Apollo Sample database to help better visualize the geographic contexts of retrieved samples. All of this will be done within the framework of a new user interface which, among other improvements, will provide significantly enhanced 3D visualizations and navigation.Mars Trek, the project's Mars portal, has now been assigned by NASA's Planetary Science Division to support site selection and analysis for the Mars 2020 Rover mission as well as for the Mars Human Landing Exploration Zone Sites, and is being enhanced with data products and analysis tools specifically requested by the proposing teams for the various sites. NASA Headquarters is giving high priority to Mars Trek's use as a means to directly involve the public in these upcoming missions, letting them explore the areas the agency is focusing upon, understand what makes these sites so fascinating, follow the selection process, and get caught up in the excitement of exploring Mars.The portals also

  15. NASA Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, B. H.; Law, E.

    2016-12-01

    NASA's Lunar and Planetary Mapping and Modeling Portals provide web-based suites of interactive visualization and analysis tools to enable mission planners, planetary scientists, students, and the general public to access mapped lunar data products from past and current missions for the Moon, Mars, and Vesta. New portals for additional planetary bodies are being planned. This presentation will recap significant enhancements to these toolsets during the past year and look forward to the results of the exciting work currently being undertaken. Additional data products and tools continue to be added to the Lunar Mapping and Modeling Portal (LMMP). These include both generalized products as well as polar data products specifically targeting potential sites for the Resource Prospector mission. Current development work on LMMP also includes facilitating mission planning and data management for lunar CubeSat missions, and working with the NASA Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office's Lunar Apollo Sample database in order to help better visualize the geographic contexts from which samples were retrieved. A new user interface provides, among other improvements, significantly enhanced 3D visualizations and navigation. Mars Trek, the project's Mars portal, has now been assigned by NASA's Planetary Science Division to support site selection and analysis for the Mars 2020 Rover mission as well as for the Mars Human Landing Exploration Zone Sites. This effort is concentrating on enhancing Mars Trek with data products and analysis tools specifically requested by the proposing teams for the various sites. Also being given very high priority by NASA Headquarters is Mars Trek's use as a means to directly involve the public in these upcoming missions, letting them explore the areas the agency is focusing upon, understand what makes these sites so fascinating, follow the selection process, and get caught up in the excitement of exploring Mars. The portals also serve as

  16. MODIS/COMBINED MCD43B1 BRDF-Albedo Model 16-Day L3 Global 1km

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/Albedo Model Parameters product (MCD43A1) contains three-dimensional (3D) data sets providing users...

  17. MODIS/COMBINED MCD43A1 BRDF-Albedo Model Parameters 16-Day L3 Global 500m

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/Albedo Model Parameters product (MCD43A1) contains three-dimensional (3D) data sets providing users...

  18. Process-model simulations of cloud albedo enhancement by aerosols in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravitz, Ben; Wang, Hailong; Rasch, Philip J.; Morrison, Hugh; Solomon, Amy B.

    2014-01-01

    A cloud-resolving model is used to simulate the effectiveness of Arctic marine cloud brightening via injection of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), either through geoengineering or other increased sources of Arctic aerosols. An updated cloud microphysical scheme is employed, with prognostic CCN and cloud particle numbers in both liquid and mixed-phase marine low clouds. Injection of CCN into the marine boundary layer can delay the collapse of the boundary layer and increase low-cloud albedo. Albedo increases are stronger for pure liquid clouds than mixed-phase clouds. Liquid precipitation can be suppressed by CCN injection, whereas ice precipitation (snow) is affected less; thus, the effectiveness of brightening mixed-phase clouds is lower than for liquid-only clouds. CCN injection into a clean regime results in a greater albedo increase than injection into a polluted regime, consistent with current knowledge about aerosol–cloud interactions. Unlike previous studies investigating warm clouds, dynamical changes in circulation owing to precipitation changes are small. According to these results, which are dependent upon the representation of ice nucleation processes in the employed microphysical scheme, Arctic geoengineering is unlikely to be effective as the sole means of altering the global radiation budget but could have substantial local radiative effects. PMID:25404677

  19. Hierarchies of Models: Toward Understanding Planetary Nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knuth, Kevin H.; Hajian, Arsen R.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Stars like our sun (initial masses between 0.8 to 8 solar masses) end their lives as swollen red giants surrounded by cool extended atmospheres. The nuclear reactions in their cores create carbon, nitrogen and oxygen, which are transported by convection to the outer envelope of the stellar atmosphere. As the star finally collapses to become a white dwarf, this envelope is expelled from the star to form a planetary nebula (PN) rich in organic molecules. The physics, dynamics, and chemistry of these nebulae are poorly understood and have implications not only for our understanding of the stellar life cycle but also for organic astrochemistry and the creation of prebiotic molecules in interstellar space. We are working toward generating three-dimensional models of planetary nebulae (PNe), which include the size, orientation, shape, expansion rate and mass distribution of the nebula. Such a reconstruction of a PN is a challenging problem for several reasons. First, the data consist of images obtained over time from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) and spectra obtained from Kitt Peak National Observatory (KPNO) and Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory (CTIO). These images are of course taken from a single viewpoint in space, which amounts to a very challenging tomographic reconstruction. Second, the fact that we have two disparate and orthogonal data types requires that we utilize a method that allows these data to be used together to obtain a solution. To address these first two challenges we employ Bayesian model estimation using a parameterized physical model that incorporates much prior information about the known physics of the PN. In our previous works we have found that the forward problem of the comprehensive model is extremely time consuming. To address this challenge, we explore the use of a set of hierarchical models, which allow us to estimate increasingly more detailed sets of model parameters. These hierarchical models of increasing complexity are akin

  20. Assessing modeled Greenland surface mass balance in the GISS Model E2 and its sensitivity to surface albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Patrick; LeGrande, Allegra N.; Koenig, Lora S.; Tedesco, Marco; Moustafa, Samiah E.; Ivanoff, Alvaro; Fischer, Robert P.; Fettweis, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland Ice Sheet (GrIS) plays an important role in global sea level change. Regional Climate Models (RCMs) such as the Modèle Atmosphérique Régionale (MAR) have been employed at high spatial resolution with relatively complex physics to simulate ice sheet SMB. Global climate models (GCMs) incorporate less sophisticated physical schemes and provide outputs at a lower spatial resolution, but have the advantage of modeling the interaction between different components of the earth's oceans, climate, and land surface at a global scale. Improving the ability of GCMs to represent ice sheet SMB is important for making predictions of future changes in global sea level. With the ultimate goal of improving SMB simulated by the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) Model E2 GCM, we compare simulated GrIS SMB against the outputs of the MAR model and radar-derived estimates of snow accumulation. In order to reproduce present-day climate variability in the Model E2 simulation, winds are constrained to match the reanalysis datasets used to force MAR at the lateral boundaries. We conduct a preliminary assessment of the sensitivity of the simulated Model E2 SMB to surface albedo, a parameter that is known to strongly influence SMB. Model E2 albedo is set to a fixed value of 0.8 over the entire ice sheet in the initial configuration of the model (control case). We adjust this fixed value in an ensemble of simulations over a range of 0.4 to 0.8 (roughly the range of observed summer GrIS albedo values) to examine the sensitivity of ice-sheet-wide SMB to albedo. We prescribe albedo from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) MCD43A3 v6 to examine the impact of a more realistic spatial and temporal variations in albedo. An age-dependent snow albedo parameterization is applied, and its impact on SMB relative to observations and the RCM is assessed.

  1. FITTING PHOTOIONIZATION MODELS TO PLANETARY NEBULAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bohigas

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Good to excellent photoionization models based on the Cloudy code were obtained for 13 out of 19 spectra of planetary nebulae. The two most important assumptions are that the photoionizing continuum is a Rauch model star, with gravity set by the condition that the stellar mass must be 1 M , and density is constant and determined from the observed [S II]6717/6731 ratio. The temperature and luminosity of the central star, the inner radius of the nebula and the abundance of carbon are treated as free parameters in each model run, destined to obtain the best possible t to the relative intensities of He II 4686, [O III]5007 and [N II]6584. Observed and modeled nebular temperatures derived from [N II] (6548+6584 /5755 agree within 10%, but models usually underestimate temperatures found from [O III] (4959+5007 /4363, more so when the slit does not cover the in-depth extent of the ionized region. Helium, nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulfur and argon model abundances are uncertain at the 15%, 15%, 10%, 7%, 30% and 7% level. It is shown that neon abundance in PNe has been consistently overestimated, and an alternative ionization correction factor is recommended.

  2. Transient and asymptotic behavior in a regular network model for the ice-albedo feedback under thermal forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller-Stoffels, M.; Wackerbauer, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Arctic ocean and sea ice form a feedback system which plays an important role in the global climate. Variations of the global ice and snow distribution have a significant effect on the planetary albedo which governs the absorption of shortwave radiation. The complexity of highly parametrized GCMs makes it very difficult to assess single feedback processes in the climate system without the concurrent use of simple models where the physics are understood [1][2][3]. We introduce a complex systems model to investigate thermodynamic feedback processes in an Arctic ice-ocean layer. The ice-ocean layer is represented as a regular network of coupled cells. The state of each cell is determined by its energy content, which also defines the phase of the cell. The energy transport between cells is described with nonlinear and heterogeneous diffusion constants. And the time-evolution of the ice-ocean is driven by shortwave, longwave and lateral oceanic and atmospheric thermal forcing. This model is designed to study the stability of an ice cover under various heat intake scenarios. The network structure of the model allows to easily introduce albedo heterogeneities due to aging ice, wind blown snow cover, and ice movement to explore the time-evolution and pattern formation (melt ponds) processes in the Arctic sea ice. The solely thermodynamic model exhibits two stable states; one in the perennially ice covered domain and one in the perennially open water domain. Their existence is due to the temperature dependence of the longwave radiative budget. Transition between these states can be forced via lateral heat fluxes. During the transition from the ice covered to the open water stable state the ice albedo feedback effects are manifested as an increased warming rate of the ice cover together with enhanced seasonal energy oscillations. In the current model realization seasonal ice cover is present as a transient state only. Furthermore, the model exhibits hysteresis between

  3. Rotating, hydromagnetic laboratory experiment modelling planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Douglas H.

    2009-10-01

    This dissertation describes a series of laboratory experiments motivated by planetary cores and the dynamo effect, the mechanism by which the flow of an electrically conductive fluid can give rise to a spontaneous magnetic field. Our experimental apparatus, meant to be a laboratory model of Earth's core, contains liquid sodium between an inner, solid sphere and an outer, spherical shell. The fluid is driven by the differential rotation of these two boundaries, each of which is connected to a motor. Applying an axial, DC magnetic field, we use a collection of Hall probes to measure the magnetic induction that results from interactions between the applied field and the flowing, conductive fluid. We have observed and identified inertial modes, which are bulk oscillations of the fluid restored by the Coriolis force. Over-reflection at a shear layer is one mechanism capable of exciting such modes, and we have developed predictions of both onset boundaries and mode selection from over-reflection theory which are consistent with our observations. Also, motivated by previous experimental devices that used ferromagnetic boundaries to achieve dynamo action, we have studied the effects of a soft iron (ferromagnetic) inner sphere on our apparatus, again finding inertial waves. We also find that all behaviors are more broadband and generally more nonlinear in the presence of a ferromagnetic boundary. Our results with a soft iron inner sphere have implications for other hydromagnetic experiments with ferromagnetic boundaries, and are appropriate for comparison to numerical simulations as well. From our observations we conclude that inertial modes almost certainly occur in planetary cores and will occur in future rotating experiments. In fact, the predominance of inertial modes in our experiments and in other recent work leads to a new paradigm for rotating turbulence, starkly different from turbulence theories based on assumptions of isotropy and homogeneity, starting instead

  4. Inferring past land use-induced changes in surface albedo from satellite observations: a useful tool to evaluate model simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Boisier

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Regional cooling resulting from increases in surface albedo has been identified in several studies as the main biogeophysical effect of past land use-induced land cover changes (LCC on climate. However, the amplitude of this effect remains quite uncertain due to, among other factors, (a uncertainties in the extent of historical LCC and, (b differences in the way various models simulate surface albedo and more specifically its dependency on vegetation type and snow cover. We derived monthly albedo climatologies for croplands and four other land cover types from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS satellite observations. We then reconstructed the changes in surface albedo between preindustrial times and present-day by combining these climatologies with the land cover maps of 1870 and 1992 used by seven land surface models (LSMs in the context of the LUCID ("Land Use and Climate: identification of robust Impacts" intercomparison project. These reconstructions show surface albedo increases larger than 10% (absolute in winter, and larger than 2% in summer between 1870 and 1992 over areas that experienced intense deforestation in the northern temperate regions. The historical surface albedo changes estimated with MODIS data were then compared to those simulated by the various climate models participating in LUCID. The inter-model mean albedo response to LCC shows a similar spatial and seasonal pattern to the one resulting from the MODIS-based reconstructions, that is, larger albedo increases in winter than in summer, driven by the presence of snow. However, individual models show significant differences between the simulated albedo changes and the corresponding reconstructions, despite the fact that land cover change maps are the same. Our analyses suggest that the primary reason for those discrepancies is how LSMs parameterize albedo. Another reason, of secondary importance, results from differences in their simulated snow extent

  5. Exact results in modeling planetary atmospheres-III

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pelkowski, J. [Institut fuer Atmosphaere und Umwelt, J.W. Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Campus Riedberg, Altenhoferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt a.M. (Germany)], E-mail: Pelkowski@meteor.uni-frankfurt.de; Chevallier, L. [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Laboratoire LUTH, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon cedex (France); Rutily, B. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Titaud, O. [Centro de Modelamiento Matematico, UMI 2807 CNRS-UChile, Blanco Encalada 2120 - 7 Piso, Casilla 170 - Correo 3, Santiago (Chile)

    2008-01-15

    We apply the semi-gray model of our previous paper to the particular case of the Earth's atmosphere, in order to illustrate quantitatively the inverse problem associated with the direct problem we dealt with before. From given climatological values of the atmosphere's spherical albedo and transmittance for visible radiation, the single-scattering albedo and the optical thickness in the visible are inferred, while the infrared optical thickness is deduced for given global average surface temperature. Eventually, temperature distributions in terms of the infrared optical depth will be shown for a terrestrial atmosphere assumed to be semi-gray and, locally, in radiative and thermodynamic equilibrium.

  6. Testing the planetary models of HU Aquarii

    CERN Document Server

    Bours, M; Breedt, E; Copperwheat, C; Dhillon, V; Leckngam, A; Littlefair, S; Parsons, S; Prasit, A

    2014-01-01

    We present new eclipse observations of the polar (i.e. semi-detached magnetic white dwarf + M-dwarf binary) HU Aqr, and mid-egress times for each eclipse, which continue to be observed increasingly early. Recent eclipses occurred more than 70 seconds earlier than the prediction from the latest model that invoked a single circumbinary planet to explain the observed orbital period variations, thereby conclusively proving this model to be incorrect. Using ULTRACAM data, we show that mid-egress times determined for simultaneous data taken at different wavelengths agree with each other. The large variations in the observed eclipse times cannot be explained by planetary models containing up to three planets, because of poor fits to the data as well as orbital instability on short time scales. The peak-to-peak amplitude of the O-C diagram of almost 140 seconds is also too great to be caused by Applegate's mechanism, movement of the accretion spot on the surface of the white dwarf, or by asynchronous rotation of the ...

  7. Measurements and modelling of aerosol single-scattering albedo: progress, problems and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heintzenberg, J. [Institut fuer Troposphaerenforschung e.V. (IfT), Leipzig (Germany); Charlson, R.J.; Clarke, A.D.; Liousse, C.; Ramaswamy, V.; Shine, K.P.; Wendisch, M.; Helas, G.

    1997-11-01

    The net effect of atmospheric aerosols in the radiation balance is determined by both their scattering and absorption of solar radiation. The combined optical effect is expressed in the single scatter albedo, {omega}, of the particles. Currently available data on {omega} are insufficient for definitive use in climate models because most of them are not corrected for the method-dependent effect of the scattering portion of the aerosol on the measured absorption, most refer to the dry state of the aerosol, and the coverage of the globe is far from being complete. Standardisation and calibration of the measurements is needed. Modelling exercises using currently available data on {omega} should clearly state that corrections are required. The purpose of this review is not to suggest a particular range of values for single scatter albedo. Rather, it is to illustrate that the uncertainties are currently imbedded in various data sets because of the lack of calibration, the possibility that many of the extant methods systematically overestimate light absorption coefficients, and the necessity of including the influence of humidity in models. (orig.) 95 refs.

  8. Effect of ice-albedo feedback on global sensitivity in a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, W.-C.; Stone, P. H.

    1980-01-01

    The feedback between the ice albedo and temperature is included in a one-dimensional radiative-convective climate model. The effect of this feedback on global sensitivity to changes in solar constant is studied for the current climate conditions. This ice-albedo feedback amplifies global sensitivity by 26 and 39%, respectively, for assumptions of fixed cloud altitude and fixed cloud temperature. The global sensitivity is not affected significantly if the latitudinal variations of mean solar zenith angle and cloud cover are included in the global model. The differences in global sensitivity between one-dimensional radiative-convective models and energy balance models are examined. It is shown that the models are in close agreement when the same feedback mechanisms are included. The one-dimensional radiative-convective model with ice-albedo feedback included is used to compute the equilibrium ice line as a function of solar constant.

  9. The evolution of planetary nebulae VII. Modelling planetary nebulae of distant stellar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Schönberner, D; Sandin, C; Steffen, M

    2010-01-01

    By means of hydrodynamical models we do the first investigations of how the properties of planetary nebulae are affected by their metal content and what can be learned from spatially unresolved spectrograms of planetary nebulae in distant stellar systems. We computed a new series of 1D radiation-hydrodynamics planetary nebulae model sequences with central stars of 0.595 M_sun surrounded by initial envelope structures that differ only by their metal content. At selected phases along the evolutionary path, the hydrodynamic terms were switched off, allowing the models to relax for fixed radial structure and radiation field into their equilibrium state with respect to energy and ionisation. The analyses of the line spectra emitted from both the dynamical and static models enabled us to systematically study the influence of hydrodynamics as a function of metallicity and evolution. We also recomputed selected sequences already used in previous publications, but now with different metal abundances. These sequences w...

  10. Albedo and heat transport in 3-D model simulations of the early Archean climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kienert

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of the Archean eon (ca. 3.8 billion years ago, the Earth's climate state was significantly different from today due to the lower solar luminosity, smaller continental fraction, higher rotation rate and, presumably, significantly larger greenhouse gas concentrations. All these aspects play a role in solutions to the "faint young Sun paradox" which must explain why the ocean surface was not fully frozen at that time. Here, we present 3-D model simulations of climate states that are consistent with early Archean boundary conditions and have different CO2 concentrations, aiming at an understanding of the fundamental characteristics of the early Archean climate system. In order to do so, we have appropriately modified an intermediate complexity climate model that couples a statistical-dynamical atmosphere model (involving parameterizations of the dynamics to an ocean general circulation model and a thermodynamic-dynamic sea-ice model. We focus on three states: one of them is ice-free, one has the same mean surface air temperature of 288 K as today's Earth and the third one is the coldest stable state in which there is still an area with liquid surface water (i.e. the critical state at the transition to a "snowball Earth". We find a reduction in meridional heat transport compared to today, which leads to a steeper latitudinal temperature profile and has atmospheric as well as oceanic contributions. Ocean surface velocities are largely zonal, and the strength of the atmospheric meridional circulation is significantly reduced in all three states. These aspects contribute to the observed relation between global mean temperature and albedo, which we suggest as a parameterization of the ice-albedo feedback for 1-D model simulations of the early Archean and thus the faint young Sun problem.

  11. The Impact of Albedo Increase to Mitigate the Urban Heat Island in Terni (Italy Using the WRF Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Morini

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The impacts of the urban heat island (UHI phenomenon on energy consumption, air quality, and human health have been widely studied and described. Mitigation strategies have been developed to fight the UHI and its detrimental consequences. A potential countermeasure is the increase of urban albedo by using cool materials. Cool materials are highly reflective materials that can maintain lower surface temperatures and thus can present an effective solution to mitigate the UHI. Terni’s proven record of high temperatures along with related environmental and comfort issues in its urban areas have reflected the local consequences of global warming. On the other hand, it promoted integrated actions by the government and research institutes to investigate solutions to mitigate the UHI effects. In this study, the main goal is to investigate the effectiveness of albedo increase as a strategy to tackle the UHI, by using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF mesoscale model to simulate the urban climate of Terni (Italy. Three different scenarios through a summer heat wave in the summer of 2015 are analyzed. The Base Scenario, which simulates the actual conditions of the urban area, is the control case. In the Albedo Scenario (ALB Scenario, the albedo of the roof, walls and road of the whole urban area is increased. In the Albedo-Industrial Scenario (ALB-IND Scenario, the albedo of the roof, walls and road of the area occupied by the main industrial site of Terni, located in close proximity to the city center, is increased. The simulation results show that the UHI is decreased up to 2 °C both at daytime and at nighttime in the ALB and in ALB-IND Scenarios. Peak temperatures in the urban area can be decreased by 1 °C at daytime, and by about 2 °C at nighttime. Albedo increase in the area of interest might thus represent an opportunity to decrease the UHI effect and its consequences.

  12. Accuracy of physically based snow albedo model evaluated with measured data at Sapporo, Japan during five winters from 2006 to 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, T.; Kuchiki, K.; Niwano, M.; Kodama, Y.

    2011-12-01

    Physically based snow albedo model (PBSAM) to calculate broadband albedos and solar heating profile in a general circulation model was developed by Aoki et al. (2011), in which the accuracy for albedos was evaluated with the data of radiation budget and snow pit work performed at Sapporo during two winters from 2007 to 2009. The model calculates the broadband albedos for the visible, near-infrared (NIR), and shortwave bands for any snow layer structure of snow grain size, snow impurity concentrations, and snow water equivalent under any solar illumination condition. The estimated root mean square errors (RMSE) from the measured data were 0.047 for the visible albedo and 0.057 for the NIR albedo. In the paper, it is described that possible error causes for calculated albedos are (1) PBSAM faultiness; (2) inappropriately modeled snow layers structure (e.g., number of layers and depths of layer boundaries); (3) the assumption that the diffuse fractions of the visible and NIR bands are the same as the measured diffuse fraction of the shortwave radiation; (4) errors in the measured snow grain size and snow impurity concentrations; and (5) errors in the albedo measurements. Using the data obtained at Sapporo during five winters from 2006 to 2011, we further investigated the effects of snow grain size, mass concentrations of snow impurities (black carbon and dust), air temperature, snow surface temperature, snow depth, diffuse fraction of solar radiation, continuous snow cover days, wet snow days, new snow days, ice layer days, and albedo values themselves on the accuracy of calculated albedos for each winter. Among them, the best (worst) RMSE value of calculated albedos by PBSAM for each winter during five winters is 2008-2009 (2010-2011) for the visible albedo and 2007-2008 (2006-2007) for the NIR albedos. The estimated RMSE for each winter have a high correlation with continuous snow cover days and wet snow days for each winter, meaning that PBSAM error may increase

  13. Developing a Model-Based Framework for Quality Assessments of In-Situ Measurement Protocols for Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Jennifer Susan; Gobron, Nadine; Widlowski, Jean-Luc; Mio, Corrado

    2016-08-01

    Validation of satellite-based retrievals of land surface albedo using in-situ measurements is essential to identify differences between them, to improve retrieval algorithms and to assess conformity to accuracy requirements. Differences between in-situ and satellite-based retrievals depend on the actual difference and their associated uncertainties, where it is crucial that the uncertainties of both can be computed to properly understand potential differences. This study introduces a model-based framework for assessing the quality of in-situ albedo measurements. A 3D Monte Carlo Ray Tracing (MCRT) radiative transfer model is used to simulate field measurements of surface albedo, and is able to identify and quantify potential sources of error in the field measurement. Compliance with the World Meteorological Organisation (WMO) requirement for 3% accuracy is tested.

  14. Albedo and heat transport in 3-dimensional model simulations of the early Archean climate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kienert

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available At the beginning of the Archean eon (ca. 3.8 billion yr ago, the Earth's climate state was significantly different from today due to the lower solar luminosity, smaller continental fraction, higher rotation rate and, presumably, significantly larger greenhouse gas concentrations. All these aspects play a role in solutions to the "faint young Sun problem" which must explain why the ocean surface was not fully frozen at that time. Here, we present 3-dimensional model simulations of climate states that are consistent with early Archean boundary conditions and have different CO2 concentrations, aiming at an understanding of the fundamental characteristics of the early Archean climate system. We focus on three states: one of them is ice-free, one has the same mean surface air temperature of 288 K as today's Earth and the third one is the coldest stable state in which there is still an area with liquid surface water (i.e. the critical state at the transition to a "snowball Earth". We find a reduction in meridional heat transport compared to today which leads to a steeper latitudinal temperature profile and has atmospheric as well as oceanic contributions. Ocean surface velocities are largely zonal, and the strength of the atmospheric meridional circulation is significantly reduced in all three states. These aspects contribute to the observed relation between global mean temperature and albedo, which we suggest as a parameterisation of the ice-albedo feedback for 1-dimensional model simulations of the early Archean and thus the faint young Sun problem.

  15. Development of a MODIS-Derived Surface Albedo Data Set: An Improved Model Input for Processing the NSRDB

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maclaurin, Galen [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sengupta, Manajit [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Xie, Yu [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Gilroy, Nicholas [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-12-01

    A significant source of bias in the transposition of global horizontal irradiance to plane-of-array (POA) irradiance arises from inaccurate estimations of surface albedo. The current physics-based model used to produce the National Solar Radiation Database (NSRDB) relies on model estimations of surface albedo from a reanalysis climatalogy produced at relatively coarse spatial resolution compared to that of the NSRDB. As an input to spectral decomposition and transposition models, more accurate surface albedo data from remotely sensed imagery at finer spatial resolutions would improve accuracy in the final product. The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) developed an improved white-sky (bi-hemispherical reflectance) broadband (0.3-5.0 ..mu..m) surface albedo data set for processing the NSRDB from two existing data sets: a gap-filled albedo product and a daily snow cover product. The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) sensors onboard the Terra and Aqua satellites have provided high-quality measurements of surface albedo at 30 arc-second spatial resolution and 8-day temporal resolution since 2001. The high spatial and temporal resolutions and the temporal coverage of the MODIS sensor will allow for improved modeling of POA irradiance in the NSRDB. However, cloud and snow cover interfere with MODIS observations of ground surface albedo, and thus they require post-processing. The MODIS production team applied a gap-filling methodology to interpolate observations obscured by clouds or ephemeral snow. This approach filled pixels with ephemeral snow cover because the 8-day temporal resolution is too coarse to accurately capture the variability of snow cover and its impact on albedo estimates. However, for this project, accurate representation of daily snow cover change is important in producing the NSRDB. Therefore, NREL also used the Integrated Multisensor Snow and Ice Mapping System data set, which provides daily snow cover observations of the

  16. The influence of inter-annually varying albedo on regional climate and drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, X. H.; Evans, J. P.; McCabe, M. F.

    2014-02-01

    Albedo plays an important role in land-atmosphere interactions and local climate. This study presents the impact on simulating regional climate, and the evolution of a drought, when using the default climatological albedo as is usually done in regional climate modelling, or using the actual observed albedo which is rarely done. Here, time-varying satellite derived albedo data is used to update the lower boundary condition of the Weather Research and Forecasting regional climate model in order to investigate the influence of observed albedo on regional climate simulations and also potential changes to land-atmosphere feedback over south-east Australia. During the study period from 2000 to 2008, observations show that albedo increased with an increasingly negative precipitation anomaly, though it lagged precipitation by several months. Compared to in-situ observations, using satellite observed albedo instead of the default climatological albedo provided an improvement in the simulated seasonal mean air temperature. In terms of precipitation, both simulations reproduced the drought that occurred from 2002 through 2006. Using the observed albedo produced a drier simulation overall. During the onset of the 2002 drought, albedo changes enhanced the precipitation reduction by 20 % on average, over locations where it was active. The area experiencing drought increased 6.3 % due to the albedo changes. Two mechanisms for albedo changes to impact land-atmosphere drought feedback are investigated. One accounts for the increased albedo, leading to reduced turbulent heat flux and an associated decrease of moist static energy density in the planetary boundary layer; the other considers that enhanced local radiative heating, due to the drought, favours a deeper planetary boundary layer, subsequently decreasing the moist static energy density through entrainment of the free atmosphere. Analysis shows that drought related large-scale changes in the regional climate favour a

  17. The influence of inter-annually varying albedo on regional climate and drought

    KAUST Repository

    Meng, Xianhong

    2013-05-05

    Albedo plays an important role in land-atmosphere interactions and local climate. This study presents the impact on simulating regional climate, and the evolution of a drought, when using the default climatological albedo as is usually done in regional climate modelling, or using the actual observed albedo which is rarely done. Here, time-varying satellite derived albedo data is used to update the lower boundary condition of the Weather Research and Forecasting regional climate model in order to investigate the influence of observed albedo on regional climate simulations and also potential changes to land-atmosphere feedback over south-east Australia. During the study period from 2000 to 2008, observations show that albedo increased with an increasingly negative precipitation anomaly, though it lagged precipitation by several months. Compared to in-situ observations, using satellite observed albedo instead of the default climatological albedo provided an improvement in the simulated seasonal mean air temperature. In terms of precipitation, both simulations reproduced the drought that occurred from 2002 through 2006. Using the observed albedo produced a drier simulation overall. During the onset of the 2002 drought, albedo changes enhanced the precipitation reduction by 20 % on average, over locations where it was active. The area experiencing drought increased 6.3 % due to the albedo changes. Two mechanisms for albedo changes to impact land-atmosphere drought feedback are investigated. One accounts for the increased albedo, leading to reduced turbulent heat flux and an associated decrease of moist static energy density in the planetary boundary layer; the other considers that enhanced local radiative heating, due to the drought, favours a deeper planetary boundary layer, subsequently decreasing the moist static energy density through entrainment of the free atmosphere. Analysis shows that drought related large-scale changes in the regional climate favour a

  18. Top-of-Atmosphere Albedo Estimation from Angular Distribution Models using Scene Identification from Satellite Cloud Property Retrievals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, N. G.; Parol, F.; Buriez, J.-C.; Vanbauce, C.

    2000-01-01

    The next generation of Earth radiation budget satellite instruments will routinely merge estimates of global top-of-atmosphere radiative fluxes with cloud properties. This information will offer many new opportunities for validating radiative transfer models and cloud parameterizations in climate models. In this study, five months of POLarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectances (POLDER) 670 nm radiance measurements are considered in order to examine how satellite cloud property retrievals can be used to define empirical Angular Distribution Models (ADMs) for estimating top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedo. ADMs are defined for 19 scene types defined by satellite retrievals of cloud fraction and cloud optical depth. Two approaches are used to define the ADM scene types: The first assumes there are no biases in the retrieved cloud properties and defines ADMs for fixed discrete intervals of cloud fraction and cloud optical depth (fixed-tau approach). The second approach involves the same cloud fraction intervals, but uses percentile intervals of cloud optical depth instead (percentile-tau approach). Albedos generated using these methods are compared with albedos inferred directly from the mean observed reflectance field. Albedos based on ADMs that assume cloud properties are unbiased (fixed-tau approach) show a strong systematic dependence on viewing geometry. This dependence becomes more pronounced with increasing solar zenith angle, reaching approximately equals 12% (relative) between near-nadir and oblique viewing zenith angles for solar zenith angles between 60 deg and 70 deg. The cause for this bias is shown to be due to biases in the cloud optical depth retrievals. In contrast, albedos based on ADMs built using percentile intervals of cloud optical depth (percentile-tau approach) show very little viewing zenith angle dependence and are in good agreement with albedos obtained by direct integration of the mean observed reflectance field (less than 1

  19. Planetary and Interplanetary Environmental Models for Radiation Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeAngelis, G.; Cucinotta, F. A.

    2005-01-01

    The essence of environmental modeling is presented as suited for radiation analysis purposes. The variables of fundamental importance for radiation environmental assessment are discussed. The characterization is performed by dividing modeling into three areas, namely the interplanetary medium, the circumplanetary environment, and the planetary or satellite surface. In the first area, the galactic cosmic rays (GCR) and their modulation by the heliospheric magnetic field as well as and solar particle events (SPE) are considered, in the second area the magnetospheres are taken into account, and in the third area the effect of the planetary environment is also considered. Planetary surfaces and atmospheres are modeled based on results from the most recent targeted spacecraft. The results are coupled with suited visualization techniques and radiation transport models in support of trade studies of health risks for future exploration missions.

  20. Solar Irradiance from GOES Albedo performance in a Hydrologic Model Simulation of Snowmelt Runoff

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumargo, E.; Cayan, D. R.; McGurk, B. J.

    2015-12-01

    In many hydrologic modeling applications, solar radiation has been parameterized using commonly available measures, such as the daily temperature range, due to scarce in situ solar radiation measurement network. However, these parameterized estimates often produce significant biases. Here we test hourly solar irradiance derived from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) visible albedo product, using several established algorithms. Focusing on the Sierra Nevada and White Mountain in California, we compared the GOES irradiance and that from a traditional temperature-based algorithm with incoming irradiance from pyranometers at 19 stations. The GOES based estimates yielded 21-27% reduction in root-mean-squared error (average over 19 sites). The derived irradiance is then prescribed as an input to Precipitation-Runoff Modeling System (PRMS). We constrain our experiment to the Tuolumne River watershed and focus our attention on the winter and spring of 1996-2014. A root-mean-squared error reduction of 2-6% in daily inflow to Hetch Hetchy at the lower end of the Tuolumne catchment was achieved by incorporating the insolation estimates at only 8 out of 280 Hydrologic Response Units (HRUs) within the basin. Our ongoing work endeavors to apply satellite-derived irradiance at each individual HRU.

  1. The temporal scale research of MODIS albedo product authenticity verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Yongxing; Xue, Zhihang; Cheng, Hui; Xiong, Yajv; Chen, Yunping; Tong, Ling

    2016-06-01

    This study introduces a method that normalizes the inversed ETM+ albedo to the local solar noon albedo for the temporal scale of the MODIS albedo validation. Firstly, the statistical relation model between the surface albedo and the solar elevation angle was set up, and then deducing relationship between ETM+ albedo and the solar elevation angle, so the ETM+ albedo at local solar noon could be got. Secondly, the ground measurement albedo at the local solar noon was used to assess the inversed ETM+ albedo and the normalized albedo. The experiment results show that the method can effectively improve the accuracy of product certification.

  2. The Planetary Data System Web Catalog Interface--Another Use of the Planetary Data System Data Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, S.; Bernath, A.

    1995-01-01

    The Planetary Data System Data Model consists of a set of standardized descriptions of entities within the Planetary Science Community. These can be real entities in the space exploration domain such as spacecraft, instruments, and targets; conceptual entities such as data sets, archive volumes, and data dictionaries; or the archive data products such as individual images, spectrum, series, and qubes.

  3. Extra-tropical origin of equatorial Pacific cold bias in climate models with links to cloud albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burls, Natalie J.; Muir, Leslie; Vincent, Emmanuel M.; Fedorov, Alexey

    2017-09-01

    General circulation models frequently suffer from a substantial cold bias in equatorial Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs). For instance, the majority of the climate models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) have this particular problem (17 out of the 26 models evaluated in the present study). Here, we investigate the extent to which these equatorial cold biases are related to mean climate biases generated in the extra-tropics and then communicated to the equator via the oceanic subtropical cells (STCs). With an evident relationship across the CMIP5 models between equatorial SSTs and upper ocean temperatures in the extra-tropical subduction regions, our analysis suggests that cold SST biases within the extra-tropical Pacific indeed translate into a cold equatorial bias via the STCs. An assessment of the relationship between these extra-tropical SST biases and local surface heat flux components indicates a link to biases in the simulated shortwave fluxes. Further sensitivity studies with a climate model (CESM) in which extra-tropical cloud albedo is systematically varied illustrate the influence of cloud albedo perturbations, not only directly above the oceanic subduction regions but across the extra-tropics, on the equatorial bias. The CESM experiments reveal a quadratic relationship between extra-tropical Pacific albedo and the root-mean-square-error in equatorial SSTs—a relationship with which the CMIP5 models generally agree. Thus, our study suggests that one way to improve the equatorial cold bias in the models is to improve the representation of subtropical and mid-latitude cloud albedo.

  4. Extra-tropical origin of equatorial Pacific cold bias in climate models with links to cloud albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burls, Natalie J.; Muir, Leslie; Vincent, Emmanuel M.; Fedorov, Alexey

    2016-11-01

    General circulation models frequently suffer from a substantial cold bias in equatorial Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs). For instance, the majority of the climate models participating in the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) have this particular problem (17 out of the 26 models evaluated in the present study). Here, we investigate the extent to which these equatorial cold biases are related to mean climate biases generated in the extra-tropics and then communicated to the equator via the oceanic subtropical cells (STCs). With an evident relationship across the CMIP5 models between equatorial SSTs and upper ocean temperatures in the extra-tropical subduction regions, our analysis suggests that cold SST biases within the extra-tropical Pacific indeed translate into a cold equatorial bias via the STCs. An assessment of the relationship between these extra-tropical SST biases and local surface heat flux components indicates a link to biases in the simulated shortwave fluxes. Further sensitivity studies with a climate model (CESM) in which extra-tropical cloud albedo is systematically varied illustrate the influence of cloud albedo perturbations, not only directly above the oceanic subduction regions but across the extra-tropics, on the equatorial bias. The CESM experiments reveal a quadratic relationship between extra-tropical Pacific albedo and the root-mean-square-error in equatorial SSTs—a relationship with which the CMIP5 models generally agree. Thus, our study suggests that one way to improve the equatorial cold bias in the models is to improve the representation of subtropical and mid-latitude cloud albedo.

  5. Observational determination of albedo decrease caused by vanishing Arctic sea ice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pistone, Kristina; Eisenman, Ian; Ramanathan, V

    2014-03-04

    The decline of Arctic sea ice has been documented in over 30 y of satellite passive microwave observations. The resulting darkening of the Arctic and its amplification of global warming was hypothesized almost 50 y ago but has yet to be verified with direct observations. This study uses satellite radiation budget measurements along with satellite microwave sea ice data to document the Arctic-wide decrease in planetary albedo and its amplifying effect on the warming. The analysis reveals a striking relationship between planetary albedo and sea ice cover, quantities inferred from two independent satellite instruments. We find that the Arctic planetary albedo has decreased from 0.52 to 0.48 between 1979 and 2011, corresponding to an additional 6.4 ± 0.9 W/m(2) of solar energy input into the Arctic Ocean region since 1979. Averaged over the globe, this albedo decrease corresponds to a forcing that is 25% as large as that due to the change in CO2 during this period, considerably larger than expectations from models and other less direct recent estimates. Changes in cloudiness appear to play a negligible role in observed Arctic darkening, thus reducing the possibility of Arctic cloud albedo feedbacks mitigating future Arctic warming.

  6. The dependence of the ice-albedo feedback on atmospheric properties

    CERN Document Server

    von Paris, P; Kitzmann, D; Rauer, H

    2013-01-01

    The ice-albedo feedback is a potentially important de-stabilizing effect for the climate of terrestrial planets. It is based on the positive feedback between decreasing surface temperatures, an increase of snow and ice cover and an associated increase in planetary albedo, which then further decreases surface temperature. A recent study shows that for M stars, the strength of the ice-albedo feedback is reduced This study investigates the influence of the atmosphere (in terms of surface pressure and atmospheric composition) for this feedback. A plane-parallel radiative transfer model is used for the calculation of planetary albedos. We varied CO2 partial pressures as well as the H2O, CH4, and O3 content in the atmosphere for planets orbiting Sun-like and M-type stars. Results suggest that for planets around M stars, the ice-albedo effect is significantly reduced, compared to planets around Sun-like stars. Including the effects of an atmosphere further suppresses the sensitivity to the ice-albedo effect. Atmosph...

  7. A wind-shell interaction model for multipolar planetary nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Steffen, W; Esquivel, A; Garcia-Segura, G; Garcia-Diaz, Ma T; Lopez, J A; Magnor, M

    2013-01-01

    We explore the formation of multipolar structures in planetary and pre-planetary nebulae from the interaction of a fast post-AGB wind with a highly inhomogeneous and filamentary shell structure assumed to form during the final phase of the high density wind. The simulations were performed with a new hydrodynamics code integrated in the interactive framework of the astrophysical modeling package SHAPE. In contrast to conventional astrophysical hydrodynamics software, the new code does not require any programming intervention by the user for setting up or controlling the code. Visualization and analysis of the simulation data has been done in SHAPE without external software. The key conclusion from the simulations is that secondary lobes in planetary nebulae, such as Hubble 5 and K3-17, can be formed through the interaction of a fast low-density wind with a complex high density environment, such as a filamentary circumstellar shell. The more complicated alternative explanation of intermittent collimated outflow...

  8. Snow Metamorphism and Albedo Process (SMAP) model for climate studies: Model validation using meteorological and snow impurity data measured at Sapporo, Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niwano, Masashi; Aoki, Teruo; Kuchiki, Katsuyuki; Hosaka, Masahiro; Kodama, Yuji

    2012-09-01

    We developed a multilayered physical snowpack model named Snow Metamorphism and Albedo Process (SMAP), which is intended to be incorporated into general circulation models for climate simulations. To simulate realistic physical states of snowpack, SMAP incorporates a state-of-the-art physically based snow albedo model, which calculates snow albedo and solar heating profile in snowpack considering effects of snow grain size and snow impurities explicitly. We evaluated the performance of SMAP with meteorological and snow impurities (black carbon and dust) input data measured at Sapporo, Japan during two winters: 2007-2008 and 2008-2009, and found SMAP successfully reproduced all observed variations of physical properties of snowpack for both winters. We have thus confirmed that SMAP is suitable for climate simulations. With SMAP, we also investigated the effects of snow impurities on snowmelt at Sapporo during the two winters. We found that snowpack durations at Sapporo were shortened by 19 days during the 2007-2008 winter and by 16 days during the 2008-2009 winter due to radiative forcings caused by snow impurities. The estimated radiative forcings due to snow impurities during the accumulation periods were 3.7 W/m2 (it corresponds to albedo reduction in 0.05) and 3.2 W/m2 (albedo reduction in 0.05) for the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 winters, respectively. While during the ablation periods they were 25.9 W/m2 (albedo reduction in 0.18) and 21.0 W/m2 (albedo reduction in 0.17) for each winter, respectively.

  9. MODIS/COMBINED MCD43C1 BRDF-Albedo Model Parameters 16-Day L3 0.05Deg CMG

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/Albedo Model Parameters product (MCD43A1) contains three-dimensional (3D) data sets providing users...

  10. Integrated Medium for Planetary Exploration (IMPEx): an infrastructure to bridge space missions data and computational models in planetary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khodachenko, M. L.; Kallio, E. J.; Génot, V. N.; Al-Ubaidi, T.; Topf, F.; Schmidt, W.; Alexeev, I. I.; Modolo, R.; André, N.; Gangloff, M.; Belenkaya, E. S.

    2012-04-01

    The FP7-SPACE project Integrated Medium for Planetary Exploration (IMPEx) has started in June 2011. The aim of the project is the Creation of an integrated interactive IT framework where data from space missions will be interconnected to numerical models, providing a possibility to 1) simulate planetary phenomena and interpret spacecraft data; 2) test and improve models versus experimental data; 3) fill gaps in measurements by appropriate modelling runs; 4) solve technological tasks of mission operation and preparation. Data analysis and visualization within IMPEx will be based on the advanced computational models of the planetary environments. Specifically, the 'modeling sector' of IMPEx is formed of four well established numerical codes and their related computational infrastructures: 1) 3D hybrid modeling platform HYB for the study of planetary plasma environments, hosted at FMI; 2) an alternative 3D hybrid modeling platform, hosted at LATMOS; 3) MHD modelling platform GUMICS for 3D terrestrial magnetosphere, hosted at FMI; and 4) the global 3D Paraboloid Magnetospheric Model for simulation of magnetospheres of different Solar System objects, hosted at SINP. Modelling results will be linked to the corresponding experimental data from space and planetary missions via several online tools: 1/ AMDA (Automated Multi-Dataset Analysis) which provides cross-linked visualization and operation of experimental and numerical modelling data, 2/ 3DView which will propose 3D visualization of spacecraft trajectories in simulated and observed environments, and 3/ "CLWeb" software which enables computation of various micro-scale physical products (spectra, distribution functions, etc.). In practice, IMPEx is going to provide an external user with an access to an extended set of space and planetary missions' data and powerful, world leading computing models, equipped with advanced visualization tools. Via its infrastructure, IMPEx will enable to merge spacecraft data bases and

  11. A Model for the Spectral Albedo of Snow. II: Snow Containing Atmospheric Aerosols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren, Stephen G.; Wiscombe, Warren J.

    1980-12-01

    Small highly absorbing particles, present in concentrations of only 1 part per million by weight (ppmw) or less, can lower snow albedo in the visible by 5-15% from the high values (96-99%) predicted for pure snow in Part I. These particles have, however, no effect on snow albedo beyond 0.9 m wavelength where ice itself becomes a strong absorber. Thus we have an attractive explanation for the discrepancy between theory and observation described in Part I, a discrepancy which seemingly cannot be resolved on the basis of near-field scattering and nonsphericity effects.Desert dust and carbon soot are the most likely contaminants. But careful measurements of spectral snow albedo in the Arctic and Antarctic paint to a `grey' absorber, one whose imaginary refractive index is nearly constant across the visible spectrum. Thus carbon soot, rather than the red iron oxide normally present in desert dust, is strongly indicated at these sites. Soot particles of radius 0.1 m, in concentrations of only 0.3 ppmw, can explain the albedo measurements of Grenfell and Maykut on Arctic Ice Island T-3. This amount is consistent with some observations of soot in Arctic air masses. 1.5 ppmw of soot is required to explain the Antarctic observations of Kuhn and Siogas, which seemed an unrealistically large amount for the earth's most unpolluted continent until we learned that burning of camp heating fuel and aircraft exhaust indeed had contaminated the measurement site with soot.Midlatitude snowfields are likely to contain larger absolute amounts of soot and dust than their polar counterparts, but the snowfall is also much larger, so that the ppmw contamination does not differ drastically until melting begins. Nevertheless, the variations in absorbing particle concentration which will exist can help to explain the wide range of visible snow albedos reported in the literature.Longwave emissivity of snow is unaltered by its soot and dust content. Thus the depression of snow albedo in the

  12. Europlanet/IDIS: Combining Diverse Planetary Observations and Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Walter; Capria, Maria Teresa; Chanteur, Gerard

    2013-04-01

    Planetary research involves a diversity of research fields from astrophysics and plasma physics to atmospheric physics, climatology, spectroscopy and surface imaging. Data from all these disciplines are collected from various space-borne platforms or telescopes, supported by modelling teams and laboratory work. In order to interpret one set of data often supporting data from different disciplines and other missions are needed while the scientist does not always have the detailed expertise to access and utilize these observations. The Integrated and Distributed Information System (IDIS) [1], developed in the framework of the Europlanet-RI project, implements a Virtual Observatory approach ([2] and [3]), where different data sets, stored in archives around the world and in different formats, are accessed, re-formatted and combined to meet the user's requirements without the need of familiarizing oneself with the different technical details. While observational astrophysical data from different observatories could already earlier be accessed via Virtual Observatories, this concept is now extended to diverse planetary data and related model data sets, spectral data bases etc. A dedicated XML-based Europlanet Data Model (EPN-DM) [4] was developed based on data models from the planetary science community and the Virtual Observatory approach. A dedicated editor simplifies the registration of new resources. As the EPN-DM is a super-set of existing data models existing archives as well as new spectroscopic or chemical data bases for the interpretation of atmospheric or surface observations, or even modeling facilities at research institutes in Europe or Russia can be easily integrated and accessed via a Table Access Protocol (EPN-TAP) [5] adapted from the corresponding protocol of the International Virtual Observatory Alliance [6] (IVOA-TAP). EPN-TAP allows to search catalogues, retrieve data and make them available through standard IVOA tools if the access to the archive

  13. Planetary systems based on a quantum-like model

    CERN Document Server

    T., N Poveda; C, N Y Buitrago

    2015-01-01

    Planetary systems have their origin in the gravitational collapse of a cloud of gas and dust. Through a process of accretion, is formed a massive star and a disk of planetesimals orbiting the star. Using a formalism analogous to quantum mechanics (quantum-like model), the star-planetesimal system is described and the flow quantizing the gravitational field theoretical model parameters are obtained. Goodness of fit (chi-square) of the observed data with model quantum-like, to the solar system, satellites, exoplanets and protoplanetary disk around HL Tauri is determined. Shows that the radius, eccentricity, energy, angular momentum and orbital inclination of planetary objects formed take discrete values depending only on the mass star.

  14. Planetary Gear Profile Modification Design Based on Load Sharing Modelling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    IGLESIAS Miguel; FERNÁNDEZ DEL RINCÓN Alfonso; DE-JUAN Ana Magdalena; GARCIA Pablo; DIEZ Alberto; VIADERO Fernando

    2015-01-01

    In order to satisfy the increasing demand on high performance planetary transmissions, an important line of research is focused on the understanding of some of the underlying phenomena involved in this mechanical system. Through the development of models capable of reproduce the system behavior, research in this area contributes to improve gear transmission insight, helping developing better maintenance practices and more efficient design processes. A planetary gear model used for the design of profile modifications ratio based on the levelling of the load sharing ratio is presented. The gear profile geometry definition, following a vectorial approach that mimics the real cutting process of gears, is thoroughly described. Teeth undercutting and hypotrochoid definition are implicitly considered, and a procedure for the incorporation of a rounding arc at the tooth tip in order to deal with corner contacts is described. A procedure for the modeling of profile deviations is presented, which can be used for the introduction of both manufacturing errors and designed profile modifications. An easy and flexible implementation of the profile deviation within the planetary model is accomplished based on the geometric overlapping. The contact force calculation and dynamic implementation used in the model are also introduced, and parameters from a real transmission for agricultural applications are presented for the application example. A set of reliefs is designed based on the levelling of the load sharing ratio for the example transmission, and finally some other important dynamic factors of the transmission are analyzed to assess the changes in the dynamic behavior with respect to the non-modified case. Thus, the main innovative aspect of the proposed planetary transmission model is the capacity of providing a simulated load sharing ratio which serves as design variable for the calculation of the tooth profile modifications.

  15. Exact results in modeling planetary atmospheres-II. Semi-gray atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rutily, B. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France); Chevallier, L. [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Laboratoire LUTH, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon cedex (France); Pelkowski, J. [Institut fuer Atmosphaere und Umwelt, J.W. Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Campus Riedberg, Altenhaferallee 1, D-60438 Frankfurt a.M. (Germany)], E-mail: Pelkowski@meteor.uni-frankfurt.de; Bergeat, J. [Universite de Lyon, F-69003 Lyon (France); Universite Lyon 1, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, F-69230 Saint-Genis-Laval (France); CNRS, UMR 5574, Centre de Recherche Astrophysique de Lyon (France); Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, F-69007 Lyon (France)

    2008-01-15

    We solve the radiative transfer equation for a semi-gray planetary atmosphere in radiative equilibrium, in an attempt to define an entirely analytical non-gray model atmosphere of finite optical thickness. The salient feature of the model is that the incident solar radiation is partitioned between two adjacent spectral domains-the 'visible' and the 'infrared'-in each of which the atmosphere's (effective) opacity is assumed to be independent of frequency (the semi-gray assumption). We envisage a plane-parallel atmosphere illuminated by a beam of parallel radiation and bounded below by a partially reflecting and emitting ground. The former emits infrared radiation, induced by the absorption of radiation both visible and infrared, deriving from the external irradiation as well as from the emission of the planet's surface layer. For an atmosphere with given single-scattering albedos and optical thicknesses in both the visible and infrared domains, we compute the temperature at every depth of the atmosphere, as well as the ground's temperature.

  16. Planetary Kp index forecast using autoregressive models

    CERN Document Server

    Gonzalez, Arian Ojeda; Odriozola, Siomel Savio; Rosa, Reinaldo Roberto; Mendes, Odim

    2014-01-01

    The geomagnetic Kp index is derived from the K index measurements obtained from thirteen stations located around the Earth geomagnetic latitudes between $48^\\circ$ and $63^\\circ$. This index is processed every three hours, is quasi-logarithmic and estimates the geomagnetic activity. The Kp values fall within a range of 0 to 9 and are organized as a set of 28 discrete values. The data set is important because it is used as one of the many input parameters of magnetospheric and ionospheric models. The objective of this work is to use historical data from the Kp index to develop a methodology to make a prediction in a time interval of at least three hours. Five different models to forecast geomagnetic indices Kp and ap are tested. Time series of values of Kp index from 1932 to 15/12/2012 at 21:00 UT are used as input to the models. The purpose of the model is to predict the three measured values after the last measured value of the Kp index (it means the next 9 hours values). The AR model provides the lowest com...

  17. Constructing an advanced software tool for planetary atmospheric modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Richard M.; Sims, Michael; Podolak, Ester; Mckay, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Scientific model building can be an intensive and painstaking process, often involving the development of large and complex computer programs. Despite the effort involved, scientific models cannot be easily distributed and shared with other scientists. In general, implemented scientific models are complex, idiosyncratic, and difficult for anyone but the original scientist/programmer to understand. We believe that advanced software techniques can facilitate both the model building and model sharing process. In this paper, we describe a prototype for a scientific modeling software tool that serves as an aid to the scientist in developing and using models. This tool includes an interactive intelligent graphical interface, a high level domain specific modeling language, a library of physics equations and experimental datasets, and a suite of data display facilities. Our prototype has been developed in the domain of planetary atmospheric modeling, and is being used to construct models of Titan's atmosphere.

  18. Modeling of ground albedo neutrons to investigate seasonal cosmic ray-induced neutron variations measured at high-altitude stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubert, G.; Pazianotto, M. T.; Federico, C. A.

    2016-12-01

    This paper investigates seasonal cosmic ray-induced neutron variations measured over a long-term period (from 2011 to 2016) in both the high-altitude stations located in medium geomagnetic latitude and Antarctica (Pic-du-Midi and Concordia, respectively). To reinforce analysis, modeling based on ground albedo neutrons simulations of extensive air showers and the solar modulation potential was performed. Because the local environment is well known and stable over time in Antarctica, data were used to validate the modeling approach. A modeled scene representative to the Pic-du-Midi was simulated with GEANT4 for various hydrogen properties (composition, density, and wet level) and snow thickness. The orders of magnitudes of calculated thermal fluence rates are consistent with measurements obtained during summers and winters. These variations are dominant in the thermal domain (i.e., En 20 MeV) is weakly impacted. The role of hydrogen content on ground albedo neutron generation was investigated with GEANT4 simulations. These investigations focused to mountain environment; nevertheless, they demonstrate the complexity of the local influences on neutron fluence rates.

  19. The Future of Planetary Climate Modeling and Weather Prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Genio, A. D.; Domagal-Goldman, S. D.; Kiang, N. Y.; Kopparapu, R. K.; Schmidt, G. A.; Sohl, L. E.

    2017-01-01

    Modeling of planetary climate and weather has followed the development of tools for studying Earth, with lags of a few years. Early Earth climate studies were performed with 1-dimensionalradiative-convective models, which were soon fol-lowed by similar models for the climates of Mars and Venus and eventually by similar models for exoplan-ets. 3-dimensional general circulation models (GCMs) became common in Earth science soon after and within several years were applied to the meteorology of Mars, but it was several decades before a GCM was used to simulate extrasolar planets. Recent trends in Earth weather and and climate modeling serve as a useful guide to how modeling of Solar System and exoplanet weather and climate will evolve in the coming decade.

  20. Modelling long-term impacts of mountain pine beetle outbreaks on merchantable biomass, ecosystem carbon, albedo, and radiative forcing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Jean-Sébastien; Parrott, Lael; Price, David T.; Ramankutty, Navin; Damon Matthews, H.

    2016-09-01

    The ongoing major outbreak of mountain pine beetle (MPB) in forests of western North America has led to considerable research efforts. However, many questions remain unaddressed regarding its long-term impacts, especially when accounting for the range of possible responses from the non-target vegetation (i.e., deciduous trees and lower-canopy shrubs and grasses). We used the Integrated BIosphere Simulator (IBIS) process-based ecosystem model along with the recently incorporated Marauding Insect Module (MIM) to quantify, over 240 years, the impacts of various MPB outbreak regimes on lodgepole pine merchantable biomass, ecosystem carbon, surface albedo, and the net radiative forcing on global climate caused by the changes in ecosystem carbon and albedo. We performed simulations for three locations in British Columbia, Canada, with different climatic conditions, and four scenarios of various coexisting vegetation types with variable growth release responses. The impacts of MPB outbreaks on merchantable biomass (decrease) and surface albedo (increase) were similar across the 12 combinations of locations and vegetation coexistence scenarios. The impacts on ecosystem carbon and radiative forcing, however, varied substantially in magnitude and sign, depending upon the presence and response of the non-target vegetation, particularly for the two locations not subjected to growing-season soil moisture stress; this variability represents the main finding from our study. Despite major uncertainty in the value of the resulting radiative forcing, a simple analysis also suggested that the MPB outbreak in British Columbia will have a smaller impact on global temperature over the coming decades and centuries than a single month of global anthropogenic CO2 emissions from fossil fuel combustion and cement production. Moreover, we found that (1) outbreak severity (i.e., per-event mortality) had a stronger effect than outbreak return interval on the variables studied, (2) MPB

  1. GIS-based Conceptual Database Model for Planetary Geoscientific Mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gasselt, Stephan; Nass, Andrea; Neukum, Gerhard

    2010-05-01

    We here report on the conceptual design of a geodatabase model as part of a larger-scaled GIS-based system composed of several applications, templates and database backend which supports conducting combined geological as well as geomorphological mapping of planetary surfaces and which simplifies the process of maintaining data and map products. Performing geological and/or geomorphological stand-alone or systematic mapping of planetary surfaces supported by modern GIS environments involves several tasks to be performed before the actual mapping process can be carried out. Such tasks deal with setting up a working environment by querying and defining raster data from a variety of planetary missions to be used and processed, importing auxiliary data, defining projection parameters for one or more map layer(s) and each raster/vector dataset, importing processed data, and defining a variety of vector shape geometries and attributes for mapping in terms of geometry type, representation symbology and attribute domains in a consistent way. In order to allow consistent mapping approaches and subsequent homogenisation success, a mapper makes use of pre-defined model schemas (templates) and definitions allowing to import mapping representation and styles as well as a backbone geo-database to immediately start working and making use of the provided infrastructure. The conceptual geo-database design developed far involves the design of the main object and data layers and consists of objects, object types, their relationships and additionally the formulation of integrity conditions on a level which is in principle independent of the exact implementation and its environment. Furthermore, the data layer containing attribute domains has been implemented. The conceptual design has been crafted using ESRI's ArcGIS File Geodatabase environment but it can be exported to any other GDBMS. The overall layout consists of several main elements or entity groups composed of relations

  2. Exact results in modeling planetary atmospheres-I. Gray atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chevallier, L. [Observatoire de Paris-Meudon, Laboratoire LUTH, 5 Place Jules Janssen, 92195 Meudon cedex (France)]. E-mail: loic.chevallier@obspm.fr; Pelkowski, J. [Institut fuer Meteorologie und Geophysik, J.W. Goethe Universitaet Frankfurt, Robert Mayer Strasse 1, D-60325 Frankfurt (Germany); Rutily, B. [Universite de Lyon, Lyon, F-69000 (France) and Universite Lyon 1, Villeurbanne, F-69622 (France) and Centre de Recherche Astronomique de Lyon, Observatoire de Lyon, 9 avenue Charles Andre, Saint-Genis Laval cedex, F-69561 (France) and CNRS, UMR 5574; Ecole Normale Superieure de Lyon, Lyon (France)

    2007-04-15

    An exact model is proposed for a gray, isotropically scattering planetary atmosphere in radiative equilibrium. The slab is illuminated on one side by a collimated beam and is bounded on the other side by an emitting and partially reflecting ground. We provide expressions for the incident and reflected fluxes on both boundary surfaces, as well as the temperature of the ground and the temperature distribution in the atmosphere, assuming the latter to be in local thermodynamic equilibrium. Tables and curves of the temperature distribution are included for various values of the optical thickness. Finally, semi-infinite atmospheres illuminated from the outside or by sources at infinity is dealt with.

  3. An Analytic Radiative-Convective Model for Planetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Robinson, Tyler D; 10.1088/0004-637X/757/1/104

    2012-01-01

    We present an analytic 1-D radiative-convective model of the thermal structure of planetary atmospheres. Our model assumes that thermal radiative transfer is gray and can be represented by the two-stream approximation. Model atmospheres are assumed to be in hydrostatic equilibrium, with a power law scaling between the atmospheric pressure and the gray thermal optical depth. The convective portions of our models are taken to follow adiabats that account for condensation of volatiles through a scaling parameter to the dry adiabat. By combining these assumptions, we produce simple, analytic expressions that allow calculations of the atmospheric pressure-temperature profile, as well as expressions for the profiles of thermal radiative flux and convective flux. We explore the general behaviors of our model. These investigations encompass (1) worlds where atmospheric attenuation of sunlight is weak, which we show tend to have relatively high radiative-convective boundaries, (2) worlds with some attenuation of sunli...

  4. Planetary Suit Hip Bearing Model for Predicting Design vs. Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cowley, Matthew S.; Margerum, Sarah; Harvil, Lauren; Rajulu, Sudhakar

    2011-01-01

    Designing a planetary suit is very complex and often requires difficult trade-offs between performance, cost, mass, and system complexity. In order to verifying that new suit designs meet requirements, full prototypes must eventually be built and tested with human subjects. Using computer models early in the design phase of new hardware development can be advantageous, allowing virtual prototyping to take place. Having easily modifiable models of the suit hard sections may reduce the time it takes to make changes to the hardware designs and then to understand their impact on suit and human performance. A virtual design environment gives designers the ability to think outside the box and exhaust design possibilities before building and testing physical prototypes with human subjects. Reductions in prototyping and testing may eventually reduce development costs. This study is an attempt to develop computer models of the hard components of the suit with known physical characteristics, supplemented with human subject performance data. Objectives: The primary objective was to develop an articulating solid model of the Mark III hip bearings to be used for evaluating suit design performance of the hip joint. Methods: Solid models of a planetary prototype (Mark III) suit s hip bearings and brief section were reverse-engineered from the prototype. The performance of the models was then compared by evaluating the mobility performance differences between the nominal hardware configuration and hardware modifications. This was accomplished by gathering data from specific suited tasks. Subjects performed maximum flexion and abduction tasks while in a nominal suit bearing configuration and in three off-nominal configurations. Performance data for the hip were recorded using state-of-the-art motion capture technology. Results: The results demonstrate that solid models of planetary suit hard segments for use as a performance design tool is feasible. From a general trend perspective

  5. Influence of Dust and Black Carbon on the Snow Albedo in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.; Koster, Randal D.; Lau, K. M.; Aoki, Teruo; Sud, Yogesh C.; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Motoyoshi, Hiroki; Kodama, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Present-day land surface models rarely account for the influence of both black carbon and dust in the snow on the snow albedo. Snow impurities increase the absorption of incoming shortwave radiation (particularly in the visible bands), whereby they have major consequences for the evolution of snowmelt and life cycles of snowpack. A new parameterization of these snow impurities was included in the catchment-based land surface model used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Earth Observing System version 5. Validation tests against in situ observed data were performed for the winter of 2003.2004 in Sapporo, Japan, for both the new snow albedo parameterization (which explicitly accounts for snow impurities) and the preexisting baseline albedo parameterization (which does not). Validation tests reveal that daily variations of snow depth and snow surface albedo are more realistically simulated with the new parameterization. Reasonable perturbations in the assigned snow impurity concentrations, as inferred from the observational data, produce significant changes in snowpack depth and radiative flux interactions. These findings illustrate the importance of parameterizing the influence of snow impurities on the snow surface albedo for proper simulation of the life cycle of snow cover.

