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Sample records for modeling microstructure development

  1. Modelling microstructural evolution under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tikare, V.

    2015-01-01

    Microstructural evolution of materials under irradiation is characterised by some unique features that are not typically present in other application environments. While much understanding has been achieved by experimental studies, the ability to model this microstructural evolution for complex materials states and environmental conditions not only enhances understanding, it also enables prediction of materials behaviour under conditions that are difficult to duplicate experimentally. Furthermore, reliable models enable designing materials for improved engineering performance for their respective applications. Thus, development and application of mesoscale microstructural model are important for advancing nuclear materials technologies. In this chapter, the application of the Potts model to nuclear materials will be reviewed and demonstrated, as an example of microstructural evolution processes. (author)

  2. Microstructure modeling in weld metal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    David, S.A.; Babu, S.S.

    1995-01-01

    Since microstructure development in the weld metal region is controlled by various physical processes, there is a need for integrated predictive models based on fundamental principles to describe and predict the effect of these physical processes. These integrated models should be based on various tools available for modeling microstructure development in a wide variety of alloy systems and welding processes. In this paper, the principles, methodology, and future directions of modeling thermochemical reactions in liquid, solidification, and solid state transformations are discussed with some examples for low-alloy steel, stainless steel, and Ni-base superalloy. Thermochemical deoxidation reactions in liquid low-alloy steel lead to oxide inclusion formation. This inclusion formation has been modeled by combining principles of ladle metallurgy and overall transformation kinetics. The model's comparison with the experimental data and the ongoing work on coupling this inclusion model with the numerical models of heat transfer and fluid flow are discussed. Also, recent advances in theoretical and physical modeling of the solidification process are reviewed with regard to predicting the solidification modes, grain structure development, segregation effects, and nonequilibrium solidification in welds. The effects of solid state phase transformations on microstructure development and various methods of modeling these transformations are reviewed. Successful models, based on diffusion-controlled growth and plate growth theories, on microstructure development in low-alloy steel and stainless steel weld metals are outlined. This paper also addresses the importance of advanced analytical techniques to understand the solid state transformation mechanisms in welds

  3. Recrystallization microstructure modelling from superimposed ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The recovered cold rolled microstructure obtained from orientation image microstructure of Al–4%Mg–0.5%Mn alloy (AA5182 alloy) was superimposed on the grid of cellular automata based microstructure model. The Taylor factors of deformed/cold rolled orientations were considered as the driving force for recrystallization.

  4. Solidification microstructure development

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. In the present article, evolution of microstructure during solidi- fication, as a function of various parameters, is discussed. Macrosegregation is described as being due to insufficient diffusivity of solute in the solid. Pattern formation is discussed in the light of instabilities at the solidification growth front. An overview of ...

  5. Microstructure Modeling of Third Generation Disk Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Herng-Jeng

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this program was to model, validate, and predict the precipitation microstructure evolution, using PrecipiCalc (QuesTek Innovations LLC) software, for 3rd generation Ni-based gas turbine disc superalloys during processing and service, with a set of logical and consistent experiments and characterizations. Furthermore, within this program, the originally research-oriented microstructure simulation tool was to be further improved and implemented to be a useful and user-friendly engineering tool. In this report, the key accomplishments achieved during the third year (2009) of the program are summarized. The activities of this year included: Further development of multistep precipitation simulation framework for gamma prime microstructure evolution during heat treatment; Calibration and validation of gamma prime microstructure modeling with supersolvus heat treated LSHR; Modeling of the microstructure evolution of the minor phases, particularly carbides, during isothermal aging, representing the long term microstructure stability during thermal exposure; and the implementation of software tools. During the research and development efforts to extend the precipitation microstructure modeling and prediction capability in this 3-year program, we identified a hurdle, related to slow gamma prime coarsening rate, with no satisfactory scientific explanation currently available. It is desirable to raise this issue to the Ni-based superalloys research community, with hope that in future there will be a mechanistic understanding and physics-based treatment to overcome the hurdle. In the mean time, an empirical correction factor was developed in this modeling effort to capture the experimental observations.

  6. ON MODELLING OF MICROSTRUCTURE FORMATION, LOCAL MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND STRESS – STRAIN DEVELOPMENT IN ALUMINIUM CASTINGS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svensson, Ingvar; Seifeddine, Salem; Kotas, Petr

    2009-01-01

    inherently affects the component’s properties depending on design, metallurgy and casting method. The wall thickness influences the coarseness of the microstructure and the material will have properties depending on the local metallurgical and thermal histories. This is independent on the material, i......, related to mechanical properties as elastic modulus, yield stress, ultimate strength and elongation. In the present work, a test case of a complex casting in an aluminium alloy is considered including simulation of the entire casting process with focus on of microstructure formation, related to mechanical...... properties as elastic modulus, yield stress, ultimate strength and elongation as well as residual stresses. Subsequently, the casting is subject to service loads and the results of this analysis are discussed in relation to the predicted local properties as well as the residual stresses originating from...

