WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling oceanic primary

  1. Models for ecological models: Ocean primary productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikle, Christopher K.; Leeds, William B.; Hooten, Mevin B.

    2016-01-01

    The ocean accounts for more than 70% of planet Earth's surface, and it processes are critically important to marine and terrestrial life.  Ocean ecosystems are strongly dependent on the physical state of the ocean (e.g., transports, mixing, upwelling, runoff, and ice dynamics(.  As an example, consider the Coastal Gulf of Alaska (CGOA) region.

  2. Small diversity effects on ocean primary production under environmental change in a diversity-resolving ocean ecosystem model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prowe, Friederike; Pahlow, M.; Dutkiewicz, S.

    2013-01-01

    Marine ecosystem models used to investigate how global change affects ocean ecosystems and their functioning typically omit pelagic diversity. Diversity, however, can affect functions such as primary production and their sensitivity to environmental changes. Using a global ocean ecosystem model t...

  3. Ecosystem model intercomparison of under-ice and total primary production in the Arctic Ocean

    OpenAIRE

    Jin, Meibing; Popova, Ekaterina E.; Zhang, Jinlun; Ji, Rubao; Pendleton, Daniel; Varpe, Øystein; Yool, Andrew; Lee, Younjoo J.

    2016-01-01

    Previous observational studies have found increasing primary production (PP) in response to declining sea ice cover in the Arctic Ocean. In this study, under-ice PP was assessed based on three coupled ice-ocean-ecosystem models participating in the Forum for Arctic Modeling and Observational Synthesis (FAMOS) project. All models showed good agreement with under-ice measurements of surface chlorophyll-a concentration and vertically integrated PP rates during the main under-ice production perio...

  4. Small diversity effects on ocean primary production under environmental change in a diversity-resolving ocean ecosystem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prowe, A. E. F.; Pahlow, M.; Dutkiewicz, S.; Oschlies, A.

    2013-07-01

    Marine ecosystem models used to investigate how global change affects ocean ecosystems and their functioning typically omit pelagic diversity. Diversity, however, can affect functions such as primary production and their sensitivity to environmental changes. Using a global ocean ecosystem model that explicitly resolves phytoplankton diversity within four phytoplankton functional types (PFTs) we investigate the model's ability to capture diversity effects on primary production under environmental change. An idealized scenario with a sudden reduction in vertical mixing causes diversity and primary-production changes that turn out to be largely independent of the number of coexisting phytoplankton types. The model provides a small number of niches with respect to nutrient use in accordance with the PFTs defined in the model, and increasing the number of phytoplankton types increases the resolution within the niches. The variety of traits and trade-offs resolved in the model constrains diversity effects such as niche complementarity, which operate between, but not within PFTs. The number and nature of the niches formulated in the model, for example via trade-offs or different PFTs, thus determines the diversity effects on ecosystem functioning captured in ocean ecosystem models.

  5. Integration of radiative transfer into satellite models of ocean primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smyth, T. J.; Tilstone, G. H.; Groom, S. B.

    2005-10-01

    A major goal of ocean color observations from space is the determination of phytoplankton primary productivity (PP) and hence oceanic carbon uptake. Results of a PP model implemented to use satellite-derived fields of chlorophyll, photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) and sea-surface temperature (SST) are presented. The model gave a global estimate of PP of around 57 Gt C yr-1 and gives a low RMS (0.16) when compared with in situ data. However, as the model's in-water light field parameterization only considers attenuation by pure water and chlorophyll, PP is overestimated in case II waters where other optically important constituents such as colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and suspended particulate matter (SPM) are also present. This paper develops a novel technique to determine PP by coupling a radiative transfer code, which allows the inclusion of CDOM and SPM, to the original photosynthesis model. For the global calculations, a look-up table has been generated using chlorophyll, CDOM, SST, PAR and day length as inputs. The resultant 364,500 element look-up table has been applied to data from the Sea-viewing Wide Field-of-view Sensor (SeaWiFS) and Moderate-Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). PP retrievals are improved in case II waters and global estimates are reduced to between 52 and 55 Gt C yr-1.

  6. Estimation of ocean primary productivity and its spatio-temporal variation mechanism for East China Sea based on VGPM model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIGuosheng; GAOPing; WANGFang; LIANGQiang

    2004-01-01

    According to calculation results of ocean chlorophyll concentration based on SeaWiFS data by SeaBAM model and synchronous ship-measured data, this research set up an improved model for Case I and Case Ⅱ water bodies respectively. The monthly chlorophyll distribution in the East China Sea in 1998 was obtained from this improved model on calculation results of SeaBAM. The euphotic depth distribution in 1998 in the East China Sea is calculated by using remote sensing data of K490 from SeaWiFS according to the relation between the euphotic depth and the oceanic diffuse attenuation coefficient. With data of ocean chlorophyll concentration, euphotic depth, ocean surface photosynthetic available radiation (PAR), daily photoperiod and optimal rate of daily carbon fixation within a water column, the monthly and annual primary productivity spatio-temporal distributions in the East China Sea in 1998 were obtained based on VGPM model. Based on analysis of those distributions, the conclusion can be drawn that there is a clear bimodality character of primary productivity in the monthly distribution in the East China Sea. In detail, the monthly distribution of primary productivity stays the lowest level in winter and rises rapidly to the peak in spring. It gets down a little in summer, and gets up a little in autumn. The daily average of primary productivity in the whole East China Sea is 560.03 mg/m2/d, which is far higher than the average of subtropical ocean areas. The annual average of primary productivity is 236.95 g/m2/a. The research on the seasonal variety mechanism of primary productivity shows that several factors that affect the spatio-temporal distribution may include the chlorophyll concentration distribution, temperature condition, the Yangtze River diluted water variety, the euphotic depth, ocean current variety, etc. But the main influencing factors may be different in each local sea area.

  7. Control of primary production in the Arctic by nutrients and light: insights from a high resolution ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Popova

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Until recently, the Arctic Basin was generally considered to be a low productivity area and was afforded little attention in global- or even basin-scale ecosystem modelling studies. Due to anthropogenic climate change however, the sea ice cover of the Arctic Ocean is undergoing an unexpectedly fast retreat, exposing increasingly large areas of the basin to sunlight. As indicated by existing Arctic phenomena such as ice-edge blooms, this decline in sea-ice is liable to encourage pronounced growth of phytoplankton in summer and poses pressing questions concerning the future of Arctic ecosystems. It thus provides a strong impetus to modelling of this region.

    The Arctic Ocean is an area where plankton productivity is heavily influenced by physical factors. As these factors are strongly responding to climate change, we analyse here the results from simulations of the 1/4° resolution global ocean NEMO (Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean model coupled with the MEDUSA (Model for Ecosystem Dynamics, carbon Utilisation, Sequestration and Acidification biogeochemical model, with a particular focus on the Arctic Basin. Simulated productivity is consistent with the limited observations for the Arctic, with significant production occurring both under the sea-ice and at the thermocline, locations that are difficult to sample in the field.

    Results also indicate that a substantial fraction of the variability in Arctic primary production can be explained by two key physical factors: (i the maximum penetration of winter mixing, which determines the amount of nutrients available for summer primary production, and (ii short-wave radiation at the ocean surface, which controls the magnitude of phytoplankton blooms. A strong empirical correlation was found in the model output between primary production these two factors, highlighting the importance of physical processes in the Arctic Ocean.

  8. Net primary productivity estimates and environmental variables in the Arctic Ocean: An assessment of coupled physical-biogeochemical models

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Younjoo J.; Matrai, Patricia A.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M; Vincent S. Saba; Aumont, Olivier; Babin, Marcel; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Chevallier, Matthieu; de Mora, Lee; Dessert, Morgane; Dunne, John P.; Ellingsen, Ingrid; Feldman, Doron; Frouin, Robert; Gehlen, Marion

    2016-01-01

    The relative skill of 21 regional and global biogeochemical models was assessed in terms of how well the models reproduced observed net primary productivity (NPP) and environmental variables such as nitrate concentration (NO3), mixed layer depth (MLD), euphotic layer depth (Zeu), and sea ice concentration, by comparing results against a newly updated, quality-controlled in situ NPP database for the Arctic Ocean (1959-2011). The models broadly captured the spatial features of integrated NPP (i...

  9. An evaluation of ocean color model estimates of marine primary productivity in coastal and pelagic regions across the globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saba, V. S.; Friedrichs, M. A. M.; Antoine, D.; Armstrong, R. A.; Asanuma, I.; Behrenfeld, M. J.; Ciotti, A. M.; Dowell, M.; Hoepffner, N.; Hyde, K. J. W.; Ishizaka, J.; Kameda, T.; Marra, J.; Mélin, F.; Morel, A.; O'Reilly, J.; Scardi, M.; Smith, W. O., Jr.; Smyth, T. J.; Tang, S.; Uitz, J.; Waters, K.; Westberry, T. K.

    2011-02-01

    Nearly half of the earth's photosynthetically fixed carbon derives from the oceans. To determine global and region specific rates, we rely on models that estimate marine net primary productivity (NPP) thus it is essential that these models are evaluated to determine their accuracy. Here we assessed the skill of 21 ocean color models by comparing their estimates of depth-integrated NPP to 1156 in situ 14C measurements encompassing ten marine regions including the Sargasso Sea, pelagic North Atlantic, coastal Northeast Atlantic, Black Sea, Mediterranean Sea, Arabian Sea, subtropical North Pacific, Ross Sea, West Antarctic Peninsula, and the Antarctic Polar Frontal Zone. Average model skill, as determined by root-mean square difference calculations, was lowest in the Black and Mediterranean Seas, highest in the pelagic North Atlantic and the Antarctic Polar Frontal Zone, and intermediate in the other six regions. The maximum fraction of model skill that may be attributable to uncertainties in both the input variables and in situ NPP measurements was nearly 72%. On average, the simplest depth/wavelength integrated models performed no worse than the more complex depth/wavelength resolved models. Ocean color models were not highly challenged in extreme conditions of surface chlorophyll-a and sea surface temperature, nor in high-nitrate low-chlorophyll waters. Water column depth was the primary influence on ocean color model performance such that average skill was significantly higher at depths greater than 250 m, suggesting that ocean color models are more challenged in Case-2 waters (coastal) than in Case-1 (pelagic) waters. Given that in situ chlorophyll-a data was used as input data, algorithm improvement is required to eliminate the poor performance of ocean color NPP models in Case-2 waters that are close to coastlines. Finally, ocean color chlorophyll-a algorithms are challenged by optically complex Case-2 waters, thus using satellite-derived chlorophyll-a to

  10. Primary Reasoning behind the Double ITCZ Phenomenon in a Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere General Circulation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李江龙; 张学洪; 俞永强; 戴福山

    2004-01-01

    This paper investigates the processes behind the double ITCZ phenomenon, a common problem in Coupled ocean-atmosphere General Circulation Models (CGCMs), using a CGCM-FGCM-0 (Flexible General Circulation Model, version 0). The double ITCZ mode develops rapidly during the first two years of the integration and becomes a perennial phenomenon afterwards in the model. By way of Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) for SST, sea surface pressure, and sea surface wind, some air-sea interactions are analyzed. These interactions prompt the anomalous signals that appear at the beginning of the coupling to develop rapidly. There are two possible reasons, proved by sensitivity experiments: (1) the overestimated east-west gradient of SST in the equatorial Pacific in the ocean spin-up process, and (2) the underestimated amount of low-level stratus over the Peruvian coast in CCM3 (the Community Climate Model, Version Three). The overestimated east-west gradient of SST brings the anomalous equatorial easterly. The anomalous easterly, affected by the Coriolis force in the Southern Hemisphere, turns into an anomalous westerly in a broad area south of the equator and is enhanced by atmospheric anomalous circulation due to the underestimated amount of low-level stratus over the Peruvian coast simulated by CCM3. The anomalous westerly leads to anomalous warm advection that makes the SST warm in the southeast Pacific.The double ITCZ phenomenon in the CGCM is a result of a series of nonlocal and nonlinear adjustment processes in the coupled system, which can be traced to the uncoupled models, oceanic component, and atmospheric component. The zonal gradient of the equatorial SST is too large in the ocean component and the amount of low-level stratus over the Peruvian coast is too low in the atmosphere component.

  11. Directional and Spectral Irradiance in Ocean Models:Effects on Simulated Global Phytoplankton,Nutrients,and Primary Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Watson Gregg

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The importance of including directional and spectral light in simulations of ocean radiative transfer was investigated using a coupled biogeochemical-circulation-radiative model of the global oceans. The effort focused on phytoplankton abundances, nutrient concentrations and net primary production.The importance was approached by sequentially removing directional (i.e., direct vs. diffuse and spectral irradiance and comparing results of the above variables to a fully directionally and spectrally-resolved model.In each case the total irradiance was kept constant; it was only the pathways and spectral nature that were changed.Assuming all irradiance was diffuse had negligible effect on global ocean primary production. Global nitrate and total chlorophyll concentrations declined by about 20% each. The largest changes occurred in the tropics and sub-tropics rather than the high latitudes, where most of the irradiance is already diffuse. Disregarding spectral irradiance had effects that depended upon the choice of attenuation wavelength. The wavelength closest to the spectrally-resolved model, 500nm, produced lower nitrate (19% and chlorophyll (8% and higher primary production (2% than the spectral model. Phytoplankton relative abundances were very sensitive to the choice of non-spectral wavelength transmittance. The combined effects of neglecting both directional and spectral irradiance exacerbated the differences, despite using attenuation at 500nm. Global nitrate decreased 33% and chlorophyll decreased 24%. Changes in phytoplankton community structure were considerable, representing a change from chlorophytes to cyanobacteria and coccolithophores. This suggested a shift in community function, from light-limitation to nutrient limitation: lower demands for nutrients from cyanobacteria and coccolithophores favored them over the more nutrient-demanding chlorophytes. Although diatoms have the highest nutrient demands in the model, their relative

  12. Net primary productivity estimates and environmental variables in the Arctic Ocean: An assessment of coupled physical-biogeochemical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Younjoo J.; Matrai, Patricia A.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Saba, Vincent S.; Aumont, Olivier; Babin, Marcel; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Chevallier, Matthieu; de Mora, Lee; Dessert, Morgane; Dunne, John P.; Ellingsen, Ingrid H.; Feldman, Doron; Frouin, Robert; Gehlen, Marion; Gorgues, Thomas; Ilyina, Tatiana; Jin, Meibing; John, Jasmin G.; Lawrence, Jon; Manizza, Manfredi; Menkes, Christophe E.; Perruche, Coralie; Le Fouest, Vincent; Popova, Ekaterina E.; Romanou, Anastasia; Samuelsen, Annette; Schwinger, Jörg; Séférian, Roland; Stock, Charles A.; Tjiputra, Jerry; Tremblay, L. Bruno; Ueyoshi, Kyozo; Vichi, Marcello; Yool, Andrew; Zhang, Jinlun

    2016-12-01

    The relative skill of 21 regional and global biogeochemical models was assessed in terms of how well the models reproduced observed net primary productivity (NPP) and environmental variables such as nitrate concentration (NO3), mixed layer depth (MLD), euphotic layer depth (Zeu), and sea ice concentration, by comparing results against a newly updated, quality-controlled in situ NPP database for the Arctic Ocean (1959-2011). The models broadly captured the spatial features of integrated NPP (iNPP) on a pan-Arctic scale. Most models underestimated iNPP by varying degrees in spite of overestimating surface NO3, MLD, and Zeu throughout the regions. Among the models, iNPP exhibited little difference over sea ice condition (ice-free versus ice-influenced) and bottom depth (shelf versus deep ocean). The models performed relatively well for the most recent decade and toward the end of Arctic summer. In the Barents and Greenland Seas, regional model skill of surface NO3 was best associated with how well MLD was reproduced. Regionally, iNPP was relatively well simulated in the Beaufort Sea and the central Arctic Basin, where in situ NPP is low and nutrients are mostly depleted. Models performed less well at simulating iNPP in the Greenland and Chukchi Seas, despite the higher model skill in MLD and sea ice concentration, respectively. iNPP model skill was constrained by different factors in different Arctic Ocean regions. Our study suggests that better parameterization of biological and ecological microbial rates (phytoplankton growth and zooplankton grazing) are needed for improved Arctic Ocean biogeochemical modeling.

  13. An assessment of phytoplankton primary productivity in the Arctic Ocean from satellite ocean color/in situ chlorophyll‐a based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrai, Patricia A.; Friedrichs, Marjorie A. M.; Saba, Vincent S.; Antoine, David; Ardyna, Mathieu; Asanuma, Ichio; Babin, Marcel; Bélanger, Simon; Benoît‐Gagné, Maxime; Devred, Emmanuel; Fernández‐Méndez, Mar; Gentili, Bernard; Hirawake, Toru; Kang, Sung‐Ho; Kameda, Takahiko; Katlein, Christian; Lee, Sang H.; Lee, Zhongping; Mélin, Frédéric; Scardi, Michele; Smyth, Tim J.; Tang, Shilin; Turpie, Kevin R.; Waters, Kirk J.; Westberry, Toby K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We investigated 32 net primary productivity (NPP) models by assessing skills to reproduce integrated NPP in the Arctic Ocean. The models were provided with two sources each of surface chlorophyll‐a concentration (chlorophyll), photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), sea surface temperature (SST), and mixed‐layer depth (MLD). The models were most sensitive to uncertainties in surface chlorophyll, generally performing better with in situ chlorophyll than with satellite‐derived values. They were much less sensitive to uncertainties in PAR, SST, and MLD, possibly due to relatively narrow ranges of input data and/or relatively little difference between input data sources. Regardless of type or complexity, most of the models were not able to fully reproduce the variability of in situ NPP, whereas some of them exhibited almost no bias (i.e., reproduced the mean of in situ NPP). The models performed relatively well in low‐productivity seasons as well as in sea ice‐covered/deep‐water regions. Depth‐resolved models correlated more with in situ NPP than other model types, but had a greater tendency to overestimate mean NPP whereas absorption‐based models exhibited the lowest bias associated with weaker correlation. The models performed better when a subsurface chlorophyll‐a maximum (SCM) was absent. As a group, the models overestimated mean NPP, however this was partly offset by some models underestimating NPP when a SCM was present. Our study suggests that NPP models need to be carefully tuned for the Arctic Ocean because most of the models performing relatively well were those that used Arctic‐relevant parameters. PMID:27668139

  14. An assessment of phytoplankton primary productivity in the Arctic Ocean from satellite ocean color/in situ chlorophyll-a based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Younjoo J; Matrai, Patricia A; Friedrichs, Marjorie A M; Saba, Vincent S; Antoine, David; Ardyna, Mathieu; Asanuma, Ichio; Babin, Marcel; Bélanger, Simon; Benoît-Gagné, Maxime; Devred, Emmanuel; Fernández-Méndez, Mar; Gentili, Bernard; Hirawake, Toru; Kang, Sung-Ho; Kameda, Takahiko; Katlein, Christian; Lee, Sang H; Lee, Zhongping; Mélin, Frédéric; Scardi, Michele; Smyth, Tim J; Tang, Shilin; Turpie, Kevin R; Waters, Kirk J; Westberry, Toby K

    2015-09-01

    We investigated 32 net primary productivity (NPP) models by assessing skills to reproduce integrated NPP in the Arctic Ocean. The models were provided with two sources each of surface chlorophyll-a concentration (chlorophyll), photosynthetically available radiation (PAR), sea surface temperature (SST), and mixed-layer depth (MLD). The models were most sensitive to uncertainties in surface chlorophyll, generally performing better with in situ chlorophyll than with satellite-derived values. They were much less sensitive to uncertainties in PAR, SST, and MLD, possibly due to relatively narrow ranges of input data and/or relatively little difference between input data sources. Regardless of type or complexity, most of the models were not able to fully reproduce the variability of in situ NPP, whereas some of them exhibited almost no bias (i.e., reproduced the mean of in situ NPP). The models performed relatively well in low-productivity seasons as well as in sea ice-covered/deep-water regions. Depth-resolved models correlated more with in situ NPP than other model types, but had a greater tendency to overestimate mean NPP whereas absorption-based models exhibited the lowest bias associated with weaker correlation. The models performed better when a subsurface chlorophyll-a maximum (SCM) was absent. As a group, the models overestimated mean NPP, however this was partly offset by some models underestimating NPP when a SCM was present. Our study suggests that NPP models need to be carefully tuned for the Arctic Ocean because most of the models performing relatively well were those that used Arctic-relevant parameters.

  15. A Model For The Use Of Satellite Remote Sensing For The Measurement Of Primary Production In The Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Donald J.; Kiefer, Dale A.; SooHoo, Janice B.; Stallings, Casson; Yang, Wei-Liang

    1986-08-01

    The estimation of oceanic primary production on a global scale is the focus of efforts in remote sensing using the Coastal Zone Color Scanner (CZCS). The goal of this research is to provide a measure of the primary production using only satellite data for the estimate. This estimate requires the measurement of surface pigments (chlorophyll a + phaeophytin a) using the CZCS, an estimate of the sea-surface temperature using the AVHRR and determination of the incident solar irradiance using GOES imagery. In this paper, we describe a model of primary production based upon the responses of phytoplankton to differing light and nutrient fields. This model includes the effects on production of variations in surface pigment concentration, the mixed layer depth and the dependence on the incident solar irradiance. The model has been tested using in situ data provided by the Southern California Bight Studies (Eppley, et al., 1979), California Cooperative Fisheries Investigations (CalCOFI), Organization of Persistent Upwelling Structures (J.B. Soolloo in OPUS Data Report) and other data sets. A synoptic measure of the distribution of surface pigments is derived from the West Coast Chlorophyll and Temperature Time Series (West Coast Time Series Advisory Group, 1985). The features and behavior of the model will be presented together with the results of the model verification.

  16. Multiple stressors for oceanic primary production

    KAUST Repository

    Agusti, Susana

    2015-12-15

    Marine ecosystems are increasingly exposed to stress factors of anthropogenic origin that change their function, structure and services they deliver society. Climate change occurs simultaneously with other changes in the environment acting jointly in a context of global environmental change. For oceanic phytoplankton communities, the research conducted so far has identified stress factors associated with global change and their impact individually (warming, acidification, increased UVB radiation, pollutants). But when several stressors act simultaneously interactions and responses are not equal to the sum of individual impacts, but may have synergistic effects (the effects are multiplied) or antagonistic (cancel out the effects) that hinder predictions of the vulnerability of ecosystems to global change. Here we will examine the vulnerability of oceanic primary producers to the accumulation of different stressors associated with global change. The trend for autotrophic picoplankton to increase with temperature in the ocean has led to predictions that autotrophic picoplankton abundance will increase with warming. However, it is documented a trend towards a decline in productivity, due to declined autotroph biomass and production with warming and the associated stratification in the subtropical ocean. Models predicting an increase in abundance are in contradiction with the reported decrease in productivity in several oceanic areas, and associate oligotrophication. Here we perform a global study to analyze the relationships of autotrophic picoplankton with oceanic temperature, nutrients, underwater light and ultraviolet B (UVB) radiation, and productivity. We built a model to project the future changes of autotrophic picoplankton considering multiple environmental changes in future climate scenarios for the subtropical gyres. We considered increased water temperature, and associated changes in productivity and underwater light and UVB. The model show that warming and

  17. Microphysical sensitivity of coupled springtime Arctic stratocumulus to modelled primary ice over the ice pack, marginal ice, and ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Gillian; Connolly, Paul J.; Jones, Hazel M.; Choularton, Thomas W.

    2017-03-01

    This study uses large eddy simulations to test the sensitivity of single-layer mixed-phase stratocumulus to primary ice number concentrations in the European Arctic. Observations from the Aerosol-Cloud Coupling and Climate Interactions in the Arctic (ACCACIA) campaign are considered for comparison with cloud microphysics modelled using the Large Eddy Model (LEM, UK Met. Office). We find that cloud structure is very sensitive to ice number concentrations, Nice, and small increases can cause persisting mixed-phase clouds to glaciate and break up.Three key dependencies on Nice are identified from sensitivity simulations and comparisons with observations made over the sea ice pack, marginal ice zone (MIZ), and ocean. Over sea ice, we find deposition-condensation ice formation rates are overestimated, leading to cloud glaciation. When ice formation is limited to water-saturated conditions, we find microphysics comparable to aircraft observations over all surfaces considered. We show that warm supercooled (-13 °C) mixed-phase clouds over the MIZ are simulated to reasonable accuracy when using both the DeMott et al.(2010) and Cooper(1986) primary ice nucleation parameterisations. Over the ocean, we find a strong sensitivity of Arctic stratus to Nice. The Cooper(1986) parameterisation performs poorly at the lower ambient temperatures, leading to a comparatively higher Nice (2.43 L-1 at the cloud-top temperature, approximately -20 °C) and cloud glaciation. A small decrease in the predicted Nice (2.07 L-1 at -20 °C), using the DeMott et al.(2010) parameterisation, causes mixed-phase conditions to persist for 24 h over the ocean. However, this representation leads to the formation of convective structures which reduce the cloud liquid water through snow precipitation, promoting cloud break-up through a depleted liquid phase. Decreasing the Nice further (0.54 L-1, using a relationship derived from ACCACIA observations) allows mixed-phase conditions to be maintained for at

  18. Remote sensing of oceanic primary production: Computations using a spectral model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sathyendranath, S.; Platt, T.; Caverhill, C.M.; Warnock, R.E.; Lewis, M.R.

    the conventional non-spectral approach. The problem of non-uniform vertical distribution of biomass is investigated next, from the point of view of estimation of water-column primary production using satellite data. The errors in estimated production are shown...

  19. Marine biogeochemical influence on primary sea spray aerosol composition in the Southern Ocean: predictions from a mechanistic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, D.; Burrows, S. M.; Elliott, S.; Frossard, A. A.; Russell, L. M.; Liu, X.; Ogunro, O. O.; Easter, R. C.; Rasch, P. J.

    2014-12-01

    Remote marine clouds, such as those over the Southern Ocean, are particularly sensitive to variations in the concentration and chemical composition of aerosols that serve as cloud condensation nuclei (CCN). Observational evidence indicates that the organic content of fine marine aerosol is greatly increased during the biologically active season near strong phytoplankton blooms in certain locations, while being nearly constant in other locations. We have recently developed a novel modeling framework that mechanistically links the organic fraction of submicron sea spray to ocean biogeochemistry (Burrows et al., in discussion, ACPD, 2014; Elliott et al., ERL, 2014). Because of its combination of large phytoplankton blooms and high wind speeds, the Southern Ocean is an ideal location for testing our understanding of the processes driving the enrichment of organics in sea spray aerosol. Comparison of the simulated OM fraction with satellite observations shows that OM fraction is a statistically significant predictor of cloud droplet number concentration over the Southern Ocean. This presentation will focus on predictions from our modeling framework for the Southern Ocean, specifically, the predicted geographic gradients and seasonal cycles in the aerosol organic matter and its functional group composition. The timing and location of a Southern Ocean field campaign will determine its utility in observing the effects of highly localized and seasonal phytoplankton blooms on aerosol composition and clouds. Reference cited: Burrows, S. M., Ogunro, O., Frossard, A. A., Russell, L. M., Rasch, P. J., and Elliott, S.: A physically-based framework for modelling the organic fractionation of sea spray aerosol from bubble film Langmuir equilibria, Atmos. Chem. Phys. Discuss., 14, 5375-5443, doi:10.5194/acpd-14-5375-2014, 2014. Elliott, S., Burrows, S. M., Deal, C., Liu, X., Long, M., Ogunro, O., Russell, L. M., and Wingenter O.. "Prospects for simulating macromolecular surfactant

  20. Ocean primary productivity estimation of China Sea by remote sensing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PAN Delu; GUAN Wenjiang; BAI Yan; HUANG Haiqing

    2005-01-01

    Ocean primary productivity is a key parameter in the research of global carbon cycle, ocean biological resources, and in evaluation of the feature and quality of ocean biological environment. Traditional shipboard measurement which is costly and time-consuming is impossible to obtain the spatial and temporal information on primary productivity on a large scale in a short period of time. Satellite remote sensing is an effective strategy to acquire the ocean information in near real time. Here we propose a model special for China Sea based on the concept of primary productivity using in situ primary productivity and environmental data from 1984 to 1990, and discuss every modeling parameter which can be retrieved by remote sensing in detail. The reliability of this model is tested by in situ data, and the comparison of other primary productivity models is made. We also analyze the temporal and spatial distribution of China Sea primary productivity in 2000. From our analysis the satellite remote sensing data have been proved very useful for ocean primary productivity study.

  1. Modeling the impact of riverine DON removal by marine bacterioplankton on primary production in the Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Le Fouest

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The planktonic and biogeochemical dynamics of the Arctic shelves exhibit a strong variability in response to Arctic warming. In this study, in order to elucidate on the processes regulating the production of phytoplankton (PP and bacterioplankton (BP and their interactions, we employ a biogeochemical model coupled to a pan-Arctic ocean-sea ice model (MITgcm to explicitly simulate and quantify the contribution of usable dissolved organic nitrogen (DON drained by the major circum-Arctic rivers on PP and BP in a scenario of melting sea ice (1998–2011. Model simulations suggest that on average between 1998 and 2011, the removal of usable RDON by bacterioplankton is responsible of a ~26% increase of the annual BP for the whole Arctic Ocean. With respect to total PP, the model simulates an increase of ~8% on an annual basis and of ~18% in summer. Recycled ammonium is responsible for the PP increase. The recycling of RDON by bacterioplankton promotes higher BP and PP but there is no significant temporal trend in the BP : PP ratio within the ice-free shelves over the 1998–2011 period. This suggests no significant evolution in the balance between autotrophy and heterotrophy in the last decade with a constant annual flux of RDON into the coastal ocean although changes in RDON supply and further reduction in sea ice cover could potentially alter this delicate balance.

  2. Mechanisms controlling primary and new production in a global ecosystem model – Part II: the role of the upper ocean short-term periodic and episodic mixing events

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Popova

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of 6 h, daily, weekly and monthly atmospheric forcing resulted in dramatically different predictions of plankton productivity in a global 3-D coupled physical-biogeochemical model.

    Resolving the diurnal cycle of atmospheric variability by use of 6 h forcing, and hence also diurnal variability in UML depth, produced the largest difference, reducing predicted global primary and new production by 25% and 10% respectively relative to that predicted with daily and weekly forcing. This decrease varied regionally, being a 30% reduction in equatorial areas and 25% at moderate and high latitudes. A 10% increase in the primary production was seen in the peripheries of the oligotrophic gyres.

    By resolving the diurnal cycle, model performance was significantly improved with respect to several common problems: underestimated primary production in the oligotrophic gyres; overestimated primary production in the Southern Ocean; overestimated magnitude of the spring bloom in the subarctic Pacific Ocean, and overestimated primary production in equatorial areas. The result of using 6 h forcing on predicted ecosystem dynamics was profound, the effects persisting far beyond the hourly timescale, and having major consequences for predicted global and new production on an annual basis.

  3. A model for the use of satellite remote sensing for the measurement of primary production in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Donald J.; Yang, Wei-Liang; Kiefer, Dale A.; Soohoo, Janice Beeler; Stallings, Casson

    1986-01-01

    A model of primary production based upon the responses of phytoplankton to differing light and nutrient fields is described. This model includes the effects on production of variations in surface pigment concentration, the mixed layer depth, and the dependence on the incident solar irradiance. The model has been tested using in situ data provided by the Southern California Bight Studies of Eppley, et al. (1979), the California Cooperative Fisheries Investigations, the Organization of Persistent Upwelling Structures, and other data sets. A synoptic measure of the distribution of surface pigments is derived from the West Coast Chlorophyll and Temperature Time Series. The features and behavior of the model are presented together with the results of the model verification.

  4. Discrepant estimates of primary and export production from satellite algorithms, a biogeochemical model, and geochemical tracer measurements in the North Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palevsky, Hilary I.; Quay, Paul D.; Nicholson, David P.

    2016-08-01

    Estimates of primary and export production (PP and EP) based on satellite remote sensing algorithms and global biogeochemical models are widely used to provide year-round global coverage not available from direct observations. However, observational data to validate these approaches are limited. We find that no single satellite algorithm or model can reproduce seasonal and annual geochemically determined PP, export efficiency (EP/PP), and EP rates throughout the North Pacific basin, based on comparisons throughout the full annual cycle at time series stations in the subarctic and subtropical gyres and basin-wide regions sampled by container ship transects. The high-latitude regions show large PP discrepancies in winter and spring and strong effects of deep winter mixed layers on annual EP that cannot be accounted for in current satellite-based approaches. These results underscore the need to evaluate satellite- and model-based estimates using multiple productivity parameters measured over broad ocean regions throughout the annual cycle.

  5. ESTIMATION OF PRIMARY PRODUCTIVITY FOR TUNA IN INDIAN OCEAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ende Kasma

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Indonesia has abundant fisheries potency, one of fisheries potency in Indian Ocean is tuna fish. Primary productivity data used as indicator of tuna fisheries potency in Idian Ocean.Research location is in Indian Ocean 070 - 210 S and 1070 - 1210 E. Weekly satellite data in 2007 used are chlorophyl, sea surface temperature, Photosynthetic Available Radiation (PAR and euphotic zone (Zeu data. Daily fisheries data is from tuna fish catching data 2007 in PT. Perikanan Samudera Besar (PT. PSB. Satellite data is processed by Vertically Generalized Production Model (VGPM formula to obtained primary productivity. Tuna fish catching data correlated to satellite data to know correlation of primary productivity value to fish catching data.Result of this research is there four species of tuna fish catch in Indian Ocean, that are Madidihang or Yellowfin tuna (Thunnus albacores, Bigeye tuna (Thunnus obesus, Southtern Bluefin tuna (Thunnus macoyii, and Albacore (Thunnus alalunga. Where 73% tuna fish is Bigeye tuna. Bigeye, Albacore and Yellowfin tuna are produced annually, while Southern Bluefin tuna in northwest monsoon is no fish production. Chlorophyll-a, sea surface temperature and primary productivity value in research location are from 0,06 mg/m3 to 0,38 mg/m3, from 24,640C to 31,820C, and from 73,22mgC/m2 to 658,57 mgC/m2 respectively. Coefficient correlation in primary productivity and fish catching in fishing ground area is small (r = 0.008, its explained that, fish catching number is not influenced by primary productivity. In high or low primary productivity condition tuna fish catched in Indian Ocean area. Potential fishing ground area of Bigeye tuna, Albacore, Yellowfin and Southern Bluefin tuna in Indian Ocean are in 110 – 160 S and 1060 – 1210 E, the primary productivity value is from 73 mgC/m2day to 732 mgC/m2day and differences of sea surface temperature value of tuna fish are from 240 C to 310 C, 240 C to 300 C, and 250 C to 310 C for

  6. Estimating photosynthetically available radiation at the ocean surface for primary production (3P Project): modeling, evaluation, and application to global MERIS imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramon, Didier; Jolivet, Dominique; Tan, Jing; Frouin, Robert

    2016-05-01

    The goal of the Photosynthetically available radiation (PAR) for Primary Production (3P) project is to provide robust, complete, and user-friendly satellite radiation products for ecosystem modeling, carbon cycle investigations, and climate change monitoring. A specific objective is to design and distribute a daily PAR product from MERIS and potentially the recent OLCI. In view of this, a PAR algorithm, based on the NASA Ocean Biology Processing Group (OBPG) operational algorithm, has been developed. The algorithm takes into account statistical diurnal variability of clouds using 3-hourly International Satellite Cloud Climatology (ISCCP) data. The PAR modeling, simplified to accommodate the information available, is evaluated using a Monte Carlo tool that simulates the satellite radiance and corresponding daily PAR. The daily PAR estimates obtained from reduced resolution (i.e., 1 km) MERIS data are evaluated against in situ measurements routinely collected from fixed buoys and platforms, namely BOUSSOLE in the Mediterranean Sea, CCE- 1 and -2 off the West coast of the United States, and COVE in the coastal Atlantic Ocean. The agreement between estimated and measured values is good on a daily time scale and substantially improved on a monthly time scale, with a bias of 2.7 (7.7%) E/m2/day and RMS errors of 8.5 (24.9%) and 4.5 (12.9%) E/m2/day. The bias is reduced significantly (by 1.8%) when using diurnal cloud climatology. Overestimation in cloudy conditions is partly explained by decoupling the clear atmosphere from the cloud/surface layer. Large gaps in regions affected by sun glint (not processed because incorrectly interpreted as cloudy) are adequately filled in the monthly PAR imagery. The statistical performance is satisfactory for long-term studies of aquatic primary production, especially in view of the much larger uncertainties on the fraction of PAR absorbed by live algae and the quantum yield of carbon fixation.

  7. 东海初级生产力遥感反演及其时空演化机制%Estimation of ocean primary productivity and its spatio-temporal variation mechanism for East China Sea based on VGPM model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李国胜; 高平; 王芳

    2004-01-01

    According to calculation results of ocean chlorophyll concentration based on SeaWiFS data by SeaBAM model and synchronous ship-measured data, this research set up an improved model for Case Ⅰ and Case Ⅱ water bodies respectively. The monthly chlorophyll distribution in the East China Sea in 1998 was obtained kom this improved model on calculation results of SeaBAM. The euphotic depth distribution in 1998 in the East China Sea is calculated by using remote sensing data of K490 from SeaWiFS according to the relation between the euphotic depth and the oceanic diffuse attenuation coefficient. With data of ocean chlorophyll concentration, euphotic depth, ocean surface photosynthetic available radiation (PAR), daily photoperiod and optimal rate of daily carbon fixation within a water column, the monthly and annual primary productivity spatio-temporal distributions in the East China Sea in 1998 were obtained based on VGPM model. Based on analysis of those distributions, the conclusion can be drawn that there is a clear bimodality character of primary productivity in the monthly distribution in the East China Sea. In detail, the monthly distribution of primary productivity stays the lowest level in winter and rises rapidly to the peak in spring. It gets down a little in summer, and gets up a little in autumn. The daily average of primary productivity in the whole East China Sea is 560.03 mg/m2/d, which is far higher than the average of subtropical ocean areas. The annual average of primary productivity is 236.95 g/m2/a. The research on the seasonal variety mechanism of primary productivity shows that several factors that affect the spatio-temporal distribution may include the chlorophyll concentration distribution, temperature condition, the Yangtze River diluted water variety, the euphotic depth, ocean current variety, etc. But the main influencing factors may be different in each local sea area.

  8. A one ocean model of biodiversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Dor, Ronald K.; Fennel, Katja; Berghe, Edward Vanden

    2009-09-01

    The history of life is written in the ocean, and the history of the ocean is written in DNA. Geologists have shown us that hundreds of millions of years of ocean history can be revealed from records of a single phylum in cores of mud from abyssal plains. We are now accumulating genetic tools to unravel the relationships of hundreds of phyla to track this history back billions of years. The technologies demonstrated by the Census of Marine Life (CoML) mean that the ocean is no longer opaque or unknowable. The secrets of the largest component of the biosphere are knowable. The cost of understanding the history of ocean life is not cheap, but it is also not prohibitive. A transparent, open ocean is available for us to use to understand ourselves. This article develops a model of biodiversity equilibration in a single, physically static ocean as a step towards biodiversity in physically complex real oceans. It attempts to be quantitative and to simultaneously account for biodiversity patterns from bacteria to whales focusing on emergent properties rather than details. Biodiversity reflects long-term survival of DNA sequences, stabilizing "ecosystem services" despite environmental change. In the ocean, mechanisms for ensuring survival range from prokaryotes maintaining low concentrations of replicable DNA throughout the ocean volume, anticipating local change, to animals whose mobility increases with mass to avoid local change through movement. Whales can reach any point in the ocean in weeks, but prokaryotes can only diffuse. The high metabolic costs of mobility are offset by the dramatically lower number of DNA replicates required to ensure survival. Reproduction rates probably scale more or less inversely with body mass. Bacteria respond in a week, plankton in a year, whales in a century. We generally lack coherent theories to explain the origins of animals (metazoans) and the contributions of biodiversity to ecosystems. The One Ocean Model suggests that mobile

  9. NEMO Oceanic Model Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epicoco, I.; Mocavero, S.; Murli, A.; Aloisio, G.

    2012-04-01

    NEMO is an oceanic model used by the climate community for stand-alone or coupled experiments. Its parallel implementation, based on MPI, limits the exploitation of the emerging computational infrastructures at peta and exascale, due to the weight of communications. As case study we considered the MFS configuration developed at INGV with a resolution of 1/16° tailored on the Mediterranenan Basin. The work is focused on the analysis of the code on the MareNostrum cluster and on the optimization of critical routines. The first performance analysis of the model aimed at establishing how much the computational performance are influenced by the GPFS file system or the local disks and wich is the best domain decomposition. The results highlight that the exploitation of local disks can reduce the wall clock time up to 40% and that the best performance is achieved with a 2D decomposition when the local domain has a square shape. A deeper performance analysis highlights the obc_rad, dyn_spg and tra_adv routines are the most time consuming routines. The obc_rad implements the evaluation of the open boundaries and it has been the first routine to be optimized. The communication pattern implemented in obc_rad routine has been redesigned. Before the introduction of the optimizations all processes were involved in the communication, but only the processes on the boundaries have the actual data to be exchanged and only the data on the boundaries must be exchanged. Moreover the data along the vertical levels are "packed" and sent with only one MPI_send invocation. The overall efficiency increases compared with the original version, as well as the parallel speed-up. The execution time was reduced of about 33.81%. The second phase of optimization involved the SOR solver routine, implementing the Red-Black Successive-Over-Relaxation method. The high frequency of exchanging data among processes represent the most part of the overall communication time. The number of communication is

  10. HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM): Global

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Global HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) and U.S. Navy Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation (NCODA) 3-day, daily forecast at approximately 9-km (1/12-degree)...

  11. Effects of Ocean Acidification on Primary Production of Marine Macroalgae

    OpenAIRE

    Sarker, Yusuf

    2010-01-01

    Currently global warming and increase in atmospheric CO2 levels are major concerns for our ecosystems. The ocean acidification, the consequence of rising atmospheric CO2, is occurring in synergy with ocean temperature increase and their cumulative impacts or interactive effects may have very significant consequences for marine life and still are virtually unknown. This will not only change the ecosystem structure but very importantly the basis of the food web, namely the primary production. M...

  12. Ocean U.S. GODAE: Global Ocean Prediction with the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-10-01

    Ocean U.S. GODAE: Global Ocean Prediction with the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) By Eric P. Chassignet1 and Harley E. Hurlburt2 1 COAPS ...UAcademia:U Florida State University/Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies ( COAPS ); University of Miami/Rosenstiel School of Marine and

  13. Climate science: Unexpected fix for ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kathryn A.; Thompson, Luanne

    2016-07-01

    Computational models persistently underestimate strong currents that redistribute ocean heat. This problem is solved in models in which ocean eddies are damped by coupling of the atmosphere with the sea. See Letter p.533

  14. GOCE Data for Ocean Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herceg, Matija

    As the most advanced gravity space mission to date, The Gravity Field and Steady State Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) mapped global variations in the gravity field with remarkable detail and accuracy. Variations are mapped by observing second order derivatives (gradients) of the Earth...... gravitational potential. The results are Earth geopotential models and the geoid. An important use of GOCE is in oceanography, where an improved understanding of Earth’s gravitational field contributes to an improved description of the ocean circulation. The GOCE gradients, having a spatially dense data...... MDT and GOCINA project MDT is made. The results presented here are based on only 18 months of GOCE data, and they show that GOCE data provides better estimation of the MDT and ocean’s geostrophic circulation in GOCINA region than any previously obtained using only satellite observations. However...

  15. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): Samoa

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 7-day, 3-hourly forecast for the region surrounding the islands of Samoa at approximately 3-km resolution. While considerable...

  16. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): CNMI

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 7-day, 3-hourly forecast for the region surrounding the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI) at approximately...

  17. U.S. GODAE: Global Ocean Prediction with the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    assimilation of sea surface height ( SSH ) from satellite altimeters, sea surface temperature (SST) and temperature (T)/salinity (S) profiles and the...and H.-S. Kang (U. Miami). 3DVAR is a planned upgrade to NCODA, which also includes advanced data QC. The primary data types are SSH from satellite...for downward projection of SSH and SST. 3. Ocean model and prediction system configurations: The primary model domain is a fully global HYCOM

  18. Ocean Model Assessment with Lagrangian Metrics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Ocean Model Assessment With Lagrangian Metrics” Pearn P. Niiler Scripps Institution of Oceanography 9500 Gilman Drive MC 0213 La Jolla, CA...project are to aid in the development of accurate modeling of upper ocean circulation by using data on circulation observations to test models . These tests...or metrics, will be statistical measures of model and data comparisons. It is believed that having accurate models of upper ocean currents will

  19. Development of ocean model LSOMG

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachl, Libor; Martinec, Zdenek

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this contribution is to present the ocean general circulation model LSOMG. It originates from the LSG (Maier-Reimer and Mikolajewicz, 1992) ocean model, however, significant number of changes has been made. LSOMG is a z-coordinate baroclinic ocean model which solves the primitive equations under the Boussinesq approximation. We intend to use the model for a various geophysical applications with the focus on paleoclimate studies. Hence, the model is not as complex as the current state-of-art climate models, such as the Modular Ocean Model or NEMO models. On the other hand, it is less computationally demanding. The changes and improvements in the code will be reported. One of the obvious changes is that the governing equations are no more discretized on the Arakawa E grid. The whole model has been rewritten on the Arakawa C grid. The main motivation is to avoid a coexistence of two solutions on the grid that evolve independently of each other. A more natural treatment of boundary conditions and simpler structure of the grid are additional advantages. Another significant change is the treatment of time tendencies. The system of equations is split to barotropic and baroclinic subsystems. Both subsystems may either be discretized at the same time points (as in the original LSG model), or their discretizations may be staggered in time as described in Griffies (2004). The original fully implicit barotropic time stepping scheme was found to significantly dissipate energy. Three different time stepping schemes are available instead. Namely, the predictor-corrector scheme of Griffies (2004), the generalized forward-backward scheme of Shchepetkin and McWilliams (2008) and the implicit free surface scheme of Campin et al. (2004). The first two schemes are intended to be used with the split-explicit model configuration for short-term studies whereas the third scheme is suitable for long-term studies, e.g. paleoclimate studies. The short-term studies may also

  20. Puget Sound ocean acidification model outputs - Modeling the impacts of ocean acidification on ecosystems and populations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NWFSC OA team will model the effects of ocean acidification on regional marine species and ecosystems using food web models, life-cycle models, and bioenvelope...

  1. Analytic model of ocean color

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sathyendranath, Shubha; Platt, Trevor

    1997-04-01

    Ocean color is determined by spectral variations in reflectance at the sea surface. In the analytic model presented here, reflectance at the sea surface is estimated with the quasi-single-scattering approximation that ignores transspectral processes. The analytic solutions we obtained are valid for a vertically homogeneous water column. The solution provides a theoretical expression for the dimensionless, quasi-stable parameter ( r ), with a value of 0.33, that appears in many models in which reflectance at the sea surface is expressed as a function of absorption coefficient ( a ) and backscattering coefficient ( b b ). In the solution this parameter is represented as a function of the mean cosines for downwelling and upwelling irradiances and as the ratio of the upward-scattering coefficient to the backscattering coefficient. Implementation of the model is discussed for two cases: (1) that in which molecular scattering is the main source of upwelling light, and (2) that in which particle scattering is responsible for all the upwelled light. Computations for the two cases are compared with Monte Carlo simulations, which accounts for processes not considered in the analytic model (multiple scattering, and consequent depth-dependent changes in apparent optical properties). The Monte Carlo models show variations in reflectance with the zenith angle of the incident light. The analytic model can be used to reproduce these variations fairly well for the case of molecular scattering. For the particle-scattering case also, the analytic and Monte Carlo models show similar variations in r with zenith angle. However, the analytic model (as implemented here) appears to underestimate r when the value of the backscattering coefficient b b increases relative to the absorption coefficient a . The errors also vary with the zenith angle of the incident light field, with the maximum underestimate being approximately 0.06 (equivalent to relative errors from 12 to 17 ) for the range of

  2. Primary carbonatite melt from deeply subducted oceanic crust

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walter, M.J.; Bulanova, G.P.; Armstrong, L.S.; Keshav, S.; Blundy, J.D.; Gudfinnesson, G.; Lord, O.T.; Lennie, A.R.; Clark, S.M.; Smith, C.B.; Gobbo, L.

    2008-07-01

    Partial melting in the Earth's mantle plays an important part in generating the geochemical and isotopic diversity observed in volcanic rocks at the surface. Identifying the composition of these primary melts in the mantle is crucial for establishing links between mantle geochemical 'reservoirs' and fundamental geodynamic processes. Mineral inclusions in natural diamonds have provided a unique window into such deep mantle processes. Here they provide exper8imental and geochemical evidence that silicate mineral inclusions in diamonds from Juina, Brazil, crystallized from primary and evolved carbonatite melts in the mantle transition zone and deep upper mantle. The incompatible trace element abundances calculated for a melt coexisting with a calcium-titanium-silicate perovskite inclusion indicate deep melting of carbonated oceanic crust, probably at transition-zone depths. Further to perovskite, calcic-majorite garnet inclusions record crystallization in the deep upper mantle from an evolved melt that closely resembles estimates of primitive carbonatite on the basis of volcanic rocks. Small-degree melts of subducted crust can be viewed as agents of chemical mass-transfer in the upper mantle and transition zone, leaving a chemical imprint of ocean crust that can possibly endure for billions of years.

  3. Warm World Ocean Thermohaline Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimov, N.; Zimov, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    Modern day ocean circulation is dominated by thermal convection with cold waters subsiding in the Northern Atlantic, filling the ocean interior with cold and heavy water. However, ocean circulation diminished during the last glaciation and consequently the downwelling of the cold. Therefore interior ocean water temperatures must have been affected by other mechanisms which are negligible in the current state. We propose that the submergence of highly saline water from warm seas with high rates of evaporation (like the Red or Mediterranean Sea) was a major factor controlling ocean circulation during the last glaciation. Even today, waters in these poorly connected seas are the heaviest waters in the World ocean (1.029 g/cm3). The second mechanism affecting ocean temperature is the geothermal heat flux. With no heat exchange between the atmosphere and the ocean, geothermal heat flux through the ocean floor is capable of increasing ocean temperature by tens of degrees C over a 100 thousand year glacial cycle. To support these hypotheses we present an ocean box model that describes thermohaline circulation in the World Ocean. According to the model parameters, all water circulation is driven by the water density gradient. Boxes include high-latitude seas, high salinity seas, surface ocean, glaciers, and rift and lateral zones of the ocean interior. External heat sources are radiative forcing, affected by Milankovich cycles, and geothermal heat flux. Additionally this model accounts for the heat produced by organic rain decay. Taking all input parameters close to currently observed values, the model manages to recreate the glacial-interglacial cycles. During the glacial periods only haline circulation takes place, the ocean is strongly stratified, and the interior ocean accumulates heat while high-latitudes accumulate ice. 112,000 years after glaciation starts, water density on the ocean bottom becomes equal to the density of water in high-latitude seas, strong thermal

  4. Towards petascaling of the NEMO ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donners, J.; Audiffren, N.; Molines, J.-M.

    2012-04-01

    PRACE, the Partnership for Advanced Computing in Europe, offers acces to the largest high-performance computing systems in Europe. These systems follow the trend of increasing numbers of nodes, each with an increasing number of cores. To utilize these computing systems, it is necessary to use a model that is parallellized and has a good scalability. This poster describes different efforts to improve the scalability of the NEMO ocean model. Most importantly, the problem size needs to be chosen adequately: it should contain enough computations to keep thousands of cores busy, but foremostly it has to be scientifically relevant. The global, 1/12degree, NEMO ocean model configuration, developed by the Mercator team, is used for operational ocean forecasting. Therefore, PRACE selected this model for the PRACE Benchmarking suite. However, an increased problem size alone was not enough to efficiently use these petascale systems. Different optimizations were required to reach the necessary performance. Scientifically, the model should simulate one year within a wallclock day. Technically, the application needs to scale up to a minimum number of cores. For example, to utilize the fastest system in Europe, the new Curie system in France, the lower limit is 2048 cores. Scalability can be increased by minimizing the time needed for communication between cores. This has been done in two ways. Firstly, advanced parameters of the MPI-communication library were optimized. The improvement consists in: 1. using RDMA for eager messages (NEMO messages size are below the eager size limit) conjugated with adequate openib flags. 2. tuning for openMPI for collective communication through the btl_coll_tuned_dynamic_rules flag. Overall, the improvement is 33%. Secondly, NEMO uses a tri-polar and staggered grid, which involves a complicated fold across the northpole. Communication along this fold involves collective gather and scatter operations which create a bottleneck at a single core, so

  5. Chlorophyll a and primary production in the northeastern Pacific Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HEN Xingqun; LIN Rongeheng

    2008-01-01

    The primary production and chlorophyll a concentration of picoplankton (0.2~2μm),nanoplankton (2~20 μm) and micro- plankton (20~200 μm) are described in the northeastern Pacific Ocean near the Hawaii Islands during the six survey cruises from 1996 to 2003:DY85-4,DY95-7,DY95-8,DY95-10,DY105-11 and DY105-12.14.The primary production of carbon was in range from 76.8 to 191.9 mg/(m2·d) with an average of 116.1 mg/( m2·d) in the east region,and from 73.1 to 222.5 mg/(m2·d) with an average of 127.1 mg/( m2·d) in the west region,similar to the other oligotrophic regions of the Pacific Ocean investigated.The chlorophyll a concentration was about 0.1 mg/m3 from the surface to the 50 m depth,about 0.2-0.4 mg/m3from 50 to 100 m,and gradually decreased below the 100 m depth.The picoplankton accounted for more than 70% of the total chlorophyll a in the upper layer (surface to 125 m),but it decreased to less than 50% in depth below 125 m.The na- noplankton and microplankton combined only accounted for less than 30% of the total chlorophyll a in the upper layer,but showed a more even vertical distribution.

  6. Ocean City, Maryland Coastal Digital Elevation Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NOAA's National Geophysical Data Center (NGDC) is building high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs) for select U.S. coastal regions. These integrated...

  7. Incorporating Phaeocystis into a Southern Ocean ecosystem model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shanlin; Moore, J. Keith

    2011-01-01

    Phaeocystis antarctica is an important phytoplankton species in the Southern Ocean. We incorporated P. antarctica into the biogeochemical elemental cycling ocean model to study Southern Ocean ecosystem dynamics and biogeochemistry. The optimum values of ecological parameters for Phaeocystis were sought through synthesizing laboratory and field observations, and the model output was evaluated with observed chlorophyll a, carbon biomass, and nutrient distributions. Several factors have been proposed to control Southern Ocean ecosystem structure, including light adaptation, iron uptake capability, and loss processes. Optimum simulation results were obtained when P. antarctica had a relatively high α (P-I curve initial slope) value and a higher half-saturation constant for iron uptake than other phytoplankton. Simulation results suggested that P. antarctica had a competitive advantage under low irradiance levels, especially in the Ross Sea and Weddell Sea. However, the distributions of P. antarctica and diatoms were also strongly influenced by iron availability. Although grazing rates had an influence on total biomass, our simulations did not show a strong influence of grazing pressure in the competition between P. antarctica and diatoms. However, limited observations and the relative simplicity of zooplankton in our model suggest further research is needed. Overall, P. antarctica contributed ˜13% of annual primary production and ˜19% of sinking carbon export in the Southern Ocean (>40°S) in our best case simulation. At higher latitudes (>60°S) P. antarctica accounts for ˜23% of annual primary production and ˜30% of sinking carbon export.