  6. Influence of Dust and Black Carbon on the Snow Albedo in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 Land Surface Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.; Koster, Randal D.; Lau, K. M.; Aoki, Teruo; Sud, Yogesh C.; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Motoyoshi, Hiroki; Kodama, Yuji

    2011-01-01

    Present-day land surface models rarely account for the influence of both black carbon and dust in the snow on the snow albedo. Snow impurities increase the absorption of incoming shortwave radiation (particularly in the visible bands), whereby they have major consequences for the evolution of snowmelt and life cycles of snowpack. A new parameterization of these snow impurities was included in the catchment-based land surface model used in the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Goddard Earth Observing System version 5. Validation tests against in situ observed data were performed for the winter of 2003.2004 in Sapporo, Japan, for both the new snow albedo parameterization (which explicitly accounts for snow impurities) and the preexisting baseline albedo parameterization (which does not). Validation tests reveal that daily variations of snow depth and snow surface albedo are more realistically simulated with the new parameterization. Reasonable perturbations in the assigned snow impurity concentrations, as inferred from the observational data, produce significant changes in snowpack depth and radiative flux interactions. These findings illustrate the importance of parameterizing the influence of snow impurities on the snow surface albedo for proper simulation of the life cycle of snow cover.

  7. Active Amplification of the Terrestrial Albedo to Mitigate Climate Change: An Exploratory Study

    CERN Document Server

    Hamwey, R M

    2005-01-01

    This study explores the potential to enhance the reflectance of solar insolation by the human settlement and grassland components of the Earth's terrestrial surface as a climate change mitigation measure. Preliminary estimates derived using a static radiative transfer model indicate that such efforts could amplify the planetary albedo enough to offset the current global annual average level of radiative forcing caused by anthropogenic greenhouse gases by as much as 30 percent or 0.76 W/m2. Terrestrial albedo amplification may thus extend, by about 25 years, the time available to advance the development and use of low-emission energy conversion technologies which ultimately remain essential to mitigate long-term climate change. However, additional study is needed to confirm the estimates reported here and to assess the economic and environmental impacts of active land-surface albedo amplification as a climate change mitigation measure.

  8. Flyover Modeling of Planetary Pits - Undergraduate Student Instrument Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhasin, N.; Whittaker, W.

    2015-12-01

    On the surface of the moon and Mars there are hundreds of skylights, which are collapsed holes that are believed to lead to underground caves. This research uses Vision, Inertial, and LIDAR sensors to build a high resolution model of a skylight as a landing vehicle flies overhead. We design and fabricate a pit modeling instrument to accomplish this task, implement software, and demonstrate sensing and modeling capability on a suborbital reusable launch vehicle flying over a simulated pit. Future missions on other planets and moons will explore pits and caves, led by the technology developed by this research. Sensor software utilizes modern graph-based optimization techniques to build 3D models using camera, LIDAR, and inertial data. The modeling performance was validated with a test flyover of a planetary skylight analog structure on the Masten Xombie sRLV. The trajectory profile closely follows that of autonomous planetary powered descent, including translational and rotational dynamics as well as shock and vibration. A hexagonal structure made of shipping containers provides a terrain feature that serves as an appropriate analog for the rim and upper walls of a cylindrical planetary skylight. The skylight analog floor, walls, and rim are modeled in elevation with a 96% coverage rate at 0.25m2 resolution. The inner skylight walls have 5.9cm2 color image resolution and the rims are 6.7cm2 with measurement precision superior to 1m. The multidisciplinary student team included students of all experience levels, with backgrounds in robotics, physics, computer science, systems, mechanical and electrical engineering. The team was commited to authentic scientific experimentation, and defined specific instrument requirements and measurable experiment objectives to verify successful completion.This work was made possible by the NASA Undergraduate Student Instrument Project Educational Flight Opportunity 2013 program. Additional support was provided by the sponsorship of an

  9. Observations and model simulations of snow albedo reduction in seasonal snow due to insoluble light-absorbing particles during 2014 Chinese survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin; Pu, Wei; Ren, Yong; Zhang, Xuelei; Zhang, Xueying; Shi, Jinsen; Jin, Hongchun; Dai, Mingkai; Chen, Quanliang

    2017-02-01

    A snow survey was carried out to collect 13 surface snow samples (10 for fresh snow, and 3 for aged snow) and 79 subsurface snow samples in seasonal snow at 13 sites across northeastern China in January 2014. A spectrophotometer combined with chemical analysis was used to quantify snow particulate absorption by insoluble light-absorbing particles (ILAPs, e.g., black carbon, BC; mineral dust, MD; and organic carbon, OC) in snow. Snow albedo was measured using a field spectroradiometer. A new radiative transfer model (Spectral Albedo Model for Dirty Snow, or SAMDS) was then developed to simulate the spectral albedo of snow based on the asymptotic radiative transfer theory. A comparison between SAMDS and an existing model - the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR) - indicates good agreements in the model-simulated spectral albedos of pure snow. However, the SNICAR model values tended to be slightly lower than those of SAMDS when BC and MD were considered. Given the measured BC, MD, and OC mixing ratios of 100-5000, 2000-6000, and 1000-30 000 ng g-1, respectively, in surface snow across northeastern China, the SAMDS model produced a snow albedo in the range of 0.95-0.75 for fresh snow at 550 nm, with a snow grain optical effective radius (Reff) of 100 µm. The snow albedo reduction due to spherical snow grains assumed to be aged snow is larger than fresh snow such as fractal snow grains and hexagonal plate or column snow grains associated with the increased BC in snow. For typical BC mixing ratios of 100 ng g-1 in remote areas and 3000 ng g-1 in heavy industrial areas across northern China, the snow albedo for internal mixing of BC and snow is lower by 0.005 and 0.036 than that of external mixing for hexagonal plate or column snow grains with Reff of 100 µm. These results also show that the simulated snow albedos by both SAMDS and SNICAR agree well with the observed values at low ILAP mixing ratios but tend to be higher than surface observations at high ILAP

  10. Nonlinear dynamic modeling of a helicopter planetary gear train for carrier plate crack fault diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Fan Lei; Wang Shaoping; Wang Xingjian; Han Feng; Lyu Huawei

    2016-01-01

    Planetary gear train plays a significant role in a helicopter operation and its health is of great importance for the flight safety of the helicopter. This paper investigates the effects of a planet carrier plate crack on the dynamic characteristics of a planetary gear train, and thus finds an effective method to diagnose crack fault. A dynamic model is developed to analyze the torsional vibration of a planetary gear train with a cracked planet carrier plate. The model takes into consideratio...

  11. Prognostic land surface albedo from a dynamic global vegetation model clumped canopy radiative transfer scheme and satellite-derived geographic forest heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiang, N. Y.; Yang, W.; Ni-Meister, W.; Aleinov, I. D.; Jonas, J.

    2014-12-01

    Vegetation cover was introduced into general circulations models (GCMs) in the 1980's to account for the effect of land surface albedo and water vapor conductance on the Earth's climate. Schemes assigning canopy albedoes by broad biome type have been superceded in 1990's by canopy radiative transfer schemes for homogeneous canopies obeying Beer's Law extinction as a function of leaf area index (LAI). Leaf albedo and often canopy height are prescribed by plant functional type (PFT). It is recognized that this approach does not effectively describe geographic variation in the radiative transfer of vegetated cover, particularly for mixed and sparse canopies. GCM-coupled dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) have retained these simple canopy representations, with little further evaluation of their albedos. With the emergence lidar-derived canopy vertical structure data, DGVM modelers are now revisiting albedo simulation. We present preliminary prognostic global land surface albedo produced by the Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (TBM), a DGVM coupled to the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. The Ent TBM is a next generation DGVM designed to incorporate variation in canopy heights, and mixed and sparse canopies. For such dynamically varying canopy structure, it uses the Analytical Clumped Two-Stream (ACTS) canopy radiative transfer model, which is derived from gap probability theory for canopies of tree cohorts with ellipsoidal crowns, and accounts for soil, snow, and bare stems. We have developed a first-order global vegetation structure data set (GVSD), which gives a year of satellite-derived geographic variation in canopy height, maximum canopy leaf area, and seasonal LAI. Combined with Ent allometric relations, this data set provides population density and foliage clumping within crowns. We compare the Ent prognostic albedoes to those of the previous GISS GCM scheme, and to satellite estimates. The impact of albedo differences on surface

  12. Ground tests of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutron instrument operation in the passive mode with a Martian soil model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shvetsov, V. N.; Dubasov, P. V.; Golovin, D. V.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Krylov, A. R.; Krylov, V. A.; Litvak, M. L.; Malakhov, A. V.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Sanin, A. B.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Zontikov, A. O.

    2017-07-01

    The results of the Dynamic Albedo of Neutrons (DAN) instrument ground tests in the passive mode of operation are presented in comparison with the numerical calculations. These test series were conducted to support the current surface measurements of DAN onboard the MSL Curiosity rover. The instrument sensitivity to detect thin subsurface layers of water ice buried at different depths in the analog of Martian soil has been evaluated during these tests. The experiments have been done with a radioisotope Pu-Be neutron source (analog of the MMRTG neutron source onboard the Curiosity rover) and the Martian soil model assembled from silicon-rich window glass pane. Water ice layers were simulated with polyethylene sheets. All experiments have been performed at the test facility built at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia).

  13. Modeling Planetary Atmospheric Energy Deposition By Energetic Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Bougher, Stephen; Gronoff, Guillaume; Barthelemy, Mathieu

    2016-07-01

    The structure, dynamics, chemistry, and evolution of planetary upper atmospheres are in large part determined by the available sources of energy. In addition to the solar EUV flux, the solar wind and solar energetic particle (SEP) events are also important sources. Both of these particle populations can significantly affect an atmosphere, causing atmospheric loss and driving chemical reactions. Attention has been paid to these sources from the standpoint of the radiation environment for humans and electronics, but little work has been done to evaluate their impact on planetary atmospheres. At unmagnetized planets or those with crustal field anomalies, in particular, the solar wind and SEPs of all energies have direct access to the atmosphere and so provide a more substantial energy source than at planets having protective global magnetic fields. Additionally, solar wind and energetic particle fluxes should be more significant for planets orbiting more active stars, such as is the case in the early history of the solar system for paleo-Venus and Mars. Therefore quantification of the atmospheric energy input from the solar wind and SEP events is an important component of our understanding of the processes that control their state and evolution. We have applied a full Lorentz motion particle transport model to study the effects of particle precipitation in the upper atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Such modeling has been previously done for Earth and Mars using a guiding center precipitation model. Currently, this code is only valid for particles with small gyroradii in strong uniform magnetic fields. There is a clear necessity for a Lorentz formulation, hence, a systematic study of the ionization, excitation, and energy deposition has been conducted, including a comparison of the influence relative to other energy sources (namely EUV photons). The result is a robust examination of the influence of energetic ion transport on the Venus and Mars upper atmosphere which

  14. Nature, theory and modelling of geophysical convective planetary boundary layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zilitinkevich, Sergej

    2015-04-01

    Geophysical convective planetary boundary layers (CPBLs) are still poorly reproduced in oceanographic, hydrological and meteorological models. Besides the mean flow and usual shear-generated turbulence, CPBLs involve two types of motion disregarded in conventional theories: 'anarchy turbulence' comprised of the buoyancy-driven plumes, merging to form larger plumes instead of breaking down, as postulated in conventional theory (Zilitinkevich, 1973), large-scale organised structures fed by the potential energy of unstable stratification through inverse energy transfer in convective turbulence (and performing non-local transports irrespective of mean gradients of transporting properties). C-PBLs are strongly mixed and go on growing as long as the boundary layer remains unstable. Penetration of the mixed layer into the weakly turbulent, stably stratified free flow causes turbulent transports through the CPBL outer boundary. The proposed theory, taking into account the above listed features of CPBL, is based on the following recent developments: prognostic CPBL-depth equation in combination with diagnostic algorithm for turbulence fluxes at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries (Zilitinkevich, 1991, 2012, 2013; Zilitinkevich et al., 2006, 2012), deterministic model of self-organised convective structures combined with statistical turbulence-closure model of turbulence in the CPBL core (Zilitinkevich, 2013). It is demonstrated that the overall vertical transports are performed mostly by turbulence in the surface layer and entrainment layer (at the CPBL inner and outer boundaries) and mostly by organised structures in the CPBL core (Hellsten and Zilitinkevich, 2013). Principal difference between structural and turbulent mixing plays an important role in a number of practical problems: transport and dispersion of admixtures, microphysics of fogs and clouds, etc. The surface-layer turbulence in atmospheric and marine CPBLs is strongly enhanced by the velocity shears in

  15. The Explicit Planetary Isentropic-Coordinate (EPIC) Atmospheric Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowling, T. E.; Fischer, A. S.; Gierasch, P. J.; Harrington, J.; LeBeau, R. P.; Santori, C. M.

    1998-04-01

    We describe a new general circulation model (GCM) designed for planetary atmospheric studies called the EPIC model. This is a finite-difference model based on the isentropic-coordinate scheme of Hsu and Arakawa (1990.Mon. Wea. Rev.118, 1933-1959). We report on previously undocumented modifications, additions, and key practical issues that experience running the model has revealed to be important. The model integrates the hydrostatic primitive equations, which are valid for large-scale atmospheric dynamics and include gravity waves (buoyancy waves), planetary waves (Rossby waves), and horizontally propagating sound waves (Lamb waves), but not vertically propagating sound waves because of the hydrostatic approximation. The vertical coordinate is entropy in the form of potential temperature, which coincides with material surfaces for adiabatic motion. This means that there is no vertical velocity except where there is heating, which improves accuracy and helps the model maintain conservation properties over long integrations. An isentropic vertical coordinate is natural for the atmospheres of Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune, which are believed to have essentially adiabatic interiors that match up with the bottom of the model and is also excellent for middle-atmosphere studies on any planet. Radiative processes are parameterized by Newtonian cooling, and the latent heat of ortho-para hydrogen conversion is included when appropriate, with a suitably defined mean potential temperature. The model is written with general map factors that make it easy to configure in oblate spherical, cylindrical, or Cartesian coordinates. The code includes optional Message Passing Interface (MPI) library calls and hence runs on any Unix-based parallel computer or network cluster. An optional graphical user interface to commercial visualization software facilitates control of the model and analysis of output. Memory is allocated dynamically such that the user does not recompile to

  16. The viscosity of planetary tholeiitic melts: A configurational entropy model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehlke, Alexander; Whittington, Alan G.

    2016-10-01

    The viscosity (η) of silicate melts is a fundamental physical property controlling mass transfer in magmatic systems. Viscosity can span many orders of magnitude, strongly depending on temperature and composition. Several models are available that describe this dependency for terrestrial melts quite well. Planetary basaltic lavas however are distinctly different in composition, being dominantly alkali-poor, iron-rich and/or highly magnesian. We measured the viscosity of 20 anhydrous tholeiitic melts, of which 15 represent known or estimated surface compositions of Mars, Mercury, the Moon, Io and Vesta, by concentric cylinder and parallel plate viscometry. The planetary basalts span a viscosity range of 2 orders of magnitude at liquidus temperatures and 4 orders of magnitude near the glass transition, and can be more or less viscous than terrestrial lavas. We find that current models under- and overestimate superliquidus viscosities by up to 2 orders of magnitude for these compositions, and deviate even more strongly from measured viscosities toward the glass transition. We used the Adam-Gibbs theory (A-G) to relate viscosity (η) to absolute temperature (T) and the configurational entropy of the system at that temperature (Sconf), which is in the form of log η =Ae +Be /TSconf . Heat capacities (CP) for glasses and liquids of our investigated compositions were calculated via available literature models. We show that the A-G theory is applicable to model the viscosity of individual complex tholeiitic melts containing 10 or more major oxides as well or better than the commonly used empirical equations. We successfully modeled the global viscosity data set using a constant Ae of -3.34 ± 0.22 log units and 12 adjustable sub-parameters, which capture the compositional and temperature dependence on melt viscosity. Seven sub-parameters account for the compositional dependence of Be and 5 for Sconf. Our model reproduces the 496 measured viscosity data points with a 1

  17. A numerical-physical planetary boundary layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padro, Jacob

    1983-07-01

    A numerical-physical model for the planetary boundary layer has been formulated for the purpose of predicting the winds, temperatures and humidities in the lowest 1600 m of the atmosphere. An application of the model to the synoptic situation of 30 August, 1972, demonstrates its ability to produce useful forecasts for a period of 24 h. Results are illustrated in terms of horizontal maps and time-height sections of winds and temperatures. The model is divided in the vertical direction into three layers that are governed, respectively, by different physical formulations. At the lowest level, which is the surface of the earth, forecasts of temperature and humidity are computed from empirical relations. In the first layer, the surface layer, application is made of the similarity theories of Monin-Obukhov, Monin-Kazanski and Businger’s form of the universal functions. The second layer, the Ekman layer, is 1550 m deep and is governed by diagnostic momentum and time-dependent thermodynamic and humidity equations. External input to the model are large-scale pressure gradients and middle-level cloudiness. Cressman’s objective analysis procedure is applied to conventional surface and upper air data over a horizontal region of about 2500 km by 2500 km, centered about Lake Ontario. With a grid distance of 127 km and a time interval of 30 min, the computer time required on Control Data Cyber 76 for a 24 h forecast for the case study is less than two minutes.

  18. Lunar Regolith Albedos Using Monte Carlos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, T. L.; Andersen, V.; Pinsky, L. S.

    2003-01-01

    The analysis of planetary regoliths for their backscatter albedos produced by cosmic rays (CRs) is important for space exploration and its potential contributions to science investigations in fundamental physics and astrophysics. Albedos affect all such experiments and the personnel that operate them. Groups have analyzed the production rates of various particles and elemental species by planetary surfaces when bombarded with Galactic CR fluxes, both theoretically and by means of various transport codes, some of which have emphasized neutrons. Here we report on the preliminary results of our current Monte Carlo investigation into the production of charged particles, neutrons, and neutrinos by the lunar surface using FLUKA. In contrast to previous work, the effects of charm are now included.

  19. Advanced model for the calculation of meshing forces in spur gear planetary transmissions

    OpenAIRE

    Iglesias Santamaría, Miguel; Fernández del Rincón, Alfonso; Juan de Luna, Ana Magdalena de; Díez Ibarbia, Alberto; García Fernández, Pablo; Viadero Rueda, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a planar spur gear planetary transmission model, describing in great detail aspects such as the geometric definition of geometric overlaps and the contact forces calculation, thus facilitating the reproducibility of results by fellow researchers. The planetary model is based on a mesh model already used by the authors in the study of external gear ordinary transmissions. The model has been improved and extended to allow for the internal meshing simulation, taking into cons...

  20. Improved meteorology from an updated WRF/CMAQ modeling system with MODIS vegetation and albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Realistic vegetation characteristics and phenology from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) products improve the simulation for the meteorology and air quality modeling system WRF/CMAQ (Weather Research and Forecasting model and Community Multiscale Air Qual...

  1. A Model for Siderophile Element Distribution in Planetary Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humayun, M.; Rushmer, T.; Rankenburg, K.; Brandon, A. D.

    2005-01-01

    Planetary differentiation begins with partial melting of small planetesimals. At low degrees of partial melting, a sulfur-rich liquid segregates by physical mechanisms including deformation-assisted porous flow. Experimental studies of the physical mechanisms by which Fe-S melts segregate from the silicate matrix of a molten H chondrite are part of a companion paper. Geochemical studies of these experimental products revealed that metallic liquids were in equilibrium with residual metal in the H chondrite matrix. This contribution explores the geochemical signatures produced by early stages of core formation. Particularly, low-degree partial melt segregation of Fe-S liquids leaves residual metal in the silicate matrix. Some achondrites appear to be residues of partial melting, e.g., ureilites, which are known to contain metal. The metal in these achondrites may show a distinct elemental signature. To quantify the effect of sulfur on siderophile element contents of residual metal we have developed a model based on recent parametrizations of equilibrium solid metal-liquid metal partitioning experiments.

  2. Comparison and Implementation of a Rigid and a Flexible Multibody Planetary Gearbox Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Felix; Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    2014-01-01

    We propose algorithms for developing (1) a rigid (constrained) and (2) a flexible planetary gearbox model. The two methods are compared against each other and advantages/disadvantages of each method are discussed. The rigid model (1) has gear tooth reaction forces expressed by Lagrange multipliers...... between one and two gear teeth in mesh. The final results are from modelling the planetary gearbox in a 500 kW wind turbine which we also described in Jørgensen et al. (2013)....

  3. Regular network model for the sea ice-albedo feedback in the Arctic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Stoffels, Marc; Wackerbauer, Renate

    2011-03-01

    The Arctic Ocean and sea ice form a feedback system that plays an important role in the global climate. The complexity of highly parameterized global circulation (climate) models makes it very difficult to assess feedback processes in climate without the concurrent use of simple models where the physics is understood. We introduce a two-dimensional energy-based regular network model to investigate feedback processes in an Arctic ice-ocean layer. The model includes the nonlinear aspect of the ice-water phase transition, a nonlinear diffusive energy transport within a heterogeneous ice-ocean lattice, and spatiotemporal atmospheric and oceanic forcing at the surfaces. First results for a horizontally homogeneous ice-ocean layer show bistability and related hysteresis between perennial ice and perennial open water for varying atmospheric heat influx. Seasonal ice cover exists as a transient phenomenon. We also find that ocean heat fluxes are more efficient than atmospheric heat fluxes to melt Arctic sea ice.

  4. Theoretical Modeling of ISO Results on Planetary Nebula NGC 7027

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, M.; Federman, S. R.; Dalgarno, A.; Bjorkman, J. E.

    1999-04-01

    We present a thermal and chemical model of the neutral envelope of planetary nebula NGC 7027. In our model, the neutral envelope is composed of a thin dense shell of constant density and an outer stellar wind region with the usual inverse-square law density profile. The thermal and chemical structure is calculated with the assumption that the incident radiation field on the inner surface equals 0.5×105 times Draine's fit to the average interstellar far-ultraviolet field. The rate coefficient for H2 formation on grains is assumed to be 1/5 the usual value to take into account the lower dust-gas mass ratio in the neutral envelope of NGC 7027. The calculated temperature in the dense shell decreases from 3000 to under 200 K. Once the temperature drops to 200 K, we assume that it remains at 200 K until the outer edge of the dense shell is reached, so that the observed intensities of CO J=16-15, 15-14, and 14-13 lines can be reproduced. The 200 K temperature can be interpreted as the average temperature of the shocked gas just behind the forward shock front in the framework of the interacting stellar wind theory. We calculate the intensities of the molecular far-infrared rotational lines by using a revised version of the escape probability formalism. The theoretical intensities for rotational lines of CO (from J=29-28 to J=14-13), CH+, OH, and CH are shown to be in good agreement with ISO observations. The H2 rovibrational line intensities are also calculated and are in agreement with available observations.

  5. Modeling of the process of gear shifting in planetary gear trains of motor vehicles

    OpenAIRE

    Aleksandar R. Grkić; Čedomir V. Duboka; Milan M. Krsmanović

    2011-01-01

    Gear boxes, i. e. the realization of their functions, especially gear shift, have a big impact on vehicle operation quality through their effects on the performance of vehicles and their comfort. This paper shows a method of modeling the transition process during gear shifting in planetary gear trains. The simulation model is developed with in order to provide virtual research of planetary gear trains, which would positively decrease the number of real prototypes, thus considerably saving tim...

  6. Ice Caps and Ice Belts: The Effects of Obliquity on Ice‑Albedo Feedback

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Brian E. J.; Cronin, Timothy W.; Bitz, Cecilia M.

    2017-09-01

    Planetary obliquity determines the meridional distribution of the annual mean insolation. For obliquity exceeding 55°, the weakest insolation occurs at the equator. Stable partial snow and ice cover on such a planet would be in the form of a belt about the equator rather than polar caps. An analytical model of planetary climate is used to investigate the stability of ice caps and ice belts over the widest possible range of parameters. The model is a non-dimensional diffusive Energy Balance Model, representing insolation, heat transport, and ice‑albedo feedback on a spherical planet. A complete analytical solution for any obliquity is given and validated against numerical solutions of a seasonal model in the “deep-water” regime of weak seasonal ice line migration. Multiple equilibria and unstable transitions between climate states (ice-free, Snowball, or ice cap/belt) are found over wide swaths of parameter space, including a “Large Ice-Belt Instability” and “Small Ice-Belt Instability” at high obliquity. The Snowball catastrophe is avoided at weak radiative forcing in two different scenarios: weak albedo feedback and inefficient heat transport (favoring stable partial ice cover), or efficient transport at high obliquity (favoring ice-free conditions). From speculative assumptions about distributions of planetary parameters, three-fourths to four-fifths of all planets with stable partial ice cover should be in the form of Earth-like polar caps.

  7. Planetary subsurface investigation by 3D visualization model .

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seu, R.; Catallo, C.; Tragni, M.; Abbattista, C.; Cinquepalmi, L.

    Subsurface data analysis and visualization represents one of the main aspect in Planetary Observation (i.e. search for water or geological characterization). The data are collected by subsurface sounding radars as instruments on-board of deep space missions. These data are generally represented as 2D radargrams in the perspective of space track and z axes (perpendicular to the subsurface) but without direct correlation to other data acquisition or knowledge on the planet . In many case there are plenty of data from other sensors of the same mission, or other ones, with high continuity in time and in space and specially around the scientific sites of interest (i.e. candidate landing areas or particular scientific interesting sites). The 2D perspective is good to analyse single acquisitions and to perform detailed analysis on the returned echo but are quite useless to compare very large dataset as now are available on many planets and moons of solar system. The best way is to approach the analysis on 3D visualization model generated from the entire stack of data. First of all this approach allows to navigate the subsurface in all directions and analyses different sections and slices or moreover navigate the iso-surfaces respect to a value (or interval). The last one allows to isolate one or more iso-surfaces and remove, in the visualization mode, other data not interesting for the analysis; finally it helps to individuate the underground 3D bodies. Other aspect is the needs to link the on-ground data, as imaging, to the underground one by geographical and context field of view.

  8. MODELING 3D CAD AND RAPID PROTOTYPING THE PRESENTER PLANETARY GEAR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadeusz MARKOWSKI

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a methodology for modeling and prototyping presentation of the planetary gear. Shown is the way of modeling hybrid transmission gear teeth. The first step is to develop a hybrid modeling the geometry of the teeth profiles. In the second stage, solid modeling has been done other elements of the geometry of the gear. In the following, using modeling as a team made the other elements of the planetary gear. The resulting band before performing a physical model has been verified in CAD software. Solid models were used to perform a physical prototype. The prototype was prepared using FDM rapid prototyping methods.

  9. Suppression of the water ice and snow albedo feedback on planets orbiting red dwarf stars and the subsequent widening of the habitable zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Manoj M; Haberle, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    M stars comprise 80% of main sequence stars, so their planetary systems provide the best chance for finding habitable planets, that is, those with surface liquid water. We have modeled the broadband albedo or reflectivity of water ice and snow for simulated planetary surfaces orbiting two observed red dwarf stars (or M stars), using spectrally resolved data of Earth's cryosphere. The gradual reduction of the albedos of snow and ice at wavelengths greater than 1 μm, combined with M stars emitting a significant fraction of their radiation at these same longer wavelengths, means that the albedos of ice and snow on planets orbiting M stars are much lower than their values on Earth. Our results imply that the ice/snow albedo climate feedback is significantly weaker for planets orbiting M stars than for planets orbiting G-type stars such as the Sun. In addition, planets with significant ice and snow cover will have significantly higher surface temperatures for a given stellar flux if the spectral variation of cryospheric albedo is considered, which in turn implies that the outer edge of the habitable zone around M stars may be 10-30% farther away from the parent star than previously thought.

  10. Little Earth Experiment: an instrument to model planetary cores

    CERN Document Server

    Aujogue, Kelig; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  11. Little Earth Experiment: An instrument to model planetary cores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aujogue, Kélig; Pothérat, Alban; Bates, Ian; Debray, François; Sreenivasan, Binod

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we present a new experimental facility, Little Earth Experiment, designed to study the hydrodynamics of liquid planetary cores. The main novelty of this apparatus is that a transparent electrically conducting electrolyte is subject to extremely high magnetic fields (up to 10 T) to produce electromagnetic effects comparable to those produced by moderate magnetic fields in planetary cores. This technique makes it possible to visualise for the first time the coupling between the principal forces in a convection-driven dynamo by means of Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV) in a geometry relevant to planets. We first present the technology that enables us to generate these forces and implement PIV in a high magnetic field environment. We then show that the magnetic field drastically changes the structure of convective plumes in a configuration relevant to the tangent cylinder region of the Earth's core.

  12. Nonlinear dynamics of planetary gears using analytical and finite element models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambarisha, Vijaya Kumar; Parker, Robert G.

    2007-05-01

    Vibration-induced gear noise and dynamic loads remain key concerns in many transmission applications that use planetary gears. Tooth separations at large vibrations introduce nonlinearity in geared systems. The present work examines the complex, nonlinear dynamic behavior of spur planetary gears using two models: (i) a lumped-parameter model, and (ii) a finite element model. The two-dimensional (2D) lumped-parameter model represents the gears as lumped inertias, the gear meshes as nonlinear springs with tooth contact loss and periodically varying stiffness due to changing tooth contact conditions, and the supports as linear springs. The 2D finite element model is developed from a unique finite element-contact analysis solver specialized for gear dynamics. Mesh stiffness variation excitation, corner contact, and gear tooth contact loss are all intrinsically considered in the finite element analysis. The dynamics of planetary gears show a rich spectrum of nonlinear phenomena. Nonlinear jumps, chaotic motions, and period-doubling bifurcations occur when the mesh frequency or any of its higher harmonics are near a natural frequency of the system. Responses from the dynamic analysis using analytical and finite element models are successfully compared qualitatively and quantitatively. These comparisons validate the effectiveness of the lumped-parameter model to simulate the dynamics of planetary gears. Mesh phasing rules to suppress rotational and translational vibrations in planetary gears are valid even when nonlinearity from tooth contact loss occurs. These mesh phasing rules, however, are not valid in the chaotic and period-doubling regions.

  13. Modeling radiative transfer in tropical rainforest canopies: sensitivity of simulated albedo to canopy architectural and optical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagi, Sílvia N M; Costa, Marcos H

    2011-12-01

    This study evaluates the sensitivity of the surface albedo simulated by the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS) to a set of Amazonian tropical rainforest canopy architectural and optical parameters. The parameters tested in this study are the orientation and reflectance of the leaves of upper and lower canopies in the visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) spectral bands. The results are evaluated against albedo measurements taken above the K34 site at the INPA (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia) Cuieiras Biological Reserve. The sensitivity analysis indicates a strong response to the upper canopy leaves orientation (χup) and to the reflectivity in the near-infrared spectral band (ρNIR,up), a smaller sensitivity to the reflectivity in the visible spectral band (ρVIS,up) and no sensitivity at all to the lower canopy parameters, which is consistent with the canopy structure. The combination of parameters that minimized the Root Mean Square Error and mean relative error are χup = 0.86, ρVIS,up = 0.062 and ρNIR,up = 0.275. The parameterizations performed resulted in successful simulations of tropical rainforest albedo by IBIS, indicating its potential to simulate the canopy radiative transfer for narrow spectral bands and permitting close comparison with remote sensing products.

  14. Modeling of the process of gear shifting in planetary gear trains of motor vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandar R. Grkić

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Gear boxes, i. e. the realization of their functions, especially gear shift, have a big impact on vehicle operation quality through their effects on the performance of vehicles and their comfort. This paper shows a method of modeling the transition process during gear shifting in planetary gear trains. The simulation model is developed with in order to provide virtual research of planetary gear trains, which would positively decrease the number of real prototypes, thus considerably saving time and contributing to the quality improvement of the final product (planetary gear train and vehicles in general. Introduction Modeling of gear shift processes has been carried out on the planetary gear type Ravigneaux used in planetary gear trains of motor vehicles. The model was developed modularly, so that more simulation models can be added to the whole. At the same time each subsystem is a model for itself and can be used independently from the main model. Simplified engine model Bearing in mind that, for the simulation of the planetary gear which is the subject of this paper, the necessary input parameters are in the form of engine torque Mm, angular velocity and motor ωm moment of inertia of rotating engine components reduced to the input shaft gear, a simplified model of an internal combustion engine has been formed. Model of external load External load resistance is in the form of the torque Mt occurring on the drive wheel of the vehicle. On the other hand, this load is defined by the moment of inertia of rotating elements from the planetary gear to the drive wheel, reduced to the output shaft. Model of friction transmission simulation Transmission power control in planetary gears is achieved through friction components. The output size of this subsystem is the moment of carrying the friction assembly. Simulation model of the planetary gear train The model simulation of the planetary gear type Ravigneaux was formed in accordance with the kinematic

  15. An Ontology-Based Archive Information Model for the Planetary Science Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J. Steven; Crichton, Daniel J.; Mattmann, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Planetary Data System (PDS) information model is a mature but complex model that has been used to capture over 30 years of planetary science data for the PDS archive. As the de-facto information model for the planetary science data archive, it is being adopted by the International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) as their archive data standard. However, after seventeen years of evolutionary change the model needs refinement. First a formal specification is needed to explicitly capture the model in a commonly accepted data engineering notation. Second, the core and essential elements of the model need to be identified to help simplify the overall archive process. A team of PDS technical staff members have captured the PDS information model in an ontology modeling tool. Using the resulting knowledge-base, work continues to identify the core elements, identify problems and issues, and then test proposed modifications to the model. The final deliverables of this work will include specifications for the next generation PDS information model and the initial set of IPDA archive data standards. Having the information model captured in an ontology modeling tool also makes the model suitable for use by Semantic Web applications.

  16. An Ontology-Based Archive Information Model for the Planetary Science Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, J. Steven; Crichton, Daniel J.; Mattmann, Chris

    2008-01-01

    The Planetary Data System (PDS) information model is a mature but complex model that has been used to capture over 30 years of planetary science data for the PDS archive. As the de-facto information model for the planetary science data archive, it is being adopted by the International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) as their archive data standard. However, after seventeen years of evolutionary change the model needs refinement. First a formal specification is needed to explicitly capture the model in a commonly accepted data engineering notation. Second, the core and essential elements of the model need to be identified to help simplify the overall archive process. A team of PDS technical staff members have captured the PDS information model in an ontology modeling tool. Using the resulting knowledge-base, work continues to identify the core elements, identify problems and issues, and then test proposed modifications to the model. The final deliverables of this work will include specifications for the next generation PDS information model and the initial set of IPDA archive data standards. Having the information model captured in an ontology modeling tool also makes the model suitable for use by Semantic Web applications.

  17. Tackling regional climate change by leaf albedo bio-geoengineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgwell, Andy; Singarayer, Joy S; Hetherington, Alistair M; Valdes, Paul J

    2009-01-27

    The likelihood that continuing greenhouse-gas emissions will lead to an unmanageable degree of climate change has stimulated the search for planetary-scale technological solutions for reducing global warming ("geoengineering"), typically characterized by the necessity for costly new infrastructures and industries. We suggest that the existing global infrastructure associated with arable agriculture can help, given that crop plants exert an important influence over the climatic energy budget because of differences in their albedo (solar reflectivity) compared to soils and to natural vegetation. Specifically, we propose a "bio-geoengineering" approach to mitigate surface warming, in which crop varieties having specific leaf glossiness and/or canopy morphological traits are specifically chosen to maximize solar reflectivity. We quantify this by modifying the canopy albedo of vegetation in prescribed cropland areas in a global-climate model, and thereby estimate the near-term potential for bio-geoengineering to be a summertime cooling of more than 1 degrees C throughout much of central North America and midlatitude Eurasia, equivalent to seasonally offsetting approximately one-fifth of regional warming due to doubling of atmospheric CO(2). Ultimately, genetic modification of plant leaf waxes or canopy structure could achieve greater temperature reductions, although better characterization of existing intraspecies variability is needed first.

  18. Spacecraft Attitude Determination with Earth Albedo Corrected Sun Sensor Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhanderi, Dan

    This thesis focuses on advanced modeling of the Earth albedo experienced by satellites in Earth orbit. The model of the Earth albedo maintains directional information of the Earth albedo irradiance from each partition on the Earth surface. This allows enhanced modeling of Sun sensor current outputs......-Method, Extended Kalman Filter, and Unscented Kalman Filter algorithms are presented and the results are compared. Combining the Unscented Kalman Filter with Earth albedo and enhanced Sun sensor modeling allows for three-axis attitude determination from Sun sensor only, which previously has been perceived...

  19. A New Model of the Fractional Order Dynamics of the Planetary Gears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Nikolic-Stanojevic

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model of planetary gears dynamics is presented. Planetary gears are parametrically excited by the time-varying mesh stiffness that fluctuates as the number of gear tooth pairs in contact changes during gear rotation. In the paper, it has been indicated that even the small disturbance in design realizations of this gear cause nonlinear properties of dynamics which are the source of vibrations and noise in the gear transmission. Dynamic model of the planetary gears with four degrees of freedom is used. Applying the basic principles of analytical mechanics and taking the initial and boundary conditions into consideration, it is possible to obtain the system of equations representing physical meshing process between the two or more gears. This investigation was focused to a new model of the fractional order dynamics of the planetary gear. For this model analytical expressions for the corresponding fractional order modes like one frequency eigen vibrational modes are obtained. For one planetary gear, eigen fractional modes are obtained, and a visualization is presented. By using MathCAD the solution is obtained.

  20. Planetary Magnetism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connerney, J. E. P.

    2007-01-01

    The chapter on Planetary Magnetism by Connerney describes the magnetic fields of the planets, from Mercury to Neptune, including the large satellites (Moon, Ganymede) that have or once had active dynamos. The chapter describes the spacecraft missions and observations that, along with select remote observations, form the basis of our knowledge of planetary magnetic fields. Connerney describes the methods of analysis used to characterize planetary magnetic fields, and the models used to represent the main field (due to dynamo action in the planet's interior) and/or remnant magnetic fields locked in the planet's crust, where appropriate. These observations provide valuable insights into dynamo generation of magnetic fields, the structure and composition of planetary interiors, and the evolution of planets.

  1. The IMPEx data model - representation of planetary magnetospheric environment with the paraboloid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalegaev, Vladimir; Kallio, Esa; Belenkaya, Elena; Alexeev, Igor; Ronan Modolo, M.; Khodachenko, Maxim; Tarek Al-Ubaidi, Di.; Mukhametdinova, Ludmila; Genot, Vincent

    Data from different sources (satellite measurements, simulation data bases and online services) are accumulated inside a digital framework developed within the FP7 project IMPEx. Paraboloid model of the planetary magnetospheres (PMM) is a part of this infrastructure. A generalized paraboloid model was developed to represent correctly the electrodynamics processes in the magnetospheres of some magnetized planets: Earth, Saturn, Jupiter and Mercury. This model is intended to calculate the magnetic field generated by a variety of current systems located on the boundaries and within the boundaries of the planetary magnetosphere under a wide range of environmental conditions, quiet and disturbed, affected by Solar activity such as Solar Flares and related phenomena. A set of Web-services to provide an access to PMM calculations and to enable the modeling data processing under SOAP protocol have been created. These will be implemented for easy data exchange within IMPEx infrastructure. Interactive models of the Earth's, Kronian and Mercury's magnetospheres, which take into account specific features of the modeled objects have been realized at Space Monitoring Data Center of SINP MSU (http://smdc.sinp.msu.ru/). The real-time model of the Earth's magnetosphere is currently working at SINP MSU Space Weather Web-site (http://swx.sinp.msu.ru/?lang=en).

  2. The Effect of Host Star Spectral Energy Distribution and Ice-Albedo Feedback on the Climate of Extrasolar Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Shields, Aomawa L; Bitz, Cecilia M; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Joshi, Manoj M; Robinson, Tyler D

    2013-01-01

    Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. Here we explore this effect using a one dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative-transfer model to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy-balance climate model. A three-dimensional general circulation model is also used to explore the atmosphere's response to changes in incoming stellar radiation, or instellation, and surface albedo. Using this hierarchy of models we simulate planets covered by ocean, land, and water ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibit a stronger ice-albedo feedback. We find that ice-covered conditions occur on an F-dwarf planet with only a 2% reduction in instellation relative to the present instellation on Earth, assuming fixed CO2 (present atmospheric level on Ea...

  3. Toward a Deterministic Model of Planetary Formation VII: Eccentricity Distribution of Gas Giants

    CERN Document Server

    Ida, S; Nagasawa, M

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquity of planets and diversity of planetary systems reveal planet formation encompass many complex and competing processes. In this series of papers, we develop and upgrade a population synthesis model as a tool to identify the dominant physical effects and to calibrate the range of physical conditions. Recent planet searches leads to the discovery of many multiple-planet systems. Any theoretical models of their origins must take into account dynamical interaction between emerging protoplanets. Here, we introduce a prescription to approximate the close encounters between multiple planets. We apply this method to simulate the growth, migration, and dynamical interaction of planetary systems. Our models show that in relatively massive disks, several gas giants and rocky/icy planets emerge, migrate, and undergo dynamical instability. Secular perturbation between planets leads to orbital crossings, eccentricity excitation, and planetary ejection. In disks with modest masses, two or less gas giants form wit...

  4. Incorporation of the Mass Concentration and the New Snow Albedo Schemes into the Global Forecasting Model, GEOS-5 and the Impact of the New Schemes over Himalayan Glaciers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei

    2012-01-01

    Recently the issue on glacier retreats comes up and many factors should be relevant to the issue. The absorbing aerosols such as dust and black carbon (BC) are considered to be one of the factors. After they deposited onto the snow surface, it will reduce snow albedo (called snow darkening effect) and probably contribute to further melting of glacier. The Goddard Earth Observing System version 5 (GEOS-5) has developed at NASA/GSFC. However, the original snowpack model used in the land surface model in the GEOS-5 did not consider the snow darkening effect. Here we developed the new snow albedo scheme which can consider the snow darkening effect. In addition, another scheme on calculating mass concentrations on the absorbing aerosols in snowpack was also developed, in which the direct aerosol depositions from the chemical transport model in the GEOS-5 were used. The scheme has been validated with the observed data obtained at backyard of the Institute of Low Temperature Science, Hokkaido University, by Dr. Teruo Aoki (Meteorological Research Institute) et aL including me. The observed data was obtained when I was Ph.D. candidate. The original GEOS-5during 2007-2009 over the Himalayas and Tibetan Plateau region showed more reductions of snow than that of the new GEOS-5 because the original one used lower albedo settings. On snow cover fraction, the new GEOS-5 simulated more realistic snow-covered area comparing to the MODIS snow cover fraction. The reductions on snow albedo, snow cover fraction, and snow water equivalent were seen with statistically significance if we consider the snow darkening effect comparing to the results without the snow darkening effect. In the real world, debris cover, inside refreezing process, surface flow of glacier, etc. affect glacier mass balance and the simulated results immediately do not affect whole glacier retreating. However, our results indicate that some surface melting over non debris covered parts of the glacier would be

  5. Arctic sea ice albedo in summer: observation and modelling experiments%北极夏季海冰反照率的观测和数值模拟试验

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨清华; 程斌; 雷瑞波; 王先桥; 杨宇; 张占海

    2011-01-01

    在中国第3次北极科学考察浮冰站开展了积雪/海冰反照率观测.本文对观测结果进行了分析,并结合一维高分辨雪/冰模式(HIGHTSI)对3个常用的反照率参数化方案在天气尺度的表现进行了评估.观测期间测站反照率变化范围0.75~0.85,其天气尺度变化同天气和表面冰、雪状况紧密相关,降雪和吹雪过程可改变表面积雪厚度及水平分布,进而显著影响反照率.考虑雪、冰厚度变化时,模式能很好的再现反照率的变化趋势,但难以准确模拟出反照率的日变化.%The surface albedo was observed at the Ice Camp during the Chinese National Arctic Research Expedition (CHINARE) at the end of melting season in 2008. The in situ data were investigated in this paper. Several albedo parameterizations were incorporated into a one-dimensional high-resolution thermodynamic snow/ice model (HIGHTSI) to simulate local surface albedo. The observed albedo varies between O. 75~0. 85 during the observation period with a slightly decreasing trend, the local change of albedo was strongly linked with snowfall/sleet and snow drift events. The trend of observed surface albedo can be captured by an albedo scheme taken snow and ice thicknesses into account. Albedo schemes with the current complexity, however, are difficult to reconstruct the short-term variability.

  6. Cold aqueous planetary geochemistry with FREZCHEM from modeling to the search for life at the limits

    CERN Document Server

    Marion, Giles M

    2007-01-01

    This book explicitly investigates issues of astrobiological relevance in the context of cold aqueous planetary geochemistry. At the core of the technical chapters is the FREZCHEM model, initially developed over many years by one of the authors to quantify aqueous electrolyte properties and chemical thermodynamics at subzero temperatures. FREZCHEM, of general relevance to biogeochemists and geochemical modelers, cold planetary scientists, physicochemists and chemical engineers, is subsequently applied to the exploration of biogeochemical applications to solar systems bodies in general, and to speculations about the limits for life in cold environments in particular.

  7. The effects of timing and rate of marine cloud brightening aerosol injection on albedo changes during the diurnal cycle of marine stratocumulus clouds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. K. L. Jenkins

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The marine-cloud brightening geoengineering technique has been suggested as a~possible means of counteracting the positive radiative forcing associated with anthropogenic atmospheric CO2 increases. The focus of this study is to quantify the albedo response to aerosols injected into marine stratocumulus cloud from a point source at different times of day. We use a cloud-resolving model to investigate both weakly precipitating and non-precipitating regimes. Injection into both regimes induces a first indirect aerosol effect. Additionally, the weakly precipitating regime shows evidence of the second indirect aerosol effect and leads to cloud changes indicative of a regime change to more persistent cloud. This results in a cloud albedo increase up to six times larger than in the non-precipitating case. These indirect effects show considerable variation with injection at different times in the diurnal cycle. For the weakly precipitating case, aerosol injection results in average increases in cloud albedo of 0.28 and 0.17 in the early and mid morning (03:00:00 local time (LT and 08:00:00 LT, respectively and 0.01 in the evening (18:00:00 LT. No cloud develops when injecting into the cloud-free day (13:00:00 LT. However, the all-sky albedo increases (which include both the indirect and direct aerosol effects are highest for early morning injection (0.11. Mid-morning and daytime injections produce increases of 0.06, with the direct aerosol effect compensating for the lack of cloud albedo perturbation during the cloud-free day. Evening injection results in an increase of 0.04. Penetration and accumulation of aerosols above the cloud top may lead to a reduction of all-sky albedo that tempers the cloud albedo increases. The apparent direct aerosol tempering effect increases with injection rate, although not enough to overcome the increase in all-sky planetary albedo resulting from increases in cloud albedo. For the weakly precipitating case

  8. Modeling radiative transfer in tropical rainforest canopies: sensitivity of simulated albedo to canopy architectural and optical parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sílvia N. M. Yanagi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the sensitivity of the surface albedo simulated by the Integrated Biosphere Simulator (IBIS to a set of Amazonian tropical rainforest canopy architectural and optical parameters. The parameters tested in this study are the orientation and reflectance of the leaves of upper and lower canopies in the visible (VIS and near-infrared (NIR spectral bands. The results are evaluated against albedo measurements taken above the K34 site at the INPA (Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia Cuieiras Biological Reserve. The sensitivity analysis indicates a strong response to the upper canopy leaves orientation (x up and to the reflectivity in the near-infrared spectral band (rNIR,up, a smaller sensitivity to the reflectivity in the visible spectral band (rVIS,up and no sensitivity at all to the lower canopy parameters, which is consistent with the canopy structure. The combination of parameters that minimized the Root Mean Square Error and mean relative error are Xup = 0.86, rVIS,up = 0.062 and rNIR,up = 0.275. The parameterizations performed resulted in successful simulations of tropical rainforest albedo by IBIS, indicating its potential to simulate the canopy radiative transfer for narrow spectral bands and permitting close comparison with remote sensing products.Este estudo avalia a sensibilidade do albedo da superfície pelo Simulador Integrado da Biosfera (IBIS a um conjunto de parâmetros que representam algumas propriedades arquitetônicas e óticas do dossel da floresta tropical Amazônica. Os parâmetros testados neste estudo são a orientação e refletância das folhas do dossel superior e inferior nas bandas espectrais do visível (VIS e infravermelho próximo (NIR. Os resultados são avaliados contra observações feitas no sítio K34 pertencente ao Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas da Amazônia (INPA na Reserva Biológica de Cuieiras. A análise de sensibilidade indica uma forte resposta aos parâmetros de orienta

  9. Evaluation of preindustrial to present-day black carbon and its albedo forcing from ACCMIP (Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP, we evaluate the historical black carbon (BC aerosols simulated by 8 ACCMIP models against observations including 12 ice core records, long-term surface mass concentrations and recent Arctic BC snowpack measurements. We also estimate BC albedo forcing by performing additional simulations using offline models with prescribed meteorology from 1996–2000. We evaluated the vertical profile of BC snow concentrations from these offline simulations using the recent BC snowpack measurements.

    Despite using the same BC emissions, the global BC burden differs by approximately a factor of 3 among models due to differences in aerosol removal parameterizations and simulated meteorology: 34 Gg to 103 Gg in 1850 and 82 Gg to 315 Gg in 2000. However, the global BC burden from preindustrial to present-day increases by 2.5–3 times with little variation among models, roughly matching the 2.5-fold increase in total BC emissions during the same period. We find a large divergence among models at both Northern Hemisphere (NH and Southern Hemisphere (SH high latitude regions for BC burden and at SH high latitude regions for deposition fluxes. The ACCMIP simulations match the observed BC surface mass concentrations well in Europe and North America except at Jungfraujoch and Ispra. However, the models fail to predict the Arctic BC seasonality due to severe underestimations during winter and spring. The simulated vertically resolved BC snow concentrations are, on average, within a factor of 2–3 of the BC snowpack measurements except for Greenland and the Arctic Ocean.

    For the ice core evaluation, models tend to capture both the observed temporal trends and the magnitudes well at Greenland sites. However, models fail to predict the decreasing trend of BC depositions/ice-core concentrations from the 1950s to the 1970s in most Tibetan Plateau ice cores. The distinct

  10. A Continental United States High Resolution NLCD Land Cover – MODIS Albedo Database to Examine Albedo and Land Cover Change Relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surface albedo influences climate by affecting the amount of solar radiation that is reflected at the Earth’s surface, and surface albedo is, in turn, affected by land cover. General Circulation Models typically use modeled or prescribed albedo to assess the influence of land co...

  11. Evaluation of preindustrial to present-day black carbon and its albedo forcing from Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Y. H.; Lamarque, J.-F.; Flanner, M. G.; Jiao, C.; Shindell, D. T.; Bernsten, T.; Bisiaux, M. M.; Cao, J.; Collins, W. J.; Curran, M.; Edwards, R.; Faluvegi, G.; Ghan, S.; Horowitz, L. W.; McConnell, J. R.; Ming, J.; Myhre, G.; Nagashima, T.; Naik, V.; Rumbold, S. T.; Skeie, R. B.; Sudo, K.; Takemura, T.; Thevenon, F.; Xu, B.; Yoon, J.-H.

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP), we evaluate the historical black carbon (BC) aerosols simulated by 8 ACCMIP models against observations including 12 ice core records, long-term surface mass concentrations, and recent Arctic BC snowpack measurements. We also estimate BC albedo forcing by performing additional simulations using offline models with prescribed meteorology from 1996-2000. We evaluate the vertical profile of BC snow concentrations from these offline simulations using the recent BC snowpack measurements. Despite using the same BC emissions, the global BC burden differs by approximately a factor of 3 among models due to differences in aerosol removal parameterizations and simulated meteorology: 34 Gg to 103 Gg in 1850 and 82 Gg to 315 Gg in 2000. However, the global BC burden from preindustrial to present-day increases by 2.5-3 times with little variation among models, roughly matching the 2.5-fold increase in total BC emissions during the same period.We find a large divergence among models at both Northern Hemisphere (NH) and Southern Hemisphere (SH) high latitude regions for BC burden and at SH high latitude regions for deposition fluxes. The ACCMIP simulations match the observed BC surface mass concentrations well in Europe and North America except at Ispra. However, the models fail to predict the Arctic BC seasonality due to severe underestimations during winter and spring. The simulated vertically resolved BC snow concentrations are, on average, within a factor of 2-3 of the BC snowpack measurements except for Greenland and the Arctic Ocean. For the ice core evaluation, models tend to adequately capture both the observed temporal trends and the magnitudes at Greenland sites. However, models fail to predict the decreasing trend of BC depositions/ice core concentrations from the 1950s to the 1970s in most Tibetan Plateau ice cores. The distinct temporal trend at the Tibetan Plateau ice cores

  12. Evaluation of preindustrial to present-day black carbon and its albedo forcing from Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. H. Lee

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available As part of the Atmospheric Chemistry and Climate Model Intercomparison Project (ACCMIP, we evaluate the historical black carbon (BC aerosols simulated by 8 ACCMIP models against observations including 12 ice core records, long-term surface mass concentrations, and recent Arctic BC snowpack measurements. We also estimate BC albedo forcing by performing additional simulations using offline models with prescribed meteorology from 1996–2000. We evaluate the vertical profile of BC snow concentrations from these offline simulations using the recent BC snowpack measurements. Despite using the same BC emissions, the global BC burden differs by approximately a factor of 3 among models due to differences in aerosol removal parameterizations and simulated meteorology: 34 Gg to 103 Gg in 1850 and 82 Gg to 315 Gg in 2000. However, the global BC burden from preindustrial to present-day increases by 2.5–3 times with little variation among models, roughly matching the 2.5-fold increase in total BC emissions during the same period. We find a large divergence among models at both Northern Hemisphere (NH and Southern Hemisphere (SH high latitude regions for BC burden and at SH high latitude regions for deposition fluxes. The ACCMIP simulations match the observed BC surface mass concentrations well in Europe and North America except at Ispra. However, the models fail to predict the Arctic BC seasonality due to severe underestimations during winter and spring. The simulated vertically resolved BC snow concentrations are, on average, within a factor of 2–3 of the BC snowpack measurements except for Greenland and the Arctic Ocean. For the ice core evaluation, models tend to adequately capture both the observed temporal trends and the magnitudes at Greenland sites. However, models fail to predict the decreasing trend of BC depositions/ice core concentrations from the 1950s to the 1970s in most Tibetan Plateau ice cores. The distinct temporal trend at the Tibetan

  13. Towards Camera-LIDAR Fusion-Based Terrain Modelling for Planetary Surfaces: Review and Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Affan Shaukat

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, terrain modelling and reconstruction techniques have increased research interest in precise short and long distance autonomous navigation, localisation and mapping within field robotics. One of the most challenging applications is in relation to autonomous planetary exploration using mobile robots. Rovers deployed to explore extraterrestrial surfaces are required to perceive and model the environment with little or no intervention from the ground station. Up to date, stereopsis represents the state-of-the art method and can achieve short-distance planetary surface modelling. However, future space missions will require scene reconstruction at greater distance, fidelity and feature complexity, potentially using other sensors like Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR. LIDAR has been extensively exploited for target detection, identification, and depth estimation in terrestrial robotics, but is still under development to become a viable technology for space robotics. This paper will first review current methods for scene reconstruction and terrain modelling using cameras in planetary robotics and LIDARs in terrestrial robotics; then we will propose camera-LIDAR fusion as a feasible technique to overcome the limitations of either of these individual sensors for planetary exploration. A comprehensive analysis will be presented to demonstrate the advantages of camera-LIDAR fusion in terms of range, fidelity, accuracy and computation.

  14. Towards Camera-LIDAR Fusion-Based Terrain Modelling for Planetary Surfaces: Review and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaukat, Affan; Blacker, Peter C; Spiteri, Conrad; Gao, Yang

    2016-11-20

    In recent decades, terrain modelling and reconstruction techniques have increased research interest in precise short and long distance autonomous navigation, localisation and mapping within field robotics. One of the most challenging applications is in relation to autonomous planetary exploration using mobile robots. Rovers deployed to explore extraterrestrial surfaces are required to perceive and model the environment with little or no intervention from the ground station. Up to date, stereopsis represents the state-of-the art method and can achieve short-distance planetary surface modelling. However, future space missions will require scene reconstruction at greater distance, fidelity and feature complexity, potentially using other sensors like Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR). LIDAR has been extensively exploited for target detection, identification, and depth estimation in terrestrial robotics, but is still under development to become a viable technology for space robotics. This paper will first review current methods for scene reconstruction and terrain modelling using cameras in planetary robotics and LIDARs in terrestrial robotics; then we will propose camera-LIDAR fusion as a feasible technique to overcome the limitations of either of these individual sensors for planetary exploration. A comprehensive analysis will be presented to demonstrate the advantages of camera-LIDAR fusion in terms of range, fidelity, accuracy and computation.

  15. Nonlinear dynamic modeling of a helicopter planetary gear train for carrier plate crack fault diagnosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fan Lei; Wang Shaoping; Wang Xingjian; Han Feng; Lyu Huawei

    2016-01-01

    Planetary gear train plays a significant role in a helicopter operation and its health is of great importance for the flight safety of the helicopter. This paper investigates the effects of a planet carrier plate crack on the dynamic characteristics of a planetary gear train, and thus finds an effec-tive method to diagnose crack fault. A dynamic model is developed to analyze the torsional vibra-tion of a planetary gear train with a cracked planet carrier plate. The model takes into consideration nonlinear factors such as the time-varying meshing stiffness, gear backlash and viscous damping. Investigation of the deformation of the cracked carrier plate under static stress is performed in order to simulate the dynamic effects of the planet carrier crack on the angular displacement of car-rier posts. Validation shows good accuracy of the developed dynamic model in predicting dynamic characteristics of a planetary gear train. Fault features extracted from predictions of the model reveal the correspondence between vibration characteristic and the conditions (length and position) of a planet carrier crack clearly.

  16. Nonlinear dynamic modeling of a helicopter planetary gear train for carrier plate crack fault diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Lei

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Planetary gear train plays a significant role in a helicopter operation and its health is of great importance for the flight safety of the helicopter. This paper investigates the effects of a planet carrier plate crack on the dynamic characteristics of a planetary gear train, and thus finds an effective method to diagnose crack fault. A dynamic model is developed to analyze the torsional vibration of a planetary gear train with a cracked planet carrier plate. The model takes into consideration nonlinear factors such as the time-varying meshing stiffness, gear backlash and viscous damping. Investigation of the deformation of the cracked carrier plate under static stress is performed in order to simulate the dynamic effects of the planet carrier crack on the angular displacement of carrier posts. Validation shows good accuracy of the developed dynamic model in predicting dynamic characteristics of a planetary gear train. Fault features extracted from predictions of the model reveal the correspondence between vibration characteristic and the conditions (length and position of a planet carrier crack clearly.

  17. Numerical model of a non-steady atmospheric planetary boundary layer, based on similarity theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zilitinkevich, S.S.; Fedorovich, E.E.; Shabalova, M.V.

    1992-01-01

    A numerical model of a non-stationary atmospheric planetary boundary layer (PBL) over a horizontally homogeneous flat surface is derived on the basis of similarity theory. The two most typical turbulence regimes are reproduced: one corresponding to a convectively growing PBL and another correspon...

  18. Modelling Velocity Spectra in the Lower Part of the Planetary Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, H.R.; Larsen, Søren Ejling; Højstrup, Jørgen

    1984-01-01

    of the planetary boundary layer. Knowledge of the variation with stability of the (reduced) frequency f, for the spectral maximum is utilized in this modelling. Stable spectra may be normalized so that they adhere to one curve only, irrespective of stability, and unstable w-spectra may also be normalized to fit...

  19. On the Nature, Theory, and Modeling of Atmospheric Planetary Boundary Layers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baklanov, Alexander A.; Grisogono, Branko; Bornstein, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The gap between our modern understanding of planetary boundary layer physics and its decades-old representations in current operational atmospheric models is widening, which has stimulated this review of the current state of the art and an analysis of the immediate needs in boundary layer theory...

  20. Aerosol single-scattering albedo over the global oceans: Comparing PARASOL retrievals with AERONET, OMI, and AeroCom models estimates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacagnina, Carlo [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht Netherlands; Hasekamp, Otto P. [SRON Netherlands Institute for Space Research, Utrecht Netherlands; Bian, Huisheng [Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, Catonsville Maryland USA; Curci, Gabriele [Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L' Aquila, L' Aquila Italy; CETEMPS, University of L' Aquila, L' Aquila Italy; Myhre, Gunnar [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research - Oslo, Oslo Norway; van Noije, Twan [KNMI Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute, De Bilt Netherlands; Schulz, Michael [Norwegian Meteorological Institute, Oslo Norway; Skeie, Ragnhild B. [Center for International Climate and Environmental Research - Oslo, Oslo Norway; Takemura, Toshihiko [Research Institute for Applied Mechanics, Kyushu University, Fukuoka Japan; Zhang, Kai [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington USA; Max Planck Institute for Meteorology, Hamburg Germany

    2015-09-27

    The aerosol Single Scattering Albedo (SSA) over the global oceans is evaluated based on polarimetric measurements by the PARASOL satellite. The retrieved values for SSA and Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) agree well with the ground-based measurements of the AErosol RObotic NETwork (AERONET). The global coverage provided by the PARASOL observations represents a unique opportunity to evaluate SSA and AOD simulated by atmospheric transport model runs, as performed in the AeroCom framework. The SSA estimate provided by the AeroCom models is generally higher than the SSA retrieved from both PARASOL and AERONET. On the other hand, the mean simulated AOD is about right or slightly underestimated compared with observations. An overestimate of the SSA by the models would suggest that these simulate an overly strong aerosol radiative cooling at top-of-atmosphere (TOA) and underestimate it at surface. This implies that aerosols have a potential stronger impact within the atmosphere than currently simulated.