  7. A New Microstructure Development Model for the Evaluation of Concrete Setting Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho-Jin Cho

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete is an exceptionally attractive construction material, with stable material supply, adequate fire resistance, and high durability. Its plasticity can be both an advantage and a disadvantage from an engineering point of view, providing versatile shapes via casting and hardening but also requiring a relatively long period of time to reach its design strength. The setting time, or hardening period, needed before the freshly poured concrete can carry a load, which begins once the hydration reaction has commenced, is a key parameter for durability since it directly affects cracking resistance in early-aged concrete. The new analysis technique for calculating setting time that was developed for this study utilizes both percolation theory and the strength development model. To verify the analytical results obtained using the new model, a critical volume ratio of hydrates was determined and a series of final setting times in concrete were experimentally investigated for different temperatures, mineral admixtures (FA: fly ash; GGBFS: ground granulated blast furnace slag, and a chemical admixture (superplasticizer. The results were found to be in good agreement with the model predictions, confirming its potential utility.

  8. Modeling the Microstructural Evolution During Constrained Sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Pryds, Nini

    2015-01-01

    A numerical model able to simulate solid-state constrained sintering is presented. The model couples an existing kinetic Monte Carlo model for free sintering with a finite element model (FEM) for calculating stresses on a microstructural level. The microstructural response to the local stress as ...

  9. Modeling the microstructural evolution during constrained sintering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Frandsen, Henrik Lund; Tikare, V.

    A numerical model able to simulate solid state constrained sintering of a powder compact is presented. The model couples an existing kinetic Monte Carlo (kMC) model for free sintering with a finite element (FE) method for calculating stresses on a microstructural level. The microstructural respon...

  10. Development of a methodology for microstructural description

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanderley de Vasconcelos

    1999-07-01

    Full Text Available A systematic methodology for microstructural description can help the task of obtaining the processing x microstructure x properties x performance relationships. There are, however, some difficulties in performing this task, which are related mainly to the following three factors: the complexity of the interactions between microstructural features; difficulties in evaluating geometric parameters of microstructural features; and difficulties in relating these geometric parameters to process variables. To solve some of these problems, it is proposed a methodology that embodies the following features: takes into account the different possible types of approaches for the microstructural description problem; includes concepts and tools of Total Quality Management; is supported on techniques of system analysis; and makes use of computer modeling and simulation and statistical design of experiments tools. The methodology was applied on evaluating some topological parameters during sintering process and its results were compared with available experimental data.

  11. Quantitative interface models for simulating microstructure evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, J.Z.; Wang, T.; Zhou, S.H.; Liu, Z.K.; Chen, L.Q.

    2004-01-01

    To quantitatively simulate microstructural evolution in real systems, we investigated three different interface models: a sharp-interface model implemented by the software DICTRA and two diffuse-interface models which use either physical order parameters or artificial order parameters. A particular example is considered, the diffusion-controlled growth of a γ ' precipitate in a supersaturated γ matrix in Ni-Al binary alloys. All three models use the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters from the same databases. The temporal evolution profiles of composition from different models are shown to agree with each other. The focus is on examining the advantages and disadvantages of each model as applied to microstructure evolution in alloys

  12. Linking Experimental Characterization and Computational Modeling in Microstructural Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, Melik Cumhar [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    It is known that by controlling microstructural development, desirable properties of materials can be achieved. The main objective of our research is to understand and control interface dominated material properties, and finally, to verify experimental results with computer simulations. In order to accomplish this objective, we studied the grain growth in detail with experimental techniques and computational simulations. We obtained 5170-grain data from an Aluminum-film (120μm thick) with a columnar grain structure from the Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Experimentally obtained starting microstructure and grain boundary properties are input for the three-dimensional grain growth simulation. In the computational model, minimization of the interface energy is the driving force for the grain boundary motion. The computed evolved microstructure is compared with the final experimental microstructure, after annealing at 550 ºC. Two different measures were introduced as methods of comparing experimental and computed microstructures. Modeling with anisotropic mobility explains a significant amount of mismatch between experiment and isotropic modeling. We have shown that isotropic modeling has very little predictive value. Microstructural evolution in columnar Aluminum foils can be correctly modeled with anisotropic parameters. We observed a strong similarity between grain growth experiments and anisotropic three-dimensional simulations.

  13. Linking Experimental Characterization and Computational Modeling in Microstructural Evolution

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demirel, Melik Cumhur [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2002-06-01

    It is known that by controlling microstructural development, desirable properties of materials can be achieved. The main objective of our research is to understand and control interface dominated material properties, and finally, to verify experimental results with computer simulations. In order to accomplish this objective, we studied the grain growth in detail with experimental techniques and computational simulations. We obtained 5170-grain data from an Aluminum-film (120μm thick) with a columnar grain structure from the Electron Backscattered Diffraction (EBSD) measurements. Experimentally obtained starting microstructure and grain boundary properties are input for the three-dimensional grain growth simulation. In the computational model, minimization of the interface energy is the driving force for the grain boundary motion. The computed evolved microstructure is compared with the final experimental microstructure, after annealing at 550 ºC. Two different measures were introduced as methods of comparing experimental and computed microstructures. Modeling with anisotropic mobility explains a significant amount of mismatch between experiment and isotropic modeling. We have shown that isotropic modeling has very little predictive value. Microstructural evolution in columnar Aluminum foils can be correctly modeled with anisotropic parameters. We observed a strong similarity