  8. An isopycnic ocean carbon cycle model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Assmann

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The carbon cycle is a major forcing component in the global climate system. Modelling studies, aiming to explain recent and past climatic changes and to project future ones, increasingly include the interaction between the physical and biogeochemical systems. Their ocean components are generally z-coordinate models that are conceptually easy to use but that employ a vertical coordinate that is alien to the real ocean structure. Here, we present first results from a newly-developed isopycnic carbon cycle model and demonstrate the viability of using an isopycnic physical component for this purpose. As expected, the model represents well the interior ocean transport of biogeochemical tracers and produces realistic tracer distributions. Difficulties in employing a purely isopycnic coordinate lie mainly in the treatment of the surface boundary layer which is often represented by a bulk mixed layer. The most significant adjustments of the ocean biogeochemistry model HAMOCC, for use with an isopycnic coordinate, were in the representation of upper ocean biological production. We present a series of sensitivity studies exploring the effect of changes in biogeochemical and physical processes on export production and nutrient distribution. Apart from giving us pointers for further model development, they highlight the importance of preformed nutrient distributions in the Southern Ocean for global nutrient distributions. The sensitivity studies show that iron limitation for biological particle production, the treatment of light penetration for biological production, and the role of diapycnal mixing result in significant changes of nutrient distributions and liniting factors of biological production.

  9. Sea spray geoengineering can reduce ocean net primary productivity and carbon uptake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partanen, Antti-Ilari; Keller, David; Korhonen, Hannele; Matthews, Damon

    2016-04-01

    Sea spray geoengineering or marine cloud brightening is one of the proposed methods to deliberately increase planetary albedo and thus counteract climate change. Previous studies have shown that it has potential to significantly alter the global energy balance and reduce impacts on temperature and precipitation. However, its effects on ecosystems have received considerably less attention. Our goal is to assess the effects of sea spray geoengineering on marine biological productivity and global carbon cycle. We use the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) to simulate the effects of prescribed aerosol forcing from previous simulations with the aerosol-climate model ECHAM-HAMMOZ. In our baseline simulation (GEO), forcing from geoengineering was applied over three persistent stratocumulus regions off the coasts of North America, South America, and South Africa. The global mean forcing was -1 W m-2. Other forcings and emissions were set according to the RCP4.5 scenario. The control run (CTRL) was identical to GEO except that no geoengineering was present. As a more extreme case, we simulated a scenario where forcing from geoengineering was applied over all ocean area (GEO-ALL) giving a global mean forcing of -4.9 W m-2. Geoengineering decreased the global total ocean net primary productivity (NPP) during the first decades, but the effect was insignificant by the end of the 21st century. The decrease was caused by decreased temperature of the ocean and climate system in general, not by the decrease in available sunlight as might have been expected. This was demonstrated by two sensitivity simulations where geoengineering was affecting only either temperature or the light available to marine ecosystems. The simulation GEO-ALL behaves in a different way than GEO: ocean NPP was lower than that in CTRL for the first three decades of geoengineering as in GEO, but then NPP increased over the level in CTRL for the remaining of the simulation. In

  10. An Arctic Ice/Ocean Coupled Model with Wave Interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    ocean waves and sea ice interact, for use in operational models of the Arctic Basin and the adjacent seas; – improve the forecasting capacities of...spectra and modify their directional spread. Being the primary focus of the current project, we are developing innovative methods to model these...during WIFAR (Waves-in-Ice Forecasting for Arctic Operators), a partnership between the Nansen Environmental and Remote Sensing Center (NERSC) in

  11. Influence of consumer-driven nutrient recycling on primary production and the distribution of N and P in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nugraha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the impact of consumer-driven nutrient recycling (CNR on oceanic primary production and the distribution of nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P in the deep ocean. For this purpose, we used and extended two existing models: a 2-box model of N and P cycling in the global ocean (Tyrrell, 1999, and the model of Sterner (1990 which formalised the principles of CNR theory. The resulting model showed that marine herbivores may affect the supply and the stoichiometry of N and P in the ocean, thereby exerting a control on global primary production. The predicted global primary production was higher when herbivores were included in the model, particularly when these herbivores had higher N:P ratios than phytoplankton. This higher primary production was triggered by a low N:P resupply ratio, which, in turn, favoured the P-limited N2-fixation and eventually the N-limited non-fixers. Conversely, phytoplankton with higher N:P ratios increased herbivore yield until phosphorus became the limiting nutrient, thereby favouring herbivores with a low P-requirement. Finally, producer-consumer interactions fed back on the N and P inventories in the deep ocean through differential nutrient recycling. In this model, N deficit or N excess in the deep ocean resulted not only from the balance between N2-fixation and denitrification, but also from CNR, especially when the elemental composition of producers and consumers differed substantially. Although the model is fairly simply, these results emphasize our need for a better understanding of how consumers influence nutrient recycling in the ocean.

  12. Influence of consumer-driven nutrient recycling on primary production and the distribution of N and P in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nugraha

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study we investigated the impact of consumer-driven nutrient recycling (CNR on oceanic primary production and the distribution of nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P in the deep ocean. For this purpose, we used and extended two existing models: a 2-box model of N and P cycling in the global ocean (Tyrrell, 1999, and the model of Sterner (1990 which formalised the principles of CNR theory. The resulting model showed that marine herbivores may affect the supply and the stoichiometry of N and P in the ocean, thereby exerting a control on global primary production. The predicted global primary production was higher when herbivores were included in the model, particularly when these herbivores had higher N:P ratios than phytoplankton. This higher primary production was triggered by a low N:P resupply ratio, which, in turn, favoured the P-limited N2-fixation and eventually the N-limited non-fixers. Conversely, phytoplankton with higher N:P ratios increased herbivore yield until phosphorus became the limiting nutrient, thereby favouring herbivores with a low P-requirement. Finally, producer-consumer interactions fed back on the N and P inventories in the deep ocean through differential nutrient recycling. In this model, N deficit or N excess in the deep ocean resulted not only from the balance between N2-fixation and denitrification, but also from CNR, especially when the elemental composition of producers and consumers differed substantially. Although the model is fairly simple, these results emphasize our need for a better understanding of how consumers influence nutrient recycling in the ocean.

  13. Climate Modeling: Ocean Cavities below Ice Shelves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Mark Roger [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States). Computer, Computational, and Statistical Sciences Division

    2016-09-12

    The Accelerated Climate Model for Energy (ACME), a new initiative by the U.S. Department of Energy, includes unstructured-mesh ocean, land-ice, and sea-ice components using the Model for Prediction Across Scales (MPAS) framework. The ability to run coupled high-resolution global simulations efficiently on large, high-performance computers is a priority for ACME. Sub-ice shelf ocean cavities are a significant new capability in ACME, and will be used to better understand how changing ocean temperature and currents influence glacial melting and retreat. These simulations take advantage of the horizontal variable-resolution mesh and adaptive vertical coordinate in MPAS-Ocean, in order to place high resolution below ice shelves and near grounding lines.

  14. Ocean Prediction with the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-01-01

    Smedstad, George R. Hlalliwpll, Patrick J. Hogan, Alan J. Wallcraft, Rainer Bleck 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 73-7840-04-5 . •PERFORMING...OCEAN MODEL (HYCOM) Eric P. Chassignet’, Harley E. Hurlburt2, Ole Martin Smedstad 3, George R. Halliwell’, Patrick J. Hogan2, Alan J. Wallcraft2, and...Tellus, 19, 98-106. Large, W.G., G. Danabasoglu, S.C. Doney and J.C. McWilliams , 1997: Sensitivity to surface forcing and boundary layer mixing in a global

  15. Moving Towards Dynamic Ocean Management: How Well Do Modeled Ocean Products Predict Species Distributions?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A. Becker

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Species distribution models are now widely used in conservation and management to predict suitable habitat for protected marine species. The primary sources of dynamic habitat data have been in situ and remotely sensed oceanic variables (both are considered “measured data”, but now ocean models can provide historical estimates and forecast predictions of relevant habitat variables such as temperature, salinity, and mixed layer depth. To assess the performance of modeled ocean data in species distribution models, we present a case study for cetaceans that compares models based on output from a data assimilative implementation of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS to those based on measured data. Specifically, we used seven years of cetacean line-transect survey data collected between 1991 and 2009 to develop predictive habitat-based models of cetacean density for 11 species in the California Current Ecosystem. Two different generalized additive models were compared: one built with a full suite of ROMS output and another built with a full suite of measured data. Model performance was assessed using the percentage of explained deviance, root mean squared error (RMSE, observed to predicted density ratios, and visual inspection of predicted and observed distributions. Predicted distribution patterns were similar for models using ROMS output and measured data, and showed good concordance between observed sightings and model predictions. Quantitative measures of predictive ability were also similar between model types, and RMSE values were almost identical. The overall demonstrated success of the ROMS-based models opens new opportunities for dynamic species management and biodiversity monitoring because ROMS output is available in near real time and can be forecast.

  16. Oceanic primary production 2. Estimation at global scale from satellite (coastal zone color scanner) chlorophyll

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antoine, David; André, Jean-Michel; Morel, André

    A fast method has been proposed [Antoine and Morel, this issue] to compute the oceanic primary production from the upper ocean chlorophyll-like pigment concentration, as it can be routinely detected by a spaceborne ocean color sensor. This method is applied here to the monthly global maps of the photosynthetic pigments that were derived from the coastal zone color scanner (CZCS) data archive [Feldman et al., 1989]. The photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) field is computed from the astronomical constant and by using an atmospheric model, thereafter combined with averaged cloud information, derived from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP). The aim is to assess the seasonal evolution, as well as the spatial distribution of the photosynthetic carbon fixation within the world ocean and for a ``climatological year,'' to the extent that both the chlorophyll information and the cloud coverage statistics actually are averages obtained over several years. The computed global annual production actually ranges between 36.5 and 45.6 Gt C yr-1 according to the assumption which is made (0.8 or 1) about the ratio of active-to-total pigments (recall that chlorophyll and pheopigments are not radiometrically resolved by CZCS). The relative contributions to the global productivity of the various oceans and zonal belts are examined. By considering the hypotheses needed in such computations, the nature of the data used as inputs, and the results of the sensitivity studies, the global numbers have to be cautiously considered. Improving the reliability of the primary production estimates implies (1) new global data sets allowing a higher temporal resolution and a better coverage, (2) progress in the knowledge of physiological responses of phytoplankton and therefore refinements of the time and space dependent parameterizations of these responses.

  17. Mixing parameterizations in ocean climate modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshonkin, S. N.; Gusev, A. V.; Zalesny, V. B.; Byshev, V. I.

    2016-03-01

    Results of numerical experiments with an eddy-permitting ocean circulation model on the simulation of the climatic variability of the North Atlantic and the Arctic Ocean are analyzed. We compare the ocean simulation quality with using different subgrid mixing parameterizations. The circulation model is found to be sensitive to a mixing parametrization. The computation of viscosity and diffusivity coefficients by an original splitting algorithm of the evolution equations for turbulence characteristics is found to be as efficient as traditional Monin-Obukhov parameterizations. At the same time, however, the variability of ocean climate characteristics is simulated more adequately. The simulation of salinity fields in the entire study region improves most significantly. Turbulent processes have a large effect on the circulation in the long-term through changes in the density fields. The velocity fields in the Gulf Stream and in the entire North Atlantic Subpolar Cyclonic Gyre are reproduced more realistically. The surface level height in the Arctic Basin is simulated more faithfully, marking the Beaufort Gyre better. The use of the Prandtl number as a function of the Richardson number improves the quality of ocean modeling.

  18. Ocean City, Maryland Tsunami Forecast Grids for MOST Model

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Ocean City, Maryland Forecast Model Grids provides bathymetric data strictly for tsunami inundation modeling with the Method of Splitting Tsunami (MOST) model....

  19. Biogeochemical versus ecological consequences of modeled ocean physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Sophie; Dutkiewicz, Stephanie; Jahn, Oliver; Hill, Christopher; Heimbach, Patrick; Follows, Michael J.

    2017-06-01

    We present a systematic study of the differences generated by coupling the same ecological-biogeochemical model to a 1°, coarse-resolution, and 1/6°, eddy-permitting, global ocean circulation model to (a) biogeochemistry (e.g., primary production) and (b) phytoplankton community structure. Surprisingly, we find that the modeled phytoplankton community is largely unchanged, with the same phenotypes dominating in both cases. Conversely, there are large regional and seasonal variations in primary production, phytoplankton and zooplankton biomass. In the subtropics, mixed layer depths (MLDs) are, on average, deeper in the eddy-permitting model, resulting in higher nutrient supply driving increases in primary production and phytoplankton biomass. In the higher latitudes, differences in winter mixed layer depths, the timing of the onset of the spring bloom and vertical nutrient supply result in lower primary production in the eddy-permitting model. Counterintuitively, this does not drive a decrease in phytoplankton biomass but results in lower zooplankton biomass. We explain these similarities and differences in the model using the framework of resource competition theory, and find that they are the consequence of changes in the regional and seasonal nutrient supply and light environment, mediated by differences in the modeled mixed layer depths. Although previous work has suggested that complex models may respond chaotically and unpredictably to changes in forcing, we find that our model responds in a predictable way to different ocean circulation forcing, despite its complexity. The use of frameworks, such as resource competition theory, provides a tractable way to explore the differences and similarities that occur. As this model has many similarities to other widely used biogeochemical models that also resolve multiple phytoplankton phenotypes, this study provides important insights into how the results of running these models under different physical conditions

  20. Modeling Water Clarity and Light Quality in Oceans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. Abdelrhman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Phytoplankton is a primary producer of organic compounds, and it forms the base of the food chain in ocean waters. The concentration of phytoplankton in the water column controls water clarity and the amount and quality of light that penetrates through it. The availability of adequate light intensity is a major factor in the health of algae and phytoplankton. There is a strong negative coupling between light intensity and phytoplankton concentration (e.g., through self-shading by the cells, which reduces available light and in return affects the growth rate of the cells. Proper modeling of this coupling is essential to understand primary productivity in the oceans. This paper provides the methodology to model light intensity in the water column, which can be included in relevant water quality models. The methodology implements relationships from bio-optical models, which use phytoplankton chlorophyll a (chl-a concentration as a surrogate for light attenuation, including absorption and scattering by other attenuators. The presented mathematical methodology estimates the reduction in light intensity due to absorption by pure seawater, chl-a pigment, non-algae particles (NAPs and colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM, as well as backscattering by pure seawater, phytoplankton particles and NAPs. The methods presented facilitate the prediction of the effects of various environmental and management scenarios (e.g., global warming, altered precipitation patterns, greenhouse gases on the wellbeing of phytoplankton communities in the oceans as temperature-driven chl-a changes take place.

  1. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Geider, R. [Delaware Univ., Lewes, DE (United States). Coll. of Marine Studies

    1992-07-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies.

  2. Molecular biology in studies of oceanic primary production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LaRoche, J.; Falkowski, P.G. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)); Geider, R. (Delaware Univ., Lewes, DE (United States). Coll. of Marine Studies)

    1992-01-01

    Remote sensing and the use of moored in situ instrumentation has greatly improved our ability to measure phytoplankton chlorophyll and photosynthesis on global scales with high temporal resolution. However, the interpretation of these measurements and their significance with respect to the biogeochemical cycling of carbon relies on their relationship with physiological and biochemical processes in phytoplankton. For example, the use of satellite images of surface chlorophyll to estimate primary production is often based on the functional relationship between photosynthesis and irradiance. A variety of environmental factors such as light, temperature, nutrient availability affect the photosynthesis/irradiance (P vs I) relationship in phytoplankton. We present three examples showing how molecular biology can be used to provide basic insight into the factors controlling primary productivity at three different levels of complexity: 1. Studies of light intensity regulation in unicellular alga show how molecular biology can help understand the processing of environmental cues leading to the regulation of photosynthetic gene expression. 2. Probing of the photosynthetic apparatus using molecular techniques can be used to test existing mechanistic models derived from the interpretation of physiological and biophysical measurements. 3. Exploratory work on the expression of specific proteins during nutrient-limited growth of phytoplankton may lead to the identification and production of molecular probes for field studies.

  3. Modeling the Middle Jurassic ocean circulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maura Brunetti

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available We present coupled ocean–sea-ice simulations of the Middle Jurassic (∼165 Ma when Laurasia and Gondwana began drifting apart and gave rise to the formation of the Atlantic Ocean. Since the opening of the Proto-Caribbean is not well constrained by geological records, configurations with and without an open connection between the Proto-Caribbean and Panthalassa are examined. We use a sea-floor bathymetry obtained by a recently developed three-dimensional (3D elevation model which compiles geological, palaeogeographical and geophysical data. Our original approach consists in coupling this elevation model, which is based on detailed reconstructions of oceanic realms, with a dynamical ocean circulation model. We find that the Middle Jurassic bathymetry of the Central Atlantic and Proto-Caribbean seaway only allows for a weak current of the order of 2 Sv in the upper 1000 m even if the system is open to the west. The effect of closing the western boundary of the Proto-Caribbean is to increase the transport related to barotropic gyres in the southern hemisphere and to change water properties, such as salinity, in the Neo-Tethys. Weak upwelling rates are found in the nascent Atlantic Ocean in the presence of this superficial current and we discuss their compatibility with deep-sea sedimentological records in this region.

  4. Fueling primary productivity: nutrient return pathways from the deep ocean and their dependence on the Meridional Overturning Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palter, J. B.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Gnanadesikan, A.; Simeon, J.; Slater, D.

    2010-06-01

    In the Southern Ocean, mixing and upwelling in the presence of heat and freshwater surface fluxes transform subpycnocline water to lighter densities as part of the upward branch of the Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC). One hypothesized impact of this transformation is the restoration of nutrients to the global pycnocline, without which biological productivity at low latitudes would be catastrophically reduced. Here we use a novel set of modeling experiments to explore the causes and consequences of the Southern Ocean nutrient return pathway. Specifically, we quantify the contribution to global productivity of nutrients that rise from the ocean interior in the Southern Ocean, the northern high latitudes, and by mixing across the low latitude pycnocline. In addition, we evaluate how the strength of the Southern Ocean winds and the parameterizations of subgridscale processes change the dominant nutrient return pathways in the ocean. Our results suggest that nutrients upwelled from the deep ocean in the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and subducted in Subantartic Mode Water support between 33 and 75% of global primary productivity between 30° S and 30° N. The high end of this range results from an ocean model in which the MOC is driven primarily by wind-induced Southern Ocean upwelling, a configuration favored due to its fidelity to tracer data, while the low end results from an MOC driven by high diapycnal diffusivity in the pycnocline. In all models, the high preformed nutrients subducted in the SAMW layer are converted rapidly (in less than 40 years) to remineralized nutrients, explaining previous modeling results that showed little influence of the drawdown of SAMW surface nutrients on atmospheric carbon concentrations.

  5. Achieving Value in Primary Care: The Primary Care Value Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rollow, William; Cucchiara, Peter

    2016-03-01

    The patient-centered medical home (PCMH) model provides a compelling vision for primary care transformation, but studies of its impact have used insufficiently patient-centered metrics with inconsistent results. We propose a framework for defining patient-centered value and a new model for value-based primary care transformation: the primary care value model (PCVM). We advocate for use of patient-centered value when measuring the impact of primary care transformation, recognition, and performance-based payment; for financial support and research and development to better define primary care value-creating activities and their implementation; and for use of the model to support primary care organizations in transformation.

  6. Modeling the distribution of Nd isotopes in the oceans using an offline Ocean General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K. M.; Khatiwala, S. P.; Goldstein, S. L.; Hemming, S. R.; van de Flierdt, T.

    2007-12-01

    The authigenic (seawater-derived) Nd isotopic composition of marine archives is increasingly used to study changes in ocean circulation on tectonic to millennial time-scales. Such applications for Nd isotopes assume that water masses are "tagged" with distinct Nd isotopic compositions in source regions and mix quasi- conservatively thereafter. However, there are a number of possible sources and sinks of Nd within the ocean that may complicate quasi-conservative behavior, including input from rivers, dissolution of dust, exchange at continental margin boundaries, and fluxes from the ocean-sediment interface. We use an offline ocean general circulation model (OGCM) to model the distribution of Nd isotope variability in seawater. A major obstacle to a thorough understanding of the marine Nd cycle is the lack of a truly global dataset of Nd isotopes in the modern oceans--most data are focused in only a few regions of the ocean. However, even within the constraints of sparse data, a better understanding of sources, sinks, and internal cycling of Nd and its isotopes can be reached through ocean modeling. We take a simple approach, treating the Nd isotopic composition of seawater as a conservative tracer, neglecting the effect of variable Nd concentrations on mixing. Nd isotope data from modern surface waters are used to generate a map of Nd isotope compositions for the entire surface ocean. This map is treated as a fixed boundary condition, and Nd isotope compositions of the surface are transported and mixed according to the flow characteristics of the OGCM until the interior ocean reaches a steady state. This simple approach produces Nd isotope estimates for North Atlantic Deep Water that are consistent with the observations, but produces values lower than observed in the deep Pacific and Southern Oceans. However, by introducing an additional source of Nd in the deep Pacific with higher Nd isotope ratios, the model output agrees well with the data. With the addition of

  7. A Review of Ocean Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-23

    eddyFU4CIO field onda 2-3 A rigid surface, no flow or heat flux through the bottom boundary, quadratic bottom stress (Tb- [ u2 + v2 ] ), free-slip on...MODELYAAD 1(MODELZLTIKVII MD FIGURE ~ ~ ~ ~~~TEMERTR 4-9 epeaueprflsfo he mdl n 4-6 so4 MID-AAA,00I INERTIAL OSCILLATION AMPLITUDE rucmhacl INERTIAL...OSCILLATION AMPLITUDE iuc I 44 1 2 16 2 12 16 20 S20, - 20’ 1 ~30. 30 j 40 40 50 [(a) MUNKANERSON MODEL Wb VAGER.ZILITINKEVICH MOEL INERTIAL OSCILLATION

  8. Natural Ocean Carbon Cycle Sensitivity to Parameterizations of the Recycling in a Climate Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanou, A.; Romanski, J.; Gregg, W. W.

    2014-01-01

    Sensitivities of the oceanic biological pump within the GISS (Goddard Institute for Space Studies ) climate modeling system are explored here. Results are presented from twin control simulations of the air-sea CO2 gas exchange using two different ocean models coupled to the same atmosphere. The two ocean models (Russell ocean model and Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, HYCOM) use different vertical coordinate systems, and therefore different representations of column physics. Both variants of the GISS climate model are coupled to the same ocean biogeochemistry module (the NASA Ocean Biogeochemistry Model, NOBM), which computes prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2 and the deep ocean carbon transport and storage. In particular, the model differences due to remineralization rate changes are compared to differences attributed to physical processes modeled differently in the two ocean models such as ventilation, mixing, eddy stirring and vertical advection. GISSEH(GISSER) is found to underestimate mixed layer depth compared to observations by about 55% (10 %) in the Southern Ocean and overestimate it by about 17% (underestimate by 2%) in the northern high latitudes. Everywhere else in the global ocean, the two models underestimate the surface mixing by about 12-34 %, which prevents deep nutrients from reaching the surface and promoting primary production there. Consequently, carbon export is reduced because of reduced production at the surface. Furthermore, carbon export is particularly sensitive to remineralization rate changes in the frontal regions of the subtropical gyres and at the Equator and this sensitivity in the model is much higher than the sensitivity to physical processes such as vertical mixing, vertical advection and mesoscale eddy transport. At depth, GISSER, which has a significant warm bias, remineralizes nutrients and carbon faster thereby producing more nutrients and carbon at depth, which

  9. Effects of sea ice cover on satellite-detected primary production in the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahru, Mati; Lee, Zhongping; Mitchell, B Greg; Nevison, Cynthia D

    2016-11-01

    The influence of decreasing Arctic sea ice on net primary production (NPP) in the Arctic Ocean has been considered in multiple publications but is not well constrained owing to the potentially large errors in satellite algorithms. In particular, the Arctic Ocean is rich in coloured dissolved organic matter (CDOM) that interferes in the detection of chlorophyll a concentration of the standard algorithm, which is the primary input to NPP models. We used the quasi-analytic algorithm (Lee et al 2002 Appl. Opti. 41, 5755-5772. (doi:10.1364/AO.41.005755)) that separates absorption by phytoplankton from absorption by CDOM and detrital matter. We merged satellite data from multiple satellite sensors and created a 19 year time series (1997-2015) of NPP. During this period, both the estimated annual total and the summer monthly maximum pan-Arctic NPP increased by about 47%. Positive monthly anomalies in NPP are highly correlated with positive anomalies in open water area during the summer months. Following the earlier ice retreat, the start of the high-productivity season has become earlier, e.g. at a mean rate of -3.0 d yr(-1) in the northern Barents Sea, and the length of the high-productivity period has increased from 15 days in 1998 to 62 days in 2015. While in some areas, the termination of the productive season has been extended, owing to delayed ice formation, the termination has also become earlier in other areas, likely owing to limited nutrients.

  10. Predicting interactions among fishing, ocean warming, and ocean acidification in a marine system with whole-ecosystem models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, Gary P; Fulton, Elizabeth A; Gorton, Rebecca; Richardson, Anthony J

    2012-12-01

    An important challenge for conservation is a quantitative understanding of how multiple human stressors will interact to mitigate or exacerbate global environmental change at a community or ecosystem level. We explored the interaction effects of fishing, ocean warming, and ocean acidification over time on 60 functional groups of species in the southeastern Australian marine ecosystem. We tracked changes in relative biomass within a coupled dynamic whole-ecosystem modeling framework that included the biophysical system, human effects, socioeconomics, and management evaluation. We estimated the individual, additive, and interactive effects on the ecosystem and for five community groups (top predators, fishes, benthic invertebrates, plankton, and primary producers). We calculated the size and direction of interaction effects with an additive null model and interpreted results as synergistic (amplified stress), additive (no additional stress), or antagonistic (reduced stress). Individually, only ocean acidification had a negative effect on total biomass. Fishing and ocean warming and ocean warming with ocean acidification had an additive effect on biomass. Adding fishing to ocean warming and ocean acidification significantly changed the direction and magnitude of the interaction effect to a synergistic response on biomass. The interaction effect depended on the response level examined (ecosystem vs. community). For communities, the size, direction, and type of interaction effect varied depending on the combination of stressors. Top predator and fish biomass had a synergistic response to the interaction of all three stressors, whereas biomass of benthic invertebrates responded antagonistically. With our approach, we were able to identify the regional effects of fishing on the size and direction of the interacting effects of ocean warming and ocean acidification. ©2012 Society for Conservation Biology.

  11. Mixing parametrizations for ocean climate modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusev, Anatoly; Moshonkin, Sergey; Diansky, Nikolay; Zalesny, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    The algorithm is presented of splitting the total evolutionary equations for the turbulence kinetic energy (TKE) and turbulence dissipation frequency (TDF), which is used to parameterize the viscosity and diffusion coefficients in ocean circulation models. The turbulence model equations are split into the stages of transport-diffusion and generation-dissipation. For the generation-dissipation stage, the following schemes are implemented: the explicit-implicit numerical scheme, analytical solution and the asymptotic behavior of the analytical solutions. The experiments were performed with different mixing parameterizations for the modelling of Arctic and the Atlantic climate decadal variability with the eddy-permitting circulation model INMOM (Institute of Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model) using vertical grid refinement in the zone of fully developed turbulence. The proposed model with the split equations for turbulence characteristics is similar to the contemporary differential turbulence models, concerning the physical formulations. At the same time, its algorithm has high enough computational efficiency. Parameterizations with using the split turbulence model make it possible to obtain more adequate structure of temperature and salinity at decadal timescales, compared to the simpler Pacanowski-Philander (PP) turbulence parameterization. Parameterizations with using analytical solution or numerical scheme at the generation-dissipation step of the turbulence model leads to better representation of ocean climate than the faster parameterization using the asymptotic behavior of the analytical solution. At the same time, the computational efficiency left almost unchanged relative to the simple PP parameterization. Usage of PP parametrization in the circulation model leads to realistic simulation of density and circulation with violation of T,S-relationships. This error is majorly avoided with using the proposed parameterizations containing the split turbulence model

  12. Evaluating the ocean biogeochemical components of earth system models using atmospheric potential oxygen (APO and ocean color data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Nevison

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The observed seasonal cycles in atmospheric potential oxygen (APO at a range of mid to high latitude surface monitoring sites are compared to those inferred from the output of 6 Earth System Models participating in the fifth phase of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project (CMIP5. The simulated air–sea O2 fluxes are translated into APO seasonal cycles using a matrix method that takes into account atmospheric transport model (ATM uncertainty among 13 different ATMs. Half of the ocean biogeochemistry models tested are able to reproduce the observed APO cycles at most sites, to within the current large ATM uncertainty, while the other half generally are not. Net Primary Production (NPP and net community production (NCP, as estimated from satellite ocean color data, provide additional constraints, albeit more with respect to the seasonal phasing of ocean model productivity than the overall magnitude. The present analysis suggests that, of the tested ocean biogeochemistry models, CESM and GFDL ESM2M are best able to capture the observed APO seasonal cycle at both Northern and Southern Hemisphere sites. In the northern oceans, the comparison to observed APO suggests that most models tend to underestimate NPP or deep ventilation or both.

  13. The CAFE model: A net production model for global ocean phytoplankton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silsbe, Greg M.; Behrenfeld, Michael J.; Halsey, Kimberly H.; Milligan, Allen J.; Westberry, Toby K.

    2016-12-01

    The Carbon, Absorption, and Fluorescence Euphotic-resolving (CAFE) net primary production model is an adaptable framework for advancing global ocean productivity assessments by exploiting state-of-the-art satellite ocean color analyses and addressing key physiological and ecological attributes of phytoplankton. Here we present the first implementation of the CAFE model that incorporates inherent optical properties derived from ocean color measurements into a mechanistic and accurate model of phytoplankton growth rates (μ) and net phytoplankton production (NPP). The CAFE model calculates NPP as the product of energy absorption (QPAR), and the efficiency (ϕμ) by which absorbed energy is converted into carbon biomass (CPhyto), while μ is calculated as NPP normalized to CPhyto. The CAFE model performance is evaluated alongside 21 other NPP models against a spatially robust and globally representative set of direct NPP measurements. This analysis demonstrates that the CAFE model explains the greatest amount of variance and has the lowest model bias relative to other NPP models analyzed with this data set. Global oceanic NPP from the CAFE model (52 Pg C m-2 yr-1) and mean division rates (0.34 day-1) are derived from climatological satellite data (2002-2014). This manuscript discusses and validates individual CAFE model parameters (e.g., QPAR and ϕμ), provides detailed sensitivity analyses, and compares the CAFE model results and parameterization to other widely cited models.

  14. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): CNMI: Data Assimilating

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 3-day, 3-hourly data assimilating hindcast for the region surrounding the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands (CNMI)...

  15. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): Oahu South Shore

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 2-day, 3-hourly forecast for the region surrounding the south shore of the island of Oahu at approximately 200-m resolution....

  16. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): Main Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 7-day, 3-hourly forecast for the region surrounding the main Hawaiian islands at approximately 4-km resolution. While...

  17. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): Samoa: Data Assimilating

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 3-day, 3-hourly data assimilating hindcast for the region surrounding the islands of Samoa at approximately 3-km resolution....

  18. Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS): Main Hawaiian Islands: Data Assimilating

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) 3-day, 3-hourly data assimilating hindcast for the region surrounding the main Hawaiian islands at approximately 4-km...

  19. Forcings of nutrient, oxygen, and primary production interannual variability in the southeast Atlantic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachèlery, M.-L.; Illig, S.; Dadou, I.

    2016-08-01

    The recurrent occurrences of interannual warm and cold events along the coast of Africa have been intensively studied because of their striking effects on climate and fisheries. Using sensitivity experimentation based on a coupled physical/biogeochemical model, we show that the oceanic remote equatorial forcing explains more than 85% of coastal interannual nitrate and oxygen fluctuations along the Angolan and Namibian coasts up to the Benguela Upwelling System (BUS). These events, associated with poleward propagations of upwelling and downwelling Coastal Trapped Waves (CTW), are maximum in subsurface and controlled by physical advection processes. Surprisingly, an abrupt change in the CTW biogeochemical signature is observed in the BUS, associated with mixed vertical gradients due to the strong local upwelling dynamics. Coastal modifications of biogeochemical features result in significant primary production variations that may affect fisheries habitats and coastal biodiversity along the southwestern African coasts and in the BUS.

  20. Nitrogenous nutrients and primary production in a tropical oceanic environment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Wafar, M.V.M.; Wafar, S.; Devassy, V.P.

    .59 mu g-at N (mg dry wt)-1d-1 Assimilation of this quantity of NH4 would account for 9-50%(average 23%) of the measured primary production Stimulation of carbon fixation on addition of urea was, on an average, as much as with either NO3 or NH4 addition...

  1. Primary carbonatite melt from deeply subducted oceanic crust

    OpenAIRE

    Walter, Michael J.; Bulanova, Galina; Armstrong, Lora S; Keshav, S; Blundy, Jon D; Gudfinnsson, G; Lord, Oliver T.; Lennie, A; Clark, SM; Smith, C; Gobbo, L

    2008-01-01

    Partial melting in the Earth’s mantle plays an important part in generating the geochemical and isotopic diversity observed in volcanic rocks at the surface. Identifying the composition of these primary melts in the mantle is crucial for establishing links between mantle geochemical ‘reservoirs’ and fundamental geodynamic processes. Mineral inclusions in natural diamonds have provided a unique window into such deep mantle processes. Here we provide experimental and geochemical evidence that s...

  2. Temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production in the European Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holding, J. M.; Duarte, C. M.; Sanz-Martín, M.; Mesa, E.; Arrieta, J. M.; Chierici, M.; Hendriks, I. E.; García-Corral, L. S.; Regaudie-de-Gioux, A.; Delgado, A.; Reigstad, M.; Wassmann, P.; Agustí, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Arctic Ocean is warming at two to three times the global rate and is perceived to be a bellwether for ocean acidification. Increased CO2 concentrations are expected to have a fertilization effect on marine autotrophs, and higher temperatures should lead to increased rates of planktonic primary production. Yet, simultaneous assessment of warming and increased CO2 on primary production in the Arctic has not been conducted. Here we test the expectation that CO2-enhanced gross primary production (GPP) may be temperature dependent, using data from several oceanographic cruises and experiments from both spring and summer in the European sector of the Arctic Ocean. Results confirm that CO2 enhances GPP (by a factor of up to ten) over a range of 145-2,099 μatm however, the greatest effects are observed only at lower temperatures and are constrained by nutrient and light availability to the spring period. The temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production has significant implications for metabolic balance in a warmer, CO2-enriched Arctic Ocean in the future. In particular, it indicates that a twofold increase in primary production during the spring is likely in the Arctic.

  3. Temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production in the European Arctic Ocean

    KAUST Repository

    Holding, J. M.

    2015-08-31

    The Arctic Ocean is warming at two to three times the global rate1 and is perceived to be a bellwether for ocean acidification2, 3. Increased CO2 concentrations are expected to have a fertilization effect on marine autotrophs4, and higher temperatures should lead to increased rates of planktonic primary production5. Yet, simultaneous assessment of warming and increased CO2 on primary production in the Arctic has not been conducted. Here we test the expectation that CO2-enhanced gross primary production (GPP) may be temperature dependent, using data from several oceanographic cruises and experiments from both spring and summer in the European sector of the Arctic Ocean. Results confirm that CO2 enhances GPP (by a factor of up to ten) over a range of 145–2,099 μatm; however, the greatest effects are observed only at lower temperatures and are constrained by nutrient and light availability to the spring period. The temperature dependence of CO2-enhanced primary production has significant implications for metabolic balance in a warmer, CO2-enriched Arctic Ocean in the future. In particular, it indicates that a twofold increase in primary production during the spring is likely in the Arctic.

  4. Synthesis of integrated primary production in the Arctic Ocean: II. In situ and remotely sensed estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Victoria J.; Matrai, Patricia A.; Olson, Elise; Suttles, S.; Steele, Mike; Codispoti, L. A.; Zimmerman, Richard C.

    2013-03-01

    Recent warming of surface waters, accompanied by reduced ice thickness and extent may have significant consequences for climate-driven changes of primary production (PP) in the Arctic Ocean (AO). However, it has been difficult to obtain a robust benchmark estimate of pan-Arctic PP necessary for evaluating change. This paper provides an estimate of pan-Arctic PP prior to significant warming from a synthetic analysis of the ARCSS-PP database of in situ measurements collected from 1954 to 2007 and estimates derived from satellite-based observations from 1998 to 2007. Vertical profiles of in situ chlorophyll a (Chl a) and PP revealed persistent subsurface peaks in biomass and PP throughout the AO during most of the summer period. This was contradictory with the commonly assumed exponential decrease in PP with depth on which prior satellite-derived estimates were based. As remotely sensed Chl a was not a good predictor of integrated water column Chl a, accurate satellite-based modeling of vertically integrated primary production (IPPsat), requires knowledge of the subsurface distribution of phytoplankton, coincident with the remotely sensed ocean color measurements. We developed an alternative approach to modeling PP from satellite observations by incorporating climatological information on the depths of the euphotic zone and the mixed layer that control the distribution of phytoplankton that significantly improved the fidelity of satellite derived PP to in situ observations. The annual IPP of the Arctic Ocean combining both in situ and satellite based estimates was calculated here to be a minimum of 466 ± 94 Tg C yr-1 and a maximum of 993 ± 94 Tg C yr-1, when corrected for subsurface production. Inflow shelf seas account for 75% of annual IPP, while the central basin and Beaufort northern sea were the regions with the lowest annual integrated productivity, due to persistently stratified, oligotrophic and ice-covered conditions. Although the expansion of summertime

  5. Wintertime Arctic Ocean sea water properties and primary marine aerosol concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zábori

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Sea spray aerosols are an important part of the climate system through their direct and indirect effects. Due to the diminishing sea ice, the Arctic Ocean is one of the most rapidly changing sea spray aerosol source areas. However, the influence of these changes on primary particle production is not known.

    In laboratory experiments we examined the influence of Arctic Ocean water temperature, salinity, and oxygen saturation on primary particle concentration characteristics. Sea water temperature was identified as the most important of these parameters. A strong decrease in sea spray aerosol production with increasing water temperature was observed for water temperatures between −1°C and 9°C. Aerosol number concentrations decreased from at least 1400 cm−3 to 350 cm−3. In general, the aerosol number size distribution exhibited a robust shape with one mode close to dry diameter Dp 0.2 μm with approximately 45% of particles at smaller sizes. Changes in sea water temperature did not result in pronounced change of the shape of the aerosol size distribution, only in the magnitude of the concentrations. Our experiments indicate that changes in aerosol emissions are most likely linked to changes of the physical properties of sea water at low temperatures. The observed strong dependence of sea spray aerosol concentrations on sea water temperature, with a large fraction of the emitted particles in the typical cloud condensation nuclei size range, provide strong arguments for a more careful consideration of this effect in climate models.

  6. Wintertime Arctic Ocean sea water properties and primary marine aerosol concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zábori

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Sea spray aerosols are an important part of the climate system through their direct and indirect effects. Due to the diminishing sea ice, the Arctic Ocean is one of the most rapidly changing sea spray aerosol source areas. However, the influence of these changes on primary particle production is not known.

    In laboratory experiments we examined the influence of Arctic Ocean water temperature, salinity and oxygen saturation on primary particle concentration characteristics. Sea water temperature was identified as the most important of these parameters. A strong decrease in sea spray aerosol production with increasing water temperature was observed for water temperatures between −1 °C and 9 °C. Aerosol number concentrations decreased from at least 1400 cm−3 to 350 cm−3. In general, the aerosol number size distribution exhibited a robust shape with one mode close to Dp 0.2 μm with approximately 45% of particles at smaller sizes. Changes in sea water temperature did not result in pronounced change of the shape of the aerosol size distribution, only in the magnitude of the concentrations. Our experiments indicate that changes in aerosol emissions are most likely linked to changes of the physical properties of sea water at low temperatures. The observed strong dependence of sea spray aerosol concentrations on sea water temperature, with a large fraction of the emitted particles in the typical cloud condensation nuclei size range, provide strong arguments for a more careful consideration of this effect in climate models.

  7. Impact of Targeted Ocean Observations for Improving Ocean Model Initialization for Coupled Hurricane Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, G. R.; Srinivasan, A.; Kourafalou, V. H.; Yang, H.; Le Henaff, M.; Atlas, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    The accuracy of hurricane intensity forecasts produced by coupled forecast models is influenced by errors and biases in SST forecasts produced by the ocean model component and the resulting impact on the enthalpy flux from ocean to atmosphere that powers the storm. Errors and biases in fields used to initialize the ocean model seriously degrade SST forecast accuracy. One strategy for improving ocean model initialization is to design a targeted observing program using airplanes and in-situ devices such as floats and drifters so that assimilation of the additional data substantially reduces errors in the ocean analysis system that provides the initial fields. Given the complexity and expense of obtaining these additional observations, observing system design methods such as OSSEs are attractive for designing efficient observing strategies. A new fraternal-twin ocean OSSE system based on the HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM) is used to assess the impact of targeted ocean profiles observed by hurricane research aircraft, and also by in-situ float and drifter deployments, on reducing errors in initial ocean fields. A 0.04-degree HYCOM simulation of the Gulf of Mexico is evaluated as the nature run by determining that important ocean circulation features such as the Loop Current and synoptic cyclones and anticyclones are realistically simulated. The data-assimilation system is run on a 0.08-degree HYCOM mesh with substantially different model configuration than the nature run, and it uses a new ENsemble Kalman Filter (ENKF) algorithm optimized for the ocean model's hybrid vertical coordinates. The OSSE system is evaluated and calibrated by first running Observing System Experiments (OSEs) to evaluate existing observing systems, specifically quantifying the impact of assimilating more than one satellite altimeter, and also the impact of assimilating targeted ocean profiles taken by the NOAA WP-3D hurricane research aircraft in the Gulf of Mexico during the Deepwater

  8. Improvement in Geoid Models for Ocean Circulation Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tapley, Byron D.; Chambers, Don P.; Poole, Steve; Ries, John c.

    2003-01-01

    At wavelengths of 500 km and longer, the GRACE GGM01 Model produces a significantly better marine geoid than any previous model. This conclusion follows from evaluating the geostrophic currents determined by combining the model with a mean sea surface from altimetry. The agreement with currents computed from a traditional hydrographic map is very close, which suggests that one of the primary missions of the TOPEX/POSEIDON mission, to determine the absolute dynamic ocean topography, may soon be met. This solution has been made available to the public at http://www.csr.utexs.edu/grace/gravity. The results reported in this paper have been presented at the 2003 EGS-AGU-EUG Joint Assembly. Two articles are currently being prepared for Geophysical Research Letters to summarize these results.

  9. Ocean circulation modeling by use of radar altimeter data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olbers, Dirk; Alpers, W.; Hasselmann, K.; Maier-Reimer, E.; Kase, R.; Krauss, W.; Siedler, G.; Willebrand, J.; Zahel, W.

    1991-01-01

    The project will investigate the use of radar altimetry (RA) data in the determination of the ocean circulation models. RA data will be used to verify prognostic experiments of the steady state and seasonal cycle of large-scale circulation models and the statistical steady state of eddy-resolving models. The data will serve as initial and update conditions in data assimilation experiments and as constraints in inverse calculations. The aim of the project is a better understanding of ocean physics, the determination and mapping of ocean currents, and a contribution to the establishment of ocean circulation models for climate studies. The goal of the project is to use satellite radar altimetry data for improving our knowledge of ocean circulation both in a descriptive sense and through the physics that govern the circulation state. The basic tool is a series of ocean circulation models. Depending on the model, different techniques will be applied to incorporate the RA data.

  10. Insolation cycles as a major control of equatorial indian ocean primary production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaufort; Lancelot; Camberlin; Cayre; Vincent; Bassinot; Labeyrie

    1997-11-21

    Analysis of a continuous sedimentary record taken in the Maldives indicates that strong primary production fluctuations (70 to 390 grams of carbon per square meter per year) have occurred in the equatorial Indian Ocean during the past 910,000 years. The record of primary production is coherent and in phase with the February equatorial insolation, whereas it shows diverse phase behavior with delta18O, depending on the orbital frequency (eccentricity, obliquity, or precession) examined. These observations imply a direct control of productivity in the equatorial oceanic system by insolation. In the equatorial Indian Ocean, productivity is driven by the wind intensity of westerlies, which is related to the Southern Oscillation; therefore, it is suggested that a precession forcing on the Southern Oscillation is responsible for the observed paleoproductivity dynamics.

  11. Model Testing - Bringing the Ocean into the Laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aage, Christian

    2000-01-01

    Hydrodynamic model testing, the principle of bringing the ocean into the laboratory to study the behaviour of the ocean itself and the response of man-made structures in the ocean in reduced scale, has been known for centuries. Due to an insufficient understanding of the physics involved, however......, the early model tests often gave incomplete or directly misleading results.This keynote lecture deals with some of the possibilities and problems within the field of hydrodynamic and hydraulic model testing....

  12. A skill assessment of the biogeochemical model REcoM2 coupled to the finite element sea-ice ocean model (FESOM 1.3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schourup-Kristensen, V.; Sidorenko, D.; Wolf-Gladrow, D. A.; Völker, C.

    2014-07-01

    In coupled ocean-biogeochemical models, the choice of numerical schemes in the ocean circulation component can have a large influence on the distribution of the biological tracers. Biogeochemical models are traditionally coupled to ocean general circulation models (OGCMs), which are based on dynamical cores employing quasi regular meshes, and therefore utilize limited spatial resolution in a global setting. An alternative approach is to use an unstructured-mesh ocean model, which allows variable mesh resolution. Here, we present initial results of a coupling between the Finite Element Sea-ice Ocean Model (FESOM) and the biogeochemical model REcoM2, with special focus on the Southern Ocean. Surface fields of nutrients, chlorophyll a and net primary production were compared to available data sets with focus on spatial distribution and seasonal cycle. The model produced realistic spatial distributions, especially regarding net primary production and chlorophyll a, whereas the iron concentration became too low in the Pacific Ocean. The modelled net primary production was 32.5 Pg C yr-1 and the export production 6.1 Pg C yr-1. This is lower than satellite-based estimates, mainly due to the excessive iron limitation in the Pacific along with too little coastal production. Overall, the model performed better in the Southern Ocean than on the global scale, though the assessment here is hindered by the lower availability of observations. The modelled net primary production was 3.1 Pg C yr-1 in the Southern Ocean and the export production 1.1 Pg C yr-1. All in all, the combination of a circulation model on an unstructured grid with an ocean biogeochemical model shows similar performance to other models at non-eddy-permitting resolution. It is well suited for studies of the Southern Ocean, but on the global scale deficiencies in the Pacific Ocean would have to be taken into account.

  13. The impact of global warming on seasonality of ocean primary production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Henson

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal cycle (i.e. phenology of oceanic primary production (PP is expected to change in response to climate warming. Here, we use output from 6 global biogeochemical models to examine the response in the seasonal amplitude of PP and timing of peak PP to the IPCC AR5 warming scenario. We also investigate whether trends in PP phenology may be more rapidly detectable than trends in annual mean PP. The seasonal amplitude of PP decreases by an average of 1–2% per year by 2100 in most biomes, with the exception of the Arctic which sees an increase of ~1% per year. This is accompanied by an advance in the timing of peak PP by ~0.5–1 months by 2100 over much of the globe, and particularly pronounced in the Arctic. These changes are driven by an increase in seasonal amplitude of sea surface temperature (where the maxima get hotter faster than the minima and a decrease in the seasonal amplitude of the mixed layer depth and surface nitrate concentration. Our results indicate a transformation of currently strongly seasonal (bloom forming regions, typically found at high latitudes, into weakly seasonal (non-bloom regions, characteristic of contemporary subtropical conditions. On average, 36 yr of data are needed to detect a climate-change-driven trend in the seasonal amplitude of PP, compared to 32 yr for mean annual PP. Monthly resolution model output is found to be inadequate for resolving phenological changes. We conclude that analysis of phytoplankton seasonality is not necessarily a shortcut to detecting climate change impacts on ocean productivity.

  14. A fully-implicit model of the global ocean circulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijer, Wilbert; Dijkstra, Henk A.; Öksüzoğlu, Hakan; Wubs, Fred W.; Niet, Arie C. de

    2003-01-01

    With the recent developments in the solution methods for large-dimensional nonlinear algebraic systems, fully-implicit ocean circulation models are now becoming feasible. In this paper, the formulation of such a three-dimensional global ocean model is presented. With this implicit model, the

  15. Sea ice phenology and timing of primary production pulses in the Arctic Ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Rubao; Jin, Meibing; Varpe, Øystein

    2013-03-01

    Arctic organisms are adapted to the strong seasonality of environmental forcing. A small timing mismatch between biological processes and the environment could potentially have significant consequences for the entire food web. Climate warming causes shrinking ice coverage and earlier ice retreat in the Arctic, which is likely to change the timing of primary production. In this study, we test predictions on the interactions among sea ice phenology and production timing of ice algae and pelagic phytoplankton. We do so using the following (1) a synthesis of available satellite observation data; and (2) the application of a coupled ice-ocean ecosystem model. The data and model results suggest that, over a large portion of the Arctic marginal seas, the timing variability in ice retreat at a specific location has a strong impact on the timing variability in pelagic phytoplankton peaks, but weak or no impact on the timing of ice-algae peaks in those regions. The model predicts latitudinal and regional differences in the timing of ice algae biomass peak (varying from April to May) and the time lags between ice algae and pelagic phytoplankton peaks (varying from 45 to 90 days). The correlation between the time lag and ice retreat is significant in areas where ice retreat has no significant impact on ice-algae peak timing, suggesting that changes in pelagic phytoplankton peak timing control the variability in time lags. Phenological variability in primary production is likely to have consequences for higher trophic levels, particularly for the zooplankton grazers, whose main food source is composed of the dually pulsed algae production of the Arctic.

  16. Modeling the ocean effect of geomagnetic storms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Nils; Kuvshinov, A.

    2004-01-01

    At coastal sites, geomagnetic variations for periods shorter than a few days are strongly distorted by the conductivity of the nearby sea-water. This phenomena, known as the ocean (or coast) effect, is strongest in the magnetic vertical component. We demonstrate the ability to predict the ocean...... if the oceans are considered. Our analysis also indicates a significant local time asymmetry (i.e., contributions from spherical harmonics other than P-I(0)), especially during the main phase of the storm....

  17. The impact of global warming on seasonality of ocean primary production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Henson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The seasonal cycle (i.e. phenology of oceanic primary production (PP is expected to change in response to climate warming. Here, we use output from 6 global biogeochemical models to examine the response in the seasonal amplitude of PP and timing of peak PP to the IPCC AR5 warming scenario. We also investigate whether trends in PP phenology may be more rapidly detectable than trends in PP itself. The seasonal amplitude of PP decreases by an average of 1–2% per year by 2100 in most biomes, with the exception of the Arctic which sees an increase of ~1% per year. This is accompanied by an advance in the timing of peak PP by ~0.5–1 months by 2100 over much of the globe, and particularly pronounced in the Arctic. These changes are driven by an increase in seasonal amplitude of sea surface temperature (where the maxima get hotter faster than the minima and a decrease in the seasonal amplitude of the mixed layer depth and surface nitrate concentration. Our results indicate a transformation of currently strongly seasonal (bloom forming regions, typically found at high latitudes, into weakly seasonal (non-bloom regions, characteristic of contemporary subtropical conditions. On average, 36 yr of data are needed to detect a climate change-driven trend in the seasonal amplitude of PP, compared to 32 yr for mean annual PP. We conclude that analysis of phytoplankton phenology is not necessarily a shortcut to detecting climate change impacts on ocean productivity.

  18. Skill assessment of the PELAGOS global ocean biogeochemistry model over the period 1980–2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vichi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Global Ocean Biogeochemistry General Circulation models are useful tools to study biogeochemical processes at gobal and large scales under current climate and future scenario conditions. The accuracy of the future estimate is however dependent on the adequate representation of the current ocean biogeochemical features. To this purpose, the results of an interannual simulation of the global ocean biogeochemical model PELAGOS have been objectively compared with multi-variate observations from the last 20 years of the XX century. The model was assessed in terms of spatial and temporal variability of chlorophyll and primary production derived from satellite sensors, with a specific focus on the simulation of carbon production/consumption rates observed in the equatorial Pacific ocean and at the long-term JGOFS stations. The predicted chlorophyll is acceptable in the northern mid-latitude regions and equatorial Pacific, but is underestimated in the upwelling regions of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans and markedly overestimated in the Southern Ocean. This latter bias is linked to the inadequate representation of the mixed layer seasonal cycle in the region, which favours primary production during austral spring. Simulated primary production is comparable with satellite estimates both at the global scale and when compared with an independent data-set in the equatorial Pacific. A comparison with other models showed that PELAGOS results are as good as the estimates from state-of-the-art diagnostic models based on satellite data. The skill in reproducing the interannual varibility was assessed in the equatorial Pacific and against the decadal JGOFS timeseries BATS and HOT. In the tropical Pacific our analysis suggests that interannual variability of primary production is related to the climate variability both in the observations and in the model. At the JGOFS stations PELAGOS has skill to simulate the observed bacterial biomass and shows realistic means

  19. Indian Ocean sea surface salinity variations in a coupled model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vinayachandran, P.N.; Nanjundiah, Ravi S. [Indian Institute of Science, Centre for Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences, Bangalore (India)

    2009-08-15

    The variability of the sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Indian Ocean is studied using a 100-year control simulation of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM 2.0). The monsoon-driven seasonal SSS pattern in the Indian Ocean, marked by low salinity in the east and high salinity in the west, is captured by the model. The model overestimates runoff into the Bay of Bengal due to higher rainfall over the Himalayan-Tibetan regions which drain into the Bay of Bengal through Ganga-Brahmaputra rivers. The outflow of low-salinity water from the Bay of Bengal is too strong in the model. Consequently, the model Indian Ocean SSS is about 1 less than that seen in the climatology. The seasonal Indian Ocean salt balance obtained from the model is consistent with the analysis from climatological data sets. During summer, the large freshwater input into the Bay of Bengal and its redistribution decide the spatial pattern of salinity tendency. During winter, horizontal advection is the dominant contributor to the tendency term. The interannual variability of the SSS in the Indian Ocean is about five times larger than that in coupled model simulations of the North Atlantic Ocean. Regions of large interannual standard deviations are located near river mouths in the Bay of Bengal and in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean. Both freshwater input into the ocean and advection of this anomalous flux are responsible for the generation of these anomalies. The model simulates 20 significant Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events and during IOD years large salinity anomalies appear in the equatorial Indian Ocean. The anomalies exist as two zonal bands: negative salinity anomalies to the north of the equator and positive to the south. The SSS anomalies for the years in which IOD is not present and for ENSO years are much weaker than during IOD years. Significant interannual SSS anomalies appear in the Indian Ocean only during IOD years. (orig.)

  20. Indian Ocean sea surface salinity variations in a coupled model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinayachandran, P. N.; Nanjundiah, Ravi S.