  1. IMPEx - an infrastructure for joint analysis of space missions and computational modelling data in planetary science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, Michel

    2012-07-01

    The FP7-SPACE project Integrated Medium for Planetary Exploration (IMPEx) was started in June 2011. The aim of the project is the creation of an integrated interactive IT framework where data from space missions will be interconnected to numerical models, providing a possibility to 1) simulate planetary phenomena and interpret spacecraft data; 2) test and improve models versus experimental data; 3) fill gaps in measurements by appropriate modelling runs; 4) solve technological tasks of mission operation and preparation. Specifically, the `modeling sector' of IMPEx is formed of four well established numerical codes and their related computational infrastructures: 1) 3D hybrid modeling platform HYB for the study of planetary plasma environments, hosted at FMI; 2) an alternative 3D hybrid modeling platform, hosted at LATMOS; 3) MHD modelling platform GUMICS for 3D terrestrial magnetosphere, hosted at FMI; and 4) the global 3D Paraboloid Magnetospheric Model for simulation of magnetospheres of different Solar System objects, hosted at SINP. Modelling results will be linked to the corresponding experimental data from space and planetary missions via several online tools: 1/ AMDA (Automated Multi-Dataset Analysis) which provides cross-linked visualization and analysis of experimental and numerical modelling data, 2/ 3DView which will enable 3D visualization of spacecraft trajectories in simulated and observed environments, and 3/ CLWeb software for computation of various micro-scale physical products (spectra, distribution functions, etc.). In practice, IMPEx is going to provide an external user with an access to an extended set of space and planetary missions' data and powerful, world leading computing models, equipped with advanced visualization tools. Via its infrastructure, IMPEx will enable to merge spacecraft data bases and scientific modelling tools, providing their joint interconnected analysis for the better understanding of related space and planetary physics

  2. Modeling, Modal Properties, and Mesh Stiffness Variation Instabilities of Planetary Gears

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Robert G.; Lin, Jian; Krantz, Timothy L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Planetary gear noise and vibration are primary concerns in their applications in helicopters, automobiles, aircraft engines, heavy machinery and marine vehicles. Dynamic analysis is essential to the noise and vibration reduction. This work analytically investigates some critical issues and advances the understanding of planetary gear dynamics. A lumped-parameter model is built for the dynamic analysis of general planetary gears. The unique properties of the natural frequency spectra and vibration modes are rigorously characterized. These special structures apply for general planetary gears with cyclic symmetry and, in practically important case, systems with diametrically opposed planets. The special vibration properties are useful for subsequent research. Taking advantage of the derived modal properties, the natural frequency and vibration mode sensitivities to design parameters are investigated. The key parameters include mesh stiffnesses, support/bearing stiffnesses, component masses, moments of inertia, and operating speed. The eigen-sensitivities are expressed in simple, closed-form formulae associated with modal strain and kinetic energies. As disorders (e.g., mesh stiffness variation. manufacturing and assembling errors) disturb the cyclic symmetry of planetary gears, their effects on the free vibration properties are quantitatively examined. Well-defined veering rules are derived to identify dramatic changes of natural frequencies and vibration modes under parameter variations. The knowledge of free vibration properties, eigen-sensitivities, and veering rules provide important information to effectively tune the natural frequencies and optimize structural design to minimize noise and vibration. Parametric instabilities excited by mesh stiffness variations are analytically studied for multi-mesh gear systems. The discrepancies of previous studies on parametric instability of two-stage gear chains are clarified using perturbation and numerical methods. The

  3. Suppression of the water ice and snow albedo feedback on planets orbiting red dwarf stars and the subsequent widening of the habitable zone

    CERN Document Server

    Joshi, M

    2012-01-01

    M-stars comprise 80% of main-sequence stars, and so their planetary systems provide the best chance for finding habitable planets, i.e.: those with surface liquid water. We have modelled the broadband albedo or reflectivity of water ice and snow for simulated planetary surfaces orbiting two observed red dwarf stars (or M-stars) using spectrally resolved data of the Earth's cryosphere. The gradual reduction of the albedos of snow and ice at wavelengths greater than 1 ?m, combined with M-stars emitting a significant fraction of their radiation at these same longer wavelengths, mean that the albedos of ice and snow on planets orbiting M-stars are much lower than their values on Earth. Our results imply that the ice/snow albedo climate feedback is significantly weaker for planets orbiting M-stars than for planets orbiting G-type stars such as the Sun. In addition, planets with significant ice and snow cover will have significantly higher surface temperatures for a given stellar flux if the spectral variation of c...

  4. Two methods for modeling vibrations of planetary gearboxes including faults: Comparison and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra, J.; Vicuña, Cristián Molina

    2017-08-01

    Planetary gearboxes are important components of many industrial applications. Vibration analysis can increase their lifetime and prevent expensive repair and safety concerns. However, an effective analysis is only possible if the vibration features of planetary gearboxes are properly understood. In this paper, models are used to study the frequency content of planetary gearbox vibrations under non-fault and different fault conditions. Two different models are considered: phenomenological model, which is an analytical-mathematical formulation based on observation, and lumped-parameter model, which is based on the solution of the equations of motion of the system. Results of both models are not directly comparable, because the phenomenological model provides the vibration on a fixed radial direction, such as the measurements of the vibration sensor mounted on the outer part of the ring gear. On the other hand, the lumped-parameter model provides the vibrations on the basis of a rotating reference frame fixed to the carrier. To overcome this situation, a function to decompose the lumped-parameter model solutions to a fixed reference frame is presented. Finally, comparisons of results from both model perspectives and experimental measurements are presented.

  5. Mars surface albedo and changes

    CERN Document Server

    Vincendon, Mathieu; Altieri, Francesca; Ody, Anouck

    2014-01-01

    The pervasive Mars dust is continually transported between surface and atmosphere. When on the surface, dust increases the albedo of darker underlying rocks and regolith, which modifies climate energy balance and must be quantified. Remote observation of surface albedo absolute value and albedo change is however complicated by dust itself when lifted in the atmosphere. Here we present a method to calculate and map the bolometric solar hemispherical albedo of the Martian surface using the 2004 - 2010 OMEGA imaging spectrometer dataset. This method takes into account aerosols radiative transfer, surface photometry, and instrumental issues such as registration differences between visible and near-IR detectors. Resulting albedos are on average 17% higher than previous estimates for bright surfaces while similar for dark surfaces. We observed that surface albedo changes occur mostly during the storm season due to isolated events. The main variations are observed during the 2007 global dust storm and during the fol...

  6. Planetary model of sunspot emergence: A spectral and autocorrelation analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Edmonds, Ian

    2016-01-01

    This paper is concerned with intermediate range periodicity in the sunspot area spectrum. An empirical model of sunspot area emergence based on Mercury planet conjunctions was developed and the spectra of the model variation and the sunspot area variation compared. By including solar cycle amplitude modulation and the effect of solar magnetic field reversal the model was able to predict fine detail in the sunspot area spectrum. As Mercury planet conjunctions occur predictably it was possible to compare the time variation of band limited components of sunspot area with the corresponding component variations in the model. When the model component variation was stable corresponding components of sunspot area lagged the model variation by a few tens of days. When a 180 degree phase change occurred in the model variation the corresponding component of sunspot area followed the change over an interval of a few hundred days, first by decreasing to zero and then emerging in phase with the model variation. Where perio...

  7. Observations and three-dimensional photoionization modelling of the Wolf-Rayet planetary nebula Abell 48

    CERN Document Server

    Danehkar, A; Ercolano, B; Kniazev, A Y

    2014-01-01

    Recent observations reveal that the central star of the planetary nebula Abell 48 exhibits spectral features similar to massive nitrogen-sequence Wolf-Rayet stars. This raises a pertinent question, whether it is still a planetary nebula or rather a ring nebula of a massive star. In this study, we have constructed a three-dimensional photoionization model of Abell 48, constrained by our new optical integral field spectroscopy. An analysis of the spatially resolved velocity distributions allowed us to constrain the geometry of Abell 48. We used the collisionally excited lines to obtain the nebular physical conditions and ionic abundances of nitrogen, oxygen, neon, sulphur and argon, relative to hydrogen. We also determined helium temperatures and ionic abundances of helium and carbon from the optical recombination lines. We obtained a good fit to the observations for most of the emission-line fluxes in our photoionization model. The ionic abundances deduced from our model are in decent agreement with those deri...

  8. Atmospheric Modelling for the Removal of Telluric Features from Infrared Planetary Spectra

    CERN Document Server

    Cotton, Daniel V; Kedziora-Chudczer, Lucyna

    2013-01-01

    The effects of telluric absorption on infrared spectra present a problem for the observer. Strong molecular absorptions from species whose concentrations vary with time can be particularly challenging to remove precisely. Yet removing these effects is key to accurately determining the composition of many astronomical objects, planetary atmospheres in particular. Here we present a method for removing telluric effects based on a modelling approach. The method relies only on observations usually made by the planetary astronomer, and so is directly comparable with current techniques. We use the modelling approach to process observations made of Jupiter, and Saturnian moon Titan and compare the results with those of the standard telluric division technique, finding the modelling approach to have distinct advantages even in conditions regarded as ideal for telluric division.

  9. Black carbon in snow in the upper Himalayan Khumbu Valley, Nepal: observations and modeling of the impact on snow albedo, melting, and radiative forcing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.-W. Jacobi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon (BC in the snow in the Himalayas has recently attracted considerable interest due to its impact on snow albedo, snow and glacier melting, regional climate and water resources. A single particle soot photometer (SP2 instrument was used to measure refractory BC (rBC in a series of surface snow samples collected in the upper Khumbu Valley in Nepal between November 2009 and February 2012. The obtained time series indicates annual cycles with maximum concentration before the onset of the monsoon season and fast decreases in rBC during the monsoon period. Measured concentrations ranged from a few ppb up to 70 ppb rBC. However, due to the handling of the samples the measured concentrations possess rather large uncertainties. Detailed modeling of the snowpack including the measured range and an estimated upper limit of rBC concentrations was performed to study the role of BC in the seasonal snowpack. Simulations were performed for three winter seasons with the snowpack model Crocus including a detailed description of the radiative transfer inside the snowpack. While the standard Crocus model strongly overestimates the height and the duration of the seasonal snowpack, a better calculation of the snow albedo with the new radiative transfer scheme enhanced the representation of the snow. However, the period with snow on the ground neglecting BC in the snow was still over-estimated between 37 and 66 days, which was further diminished by 8 to 15% and more than 40% in the presence of 100 or 300 ppb of BC. Compared to snow without BC the albedo is on average reduced by 0.027 and 0.060 in the presence of 100 and 300 ppb BC. While the impact of increasing BC in the snow on the albedo was largest for clean snow, the impact on the local radiative forcing is the opposite. Here, increasing BC caused an even larger impact at higher BC concentrations. This effect is related to an accelerated melting of the snowpack caused by a more efficient metamorphism

  10. UV albedo of arctic snow in spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Meinander

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of snow for climate studies is based on its physical properties, such as high surface reflectivity. Surface ultraviolet (UV albedo is an essential parameter for various applications based on radiative transfer modeling. Here, new continuous measurements of the local UV albedo of natural Arctic snow were made at Sodankylä (67.37° N, 26.63° E, 179 m a.s.l. during the spring of 2007. The data were logged at 1-min intervals. The accumulation of snow was up to 68 cm. The surface layer thickness varied from 0.5 to 35 cm with the snow grain size between 0.2 and 2.5 mm. The midday erythemally weighted UV albedo ranged from 0.6 to 0.8 in the accumulation period and 0.5–0.7 during melting. During the snow melt period, under cases of an almost clear sky and variable cloudiness, an unexpected diurnal decrease of 0.05 in albedo soon after midday, and recovery thereafter, was detected. This diurnal decrease in albedo was found to be asymmetric with respect to solar midday, thus indicating a change in the properties of the snow. Independent UV albedo results with two different types of instruments confirm these findings. The measured temperature of the snow surface was below 0°C on the following mornings. Hence, the reversible diurnal change, evident for ~1–2 h, could be explained by the daily metamorphosis of the surface of the snowpack, in which the temperature of the surface increases, melting some of the snow to liquid water, after which the surface freezes again.

  11. Strong Dependence of the Inner Edge of the Habitable Zone on Planetary Rotation Rate

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, Jun; Fabrycky, Daniel C; Abbot, Dorian S

    2014-01-01

    Planetary rotation rate is a key parameter in determining atmospheric circulation and hence the spatial pattern of clouds. Since clouds can exert a dominant control on planetary radiation balance, rotation rate could be critical for determining mean planetary climate. Here we investigate this idea using a three-dimensional general circulation model with a sophisticated cloud scheme. We find that slowly rotating planets (like Venus) can maintain an Earth-like climate at nearly twice the stellar flux as rapidly rotating planets (like Earth). This suggests that many exoplanets previously believed to be too hot may actually be habitable, depending on their rotation rate. The explanation for this behavior is that slowly rotating planets have a weak Coriolis force and long daytime illumination, which promotes strong convergence and convection in the substellar region. This produces a large area of optically thick clouds, which greatly increases the planetary albedo. In contrast, on rapidly rotating planets a much n...

  12. Representation of planetary magnetospheric environment with the paraboloid model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalegaev, V. V.; Alexeev, I. I.; Belenkaya, E. S.; Mukhametdinova, L. R.; Khodachenko, M. L.; Génot, V.; Kallio, E. J.; Al-Ubaidi, T.; Modolo, R.

    2013-09-01

    Paraboloid model of the Earth's magnetosphere has been developed at Moscow State University to represent correctly the electrodynamics processes in the near-Earth's space [1]. This model is intended to calculate the magnetic field generated by a variety of current systems located on the boundaries and within the boundaries of the Earth's magnetosphere under a wide range of environmental conditions, quiet and disturbed, affected by Solar-Terrestrial interactions simulated by Solar activity such as Solar Flares and related phenomena which induce terrestrial magnetic disturbances such as Magnetic Storms. The model depends on a small set of physical input parameters, which characterize the intensity of large-scale magnetospheric current systems and their location. Among these parameters are a geomagnetic dipole tilt angle, distance to the subsolar point of the magnetosphere, etc. The input parameters depend on real- or quasi-real- time Empirical Data that include solar wind and IMF data as well as geomagnetic indices. A generalized paraboloid model was implemented to represent the magnetospheres of some magnetized planets, e.g. Saturn [2], Jupiter [3], Mercury [4]. Interactive models of the Earth's, Kronian and Mercury's magnetospheres, which take into account specific features of the modeled objects have been realized at Space Monitoring Data Center of SINP MSU [5]. The real-time model of the Earth's magnetosphere is currently working at SINP MSU Space Weather Web-site [6]. Data from different sources (satellite measurements, simulation data bases and online services) are accumulated inside a digital framework developed within the FP7 project IMPEx. Paraboloid model of the magnetospheres (PMM) is part of this infrastructure. A set of Webservices to provide the access to PMM calculations and to enable the modeling data post-processing under SOAP protocol have been created. These will be implemented for easy data exchange within IMPEx infrastructure.

  13. The solar zenith angle dependence of desert albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuo; Barlage, Michael; Zeng, Xubin; Dickinson, Robert E.; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2005-03-01

    Most land models assume that the bare soil albedo is a function of soil color and moisture but independent of solar zenith angle (SZA). However, analyses of the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function (BRDF) and albedo data over thirty desert locations indicate that bare soil albedo does vary with SZA. This is further confirmed using the in situ data. In particular, bare soil albedo normalized by its value at 60° SZA can be adequately represented by a one-parameter formulation (1 + C)/(1 + 2C * cos(SZA)) or a two-parameter formulation (1 + B1 * f1(SZA) + B2 * f2(SZA)). Using the MODIS and in situ data, the empirical parameters C, B1, and B2 are taken as 0.15, 0.346 and 0.063. The SZA dependence of soil albedo is also found to significantly affect the modeling of land surface energy balance over a desert site.

  14. The effect of host star spectral energy distribution and ice-albedo feedback on the climate of extrasolar planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Aomawa L; Meadows, Victoria S; Bitz, Cecilia M; Pierrehumbert, Raymond T; Joshi, Manoj M; Robinson, Tyler D

    2013-08-01

    Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. In this study, we explored this effect with a one-dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative transfer model to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy balance climate model. A three-dimensional (3-D) general circulation model was also used to explore the atmosphere's response to changes in incoming stellar radiation, or instellation, and surface albedo. Using this hierarchy of models, we simulated planets covered by ocean, land, and water-ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibited a stronger ice-albedo feedback. We found that ice extent was much greater on a planet orbiting an F-dwarf star than on a planet orbiting a G-dwarf star at an equivalent flux distance, and that ice-covered conditions occurred on an F-dwarf planet with only a 2% reduction in instellation relative to the present instellation on Earth, assuming fixed CO(2) (present atmospheric level on Earth). A similar planet orbiting the Sun at an equivalent flux distance required an 8% reduction in instellation, while a planet orbiting an M-dwarf star required an additional 19% reduction in instellation to become ice-covered, equivalent to 73% of the modern solar constant. The reduction in instellation must be larger for planets orbiting cooler stars due in large part to the stronger absorption of longer-wavelength radiation by icy surfaces on these planets in addition to stronger absorption by water vapor and CO(2) in their atmospheres, which provides increased downwelling longwave radiation. Lowering the IR and visible-band surface ice and snow albedos for an M-dwarf planet increased the planet's climate stability against changes in instellation and slowed the descent into global ice

  15. Saltation-threshold model can explain aeolian features on low-air-density planetary bodies

    CERN Document Server

    Pähtz, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the minimal fluid speeds at which sediment transport can be sustained is crucial for understanding whether underwater landscapes exposed to water streams and wind-blown loose planetary surfaces can be altered. It also tells us whether surface features, such as ripples and dunes, can evolve. Here, guided by state-of-the-art numerical simulations, we propose an analytical model predicting the minimal fluid speeds required to sustain sediment transport in a Newtonian fluid. The model results are consistent with measurements and estimates of the transport threshold in water and Earth's and Mars' atmospheres. Furthermore, it predicts reasonable wind speeds to sustain aeolian sediment transport ("saltation") on the low-air-density planetary bodies Triton, Pluto, and 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko (comet). This offers an explanation for possible aeolian surface features photographed on these bodies during space missions.

  16. ESA' s novel gravitational modeling of irregular planetary bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortega, Guillermo

    A detailed understanding and modeling of the gravitational modeling is required for realistic investigation of the dynamics of orbits close to irregularly shaped bodies. Gravity field modelling up to a certain maximum spherical harmonic degree N involves N2 unkown spherical harmonic coefficients or complex harmonics. The corresponding number of matrix entries reaches till N4 . For missions like CHAMP, GRACE or GOCE, the maximum degree of resolution is 75, 150 and 300 respectively. Therefore, the number of unknowns for a satellite like GOCE will be around 100.000. Since these missions usually fly for a period of time of several years, the number of observations is huge. Hence, gravity field recovery from these missions is a high demanding task. The classical approaches like spherical expansion of the potential lead generally to a high number of coefficients, which reduce the software computational efficiency of the orbit propagation and which have mostly a limited physical meaning. One of the main targets of the activity is the modelling of asteroids, small moons, and cometary bodies. All celestial bodies are irregular by definition. However, the scope of the activity is broad enough as to be able to use the models and the software in quasy-regular bodies as well. Therefore the models and tools could be used for bodies such as the Moon, Mars, Venus, Deimos, Europa, Eros, Mathilda, and Churyumov-Gerasimenko, etc., being these applications relevant for scientific (Rosetta, Bepi Colombo), exploration (Exo-Mars), NEO mitigation (Don Quijote) and Earth observation (GOCE) missions of ESA.

  17. Collisional features in a model of a planetary ring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lawney, Brian; Jenkins, J.T; Burns, J.A.

    2012-01-01

    Images taken by the Cassini spacecraft display numerous “propellers”, telltale disturbances detected in Saturn’s outer A ring. In conventionally accepted models (Seiß, M., Spahn, F., Sremčević, M., Salo, H. [2005]. Geophys. Res. Lett. 32, L11205; Lewis, M., Stewart, G. [2009]. Icarus 199, 387–412),

  18. Bond graph modeling, simulation, and reflex control of the Mars planetary automatic vehicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amara, Maher; Friconneau, Jean Pierre; Micaelli, Alain

    1993-01-01

    The bond graph modeling, simulation, and reflex control study of the Planetary Automatic Vehicle are considered. A simulator derived from a complete bond graph model of the vehicle is presented. This model includes both knowledge and representation models of the mechanical structure, the floor contact, and the Mars site. The MACSYMEN (French acronym for aided design method of multi-energetic systems) is used and applied to study the input-output power transfers. The reflex control is then considered. Controller architecture and locomotion specificity are described. A numerical stage highlights some interesting results of the robot and the controller capabilities.

  19. Measurements of spectral snow albedo at Neumayer, Antarctica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Wuttke

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Spectral albedo in high resolution, from 290 to 1050 nm, has been measured at Neumayer, Antarctica, (70°39' S, 8°15' W during the austral summer 2003/2004. At 500 nm, the spectral albedo nearly reaches unity, with slightly lower values below and above 500 nm. Above 600 nm, the spectral albedo decreases to values between 0.45 and 0.75 at 1000 nm. For one cloudless case an albedo up to 1.01 at 500 nm could be determined. This can be explained by the larger directional component of the snow reflectivity for direct incidence, combined with a slightly mislevelled sensor and the snow surface not being perfectly horizontal. A possible explanation for an observed decline in albedo is an increase in snow grain size. The theoretically predicted increase in albedo with increasing solar zenith angle (SZA could not be observed. This is explained by the small range of SZA during albedo measurements, combined with the effect of changing snow conditions outweighing the effect of changing SZA. The measured spectral albedo serves as input for radiative transfer models, describing radiation conditions in Antarctica.

  20. Weber's planetary model of the atom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch Torres Assis, Andre; Wiederkehr, Karl Heinrich; Wolfschmidt, Gudrun

    2011-07-01

    Known is Wilhelm Weber together with Gaussfor the creation of the absolute measurement systems, foundation for the contemporary Si units. Here Weber's atomic model, originated around 1860, is presented.With the triumph of the field physics and the short-range interaction theory (Faraday, Maxwell, Heinrich Hertz) all to fastly the older electrodynamics was put as superseeded long-range interaction theory ad acta. Just at the end of the 19th century the idea of a substantial, atomistic structure of electricity (H. A. Lorentz, J. J. Thomson) had is way. On the base of Ampere's hypothesis of the molecular currents in Weber's atomic model electrical particles with electric charge and very small mass circulate around a ponderable atom or molecule, which carries also electrical charge. These circulating particles excite according to Weber in the ether light waves of constant frequency. The similarity with Bohr's atomic model - apart from the quantum conditions and quantum jumps - is amazing. Energetic consideration in the emission of the light waves Weber indeed not yet made. In the foundation of metal electronics Weber also started from Ampere's molecular currents. If voltage is put on the conductor ballistic motions of electrical particles result, which arrive so from the effective sphere of a ponderable atom in the effective sphere of a neighbouring atom. Based on these ideas then Riecke, Drude, and H. A. Lorentz created then the classical electron theory of the metals. Sommerfeld took up again the idea under usage of the quantum theory come into use, and solid-state physics began.

  1. The importance of accurate glacier albedo for estimates of surface mass balance on Vatnajökull: evaluating the surface energy budget in a regional climate model with automatic weather station observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steffensen Schmidt, Louise; Aðalgeirsdóttir, Guðfinna; Guðmundsson, Sverrir; Langen, Peter L.; Pálsson, Finnur; Mottram, Ruth; Gascoin, Simon; Björnsson, Helgi

    2017-07-01

    A simulation of the surface climate of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland, carried out with the regional climate model HIRHAM5 for the period 1980-2014, is used to estimate the evolution of the glacier surface mass balance (SMB). This simulation uses a new snow albedo parameterization that allows albedo to exponentially decay with time and is surface temperature dependent. The albedo scheme utilizes a new background map of the ice albedo created from observed MODIS data. The simulation is evaluated against observed daily values of weather parameters from five automatic weather stations (AWSs) from the period 2001-2014, as well as in situ SMB measurements from the period 1995-2014. The model agrees well with observations at the AWS sites, albeit with a general underestimation of the net radiation. This is due to an underestimation of the incoming radiation and a general overestimation of the albedo. The average modelled albedo is overestimated in the ablation zone, which we attribute to an overestimation of the thickness of the snow layer and not taking the surface darkening from dirt and volcanic ash deposition during dust storms and volcanic eruptions into account. A comparison with the specific summer, winter, and net mass balance for the whole of Vatnajökull (1995-2014) shows a good overall fit during the summer, with a small mass balance underestimation of 0.04 m w.e. on average, whereas the winter mass balance is overestimated by on average 0.5 m w.e. due to too large precipitation at the highest areas of the ice cap. A simple correction of the accumulation at the highest points of the glacier reduces this to 0.15 m w.e. Here, we use HIRHAM5 to simulate the evolution of the SMB of Vatnajökull for the period 1981-2014 and show that the model provides a reasonable representation of the SMB for this period. However, a major source of uncertainty in the representation of the SMB is the representation of the albedo, and processes currently not accounted for in RCMs

  2. The importance of accurate glacier albedo for estimates of surface mass balance on Vatnajökull: evaluating the surface energy budget in a regional climate model with automatic weather station observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. S. Schmidt

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available A simulation of the surface climate of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland, carried out with the regional climate model HIRHAM5 for the period 1980–2014, is used to estimate the evolution of the glacier surface mass balance (SMB. This simulation uses a new snow albedo parameterization that allows albedo to exponentially decay with time and is surface temperature dependent. The albedo scheme utilizes a new background map of the ice albedo created from observed MODIS data. The simulation is evaluated against observed daily values of weather parameters from five automatic weather stations (AWSs from the period 2001–2014, as well as in situ SMB measurements from the period 1995–2014. The model agrees well with observations at the AWS sites, albeit with a general underestimation of the net radiation. This is due to an underestimation of the incoming radiation and a general overestimation of the albedo. The average modelled albedo is overestimated in the ablation zone, which we attribute to an overestimation of the thickness of the snow layer and not taking the surface darkening from dirt and volcanic ash deposition during dust storms and volcanic eruptions into account. A comparison with the specific summer, winter, and net mass balance for the whole of Vatnajökull (1995–2014 shows a good overall fit during the summer, with a small mass balance underestimation of 0.04 m w.e. on average, whereas the winter mass balance is overestimated by on average 0.5 m w.e. due to too large precipitation at the highest areas of the ice cap. A simple correction of the accumulation at the highest points of the glacier reduces this to 0.15 m w.e. Here, we use HIRHAM5 to simulate the evolution of the SMB of Vatnajökull for the period 1981–2014 and show that the model provides a reasonable representation of the SMB for this period. However, a major source of uncertainty in the representation of the SMB is the representation of the albedo, and processes

  3. Modeling feedbacks between a boreal forest and the planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. C.; Williams, M.; Moncrieff, J. B.

    2008-08-01

    The atmosphere and biosphere interact strongly in the planetary boundary layer. Understanding the mechanisms controlling the coupled atmosphere-biosphere system allows improved scaling between observations at the stand scale (e.g., flux towers) and those at larger scales, e.g., airborne or satellite measurements. Simulation of the joint atmosphere-biosphere system permits the study of feedbacks occurring within the coupled system. In this paper, two well-tested models, one a process-based biosphere model (SPA) and the other a planetary boundary layer model (CAPS), were coupled to allow simulation of atmosphere-biosphere feedbacks and interactions with a focus on ecological controls. As part of the validation process, the biosphere model was tested using eddy covariance, surface meteorology, and soil data collected during a 120 day period at a boreal black spruce site during the 1994 BOREAS field campaign. The coupled atmosphere-biosphere model was also validated with radiosonde data above the black spruce site, demonstrating that atmosphere and biosphere models can be coherently combined. We show that negative feedbacks at the black spruce site have strong moderating effects. The feedbacks reduce the mean impact of LAI changes on the atmospheric surface layer by 21% for latent energy, 64% for air temperature, and 44% for water mixing ratio. We show that both radiative and hydraulic limitations imposed by the vegetation structure strongly affected the interactions within the atmosphere-biosphere system, while the impact of the canopy roughness length was weak.

  4. Soil Albedo in Relation to Soil Color, Moisture and Roughness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Adan Fimbres

    Land surface albedo is the ratio of reflected to incident solar radiation. It is a function of several surface parameters including soil color, moisture, roughness and vegetation cover. A better understanding of albedo and how it changes in relation to variations in these parameters is important in order to help improve our ability to model the effects of land surface modifications on climate. The objectives of this study were (1) To determine empirical relationships between smooth bare soil albedo and soil color, (2) To develop statistical relationships between albedo and ground-based thematic mapper (TM) measurements of spectral reflectances, (3) To determine how increased surface roughness caused by tillage reduces bare soil albedo and (4) To empirically relate albedo with TM data and other physical characteristics of mixed grass/shrubland sites at Walnut Gulch Watershed. Albedos, colors and spectral reflectances were measured by Eppley pyranometer, Chroma Meter CR-200 and a Spectron SE-590, respectively. Measurements were made on two field soils (Gila and Pima) at the Campus Agricultural Center (CAC), Tucson, AZ. Soil surface roughness was measured by a profile meter developed by the USDA/ARS. Additional measurements were made at the Maricopa Agricultural Center (MAC) for statistical model testing. Albedos of the 15 smooth, bare soils (plus silica sand) were determined by linear regression to be highly correlated (r^2 = 0.93, p > 0.01) with color values for both wet and dry soil conditions. Albedos of the same smooth bare soils were also highly correlated (r^2>=q 0.86, p > 0.01) with spectral reflectances. Testing of the linear regression equations relating albedo to soil color and spectral reflectances using the data from MAC showed a high correlation. A general nonlinear relationship given by y = 8.366ln(x) + 37.802 r^2 = 0.71 was determined between percent reduction in albedo (y) and surface roughness index (x) for wet and dry Pima and Gila field soils

  5. Surface albedo measurements in Mexico City metropolitan area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, T; Mar, B; Longoria, R; Ruiz Suarez, L. G [Centro de Ciencias de la Atmosfera, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Morales, L [Instituto de Geografia, UNAM, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-04-01

    Optical and thermal properties of soils are important input data for the meteorological and photochemical modules of air quality models. As development of these models increase on spatial resolution good albedo data become more important. In this paper measurements of surface albedo of UV (295-385 nm) and visible (450-550 nm) radiation are reported for different urban and rural surfaces in the vicinity of Mexico City. It was found for the downtown zone and average albedo value of 0.05 which is in very good agreement with reported values for urban surfaces. Our albedo values measured in UV region for grey cement and green grass are of 0.10 and 0.009, respectively, and quite similar to those found at the literature of 0.11 and 0.008 for those type of surfaces. [Spanish] Las propiedades opticas y termicas de suelos son datos importantes para los modulos meteorologicos y fotoquimicos de los modelos de calidad del aire. Conforme aumenta la resolucion espacial del modelo se vuelve mas importante contar con buenos datos de albedo. En este articulo se presentan mediciones de albedo superficial de radiacion Ultravioleta (295-385 nm) y visible (450-550 nm) para diferentes superficies urbanas. Los valores medidos de albedo en la region UV para cemento gris y pasto verde son de 0.10 y 0.009, respectivamente, y son muy similares a los reportados en la literatura, 0.11 y 0.008 para este tipo de superficies.

  6. Global fully kinetic models of planetary magnetospheres with iPic3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, D.; Sanna, L.; Amaya, J.; Zitz, A.; Lembege, B.; Markidis, S.; Schriver, D.; Walker, R. J.; Berchem, J.; Peng, I. B.; Travnicek, P. M.; Lapenta, G.

    2016-12-01

    We report on the latest developments of our approach to model planetary magnetospheres, mini magnetospheres and the Earth's magnetosphere with the fully kinetic, electromagnetic particle in cell code iPic3D. The code treats electrons and multiple species of ions as full kinetic particles. We review: 1) Why a fully kinetic model and in particular why kinetic electrons are needed for capturing some of the most important aspects of the physics processes of planetary magnetospheres. 2) Why the energy conserving implicit method (ECIM) in its newest implementation [1] is the right approach to reach this goal. We consider the different electron scales and study how the new IECIM can be tuned to resolve only the electron scales of interest while averaging over the unresolved scales preserving their contribution to the evolution. 3) How with modern computing planetary magnetospheres, mini magnetosphere and eventually Earth's magnetosphere can be modeled with fully kinetic electrons. The path from petascale to exascale for iPiC3D is outlined based on the DEEP-ER project [2], using dynamic allocation of different processor architectures (Xeon and Xeon Phi) and innovative I/O technologies.Specifically results from models of Mercury are presented and compared with MESSENGER observations and with previous hybrid (fluid electrons and kinetic ions) simulations. The plasma convection around the planets includes the development of hydrodynamic instabilities at the flanks, the presence of the collisionless shocks, the magnetosheath, the magnetopause, reconnection zones, the formation of the plasma sheet and the magnetotail, and the variation of ion/electron plasma flows when crossing these frontiers. Given the full kinetic nature of our approach we focus on detailed particle dynamics and distribution at locations that can be used for comparison with satellite data. [1] Lapenta, G. (2016). Exactly Energy Conserving Implicit Moment Particle in Cell Formulation. arXiv preprint ar

  7. Modeling for planetary boundaries: a network analysis of representations of complex human-environmental interactions in integrated global models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedrich, Johannes; Fetzer, Ingo; Cornell, Sarah

    2016-04-01

    The planetary boundaries framework is an approach to global sustainability that emphasises non-linear threshold behavior in anthropogenically perturbed Earth system processes. However, knowledge about the characteristics and positions of thresholds, and the scope for management of the boundaries is not well established. Global integrated models can help to improve this understanding, by reflecting the complex feedbacks between human and environmental systems. This study analyses the current state of integrated models with regard to the main processes identified as 'critical Earth system processes' in the planetary boundaries framework, and identifies gaps and suggests priorities for future improvements. Our approach involves creating a common ontology of model descriptions, and performing a network analysis on the state of system integration in models. The distinct clusters of specific biophysical and social-economic systems obviously has enabled progress in those specific areas of global change, but it now constrains analysis of important human-driven Earth system dynamics. The modeling process therefore has to be improved through technical integration, scientific gap-filling, and also changes in scientific institutional dynamics. Combined, this can advance model potentials that may help us to find sustainable pathways within planetary boundaries.

  8. Observations and 3D hydrodynamical models of planetary nebulae with Wolf-Rayet type central stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechy-García, J. S.; Velázquez, P. F.; Peña, M.; Raga, A. C.

    2017-01-01

    We present high-resolution, long-slit spectroscopic observations of two planetary nebulae, M 1-32 and M 3-15, with [WC] central stars located near the Galactic bulge. The observations were obtained with the 2.1-m telescope of the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, San Pedro Mártir. M 1-32 shows wide wings on the base of its emission lines and M 3-15 has two very faint high-velocity knots. In order to model both planetary nebulae, we built a three-dimensional model consisting of a jet interacting with an equatorially concentrated slow wind, emulating the presence of a dense torus, using the Yguazú hydrodynamical code. From our hydrodynamical models, we obtained position-velocity diagrams in the [N II]λ6583 line for comparison with the observations. We find that the spectral characteristics of M 1-32 and M 3-15 can be explained with the same physical model - a jet moving inside an asymptotic giant branch wind - using different parameters (physical conditions and position angles of the jet). In agreement with our model and observations, these objects contain a dense torus seeing pole-on and a bipolar jet escaping through the poles. Then, we propose to classify this kind of objects as spectroscopic bipolar nebulae, although they have been classified morphologically as compact, round, or elliptical nebulae or with `close collimated lobes'.

  9. An Internal Heating Model to Elucidate the Shape of a Small Planetary Body

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Gen; CHEN Chu-Xin

    2012-01-01

    Small planetary bodies usually have irregular shapes.If they are large enough to be heated to a partial melting status,the deforming force of gravity could overcome the internal forces and make the shape transfigure from potato-like to spherical.We have developed a model to calculate the thermal history of a planetoid and apply the model to asteroids,since ample evidence has shown that many asteroids could have undergone differentiation.After revealing the relation between the shape and the ratio of the melt part,we also examine the surface roughness of these asteroids and suggest that 280km would be a critical radius for an asteroid to develop a virtually globular contour.%Small planetary bodies usually have irregular shapes. If they are large enough to be heated to a partial melting status, the deforming force of gravity could overcome the internal forces and make the shape transfigure from potato-like to spherical. We have developed a model to calculate the thermal history of a planetoid and apply the model to asteroids, since ample evidence has shown that many asteroids could have undergone differentiation. After revealing the relation between the shape and the ratio of the melt part, we also examine the surface roughness of these asteroids and suggest that 280 km would be a critical radius for an asteroid to develop a virtually globular contour.

  10. CHARACTERISTICS OF VEGETATION COVER, ROUGHNESS AND ALBEDO DISTRIBUTION OVER CHINA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张正秋; 周秀骥; 李维亮; 徐兴奎

    2001-01-01

    To build land surface dataset for climate model, with application of remote sensing technique as well as the Geographic Information System (GIS), the data of surface type, roughness and albedo over China in 1997 were retrieved, resolutions being 10 km× 10 km. Based on these data,an analysis is conducted on the geographic distributions and seasonal variations of surface vegetation cover and roughness as well as albedo over China. Results show that surface vegetation cover is mainly located to the south of Yangtze River, in Southwest and Northeast China and sparse vegetation cover is in the Northwest. The variation of land surface cover affects the variations of land surface roughness and albedo. High albedo occurred in the north of Xinjiang Autonomous Region, the north of Northeast China and the Qinghai-Xizang Plateau in winter, in correspondence with the location of snow cover.For most part of China, surface roughness decreases and albedo increases in winter, while the roughness increases and the albedo decreases in summer, which could mainly result from land surface cover (snow cover and vegetation cover) and soil moisture changes. This shows that the geographic distribution and seasonal variation of the albedo are alnost opposite to those of the roughness, in agreement with theoretical results. Temporally, the amplitude of surface roughness change is quite small in comparison with the roughness itself.

  11. The Gamma-ray Albedo of the Moon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moskalenko, Igor V.; /Stanford U., HEPL; Porter, Troy A.; /UC, Santa Cruz

    2007-09-28

    We use the GEANT4 Monte Carlo framework to calculate the {gamma}-ray albedo of the Moon due to interactions of cosmic ray (CR) nuclei with moon rock. Our calculation of the albedo spectrum agrees with the EGRET data. We show that the spectrum of {gamma}-rays from the Moon is very steep with an effective cutoff around 3-4 GeV (600 MeV for the inner part of the Moon disk) and exhibits a narrow pion-decay line at 67.5 MeV, perhaps unique in astrophysics. Apart from other astrophysical sources, the albedo spectrum of the Moon is well understood, including its absolute normalization; this makes it a useful 'standard candle' for {gamma}-ray telescopes. The steep albedo spectrum also provides a unique opportunity for energy calibration of {gamma}-ray telescopes, such as the forthcoming Gamma Ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST). Since the albedo flux depends on the incident CR spectrum which changes over the solar cycle, it is possible to monitor the CR spectrum using the albedo {gamma}-ray flux. Simultaneous measurements of CR proton and helium spectra by the Payload for Antimatter-Matter Exploration and Light-nuclei Astrophysics (PAMELA), and observations of the albedo {gamma}-rays by the GLAST Large Area Telescope (LAT), can be used to test the model predictions and will enable the LAT to monitor the CR spectrum near the Earth beyond the lifetime of the PAMELA.

  12. Europlanet-RI: Access to Planetary Data, Tools, Models and Support Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, W.; Capria, M. T.; Chanteur, G.

    2012-04-01

    During the past three years the Europlanet Research Infrastructure consortium with financial support from the EU's 7th framework program has developed a wide range of tools to support all aspects of planetary research. During the final year of the project these are being integrated into the "Integrated and Distributed Information Service IDIS" [1]. The challenge is the diversity of research fields involved in planetary research, each with its own way of collecting and archiving data and publishing its results. Nevertheless the results of one field are needed by others to be able to correctly interpret their observations, and to design new kinds of measurements to advance our knowledge of the Solar system. The IDIS team in close cooperation with the efforts of the International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA) has developed a data model which allows the registration of a wide range of data sources including the results from modelling efforts thereby providing Virtual Observatory (IDIS-VO) [2,3] services for the community to register and access data from planetary data centres, laboratory measurements, spectral- and molecular data bases and simulations. Once a data set from any of these sources is registered with IDIS, it can be accessed, its used archive format translated into a compatible internal format and combined with other data using the visualization tools developed in connection with IDIS. Tools to calculate ephemeris data for a wide range of solar system bodies, to visualize their locations or identify them from existing images can be found as well as interactive tools to evaluate chemical reaction paths, spectral information from gas or solids or the mapping of planetary surfaces. Additionally information about ground observation possibilities, test facilities, laboratories, research institutes and scientists with detailed contact information is made available to the user. For the developers of new space instruments and operators of active missions support

  13. The Low Albedo of Comets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.; Choukroun, M.; Bauer, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    Comets are among the handful of objects with very low albedos, in the 0.02-0.06 range. Dark material is common in the outer Solar System, but analysis of the spectra and albedo of this material by spacecraft including Cassini and New Horizons shows that it is diverse, covering a range of compositions. Some is neutral-colored in the visible, such as that found on Phoebe, while some is very red, such as that on the surfaces of D-type asteroids or the low-albedo side of Iapetus. The different types of low-albedo material may reflect both compositional diversity, including contamination by volatiles or darkening agents, and divergent alteration histories. The key question is whether a particular sub-type of low albedo material is pristine - an unprocessed accumulation of interstellar dust - or an end product of polymerization and photolysis into ever more complex materials. Comets have albedos similar to the leading hemisphere of Iapetus, the surface of Titan, and the lowest-albedo C-type and D-type asteroids. Observations by the WISE and NEOWISE cameras show that comets have consistently low albedos (1). The first quantitative measurement of low-albedo material in the Kuiper Belt, from which comets such as Jupiter Family Comets including 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko come, shows that even this material is not as dark as that found on comets (2). Results from both Stardust (3) and more recently Rosetta (4, 5) show that cometary surfaces contain prebiotic molecules, including the amino acid glycine. Other very low albedo objects have also been connected to complex organic molecules: on Iapetus, PAHs have been detected (6), and Titan's surface is believed to be covered with hydrocarbons produced in its haze layer (7). The presence of organic molecules, including complex ones, could be the unique characteristic of the very darkest material. The delivery of pre-biotic material from comets to the young Earth could represent a key link in the origins of terrestrial life. (1

  14. Greenland ice sheet albedo feedback: thermodynamics and atmospheric drivers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Box

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Greenland ice sheet mass loss has accelerated in the past decade responding to combined glacier discharge and surface melt water runoff increases. During summer, absorbed solar energy, modulated at the surface primarily by albedo, is the dominant factor governing surface melt variability in the ablation area. Using satellite-derived surface albedo with calibrated regional climate modeled surface air temperature and surface downward solar irradiance, we determine the spatial dependence and quantitative impact of the ice sheet albedo feedback over 12 summer periods beginning in 2000. We find that, while albedo feedback defined by the change in net solar shortwave flux and temperature over time is positive over 97% of the ice sheet, when defined using paired annual anomalies, a second-order negative feedback is evident over 63% of the accumulation area. This negative feedback damps the accumulation area response to warming due to a positive correlation between snowfall and surface air temperature anomalies. Positive anomaly-gauged feedback concentrated in the ablation area accounts for more than half of the overall increase in melting when satellite-derived melt duration is used to define the timing when net shortwave flux is sunk into melting. Abnormally strong anticyclonic circulation, associated with a persistent summer North Atlantic Oscillation extreme since 2007, enabled three amplifying mechanisms to maximize the albedo feedback: (1 increased warm (south air advection along the western ice sheet increased surface sensible heating that in turn enhanced snow grain metamorphic rates, further reducing albedo; (2 increased surface downward shortwave flux, leading to more surface heating and further albedo reduction; and (3 reduced snowfall rates sustained low albedo, maximizing surface solar heating, progressively lowering albedo over multiple years. The summer net infrared and solar radiation for the high elevation accumulation area approached

  15. Directional Characteristics of Thermal-Infrared Beaming from Atmosphereless Planetary Surfaces - A New Thermophysical Model

    CERN Document Server

    Rozitis, Ben

    2012-01-01

    We present a new rough-surface thermophysical model (Advanced Thermophysical Model or ATPM) that describes the observed directional thermal emission from any atmosphereless planetary surface. It explicitly incorporates partial shadowing, scattering of sunlight, selfheating and thermal-infrared beaming (re-radiation of absorbed sunlight back towards the Sun as a result of surface roughness). The model is verified by accurately reproducing ground-based directional thermal emission measurements of the lunar surface using surface properties that are consistent with the findings of the Apollo missions and roughness characterised by an RMS slope of ~32 degrees. By considering the wide range of potential asteroid surface properties, the model implies a beaming effect that cannot be described by a simple parameter or function. It is highly dependent on the illumination and viewing angles as well as surface thermal properties and is predominantly caused by macroscopic rather than microscopic roughness. Roughness alter...

  16. Enhancement of marine cloud albedo via controlled sea spray injections: a global model study of the influence of emission rates, microphysics and transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Korhonen

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Modification of cloud albedo by controlled emission of sea spray particles into the atmosphere has been suggested as a possible geoengineering option to slow global warming. Previous global studies have imposed changes in cloud drop concentration in low level clouds to explore the radiative and climatic effects. Here, we use a global aerosol transport model to quantify how an imposed flux of sea spray particles affects the natural aerosol processes, the particle size distribution, and concentrations of cloud drops. We assume that the proposed fleet of vessels emits sea spray particles with a wind speed-dependent flux into four regions of persistent stratocumulus cloud off the western coasts of continents. The model results show that fractional changes in cloud drop number concentration (CDNC vary substantially between the four regions because of differences in wind speed (which affects the spray efficiency of the vessels, transport and particle deposition rates, and because of variations in aerosols from natural and anthropogenic sources. Using spray emission rates comparable to those implied by previous studies we find that the predicted CDNC changes are very small (maximum 20% and in one of the four regions even negative. The weak or negative effect is because the added particles suppress the in-cloud supersaturation and prevent existing aerosol particles from forming cloud drops. A scenario with five times higher emissions (considerably higher than previously assumed increases CDNC on average by 45–163%, but median concentrations are still below the 375 cm−3 assumed in previous studies. An inadvertent effect of the spray emissions is that sulphur dioxide concentrations are suppressed by 1–2% in the seeded regions and sulphuric acid vapour by 64–68% due to chemical reactions on the additional salt particles. The impact of this suppression on existing aerosol is negligible in the model, but should be investigated further in

  17. Global albedo particles: a new approach from loss cone distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, K; Huang, Ming-Huey A.; Wang, Kaiti

    2006-01-01

    Global distributions of albedo particles measured by Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) are investigated by modeling loss cones derived from adiabatic invariants. Particles can be immediately determined as being loss to the atmosphere in a bounce period, or a drift period, or being trapped, without any computing-time consumption on particle trajectories. The results suggest this new approach is a faster tool to categorize the observed albedo particles and it can be applied to particles with energies up to GeV.

  18. A Simple Solar, Spectral Model for Studying the Effects of Cloud Cover and Surface Albedo on the Incoming Solar Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    designed for particular locations ( Barbaro , 1979), clear sky cases only (Bird, 1984), for slopes of different orientation (Temps and Coulson, 1977...not desirable. In late 1982, a volcano (El Chichon) erupted in Mexico and spewed ash and other constituents into the atmosphere. The volcanic cloud...April 1981, pp. 889-894. Barbaro , S.; Coppolino, S.; Leone, C.; and Sinagra, E. "An Atmospheric Model For computing Direct and Diffuse Solar Radiation

  19. The two-box model of climate: limitations and applications to planetary habitability and maximum entropy production studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, Ralph D

    2010-05-12

    The 'two-box model' of planetary climate is discussed. This model has been used to demonstrate consistency of the equator-pole temperature gradient on Earth, Mars and Titan with what would be predicted from a principle of maximum entropy production (MEP). While useful for exposition and for generating first-order estimates of planetary heat transports, it has too low a resolution to investigate climate systems with strong feedbacks. A two-box MEP model agrees well with the observed day : night temperature contrast observed on the extrasolar planet HD 189733b.

  20. Effects of the Earth Albedo and Thermic Emissivity on Geodetic Satellite Trajectories: a Mean Model from 2000-2016 data sets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deleflie, Florent; Sammuneh, Muhammad Ali; Coulot, David; Pollet, Arnaud; Biancale, Richard; Capderou, Michel

    2017-04-01

    Part of the energy received on the Earth from the Sun is split into two components, a short wave component which corresponds to the visible emissivity of the Earth's surface (albedo), and the long wave part corresponding to the thermic emissivity (infrared wavelengths). These two components induce small non gravitational forces on the orbits of artificial satellites, towards the radial direction (mainly), that we are evaluating to derive a mean model. The first step to evaluate the mean amplitudes and periods of the generaetd perturbations consists in comparing post-fit adjustment of geodetic satellites to SLR data, in two dynamical models accounting or not accounting for empirical forces standing for such effects: the orbits of the geodetic satellite STARLETTE, Stella, Ajisai, Lageos 1 and Lageos 2 are carried out in such a way over the period 2000-2016, with the GINS GRGS orbit computation s/w. We then use three kinds of data sets to investigate the mean amplitudes of the perturbations, and to investigate features on regional spatial scales: (i) Stephens tables, (Stephens, 1980), ECMWF (European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ) data sets (that are available at GRGS, Groupe de Recherche de Géodésie Spatiale, France), and CERES (Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System) data sets (publickly available).We analyze what is the data set leading to the lowest residual level. Then, following an approach close to the one developed by Stephens, we propose a set of monthly grids that are averaged over the period 2000-2016, and that is evaluated through the orbit computation of the above-mentioned satellites.

  1. STRONG DEPENDENCE OF THE INNER EDGE OF THE HABITABLE ZONE ON PLANETARY ROTATION RATE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Jun; Abbot, Dorian S. [Department of Geophysical Sciences, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States); Boué, Gwenaël; Fabrycky, Daniel C., E-mail: abbot@uchicago.edu [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL 60637 (United States)

    2014-05-20

    Planetary rotation rate is a key parameter in determining atmospheric circulation and hence the spatial pattern of clouds. Since clouds can exert a dominant control on planetary radiation balance, rotation rate could be critical for determining the mean planetary climate. Here we investigate this idea using a three-dimensional general circulation model with a sophisticated cloud scheme. We find that slowly rotating planets (like Venus) can maintain an Earth-like climate at nearly twice the stellar flux as rapidly rotating planets (like Earth). This suggests that many exoplanets previously believed to be too hot may actually be habitable, depending on their rotation rate. The explanation for this behavior is that slowly rotating planets have a weak Coriolis force and long daytime illumination, which promotes strong convergence and convection in the substellar region. This produces a large area of optically thick clouds, which greatly increases the planetary albedo. In contrast, on rapidly rotating planets a much narrower belt of clouds form in the deep tropics, leading to a relatively low albedo. A particularly striking example of the importance of rotation rate suggested by our simulations is that a planet with modern Earth's atmosphere, in Venus' orbit, and with modern Venus' (slow) rotation rate would be habitable. This would imply that if Venus went through a runaway greenhouse, it had a higher rotation rate at that time.

  2. A model of the planetary boundary layer over a snow surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halberstam, I.; Melendez, R.

    1979-01-01

    A model of the planetary boundary layer over a snow surface has been developed. It contains the vertical heat exchange processes due to radiation, conduction, and atmospheric turbulence. Parametrization of the boundary layer is based on similarity functions developed by Hoffert and Sud (1976), which involve a dimensionless variable, dependent on boundary-layer height and a localized Monin-Obukhov length. The model also contains the atmospheric surface layer and the snowpack itself, where snowmelt and snow evaporation are calculated. The results indicate a strong dependence of surface temperatures, especially at night, on the bursts of turbulence which result from the frictional damping of surface-layer winds during periods of high stability, as described by Businger (1973). The model also shows the cooling and drying effect of the snow on the atmosphere, which may be the mechanism for air mass transformation in sub-Arctic regions.

  3. Multibody Model for Planetary Gearbox of 500 kW Wind Turbine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Felix; Pedersen, Niels Leergaard; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær

    The aim of the work is to simulate the loadings in a planetary gearbox of a wind turbine using a multibody program. A realistic wind turbine gearbox of a 500 kW wind turbine is examined using turbulent inflow data. An aeroelastic model of the wind turbine has been set up using the FLEX5-code...... (industrial standard software). The FLEX5 model as well as the developed multibody code has been verified from strain gauge measurements, giving e.g. the main shaft torque, and met mast wind data measurements. The realistic measurements on both input and output variables form an excellent base for studying...... the gearbox fatigue loads, the effect of wind turbulence on the power production/output torque on the highspeed shaft and for calibration and verification of the gearbox model....

  4. Modelling the 3D morphology and proper motions of the planetary nebula NGC 6302

    CERN Document Server

    Uscanga, L; Esquivel, A; Raga, A C; Boumis, P; Cantó, J

    2014-01-01

    We present 3D hydrodynamical simulations of an isotropic fast wind interacting with a previously ejected toroidally-shaped slow wind in order to model both the observed morphology and the kinematics of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 6302. This source, also known as the Butterfly nebula, presents one of the most complex morphologies ever observed in PNe. From our numerical simulations, we have obtained an intensity map for the H$\\alpha$ emission to make a comparison with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) observations of this object. We have also carried out a proper motion (PM) study from our numerical results, in order to compare with previous observational studies. We have found that the two interacting stellar wind model reproduces well the morphology of NGC 6302, and while the PM in the models are similar to the observations, our results suggest that an acceleration mechanism is needed to explain the Hubble-type expansion found in HST observations.

  5. Reflected Light Curves, Spherical and Bond Albedos of Jupiter- and Saturn-like Exoplanets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dyudina, Ulyana A.; Zhang, Xi; Li, Liming; Kopparla, Pushkar; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Dones, Henry C. Luke; Verbiscer, Anne J.; Yung, Yuk

    2016-10-01

    Reflected light curves observed for exoplanets indicate that a few of them host bright clouds. We estimate how the light curve and total stellar heating of a planet depends on forward and backward scattering in the clouds based on Pioneer and Cassini spacecraft images of Jupiter and Saturn. We fit analytical functions to the local reflected brightnesses of Jupiter and Saturn depending on the planet's phase. These observations cover broad bands at 0.59-0.72 and 0.39-0.5 μm, and narrow bands at 0.938 (atmospheric window), 0.889 (CH4 absorption band), and 0.24-0.28 μm. We simulate the images of the planets with a ray-tracing model, and disk-integrate them to produce the full-orbit light curves. For Jupiter, we also fit the modeled light curves to the observed full-disk brightness. We derive spherical albedos for Jupiter and Saturn, and for planets with Lambertian and Rayleigh-scattering atmospheres. Jupiter-like atmospheres can produce light curves that are a factor of two fainter at half-phase than the Lambertian planet, given the same geometric albedo at transit. The spherical albedo is typically lower than for a Lambertian planet by up to a factor of ˜1.5. The Lambertian assumption will underestimate the absorption of the stellar light and the equilibrium temperature of the planetary atmosphere. We also compare our light curves with the light curves of solid bodies: the moons Enceladus and Callisto. Their strong backscattering peak within a few degrees of opposition (secondary eclipse) can lead to an even stronger underestimate of the stellar heating. This work is published: Dyudina, U.,et al., 2016: ApJ, 822, 76, http://arxiv.org/abs/1511.04415.

  6. Planetary resources and astroecology. Planetary microcosm models of asteroid and meteorite interiors: electrolyte solutions and microbial growth--implications for space populations and panspermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mautner, Michael N

    2002-01-01

    Planetary microcosms were constructed using extracts from meteorites that simulate solutions in the pores of carbonaceous chondrites. The microcosms were found to support the growth of complex algal and microbial populations. Such astroecology experiments demonstrate how a diverse ecosystem could exist in fluids within asteroids, and in meteorites that land on aqueous planets. The microcosm solutions were obtained by extracting nutrient electrolytes under natural conditions from powders of the Allende (CV3) and Murchison (CM2) meteorites at low (0.02 g/ml) and high (10.0 g/ml) solid/solution ratios. The latter solutions contain > 3 mol/L electrolytes and about 10 g/L organics, that simulate natural fluids in asteroids during aqueous alteration and in the pores of meteorites, which can help prebiotic synthesis and the survival of early microorganisms. These solutions and wet solids were in fact found to support complex self-sustaining microbial communities with populations of 4 x 10(5) algae and 6 x 10(6) bacteria and fungi for long periods (> 8 months). The results show that planetary microcosms based on meteorites can: assay the fertilities of planetary materials; identify space bioresources; target astrobiology exploration; and model past and future space-based ecosystems. The results show that bioresources in the carbonaceous asteroids can sustain a biomass of 10(18) kg, comprising 10(32) microorganisms and a human population of 10(14). The results also suggest that protoplanetary nebulae can support and disperse microorganisms and can be therefore effective environments for natural and directed panspermia.

  7. MRO/CRISM Retrieval of Surface Lambert Albedos for Multispectral Mapping of Mars with DISORT-based Rad. Transfer Modeling: Phase 1 - Using Historical Climatology for Temperatures, Aerosol Opacities, & Atmo. Pressures

    CERN Document Server

    McGuire, P C; Smith, M D; Arvidson, R E; Murchie, S L; Clancy, R T; Roush, T L; Cull, S C; Lichtenberg, K A; Wiseman, S M; Green, R O; Martin, T Z; Milliken, R E; Cavender, P J; Humm, D C; Seelos, F P; Seelos, K D; Taylor, H W; Ehlmann, B L; Mustard, J F; Pelkey, S M; Titus, T N; Hash, C D; Malaret, E R

    2009-01-01

    We discuss the DISORT-based radiative transfer pipeline ('CRISM_LambertAlb') for atmospheric and thermal correction of MRO/CRISM data acquired in multispectral mapping mode (~200 m/pixel, 72 spectral channels). Currently, in this phase-one version of the system, we use aerosol optical depths, surface temperatures, and lower-atmospheric temperatures, all from climatology derived from Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer (MGS-TES) data, and surface altimetry derived from MGS Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA). The DISORT-based model takes as input the dust and ice aerosol optical depths (scaled to the CRISM wavelength range), the surface pressures (computed from MOLA altimetry, MGS-TES lower-atmospheric thermometry, and Viking-based pressure climatology), the surface temperatures, the reconstructed instrumental photometric angles, and the measured I/F spectrum, and then outputs a Lambertian albedo spectrum. The Lambertian albedo spectrum is valuable geologically since it allows the mineralogical ...

  8. Narrowband-to-broadband albedo conversion for glacier ice and snow: equations based on modeling and ranges of validity of the equations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Greuell, W.; Oerlemans, J.

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, we propose equations for narrowband-to-broadband (NTB) albedo conversion for glacier ice and snow for four types of satellite sensors: thematic mapper (TM), advanced very high resolution radiometer (AVHRR), moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS), and multi-angle imaging

  9. Characterizing Greenland ice sheet surface mass balance via assimilation of spaceborne surface temperature, albedo, and passive microwave data into a physically-based model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navari, M.; Bateni, S.; Margulis, S. A.; Alexander, P. M.; Tedesco, M.

    2012-12-01

    The Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) has been the focus of climate studies due to its significant impact on sea level rise and Arctic climate. Accurate estimates of space-time maps of surface mass balance (SMB) components including precipitation, runoff, and evaporation over the GrIS would contribute to understanding the cause of its recent unprecedented changes (e.g., increase in melt amount and duration, thickening of ice sheet interior, and thinning at the margins) and forecasting its changes in the future. In situ measurement of the SMB components across the GrIS is difficult and costly, and thus there are only a limited number of sparse measurements. Remote sensing retrievals are capable of providing some estimates of SMB terms and/or SMB indicators (i.e. melt onset), but generally provide an incomplete picture of the SMB. Additional efforts have focused on the use of regional climate models coupled to surface models in an effort to obtain spatially and temporally continuous estimates of the SMB. However, these estimates are prone to model errors and are generally unconstrained by the remote sensing record. To overcome these uncertainties and consequently improve estimates of the GrIS SMB, an ensemble data assimilation approach is developed for characterizing the SMB and its uncertainty. The EnBS consists of two steps: forecast and update. In the forecast step, an unconditional estimate of SMB using the MAR regional climate model and an ensemble implementation of the CROCUS snow is obtained that includes appropriate uncertainty in key SMB forcings. In the update step, the estimate is conditioned on remotely sensed land surface temperature (LST), albedo, and passive microwave (1.4, 6.9, 18.7, 36.5, and 89 GHz) measurements to provide a posterior estimate of the GrIS SMB components. The end result is an estimate that benefits from the regional atmospheric and snow models, but is also constrained by remote sensing data streams. The assimilation approach is tested for

  10. New models for the evolution of central stars of planetary nebulae: Faster and Brighter

    CERN Document Server

    Bertolami, Marcelo M Miller

    2016-01-01

    The post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase is arguably one of the least understood phases of the evolution of low- and intermediate- mass stars. The recent post-AGB evolutionary sequences computed by Miller Bertolami (2016) are at least three to ten times faster than those previously published by Vassiliadis & Wood (1994) and Bloecker (1995) which have been used in a large number of studies. This is true for the whole mass and metallicity range. The new models are also $\\sim$0.1-0.3 dex brighter than the previous models with similar remnant masses. In this short article we comment on the main reasons behind these differences, and discuss possible implications for other studies of post-AGB stars or planetary nebulae.

  11. Albedo as a modulator of climate response to tropical deforestation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirmeyer, Paul A.; Shukla, J.

    1994-01-01

    An atmospheric general circulation model with land surface properties represented by the simplified Simple Biosphere model is used to investigate the effects on local climate due to tropical deforestation for the Amazon basin. One control and three anomaly integrations of 4 years' duration are performed. In the anomaly integrations, rain forest in South America is replaced by degraded grassland. The anomaly integrations differ only in the optical properties of the grassland vegetation, with net surface albedos ranging from the same as to 0.09 lighter than that of rain forest. It is found that the change in climate, particularly rainfall, is strongly dependent on the change in surface albedo that accompanies deforestation. Replacement of forest by grass causes a reduction in transpiration and reduces frictional convergence by decreasing surface roughness. However, precipitation averaged over the deforested area is not necessarily reduced. Average precipitation decreases when the increase in albedo is greater than 0.03. If surface albedo is not increased appreciably as a result of deforestation, moisture flux convergence driven by the increase in surface temperature can offset the other effects, and average precipitation increases. As albedo is increased, surface temperature does not change, but surface latent and sensible heat flux decreases due to reduced radiational energy absorbed at the surface, resulting in a reduction in convection and precipitation. A change in the distribution of precipitation due to deforestation that appears to be independent of the albedo is observed.

  12. Albedo and transmittance of inhomogeneous stratus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zuev, V.E.; Kasyanov, E.I.; Titov, G.A. [Institute of Atmospheric Optics, Tomsk (Russian Federation)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    A highly important topic is the study of the relationship between the statistical parameters of optical and radiative charactertistics of inhomogeneous stratus clouds. This is important because the radiation codes of general circulation models need improvement, and it is important for geophysical information. A cascade model has been developed at the Goddard Space Flight Center to treat stratocumulus clouds with the simplest geometry and horizontal fluctuations of the liquid water path (optical thickness). The model evaluates the strength with which the stochastic geometry of clouds influences the statistical characteristics of albedo and the trnasmittance of solar radiation.

  13. Natural Aerosols Explain Seasonal and Spatial Patterns of Southern Ocean Cloud Albedo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCoy, Daniel; Burrows, Susannah M.; Wood, R.; Grosvenor, Daniel P.; Elliott, Scott; Ma, Po-Lun; Rasch, Philip J.; Hartmann, Dennis L.

