WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling results min

  1. Performance analysis of 60-min to 1-min integration time rain rate conversion models in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Yun-Yann; Singh, Mandeep Singh Jit; Thiruchelvam, Vinesh

    2018-01-01

    Utilizing the frequency band above 10 GHz is in focus nowadays as a result of the fast expansion of radio communication systems in Malaysia. However, rain fade is the critical factor in attenuation of signal propagation for frequencies above 10 GHz. Malaysia is located in a tropical and equatorial region with high rain intensity throughout the year, and this study will review rain distribution and evaluate the performance of 60-min to 1-min integration time rain rate conversion methods for Malaysia. Several conversion methods such as Segal, Chebil & Rahman, Burgeono, Emiliani, Lavergnat and Gole (LG), Simplified Moupfouma, Joo et al., fourth order polynomial fit and logarithmic model have been chosen to evaluate the performance to predict 1-min rain rate for 10 sites in Malaysia. After the completion of this research, the results show that Chebil & Rahman model, Lavergnat & Gole model, Fourth order polynomial fit and Logarithmic model have shown the best performances in 60-min to 1-min rain rate conversion over 10 sites. In conclusion, it is proven that there is no single model which can claim to perform the best across 10 sites. By averaging RMSE and SC-RMSE over 10 sites, Chebil and Rahman model is the best method.

  2. Simple membrane-based model of the Min oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra

    2015-04-01

    Min proteins in E. coli bacteria organize into a dynamic pattern oscillating between the two cell poles. This process identifies the middle of the cell and enables symmetric cell division. In an experimental model system consisting of a flat membrane with effectively infinite supply of proteins and energy source, the Min proteins assemble into travelling waves. Here we propose a simple one-dimensional model of the Min dynamics that, unlike the existing models, reproduces the sharp decrease of Min concentration when the majority of protein detaches from the membrane, and even the narrow MinE maximum immediately preceding the detachment. The proposed model thus provides a possible mechanism for the formation of the MinE ring known from cells. The model is restricted to one dimension, with protein interactions described by chemical kinetics allowing at most bimolecular reactions, and explicitly considering only three, membrane-bound, species. The bulk solution above the membrane is approximated as being well-mixed, with constant concentrations of all species. Unlike other models, our proposal does not require autocatalytic binding of MinD to the membrane. Instead, it is assumed that two MinE molecules are necessary to induce the dissociation of the MinD dimer and its subsequent detachment from the membrane. We investigate which reaction schemes lead to unstable homogeneous steady states and limit cycle oscillations, and how diffusion affects their stability. The suggested model qualitatively describes the shape of the Min waves observed on flat membranes, and agrees with the experimental dependence of the wave period on the MinE concentration. These results highlight the importance of MinE presence on the membrane without being bound to MinD, and of the reactions of Min proteins on the membrane.

  3. Simple membrane-based model of the Min oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrášek, Zdeněk; Schwille, Petra

    2015-01-01

    Min proteins in E. coli bacteria organize into a dynamic pattern oscillating between the two cell poles. This process identifies the middle of the cell and enables symmetric cell division. In an experimental model system consisting of a flat membrane with effectively infinite supply of proteins and energy source, the Min proteins assemble into travelling waves. Here we propose a simple one-dimensional model of the Min dynamics that, unlike the existing models, reproduces the sharp decrease of Min concentration when the majority of protein detaches from the membrane, and even the narrow MinE maximum immediately preceding the detachment. The proposed model thus provides a possible mechanism for the formation of the MinE ring known from cells. The model is restricted to one dimension, with protein interactions described by chemical kinetics allowing at most bimolecular reactions, and explicitly considering only three, membrane-bound, species. The bulk solution above the membrane is approximated as being well-mixed, with constant concentrations of all species. Unlike other models, our proposal does not require autocatalytic binding of MinD to the membrane. Instead, it is assumed that two MinE molecules are necessary to induce the dissociation of the MinD dimer and its subsequent detachment from the membrane. We investigate which reaction schemes lead to unstable homogeneous steady states and limit cycle oscillations, and how diffusion affects their stability. The suggested model qualitatively describes the shape of the Min waves observed on flat membranes, and agrees with the experimental dependence of the wave period on the MinE concentration. These results highlight the importance of MinE presence on the membrane without being bound to MinD, and of the reactions of Min proteins on the membrane. (paper)

  4. The US Army HazMin probe model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuusinen, T.; Dirks, J.; Brothers, A.; Fowler, K.; Skumanich, M.; Scola, R.; Perich, A.; Napolitano, M.

    1993-03-01

    In 1987, the US Department of Defense (DOD) established a goal of reducing the quantity of hazardous waste generated by DOD facilities by 50%. To help achieve this goal, the US Army Production Base Modernization Activity (PBMA) has contracted with the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) to develop decision support software to be used in the Army-wide hazardous waste minimization (HazMin) program. The resulting waste minimization prioritization software has been named the Project Opportunity and Benefit Evaluation (PROBE) model. PROBE can be used to evaluate both waste stream and project priorities. PROBE operates on any IBM-compatible personal computer hardware with at least 640K of memory and 5 megabytes of available hard disk space. PROBE was developed under the direction of PBMA, which retains unlimited rights to the Federal version of PROBE. PBMA encourages other DOD services and other Federal agencies to use PROBE to assist in their own waste minimization programs. PNL is also considering developing a copyrighted version of PROBE for the commercial market. PROBE was written using FoxPro 2.0 application development software, and runs as an executable file from either MS-DOS or Windows. The software can be loaded onto a single high-capacity floppy disk in a compressed format and can be transferred onto hard disk, ready to operate, via a simple start-up routine

  5. Polymerization and oscillation stuttering in a filamentous model of the subcellular Min oscillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutenberg, Andrew; Sengupta, Supratim; Sain, Anirban; Derr, Julien

    2011-03-01

    We present a computational model of the E. coli Min oscillation that involves polymerization of MinD filaments followed by depolymerization stimulated by filament-end zones of MinE. Our stochastic model is fully three-dimensional, and tracks the diffusion and interactions of every MinD and MinE molecule. We recover self-organized Min oscillations. We investigate the experimental phenomenon of oscillation stuttering, which we relate to the disruption of MinE tip-binding at the filament scale.

  6. MinC/MinD copolymers are not required for Min function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Tae; Du, Shishen; Lutkenhaus, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Summary In Escherichia coli, precise placement of the cytokinetic Z ring at midcell requires the concerted action of the three Min proteins. MinD activates MinC, an inhibitor of FtsZ, at least in part, by recruiting it to the membrane and targeting it to the Z ring, while MinE stimulates the MinD ATPase inducing an oscillation that directs MinC/MinD activity away from midcell. Recently, MinC and MinD were shown to form copolymers of alternating dimers of MinC and MinD and it was suggested that these copolymers are the active form of MinC/MinD. Here, we use MinD mutants defective in binding MinC to generate heterodimers with wild type MinD that are unable to form MinC/MinD copolymers. Similarly, MinC mutants defective in binding to MinD were used to generate heterodimers with wild type MinC that are unable to form copolymers. Such heterodimers are active and in the case of MinC were shown to mediate spatial regulation of the Z ring demonstrating that MinC/MinD copolymer formation is not required. Our results are consistent with a model in which a membrane anchored MinC/MinD complex is targeted to the Z ring through the conserved carboxy tail of FtsZ leading to breakage of FtsZ filaments. PMID:26268537

  7. Stuttering Min oscillations within E. coli bacteria: a stochastic polymerization model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Supratim; Derr, Julien; Sain, Anirban; Rutenberg, Andrew D.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a 3D off-lattice stochastic polymerization model to study the subcellular oscillation of Min proteins in the bacteria Escherichia coli, and used it to investigate the experimental phenomenon of Min oscillation stuttering. Stuttering was affected by the rate of immediate rebinding of MinE released from depolymerizing filament tips (processivity), protection of depolymerizing filament tips from MinD binding and fragmentation of MinD filaments due to MinE. Processivity, protection and fragmentation each reduce stuttering, speed oscillations and MinD filament lengths. Neither processivity nor tip protection were, on their own, sufficient to produce fast stutter-free oscillations. While filament fragmentation could, on its own, lead to fast oscillations with infrequent stuttering; high levels of fragmentation degraded oscillations. The infrequent stuttering observed in standard Min oscillations is consistent with short filaments of MinD, while we expect that mutants that exhibit higher stuttering frequencies will exhibit longer MinD filaments. Increased stuttering rate may be a useful diagnostic to find observable MinD polymerization under experimental conditions.

  8. Stuttering Min oscillations within E. coli bacteria: a stochastic polymerization model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sengupta, Supratim; Derr, Julien; Sain, Anirban; Rutenberg, Andrew D

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a 3D off-lattice stochastic polymerization model to study the subcellular oscillation of Min proteins in the bacteria Escherichia coli, and used it to investigate the experimental phenomenon of Min oscillation stuttering. Stuttering was affected by the rate of immediate rebinding of MinE released from depolymerizing filament tips (processivity), protection of depolymerizing filament tips from MinD binding and fragmentation of MinD filaments due to MinE. Processivity, protection and fragmentation each reduce stuttering, speed oscillations and MinD filament lengths. Neither processivity nor tip protection were, on their own, sufficient to produce fast stutter-free oscillations. While filament fragmentation could, on its own, lead to fast oscillations with infrequent stuttering; high levels of fragmentation degraded oscillations. The infrequent stuttering observed in standard Min oscillations is consistent with short filaments of MinD, while we expect that mutants that exhibit higher stuttering frequencies will exhibit longer MinD filaments. Increased stuttering rate may be a useful diagnostic to find observable MinD polymerization under experimental conditions. (paper)

  9. Effects of hemin and nitrite on intestinal tumorigenesis in the A/J Min/+ mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Sødring

    Full Text Available Red and processed meats are considered risk factors for colorectal cancer (CRC; however, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. One cause for the potential link between CRC and meat is the heme iron in red meat. Two pathways by which heme and CRC promotion may be linked have been suggested: fat peroxidation and N-nitrosation. In the present work we have used the novel A/J Min/+ mouse model to test the effects of dietary hemin (a model of red meat, and hemin in combination with nitrite (a model of processed meat on intestinal tumorigenesis. Mice were fed a low Ca2+ and vitamin D semi-synthetic diet with added hemin and/or nitrite for 8 weeks post weaning, before termination followed by excision and examination of the intestinal tract. Our results indicate that dietary hemin decreased the number of colonic lesions in the A/J Min/+ mouse. However, our results also showed that the opposite occurred in the small intestine, where dietary hemin appeared to stimulate tumor growth. Furthermore, we find that nitrite, which did not have an effect in the colon, appeared to have a suppressive effect on tumor growth in the small intestine.

  10. MinD directly interacting with FtsZ at the H10 helix suggests a model for robust activation of MinC to destabilize FtsZ polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taviti, Ashoka Chary; Beuria, Tushar Kant

    2017-09-07

    Cell division in bacteria is a highly controlled and regulated process. FtsZ, a bacterial cytoskeletal protein, forms a ring-like structure known as the Z-ring and recruits more than a dozen other cell division proteins. The Min system oscillates between the poles and inhibits the Z-ring formation at the poles by perturbing FtsZ assembly. This leads to an increase in the FtsZ concentration at the mid-cell and helps in Z-ring positioning. MinC, the effector protein, interferes with Z-ring formation through two different mechanisms mediated by its two domains with the help of MinD. However, the mechanism by which MinD triggers MinC activity is not yet known. We showed that MinD directly interacts with FtsZ with an affinity stronger than the reported MinC-FtsZ interaction. We determined the MinD-binding site of FtsZ using computational, mutational and biochemical analyses. Our study showed that MinD binds to the H10 helix of FtsZ. Single-point mutations at the charged residues in the H10 helix resulted in a decrease in the FtsZ affinity towards MinD. Based on our findings, we propose a novel model for MinCD-FtsZ interaction, where MinD through its direct interaction with FtsZ would trigger MinC activity to inhibit FtsZ functions. © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  11. Feedback min-max model predictive control using robust one-step sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cychowski, Marcin T.; O'Mahony, Tom

    2010-07-01

    A solution to the infinite-horizon min-max model predictive control (MPC) problem of constrained polytopic systems has recently been defined in terms of a sequence of free control moves over a fixed horizon and a state feedback law in the terminal region using a time-varying terminal cost. The advantage of this formulation is the enlargement of the admissible set of initial states without sacrificing local optimality, but this comes at the expense of higher computational complexity. This article, by means of a counterexample, shows that the robust feasibility and stability properties of such algorithms are not, in general, guaranteed when more than one control move is adopted. For this reason, this work presents a novel formulation of min-max MPC based on the concept of within-horizon feedback and robust contractive set theory that ensures robust stability for any choice of the control horizon. A parameter-dependent feedback extension is also proposed and analysed. The effectiveness of the algorithms is demonstrated with two numerical examples.

  12. Power Quality Analysis Using a Hybrid Model of the Fuzzy Min-Max Neural Network and Clustering Tree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seera, Manjeevan; Lim, Chee Peng; Loo, Chu Kiong; Singh, Harapajan

    2016-12-01

    A hybrid intelligent model comprising a modified fuzzy min-max (FMM) clustering neural network and a modified clustering tree (CT) is developed. A review of clustering models with rule extraction capabilities is presented. The hybrid FMM-CT model is explained. We first use several benchmark problems to illustrate the cluster evolution patterns from the proposed modifications in FMM. Then, we employ a case study with real data related to power quality monitoring to assess the usefulness of FMM-CT. The results are compared with those from other clustering models. More importantly, we extract explanatory rules from FMM-CT to justify its predictions. The empirical findings indicate the usefulness of the proposed model in tackling data clustering and power quality monitoring problems under different environments.

  13. Therapeutic utility of aspirin in the ApcMin/+ murine model of colon carcinogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reuter, Brian K; Zhang, Xiao-Jing; Miller, Mark JS

    2002-01-01

    In recent years it has become evident that nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, in particular aspirin represent a potential class of cancer chemotherapeutic agents. Despite the wealth of knowledge gained from epidemiological, clinical and animal studies, the effectiveness of aspirin to treat established gastrointestinal cancer has not been determined. The present study examines the ability of aspirin to treat established polyposis in Min/+ mice. Min/+ mice with established polyposis were treated orally once daily from 12–16 weeks of age with either drug vehicle or aspirin (25 mg/kg). Upon completion of treatment, the number, location and size of intestinal tumours was determined. Additional variables examined were the number of apoptotic cells within tumours and COX activity. Administration of aspirin for 4 weeks to Min/+ mice produce no effect on tumour number compared to vehicle-treated Min/+ mice (65 ± 8 vs. 63 ± 9, respectively). In addition, aspirin had no effect on tumour size or location. However, aspirin treatment produced a greater than 2-fold (p < 0.05) increase in the number of apoptotic positive cells within tumours and significantly decreased hepatic PGE 2 content. Aspirin was found to have no effect on tumour number and size when administered to Min/+ mice with established polyposis. The findings in the present study call in to question the utility of aspirin as a stand-alone treatment for established GI cancer. However, aspirin's ability to significantly promote apoptosis may render it suitable for use in combinatorial chemotherapy

  14. Integrated water vapor from IGS ground-based GPS observations: initial results from a global 5-min data set

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Heise

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Ground based GPS zenith path delay (ZPD measurements are well established as a powerful tool for integrated water vapor (IWV observation. The International GNSS Service (IGS provides ZPD data of currently more than 300 globally distributed GPS stations. To derive IWV from these data, meteorological information (ground pressure and mean temperature above the station are needed. Only a limited number of IGS stations is equipped with meteorological ground sensors up to now. Thus, meteorological data for IWV conversion are usually derived from nearby ground meteorological observations (ground pressure and meteorological analyses (mean temperature. In this paper we demonstrate for the first time the applicability of ground pressure data from ECMWF meteorological analysis fields in this context. Beside simplified data handling (no single station data and quality control this approach allows for IWV derivation if nearby meteorological stations are not available. Using ECMWF ground pressure and mean temperature data the new IGS 5-min ZPD data set has been converted to IWV for the first time. We present initial results from selected stations with ground meteorological sensors including pressure and temperature comparisons between ECMWF and local measurements. The GPS IWV is generally validated by comparison with ECMWF IWV. The ECMWF derived station meteorological data are compared with local measurements at all accordingly equipped stations. Based on this comparison, the mean error (in terms of standard deviation introduced by time interpolation of the 6-hourly ECMWF data is estimated below 0.2 mm IWV.

  15. Integrated water vapor from IGS ground-based GPS observations. Initial results from a global 5-min data set

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heise, S.; Dick, G.; Gendt, G.; Schmidt, T.; Wickert, J. [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam (Germany). Dept. 1 Geodesy and Remote Sensing

    2009-07-01

    Ground based GPS zenith path delay (ZPD) measurements are well established as a powerful tool for integrated water vapor (IWV) observation. The International GNSS Service (IGS) provides ZPD data of currently more than 300 globally distributed GPS stations. To derive IWV from these data, meteorological information (ground pressure and mean temperature above the station) are needed. Only a limited number of IGS stations is equipped with meteorological ground sensors up to now. Thus, meteorological data for IWV conversion are usually derived from nearby ground meteorological observations (ground pressure) and meteorological analyses (mean temperature). In this paper we demonstrate for the first time the applicability of ground pressure data from ECMWF meteorological analysis fields in this context. Beside simplified data handling (no single station data and quality control) this approach allows for IWV derivation if nearby meteorological stations are not available. Using ECMWF ground pressure and mean temperature data the new IGS 5-min ZPD data set has been converted to IWV for the first time. We present initial results from selected stations with ground meteorological sensors including pressure and temperature comparisons between ECMWF and local measurements. The GPS IWV is generally validated by comparison with ECMWF IWV. The ECMWF derived station meteorological data are compared with local measurements at all accordingly equipped stations. Based on this comparison, the mean error (in terms of standard deviation) introduced by time interpolation of the 6-hourly ECMWF data is estimated below 0.2 mm IWV. (orig.)

  16. MinSORTING: an Excel macro for modelling sediment composition and grain-size distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resentini, Alberto; Malusà, Marco G.; Garzanti, Eduardo

    2013-04-01

    Detrital mineral analyses are gaining increasing attention in the geosciences as new single-grain analytical techniques are constantly improving their resolution, and consequently widening their range of application, including sedimentary petrology, tectonic geomorphology and archaeology (Mange and Wright, 2007; von Eynatten and Dunkl, 2012). We present here MinSORTING, a new tool to quickly predict the size distribution of various minerals and rock fragments in detrital sediments, based on the physical laws that control sedimentation by tractive wind or water currents (Garzanti et al., 2008). The input values requested by the software are the sediment mean size, sorting, fluid type (seawater, freshwater, air) and standard sediment composition chosen from a given array including nine diverse tectonic settings. MinSORTING calculates the bulk sediment density and the settling velocity. The mean size of each single detrital component, assumed as lognormally-distributed, is calculated from its characteristic size-shift with respect to bulk sediment mean size, dependent in turn on its density and shape. The final output of MinSORTING is the distribution of each single detrital mineral in each size classes (at the chosen 0.25, 0.5 or 1 phi intervals). This allows geochronolgists to select the most suitable grain size of sediment to be sampled in the field, as well as the most representative size-window for analysis. Also, MinSORTING provides an estimate of the volume/weight of the fractions not considered in both sizes finer and coarser than the selected size-window. A beta version of the software is available upon request from: alberto.resentini@unimib.it Mange, M., and Wright, D. (eds), 2007. Heavy minerals in use. Developments in Sedimentology Series, 58. Elsevier, Amsterdam. Garzanti, E., Andò, S., Vezzoli, G., 2008. Settling-equivalence of detrital minerals and grain-size dependence of sediment composition. Earth and Planetary Science Letters 273, 138-151. von

  17. A Count Model to Study the Correlates of 60 Min of Daily Physical Activity in Portuguese Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Borges

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to present data on Portuguese children (aged 9–11 years complying with moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA guidelines, and to identify the importance of correlates from multiple domains associated with meeting the guidelines. Physical activity (PA was objectively assessed by accelerometry throughout seven days on 777 children. A count model using Poisson regression was used to identify the best set of correlates that predicts the variability in meeting the guidelines. Only 3.1% of children met the recommended daily 60 min of MVPA for all seven days of the week. Further, the Cochrane–Armitage chi-square test indicated a linear and negative trend (p < 0.001 from none to all seven days of children complying with the guidelines. The count model explained 22% of the variance in meeting MVPA guidelines daily. Being a girl, having a higher BMI, belonging to families with higher income, sleeping more and taking greater time walking from home to a sporting venue significantly reduced the probability of meeting daily recommended MVPA across the seven days. Furthermore, compared to girls, increasing sleep time in boys increased their chances of compliance with the MVPA recommendations. These results reinforce the relevance of considering different covariates’ roles on PA compliance when designing efficient intervention strategies to promote healthy and active lifestyles in children.

  18. MODIS/Terra Cloud Mask and Spectral Test Results 5-Min L2 Swath 250m and 1km V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — MODIS/Terra Cloud Mask and Spectral Test Results 5-Min L2 Swath 250m and 1km (MOD35_L2). MODIS was launched aboard the Terra satellite on December 18, 1999 (10:30 am...

  19. Reference Values for the 6-min Walk Distance in Healthy Children Age 7 to 12 Years in Brazil: Main Results of the TC6minBrasil Multi-Center Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Assis Pereira Cacau, Lucas; Carvalho, Vitor Oliveira; Dos Santos Pin, Alessandro; Araujo Daniel, Carlos Raphael; Ykeda, Daisy Satomi; de Carvalho, Eliane Maria; Francica, Juliana Valente; Faria, Luíza Martins; Gomes-Neto, Mansueto; Fernandes, Marcelo; Velloso, Marcelo; Karsten, Marlus; de Sá Barros, Patrícia; de Santana-Filho, Valter Joviniano

    2018-03-01

    Brazil is a country with great climatic, socioeconomic, and cultural differences that does not yet have a reference value for the 6-min walk test (6MWT) in healthy children. To avoid misinterpretation, the use of equations to predict the maximum walk distance should be established in each country. We sought to establish reference values and to develop an equation to predict the 6-min walk distance for healthy children in Brazil. This is a cross-sectional multi-center study that included 1,496 healthy children, aged 7 to 12 y, assessed across 11 research sites in all regions of Brazil, and recruited from public and private schools in their respective regions. Each child was assessed for weight and height. Walk distance was our main outcome. An open-source software environment for statistical computing was used for statistical analysis. We observed a higher average distance walked by boys (531.1 m) than by girls (506.2 m), with a difference of 24.9 m ( P < .001). We established 6MWT reference values for boys with the following equation: Distance = (16.86 × age) + (1.89 × Δ heart rate) - (0.80 × weight) + (336.91 × R1) + (360.91 × R2). For girls the equation is as follows: Distance = (13.54 × age) + (1.62 × Δ heart rate) - (1.28 × weight) + (352.33 × R1) + (394.81 × R2). Reference values were established for the 6MWT in healthy children aged 7-12 y in Brazil. Copyright © 2018 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  20. Atmospheric Deposition Modeling Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This asset provides data on model results for dry and total deposition of sulfur, nitrogen and base cation species. Components include deposition velocities, dry...

  1. Model of the impact of parameters controlling replenishment in the bs (min-max continuous review system on the actual inventory availibility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanisław Krzyżaniak

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Due to random changes in demand, inventory management is still - despite the development of alternative goods flow management concepts - an important issue both in terms of costs of maintenance and replenishment as well as the level of service measured by inventory availability levels. There are a number of replenishment systems to be used in such conditions, but they are most often formed on the basis of two basic ones: a system based on the reorder point and based on periodic inspection.  This paper refers to the former system, the BS system (min-max, in which an order is placed after reaching inventory level B (information level, reorder point for a quantity allowing to reach level S. This system is very often used in business practice. Observations conducted under realistic conditions indicate the need to improve the classical models describing the system.  This results, among other things, from the fact that the actual level of available inventory at the start of the replenishment cycle may be significantly lower than level B, resulting in lower than expected levels of customer service. Taking account of this phenomenon through model determination of the cumulative distribution function for the observed difference makes it possible to select the correct parameters to control the replenishment system in question and - therefore - to achieve the expected economic effects. Methods: The object of the study is to create a mathematical model allowing the determination of the required inventory level B taking into account the difference D between this level and the actual level of inventory at the start of the replenishment cycle.  To determine the effect of various factors such as demand distribution parameters in the adopted unit of time and the difference between level S (max and B (min, a dedicated tool (simulator in EXCEL spreadsheet for determining the distribution of frequency of value D has been developed.  Then a

  2. MinD-dependent conformational changes in MinE required for the Min oscillator to spatially regulate cytokinesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Tae; Wu, Wei; Battaile, Kevin P.; Lovell, Scott; Holyoak, Todd; Lutkenhaus, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Summary MinD recruits MinE to the membrane leading to a coupled oscillation required for spatial regulation of the cytokinetic Z ring in E. coli. How these proteins interact, however, is not clear since the MinD binding regions of MinE are sequestered within a 6-stranded β-sheet and masked by N-terminal helices. Here, minE mutations are isolated that restore interaction to some MinD and MinE mutants. These mutations alter the MinE structure releasing the MinD binding regions and N-terminal helices that bind MinD and the membrane, respectively. Crystallization of MinD-MinE complexes reveals a 4-stranded β-sheet MinE dimer with the released β strands (MinD binding regions) converted to α-helices bound to MinD dimers. These results suggest a 6 stranded, β-sheet dimer of MinE ‘senses’ MinD and switches to a 4-stranded β-sheet dimer that binds MinD and contributes to membrane binding. Also, the results indicate how MinE persists at the MinD-membrane surface. PMID:21816275

  3. Application of the Min-Projection and the Model Predictive Strategies for Current Control of Three-Phase Grid-Connected Converters: a Comparative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Oloumi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a detailed comparative study concerning the performance of min-projection strategy (MPS and model predictive control (MPC systems to control the three-phase grid connected converters. To do so, first, the converter is modeled as a switched linear system. Then, the feasibility of the MPS technique is investigated and its stability criterion is derived as a lower limit on the DC link voltage. Next, the fundamental equations of the MPS to control a VSC are obtained in the stationary reference frame. The mathematical analysis reveals that the MPS is independent of the load, grid, filter and converter parameters. This feature is a great advantage of MPS over the MPC approach. However, the latter is a well-known model-based control technique, has already developed for controlling the VSC in the stationary reference frame. To control the grid connected VSC, both MPS and MPC approaches are simulated in the PSCAD/EMTDC environment. Simulation results illustrate that the MPS is functioning well and is less sensitive to grid and filter inductances as well as the DC link voltage level. However, the MPC approach renders slightly a better performance in the steady state conditions.

  4. Se min kjole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bogen Se min kjole udkom i anledning af 50-året for de første ordinationer af kvindelige præster i den danske folkekirke i 1948. Bogen giver analyser af, hvad kvindelige præster har betydet for præsterollen og for prædikengenren; den fortæller om de første kvindelige præsters liv og syn på forkyn...

  5. Lack of anti-tumor activity with the β-catenin expression inhibitor EZN-3892 in the C57BL/6J Min/+ model of intestinal carcinogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasson, Rian M.; Briggs, Alexandra; Rizvi, Hira; Carothers, Adelaide M.; Davids, Jennifer S.; Bertagnolli, Monica M.; Cho, Nancy L., E-mail: nlcho@partners.org

    2014-02-14

    Highlights: • Wnt/β-catenin signaling is aberrantly activated in most colorectal cancers. • Locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based antisense is a novel tool for cancer therapy. • β-Catenin inhibition was observed in mature intestinal tissue of LNA-treated mice. • Further investigation of Wnt/β-catenin targeted therapies is warranted. - Abstract: Background: Previously, we showed that short-term inhibition of β-catenin expression and reversal of aberrant β-catenin subcellular localization by the selective COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib is associated with adenoma regression in the C57BL/6J Min/+ mouse. Conversly, long-term administration resulted in tumor resistance, leading us to investigate alternative methods for selective β-catenin chemoprevention. In this study, we hypothesized that disruption of β-catenin expression by EZN-3892, a selective locked nucleic acid (LNA)-based β-catenin inhibitor, would counteract the tumorigenic effect of Apc loss in Min/+ adenomas while preserving normal intestinal function. Materials and methods: C57BL/6J Apc{sup +/+} wild-type (WT) and Min/+ mice were treated with the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of EZN-3892 (30 mg/kg). Drug effect on tumor numbers, β-catenin protein expression, and nuclear β-catenin localization were determined. Results: Although the tumor phenotype and β-catenin nuclear localization in Min/+ mice did not change following drug administration, we observed a decrease in β-catenin expression levels in the mature intestinal tissue of treated Min/+ and WT mice, providing proof of principle regarding successful delivery of the LNA-based antisense vehicle. Higher doses of EZN-3892 resulted in fatal outcomes in Min/+ mice, likely due to β-catenin ablation in the intestinal tissue and loss of function. Conclusions: Our data support the critical role of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in maintaining intestinal homeostasis and highlight the challenges of effective drug delivery to target disease without permanent

  6. Aquatic modules for bioregenerative life support systems: developmental aspects based on the space flight results of the C.E.B.A.S. MIN-MODULE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, V

    2003-01-01

    The Closed Equilibrated Biological Aquatic System (C.E.B.A.S.) is an artificial aquatic ecosystem which contains teleost fishes, water snails, ammonia oxidizing bacteria and edible non-gravitropic water plants. It serves as a model for aquatic food production modules which are not seriously affected by microgravity and other space conditions. Its space flight version, the so-called C.E.B.A.S. MINI-MODULE was already successfully tested in the STS-89 and STS-90 (NEUROLAB) missions. It will be flown a third time in space with the STS-107 mission in January 2003. All results obtained so far in space indicate that the basic concept of the system is more than suitable to drive forward its development. The C.E.B.A.S. MINI-MODULE is located within a middeck locker with limited space for additional components. These technical limitations allow only some modifications which lead to a maximum experiment time span of 120 days which is not long enough for scientifically essential multi-generation-experiments. The first necessary step is the development of "harvesting devices" for the different organisms. In the limited space of the plant bioreactor a high biomass production leads to self-shadowing effects which results in an uncontrolled degradation and increased oxygen consumption by microorganisms which will endanger the fishes and snails. It was shown already that the latter reproduce excellently in space and that the reproductive functions of the fish species are not affected. Although the parent-offspring-cannibalism of the ovoviviparous fish species (Xiphophorus helleri) serves as a regulating factor in population dynamics an uncontrolled snail reproduction will also induce an increased oxygen consumption per se and a high ammonia concentration in the water. If harvesting locks can be handled by astronauts in, e. g., 4-week intervals their construction is not very difficult and basic technical solutions are already developed. The second problem is the feeding of the

  7. Development and validation of PCR-GLOBWB 2.0: a 5 arc min resolution global hydrology and water resources model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutanudjaja, Edwin H.; van Beek, Ludovicus P. H.; Wada, Yoshihide; Wisser, Dominik; de Graaf, Inge E. M.; Straatsma, Menno W.; Bierkens, Marc F. P.

    2014-05-01

    PCR-GLOBWB (PCRaster Global Water Balance) is a grid-based global hydrological model developed at the Department of Physical Geography, Utrecht University. For each grid cell, PCR-GLOBWB simulates moisture storage in vertically stacked soil layers, as well as the water exchange to the atmosphere and underlying groundwater reservoir. Exchange to the atmosphere comprises of precipitation, evaporation and transpiration, as well as snow accumulation and melt. All fluxes are all simulated by considering vegetation phenology and sub-grid variations in elevation, land cover and soil saturation. The model includes physically-based schemes for runoff-infiltration partitioning, interflow, groundwater recharge and baseflow, as well as river routing of discharge. Here we present and summarize the latest developments of PCR-GLOBWB. The new version of the model, PCR-GLOBWB 2.0, now runs at a spatial resolution of 5 arc min (about 10 km at the equator) and supersedes the previous generation of the model (30 arc min PCR-GLOBWB 1.0, van Beek et al., 2011). PCR-GLOBWB 2.0 consolidates all components that have been introduced since PCR-GLOWB 1.0 was first published (2011). Examples of these new components are: A comprehensive water demand and irrigation module (Wada et al., 2012). A dynamic attribution and return flow of water demand to surface water and groundwater resources (de Graaf et al., 2013). An advanced surface water routing scheme with wetland, lakes and floodplains of variable extent, thus simulating flooding and flood wave attenuation (Winsemius et al., 2013). An online scheme for dynamic withdrawal, allocation and consumptive use of groundwater and surface water resources, including a progressive introduction of reservoirs (Wada et al., 2013). Further development will include the inclusion of a dynamic reservoir operation/optimization scheme and a MODFLOW lateral groundwater flow module (Sutanudjaja et al., 2011; Sutanudjaja et al., 2014). Also, scripts used for deriving

  8. Noise-induced Min phenotypes in E. coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Fange

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The spatiotemporal oscillations of the Escherichia coli proteins MinD and MinE direct cell division to the region between the chromosomes. Several quantitative models of the Min system have been suggested before, but no one of them accounts for the behavior of all documented mutant phenotypes. We analyzed the stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics of the Min proteins for several E. coli mutants and compared the results to the corresponding deterministic mean-field description. We found that wild-type (wt and filamentous (ftsZ- cells are well characterized by the mean-field model, but that a stochastic model is necessary to account for several of the characteristics of the spherical (rodA- and phospathedylethanolamide-deficient (PE- phenotypes. For spherical cells, the mean-field model is bistable, and the system can get trapped in a non-oscillatory state. However, when the intrinsic noise is considered, only the experimentally observed oscillatory behavior remains. The stochastic model also reproduces the change in oscillation directions observed in the spherical phenotype and the occasional gliding of the MinD region along the inner membrane. For the PE- mutant, the stochastic model explains the appearance of randomly localized and dense MinD clusters as a nucleation phenomenon, in which the stochastic kinetics at low copy number causes local discharges of the high MinD(ATP to MinD(ADP potential. We find that a simple five-reaction model of the Min system can explain all documented Min phenotypes, if stochastic kinetics and three-dimensional diffusion are accounted for. Our results emphasize that local copy number fluctuation may result in phenotypic differences although the total number of molecules of the relevant species is high.

  9. Mechanism of the asymmetric activation of the MinD ATPase by MinE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kyung-Tae; Wu, Wei; Lovell, Scott; Lutkenhaus, Joe

    2012-01-01

    Summary MinD is a component of the Min system involved in the spatial regulation of cell division. It is an ATPase in the MinD/ParA/Mrp deviant Walker A motif family which is within the P loop GTPase superfamily. Its ATPase activity is stimulated by MinE, however, the mechanism of this activation is unclear. MinD forms a symmetric dimer with two binding sites for MinE, however, a recent model suggested that MinE occupying one site was sufficient for ATP hydrolysis. By generating heterodimers with one binding site for MinE we show that one binding site is sufficient for stimulation of the MinD ATPase. Furthermore, comparison of structures of MinD and related proteins led us to examine the role of N45 in the switch I region. An asparagine at this position is conserved in four of the deviant Walker A motif subfamilies (MinD, chromosomal ParAs, Get3 and FleN) and we find that N45 in MinD is essential for MinE stimulated ATPase activity and suggest that it is a key residue affected by MinE binding. PMID:22651575

  10. Instant MinGW starter

    CERN Document Server

    Shpigor, Ilya

    2013-01-01

    This is a Starter guide designed to enable the reader to start using MinGW to develop Microsoft Windows applications as quickly, and as efficiently, as possible. This book is for C and C++ developers who are looking for new and effective instruments to use in application development for Microsoft Windows. No experience of MinGW is needed: this book will guide you through the essentials to get you using the software like a pro in a matter of hours.

  11. VEMAP 1: Selected Model Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) was a multi-institutional, international effort addressing the response of biogeography and...

  12. VEMAP 1: Selected Model Results

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ABSTRACT: The Vegetation/Ecosystem Modeling and Analysis Project (VEMAP) was a multi-institutional, international effort addressing the response of biogeography and...

  13. The cell division protein MinD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa dominates the assembly of the MinC-MinD copolymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Haiyan; Wang, Ping; Bian, Li; Osawa, Masaki; Erickson, Harold P; Chen, Yaodong

    2018-04-02

    Cell division of rod-shaped bacteria requires the Z ring, a ring of FtsZ filaments associated with the inner-membrane wall. The MinCDE proteins help localize the Z ring to the center of the Escherichia coli cell. MinC, which inhibits Z-ring assembly, is a passenger on MinD. Previous studies have shown that MinC-MinD from E. coli and Aquifex aeolicus assemble in vitro into extended filaments with a 1:1 stoichiometry. However, a recent study has raised questions about the function of the MinC-MinD copolymer in vivo , since its assembly appears to require a high concentration of these two proteins, has a long lag time, and its blockade does not affect in vivo activities. Here, we found that MinC and MinD from Pseudomonas aeruginosa coassemble into filaments with a 1:1 stoichiometry. We also found that the minimal concentration of ~4 μM required for assembly applies only to MinD because above 4 μM MinD, even very low MinC concentrations sustained coassembly. As previously reported, the MinC-MinD coassembly exhibited a long lag of ~100 s when initiated by ATP. Premixing MinD with ATP eliminated this lag, suggesting that it may be due to slow MinD dimerization following ATP activation. We also discovered that MinC-MinD copolymers quickly bound and formed huge bundles with FtsZ filaments. Our results resolve previous questions about the low concentration of MinC and the lag time, insights that may inform future investigations into the exact role of the MinC-MinD copolymer in vivo . Published under license by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. USGS 1-min Dst index

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gannon, J.L.; Love, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    We produce a 1-min time resolution storm-time disturbance index, the USGS Dst, called Dst8507-4SM. This index is based on minute resolution horizontal magnetic field intensity from low-latitude observatories in Honolulu, Kakioka, San Juan and Hermanus, for the years 1985-2007. The method used to produce the index uses a combination of time- and frequency-domain techniques, which more clearly identifies and excises solar-quiet variation from the horizontal intensity time series of an individual station than the strictly time-domain method used in the Kyoto Dst index. The USGS 1-min Dst is compared against the Kyoto Dst, Kyoto Sym-H, and the USGS 1-h Dst (Dst5807-4SH). In a time series comparison, Sym-H is found to produce more extreme values during both sudden impulses and main phase maximum deviation, possibly due to the latitude of its contributing observatories. Both Kyoto indices are shown to have a peak in their distributions below zero, while the USGS indices have a peak near zero. The USGS 1-min Dst is shown to have the higher time resolution benefits of Sym-H, while using the more typical low-latitude observatories of Kyoto Dst. ?? 2010.

  15. Detection of Bacillus anthracis spores and a model protein using PEMC sensors in a flow cell at 1 mL/min.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Gossett A; Mutharasan, Raj

    2006-07-15

    Piezoelectric-excited millimeter-sized cantilever (PEMC) sensors of 4mm(2) sensing area were immobilized with antibody specific to Bacillus anthracis (anti-BA) spores or bovine serum albumin (anti-BSA). Detection of pathogen (Bacillus anthracis (BA) at 300 spores/mL) and BSA (1 mg/mL) were investigated under both stagnant and flow conditions. Two flow cell designs were evaluated by characterizing flow-induced resonant frequency shifts. One of the flow cells labeled SFC-2 (hold-up volume of 0.3 mL), showed small fluctuations (+/-20 Hz) around a common resonant frequency response of 217 Hz in the flow rate range of 1-17 mL/min. The total resonant frequency change obtained for the binding of 300 spores/mL in 1h was 90+/-5 Hz (n=2), and 162+/-10 Hz (n=2) under stagnant and flow conditions, respectively. Binding of antibodies, anti-BA and anti-BSA, were more rapid under flow than under stagnant conditions. The sensor was repeatedly exposed to BSA with an intermediate release step. The first and second responses to BSA were nearly identical. The total resonant frequency response to BSA was 388+/-10 (n=2) Hz under flow conditions. Kinetic analysis is carried out to quantify the effect of flow rate on antibody immobilization and the two types of detection experiments.

  16. MinD and MinE Interact with Anionic Phospholipids and Regulate Division Plane Formation in Escherichia coli*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renner, Lars D.; Weibel, Douglas B.

    2012-01-01

    The Min proteins (MinC, MinD, and MinE) form a pole-to-pole oscillator that controls the spatial assembly of the division machinery in Escherichia coli cells. Previous studies identified that interactions of MinD with phospholipids positioned the Min machinery at the membrane. We extend these studies by measuring the affinity, kinetics, and ATPase activity of E. coli MinD, MinE, and MinDE binding to supported lipid bilayers containing varying compositions of anionic phospholipids. Using quartz crystal microbalance measurements, we found that the binding affinity (Kd) for the interaction of recombinant E. coli MinD and MinE with lipid bilayers increased with increasing concentration of the anionic phospholipids phosphatidylglycerol and cardiolipin. The Kd for MinD (1.8 μm) in the presence of ATP was smaller than for MinE (12.1 μm) binding to membranes consisting of 95:5 phosphatidylcholine/cardiolipin. The simultaneous binding of MinD and MinE to membranes revealed that increasing the concentration of anionic phospholipid stimulates the initial rate of adsorption (kon). The ATPase activity of MinD decreased in the presence of anionic phospholipids. These results indicate that anionic lipids, which are concentrated at the poles, increase the retention of MinD and MinE and explain its dwell time at this region of bacterial cells. These studies provide insight into interactions between MinD and MinE and between these proteins and membranes that are relevant to understanding the process of bacterial cell division, in which the interaction of proteins and membranes is essential. PMID:23012351

  17. A new hybrid approach for MHC genotyping: high-throughput NGS and long read MinION nanopore sequencing, with application to the non-model vertebrate Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuselli, S; Baptista, R P; Panziera, A; Magi, A; Guglielmi, S; Tonin, R; Benazzo, A; Bauzer, L G; Mazzoni, C J; Bertorelle, G

    2018-03-24

    The major histocompatibility complex (MHC) acts as an interface between the immune system and infectious diseases. Accurate characterization and genotyping of the extremely variable MHC loci are challenging especially without a reference sequence. We designed a combination of long-range PCR, Illumina short-reads, and Oxford Nanopore MinION long-reads approaches to capture the genetic variation of the MHC II DRB locus in an Italian population of the Alpine chamois (Rupicapra rupicapra). We utilized long-range PCR to generate a 9 Kb fragment of the DRB locus. Amplicons from six different individuals were fragmented, tagged, and simultaneously sequenced with Illumina MiSeq. One of these amplicons was sequenced with the MinION device, which produced long reads covering the entire amplified fragment. A pipeline that combines short and long reads resolved several short tandem repeats and homopolymers and produced a de novo reference, which was then used to map and genotype the short reads from all individuals. The assembled DRB locus showed a high level of polymorphism and the presence of a recombination breakpoint. Our results suggest that an amplicon-based NGS approach coupled with single-molecule MinION nanopore sequencing can efficiently achieve both the assembly and the genotyping of complex genomic regions in multiple individuals in the absence of a reference sequence.

  18. Results of steel containment vessel model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luk, V.K.; Ludwigsen, J.S.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Komine, Kuniaki; Matsumoto, Tomoyuki; Costello, J.F.

    1998-05-01

    A series of static overpressurization tests of scale models of nuclear containment structures is being conducted by Sandia National Laboratories for the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation of Japan and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. Two tests are being conducted: (1) a test of a model of a steel containment vessel (SCV) and (2) a test of a model of a prestressed concrete containment vessel (PCCV). This paper summarizes the conduct of the high pressure pneumatic test of the SCV model and the results of that test. Results of this test are summarized and are compared with pretest predictions performed by the sponsoring organizations and others who participated in a blind pretest prediction effort. Questions raised by this comparison are identified and plans for posttest analysis are discussed

  19. A physiological production model for cacao : results of model simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuidema, P.A.; Leffelaar, P.A.

    2002-01-01

    CASE2 is a physiological model for cocoa (Theobroma cacao L.) growth and yield. This report introduces the CAcao Simulation Engine for water-limited production in a non-technical way and presents simulation results obtained with the model.

  20. Interpreting Results from the Multinomial Logit Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wulff, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    This article provides guidelines and illustrates practical steps necessary for an analysis of results from the multinomial logit model (MLM). The MLM is a popular model in the strategy literature because it allows researchers to examine strategic choices with multiple outcomes. However, there seem...... to be systematic issues with regard to how researchers interpret their results when using the MLM. In this study, I present a set of guidelines critical to analyzing and interpreting results from the MLM. The procedure involves intuitive graphical representations of predicted probabilities and marginal effects...... suitable for both interpretation and communication of results. The pratical steps are illustrated through an application of the MLM to the choice of foreign market entry mode....

  1. Study of 1-min rain rate integration statistic in South Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Sujan; Choi, Dong-You

    2017-03-01

    The design of millimeter wave communication links and the study of propagation impairments at higher frequencies due to a hydrometeor, particularly rain, require the knowledge of 1-min. rainfall rate data. Signal attenuation in space communication results are due to absorption and scattering of radio wave energy. Radio wave attenuation due to rain depends on the relevance of a 1-min. integration time for the rain rate. However, in practice, securing these data over a wide range of areas is difficult. Long term precipitation data are readily available. However, there is a need for a 1-min. rainfall rate in the rain attenuation prediction models for a better estimation of the attenuation. In this paper, we classify and survey the prominent 1-min. rain rate models. Regression analysis was performed for the study of cumulative rainfall data measured experimentally for a decade in nine different regions in South Korea, with 93 different locations, using the experimental 1-min. rainfall accumulation. To visualize the 1-min. rainfall rate applicable for the whole region for 0.01% of the time, we have considered the variation in the rain rate for 40 stations across South Korea. The Kriging interpolation method was used for spatial interpolation of the rain rate values for 0.01% of the time into a regular grid to obtain a highly consistent and predictable rainfall variation. The rain rate exceeded the 1-min. interval that was measured through the rain gauge compared to the rainfall data estimated using the International Telecommunication Union Radio Communication Sector model (ITU-R P.837-6) along with the empirical methods as Segal, Burgueno et al., Chebil and Rahman, logarithmic, exponential and global coefficients, second and third order polynomial fits, and Model 1 for Icheon regions under the regional and average coefficient set. The ITU-R P. 837-6 exhibits a lower relative error percentage of 3.32% and 12.59% in the 5- and 10-min. to 1-min. conversion, whereas the

  2. The Danish national passenger modelModel specification and results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Jeppe; Hansen, Christian Overgaard

    2016-01-01

    , the paper provides a description of a large-scale forecast model with a discussion of the linkage between population synthesis, demand and assignment. Secondly, the paper gives specific attention to model specification and in particular choice of functional form and cost-damping. Specifically we suggest...... a family of logarithmic spline functions and illustrate how it is applied in the model. Thirdly and finally, we evaluate model sensitivity and performance by evaluating the distance distribution and elasticities. In the paper we present results where the spline-function is compared with more traditional...... function types and it is indicated that the spline-function provides a better description of the data. Results are also provided in the form of a back-casting exercise where the model is tested in a back-casting scenario to 2002....

  3. MinChem: A Prototype Petrologic Database for Hanford Site Sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackley, Rob D.; Last, George V.; Serkowski, John A.; Middleton, Lisa A.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2010-09-01

    A prototype petrologic database (MinChem) has been under continual development for several years. MinChem contains petrologic, mineralogical, and bulk-rock geochemical data for Hanford Site sediments collected over multiple decades. The database is in relational form and consists of a series of related tables modeled after the Hanford Environmental Information System HEIS (BHI 2002) structures. The HEIS-compatible tables were created in anticipation of eventual migration into HEIS, or some future form of HEIS (e.g. HEIS-GEO). There are currently a total of 13,129 results in MinChem from 521 samples collected at 381 different sampling sites. These data come from 19 different original source documents published and unpublished (e.g. letter reports) between 1976 and 2009. The data in MinChem consist of results from analytical methods such as optical and electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, and electron probe microanalysis.

  4. MinChem: A Prototype Petrologic Database for Hanford Site Sediments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mackley, Rob D.; Last, George V.; Serkowski, John A.; Middleton, Lisa A.; Cantrell, Kirk J.

    2010-01-01

    A prototype petrologic database (MinChem) has been under continual development for several years. MinChem contains petrologic, mineralogical, and bulk-rock geochemical data for Hanford Site sediments collected over multiple decades. The database is in relational form and consists of a series of related tables modeled after the Hanford Environmental Information System HEIS (BHI 2002) structures. The HEIS-compatible tables were created in anticipation of eventual migration into HEIS, or some future form of HEIS (e.g. HEIS-GEO). There are currently a total of 13,129 results in MinChem from 521 samples collected at 381 different sampling sites. These data come from 19 different original source documents published and unpublished (e.g. letter reports) between 1976 and 2009. The data in MinChem consist of results from analytical methods such as optical and electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, x-ray fluorescence, and electron probe microanalysis.

  5. Effective learning in recurrent max-min neural networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loe, Kia Fock; Teow, Loo Nin

    1998-04-01

    Max and min operations have interesting properties that facilitate the exchange of information between the symbolic and real-valued domains. As such, neural networks that employ max-min activation functions have been a subject of interest in recent years. Since max-min functions are not strictly differentiable, we propose a mathematically sound learning method based on using Fourier convergence analysis of side-derivatives to derive a gradient descent technique for max-min error functions. We then propose a novel recurrent max-min neural network model that is trained to perform grammatical inference as an application example. Comparisons made between this model and recurrent sigmoidal neural networks show that our model not only performs better in terms of learning speed and generalization, but that its final weight configuration allows a deterministic finite automation (DFA) to be extracted in a straightforward manner. In essence, we are able to demonstrate that our proposed gradient descent technique does allow max-min neural networks to learn effectively.

  6. Scale Model Thruster Acoustic Measurement Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas, Magda; Kenny, R. Jeremy

    2013-01-01

    The Space Launch System (SLS) Scale Model Acoustic Test (SMAT) is a 5% scale representation of the SLS vehicle, mobile launcher, tower, and launch pad trench. The SLS launch propulsion system will be comprised of the Rocket Assisted Take-Off (RATO) motors representing the solid boosters and 4 Gas Hydrogen (GH2) thrusters representing the core engines. The GH2 thrusters were tested in a horizontal configuration in order to characterize their performance. In Phase 1, a single thruster was fired to determine the engine performance parameters necessary for scaling a single engine. A cluster configuration, consisting of the 4 thrusters, was tested in Phase 2 to integrate the system and determine their combined performance. Acoustic and overpressure data was collected during both test phases in order to characterize the system's acoustic performance. The results from the single thruster and 4- thuster system are discussed and compared.

  7. CMS standard model Higgs boson results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garcia-Abia Pablo

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In July 2012 CMS announced the discovery of a new boson with properties resembling those of the long-sought Higgs boson. The analysis of the proton-proton collision data recorded by the CMS detector at the LHC, corresponding to integrated luminosities of 5.1 fb−1 at √s = 7 TeV and 19.6 fb−1 at √s = 8 TeV, confirm the Higgs-like nature of the new boson, with a signal strength associated with vector bosons and fermions consistent with the expectations for a standard model (SM Higgs boson, and spin-parity clearly favouring the scalar nature of the new boson. In this note I review the updated results of the CMS experiment.

  8. Wip1 abrogation decreases intestinal tumor frequency in APC(Min/+) mice irrespective of radiation quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suman, Shubhankar; Moon, Bo-Hyun; Thakor, Hemang; Fornace, Albert J; Datta, Kamal

    2014-09-01

    Low-linear energy transfer (low-LET) γ-ray exposure is a risk factor for colorectal cancer (CRC). Due to their high-LET nature, energetic iron ions found in space are expected to pose greater CRC risks to astronauts undertaking long-duration space missions beyond low Earth orbit. Wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1) is important for cellular DNA damage response and its abrogation has been shown to inhibit spontaneous intestinal tumorigenesis in APC(Min/+) mice, a well-studied mouse model of human CRC. However, the relationship of Wip1 to radiation-induced intestinal tumorigenesis, especially by energetic iron ions, has not been investigated in APC(Min/+) mice. We have previously reported that there is a greater intestinal tumorigenic potential of iron-ion radiation relative to (137)Cs γ rays, so the purpose of the current study was to investigate whether Wip1 abrogation could influence high-LET dependent intestinal tumorigenesis in APC(Min/+) mice. Intestinal tumor frequency and grade were assessed in APC(Min/+)/Wip1(-/-) mice and results were compared to those in APC(Min/+)/Wip1(+/+) mice after exposure to a mean absorbed dose of 2 Gy from (137)Cs γ rays or 1.6 Gy from 1 GeV/n iron ions. Cellular differentiation and proliferation were also assessed in the intestinal tumors of sham-irradiated and irradiated mice. Decreased tumor frequency and lower tumor grade were observed in APC(Min/+)/Wip1(-/-) relative to APC(Min/+)/Wip1(+/+) mice. Notably, a similar decrease (∼6-fold in both groups) in tumor number was observed in sham-irradiated and γ-irradiated APC(Min/+)/Wip1(-/-) relative to APC(Min/+)/Wip1(+/+) mice. However, tumorigenesis in the energetic iron-ion exposed group was reduced ∼8-fold in APC(Min/+)/Wip1(-/-) relative to APC(Min/+)/Wip1(+/+) mice. A significantly lower proliferation/differentiation index in tumors of iron-ion exposed APC(Min/+)/Wip1(-/-) relative to APC(Min/+)/Wip1(+/+) mice suggests that reduced proliferation and enhanced

  9. Dynamic assembly of MinD on phospholipid vesicles regulated by ATP and MinE

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Zonglin; Gogol, Edward P.; Lutkenhaus, Joe

    2002-01-01

    Selection of the division site in Escherichia coli is regulated by the min system and requires the rapid oscillation of MinD between the two halves of the cell under the control of MinE. In this study we have further investigated the molecular basis for this oscillation by examining the interaction of MinD with phospholipid vesicles. We found that MinD bound to phospholipid vesicles in the presence of ATP and, upon binding, assembled into a well-ordered helical array that deformed the vesicle...

  10. Revisiting Runoff Model Calibration: Airborne Snow Observatory Results Allow Improved Modeling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGurk, B. J.; Painter, T. H.

    2014-12-01

    Deterministic snow accumulation and ablation simulation models are widely used by runoff managers throughout the world to predict runoff quantities and timing. Model fitting is typically based on matching modeled runoff volumes and timing with observed flow time series at a few points in the basin. In recent decades, sparse networks of point measurements of the mountain snowpacks have been available to compare with modeled snowpack, but the comparability of results from a snow sensor or course to model polygons of 5 to 50 sq. km is suspect. However, snowpack extent, depth, and derived snow water equivalent have been produced by the NASA/JPL Airborne Snow Observatory (ASO) mission for spring of 20013 and 2014 in the Tuolumne River basin above Hetch Hetchy Reservoir. These high-resolution snowpack data have exposed the weakness in a model calibration based on runoff alone. The U.S. Geological Survey's Precipitation Runoff Modeling System (PRMS) calibration that was based on 30-years of inflow to Hetch Hetchy produces reasonable inflow results, but modeled spatial snowpack location and water quantity diverged significantly from the weekly measurements made by ASO during the two ablation seasons. The reason is that the PRMS model has many flow paths, storages, and water transfer equations, and a calibrated outflow time series can be right for many wrong reasons. The addition of a detailed knowledge of snow extent and water content constrains the model so that it is a better representation of the actual watershed hydrology. The mechanics of recalibrating PRMS to the ASO measurements will be described, and comparisons in observed versus modeled flow for both a small subbasin and the entire Hetch Hetchy basin will be shown. The recalibrated model provided a bitter fit to the snowmelt recession, a key factor for water managers as they balance declining inflows with demand for power generation and ecosystem releases during the final months of snow melt runoff.

  11. Immersive visualization of dynamic CFD model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comparato, J.R.; Ringel, K.L.; Heath, D.J.

    2004-01-01

    With immersive visualization the engineer has the means for vividly understanding problem causes and discovering opportunities to improve design. Software can generate an interactive world in which collaborators experience the results of complex mathematical simulations such as computational fluid dynamic (CFD) modeling. Such software, while providing unique benefits over traditional visualization techniques, presents special development challenges. The visualization of large quantities of data interactively requires both significant computational power and shrewd data management. On the computational front, commodity hardware is outperforming large workstations in graphical quality and frame rates. Also, 64-bit commodity computing shows promise in enabling interactive visualization of large datasets. Initial interactive transient visualization methods and examples are presented, as well as development trends in commodity hardware and clustering. Interactive, immersive visualization relies on relevant data being stored in active memory for fast response to user requests. For large or transient datasets, data management becomes a key issue. Techniques for dynamic data loading and data reduction are presented as means to increase visualization performance. (author)

  12. Linkage of PRA models. Phase 1, Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, C.L.; Knudsen, J.K.; Kelly, D.L.

    1995-12-01

    The goal of the Phase I work of the ``Linkage of PRA Models`` project was to postulate methods of providing guidance for US Nuclear Regulator Commission (NRC) personnel on the selection and usage of probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) models that are best suited to the analysis they are performing. In particular, methods and associated features are provided for (a) the selection of an appropriate PRA model for a particular analysis, (b) complementary evaluation tools for the analysis, and (c) a PRA model cross-referencing method. As part of this work, three areas adjoining ``linking`` analyses to PRA models were investigated: (a) the PRA models that are currently available, (b) the various types of analyses that are performed within the NRC, and (c) the difficulty in trying to provide a ``generic`` classification scheme to groups plants based upon a particular plant attribute.

  13. Engineering Glass Passivation Layers -Model Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skorski, Daniel C.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Strachan, Denis M.; Lepry, William C.

    2011-08-08

    The immobilization of radioactive waste into glass waste forms is a baseline process of nuclear waste management not only in the United States, but worldwide. The rate of radionuclide release from these glasses is a critical measure of the quality of the waste form. Over long-term tests and using extrapolations of ancient analogues, it has been shown that well designed glasses exhibit a dissolution rate that quickly decreases to a slow residual rate for the lifetime of the glass. The mechanistic cause of this decreased corrosion rate is a subject of debate, with one of the major theories suggesting that the decrease is caused by the formation of corrosion products in such a manner as to present a diffusion barrier on the surface of the glass. Although there is much evidence of this type of mechanism, there has been no attempt to engineer the effect to maximize the passivating qualities of the corrosion products. This study represents the first attempt to engineer the creation of passivating phases on the surface of glasses. Our approach utilizes interactions between the dissolving glass and elements from the disposal environment to create impermeable capping layers. By drawing from other corrosion studies in areas where passivation layers have been successfully engineered to protect the bulk material, we present here a report on mineral phases that are likely have a morphological tendency to encrust the surface of the glass. Our modeling has focused on using the AFCI glass system in a carbonate, sulfate, and phosphate rich environment. We evaluate the minerals predicted to form to determine the likelihood of the formation of a protective layer on the surface of the glass. We have also modeled individual ions in solutions vs. pH and the addition of aluminum and silicon. These results allow us to understand the pH and ion concentration dependence of mineral formation. We have determined that iron minerals are likely to form a complete incrustation layer and we plan

  14. Modeling and Field Results from Seismic Stimulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Majer, E.; Pride, S.; Lo, W.; Daley, T.; Nakagawa, Seiji; Sposito, Garrison; Roberts, P.

    2006-01-01

    Modeling the effect of seismic stimulation employing Maxwell-Boltzmann theory shows that the important component of stimulation is mechanical rather than fluid pressure effects. Modeling using Biot theory (two phases) shows that the pressure effects diffuse too quickly to be of practical significance. Field data from actual stimulation will be shown to compare to theory

  15. Dissecting the role of conformational change and membrane binding by the bacterial cell division regulator MinE in the stimulation of MinD ATPase activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayed, Saud H; Cloutier, Adam D; McLeod, Laura J; Foo, Alexander C Y; Damry, Adam M; Goto, Natalie K

    2017-12-15

    The bacterial cell division regulators MinD and MinE together with the division inhibitor MinC localize to the membrane in concentrated zones undergoing coordinated pole-to-pole oscillation to help ensure that the cytokinetic division septum forms only at the mid-cell position. This dynamic localization is driven by MinD-catalyzed ATP hydrolysis, stimulated by interactions with MinE's anti-MinCD domain. This domain is buried in the 6-β-stranded MinE "closed" structure, but is liberated for interactions with MinD, giving rise to a 4-β-stranded "open" structure through an unknown mechanism. Here we show that MinE-membrane interactions induce a structural change into a state resembling the open conformation. However, MinE mutants lacking the MinE membrane-targeting sequence stimulated higher ATP hydrolysis rates than the full-length protein, indicating that binding to MinD is sufficient to trigger this conformational transition in MinE. In contrast, conformational change between the open and closed states did not affect stimulation of ATP hydrolysis rates in the absence of membrane binding, although the MinD-binding residue Ile-25 is critical for this conformational transition. We therefore propose an updated model where MinE is brought to the membrane through interactions with MinD. After stimulation of ATP hydrolysis, MinE remains bound to the membrane in a state that does not catalyze additional rounds of ATP hydrolysis. Although the molecular basis for this inhibited state is unknown, previous observations of higher-order MinE self-association may explain this inhibition. Overall, our findings have general implications for Min protein oscillation cycles, including those that regulate cell division in bacterial pathogens. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  16. Coupled Michigan MHD - Rice Convection Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zeeuw, D.; Sazykin, S.; Wolf, D.; Gombosi, T.; Powell, K.

    2002-12-01

    A new high performance Rice Convection Model (RCM) has been coupled to the adaptive-grid Michigan MHD model (BATSRUS). This fully coupled code allows us to self-consistently simulate the physics in the inner and middle magnetosphere. A study will be presented of the basic characteristics of the inner and middle magnetosphere in the context of a single coupled-code run for idealized storm inputs. The analysis will include region-2 currents, shielding of the inner magnetosphere, partial ring currents, pressure distribution, magnetic field inflation, and distribution of pV^gamma.

  17. Graphical interpretation of numerical model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Drewes, D.R.

    1979-01-01

    Computer software has been developed to produce high quality graphical displays of data from a numerical grid model. The code uses an existing graphical display package (DISSPLA) and overcomes some of the problems of both line-printer output and traditional graphics. The software has been designed to be flexible enough to handle arbitrarily placed computation grids and a variety of display requirements

  18. Ignalina NPP Safety Analysis: Models and Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uspuras, E.

    1999-01-01

    Research directions, linked to safety assessment of the Ignalina NPP, of the scientific safety analysis group are presented: Thermal-hydraulic analysis of accidents and operational transients; Thermal-hydraulic assessment of Ignalina NPP Accident Localization System and other compartments; Structural analysis of plant components, piping and other parts of Main Circulation Circuit; Assessment of RBMK-1500 reactor core and other. Models and main works carried out last year are described. (author)

  19. Modeling clicks beyond the first result page

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuklin, A.; Serdyukov, P.; de Rijke, M.