    2009-08-01

    The variability of the sea surface salinity (SSS) in the Indian Ocean is studied using a 100-year control simulation of the Community Climate System Model (CCSM 2.0). The monsoon-driven seasonal SSS pattern in the Indian Ocean, marked by low salinity in the east and high salinity in the west, is captured by the model. The model overestimates runoff into the Bay of Bengal due to higher rainfall over the Himalayan-Tibetan regions which drain into the Bay of Bengal through Ganga-Brahmaputra rivers. The outflow of low-salinity water from the Bay of Bengal is too strong in the model. Consequently, the model Indian Ocean SSS is about 1 less than that seen in the climatology. The seasonal Indian Ocean salt balance obtained from the model is consistent with the analysis from climatological data sets. During summer, the large freshwater input into the Bay of Bengal and its redistribution decide the spatial pattern of salinity tendency. During winter, horizontal advection is the dominant contributor to the tendency term. The interannual variability of the SSS in the Indian Ocean is about five times larger than that in coupled model simulations of the North Atlantic Ocean. Regions of large interannual standard deviations are located near river mouths in the Bay of Bengal and in the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean. Both freshwater input into the ocean and advection of this anomalous flux are responsible for the generation of these anomalies. The model simulates 20 significant Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) events and during IOD years large salinity anomalies appear in the equatorial Indian Ocean. The anomalies exist as two zonal bands: negative salinity anomalies to the north of the equator and positive to the south. The SSS anomalies for the years in which IOD is not present and for ENSO years are much weaker than during IOD years. Significant interannual SSS anomalies appear in the Indian Ocean only during IOD years.

  1. A Coupled Ocean General Circulation, Biogeochemical, and Radiative Model of the Global Oceans: Seasonal Distributions of Ocean Chlorophyll and Nutrients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson W.; Busalacchi, Antonio (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    A coupled ocean general circulation, biogeochemical, and radiative model was constructed to evaluate and understand the nature of seasonal variability of chlorophyll and nutrients in the global oceans. Biogeochemical processes in the model are determined from the influences of circulation and turbulence dynamics, irradiance availability. and the interactions among three functional phytoplankton groups (diatoms. chlorophytes, and picoplankton) and three nutrients (nitrate, ammonium, and silicate). Basin scale (greater than 1000 km) model chlorophyll results are in overall agreement with CZCS pigments in many global regions. Seasonal variability observed in the CZCS is also represented in the model. Synoptic scale (100-1000 km) comparisons of imagery are generally in conformance although occasional departures are apparent. Model nitrate distributions agree with in situ data, including seasonal dynamics, except for the equatorial Atlantic. The overall agreement of the model with satellite and in situ data sources indicates that the model dynamics offer a reasonably realistic simulation of phytoplankton and nutrient dynamics on synoptic scales. This is especially true given that initial conditions are homogenous chlorophyll fields. The success of the model in producing a reasonable representation of chlorophyll and nutrient distributions and seasonal variability in the global oceans is attributed to the application of a generalized, processes-driven approach as opposed to regional parameterization and the existence of multiple phytoplankton groups with different physiological and physical properties. These factors enable the model to simultaneously represent many aspects of the great diversity of physical, biological, chemical, and radiative environments encountered in the global oceans.

  2. What causes the inverse relationship between primary production and export efficiency in the Southern Ocean?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moigne, Frédéric A. C.; Henson, Stephanie A.; Cavan, Emma; Georges, Clément; Pabortsava, Katsiaryna; Achterberg, Eric P.; Ceballos-Romero, Elena; Zubkov, Mike; Sanders, Richard J.

    2016-05-01

    The ocean contributes to regulating atmospheric CO2 levels, partly via variability in the fraction of primary production (PP) which is exported out of the surface layer (i.e., the e ratio). Southern Ocean studies have found that contrary to global-scale analyses, an inverse relationship exists between e ratio and PP. This relationship remains unexplained, with potential hypotheses being (i) large export of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in high PP areas, (ii) strong surface microbial recycling in high PP regions, and/or (iii) grazing-mediated export that varies inversely with PP. We find that the export of DOC has a limited influence in setting the negative e ratio/PP relationship. However, we observed that at sites with low PP and high e ratios, zooplankton-mediated export is large and surface microbial abundance low suggesting that both are important drivers of the magnitude of the e ratio in the Southern Ocean.

  3. An empirical model of tropical ocean dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, Matthew; Scott, James D. [University of Colorado, CIRES Climate Diagnostics Center, Boulder, CO (United States); NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Physical Sciences Division, Boulder, CO (United States); Alexander, Michael A. [NOAA Earth System Research Laboratory, Physical Sciences Division, Boulder, CO (United States)

    2011-11-15

    To extend the linear stochastically forced paradigm of tropical sea surface temperature (SST) variability to the subsurface ocean, a linear inverse model (LIM) is constructed from the simultaneous and 3-month lag covariances of observed 3-month running mean anomalies of SST, thermocline depth, and zonal wind stress. This LIM is then used to identify the empirically-determined linear dynamics with physical processes to gauge their relative importance to ENSO evolution. Optimal growth of SST anomalies over several months is triggered by both an initial SST anomaly and a central equatorial Pacific thermocline anomaly that propagates slowly eastward while leading the amplifying SST anomaly. The initial SST and thermocline anomalies each produce roughly half the SST amplification. If interactions between the sea surface and the thermocline are removed in the linear dynamical operator, the SST anomaly undergoes less optimal growth but is also more persistent, and its location shifts from the eastern to central Pacific. Optimal growth is also found to be essentially the result of two stable eigenmodes with similar structure but differing 2- and 4-year periods evolving from initial destructive to constructive interference. Variations among ENSO events could then be a consequence not of changing stability characteristics but of random excitation of these two eigenmodes, which represent different balances between surface and subsurface coupled dynamics. As found in previous studies, the impact of the additional variables on LIM SST forecasts is relatively small for short time scales. Over time intervals greater than about 9 months, however, the additional variables both significantly enhance forecast skill and predict lag covariances and associated power spectra whose closer agreement with observations enhances the validation of the linear model. Moreover, a secondary type of optimal growth exists that is not present in a LIM constructed from SST alone, in which initial SST

  4. Modelling Tropical Cyclones-Ocean interactions: the role of the Atmophere - Ocean coupling frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoccimarro, Enrico; Fogli, Pier Giuseppe; Gualdi, Silvio; Masina, Simona; Navarra, Antonio

    2016-04-01

    The interaction between Tropical Cyclones (TCs) and ocean is a major mechanism responsible for energy exchange between the atmosphere and the ocean. TCs affect the thermal and dynamical structure of the ocean, but the magnitude of the impact is still uncertain. Very few CMIP5 models demonstrated ability in representing TCs, mainly due to their horizontal resolution. We aim to improve TCs representation in next CMIPs experiments through the new CMCC-CM2VHR General Circulation Model, having a horizontal resolution of 1/4 degree in both atmospheric and ocean components. The model is capable to represent realistically TCs up to Cat-5 Typhoons. A good representation of the TC-Ocean interaction strongly depends on the coupling frequency between the atmospheric and the ocean components. In this work, we found that a better representation of the negative Sea Surface Temperature - TC induced feedback, through a high (hourly) coupling frequency, ensures the reduction of the TC induced Power Dissipation Index (PDI) bias of one order of magnitude. In addition, a cat-5 storm case study is deeply investigated also in terms of TC effects on the deep ocean.

  5. Biogeochemical modelling of dissolved oxygen in a changing ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Oliver; Buitenhuis, Erik; Le Quéré, Corinne; Suntharalingam, Parvadha

    2017-09-13

    Secular decreases in dissolved oxygen concentration have been observed within the tropical oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) and at mid- to high latitudes over the last approximately 50 years. Earth system model projections indicate that a reduction in the oxygen inventory of the global ocean, termed ocean deoxygenation, is a likely consequence of on-going anthropogenic warming. Current models are, however, unable to consistently reproduce the observed trends and variability of recent decades, particularly within the established tropical OMZs. Here, we conduct a series of targeted hindcast model simulations using a state-of-the-art global ocean biogeochemistry model in order to explore and review biases in model distributions of oceanic oxygen. We show that the largest magnitude of uncertainty is entrained into ocean oxygen response patterns due to model parametrization of pCO2-sensitive C : N ratios in carbon fixation and imposed atmospheric forcing data. Inclusion of a pCO2-sensitive C : N ratio drives historical oxygen depletion within the ocean interior due to increased organic carbon export and subsequent remineralization. Atmospheric forcing is shown to influence simulated interannual variability in ocean oxygen, particularly due to differences in imposed variability of wind stress and heat fluxes.This article is part of the themed issue 'Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  6. A Parallel Ocean Model With Adaptive Mesh Refinement Capability For Global Ocean Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herrnstein, Aaron R. [Univ. of California, Davis, CA (United States)

    2005-12-01

    An ocean model with adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) capability is presented for simulating ocean circulation on decade time scales. The model closely resembles the LLNL ocean general circulation model with some components incorporated from other well known ocean models when appropriate. Spatial components are discretized using finite differences on a staggered grid where tracer and pressure variables are defined at cell centers and velocities at cell vertices (B-grid). Horizontal motion is modeled explicitly with leapfrog and Euler forward-backward time integration, and vertical motion is modeled semi-implicitly. New AMR strategies are presented for horizontal refinement on a B-grid, leapfrog time integration, and time integration of coupled systems with unequal time steps. These AMR capabilities are added to the LLNL software package SAMRAI (Structured Adaptive Mesh Refinement Application Infrastructure) and validated with standard benchmark tests. The ocean model is built on top of the amended SAMRAI library. The resulting model has the capability to dynamically increase resolution in localized areas of the domain. Limited basin tests are conducted using various refinement criteria and produce convergence trends in the model solution as refinement is increased. Carbon sequestration simulations are performed on decade time scales in domains the size of the North Atlantic and the global ocean. A suggestion is given for refinement criteria in such simulations. AMR predicts maximum pH changes and increases in CO2 concentration near the injection sites that are virtually unattainable with a uniform high resolution due to extremely long run times. Fine scale details near the injection sites are achieved by AMR with shorter run times than the finest uniform resolution tested despite the need for enhanced parallel performance. The North Atlantic simulations show a reduction in passive tracer errors when AMR is applied instead of a uniform coarse resolution. No

  7. Adaptation of a general circulation model to ocean dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, R. E.; Rees, T. H.; Woodbury, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    A primitive-variable general circulation model of the ocean was formulated in which fast external gravity waves are suppressed with rigid-lid surface constraint pressires which also provide a means for simulating the effects of large-scale free-surface topography. The surface pressure method is simpler to apply than the conventional stream function models, and the resulting model can be applied to both global ocean and limited region situations. Strengths and weaknesses of the model are also presented.

  8. Self-organized Criticality Model for Ocean Internal Waves

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gang; LIN Min; QIAO Fang-Li; HOU Yi-Jun

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a simple spring-block model for ocean internal waves based on the self-organized criticality (SOC). The oscillations of the water blocks in the model display power-law behavior with an exponent of-2 in the frequency domain, which is similar to the current and sea water temperature spectra in the actual ocean and the universal Garrett and Munk deep ocean internal wave model [Geophysical Fluid Dynamics 2 (1972) 225; J. Geophys. Res. 80 (1975) 291]. The influence of the ratio of the driving force to the spring coefficient to SOC behaviors in the model is also discussed.

  9. Development of an Ocean Model for COAMPS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be subject to a penalty for failing to comply with a collection of information if it does not... thermodynamic properties of the ocean using either sigma-levels, z-levels, or a combination of sigma- and z-levels. The 3D ocean MVOI and NCOM will...way coupled experiments, to measure the effect of two-way coupling on the atmospheric forecasts. The second component of our work in this project

  10. NW European shelf under climate warming: implications for open ocean – shelf exchange, primary production, and carbon absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gröger

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Shelves have been estimated to account for more than one fifth of the global marine primary production. It has been also conjectured that shelves strongly influence the oceanic absorption of atmospheric CO2 (carbon shelf pump. Owing to their coarse resolution, currently applied global climate models are inappropriate to investigate the impact of climate change on shelfs and regional models do not account for the complex interaction with the adjacent open ocean. In this study, a global ocean general circulation model and biogeochemistry model were set up with a distorted grid providing a maximal resolution for the NW European shelf and the adjacent North Atlantic.

    Using model climate projections we found that already a moderate warming of about 2.0 K of the sea surface is linked with a reduction by ~ 30% of biological production on the NW European shelf. If we consider the decline of anthropogenic riverine eutrophication since the 90's the reduction of biological production amounts to 39%. The decline of NW European shelf productivity is twice as strong as the decline in the open ocean (~ 15%. The underlying mechanism is a spatially well confined stratification feedback along the continental shelf break. This feedback reduces the nutrient supply from the deep Atlantic to about 50%. In turn, the reduced productivity draws down CO2 absorption on the NW European shelf by ~ 34% at the end of the 21st century compared to the end of the 20th century implying a strong weakening of shelf carbon pumping. Sensitivity experiments with diagnostic tracers indicate that not more than 20% of the carbon absorbed in the North Sea contributes to the long term carbon uptake of the world ocean. The rest remains within the ocean mixed layer where it is exposed to the atmosphere.

    The predicted decline in biological productivity and decrease of phytoplankton concentration (by averaged 25% due to reduced nutrient imports from the

  11. NW European shelf under climate warming: implications for open ocean – shelf exchange, primary production, and carbon absorption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gröger

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Shelves have been estimated to account for more than one-fifth of the global marine primary production. It has been also conjectured that shelves strongly influence the oceanic absorption of anthropogenic CO2 (carbon shelf pump. Owing to their coarse resolution, currently applied global climate models are inappropriate to investigate the impact of climate change on shelves and regional models do not account for the complex interaction with the adjacent open ocean. In this study, a global ocean general circulation model and biogeochemistry model were set up with a distorted grid providing a maximal resolution for the NW European shelf and the adjacent northeast Atlantic. Using model climate projections we found that already a~moderate warming of about 2.0 K of the sea surface is linked with a reduction by ~ 30% of the biological production on the NW European shelf. If we consider the decline of anthropogenic riverine eutrophication since the 1990s, the reduction of biological production amounts is even larger. The relative decline of NW European shelf productivity is twice as strong as the decline in the open ocean (~ 15%. The underlying mechanism is a spatially well confined stratification feedback along the continental shelf break. This feedback reduces the nutrient supply from the deep Atlantic to about 50%. In turn, the reduced productivity draws down CO2 absorption in the North Sea by ~ 34% at the end of the 21st century compared to the end of the 20th century implying a strong weakening of shelf carbon pumping. Sensitivity experiments with diagnostic tracers indicate that not more than 20% of the carbon absorbed in the North Sea contributes to the long-term carbon uptake of the world ocean. The rest remains within the ocean's mixed layer where it is exposed to the atmosphere. The predicted decline in biological productivity, and decrease of phytoplankton concentration (in the North Sea by averaged 25% due to reduced nutrient imports from

  12. Synthesis of primary production in the Arctic Ocean: I. Surface waters, 1954-2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matrai, P. A.; Olson, E.; Suttles, S.; Hill, V.; Codispoti, L. A.; Light, B.; Steele, M.

    2013-03-01

    The spatial and seasonal magnitude and variability of primary production in the Arctic Ocean (AO) is quantified with a pan-arctic approach. We synthesize estimates of primary production (PP), focusing on surface waters (0-5 m), using complementary methods that emphasize different spatial and temporal scales. These methods include (1) in situ observations of 14C uptake mostly and possibly some O2 production reported in units of carbon (in situ PP), (2) remotely sensed primary production (sat-PP), and (3) an empirical algorithm giving net PP as a function of in situ chlorophyll a (in situ Chl-PP). The work presented herein examines historical data for PP collected in surface waters only, as they form the majority of the values of a larger ensemble of PP data collected over >50 years (ARCSS-PP) by many national and international efforts. This extended set of surface and vertically-resolved data will provide pan-Arctic validation of remotely sensed chlorophyll a and PP, an extremely valuable tool in this environment which is so difficult to sample. To this day, PP data in the AO are scarce and have uneven temporal and spatial coverage which, when added to the AO’s regional heterogeneity, its strong seasonal changes, and limited access, have made and continue to make obtaining a comprehensive picture of PP in the AO difficult. Daily surface in situ PP averaged 70 and 21 mg C m-3 d-1 for spring and summer, respectively, for the ca. 50 year period across the AO. Average daily estimates of in situ PP in surface waters on a pan-Arctic basis were several fold higher with respect to remotely sensed PP (sat-PP) and in situ chlorophyll-derived PP (Chl-PP) in the spring period, likely due to differences in data availability and coverage. Summer daily averages for surface in situ PP and sat-PP were similar and twice as high as in situ Chl-PP. Differences among annual estimates of surface in situ PP, in situ Chl-PP and sat-PP across the Arctic Ocean are presented and discussed

  13. Bio-Physical Ocean Modeling in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    SS11/G (Rev. 12- efl ] (o) Bio-Physical Ocean Modeling in the Gulf of Mexico Sergio deRada, Robert A. Arnone, Stephanie Anderson Naval Research...for viewing the model results interactively and dynamically in real-time. Initial assessment of the model prediction skill is presented along with...comprehensive picture of the ocean environment. In mutual benefit, the numerical solution gains skill from the assimilation of observational data which are

  14. Ocean (de)oxygenation from the Last Glacial Maximum to the twenty-first century: insights from Earth System models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bopp, L; Resplandy, L; Untersee, A; Le Mezo, P; Kageyama, M

    2017-09-13

    All Earth System models project a consistent decrease in the oxygen content of oceans for the coming decades because of ocean warming, reduced ventilation and increased stratification. But large uncertainties for these future projections of ocean deoxygenation remain for the subsurface tropical oceans where the major oxygen minimum zones are located. Here, we combine global warming projections, model-based estimates of natural short-term variability, as well as data and model estimates of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) ocean oxygenation to gain some insights into the major mechanisms of oxygenation changes across these different time scales. We show that the primary uncertainty on future ocean deoxygenation in the subsurface tropical oceans is in fact controlled by a robust compensation between decreasing oxygen saturation (O2sat) due to warming and decreasing apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) due to increased ventilation of the corresponding water masses. Modelled short-term natural variability in subsurface oxygen levels also reveals a compensation between O2sat and AOU, controlled by the latter. Finally, using a model simulation of the LGM, reproducing data-based reconstructions of past ocean (de)oxygenation, we show that the deoxygenation trend of the subsurface ocean during deglaciation was controlled by a combination of warming-induced decreasing O2sat and increasing AOU driven by a reduced ventilation of tropical subsurface waters.This article is part of the themed issue 'Ocean ventilation and deoxygenation in a warming world'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  15. Variational Data Assimilation Technique in Mathematical Modeling of Ocean Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agoshkov, V. I.; Zalesny, V. B.

    2012-03-01

    Problems of the variational data assimilation for the primitive equation ocean model constructed at the Institute of Numerical Mathematics, Russian Academy of Sciences are considered. The model has a flexible computational structure and consists of two parts: a forward prognostic model, and its adjoint analog. The numerical algorithm for the forward and adjoint models is constructed based on the method of multicomponent splitting. The method includes splitting with respect to physical processes and space coordinates. Numerical experiments are performed with the use of the Indian Ocean and the World Ocean as examples. These numerical examples support the theoretical conclusions and demonstrate the rationality of the approach using an ocean dynamics model with an observed data assimilation procedure.

  16. A study on boundary separation in an idealized ocean model

    CERN Document Server

    Düben, Peter D

    2015-01-01

    In numerical ocean models coast lines change the direction from one grid cell to its neighbor and the value for viscosity is set to be as small as possible. Therefore, model simulations are not converged with resolution and boundary separation points differ in essential properties from flow separation in continuous flow fields. In this paper, we investigate the quality of the representation of boundary separation points in global ocean models. To this end, we apply well established criteria for boundary separation within an idealized ocean model setup. We investigate an eddy-resolving as well as a steady test case with idealized and unstructured coast lines in a shallow water model that is based on a finite element discretization method. The results show that well established criteria for separation fail to detect boundary separation points due to an insufficient representation of ocean flows along free-slip boundaries. Along no-slip boundaries, most separation criteria provide adequate results. However, a ve...

  17. Indian Ocean SST Biases in a Flexible Regional Ocean Atmosphere Land System (FROALS) Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Zhen-Yu; ZHOU Tian-Jun; ZOU Li-Wei

    2012-01-01

    The authors examine the Indian Ocean sea surface temperature (SST) biases simulated by a Flexible Regional Ocean Atmosphere Land System (FROALS) model. The regional coupled model exhibits pronounced cold SST biases in a large portion of the Indian Ocean warm pool. Negative biases in the net surface heat fluxes are evident in the model, leading to the cold biases of the SST. Further analysis indicates that the negative biases in the net surface heat fluxes are mainly contributed by the biases of sensible heat and latent heat flux. Near-surface meteorological variables that could contribute to the SST biases are also examined. It is found that the biases of sensible heat and latent heat flux are caused by the colder and dryer near-surface air in the model.

  18. Modeling Water Clarity and Light Quality in Oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phytoplankton is a primary producer of organic compounds, and it forms the base of the food chain in ocean waters. The concentration of phytoplankton in the water column controls water clarity and the amount and quality of light that penetrates through it. The availability of ade...

  19. Hidden biosphere in an oxygen-deficient Atlantic open ocean eddy: future implications of ocean deoxygenation on primary production in the eastern tropical North Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loescher, Carolin; Fischer, Martin; Neulinger, Sven; Fiedler, Björn; Philippi, Miriam; Schütte, Florian; Singh, Arvind; Hauss, Helena; Karstensen, Johannes; Körtzinger, Arne; Schmitz, Ruth

    2016-04-01

    The eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA) is characterized by a highly productive coastal upwelling system and a moderate oxygen minimum zone with lowest open ocean oxygen (O2) concentrations of approximately 40 μmol kg-1. The recent discovery of re-occurring mesoscale eddies with close to anoxic O2 concentrations (promoted transcription of the key gene for denitrification, nirS. This process is usually absent from the open ETNA waters. In light of future projected ocean deoxygenation, our results show that even distinct events of anoxia have the potential to alter microbial community structure with critical impacts on primary productivity and biogeochemical processes of oceanic water bodies.

  20. Data assimilation in modeling ocean processes: A bibliographic study

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Mahadevan, R.; Fernandes, A.A.; Saran, A.K.

    An annotated bibliography on studies related to data assimilation in modeling ocean processes has been prepared. The bibliography listed here is not comprehensive and is not prepared from the original references. Information obtainable from...

  1. Data assimilation with implicit ocean models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terwisscha van Scheltinga, A.D.

    2007-01-01

    The ocean is an important part of the climate system, controlling the climate variability on many time-scales. Climate change, for example, has been linked to changes in the thermohaline circulation. This thesis is motivated by theoretical results on the stability of this circulation, especially the

  2. Model-Based Detection in a Shallow Water Ocean Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Candy, J V

    2001-07-30

    A model-based detector is developed to process shallow water ocean acoustic data. The function of the detector is to adaptively monitor the environment and decide whether or not a change from normal has occurred. Here we develop a processor incorporating both a normal-mode ocean acoustic model and a vertical hydrophone array. The detector is applied to data acquired from the Hudson Canyon experiments at various ranges and its performance is evaluated.

  3. Advances in a Distributed Approach for Ocean Model Data Interoperability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard P. Signell

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available An infrastructure for earth science data is emerging across the globe based on common data models and web services. As we evolve from custom file formats and web sites to standards-based web services and tools, data is becoming easier to distribute, find and retrieve, leaving more time for science. We describe recent advances that make it easier for ocean model providers to share their data, and for users to search, access, analyze and visualize ocean data using MATLAB® and Python®. These include a technique for modelers to create aggregated, Climate and Forecast (CF metadata convention datasets from collections of non-standard Network Common Data Form (NetCDF output files, the capability to remotely access data from CF-1.6-compliant NetCDF files using the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC Sensor Observation Service (SOS, a metadata standard for unstructured grid model output (UGRID, and tools that utilize both CF and UGRID standards to allow interoperable data search, browse and access. We use examples from the U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS® Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed, a project in which modelers using both structured and unstructured grid model output needed to share their results, to compare their results with other models, and to compare models with observed data. The same techniques used here for ocean modeling output can be applied to atmospheric and climate model output, remote sensing data, digital terrain and bathymetric data.

  4. A model of the ocean iron cycle and its influence on biological production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, S.; Parekh, P.; Follows, M.

    2003-04-01

    Biological productivity in large regions of the ocean, specifically high nutrient, low chlorophyll regions, is limited by the deficit in iron relative to other nutrients. We have developed a parameterization of the iron cycle of the world's oceans which attempts to explicitly represent the processes by which this deficit in iron occurs. We have implemented this parameterization in the context of the MIT three dimensional global ocean model and examined the consequences for nutrient distributions, new production and primary production. The iron model parameterizes the mechanisms of scavenging of iron onto sinking particles and complexation with an organic ligand and is driven by specified aeolian flux patterns. First, using an idealized representation of export production, limited by light, phosphate and iron, the model reproduces the broad features of the observed ocean phosphate and iron distributions. We replace the simplified export parameterization with an explicit, but highly idealized, ecosystem model. The model represents a simplified food web with two phytoplankton size classes and a single grazer. The base currency for this model is phosphorus, but the larger phytoplankton class (i.e. diatoms) is also limited by silica. Both classes are limited by the availability of iron. The results of this model are also generally consistent with the observed patterns of phosphate and iron. In addition, the model captures the broad features of the distributions and cycles of silica, chlorophyll and primary production. We will also explore the sensitivities of this model to the forcing fields (e.g. aeolian iron flux) and parameter choices of the ecosystem model. This model represents a step towards the explicit representation of the ocean iron cycle, and its biogeochemical influences, in global biogeochemical models.

  5. A new high resolution tidal model in the arctic ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cancet, M.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Lyard, F.

    The Arctic Ocean is a challenging region for tidal modeling, because of its complex and not well-documented bathymetry, together combined with the intermittent presence of sea ice and the fact that the in situ tidal observations are rather scarce at such high latitudes. As a consequence......-growing maritime and industrial activities in this region. NOVELTIS and DTU Space have developed a regional, high-resolution tidal atlas in the Arctic Ocean, in the framework of the CryoSat Plus for Ocean (CP4O) ESA project. In particular, this atlas benefits from the assimilation of the most complete satellite...... for assimilation and validation. This paper presents the performances of this new regional tidal model in the Arctic Ocean, compared to the existing global tidal models....

  6. A skill assessment of the biogeochemical model REcoM2 coupled to the Finite Element Sea Ice-Ocean Model (FESOM 1.3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schourup-Kristensen, V.; Sidorenko, D.; Wolf-Gladrow, D. A.; Völker, C.

    2014-11-01

    In coupled biogeochmical-ocean models, the choice of numerical schemes in the ocean circulation component can have a large influence on the distribution of the biological tracers. Biogeochemical models are traditionally coupled to ocean general circulation models (OGCMs), which are based on dynamical cores employing quasi-regular meshes, and therefore utilize limited spatial resolution in a global setting. An alternative approach is to use an unstructured-mesh ocean model, which allows variable mesh resolution. Here, we present initial results of a coupling between the Finite Element Sea Ice-Ocean Model (FESOM) and the biogeochemical model REcoM2 (Regulated Ecosystem Model 2), with special focus on the Southern Ocean. Surface fields of nutrients, chlorophyll a and net primary production (NPP) were compared to available data sets with a focus on spatial distribution and seasonal cycle. The model produces realistic spatial distributions, especially regarding NPP and chlorophyll a, whereas the iron concentration becomes too low in the Pacific Ocean. The modelled NPP is 32.5 Pg C yr-1 and the export production 6.1 Pg C yr-1, which is lower than satellite-based estimates, mainly due to excessive iron limitation in the Pacific along with too little coastal production. The model performs well in the Southern Ocean, though the assessment here is hindered by the lower availability of observations. The modelled NPP is 3.1 Pg C yr-1 in the Southern Ocean and the export production 1.1 Pg C yr-1. All in all, the combination of a circulation model on an unstructured grid with a biogeochemical-ocean model shows similar performance to other models at non-eddy-permitting resolution. It is well suited for studies of the Southern Ocean, but on the global scale deficiencies in the Pacific Ocean would have to be taken into account.

  7. Tracer Modeling with the Hybrid Coordinates Ocean Model (hycom)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garraffo, Z. D.; Kim, H.; Li, B.; Mehra, A.; Rivin, I.; Spindler, T.; Tolman, H. L.

    2012-12-01

    A series of tracer simulations have been started at NCEP/NWS aiming to a variety of applications, from dispersion of contaminants in estimations motivated by the Japanese nuclear accident near Fukushima, to nutrient estimations. The tracer capabilities of HYCOM are used, in regional domains, nested to daily nowcast/forecast fields from 1/12 HYCOM (RTOFS-Global) model output. A Fukushima Cs-137 simulation is now run in operational mode (RTOFS_ET). The simulation was initialized at the time of the Fukushima nuclear accident, and includes atmospheric deposition of Cs-137 and coastal discharge from a high resolution coastal model (ROMS done at NOAA/NOS). Almost all tracer moved offshore before the end of the first year after the accident. The tracer initially deposited in the Pacific ocean through the atmosphere slowly moves eastward and to deeper waters following the 3D ocean circulation. A series of simulations were started for nutrient estimations in the Gulf Stream and Mid Atlantic Bight region. Initially the capabilities implemented in HYCOM are used. The work aims to monitoring nutrients in the chosen region. Work is done in collaboration with Victoria Coles of U. Maryland.

  8. A simple metabolic model of glacial-interglacial energy supply to the upper ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Pelegrí

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available We use a simple two-state two-box ocean to simulate the CO2 signal during the last four glacial-interglacial transitions in the earth system. The model is inspired by the similarity in spatial organization and temporal transition patterns between the earth and other complex systems, such as mammals. The comparison identifies the earth's metabolic rate with net autotrophic primary production in the upper ocean, sustained through new inorganic carbon and nutrients advected from the deep ocean and organic matter remineralized within the upper ocean. We view the glacial-interglacial transition as a switch of the upper ocean from a basal to an enhanced metabolic state, with energy supply initially relying on the remineralization of the local organic sources and the eventual steady state resulting from the increased advective supply of inorganic deep sources. During the interglacial-glacial transition the opposite occurs, with an initial excess of advective supply and primary production that allows the replenishment of the upper-ocean organic storages. We set the relative change in energy supply from the CO2 signal and use genetic algorithms to explore the sensitivity of the model output to both the basal recirculation rate and the intensity-timing of the maximum recirculation rate. The model is capable of reproducing quite well the long-term oscillations, as shown by correlations with observations typically about 0.8. The dominant time scale for each cycle ranges between about 40 and 45 kyr, close to the 41 kyr average obliquity astronomical period, and the deep-ocean recirculation rate increases between one and two orders of magnitude from glacial to interglacial periods.

  9. Mathematical Modeling of the Pressure Field Generated by Ocean Wave at the Bottom of the Ocean

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚沈光; 唐劲飞; 颜冰

    2002-01-01

    This paper develops a new method for calculating the pressure-tirme processof the pressure field generated by ocean wave at sea bottom based on the surface wavespectrum of the ocean wave. The basic assumptions of modeling are that the surfaceocean wave pressure equals to the atmospheric pressure and that the viscidity of seawater is neglected. The steps of modeling are described below. First the power spectraldensity of ocean wave is discretized and the amplitude spectra of harmonic ocean waveare obtained. Then the amplitude spectra of harmonic pressure are obtained accordingto the amplitude spectrum of surface wave and the depth of the sea. Finally, based onthe oceanographic theory of representing a fixed wave surface by summing up random-phase sinusoids, the pressure-time process of pressure field at sea bottom is obtained bysumming up the amplitude spectrum of pressure. The paper also develops a method ofdetermining the relationship between mean wave period and wave heights undershallow water condition, thus the pressure-time process of pressure field produced bynon-well-developed ocean wave can be directly calculated once the mean wave heightand period are known.

  10. Mesoscale Ocean Large Eddy Simulations Using High-resolution Ocean Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, B.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Bachman, S.; Bryan, F.; Bailey, D. A.

    2016-02-01

    Inaccurate parameterization of sub-grid eddies can cause excessive damping and spurious diapycnal mixing, especially in high-resolution [O(10km)] ocean models. The Mesoscale Ocean Large Eddy Simulation (MOLES) approach provides a framework for developing resolution- and flow-adaptive parameterizations of eddy effects. Large eddy simulation techniques are commonly used to simulate 3D turbulence, and MOLES is modified to be appropriate for the more two-dimensional nature of mesoscale ocean turbulence. However, the effect of MOLES in high-resolution ocean models has not been investigated extensively. We will contrast results, and cost, from a suite of idealized simulations of frontal spin-down (MITgcm) and from high-resolution global climate models (0.1o, POP2), under a variety of eddy parameterizations. These include MOLES based upon 2D turbulence theory, MOLES based upon quasi-geostrophic (QG) turbulence theory, and traditional biharmonic schemes. The idealized simulations show that MOLES (particularly QG) improves the spectral slopes of energy and enstrophy near the grid-scale when compared to more traditional eddy parameterizations, across a range of grid resolutions. In the high-resolution global climate model we compare the effect of different parameterizations on the spectral characteristics of the simulated flow, and on the large-scale transport. Using MOLES in a climate model results in greater energy and variability near the grid scale, and this produces a flow, which, spectrally, is more consistent with an inertial turbulent cascade and observations of eddy behavior.

  11. Global Modeling of the Oceanic Source of Organic Aerosols

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stelios Myriokefalitakis

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The global marine organic aerosol budget is investigated by a 3-dimensional chemistry-transport model considering recently proposed parameterisations of the primary marine organic aerosol (POA and secondary organic aerosol (SOA formation from the oxidation of marine volatile organic compounds. MODIS and SeaWiFS satellite data of Chlorophyll-a and ECMWF solar incoming radiation, wind speed, and temperature are driving the oceanic emissions in the model. Based on the adopted parameterisations, the SOA and the submicron POA marine sources are evaluated at about 5 Tg yr−1 (∼1.5 Tg C yr−1 and 7 to 8 Tg yr−1 (∼4 Tg C yr−1, respectively. The computed marine SOA originates from the dimethylsulfide oxidation (∼78%, the potentially formed dialkyl amine salts (∼21%, and marine hydrocarbon oxidation (∼0.1%. Comparison of calculations with observations indicates an additional marine source of soluble organic carbon that could be partially encountered by marine POA chemical ageing.

  12. Low-order models of biogenic ocean mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabiri, J. O.; Rosinelli, D.; Koumoutsakos, P.

    2009-12-01

    Biogenic ocean mixing, the process whereby swimming animals may affect ocean circulation, has primarily been studied using order-of-magnitude theoretical estimates and a small number of field observations. We describe numerical simulations of arrays of simplified animal shapes migrating in inviscid fluid and at finite Reynolds numbers. The effect of density stratification is modeled in the fluid dynamic equations of motion by a buoyancy acceleration term, which arises due to perturbations to the density field by the migrating bodies. The effects of fluid viscosity, body spacing, and array configuration are investigated to identify scenarios in which a meaningful contribution to ocean mixing by swimming animals is plausible.

  13. Bifurcation analysis of 3D ocean flows using a parallel fully-implicit ocean model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thies, J.; Wubs, F.W.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    To understand the physics and dynamics of the ocean circulation, techniques of numerical bifurcation theory such as continuation methods have proved to be useful. Up to now these techniques have been applied to models with relatively few degrees of freedom such as multi-layer quasi-geostrophic and s

  14. Bifurcation analysis of 3D ocean flows using a parallel fully-implicit ocean model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thies, J.; Wubs, F.W.; Dijkstra, H.A.

    2009-01-01

    To understand the physics and dynamics of the ocean circulation, techniques of numerical bifurcation theory such as continuation methods have proved to be useful. Up to now these techniques have been applied to models with relatively few degrees of freedom such as multi-layer quasi-geostrophic and s

  15. Bifurcation analysis of 3D ocean flows using a parallel fully-implicit ocean model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Thies, Jonas; Wubs, Fred; Dijkstra, Henk A.

    2009-01-01

    To understand the physics and dynamics of the ocean circulation, techniques of numerical bifurcation theory such as continuation methods have proved to be useful. Up to now these techniques have been applied to models with relatively few (O(10(5))) degrees of freedom such as multi-layer

  16. Multiple stressors of ocean ecosystems in the 21st century: projections with CMIP5 models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bopp

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ocean ecosystems are increasingly stressed by human-induced changes of their physical, chemical and biological environment. Among these changes, warming, acidification, deoxygenation and changes in primary productivity by marine phytoplankton can be considered as four of the major stressors of open ocean ecosystems. Due to rising atmospheric CO2 in the coming decades, these changes will be amplified. Here, we use the most recent simulations performed in the framework of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 to assess how these stressors may evolve over the course of the 21st century. The 10 Earth System Models used here project similar trends in ocean warming, acidification, deoxygenation and reduced primary productivity for each of the IPCC's representative concentration parthways (RCP over the 21st century. For the "business-as-usual" scenario RCP8.5, the model-mean changes in 2090s (compared to 1990s for sea surface temperature, sea surface pH, global O2 content and integrated primary productivity amount to +2.73 °C, −0.33 pH unit, −3.45% and −8.6%, respectively. For the high mitigation scenario RCP2.6, corresponding changes are +0.71 °C, −0.07 pH unit, −1.81% and −2.0% respectively, illustrating the effectiveness of extreme mitigation strategies. Although these stressors operate globally, they display distinct regional patterns. Large decreases in O2 and in pH are simulated in global ocean intermediate and mode waters, whereas large reductions in primary production are simulated in the tropics and in the North Atlantic. Although temperature and pH projections are robust across models, the same does not hold for projections of sub-surface O2 concentrations in the tropics and global and regional changes in net primary productivity.

  17. Parallel Computation of the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, P; Song, Y T; Chao, Y; Zhang, H

    2005-04-05

    The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS) is a regional ocean general circulation modeling system solving the free surface, hydrostatic, primitive equations over varying topography. It is free software distributed world-wide for studying both complex coastal ocean problems and the basin-to-global scale ocean circulation. The original ROMS code could only be run on shared-memory systems. With the increasing need to simulate larger model domains with finer resolutions and on a variety of computer platforms, there is a need in the ocean-modeling community to have a ROMS code that can be run on any parallel computer ranging from 10 to hundreds of processors. Recently, we have explored parallelization for ROMS using the MPI programming model. In this paper, an efficient parallelization strategy for such a large-scale scientific software package, based on an existing shared-memory computing model, is presented. In addition, scientific applications and data-performance issues on a couple of SGI systems, including Columbia, the world's third-fastest supercomputer, are discussed.

  18. Consumers mediate the effects of experimental ocean acidification and warming on primary producers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsterberg, Christian; Eklöf, Johan S; Gamfeldt, Lars; Havenhand, Jonathan N; Sundbäck, Kristina

    2013-05-21

    It is well known that ocean acidification can have profound impacts on marine organisms. However, we know little about the direct and indirect effects of ocean acidification and also how these effects interact with other features of environmental change such as warming and declining consumer pressure. In this study, we tested whether the presence of consumers (invertebrate mesograzers) influenced the interactive effects of ocean acidification and warming on benthic microalgae in a seagrass community mesocosm experiment. Net effects of acidification and warming on benthic microalgal biomass and production, as assessed by analysis of variance, were relatively weak regardless of grazer presence. However, partitioning these net effects into direct and indirect effects using structural equation modeling revealed several strong relationships. In the absence of grazers, benthic microalgae were negatively and indirectly affected by sediment-associated microalgal grazers and macroalgal shading, but directly and positively affected by acidification and warming. Combining indirect and direct effects yielded no or weak net effects. In the presence of grazers, almost all direct and indirect climate effects were nonsignificant. Our analyses highlight that (i) indirect effects of climate change may be at least as strong as direct effects, (ii) grazers are crucial in mediating these effects, and (iii) effects of ocean acidification may be apparent only through indirect effects and in combination with other variables (e.g., warming). These findings highlight the importance of experimental designs and statistical analyses that allow us to separate and quantify the direct and indirect effects of multiple climate variables on natural communities.

  19. Model study on Bohai ecosystem 1. Model description and primary productivity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Hao; YIN Baoshu

    2006-01-01

    A Nutrient-Phytoplankton-Zooplankton(NPZD) type of ecological model is developed to reflect the biochemical process, and further coupled to a primitive equation ocean model, an irradiation model as well as a river discharge model to reproduce ecosystem dynamics in the Bohai Sea. Modeled primary production shows reasonable consistency with observations quantitatively and qualitatively; in addition, f-ratio is examined in detail in the first time, which is also within the range reported in other studies and reveals some meaningful insight into the relative contributions of ammonium and nitrate to the growth of phytoplankton in the Bohai Sea.

  20. Testing ocean tide models using GGP superconducting gravimeter observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, T.; Bos, M.

    2003-04-01

    Observations from the global network of superconducting gravimeters in the Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) are used to test 10 ocean tide models (SCHW; FES94.1, 95.2, 98, 99; CSR3.0, 4.0; TPXO.5; GOT99.2b; and NAO.99b). In addition, observations are used from selected sites with LaCoste and Romberg gravimeters with electrostatic feedback, where special attention has been given to achieving a calibration accuracy of 0.1%. In Europe, there are several superconducting gravimeter stations in a relatively small area and this can be used to advantage in testing the ocean (and body) tide models and in identifying sites with anomalous observations. At some of the superconducting gravimeter sites there are anomalies in the in-phase components of the main tidal harmonics, which are due to calibration errors of up to 0.3%. It is shown that the recent ocean tide models are in better agreement with the tidal gravity observations than were the earlier models of Schwiderski and FES94.1. However, no single ocean tide model gives completely satisfactory results in all areas of the world. For example, for M2 the TPXO.5 and NAO99b models give anomalous results in Europe, whereas the FES95.2, FES98 and FES99 models give anomalous results in China and Japan. It is shown that the observations from this improved set of tidal gravity stations will provide an important test of the new ocean tide models that will be developed in the next few years. For further details see Baker, T.F. and Bos, M.S. (2003). "Validating Earth and ocean tide models using tidal gravity measurements", Geophysical Journal International, 152.

  1. Progress in the Development and Application of Climate Ocean Models and Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Models in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    A review is presented about the development and application of climate ocean models and oceanatmosphere coupled models developed in China as well as 8 review of climate variability and climate change studies performed with these models.While the history of model development is briefly reviewed,emphasis has been put on the achievements made in the last five years.Advances in model development are described along with a summary on scientific issues addressed by using these models.The focus of the review is the climate ocean models and the associated coupled models,including both global and regional models,developed at the Institute of Atmospheric Physics,Chinese Academy of Sciences.The progress of either coupled model development made by other institutions or climate modeling using internationally developed models also is reviewed.

  2. Overview on high-resolution ocean modeling in JAMSTEC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Michio Kawamiya

    2014-01-01

    In view of the importance of ocean component for representing climate change,efforts are underway to implement a high-resolution nesting model system in Model for Interdisciplinary Research on Climate (MI-ROC) for the North Pacific using the same ocean model as used in the coupled model MIROC5. By comparing double (10 km for the northwestern Pacific,50 km for the rest of the Pacific) and triple (double nesting plus 2 km resolution near Japan) nesting,it turns out that relative vorticity is drastically enhanced near Japan with 2 km resolution. It is hoped that such an elaborated nesting system will reveal detailed processes for the ocean heat uptake by,e.g.,intermediate water and mode water formation for which the“perturbed region”near Japan is the key region.

  3. Variational Data Assimilation for Optimizing Boundary Conditions in Ocean Models

    CERN Document Server

    Kazantsev, Christine; Tolstykh, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    The review describes the development of ideas Gury Ivanovich Marchuk in the field of variational data assimilation for ocean models applied in particular in coupled models for long-range weather forecasts. Particular attention is paid to the optimization of boundary conditions on rigid boundaries. As idealized and realistic model configurations are considered. It is shown that the optimization allows us to determine the most sensitive model operators and bring the model solution closer to the assimilated data.

  4. Multiresolution in CROCO (Coastal and Regional Ocean Community model)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debreu, Laurent; Auclair, Francis; Benshila, Rachid; Capet, Xavier; Dumas, Franck; Julien, Swen; Marchesiello, Patrick

    2016-04-01

    CROCO (Coastal and Regional Ocean Community model [1]) is a new oceanic modeling system built upon ROMS_AGRIF and the non-hydrostatic kernel of SNH, gradually including algorithms from MARS3D (sediments)and HYCOM (vertical coordinates). An important objective of CROCO is to provide the possibility of running truly multiresolution simulations. Our previous work on structured mesh refinement [2] allowed us to run two-way nesting with the following major features: conservation, spatial and temporal refinement, coupling at the barotropic level. In this presentation, we will expose the current developments in CROCO towards multiresolution simulations: connection between neighboring grids at the same level of resolution and load balancing on parallel computers. Results of preliminary experiments will be given both on an idealized test case and on a realistic simulation of the Bay of Biscay with high resolution along the coast. References: [1] : CROCO : http://www.croco-ocean.org [2] : Debreu, L., P. Marchesiello, P. Penven, and G. Cambon, 2012: Two-way nesting in split-explicit ocean models: algorithms, implementation and validation. Ocean Modelling, 49-50, 1-21.

  5. Numerical modelling of floating debris in the world's oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebreton, L C-M; Greer, S D; Borrero, J C

    2012-03-01

    A global ocean circulation model is coupled to a Lagrangian particle tracking model to simulate 30 years of input, transport and accumulation of floating debris in the world ocean. Using both terrestrial and maritime inputs, the modelling results clearly show the formation of five accumulation zones in the subtropical latitudes of the major ocean basins. The relative size and concentration of each clearly illustrate the dominance of the accumulation zones in the northern hemisphere, while smaller seas surrounded by densely populated areas are also shown to have a high concentration of floating debris. We also determine the relative contribution of different source regions to the total amount of material in a particular accumulation zone. This study provides a framework for describing the transport, distribution and accumulation of floating marine debris and can be continuously updated and adapted to assess scenarios reflecting changes in the production and disposal of plastic worldwide. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. A Global Ocean Biogeochemistry General Circulation Model and its Simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU Yongfu; LI Yangchun; CHU Min

    2013-01-01

    An ocean biogeochemistry model was developed and incorporated into a global ocean general circulation model (LICOM) to form an ocean biogeochemistry general circulation model (OBGCM).The model was used to study the natural carbon cycle and the uptake and storage of anthropogenic CO2 in the ocean.A global export production of 12.5 Pg C yr-1 was obtained.The model estimated that in the pre-industrial era the global equatorial region within ±15° of the equator released 0.97 Pg C yr-1 to the atmosphere,which was balanced by the gain of CO2 in other regions.The post-industrial air-sea CO2 flux indicated the oceanic uptake of CO2 emitted by human activities.An increase of 20-50 μmol kg-1 for surface dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) concentrations in the 1990s relative to pre-industrial times was obtained in the simulation,which was consistent with data-based estimates.The model generated a total anthropogenic carbon inventory of 105 Pg C as of 1994,which was within the range of estimates by other researchers.Various transports of both natural and anthropogenic DIC as well as labile dissolved organic carbon (LDOC)were estimated from the simulation.It was realized that the Southern Ocean and the high-latitude region of the North Pacific are important export regions where accumulative air-sea CO2 fluxes are larger than the DIC inventory,whereas the subtropical regions are acceptance regions.The interhemispheric transport of total natural carbon (DIC+LDOC) was found to be northward (0.11 Pg C yr-1),which was just balanced by the gain of carbon from the atmosphere in the Southern Hemisphere.

  7. iMarNet: an ocean biogeochemistry model inter-comparison project within a common physical ocean modelling framework

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Kwiatkowski

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Ocean biogeochemistry (OBGC models span a wide range of complexities from highly simplified, nutrient-restoring schemes, through nutrient-phytoplankton-zooplankton-detritus (NPZD models that crudely represent the marine biota, through to models that represent a broader trophic structure by grouping organisms as plankton functional types (PFT based on their biogeochemical role (Dynamic Green Ocean Models; DGOM and ecosystem models which group organisms by ecological function and trait. OBGC models are now integral components of Earth System Models (ESMs, but they compete for computing resources with higher resolution dynamical setups and with other components such as atmospheric chemistry and terrestrial vegetation schemes. As such, the choice of OBGC in ESMs needs to balance model complexity and realism alongside relative computing cost. Here, we present an inter-comparison of six OBGC models that were candidates for implementation within the next UK Earth System Model (UKESM1. The models cover a large range of biological complexity (from 7 to 57 tracers but all include representations of at least the nitrogen, carbon, alkalinity and oxygen cycles. Each OBGC model was coupled to the Nucleus for the European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO ocean general circulation model (GCM, and results from physically identical hindcast simulations were compared. Model skill was evaluated for biogeochemical metrics of global-scale bulk properties using conventional statistical techniques. The computing cost of each model was also measured in standardised tests run at two resource levels. No model is shown to consistently outperform or underperform all other models across all metrics. Nonetheless, the simpler models that are easier to tune are broadly closer to observations across a number of fields, and thus offer a high-efficiency option for ESMs that prioritise high resolution climate dynamics. However, simpler models provide limited insight into more complex

  8. Climate Ocean Modeling on a Beowulf Class System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, B. N.; Chao, Y.; Wang, P.; Bondarenko, M.

    2000-01-01

    With the growing power and shrinking cost of personal computers. the availability of fast ethernet interconnections, and public domain software packages, it is now possible to combine them to build desktop parallel computers (named Beowulf or PC clusters) at a fraction of what it would cost to buy systems of comparable power front supercomputer companies. This led as to build and assemble our own sys tem. specifically for climate ocean modeling. In this article, we present our experience with such a system, discuss its network performance, and provide some performance comparison data with both HP SPP2000 and Cray T3E for an ocean Model used in present-day oceanographic research.

  9. Impact of Icebergs on Net Primary Productivity in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuang-Ye; Hou, Shugui

    2017-04-01

    Productivity in the Southern Ocean (SO) is iron-limited, and supply of iron dissolved from aeolian dust is believed to be the main source from outside the marine environment. However, recent studies show that icebergs could provide comparable amount of bioavailable iron to the SO as aeolian dust. In addition, small scale areal studies suggest increased concentrations of chlorophyll, krill, and seabirds surrounding icebergs. Based on previous research, this study aims to examine whether iceberg occurrence has a significant impact on marine productivity at the scale of the SO, using remote sensing data of iceberg occurrences and ocean net primary productivity (NPP) covering the period 2002-2014. The impacts of both large and small icebergs are examined in four major ecological zones of the SO: the continental shelf zone (CSZ), the seasonal ice zone (SIZ), the permanent open ocean zone (POOZ) and the polar front zone (PFZ). We found that both large and small icebergs have an observable positive impact on NPP, but their impacts vary in different zones. Small icebergs on average increase NPP in most iron deficient zones: by 21% for the SIZ, 16% for the POOZ, and 12% for the PFZ, but have relatively small effect in the CSZ where iron is supplied from melt water and sediment input from the continent. Large icebergs on average increase the NPP by about 10%. Their impacts are stronger at higher latitudes, where they are more concentrated. From 1992-2014, there is a significant increasing trend for both small and large icebergs. The increase was most rapid in the early 2000s, and has levelled off since then. As the climate continues to warm, the Antarctic Ice Sheet is expected to experience increased mass loss as a whole, which could lead to more icebergs in the region. Based on our study, this could result in higher level of NPP in the SO as a whole, providing a negative feedback for global warming.

  10. Manganese in the world ocean: a first global model

    CERN Document Server

    van Hulten, M M P; Middag, R; de Baar, H J W; Roy-Barman, M; Gehlen, M; Tagliabue, A; Sterl, A

    2016-01-01

    Dissolved manganese (Mn) is a biologically essential element, and its oxidised form is involved in the removal of trace elements from ocean waters. Recently, a large number of highly accurate Mn measurements have been obtained in the Atlantic, Indian and Arctic Oceans as part of the GEOTRACES programme. The goal of this study is to combine these new observations with state-of-the-art modelling to give new insights into the main sources and redistribution of Mn throughout the ocean. To this end, we simulate the distribution of dissolved Mn using a global-scale circulation model. This first model includes simple parameterisations to account, realistically, for the sources, processes and sinks of Mn in the ocean. Whereas oxidation and (photo)reduction, as well as aggregation and settling are parameterised in the model, biological uptake is not yet taken into account by the model. Our model reproduces observations accurately and provides the following insights: - The high surface concentrations of manganese are c...

  11. CGRP in human models of primary headaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ashina, Håkan; Schytz, Henrik Winther; Ashina, Messoud

    2017-01-01

    experiments are likely due to assay variation; therefore, proper validation and standardization of an assay is needed. To what extent CGRP is involved in tension-type headache and cluster headache is unknown. CONCLUSION: Human models of primary headaches have elucidated the role of CGRP in headache......OBJECTIVE: To review the role of CGRP in human models of primary headaches and to discuss methodological aspects and future directions. DISCUSSION: Provocation experiments demonstrated a heterogeneous CGRP migraine response in migraine patients. Conflicting CGRP plasma results in the provocation...... pathophysiology and sparked great interest in developing new treatment strategies using CGRP antagonists and antibodies. Future studies applying more refined human experimental models should identify biomarkers of CGRP-induced primary headache and reveal whether CGRP provocation experiments could be used...