    2015-07-17

    Small particles called aerosols act as nucleation sites for cloud drop formation, affecting clouds and cloud properties – ultimately influencing the cloud dynamics, lifetime, water path and areal extent that determine the reflectivity (albedo) of clouds. The concentration Nd of droplets in clouds that influences planetary albedo is sensitive to the availability of aerosol particles on which the droplets form. Natural aerosol concentrations not only affect cloud properties themselves, but also modulate the sensitivity of clouds to changes in anthropogenic aerosols. Here, it is shown that modeled natural aerosols, principally marine biogenic primary and secondary aerosol sources, explain more than half of the spatiotemporal variability in satellite-observed Nd. Enhanced Nd over regions of high biological activity is found to be driven primarily by high concentrations of sulfate aerosol at lower Southern Ocean latitudes (35-45°S) and by organic matter in sea spray aerosol at higher latitudes (45-55°S). Biogenic sources are estimated to increase the summertime mean reflected solar radiation in excess of 10 W m-2 over parts of the Southern Ocean, which is comparable to the annual mean increases expected from anthropogenic aerosols over heavily polluted regions of the Northern Hemisphere.

  14. Construction of Hierarchical Models for Fluid Dynamics in Earth and Planetary Sciences : DCMODEL project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y. O.; Takehiro, S.; Sugiyama, K.; Odaka, M.; Ishiwatari, M.; Sasaki, Y.; Nishizawa, S.; Ishioka, K.; Nakajima, K.; Hayashi, Y.

    2012-12-01

    Toward the understanding of fluid motions of planetary atmospheres and planetary interiors by performing multiple numerical experiments with multiple models, we are now proceeding ``dcmodel project'', where a series of hierarchical numerical models with various complexity is developed and maintained. In ``dcmodel project'', a series of the numerical models are developed taking care of the following points: 1) a common ``style'' of program codes assuring readability of the software, 2) open source codes of the models to the public, 3) scalability of the models assuring execution on various scales of computational resources, 4) stressing the importance of documentation and presenting a method for writing reference manuals. The lineup of the models and utility programs of the project is as follows: Gtool5, ISPACK/SPML, SPMODEL, Deepconv, Dcpam, and Rdoc-f95. In the followings, features of each component are briefly described. Gtool5 (Ishiwatari et al., 2012) is a Fortran90 library, which provides data input/output interfaces and various utilities commonly used in the models of dcmodel project. A self-descriptive data format netCDF is adopted as a IO format of Gtool5. The interfaces of gtool5 library can reduce the number of operation steps for the data IO in the program code of the models compared with the interfaces of the raw netCDF library. Further, by use of gtool5 library, procedures for data IO and addition of metadata for post-processing can be easily implemented in the program codes in a consolidated form independent of the size and complexity of the models. ``ISPACK'' is the spectral transformation library and ``SPML (SPMODEL library)'' (Takehiro et al., 2006) is its wrapper library. Most prominent feature of SPML is a series of array-handling functions with systematic function naming rules, and this enables us to write codes with a form which is easily deduced from the mathematical expressions of the governing equations. ``SPMODEL'' (Takehiro et al., 2006

  15. Decadal to seasonal variability of Arctic sea ice albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarwal, S.; Moon, W.; Wettlaufer, J. S.

    2011-10-01

    A controlling factor in the seasonal and climatological evolution of the sea ice cover is its albedo α. Here we analyze Arctic data from the Advanced Very High Resolution Radiometer (AVHRR) Polar Pathfinder and assess the seasonality and variability of broadband albedo from a 23 year daily record. We produce a histogram of daily albedo over ice covered regions in which the principal albedo transitions are seen; high albedo in late winter and spring, the onset of snowmelt and melt pond formation in the summer, and fall freezeup. The bimodal late summer distribution demonstrates the combination of the poleward progression of the onset of melt with the coexistence of perennial bare ice with melt ponds and open water, which then merge to a broad peak at α $\\gtrsim$ 0.5. We find the interannual variability to be dominated by the low end of the α distribution, highlighting the controlling influence of the ice thickness distribution and large-scale ice edge dynamics. The statistics obtained provide a simple framework for model studies of albedo parameterizations and sensitivities.

  16. Potential effects of forest management on surface albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, J.; Bréon, F.-M.; Schelhaas, M.-J.; Pinty, B.; Luyssaert, S.

    2012-04-01

    Currently 70% of the world's forests are managed and this figure is likely to rise due to population growth and increasing demand for wood based products. Forest management has been put forward by the Kyoto-Protocol as one of the key instruments in mitigating climate change. For temperate and boreal forests, the effects of forest management on the stand-level carbon balance are reasonably well understood, but the biophysical effects, for example through changes in the albedo, remain elusive. Following a modeling approach, we aim to quantify the variability in albedo that can be attributed to forest management through changes in canopy structure and density. The modelling approach chains three separate models: (1) a forest gap model to describe stand dynamics, (2) a Monte-Carlo model to estimate the probability density function of the optical path length of photons through the canopy and (3) a physically-based canopy transfer model to estimate the interaction between photons and leaves. The forest gap model provides, on a monthly time step the position, height, diameter, crown size and leaf area index of individual trees. The Monte-Carlo model computes from this the probability density function of the distance a photon travels through crown volumes to determine the direct light reaching the forest floor. This information is needed by the canopy transfer model to calculate the effective leaf area index - a quantity that allows it to correctly represent a 3D process with a 1D model. Outgoing radiation is calculated as the result of multiple processes involving the scattering due to the canopy layer and the forest floor. Finally, surface albedo is computed as the ratio between incident solar radiation and calculated outgoing radiation. The study used two time series representing thinning from below of a beech and a Scots pine forest. The results show a strong temporal evolution in albedo during stand establishment followed by a relatively stable albedo once the canopy

  17. Spectroscopy and Photoionization Model of Planetary Nebulae: NGC 6543 and NGC 7662

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puspitaningrum, Evaria; Lutfi Malasan, Hakim; Kawakita, Hideyo

    2016-11-01

    Spectroscopic observations in the wavelength range of λλ4000 — 8000 Å of the planetary nebulae (PN), NGC 6543 and NGC 7662, have been undertaken in 2014 using the compact spectrograph attached to the 28-cm Schmidt-Cassegrainian reflector at Koyama Astronomical Observatory. We derived physical parameters of NGC 6543 and NGC 7662 from the analyses of observed emission lines, i.e. electron temperature, density, and elemental abundances. To obtain more reliable physical quantities of NGC 6543 and NGC 7662, the use of photoionization model is needed. We use the computer code, CLOUDY C13.3 to build detailed photoionization models of NGC 6543 and NGC 7662. Model of NGC 6543 and 7662 can be constructed by providing sufficient information on physical parameters of the central stars and the nebula. In this work, input parameters to construct the photoionization model of NGC 6543 and NGC 7662 are distance, temperature and luminosity of central star and nebula parameters. The model results were compared with observational result taken in 2014. Observed and modeled temperatures were deduced from [O III] λλ(4959 + 5007) Å /λ4636 Å and the electron density from [S II] λλ 6716/6731 Å. There are some discrepancies between observed and modeled due to limitations inherent with the resolution and quality of spectroscopic data. Further spectroscopic observations with higher resolution of NGC 6543 and NGC 7662 is recommended.

  18. Compact planetary systems perturbed by an inclined companion: I. Vectorial representation of the secular model

    CERN Document Server

    Boué, Gwenaël

    2014-01-01

    The non-resonant secular dynamics of compact planetary systems are modeled by a perturbing function which is usually expanded in eccentricity and absolute inclination with respect to the invariant plane. Here, the expressions are given in a vectorial form which naturally leads to an expansion in eccentricity and mutual inclination. The two approaches are equivalent in most cases, but the vectorial one is specially designed for those where a quasi-coplanar system tilts as a whole by a large amount. Moreover, the vectorial expressions of the Hamiltonian and of the equations of motion are slightly simpler than those given in terms of the usual elliptical elements. We also provide the secular perturbing function in vectorial form expanded in semimajor axis ratio allowing for arbitrary eccentricities and inclinations. The interaction between the equatorial bulge of a central star and its planets is also provided, as is the relativistic periapse precession of any planet induced by the central star. We illustrate th...

  19. Frequency Modulation of Directly Imaged Exoplanets: Geometric Effect as a Probe of Planetary Obliquity

    CERN Document Server

    Kawahara, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    We consider the time-frequency analysis of a scattered light curve by a directly imaged exoplanet. We show that the geometric effect due to planetary obliquity and orbital inclination induce the frequency modulation of the apparent diurnal periodicity. We construct a model of the frequency modulation and compare with the instantaneous frequency extracted from the pseudo-Wigner distribution of the simulated light curves of a cloudless Earth. The model provides good agreement with the simulated modulation factor even for the light curve with Gaussian noise comparable to the signal. Notably, the shape of the instantaneous frequency is sensitive to the difference between prograde, retrograde, and pole-on spin rotations. Whereas our technique requires the static property of the albedo map, it does not need to solve the albedo map of the planet. The time-frequency analysis is complementary to other methods which utilize the amplitude modulation. This paper demonstrates the importance of the frequency domain of the ...

  20. Impact of remotely sensed albedo and vegetation fraction on simulation of urban climate in WRF-urban canopy model: A case study of the urban heat island in Los Angeles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vahmani, P.; Ban-Weiss, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    Modeling the climate of urban areas is of interest for studying urban heat islands (UHIs). Reliable assessment of the primary causes of UHIs and the efficacy of various heat mitigation strategies requires accurate prediction of urban temperatures and realistic representation of land surface physical characteristics in models. In this study, we expand the capabilities of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model by implementing high-resolution, real-time satellite observations of green vegetation fraction (GVF) and albedo. Satellite-based GVF and albedo replace constant values that are assumed for urban pixels in the default version of WRF. Simulations of urban meteorology in Los Angeles using the improved model show marked improvements relative to the default model. The largest improvements are for nocturnal air temperatures, with a reduction in root-mean-square deviation between simulations and observations from 3.8 to 1.9°C. Utilizing the improved model, we quantify relationships between surface and 2 m air temperatures versus urban fraction, GVF, albedo, distance from the ocean, and elevation. Distance from the ocean is found to be the main contributor to variations in temperatures around Los Angeles. After conditionally sampling pixels to minimize the influence of distance from the ocean and elevation, we find that variations in GVF and urban fraction are responsible for up to 58 and 27% of the variance in temperatures. The satellite-supported meteorological modeling framework reported here can be used for studying UHIs in other cities and can serve as a foundation for testing the efficacy of various heat mitigation strategies.

  1. On the modeling of planetary plasma environments by a fully kinetic electromagnetic global model HYB-em

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Pohjola

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a fully kinetic electromagnetic model to study instabilities and waves in planetary plasma environments. In the particle-in-a-cell (PIC model both ions and electrons are modeled as particles. An important feature of the developed global kinetic model, called HYB-em, compared to other electromagnetic codes is that it is built up on an earlier quasi-neutral hybrid simulation platform called HYB and that it can be used in conjunction with earlier hybrid models. The HYB models have been used during the past ten years to study globally the flowing plasma interaction with various Solar System objects: Mercury, Venus, the Moon, Mars, Saturnian moon Titan and asteroids. The new stand-alone fully kinetic model enables us to (1 study the stability of various planetary plasma regions in three-dimensional space, (2 analyze the propagation of waves in a plasma environment derived from the other global HYB models. All particle processes in a multi-ion plasma which are implemented on the HYB platform (e.g. ion-neutral-collisions, chemical processes, particle loss and production processes are also automatically included in HYB-em model.

    In this brief report we study the developed approach by analyzing the propagation of high frequency electromagnetic waves in non-magnetized plasma in two cases: We study (1 expansion of a spherical wave generated from a point source and (2 propagation of a plane wave in plasma. The analysis shows that the HYB-em model is capable of describing these space plasma situations successfully. The analysis also suggests the potential of the developed model to study both high density-high magnetic field plasma environments, such as Mercury, and low density-low magnetic field plasma environments, such as Venus and Mars.

  2. How Does the Shape of the Stellar Spectrum Affect the Raman Scattering Features in the Albedo of Exoplanets?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oklopčić, Antonija; Hirata, Christopher M.; Heng, Kevin

    2017-09-01

    The diagnostic potential of the spectral signatures of Raman scattering, imprinted in planetary albedo spectra at short optical wavelengths, has been demonstrated in research on planets in the solar system, and has recently been proposed as a probe of exoplanet atmospheres, complementary to albedo studies at longer wavelengths. Spectral features caused by Raman scattering offer insight into the properties of planetary atmospheres, such as the atmospheric depth, composition, and temperature, as well as the possibility of detecting and spectroscopically identifying spectrally inactive species, such as H2 and N2, in the visible wavelength range. Raman albedo features, however, depend on both the properties of the atmosphere and the shape of the incident stellar spectrum. Identical planetary atmospheres can produce very different albedo spectra depending on the spectral properties of the host star. Here we present a set of geometric albedo spectra calculated for atmospheres with H2/He, N2, and CO2 composition, irradiated by different stellar types ranging from late A to late K stars. Prominent albedo features caused by Raman scattering appear at different wavelengths for different types of host stars. We investigate how absorption due to the alkali elements sodium and potassium may affect the intensity of Raman features, and we discuss the preferred strategies for detecting Raman features in future observations.

  3. Limits to Planetary Fresh Water Use: A Multi-Model Investigation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kwakkel, J.H.; Timmermans, J.

    2013-01-01

    There has been a renewed interest over the last few years in limits to various earth bound systems and processes. This has been instigated by the work of Rockström and colleagues on planetary limits. Essentially, the planetary limit concept can be understood as a modern update to the seminal system

  4. Observations and 3D Hydrodynamical models of planetary nebulae with Wolf Rayet type central stars

    CERN Document Server

    Rechy-García, J S; Peña, M; Raga, A C

    2016-01-01

    We present high-resolution, long-slit spectroscopic observations of two planetary nebulae with [WC] central stars located near the galactic bulge, M 1-32 and M 3-15. The observations were obtained with the 2.1-m telescope at the Observatorio Astron\\'omico Nacional, San Pedro M\\'artir. M 1-32 shows wide wings on the base of its emission lines and M 3-15 has two very faint high-velocity knots. In order to model both PNe we built a three-dimensional model consisting of a jet interacting with an equatorially concentrated slow wind, emulating the presence of a dense torus, using the Yguaz\\'u hydrodynamical code. From our hydrodynamical models, we obtained position-velocity (PV) diagrams in the [N II]$\\lambda$6583 line for comparison with the observations. We find that the spectral characteristics of M 1-32 and M 3-15 can be explained with the same physical model -a jet moving inside an AGB wind- using different parameters (physical conditions and position angles of the jet). In agreement with our model and observa...

  5. Observations and 3D Hydrodynamical models of planetary nebulae with Wolf Rayet type central stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rechy-García, J. S.; Velázquez, P. F.; Peña, M.; Raga, A. C.

    2016-10-01

    We present high-resolution, long-slit spectroscopic observations of two planetary nebulae with [WC] central stars located near the galactic bulge, M 1-32 and M 3-15. The observations were obtained with the 2.1-m telescope at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional, San Pedro Mártir. M 1-32 shows wide wings on the base of its emission lines and M 3-15 has two very faint high-velocity knots. In order to model both PNe we built a three-dimensional model consisting of a jet interacting with an equatorially concentrated slow wind, emulating the presence of a dense torus, using the Yguazú hydrodynamical code. From our hydrodynamical models, we obtained position-velocity (PV) diagrams in the [N II]λ6583 line for comparison with the observations. We find that the spectral characteristics of M 1-32 and M 3-15 can be explained with the same physical model -a jet moving inside an AGB wind- using different parameters (physical conditions and position angles of the jet). In agreement with our model and observations, these objects contain a dense torus seeing pole-on and a bipolar jet escaping thorough the poles. Then we propose to classify this kind of objects as spectroscopic bipolar nebulae, although they have been classified morphologically as compact, round, or elliptical nebulae or with "close collimated lobes".

  6. Planetary host stars: Evaluating uncertainties in ultra-cool model atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Bozhinova, I; Scholz, A

    2014-01-01

    M-dwarfs are discussed as promising targets for detecting planet at the lower mass end of the planetary mass distribution. An important step in this process is to accurately estimate the stellar parameters of the M-dwarf host star for which the results of stellar model atmosphere simulations are used. We present a comparison of the ATLAS9, MARCS, PHOENIX and Drift-PHOENIX model atmosphere families in the M-dwarf parameter space. We examine the differences in the (T$_{\\rm gas}$, p$_{\\rm gas}$)-structures, in synthetic photometric fluxes and in colour indices. We compiled the broad-band synthetic photometric fluxes for all available M-dwarf model atmospheres for the UKIRT WFCAM ZYJHK, 2MASS JHKs and Johnson UBVRI filters, and calculated related colour indices. We find that the synthetic colours in the IR wavelengths diverge by no more than 0.15 dex amongst all model families. For all bands considered, discrepancies in colour diminish for the higher T$_{\\rm eff}$-end of model atmosphere grids. We notice signific...

  7. Planetary Atmospheric Electricity

    CERN Document Server

    Leblanc, F; Yair, Y; Harrison, R. G; Lebreton, J. P; Blanc, M

    2008-01-01

    This volume presents our contemporary understanding of atmospheric electricity at Earth and in other solar system atmospheres. It is written by experts in terrestrial atmospheric electricity and planetary scientists. Many of the key issues related to planetary atmospheric electricity are discussed. The physics presented in this book includes ionisation processes in planetary atmospheres, charge generation and separation, and a discussion of electromagnetic signatures of atmospheric discharges. The measurement of thunderstorms and lightning, including its effects and hazards, is highlighted by articles on ground and space based instrumentation, and new missions.Theory and modelling of planetary atmospheric electricity complete this review of the research that is undertaken in this exciting field of space science. This book is an essential research tool for space scientists and geoscientists interested in electrical effects in atmospheres and planetary systems. Graduate students and researchers who are new to t...

  8. Utilizing a scale model solar system project to visualize important planetary science concepts and develop technology and spatial reasoning skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, Stephen J.; Brock, Laci

    2016-10-01

    Scale model solar systems have been used for centuries to help educate young students and the public about the vastness of space and the relative sizes of objects. We have adapted the classic scale model solar system activity into a student-driven project for an undergraduate general education astronomy course at the University of Arizona. Students are challenged to construct and use their three dimensional models to demonstrate an understanding of numerous concepts in planetary science, including: 1) planetary obliquities, eccentricities, inclinations; 2) phases and eclipses; 3) planetary transits; 4) asteroid sizes, numbers, and distributions; 5) giant planet satellite and ring systems; 6) the Pluto system and Kuiper belt; 7) the extent of space travel by humans and robotic spacecraft; 8) the diversity of extrasolar planetary systems. Secondary objectives of the project allow students to develop better spatial reasoning skills and gain familiarity with technology such as Excel formulas, smart-phone photography, and audio/video editing.During our presentation we will distribute a formal description of the project and discuss our expectations of the students as well as present selected highlights from preliminary submissions.

  9. A Model of Thermal Conductivity for Planetary Soils. 2; Theory for Cemented Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model of heat conduction through particulate media made of spherical grains cemented by various bonding agents is presented. The pore-filling gas conductivity, volume fraction, and thermal conductivity of the cementing phase are tunable parameters. Cement fractions conductivity. A significant conductivity increase (factor 3-8) is observed for bond fractions of 0.01 to 1% in volume. In the 1 to 15% bond fraction domain, the conductivity increases continuously but less intensely (25-100% conductivity increase compared to a 1% bond system). Beyond 15% of cements, the conductivity increases vigorously and the bulk conductivity rapidly approaches that of bedrock. The composition of the cements (i.e. conductivity) has little influence on the bulk thermal inertia of the soil, especially if the volume of bond <10%. These results indicate that temperature measurements are sufficient to detect cemented soils and quantify the amount of cementing phase, but the mineralogical nature of the bonds and the typical grain size are unlikely to be determined from orbit. On Mars, a widespread surface unit characterized by a medium albedo (0.19-0.26) and medium/high thermal inertia (200-600 J s(0.5)/sq m/K) has long been hypothesized to be associated with a duricrust. The fraction of cement required to fit the thermal data is less than approx.1-5% by volume. This small amount of material is consistent with orbital observations, confirming that soil cementation is an important factor controlling the thermal inertia of the Martian surface

  10. 3-D model for cosmic ray planetary ionisation in the middle atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. I. Y. Velinov

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A 3-D planetary model of the cosmic ray electron production rate q(h (cm-3 s-1 has been developed for the strato-mesosphere and lower thermosphere (altitude range 30-100 km with a 10-km step. The spectrum of the primary cosmic rays is modelled by an analytical expression using input data from the CREME96 model. An isotropic penetration of the cosmic rays from the upper hemisphere is assumed in the model and a spherical shape of the Earth's atmosphere is taken into account. The longitudinal effect of ionisation from cosmic rays in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere is calculated. A graphical presentation of the computational results is given for 50 and 90 km at 0°, 40°, 50° and 70° N, S latitudes and all longitudes with a step of 30°. The results of this paper provide a basis for a quantitative understanding of the energetic processes of the middle atmosphere and mechanisms affecting the thermodynamical balance of the Earth's atmosphere.

  11. Verification of a Monte-Carlo planetary surface radiation environment model using gamma-ray data from Lunar Prospector and 2001 Mars Odyssey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skidmore, M.S., E-mail: mss16@star.le.ac.u [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom); Ambrosi, R.M. [Space Research Centre, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Leicester, University Road, Leicester, LE1 7RH (United Kingdom)

    2010-01-01

    Characterising a planetary radiation environment is important to: (1) assess the habitability of a planetary body for indigenous life; (2) assess the risks associated with manned exploration missions to a planetary body and (3) predict/interpret the results that remote sensing instrumentation may obtain from a planetary body (e.g. interpret the gamma-ray emissions from a planetary surface produced by radioactive decay or via the interaction of galactic cosmic rays to obtain meaningful estimates of the concentration of certain elements on the surface of a planet). The University of Leicester is developing instrumentation for geophysical applications that include gamma-ray spectroscopy, gamma-ray densitometry and radiometric dating. This paper describes the verification of a Monte-Carlo planetary radiation environment model developed using the MCNPX code. The model is designed to model the radiation environments of Mars and the Moon, but is applicable to other planetary bodies, and will be used to predict the performance of the instrumentation being developed at Leicester. This study demonstrates that the modelled gamma-ray data is in good agreement with gamma-ray data obtained by the gamma-ray spectrometers on 2001 Mars Odyssey and Lunar Prospector, and can be used to accurately model geophysical instrumentation for planetary science applications.

  12. The Effect of Host Star Spectral Energy Distribution and Ice-Albedo Feedback on the Climate of Extrasolar Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Aomawa; Meadows, V.; Bitz, C. M.; Pierrehumbert, R. T.; Joshi, M. M.; Robinson, T. D.

    2013-01-01

    Planetary climate can be affected by the interaction of the host star spectral energy distribution with the wavelength-dependent reflectivity of ice and snow. A one dimensional (1-D), line-by-line, radiative-transfer model is used to calculate broadband planetary albedos as input to a seasonally varying, 1-D energy-balance climate model. We simulated planets covered by ocean, land, and water ice of varying grain size, with incident radiation from stars of different spectral types. Our results show that terrestrial planets orbiting stars with higher near-UV radiation exhibit a stronger ice-albedo feedback. Using a general circulation model we demonstrate that an ocean-covered planet orbiting in the habitable zone of an M-dwarf star has a higher global mean surface temperature than a planet orbiting the Sun (a G-dwarf star) at an equivalent stellar flux distance. The effect is even more pronounced when the albedos of snow and ice are lowered, indicating the importance of the spectral dependence of surface ice and snow on climate for these planets. We find that the sensitivity of climate to changes in stellar insolation for M-dwarf planets is weaker than for planets orbiting stars with greater visible and near-UV radiation. While a planet orbiting the Sun becomes ice-covered with an 8% reduction in stellar insolation, a similar planet orbiting an M dwarf requires a 27% reduction to become ice-covered. A 2% reduction in stellar insolation is all that is required for global ice cover on a planet orbiting an F-dwarf star. Consequently the habitable zone for surface liquid water on planets with Earth-like greenhouse gas concentrations may be ~12% wider for M-dwarf stars than for G-dwarf stars, and ~3% narrower for F-dwarf stars. Higher obliquities expand the outer habitable zone boundary for surface liquid water. Raising atmospheric CO2 can reduce the ice-albedo effect on M-dwarf planets, but ~3-10 bars are required to entirely mask the climatic effect of ice and snow.

  13. Global Cooling: Effect of Urban Albedo on Global Temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akbari, Hashem; Menon, Surabi; Rosenfeld, Arthur

    2007-05-22

    In many urban areas, pavements and roofs constitute over 60% of urban surfaces (roof 20-25%, pavements about 40%). The roof and the pavement albedo can be increased by about 0.25 and 0.10, respectively, resulting in a net albedo increase for urban areas of about 0.1. Many studies have demonstrated building cooling-energy savings in excess of 20% upon raising roof reflectivity from an existing 10-20% to about 60%. We estimate U.S. potential savings in excess of $1 billion (B) per year in net annual energy bills. Increasing albedo of urban surfaces can reduce the summertime urban temperature and improve the urban air quality. Increasing the urban albedo has the added benefit of reflecting more of the incoming global solar radiation and countering the effect of global warming. We estimate that increasing albedo of urban areas by 0.1 results in an increase of 3 x 10{sup -4} in Earth albedo. Using a simple global model, the change in air temperature in lowest 1.8 km of the atmosphere is estimated at 0.01K. Modelers predict a warming of about 3K in the next 60 years (0.05K/year). Change of 0.1 in urban albedo will result in 0.01K global cooling, a delay of {approx}0.2 years in global warming. This 0.2 years delay in global warming is equivalent to 10 Gt reduction in CO2 emissions.

  14. Planetary Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  15. Global albedos of Pluto and Charon from LORRI New Horizons observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, B. J.; Hofgartner, J. D.; Hicks, M. D.; Weaver, H. A.; Stern, S. A.; Momary, T.; Mosher, J. A.; Beyer, R. A.; Verbiscer, A. J.; Zangari, A. M.; Young, L. A.; Lisse, C. M.; Singer, K.; Cheng, A.; Grundy, W.; Ennico, K.; Olkin, C. B.

    2017-05-01

    The exploration of the Pluto-Charon system by the New Horizons spacecraft represents the first opportunity to understand the distribution of albedo and other photometric properties of the surfaces of objects in the Solar System's ;Third Zone; of distant ice-rich bodies. Images of the entire illuminated surface of Pluto and Charon obtained by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) camera provide a global map of Pluto that reveals surface albedo variegations larger than any other Solar System world except for Saturn's moon Iapetus. Normal reflectances on Pluto range from 0.08-1.0, and the low-albedo areas of Pluto are darker than any region of Charon. Charon exhibits a much blander surface with normal reflectances ranging from 0.20-0.73. Pluto's albedo features are well-correlated with geologic features, although some exogenous low-albedo dust may be responsible for features seen to the west of the area informally named Tombaugh Regio. The albedo patterns of both Pluto and Charon are latitudinally organized, with the exception of Tombaugh Regio, with darker regions concentrated at the Pluto's equator and Charon's northern pole. The phase curve of Pluto is similar to that of Triton, the large moon of Neptune believed to be a captured Kuiper Belt Object (KBO), while Charon's is similar to that of the Moon. Preliminary Bond albedos are 0.25 ± 0.03 for Charon and 0.72 ± 0.07 for Pluto. Maps of an approximation to the Bond albedo for both Pluto and Charon are presented for the first time. Our work shows a connection between very high albedo (near unity) and planetary activity, a result that suggests the KBO Eris may be currently active.

  16. An Improved Rigid Multibody Model for the Dynamic Analysis of the Planetary Gearbox in a Wind Turbine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenguang Yang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an improved rigid multibody model for the dynamic analysis of the planetary gearbox in a wind turbine. The improvements mainly include choosing the inertia frame as the reference frame of the carrier, the ring, and the sun and adding a new degree of freedom for each planet. An element assembly method is introduced to build the model, and a time-varying mesh stiffness model is presented. A planetary gear study case is employed to verify the validity of the improved model. Comparisons between the improvement model and the traditional model show that the natural characteristics are very close; the improved model can obtain the right equivalent moment of inertia of the planetary gear in the transient simulation, and all the rotation speeds satisfy the transmission relationships well; harmonic resonance and resonance modulation phenomena can be found in their vibration signals. The improved model is applied in a multistage gearbox dynamics analysis to reveal the prospects of the model. Modal analysis and transient analysis with and without time-varying mesh stiffness considered are conducted. The rotation speeds from the transient analysis are consistent with the theory, and resonance modulation can be found in the vibration signals.

  17. Summertime canopy albedo is sensitive to forest thinning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, J.; Berveiller, D.; Bréon, F.M.; Delpierre, N.; Geppert, G.; Granier, A.; Jans, W.W.P.; Knohl, A.; Moors, E.J.

    2013-01-01

    Despite an emerging body of literature linking canopy albedo to forest management, understanding of the process is still fragmented. We combined a stand-level forest gap model with a canopy radiation transfer model and satellite-derived model parameters to quantify the effects of forest thinning,

  18. Analytical model of multi-planetary resonant chains and constraints on migration scenarios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delisle, J.-B.

    2017-09-01

    Resonant chains are groups of planets for which each pair is in resonance, with an orbital period ratio locked at a rational value (2/1, 3/2, etc.). Such chains naturally form as a result of convergent migration of the planets in the proto-planetary disk. In this article, I present an analytical model of resonant chains of any number of planets. Using this model, I show that a system captured in a resonant chain can librate around several possible equilibrium configurations. The probability of capture around each equilibrium depends on how the chain formed, and especially on the order in which the planets have been captured in the chain. Therefore, for an observed resonant chain, knowing around which equilibrium the chain is librating allows for constraints to be put on the formation and migration scenario of the system. I apply this reasoning to the four planets orbiting Kepler-223 in a 3:4:6:8 resonant chain. I show that the system is observed around one of the six equilibria predicted by the analytical model. Using N-body integrations, I show that the most favorable scenario to reproduce the observed configuration is to first capture the two intermediate planets, then the outermost, and finally the innermost.

  19. A Weakly Nonlinear Model for the Damping of Resonantly Forced Density Waves in Dense Planetary Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, Marius; Schmidt, Jürgen; Salo, Heikki

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we address the stability of resonantly forced density waves in dense planetary rings. Goldreich & Tremaine have already argued that density waves might be unstable, depending on the relationship between the ring’s viscosity and the surface mass density. In the recent paper Schmidt et al., we have pointed out that when—within a fluid description of the ring dynamics—the criterion for viscous overstability is satisfied, forced spiral density waves become unstable as well. In this case, linear theory fails to describe the damping, but nonlinearity of the underlying equations guarantees a finite amplitude and eventually a damping of the wave. We apply the multiple scale formalism to derive a weakly nonlinear damping relation from a hydrodynamical model. This relation describes the resonant excitation and nonlinear viscous damping of spiral density waves in a vertically integrated fluid disk with density dependent transport coefficients. The model consistently predicts density waves to be (linearly) unstable in a ring region where the conditions for viscous overstability are met. Sufficiently far away from the Lindblad resonance, the surface mass density perturbation is predicted to saturate to a constant value due to nonlinear viscous damping. The wave’s damping lengths of the model depend on certain input parameters, such as the distance to the threshold for viscous overstability in parameter space and the ground state surface mass density.

  20. Developing a global mixed-canopy, height-variable vegetation structure dataset for estimating global vegetation albedo by a clumped canopy radiative transfer scheme in the NASA Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model and GISS GCM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montes, Carlo; Kiang, Nancy Y.; Ni-Meister, Wenge; Yang, Wenze; Schaaf, Crystal; Aleinov, Igor; Jonas, Jeffrey A.; Zhao, Feng; Yao, Tian; Wang, Zhuosen; Sun, Qingsong; Carrer, Dominique

    2016-04-01

    Processes determining biosphere-atmosphere coupling are strongly influenced by vegetation structure. Thus, ecosystem carbon sequestration and evapotranspiration affecting global carbon and water balances will depend upon the spatial extent of vegetation, its vertical structure, and its physiological variability. To represent this globally, Dynamic Global Vegetation Models (DGVMs) coupled to General Circulation Models (GCMs) make use of satellite and/or model-based vegetation classifications often composed by homogeneous communities. This work aims at developing a new Global Vegetation Structure Dataset (GVSD) by incorporating varying vegetation heights for mixed plant communities to be used as boundary conditions to the Analytical Clumped Two-Stream (ACTS) canopy radiative transfer scheme (Ni-Meister et al., 2010) incorporated into the NASA Ent Terrestrial Biosphere Model (TBM), the DGVM coupled to the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) GCM. Information sources about land surface and vegetation characteristics obtained from a number of earth observation platforms and algorithms include the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) land cover and plant functional types (PFTs) (Friedl et al., 2010), soil albedo derived from MODIS (Carrer et al., 2014), along with vegetation height from the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on board ICESat (Ice, Cloud, and land Elevation Satellite) (Simard et al., 2011; Tang et al., 2014). Three widely used Leaf Area Index (LAI) products are compared as input to the GVSD and ACTS forcing in terms of vegetation albedo: Global Data Sets of Vegetation (LAI)3g (Zhu et al. 2013), Beijing Normal University LAI (Yuan et al., 2011), and MODIS MOD15A2H product (Yang et al., 2006). Further PFT partitioning is performed according to a climate classification utilizing the Climate Research Unit (CRU; Harris et al., 2013) and the NOAA Global Precipitation Climatology Centre (GPCC; Scheider et al., 2014) data. Final

  1. Detectability of planetary characteristics in disk-averaged spectra. I: The Earth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinetti, Giovanna; Meadows, Victoria S; Crisp, David; Fong, William; Fishbein, Evan; Turnbull, Margaret; Bibring, Jean-Pierre

    2006-02-01

    Over the next 2 decades, NASA and ESA are planning a series of space-based observatories to detect and characterize extrasolar planets. This first generation of observatories will not be able to spatially resolve the terrestrial planets detected. Instead, these planets will be characterized by disk-averaged spectroscopy. To assess the detectability of planetary characteristics in disk-averaged spectra, we have developed a spatially and spectrally resolved model of the Earth. This model uses atmospheric and surface properties from existing observations and modeling studies as input, and generates spatially resolved high-resolution synthetic spectra using the Spectral Mapping Atmospheric Radiative Transfer model. Synthetic spectra were generated for a variety of conditions, including cloud coverage, illumination fraction, and viewing angle geometry, over a wavelength range extending from the ultraviolet to the farinfrared. Here we describe the model and validate it against disk-averaged visible to infrared observations of the Earth taken by the Mars Global Surveyor Thermal Emission Spectrometer, the ESA Mars Express Omega instrument, and ground-based observations of earthshine reflected from the unilluminated portion of the Moon. The comparison between the data and model indicates that several atmospheric species can be identified in disk-averaged Earth spectra, and potentially detected depending on the wavelength range and resolving power of the instrument. At visible wavelengths (0.4-0.9 microm) O3, H2O, O2, and oxygen dimer [(O2)2] are clearly apparent. In the mid-infrared (5-20 microm) CO2, O3, and H2O are present. CH4, N2O, CO2, O3, and H2O are visible in the near-infrared (1-5 microm). A comprehensive three-dimensional model of the Earth is needed to produce a good fit with the observations.

  2. Ultra-high degree spectral modelling of Earth and planetary topography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rexer, Moritz; Hirt, Christian

    2016-04-01

    New methods for ultra-high degree spherical harmonic analyses and syntheses have been developed and studied over the past years. The focus group "High-resolution Gravity Modelling", established in 2013 at TU Munich, has implemented ultra-high degree spectral modelling techniques and used successfully to transform high-resolution topography grids of Earth, Moon and Mars into spherical harmonics. For Earth, a new set of 1 arc-min topography models, developed by our group and released under the name Earth2014, was expanded into a spherical harmonic series to degree 10,800. For the 15 arc-sec resolution SRTM15_plus topography and bathymetry, a spectral resolution of degree 43,200 was achieved. For Moon and Mars, topography grids from laser altimetry were harmonically analysed up to degree ~46,000. The spectral representations of the topography grids presented in this contribution are required in the context of spectral gravity forward modelling with ultra-high degree, where the topographic potential is computed as a function of the spherical harmonic series of the topography and its integer powers. References: Hirt, C., and M. Rexer (2015) Earth2014: 1 arc-min shape, topography, bedrock and ice-sheet models - available as gridded data and degree-10,800 spherical harmonics, International Journal of Applied Earth Observation and Geoinformation 39, 103-112, doi:10.1016/j.jag.2015.03.001. Rexer, M. and C. Hirt (2015), Ultra-high degree surface spherical harmonic analysis using the Gauss-Legendre and the Driscoll/Healy quadrature theorem and application to planetary topography models of Earth, Moon and Mars. Surveys in Geophysics 36(6), 803-830, doi: 10.1007/s10712-015-9345-z.

  3. Observations and 3D photoionisation modelling of the Wolf-Rayet planetary nebula NGC 1501

    CERN Document Server

    Ercolano, B; Zhang, Y; Barlow, M J; De Marco, O; Rauch, T; Liu, X W; Ercolano, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    Deep optical spectra of the high excitation planetary nebula NGC 1501 and its W04 central star are presented. A recombination line abundance analysis of the central star's emission-line spectrum yields He:C:O mass fractions of 0.36:0.48:0.16, similar to those of PG1159 stars. A detailed empirical analysis of the nebular collisionally excited line (CEL) and optical recombination line (ORL) spectrum is presented, together with fully three-dimensional photoionisation modelling of the nebula. We found very large ORL-CEL abundance discrepancy factors (ADFs) for O^2+ (32) and Ne^2+ (33). The mean value of 5100K for the T_e derived from HeI recombination lines ratios is 6000K lower than the value of 11100K implied by the [OIII] line ratio. A three-dimensional photoionisation model of NGC 1501 was constructed using the photoionisation code MOCASSIN, based on our new spectroscopic data and using the three-dimensional electron density distribution determined from long-slit echellograms of the nebula by Ragazzoni et al....

  4. Three-dimensional photoionization modelling of the planetary nebula NGC 3918

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercolano, B.; Morisset, C.; Barlow, M. J.; Storey, P. J.; Liu, X.-W.

    2003-04-01

    The three-dimensional Monte Carlo photoionization code MOCASSIN has been applied to construct a realistic model of the planetary nebula NGC 3918. Three different geometric models were tried, the first being the biconical density distribution already used some years ago by Clegg et al. In this model the nebula is approximated by a biconical structure of enhanced density, embedded in a lower-density spherical region. Spindle-like density distributions were used for the other two models (models A and B). Model A used a mass distribution slightly modified from one of Mellema's hydrodynamical models that had already been adopted by Corradi et al. for their observational analysis of NGC 3918. Our spindle-like model B instead used an analytical expression to describe the shape of the inner shell of this object as consisting of an ellipsoid embedded in a sphere. The effects of the interaction of the diffuse fields coming from two adjacent regions of different densities were investigated. These are found to be non-negligible, even for the relatively uncomplicated case of a biconical geometry. We found that the ionization structure of low-ionization species near the boundaries is particularly affected. It is found that all three models provided acceptable matches to the integrated nebular optical and ultraviolet spectrum. Large discrepancies were found between all of the model predictions of infrared fine-structure line fluxes and ISO SWS measurements. This was found to be largely due to an offset of ~14 arcsec from the centre of the nebula that affected all of the ISO observations of NGC 3918. For each model, we also produced projected emission-line maps and position-velocity diagrams from synthetic long-slit spectra, which could be compared to recent HST images and ground-based long-slit echelle spectra. This comparison showed that spindle-like model B provided the best match to the observations. Although the integrated emission-line spectrum of NGC 3918 can be reproduced

  5. A Common Model to Handle PDS3 and PDS4 Data in the New Planetary Science Archive (PSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macfarlane, A. J.; Barbarisi, I.; Rios, C.; Docasal, R.; Martinez, S.; Arviset, C.; Besse, S.; De Marchi, G.; Grotheer, E.; Gonzalez, J.; Lim, T.; Fraga, D.; Barthelemy, M.

    2015-12-01

    The first of the European Space Agency's (ESA) planetary missions to make use of the latest release of the Planetary Data Standards (PDS4) are currently in advanced stages of development (ExoMars, BepiColombo). This occurs at a time when the Planetary Science Archive (PSA) has been undergoing a complete reengineering in order to increase the accessibility of ESA's planetary data holdings utilising the latest technologies and to significantly improve the user experience for both the specialist scientific community and general public alike. The PSA must also keep on handling PDS3 data arriving to the archive from active missions (Rosetta, Mars Express, Venus Express) as well as continuing to provide access to missions that have reached the legacy phase (Huygens, SMART1, Giotto). Therefore, as part of the reengineering of the PSA, an effort has been made to map the key metadata from PDS3 and PDS4 into a common data model with the intention of providing transparency to the services that make up the new PSA, and consequently to the end user. We present how this common mapping allows the PSA to support the data deliveries from the pipelines of existing missions without the need to reprocess the PDS3 data and in addition how it should simplify the data deliveries from PDS4 missions. We review how the implementation of this data model, involving a PostgreSQL database with the PostGIS extension, enables the new PSA to be able to provide multiple methods of interoperability used by the international community, such as PDAP (Planetary Data Access Protocol), EPN-TAP (EuroPlanet-Table Access Protocol), and GIS-enabled technologies without the user having to know in detail the underlying structure of the data format.

  6. Fast and Accurate Radiative Transfer Calculations Using Principal Component Analysis for (Exo-)Planetary Retrieval Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopparla, P.; Natraj, V.; Shia, R. L.; Spurr, R. J. D.; Crisp, D.; Yung, Y. L.

    2015-12-01

    Radiative transfer (RT) computations form the engine of atmospheric retrieval codes. However, full treatment of RT processes is computationally expensive, prompting usage of two-stream approximations in current exoplanetary atmospheric retrieval codes [Line et al., 2013]. Natraj et al. [2005, 2010] and Spurr and Natraj [2013] demonstrated the ability of a technique using principal component analysis (PCA) to speed up RT computations. In the PCA method for RT performance enhancement, empirical orthogonal functions are developed for binned sets of inherent optical properties that possess some redundancy; costly multiple-scattering RT calculations are only done for those few optical states corresponding to the most important principal components, and correction factors are applied to approximate radiation fields. Kopparla et al. [2015, in preparation] extended the PCA method to a broadband spectral region from the ultraviolet to the shortwave infrared (0.3-3 micron), accounting for major gas absorptions in this region. Here, we apply the PCA method to a some typical (exo-)planetary retrieval problems. Comparisons between the new model, called Universal Principal Component Analysis Radiative Transfer (UPCART) model, two-stream models and line-by-line RT models are performed, for spectral radiances, spectral fluxes and broadband fluxes. Each of these are calculated at the top of the atmosphere for several scenarios with varying aerosol types, extinction and scattering optical depth profiles, and stellar and viewing geometries. We demonstrate that very accurate radiance and flux estimates can be obtained, with better than 1% accuracy in all spectral regions and better than 0.1% in most cases, as compared to a numerically exact line-by-line RT model. The accuracy is enhanced when the results are convolved to typical instrument resolutions. The operational speed and accuracy of UPCART can be further improved by optimizing binning schemes and parallelizing the codes, work

  7. Modeling pN2 through Geological Time: Implications for Planetary Climates and Atmospheric Biosignatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüeken, E E; Kipp, M A; Koehler, M C; Schwieterman, E W; Johnson, B; Buick, R

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen is a major nutrient for all life on Earth and could plausibly play a similar role in extraterrestrial biospheres. The major reservoir of nitrogen at Earth's surface is atmospheric N2, but recent studies have proposed that the size of this reservoir may have fluctuated significantly over the course of Earth's history with particularly low levels in the Neoarchean-presumably as a result of biological activity. We used a biogeochemical box model to test which conditions are necessary to cause large swings in atmospheric N2 pressure. Parameters for our model are constrained by observations of modern Earth and reconstructions of biomass burial and oxidative weathering in deep time. A 1-D climate model was used to model potential effects on atmospheric climate. In a second set of tests, we perturbed our box model to investigate which parameters have the greatest impact on the evolution of atmospheric pN2 and consider possible implications for nitrogen cycling on other planets. Our results suggest that (a) a high rate of biomass burial would have been needed in the Archean to draw down atmospheric pN2 to less than half modern levels, (b) the resulting effect on temperature could probably have been compensated by increasing solar luminosity and a mild increase in pCO2, and (c) atmospheric oxygenation could have initiated a stepwise pN2 rebound through oxidative weathering. In general, life appears to be necessary for significant atmospheric pN2 swings on Earth-like planets. Our results further support the idea that an exoplanetary atmosphere rich in both N2 and O2 is a signature of an oxygen-producing biosphere. Key Words: Biosignatures-Early Earth-Planetary atmospheres. Astrobiology 16, 949-963.

  8. Procedures for calculation of the albedo with OLI-Landsat 8 images: Application to the Brazilian semi-arid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernardo B. da Silva

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The surface albedo plays an important role in the exchanges of energy and mass in the planetary boundary layer. Therefore, changes in albedo affect the balance of radiation and energy at the surface, which can be detected with its monitoring. Albedo determination has been performed through various sensors, but there is not yet any publication dealing with albedo calculation procedures using OLI (Operational Land Imager - Landsat 8 images. The objective of the study is to present the procedures for computing the albedo with OLI images and map it in irrigated areas of the São Gonçalo Irrigated District, PB, Brazil. Images of the year 2013, path 215 and row 65, were selected. The data necessary for calculating the albedo were extracted from each image metadata: additive and multiplicative terms of radiance and reflectance, and sun elevation angle. There were large differences between the albedo values of irrigated plots, water bodies and native vegetation. The albedo obtained with OLI images provides a higher degree of differentiation of the various types of land use, due to the substantial increase in the radiometric resolution of this new sensor.

  9. The retrieval of land surface albedo in rugged terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, B.; Jia, L.; Menenti, M.

    2012-01-01

    Land surface albedo may be derived from the satellite data through the estimation of a bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model and angular integration. However many BRDF models do not consider explicitly the topography. In rugged terrain, the topography influences the observed s

  10. The retrieval of land surface albedo in rugged terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, B.; Jia, L.; Menenti, M.

    2012-01-01

    Land surface albedo may be derived from the satellite data through the estimation of a bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model and angular integration. However many BRDF models do not consider explicitly the topography. In rugged terrain, the topography influences the observed s

  11. The retrieval of land surface albedo in rugged terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, B.; Jia, L.; Menenti, M.

    2012-01-01

    Land surface albedo may be derived from the satellite data through the estimation of a bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model and angular integration. However many BRDF models do not consider explicitly the topography. In rugged terrain, the topography influences the observed

  12. Effective UV surface albedo of seasonally snow-covered lands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanskanen, A.; Manninen, T.

    2007-05-01

    At ultraviolet wavelengths the albedo of most natural surfaces is small with the striking exception of snow and ice. Therefore, snow cover is a major challenge for various applications based on radiative transfer modelling. The aim of this work was to determine the characteristic effective UV range surface albedo of various land cover types when covered by snow. First we selected 1 by 1 degree sample regions that met three criteria: the sample region contained dominantly subpixels of only one land cover type according to the 8 km global land cover classification product from the University of Maryland; the average slope of the sample region was less than 2 degrees according to the USGS's HYDRO1K slope data; the sample region had snow cover in March according to the NSIDC Northern Hemisphere weekly snow cover data. Next we generated 1 by 1 degree gridded 360 nm surface albedo data from the Nimbus-7 TOMS Lambertian equivalent reflectivity data, and used them to construct characteristic effective surface albedo distributions for each land cover type. The resulting distributions showed that each land cover type experiences a characteristic range of surface albedo values when covered by snow. The result is explained by the vegetation that extends upward beyond the snow cover and masks the bright snow covered surface.

  13. Laboratory Measurements and Modeling of Molecular Photoabsorption Cross Sections for Planetary Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, G.; Smith, P. L.; Lewis, B. R.; Heays, A.; Blackie, D.; Pickering, J.

    2010-12-01

    Our research program comprises the measurement and modeling of ultraviolet molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement and modeling efforts on molecular nitrogen, sulfur dioxide, diatomic sulfur, and carbon dioxide are in progress. Molecular Nitrogen: We focus on the measurement of line f-values and line widths within the complex spectrum between 80 and 100 nm. Our measurements are incorporated into a theoretical model of the absorption spectrum of N2 which has established the mechanisms responsible for predissociation and reproduces all observed features in 14N2 and its isotopomers as a function of temperature. Sulfur Dioxide: We provide astronomers with high-resolution cross section data for the complex ultraviolet SO2 absorption spectrum. Using the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have completed and published room temperature cross sections from 198 to 325 nm and 160 K cross sections from 199 to 220 nm. We have completed work on further low-temperature measurements from 220 to 325 nm. Diatomic Sulfur: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S2 absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are working to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S2 from 200 to 300 nm based on laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. We have designed an experimental apparatus to produce a stable column of S2 vapor. Measurements of the absorption spectrum of S2 at high resolution will be complemented by coupled-channel calculations. Carbon Dioxide: The photodissociation of CO2 is a fundamental photochemical process in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Our research centers on the measurement of high resolution cross sections from 87 to 120 nm. We have completed measurements at 295 K and 195 K over the 106 to 120 nm region, and we have

  14. Laboratory Measurements and Modeling of Molecular Photoabsorption Cross Sections in the Ultraviolet for Planetary Atmospheres Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Glenn; Smith, P. L.; Lewis, B. R.; Heays, A. N.; Pickering, J.; Blackwell-Whitehead, R.; Blackie, D.

    2008-09-01

    Our research program is dedicated to the measurement and modeling of vacuum ultraviolet and UV molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement and modeling efforts on molecular nitrogen, carbon dioxide, sulfur dioxide, and diatomic sulfur are in progress. N2: We focus on the measurement of line f-values and line widths within the complex spectrum between 80 and 100 nm. Our measurements are incorporated into a theoretical model of the absorption spectrum of N2 which has established the mechanisms responsible for predissociation and reproduces all observed features in 14N2 and its isotopomers as a function of temperature. CO2: The photodissociation of CO2 is a fundamental photochemical process in the atmospheres of Mars and Venus. Our research centers on the measurement of high resolution cross sections from 91 to 120 nm. We have completed measurements at 295 K and 195 K over the 106 to 120 nm region, and we are analyzing recent measurements of cross sections between 91 and 106 nm. SO2: We provide astronomers with high-resolution cross section data for the complex ultraviolet absorption spectrum between 198 and 325 nm. Using the Imperial College VUV Fourier transform spectrometer, we have completed and published room temperature cross sections, and we are completing work on low-temperature measurements over the same spectral region. S2: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S2 absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are beginning an effort to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S2 from 200 to 300 nm based on theoretical calculations and laboratory measurements. Coupled-channel calculations will be complemented by measurements of the absorption spectrum of S2 at high resolution.

  15. Effects of stellar flybys on planetary systems: 3D modeling of the circumstellar disks damping effects

    CERN Document Server

    Picogna, Giovanni

    2014-01-01

    Stellar flybys in star clusters are suspected to affect the orbital architecture of planetary systems causing eccentricity excitation and orbital misalignment between the planet orbit and the equatorial plane of the star. We explore whether the impulsive changes in the orbital elements of planets, caused by an hyperbolic stellar flyby, can be fully damped by the circumstellar disk surrounding the star. The time required to disperse stellar clusters is in fact comparable to circumstellar disk's lifetime. We have modelled in 3D a system made of a solar type star surrounded by a low density disk with a giant planet embedded in it approached on a hyperbolic encounter trajectory by a second star, of similar mass and with its own disk. We focus on extreme configurations where a very deep stellar flyby perturbs a Jovian planet on an external orbit. This allows to test in full the ability of the disk to erase the effects of the stellar encounter. We find that the amount of mass lost by the disk during the stellar fly...

  16. Estimation of a planetary magnetic field using a reduced magnetohydrodynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabert, Christian; Heyner, Daniel; Glassmeier, Karl-Heinz

    2017-03-01

    Knowledge of planetary magnetic fields provides deep insights into the structure and dynamics of planets. Due to the interaction of a planet with the solar wind plasma, a rather complex magnetic environment is generated. The situation at planet Mercury is an example of the complexities occurring as this planet's field is rather weak and the magnetosphere rather small. New methods are presented to separate interior and exterior magnetic field contributions which are based on a dynamic inversion approach using a reduced magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) model and time-varying spacecraft observations. The methods select different data such as bow shock location information or magnetosheath magnetic field data. Our investigations are carried out in preparation for the upcoming dual-spacecraft BepiColombo mission set out to precisely estimate Mercury's intrinsic magnetic field. To validate our new approaches, we use THEMIS magnetosheath observations to estimate the known terrestrial dipole moment. The terrestrial magnetosheath provides observations from a strongly disturbed magnetic environment, comparable to the situation at Mercury. Statistical and systematic errors are considered and their dependence on the selected data sets are examined. Including time-dependent upstream solar wind variations rather than averaged conditions significantly reduces the statistical error of the estimation. Taking the entire magnetosheath data along the spacecraft's trajectory instead of only the bow shock location into account further improves accuracy of the estimated dipole moment.

  17. Planetary atmosphere models: A research and instructional web-based resource

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Samuel Augustine

    The effects of altitude change on the temperature, pressure, density, and speed of sound were investigated. These effects have been documented in Global Reference Atmospheric Models (GRAMs) to be used in calculating the conditions in various parts of the atmosphere for several planets. Besides GRAMs, there are several websites that provide online calculators for the 1976 US Standard Atmosphere. This thesis presents the creation of an online calculator of the atmospheres of Earth, Mars, Venus, Titan, and Neptune. The websites consist of input forms for altitude and temperature adjustment followed by a results table for the calculated data. The first phase involved creating a spreadsheet reference based on the 1976 US Standard Atmosphere and other planetary GRAMs available. Microsoft Excel was used to input the equations and make a graphical representation of the temperature, pressure, density, and speed of sound change as altitude changed using equations obtained from the GRAMs. These spreadsheets were used later as a reference for the JavaScript code in both the design and comparison of the data output of the calculators. The websites were created using HTML, CSS, and JavaScript coding languages. The calculators could accurately display the temperature, pressure, density, and speed of sound of these planets from surface values to various stages within the atmosphere. These websites provide a resource for students involved in projects and classes that require knowledge of these changes in these atmospheres. This project also created a chance for new project topics to arise for future students involved in aeronautics and astronautics.

  18. Albedo control of seasonal South Polar cap recession on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Frédéric; Douté, Sylvain; Schmitt, Bernard; Vincendon, Mathieu; Bibring, Jean-Pierre; Langevin, Yves; Omega Team

    2009-04-01

    Over the last few decades, General Circulation Models (GCM) have been used to simulate the current martian climate. The calibration of these GCMs with the current seasonal cycle is a crucial step in understanding the climate history of Mars. One of the main climatic signals currently used to validate GCMs is the annual atmospheric pressure cycle. It is difficult to use changes in seasonal deposits on the surface of Mars to calibrate the GCMs given the spectral ambiguities between CO 2 and H 2O ice in the visible range. With the OMEGA imaging spectrometer covering the near infra-red range, it is now possible to monitor both types of ice at a spatial resolution of about 1 km. At global scale, we determine the change with time of the Seasonal South Polar Cap (SSPC) crocus line, defining the edge of CO 2 deposits. This crocus line is not symmetric around the geographic South Pole. At local scale, we introduce the snowdrop distance, describing the local structure of the SSPC edge. Crocus line and snowdrop distance changes can now be used to calibrate GCMs. The albedo of the seasonal deposits is usually assumed to be a uniform and constant parameter of the GCMs. In this study, albedo is found to be the main parameter controlling the SSPC recession at both global and local scale. Using a defrost mass balance model (referred to as D-frost) that incorporates the effect of shadowing induced by topography, we show that the global SSPC asymmetry in the crocus line is controlled by albedo variations. At local scale, we show that the snowdrop distance is correlated with the albedo variability. Further GCM improvements should take into account these two results. We propose several possibilities for the origin of the asymmetric albedo control. The next step will be to identify and model the physical processes that create the albedo differences.

  19. Matrix Pseudospectral Method for (Visco)Elastic Tides Modeling of Planetary Bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabranova, Eliska; Hanyk, Ladidslav; Matyska, Ctirad

    2010-05-01

    We deal with the equations and boundary conditions describing deformation and gravitational potential of prestressed spherically symmetric elastic bodies by decomposing governing equations into a series of boundary value problems (BVP) for ordinary differential equations (ODE) of the second order. In contrast to traditional Runge-Kutta integration techniques, highly accurate pseudospectral schemes are employed to directly discretize the BVP on Chebyshev grids and a set of linear algebraic equations with an almost block diagonal matrix is derived. As a consequence of keeping the governing ODEs of the second order instead of the usual first-order equations, the resulting algebraic system is half-sized but derivatives of the model parameters are required. Moreover, they can be easily evaluated for models, where structural parametres are piecewise polynomially dependent. Both accuracy and efficiency of the method are tested by evaluating the tidal Love numbers for the Earth's model PREM. Finally, we also derive complex Love numbers for models with the Maxwell viscoelastic rheology, where viscosity is a depth-dependent function. The method is applied to evaluation of the tidal Love numbers for models of Mars and Venus. The Love numbers of the two Martian models - the former optimized to cosmochemical data and the latter to the moment of inertia (Sohl and Spohn, 1997) - are h2=0.172 (0.212) and k2=0.093 (0.113). For Venus, the value of k2=0.295 (Konopliv and Yoder, 1996), obtained from the gravity-field analysis, is consistent with the results for our model with the liquid-core radius of 3110 km (Zábranová et al., 2009). Together with rapid evaluation of free oscillation periods by an analogous method, this combined matrix approach could by employed as an efficient numerical tool in structural studies of planetary bodies. REFERENCES Konopliv, A. S. and Yoder, C. F., 1996. Venusian k2 tidal Love number from Magellan and PVO tracking data, Geophys. Res. Lett., 23, 1857

  20. Albedo enhancement of marine clouds to counteract global warming: impacts on the hydrological cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, G. [Indian Institute of Science, Divecha Center for Climate Change, Bangalore (India); Indian Institute of Science, Center for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Bangalore (India); Caldeira, Ken; Cao, Long; Ban-Weiss, George; Shin, Ho-Jeong [Carnegie Institution, Department of Global Ecology, Stanford, CA (United States); Nemani, Rama [NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA (United States)

    2011-09-15

    Recent studies have shown that changes in solar radiation affect the hydrological cycle more strongly than equivalent CO{sub 2} changes for the same change in global mean surface temperature. Thus, solar radiation management ''geoengineering'' proposals to completely offset global mean temperature increases by reducing the amount of absorbed sunlight might be expected to slow the global water cycle and reduce runoff over land. However, proposed countering of global warming by increasing the albedo of marine clouds would reduce surface solar radiation only over the oceans. Here, for an idealized scenario, we analyze the response of temperature and the hydrological cycle to increased reflection by clouds over the ocean using an atmospheric general circulation model coupled to a mixed layer ocean model. When cloud droplets are reduced in size over all oceans uniformly to offset the temperature increase from a doubling of atmospheric CO{sub 2}, the global-mean precipitation and evaporation decreases by about 1.3% but runoff over land increases by 7.5% primarily due to increases over tropical land. In the model, more reflective marine clouds cool the atmospheric column over ocean. The result is a sinking motion over oceans and upward motion over land. We attribute the increased runoff over land to this increased upward motion over land when marine clouds are made more reflective. Our results suggest that, in contrast to other proposals to increase planetary albedo, offsetting mean global warming by reducing marine cloud droplet size does not necessarily lead to a drying, on average, of the continents. However, we note that the changes in precipitation, evaporation and P-E are dominated by small but significant areas, and given the highly idealized nature of this study, a more thorough and broader assessment would be required for proposals of altering marine cloud properties on a large scale. (orig.)

  1. An investigation of ozone and planetary boundary layer dynamics over the complex topography of Grenoble combining measurements and modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Couach, O.; Balin, I.; Jiménez, R; P. Ristori(CEILAP); Perego, S.; Kirchner, F.; Simeonov, V.; Calpini, B.; H. Bergh

    2003-01-01

    This paper concerns an evaluation of ozone (O3) and planetary boundary layer (PBL) dynamics over the complex topography of the Grenoble region through a combination of measurements and mesoscale model (METPHOMOD) predictions for three days, during July 1999. The measurements of O3 and PBL structure were obtained with a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system, situated 20 km south of Grenoble at Vif (310 m ASL). The combined lidar observations ...

  2. Evaluating winds and vertical wind shear from Weather Research and Forecasting model forecasts using seven planetary boundary layer schemes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Draxl, Caroline; Hahmann, Andrea N.; Pena Diaz, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    The existence of vertical wind shear in the atmosphere close to the ground requires that wind resource assessment and prediction with numerical weather prediction (NWP) models use wind forecasts at levels within the full rotor span of modern large wind turbines. The performance of NWP models...... regarding wind energy at these levels partly depends on the formulation and implementation of planetary boundary layer (PBL) parameterizations in these models. This study evaluates wind speeds and vertical wind shears simulated by theWeather Research and Forecasting model using seven sets of simulations...

  3. Impact of planetary boundary layer turbulence on model climate and tracer transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath-Spangler, E. L.; Molod, A.; Ott, L. E.; Pawson, S.

    2015-07-01

    Planetary boundary layer (PBL) processes are important for weather, climate, and tracer transport and concentration. One measure of the strength of these processes is the PBL depth. However, no single PBL depth definition exists and several studies have found that the estimated depth can vary substantially based on the definition used. In the Goddard Earth Observing System (GEOS-5) atmospheric general circulation model, the PBL depth is particularly important because it is used to calculate the turbulent length scale that is used in the estimation of turbulent mixing. This study analyzes the impact of using three different PBL depth definitions in this calculation. Two definitions are based on the scalar eddy diffusion coefficient and the third is based on the bulk Richardson number. Over land, the bulk Richardson number definition estimates shallower nocturnal PBLs than the other estimates while over water this definition generally produces deeper PBLs. The near-surface wind velocity, temperature, and specific humidity responses to the change in turbulence are spatially and temporally heterogeneous, resulting in changes to tracer transport and concentrations. Near-surface wind speed increases in the bulk Richardson number experiment cause Saharan dust increases on the order of 1 × 10-4 kg m-2 downwind over the Atlantic Ocean. Carbon monoxide (CO) surface concentrations are modified over Africa during boreal summer, producing differences on the order of 20 ppb, due to the model's treatment of emissions from biomass burning. While differences in carbon dioxide (CO2) are small in the time mean, instantaneous differences are on the order of 10 ppm and these are especially prevalent at high latitude during boreal winter. Understanding the sensitivity of trace gas and aerosol concentration estimates to PBL depth is important for studies seeking to calculate surface fluxes based on near-surface concentrations and for studies projecting future concentrations.