    2013-01-01

    Most modern web search engines yield a list of documents of a fixed length (usually 10) in response to a user query. The next ten search results are usually available in one click. These documents either replace the current result page or are appended to the end. Hence, in order to examine more

  20. Planck intermediate results XXIX. All-sky dust modelling with Planck, IRAS, and WISE observations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ade, P. A. R.; Aghanim, N.; Alves, M. I. R.

    2016-01-01

    . The present work extends the DL dust modelling carried out on nearby galaxies using Herschel and Spitzer data to Galactic dust emission. We employ the DL dust model to generate maps of the dust mass surface density Sigma(Md), the dust optical extinction A(V), and the starlight intensity heating the bulk...... grains per unit A(V), and not only in the starlight intensity. These results show that some of the physical assumptions of the DL model will need to be revised. To circumvent the model deficiency, we propose an empirical renormalization of the DL A(V) estimate, dependent of U-min, which compensates...

  1. Microplasticity of MMC. Experimental results and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maire, E. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Lormand, G. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Gobin, P.F. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France)); Fougeres, R. (Groupe d' Etude de Metallurgie Physique et de Physique des Materiaux, INSA, 69 Villeurbanne (France))

    1993-11-01

    The microplastic behavior of several MMC is investigated by means of tension and compression tests. This behavior is assymetric : the proportional limit is higher in tension than in compression but the work hardening rate is higher in compression. These differences are analysed in terms of maxium of the Tresca's shear stress at the interface (proportional limit) and of the emission of dislocation loops during the cooling (work hardening rate). On another hand, a model is proposed to calculate the value of the yield stress, describing the composite as a material composed of three phases : inclusion, unaffected matrix and matrix surrounding the inclusion having a gradient in the density of the thermally induced dilocations. (orig.).

  2. MinT: Middleware for Cooperative Interaction of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soobin Jeon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes an Internet of Things (IoT middleware called Middleware for Cooperative Interaction of Things (MinT. MinT supports a fully distributed IoT environment in which IoT devices directly connect to peripheral devices easily construct a local or global network, and share their data in an energy efficient manner. MinT provides a sensor abstract layer, a system layer and an interaction layer. These enable integrated sensing device operations, efficient resource management, and active interconnection between peripheral IoT devices. In addition, MinT provides a high-level API to develop IoT devices easily for IoT device developers. We aim to enhance the energy efficiency and performance of IoT devices through the performance improvements offered by MinT resource management and request processing. The experimental results show that the average request rate increased by 25% compared to Californium, which is a middleware for efficient interaction in IoT environments with powerful performance, an average response time decrease of 90% when resource management was used, and power consumption decreased by up to 68%. Finally, the proposed platform can reduce the latency and power consumption of IoT devices.

  3. Roles of MinC and MinD in the site-specific septation block mediated by the MinCDE system of Escherichia coli.

    OpenAIRE

    de Boer, P A; Crossley, R E; Rothfield, L I

    1992-01-01

    The proper placement of the cell division site in Escherichia coli requires the site-specific inactivation of potential division sites at the cell poles in a process that requires the coordinate action of the MinC, MinD, and MinE proteins. In the absence of MinE, the coordinate expression of MinC and MinD leads to a general inhibition of cell division. MinE gives topological specificity to the division inhibition process, so that the septation block is restricted to the cell poles. At normal ...

  4. Primary standards for measuring flow rates from 100 nl/min to 1 ml/min - gravimetric principle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissig, Hugo; Petter, Harm Tido; Lucas, Peter; Batista, Elsa; Filipe, Eduarda; Almeida, Nelson; Ribeiro, Luis Filipe; Gala, João; Martins, Rui; Savanier, Benoit; Ogheard, Florestan; Niemann, Anders Koustrup; Lötters, Joost; Sparreboom, Wouter

    2015-08-01

    Microflow and nanoflow rate calibrations are important in several applications such as liquid chromatography, (scaled-down) process technology, and special health-care applications. However, traceability in the microflow and nanoflow range does not go below 16 μl/min in Europe. Furthermore, the European metrology organization EURAMET did not yet validate this traceability by means of an intercomparison between different National Metrology Institutes (NMIs). The NMIs METAS, Centre Technique des Industries Aérauliques et Thermiques, IPQ, Danish Technological Institute, and VSL have therefore developed and validated primary standards to cover the flow rate range from 0.1 μl/min to at least 1 ml/min. In this article, we describe the different designs and methods of the primary standards of the gravimetric principle and the results obtained at the intercomparison for the upper flow rate range for the various NMIs and Bronkhorst High-Tech, the manufacturer of the transfer standards used.

  5. A Modified MinMaxk-Means Algorithm Based on PSO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Bai, Yanping

    The MinMax k -means algorithm is widely used to tackle the effect of bad initialization by minimizing the maximum intraclustering errors. Two parameters, including the exponent parameter and memory parameter, are involved in the executive process. Since different parameters have different clustering errors, it is crucial to choose appropriate parameters. In the original algorithm, a practical framework is given. Such framework extends the MinMax k -means to automatically adapt the exponent parameter to the data set. It has been believed that if the maximum exponent parameter has been set, then the programme can reach the lowest intraclustering errors. However, our experiments show that this is not always correct. In this paper, we modified the MinMax k -means algorithm by PSO to determine the proper values of parameters which can subject the algorithm to attain the lowest clustering errors. The proposed clustering method is tested on some favorite data sets in several different initial situations and is compared to the k -means algorithm and the original MinMax k -means algorithm. The experimental results indicate that our proposed algorithm can reach the lowest clustering errors automatically.

  6. Membrane-bound MinDE complex acts as a toggle switch that drives Min oscillation coupled to cytoplasmic depletion of MinD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecchiarelli, Anthony G.; Li, Min; Mizuuchi, Michiyo; Hwang, Ling Chin; Seol, Yeonee; Neuman, Keir C.; Mizuuchi, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli Min system self-organizes into a cell-pole to cell-pole oscillator on the membrane to prevent divisions at the cell poles. Reconstituting the Min system on a lipid bilayer has contributed to elucidating the oscillatory mechanism. However, previous in vitro patterns were attained with protein densities on the bilayer far in excess of those in vivo and failed to recapitulate the standing wave oscillations observed in vivo. Here we studied Min protein patterning at limiting MinD concentrations reflecting the in vivo conditions. We identified “burst” patterns—radially expanding and imploding binding zones of MinD, accompanied by a peripheral ring of MinE. Bursts share several features with the in vivo dynamics of the Min system including standing wave oscillations. Our data support a patterning mechanism whereby the MinD-to-MinE ratio on the membrane acts as a toggle switch: recruiting and stabilizing MinD on the membrane when the ratio is high and releasing MinD from the membrane when the ratio is low. Coupling this toggle switch behavior with MinD depletion from the cytoplasm drives a self-organized standing wave oscillator. PMID:26884160

  7. Detection of active bile leak with Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MR cholangiography: comparison of 20-25 min delayed and 60-180 min delayed images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieszanowski, Andrzej; Stadnik, Anna; Lezak, Aleksandra; Maj, Edyta; Zieniewicz, Krzysztof; Rowinska-Berman, Katarzyna; Grudzinski, Ireneusz P; Krawczyk, Marek; Rowiński, Olgierd

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the value of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance cholangiography (MRC) performed in different time delays after injection of gadoxetic acid disodium (Gd-EOB-DTPA) for the diagnosis of active bile leak. This retrospective analysis included Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MR images of 34 patients suspected of bile leak. Images were acquired 20-25 min after Gd-EOB-DTPA injection. If there was inadequate contrast in the bile ducts then delayed images after 60-90 min and 150-180 min were obtained. Results were correlated with intraoperative findings, ERCP results, clinical data, laboratory tests, and follow-up examinations. Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRC yielded an overall sensitivity of 96.4%, specificity of 100% and accuracy of 97.1% for the diagnosis of an active bile leak. The sensitivity of 20-25 min delayed MR images was 42.9%, of combined 20-25 min and 60-90 min delayed images was 92.9% and of combined 20-25 min, 60-90 min and 150-180 min delayed images was 96.4%. Gd-EOB-DTPA enhanced MRC utilizing delayed phase images was effective for detecting the presence and location of active bile leaks. The images acquired 60-180 min post-injection enabled identification of bile leaks even in patients with a dilated biliary system or moderate liver dysfunction. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Resolving plasmid structures inEnterobacteriaceaeusing the MinION nanopore sequencer: assessment of MinION and MinION/Illumina hybrid data assembly approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Sophie; Pankhurst, Louise; Hubbard, Alasdair; Votintseva, Antonia; Stoesser, Nicole; Sheppard, Anna E; Mathers, Amy; Norris, Rachel; Navickaite, Indre; Eaton, Chloe; Iqbal, Zamin; Crook, Derrick W; Phan, Hang T T

    2017-08-01

    This study aimed to assess the feasibility of using the Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT) MinION long-read sequencer in reconstructing fully closed plasmid sequences from eight Enterobacteriaceae isolates of six different species with plasmid populations of varying complexity. Species represented were Escherichia coli , Klebsiella pneumoniae , Citrobacter freundii , Enterobacter cloacae, Serratia marcescens and Klebsiella oxytoca , with plasmid populations ranging from 1-11 plasmids with sizes of 2-330 kb. Isolates were sequenced using Illumina (short-read) and ONT's MinION (long-read) platforms, and compared with fully resolved PacBio (long-read) sequence assemblies for the same isolates. We compared the performance of different assembly approaches including SPAdes, plasmidSPAdes, hybridSPAdes, Canu, Canu+Pilon (canuPilon) and npScarf in recovering the plasmid structures of these isolates by comparing with the gold-standard PacBio reference sequences. Overall, canuPilon provided consistently good quality assemblies both in terms of assembly statistics (N50, number of contigs) and assembly accuracy [presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs)/indels with respect to the reference sequence]. For plasmid reconstruction, Canu recovered 70 % of the plasmids in complete contigs, and combining three assembly approaches (Canu or canuPilon, hybridSPAdes and plasmidSPAdes) resulted in a total 78 % recovery rate for all the plasmids. The analysis demonstrated the potential of using MinION sequencing technology to resolve important plasmid structures in Enterobacteriaceae species independent of and in conjunction with Illumina sequencing data. A consensus assembly derived from several assembly approaches could present significant benefit in accurately resolving the greatest number of plasmid structures.

  9. A novel approach to assess the spontaneous gastrointestinal bleeding risk of antithrombotic agents using Apc(min/+) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Huijun; Shang, Jin; Keohane, CarolAnn; Wang, Min; Li, Qiu; Ni, Weihua; O'Neill, Kim; Chintala, Madhu

    2014-06-01

    Assessment of the bleeding risk of antithrombotic agents is usually performed in healthy animals with some form of vascular injury to peripheral organs to induce bleeding. However, bleeding observed in patients with currently marketed antithrombotic drugs is typically spontaneous in nature such as intracranial haemorrhage (ICH) and gastrointestinal (GI) bleeding, which happens most frequently on top of preexisting pathologies such as GI ulcerations and polyps. Apc(min/+) mice are reported to develop multiple adenomas through the entire intestinal tract and display progressive anaemia.In this study, we evaluated the potential utility of Apc(min/+) mice as a model for assessing spontaneous GI bleeding with antithrombotic agents. Apc(min/+) mice exhibited progressive blood loss starting at the age of nine weeks. Despite the increase in bleeding, Apc(min/+) mice were in a hypercoagulable state and displayed an age-dependent increase in thrombin generation and circulating fibrinogen as well as a significant decrease in clotting times. We evaluated the effect of warfarin, dabigatran etexilate, apixaban and clopidogrel in this model by administering them in diet or in the drinking water to mice for 1-4 weeks. All of these marketed drugs significantly increased GI bleeding in Apc(min/+) mice, but not in wild-type mice. Although different exposure profiles of these antithrombotic agents make it challenging to compare the bleeding risk of compounds, our results indicate that the Apc(min/+) mouse may be a sensitive preclinical model for assessing the spontaneous GI bleeding risk of novel antithrombotic agents.

  10. Min-max event-triggered computation tree logic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    components. In order to express the above class of efficiently checkable event timing queries, we define an extension of Min-max CTL, called Min-max Event Triggered Computation Tree. Logic (Min-max ETCTL). We then present an algorithm for Min-max ETCTL evaluation and show that it runs in time polynomial in the size ...

  11. Max–min distance nonnegative matrix factorization

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-10-26

    Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) has been a popular representation method for pattern classification problems. It tries to decompose a nonnegative matrix of data samples as the product of a nonnegative basis matrix and a nonnegative coefficient matrix. The columns of the coefficient matrix can be used as new representations of these data samples. However, traditional NMF methods ignore class labels of the data samples. In this paper, we propose a novel supervised NMF algorithm to improve the discriminative ability of the new representation by using the class labels. Using the class labels, we separate all the data sample pairs into within-class pairs and between-class pairs. To improve the discriminative ability of the new NMF representations, we propose to minimize the maximum distance of the within-class pairs in the new NMF space, and meanwhile to maximize the minimum distance of the between-class pairs. With this criterion, we construct an objective function and optimize it with regard to basis and coefficient matrices, and slack variables alternatively, resulting in an iterative algorithm. The proposed algorithm is evaluated on three pattern classification problems and experiment results show that it outperforms the state-of-the-art supervised NMF methods.

  12. Septal membrane localization by C-terminal amphipathic α-helices of MinD in Bacillus subtilis mutant cells lacking MinJ or DivIVA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazuki; Matsuoka, Satoshi; Hara, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Kouji

    2017-10-18

    The Min system, which inhibits assembly of the cytokinetic protein FtsZ, is largely responsible for positioning the division site in rod-shaped bacteria. It has been reported that MinJ, which bridges DivIVA and MinD, is targeted to the cell poles by an interaction with DivIVA, and that MinJ in turn recruits MinCD to the cell poles. MinC, however, is located primarily at active division sites at mid-cell when expressed from its native promoter. Surprisingly, we found that Bacillus subtilis MinD is located at nascent septal membranes and at an asymmetric site on lateral membranes between nascent septal membranes in filamentous cells lacking MinJ or DivIVA. Bacillus subtilis MinD has two amphipathic α-helices rich in basic amino acid residues at its C-terminus; one of these, named MTS1 here, is the counterpart of the membrane targeting sequence (MTS) in Escherichia coli MinD while the other, named MTS-like sequence (MTSL), is the nearest helix to MTS1. These amphipathic helices were located independently at nascent septal membranes in cells lacking MinJ or DivIVA, whereas elimination of the helices from the wild type protein reduced its localization considerably. MinD variants with altered MTS1 and MTSL, in which basic amino acid residues were replaced with proline or acidic residues, were not located at nascent septal membranes, indicating that the binding to the nascent septal membranes requires basic residues and a helical structure. The septal localization of MTSL, but not of MTS1, was dependent on host cell MinD. These results suggest that MinD is targeted to nascent septal membranes via its C-terminal amphipathic α-helices in B. subtilis cells lacking MinJ or DivIVA. Moreover, the diffuse distribution of MinD lacking both MTSs suggests that only a small fraction of MinD depends on MinJ for its localization to nascent septal membranes.

  13. Symmetry and scale orient Min protein patterns in shaped bacterial sculptures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Fabai; van Schie, Bas G. C.; Keymer, Juan E.; Dekker, Cees

    2015-08-01

    The boundary of a cell defines the shape and scale of its subcellular organization. However, the effects of the cell's spatial boundaries as well as the geometry sensing and scale adaptation of intracellular molecular networks remain largely unexplored. Here, we show that living bacterial cells can be ‘sculpted’ into defined shapes, such as squares and rectangles, which are used to explore the spatial adaptation of Min proteins that oscillate pole-to-pole in rod-shaped Escherichia coli to assist cell division. In a wide geometric parameter space, ranging from 2 × 1 × 1 to 11 × 6 × 1 μm3, Min proteins exhibit versatile oscillation patterns, sustaining rotational, longitudinal, diagonal, stripe and even transversal modes. These patterns are found to directly capture the symmetry and scale of the cell boundary, and the Min concentration gradients scale with the cell size within a characteristic length range of 3-6 μm. Numerical simulations reveal that local microscopic Turing kinetics of Min proteins can yield global symmetry selection, gradient scaling and an adaptive range, when and only when facilitated by the three-dimensional confinement of the cell boundary. These findings cannot be explained by previous geometry-sensing models based on the longest distance, membrane area or curvature, and reveal that spatial boundaries can facilitate simple molecular interactions to result in far more versatile functions than previously understood.

  14. Min-Bias at the Tevatron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Field, Rick

    2007-01-01

    As illustrated in Fig. 1, the total proton-antiproton cross section is the sum of the elastic and inelastic components, σ tot = σ EL + σ IN . The inelastic cross section consists of three terms; single diffraction, double-diffraction, and everything else (referred to as the 'hard core'), σ IN = σ SD + σ DD + σ HC . For elastic scattering neither of the beam particles breaks apart (i.e. color singlet exchange). For single and double diffraction one or both of the beam particles are excited into a high mass color singlet state (i.e. N* states) which then decays. Single and double diffraction also corresponds to color singlet exchange between the beam hadrons. When color is exchanged the outgoing remnants are no longer color singlets and one has a separation of color resulting in a multitude of quark-antiquark pairs being pulled out of the vacuum. The 'hard core' component, σ HC , involves color exchange and the separation of color. However, the 'hard core' contribution has both a 'soft' and 'hard' component. Most of the time the color exchange between partons in the beam hadrons occurs through a soft interaction (i.e. no high transverse momentum) and the two beam hadrons 'ooze' through each other producing lots of soft particles with a uniform distribution in rapidity and many particles flying down the beam pipe. Occasionally there is a hard scattering among the constituent partons producing outgoing particles and 'jets' with high transverse momentum

  15. Characterization of Min-K TE-1400 Thermal Insulation (Two-Year Gradient Stress Relaxation Testing Update)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemrick, James Gordon [ORNL; Lara-Curzio, Edgar [ORNL; King, James [ORNL

    2009-09-01

    Min-K 1400TE insulation material was characterized at Oak Ridge National Laboratory for use in structural applications under gradient temperature conditions. A previous report (ORNL/TM-2008/089) discusses the testing and results from the original three year duration of the project. This testing included compression testing to determine the effect of sample size and test specimen geometry on the compressive strength of Min-K, subsequent compression testing on cylindrical specimens to determine loading rates for stress relaxation testing, isothermal stress relaxation testing, and gradient stress relaxation testing. This report presents the results from the continuation of the gradient temperature stress relaxation testing and the resulting updated modeling.

  16. Some results regarding the comparison of the Earth's atmospheric models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šegan S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we examine air densities derived from our realization of aeronomic atmosphere models based on accelerometer measurements from satellites in a low Earth's orbit (LEO. Using the adapted algorithms we derive comparison parameters. The first results concerning the adjustment of the aeronomic models to the total-density model are given.

  17. Verification of aseismic design model by using experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mizuno, N.; Sugiyama, N.; Suzuki, T.; Shibata, Y.; Miura, K.; Miyagawa, N.

    1985-01-01

    A lattice model is applied as an analysis model for an aseismic design of the Hamaoka nuclear reactor building. With object to verify an availability of this design model, two reinforced concrete blocks are constructed on the ground and the forced vibration tests are carried out. The test results are well followed by simulation analysis using the lattice model. Damping value of the ground obtained from the test is more conservative than the design value. (orig.)

  18. Determination of structure of the MinD-ATP complex reveals the orientation of MinD on the membrane and the relative location of the binding sites for MinE and MinC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Wei; Park, Kyung-Tae; Holyoak, Todd; Lutkenhaus, Joe

    2011-01-01

    Summary The three Min proteins spatially regulate Z ring positioning in E. coli and are dynamically associated with the membrane. MinD binds to vesicles in the presence of ATP and can recruit MinC or MinE. Biochemical and genetic evidence indicate the binding sites for these two proteins on MinD overlap. Here we solved the structure of a hydrolytic-deficient mutant of MinD truncated for the C-terminal amphipathic helix involved in binding to the membrane. The structure solved in the presence of ATP is a dimer and reveals the face of MinD abutting the membrane. Using a combination of random and extensive site-directed mutagenesis additional residues important for MinE and MinC binding were identified. The location of these residues on the MinD structure confirms that the binding sites overlap and reveals that the binding sites are at the dimer interface and exposed to the cytosol. The location of the binding sites at the dimer interface offers a simple explanation for the ATP-dependency of MinC and MinE binding to MinD. PMID:21231967

  19. Steel Containment Vessel Model Test: Results and Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costello, J.F.; Hashimote, T.; Hessheimer, M.F.; Luk, V.K.

    1999-03-01

    A high pressure test of the steel containment vessel (SCV) model was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, NM, USA. The test model is a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of an improved Mark II boiling water reactor (BWR) containment. A concentric steel contact structure (CS), installed over the SCV model and separated at a nominally uniform distance from it, provided a simplified representation of a reactor shield building in the actual plant. The SCV model and contact structure were instrumented with strain gages and displacement transducers to record the deformation behavior of the SCV model during the high pressure test. This paper summarizes the conduct and the results of the high pressure test and discusses the posttest metallurgical evaluation results on specimens removed from the SCV model.

  20. Using the Min/Max Method for Replenishment of Picking Locations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apsalons Raitis

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The irregularity of removing quantities from a definite picking location in a warehouse very often results in the stock out in the particular picking address. In practice, the Red Card principle is used to determine a critical level for each picking location when it is necessary to start the replenishment of stock in the picking address. The question is how to calculate an adequate critical level. The guidelines in this paper explain in detail the solution of the problem using the Min/Max stock control method and mathematical algorithms adjusted by authors. In order to check the validity of these mathematical algorithms of the Min/Max method, the simulation modelling has been also done and presented.

  1. Identifiability Results for Several Classes of Linear Compartment Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Nicolette; Sullivant, Seth; Eisenberg, Marisa

    2015-08-01

    Identifiability concerns finding which unknown parameters of a model can be estimated, uniquely or otherwise, from given input-output data. If some subset of the parameters of a model cannot be determined given input-output data, then we say the model is unidentifiable. In this work, we study linear compartment models, which are a class of biological models commonly used in pharmacokinetics, physiology, and ecology. In past work, we used commutative algebra and graph theory to identify a class of linear compartment models that we call identifiable cycle models, which are unidentifiable but have the simplest possible identifiable functions (so-called monomial cycles). Here we show how to modify identifiable cycle models by adding inputs, adding outputs, or removing leaks, in such a way that we obtain an identifiable model. We also prove a constructive result on how to combine identifiable models, each corresponding to strongly connected graphs, into a larger identifiable model. We apply these theoretical results to several real-world biological models from physiology, cell biology, and ecology.

  2. Results of the Marine Ice Sheet Model Intercomparison Project, MISMIP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Pattyn

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Predictions of marine ice-sheet behaviour require models that are able to robustly simulate grounding line migration. We present results of an intercomparison exercise for marine ice-sheet models. Verification is effected by comparison with approximate analytical solutions for flux across the grounding line using simplified geometrical configurations (no lateral variations, no effects of lateral buttressing. Unique steady state grounding line positions exist for ice sheets on a downward sloping bed, while hysteresis occurs across an overdeepened bed, and stable steady state grounding line positions only occur on the downward-sloping sections. Models based on the shallow ice approximation, which does not resolve extensional stresses, do not reproduce the approximate analytical results unless appropriate parameterizations for ice flux are imposed at the grounding line. For extensional-stress resolving "shelfy stream" models, differences between model results were mainly due to the choice of spatial discretization. Moving grid methods were found to be the most accurate at capturing grounding line evolution, since they track the grounding line explicitly. Adaptive mesh refinement can further improve accuracy, including fixed grid models that generally perform poorly at coarse resolution. Fixed grid models, with nested grid representations of the grounding line, are able to generate accurate steady state positions, but can be inaccurate over transients. Only one full-Stokes model was included in the intercomparison, and consequently the accuracy of shelfy stream models as approximations of full-Stokes models remains to be determined in detail, especially during transients.

  3. KoBaMIN: a knowledge-based minimization web server for protein structure refinement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, João P G L M; Levitt, Michael; Chopra, Gaurav

    2012-07-01

    The KoBaMIN web server provides an online interface to a simple, consistent and computationally efficient protein structure refinement protocol based on minimization of a knowledge-based potential of mean force. The server can be used to refine either a single protein structure or an ensemble of proteins starting from their unrefined coordinates in PDB format. The refinement method is particularly fast and accurate due to the underlying knowledge-based potential derived from structures deposited in the PDB; as such, the energy function implicitly includes the effects of solvent and the crystal environment. Our server allows for an optional but recommended step that optimizes stereochemistry using the MESHI software. The KoBaMIN server also allows comparison of the refined structures with a provided reference structure to assess the changes brought about by the refinement protocol. The performance of KoBaMIN has been benchmarked widely on a large set of decoys, all models generated at the seventh worldwide experiments on critical assessment of techniques for protein structure prediction (CASP7) and it was also shown to produce top-ranking predictions in the refinement category at both CASP8 and CASP9, yielding consistently good results across a broad range of model quality values. The web server is fully functional and freely available at http://csb.stanford.edu/kobamin.

  4. Results on the symmetries of integrable fermionic models on chains

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dolcini, F.; Montorsi, A.

    2001-01-01

    We investigate integrable fermionic models within the scheme of the graded quantum inverse scattering method, and prove that any symmetry imposed on the solution of the Yang-Baxter equation reflects on the constants of motion of the model; generalizations with respect to known results are discussed. This theorem is shown to be very effective when combined with the polynomial R-matrix technique (PRT): we apply both of them to the study of the extended Hubbard models, for which we find all the subcases enjoying several kinds of (super)symmetries. In particular, we derive a geometrical construction expressing any gl(2,1)-invariant model as a linear combination of EKS and U-supersymmetric models. Further, we use the PRT to obtain 32 integrable so(4)-invariant models. By joint use of the Sutherland's species technique and η-pairs construction we propose a general method to derive their physical features, and we provide some explicit results

  5. KA…HOO CONSTRUCTIONS IN TAIWAN SOUTHERN MIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Chi Lee

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Taiwan Southern Min ka and hoo have been broadly investigated in the literature (e.g., Cheng et al. 1999, Lien 2002, Tsao 2005. However, very little of the previous research has focused on the interaction between these two functional words. This paper thus explores structures with a ka…hoo configuration. Through the examination of corpus data, this paper finds that ka…hoo constructions are mainly separated into two constructions: ditransitive and resultative constructions. Based on the constructional approach, the ditransitive construction is found to include four construction patterns which can help differentiate verb types. In addition, the event structure account of the resultative ka…hoo construction is explored. It is posited that the event telicity may change when the causative word hoo overtly occurs. The distinction between a ditransitive and a resultative ka…hoo construction significantly reduces the confusion in data where the ka…hoo configuration is found.

  6. Min-max optimal public service system design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kvet

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with designing a fair public service system. To achieve fairness, various schemes are be applied. The strongest criterion in the process is minimization of disutility of the worst situated users and then optimization of disutility of the better situated users under the condition that disutility of the worst situated users does not worsen, otherwise called lexicographical minimization. Focusing on the first step, this paper endeavours to find an effective solution to the weighted p-median problem based on radial formulation. Attempts at solving real instances when using a location-allocation model often fail due to enormous computational time or huge memory demands. Radial formulation can be implemented using commercial optimisation software. The main goal of this study is to show that the suitability solving of the min-max optimal public service system design can save computational time.

  7. CHOP-like chemotherapy with or without rituximab in young patients with good-prognosis diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma: 6-year results of an open-label randomised study of the MabThera International Trial (MInT) Group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pfreundschuh, Michael; Kuhnt, Evelyn; Trümper, Lorenz

    2011-01-01

    The MInT study was the first to show improved 3-year outcomes with the addition of rituximab to a CHOP (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone)-like regimen in young patients with good-prognosis diffuse large-B-cell lymphoma. Extended follow-up was needed to establish long-ter...

  8. Timing matters: negative emotion elicited 5 min but not 30 min or 45 min after learning enhances consolidation of internal-monitoring source memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bo; Bukuan, Sun

    2015-05-01

    Two experiments examined the time-dependent effects of negative emotion on consolidation of item and internal-monitoring source memory. In Experiment 1, participants (n=121) learned a list of words. They were asked to read aloud half of the words and to think about the remaining half. They were instructed to memorize each word and its associative cognitive operation ("reading" versus "thinking"). Immediately following learning they conducted free recall and then watched a 3-min either neutral or negative video clip when 5 min, 30 min or 45 min had elapsed after learning. Twenty-four hours later they returned to take surprise tests for item and source memory. Experiment 2 was similar to Experiment 1 except that participants, without conducting an immediate test of free recall, took tests of source memory for all encoded words both immediately and 24 h after learning. Experiment 1 showed that negative emotion enhanced consolidation of item memory (as measured by retention ratio of free recall) regardless of delay of emotion elicitation and that negative emotion enhanced consolidation of source memory when it was elicited at a 5 min delay but reduced consolidation of source memory when it was elicited at a 30 min delay; when elicited at a 45 min delay, negative emotion had little effect. Furthermore, Experiment 2 replicated the enhancement effect on source memory in the 5 min delay even when participants were tested on all the encoded words. The current study partially replicated prior studies on item memory and extends the literature by providing evidence for a time-dependent effect of negative emotion on consolidation of source memory based on internal monitoring. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. High-Coverage Long Read DNA Sequencing with the Oxford Nanopore MinION

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Miten

    2017-01-01

    Nanopore sequencing was conceived in 1989 by Dave Deamer (UCSC). Over two decades of development from research laboratories and, later on, Oxford Nanopore Technologies resulted in the MinION nanopore sequencer. This work describes the developments in MinION nanopore sequencing and software, and technical milestones achieved since the MinION’s release in 2014. These developments include establishing DNA reads that exceed 200 kb+ lengths and direct, simultaneous detection of nucleotide modifica...

  10. Use of the LQ model with large fraction sizes results in underestimation of isoeffect doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheu, Tommy; Molkentine, Jessica; Transtrum, Mark K.; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Withers, Hubert Rodney; Thames, Howard D.; Mason, Kathy A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To test the appropriateness of the linear-quadratic (LQ) model to describe survival of jejunal crypt clonogens after split doses with variable (small 1–6 Gy, large 8–13 Gy) first dose, as a model of its appropriateness for both small and large fraction sizes. Methods: C3Hf/KamLaw mice were exposed to whole body irradiation using 300 kVp X-rays at a dose rate of 1.84 Gy/min, and the number of viable jejunal crypts was determined using the microcolony assay. 14 Gy total dose was split into unequal first and second fractions separated by 4 h. Data were analyzed using the LQ model, the lethal potentially lethal (LPL) model, and a repair-saturation (RS) model. Results: Cell kill was greater in the group receiving the larger fraction first, creating an asymmetry in the plot of survival vs size of first dose, as opposed to the prediction of the LQ model of a symmetric response. There was a significant difference in the estimated βs (higher β after larger first doses), but no significant difference in the αs, when large doses were given first vs small doses first. This difference results in underestimation (based on present data by approximately 8%) of isoeffect doses using LQ model parameters based on small fraction sizes. While the LPL model also predicted a symmetric response inconsistent with the data, the RS model results were consistent with the observed asymmetry. Conclusion: The LQ model underestimates doses for isoeffective crypt-cell survival with large fraction sizes (in the present setting, >9 Gy)

  11. Convergence models for cylindrical caverns and the resulting ground subsidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haupt, W.; Sroka, A.; Schober, F.

    1983-02-01

    The authors studied the effects of different convergence characteristics on surface soil response for the case of narrow, cylindrical caverns. Maximum ground subsidence - a parameter of major importance in this type of cavern - was calculated for different convergence models. The models were established without considering the laws of rock mechanics and rheology. As a result, two limiting convergence models were obtained that describe an interval of expectation into which all other models fit. This means that ground movements over cylindrical caverns can be calculated ''on the safe side'', correlating the trough resulting on the surface with the convergence characterisitcs of the cavern. Among other applications, the method thus permits monitoring of caverns.

  12. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik

    . However, recent developments in numerical weather prediction (NWP) include probabilistic forecasting techniques, which can be utilised also for atmospheric dispersion models. The ensemble statistical methods developed and applied to NWP models aim at describing the inherent uncertainties......The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the 'most likely' dispersion scenario...... of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological obser-vations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observa-tional data, an ensemble of meteorological forecasts is produced...

  13. Meteorological Uncertainty of atmospheric Dispersion model results (MUD)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havskov Sørensen, Jens; Amstrup, Bjarne; Feddersen, Henrik

    ’ dispersion scenario. However, recent developments in numerical weather prediction (NWP) include probabilistic forecasting techniques, which can be utilised also for long-range atmospheric dispersion models. The ensemble statistical methods developed and applied to NWP models aim at describing the inherent......The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as possibilities for optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the ‘most likely...... uncertainties of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological observations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing e.g. the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observational data, an ensemble...

  14. The 2013 European Seismic Hazard Model: key components and results

    OpenAIRE

    Jochen Woessner; Danciu Laurentiu; Domenico Giardini; Helen Crowley; Fabrice Cotton; G. Grünthal; Gianluca Valensise; Ronald Arvidsson; Roberto Basili; Mine Betül Demircioglu; Stefan Hiemer; Carlo Meletti; Roger W. Musson; Andrea N. Rovida; Karin Sesetyan

    2015-01-01

    The 2013 European Seismic Hazard Model (ESHM13) results from a community-based probabilistic seismic hazard assessment supported by the EU-FP7 project “Seismic Hazard Harmonization in Europe” (SHARE, 2009–2013). The ESHM13 is a consistent seismic hazard model for Europe and Turkey which overcomes the limitation of national borders and includes a through quantification of the uncertainties. It is the first completed regional effort contributing to the “Global Earthquake Model” initiative. It m...

  15. Hydroclimatology of the Nile: results from a regional climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. A. Mohamed

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the result of the regional coupled climatic and hydrologic model of the Nile Basin. For the first time the interaction between the climatic processes and the hydrological processes on the land surface have been fully coupled. The hydrological model is driven by the rainfall and the energy available for evaporation generated in the climate model, and the runoff generated in the catchment is again routed over the wetlands of the Nile to supply moisture for atmospheric feedback. The results obtained are quite satisfactory given the extremely low runoff coefficients in the catchment. The paper presents the validation results over the sub-basins: Blue Nile, White Nile, Atbara river, the Sudd swamps, and the Main Nile for the period 1995 to 2000. Observational datasets were used to evaluate the model results including radiation, precipitation, runoff and evaporation data. The evaporation data were derived from satellite images over a major part of the Upper Nile. Limitations in both the observational data and the model are discussed. It is concluded that the model provides a sound representation of the regional water cycle over the Nile. The sources of atmospheric moisture to the basin, and location of convergence/divergence fields could be accurately illustrated. The model is used to describe the regional water cycle in the Nile basin in terms of atmospheric fluxes, land surface fluxes and land surface-climate feedbacks. The monthly moisture recycling ratio (i.e. locally generated/total precipitation over the Nile varies between 8 and 14%, with an annual mean of 11%, which implies that 89% of the Nile water resources originates from outside the basin physical boundaries. The monthly precipitation efficiency varies between 12 and 53%, and the annual mean is 28%. The mean annual result of the Nile regional water cycle is compared to that of the Amazon and the Mississippi basins.

  16. Results of a model for premixed combustion oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Janus, M.C.; Richards, G.A.

    1996-09-01

    Combustion oscillations are receiving renewed research interest due to increasing use of lean premix (LPM) combustion to gas turbines. A simple, nonlinear model for premixed combustion is described in this paper. The model was developed to help explain specific experimental observations and to provide guidance for development of active control schemes based on nonlinear concepts. The model can be used to quickly examine instability trends associated with changes in equivalence ratio, mass flow rate, geometry, ambient conditions, etc. The model represents the relevant processes occurring in a fuel nozzle and combustor which are analogous to current LPM turbine combustors. Conservation equations for the fuel nozzle and combustor are developed from simple control volume analysis, providing a set of ordinary differential equations that can be solved on a personal computer. Combustion is modeled as a stirred reactor, with a bimolecular reaction rate between fuel and air. A variety of numerical results and comparisons to experimental data are presented to demonstrate the utility of the model. Model results are used to understand the fundamental mechanisms which drive combustion oscillations, effects of inlet air temperature and nozzle geometry on instability, and effectiveness of open loop control schemes.

  17. Summary of FY15 results of benchmark modeling activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arguello, J. Guadalupe [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Sandia is participating in the third phase of an is a contributing partner to a U.S.-German "Joint Project" entitled "Comparison of current constitutive models and simulation procedures on the basis of model calculations of the thermo-mechanical behavior and healing of rock salt." The first goal of the project is to check the ability of numerical modeling tools to correctly describe the relevant deformation phenomena in rock salt under various influences. Achieving this goal will lead to increased confidence in the results of numerical simulations related to the secure storage of radioactive wastes in rock salt, thereby enhancing the acceptance of the results. These results may ultimately be used to make various assertions regarding both the stability analysis of an underground repository in salt, during the operating phase, and the long-term integrity of the geological barrier against the release of harmful substances into the biosphere, in the post-operating phase.

  18. MIN-CUT BASED SEGMENTATION OF AIRBORNE LIDAR POINT CLOUDS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Ural

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Introducing an organization to the unstructured point cloud before extracting information from airborne lidar data is common in many applications. Aggregating the points with similar features into segments in 3-D which comply with the nature of actual objects is affected by the neighborhood, scale, features and noise among other aspects. In this study, we present a min-cut based method for segmenting the point cloud. We first assess the neighborhood of each point in 3-D by investigating the local geometric and statistical properties of the candidates. Neighborhood selection is essential since point features are calculated within their local neighborhood. Following neighborhood determination, we calculate point features and determine the clusters in the feature space. We adapt a graph representation from image processing which is especially used in pixel labeling problems and establish it for the unstructured 3-D point clouds. The edges of the graph that are connecting the points with each other and nodes representing feature clusters hold the smoothness costs in the spatial domain and data costs in the feature domain. Smoothness costs ensure spatial coherence, while data costs control the consistency with the representative feature clusters. This graph representation formalizes the segmentation task as an energy minimization problem. It allows the implementation of an approximate solution by min-cuts for a global minimum of this NP hard minimization problem in low order polynomial time. We test our method with airborne lidar point cloud acquired with maximum planned post spacing of 1.4 m and a vertical accuracy 10.5 cm as RMSE. We present the effects of neighborhood and feature determination in the segmentation results and assess the accuracy and efficiency of the implemented min-cut algorithm as well as its sensitivity to the parameters of the smoothness and data cost functions. We find that smoothness cost that only considers simple distance

  19. Max-plus and min-plus projection autoassociative morphological memories and their compositions for pattern classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dos Santos, Alex Santana; Valle, Marcos Eduardo

    2018-04-01

    Autoassociative morphological memories (AMMs) are robust and computationally efficient memory models with unlimited storage capacity. In this paper, we present the max-plus and min-plus projection autoassociative morphological memories (PAMMs) as well as their compositions. Briefly, the max-plus PAMM yields the largest max-plus combination of the stored vectors which is less than or equal to the input. Dually, the vector recalled by the min-plus PAMM corresponds to the smallest min-plus combination which is larger than or equal to the input. Apart from unlimited absolute storage capacity and one step retrieval, PAMMs and their compositions exhibit an excellent noise tolerance. Furthermore, the new memories yielded quite promising results in classification problems with a large number of features and classes. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Relationship Marketing results: proposition of a cognitive mapping model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iná Futino Barreto

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective - This research sought to develop a cognitive model that expresses how marketing professionals understand the relationship between the constructs that define relationship marketing (RM. It also tried to understand, using the obtained model, how objectives in this field are achieved. Design/methodology/approach – Through cognitive mapping, we traced 35 individual mental maps, highlighting how each respondent understands the interactions between RM elements. Based on the views of these individuals, we established an aggregate mental map. Theoretical foundation – The topic is based on a literature review that explores the RM concept and its main elements. Based on this review, we listed eleven main constructs. Findings – We established an aggregate mental map that represents the RM structural model. Model analysis identified that CLV is understood as the final result of RM. We also observed that the impact of most of the RM elements on CLV is brokered by loyalty. Personalization and quality, on the other hand, proved to be process input elements, and are the ones that most strongly impact others. Finally, we highlight that elements that punish customers are much less effective than elements that benefit them. Contributions - The model was able to insert core elements of RM, but absent from most formal models: CLV and customization. The analysis allowed us to understand the interactions between the RM elements and how the end result of RM (CLV is formed. This understanding improves knowledge on the subject and helps guide, assess and correct actions.

  1. Quantitative approach of Min protein researches and applications ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cell division in prokaryotes is a process (known as binary fission) where the parent cell divides into daughter cells. In this process, the dynamics of Min proteins is an important factor in the accurate positioning at the midcell in Escherichia coli. This site specificity is regulated by the oscillatory behavior of Min proteins.

  2. Marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico - II. Model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaiser, Mark J.; Yu, Yunke

    2010-01-01

    In the second part of this two-part article on marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico, we estimate the number of committed assets in water depth less than 1000 ft that are expected to be marginal over a 60-year time horizon. We compute the expected quantity and value of the production and gross revenue streams of the gulf's committed asset inventory circa. January 2007 using a probabilistic model framework. Cumulative hydrocarbon production from the producing inventory is estimated to be 1056 MMbbl oil and 13.3 Tcf gas. Marginal production from the committed asset inventory is expected to contribute 4.1% of total oil production and 5.4% of gas production. A meta-evaluation procedure is adapted to present the results of sensitivity analysis. Model results are discussed along with a description of the model framework and limitations of the analysis. (author)

  3. Marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico - II. Model results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Mark J.; Yu, Yunke [Center for Energy Studies, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2010-08-15

    In the second part of this two-part article on marginal production in the Gulf of Mexico, we estimate the number of committed assets in water depth less than 1000 ft that are expected to be marginal over a 60-year time horizon. We compute the expected quantity and value of the production and gross revenue streams of the gulf's committed asset inventory circa. January 2007 using a probabilistic model framework. Cumulative hydrocarbon production from the producing inventory is estimated to be 1056 MMbbl oil and 13.3 Tcf gas. Marginal production from the committed asset inventory is expected to contribute 4.1% of total oil production and 5.4% of gas production. A meta-evaluation procedure is adapted to present the results of sensitivity analysis. Model results are discussed along with a description of the model framework and limitations of the analysis. (author)

  4. Oscillating behavior of Clostridium difficile Min proteins in Bacillus subtilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makroczyová, Jana; Jamroškovič, Ján; Krascsenitsová, Eva; Labajová, Nad'a; Barák, Imrich

    2016-06-01

    In rod-shaped bacteria, the proper placement of the division septum at the midcell relies, at least partially, on the proteins of the Min system as an inhibitor of cell division. The main principle of Min system function involves the formation of an inhibitor gradient along the cell axis; however, the establishment of this gradient differs between two well-studied gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria. While in gram-negative Escherichia coli, the Min system undergoes pole-to-pole oscillation, in gram-positive Bacillus subtilis, proper spatial inhibition is achieved by the preferential attraction of the Min proteins to the cell poles. Nevertheless, when E.coli Min proteins are inserted into B.subtilis cells, they still oscillate, which negatively affects asymmetric septation during sporulation in this organism. Interestingly, homologs of both Min systems were found to be present in various combinations in the genomes of anaerobic and endospore-forming Clostridia, including the pathogenic Clostridium difficile. Here, we have investigated the localization and behavior of C.difficile Min protein homologs and showed that MinDE proteins of C.difficile can oscillate when expressed together in B.subtilis cells. We have also investigated the effects of this oscillation on B.subtilis sporulation, and observed decreased sporulation efficiency in strains harboring the MinDE genes. Additionally, we have evaluated the effects of C.difficile Min protein expression on vegetative division in this heterologous host. © 2016 The Authors. MicrobiologyOpen published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Modeling Results For the ITER Cryogenic Fore Pump. Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfotenhauer, John M. [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Zhang, Dongsheng [University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2014-03-31

    A numerical model characterizing the operation of a cryogenic fore-pump (CFP) for ITER has been developed at the University of Wisconsin – Madison during the period from March 15, 2011 through June 30, 2014. The purpose of the ITER-CFP is to separate hydrogen isotopes from helium gas, both making up the exhaust components from the ITER reactor. The model explicitly determines the amount of hydrogen that is captured by the supercritical-helium-cooled pump as a function of the inlet temperature of the supercritical helium, its flow rate, and the inlet conditions of the hydrogen gas flow. Furthermore the model computes the location and amount of hydrogen captured in the pump as a function of time. Throughout the model’s development, and as a calibration check for its results, it has been extensively compared with the measurements of a CFP prototype tested at Oak Ridge National Lab. The results of the model demonstrate that the quantity of captured hydrogen is very sensitive to the inlet temperature of the helium coolant on the outside of the cryopump. Furthermore, the model can be utilized to refine those tests, and suggests methods that could be incorporated in the testing to enhance the usefulness of the measured data.

  6. Fuel assembly bow: analytical modeling and resulting design improvements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabel, J.; Huebsch, H.P.

    1995-01-01

    The bowing of fuel assemblies may result in a contact between neighbouring fuel assemblies and in connection with a vibration to a resulting wear or even perforation at the corners of the spacer grids of neighbouring assemblies. Such events allowed reinsertion of a few fuel assemblies in Germany only after spacer repair. In order to identify the most sensitive parameters causing the observed bowing of fuel assemblies a new computer model was develop which takes into a account the highly nonlinear behaviour of the interaction between fuel rods and spacers. As a result of the studies performed with this model, design improvements such as a more rigid connection between guide thimbles and spacer grids, could be defined. First experiences with this improved design show significantly better fuel behaviour. (author). 5 figs., 1 tabs

  7. Methodology and Results of Mathematical Modelling of Complex Technological Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokrova, Nataliya V.

    2018-03-01

    The methodology of system analysis allows us to draw a mathematical model of the complex technological process. The mathematical description of the plasma-chemical process was proposed. The importance the quenching rate and initial temperature decrease time was confirmed for producing the maximum amount of the target product. The results of numerical integration of the system of differential equations can be used to describe reagent concentrations, plasma jet rate and temperature in order to achieve optimal mode of hardening. Such models are applicable both for solving control problems and predicting future states of sophisticated technological systems.

  8. Modeling vertical loads in pools resulting from fluid injection. [BWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-06-15

    Table-top model experiments were performed to investigate pressure suppression pool dynamics effects due to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) for the Peachbottom Mark I boiling water reactor containment system. The results guided subsequent conduct of experiments in the /sup 1///sub 5/-scale facility and provided new insight into the vertical load function (VLF). Model experiments show an oscillatory VLF with the download typically double-spiked followed by a more gradual sinusoidal upload. The load function contains a high frequency oscillation superimposed on a low frequency one; evidence from measurements indicates that the oscillations are initiated by fluid dynamics phenomena.

  9. Modeling vertical loads in pools resulting from fluid injection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lai, W.; McCauley, E.W.

    1978-01-01

    Table-top model experiments were performed to investigate pressure suppression pool dynamics effects due to a postulated loss-of-coolant accident (LOCA) for the Peachbottom Mark I boiling water reactor containment system. The results guided subsequent conduct of experiments in the 1 / 5 -scale facility and provided new insight into the vertical load function (VLF). Model experiments show an oscillatory VLF with the download typically double-spiked followed by a more gradual sinusoidal upload. The load function contains a high frequency oscillation superimposed on a low frequency one; evidence from measurements indicates that the oscillations are initiated by fluid dynamics phenomena

  10. Some results on the dynamics generated by the Bazykin model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georgescu, R M

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available A predator-prey model formerly proposed by A. Bazykin et al. [Bifurcation diagrams of planar dynamical systems (1985] is analyzed in the case when two of the four parameters are kept fixed. Dynamics and bifurcation results are deduced by using the methods developed by D. K. Arrowsmith and C. M. Place [Ordinary differential equations (1982], S.-N. Chow et al. [Normal forms and bifurcation of planar fields (1994], Y. A. Kuznetsov [Elements of applied bifurcation theory (1998], and A. Georgescu [Dynamic bifurcation diagrams for some models in economics and biology (2004]. The global dynamic bifurcation diagram is constructed and graphically represented. The biological interpretation is presented, too.

  11. Results of the eruptive column model inter-comparison study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Antonio; Suzuki, Yujiro; Cerminara, M.; Devenish, Ben J.; Esposti Ongaro, T.; Herzog, Michael; Van Eaton, Alexa; Denby, L.C.; Bursik, Marcus; de' Michieli Vitturi, Mattia; Engwell, S.; Neri, Augusto; Barsotti, Sara; Folch, Arnau; Macedonio, Giovanni; Girault, F.; Carazzo, G.; Tait, S.; Kaminski, E.; Mastin, Larry G.; Woodhouse, Mark J.; Phillips, Jeremy C.; Hogg, Andrew J.; Degruyter, Wim; Bonadonna, Costanza

    2016-01-01

    This study compares and evaluates one-dimensional (1D) and three-dimensional (3D) numerical models of volcanic eruption columns in a set of different inter-comparison exercises. The exercises were designed as a blind test in which a set of common input parameters was given for two reference eruptions, representing a strong and a weak eruption column under different meteorological conditions. Comparing the results of the different models allows us to evaluate their capabilities and target areas for future improvement. Despite their different formulations, the 1D and 3D models provide reasonably consistent predictions of some of the key global descriptors of the volcanic plumes. Variability in plume height, estimated from the standard deviation of model predictions, is within ~ 20% for the weak plume and ~ 10% for the strong plume. Predictions of neutral buoyancy level are also in reasonably good agreement among the different models, with a standard deviation ranging from 9 to 19% (the latter for the weak plume in a windy atmosphere). Overall, these discrepancies are in the range of observational uncertainty of column height. However, there are important differences amongst models in terms of local properties along the plume axis, particularly for the strong plume. Our analysis suggests that the simplified treatment of entrainment in 1D models is adequate to resolve the general behaviour of the weak plume. However, it is inadequate to capture complex features of the strong plume, such as large vortices, partial column collapse, or gravitational fountaining that strongly enhance entrainment in the lower atmosphere. We conclude that there is a need to more accurately quantify entrainment rates, improve the representation of plume radius, and incorporate the effects of column instability in future versions of 1D volcanic plume models.

  12. Initial CGE Model Results Summary Exogenous and Endogenous Variables Tests

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edwards, Brian Keith [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Boero, Riccardo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Rivera, Michael Kelly [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-08-07

    The following discussion presents initial results of tests of the most recent version of the National Infrastructure Simulation and Analysis Center Dynamic Computable General Equilibrium (CGE) model developed by Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The intent of this is to test and assess the model’s behavioral properties. The test evaluated whether the predicted impacts are reasonable from a qualitative perspective. This issue is whether the predicted change, be it an increase or decrease in other model variables, is consistent with prior economic intuition and expectations about the predicted change. One of the purposes of this effort is to determine whether model changes are needed in order to improve its behavior qualitatively and quantitatively.

  13. CPMC: Automatic Object Segmentation Using Constrained Parametric Min-Cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreira, João; Sminchisescu, Cristian

    2012-07-01

    We present a novel framework to generate and rank plausible hypotheses for the spatial extent of objects in images using bottom-up computational processes and mid-level selection cues. The object hypotheses are represented as figure-ground segmentations, and are extracted automatically, without prior knowledge of the properties of individual object classes, by solving a sequence of Constrained Parametric Min-Cut problems (CPMC) on a regular image grid. In a subsequent step, we learn to rank the corresponding segments by training a continuous model to predict how likely they are to exhibit real-world regularities (expressed as putative overlap with ground truth) based on their mid-level region properties, then diversify the estimated overlap score using maximum marginal relevance measures. We show that this algorithm significantly outperforms the state of the art for low-level segmentation in the VOC 2009 and 2010 data sets. In our companion papers [1], [2], we show that the algorithm can be used, successfully, in a segmentation-based visual object category recognition pipeline. This architecture ranked first in the VOC2009 and VOC2010 image segmentation and labeling challenges.

  14. Interaction between subducting plates: results from numerical and analogue modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiraly, Agnes; Capitanio, Fabio A.; Funiciello, Francesca; Faccenna, Claudio

    2016-04-01

    The tectonic setting of the Alpine-Mediterranean area is achieved during the late Cenozoic subduction, collision and suturing of several oceanic fragments and continental blocks. In this stage, processes such as interactions among subducting slabs, slab migrations and related mantle flow played a relevant role on the resulting tectonics. Here, we use numerical models to first address the mantle flow characteristic in 3D. During the subduction of a single plate the strength of the return flow strongly depends on the slab pull force, that is on the plate's buoyancy, however the physical properties of the slab, such as density, viscosity or width, do not affect largely the morphology of the toroidal cell. Instead, dramatic effects on the geometry and the dynamics of the toroidal cell result in models where the thickness of the mantle is varied. The vertical component of the vorticity vector is used to define the characteristic size of the toroidal cell, which is ~1.2-1.3 times the mantle depth. This latter defines the range of viscous stress propagation through the mantle and consequent interactions with other slabs. We thus further investigate on this setup where two separate lithospheric plates subduct in opposite sense, developing opposite polarities and convergent slab retreat, and model different initial sideways distance between the plates. The stress profiles in time illustrate that the plates interacts when slabs are at the characteristic distance and the two slabs toroidal cells merge. Increased stress and delayed slab migrations are the results. Analogue models of double-sided subduction show similar maximum distance and allow testing the additional role of stress propagated through the plates. We use a silicon plate subducting on its two opposite margins, which is either homogeneous or comprises oceanic and continental lithospheres, differing in buoyancy. The modeling results show that the double-sided subduction is strongly affected by changes in plate

  15. First experiments results about the engineering model of Rapsodie

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chalot, A.; Ginier, R.; Sauvage, M.

    1964-01-01

    This report deals with the first series of experiments carried out on the engineering model of Rapsodie and on an associated sodium facility set in a laboratory hall of Cadarache. It conveys more precisely: 1/ - The difficulties encountered during the erection and assembly of the engineering model and a compilation of the results of the first series of experiments and tests carried out on this installation (loading of the subassemblies preheating, thermal chocks...). 2/ - The experiments and tests carried out on the two prototypes control rod drive mechanisms which brought to the choice for the design of the definitive drive mechanism. As a whole, the results proved the validity of the general design principles adopted for Rapsodie. (authors) [fr

  16. Workshop to transfer VELMA watershed model results to ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    An EPA Western Ecology Division (WED) watershed modeling team has been working with the Snoqualmie Tribe Environmental and Natural Resources Department to develop VELMA watershed model simulations of the effects of historical and future restoration and land use practices on streamflow, stream temperature, and other habitat characteristics affecting threatened salmon populations in the 100 square mile Tolt River watershed in Washington state. To date, the WED group has fully calibrated the watershed model to simulate Tolt River flows with a high degree of accuracy under current and historical conditions and practices, and is in the process of simulating long-term responses to specific watershed restoration practices conducted by the Snoqualmie Tribe and partners. On July 20-21 WED Researchers Bob McKane, Allen Brookes and ORISE Fellow Jonathan Halama will be attending a workshop at the Tolt River site in Carnation, WA, to present and discuss modeling results with the Snoqualmie Tribe and other Tolt River watershed stakeholders and land managers, including the Washington Departments of Ecology and Natural Resources, U.S. Forest Service, City of Seattle, King County, and representatives of the Northwest Indian Fisheries Commission. The workshop is being co-organized by the Snoqualmie Tribe, EPA Region 10 and WED. The purpose of this 2-day workshop is two-fold. First, on Day 1, the modeling team will perform its second site visit to the watershed, this time focus

  17. Meteorological uncertainty of atmospheric dispersion model results (MUD)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Havskov Soerensen, J.; Amstrup, B.; Feddersen, H.

    2013-08-01

    The MUD project addresses assessment of uncertainties of atmospheric dispersion model predictions, as well as possibilities for optimum presentation to decision makers. Previously, it has not been possible to estimate such uncertainties quantitatively, but merely to calculate the 'most likely' dispersion scenario. However, recent developments in numerical weather prediction (NWP) include probabilistic forecasting techniques, which can be utilised also for long-range atmospheric dispersion models. The ensemble statistical methods developed and applied to NWP models aim at describing the inherent uncertainties of the meteorological model results. These uncertainties stem from e.g. limits in meteorological observations used to initialise meteorological forecast series. By perturbing e.g. the initial state of an NWP model run in agreement with the available observational data, an ensemble of meteorological forecasts is produced from which uncertainties in the various meteorological parameters are estimated, e.g. probabilities for rain. Corresponding ensembles of atmospheric dispersion can now be computed from which uncertainties of predicted radionuclide concentration and deposition patterns can be derived. (Author)

  18. Some results on hyperscaling in the 3D Ising model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, G.A. Jr. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States). Theoretical Div.; Kawashima, Naoki [Univ. of Tokyo (Japan). Dept. of Physics

    1995-09-01

    The authors review exact studies on finite-sized 2 dimensional Ising models and show that the point for an infinite-sized model at the critical temperature is a point of nonuniform approach in the temperature-size plane. They also illuminate some strong effects of finite-size on quantities which do not diverge at the critical point. They then review Monte Carlo studies for 3 dimensional Ising models of various sizes (L = 2--100) at various temperatures. From these results they find that the data for the renormalized coupling constant collapses nicely when plotted against the correlation length, determined in a system of edge length L, divided by L. They also find that {zeta}{sub L}/L {ge} 0.26 is definitely too large for reliable studies of the critical value, g*, of the renormalized coupling constant. They have reasonable evidence that {zeta}{sub L}/L {approx} 0.1 is adequate for results that are within one percent of those for the infinite system size. On this basis, they have conducted a series of Monte Carlo calculations with this condition imposed. These calculations were made practical by the development of improved estimators for use in the Swendsen-Wang cluster method. The authors found from these results, coupled with a reversed limit computation (size increases with the temperature fixed at the critical temperature), that g* > 0, although there may well be a sharp downward drop in g as the critical temperature is approached in accord with the predictions of series analysis. The results support the validity of hyperscaling in the 3 dimensional Ising model.

  19. Presenting results of software model checker via debugging interface

    OpenAIRE

    Kohan, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Title: Presenting results of software model checker via debugging interface Author: Tomáš Kohan Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor of the master thesis: RNDr. Ondřej Šerý, Ph.D., Department of Distributed and Dependable Systems Abstract: This thesis is devoted to design and implementation of the new debugging interface of the Java PathFinder application. As a suitable inte- face container was selected the Eclipse development environment. The created interface should vis...

  20. Review of Current Standard Model Results in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Brandt, Gerhard; The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This talk highlights results selected from the Standard Model research programme of the ATLAS Collaboration at the Large Hadron Collider. Results using data from $p-p$ collisions at $\\sqrt{s}=7,8$~TeV in LHC Run-1 as well as results using data at $\\sqrt{s}=13$~TeV in LHC Run-2 are covered. The status of cross section measurements from soft QCD processes and jet production as well as photon production are presented. The presentation extends to vector boson production with associated jets. Precision measurements of the production of $W$ and $Z$ bosons, including a first measurement of the mass of the $W$ bosons, $m_W$, are discussed. The programme to measure electroweak processes with di-boson and tri-boson final states is outlined. All presented measurements are compatible with Standard Model descriptions and allow to further constrain it. In addition they allow to probe new physics which would manifest through extra gauge couplings, or Standard Model gauge couplings deviating from their predicted value.

  1. Projekti Min-E-Max kohtumine Saksamaal / Katrin Arge

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Arge, Katrin

    2005-01-01

    Oktoobri keskel toimus Lõuna-Saksamaa väikelinnas Oberderdingenis Hispaania, Portugali, Ungari, Leedu, Eesti ja Saksamaa õpetajate kohtumine seoses Euroopa Liidu poolt rahastatava Comenius1 projektiga Min-E-Max (minimum energy input maximum output)

  2. Teadlastele on Saksamaa kogemus hindamatu / Mart Min, Jaan Aru

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Min, Mart, 1943-

    2012-01-01

    Oma muljeid Saksamaalt jagavad Tallinna Tehnikaülikooli professor Mart Min, kes on viibinud õppejõuna Saksamaal ja Frankfurdis Max Plancki instituudis doktorantuuris aju ja teadvust uuriv noorteadlane Jaan Aru

  3. 160-min solar pulsation recorded simultaneously by two radio telescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterov, N.S.; Urpo, S.; Kotov, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    Independent differential (center--limb) measurements of the brightness of the quiet sun on 1981 June 22 at lambda = 13.5 mm in the Crimea and at 8 mm in Finland show synchronous variations with 160-min periodicity

  4. Challenges in validating model results for first year ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melsom, Arne; Eastwood, Steinar; Xie, Jiping; Aaboe, Signe; Bertino, Laurent

    2017-04-01

    In order to assess the quality of model results for the distribution of first year ice, a comparison with a product based on observations from satellite-borne instruments has been performed. Such a comparison is not straightforward due to the contrasting algorithms that are used in the model product and the remote sensing product. The implementation of the validation is discussed in light of the differences between this set of products, and validation results are presented. The model product is the daily updated 10-day forecast from the Arctic Monitoring and Forecasting Centre in CMEMS. The forecasts are produced with the assimilative ocean prediction system TOPAZ. Presently, observations of sea ice concentration and sea ice drift are introduced in the assimilation step, but data for sea ice thickness and ice age (or roughness) are not included. The model computes the age of the ice by recording and updating the time passed after ice formation as sea ice grows and deteriorates as it is advected inside the model domain. Ice that is younger than 365 days is classified as first year ice. The fraction of first-year ice is recorded as a tracer in each grid cell. The Ocean and Sea Ice Thematic Assembly Centre in CMEMS redistributes a daily product from the EUMETSAT OSI SAF of gridded sea ice conditions which include "ice type", a representation of the separation of regions between those infested by first year ice, and those infested by multi-year ice. The ice type is parameterized based on data for the gradient ratio GR(19,37) from SSMIS observations, and from the ASCAT backscatter parameter. This product also includes information on ambiguity in the processing of the remote sensing data, and the product's confidence level, which have a strong seasonal dependency.

  5. Thermal-Chemical Model Of Subduction: Results And Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorczyk, W.; Gerya, T. V.; Connolly, J. A.; Yuen, D. A.; Rudolph, M.