  12. South Atlantic circulation in a world ocean model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew H. England

    Full Text Available The circulation in the South Atlantic Ocean has been simulated within a global ocean general circulation model. Preliminary analysis of the modelled ocean circulation in the region indicates a rather close agreement of the simulated upper ocean flows with conventional notions of the large-scale geostrophic currents in the region. The modelled South Atlantic Ocean witnesses the return flow and export of North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW at its northern boundary, the inflow of a rather barotropic Antarctic Circumpolar Current (ACC through the Drake Passage, and the inflow of warm saline Agulhas water around the Cape of Good Hope. The Agulhas leakage amounts to 8.7 Sv, within recent estimates of the mass transport shed westward at the Agulhas retroflection. Topographic steering of the ACC dominates the structure of flow in the circumpolar ocean. The Benguela Current is seen to be fed by a mixture of saline Indian Ocean water (originating from the Agulhas Current and fresher Subantarctic surface water (originating in the ACC. The Benguela Current is seen to modify its flow and fate with depth; near the surface it flows north-westwards bifurcating most of its transport northward into the North Atlantic Ocean (for ultimate replacement of North Atlantic surface waters lost to the NADW conveyor. Deeper in the water column, more of the Benguela Current is destined to return with the Brazil Current, though northward flows are still generated where the Benguela Current extension encounters the coast of South America. At intermediate levels, these northward currents trace the flow of Antarctic Intermediate Water (AAIW equatorward, though even more AAIW is seen to recirculate poleward in the subtropical gyre. In spite of the model's rather coarse resolution, some subtle features of the Brazil-Malvinas Confluence are simulated rather well, including the latitude at which the two currents meet. Conceptual diagrams of the recirculation and interocean

  13. The Marine Virtual Laboratory: enabling efficient ocean model configuration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. R. Oke

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The technical steps involved in configuring a regional ocean model are analogous for all community models. All require the generation of a model grid, preparation and interpolation of topography, initial conditions, and forcing fields. Each task in configuring a regional ocean model is straight-forward – but the process of downloading and reformatting data can be time-consuming. For an experienced modeller, the configuration of a new model domain can take as little as a few hours – but for an inexperienced modeller, it can take much longer. In pursuit of technical efficiency, the Australian ocean modelling community has developed the Web-based MARine Virtual Laboratory (WebMARVL. WebMARVL allows a user to quickly and easily configure an ocean general circulation or wave model through a simple interface, reducing the time to configure a regional model to a few minutes. Through WebMARVL, a user is prompted to define the basic options needed for a model configuration, including the: model, run duration, spatial extent, and input data. Once all aspects of the configuration are selected, a series of data extraction, reprocessing, and repackaging services are run, and a "take-away bundle" is prepared for download. Building on the capabilities developed under Australia's Integrated Marine Observing System, WebMARVL also extracts all of the available observations for the chosen time-space domain. The user is able to download the take-away bundle, and use it to run the model of their choice. Models supported by WebMARVL include three community ocean general circulation models, and two community wave models. The model configuration from the take-away bundle is intended to be a starting point for scientific research. The user may subsequently refine the details of the model set-up to improve the model performance for the given application. In this study, WebMARVL is described along with a series of results from test cases comparing Web

  14. An Analysis of Eddy Resolving Global Ocean Models in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    zains. Improvement in this area and in veruical resohution of the model will improve this globa three wlmodel. More thennohalinge observations in the...the ACC reaches far enough north to collide with the warm southward flowing Brazil current. The influence of the Southern Ocean on the rest of the...The induced upwelling of the relatively warm , saline, deep water necessitates a compenating southward flow of deep water. The deep water upweiling

  15. Multiple stressors of ocean ecosystems in the 21st century: projections with CMIP5 models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Bopp

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ocean ecosystems are increasingly stressed by human-induced changes of their physical, chemical and biological environment. Among these changes, warming, acidification, deoxygenation and changes in primary productivity by marine phytoplankton can be considered as four of the major stressors of open ocean ecosystems. Due to rising atmospheric CO2 in the coming decades, these changes will be amplified. Here, we use the most recent simulations performed in the framework of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project 5 to assess how these stressors may evolve over the course of the 21st century. The 10 Earth system models used here project similar trends in ocean warming, acidification, deoxygenation and reduced primary productivity for each of the IPCC's representative concentration pathways (RCPs over the 21st century. For the "business-as-usual" scenario RCP8.5, the model-mean changes in the 2090s (compared to the 1990s for sea surface temperature, sea surface pH, global O2 content and integrated primary productivity amount to +2.73 (±0.72 °C, −0.33 (±0.003 pH unit, −3.45 (±0.44% and −8.6 (±7.9%, respectively. For the high mitigation scenario RCP2.6, corresponding changes are +0.71 (±0.45 °C, −0.07 (±0.001 pH unit, −1.81 (±0.31% and −2.0 (±4.1%, respectively, illustrating the effectiveness of extreme mitigation strategies. Although these stressors operate globally, they display distinct regional patterns and thus do not change coincidentally. Large decreases in O2 and in pH are simulated in global ocean intermediate and mode waters, whereas large reductions in primary production are simulated in the tropics and in the North Atlantic. Although temperature and pH projections are robust across models, the same does not hold for projections of subsurface O2 concentrations in the tropics and global and regional changes in net primary productivity. These high uncertainties in projections of primary productivity and subsurface

  16. Ventilation of the Miocene Arctic Ocean: An idealized model study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Bijoy; Nilsson, Johan; Nycander, Jonas; Jakobsson, Martin; Döös, Kristofer

    2010-11-01

    A model study of an idealized early Miocene Arctic Ocean has been undertaken. The work is motivated by the first drill core retrieved from the Lomonosov Ridge in the central Arctic Ocean, which suggests a transition from anoxic to oxic condition during the early Miocene, a feature presumably related to the opening of the Fram Strait. Here, the ventilation in a semienclosed basin, connected with the ocean through a strait with a sill, is examined using an ocean circulation model that includes a passive age tracer. In particular, we investigate how the ventilation depends on strait geometry, freshwater influx, and surface wind stress. We find that the turnover time, characterizing the bulk ventilation rate, is primarily controlled by the strait width and the wind stress. Generally, the oldest water in the basin is encountered near the sill depth, but wind forcing displaces the oldest water downward. For narrow straits, the turnover time gives an upper bound on the mean age of the basin water. The results have implications when translating local oxygen conditions, recorded in the sediment sequence from the Lomonosov Ridge, to basin-scale circulation patterns. Further, the results indicate that the early Miocene Arctic Ocean became well ventilated when the Fram Strait reached a width of about 100 km.

  17. Lagrangian Time Series Models for Ocean Surface Drifter Trajectories

    CERN Document Server

    Sykulski, Adam M; Lilly, Jonathan M; Danioux, Eric

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes stochastic models for the analysis of ocean surface trajectories obtained from freely-drifting satellite-tracked instruments. The proposed time series models are used to summarise large multivariate datasets and infer important physical parameters of inertial oscillations and other ocean processes. Nonstationary time series methods are employed to account for the spatiotemporal variability of each trajectory. Because the datasets are large, we construct computationally efficient methods through the use of frequency-domain modelling and estimation, with the data expressed as complex-valued time series. We detail how practical issues related to sampling and model misspecification may be addressed using semi-parametric techniques for time series, and we demonstrate the effectiveness of our stochastic models through application to both real-world data and to numerical model output.

  18. Formulation of an ocean model for global climate simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Griffies

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper summarizes the formulation of the ocean component to the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory's (GFDL climate model used for the 4th IPCC Assessment (AR4 of global climate change. In particular, it reviews the numerical schemes and physical parameterizations that make up an ocean climate model and how these schemes are pieced together for use in a state-of-the-art climate model. Features of the model described here include the following: (1 tripolar grid to resolve the Arctic Ocean without polar filtering, (2 partial bottom step representation of topography to better represent topographically influenced advective and wave processes, (3 more accurate equation of state, (4 three-dimensional flux limited tracer advection to reduce overshoots and undershoots, (5 incorporation of regional climatological variability in shortwave penetration, (6 neutral physics parameterization for representation of the pathways of tracer transport, (7 staggered time stepping for tracer conservation and numerical efficiency, (8 anisotropic horizontal viscosities for representation of equatorial currents, (9 parameterization of exchange with marginal seas, (10 incorporation of a free surface that accomodates a dynamic ice model and wave propagation, (11 transport of water across the ocean free surface to eliminate unphysical ``virtual tracer flux' methods, (12 parameterization of tidal mixing on continental shelves. We also present preliminary analyses of two particularly important sensitivities isolated during the development process, namely the details of how parameterized subgridscale eddies transport momentum and tracers.

  19. Ocean Model, Analysis and Prediction System version 3: operational global ocean forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassington, Gary; Sandery, Paul; Sakov, Pavel; Freeman, Justin; Divakaran, Prasanth; Beckett, Duan

    2017-04-01

    The Ocean Model, Analysis and Prediction System version 3 (OceanMAPSv3) is a near-global (75S-75N; no sea-ice), uniform horizontal resolution (0.1°x0.1°), 51 vertical level ocean forecast system producing daily analyses and 7 day forecasts. This system was declared operational at the Bureau of Meteorology in April 2016 and subsequently upgraded to include ACCESS-G APS2 in June 2016 and finally ported to the Bureau's new supercomputer in Sep 2016. This system realises the original vision of the BLUElink projects (2003-2015) to provide global forecasts of the ocean geostrophic turbulence (eddies and fronts) in support of Naval operations as well as other national services. The analysis system has retained an ensemble-based optimal interpolation method with 144 stationary ensemble members derived from a multi-year hindcast. However, the BODAS code has been upgraded to a new code base ENKF-C. A new strategy for initialisation has been introduced leading to greater retention of analysis increments and reduced shock. The analysis cycle has been optimised for a 3-cycle system with 3 day observation windows retaining an advantage as a multi-cycle time-lagged ensemble. The sea surface temperature and sea surface height anomaly analysis errors in the Australian region are 0.34 degC and 6.2 cm respectively an improvement of 10% and 20% respectively over version 2. In addition, the RMSE of the 7 day forecast has lower error than the 1 day forecast from the previous system (version 2). International intercomparisons have shown that this system is comparable in performance with the two leading systems and is often the leading performer for surface temperature and upper ocean temperature. We present an overview of the system, the data assimilation and initialisation, demonstrate the performance and outline future directions.

  20. Equatorial Indian Ocean subsurface current variability in an Ocean General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnanaseelan, C.; Deshpande, Aditi

    2017-05-01

    The variability of subsurface currents in the equatorial Indian Ocean is studied using high resolution Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) simulations during 1958-2009. February-March eastward equatorial subsurface current (ESC) shows weak variability whereas strong variability is observed in northern summer and fall ESC. An eastward subsurface current with maximum amplitude in the pycnocline is prominent right from summer to winter during strong Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) years when air-sea coupling is significant. On the other hand during weak IOD years, both the air-sea coupling and the ESC are weak. This strongly suggests the role of ESC on the strength of IOD. The extension of the ESC to the summer months during the strong IOD years strengthens the oceanic response and supports intensification and maintenance of IODs through modulation of air sea coupling. Although the ESC is triggered by equatorial winds, the coupled air-sea interaction associated with IODs strengthens the ESC to persist for several seasons thereby establishing a positive feedback cycle with the surface. This suggests that the ESC plays a significant role in the coupled processes associated with the evolution and intensification of IOD events by cooling the eastern basin and strengthening thermocline-SST (sea surface temperature) interaction. As the impact of IOD events on Indian summer monsoon is significant only during strong IOD years, understanding and monitoring the evolution of ESC during these years is important for summer monsoon forecasting purposes. There is a westward phase propagation of anomalous subsurface currents which persists for a year during strong IOD years, whereas such persistence or phase propagation is not seen during weak IOD years, supporting the close association between ESC and strength of air sea coupling during strong IOD years. In this study we report the processes which strengthen the IOD events and the air sea coupling associated with IOD. It also unravels

  1. Explicit Modeling of Solid Ocean Floor in Shallow Underwater Explosions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.P. Walters

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Current practices for modeling the ocean floor in underwater explosion simulations call for application of an inviscid fluid with soil properties. A method for modeling the ocean floor as a Lagrangian solid, vice an Eulerian fluid, was developed in order to determine its effects on underwater explosions in shallow water using the DYSMAS solver. The Lagrangian solid bottom model utilized transmitting boundary segments, exterior nodal forces acting as constraints, and the application of prestress to minimize any distortions into the fluid domain. For simplicity, elastic materials were used in this current effort, though multiple constitutive soil models can be applied to improve the overall accuracy of the model. Even though this method is unable to account for soil cratering effects, it does however provide the distinct advantage of modeling contoured ocean floors such as dredged channels and sloped bottoms absent in Eulerian formulations. The study conducted here showed significant differences among the initial bottom reflections for the different solid bottom contours that were modeled. The most important bottom contour effect was the distortion to the gas bubble and its associated first pulse timing. In addition to its utility in bottom modeling, implementation of the non-reflecting boundary along with realistic material models can be used to drastically reduce the size of current fluid domains.

  2. Towards accounting for dissolved iron speciation in global ocean models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tagliabue

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available The trace metal iron (Fe is now routinely included in state-of-the-art ocean general circulation and biogeochemistry models (OGCBMs because of its key role as a limiting nutrient in regions of the world ocean important for carbon cycling and air-sea CO2 exchange. However, the complexities of the seawater Fe cycle, which impact its speciation and bioavailability, are simplified in such OGCBMs due to gaps in understanding and to avoid high computational costs. In a similar fashion to inorganic carbon speciation, we outline a means by which the complex speciation of Fe can be included in global OGCBMs in a reasonably cost-effective manner. We construct an Fe speciation model based on hypothesised relationships between rate constants and environmental variables (temperature, light, oxygen, pH, salinity and assumptions regarding the binding strengths of Fe complexing organic ligands and test hypotheses regarding their distributions. As a result, we find that the global distribution of different Fe species is tightly controlled by spatio-temporal environmental variability and the distribution of Fe binding ligands. Impacts on bioavailable Fe are highly sensitive to assumptions regarding which Fe species are bioavailable and how those species vary in space and time. When forced by representations of future ocean circulation and climate we find large changes to the speciation of Fe governed by pH mediated changes to redox kinetics. We speculate that these changes may exert selective pressure on phytoplankton Fe uptake strategies in the future ocean. In future work, more information on the sources and sinks of ocean Fe ligands, their bioavailability, the cycling of colloidal Fe species and kinetics of Fe-surface coordination reactions would be invaluable. We hope our modeling approach can provide a means by which new observations of Fe speciation can be tested against hypotheses of the processes present in governing the ocean Fe cycle in an

  3. Tidal simulation using regional ocean modeling systems (ROMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaochun; Chao, Yi; Li, Zhijin; Dong, Changming; Farrara, John; McWilliams, James C.; Shum, C. K.; Wang, Yu; Matsumoto, Koji; Rosenfeld, Leslie K.; Paduan, Jeffrey D.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of our research is to test the capability of ROMS in simulating tides. The research also serves as a necessary exercise to implement tides in an operational ocean forecasting system. In this paper, we emphasize the validation of the model tide simulation. The characteristics and energetics of tides of the region will be reported in separate publications.

  4. Verification of the Naval Oceanic Vertical Aerosol Model During Fire

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Davidson, K.L.; Leeuw, G. de; Gathman, S.G.; Jensen, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Naval Oceanic Vertical Aerosol Model (NOVAM) has been formulated to estimate the vertical structure of the optical and infrared extinction coefficients in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL), for waverengths between 0,2 and 40 um. NOVAM was designed to predict, utilizing a set of routin

  5. The Naval Ocean Vertical Aerosol Model : Progress Report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuw, G. de; Gathman, S.G.; Davidson, K.L.; Jensen, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    The Naval Oceanic Vertical Aerosol Model (NOVAM) has been formulated to estimate the vertical structure of the optical and infrared extinction coefficients in the marine atmospheric boundary layer (MABL). NOVAM was designed to predict the non-uniform and non-logarithmic extinction profiles which are

  6. Approximate Stokes Drift Profiles and their use in Ocean Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breivik, Oyvind; Bidlot, Jea-Raymond; Janssen, Peter A. E. M.; Mogensen, Kristian

    2016-04-01

    Deep-water approximations to the Stokes drift velocity profile are explored as alternatives to the monochromatic profile. The alternative profiles investigated rely on the same two quantities required for the monochromatic profile, viz the Stokes transport and the surface Stokes drift velocity. Comparisons against parametric spectra and profiles under wave spectra from the ERA-Interim reanalysis and buoy observations reveal much better agreement than the monochromatic profile even for complex sea states. That the profiles give a closer match and a more correct shear has implications for ocean circulation models since the Coriolis-Stokes force depends on the magnitude and direction of the Stokes drift profile and Langmuir turbulence parameterizations depend sensitively on the shear of the profile. Of the two Stokes drift profiles explored here, the profile based on the Phillips spectrum is by far the best. In particular, the shear near the surface is almost identical to that influenced by the f-5 tail of spectral wave models. The NEMO general circulation ocean model was recently extended to incorporate the Stokes-Coriolis force along with two other wave-related effects. The ECWMF coupled atmosphere-wave-ocean ensemble forecast system now includes these wave effects in the ocean model component (NEMO).

  7. Spatial distribution of the iron supply to phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean: a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lancelot

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available An upgraded version of the biogeochemical model SWAMCO is coupled to the ocean-sea-ice model NEMO-LIM to explore processes governing the spatial distribution of the iron supply to phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean. The 3-D NEMO-LIM-SWAMCO model is implemented in the ocean domain south of latitude 30° S and runs are performed over September 1989–December 2000. Model scenarios include potential iron sources (atmospheric deposition, iceberg calving/melting and continental sediments as well as iron storage within sea ice, all formulated based on a literature review. When all these processes are included, the simulated iron profiles and phytoplankton bloom distributions show satisfactory agreement with observations. Analyses of simulations and sensitivity tests point to the key role played by continental sediments as a primary source for iron. Iceberg calving and melting contribute by up to 25% of Chl-a simulated in areas influenced by icebergs while atmospheric deposition has little effect at high latitudes. Activating sea ice-ocean iron exchanges redistribute iron geographically. Stored in the ice during winter formation, iron is then transported due to ice motion and is released and made available to phytoplankton during summer melt, in the vicinity of the marginal ice zones. Transient iron storage and transport associated with sea ice dynamics stimulate summer phytoplankton blooming (up to 3 mg Chl-a m-3 in the Weddell Sea and off East Antarctica but not in the Ross, Bellingshausen and Amundsen Seas. This contrasted feature results from the simulated variable content of iron in sea ice and release of melting ice showing higher ice-ocean iron fluxes in the continental shelves of the Weddell and Ross Seas than in the Eastern Weddell Sea and the Bellingshausen-Amundsen Seas. This study confirms that iron sources and transport in the Southern Ocean likely provide important mechanisms in the geographical development of

  8. Spatial distribution of the iron supply to phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean: a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Lancelot

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available An upgraded version of the biogeochemical model SWAMCO is coupled to the ocean-sea-ice model NEMO-LIM to explore processes governing the spatial distribution of the iron supply to phytoplankton in the Southern Ocean. The 3-D NEMO-LIM-SWAMCO model is implemented in the ocean domain south of latitude 30° S and runs are performed over September 1989–December 2000. Model scenarios include potential iron sources (atmospheric deposition, iceberg calving and continental sediments as well as iron storage within sea ice, all formulated based on a literature review. When all these processes are included, the simulated iron profiles and phytoplankton bloom distributions show satisfactory agreement with observations. Analysis of simulations points to the key role played by continental sediments as a primary source for iron. Iceberg calving and melting contribute by up to 25% of Chl a simulated in areas under influence of icebergs while atmospheric deposition has little effect at high latitudes. Activating sea ice-ocean iron exchanges redistribute iron geographically. Stored in the ice during winter formation, iron is then transported due to ice motion and is released and made available to phytoplankton during summer melt, in the vicinity of the marginal ice zones. Transient iron storage and transport associated with sea ice dynamics stimulate summer phytoplankton blooming (up to 3 mg Chl a m−3 in the Weddell Sea and off East Antarctica but not in the Ross, Bellingshausen and Amundsen Seas. This contrasted feature results from the simulated variable content of iron in sea ice and release of melting ice showing higher ice-ocean iron fluxes in the continental shelves of the Weddell and Ross Seas than in the Eastern Weddell Sea and the Bellingshausen-Amundsen Seas. This study confirms that iron sources and transport in the Southern Ocean likely provide important mechanisms in the geographical development of phytoplankton blooms and

  9. A Primary Quantum Model of Telepathy

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Shan

    2003-01-01

    In this paper, we give a primary quantum theoretical model of telepathy based on the principle of quantum superluminal communication (QSC). Some feasible experimental suggestions are presented. The possible application of telepathy as one kind of new communication means is also discussed.

  10. [The model of adaptive primary image processing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudkin, K N; Mironov, S V; Dudkin, A K; Chikhman, V N

    1998-07-01

    A computer model of adaptive segmentation of the 2D visual objects was developed. Primary image descriptions are realised via spatial frequency filters and feature detectors performing as self-organised mechanisms. Simulation of the control processes related to attention, lateral, frequency-selective and cross-orientation inhibition, determines the adaptive image processing.

  11. The Finite Element Sea Ice-Ocean Model (FESOM v.1.4: formulation of an ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Q. Wang

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The Finite Element Sea Ice-Ocean Model (FESOM is the first global ocean general circulation model based on unstructured-mesh methods that has been developed for the purpose of climate research. The advantage of unstructured-mesh models is their flexible multi-resolution modelling functionality. In this study, an overview of the main features of FESOM will be given; based on sensitivity experiments a number of specific parameter choices will be explained; and directions of future developments will be outlined. It is argued that FESOM is sufficiently mature to explore the benefits of multi-resolution climate modelling and that its applications will provide information useful for the advancement of climate modelling on unstructured meshes.

  12. Multi-Scale Coupling in Ocean and Climate Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhengyu Liu, Leslie Smith

    2009-08-14

    We have made significant progress on several projects aimed at understanding multi-scale dynamics in geophysical flows. Large-scale flows in the atmosphere and ocean are influenced by stable density stratification and rotation. The presence of stratification and rotation has important consequences through (i) the conservation of potential vorticity q = {omega} {center_dot} {del} {rho}, where {omega} is the total vorticity and {rho} is the density, and (ii) the existence of waves that affect the redistribution of energy from a given disturbance to the flow. Our research is centered on quantifying the effects of potential vorticity conservation and of wave interactions for the coupling of disparate time and space scales in the oceans and the atmosphere. Ultimately we expect the work to help improve predictive capabilities of atmosphere, ocean and climate modelers. The main findings of our research projects are described.

  13. The Dependence of Global Ocean Modeling on Background Diapycnal Mixing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zengan Deng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The Argo-derived background diapycnal mixing (BDM proposed by Deng et al. (in publish is introduced to and applied in Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM. Sensitive experiments are carried out using HYCOM to detect the responses of ocean surface temperature and Meridional Overturning Circulation (MOC to BDM in a global context. Preliminary results show that utilizing a constant BDM, with the same order of magnitude as the realistic one, may cause significant deviation in temperature and MOC. It is found that the dependence of surface temperature and MOC on BDM is prominent. Surface temperature is decreased with the increase of BDM, because diapycnal mixing can promote the deep cold water return to the upper ocean. Comparing to the control run, more striking MOC changes can be caused by the larger variation in BDM.

  14. A coupled oscillator model of shelf and ocean tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arbic, Brian K.; Garrett, Chris

    2010-04-01

    The resonances of tides in the coupled open ocean and shelf are modeled by a mechanical analogue consisting of a damped driven larger mass and spring (the open-ocean) connected to a damped smaller mass and spring (the shelf). When both masses are near resonance, the addition of even a very small mass can significantly affect the oscillations of the larger mass. The influence of the shelf is largest if the shelf is resonant with weak friction. In particular, an increase of friction on a near-resonant shelf can, perhaps surprisingly, lead to an increase in ocean tides. On the other hand, a shelf with large friction has little effect on ocean tides. Comparison of the model predictions with results from numerical models of tides during the ice ages, when lower sea levels led to a much reduced areal extent of shelves, suggests that the predicted larger tidal dissipation then is related to the ocean basins being close to resonance. New numerical simulations with a forward global tide model are used to test expectations from the mechanical analogue. Setting friction to unrealistically large values in Hudson Strait yields larger North Atlantic M2 amplitudes, very similar to those seen in a simulation with the Hudson Strait blocked off. Thus, as anticipated, a shelf with very large friction is nearly equivalent in its effect on the open ocean to the removal of the shelf altogether. Setting friction in shallow waters throughout the globe to unrealistically large values yields even larger open ocean tidal amplitudes, similar to those found in simulations of ice-age tides. It thus appears that larger modeled tides during the ice ages can be a consequence of enhanced friction in shallower water on the shelf in glacial times as well as a reduced shelf area then. Single oscillator and coupled oscillator models for global tides show that the maximum extractable power for human use is a fraction of the present dissipation rate, which is itself a fraction of global human power

  15. A new high resolution tidal model in the arctic ocean

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cancet, M.; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Lyard, F.

    The Arctic Ocean is a challenging region for tidal modeling, because of its complex and not well-documented bathymetry, together combined with the intermittent presence of sea ice and the fact that the in situ tidal observations are rather scarce at such high latitudes. As a consequence, the accu......The Arctic Ocean is a challenging region for tidal modeling, because of its complex and not well-documented bathymetry, together combined with the intermittent presence of sea ice and the fact that the in situ tidal observations are rather scarce at such high latitudes. As a consequence...... of the tides improves the quality of the high latitudes altimeter sea surface heights and of all derived products, such as the altimetry-derived geostrophic currents, the mean sea surface and the mean dynamic topography. In addition, accurate tidal models are highly strategic information for ever......-growing maritime and industrial activities in this region. NOVELTIS and DTU Space have developed a regional, high-resolution tidal atlas in the Arctic Ocean, in the framework of the CryoSat Plus for Ocean (CP4O) ESA project. In particular, this atlas benefits from the assimilation of the most complete satellite...

  16. Framework of Distributed Coupled Atmosphere-Ocean-Wave Modeling System

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WEN Yuanqiao; HUANG Liwen; DENG Jian; ZHANG Jinfeng; WANG Sisi; WANG Lijun

    2006-01-01

    In order to research the interactions between the atmosphere and ocean as well as their important role in the intensive weather systems of coastal areas, and to improve the forecasting ability of the hazardous weather processes of coastal areas, a coupled atmosphere-ocean-wave modeling system has been developed.The agent-based environment framework for linking models allows flexible and dynamic information exchange between models. For the purpose of flexibility, portability and scalability, the framework of the whole system takes a multi-layer architecture that includes a user interface layer, computational layer and service-enabling layer. The numerical experiment presented in this paper demonstrates the performance of the distributed coupled modeling system.

  17. Passive Remote Sensing of Oceanic Whitecaps: Updated Geophysical Model Function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguelova, M. D.; Bettenhausen, M. H.; Johnston, W.; Gaiser, P. W.

    2016-12-01

    Many air-sea interaction processes are quantified in terms of whitecap fraction W because oceanic whitecaps are the most visible and direct way of observing breaking of wind waves in the open ocean. Enhanced by breaking waves, surface fluxes of momentum, heat, and mass are critical for ocean-atmosphere coupling and thus affect the accuracy of models used to forecast weather, predict storm intensification, and study climate change. Whitecap fraction has been traditionally measured from photographs or video images collected from towers, ships, and aircrafts. Satellite-based passive remote sensing of whitecap fraction is a recent development that allows long term, consistent observations of whitecapping on a global scale. The method relies on changes of ocean surface emissivity at microwave frequencies (e.g., 6 to 37 GHz) due to presence of sea foam on a rough sea surface. These changes at the ocean surface are observed from the satellite as brightness temperature TB. A year-long W database built with this algorithm has proven useful in analyzing and quantifying the variability of W, as well as estimating fluxes of CO2 and sea spray production. The algorithm to obtain W from satellite observations of TB was developed at the Naval Research Laboratory within the framework of WindSat mission. The W(TB) algorithm estimates W by minimizing the differences between measured and modeled TB data. A geophysical model function (GMF) calculates TB at the top of the atmosphere as contributions from the atmosphere and the ocean surface. The ocean surface emissivity combines the emissivity of rough sea surface and the emissivity of areas covered with foam. Wind speed and direction, sea surface temperature, water vapor, and cloud liquid water are inputs to the atmospheric, roughness and foam models comprising the GMF. The W(TB) algorithm has been recently updated to use new sources and products for the input variables. We present new version of the W(TB) algorithm that uses updated

  18. Reconciling Glyoxal Observations Over Oceans with Model Simulations: A 3D sensitivity study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myriokefalitakis, S.; Daskalakis, N.; Tsigaridis, K.; Baidar, S.; Dix, B. K.; Coburn, S.; Sinreich, R.; Volkamer, R. M.; Kanakidou, M.

    2012-12-01

    Glyoxal, the smallest dicarbonyl can be observed from space, is expected to provide indications on volatile organic compounds (VOC) oxidation and secondary aerosol formation in the troposphere. Glyoxal (CHOCHO) is known to be both of natural origin as a by-product of biogenic VOC oxidation and also produced during anthropogenically emitted hydrocarbon tropospheric chemical transformations, like acetylene and aromatics. CHOCHO's short chemical lifetime in the boundary layer and the lower troposphere makes it an excellent indicator of photochemical hotspots and rapidly changing atmospheric conditions around the globe. Although over land CHOCHO atmospheric load is well established, concentrations over ocean deserts observed by satellite instruments and in-situ measurements remain a challenge for all state of the art chemistry transport models (CTM). High column amounts and concentrations of CHOCHO above oceans are observed close to upwelling areas and above regions with large concentrations of phytoplankton that suggest strong maritime biological activity. In addition, the short lifetime of CHOCHO limits long range transport from continental regions. The observed enhancement of CHOCHO load over the tropical ocean during the TORERO campaign corroborate with satellite retrieval points to the existence of primary and/or secondary tropical oceanic sources of CHOCHO; currently neglected or underestimated these chemical pathways by current knowledge. This hypothesis is investigated based on simulations using global TM4-ECPL CTM. The modeling focuses in the TORERO region and reconciles TORERO ship and aircraft observations with the model results.

  19. Parallel Computing of Ocean General Circulation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This paper discusses the parallel computing of the thirdgeneration Ocea n General Circulation Model (OGCM) from the State Key Laboratory of Numerical Mo deling for Atmospheric Science and Geophysical Fluid Dynamics(LASG),Institute of Atmosphere Physics(IAP). Meanwhile, several optimization strategies for paralle l computing of OGCM (POGCM) on Scalable Shared Memory Multiprocessor (S2MP) are presented. Using Message Passing Interface (MPI), we obtain super linear speedup on SGI Origin 2000 for parallel OGCM(POGCM) after optimization.

  20. Three-Dimensional Ocean Noise Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-03-01

    particular attention paid to the case of Gaussian canyon . The solution to the three-dimensional wave equation in Cartesian co-ordinates can be written...in terms of a modal decomposition, carried out in the vertical and across- canyon horizontal directions. Work Completed 1. Nx2D and 3D Noise PE...azimuth in the Hudson Canyon [Figure 2). Additionally, the PE-reciprocity noise model was used to estimate the size, speed and distance from the

  1. Towards accounting for dissolved iron speciation in global ocean models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Tagliabue

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The trace metal iron (Fe is now routinely included in state-of-the-art ocean general circulation and biogeochemistry models (OGCBMs because of its key role as a limiting nutrient in regions of the world ocean important for carbon cycling and air-sea CO2 exchange. However, the complexities of the seawater Fe cycle, which impact its speciation and bioavailability, are highly simplified in such OGCBMs to avoid high computational costs. In a similar fashion to inorganic carbon speciation, we outline a means by which the complex speciation of Fe can be included in global OGCBMs in a reasonably cost-effective manner. We use our Fe speciation to suggest the global distribution of different Fe species is tightly controlled by environmental variability (temperature, light, oxygen and pH and the assumptions regarding Fe binding ligands. Impacts on bioavailable Fe are highly sensitive to assumptions regarding which Fe species are bioavailable. When forced by representations of future ocean circulation and climate we find large changes to the speciation of Fe governed by pH mediated changes to redox kinetics. We speculate that these changes may exert selective pressure on phytoplankton Fe uptake strategies in the future ocean. We hope our modeling approach can also be used as a ''test bed'' for exploring our understanding of Fe speciation at the global scale.

  2. Aluminium in an ocean general circulation model compared with the West Atlantic Geotraces cruises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulten, M. M. P.; Sterl, A.; Tagliabue, A.; Dutay, J. -C.; Gehlen, M.; de Baar, H. J. W.; Middag, R.

    2013-01-01

    A model of aluminium has been developed and implemented in an Ocean General Circulation Model (NEMO-PISCES). In the model, aluminium enters the ocean by means of dust deposition. The internal oceanic processes are described by advection, mixing and reversible scavenging. The model has been evaluated

  3. Aluminium in an ocean general circulation model compared with the West Atlantic Geotraces cruises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulten, M. M. P.; Sterl, A.; Tagliabue, A.; Dutay, J. -C.; Gehlen, M.; de Baar, H. J. W.; Middag, R.

    2013-01-01

    A model of aluminium has been developed and implemented in an Ocean General Circulation Model (NEMO-PISCES). In the model, aluminium enters the ocean by means of dust deposition. The internal oceanic processes are described by advection, mixing and reversible scavenging. The model has been evaluated

  4. Coupled Modeling of Hydrodynamics and Sound in Coastal Ocean for Renewable Ocean Energy Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Wen; Jung, Ki Won; Yang, Zhaoqing; Copping, Andrea; Deng, Z. Daniel

    2016-03-01

    An underwater sound model was developed to simulate sound propagation from marine and hydrokinetic energy (MHK) devices or offshore wind (OSW) energy platforms. Finite difference methods were developed to solve the 3D Helmholtz equation for sound propagation in the coastal environment. A 3D sparse matrix solver with complex coefficients was formed for solving the resulting acoustic pressure field. The Complex Shifted Laplacian Preconditioner (CSLP) method was applied to solve the matrix system iteratively with MPI parallelization using a high performance cluster. The sound model was then coupled with the Finite Volume Community Ocean Model (FVCOM) for simulating sound propagation generated by human activities, such as construction of OSW turbines or tidal stream turbine operations, in a range-dependent setting. As a proof of concept, initial validation of the solver is presented for two coastal wedge problems. This sound model can be useful for evaluating impacts on marine mammals due to deployment of MHK devices and OSW energy platforms.

  5. Skill assessment of the PELAGOS global ocean biogeochemistry model over the period 1980–2000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vichi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Global Ocean Biogeochemistry General Circulation Models are useful tools to study biogeochemical processes at global and large scales under current climate and future scenario conditions. The credibility of future estimates is however dependent on the model skill in capturing the observed multi-annual variability of firstly the mean bulk biogeochemical properties, and secondly the rates at which organic matter is processed within the food web. For this double purpose, the results of a multi-annual simulation of the global ocean biogeochemical model PELAGOS have been objectively compared with multi-variate observations from the last 20 years of the 20th century, both considering bulk variables and carbon production/consumption rates. Simulated net primary production (NPP is comparable with satellite-derived estimates at the global scale and when compared with an independent data-set of in situ observations in the equatorial Pacific. The usage of objective skill indicators allowed us to demonstrate the importance of comparing like with like when considering carbon transformation processes. NPP scores improve substantially when in situ data are compared with modeled NPP which takes into account the excretion of freshly-produced dissolved organic carbon (DOC. It is thus recommended that DOC measurements be performed during in situ NPP measurements to quantify the actual production of organic carbon in the surface ocean. The chlorophyll bias in the Southern Ocean that affects this model as well as several others is linked to the inadequate representation of the mixed layer seasonal cycle in the region. A sensitivity experiment confirms that the artificial increase of mixed layer depths towards the observed values substantially reduces the bias. Our assessment results qualify the model for studies of carbon transformation in the surface ocean and metabolic balances. Within the limits of the model assumption and known biases, PELAGOS indicates a net

  6. STUDY OF OCEAN CIRCULATION IN INDONESIAN ARCHIPELAGO SEA USING THREE DIMENSIONAL OCEAN MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Dewa Nym. Nurweda P.,

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS was used to simulate the Indonesian Archipelago Sea current and temperature with two different vertical mixing schemes. One corresponds to the newly developed K-Profile Parameterization (KPP scheme and the other is adapted from the stability frequency of Brunt-Vaisala Frequency mixing (BVF. It is found that, both of schemes produce reasonably realistic sea surface temperature (SST; however, the root mean square error (RMSE values from the BVF vertical mixing were less than the KPP vertical mixing. The RMSE values from the BVF vertical mixing at northwest and southeast monsoons can be reduced down to 5.1607E-01 0C and 5.7639E-01 0C respectively. These validation results reveal that accuracy of the BVF vertical mixing is better than the KPP vertical mixing.The model results based on the BVF vertical mixing scheme show that the direction of Java Sea, Karimata and Sunda Straits surface current are strongly affected by the zonal wind system. The direction of surface current was change following the monsoonal wind system. On the other hand, the Makasar Strait surface current tend to flow southward throughout the year with annual variations in transport are related dynamically to the monsoon winds. These southward surface currents are known as Indonesian Through Flow (ITF and it is governed by strong pressure gradient from the Pacific to the Indian Oceans. The signals of El Nino 2002 event also can be detected by the model results. It recognized that the strong Equatorial Counter Current flows to eastward to the central part of the Pacific Ocean. The Makasar Strait surface current was stronger than usual but the Karimata Strait surface current was weaker during this period.

  7. Reconciling surface ocean productivity, export fluxes and sediment composition in a global biogeochemical ocean model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Gehlen

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on an improved representation of the biological soft tissue pump in the global three-dimensional biogeochemical ocean model PISCES. We compare three parameterizations of particle dynamics: (1 the model standard version including two particle size classes, aggregation-disaggregation and prescribed sinking speed; (2 an aggregation-disaggregation model with a particle size spectrum and prognostic sinking speed; (3 a mineral ballast parameterization with no size classes, but prognostic sinking speed. In addition, the model includes a description of surface sediments and organic carbon early diagenesis. Model output is compared to data or data based estimates of ocean productivity, pe-ratios, particle fluxes, surface sediment bulk composition and benthic O2 fluxes. Model results suggest that different processes control POC fluxes at different depths. In the wind mixed layer turbulent particle coagulation appears as key process in controlling pe-ratios. Parameterization (2 yields simulated pe-ratios that compare well to observations. Below the wind mixed layer, POC fluxes are most sensitive to the intensity of zooplankton flux feeding, indicating the importance of zooplankton community composition. All model parameters being kept constant, the capability of the model to reproduce yearly mean POC fluxes below 2000 m and benthic oxygen demand does at first order not dependent on the resolution of the particle size spectrum. Aggregate formation appears essential to initiate an intense biological pump. At great depth the reported close to constant particle fluxes are most likely the result of the combined effect of aggregate formation and mineral ballasting.

  8. Advancing dynamic and thermodynamic modelling of magma oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bower, Dan; Wolf, Aaron; Sanan, Patrick; Tackley, Paul

    2017-04-01

    The techniques for modelling low melt-fraction dynamics in planetary interiors are well-established by supplementing the Stokes equations with Darcy's Law. But modelling high-melt fraction phenomena, relevant to the earliest phase of magma ocean cooling, necessitates parameterisations to capture the dynamics of turbulent flow that are otherwise unresolvable in numerical models. Furthermore, it requires knowledge about the material properties of both solid and melt mantle phases, the latter of which are poorly described by typical equations of state. To address these challenges, we present (1) a new interior evolution model that, in a single formulation, captures both solid and melt dynamics and hence charts the complete cooling trajectory of a planetary mantle, and (2) a physical and intuitive extension of a "Hard Sphere" liquid equation of state (EOS) to describe silicate melt properties for the pressure-temperature (P-T) range of Earth's mantle. Together, these two advancements provide a comprehensive and versatile modelling framework for probing the far-reaching consequences of magma ocean cooling and crystallisation for Earth and other rocky planets. The interior evolution model accounts for heat transfer by conduction, convection, latent heat, and gravitational separation. It uses the finite volume method to ensure energy conservation at each time-step and accesses advanced time integration algorithms by interfacing with PETSc. This ensures it accurately and efficiently computes the dynamics throughout the magma ocean, including within the ultra-thin thermal boundary layers (important for multi-component systems). Our new high P-T liquid EOS accurately captures the energetics and physical properties of the partially molten system whilst retaining the largest number of familiar EOS parameters. We demonstrate the power of our integrated dynamic and EOS model by exploring two crystallisation scenarios for Earth that are dictated by the coincidence of the liquid

  9. Fifty years of numerical modeling of baroclinic ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkisyan, A. S.

    2012-02-01

    This paper presents a brief critical analysis of the main historical stages of numerical modeling for the last fifty years. It was a half a century ago that the numerical simulation of an actual baroclinic ocean was initiated by the author and his students [1, 2]. In meteorology, studies on the numerical modeling of a baroclinic atmosphere existed much earlier [21, 22]. Despite this, a similar move in oceanography was met with strong resistance. At that time, there were many studies on the calculation of the total mass transport. The founders of this field, V.B. Shtokman, H. Sverdrup, and W. Munk, were mistaken in believing that they addressed baroclinic models of the ocean. The author preferred works by V. Ekman [12] and I. Sandström and B. Helland-Hansen [19]. A generalization of recent studies made it possible to come to some conclusions on the need to use the level of the free oceanic surface as a basis rather than the function of total mass transport, on the role of the baroclinic β effect (BARBE), on the joint effect of baroclinicity and bottom relief (JEBAR), etc. The author conditionally divides these fifty years into the following three stages. (1) The first stage was 1961-1969, when the author and his students performed almost exclusively diagnostic and adaptation calculations of climatic characteristics. (2) The second stage began with papers by K. Bryan [23] and his students. This is an important and promising stage involving mainly prognostic studies and four-dimensional analysis. The major advances in modeling at this stage (the Gulf Stream separation point [61], the Kuroshio seasonal evolution [63], the formation of the cold intermediate layer in the Black Sea [80], the subsurface countercurrent in the Caspian Sea [25], the realistic four-dimensional analysis of the Kara Sea [60], etc.) were due to high-resolution and/or data assimilation with an adequate period of integration. (3) The third stage began with the activities of international

  10. Ocean modelling for aquaculture and fisheries in Irish waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Dabrowski

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Marine Institute, Ireland, runs a suite of operational regional and coastal ocean models. Recent developments include several tailored products that focus on the key needs of the Irish aquaculture sector. In this article, an overview of the products and services derived from the models are presented. A shellfish model that includes growth and physiological interactions of mussels with the ecosystem and is fully embedded in the 3-D numerical modelling framework has been developed at the Marine Institute. This shellfish model has a microbial module designed to predict levels of coliform contamination in mussels. This model can also be used to estimate the carrying capacity of embayments, assess impacts of pollution on aquaculture grounds and help to classify shellfish waters. The physical coastal model of southwest Ireland provides a three day forecast of shelf water movement in the region. This is assimilated into a new harmful algal bloom alert system used to inform end-users of potential toxic shellfish events and high biomass blooms that include fish killing species. Further services include the use of models to identify potential sites for offshore aquaculture, to inform studies of potential cross-contamination in farms from the dispersal of planktonic sea lice larvae and other pathogens that can infect finfish and to provide modelled products that underpin the assessment and advisory services on the sustainable exploitation of the marine fisheries resources. This paper demonstrates that ocean models can provide an invaluable contribution to the sustainable blue growth of aquaculture and fisheries.

  11. Validation of Satellite Derived Primary Production Models in the Northeast Atlantic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanova, P. V.; Bashmachnikov, I. L.; Brotas, V.

    2016-08-01

    With all the variety of models used for calculation of primary production of phytoplankton (PP) from remote sensing data, a choice of the most realistic one for a particular ocean region remains a non-trivial issue. In this work, we estimate PP in the Northeast Atlantic Ocean (200 - 510 N and 100 - 400 W) from 1998 to 2005 using three frequently used models: VGPM (Vertically Generalized Production Model), PSM (Platt and Sathyendranath Model) and Aph-PP model (Absorption Based Model). The modeled results are then compared with in situ observations of PP. The results show a close similarity in PP patterns obtained by different models, but the absolute modeled values differ substantially. In the Northeast Atlantic, PSM is found reproducing better the observed seasonal and spatial variability of PP as compared to the two other models. However, PSM slightly underestimates the PP values.

  12. Atmosphere-magma ocean modeling of GJ 1132 b

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaefer, Laura; Wordsworth, Robin; Berta-Thompson, Zachory K.; Sasselov, Dimitar

    2017-01-01

    GJ 1132 b is a nearby Earth-sized exoplanet transiting an M dwarf, and is amongst the most highly characterizable small exoplanets currently known. Using a coupled atmosphere-magma ocean model, we determine that GJ 1132 b must have begun with more than 5 wt% initial water in order to still retain a water-based atmosphere. We also determine the amount of O2 that can build up in the atmosphere as a result of hydrogen dissociation and loss. We find that the magma ocean absorbs at most ~ 10% of the O2 produced, whereas more than 90% is lost to space through hydrodynamic drag. The results of the model depend strongly on the initial water abundance and the XUV model. The most common outcome for GJ 1132 b from our simulations is a tenuous atmosphere dominated by O2, although for very large initial water abundances, atmospheres with several thousands of bars of O2 are possible. A substantial steam envelope would indicate either the existence of an earlier H2 envelope or low XUV flux over the system's lifetime. A steam atmosphere would also imply the continued existence of a magma ocean on GJ 1132 b. Preliminary modeling with the addition of CO2 gas will be presented.

  13. Could Ocean Acidification Have Caused the End-Permian Mass Extinction? - An Earth System Model Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Kump, L. R.; Ridgwell, A.

    2013-12-01

    The end-Permian is associated with a 3-5‰ carbon isotope excursion in the ocean-atmosphere system within 20 kyr, most likely explained by a rapid and large amount of greenhouse gas emission. This has led to the hypothesis that it was ocean acidification that was the primary driver for the end-Permian marine mass extinction event. However, the total carbon emissions and degree of ocean acidification associated with the carbon isotope excursion are currently poorly constrained. To address this, we conduct a series of experiments varying initial and boundary conditions using an Earth system model (GENIE: http://cgenie.seao2.org/). We then invert the model by forcing the atmosphere δ13C to track our prescribed carbon isotopes on a reliable time scale derived from the recently published Meishan section in South China at each time step. The carbon isotope records are statistically treated to remove the noise that could result in unrealistic fluctuations in the derivatives of δ13C. The models are run for ~100 kyr from the initial sharp drop in δ13C (~60 kyr prior to the onset of the extinction event) to its initial recovery phase (~30 kyr after the onset of the extinction event). We test four isotopically distinctive sources, including mantle volcanic source (-9‰), organic matter (-25‰), thermogenic methane (-40‰) and biogenic methane (-60‰) and derive the corresponding carbon emissions consistent with the observed isotopic excursion for each. We also test the importance of the lack of pelagic carbonate production during the late Paleozoic and run the model configured both as a 'Neritan' (shallow carbonate production only) and 'Cretan' (both shallow benthic and open ocean pelagic) ocean scenarios.

  14. Slush Fund: Modeling the Multiphase Physics of Oceanic Ices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffo, J.; Schmidt, B. E.

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of ice interacting with an ocean, both on Earth and throughout the solar system, and its crucial role as the mediator of exchange between the hydrosphere below and atmosphere above, have made quantifying the thermodynamic, chemical, and physical properties of the ice highly desirable. While direct observations of these quantities exist, their scarcity increases with the difficulty of obtainment; the basal surfaces of terrestrial ice shelves remain largely unexplored and the icy interiors of moons like Europa and Enceladus have never been directly observed. Our understanding of these entities thus relies on numerical simulation, and the efficacy of their incorporation into larger systems models is dependent on the accuracy of these initial simulations. One characteristic of seawater, likely shared by the oceans of icy moons, is that it is a solution. As such, when it is frozen a majority of the solute is rejected from the forming ice, concentrating in interstitial pockets and channels, producing a two-component reactive porous media known as a mushy layer. The multiphase nature of this layer affects the evolution and dynamics of the overlying ice mass. Additionally ice can form in the water column and accrete onto the basal surface of these ice masses via buoyancy driven sedimentation as frazil or platelet ice. Numerical models hoping to accurately represent ice-ocean interactions should include the multiphase behavior of these two phenomena. While models of sea ice have begun to incorporate multiphase physics into their capabilities, no models of ice shelves/shells explicitly account for the two-phase behavior of the ice-ocean interface. Here we present a 1D multiphase model of floating oceanic ice that includes parameterizations of both density driven advection within the `mushy layer' and buoyancy driven sedimentation. The model is validated against contemporary sea ice models and observational data. Environmental stresses such as supercooling and

  15. On energy conversion in a sigma coordinate ocean model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eldevik, Tor

    1999-08-01

    Energy diagnostics are useful for understanding the transfer of energy through instabilities and between different scales. In this note the conservation equations for kinetic and potential energy, divided into suitable mean and eddy quantities, for a sigma coordinate ocean model are set up. By identifying the transfer terms responsible for the conservative conversions between the different energies, an energy flow diagram is suggested. The motivation for this is twofold. Firstly, the average operator required for dividing the quantities of the flow into mean and eddy parts is in general not well defined in Cartesian coordinates when the upper and lower boundaries are not at fixed vertical levels. This is overcome by introducing the ''terrain-following'' sigma as the vertical coordinate. Secondly, and most important, many of today's numerical ocean models have this as the vertical coordinate. (author)

  16. Optimisation of a parallel ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. I. Beare

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of a general-purpose parallel ocean circulation model, for use on a wide range of computer platforms, from traditional scalar machines to workstation clusters and massively parallel processors. Parallelism is provided, as a modular option, via high-level message-passing routines, thus hiding the technical intricacies from the user. An initial implementation highlights that the parallel efficiency of the model is adversely affected by a number of factors, for which optimisations are discussed and implemented. The resulting ocean code is portable and, in particular, allows science to be achieved on local workstations that could otherwise only be undertaken on state-of-the-art supercomputers.

  17. Potential feedback mechanism between phytoplankton and upper ocean circulation with oceanic radiative transfer processes influenced by phytoplankton - Numerical ocean, general circulation models and an analytical solution

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; Kano, M.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Muneyama, K.; Ueyoshi, K.; Subrahmanyam, B.; Nakata, K.; Lai, C.A.; Frouin, R.

    between nonliving things and living things in the oceanic ecosystem as an alternative approach in the modeling of the earth system with life. It is shown that marine phytoplankton influence the global pattern of the sea surface temperature, seawater...

  18. Exploring oceanic impact crater mechanics through numerical models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wünnemann, K.; Lange, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    The mechanics of oceanic impact events differ in several ways from the processes that accompany the strike of an asteroid on land. In order to explore the cratering process on a water-covered target, a series of 2D hydrocode simulations have been carried out. Whereas crater structures on continental targets are the result of a gravity-driven collapse of the transient cavity that is formed immediately after the impact, we show that oceanic impact structures are additionally modified by strong water movements along the ocean-sea floor interface. Water currents directed both inwardly and outwardly from the impact point result in significant structural disturbances of the pelagic sediments. These currents are treated in the numerical models through an analysis of massless tracer particles movement initially placed in the target. In the models it is shown, that the modification of the ocean floor by water currents takes place, regardless of whether or not the residual kinetic energy of the impactor is large enough to penetrate the water column and to form a crater at the ocean floor. This hypothesis verified by an investigation of the so far only known deep sea impact structure, the Eltanin impact structure. Here a zone of chaotically deposited sediments was found but no depression in the ocean floor has been detected. Strong water surges play also an import role in the modification of crater structures at relatively shallow water depth on the continental shelf. This has been observed in the formation of gullies at the Lockne structure in Sweden. Even more surprisingly is the existence of a ringed impact structure in the North Sea, the Silverpit crater, which has a diameter of only 20 km. We explain the formation of a ring structure, which has not previously been thought possible at such a small scale, via numerical modelling by extremely weak strength properties of the target rocks. This kind of strength softening may be due to the fact, that water is involved in the

  19. Mechanistic controls of surface warming by ocean heat and carbon uptake: Experiments using idealised ocean models with and without overturning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katavouta, Anna; Williams, Richard; Goodwin, Philip

    2017-04-01

    Transient climate response to emissions (TCRE) is an empirically derived index that relates global surface warming to cumulative carbon emissions in Earth system models. TCRE is nearly constant (i.e. surface warming is proportional to carbon emissions), and independent of the emissions pathway and model complexity, for reasons that are not yet fully understood. In our view, this proportionality is driven by ocean ventilation. To explore the link between TCRE and ocean heat and carbon uptake, we use an idealised 1-D atmosphere-ocean model with three layers (i.e., atmosphere, ocean mixed layer, interior ocean) with or without circulation. The model is forced using idealised carbon emission scenarios and drives the temperature and carbon concentration for each layer. The experiments reveal that an increase in carbon emissions eventually leads to ocean declining heat uptake, which causes the dependence of surface warming on radiative forcing from anthropogenic carbon to increase with time. In contrast, an increase in carbon emissions amplifies the ocean carbon uptake which acts to decrease the dependence of radiative forcing on carbon emissions. These two partially compensating effects lead to the nearly linear dependence between surface temperature and cumulative carbon emissions. The linear dependence holds in experiments with and without circulation. However, the TCRE value depends on the circulation and associated ventilation of heat and carbon. Hence, differences in circulation patterns amongst climate models may be responsible for the spread in their response.

  20. The importance of diazotrophic cyanobacteria as primary producers during Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ohkouchi

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In Livello Bonarelli black shale deposited during Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE-2, ca. 94 Ma, nitrogen isotopic compositions of bulk sediments are mostly in a narrow range from –2.7 to –0.7‰. We also determined molecular distribution and nitrogen isotopic compositions of geoporphyrins extracted from the black shale. The nitrogen isotopic compositions of C32 Ni deoxophylloerythroetioporphyrin (DPEP and total Ni porphyrins are –3.5 and –3.3‰, respectively, leading us to the estimation that the mean nitrogen isotopic composition of photoautotrophic cells were around +1‰ during the formation of Bonarelli black shale. This value is suggestive of N2-fixation, a dominant process for these photoautotrophs when assimilating nitrogen. Furthermore, Ni-chelated C32 DPEP, derived mainly from chlorophyll a had the highest concentration. Based on this evidence, we conclude that diazotrophic cyanobacteria were major primary producers during that time. Cyanobacteria may be key photoautotrophs during the formation of black shale type sediments intermittently observed throughout the later half of the Earth's history, and hence may have played a crucial role in the evolution of geochemical cycles even in the later half of the Earth's history.

  1. An importance of diazotrophic cyanobacteria as a primary producer during Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event 2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Ohkouchi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available In Livello Bonarelli black shale deposited during Cretaceous Oceanic Anoxic Event 2 (OAE-2, ca. 94 Ma, nitrogen isotopic compositions of bulk sediments are in a narrow range from −2.7 to −0.7. We also determined molecular distribution and nitrogen isotopic compositions of geoporphyrins extracted from the black shale. The nitrogen isotopic compositions of C32 Ni deoxophylloerythroetioporphyrin (DPEP and total Ni porphyrins are −3.5 and −3.3, respectively, leading us to the estimation that the mean nitrogen isotopic composition of photoautotrophic cell was around +1 during the formation of Bonarelli black shale. This value is suggestive of N2-fixation a dominant process for these photoautotrophs when assimilating nitrogen. Furthermore, Ni-chelated C32 DPEP, derived mainly from chlorophyll a was the highest concentration. Based on these evidence, we conclude that diazotrophic cyanobacteria were major primary producers during that time. The cyanobacteria may be key photoautotrophs during the formation of black shale type sediments intermittently observed throughout the later half of the Earth's history, and hence may have played a crucial role in the evolution of geochemical cycles.

  2. Effect Of Oceanic Lithosphere Age Errors On Model Discrimination

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeLaughter, J. E.

    2016-12-01

    The thermal structure of the oceanic lithosphere is the subject of a long-standing controversy. Because the thermal structure varies with age, it governs properties such as heat flow, density, and bathymetry with important implications for plate tectonics. Though bathymetry, geoid, and heat flow for young (geoid, and heat flow data to an inverse model to determine lithospheric structure details. Though inverse models usually include the effect of errors in bathymetry, heat flow, and geoid, they rarely examine the effects of errors in age. This may have the effect of introducing subtle biases into inverse models of the oceanic lithosphere. Because the inverse problem for thermal structure is both ill-posed and ill-conditioned, these overlooked errors may have a greater effect than expected. The problem is further complicated by the non-uniform distribution of age and errors in age estimates; for example, only 30% of the oceanic lithosphere is older than 80 MY and less than 3% is older than 150 MY. To determine the potential strength of such biases, I have used the age and error maps of Mueller et al (2008) to forward model the bathymetry for half space and GDH1 plate models. For ages less than 20 MY, both models give similar results. The errors induced by uncertainty in age are relatively large and suggest that when possible young lithosphere should be excluded when examining the lithospheric thermal model. As expected, GDH1 bathymetry converges asymptotically on the theoretical result for error-free data for older data. The resulting uncertainty is nearly as large as that introduced by errors in the other parameters; in the absence of other errors, the models can only be distinguished for ages greater than 80 MY. These results suggest that the problem should be approached with the minimum possible number of variables. For example, examining the direct relationship of geoid to bathymetry or heat flow instead of their relationship to age should reduce uncertainties

  3. Simulation of 14C in IAP/LASG L30T63 Ocean Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qingquan; SHI Guangyu

    2005-01-01

    14C plays an important role in the study of ocean circulation and anthropogenic CO2. Radioactive 14C is usually used in ocean carbon circulation model to test the physical performance of model. In the present paper, a 14C model is established and coupled with the IAP/LASG L30T63 global ocean circulation model to simulate the distribution of natural 14C in oceans and the penetration and uptake of 14C in oceans after industrial revolution and nuclear bomb test. The simulation of natural 14C reveals the basic characteristics of oceanic ventilation. However, simulation value is "younger" than observation in the Pacific and Indian Oceans, and "older" than observation in the Atlantic deep ocean. The simulation of bomb 14C agrees well with GEOSECS observation, but the volume inventory and averaged penetration depth of bomb 14C in oceans are smaller than observation. The probable reasons for these discrepancies are analyzed.