  4. Developments with the planetWRF and planetMPAS Planetary Atmospheric Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Mark I.; Lee, Christopher; Lian, Yuan; Mischna, Michael A.; Newman, Claire E.; Toigo, Anthony

    2016-10-01

    planetWRF is based upon the NCAR Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model and has been applied to Mars, Titan and Pluto. planetWRF offers global-scale, two-way interactive nested mesoscale, and microscale LES simulation of planetary atmospheres using a rectangular grid.Recently, a fully-coupled dust and water cycle aerosol scheme has been introduced based on Morrison and Gettelman [Lee et al., this conference]. The scheme treats both dust and water ice as two-moment distributions. Significantly, the scheme treats all processes (nucleation, growth, advection, sedimentation, radiation) using the two-moment distributions, with no lossy conversion between spectral and radius-bin representation.The LES modeing capability has been augmented with the ability to import HiRISE DTMs to allow simulation of small-scale flow over topography including the first order effects of local slope and shadowing. Simulations of Victoria crater (visited by Opportunity) show dramatic variations of surface temperature on scales of a few meters during the morning and distinct changes in the patterns of wind stress as the crater interior is coupled and decoupled from boundary layer convection at different times. The LES has also been augmented to run with dynamically and radiatively interactive dust.planetMPAS is based upon the NCAR Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS), an unstructured mesh model that allows for far more uniform resolution of the whole globe, uses a fully compressible nonhydrostatic dynamical core, and an advanced terrain-following coordinate system. The MPAS model been designed to use WRF physics routines. As such, planetMPAS and planetWRF are alternate dynamical cores within the same modeling system. planetMPAS has major advantages over WRF for certain kinds of global simulations: high-precision tracer problems, e.g. Argon transport on Mars; uniform resolution of polar regions, e.g. water ice cap interactions with the martian global water cycle; and convection

  5. Quantifying the missing link between forest albedo and productivity in the boreal zone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovi, Aarne; Liang, Jingjing; Korhonen, Lauri; Kobayashi, Hideki; Rautiainen, Miina

    2016-11-01

    Albedo and fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FAPAR) determine the shortwave radiation balance and productivity of forests. Currently, the physical link between forest albedo and productivity is poorly understood, yet it is crucial for designing optimal forest management strategies for mitigating climate change. We investigated the relationships between boreal forest structure, albedo and FAPAR using a radiative transfer model called Forest Reflectance and Transmittance model FRT and extensive forest inventory data sets ranging from southern boreal forests to the northern tree line in Finland and Alaska (N = 1086 plots). The forests in the study areas vary widely in structure, species composition, and human interference, from intensively managed in Finland to natural growth in Alaska. We show that FAPAR of tree canopies (FAPARCAN) and albedo are tightly linked in boreal coniferous forests, but the relationship is weaker if the forest has broadleaved admixture, or if canopies have low leaf area and the composition of forest floor varies. Furthermore, the functional shape of the relationship between albedo and FAPARCAN depends on the angular distribution of incoming solar irradiance. We also show that forest floor can contribute to over 50 % of albedo or total ecosystem FAPAR. Based on our simulations, forest albedos can vary notably across the biome. Because of larger proportions of broadleaved trees, the studied plots in Alaska had higher albedo (0.141-0.184) than those in Finland (0.136-0.171) even though the albedo of pure coniferous forests was lower in Alaska. Our results reveal that variation in solar angle will need to be accounted for when evaluating climate effects of forest management in different latitudes. Furthermore, increasing the proportion of broadleaved trees in coniferous forests is the most important means of maximizing albedo without compromising productivity: based on our findings the potential of controlling forest

  6. Validation of response simulation methodology of Albedo dosemeter; Validacao da metodologia de simulacao de resposta de dosimetro de Albedo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, B.M.; Silva, A.X. da, E-mail: bfreitas@nuclear.ufrj.br [Coordenacao do Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear; Mauricio, C.L.P. [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria developed and runs a neutron TLD albedo individual monitoring service. To optimize the dose calculation algorithm and to infer new calibration factors, the response of this dosemeter was simulated. In order to validate this employed methodology, it was applied in the simulation of the problem of the QUADOS (Quality Assurance of Computational Tools for Dosimetry) intercomparison, aimed to evaluate dosimetric problems, one being to calculate the response of a generic albedo dosemeter. The obtained results were compared with those of other modeling and the reference one, with good agreements. (author)

  7. Helium 584 Å and H Lyman-α Airglow in Giant Planetary Atmospheres: Modeling, Observations, and Implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Christopher; Esposito, Larry W.

    2016-07-01

    The atmosphere of the outer planets is mainly composed of H2 and neutral atomic helium. The study of He 584 Å and H Lyman-α brightnesses is interesting as the EUV and FUV (Extreme and Far Ultraviolet) planetary airglow have the potential to yield useful information about mixing and other important parameters in their thermospheres. Time variation, asymmetries, and polar enhancement of the airglow are also possible and analysis of the public archived NASA mission data sets (i.e. Voyager and Cassini) can help solve some of the outstanding problems associated with these phenomena. The comparison of observations with results from sophisticated photochemical and radiative transfer models can also help ameliorate unexplained differences in the dynamical processes operating within planetary upper atmospheres. Powerful analysis techniques allow us to extract information on atmospheric mixing, temperatures, and temporal changes due to the solar and seasonal cycles from the variations in distribution and intensity of airglow emissions that result. The presentation will discuss the implications of interpretations from comparison of modeling and observations in giant planetary atmospheres.

  8. Diurnal variations in the UV albedo of arctic snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Meinander

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of snow for climate studies is based on its physical properties, such as high surface reflectivity. Surface ultraviolet (UV albedo is an essential parameter for various applications based on radiative transfer modeling. Here, new continuous measurements of the local UV albedo of natural Arctic snow were made at Sodankylä (67°22'N, 26°39'E, 179 m a.s.l. during the spring of 2007. The data were logged at 1-min intervals. The accumulation of snow was up to 68 cm. The surface layer thickness varied from 0.5 to 35 cm with the snow grain size between 0.2 and 2.5 mm. The midday erythemally weighted UV albedo ranged from 0.6 to 0.8 in the accumulation period, and from 0.5 to 0.7 during melting. During the snow melt period, under cases of an almost clear sky and variable cloudiness, an unexpected diurnal decrease of 0.05 in albedo soon after midday, and recovery thereafter, was detected. This diurnal decrease in albedo was found to be asymmetric with respect to solar midday, thus indicating a change in the properties of the snow. Independent UV albedo results with two different types of instruments confirm these findings. The measured temperature of the snow surface was below 0°C on the following mornings. Hence, the reversible diurnal change, evident for ~1–2 h, could be explained by the daily metamorphosis of the surface of the snowpack, in which the temperature of the surface increases, melting some of the snow to liquid water, after which the surface freezes again.

  9. Effects of stellar flybys on planetary systems: 3D modeling of the circumstellar disk's damping effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picogna, G.; Marzari, F.

    2014-04-01

    Context. Stellar flybys in star clusters are suspected of affecting the orbital architecture of planetary systems causing eccentricity excitation and orbital misalignment between the planet orbit and the equatorial plane of the star. Aims: We explore whether the impulsive changes in the orbital elements of planets, caused by a hyperbolic stellar flyby, can be fully damped by the circumstellar disk surrounding the star. The time required to disperse stellar clusters is comparable to the circumstellar disk's lifetime. Since we perform 3D simulations, we can also test the inclination, excitation, and damping. Methods: We have modeled in 3D with the SPH code VINE, a system made of a solar-type star surrounded by a low density disk with a giant planet embedded in it approached on a hyperbolic encounter trajectory by a second star of similar mass and with its own disk. Different inclinations between the disks, planet orbit, and star trajectory have been considered to explore various encounter geometries. We focus on an extreme configuration where a very deep stellar flyby perturbs a Jovian planet on an external orbit. This allows us to test in full the ability of the disk to erase the effects of the stellar encounter. Results: We find that the amount of mass lost by the disk during the stellar flyby is less than in 2D models where a single disk was considered. This is mostly related to the mass exchange between the two disks at the encounter. The damping in eccentricity is slightly faster than in 2D models and it occurs on timescales on the order of a few kyr. During the flyby both the disks are warped owing to the mutual interaction and to the stellar gravitational perturbations, but they quickly relax to a new orbital plane. The planet is quickly dragged back within the disk by the tidal interaction with the gas. The only trace of the flyby left in the planet system, after about 104 yr, is a small misalignment, lower than 9°, between the star equatorial plane and the

  10. Summary of the Second International Planetary Dunes Workshop: Planetary Analogs - Integrating Models, Remote Sensing, and Field Data, Alamosa, Colorado, USA, May 18-21, 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, L.K.; Bishop, M.A.; Bourke, M.C.; Bristow, C.S.; Hayward, R.K.; Horgan, B.H.; Lancaster, N.; Michaels, T.I.; Tirsch, D.; Titus, T.N.; Valdez, A.

    2010-01-01

    The Second International Planetary Dunes Workshop took place in Alamosa, Colorado, USA from May 18-21, 2010. The workshop brought together researchers from diverse backgrounds to foster discussion and collaboration regarding terrestrial and extra-terrestrial dunes and dune systems. Two and a half days were spent on five oral sessions and one poster session, a full-day field trip to Great Sand Dunes National Park, with a great deal of time purposefully left open for discussion. On the last day of the workshop, participants assembled a list of thirteen priorities for future research on planetary dune systems. ?? 2010.

  11. Modelling of asteroid formation in planetary vortex and calculation its orbital parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Klychinska

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The theory of planetary vortex as the initial state of creation of the star systems is used to the study of conditions of formation of asteroids and calculation its orbital parameters. In application to Main asteroid belt of the Solar system the kind coincidence of theoretical and experimental data is got.

  12. Cloud albedo increase from carbonaceous aerosol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Leaitch

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Airborne measurements from two consecutive days, analysed with the aid of an aerosol-adiabatic cloud parcel model, are used to study the effect of carbonaceous aerosol particles on the reflectivity of sunlight by water clouds. The measurements, including aerosol chemistry, aerosol microphysics, cloud microphysics, cloud gust velocities and cloud light extinction, were made below, in and above stratocumulus over the northwest Atlantic Ocean. On the first day, the history of the below-cloud fine particle aerosol was marine and the fine particle sulphate and organic carbon mass concentrations measured at cloud base were 2.4 μg m−3 and 0.9 μg m−3 respectively. On the second day, the below-cloud aerosol was continentally influenced and the fine particle sulphate and organic carbon mass concentrations were 2.3 μg m−3 and 2.6 μg m−3 respectively. Over the range 0.06–0.8 μm diameter, the shapes of the below-cloud size distributions were similar on both days and the number concentrations were approximately a factor of two higher on the second day. The cloud droplet number concentrations (CDNC on the second day were approximately three times higher than the CDNC measured on the first day. Using the parcel model to separate the influence of the differences in gust velocities, we estimate from the vertically integrated cloud light scattering measurements a 6% increase in the cloud albedo principally due to the increase in the carbonaceous components on the second day. Assuming no additional absorption by this aerosol, a 6% albedo increase translates to a local daytime radiative cooling of ∼12 W m−2. This result provides observational evidence that the role of anthropogenic carbonaceous components in the cloud albedo effect can be much larger than that of anthropogenic sulphate, as some global simulations have indicated.

  13. Mars: Correcting surface albedo observations for effects of atmospheric dust loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. W.; Clancy, R. T.

    1992-01-01

    We have developed a radiative transfer model which allows the effects of atmospheric dust loading on surface albedo to be investigated. This model incorporates atmospheric dust opacity, the single scattering albedo and particle phase function of atmospheric dust, the bidirectional reflectance of the surface, and variable lighting and viewing geometry. The most recent dust particle properties are utilized. The spatial and temporal variability of atmospheric opacity (Tan) strongly influences the radiative transfer modelling results. We are currently using the approach described to determine Tan for IRTM mapping sequences of selected regions. This approach allows Tan to be determined at the highest spatial and temporal resolution supported by the IRTM data. Applying the radiative transfer modelling and determination of Tan described, IRTM visual brightness observations can be corrected for the effects of atmospheric dust loading a variety of locations and times. This approach allows maps of 'dust-corrected surface albedo' to be constructed for selected regions. Information on the variability of surface albedo and the amount of dust deposition/erosion related to such variability results. To date, this study indicates that atmospheric dust loading has a significant effect on observations of surface albedo, amounting to albedo corrections of as much as several tens of percent. This correction is not constant or linear, but depends upon surface albedo, viewing and lighting geometry, the dust and surface phase functions, and the atmospheric opacity. It is clear that the quantitative study of surface albedo, especially where small variations in observed albedo are important (such as photometric analyses), needs to account for the effects of the atmospheric dust loading. Maps of 'dust-corrected surface albedo' will be presented for a number of regions.

  14. Career and Workforce Impacts of the NASA Planetary Science Summer School: TEAM X model 1999-2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowes, Leslie L.; Budney, Charles; Mitchell, Karl; Wessen, Alice; JPL Education Office, JPL Team X

    2016-10-01

    Sponsored by NASA's Planetary Science Division, and managed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the Planetary Science Summer School prepares the next generation of engineers and scientists to participate in future solar system exploration missions. PSSS utilizes JPL's emerging concurrent mission design "Team X" as mentors. With this model, participants learn the mission life cycle, roles of scientists and engineers in a mission environment, mission design interconnectedness and trade-offs, and the importance of teamwork. Applicants are sought who have a strong interest and experience in careers in planetary exploration, and who are science and engineering post-docs, recent PhDs, doctoral or graduate students, and faculty teaching such students. An overview of the program will be presented, along with results of a diversity study conducted in fall 2015 to assess the gender and ethnic diversity of participants since 1999. PSSS seeks to have a positive influence on participants' career choice and career progress, and to help feed the employment pipeline for NASA, aerospace, and related academia. Results will also be presented of an online search that located alumni in fall 2015 related to their current occupations (primarily through LinkedIn and university and corporate websites), as well as a 2015 survey of alumni.

  15. Computer Modeling of Electrostatic Aggregation of Granular Materials in Planetary and Astrophysical Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, J.; Sauke, T.

    1999-01-01

    Electrostatic forces strongly influence the behavior of granular materials in both dispersed (cloud) systems and semi-packed systems. These forces can cause aggregation or dispersion of particles and are important in a variety of astrophysical and planetary settings. There are also many industrial and commercial settings where granular matter and electrostatics become partners for both good and bad. This partnership is important for human exploration on Mars where dust adheres to suits, machines, and habitats. Long-range Coulombic (electrostatic) forces, as opposed to contact-induced dipoles and van der Waals attractions, are generally regarded as resulting from net charge. We have proposed that in addition to net charge interactions, randomly distributed charge carriers on grains will result in a dipole moment regardless of any net charge. If grains are unconfined, or fluidized, they will rotate so that the dipole always induces attraction between grains. Aggregates are readily formed, and Coulombic polarity resulting from the dipole produces end-to-end stacking of grains to form filamentary aggregates. This has been demonstrated in USML experiments on Space Shuttle where microgravity facilitated the unmasking of static forces. It has also been demonstrated in a computer model using grains with charge carriers of both sign. Model results very closely resembled micro-g results with actual sand grains. Further computer modeling of the aggregation process has been conducted to improve our understanding of the aggregation process, and to provide a predictive tool for microgravity experiments slated for Space Station. These experiments will attempt to prove the dipole concept as outlined above. We have considerably enhanced the original computer model: refinements to the algorithm have improved the fidelity of grain behavior during grain contact, special attention has been paid to simulation time steps to enable establishment of a meaningful, quantitative time axis

  16. Numerical Models in Planetary Geology - Specifics of One-Plate Planets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breuer, Doris; Wünnemann, Kai; Spohn, Tilman

    2015-04-01

    Impact craters, volcanic constructs and compressional and extensional fracture zones are typical landforms found on terrestrial planets. Features characteristic of plate-tectonics like on Earth are generally lacking. An exception are the surfaces of Ganymede and perhaps Europa where indications of lateral displacements of surface units have been observed. Planetary geologists modeling tectonic features often resort to studies of features on Earth such as Graben formation of which Valles Marineris on Mars is a giant example or shield volcanoes where Olympus Mons is another giant example. Scaling laws can be used, for instance for shield volcanoes to relate their height and base diameter to the value of the planet's gravity. More specific for numerical modeling of landforms on terrestrial planets is the formation of impact craters, which can be more easily studied on airless bodies or planets of low atmospheric pressure such as Mercury, the Moon, and Mars. Impact modeling relates crater diameters and morphology to the size and mass of the impactor. Very large impacts may even be affecting the mantles and cores and have been modeled, for instance, to study the heating and melting of a planet's deep interior. The giant impact hypothesis for the formation of Earth's moon has been tested by modeling. Such studies have only been possible due to significant improvements of so-called hydrocodes over the last couple of decades, specifically in terms of material modeling. The consideration of elastic-plastic material behavior taking ductile and brittle deformation, fracturing, and the compaction and opening of pore space into account was recognized to be key for a better understanding of impact crater formation. As a consequence of the advancements in material modeling the classic term "hydrocode" is actually no longer justified and is now often replaced by the term "shock physics code". Another tectonic feature that is more specific to terrestrial planets are lobate scarps

  17. On the Charney Conjecture of Data Assimilation Employing Temperature Measurements Alone: The Paradigm of 3D Planetary Geostrophic Model

    CERN Document Server

    Farhat, Aseel; Titi, Edriss S

    2016-01-01

    Analyzing the validity and success of a data assimilation algorithm when some state variable observations are not available is an important problem in meteorology and engineering. We present an improved data assimilation algorithm for recovering the exact full reference solution (i.e. the velocity and temperature) of the 3D Planetary Geostrophic model, at an exponential rate in time, by employing coarse spatial mesh observations of the temperature alone. This provides, in the case of this paradigm, a rigorous justification to an earlier conjecture of Charney which states that temperature history of the atmosphere, for certain simple atmospheric models, determines all other state variables.

  18. Multiple solutions and numerical analysis to the dynamic and stationary models coupling a delayed energy balance model involving latent heat and discontinuous albedo with a deep ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, J I; Hidalgo, A; Tello, L

    2014-10-08

    We study a climatologically important interaction of two of the main components of the geophysical system by adding an energy balance model for the averaged atmospheric temperature as dynamic boundary condition to a diagnostic ocean model having an additional spatial dimension. In this work, we give deeper insight than previous papers in the literature, mainly with respect to the 1990 pioneering model by Watts and Morantine. We are taking into consideration the latent heat for the two phase ocean as well as a possible delayed term. Non-uniqueness for the initial boundary value problem, uniqueness under a non-degeneracy condition and the existence of multiple stationary solutions are proved here. These multiplicity results suggest that an S-shaped bifurcation diagram should be expected to occur in this class of models generalizing previous energy balance models. The numerical method applied to the model is based on a finite volume scheme with nonlinear weighted essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction and Runge-Kutta total variation diminishing for time integration.

  19. Multiple solutions and numerical analysis to the dynamic and stationary models coupling a delayed energy balance model involving latent heat and discontinuous albedo with a deep ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Díaz, J. I.; Hidalgo, A.; Tello, L.

    2014-01-01

    We study a climatologically important interaction of two of the main components of the geophysical system by adding an energy balance model for the averaged atmospheric temperature as dynamic boundary condition to a diagnostic ocean model having an additional spatial dimension. In this work, we give deeper insight than previous papers in the literature, mainly with respect to the 1990 pioneering model by Watts and Morantine. We are taking into consideration the latent heat for the two phase ocean as well as a possible delayed term. Non-uniqueness for the initial boundary value problem, uniqueness under a non-degeneracy condition and the existence of multiple stationary solutions are proved here. These multiplicity results suggest that an S-shaped bifurcation diagram should be expected to occur in this class of models generalizing previous energy balance models. The numerical method applied to the model is based on a finite volume scheme with nonlinear weighted essentially non-oscillatory reconstruction and Runge–Kutta total variation diminishing for time integration. PMID:25294969

  20. New models for the evolution of post-asymptotic giant branch stars and central stars of planetary nebulae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller Bertolami, Marcelo Miguel

    2016-04-01

    Context. The post-asymptotic giant branch (AGB) phase is arguably one of the least understood phases of the evolution of low- and intermediate- mass stars. The two grids of models presently available are based on outdated micro- and macrophysics and do not agree with each other. Studies of the central stars of planetary nebulae (CSPNe) and post-AGB stars in different stellar populations point to significant discrepancies with the theoretical predictions of post-AGB models. Aims: We study the timescales of post-AGB and CSPNe in the context of our present understanding of the micro- and macrophysics of stars. We want to assess whether new post-AGB models, based on the latter improvements in TP-AGB modeling, can help us to understand the discrepancies between observation and theory and within theory itself. In addition, we aim to understand the impact of the previous AGB evolution for post-AGB phases. Methods: We computed a grid of post-AGB full evolutionary sequences that include all previous evolutionary stages from the zero age main sequence to the white dwarf phase. We computed models for initial masses between 0.8 and 4 M⊙ and for a wide range of initial metallicities (Z0 = 0.02, 0.01, 0.001, 0.0001). This allowed us to provide post-AGB timescales and properties for H-burning post-AGB objects with masses in the relevant range for the formation of planetary nebulae (~0.5-0.8 M⊙). We included an updated treatment of the constitutive microphysics and included an updated description of the mixing processes and winds that play a key role during the thermal pulses (TP) on the AGB phase. Results: We present a new grid of models for post-AGB stars that take into account the improvements in the modeling of AGB stars in recent decades. These new models are particularly suited to be inputs in studies of the formation of planetary nebulae and for the determination of the properties of CSPNe from their observational parameters. We find post-AGB timescales that are at

  1. Planetary rings - Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borderies, Nicole

    1989-01-01

    Theoretical models of planetary-ring dynamics are examined in a brief analytical review. The mathematical description of streamlines and streamline interactions is outlined; the redistribution of angular momentum due to collisions between particles is explained; and problems in the modeling of broad, narrow, and arc rings are discussed.

  2. Dynamic Response of a Planetary Gear System Using a Finite Element/Contact Mechanics Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Robert G.; Agashe, Vinayak; Vijayakar, Sandeep M.

    2000-01-01

    The dynamic response of a helicopter planetary gear system is examined over a wide range of operating speeds and torques. The analysis tool is a unique, semianalytical finite element formulation that admits precise representation of the tooth geometry and contact forces that are crucial in gear dynamics. Importantly, no a priori specification of static transmission error excitation or mesh frequency variation is required; the dynamic contact forces are evaluated internally at each time step. The calculated response shows classical resonances when a harmonic of mesh frequency coincides with a natural frequency. However, peculiar behavior occurs where resonances expected to be excited at a given speed are absent. This absence of particular modes is explained by analytical relationships that depend on the planetary configuration and mesh frequency harmonic. The torque sensitivity of the dynamic response is examined and compared to static analyses. Rotation mode response is shown to be more sensitive to input torque than translational mode response.

  3. Albedo changes of the Arctic sea ice cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, D. K.; Light, B.; Jones, K. F.; Eicken, H.; Runciman, K.; Nghiem, S. V.; Stroeve, J.; Markus, T.

    2008-12-01

    The summer extent of the Arctic sea ice cover has decreased in recent decades and there have been alterations in the timing and duration of the summer melt season. This has resulted in changes in the evolution of albedo of the Arctic sea ice cover, and consequently in the partitioning of solar energy. These changes are examined on a pan-Arctic scale on a 25 x 25 km Equal Area Scalable Earth Grid for the years 1979 - 2007. Daily values of incident solar irradiance are obtained from ERA-40 reanalysis products and ice concentrations are determined from passive microwave satellite data. The albedo of the ice is modeled by a five-phase process that includes dry snow, melting snow, melt pond formation, melt pond evolution, and freezeup. The timing of these phases is governed by the onset dates of summer melt and fall freezeup, which are determined from satellite observations. Results indicate a general trend of increasing solar heat input to the Arctic ice-ocean system due to reductions in ice concentration and longer melt seasons. This trend may accelerate the loss of sea ice through the ice-albedo feedback. The evolution of albedo, and hence the total solar heating of the ocean, is more sensitive to the date of melt onset than the date of fall freezeup.

  4. Modeling Indications of Technology in Planetary Transit Light Curves -- Dark-side illumination

    CERN Document Server

    Korpela, Eric J; Green, Diana Leystra

    2015-01-01

    We analyze potential effects of an extraterrestrial civilization's use of orbiting mirrors to illuminate the dark side of a synchronously rotating planet on planetary transit light curves. Previous efforts to detect civilizations based on side effects of planetary-scale engineering have focused on structures affecting the host star output (e.g. Dyson spheres). However, younger civilizations are likely to be less advanced in their engineering efforts, yet still capable of sending small spacecraft into orbit. Since M dwarfs are the most common type of star in the solar neighborhood, it seems plausible that many of the nearest habitable planets orbit dim, low-mass M stars, and will be in synchronous rotation. Logically, a civilization evolving on such a planet may be inspired to illuminate their planet's dark side by placing a single large mirror at the L2 Lagrangian point, or launching a fleet of small thin mirrors into planetary orbit. We briefly examine the requirements and engineering challenges of such a co...

  5. Atmospheric effects on the mapping of Martian thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Joan N.; Jakosky, Bruce M.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    We examine the effects of a dusty CO2 atmosphere on the thermal inertia and thermally derived albedo of Mars and we present a new map of thermal inertias. This new map was produced using a coupled surface atmosphere (CSA) model, dust opacities from Viking infrared thermal mapper (IRTM) data, and CO2 columns based on topography. The CSA model thermal inertias are smaller than the 2% model thermal inertias, with the difference largest at large thermal inertia. Although the difference between the thermal inertias obtained with the two models is moderate for much of the region studied, it is largest in regions of either high dust opacity or of topographic lows, including the Viking Lander 1 site and some geologically interesting regions. The CSA model thermally derived albedos do not acurately predict the IRTM measured albedos and are very similar to the thermally derived albedos obtained with models making the 2% assumption.

  6. A New Perspective on Trapped Radiation Belts in Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, A.; Lodhi, M. A. K.; Wilson, T. L.

    2005-01-01

    The charged particle fluxes trapped in the magnetic dipole fields of certain planets in our Solar System are interesting signatures of planetary properties in space physics. They also represent a source of potentially hazardous radiation to spacecraft during planetary and interplanetary exploration. The Earth s trapped radiation belts have been studied for years and the physical mechanisms by which primary radiation from the Sun and Galaxy is captured is well understood. The higher-energy particles collide with molecules in the planetary atmosphere and initiate large cascades of secondary radiation which itself becomes trapped by the magnetic dipole field of the planet. Some of it is even backscattered as albedo neutrons.

  7. Planetary Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  8. Albedo protons and electrons at ISS - an important contribution to astronaut dose?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norman, R. B.; Slaba, T. C.; Badavi, F. F.; Mertens, C. J.; Blattnig, S.

    2015-12-01

    Albedo particles, which are created by cosmic ray interactions in the atmosphere and are moving upwards away from the surface of the earth, are often considered a negligible contribution to astronaut radiation exposure on the International Space Station (ISS). Models of astronaut exposure, however, consistently underestimate measurements onboard ISS when these albedo particles are neglected. Recent measurements by instruments on ISS (AMS, PAMELA, and SEDA-AP) hint that there are high energy protons and electrons which are not being modeled and that may contribute to radiation exposure on ISS. Estimates of the contribution of radiation exposure on ISS due to albedo particles, along with open questions, will be discussed.

  9. Spatial and temporal variations of albedo and absorbed solar radiation during 2009 - 2016 from IKOR-M satellite program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherviakov, Maksim; Bogdanov, Mikhail; Spiryakhina, Anastasia; Shishkina, Elena; Surkova, Yana; Kulkova, Eugenia

    2017-04-01

    This report describes Earth's radiation budget IKOR-M satellite program which has been started in Russia. The first satellite "Meteor-M» No 1 of this project was put into orbit in September, 2009. The IKOR-M radiometer is a satellite instrument that measures reflected shortwave radiation (0.3-4.0 µm). It was created in Saratov State University and installed on Russian hydrometeorological satellites "Meteor-M" No 1 and No 2. Radiometer IKOR-M designed for satellite monitoring of the outgoing reflected short-wave radiation, which is one of the components of Earth's radiation budget. Such measurements can be used to derive Earth's surface albedo and absorbed solar radiation. This information also can be used in different models of long-term weather forecasts and in researches of climate change trends (Sklyarov et al., 2016). Satellite "Meteor-M" No 1 and No 2 are heliosynchronous that allows observing from North to South Poles. The basic products of data processing are given in the form of global maps of distribution outgoing short-wave radiation (OSR), albedo and absorbed solar radiation (ASR). Such maps were made for each month during observation period. The IKOR-M product archive is available online at all times. A searchable catalogue of data products is continually updated and users may search and download data products via the Earth radiation balance components research laboratory website (http://www.sgu.ru/structure/geographic/metclim/balans) as soon as they become available. Two series of measurements from two different IKOR-M are available. The first radiometer had worked from October, 2009 to August, 2014 and second - from August, 2014 to the present. Therefore, there is a period when both radiometers work at the same time. Top-of-atmosphere fluxes deduced from the "Meteor-M" No 1 measurements in August, 2014 show very good agreement with the fluxes determined from "Meteor-M" No 2 (Bogdanov et al., 2016). The effect of aging is investigated for first IKOR

  10. On the effect of surface roughness and frequency on the planetary radar echo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virkki, Anne

    2016-10-01

    Planetary radar is a strong tool for revealing surface properties of near-Earth asteroids, such as the geometric composition, or surface roughness, with implications on the chemical composition. For some asteroids and comets visited with spacecrafts, local variations of the size distribution of surface particles have been observed (Michikami et al., Earth Planets Space 60, 2008). The variations can be observed using radar through variations of circular-polarization ratio (Virkki et al. In Asteroids, Comets, Meteors 2014, 2014).We model radar scattering by planetary surfaces using an algorithm of geometric optics with Fresnelian reflections and refractions as well as diffuse scattering (Muinonen et al., JQSRT 110, 2009). Previously, we have shown the effect of various surface properties, such as the material, geometry, and size of the scatterers, e.g., wavelength-scale boulders on the asteroid surface, on the observed radar albedo and circular-polarization ratio when a power-law (r-3) size distribution of irregular particles is used (Virkki and Muinonen, Icarus 269, 2016). In this study, we show how different size distributions affect the radar albedo and circular-polarization ratio. Also, we discuss the effect that the choice of the observation frequency (2380 or 8560 MHz) may have on the echo. As materials, we compare different types of rock and ice.

  11. MODIS/COMBINED MCD43B3 Albedo 16-Day L3 Global 1km

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/Albedo Model Parameters product (MCD43A1) contains three-dimensional (3D) data sets providing users...

  12. MODIS/COMBINED MCD43A3 Albedo 16-Day L3 Global 500m

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/Albedo Model Parameters product (MCD43A1) contains three-dimensional (3D) data sets providing users...

  13. Albedo evolution of seasonal Arctic sea ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovich, Donald K.; Polashenski, Christopher

    2012-04-01

    There is an ongoing shift in the Arctic sea ice cover from multiyear ice to seasonal ice. Here we examine the impact of this shift on sea ice albedo. Our analysis of observations from four years of field experiments indicates that seasonal ice undergoes an albedo evolution with seven phases; cold snow, melting snow, pond formation, pond drainage, pond evolution, open water, and freezeup. Once surface ice melt begins, seasonal ice albedos are consistently less than albedos for multiyear ice resulting in more solar heat absorbed in the ice and transmitted to the ocean. The shift from a multiyear to seasonal ice cover has significant implications for the heat and mass budget of the ice and for primary productivity in the upper ocean. There will be enhanced melting of the ice cover and an increase in the amount of sunlight available in the upper ocean.

  14. Planetary Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Carl Sagan, Bruce Murray and Louis Friedman founded the non-profit Planetary Society in 1979 to advance the exploration of the solar system and to continue the search for extraterrestrial life. The Society has its headquarters in Pasadena, California, but is international in scope, with 100 000 members worldwide, making it the largest space interest group in the world. The Society funds a var...

  15. Radiation transfer in an anisotropically scattering plane-parallel medium with space dependent albedo, omega(x)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cengel, Y. A.; Ozisik, M. N.

    1984-08-01

    An analytical model is developed for radiation transfer in a plane-parallel slab geometry with anisotropic scattering, spatially varying albedo, reflecting and emitting boundaries, and energy sources within the medium. The albedo is defined in terms of Legendre polynomials and account is taken of the effects of spatial albedo variation on reflectivity and transmissivity of the medium after formulating generalized incident radiation equation. Forward and backward radiation fluxes are then obtained. It is noted that the Legendre polynomials permit inclusion of sufficient numbers of terms to achieve any desired level of accuracy for the albedo.

  16. Planetary Rings

    CERN Document Server

    Tiscareno, Matthew S

    2011-01-01

    Planetary rings are the only nearby astrophysical disks, and the only disks that have been investigated by spacecraft. Although there are significant differences between rings and other disks, chiefly the large planet/ring mass ratio that greatly enhances the flatness of rings (aspect ratios as small as 1e-7), understanding of disks in general can be enhanced by understanding the dynamical processes observed at close-range and in real-time in planetary rings. We review the known ring systems of the four giant planets, as well as the prospects for ring systems yet to be discovered. We then review planetary rings by type. The main rings of Saturn comprise our system's only dense broad disk and host many phenomena of general application to disks including spiral waves, gap formation, self-gravity wakes, viscous overstability and normal modes, impact clouds, and orbital evolution of embedded moons. Dense narrow rings are the primary natural laboratory for understanding shepherding and self-stability. Narrow dusty...

  17. PDS4: Meeting Big Data Challenges Via a Model-Driven Planetary Science Data Architecture and System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, E.; Hughes, J. S.; Crichton, D. J.; Hardman, S. H.; Joyner, R.; Ramirez, P.

    2014-12-01

    Big science data management entails cataloging, processing, distribution, multiple ways of analyzing and interpreting the data, long-term preservation, and international cooperation of massive amount of scientific data. PDS4, the next generation of the Planetary Data System (PDS), uses an information model-driven architectural approach coupled with modern information technologies and standards to meet theses challenges of big science data management. PDS4 is an operational example of the use of an explicit data system architecture and an ontology-base information model to drive the development, operations, and evolution of a scalable data system along the entire science data lifecycle from ground systems to the archives. This overview of PDS4 will include a description of its model-driven approach and its overall systems architecture. It will illustrate how the system is being used to help meet the expectations of modern scientists for interoperable data systems and correlatable data in the Big Data era.

  18. Measurement of the Absolute Hohlraum Wall Albedo Under Ignition Foot Drive Condition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jones, O S; Glenzer, S H; Suter, L J; Turner, R E; Campbell, K M; Dewald, E L; Hammel, B A; Kauffman, R L; Landen, O L; Rosen, M D; Wallace, R J; Weber, F A

    2003-08-26

    We present the first measurements of the absolute albedos of hohlraums made from gold or from high-Z mixtures. The measurements are performed over the range of radiation temperatures (70-100 eV) expected during the foot of an indirect-drive temporally-shaped ignition laser pulse, where accurate knowledge of the wall albedo (i.e. soft x-ray wall re-emission) is most critical for determining capsule radiation symmetry. We find that the gold albedo agrees well with calculations using the super transition array opacity model, potentially providing additional margin for ICF ignition.

  19. Measurement of the absolute hohlraum wall albedo under ignition foot drive conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, L J; Wallace, R J; Hammel, B A; Weber, F A; Landen, O L; Campbell, K M; DeWald, E L; Glenzer, S H; Rosen, M D; Jones, O S; Turner, R E; Kauffmann, R L; Hammer, J H

    2003-11-25

    We present the first measurements of the absolute albedos of hohlraums made from gold or from high-Z mixtures. The measurements are performed over the range of radiation temperatures (70-100 eV) expected during the foot of an indirect-drive temporally-shaped ignition laser pulse, where accurate knowledge of the wall albedo (i.e. soft x-ray wall re-emission) is most critical for determining capsule radiation symmetry. We find that the gold albedo agrees well with calculations using the super transition array opacity model, potentially providing additional margin for ICF ignition.

  20. Albedo Properties of Small (0.5 to 20 km) Main Belt Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Erin L.; Woodward, C. E.

    2010-01-01

    Serendipitous observations of main belt asteroids by the Spitzer Space Telescope have enabled determination of main belt asteroid albedos and diameters for targets as small as 0.5 km (eg., Ryan et al. 2009, AJ, 137, 5134). We have used multi-epoch data at 5.8, 8.0 and 24 microns from the MIPSGAL and Taurus Legacy Surveys to obtain diameters and albedos for a sample of approximately 2000 main belt asteroids. Using STM and NEATM, we have obtained diameters ranging from 0.5 to 30 km and albedos ranging from 0.02 to 0.5. Results of this program reveal an albedo distribution that is more diverse in range than the albedo distribution seen in the IRAS and MSX surveys. This diversity may reflect effects of space weathering reddening which is selectively reddening larger asteroids. This reddening effect may reinforce the findings from accretion models that indicate that asteroids in the early solar system were 100 km and larger (Morbidelli et al., 2009, Icarus, in press), by suggesting that the larger asteroids are indeed the oldest members of the main belt. We will present results on the albedo distribution as a function of semi-major axis and new analysis of the mean albedo of dynamical families within the main belt. Support for this work provided in part by a National Science Foundation grant AST-0706980 to the University of Minnesota.

  1. Estimation of Instantaneous TOA Albedo at 670 nm over Ice Clouds from POLDER Multidirectional Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, W.; Loeb, N. G.; Kato, S.

    2003-01-01

    An algorithm that determines the 670-nm top-of-atmosphere (TOA) albedo of ice clouds over ocean using Polarization and Directionality of the Earth's Reflectance ( POLDER) multidirectional measurements is developed. A plane-parallel layer of ice cloud with various optical thicknesses and light scattering phase functions is assumed. For simplicity, we use a double Henyey-Greenstein phase function to approximate the volume-averaged phase function of the ice clouds. A multidirectional reflectance best-fit match between theoretical and POLDER reflectances is used to infer effective cloud optical thickness, phase function and TOA albedo. Sensitivity tests show that while the method does not provide accurate independent retrievals of effective cloud optical depth and phase function, TOA albedo retrievals are accurate to within similar to 3% for both a single layer of ice clouds or a multilayer system of ice clouds and water clouds. When the method is applied to POLDER measurements and retrieved albedos are compared with albedos based on empirical angular distribution models (ADMs), zonal albedo differences are generally smaller than similar to 3%. When albedos are compared with those on the POLDER-I ERB and Cloud product, the differences can reach similar to 15% at small solar zenith angles.

  2. Mapping Surface Broadband Albedo from Satellite Observations: A Review of Literatures on Algorithms and Products

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Qu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Surface albedo is one of the key controlling geophysical parameters in the surface energy budget studies, and its temporal and spatial variation is closely related to the global climate change and regional weather system due to the albedo feedback mechanism. As an efficient tool for monitoring the surfaces of the Earth, remote sensing is widely used for deriving long-term surface broadband albedo with various geostationary and polar-orbit satellite platforms in recent decades. Moreover, the algorithms for estimating surface broadband albedo from satellite observations, including narrow-to-broadband conversions, bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF angular modeling, direct-estimation algorithm and the algorithms for estimating albedo from geostationary satellite data, are developed and improved. In this paper, we present a comprehensive literature review on algorithms and products for mapping surface broadband albedo with satellite observations and provide a discussion of different algorithms and products in a historical perspective based on citation analysis of the published literature. This paper shows that the observation technologies and accuracy requirement of applications are important, and long-term, global fully-covered (including land, ocean, and sea-ice surfaces, gap-free, surface broadband albedo products with higher spatial and temporal resolution are required for climate change, surface energy budget, and hydrological studies.

  3. Monitoring land surface albedo and vegetation dynamics using high spatial and temporal resolution synthetic time series from Landsat and the MODIS BRDF/NBAR/albedo product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhuosen; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Sun, Qingsong; Kim, JiHyun; Erb, Angela M.; Gao, Feng; Román, Miguel O.; Yang, Yun; Petroy, Shelley; Taylor, Jeffrey R.; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Morisette, Jeffrey T.; Zhang, Xiaoyang; Papuga, Shirley A.

    2017-07-01

    Seasonal vegetation phenology can significantly alter surface albedo which in turn affects the global energy balance and the albedo warming/cooling feedbacks that impact climate change. To monitor and quantify the surface dynamics of heterogeneous landscapes, high temporal and spatial resolution synthetic time series of albedo and the enhanced vegetation index (EVI) were generated from the 500 m Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) operational Collection V006 daily BRDF/NBAR/albedo products and 30 m Landsat 5 albedo and near-nadir reflectance data through the use of the Spatial and Temporal Adaptive Reflectance Fusion Model (STARFM). The traditional Landsat Albedo (Shuai et al., 2011) makes use of the MODIS BRDF/Albedo products (MCD43) by assigning appropriate BRDFs from coincident MODIS products to each Landsat image to generate a 30 m Landsat albedo product for that acquisition date. The available cloud free Landsat 5 albedos (due to clouds, generated every 16 days at best) were used in conjunction with the daily MODIS albedos to determine the appropriate 30 m albedos for the intervening daily time steps in this study. These enhanced daily 30 m spatial resolution synthetic time series were then used to track albedo and vegetation phenology dynamics over three Ameriflux tower sites (Harvard Forest in 2007, Santa Rita in 2011 and Walker Branch in 2005). These Ameriflux sites were chosen as they are all quite nearby new towers coming on line for the National Ecological Observatory Network (NEON), and thus represent locations which will be served by spatially paired albedo measures in the near future. The availability of data from the NEON towers will greatly expand the sources of tower albedometer data available for evaluation of satellite products. At these three Ameriflux tower sites the synthetic time series of broadband shortwave albedos were evaluated using the tower albedo measurements with a Root Mean Square Error (RMSE) less than 0.013 and a

  4. Using Remote Sensing to Quantify Roof Albedo in Seven California Cities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ban-Weiss, G. A.; Woods, J.; Millstein, D.; Levinson, R.

    2013-12-01

    Building Energy Efficiency Standard (Title-24, Part 6) includes the use of high-albedo surfaces on low-sloped roofs on non-residential buildings. Analyzing a subset of large presumably commercial buildings, we find high albedo roofs represent 0.5% and 10% of total roofs and roof surface area, respectively. The potential for high albedo roofs to reduce urban temperatures was investigated for a California city (Bakersfield) with warm summers using a state-of-the-art meteorological model (Weather Research and Forecasting, WRF). Base case and cool roof scenarios were simulated with the only difference being that the surface albedo was increased under the cool roof scenario. Roof albedos derived from the aerial imagery were used as an input to the climate model in the base case scenario. Simulation results indicate that seasonal average afternoon (1500 h) temperatures could be reduced by up to 0.2 °C across Bakersfield during both the summer and winter. While temperature changes are similar during winter and summer, only summer shows statistically significant temperature changes downwind (southeast) from Bakersfield. This indicates that reduced summertime temperatures may be felt over a distance that is 2 or 3 times the length scale of the region with high albedo roofs.

  5. Migration of Frosts from High-Albedo Regions of Pluto: what New Horizons Reveals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buratti, Bonnie J.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, Hal A.; Young, Leslie A.; Olkin, Cathy B.; Ennico, Kimberly; Binzel, Richard P.; Zangari, Amanda; Earle, Alissa M.

    2015-11-01

    With its high eccentricity and obliquity, Pluto should exhibit seasonal volatile transport on its surface. Several lines of evidence support this transport: doubling of Pluto’s atmospheric pressure over the past two decades (Young et al., 2013, Ap. J. 766, L22; Olkin et al., 2015, Icarus 246, 230); changes in its historical rotational light curve, once all variations due to viewing geometry have been modelled (Buratti et al., 2015; Ap. J. 804, L6); and changes in HST albedo maps (Buie et al., 2010, Astron. J. 139, 1128). New Horizons LORRI images reveal that the region of greatest albedo change is not the polar cap(s) of Pluto, but the feature informally named Tombaugh Regio (TR). This feature has a normal reflectance as high as ~0.8 in some places, and it is superposed on older, lower-albedo pre-existing terrain with an albedo of only ~0.10. This contrast is larger than any other body in the Solar System, except for Iapetus. This albedo dichotomy leads to a complicated system of cold-trapping and thermal segregation, beyond the simple picture of seasonal volatile transport. Whatever the origin of TR, it initially acted as a cold trap, as the temperature differential between the high and low albedo regions could be enormous, possibly approaching 20K, based on their albedo differences and assuming their normalized phase curves are similar. This latter assumption will be refined as the full New Horizons data set is returned.Over six decades of ground-based photometry suggest that TR has been decreasing in albedo over the last 25 years. Possible causes include changing insolation angles, or sublimation from the edges where the high-albedo material impinges on a much warmer substrate.Funding by the NASA New Horizons Project acknowledged.

  6. Albedo enhancement over land to counteract global warming: impacts on hydrological cycle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, Govindasamy; Nag, Bappaditya [Indian Institute of Science, Divecha Center for Climate Change and Center for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Bangalore (India)

    2012-09-15

    A recent modelling study has shown that precipitation and runoff over land would increase when the reflectivity of marine clouds is increased to counter global warming. This implies that large scale albedo enhancement over land could lead to a decrease in runoff over land. In this study, we perform simulations using NCAR CAM3.1 that have implications for Solar Radiation Management geoengineering schemes that increase the albedo over land. We find that an increase in reflectivity over land that mitigates the global mean warming from a doubling of CO{sub 2} leads to a large residual warming in the southern hemisphere and cooling in the northern hemisphere since most of the land is located in northern hemisphere. Precipitation and runoff over land decrease by 13.4 and 22.3%, respectively, because of a large residual sinking motion over land triggered by albedo enhancement over land. Soil water content also declines when albedo over land is enhanced. The simulated magnitude of hydrological changes over land are much larger when compared to changes over oceans in the recent marine cloud albedo enhancement study since the radiative forcing over land needed (-8.2 W m{sup -2}) to counter global mean radiative forcing from a doubling of CO{sub 2} (3.3 W m{sup -2}) is approximately twice the forcing needed over the oceans (-4.2 W m{sup -2}). Our results imply that albedo enhancement over oceans produce climates closer to the unperturbed climate state than do albedo changes on land when the consequences on land hydrology are considered. Our study also has important implications for any intentional or unintentional large scale changes in land surface albedo such as deforestation/afforestation/reforestation, air pollution, and desert and urban albedo modification. (orig.)

  7. From climate models to planetary habitability: temperature constraints for complex life

    CERN Document Server

    Silva, Laura; Schulte, Patricia M; Murante, Giuseppe; Provenzale, Antonello

    2016-01-01

    In an effort to derive temperature based criteria of habitability for multicellular life, we investigated the thermal limits of terrestrial poikilotherms, i.e. organisms whose body temperature and the functioning of all vital processes is directly affected by the ambient temperature. Multicellular poikilotherms are the most common and evolutionarily ancient form of complex life on earth. The thermal limits for their active metabolism and reproduction are bracketed by the temperature interval 0Cplanetary surface that satisfies the temperature limits 0C

  8. Spatially Complete Surface Albedo Data Sets: Value-Added Products Derived from Terra MODIS Land Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Eric G.; King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Gao, Feng

    2004-01-01

    Spectral land surface albedo is an important parameter for describing the radiative properties of the Earth. Accordingly it reflects the consequences of natural and human interactions, such as anthropogenic, meteorological, and phenological effects, on global and local climatological trends. Consequently, albedos are integral parts in a variety of research areas, such as general circulation models (GCMs), energy balance studies, modeling of land use and land use change, and biophysical, oceanographic, and meteorological studies. Recent observations of diffuse bihemispherical (white-sky) and direct beam directional hemispherical (black-sky ) land surface albedo included in the MOD43B3 product from MODIS instruments aboard NASA's Terra and Aqua satellite platforms have provided researchers with unprecedented spatial, spectral, and temporal characteristics. Cloud and seasonal snow cover, however, curtail retrievals to approximately half the global land surfaces on an annual equal-angle basis, precluding MOD43B3 albedo products from direct inclusion in some research projects and production environments.

  9. From climate models to planetary habitability: temperature constraints for complex life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Laura; Vladilo, Giovanni; Schulte, Patricia M.; Murante, Giuseppe; Provenzale, Antonello

    2017-07-01

    In an effort to derive temperature-based criteria of habitability for multicellular life, we investigated the thermal limits of terrestrial poikilotherms, i.e. organisms whose body temperature and the functioning of all vital processes is directly affected by the ambient temperature. Multicellular poikilotherms are the most common and evolutionarily ancient form of complex life on earth. The thermal limits for the active metabolism and reproduction of multicellular poikilotherms on earth are approximately bracketed by the temperature interval 0°C life, and for the generation of atmospheric biosignatures observable in exoplanets. Analysis of the main mechanisms responsible for the thermal thresholds of terrestrial life suggests that the same mechanisms would apply to other forms of chemical life. We therefore propose a habitability index for complex life, h 050, representing the mean orbital fraction of planetary surface that satisfies the temperature limits 0°C planets, we calculated h 050 as a function of planet insolation, S, and atmospheric columnar mass, N atm, for a few earth-like atmospheric compositions with trace levels of CO2. By displaying h 050 as a function of S and N atm, we built up an atmospheric mass habitable zone (AMHZ) for complex life. At variance with the classic habitable zone, the inner edge of the complex life habitable zone is not affected by the uncertainties inherent to the calculation of the runaway greenhouse limit. The complex life habitable zone is significantly narrower than the habitable zone of dry planets. Our calculations illustrate how changes in ambient conditions dependent on S and N atm, such as temperature excursions and surface dose of secondary particles of cosmic rays, may influence the type of life potentially present at different epochs of planetary evolution inside the AMHZ.

  10. SURFACE ALBEDO AND SPECTRAL VARIABILITY OF CERES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Jian-Yang; Reddy, Vishnu; Corre, Lucille Le; Sykes, Mark V.; Prettyman, Thomas H. [Planetary Science Institute, 1700 E. Ft. Lowell Road, Suite 106, Tucson, AZ 85719 (United States); Nathues, Andreas; Hoffmann, Martin; Schaefer, Michael [Max Planck Institute for Solar System Research, Göttingen (Germany); Izawa, Matthew R. M.; Cloutis, Edward A. [University of Winnipeg, Winnipeg, Manitoba (Canada); Carsenty, Uri; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Schröder, Stefan E. [German Aerospace Center (DLR), Institute of Planetary Research, Berlin (Germany); Castillo-Rogez, Julie C. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Schenk, Paul [Lunar and Planetary Institute, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Williams, David A. [School of Earth and Space Exploration, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287 (United States); Smith, David E. [Solar System Exploration Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Zuber, Maria T. [Department of Earth, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); and others

    2016-02-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active, but possibly sporadic, water outgassing as well as possibly varying spectral characteristics over a timescale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, as well as the newly acquired images by the Dawn  Framing Camera, to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, on both a global scale and in local regions, particularly the bright spots inside the Occator crater, over timescales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in the Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over the various timescales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun–Ceres–Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km{sup 2}, too small to cause global albedo and spectral variations detectable in our data. Impact ejecta due to impacting projectiles of tens of meters in size like those known to cause observable changes to the surface albedo on Asteroid Scheila cannot cause detectable albedo change on Ceres due to its relatively large size and strong gravity. The water vapor activity on Ceres is independent of Ceres’ heliocentric distance, ruling out the possibility of the comet-like sublimation process as a possible mechanism driving the activity.

  11. Magnetic Helicity and Planetary Dynamos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shebalin, John V.

    2012-01-01

    A model planetary dynamo based on the Boussinesq approximation along with homogeneous boundary conditions is considered. A statistical theory describing a large-scale MHD dynamo is found, in which magnetic helicity is the critical parameter

  12. Multiplatform observations enabling albedo retrievals with high temporal resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riihelä, Aku; Manninen, Terhikki; Key, Jeffrey; Sun, Qingsong; Sütterlin, Melanie; Lattanzio, Alessio; Schaaf, Crystal

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we show that combining observations from different polar orbiting satellite families (such as AVHRR and MODIS) is physically justifiable and technically feasible. Our proposed approach will lead to surface albedo retrievals at higher temporal resolution than the state of the art, with comparable or better accuracy. This study is carried out in the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Sustained and coordinated processing of Environmental Satellite data for Climate Monitoring (SCOPE-CM) project SCM-02 (http://www.scope-cm.org/projects/scm-02/). Following a spectral homogenization of the Top-of-Atmosphere reflectances of bands 1 & 2 from AVHRR and MODIS, both observation datasets are atmospherically corrected with a coherent atmospheric profile and algorithm. The resulting surface reflectances are then fed into an inversion of the RossThick-LiSparse-Reciprocal surface bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model. The results of the inversion (BRDF kernels) may then be integrated to estimate various surface albedo quantities. A key principle here is that the larger number of valid surface observations with multiple satellites allows us to invert the BRDF coefficients within a shorter time span, enabling the monitoring of relatively rapid surface phenomena such as snowmelt. The proposed multiplatform approach is expected to bring benefits in particular to the observation of the albedo of the polar regions, where persistent cloudiness and long atmospheric path lengths present challenges to satellite-based retrievals. Following a similar logic, the retrievals over tropical regions with high cloudiness should also benefit from the method. We present results from a demonstrator dataset of a global combined AVHRR-GAC and MODIS dataset covering the year 2010. The retrieved surface albedo is compared against quality-monitored in situ albedo observations from the Baseline Surface Radiation Network (BSRN). Additionally, the combined retrieval

  13. Exogenic and endogenic albedo and color patterns on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1986-01-01

    New global and high-resolution multispectral mosaics of Europa have been produced from the Voyager imaging data. Photometric normalizations are based on multiple-image techniques that explicitly account for intrinsic albedo variations through pixel-by-pixel solutions. The exogenic color and albedo pattern on Europa is described by a second-order function of the cosine of the angular distance from the apex of orbital motion. On the basis of this second-order function and of color trends that are different on the leading and trailing hemispheres, the exogenic pattern is interpreted as being due to equilibrium between two dominant processes: (1) impact gardening and (2) magnetospheric interactions, including sulfur-ion implantation and sputtering redistribution. Removal of the model exogenic pattern in the mosaics reveals the endogenic variations, consisting of only two major units: darker (redder) and bright materials. Therefore Europa's visual spectral reflectivity is simple, having one continuous exogenic pattern and two discrete endogenic units.

  14. PAMELA's measurements of geomagnetically trapped and albedo protons

    CERN Document Server

    Bruno, A; Barbarino, G C; Bazilevskaya, G A; Bellotti, R; Boezio, M; Bogomolov, E A; Bongi, M; Bonvicini, V; Bottai, S; Bravar, U; Cafagna, F; Campana, D; Carbone, R; Carlson, P; Casolino, M; Castellini, G; Christian, E C; De Donato, C; de Nolfo, G A; De Santis, C; De Simone, N; Di Felice, V; Formato, V; Galper, A M; Karelin, A V; Koldashov, S V; Koldobskiy, S; Krutkov, S Y; Kvashnin, A N; Lee, M; Leonov, A; Malakhov, V; Marcelli, L; Martucci, M; Mayorov, A G; Menn, W; Mergè, M; Mikhailov, V V; Mocchiutti, E; Monaco, A; Mori, N; Munini, R; Osteria, G; Palma, F; Panico, B; Papini, P; Pearce, M; Picozza, P; Ricci, M; Ricciarini, S B; Ryan, J M; Sarkar, R; Scotti, V; Simon, M; Sparvoli, R; Spillantini, P; Stochaj, S; Stozhkov, Y I; Vacchi, A; Vannuccini, E; Vasilyev, G I; Voronov, S A; Yurkin, Y T; Zampa, G; Zampa, N; Zverev, V G

    2015-01-01

    Data from the PAMELA satellite experiment were used to perform a detailed measurement of under-cutoff protons at low Earth orbits. On the basis of a trajectory tracing approach using a realistic description of the magnetosphere, protons were classified into geomagnetically trapped and re-entrant albedo. The former include stably-trapped protons in the South Atlantic Anomaly, which were analyzed in the framework of the adiabatic theory, investigating energy spectra, spatial and angular distributions; results were compared with the predictions of the AP8 and the PSB97 empirical trapped models. The albedo protons were classified into quasi-trapped, concentrating in the magnetic equatorial region, and un-trapped, spreading over all latitudes and including both short-lived (precipitating) and long-lived (pseudo-trapped) components. Features of the penumbra region around the geomagnetic cutoff were investigated as well. PAMELA observations significantly improve the characterization of the high energy proton populat...

  15. Albedo and Reflection Spectra of Extrasolar Giant Planets

    CERN Document Server

    Sudarsky, D; Pinto, P A; Sudarsky, David; Burrows, Adam; Pinto, Philip

    1999-01-01

    We generate theoretical albedo and reflection spectra for a full range of extrasolar giant planet (EGP) models, from Jovian to 51-Pegasi class objects. Our albedo modeling utilizes the latest atomic and molecular cross sections, a Mie theory treatment of extinction by condensates, a variety of particle size distributions, and an extension of the Feautrier radiative transfer method which allows for a general treatment of the scattering phase function. We find that due to qualitative similarities in the compositions and spectra of objects within each of four broad effective temperature ranges, it is natural to establish four representative EGP albedo classes: a ``Jovian'' class (T$_{\\rm eff} \\lesssim 150$ K; Class I) with tropospheric ammonia clouds, a ``water cloud'' class (T$_{\\rm eff} \\sim 250$ K; Class II) primarily affected by condensed H$_2$O, a ``clear'' class (T$_{\\rm eff} \\gtrsim 350$ K; Class III) which lacks clouds, and a high-temperature class (T$_{\\rm{eff}}$ $\\gtrsim$ 900 K; Class IV) for which alk...

  16. Quantifying the missing link between albedo and productivity of boreal forests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovi, Aarne; Liang, Jingjing; Korhonen, Lauri; Kobayashi, Hideki; Rautiainen, Miina

    2016-04-01

    Albedo and fraction of absorbed photosynthetically active radiation (FAPAR) determine the shortwave radiation balance and productivity of forests. Several studies have examined the relation between forest structure and albedo in the boreal zone. Studies regarding FAPAR are fewer and the relations between albedo and FAPAR are still poorly understood. To study these relations we simulated shortwave black sky albedo and canopy FAPAR, using the FRT forest reflectance model. We used two sets of field plots as input data. The plots were located in Alaska, USA (N = 584) and in Finland (N = 506) between Northern latitudes of 60° and 68° , and they represent naturally grown and more intensively managed (regularly thinned) forests, respectively. The simulations were carried out with sun zenith angles (SZA) typical to the biome, ranging from 40° to 80° . The simulated albedos in coniferous plots decreased with increasing tree height, whereas canopy FAPAR showed an opposite trend. The albedo of broadleaved plots was notably higher than that of coniferous plots. No species differences in canopy FAPAR were seen, except for pine forests in Finland that showed lowest FAPAR among species. Albedo and canopy FAPAR were negatively correlated (r ranged from -0.93 to -0.69) in coniferous plots. The correlations were notably weaker (r ranged from -0.64 to 0.05) if plots with broadleaved trees were included. To show the influence of forest management, we further examined the response of albedo and FAPAR to forest density (basal area) and fraction of broadleaved trees. Plots with low basal area showed high albedos but also low canopy FAPAR. When comparing the sparse plots to dense ones, the relative decrease in canopy FAPAR was larger than the relative increase in albedo. However, at large SZAs the basal area could be lowered to approx. 20 m2 ha-1 before FAPAR was notably reduced. Increasing the proportion of broadleaved trees from 0% to 100% increased the albedos to approximately

  17. On the effects of size factor on albedo versus wavelength for light scattered by small particles under Mie and Rayleigh regimes

    CERN Document Server

    Brown, Adrian J

    2013-01-01

    Scattering by particles significantly smaller than the wavelength is an important physical process in the rocky bodies in our solar system and beyond. A number of observations of spectral bluing (referred to in those papers as "Rayleigh scattering") on planetary surfaces have been recently reported, however, the necessary mathematical modeling of this phenomenon has not yet achieved maturity. This paper is a first step to this effect, by examining the effect of grain size and optical index on the albedo of small conservative and absorbing particles as a function of wavelength. The basic conditions necessary for spectral bluing or reddening to be observed in real-world situations are identified. We find that any sufficiently monomodal size distribution of scattering particles will cause spectral bluing in some part of the EM spectrum regardless of its optical index.

  18. Comprehensive modelling of the planetary nebula LMC-SMP 61 and its [WC]-type central star

    CERN Document Server

    Stasinska, G; Peña, M; Hamann, W R; Koesterke, L; Szczerba, R

    2003-01-01

    We present a comprehensive study of the Magellanic Cloud planetary nebula SMP 61 and of its nucleus, a Wolf-Rayet type star classified [WC 5-6]. We have performed a detailed spectral analysis of the central star, using the Potsdam code for expanding atmospheres in non-LTE. The fluxes from the model stellar atmosphere were used to compute photoionization models of the nebula. All the available observations, within their error bars, were used to constrain these models. We find that the ionizing fluxes predicted by the stellar model are basically consistent with the fluxes needed by the photoionization model to reproduce the nebular emission, within the error margins. However, there are indications that the stellar model overestimates the number and hardness of Lyman continuum photons. The photoionization models imply a clumped density structure of the nebular material. The observed CIII] 1909/CII 4267 line ratio implies the existence of carbon-rich clumps in the nebula. Such clumps are likely produced by stella...

  19. Albedo impact on the suitability of biochar systems to mitigate global warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Sebastian; Bright, Ryan M; Fischer, Daniel; Schulz, Hardy; Glaser, Bruno

    2012-11-20

    Biochar application to agricultural soils can change the surface albedo which could counteract the climate mitigation benefit of biochar systems. However, the size of this impact has not yet been quantified. Based on empirical albedo measurements and literature data of arable soils mixed with biochar, a model for annual vegetation cover development based on satellite data and an assessment of the annual development of surface humidity, an average mean annual albedo reduction of 0.05 has been calculated for applying 30-32 Mg ha(-1) biochar on a test field near Bayreuth, Germany. The impact of biochar production and application on the carbon cycle and on the soil albedo was integrated into the greenhouse gas (GHG) balance of a modeled pyrolysis based biochar system via the computation of global warming potential (GWP) characterization factors. The analysis resulted in a reduction of the overall climate mitigation benefit of biochar systems by 13-22% due to the albedo change as compared to an analysis which disregards the albedo effect. Comparing the use of the same quantity of biomass in a biochar system to a bioenergy district heating system which replaces natural gas combustion, bioenergy heating systems achieve 99-119% of the climate benefit of biochar systems according to the model calculation.