    2005-12-01

    Seismic structures with strong positive and negative velocity anomalies in the mantle wedge above subduction zones have been interpreted as thermally and/or chemically induced phenomena. We have developed a thermal-chemical model of subduction, which constrains the dynamics of seismic velocity structure beneath volcanic arcs. Our simulations have been calculated over a finite-difference grid with (201×101) to (201×401) regularly spaced Eulerian points, using 0.5 million to 10 billion markers. The model couples numerical thermo-mechanical solution with Gibbs energy minimization to investigate the dynamic behavior of partially molten upwellings from slabs (cold plumes) and structures associated with their development. The model demonstrates two chemically distinct types of plumes (mixed and unmixed), and various rigid body rotation phenomena in the wedge (subduction wheel, fore-arc spin, wedge pin-ball). These thermal-chemical features strongly perturb seismic structure. Their occurrence is dependent on the age of subducting slab and the rate of subduction.The model has been validated through a series of test cases and its results are consistent with a variety of geological and geophysical data. In contrast to models that attribute a purely thermal origin for mantle wedge seismic anomalies, the thermal-chemical model is able to simulate the strong variations of seismic velocity existing beneath volcanic arcs which are associated with development of cold plumes. In particular, molten regions that form beneath volcanic arcs as a consequence of vigorous cold wet plumes are manifest by > 20% variations in the local Poisson ratio, as compared to variations of ~ 2% expected as a consequence of temperature variation within the mantle wedge.

  6. An enhanced fuzzy min-max neural network for pattern classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mohammed Falah; Lim, Chee Peng

    2015-03-01

    An enhanced fuzzy min-max (EFMM) network is proposed for pattern classification in this paper. The aim is to overcome a number of limitations of the original fuzzy min-max (FMM) network and improve its classification performance. The key contributions are three heuristic rules to enhance the learning algorithm of FMM. First, a new hyperbox expansion rule to eliminate the overlapping problem during the hyperbox expansion process is suggested. Second, the existing hyperbox overlap test rule is extended to discover other possible overlapping cases. Third, a new hyperbox contraction rule to resolve possible overlapping cases is provided. Efficacy of EFMM is evaluated using benchmark data sets and a real medical diagnosis task. The results are better than those from various FMM-based models, support vector machine-based, Bayesian-based, decision tree-based, fuzzy-based, and neural-based classifiers. The empirical findings show that the newly introduced rules are able to realize EFMM as a useful model for undertaking pattern classification problems.

  7. Measurement model choice influenced randomized controlled trial results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorter, Rosalie; Fox, Jean-Paul; Apeldoorn, Adri; Twisk, Jos

    2016-11-01

    In randomized controlled trials (RCTs), outcome variables are often patient-reported outcomes measured with questionnaires. Ideally, all available item information is used for score construction, which requires an item response theory (IRT) measurement model. However, in practice, the classical test theory measurement model (sum scores) is mostly used, and differences between response patterns leading to the same sum score are ignored. The enhanced differentiation between scores with IRT enables more precise estimation of individual trajectories over time and group effects. The objective of this study was to show the advantages of using IRT scores instead of sum scores when analyzing RCTs. Two studies are presented, a real-life RCT, and a simulation study. Both IRT and sum scores are used to measure the construct and are subsequently used as outcomes for effect calculation. The bias in RCT results is conditional on the measurement model that was used to construct the scores. A bias in estimated trend of around one standard deviation was found when sum scores were used, where IRT showed negligible bias. Accurate statistical inferences are made from an RCT study when using IRT to estimate construct measurements. The use of sum scores leads to incorrect RCT results. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A Protocol to Enhance INS1E and MIN6 Functionality—The Use of Theophylline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milou Groot Nibbelink

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In vitro research in the field of type I diabetes is frequently limited by the availability of a functional model for islets of Langerhans. This method shows that by the addition of theophylline to the glucose buffers, mouse insulinoma MIN6 and rat insulinoma INS1E pseudo-islets can serve as a model for islets of Langerhans for in vitro research. The effect of theophylline is dose- and cell line-dependent, resulting in a minimal stimulation index of five followed by a rapid return to baseline insulin secretion by reducing glucose concentrations after a first high glucose stimulation. This protocol solves issues concerning in vitro research for type I diabetes as donors and the availability of primary islets of Langerhans are limited. To avoid the limitations of using human donor material, cell lines represent a valid alternative. Many different β cell lines have been reported, but the lack of reproducible responsiveness to glucose stimulation remains a challenge.

  9. The 2-min walk test is sufficient for evaluating walking abilities in sporadic inclusion body myositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfano, L N; Lowes, L P; Dvorchik, I; Yin, H; Maus, E G; Flanigan, K M; Mendell, J R

    2014-03-01

    Sporadic inclusion body myositis causes progressive functional loss due to declining muscle strength. Although the underlying cause is unknown, clinical trials are underway to improve strength and function. Selection of appropriate outcome measures is critical for the success of these trials. The 6-min walk test has been the de facto standard for assessing function in neuromuscular disease; however, the optimal walking test has not been determined in this disease. In this study, 67 individuals with sporadic inclusion body myositis completed a battery of quantitative strength and functional tests including timed walking tests, patient-reported outcomes, and other tasks. The 2-min and 6-min walk tests are highly correlated to each other (r=0.97, pwalk test, but 7% of subjects were unable to walk the full 6-min of the 6-min walk test due to fatigue. The 2-min walk test demonstrates similar correlation to all outcomes compared to the 6-min walk test, is less fatiguing and better tolerated. Results suggest that the 2-min walk test is a better alternative to tests of longer duration. Further research is needed to determine longitudinal changes on this outcome. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. An Optimal Free Energy Dissipation Strategy of the MinCDE Oscillator in Regulating Symmetric Bacterial Cell Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Liping; Lan, Ganhui

    2015-01-01

    Sustained molecular oscillations are ubiquitous in biology. The obtained oscillatory patterns provide vital functions as timekeepers, pacemakers and spacemarkers. Models based on control theory have been introduced to explain how specific oscillatory behaviors stem from protein interaction feedbacks, whereas the energy dissipation through the oscillating processes and its role in the regulatory function remain unexplored. Here we developed a general framework to assess an oscillator’s regulation performance at different dissipation levels. Using the Escherichia coli MinCDE oscillator as a model system, we showed that a sufficient amount of energy dissipation is needed to switch on the oscillation, which is tightly coupled to the system’s regulatory performance. Once the dissipation level is beyond this threshold, unlike stationary regulators’ monotonic performance-to-cost relation, excess dissipation at certain steps in the oscillating process damages the oscillator’s regulatory performance. We further discovered that the chemical free energy from ATP hydrolysis has to be strategically assigned to the MinE-aided MinD release and the MinD immobilization steps for optimal performance, and a higher energy budget improves the robustness of the oscillator. These results unfold a novel mode by which living systems trade energy for regulatory function. PMID:26317492

  11. Loss of spent fuel pool cooling PRA: Model and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siu, N.; Khericha, S.; Conroy, S.; Beck, S.; Blackman, H.

    1996-09-01

    This letter report documents models for quantifying the likelihood of loss of spent fuel pool cooling; models for identifying post-boiling scenarios that lead to core damage; qualitative and quantitative results generated for a selected plant that account for plant design and operational practices; a comparison of these results and those generated from earlier studies; and a review of available data on spent fuel pool accidents. The results of this study show that for a representative two-unit boiling water reactor, the annual probability of spent fuel pool boiling is 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} and the annual probability of flooding associated with loss of spent fuel pool cooling scenarios is 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}3}. Qualitative arguments are provided to show that the likelihood of core damage due to spent fuel pool boiling accidents is low for most US commercial nuclear power plants. It is also shown that, depending on the design characteristics of a given plant, the likelihood of either: (a) core damage due to spent fuel pool-associated flooding, or (b) spent fuel damage due to pool dryout, may not be negligible.

  12. SR-Site groundwater flow modelling methodology, setup and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selroos, Jan-Olof (Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Co., Stockholm (Sweden)); Follin, Sven (SF GeoLogic AB, Taeby (Sweden))

    2010-12-15

    As a part of the license application for a final repository for spent nuclear fuel at Forsmark, the Swedish Nuclear Fuel and Waste Management Company (SKB) has undertaken three groundwater flow modelling studies. These are performed within the SR-Site project and represent time periods with different climate conditions. The simulations carried out contribute to the overall evaluation of the repository design and long-term radiological safety. Three time periods are addressed; the Excavation and operational phases, the Initial period of temperate climate after closure, and the Remaining part of the reference glacial cycle. The present report is a synthesis of the background reports describing the modelling methodology, setup, and results. It is the primary reference for the conclusions drawn in a SR-Site specific context concerning groundwater flow during the three climate periods. These conclusions are not necessarily provided explicitly in the background reports, but are based on the results provided in these reports. The main results and comparisons presented in the present report are summarised in the SR-Site Main report.

  13. Loss of spent fuel pool cooling PRA: Model and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siu, N.; Khericha, S.; Conroy, S.; Beck, S.; Blackman, H.

    1996-09-01

    This letter report documents models for quantifying the likelihood of loss of spent fuel pool cooling; models for identifying post-boiling scenarios that lead to core damage; qualitative and quantitative results generated for a selected plant that account for plant design and operational practices; a comparison of these results and those generated from earlier studies; and a review of available data on spent fuel pool accidents. The results of this study show that for a representative two-unit boiling water reactor, the annual probability of spent fuel pool boiling is 5 x 10 -5 and the annual probability of flooding associated with loss of spent fuel pool cooling scenarios is 1 x 10 -3 . Qualitative arguments are provided to show that the likelihood of core damage due to spent fuel pool boiling accidents is low for most US commercial nuclear power plants. It is also shown that, depending on the design characteristics of a given plant, the likelihood of either: (a) core damage due to spent fuel pool-associated flooding, or (b) spent fuel damage due to pool dryout, may not be negligible

  14. Results of the benchmark for blade structural models, part A

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lekou, D.J.; Chortis, D.; Belen Fariñas, A.

    2013-01-01

    Task 2.2 of the InnWind.Eu project. The benchmark is based on the reference wind turbine and the reference blade provided by DTU [1]. "Structural Concept developers/modelers" of WP2 were provided with the necessary input for a comparison numerical simulation run, upon definition of the reference blade......A benchmark on structural design methods for blades was performed within the InnWind.Eu project under WP2 “Lightweight Rotor” Task 2.2 “Lightweight structural design”. The present document is describes the results of the comparison simulation runs that were performed by the partners involved within...

  15. Preliminary results of steel containment vessel model test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsumoto, T.; Komine, K.; Arai, S.

    1997-01-01

    A high pressure test of a mixed-scaled model (1:10 in geometry and 1:4 in shell thickness) of a steel containment vessel (SCV), representing an improved boiling water reactor (BWR) Mark II containment, was conducted on December 11-12, 1996 at Sandia National Laboratories. This paper describes the preliminary results of the high pressure test. In addition, the preliminary post-test measurement data and the preliminary comparison of test data with pretest analysis predictions are also presented

  16. %MinMax: A versatile tool for calculating and comparing synonymous codon usage and its impact on protein folding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Anabel; Wright, Gabriel; Emrich, Scott; Clark, Patricia L

    2018-01-01

    Most amino acids can be encoded by more than one synonymous codon, but these are rarely used with equal frequency. In many coding sequences the usage patterns of rare versus common synonymous codons is nonrandom and under selection. Moreover, synonymous substitutions that alter these patterns can have a substantial impact on the folding efficiency of the encoded protein. This has ignited broad interest in exploring synonymous codon usage patterns. For many protein chemists, biophysicists and structural biologists, the primary motivation for codon analysis is identifying and preserving usage patterns most likely to impact high-yield production of functional proteins. Here we describe the core functions and new features of %MinMax, a codon usage calculator freely available as a web-based portal and downloadable script (http://www.codons.org). %MinMax evaluates the relative usage frequencies of the synonymous codons used to encode a protein sequence of interest and compares these results to a rigorous null model. Crucially, for analyzing codon usage in common host organisms %MinMax requires only the coding sequence as input; with a user-input codon frequency table, %MinMax can be used to evaluate synonymous codon usage patterns for any coding sequence from any fully sequenced genome. %MinMax makes no assumptions regarding the impact of transfer ribonucleic acid concentrations or other molecular-level interactions on translation rates, yet its output is sufficient to predict the effects of synonymous codon substitutions on cotranslational folding mechanisms. A simple calculation included within %MinMax can be used to harmonize codon usage frequencies for heterologous gene expression. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  17. Max-Min Fairness in WMNs with Interference Cancelation Using Overheard Transmissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateusz Żotkiewicz

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We show an impact of using interference cancelation mechanisms for signals that have been overheard in the past on performance of fair wireless mesh networks. In our research we show that even in those very restricted conditions and max-min cost function, the idea of interference cancelation can significantly increase the capacity of such networks. In order to approximate possible advantages of using interference cancelation in the considered conditions, we propose a novel MIP model that allows for calculating perfect scheduling and maximal throughput in a network. We compare the results with cases when the interference cancelation mechanisms are disabled. Our results show that using interference cancelation mechanisms for signals that have been overheard in the past increases a network throughput by 40% on average in approximately 20% of test cases.

  18. Impact Flash Physics: Modeling and Comparisons With Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainey, E.; Stickle, A. M.; Ernst, C. M.; Schultz, P. H.; Mehta, N. L.; Brown, R. C.; Swaminathan, P. K.; Michaelis, C. H.; Erlandson, R. E.

    2015-12-01

    horizontal. High-speed radiometer measurements were made of the time-dependent impact flash at wavelengths of 350-1100 nm. We will present comparisons between these measurements and the output of APL's model. The results of this validation allow us to determine basic relationships between observed optical signatures and impact conditions.

  19. Asymptotic Identity in Min-Plus Algebra: A Report on CPNS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Network calculus is a theory initiated primarily in computer communication networks, especially in the aspect of real-time communications, where min-plus algebra plays a role. Cyber-physical networking systems (CPNSs are recently developing fast and models in data flows as well as systems in CPNS are, accordingly, greatly desired. Though min-plus algebra may be a promising tool to linearize any node in CPNS as can be seen from its applications to the Internet computing, there are tough problems remaining unsolved in this regard. The identity in min-plus algebra is one problem we shall address. We shall point out the confusions about the conventional identity in the min-plus algebra and present an analytical expression of the asymptotic identity that may not cause confusions.

  20. Position-sensitive transition edge sensor modeling and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hammock, Christina E-mail: chammock@milkyway.gsfc.nasa.gov; Figueroa-Feliciano, Enectali; Apodaca, Emmanuel; Bandler, Simon; Boyce, Kevin; Chervenak, Jay; Finkbeiner, Fred; Kelley, Richard; Lindeman, Mark; Porter, Scott; Saab, Tarek; Stahle, Caroline

    2004-03-11

    We report the latest design and experimental results for a Position-Sensitive Transition-Edge Sensor (PoST). The PoST is motivated by the desire to achieve a larger field-of-view without increasing the number of readout channels. A PoST consists of a one-dimensional array of X-ray absorbers connected on each end to a Transition Edge Sensor (TES). Position differentiation is achieved through a comparison of pulses between the two TESs and X-ray energy is inferred from a sum of the two signals. Optimizing such a device involves studying the available parameter space which includes device properties such as heat capacity and thermal conductivity as well as TES read-out circuitry parameters. We present results for different regimes of operation and the effects on energy resolution, throughput, and position differentiation. Results and implications from a non-linear model developed to study the saturation effects unique to PoSTs are also presented.

  1. Comparison of blade-strike modeling results with empirical data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ploskey, Gene R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Carlson, Thomas J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2004-03-01

    This study is the initial stage of further investigation into the dynamics of injury to fish during passage through a turbine runner. As part of the study, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) estimated the probability of blade strike, and associated injury, as a function of fish length and turbine operating geometry at two adjacent turbines in Powerhouse 1 of Bonneville Dam. Units 5 and 6 had identical intakes, stay vanes, wicket gates, and draft tubes, but Unit 6 had a new runner and curved discharge ring to minimize gaps between the runner hub and blades and between the blade tips and discharge ring. We used a mathematical model to predict blade strike associated with two Kaplan turbines and compared results with empirical data from biological tests conducted in 1999 and 2000. Blade-strike models take into consideration the geometry of the turbine blades and discharges as well as fish length, orientation, and distribution along the runner. The first phase of this study included a sensitivity analysis to consider the effects of difference in geometry and operations between families of turbines on the strike probability response surface. The analysis revealed that the orientation of fish relative to the leading edge of a runner blade and the location that fish pass along the blade between the hub and blade tip are critical uncertainties in blade-strike models. Over a range of discharges, the average prediction of injury from blade strike was two to five times higher than average empirical estimates of visible injury from shear and mechanical devices. Empirical estimates of mortality may be better metrics for comparison to predicted injury rates than other injury measures for fish passing at mid-blade and blade-tip locations.

  2. Min-max event-triggered computation tree logic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    language called Min-max Event-Triggered Computational Tree Logic for express- ing such extremal queries on the timings of events and show that such queries can be evaluated in time polynomial in the size of the system times the length of the formula. Keywords. Computational tree logic; timing verification; temporal ...

  3. Linked Min.B configuration inside high shear magnetic surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohasa, K.; Ikuta, K.

    1976-03-01

    Arrangement of the l = m baseball coils to form the toroidally linked Min.B configuration with large rotational transform is studied analytically and numerically. By an optimization the closed magnetic isobars are obtained inside the last closed magnetic surface having practical volume and high shear if l = 3 baseball coils are arranged. (auth.)

  4. Results of EPRI/ANL DCH investigations and model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spencer, B.W.; Sienicki, J.J.; Sehgal, B.R.; Merilo, M.

    1988-01-01

    The results of a series of five experiments are described addressing the severity and mitigation of direct containment heating. The tests were performed in a 1:30 linear scale mockup of the Zion PWR containment system using a reactor-material corium melt consisting of 60% UO 2 , 16% ZrO 2 , 24% SSt at nominally 2800C initial temperature. A ''worst-case'' type test involving unimpeded corium dispersal through an air atmosphere in a closed vessel produced an atmosphere heatup of 323K, equivalent to a DCH efficiency of 62%. With the addition of structural features which impeded the corium dispersal, representative of dispersal pathway features at Zion, the DCH efficiency was reduced to 1--5%. (This important result is scale dependent and requires larger scale tests such as the SURTSEY program at SNL plus mechanistic modeling for application to the reactor system.) With the addition of water in the cavity region, there was no measurable heatup of the atmosphere. This was attributable to the vigorous codispersal of water with corium which prevented the temperature of the atmosphere from significantly exceeding T/sub sat/. In this case the DCH load was replaced by the more benign ''steam spike'' from corium quench. Significant oxidation of the corium constituents occurred in the tests, adding chemical energy to the system and producing hydrogen. Overall, the results suggest that with consideration of realistic, plant specific, mitigating features, DCH may be no worse and possibly far less severe than the previously examined steam spike. Implications for accident management are addressed. 17 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs

  5. Effets à long terme des fumures minérales et organo-minérales sur ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. La disponibilité et la cinétique du phosphore (P) dans un Lixisol, après 40 années de mise en culture, ont été étudiées par la méthode de la dilution isotopique. Quatre traitements ont été utilisés : fumures minérales faible (fm) et forte (FM), organo-minérale faible (fmo) et le témoin (T1). Les fumures ont eu des effets ...

  6. A Duality Result for the Generalized Erlang Risk Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lanpeng Ji

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we consider the generalized Erlang risk model and its dual model. By using a conditional measure-preserving correspondence between the two models, we derive an identity for two interesting conditional probabilities. Applications to the discounted joint density of the surplus prior to ruin and the deficit at ruin are also discussed.

  7. X radiation up-regulates the occurrence and the multiplicity of invasive carcinomas in the intestinal tract of Apc(min/+) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Toshiyuki; Yamazumi, Kazuyuki; Uemura, Takashi; Yoshizaki, Ayumi; Yakata, Yuichi; Matsuu-Matsuyama, Mutsumi; Shichijo, Kazuko; Sekine, Ichiro

    2007-10-01

    X rays are well known to cause genetic damage and to induce many types of carcinomas in humans. The Apc(min/+) mouse, an animal model for human familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), contains a truncating mutation in the APC gene and spontaneously develops intestinal adenomas. To elucidate the role of X rays in the development of intestinal tumors, we examined the promotion of carcinogenesis in X-irradiated Apc(min/+) mice. Forty out of 77 (52%) X-irradiated Apc(min/+) mice developed adenocarcinomas that invaded the proprial muscle layer of the small intestine; 24 of 44 (55%) were in males, and 16 of 33 (49%) were in females. In contrast, invasive carcinomas were detected in the small intestines of only 13 of 64 (20%) nonirradiated Apc(min/+) mice; nine of 32 (28%) were in males and four of 32 (13%) were in females. These differences between X-irradiated and nonirradiated Apc(min/+) mice in the occurrence of invasive intestinal carcinomas were statistically significant (P polyps in the large intestine with or without X irradiation; there was no difference in the number of polyps between the two groups. Also, invasive carcinomas were not detected in the large intestine with or without irradiation. The occurrence of mammary tumors, which was observed in Apc(min/+) mice, was found to be increased in irradiated Apc(min/+) mice (P polyps in the small and large intestines with or without X irradiation. X-irradiated Apc(min/+) mice had highly invasive carcinomas in the small intestine with multiplicities associated with invasiveness. Our results suggest that X radiation may promote the invasive activity of intestinal tumors in Apc(min/+) mice.

  8. Waste glass corrosion modeling: Comparison with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourcier, W.L.

    1994-01-01

    Models for borosilicate glass dissolution must account for the processes of (1) kinetically-controlled network dissolution, (2) precipitation of secondary phases, (3) ion exchange, (4) rate-limiting diffusive transport of silica through a hydrous surface reaction layer, and (5) specific glass surface interactions with dissolved cations and anions. Current long-term corrosion models for borosilicate glass employ a rate equation consistent with transition state theory embodied in a geochemical reaction-path modeling program that calculates aqueous phase speciation and mineral precipitation/dissolution. These models are currently under development. Future experimental and modeling work to better quantify the rate-controlling processes and validate these models are necessary before the models can be used in repository performance assessment calculations

  9. Argonne Fuel Cycle Facility ventilation system -- modeling and results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohr, D.; Feldman, E.E.; Danielson, W.F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes an integrated study of the Argonne-West Fuel Cycle Facility (FCF) interconnected ventilation systems during various operations. Analyses and test results include first a nominal condition reflecting balanced pressures and flows followed by several infrequent and off-normal scenarios. This effort is the first study of the FCF ventilation systems as an integrated network wherein the hydraulic effects of all major air systems have been analyzed and tested. The FCF building consists of many interconnected regions in which nuclear fuel is handled, transported and reprocessed. The ventilation systems comprise a large number of ducts, fans, dampers, and filters which together must provide clean, properly conditioned air to the worker occupied spaces of the facility while preventing the spread of airborne radioactive materials to clean am-as or the atmosphere. This objective is achieved by keeping the FCF building at a partial vacuum in which the contaminated areas are kept at lower pressures than the other worker occupied spaces. The ventilation systems of FCF and the EBR-II reactor are analyzed as an integrated totality, as demonstrated. We then developed the network model shown in Fig. 2 for the TORAC code. The scope of this study was to assess the measured results from the acceptance/flow balancing testing and to predict the effects of power failures, hatch and door openings, single-failure faulted conditions, EBR-II isolation, and other infrequent operations. The studies show that the FCF ventilation systems am very controllable and remain stable following off-normal events. In addition, the FCF ventilation system complex is essentially immune to reverse flows and spread of contamination to clean areas during normal and off-normal operation

  10. ExEP yield modeling tool and validation test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Rhonda; Turmon, Michael; Delacroix, Christian; Savransky, Dmitry; Garrett, Daniel; Lowrance, Patrick; Liu, Xiang Cate; Nunez, Paul

    2017-09-01

    EXOSIMS is an open-source simulation tool for parametric modeling of the detection yield and characterization of exoplanets. EXOSIMS has been adopted by the Exoplanet Exploration Programs Standards Definition and Evaluation Team (ExSDET) as a common mechanism for comparison of exoplanet mission concept studies. To ensure trustworthiness of the tool, we developed a validation test plan that leverages the Python-language unit-test framework, utilizes integration tests for selected module interactions, and performs end-to-end crossvalidation with other yield tools. This paper presents the test methods and results, with the physics-based tests such as photometry and integration time calculation treated in detail and the functional tests treated summarily. The test case utilized a 4m unobscured telescope with an idealized coronagraph and an exoplanet population from the IPAC radial velocity (RV) exoplanet catalog. The known RV planets were set at quadrature to allow deterministic validation of the calculation of physical parameters, such as working angle, photon counts and integration time. The observing keepout region was tested by generating plots and movies of the targets and the keepout zone over a year. Although the keepout integration test required the interpretation of a user, the test revealed problems in the L2 halo orbit and the parameterization of keepout applied to some solar system bodies, which the development team was able to address. The validation testing of EXOSIMS was performed iteratively with the developers of EXOSIMS and resulted in a more robust, stable, and trustworthy tool that the exoplanet community can use to simulate exoplanet direct-detection missions from probe class, to WFIRST, up to large mission concepts such as HabEx and LUVOIR.

  11. Maxi-Min Language Use A Critical Remark on a Concept by Philippe van Parijs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruse Jan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Philippe van Parijs explains in Linguistic Justice for Europe and for the World the concept of maxi-min language use as a process of language choice. He suggests that the language chosen as a common language should maximize the minimal competence of a community. Within a multilingual group of people, the chosen language is the language known best by a participant who knows it least. For obvious reasons, only English would qualify for having that status. This article argues that maxi-min is rather a normative concept, not only because the process itself remains empirically unfounded. Moreover, language choice is the result of complex social and psychological structures. As a descriptive process, the maxi-min choice happens in the reality fairly seldom, whereas the max-min use of languages seen as a normative process could be a very effective tool to measure linguistic justice.

  12. Final model independent result of DAMA/LIBRA-phase1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabei, R.; D' Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Belli, P. [INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Cappella, F.; D' Angelo, A.; Prosperi, D. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipartimento di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, sez. Roma, Rome (Italy); Caracciolo, V.; Castellano, S.; Cerulli, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Dai, C.J.; He, H.L.; Kuang, H.H.; Ma, X.H.; Sheng, X.D.; Wang, R.G. [Chinese Academy, IHEP, Beijing (China); Incicchitti, A. [INFN, sez. Roma, Rome (Italy); Montecchia, F. [INFN, sez. Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipartimento di Ingegneria Civile e Ingegneria Informatica, Rome (Italy); Ye, Z.P. [Chinese Academy, IHEP, Beijing (China); University of Jing Gangshan, Jiangxi (China)

    2013-12-15

    The results obtained with the total exposure of 1.04 ton x yr collected by DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the I.N.F.N. during 7 annual cycles (i.e. adding a further 0.17 ton x yr exposure) are presented. The DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 data give evidence for the presence of Dark Matter (DM) particles in the galactic halo, on the basis of the exploited model independent DM annual modulation signature by using highly radio-pure NaI(Tl) target, at 7.5{sigma} C.L. Including also the first generation DAMA/NaI experiment (cumulative exposure 1.33 ton x yr, corresponding to 14 annual cycles), the C.L. is 9.3{sigma} and the modulation amplitude of the single-hit events in the (2-6) keV energy interval is: (0.0112{+-}0.0012) cpd/kg/keV; the measured phase is (144{+-}7) days and the measured period is (0.998{+-}0.002) yr, values well in agreement with those expected for DM particles. No systematic or side reaction able to mimic the exploited DM signature has been found or suggested by anyone over more than a decade. (orig.)

  13. Innovation ecosystem model for commercialization of research results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlăduţ Gabriel

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Innovation means Creativity and Added value recognise by the market. The first step in creating a sustainable commercialization of research results, Technological Transfer – TT mechanism, on one hand is to define the “technology” which will be transferred and on other hand to define the context in which the TT mechanism work, the ecosystem. The focus must be set on technology as an entity, not as a science or a study of the practical industrial arts and certainly not any specific applied science. The transfer object, the technology, must rely on a subjectively determined but specifiable set of processes and products. Focusing on the product is not sufficient to the transfer and diffusion of technology. It is not merely the product that is transferred but also knowledge of its use and application. The innovation ecosystem model brings together new companies, experienced business leaders, researchers, government officials, established technology companies, and investors. This environment provides those new companies with a wealth of technical expertise, business experience, and access to capital that supports innovation in the early stages of growth.

  14. Analysis of only 0-1 min clip or 1-4 min Clip for focal liver lesions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Science and Technology, 1095 Jiefang Road, Wuhan 430030, PR China ... arterial phase starts from 10-20 s after the injection of MBs, lasts for ..... malignant lesions because of rapidly filling in the artery phase. However, it did not affect the diagnosis as benign nodules by the entire clips and 1-4min clips in our investigation.

  15. Blade element momentum modeling of inflow with shear in comparison with advanced model results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aagaard Madsen, Helge; Riziotis, V.; Zahle, Frederik

    2012-01-01

    shear is present in the inflow. This gives guidance to how the BEM modeling of shear should be implemented. Another result from the advanced vortex model computations is a clear indication of influence of the ground, and the general tendency is a speed up effect of the flow through the rotor giving...

  16. Regionalization of climate model results for the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauker, F.

    1999-07-01

    A dynamical downscaling is presented that allows an estimation of potential effects of climate change on the North Sea. Therefore, the ocean general circulation model OPYC is adapted for application on a shelf by adding a lateral boundary formulation and a tide model. In this set-up the model is forced, first, with data from the ECMWF reanalysis for model validation and the study of the natural variability, and, second, with data from climate change experiments to estimate the effects of climate change on the North Sea. (orig.)

  17. Oxford Nanopore MinION Sequencing and Genome Assembly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hengyun Lu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The revolution of genome sequencing is continuing after the successful second-generation sequencing (SGS technology. The third-generation sequencing (TGS technology, led by Pacific Biosciences (PacBio, is progressing rapidly, moving from a technology once only capable of providing data for small genome analysis, or for performing targeted screening, to one that promises high quality de novo assembly and structural variation detection for human-sized genomes. In 2014, the MinION, the first commercial sequencer using nanopore technology, was released by Oxford Nanopore Technologies (ONT. MinION identifies DNA bases by measuring the changes in electrical conductivity generated as DNA strands pass through a biological pore. Its portability, affordability, and speed in data production makes it suitable for real-time applications, the release of the long read sequencer MinION has thus generated much excitement and interest in the genomics community. While de novo genome assemblies can be cheaply produced from SGS data, assembly continuity is often relatively poor, due to the limited ability of short reads to handle long repeats. Assembly quality can be greatly improved by using TGS long reads, since repetitive regions can be easily expanded into using longer sequencing lengths, despite having higher error rates at the base level. The potential of nanopore sequencing has been demonstrated by various studies in genome surveillance at locations where rapid and reliable sequencing is needed, but where resources are limited.

  18. Effect of geometry of rice kernels on drying modeling results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geometry of rice grain is commonly represented by sphere, spheroid or ellipsoid shapes in the drying models. Models using simpler shapes are easy to solve mathematically, however, deviation from the true grain shape might lead to large errors in predictions of drying characteristics such as, moistur...

  19. Spinal cord stimulation: modeling results and clinical data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Struijk, Johannes J.; Struijk, J.J.; Holsheimer, J.; Barolat, Giancarlo; He, Jiping

    1992-01-01

    The potential distribution in volume couductor models of the spinal cord at cervical, midthoracic and lowthoracic levels, due to epidural stimulation, was calculated. Treshold stimuli of modeled myelhated dorsal column and dorsal root fibers were calculated and were compared with perception

  20. Quark cluster model of nuclei and lepton scattering results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vary, J.P.; Iowa State Univ. of Science and Technology, Ames

    1984-01-01

    A review of the quark cluster model (QCM) of nuclei is presented along with applications to deep inelastic lepton scattering and elastic lepton scattering experiments. In addition a sample comparison is made with high momentum transfer (p, π) data. The QCM prediction for the ratio of nuclear structure functions in the x > 1 domain is discussed as a critical test of the model

  1. How to: understanding SWAT model uncertainty relative to measured results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watershed models are being relied upon to contribute to most policy-making decisions of watershed management, and the demand for an accurate accounting of complete model uncertainty is rising. Generalized likelihood uncertainty estimation (GLUE) is a widely used method for quantifying uncertainty i...

  2. Identification of five novel modifier loci of ApcMin harbored in the BXH14 recombinant inbred strain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siracusa, Linda D.

    2012-01-01

    Every year thousands of people in the USA are diagnosed with small intestine and colorectal cancers (CRC). Although environmental factors affect disease etiology, uncovering underlying genetic factors is imperative for risk assessment and developing preventative therapies. Familial adenomatous polyposis is a heritable genetic disorder in which individuals carry germ-line mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene that predisposes them to CRC. The Apc Min mouse model carries a point mutation in the Apc gene and develops polyps along the intestinal tract. Inbred strain background influences polyp phenotypes in Apc Min mice. Several Modifier of Min (Mom) loci that alter tumor phenotypes associated with the Apc Min mutation have been identified to date. We screened BXH recombinant inbred (RI) strains by crossing BXH RI females with C57BL/6J (B6) Apc Min males and quantitating tumor phenotypes in backcross progeny. We found that the BXH14 RI strain harbors five modifier loci that decrease polyp multiplicity. Furthermore, we show that resistance is determined by varying combinations of these modifier loci. Gene interaction network analysis shows that there are multiple networks with proven gene–gene interactions, which contain genes from all five modifier loci. We discuss the implications of this result for studies that define susceptibility loci, namely that multiple networks may be acting concurrently to alter tumor phenotypes. Thus, the significance of this work resides not only with the modifier loci we identified but also with the combinations of loci needed to get maximal protection against polyposis and the impact of this finding on human disease studies. Abbreviations:APCadenomatous polyposis coliGWASgenome-wide association studiesQTLquantitative trait lociSNPsingle-nucleotide polymorphism. PMID:22637734

  3. Identification of five novel modifier loci of Apc(Min) harbored in the BXH14 recombinant inbred strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nnadi, Stephanie C; Watson, Rayneisha; Innocent, Julie; Gonye, Gregory E; Buchberg, Arthur M; Siracusa, Linda D

    2012-08-01

    Every year thousands of people in the USA are diagnosed with small intestine and colorectal cancers (CRC). Although environmental factors affect disease etiology, uncovering underlying genetic factors is imperative for risk assessment and developing preventative therapies. Familial adenomatous polyposis is a heritable genetic disorder in which individuals carry germ-line mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene that predisposes them to CRC. The Apc ( Min ) mouse model carries a point mutation in the Apc gene and develops polyps along the intestinal tract. Inbred strain background influences polyp phenotypes in Apc ( Min ) mice. Several Modifier of Min (Mom) loci that alter tumor phenotypes associated with the Apc ( Min ) mutation have been identified to date. We screened BXH recombinant inbred (RI) strains by crossing BXH RI females with C57BL/6J (B6) Apc ( Min ) males and quantitating tumor phenotypes in backcross progeny. We found that the BXH14 RI strain harbors five modifier loci that decrease polyp multiplicity. Furthermore, we show that resistance is determined by varying combinations of these modifier loci. Gene interaction network analysis shows that there are multiple networks with proven gene-gene interactions, which contain genes from all five modifier loci. We discuss the implications of this result for studies that define susceptibility loci, namely that multiple networks may be acting concurrently to alter tumor phenotypes. Thus, the significance of this work resides not only with the modifier loci we identified but also with the combinations of loci needed to get maximal protection against polyposis and the impact of this finding on human disease studies.

  4. results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salabura Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available HADES experiment at GSI is the only high precision experiment probing nuclear matter in the beam energy range of a few AGeV. Pion, proton and ion beams are used to study rare dielectron and strangeness probes to diagnose properties of strongly interacting matter in this energy regime. Selected results from p + A and A + A collisions are presented and discussed.

  5. Wave-current interactions: model development and preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayet, Clement; Lyard, Florent; Ardhuin, Fabrice

    2013-04-01

    The coastal area concentrates many uses that require integrated management based on diagnostic and predictive tools to understand and anticipate the future of pollution from land or sea, and learn more about natural hazards at sea or activity on the coast. The realistic modelling of coastal hydrodynamics needs to take into account various processes which interact, including tides, surges, and sea state (Wolf [2008]). These processes act at different spatial scales. Unstructured-grid models have shown the ability to satisfy these needs, given that a good mesh resolution criterion is used. We worked on adding a sea state forcing in a hydrodynamic circulation model. The sea state model is the unstructured version of WAVEWATCH III c (Tolman [2008]) (which version is developed at IFREMER, Brest (Ardhuin et al. [2010]) ), and the hydrodynamic model is the 2D barotropic module of the unstructured-grid finite element model T-UGOm (Le Bars et al. [2010]). We chose to use the radiation stress approach (Longuet-Higgins and Stewart [1964]) to represent the effect of surface waves (wind waves and swell) in the barotropic model, as previously done by Mastenbroek et al. [1993]and others. We present here some validation of the model against academic cases : a 2D plane beach (Haas and Warner [2009]) and a simple bathymetric step with analytic solution for waves (Ardhuin et al. [2008]). In a second part we present realistic application in the Ushant Sea during extreme event. References Ardhuin, F., N. Rascle, and K. Belibassakis, Explicit wave-averaged primitive equations using a generalized Lagrangian mean, Ocean Modelling, 20 (1), 35-60, doi:10.1016/j.ocemod.2007.07.001, 2008. Ardhuin, F., et al., Semiempirical Dissipation Source Functions for Ocean Waves. Part I: Definition, Calibration, and Validation, J. Phys. Oceanogr., 40 (9), 1917-1941, doi:10.1175/2010JPO4324.1, 2010. Haas, K. A., and J. C. Warner, Comparing a quasi-3D to a full 3D nearshore circulation model: SHORECIRC and

  6. New analytic results for speciation times in neutral models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gernhard, Tanja

    2008-05-01

    In this paper, we investigate the standard Yule model, and a recently studied model of speciation and extinction, the "critical branching process." We develop an analytic way-as opposed to the common simulation approach-for calculating the speciation times in a reconstructed phylogenetic tree. Simple expressions for the density and the moments of the speciation times are obtained. Methods for dating a speciation event become valuable, if for the reconstructed phylogenetic trees, no time scale is available. A missing time scale could be due to supertree methods, morphological data, or molecular data which violates the molecular clock. Our analytic approach is, in particular, useful for the model with extinction, since simulations of birth-death processes which are conditioned on obtaining n extant species today are quite delicate. Further, simulations are very time consuming for big n under both models.

  7. Box photosynthesis modeling results for WRF/CMAQ LSM

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Box Photosynthesis model simulations for latent heat and ozone at 6 different FLUXNET sites. This dataset is associated with the following publication: Ran, L., J....

  8. New Results in Optical Modelling of Quantum Well Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvian Fara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This project brought further advancements to the quantum well solar cell concept proposed by Keith Barnham. In this paper, the optical modelling of MQW solar cells was analyzed and we focussed on the following topics: (i simulation of the refraction index and the reflectance, (ii simulation of the absorption coefficient, (iii simulation of the quantum efficiency for the absorption process, (iv discussion and modelling of the quantum confinement effect, and (v evaluation of datasheet parameters of the MQW cell.

  9. Some Econometric Results for the Blanchard-Watson Bubble Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Soren; Lange, Theis

    The purpose of the present paper is to analyse a simple bubble model suggested by Blanchard and Watson. The model is defined by y(t) =s(t)¿y(t-1)+e(t), t=1,…,n, where s(t) is an i.i.d. binary variable with p=P(s(t)=1), independent of e(t) i.i.d. with mean zero and finite variance. We take ¿>1 so ...

  10. Regression of intestinal adenomas by vaccination with heat shock protein 105-pulsed bone marrow-derived dendritic cells in Apc(Min/+) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokomine, Kazunori; Nakatsura, Tetsuya; Senju, Satoru; Nakagata, Naomi; Minohara, Motozumi; Kira, Jun-Ichi; Motomura, Yutaka; Kubo, Tatsuko; Sasaki, Yutaka; Nishimura, Yasuharu

    2007-12-01

    Heat shock protein (HSP) 105 is overexpressed in various cancers, but is expressed at low levels in many normal tissues, except for the testis. A vaccination with HSP105-pulsed bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BM-DC) induced antitumor immunity without causing an autoimmune reaction in a mouse model. Because Apc(Min/+) mice develop multiple adenomas throughout the intestinal tract by 4 months of age, the mice provide a clinically relevant model of human intestinal tumor. In the present study, we investigated the efficacy of the HSP105-pulsed BM-DC vaccine on tumor regression in the Apc(Min/+) mouse. Western blot and immunohistochemical analyses revealed that the tumors of the Apc(Min/+) mice endogenously overexpressed HSP105. Immunization of the Apc(Min/+) mice with a HSP105-pulsed BM-DC vaccine at 6, 8, and 10 weeks of age significantly reduced the number of small-intestinal polyps accompanied by infiltration of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in the tumors. Cell depletion experiments proved that both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells play a critical role in the activation of antitumor immunity induced by these vaccinations. These findings indicate that the HSP105-pulsed BM-DC vaccine can provide potent immunotherapy for tumors that appear spontaneously as a result of the inactivation of a tumor suppressor gene, such as in the Apc(Min/+) mouse model.

  11. Decay of the 16.3 min Decay of the 16.3 min {sup 182}Ta Isomer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejeberg, M. [Inst. of Physics, Univ. of Stockholm, Stockholm (Sweden); Malmskog, S.G. [AB Atomenergi, Nykoeping (Sweden)

    1967-01-15

    Some transitions in the decay of the 16.3 min {sup 182}Ta isomer have been studied with a Ge(Li) detector and a double lens electron coincidence spectrometer. Gamma ray and conversion electron intensities were measured. From a delayed coincidence experiment it was concluded that both of the two lowest excited states in {sup 182}Ta had a half life less than 30 psec.

  12. The animal model determines the results of Aeromonas virulence factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Romero

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The selection of an experimental animal model is of great importance in the study of bacterial virulence factors. Here, a bath infection of zebrafish larvae is proposed as an alternative model to study the virulence factors of A. hydrophila. Intraperitoneal infections in mice and trout were compared with bath infections in zebrafish larvae using specific mutants. The great advantage of this model is that bath immersion mimics the natural route of infection, and injury to the tail also provides a natural portal of entry for the bacteria. The implication of T3SS in the virulence of A. hydrophila was analysed using the AH-1::aopB mutant. This mutant was less virulent than the wild-type strain when inoculated into zebrafish larvae, as described in other vertebrates. However, the zebrafish model exhibited slight differences in mortality kinetics only observed using invertebrate models. Infections using the mutant AH-1∆vapA lacking the gene coding for the surface S-layer suggested that this protein was not totally necessary to the bacteria once it was inside the host, but it contributed to the inflammatory response. Only when healthy zebrafish larvae were infected did the mutant produce less mortality than the wild type. Variations between models were evidenced using the AH-1∆rmlB, which lacks the O-antigen lipopolysaccharide (LPS, and the AH-1∆wahD, which lacks the O-antigen LPS and part of the LPS outer-core. Both mutants showed decreased mortality in all of the animal models, but the differences between them were only observed in injured zebrafish larvae, suggesting that residues from the LPS outer core must be important for virulence. The greatest differences were observed using the AH-1ΔFlaB-J (lacking polar flagella and unable to swim and the AH-1::motX (non-motile but producing flagella. They were as pathogenic as the wild-type strain when injected into mice and trout, but no mortalities were registered in zebrafish larvae. This study

  13. Period 2 Mutation Accelerates ApcMin/+ Tumorigenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Patricia A.; Yang, Xiaoming; Taber, Andrew; Oh, Eun-Young; Ansell, Christine; Ayers, Stacy E.; Al-Assaad, Ziad; Carnevale, Kevin; Berger, Franklin G.; Peña, Maria Marjorette O.; Hrushesky, William J.M.

    2014-01-01

    Colorectal cancer risk is increased in shift workers with presumed circadian disruption. Intestinal epithelial cell proliferation is gated throughout each day by the circadian clock. Period 2 (Per2) is a key circadian clock gene. Per2 mutant (Per2m/m) mice show an increase in lymphomas and deregulated expression of cyclin D and c-Myc genes that are key to proliferation control. We asked whether Per2 clock gene inactivation would accelerate intestinal and colonic tumorigenesis. The effects of PER2 on cell proliferation and β-catenin were studied in colon cancer cell lines by its down-regulation following RNA interference. The effects of Per2 inactivation in vivo on β-catenin and on intestinal and colonic polyp formation were studied in mice with Per2 mutation alone and in combination with an Apc mutation using polyp-prone ApcMin/+ mice. Down-regulation of PER2 in colon cell lines (HCT116 and SW480) increases β-catenin, cyclin D, and cell proliferation. Down-regulation of β-catenin along with Per2 blocks the increase in cyclin D and cell proliferation. Per2m/m mice develop colonic polyps and show an increase in small intestinal mucosa β-catenin and cyclin D protein levels compared with wild-type mice. ApcMin/+Per2m/m mice develop twice the number of small intestinal and colonic polyps, with more severe anemia and splenomegaly, compared with ApcMin/+ mice. These data suggest that Per2 gene product suppresses tumorigenesis in the small intestine and colon by down-regulation of β-catenin and β-catenin target genes, and this circadian core clock gene may represent a novel target for colorectal cancer prevention and control. PMID:19010825

  14. Chain rules for smooth min-and max-entropies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vitanov, Alexande; Dupont-Dupuis, Fréderic; Tomamichel, Marco

    2013-01-01

    The chain rule for the Shannon and von Neumann en- tropy, which relates the total entropy of a system to the entropies of its parts, is of central importance to information theory. Here, we consider the chain rule for the more general smooth min- and max-entropies, used in one-shot in formation...... theory. For these en- tropy measures, the chain rule no longer holds as an equality. How- ever, the standard chain rule for the von Neum ann entropy is re- trieved asymptotically when evaluating the smooth entropies for many identical and independently distributed states....

  15. Results from Development of Model Specifications for Multifamily Energy Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozyna, K.

    2012-08-01

    Specifications, modeled after CSI MasterFormat, provide the trade contractors and builders with requirements and recommendations on specific building materials, components and industry practices that comply with the expectations and intent of the requirements within the various funding programs associated with a project. The goal is to create a greater level of consistency in execution of energy efficiency retrofits measures across the multiple regions a developer may work. IBACOS and Mercy Housing developed sample model specifications based on a common building construction type that Mercy Housing encounters.

  16. Results From Development of Model Specifications for Multifamily Energy Retrofits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brozyna, Kevin [IBACOS, Inc., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2012-08-01

    Specifications, modeled after CSI MasterFormat, provide the trade contractors and builders with requirements and recommendations on specific building materials, components and industry practices that comply with the expectations and intent of the requirements within the various funding programs associated with a project. The goal is to create a greater level of consistency in execution of energy efficiency retrofits measures across the multiple regions a developer may work. IBACOS and Mercy Housing developed sample model specifications based on a common building construction type that Mercy Housing encounters.

  17. Analysis of inelastic neutron scattering results on model compounds ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Tomkinson heterobicyclic molecules could form a reasonable base of model compounds to un- derstand the eigenvectors of one interesting molecular system; the nitrogenous het- erocyclic bases of the nucleotides. Low energy molecular vibrational eigenvectors involve atomic displacements over the molecule as a whole ...

  18. Delta-tilde interpretation of standard linear mixed model results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockhoff, Per Bruun; Amorim, Isabel de Sousa; Kuznetsova, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    data set and compared to actual d-prime calculations based on Thurstonian regression modeling through the ordinal package. For more challenging cases we offer a generic "plug-in" implementation of a version of the method as part of the R-package SensMixed. We discuss and clarify the bias mechanisms...

  19. Some Results On The Modelling Of TSS Manufacturing Lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viorel MÎNZU

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the modelling of a particular class of manufacturing lines, governed by a decentralised control strategy so that they balance themselves. Such lines are known as “bucket brigades” and also as “TSS lines”, after their first implementation, at Toyota, in the 70’s. A first study of their behaviour was based upon modelling as stochastic dynamic systems, which emphasised, in the frame of the so-called “Normative Model”, a sufficient condition for self-balancing, that means for autonomous functioning at a steady production rate (stationary behaviour. Under some particular conditions, a simulation analysis of TSS lines could be made on non-linear block diagrams, showing that the state trajectories are piecewise continuous in between occurrences of certain discrete events, which determine their discontinuity. TSS lines may therefore be modelled as hybrid dynamic systems, more specific, with autonomous switching and autonomous impulses (jumps. A stability analysis of such manufacturing lines is allowed by modelling them as hybrid dynamic systems with discontinuous motions.

  20. Some results for the dynamic (s, S) inventory model *

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.C. Tijms

    1971-01-01

    textabstractSummary The periodic review, single item, stationary (s, S) inventory model is considered. There is a fixed lead time, a linear purchase cost, a fixed set‐up cost, a holding and shortage cost function, a discount factor 0 < α≤ 1 and backlogging of unfilled demand. The solution for the

  1. Recent numerical results on the two dimensional Hubbard model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parola, A.; Sorella, S.; Baroni, S.; Car, R.; Parrinello, M.; Tosatti, E. (SISSA, Trieste (Italy))

    1989-12-01

    A new method for simulating strongly correlated fermionic systems, has been applied to the study of the ground state properties of the 2D Hubbard model at various fillings. Comparison has been made with exact diagonalizations in the 4 x 4 lattices where very good agreement has been verified in all the correlation functions which have been studied: charge, magnetization and momentum distribution. (orig.).

  2. Analytical results for the Sznajd model of opinion formation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Slanina, František; Lavička, H.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 35, - (2003), s. 279-288 ISSN 1434-6028 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/1091 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z1010914 Keywords : agent models * sociophysics Subject RIV: BE - Theoretical Physics Impact factor: 1.457, year: 2003

  3. Regionalization of climate model results for the North Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kauker, F. [Alfred-Wegener-Institut fuer Polar- und Meeresforschung, Bremerhaven (Germany); Storch, H. von [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrophysik

    2000-07-01

    A dynamical downscaling for the North Sea is presented. The numerical model used for the study is the coupled ice-ocean model OPYC. In a hindcast of the years 1979 to 1993 it was forced with atmospheric forcing of the ECMWF reanalysis. The models capability in simulating the observed mean state and variability in the North Sea is demonstrated by the hindcast. Two time scale ranges, from weekly to seasonal and the longer-than-seasonal time scales are investigated. Shorter time scales, for storm surges, are not captured by the model formulation. The main modes of variability of sea level, sea-surface circulation, sea-surface temperature, and sea-surface salinity are described and connections to atmospheric phenomena, like the NAO, are discussed. T106 ''time-slice'' simulations with a ''2 x CO{sub 2}'' horizon are used to estimate the effects of a changing climate on the shelf sea ''North Sea''. The ''2 x CO{sub 2}'' changes in the surface forcing are accompanied by changes in the lateral oceanic boundary conditions taken from a global coupled climate model. For ''2 x CO{sub 2}'' the time mean sea level increases up to 25 cm in the German Bight in the winter, where 15 cm are due to the surface forcing and 10 cm due to thermal expansion. This change is compared to the ''natural'' variability as simulated in the ECMWF integration and found to be not outside the range spanned by it. The variability of sea level on the weekly-to-seasonal time-scales is significantly reduced in the scenario integration. The variability on the longer-than-seasonal time-scales in the control and scenario runs is much smaller then in the ECMWF integration. This is traced back to the use of ''time-slice'' experiments. Discriminating between locally forced changes and changes induced at the lateral oceanic boundaries of the model in the circulation and

  4. Dynamic model of the electrorheological fluid based on measurement results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krivenkov, K; Ulrich, S; Bruns, R

    2013-01-01

    To develop modern applications for vibration decoupling based on electrorheological fluids with suitable control strategies, an appropriate mathematical model of the ERF is necessary. The devices mostly used have annular-shape electrorheological valves. This requires the use of flow channels to measure the static and dynamic properties of the electrorheological fluids in similar flow conditions. Particularly for the identification of the dynamic behavior of the fluids, the influences of the non-electrorheological properties on the overall system must be taken into account. In this contribution three types of parameters with several nonlinear dependencies for the mapping of the static and dynamic properties of the ERF are considered: electro-rheological, hydraulic and electrical. The mathematical model introduced can precisely demonstrate the static and dynamic behavior of the electrorheological fluid and can be used for the future design of real systems for vibration decoupling or other systems with high dynamic requirements.

  5. 1-g model loading tests: methods and results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Feda, Jaroslav

    1999-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 4 (1999), s. 371-381 ISSN 1436-6517. [Int.Conf. on Soil - Structure Interaction in Urban Civ. Engineering. Darmstadt, 08.10.1999-09.10.1999] R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC C7.10 Keywords : shallow foundation * model tests * sandy subsoil * bearing capacity * subsoil failure * volume deformation Subject RIV: JM - Building Engineering

  6. Sharing brain mapping statistical results with the neuroimaging data model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maumet, Camille; Auer, Tibor; Bowring, Alexander; Chen, Gang; Das, Samir; Flandin, Guillaume; Ghosh, Satrajit; Glatard, Tristan; Gorgolewski, Krzysztof J.; Helmer, Karl G.; Jenkinson, Mark; Keator, David B.; Nichols, B. Nolan; Poline, Jean-Baptiste; Reynolds, Richard; Sochat, Vanessa; Turner, Jessica; Nichols, Thomas E.

    2016-01-01

    Only a tiny fraction of the data and metadata produced by an fMRI study is finally conveyed to the community. This lack of transparency not only hinders the reproducibility of neuroimaging results but also impairs future meta-analyses. In this work we introduce NIDM-Results, a format specification providing a machine-readable description of neuroimaging statistical results along with key image data summarising the experiment. NIDM-Results provides a unified representation of mass univariate analyses including a level of detail consistent with available best practices. This standardized representation allows authors to relay methods and results in a platform-independent regularized format that is not tied to a particular neuroimaging software package. Tools are available to export NIDM-Result graphs and associated files from the widely used SPM and FSL software packages, and the NeuroVault repository can import NIDM-Results archives. The specification is publically available at: http://nidm.nidash.org/specs/nidm-results.html. PMID:27922621

  7. DISCRETE DEFORMATION WAVE DYNAMICS IN SHEAR ZONES: PHYSICAL MODELLING RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Bornyakov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of earthquake migration along active fault zones [Richter, 1958; Mogi, 1968] and related theoretical concepts [Elsasser, 1969] have laid the foundation for studying the problem of slow deformation waves in the lithosphere. Despite the fact that this problem has been under study for several decades and discussed in numerous publications, convincing evidence for the existence of deformation waves is still lacking. One of the causes is that comprehensive field studies to register such waves by special tools and equipment, which require sufficient organizational and technical resources, have not been conducted yet.The authors attempted at finding a solution to this problem by physical simulation of a major shear zone in an elastic-viscous-plastic model of the lithosphere. The experiment setup is shown in Figure 1 (A. The model material and boundary conditions were specified in accordance with the similarity criteria (described in detail in [Sherman, 1984; Sherman et al., 1991; Bornyakov et al., 2014]. The montmorillonite clay-and-water paste was placed evenly on two stamps of the installation and subject to deformation as the active stamp (1 moved relative to the passive stamp (2 at a constant speed. The upper model surface was covered with fine sand in order to get high-contrast photos. Photos of an emerging shear zone were taken every second by a Basler acA2000-50gm digital camera. Figure 1 (B shows an optical image of a fragment of the shear zone. The photos were processed by the digital image correlation method described in [Sutton et al., 2009]. This method estimates the distribution of components of displacement vectors and strain tensors on the model surface and their evolution over time [Panteleev et al., 2014, 2015].Strain fields and displacements recorded in the optical images of the model surface were estimated in a rectangular box (220.00×72.17 mm shown by a dot-and-dash line in Fig. 1, A. To ensure a sufficient level of

  8. Science Goals and First Light Analysis from the Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Warren, Harry; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Jones, Andrew; Mason, James; McTiernan, James; Moore, Christopher; Palo, Scott; Solomon, Stanley

    2016-05-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) is a 3U CubeSat with deployment from the ISS planned in Q2 2016. Its goal is to measure the solar soft X-ray (SXR) spectral irradiance, an observational signature of hot plasma in the solar corona. Over the last few decades, there have been very few spectrally resolved observations from ~0.2 to ~4 keV (~0.3-6 nm). This range is sensitive to high-temperature plasma and contains many spectral lines (e.g., Mg, Si, Fe, S, Ar), the abundances of which probe plasma transport and provide valuable constraints on plasma heating mechanisms during both flares and quiescence. This solar SXR emission is primarily absorbed in the E-region of Earth's ionosphere, and the subsequently driven dynamical processes are still poorly understood, in large part because the energy distribution of the incident SXRs is not yet well characterized.MinXSS flies a miniature commercial off-the-shelf soft X-ray (SXR) spectrometer, the Amptek X123-SDD. The silicon drift detector has 0.5 mm fully depleted thickness and a 25 mm^2 physical area, with a ~16 micron Be entrance window; with on-board thermoelectric cooling and pulse pile-up rejection, it is sensitive to solar SXRs from ~0.5 to 30 keV with ~0.15 keV FWHM resolution. MinXSS also includes a broadband SXR photometer, providing an integrated intensity over a similar energy range for comparison, cross-calibration, and additional data, especially useful during more intense flares at the upper end of the X123 dynamic range.We present the MinXSS science goals for studying hot plasma in the solar corona, including impulsive flare heating and quiescent coronal heating, and the impact of the resultant SXR emission on Earth's ionosphere, thermosphere, and mesosphere. We present analysis of MinXSS first light results (depending on deployment date from the ISS), as well as modeling and predictions of future observations over the MinXSS 6-12 month mission lifetime.

  9. MCNP Modeling Results for Location of Buried TRU Waste Drums

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinman, D K; Schweitzer, J S

    2006-01-01

    In the 1960's, fifty-five gallon drums of TRU waste were buried in shallow pits on remote U.S. Government facilities such as the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (now split into the Idaho National Laboratory and the Idaho Completion Project [ICP]). Subsequently, it was decided to remove the drums and the material that was in them from the burial pits and send the material to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant in New Mexico. Several technologies have been tried to locate the drums non-intrusively with enough precision to minimize the chance for material to be spread into the environment. One of these technologies is the placement of steel probe holes in the pits into which wireline logging probes can be lowered to measure properties and concentrations of material surrounding the probe holes for evidence of TRU material. There is also a concern that large quantities of volatile organic compounds (VOC) are also present that would contaminate the environment during removal. In 2001, the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL) built two pulsed neutron wireline logging tools to measure TRU and VOC around the probe holes. The tools are the Prompt Fission Neutron (PFN) and the Pulsed Neutron Gamma (PNG), respectively. They were tested experimentally in surrogate test holes in 2003. The work reported here estimates the performance of the tools using Monte-Carlo modelling prior to field deployment. A MCNP model was constructed by INEEL personnel. It was modified by the authors to assess the ability of the tools to predict quantitatively the position and concentration of TRU and VOC materials disposed around the probe holes. The model was used to simulate the tools scanning the probe holes vertically in five centimetre increments. A drum was included in the model that could be placed near the probe hole and at other locations out to forty-five centimetres from the probe-hole in five centimetre increments. Scans were performed with no chlorine in the

  10. NASA Air Force Cost Model (NAFCOM): Capabilities and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAfee, Julie; Culver, George; Naderi, Mahmoud

    2011-01-01

    NAFCOM is a parametric estimating tool for space hardware. Uses cost estimating relationships (CERs) which correlate historical costs to mission characteristics to predict new project costs. It is based on historical NASA and Air Force space projects. It is intended to be used in the very early phases of a development project. NAFCOM can be used at the subsystem or component levels and estimates development and production costs. NAFCOM is applicable to various types of missions (crewed spacecraft, uncrewed spacecraft, and launch vehicles). There are two versions of the model: a government version that is restricted and a contractor releasable version.

  11. Solar activity variations of ionosonde measurements and modeling results

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Altadill, D.; Arrazola, D.; Blanch, E.; Burešová, Dalia

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 42, č. 4 (2008), s. 610-616 ISSN 0273-1177 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR 1QS300120506 Grant - others:MCYT(ES) REN2003-08376-C02-02; CSIC(XE) 2004CZ0002; AGAUR(XE) 2006BE00112; AF Research Laboratory(XE) FA8718-L-0072 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30420517 Keywords : mid-latitude ionosphere * bottomside modeling * ionospheric variability Subject RIV: DG - Athmosphere Sciences, Meteorology Impact factor: 0.860, year: 2008 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/journal/02731177

  12. Quality control of 10-min soil temperatures data at RMI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertrand, C.; González Sotelino, L.; Journée, M.

    2015-03-01

    Soil temperatures at various depths are unique parameters useful to describe both the surface energy processes and regional environmental and climate conditions. To provide soil temperature observation in different regions across Belgium for agricultural management as well as for climate research, soil temperatures are recorded in 13 of the 20 automated weather stations operated by the Royal Meteorological Institute (RMI) of Belgium. At each station, soil temperature can be measured at up to 5 different depths (from 5 to 100 cm) in addition to the bare soil and grass temperature records. Although many methods have been developed to identify erroneous air temperatures, little attention has been paid to quality control of soil temperature data. This contribution describes the newly developed semi-automatic quality control of 10-min soil temperatures data at RMI.

  13. Secrecy Outage of Max-Min TAS Scheme in MIMO-NOMA Systems

    KAUST Repository

    Lei, Hongjiang

    2018-04-09

    This paper considers a secure non-orthogonal multiple access system, where confidential messages are transmitted from a base station to multiple legitimate destinations and wiretapped by multiple illegitimate receivers. It is assumed that all the channels experience Nakagami-m fading model and all the nodes are equipped with multiple antennas, respectively. Both non-colluding and colluding eavesdroppers are respectively considered. Max-min (MM) transmit antenna selection (TAS) strategy is adopted to improve the secrecy performance of the target system, in which both users in user paring are considered simultaneously. In particular, closed-form expressions for the cumulative distribution function of the signal-to-interference-noise ratio at the legitimate user are derived firstly. Then we obtain the exact and asymptotic analytical results in a closed form for the secrecy outage probability of MM TAS scheme. Monte-Carlo simulation results are presented to corroborate the correctness of the analysis. The results show that the secrecy diversity order is zero and non-zero for fixed and dynamic power allocations, respectively.

  14. Combining forming results via weld models to powerful numerical assemblies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kose, K.; Rietman, Bert

    2004-01-01

    Forming simulations generally give satisfying results with respect to thinning, stresses, changed material properties and, with a proper springback calculation, the geometric form. The joining of parts by means of welding yields an extra change of the material properties and the residual stresses.

  15. The Effects of Passive Cycling Exercise for 20 min on Cardiorespiratory Dynamics in Healthy Men [corrected].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuse, Sayuri; Kime, Ryotaro; Osada, Takuya; Murase, Norio; Katsumura, Toshihito

    2016-01-01

    An increase in the incidence rate of cardiovascular disease is attributed to high daily sitting time, while a drop in risk of cardiovascular disease comes from a decrease in daily sitting time, rather than an increase in physical activity levels. Although short-duration passive exercise increases energy expenditure and blood flow, few studies have reported on the responses of cardiorespiratory dynamics to long-duration passive exercise. The purpose of this study was to consider the effect of long-duration passive exercise for 20 min on cardiorespiratory and muscle oxygen dynamics. Eight healthy men continuously performed passive exercise using a cycle ergometer for 20 min at 50 rpm. Changes in oxygen uptake, cardiac output and muscle oxygenation were measured during passive cycling exercise. The oxygen uptake at 1 min after the start of passive exercise was significantly increased, compared to resting level, but subsequently returned to the same as resting level. Cardiac output showed no change during passive cycling exercise. Tissue oxygen saturation increased after the start of passive exercise and subsequently maintained steady state. These results suggest that the effect of increases in energy expenditure was not maintained by passive exercise for 20 min. In addition, it is likely that passive cycling exercise for 20 min has an effect on peripheral circulation, although the exercise seems to have no effect on central circulation.