  14. Modeling Percolation in Polymer Nanocomposites by Stochastic Microstructuring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matias Soto

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available A methodology was developed for the prediction of the electrical properties of carbon nanotube-polymer nanocomposites via Monte Carlo computational simulations. A two-dimensional microstructure that takes into account waviness, fiber length and diameter distributions is used as a representative volume element. Fiber interactions in the microstructure are identified and then modeled as an equivalent electrical circuit, assuming one-third metallic and two-thirds semiconductor nanotubes. Tunneling paths in the microstructure are also modeled as electrical resistors, and crossing fibers are accounted for by assuming a contact resistance associated with them. The equivalent resistor network is then converted into a set of linear equations using nodal voltage analysis, which is then solved by means of the Gauss–Jordan elimination method. Nodal voltages are obtained for the microstructure, from which the percolation probability, equivalent resistance and conductivity are calculated. Percolation probability curves and electrical conductivity values are compared to those found in the literature.

  15. Modeling of Microstructure Evolution During Alloy Solidification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Mingfang; Pan, Shiyan; Sun, Dongke

    In recent years, considerable advances have been achieved in the numerical modeling of microstructure evolution during solidification. This paper presents the models based on the cellular automaton (CA) technique and lattice Boltzmann method (LBM), which can reproduce a wide variety of solidification microstructure features observed experimentally with an acceptable computational efficiency. The capabilities of the models are addressed by presenting representative examples encompassing a broad variety of issues, such as the evolution of dendritic structure and microsegregation in two and three dimensions, dendritic growth in the presence of convection, divorced eutectic solidification of spheroidal graphite irons, and gas porosity formation. The simulations offer insights into the underlying physics of microstructure formation during alloy solidification.

  16. Metal-Matrix Composites and Porous Materials: Constitute Models, Microstructure Evolution and Applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Castafieda, P

    2000-01-01

    Constitutive models were developed and implemented numerically to account for the evolution of microstructure and anisotropy in finite-deformation processes involving porous and composite materials...

  17. Modeling of microstructure property relationships in titanium-aluminum-vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiley, Jaimie Scott

    Fuzzy logic neural network models were developed to predict the room temperature tensile behavior of Ti-6Al-4V. This involved the development of a database relating microstructure to properties. This necessitated establishing heat treatment processes to develop microstructural features, mechanical testing of samples, creating rigorous stereology procedures, developing numerical models to predict mechanical behavior, and determining trends and inter-relationships relating microstructural features to mechanical properties. Microstructural features were developed using a Gleeble(TM) 1500 Thermal-mechanical simulator. Samples were obtained from mill annealed plate material and both alpha + beta forged and beta forged materials. A total of 72 samples were beta solutionized and heat treated using different heating and cooling conditions. Rigorous stereology procedures were developed to characterize the important microstructural features. The features included Widmanstatten alpha lath thickness, volume fraction of total alpha, volume fraction of Widmanstatten alpha, grain boundary alpha thickness, mean edge length, colony scale factor, and prior beta grain size factor. Chemical composition was also determined using standard chemical analysis and microscopy techniques. The samples were tested for yield strength, ultimate tensile strength, and elongation at room temperature. Results from the tests and the characterization were used to develop fuzzy logic neural network models to predict the mechanical behaviors and develop relationships between the microstructural features (using CubiCalc RTC(TM)). Results were compared to standard multi-variable regression models. The fuzzy logic neural network models were able to predict the yield, and ultimate tensile strength, within acceptable error ranges with a limited number of input data samples. The models also predicted the elongation values but with larger errors. Of particular importance, the models identified the importance of

  18. Fatigue modeling of materials with complex microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2011-01-01

    with the phenomenological model of fatigue damage growth. As a result, the fatigue lifetime of materials with complex structures can be determined as a function of the parameters of their structures. As an example, the fatigue lifetimes of wood modeled as a cellular material with multilayered, fiber reinforced walls were...... determined for different parameters of wood microstructures. In so doing, 3D hierarchical finite element models of softwood, and a computational technique, including the repeating restart and model change procedures, have been employed to model the fatigue response of latewood....

  19. Molecular modeling of the microstructure evolution during carbon fiber processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Saaketh; Li, Chunyu; Shen, Tongtong; Strachan, Alejandro

    2017-12-01

    The rational design of carbon fibers with desired properties requires quantitative relationships between the processing conditions, microstructure, and resulting properties. We developed a molecular model that combines kinetic Monte Carlo and molecular dynamics techniques to predict the microstructure evolution during the processes of carbonization and graphitization of polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers. The model accurately predicts the cross-sectional microstructure of the fibers with the molecular structure of the stabilized PAN fibers and physics-based chemical reaction rates as the only inputs. The resulting structures exhibit key features observed in electron microcopy studies such as curved graphitic sheets and hairpin structures. In addition, computed X-ray diffraction patterns are in good agreement with experiments. We predict the transverse moduli of the resulting fibers between 1 GPa and 5 GPa, in good agreement with experimental results for high modulus fibers and slightly lower than those of high-strength fibers. The transverse modulus is governed by sliding between graphitic sheets, and the relatively low value for the predicted microstructures can be attributed to their perfect longitudinal texture. Finally, the simulations provide insight into the relationships between chemical kinetics and the final microstructure; we observe that high reaction rates result in porous structures with lower moduli.