  4. Toward an Internal Gravity Wave Spectrum in Global Ocean Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-14

    Davis Highway, Suite 1204, Arlington VA 22202-4302 Respondents should be aware that notwithstanding any other provision of law , no person shall be...14 MAY 2015 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Toward an Internal Gravity Wave Spectrum in Global...resolution global ocean models forced by atmospheric fields and tides are beginning to display realistic internal gravity wave spectra, especially as

  5. Aluminium in an ocean general circulation model compared with the West Atlantic Geotraces cruises

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Hulten, M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A model of aluminium has been developed and implemented in an Ocean General Circulation Model (NEMO-PISCES). In the model, aluminium enters the ocean by means of dust deposition. The internal oceanic processes are described by advection, mixing...

  6. A Pacific Ocean general circulation model for satellite data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Y.; Halpern, D.; Mechoso, C. R.

    1991-01-01

    A tropical Pacific Ocean General Circulation Model (OGCM) to be used in satellite data assimilation studies is described. The transfer of the OGCM from a CYBER-205 at NOAA's Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory to a CRAY-2 at NASA's Ames Research Center is documented. Two 3-year model integrations from identical initial conditions but performed on those two computers are compared. The model simulations are very similar to each other, as expected, but the simulations performed with the higher-precision CRAY-2 is smoother than that with the lower-precision CYBER-205. The CYBER-205 and CRAY-2 use 32 and 64-bit mantissa arithmetic, respectively. The major features of the oceanic circulation in the tropical Pacific, namely the North Equatorial Current, the North Equatorial Countercurrent, the South Equatorial Current, and the Equatorial Undercurrent, are realistically produced and their seasonal cycles are described. The OGCM provides a powerful tool for study of tropical oceans and for the assimilation of satellite altimetry data.

  7. Anisotropic Mesoscale Eddy Transport in Ocean General Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reckinger, S. J.; Fox-Kemper, B.; Bachman, S.; Bryan, F.; Dennis, J.; Danabasoglu, G.

    2014-12-01

    Modern climate models are limited to coarse-resolution representations of large-scale ocean circulation that rely on parameterizations for mesoscale eddies. The effects of eddies are typically introduced by relating subgrid eddy fluxes to the resolved gradients of buoyancy or other tracers, where the proportionality is, in general, governed by an eddy transport tensor. The symmetric part of the tensor, which represents the diffusive effects of mesoscale eddies, is universally treated isotropically in general circulation models. Thus, only a single parameter, namely the eddy diffusivity, is used at each spatial and temporal location to impart the influence of mesoscale eddies on the resolved flow. However, the diffusive processes that the parameterization approximates, such as shear dispersion, potential vorticity barriers, oceanic turbulence, and instabilities, typically have strongly anisotropic characteristics. Generalizing the eddy diffusivity tensor for anisotropy extends the number of parameters to three: a major diffusivity, a minor diffusivity, and the principal axis of alignment. The Community Earth System Model (CESM) with the anisotropic eddy parameterization is used to test various choices for the newly introduced parameters, which are motivated by observations and the eddy transport tensor diagnosed from high resolution simulations. Simply setting the ratio of major to minor diffusivities to a value of five globally, while aligning the major axis along the flow direction, improves biogeochemical tracer ventilation and reduces global temperature and salinity biases. These effects can be improved even further by parameterizing the anisotropic transport mechanisms in the ocean.

  8. Ocean modelling for aquaculture and fisheries in Irish waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabrowski, T.; Lyons, K.; Cusack, C.; Casal, G.; Berry, A.; Nolan, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    The Marine Institute, Ireland, runs a suite of operational regional and coastal ocean models. Recent developments include several tailored products that focus on the key needs of the Irish aquaculture sector. In this article, an overview of the products and services derived from the models are presented. The authors give an overview of a shellfish model developed in-house and that was designed to predict the growth, the physiological interactions with the ecosystem, and the level of coliform contamination of the blue mussel. As such, this model is applicable in studies on the carrying capacity of embayments, assessment of the impacts of pollution on aquaculture grounds, and the determination of shellfish water classes. Further services include the assimilation of the model-predicted shelf water movement into a new harmful algal bloom alert system used to inform end users of potential toxic shellfish events and high biomass blooms that include fish-killing species. Models are also used to identify potential sites for offshore aquaculture, to inform studies of potential cross-contamination in farms from the dispersal of planktonic sea lice larvae and other pathogens that can infect finfish, and to provide modelled products that underpin the assessment and advisory services on the sustainable exploitation of the resources of marine fisheries. This paper demonstrates that ocean models can provide an invaluable contribution to the sustainable blue growth of aquaculture and fisheries.

  9. Validation of the BASALT model for simulating off-axis hydrothermal circulation in oceanic crust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farahat, Navah X.; Archer, David; Abbot, Dorian S.

    2017-08-01

    Fluid recharge and discharge between the deep ocean and the porous upper layer of off-axis oceanic crust tends to concentrate in small volumes of rock, such as seamounts and fractures, that are unimpeded by low-permeability sediments. Basement structure, sediment burial, heat flow, and other regional characteristics of off-axis hydrothermal systems appear to produce considerable diversity of circulation behaviors. Circulation of seawater and seawater-derived fluids controls the extent of fluid-rock interaction, resulting in significant geochemical impacts. However, the primary regional characteristics that control how seawater is distributed within upper oceanic crust are still poorly understood. In this paper we present the details of the two-dimensional (2-D) BASALT (Basement Activity Simulated At Low Temperatures) numerical model of heat and fluid transport in an off-axis hydrothermal system. This model is designed to simulate a wide range of conditions in order to explore the dominant controls on circulation. We validate the BASALT model's ability to reproduce observations by configuring it to represent a thoroughly studied transect of the Juan de Fuca Ridge eastern flank. The results demonstrate that including series of narrow, ridge-parallel fractures as subgrid features produces a realistic circulation scenario at the validation site. In future projects, a full reactive transport version of the validated BASALT model will be used to explore geochemical fluxes in a variety of off-axis hydrothermal environments.

  10. Contribution of riverine nutrients to the silicon biogeochemistry of the global ocean – a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Y. Bernard

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Continental shelf seas are known to support a large fraction of the global primary production. Yet, they are mostly ignored or neglected in global biogeochemical models. A number of processes that control the transfer of dissolved nutrients from rivers to the open ocean remain poorly understood. This applies in particular to dissolved silica which drives the growth of diatoms that form a large part of the phytoplankton biomass and are thus an important contributor to export production of carbon.

    Here, the representation of the biogeochemical cycling along continents is improved by coupling a high resolution database of riverine fluxes of nutrients to the global biogeochemical ocean general circulation model HAMOCC5-OM. Focusing on silicon (Si, but including the whole suite of nutrients – carbon (C, nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P in various forms – inputs are implemented in the model at coastal coupling points using the COSCAT global database of 156 mega-river-ensemble catchments from Meybeck et al. (2006. The catchments connect to the ocean through coastal segments according to three sets of criteria: natural limits, continental shelf topography, and geophysical dynamics.

    According to the model the largest effects on nutrient concentrations occur in hot spots such as the Amazon plume, the Arctic – with high nutrient inputs in relation to its total volume, and areas that encounter the largest increase in human activity, e.g., Southern Asia.

  11. Contribution of riverine nutrients to the silicon biogeochemistry of the global ocean – a model study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Y. Bernard

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Continental shelf seas are known to support a large fraction of the global primary production. Yet, continental shelf areas are mostly ignored or neglected in global biogeochemical models. A number of processes that control the transfer of dissolved nutrients from river to the open ocean remain poorly understood. This applies in particular to dissolved silica which drives the growth of diatoms that form a large part of the phytoplankton biomass and are thus an important contributor to export production of carbon.

    Here, the representation of the biogeochemical state along continents is improved by coupling a high resolution database of riverine fluxes of nutrients to the global biogeochemical ocean general circulation model MPI-OM/HAMOCC5. Focusing on silicon (Si, but including the whole suite of nutrients – carbon (C, nitrogen (N and phosphorus (P in various forms – inputs are implemented in the model at coastal coupling points using the COSCAT global database of 156 mega-river-ensemble catchments from Meybeck et al. (2006. The catchments connect to the ocean through coastal segments according to three sets of criteria: natural limits, continental shelf topography, and geophysical dynamics.

    According to the model the largest effects on nutrient concentrations occur in hot spots such as the Amazon plume, the Arctic – with high nutrient inputs in relation to its total volume, and areas that encounter the largest increase in human activity, e.g., Southern Asia.

  12. Modelling the Oceanic Nd Isotopic Composition With a North Atlantic Eddy Permitting Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peronne, S.; Treguier, A.; Arsouze, T.; Dutay, J.; Lacan, F.; Jeandel, C.

    2006-12-01

    The oceanic water masses differ by their temperatures, salinity, but also a number of geochemical tracers characterized by their weak concentrations and their ability to quantify oceanic processes (mixing, scavenging rates etc). Among these tracers, the Nd isotopic composition (hereafter epsilon-Nd) is a (quasi) conservative tracer of water mass mixing in the ocean interior, far from any lithogenic inputs. It has been recently established that exchange of Nd at the oceanic margins could be the dominant process controlling both its concentration and isotopic composition distribution in the ocean. This was demonstrated using in situ measurements and budget calculations and has recently been confirmed by a low resolution (2°) modeling approach (Arsouze et al., 2006). However, the currents flowing on the ocean margins are not correctly represented in coarse ocean models. It is the case in the North Atlantic ocean, which is of particular interest since i) it is the area of deep water formation and ii) these deep waters are characterized by the most negative epsilon-Nd values of the world ocean, which are used as "imprint" of the present and past thermohaline circulation. It is therefore essential to understand how these water masses acquire their epsilon-Nd signature. We propose here the first results of the modeling of oceanic Nd isotopic composition at eddy-permitting resolution, with the North Atlantic 0.25° version of the NEMO model used for the DRAKKAR European project. A 150 years off-line experiment and a shorter on-line experiment are performed. Simulated Nd distributions are compared to the present-day data base, vertical profiles, and the results of the low resolution model (in the North Atlantic). The eddy permitting model generally provides improved results, provided a high enough exchange rate is imposed in the deep ocean. Deficiencies of the simulated distribution in the Nordic Seas and the subpolar gyre are explained by errors in the input function on

  13. Modeling Coastal Ocean Optical Properties for Coupled Circulation and Ecosystem Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-07

    Modeling Coastal Ocean Optical Properties for Coupled Circulation and Ecosystem Models Curtis D. Mobley Sequoia Scientific , Inc. 2700 Richards...N00014D01610002 http://www.onr.navy.mil/sci_tech/32/322/ocean_optics_biology.asp LONG-TERM GOAL The overall goal of this work , now completed, was to...wrong by orders of magnitude in Case 2 or optically shallow waters. The objective of this work was develop a radiative transfer model that can be

  14. Modelling Southern Ocean iceberg drift and decay with FESOM-IB

    OpenAIRE

    Rackow, Thomas; Wesche, Christine; Timmermann, Ralph; Juricke, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Icebergs are commonly ignored in current general circulation models despite their connections to ocean stratification, phytoplankton growth and redistribution of freshwater in the Southern Ocean. On the way to fully including icebergs in ocean circulation models, we present FESOM-IB, the high resolution Finite Element Sea Ice - Ocean Model (FESOM) enhanced by an IceBerg drift and decay module developed at AWI Bremerhaven. By solving the momentum equations for iceberg drift, ...

  15. The NOW regional coupled model: Application to the tropical Indian Ocean climate and tropical cyclone activity

    OpenAIRE

    Samson, G; Masson, S.; M. Lengaigne; Keerthi, M. G.; Vialard, J; S. Pous; Madec, G.; Jourdain, N. C.; Jullien, S; MENKES, C.; Marchesiello, P.

    2014-01-01

    International audience; This paper presents the NOW regional coupled ocean-atmosphere model built from the NEMO ocean and WRF atmospheric numerical models. This model is applied to the tropical Indian Ocean, with the oceanic and atmospheric components sharing a common 1 =4 horizontal grid. Long experiments are performed over the 1990–2009 period using the Betts-Miller-Janjic (BMJ) and Kain-Fritsch (KF) cumulus parameterizations. Both simulations produce a realistic distribution of seasonal ra...

  16. The modeled atmospheric and oceanic response to the South China Sea SST anomaly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiande; Wu, Lixin; Zhou, Jun; Gao, Jianjun

    2016-10-01

    The sensitivity of the global atmospheric and oceanic response to sea surface temperature anomaly (SSTA) throughout the South China Sea (SCS) is investigated using the Fast Ocean-Atmosphere Model (FOAM). Forced by a warming SST, the experiment explicitly demonstrates that the responses of surface air temperature (SAT) and SST exhibit positive anomalous center over SCS and negative anomalous center over the Northern Pacific Ocean (NPO). The atmospheric response to the warm SST anomalies is characterized by a barotropical anomaly in middle-latitude, leading to a weak subtropical high in summer and a weak Aleutian low in winter. Accordingly, Indian monsoon and eastern Asian monsoon strengthen in summer but weaken in winter as a result of wind convergence owing to the warm SST. It is worth noting that the abnormal signals propagate poleward and eastward away in the form of Rossby Waves from the forcing region, which induces high pressure anomaly. Owing to action of the wind-driven circulation, an anomalous anti-cyclonic circulation is induced with a primary southward current in the upper ocean. An obvious cooling appears over the North Pacific, which can be explained by anomalous meridional cold advection and mixing as shown in the analysises of heat budget and other factors that affect SST.

  17. Ocean sea-ice modelling in the Southern Ocean around Indian Antarctic stations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anurag Kumar; Suneet Dwivedi; D Ram Rajak

    2017-07-01

    An eddy-resolving coupled ocean sea-ice modelling is carried out in the Southern Ocean region (9∘–78∘E; 51∘–71∘S) using the MITgcm. The model domain incorporates the Indian Antarctic stations, Maitri (11.7∘E; 70.7∘S) and Bharati (76.1∘E; 69.4∘S). The realistic simulation of the surface variables, namely, sea surface temperature (SST), sea surface salinity (SSS), surface currents, sea ice concentration (SIC) and sea ice thickness (SIT) is presented for the period of 1997–2012. The horizontal resolution of the model varies between 6 and 10 km. The highest vertical resolution of 5 m is taken near the surface, which gradually increases with increasing depths. The seasonal variability of the SST, SSS, SIC and currents is compared with the available observations in the region of study. It is found that the SIC of the model domain is increasing at a rate of 0.09% per month (nearly 1% per year), whereas, the SIC near Maitri and Bharati regions is increasing at a rate of 0.14 and 0.03% per month, respectively. The variability of the drift of the sea-ice is also estimated over the period of simulation. It is also found that the sea ice volume of the region increases at the rate of 0.0004 km3 per month (nearly 0.005 km3 per year). Further, it is revealed that the accumulation of sea ice around Bharati station is more as compared to Maitri station.

  18. Modeling of sea spray droplets in the ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Jian-Bin

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Droplets are known to play an important role in momentum, heat, and moisture transfer between the ocean and atmosphere. A lot of scholars and experts aim to investigate the effects of droplets on the climate and make precise forecast for hurricane conditions. So the profiles of droplets concentration at different heights above the sea surface are important. For a better study of the momentum and energy transport among the boundary layer, we also need to know the distribution of droplets with different radii. After wave break, with the coupled effects of inertia, gravity, wind updraught, and turbulent mixing, droplets can be transported to certain heights above the sea surface. In the present study, we develop a modified subgrid-scale flow field model coupled with the large eddy simulation to investigate the profiles of spay droplets concentration after wave break. The results in our simulation show that, the distribution of the droplets with the same radii in vertical direction is roughly Gaussian distribution, and the maximum appears at the height nearly above the significant wave height. For different radii, the concentration of droplets with larger radii can be higher than that of the smaller ones at some heights. Since the droplets in our model only include the spay droplets generated by wave break, the data will not be identical with the measurement in the open ocean and laboratory, which include all the kinds of droplets above the ocean.

  19. Warm Bias and Parameterization of Boundary Upwelling in Ocean Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cessi, Paola; Wolfe, Christopher

    2012-11-06

    It has been demonstrated that Eastern Boundary Currents (EBC) are a baroclinic intensification of the interior circulation of the ocean due to the emergence of mesoscale eddies in response to the sharp buoyancy gradients driven by the wind-stress and the thermal surface forcing. The eddies accomplish the heat and salt transport necessary to insure that the subsurface flow is adiabatic, compensating for the heat and salt transport effected by the mean currents. The EBC thus generated occurs on a cross-shore scale of order 20-100 km, and thus this scale needs to be resolved in climate models in order to capture the meridional transport by the EBC. Our result indicate that changes in the near shore currents on the oceanic eastern boundaries are linked not just to local forcing, such as coastal changes in the winds, but depend on the basin-wide circulation as well.

  20. Establishment of ocean dumping area capacity assessment model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Zhizu; ZUO Juncheng; XU Ren; JIN Zuowen; CHEN Meixiang

    2016-01-01

    Dumping area capacity is mainly affected by the hydrodynamic process (tidal sediment, storm surge and wave, etc.) as well as the size and depth of dumping area. Based on three-dimensional ocean circulation model known as FVCOM (Finite Volume Coast and Ocean Model) and the stochastic dynamic statistical analysis model, taking advantage of dumping ground topography evolution and dumping quantity, the author aims to discuss the influence of hydrodynamic processes and dumping activity so as to built a new model of ocean dumping area capacity. With the data of depth and dumped amount in the dumping area, the changes of bottom topographic which caused by tidal current under the natural condition based on the FVCOM hydrodynamic and sediment module, the author strive to analyze the statistical relation of the changes for dumping amount, tidal current and bottom topographic. Through real data to fit revision coefficient values, which will be regarded as topographic changes reference value affected by wave and storm surges. Thus taking this evaluation as the long-term changes in the dumping capacity. In the premise of setting up the threshold of bottom topographic changes, the dumping area capacity is calculated. Take Yangtze Estuary No. 1 dumping area as an example, As the water depth reduces by 0.5 m annually, the dumping area capacity is about 6.7 million m3/a, the model results are in reasonable agreement with the actual amount. Then the model is validated in Luoyuan Bay dumping area, Shengsishangchuan Mountain dumping area, Dongding dumping area, Dongshan dumping area, and Wenzhou Port dumping area, it is turns out the results are similar to that of the actual observations.

  1. Multi-scale Modelling of the Ocean Beneath Ice Shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candy, A. S.; Kimura, S.; Holland, P.; Kramer, S. C.; Piggott, M. D.; Jenkins, A.; Pain, C. C.

    2011-12-01

    Quantitative prediction of future sea-level is currently limited because we lack an understanding of how the mass balance of the Earth's great ice sheets respond to and influence the climate. Understanding the behaviour of the ocean beneath an ice shelf and its interaction with the sheet above presents a great scientific challenge. A solid ice cover, in many places kilometres thick, bars access to the water column, so that observational data can only be obtained by drilling holes through, or launching autonomous vehicles beneath, the ice. In the absence of a comprehensive observational database, numerical modelling can be a key tool to advancing our understanding of the sub-ice-shelf regime. While we have a reasonable understanding of the overall ocean circulation and basic sensitivities, there remain critical processes that are difficult or impossible to represent in current operational models. Resolving these features adequately within a domain that includes the entire ice shelf and continental shelf to the north can be difficult with a structured horizontal resolution. It is currently impossible to adequately represent the key grounding line region, where the water column thickness reduces to zero, with a structured vertical grid. In addition, fronts and pycnoclines, the ice front geometry, shelf basal irregularities and modelling surface pressure all prove difficult in current approaches. The Fluidity-ICOM model (Piggott et al. 2008, doi:10.1002/fld.1663) simulates non-hydrostatic dynamics on meshes that can be unstructured in all three dimensions and uses anisotropic adaptive resolution which optimises the mesh and calculation in response to evolving solution dynamics. These features give it the flexibility required to tackle the challenges outlined above and the opportunity to develop a model that can improve understanding of the physical processes occurring under ice shelves. The approaches taken to develop a multi-scale model of ice shelf ocean cavity

  2. Challenges and potential solutions for European coastal ocean modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    She, Jun; Stanev, Emil

    2017-04-01

    Coastal operational oceanography is a science and technological platform to integrate and transform the outcomes in marine monitoring, new knowledge generation and innovative technologies into operational information products and services in the coastal ocean. It has been identified as one of the four research priorities by EuroGOOS (She et al. 2016). Coastal modelling plays a central role in such an integration and transformation. A next generation coastal ocean forecasting system should have following features: i) being able to fully exploit benefits from future observations, ii) generate meaningful products in finer scales e.g., sub-mesoscale and in estuary-coast-sea continuum, iii) efficient parallel computing and model grid structure, iv) provide high quality forecasts as forcing to NWP and coastal climate models, v) resolving correctly inter-basin and inter-sub-basin water exchange, vi) resolving synoptic variability and predictability in marine ecosystems, e.g., for algae bloom, vi) being able to address critical and relevant issues in coastal applications, e.g., marine spatial planning, maritime safety, marine pollution protection, disaster prevention, offshore wind energy, climate change adaptation and mitigation, ICZM (integrated coastal zone management), the WFD (Water Framework Directive), and the MSFD (Marine Strategy Framework Directive), especially on habitat, eutrophication, and hydrographic condition descriptors. This presentation will address above challenges, identify limits of current models and propose correspondent research needed. The proposed roadmap will address an integrated monitoring-modelling approach and developing Unified European Coastal Ocean Models. In the coming years, a few new developments in European Sea observations can expected, e.g., more near real time delivering on profile observations made by research vessels, more shallow water Argo floats and bio-Argo floats deployed, much more high resolution sea level data from SWOT

  3. Atmospheric and Oceanic Response to Southern Ocean Deep Convection Oscillations on Decadal to Centennial Time Scales in Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, T.; Reintges, A.; Park, W.; Latif, M.

    2014-12-01

    Many current coupled global climate models simulate open ocean deep convection in the Southern Ocean as a recurring event with time scales ranging from a few years to centennial (de Lavergne et al., 2014, Nat. Clim. Ch.). The only observation of such event, however, was the occurrence of the Weddell Polynya in the mid-1970s, an open water area of 350 000 km2 within the Antarctic sea ice in three consecutive winters. Both the wide range of modeled frequency of occurrence and the absence of deep convection in the Weddell Sea highlights the lack of understanding concerning the phenomenon. Nevertheless, simulations indicate that atmospheric and oceanic responses to the cessation of deep convection in the Southern Ocean include a strengthening of the low-level atmospheric circulation over the Southern Ocean (increasing SAM index) and a reduction in the export of Antarctic Bottom Water (AABW), potentially masking the regional effects of global warming (Latif et al., 2013, J. Clim.; Martin et al., 2014, Deep Sea Res. II). It is thus of great importance to enhance our understanding of Southern Ocean deep convection and clarify the associated time scales. In two multi-millennial simulations with the Kiel Climate Model (KCM, ECHAM5 T31 atmosphere & NEMO-LIM2 ~2˚ ocean) we showed that the deep convection is driven by strong oceanic warming at mid-depth periodically overriding the stabilizing effects of precipitation and ice melt (Martin et al., 2013, Clim. Dyn.). Sea ice thickness also affects location and duration of the deep convection. A new control simulation, in which, amongst others, the atmosphere grid resolution is changed to T42 (~2.8˚), yields a faster deep convection flip-flop with a period of 80-100 years and a weaker but still significant global climate response similar to CMIP5 simulations. While model physics seem to affect the time scale and intensity of the phenomenon, the driving mechanism is a rather robust feature. Finally, we compare the atmospheric and

  4. Technetium-99 in the Nordic Seas and the Arctic Ocean 1970 - 2002: observations and model results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karcher, M.J.; Iosjpe, M.; Harms, I.; Gerdes, R.; Christensen, G.C.; Dahlgaard, H.; Heldal, H.E.; Herrmann, J.; Leonard, K.S.; Kershaw, P.J.; Nies, H.; Gwynn, J.P. [Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (Germany)

    2004-07-01

    Technetium-99 ({sup 99}Tc) is a highly soluble, beta emitting anthropogenic radionuclide with a half-life of 213000 years. The primary source of {sup 99}Tc to the northern marine environment has been through controlled discharges from the nuclear reprocessing facilities at Sellafield (UK) and Cap la Hague (France) which have taken place over several decades and have seen two periods of peak discharge in the 1970's and the 1990's. In the Nordic Seas, {sup 99}Tc is detected along the Norwegian Coastal Current (NCC) and further north, in the Barents Sea and West Spitsbergen Current. The further pathways of {sup 99}Tc are a recirculation with the East Greenland Current in the Nordic Seas and an intrusion into the Arctic Ocean proper with advective timescales of up to several decades. In the Norwegian Research Council (NFR) funded research project RADNOR, two state-of-the-art numerical models are used to simulate the fate of {sup 99}Tc discharges into the marine environment: The hydrodynamic coupled ice-ocean model NAOSIM, forced with realistic atmospheric data and the NRPA assessment box model which is forced by a fixed circulation pattern, but resolves the movement of the radionuclides in several environmental compartments. An intercomparison of the NAOSIM and NRPA model simulations of the dispersal of {sup 99}Tc will be performed followed by a comparison of the model simulations with an observational database. The database encompasses as complete as possible the available measurements from the West-European shelf seas northward into the Arctic Ocean. Results from this work will help to provide a better understanding of the dispersion dynamics of {sup 99}Tc in the Nordic Seas and the Arctic Ocean. (author)

  5. Upper oceanic response to tropical cyclone Phailin in the Bay of Bengal using a coupled atmosphere-ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Kumar Ravi; Pant, Vimlesh

    2016-11-01

    A numerical simulation of very severe cyclonic storm `Phailin', which originated in southeastern Bay of Bengal (BoB) and propagated northwestward during 10-15 October 2013, was carried out using a coupled atmosphere-ocean model. A Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT) was used to make exchanges of fluxes consistent between the atmospheric model `Weather Research and Forecasting' (WRF) and ocean circulation model `Regional Ocean Modelling System' (ROMS) components of the `Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport' (COAWST) modelling system. The track and intensity of tropical cyclone (TC) Phailin simulated by the WRF component of the coupled model agrees well with the best-track estimates reported by the India Meteorological Department (IMD). Ocean model component (ROMS) was configured over the BoB domain; it utilized the wind stress and net surface heat fluxes from the WRF model to investigate upper oceanic response to the passage of TC Phailin. The coupled model shows pronounced sea surface cooling (2-2.5 °C) and an increase in sea surface salinity (SSS) (2-3 psu) after 06 GMT on 12 October 2013 over the northwestern BoB. Signature of this surface cooling was also observed in satellite data and buoy measurements. The oceanic mixed layer heat budget analysis reveals relative roles of different oceanic processes in controlling the mixed layer temperature over the region of observed cooling. The heat budget highlighted major contributions from horizontal advection and vertical entrainment processes in governing the mixed layer cooling (up to -0.1 °C h-1) and, thereby, reduction in sea surface temperature (SST) in the northwestern BoB during 11-12 October 2013. During the post-cyclone period, the net heat flux at surface regained its diurnal variations with a noontime peak that provided a warming tendency up to 0.05 °C h-1 in the mixed layer. Clear signatures of TC-induced upwelling are seen in vertical velocity (about 2.5 × 10-3 m s-1), rise in isotherms and

  6. Upper oceanic response to tropical cyclone Phailin in the Bay of Bengal using a coupled atmosphere-ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prakash, Kumar Ravi; Pant, Vimlesh

    2017-01-01

    A numerical simulation of very severe cyclonic storm `Phailin', which originated in southeastern Bay of Bengal (BoB) and propagated northwestward during 10-15 October 2013, was carried out using a coupled atmosphere-ocean model. A Model Coupling Toolkit (MCT) was used to make exchanges of fluxes consistent between the atmospheric model `Weather Research and Forecasting' (WRF) and ocean circulation model `Regional Ocean Modelling System' (ROMS) components of the `Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport' (COAWST) modelling system. The track and intensity of tropical cyclone (TC) Phailin simulated by the WRF component of the coupled model agrees well with the best-track estimates reported by the India Meteorological Department (IMD). Ocean model component (ROMS) was configured over the BoB domain; it utilized the wind stress and net surface heat fluxes from the WRF model to investigate upper oceanic response to the passage of TC Phailin. The coupled model shows pronounced sea surface cooling (2-2.5 °C) and an increase in sea surface salinity (SSS) (2-3 psu) after 06 GMT on 12 October 2013 over the northwestern BoB. Signature of this surface cooling was also observed in satellite data and buoy measurements. The oceanic mixed layer heat budget analysis reveals relative roles of different oceanic processes in controlling the mixed layer temperature over the region of observed cooling. The heat budget highlighted major contributions from horizontal advection and vertical entrainment processes in governing the mixed layer cooling (up to -0.1 °C h-1) and, thereby, reduction in sea surface temperature (SST) in the northwestern BoB during 11-12 October 2013. During the post-cyclone period, the net heat flux at surface regained its diurnal variations with a noontime peak that provided a warming tendency up to 0.05 °C h-1 in the mixed layer. Clear signatures of TC-induced upwelling are seen in vertical velocity (about 2.5 × 10-3 m s-1), rise in isotherms and

  7. Observationally-Based Data/Model Metrics from the Southern Ocean Climate Model Atlas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, J.; Russell, J. L.; Goodman, P. J.

    2015-12-01

    The Southern Ocean Climate Model Atlas makes available observationally-based standardized data/model metrics of the latest simulations of climate and projections of climate change from available climate models. Global climate model simulations differ greatly in the Southern Ocean, so the development of consistent, observationally-based metrics, by which to assess the fidelity of model simulations is essential. We will present metrics showing and quantifying the results of the modern day climate simulations over the Southern Ocean from models submitted as part of the CMIP5/IPCC-AR5 process. Our analysis will focus on the simulations of the temperature, salinity and carbon at various depths and along significant hydrographic sections. The models exhibit different skill levels with various metrics between models and also within individual models.

  8. Effects of ocean acidification on primary production in a coastal North Sea phytoplankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberlein, Tim; Wohlrab, Sylke; Rost, Björn; John, Uwe; Bach, Lennart T.; Riebesell, Ulf; Van de Waal, Dedmer B.

    2017-01-01

    We studied the effect of ocean acidification (OA) on a coastal North Sea plankton community in a long-term mesocosm CO2-enrichment experiment (BIOACID II long-term mesocosm study). From March to July 2013, 10 mesocosms of 19 m length with a volume of 47.5 to 55.9 m3 were deployed in the Gullmar Fjord, Sweden. CO2 concentrations were enriched in five mesocosms to reach average CO2 partial pressures (pCO2) of 760 μatm. The remaining five mesocosms were used as control at ambient pCO2 of 380 μatm. Our paper is part of a PLOS collection on this long-term mesocosm experiment. Here, we here tested the effect of OA on total primary production (PPT) by performing 14C-based bottle incubations for 24 h. Furthermore, photoacclimation was assessed by conducting 14C-based photosynthesis-irradiance response (P/I) curves. Changes in chlorophyll a concentrations over time were reflected in the development of PPT, and showed higher phytoplankton biomass build-up under OA. We observed two subsequent phytoplankton blooms in all mesocosms, with peaks in PPT around day 33 and day 56. OA had no significant effect on PPT, except for a marginal increase during the second phytoplankton bloom when inorganic nutrients were already depleted. Maximum light use efficiencies and light saturation indices calculated from the P/I curves changed simultaneously in all mesocosms, and suggest that OA did not alter phytoplankton photoacclimation. Despite large variability in time-integrated productivity estimates among replicates, our overall results indicate that coastal phytoplankton communities can be affected by OA at certain times of the seasonal succession with potential consequences for ecosystem functioning. PMID:28273107

  9. Integration of Biogeochemistry and Marine Ecosystem Model in Mercator-Ocean Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Moussaoui, Abdelali; Dombrowsky, Eric; Moulin, Cyril; Bopp, Laurent; Aumont, Olivier

    2010-05-01

    Accounting for ocean biogeochemistry and marine ecosystem dynamic is of strong interest in the context of Earth System modelling to better represent the marine component to the global atmospheric cycle of greenhouse gazes that influence climate as CO2. Furthermore, treating the ocean as a whole is also the way to address large anthropogenic impacts on marine systems as climate change, nutrients loading, acidification, and eventually overfishing and habitat destructuring. To forecast how interactions between marine biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems respond to and force global change, several efforts have been promoted on biogeochemical integration into operational Mercator Ocean systems. The aim of this work is to implement a marine biogeochemical and ecosystem component at global scale into the MERCATOR operational system, using first PSY3 analysis at 1/4° then PSY4 at 1/12°. Previous works have conducted successfully the integration of a multi-nutrient and multi-plankton biogeochemical model (PISCES, N5P2Z2D2 type) into MERCATOR system. This allowed the use of MERCATOR operational analyses to drive near real time forecast of marine primary production. Results will be shown and advances on biogeochemical model integration within Mercator Systems will be discussed.

  10. Natural ocean carbon cycle sensitivity to parameterizations of the recycling in a climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Romanou

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Sensitivities of the oceanic biological pump within the GISS climate modeling system are explored here. Results are presented from twin control simulations of the air-sea CO2 gas exchange using two different ocean models coupled to the same atmosphere. The two ocean models (Russell ocean model and Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model, HYCOM use different vertical coordinate systems, and therefore different representations of column physics. Both variants of the GISS climate model are coupled to the same ocean biogeochemistry module (the NASA Ocean Biogeochemistry Model, NOBM which computes prognostic distributions for biotic and abiotic fields that influence the air-sea flux of CO2 and the deep ocean carbon transport and storage. In particular, the model differences due to remineralization rate changes are compared to differences attributed to physical processes modeled differently in the two ocean models such as ventilation, mixing, eddy stirring and vertical advection. The Southern Ocean emerges as a key region where the CO2 flux is as sensitive to biological parameterizations as it is to physical parameterizations. Mixing in the Southern Ocean is shown to be a~good indicator of the magnitude of the biological pump efficiency regardless of physical model choice.

  11. gpuPOM: a GPU-based Princeton Ocean Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Xu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Rapid advances in the performance of the graphics processing unit (GPU have made the GPU a compelling solution for a series of scientific applications. However, most existing GPU acceleration works for climate models are doing partial code porting for certain hot spots, and can only achieve limited speedup for the entire model. In this work, we take the mpiPOM (a parallel version of the Princeton Ocean Model as our starting point, design and implement a GPU-based Princeton Ocean Model. By carefully considering the architectural features of the state-of-the-art GPU devices, we rewrite the full mpiPOM model from the original Fortran version into a new Compute Unified Device Architecture C (CUDA-C version. We take several accelerating methods to further improve the performance of gpuPOM, including optimizing memory access in a single GPU, overlapping communication and boundary operations among multiple GPUs, and overlapping input/output (I/O between the hybrid Central Processing Unit (CPU and the GPU. Our experimental results indicate that the performance of the gpuPOM on a workstation containing 4 GPUs is comparable to a powerful cluster with 408 CPU cores and it reduces the energy consumption by 6.8 times.

  12. A SIMULATION OF CO2 UPTAKE IN A THREE DIMENSIONAL OCEAN CARBON CYCLE MODEL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金心; 石广玉

    2001-01-01

    A three-dimensional ocean carbon cycle model which is a general circulation model couple.d with simple biogeochemical processes is used to simulate CO2 uptake by the ocean. The OGCM used is a modified version of the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory modular ocean model (MOM2). The ocean chemistry and a simple ocean biota model are included. Principal variables are .total CO2, alkalinity and phosphate. The vertical profile of POC flux observed by sediment traps is adopted, the rain ratio, a ratio of production rate of calcite against that of POC, and the bio-production efficiency should be 0. 06 and 2 per year, separately. The uptake of anthropogenicCO2 by the ocean is studied. Calculated oceanic uptake of anthropogenic CO2 during the 1980s is 2. 05× 10 15g (Pg) per year. The regional distributions of global oceanic CO2 are discussed.

  13. Bayesian Hierarchical Model Characterization of Model Error in Ocean Data Assimilation and Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    tracer concentration measurements are available; circles indicate a regular 19 × 37 spatial grid. Time-Varying Error Covariance Models: Extending...2013. (Wikle) Invited; Using quadratic nonlinear statistical emulators to facilitate ocean biogeochemical data assimilation, Institute for

  14. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1998-03 (NODC Accession 0001531)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  15. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2005-12 (NODC Accession 0002659)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  16. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2005-06 (NODC Accession 0002406)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  17. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1997-07 (NODC Accession 0001523)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  18. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1997-09 (NODC Accession 0001525)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  19. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1997-04 (NODC Accession 0001520)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  20. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1997-06 (NODC Accession 0001522)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  1. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1998-05 (NODC Accession 0001533)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  2. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1997-03 (NODC Accession 0001519)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  3. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1999-05 (NODC Accession 0001545)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  4. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2006-10 (NODC Accession 0043271)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  5. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2006-03 (NODC Accession 0002742)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  6. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1998-04 (NODC Accession 0001532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  7. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1997-11 (NODC Accession 0001527)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  8. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2006-09 (NODC Accession 0043270)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  9. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1999-10 (NODC Accession 0001550)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  10. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2006-12 (NODC Accession 0043273)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  11. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2000-02 (NODC Accession 0001554)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  12. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1999-09 (NODC Accession 0001549)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  13. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1999-02 (NODC Accession 0001542)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  14. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1998-02 (NODC Accession 0001530)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  15. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2002-11 (NODC Accession 0001587)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  16. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2001-05 (NODC Accession 0001569)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  17. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1997-08 (NODC Accession 0001524)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  18. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1998-01 (NODC Accession 0001529)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  19. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2004-03 (NODC Accession 0001603)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  20. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2007-05 (NODC Accession 0043281)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  1. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2001-07 (NODC Accession 0001571)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  2. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1997-05 (NODC Accession 0001521)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  3. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2001-04 (NODC Accession 0001568)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  4. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2000-07 (NODC Accession 0001559)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  5. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2003-03 (NODC Accession 0001591)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  6. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2007-08 (NODC Accession 0043284)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  7. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2000-10 (NODC Accession 0001562)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  8. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1997-01 (NODC Accession 0001517)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  9. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2005-03 (NODC Accession 0002162)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  10. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2006-04 (NODC Accession 0043262)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  11. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2002-01 (NODC Accession 0001577)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  12. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2002-12 (NODC Accession 0001588)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  13. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2001-09 (NODC Accession 0001573)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  14. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2001-01 (NODC Accession 0001565)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  15. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2005-08 (NODC Accession 0002504)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  16. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2003-02 (NODC Accession 0001590)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  17. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2007-06 (NODC Accession 0043282)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  18. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2002-07 (NODC Accession 0001583)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  19. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2000-08 (NODC Accession 0001560)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  20. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2006-08 (NODC Accession 0043268)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  1. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2002-09 (NODC Accession 0001585)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  2. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2000-06 (NODC Accession 0001558)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  3. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2006-07 (NODC Accession 0043267)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  4. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2002-03 (NODC Accession 0001579)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  5. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2002-06 (NODC Accession 0001582)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  6. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2001-03 (NODC Accession 0001567)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  7. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1999-11 (NODC Accession 0001551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  8. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2006-01 (NODC Accession 0002660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  9. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1997-02 (NODC Accession 0001518)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  10. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2001-12 (NODC Accession 0001576)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  11. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2003-08 (NODC Accession 0001596)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  12. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2000-12 (NODC Accession 0001564)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  13. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2003-09 (NODC Accession 0001597)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  14. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2000-04 (NODC Accession 0001556)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  15. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2004-04 (NODC Accession 0001604)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  16. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2001-02 (NODC Accession 0001566)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  17. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2007-07 (NODC Accession 0043283)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  18. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2003-05 (NODC Accession 0001593)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  19. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2003-11 (NODC Accession 0001599)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  20. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2003-06 (NODC Accession 0001594)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  1. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2003-12 (NODC Accession 0001600)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  2. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2002-08 (NODC Accession 0001584)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  3. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2005-04 (NODC Accession 0002340)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  4. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2000-09 (NODC Accession 0001561)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  5. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2003-04 (NODC Accession 0001592)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  6. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2005-02 (NODC Accession 0002160)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  7. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2001-08 (NODC Accession 0001572)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  8. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2005-01 (NODC Accession 0002159)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  9. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2004-01 (NODC Accession 0001601)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  10. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2001-11 (NODC Accession 0001575)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  11. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2000-11 (NODC Accession 0001563)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  12. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2003-10 (NODC Accession 0001598)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  13. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2006-05 (NODC Accession 0043265)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  14. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2001-06 (NODC Accession 0001570)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  15. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2003-07 (NODC Accession 0001595)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  16. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1998-07 (NODC Accession 0001535)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  17. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1997-12 (NODC Accession 0001528)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  18. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2002-05 (NODC Accession 0001581)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  19. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2004-08 (NODC Accession 0002154)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  20. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2005-05 (NODC Accession 0002373)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  1. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2002-02 (NODC Accession 0001578)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  2. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2003-01 (NODC Accession 0001589)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  3. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2004-06 (NODC Accession 0002151)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  4. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2006-06 (NODC Accession 0043266)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  5. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2005-09 (NODC Accession 0002505)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  6. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1997-10 (NODC Accession 0001526)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  7. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1998-06 (NODC Accession 0001534)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  8. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1999-08 (NODC Accession 0001548)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  9. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1999-04 (NODC Accession 0001544)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  10. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1999-07 (NODC Accession 0001547)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  11. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2004-02 (NODC Accession 0001602)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  12. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2002-10 (NODC Accession 0001586)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  13. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1999-01 (NODC Accession 0001541)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  14. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1998-12 (NODC Accession 0001540)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  15. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2002-04 (NODC Accession 0001580)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  16. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1999-06 (NODC Accession 0001546)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  17. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1999-03 (NODC Accession 0001543)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  18. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 1998-09 (NODC Accession 0001537)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  19. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2004-10 (NODC Accession 0002156)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  20. National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) model output from 2005-11 (NODC Accession 0002652)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Regional Ocean Forecast System (ROFS) has been developed jointly by the Ocean Modeling Branch of the National Weather Service's Environmental Modeling Center,...

  1. Multi-satellite ocean tide modelling - the K-1 constituent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Knudsen, Per

    1997-01-01

    All major ocean tide constituents are aliased into signals with periods less than 90 days from TOPEX/POSEIDON altimetry, except the K-1 constituent. The aliased K-1 has a period of 173 days. Consequently, it might be confounded with height variations caused by the semiannual cycle having a period......, where the presence of crossing tracks cannot separate K-1 from the semiannual signal from TOPEX/POSEIDON, the importance of including ERS-1 and GEOSAT observations was demonstrated. A comparison with 29 pelagic and coastal tide gauges in the Southern Ocean south of 50 degrees S gave 5.59 (M-2), 2.27 (S......-2) and 5.04 (K-1) cm RMS agreement for FES95.1 ocean tide model. The same comparison for the best empirical estimated constituents based on TOPEX/POSEIDON + ERS-1 + GEOSAT gave 4.32, 2.21, and 4.29 cm for M-2, S-2 and K-1, respectively....

  2. Modelling of bio-optical parameters of open ocean waters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim N. Pelevin

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available An original method for estimating the concentration of chlorophyll pigments, absorption of yellow substance and absorption of suspended matter without pigments and yellow substance in detritus using spectral diffuse attenuation coefficient for downwelling irradiance and irradiance reflectance data has been applied to sea waters of different types in the open ocean (case 1. Using the effective numerical single parameter classification with the water type optical index m as a parameter over the whole range of the open ocean waters, the calculations have been carried out and the light absorption spectra of sea waters tabulated. These spectra are used to optimize the absorption models and thus to estimate the concentrations of the main admixtures in sea water. The value of m can be determined from direct measurements of the downward irradiance attenuation coefficient at 500 nm or calculated from remote sensing data using the regressions given in the article. The sea water composition can then be readily estimated from the tables given for any open ocean area if that one parameter m characterizing the basin is known.

  3. Numerical assessments of ocean energy extraction from western boundary currents using a quasi-geostrophic ocean circulation model

    CERN Document Server

    San, Omer

    2016-01-01

    A single-layer, quasi-geostrophic (QG), large-scale ocean circulation model is developed in this paper to study available ocean current energy potentials harnessed by using the ocean current turbines. Power extraction is modeled by adding a parameterized Rayleigh friction term in the barotropic vorticity equation. Numerical assessments are performed by simulating a set of mid-latitude ocean basins in the beta plane, which are standard prototypes of more realistic ocean dynamics considering inter-decadal variability in turbulent equilibrium. A sensitivity analysis with respect to the turbine parameters is performed for various physical conditions. Results show that the proposed model captures the quasi-stationary ocean dynamics and provides the four-gyre circulation patterns in time mean. After an initial spin-up process, the proposed model reaches a statistically steady state at an average maximum speed between 1.5 m/s and 2.5 m/s, which is close to the observed maximum zonal velocities in the western boundar...

  4. Operational ocean models in the Adriatic Sea: a skill assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chiggiato

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the Mediterranean Forecasting System (MFS project, the performance of regional numerical ocean forecasting systems is assessed by means of model-model and model-data comparison. Three different operational systems considered in this study are: the Adriatic REGional Model (AREG; the Adriatic Regional Ocean Modelling System (AdriaROMS and the Mediterranean Forecasting System General Circulation Model (MFS-GCM. AREG and AdriaROMS are regional implementations (with some dedicated variations of POM and ROMS, respectively, while MFS-GCM is an OPA based system. The assessment is done through standard scores. In situ and remote sensing data are used to evaluate the system performance. In particular, a set of CTD measurements collected in the whole western Adriatic during January 2006 and one year of satellite derived sea surface temperature measurements (SST allow to asses a full three-dimensional picture of the operational forecasting systems quality during January 2006 and to draw some preliminary considerations on the temporal fluctuation of scores estimated on surface quantities between summer 2005 and summer 2006.

    The regional systems share a negative bias in simulated temperature and salinity. Nonetheless, they outperform the MFS-GCM in the shallowest locations. Results on amplitude and phase errors are improved in areas shallower than 50 m, while degraded in deeper locations, where major models deficiencies are related to vertical mixing overestimation. In a basin-wide overview, the two regional models show differences in the local displacement of errors. In addition, in locations where the regional models are mutually correlated, the aggregated mean squared error was found to be smaller, that is a useful outcome of having several operational systems in the same region.

  5. An ocean-land-atmosphere coupled model for tropical cyclone landfall processes: The multi-layer ocean model and its verification

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Yihong; YU Runling; LI Yongping

    2006-01-01

    POM (Princeton ocean model) tentatively taken as the ocean part of an ocean-land-atmosphere coupled model is verified for the ultimate purpose of studying the landfall process of tropical cyclone (TC) in the western North Pacific. The POM is tested with monthly mean wind stress in the summer and given lateral boundary conditions. The results indicate that the equilibrium state of the ocean is in accordance with the climate mean, with the error in sea surface temperature (salinity) less than 0.5 ℃ (0.5). The simulated ocean currents are reasonable as well. Several numerical experiments are designed to verify the oceanic response to a stationary or moving TC. It is found that the results agree fairly well with the previous work, including both the drop magnitude and the distribution of sea temperature. Compared with the simple two-layer ocean model used by some other studies, the response of the ocean to a TC is more logical here. The model is also verified in a real case with a TC passing the neighborhood of a buoy station. It is shown that the established ocean model can basically reproduce the sea surface temperature change as observed.

  6. A coupled physical-biological-chemical model for the Indian Ocean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P S Swathi; M K Sharada; K S Yajnik

    2000-12-01

    A coupled physical-biological-chemical model has been developed at C-MMACS. for studying the time- variation of primary productivity and air-sea carbon-dioxide exchange in the Indian Ocean. The physical model is based on the Modular Ocean Model, Version 2 (MOM2) and the biological model describes the nonlinear dynamics of a 7-component marine ecosystem. The chemical model includes dynamical equation for the evolution of dissolved inorganic carbon and total alkalinity. The interaction between the biological and chemical model is through the Redfield ratio. The partial pressure of carbon dioxide pCO2 of the surface layer is obtained from the chemical equilibrium equations of Peng et al 1987. Transfer coefficients for air-sea exchange of CO2 are computed dynamically based on the wind speeds. The coupled model reproduces the high productivity observed in the Arabian Sea off the Somali and Omani coasts during the Southwest (SW) monsoon. The entire Arabian Sea is an outgassing region for CO2 in spite of high productivity with transfer rates as high as 80 m-mol C/m2/day during SW monsoon near the Somali Coast on account of strong winds.

  7. Stoichiometries of remineralisation and denitrification in global biogeochemical ocean models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Paulmier

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Since the seminal paper of Redfield (1934, constant stoichiometric elemental ratios linking biotic carbon and nutrient fluxes are often assumed in marine biogeochemistry, and especially in coupled biogeochemical circulation models, to couple the global oxygen, carbon and nutrient cycles. However, when looking in more detail, some deviations from the classical Redfield stoichiometry have been reported, in particular with respect to remineralization of organic matter changing with depth or with ambient oxygen levels. We here compare the assumptions about the stoichiometry of organic matter and its remineralization that are used explicitly and implicitly in common biogeochemical ocean models. We find that the implicit assumptions made about the hydrogen content of organic matter can lead to inconsistencies in the modeled remineralization and denitrification stoichiometries. It is suggested that future marine biogeochemical models explicitly state the chemical composition assumed for the organic matter, including its oxygen and hydrogen content.

  8. Estimating Oceanic Primary Production Using Vertical Irradiance and Chlorophyll Profiles from Ocean Gliders in the North Atlantic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemsley, Victoria S; Smyth, Timothy J; Martin, Adrian P; Frajka-Williams, Eleanor; Thompson, Andrew F; Damerell, Gillian; Painter, Stuart C

    2015-10-06

    An autonomous underwater vehicle (Seaglider) has been used to estimate marine primary production (PP) using a combination of irradiance and fluorescence vertical profiles. This method provides estimates for depth-resolved and temporally evolving PP on fine spatial scales in the absence of ship-based calibrations. We describe techniques to correct for known issues associated with long autonomous deployments such as sensor calibration drift and fluorescence quenching. Comparisons were made between the Seaglider, stable isotope ((13)C), and satellite estimates of PP. The Seaglider-based PP estimates were comparable to both satellite estimates and stable isotope measurements.

  9. Climate-induced interannual variability of marine primary and export production in three global coupled climate carbon cycle models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Schneider

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Fully coupled climate carbon cycle models are sophisticated tools that are used to predict future climate change and its impact on the land and ocean carbon cycles. These models should be able to adequately represent natural variability, requiring model validation by observations. The present study focuses on the ocean carbon cycle component, in particular the spatial and temporal variability in net primary productivity (PP and export production (EP of particulate organic carbon (POC. Results from three coupled climate carbon cycle models (IPSL, MPIM, NCAR are compared with observation-based estimates derived from satellite measurements of ocean colour and results from inverse modelling (data assimilation. Satellite observations of ocean colour have shown that temporal variability of PP on the global scale is largely dominated by the permanently stratified, low-latitude ocean (Behrenfeld et al., 2006 with stronger stratification (higher sea surface temperature; SST being associated with negative PP anomalies. Results from all three coupled models confirm the role of the low-latitude, permanently stratified ocean for anomalies in globally integrated PP, but only one model (IPSL also reproduces the inverse relationship between stratification (SST and PP. An adequate representation of iron and macronutrient co-limitation of phytoplankton growth in the tropical ocean has shown to be the crucial mechanism determining the capability of the models to reproduce observed interactions between climate and PP.

  10. A Global, Multi-Resolution Approach to Regional Ocean Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Qiang

    2013-11-08

    In this collaborative research project between Pennsylvania State University, Colorado State University and Florida State University, we mainly focused on developing multi-resolution algorithms which are suitable to regional ocean modeling. We developed hybrid implicit and explicit adaptive multirate time integration method to solve systems of time-dependent equations that present two signi cantly di erent scales. We studied the e ects of spatial simplicial meshes on the stability and the conditioning of fully discrete approximations. We also studies adaptive nite element method (AFEM) based upon the Centroidal Voronoi Tessellation (CVT) and superconvergent gradient recovery. Some of these techniques are now being used by geoscientists(such as those at LANL).

  11. Modeling deep ocean shipping noise in varying acidity conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udovydchenkov, Ilya A; Duda, Timothy F; Doney, Scott C; Lima, Ivan D

    2010-09-01

    Possible future changes of ambient shipping noise at 0.1-1 kHz in the North Pacific caused by changing seawater chemistry conditions are analyzed with a simplified propagation model. Probable decreases of pH would cause meaningful reduction of the sound absorption coefficient in near-surface ocean water for these frequencies. The results show that a few decibels of increase may occur in 100 years in some very quiet areas very far from noise sources, with small effects closer to noise sources. The use of ray physics allows sound energy attenuated via volume absorption and by the seafloor to be compared.

  12. The HYCOM (HYbrid Coordinate Ocean Model) Data Assimilative System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    Harley E. Hurlburt, Ole Martin Smedstad, George R. Halliwell, Patrick J. Hogan, Alan J. Wallcraft, Remy Baraille, Rainer Bleck 5.. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK...assimilative system Eric P. Chassignet a,*, Harley E. Hurlburt b Ole Martin Smedstad C George R. Halliwell a Patrick J. Hogan b, Alan J. Wallcraft b...coordinate. J. Comput. Phys. Large, W.G., McWilliams , J.C., Doney, S.C., 1994. Oceanic vertical 115, 228-244. mixing: a review and a model with a nonlocal

  13. The Fidelity of Ocean Models With Explicit Eddies (Chapter 17)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McClean, J; Jayne, S; Maltrud, M; Ivanova, D

    2007-08-01

    Current practices within the oceanographic community have been reviewed with regard to the use of metrics to assess the realism of the upper-ocean circulation, ventilation processes diagnosed by time-evolving mixed layer depth and mode water formation, and eddy heat fluxes in large-scale fine resolution ocean model simulations. We have striven to understand the fidelity of these simulations in the context of their potential use in future fine-resolution coupled climate system studies. A variety of methodologies are used to assess the veracity of the numerical simulations. Sea surface height variability and the location of western boundary current paths from altimetry have been used routinely as basic indicators of fine-resolution model performance. Drifters and floats have also been used to provide pseudo-Eulerian measures of the mean and variability of surface and sub-surface flows, while statistical comparisons of observed and simulated means have been carried out using James tests. Probability density functions have been used to assess the Gaussian nature of the observed and simulated flows. Length and time scales have been calculated in both Eulerian and Lagrangian frameworks from altimetry and drifters, respectively. Concise measures of multiple model performance have been obtained from Taylor diagrams. The time-evolution of the mixed layer depth at monitoring stations has been compared with simulated time series. Finally, eddy heat fluxes are compared to climatological inferences.