  16. The Multipole Plasma Trap-PIC Modeling Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Nathaniel; Bowman, Amanda; Godden, Katarina

    2017-10-01

    A radio-frequency (RF) multipole structure is studied via particle-in-cell computer modeling, to assess the response of quasi-neutral plasma to the imposed RF fields. Several regimes, such as pair plasma, antimatter plasma, and conventional (ion-electron) plasma are considered. In the case of equal charge-to-mass ratio of plasma species, the effects of the multipole field are symmetric between positive and negative particles. In the case of a charge-to-mass disparity, the multipole RF parameters (frequency, voltage, structure size) may be chosen such that the light species (e.g. electrons) is strongly confined, while the heavy species (e.g. positive ions) does not respond to the RF field. In this case, the trapped negative space charge creates a potential well that then traps the positive species. 2D and 3D particle-in-cell simulations of this concept are presented, to assess plasma response and trapping dependences on multipole order, consequences of the formation of an RF plasma sheath, and the effects of an axial magnetic field. The scalings of trapped plasma parameters are explored in each of the mentioned regimes, to guide the design of prospective experiments investigating each. Supported by U.S. NSF/DOE Partnership in Basic Plasma Science and Engineering Grant PHY-1619615.

  17. Modeling Framework and Results to Inform Charging Infrastructure Investments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melaina, Marc W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Wood, Eric W [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The plug-in electric vehicle (PEV) market is experiencing rapid growth with dozens of battery electric (BEV) and plug-in hybrid electric (PHEV) models already available and billions of dollars being invested by automotive manufacturers in the PEV space. Electric range is increasing thanks to larger and more advanced batteries and significant infrastructure investments are being made to enable higher power fast charging. Costs are falling and PEVs are becoming more competitive with conventional vehicles. Moreover, new technologies such as connectivity and automation hold the promise of enhancing the value proposition of PEVs. This presentation outlines a suite of projects funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Vehicle Technology Office to conduct assessments of the economic value and charging infrastructure requirements of the evolving PEV market. Individual assessments include national evaluations of PEV economic value (assuming 73M PEVs on the road in 2035), national analysis of charging infrastructure requirements (with community and corridor level resolution), and case studies of PEV ownership in Columbus, OH and Massachusetts.

  18. Results from the coupled Michigan MHD model and the Rice Convection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Zeeuw, D.; Sazykin, S.; Wolf, R.; Gombosi, T.; Powell, K.

    A new high performance Rice Convection Model (RCM) has been coupled to the adaptive-grid Michigan MHD model (BATSRUS). This fully coupled code allows us to self-consistently simulate the physics in the inner and middle magnetosphere. A study will be presented of the basic characteristics of the inner and middle magnetosphere in the context of a single coupled-code run with steady inputs. The analysis will include region-2 currents, shielding of the inner magnetosphere, partial ring currents, pressure distribution, magnetic field inflation, and distribution of pV^gamma. The coupled-code simulation will be compared with results from RCM runs and algorithms.

  19. Stirling cryocooler test results and design model verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimko, M.A.; Stacy, W.D.; McCormick, J.A.

    1990-01-01

    This paper reports on progress in developing a long-life Stirling cycle cryocooler for space borne applications. It presents the results from tests on a preliminary breadboard version of the cryocooler used to demonstrate the feasibility of the technology and to validate the regenerator design code used in its development. This machine achieved a cold-end temperature of 65 K while carrying a 1/2 Watt cooling load. The basic machine is a double-acting, flexure-bearing, split Stirling design with linear electromagnetic drives for the expander and compressors. Flat metal diaphragms replace pistons for both sweeping and sealing the machine working volumes. In addition, the double-acting expander couples to a laminar-channel counterflow recuperative heat exchanger for regeneration. A PC compatible design code was developed for this design approach that calculates regenerator loss including heat transfer irreversibilities, pressure drop, and axial conduction in the regenerator walls

  20. Stress Resultant Based Elasto-Viscoplastic Thick Shell Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawel Woelke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The current paper presents enhancement introduced to the elasto-viscoplastic shell formulation, which serves as a theoretical base for the finite element code EPSA (Elasto-Plastic Shell Analysis [1–3]. The shell equations used in EPSA are modified to account for transverse shear deformation, which is important in the analysis of thick plates and shells, as well as composite laminates. Transverse shear forces calculated from transverse shear strains are introduced into a rate-dependent yield function, which is similar to Iliushin's yield surface expressed in terms of stress resultants and stress couples [12]. The hardening rule defined by Bieniek and Funaro [4], which allows for representation of the Bauschinger effect on a moment-curvature plane, was previously adopted in EPSA and is used here in the same form. Viscoplastic strain rates are calculated, taking into account the transverse shears. Only non-layered shells are considered in this work.

  1. Tethered 3-min all-out test did not predict the traditional critical force parameters in inexperienced swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalva-Filho, Carlos A; Zagatto, Alessandro M; da Silva, Adelino S; Castanho de Araújo, Monique Y; de Almeida, Pablo B; Papoti, Marcelo

    2017-09-01

    Critical power model can be performed in tethered swimming (i.e. critical force model). Although critical force can be used to prescribe aerobic training, its determination depends on at least three exhaustive efforts in altered days. In this context, previously studies have demonstrate that critical power model can be estimated by a single 3-min all-out test (3MT), which was not investigated in swimming yet. Thus, the aim of this study was to compare the parameters obtained during the tethered swimming 3MT to those obtained during the traditional critical force model. Seven swimmers (four female and three male) underwent a tethered swimming 3MT and three exhaustive efforts to determine the traditional critical force parameters (i.e. critical force [CF] and anaerobic impulse capacity [AIC]). The critical force (CF3-MIN) and force-time integral above the CF3-MIN (AIC3-MIN) determined during the tethered 3MT were not different to CF and AIC, respectively (P value >0.55). However, these parameters were not correlated (P value >0.45). In addition, we verified large limits of agreement between CF3MIN and CF (±19.7 N), which was also observed between AIC3MIN and AIC (±0.84 Log[N·min]). These findings demonstrated that tethered 3MTs should not be used to predict traditional critical force parameters, at least when the swimmers are inexperienced in long tethered all-out efforts.

  2. Error statistics of hidden Markov model and hidden Boltzmann model results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newberg Lee A

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hidden Markov models and hidden Boltzmann models are employed in computational biology and a variety of other scientific fields for a variety of analyses of sequential data. Whether the associated algorithms are used to compute an actual probability or, more generally, an odds ratio or some other score, a frequent requirement is that the error statistics of a given score be known. What is the chance that random data would achieve that score or better? What is the chance that a real signal would achieve a given score threshold? Results Here we present a novel general approach to estimating these false positive and true positive rates that is significantly more efficient than are existing general approaches. We validate the technique via an implementation within the HMMER 3.0 package, which scans DNA or protein sequence databases for patterns of interest, using a profile-HMM. Conclusion The new approach is faster than general naïve sampling approaches, and more general than other current approaches. It provides an efficient mechanism by which to estimate error statistics for hidden Markov model and hidden Boltzmann model results.

  3. Modeling results for a linear simulator of a divertor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hooper, E.B.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Jackson, M.C.; Kaiser, T.B.; Molvik, A.W.; Nevins, W.M.; Nilson, D.G.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1993-06-23

    A divertor simulator, IDEAL, has been proposed by S. Cohen to study the difficult power-handling requirements of the tokamak program in general and the ITER program in particular. Projections of the power density in the ITER divertor reach {approximately} 1 Gw/m{sup 2} along the magnetic fieldlines and > 10 MW/m{sup 2} on a surface inclined at a shallow angle to the fieldlines. These power densities are substantially greater than can be handled reliably on the surface, so new techniques are required to reduce the power density to a reasonable level. Although the divertor physics must be demonstrated in tokamaks, a linear device could contribute to the development because of its flexibility, the easy access to the plasma and to tested components, and long pulse operation (essentially cw). However, a decision to build a simulator requires not just the recognition of its programmatic value, but also confidence that it can meet the required parameters at an affordable cost. Accordingly, as reported here, it was decided to examine the physics of the proposed device, including kinetic effects resulting from the intense heating required to reach the plasma parameters, and to conduct an independent cost estimate. The detailed role of the simulator in a divertor program is not explored in this report.

  4. Modeling results for a linear simulator of a divertor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hooper, E.B.; Brown, M.D.; Byers, J.A.; Casper, T.A.; Cohen, B.I.; Cohen, R.H.; Jackson, M.C.; Kaiser, T.B.; Molvik, A.W.; Nevins, W.M.; Nilson, D.G.; Pearlstein, L.D.; Rognlien, T.D.

    1993-01-01

    A divertor simulator, IDEAL, has been proposed by S. Cohen to study the difficult power-handling requirements of the tokamak program in general and the ITER program in particular. Projections of the power density in the ITER divertor reach ∼ 1 Gw/m 2 along the magnetic fieldlines and > 10 MW/m 2 on a surface inclined at a shallow angle to the fieldlines. These power densities are substantially greater than can be handled reliably on the surface, so new techniques are required to reduce the power density to a reasonable level. Although the divertor physics must be demonstrated in tokamaks, a linear device could contribute to the development because of its flexibility, the easy access to the plasma and to tested components, and long pulse operation (essentially cw). However, a decision to build a simulator requires not just the recognition of its programmatic value, but also confidence that it can meet the required parameters at an affordable cost. Accordingly, as reported here, it was decided to examine the physics of the proposed device, including kinetic effects resulting from the intense heating required to reach the plasma parameters, and to conduct an independent cost estimate. The detailed role of the simulator in a divertor program is not explored in this report

  5. The Min system and nucleoid occlusion are not required for identifying the division site in Bacillus subtilis but ensure its efficient utilization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher D A Rodrigues

    Full Text Available Precise temporal and spatial control of cell division is essential for progeny survival. The current general view is that precise positioning of the division site at midcell in rod-shaped bacteria is a result of the combined action of the Min system and nucleoid (chromosome occlusion. Both systems prevent assembly of the cytokinetic Z ring at inappropriate places in the cell, restricting Z rings to the correct site at midcell. Here we show that in the bacterium Bacillus subtilis Z rings are positioned precisely at midcell in the complete absence of both these systems, revealing the existence of a mechanism independent of Min and nucleoid occlusion that identifies midcell in this organism. We further show that Z ring assembly at midcell is delayed in the absence of Min and Noc proteins, while at the same time FtsZ accumulates at other potential division sites. This suggests that a major role for Min and Noc is to ensure efficient utilization of the midcell division site by preventing Z ring assembly at potential division sites, including the cell poles. Our data lead us to propose a model in which spatial regulation of division in B. subtilis involves identification of the division site at midcell that requires Min and nucleoid occlusion to ensure efficient Z ring assembly there and only there, at the right time in the cell cycle.

  6. PV Performance Modeling Methods and Practices: Results from the 4th PV Performance Modeling Collaborative Workshop.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stein, Joshua [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-03-01

    In 2014, the IEA PVPS Task 13 added the PVPMC as a formal activity to its technical work plan for 2014-2017. The goal of this activity is to expand the reach of the PVPMC to a broader international audience and help to reduce PV performance modeling uncertainties worldwide. One of the main deliverables of this activity is to host one or more PVPMC workshops outside the US to foster more international participation within this collaborative group. This report reviews the results of the first in a series of these joint IEA PVPS Task 13/PVPMC workshops. The 4th PV Performance Modeling Collaborative Workshop was held in Cologne, Germany at the headquarters of TÜV Rheinland on October 22-23, 2015.

  7. Evaluation of the Passive Cooling Strategies for Pei Min Sport Complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yam, K. S.; Yem, W. L.; Lee, V. C. C.

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents a modelling study on the evaluation of the passive cooling strategies for Pei Min sport complex at Miri. The squash centre has experienced excessively high temperature during peak hours that results in complains from the users. We discussed several passive cooling mechanisms and proposed four strategies for the sport centre. Thermal energy simulations were performed on these strategies using OpenStudio to evaluate their impact on the hourly temperature profile within the building. It was found that the peak temperature during the noon was significantly reduced when conductive material was applied at the lower surface of the roof, and the top of the roof was coated with white paint. However, insulating the roof also leads to weaker heat dispersion from the building which lower the rate of temperature drop in the late afternoon. Partitioning the roof was found to have similar effect as insulating roof. Air infiltration is essential for promoting air movement and regulating the temperature within the building. It was found the complex already have sufficient opening for the full effect of air infiltration.

  8. 3D radiation belt diffusion model results using new empirical models of whistler chorus and hiss

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, G.; Chen, Y.; Henderson, M. G.; Reeves, G. D.; Tu, W.

    2012-12-01

    3D diffusion codes model the energization, radial transport, and pitch angle scattering due to wave-particle interactions. Diffusion codes are powerful but are limited by the lack of knowledge of the spatial & temporal distribution of waves that drive the interactions for a specific event. We present results from the 3D DREAM model using diffusion coefficients driven by new, activity-dependent, statistical models of chorus and hiss waves. Most 3D codes parameterize the diffusion coefficients or wave amplitudes as functions of magnetic activity indices like Kp, AE, or Dst. These functional representations produce the average value of the wave intensities for a given level of magnetic activity; however, the variability of the wave population at a given activity level is lost with such a representation. Our 3D code makes use of the full sample distributions contained in a set of empirical wave databases (one database for each wave type, including plasmaspheric hiss, lower and upper hand chorus) that were recently produced by our team using CRRES and THEMIS observations. The wave databases store the full probability distribution of observed wave intensity binned by AE, MLT, MLAT and L*. In this presentation, we show results that make use of the wave intensity sample probability distributions for lower-band and upper-band chorus by sampling the distributions stochastically during a representative CRRES-era storm. The sampling of the wave intensity probability distributions produces a collection of possible evolutions of the phase space density, which quantifies the uncertainty in the model predictions caused by the uncertainty of the chorus wave amplitudes for a specific event. A significant issue is the determination of an appropriate model for the spatio-temporal correlations of the wave intensities, since the diffusion coefficients are computed as spatio-temporal averages of the waves over MLT, MLAT and L*. The spatiotemporal correlations cannot be inferred from the

  9. ERA-MIN: The European network (ERA-NET) on non-energy raw materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    vidal, o.; christmann, p.; Bol, d.; Goffé, b.; Groth, m.; Kohler, e.; Persson Nelson, k.; Schumacher, k.

    2012-04-01

    Non-energy raw materials are vital for the EU's economy, and for the development of environmentally friendly technologies. The EU is the world's largest consumers of non-energy minerals, but it remains dependent on the importation of many metals, as its domestic production is limited to about 3% of world production. We will present the project ERA-MIN, which is an ERA-NET on the Industrial Handling of Raw Materials for European industries, financially supported by the European Commission. The main objectives of ERA-MIN are: 1) Mapping and Networking: interconnecting the members of the currently fragmented European mineral resources research area, to the aim of fostering convergence of public research programs, industry, research institutes, academia and the European Commission, 2) Coordinating: establishing a permanent mechanism for planning and coordination of the European non-energy mineral raw materials research community (ENERC). 3) Roadmapping: defining the most important scientific and technological challenges that should be supported by the EU and its state members, 4) Programming: designing a Joint European Research Programme model and implementating it into a call for proposals open to academic and industrial research. The topics of interest in ERA-MIN are the primary continental and marine resources, the secondary resources and their related technologies, substitution and material efficiency, along with transversal topics such as environmental impact, public policy support, mineral intelligence, and public education and teaching. Public scientific research is very central in the scope of the ERA-MIN activity, whose consortium is indeed lead by a public organisation of fundamental research. Thus, universities and public research organisations are warmly invited to play an active role in defining the scientific questions and challenges that shall determine the European Raw Materials Roadmap and should be addressed by joint programming at the European scale

  10. ak_sc_2min.new.grd

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NGDC builds and distributes high-resolution, coastal digital elevation models (DEMs) that integrate ocean bathymetry and land topography to support NOAA's mission to...

  11. A Modified MinMax k-Means Algorithm Based on PSO

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The MinMax k-means algorithm is widely used to tackle the effect of bad initialization by minimizing the maximum intraclustering errors. Two parameters, including the exponent parameter and memory parameter, are involved in the executive process. Since different parameters have different clustering errors, it is crucial to choose appropriate parameters. In the original algorithm, a practical framework is given. Such framework extends the MinMax k-means to automatically adapt the exponent parameter to the data set. It has been believed that if the maximum exponent parameter has been set, then the programme can reach the lowest intraclustering errors. However, our experiments show that this is not always correct. In this paper, we modified the MinMax k-means algorithm by PSO to determine the proper values of parameters which can subject the algorithm to attain the lowest clustering errors. The proposed clustering method is tested on some favorite data sets in several different initial situations and is compared to the k-means algorithm and the original MinMax k-means algorithm. The experimental results indicate that our proposed algorithm can reach the lowest clustering errors automatically. PMID:27656201

  12. A Leukocyte image fast scanning based on max–min distance clustering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yapin Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A leukocyte image fast scanning method based on max-min distance clustering is proposed. Because of the lower proportion and uneven distribution of leukocytes in human peripheral blood, there will not be any leukocyte in lager quantity of the captured images if we directly scan the blood smear along an ordinary zigzag scanning routine with high power (100x objective. Due to the larger field of view of low power (10x objective, the captured low power blood smear images can be used to locate leukocytes. All of the located positions make up a specific routine, if we scan the blood smear along this routine with high power objective, there will be definitely leukocytes in almost all of the captured images. Considering the number of captured images is still large and some leukocytes may be redundantly captured twice or more, a leukocyte clustering method based on max–min distance clustering is developed to reduce the total number of captured images as well as the number of redundantly captured leukocytes. This method can improve the scanning efficiency obviously. The experimental results show that the proposed method can shorten scanning time from 8.0–14.0min to 2.5–4.0min while extracting 110 nonredundant individual high power leukocyte images.

  13. Quasi-min-max Fuzzy MPC of UTSG Water Level Based on Off-Line Invariant Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiangjie; Jiang, Di; Lee, Kwang Y.

    2015-10-01

    In a nuclear power plant, the water level of the U-tube steam generator (UTSG) must be maintained within a safe range. Traditional control methods encounter difficulties due to the complexity, strong nonlinearity and “swell and shrink” effects, especially at low power levels. A properly designed robust model predictive control can well solve this problem. In this paper, a quasi-min-max fuzzy model predictive controller is developed for controlling the constrained UTSG system. While the online computational burden could be quite large for the real-time control, a bank of ellipsoid invariant sets together with the corresponding feedback control laws are obtained by off-line solving linear matrix inequalities (LMIs). Based on the UTSG states, the online optimization is simplified as a constrained optimization problem with a bisection search for the corresponding ellipsoid invariant set. Simulation results are given to show the effectiveness of the proposed controller.

  14. Facial skin physiology recovery kinetics during 180 min post-washing with a cleanser.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eo, J; Seo, Y K; Baek, J H; Choi, A R; Shin, M K; Koh, J S

    2016-05-01

    Facial cleansing is important to clean and exfoliate the skin while maintaining optimal physiologic function. However, there is insufficient data on the very early stage of skin change after applying soap or cleansing foam. We investigated the recovery kinetics of facial skin physiology during 180 min after exposure to the cleanser. For the study, 22 Korean female subjects with normal and dry to oily skin type were recruited in this study. Study subjects were required to have face washing done within the 12 hours prior to visiting the research center, with only toner, lotion, or cream applied. The next day, the subjects visited the research center without face washing. We evaluated the skin hydration (Corneometer(®) CM 825), sebum (Sebumeter(®) SM 815), transepidermal water loss (Tewameter(®) TM 300), and pH (Skin-pH-Meter(®) PH 905) to define recovery kinetics of facial skin physiology during 180 min exposure post-cleansing. Skin hydration, sebum, and TEWL were significantly decreased at 20 min after washing, as compared to the baseline (P < 0.05). And skin hydration returned at 40 min, and skin sebum and TEWL returned at 120 min after washing. However, skin pH did not show significant differences at all times points. This study indicated that each of the skin parameters was restored at defined time points post-cleansing. Our result could be a useful reference to set the resting time in the estimation of skin bioengineering parameters. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Renal safety of ibandronate 6 mg infused over 15 min versus 60 min in breast cancer patients with bone metastases: a randomized open-label equivalence trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivot, Xavier; Lortholary, Alain; Abadie-Lacourtoisie, Sophie; Mefti-Lacheraf, Fawzia; Pujade-Lauraine, Eric; Lefeuvre, Claudia; Letessier, Sarah; Morvan, Philippe; Dür, Carole; Frimat, L

    2011-12-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the renal safety equivalence of ibandronate 6 mg infused over 15 min versus 60 min, in patients with bone metastases of breast cancer. Patients were females having breast cancer with at least one bone metastasis. Exclusion criteria were renal failure (creatinine clearance jaw disorder or uncontrolled severe disease. Eligible patients were randomly assigned to receive nine ibandronate 6 mg i.v. infusions over either 15 min or 60 min. The primary outcome was the 95% confidence interval (CI) of the difference in creatinine clearance between groups, 28 days after the last infusion. The equivalence margin was ±8 mL/min. Overall 334 patients were randomized (165-15 min infusions vs. 169 to 60 min infusions, 325 (159 vs. 166) were analyzed by intent-to-treat, and 312 (151 vs. 161) were analyzed per protocol. Per protocol, the 15 min-60 min difference in creatinine clearance [95% CI] was -3.00 [-8.18, 2.18]. By intent-to-treat, this difference was-2.91 [-7.99, 2.16]. Death and serious adverse event rates did not differ between groups. Three serious adverse events were considered related to ibandronate: an osteonecrosis of the jaw (15-min group), a pain in jaw and an enamel cracking (60-min group). Two renal failures, reported in the 60 min group, were not considered related to ibandronate. None occurred in the 15 min group. Ibandronate may be infused over 15 min without clinically significant consequence on renal safety. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Applying the min-projection strategy to improve the transient performance of the three-phase grid-connected inverter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baygi, Mahdi Oloumi; Ghazi, Reza; Monfared, Mohammad

    2014-07-01

    Applying the min-projection strategy (MPS) to a three-phase grid-connected inverter to improve its transient performance is the main objective of this paper. For this purpose, the inverter is first modeled as a switched linear system. Then, the feasibility of the MPS technique is investigated and the stability criterion is derived. Hereafter, the fundamental equations of the MPS for the control of the inverter are obtained. The proposed scheme is simulated in PSCAD/EMTDC environment. The validity of the MPS approach is confirmed by comparing the obtained results with those of VOC method. The results demonstrate that the proposed method despite its simplicity provides an excellent transient performance, fully decoupled control of active and reactive powers, acceptable THD level and a reasonable switching frequency. Copyright © 2014 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Overview of fuel behaviour and core degradation, based on modelling analyses. Overview of fuel behaviour and core degradation, on the basis of modelling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massara, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Since the very first hours after the accident at Fukushima-Daiichi, numerical simulations by means of severe accident codes have been carried out, aiming at highlighting the key physical phenomena allowing a correct understanding of the sequence of events, and - on a long enough timeline - improving models and methods, in order to reduce the discrepancy between calculated and measured data. A last long-term objective is to support the future decommissioning phase. The presentation summarises some of the available elements on the role of the fuel/cladding-water interaction, which became available only through modelling because of the absence of measured data directly related to the cladding-steam interaction. This presentation also aims at drawing some conclusions on the status of the modelling capabilities of current tools, particularly for the purpose of the foreseen application to ATF fuels: - analyses with MELCOR, MAAP, THALES2 and RELAP5 are presented; - input data are taken from BWR Mark-I Fukushima-Daiichi Units 1, 2 and 3, completed with operational data published by TEPCO. In the case of missing or incomplete data or hypotheses, these are adjusted to reduce the calculation/measurement discrepancy. The behaviour of the accident is well understood on a qualitative level (major trends on RPV pressure and water level, dry-wet and PCV pressure are well represented), allowing a certain level of confidence in the results of the analysis of the zirconium-steam reaction - which is accessible only through numerical simulations. These show an extremely fast sequence of events (here for Unit 1): - the top of fuel is uncovered in 3 hours (after the tsunami); - the steam line breaks at 6.5 hours. Vessel dries at 10 hours, with a heat-up rate in a first moment driven by the decay heat only (∼7 K/min) and afterwards by the chemical heat from Zr-oxidation (over 30 K/min), associated with massive hydrogen production. It appears that the level of uncertainty increases with

  18. Min-Max MSE-based Interference Alignment for Transceiver Designs in Cognitive Radio Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. H. Kha

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is concerned with an optimal design of the precoders and receive filters for cognitive radio (CR networks in which multiple secondary users (SUs share the same frequency band with multiple primary users (PUs. To cope with interference and to achieve fairness among users, we develop an interference alignment (IA scheme by minimizing the maximum mean squared error (Min-Max MSE of the received signals. Since the Min-Max MSE design problems are nonconvex in the design matrix variables of the precoders and receive filters, we develop an alternating optimization algorithm with provable convergence to iteratively find the optimal solutions. In each iteration, the precoder design problems can be recast as second order cone program (SOCP while the optimal receive filters can be derived in closed-form solutions. Finally, numerical results are provided to demonstrate the superiority of the proposed method as compared to previous work in terms of the information rate and bit error rate.

  19. DeepNano: Deep recurrent neural networks for base calling in MinION nanopore reads.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimír Boža

    Full Text Available The MinION device by Oxford Nanopore produces very long reads (reads over 100 kBp were reported; however it suffers from high sequencing error rate. We present an open-source DNA base caller based on deep recurrent neural networks and show that the accuracy of base calling is much dependent on the underlying software and can be improved by considering modern machine learning methods. By employing carefully crafted recurrent neural networks, our tool significantly improves base calling accuracy on data from R7.3 version of the platform compared to the default base caller supplied by the manufacturer. On R9 version, we achieve results comparable to Nanonet base caller provided by Oxford Nanopore. Availability of an open source tool with high base calling accuracy will be useful for development of new applications of the MinION device, including infectious disease detection and custom target enrichment during sequencing.

  20. New EB curing system for narrow web, using Min-EB

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Tetsuhisa; Tominaga, Hiroshi; Oizumi, Kei

    2003-01-01

    We, TOYO INK, developed the new equipment of EB curing system for narrow web composed of vacuum tube-type electron beam irradiation apparatus called Min-EB which is specialized with ultra-low voltage, 50-60 KV, and not damaging against the substrate. The new development is very small size, 66 cm width, 64 cm depth, 80 cm height and convenient to install into printing and coating machines. Several tubes, Min-EB, are assembled to be multi-tube module, called MTM, to easily handle. Basically we can change the irradiation width and printing and coating speed by increasing MTM due to the sheet size and printing and coating condition. We got good results, showing high density for the printed film, after used new EB curing system. (author)

  1. Optimizing Multiple QoS for Workflow Applications using PSO and Min-Max Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umar Ambursa, Faruku; Latip, Rohaya; Abdullah, Azizol; Subramaniam, Shamala

    2017-08-01

    Workflow scheduling under multiple QoS constraints is a complicated optimization problem. Metaheuristic techniques are excellent approaches used in dealing with such problem. Many metaheuristic based algorithms have been proposed, that considers various economic and trustworthy QoS dimensions. However, most of these approaches lead to high violation of user-defined QoS requirements in tight situation. Recently, a new Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO)-based QoS-aware workflow scheduling strategy (LAPSO) is proposed to improve performance in such situations. LAPSO algorithm is designed based on synergy between a violation handling method and a hybrid of PSO and min-max heuristic. Simulation results showed a great potential of LAPSO algorithm to handling user requirements even in tight situations. In this paper, the performance of the algorithm is anlysed further. Specifically, the impact of the min-max strategy on the performance of the algorithm is revealed. This is achieved by removing the violation handling from the operation of the algorithm. The results show that LAPSO based on only the min-max method still outperforms the benchmark, even though the LAPSO with the violation handling performs more significantly better.

  2. Acute Oxidative Effect and Muscle Damage after a Maximum 4 Min Test in High Performance Athletes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heros Ribeiro Ferreira

    Full Text Available The purpose of this investigation was to determine lipid peroxidation markers, physiological stress and muscle damage in elite kayakers in response to a maximum 4-min kayak ergometer test (KE test, and possible correlations with individual 1000m kayaking performances. The sample consisted of twenty-three adult male and nine adult female elite kayakers, with more than three years' experience in international events, who voluntarily took part in this study. The subjects performed a 10-min warm-up, followed by a 2-min passive interval, before starting the test itself, which consisted of a maximum 4-min work paddling on an ergometer; right after the end of the test, an 8 ml blood sample was collected for analysis. 72 hours after the test, all athletes took part in an official race, when then it was possible to check their performance in the on site K1 1000m test (P1000m. The results showed that all lipoproteins and hematological parameters tested presented a significant difference (p≤0.05 after exercise for both genders. In addition, parameters related to muscle damage such as lactate dehydrogenase (LDH and creatine kinase (CK presented significant differences after stress. Uric acid presented an inverse correlation with the performance (r = -0.76, while CK presented a positive correlation (r = 0.46 with it. Based on these results, it was possible to verify muscle damage and the level of oxidative stress caused by indoor training with specific ergometers for speed kayaking, highlighting the importance of analyzing and getting to know the physiological responses to this type of training, in order to provide information to coaches and optimize athletic performance.

  3. Constraining performance assessment models with tracer test results: a comparison between two conceptual models

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Sean A.; Selroos, Jan-Olof

    Tracer tests are conducted to ascertain solute transport parameters of a single rock feature over a 5-m transport pathway. Two different conceptualizations of double-porosity solute transport provide estimates of the tracer breakthrough curves. One of the conceptualizations (single-rate) employs a single effective diffusion coefficient in a matrix with infinite penetration depth. However, the tracer retention between different flow paths can vary as the ratio of flow-wetted surface to flow rate differs between the path lines. The other conceptualization (multirate) employs a continuous distribution of multiple diffusion rate coefficients in a matrix with variable, yet finite, capacity. Application of these two models with the parameters estimated on the tracer test breakthrough curves produces transport results that differ by orders of magnitude in peak concentration and time to peak concentration at the performance assessment (PA) time and length scales (100,000 years and 1,000 m). These differences are examined by calculating the time limits for the diffusive capacity to act as an infinite medium. These limits are compared across both conceptual models and also against characteristic times for diffusion at both the tracer test and PA scales. Additionally, the differences between the models are examined by re-estimating parameters for the multirate model from the traditional double-porosity model results at the PA scale. Results indicate that for each model the amount of the diffusive capacity that acts as an infinite medium over the specified time scale explains the differences between the model results and that tracer tests alone cannot provide reliable estimates of transport parameters for the PA scale. Results of Monte Carlo runs of the transport models with varying travel times and path lengths show consistent results between models and suggest that the variation in flow-wetted surface to flow rate along path lines is insignificant relative to variability in

  4. MSFC Stream Model Preliminary Results: Modeling Recent Leonid and Perseid Encounters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, William J.; Moser, Danielle E.

    2004-01-01

    The cometary meteoroid ejection model of Jones and Brown (1996b) was used to simulate ejection from comets 55P/Tempel-Tuttle during the last 12 revolutions, and the last 9 apparitions of 109P/Swift-Tuttle. Using cometary ephemerides generated by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory s (JPL) HORIZONS Solar System Data and Ephemeris Computation Service, two independent ejection schemes were simulated. In the first case, ejection was simulated in 1 hour time steps along the comet s orbit while it was within 2.5 AU of the Sun. In the second case, ejection was simulated to occur at the hour the comet reached perihelion. A 4th order variable step-size Runge-Kutta integrator was then used to integrate meteoroid position and velocity forward in time, accounting for the effects of radiation pressure, Poynting-Robertson drag, and the gravitational forces of the planets, which were computed using JPL s DE406 planetary ephemerides. An impact parameter was computed for each particle approaching the Earth to create a flux profile, and the results compared to observations of the 1998 and 1999 Leonid showers, and the 1993 and 2004 Perseids.

  5. On the self-organisation of the bacterial proteins MinD and MinE and of the protein kinase PKCα

    OpenAIRE

    Bonny, Mike

    2014-01-01

    Es existieren viele faszinierende Beispiele von Musterbildung in biologischen Systemen. Es wird seit langem vermutet, dass physikalische Mechanismen eine wichtige Rolle in der Bildung dieser Muster spielen. In dieser Arbeit verwenden wir Konzepte der Physik von Systemen außerhalb des thermodynamischen Gleichgewichts um die komplexen raumzeitlichen Muster der bakteriellen Proteine MinD und MinE und der Proteinkinase Cα (PKCα) zu untersuchen. Die Min Proteine organisieren sich im Bakterium ...

  6. Dermal uptake of phthalates from clothing: Comparison of model to human participant results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, G. C.; Weschler, Charles J.; Beko, G.

    2017-01-01

    In this research, we extend a model of transdermal uptake of phthalates to include a layer of clothing. When compared with experimental results, this model better estimates dermal uptake of diethylphthalate and di-n-butylphthalate (DnBP) than a previous model. The model predictions are consistent...

  7. Experimental and modeling results of creep fatigue life of Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 at 850 C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Xiang; Sokolov, Mikhail A.; Sham, Sam; Erdman, Donald L. III; Busby, Jeremy T.; Mo, Kun; Stubbins, James

    2013-01-01

    Creep fatigue testing of Ni-based superalloy Inconel 617 and Haynes 230 were conducted in the air at 850 C. Tests were performed with fully reversed axial strain control at a total strain range of 0.5%, 1.0% or 1.5% and hold time at maximum tensile strain for 3, 10 or 30 min. In addition, two creep fatigue life prediction methods, i.e. linear damage summation and frequency-modified tensile hysteresis energy modeling, were evaluated and compared with experimental results. Under all creep fatigue tests, Haynes 230 performed better than Inconel 617. Compared to the low cycle fatigue life, the cycles to failure for both materials decreased under creep fatigue test conditions. Longer hold time at maximum tensile strain would cause a further reduction in both material creep fatigue life. The linear damage summation could predict the creep fatigue life of Inconel 617 for limited test conditions, but considerably underestimated the creep fatigue life of Haynes 230. In contrast, frequency-modified tensile hysteresis energy modeling showed promising creep fatigue life prediction results for both materials.

  8. Signaling-Free Max-Min Airtime Fairness in IEEE 802.11 Ad Hoc Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youngsoo Lee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a novel media access control (MAC protocol, referred to as signaling-free max-min airtime fair (SMAF MAC, to improve fairness and channel utilization in ad hoc networks based on IEEE 802.11 wireless local area networks (WLANs. We introduce busy time ratio (BTR as a measure for max-min airtime fairness. Each node estimates its BTR and adjusts the transmission duration by means of frame aggregation and fragmentation, so that it can implicitly announce the BTR to neighbor nodes. Based on the announced BTR, each of the neighbor nodes controls its contention window. In this way, the SMAF MAC works in a distributed manner without the need to know the max-min fair share of airtime, and it does not require exchanging explicit control messages among nodes to attain fairness. Moreover, we successfully incorporate the hidden node detection and resolution mechanisms into the SMAF MAC to deal with the hidden node problem in ad hoc networks. The simulation results confirm that the SMAF MAC enhances airtime fairness without degrading channel utilization, and it effectively resolves several serious problems in ad hoc networks such as the starvation, performance anomaly, and hidden node problems.

  9. Regression mixture models : Does modeling the covariance between independent variables and latent classes improve the results?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lamont, A.E.; Vermunt, J.K.; Van Horn, M.L.

    2016-01-01

    Regression mixture models are increasingly used as an exploratory approach to identify heterogeneity in the effects of a predictor on an outcome. In this simulation study, we tested the effects of violating an implicit assumption often made in these models; that is, independent variables in the

  10. Modeling drifting snow in Antarctica with a regional climate model: 2. Results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenaerts, J.T.M.; van den Broeke, M.R.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a model study of the impact of drifting snow on the lower atmosphere, surface snow characteristics, and surface mass balance of Antarctica. We use the regional atmospheric climate model RACMO2.1/ANT with a high horizontal resolution (27 km), equipped with a drifting snow routine

  11. Comparison of model results obtained with several European regional air quality models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hass, H.; Builtjes, P.J.H.; Simpson, D.; Stern, R.

    1997-01-01

    An intercomparison study has been performed with four photo-oxidant dispersion models (EMEP, EURAD, LOTOS and REM3) which are currently capable of performing photo-oxidant formation calculations over larger path of Europe. The models, in principle, were run in the mode in which they are normally

  12. The MARINA model (Model to Assess River Inputs of Nutrients to seAs): Model description and results for China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strokal, Maryna; Kroeze, Carolien; Wang, Mengru; Bai, Zhaohai; Ma, Lin

    2016-08-15

    Chinese agriculture has been developing fast towards industrial food production systems that discharge nutrient-rich wastewater into rivers. As a result, nutrient export by rivers has been increasing, resulting in coastal water pollution. We developed a Model to Assess River Inputs of Nutrients to seAs (MARINA) for China. The MARINA Nutrient Model quantifies river export of nutrients by source at the sub-basin scale as a function of human activities on land. MARINA is a downscaled version for China of the Global NEWS-2 (Nutrient Export from WaterSheds) model with an improved approach for nutrient losses from animal production and population. We use the model to quantify dissolved inorganic and organic nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) export by six large rivers draining into the Bohai Gulf (Yellow, Hai, Liao), Yellow Sea (Yangtze, Huai) and South China Sea (Pearl) in 1970, 2000 and 2050. We addressed uncertainties in the MARINA Nutrient model. Between 1970 and 2000 river export of dissolved N and P increased by a factor of 2-8 depending on sea and nutrient form. Thus, the risk for coastal eutrophication increased. Direct losses of manure to rivers contribute to 60-78% of nutrient inputs to the Bohai Gulf and 20-74% of nutrient inputs to the other seas in 2000. Sewage is an important source of dissolved inorganic P, and synthetic fertilizers of dissolved inorganic N. Over half of the nutrients exported by the Yangtze and Pearl rivers originated from human activities in downstream and middlestream sub-basins. The Yellow River exported up to 70% of dissolved inorganic N and P from downstream sub-basins and of dissolved organic N and P from middlestream sub-basins. Rivers draining into the Bohai Gulf are drier, and thus transport fewer nutrients. For the future we calculate further increases in river export of nutrients. The MARINA Nutrient model quantifies the main sources of coastal water pollution for sub-basins. This information can contribute to formulation of

  13. A new hyperbox selection rule and a pruning strategy for the enhanced fuzzy min-max neural network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Mohammed Falah; Lim, Chee Peng

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we extend our previous work on the Enhanced Fuzzy Min-Max (EFMM) neural network by introducing a new hyperbox selection rule and a pruning strategy to reduce network complexity and improve classification performance. Specifically, a new k-nearest hyperbox expansion rule (for selection of a new winning hyperbox) is first introduced to reduce the network complexity by avoiding the creation of too many small hyperboxes within the vicinity of the winning hyperbox. A pruning strategy is then deployed to further reduce the network complexity in the presence of noisy data. The effectiveness of the proposed network is evaluated using a number of benchmark data sets. The results compare favorably with those from other related models. The findings indicate that the newly introduced hyperbox winner selection rule coupled with the pruning strategy are useful for undertaking pattern classification problems. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Report on the results of studies on revised ECCS evaluation models for LWR power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-01-01

    For evaluating the function and performance of emergency core cooling systems of LWR power plants, the use of the ECCS evaluation models of GE and westinghouse are permitted. For the models, however, the formulae of correlation with higher accuracy were developed along with the accumulation of results of experimental and theoretical studies in the field. Revision to the models has thus been proposed on the basis of the results of researches both in Japan and abroad. Such alterations and the results of the studies thereon are described. The following matters are described: on the evaluation models for BWR ECCS, CCFL model, low flow rate film boiling heat transfer coefficient, radiation heat transfer model, and critical flow model; on the evaluation models, for PWR ECCS, heat radiation, between fuel rods, accumulator injection pressure loss in reflooding, rupture of cladding tubes, hot wall delay, model of steam cooling in reflooding 17 x 17 core ELECHT correlation, and temperature at reactor vessel top. (Mori, K.)

  15. Establishment of clonal MIN-O transplant lines for molecular imaging via lentiviral transduction & in vitro culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L Boucher

    Full Text Available As the field of molecular imaging evolves and increasingly is asked to fill the discovery and validation space between basic science and clinical applications, careful consideration should be given to the models in which studies are conducted. The MIN-O mouse model series is an established in vivo model of human mammary precancer ductal carcinoma in situ with progression to invasive carcinoma. This series of transplant lines is propagated in vivo and experiments utilizing this model can be completed in non-engineered immune intact FVB/n wild type mice thereby modeling the tumor microenvironment with biological relevance superior to traditional tumor cell xenografts. Unfortunately, the same qualities that make this and many other transplant lines more biologically relevant than standard cell lines for molecular imaging studies present a significant obstacle as somatic genetic re-engineering modifications common to many imaging applications can be technically challenging. Here, we describe a protocol for the efficient lentiviral transduction of cell slurries derived from precancerous MIN-O lesions, in vitro culture of "MIN-O-spheres" derived from single cell clones, and the subsequent transplantation of these spheres to produce transduced sublines suitable for optical imaging applications. These lines retain the physiologic and pathologic properties, including multilineage differentiation, and complex microanatomic interaction with the host stroma characteristic of the MIN-O model. We also present the in vivo imaging and immunohistochemical analysis of serial transplantation of one such subline and detail the progressive multifocal loss of the transgene in successive generations.

  16. Promotion of minTBP-1-PRGDN on the attachment, proliferation and collagen I synthesis of human keratocyte on titanium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin-Yu Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To investigate the influence of minTBP-1-PRGDN on the attachment, proliferation and collagen I synthesis of human keratocyte on titanium (Ti surface.METHODS:The chimeric peptide RKLPDAPRGDN (minTBP-1-PRGDN was synthesized by connecting RKLPDA (minTBP-1 to the N-terminal of PRGDN , the influence of minTBP-1-PRGDN on the attachment, proliferation and collagen I synthesis of human keratocyte on Ti surface were tested using PRGDN and minTBP-1as controls. The keratocytes attached to the surface of Ti were either stained with FITC-labeled phalloidin and viewed with fluorescence microscope or quantified with alamar Blue method. The proliferation of keratocytes on Ti were quantified with 3-(4,5-dim- ethylthiazol-2-yl-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide up-taking methods. The secretion of type I collagen were determined using an ELISA kit.RESULTS:The results showed that minTBP-1-PRGDN at a concentration of 100ng/mL was the most potent peptide to enhance the attachment of human keratocytes to the surface of Ti (1.40±0.03 folds, P=0.003, to promote the proliferation (1.26±0.05 folds, P=0.014 and the synthesis of type I collagen (1.530±0.128, P=0.008. MinTBP-1 at the same concentration could only promote the attachment (1.13±0.04 folds, P=0.020 and proliferation(1.15±0.06 folds, P=0.021, while PRGDN had no significant influence (P>0.05.CONCLUSION:Our data shows that the novel chimeric peptide minTBP-1-PRGDN could promote the attachment, proliferation and type I collagen synthesis of human keratocytes on the surface of Ti.

  17. Channel Verification Results for the SCME models in a Multi-Probe Based MIMO OTA Setup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fan, Wei; Carreño, Xavier; S. Ashta, Jagjit

    2013-01-01

    , where the focus is on comparing results from various proposed methods. Channel model verification is necessary to ensure that the target channel models are correctly implemented inside the test area. This paper shows that the all the key parameters of the SCME models, i.e., power delay profile, temporal...

  18. Intrastriatal convection-enhanced delivery results in widespread perivascular distribution in a pre-clinical model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barua Neil U

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Convection-enhanced delivery (CED, a direct method for drug delivery to the brain through intraparenchymal microcatheters, is a promising strategy for intracerebral pharmacological therapy. By establishing a pressure gradient at the tip of the catheter, drugs can be delivered in uniform concentration throughout a large volume of interstitial fluid. However, the variables affecting perivascular distribution of drugs delivered by CED are not fully understood. The aim of this study was to determine whether the perivascular distribution of solutes delivered by CED into the striatum of rats is affected by the molecular weight of the infused agent, by co-infusion of vasodilator, alteration of infusion rates or use of a ramping regime. We also wanted to make a preliminary comparison of the distribution of solutes with that of nanoparticles. Methods We analysed the perivascular distribution of 4, 10, 20, 70, 150 kDa fluorescein-labelled dextran and fluorescent nanoparticles at 10 min and 3 h following CED into rat striatum. We investigated the effect of local vasodilatation, slow infusion rates and ramping on the perivascular distribution of solutes. Co-localisation with perivascular basement membranes and vascular endothelial cells was identified by immunohistochemistry. The uptake of infusates by perivascular macrophages was quantified using stereological methods. Results Widespread perivascular distribution and macrophage uptake of fluorescein-labelled dextran was visible 10 min after cessation of CED irrespective of molecular weight. However, a significantly higher proportion of perivascular macrophages had taken up 4, 10 and 20 kDa fluorescein-labelled dextran than 150 kDa dextran (p Conclusions This study suggests that widespread perivascular distribution and interaction with perivascular macrophages is likely to be an inevitable consequence of CED of solutes. The potential consequences of perivascular distribution of

  19. Photovoltaic Grid-Connected Modeling and Characterization Based on Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humada, Ali M.; Hojabri, Mojgan; Sulaiman, Mohd Herwan Bin; Hamada, Hussein M.; Ahmed, Mushtaq N.

    2016-01-01

    A grid-connected photovoltaic (PV) system operates under fluctuated weather condition has been modeled and characterized based on specific test bed. A mathematical model of a small-scale PV system has been developed mainly for residential usage, and the potential results have been simulated. The proposed PV model based on three PV parameters, which are the photocurrent, IL, the reverse diode saturation current, Io, the ideality factor of diode, n. Accuracy of the proposed model and its parameters evaluated based on different benchmarks. The results showed that the proposed model fitting the experimental results with high accuracy compare to the other models, as well as the I-V characteristic curve. The results of this study can be considered valuable in terms of the installation of a grid-connected PV system in fluctuated climatic conditions. PMID:27035575

  20. Identification of the modifier of Min 2 (Mom2) locus, a new mutation that influences Apc-induced intestinal neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silverman, Karen A; Koratkar, Revati; Siracusa, Linda D; Buchberg, Arthur M

    2002-01-01

    Min (Multiple intestinal neoplasia) mice carry a dominant mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli (Apc) gene and develop multiple adenomas throughout their intestinal tract (Moser et al. 1990; Su et al 1992). Polyp multiplicity in Min mice is greatly influenced by genetic background. A modifier locus, Mom1 (Modifier of Min 1), was identified and localized to distal mouse chromosome 4 (Moser et al. 1992; Dietrich et al. 1993), and accounts for some of the genetic variance in polyp multiplicity. Mom1 is a semidominant modifier of polyp size and multiplicity in Min mice (Gould and Dove 1997), and encodes the secretory type II nonpancreatic phospholipase A2 (Pla2g2a) gene (MacPhee et al. 1995; Cornier et al. 1997, 2000). We now report the identification of a second Modifier of Min 2 (Mom2) locus that is the result of a spontaneous mutation. One resistant Mom2 allele can suppress 88%-95% of polyps detected in Apc(Min)/+ mice, indicating that Mom2 acts in a dominant fashion. Linkage analysis has localized Mom2 to distal mouse chromosome 18. The effects of the Mom2 locus on reducing polyp multiplicity are stronger than the effects of the Mom1 locus, in both the small and large intestines. Some Apc(Min)/+ mice that carried one resistant Mom2 allele were tumor-free at 21 weeks of age, even in the absence of a resistant Mom1 allele. Thus, the resistant Mom2 allele can, in some cases, completely suppress the penetrance of the Apc(Min) mutation.

  1. Min mentor er min voksenven

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Birte

    2009-01-01

    En artikel i bogen: 6 belysninger af vejledning, brydninger, forståelser & praksis. Artiklen er et sammendrag af en diskursanalyse fra 2008 fra projetrapporten: Ind under huden, www.vejledning.net...

  2. Validation of functional fetal autonomic brain age score fABAS in 5 min short recordings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoyer, Dirk; Kowalski, Eva-Maria; Schmidt, Alexander; Witte, Otto W; Schneider, Uwe; Schleußner, Ekkehard; Hatzmann, Wolfgang; Grönemeyer, Dietrich HW; Van Leeuwen, Peter

    2015-01-01

    With the objective of evaluating the functional maturation age and developmental disturbances we have previously introduced the fetal autonomic brain age score (fABAS) using 30 min fetal magnetocardiographic recordings (fMCG, Jena). The score is based on heart rate pattern indices that are related to universal principles of developmental biology. The present work aims at the validation of the fABAS methodology on 5 min recordings from an independent database (fMCG, Bochum).We found high agreement of fABAS obtained from Jena normal fetuses (5 min subsets, n  =  364) and Bochum recordings (n  =  322, normal fetuses). fABAS of 48 recordings from fetuses with intra-uterine growth restriction (IUGR, Bochum) was reduced in most of the cases, a result consistent with IUGR fetuses from Jena previously reported. fABAS calculated from 5 min snapshots only partly covers the accuracy when compared to fABAS from 30 min recordings. More precise diagnosis requires longer recordings.fABAS obtained from fMCG recordings is a strong candidate for standardized assessment of functional maturation age and developmental disturbances. Even 5 min recordings seem to be valuable for screening for maturation problems. (paper)

  3. Differences in walking pattern during 6-min walk test between patients with COPD and healthy subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annegarn, Janneke; Spruit, Martijn A; Savelberg, Hans H C M; Willems, Paul J B; van de Bool, Coby; Schols, Annemie M W J; Wouters, Emiel F M; Meijer, Kenneth

    2012-01-01

    To date, detailed analyses of walking patterns using accelerometers during the 6-min walk test (6MWT) have not been performed in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Therefore, it remains unclear whether and to what extent COPD patients have an altered walking pattern during the 6MWT compared to healthy elderly subjects. 79 COPD patients and 24 healthy elderly subjects performed the 6MWT wearing an accelerometer attached to the trunk. The accelerometer features (walking intensity, cadence, and walking variability) and subject characteristics were assessed and compared between groups. Moreover, associations were sought with 6-min walk distance (6MWD) using multiple ordinary least squares (OLS) regression models. COPD patients walked with a significantly lower walking intensity, lower cadence and increased walking variability compared to healthy subjects. Walking intensity and height were the only two significant determinants of 6MWD in healthy subjects, explaining 85% of the variance in 6MWD. In COPD patients also age, cadence, walking variability measures and their interactions were included were significant determinants of 6MWD (total variance in 6MWD explained: 88%). COPD patients have an altered walking pattern during 6MWT compared to healthy subjects. These differences in walking pattern partially explain the lower 6MWD in patients with COPD.

  4. Using the MDCT thick slab MinIP method for the follow-up of pulmonary emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lan, Hai; Nishitani, Hiromu; Nishihara, Sadamitsu; Ueno, Junji; Takao, Shoichiro; Iwamoto, Seiji; Kawanaka, Takashi; Mahmut, Mawlan; Qingge, Si

    2011-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of thick slab minimum intensity projection (MinIP) as a follow-up method in patients with pulmonary emphysema. This method was used to determine the presence or absence of changes over time in the lung field based on multi-detector-row CT (MDCT) data. Among patients diagnosed with pulmonary emphysema who underwent 16-MDCT (slice thickness, 1 mm) twice at an interval of 6 months or more, 12 patients without changes in the lung field and 14 with clear changes in the lung field were selected as subjects. An image interpretation experiment was performed by five image interpreters. Pulmonary emphysema was followed up using two types of thick slab MinIP (thick slab MinIP 1 and 2) and multi-planar reformation (MPR), and the results of image interpretation were evaluated by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. In addition, the time required for image interpretation was compared among the three follow-up methods. The area under the ROC curve (Az) was 0.794 for thick slab MinIP 1, 0.778 for the thick slab MinIP 2, and 0.759 for MPR, showing no significant differences among the three methods. Individual differences in each item were significantly more marked for MPR than for thick slab MinIP. The time required for image interpretation was around 18 seconds for thick slab MinIP 1, 11 seconds for thick slab MinIP 2, and approximately 127 seconds for MPR, showing significant differences among the three methods. There were no significant differences in the results of image interpretation regarding the presence or absence of changes in the lung fields between thick slab MinIP and MPR. However, thick slab MinIP showed a shorter image interpretation time and smaller individual differences in the results among image interpreters than MPR, suggesting the usefulness of this method for determining the presence or absence of changes with time in the lung fields of patients with pulmonary emphysema.

  5. Norfolk Harbor and Channels Deepening Study. Report 1. Physical Model Results. Chesapeake Bay Hydraulic Model Investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    These mechanisms consist of a feedback system that is entirely self-contained and is not dependent on computer feedback for adjustment. The system...reproducing a variable hydro- graph freshwater inflow through the use of positive feedback control of river discharges. Fresh water normally enters the model...juni of the I IOW patter-1 it Lte in, aI t he )Jillls . ’Ihe othle r t o .Lames ranges , JN02 arnd JG63 , show s I i gilt dt-( I 1ae 1. IAm If I I iti

  6. MinHash-Based Fuzzy Keyword Search of Encrypted Data across Multiple Cloud Servers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingsha He

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available To enhance the efficiency of data searching, most data owners store their data files in different cloud servers in the form of cipher-text. Thus, efficient search using fuzzy keywords becomes a critical issue in such a cloud computing environment. This paper proposes a method that aims at improving the efficiency of cipher-text retrieval and lowering storage overhead for fuzzy keyword search. In contrast to traditional approaches, the proposed method can reduce the complexity of Min-Hash-based fuzzy keyword search by using Min-Hash fingerprints to avoid the need to construct the fuzzy keyword set. The method will utilize Jaccard similarity to rank the results of retrieval, thus reducing the amount of calculation for similarity and saving a lot of time and space overhead. The method will also take consideration of multiple user queries through re-encryption technology and update user permissions dynamically. Security analysis demonstrates that the method can provide better privacy preservation and experimental results show that efficiency of cipher-text using the proposed method can improve the retrieval time and lower storage overhead as well.

  7. A lightweight QRS detector for single lead ECG signals using a max-min difference algorithm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandit, Diptangshu; Zhang, Li; Liu, Chengyu; Chattopadhyay, Samiran; Aslam, Nauman; Lim, Chee Peng

    2017-06-01

    Detection of the R-peak pertaining to the QRS complex of an ECG signal plays an important role for the diagnosis of a patient's heart condition. To accurately identify the QRS locations from the acquired raw ECG signals, we need to handle a number of challenges, which include noise, baseline wander, varying peak amplitudes, and signal abnormality. This research aims to address these challenges by developing an efficient lightweight algorithm for QRS (i.e., R-peak) detection from raw ECG signals. A lightweight real-time sliding window-based Max-Min Difference (MMD) algorithm for QRS detection from Lead II ECG signals is proposed. Targeting to achieve the best trade-off between computational efficiency and detection accuracy, the proposed algorithm consists of five key steps for QRS detection, namely, baseline correction, MMD curve generation, dynamic threshold computation, R-peak detection, and error correction. Five annotated databases from Physionet are used for evaluating the proposed algorithm in R-peak detection. Integrated with a feature extraction technique and a neural network classifier, the proposed ORS detection algorithm has also been extended to undertake normal and abnormal heartbeat detection from ECG signals. The proposed algorithm exhibits a high degree of robustness in QRS detection and achieves an average sensitivity of 99.62% and an average positive predictivity of 99.67%. Its performance compares favorably with those from the existing state-of-the-art models reported in the literature. In regards to normal and abnormal heartbeat detection, the proposed QRS detection algorithm in combination with the feature extraction technique and neural network classifier achieves an overall accuracy rate of 93.44% based on an empirical evaluation using the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia data set with 10-fold cross validation. In comparison with other related studies, the proposed algorithm offers a lightweight adaptive alternative for R-peak detection with good

  8. A regional climate model for northern Europe: model description and results from the downscaling of two GCM control simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummukainen, M.; Räisänen, J.; Bringfelt, B.; Ullerstig, A.; Omstedt, A.; Willén, U.; Hansson, U.; Jones, C.

    This work presents a regional climate model, the Rossby Centre regional Atmospheric model (RCA1), recently developed from the High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM). The changes in the HIRLAM parametrizations, necessary for climate-length integrations, are described. A regional Baltic Sea ocean model and a modeling system for the Nordic inland lake systems have been coupled with RCA1. The coupled system has been used to downscale 10-year time slices from two different general circulation model (GCM) simulations to provide high-resolution regional interpretation of large-scale modeling. A selection of the results from the control runs, i.e. the present-day climate simulations, are presented: large-scale free atmospheric fields, the surface temperature and precipitation results and results for the on-line simulated regional ocean and lake surface climates. The regional model modifies the surface climate description compared to the GCM simulations, but it is also substantially affected by the biases in the GCM simulations. The regional model also improves the representation of the regional ocean and the inland lakes, compared to the GCM results.

  9. A regional climate model for northern Europe: model description and results from the downscaling of two GCM control simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rummukainen, M.; Raeisaenen, J.; Bringfelt, B.; Ullerstig, A.; Omstedt, A.; Willen, U.; Hansson, U.; Jones, C. [Rossby Centre, Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Inst., Norrkoeping (Sweden)

    2001-03-01

    This work presents a regional climate model, the Rossby Centre regional Atmospheric model (RCA1), recently developed from the High Resolution Limited Area Model (HIRLAM). The changes in the HIRLAM parametrizations, necessary for climate-length integrations, are described. A regional Baltic Sea ocean model and a modeling system for the Nordic inland lake systems have been coupled with RCA1. The coupled system has been used to downscale 10-year time slices from two different general circulation model (GCM) simulations to provide high-resolution regional interpretation of large-scale modeling. A selection of the results from the control runs, i.e. the present-day climate simulations, are presented: large-scale free atmospheric fields, the surface temperature and precipitation results and results for the on-line simulated regional ocean and lake surface climates. The regional model modifies the surface climate description compared to the GCM simulations, but it is also substantially affected by the biases in the GCM simulations. The regional model also improves the representation of the regional ocean and the inland lakes, compared to the GCM results. (orig.)

  10. Study on driver model for hybrid truck based on driving simulator experimental results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dam Hoang Phuc

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a proposed car-following driver model taking into account some features of both the compensatory and anticipatory model representing the human pedal operation has been verified by driving simulator experiments with several real drivers. The comparison between computer simulations performed by determined model parameters with the experimental results confirm the correctness of this mathematical driver model and identified model parameters. Then the driver model is joined to a hybrid vehicle dynamics model and the moderate car following maneuver simulations with various driver parameters are conducted to investigate influences of driver parameters on vehicle dynamics response and fuel economy. Finally, major driver parameters involved in the longitudinal control of drivers are clarified. Keywords: Driver model, Driver-vehicle closed-loop system, Car Following, Driving simulator/hybrid electric vehicle (B1

  11. Contrast enhancement in atherosclerosis development in a mouse model: in vivo results at 2 Tesla.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaabane, L; Pellet, N; Bourdillon, M C; Desbleds Mansard, C; Sulaiman, A; Hadour, G; Thivolet-Béjui, F; Roy, P; Briguet, A; Douek, P; Canet Soulas, E

    2004-12-01

    To develop an MRI method for the evaluation of contrast enhancement in early atherosclerotic plaque development in the abdominal aorta of a mouse model. Male apoE-/- mice from three groups, respectively 4 (n = 6), 8 (n = 11) and 16 (n = 4) weeks were included. Axial T1 spin echo images of the abdominal aorta were obtained above and below the renal arteries (90 microm spatial resolution) before and over 1 h after the injection of a macromolecular contrast agent. Signal enhancement was measured in the vessel wall and compared to histological features. Maximal arterial wall signal enhancement was obtained from 16 to 32 min post injection. During this time, the signal-to-noise ratio increased by a factor up to 1.7 in 16 week mice and 2.7 and 2.4 in 8 and 4 weeks mice, respectively. The enhancement of the arterial wall appeared less pronounced in the oldest mice, 16 weeks old, exhibiting more advanced lesions. Using a macromolecular gadolinium agent, contrast uptake in atherogenesis varies with lesion stage and may be related to vessel-wall permeability. Dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI may be useful to evaluate the atherosclerotic plaque activity in mice.

  12. Random Secure Comparator Selection Based Privacy-Preserving MAX/MIN Query Processing in Two-Tiered Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua Dai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Privacy-preserving data queries for wireless sensor networks (WSNs have drawn much attention recently. This paper proposes a privacy-preserving MAX/MIN query processing approach based on random secure comparator selection in two-tiered sensor network, which is denoted by RSCS-PMQ. The secret comparison model is built on the basis of the secure comparator which is defined by 0-1 encoding and HMAC. And the minimal set of highest secure comparators generating algorithm MaxRSC is proposed, which is the key to realize RSCS-PMQ. In the data collection procedures, the sensor node randomly selects a generated secure comparator of the maximum data into ciphertext which is submitted to the nearby master node. In the query processing procedures, the master node utilizes the MaxRSC algorithm to determine the corresponding minimal set of candidate ciphertexts containing the query results and returns it to the base station. And the base station obtains the plaintext query result through decryption. The theoretical analysis and experimental result indicate that RSCS-PMQ can preserve the privacy of sensor data and query result from master nodes even if they are compromised, and it has a better performance on the network communication cost than the existing approaches.

  13. An elementary proof of MinVol(Rn = 0 for n > 3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiaqiang Mei

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we give an elementary proof of the result that the minimal volumes of R³ and R4 are zero. The approach is to construct a sequence of explicit complete metrics on them such that the sectional curvatures are bounded in absolute value by 1 and the volumes tend to zero. As a direct consequence, we get that MinVol (Rn = 0 for n > 3.Neste artigo fornecemos uma demonstração elementar do resultado de que os volumes minimais de R³ e R4 são ambos iguais a zero. A abordagem consiste na construção de uma seqüência de métricas completas explícitas nesses espaços cujas curvaturas seccionais são limitadas em valor absoluto por 1 e os volumes tendem a zero. Como conseqüência direta, estabelecemos que MinVol(Rn = 0 para n > 3.