  20. Microstructural Development in Al-Si Powder During Rapid Solidification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Genau, Amber Lynn [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2004-01-01

    Powder metallurgy has become an increasingly important form of metal processing because of its ability to produce materials with superior mechanical properties. These properties are due in part to the unique and often desirable microstructures which arise as a result of the extreme levels of undercooling achieved, especially in the finest size powder, and the subsequent rapid solidification which occurs. A better understanding of the fundamental processes of nucleation and growth is required to further exploit the potential of rapid solidification processing. Aluminum-silicon, an alloy of significant industrial importance, was chosen as a model for simple eutectic systems displaying an unfaceted/faceted interface and skewed coupled eutectic growth zone, Al-Si powder produced by high pressure gas atomization was studied to determine the relationship between microstructure and alloy composition as a function of powder size and atomization gas. Critical experimental measurements of hypereutectic (Si-rich) compositions were used to determine undercooling and interface velocity, based on the theoretical models which are available. Solidification conditions were analyzed as a function of particle diameter and distance from nucleation site. A revised microstructural map is proposed which allows the prediction of particle morphology based on temperature and composition. It is hoped that this work, by providing enhanced understanding of the processes which govern the development of the solidification morphology of gas atomized powder, will eventually allow for better control of processing conditions so that particle microstructures can be optimized for specific applications.

  1. Microstructure based hygromechanical modelling of deformation of fruit tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abera, M. K.; Wang, Z.; Verboven, P.; Nicolai, B.

    2017-10-01

    Quality parameters such as firmness and susceptibility to mechanical damage are affected by the mechanical properties of fruit tissue. Fruit tissue is composed of turgid cells that keep cell walls under tension, and intercellular gas spaces where cell walls of neighboring cells have separated. How the structure and properties of these complex microstructures are affecting tissue mechanics is difficult to unravel experimentally. In this contribution, a modelling methodology is presented to calculate the deformation of apple fruit tissue affected by differences in structure and properties of cells and cell walls. The model can be used to perform compression experiments in silico using a hygromechanical model that computes the stress development and water loss during tissue deformation, much like in an actual compression test. The advantage of the model is that properties and structure can be changed to test the influence on the mechanical deformation process. The effect of microstructure, turgor pressure, cell membrane permeability, wall thickness and damping) on the compressibility of the tissue was simulated. Increasing the turgor pressure and thickness of the cell walls results in increased compression resistance of apple tissue increases, as do decreasing cell size and porosity. Geometric variability of the microstructure of tissues plays a major role, affecting results more than other model parameters. Different fruit cultivars were compared, and it was demonstrated, that microstructure variations within a cultivar are so large that interpretation of cultivar-specific effects is difficult.

  2. Discrete element modeling of microstructure of nacre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Mei Qiang; Cheng, Jing-Ru C.

    2018-04-01

    The microstructure of nacre consists of polygon-shaped aragonite mineral tablets bonded by very thin layers of organic materials and is organized in a brick-mortar morphology. In this research, the discrete element method was utilized to model this structure. The aragonite mineral tablets were modeled with three-dimensional polygon particles generated by the Voronoi tessellation method to represent the Voronoi-like patterns of mineral tablets assembly observed in experiments. The organic matrix was modeled with a group of spring elements. The constitutive relations of the spring elements were inspired from the experimental results of organic molecules from the literature. The mineral bridges were modeled with simple elastic bonds with the parameters based on experimental data from the literature. The bulk stress-strain responses from the models agreed well with experimental results. The model results show that the mineral bridges play important roles in providing the stiffness and yield strength for the nacre, while the organic matrix in providing the ductility for the nacre. This work demonstrated the suitability of particle methods for modeling microstructures of nacre.

  3. Applications of a composite model of microstructural evolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stoller, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Near-term fusion reactors will have to be designed using radiation effects data from experiments conducted in fast fission reactors. These fast reactors generate atomic displacements at a rate similar to that expected in a DT fusion reactor first wall. However, the transmutant helium production in an austenitic stainless steel first wall will exceed that in fast reactor fuel cladding by about a factor of 30. Hence, the use of the fast reactor data will involve some extrapolation. A major goal of this work is to develop theoretical models of microstructural evolution to aid in this extrapolation. In the present work a detailed rate-theory-based model of microstructural evolution under fast neutron irradiation has been developed. The prominent new aspect of this model is a treatment of dislocation evolution in which Frank faulted loops nucleate, grow and unfault to provide a source for network dislocations while the dislocation network can be simultaneously annihilated by a climb/glide process. The predictions of this model compare very favorably with the observed dose and temperature dependence of these key microstructural features over a broad range. In addition, this new description of dislocation evolution has been coupled with a previously developed model of cavity evolution and good agreement has been obtained between the predictions of the composite model and fast reactor swelling data. The results from the composite model also reveal that the various components of the irradiation-induced microstructure evolve in a highly coupled manner. The predictions of the composite model are more sensitive to parametric variations than more simple models. Hence, its value as a tool in data analysis and extrapolation is enhanced