  14. Polarimetric entropy of the ocean surface with a two-scale scattering model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Wenguang; LI Haiyan; SONG Xingai

    2014-01-01

    The relationships among an ocean wave spectrum, a fully polarimetric coherence matrix, and radar pa-rameters are deduced with an electromagnetic wave theory. Furthermore, the relationship between the polarimetric entropy and ocean wave spectrum is established based on the definition of entropy and a two-scale scattering model of the ocean surface. It is the first time that the polarimetric entropy of the ocean surface is presented in theory. Meanwhile, the relationships among the fully polarimetric entropy and the parameters related to radar and ocean are discussed. The study is the basis of further monitoring targets on the ocean surface and deriving oceanic information with the entropy from the ocean surface. The con-trast enhancement between human-made targets and the ocean surface with the entropy is presented with quad-pol airborne synthetic aperture radar (AIRSAR) data.

  15. Preliminary ice shelf-ocean simulation results from idealized standalone-ocean and coupled model intercomparison projects (MIPs)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asay-Davis, Xylar; Martin, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    The second Ice Shelf-Ocean MIP (ISOMIP+) and the first Marine Ice Sheet-Ocean MIP (MISOMIP1) prescribe a set of idealized experiments for ocean models with ice-shelf cavities and coupled ice sheet-ocean models, respectively. ISOMIP+ and MISOMIP1 were designed together with the third Marine Ice Sheet MIP (MISMIP+) with three main goals, namely that the MIPs should provide: a controlled forum for researchers to compare their model results with those from other models during model development. a path for testing components in the process of developing coupled ice sheet-ocean models. a basic setup from which a large variety of parameter and process studies can usefully be performed. The experimental design for the three MIPs is currently under review in Geoscientific Model Development (Asay-Davis et al. 2015, doi:10.5194/gmdd-8-9859-2015). We present preliminary results from ISOMIP+ and MISOMIP1 experiments using several ocean-only and coupled ice sheet-ocean models. Among ocean models, we show that differences in model behavior are significant enough that similar results can only be achieved by tuning model parameters (e.g. boundary-layer transfer coefficients, drag coefficients, vertical mixing parameterizations) for each models. This tuning is constrained by a desired mean melt rate in quasi-steady state under specified forcing conditions, akin to how models would be tuned based on observations for non-idealized simulations. We also present a number of parameter studies based the MIP experiments. Again, using several models, we show that melt rates respond sub-linearly to both changes in the square root of the drag coefficient and the heat-transfer coefficient, and that melting is relatively insensitive to horizontal-mixing coefficients (perhaps because the resolution is sufficient to permit eddies) but more sensitive to vertical-mixing coefficients. We show that the choice of the equation of state (linear or nonlinear) does not have a significant impact as long as

  16. Carbon export fluxes in the Southern Ocean: results from inverse modeling and comparison with satellite-based estimates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlitzer, Reiner

    The use of dissolved nutrients and carbon for photosynthesis in the euphotic zone and the subsequent downward transport of particulate and dissolved organic material strongly affect carbon concentrations in surface water and thus the air-sea exchange of CO 2. Efforts to quantify the downward carbon flux for the whole ocean or on basin-scales are hampered by the sparseness of direct productivity or flux measurements. Here, a global ocean circulation, biogeochemical model is used to determine rates of export production and vertical carbon fluxes in the Southern Ocean. The model exploits the existing large sets of hydrographic, oxygen, nutrient and carbon data that contain information on the underlying biogeochemical processes. The model is fitted to the data by systematically varying circulation, air-sea fluxes, production, and remineralization rates simultaneously. Use of the adjoint method yields model property simulations that are in very good agreement with measurements. In the model, the total integrated export flux of particulate organic matter necessary for the realistic reproduction of nutrient data is significantly larger than export estimates derived from primary productivity maps. Of the 10,000 TgC yr -1(10 GtC yr -1) required globally, the Southern Ocean south of 30°S contributes about 3000 TgC yr -1 (33%), most of it occurring in a zonal belt along the Antarctic Circumpolar Current and in the Peru, Chile and Namibia coastal upwelling regions. The export flux of POC for the area south of 50°S amounts to 1000±210 TgC yr -1, and the particle flux in 1000 m for the same area is 115±20 TgC yr -1. Unlike for the global ocean, the contribution of the downward flux of dissolved organic carbon is significant in the Southern Ocean in the top 500 m of the water column. Comparison with satellite-based productivity estimates (CZCS and SeaWiFS) shows a relatively good agreement over most of the ocean except for the Southern Ocean south of 50°S, where the model

  17. A reduction in marine primary productivity driven by rapid warming over the tropical Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Roxy, M.K.; Modi, A; Murtugudde, R.; Valsala, V.; Panickal, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Ravichandran, M.; Vichi, M.; Levy, M.

    during the past century-although the contribution of such a large warming to productivity changes has remained ambiguous. Earlier studies had described the western Indian Ocean as a region with the largest increase in phytoplankton during the recent...

  18. Ocean primary production and available light: Further algorithms for remote sensing

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Platt, T.; Sathyendranath, S.; Caverhill, C.M.; Lewis, M.R.

    In the context of remote sensing of the ocean, the general problem of estimating water column production from surface irradiance and column chlorophyll concentration is examined, and some refinements are made to the linear theory presented by PLATr...

  19. Ice-ocean-ecosystem operational model of the Baltic Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janecki, M.; Dzierzbicka-Glowacka, L.; Jakacki, J.; Nowicki, A.

    2012-04-01

    3D-CEMBS is a fully coupled model adopted for the Baltic Sea and have been developed within the grant, wchich is supported by the Polish State Committee of Scientific Reasearch. The model is based on CESM1.0 (Community Earth System Model), in our configuration it consists of two active components (ocean and ice) driven by central coupler (CPL7). Ocean (POP version 2.1) and ice models (CICE model, version 4.0) are forced by atmospheric and land data models. Atmospheric data sets are provided by ICM-UM model from University of Warsaw. Additionally land model provides runoff of the Baltic Sea (currently 78 rivers). Ecosystem model is based on an intermediate complexity marine ecosystem model for the global domain (J.K. Moore et. al., 2002) and consists of 11 main components: zooplankton, small phytoplankton, diatoms, cyanobacteria, two detrital classes, dissolved oxygen and the nutrients nitrate, ammonium, phosphate and silicate. The model is configured at two horizontal resolutions, approximately 9km and 2km (1/12° and 1/48° respectively). The model bathymetry is represented as 21 vertical levels and the thickness of the first four layers were chosen to be five metres. 3D-CEMBS model grid is based on stereographic coordinates, but equator of these coordinates is in the centre of the Baltic Sea (rotated stereographic coordinates) and we can assume that shape of the cells are square and they are identical. Currently model works in a operational state. The model creates 48-hour forecasts every 6 hours (or when new atmospheric dataset is available). Prognostic variables such as temperature, salinity, ice cover, currents, sea surface height and phytoplankton concentration are presented online on a the website and are available for registered users. Also time series for any location are accessible. This work was carried out in support of grant No NN305 111636 and No NN306 353239 - the Polish state Committee of Scientific Research. The partial support for this study was

  20. Coupling atmospheric and ocean wave models for storm simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Jianting

    This thesis studies the wind-wave interactions through the coupling between the atmospheric model and ocean surface wave models. Special attention is put on storm simulations in the North Sea for wind energy applications in the coastal zones. The two aspects, namely storm conditions and coastal...... areas, are challenging for the wind-wave coupling system because: in storm cases, the wave field is constantly modified by the fast varying wind field; in coastal zones, the wave field is strongly influenced by the bathymetry and currents. Both conditions have complex, unsteady sea state varying...... with time and space that challenge the current coupled modeling system. The conventional approach of estimating the momentum exchange is through parameterizing the aerodynamic roughness length (z0) with wave parameters such as wave age, steepness, significant wave height, etc. However, it is found in storm...

  1. Modeling the Ocean Tide for Tidal Power Generation Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawase, M.; Gedney, M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent years have seen renewed interest in the ocean tide as a source of energy for electrical power generation. Unlike in the 1960s, when the tidal barrage was the predominant method of power extraction considered and implemented, the current methodology favors operation of a free-stream turbine or an array of them in strong tidal currents. As tidal power generation moves from pilot-scale projects to actual array implementations, numerical modeling of tidal currents is expected to play an increasing role in site selection, resource assessment, array design, and environmental impact assessment. In this presentation, a simple, coupled ocean/estuary model designed for research into fundamental aspects of tidal power generation is described. The model consists of a Pacific Ocean-size rectangular basin and a connected fjord-like embayment with dimensions similar to that of Puget Sound, Washington, one of the potential power generation sites in the United States. The model is forced by an idealized lunar tide-generating potential. The study focuses on the energetics of a tidal system including tidal power extraction at both global and regional scales. The hyperbolic nature of the governing shallow water equations means consequence of tidal power extraction cannot be limited to the local waters, but is global in extent. Modeling power extraction with a regional model with standard boundary conditions introduces uncertainties of 3 ~ 25% in the power extraction estimate depending on the level of extraction. Power extraction in the model has a well-defined maximum (~800 MW in a standard case) that is in agreement with previous theoretical studies. Natural energy dissipation and tidal power extraction strongly interact; for a turbine array of a given capacity, the higher the level of natural dissipation the lower the power the array can extract. Conversely, power extraction leads to a decrease in the level of natural dissipation (Figure) as well as the tidal range and the

  2. Comparison between summertime and wintertime Arctic Ocean primary marine aerosol properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Zábori

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Primary marine aerosols (PMAs are an important source of cloud condensation nuclei, and one of the key elements of the remote marine radiative budget. Changes occurring in the rapidly warming Arctic, most importantly the decreasing sea ice extent, will alter PMA production and hence the Arctic climate through a set of feedback processes. In light of this, laboratory experiments with Arctic Ocean water during both Arctic winter and summer were conducted and focused on PMA emissions as a function of season and water properties. Total particle number concentrations and particle number size distributions were used to characterize the PMA population. A comprehensive data set from the Arctic summer and winter showed a decrease in PMA concentrations for the covered water temperature (Tw range between −1°C and 15°C. A sharp decrease in PMA emissions for a Tw increase from −1°C to 4°C was followed by a lower rate of change in PMA emissions for Tw up to about 6°C. Near constant number concentrations for water temperatures between 6°C to 10°C and higher were recorded. Even though the total particle number concentration changes for overlapping Tw ranges were consistent between the summer and winter measurements, the distribution of particle number concentrations among the different sizes varied between the seasons. Median particle number concentrations for a dry diameter (DpDp > 0.125μm, the particle number concentrations during winter were mostly higher than in summer (up to 50%. The normalized particle number size distribution as a function of water temperature was examined for both winter and summer measurements. An increase in Tw from −1°C to 10°C during winter measurements showed a decrease in the peak of relative particle number concentration at about a Dp of 0.180μm, while an increase was observed for particles with Dp > 1μm. Summer measurements exhibited a relative shift to smaller particle sizes for an increase of Tw in the range

  3. The Middle Miocene climate as modelled in an atmosphere-ocean-biosphere model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krapp

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We present simulations with a coupled atmosphere-ocean-biosphere model for the Middle Miocene 15 million years ago. The model is insofar more consistent than previous models because it captures the essential interactions between ocean and atmosphere and between atmosphere and vegetation. The Middle Miocene topography, which alters both large-scale ocean and atmospheric circulations, causes a global warming of 0.7 K compared to present day. Higher than present-day CO2 levels of 480 and 720 ppm cause a global warming of 2.8 and 4.9 K. The associated water vapour feedback enhances the greenhouse effect which leads to a polar amplification of the warming. These results suggest that higher than present-day CO2 levels are necessary to drive the warm Middle Miocene climate, also because the dynamic vegetation model simulates a denser vegetation which is in line with fossil records. However, we do not find a flatter than present-day equator-to-pole temperature gradient as has been suggested by marine and terrestrial proxies. Instead, a compensation between atmospheric and ocean heat transport counteracts the flattening of the temperature gradient. The acclaimed role of the large-scale ocean circulation in redistributing heat cannot be supported by our results. Including full ocean dynamics, therefore, does not solve the problem of the flat temperature gradient during the Middle Miocene.

  4. Climatology of the HOPE-G global ocean general circulation model - Sea ice general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legutke, S. [Deutsches Klimarechenzentrum (DKRZ), Hamburg (Germany); Maier-Reimer, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1999-12-01

    The HOPE-G global ocean general circulation model (OGCM) climatology, obtained in a long-term forced integration is described. HOPE-G is a primitive-equation z-level ocean model which contains a dynamic-thermodynamic sea-ice model. It is formulated on a 2.8 grid with increased resolution in low latitudes in order to better resolve equatorial dynamics. The vertical resolution is 20 layers. The purpose of the integration was both to investigate the models ability to reproduce the observed general circulation of the world ocean and to obtain an initial state for coupled atmosphere - ocean - sea-ice climate simulations. The model was driven with daily mean data of a 15-year integration of the atmosphere general circulation model ECHAM4, the atmospheric component in later coupled runs. Thereby, a maximum of the flux variability that is expected to appear in coupled simulations is included already in the ocean spin-up experiment described here. The model was run for more than 2000 years until a quasi-steady state was achieved. It reproduces the major current systems and the main features of the so-called conveyor belt circulation. The observed distribution of water masses is reproduced reasonably well, although with a saline bias in the intermediate water masses and a warm bias in the deep and bottom water of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The model underestimates the meridional transport of heat in the Atlantic Ocean. The simulated heat transport in the other basins, though, is in good agreement with observations. (orig.)

  5. Climatology of the HOPE-G global ocean general circulation model - Sea ice general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legutke, S. [Deutsches Klimarechenzentrum (DKRZ), Hamburg (Germany); Maier-Reimer, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)

    1999-12-01

    The HOPE-G global ocean general circulation model (OGCM) climatology, obtained in a long-term forced integration is described. HOPE-G is a primitive-equation z-level ocean model which contains a dynamic-thermodynamic sea-ice model. It is formulated on a 2.8 grid with increased resolution in low latitudes in order to better resolve equatorial dynamics. The vertical resolution is 20 layers. The purpose of the integration was both to investigate the models ability to reproduce the observed general circulation of the world ocean and to obtain an initial state for coupled atmosphere - ocean - sea-ice climate simulations. The model was driven with daily mean data of a 15-year integration of the atmosphere general circulation model ECHAM4, the atmospheric component in later coupled runs. Thereby, a maximum of the flux variability that is expected to appear in coupled simulations is included already in the ocean spin-up experiment described here. The model was run for more than 2000 years until a quasi-steady state was achieved. It reproduces the major current systems and the main features of the so-called conveyor belt circulation. The observed distribution of water masses is reproduced reasonably well, although with a saline bias in the intermediate water masses and a warm bias in the deep and bottom water of the Atlantic and Indian Oceans. The model underestimates the meridional transport of heat in the Atlantic Ocean. The simulated heat transport in the other basins, though, is in good agreement with observations. (orig.)

  6. Light availability in the coastal ocean: impact on the distribution of benthic photosynthetic organisms and their contribution to primary production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Gattuso

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the major features of the coastal zone is that part of its sea floor receives a significant amount of sunlight and can therefore sustain benthic primary production by seagrasses, macroalgae, microphytobenthos and corals. However, the contribution of benthic communities to the primary production of the global coastal ocean is not known, partly because the surface area where benthic primary production can proceed is poorly quantified. Here, we use a new analysis of satellite (SeaWiFS data collected between 1998 and 2003 to estimate, for the first time at a nearly global scale, the irradiance reaching the bottom of the coastal ocean. The following cumulative functions provide the percentage of the surface (S of the coastal zone receiving an irradiance greater than Ez (in mol photons m−2 d−1: SNon-polar = 29.61 − 17.92 log10(Ez + 0.72 log102(Ez + 0.90 log103(Ez SArctic = 15.99 − 13.56 log10(Ez + 1.49 log102(Ez + 0.70 log103(Ez Data on the constraint of light availability on the major benthic primary producers and net community production are reviewed. Some photosynthetic organisms can grow deeper than the nominal bottom limit of the coastal ocean (200 m. The minimum irradiance required varies from 0.4 to 5.1 mol photons m−2 d−1 depending on the group considered. The daily compensation irradiance of benthic communities ranges from 0.24 to 4.4 mol photons m−2 d−1. Data on benthic irradiance and light requirements are combined to estimate the surface area of the coastal ocean where (1 light does not limit the distribution of primary producers and (2 net community production (NCP, the balance between gross primary production and community respiration is positive. Positive benthic NCP can occur over 33% of the global shelf area. The limitations of this approach, related to the spatial resolution of the satellite data, the parameterization used to convert reflectance data to irradiance, the lack of global information on the benthic

  7. Global warming in a coupled climate model including oceanic eddy-induced advection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirst, Anthony C.; Gordon, Hal B.; O'Farrell, Siobhan P.

    The Gent and McWilliams (GM) parameterization for large-scale water transport caused by mesoscale oceanic eddies is introduced into the oceanic component of a global coupled ocean-atmosphere model. Parallel simulations with and without the GM scheme are performed to examine the effect of this parameterization on model behavior under constant atmospheric CO2 and on the model response to increasing CO2. The control (constant CO2) runs show substantial differences in the oceanic stratification and extent of convection, similar to differences found previously using uncoupled ocean models. The transient (increasing CO2) runs show moderate differences in the rate of oceanic heat sequestration (less in the GM case), as expected based on passive tracer uptake studies. However, the surface warming is weaker in the GM case, especially over the Southern Ocean, which is contrary to some recent supposition. Reasons for the reduced warming in the GM case are discussed.

  8. Ocean acidification in the Meso- vs. Cenozoic: lessons from modeling about the geological expression of paleo-ocean acidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, S. E.; Ridgwell, A.; Kirtland Turner, S.

    2015-12-01

    Rapid climatic and biotic events putatively associated with ocean acidification are scattered throughout the Meso-Cenozoic. Many of these rapid perturbations, variably referred to as hyperthermals (Paleogene) and oceanic anoxic events or mass extinction events (Mesozoic), share a number of characteristic features, including some combination of negative carbon isotopic excursion, global warming, and a rise in atmospheric CO2 concentration. Comparisons between ocean acidification events over the last ~250 Ma are, however, problematic because the types of marine geological archives and carbon reservoirs that can be interrogated are fundamentally different for early Mesozoic vs. late Mesozoic-Cenozoic events. Many Mesozoic events are known primarily or exclusively from geological outcrops of relatively shallow water deposits, whereas the more recent Paleogene hyperthermal events have been chiefly identified from deep sea records. In addition, these earlier events are superimposed on an ocean with a fundamentally different carbonate buffering capacity, as calcifying plankton (which created the deep-sea carbonate sink) originate in the mid-Mesozoic. Here, we use both Earth system modeling and reaction transport sediment modeling to explore the ways in which comparable ocean acidification-inducing climate perturbations might manifest in the Mesozoic vs. the Cenozoic geological record. We examine the role of the deep-sea carbonate sink in the expression of ocean acidification, as well as the spatial heterogeneity of surface ocean pH and carbonate saturation state. These results critically inform interpretations of ocean acidification prior to the mid-Mesozoic advent of calcifying plankton and expectations about the recording of these events in geological outcrop.

  9. Towards Next Generation Ocean Models: Novel Discontinuous Galerkin Schemes for 2D Unsteady Biogeochemical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-01

    28 2.3 Delfin and Finel . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 30 2.4 ELCIRC and...Designed for coastal oceans, shelves, estuaries, inlets, floodplains, rivers and beaches Delfin FV/FD ELCIRC Eularian-Lagrangian CIRCu- lation model FV/FD...NOAA’s National Ocean Services for storm surge/inundation applications. 2.3 Delfin and Finel Delfin was developed by D. Ham under the supervision of J

  10. Global Modeling of Internal Tides Within an Eddying Ocean General Circulation Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    topography take the form of internal waves (waves along interfaces between fluids of differing densities), which are the subject of this special ...Southern Africa, and the Antarctic Circumpolar Current in the Southern Ocean (Schmitz, 1996a,b; Siedler et al., 2001). On timescales of about 10–200...Coupled Ocean Data Assimilation system (NCODA; Cummings, 2005) to provide a statistical Oceanography | Vol. 25, No. 224 blending of model and

  11. (Studies of ocean predictability at decade to century time scales using a global ocean general circulation model in a parallel competing environment). [Large Scale Geostrophic Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-10

    The first phase of the proposed work is largely completed on schedule. Scientists at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) succeeded in putting a version of the Hamburg isopycnal coordinate ocean model (OPYC) onto the INTEL parallel computer. Due to the slow run speeds of the OPYC on the parallel machine, another ocean is being model used during the first part of phase 2. The model chosen is the Large Scale Geostrophic (LSG) model form the Max Planck Institute.

  12. Marine regime shifts in ocean biogeochemical models: a case study in the Gulf of Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaulieu, Claudie; Cole, Harriet; Henson, Stephanie; Yool, Andrew; Anderson, Tom; de Mora, Lee; Buitenhuis, Erik T.; Butenschön, Momme; Totterdell, Ian J.; Icarus Allen, J.

    2016-08-01

    Regime shifts have been reported in many marine ecosystems, and are often expressed as an abrupt change occurring in multiple physical and biological components of the system. In the Gulf of Alaska, a regime shift in the late 1970s was observed, indicated by an abrupt increase in sea surface temperature and major shifts in the catch of many fish species. A thorough understanding of the extent and mechanisms leading to such regime shifts is challenged by data paucity in time and space. We investigate the ability of a suite of ocean biogeochemistry models of varying complexity to simulate regime shifts in the Gulf of Alaska by examining the presence of abrupt changes in time series of physical variables (sea surface temperature and mixed-layer depth), nutrients and biological variables (chlorophyll, primary productivity and plankton biomass) using change-point analysis. Our results show that some ocean biogeochemical models are capable of simulating the late 1970s shift, manifested as an abrupt increase in sea surface temperature followed by an abrupt decrease in nutrients and biological productivity. Models from low to intermediate complexity simulate an abrupt transition in the late 1970s (i.e. a significant shift from one year to the next) while the transition is smoother in higher complexity models. Our study demonstrates that ocean biogeochemical models can successfully simulate regime shifts in the Gulf of Alaska region. These models can therefore be considered useful tools to enhance our understanding of how changes in physical conditions are propagated from lower to upper trophic levels.

  13. Sea ice thermohaline dynamics and biogeochemistry in the Arctic Ocean: Empirical and model results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Pedro; Meyer, Amelie; Olsen, Lasse M.; Kauko, Hanna M.; Assmy, Philipp; Rösel, Anja; Itkin, Polona; Hudson, Stephen R.; Granskog, Mats A.; Gerland, Sebastian; Sundfjord, Arild; Steen, Harald; Hop, Haakon; Cohen, Lana; Peterson, Algot K.; Jeffery, Nicole; Elliott, Scott M.; Hunke, Elizabeth C.; Turner, Adrian K.

    2017-07-01

    Large changes in the sea ice regime of the Arctic Ocean have occurred over the last decades justifying the development of models to forecast sea ice physics and biogeochemistry. The main goal of this study is to evaluate the performance of the Los Alamos Sea Ice Model (CICE) to simulate physical and biogeochemical properties at time scales of a few weeks and to use the model to analyze ice algal bloom dynamics in different types of ice. Ocean and atmospheric forcing data and observations of the evolution of the sea ice properties collected from 18 April to 4 June 2015, during the Norwegian young sea ICE expedition, were used to test the CICE model. Our results show the following: (i) model performance is reasonable for sea ice thickness and bulk salinity; good for vertically resolved temperature, vertically averaged Chl a concentrations, and standing stocks; and poor for vertically resolved Chl a concentrations. (ii) Improving current knowledge about nutrient exchanges, ice algal recruitment, and motion is critical to improve sea ice biogeochemical modeling. (iii) Ice algae may bloom despite some degree of basal melting. (iv) Ice algal motility driven by gradients in limiting factors is a plausible mechanism to explain their vertical distribution. (v) Different ice algal bloom and net primary production (NPP) patterns were identified in the ice types studied, suggesting that ice algal maximal growth rates will increase, while sea ice vertically integrated NPP and biomass will decrease as a result of the predictable increase in the area covered by refrozen leads in the Arctic Ocean.

  14. Primary and Secondary Organic Marine Aerosol and Oceanic Biological Activity: Recent Results and New Perspectives for Future Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Rinaldi

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important natural aerosol systems at the global level is marine aerosol that comprises both organic and inorganic components of primary and secondary origin. The present paper reviews some new results on primary and secondary organic marine aerosol, achieved during the EU project MAP (Marine Aerosol Production, comparing them with those reported in the recent literature. Marine aerosol samples collected at the coastal site of Mace Head, Ireland, show a chemical composition trend that is influenced by the oceanic biological activity cycle, in agreement with other observations. Laboratory experiments show that sea-spray aerosol from biologically active sea water can be highly enriched in organics, and the authors highlight the need for further studies on the atmospheric fate of such primary organics. With regard to the secondary fraction of organic aerosol, the average chemical composition and molecular tracer (methanesulfonic-acid, amines distribution could be successfully characterized by adopting a multitechnique analytical approach.

  15. Net primary productivity collected from New Horizon in Gulf of California and North Pacific Ocean from 2004-07-14 to 2008-08-06 (NCEI Accession 0130076)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Net primary productivity determined from 13C-labeled in situ incubations. Water collected via Niskin bottle was incubated with labeled bicarbonate for 24 hours at...

  16. Distribution of [sup 32]Si in the world ocean: Model compared to observation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, T.H. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)); Maier-Reimer, E. (Max-Planck Institut fuer Meteorologie, Hamburg (Germany)); Broecker, W.S. (Columbia Univ., Palisades, NY (United States))

    1993-06-01

    The most difficult measurement of the GEOSECS survey was that of silicon 32. This paper compares the observed distribution from the survey with the distributions predicted from two global ocean models. Existing measurements show little surface to bottom or ocean to ocean variations where as the models predict three to five fold greater ratios in the deep Atlantic Ocean than in the deep Pacific and Indian oceans. A flaw in the measurements is one possibility for the discrepancy. 9 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  17. Modulation in Ocean Primary Production due to Variability of Photosynthetically Available Radiation under Different Atmospheric Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhumita Tripathy

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The rate of photosynthesis primarily depends on nutrients and photosynthetically available radiation (PAR at sea surface. Several ship cruises were carried out to measure optical, biological, and atmospheric parameters in the Arabian Sea and their variability were studied. An analytical nonspectral photosynthesis-irradiance model was used to estimate euphotic primary production (EuPP to study its variability during cruise periods. PAR was estimated using COART model using in situ measured aerosol optical depth (AOD to compare with in situ measured PAR. In order to understand the variability of PAR under different types of aerosol and different aerosol loading, a simulation study was carried out using COART model. EuPP was estimated for various PAR values under different aerosol loading and cloud coverage conditions. Sensitivity analysis showed that for maritime, maritime polluted, and desert aerosols, the ratio PAR/PAR0AOD has attenuated to about 11–25%, whereas it has attenuated to 44% for urban aerosol type. PAR/PARclear  sky was reduced by ~57% for high aerosol loading and for overcast sky. The decrease in EuPP under various aerosol loading and cloud coverage was observed to depend on the photoadaptation parameter. EuPP/EuPPclear  sky was reduced by 38% for maximum maritime aerosol loading and for overcast sky.

  18. Simulation of the world ocean climate with a massively parallel numerical model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ushakov, K. V.; Ibrayev, R. A.; Kalmykov, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The INM-IO numerical World Ocean model is verified through the calculation of the model ocean climate. The numerical experiment was conducted for a period of 500 years following the CORE-I protocol. We analyze some basic elements of the large-scale ocean circulation and local and integral characteristics of the model solution. The model limitations and ways they are overcome are described. The results generally fit the level of leading models. This experiment is a necessary step preceding the transition to high-resolution diagnostic and prognostic calculations of the state of the World Ocean and its individual basins.

  19. A coupled ice-ocean ecosystem model for 1-D and 3-D applications in the Bering and Chukchi Seas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Meibing; Clara Deal; WANG Jia

    2008-01-01

    Primary production in the Bering and Chukchi Seas is strongly influenced by the annual cycle of sea ice. Here pelagic and sea ice algal ecosystems coexist and interact with each other. Ecosystem modeling of sea ice associated phytoplankton blooms has been understudied compared to open water ecosystem model applications.This study introduces a general coupled ice-ocean ecosystem model with equations and parameters for 1-D and 3-D applications that is based on 1-D coupled ice-ocean ecosystem model development in the landfast ice in the Chukchi Sea and marginal ice zone of Bering Sea. The biological model includes both pelagic and sea ice algal habitats with 10 compartments: three phytoplankton (pelagic diatom, flagellates and ice algae: D, F, and Ai), three zooplankton (copepods, large zooplankton, and microzooplankton: ZS, ZL, ZP), three nutrients (nitrate + nitrite, ammonium, silicon:NO3, NH4, Si) and detritus (Det). The coupling of the biological models with physical ocean models is straightforward with just the addition of the advection and diffusion terms to the ecosystem model. The coupling with a multi-category sea ice model requires the same calculation of the sea ice ecosystem model in each ice thickness category and the redistribution between categories caused by both dynamic and thermodynamic forcing as in the physical model. Phytoplankton and ice algal self-shading effect is the sole feedback from the ecosystem model to the physical model.

  20. A regional ocean circulation model for the mid-Cretaceous North Atlantic Basin: implications for black shale formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. M. Topper

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available High concentrations of organic matter accumulated in marine sediments during Oceanic Anoxic Events (OAEs in the Cretaceous. Model studies examining these events invariably make use of global ocean circulation models. In this study, a regional model for the North Atlantic Basin during OAE2 at the Cenomanian-Turonian boundary has been developed. A first order check of the results has been performed by comparison with the results of a recent global Cenomanian CCSM3 run, from which boundary and initial conditions were obtained. The regional model is able to maintain tracer patterns and to produce velocity patterns similar to the global model. The sensitivity of the basin tracer and circulation patterns to changes in the geometry of the connections with the global ocean is examined with three experiments with different bathymetries near the sponges. Different geometries turn out to have little effect on tracer distribution, but do affect circulation and upwelling patterns. The regional model is also used to test the hypothesis that ocean circulation may have been behind the deposition of black shales during OAEs. Three scenarios are tested which are thought to represent pre-OAE, OAE and post-OAE situations. Model results confirm that Pacific intermediate inflow together with coastal upwelling could have enhanced primary production during OAE2. A low sea level in the pre-OAE scenario could have inhibited large scale black shale formation, as could have the opening of the Equatorial Atlantic Seaway in the post-OAE scenario.

  1. Organic carbon fluxes in the Atlantic and the Southern Ocean: relationship to primary production compiled from satellite radiometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, G.; Ratmeyer, V.; Wefer, G.

    Fluxes of organic carbon normalised to a depth of 1000 m from 18 sites in the Atlantic and the Southern Ocean are presented, comprising nine biogeochemical provinces as defined by Longhurst et al. (1995. Journal of Plankton Research 17, 1245-1271). For comparison with primary production, we used a recent compilation of primary production values derived from CZCS data (Antoine et al., 1996. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 10, 57-69). In most cases, the seasonal patterns stood reasonably well in accordance with the carbon fluxes. Particularly, organic carbon flux records from two coastal sites off northwest and southwest Africa displayed a more distinct correlation to the primary production in sectors (1×1°) which are situated closer to the coastal environments. This was primarily caused by large upwelling filaments streaming far offshore, resulting in a cross-shelf carbon transport. With respect to primary production, organic carbon export to a water depth of 1000 m, and the fraction of primary production exported to a depth of 1000 m (export fraction=EF 1000), we were able to distinguish between: (1) the coastal environments with highest values (EF 1000=1.75-2.0%), (2) the eastern equatorial upwelling area with moderately high values (EF 1000=0.8-1.1%), (3) and the subtropical oligotrophic gyres that yielded lowest values (EF 1000=0.6%). Carbon export in the Southern Ocean was low to moderate, and the EF 1000 value seems to be quite low in general. Annual organic carbon fluxes were proportional to primary production, and the export fraction EF 1000 increased with primary production up to 350 gC m -2 yr-1. Latitudinal variations in primary production were reflected in the carbon flux pattern. A high temporal variability of primary production rates and a pronounced seasonality of carbon export were observed in the polar environments, in particular in coastal domains, although primary production (according to Antoine et al., 1996. Global Biogeochemical Cycles 10, 57

  2. Effects of whaling on the structure of the Southern Ocean food web: insights on the "krill surplus" from ecosystem modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szymon Surma

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to examine the ecological plausibility of the "krill surplus" hypothesis and the effects of whaling on the Southern Ocean food web using mass-balance ecosystem modelling. The depletion trajectory and unexploited biomass of each rorqual population in the Antarctic was reconstructed using yearly catch records and a set of species-specific surplus production models. The resulting estimates of the unexploited biomass of Antarctic rorquals were used to construct an Ecopath model of the Southern Ocean food web existing in 1900. The rorqual depletion trajectory was then used in an Ecosim scenario to drive rorqual biomasses and examine the "krill surplus" phenomenon and whaling effects on the food web in the years 1900-2008. An additional suite of Ecosim scenarios reflecting several hypothetical trends in Southern Ocean primary productivity were employed to examine the effect of bottom-up forcing on the documented krill biomass trend. The output of the Ecosim scenarios indicated that while the "krill surplus" hypothesis is a plausible explanation of the biomass trends observed in some penguin and pinniped species in the mid-20th century, the excess krill biomass was most likely eliminated by a rapid decline in primary productivity in the years 1975-1995. Our findings suggest that changes in physical conditions in the Southern Ocean during this time period could have eliminated the ecological effects of rorqual depletion, although the mechanism responsible is currently unknown. Furthermore, a decline in iron bioavailability due to rorqual depletion may have contributed to the rapid decline in overall Southern Ocean productivity during the last quarter of the 20th century. The results of this study underscore the need for further research on historical changes in the roles of top-down and bottom-up forcing in structuring the Southern Ocean food web.

  3. Arctic Ocean Freshwater: How Robust are Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahn, A.; Aksenov, Y.; deCuevas, B. A.; deSteur, L.; Haekkinen, S.; Hansen, E.; Herbaut, C.; Houssais, M.-N.; Karcher, M.; Kauker, F.; Lique, C.; Nguyen, A.; Pemberton, P.; Worthen, D.; Zhang, J.

    2012-01-01

    The Arctic freshwater (FW) has been the focus of many modeling studies, due to the potential impact of Arctic FW on the deep water formation in the North Atlantic. A comparison of the hindcasts from ten ocean-sea ice models shows that the simulation of the Arctic FW budget is quite different in the investigated models. While they agree on the general sink and source terms of the Arctic FW budget, the long-term means as well as the variability of the FW export vary among models. The best model-to-model agreement is found for the interannual and seasonal variability of the solid FW export and the solid FW storage, which also agree well with observations. For the interannual and seasonal variability of the liquid FW export, the agreement among models is better for the Canadian Arctic Archipelago (CAA) than for Fram Strait. The reason for this is that models are more consistent in simulating volume flux anomalies than salinity anomalies and volume-flux anomalies dominate the liquid FW export variability in the CAA but not in Fram Strait. The seasonal cycle of the liquid FW export generally shows a better agreement among models than the interannual variability, and compared to observations the models capture the seasonality of the liquid FW export rather well. In order to improve future simulations of the Arctic FW budget, the simulation of the salinity field needs to be improved, so that model results on the variability of the liquid FW export and storage become more robust.

  4. Modelling of partially-resolved oceanic symmetric instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachman, S. D.; Taylor, J. R.

    2014-10-01

    A series of idealized numerical models have been developed to investigate the effects of partially resolved symmetric instability (SI) in oceanic general circulation models. An analysis of the energetics of symmetric instability is used to argue that the mixed layer can be at least partially restratified even when some SI modes are absent due to either large horizontal viscosity or coarse model resolution. Linear stability analysis reveals that in the idealized models the amount of restratification can be predicted as a function of the grid spacing and viscosity. The models themselves are used to demonstrate these predictions and reveal three possible outcomes in steady-state: (1) incomplete restratification due to viscosity, (2) incomplete restratification due to resolution, and (3) excessive restratification due to anisotropy of the viscosity. The third outcome occurs even on a high-resolution isotropic grid and in two separate numerical models, and thus appears to be a sort of robust numerical feature. The three outcomes are used to recommend criteria that a successful SI parameterization should satisfy.

  5. US GODAE: Global Ocean Prediction with the Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model (HYCOM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-06-01

    coastal application was to assess the impact of open boundary conditions from the HYCOM ocean prediction system on the dynamics and accuracy of a...near the Florida Keys when hurricane Katrina crossed South Florida in late August 2005. iMPact In summary, 25 institutions (nine from academia, nine...example, detailed surface current information derived from HYCOM is summarized by OCENS (Ocean and Coastal ENviromental Sensing, http

  6. The National Ocean Sciences Bowl: An Effective Model for Engaging High School Students in Ocean Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holloway, A. E.

    2016-02-01

    The National Ocean Sciences Bowl (NOSB) is an informal high school education program that engages students in ocean and environmental science and exposes them to the breadth of ocean-related careers. The NOSB strives to train the next generation of interdisciplinary capable scientists and build a STEM-literate society that harnesses the power of ocean and climate science to address environmental, economic, and societal issues. Through the NOSB, students not only learn scientific principles, but also apply them to compelling real-world problems. The NOSB provides a richer STEM education and exposes students to ocean science topics they may not otherwise study through classroom curriculum. A longitudinal study that began in 2007 has shown that NOSB participants have an enhanced interest in ocean-related hobbies and environmental stewardship and an increasing number of these students have remained in the STEM pipeline and workforce.While the NOSB is primarily an academic competition, it has evolved since its creation in 1998 to include a variety of practical and professional development components. One of the program enhancements, the Scientific Expert Briefing (SEB), gives students the opportunity to apply what they have studied and think critically about current and ongoing ocean science challenges. The SEB helps students connect their knowledge of ocean science with current and proposed policy initiatives. Students gain significant research, writing, and presentation skills, while enhancing their ability for collaboration and consensus building, all vital workforce skills. Ultimately, the SEB teaches students how to communicate complex scientific research into digestible information for decision-makers and the general public.This poster will examine the impact of the NOSB and its role in strengthening the workforce pipeline through a combination of independent learning, competition, and opportunities for communication skills development.

  7. Technical note: Evaluation of three machine learning models for surface ocean CO2 mapping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jiye; Matsunaga, Tsuneo; Saigusa, Nobuko; Shirai, Tomoko; Nakaoka, Shin-ichiro; Tan, Zheng-Hong

    2017-04-01

    Reconstructing surface ocean CO2 from scarce measurements plays an important role in estimating oceanic CO2 uptake. There are varying degrees of differences among the 14 models included in the Surface Ocean CO2 Mapping (SOCOM) inter-comparison initiative, in which five models used neural networks. This investigation evaluates two neural networks used in SOCOM, self-organizing maps and feedforward neural networks, and introduces a machine learning model called a support vector machine for ocean CO2 mapping. The technique note provides a practical guide to selecting the models.

  8. [Catalonia's primary healthcare accreditation model: a valid model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davins, Josep; Gens, Montserrat; Pareja, Clara; Guzmán, Ramón; Marquet, Roser; Vallès, Roser

    2014-07-01

    There are few experiences of accreditation models validated by primary care teams (EAP). The aim of this study was to detail the process of design, development, and subsequent validation of the consensus EAP accreditation model of Catalonia. An Operating Committee of the Health Department of Catalonia revised models proposed by the European Foundation for Quality Management, the Joint Commission International and the Institut Català de la Salut and proposed 628 essential standards to the technical group (25 experts in primary care and quality of care), to establish consensus standards. The consensus document was piloted in 30 EAP for the purpose of validating the contents, testing standards and identifying evidence. Finally, we did a survey to assess acceptance and validation of the document. The Technical Group agreed on a total of 414 essential standards. The pilot selected a total of 379. Mean compliance with the standards of the final document in the 30 EAP was 70.4%. The standards results were the worst fulfilment percentage. The survey target that 83% of the EAP found it useful and 78% found the content of the accreditation manual suitable as a tool to assess the quality of the EAP, and identify opportunities for improvement. On the downside they highlighted its complexity and laboriousness. We have a model that fits the reality of the EAP, and covers all relevant issues for the functioning of an excellent EAP. The model developed in Catalonia is a model for easy understanding.

  9. Modeling Mediterranean ocean climate of the Last Glacial Maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Mikolajewicz

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available A regional ocean general circulation model of the Mediterranean is used to study the climate of the last glacial maximum. The atmospheric forcing for these simulations has been derived from simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model, which in turn was forced with surface conditions from a coarse resolution earth system model. The model is successful in reproducing the general patterns of reconstructed sea surface temperature anomalies with the strongest cooling in summer in the northwestern Mediterranean and weak cooling in the Levantine, although the model underestimates the extent of the summer cooling in the western Mediterranean. However, there is a strong vertical gradient associated with this pattern of summer cooling, which makes the comparison with reconstructions nontrivial. The exchange with the Atlantic is decreased to roughly one half of its present value, which can be explained by the shallower Strait of Gibraltar as a consequence of lower global sea level. This reduced exchange causes a strong increase of the salinity in the Mediterranean in spite of reduced net evaporation.

  10. Modeling Mediterranean Ocean climate of the Last Glacial Maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Mikolajewicz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A regional ocean general circulation model of the Mediterranean is used to study the climate of the Last Glacial Maximum. The atmospheric forcing for these simulations has been derived from simulations with an atmospheric general circulation model, which in turn was forced with surface conditions from a coarse resolution earth system model. The model is successful in reproducing the general patterns of reconstructed sea surface temperature anomalies with the strongest cooling in summer in the northwestern Mediterranean and weak cooling in the Levantine, although the model underestimates the extent of the summer cooling in the western Mediterranean. However, there is a strong vertical gradient associated with this pattern of summer cooling, which makes the comparison with reconstructions complicated. The exchange with the Atlantic is decreased to roughly one half of its present value, which can be explained by the shallower Strait of Gibraltar as a consequence of lower global sea level. This reduced exchange causes a strong increase of salinity in the Mediterranean in spite of reduced net evaporation.

  11. Unstable periodic orbits and attractor of the barotropic ocean model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Kazantsev

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available A numerical method for detection of unstable periodic orbits on attractors of nonlinear models is proposed.  The method requires similar techniques to data assimilation.  This fact facilitates its implementation for geophysical models.  This method was used to find numerically several low-period orbits for the barotropic ocean model in a square.  Some numerical particularities of application of this method are discussed. Knowledge of periodic orbits of the model helps to explain some of these features like bimodality of probability density functions (PDF of principal parameters.  These PDFs have been reconstructed as weighted averages of periodic orbits with weights proportional to the period of the orbit and inversely proportional to the sum of positive Lyapunov exponents. The fraction of time spent in the vicinity of each periodic orbit has been compared with its instability characteristics. The relationship between these values shows the 93% correlation.  The attractor dimension of the model has also been approximated as a weighted average of local attractor dimensions in vicinities of periodic orbits.

  12. Trace-element budgets in the Ohio/Sunbury shales of Kentucky: Constraints on ocean circulation and primary productivity in the Devonian-Mississippian Appalachian Basin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perkins, R.B.; Piper, D.Z.; Mason, C.E.

    2008-01-01

    The hydrography of the Appalachian Basin in late Devonian-early Mississippian time is modeled based on the geochemistry of black shales and constrained by others' paleogeographic reconstructions. The model supports a robust exchange of basin bottom water with the open ocean, with residence times of less than forty years during deposition of the Cleveland Shale Member of the Ohio Shale. This is counter to previous interpretations of these carbon-rich units having accumulated under a stratified and stagnant water column, i.e., with a strongly restricted bottom bottom-water circulation. A robust circulation of bottom waters is further consistent with the palaeoclimatology, whereby eastern trade-winds drove upwelling and arid conditions limited terrestrial inputs of siliciclastic sediment, fresh waters, and riverine nutrients. The model suggests that primary productivity was high (~ 2??g C m- 2 d- 1), although no higher than in select locations in the ocean today. The flux of organic carbon settling through the water column and its deposition on the sea floor was similar to fluxes found in modern marine environments. Calculations based on the average accumulation rate of the marine fraction of Ni suggest the flux of organic carbon settling out of the water column was approximately 9% of primary productivity, versus an accumulation rate (burial) of organic carbon of 0.5% of primary productivity. Trace-element ratios of V:Mo and Cr:Mo in the marine sediment fraction indicate that bottom waters shifted from predominantly anoxic (sulfate reducing) during deposition of the Huron Shale Member of the Ohio Shale to predominantly suboxic (nitrate reducing) during deposition of the Cleveland Shale Member and the Sunbury Shale, but with anoxic conditions occurring intermittently throughout this period. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  13. On Impacts of Ocean Waves in Marginal Ice Zones and their Repercussions for Arctic Ice/Ocean Models (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squire, V. A.

    2013-12-01

    Associated with a gradual metamorphosis of summer Arctic sea ice -- from a quasi-continuous ice sheet punctuated by pressure ridges and leads to a mélange of ice floes resembling a MIZ, is an augmented presence of sizeable ocean waves that may have propagated into the pack ice from distant storms or have arisen within the MIZ itself due to the larger fetches that are now more common [Francis et al., 2011]. If sufficiently forceful as they pass through the ice field, these waves can break up the ice floes to create a new floe size distribution (FSD), change local concentration by moving floes around, and supplement the melting that is occurring because of ice albedo feedback. In turn, the ocean waves themselves attenuate due to conservative scattering from the randomly-sized, spatially-disordered floes and cakes making up the MIZ that diffuse the waves and return energy to neighboring open water, and lose energy through several prospective dissipative processes. Consequently, the omission of ocean waves from ice/ocean models is unwise, as they can potentially alter atmosphere-ice-ocean coupling appreciably by affecting MIZ morphology so radically. In a series of 3 research projects, involving scientists from Norway, Canada, Australia and NZ, we have systematically investigated how ocean wave interactions with sea ice can be embedded in an ice/ocean model; first at high resolution in the Fram Strait and later in other MIZ around the Arctic Basin. In each case it has been possible to track how the MIZ forms and, on the basis of its FSD or an abrupt change of concentration, how wide it becomes as a result of an inbound wave field provided by a spectral model such as WAM. Initially unidirectional seas were considered [Williams et al., 2013ab] but more sophisticated 2D scattering paradigms are now being developed that allow directionally defined seas to be modeled. Based upon the recognition that a MIZ can be delineated into a number of contiguous bands of ice floes

  14. Simulation of snowbands in the Baltic Sea area with the coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice model COSMO-CLM/NEMO

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trang Van Pham

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Wind-parallel bands of snowfall over the Baltic Sea area are common during late autumn and early winter. This phenomenon occurs when cold air flows over the warm water surface, enhancing convection and leading to heavy snow fall. Six snowband events from 1985 to 2010 are simulated by using the coupled atmosphere-ocean-ice model COSMO-CLM/NEMO. The model resolution is reasonably high to capture the snowbands; the atmospheric model COSMO-CLM has a horizontal grid-spacing of approximately 25 km and the ocean sea-ice model NEMO has a horizontal grid-spacing of approximately 3 km. The model results show that the coupled system COSMO-CLM/NEMO successfully reproduced the snowband events with a high contrast of temperatures between the surface and the atmosphere, sharp bands of precipitation over the sea, as well as the enormous heat fluxes released by the ocean to the atmosphere during the days when snowbands occurred. In the two cases when radar data are available, the model precipitation is shown to be in satisfactory agreement. The precipitation patterns closely follow the cloud shapes on satellite images. When not coupled with the ocean model, the atmospheric stand-alone model provided acceptable results if forced by high-quality sea surface temperatures (SSTs from reanalysis data. However, COSMO-CLM forced with lower quality SSTs could not recreate the snowbands. The results indicate the need of an atmospheric model with high SST skill or a coupled ocean model when extreme event climatology is the primary aim in the Baltic Sea area.

  15. Statistical characteristics of irreversible predictability time in regional ocean models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. C. Chu

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Probabilistic aspects of regional ocean model predictability is analyzed using the probability density function (PDF of the irreversible predictability time (IPT (called τ-PDF computed from an unconstrained ensemble of stochastic perturbations in initial conditions, winds, and open boundary conditions. Two-attractors (a chaotic attractor and a small-amplitude stable limit cycle are found in the wind-driven circulation. Relationship between attractor's residence time and IPT determines the τ-PDF for the short (up to several weeks and intermediate (up to two months predictions. The τ-PDF is usually non-Gaussian but not multi-modal for red-noise perturbations in initial conditions and perturbations in the wind and open boundary conditions. Bifurcation of τ-PDF occurs as the tolerance level varies. Generally, extremely successful predictions (corresponding to the τ-PDF's tail toward large IPT domain are not outliers and share the same statistics as a whole ensemble of predictions.

  16. Dynamics of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and Southern Ocean in an ocean model of intermediate complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCreary, Julian P.; Furue, Ryo; Schloesser, Fabian; Burkhardt, Theodore W.; Nonaka, Masami

    2016-04-01

    A steady-state, variable-density, 2-layer, ocean model (VLOM) is used to investigate basic dynamics of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation and Southern Ocean. The domain consists of idealized (rectangular) representations of the Atlantic, Southern, and Pacific Oceans. The model equations represent the depth-averaged, layer-1 response (except for one solution in which they represent the depth-integrated flow over both layers). To allow for overturning, water can cross the bottom of layer 1 at the velocity we =wd +wm +wn , the three parts representing: interior diffusion wd that increases the layer-1 thickness h throughout the basin, mixed-layer entrainment wm that ensures h is never less than a minimum value hm , and diapycnal (cooling) processes external to the basin wn that adjust h to hn . For most solutions, horizontal mixing has the form of Rayleigh damping with coefficient ν , which we interpret to result from baroclinic instability through the closure, V∗ = - (ν /f2) ∇P , where ∇P = ∇(1/2 g‧h2) is the depth-integrated pressure gradient, g‧ is the reduced-gravity coefficient, and ν is a mixing coefficient; with this interpretation, the layer-1 flow corresponds to the sum of the Eulerian-mean and eddy-mean (V∗) transport/widths, that is, the "residual" circulation. Finally, layer-1 temperature cools polewards in response to a surface heat flux Q, and the cooling can be strong enough in the Southern Ocean for g‧ = 0 south of a latitude y0 , in which case layer 1 vanishes and the model reduces to a single layer 2. Solutions are obtained both numerically and analytically. The analytic approach splits fields into interior and boundary-layer parts, from which a coupled set of integral constraints can be derived. The set allows properties of the circulation (upwelling-driven transport out of the Southern Ocean M , downwelling transport in the North Atlantic, transport of the Antarctic Circumpolar Current) and stratification (Atlantic

  17. The anthropogenic influence on Iron deposition over the oceans: a 3-D global modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myriokefalitakis, Stelios; Mihalopoulos, Nikos; Baker, Alex; Kanakidou, Maria

    2014-05-01

    Iron (Fe) deposition over oceans is directly linked to the marine biological productivity and consequently to atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Experimental and modeling results support that both inorganic (sulphate, ammonium and nitrate) and organic (e.g. oxalate) ligands can increase the Fe mobilization. Mineral dust deposition is considered as the most important supply of bioavailable Fe in the oceans. Although, due to the low soil soluble iron fractions, atmospheric processes which are also related to anthropogenic emissions, can convert iron to more soluble forms in the atmosphere. Recent studies also support that anthropogenic emissions of Fe from combustion sources also significantly contribute to the dissolved Fe atmospheric pool. The evaluation of the impact of humans on atmospheric soluble or bioavailable Fe deposition remains challenging, since Fe mobilization due to changes in anthropogenic emissions is largely uncertain. In the present study, the global atmospheric Fe cycle is parameterized in the 3-D chemical transport global model TM4-ECPL and the model is used to calculate the Fe deposition over the oceans. The model considers explicitly organic, sulfur and nitrogen gas-phase chemistry, aqueous-phase organic chemistry, including oxalate and all major aerosol constituents. TM4-ECPL simulates the organic and inorganic ligand-promoted mineral Fe dissolution and also aqueous-phase photochemical reactions between different forms of Fe (III/II). Primary emissions of Fe associated with dust and soluble Fe from combustion processes as well as atmospheric processing of the emitted Fe is taken into account in the model Sensitivity simulations are performed to study the impact of anthropogenic emissions on Fe deposition. For this preindustrial, present and future emission scenarios are used in the model in order to examine the response of chemical composition of iron-containing aerosols to environmental changes. The release of soluble iron associated with

  18. Predictability of the Indian Ocean Dipole in the coupled models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huafeng; Tang, Youmin; Chen, Dake; Lian, Tao

    2017-03-01

    In this study, the Indian Ocean Dipole (IOD) predictability, measured by the Indian Dipole Mode Index (DMI), is comprehensively examined at the seasonal time scale, including its actual prediction skill and potential predictability, using the ENSEMBLES multiple model ensembles and the recently developed information-based theoretical framework of predictability. It was found that all model predictions have useful skill, which is normally defined by the anomaly correlation coefficient larger than 0.5, only at around 2-3 month leads. This is mainly because there are more false alarms in predictions as leading time increases. The DMI predictability has significant seasonal variation, and the predictions whose target seasons are boreal summer (JJA) and autumn (SON) are more reliable than that for other seasons. All of models fail to predict the IOD onset before May and suffer from the winter (DJF) predictability barrier. The potential predictability study indicates that, with the model development and initialization improvement, the prediction of IOD onset is likely to be improved but the winter barrier cannot be overcome. The IOD predictability also has decadal variation, with a high skill during the 1960s and the early 1990s, and a low skill during the early 1970s and early 1980s, which is very consistent with the potential predictability. The main factors controlling the IOD predictability, including its seasonal and decadal variations, are also analyzed in this study.

  19. Parallelism and optimization of numerical ocean forecasting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianliang; Pang, Renbo; Teng, Junhua; Liang, Hongtao; Yang, Dandan

    2016-10-01

    According to the characteristics of Chinese marginal seas, the Marginal Sea Model of China (MSMC) has been developed independently in China. Because the model requires long simulation time, as a routine forecasting model, the parallelism of MSMC becomes necessary to be introduced to improve the performance of it. However, some methods used in MSMC, such as Successive Over Relaxation (SOR) algorithm, are not suitable for parallelism. In this paper, methods are developedto solve the parallel problem of the SOR algorithm following the steps as below. First, based on a 3D computing grid system, an automatic data partition method is implemented to dynamically divide the computing grid according to computing resources. Next, based on the characteristics of the numerical forecasting model, a parallel method is designed to solve the parallel problem of the SOR algorithm. Lastly, a communication optimization method is provided to avoid the cost of communication. In the communication optimization method, the non-blocking communication of Message Passing Interface (MPI) is used to implement the parallelism of MSMC with complex physical equations, and the process of communication is overlapped with the computations for improving the performance of parallel MSMC. The experiments show that the parallel MSMC runs 97.2 times faster than the serial MSMC, and root mean square error between the parallel MSMC and the serial MSMC is less than 0.01 for a 30-day simulation (172800 time steps), which meets the requirements of timeliness and accuracy for numerical ocean forecasting products.

  20. A sustained oscillation in a toy-model of the coupled atmosphere-ocean system

    CERN Document Server

    Bothe, Oliver

    2011-01-01

    Interaction between atmospheric mid-latitude flow and wind-driven ocean circulation is studied coupling two idealized low-order spectral models. The barotropic Charney-DeVore model with three components simulates a bimodal mid-latitude atmospheric circulation in a channel with two stable flow patterns induced by topography. The wind-driven ocean double gyre circulation in a square basin (of half the channel length) is modeled by an equivalent barotropic formulation of the Veronis model with 21 components, which captures Rossby-wave dynamics and nonlinear decadal variability. When coupled, the atmosphere forces the ocean by wind-stress while, simultaneously, the ocean affects the atmosphere by thermal forcing in terms of a vorticity source. Coupled atmosphere-ocean simulations show two stable flow patterns associated with the topographically induced atmospheric bimodality and a sustained oscillation due to interaction between atmospheric bimodality and oceanic Rossby dynamics. The oscillation is of inter-annua...