  14. Some important results from the air pollution distribution model STACKS (1988-1992)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Erbrink, J.J.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is paid to the results of the study on the distribution of air pollutants by high chimney-stacks of electric power plants. An important product of the study is the integrated distribution model STACKS (Short Term Air-pollutant Concentrations Kema modelling System). The improvements and the extensions of STACKS are described in relation to the National Model, which has been used to estimate the environmental effects of individual chimney-stacks. The National Model shows unacceptable variations for high pollutant sources. Based on the results of STACKS revision of the National model has been taken into consideration. By means of the revised National Model a more realistic estimation of the environmental effects of electric power plants can be carried out

  15. Simultaneous Aurora-A/STK15 overexpression and centrosome amplification induce chromosomal instability in tumour cells with a MIN phenotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lentini, Laura; Amato, Angela; Schillaci, Tiziana; Di Leonardo, Aldo

    2007-01-01

    Genetic instability is a hallmark of tumours and preneoplastic lesions. The predominant form of genome instability in human cancer is chromosome instability (CIN). CIN is characterized by chromosomal aberrations, gains or losses of whole chromosomes (aneuploidy), and it is often associated with centrosome amplification. Centrosomes control cell division by forming a bipolar mitotic spindle and play an essential role in the maintenance of chromosomal stability. However, whether centrosome amplification could directly cause aneuploidy is not fully established. Also, alterations in genes required for mitotic progression could be involved in CIN. A major candidate is represented by Aurora-A/STK15 that associates with centrosomes and is overexpressed in several types of human tumour. Centrosome amplification were induced by hydroxyurea treatment and visualized by immunofluorescence microscopy. Aurora-A/STK15 ectopic expression was achieved by retroviral infection and puromycin selection in HCT116 tumour cells. Effects of Aurora-A/STK15 depletion on centrosome status and ploidy were determined by Aurora-A/STK15 transcriptional silencing by RNA interference. Changes in the expression levels of some mitotic genes were determined by Real time RT-PCR. We investigated whether amplification of centrosomes and overexpression of Aurora-A/STK15 induce CIN using as a model system a colon carcinoma cell line (HCT116). We found that in HCT116 cells, chromosomally stable and near diploid cells harbouring a MIN phenotype, centrosome amplification induced by hydroxyurea treatment is neither maintained nor induces aneuploidy. On the contrary, ectopic overexpression of Aurora-A/STK15 induced supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Aurora-A/STK15 transcriptional silencing by RNA interference in cells ectopically overexpressing this kinase promptly decreased cell numbers with supernumerary centrosomes and aneuploidy. Our results show that centrosome amplification alone is not sufficient

  16. Radiative effects of a CO2 increase: Results of a model comparison

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luther, F.M.

    1992-01-01

    Many infrared (IR) radiative transfer models have been developed that range in complexity from line-by-line calculations to simplified parameterizations used in climate models and general circulation models. Assessment of the potential climatic effects of trace gases such as carbon dioxide requires first an evaluation of the radiative properties of each gas and determination of the perturbation to the radiative fluxes. The most detailed radiative transfer models are well suited for this application. The perturbed radiative fluxes lead to climatic effects that are evaluated using models that couple radiative, dynamic transport, and hydrological processes. Recently, chemical interactions have also been included in the assessments. It is desirable that a better understanding be developed of the differences in model approaches used by various modeling groups and how these differences affect model sensitivity to perturbations such as increased carbon dioxide. Since many factors affect model sensitivity, a practical approach is to start with a comparison of the basic physical processes without feedbacks and couplings, then to build in complexity. Because increases in carbon dioxide leads to radiative forcing, the treatment of radiative processes is a natural starting point for comparison. A comparison of infrared radiative transfer models has begun under the auspices of the US Department of Energy's Carbon Dioxide Research Program. The results of the IR model comparison will be included in the state-of-the-art report on climate modeling

  17. GIS Grid and CWS-based assessment of vulnerability to debris flow hazards in the upper reaches of Min River, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Mingtao; Hübl, Johannes; Fuchs, Sven

    2014-05-01

    Based on conceptual models of vulnerability assessment for mountain hazards, this paper aims to improve a quantitative assessment model for regional vulnerability by a detailed analysis of the relation between and among vulnerability (V), exposure (E), social coping capacity (C) and resilience (Re) with the expression of V = E(1-° C+Re- 2). Taking the mountain settlements in the upper reaches of Min River, China, as an example and ArcGIS 9.3 as the platform, we applied the technology of GIS Grid and the method of Contributing Weight Superposition (CWS) to establish both a model and a system for the vulnerability assessment of elements at risk. The latter consists of 13 index factors including population, economics and road densities, building and farmland coverage, hazard-affected areas, a monitoring coefficient to take into account early warning measures, the urbanization rate, GDP per capita, and labor aged population ratio. Accordingly, a debris-flow hazard vulnerability zoning map has been obtained and the assessment results had shown that the distribution of high and comparatively high vulnerability zones, where economic activities are the most intensive, had a close correlation to the river geometry and geomorphology and population activities. Such results correspond well with loss data in the region, proving the reasonability and feasibility of assessment methods in this paper. The results thus may serve as the pertinent guidance for settlement relocation, population distribution readjustment, and management to prevent and reduce hazards in the upper reaches of Min River.

  18. Results and Comparison from the SAM Linear Fresnel Technology Performance Model: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, M. J.

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents the new Linear Fresnel technology performance model in NREL's System Advisor Model. The model predicts the financial and technical performance of direct-steam-generation Linear Fresnel power plants, and can be used to analyze a range of system configurations. This paper presents a brief discussion of the model formulation and motivation, and provides extensive discussion of the model performance and financial results. The Linear Fresnel technology is also compared to other concentrating solar power technologies in both qualitative and quantitative measures. The Linear Fresnel model - developed in conjunction with the Electric Power Research Institute - provides users with the ability to model a variety of solar field layouts, fossil backup configurations, thermal receiver designs, and steam generation conditions. This flexibility aims to encompass current market solutions for the DSG Linear Fresnel technology, which is seeing increasing exposure in fossil plant augmentation and stand-alone power generation applications.

  19. An outcome-based learning model to identify emerging threats : experimental and simulation results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martinez-Moyano, I. J.; Conrad, S. H.; Andersen, D. F.; Decision and Information Sciences; SNL; Univ. at Albany

    2007-01-01

    The authors present experimental and simulation results of an outcome-based learning model as it applies to the identification of emerging threats. This model integrates judgment, decision making, and learning theories to provide an integrated framework for the behavioral study of emerging threats.

  20. The European Integrated Tokamak Modelling (ITM) effort: achievements and first physics results

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.L. Falchetto,; Coster, D.; Coelho, R.; Scott, B. D.; Figini, L.; Kalupin, D.; Nardon, E.; Nowak, S.; L.L. Alves,; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; João P.S. Bizarro,; C. Boulbe,; Dinklage, A.; Farina, D.; B. Faugeras,; Ferreira, J.; Figueiredo, A.; Huynh, P.; Imbeaux, F.; Ivanova-Stanik, I.; Jonsson, T.; H.-J. Klingshirn,; Konz, C.; Kus, A.; Marushchenko, N. B.; Pereverzev, G.; M. Owsiak,; Poli, E.; Peysson, Y.; R. Reimer,; Signoret, J.; Sauter, O.; Stankiewicz, R.; Strand, P.; Voitsekhovitch, I.; Westerhof, E.; T. Zok,; Zwingmann, W.; ITM-TF contributors,; ASDEX Upgrade team,; JET-EFDA Contributors,

    2014-01-01

    A selection of achievements and first physics results are presented of the European Integrated Tokamak Modelling Task Force (EFDA ITM-TF) simulation framework, which aims to provide a standardized platform and an integrated modelling suite of validated numerical codes for the simulation and

  1. The Plumbing of Land Surface Models: Is Poor Performance a Result of Methodology or Data Quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haughton, Ned; Abramowitz, Gab; Pitman, Andy J.; Or, Dani; Best, Martin J.; Johnson, Helen R.; Balsamo, Gianpaolo; Boone, Aaron; Cuntz, Matthais; Decharme, Bertrand; hide

    2016-01-01

    The PALS Land sUrface Model Benchmarking Evaluation pRoject (PLUMBER) illustrated the value of prescribing a priori performance targets in model intercomparisons. It showed that the performance of turbulent energy flux predictions from different land surface models, at a broad range of flux tower sites using common evaluation metrics, was on average worse than relatively simple empirical models. For sensible heat fluxes, all land surface models were outperformed by a linear regression against downward shortwave radiation. For latent heat flux, all land surface models were outperformed by a regression against downward shortwave, surface air temperature and relative humidity. These results are explored here in greater detail and possible causes are investigated. We examine whether particular metrics or sites unduly influence the collated results, whether results change according to time-scale aggregation and whether a lack of energy conservation in fluxtower data gives the empirical models an unfair advantage in the intercomparison. We demonstrate that energy conservation in the observational data is not responsible for these results. We also show that the partitioning between sensible and latent heat fluxes in LSMs, rather than the calculation of available energy, is the cause of the original findings. Finally, we present evidence suggesting that the nature of this partitioning problem is likely shared among all contributing LSMs. While we do not find a single candidate explanation forwhy land surface models perform poorly relative to empirical benchmarks in PLUMBER, we do exclude multiple possible explanations and provide guidance on where future research should focus.

  2. Modelling of water potential and water uptake rate of tomato plants in the greenhouse: preliminary results.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruggink, G.T.; Schouwink, H.E.; Gieling, Th.H.

    1988-01-01

    A dynamic model is presented which predicts water potential and water uptake rate of greenhouse tomato plants using transpiration rate as input. The model assumes that water uptake is the resultant of water potential and hydraulic resistance, and that water potential is linearly related to water

  3. Mobile satellite propagation measurements and modeling: A review of results for systems engineers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stutzman, W. L. (Editor); Barts, R. M.; Bostian, C. W.; Butterworth, J. S.; Campbell, R.; Goldhirsh, J.; Vogel, W. J.

    1988-01-01

    An overview of Mobile Satellite System (MSS) propagation measurements and modeling is given, including a summary of results. The simple models presented should be of some use to systems engineers. A complete summary of propagation experiments with literature references is included.

  4. Predicting ecosystem functioning from plant traits: Results from a multi-scale ecophsiological modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wijk, van M.T.

    2007-01-01

    Ecosystem functioning is the result of processes working at a hierarchy of scales. The representation of these processes in a model that is mathematically tractable and ecologically meaningful is a big challenge. In this paper I describe an individual based model (PLACO¿PLAnt COmpetition) that

  5. User's guide to Model Viewer, a program for three-dimensional visualization of ground-water model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Paul A.; Winston, Richard B.

    2002-01-01

    Model Viewer is a computer program that displays the results of three-dimensional groundwater models. Scalar data (such as hydraulic head or solute concentration) may be displayed as a solid or a set of isosurfaces, using a red-to-blue color spectrum to represent a range of scalar values. Vector data (such as velocity or specific discharge) are represented by lines oriented to the vector direction and scaled to the vector magnitude. Model Viewer can also display pathlines, cells or nodes that represent model features such as streams and wells, and auxiliary graphic objects such as grid lines and coordinate axes. Users may crop the model grid in different orientations to examine the interior structure of the data. For transient simulations, Model Viewer can animate the time evolution of the simulated quantities. The current version (1.0) of Model Viewer runs on Microsoft Windows 95, 98, NT and 2000 operating systems, and supports the following models: MODFLOW-2000, MODFLOW-2000 with the Ground-Water Transport Process, MODFLOW-96, MOC3D (Version 3.5), MODPATH, MT3DMS, and SUTRA (Version 2D3D.1). Model Viewer is designed to directly read input and output files from these models, thus minimizing the need for additional postprocessing. This report provides an overview of Model Viewer. Complete instructions on how to use the software are provided in the on-line help pages.

  6. AFSC/RACE/GAP/Laman: Model Results of Aleutian Island POP distributions

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The data supporting the "Model Results of Aleutian Island POP distributions" manuscript are distribution and abundance of Pacific ocean perch from RACEBase,...

  7. Modeling the radiation transfer of discontinuous canopies: results for gap probability and single-scattering contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Feng; Zou, Kai; Shang, Hong; Ji, Zheng; Zhao, Huijie; Huang, Wenjiang; Li, Cunjun

    2010-10-01

    In this paper we present an analytical model for the computation of radiation transfer of discontinuous vegetation canopies. Some initial results of gap probability and bidirectional gap probability of discontinuous vegetation canopies, which are important parameters determining the radiative environment of the canopies, are given and compared with a 3- D computer simulation model. In the model, negative exponential attenuation of light within individual plant canopies is assumed. Then the computation of gap probability is resolved by determining the entry points and exiting points of the ray with the individual plants via their equations in space. For the bidirectional gap probability, which determines the single-scattering contribution of the canopy, a gap statistical analysis based model was adopted to correct the dependence of gap probabilities for both solar and viewing directions. The model incorporates the structural characteristics, such as plant sizes, leaf size, row spacing, foliage density, planting density, leaf inclination distribution. Available experimental data are inadequate for a complete validation of the model. So it was evaluated with a three dimensional computer simulation model for 3D vegetative scenes, which shows good agreement between these two models' results. This model should be useful to the quantification of light interception and the modeling of bidirectional reflectance distributions of discontinuous canopies.

  8. AREVA announces US$ 7.75 Per share friendly cash offer for UraMin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    AREVA and UraMin Inc. ('UraMin') entered on June 15, 2007 into an agreement in respect of AREVA's friendly cash offer for 100% of the share capital of UraMin. UraMin is listed in London (AIM) and Toronto (TSX). AREVA (Euronext Paris) already owns 5.5% of UraMin's share capital. This cash offer of AREVA will be made through its indirect wholly-owned subsidiary CFMM Development ('AREVA') based on a price of US$ 7.75 per UraMin share. The total offer consideration amounts to more than USD 2.5 billion for 100% of the fully diluted share capital of UraMin. This represents a premium of 21% over UraMin 20-day weighted average trading price ending on June 8, 2007. The UraMin Board of Directors, after consulting with its financial advisors, has determined that the offer is fair and in the best interest of the UraMin shareholders and it has resolved to recommend acceptance of the Offer. BMO Capital Markets has provided an opinion that the offer is fair, from a financial point of view, to the UraMin shareholders. In connection with the offer, all directors and certain other shareholders representing approximately 25% of the outstanding UraMin shares (calculated on a fully diluted basis) have entered into lock-up agreements with AREVA pursuant to which they have agreed to tender all their UraMin shares to AREVA's offer. The support agreement entered into between AREVA and UraMin provides for, among other things, in case a superior proposal is accepted by UraMin, a right to match in favour of AREVA. The support agreement also includes a break up fee in favour of AREVA of US$ 75 million under certain circumstances. Concurrently with the closing of the proposed offer, UraMin will declare a dividend payable in shares of the capital of Niger Uranium Limited held by UraMin (where permitted by law) or a cash equivalent of the value of such shares

  9. Numerical modelling of radon-222 entry into houses: An outline of techniques and results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.E.

    2001-01-01

    Numerical modelling is a powerful tool for studies of soil gas and radon-222 entry into houses. It is the purpose of this paper to review some main techniques and results. In the past, modelling has focused on Darcy flow of soil gas (driven by indoor–outdoor pressure differences) and combined......, fractures, moisture, non-uniform soil temperature, non-Darcy flow of gas, and flow caused by changes in the atmospheric pressure. Numerical models can be used to estimate the importance of specific factors for radon entry. Models are also helpful when results obtained in special laboratory or test structure...... experiments need to be extrapolated to more general situations (e.g. to real houses or even to other soil–gas pollutants). Finally, models provide a cost-effective test bench for improved designs of radon prevention systems. The paper includes a summary of transport equations and boundary conditions...

  10. Modelling lung cancer due to radon and smoking in WISMUT miners: Preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bijwaard, H.; Dekkers, F.; Van Dillen, T.

    2011-01-01

    A mechanistic two-stage carcinogenesis model has been applied to model lung-cancer mortality in the largest uranium-miner cohort available. Models with and without smoking action both fit the data well. As smoking information is largely missing from the cohort data, a method has been devised to project this information from a case-control study onto the cohort. Model calculations using 256 projections show that the method works well. Preliminary results show that if an explicit smoking action is absent in the model, this is compensated by the values of the baseline parameters. This indicates that in earlier studies performed without smoking information, the results obtained for the radiation parameters are still valid. More importantly, the inclusion of smoking-related parameters shows that these mainly influence the later stages of lung-cancer development. (authors)

  11. Generalized Simplified Variable-Scaled Min Sum LDPC decoder for irregular LDPC Codes

    OpenAIRE

    Emran, Ahmed A.; Elsabrouty, Maha

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel low complexity scaling strategy of min-sum decoding algorithm for irregular LDPC codes. In the proposed method, we generalize our previously proposed simplified Variable Scaled Min-Sum (SVS-min-sum) by replacing the sub-optimal starting value and heuristic update for the scaling factor sequence by optimized values. Density evolution and Nelder-Mead optimization are used offline, prior to the decoding, to obtain the optimal starting point and per iteration upd...

  12. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN ISO 9001 CERTIFICATION MATURITY AND EFQM BUSINESS EXCELLENCE MODEL RESULTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Miguel Fonseca

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This exploratory research evaluates if there a relationship between the number of years since an organization has achieved ISO 9001 certification and the highest level of recognition received by the same organization with the EFQM Business Excellence Model.Methodology/Approach: After state of the art review a detailed comparison between both models was made. Fifty two Portuguese organizations were considered and Correlation coefficient Spearman Rho was used to investigate the possible relationships.Findings: Conclusion is that there is indeed a moderate positive correlation between these two variables, the higher the number of years of ISO 9001 certification, the higher the results of the organization EFQM model evaluation and recognition. This supports the assumption that ISO 9001 International Standard by incorporating many of the principles present in the EFQM Business Excellence Model is consistent with this model and can be considered as a step towards that direction.Research Limitation/implication: Due to the dynamic nature of these models that might change over time and the possible time delays between implementation and results, more in-depth studies like experimental design or a longitudinal quasi-experimental design could be used to confirm the results of this investigation.Originality/Value of paper: This research gives additional insights on conjunct studies of both models. The use of external evaluation results carried out by the independent EFQM assessors minimizes the possible bias of previous studies accessing the value of ISO 9001 certification.

  13. Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) exercise: Results from the second phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinty, B.; Widlowski, J.-L.; Taberner, M.; Gobron, N.; Verstraete, M. M.; Disney, M.; Gascon, F.; Gastellu, J.-P.; Jiang, L.; Kuusk, A.; Lewis, P.; Li, X.; Ni-Meister, W.; Nilson, T.; North, P.; Qin, W.; Su, L.; Tang, S.; Thompson, R.; Verhoef, W.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Yan, G.; Zang, H.

    2004-03-01

    The Radiation Transfer Model Intercomparison (RAMI) initiative is a community-driven exercise to benchmark the models of radiation transfer (RT) used to represent the reflectance of terrestrial surfaces. Systematic model intercomparisons started in 1999 as a self-organized, open-access, voluntary activity of the RT modeling community. The results of the first phase were published by [2001]. The present paper describes the benchmarking protocol and the results achieved during the second phase, which took place during 2002. This second phase included two major components: The first one included a rerun of all direct-mode tests proposed during the first phase, to accommodate the evaluation of models that have been upgraded since, and the participation of new models into the entire exercise. The second component was designed to probe the performance of three-dimensional models in complex heterogeneous environments, which closely mimic the observations of actual space instruments operating at various spatial resolutions over forest canopy systems. Phases 1 and 2 of RAMI both confirm not only that a majority of the radiation transfer models participating in RAMI are in good agreement between themselves for relatively simple radiation transfer problems but also that these models exhibit significant discrepancies when considering more complex but nevertheless realistic geophysical scenarios. Specific recommendations are provided to guide the future of this benchmarking program (Phase 3 and beyond).

  14. [Analysis of the model OPM3®application and results for health area].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Augusto Dos Santos, Luis; de Fátima Marin, Heimar

    2011-01-01

    This research sought to analyze if a questionnaire model created by an international community of project management is applicable to health organizations. The model OPM3 ® (Organizational Project Management Maturity Model) was created in order that organizations of any area or size can identify the presence or absence of good management practices. The aim of applying this model is to always evaluate the organization and not the interviewee. In this paper, one presents the results of employing this model in an organization that has information technology products and services applied to health area. This study verified that the model is rapidly applicable and that the analyzed organization has an expressive number of good practices.

  15. A New Explanation and Proof of the Paradoxical Scoring Results in Multidimensional Item Response Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Pascal; Spiess, Martin

    2017-10-13

    In multidimensional item response models, paradoxical scoring effects can arise, wherein correct answers are penalized and incorrect answers are rewarded. For the most prominent class of IRT models, the class of linearly compensatory models, a general derivation of paradoxical scoring effects based on the geometry of item discrimination vectors is given, which furthermore corrects an error in an established theorem on paradoxical results. This approach highlights the very counterintuitive way in which item discrimination parameters (and also factor loadings) have to be interpreted in terms of their influence on the latent ability estimate. It is proven that, despite the error in the original proof, the key result concerning the existence of paradoxical effects remains true-although the actual relation to the item parameters is shown to be a more complicated function than previous results suggested. The new proof enables further insights into the actual mathematical causation of the paradox and generalizes the findings within the class of linearly compensatory models.

  16. Influence of delayed neutron parameter calculation accuracy on results of modeled WWER scram experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artemov, V.G.; Gusev, V.I.; Zinatullin, R.E.; Karpov, A.S.

    2007-01-01

    Using modeled WWER cram rod drop experiments, performed at the Rostov NPP, as an example, the influence of delayed neutron parameters on the modeling results was investigated. The delayed neutron parameter values were taken from both domestic and foreign nuclear databases. Numerical modeling was carried out on the basis of SAPFIR 9 5andWWERrogram package. Parameters of delayed neutrons were acquired from ENDF/B-VI and BNAB-78 validated data files. It was demonstrated that using delay fraction data from different databases in reactivity meters led to significantly different reactivity results. Based on the results of numerically modeled experiments, delayed neutron parameters providing the best agreement between calculated and measured data were selected and recommended for use in reactor calculations (Authors)

  17. Rapid and Accurate Sequencing of Enterovirus Genomes Using MinION Nanopore Sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ji; Ke, Yue Hua; Zhang, Yong; Huang, Ke Qiang; Wang, Lei; Shen, Xin Xin; Dong, Xiao Ping; Xu, Wen Bo; Ma, Xue Jun

    2017-10-01

    Knowledge of an enterovirus genome sequence is very important in epidemiological investigation to identify transmission patterns and ascertain the extent of an outbreak. The MinION sequencer is increasingly used to sequence various viral pathogens in many clinical situations because of its long reads, portability, real-time accessibility of sequenced data, and very low initial costs. However, information is lacking on MinION sequencing of enterovirus genomes. In this proof-of-concept study using Enterovirus 71 (EV71) and Coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) strains as examples, we established an amplicon-based whole genome sequencing method using MinION. We explored the accuracy, minimum sequencing time, discrimination and high-throughput sequencing ability of MinION, and compared its performance with Sanger sequencing. Within the first minute (min) of sequencing, the accuracy of MinION was 98.5% for the single EV71 strain and 94.12%-97.33% for 10 genetically-related CA16 strains. In as little as 14 min, 99% identity was reached for the single EV71 strain, and in 17 min (on average), 99% identity was achieved for 10 CA16 strains in a single run. MinION is suitable for whole genome sequencing of enteroviruses with sufficient accuracy and fine discrimination and has the potential as a fast, reliable and convenient method for routine use. Copyright © 2017 The Editorial Board of Biomedical and Environmental Sciences. Published by China CDC. All rights reserved.

  18. A Tower Model for Lightning Overvoltage Studies Based on the Result of an FDTD Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Taku

    This paper describes a method for deriving a transmission tower model for EMTP lightning overvoltage studies from a numerical electromagnetic simulation result obtained by the FDTD (Finite Difference Time Domain) method. The FDTD simulation carried out in this paper takes into account the following items which have been ignored or over-simplified in previously-presented simulations: (i) resistivity of the ground soil; (ii) arms, major slant elements, and foundations of the tower; (iii) development speed of the lightning return stroke. For validation purpose a pulse test of a 500-kV transmission tower is simulated, and a comparison with the measured result shows that the present FDTD simulation gives a sufficiently accurate result. Using this validated FDTD-based simulation method the insulator-string voltages of a tower for a lightning stroke are calculated, and based on the simulation result the parameter values of the proposed tower model for EMTP studies are determined in a systematic way. Since previously-presented models include trial-and-error process in the parameter determination, it can be said that the proposed model is more general in this regard. As an illustrative example, the 500-kV transmission tower mentioned above is modeled, and it is shown that the derived model closely reproduces the FDTD simulation result.

  19. A hierarchy of models for simulating experimental results from a 3D heterogeneous porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogler, Daniel; Ostvar, Sassan; Paustian, Rebecca; Wood, Brian D.

    2018-04-01

    In this work we examine the dispersion of conservative tracers (bromide and fluorescein) in an experimentally-constructed three-dimensional dual-porosity porous medium. The medium is highly heterogeneous (σY2 = 5.7), and consists of spherical, low-hydraulic-conductivity inclusions embedded in a high-hydraulic-conductivity matrix. The bimodal medium was saturated with tracers, and then flushed with tracer-free fluid while the effluent breakthrough curves were measured. The focus for this work is to examine a hierarchy of four models (in the absence of adjustable parameters) with decreasing complexity to assess their ability to accurately represent the measured breakthrough curves. The most information-rich model was (1) a direct numerical simulation of the system in which the geometry, boundary and initial conditions, and medium properties were fully independently characterized experimentally with high fidelity. The reduced-information models included; (2) a simplified numerical model identical to the fully-resolved direct numerical simulation (DNS) model, but using a domain that was one-tenth the size; (3) an upscaled mobile-immobile model that allowed for a time-dependent mass-transfer coefficient; and, (4) an upscaled mobile-immobile model that assumed a space-time constant mass-transfer coefficient. The results illustrated that all four models provided accurate representations of the experimental breakthrough curves as measured by global RMS error. The primary component of error induced in the upscaled models appeared to arise from the neglect of convection within the inclusions. We discuss the necessity to assign value (via a utility function or other similar method) to outcomes if one is to further select from among model options. Interestingly, these results suggested that the conventional convection-dispersion equation, when applied in a way that resolves the heterogeneities, yields models with high fidelity without requiring the imposition of a more

  20. Min st-cut oracle for planar graphs with near-linear preprocessing time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borradaile, Glencora; Sankowski, Piotr; Wulff-Nilsen, Christian

    2010-01-01

    For an undirected n-vertex planar graph G with non-negative edge-weights, we consider the following type of query: given two vertices s and t in G, what is the weight of a min st-cut in G? We show how to answer such queries in constant time with O(n log5 n) preprocessing time and O(n log n) space...... problems in planar graphs, we also obtain an implicit representation of a minimum cycle basis in O(n log5 n) time and O(n log n) space and an explicit representation with additional O(C) time and space where C is the size of the basis. To obtain our results, we require that shortest paths be unique...

  1. Fuzzy Mutual Information Based min-Redundancy and Max-Relevance Heterogeneous Feature Selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daren Yu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Feature selection is an important preprocessing step in pattern classification and machine learning, and mutual information is widely used to measure relevance between features and decision. However, it is difficult to directly calculate relevance between continuous or fuzzy features using mutual information. In this paper we introduce the fuzzy information entropy and fuzzy mutual information for computing relevance between numerical or fuzzy features and decision. The relationship between fuzzy information entropy and differential entropy is also discussed. Moreover, we combine fuzzy mutual information with qmin-Redundancy-Max-Relevanceq, qMax-Dependencyq and min-Redundancy-Max-Dependencyq algorithms. The performance and stability of the proposed algorithms are tested on benchmark data sets. Experimental results show the proposed algorithms are effective and stable.

  2. Quicksort, largest bucket, and min-wise hashing with limited independence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Mathias Bæk Tejs; Stöckel, Morten

    2015-01-01

    Randomized algorithms and data structures are often analyzed under the assumption of access to a perfect source of randomness. The most fundamental metric used to measure how “random” a hash function or a random number generator is, is its independence: a sequence of random variables is said...... to be k-independent if every variable is uniform and every size k subset is independent. In this paper we consider three classic algorithms under limited independence. Besides the theoretical interest in removing the unrealistic assumption of full independence, the work is motivated by lower independence...... being more practical. We provide new bounds for randomized quicksort, min-wise hashing and largest bucket size under limited independence. Our results can be summarized as follows. Randomized Quicksort. When pivot elements are computed using a 5-independent hash function, Karloff and Raghavan, J.ACM’93...

  3. Ex-plant consequence assessment for NUREG-1150: models, typical results, uncertainties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sprung, J.L.

    1988-01-01

    The assessment of ex-plant consequences for NUREG-1150 source terms was performed using the MELCOR Accident Consequence Code System (MACCS). This paper briefly discusses the following elements of MACCS consequence calculations: input data, phenomena modeled, computational framework, typical results, controlling phenomena, and uncertainties. Wherever possible, NUREG-1150 results will be used to illustrate the discussion. 28 references

  4. Deriving user-informed climate information from climate model ensemble results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Huebener

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Communication between providers and users of climate model simulation results still needs to be improved. In the German regional climate modeling project ReKliEs-De a midterm user workshop was conducted to allow the intended users of the project results to assess the preliminary results and to streamline the final project results to their needs. The user feedback highlighted, in particular, the still considerable gap between climate research output and user-tailored input for climate impact research. Two major requests from the user community addressed the selection of sub-ensembles and some condensed, easy to understand information on the strengths and weaknesses of the climate models involved in the project.

  5. Updating the CHAOS series of field models using Swarm data and resulting candidate models for IGRF-12

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finlay, Chris; Olsen, Nils; Tøffner-Clausen, Lars

    Ten months of data from ESA's Swarm mission, together with recent ground observatory monthly means, are used to update the CHAOS series of geomagnetic field models with a focus on time-changes of the core field. As for previous CHAOS field models quiet-time, night-side, data selection criteria......th order spline representation with knot points spaced at 0.5 year intervals. The resulting field model is able to consistently fit data from six independent low Earth orbit satellites: Oersted, CHAMP, SAC-C and the three Swarm satellites. As an example, we present comparisons of the excellent model...... fit obtained to both the Swarm data and the CHAMP data. The new model also provides a good description of observatory secular variation, capturing rapid field evolution events during the past decade. Maps of the core surface field and its secular variation can already be extracted in the Swarm-era. We...

  6. Assessing flood risk at the global scale: model setup, results, and sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ward, Philip J; Jongman, Brenden; Weiland, Frederiek Sperna; Winsemius, Hessel C; Bouwman, Arno; Ligtvoet, Willem; Van Beek, Rens; Bierkens, Marc F P

    2013-01-01

    Globally, economic losses from flooding exceeded $19 billion in 2012, and are rising rapidly. Hence, there is an increasing need for global-scale flood risk assessments, also within the context of integrated global assessments. We have developed and validated a model cascade for producing global flood risk maps, based on numerous flood return-periods. Validation results indicate that the model simulates interannual fluctuations in flood impacts well. The cascade involves: hydrological and hydraulic modelling; extreme value statistics; inundation modelling; flood impact modelling; and estimating annual expected impacts. The initial results estimate global impacts for several indicators, for example annual expected exposed population (169 million); and annual expected exposed GDP ($1383 billion). These results are relatively insensitive to the extreme value distribution employed to estimate low frequency flood volumes. However, they are extremely sensitive to the assumed flood protection standard; developing a database of such standards should be a research priority. Also, results are sensitive to the use of two different climate forcing datasets. The impact model can easily accommodate new, user-defined, impact indicators. We envisage several applications, for example: identifying risk hotspots; calculating macro-scale risk for the insurance industry and large companies; and assessing potential benefits (and costs) of adaptation measures. (letter)

  7. Comparison of the 1981 INEL dispersion data with results from a number of different models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lewellen, W S; Sykes, R I; Parker, S F

    1985-05-01

    The results from simulations by 12 different dispersion models are compared with observations from an extensive field experiment conducted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory in July, 1981. Comparisons were made on the bases of hourly SF/sub 6/ samples taken at the surface, out to approximately 10 km from the 46 m release tower, both during and following 7 different 8-hour releases. Comparisons are also made for total integrated doses collected out to approximately 40 km. Three classes of models are used. Within the limited range appropriate for Class A models this data comparison shows that neither the puff models or the transport and diffusion models agree with the data any better than the simple Gaussian plume models. The puff and transport and diffusion models do show a slight edge in performance in comparison with the total dose over the extended range approximate for class B models. The best model results for the hourly samples show approximately 40% calculated within a factor of two when a 15/sup 0/ uncertainty in plume position is permitted and it is assumed that higher data samples may occur at stations between the actual sample sites. This is increased to 60% for the 12 hour integrated dose and 70% for the total integrated dose when the same performance measure is used. None of the models reproduce the observed patchy dose patterns. This patchiness is consistent with the discussion of the inherent uncertainty associated with time averaged plume observations contained in our companion reports on the scientific critique of available models.

  8. The use of the k - {epsilon} turbulence model within the Rossby Centre regional ocean climate model: parameterization development and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markus Meier, H.E. [Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Inst., Norrkoeping (Sweden). Rossby Centre

    2000-09-01

    As mixing plays a dominant role for the physics of an estuary like the Baltic Sea (seasonal heat storage, mixing in channels, deep water mixing), different mixing parameterizations for use in 3D Baltic Sea models are discussed and compared. For this purpose two different OGCMs of the Baltic Sea are utilized. Within the Swedish regional climate modeling program, SWECLIM, a 3D coupled ice-ocean model for the Baltic Sea has been coupled with an improved version of the two-equation k - {epsilon} turbulence model with corrected dissipation term, flux boundary conditions to include the effect of a turbulence enhanced layer due to breaking surface gravity waves and a parameterization for breaking internal waves. Results of multi-year simulations are compared with observations. The seasonal thermocline is simulated satisfactory and erosion of the halocline is avoided. Unsolved problems are discussed. To replace the controversial equation for dissipation the performance of a hierarchy of k-models has been tested and compared with the k - {epsilon} model. In addition, it is shown that the results of the mixing parameterization depend very much on the choice of the ocean model. Finally, the impact of two mixing parameterizations on Baltic Sea climate is investigated. In this case the sensitivity of mean SST, vertical temperature and salinity profiles, ice season and seasonal cycle of heat fluxes is quite large.

  9. Satellite data for systematic validation of wave model results in the Black Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrens, Arno; Staneva, Joanna

    2017-04-01

    The Black Sea is with regard to the availability of traditional in situ wave measurements recorded by usual waverider buoys a data sparse semi-enclosed sea. The only possibility for systematic validations of wave model results in such a regional area is the use of satellite data. In the frame of the COPERNICUS Marine Evolution System for the Black Sea that requires wave predictions, the third-generation spectral wave model WAM is used. The operational system is demonstrated based on four years' systematic comparisons with satellite data. The aim of this investigation was to answer two questions. Is the wave model able to provide a reliable description of the wave conditions in the Black Sea and are the satellite measurements suitable for validation purposes on such a regional scale ? Detailed comparisons between measured data and computed model results for the Black Sea including yearly statistics have been done for about 300 satellite overflights per year. The results discussed the different verification schemes needed to review the forecasting skills of the operational system. The good agreement between measured and modeled data supports the expectation that the wave model provides reasonable results and that the satellite data is of good quality and offer an appropriate validation alternative to buoy measurements. This is the required step towards further use of those satellite data for assimilation into the wave fields to improve the wave predictions. Additional support for the good quality of the wave predictions is provided by comparisons between ADCP measurements that are available for a short time period in February 2012 and the corresponding model results at a location near the Bulgarian coast in the western Black Sea. Sensitivity tests with different wave model options and different driving wind fields have been done which identify the appropriate model configuration that provides the best wave predictions. In addition to the comparisons between measured

  10. SModelS: A Tool for Making Systematic Use of Simplified Models Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltenberger, Wolfgang; SModelS Group

    2016-10-01

    We present an automated software tool ”SModelS” to systematically confront theories Beyond the Standard Model (BSM) with experimental data. The tool consists of a general procedure to decompose such BSM theories into their Simplified Models Spectra (SMS). In addition, SModelS features a database containing the majority of the published SMS results of CMS and ATLAS. These results consist of the 95% confidence level upper limits on signal production cross sections. The two components together allow us to quickly confront any BSM model with LHC results. As a show-case example we will briefly discuss an application of our procedure to a specific supersymmetric model. It is one of our ongoing efforts to extend the framework to include also efficiency maps produced either by the experimental collaborations, by efforts performed within the phenomenological groups, or possibly also by ourselves. While the current implementation can handle null results only, it is our ultimate goal to build the Next Standard Model in a bottom-up fashion from both negative and positive results of several experiments. The implementation is open source, written in python, and available from http://smodels.hephy.at.

  11. Updating Finite Element Model of a Wind Turbine Blade Section Using Experimental Modal Analysis Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcin Luczak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents selected results and aspects of the multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary research oriented for the experimental and numerical study of the structural dynamics of a bend-twist coupled full scale section of a wind turbine blade structure. The main goal of the conducted research is to validate finite element model of the modified wind turbine blade section mounted in the flexible support structure accordingly to the experimental results. Bend-twist coupling was implemented by adding angled unidirectional layers on the suction and pressure side of the blade. Dynamic test and simulations were performed on a section of a full scale wind turbine blade provided by Vestas Wind Systems A/S. The numerical results are compared to the experimental measurements and the discrepancies are assessed by natural frequency difference and modal assurance criterion. Based on sensitivity analysis, set of model parameters was selected for the model updating process. Design of experiment and response surface method was implemented to find values of model parameters yielding results closest to the experimental. The updated finite element model is producing results more consistent with the measurement outcomes.

  12. Soil gas and radon entry into a simple test structure: Comparison of experimental and modelling results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.E.; Søgaard-Hansen, J.; Majborn, B.

    1994-01-01

    A radon test structure has been established at a field site at Riso National Laboratory. Measurements have been made of soil gas entry rates, pressure couplings and radon depletion. The experimental results have been compared with results obtained from measured soil parameters and a two......-dimensional steady-state numerical model of Darcy flow and combined diffusive and advective transport of radon. For most probe locations, the calculated values of the pressure couplings and the radon depletion agree well with the measured values, thus verifying important elements of the Darcy flow approximation......, and the ability of the model to treat combined diffusive and advective transport of radon. However, the model gives an underestimation of the soil gas entry rate. Even if it is assumed that the soil has a permeability equal to the highest of the measured values, the model underestimates the soil gas entry rate...

  13. Mathematical Modeling in Tobacco Control Research: Initial Results From a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feirman, Shari P; Donaldson, Elisabeth; Glasser, Allison M; Pearson, Jennifer L; Niaura, Ray; Rose, Shyanika W; Abrams, David B; Villanti, Andrea C

    2016-03-01

    The US Food and Drug Administration has expressed interest in using mathematical models to evaluate potential tobacco policies. The goal of this systematic review was to synthesize data from tobacco control studies that employ mathematical models. We searched five electronic databases on July 1, 2013 to identify published studies that used a mathematical model to project a tobacco-related outcome and developed a data extraction form based on the ISPOR-SMDM Modeling Good Research Practices. We developed an organizational framework to categorize these studies and identify models employed across multiple papers. We synthesized results qualitatively, providing a descriptive synthesis of included studies. The 263 studies in this review were heterogeneous with regard to their methodologies and aims. We used the organizational framework to categorize each study according to its objective and map the objective to a model outcome. We identified two types of study objectives (trend and policy/intervention) and three types of model outcomes (change in tobacco use behavior, change in tobacco-related morbidity or mortality, and economic impact). Eighteen models were used across 118 studies. This paper extends conventional systematic review methods to characterize a body of literature on mathematical modeling in tobacco control. The findings of this synthesis can inform the development of new models and the improvement of existing models, strengthening the ability of researchers to accurately project future tobacco-related trends and evaluate potential tobacco control policies and interventions. These findings can also help decision-makers to identify and become oriented with models relevant to their work. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Research on Nicotine and Tobacco. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  14. Dermal uptake of phthalates from clothing: comparison of model to human participant results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morrison, Glenn; Weschler, Charles J.; Bekö, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    In this research, we extend a model of transdermal uptake of phthalates to include a layer of clothing. When compared with experimental results, this model better estimates dermal uptake of diethylphthalate (DEP) and di-n-butylphthalate (DnBP) than a previous model. It also demonstrates that uptake...... is sensitive to both the gap between skin and clothing and the time clothing is allowed to adsorb phthalates. The model predictions are consistent with the observation that exposed clothing increases dermal uptake when compared with uptake observed in bare-skin participants. Extension of this model beyond...... the cotton-phthalate system will be challenging until data on partition coefficients are quantified for other combinations of SVOCs, fabric materials and environmental conditions....

  15. A Calibration of the Wierzbicki-Xue Damage Model Using Charpy Test Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Jong-Bong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Damage models are frequently used to predict fractures in large deformation problems such as penetration of a projectile into a target. Though many damage models have been proposed so far, coefficients of each model have been provided for only a few materials. In this study, the coefficients of the Wierzbicki-Xue (2005 damage model for tungsten heavy alloy (DX2HCMF are determined using the Charpy impact test. The Wierzbicki-Xue fracture criterion is implemented into NET3D code in which a node-split algorithm is built in. By comparing the energy absorbed in the Charpy test with the results of finite element analysis, the fracture model coefficients are determined.

  16. Quantifying Uncertainty in Model Predictions for the Pliocene (Plio-QUMP): Initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, J.O.; Collins, M.; Haywood, A.M.; Dowsett, H.J.; Hunter, S.J.; Lunt, D.J.; Pickering, S.J.; Pound, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    Examination of the mid-Pliocene Warm Period (mPWP; ~. 3.3 to 3.0. Ma BP) provides an excellent opportunity to test the ability of climate models to reproduce warm climate states, thereby assessing our confidence in model predictions. To do this it is necessary to relate the uncertainty in model simulations of mPWP climate to uncertainties in projections of future climate change. The uncertainties introduced by the model can be estimated through the use of a Perturbed Physics Ensemble (PPE). Developing on the UK Met Office Quantifying Uncertainty in Model Predictions (QUMP) Project, this paper presents the results from an initial investigation using the end members of a PPE in a fully coupled atmosphere-ocean model (HadCM3) running with appropriate mPWP boundary conditions. Prior work has shown that the unperturbed version of HadCM3 may underestimate mPWP sea surface temperatures at higher latitudes. Initial results indicate that neither the low sensitivity nor the high sensitivity simulations produce unequivocally improved mPWP climatology relative to the standard. Whilst the high sensitivity simulation was able to reconcile up to 6 ??C of the data/model mismatch in sea surface temperatures in the high latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere (relative to the standard simulation), it did not produce a better prediction of global vegetation than the standard simulation. Overall the low sensitivity simulation was degraded compared to the standard and high sensitivity simulations in all aspects of the data/model comparison. The results have shown that a PPE has the potential to explore weaknesses in mPWP modelling simulations which have been identified by geological proxies, but that a 'best fit' simulation will more likely come from a full ensemble in which simulations that contain the strengths of the two end member simulations shown here are combined. ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  17. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    OpenAIRE

    A. D. Bottrill; J. van Hunen; M. B. Allen

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs) deepening in the area of the back arc-basin after initial collision. This collisional mantle dynamic basin (CMDB) is caused by slab steepening drawing material away...

  18. Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test Above Deck Water Sound Suppression Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counter, Douglas D.; Houston, Janice D.

    2011-01-01

    The Ares I Scale Model Acoustic Test (ASMAT) program test matrix was designed to determine the acoustic reduction for the Liftoff acoustics (LOA) environment with an above deck water sound suppression system. The scale model test can be used to quantify the effectiveness of the water suppression system as well as optimize the systems necessary for the LOA noise reduction. Several water flow rates were tested to determine which rate provides the greatest acoustic reductions. Preliminary results are presented.

  19. C2 domain protein MIN1 promotes eyespot organization in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelmeier, Telsa M; Berthold, Peter; Danon, Avihai; Lamb, Mary Rose; Levitan, Alexander; Rice, Michael E; Dieckmann, Carol L

    2008-12-01

    Assembly and asymmetric localization of the photosensory eyespot in the biflagellate, unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii requires coordinated organization of photoreceptors in the plasma membrane and pigment granule/thylakoid membrane layers in the chloroplast. min1 (mini-eyed) mutant cells contain abnormally small, disorganized eyespots in which the chloroplast envelope and plasma membrane are no longer apposed. The MIN1 gene, identified here by phenotypic rescue, encodes a protein with an N-terminal C2 domain and a C-terminal LysM domain separated by a transmembrane sequence. This novel domain architecture led to the hypothesis that MIN1 is in the plasma membrane or the chloroplast envelope, where membrane association of the C2 domain promotes proper eyespot organization. Mutation of conserved C2 domain loop residues disrupted association of the MIN1 C2 domain with the chloroplast envelope in moss cells but did not abolish eyespot assembly in Chlamydomonas. In min1 null cells, channelrhodopsin-1 (ChR1) photoreceptor levels were reduced, indicating a role for MIN1 in ChR1 expression and/or stability. However, ChR1 localization was only minimally disturbed during photoautotrophic growth of min1 cells, conditions under which the pigment granule layers are disorganized. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that neither MIN1 nor proper organization of the plastidic components of the eyespot is essential for localization of ChR1.

  20. Characterization of ftsZ mutations that render Bacillus subtilis resistant to MinC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Oliveira, I.F.F.; Sousa Borges, A.; Kooij, V.; Bartosiak-Jentys, J.; Luirink, S.; Scheffers, D.J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cell division in Bacillus subtilis occurs precisely at midcell. Positional control of cell division is exerted by two mechanisms: nucleoid occlusion, through Noc, which prevents division through nucleoids, and the Min system, where the combined action of the MinC, D and J proteins

  1. Characterization of ftsZ Mutations that Render Bacillus subtilis Resistant to MinC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fernandes de Oliveira, Inês Filipa; Sousa Borges, Anabela de; Kooij, Viola; Bartosiak-Jentys, Jeremy; Luirink, Joen; Scheffers, Dirk-Jan

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cell division in Bacillus subtilis occurs precisely at midcell. Positional control of cell division is exerted by two mechanisms: nucleoid occlusion, through Noc, which prevents division through nucleoids, and the Min system, where the combined action of the MinC, D and J proteins

  2. A facile synthesis of MInSe2 (M= Cu, Ag) via low temperature ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 30; Issue 2. A facile synthesis of MInSe2 (M = Cu, Ag) via low temperature pyrolysis of single source molecular precursors, [(R3P)2MIn(SeCOAr)4]. Shamik Ghoshal Liladhar B Kumbhare Vimal K Jain Gautam K Dey. Nanomaterials Volume 30 Issue 2 April 2007 pp 173- ...

  3. The design, results and future development of the National Energy Strategy Environmental Analysis Model (NESEAM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, R.E.; Boyd, G.A.; Breed, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    The National Energy Strategy Environmental Model (NESEAM) has been developed to project emissions for the National Energy Strategy (NES). Two scenarios were evaluated for the NES, a Current Policy Base Case and a NES Action Case. The results from the NES Actions Case project much lower emissions than the Current Policy Base Case. Future enhancements to NESEAM will focus on fuel cycle analysis, including future technologies and additional pollutants to model. NESEAM's flexibility will allow it to model other future legislative issues. 7 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs

  4. [DESCRIPTION AND PRESENTATION OF THE RESULTS OF ELECTROENCEPHALOGRAM PROCESSING USING AN INFORMATION MODEL].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myznikov, I L; Nabokov, N L; Rogovanov, D Yu; Khankevich, Yu R

    2016-01-01

    The paper proposes to apply the informational modeling of correlation matrix developed by I.L. Myznikov in early 1990s in neurophysiological investigations, such as electroencephalogram recording and analysis, coherence description of signals from electrodes on the head surface. The authors demonstrate information models built using the data from studies of inert gas inhalation by healthy human subjects. In the opinion of the authors, information models provide an opportunity to describe physiological processes with a high level of generalization. The procedure of presenting the EEG results holds great promise for the broad application.

  5. Building a Global Groundwater Model fromScratch - Concepts and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinecke, R.; Song, Q.; Foglia, L.; Mehl, S.; Doll, P. M.

    2016-12-01

    To represent groundwater-surface water interactions as well as the impact of capillary rise on evapotranspiration in global-scale hydrological models, it is necessary to simulate the location and temporal variation of the groundwater table. This requires to replace simulation of groundwater dynamics by calculating groundwater storage variations in individual grid cells (independent from the storage variation in neighboring cells) by hydraulic head gradient-based groundwater modeling. Based on the experience of two research groups who have published different approaches for global-scale groundwater modeling, we present first results of our effort to develop a transient global groundwater model that is to replace the simple storage-based ground-water module of the global hydrological model WaterGAP. The following three technical and conceptual aspects of this endeavour arediscussed: (1) A software engineering approach to build a new hydraulic head based global groundwater model from scratch with the goal of maximizing performance and extensibility. (2) Comparison to other model approaches and their inherent problems. (3) Global-data deficits and how to deal with them. Furthermore, this poster presents and discusses first results and provides an outlook on future developments.

  6. Exploring the uncertainties of early detection results: model-based interpretation of mayo lung project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berman Barbara

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Mayo Lung Project (MLP, a randomized controlled clinical trial of lung cancer screening conducted between 1971 and 1986 among male smokers aged 45 or above, demonstrated an increase in lung cancer survival since the time of diagnosis, but no reduction in lung cancer mortality. Whether this result necessarily indicates a lack of mortality benefit for screening remains controversial. A number of hypotheses have been proposed to explain the observed outcome, including over-diagnosis, screening sensitivity, and population heterogeneity (initial difference in lung cancer risks between the two trial arms. This study is intended to provide model-based testing for some of these important arguments. Method Using a micro-simulation model, the MISCAN-lung model, we explore the possible influence of screening sensitivity, systematic error, over-diagnosis and population heterogeneity. Results Calibrating screening sensitivity, systematic error, or over-diagnosis does not noticeably improve the fit of the model, whereas calibrating population heterogeneity helps the model predict lung cancer incidence better. Conclusions Our conclusion is that the hypothesized imperfection in screening sensitivity, systematic error, and over-diagnosis do not in themselves explain the observed trial results. Model fit improvement achieved by accounting for population heterogeneity suggests a higher risk of cancer incidence in the intervention group as compared with the control group.

  7. Comparison of analytical models and experimental results for single-event upset in CMOS SRAMs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mnich, T.M.; Diehl, S.E.; Shafer, B.D.

    1983-01-01

    In an effort to design fully radiation-hardened memories for satellite and deep-space applications, a 16K and a 2K CMOS static RAM were modeled for single-particle upset during the design stage. The modeling resulted in the addition of a hardening feedback resistor in the 16K remained tentatively unaltered. Subsequent experiments, using the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories' 88-inch cyclotron to accelerate krypton and oxygen ions, established an upset threshold for the 2K and the 16K without resistance added, as well as a hardening threshold for the 16K with feedback resistance added. Results for the 16K showed it to be hardenable to the higher level than previously published data for other unhardened 16K RAMs. The data agreed fairly well with the modeling results; however, a close look suggests that modification of the simulation methodology is required to accurately predict the resistance necessary to harden the RAM cell

  8. Phase Partitioning of Common Alcohols With BTEX Compounds in Water: Comparison Between Modeling and Experimental Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K. Y.

    2007-12-01

    This study compares the modeling and experimental results on the equilibrium phase partitioning behavior of three common alcohols (ethanol, isopropanol, and methanol) in a two-phase system consisting of water and a BTEX compound. A previously developed computer program is used to generate ternary phase diagrams for each alcohol-water-NAPL mixture combination, where the required activity coefficients are estimated using the UNIFAC model. A set of laboratory experiments is conducted to determine the maximum single-phase water content for every alcohol-water-NAPL mixture combination considered in this study, where the initial volume composition is 85 percent alcohol and 15 percent NAPL. Comparison of experimental results against UNIFAC- derived modeling results shows good agreement for mixtures containing ethanol and methanol, but relatively poor agreement for mixtures containing isopropanol.

  9. Latest results from the EU project AVATAR: Aerodynamic modelling of 10 MW wind turbines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schepers O. Ceyhan, J. G.; Boorsma, K.; Gonzalez, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the most recent results from the EU project AVATAR in which aerodynamic models are improved and validated for wind turbines on a scale of 10 MW and more. Measurements on a DU 00-W-212 airfoil are presented which have been taken in the pressurized DNW-HDG wind tunnel up...... to a Reynolds number of 15 Million. These measurements are compared with measurements in the LM wind tunnel for Reynolds numbers of 3 and 6 Million and with calculational results. In the analysis of results special attention is paid to high Reynolds numbers effects. CFD calculations on airfoil performance...... results from 3D rotor models where a comparison is made between results from vortex wake methods and BEM methods at yawed conditions....

  10. THE EFFECTS OF COOPERATIVE LEARNING MODEL GROUP INVESTIGATION AND MOTIVATION TOWARD PHYSICS LEARNING RESULTS MAN TANJUNGBALAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amalia Febri Aristi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine: (1 Is there a difference in student's learning outcomes with the application of learning models Investigation Group and Direct Instruction teaching model. (2 Is there a difference in students' motivation with the application of learning models Investigation Group and Direct Instruction teaching model, (3 Is there an interaction between learning models Investigation Group and Direct Instruction to improve students' motivation in learning outcomes Physics. This research is a quasi experimental. The study population was a student of class XII Tanjung Balai MAN. Random sample selection is done by randomizing the class. The instrument used consisted of: (1 achievement test (2 students' motivation questionnaire. The tests are used to obtain the data is shaped essay. The data in this study were analyzed using ANOVA analysis of two paths. The results showed that: (1 there were differences in learning outcomes between students who used the physics model of Group Investigation learning compared with students who used the Direct Instruction teaching model. (2 There was a difference in student's learning outcomes that had a low learning motivation and high motivation to learn both in the classroom and in the classroom Investigation Group Direct Instruction. (3 There was interaction between learning models Instruction Direct Group Investigation and motivation to learn in improving learning outcomes Physics.

  11. Results of the first tests of the SIDRA satellite-borne instrument breadboard model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dudnik, O.V.; Kurbatov, E.V.; Avilov, A.M.; Titov, K.G.; Prieto, M; Sanchez, S.; Spassky, A.V.; Sylwester, J.; Gburek, S.; Podgorski, P.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, the results of the calibration of the solid-state detectors and electronic channels of the SIDRA satellite borne energetic charged particle spectrometer-telescope breadboard model are presented. The block schemes and experimental equipment used to conduct the thermal vacuum and electromagnetic compatibility tests of the assemblies and modules of the compact satellite equipment are described. The results of the measured thermal conditions of operation of the signal analog and digital processing critical modules of the SIDRA instrument prototype are discussed. Finally, the levels of conducted interference generated by the instrument model in the primary vehicle-borne power circuits are presented.

  12. Lattice Hamiltonian approach to the Schwinger model. Further results from the strong coupling expansion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Szyniszewski, Marcin; Manchester Univ.; Cichy, Krzysztof; Poznan Univ.; Kujawa-Cichy, Agnieszka

    2014-10-01

    We employ exact diagonalization with strong coupling expansion to the massless and massive Schwinger model. New results are presented for the ground state energy and scalar mass gap in the massless model, which improve the precision to nearly 10 -9 %. We also investigate the chiral condensate and compare our calculations to previous results available in the literature. Oscillations of the chiral condensate which are present while increasing the expansion order are also studied and are shown to be directly linked to the presence of flux loops in the system.

  13. The MinAdept Clustering Approach for Discovering Reference Process Models out of Process Variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, C.; Reichert, M.U.; Wombacher, Andreas

    2010-01-01

    During the last years a new generation of adaptive Process-Aware Information Systems (PAIS) has emerged, which enables dynamic process changes at runtime, while preserving PAIS robustness and consistency. Such adaptive PAIS allow authorized users to add new process activities, to delete existing

  14. Comparison of Experimental Surface and Flow Field Measurements to Computational Results of the Juncture Flow Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roozeboom, Nettie H.; Lee, Henry C.; Simurda, Laura J.; Zilliac, Gregory G.; Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2016-01-01

    Wing-body juncture flow fields on commercial aircraft configurations are challenging to compute accurately. The NASA Advanced Air Vehicle Program's juncture flow committee is designing an experiment to provide data to improve Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) modeling in the juncture flow region. Preliminary design of the model was done using CFD, yet CFD tends to over-predict the separation in the juncture flow region. Risk reduction wind tunnel tests were requisitioned by the committee to obtain a better understanding of the flow characteristics of the designed models. NASA Ames Research Center's Fluid Mechanics Lab performed one of the risk reduction tests. The results of one case, accompanied by CFD simulations, are presented in this paper. Experimental results suggest the wall mounted wind tunnel model produces a thicker boundary layer on the fuselage than the CFD predictions, resulting in a larger wing horseshoe vortex suppressing the side of body separation in the juncture flow region. Compared to experimental results, CFD predicts a thinner boundary layer on the fuselage generates a weaker wing horseshoe vortex resulting in a larger side of body separation.

  15. The Instruments and Capabilities of the Miniature X-Ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Christopher S.; Caspi, Amir; Woods, Thomas N.; Chamberlin, Phillip C.; Dennis, Brian R.; Jones, Andrew R.; Mason, James P.; Schwartz, Richard A.; Tolbert, Anne K.

    2018-02-01

    The Miniature X-ray Solar Spectrometer (MinXSS) CubeSat is the first solar science oriented CubeSat mission flown for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, with the main objective of measuring the solar soft X-ray (SXR) flux and a science goal of determining its influence on Earth's ionosphere and thermosphere. These observations can also be used to investigate solar quiescent, active region, and flare properties. The MinXSS X-ray instruments consist of a spectrometer, called X123, with a nominal 0.15 keV full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) resolution at 5.9 keV and a broadband X-ray photometer, called XP. Both instruments are designed to obtain measurements from 0.5 - 30 keV at a nominal time cadence of 10 s. A description of the MinXSS instruments, performance capabilities, and relation to the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES) 0.1 - 0.8 nm flux is given in this article. Early MinXSS results demonstrate the capability of measuring variations of the solar spectral soft X-ray (SXR) flux between 0.8 - 12 keV from at least GOES A5-M5 (5 × 10^{-8} - 5 ×10^{-5} W m^{-2}) levels and of inferring physical properties (temperature and emission measure) from the MinXSS data alone. Moreover, coronal elemental abundances can be inferred, specifically for Fe, Ca, Si, Mg, S, Ar, and Ni, when the count rate is sufficiently high at each elemental spectral feature. Additionally, temperature response curves and emission measure loci demonstrate the MinXSS sensitivity to plasma emission at different temperatures. MinXSS observations coupled with those from other solar observatories can help address some of the most compelling questions in solar coronal physics. Finally, simultaneous observations by MinXSS and the Reuven Ramaty High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (RHESSI) can provide the most spectrally complete soft X-ray solar flare photon flux measurements to date.

  16. Robustness of life cycle assessment results : influence of data variation and modelling choices on results for beverage packaging materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Harst-Wintraecken, van der E.J.M.

    2015-01-01

    Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a well-established method to evaluate the potential environmental impacts of product and service systems throughout their life cycles. However, it can happen that LCAs for the same product have different and even conflicting outcomes. LCA results need to be robust and

  17. Comparison of TS and ANN Models with the Results of Emission Scenarios in Rainfall Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Babaei Hessar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Precipitation is one of the most important and sensitive parameters of the tropical climate that influence the catchments hydrological regime. The prediction of rainfall is vital for strategic planning and water resources management. Despite its importance, statistical rainfall forecasting, especially for long-term, has been proven to be a great challenge due to the dynamic nature of climate phenomena and random fluctuations involved in the process. Various methods, such as time series and artificial neural network models, have been proposed to predict the level of rainfall. But there is not enough attention to global warming and climate change issues. The main aim of this study is to investigate the conformity of artificial neural network and time series models with climate scenarios. Materials and Methods: For this study, 50 years of daily rainfall data (1961 to 2010 of the synoptic station of Urmia, Tabriz and Khoy was investigated. Data was obtained from Meteorological Organization of Iran. In the present study, the results of two Artificial Neural Network (ANN and Time Seri (TS methods were compared with the result of the Emission Scenarios (A2 & B1. HadCM3 model in LARS-WG software was used to generate rainfall for the next 18 years (2011-2029. The results of models were compared with climate scenarios over the next 18 years in the three synoptic stations located in the basin of the Lake Urmia. At the first stage, the best model of time series method was selected. The precipitation was estimated for the next 18 years using these models. For the same period, precipitation was forecast using artificial neural networks. Finally, the results of two models were compared with data generated under two scenarios (B1 and A2 in LARS-WG. Results and Discussion: Different order of AR, MA and ARMA was examined to select the best model of TS The results show that AR(1 was suitable for Tabriz and Khoy stations .In the Urmia station MA(1 was

  18. Exact results for quantum chaotic systems and one-dimensional fermions from matrix models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simons, B.D.; Lee, P.A.; Altshuler, B.L.

    1993-01-01

    We demonstrate a striking connection between the universal parametric correlations of the spectra of quantum chaotic systems and a class of integrable quantum hamiltonians. We begin by deriving a non-perturbative expression for the universal m-point correlation function of the spectra of random matrix ensembles in terms of a non-linear supermatrix σ-model. These results are shown to coincide with those from previous studies of weakly disordered metallic systems. We then introduce a continuous matrix model which describes the quantum mechanics of the Sutherland hamiltonian describing particles interacting through an inverse-square pairwise potential. We demonstrate that a field theoretic approach can be employed to determine exact analytical expressions for correlations of the quantum hamiltonian. The results, which are expressed in terms of a non-linear σ-model, are shown to coincide with those for analogous correlation functions of random matrix ensembles after an appropriate change of variables. We also discuss possible generalizations of the matrix model to higher dimensions. These results reveal a common mathematical structure which underlies branches of theoretical physics ranging from continuous matrix models to strongly interacting quantum hamiltonians, and universalities in the spectra of quantum chaotic systems. (orig.)

  19. Computations for the 1:5 model of the THTR pressure vessel compared with experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stangenberg, F.

    1972-01-01

    In this report experimental results measured at the 1:5-model of the prestressed concrete pressure vessel of the THTR-nuclear power station Schmehausen in 1971, are compared with the results of axis-symmetrical computations. Linear-elastic computations were performed as well as approximate computations for overload pressures taking into consideration the influences of the load history (prestressing, temperature, creep) and the effects of the steel components. (orig.) [de

  20. Modelling of the earth atmosphere contamination as result of cesium 137 deflation from contaminated territories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhmura, G.M.; Zhmura, N.V.