  4. Microstructure Modeling of 3rd Generation Disk Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Herng-Jeng

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this program is to model, validate, and predict the precipitation microstructure evolution, using PrecipiCalc (QuesTek Innovations LLC) software, for 3rd generation Ni-based gas turbine disc superalloys during processing and service, with a set of logical and consistent experiments and characterizations. Furthermore, within this program, the originally research-oriented microstructure simulation tool will be further improved and implemented to be a useful and user-friendly engineering tool. In this report, the key accomplishment achieved during the second year (2008) of the program is summarized. The activities of this year include final selection of multicomponent thermodynamics and mobility databases, precipitate surface energy determination from nucleation experiment, multiscale comparison of predicted versus measured intragrain precipitation microstructure in quench samples showing good agreement, isothermal coarsening experiment and interaction of grain boundary and intergrain precipitates, primary microstructure of subsolvus treatment, and finally the software implementation plan for the third year of the project. In the following year, the calibrated models and simulation tools will be validated against an independently developed experimental data set, with actual disc heat treatment process conditions. Furthermore, software integration and implementation will be developed to provide material engineers valuable information in order to optimize the processing of the 3rd generation gas turbine disc alloys.

  5. Robust and fast nonlinear optimization of diffusion MRI microstructure models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, R L; Fritz, F J; Tobisch, A; Goebel, R; Roebroeck, A

    2017-07-15

    Advances in biophysical multi-compartment modeling for diffusion MRI (dMRI) have gained popularity because of greater specificity than DTI in relating the dMRI signal to underlying cellular microstructure. A large range of these diffusion microstructure models have been developed and each of the popular models comes with its own, often different, optimization algorithm, noise model and initialization strategy to estimate its parameter maps. Since data fit, accuracy and precision is hard to verify, this creates additional challenges to comparability and generalization of results from diffusion microstructure models. In addition, non-linear optimization is computationally expensive leading to very long run times, which can be prohibitive in large group or population studies. In this technical note we investigate the performance of several optimization algorithms and initialization strategies over a few of the most popular diffusion microstructure models, including NODDI and CHARMED. We evaluate whether a single well performing optimization approach exists that could be applied to many models and would equate both run time and fit aspects. All models, algorithms and strategies were implemented on the Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) to remove run time constraints, with which we achieve whole brain dataset fits in seconds to minutes. We then evaluated fit, accuracy, precision and run time for different models of differing complexity against three common optimization algorithms and three parameter initialization strategies. Variability of the achieved quality of fit in actual data was evaluated on ten subjects of each of two population studies with a different acquisition protocol. We find that optimization algorithms and multi-step optimization approaches have a considerable influence on performance and stability over subjects and over acquisition protocols. The gradient-free Powell conjugate-direction algorithm was found to outperform other common algorithms in terms of

  6. Modeling microstructural evolution of multiple texture components during recrystallization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandermeer, R.A.; Juul Jensen, D.

    1994-01-01

    Models were formulated in an effort to characterize recrystallization in materials with multiple texture components. The models are based on a microstructural path methodology (MPM). Experimentally the microstructural evolution of conmmercial aluminum during recrystallization was characterized...... using stereological point and lineal measurements of microstructural properties in combination with EBSP analysis for orientation determinations. The potential of the models to describe the observed recrystallization behavior of heavily cold-rolled commercial aluminum was demonstrated. A successful MPM...

  7. A tracer diffusion model derived from microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehikoinen, Jarmo; Muurinen, Arto; Olin, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Document available in extended abstract form only. Full text of publication follows: Numerous attempts have been made to explain the tracer diffusion of various solutes in compacted clays. These attempts have commonly suffered from an inability to describe the diffusion of uncharged and charged solutes with a single unified model. Here, an internally consistent approach to describing the diffusion of solutes in a heterogeneous porous medium, such as compacted bentonite, in terms of its microstructure is presented. The microstructure is taken to be represented by a succession of unit cells, which consist of two consecutive regions (Do, 1996). In the first region, the diffusion is viewed to occur in two parallel paths: one through microcrystalline units (micropores) and the other through meso-pores between the microcrystalline units. Solutes exiting these two paths are then joined together to continue diffusing through the second, disordered, region, connecting the two adjacent microcrystalline units. Adsorption (incl. co-ion exclusion) is thought to occur in the micropores, whereas meso-pores and the disordered region accommodate free species alone. Co-ions are also assumed to experience transfer resistance into and out of the micropores, which is characterized in the model by a transmission coefficient. Although the model is not new per se, its application to compacted clays has never been attempted before. It is shown that in the limit of strong adsorption, the effective diffusivity is limited from above only by the microstructural parameters of the model porous medium. As intuitive and logical as this result may appear, it has not been proven before. In the limit of vanishing disordered region, the effective diffusivity is no longer explicitly constrained by any of the model parameters. The tortuosity of the diffusion path, i.e. the quotient of the actual diffusion path length in the porous-medium coordinates and the characteristic length of the laboratory frame

  8. A microstructure-guided constitutive modeling approach for random heterogeneous materials: Application to structural binders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Sumanta; Maroli, Amit; Singh, Sudhanshu S.; Stannard, Tyler; Xiao, Xianghui; Chawla, Nikhilesh; Neithalath, Narayanan