  1. CMIP5 earth system models with biogeochemistry: An assessment for the southwest Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Graham J.; Behrens, Erik; Chiswell, Stephen M.

    2016-10-01

    An assessment is made of the ability of CMIP5 models to represent the seasonal biogeochemical cycles over the late twentieth century in the southwest Pacific Ocean. In particular, sea surface temperature (SST), surface chlorophyll a, nitrate, phosphate, silicate, and the depth of the seasonal thermocline, are examined to quantify the physical-biogeochemical capabilities of each model; the result is a "ranking" estimate enabling model ensemble generation. The better/less ranked ensembles we refer to as inner/outer, respectively. The ensembles then allow less well-observed variables such as iron and vertically integrated primary production to be assessed. The assessment establishes model output confidence limits for setting bounds on future model scenario ecosystem change projections. By the end of the twenty first century under Representative Concentration Pathways (RCP) RCP4.5 and/or RCP8.5, our best estimates suggest that there will be average domain wide increases in SST and surface iron, but average decreases in surface chlorophyll a, nitrate, and phosphate, accompanied by relatively large decreases in the depth of the seasonal thermocline (all changes realized by both ensembles). On the other hand, for surface silicate the inner ensemble suggests general declines, and vice versa for the outer ensemble. For integrated primary production, the ensembles predict declines in subtropical water, but elsewhere generally less significant changes.

  2. Model evaluation of marine primary organic aerosol emission schemes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Gantt

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this study, several marine primary organic aerosol (POA emission schemes have been evaluated using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model in order to provide guidance for their implementation in air quality and climate models. These emission schemes, based on varying dependencies of chlorophyll a concentration ([chl a] and 10 m wind speed (U10, have large differences in their magnitude, spatial distribution, and seasonality. Model comparison with weekly and monthly mean values of the organic aerosol mass concentration at two coastal sites shows that the source function exclusively related to [chl a] does a better job replicating surface observations. Sensitivity simulations in which the negative U10 and positive [chl a] dependence of the organic mass fraction of sea spray aerosol are enhanced show improved prediction of the seasonality of the marine POA concentrations. A top-down estimate of submicron marine POA emissions based on the parameterization that compares best to the observed weekly and monthly mean values of marine organic aerosol surface concentrations has a global average emission rate of 6.3 Tg yr−1. Evaluation of existing marine POA source functions against a case study during which marine POA contributed the major fraction of submicron aerosol mass shows that none of the existing parameterizations are able to reproduce the hourly-averaged observations. Our calculations suggest that in order to capture episodic events and short-term variability in submicron marine POA concentration over the ocean, new source functions need to be developed that are grounded in the physical processes unique to the organic fraction of sea spray aerosol.

  3. Model evaluation of marine primary organic aerosol emission schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gantt, B.; Johnson, M. S.; Meskhidze, N.; Sciare, J.; Ovadnevaite, J.; Ceburnis, D.; O'Dowd, C. D.

    2012-09-01

    In this study, several marine primary organic aerosol (POA) emission schemes have been evaluated using the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model in order to provide guidance for their implementation in air quality and climate models. These emission schemes, based on varying dependencies of chlorophyll a concentration ([chl a]) and 10 m wind speed (U10), have large differences in their magnitude, spatial distribution, and seasonality. Model comparison with weekly and monthly mean values of the organic aerosol mass concentration at two coastal sites shows that the source function exclusively related to [chl a] does a better job replicating surface observations. Sensitivity simulations in which the negative U10 and positive [chl a] dependence of the organic mass fraction of sea spray aerosol are enhanced show improved prediction of the seasonality of the marine POA concentrations. A top-down estimate of submicron marine POA emissions based on the parameterization that compares best to the observed weekly and monthly mean values of marine organic aerosol surface concentrations has a global average emission rate of 6.3 Tg yr-1. Evaluation of existing marine POA source functions against a case study during which marine POA contributed the major fraction of submicron aerosol mass shows that none of the existing parameterizations are able to reproduce the hourly-averaged observations. Our calculations suggest that in order to capture episodic events and short-term variability in submicron marine POA concentration over the ocean, new source functions need to be developed that are grounded in the physical processes unique to the organic fraction of sea spray aerosol.

  4. South African seasonal rainfall prediction performance by a coupled ocean-atmosphere model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Landman, WA

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Evidence is presented that coupled ocean-atmosphere models can already outscore computationally less expensive atmospheric models. However, if the atmospheric models are forced with highly skillful SST predictions, they may still be a very strong...

  5. Thermohaline feedbacks in ocean-climate models of varying complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Toom, M.

    2013-03-01

    The Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) is considered an important component of the climate system, because of its significant contribution to the heat budget of the Northern Hemisphere. Theoretical models indicate that the AMOC has non-linear dynamics, which result in a strong sensitivity to high latitude freshwater forcing. These models suggest that, as a result of the presence of multiple equilibria, the AMOC may drive large, abrupt shifts of the climate when a certain threshold is exceeded. There is no direct observational evidence that such AMOC related climate variations occur in reality, but the available data are too short and sparse to be conclusive in this case. Therefore, numerical models provide the main source of information regarding the nonlinear behavior of the AMOC. Because numerical models are necessarily incomplete, not in the least because of a lack of computational resources, their results must always be tested for robustness. This thesis presents four studies that examine how the representation of a certain unresolved process affects the behavior of the simulated AMOC The study in chapter 2 deals with the representation of horizontal mixing by mesoscale eddies. It is shown that a simple horizontal tracer mixing scheme is only a reasonable alternative to the more realistic isoneutral / Gent-McWilliams parameterization, provided that no wind forcing is imposed. In chapter 3, it is demonstrated that the use of a stability-dependent tracer diffusivity, which is commonly used to parameterize convection, leads to the occurrence of artificial multiple equilibria. In chapter 4, the representation of ocean-atmosphere interaction is considered. It is found that the sensitivity to anomalous freshwater forcing is only slightly modified if an interactive (sea surface temperature-dependent) atmosphere model is used, instead of a static atmosphere model. In chapter 5, the simulated sensitivity of the AMOC is compared between a model that

  6. Mathematical Modelling for Singapore Primary Classrooms: From a Teacher's Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seto, Cynthia; Magdalene, Thomas Mary; Ng Kit Ee, Dawn; Chan Chun Ming, Eric; Widjaja, Wanty

    2012-01-01

    Limited Singapore research indicated a lack of exposure of modelling tasks at primary levels. Teacher reflection is used as a tool in design research cycles exploring the potentials of modelling tasks in a Singapore primary five classroom. Findings reveal that the teacher identified three potentials of a modelling task on children's…

  7. Operational ocean models in the Adriatic Sea: a skill assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Chiggiato

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of the Mediterranean Forecasting System project (MFS sub-regional and regional numerical ocean forecasting systems performance are assessed by mean of model-model and model-data comparison. Three different operational systems have been considered in this study: the Adriatic REGional Model (AREG; the AdriaROMS and the Mediterranean Forecasting System general circulation model (MFS model. AREG and AdriaROMS are regional implementations (with some dedicated variations of POM (Blumberg and Mellor, 1987 and ROMS (Shchepetkin and McWilliams, 2005 respectively, while MFS model is based on OPA (Madec et al., 1998 code. The assessment has been done by means of standard scores. The data used for operational systems assessment derive from in-situ and remote sensing measurements. In particular a set of CTDs covering the whole western Adriatic, collected in January 2006, one year of SST from space born sensors and six months of buoy data. This allowed to have a full three-dimensional picture of the operational forecasting systems quality during January 2006 and some preliminary considerations on the temporal fluctuation of scores estimated on surface (or near surface quantities between summer 2005 and summer 2006. In general, the regional models are found to be colder and fresher than observations. They eventually outperform the large scale model in the shallowest locations, as expected. Results on amplitude and phase errors are also much better in locations shallower than 50 m, while degraded in deeper locations, where the models tend to have a higher homogeneity along the vertical column compared to observations. In a basin-wide overview, the two regional models show some dissimilarities in the local displacement of errors, something suggested by the full three-dimensional picture depicted using CTDs, but also confirmed by the comparison with SSTs. In locations where the regional models are mutually correlated, the aggregated mean

  8. Seasonal Distributions of Global Ocean Chlorophyll and Nutrients: Analysis with a Coupled Ocean General Circulation Biogeochemical, and Radiative Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregg, Watson W.

    1999-01-01

    A coupled general ocean circulation, biogeochemical, and radiative model was constructed to evaluate and understand the nature of seasonal variability of chlorophyll and nutrients in the global oceans. The model is driven by climatological meteorological conditions, cloud cover, and sea surface temperature. Biogeochemical processes in the model are determined from the influences of circulation and turbulence dynamics, irradiance availability, and the interactions among three functional phytoplankton groups (diatoms, chorophytes, and picoplankton) and three nutrient groups (nitrate, ammonium, and silicate). Phytoplankton groups are initialized as homogeneous fields horizontally and vertically, and allowed to distribute themselves according to the prevailing conditions. Basin-scale model chlorophyll results are in very good agreement with CZCS pigments in virtually every global region. Seasonal variability observed in the CZCS is also well represented in the model. Synoptic scale (100-1000 km) comparisons of imagery are also in good conformance, although occasional departures are apparent. Agreement of nitrate distributions with in situ data is even better, including seasonal dynamics, except for the equatorial Atlantic. The good agreement of the model with satellite and in situ data sources indicates that the model dynamics realistically simulate phytoplankton and nutrient dynamics on synoptic scales. This is especially true given that initial conditions are homogenous chlorophyll fields. The success of the model in producing a reasonable representation of chlorophyll and nutrient distributions and seasonal variability in the global oceans is attributed to the application of a generalized, processes-driven approach as opposed to regional parameterization, and the existence of multiple phytoplankton groups with different physiological and physical properties. These factors enable the model to simultaneously represent the great diversity of physical, biological

  9. Evaluation of Ocean Tide Models Used for Jason-2 Altimetry Corrections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fok, H.S.; Baki Iz, H.; Shum, C. K.

    2010-01-01

    –3 cm RMS (root-mean-square) level. The Gulf of Mexico and Northwest Atlantic regions present the least reduction of altimetry sea surface height variability after ocean tides are removed, primarily because of large oceanic variability associated with loop currents in the Gulf of Mexico and the Gulf......It has been more than a decade since the last comprehensive accuracy assessment of global ocean tide models. Here, we conduct an evaluation of the barotropic ocean tide corrections, which were computed using FES2004 and GOT00.2, and other models on the Jason-2 altimetry Geophysical Data Record (GDR......), with a focus on selected coastal regions with energetic ocean dynamics. We compared nine historical and contemporary ocean tide models with pelagic tidal constants and with multiple satellite altimetry mission (T/P, ERS-1/-2, Envisat, GFO, Jason-1/-2) sea level anomalies using variance reduction studies...

  10. Spreading and wandering of Gaussian-Schell model laser beams in an anisotropic turbulent ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yuqian; Zhang, Yixin; Zhu, Yun; Hu, Zhengda

    2016-09-01

    The effect of anisotropic turbulence on the spreading and wandering of Gaussian-Schell model (GSM) laser beams propagating in an ocean is studied. The long-term spreading of a GSM beam propagating through the paraxial channel of a turbulent ocean is also developed. Expressions of random wander for such laser beams are derived in an anisotropic turbulent ocean based on the extended Huygens-Fresnel principle. We investigate the influence of parameters in a turbulent ocean on the beam wander and spreading. Our results indicate that beam spreading and random beam wandering are smaller without considering the anisotropy of turbulence in the oceanic channel. Salinity fluctuation has a greater contribution to both the beam spreading and beam wander than that of temperature fluctuations in a turbulent ocean. Our results could be helpful for designing a free-space optical wireless communication system in an oceanic environment.

  11. Light availability in the coastal ocean: impact on the distribution of benthic photosynthetic organisms and contribution to primary production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Gattuso

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the major features of the coastal zone is that part of its sea floor receives a significant amount of sunlight and can therefore sustain benthic primary production by seagrasses, macroalgae, microphytobenthos and corals. However, the contribution of benthic communities to the primary production of the global coastal ocean is not known, partly because the surface area where benthic primary production can proceed is poorly quantified. Here, we use a new analysis of satellite (SeaWiFS data collected between 1998 and 2003 to estimate, for the first time at a nearly global scale, the irradiance reaching the bottom of the coastal ocean. The following cumulative functions provide the percentage of the surface of the coastal zone receiving an irradiance greater than Ez:

    PaNon-polar=28.80−16.69 log10(Ez+0.84 log102(Ez+0.83 log103(Ez


    PaArctic=16.01−15.67 log10(Ez+2.03 log102(Ez+1.00 log103(Ez

    Data on the constraint of light availability on the major benthic primary producers and net primary production are reviewed. Some photosynthetic organisms can grow deeper than the nominal bottom limit of the coastal ocean (200 m. The minimum irradiance required varies from 0.4 to 5.1 mol photons m−2 d−1 depending on the group considered. The daily compensation irradiance of benthic communities ranges from 0.24 to 4.4 mol photons m−2 d−1. Data on benthic irradiance and light requirements are combined to estimate the surface area of the coastal ocean where

  12. Reproducibility and Transparency in Ocean-Climate Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannah, N.; Adcroft, A.; Hallberg, R.; Griffies, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    Reproducibility is a cornerstone of the scientific method. Within geophysical modeling and simulation achieving reproducibility can be difficult, especially given the complexity of numerical codes, enormous and disparate data sets, and variety of supercomputing technology. We have made progress on this problem in the context of a large project - the development of new ocean and sea ice models, MOM6 and SIS2. Here we present useful techniques and experience.We use version control not only for code but the entire experiment working directory, including configuration (run-time parameters, component versions), input data and checksums on experiment output. This allows us to document when the solutions to experiments change, whether due to code updates or changes in input data. To avoid distributing large input datasets we provide the tools for generating these from the sources, rather than provide raw input data.Bugs can be a source of non-determinism and hence irreproducibility, e.g. reading from or branching on uninitialized memory. To expose these we routinely run system tests, using a memory debugger, multiple compilers and different machines. Additional confidence in the code comes from specialised tests, for example automated dimensional analysis and domain transformations. This has entailed adopting a code style where we deliberately restrict what a compiler can do when re-arranging mathematical expressions.In the spirit of open science, all development is in the public domain. This leads to a positive feedback, where increased transparency and reproducibility makes using the model easier for external collaborators, who in turn provide valuable contributions. To facilitate users installing and running the model we provide (version controlled) digital notebooks that illustrate and record analysis of output. This has the dual role of providing a gross, platform-independent, testing capability and a means to documents model output and analysis.

  13. Application of a Subfilter-Scale Flux Model over the Ocean Using OHATS Field Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kelly, Mark C.; Wyngaard, John C.; Sullivan, Peter P.

    2009-01-01

    the scalar flux model appeared to perform adequately over the ocean. Analysis of data from the Ocean Horizontal Array Turbulence Study (OHATS) reveals a need to account for the moving ocean–air interface in the subfilter stress model. The authors develop simple parameterizations for the effect of surface...

  14. Evaluation of existing ecosystem models with regard to ocean acidification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Engeland, T.; Soetaert, K.; Middelburg, J.J.; Schartau, M.; Hohn, S.; Oschlies, A.

    2011-01-01

    Although the carbonate chemistry and physical aspects of ocean acidification are well constrained, its biological effects are not fully understood. Experimental research has shown large variability in responses to increased atmospheric CO2 input into the ocean, ranging from positive to zero and

  15. From oceanic plateaus to allochthonous terranes: Numerical modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vogt, Katharina; Gerya, Taras

    2014-01-01

    Large segments of the continental crust are known to have formed through the amalgamation of oceanic plateaus and continental fragments. However, mechanisms responsible for terrane accretion remain poorly understood. We have therefore analysed the interactions of oceanic plateaus with the leading ed

  16. Evaluation of Arctic Sea Ice Thickness Simulated by Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Mark; Proshuntinsky, Andrew; Aksenov, Yevgeny; Nguyen, An T.; Lindsay, Ron; Haas, Christian; Zhang, Jinlun; Diansky, Nikolay; Kwok, Ron; Maslowski, Wieslaw; Hakkinen, Sirpa; Ashik, Igor; De Cuevas, Beverly

    2012-01-01

    Six Arctic Ocean Model Intercomparison Project model simulations are compared with estimates of sea ice thickness derived from pan-Arctic satellite freeboard measurements (2004-2008); airborne electromagnetic measurements (2001-2009); ice draft data from moored instruments in Fram Strait, the Greenland Sea, and the Beaufort Sea (1992-2008) and from submarines (1975-2000); and drill hole data from the Arctic basin, Laptev, and East Siberian marginal seas (1982-1986) and coastal stations (1998-2009). Despite an assessment of six models that differ in numerical methods, resolution, domain, forcing, and boundary conditions, the models generally overestimate the thickness of measured ice thinner than approximately 2 mand underestimate the thickness of ice measured thicker than about approximately 2m. In the regions of flat immobile landfast ice (shallow Siberian Seas with depths less than 25-30 m), the models generally overestimate both the total observed sea ice thickness and rates of September and October ice growth from observations by more than 4 times and more than one standard deviation, respectively. The models do not reproduce conditions of fast ice formation and growth. Instead, the modeled fast ice is replaced with pack ice which drifts, generating ridges of increasing ice thickness, in addition to thermodynamic ice growth. Considering all observational data sets, the better correlations and smaller differences from observations are from the Estimating the Circulation and Climate of the Ocean, Phase II and Pan-Arctic Ice Ocean Modeling and Assimilation System models.

  17. Effects of vertical shear in modelling horizontal oceanic dispersion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanotte, A. S.; Corrado, R.; Palatella, L.; Pizzigalli, C.; Schipa, I.; Santoleri, R.

    2016-02-01

    The effect of vertical shear on the horizontal dispersion properties of passive tracer particles on the continental shelf of the South Mediterranean is investigated by means of observation and model data. In situ current measurements reveal that vertical gradients of horizontal velocities in the upper mixing layer decorrelate quite fast ( ˜ 1 day), whereas an eddy-permitting ocean model, such as the Mediterranean Forecasting System, tends to overestimate such decorrelation time because of finite resolution effects. Horizontal dispersion, simulated by the Mediterranean sea Forecasting System, is mostly affected by: (1) unresolved scale motions, and mesoscale motions that are largely smoothed out at scales close to the grid spacing; (2) poorly resolved time variability in the profiles of the horizontal velocities in the upper layer. For the case study we have analysed, we show that a suitable use of deterministic kinematic parametrizations is helpful to implement realistic statistical features of tracer dispersion in two and three dimensions. The approach here suggested provides a functional tool to control the horizontal spreading of small organisms or substance concentrations, and is thus relevant for marine biology, pollutant dispersion as well as oil spill applications.

  18. A Southern Ocean variability study using the Argo-based Model for Investigation of the Global Ocean (AMIGO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebedev, Konstantin

    2017-04-01

    The era of satellite observations of the ocean surface that started at the end of the 20th century and the development of the Argo project in the first years of the 21st century, designed to collect information of the upper 2000 m of the ocean using satellites, provides unique opportunities for continuous monitoring of the Global Ocean state. Starting from 2005, measurements with the Argo floats have been performed over the majority of the World Ocean. In November 2007, the Argo program reached coverage of 3000 simultaneously operating floats (one float in a three-degree square) planned during the development of the program. Currently, 4000 Argo floats autonomously profile the upper 2000-m water column of the ocean from Antarctica to Spitsbergen increasing World Ocean temperature and salinity databases by 12000 profiles per month. This makes it possible to solve problems on reconstructing and monitoring the ocean state on an almost real-time basis, study the ocean dynamics, obtain reasonable estimates of the climatic state of the ocean in the last decade and estimate existing intraclimatic trends. We present the newly developed Argo-Based Model for Investigation of the Global Ocean (AMIGO), which consists of a block for variational interpolation of the profiles of drifting Argo floats to a regular grid and a block for model hydrodynamic adjustment of variationally interpolated fields. Such a method makes it possible to obtain a full set of oceanographic characteristics - temperature, salinity, density, and current velocity - using irregularly located Argo measurements (the principle of the variational interpolation technique entails minimization of the misfit between the interpolated fields defined on the regular grid and irregularly distributed data; hence the optimal solution passes as close to the data as possible). The simulations were performed for the entire globe limited in the north by 85.5° N using 1° grid spacing in both longitude and latitude. At the

  19. A first appraisal of prognostic ocean DMS models and prospects for their use in climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Clainche, Yvonnick; Vezina, Alain; Levasseur, Maurice; Cropp, Roger A.; Gunson, Jim R.; Vallina, Sergio M.; Vogt, Meike; Lancelot, Christiane; Allen, J. Icarus; Archer, Stephen D.; Bopp, Laurent; Deal, Clara; Elliott, Scott; Jin, Meibing; Malin, Gill; Schoemann, Veronique; Simo, Rafel; Six, Katharina D.; Stefels, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Ocean dimethylsulfide (DMS) produced by marine biota is the largest natural source of atmospheric sulfur, playing a major role in the formation and evolution of aerosols, and consequently affecting climate. Several dynamic process-based DMS models have been developed over the last decade, and work

  20. A first appraisal of prognostic ocean DMS models and prospects for their use in climate models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Clainche, Yvonnick; Vezina, Alain; Levasseur, Maurice; Cropp, Roger A.; Gunson, Jim R.; Vallina, Sergio M.; Vogt, Meike; Lancelot, Christiane; Allen, J. Icarus; Archer, Stephen D.; Bopp, Laurent; Deal, Clara; Elliott, Scott; Jin, Meibing; Malin, Gill; Schoemann, Veronique; Simo, Rafel; Six, Katharina D.; Stefels, Jacqueline

    2010-01-01

    Ocean dimethylsulfide (DMS) produced by marine biota is the largest natural source of atmospheric sulfur, playing a major role in the formation and evolution of aerosols, and consequently affecting climate. Several dynamic process-based DMS models have been developed over the last decade, and work i

  1. Bayesian Hierarchical Model Characterization of Model Error in Ocean Data Assimilation and Forecasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-28

    potential benefits from allowing switching between different process models in this setting. This will be greatly facilitated by the emulator approach...of sea surface height (SSH), SST, and phytoplankton ( chlorophyll ) data from 1998, 1999, 2000, and 2001. We then used remotely sensed SeaWiFS ocean

  2. Coupled model of INM-IO global ocean model, CICE sea ice model and SCM OIAS framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayburin, Ruslan; Rashit, Ibrayev; Konstantin, Ushakov; Vladimir, Kalmykov; Gleb, Dyakonov

    2015-04-01

    Status of coupled Arctic model of ocean and sea ice is presented. Model consists of INM IO global ocean component of high resolution, Los Alamos National Laboratory CICE sea ice model and a framework SCM OIAS for the ocean-ice-atmosphere-land coupled modeling on massively-parallel architectures. Model is currently under development at the Institute of Numerical Mathematics (INM), Hydrometeorological Center (HMC) and P.P. Shirshov Institute of Oceanology (IO). Model is aimed at modeling of intra-annual variability of hydrodynamics in Arctic and. The computational characteristics of the world ocean-sea ice coupled model governed by SCM OIAS are presented. The model is parallelized using MPI technologies and currently can use efficiently up to 5000 cores. Details of programming implementation, computational configuration and physical phenomena parametrization are analyzed in terms of intercoupling complex. Results of five year computational experiment of sea ice, snow and ocean state evolution in Arctic region on tripole grid with horizontal resolution of 3-5 kilometers, closed by atmospheric forcing field from repeating "normal" annual course taken from CORE1 experiment data base are presented and analyzed in terms of the state of vorticity and warm Atlantic water expansion.

  3. Modes of Arctic Ocean Change from GRACE, ICESat and the PIOMAS and ECCO2 Models of the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Ferriz, C.; Morison, J. H.; Bonin, J. A.; Chambers, D. P.; Kwok, R.; Zhang, J.

    2012-12-01

    EOF analysis of month-to-month variations in GRACE derived Arctic Ocean bottom pressure (OBP) with trend and seasonal variation removed yield three dominant modes. The first mode is a basin wide variation in mass associated with high atmospheric pressure (SLP) over Scandinavia mainly in winter. The second mode is a shift of mass from the central Arctic Ocean to the Siberian shelves due to low pressure over the basins, associated with the Arctic Oscillation. The third mode is a shift in mass between the Eastern and Western Siberian shelves, related to strength of the Beaufort High mainly in summer, and to eastward alongshore winds on the Barents Sea in winter. The PIOMAS and ECCO2 modeled OBP show fair agreement with the form of these modes and provide context in terms of variations in sea surface height SSH. Comparing GRACE OBP from 2007 to 2011 with GRACE OBP from 2002 to 2006 reveals a rising trend over most of the Arctic Ocean but declines in the Kara Sea region and summer East Siberian Sea. ECCO2 bears a faint resemblance to the observed OBP change but appears to be biased negatively. In contrast, PIOMAS SSH and ECCO2 especially, show changes between the two periods that are muted but similar to ICESat dynamic ocean topography and GRACE-ICESat freshwater trends from 2005 through 2008 [Morison et al., 2012] with a rising DOT and freshening in the Beaufort Sea and a trough with decreased freshwater on the Russian side of the Arctic Ocean. Morison, J., R. Kwok, C. Peralta-Ferriz, M. Alkire, I. Rigor, R. Andersen, and M. Steele (2012), Changing Arctic Ocean freshwater pathways, Nature, 481(7379), 66-70.

  4. Baroclinic stabilization effect of the Atlantic-Arctic water exchange simulated by the eddy-permitting ocean model and global atmosphere-ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moshonkin, Sergey; Bagno, Alexey; Gritsun, Andrey; Gusev, Anatoly

    2017-04-01

    Numerical experiments were performed with the global atmosphere-ocean model INMCM5 (for version of the international project CMIP6, resolution for atmosphere is 2°x1.5°, 21 level) and with the three-dimensional, free surface, sigma coordinate eddy-permitting ocean circulation model for Atlantic (from 30°S) - Arctic and Bering sea domain (0.25 degrees resolution, Institute of Numerical Mathematics Ocean Model or INMOM). Spatial resolution of the INMCM5 oceanic component is 0.5°x0.25°. Both models have 40 s-levels in ocean. Previously, the simulations were carried out for INMCM5 to generate climatic system stable state. Then model was run for 180 years. In the experiment with INMOM, CORE-II data for 1948-2009 were used. As the goal for comparing results of two these numerical models, we selected evolution of the density and velocity anomalies in the 0-300m active ocean layer near Fram Strait in the Greenland Sea, where oceanic cyclonic circulation influences Atlantic-Arctic water exchange. Anomalies were count without climatic seasonal cycle for time scales smaller than 30 years. We use Singular Value Decomposition analysis (SVD) for density-velocity anomalies with time lag from minus one to six months. Both models perform identical stable physical result. They reveal that changes of heat and salt transports by West Spitsbergen and East Greenland currents, caused by atmospheric forcing, produce the baroclinic modes of velocity anomalies in 0-300m layer, thereby stabilizing ocean response on the atmospheric forcing, which stimulates keeping water exchange between the North Atlantic and Arctic Ocean at the certain climatological level. The first SVD-mode of density-velocity anomalies is responsible for the cyclonic circulation variability. The second and third SVD-modes stabilize existing ocean circulation by the anticyclonic vorticity generation. The second and third SVD-modes give 35% of the input to the total dispersion of density anomalies and 16-18% of the

  5. Effects of Southern Hemisphere Wind Changes on the Meridional Overturning Circulation in Ocean Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gent, Peter R

    2016-01-01

    Observations show that the Southern Hemisphere zonal wind stress maximum has increased significantly over the past 30 years. Eddy-resolving ocean models show that the resulting increase in the Southern Ocean mean flow meridional overturning circulation (MOC) is partially compensated by an increase in the eddy MOC. This effect can be reproduced in the non-eddy-resolving ocean component of a climate model, providing the eddy parameterization coefficient is variable and not a constant. If the coefficient is a constant, then the Southern Ocean mean MOC change is balanced by an unrealistically large change in the Atlantic Ocean MOC. Southern Ocean eddy compensation means that Southern Hemisphere winds cannot be the dominant mechanism driving midlatitude North Atlantic MOC variability.

  6. Primary Life Stage Boron Isotope and Trace Elements Incorporation in Aposymbiotic Acropora millepora Coral under Ocean Acidification and Warming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henry C. Wu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Early-life stages of reef-building corals are vital to coral existence and reef maintenance. It is therefore crucial to study juvenile coral response to future climate change pressures. Moreover, corals are known to be reliable recorders of environmental conditions in their skeletal materials. Aposymbiotic Acropora millepora larvae were cultured in different seawater temperature (27 and 29°C and pCO2 (390 and 750 μatm conditions to understand the impacts of “end of century” ocean acidification (OA and ocean warming (OW conditions on skeletal morphology and geochemistry. The experimental conditions impacted primary polyp juvenile coral skeletal morphology and growth resulting in asymmetric translucent appearances with brittle skeleton features. The impact of OA resulted in microstructure differences with decreased precipitation or lengthening of fasciculi and disorganized aragonite crystals that led to more concentrations of centers of calcifications. The coral skeletal δ11B composition measured by laser ablation MC-ICP-MS was significantly affected by pCO2 (p = 0.0024 and water temperature (p = 1.46 × 10−5. Reconstructed pH of the primary polyp skeleton using the δ11B proxy suggests a difference in coral calcification site and seawater pH consistent with previously observed coral pH up-regulation. Similarly, trace element results measured by laser ablation ICP-MS indicate the impact of pCO2. Primary polyp juvenile Sr/Ca ratio indicates a bias in reconstructed sea surface temperature (SST under higher pCO2 conditions. Coral microstructure content changes (center of calcification and fasciculi due to OA possibly contributed to the variability in B/Ca ratios. Our results imply that increasing OA and OW may lead to coral acclimation issues and species-specific inaccuracies of the commonly used Sr/Ca-SST proxy.

  7. Nonbreaking wave-induced mixing in upper ocean during tropical cyclones using coupled hurricane-ocean-wave modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aijaz, S.; Ghantous, M.; Babanin, A. V.; Ginis, I.; Thomas, B.; Wake, G.

    2017-05-01

    The effects of turbulence generated by nonbreaking waves have been investigated by testing and evaluating a new nonbreaking wave parameterization in a coupled hurricane-ocean-wave model. The MPI version of the Princeton Ocean Model (POM) with hurricane forcing is coupled with the WAVEWATCH-III (WW3) surface wave model. Hurricane Ivan is chosen as the test case due to its extreme intensity and availability of field data during its passage. The model results are validated against field observations of wave heights and sea surface temperatures (SSTs) from the National Data Buoy Centre (NDBC) during Hurricane Ivan and against limited in situ current and bottom temperature data. A series of numerical experiments is set up to examine the influence of the nonbreaking wave parameterization on the mixing of upper ocean. The SST response from the modeling experiments indicates that the nonbreaking wave-induced mixing leads to significant cooling of the SST and deepening of the mixed layer. It was found that the nondimensional constant b1 in the nonbreaking wave parameterization has different impacts on the weak and the strong sides of the storm track. A constant value of b1 leads to improved predictions on the strong side of the storm while a steepness-dependent b1 provides a better agreement with in situ observations on the weak side. A separate simulation of the intense tropical cyclone Olwyn in north-west Australia revealed the same trend for b1 on the strong side of the tropical cyclone.

  8. Tropical Indian Ocean surface salinity bias in Climate Forecasting System coupled models and the role of upper ocean processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parekh, Anant; Chowdary, Jasti S.; Sayantani, Ojha; Fousiya, T. S.; Gnanaseelan, C.

    2016-04-01

    In the present study sea surface salinity (SSS) biases and seasonal tendency over the Tropical Indian Ocean (TIO) in the coupled models [Climate Forecasting System version 1 (CFSv1) and version 2 (CFSv2)] are examined with respect to observations. Both CFSv1 and CFSv2 overestimate SSS over the TIO throughout the year. CFSv1 displays improper SSS seasonal cycle over the Bay of Bengal (BoB), which is due to weaker model precipitation and improper river runoff especially during summer and fall. Over the southeastern Arabian Sea (AS) weak horizontal advection associated with East Indian coastal current during winter limits the formation of spring fresh water pool. On the other hand, weaker Somali jet during summer results for reduced positive salt tendency in the central and eastern AS. Strong positive precipitation bias in CFSv1 over the region off Somalia during winter, weaker vertical mixing and absence of horizontal salt advection lead to unrealistic barrier layer during winter and spring. The weaker stratification and improper spatial distribution of barrier layer thickness (BLT) in CFSv1 indicate that not only horizontal flux distribution but also vertical salt distribution displays large discrepancies. Absence of fall Wyrtki jet and winter equatorial currents in this model limit the advection of horizontal salt flux to the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean. The associated weaker stratification in eastern equatorial Indian Ocean can lead to deeper mixed layer and negative Sea Surface Temperature (SST) bias, which in turn favor positive Indian Ocean Dipole bias in CFSv1. It is important to note that improper spatial distribution of barrier layer and stratification can alter the air-sea interaction and precipitation in the models. On the other hand CFSv2 could produce the seasonal evolution and spatial distribution of SSS, BLT and stratification better than CFSv1. However CFSv2 displays positive bias in evaporation over the whole domain and negative bias in

  9. Adaptation of an unstructured-mesh, finite-element ocean model to the simulation of ocean circulation beneath ice shelves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Satoshi; Candy, Adam S.; Holland, Paul R.; Piggott, Matthew D.; Jenkins, Adrian

    2013-07-01

    Several different classes of ocean model are capable of representing floating glacial ice shelves. We describe the incorporation of ice shelves into Fluidity-ICOM, a nonhydrostatic finite-element ocean model with the capacity to utilize meshes that are unstructured and adaptive in three dimensions. This geometric flexibility offers several advantages over previous approaches. The model represents melting and freezing on all ice-shelf surfaces including vertical faces, treats the ice shelf topography as continuous rather than stepped, and does not require any smoothing of the ice topography or any of the additional parameterisations of the ocean mixed layer used in isopycnal or z-coordinate models. The model can also represent a water column that decreases to zero thickness at the 'grounding line', where the floating ice shelf is joined to its tributary ice streams. The model is applied to idealised ice-shelf geometries in order to demonstrate these capabilities. In these simple experiments, arbitrarily coarsening the mesh outside the ice-shelf cavity has little effect on the ice-shelf melt rate, while the mesh resolution within the cavity is found to be highly influential. Smoothing the vertical ice front results in faster flow along the smoothed ice front, allowing greater exchange with the ocean than in simulations with a realistic ice front. A vanishing water-column thickness at the grounding line has little effect in the simulations studied. We also investigate the response of ice shelf basal melting to variations in deep water temperature in the presence of salt stratification.

  10. Dynamics of particulate organic carbon flux in a global ocean model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. D. Lima

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The sinking of particulate organic carbon (POC is a key component of the ocean carbon cycle and plays an important role in the global climate system. However, the processes controlling the fraction of primary production that is exported from the euphotic zone (export ratio and how much of it survives respiration in the mesopelagic to be sequestered in the deep ocean (transfer efficiency are not well understood. In this study, we use a three-dimensional, coupled physical-biogeochemical model (CCSM-BEC to investigate the processes controlling the export of particulate organic matter from the euphotic zone and its flux to depth. We also compare model results with sediment trap data and other parameterizations of POC flux to depth to evaluate model skill and gain further insight into the causes of error and uncertainty in POC flux estimates. In the model, export ratios are mainly a function of diatom relative abundance and temperature while absolute fluxes and transfer efficiency are driven by mineral ballast composition of sinking material. The temperature dependence of the POC remineralization length scale is modulated by denitrification under low O2 concentrations and lithogenic (dust fluxes. Lithogenic material is an important control of transfer efficiency in the model, but its effect is restricted to regions of strong atmospheric dust deposition. In the remaining regions, CaCO3 content of exported material is the main factor affecting transfer efficiency. The fact that mineral ballast composition is inextricably linked to plankton community structure results in correlations between export ratios and ballast minerals fluxes (opal and CaCO3, and transfer efficiency and diatom relative abundance that do not necessarily reflect ballast or direct ecosystem effects, respectively. This suggests that it might be difficult to differentiate between ecosystem and ballast effects in observations. The model's skill at reproducing sediment trap observations

  11. The oceanic response to Greenland melting: the effect of increasing model resolution

    OpenAIRE

    Behrens, Erik

    2013-01-01

    This study investigates the oceanic response to an enhanced melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet. A series of forced ocean simulations with different horizontal resolutions from 0.5° to 0.05° is used. The main focus is to investigate the oceanic behaviour to a freshwater input within models of different horizontal resolutions and differing in the representation of mesoscale processes. In particular, the role of the mesoscale eddies on the spreading of freshwater in the subpolar North Atlantic i...

  12. Modelling shelf-ocean exchange and its biogeochemical consequences in coastal upwelling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchamad, Al Azhar

    reactions and biological respiration of marine organic matter (remineralization) under oxic and anoxic conditions. The developed model was coupled into a three-dimensional physical circulation model called the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS). Then, the coupled model was employed and calibrated...... to relatively wide shelf areas because more sinking organic matter reach the shelf sea-floor and remineralize there, enhancing the nutrient trapping effect of the shelf circulation system. These results highlight the important role of the continental shelf bathymetry in modulating the shelf–ocean exchange......The biogeochemical cycles of organic carbon, nutrients, oxygen, and sulfur in the oceans have been suggested to dominantly occur across the shelf–ocean transition over the continental margin, although this zone represents only a small percentage of the global ocean area. Coastal upwelling zones...

  13. An Integrated Assessment Model for Helping the United States Sea Scallop (Placopecten magellanicus Fishery Plan Ahead for Ocean Acidification and Warming.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah R Cooley

    Full Text Available Ocean acidification, the progressive change in ocean chemistry caused by uptake of atmospheric CO2, is likely to affect some marine resources negatively, including shellfish. The Atlantic sea scallop (Placopecten magellanicus supports one of the most economically important single-species commercial fisheries in the United States. Careful management appears to be the most powerful short-term factor affecting scallop populations, but in the coming decades scallops will be increasingly influenced by global environmental changes such as ocean warming and ocean acidification. In this paper, we describe an integrated assessment model (IAM that numerically simulates oceanographic, population dynamic, and socioeconomic relationships for the U.S. commercial sea scallop fishery. Our primary goal is to enrich resource management deliberations by offering both short- and long-term insight into the system and generating detailed policy-relevant information about the relative effects of ocean acidification, temperature rise, fishing pressure, and socioeconomic factors on the fishery using a simplified model system. Starting with relationships and data used now for sea scallop fishery management, the model adds socioeconomic decision making based on static economic theory and includes ocean biogeochemical change resulting from CO2 emissions. The model skillfully reproduces scallop population dynamics, market dynamics, and seawater carbonate chemistry since 2000. It indicates sea scallop harvests could decline substantially by 2050 under RCP 8.5 CO2 emissions and current harvest rules, assuming that ocean acidification affects P. magellanicus by decreasing recruitment and slowing growth, and that ocean warming increases growth. Future work will explore different economic and management scenarios and test how potential impacts of ocean acidification on other scallop biological parameters may influence the social-ecological system. Future empirical work on the

  14. An Integrated Assessment Model for Helping the United States Sea Scallop (Placopecten magellanicus) Fishery Plan Ahead for Ocean Acidification and Warming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooley, Sarah R; Rheuban, Jennie E; Hart, Deborah R; Luu, Victoria; Glover, David M; Hare, Jonathan A; Doney, Scott C

    2015-01-01

    Ocean acidification, the progressive change in ocean chemistry caused by uptake of atmospheric CO2, is likely to affect some marine resources negatively, including shellfish. The Atlantic sea scallop (Placopecten magellanicus) supports one of the most economically important single-species commercial fisheries in the United States. Careful management appears to be the most powerful short-term factor affecting scallop populations, but in the coming decades scallops will be increasingly influenced by global environmental changes such as ocean warming and ocean acidification. In this paper, we describe an integrated assessment model (IAM) that numerically simulates oceanographic, population dynamic, and socioeconomic relationships for the U.S. commercial sea scallop fishery. Our primary goal is to enrich resource management deliberations by offering both short- and long-term insight into the system and generating detailed policy-relevant information about the relative effects of ocean acidification, temperature rise, fishing pressure, and socioeconomic factors on the fishery using a simplified model system. Starting with relationships and data used now for sea scallop fishery management, the model adds socioeconomic decision making based on static economic theory and includes ocean biogeochemical change resulting from CO2 emissions. The model skillfully reproduces scallop population dynamics, market dynamics, and seawater carbonate chemistry since 2000. It indicates sea scallop harvests could decline substantially by 2050 under RCP 8.5 CO2 emissions and current harvest rules, assuming that ocean acidification affects P. magellanicus by decreasing recruitment and slowing growth, and that ocean warming increases growth. Future work will explore different economic and management scenarios and test how potential impacts of ocean acidification on other scallop biological parameters may influence the social-ecological system. Future empirical work on the effect of ocean

  15. Submesoscale Flows and Mixing in the Oceanic Surface Layer Using the Regional Oceanic Modeling System (ROMS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    a few days in duration, from intensification to instability to dissipation (Fig. 1). These results are reported in Gula et al.(2014). Frontal...published, refereed] Gula . J., M. J. Molemaker, and J. C. McWilliams, 2013a: Gulf Stream dynamics and frontal eddies along the Southeast U.S...continental shelf. J. Phys. Ocean. [submitted] Gula . J., M. J. Molemaker, and J. C. McWilliams, 2013b: Submesoscale cold filaments in the Gulf Stream. J

  16. Modeling the ocean circulation in the Bering Sea

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Haoguo; WANG Jia

    2008-01-01

    With parameterized wave mixing, the circulation and the tidal current in the Bering Sea were simulated simultaneously using the three-dimensional Princeton Ocean Model. The simulated circulation pattern in the deep basin is relatively stable,cyclonic, and has little seasonal change. The Bering Slope Current between 200-1000m isobaths was estimated to be 5 Sv in volume transport. The Kamchatka Current was estimated to be 20 Sv off the Kamchatka Peninsula. The Bering shelf circulations vary with season, driven mainly by wind. These features are consistent with historical estimates. A counter current was captured flowing southeastward approximately along the 200 m isobath of the Bering Slope, opposite to the northwestward Bering Slope Current, which needs to be validated by observations. An upwelling current is located in the shelf break (120-1000 m) area, which may imply the vertical advection of nutrients for supporting the Bering Sea Green Belt seasonal plankton blooms in the breakslope area. The Bering Slope Current is located in a downwelling area.

  17. Advances in ocean modeling for climate change research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, William R.; Capotondi, Antonietta; Holland, Marika M.

    1995-07-01

    An adequate understanding of climate variability and the eventual prediction of climate change are among the most urgent and far-reaching efforts of the scientific community. The climate system is in an ever-changing state with vast impact on mankind in all his activities. Both short and long-term aspects of climate variability are of concern, and the unravelling of "natural" variability from "man-induced" climate change is required to prepare for and ameliorate, if possible, the potentially devastating aspects of such change. In terms of scientific effort, the climate community can be thought of as the union of the disciplinary sciences of meteorology, oceanography, sea ice and glaciology, and land surface processes. Since models are based upon mathematical and numerical constructs, mathematics and computer sciences are also directly involved. In addition, some of the problems of man-induced climate change (release of greenhouse gases, the ozone-hole problem, etc.) are basically chemical in nature, and the expertise of the atmospheric and oceanic chemist is also required. In addition, some part of the response to climate perturbations will arise in the biological world, due to upsetting the balance in the great food web that binds communities together on both the land and the sea. Thus, the problems to be solved are extraordinarily complex and require the efforts of many kinds of scientist.

  18. Variations of oceanic oxygen isotopes at the present day and the LGM: equilibrium simulations with an oceanic general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X. Xu

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The isotope-enabled oceanic general circulation model, MPI-OM, is used to simulate the oxygen isotope compositions of sea waters in the oceans under preindustrial and last glacial maximum climate conditions. Simulated oceanic isotope distributions at the last glacial maximum (21 000 yr ago show features similar to the preindustrial in most basins but the Northern North Atlantic. With the exception of the ice sheet impact, the oxygen-18 content variations at sea surface during the last glacial maximum are mainly controlled by the changes in boundary isotopic fluxes in most regions, while the changes from subsurface to bottom waters are mostly due to the differences in the water mass circulations. The changes in topography at the northern high latitudes have a remarkable influence on the isotopic composition in the Arctic Ocean. The pre-industrial and the last glacial maximum calcite oxygen isotope compositions in the surface water and their difference are also calculated. These results are compared with the observed values from different foraminifera species and are in agreement with the observations in most regions.

  19. Performance Optimization of NEMO Oceanic Model at High Resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epicoco, Italo; Mocavero, Silvia; Aloisio, Giovanni

    2014-05-01

    The NEMO oceanic model is based on the Navier-Stokes equations along with a nonlinear equation of state, which couples the two active tracers (temperature and salinity) to the fluid velocity. The code is written in Fortan 90 and parallelized using MPI. The resolution of the global ocean models used today for climate change studies limits the prediction accuracy. To overcome this limit, a new high-resolution global model, based on NEMO, simulating at 1/16° and 100 vertical levels has been developed at CMCC. The model is computational and memory intensive, so it requires many resources to be run. An optimization activity is needed. The strategy requires a preliminary analysis to highlight scalability bottlenecks. It has been performed on a SandyBridge architecture at CMCC. An efficiency of 48% on 7K cores (the maximum available) has been achieved. The analysis has been also carried out at routine level, so that the improvement actions could be designed for the entire code or for the single kernel. The analysis highlighted for example a loss of performance due to the routine used to implement the north fold algorithm (i.e. handling the points at the north pole of the 3-poles Grids): indeed an optimization of the routine implementation is needed. The folding is achieved considering only the last 4 rows on the top of the global domain and by applying a rotation pivoting on the point in the middle. During the folding, the point on the top left is updated with the value of the point on bottom right and so on. The current version of the parallel algorithm is based on the domain decomposition. Each MPI process takes care of a block of points. Each process can update its points using values belonging to the symmetric process. In the current implementation, each received message is placed in a buffer with a number of elements equal to the total dimension of the global domain. Each process sweeps the entire buffer, but only a part of that computation is really useful for the

  20. Adaptive Error Estimation in Linearized Ocean General Circulation Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechelnitsky, Michael Y.

    1999-01-01

    representation error, i.e. the dominance of the mesoscale eddies in the T/P signal, which are not part of the 21 by 1" GCM. Therefore, the impact of the observations on the assimilation is very small even after the adjustment of the error statistics. This work demonstrates that simult&neous estimation of the model and measurement error statistics for data assimilation with global ocean data sets and linearized GCMs is possible. However, the error covariance estimation problem is in general highly underdetermined, much more so than the state estimation problem. In other words there exist a very large number of statistical models that can be made consistent with the available data. Therefore, methods for obtaining quantitative error estimates, powerful though they may be, cannot replace physical insight. Used in the right context, as a tool for guiding the choice of a small number of model error parameters, covariance matching can be a useful addition to the repertory of tools available to oceanographers.

  1. The Middle Miocene climate as modelled in an atmosphere-ocean-biosphere model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Krapp

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available We present simulations with a coupled ocean-atmosphere-biosphere model for the Middle Miocene 15 million years ago. The Middle Miocene topography, which alters both large-scale ocean and atmospheric circulations, causes a global warming of 0.7 K compared to present-day. Higher than present-day CO2 levels of 480 and 720 ppm cause a global warming of 2.8 and 4.9 K, thereby matching proxy-based Middle Miocene global temperature estimates of 3–6 K warming. Higher CO2 levels and the associated water vapour feedback enhance the greenhouse effect and lead to a polar amplification of the warming. Although oceanic and atmospheric poleward heat transport are individually altered by 10–30 % in the mid and high latitudes, changes of the total heat transport account only for 4–8 %, pointing toward a compensation between oceanic and atmospheric heat transport. Our model reproduces a denser vegetation in agreement with fossil records. These results suggest that higher than present-day CO2 levels are essential to drive the warm Middle Miocene climate.

  2. Models for Primary Eye Care Services in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasundhra Misra

    2015-01-01

    In the current situation, an integrated health care system with primary eye care promoted by government of India is apparently the best answer. This model is both cost effective and practical for the prevention and control of blindness among the underprivileged population. Other models functioning with the newer technology of tele-ophthalmology or mobile clinics also add to the positive outcome in providing primary eye care services. This review highlights the strengths and weaknesses of various models presently functioning in the country with the idea of providing useful inputs for eye care providers and enabling them to identify and adopt an appropriate model for primary eye care services.

  3. [Primary care practices in Germany: a model for the future].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beyer, Martin; Gerlach, Ferdinand M; Erler, Antje

    2011-01-01

    In its 2009 report the Federal Advisory Council on the Assessment of Developments in the Health Care System developed a model of Primary Care Practices for future general practice-based primary care. This article presents the theoretical background of the model. Primary care practices are seen as developed organisations requiring changes at all system levels (interaction, organisation, and health system) to ensure sustainability of primary care functions in the future. Developments of the elements comprising the health care system may be compared to the developments and proposals observed in other countries. In Germany, however, the pace of these developments is relatively slow.

  4. Assimilation of TOPEX/POSEIDON Altimeter Data into a Global Ocean Circulation Model: Are the Results Any Good?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukumori, I.; Fu, L. L.; Chao, Y.

    1998-01-01

    The feasibility of assimilating satellite altimetry data into a global ocean general ocean general circulation model is studied. Three years of TOPEX/POSEIDON data is analyzed using a global, three-dimensional, nonlinear primitive equation model.

  5. Response of the equatorial Pacific to chlorophyll pigment in a mixed layer isopycnal ocean general circulation model

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nakamoto, S.; PrasannaKumar, S.; Oberhuber, J.M.; Ishizaka, J.; Muneyama, K.; Frouin, R.

    The influence of phytoplankton on the upper ocean dynamics and thermodynamics in the equatorial Pacific is investigated using an isopycnal ocean general circulation model (OPYC) coupled with a mixed layer model and remotely sensed chlorophyll...

  6. Global Bathymetric Prediction For Ocean Modeling and Marine Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandwell, David T.; Smith, Walter H. F.; Sichoix, Lydie; Frey, Herbert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We proposed to construct a complete bathymetric map of the oceans at a 3-10 km resolution by combining all of the available depth soundings collected over the past 30 years with high resolution marine gravity information provided by the Geosat, ERS-1/2, and Topex/Poseidon altimeters. Detailed bathymetry is essential for understanding physical oceanography and marine geophysics. Currents and tides are controlled by the overall shapes of the ocean basins as well as the smaller sharp ocean ridges and seamounts. Because erosion rates are low in the deep oceans, detailed bathymetry reveals the mantle convection patterns, the plate boundaries, the cooling/subsidence of the oceanic lithosphere, the oceanic plateaus, and the distribution of off-ridge volcanoes. We proposed to: (1) Accumulate all available depth soundings collected over the past 30 years; (2) Use the short wavelength (< 160 km) satellite gravity information to interpolate between sparse ship soundings; (3) Improve the resolution of the marine gravity field using enhanced estimates along repeat altimeter profiles together with the dense altimeter measurements; (4) Refine/improve bathymetric predictions using the improved resolution gravity field and also by investigating computer-intensive methods for bathymetric prediction such as inverse theory; and (5) Produce a 'Globe of the Earth' similar to the globe of Venus prepared by the NASA Magellan investigation. This will also include the best available digital land data.

  7. Assimilation of Earth rotation parameters into a global ocean model: excitation of polar motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Saynisch

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The oceanic contribution to Earth rotation anomalies can be manifold. Possible causes are a change of total ocean mass, changes in current speed or location and changes in mass distribution. To derive the governing physical mechanisms of oceanic Earth rotation excitation we assimilate Earth rotation observations with a global circulation ocean model. Before assimilation, observations of length of day and polar motion were transformed into estimates of ocean angular momentum. By using the adjoint 4D-VAR assimilation method we were able to reproduce these estimated time series. Although length of day was assimilated simultaneously the analysis in this paper focuses on the oceanic polar motion generation. Our results show that changes in mass distribution and currents contribute to oceanic polar motion generation. Both contributions are highly correlated and show similar amplitudes. The changes in the model done by the assimilation procedure could be related to changes in the atmospheric forcing. Since for geometrical reasons the change of total ocean mass does not project on polar motion, we conclude that the polar motion is mainly generated by a geostrophic response to atmospheric momentum forcing. In geostrophic currents mass displacement and current speed entail each other. This way the large similarity of mass and current generated ocean angular momentum can be explained.

  8. The M-2 ocean tide loading wave in Alaska: vertical and horizontal displacements, modelled and observed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Shfaqat Abbas; Scherneck, H.G.

    2003-01-01

    Crustal deformations caused by surface load due to ocean tides are strongly dependent on the surface load closest to the observing site. In order to correctly model this ocean loading effect near irregular coastal areas, a high-resolution coastline is required. A test is carried out using two GPS...

  9. Customised search and comparison of in situ, satellite and model data for ocean modellers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamre, Torill; Vines, Aleksander; Lygre, Kjetil

    2014-05-01

    For the ocean modelling community, the amount of available data from historical and upcoming in situ sensor networks and satellite missions, provides an rich opportunity to validate and improve their simulation models. However, the problem of making the different data interoperable and intercomparable remains, due to, among others, differences in terminology and format used by different data providers and the different granularity provided by e.g. in situ data and ocean models. The GreenSeas project (Development of global plankton data base and model system for eco-climate early warning) aims to advance the knowledge and predictive capacities of how marine ecosystems will respond to global change. In the project, one specific objective has been to improve the technology for accessing historical plankton and associated environmental data sets, along with earth observation data and simulation outputs. To this end, we have developed a web portal enabling ocean modellers to easily search for in situ or satellite data overlapping in space and time, and compare the retrieved data with their model results. The in situ data are retrieved from a geo-spatial repository containing both historical and new physical, biological and chemical parameters for the Southern Ocean, Atlantic, Nordic Seas and the Arctic. The satellite-derived quantities of similar parameters from the same areas are retrieved from another geo-spatial repository established in the project. Both repositories are accessed through standard interfaces, using the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) and Web Feature Service (WFS), and OPeNDAP protocols, respectively. While the developed data repositories use standard terminology to describe the parameters, especially the measured in situ biological parameters are too fine grained to be immediately useful for modelling purposes. Therefore, the plankton parameters were grouped according to category, size and if available by element. This grouping

  10. Quantifying Key Climate Parameter Uncertainties Using an Earth System Model with a Dynamic 3D Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, R.; Sriver, R. L.; Goes, M. P.; Urban, N.; Matthews, D.; Haran, M.; Keller, K.