  20. Geodatabase model for global geologic mapping: concept and implementation in planetary sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nass, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    One aim of the NASA Dawn mission is to generate global geologic maps of the asteroid Vesta and the dwarf planet Ceres. To accomplish this, the Dawn Science Team followed the technical recommendations for cartographic basemap production. The geological mapping campaign of Vesta was completed and published, but mapping of the dwarf planet Ceres is still ongoing. The tiling schema for the geological mapping is the same for both planetary bodies and for Ceres it is divided into two parts: four overview quadrangles (Survey Orbit, 415 m/pixel) and 15 more detailed quadrangles (High Altitude Mapping HAMO, 140 m/pixel). The first global geologic map was based on survey images (415 m/pixel). The combine 4 Survey quadrangles completed by HAMO data served as basis for generating a more detailed view of the geologic history and also for defining the chronostratigraphy and time scale of the dwarf planet. The most detailed view can be expected within the 15 mapping quadrangles based on HAMO resolution and completed by the Low Altitude Mapping (LAMO) data with 35 m/pixel. For the interpretative mapping process of each quadrangle one responsible mapper was assigned. Unifying the geological mapping of each quadrangle and bringing this together to regional and global valid statements is already a very time intensive task. However, another challenge that has to be accomplished is to consider how the 15 individual mappers can generate one homogenous GIS-based project (w.r.t. geometrical and visual character) thus produce a geologically-consistent final map. Our approach this challenge was already discussed for mapping of Vesta. To accommodate the map requirements regarding rules for data storage and database management, the computer-based GIS environment used for the interpretative mapping process must be designed in a way that it can be adjusted to the unique features of the individual investigation areas. Within this contribution the template will be presented that uses standards

  1. Character and stability of axisymmetric thermal convection in spheres and spherical shells. [model for heat transfer in planetary interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebib, A.; Schubert, G.; Dein, J. L.; Paliwal, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of shell size and mode of heating on the behavior and stability of axisymmetric, infinite Prandtl number convection in a spherical geometry is studied. Heating from within and below features convection onset governed by a self-adjoint system of equations and boundary conditions. For heating only from within or from below, linearized equations and boundary conditions are non-self-adjoint. Identification of the parameter which initiates the departure from self-adjointness, together with the properties of the self-adjoint solution, provide a basis for calculating the heat transfer characteristics of the non-self-adjoint situations. The investigations are an effort to develop a model for heat transfer in planetary interiors. Further development of the technique by modifying the Galerkin method by the introduction of diagonal mode truncation is suggested to permit the consideration of higher values of the Rayleigh numbers, i.e., those more commensurate with terrestrial planet mantles.

  2. Forward and inverse models for photon transport in soil-ice mixtures and their application to the problem of retrieving optical properties of planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Picca, Paolo; Furfaro, Roberto; Kargel, Jeffrey; Ganapol, Barry D.

    2008-04-01

    Remote sensing studies are often based on simplified approaches describing the photon transport in absorbing and scattering media. The main purpose of the present paper is to show the potentiality of modeling directly the transport phenomena by mean of linear Boltzmann equation. Some details about the solution method of the integro-differential equation are reported with a collection of results of relevance in planetary study domain. An inverse approach based on artificial neural network is also proposed to retrieve the optical properties of planetary surfaces and its performances are tested in various cases.

  3. Vibration characteristics of Z-ring-stiffened 60 deg conical shell models of a planetary entry spacecraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naumann, E. C.; Mixon, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the vibration characteristics of a 60 deg conical shell model of a planetary entry vehicle is described and the results presented. Model configurations include the shell with or without one or two Z-ring stiffeners and with or without a simulated payload. Tests were conducted with the model clamped at the small diameter and with the model suspended at the simulated payload. Additionally, calculated results obtained from application of several analytical procedures reported in the literature are presented together with comparisons between experimental and calculated frequencies and meridional mode shapes. Generally, very good frequency agreement between experimental and calculated results was obtained for all model configurations. For small values of circumferential mode number, however, the frequency agreement decreased as the number of ring stiffeners increased. Overall agreement between experimental and calculated mode shapes was generally good. The calculated modes usually showed much larger curvatures in the vicinity of the rings than were observed in the experimentally measured mode shapes. Dual resonances associated with modal preference were noted for the shell without Z-ring stiffeners, whereas the addition of stiffeners produced resonances for which the model responded in two or more modes over different sections of the shell length.

  4. Modeling SNR G1.9+0.3 as a Supernova Inside a Planetary Nebula

    CERN Document Server

    Tsebrenko, Danny

    2014-01-01

    Using 3D numerical hydrodynamical simulations we show that a type Ia supernova (SN Ia) explosion inside a planetary nebula (PN) can explain the observed shape of the G1.9+0.3 supernova remnant (SNR), and its X-ray morphology. The SNR G1.9+0.3 morphology can be generally described as a sphere with two small and incomplete lobes protruding on opposite sides of the SNR, termed "ears", a structure resembling many elliptical PNe. Observations show the synchrotron X-ray emission to be much stronger inside the two ears than in the rest of the SNR. We numerically show that a spherical SN Ia explosion into a circumstellar matter (CSM) with the structure of an elliptical PN with ears can explain the X-ray properties of SNR G1.9+0.3. While the ejecta has already collided with the PN shell in most of the SNR and its forward shock has been slowed down, the ejecta is still advancing inside the ears. The fast forward shock inside the ears explains the stronger X-ray emission there. SN Ia inside PNe (SNIPs) seem to comprise ...

  5. Estimate the influence of snow grain size and black carbon on albedo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZhongMing Guo; NingLian Wang; XiaoBo Wu; HongBo Wu; YuWei Wu

    2015-01-01

    Estimation of the influence of snow grain size and black carbon on albedo is essential in obtaining the accurate albedo. In this paper, field measurement data, including snow grain size, snow depth and density was obtained. Black carbon samples were collected from the snow surface. A simultaneous observation using Analytical Spectral Devices was employed in the Qiyi Glacier located in the Qilian Mountain. Analytical Spectral Devices spectrum data were used to analyze spectral re-flectance of snow for different grain size and black carbon content. The measurements were compared with the results obtained from the Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation model, and the simulation was found to correlate well with the ob-served data. However, the simulated albedo was near to 0.98 times of the measured albedo, so the other factors were as-sumed to be constant using the corrected Snow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation model to estimate the influence of measured snow grain size and black carbon on albedo. Field measurements were controlled to fit the relationship between the snow grain size and black carbon in order to estimate the influence of these factors on the snow albedo.

  6. Retrieval of snow albedo and grain size using reflectance measurements in Himalayan basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Negi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper, spectral reflectance measurements of Himalayan seasonal snow were carried out and analysed to retrieve the snow albedo and effective grain size. The asymptotic radiative transfer (ART theory was applied to retrieve the plane and spherical albedo. The retrieved plane albedo was compared with the measured spectral albedo and a good agreement was observed with ±10% differences. Retrieved integrated albedo was found within ±6% difference with ground observed broadband albedo. The retrieved snow grain sizes using different models based on the ART theory were compared for various snow types and it was observed that the grain size model using two channel method (one in visible and another in NIR region can work well for the Himalayan seasonal snow and it was found consistent with temporal changes in grain size. This method can work very well for clean, dry snow as in the upper Himalaya, but sometimes, due to the low reflectances (<20% using wavelength 1.24 μm, the ART theory cannot be applied, which is common in lower and middle Himalayan old snow. This study is important for monitoring the Himalayan cryosphere using air-borne or space-borne sensors.

  7. Retrieval of snow albedo and grain size using reflectance measurements in Himalayan basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Negi

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper spectral reflectance measurements of Himalayan seasonal snow were carried out and analysed to retrieve the snow albedo and effective grain size. The asymptotic radiative transfer (ART theory was applied to retrieve the plane and spherical albedo. The retrieved plane albedo was compared with the measured spectral albedo and a good agreement was observed with ±10% measured error accuracy. Retrieved integrated albedo was found within ±6% difference with ground observed broadband albedo. The snow grain sizes retrieved using different models based on ART theory are compared for different snow types and it was observed that presently grain size model using two channel method (one in visible and another in NIR region can work well for Himalayan seasonal snow and it was found consistence with temporal increased grain size. This method can work very well for clean dry snow like in upper Himalaya but sometime due to low reflectances (<0.2 using wavelength 1.24 μm ART theory can not be applied, which is common in lower and middle Himalayan old snow. This study is of importance for monitoring the Himalayan cryosphere using air-borne or space-borne sensors.

  8. Albedo parametrization and reversibility of sea ice decay

    OpenAIRE

    M. Müller-Stoffels; R. Wackerbauer

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic's sea ice cover has been receding rapidly in recent years, and global climate models typically predict a further decline over the next century. It is an open question whether a possible loss of Arctic sea ice is reversible. We study the stability of Arctic model sea ice in a conceptual, two-dimensional energy-based regular network model of the ice-ocean layer that considers ARM's longwave radiative budget data and SHEBA albedo measurements. Seasonal ice cover, perennial ice and per...

  9. Modeling planetary seismic data for icy worlds and terrestrial planets with AxiSEM/Instaseis: Example data and a model for the Europa noise environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panning, Mark Paul; Stähler, Simon; Kedar, Sharon; van Driel, Martin; Nissen-Meyer, Tarje; Vance, Steve

    2016-10-01

    Seismology is one of our best tools for detailing interior structure of planetary bodies, and seismometers are likely to be considered for future lander missions to other planetary bodies after the planned landing of InSight on Mars in 2018. In order to guide instrument design and mission requirements, however, it is essential to model likely seismic signals in advance to determine the most promising data needed to meet science goals. Seismic data for multiple planetary bodies can now be simulated rapidly for arbitrary source-receiver configurations to frequencies of 1 Hz and above using the numerical wave propagation codes AxiSEM and Instaseis (van Driel et al., 2015) using 1D models derived from thermodynamic constraints (e.g. Cammarano et al., 2006). We present simulations for terrestrial planets and icy worlds to demonstrate the types of seismic signals we may expect to retrieve. We also show an application that takes advantage of the computational strengths of this method to construct a model of the thermal cracking noise environment for Europa under a range of assumptions of activity levels and elastic and anelastic structure.M. van Driel, L. Krischer, S.C. Stähler, K. Hosseini, and T. Nissen-Meyer (2015), "Instaseis: instant global seismograms based on a broadband waveform database," Solid Earth, 6, 701-717, doi: 10.5194/se-6-701-2015.F. Cammarano, V. Lekic, M. Manga, M.P. Panning, and B.A. Romanowicz (2006), "Long-period seismology on Europa: 1. Physically consistent interior models," J. Geophys. Res., 111, E12009, doi: 10.1029/2006JE002710.

  10. Mars Rover Model Celebration: Developing Inquiry Based Lesson Plans to Teach Planetary Science In Elementary And Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A.; Slagle, E.; Nieser, K.; Carlson, C.; Kapral, A.; Dominey, W.; Ramsey, J.; Konstantinidis, I.; James, J.; Sweaney, S.; Mendez, R.

    2012-12-01

    The recent NASA Mars Rover missions capture the imagination of children, as NASA missions have done for decades. The University of Houston is in the process of developing a prototype of a flexible program that offers children an in-depth educational experience culminating in the design and construction of their own model rover. The existing prototype program is called the Mars Rover Model Celebration. It focuses on students, teachers and parents in grades 3-8. Students will design and build a model of a Mars rover to carry out a student selected science mission on the surface of Mars. The model will be a mock-up, constructed at a minimal cost from art supplies. The students will build the models as part of a project on Mars. The students will be given design criteria for a rover and will do basic research on Mars that will determine the objectives and features of their rover. This project may be used either informally as an after school club or youth group activity or formally as part of a class studying general science, earth science, solar system astronomy or robotics, or as a multi-disciplinary unit for a gifted and talented program. The project's unique strength lies in engaging students in the process of spacecraft design and interesting them in aerospace engineering careers. The project is aimed at elementary and secondary education. Not only will these students learn about scientific fields relevant to the mission (space science, physics, geology, robotics, and more), they will gain an appreciation for how this knowledge is used to tackle complex problems. The low cost of the event makes it an ideal enrichment vehicle for low income schools. It provides activities that provide professional development to educators, curricular support resources using NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) content, and provides family opportunities for involvement in K-12 student learning. This paper will describe the development of a detailed set of new 5E lesson plans to

  11. Measurement of daily spectral soil albedo over France from MODIS and MSG: comparison with soil moisture derived from ASCAT observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S.; Roujean, J. L.; Kaptue, A.; Carrer, D.; Lafont, S.; Parrens, M.; Szczypta, C.; Calvet, J. C.

    2012-04-01

    Surface albedo determines the partition of energy between land surface and atmosphere, which is a crucial parameter for climate studies. In particular, consistency of coarse scale soil background albedo data set is required to improve the radiative scheme in land surface modeling. As an important component of land surface, soil albedo depends on soil moisture, soil roughness, mineral content, tillage, etc. It can change rapidly at hourly or daily basis, revealing the variation of the state variables, particularly soil moisture. Over dense vegetation areas, radiation interactions exist between the soil background and the bottom of canopy, which adds to the difficulty to yield a clear separation between the respective soil and vegetation attributes. With the advent of a new-generation of Earth observing sensor systems, consistent sets of surface albedo products are regularly distributed at global and regional scales within expected accuracy, particularly MODIS and SEVIRI, which provides the potential of generating soil albedo from satellite observations. The objective of this study is to derive soil background albedo from MODIS and SEVIRI data sets over France. A procedure was developed to derive a MODIS albedo on a daily basis in combining TERRA and AQUA observations and in considering the MODIS BRDF model at the appropriate dates. A novel 1D radiative transfer approach is applied to disentangle soil background albedo and vegetation albedo by using the albedo and LAI data sets of MODIS and SEVIRI. This background albedo from satellite observations is made evolving with the use of a Kalman filter approach. In order to generate a predictive model, temporal trajectories of soil background albedo are extracted for each soil mapping unit and further clustered into several clusters by using k-mean method. The temporal coherence of the resulting soil background albedos was assessed with satellite and in-situ rainfall and soil moisture observations. It comes out that the

  12. Experimental evidence that microbial activity lowers the albedo of glacier surfaces: the cryoconite casserole experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, M.; Tranter, M.; Takeuchi, N.; Anesio, A. M.

    2014-12-01

    Darkened glacier and ice sheet surfaces have lower albedos, absorb more solar radiation and consequently melt more rapidly. The increase in glacier surface darkening is an important positive feedback to warming global temperatures, leading to ever growing world-wide ice mass loss. Most studies focus primarily on glacial albedo darkening caused by the physical properties of snow and ice surfaces, and the deposition of dark impurities on glaciers. To date, however, the important effects of biological activity have not been included in most albedo reduction models. This study provides the first experimental evidence that microbial activity can significantly decrease the albedo of glacier surfaces. An original laboratory experiment, the cryoconite casserole, was designed to test the microbial darkening of glacier surface debris (cryoconite) under simulated Greenlandic summer conditions. It was found that minor fertilisation of the cryoconite (at nutrient concentrations typical of glacial ice melt) stimulated extensive microbial activity. Microbes intensified their organic carbon fixation and even mined phosphorous out of the glacier surface sediment. Furthermore, the microbial organic carbon production, accumulation and transformation caused the glacial debris to darken further by 17.3% reflectivity (albedo analogue). These experiments are consistent with the hypothesis that enhanced fertilisation by anthropogenic inputs results in substantial amounts of organic carbon fixation, debris darkening and ultimately to a considerable decrease in the ice albedo of glacier surfaces on global scales. The sizeable amounts of microbially produced glacier surface organic matter and nutrients can thus be a vital source of bioavailable nutrients for subglacial and downstream environments.

  13. Influence of process parameters on the color and texture of passion fruit albedo preserved in syrup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa Pereira Figueiredo

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The industrialization of passion fruit in the form of juice produces considerable amounts of residue that could be used as food. The objective of the present study was to determine the effects of the volume of passion fruit juice added to the syrup and the cooking time on the color and texture of passion fruit albedo preserved in syrup. Multi-linear models were well fit to describe the value for a* (for the albedo the values for b* (for the albedo and syrup, which exhibited high correlation coefficients of 98%, 84%, and 88%, respectively. The volume of passion fruit juice added and the cooking time of the albedos in the syrup, involved in the processing of passion fruit albedo preserves in syrup, significantly affected color analyses. The texture was not affected by the parameters studied. Therefore, the use of larger volumes of passion fruit juice and longer cooking time is recommended for the production of passion fruit albedo preserves in syrup to achieve the characteristic yellow color of the fruit.

  14. Surface Albedo and Spectral Variability of Ceres

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jian-Yang; Nathues, Andreas; Corre, Lucille Le; Izawa, Matthew R M; Clouts, Edward A; Sykes, Mark V; Carsenty, Uri; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C; Hoffmann, Martin; Jaumann, Ralf; Krohn, Katrin; Mottola, Stefano; Prettyman, Thomas H; Schaefer, Michael; Schenk, Paul; Schröder, Stefan E; Williams, David A; Smith, David E; Zuber, Maria T; Konopliv, Alexander S; Park, Ryan S; Raymond, Carol A; Russell, Christopher T

    2016-01-01

    Previous observations suggested that Ceres has active but possibly sporadic water outgassing, and possibly varying spectral characteristics in a time scale of months. We used all available data of Ceres collected in the past three decades from the ground and the Hubble Space Telescope, and the newly acquired images by Dawn Framing Camera to search for spectral and albedo variability on Ceres, in both a global scale and local regions, particularly the bright spots inside Occator crater, over time scales of a few months to decades. Our analysis has placed an upper limit on the possible temporal albedo variation on Ceres. Sporadic water vapor venting, or any possibly ongoing activity on Ceres, is not significant enough to change the albedo or the area of the bright features in Occator crater by >15%, or the global albedo by >3% over various time scales that we searched. Recently reported spectral slope variations can be explained by changing Sun-Ceres-Earth geometry. The active area on Ceres is less than 1 km$^2...

  15. The low energy atmospheric antiproton albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, J. B.; Ormes, J. F.

    1989-01-01

    The flux of albedo antiprotons in the 100-1000 MeV kinetic energy range produced by the cosmic ray primaries in the atmosphere is calculated. It is shown that this is not a significant background to measurements of the low energy anti-proton cosmic ray flux.

  16. The Stellar Obliquity, Planet Mass, and Very Low Albedo of Qatar-2 from K2 Photometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Fei; Winn, Joshua N.; Yu, Liang; Albrecht, Simon

    2017-01-01

    The Qatar-2 transiting exoplanet system was recently observed in short-cadence mode by Kepler as part of K2 Campaign 6. We identify dozens of starspot-crossing events, when the planet eclipses a relatively dark region of the stellar photosphere. The observed patterns of these events demonstrate that the planet always transits over the same range of stellar latitudes and, therefore, that the stellar obliquity is less than about 10°. We support this conclusion with two different modeling approaches: one based on explicit identification and timing of the events and the other based on fitting the light curves with a spotted-star model. We refine the transit parameters and measure the stellar rotation period (18.5 ± 1.9 days), which corresponds to a “gyrochronological” age of 1.4 ± 0.3 Gyr. Coherent flux variations with the same period as the transits are well modeled as the combined effects of ellipsoidal light variations (15.4 ± 4.8 ppm) and Doppler boosting (14.6 ± 5.1 ppm). The magnitudes of these effects correspond to a planetary mass of 2.6+/- 0.9 {M}{Jup} and 3.9+/- 1.5 {M}{Jup}, respectively. Both of these independent mass estimates agree with the mass determined by the spectroscopic Doppler technique (2.487+/- 0.086 {M}{Jup}). No occultations are detected, giving a 2σ upper limit of 0.06 on the planet’s visual geometric albedo. We find no evidence for orbital decay, although we are only able to place a weak lower bound on the relevant tidal quality factor: {Q}\\star \\prime > 1.5× {10}4 (95% confidence).

  17. Strongly Interacting Planetary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, Eric

    2017-01-01

    Both ground-based Doppler surveys and NASA's Kepler mission have discovered a diversity of planetary system architectures that challenge theories of planet formation. Systems of tightly-packed or near-resonant planets are particularly useful for constraining theories of orbital migration and the excitation of orbital eccentricities and inclinations. In particular, transit timing variations (TTVs) provide a powerful tool to characterize the masses and orbits of dozens of small planets, including many planets at orbital periods beyond the reach of both current Doppler surveys and photoevaporation-induced atmospheric loss. Dynamical modeling of these systems has identified some ``supper-puffy'' planets, i.e., low mass planets with surprisingly large radii and low densities. I will describe a few particularly interesting planetary systems and discuss the implications for the formation of planets ranging from gaseous super-Earth-size planets to rocky planets the size of Mars.

  18. Radiative forcing and temperature response to changes in urban albedos and associated CO2 offsets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menon, Surabi; Akbari, Hashem; Mahanama, Sarith; Sednev, Igor; Levinson, Ronnen

    2010-02-12

    The two main forcings that can counteract to some extent the positive forcings from greenhouse gases from pre-industrial times to present-day are the aerosol and related aerosol-cloud forcings, and the radiative response to changes in surface albedo. Here, we quantify the change in radiative forcing and land surface temperature that may be obtained by increasing the albedos of roofs and pavements in urban areas in temperate and tropical regions of the globe by 0.1. Using the catchment land surface model (the land model coupled to the GEOS-5 Atmospheric General Circulation Model), we quantify the change in the total outgoing (outgoing shortwave+longwave) radiation and land surface temperature to a 0.1 increase in urban albedos for all global land areas. The global average increase in the total outgoing radiation was 0.5 Wm{sup -2}, and temperature decreased by {approx}0.008 K for an average 0.003 increase in surface albedo. These averages represent all global land areas where data were available from the land surface model used and are for the boreal summer (June-July-August). For the continental U.S. the total outgoing radiation increased by 2.3 Wm{sup -2}, and land surface temperature decreased by {approx}0.03 K for an average 0.01 increase in surface albedo. Based on these forcings, the expected emitted CO{sub 2} offset for a plausible 0.25 and 0.15 increase in albedos of roofs and pavements, respectively, for all global urban areas, was found to be {approx} 57 Gt CO{sub 2}. A more meaningful evaluation of the impacts of urban albedo increases on global climate and the expected CO{sub 2} offsets would require simulations which better characterizes urban surfaces and represents the full annual cycle.

  19. Comparison between Snow Albedo Obtained from Landsat TM, ETM+ Imagery and the SPOT VEGETATION Albedo Product in a Mediterranean Mountainous Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Pimentel

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Albedo plays an important role in snow evolution modeling quantifying the amount of solar radiation absorbed and reflected by the snowpack, especially in mid-latitude regions with semiarid conditions. Satellite remote sensing is the most extensive technique to determine the variability of snow albedo over medium to large areas; however, scale effects from the pixel size of the sensor source may affect the results of snow models, with different impacts depending on the spatial resolution. This work presents the evaluation of snow albedo values retrieved from (1 Landsat images, L (16-day frequency with 30 × 30 m pixel size and (2 SPOT VEGETATION albedo products, SV (10-day frequency with 1 × 1 km pixel size in the Sierra Nevada mountain range in South Spain, a Mediterranean site representative of highly heterogeneous conditions. Daily snow albedo map series were derived from both sources, and used as input for the snow module in the WiMMed (Watershed Integrated Management in Mediterranean Environment hydrological model, which was operational at the study area for snow monitoring for two hydrological years, 2011–2012 and 2012–2013, in the Guadalfeo river basin in Sierra Nevada. The results showed similar albedo trends in both data sources, but with different values, the shift between both sources being distributed in space according to the altitude. This difference resulted in lower snow cover fraction values in the SV-simulations that affected the rest of snow variables included in the simulation. This underestimation, mainly due to the effects of mixed pixels composed by both snow and snow-free areas, produced higher divergences from both sources during the melting periods when the evapo-sublimation and melting fluxes are more relevant. Therefore, the selection of the albedo data source in these areas, where snow evapo-sublimation plays a very important role and the presence of snow-free patches is very frequent, can condition the final

  20. Correction to "Influence of Dust and Black Carbon on the Snow Albedo in the NASA Goddard Earth Observing System Version 5 Land Surface Model"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasunari, Teppei J.; Koster, Randal D.; Kau, K. M.; Aoki, Teruo; Sud, Yogesh C.; Yamazaki, Takeshi; Motoyoshi, Hiroki; Kokdama, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    The website information describing the forcing meteorological data used for the land surface model (LSM) simulation, which were observed at an Automated Meteorological Station CAWS) at the Sapporo District Meteorological Observatory maintained by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA), was missing from the text. The 1-hourly data were obtained from the website of Kisyoutoukeijouhou (Information for available JMA-observed meteorological data in the past) on the website of JMA (in Japanese) (available at: http://www.jma.go.jpijmaimenulreport.html). The measurement height information of 59.5 m for the anemometer at the Sapporo Observatory was also obtained from the website of JMA (in Japanese) (available at: http://www.jma.go.jp/jma/menu/report.html). In addition, the converted 10-m wind speed, based on the AWS/JMA data, was further converted to a 2-m wind speed prior to its use with the land model as a usual treatment of off-line Catchment simulation. Please ignore the ice absorption data on the website mentioned in paragraph [15] which was not used for our calculations (but the data on the website was mostly the same as the estimated ice absorption coefficients by the following method because they partially used the same data by Warren [1984]). We calculated the ice absorption coefficients with the method mentioned in the same paragraph, for which some of the refractive index data by Warren [1984] were used and then interpolated between wavelengths, and also mentioned in paragraph [20] for the visible (VIS) and near-infrared (NIR) ranges. The optical data we used were interpolated between wavelengths as necessary.

  1. An investigation of ozone and planetary boundary layer dynamics over the complex topography of Grenoble combining measurements and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Couach

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper concerns an evaluation of ozone (O3 and planetary boundary layer (PBL dynamics over the complex topography of the Grenoble region through a combination of measurements and mesoscale model (METPHOMOD predictions for three days, during July 1999. The measurements of O3 and PBL structure were obtained with a Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL system, situated 20 km south of Grenoble at Vif (310 m ASL. The combined lidar observations and model calculations are in good agreement with atmospheric measurements obtained with an instrumented aircraft (METAIR. Ozone fluxes were calculated using lidar measurements of ozone vertical profiles concentrations and the horizontal wind speeds measured with a Radar Doppler wind profiler (DEGREANE. The ozone flux patterns indicate that the diurnal cycle of ozone production is controlled by local thermal winds. The convective PBL maximum height was some 2700 m above the land surface while the nighttime residual ozone layer was generally found between 1200 and 2200 m. Finally we evaluate the magnitude of the ozone processes at different altitudes in order to estimate the photochemical ozone production due to the primary pollutants emissions of Grenoble city and the regional network of automobile traffic.

  2. Albedo parametrization and reversibility of sea ice decay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Stoffels, M.; Wackerbauer, R.

    2012-02-01

    The Arctic's sea ice cover has been receding rapidly in recent years, and global climate models typically predict a further decline over the next century. It is an open question whether a possible loss of Arctic sea ice is reversible. We study the stability of Arctic model sea ice in a conceptual, two-dimensional energy-based regular network model of the ice-ocean layer that considers ARM's longwave radiative budget data and SHEBA albedo measurements. Seasonal ice cover, perennial ice and perennial open water are asymptotic states accessible by the model. We show that the shape of albedo parameterization near the melting temperature differentiates between reversible continuous sea ice decrease under atmospheric forcing and hysteresis behavior. Fixed points induced solely by the surface energy budget are essential for understanding the interaction of surface energy with the radiative forcing and the underlying body of ice/water, particularly close to a bifurcation point. Future studies will explore ice edge stability and reversibility in this lattice model, generalized to a latitudinal transect with spatiotemporal lateral atmospheric heat transfer and high spatial resolution.

  3. Albedo parametrization and reversibility of sea ice decay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Müller-Stoffels

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The Arctic's sea ice cover has been receding rapidly in recent years, and global climate models typically predict a further decline over the next century. It is an open question whether a possible loss of Arctic sea ice is reversible. We study the stability of Arctic model sea ice in a conceptual, two-dimensional energy-based regular network model of the ice-ocean layer that considers ARM's longwave radiative budget data and SHEBA albedo measurements. Seasonal ice cover, perennial ice and perennial open water are asymptotic states accessible by the model. We show that the shape of albedo parameterization near the melting temperature differentiates between reversible continuous sea ice decrease under atmospheric forcing and hysteresis behavior. Fixed points induced solely by the surface energy budget are essential for understanding the interaction of surface energy with the radiative forcing and the underlying body of ice/water, particularly close to a bifurcation point. Future studies will explore ice edge stability and reversibility in this lattice model, generalized to a latitudinal transect with spatiotemporal lateral atmospheric heat transfer and high spatial resolution.

  4. The Effect of Star-Planet Interactions on Planetary Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Aomawa; Meadows, Victoria; Bitz, Cecilia; Pierrehumbert, Raymond; Joshi, Manoj; Robinson, Tyler; Agol, Eric; Barnes, Rory; Charnay, Benjamin; Virtual Planetary Laboratory

    2015-01-01

    In this work I explored the effect on planetary climate and habitability of interactions between a host star, an orbiting planet and additional planets in a stellar system. I developed and tested models that include both radiative and gravitational effects, and simulated planets covered by ocean, land and water ice, with incident stellar radiation from stars of different spectral types. These simulations showed that ice-covered conditions occurred on an F-dwarf planet with a much smaller decrease in stellar flux than planets orbiting stars with less near-UV radiation, due to ice reflecting strongly in the visible and near-UV. The surface ice-albedo feedback effect is less important at the outer edge of the habitable zone, where ˜3-10 bars of CO2 could entirely mask the climatic effect of ice and snow, leaving the traditional outer limit of the habitable zone unaffected by the spectral dependence of water ice and snow albedo. The exit out of global ice cover was also sensitive to host star spectral energy distribution. A planet orbiting an M-dwarf star exhibited a smaller resistance to melting out of a frozen state, requiring a smaller stellar flux to initiate deglaciation than planets orbiting hotter, brighter stars. Given their greater climate stability, planets orbiting cooler, lower-mass stars may be the best candidates for long-term habitability and life beyond the Solar System. A specific case was explored—that of Kepler-62f, a potentially habitable planet in a five-planet system orbiting a K-dwarf star. Simulations using a 3-D Global Climate Model indicated that Kepler-62f would have areas of the planet with surface temperatures above the freezing point of water with 1 bar or more of CO2 in its atmosphere. In a low-CO2 case, increases in planetary obliquity and orbital eccentricity coupled with an orbital configuration that places the summer solstice at or near pericenter generated regions of the planet with above-freezing surface temperatures, which may

  5. Flowing Hot or Cold: User-Friendly Computational Models of Terrestrial and Planetary Lava Channels and Lakes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakimoto, S. E. H.

    2016-12-01

    Planetary volcanism has redefined what is considered volcanism. "Magma" now may be considered to be anything from the molten rock familiar at terrestrial volcanoes to cryovolcanic ammonia-water mixes erupted on an outer solar system moon. However, even with unfamiliar compositions and source mechanisms, we find familiar landforms such as volcanic channels, lakes, flows, and domes and thus a multitude of possibilities for modeling. As on Earth, these landforms lend themselves to analysis for estimating storage, eruption and/or flow rates. This has potential pitfalls, as extension of the simplified analytic models we often use for terrestrial features into unfamiliar parameter space might yield misleading results. Our most commonly used tools for estimating flow and cooling have tended to lag significantly behind state-of-the-art; the easiest methods to use are neither realistic or accurate, but the more realistic and accurate computational methods are not simple to use. Since the latter computational tools tend to be both expensive and require a significant learning curve, there is a need for a user-friendly approach that still takes advantage of their accuracy. One method is use of the computational package for generation of a server-based tool that allows less computationally inclined users to get accurate results over their range of input parameters for a given problem geometry. A second method is to use the computational package for the generation of a polynomial empirical solution for each class of flow geometry that can be fairly easily solved by anyone with a spreadsheet. In this study, we demonstrate both approaches for several channel flow and lava lake geometries with terrestrial and extraterrestrial examples and compare their results. Specifically, we model cooling rectangular channel flow with a yield strength material, with applications to Mauna Loa, Kilauea, Venus, and Mars. This approach also shows promise with model applications to lava lakes, magma

  6. On the importance of the albedo parameterization for the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet in EC-Earth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Helsen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The albedo of the surface of ice sheets changes as a function of time due to the effects of deposition of new snow, ageing of dry snow, bare ice exposure, melting and run-off. Currently, the calculation of the albedo of ice sheets is highly parameterized within the earth system model EC-Earth by taking a constant value for areas with thick perennial snow cover. This is an important reason why the surface mass balance (SMB of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS is poorly resolved in the model. The purpose of this study is to improve the SMB forcing of the GrIS by evaluating different parameter settings within a snow albedo scheme. By allowing ice-sheet albedo to vary as a function of wet and dry conditions, the spatial distribution of albedo and melt rate improves. Nevertheless, the spatial distribution of SMB in EC-Earth is not significantly improved. As a reason for this, we identify omissions in the current snow albedo scheme, such as separate treatment of snow and ice and the effect of refreezing. The resulting SMB is downscaled from the lower-resolution global climate model topography to the higher-resolution ice-sheet topography of the GrIS, such that the influence of these different SMB climatologies on the long-term evolution of the GrIS is tested by ice-sheet model simulations. From these ice-sheet simulations we conclude that an albedo scheme with a short response time of decaying albedo during wet conditions performs best with respect to long-term simulated ice-sheet volume. This results in an optimized albedo parameterization that can be used in future EC-Earth simulations with an interactive ice-sheet component.

  7. On the importance of the albedo parameterization for the mass balance of the Greenland ice sheet in EC-Earth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helsen, Michiel M.; van de Wal, Roderik S. W.; Reerink, Thomas J.; Bintanja, Richard; Madsen, Marianne S.; Yang, Shuting; Li, Qiang; Zhang, Qiong

    2017-08-01

    The albedo of the surface of ice sheets changes as a function of time due to the effects of deposition of new snow, ageing of dry snow, bare ice exposure, melting and run-off. Currently, the calculation of the albedo of ice sheets is highly parameterized within the earth system model EC-Earth by taking a constant value for areas with thick perennial snow cover. This is an important reason why the surface mass balance (SMB) of the Greenland ice sheet (GrIS) is poorly resolved in the model. The purpose of this study is to improve the SMB forcing of the GrIS by evaluating different parameter settings within a snow albedo scheme. By allowing ice-sheet albedo to vary as a function of wet and dry conditions, the spatial distribution of albedo and melt rate improves. Nevertheless, the spatial distribution of SMB in EC-Earth is not significantly improved. As a reason for this, we identify omissions in the current snow albedo scheme, such as separate treatment of snow and ice and the effect of refreezing. The resulting SMB is downscaled from the lower-resolution global climate model topography to the higher-resolution ice-sheet topography of the GrIS, such that the influence of these different SMB climatologies on the long-term evolution of the GrIS is tested by ice-sheet model simulations. From these ice-sheet simulations we conclude that an albedo scheme with a short response time of decaying albedo during wet conditions performs best with respect to long-term simulated ice-sheet volume. This results in an optimized albedo parameterization that can be used in future EC-Earth simulations with an interactive ice-sheet component.

  8. NASA Airborne Snow Observatory: Measuring Spatial Distribution of Snow Water Equivalent and Snow Albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, M.; Painter, T. H.; Mattmann, C. A.; Ramirez, P.; Laidlaw, R.; Bormann, K. J.; Skiles, M.; Richardson, M.; Berisford, D. F.

    2015-12-01

    The two most critical properties for understanding snowmelt runoff and timing are the spatial and temporal distributions of snow water equivalent (SWE) and snow albedo. Despite their importance in controlling volume and timing of runoff, snowpack albedo and SWE are still largely unquantified in the US and not at all in most of the globe, leaving runoff models poorly constrained. NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, in partnership with the California Department of Water Resources, has developed the Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO), an imaging spectrometer and scanning LiDAR system, to quantify SWE and snow albedo, generate unprecedented knowledge of snow properties for cutting edge cryospheric science, and provide complete, robust inputs to water management models and systems of the future. This poster will describe the NASA Airborne Snow Observatory, its outputs and their uses and applications, along with recent advancements to the system and plans for the project's future. Specifically, we will look at how ASO uses its imaging spectrometer to quantify spectral albedo, broadband albedo, and radiative forcing by dust and black carbon in snow. Additionally, we'll see how the scanning LiDAR is used to determine snow depth against snow-free acquisitions and to quantify snow water equivalent when combined with in-situ constrained modeling of snow density.

  9. Problems for the WELS classification of planetary nebulae central stars: Self-consistent nebular modelling of four candidates

    CERN Document Server

    Basurah, Hassan M; Dopita, Michael A; Alsulami, R; Amer, Morsi A; Alruhaili, A

    2016-01-01

    We present integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy and self-consistent photoionisation modelling for a sample of four southern Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) with supposed weak emission-line (WEL) central stars. The Wide Field Spectrograph (WiFeS) on the ANU 2.3 m telescope has been used to provide IFU spectroscopy for NGC 3211, NGC 5979, My 60, and M 4-2 covering the spectral range of 3400-7000{\\AA}. All objects are high excitation non-Type I PNe, with strong He II emission, strong [Ne V] emission, and weak low-excitation lines. They all appear to be predominantly optically-thin nebulae excited by central stars with $T_{\\rm eff} > 10^5$K. Three PNe of the sample have central stars which have been previously classified as weak emission-line stars (WELS), and the fourth also shows the characteristic recombination lines of a WELS. However, the spatially-resolved spectroscopy shows that rather than arising in the central star, the C IV and N III recombination line emission is distributed in the nebula, and in s...

  10. Analytical model of the contact interaction between the components of a special percussive mechanism for planetary exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, Luis J.; Malla, Ramesh B.

    2016-01-01

    Special percussive mechanisms, e.g. Auto Gopher and UltraSonic/Sonic Driller/Corer (USDC) have been developed by NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Honeybee Robotics Spacecraft Mechanisms, Corp. to address some of the limitations of current drilling techniques for planetary exploration. The percussive mechanism consists of an ultrasonic horn, a free mass (hammer) and the drill rod. This paper presents the analysis of the interaction between these three components. The impact between the components (i.e. ultrasonic horn and free mass, and free mass and drill rod) is analyzed using solid body collision analysis applying the principle of conservation of momentum. The drill rod is modeled for both undamped and damped cases with equivalent generalized single degree of freedom system. Various values are used for the coefficient of restitution to account for energy loss during impact. The energy transferred to the drill rod by the free mass is obtained determining the change in kinetic energy due to impact. It is observed that the free mass converts the high frequency of oscillation of the ultrasonic horn into lower frequency impacts on the drill rod. A decrease in the coefficient of restitution results in a decrease in the number of impacts, impulse imparted to the drill rod and energy transferred to the drill rod by the impact of the free mass.

  11. Albedo decline on Greenland's Mittivakkat Gletscher in a warming climate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mernild, Sebastian H.; Malmros, Jeppe K.; Yde, Jacob C.

    2015-01-01

    Albedo is one of the parameters that govern energy availability for snow and ice surface ablation, and subsequently the surface mass balance conditions of temperate glaciers and ice caps (GIC). Here, we document snow and ice albedo changes for Mittivakkat Gletscher (MG) in Southeast Greenland (20.......10. The greatest decline in albedo, of 0.25, occurred near the equilibrium line altitude (ELA), an important surface cover and albedo transitional zone. The EBY albedo correlates significantly with ELA and net winter and summer glacier mass balance records....

  12. Working model of the atmosphere and near planetary space of Jupiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, V. I. (Editor)

    1978-01-01

    Basic physical characteristics of Jupiter, its gravitational field, atmosphere, electromagnetic radiation, magnetosphere, meteorite situation and satellites are presented in tables, graphs and figures. Means of observation of the atmosphere and three models of the atmosphere are presented and analyzed.

  13. Meta Modeling of Transmission Error for Spur, Helical and Planetary Gears for Wind Turbine Application

    OpenAIRE

    Irfan, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Detailed analysis of drive train dynamics requires accounting for the transmission error that arises in gears. However, the direct computation of the transmission error requires a 3-dimensional contact analysis with correct gear geometry, which is impractically computationally intense. Therefore, a simplified representation of the transmission error is desired, a so-called meta-model, is developed. The model is based on response surface method, and the coefficients of the angle-dependent tran...

  14. Problems for the WELS classification of planetary nebula central stars: self-consistent nebular modelling of four candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basurah, Hassan M.; Ali, Alaa; Dopita, Michael A.; Alsulami, R.; Amer, Morsi A.; Alruhaili, A.

    2016-05-01

    We present integral field unit (IFU) spectroscopy and self-consistent photoionization modelling for a sample of four southern Galactic planetary nebulae (PNe) with supposed weak emission-line central stars. The Wide Field Spectrograph on the ANU 2.3 m telescope has been used to provide IFU spectroscopy for NGC 3211, NGC 5979, My 60, and M 4-2 covering the spectral range of 3400-7000 Å. All objects are high-excitation non-Type I PNe, with strong He II emission, strong [Ne V] emission, and weak low-excitation lines. They all appear to be predominantly optically thin nebulae excited by central stars with Teff > 105 K. Three PNe of the sample have central stars which have been previously classified as weak emission-line stars (WELS), and the fourth also shows the characteristic recombination lines of a WELS. However, the spatially resolved spectroscopy shows that rather than arising in the central star, the C IV and N III recombination line emission is distributed in the nebula, and in some cases concentrated in discrete nebular knots. This may suggest that the WELS classification is spurious, and that, rather, these lines arise from (possibly chemically enriched) pockets of nebular gas. Indeed, from careful background subtraction we were able to identify three of the sample as being hydrogen rich O(H)-Type. We have constructed fully self-consistent photoionization models for each object. This allows us to independently determine the chemical abundances in the nebulae, to provide new model-dependent distance estimates, and to place the central stars on the Hertzsprung-Russell diagram. All four PNe have similar initial mass (1.5 < M/M⊙ < 2.0) and are at a similar evolutionary stage.

  15. MODIS/COMBINED MCD43C3 Albedo 16-Day L3 Global 0.05Deg CMG

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/Albedo Model Parameters product (MCD43A1) contains three-dimensional (3D) data sets providing users...

  16. MODIS/COMBINED MCD43B2 BRDF-Albedo Quality 16-Day L3 Global 1km

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/Albedo Model Parameters product (MCD43A1) contains three-dimensional (3D) data sets providing users...

  17. MODIS/COMBINED MCD43A2 BRDF-Albedo Quality 16-Day L3 Global 500m

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/Albedo Model Parameters product (MCD43A1) contains three-dimensional (3D) data sets providing users...

  18. Reduced-Basis Determination of Planetary Boundary-Layer Flow Statistics for a Novel Turbulence Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skitka, Joseph; Marston, Brad; Fox-Kemper, Baylor

    2016-11-01

    Uncertainty in climate modeling and weather forecasting can largely be attributed to the omission or inaccurate representation of oceanic and atmospheric subgrid processes. Existing subgrid turbulence models are built on assumptions of isotropy, homogeneity, and the locality of correlations. Direct statistical simulation (DSS) using expansion in equal-time cumulants is a novel approach to subgrid modeling that does not make these assumptions. In prior work, a second-order closure, CE2, was shown to capture important vertical turbulent transports in Langmuir turbulence and Rayleigh-Bénard convection, but to run efficiently, this approach to turbulence modeling requires a drastic reduction in dimensionality. The present work addresses how accurately these systems can be represented with a truncated principal orthogonal decomposition (POD). The representation of turbulent transports by truncated POD bases are studied by static projection of fully resolved statistics and dynamical evolution of a reduced model. Results indicate the projected truncated turbulent statistics in these flows are less sensitive to flow details, like mixed-layer depth, than the truncated basis itself. The question of whether POD is an optimal truncation technique for these purposes is considered. NSF DMR 1306806, NSF GCE 1350795, The Institute at Brown for Environment and Society Graduate Student Fellowship.

  19. The GISS global climate-middle atmosphere model. II - Model variability due to interactions between planetary waves, the mean circulation and gravity wave drag

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rind, D.; Suozzo, R.; Balachandran, N. K.

    1988-01-01

    The variability which arises in the GISS Global Climate-Middle Atmosphere Model on two time scales is reviewed: interannual standard deviations, derived from the five-year control run, and intraseasonal variability as exemplified by statospheric warnings. The model's extratropical variability for both mean fields and eddy statistics appears reasonable when compared with observations, while the tropical wind variability near the stratopause may be excessive possibly, due to inertial oscillations. Both wave 1 and wave 2 warmings develop, with connections to tropospheric forcing. Variability on both time scales results from a complex set of interactions among planetary waves, the mean circulation, and gravity wave drag. Specific examples of these interactions are presented, which imply that variability in gravity wave forcing and drag may be an important component of the variability of the middle atmosphere.

  20. Global warming and climate forcing by recent albedo changes on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, L.K.; Geissler, P.E.; Haberle, R.M.

    2007-01-01

    For hundreds of years, scientists have tracked the changing appearance of Mars, first by hand drawings and later by photographs. Because of this historical record, many classical albedo patterns have long been known to shift in appearance over time. Decadal variations of the martian surface albedo are generally attributed to removal and deposition of small amounts of relatively bright dust on the surface. Large swaths of the surface (up to 56 million km2) have been observed to darken or brighten by 10 per cent or more. It is unknown, however, how these albedo changes affect wind circulation, dust transport and the feedback between these processes and the martian climate. Here we present predictions from a Mars general circulation model, indicating that the observed interannual albedo alterations strongly influence the martian environment. Results indicate enhanced wind stress in recently darkened areas and decreased wind stress in brightened areas, producing a positive feedback system in which the albedo changes strengthen the winds that generate the changes. The simulations also predict a net annual global warming of surface air temperatures by ???0.65 K, enhancing dust lifting by increasing the likelihood of dust devil generation. The increase in global dust lifting by both wind stress and dust devils may affect the mechanisms that trigger large dust storm initiation, a poorly understood phenomenon, unique to Mars. In addition, predicted increases in summertime air temperatures at high southern latitudes would contribute to the rapid and steady scarp retreat that has been observed in the south polar residual ice for the past four Mars years. Our results suggest that documented albedo changes affect recent climate change and large-scale weather patterns on Mars, and thus albedo variations are a necessary component of future atmospheric and climate studies. ??2007 Nature Publishing Group.

  1. Global warming and climate forcing by recent albedo changes on Mars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenton, Lori K; Geissler, Paul E; Haberle, Robert M

    2007-04-05

    For hundreds of years, scientists have tracked the changing appearance of Mars, first by hand drawings and later by photographs. Because of this historical record, many classical albedo patterns have long been known to shift in appearance over time. Decadal variations of the martian surface albedo are generally attributed to removal and deposition of small amounts of relatively bright dust on the surface. Large swaths of the surface (up to 56 million km2) have been observed to darken or brighten by 10 per cent or more. It is unknown, however, how these albedo changes affect wind circulation, dust transport and the feedback between these processes and the martian climate. Here we present predictions from a Mars general circulation model, indicating that the observed interannual albedo alterations strongly influence the martian environment. Results indicate enhanced wind stress in recently darkened areas and decreased wind stress in brightened areas, producing a positive feedback system in which the albedo changes strengthen the winds that generate the changes. The simulations also predict a net annual global warming of surface air temperatures by approximately 0.65 K, enhancing dust lifting by increasing the likelihood of dust devil generation. The increase in global dust lifting by both wind stress and dust devils may affect the mechanisms that trigger large dust storm initiation, a poorly understood phenomenon, unique to Mars. In addition, predicted increases in summertime air temperatures at high southern latitudes would contribute to the rapid and steady scarp retreat that has been observed in the south polar residual ice for the past four Mars years. Our results suggest that documented albedo changes affect recent climate change and large-scale weather patterns on Mars, and thus albedo variations are a necessary component of future atmospheric and climate studies.

  2. Evaluation of simulated climatological diurnal temperature range in CMIP5 models from the perspective of planetary boundary layer turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Nan; Zhou, Liming; Dai, Yongjiu

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the effects of modeled planetary boundary layer (PBL) mixing on the simulated temperature diurnal cycle climatology over land in 20 CMIP5 models with AMIP simulations. When compared with observations, the magnitude of diurnal temperature range (DTR) is systematically underestimated over almost all land areas due to a widespread warm bias of daily minimum temperature (Tmin) and mostly a cold bias of daily maximum temperature (Tmax). Analyses of the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble means suggest that the biases of the simulated PBL mixing could very likely contribute to the temperature biases. For the regions with the cold bias in Tmax, the daytime PBL mixing is generally underestimated. The consequent more dry air entrainment from the free atmosphere could help maintain the surface humidity gradient, and thus produce more surface evaporation and potentially lower the Tmax. The opposite situation holds true for the regions with the warm bias of Tmax. This mechanism could be particularly applicable to the regions with moderate and wet climate conditions where surface evaporation depends more on the surface humidity gradient, but less on the available soil moisture. For the widespread warm bias of Tmin, the widely-recognized overestimated PBL mixing at nighttime should play a dominant role by transferring more heat from the atmosphere to the near-surface to warm the Tmin. Further analyses using the high resolution CFMIP2 output also support the CMIP5 results about the connections of the biases between the simulated turbulent mixing and the temperature diurnal cycle. The large inter-model variations of the simulated temperature diurnal cycle primarily appear over the arid and semi-arid regions and boreal arctic regions where the model differences in the PBL turbulence mixing could make equally significant contributions to the inter-model variations of DTR, Tmax and Tmin compared to the model differences in surface radiative processes. These results

  3. Evaluation of simulated climatological diurnal temperature range in CMIP5 models from the perspective of planetary boundary layer turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Nan; Zhou, Liming; Dai, Yongjiu

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the effects of modeled planetary boundary layer (PBL) mixing on the simulated temperature diurnal cycle climatology over land in 20 CMIP5 models with AMIP simulations. When compared with observations, the magnitude of diurnal temperature range (DTR) is systematically underestimated over almost all land areas due to a widespread warm bias of daily minimum temperature (Tmin) and mostly a cold bias of daily maximum temperature (Tmax). Analyses of the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble means suggest that the biases of the simulated PBL mixing could very likely contribute to the temperature biases. For the regions with the cold bias in Tmax, the daytime PBL mixing is generally underestimated. The consequent more dry air entrainment from the free atmosphere could help maintain the surface humidity gradient, and thus produce more surface evaporation and potentially lower the Tmax. The opposite situation holds true for the regions with the warm bias of Tmax. This mechanism could be particularly applicable to the regions with moderate and wet climate conditions where surface evaporation depends more on the surface humidity gradient, but less on the available soil moisture. For the widespread warm bias of Tmin, the widely-recognized overestimated PBL mixing at nighttime should play a dominant role by transferring more heat from the atmosphere to the near-surface to warm the Tmin. Further analyses using the high resolution CFMIP2 output also support the CMIP5 results about the connections of the biases between the simulated turbulent mixing and the temperature diurnal cycle. The large inter-model variations of the simulated temperature diurnal cycle primarily appear over the arid and semi-arid regions and boreal arctic regions where the model differences in the PBL turbulence mixing could make equally significant contributions to the inter-model variations of DTR, Tmax and Tmin compared to the model differences in surface radiative processes. These results

  4. Newton-Machian analysis of Neo-tychonian model of planetary motions

    CERN Document Server

    Popov, Luka

    2013-01-01

    The calculation of the trajectories in the Sun-Earth-Mars system will be performed in two different models, both in the framework of Newtonian mechanics. First model is well-known Copernican system, which assumes the Sun is at rest and all the planets orbit around it. Second one is less-known model developed by Tycho Brahe (1546-1601), according to which the Earth stands still, the Sun orbits around the Earth, and other planets orbit around the Sun. The term "Neo-tychonian system" refers to the assumption that orbits of distant masses around the Earth are synchronized with the Sun's orbit. It is the aim of this paper to show the kinematical and dynamical equivalence of these systems, under the assumption of Mach's principle.

  5. Newtonian-Machian analysis of the neo-Tychonian model of planetary motions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popov, Luka

    2013-03-01

    The calculation of the trajectories in the Sun-Earth-Mars system is performed using two different models, both in the framework of Newtonian mechanics. The first model is the well-known Copernican system, which assumes that the Sun is at rest and that all the planets orbit around it. The second is a less well-known model, developed by Tycho Brahe (1546-1601), according to which the Earth stands still, the Sun orbits around the Earth, and the other planets orbit around the Sun. The term ‘neo-Tychonian system’ refers to the assumption that orbits of distant masses around the Earth are synchronized with the Sun's orbit. It is the aim of this paper to show the kinematical and dynamical equivalence of these systems, under the assumption of Mach's principle.

  6. Persistent spread in seasonal albedo change radiative forcings linked to forest cover changes at northern latitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, R. M.; Myhre, G.; Astrup, R. A.; Antón-Fernández, C.; Strømman, A. H.

    2014-12-01

    Large-scale land use and land cover change (LULCC) can significantly affect regional climates from changes in surface biogeophysics, and a substantial part of historical LULCC from forest to crop or pasture occurred in the mid- and high-latitudes of North America and Eurasia where the snow-masking effect of forests often leads to a negative radiative forcing from albedo changes linked to deforestation. Results from several recent historical LULCC modeling studies, however, reveal an order of magnitude spread in climate forcing from the snow-masking effect by forests. This is likely because, in months with snow cover, the interactions between vegetation and snow significantly complicate the relationship between the change in forest cover fraction and albedo, thus accurate characterizations of land surface-albedo dynamics are essential given the importance of albedo feedbacks when ground or canopy surfaces are covered in snow Here, we evaluate snow masking parameterization schemes of seven prominent climate models in greater detail in order to pinpoint major sources of the persistent variability in albedo predictions across models. Using a comprehensive dataset of forest structure, meteorology, and daily MODIS albedo observations spanning three winter-spring seasons in three regions of boreal Norway, we estimate radiative forcings connected to canopy snow masking and compare it to the observed forcings. We develop a physically-based regression model and compare its performance to existing modeling schemes, concluding with a discussion on the utility of purely empirical parameterizations relative to those rooted in radiative transfer theory and/or process-based modeling.

  7. Strength of forest-albedo feedback in mid-Holocene climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Otto

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Reconstructions of the mid-Holocene climate, 6000 years before present, suggest that spring temperatures were higher at high northern latitudes compared to the pre-industrial period. A positive feedback between expansion of forest and climate presumably contributed to this warming. In the presence of snow, forests have a lower albedo than grass land. Therefore, the expansion of forest likely favoured a warming in spring, counteracting the lower insolation at the mid-Holocene.

    We investigate the sensitivity of the vegetation-atmosphere interaction under mid-Holocene orbital forcing with respect to the strength of the forest-albedo feedback by using a comprehensive coupled atmosphere-vegetation model (ECHAM5/JSBACH. We perform two sets of model simulations: a first set of simulations with a relatively weak reduction of albedo of snow by forest; and a second set of simulations with a relatively strong reduction of the albedo of snow by forest.

    We show that the parameterisation of the albedo of snow leads to uncertainties in the temperature signal. Compared to the set with weak snow masking, the simulations with strong snow masking reveal a spring warming that is three times higher, by 0.34 °C north of 60° N. This warming is related to a forest expansion of only 13%.

  8. Stereo vision for planetary rovers - Stochastic modeling to near real-time implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthies, Larry

    1991-01-01

    JPL has achieved the first autonomous cross-country robotic traverses to use stereo vision, with all computing onboard the vehicle. This paper describes the stereo vision system, including the underlying statistical model and the details of the implementation. It is argued that the overall approach provides a unifying paradigm for practical domain-independent stereo ranging.

  9. Exponential law as a more compatible model to describe orbits of planetary systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Saeedi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available   According to the Titus-Bode law, orbits of planets in the solar system obey a geometric progression. Many investigations have been launched to improve this law. In this paper, we apply square and exponential models to planets of solar system, moons of planets, and some extra solar systems, and compare them with each other.

  10. Modeling pN2 through Geological Time: Implications for Planetary Climates and Atmospheric Biosignatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stüeken, E. E.; Kipp, M. A.; Koehler, M. C.; Schwieterman, E. W.; Johnson, B.; Buick, R.

    2016-12-01

    Nitrogen is a major nutrient for all life on Earth and could plausibly play a similar role in extraterrestrial biospheres. The major reservoir of nitrogen at Earth's surface is atmospheric N2, but recent studies have proposed that the size of this reservoir may have fluctuated significantly over the course of Earth's history with particularly low levels in the Neoarchean - presumably as a result of biological activity. We used a biogeochemical box model to test which conditions are necessary to cause large swings in atmospheric N2 pressure. Parameters for our model are constrained by observations of modern Earth and reconstructions of biomass burial and oxidative weathering in deep time. A 1-D climate model was used to model potential effects on atmospheric climate. In a second set of tests, we perturbed our box model to investigate which parameters have the greatest impact on the evolution of atmospheric pN2 and consider possible implications for nitrogen cycling on other planets. Our results suggest that (a) a high rate of biomass burial would have been needed in the Archean to draw down atmospheric pN2 to less than half modern levels, (b) the resulting effect on temperature could probably have been compensated by increasing solar luminosity and a mild increase in pCO2, and (c) atmospheric oxygenation could have initiated a stepwise pN2 rebound through oxidative weathering. In general, life appears to be necessary for significant atmospheric pN2 swings on Earth-like planets. Our results further support the idea that an exoplanetary atmosphere rich in both N2 and O2 is a signature of an oxygen-producing biosphere.

  11. A Model of Thermal Conductivity for Planetary Soils: 1. Theory for Unconsolidated Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    We present a model of heat conduction for mono-sized spherical particulate media under stagnant gases based on the kinetic theory of gases, numerical modeling of Fourier s law of heat conduction, theoretical constraints on the gas thermal conductivity at various Knudsen regimes, and laboratory measurements. Incorporating the effect of the temperature allows for the derivation of the pore-filling gas conductivity and bulk thermal conductivity of samples using additional parameters (pressure, gas composition, grain size, and porosity). The radiative and solid-to-solid conductivities are also accounted for. Our thermal model reproduces the well-established bulk thermal conductivity dependency of a sample with the grain size and pressure and also confirms laboratory measurements finding that higher porosities generally lead to lower conductivities. It predicts the existence of the plateau conductivity at high pressure, where the bulk conductivity does not depend on the grain size. The good agreement between the model predictions and published laboratory measurements under a variety of pressures, temperatures, gas compositions, and grain sizes provides additional confidence in our results. On Venus, Earth, and Titan, the pressure and temperature combinations are too high to observe a soil thermal conductivity dependency on the grain size, but each planet has a unique thermal inertia due to their different surface temperatures. On Mars, the temperature and pressure combination is ideal to observe the soil thermal conductivity dependency on the average grain size. Thermal conductivity models that do not take the temperature and the pore-filling gas composition into account may yield significant errors.

  12. Can increasing albedo of existing ship wakes reduce climate change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crook, Julia A.; Jackson, Lawrence S.; Forster, Piers M.

    2016-02-01

    Solar radiation management schemes could potentially alleviate the impacts of global warming. One such scheme could be to brighten the surface of the ocean by increasing the albedo and areal extent of bubbles in the wakes of existing shipping. Here we show that ship wake bubble lifetimes would need to be extended from minutes to days, requiring the addition of surfactant, for ship wake area to be increased enough to have a significant forcing. We use a global climate model to simulate brightening the wakes of existing shipping by increasing wake albedo by 0.2 and increasing wake lifetime by ×1440. This yields a global mean radiative forcing of -0.9 ± 0.6 Wm-2 (-1.8 ± 0.9 Wm-2 in the Northern Hemisphere) and a 0.5°C reduction of global mean surface temperature with greater cooling over land and in the Northern Hemisphere, partially offsetting greenhouse gas warming. Tropical precipitation shifts southward but remains within current variability. The hemispheric forcing asymmetry of this scheme is due to the asymmetry in the distribution of existing shipping. If wake lifetime could reach ~3 months, the global mean radiative forcing could potentially reach -3 Wm-2. Increasing wake area through increasing bubble lifetime could result in a greater temperature reduction, but regional precipitation would likely deviate further from current climatology as suggested by results from our uniform ocean albedo simulation. Alternatively, additional ships specifically for the purpose of geoengineering could be used to produce a larger and more hemispherically symmetrical forcing.

  13. MODELING OF MANUFACTURING ERRORS FOR PIN-GEAR ELEMENTS OF PLANETARY GEARBOX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan M. Egorov

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Theoretical background for calculation of k-h-v type cycloid reducers was developed relatively long ago. However, recently the matters of cycloid reducer design again attracted heightened attention. The reason for that is that such devices are used in many complex engineering systems, particularly, in mechatronic and robotics systems. The development of advanced technological capabilities for manufacturing of such reducers today gives the possibility for implementation of essential features of such devices: high efficiency, high gear ratio, kinematic accuracy and smooth motion. The presence of an adequate mathematical model gives the possibility for adjusting kinematic accuracy of the reducer by rational selection of manufacturing tolerances for its parts. This makes it possible to automate the design process for cycloid reducers with account of various factors including technological ones. A mathematical model and mathematical technique have been developed giving the possibility for modeling the kinematic error of the reducer with account of multiple factors, including manufacturing errors. The errors are considered in the way convenient for prediction of kinematic accuracy early at the manufacturing stage according to the results of reducer parts measurement on coordinate measuring machines. During the modeling, the wheel manufacturing errors are determined by the eccentricity and radius deviation of the pin tooth centers circle, and the deviation between the pin tooth axes positions and the centers circle. The satellite manufacturing errors are determined by the satellite eccentricity deviation and the satellite rim eccentricity. Due to the collinearity, the pin tooth and pin tooth hole diameter errors and the satellite tooth profile errors for a designated contact point are integrated into one deviation. Software implementation of the model makes it possible to estimate the pointed errors influence on satellite rotation angle error and

  14. The Herschel Planetary Nebula Survey (HerPlaNS): A Comprehensive Dusty Photoionization Model of NGC6781

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Masaaki; Ueta, Toshiya; van Hoof, Peter A. M.; Sahai, Raghvendra; Aleman, Isabel; Zijlstra, Albert A.; Chu, You-Hua; Villaver, Eva; Leal-Ferreira, Marcelo L.; Kastner, Joel; Szczerba, Ryszard; Exter, Katrina M.

    2017-08-01

    We perform a comprehensive analysis of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC 6781 to investigate the physical conditions of each of its ionized, atomic, and molecular gas and dust components and the object’s evolution, based on panchromatic observational data ranging from UV to radio. Empirical nebular elemental abundances, compared with theoretical predictions via nucleosynthesis models of asymptotic giant branch (AGB) stars, indicate that the progenitor is a solar-metallicity, 2.25{--}3.0 {M}⊙ initial-mass star. We derive the best-fit distance of 0.46 kpc by fitting the stellar luminosity (as a function of the distance and effective temperature of the central star) with the adopted post-AGB evolutionary tracks. Our excitation energy diagram analysis indicates high-excitation temperatures in the photodissociation region (PDR) beyond the ionized part of the nebula, suggesting extra heating by shock interactions between the slow AGB wind and the fast PN wind. Through iterative fitting using the Cloudy code with empirically derived constraints, we find the best-fit dusty photoionization model of the object that would inclusively reproduce all of the adopted panchromatic observational data. The estimated total gas mass (0.41 {M}⊙ ) corresponds to the mass ejected during the last AGB thermal pulse event predicted for a 2.5 {M}⊙ initial-mass star. A significant fraction of the total mass (about 70%) is found to exist in the PDR, demonstrating the critical importance of the PDR in PNe that are generally recognized as the hallmark of ionized/H+ regions. Herschel is an ESA Space Observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  15. THOR: A New and Flexible Global Circulation Model to Explore Planetary Atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Mendonça, João M; Grosheintz, Luc; Heng, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We have designed and developed, from scratch, a global circulation model named THOR that solves the three-dimensional non-hydrostatic Euler equations. Our general approach lifts the commonly used assumptions of a shallow atmosphere and hydrostatic equilibrium. We solve the "pole problem" (where converging meridians on a sphere lead to increasingly smaller time steps near the poles) by implementing an icosahedral grid. Irregularities in the grid, which lead to grid imprinting, are smoothed using the "spring dynamics" technique. We validate our implementation of spring dynamics by examining calculations of the divergence and gradient of test functions. To prevent the computational time step from being bottlenecked by having to resolve sound waves, we implement a split-explicit method together with a horizontally explicit and vertically implicit integration. We validate our global circulation model by reproducing the Earth and also the hot Jupiter-like benchmark tests. THOR was designed to run on Graphics Proces...