    1998-01-01

    The results of calculation of cesium 137 average annual ground atmosphere concentrations on the Belarus territory in the knots of net (50*50) km are given. The calculations were made on the base of a model notions about dusting area sources. Analysis of the results shows that cesium 137 average annual ground atmosphere concentrations on the Belarus territory are varied more than two orders depending on a point of calculation from 1 to 400 micro Bq/m 3

  1. Army Sustainability Modelling Analysis and Reporting Tool Phase 1: User Manual and Results Interpretation Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-11-01

    Force Sustainability Modelling Tool Prototype GB Gigabyte GRES General Reserve HQ Headquarters HTA Hardening the Army JOLTS Joint Operational...Hardening the Army ( HTA ) proposed force structure.1 Following this work, the Director General Preparedness and Plans – Army (DGPP-A) approached DSTO to...that the different elements of the results for the corps have been identified, we can turn our attention to what the results say about the

  2. Model unspecific search in CMS. Results at 8 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albert, Andreas; Duchardt, Deborah; Hebbeker, Thomas; Knutzen, Simon; Lieb, Jonas; Meyer, Arnd; Pook, Tobias; Roemer, Jonas [III. Physikalisches Institut A, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    In the year 2012, CMS collected a total data set of approximately 20 fb{sup -1} in proton-proton collisions at √(s)=8 TeV. Dedicated searches for physics beyond the standard model are commonly designed with the signatures of a given theoretical model in mind. While this approach allows for an optimised sensitivity to the sought-after signal, it may cause unexpected phenomena to be overlooked. In a complementary approach, the Model Unspecific Search in CMS (MUSiC) analyses CMS data in a general way. Depending on the reconstructed final state objects (e.g. electrons), collision events are sorted into classes. In each of the classes, the distributions of selected kinematic variables are compared to standard model simulation. An automated statistical analysis is performed to quantify the agreement between data and prediction. In this talk, the analysis concept is introduced and selected results of the analysis of the 2012 CMS data set are presented.

  3. Evidence for Symplectic Symmetry in Ab Initio No-Core Shell Model Results for Light Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dytrych, Tomas; Sviratcheva, Kristina D.; Bahri, Chairul; Draayer, Jerry P.; /Louisiana State U.; Vary, James P.; /Iowa State U. /LLNL, Livermore /SLAC

    2007-04-24

    Clear evidence for symplectic symmetry in low-lying states of {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O is reported. Eigenstates of {sup 12}C and {sup 16}O, determined within the framework of the no-core shell model using the JISP16 NN realistic interaction, typically project at the 85-90% level onto a few of the most deformed symplectic basis states that span only a small fraction of the full model space. The results are nearly independent of whether the bare or renormalized effective interactions are used in the analysis. The outcome confirms Elliott's SU(3) model which underpins the symplectic scheme, and above all, points to the relevance of a symplectic no-core shell model that can reproduce experimental B(E2) values without effective charges as well as deformed spatial modes associated with clustering phenomena in nuclei.

  4. Global Monthly CO2 Flux Inversion Based on Results of Terrestrial Ecosystem Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, F.; Chen, J.; Peters, W.; Krol, M.

    2008-12-01

    Most of our understanding of the sources and sinks of atmospheric CO2 has come from inverse studies of atmospheric CO2 concentration measurements. However, the number of currently available observation stations and our ability to simulate the diurnal planetary boundary layer evolution over continental regions essentially limit the number of regions that can be reliably inverted globally, especially over continental areas. In order to overcome these restrictions, a nested inverse modeling system was developed based on the Bayesian principle for estimating carbon fluxes of 30 regions in North America and 20 regions for the rest of the globe. Inverse modeling was conducted in monthly steps using CO2 concentration measurements of 5 years (2000 - 2005) with the following two models: (a) An atmospheric transport model (TM5) is used to generate the transport matrix where the diurnal variation n of atmospheric CO2 concentration is considered to enhance the use of the afternoon-hour average CO2 concentration measurements over the continental sites. (b) A process-based terrestrial ecosystem model (BEPS) is used to produce hourly step carbon fluxes, which could minimize the limitation due to our inability to solve the inverse problem in a high resolution, as the background of our inversion. We will present our recent results achieved through a combination of the bottom-up modeling with BEPS and the top-down modeling based on TM5 driven by offline meteorological fields generated by the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecast (ECMFW).

  5. Modelling analysis and prediction of women javelin throw results in the years I946 — 2013

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Grycmann

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goals of our study of the women's javelin throw were twofold; first, to analyse the dynamics of female javelin throw results variability as a function of time (time period 1946-2014, second, to create a predictive model of the results during the upcoming 4 years. The study material consisted of databases covering the female track and field events obtained from the International Association of Athletics Federations. Prior to predicting the magnitude of results change dynamics in the time to follow, the adjustment of trend function to empirical data was tested using the coefficients of convergence. Phase ll of the investigation consisted of the construction of predictive models. The greatest decreases in result indexes were noted in 2000 (9.4%, 2005-2006 (8.7% and Z009 (7.4%. The trend increase was only noted in the years 2006-2008. In general, until 1998 the mean result improved by 54.6% (100% - results of 1946 whereas from 1999 through 2011 the result only increased by 1.3%. Based on data and results variability analysis it might be presumed that, in the nearest future (2015-2018, results variability will increase by approximately 9.7%. Percent improvement of javelin throw distance calculated on the basis of the 1999 raw input data is 1.4% (end of 2014.

  6. The Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model: A brief review and some recent results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebhan, Anton

    2015-05-01

    A brief review of the Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model is given, which is a top-down holographic model of low-energy QCD with chiral quarks derived from type-IIA superstring theory. The main predictions of the model, in particular concerning meson spectra, the gluon condensate, the QCD string tension, the mass of the η' and of baryons are discussed and compared quantitatively with available experimental and/or lattice results. Then some recent results of potential interest to the physics program at the future FAIR facility are presented: The spectrum of glueballs and their decay rates into pions, and the phase diagram of QCD at finite temperature, density, and magnetic field strength.

  7. The Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model: A brief review and some recent results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rebhan Anton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A brief review of the Witten-Sakai-Sugimoto model is given, which is a top-down holographic model of low-energy QCD with chiral quarks derived from type-IIA superstring theory. The main predictions of the model, in particular concerning meson spectra, the gluon condensate, the QCD string tension, the mass of the η′ and of baryons are discussed and compared quantitatively with available experimental and/or lattice results. Then some recent results of potential interest to the physics program at the future FAIR facility are presented: The spectrum of glueballs and their decay rates into pions, and the phase diagram of QCD at finite temperature, density, and magnetic field strength.

  8. Comparative Results on 3D Navigation of Quadrotor using two Nonlinear Model based Controllers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouzid, Y.; Siguerdidjane, H.; Bestaoui, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Recently the quadrotors are being increasingly employed in both military and civilian areas where a broad range of nonlinear flight control techniques are successfully implemented. With this advancement, it has become necessary to investigate the efficiency of these flight controllers by studying theirs features and compare their performance. In this paper, the control of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) quadrotor, using two different approaches, is presented. The first controller is Nonlinear PID (NLPID) whilst the second one is Nonlinear Internal Model Control (NLIMC) that are used for the stabilization as well as for the 3D trajectory tracking. The numerical simulations have shown satisfactory results using nominal system model or disturbed model for both of them. The obtained results are analyzed with respect to several criteria for the sake of comparison.

  9. Influence of Different Modeling Strategies for CFRP on Finite Element Simulation Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Xueshu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Numerical simulation is used to predict the behavior and response of carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP. Sometimes zero thickness of interface layer is introduced into the numerical model to investigate the inter-layer behavior like delamination. To investigate the influence of critical volume-type defect like void, usually appeared in matrix rich region at the interface between layers, on mechanical properties of CFRP, numerical models with different interface thickness were created and tensile property and three-point bending simulation results were compared to experimental ones. It is found that accurate result is obtained with increasing of the interface thickness and up to 20% that of layer thickness is recommended to model the matrix rich region.

  10. Technogenic Rock Dumps Physical Properties' Prognosis via Results of the Structure Numerical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markov Sergey

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding of internal structure of the technogenic rock dumps (gob dumps is required condition for estimation of using ones as filtration massifs for treatment of mine wastewater. Internal structure of gob piles greatly depends on dumping technology to applying restrictions for use them as filtration massifs. Numerical modelling of gob dumps allows adequately estimate them physical parameters, as a filtration coefficient, density, etc. The gob dumps numerical modelling results given in this article, in particular was examined grain size distribution of determined fractions depend on dump height. Shown, that filtration coefficient is in a nonlinear dependence on amount of several fractions of rock in gob dump. The numerical model adequacy both the gob structure and the dependence of filtration coefficient from gob height acknowledged equality of calculated and real filtration coefficient values. The results of this research can be apply to peripheral dumping technology.

  11. The effects of tones on speaking frequency and intensity ranges in Mandarin and Min dialects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Sheng H.

    2005-05-01

    The differences of speaking frequency and intensity in different tonal dialects has not been widely investigated. The purposes of this study were (1) to compare the speaking frequency and speaking intensity ranges of Mandarin and Min and (2) to compare the speaking frequency and intensity ranges of Mandarin and Min to those of American English. The subjects were 80 normal Taiwanese adults divided into two dialect groups, Mandarin and Min. The speaking F0, the highest speaking F0, the lowest speaking F0, the maximum range of speaking F0, and the intensity counterpart were obtained from reading in their native dialects. Statistical analysis revealed that Min speakers had a significantly greater maximum range of speaking intensity and a smaller lowest speaking intensity than Mandarin speakers, which indicated tonal effects by speakers of the Min dialect. Moreover, Mandarin and Min speakers had a greater maximum range of speaking F0 and maximum range of speaking intensity than American English speakers. The data may provide an assessment tool for Mandarin speakers and Min speakers. .

  12. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry - general circulation model. Comparison with observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hein, R.; Dameris, M.; Schnadt, C. [and others

    2000-01-01

    An interactively coupled climate-chemistry model which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks is presented. This is the first model, which interactively combines a general circulation model based on primitive equations with a rather complex model of stratospheric and tropospheric chemistry, and which is computational efficient enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. The applied model version extends from the Earth's surface up to 10 hPa with a relatively high number (39) of vertical levels. We present the results of a present-day (1990) simulation and compare it to available observations. We focus on stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. The current model version ECHAM4.L39(DLR)/CHEM can realistically reproduce stratospheric dynamics in the Arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to formerly applied model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their interhemispheric differences are reproduced. The consideration of the chemistry feedback on dynamics results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapor concentrations, i.e., the simulated meriodional water vapor gradient in the stratosphere is realistic. The present model version constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic trace gas emissions, and the future evolution of the ozone layer. (orig.)

  13. Latest results from the EU project AVATAR : Aerodynamic modelling of 10 MW wind turbines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ceyhan, J. G Schepers O; Ceyhan, O; Boorsma, K; Gonzalez, A; Munduate, X; Pires, O; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Simao Ferreira, C.; Sieros, G; Madsen, J.; Voutsinas, S.; Lutz, T.; Barakos, G.; Colonia, S.; Heißelmann, H.; Meng, F.; Croce, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the most recent results from the EU project AVATAR in which aerodynamic models are improved and validated for wind turbines on a scale of 10 MW and more. Measurements on a DU 00-W-212 airfoil are presented which have been taken in the pressurized DNW-HDG wind tunnel up to a

  14. Social Approval of the Community Assessment Model for Odor Dispersal: Results from a Citizen Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, John C.; Grudens-Schuck, Nancy; Harmon, Jay D.; Hoff, Steve J.

    2012-08-01

    Odors emitted from US Midwest hog production facilities present farmers, residents, and state regulatory agencies with a set of complex challenges. To predict odor exposure from multiple swine production sources simultaneously, and to determine siting recommendations for proposed new or enlarged hog facilities, researchers at Iowa State University designed the community assessment model for odor dispersion (CAM). A three-county citizen survey conducted in Iowa examined the level of hypothetical social acceptance of the modeling process, and level of trust in CAM results. While 69 % of respondents approved of modeling as a way to determine the most socially appropriate location for production sites, only 35 % would trust the results if potential odor exposure from a new facility were proposed to be built near their home. We analyzed approval of the CAM model, and level of trust, across a number of demographic, attitudinal, and belief factors regarding environmental quality and the hog industry. Overall, trust in CAM was uneven and varied across respondents. Those residents who would not trust CAM tended to be more concerned with environmental quality and less inclined to believe that the hog industry is critically important economically. Those who would not trust CAM results also had significantly more direct experience with odors. Findings point to predominantly positive, yet equivocal acceptance of CAM results among the citizenry, which is not unexpected given conflict typical of siting decisions in industry and waste disposal arenas. Recommendations are offered regarding the interaction of trust, beliefs and attitudes and the utility of CAM.

  15. Spectroscopic study on the interaction between mononaphthalimide spermidine (MINS) and bovine serum albumin (BSA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Zhiyong; Zang, Fenglei; Luo, Wen; Zhao, Zhonghua; Wang, Yueqiao; Xu, Xuejun; Wang, Chaojie

    2015-01-01

    The interaction mononaphthalimide spermidine (MINS, 1) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was studied by UV/vis absorption, fluorescence and circular dichroism spectra (CD) under physiological conditions (pH=7.4). The observed spectral quenching of BSA by compound 1 indicated compound 1 could bind to BSA. Further fluorescent tests revealed that the quenching mechanism of BSA by compound 1 was overall static. Meanwhile, the obtained binding constant and thermodynamic parameters on compound-BSA interaction showed that the type of interaction force of compound 1 and BSA was mainly hydrophobic. The analysis of synchronous, three-dimensional fluorescence and CD showed that compound 1 had weak influence on the conformational changes in BSA. Molecular docking simulation was performed and docking model in silico suggested that the configuration of compound 1 was localized in enzymatic drug site II in BSA. Furthermore, naphthalimide moiety of compound 1 greatly contributed to the hydrophobic interaction between compound 1 and BSA protein, as confirmed by experimental data. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of the WAMME model surface fluxes using results from the AMMA land-surface model intercomparison project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boone, Aaron Anthony [GAME-CNRM, Meteo-France, Toulouse (France); Poccard-Leclercq, Isabelle [Universite de Nantes, LETG-Geolittomer, Nantes (France); Xue, Yongkang; Feng, Jinming [University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, CA (United States); Rosnay, Patricia de [European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2010-07-15

    The West African monsoon (WAM) circulation and intensity have been shown to be influenced by the land surface in numerous numerical studies using regional scale and global scale atmospheric climate models (RCMs and GCMs, respectively) over the last several decades. The atmosphere-land surface interactions are modulated by the magnitude of the north-south gradient of the low level moist static energy, which is highly correlated with the steep latitudinal gradients of the vegetation characteristics and coverage, land use, and soil properties over this zone. The African Multidisciplinary Monsoon Analysis (AMMA) has organised comprehensive activities in data collection and modelling to further investigate the significance land-atmosphere feedbacks. Surface energy fluxes simulated by an ensemble of land surface models from AMMA Land-surface Model Intercomparison Project (ALMIP) have been used as a proxy for the best estimate of the ''real world'' values in order to evaluate GCM and RCM simulations under the auspices of the West African Monsoon Modelling Experiment (WAMME) project, since such large-scale observations do not exist. The ALMIP models have been forced in off-line mode using forcing based on a mixture of satellite, observational, and numerical weather prediction data. The ALMIP models were found to agree well over the region where land-atmosphere coupling is deemed to be most important (notably the Sahel), with a high signal to noise ratio (generally from 0.7 to 0.9) in the ensemble and a inter-model coefficient of variation between 5 and 15%. Most of the WAMME models simulated spatially averaged net radiation values over West Africa which were consistent with the ALMIP estimates, however, the partitioning of this energy between sensible and latent heat fluxes was significantly different: WAMME models tended to simulate larger (by nearly a factor of two) monthly latent heat fluxes than ALMIP. This results due to a positive precipitation

  17. Origine de la minéralisation des eaux des aquifères discontinus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... représentés dans ces eaux. Les principaux ions à l'origine de la minéralisation des eaux sont issus de l'altération des roches, de l'hydrolyse des minéraux silicatés tels que l'anorthite dans les plagioclases et de la décomposition des minéraux ferro-magnésiens comme la biotite et l'amphibole présentes dans les roches.

  18. Characteristics of the Inner and Middle Magnetosphere: Results From the Coupled Michigan MHD Model and the Rice Convection Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Zeeuw, D.; Sazykin, S.; Wolf, D.; Gombosi, T.; Powell, K.

    2002-05-01

    A new high performance Rice Convection Model (RCM) has been coupled to the adaptive-grid Michigan MHD model (BATSRUS). This fully coupled code allows us to self-consistently simulate the physics in the inner and middle magnetosphere. A study will be presented of the basic characteristics of the inner and middle magnetosphere in the context of a single coupled-code run with steady inputs. The analysis will include region-2 currents, shielding of the inner magnetosphere, partial ring currents, pressure distribution, magnetic field inflation, and distribution of pV**gamma. The coupled-code simulation will be compared with results from RCM runs and algorithms.

  19. Assessment of Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Hydrodynamic Model Domain Expansion and Refinement, and Online Dissemination of Model Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2010-08-01

    In this report we describe the 1) the expansion of the PNNL hydrodynamic model domain to include the continental shelf along the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and Vancouver Island; and 2) the approach and progress in developing the online/Internet disseminations of model results and outreach efforts in support of the Puget Sound Operational Forecast System (PS-OPF). Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics, for fiscal year 2010 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

  20. Assessment of Energy Removal Impacts on Physical Systems: Hydrodynamic Model Domain Expansion and Refinement, and Online Dissemination of Model Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Zhaoqing; Khangaonkar, Tarang; Wang, Taiping

    2010-01-01

    In this report we describe the (1) the expansion of the PNNL hydrodynamic model domain to include the continental shelf along the coasts of Washington, Oregon, and Vancouver Island; and (2) the approach and progress in developing the online/Internet disseminations of model results and outreach efforts in support of the Puget Sound Operational Forecast System (PS-OPF). Submittal of this report completes the work on Task 2.1.2, Effects of Physical Systems, Subtask 2.1.2.1, Hydrodynamics, for fiscal year 2010 of the Environmental Effects of Marine and Hydrokinetic Energy project.

  1. Dynamic analysis of ITER tokamak. Based on results of vibration test using scaled model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takeda, Nobukazu; Kakudate, Satoshi; Nakahira, Masataka

    2005-01-01

    The vibration experiments of the support structures with flexible plates for the ITER major components such as toroidal field coil (TF coil) and vacuum vessel (VV) were performed using small-sized flexible plates aiming to obtain its basic mechanical characteristics such as dependence of the stiffness on the loading angle. The experimental results were compared with the analytical ones in order to estimate an adequate analytical model for ITER support structure with flexible plates. As a result, the bolt connection of the flexible plates on the base plate strongly affected on the stiffness of the flexible plates. After studies of modeling the connection of the bolts, it is found that the analytical results modeling the bolts with finite stiffness only in the axial direction and infinite stiffness in the other directions agree well with the experimental ones. Based on this, numerical analysis regarding the actual support structure of the ITER VV and TF coil was performed. The support structure composed of flexible plates and connection bolts was modeled as a spring composed of only two spring elements simulating the in-plane and out-of-plane stiffness of the support structure with flexible plates including the effect of connection bolts. The stiffness of both spring models for VV and TF coil agree well with that of shell models, simulating actual structures such as flexible plates and connection bolts based on the experimental results. It is therefore found that the spring model with the only two values of stiffness enables to simplify the complicated support structure with flexible plates for the dynamic analysis of the VV and TF coil. Using the proposed spring model, the dynamic analysis of the VV and TF coil for the ITER were performed to estimate the integrity under the design earthquake. As a result, it is found that the maximum relative displacement of 8.6 mm between VV and TF coil is much less than 100 mm, so that the integrity of the VV and TF coil of the

  2. Furthering our Understanding of Land Surface Interactions using SVAT modelling: Results from SimSphere's Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Matt; Petropoulos, George; Ireland, Gareth; Rendal, Daisy; Carlson, Toby

    2015-04-01

    With current predicted climate change, there is an increased requirement to gain knowledge on the terrestrial biosphere, for numerous agricultural, hydrological and meteorological applications. To this end, Soil Vegetation Atmospheric Transfer (SVAT) models are quickly becoming the preferred scientific tool to monitor, at fine temporal and spatial resolutions, detailed information on numerous parameters associated with Earth system interactions. Validation of any model is critical to assess its accuracy, generality and realism to distinctive ecosystems and subsequently acts as important step before its operational distribution. In this study, the SimSphere SVAT model has been validated to fifteen different sites of the FLUXNET network, where model performance was statistically evaluated by directly comparing the model predictions vs in situ data, for cloud free days with a high energy balance closure. Specific focus is given to the models ability to simulate parameters associated with the energy balance, namely Shortwave Incoming Solar Radiation (Rg), Net Radiation (Rnet), Latent Heat (LE), Sensible Heat (H), Air Temperature at 1.3m (Tair 1.3m) and Air temperature at 50m (Tair 50m). Comparisons were performed for a number distinctive ecosystem types and for 150 days in total using in-situ data from ground observational networks acquired from the year 2011 alone. Evaluation of the models' coherence to reality was evaluated on the basis of a series of statistical parameters including RMSD, R2, Scatter, Bias, MAE , NASH index, Slope and Intercept. Results showed good to very good agreement between predicted and observed datasets, particularly so for LE, H, Tair 1.3m and Tair 50m where mean error distribution values indicated excellent model performance. Due to the systematic underestimation, poorer simulation accuracies were exhibited for Rg and Rnet, yet all values reported are still analogous to other validatory studies of its kind. In overall, the model

  3. Results from a 2 x CO2 simulation with the Canadian Climate Centre general circulation model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boer, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    The Canadian Climate Centre's general circulation model (GCM), GCMII, was used to simulate a doubling of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration. The experiment was a standard greenhouse gas climate change study, using a three-dimensional atmospheric circulation model coupled to a simple 'slab' ocean and a thermodynamic ice model. This standard experiment retains the sophistication and generality of an atmospheric GCM, is straightforward in its use of simplified ocean and ice models, is comparatively economical of computer time, and permits comparison of results from different models. Features of the second generation GCMII include: higher resolution at T32L10 with a transform grid of 3.75 x 3.75 degree; full diurnal and annual cycles; ocean and sea ice treatment involving specification of ocean transports; modified treatment of land surface processes and hydrology; a parameterization of cloud optical feedback; and a retention of the special application data sets of surface parameters for North America and Europe. Results of the simulation were a globally averaged surface temperature increase of 3.5 degree C; a precipitation and evaporation increase of 3%; an average decrease in soil moisture of 6.6%; a decrease in cloud cover of 2.2%; a 66% decrease in mass of sea ice; and marked changes in other quantities in the polar region. 2 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  4. Implementing a continuum of care model for older people - results from a Swedish case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Duner

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: There is a need for integrated care and smooth collaboration between care-providing organisations and professions to create a continuum of care for frail older people. However, collaboration between organisations and professions is often problematic. The aim of this study was to examine the process of implementing a new continuum of care model in a complex organisational context, and illuminate some of the challenges involved. The introduced model strived to connect three organisations responsible for delivering health and social care to older people: the regional hospital, primary health care and municipal eldercare.Methods: The actions of the actors involved in the process of implementing the model were understood to be shaped by the actors' understanding, commitment and ability. This article is based on 44 qualitative interviews performed on four occasions with 26 key actors at three organisational levels within these three organisations.Results and conclusions: The results point to the importance of paying regard to the different cultures of the organisations when implementing a new model. The role of upper management emerged as very important. Furthermore, to be accepted, the model has to be experienced as effectively dealing with real problems in the everyday practice of the actors in the organisations, from the bottom to the top.

  5. Response of a laminar premixed flame to flow oscillations: A kinematic model and thermoacoustic instability results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fleifil, M.; Annaswamy, A.M.; Ghoneim, A.F. [Massachusetts Inst. of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Ghoneim, Z.A. [Ain Shams Univ., Abassia (Egypt)

    1996-09-01

    Combustion instability is a resonance phenomenon that arises due to the coupling between the system acoustics and the unsteady heat release. The constructive feedback between the two processes, which is known to occur as a certain phase relationship between the pressure and the unsteady heat release rate is satisfied, depends on many parameters among which is the acoustic mode, the flame holder characteristics, and the dominant burning pattern. In this paper, the authors construct an analytical model to describe the dynamic response of a laminar premixed flame stabilized on the rim of a tube to velocity oscillation. They consider uniform and nonuniform velocity perturbations superimposed on a pipe flow velocity profile. The model results show that the magnitude of heat release perturbation and its phase with respect to the dynamic perturbation dependent primarily on the flame Strohal number, representing the ratio of the dominant frequency times the tube radius to the laminar burning velocity. In terms of this number, high-frequency perturbations pass through the flame while low frequencies lead to a strong response. The phase with respect to the velocity perturbation behaves in the opposite way. Results of this model are shown to agree with experimental observations and to be useful in determining how the combustion excited model is selected among all the acoustic unstable modes. The model is then used to obtain a time-domain differential equation describing the relationship between the velocity perturbation and the heat release response over the entire frequency range.

  6. Breast MRI at very short TE (minTE). Image analysis of minTE sequences on non-fat-saturated, subtracted T1-weighted images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wenkel, Evelyn; Janka, Rolf; Kaemmerer, Nadine; Uder, Michael; Hammon, Matthias; Brand, Michael [Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Radiology; Geppert, Christian [Siemens Healthcare GmbH, Erlangen (Germany); Hartmann, Arndt [Univ. Hospital Erlangen (Germany). Dept. of Pathology

    2017-02-15

    The aim was to evaluate a minimum echo time (minTE) protocol for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with breast lesions compared to a standard TE (nTE) time protocol. Breasts of 144 women were examined with a 1.5 Tesla MRI scanner. Additionally to the standard gradient-echo sequence with nTE (4.8 ms), a variant with minimum TE (1.2 ms) was used in an interleaved fashion which leads to a better temporal resolution and should reduce the scan time by approximately 50%. Lesion sizes were measured and the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) as well as the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were calculated. Subjective confidence was evaluated using a 3-point scale before looking at the nTE sequences (1 = very sure that I can identify a lesion and classify it, 2 = quite sure that I can identify a lesion and classify it, 3 = definitely want to see nTE for final assessment) and the subjective image quality of all examinations was evaluated using a four-grade scale (1 = sharp, 2 = slight blur, 3 = moderate blur and 4 = severe blur/not evaluable) for lesion and skin sharpness. Lesion morphology and contrast enhancement were also evaluated. With minTE sequences, no lesion was rated with ''definitely want to see nTE sequences for final assessment''. The difference of the longitudinal and transverse diameter did not differ significantly (p>0.05). With minTE, lesions and skin were rated to be significantly more blurry (p<0.01 for lesions and p<0.05 for skin). There was no difference between both sequences with respect to SNR, CNR, lesion morphology, contrast enhancement and detection of multifocal disease. Dynamic breast MRI with a minTE protocol is feasible without a major loss of information (SNR, CNR, lesion morphology, contrast enhancement and lesion sizes) and the temporal resolution can be increased by a factor of 2 using minTE sequences.

  7. The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP): Progress and Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenzweig, C.

    2011-12-01

    The Agricultural Model Intercomparison and Improvement Project (AgMIP) is a distributed climate-scenario simulation exercise for historical model intercomparison and future climate change conditions with participation of multiple crop and agricultural trade modeling groups around the world. The goals of AgMIP are to improve substantially the characterization of risk of hunger and world food security due to climate change and to enhance adaptation capacity in both developing and developed countries. Recent progress and the current status of AgMIP will be presented, highlighting three areas of activity: preliminary results from crop pilot studies, outcomes from regional workshops, and emerging scientific challenges. AgMIP crop modeling efforts are being led by pilot studies, which have been established for wheat, maize, rice, and sugarcane. These crop-specific initiatives have proven instrumental in testing and contributing to AgMIP protocols, as well as creating preliminary results for aggregation and input to agricultural trade models. Regional workshops are being held to encourage collaborations and set research activities in motion for key agricultural areas. The first of these workshops was hosted by Embrapa and UNICAMP and held in Campinas, Brazil. Outcomes from this meeting have informed crop modeling research activities within South America, AgMIP protocols, and future regional workshops. Several scientific challenges have emerged and are currently being addressed by AgMIP researchers. Areas of particular interest include geospatial weather generation, ensemble methods for climate scenarios and crop models, spatial aggregation of field-scale yields to regional and global production, and characterization of future changes in climate variability.

  8. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry – general circulation model: Comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hein

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available The coupled climate-chemistry model ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM is presented which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks. This is the first model which interactively combines a general circulation model with a chemical model, employing most of the important reactions and species necessary to describe the stratospheric and upper tropospheric ozone chemistry, and which is computationally fast enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. This is possible as the model time-step used for the chemistry can be chosen as large as the integration time-step for the dynamics. Vertically the atmosphere is discretized by 39 levels from the surface up to the top layer which is centred at 10 hPa, with a relatively high vertical resolution of approximately 700 m near the extra-tropical tropopause. We present the results of a control simulation representing recent conditions (1990 and compare it to available observations. The focus is on investigations of stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM reproduces main features of stratospheric dynamics in the arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to earlier model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their inter-hemispheric differences are reproduced. Considering methane oxidation as part of the dynamic-chemistry feedback results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapour concentrations. The current model constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic

  9. Results of an interactively coupled atmospheric chemistry – general circulation model: Comparison with observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Hein

    Full Text Available The coupled climate-chemistry model ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM is presented which enables a simultaneous treatment of meteorology and atmospheric chemistry and their feedbacks. This is the first model which interactively combines a general circulation model with a chemical model, employing most of the important reactions and species necessary to describe the stratospheric and upper tropospheric ozone chemistry, and which is computationally fast enough to allow long-term integrations with currently available computer resources. This is possible as the model time-step used for the chemistry can be chosen as large as the integration time-step for the dynamics. Vertically the atmosphere is discretized by 39 levels from the surface up to the top layer which is centred at 10 hPa, with a relatively high vertical resolution of approximately 700 m near the extra-tropical tropopause. We present the results of a control simulation representing recent conditions (1990 and compare it to available observations. The focus is on investigations of stratospheric dynamics and chemistry relevant to describe the stratospheric ozone layer. ECHAM4.L39(DLR/CHEM reproduces main features of stratospheric dynamics in the arctic vortex region, including stratospheric warming events. This constitutes a major improvement compared to earlier model versions. However, apparent shortcomings in Antarctic circulation and temperatures persist. The seasonal and interannual variability of the ozone layer is simulated in accordance with observations. Activation and deactivation of chlorine in the polar stratospheric vortices and their inter-hemispheric differences are reproduced. Considering methane oxidation as part of the dynamic-chemistry feedback results in an improved representation of the spatial distribution of stratospheric water vapour concentrations. The current model constitutes a powerful tool to investigate, for instance, the combined direct and indirect effects of anthropogenic

  10. Simple Stellar Population Modeling of Quasar Host Galaxies with Diffusion K-Means Test Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosby, Gregory; Moravec, E. A.; Tremonti, C. A.; Wolf, M. J.

    2013-01-01

    In the last decade, the correlation of the masses of supermassive black holes (SMBHs) and their host galaxy stellar spheroid velocity dispersions (the M-sigma relation) was greeted as clear evidence for the co-evolution of host galaxies and their SMBHs. However, studies in the last five years have posited that this relation could arise from central-limit properties of hierarchical formation alone. To address the question of whether and how often the SMBHs evolve with their host galaxies, it is necessary to look at galaxies whose SMBHs are actively growing—quasars—and determine the host galaxy properties. The central nuclei of quasar host galaxies complicate this type of study because their high luminosity tends to wash out their host galaxies. But, by using 3-D spectroscopy with the integral field unit (IFU) Sparsepak on the WIYN telescope, we have shown that the quasar light can be mostly isolated to one fiber in order to obtain the spectra of the quasar and the host galaxy concurrently. We can then model simultaneously the scattered quasar light and the stellar populations in the host galaxy fiber using a new simple stellar population (SSP) modeling method called diffusion k-means (DFK). The objectives of the research presented in this poster are to model synthetic quasar host galaxies using a DFK basis and a more traditional basis, compare the accuracy of both modeling methods, and test the affects of various prescriptions for masking the quasar lines in the host galaxy fiber. We present results from our SSP modeling and Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) results for DFK and traditional modeling schemes using synthetic data. By determining and then using the more robust stellar population modeling method, we can more confidently study quasar host galaxies to answer remaining questions in galaxy evolution. This work was partially supported by a National Science Foundation Graduate Fellowship (NSF Grant DGE-0718123) and through the NSF's REU program (NSF Award

  11. A Compact Synchronous Cellular Model of Nonlinear Calcium Dynamics: Simulation and FPGA Synthesis Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soleimani, Hamid; Drakakis, Emmanuel M

    2017-06-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated that calcium is a widespread intracellular ion that controls a wide range of temporal dynamics in the mammalian body. The simulation and validation of such studies using experimental data would benefit from a fast large scale simulation and modelling tool. This paper presents a compact and fully reconfigurable cellular calcium model capable of mimicking Hopf bifurcation phenomenon and various nonlinear responses of the biological calcium dynamics. The proposed cellular model is synthesized on a digital platform for a single unit and a network model. Hardware synthesis, physical implementation on FPGA, and theoretical analysis confirm that the proposed cellular model can mimic the biological calcium behaviors with considerably low hardware overhead. The approach has the potential to speed up large-scale simulations of slow intracellular dynamics by sharing more cellular units in real-time. To this end, various networks constructed by pipelining 10 k to 40 k cellular calcium units are compared with an equivalent simulation run on a standard PC workstation. Results show that the cellular hardware model is, on average, 83 times faster than the CPU version.

  12. Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) Model: Documentation and Sample Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Denholm, P.; Drury, E.; Margolis, R.

    2009-09-01

    The Solar Deployment System (SolarDS) model is a bottom-up, market penetration model that simulates the potential adoption of photovoltaics (PV) on residential and commercial rooftops in the continental United States through 2030. NREL developed SolarDS to examine the market competitiveness of PV based on regional solar resources, capital costs, electricity prices, utility rate structures, and federal and local incentives. The model uses the projected financial performance of PV systems to simulate PV adoption for building types and regions then aggregates adoption to state and national levels. The main components of SolarDS include a PV performance simulator, a PV annual revenue calculator, a PV financial performance calculator, a PV market share calculator, and a regional aggregator. The model simulates a variety of installed PV capacity for a range of user-specified input parameters. PV market penetration levels from 15 to 193 GW by 2030 were simulated in preliminary model runs. SolarDS results are primarily driven by three model assumptions: (1) future PV cost reductions, (2) the maximum PV market share assumed for systems with given financial performance, and (3) PV financing parameters and policy-driven assumptions, such as the possible future cost of carbon emissions.

  13. Tabulation of Mie scattering calculation results for microwave radiative transfer modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Hwa-Young M.; Prasad, N.

    1988-01-01

    In microwave radiative transfer model simulations, the Mie calculations usually consume the majority of the computer time necessary for the calculations (70 to 86 percent for frequencies ranging from 6.6 to 183 GHz). For a large array of atmospheric profiles, the repeated calculations of the Mie codes make the radiative transfer computations not only expensive, but sometimes impossible. It is desirable, therefore, to develop a set of Mie tables to replace the Mie codes for the designated ranges of temperature and frequency in the microwave radiative transfer calculation. Results of using the Mie tables in the transfer calculations show that the total CPU time (IBM 3081) used for the modeling simulation is reduced by a factor of 7 to 16, depending on the frequency. The tables are tested by computing the upwelling radiance of 144 atmospheric profiles generated by a 3-D cloud model (Tao, 1986). Results are compared with those using Mie quantities computed from the Mie codes. The bias and root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) of the model results using the Mie tables, in general, are less than 1 K except for 37 and 90 GHz. Overall, neither the bias nor RMSD is worse than 1.7 K for any frequency and any viewing angle.

  14. Energy consumption and economic growth in New Zealand: Results of trivariate and multivariate models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartleet, Matthew; Gounder, Rukmani

    2010-01-01

    This study examines the energy consumption-growth nexus in New Zealand. Causal linkages between energy and macroeconomic variables are investigated using trivariate demand-side and multivariate production models. Long run and short run relationships are estimated for the period 1960-2004. The estimated results of demand model reveal a long run relationship between energy consumption, real GDP and energy prices. The short run results indicate that real GDP Granger-causes energy consumption without feedback, consistent with the proposition that energy demand is a derived demand. Energy prices are found to be significant for energy consumption outcomes. Production model results indicate a long run relationship between real GDP, energy consumption and employment. The Granger-causality is found from real GDP to energy consumption, providing additional evidence to support the neoclassical proposition that energy consumption in New Zealand is fundamentally driven by economic activities. Inclusion of capital in the multivariate production model shows short run causality from capital to energy consumption. Also, changes in real GDP and employment have significant predictive power for changes in real capital.

  15. Max-Min Optimality of Service Rate Control in Closed Queueing Networks

    KAUST Repository

    Xia, Li

    2013-04-01

    In this technical note, we discuss the optimality properties of service rate control in closed Jackson networks. We prove that when the cost function is linear to a particular service rate, the system performance is monotonic w.r.t. (with respect to) that service rate and the optimal value of that service rate can be either maximum or minimum (we call it Max-Min optimality); When the second-order derivative of the cost function w.r.t. a particular service rate is always positive (negative), which makes the cost function strictly convex (concave), the optimal value of such service rate for the performance maximization (minimization) problem can be either maximum or minimum. To the best of our knowledge, this is the most general result for the optimality of service rates in closed Jackson networks and all the previous works only involve the first conclusion. Moreover, our result is also valid for both the state-dependent and load-dependent service rates, under both the time-average and customer-average performance criteria.

  16. Deposition and removal of fugitive dust in the arid southwestern United States: measurements and model results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etyemezian, Vic; Ahonen, Sean; Nikolic, Djordje; Gillies, John; Kuhns, Hampden; Gillette, Dale; Veranth, John

    2004-09-01

    This work was motivated by the need to better reconcile emission factors for fugitive dust with the amount of geologic material found on ambient filter samples. The deposition of particulate matter with aerodynamic diameter less than or equal to 10 microm (PM10), generated by travel over an unpaved road, over the first 100 m of transport downwind of the road was examined at Ft. Bliss, near El Paso, TX. The field conditions, typical for warm days in the arid southwestern United States, represented sparsely vegetated terrain under neutral to unstable atmospheric conditions. Emission fluxes of PM10 dust were obtained from towers downwind of the unpaved road at 7, 50, and 100 m. The horizontal flux measurements at the 7 m and 100 m towers indicated that PM10 deposition to the vegetation and ground was too small to measure. The data indicated, with 95% confidence, that the loss of PM10 between the source of emission at the unpaved road, represented by the 7 m tower, and a point 100 m downwind was less than 9.5%. A Gaussian model was used to simulate the plume. Values of the vertical standard deviation sigma(z) and the deposition velocity Vd were similar to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) ISC3 model. For the field conditions, the model predicted that removal of PM10 unpaved road dust by deposition over the distance between the point of emission and 100 m downwind would be less than 5%. However, the model results also indicated that particles larger than 10 microm (aerodynamic diameter) would deposit more appreciably. The model was consistent with changes observed in size distributions between 7 m and 100 m downwind, which were measured with optical particle counters. The Gaussian model predictions were also compared with another study conducted over rough terrain and stable atmospheric conditions. Under such conditions, measured PM10 removal rates over 95 m of downwind transport were reported to be between 86% and 89%, whereas the Gaussian model predicted

  17. Financial analysis and forecasting of the results of small businesses performance based on regression model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svetlana O. Musienko

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective to develop the economicmathematical model of the dependence of revenue on other balance sheet items taking into account the sectoral affiliation of the companies. Methods using comparative analysis the article studies the existing approaches to the construction of the company management models. Applying the regression analysis and the least squares method which is widely used for financial management of enterprises in Russia and abroad the author builds a model of the dependence of revenue on other balance sheet items taking into account the sectoral affiliation of the companies which can be used in the financial analysis and prediction of small enterprisesrsquo performance. Results the article states the need to identify factors affecting the financial management efficiency. The author analyzed scientific research and revealed the lack of comprehensive studies on the methodology for assessing the small enterprisesrsquo management while the methods used for large companies are not always suitable for the task. The systematized approaches of various authors to the formation of regression models describe the influence of certain factors on the company activity. It is revealed that the resulting indicators in the studies were revenue profit or the company relative profitability. The main drawback of most models is the mathematical not economic approach to the definition of the dependent and independent variables. Basing on the analysis it was determined that the most correct is the model of dependence between revenues and total assets of the company using the decimal logarithm. The model was built using data on the activities of the 507 small businesses operating in three spheres of economic activity. Using the presented model it was proved that there is direct dependence between the sales proceeds and the main items of the asset balance as well as differences in the degree of this effect depending on the economic activity of small

  18. Recent results of searches for beyond Standard Model physics in ATLAS

    CERN Document Server

    Serkin, Leonid; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Recent results of searches for beyond Standard Model physics in ATLAS are presented, with particular focus on searches for new phenomena in high jet multiplicity final states. These include searches for charged Higgs boson in the $H^{+} \\to tb $ decay channel, vector-like quark pair production, four-top-quark production in different signal benchmark scenarios and associated heavy Higgs boson production. No significant excess are observed in data and exclusion limits on cross sections and masses are given for the signal models in a number of benchmark scenarios, in most cases significantly extending the reach of previous searches.

  19. First Test Results of the 150 mm Aperture IR Quadrupole Models for the High Luminosity LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosio, G. [Fermilab; Chlachidze, G. [Fermilab; Wanderer, P. [Brookhaven; Ferracin, P. [CERN; Sabbi, G. [LBNL, Berkeley

    2016-10-06

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the LHC at CERN will use large aperture (150 mm) quadrupole magnets to focus the beams at the interaction points. The high field in the coils requires Nb3Sn superconductor technology, which has been brought to maturity by the LHC Accelerator Re-search Program (LARP) over the last 10 years. The key design targets for the new IR quadrupoles were established in 2012, and fabrication of model magnets started in 2014. This paper discusses the results from the first single short coil test and from the first short quadrupole model test. Remaining challenges and plans to address them are also presented and discussed.

  20. First Test Results of the 150 mm Aperture IR Quadrupole Models for the High Luminosity LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ambrosio, G; Wanderer, P; Ferracin, P; Sabbi, G

    2017-01-01

    The High Luminosity upgrade of the LHC at CERN will use large aperture (150 mm) quadrupole magnets to focus the beams at the interaction points. The high field in the coils requires Nb3Sn superconductor technology, which has been brought to maturity by the LHC Accelerator Re-search Program (LARP) over the last 10 years. The key design targets for the new IR quadrupoles were established in 2012, and fabrication of model magnets started in 2014. This paper discusses the results from the first single short coil test and from the first short quadrupole model test. Remaining challenges and plans to address them are also presented and discussed.

  1. A Module for Graphical Display of Model Results with the CBP Toolbox

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, F. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2015-04-21

    This report describes work performed by the Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) in fiscal year 2014 to add enhanced graphical capabilities to display model results in the Cementitious Barriers Project (CBP) Toolbox. Because Version 2.0 of the CBP Toolbox has just been released, the graphing enhancements described in this report have not yet been integrated into a new version of the Toolbox. Instead they have been tested using a standalone GoldSim model and, while they are substantially complete, may undergo further refinement before full implementation. Nevertheless, this report is issued to document the FY14 development efforts which will provide a basis for further development of the CBP Toolbox.

  2. Exact results for survival probability in the multistate Landau-Zener model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkov, M V; Ostrovsky, V N

    2004-01-01

    An exact formula is derived for survival probability in the multistate Landau-Zener model in the special case where the initially populated state corresponds to the extremal (maximum or minimum) slope of a linear diabatic potential curve. The formula was originally guessed by S Brundobler and V Elzer (1993 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 26 1211) based on numerical calculations. It is a simple generalization of the expression for the probability of diabatic passage in the famous two-state Landau-Zener model. Our result is obtained via analysis and summation of the entire perturbation theory series

  3. AG Channel Measurement and Modeling Results for Over-Sea Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matolak, David; Sun, Rouyu

    2014-01-01

    This report describes results from flight tests conducted in an over-sea environment, for the purpose of characterizing the air-to-ground (AG) channel, for future unmanned aircraft system (UAS) communication system analysis and design. These results are for the first of a set of several flight tests conducted in different ground site (GS) environments. An ultimate aim of all these tests is the development of models for the AG channel that can be used in communication system evaluation. In this report we provide measured results for propagation path loss, root-mean square delay spread (RMS-DS), and the correlation coefficient of the primary received signal components on the four antennas (two antennas for C-band, two for L-band). For path loss, the curved-earth two-ray model provides a reasonable fit to the measured data, altered by several dB at the shortest link distances by aircraft antenna pattern effects. This two-ray model also accounts for the majority of measured RMS-DS results of a few tens of nanoseconds, except for the occasional intermittent reflections from surface objects. These intermittent reflections yield RMS-DS values up to several hundred nanoseconds. For portions of the flight path that were over a harbor area highly populated with boats, the channel was found to be more "continuously dispersive," with RMS-DS reaching approximately 250 ns. A separate model will be developed for this over-harbor setting. The correlation coefficient results are still undergoing analysis; preliminary observations are that correlation between signals on the same-band antennas is generally large (>0.6) for the C-band straight flight paths, whereas for the L-band signals and for the oval-shaped flight paths the correlation is generally small (below 0.4). Inter-band correlations are typically very small, and are well modeled as zero-mean Gaussian in distribution, with a standard deviation less than 0.2. Hence the over-sea channel effects in the two bands can be

  4. Preliminary Results from Electric Arc Furnace Off-Gas Enthalpy Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nimbalkar, Sachin U [ORNL; Thekdi, Arvind [E3M Inc; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Storey, John Morse [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This article describes electric arc furnace (EAF) off-gas enthalpy models developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to calculate overall heat availability (sensible and chemical enthalpy) and recoverable heat values (steam or power generation potential) for existing EAF operations and to test ORNL s new EAF waste heat recovery (WHR) concepts. ORNL s new EAF WHR concepts are: Regenerative Drop-out Box System and Fluidized Bed System. The two EAF off-gas enthalpy models described in this paper are: 1.Overall Waste Heat Recovery Model that calculates total heat availability in off-gases of existing EAF operations 2.Regenerative Drop-out Box System Model in which hot EAF off-gases alternately pass through one of two refractory heat sinks that store heat and then transfer it to another gaseous medium These models calculate the sensible and chemical enthalpy of EAF off-gases based on the off-gas chemical composition, temperature, and mass flow rate during tap to tap time, and variations in those parameters in terms of actual values over time. The models provide heat transfer analysis for the aforementioned concepts to confirm the overall system and major component sizing (preliminary) to assess the practicality of the systems. Real-time EAF off-gas composition (e.g., CO, CO2, H2, and H2O), volume flow, and temperature data from one EAF operation was used to test the validity and accuracy of the modeling work. The EAF off-gas data was used to calculate the sensible and chemical enthalpy of the EAF off-gases to generate steam and power. The article provides detailed results from the modeling work that are important to the success of ORNL s EAF WHR project. The EAF WHR project aims to develop and test new concepts and materials that allow cost-effective recovery of sensible and chemical heat from high-temperature gases discharged from EAFs.

  5. Atmosphere and permafrost in the Arctic: results from a new regional coupled atmosphere-land model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthes, Heidrun; Rinke, Annette; Zhou, Xu; Dethloff, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    Frozen ground is one of the key components of the land part of the Arctic climate system. A reliable representation of the exchanges of energy, water and gases (CO2 and CH4) between frozen ground and the atmosphere is essential for simulating the present day Arctic coupled climate system realistically and its future changes with some confidence. Regional atmosphere-snow-permafrost interactions can be best studied with Regional Climate Models (RCMs) due to their high horizontal resolution compared to Global Climate Models. For this purpose, the sophisticated land model CLM4 was integrated into the Arctic regional climate model HIRHAM5 (HIRHAM5-CLM4). To validate this model, it was run over the ERAInterim period (1979-2014) and the model results were compared to a similar simulation of HIRHAM5, using the inbuilt land model, as well as to station observations. The comparison focuses on the models ability to represent observations on permafrost like permafrost extent, active layer thickness (ALT) and soil temperature profiles, as well as on the representation of the Arctic atmosphere. The representation of ALT and soil temperature profiles is significantly improved in HIRHAM5-CLM4 compared to HIRHAM5. Averaged over the period 2000-2011, the bias to station observations of ALT is reduced from -1.3 m to -0.3 m, the Arctic wide winter soil temperature root mean square is reduced from up to 14.4K to a maximum of 5K. Arctic climatology of 2m air temperature and mean sea level pressure are well represented in both HIRHAM5-CLM4 and HIRHAM5, HIRHAM5-CLM4 reduces the air temperature bias averaged over 1979-2014 over Eastern and Central Siberia in winter by 0.5K. Using CLM4 in HIRHAM5 impacts the simulation of local circulation patterns and influences the occurrence of baroclinic cyclones.

  6. MODIS/Aqua Geolocation Fields 5-Min L1A Swath 1km V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Aqua Geolocation Fields 5-Min L1A Swath 1km (MYD03) are calculated for each 1 km MODIS Instantaneous Field of Views (IFOV) for all orbits daily(in...

  7. VIIRS/NPP Moderate Resolution 6-Min L1B Swath 750m

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — VIIRS/NPP Moderate Resolution 6-Min L1B Swath 750m (VNP02MOD). The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Level 1 and Level 2 swath products are generated...

  8. Peculiarities of natural electromagnetic field variations in the interval of periods of 60-240 min

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovtun, A.A.; Smirnov, M.Yu.

    1996-01-01

    Intensification of the oscillation amplitude of the natural electromagnetic field within 60-240 min period interval at practically all the latitudes was observed during the Earth re-entry to plasma high-speed flow

  9. MODIS/Terra Raw Radiances in Counts 5-Min L1A Swath V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Terra Raw Radiances in Counts 5-Min L1A Swath (MOD01) product contains reformatted and packaged raw instrument data. MODIS instrument data, in packetized...

  10. MODIS/Aqua Clouds 5-Min L2 Swath 1km and 5km V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Aqua Clouds 5-Min L2 Swath 1km and 5km (MYD06_L2) product consists of cloud optical and physical parameters. These parameters are derived using remotely...

  11. MSL Chemistry and Mineralogy X-Ray Diffraction X-Ray Fluorescence (CheMin) Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Wayne; Blake, Dave; Harris, William; Morookian, John Michael; Randall, Dave; Reder, Leonard J.; Sarrazin, Phillipe

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Chemistry and Mineralogy Xray Diffraction (XRD), X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) (CheMin) Instrument, an element of the landed Curiosity rover payload, which landed on Mars in August of 2012. The scientific goal of the MSL mission is to explore and quantitatively assess regions in Gale Crater as a potential habitat for life - past or present. The CheMin instrument will receive Martian rock and soil samples from the MSL Sample Acquisition/Sample Processing and Handling (SA/SPaH) system, and process it utilizing X-Ray spectroscopy methods to determine mineral composition. The Chemin instrument will analyze Martian soil and rocks to enable scientists to investigate geophysical processes occurring on Mars. The CheMin science objectives and proposed surface operations are described along with the CheMin hardware with an emphasis on the system engineering challenges associated with developing such a complex instrument.

  12. VIIRS/NPP Imagery Resolution 6-Min L1B Swath 375m

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — VIIRS/NPP Imagery Resolution 6-Min L1B Swath 375m (VNP02IMG). The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Level 1 and Level 2 swath products are generated...

  13. MODIS/Aqua Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 250m V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Aqua Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 250m (MYD02QKM) data set contains calibrated and geolocated at-aperture radiances for 2 discrete bands located in...

  14. MODIS/Aqua Aerosol 5-Min L2 Swath 10km V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Aqua Aerosol 5-Min L2 Swath 10km (MYD04_L2) product continues to provide full global coverage of aerosol properties from the Dark Target (DT) and Deep Blue...

  15. MODIS/Terra Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 250m V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Terra Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 250m (MOD02QKM) data set contains calibrated and geolocated at-aperture radiances for 2 discrete bands located...

  16. MODIS/Terra Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 500m V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Terra Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 500m (MOD02HKM) data set contains calibrated and geolocated at-aperture radiances for 7 discrete bands located...

  17. MODIS/Aqua Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 500m V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Aqua Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 500m (MYD02HKM) data set contains calibrated and geolocated at-aperture radiances for 7 discrete bands located in...

  18. MODIS/Aqua Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 1km V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Aqua Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 1km (MYD021KM) product contains calibrated and geolocated at-aperture radiances for 36 discrete bands located in...

  19. The Min system and other nucleoid-independent regulators of Z ring positioning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William eMargolin

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Rod-shaped bacteria such as E. coli have mechanisms to position their cell division plane at the precise center of the cell, to ensure that the daughter cells are equal in size. The two main mechanisms are the Min system and nucleoid occlusion (NO, both of which work by inhibiting assembly of FtsZ, the tubulin-like scaffold that forms the cytokinetic Z ring. Whereas NO prevents Z rings from constricting over unsegregated nucleoids, the Min system is nucleoid-independent and even functions in cells lacking nucleoids and thus NO. The Min proteins of E. coli and B. subtilis form bipolar gradients that inhibit Z ring formation most at the cell poles and least at the nascent division plane. This article will outline the molecular mechanisms behind Min function in E. coli and B. subtilis, and discuss distinct Z ring positioning systems in other bacterial species.

  20. MODIS/Aqua Raw Radiances in Counts 5-Min L1A Swath V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Aqua Raw Radiances in Counts 5-Min L1A Swath (MYD01) product contains reformatted and packaged raw instrument data. MODIS instrument data, in packetized...

  1. 2.5-min Isostatic Gravity Grid for the United States

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The 2.5-min isostatic gravity data set was produced by regridding the 4-km residual isostatic gravity grid of the U.S. The isostatic residual gravity grid was...

  2. MODIS/Terra Clouds 5-Min L2 Swath 1km and 5km V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Terra Clouds 5-Min L2 Swath 1km and 5km (MOD06_L2) product consists of cloud optical and physical parameters. These parameters are derived using remotely...

  3. Minéralogie de la fraction argileuse des sols brunifiés de Kahankro ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ilménite et boéhmite) avec une proportion généralement supérieure à 39%, des minéraux primaires (feldspaths, olivine, dolomite et calcite) ayant une proportion supérieure à 30% et des minéraux argileux (kaolinite, illite et chlorite) qui existent en une proportion généralement inférieure à 25%. Le phénomène d'argilation ...

  4. Training the Recurrent neural network by the Fuzzy Min-Max algorithm for fault prediction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zemouri, Ryad; Racoceanu, Daniel; Zerhouni, Noureddine; Minca, Eugenia; Filip, Florin

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a training technique of a Recurrent Radial Basis Function neural network for fault prediction. We use the Fuzzy Min-Max technique to initialize the k-center of the RRBF neural network. The k-means algorithm is then applied to calculate the centers that minimize the mean square error of the prediction task. The performances of the k-means algorithm are then boosted by the Fuzzy Min-Max technique.

  5. MODIS/Aqua Cloud Mask and Spectral Test Results 5-Min L2 Swath 250m and 1km - NRT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS level-2 cloud mask product is a global product generated for both daytime and nighttime conditions at 1-km spatial resolution (at nadir) and for daytime at...

  6. MODIS/Terra Cloud Mask and Spectral Test Results 5-Min L2 Swath 250m and 1km - NRT

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS level-2 cloud mask product is a global product generated for both daytime and nighttime conditions at 1-km spatial resolution (at nadir) and for daytime at...

  7. Inflation or deflation? New results for Mayon Volcano applying elastic-gravitational modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, J.; Tiampo, K. F.; Jentzsch, G.; Charco, M.; Rundle, J. B.

    Volcanic activity produces deformation and gravity changes that many times can be used as precursors of future eruptions. Applying geodetic techniques to monitoring activity involves interpretation using deformation models. Usually, the observed changes of the deformation and gravity fields are interpreted seperately, not in a joint inversion. It can be difficult, if not impossible, to interpret the data coherently or correctly in terms of the characteristics of the intrusion or the deflation derived from the gravity changes with purely elastic models, as in the case of Mayon Volcano, Phillipines. We show that elastic-gravitational models can be used to interpret these cases simultaneously leading to a result that is more plausible on the basis of the available information. Thus, we may need to change the philosophy normally used to interpret geodetic observations. Interpretation as proposed in this work can significantly improve the possibility of predicting future eruptions.

  8. The impact of air traffic in the NAFC. Model results and measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wauben, W.M.F.; Velthoven, P.F.J. van; Kelder, H.M. [Koninklijk Nederlands Meteorologisch Inst., De Bilt (Netherlands)

    1997-12-31

    The impact of aircraft emissions on the atmospheric composition has been investigated with a global chemistry transport model. The model calculations show that aircraft emissions of nitrogen oxides contribute to about 40-80% of the background values of nitrogen oxides in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor (NAFC), and lead to an increase of the background ozone concentrations by about 3-4% in winter and 5-7% in summer. The three-dimensional distributions of ozone, nitrogen oxides and nitric acid, calculated by using analysed meteorological data, have been compared with airborne measurements performed in the North Atlantic Flight Corridor as part of the EC POLINAT project. The agreement between modelled results and observations is reasonably good for ozone, but worse for nitrogen oxides and nitric acid. (author) 12 refs.

  9. Effect of Antimicrobial Agents on MinD Protein Oscillations in E. coli Bacterial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Corey; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2012-02-01

    The pole-to-pole oscillation of MinD proteins in E. coli cells determines the location of the division septum, and is integral to healthy cell division. It has been shown previously that the MinD oscillation period is approximately 40 s for healthy cells [1] but is strongly dependant on environmental factors such as temperature, which may place stress on the cell [2,3]. We use a strain of E. coli in which the MinD proteins are tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP), allowing fluorescence visualization of the MinD oscillation. We use high-resolution total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and a custom, temperature controlled flow cell to observe the effect of exposure to antimicrobial agents on the MinD oscillation period and, more generally, to analyze the time variation of the spatial distribution of the MinD proteins within the cells. These measurements provide insight into the mechanism of antimicrobial action. [1] Raskin, D.M.; de Boer, P. (1999) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. 96: 4971-4976. [2] Touhami, A.; Jericho, M; Rutenberg, A. (2006) J. Bacteriol. 188: 7661-7667. [3] Downing, B.; Rutenberg, A.; Touhami, A.; Jericho, M. (2009) PLoS ONE 4: e7285.

  10. Global statistical maps of extreme-event magnetic observatory 1 min first differences in horizontal intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Jeffrey J.; Coisson, Pierdavide; Pulkkinen, Antti

    2016-01-01

    Analysis is made of the long-term statistics of three different measures of ground level, storm time geomagnetic activity: instantaneous 1 min first differences in horizontal intensity ΔBh, the root-mean-square of 10 consecutive 1 min differences S, and the ramp change R over 10 min. Geomagnetic latitude maps of the cumulative exceedances of these three quantities are constructed, giving the threshold (nT/min) for which activity within a 24 h period can be expected to occur once per year, decade, and century. Specifically, at geomagnetic 55°, we estimate once-per-century ΔBh, S, and R exceedances and a site-to-site, proportional, 1 standard deviation range [1 σ, lower and upper] to be, respectively, 1000, [690, 1450]; 500, [350, 720]; and 200, [140, 280] nT/min. At 40°, we estimate once-per-century ΔBh, S, and R exceedances and 1 σ values to be 200, [140, 290]; 100, [70, 140]; and 40, [30, 60] nT/min.

  11. Sea ice thermohaline dynamics and biogeochemistry in the Arctic Ocean: Empirical and model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Pedro; Meyer, Amelie; Olsen, Lasse M.; Kauko, Hanna M.; Assmy, Philipp; Rösel, Anja; Itkin, Polona; Hudson, Stephen R.; Granskog, Mats A.; Gerland, Sebastian; Sundfjord, Arild; Steen, Harald; Hop, Haakon; Cohen, Lana; Peterson, Algot K.; Jeffery, Nicole; Elliott, Scott M.; Hunke, Elizabeth C.; Turner, Adrian K.

    2017-07-01

    Large changes in the sea ice regime of the Arctic Ocean have occurred over the last decades justifying the development of models to forecast sea ice physics and biogeochemistry. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the performance of the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE) to simulate physical and biogeochemical properties at time scales of a few weeks and to use the model to analyze ice algal bloom dynamics in different types of ice. Ocean and atmospheric forcing data and observations of the evolution of the sea ice properties collected from 18 April to 4 June 2015, during the Norwegian young sea ICE expedition, were used to test the CICE model. Our results show the following: (i) model performance is reasonable for sea ice thickness and bulk salinity; good for vertically resolved temperature, vertically averaged Chl a concentrations, and standing stocks; and poor for vertically resolved Chl a concentrations. (ii) Improving current knowledge about nutrient exchanges, ice algal recruitment, and motion is critical to improve sea ice biogeochemical modeling. (iii) Ice algae may bloom despite some degree of basal melting. (iv) Ice algal motility driven by gradients in limiting factors is a plausible mechanism to explain their vertical distribution. (v) Different ice algal bloom and net primary production (NPP) patterns were identified in the ice types studied, suggesting that ice algal maximal growth rates will increase, while sea ice vertically integrated NPP and biomass will decrease as a result of the predictable increase in the area covered by refrozen leads in the Arctic Ocean.

  12. alpha-pinene oxidation by OH : Box model simulation of experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capouet, M.; Fantechi, G.; Peeters, J.; Noziere, B.; Muller, J.-F.

    2003-04-01

    A detailed gas-phase mechanism for the oxidation of alpha-pinene and pinonaldehyde by OH in the presence of NOx (Peeters et al., 2001; Fantechi et al., 2002) has been implemented in a box model. A module describing the gas/particle partitioning of the semi-volatile products has been developed and coupled to the gas-phase model. The estimation of the gas/particle partitioning coefficients requires the prediction of the saturation vapour pressures for the compounds produced in the mechanism. The method developed in this work is outlined and compared with two published methods : The Marrero and Gani (2001) and the UNIFAC ( Asher et al, 2002) methods. In order to validate the gas-phase mechanism and the partitioning model, we present comparisons of simulations results with time-dependent product concentrations measured in a series of laboratories experiments performed by Noziere et al. (1999). In these experiments, gaseous products as well as total secondary organic aerosol were measured in a variety of conditions (initial alpha-pinene, NOx, type of lamp and radical precursor). The results of these comparisons are discussed. An excellent agreement is generally observed for most gaseous products, in contrast with a very poor match between modelled and observed aerosol concentrations, pointing to the existence of missing heterogeneous processes.