    2011-12-01

    Climate projections hinge critically on uncertain climate model parameters such as climate sensitivity, vertical ocean diffusivity and anthropogenic sulfate aerosol forcings. Climate sensitivity is defined as the equilibrium global mean temperature response to a doubling of atmospheric CO2 concentrations. Vertical ocean diffusivity parameterizes sub-grid scale ocean vertical mixing processes. These parameters are typically estimated using Intermediate Complexity Earth System Models (EMICs) that lack a full 3D representation of the oceans, thereby neglecting the effects of mixing on ocean dynamics and meridional overturning. We improve on these studies by employing an EMIC with a dynamic 3D ocean model to estimate these parameters. We carry out historical climate simulations with the University of Victoria Earth System Climate Model (UVic ESCM) varying parameters that affect climate sensitivity, vertical ocean mixing, and effects of anthropogenic sulfate aerosols. We use a Bayesian approach whereby the likelihood of each parameter combination depends on how well the model simulates surface air temperature and upper ocean heat content. We use a Gaussian process emulator to interpolate the model output to an arbitrary parameter setting. We use Markov Chain Monte Carlo method to estimate the posterior probability distribution function (pdf) of these parameters. We explore the sensitivity of the results to prior assumptions about the parameters. In addition, we estimate the relative skill of different observations to constrain the parameters. We quantify the uncertainty in parameter estimates stemming from climate variability, model and observational errors. We explore the sensitivity of key decision-relevant climate projections to these parameters. We find that climate sensitivity and vertical ocean diffusivity estimates are consistent with previously published results. The climate sensitivity pdf is strongly affected by the prior assumptions, and by the scaling

  11. A Modular Arbitrary-Order Ocean-Atmosphere Model: MAOOAM v1.0

    CERN Document Server

    De Cruz, L; Vannitsem, S

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes a reduced-order quasi-geostrophic coupled ocean-atmosphere model that allows for an arbitrary number of atmospheric and oceanic modes to be retained in the spectral decomposition. The modularity of this new model allows one to easily modify the model physics. Using this new model, coined "Modular Arbitrary-Order Ocean-Atmosphere Model" (maooam), we analyse the dependence of the model dynamics on the truncation level of the spectral expansion, and unveil spurious behaviour that may exist at low resolution by a comparison with the higher resolution versions. In particular, we assess the robustness of the coupled low-frequency variability when the number of modes is increased. An "optimal" version is proposed for which the ocean resolution is sufficiently high while the total number of modes is small enough to allow for a tractable and extensive analysis of the dynamics.

  12. Low recruitment due to altered settlement substrata as primary constraint for coral communities under ocean acidification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabricius, Katharina E; Noonan, Sam H C; Abrego, David; Harrington, Lindsay; De'ath, Glenn

    2017-09-13

    The future of coral reefs under increasing CO2 depends on their capacity to recover from disturbances. To predict the recovery potential of coral communities that are fully acclimatized to elevated CO2, we compared the relative success of coral recruitment and later life stages at two volcanic CO2 seeps and adjacent control sites in Papua New Guinea. Our field experiments showed that the effects of ocean acidification (OA) on coral recruitment rates were up to an order of magnitude greater than the effects on the survival and growth of established corals. Settlement rates, recruit and juvenile densities were best predicted by the presence of crustose coralline algae, as opposed to the direct effects of seawater CO2 Offspring from high CO2 acclimatized parents had similarly impaired settlement rates as offspring from control parents. For most coral taxa, field data showed no evidence of cumulative and compounding detrimental effects of high CO2 on successive life stages, and three taxa showed improved adult performance at high CO2 that compensated for their low recruitment rates. Our data suggest that severely declining capacity for reefs to recover, due to altered settlement substrata and reduced coral recruitment, is likely to become a dominant mechanism of how OA will alter coral reefs. © 2017 The Author(s).

  13. Stochastic modelling and predictability: analysis of a low-order coupled ocean-atmosphere model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vannitsem, Stéphane

    2014-06-28

    There is a growing interest in developing stochastic schemes for the description of processes that are poorly represented in atmospheric and climate models, in order to increase their variability and reduce the impact of model errors. The use of such noise could however have adverse effects by modifying in undesired ways a certain number of moments of their probability distributions. In this work, the impact of developing a stochastic scheme (based on stochastic averaging) for the ocean is explored in the context of a low-order coupled (deterministic) ocean-atmosphere system. After briefly analysing its variability, its ability in predicting the oceanic flow generated by the coupled system is investigated. Different phases in the error dynamics are found: for short lead times, an initial overdispersion of the ensemble forecast is present while the ensemble mean follows a dynamics reminiscent of the combined amplification of initial condition and model errors for deterministic systems; for longer lead times, a reliable diffusive ensemble spread is observed. These different phases are also found for ensemble-oriented skill measures like the Brier score and the rank histogram. The implications of these features on building stochastic models are then briefly discussed.

  14. A 1000-year simulation with the IPSL ocean-atmosphere coupled model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Conil

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available A 1000-year climate simulation is run with the ocean-atmosphere coupled model developed at the Institute Pierre- Simon Laplace (IPSL, Paris. No flux adjustment is used. The drift of the model is analyzed in terms of the seasurface temperature and deep ocean temperature. When the model's own equilibrium is reached, it is found that the Antarctic bottom water production experiences large-amplitude variation, oscillating between strong and weak episodes. This can yield oceanic temperature variation in the Southern Hemisphere and for the global mean.

  15. Organizational effectiveness. Primary care and the congruence model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eiser, A R; Eiser, B J

    1996-10-01

    The congruence model is a framework used to analyze organizational strengths and weaknesses and pinpoint specific areas for improving effectiveness. This article provides an overview of organizations as open systems, with examples in the primary care arena. It explains and applies the congruence model in the context of primary care issues and functions, including methods by which the model can be used to diagnose organizational problems and generate solutions. Changes needed in primary care due to the managed care environment, and areas of potential problems and sensitivities requiring organizational changes to meet market and regulatory demands now placed on PCOs are examined.

  16. Excitation of equatorial Kelvin and Yanai waves by tropical cyclones in an ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Sriver

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropical cyclones (TCs actively contribute to the dynamics of Earth's coupled climate system. They influence oceanic mixing rates, upper-ocean heat content, and air–sea fluxes, with implications for atmosphere and ocean dynamics on multiple spatial and temporal scales. Using an ocean general circulation model with modified surface wind forcing, we explore how TC winds can excite equatorial ocean waves in the tropical Pacific. We highlight a situation where three successive TCs in the western North Pacific region, corresponding to events in 2003, excite a combination of Kelvin and Yanai waves in the equatorial Pacific. The resultant thermocline adjustment significantly modifies the thermal structure of the upper equatorial Pacific and leads to eastward zonal heat transport. Observations of upper-ocean temperature by the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO buoy array and sea-level height anomalies using altimetry reveal wave passage during the same time period with similar properties to the modeled wave, although our idealized model methodology disallows precise identification of the TC forcing with the observed waves. Results indicate that direct oceanographic forcing by TCs may be important for understanding the spectrum of equatorial ocean waves, thus remotely influencing tropical mixing and surface energy budgets. Because equatorial Kelvin waves are closely linked to interannual variability in the tropical Pacific, these findings also suggest TC wind forcing may influence the timing and amplitude of El Niño events.

  17. Excitation of equatorial Kelvin and Yanai waves by tropical cyclones in an ocean general circulation model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. L. Sriver

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Tropical cyclones (TCs actively contribute to the dynamics of Earth's coupled climate system. They influence oceanic mixing rates, upper-ocean heat content, and air-sea fluxes, with implications for atmosphere and ocean dynamics on multiple spatial and temporal scales. Using an ocean general circulation model with modified surface wind forcing, we explore how TC winds can excite equatorial ocean waves in the tropical Pacific. We highlight a situation where three successive TCs in the western North Pacific region, corresponding to events in 2003, excite a combination of Kelvin and Yanai waves in the equatorial Pacific. The resultant thermocline adjustment significantly modifies the thermal structure of the upper equatorial Pacific and leads to eastward zonal heat transport. Observations of upper-ocean temperature by the Tropical Atmosphere Ocean (TAO buoy array and sea-level height anomalies using altimetry reveal wave passage during the same time period with similar properties to the modeled wave, although our idealized model methodology disallows precise identification of the TC forcing with the observed waves. Results indicate that direct oceanographic forcing by TCs may be important for understanding the spectrum of equatorial ocean waves, thus remotely influencing tropical mixing and surface energy budgets. Because equatorial Kelvin waves are closely linked to interannual variability in the tropical Pacific, these findings also suggest TC wind forcing may influence the timing and amplitude of El Niño events.

  18. Consulting Psychiatry within an Integrated Primary Care Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiter, Elizabeth A. Zeidler; Pandhi, Nancy; Fondow, Meghan D. M.; Thomas, Chantelle; Vonk, Jantina; Reardon, Claudia L.; Serrano, Neftali

    2014-01-01

    Summary After implementation of an integrated consulting psychiatry model and psychology services within primary care at a federally qualified health center, patients have increased access to needed mental health services, and primary care clinicians receive the support and collaboration needed to meet the psychiatric needs of the population. PMID:24185149

  19. The role of biology in planetary evolution: cyanobacterial primary production in low‐oxygen Proterozoic oceans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Donald A.; Macalady, Jennifer L.

    2016-01-01

    photosynthesis, including the activity of metabolically versatile cyanobacteria, played an important role in delaying the oxygenation of Earth's surface ocean during the Proterozoic Eon. PMID:26549614

  20. The role of biology in planetary evolution: cyanobacterial primary production in low-oxygen Proterozoic oceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Trinity L; Bryant, Donald A; Macalady, Jennifer L

    2016-02-01

    , including the activity of metabolically versatile cyanobacteria, played an important role in delaying the oxygenation of Earth's surface ocean during the Proterozoic Eon.

  1. Modeling of atmospheric iron processing carried by mineral dust and its deposition to ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickovic, Slobodan; Vukovic, Ana; Vujadinovic, Mirjam

    2014-05-01

    Relatively insoluble iron in dust originating from desert soils increases its solubility after Fe carried by mineral dust is chemically processed by the atmosphere. After dust is deposited deposition to the ocean, soluble Fe as a nutrient could enhance the marine primary production. The atmospheric dust cycle is driven by the atmospheric processes often of smaller, meso-scales. The soil mineralogy of dust emitted from sources determines also how much Fe in the aerosol will be finding. Once Fe is exposed to the atmospheric processes, the atmospheric radiation, clouds and polluted air will chemically affect the iron in dust. Global dust-iron models, having typical horizontal resolutions of 100-300 km which are mostly used to numerically simulate the fate of iron in the atmosphere can provide rather global picture of the dust and iron transport, but not details. Such models often introduce simplistic approximation on the Fe content in dust-productive soils. To simulate the Fe processing we instead implemented a high resolution regional atmospheric dust-iron model with detailed 1km global map for the geographic distribution of Fe content in soil. We also introduced a parameterization of the Fe processing caused by dust mineralogy, cloud processes and solar radiation. We will present results from simulation experiments in order to explore the model capability to reproduce major observed patterns of deposited Fe into the Atlantic cruises.

  2. Models for primary eye care services in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Vasundhra; Vashist, Praveen; Malhotra, Sumit; Gupta, Sanjeev K

    2015-01-01

    Blindness and visual impairment continues to be a major public health problem in India. Availability and easy access to primary eye care services is essential for elimination of avoidable blindness. 'Vision 2020: The Right to Sight - India' envisaged the need for establishing primary eye care units named vision centers for every 50,000 population in the country by the year 2020. The government of India has given priority to develop vision centers at the level of community health centers and primary health centers under the 'National Program for Control of Blindness'. NGOs and the private sector have also initiated some models for primary eye care services. In the current situation, an integrated health care system with primary eye care promoted by government of India is apparently the best answer. This model is both cost effective and practical for the prevention and control of blindness among the underprivileged population. Other models functioning with the newer technology of tele-ophthalmology or mobile clinics also add to the positive outcome in providing primary eye care services. This review highlights the strengths and weaknesses of various models presently functioning in the country with the idea of providing useful inputs for eye care providers and enabling them to identify and adopt an appropriate model for primary eye care services.

  3. Aluminium in an ocean general circulation model compared with the West Atlantic Geotraces cruises

    CERN Document Server

    van Hulten, Marco; Tagliabue, Alessandro; Dutay, Jean-Claude; Gehlen, Marion; de Baar, Hein J W; Middag, Rob

    2012-01-01

    A model of aluminium has been developed and implemented in an Ocean General Circulation Model (NEMO-PISCES). In the model, aluminium enters the ocean by means of dust deposition. The internal oceanic processes are described by advection, mixing and reversible scavenging. The model has been evaluated against a number of selected high-quality datasets covering much of the world ocean, especially those from the West Atlantic Geotraces cruises of 2010 and 2011. Generally, the model results are in fair agreement with the observations. However, the model does not describe well the vertical distribution of dissolved Al in the North Atlantic Ocean. The model may require changes in the physical forcing and the vertical dependency of the sinking velocity of biogenic silica to account for other discrepancies. To explore the model behaviour, sensitivity experiments have been performed, in which we changed the key parameters of the scavenging process as well as the input of aluminium into the ocean. This resulted in a bet...

  4. Regionally coupled atmosphere-ocean-sea ice-marine biogeochemistry model ROM: 1. Description and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sein, Dmitry V.; Mikolajewicz, Uwe; Gröger, Matthias; Fast, Irina; Cabos, William; Pinto, Joaquim G.; Hagemann, Stefan; Semmler, Tido; Izquierdo, Alfredo; Jacob, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    The general circulation models used to simulate global climate typically feature resolution too coarse to reproduce many smaller-scale processes, which are crucial to determining the regional responses to climate change. A novel approach to downscale climate change scenarios is presented which includes the interactions between the North Atlantic Ocean and the European shelves as well as their impact on the North Atlantic and European climate. The goal of this paper is to introduce the global ocean-regional atmosphere coupling concept and to show the potential benefits of this model system to simulate present-day climate. A global ocean-sea ice-marine biogeochemistry model (MPIOM/HAMOCC) with regionally high horizontal resolution is coupled to an atmospheric regional model (REMO) and global terrestrial hydrology model (HD) via the OASIS coupler. Moreover, results obtained with ROM using NCEP/NCAR reanalysis and ECHAM5/MPIOM CMIP3 historical simulations as boundary conditions are presented and discussed for the North Atlantic and North European region. The validation of all the model components, i.e., ocean, atmosphere, terrestrial hydrology, and ocean biogeochemistry is performed and discussed. The careful and detailed validation of ROM provides evidence that the proposed model system improves the simulation of many aspects of the regional climate, remarkably the ocean, even though some biases persist in other model components, thus leaving potential for future improvement. We conclude that ROM is a powerful tool to estimate possible impacts of climate change on the regional scale.

  5. "One-Stop Shopping" for Ocean Remote-Sensing and Model Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, P. Peggy; Vu, Quoc; Chao, Yi; Li, Zhi-Jin; Choi, Jei-Kook

    2006-01-01

    OurOcean Portal 2.0 (http:// ourocean.jpl.nasa.gov) is a software system designed to enable users to easily gain access to ocean observation data, both remote-sensing and in-situ, configure and run an Ocean Model with observation data assimilated on a remote computer, and visualize both the observation data and the model outputs. At present, the observation data and models focus on the California coastal regions and Prince William Sound in Alaska. This system can be used to perform both real-time and retrospective analyses of remote-sensing data and model outputs. OurOcean Portal 2.0 incorporates state-of-the-art information technologies (IT) such as MySQL database, Java Web Server (Apache/Tomcat), Live Access Server (LAS), interactive graphics with Java Applet at the Client site and MatLab/GMT at the server site, and distributed computing. OurOcean currently serves over 20 real-time or historical ocean data products. The data are served in pre-generated plots or their native data format. For some of the datasets, users can choose different plotting parameters and produce customized graphics. OurOcean also serves 3D Ocean Model outputs generated by ROMS (Regional Ocean Model System) using LAS. The Live Access Server (LAS) software, developed by the Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory (PMEL) of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), is a configurable Web-server program designed to provide flexible access to geo-referenced scientific data. The model output can be views as plots in horizontal slices, depth profiles or time sequences, or can be downloaded as raw data in different data formats, such as NetCDF, ASCII, Binary, etc. The interactive visualization is provided by graphic software, Ferret, also developed by PMEL. In addition, OurOcean allows users with minimal computing resources to configure and run an Ocean Model with data assimilation on a remote computer. Users may select the forcing input, the data to be assimilated, the

  6. [Studies of ocean predictability at decade to century time scales using a global ocean general circulation model in a parallel competing environment]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1992-03-10

    The first phase of the proposed work is largely completed on schedule. Scientists at the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC) succeeded in putting a version of the Hamburg isopycnal coordinate ocean model (OPYC) onto the INTEL parallel computer. Due to the slow run speeds of the OPYC on the parallel machine, another ocean is being model used during the first part of phase 2. The model chosen is the Large Scale Geostrophic (LSG) model form the Max Planck Institute.

  7. A conceptual model of oceanic heat transport in the Snowball Earth scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comeau, Darin; Kurtze, Douglas A.; Restrepo, Juan M.

    2016-12-01

    Geologic evidence suggests that the Earth may have been completely covered in ice in the distant past, a state known as Snowball Earth. This is still the subject of controversy, and has been the focus of modeling work from low-dimensional models up to state-of-the-art general circulation models. In our present global climate, the ocean plays a large role in redistributing heat from the equatorial regions to high latitudes, and as an important part of the global heat budget, its role in the initiation a Snowball Earth, and the subsequent climate, is of great interest. To better understand the role of oceanic heat transport in the initiation of Snowball Earth, and the resulting global ice covered climate state, the goal of this inquiry is twofold: we wish to propose the least complex model that can capture the Snowball Earth scenario as well as the present-day climate with partial ice cover, and we want to determine the relative importance of oceanic heat transport. To do this, we develop a simple model, incorporating thermohaline dynamics from traditional box ocean models, a radiative balance from energy balance models, and the more contemporary "sea glacier" model to account for viscous flow effects of extremely thick sea ice. The resulting model, consisting of dynamic ocean and ice components, is able to reproduce both Snowball Earth and present-day conditions through reasonable changes in forcing parameters. We find that including or neglecting oceanic heat transport may lead to vastly different global climate states, and also that the parameterization of under-ice heat transfer in the ice-ocean coupling plays a key role in the resulting global climate state, demonstrating the regulatory effect of dynamic ocean heat transport.

  8. Multi-model attribution of upper-ocean temperature changes using an isothermal approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Evan; Min, Seung-Ki; Palmer, Matthew D; Lee, Donghyun; Yim, Bo Young; Yeh, Sang-Wook

    2016-06-01

    Both air-sea heat exchanges and changes in ocean advection have contributed to observed upper-ocean warming most evident in the late-twentieth century. However, it is predominantly via changes in air-sea heat fluxes that human-induced climate forcings, such as increasing greenhouse gases, and other natural factors such as volcanic aerosols, have influenced global ocean heat content. The present study builds on previous work using two different indicators of upper-ocean temperature changes for the detection of both anthropogenic and natural external climate forcings. Using simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, we compare mean temperatures above a fixed isotherm with the more widely adopted approach of using a fixed depth. We present the first multi-model ensemble detection and attribution analysis using the fixed isotherm approach to robustly detect both anthropogenic and natural external influences on upper-ocean temperatures. Although contributions from multidecadal natural variability cannot be fully removed, both the large multi-model ensemble size and properties of the isotherm analysis reduce internal variability of the ocean, resulting in better observation-model comparison of temperature changes since the 1950s. We further show that the high temporal resolution afforded by the isotherm analysis is required to detect natural external influences such as volcanic cooling events in the upper-ocean because the radiative effect of volcanic forcings is short-lived.

  9. Multi-model attribution of upper-ocean temperature changes using an isothermal approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, Evan; Min, Seung-Ki; Palmer, Matthew D.; Lee, Donghyun; Yim, Bo Young; Yeh, Sang-Wook

    2016-06-01

    Both air-sea heat exchanges and changes in ocean advection have contributed to observed upper-ocean warming most evident in the late-twentieth century. However, it is predominantly via changes in air-sea heat fluxes that human-induced climate forcings, such as increasing greenhouse gases, and other natural factors such as volcanic aerosols, have influenced global ocean heat content. The present study builds on previous work using two different indicators of upper-ocean temperature changes for the detection of both anthropogenic and natural external climate forcings. Using simulations from phase 5 of the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project, we compare mean temperatures above a fixed isotherm with the more widely adopted approach of using a fixed depth. We present the first multi-model ensemble detection and attribution analysis using the fixed isotherm approach to robustly detect both anthropogenic and natural external influences on upper-ocean temperatures. Although contributions from multidecadal natural variability cannot be fully removed, both the large multi-model ensemble size and properties of the isotherm analysis reduce internal variability of the ocean, resulting in better observation-model comparison of temperature changes since the 1950s. We further show that the high temporal resolution afforded by the isotherm analysis is required to detect natural external influences such as volcanic cooling events in the upper-ocean because the radiative effect of volcanic forcings is short-lived.

  10. Model primary content type for multipurpose internet mail extensions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, S.; Parks, C.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of this memo is to propose an update to Internet RFC 2045 to include a new primary content-type to be known as `model`. RFC 2045 [1] describes mechanisms for specifying and describing the format of Internet Message Bodies via content-type/subtype pairs. We believe that `model` defines a fundamental type of content with unique presentational, hardware, and processing aspects. Various subtypes of this primary type are immediately anticipated but will be covered under separate documents.

  11. Various approaches to the modelling of large scale 3-dimensional circulation in the Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shaji, C.; Bahulayan, N.; Rao, A.D.; Dube, S.K.

    In this paper, the three different approaches to the modelling of large scale 3-dimensional flow in the ocean such as the diagnostic, semi-diagnostic (adaptation) and the prognostic are discussed in detail. Three-dimensional solutions are obtained...

  12. On usage of CABARET scheme for tracer transport in INM ocean model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diansky, Nikolay; Kostrykin, Sergey; Gusev, Anatoly; Salnikov, Nikolay

    2010-06-01

    The contemporary state of ocean numerical modelling sets some requirements for the numerical advection schemes used in ocean general circulation models (OGCMs). The most important requirements are conservation, monotonicity and numerical efficiency including good parallelization properties. Investigation of some advection schemes shows that one of the best schemes satisfying the criteria is CABARET scheme. 3D-modification of the CABARET scheme was used to develop a new transport module (for temperature and salinity) for the Institute of Numerical Mathematics ocean model (INMOM). Testing of this module on some common benchmarks shows a high accuracy in comparison with the second-order advection scheme used in the INMOM. This new module was incorporated in the INMOM and experiments with the modified model showed a better simulation of oceanic circulation than its previous version.

  13. Decadal Variability Shown by the Arctic Ocean Hydrochemical Data and Reproduced by an Ice-Ocean Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    M. Ikeda; R. Colony; H. Yamaguchi; T. Ikeda

    2005-01-01

    The Arctic is experiencing a significant warming trend as well as a decadal oscillation. The atmospheric circulation represented by the Polar Vortex and the sea ice cover show decadal variabilities, while it has been difficult to reveal the decadal oscillation from the ocean interior. The recent distribution of Russian hydrochemical data collected from the Arctic Basin provides useful information on ocean interior variabilities. Silicate is used to provide the most valuable data for showing the boundary between the silicate-rich Pacific Water and the opposite Atlantic Water. Here, it is assumed that the silicate distribution receives minor influence from seasonal biological productivity and Siberian Rivers outflow. It shows a clear maximum around 100m depth in the Canada Basin, along with a vertical gradient below 100 m, which provides information on the vertical motion of the upper boundary of the Atlantic Water at a decadal time scale. The boundary shifts upward (downward), as realized by the silicate reduction (increase) at a fixed depth, responding to a more intense (weaker) Polar Vortex or a positive (negative) phase of the Arctic Oscillation. A coupled ice-ocean model is employed to reconstruct this decadal oscillation.

  14. Assessing GOCE Gravity Models using Altimetry and In-situ Ocean Current Observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Per; Andersen, Ole Baltazar; Honecker, Johanna

    The Gravity and steady state Ocean Circulation Explorer (GOCE) satellite mission measures Earth's gravity field with an unprecedented accuracy at short spatial scales. Previous results have demonstrated a significant advance in our ability to determine the ocean's general circulation. The improved...... gravity models provided by the GOCE mission have enhanced the resolution and sharpened the boundaries of those features and the associated geostrophic surface currents reveal improvements for all of the ocean's current systems. In this study, a series of 23 newer gravity models including observations from...

  15. Modeling and Control of Primary Parallel Isolated Boost Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mira Albert, Maria del Carmen; Hernandez Botella, Juan Carlos; Sen, Gökhan

    2012-01-01

    In this paper state space modeling and closed loop controlled operation have been presented for primary parallel isolated boost converter (PPIBC) topology as a battery charging unit. Parasitic resistances have been included to have an accurate dynamic model. The accuracy of the model has been tes...

  16. Test the Ocean Acidification Hypothesis during the End-Permian Mass Extinction Using an Earth System Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Y.; Kump, L.; Ridgwell, A. J.; Meyer, K. M.

    2012-12-01

    The end-Permian is associated with a 3-5‰ carbon isotope excursion in the ocean-atmosphere system within 20 kyr, which could be explained by a rapid and large amount of greenhouse gas emission. This leads to the hypothesis of ocean acidification as a primary driver for the end-Permian mass extinction event. In order to test this hypothesis, we conducted a series of experiments varying initial and boundary conditions using an Earth system model of intermediate complexity (GENIE: http://www.genie.ac.uk/). The late Permian ocean has been proposed as a "Neritan" ocean due to lack of pelagic carbonate production. We test the ocean buffering capacity to rapid CO2 emission by turning on the pelagic carbonate factory to result in a "Cretan" ocean similar to today. Due to the uncertainties on reconstructed paleo-pCO2 records, we test the model sensitivity by varying the initial pCO2, ranging from 1× PAL (preindustrial atmospheric level), 5× PAL, 10× PAL to 20× PAL. Ocean saturation state with respect to calcite (aragonite) in the Late Permian is also a key uncertainty, estimates have been varying from Ωcalcite =2.5 to supersaturated state (Ωcalcite =10) (Ridgwell 2005; Montenegro et al. 2011). We test this key uncertainty in both the "Neritan" and "Cretan" ocean cases. GENIE was spun up for >200 kyr to allow sedimentary equilibrium to ensure the weathering input balance the sediment output. Temperature-dependent silicate weathering feedback is also turned on in the model as a driver of the long-term draw down of atmospheric pCO2. We then invert the model by forcing the atmosphere δ13C to track our prescribed carbon isotopes derived from Meishan section in South China and Gartnerkofel-1 core in Alps, Austria at each time step. The two carbon isotope records are statistically treated to remove the noise that could result in unrealistic fluctuations in the derivatives of δ13C. Due to the uncertainties in the age model applied on these two records and different

  17. Compact Ocean Models Enable Onboard AUV Autonomy and Decentralized Adaptive Sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-30

    1 DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. Compact Ocean Models Enable Onboard AUV Autonomy and...Models Enable Onboard AUV Autonomy and Decentralized Adaptive Sampling 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...onboard autonomy of underwater vehicles”, in Proc. AGU Ocean Science Meeting, Salt Lake City, UT. [published] ● Frolov, S., R., Kudela, J., Bellingham

  18. LES Modeling of Lateral Dispersion in the Ocean on Scales of 10 m to 10 km

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-20

    horizontal and vertical mixing processes in the ocean stratified interior. 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION...Geophys. Res. Lett., 36, L07601:doi:10.1029/2008GL03682, 2008. K. B. Winters and A. de la Fuente. Modelling rotating stratified flows at laboratory-scale using spectrally-based DNS . Ocean Modell., 49-50:47–59, 2012. 6

  19. Wave hindcast experiments in the Indian Ocean using MIKE 21 SW model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P G Remya; Raj Kumar; Sujit Basu; Abhijit Sarkar

    2012-04-01

    Wave prediction and hindcast studies are important in ocean engineering, coastal infrastructure development and management. In view of sparse and infrequent in-situ observations, model derived hindcast wave data can be used for the assessment of wave climate in offshore and coastal areas. In the present study, MIKE 21 SW Model has been used to carry out wave hindcast experiments in the Indian Ocean. Model runs have been made for the year 2005 using QuickSCAT scatterometer winds blended with ECMWF model winds. In order to study the impact of southern ocean swells, the model has been run in two different domains, with the southern boundary being shifted far south for the Domain 60S model. The model simulated wave parameters have been validated by comparing with buoy and altimeter data and various statistical yardsticks have been employed to quantify the validation. Possible reason for the poorer performance of the model in the Arabian Sea has also been pointed out.

  20. NAO-ocean circulation interactions in a coupled general circulation model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bellucci, A. [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici, Bologna (Italy); Gualdi, S.; Navarra, A. [Centro Euro-Mediterraneo per i Cambiamenti Climatici, Bologna (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna (Italy); Scoccimarro, E. [Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, Bologna (Italy)

    2008-12-15

    The interplay between the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) and the large scale ocean circulation is inspected in a twentieth century simulation conducted with a state-of-the-art coupled general circulation model. Significant lead-lag covariance between oceanic and tropospheric variables suggests that the system supports a damped oscillatory mode involving an active ocean-atmosphere coupling, with a typical NAO-like space structure and a 5 years timescale, qualitatively consistent with a mid-latitude delayed oscillator paradigm. The two essential processes governing the oscillation are (1) a negative feedback between ocean gyre circulation and the high latitude SST meridional gradient and (2) a positive feedback between SST and the NAO. The atmospheric NAO pattern appears to have a weaker projection on the ocean meridional overturning, compared to the gyre circulation, which leads to a secondary role for the thermohaline circulation in driving the meridional heat transport, and thus the oscillatory mode. (orig.)

  1. Oceanic circulation models help to predict global biogeography of pelagic yellow-bellied sea snake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brischoux, François; Cotté, Cédric; Lillywhite, Harvey B; Bailleul, Frédéric; Lalire, Maxime; Gaspar, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    It is well recognized that most marine vertebrates, and especially tetrapods, precisely orient and actively move in apparently homogeneous oceanic environments. Here, we investigate the presumptive role of oceanic currents in biogeographic patterns observed in a secondarily marine tetrapod, the yellow-bellied sea snake (Hydrophis [Pelamis] platurus). State-of-the-art world ocean circulation models show how H. platurus, the only pelagic species of sea snake, can potentially exploit oceanic currents to disperse and maintain population mixing between localities that spread over two-thirds of the Earth's circumference. The very close association of these snakes with surface currents seems to provide a highly efficient dispersal mechanism that allowed this species to range extensively and relatively quickly well beyond the central Indo-Pacific area, the centre of origin, abundance and diversity of sea snakes. Our results further suggest that the pan-oceanic population of this species must be extraordinarily large. © 2016 The Author(s).

  2. Modelling shelf-ocean exchange and its biogeochemical consequences in coastal upwelling systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muchamad, Al Azhar

    slope and deeper depths. The coupled model may potentially serve as a robust tool in investigation of the dynamics of oceanic biogeochemical cycle throughout Earth history as well as a practical method to quantified storage of carbon flux into the ocean across the continental margins under present day...... in eastern boundary upwelling systems is an example of the most productive ocean waters over continental margins where intense supply of nutrients occur from deeper ocean waters. Interesting questions arise related to the biogeochemical cycles in such upwelling systems; such as 1) how the recently observed...... active but cryptic sulfur cycle possibly is coupled to the nitrogen cycle in an oxygen-minimum-zone (OMZ), 2) what is the relation between the shelf–ocean exchange, continental shelf width and development of the observed bottom water anoxia/euxinia associated with different configurations of continental...

  3. A look at the ocean in the EC-Earth climate model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sterl, Andreas; Bintanja, Richard; Severijns, Camiel [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Institute (KNMI), P.O. Box 201, De Bilt (Netherlands); Brodeau, Laurent [Stockholm University, Department of Meteorology, Stockholm (Sweden); Gleeson, Emily; Semmler, Tido [Met Eireann, Dublin (Ireland); Koenigk, Torben; Wyser, Klaus [Swedish Meteorological and Hydrological Institute (SMHI), Norrkoeping (Sweden); Schmith, Torben; Yang, Shuting [Danish Meteorological Institute (DMI), Copenhagen (Denmark)

    2012-12-15

    EC-Earth is a newly developed global climate system model. Its core components are the Integrated Forecast System (IFS) of the European Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) as the atmosphere component and the Nucleus for European Modelling of the Ocean (NEMO) developed by Institute Pierre Simon Laplace (IPSL) as the ocean component. Both components are used with a horizontal resolution of roughly one degree. In this paper we describe the performance of NEMO in the coupled system by comparing model output with ocean observations. We concentrate on the surface ocean and mass transports. It appears that in general the model has a cold and fresh bias, but a much too warm Southern Ocean. While sea ice concentration and extent have realistic values, the ice tends to be too thick along the Siberian coast. Transports through important straits have realistic values, but generally are at the lower end of the range of observational estimates. Exceptions are very narrow straits (Gibraltar, Bering) which are too wide due to the limited resolution. Consequently the modelled transports through them are too high. The strength of the Atlantic meridional overturning circulation is also at the lower end of observational estimates. The interannual variability of key variables and correlations between them are realistic in size and pattern. This is especially true for the variability of surface temperature in the tropical Pacific (El Nino). Overall the ocean component of EC-Earth performs well and helps making EC-Earth a reliable climate model. (orig.)

  4. Simple parameter estimation for complex models — Testing evolutionary techniques on 3-dimensional biogeochemical ocean models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattern, Jann Paul; Edwards, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    Parameter estimation is an important part of numerical modeling and often required when a coupled physical-biogeochemical ocean model is first deployed. However, 3-dimensional ocean model simulations are computationally expensive and models typically contain upwards of 10 parameters suitable for estimation. Hence, manual parameter tuning can be lengthy and cumbersome. Here, we present four easy to implement and flexible parameter estimation techniques and apply them to two 3-dimensional biogeochemical models of different complexities. Based on a Monte Carlo experiment, we first develop a cost function measuring the model-observation misfit based on multiple data types. The parameter estimation techniques are then applied and yield a substantial cost reduction over ∼ 100 simulations. Based on the outcome of multiple replicate experiments, they perform on average better than random, uninformed parameter search but performance declines when more than 40 parameters are estimated together. Our results emphasize the complex cost function structure for biogeochemical parameters and highlight dependencies between different parameters as well as different cost function formulations.

  5. A survey of models for the prediction of ambient ocean noise: Circa 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doolittle, R.

    1996-01-01

    The state of the art of model development for application to computer studies of undersea search systems utilizing acoustics is surveyed in this document. Due to the demands for surveillance of submarines operating in ocean basins, the development of noise models for application in deep oceans is fairly advanced and somewhat generic. This is due to the deep sound channel, discovered during World War II, which when present allows for long-range sound propagation with little or no interaction with the bottom. Exceptions to this channel, also well understood, are found in both the high latitudes where the sound is upward refracting and in tropical ocean areas with downward refracting sound transmission. The controlling parameter is the sound speed as a function of depth within the ocean, the sound speed profile. When independent of range, this profile may be converted to a noise-versus-depth profile with well-validated consequences for deep-ocean ambient noise. When considering ocean areas of shallow water, the littoral regions, the idea of a genenic ocean channel advisedly is abandoned. The locally unique nature of both the noise production mechanisms and of the channel carrying the sound, obviates the generic treatment. Nevertheless, idealizations of this case exist and promote the understanding if not the exact predictability of the statistics of shallow water ambient noise. Some examples of these models are given in this document.

  6. Bioavailable atmospheric phosphorous supply to the global ocean: a 3-D global modeling study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myriokefalitakis, Stelios; Nenes, Athanasios; Baker, Alex R.; Mihalopoulos, Nikolaos; Kanakidou, Maria

    2016-12-01

    The atmospheric cycle of phosphorus (P) is parameterized here in a state-of-the-art global 3-D chemistry transport model, taking into account primary emissions of total P (TP) and soluble P (DP) associated with mineral dust, combustion particles from natural and anthropogenic sources, bioaerosols, sea spray and volcanic aerosols. For the present day, global TP emissions are calculated to be roughly 1.33 Tg-P yr-1, with the mineral sources contributing more than 80 % to these emissions. The P solubilization from mineral dust under acidic atmospheric conditions is also parameterized in the model and is calculated to contribute about one-third (0.14 Tg-P yr-1) of the global DP atmospheric source. To our knowledge, a unique aspect of our global study is the explicit modeling of the evolution of phosphorus speciation in the atmosphere. The simulated present-day global annual DP deposition flux is 0.45 Tg-P yr-1 (about 40 % over oceans), showing a strong spatial and temporal variability. Present-day simulations of atmospheric P aerosol concentrations and deposition fluxes are satisfactory compared with available observations, indicating however an underestimate of about 70 % on current knowledge of the sources that drive the P atmospheric cycle. Sensitivity simulations using preindustrial (year 1850) anthropogenic and biomass burning emission scenarios showed a present-day increase of 75 % in the P solubilization flux from mineral dust, i.e., the rate at which P is converted into soluble forms, compared to preindustrial times, due to increasing atmospheric acidity over the last 150 years. Future reductions in air pollutants due to the implementation of air-quality regulations are expected to decrease the P solubilization flux from mineral dust by about 30 % in the year 2100 compared to the present day. Considering, however, that all the P contained in bioaerosols is readily available for uptake by marine organisms, and also accounting for all other DP sources, a total

  7. Ocean-Atmosphere Coupled Model Simulations of Precipitation in the Central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Stephen D.; Mohr, Karen I.

    2015-01-01

    The meridional extent and complex orography of the South American continent contributes to a wide diversity of climate regimes ranging from hyper-arid deserts to tropical rainforests to sub-polar highland regions. In addition, South American meteorology and climate are also made further complicated by ENSO, a powerful coupled ocean-atmosphere phenomenon. Modelling studies in this region have typically resorted to either atmospheric mesoscale or atmosphere-ocean coupled global climate models. The latter offers full physics and high spatial resolution, but it is computationally inefficient typically lack an interactive ocean, whereas the former offers high computational efficiency and ocean-atmosphere coupling, but it lacks adequate spatial and temporal resolution to adequate resolve the complex orography and explicitly simulate precipitation. Explicit simulation of precipitation is vital in the Central Andes where rainfall rates are light (0.5-5 mm hr-1), there is strong seasonality, and most precipitation is associated with weak mesoscale-organized convection. Recent increases in both computational power and model development have led to the advent of coupled ocean-atmosphere mesoscale models for both weather and climate study applications. These modelling systems, while computationally expensive, include two-way ocean-atmosphere coupling, high resolution, and explicit simulation of precipitation. In this study, we use the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere-Wave-Sediment Transport (COAWST), a fully-coupled mesoscale atmosphere-ocean modeling system. Previous work has shown COAWST to reasonably simulate the entire 2003-2004 wet season (Dec-Feb) as validated against both satellite and model analysis data when ECMWF interim analysis data were used for boundary conditions on a 27-9-km grid configuration (Outer grid extent: 60.4S to 17.7N and 118.6W to 17.4W).

  8. Projections of oceanic N2O emissions in the 21st century using the IPSL Earth system model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Rey, J.; Bopp, L.; Gehlen, M.; Tagliabue, A.; Gruber, N.

    2015-07-01

    The ocean is a substantial source of nitrous oxide (N2O) to the atmosphere, but little is known about how this flux might change in the future. Here, we investigate the potential evolution of marine N2O emissions in the 21st century in response to anthropogenic climate change using the global ocean biogeochemical model NEMO-PISCES. Assuming nitrification as the dominant N2O formation pathway, we implemented two different parameterizations of N2O production which differ primarily under low-oxygen (O2) conditions. When forced with output from a climate model simulation run under the business-as-usual high-CO2 concentration scenario (RCP8.5), our simulations suggest a decrease of 4 to 12 % in N2O emissions from 2005 to 2100, i.e., a reduction from 4.03/3.71 to 3.54/3.56 TgN yr-1 depending on the parameterization. The emissions decrease strongly in the western basins of the Pacific and Atlantic oceans, while they tend to increase above the oxygen minimum zones (OMZs), i.e., in the eastern tropical Pacific and in the northern Indian Ocean. The reduction in N2O emissions is caused on the one hand by weakened nitrification as a consequence of reduced primary and export production, and on the other hand by stronger vertical stratification, which reduces the transport of N2O from the ocean interior to the ocean surface. The higher emissions over the OMZ are linked to an expansion of these zones under global warming, which leads to increased N2O production, associated primarily with denitrification. While there are many uncertainties in the relative contribution and changes in the N2O production pathways, the increasing storage seems unequivocal and determines largely the decrease in N2O emissions in the future. From the perspective of a global climate system, the averaged feedback strength associated with the projected decrease in oceanic N2O emissions amounts to around -0.009 W m-2 K-1, which is comparable to the potential increase from terrestrial N2O sources. However

  9. Dynamic energy budget modeling reveals the potential of future growth and calcification for the coccolithophore Emiliania huxleyi in an acidified ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, Erik B; Nisbet, Roger M

    2014-06-01

    Ocean acidification is likely to impact the calcification potential of marine organisms. In part due to the covarying nature of the ocean carbonate system components, including pH and CO2 and CO3(2-) levels, it remains largely unclear how each of these components may affect calcification rates quantitatively. We develop a process-based bioenergetic model that explains how several components of the ocean carbonate system collectively affect growth and calcification rates in Emiliania huxleyi, which plays a major role in marine primary production and biogeochemical carbon cycling. The model predicts that under the IPCC A2 emission scenario, its growth and calcification potential will have decreased by the end of the century, although those reductions are relatively modest. We anticipate that our model will be relevant for many other marine calcifying organisms, and that it can be used to improve our understanding of the impact of climate change on marine systems.

  10. Cloud-radiative effects on implied oceanic energy transport as simulated by atmospheric general circulation models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleckler, P. J.; Randall, D. A.; Boer, G.; Colman, R.; Dix, M.; Galin, V.; Helfand, M.; Kiehl, J.; Kitoh, A.; Lau, W.

    1995-01-01

    This paper summarizes the ocean surface net energy flux simulated by fifteen atmospheric general circulation models constrained by realistically-varying sea surface temperatures and sea ice as part of the Atmospheric Model Intercomparison Project. In general, the simulated energy fluxes are within the very large observational uncertainties. However, the annual mean oceanic meridional heat transport that would be required to balance the simulated surface fluxes is shown to be critically sensitive to the radiative effects of clouds, to the extent that even the sign of the Southern Hemisphere ocean heat transport can be affected by the errors in simulated cloud-radiation interactions. It is suggested that improved treatment of cloud radiative effects should help in the development of coupled atmosphere-ocean general circulation models.

  11. Modelling the CO2 atmosphere-ocean flux in the upwelling zones using radiative transfer tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapivin, Vladimir F.; Varotsos, Costas A.

    2016-12-01

    An advanced mathematical model of the radiation forcing on the ocean surface is proposed for the assessment of the CO2 fluxes between atmosphere and ocean boundary in the upwelling zones. Two types of the upwelling are considered: coastal and local in the open ocean that are closely associated with changes in solar irradiance. The proposed model takes into account the maximal number of the carbon fluxes in the upwelling ecosystem considering that in the latter the only original source of energy and matter for all forms of life is the energy of the solar radiation. The vertical structure of the upwelling zone is represented by four levels: the upper mixed layer above the thermocline, the intermediate photic layer below the thermocline, the deep ocean and the near-bottom layer. Peruvian upwelling and typical local upwelling of tropical pelagic region are considered as examples for the model calculations.

  12. Models for integrating rehabilitation and primary care: a scoping study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McColl, Mary Ann; Shortt, Samuel; Godwin, Marshall; Smith, Karen; Rowe, Kirby; O'Brien, Patti; Donnelly, Catherine

    2009-09-01

    To describe the scope and breadth of knowledge currently available regarding the integration of rehabilitation and primary care services. Peer-reviewed journals were searched using CINAHL, MEDLINE, and EBM Reviews for the years 1995 through 2007. This process identified 172 items. To be considered for the subsequent review, the article had to describe a service delivery program that offered primary care and rehabilitation, or services specifically designed for people with chronic conditions/disabilities. Further, it had to be available in English or French. No methodological limitations were applied to screen for levels of evidence. Based on these criteria, 38 articles remained that pertained to both primary care and rehabilitation. These were reviewed, sorted, and categorized to discover commonalities and differences among the approaches used to integrating rehabilitation into primary care. In consultation with the team of investigators, it was determined that there were 6 different models for providing primary health care and rehabilitation services in an integrated approach: clinic, outreach, self-management, community-based rehabilitation, shared care, and case management. In addition, a number of themes were identified across models that may act as either supports or impediments to the integration of rehabilitation services into primary care settings: team approach, interprofessional trust, leadership, communication, compensation, accountability, referrals, and population-based approach. Rehabilitation providers interested in working in the primary care sector may be assisted in conceptualizing the benefits that they bring to the setting by considering these models and issues.

  13. Organic molecular composition of marine aerosols over the Arctic Ocean in summer: contributions of primary emission and secondary aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Q. Fu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Organic molecular composition of marine aerosol samples collected during the MALINA cruise in the Arctic Ocean was investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. More than 110 individual organic compounds were determined in the samples and were grouped into different compound classes based on the functionality and sources. The concentrations of total quantified organics ranged from 7.3 to 185 ng m−3 (mean 47.6 ng m−3, accounting for 1.8–11.0% (4.8% of organic carbon in the marine aerosols. Primary saccharides were found to be dominant organic compound class, followed by secondary organic aerosol (SOA tracers formed from the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs such as isoprene, α-pinene and β-caryophyllene. Mannitol, the specific tracer for airborne fungal spores, was detected as the most abundant organic species in the samples with a concentration range of 0.052–53.3 ng m−3 (9.2 ng m−3, followed by glucose, arabitol, and the isoprene oxidation products of 2-methyltetrols. Biomass burning tracers such as levoglucosan are evident in all samples with trace levels. On the basis of the tracer-based method for the estimation of fungal-spore OC and biogenic secondary organic carbon (SOC, we estimate that an average of 10.7% (up to 26.2% of the OC in the marine aerosols was due to the contribution of fungal spores, followed by the contribution of isoprene SOC (mean 3.8% and α-pinene SOC (2.9%. In contrast, only 0.19% of the OC was due to the photooxidation of β-caryophyllene. This study indicates that primary organic aerosols from biogenic emissions, both from long-range transport of mid-latitude aerosols and from sea-to-air emission of marine organics, as well as secondary organic aerosols formed from the photooxidation of biogenic VOCs are important factors controlling the organic chemical composition of marine aerosols in the Arctic Ocean.

  14. Organic molecular composition of marine aerosols over the Arctic Ocean in summer: contributions of primary emission and secondary aerosol formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Q. Fu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Organic molecular composition of marine aerosol samples collected during the MALINA cruise in the Arctic Ocean was investigated by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. More than 110 individual organic compounds were determined in the samples and were grouped into different compound classes based on the functionality and sources. The concentrations of total quantified organics ranged from 7.3 to 185 ng m−3 (mean 47.6 ng m−3, accounting for 1.8–11.0% (4.8% of organic carbon in the marine aerosols. Primary saccharides were found to be dominant organic compound class, followed by secondary organic aerosol (SOA tracers formed from the oxidation of biogenic volatile organic compounds (VOCs such as isoprene, α-pinene and β-caryophyllene. Mannitol, the specific tracer for airborne fungal spores, was detected as the most abundant organic species in the samples with a concentration range of 0.052–53.3 ng m−3 (9.2 ng m−3, followed by glucose, arabitol, and the isoprene oxidation products of 2-methyltetrols. Biomass burning tracers such as levoglucosan are evident in all samples with trace levels. On the basis of the tracer-based method for the estimation of fungal-spore OC and biogenic secondary organic carbon (SOC, we estimate that an average of 10.7% (up to 26.2% of the OC in the marine aerosols was due to the contribution of fungal spores, followed by the contribution of isoprene SOC (mean 3.8% and α-pinene SOC (2.9%. In contrast, only 0.19% of the OC was due to the photooxidation of β-caryophyllene. This study indicates that primary organic aerosols from biogenic emissions, both from long-range transport of mid-latitude aerosols and from sea-to-air emission of marine organics, as well as secondary organic aerosols formed from the photooxidation of biogenic VOCs are important factors controlling the organic chemical composition of marine aerosols in the Arctic Ocean.

  15. Bridging the gap from ocean models to population dynamics of large marine predators: A model of mid-trophic functional groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehodey, Patrick; Murtugudde, Raghu; Senina, Inna

    2010-01-01

    The modeling of mid-trophic organisms of the pelagic ecosystem is a critical step in linking the coupled physical-biogeochemical models to population dynamics of large pelagic predators. Here, we provide an example of a modeling approach with definitions of several pelagic mid-trophic functional groups. This application includes six different groups characterized by their vertical behavior, i.e., occurrence of diel migration between epipelagic, mesopelagic and bathypelagic layers. Parameterization of the dynamics of these components is based on a temperature-linked time development relationship. Estimated parameters of this relationship are close to those predicted by a model based on a theoretical description of the allocation of metabolic energy at the cellular level, and that predicts a species metabolic rate in terms of its body mass and temperature. Then, a simple energy transfer from primary production is used, justified by the existence of constant slopes in log-log biomass size spectrum relationships. Recruitment, ageing, mortality and passive transport with horizontal currents, taking into account vertical behavior of organisms, are modeled by a system of advection-diffusion-reaction equations. Temperature and currents averaged in each vertical layer are provided independently by an Ocean General Circulation Model and used to drive the mid-trophic level (MTL) model. Simulation outputs are presented for the tropical Pacific Ocean to illustrate how different temperature and oceanic circulation conditions result in spatial and temporal lags between regions of high primary production and regions of aggregation of mid-trophic biomass. Predicted biomasses are compared against available data. Data requirements to evaluate outputs of these types of models are discussed, as well as the prospects that they offer both for ecosystem models of lower and upper trophic levels.

  16. Multistatistics Metric Evaluation of Ocean General Circulation Model Sea Surface Temperature: Application of 0.08 deg Pacific Hybrid Coordinate Ocean Model Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    Joseph Metzger, Harley E. Hurlburt, Alan J. Wallcraft, 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 73-5732-18-5 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND...l029/ 2O07JCO04250. Large, W. G., J. C. McWilliams , and S. C. Doncy (1994), Oceanic vertical mixing: A review and a model with a nonlocal boundary

  17. A coupled ice-ocean model for the Bohai Sea Ⅰ.Study on model and parameter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Jie; WU Huiding; ZHANG Yunfei; LIU Qinzhen; BAI Shan

    2004-01-01

    According to the earlier international studies on the coupled ice-ocean model and the hydrology, meteorology, and ice features in the Bohai Sea, a coupled ice-ocean model is developed based on the National Marine Environment Forecast Center's (NMEFC) numerical forecasting ice model of the Bohai Sea and the Princeton ocean model (POM).In the coupled model, the transfer of momentum and heat between ocean and ice is two-way, and the change of ice thickness and concentration depends on heat budget not only at the surface and bottom of ice, but also at the surface of open water between ices. The dynamic and thermodynamic coupling process is expatiated emphatically. Some thermodynamic parameters are discussed as well.

  18. Anthropogenic Carbon Uptake in the Southern Ocean: Investigating the Spread Across Climate Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, C.; de Souza, G. F.; Frenger, I.; Morrison, A. K.; Sarmiento, J. L.

    2016-02-01

    Model- and data-based analyses indicate that up to 50% of the anthropogenic CO2 ab-sorbed by the ocean is taken up in the Southern Ocean south of 30 °S. Recent syntheses basedon CMIP5 models show that much of these models' spread in anthropogenic CO2 uptake isthe result of disagreement within the Southern Ocean. The reasons for this disagreementremain unclear. In this study, we hypothesize that the disagreement between CMIP5 modelsis mainly due to ocean circulation, and more speci cally to the upwelling of deep waters un-contaminated with anthropogenic CO2 at the Antarctic Divergence. To test this hypothesis,we divided the Southern Ocean into four provinces, determined by the underlying mechanismof anthropogenic CO2 uptake. The "upwelling" province is dominated by the upwelling ofdeep water uncontaminated with anthropogenic CO2; the "WBC" province is dominated bythe cooling of subtropical waters transported southward by Western Boundary Currents; the"mixed layer" province is dominated by a combination of the above two mechanisms andcoincides with winter deep mixed layers; finally the "convection" province is dominated byopen-ocean deep convection associated with polynyas. We explored the diff erent provincesacross a suite of climate models that consists of (1) a subset of CMIP5 models and (2) threeGFDL climate models which only diff er by the resolution of their ocean (1° , 0.25° and 0.1 °).The anthropogenic CO2 is calculated from the diff erence between an idealized climate changesimulation and a preindustrial control simulation. For each province, we compared the an-thropogenic CO2 sink across the models. We found that the upwelling province consistentlyshows the most intense sink across the models, and it is also where models tend to disagree themost. We also found that increasing resolution decreases the uptake of anthropogenic CO2 inthe upwelling province.

  19. A model study of the first ventilated regime of the Arctic Ocean during the early Miocene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijoy Thompson

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The tectonic opening of Fram Strait during the Neogene was a significant geological event that transferred the Arctic Ocean from a poorly ventilated enclosed basin, with weak exchange with the North Atlantic, to a fully ventilated “ocean stage”. Previous tectonic and physical oceanographic analyses suggest that the early Miocene Fram Strait was likely several times narrower and less than half as deep as the present-day 400 km wide and 2550 m deep strait. Here we use an ocean general circulation model with a passive age tracer included to further address the effect of the Fram Strait opening on the early Miocene Arctic Ocean circulation. The model tracer age exhibits strong spatial gradient between the two major Arctic Ocean deep basins: the Eurasian and Amerasian basins. There is a two-layer stratification and the exchange flow through Fram Strait shows a bi-layer structure with a low salinity outflow from the Arctic confined to a relatively thin upper layer and a saline inflow from the North Atlantic below. Our study suggests that although Fram Strait was significantly narrower and shallower during early Miocene, and the ventilation mechanism quite different in our model, the estimated ventilation rates are comparable to the chemical tracer estimates in the present-day Arctic Ocean. Since we achieved ventilation of the Arctic Ocean with a prescribed Fram Strait width of 100 km and sill depth of 1000 m, ventilation may have preceded the timing of a full ocean depth connection between the Arctic Ocean and North Atlantic established through seafloor spreading and the development of the Lena Trough.

  20. A world ocean model for greenhouse sensitivity studies: Resolution intercomparison and the role of diagnostic forcing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Washington, W.M.; Meehl, G.A.; VerPlank, L.; Bettge, T.W. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1994-05-01

    This article documents the simulation capability of this improved 1{degrees} global ocean model, shows improvements over our earlier 5{degrees} version, and compares it to features simulated with a 0.5{degrees} model. These experiments use a model spin-up methodology whereby the ocean model can subsequently be coupled to an atmospheric model and used for order 100-year coupled model integrations. With present-day computers, 1{degrees} is a reasonable compromise in resolution that allows for century-long coupled experiments. The 1{degrees} ocean model is derived from a 0.5{degrees}-resolution model developed for studies of the global eddy-resolving world ocean circulation. The 0.5{degrees} bottom topography and continental outlines have been altered to be compatible with the 1{degrees} resolution and the Arctic Ocean has been added. Results show a dramatic intensification of the meridional overturning circulation (order of magnitude) with perpetual winter surface temperature forcing in the North Atlantic and strong intensification (factor of three) with perpetual early winter temperatures in that region. These effects are felt throughout the Atlantic (particularly an intensified and northward-shifted Gulf Stream outflow). In the Pacific, the temperature gradient strengthens in the thermocline, thus helping counter the systematic error of a thermocline that is too diffuse. 41 refs., 13 figs.