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents a microstructure-guided modeling approach to predict the effective elastic response of heterogeneous materials, and demonstrates its application toward two highly heterogeneous, uncon- ventional structural binders, i.e., iron carbonate and fly ash geopolymer. Microstructural information from synchrotron X-ray tomography (XRT) and intrinsic elastic properties of component solid phases from statistical nanoindentation are used as the primary inputs. The virtual periodic 3D microstructure reconstructed using XRT, along with periodic boundary conditions is used as a basis for strain- controlled numerical simulation scheme in the linear elastic range to predict the elastic modulus as well as the stresses in the microstructural phases. The elastic modulus of the composite material predicted from the microstructure-based constitutive modeling approach correlates very well with experimental measurements for both the materials considered. This technique efficiently links the microstructure to mechanical properties of interest and helps develop material design guidelines for novel heterogeneous composites

  9. On the principles of microstructure scale development for titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolachev, B.A.; Mal'kov, A.V.; Gus'kova, L.N.

    1982-01-01

    Analysis of an existing standard scale of microstructures for two-phase (α+#betta#)-titanium alloy semiproducts is given. The basic principles of development of control microstructure scales for titanium alloys are presented on the base of investigations and generalization of literature data on connection of microstructure of titanium intermediate products from (α+#betta#)-alloys with their mechanical properties and service life characteristics. A possibilities of changing mechanical and operating properties at the expense of obtaining qualitatively and quantitatively regulated microstructure in the alloy are disclosed on the example of the (α+#betta#)-titanium alloy

  10. Phase-field modelling of microstructural evolution and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Jingzhi

    As one of the most powerful techniques in computational materials science, the diffuse-interface phase-field model has been widely employed for simulating various meso-scale microstructural evolution processes. The main purpose of this thesis is to develop a quantitative phase-field model for predicting microstructures and properties in real alloy systems which can be linked to existing thermodynamic/kinetic databases and parameters obtained from experimental measurements or first-principle calculations. To achieve this goal; many factors involved in complicated real systems are investigated, many of which are often simplified or ignored in existing models, e.g. the dependence of diffusional atomic mobility and elastic constants on composition. Efficient numerical techniques must be developed to solve those partial differential equations that are involved in modelling microstructural evolutions and properties. In this thesis, different spectral methods were proposed for the time-dependent phase-field kinetic equations and diffusion equations. For solving the elastic equilibrium equation with the consideration of elastic inhomogeneity, a conjugate gradient method was utilized. The numerical approaches developed were generally found to be more accurate and efficient than conventional approach such as finite difference method. A composition-dependent Cahn-Hilliard equation was solved by using a semi-implicit Fourier-spectral method. It was shown that the morphological evolutions in bulk-diffusion-controlled coarsening and interface-diffusion-controlled developed similar patterns and scaling behaviors. For bulk-diffusion-controlled coarsening, a cubic growth law was obeyed in the scaling regime, whereas a fourth power growth law was observed for interface-diffusion-controlled coarsening. The characteristics of a microstructure under the influence of elastic energy depend on elastic properties such as elastic anisotropy, lattice mismatch, elastic inhomogeneity and

  11. Development of microstructure in thermomechanical processing of zirconium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jha, S.K.; Saibaba, N.; Jayaraj, R.N.

    2009-01-01

    Zirconium based alloys are used for the manufacture of fuel tubes pressure tubes calandria tubes and other components of Pressurized Heavy Water Reactors (PHWRS). In single or two phase zirconium alloy system a variety of microstructure can be generated by suitable heat treatments by the process of equilibrium and non equilibrium phase transformations Microstructure can also be modified by alloying with α and β stabilizers. The microstructure in Zr alloys could be single hexagonal phase (α alloys) two phase bcc and hexagonal (α + β alloys) phase, single metastable martensitic microstructure and β with ω phase. The microstructural and micro textural evolution during thermo mechanical treatments depends strongly on such initial microstructure. Hot extrusion is a significant bulk deformation step which decides the initial microstructure of the alloy. It is carried out at elevated temperature i e above the recrystallization temperature, which enable imposition of large strains in single step. This deformation causes a significant change in the microstructure of the material and depends on extrusion process parameters such as temperature, strain rate (Ram speed), reduction ratio etc. In the present paper development of microstructures, microtexture and texture have been examined. An attempt is also made to optimise the hot working parameters for different Zirconium alloys with help of these studies. (author)

  12. Development of micro-structured heat exchangers; Developpement d'echangeurs de chaleur microstructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzon, C.