  13. Results from flamelet and non-flamelet models for supersonic combustion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladeinde, Foluso; Li, Wenhai

    2017-11-01

    Air-breathing propulsion systems (scramjets) have been identified as a viable alternative to rocket engines for improved efficiency. A scramjet engine, which operates at flight Mach numbers around 7 or above, is characterized by the existence of supersonic flow conditions in the combustor. In a dual-mode scramjet, this phenomenon is possible because of the relatively low value of the equivalence ratio and high stagnation temperature, which, together, inhibits thermal choking downstream of transverse injectors. The flamelet method has been our choice for turbulence-combustion interaction modeling and we have extended the basic approach in several dimensions, with a focus on the way the pressure and progress variable are modeled. Improved results have been obtained. We have also examined non-flamelet models, including laminar chemistry (QL), eddy dissipation concept (EDC), and partially-stirred reactor (PaSR). The pressure/progress variable-corrected simulations give better results compared with the original model, with reaction rates that are lower than those from EDC and PaSR. In general, QL tends to over-predict the reaction rate for the supersonic combustion problems investigated in our work.

  14. Our Electron Model vindicates Schr"odinger's Incomplete Results and Require Restatement of Heisenberg's Uncertainty Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeod, David; McLeod, Roger

    2008-04-01

    The electron model used in our other joint paper here requires revision of some foundational physics. That electron model followed from comparing the experimentally proved results of human vision models using spatial Fourier transformations, SFTs, of pincushion and Hermann grids. Visual systems detect ``negative'' electric field values for darker so-called ``illusory'' diagonals that are physical consequences of the lens SFT of the Hermann grid, distinguishing this from light ``illusory'' diagonals. This indicates that oppositely directed vectors of the separate illusions are discretely observable, constituting another foundational fault in quantum mechanics, QM. The SFT of human vision is merely the scaled SFT of QM. Reciprocal space results of wavelength and momentum mimic reciprocal relationships between space variable x and spatial frequency variable p, by the experiment mentioned. Nobel laureate physicist von B'ek'esey, physiology of hearing, 1961, performed pressure input Rect x inputs that the brain always reports as truncated Sinc p, showing again that the brain is an adjunct built by sight, preserves sign sense of EMF vectors, and is hard wired as an inverse SFT. These require vindication of Schr"odinger's actual, but incomplete, wave model of the electron as having physical extent over the wave, and question Heisenberg's uncertainty proposal.

  15. Application of the IPCC model to a Brazilian landfill: First results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penteado, Roger; Cavalli, Massimo; Magnano, Enrico; Chiampo, Fulvia

    2012-01-01

    The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change gave a methodology to estimate the methane emissions from Municipal Solid Wastes landfills, based on a First Order Decay (FOD) model that assumes biodegradation kinetics depending on the type of wastes. This model can be used to estimate both the National greenhouse gas emissions in the industrialized countries as well as the reductions of these emissions in the developing ones when the Clean Development Mechanism, as defined by the Kyoto Protocol, is implemented. In this paper, the FOD model has been use to evaluate the biogas flow rates emitted by a Brazilian landfill and the results have been compared to the extracted ones: some first results can be useful to evidence the weight of key parameters and do a correct use of the model. - Highlights: ► Landfill biogas is greenhouse gas and fuel at the same time. ► In developing countries its collection can implement Kyoto Protocol mechanisms. ► Biogas collection and exploiting become part of energy policy. ► Project economical balance is based on reliable estimates of generated quantities.

  16. An analytical model for nanoparticles concentration resulting from infusion into poroelastic brain tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzichelli, G; Di Michele, F; Sinibaldi, E

    2016-02-01

    We consider the infusion of a diluted suspension of nanoparticles (NPs) into poroelastic brain tissue, in view of relevant biomedical applications such as intratumoral thermotherapy. Indeed, the high impact of the related pathologies motivates the development of advanced therapeutic approaches, whose design also benefits from theoretical models. This study provides an analytical expression for the time-dependent NPs concentration during the infusion into poroelastic brain tissue, which also accounts for particle binding onto cells (by recalling relevant results from the colloid filtration theory). Our model is computationally inexpensive and, compared to fully numerical approaches, permits to explicitly elucidate the role of the involved physical aspects (tissue poroelasticity, infusion parameters, NPs physico-chemical properties, NP-tissue interactions underlying binding). We also present illustrative results based on parameters taken from the literature, by considering clinically relevant ranges for the infusion parameters. Moreover, we thoroughly assess the model working assumptions besides discussing its limitations. While not laying any claims of generality, our model can be used to support the development of more ambitious numerical approaches, towards the preliminary design of novel therapies based on NPs infusion into brain tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. National Fire Fuels and Risks Assessment Using Remote Sensing and Ecological Modeling: Prototype Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Z.; Rollins, M.

    2003-12-01

    Hazardous fuel reduction, ecosystem rehabilitation and restoration, and firefighting safety, are land management priorities emphasized by recent national fire policies such as the National Fire Plan. Implementation of these policies requires geospatial data of vegetation conditions, fire fuels, risks, and ecosystem status developed consistently nationwide that can be used at multiple scales (i.e., local, regional, and national). A new research and development project called LANDFIRE has been conducted to develop an integrated methodology to produce geospatial fire data and predictive models for the land management community and a broad range of other applications. Main deliverables include mapped potential and existing vegetation types and structure variables, various biophysical data layers, fire fuels models, fire risk layers, as well as state-of-the-art computer models for assessing fire risk, behavior and effects. In this presentation, we will review research results and findings of the LANDFIRE project using results from a prototype study covering central Utah Uinta and Wasatch ecosystems. Particularly we will describe how a consistent and operational vegetation mapping component may be achieved by integrating machine-learning algorithms, field reference data, satellite imagery, and ecologically significant biophysical variables. We will discuss how remotely sensed vegetation cover types and structure can be successfully converted to fire fuel classes and risk layers which are necessary input into fire behavior and fire effect models. Finally we will discuss challenges and opportunities for national implementation of the methodology.

  18. EQUATIONS OF NONLINEAR SOIL DAMAGE BASED ON RESULTS OF TESTING OF LATERALLY LOADED PILE MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buslov Anatoliy Semenovich

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Results of testing of laterally loaded pile models demonstrate that the "load -to-displacement" dependency has a nonlinear character. This dependency may be regarded as linear within the interval of (0.2…0.3 Pul only. Tests were performed in a box with displacement indicators and power equipment. The pile model length was 200 mm, and its diameter was 40 mm. A hollow steel tube was used as the material for tested piles. Based on the analysis of testing results, a pattern of the non-linear damage of the base was formulated. According to the pattern, the increase of the load intensity (damage factor m=Ph/Pul involves an increase in the damage of the continuity, or the rebuff ability of the soil foundation.

  19. Non-SUSY Beyond Standard Model Searches: Recent Results from ATLAS and CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Malek, Fairouz; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    The Standard Model of particle physics is a sensational success, especially since the discovery of the 125 GeV Higgs boson. However, there are still numerous unanswered questions. Why is the Higgs so light? Do the interactions couplings unify and how can gravity be included? Why three fermion generations? What is dark matter? Theories Beyond the Standard Model (BSM), such as Grand Unified Theories, Extra Dimensions or Technicolour are trying to answer these questions. In this proceedings, we will focus on the most recent results obtained by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at the LHC for BSM searches, excluding Higgs and supersymmetry searches. New results on Dark matter, heavy narrow bosons, new heavy quarks and third generation leptoquarks are presented. A summary of the prospects at 14 TeV and at the High Luminosity LHC period is given.

  20. Turbulence modeling with fractional derivatives: Derivation from first principles and initial results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epps, Brenden; Cushman-Roisin, Benoit

    2017-11-01

    Fluid turbulence is an outstanding unsolved problem in classical physics, despite 120+ years of sustained effort. Given this history, we assert that a new mathematical framework is needed to make a transformative breakthrough. This talk offers one such framework, based upon kinetic theory tied to the statistics of turbulent transport. Starting from the Boltzmann equation and ``Lévy α-stable distributions'', we derive a turbulence model that expresses the turbulent stresses in the form of a fractional derivative, where the fractional order is tied to the transport behavior of the flow. Initial results are presented herein, for the cases of Couette-Poiseuille flow and 2D boundary layers. Among other results, our model is able to reproduce the logarithmic Law of the Wall in shear turbulence.

  1. SAMI2 model results for the quiet time low latitude ionosphere over India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, S. S.; Sharma, Shweta; Pandey, R.

    2018-04-01

    Efficacy of SAMI2 model for the Indian low latitude region around 75°E longitudes has been tested for different levels of solar flux. With a slight modification of the plasma drift velocity the SAMI2 model has been successful in reproducing quiet time ionospheric low latitude features like Equatorial Ionization Anomaly. We have also showed the formation of electron hole in the topside equatorial ionosphere in the Indian sector. Simulation results show the formation of electron hole in the altitude range 800-2500 km over the magnetic equator. Indian zone results reveal marked differences with regard to the time of occurrence, seasonal appearances and strength of the electron hole vis-a-vis those reported for the American equatorial region.

  2. Deep Learning Based Solar Flare Forecasting Model. I. Results for Line-of-sight Magnetograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin; Wang, Huaning; Xu, Long; Liu, Jinfu; Li, Rong; Dai, Xinghua

    2018-03-01

    Solar flares originate from the release of the energy stored in the magnetic field of solar active regions, the triggering mechanism for these flares, however, remains unknown. For this reason, the conventional solar flare forecast is essentially based on the statistic relationship between solar flares and measures extracted from observational data. In the current work, the deep learning method is applied to set up the solar flare forecasting model, in which forecasting patterns can be learned from line-of-sight magnetograms of solar active regions. In order to obtain a large amount of observational data to train the forecasting model and test its performance, a data set is created from line-of-sight magnetogarms of active regions observed by SOHO/MDI and SDO/HMI from 1996 April to 2015 October and corresponding soft X-ray solar flares observed by GOES. The testing results of the forecasting model indicate that (1) the forecasting patterns can be automatically reached with the MDI data and they can also be applied to the HMI data; furthermore, these forecasting patterns are robust to the noise in the observational data; (2) the performance of the deep learning forecasting model is not sensitive to the given forecasting periods (6, 12, 24, or 48 hr); (3) the performance of the proposed forecasting model is comparable to that of the state-of-the-art flare forecasting models, even if the duration of the total magnetograms continuously spans 19.5 years. Case analyses demonstrate that the deep learning based solar flare forecasting model pays attention to areas with the magnetic polarity-inversion line or the strong magnetic field in magnetograms of active regions.

  3. Model unspecific search in CMS. First results at 13 TeV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roemer, Jonas; Albert, Andreas; Duchardt, Deborah; Hebbeker, Thomas; Knutzen, Simon; Lieb, Jonas; Meyer, Arnd; Pook, Tobias [III. Physikalisches Institut A, RWTH Aachen University (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Following an upgrade in center of mass energy from √(s) = 8 TeV to 13 TeV, the LHC delivered first proton-proton collisions at this unprecedented energy in 2015. The CMS experiment recorded data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.7 fb{sup -1}. Since many theoretical models predict signal cross sections to increase strongly with the center of mass energy, the data taken at √(s) = 13 TeV are competitive to the previous data taking period even with a lower recorded integrated luminosity. The Model Unspecific Search in CMS (MUSiC) searches for physics beyond the standard model independent of theoretical models. Using an automatic method, kinematic distributions of the data are compared with the standard model expectation in every final state. Therefore, MUSiC reduces the chance of overlooking new physics, since even distributions not covered by dedicated analyses are investigated. This talk outlines changes to the analysis made necessary by the increased center of mass energy and first results with lepton triggered events.

  4. Dermal uptake of phthalates from clothing: Comparison of model to human participant results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, G C; Weschler, C J; Bekö, G

    2017-05-01

    In this research, we extend a model of transdermal uptake of phthalates to include a layer of clothing. When compared with experimental results, this model better estimates dermal uptake of diethylphthalate and di-n-butylphthalate (DnBP) than a previous model. The model predictions are consistent with the observation that previously exposed clothing can increase dermal uptake over that observed in bare-skin participants for the same exposure air concentrations. The model predicts that dermal uptake from clothing of DnBP is a substantial fraction of total uptake from all sources of exposure. For compounds that have high dermal permeability coefficients, dermal uptake is increased for (i) thinner clothing, (ii) a narrower gap between clothing and skin, and (iii) longer time intervals between laundering and wearing. Enhanced dermal uptake is most pronounced for compounds with clothing-air partition coefficients between 10 4 and 10 7 . In the absence of direct measurements of cotton cloth-air partition coefficients, dermal exposure may be predicted using equilibrium data for compounds in equilibrium with cellulose and water, in combination with computational methods of predicting partition coefficients. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Computer simulation of Gumboro disease outbreak. II. Results obtained with models G-1 and G-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takizawa, T; Ito, T; Kosuge, M; Tanaka, T; Mizumura, Y

    1978-01-01

    The authors conducted a computer simulation with their Models G-1 and G-2 for Gumboro disease ten times in each of the following initial conditions: (1) size of population, 50, 100, and 1,000 chickens; (2) age of housing, 1, 7, 14, and 21 days; (3) nine levels of parentally conferred immunity in one-day-old chicks; (4) four levels of virus contamination; and (5) three steps of coefficient for aggravating morbid status. Every simulation was operated up to the age when all the birds of a flock turned to be insusceptible so as to yield the daily numbers of chickens (1) susceptible, (2) diseased, (3) immunized, and (4) removed, and (5) the accumulation of diseased chickens. The innate resistance, parentally conferred immunity, virus contamination, and morbid status were expressed in such values that they could be compared with one another. As a result, Model G-2 produced a more realistic epizootic pattern than Model G-1, but both models concealed the effect of differences in size of population and in age of housing. Notwithstanding the incompleteness of the models, the computer simulation gave valuable information for a further advancement in this series of studies.

  6. Compilation of publication and results from project C2: Modelling of microclimates in collectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holck, O. [ed.

    1999-08-01

    It is important to avoid condensation in solar collectors, most of all because wetness of the absorber can damage the selective surface and cause corrosion on the absorber plate. During night time the cover of collectors will cool below ambient temperature due to thermal radiation to the cold sky. In climates where the air during night time becomes saturated with humidity (the relative humidity is 100%), condensation will form on the outside and inside of the collector glazing. If too much condensation takes place on the inside of the glazing, it will start to fall off on to the absorber surface. The intent of the present work is improvement of a existing computer model for calculation of microclimates data in collectors. Calculations with the model give insight in the humidity and temperature for artificial or realistic climatic data. This design tool makes it possible to calculate the effect of ventilation and insulation materials. Results from investigation of ventilation rates together with a model of the moisture inside the collector are built into the computer program. It has been found that modelling of the moisture transfer in backside insulation is essential to determine the humidity in the air gap of the collector. The objective is to develop guidelines for solar collector design to achieve the most favourable microclimates condition for materials. As a tool the computer model will be useful to fulfil this. Guidelines for collectors will be essential for manufactures to improve the long-term durability of solar collectors. (au)

  7. Modeling and optimization of acid dye manufacturing wastewater treatment with Fenton's reagent: comparison with electrocoagulation treatment results and effects on activated sludge inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan-Alaton, Idil; Gursoy, B Hande; Akyol, Abdurahman; Kobya, Mehmet; Bayramoglu, Mahmut

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, Fenton's oxidation of a chromium complex disazo dye (Acid Blue 193) synthesis wastewater was evaluated, modeled and optimized by employing Central Composite Design. Within this context, the individual and interactive effects of critical process parameters such as Fe(2 + ), H(2)O(2) concentrations, initial chemical oxygen demand (COD) and reaction time was assessed. The process response (output) variables were chosen as percent color, COD and total organic carbon (TOC) removal efficiencies. Optimum working conditions in terms of color and organic carbon removals were established to be Fe(2 + )=3 mM; H(2)O(2)=25 mM; reaction time = 10 min at pH 3 and an initial COD content of 245 mg/L. Under these conditions, 96% color, 82% COD and 51% TOC removals were obtained. The established polynomial regression models describing color, COD and TOC removals satisfactorily fitted the experimental data and could be used to predict Fenton's treatment results at statistically significant rates. Optimized treatment results were compared with those obtained via electrocoagulation treatment under optimized conditions (applied current = 50 A/m(2); reaction time = 15 min; initial pH = 7 for an initial COD content of 245 mg/L). The relative inhibition of heterotrophic oxygen uptake rate was measured to examine the inhibitory effect of azo dye synthesis effluent before and after Fenton's oxidation and electrocoagulation with respect to synthetic domestic wastewater. Untreated azo dye production wastewater exhibited a slightly inhibitory effect that was appreciably reduced but not entirely removed after Fenton's oxidation, whereas no inhibition of mixed bioculture was observed for azo dye synthesis effluent subjected to electrocoagulation treatment.

  8. Optimising The Available Scarce Water Resources At European Scale In A Modelling Environment: Results And Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Roo, Ad; Burek, Peter; Gentile, Alessandro; Udias, Angel; Bouraoui, Faycal

    2013-04-01

    sector, the manufacturing-industry sector, the energy-production sector and the domestic sector. Also, potential flood damage of a 100-year return period flood has been used as an indicator. The study has shown that technically this modelling software environment can deliver optimum scenario combinations of packages of measures that improve various water quantity and water quality indicators, but that additional work is needed before final conclusions can be made using the tool. Further work is necessary, especially in the economic loss estimations, the water prices and price-elasticity, as well as the implementation and maintenance costs of individual scenarios. First results and challenges will be presented and discussed.

  9. Verification of simulation model with COBRA-IIIP code by confrontment of experimental results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva Galetti, M.R. da; Pontedeiro, A.C.; Oliveira Barroso, A.C. de

    1985-01-01

    It is presented an evaluation of the COBRA IIIP/MIT code (of thermal hydraulic analysis by subchannels), comparing their results with experimental data obtained in stationary and transient regimes. It was done a study to calculate the spatial and temporal critical heat flux. It is presented a sensitivity study of simulation model related to the turbulent mixture and the number of axial intervals. (M.C.K.) [pt

  10. Analytical results for entanglement in the five-qubit anisotropic Heisenberg model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoguang

    2004-01-01

    We solve the eigenvalue problem of the five-qubit anisotropic Heisenberg model, without use of Bethe's ansatz, and give analytical results for entanglement and mixedness of two nearest-neighbor qubits. The entanglement takes its maximum at Δ=1 (Δ>1) for the case of zero (finite) temperature with Δ being the anisotropic parameter. In contrast, the mixedness takes its minimum at Δ=1 (Δ>1) for the case of zero (finite) temperature

  11. Fuel models and results from the TRAC-PF1/MIMAS TMI-2 accident calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schwegler, E.C.; Maudlin, P.J.

    1983-01-01

    A brief description of several fuel models used in the TRAC-PF1/MIMAS analysis of the TMI-2 accident is presented, and some of the significant fuel-rod behavior results from this analysis are given. Peak fuel-rod temperatures, oxidation heat production, and embrittlement and failure behavior calculated for the TMI-2 accident are discussed. Other aspects of fuel behavior, such as cladding ballooning and fuel-cladding eutectic formation, were found not to significantly affect the accident progression

  12. Additional Model Datasets and Results to Accelerate the Verification and Validation of RELAP-7

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoo, Jun Soo [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Choi, Yong Joon [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-11-01

    The RELAP-7 code verification and validation activities are ongoing under the code assessment plan proposed in the previous document (INL-EXT-16-40015). Among the list of V&V test problems in the ‘RELAP-7 code V&V RTM (Requirements Traceability Matrix)’, the RELAP-7 7-equation model has been tested with additional demonstration problems and the results of these tests are reported in this document. In this report, we describe the testing process, the test cases that were conducted, and the results of the evaluation.

  13. Gamma spectroscopy modelization intercomparison of the modelization results using two different codes (MCNP, and Pascalys-mercure)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luneville, L.; Chiron, M.; Toubon, H.; Dogny, S.; Huver, M.; Berger, L.

    2001-01-01

    The research performed in common these last 3 years by the French Atomic Commission CEA, COGEMA and Eurisys Mesures had for main subject the realization of a complete tool of modelization for the largest range of realistic cases, the Pascalys modelization software. The main purpose of the modelization was to calculate the global measurement efficiency, which delivers the most accurate relationship between the photons emitted by the nuclear source in volume, punctual or deposited form and the germanium hyper pure detector, which detects and analyzes the received photons. It has been stated since long time that experimental global measurement efficiency becomes more and more difficult to address especially for complex scene as we can find in decommissioning and dismantling or in case of high activities for which the use of high activity reference sources become difficult to use for both health physics point of view and regulations. The choice of a calculation code is fundamental if accurate modelization is searched. MCNP represents the reference code but its use is long time calculation consuming and then not practicable in line on the field. Direct line-of-sight point kernel code as the French Atomic Commission 3-D analysis Mercure code can represent the practicable compromise between the most accurate MCNP reference code and the realistic performances needed in modelization. The comparison between the results of Pascalys-Mercure and MCNP code taking in account the last improvements of Mercure in the low energy range where the most important errors can occur, is presented in this paper, Mercure code being supported in line by the recent Pascalys 3-D modelization scene software. The incidence of the intrinsic efficiency of the Germanium detector is also approached for the total efficiency of measurement. (authors)

  14. Disparity of outcomes: the limits of modeling amyotrophic lateral sclerosis in murine models and translating results clinically

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Zwiegers

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS is a devastatingly progressive neurodegenerative disorder with multiple underlying etiological factors contributing to disease pathogenesis. Despite intensive research efforts and therapeutic development, disease presentation in ALS remains largely intractable to intervention. To date, the most common rodent model used in pre-clinical drug development accounts for a small proportion of the affected patient population and is predicated upon the significant overexpression of a mutant form of the human antioxidant protein, superoxide dismutase 1 (mSOD1. After more than 50 clinical trials, there is an alarming paucity of positive outcomes at the clinical level of ALS therapeutics with strong supporting pre-clinical data in mSOD1 models. Potential reasons for the negative clinical results are multifactorial in nature and include an overly reductionist model system that is heavily influenced by individual transgene level variation, as well as attempting to widely apply findings derived from a model of specific genetic causality to a patient population where the majority of cases are of unknown etiology. With such a tremendous disease burden and a lack of therapeutic options, it is critical that the research community re-evaluate the dependence on mSOD1 pre-clinical models as the gold standard prior to translating findings at the clinical level. Here we briefly review both the clinical and pre-clinical findings of select therapeutics, discuss the limitations of pre-clinical mSOD1 models, and suggest future stratagems that could aid in the clinical translation of efficacious therapeutic agents. Supplementary files: The supplementary files of this article are found under 'Article Tools' at the right  side bar.

  15. Mercury Studies around the Mediterranean Sea Basin: Ten years of Measurements and Modeling results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sprovieri F.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Only a few years ago the presence of Reactive Gaseous Mercury (RGM was believed to be almost exclusively the result of anthropogenic emissions and that sustained high RGM concentrations in the MBL were not considered likely. During the past ten years, an in-depth investigation was carried out in the Marine Boundary Layer (MBL of the Mediterranean Sea to quantify and possibly explain spatial and temporal patterns of Hg-species concentrations. This paper provides an overview of modeling results and atmospheric measurements performed during several cruise campaigns performed aboard the Research Vessel (RV URANIA of the CNR over the Mediterranean sea basin. RGM concentrations have been modelled using a photochemical box model of the MBL and compared to measured data obtained during the research cruises. The comparison results supports the hypothesis that there are daytime mercury oxidation reactions occurring which have not yet been identified. Major findings of key studies carried out during ten years of ship-borne activities have been highlighted.

  16. Results from ITMIX - the Ice Thickness Models Intercomparison eXperiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farinotti, Daniel; Itmix Consortium, The

    2017-04-01

    Knowledge about the ice thickness distribution of a given glacier or ice cap is essential for a number of glaciological and hydrological applications. Yet, the ice thickness of the majority of worlds' ice masses remains poorly constrained. Recently, significant advances have been made in numerical methods that infer glacier ice thickness from surface characteristics, and a number of approaches have been proposed. A comprehensive assessment of their performance, however, is missing to date. Here, we present results from ITMIX - the Ice Thickness Models Intercomparison eXperiment - which was the first coordinated effort to assess the relative strengths and weaknesses of individual approaches. Operating in a working group of the International Association of Cryospheric Sciences, we present results from a total of 17 different models, applied over 21 test cases including glaciers, ice caps, and synthetic geometries. We show that the results from individual approaches can differ largely, but that combining them into an ensemble-estimate can yield significantly improvements. Comparison against direct ice thickness measurements reveals that ensemble solution can achieve accuracies in the order of 10 ± 24 % of the mean ice thickness. We additionally highlight how input-data quality can affect the estimates, and argue that better accounting for input-data uncertainty will be a key for an improved next generation of ice thickness estimation models.

  17. Comprehensive Interpretation of the Laboratory Experiments Results to Construct Model of the Polish Shale Gas Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarzyna, Jadwiga A.; Krakowska, Paulina I.; Puskarczyk, Edyta; Wawrzyniak-Guz, Kamila; Zych, Marcin

    2018-03-01

    More than 70 rock samples from so-called sweet spots, i.e. the Ordovician Sa Formation and Silurian Ja Member of Pa Formation from the Baltic Basin (North Poland) were examined in the laboratory to determine bulk and grain density, total and effective/dynamic porosity, absolute permeability, pore diameters size, total surface area, and natural radioactivity. Results of the pyrolysis, i.e., TOC (Total Organic Carbon) together with S1 and S2 - parameters used to determine the hydrocarbon generation potential of rocks, were also considered. Elemental composition from chemical analyses and mineral composition from XRD measurements were also included. SCAL analysis, NMR experiments, Pressure Decay Permeability measurements together with water immersion porosimetry and adsorption/ desorption of nitrogen vapors method were carried out along with the comprehensive interpretation of the outcomes. Simple and multiple linear statistical regressions were used to recognize mutual relationships between parameters. Observed correlations and in some cases big dispersion of data and discrepancies in the property values obtained from different methods were the basis for building shale gas rock model for well logging interpretation. The model was verified by the result of the Monte Carlo modelling of spectral neutron-gamma log response in comparison with GEM log results.

  18. Testing the AGN unification model in the infrared. First results with GTC/CanariCam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos Almeida, C.

    2015-05-01

    The unified model for Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) accounts for a variety of observational differences in terms of viewing geometry alone. However, from the fitting of high spatial resolution infrared (IR) data with clumpy torus models, it has been hinted that the immediate dusty surroundings of Type-1 and 2 Seyfert nuclei might be intrinsically different in terms of covering factor (torus width and number of clouds). Moreover, these torus covering factors also showed variations among objects belonging to the same type, in contradiction with simple unification. Interestingly, these intrinsic differences in Seyfert tori could explain, for example, the lack of broad optical lines in the polarized spectra of about half of the brightest Seyfert 2 galaxies. On the other hand, recent IR interferometry studies have revealed that, in at least four Seyfert galaxies, the mid-IR emission is elongated in the polar direction. These results are difficult to reconcile with unified models, which claim that the bulk of the mid-IR emission comes from the torus. In this invited contribution I summarize the latest results on high angular resolution IR studies of AGN, which constitute a crucial test for AGN unification. These results include those from the mid-infrared instrument CanariCam on the 10.4 m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC), which are starting to be published by the CanariCam AGN team, Los Piratas (https://sites.google.com/site/piratasrelatedpublications).

  19. Max-min SINR low complexity transceiver design for single cell massive MIMO

    KAUST Repository

    Sifaou, Houssem

    2016-08-11

    This work focuses on large scale multi-user MIMO systems in which the base station (BS) outfitted with M antennas communicates with K single antenna user equipments (UEs). In particular, we aim at designing the linear precoder and receiver that maximizes the minimum signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio (SINR) subject to a given power constraint. To gain insights into the structure of the optimal precoder and receiver as well as to reduce the computational complexity for their implementation, we analyze the asymptotic regime where M and K grow large with a given ratio and make use of random matrix theory (RMT) tools to compute accurate approximations. Although simpler, the implementation of the asymptotic precoder and receiver requires fast inversions of large matrices in every coherence period. To overcome this issue, we apply the truncated polynomial expansion (TPE) technique to the precoding and receiving vector of each UE and make use of RMT to determine the optimal weighting coefficients that asymptotically solve the max-min SINR problem. Numerical results are used to show that the proposed TPE-based precoder and receiver almost achieve the same performance as the optimal ones while requiring a lower complexity.

  20. Symmetry breaking in frustrated XY models: Results from new self-consistent fluctuation approach and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behzadi, Azad Esmailov

    1999-10-01

    The critical behavior of the fully frustrated XY model has remained controversial in spite of almost two decades of related research. In this study, we have developed a new method inspired by Netz and Berker's hard-spin mean- field theory. Our approach for XY models yields results consistent with Monte Carlo simulations as the ratio of antiferromagnetic to ferromagnetic interactions is varied. The method captures two phase transitions clearly separated in temperature for ratios of 0.5, 0.6, and 1.5, with these transitions moving closer together in temperature as the interaction ratio approaches 1.0, the fully frustrated case. From the system's chirality as a function of temperature in the critical region, we calculate the critical exponent β in agreement with an Ising transition for all of the interaction ratios studied, including 1.0. This result provides support for the view that there are two transitions, rather than one transition in a new universality class, occurring in the fully frustrated XY model. Finite size effects in this model can be essentially eliminated by rescaling the local magnetization, the quantity retained self- consistently in our computations. This rescaling scheme also shows excellent results when tested on the two- dimensional Ising model, and the method, as generalized, provides a framework for an analytical approach to complex systems. Monte Carlo simulations of the fully frustrated XY model in a magnetic field provide further evidence of two transitions. The magnetic field breaks the rotational symmetry of the model, but the two-fold chiral degeneracy of the ground state persists in the field. This lower degeneracy with the field present makes Monte Carlo simulations converge more rapidly. The critical exponent δ determined from the sublattice magnetizations as a function of field agrees with the value expected for a Kosterlitz-Thouless transition. Further, the zero-field specific heat obtained by extrapolation from simulations in a

  1. Modelling the effects of phase change materials on the energy use in buildings. Results of Experiments and System Dynamics Modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prins, J.

    2012-02-15

    The current era is in need for more and more sustainable energy solutions. Phase Change Materials (PCM's) are a solution for a more sustainable build environment because they can help to reduce the energy use of buildings during heating and cooling of the indoor air. This paper presents the results of recent experiments that have been executed with test boxes. In addition a System Dynamics model has been developed to find out how PCM's can be used efficiently without testing in reality. The first experiment, in which PCM's were applied in a concrete floor, shows a reduction of peak temperatures with 4C {+-} 0.7C on maximum temperatures and over 1.5C {+-} 0.7C on minimum temperatures during warm periods. The model confirmed these findings, although the predicted reductions were slightly. During the second experiment more PCM's were applied by mounting them into the walls using gypsum plasterboard to increase the latent heat capacity. Remarkably, both the experimental set-up as the model showed that the increase of PCM's (of almost 98%) causes hardly any difference compared to the first situation. Adapting the exterior in a way to absorb more solar energy, increases the average indoor temperature but decreases the reduction of peak temperatures. Again the model confirmed these findings of the experiment. These results show that the effect of PCM's varies on different climatological contexts and with different construction components physics. This means no straight forward advice on the use of PCM's for a building design can be given. The solution for this problem is provided by the model, showing that the effects of PCM's can be modelled in order to use PCM's in an effective way in different climatological contexts and with different characteristics of construction components. The research shows that a simple model is already capable of predicting PCM performance in test boxes with reasonable accuracy. Therefore it can be

  2. Discrete Element Modeling Results of Proppant Rearrangement in the Cooke Conductivity Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earl Mattson; Hai Huang; Michael Conway; Lisa O' Connell

    2014-02-01

    The study of propped fracture conductivity began in earnest with the development of the Cooke cell which later became part of the initial API standard. Subsequent developments included a patented multicell design to conduct 4 tests in a press at the same time. Other modifications have been used by various investigators. Recent studies by the Stim-Lab proppant consortium have indicated that the flow field across a Cooke proppant conductivity testing cell may not be uniform as initially believed which resulted is significantly different conductivity results. Post test analysis of low temperature metal alloy injections at the termination of proppant testing prior to the release of the applied stress suggest that higher flow is to be expected along the sides and top of the proppant pack than compared to the middle of the pack. To evaluate these experimental findings, a physics-based two-dimensional (2-D) discrete element model (DEM) was developed and applied to simulate proppant rearrangement during stress loading in the Cooke conductivity cell and the resulting porosity field. Analysis of these simulations are critical to understanding the impact of modification to the testing cell as well as understanding key proppant conductivity issues such as how these effects are manifested in proppant concentration testing results. The 2-D DEM model was constructed to represent a realistic cross section of the Cooke cell with a distribution of four material properties, three that represented the Cooke cell (steel, sandstone,square rings), and one representing the proppant. In principle, Cooke cell materials can be approximated as assemblies of independent discrete elements (particles) of various sizes and material properties that interact via cohesive interactions, repulsive forces, and frictional forces. The macroscopic behavior can then be modeled as the collective behavior of many interacting discrete elements. This DEM model is particularly suitable for modeling proppant

  3. OCAM - A CELSS modeling tool: Description and results. [Object-oriented Controlled Ecological Life Support System Analysis and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drysdale, Alan; Thomas, Mark; Fresa, Mark; Wheeler, Ray

    1992-01-01

    Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) technology is critical to the Space Exploration Initiative. NASA's Kennedy Space Center has been performing CELSS research for several years, developing data related to CELSS design. We have developed OCAM (Object-oriented CELSS Analysis and Modeling), a CELSS modeling tool, and have used this tool to evaluate CELSS concepts, using this data. In using OCAM, a CELSS is broken down into components, and each component is modeled as a combination of containers, converters, and gates which store, process, and exchange carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen on a daily basis. Multiple crops and plant types can be simulated. Resource recovery options modeled include combustion, leaching, enzyme treatment, aerobic or anaerobic digestion, and mushroom and fish growth. Results include printouts and time-history graphs of total system mass, biomass, carbon dioxide, and oxygen quantities; energy consumption; and manpower requirements. The contributions of mass, energy, and manpower to system cost have been analyzed to compare configurations and determine appropriate research directions.

  4. Health and budget impact of combined HIV prevention - first results of the BELHIVPREV model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermeersch, Sebastian; Callens, Steven; De Wit, Stéphane; Goffard, Jean-Christophe; Laga, Marie; Van Beckhoven, Dominique; Annemans, Lieven

    2018-02-01

    We developed a pragmatic modelling approach to estimate the impact of treatment as prevention (TasP); outreach testing strategies; and pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) on the epidemiology of HIV and its associated pharmaceutical expenses. Our model estimates the incremental health (in terms of new HIV diagnoses) and budget impact of two prevention scenarios (outreach+TasP and outreach+TasP+PrEP) against a 'no additional prevention' scenario. Model parameters were estimated from reported Belgian epidemiology and literature data. The analysis was performed from a healthcare payer perspective with a 15-year-time horizon. It considers subpopulation differences, HIV infections diagnosed in Belgium having occurred prior to migration, and the effects of an ageing HIV population. Without additional prevention measures, the annual number of new HIV diagnoses rises to over 1350 new diagnoses in 2030 as compared to baseline, resulting in a budget expenditure of €260.5 million. Implementation of outreach+TasP and outreach+TasP+PrEP results in a decrease in the number of new HIV diagnoses to 865 and 663 per year, respectively. Respective budget impacts decrease by €20.6 million and €33.7 million. Foregoing additional investments in prevention is not an option. An approach combining TasP, outreach and PrEP is most effective in reducing the number of new HIV diagnoses and the HIV treatment budget. Our model is the first pragmatic HIV model in Belgium estimating the consequences of a combined preventive approach on the HIV epidemiology and its economic burden assuming other prevention efforts such as condom use and harm reduction strategies remain the same.

  5. Introducing tropical lianas in a vegetation model, methods and first results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbeeck, Hans; di Porcia, Manfredo; Kearsley, Elizabeth; Longo, Marcos

    2017-04-01

    Lianas are an important component of tropical forests, commonly constituting up to 40% of the woody stems and about 35% of the woody species and contributing substantially to forest leaf biomass. Lianas compete strongly with trees for both above- and below-ground resources. Their indirect impact on the carbon balance, due to their influence on tree community dynamics (by increasing mortality and suppressing tree growth), is far larger than their direct contribution to biomass. Currently tropical forests are experiencing large-scale structural changes, including an increase in liana abundance and biomass. This may eventually reduce the projected carbon sink of tropical forests. Despite their crucial role no single terrestrial ecosystem model has included lianas so far. The goal of this work is to include lianas in a vegetation model and to test it against experimental data. For the purpose we chose ED2 (Ecosystem Demography model version 2), a model that occupies the midpoint on the continuum from gap models that contain individual trees, to area-based global models. ED2 explicitly tracks horizontal and vertical heterogeneity in canopy structure making it very suitable to study liana impacts at a large scale. At the same time, the very inner structure of the model, that is its spatial implicitness, constraints the programming design of this new liana PFT. The first part of the presentation will focus on the current representation of lianas in ED2 and the parameterization that has been used. We will provide reference to the available literature to justify the choices made for parameters and allometries. In the second part first results will be shown where we compare the output of the model with data collected in the Paracou site (French Guiana). The data comes from both inventories and fluxtowers. We will focus mainly on plant density, diameter distributions (demography) and carbon/water fluxes. By comparing runs starting from bare ground, rus starting from observed

  6. Tracer simulation using a global general circulation model: Results from a midlatitude instantaneous source experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mahlman, J.D.; Moxim, W.J.

    1978-01-01

    An 11-level general circulation model with seasonal variation is used to perform an experiment on the dispersion of passive tracers. Specially constructed time-dependent winds from this model are used as input to a separate tracer model. The methodologies employed to construct the tracer model are described.The experiment presented is the evolution of a hypothetical instantaneous source of tracer on 1 Janaury with maximum initial concentration at 65 mb, 36 0 N, 180 0 E. The tracer is assumed to have no sources or sinks in the stratosphere, but is subject to removal processes in the lower troposphere.The experimental results reveal a number of similarities to observed tracer behavior, including the average poleward-downward slope of mixing ratio isopleths, strong tracer gradients across the tropopause, intrusion of tracer into the Southern Hemisphere lower stratosphere, and the long-term interhemispheric exchange rate. The model residence times show behavior intermediate to those exhibited for particulate radioactive debris and gaseous C 14 O 2 . This suggests that caution should be employed when either radioactive debris or C 14 O 2 data are used to develop empirical models for prediction of gaseous tracers which are efficiently removed in the troposphere.In this experiment, the tracer mixing ratio and potential vorticity evolve to very high correlations. Mechanisms for this correlation are discussed. The zonal mean tracer balances exhibit complex behavior among the various transport terms. At early stages, the tracer evolution is dominated by eddy effects. Later, a very large degree of self-cancellation between mean cell and eddy effects is observed. During seasonal transitions, however, this self-cancellation diminishes markedly, leading to significant changes in the zonal mean tracer distribution. A possible theoretical explanation is presented

  7. Uncertainty and variability of infiltration at Yucca Mountain: Part 2. Model results and corroboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stothoff, Stuart A.

    2013-06-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission actively investigated climate and infiltration at Yucca Mountain for two decades to (i) understand important controls and uncertainties influencing percolation through the unsaturated zone on multimillennial time scales and (ii) provide flux boundary conditions for up to 1 million years in performance assessment models of the proposed Yucca Mountain repository. This second part of a two-part series describes site-scale model results for present and potential future conditions and confirmatory analyses for present-day conditions. At both the grid-cell and site-average scale, the calculated uncertainty distribution for net infiltration is approximately lognormal, and the coefficient of variation decreases with increasing net infiltration. Smaller relative but larger absolute responses to climate change occur where net infiltration is large. Comparisons of distributed model estimates with temperature and geochemical observations from the unsaturated zone suggest that average estimates are generally consistent but exhibit significant variability. An observed seepage event in the South Ramp of the Exploratory Studies Facility, combined with related subsurface observations across the site, suggests that subsurface spreading from zones of high infiltration to zones of low infiltration may occur in stratabound fractures, laterally extensive discontinuities, or at transitions between welded and nonwelded tuff units. Two conceptual models for unsaturated-zone flow each explain the subsurface observations, collectively providing bounding estimates for net infiltration. Model-predicted uncertainty distribution for decadal-average site-scale net infiltration is generally consistent with estimated percolation fluxes using the bounding hypotheses, suggesting that the model-calculated uncertainty is reasonably consistent with the uncertainty in interpreting site observations.

  8. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM1: Experimental Results.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Craig [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunawan, Budi [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guala, Michele [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2017-08-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing nonproprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for opensource research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL). Reference Model 1 (RM1) is a 1:40 geometric scale dual-rotor axial flow horizontal axis device with counter-rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.5m. Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM1. Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2.425m3s-1, resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1.05ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec ≈ 3.0x105. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing turbulence performance models and their ability to accurately predict device performance metrics, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to predict turbulent inflow environments, reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order turbulent statistics, as well as device performance metrics.

  9. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM1: Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Craig [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunawan, Budi [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guala, Michele [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-10-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing non-proprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for open-source research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL). Reference Model 1 (RM2) is a 1:40 geometric scale dual-rotor axial flow horizontal axis device with counter-rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.5m. Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADVs) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM1. Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2.425m3s-1, resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1.05ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec ≈ 3.0x105. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing turbulence performance models and their ability to accurately predict device performance metrics, including computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models that can be used to predict turbulent inflow environments, reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order turbulent statistics, as well as device performance metrics.

  10. The Formation of the Model of Diagnosing the Results Implementation of of Consulting Projects for Enterprises

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuzmin Oleh Ye.

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In the article the graphic-analytical model of diagnostics of results of implementation of consulting projects is formed, which allows to: take into consideration interests of participants to the project on choice of methods and methodologies of diagnosing; allocate alternative sets of business indicators for each object of impact in terms of consulting project; establish economic and non-economic criteria for evaluating the effectiveness of consulting, as well as monitoring of indicators and automated processing of diagnostic results to control deviations from the optimal values of the diagnosed project results. A structural-logical model of formation of alternative sets of indicators and choice of indicators for diagnostics of results of consulting projects has been developed. The elements of the enterprise management system have been codified to harmonize the corresponding indicators with their subsequent combination within the proposed sets. The control system objects and their elements have been allocated. The groups of indicators according to the technology of Balanced Score Card (BSC have been presented. The prospect of further research is the economic assessment of implementation of the diagnosed consulting projects, which will reveal the links between the parameters of production-economic activity and the assessment of projects, and allows choose the most significant ones.

  11. QCD thermodynamics from an imaginary μB: Results on the four flavor lattice model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Elia, Massimo; Lombardo, Maria-Paola

    2004-01-01

    We study four flavor QCD at nonzero temperature and density by analytic continuation from an imaginary chemical potential. The explored region is T=0.95T c c , and the baryochemical potentials range from 0 to ≅500 MeV. Observables include the number density, the order parameter for chiral symmetry, and the pressure, which is calculated via an integral method at fixed temperature and quark mass. The simulations are carried out on a 16 3 x4 lattice, and the mass dependence of the results is estimated by exploiting the Maxwell relations. In the hadronic region, we confirm that the results are consistent with a simple resonance hadron gas model, and we estimate the critical density by combining the results for the number density with those for the critical line. In the hot phase, above the end point of the Roberge-Weiss transition T E ≅1.1T c , the results are consistent with a free lattice model with a fixed effective number of flavor slightly different from four. We confirm that confinement and chiral symmetry are coincident by a further analysis of the critical line, and we discuss the interrelation between thermodynamics and critical behavior. We comment on the strength and weakness of the method, and propose further developments

  12. A Summary of the NASA Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) and Recent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koshak, William; Peterson, Harld

    2011-01-01

    The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center introduced the Lightning Nitrogen Oxides Model (LNOM) a couple of years ago to combine routine state-of-the-art measurements of lightning with empirical laboratory results of lightning NOx production. The routine measurements included VHF lightning source data [such as from the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (LMA)], and ground flash location, peak current, and stroke multiplicity data from the National Lightning Detection Network(TradeMark) (NLDN). Following these initial runs of LNOM, the model was updated to include several non-return stroke lightning NOx production mechanisms, and provided the impact of lightning NOx on an August 2006 run of CMAQ. In this study, we review the evolution of the LNOM in greater detail and discuss the model?s latest upgrades and applications. Whereas previous applications were limited to five summer months of data for North Alabama thunderstorms, the most recent LNOM analyses cover several years. The latest statistics of ground and cloud flash NOx production are provided.

  13. SEMI-ANALYTIC GALAXY EVOLUTION (SAGE): MODEL CALIBRATION AND BASIC RESULTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croton, Darren J.; Stevens, Adam R. H.; Tonini, Chiara; Garel, Thibault; Bernyk, Maksym; Bibiano, Antonio; Hodkinson, Luke; Mutch, Simon J.; Poole, Gregory B.; Shattow, Genevieve M. [Centre for Astrophysics and Supercomputing, Swinburne University of Technology, P.O. Box 218, Hawthorn, Victoria 3122 (Australia)

    2016-02-15

    This paper describes a new publicly available codebase for modeling galaxy formation in a cosmological context, the “Semi-Analytic Galaxy Evolution” model, or sage for short.{sup 5} sage is a significant update to the 2006 model of Croton et al. and has been rebuilt to be modular and customizable. The model will run on any N-body simulation whose trees are organized in a supported format and contain a minimum set of basic halo properties. In this work, we present the baryonic prescriptions implemented in sage to describe the formation and evolution of galaxies, and their calibration for three N-body simulations: Millennium, Bolshoi, and GiggleZ. Updated physics include the following: gas accretion, ejection due to feedback, and reincorporation via the galactic fountain; a new gas cooling–radio mode active galactic nucleus (AGN) heating cycle; AGN feedback in the quasar mode; a new treatment of gas in satellite galaxies; and galaxy mergers, disruption, and the build-up of intra-cluster stars. Throughout, we show the results of a common default parameterization on each simulation, with a focus on the local galaxy population.

  14. Evolution in performance assessment modeling as a result of regulatory review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowat, J.H.; Dolinar, G.M.; Stephens, M.E. [AECL Chalk River Labs., Ontario (Canada)] [and others

    1995-12-31

    AECL is planning to build the IRUS (Intrusion Resistant Underground Structure) facility for near-surface disposal of LLRW. The PSAR (preliminary safety assessment report) was subject to an initial regulatory review during mid-1992. The regulatory authority provided comments on many aspects of the safety assessment documentation including a number of questions on specific PA (Performance Assessment) modelling assumptions. As a result of these comments as well as a separate detailed review of the IRUS disposal concept, changes were made to the conceptual and mathematical models. The original disposal concept included a non-sorbing vault backfill, with a strong reliance on the wasteform as a barrier. This concept was altered to decrease reliance on the wasteform by replacing the original backfill with a sand/clinoptilolite mix, which is a better sorber of metal cations. This change lead to changes in the PA models which in turn altered the safety case for the facility. This, and other changes that impacted performance assessment modelling are the subject of this paper.

  15. Recent results of full-spatial scale modeling of fast ignition and shock ignition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonge, J.; May, J.; Mori, W. B.; Fiuza, F.; Marti, M.; Fonseca, R. A.; Davies, J. R.; Silva, L. O.

    2010-11-01

    We show recent results of full-spatial scale modeling of fast ignition and shock ignition, from both full-PIC and the recently developed hybrid-PIC capability of OSIRIS 2.0. Our results show full-scale modeling of fast ignition over full density and time scales, where laser absorption, electron beam divergence, and energy deposition in the compressed core will be addressed in a self-consistent manner. Full-PIC and hybrid-PIC simulations of isolated targets will be presented, illustrating the importance of this type of modeling in order to accurately infer the beam divergence and transport properties. We will also demonstrate the possibility of performing full-scale simulations of shock ignition with the new hybrid-PIC capability, using compressed target profiles from hydrodynamic simulations, and studying the self-consistent laser absorption, electron transport, and energy deposition that can lead to the generation of the shock required for ignition. Work supported by DOE under DE-FC02-04-ER54789 and DE-FG52-09NA29552, and NSF under NSF-Phy-0904039, FCT (Portugal), and the HiPER project. Simulations performed on Hoffman at UCLA, Thresher at SDSC, and Intrepid at ANL supported by Incite grant FastIgnitionPIC.

  16. Latitudinal variation of perturbation electric fields during magnetically disturbed periods - 1986 Sundial observations and model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fejer, B. G.; Spiro, R. W.; Wolf, R. A.; Foster, J. C.

    1990-01-01

    F-region incoherent scatter radar drift observations from Millstone Hill and Jicamarca, h-prime F observations from Huancayo, and high latitude ground-magnetometer measurements taken during the Sundial 1986 campaign are used to study the relationship between plasmaspheric electric field perturbations and high latitude currents during disturbed periods. The observations are in good agreement with numerical results from a Rice Covection Model run that involved a sharp increase in the polar cap potential drop followed by a subsequent decrease. The zonal disturbance electric field pattern is latitude independent, and the corresponding amplitudes change approximately as L exp n (where n is about 1.5). The meridional electric field patterns and amplitudes have larger latitudinal variations. The mid-, low, and equatorial electric fields from the Rice Convection Model are in good agreement with previous results from the semianalytic, Senior-Blanc (1987) model. Also discussed are three physical mechanisms (over-shielding, fossil winds, and magnetic reconfiguration) that contribute to the long lasting (1-2 h) equatorial zonal electric field perturbations associated with a sudden northward turning of the IMF. It is predicted that the penetration of high latitude electric fields to low latitudes should, in general, be closely related to the rate of motion of the shielding layer and the equatorward edge of the diffuse aurora.

  17. Fugacity based modeling for pollutant fate and transport during floods. Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deda, M.; Fiorini, M.; Massabo, M.; Rudari, R.

    2010-09-01

    Fugacity based modeling for pollutant fate and transport during floods. Preliminary results Miranda Deda, Mattia Fiorini, Marco Massabò, Roberto Rudari One of the concerns that arises during floods is whether the wide-spreading of chemical contamination is associated with the flooding. Many potential sources of toxics releases during floods exists in cities or rural area; hydrocarbons fuel storage system, distribution facilities, commercial chemical storage, sewerage system are only few examples. When inundated homes and vehicles can also be source of toxics contaminants such as gasoline/diesel, detergents and sewage. Hazardous substances released into the environment are transported and dispersed in complex environmental systems that include air, plant, soil, water and sediment. Effective environmental models demand holistic modelling of the transport and transformation of the materials in the multimedia arena. Among these models, fugacity-based models are distribution based models incorporating all environmental compartments and are based on steady-state fluxes of pollutants across compartment interfaces (Mackay "Multimedia Environmental Models" 2001). They satisfy the primary objective of environmental chemistry which is to forecast the concentrations of pollutants in the environments with respect to space and time variables. Multimedia fugacity based-models has been used to assess contaminant distribution at very different spatial and temporal scales. The applications range from contaminant leaching to groundwater, runoff to surface water, partitioning in lakes and streams, distribution at regional and even global scale. We developped a two-dimensional fugacity based model for fate and transport of chemicals during floods. The model has three modules: the first module estimates toxins emission rates during floods; the second modules is the hydrodynamic model that simulates the water flood and the third module simulate the dynamic distribution of chemicals in

  18. Validity of the 6min walk test in outpatients with bipolar disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vancampfort, Davy; Buys, Roselien; Sienaert, Pascal; Wyckaert, Sabine; De Herdt, Amber; De Hert, Marc; Probst, Michel

    2015-12-15

    Cardiorespiratory fitness is a major modifiable risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. People with bipolar disorder have a reduced cardiorespiratory fitness and its assessment within a multidisciplinary treatment therefore is necessary. We investigated the validity of the 6min walk test in people with bipolar disorder. A secondary aim was to assess clinical and demographic characteristics that might interfere with cardiorespiratory fitness performance. 19 (5♂) outpatients (47.1±8.3 years) underwent a 6min walk test and a maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test on a cycle ergometer and completed the Positive-and-Negative-Affect-Schedule (PANAS) and Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The distance achieved on the 6min walk test correlated moderately with peak oxygen uptake obtained during the maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test. The variance in age, weight and the PANAS negative score explained 70% of the variance in the distance achieved on the 6min walk test. The 6min walk test can be used as a measure-of-proxy to gauge cardiorespiratory fitness in people with bipolar disorder when maximal cardiopulmonary exercise test equipment is not available. Negative mood should be considered when evaluating the cardiorespiratory fitness of this vulnerable population. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The impact of basin heterogeneity on modeling results of two tributaries of the Okavango River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumberg, V.; Goehmann, H.; Steudel, T.; Fluegel, W.; Helmschrot, J.

    2013-12-01

    The two river systems Cuito (57.300 km2) and Cubango (103.800 km2) drain the south-eastern parts of Angola forming the Okavango River after their confluence and thus providing ca. 95 % of the Okavango River discharge. Although located side by side and therefore exposed to similar climatic and environmental conditions, runoff records indicate that both basins differ regarding their hydrological system dynamics. The Cubango is known for rapid discharges with comparatively high runoff peaks during the rainy season and low base flow during the dry season whereas the runoff of the Cuito appears more balanced. The differences in the runoff dynamics of both basins are mainly caused by heterogeneous geological conditions or terrain features. While the headwater region of the Cubango is underlain by igneous bedrock, the Cuito catchment is covered with thick Kalahari sand layers. The headwaters of the Cubango system are characterized by steep valleys carved into the crystalline bedrock. Thus, storage capacities are low and a higher percentage of the precipitation is transferred to direct runoff. In contrast, the meandering rivers of the Cuito system are embedded in wide valleys with alluvial swamps and floodplains that offer high water storage capacities. This spatial pattern generating different hydrological dynamics in both basins was neglected in previous modeling studies focusing on the Okavango River basin system. To better understand and assess the influence of geological structures, terrain, climate, soils, and land cover on the spatio-temporal variability of hydrological components and runoff generation mechanisms, the distributed J2000g model and the concept of Hydrological Response Units (HRU) were applied to both tributaries. Model exercises were carried out on a monthly basis for the period 1962-1975. Both models provide sufficient results of the spatio-temporal runoff pattern in both tributaries for the entire period. Good fits for dry and moderate conditions

  20. Silent game as Model for Examining Student Online Creativity - Preliminary Results from an Experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jannick Kirk

    2016-01-01

    -called “Silent game” (Habraken & Gross, 1988). But where Habraken et al.’s research in design games focussed on how professional architects and designers collaborate, we examine the potential of Silent game as model for researching online creative collaboration among students. This paper presents the results...... of the experiment and a tentative analysis. The aim is to discuss the possibilities in using Silent game as a model for examining and improving online creativity.......The ERASMUS+ project “OnCreate” aims at improving online mediated creative collaboration among students. But what are the differences between collaboration online and in a face-to-face setting in terms of creative processes? Theories on media richness and collaborative creativity can provide...

  1. Measurements of entanglement over a kilometric distance to test superluminal models of Quantum Mechanics: preliminary results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cocciaro, B.; Faetti, S.; Fronzoni, L.

    2017-08-01

    As shown in the EPR paper (Einstein, Podolsky e Rosen, 1935), Quantum Mechanics is a non-local Theory. The Bell theorem and the successive experiments ruled out the possibility of explaining quantum correlations using only local hidden variables models. Some authors suggested that quantum correlations could be due to superluminal communications that propagate isotropically with velocity vt > c in a preferred reference frame. For finite values of vt and in some special cases, Quantum Mechanics and superluminal models lead to different predictions. So far, no deviations from the predictions of Quantum Mechanics have been detected and only lower bounds for the superluminal velocities vt have been established. Here we describe a new experiment that increases the maximum detectable superluminal velocities and we give some preliminary results.

  2. Field studies of submerged-diffuser thermal plumes with comparisons to predictive model results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frigo, A.A.; Paddock, R.A.; Ditmars, J.D.

    1976-01-01

    Thermal plumes from submerged discharges of cooling water from two power plants on Lake Michigan were studied. The system for the acquisition of water temperatures and ambient conditions permitted the three-dimensional structure of the plumes to be determined. The Zion Nuclear Power Station has two submerged discharge structures separated by only 94 m. Under conditions of flow from both structures, interaction between the two plumes resulted in larger thermal fields than would be predicted by the superposition of single non-interacting plumes. Maximum temperatures in the near-field region of the plume compared favorably with mathematical model predictions. A comparison of physical-model predictions for the plume at the D. C. Cook Nuclear Plant with prototype measurements indicated good agreement in the near-field region, but differences in the far-field occurred as similitude was not preserved there

  3. Metabonomic Profiling Reveals Cancer Chemopreventive Effects of American Ginseng on Colon Carcinogenesis in Apc(Min/+) Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Guoxiang; Wang, Chong-Zhi; Yu, Chunhao; Qiu, Yunping; Wen, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Chun-Feng; Yuan, Chun-Su; Jia, Wei

    2015-08-07

    American ginseng (Panax quinquefolius L.) is one of the most commonly used herbal medicines in the West. It has been reported to possess significant antitumor effects that inhibit the process of carcinogenesis. However, the mechanisms underlying its anticancer effects remain largely unresolved. In this study, we investigated the cancer chemopreventive effects of American ginseng on the progression of high fat (HF) diet-enhanced colorectal carcinogenesis with a genetically engineered Apc(Min/+) mouse model. The metabolic alterations in sera of experimental mice perturbed by HF diet intervention as well as the American ginseng treatment were measured by gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOFMS) and liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOFMS) analysis. American ginseng treatment significantly extended the life span of the Apc(Min/+) mouse. Significant alterations of metabolites involving amino acids, organic acids, fatty acids, and carbohydrates were observed in Apc(Min/+) mouse in sera, which were attenuated by American ginseng treatment and concurrent with the histopathological improvement with significantly reduced tumor initiation, progression and gut inflammation. These metabolic changes suggest that the preventive effect of American ginseng is associated with attenuation of impaired amino acid, carbohydrates, and lipid metabolism. It also appears that American ginseng induced significant metabolic alterations independent of the Apc(Min/+) induced metabolic changes. The significantly altered metabolites induced by American ginseng intervention include arachidonic acid, linolelaidic acid, glutamate, docosahexaenoate, tryptophan, and fructose, all of which are associated with inflammation and oxidation. This suggests that American ginseng exerts the chemopreventive effects by anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms.

  4. Model of a realistic InP surface quantum dot extrapolated from atomic force microscopy results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barettin, Daniele; De Angelis, Roberta; Prosposito, Paolo; Auf der Maur, Matthias; Casalboni, Mauro; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2014-05-01

    We report on numerical simulations of a zincblende InP surface quantum dot (QD) on \\text{I}{{\\text{n}}_{0.48}}\\text{G}{{\\text{a}}_{0.52}}\\text{P} buffer. Our model is strictly based on experimental structures, since we extrapolated a three-dimensional dot directly by atomic force microscopy results. Continuum electromechanical, \\vec{k}\\;\\cdot \\;\\vec{p} bandstructure and optical calculations are presented for this realistic structure, together with benchmark calculations for a lens-shape QD with the same radius and height of the extrapolated dot. Interesting similarities and differences are shown by comparing the results obtained with the two different structures, leading to the conclusion that the use of a more realistic structure can provide significant improvements in the modeling of QDs fact, the remarkable splitting for the electron p-like levels of the extrapolated dot seems to prove that a realistic experimental structure can reproduce the right symmetry and a correct splitting usually given by atomistic calculations even within the multiband \\vec{k}\\;\\cdot \\;\\vec{p} approach. Moreover, the energy levels and the symmetry of the holes are strongly dependent on the shape of the dot. In particular, as far as we know, their wave function symmetries do not seem to resemble to any results previously obtained with simulations of zincblende ideal structures, such as lenses or truncated pyramids. The magnitude of the oscillator strengths is also strongly dependent on the shape of the dot, showing a lower intensity for the extrapolated dot, especially for the transition between the electrons and holes ground state, as a result of a relevant reduction of the wave functions overlap. We also compare an experimental photoluminescence spectrum measured on an homogeneous sample containing about 60 dots with a numerical ensemble average derived from single dot calculations. The broader energy range of the numerical spectrum motivated us to perform further

  5. Model of a realistic InP surface quantum dot extrapolated from atomic force microscopy results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barettin, Daniele; De Angelis, Roberta; Prosposito, Paolo; Auf der Maur, Matthias; Casalboni, Mauro; Pecchia, Alessandro

    2014-05-16

    We report on numerical simulations of a zincblende InP surface quantum dot (QD) on In₀.₄₈Ga₀.₅₂ buffer. Our model is strictly based on experimental structures, since we extrapolated a three-dimensional dot directly by atomic force microscopy results. Continuum electromechanical, [Formula: see text] bandstructure and optical calculations are presented for this realistic structure, together with benchmark calculations for a lens-shape QD with the same radius and height of the extrapolated dot. Interesting similarities and differences are shown by comparing the results obtained with the two different structures, leading to the conclusion that the use of a more realistic structure can provide significant improvements in the modeling of QDs fact, the remarkable splitting for the electron p-like levels of the extrapolated dot seems to prove that a realistic experimental structure can reproduce the right symmetry and a correct splitting usually given by atomistic calculations even within the multiband [Formula: see text] approach. Moreover, the energy levels and the symmetry of the holes are strongly dependent on the shape of the dot. In particular, as far as we know, their wave function symmetries do not seem to resemble to any results previously obtained with simulations of zincblende ideal structures, such as lenses or truncated pyramids. The magnitude of the oscillator strengths is also strongly dependent on the shape of the dot, showing a lower intensity for the extrapolated dot, especially for the transition between the electrons and holes ground state, as a result of a relevant reduction of the wave functions overlap. We also compare an experimental photoluminescence spectrum measured on an homogeneous sample containing about 60 dots with a numerical ensemble average derived from single dot calculations. The broader energy range of the numerical spectrum motivated us to perform further verifications, which have clarified some aspects of the experimental

  6. Impact of the volume of gaseous phase in closed reactors on ANC results and modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drapeau, Clémentine; Delolme, Cécile; Lassabatere, Laurent; Blanc, Denise

    2016-04-01

    The understanding of the geochemical behavior of polluted solid materials is often challenging and requires huge expenses of time and money. Nevertheless, given the increasing amounts of polluted solid materials and related risks for the environment, it is more and more crucial to understand the leaching of majors and trace metals elements from these matrices. In the designs of methods to quantify pollutant solubilization, the combination of experimental procedures with modeling approaches has recently gained attention. Among usual methods, some rely on the association of ANC and geochemical modeling. ANC experiments - Acid Neutralization Capacity - consists in adding known quantities of acid or base to a mixture of water and contaminated solid materials at a given liquid / solid ratio in closed reactors. Reactors are agitated for 48h and then pH, conductivity, redox potential, carbon, majors and heavy metal solubilized are quantified. However, in most cases, the amounts of matrix and water do not reach the total volume of reactors, leaving some space for air (gaseous phase). Despite this fact, no clear indication is given in standard procedures about the effect of this gaseous phase. Even worse, the gaseous phase is never accounted for when exploiting or modeling ANC data. The gaseous phase may exchange CO2 with the solution, which may, in turn, impact both pH and element release. This study lies within the most general framework for the use of geochemical modeling for the prediction of ANC results for the case of pure phases to real phase assemblages. In this study, we focus on the effect of the gaseous phase on ANC experiments on different mineral phases through geochemical modeling. To do so, we use PHREEQC code to model the evolution of pH and element release (including majors and heavy metals) when several matrices are put in contact with acid or base. We model the following scenarios for the gaseous phase: no gas, contact with the atmosphere (open system

  7. Multimodel inference applied to oxygen recovery kinetics after 6-min walk tests in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baty, Florent; Ritz, Christian; Jensen, Signe Marie

    2017-01-01

    6-min walk tests (6MWT) are routinely performed in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Oxygen uptake ([Formula: see text]) kinetics during 6MWT can be modeled and derived parameters provide indicators of patients' exercise capacity. Post-exercise [Formula: see text] recovery...... also provides important parameters of patients' fitness which has not been extensively investigated in COPD. Several nonlinear regression models with different underlying biological assumptions may be suitable for describing recovery kinetics. Multimodel inference (model averaging) can then be used...... to capture the uncertainty in considering several models. Our aim was to apply multimodel inference in order to better understand the physiological underpinnings of [Formula: see text] recovery after 6MWT in patients with COPD. 61 patients with COPD (stages 2 to 4) were included in this study. Oxygen...