  16. Impacts of planet migration models on planetary populations. Effects of saturation, cooling and stellar irradiation

    CERN Document Server

    Dittkrist, K -M; Klahr, H; Alibert, Y; Henning, T

    2014-01-01

    Context: Several recent studies have found that planet migration in adiabatic discs differs significantly from migration in isothermal discs. Depending on the thermodynamic conditions, i.e., the effectiveness of radiative cooling, and the radial surface density profile, planets migrate inward or outward. Clearly, this will influence the semimajor axis - mass distribution of planets as predicted by population synthesis simulations. Aims: Our goal is to study the global effects of radiative cooling, viscous torque desaturation and gap opening as well as stellar irradiation on the tidal migration of a synthetic planet population. Methods: We combine results from several analytical studies and 3D hydrodynamic simulations in a new semi-analytical migration model for the application in our planet population synthesis calculations. Results: We find a good agreement of our model with torques obtained in a 3D radiative hydrodynamic simulations. We find three convergence zones in a typical disc, towards which planets m...

  17. Towards a Subgrid Model of Planetary Boundary Layers Based on Direct Statistical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skitka, Joseph; Fox-Kemper, Baylor; Marston, Brad

    2015-11-01

    Reliable weather and climate modeling requires the accurate simulation of Earth's oceanic and atmospheric boundary layers. However, long duration turbulence-resolving simulation is centuries beyond the reach of present day computers, hence subgrid modeling is required. Direct statistical simulation (DSS) that is based upon expansion in equal-time cumulants offers the prospect of building improved subgrid schemes. In contrast to other earlier statistical approaches, DSS makes no unphysical assumptions about the homogeneity, isotropy, or locality of correlations. We investigate the feasibility of a second-order closure (CE2) by performing simulations of the ocean boundary layer in a quasi-linear approximation for which CE2 is exact. Wind-driven Langmuir turbulence and thermal convection are studied by comparison of the quasi-linear and fully nonlinear statistics. We also investigate whether or not basis reduction can be achieved by proper orthogonal decomposition (POD) of the second cumulant. Supported in part by NSF DMR-1306806 and NSF CCF-1048701.

  18. A Survey of Parameterization Techniques for the Planetary Boundary Layer in Atmospheric Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    ensuing description follows that given by Estoque (1973). Numerical models enable us to examine the relative i.,ortance of ex- ternal factors and internal...8217 10 m) and is kept fixed. Estoque (1963) used a value as large as 50 m for zs. However, Sasamori (1970) used variable depths for the constant flux...respectiveiy, eddy diffusior- coefficients of oumntum, heat, and moisture. Businger et al. (1971), Yamamoto and Shimanuki (1966), and Estoque and

  19. gadgetbelt: A Tool for Modeling Planetary Sculpting of Massive Debris Disks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Rebekah; Murray-Clay, Ruth

    2013-07-01

    In models of the sculpting of planetesimal disks by planets, the planetesimals are often treated as test particles, with their effect on the planet modeled analytically. However, this treatment is insufficient in certain regimes, including: when the self-gravity of the disk causes density waves, transporting the angular momentum imparted or removed by the planet (e.g. Hahn 2003); when the self-gravity of the disk causes the disk to precess, interfering with the resonant and secular effects of the planet on the disk; and/or when interaction of the planet with individual planetesimals causes stochasticity in the planet's orbital evolution (e.g.,Murray-Clay & Chiang 2006), not well captured by prescriptions of the planetesimal-induced orbital evolution. We are adapting gadget (Springel 2005), a cosmological simulation code, for use in collisionless debris disks, allowing us to model thousands to millions of planetesimals in a reasonable CPU time through gains in speed from gadget's parallel processing implementation and tree code for N-body interactions. We will use this code, gadgetbelt, to explore regimes in which the planetesimal disk's self-gravity and/or back-reaction on the planet cannot be neglected and to explore the effects of stochasticity, which may lead to constraints on the planetesimal size-distribution. Here we present results from our benchmarking of gadgetbelt to the full N-body integrator mercury (Chambers 1999) and plans for future work.

  20. Robotic Planetary Drill Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Brian J.; Thompson, S.; Paulsen, G.

    2010-01-01

    Several proposed or planned planetary science missions to Mars and other Solar System bodies over the next decade require subsurface access by drilling. This paper discusses the problems of remote robotic drilling, an automation and control architecture based loosely on observed human behaviors in drilling on Earth, and an overview of robotic drilling field test results using this architecture since 2005. Both rotary-drag and rotary-percussive drills are targeted. A hybrid diagnostic approach incorporates heuristics, model-based reasoning and vibration monitoring with neural nets. Ongoing work leads to flight-ready drilling software.

  1. Laboratory measurements and modeling of molecular photoabsorption in the ultraviolet for planetary atmospheres applications: diatomic sulfur and sulfur monoxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Glenn

    2016-07-01

    Our research program comprises the measurement and modeling of ultraviolet molecular photoabsorption cross sections with the highest practical resolution. It supports efforts to interpret and model observations of planetary atmospheres. Measurement and modeling efforts on diatomic sulfur (S _{2}) and sulfur monoxide (SO) are in progress. S _{2}: Interpretations of atmospheric (Io, Jupiter, cometary comae) S _{2} absorption features are hindered by a complete lack of laboratory cross section data in the ultraviolet. We are working to quantify the photoabsorption spectrum of S _{2} from 240 to 300 nm based on laboratory measurements and theoretical calculations. We have constructed an experimental apparatus to produce a stable column of S _{2} vapor at a temperature of 800 K. High-resolution measurements of the absorption spectrum of the strong B - X system of S _{2} were completed using the NIST VUV-FTS at Gaithersburg, Maryland. These measurements are currently being incorporated into a coupled-channel model of the absorption spectrum of S _{2} to quantify the contributions from individual band features and to establish the mechanisms responsible for the strong predissociation signature of the B - X system. A successful coupled channels model can then be used to calculate the B - X absorption spectrum at any temperature. SO: There has been a long-standing need for high-resolution cross sections of sulfur monoxide radicals in the ultraviolet and vacuum ultraviolet regions, where the molecule strongly predissociates, for modeling the atmospheres of Io and Venus, and most recently for understanding sulfur isotope effects in the ancient (pre-O _{2}) atmosphere of Earth. We have produced a measurable column of SO in a continuous-flow DC discharge cell, using SO _{2} as a parent molecule. Photoabsorption measurements were recently recorded on the DESIRS beamline of the SOLEIL synchrotron, taking advantage of the high-resolution VUV-FTS on that beamline. A number of

  2. Planetary Data System (PDS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Planetary Data System (PDS) is an archive of data products from NASA planetary missions, which is sponsored by NASA's Science Mission Directorate. We actively...

  3. Mars Rover Model Celebration: Using Planetary Exploration To Enrich STEM Teaching In Elementary And Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A.; Ramsey, J.; Dominey, W.; Kapral, A.; Carlson, C.; Konstantinidis, I.; James, J.; Sweaney, S.; Mendez, R.

    2011-12-01

    The present aerospace engineering and science workforce is ageing. It is not clear that the US education system will produce enough qualified replacements to meet the need in the near future. Unfortunately, by the time many students get to high school, it is often too late to get them pointed toward an engineering or science career. Since some college programs require 6 units of high school mathematics for admission, students need to begin consciously preparing for a science or engineering curriculum as early as 6th or 7th grade. The challenge for educators is to convince elementary school students that science and engineering are both exciting, relevant and accessible career paths. The recent NASA Mars Rover missions capture the imagination of children, as NASA missions have done for decades. The University of Houston is in the process of developing a prototype of a flexible program that offers children an in-depth educational experience culminating in the design and construction of their own model rover. The existing prototype program is called the Mars Rover Model Celebration. It focuses on students, teachers and parents in grades 3-8. Students will design and build a model of a Mars rover to carry out a student selected science mission on the surface of Mars. The model will be a mock-up, constructed at a minimal cost from art supplies. The students will build the models as part of a project on Mars. The students will be given design criteria for a rover and will do basic research on Mars that will determine the objectives and features of their rover. This project may be used either informally as an after school club or youth group activity or formally as part of a class studying general science, earth science, solar system astronomy or robotics, or as a multi-disciplinary unit for a gifted and talented program. The program culminates in a capstone event held at the University of Houston (or other central location in the other communities that will be involved

  4. Mathematical models of non-linear phenomena, processes and systems: from molecular scale to planetary atmosphere

    CERN Document Server

    2013-01-01

    This book consists of twenty seven chapters, which can be divided into three large categories: articles with the focus on the mathematical treatment of non-linear problems, including the methodologies, algorithms and properties of analytical and numerical solutions to particular non-linear problems; theoretical and computational studies dedicated to the physics and chemistry of non-linear micro-and nano-scale systems, including molecular clusters, nano-particles and nano-composites; and, papers focused on non-linear processes in medico-biological systems, including mathematical models of ferments, amino acids, blood fluids and polynucleic chains.

  5. Numerical Modeling Studies of Wake Vortex Transport and Evolution Within the Planetary Boundary Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuh-Lang; Arya, S. Pal; Kaplan, Michael L.; Han, Jongil

    2000-01-01

    The fundamental objective of this research is study behavior of aircraft wake vortices within atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in support of developing the system, Aircraft VOrtex Spacing System (AVOSS), under NASA's Terminal Area Productivity (TAR) program that will control aircraft spacing within the narrow approach corridors of airports. The purpose of the AVOSS system is to increase airport capacity by providing a safe reduction in separation of aircraft compared to the now-existing flight rules. In our first funding period (7 January 19994 - 6 April 1997), we have accomplished extensive model development and validation of ABL simulations. Using the validated model, in our second funding period (7 April 1997 - 6 April 2000) we have investigated the effects of ambient atmospheric turbulence on vortex decay and descent, Crow instability, and wake vortex interaction with the ground. Recognizing the crucial influence of ABL turbulence on wake vortex behavior, we have also developed a software generating vertical profiles of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) or energy dissipation rate (EDR), which are, in turn, used as input data in the AVOSS prediction algorithms.

  6. Snow spectral albedo at Summit, Greenland: measurements and numerical simulations based on physical and chemical properties of the snowpack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. Carmagnola

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The broadband albedo of surface snow is determined both by the near-surface profile of the physical and chemical properties of the snowpack and by the spectral and angular characteristics of the incident solar radiation. Simultaneous measurements of the physical and chemical properties of snow were carried out at Summit Camp, Greenland (72°36´ N, 38°25´ W, 3210 m a.s.l. in May and June 2011, along with spectral albedo measurements. One of the main objectives of the field campaign was to test our ability to predict snow spectral albedo by comparing the measured albedo to the albedo calculated with a radiative transfer model, using measured snow physical and chemical properties. To achieve this goal, we made daily measurements of the snow spectral albedo in the range 350–2200 nm and recorded snow stratigraphic information down to roughly 80 cm. The snow specific surface area (SSA was measured using the DUFISSS instrument (DUal Frequency Integrating Sphere for Snow SSA measurement, Gallet et al., 2009. Samples were also collected for chemical analyses including black carbon (BC and dust, to evaluate the impact of light absorbing particulate matter in snow. This is one of the most comprehensive albedo-related data sets combining chemical analysis, snow physical properties and spectral albedo measurements obtained in a polar environment. The surface albedo was calculated from density, SSA, BC and dust profiles using the DISORT model (DIScrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer, Stamnes et al., 1988 and compared to the measured values. Results indicate that the energy absorbed by the snowpack through the whole spectrum considered can be inferred within 1.10%. This accuracy is only slightly better than that which can be obtained considering pure snow, meaning that the impact of impurities on the snow albedo is small at Summit. In the near infrared, minor deviations in albedo up to 0.014 can be due to the accuracy of radiation and SSA measurements and to

  7. Kinetic and isotherm studies of bisphenol A adsorption onto orange albedo(Citrus sinensis): Sorption mechanisms based on the main albedo components vitamin C, flavones glycosides and carotenoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamgaing, Theophile; Doungmo, Giscard; Melataguia Tchieno, Francis Merlin; Gouoko Kouonang, Jimmy Julio; Mbadcam, Ketcha Joseph

    2017-07-03

    Orange albedo and its adsorption capacity towards bisphenol A (BPA) were studied. Adsorption experiments were conducted in batch mode at 25-55°C. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were used to characterise the biosorbent. The effects of various parameters including adsorption time, equilibrium pH, adsorbent dosage and initial adsorbate concentration were investigated. The optimum contact time and pH for the removal of BPA were 60 min and 2, respectively. It was found that the adsorption isotherms best matched the Freundlich model, the adsorption of BPA being multilayer and that of the albedo surface heterogeneous. From the kinetic studies, it was found that the removal of BPA best matched the pseudo-second order kinetic model. An adsorption mechanism based on the albedo surface molecules is proposed and gives a good account of π-π interactions and hydrogen bonding. Orange albedo, with a maximum BPA loading capacity of 82.36 mg g(-1) (significantly higher than that of most agricultural residues), is a good candidate for BPA adsorption in aqueous media.

  8. Ensemble using different Planetary Boundary Layer schemes in WRF model for wind speed and direction prediction over Apulia region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateo, Andrea; Marcello Miglietta, Mario; Fedele, Francesca; Menegotto, Micaela; Monaco, Alfonso; Bellotti, Roberto

    2017-04-01

    The Weather Research and Forecasting mesoscale model (WRF) was used to simulate hourly 10 m wind speed and direction over the city of Taranto, Apulia region (south-eastern Italy). This area is characterized by a large industrial complex including the largest European steel plant and is subject to a Regional Air Quality Recovery Plan. This plan constrains industries in the area to reduce by 10 % the mean daily emissions by diffuse and point sources during specific meteorological conditions named wind days. According to the Recovery Plan, the Regional Environmental Agency ARPA-PUGLIA is responsible for forecasting these specific meteorological conditions with 72 h in advance and possibly issue the early warning. In particular, an accurate wind simulation is required. Unfortunately, numerical weather prediction models suffer from errors, especially for what concerns near-surface fields. These errors depend primarily on uncertainties in the initial and boundary conditions provided by global models and secondly on the model formulation, in particular the physical parametrizations used to represent processes such as turbulence, radiation exchange, cumulus and microphysics. In our work, we tried to compensate for the latter limitation by using different Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) parameterization schemes. Five combinations of PBL and Surface Layer (SL) schemes were considered. Simulations are implemented in a real-time configuration since our intention is to analyze the same configuration implemented by ARPA-PUGLIA for operational runs; the validation is focused over a time range extending from 49 to 72 h with hourly time resolution. The assessment of the performance was computed by comparing the WRF model output with ground data measured at a weather monitoring station in Taranto, near the steel plant. After the analysis of the simulations performed with different PBL schemes, both simple (e.g. average) and more complex post-processing methods (e.g. weighted average

  9. Single-column model and large eddy simulation of the evening transition in the planetary boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuchiara, Gustavo; Rappenglück, Bernhard

    2016-04-01

    The transition from the convective boundary layer during the daytime to the stable stratified boundary layer during nighttime after sunset plays an important role in the transport and dispersion of atmospheric pollutants. However, our knowledge regarding this transition and its feedback on the structure of the subsequent nocturnal boundary layer is still restricted. This also prevents forecast models from accurate prediction of the onset and development of the nighttime boundary layer, which determines the redistribution of pollutants within the nocturnal surface layer and the residual layer aloft. In the present study, the well-known case of day 33 of the Wangara experiment is resimulated using the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model in an idealized single-column mode to assess the performance of a frequently used planetary boundary layer (PBL) scheme, the Yonsei University (YSU) PBL scheme. These results are compared with two large eddy simulations (LES) for the same case study imposing different surface fluxes: one using previous surface fluxes calculated for the Wangara experiment and a second one using output from the WRF model. The results show a reasonable agreement of the PBL scheme in WRF with the LES. Overall, all the simulations presented a cold bias of ~3 Kelvin for the potential temperature and underestimation of the wind speed, especially after the transition to nighttime conditions (biases were up to 4 ms-1). Finally, an alternative set of eddy diffusivity equations was tested to represent the transition characteristics of a sunset period, with a stable layer below and a new parameterization for the convective decay regime typically observed in the RL aloft. This set of equations led to a gradual decrease of the eddy diffusivity, which replaces the instantaneous collapse of traditional diagnostics for eddy diffusivities. More appreciable changes were observed in air temperature, wind speed and specific humidity (up to 0.5 K, 0.6 ms-1, and 0

  10. Change in Urban Albedo in London: A Multi-scale Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susca, T.; Kotthaus, S.; Grimmond, S.

    2013-12-01

    Urbanization-induced change in land use has considerable implications for climate, air quality, resources and ecosystems. Urban-induced warming is one of the most well-known impacts. This directly and indirectly can extend beyond the city. One way to reduce the size of this is to modify the surface atmosphere exchanges through changing the urban albedo. As increased rugosity caused by the morphology of a city results in lower albedo with constant material characteristics, the impacts of changing the albedo has impacts across a range of scales. Here a multi-scale assessment of the potential effects of the increase in albedo in London is presented. This includes modeling at the global and meso-scale informed by local and micro-scale measurements. In this study the first order calculations are conducted for the impact of changing the albedo (e.g. a 0.01 increase) on the radiative exchange. For example, when incoming solar radiation and cloud cover are considered, based on data retrieved from NASA (http://power.larc.nasa.gov/) for ~1600 km2 area of London, would produce a mean decrease in the instantaneous solar radiative forcing on the same surface of 0.40 W m-2. The nature of the surface is critical in terms of considering the impact of changes in albedo. For example, in the Central Activity Zone in London pavement and building can vary from 10 to 100% of the plan area. From observations the albedo is seen to change dramatically with changes in building materials. For example, glass surfaces which are being used increasingly in the central business district results in dramatic changes in albedo. Using the documented albedo variations determined across different scales the impacts are considered. For example, the effect of the increase in urban albedo is translated into the corresponding amount of avoided emission of carbon dioxide that produces the same effect on climate. At local scale, the effect that the increase in urban albedo can potentially have on local

  11. Model-Independent Stellar and Planetary Masses from Multi-Transiting Exoplanetary Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Montet, Benjamin T

    2012-01-01

    Precise exoplanet characterization requires precise classification of exoplanet host stars. The masses of host stars are commonly estimated by comparing their spectra to those predicted by stellar evolution models. However, spectroscopically determined properties are difficult to measure accurately for stars that are substantially different from the Sun, such as M-dwarfs and evolved stars. Here, we propose a new method to dynamically measure the masses of transiting planets near mean-motion resonances and their host stars by combining observations of transit timing variations with radial velocity measurements. We derive expressions to analytically determine the mass of each member of the system and demonstrate the technique on the Kepler-18 system. We compare these analytic results to numerical simulations and find the two are consistent. We identify eight systems for which our technique could be applied if follow-up radial velocity measurements are collected. We conclude this analysis would be optimal for sy...

  12. Spatially Complete Global Spectral Surface Albedos: Value-Added Datasets Derived from Terra MODIS Land Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Eric G.; King, Michael D.; Platnick, Steven; Schaaf, Crystal B.; Gao, Feng

    2004-01-01

    Land surface albedo is an important parameter in describing the radiative properties of the earth s surface as it represents the amount of incoming solar radiation that is reflected from the surface. The amount and type of vegetation of the surface dramatically alters the amount of radiation that is reflected; for example, croplands that contain leafy vegetation will reflect radiation very differently than blacktop associated with urban areas. In addition, since vegetation goes through a growth, or phenological, cycle, the amount of radiation that is reflected changes over the course of a year. As a result, albedo is both temporally and spatially dependant upon global location as there is a distribution of vegetated surface types and growing conditions. Land surface albedo is critical for a wide variety of earth system research projects including but not restricted to remote sensing of atmospheric aerosol and cloud properties from space, ground-based analysis of aerosol optical properties from surface-based sun/sky radiometers, biophysically-based land surface modeling of the exchange of energy, water, momentum, and carbon for various land use categories, and surface energy balance studies. These projects require proper representation of the surface albedo s spatial, spectral, and temporal variations, however, these representations are often lacking in datasets prior to the latest generation of land surface albedo products.

  13. A Model of Thermal Conductivity for Planetary Soils. 2; Theory for Cemented Soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueux, S.; Christensen, P. R.

    2009-01-01

    A numerical model of heat conduction through particulate media made of spherical grains cemented by various bonding agents is presented. The pore-filling gas conductivity, volume fraction, and thermal conductivity of the cementing phase are tunable parameters. Cement fractions thermal conductivity. A significant conductivity increase (factor 3-8) is observed for bond fractions of 0.01 to 1% in volume. In the 1 to 15% bond fraction domain, the conductivity increases continuously but less intensely (25-100% conductivity increase compared to a 1% bond system). Beyond 15% of cements, the conductivity increases vigorously and the bulk conductivity rapidly approaches that of bedrock. The composition of the cements (i.e. conductivity) has little influence on the bulk thermal inertia of the soil, especially if the volume of bond thermal inertia (200-600 J s(0.5)/sq m/K) has long been hypothesized to be associated with a duricrust. The fraction of cement required to fit the thermal data is less than approx.1-5% by volume. This small amount of material is consistent with orbital observations, confirming that soil cementation is an important factor controlling the thermal inertia of the Martian surface

  14. Planetary boundary layer depth in Global climate models induced biases in surface climatology

    CERN Document Server

    Davy, Richard

    2014-01-01

    The Earth has warmed in the last century with the most rapid warming occurring near the surface in the arctic. This enhanced surface warming in the Arctic is partly because the extra heat is trapped in a thin layer of air near the surface due to the persistent stable-stratification found in this region. The warming of the surface air due to the extra heat depends upon the amount of turbulent mixing in the atmosphere, which is described by the depth of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL). In this way the depth of the ABL determines the effective response of the surface air temperature to perturbations in the climate forcing. The ABL depth can vary from tens of meters to a few kilometers which presents a challenge for global climate models which cannot resolve the shallower layers. Here we show that the uncertainties in the depth of the ABL can explain up to 60 percent of the difference between the simulated and observed surface air temperature trends and 50 percent of the difference in temperature variability...

  15. THOR: A New and Flexible Global Circulation Model to Explore Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, João M.; Grimm, Simon L.; Grosheintz, Luc; Heng, Kevin

    2016-10-01

    We have designed and developed, from scratch, a global circulation model (GCM) named THOR that solves the three-dimensional nonhydrostatic Euler equations. Our general approach lifts the commonly used assumptions of a shallow atmosphere and hydrostatic equilibrium. We solve the “pole problem” (where converging meridians on a sphere lead to increasingly smaller time steps near the poles) by implementing an icosahedral grid. Irregularities in the grid, which lead to grid imprinting, are smoothed using the “spring dynamics” technique. We validate our implementation of spring dynamics by examining calculations of the divergence and gradient of test functions. To prevent the computational time step from being bottlenecked by having to resolve sound waves, we implement a split-explicit method together with a horizontally explicit and vertically implicit integration. We validate our GCM by reproducing the Earth and hot-Jupiter-like benchmark tests. THOR was designed to run on graphics processing units (GPUs), which allows for physics modules (radiative transfer, clouds, chemistry) to be added in the future, and is part of the open-source Exoclimes Simulation Platform (www.exoclime.org).

  16. MODEL-INDEPENDENT STELLAR AND PLANETARY MASSES FROM MULTI-TRANSITING EXOPLANETARY SYSTEMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Montet, Benjamin T. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 249-17, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Johnson, John Asher, E-mail: btm@astro.caltech.edu [Division of Geological and Planetary Sciences, California Institute of Technology, 1200 East California Boulevard, MC 170-25, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2013-01-10

    Precise exoplanet characterization requires precise classification of exoplanet host stars. The masses of host stars are commonly estimated by comparing their spectra to those predicted by stellar evolution models. However, spectroscopically determined properties are difficult to measure accurately for stars that are substantially different from the Sun, such as M-dwarfs and evolved stars. Here, we propose a new method to dynamically measure the masses of transiting planets near mean-motion resonances and their host stars by combining observations of transit timing variations with radial velocity (RV) measurements. We derive expressions to analytically determine the mass of each member of the system and demonstrate the technique on the Kepler-18 system. We compare these analytic results to numerical simulations and find that the two are consistent. We identify eight systems for which our technique could be applied if follow-up RV measurements are collected. We conclude that this analysis would be optimal for systems discovered by next-generation missions similar to TESS or PLATO, which will target bright stars that are amenable to efficient RV follow-up.

  17. Integrating the Teaching of Space Science, Planetary Exploration And Robotics In Elementary And Middle School with Mars Rover Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bering, E. A.; Ramsey, J.; Smith, H.; Boyko, B. S.; Peck, S.; Arcenaux, W. H.

    2005-05-01

    The present aerospace engineering and science workforce is ageing. It is not clear that the US education system will produce enough qualified replacements to meet the need in the near future. Unfortunately, by the time many students get to high school, it is often too late to get them pointed toward an engineering or science career. Since some college programs require 6 units of high school mathematics for admission, students need to begin consciously preparing for a science or engineering curriculum as early as 6th or 7th grade. The challenge for educators is to convince elementary school students that science and engineering are both exciting, relevant and accessible career paths. This paper describes a program designed to help provide some excitement and relevance. It is based on the task of developing a mobile robot or "Rover" to explore the surface of Mars. There are two components to the program, a curriculum unit and a contest. The curriculum unit is structured as a 6-week planetary science unit for elementary school (grades 3-5). It can also be used as a curriculum unit, enrichment program or extracurricular activity in grades 6-8 by increasing the expected level of scientific sophistication in the mission design. The second component is a citywide competition to select the most outstanding models that is held annually at a local college or University. Primary (Grades 3-5) and middle school (Grades 6-8) students interested in science and engineering will design and build of a model of a Mars Rover to carry out a specific science mission on the surface of Mars. The students will build the models as part of a 6-week Fall semester classroom-learning or homework project on Mars. The students will be given design criteria for a rover, and be required to do basic research on Mars that will determine the operational objectives and structural features of their rover. This module may be used as part of a class studying general science, earth science, solar system

  18. Impact of dust deposition on the albedo of Vatnajökull ice cap, Iceland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Monika; Dorothea Groot Zwaaftink, Christine; Steffensen Schmidt, Louise; Guðmundsson, Sverrir; Pálsson, Finnur; Arnalds, Olafur; Björnsson, Helgi; Thorsteinsson, Throstur; Stohl, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Deposition of small amounts of airborne dust on glaciers causes positive radiative forcing and enhanced melting due to the reduction of surface albedo. To study the effects of dust deposition on the mass balance of Brúarjökull, an outlet glacier of the largest ice cap in Iceland, Vatnajökull, a study of dust deposition events in the year 2012 was carried out. The dust-mobilisation module FLEXDUST was used to calculate spatio-temporally resolved dust emissions from Iceland and the dispersion model FLEXPART was used to simulate atmospheric dust dispersion and deposition. We used albedo measurements at two automatic weather stations on Brúarjökull to evaluate the dust impacts. Both stations are situated in the accumulation area of the glacier, but the lower station is close to the equilibrium line. For this site ( ˜ 1210 m a.s.l.), the dispersion model produced 10 major dust deposition events and a total annual deposition of 20.5 g m-2. At the station located higher on the glacier ( ˜ 1525 m a.s.l.), the model produced nine dust events, with one single event causing ˜ 5 g m-2 of dust deposition and a total deposition of ˜ 10 g m-2 yr-1. The main dust source was found to be the Dyngjusandur floodplain north of Vatnajökull; northerly winds prevailed 80 % of the time at the lower station when dust events occurred. In all of the simulated dust events, a corresponding albedo drop was observed at the weather stations. The influence of the dust on the albedo was estimated using the regional climate model HIRHAM5 to simulate the albedo of a clean glacier surface without dust. By comparing the measured albedo to the modelled albedo, we determine the influence of dust events on the snow albedo and the surface energy balance. We estimate that the dust deposition caused an additional 1.1 m w.e. (water equivalent) of snowmelt (or 42 % of the 2.8 m w.e. total melt) compared to a hypothetical clean glacier surface at the lower station, and 0.6 m w.e. more melt (or 38 % of

  19. Bipolar high temporal resolution measurements of snow UV albedo in Sodankylä and Marambio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinander, Outi; Kontu, Anna; Asmi, Eija; Sanchez, Ricardo; Mei, Miguel; de Leeuw, Gerrit

    2015-04-01

    In this presentation we will give an overview of our high temporal resolution polar snow UV albedo data from Arctic Sodankylä, and from Marambio, Antarctica. These both are WMO GAW stations with many measurement parameters relevant to the albedo data usage. We will also describe our campaign based polar albedo data (SNORTEX and SOS campaigns), and an important data set of light absorbing impurities (BC) in the Arctic snow. The black carbon (BC) has been estimated to be the second most important human emission after carbon dioxide, in terms of its climate forcing in the present-day atmosphere. The reflectance effect of BC deposited on snow surface is the bigger the smaller the wavelength, i.e. the albedo effect of BC is the biggest at UV. This is also shown in SNICAR-model simulated albedo values. In Sodankylä, our bipolar snow ultraviolet (UV) albedo research started within the International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008. In 2007, the continuous Sodankylä snow UV albedo measurements were installed in Sodankylä, in the operational albedo field of the Finnish Meteorological Institute Arctic Research Center (FMI-ARC). These Sodankylä 1-min data during snow time were soon compared with the German Antarctic Neumayer Station UV albedo data, also with the same sensor type. In both data we found an up to 10 % decrease in albedo as a function of time within a day, ranging from 0.77 to 0.67 in Sodankylä and from 0.96 to 0.86 in Neumeyer. Physical explanations to asymmetry were found for cases with high relative humidity and low surface temperature during the previous night, favorable to frost and higher albedo on the next morning; new snow on the previous night; snow melting during day time and refreezing during night. In Marambio, in the beginning of 2013, our new continuous Finnish-Argentinian co-operation snow UV albedo measurements were installed and started as part of a larger continuous meteorological and environmental instrumentation. These new UV radiation data

  20. High-albedo C-complex outer-belt asteroids: The near-infrared spectra

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasuga, T.; Usui, F.; Ootsubo, T.; Hasegawa, S.; Kuroda, D.; Shirahata, M.; Okamura, N.

    2014-07-01

    Primitive, outer-belt asteroids are generally of low albedo, reflecting carbonaceous compositions like those of CI and CM meteorites. However, a few outer-belt asteroids having high albedos are known, suggesting the presence of unusually reflective surface minerals or, conceivably, even exposed water ice. Here, we present near-infrared (1.1--2.5 micron) spectra of four outer-belt C-complex asteroids with albedos > 0.1. We find no absorption features characteristic of water ice (near 1.5 and 2.0 micron) in the objects. Intimate mixture models set limits to the water ice by weight Journal, Volume 146, Issue 1, article id. 1, 6 pp. (2013).

  1. Planetary Ices Attenuation Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Christine; Castillo-Rogez, Julie C.

    In this chapter, we review the topic of energy dissipation in the context of icy satellites experiencing tidal forcing. We describe the physics of mechanical dissipation, also known as attenuation, in polycrystalline ice and discuss the history of laboratory methods used to measure and understand it. Because many factors - such as microstructure, composition and defect state - can influence rheological behavior, we review what is known about the mechanisms responsible for attenuation in ice and what can be inferred from the properties of rocks, metals and ceramics. Since attenuation measured in the laboratory must be carefully scaled to geologic time and to planetary conditions in order to provide realistic extrapolation, we discuss various mechanical models that have been used, with varying degrees of success, to describe attenuation as a function of forcing frequency and temperature. We review the literature in which these models have been used to describe dissipation in the moons of Jupiter and Saturn. Finally, we address gaps in our present knowledge of planetary ice attenuation and provide suggestions for future inquiry.

  2. The Spherical Bolometric Albedo of Planet Mercury

    OpenAIRE

    Mallama, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    Published reflectance data covering several different wavelength intervals has been combined and analyzed in order to determine the spherical bolometric albedo of Mercury. The resulting value of 0.088 +/- 0.003 spans wavelengths from 0 to 4 {\\mu}m which includes over 99% of the solar flux. This bolometric result is greater than the value determined between 0.43 and 1.01 {\\mu}m by Domingue et al. (2011, Planet. Space Sci., 59, 1853-1872). The difference is due to higher reflectivity at wavelen...

  3. Variational Principle for Planetary Interiors

    CERN Document Server

    Zeng, Li

    2016-01-01

    In the past few years, the number of confirmed planets has grown above 2000. It is clear that they represent a diversity of structures not seen in our own solar system. In addition to very detailed interior modeling, it is valuable to have a simple analytical framework for describing planetary structures. Variational principle is a fundamental principle in physics, entailing that a physical system follows the trajectory which minimizes its action. It is alternative to the differential equation formulation of a physical system. Applying this principle to planetary interior can beautifully summarize the set of differential equations into one, which provides us some insight into the problem. From it, a universal mass-radius relation, an estimate of error propagation from equation of state to mass-radius relation, and a form of virial theorem applicable to planetary interiors are derived.

  4. Variational Principle for Planetary Interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Li; Jacobsen, Stein B.

    2016-09-01

    In the past few years, the number of confirmed planets has grown above 2000. It is clear that they represent a diversity of structures not seen in our own solar system. In addition to very detailed interior modeling, it is valuable to have a simple analytical framework for describing planetary structures. The variational principle is a fundamental principle in physics, entailing that a physical system follows the trajectory, which minimizes its action. It is alternative to the differential equation formulation of a physical system. Applying the variational principle to the planetary interior can beautifully summarize the set of differential equations into one, which provides us some insight into the problem. From this principle, a universal mass-radius relation, an estimate of the error propagation from the equation of state to the mass-radius relation, and a form of the virial theorem applicable to planetary interiors are derived.

  5. The price of snow: albedo valuation and a case study for forest management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, David A.; Howarth, Richard B.

    2015-06-01

    Several climate frameworks have included the role of carbon storage in natural landscapes as a potential mechanism for climate change mitigation. This has resulted in an incentive to grow and maintain intact long-lived forest ecosystems. However, recent research has suggested that the influence of albedo-related radiative forcing can impart equal and in some cases greater magnitudes of climate mitigation compared to carbon storage in forests where snowfall is common and biomass is slow-growing. While several methodologies exist for relating albedo-associated radiative forcing to carbon storage for the analysis of the tradeoffs of these ecosystem services, they are varied, and they have yet to be contrasted in a case study with implications for future forest management. Here we utilize four methodologies for calculating a shadow price for albedo radiative forcing and apply the resulting eight prices to an ecological and economic forest model to examine the effects on optimal rotation periods on two different forest stands in the White Mountain National Forest in New Hampshire, USA. These pricing methodologies produce distinctly different shadow prices of albedo, varying from a high of 9.36 × 10-4 and a low of 1.75 × 10-5 w-1yr-1 in the initial year, to a high of 0.019 and a low of 3.55 × 10-4 w-1yr-1 in year 200 of the simulation. When implemented in the forest model, optimal rotation periods also varied considerably, from a low of 2 to a high of 107 years for a spruce-fir stand and from 35 to 80 years for a maple-beech-birch stand. Our results suggest that the choice of climate metrics and pricing methodologies for use with forest albedo alter albedo prices considerably, may substantially adjust optimal rotation period length, and therefore may have consequences with respect to forest land cover change.

  6. Relationships between MODIS black-sky shortwave albedo and airborne lidar based forest canopy structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korhonen, Lauri; Rautiainen, Miina; Arumäe, Tauri; Lang, Mait; Flewelling, James; Tokola, Timo; Stenberg, Pauline

    2016-04-01

    Albedo is one of the essential climate variables affecting the Earth's radiation balance. It is however not well understood how changes in forest canopy structure influence the albedo. Canopy structure can be mapped consistently for fairly large areas using airborne lidar sensors. Our objective was to study the relationships between MODIS shortwave black sky albedo product and lidar-based estimates of canopy structure in different biomes ranging from arctic to tropical. Our study is based on six structurally different forest sites located in Finland, Estonia, USA and Laos. Lidar-based mean height of the canopy, canopy cover and their transformations were used as predictor variables to describe the canopy structure. Tree species composition was also included for the three sites where it was available. We noticed that the variables predicting albedo best were different in open and closed canopy forests. In closed canopy forests, the species information was more important than canopy structure variables (R2=0.31-0.32) and using only structural variables resulted in poor R2 (0.13-0.15). If the 500 m MODIS pixel contained a mixture of forests and other land cover types, the albedo was strongly related to the forest area percent. In open canopy forests, structural variables such as canopy cover or height explained albedo well, but species information still improved the models (R2=0.27-0.52). We obtained the highest R2=0.52 using only structural variables in Laos on a partially degraded tropical forest with large variation in canopy cover. The different canopy structure variables were often correlated and the one that provided the best model changed from site to site.

  7. Spatial and temporal variability of Arctic summer sea-ice albedo and its dependence on meltwater hydraulics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eicken, H.; Perovich, D. K.; Grenfell, T. C.; Richter-Menge, J. A.; Frey, K.

    2001-12-01

    Next to ice extent and thickness, the area-averaged albedo of the summer sea-ice cover is a key parameter in determining the large-scale heat exchange over the Arctic Ocean. Various remote sensing applications have yielded a substantial data base for the former two parameters, not least due to the efforts of the National Snow and Ice Data Center (NSIDC) over the past 25 years. In contrast, the spatial and temporal variability of Arctic summer sea-ice albedo is much less well described. Despite its importance (incl. for ice-albedo feedback processes), few if any large-scale sea-ice and global circulation models actually predict summer ice based on the underlying physical processes. Most models employ simple parameterization schemes instead. Remote sensing of surface ice albedo also faces substantial challenges, some of which still need to be addressed in more detail. Here, we report on albedo measurements completed over first- and multi-year sea ice in the summers of 1998, 2000 and 2001 in the North American at the SHEBA drifting ice camp and in fast ice near Barrow, Alaska. As has been established in a number of studies, spatial and temporal variability in summer sea-ice albedo is mostly determined by the areal extent of meltwater ponding at the ice surface. Given the importance of this process, a comprehensive ice hydrological program (meltwater distribution, surface topography, meltwater flow and discharge, ice permeability) has been carried out in conjunction with the optical measurements. Measurements demonstrate that Arctic summer sea-ice albedo is critically dependent on the hydrology of surface melt ponds, as controlled by meltwater production rate, ice permeability and topography. Both, remarkable short-term variability (a reduction of albedo by 43% within two days) as well as the seasonal evolution of the pond fraction and hence area-averaged albedo are forced by changes in pond water level on the order of a few centimeters. While some of these forcing

  8. The Impacts of Microphysics and Planetary Boundary Layer Physics on Model Simulations of U.S. Deep South Summer Convection

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCaul, Eugene W., Jr.; Case, Jonathan L.; Zavodsky, Bradley; Srikishen, Jayanthi; Medlin, Jeffrey; Wood, Lance

    2014-01-01

    Convection-allowing numerical weather simula- tions have often been shown to produce convective storms that have significant sensitivity to choices of model physical parameterizations. Among the most important of these sensitivities are those related to cloud microphysics, but planetary boundary layer parameterizations also have a significant impact on the evolution of the convection. Aspects of the simulated convection that display sensitivity to these physics schemes include updraft size and intensity, simulated radar reflectivity, timing and placement of storm initi- ation and decay, total storm rainfall, and other storm features derived from storm structure and hydrometeor fields, such as predicted lightning flash rates. In addition to the basic parameters listed above, the simulated storms may also exhibit sensitivity to im- posed initial conditions, such as the fields of soil temper- ature and moisture, vegetation cover and health, and sea and lake water surface temperatures. Some of these sensitivities may rival those of the basic physics sensi- tivities mentioned earlier. These sensitivities have the potential to disrupt the accuracy of short-term forecast simulations of convective storms, and thereby pose sig- nificant difficulties for weather forecasters. To make a systematic study of the quantitative impacts of each of these sensitivities, a matrix of simulations has been performed using all combinations of eight separate microphysics schemes, three boundary layer schemes, and two sets of initial conditions. The first version of initial conditions consists of the default data from large-scale operational model fields, while the second features specialized higher- resolution soil conditions, vegetation conditions and water surface temperatures derived from datasets created at NASA's Short-term Prediction and Operational Research Tran- sition (SPoRT) Center at the National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC) in Huntsville, AL. Simulations as

  9. LUNAR TERRAIN AND ALBEDO RECONSTRUCTION FROM APOLLO IMAGERY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LUNAR TERRAIN AND ALBEDO RECONSTRUCTION FROM APOLLO IMAGERY ARA V NEFIAN*, TAEMIN KIM, MICHAEL BROXTON, AND ZACH MORATTO Abstract. Generating accurate three...

  10. Comprehensive Wide-Band Magnitudes and Albedos for the Planets, With Applications to Exo-Planets and Planet Nine

    CERN Document Server

    Mallama, Anthony; Pavlov, Hristo

    2016-01-01

    Complete sets of reference magnitudes in all 7 Johnson-Cousins bands (U, B, V, R, I, Rc and Ic) and the 5 principal Sloan bands (u', g', r', i', and z') are presented for the 8 planets. These data are accompanied by illumination phase functions and other formulas which characterize the instantaneous brightness of the planets. The main source of Johnson-Cousins magnitudes is a series of individualized photometric studies reported in recent years. Gaps in that dataset were filled with magnitudes synthesized in this study from published spectrophotometry. The planetary Sloan magnitudes, which are established here for the first time, are an average of newly recorded Sloan filter photometry, synthetic magnitudes and values transformed from the Johnson-Cousins system. Geometric albedos derived from these two sets of magnitudes are consistent within each photometric system and between the systems for all planets and in all bands. This consistency validates the albedos themselves as well as the magnitudes from which ...

  11. The Far-UV Albedo of the Moon Determined from Dayside LAMP Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bullock, Mark A.; Retherford, K. D.; Gladstone, R.; Greathouse, T. K.; Mandt, K. E.; Hendrix, A. R.; Feldman, P. D.; Miles, P. F.; Egan, A. F.

    2013-10-01

    The Lyman Alpha Mapping Project (LAMP) onboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) has been recording far-UV photons reflected from the lunar surface almost continuously since December 2009 (Gladstone et al., 2010). One photon at a time, LAMP builds up spectra from 575 to 1965 Å with a resolution of 26 Å. We will present 3 years of accumulated LAMP lunar dayside spectral maps and derive the lunar geometric albedo spectrum for a range of phase angles. These LAMP observations can thus be used to reconstruct the lunar far-UV photometric function and refine photometric models of the lunar surface (Hapke, 1963; Lucke et al., 1976). We will also compare LAMP lunar dayside albedo with the albedo from 820-1840 Å obtained by the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT) on the March 1995 Astro-2 Space Shuttle mission (Henry et al., 1995). The improved lunar photometric functions from our analysis of LAMP albedo spectra will enable a better quantitative assessment of how phase angle and composition affect the Moon’s reflectance in the far-UV. Gladstone, G. R., Stern, S. A., Retherford, K. D., Black, R. K., Slater, D. C., Davis, M. W., Versteeg, M. H., Persson, K. B., Parker, J. W., Kaufmann, D. E., Egan, A. F., Greathouse, T. K., Feldman, P. D., Hurley, D., Pryor, W. R., Hendrix, A. R., 2010. LAMP: The lyman alpha mapping project on NASA's lunar reconnaissance orbiter mission. Space Science Reviews. 150, 161-181. Hapke, B. W., 1963. A theoretical photometric function for the lunar surface. Journal of Geophysical Research. 68, 4571-4586. Henry, R. C., Feldman, P. D., Kruk, J. W., Davidsen, A. F., Durrance, S. T., 1995. Ultraviolet Albedo of the Moon with the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope. The Astrophysical Journal Letters. 454, L69. Lucke, R. L., Henry, R. C., Fastie, W. G., 1976. Far-ultraviolet albedo of the moon. The Astronomical Journal. 81, 1162-1169.

  12. Titan-Like Exoplanets: Variations in Geometric Albedo and Effective Transit Height with Haze Production Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Checlair, Jade; McKay, Christopher P.; Imanaka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Extensive studies characterizing Titan present an opportunity to study the atmospheric properties of Titan-like exoplanets. Using an existing model of Titan's atmospheric haze, we computed geometric albedo spectra and effective transit height spectra for six values of the haze production rate (zero haze to twice present) over a wide range of wavelengths (0.2-2 microns). In the geometric albedo spectra, the slope in the UV-visible changes from blue to red when varying the haze production rate values from zero to twice the current Titan value. This spectral feature is the most effective way to characterize the haze production rates. Methane absorption bands in the visible-NIR compete with the absorbing haze, being more prominent for smaller haze production rates. The effective transit heights probe a region of the atmosphere where the haze and gas are optically thin and that is thus not effectively probed by the geometric albedo. The effective transit height decreases smoothly with increasing wavelength, from 376 km to 123 km at 0.2 and 2 microns, respectively. When decreasing the haze production rate, the methane absorption bands become more prominent, and the effective transit height decreases with a steeper slope with increasing wavelength. The slope of the geometric albedo in the UV-visible increases smoothly with increasing haze production rate, while the slope of the effective transit height spectra is not sensitive to the haze production rate other than showing a sharp rise when the haze production rate increases from zero. We conclude that geometric albedo spectra provide the most sensitive indicator of the haze production rate and the background Rayleigh gas. Our results suggest that important and complementary information can be obtained from the geometric albedo and motivates improvements in the technology for direct imaging of nearby exoplanets.

  13. International Infrastructure for Planetary Sciences: Universal Planetary Database Development Project 'the International Planetary Data Alliance'

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasaba, Yasumasa; Crichton, D.; Capria, M. T.; Beebe, R.; Zender, J.

    2009-09-01

    The International Planetary Data Alliance (IPDA), formed under COSPAR in 2008, is a joint international effort to enable global access and exchange of high quality planetary science data, and to establish archive standards that make it easier to share data across international boundaries. In June - July 2009, we held the 4th Steering Committee meeting. Thanks to the many players from several agencies and institutions in the world, we got fruitful results in 6 projects: (1) Inter-operable Planetary Data Access Protocol (PDAP) implementations [led by J. Salgado@ESA], (2) Small bodies interoperability [led by I. Shinohara@JAXA & N. Hirata@U. Aizu], (3) PDAP assessment [led by Y. Yamamoto@JAXA], (4) Architecture and standards definition [led by D. Crichton@NASA], (5) Information model and data dictionary [led by S. Hughes@NASA], and (6) Venus Express Interoperability [led by N. Chanover@NMSU]. The projects demonstrated the feasibility of sharing data and emphasized the importance of developing common data standards to ensure world-wide access to international planetary archives. The Venus Express Interoperability project leveraged standards and technology efforts from both the Planetary Data System (PDS) and IPDA in order to deliver a new capability for data sharing between NASA/PDS and ESA/PSA. This project demonstrated a model and framework for linking compliant planetary archive systems for future international missions. The next step for IPDA, during the 2009-2010 period, will be to work with NASA/PDS to review and participate in an upgrade of its standards to improve both the consistency of the standards to build compliant international archives as well as improve long-term usability of the science data products. This paper presents the achievements and plans, which will be summarized in the paper which will appear in 'Space Research Today' in December 2009.

  14. Surface Albedo Variations Across Opportunity's Traverse in Meridiani Planum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studer-Ellis, G. L.; Rice, M. S.; Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F., III

    2015-12-01

    Surface albedo measurements from the Mars Exploration Rover (MER) Opportunity mission can be used to help understand surface-atmosphere interactions at Meridiani Planum. Opportunity has acquired 117 albedo panoramas with the Pancam instrument as of sol 3870, across the first 40 km of its traverse. To date, only the first 32 panoramas have been reported upon in previous studies [1]. Here we present an analysis of the full set of PDS-released albedo observations from Opportunity and correlate our measurements with terrain type and known atmospheric events. To acquire a 360-degree albedo observation, Pancam's L1 ("clear") filter is used to take 27 broad-spectrum images, which are stitched into a mosaic. Pancam images are calibrated to reflectance factor (R*), which is taken as an approximation of the Lambertian albedo. Areas of interest are selected and average albedo calculations are applied to all of the selections. Results include the average albedo of each scene, as well as equal-area corrections where applicable, in addition to measurements of specific classes of surface features (e.g., outcrops, dusty terrain, and rover tracks). Average scene albedo measurements range from 0.11 ± 0.04 to 0.30 ± 0.04, with the highest value observed on sol 1290 (immediately after the planet-encircling dust storm of 2007). We compare these results to distance traveled, surface morphologies, local wind driven events, and dust opacity measurements. Future work will focus on correlating Pancam albedo values with orbital data from cameras such as HiRISE, CTX, MOC, THEMIS-VIS, and MARCI, and completion of the same analysis for the full Pancam albedo dataset from Spirit. References: [1] Bell, J. F., III, M. S. Rice, J. R. Johnson, and T. M. Hare (2008), Surface albedo observations at Gusev Crater and Meridiani Planum, Mars, J. Geophys. Res., 113, E06S18, doi:10.1029/2007JE002976.

  15. Absolute magnitudes of asteroids and a revision of asteroid albedo estimates from WISE thermal observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pravec, Petr; Harris, Alan W.; Kušnirák, Peter; Galád, Adrián; Hornoch, Kamil

    2012-09-01

    We obtained estimates of the Johnson V absolute magnitudes (H) and slope parameters (G) for 583 main-belt and near-Earth asteroids observed at Ondřejov and Table Mountain Observatory from 1978 to 2011. Uncertainties of the absolute magnitudes in our sample are estimates reported by asteroid surveys. With our photometric H and G data, we revised the preliminary WISE albedo estimates made by Masiero et al. (Masired, J.R. et al. [2011]. Astrophys. J. 741, 68-89) and Mainzer et al. (Mainzer, A. et al. [2011b]. Astrophys. J. 743, 156-172) for asteroids in our sample. We found that the mean geometric albedo of Tholen/Bus/DeMeo C/G/B/F/P/D types with sizes of 25-300 km is pV = 0.057 with the standard deviation (dispersion) of the sample of 0.013 and the mean albedo of S/A/L types with sizes 0.6-200 km is 0.197 with the standard deviation of the sample of 0.051. The standard errors of the mean albedos are 0.002 and 0.006, respectively; systematic observational or modeling errors can predominate over the quoted formal errors. There is apparent only a small, marginally significant difference of 0.031 ± 0.011 between the mean albedos of sub-samples of large and small (divided at diameter 25 km) S/A/L asteroids, with the smaller ones having a higher albedo. The difference will have to be confirmed and explained; we speculate that it may be either a real size dependence of surface properties of S type asteroids or a small size-dependent bias in the data (e.g., a bias towards higher albedos in the optically-selected sample of asteroids). A trend of the mean of the preliminary WISE albedo estimates increasing with asteroid size decreasing from D ∼ 30 down to ∼5 km (for S types) showed in Mainzer et al. (Mainzer, A. et al. [2011a]. Astrophys. J. 741, 90-114) appears to be mainly due to the systematic bias in the MPCORB absolute magnitudes that progressively increases with H in the corresponding range H = 10-14.

  16. Introducing PLIA: Planetary Laboratory for Image Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta, J.; Hueso, R.; Barrado, N.; Sánchez-Lavega, A.

    2005-08-01

    We present a graphical software tool developed under IDL software to navigate, process and analyze planetary images. The software has a complete Graphical User Interface and is cross-platform. It can also run under the IDL Virtual Machine without the need to own an IDL license. The set of tools included allow image navigation (orientation, centring and automatic limb determination), dynamical and photometric atmospheric measurements (winds and cloud albedos), cylindrical and polar projections, as well as image treatment under several procedures. Being written in IDL, it is modular and easy to modify and grow for adding new capabilities. We show several examples of the software capabilities with Galileo-Venus observations: Image navigation, photometrical corrections, wind profiles obtained by cloud tracking, cylindrical projections and cloud photometric measurements. Acknowledgements: This work has been funded by Spanish MCYT PNAYA2003-03216, fondos FEDER and Grupos UPV 15946/2004. R. Hueso acknowledges a post-doc fellowship from Gobierno Vasco.

  17. An Algorithm for the Retrieval of 30-m Snow-Free Albedo from Landsat Surface Reflectance and MODIS BRDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuai, Yanmin; Masek, Jeffrey G.; Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal B.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new methodology to generate 30-m resolution land surface albedo using Landsat surface reflectance and anisotropy information from concurrent MODIS 500-m observations. Albedo information at fine spatial resolution is particularly useful for quantifying climate impacts associated with land use change and ecosystem disturbance. The derived white-sky and black-sky spectral albedos maybe used to estimate actual spectral albedos by taking into account the proportion of direct and diffuse solar radiation arriving at the ground. A further spectral-to-broadband conversion based on extensive radiative transfer simulations is applied to produce the broadband albedos at visible, near infrared, and shortwave regimes. The accuracy of this approach has been evaluated using 270 Landsat scenes covering six field stations supported by the SURFace RADiation Budget Network (SURFRAD) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Southern Great Plains (ARM/SGP) network. Comparison with field measurements shows that Landsat 30-m snow-free shortwave albedos from all seasons generally achieve an absolute accuracy of +/-0.02 - 0.05 for these validation sites during available clear days in 2003-2005,with a root mean square error less than 0.03 and a bias less than 0.02. This level of accuracy has been regarded as sufficient for driving global and regional climate models. The Landsat-based retrievals have also been compared to the operational 16-day MODIS albedo produced every 8-days from MODIS on Terra and Aqua (MCD43A). The Landsat albedo provides more detailed landscape texture, and achieves better agreement (correlation and dynamic range) with in-situ data at the validation stations, particularly when the stations include a heterogeneous mix of surface covers.

  18. Global Climate Forcing from Albedo Change Caused by Large-scale Deforestation and Reforestation: Quantification and Attribution of Geographic Variation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Tong; Williams, Christopher A.; Ghimire, Bardan; Masek, Jeffrey; Gao, Feng; Schaaf, Crystal

    2017-01-01

    Large-scale deforestation and reforestation have contributed substantially to historical and contemporary global climate change in part through albedo-induced radiative forcing, with meaningful implications for forest management aiming to mitigate climate change. Associated warming or cooling varies widely across the globe due to a range of factors including forest type, snow cover, and insolation, but resulting geographic variation remain spoorly described and has been largely based on model assessments. This study provides an observation-based approach to quantify local and global radiative forcings from large-scale deforestation and reforestation and further examines mechanisms that result in the spatial heterogeneity of radiative forcing. We incorporate a new spatially and temporally explicit land cover-specific albedo product derived from Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer with a historical land use data set (Land Use Harmonization product). Spatial variation in radiative forcing was attributed to four mechanisms, including the change in snow-covered albedo, change in snow-free albedo, snow cover fraction, and incoming solar radiation. We find an albedo-only radiative forcing (RF) of -0.819 W m(exp -2) if year 2000 forests were completely deforested and converted to croplands. Albedo RF from global reforestation of present-day croplands to recover year 1700 forests is estimated to be 0.161 W m)exp -2). Snow-cover fraction is identified as the primary factor in determining the spatial variation of radiative forcing in winter, while the magnitude of the change in snow-free albedo is the primary factor determining variations in summertime RF. Findings reinforce the notion that, for conifers at the snowier high latitudes, albedo RF diminishes the warming from forest loss and the cooling from forest gain more so than for other forest types, latitudes, and climate settings.

  19. Effect of increasing urban albedo on meteorology and air quality of Montreal (Canada) - Episodic simulation of heat wave in 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchaei, Ali G.; Akbari, Hashem; Tessum, Christopher W.

    2016-05-01

    Increasing albedo is an effective strategy to mitigate urban air temperature in different climates. Using reflective urban surfaces decreases the air temperature, which potentially reduces the rate of generation of smog. However, for implementing the albedo enhancement, complicated interactions between air, moisture, aerosols, and other gaseous contaminant in the atmosphere should be considered. We used WRF-CHEM to investigate the effect of increasing albedo in Montreal, Canada, during a heat wave period (July 10th through July 12th, 2005) on air quality and urban climate. The reflectivity of roofs, walls, and roads are increased from 0.2 to 0.65, 0.6, and 0.45, respectively. Air temperature at 2-m elevation is decreased during all hours in the simulation period and the maximum reduction is about 1 °C on each day (Tmax is reduced by about 0.7 °C) The concentration of two regulated pollutants -ozone (O3) and fine particulate matters (PM2.5) - is calculated at a height of 5-m above the ground. The maximum decrease in 8-h averaged ozone concentration is about 3% (∼0.2 ppbv). 24-h averaged PM2.5 concentration decreases by 1.8 μg/m3. This relatively small change in concentration of pollutants is related to the decrease in planetary boundary layer height caused by increasing the albedo. Additionally, the combined effect of decreased solar heat gain by building surfaces and decreased air temperature reduces the energy consumption of HVAC systems by 2% (∼0.1 W/m2), which exacerbates the positive effect of the albedo enhancement on the air quality.

  20. The effect of pulverization on the albedo of lunar rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnaert, Marcel Gilles Jozef

    1969-01-01

    Measures of the albedo under full-moon conditions have been made on two samples of very dark rocks, pulverized and sieved so as to obtain powders of different grain size. Below a size of 0.05 mm the albedo suddenly increases, obviously because the individual grains become transparent. By a rough cal

  1. Narrowband to broadband conversion of Landsat TM glacier albedos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Knap, W.H.; Reijmer, C.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an empirical relationship between the broadband glacier albedo (alpha) and the narrowband glacier albedos in Landsat TM bands 2 and 4 (alpha2 and alpha4, respectively). The relationship was established on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis of 112 ground-based s

  2. Narrowband to broadband conversion of Landsat TM glacier albedos

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oerlemans, J.; Knap, W.H.; Reijmer, C.

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we present an empirical relationship between the broadband glacier albedo (alpha) and the narrowband glacier albedos in Landsat TM bands 2 and 4 (alpha2 and alpha4, respectively). The relationship was established on the basis of multiple linear regression analysis of 112 ground-based

  3. The Albedo of Pervious Cement Concrete Linearly Decreases with Porosity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pervious pavements have been advocated as a potential countermeasure to the urban heat island effect. To understand if pervious pavements stay cooler than conventional pavements, the albedo of the pervious concrete must be understood. This study measured the albedo of pervious concrete with different porosity. Four Portland cement concrete mixes were casted, using designed amounts of sand to vary the porosity of the pervious concrete samples. The samples were sliced and the spectral reflectance and albedo of the sliced samples were measured and analyzed. It is found that the albedo of pervious concrete decreases linearly with the increase of the porosity. The albedo of a pervious Portland concrete varies from 0.25 to 0.35, which is 0.05~0.15 lower than the albedo of conventional cement concrete. Due to this lower albedo, it should be cautious to develop pervious concrete to battle with urban heat island unless the evaporation of pervious concrete is promoted to compensate the additional solar absorption caused by the low albedo.

  4. Greenland surface albedo changes 1981-2012 from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Significant melt over Greenland has been observed during the last several decades associated with extreme warming events over the northern Atlantic Ocean. An analysis of surface albedo change over Greenland is presented, using a 32-year consistent satellite albedo product from the Global Land Surfac...

  5. The effect of pulverization on the albedo of lunar rocks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnaert, Marcel Gilles Jozef

    Measures of the albedo under full-moon conditions have been made on two samples of very dark rocks, pulverized and sieved so as to obtain powders of different grain size. Below a size of 0.05 mm the albedo suddenly increases, obviously because the individual grains become transparent. By a rough

  6. Simulating influence of QBO phase on planetary waves during a stratospheric warming in a general circulation model of the middle atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koval, Andrey; Gavrilov, Nikolai; Pogoreltsev, Alexander; Savenkova, Elena

    2016-04-01

    One of the important factors of dynamical interactions between the lower and upper atmosphere is energy and momentum transfer by atmospheric internal gravity waves. For numerical modeling of the general circulation and thermal regime of the middle and upper atmosphere, it is important to take into account accelerations of the mean flow and heating rates produced by dissipating internal waves. The quasi-biennial oscillations (QBOs) of the zonal mean flow at lower latitudes at stratospheric heights can affect the propagation conditions of planetary waves. We perform numerical simulation of global atmospheric circulation for the initial conditions corresponding to the years with westerly and easterly QBO phases. We focus on the changes in amplitudes of stationary planetary waves (SPWs) and traveling normal atmospheric modes (NAMs) in the atmosphere during SSW events for the different QBO phases. For these experiments, we use the global circulation of the middle and upper atmosphere model (MUAM). There is theory of PW waveguide describing atmospheric regions where the background wind and temperature allow the wave propagation. There were introduced the refractive index for PWs and found that strongest planetary wave propagation is in areas of large positive values of this index. Another important PW characteristic is the Eliassen-Palm flux (EP-flux). These characteristics are considered as useful tools for visualizing the PW propagation conditions. Sudden stratospheric warming (SSW) event has significant influence on the formation of the weather anomalous and climate changes in the troposphere. Also, SSW event may affect the dynamical and energy processes in the upper atmosphere. The major SSW events imply significant temperature rises (up to 30 - 40 K) at altitudes 30 - 50 km accompanying with corresponding decreases, or reversals, of climatological eastward zonal winds in the stratosphere.

  7. The Very Low Albedo of WASP-12b from Spectral Eclipse Observations with Hubble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Taylor J.; Nikolov, Nikolay; Cowan, Nicolas B.; Barstow, Joanna K.; Barman, Travis S.; Crossfield, Ian J. M.; Gibson, Neale P.; Evans, Thomas M.; Sing, David K.; Knutson, Heather A.; Kataria, Tiffany; Lothringer, Joshua D.; Benneke, Björn; Schwartz, Joel C.

    2017-09-01

    We present an optical eclipse observation of the hot Jupiter WASP-12b using the Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph on board the Hubble Space Telescope. These spectra allow us to place an upper limit of {A}g< 0.064 (97.5% confidence level) on the planet’s white light geometric albedo across 290–570 nm. Using six wavelength bins across the same wavelength range also produces stringent limits on the geometric albedo for all bins. However, our uncertainties in eclipse depth are ∼40% greater than the Poisson limit and may be limited by the intrinsic variability of the Sun-like host star—the solar luminosity is known to vary at the 10‑4 level on a timescale of minutes. We use our eclipse depth limits to test two previously suggested atmospheric models for this planet: Mie scattering from an aluminum-oxide haze or cloud-free Rayleigh scattering. Our stringent nondetection rules out both models and is consistent with thermal emission plus weak Rayleigh scattering from atomic hydrogen and helium. Our results are in stark contrast with those for the much cooler HD 189733b, the only other hot Jupiter with spectrally resolved reflected light observations; those data showed an increase in albedo with decreasing wavelength. The fact that the first two exoplanets with optical albedo spectra exhibit significant differences demonstrates the importance of spectrally resolved reflected light observations and highlights the great diversity among hot Jupiters.