    2004-10-01

    This study has been carried out to defend the Technological Diploma of Research, in the aim to develop micro-structured heat exchangers. Realized within the Research Group on the Heat exchangers and Energy (GREThE) of the Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) of Grenoble. The rise of micro-technologies and the optimization of heat exchangers have led to emergence from few years of new structures of fluid paths with scales lower than the millimeter, thus making it possible to produce heat exchangers ultra-compacts. The micro-structured exchangers are heat exchangers whose hydraulic diameters are lower than the millimeter but with external dimensions of several centimeters. The study is based on two patents filed by the CEA and the characterization of these two geometries. A first concept of cross flow type finds applications with Gas/Liquid heat exchanger. A second type, a countercurrent, is more adapted to Liquid/Liquid applications. An approach with simplified analytical models and by numerical simulation was employed for each concept. An experimental study on the Gas/Liquid concept was also carried out. (author)

  13. Microstructural Modeling of Brittle Materials for Enhanced Performance and Reliability.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teague, Melissa Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Teague, Melissa Christine [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodgers, Theron [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Rodgers, Theron [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grutzik, Scott Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Grutzik, Scott Joseph [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meserole, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Meserole, Stephen [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Brittle failure is often influenced by difficult to measure and variable microstructure-scale stresses. Recent advances in photoluminescence spectroscopy (PLS), including improved confocal laser measurement and rapid spectroscopic data collection have established the potential to map stresses with microscale spatial resolution (%3C2 microns). Advanced PLS was successfully used to investigate both residual and externally applied stresses in polycrystalline alumina at the microstructure scale. The measured average stresses matched those estimated from beam theory to within one standard deviation, validating the technique. Modeling the residual stresses within the microstructure produced general agreement in comparison with the experimentally measured results. Microstructure scale modeling is primed to take advantage of advanced PLS to enable its refinement and validation, eventually enabling microstructure modeling to become a predictive tool for brittle materials.

  14. Microstructure - based continuum damage model for Asphalt mixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashman, Laith; Masad, Eyad; Zbib, Hussein; Kaloush, Kamil

    2002-01-01

    Full text.Hot mix asphalt (HMA) is a complex composite material that consists of different sizes of aggregates, asphalt binder and air voids. One of the most important failures in asphalt pavements is caused by permanent deformation under high service temperature. An HMA with high resistance to permanent deformation work-hardens under repeated loading with accumulating strain. However, HMA that is susceptible to permanenr deformation develop microcracks under repeated loading, which softens the mix and leads ao an increase in the rate of accumulated strain. Most of macroscopic response of HMA, assume isotropic material properties and do not account for the microscopic behavior. This study develops a viscoplastic constitutive model for asphalt mixtures that incorporates microstructure parameters. The model is based on Perzyna's elasto-viscoplastic theory. The viscous flow function is extended to reflect the microstructure anisotropy. In addition, a damage parameter is included in the model to reflect the initiation adn propagation of cracks. The model's parameters are obtained using image analysis procedures, static creep tests and strength tests. The model is used to describe the behavior of number of mixtures with known field performance

  15. Three-Dimensional Electromagnetic Mixing Models for Dual-Phase Steel Microstructures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weibin Zhou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Linking the ferrite fraction in a dual-phase (DP steel microstructure and its electromagnetic properties is critical in the effort to develop on-line measurement techniques for phase transformation using electromagnetic (EM sensors. This paper developed a seamlessly integrated method for generating 3D microstructures and evaluating their equivalent permeability values. Both the generation of 3D microstructures and evaluation of equivalent permeability have been achieved through custom modelling packages developed by the authors. Voronoi modelling based on the random close packing of spheres (RCPS-VM was used to precisely control the ferrite fraction in DP steel microstructure, and an equivalent uniform field method for 3D finite element simulation was developed for efficient analysis.

  16. Utilization of FEM model for steel microstructure determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kešner, A.; Chotěborský, R.; Linda, M.; Hromasová, M.

    2018-02-01

    Agricultural tools which are used in soil processing, they are worn by abrasive wear mechanism cases by hard minerals particles in the soil. The wear rate is influenced by mechanical characterization of tools material and wear rate is influenced also by soil mineral particle contents. Mechanical properties of steel can be affected by a technology of heat treatment that it leads to a different microstructures. Experimental work how to do it is very expensive and thanks to numerical methods like FEM we can assumed microstructure at low cost but each of numerical model is necessary to be verified. The aim of this work has shown a procedure of prediction microstructure of steel for agricultural tools. The material characterizations of 51CrV4 grade steel were used for numerical simulation like TTT diagram, heat capacity, heat conduction and other physical properties of material. A relationship between predicted microstructure by FEM and real microstructure after heat treatment shows a good correlation.

  17. Influence of copper content on microstructure development of AlSi9Cu3 alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brodarac Zovko Z.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure development and possible interaction of present elements have been determined in charge material of EN AlSi9Cu3 quality. Literature review enables prediction of solidification sequence. Modelling of equilibrium phase diagram for examined chemical composition has been performed, which enables determination of equilibrium solidification sequence. Microstructural investigation indicated distribution and morphology of particular phase. Metallographic analysis tools enable exact determination of microstructural constituents: matrix αAl, eutectic αAl+βSi, iron base intermetallic phase - Al5FeSi, Alx(Fe,MnyCuuSiw and/or Alx(Fe,MnyMgzCuuSiw and copper base phases in ternary eutectic morphology Al-Al2Cu-Si and in complex intermetallic ramified morphology Alx(Fe,MnyMgzSiuCuw. Microstructure development examination reveals potential differences due to copper content which is prerequisite for high values of final mechanical, physical and technological properties of cast products.

  18. A modelling approach to designing microstructures in thermal barrier coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gupta, M.; Nylen, P.; Wigren, J.