  8. Equilibrium resurfacing of Venus: Results from new Monte Carlo modeling and implications for Venus surface histories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjonnes, E. E.; Hansen, V. L.; James, B.; Swenson, J. B.

    2012-02-01

    Venus' impact crater population imposes two observational constraints that must be met by possible model surface histories: (1) near random spatial distribution of ˜975 craters, and (2) few obviously modified impact craters. Catastrophic resurfacing obviously meets these constraints, but equilibrium resurfacing histories require a balance between crater distribution and modification to be viable. Equilibrium resurfacing scenarios with small incremental resurfacing areas meet constraint 1 but not 2, whereas those with large incremental resurfacing areas meet constraint 2 but not 1. Results of Monte Carlo modeling of equilibrium resurfacing ( Strom et al., 1994) is widely cited as support for catastrophic resurfacing hypotheses and as evidence against hypotheses of equilibrium resurfacing. However, the Monte Carlo models did not consider intermediate-size incremental resurfacing areas, nor did they consider histories in which the era of impact crater formation outlasts an era of equilibrium resurfacing. We construct three suites of Monte Carlo experiments that examine incremental resurfacing areas not previously considered (5%, 1%, 0.7%, and 0.1%), and that vary the duration of resurfacing relative to impact crater formation time (1:1 [suite A], 5:6 [suite B], and 2:3 [suite C]). We test the model results against the two impact crater constraints. Several experiments met both constraints. The shorter the time period of equilibrium resurfacing, or the longer the time of crater formation following the cessation of equilibrium resurfacing, the larger the possible areas of incremental resurfacing that satisfy both constraints. Equilibrium resurfacing is statistically viable for suite A at 0.1%, suite B at 0.1%, and suite C for 1%, 0.7%, and 0.1% areas of incremental resurfacing.

  9. Mesoscopic models for DNA stretching under force: New results and comparison with experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manghi, Manoel; Destainville, Nicolas; Palmeri, John

    2012-10-01

    Single-molecule experiments on double-stranded B-DNA stretching have revealed one or two structural transitions, when increasing the external force. They are characterized by a sudden increase of DNA contour length and a decrease of the bending rigidity. The nature and the critical forces of these transitions depend on DNA base sequence, loading rate, salt conditions and temperature. It has been proposed that the first transition, at forces of 60-80 pN, is a transition from B to S-DNA, viewed as a stretched duplex DNA, while the second one, at stronger forces, is a strand peeling resulting in single-stranded DNAs (ssDNA), similar to thermal denaturation. But due to experimental conditions these two transitions can overlap, for instance for poly(dA-dT). In an attempt to propose a coherent picture compatible with this variety of experimental observations, we derive an analytical formula using a coupled discrete worm-like chain-Ising model. Our model takes into account bending rigidity, discreteness of the chain, linear and non-linear (for ssDNA) bond stretching. In the limit of zero force, this model simplifies into a coupled model already developed by us for studying thermal DNA melting, establishing a connection with previous fitting parameter values for denaturation profiles. Our results are summarized as follows: i) ssDNA is fitted, using an analytical formula, over a nano-Newton range with only three free parameters, the contour length, the bending modulus and the monomer size; ii) a surprisingly good fit on this force range is possible only by choosing a monomer size of 0.2 nm, almost 4 times smaller than the ssDNA nucleobase length; iii) mesoscopic models are not able to fit B to ssDNA (or S to ss) transitions; iv) an analytical formula for fitting B to S transitions is derived in the strong force approximation and for long DNAs, which is in excellent agreement with exact transfer matrix calculations; v) this formula fits perfectly well poly(dG-dC) and

  10. Data from the Mars Science Laboratory CheMin XRD/XRF Instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniman, David; Blake, David; Bristow, Tom; DesMarais, David; Achilles, Cherie; Anderson, Robert; Crips, Joy; Morookian, John Michael; Spanovich, Nicole; Vasavada, Ashwin; hide

    2013-01-01

    The CheMin instrument on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) rover Curiosity uses a Co tube source and a CCD detector to acquire mineralogy from diffracted primary X-rays and chemical information from fluoresced X-rays. CheMin has been operating at the MSL Gale Crater field site since August 5, 2012 and has provided the first X-ray diffraction (XRD) analyses in situ on a body beyond Earth. Data from the first sample collected, the Rocknest eolian soil, identify a basaltic mineral suite, predominantly plagioclase (approx.An50), forsteritic olivine (approx.Fo58), augite and pigeonite, consistent with expectation that detrital grains on Mars would reflect widespread basaltic sources. Minor phases (each data collected with the CheMin instrument.

  11. [Professor YANG Zhao-min's contribution to the education of modern acupuncture and moxibustion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qin; Mu, Yan-Yun; Xia, You-Bing; Zhang, Jian-Bin

    2012-05-01

    It was completely collected and summarized the teaching history and the relevant historical materials of Professor YANG Zhao-min via consulting the literatures, investigation, interview, etc. in this paper. The summaries indicated that from the beginning of running a school, Professor YANG Zhao-min adhered to the CHENG's moral, worked hard and successfully explored and practiced the training pattern of teaching tour for the personnel training of acupuncture and moxibustion. He established the specialty of acupuncture and moxibustion, formatted courses and inherited the feature of practice teaching. He was in charge of the compilation of textbook and engaged in scientific innovation. He inherited the past and forged ahead into the future and had made the decision to cultivate the personnel of acupuncture and moxibustion. Professor YANG Zhao-min had practiced and developed the modern educational thought from the CHENG Dan-an and had made the important contribution to the training of acupuncture and moxibustion professionals.

  12. Evolution of the Min Protein Oscillation in E. coli Bacteria During Cell Growth and Division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baylis, Benjamin; Giuliani, Maximiliano; Dutcher, John

    2014-03-01

    Cell division is a key step in the life of a bacterium. This process is carefully controlled and regulated so that the cellular machinery is equally partitioned into two daughter cells of equal size. In E. coli, this is accomplished, in part, by the Min protein system, in which Min proteins oscillate along the long axis of the rod-shaped cells. We have used high magnification, time-resolved fluorescence microscopy to characterize in detail the oscillation in E. coli cells in which the MinD proteins are tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP). We have used a microfluidic device to confine the bacteria into microchannels that allows us to track the evolution of the oscillation in cells as they grow and divide in LB growth media. In particular, we have tracked the loss of synchrony between the oscillations in the daughter cells following cell division.

  13. Practical models to estimate horizontal irradiance in clear sky conditions: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salazar, German A.; Hernandez, Alejandro L.; Saravia, Luis R. [Department of Physics, School of Exact Sciences, National University of Salta, Bolivia Avenue 5150, 4400 Salta Capital (Argentina); INENCO (Institute of Non Conventional Energy Research), Bolivia Avenue 5150, 4400 Salta Capital (Argentina)

    2010-11-15

    The Argentinean Northwest (ANW) is a high altitude region located alongside Los Andes Mountains. The ANW is also one of the most insolated regions in the world due to its altitude and particular climate. However, the characterization of the solar resource in the region is incomplete as there are no stations to measure solar radiation continuously and methodically. With irradiance data recently having been measured at three sites in the Salta Province, a study was carried out that resulted in a practical model to quickly and efficiently estimate the horizontal irradiance in high altitude sites in clear sky conditions. This model uses the altitude above sea level (A) as a variable and generates a representative clearness index as a result (k{sub t-R}) that is calculated for each site studied. This index k{sub t-R} is then used with the relative optical air mass and the extraterrestrial irradiance to estimate the instantaneous clearness index (k{sub t}). Subsequently, the index k{sub t-R} is corrected by introducing the atmospheric pressure in the definition of relative optical air mass proposed by Kasten. The results are satisfactory as errors in the irradiance estimations with respect to measured values do not exceed 5% for pressure corrected air masses AM{sub c} < 2. This model will be used in a feasibility study to locate sites for the installation of solar thermal power plants in the ANW. A prototype of a CLFR solar power plant is being built in the INENCO Campus, at the National University of Salta. (author)

  14. Targeted screening of individuals at high risk for pancreatic cancer: results of a simulation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandharipande, Pari V; Heberle, Curtis; Dowling, Emily C; Kong, Chung Yin; Tramontano, Angela; Perzan, Katherine E; Brugge, William; Hur, Chin

    2015-04-01

    To identify when, from the standpoint of relative risk, magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-based screening may be effective in patients with a known or suspected genetic predisposition to pancreatic cancer. The authors developed a Markov model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). The model was calibrated to National Cancer Institute Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results registry data and informed by the literature. A hypothetical screening strategy was evaluated in which all population individuals underwent one-time MR imaging screening at age 50 years. Screening outcomes for individuals with an average risk for PDAC ("base case") were compared with those for individuals at an increased risk to assess for differential benefits in populations with a known or suspected genetic predisposition. Effects of varying key inputs, including MR imaging performance, surgical mortality, and screening age, were evaluated with a sensitivity analysis. RESULTS In the base case, screening resulted in a small number of cancer deaths averted (39 of 100 000 men, 38 of 100 000 women) and a net decrease in life expectancy (-3 days for men, -4 days for women), which was driven by unnecessary pancreatic surgeries associated with false-positive results. Life expectancy gains were achieved if an individual's risk for PDAC exceeded 2.4 (men) or 2.7 (women) times that of the general population. When relative risk increased further, for example to 30 times that of the general population, averted cancer deaths and life expectancy gains increased substantially (1219 of 100 000 men, life expectancy gain: 65 days; 1204 of 100 000 women, life expectancy gain: 71 days). In addition, results were sensitive to MR imaging specificity and the surgical mortality rate. Although PDAC screening with MR imaging for the entire population is not effective, individuals with even modestly increased risk may benefit. © RSNA, 2014 Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  15. The MinD protein is a membrane ATPase required for the correct placement of the Escherichia coli division site.

    OpenAIRE

    de Boer, P A; Crossley, R E; Hand, A R; Rothfield, L I

    1991-01-01

    The proper placement of the cell division site in Escherichia coli requires the site-specific inactivation of potential division sites at the cell poles in a process that is mediated by the MinC, MinD and MinE proteins. During the normal division cycle MinD plays two roles. It activates the MinC-dependent mechanism that is responsible for the inactivation of potential division sites and it also renders the division inhibition system sensitive to the topological specificity factor MinE. MinE s...

  16. Results from the direct search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at LEP

    CERN Document Server

    Marco, Jesus

    2001-01-01

    The direct search for the Standard Model Higgs boson at LEP, using 2.5 fb−1 of e+e− collision data collected and analyzed by the four LEP collaborations, ALEPH, DELPHI, L3 and OPAL, at center-of-mass energies between 189 and 209 GeV, is pre- sented. The combination of their results by the LEP Higgs Working Group sets a lower bound for the SM Higgs boson mass of 114.1 GeV/c2 at the 95% confidence level. The excess observed in the higher mass zone, with a significance at the 2 σ level, is described.

  17. Vertical Instability in EAST: Comparison of Model Predictions with Experimental Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qian Jinping; Wan Baonian; Shen Biao; Xiao Bingjia; Sun Youwen; Shi Yuejiang; Lin Shiyao; Li Jiangang; Gong Xianzu

    2008-01-01

    Growth rates of the axisymmetric mode in elongated plasmas in the experimental advanced superconducting tokamak (EAST) are measured with zero feedback gains and then compared with numerically calculated growth rates for the reconstructed shapes. The comparison is made after loss of vertical position control. The open-loop growth rates were scanned with the number of vessel eigenmodes, which up to 20 is enough to make the growth rates settled. The agreement between the growth rates measured experimentally and the growth rates determined numerically is good. The results show that a linear RZIP model is essentially good enough for the vertical position feedback control.

  18. Bacterial and viral identification and differentiation by amplicon sequencing on the MinION nanopore sequencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilianski, Andy; Haas, Jamie L; Corriveau, Elizabeth J; Liem, Alvin T; Willis, Kristen L; Kadavy, Dana R; Rosenzweig, C Nicole; Minot, Samuel S

    2015-01-01

    The MinION™ nanopore sequencer was recently released to a community of alpha-testers for evaluation using a variety of sequencing applications. Recent reports have tested the ability of the MinION™ to act as a whole genome sequencer and have demonstrated that nanopore sequencing has tremendous potential utility. However, the current nanopore technology still has limitations with respect to error-rate, and this is problematic when attempting to assemble whole genomes without secondary rounds of sequencing to correct errors. In this study, we tested the ability of the MinION™ nanopore sequencer to accurately identify and differentiate bacterial and viral samples via directed sequencing of characteristic genes shared broadly across a target clade. Using a 6 hour sequencing run time, sufficient data were generated to identify an E. coli sample down to the species level from 16S rDNA amplicons. Three poxviruses (cowpox, vaccinia-MVA, and vaccinia-Lister) were identified and differentiated down to the strain level, despite over 98% identity between the vaccinia strains. The ability to differentiate strains by amplicon sequencing on the MinION™ was accomplished despite an observed per-base error rate of approximately 30%. While nanopore sequencing, using the MinION™ platform from Oxford Nanopore in particular, continues to mature into a commercially available technology, practical uses are sought for the current versions of the technology. This study offers evidence of the utility of amplicon sequencing by demonstrating that the current versions of MinION™ technology can accurately identify and differentiate both viral and bacterial species present within biological samples via amplicon sequencing.

  19. Snpdat: Easy and rapid annotation of results from de novo snp discovery projects for model and non-model organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doran Anthony G

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs are the most abundant genetic variant found in vertebrates and invertebrates. SNP discovery has become a highly automated, robust and relatively inexpensive process allowing the identification of many thousands of mutations for model and non-model organisms. Annotating large numbers of SNPs can be a difficult and complex process. Many tools available are optimised for use with organisms densely sampled for SNPs, such as humans. There are currently few tools available that are species non-specific or support non-model organism data. Results Here we present SNPdat, a high throughput analysis tool that can provide a comprehensive annotation of both novel and known SNPs for any organism with a draft sequence and annotation. Using a dataset of 4,566 SNPs identified in cattle using high-throughput DNA sequencing we demonstrate the annotations performed and the statistics that can be generated by SNPdat. Conclusions SNPdat provides users with a simple tool for annotation of genomes that are either not supported by other tools or have a small number of annotated SNPs available. SNPdat can also be used to analyse datasets from organisms which are densely sampled for SNPs. As a command line tool it can easily be incorporated into existing SNP discovery pipelines and fills a niche for analyses involving non-model organisms that are not supported by many available SNP annotation tools. SNPdat will be of great interest to scientists involved in SNP discovery and analysis projects, particularly those with limited bioinformatics experience.

  20. PBT assessment and prioritization by PBT Index and consensus modeling: comparison of screening results from structural models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramatica, Paola; Cassani, Stefano; Sangion, Alessandro

    2015-04-01

    The limited availability of comprehensive data for Persistence, Bioaccumulation and Toxicity (PBT) of chemicals is a serious hindrance to the assignment of compounds to the categories of PBT and vPvB; REACH regulation requires authorization for the use of such chemicals, and additionally plans for safer alternatives. In the context of screening and priority-setting tools for PBT-assessment, the cumulative PBT Index model, implemented in QSARINS (QSAR-INSUBRIA), new software tool for the development and validation of multiple linear regression QSAR models, offers a new holistic approach for the identification of chemicals with cumulative PBT properties directly from their molecular structure. In this study the Insubria PBT Index in QSARINS is applied to the screening and prioritization of various data sets, containing a large variety of chemicals of heterogeneous molecular structure, previously screened by various authors by different methods, for their potential PBT behavior. Particular attention is devoted to the model Applicability Domain, using different approaches such as Descriptor Range, Leverage, and Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the modeling molecular descriptors, in order to discriminate between interpolated and extrapolated predictions. The results of this screening, which is based only on the molecular structure features and is not dependent on single threshold values for P, B and T, are compared with those obtained by the on-line US-EPA PBT Profiler. Good agreement between the various approaches is found, supporting the utility of a consensus approach in priority-setting studies. The main discrepancies are highlighted and commented on. Moreover, a priority list containing the most hazardous compounds identified in agreement between the two tools is drafted. The PBT Index, implemented in QSARINS, which was demonstrated to be a practical, precautionary and reliable screening tool for PBT-behavior directly from the molecular structure, can be

  1. Observations of Subvisual Cirrus Clouds with Optical Particle Counters at Thailand; Comparisons with Observation and Parcel Model Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, S.; Maruyama, K.; Hayashi, M.; Ogino, S.; Ishimoto, H.

    2006-12-01

    1. Introduction Subvisual cirrus clouds (SVC) generally exist at a height of around 17 km in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL). In order to research SVC, in situ measurements are effective. However, since all in situ measurements are airborne measurements, they are fairly expensive to conduct and are not suitable for measuring the vertical profiles of the particles. Hence, we launched 11 balloon-borne optical particle counters (OPC) from April to June 2003 in Thailand (17.9 °N, 99.5 °E). 2. Optical particle counter Our OPC has 8 channels, of which radii are from 0.15 to 3.5 μm for spherical particles, to measure the accumulated number concentrations. Because ice particles are not spherical, the measurement error is estimated by the finite-difference time domain method (FDTD). The minimum detectable number concentration and the vertical resolution are approximately 1.5 × 104 number/m3 and 50 m at the TTL. 3. Results We launched 11 OPCs and 5 of them measured SVCs in the TTL in Thailand. Comparisons between the averaged particle size distributions in the TTL in the presence and absence of SVCs show the following features: (1) the regression lines of droplet (aerosol) size distributions in the two cases are not significantly different, (2) 5 OPCs detected enhancements in the number of particles as compared with the background aerosol number for the radius of 1.2 μm or 1.7 μm in the presence of SVCs, and (3) 5 OPCs detected the local maximum value at a radius of 1.7 μm. A parcel model whose initial relative humidity with respect to ice and ambient temperature were 120 % and - 80 °C satisfied abovementioned items when the vertical wind velocity was defined as the Brunt-Vaisala frequency, w = 20 cm/s × cos(2πt/7min); hence the comparison suggests ithe frequency is one of the possibility of the SVC generation mechanism.

  2. MINÄ OLEN IHME, SUURI IHME : Varhaisnuorten minäkuvan ja itsetunnon vahvistaminen mielikuvitusseikkailun avulla

    OpenAIRE

    Harjukelo, Elina

    2013-01-01

    Opinnäytetyöni oli seurakunnassa toteutettu toiminnallinen Minä olen ihme, suuri ihme –mielikuvitusseikkailu. Opinnäytetyöni tarkoituksena oli vahvistaa lapsen itsetuntoa ja minäkuvaa mielikuvitusseikkailun avulla. Opinnäytetyössäni keskityin kohtaamisiin, joissa pyrittiin auttaa lasta pohtimaan omia käsityksiä itsestään. Tarkoituksena oli auttaa lasta näkemään omia voimavaroja ja hyviä asioita itsessään. Toiminnallinen tuokio järjestettiin kolmessa osassa. Toimintatuokioissa lapset pääs...

  3. AtMIN7 mediated disease resistance to Pseudomonas syringae in Arabidopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Sheng Yang [Okemos, MI; Nomura, Kinya [East Lansing, MI

    2011-07-26

    The present invention relates to compositions and methods for enhancing plant defenses against pathogens. More particularly, the invention relates to enhancing plant immunity against bacterial pathogens, wherein AtMIN7 mediated protection is enhanced and/or there is a decrease in activity of an AtMIN7 associated virulence protein such as a Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato DC3000 HopM1. Reagents of the present invention provide a means of studying cellular trafficking while formulations of the present inventions provide increased pathogen resistance in plants.

  4. Natural dynamic stability of thermal and nuclear power sets at 3000 and 1500 rev/min

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caucheteux, G.

    1974-01-01

    The natural dynamic stability time limits were determined for the main types of power set, using a micro-network. By definition, the characteristic feature of natural dynamic stability is that speed governing is in effective, i.e. a constant driving torque is applied to the machine shaft. The time limits give an order of magnitude of the performance to be expected from future power sets connected to the system in the 1980s, for which low-inertia conventional sets running at 3000 rev/min or high-inertia nuclear power sets at 1500 rev/min are envisaged [fr

  5. Modeling of Particle Acceleration at Multiple Shocks via Diffusive Shock Acceleration: Preliminary Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, L. Neergaard; Zank, G. P.

    2013-01-01

    Successful forecasting of energetic particle events in space weather models require algorithms for correctly predicting the spectrum of ions accelerated from a background population of charged particles. We present preliminary results from a model that diffusively accelerates particles at multiple shocks. Our basic approach is related to box models in which a distribution of particles is diffusively accelerated inside the box while simultaneously experiencing decompression through adiabatic expansion and losses from the convection and diffusion of particles outside the box. We adiabatically decompress the accelerated particle distribution between each shock by either the method explored in Melrose and Pope (1993) and Pope and Melrose (1994) or by the approach set forth in Zank et al. (2000) where we solve the transport equation by a method analogous to operator splitting. The second method incorporates the additional loss terms of convection and diffusion and allows for the use of a variable time between shocks. We use a maximum injection energy (E(sub max)) appropriate for quasi-parallel and quasi-perpendicular shocks and provide a preliminary application of the diffusive acceleration of particles by multiple shocks with frequencies appropriate for solar maximum (i.e., a non-Markovian process).

  6. RC Beams Strengthened with Mechanically Fastened Composites: Experimental Results and Numerical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enzo Martinelli

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The use of mechanically-fastened fiber-reinforced polymer (MF-FRP systems has recently emerged as a competitive solution for the flexural strengthening of reinforced concrete (RC beams and slabs. An overview of the experimental research has proven the effectiveness and the potentiality of the MF-FRP technique which is particularly suitable for emergency repairs or when the speed of installation and immediacy of use are imperative. A finite-element (FE model has been recently developed by the authors with the aim to simulate the behavior of RC beams strengthened in bending by MF-FRP laminates; such a model has also been validated by using a wide experimental database collected from the literature. By following the previous study, the FE model and the assembled database are considered herein with the aim of better exploring the influence of some specific aspects on the structural response of MF-FRP strengthened members, such as the bearing stress-slip relationship assumed for the FRP-concrete interface, the stress-strain law considered for reinforcing steel rebars and the cracking process in RC members resulting in the well-known tension stiffening effect. The considerations drawn from this study will be useful to researchers for the calibration of criteria and design rules for strengthening RC beams through MF-FRP laminates.

  7. Insight into collision zone dynamics from topography: numerical modelling results and observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Bottrill

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Dynamic models of subduction and continental collision are used to predict dynamic topography changes on the overriding plate. The modelling results show a distinct evolution of topography on the overriding plate, during subduction, continental collision and slab break-off. A prominent topographic feature is a temporary (few Myrs basin on the overriding plate after initial collision. This "collisional mantle dynamic basin" (CMDB is caused by slab steepening drawing, material away from the base of the overriding plate. Also, during this initial collision phase, surface uplift is predicted on the overriding plate between the suture zone and the CMDB, due to the subduction of buoyant continental material and its isostatic compensation. After slab detachment, redistribution of stresses and underplating of the overriding plate cause the uplift to spread further into the overriding plate. This topographic evolution fits the stratigraphy found on the overriding plate of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone in Iran and south east Turkey. The sedimentary record from the overriding plate contains Upper Oligocene-Lower Miocene marine carbonates deposited between terrestrial clastic sedimentary rocks, in units such as the Qom Formation and its lateral equivalents. This stratigraphy shows that during the Late Oligocene–Early Miocene the surface of the overriding plate sank below sea level before rising back above sea level, without major compressional deformation recorded in the same area. Our modelled topography changes fit well with this observed uplift and subsidence.

  8. Model predictions and experimental results on self-heating prevention of stockpiled coals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fierro, V.; Miranda, J.L.; Romero, C.; Andres, J.M.; Arriaga, A.; Schmal, D. [Instituto de Carboquimica, Zaragoza (Spain)

    2001-01-01

    The spontaneous combustion of coal stockpiles is a serious economic and safety problem. This phenomenon is analysed using a TNO-model modified to predict the spontaneous heating behaviour of coal piles built with 'Mezcla', a mixture of low rank coals from Teruel (Spain). The simulation carried out with the mathematical model for this coal showed that the pile porosity or voidage and wind speed play an important role, although voidage is decisive and controls the effect of the wind velocity. To reduce the negative effects of both factors, five test coal piles (2000-3000 t) were built and several measures were applied to four of them: periodic compaction, use of a low angle slope, protection of the stockpiled coal with an artificial wind barrier and covering it with an ash-water slurry. The heat losses were experimentally determined and it was found that the mathematical model gave predictions of the right order of magnitude of time, site of spontaneous combustion and magnitude of calorific losses. All the methods of protection applied to decrease the self-heating of coal were effective, but the experimental results indicate that the most economical way to avoid the heat losses is the use of an ash-water slurry to cover the coal pile. 28 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  9. MELMRK 2. 0: A description of computer models and results of code testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittman, R.S. (ed.) (Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States)); Denny, V.; Mertol, A. (Science Applications International Corp., Los Atlos, CA (United States))

    1992-05-31

    An advanced version of the MELMRK computer code has been developed that provides detailed models for conservation of mass, momentum, and thermal energy within relocating streams of molten metallics during meltdown of Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor assemblies. In addition to a mechanistic treatment of transport phenomena within a relocating stream, MELMRK 2.0 retains the MOD1 capability for real-time coupling of the in-depth thermal response of participating assembly heat structure and, further, augments this capability with models for self-heating of relocating melt owing to steam oxidation of metallics and fission product decay power. As was the case for MELMRK 1.0, the MOD2 version offers state-of-the-art numerics for solving coupled sets of nonlinear differential equations. Principal features include application of multi-dimensional Newton-Raphson techniques to accelerate convergence behavior and direct matrix inversion to advance primitive variables from one iterate to the next. Additionally, MELMRK 2.0 provides logical event flags for managing the broad range of code options available for treating such features as (1) coexisting flow regimes, (2) dynamic transitions between flow regimes, and (3) linkages between heatup and relocation code modules. The purpose of this report is to provide a detailed description of the MELMRK 2.0 computer models for melt relocation. Also included are illustrative results for code testing, as well as an integrated calculation for meltdown of a Mark 31a assembly.

  10. MELMRK 2.0: A description of computer models and results of code testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittman, R.S. [ed.] [Westinghouse Savannah River Co., Aiken, SC (United States); Denny, V.; Mertol, A. [Science Applications International Corp., Los Atlos, CA (United States)

    1992-05-31

    An advanced version of the MELMRK computer code has been developed that provides detailed models for conservation of mass, momentum, and thermal energy within relocating streams of molten metallics during meltdown of Savannah River Site (SRS) reactor assemblies. In addition to a mechanistic treatment of transport phenomena within a relocating stream, MELMRK 2.0 retains the MOD1 capability for real-time coupling of the in-depth thermal response of participating assembly heat structure and, further, augments this capability with models for self-heating of relocating melt owing to steam oxidation of metallics and fission product decay power. As was the case for MELMRK 1.0, the MOD2 version offers state-of-the-art numerics for solving coupled sets of nonlinear differential equations. Principal features include application of multi-dimensional Newton-Raphson techniques to accelerate convergence behavior and direct matrix inversion to advance primitive variables from one iterate to the next. Additionally, MELMRK 2.0 provides logical event flags for managing the broad range of code options available for treating such features as (1) coexisting flow regimes, (2) dynamic transitions between flow regimes, and (3) linkages between heatup and relocation code modules. The purpose of this report is to provide a detailed description of the MELMRK 2.0 computer models for melt relocation. Also included are illustrative results for code testing, as well as an integrated calculation for meltdown of a Mark 31a assembly.

  11. Modeling the Capacity and Emissions Impacts of Reduced Electricity Demand. Part 1. Methodology and Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coughlin, Katie [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Shen, Hongxia [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Chan, Peter [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; McDevitt, Brian [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division; Sturges, Andrew [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Environmental Energy Technologies Division

    2013-02-07

    Policies aimed at energy conservation and efficiency have broad environmental and economic impacts. Even if these impacts are relatively small, they may be significant compared to the cost of implementing the policy. Methodologies that quantify the marginal impacts of reduced demand for energy have an important role to play in developing accurate measures of both the benefits and costs of a given policy choice. This report presents a methodology for estimating the impacts of reduced demand for electricity on the electric power sector as a whole. The approach uses the National Energy Modeling System (NEMS), a mid-range energy forecast model developed and maintained by the U.S. Department of Energy, Energy Information Administration (EIA)(DOE EIA 2013). The report is organized as follows: In the rest of this section the traditional NEMS-BT approach is reviewed and an outline of the new reduced form NEMS methodology is presented. Section 2 provides an overview of how the NEMS model works, and describes the set of NEMS-BT runs that are used as input to the reduced form approach. Section 3 presents our NEMS-BT simulation results and post-processing methods. In Section 4 we show how the NEMS-BT output can be generalized to apply to a broader set of end-uses. In Section 5 we disuss the application of this approach to policy analysis, and summarize some of the issues that will be further investigated in Part 2 of this study.

  12. Results from the long-term interaction and modeling of SRL-131 glass with aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strachan, D.M.; Pederson, L.R.; Lokken, R.O.

    1985-11-01

    Leaching studies on SRL-131 simulated defense waste glass have been carried out for a duration of two years. This glass contained nonradioactive elements and depleted uranium to simulate the waste content. The leachants used in this study were deionized water, a sodium bicarbonate/silicic acid solution (silicate water), a synthetic groundwater, and a high ionic strength K-Mg-Na-Cl brine. Two temperatures were used: 40 0 C and 90 0 C. The long-term results were in fair agreement with modeling calculations performed using the PHREEQE geochemical code. The leachability of SRL-131 glass from results up to two years followed the trend: deionized water > silicate water > synthetic groundwater > salt brine at 40 0 C and deionized water approx. = synthetic groundwater > silicate water > salt brine at 90 0 C. Solid state analyses are reported along with an Appendix containing a complete data set

  13. Fast MinMax energy-based phase correction method for NMR spectra with linear phase distortion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Tomasz P.; Duda, Krzysztof; Ostrowska, Katarzyna

    2017-08-01

    This paper addresses the problem of phase correction of dense NMR spectra on the example of the etoxy derivative of the fused heterocyclic system 5,6,10b-triazaacephenanthrylene (TAAP-OEt). A new estimation method for the linear phase correction coefficients is proposed that successfully extends the min-max (minimization of maximum errors) approach of Siegel (1981). Distinctive to the Siegel method, the smallest values of the real part of the discrete Fourier transform (DFT) spectrum are maximized, not for the whole spectrum but only for DFT bins near the peaks selected by a new energy-based criterion. Additionally, the method makes use of two one-parameter optimizations for finding the phase correction line coefficients and not the single two-parameter search. The new method is demonstrated to be precise, fast and robust against additive noise. The method's properties are verified in comparison with the state-of-the-art algorithms of Chen et al. (2002) and Bao et al. (2013) for laboratory recorded TAAP-OEt FID data and for simulated TAAP-OEt signal consisting of the sum of more than 100 complex damped exponentials. Extensive simulations were also conducted on the set of test signals derived from the TAAP-OEt signal by deterministic and pseudorandom manipulation of its content. The components of the signal model were identified by the Bertocco-Yoshida Interpolated DFT (IpDFT) algorithm with a spectral leakage correction. Simulated signals were embedded in the additive Gaussian noise, and the noise-robustness of all of the algorithms was evaluated. The obtained results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the Chen and the Bao algorithms, being more than 100 times faster than the Bao method (for a signal having 216 samples).

  14. Max-Min SINR in Large-Scale Single-Cell MU-MIMO: Asymptotic Analysis and Low Complexity Transceivers

    KAUST Repository

    Sifaou, Houssem

    2016-12-28

    This work focuses on the downlink and uplink of large-scale single-cell MU-MIMO systems in which the base station (BS) endowed with M antennas communicates with K single-antenna user equipments (UEs). Particularly, we aim at reducing the complexity of the linear precoder and receiver that maximize the minimum signal-to-interference-plus-noise ratio subject to a given power constraint. To this end, we consider the asymptotic regime in which M and K grow large with a given ratio. Tools from random matrix theory (RMT) are then used to compute, in closed form, accurate approximations for the parameters of the optimal precoder and receiver, when imperfect channel state information (modeled by the generic Gauss-Markov formulation form) is available at the BS. The asymptotic analysis allows us to derive the asymptotically optimal linear precoder and receiver that are characterized by a lower complexity (due to the dependence on the large scale components of the channel) and, possibly, by a better resilience to imperfect channel state information. However, the implementation of both is still challenging as it requires fast inversions of large matrices in every coherence period. To overcome this issue, we apply the truncated polynomial expansion (TPE) technique to the precoding and receiving vector of each UE and make use of RMT to determine the optimal weighting coefficients on a per- UE basis that asymptotically solve the max-min SINR problem. Numerical results are used to validate the asymptotic analysis in the finite system regime and to show that the proposed TPE transceivers efficiently mimic the optimal ones, while requiring much lower computational complexity.

  15. Max–min Bin Packing Algorithm and its application in nano-particles filling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Dingju

    2016-01-01

    With regard to existing bin packing algorithms, higher packing efficiency often leads to lower packing speed while higher packing speed leads to lower packing efficiency. Packing speed and packing efficiency of existing bin packing algorithms including NFD, NF, FF, FFD, BF and BFD correlates negatively with each other, thus resulting in the failure of existing bin packing algorithms to satisfy the demand of nano-particles filling for both high speed and high efficiency. The paper provides a new bin packing algorithm, Max–min Bin Packing Algorithm (MM), which realizes both high packing speed and high packing efficiency. MM has the same packing speed as NFD (whose packing speed ranks no. 1 among existing bin packing algorithms); in case that the size repetition rate of objects to be packed is over 5, MM can realize almost the same packing efficiency as BFD (whose packing efficiency ranks No. 1 among existing bin packing algorithms), and in case that the size repetition rate of objects to be packed is over 500, MM can achieve exactly the same packing efficiency as BFD. With respect to application of nano-particles filling, the size repetition rate of nano particles to be packed is usually in thousands or ten thousands, far higher than 5 or 500. Consequently, in application of nano-particles filling, the packing efficiency of MM is exactly equal to that of BFD. Thus the irreconcilable conflict between packing speed and packing efficiency is successfully removed by MM, which leads to MM having better packing effect than any existing bin packing algorithm. In practice, there are few cases when the size repetition of objects to be packed is lower than 5. Therefore the MM is not necessarily limited to nano-particles filling, and can also be widely used in other applications besides nano-particles filling. Especially, MM has significant value in application of nano-particles filling such as nano printing and nano tooth filling.

  16. Cascade impactor practice for a high dose dry powder inhaler at 90 L/min: NGI versus modified 6-stage and 8-stage ACI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamiya, Akihiko; Sakagami, Masahiro; Byron, Peter R

    2009-03-01

    The compendial methods of particle size distribution (PSD) profile determination for dry powder inhalers (DPIs) were compared between the Next Generation Pharmaceutical Impactor (NGI) and the Andersen Cascade Impactor (ACI). Relenza Rotadisk (zanamivir) and Diskhaler was used as a model DPI and sampled into each impactor via its preseparator (PS), at 90 L/min under various protocols. In the NGI, silicone coating was shown to be indispensable to prevent or minimize particle bounce and reentrainment, and to reduce wall losses to the levels acceptable to the compendia (5%). In contrast, the ACI exceeded this 5% limit, regardless of coating, implying different wall loss mechanisms from the NGI. Particle bounce occurred in both impactors, inaccurately undersizing the PSD profiles for Relenza, unless the collection surfaces were coated or an increased number of doses were employed. Hence, the PSD profile for Relenza following single dose collection in the stage-coated NGI was the most accurate. In contrast, the use of the ACI and its PS for Relenza at 90 L/min suffered from several problems, even though the poorly designed PS still resulted in consistent impactor dose and PSD profiles, compared to those obtained from the NGI and its PS. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  17. Online Detection of Broken Rotor Bar Fault in Induction Motors by Combining Estimation of Signal Parameters via Min-norm Algorithm and Least Square Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan-Pan; Yu, Qiang; Hu, Yong-Jun; Miao, Chang-Xin

    2017-11-01

    Current research in broken rotor bar (BRB) fault detection in induction motors is primarily focused on a high-frequency resolution analysis of the stator current. Compared with a discrete Fourier transformation, the parametric spectrum estimation technique has a higher frequency accuracy and resolution. However, the existing detection methods based on parametric spectrum estimation cannot realize online detection, owing to the large computational cost. To improve the efficiency of BRB fault detection, a new detection method based on the min-norm algorithm and least square estimation is proposed in this paper. First, the stator current is filtered using a band-pass filter and divided into short overlapped data windows. The min-norm algorithm is then applied to determine the frequencies of the fundamental and fault characteristic components with each overlapped data window. Next, based on the frequency values obtained, a model of the fault current signal is constructed. Subsequently, a linear least squares problem solved through singular value decomposition is designed to estimate the amplitudes and phases of the related components. Finally, the proposed method is applied to a simulated current and an actual motor, the results of which indicate that, not only parametric spectrum estimation technique.

  18. U.S. Department of Energy Reference Model Program RM2: Experimental Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, Craig [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL); Neary, Vincent Sinclair [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Gunawan, Budi [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Guala, Michele [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL); Sotiropoulos, Fotis [Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN (United States). St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN-SAFL)

    2014-08-01

    The Reference Model Project (RMP), sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) Wind and Water Power Technologies Program within the Office of Energy Efficiency & Renewable Energy (EERE), aims at expediting industry growth and efficiency by providing non-proprietary Reference Models (RM) of MHK technology designs as study objects for open-source research and development (Neary et al. 2014a,b). As part of this program, MHK turbine models were tested in a large open channel facility at the University of Minnesota’s St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (UMN - SAFL) . Reference Model 2 (RM2) is a 1:15 geometric scale dual - rotor cross flow vertical axis device with counter - rotating rotors, each with a rotor diameter dT = 0.43m and rotor height, hT = 0.323 m. RM2 is a river turbine designed for a site modeled after a reach in the lower Mississippi River near Baton Rouge, Louisiana (Barone et al. 2014) . Precise blade angular position and torque measurements were synchronized with three acoustic Doppler velocimeters (ADV) aligned with each rotor and the midpoint for RM2 . Flow conditions for each case were controlled such that depth, h = 1m, and volumetric flow rate, Qw = 2. 35m3s-1 , resulting in a hub height velocity of approximately Uhub = 1. 2 ms-1 and blade chord length Reynolds numbers of Rec = 6 .1x104. Vertical velocity profiles collected in the wake of each device from 1 to 10 rotor diameters are used to estimate the velocity recovery and turbulent characteristics in the wake, as well as the interaction of the counter-rotating rotor wakes. The development of this high resolution laboratory investigation provides a robust dataset that enables assessing computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models and their ability to accurately simulate turbulent inflow environments, device performance metrics, and to reproduce wake velocity deficit, recovery and higher order

  19. Development of a patient and institutional-based model for estimation of operative times for robot-assisted radical cystectomy: results from the International Robotic Cystectomy Consortium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Ahmed A; May, Paul R; Ahmed, Youssef E; Saar, Matthias; Wijburg, Carl J; Richstone, Lee; Wagner, Andrew; Wilson, Timothy; Yuh, Bertram; Redorta, Joan P; Dasgupta, Prokar; Kawa, Omar; Khan, Mohammad S; Menon, Mani; Peabody, James O; Hosseini, Abolfazl; Gaboardi, Franco; Pini, Giovannalberto; Schanne, Francis; Mottrie, Alexandre; Rha, Koon-Ho; Hemal, Ashok; Stockle, Michael; Kelly, John; Tan, Wei S; Maatman, Thomas J; Poulakis, Vassilis; Kaouk, Jihad; Canda, Abdullah E; Balbay, Mevlana D; Wiklund, Peter; Guru, Khurshid A

    2017-11-01

    To design a methodology to predict operative times for robot-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) based on variation in institutional, patient, and disease characteristics to help in operating room scheduling and quality control. The model included preoperative variables and therefore can be used for prediction of surgical times: institutional volume, age, gender, body mass index, American Society of Anesthesiologists score, history of prior surgery and radiation, clinical stage, neoadjuvant chemotherapy, type, technique of diversion, and the extent of lymph node dissection. A conditional inference tree method was used to fit a binary decision tree predicting operative time. Permutation tests were performed to determine the variables having the strongest association with surgical time. The data were split at the value of this variable resulting in the largest difference in means for the surgical time across the split. This process was repeated recursively on the resultant data sets until the permutation tests showed no significant association with operative time. In all, 2 134 procedures were included. The variable most strongly associated with surgical time was type of diversion, with ileal conduits being 70 min shorter (P 66 RARCs) was important, with those with a higher volume being 55 min shorter (P < 0.001). The regression tree output was in the form of box plots that show the median and ranges of surgical times according to the patient, disease, and institutional characteristics. We developed a method to estimate operative times for RARC based on patient, disease, and institutional metrics that can help operating room scheduling for RARC. © 2017 The Authors BJU International © 2017 BJU International Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. Light Penetration in Seawater Polluted by Dispersed Oil: Results of Radiative Transfer Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haule, K.; Darecki, M.; Toczek, H.

    2015-11-01

    The downwelling light in seawater is shaped by natural seawater constituents as well as by some external substances which can occur locally and temporally. In this study we focused on dispersed oil droplets which can be found in seawater after an oil spill or in the consequence of intensive shipping, oil extraction and transportation. We applied our modified radiative transfer model based on Monte Carlo code to evaluate the magnitude of potential influence of dispersed oil droplets on the downwelling irradiance and the depth of the euphotic zone. Our model was validated on the basis of in situ measurements for natural (unpolluted) seawater in the Southern Baltic Sea, resulting in less than 5% uncertainty. The optical properties of dispersed Petrobaltic crude oil were calculated on the basis of Mie theory and involved into radiative transfer model. We found that the changes in downwelling light caused by dispersed oil depend on several factors such as oil droplet concentration, size distribution, and the penetration depth (i.e. vertical range of oil droplets occurrence below sea surface). Petrobaltic oil droplets of submicron sizes and penetration depth of 5 m showed a potentially detectable reduction in the depth of the euphotic zone of 5.5% at the concentration of only 10 ppb. Micrometer-sized droplets needed 10 times higher concentration to give a similar effect. Our radiative transfer model provided data to analyse and discuss the influence of each factor separately. This study contributes to the understanding of the change in visible light penetration in seawater affected by dispersed oil.

  1. Dynamics of dual prism adaptation: relating novel experimental results to a minimalistic neural model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Orlando Arévalo

    Full Text Available In everyday life, humans interact with a dynamic environment often requiring rapid adaptation of visual perception and motor control. In particular, new visuo-motor mappings must be learned while old skills have to be kept, such that after adaptation, subjects may be able to quickly change between two different modes of generating movements ('dual-adaptation'. A fundamental question is how the adaptation schedule determines the acquisition speed of new skills. Given a fixed number of movements in two different environments, will dual-adaptation be faster if switches ('phase changes' between the environments occur more frequently? We investigated the dynamics of dual-adaptation under different training schedules in a virtual pointing experiment. Surprisingly, we found that acquisition speed of dual visuo-motor mappings in a pointing task is largely independent of the number of phase changes. Next, we studied the neuronal mechanisms underlying this result and other key phenomena of dual-adaptation by relating model simulations to experimental data. We propose a simple and yet biologically plausible neural model consisting of a spatial mapping from an input layer to a pointing angle which is subjected to a global gain modulation. Adaptation is performed by reinforcement learning on the model parameters. Despite its simplicity, the model provides a unifying account for a broad range of experimental data: It quantitatively reproduced the learning rates in dual-adaptation experiments for both direct effect, i.e. adaptation to prisms, and aftereffect, i.e. behavior after removal of prisms, and their independence on the number of phase changes. Several other phenomena, e.g. initial pointing errors that are far smaller than the induced optical shift, were also captured. Moreover, the underlying mechanisms, a local adaptation of a spatial mapping and a global adaptation of a gain factor, explained asymmetric spatial transfer and generalization of prism

  2. Cladding oxidation during air ingress. Part II: Synthesis of modelling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beuzet, E.; Haurais, F.; Bals, C.; Coindreau, O.; Fernandez-Moguel, L.; Vasiliev, A.; Park, S.

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A state-of-the-art for air oxidation modelling in the frame of severe accident is done. • Air oxidation models from main severe accident codes are detailed. • Simulations from main severe accident codes are compared against experimental results. • Perspectives in terms of need for further model development and experiments are given. - Abstract: Air ingress is a potential risk in some low probable situations of severe accidents in a nuclear power plant. Air is a highly oxidizing atmosphere that can lead to an enhanced Zr-based cladding oxidation and core degradation affecting the release of fission products. This is particularly true speaking about ruthenium release, due to its high radiotoxicity and its ability to form highly volatile oxides in a significant manner in presence of air. The oxygen affinity is decreasing from the Zircaloy cladding, fuel and ruthenium inclusions. It is consequently of great need to understand the phenomena governing cladding oxidation by air as a prerequisite for the source term issues in such scenarios. In the past years, many works have been done on cladding oxidation by air under severe accident conditions. This paper with in addition the paper “Cladding oxidation during air ingress – Part I: Synthesis of experimental results” of this journal issue aim at assessing the state of the art on this phenomenon. In this paper, the modelling of air ingress phenomena in the main severe accident codes (ASTEC, ATHLET-CD, MAAP, MELCOR, RELAP/SCDAPSIM, SOCRAT) is described in details, as well as the validation against the integral experiments QUENCH-10, QUENCH-16 and PARAMETER-SF4. A full review of cladding oxidation by air is thus established.

  3. Hawaii Solar Integration Study: Solar Modeling Developments and Study Results; Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orwig, K.; Corbus, D.; Piwko, R.; Schuerger, M.; Matsuura, M.; Roose, L.

    2012-12-01

    The Hawaii Solar Integration Study (HSIS) is a follow-up to the Oahu Wind Integration and Transmission Study completed in 2010. HSIS focuses on the impacts of higher penetrations of solar energy on the electrical grid and on other generation. HSIS goes beyond the island of Oahu and investigates Maui as well. The study examines reserve strategies, impacts on thermal unit commitment and dispatch, utilization of energy storage, renewable energy curtailment, and other aspects of grid reliability and operation. For the study, high-frequency (2-second) solar power profiles were generated using a new combined Numerical Weather Prediction model/ stochastic-kinematic cloud model approach, which represents the 'sharp-edge' effects of clouds passing over solar facilities. As part of the validation process, the solar data was evaluated using a variety of analysis techniques including wavelets, power spectral densities, ramp distributions, extreme values, and cross correlations. This paper provides an overview of the study objectives, results of the solar profile validation, and study results.

  4. Modeling and Results for Creating Oblique Fields in a Magnetic Flux Leakage Survey Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simek, James C.

    2010-02-01

    Integrity management programs designed to maintain safe pipeline systems quite often will use survey results from In line inspection (ILI) tools in addition to data from other sources. Commonly referred to a "smart pigs," one of the most widely used types are those based upon the magnetic flux leakage technique, typically used to detect and quantify metal loss zones. The majority of pipelines surveyed to date have used tools with the magnetic field direction axially aligned with the length of the pipeline. In order to enable detection and quantification of extremely narrow metal loss features or certain types of weld zone anomalies, tools employing magnetic circuits directing the magnetic fields around the pipe circumference have been designed and are use in segments where these feature categories are a primary concern. Modeling and laboratory test data of metal loss features will be used to demonstrate the response of extremely narrow metal loss zones as the features are rotated relative to the induced field direction. Based upon these results, the basis for developing a magnetizer capable of creating fields oblique to either pipeline axis will be presented along with the magnetic field profile models of several configurations.

  5. Energy and exergy analysis of an indirect solar cabinet dryer based on mathematical modeling results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sami, Samaneh; Etesami, Nasrin; Rahimi, Amir

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, using a previously developed dynamic mathematical model for performance analysis of an indirect cabinet solar dryer , a microscopic energy and exergy analysis for an indirect solar cabinet dryer is carried out. To this end, appropriate energy and exergy models are developed and using the predicted values for temperature and enthalpy of gas stream and the temperature, enthalpy and moisture content of the drying solid, the energy and exergy efficiencies are estimated. The validity of the model for predicting variations in gas and solid characteristics along the time and the length of the solar collector and/or dryer length was examined against some existing experimental data. The results show that in spite of high energy efficiency, the indirect solar cabinet dryer has relatively low exergy efficiency. Results show that the maximum exergy losses are in midday. Also the minimums of total exergy efficiency are 32.3% and 47.2% on the first and second days, respectively. Furthermore, the effect of some operating parameters, including length of the collector, its surface, and air flow rate was investigated on the exergy destruction and efficiency. -- Highlights: → In the literature, there are few studies on the energy and exergy analysis of solar cabinet dryers. → In the present study a microscopic energy and exergy analysis for an indirect solar cabinet dryer is carried out. → Effect of operating parameters, including collector length, and air flow rate was investigated on the exergy destruction and efficiency. → For collector section, the maximum values for outlet air temperature, outlet exergy and energy are 69 o C, 2.5 kW and 1.12 kW, respectively. → Increasing the air flow rate decreases the exergy efficiency of solar collector.

  6. Ozone precursor levels and responses to emissions reductions: Analysis of regional oxidant model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milford, Jana B.; Gao, Dongfen; Zafirakou, Antigoni; Pierce, Thomas E.

    An analysis of results from the Regional Oxidant Modeling for Northeast Transport (ROMNET) study ( U.S. EPA, 1991, EPA-450/4-91-002a) has investigated the chemical conditions under which air quality was predicted to improve with reductions in ROG and/or NO ξ emissions, or with changes in the composition of ROG emissions. The ROMNET simulations used emissions projected to the year 2005, with meteorological conditions from July 1988. Predicted concentrations of PAN, HNO 3, H 2O 2 and HCHO are shown along with O 3 for the 2005 base case, allowing limited comparisons to be made with field observations and results from other modeling studies. Predicted secondary pollutant concentrations indicate an unusual degree of photochemical activity over much of the model domain, directionally consistent with the extreme nature of the July 1988 episode. Reducing NO ξ emissions was predicted to reduce O 3 in grid cells in which reactive nitrogen (NO y) concentrations were below about 25 ppb, but to be counterproductive for some cells with higher NO y. The New York City area where NO ξ control was predicted to be counterproductive was characterized by very high NO ξ to NO y ratios. Ozone was relatively insensitive to ROG controls in grid cells with NO y concentrations below 5-10 ppb. Comparison of unweighted ROG concentrations with concentrations weighted by HO rate constants (i.e. reactivity) showed that the latter varied less across locations. Predicted spatial gradients of NO y were generally sharper than those of reactivity-weighted ROG, supporting a dominant role for variations in NO y in controlling the sensitivity of ozone to its precursors. Reductions in reactivity-weighted ROG achieved with composition changes were similar to reductions achieved with ROG emissions cuts, explaining the similar response of ozone to these two control strategies.

  7. Predictive models of tree-growth: preliminary results in the French Alps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Lucien; Keller, Thierry; Guiot, Joel; Edouard, Jean-Louis; Guibal, Frédéric

    The analysis of tree-ring-climate relationships provides models (response functions) of tree-growth calibrated on the inter-annual variability of climate. Output of GCMs can be used as inputs of these models in order to evaluate the change in radial growth induced by climatic change. A spatiotemporal approach applied to a large data set of ring-width chronologies and meteorological data allows the response of trees to be evaluated for different populations of various species in numerous habitats. Such a study was carried out, firstly on ten populations in south-eastern France, then on populations at high-altitude sites. The species involved were Larix decidua, Mill., Pinus sylvestris, L., Abies alba, Mill., and Picea abies Karst. The calibration of tree ring to climate relationships was based on the monthly values of precipitation and temperature provided by meteorological stations more or less distant from the tree sites. Outputs of GCMs were obtained from the ARPEGE model of Météo-France with a simulation on a large grid (2°79 in latitude and 3° in longitude) for the hypothesis of a CO2 doubling. Results show that climatic change can induce either an increase or a decrease in the mean radial growth. For most of the tree-populations, no significant change was apparent. The results suffer from insufficient data related to the spatial representation of climate (i.e. stations that are too far from the tree populations, only two grid points available from the GCMs, etc.).

  8. Effects of a 30-min running performed daily after downhill running on recovery of muscle function and running economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Trevor C; Nosaka, Kazunori; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2008-06-01

    This study investigated the effects of a 30-min level running performed daily for 6 days after downhill running (DHR) on indicators of muscle damage and running economy (RE). Fifty men were placed into five groups - control (CON), 40%, 50%, 60% and 70% (10 subjects per group) - by matching the baseline maximal oxygen consumption (V O(2max)) among the groups. Subjects in the 40%, 50%, 60% and 70% groups had a treadmill (0 degrees ) run for 30min at 40%, 50%, 60% and 70% of the pre-determined V O(2max), respectively, at 1-6 days after a bout of 30-min DHR at -15% (-8.5 degrees ). Maximal voluntary isometric strength of the knee extensors, muscle soreness, plasma creatine kinase and lactate dehydrogenase activities were measured before, immediately after and every day for 7 days after DHR. RE was assessed by oxygen consumption, minute ventilation, respiratory exchange ratio, lactate, heart rate and rating of perceived exertion during a 5-min level running at 85% V O(2max) performed before and at 2, 5 and 7 days after DHR. All muscle damage markers changed significantly (P<0.05) after DHR without significant differences among the groups. The RE parameters showed a significant decrease in RE for 7 days after DHR, but no significant differences in the changes were evident among the groups. These results suggest that the daily running performed after DHR did not have any beneficial or adverse effects on recovery of muscle damage and RE regardless of the intensity.

  9. The Arabidopsis minE mutation causes new plastid and FtsZ1 localization phenotypes in the leaf epidermis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makoto T. Fujiwara

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Plastids in the leaf epidermal cells of plants are regarded as immature chloroplasts that, like mesophyll chloroplasts, undergo binary fission. While mesophyll chloroplasts have generally been used to study plastid division, recent studies have suggested the presence of tissue- or plastid type-dependent regulation of plastid division. Here, we report the detailed morphology of plastids and their stromules, and the intraplastidic localization of the chloroplast division-related protein AtFtsZ1-1, in the leaf epidermis of an Arabidopsis mutant that harbors a mutation in the chloroplast division site determinant gene AtMinE1. In atminE1, the size and shape of epidermal plastids varied widely, which contrasts with the plastid phenotype observed in atminE1 mesophyll cells. In particular, atminE1 epidermal plastids occasionally displayed grape-like morphology, a novel phenotype induced by a plastid division mutation. Observation of an atminE1 transgenic line harboring an AtMinE1 promoter::AtMinE1-yellow fluorescent protein fusion gene confirmed the expression and plastidic localization of AtMinE1 in the leaf epidermis. Further examination revealed that constriction of plastids and stromules mediated by the FtsZ1 ring contributed to the plastid pleomorphism in the atminE1 epidermis. These results illustrate that a single plastid division mutation can have dramatic consequences for epidermal plastid morphology, thereby implying that plastid division and morphogenesis are differentially regulated in epidermal and mesophyll plastids.

  10. Statistical Properties of Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies Jie-Min ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Statistical Properties of Gamma-Ray Burst Host Galaxies. Jie-Min Chen1, Jin Zhang2,3, ... of GRB host galaxies and explore possible correlations between these properties. We also investigate possible cosmic ... hydrogen column density for the GRB host galaxies in our sample. 6.295. The stellar masses are mainly in the ...

  11. Prdm5 suppresses Apc(Min)-driven intestinal adenomas and regulates monoacylglycerol lipase expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Galli, G G; Multhaupt, H A; Carrara, M

    2013-01-01

    (Min) background. By using the genome-wide ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by DNA sequencing) and transcriptome analyses we identify loci encoding proteins involved in metabolic processes as prominent PRDM5 targets and characterize monoacylglycerol lipase (Mgll) as a direct PRDM5 target...

  12. Separation of sup(115m)In from mother 115Cd

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kersulis, V.J.

    1979-01-01

    The methods of the accelerated isolation of the metallic sup(115m)In from the mother solution of 115 Cd were worked out. The sample was dissolved in the concentrated HCl with the presence of H 2 O 2 . After the injection of 5 mg (recalculated for the metallic In) of the carrier, the solution was evaporated dry, the remainder was dissolved in 2n HCl. The obtained solution was lead through an ion-exchange column (9 mm in diameter and with the 250 mm height of the layer with the anionite Dowex 2x8 (50-100 mesh). The sup(115m)In was eluated by 0.15n HCl, and 115 Cd - by 1.5n HCl. Radiochemical purity of the sup(115m)In was not less than 99.99%. The isolation of the sup(115m)In from the eluent (alkalined up to ph=2.3) was carried out electrochemically during approximately 1 hour on the platinum cathode at high (400 mA/cm 2 ) cathode density of current

  13. Quasi-inverses and approximation with min-max operators in the l 1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The semi-group of min-max operators, as used for nonlinear smoothing or multiresolution analysis, has no nontrivial inverses. Having chosen a smoother for a specific purpose, the secondary approximation problem of minimising damage was considered by showing that quasi-inverses exist. This was done with respect to ...

  14. MinInversion: A Program for Petrophysical Composition Analysis of Geophysical Well Log Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adewale Amosu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Knowledge of the composition (mineral and fluid proportions of rock formation lithologies is important for petrophysical and rock physics analysis. The mineralogy of a rock formation can be estimated by solving a system of linear equations that relate a class of geophysical log measurements to the petrophysical properties of known minerals and fluids. This method is useful for carbonate rocks with complex mineralogies and a wide range of other lithologies. Although this method of linear inversion for rock composition is well known, there are no interactive, open-source programs for routinely estimating rock mineralogy from standard digital geophysical wireline logs. We present an interactive open-source program, MinInversion, for constructing a balanced system of linear equations from digital geophysical logs and estimating the rock mineralogy as an inverse problem. MinInversion makes use of a library of petrophysical properties that can be easily expanded and modified by the users. MinInversion also provides several options for solving the system of linear equations and executing the linear matrix inversion including least squares, LU-decomposition and Moore-Penrose generalized inverse methods. In addition, MinInversion enables the estimation of the joint probability distributions for constituent minerals and measured porosity. The joint probability distributions are useful for revealing and analyzing depositional or diagenetic composition trends that affect porosity. The program introduces ease and flexibility to the problems of rock formation composition analysis and the study of the effects of rock composition on porosity.

  15. Measurements of thermal conductivities of alumina powders and Min-K in vacuum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, L.; El-Genk, M.S.; Schuller, M.J.

    1997-01-01

    Thermal conductivities of two types of alumina powders, having average particle sizes of 1.0 microm and 0.1 microm and effective porosities of 91.4% and 96.2%, respectively, and of Min-K insulation materials were measured in vacuum. The thermal conductivities of all three materials increased with temperature, but at varying slopes. The developed thermal conductivity correlations were within ± 10% and ± 5% of the data of the alumina powders and the Min-K, respectively. The Min-K thermal conductivity was the lowest and least dependent on temperature, increasing from 0.03 to 0.042 W/mK as the temperature increased from 400 K to 800 K, respectively. Analysis showed that the thermal conductance of the Min-K could be an order of magnitude lower in the axial direction, but as much as 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than those of 60 and 240 Molybdenum foils insulation's in the perpendicular direction, respectively

  16. Return period curves for extreme 5-min rainfall amounts at the Barcelona urban network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lana, X.; Casas-Castillo, M. C.; Serra, C.; Rodríguez-Solà, R.; Redaño, A.; Burgueño, A.; Martínez, M. D.

    2018-03-01

    Heavy rainfall episodes are relatively common in the conurbation of Barcelona and neighbouring cities (NE Spain), usually due to storms generated by convective phenomena in summer and eastern and south-eastern advections in autumn. Prevention of local flood episodes and right design of urban drainage have to take into account the rainfall intensity spread instead of a simple evaluation of daily rainfall amounts. The database comes from 5-min rain amounts recorded by tipping buckets in the Barcelona urban network along the years 1994-2009. From these data, extreme 5-min rain amounts are selected applying the peaks-over-threshold method for thresholds derived from both 95% percentile and the mean excess plot. The return period curves are derived from their statistical distribution for every gauge, describing with detail expected extreme 5-min rain amounts across the urban network. These curves are compared with those derived from annual extreme time series. In this way, areas in Barcelona submitted to different levels of flood risk from the point of view of rainfall intensity are detected. Additionally, global time trends on extreme 5-min rain amounts are quantified for the whole network and found as not statistically significant.

  17. Simultaneous detection of the 160-min pulsations of the Sun with two radiotelescopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nesterov, N.S.; Urno, S.; Kotov, V.A.

    1983-01-01

    The differential (center-to-limb) radio briqhtness of the quet Sun was measured on June 22, 1981 simultaneously in Crimea at 13.5-mm wavelength and in Finland at 8-mm wavelength. Both independent sets of observations have shown the presence of synchronous variation of the solar radioemission with the 160-min period

  18. VIIRS/NPP Day/Night Band 6-Min L1B Swath 750m

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — VIIRS/NPP Day/Night Band 6-Min L1B Swath 750m (VNP02DNB). The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) Level 1 and Level 2 swath products are generated from...

  19. MODIS/Terra Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 1km V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The MODIS/Terra Calibrated Radiances 5-Min L1B Swath 1km (MOD021KM) contains calibrated and geolocated at-aperture radiances for 36 discrete bands located in the 0.4...

  20. Determinants of poor 6-min walking distance in patients with COPD: the ECLIPSE cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spruit, Martijn A; Watkins, Michael L; Edwards, Lisa D

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The 6-min walking test (6MWT) is widely used to assess exercise tolerance in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Given the prognostic significance of the 6MWT, it is important to identify why some COPD patients perform poorly in terms of this outcome. We aimed ...