  8. Temporal and spatial mapping of surface albedo and atmospheric dust opacity on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, S. W.; Clancy, R. T.; Gladstone, G. R.

    1993-01-01

    The Mariner 9 and Viking provided abundant evidence that eolian processes are active over much of the surface of Mars. Past studies have demonstrated that variations in regional albedo and wind-streak patterns are indicative of sediment transport through a region, while thermal inertia data (derived from the Viking Infrared Thermal Mapper (IRTM) dataset) are indicative of the degree of surface mantling by dust deposits. The visual and thermal data are therefore diagnostic of whether net erosion or deposition of dust-storm fallout is taking place currently and whether such processes have been active in a region over the long term. These previous investigations, however, have not attempted to correct for the effects of atmospheric dust loading on observations of the martian surface, so quantitative studies of current sediment transport rates have included large errors due to uncertainty in the magnitude of this 'atmospheric component' of the observations. We have developed a radiative transfer model that allows the atmospheric dust opacity to be determined from IRTM thermal observations. Corrections for the effects of atmospheric dust loading on observations of surface albedo can also be modeled. This approach to determining 'dust-corrected surface albedo' incorporates the atmospheric dust opacity, the single-scattering albedo and particle phase function of atmospheric dust, and the bidirectional reflectance of the surface, and it accounts for variable lighting and viewing geometry.

  9. Land Surface Albedo From EPS/AVHRR : Method For Retrieval and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, G.

    2015-12-01

    The scope of Land Surface Analysis Satellite Applications Facility (LSA-SAF) is to increase benefit from EUMETSAT Satellites (MSG and EPS) data by providing added value products for the meteorological and environmental science communities with main applications in the fields of climate modelling, environmental management, natural hazards management, and climate change detection. The MSG/SEVIRI daily albedo product is disseminated operationally by the LSA-SAF processing centre based in Portugal since 2009. This product so-called MDAL covers Europe and Africa includes in the visible, near infrared and shortwave bands at a resolution of 3km at the equator. Recently, an albedo product at 1km so-called ETAL has been built from EPS/AVHRR observations in order to primarily MDAL product outside the MSG disk, while ensuring a global coverage. The methodology is common to MSG and EPS data and relies on the inversion of the BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) model of Roujean et al. On a given target, ETAL products exploits the variability of viewing angles whereas MDAL looks at the variations of solar illumination. The comparison of ETAL albedo product against MODIS and MSG/SEVIRI products over the year 2015 is instructive in many ways and shows in general a good agreement between them. The dispersion may be accounted by different factors that will be explained The additional information provided by EPS appears to be particularly beneficial for high latitudes during winter and for snow albedo.

  10. Planetary internal structures

    CERN Document Server

    Baraffe, I; Fortney, J; Sotin, C

    2014-01-01

    This chapter reviews the most recent advancements on the topic of terrestrial and giant planet interiors, including Solar System and extrasolar objects. Starting from an observed mass-radius diagram for known planets in the Universe, we will discuss the various types of planets appearing in this diagram and describe internal structures for each type. The review will summarize the status of theoretical and experimental works performed in the field of equation of states (EOS) for materials relevant to planetary interiors and will address the main theoretical and experimental uncertainties and challenges. It will discuss the impact of new EOS on interior structures and bulk composition determination. We will discuss important dynamical processes which strongly impact the interior and evolutionary properties of planets (e.g plate tectonics, semiconvection) and describe non standard models recently suggested for our giant planets. We will address the case of short-period, strongly irradiated exoplanets and critica...

  11. From Planetary Intelligence to Planetary Wisdom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moser, S. C.

    2016-12-01

    "Planetary intelligence" - when understood as an input into the processes of "managing" Earth - hints at an instrumental understanding of scientific information. At minimum it is a call for useful data of political (and even military) value; at best it speaks to an ability to collect, integrate and apply such information. In this sense, 21st century society has more "intelligence" than any generation of humans before, begging the question whether just more or better "planetary intelligence" will do anything at all to move us off the path of planetary destruction (i.e., beyond planetary boundaries) that it has been on for decades if not centuries. Social scientists have argued that there are at least four shortcomings in this way of thinking that - if addressed - could open up 1) what is being researched; 2) what is considered socially robust knowledge; 3) how science interacts with policy-makers and other "planet managers"; and 4) what is being done in practice with the "intelligence" given to those positioned at the levers of change. To the extent "planetary management" continues to be approached from a scientistic paradigm alone, there is little hope that Earth's future will remain in a safe operating space in this or coming centuries.

  12. NEOWISE Reactivation Mission Year Two: Asteroid Diameters and Albedos

    CERN Document Server

    Nugent, C R; Bauer, J; Cutri, R M; Kramer, E A; Grav, T; Masiero, J; Sonnett, S; Wright, E L

    2016-01-01

    The Near-Earth Object Wide-Field Infrared Survey Explorer (NEOWISE) mission continues to detect, track, and characterize minor planets. We present diameters and albedos calculated from observations taken during the second year since the spacecraft was reactivated in late 2013. These include 207 near-Earth asteroids and 8,885 other asteroids. $84\\%$ of the near-Earth asteroids did not have previously measured diameters and albedos by the NEOWISE mission. Comparison of sizes and albedos calculated from NEOWISE measurements with those measured by occultations, spacecraft, and radar-derived shapes shows accuracy consistent with previous NEOWISE publications. Diameters and albedos fall within $ \\pm \\sim20\\%$ and $\\pm\\sim40\\%$, 1-sigma, respectively, of those measured by these alternate techniques. NEOWISE continues to preferentially discover near-Earth objects which are large ($>100$ m), and have low albedos.

  13. A Synthetical Estimation of Northern Hemisphere Sea-ice Albedo Radiative Forcing and Feedback between 1982 and 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y.

    2014-12-01

    The decreasing surface albedo caused by continously vanishing sea ice over the Arctic plays a very important role in Arctic warming amplification. However, the quantification of the change of radiative forcing at top of atmosphere (TOA) introduced by the decreasing sea ice albedo and its generated feedback to the climate remain uncertain. Two recent representative studies showed a large difference with each other: Flanner et al. (2011) used a method of synthesis of surface albedo and radiative kernels and found that the change of sea ice radiative forcing (ΔSIRF) in Northern Hemisphere (NH) from 1979 to 2008 was 0.22 (0.15 - 0.32) W m-2, and the corresponding sea ice albedo feedback (SIAF) over NH was 0.28 (0.19 - 0.41) W m-2 K-1; while Pistone et al. (2014) directly used the observed planetary albedo to estimate the NH ΔSIRF and SIAF from 1979 to 2011 and draw a NH ΔSIRF of 0.43 ± 0.07 W m-2, which was nearly twice as larger as Flanner's result, and the estimated global SIAF was 0.31 ± 0.04 W m-2 K-1. Motivated by reconciling the difference between these two studies and obtaining a more accurate qualification of the NH ΔSIRF, we used a newly released satellite-retrieved surface albedo product CLARA-A1 and made an attempt in two steps: Firstly, based on synthesising the surface albedo and raditive kernels, we calcualted the ΔSIRF from 1982 to 2009 was 0.20 ± 0.05 W m-2, and the NH SIAF was 0.25 W m-2 K-1; After comparing with TOA observed radiative flux, we found it's quite likely the kernel methods yield an underestimation for the all-sky ΔSIRF. Then, we tried to use TOA observed broadband radiative flux to adjust the estimation with kernels. After an adjustment, the NH all-sky ΔSIRF was 0.34 ± 0.09 W m-2, and the corresponding SIAF was 0.43 W m-2 K-1 over NH and 0.31 W m-2 K-1 over the entire globe.

  14. Spectroscopic detection and characterisation of planetary atmospheres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collier Cameron A.

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Space based broadband infrared observations of close orbiting extrasolar giant planets at transit and secondary eclipse have proved a successful means of determining atmospheric spectral energy distributions and molecular composition. Here, a ground-based spectroscopic technique to detect and characterise planetary atmospheres is presented. Since the planet need not be transiting, this method enables a greater sample of systems to be studied. By modelling the planetary signature as a function of phase, high resolution spectroscopy has the potential to recover the signature of molecules in planetary atmospheres.

  15. The effects of additional black carbon on Arctic sea ice surface albedo: variation with sea ice type and snow cover

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Marks

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Black carbon in sea ice will decrease sea ice surface albedo through increased absorption of incident solar radiation, exacerbating sea ice melting. Previous literature has reported different albedo responses to additions of black carbon in sea ice and has not considered how a snow cover may mitigate the effect of black carbon in sea ice. Sea ice is predominately snow covered. Visible light absorption and light scattering coefficients are calculated for a typical first year and multi-year sea ice and "dry" and "wet" snow types that suggest black carbon is the dominating absorbing impurity. The albedo response of first year and multi-year sea ice to increasing black carbon, from 1–1024 ng g−1, in a top 5 cm layer of a 155 cm thick sea ice was calculated using the radiative transfer model: TUV-snow. Sea ice albedo is surprisingly unresponsive to black carbon additions up to 100 ng g−1 with a decrease in albedo to 98.7% of the original albedo value due to an addition of 8 ng g−1 of black carbon in first year sea ice compared to an albedo decrease to 99.6% for the same black carbon mass ratio increase in multi-year sea ice. The first year sea ice proved more responsive to black carbon additions than the multi-year ice. Comparison with previous modelling of black carbon in sea ice suggests a more scattering sea ice environment will be less responsive to black carbon additions. Snow layers on sea ice may mitigate the effects of black carbon in sea ice. "Wet" and "dry" snow layers of 0.5, 1, 2, 5 and 10 cm were added onto the sea ice surface and the snow surface albedo calculated with the same increase in black carbon in the underlying sea ice. Just a 0.5 cm layer of snow greatly diminishes the effect of black carbon on surface albedo, and a 2–5 cm layer (less than half the e-folding depth of snow is enough to "mask" any change in surface albedo owing to additional black carbon in sea ice, but not thick enough to ignore the underlying sea ice.

  16. Three-dimensional chemically homogeneous and bi-abundance photoionization models of the "super-metal-rich" planetary nebula NGC 6153

    CERN Document Server

    Yuan, H -B; Péquignot, D; Rubin, R H; Ercolano, B; Zhang, Y

    2010-01-01

    Deep spectroscopy of the planetary nebula (PN) NGC\\,6153 shows that its heavy element abundances derived from optical recombination lines (ORLs) are ten times higher than those derived from collisionally excited lines (CELs), and points to the existence of H-deficient inclusions embedded in the diffuse nebula. In this study, we have constructed chemically homogeneous and bi-abundance three-dimensional photoionization models, using the Monte Carlo photoionization code {\\sc mocassin}. We attempt to reproduce the multi-waveband spectroscopic and imaging observations of NGC\\,6153, and investigate the nature and origin of the postulated H-deficient inclusions, as well as their impacts on the empirical nebular analyses assuming a uniform chemical composition. Our results show that chemically homogeneous models yield small electron temperature fluctuations and fail to reproduce the strengths of ORLs from C, N, O and Ne ions. In contrast, bi-abundance models incorporating a small amount of metal-rich inclusions ($\\si...

  17. Global Monitoring of Martian Surface Albedo Changes from Orbital Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissler, P.; Enga, M.; Mukherjee, P.

    2013-12-01

    Martian surface changes were first observed from orbit during the Mariner 9 and Viking Orbiter missions. They were found to be caused by eolian processes, produced by deposition of dust during regional and global dust storms and subsequent darkening of the surface through erosion and transportation of dust and sand. The albedo changes accumulated in the 20 years between Viking and Mars Global Surveyor were sufficient to alter the global circulation of winds and the climate of Mars according to model calculations (Fenton et al., Nature 2007), but little was known about the timing or frequency of the changes. Since 1999, we have had the benefit of continuous monitoring by a series of orbiting spacecraft that continues today with Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, Mars Odyssey, and Mars Express. Daily synoptic observations enable us to determine whether the surface albedo changes are gradual or episodic in nature and to record the seasons that the changes take place. High resolution images of surface morphology and atmospheric phenomena help identify the physical mechanisms responsible for the changes. From these data, we hope to learn the combinations of atmospheric conditions and sediment properties that produce surface changes on Mars and possibly predict when they will take place in the future. Martian surface changes are particularly conspicuous in low albedo terrain, where even a thin layer of bright dust brightens the surface drastically. Equatorial dark areas are repeatedly coated and recoated by dust, which is later shed from the surface by a variety of mechanisms. An example is Syrtis Major, suddenly buried in bright dust by the global dust storm of 2001. Persistent easterly winds blew much of the dust cover away over the course of the next Martian year, but episodic changes continue today, particularly during southern summer when regional dust storms are rife. Another such region is Solis Planum, south of the Valles Marineris, where changes take place

  18. Process engineering with planetary ball mills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burmeister, Christine Friederike; Kwade, Arno

    2013-09-21

    Planetary ball mills are well known and used for particle size reduction on laboratory and pilot scales for decades while during the last few years the application of planetary ball mills has extended to mechanochemical approaches. Processes inside planetary ball mills are complex and strongly depend on the processed material and synthesis and, thus, the optimum milling conditions have to be assessed for each individual system. The present review focuses on the insight into several parameters like properties of grinding balls, the filling ratio or revolution speed. It gives examples of the aspects of grinding and illustrates some general guidelines to follow for modelling processes in planetary ball mills in terms of refinement, synthesis' yield and contamination from wear. The amount of energy transferred from the milling tools to the powder is significant and hardly measurable for processes in planetary ball mills. Thus numerical simulations based on a discrete-element-method are used to describe the energy transfer to give an adequate description of the process by correlation with experiments. The simulations illustrate the effect of the geometry of planetary ball mills on the energy entry. In addition the imaging of motion patterns inside a planetary ball mill from simulations and video recordings is shown.

  19. Simultaneous Cartography of Aerosol Opacity and Surface Albedo of Titan by the Massive Inversion of the Cassini/VIMS Dataset

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, S.; Maltagliati, L.; Sotin, C.; Rannou, P.; Cornet, T.; Hirtzig, M.; Appéré, T.; Solomonidou, A.; Le Mouelic, S.; Coustenis, A.; Brown, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    Mapping Titan's surface albedo is a necessary step to give reliable constraints on its composition. However, surface albedo maps of Titan, especially over large regions, are still very rare, the surface windows being strongly affected by atmospheric effects (absorption, scattering). A full radiative transfer model is an essential tool to remove these effects, but too time-consuming to treat systematically the ~40000 hyperspectral images VIMS acquired since the beginning of the mission. We developed a massive inversion of VIMS data based on lookup tables computed from a state-of-the-art radiative transfer model (Hirtzig et al. 2013), updated with new aerosol properties coming from our analysis of the Emission Phase Function observation acquired recently by VIMS. Once the physical properties of gases, aerosols and surface are fixed, the lookup tables are built for the remaining free parameters: the incidence, emergence and azimuth angles, given by navigation; and two products (the aerosol opacity and the surface albedo at all wavelengths). The lookup table grid was carefully selected after thorough testing. The data inversion on these pre-computed spectra (opportunely interpolated) is more than 1000 times faster than recalling the full radiative transfer at each minimization step. We present here the results from selected flybys. We invert mosaics composed by couples of flybys observing the same area at two different times. The composite albedo maps do not show significant discontinuities in any of the surface windows, suggesting a robust correction of the effects of the geometry (and thus the aerosols) on the observations. Maps of aerosol and albedo uncertainties are also provided, with the absolute error on the albedo being approximately between 1 and 3% (depending on the surface window considered). We are thus able to provide for the first time ever reliable surface albedo maps at pixel scale for the whole VIMS spectral range.

  20. Temporal observations of a linear sand dune in the Simpson Desert, central Australia: Testing models for dune formation on planetary surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Robert A.; Tooth, Stephen; Zimbelman, James R.; Wilson, Sharon A.; Maxwell, Ted A.; Kling, Corbin

    2015-10-01

    Linear dunes are the most common dune form found on planetary surfaces, yet questions remain about their formation. Temporal observations of a linear dune located in the Simpson Desert of central Australia were made to monitor dune movement and to test competing hypotheses regarding linear dune formation. Our observations were collected on three separate occasions from 2006 to 2014. Rebar stakes were placed in a gridded pattern so that multiple measurements of sand thickness, GPS surveys, and photographs could be taken at the same locations over time. We observed widespread reworking of sand on and around the dune crest, with sand accumulation locally exceeding a meter between surveys. Overall, the height of the dune crest increased by several centimeters. We also observed fluctuations in the sand cover in the adjacent swales that often exceeded 2-3 cm between surveys, yet we did not observe any appreciable changes in the position of the dune's downwind terminus. Weather data indicate that the effective sand-transporting winds in the Simpson are widely unimodal. Net sediment flux (resultant drift direction) is toward the north-northwest, locally at an oblique angle to dune orientation. Collectively, our results suggest that the linear dune is actively maintained by vertical accretion. The implications from our observations are that linear dunes on other planetary surfaces could form in wind regimes that are widely unimodal, even where the resultant drift direction is locally oblique to dune orientation. In particular, such findings may provide support for global circulation models of Titan.

  1. The decreasing albedo of the Zhadang glacier on western Nyainqentanglha and the role of light-absorbing impurities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, B.; Ming, J.; Kang, S.-C.; Zhang, G.-S.; Li, Y.-W.; Li, C.-D.; Zhao, S.-Y.; Ji, Z.-M.; Cao, J.-J.

    2014-10-01

    A large change in albedo has a significant effect on glacier ablation. Atmospheric aerosols - e.g. black carbon (BC) and dust - can reduce the albedo of glaciers and thus contribute to their melting. In this study, two main themes were explored: (1) the decrease in albedo of the Zhadang glacier on Mt. Nyainqentanglha between 2001 and 2012, as observed by the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on-board the Terra satellite, and the correlation of this albedo with mass balance; and (2) the concentrations of BC and dust in the glacier measured during 2012, and the associated impacts of these impurities on albedo and radiative forcings (RF). The average albedo of the Zhadang glacier from the MODIS increased with the altitude and fluctuated but had a decreasing trend (-0.003 a-1) during the period 2001-2012, with the highest (0.722) in 2003 and the lowest (0.597) in 2009 and 2010. The mass balance of the glacier has a positively significant correlation with its surface albedo derived from MODIS. Snow samples were collected on the Zhadang glacier to measure the BC and dust in the summer of 2012. The impacts of BC and dust on albedo reduction in different melting conditions were identified with the SNow ICe Aerosol Radiative (SNICAR) model initiated by in situ observation data. The sensitivity analysis showed that BC was a major factor in albedo reduction when the glacier was covered by newly fallen snow. Nevertheless, the contribution of dust to albedo reduction can reach as high as 56%, much exceeding that of BC (28%), when the glacier experiences strong surficial melting and its surface is almost bare ice. The average RF caused by dust could increase from 1.1 to 8.6 W m-2, exceeding the RF caused by BC after snow was deposited and surface melting occurred in the Zhadang glacier. This implies that it may be dust that primarily dominates the melting of some glaciers in the inner Tibetan Plateau during melting seasons, rather than BC.

  2. Planetary Gearbox Fault Diagnosis Using Envelope Manifold Demodulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weigang Wen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The important issue in planetary gear fault diagnosis is to extract the dependable fault characteristics from the noisy vibration signal of planetary gearbox. To address this critical problem, an envelope manifold demodulation method is proposed for planetary gear fault detection in the paper. This method combines complex wavelet, manifold learning, and frequency spectrogram to implement planetary gear fault characteristic extraction. The vibration signal of planetary gear is demodulated by wavelet enveloping. The envelope energy is adopted as an indicator to select meshing frequency band. Manifold learning is utilized to reduce the effect of noise within meshing frequency band. The fault characteristic frequency of the planetary gear is shown by spectrogram. The planetary gearbox model and test rig are established and experiments with planet gear faults are conducted for verification. All results of experiment analysis demonstrate its effectiveness and reliability.

  3. Global biogeophysical interactions between historical deforestation and climate through land surface albedo and interactive ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye

    2017-02-01

    Deforestation is expanding and accelerating into the remaining areas of undisturbed forest, and the quality of the remaining forests is declining today. Assessing the climatic impacts of deforestation can help to rectify this alarming situation. In this paper, how historical deforestation may affect global climate through interactive ocean and surface albedo is examined using an Earth system model of intermediate complexity (EMIC). Control and anomaly integrations are performed for 1000 years. In the anomaly case, cropland is significantly expanded since AD 1700. The response of climate in deforested areas is not uniform between the regions. In the background of a global cooling of 0.08 °C occurring with cooler surface air above 0.4 °C across 30° N to 75° N from March to September, the surface albedo increase has a global cooling effect in response to global-scale replacement of forests by cropland, especially over northern mid-high latitudes. The northern mid-latitude (30° N-60° N) suffers a prominent cooling in June, suggesting that this area is most sensitive to cropland expansion through surface albedo. Most regions show a consistent trend between the overall cooling in response to historical deforestation and its resulting cooling due to surface albedo anomaly. Furthermore, the effect of the interactive ocean on shaping the climate response to deforestation is greater than that of prescribed SSTs in most years with a maximum spread of 0.05 °C. This difference is more prominent after year 1800 than that before due to the more marked deforestation. These findings show the importance of the land cover change and the land surface albedo, stressing the necessity to analyze other biogeophysical processes of deforestation using interactive ocean.

  4. Planetary data definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-10-01

    Planetary data include all of those data which have resulted from measurements made by the instruments carried aboard planetary exploration spacecraft, and (for our purposes) exclude observations of Moon and Earth. The working, planetary data base is envisioned to contain not only these data, but also a wide range of supporting measurements such as calibration files, navigation parameters, spacecraft engineering states, and the various Earth-based and laboratory measurements which provide the planetary research scientist with historical and comparative data. No convention exists across the disciplines of the planetary community for defining or naming the various levels through which data pass in the progression from a sensed impulse at the spacecraft to a reduced, calibrated, and/or analyzed element in a planetary data set. Terms such as EDR (experiment data record), RDR (reduced data record), and SEDR (supplementary experiment data record) imply different meanings depending on the data set under consideration. The development of standard terminology for the general levels of planetary data is necessary.

  5. The Albedo Distribution of Near Earth Asteroids

    CERN Document Server

    Wright, Edward L; Masiero, Joseph; Grav, Tommy; Bauer, James

    2016-01-01

    The cryogenic WISE mission in 2010 was extremely sensitive to asteroids and not biased against detecting dark objects. The albedos of 428 Near Earth Asteroids (NEAs) observed by WISE during its fully cryogenic mission can be fit quite well by a 3 parameter function that is the sum of two Rayleigh distributions. The Rayleigh distribution is zero for negative values, and follows $f(x) = x \\exp[-x^2/(2\\sigma^2)]/\\sigma^2$ for positive x. The peak value is at x=\\sigma, so the position and width are tied together. The three parameters are the fraction of the objects in the dark population, the position of the dark peak, and the position of the brighter peak. We find that 25.3% of the NEAs observed by WISE are in a very dark population peaking at $p_V = 0.03$, while the other 74.7% of the NEAs seen by WISE are in a moderately dark population peaking at $p_V = 0.168$. A consequence of this bimodal distribution is that the Congressional mandate to find 90% of all NEAs larger than 140 m diameter cannot be satisfied by...

  6. Albedos and spectral signatures determination and it connection to geological processes: Simile between Earth and other solar system bodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, J.; Ochoa, L.; Saavedra, F.

    2017-07-01

    Remote sensing has always been the best investigation tool for planetary sciences. In this research have been used data of Surface albedo, electromagnetic spectra and satelital imagery in search of understanding glacier dynamics in some bodies of the solar system, and how it's related to their compositions and associated geological processes, this methodology is very common in icy moons studies. Through analytic software's some albedos map's and geomorphological analysis were made that allow interpretation of different types of ice in the glacier's and it's interaction with other materials, almost all the images were worked in the visible and infrared ranges of the spectrum; spectral data were later used to connect the reflectance whit chemical and reologic properties of the compounds studied. It have been concluded that the albedo analysis is an effective tool to differentiate materials in the bodies surfaces, but the application of spectral data is necessary to know the exact compounds of the glaciers and to have a better understanding of the icy bodies.

  7. Mathematical optimization of matter distribution for a planetary system configuration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, Yegor; Bukhtoyarov, Mikhail

    2016-07-01

    Planetary formation is mostly a random process. When the humanity reaches the point when it can transform planetary systems for the purpose of interstellar life expansion, the optimal distribution of matter in a planetary system will determine its population and expansive potential. Maximization of the planetary system carrying capacity and its potential for the interstellar life expansion depends on planetary sizes, orbits, rotation, chemical composition and other vital parameters. The distribution of planetesimals to achieve maximal carrying capacity of the planets during their life cycle, and maximal potential to inhabit other planetary systems must be calculated comprehensively. Moving much material from one planetary system to another is uneconomic because of the high amounts of energy and time required. Terraforming of the particular planets before the whole planetary system is configured might drastically decrease the potential habitability the whole system. Thus a planetary system is the basic unit for calculations to sustain maximal overall population and expand further. The mathematical model of optimization of matter distribution for a planetary system configuration includes the input observed parameters: the map of material orbiting in the planetary system with specified orbits, masses, sizes, and the chemical compound for each, and the optimized output parameters. The optimized output parameters are sizes, masses, the number of planets, their chemical compound, and masses of the satellites required to make tidal forces. Also the magnetic fields and planetary rotations are crucial, but they will be considered in further versions of this model. The optimization criteria is the maximal carrying capacity plus maximal expansive potential of the planetary system. The maximal carrying capacity means the availability of essential life ingredients on the planetary surface, and the maximal expansive potential means availability of uranium and metals to build

  8. MCNP - transport calculations in ducts using multigroup albedo coefficients; Calculos de transporte em dutos utilizando coeficientes de albedo multigrupo no codigo MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ono, Shizuca; Vieira, Wilson J.; Garcia, Roberto D.M. [Centro Tecnico Aeroespacial (CTA-IEAv), Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Estudos Avancados

    2000-07-01

    In this work, the use of multigroup albedo coefficients in Monte Carlo calculations of particle reflection and transmission by ducts is investigated. The procedure consists in modifying the MCNP code so that an albedo matrix computed previously by deterministic methods or Monte Carlo is introduced into the program to describe particle reflection by a surface. This way it becomes possible to avoid the need of considering particle transport in the duct wall explicitly, changing the problem to a problem of transport in the duct interior only and reducing significantly the difficulty of the real problem. The probability of particle reflection at the duct wall is given, for each group, as the sum of the albedo coefficients over the final groups. The calculation is started by sampling a source particle and simulating its reflection on the duct wall by sampling a group for the emerging particle. The particle weight is then reduced by the reflection probability. Next, a new direction and trajectory for the particle is selected. Numerical results obtained for the model are compared with results from a discrete ordinates code and results from Monte Carlo simulations that take particle transport in the wall into account. (author)

  9. Planetary Geophysics and Tectonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuber, Maria

    2005-01-01

    The broad objective of this work is to improve understanding of the internal structures and thermal and stress histories of the solid planets by combining results from analytical and computational modeling, and geophysical data analysis of gravity, topography and tectonic surface structures. During the past year we performed two quite independent studies in the attempt to explain the Mariner 10 magnetic observations of Mercury. In the first we revisited the possibility of crustal remanence by studying the conditions under which one could break symmetry inherent in Runcorn's model of a uniformly magnetized shell to produce a remanent signal with a dipolar form. In the second we applied a thin shell dynamo model to evaluate the range of intensity/structure for which such a planetary configuration can produce a dipole field consistent with Mariner 10 results. In the next full proposal cycle we will: (1) develop numerical and analytical and models of thin shell dynamos to address the possible nature of Mercury s present-day magnetic field and the demise of Mars magnetic field; (2) study the effect of degree-1 mantle convection on a core dynamo as relevant to the early magnetic field of Mars; (3) develop models of how the deep mantles of terrestrial planets are perturbed by large impacts and address the consequences for mantle evolution; (4) study the structure, compensation, state of stress, and viscous relaxation of lunar basins, and address implications for the Moon s state of stress and thermal history by modeling and gravity/topography analysis; and (5) use a three-dimensional viscous relaxation model for a planet with generalized vertical viscosity distribution to study the degree-two components of the Moon's topography and gravity fields to constrain the primordial stress state and spatial heterogeneity of the crust and mantle.

  10. Where Do Messy Planetary Nebulae Come From?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2017-03-01

    If you examined images of planetary nebulae, you would find that many of them have an appearance that is too messy to be accounted for in the standard model of how planetary nebulae form. So what causes these structures?Examples of planetary nebulae that have a low probability of having beenshaped by a triple stellar system. They are mostly symmetric, with only slight departures (labeled) that can be explained by instabilities, interactions with the interstellar medium, etc. [Bear and Soker 2017]A Range of LooksAt the end of a stars lifetime, in the red-giant phase, strong stellar winds can expel the outer layers of the star. The hot, luminous core then radiates in ultraviolet, ionizing the gas of the ejected stellar layers and causing them to shine as a brightly colored planetary nebula for a few tens of thousands of years.Planetary nebulae come in a wide variety of morphologies. Some are approximately spherical, but others can be elliptical, bipolar, quadrupolar, or even more complex.Its been suggested that non-spherical planetary nebulae might be shaped by the presence of a second star in a binary system with the source of the nebula but even this scenario should still produce a structure with axial or mirror symmetry.A pair of scientists from Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Ealeal Bear and Noam Soker, argue that planetary nebulae with especially messy morphologies those without clear axial or point symmetries may have been shaped by an interacting triple stellar system instead.Examples of planetary nebulae that might have been shaped by a triple stellar system. They have some deviations from symmetry but also show signs of interacting with the interstellar medium. [Bear and Soker 2017]Departures from SymmetryTo examine this possibility more closely, Bear and Soker look at a sample of thousands planetary nebulae and qualitatively classify each of them into one of four categories, based on the degree to which they show signs of having been shaped by a

  11. MCD43A2: MODIS/Terra and Aqua BRDF/Albedo Quality Daily L3 Global 500 m SIN Grid Version 6

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/Albedo Model Parameters product (MCD43A1) contains three-dimensional (3D) data sets providing users...

  12. MODIS/COMBINED MCD43C2 BRDF-Albedo Snow-Free Quality 16-Day L3 Global 0.05Deg CMG

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — The MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) BRDF/Albedo Model Parameters product (MCD43A1) contains three-dimensional (3D) data sets providing users...

  13. PHOTOMETRIC STEREO SHAPE-AND-ALBEDO-FROM-SHADING FOR PIXEL-LEVEL RESOLUTION LUNAR SURFACE RECONSTRUCTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. C. Liu

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Shape and Albedo from Shading (SAfS techniques recover pixel-wise surface details based on the relationship between terrain slopes, illumination and imaging geometry, and the energy response (i.e., image intensity captured by the sensing system. Multiple images with different illumination geometries (i.e., photometric stereo can provide better SAfS surface reconstruction due to the increase in observations. Photometric stereo SAfS is suitable for detailed surface reconstruction of the Moon and other extra-terrestrial bodies due to the availability of photometric stereo and the less complex surface reflecting properties (i.e., albedo of the target bodies as compared to the Earth. Considering only one photometric stereo pair (i.e., two images, pixel-variant albedo is still a major obstacle to satisfactory reconstruction and it needs to be regulated by the SAfS algorithm. The illumination directional difference between the two images also becomes an important factor affecting the reconstruction quality. This paper presents a photometric stereo SAfS algorithm for pixel-level resolution lunar surface reconstruction. The algorithm includes a hierarchical optimization architecture for handling pixel-variant albedo and improving performance. With the use of Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera - Narrow Angle Camera (LROC NAC photometric stereo images, the reconstructed topography (i.e., the DEM is compared with the DEM produced independently by photogrammetric methods. This paper also addresses the effect of illumination directional difference in between one photometric stereo pair on the reconstruction quality of the proposed algorithm by both mathematical and experimental analysis. In this case, LROC NAC images under multiple illumination directions are utilized by the proposed algorithm for experimental comparison. The mathematical derivation suggests an illumination azimuthal difference of 90 degrees between two images is recommended to achieve

  14. Testing the Prediction of Iron Alteration Minerals on Low Albedo Asteroids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvis, K. S.; Vilas, Faith; Howell, E.; Kelley, M.; Cochran, A.

    1999-01-01

    Absorption features centered near 0.60 - 0.65 and 0.80 - 0.90 micron were identified in the spectra of three low-albedo main-belt (165, 368, 877) and two low-albedo outer-belt (225, 334) asteroids (Vilas et al., Icarus, v. 109,274,1994). The absorption features were attributed to charge transfer transitions in iron alteration minerals such as goethite, hematite, and jarosite, all products of aqueous alteration. Concurrently, Jarvis et al. (LPSC XXIV, 715, 1993) presented additional spectra of low-albedo asteroids that had absorption features centered near 0.60 - 0.65 micron without the longer wavelength feature. Since these two features in iron oxides originate from the same ground state, and the longer wavelength feature requires less energy to exist, the single shorter wavelength feature cannot be caused by the iron alteration minerals. In addition, spectra of minerals such as hematite and goethite show a rapid increase in reflectance beginning near 0.5 micron absent in the low-albedo asteroid spectra. The absence of this rise has been attributed to its suppresion from opaques in the surface material. Spectra on more than one night were available for only one of these five asteroids, 225 Henrietta, and showed good repeatability of the 0.65-micron feature. We have acquired additional spectra of all five asteroids in order to test the repeatability of the 0.65-micron feature, and the presence and repeatability of the features centered near 0.8 - 0.9 micron. We specifically will test the possibility that longer wavelength features could be caused by incomplete removal of telluric water. Asteroid 877 Walkure is a member of the Nysa-Hertha family, and will be compared to spectra of other members of that family. Data were acquired in 1996 and 1999 on the 2.1-m telescope with a facility cassegrain spectrograph, McDonald Observatory, Univ. Of Texas, and the 1.5-m telescope with facility cassegrain spectrograph at CTIO. This research is supported by the NASA Planetary

  15. Changes in Snow Albedo Resulting from Snow Darkening Caused by Black Carbon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engels, J.; Kloster, S.; Bourgeois, Q.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the potential impact of snow darkening caused by pre-industrial and present-day black carbon (BC) emissions on snow albedo and subsequently climate. To assess this impact, we implemented the effect of snow darkening caused by BC emitted from natural as well as anthropogenic sources into the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology Earth System Model (MPI-M ESM). Considerable amounts of BC are emitted e.g. from fires and are transported through the atmosphere for several days before being removed by rain or snow precipitation in snow covered regions. Already very small quantities of BC reduce the snow reflectance significantly, with consequences for snow melting and snow spatial coverage. We implemented the snow albedo reduction caused by BC contamination and snow aging in the one layer land surface component (JSBACH) of the atmospheric general circulation model ECHAM6, developed at MPI-M. For this we used the single-layer simulator of the SNow, Ice, and Aerosol Radiation (SNICAR-Online (Flanner et al., 2007); http://snow.engin.umich.edu) model to derive snow albedo values for BC in snow concentrations ranging between 0 and 1500 ng(BC)/g(snow) for different snow grain sizes for the visible (0.3 - 0.7 μm) and near infrared range (0.7 - 1.5 μm). As snow grains grow over time, we assign different snow ages to different snow grain sizes (50, 150, 500, and 1000 μm). Here, a radius of 50 μm corresponds to new snow, whereas a radius of 1000 μm corresponds to old snow. The deposition rates of BC on snow are prescribed from previous ECHAM6-HAM simulations for two time periods, pre-industrial (1880-1889) and present-day (2000-2009), respectively. We perform a sensitivity study regarding the scavenging of BC by snow melt. To evaluate the newly implemented albedo scheme we will compare the modeled black carbon in snow concentrations to observed ones. Moreover, we will show the impact of the BC contamination and snow aging on the simulated snow albedo. The

  16. Planetary Landscape Geography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargitai, H.

    hydrosphere (no erosion). Adding new elements (differentiated body: horizon, atmosphere: blue/purple etc sky as visually important elements; complex lithology (mountains of tectonic ori- gin); atmosphere (which can alter temperature) and hydrosphere (erosion, rivers, de- position) a more complex landscape will appear. As a first step, by making a "landscape model", we can input general parameters of atmosphere, lithosphere, hydrosphere, biosphere, the distance from the Sun, orbital parameters, last resurfacing date, age of the planet and the model will output the pos- 1 sible landscape elements in the planet. This can be refined by inputing the actual pa- rameters (place on planet, climate region etc.) from which the actual landscape can be the result. The landscape altering processes are: exogenic (impact), mass movement, endogenic (volcanism, thermal conditions), weathering, aeolic, fluvial, glacial, biogenic, antro- pogenic processes. Comparing planets and moons, all of these processes work on Earth, only half of them works on Mars and Venus, and even fewer on Mercury and Moon [3], where most of the surface is an "post-impact" landscape. A Planetary view. Science-fiction writers often describe planets with one characteris- tic: "desert planet", "ocean planet", "forest planet". Generally, planetary flyby missions verify these images (Europa - ice plain planet or Io - volcano world), but a orbiter mis- sion makes clear than in any planet, several significantly different landcape units are present, but from planet to planet, the average climatic and lithologic conditions do change and characterize the given planet. LANDSCAPE RESOURCES, LANDSCAPE "HOT SPOTS" Landscape hot spots has "high values" in the factors listed below. Physical landscape values. Small object not detectable from orbiters: individual rocks or the local physical characteristics of the upper layer of the regolith, the sediment or bedrock characteristics along with relief forms will be the important factors of

  17. Improving winter leaf area index estimation in coniferous forests and its significance in estimating the land surface albedo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Chen, Jing M.; Pavlic, Goran; Arain, Altaf

    2016-09-01

    Winter leaf area index (LAI) of evergreen coniferous forests exerts strong control on the interception of snow, snowmelt and energy balance. Simulation of winter LAI and associated winter processes in land surface models is challenging. Retrieving winter LAI from remote sensing data is difficult due to cloud contamination, poor illumination, lower solar elevation and higher radiation reflection by snow background. Underestimated winter LAI in evergreen coniferous forests is one of the major issues limiting the application of current remote sensing LAI products. It has not been fully addressed in past studies in the literature. In this study, we used needle lifespan to correct winter LAI in a remote sensing product developed by the University of Toronto. For the validation purpose, the corrected winter LAI was then used to calculate land surface albedo at five FLUXNET coniferous forests in Canada. The RMSE and bias values for estimated albedo were 0.05 and 0.011, respectively, for all sites. The albedo map over coniferous forests across Canada produced with corrected winter LAI showed much better agreement with the GLASS (Global LAnd Surface Satellites) albedo product than the one produced with uncorrected winter LAI. The results revealed that the corrected winter LAI yielded much greater accuracy in simulating land surface albedo, making the new LAI product an improvement over the original one. Our study will help to increase the usability of remote sensing LAI products in land surface energy budget modeling.

  18. An algorithm to determine backscattering ratio and single scattering albedo

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Suresh, T.; Desa, E.; Matondkar, S.G.P.; Mascarenhas, A.A.M.Q.; Nayak, S.R.; Naik, P.

    Algorithms to determine the inherent optical properties of water, backscattering probability and single scattering albedo at 490 and 676 nm from the apparent optical property, remote sensing reflectance are presented here. The measured scattering...

  19. MCNP simulation of the incident and Albedo neutron response of the IRD Albedo Neutron Dosemeter for {sup 241}Am-Be moderated sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Bruno M.; Martins, Marcelo M.; Mauricio, Claudia L.P.; Mauricio, Claudia L.P. da, E-mail: claudia@ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Silva, Ademir X. [Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-Graduacao em Engenharia (COPPE/UFRJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Programa de Engenharia Nuclear

    2015-07-01

    The IRD TLD Albedo dosemeter measures both incident and albedo neutron component. The incident to Albedo ratio is used to take into account the energy dependence of its response. In this paper, the behavior of the IRD Albedo dosemeter response as a function of the incident to Albedo ratio for {sup 241}Am-Be sources was simulated to improve its algorithm. The simulation was performed in MCNPX transport code and presents a good agreement with experimental measurements. The results obtained in this work are very useful to improve the accuracy of the IRD Albedo dosemeter at real neutron workplace. (author)

  20. Predictions of mineral assemblages in planetary interiors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolper, E.

    1980-01-01

    It is shown that mineral compatibilities in the model system CaO-MgO-Al2O3-SiO2 can be applied to deduce the mineral assemblages expected in planetary interiors and their variation with depth. In general, the available estimates of bulk composition of the terrestrial planets suggest that the terrestrial planets can be divided into two groups based on their predicted mineral assemblages. The terrestrial, Venusian, and lunar bulk compositions are expected to display the following sequence of mineral assemblages with increasing pressure: plagioclase lherzolite, spinel lherzolite, and garnet lherzolite. The sequences expected in Martian and Mercurian are different: spinel-plagioclase wehrlite, spinel lherzolite, and spinel-garnet wehrlite. These assemblages have a major influence on the compositions of liquids produced by melting of these planetary interiors, on the solidus temperatures, and thus on the nature of planetary differentiation and the types of magmas extruded at planetary surfaces.

  1. IAU nomenclature for albedo features on the planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollfus, A.; Chapman, C. R.; Davies, M. E.; Gingerich, O.; Goldstein, R.; Guest, J.; Morrison, D.; Smith, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    The International Astronomical Union has endorsed a nomenclature for the albedo features on Mercury. Designations are based upon the mythological names related to the god Hermes; they are expressed in Latin form. The dark-hued albedo features are associated with the generic term Solitudo. The light-hued areas are designated by a single name without generic term. The 32 names adopted are allocated on the Mercury map.

  2. IAU nomenclature for albedo features on the planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dollfus, A.; Chapman, C. R.; Davies, M. E.; Gingerich, O.; Goldstein, R.; Guest, J.; Morrison, D.; Smith, B. A.

    1978-01-01

    The International Astronomical Union has endorsed a nomenclature for the albedo features on Mercury. Designations are based upon the mythological names related to the god Hermes; they are expressed in Latin form. The dark-hued albedo features are associated with the generic term Solitudo. The light-hued areas are designated by a single name without generic term. The 32 names adopted are allocated on the Mercury map.

  3. Planetary mass function and planetary systems

    CERN Document Server

    Dominik, M

    2010-01-01

    With planets orbiting stars, a planetary mass function should not be seen as a low-mass extension of the stellar mass function, but a proper formalism needs to take care of the fact that the statistical properties of planet populations are linked to the properties of their respective host stars. This can be accounted for by describing planet populations by means of a differential planetary mass-radius-orbit function, which together with the fraction of stars with given properties that are orbited by planets and the stellar mass function allows to derive all statistics for any considered sample. These fundamental functions provide a framework for comparing statistics that result from different observing techniques and campaigns which all have their very specific selection procedures and detection efficiencies. Moreover, recent results both from gravitational microlensing campaigns and radial-velocity surveys of stars indicate that planets tend to cluster in systems rather than being the lonely child of their r...

  4. The Planetary Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pataki, Louis P.

    2016-06-01

    This poster presentation presents the Planetary Project, a multi-week simulated research experience for college non-science majors. Students work in research teams of three to investigate the properties of a fictitious planetary system (the “Planetary System”) created each semester by the instructor. The students write team and individual papers in which they use the available data to draw conclusions about planets, other objects or general properties of the Planetary System and in which they compare, contrast and explain the similarities between the objects in the Planetary System and comparable objects in the Solar System.Data about the orbital and physical properties of the planets in the Planetary System are released at the start of the project. Each week the teams request data from a changing pool of available data. For example, in week one pictures of the planets are available. Each team picks one planet and the data (pictures) on that planet are released only to that team. Different data are available in subsequent weeks. Occasionally a news release to all groups reports an unusual occurrence - e.g. the appearance of a comet.Each student acts as principal author for one of the group paper which must contain a description of the week’s data, conclusions derived from that data about the Planetary System and a comparison with the Solar System. Each students writes a final, individual paper on a topic of their choice dealing with the Planetary System in which they follow the same data, conclusion, comparison format. Students “publish” their papers on a class-only restricted website and present their discoveries in class talks. Data are released to all on the website as the related papers are “published.” Additional papers commenting on the published work and released data are encouraged.The successes and problems of the method are presented.

  5. MODIS-derived albedo changes of Vatnajökull (Iceland) due to tephra deposition from the 2004 Grímsvötn eruption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Rebecca; Möller, Marco; Björnsson, Helgi; Guðmundsson, Sverrir; Pálsson, Finnur; Oddsson, Björn; Kukla, Peter A.; Schneider, Christoph

    2014-02-01

    Occasionally, the surface albedo of glaciers may be abruptly altered by deposition of light-absorbing aerosols, which consequently has a sustained impact on their energy- and mass balance. Volcanic eruptions may spread tephra deposits over regional-scale glacierized areas. In November 2004, an explosive, phreatomagmatic eruption of the subglacial Grímsvötn volcano, located in the centre of the Icelandic ice cap Vatnajökull, produced ash fall covering an area of ∼1280 km2 in the northwestern part of the ice cap. This event affected the surface albedo of the glacier over several years after the eruption. We use MODIS surface-albedo data and an ash-dispersal dataset obtained from in situ measurements on the ice cap to develop a novel, empirically based modelling approach to describe the albedo decrease across the glacier surface caused by the deposited tephra. We present analyses of the temporal and spatial variability of the albedo pattern over the post-eruption period from November 2004 to December 2008. The tephra-induced albedo changes were largest and most widely distributed over the glacier surface during the summer season 2005. The observed albedo decrease reached 0.35 when compared to modelled, undisturbed conditions. In the low-lying ablation area, where strong surface melting takes place, the tephra influence on albedo diminished with time and completely faded out within four years after the eruption. In contrast, at the rim of the Grímsvötn caldera surrounding the eruption site the tephra influences on albedo considerably increased with time. Throughout the rest of the high-lying accumulation area, the influences were scattered in both space and time.

  6. Climate implications of including albedo effects in terrestrial carbon policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, A. D.; Collins, W.; Torn, M. S.; Calvin, K. V.

    2012-12-01

    Proposed strategies for managing terrestrial carbon in order to mitigate anthropogenic climate change, such as financial incentives for afforestation, soil carbon sequestration, or biofuel production, largely ignore the direct effects of land use change on climate via biophysical processes that alter surface energy and water budgets. Subsequent influences on temperature, hydrology, and atmospheric circulation at regional and global scales could potentially help or hinder climate stabilization efforts. Because these policies often rely on payments or credits expressed in units of CO2-equivalents, accounting for biophysical effects would require a metric for comparing the strength of biophysical climate perturbation from land use change to that of emitting CO2. One such candidate metric that has been suggested in the literature on land use impacts is radiative forcing, which underlies the global warming potential metric used to compare the climate effects of various greenhouse gases with one another. Expressing land use change in units of radiative forcing is possible because albedo change results in a net top-of-atmosphere radiative flux change. However, this approach has also been critiqued on theoretical grounds because not all climatic changes associated with land use change are principally radiative in nature, e.g. changes in hydrology or the vertical distribution of heat within the atmosphere, and because the spatial scale of land use change forcing differs from that of well-mixed greenhouse gases. To explore the potential magnitude of this discrepancy in the context of plausible scenarios of future land use change, we conduct three simulations with the Community Climate System Model 4 (CCSM4) utilizing a slab ocean model. Each simulation examines the effect of a stepwise change in forcing relative to a pre-industrial control simulation: 1) widespread conversion of forest land to crops resulting in approximately 1 W/m2 global-mean radiative forcing from albedo

  7. Estimation of Sub Hourly Glacier Albedo Values Using Artificial Intelligence Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moya Quiroga, Vladimir; Mano, Akira; Asaoka, Yoshihiro; Udo, Keiko; Kure, Shuichi; Mendoza, Javier

    2013-04-01

    Glaciers are the most important fresh water reservoirs storing about 67% of total fresh water. Unfortunately, they are retreating and some small glaciers have already disappeared. Thus, snow glacier melt (SGM) estimation plays an important role in water resources management. Whether SGM is estimated by complete energy balance or a simplified method, albedo is an important data present in most of the methods. However, this is a variable value depending on the ground surface and local conditions. The present research presents a new approach for estimating sub hourly albedo values using different artificial intelligence techniques such as artificial neural networks and decision trees along with measured and easy to obtain data. . The models were developed using measured data from the Zongo-Ore station located in the Bolivian tropical glacier Zongo (68°10' W, 16°15' S). This station automatically records every 30 minutes several meteorological parameters such as incoming short wave radiation, outgoing short wave radiation, temperature or relative humidity. The ANN model used was the Multi Layer Perceptron, while the decision tree used was the M5 model. Both models were trained using the WEKA software and validated using the cross validation method. After analysing the model performances, it was concluded that the decision tree models have a better performance. The model with the best performance was then validated with measured data from the Equatorian tropical glacier Antizana (78°09'W, 0°28'S). The model predicts the sub hourly albedo with an overall mean absolute error of 0.103. The highest errors occur for albedo measured values higher than 0.9. Considering that this is an extreme value coincident with low measured values of incoming short wave radiation, it is reasonable to assume that such values include errors due to censored data. Assuming a maximum albedo of 0.9 improved the accuracy of the model reducing the MAE to less than 0.1. Considering that the

  8. Raising the Albedo of 2010 GY6: Fitting ATPM to Wise Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooden, D. H.; Rozitis, B. D.; Jefferson, J. D.; Nelson, T. W.; Dotson, J. L.

    2017-01-01

    Near-Earth Asteroid 462775 (2010 GY6) is in the Apollo orbit-family with a 1.46 year orbital period. 2010 GY6 was measured by WISE and fitted with NEATM, yielding NEATM model parameters of D=1.1 km, pv=0.028 and eta=2.3.The NEATM-derived geometric albedo of 2010 GY6 is lower than the surface of comet 67P/C-G. The eta value is considerably higher than typical for its phase angle of 33 deg, indicating a cooler surface due to non-zero thermal inertia and/or surface roughness are important. If the thermal inertia and surface roughness are constrained by fitting the Advanced Thermophysical Model (ATPM) to the WISE data, what would the resulting geometric albedo? We find pv=0.06-0.08, in the same range as B- or C-type NEAs like Bennu or JU3.

  9. Snow spectral albedo at Summit, Greenland: comparison between in situ measurements and numerical simulations using measured physical and chemical properties of the snowpack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmagnola, C. M.; Domine, F.; Dumont, M.; Wright, P.; Strellis, B.; Bergin, M.; Dibb, J.; Picard, G.; Morin, S.

    2012-12-01

    The albedo of surface snow is determined both by the near-surface profile of the physical and chemical properties of the snowpack and by the spectral and angular characteristics of the incident solar radiation. Simultaneous measurements of the physical and chemical properties of snow were carried out at Summit Camp, Greenland (72°36´ N, 38°25´ W, 3210 m a.s.l.) in May and June 2011, along with spectral albedo measurements. One of the main objectives of the field campaign was to test our ability to predict snow albedo comparing measured snow spectral albedo to the albedo calculated with a radiative transfer model. To achieve this goal, we made daily measurements of the snow spectral albedo in the range 350-2200 nm and recorded snow stratigraphic information down to roughly 80 cm. The snow specific surface area (SSA) was measured using the DUFISSS instrument (DUal Frequency Integrating Sphere for Snow SSA measurement, Gallet et al., 2009). Samples were also collected for chemical analyses including black carbon (BC) and trace elements, to evaluate the impact of light absorbing particulate matter in snow. This is one of the most comprehensive albedo-related data sets combining chemical analysis, snow physical properties and spectral albedo measurements obtained in a polar environment. The surface albedo was calculated from density, SSA, BC and dust profiles using the DISORT model (DIScrete Ordinate Radiative Transfer, Stamnes et al., 1988) and compared to the measured values. Results indicate that the energy absorbed by the snowpack through the whole spectrum considered can be inferred within 1.35%. This accuracy is only slightly better than that which can be obtained considering pure snow, meaning that the impact of impurities on the snow albedo is small at Summit. In the visible region, the discrepancies between measured and simulated albedo are mostly due to the lack of correction of the cosine collector deviation from a true cosine response. In the near

  10. Effects of boundary layer particle formation on cloud droplet number and changes in cloud albedo from 1850 to 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Merikanto

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available We use a global aerosol microphysics model to estimate the effect of particle formation through activation nucleation in the boundary layer (BL on cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC on global and regional scales. The calculations are carried out for years 1850 and 2000 using historical emissions inventories for primary particles and aerosol precursor gases. Predicted CDNC in 2000 are in good agreement with in-situ observations when activation nucleation is included. We find that BL particle formation increases global annual mean CDNC by approximately the same relative amount in both years (16.0% in 1850 and 13.5% in 2000. As a result, global mean changes in cloud albedo are similar with and without BL particle formation. However, there are substantial regional effects of up to 50% enhancement or suppression of the 1850–2000 albedo change. Over most modern-day polluted northern hemisphere regions, including BL particle formation scheme suppresses the 1850–2000 increase in CDNC and cloud albedo because BL particle formation is already large in 1850. Over the Arctic the albedo change is suppressed by 23% in the annual mean and by 43% in summer when BL particle formation is taken into account. The albedo change of the persistent stratocumulus cloud deck west of Chile is enhanced by 49%.

  11. Effects of boundary layer particle formation on cloud droplet number and changes in cloud albedo from 1850 to 2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Merikanto

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available We use a global aerosol microphysics model to estimate the effect of boundary layer particle formation on cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC on global and regional scales. The calculations are carried out for years 1850 and 2000 using historical emissions inventories for primary particles and aerosol precursor gases. Predicted CDNC in 2000 are in good agreement with in-situ observations when particle formation is included. We find that particle formation increases global annual mean CDNC by approximately the same amount in both years (16.0% in 1850 and 13.5% in 2000. Thus, global mean changes in cloud albedo are similar with and without particle formation. However, there are substantial regional effects of up to 50% enhancement or suppression of the 1850–2000 albedo change. Over most modern-day polluted Northern Hemisphere regions particle formation suppresses the 1850–2000 increase in CDNC and cloud albedo. Over the Arctic the albedo change is suppressed by 23% in the annual mean and by 43% in summer when particle formation is taken into account. The albedo change of the persistent stratocumulus cloud deck west of Chile is enhanced by 49%.

  12. Impact of absorbing aerosol deposition on snow albedo reduction over the southern Tibetan plateau based on satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wei-Liang; Liou, K. N.; He, Cenlin; Liang, Hsin-Chien; Wang, Tai-Chi; Li, Qinbin; Liu, Zhenxin; Yue, Qing

    2017-08-01

    We investigate the snow albedo variation in spring over the southern Tibetan Plateau induced by the deposition of light-absorbing aerosols using remote sensing data from moderate resolution imaging spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard Terra satellite during 2001-2012. We have selected pixels with 100 % snow cover for the entire period in March and April to avoid albedo contamination by other types of land surfaces. A model simulation using GEOS-Chem shows that aerosol optical depth (AOD) is a good indicator for black carbon and dust deposition on snow over the southern Tibetan Plateau. The monthly means of satellite-retrieved land surface temperature (LST) and AOD over 100 % snow-covered pixels during the 12 years are used in multiple linear regression analysis to derive the empirical relationship between snow albedo and these variables. Along with the LST effect, AOD is shown to be an important factor contributing to snow albedo reduction. We illustrate through statistical analysis that a 1-K increase in LST and a 0.1 increase in AOD indicate decreases in snow albedo by 0.75 and 2.1 % in the southern Tibetan Plateau, corresponding to local shortwave radiative forcing of 1.5 and 4.2 W m-2, respectively.

  13. Planetary boundary layer model for estimating the radionuclides concentration in accidental liberations; Modelo de camada limite planetaria para estimar a concentracao de radionuclideos em liberacoes acidentais

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molnary, Leslie de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: molnaryy@net.ipen.br

    2002-07-01

    A two layer bulk model is used to simulate numerically the time and spatial evolution of concentration of radionuclides in the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) for convective and stable conditions. In this model, the closure hypothesis are based on the integrated version of the Turbulent Kinetics Energy equation. This type of model was adopted here because it is numerically simple to be applied operationally in routine and emergency support systems of atmospheric releases at nuclear power plants, and the hypothesis of the efficiency of the vertical mixing seems to be physically reasonable to simulate PBL evolution for high wind conditions and stable conditions in subtropical latitudes regions. In order to validate the model, numerical simulations were carried out with initial and boundary conditions based on vertical profiles of temperatures and horizontal wind speed and direction obtained from tethered balloon soundings, synoptic charts at 850 hPa and surface observations. Comparisons between a 24 hour long numerical simulation and observations indicate that the model is capable of reproduce the diurnal evolution of temperature and horizontal wind during the convective regime. During stable conditions, the slab model was able to simulate the intensity of the surface inversion as a difference between the mixed layer and the surface temperature. The simulated mixed layer height matches with observations during the convective and stable regime. (author)

  14. Effect of satellite formations and imaging modes on global albedo estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nag, Sreeja; Gatebe, Charles K.; Miller, David W.; de Weck, Olivier L.

    2016-05-01

    We confirm the applicability of using small satellite formation flight for multi-angular earth observation to retrieve global, narrow band, narrow field-of-view albedo. The value of formation flight is assessed using a coupled systems engineering and science evaluation model, driven by Model Based Systems Engineering and Observing System Simulation Experiments. Albedo errors are calculated against bi-directional reflectance data obtained from NASA airborne campaigns made by the Cloud Absorption Radiometer for the seven major surface types, binned using MODIS' land cover map - water, forest, cropland, grassland, snow, desert and cities. A full tradespace of architectures with three to eight satellites, maintainable orbits and imaging modes (collective payload pointing strategies) are assessed. For an arbitrary 4-sat formation, changing the reference, nadir-pointing satellite dynamically reduces the average albedo error to 0.003, from 0.006 found in the static referencecase. Tracking pre-selected waypoints with all the satellites reduces the average error further to 0.001, allows better polar imaging and continued operations even with a broken formation. An albedo error of 0.001 translates to 1.36 W/m2 or 0.4% in Earth's outgoing radiation error. Estimation errors are found to be independent of the satellites' altitude and inclination, if the nadir-looking is changed dynamically. The formation satellites are restricted to differ in only right ascension of planes and mean anomalies within slotted bounds. Three satellites in some specific formations show average albedo errors of less than 2% with respect to airborne, ground data and seven satellites in any slotted formation outperform the monolithic error of 3.6%. In fact, the maximum possible albedo error, purely based on angular sampling, of 12% for monoliths is outperformed by a five-satellite formation in any slotted arrangement and an eight satellite formation can bring that error down four fold to 3%. More than

  15. Planetary Vital Signs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennel, Charles; Briggs, Stephen; Victor, David

    2016-07-01

    The climate is beginning to behave in unusual ways. The global temperature reached unprecedented highs in 2015 and 2016, which led climatologists to predict an enormous El Nino that would cure California's record drought. It did not happen the way they expected. That tells us just how unreliable temperature has become as an indicator of important aspects of climate change. The world needs to go beyond global temperature to a set of planetary vital signs. Politicians should not over focus policy on one indicator. They need to look at the balance of evidence. A coalition of scientists and policy makers should start to develop vital signs at once, since they should be ready at the entry into force of the Paris Agreement in 2020. But vital signs are only the beginning. The world needs to learn how to use the vast knowledge we will be acquiring about climate change and its impacts. Is it not time to use all the tools at hand- observations from space and ground networks; demographic, economic and societal measures; big data statistical techniques; and numerical models-to inform politicians, managers, and the public of the evolving risks of climate change at global, regional, and local scales? Should we not think in advance of an always-on social and information network that provides decision-ready knowledge to those who hold the responsibility to act, wherever they are, at times of their choosing?

  16. High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

    1992-01-01

    One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building`s envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

  17. High-albedo materials for reducing building cooling energy use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taha, H.; Sailor, D.; Akbari, H.

    1992-01-01

    One simple and effective way to mitigate urban heat islands, i.e., the higher temperatures in cities compared to those of the surrounds, and their negative impacts on cooling energy consumption is to use high-albedo materials on major urban surfaces such as rooftops, streets, sidewalks, school yards, and the exposed surfaces of parking lots. High-albedo materials can save cooling energy use by directly reducing the heat gain through a building's envelope (direct effect) and also by lowering the urban air temperature in the neighborhood of the building (indirect effect). This project is an attempt to address high-albedo materials for buildings and to perform measurements of roof coatings. We search for existing methods and materials to implement fighter colors on major building and urban surfaces. Their cost effectiveness are examined and the possible related technical, maintenance, and environmental problems are identified. We develop a method for measuring albedo in the field by studying the instrumentation aspects of such measurements. The surface temperature impacts of various albedo/materials in the actual outdoor environment are studied by measuring the surface temperatures of a variety of materials tested on an actual roof. We also generate an albedo database for several urban surfaces to serve as a reference for future use. The results indicate that high-albedo materials can have a large impact on the surface temperature regime. On clear sunny days, when the solar noon surface temperatures of conventional roofing materials were about 40{degrees}C (72{degrees}F) warmer than air, the surface temperature of high-albedo coatings were only about 5{degrees}C warmer than air. In the morning and in the late afternoon, the high-albedo materials were as cool as the air itself. While conventional roofing materials warm up by an average 0.055{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}), the high-albedo surfaces warm up by an average 0.015{degrees}C/(W m{sup {minus}2}).

  18. Finite Element Residual Stress Analysis of Planetary Gear Tooth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jungang Wang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A method to simulate residual stress field of planetary gear is proposed. In this method, the finite element model of planetary gear is established and divided to tooth zone and profile zone, whose different temperature field is set. The gear's residual stress simulation is realized by the thermal compression stress generated by the temperature difference. Based on the simulation, the finite element model of planetary gear train is established, the dynamic meshing process is simulated, and influence of residual stress on equivalent stress of addendum, pitch circle, and dedendum of internal and external meshing planetary gear tooth profile is analyzed, according to non-linear contact theory, thermodynamic theory, and finite element theory. The results show that the equivalent stresses of planetary gear at both meshing and nonmeshing surface are significantly and differently reduced by residual stress. The study benefits fatigue cracking analysis and dynamic optimization design of planetary gear train.

  19. Rectified Asteroid Albedos and Diameters from IRAS and MSX Photometry Catalogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Erin Lee; Woodward, Charles E.

    2010-10-01

    Rectified diameters and albedo estimates of 1517 main-belt asteroids selected from IRAS and the Mid-Course Space Experiment asteroid photometry catalogs are derived from updated infrared thermal models, the Standard Thermal Model and the Near-Earth Asteroid Thermal Model (NEATM), and Monte Carlo simulations, using new Minor Planet Center compilations of absolute magnitudes (H values) constrained by occultation- and radar-derived parameters. The NEATM approach produces a more robust estimate of albedos and diameters, yielding albedos of pv (NEATM mean) =0.081 ± 0.064. The asteroid beaming parameter (η) for the selected asteroids has a mean value of 1.07 ± 0.27, and the smooth distribution of η suggests that this parameter is independent of asteroid properties such as composition. No trends in η due to size-dependent rotation rates are evident. Comparison of derived values of η as a function of taxonomic type indicates that the beaming parameter values for S- and C-type asteroids are identical within the standard deviation of the population of beaming parameters.

  20. Inferring heat recirculation and albedo for exoplanetary atmospheres: Comparing optical phase curves and secondary eclipse data