    2013-01-01

    Thermomechanical properties of Thermal Barrier Coatings (TBCs) are strongly influenced by coating defects, such as delaminations and pores, thus making it essential to have a fundamental understanding of microstructure-property relationships in TBCs to produce a desired coating. Object-Oriented Finite element analysis (OOF) has been shown previously as an effective tool for evaluating thermal and mechanical material behaviour, as this method is capable of incorporating the inherent material microstructure as input to the model. In this work, OOF was used to predict the thermal conductivity and effective Young's modulus of TBC topcoats. A Design of Experiments (DoE) was conducted by varying selected parameters for spraying Yttria-Stabilised Zirconia (YSZ) topcoat. The microstructure was assessed with SEM, and image analysis was used to characterize the porosity content. The relationships between microstructural features and properties predicted by modelling are discussed. The microstructural features having the most beneficial effect on properties were sprayed with a different spray gun so as to verify the results obtained from modelling. Characterisation of the coatings included microstructure evaluation, thermal conductivity and lifetime measurements. The modelling approach in combination with experiments undertaken in this study was shown to be an effective way to achieve coatings with optimised thermo-mechanical properties.

  19. Multiscale crystal defect dynamics: A coarse-grained lattice defect model based on crystal microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Dandan; Li, Shaofan

    2017-10-01

    Crystal defects have microstructure, and this microstructure should be related to the microstructure of the original crystal. Hence each type of crystals may have similar defects due to the same failure mechanism originated from the same microstructure, if they are under the same loading conditions. In this work, we propose a multiscale crystal defect dynamics (MCDD) model that models defects by considering its intrinsic microstructure derived from the microstructure or material genome of the original perfect crystal. The main novelties of present work are: (1) the discrete exterior calculus and algebraic topology theory are used to construct a scale-up (coarse-grained) dual lattice model for crystal defects, which may represent all possible defect modes inside a crystal; (2) a higher order Cauchy-Born rule (up to the fourth order) is adopted to construct atomistic-informed constitutive relations for various defect process zones, and (3) an hierarchical strain gradient theory based finite element formulation is developed to support an hierarchical multiscale cohesive (process) zone model for various defects in a unified formulation. The efficiency of MCDD computational algorithm allows us to simulate dynamic defect evolution at large scale while taking into account atomistic interaction. The MCDD model has been validated by comparing of the results of MCDD simulations with that of molecular dynamics (MD) in the cases of nanoindentation and uniaxial tension. Numerical simulations have shown that MCDD model can predict dislocation nucleation induced instability and inelastic deformation, and thus it may provide an alternative solution to study crystal plasticity.

  20. Developing 3D microstructures for tissue engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohanty, Soumyaranjan

    casting process to generate various large scale tissue engineering constructs with single pore geometry with the desired mechanical stiffness and porosity. In addition, a new technique was developed to fa bricate dual-pore scaffolds for various tissue-engineering applications where 3D printing...... of a hydrogel to create an additional interpenetrating network (IPN) of hydrogel nanodeposits. Biocompatible IPNs of silicone elastomer with poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) (pHEMA) and Poly(ethylene glycol) methylether acrylate (PEGMEA) hydrogel 3D scaffolds were produced in this way. The model drug...... of hiPSC-derived DE cells cultured for 25 days in a 3D perfusion bioreactor system with an array of 16 small-scale tissue-bioreactors with integrated dual-pore pore scaffolds and flow rates. Hepatic differentiation and functionality of hiPSC-derived hepatocytes were successfully assessed and compared...

  1. Microstructure and properties of sintered mullite developed from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dense mullite aggregates with 72% Al2O3 have been synthesized by reaction sintering of two varieties of Indian bauxite and silica sol. The bauxites used are of inferior grade with different levels of accessory impurities such as Fe2O3, TiO2, CaO. The phase and microstructure development of sintered samples were ...

  2. Modeling Microstructural Evolution During Dynamic Recrystallization of Alloy D9 Using Artificial Neural Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandal, Sumantra; Sivaprasad, P. V.; Dube, R. K.

    2007-12-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) model was developed to predict the microstructural evolution of a 15Cr-15Ni-2.2Mo-Ti modified austenitic stainless steel (Alloy D9) during dynamic recrystallization (DRX). The input parameters were strain, strain rate, and temperature whereas microstructural features namely, %DRX and average grain size were the output parameters. The ANN was trained with the database obtained from various industrial scale metal-forming operations like forge hammer, hydraulic press, and rolling carried out in the temperature range 1173-1473 K to various strain levels. The performance of the model was evaluated using a wide variety of statistical indices and the predictability of the model was found to be good. The combined influence of temperature and strain on microstructural features has been simulated employing the developed model. The results were found to be consistent with the relevant fundamental metallurgical phenomena.

  3. Microstructural Characterization and Modeling of SLM Superalloy 718

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tim M.; Sudbrack, Chantal K.; Bonacuse, Pete; Rogers, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Superalloy 718 is an excellent candidate for selective laser melting (SLM) fabrication due to a combination of excellent mechanical properties and workability. Predicting and validating the microstructure of SLM-fabricated Superalloy 718 after potential post heat-treatment paths is an important step towards producing components comparable to those made using conventional methods. At present, obtaining accurate volume fraction and size measurements of gamma-double-prime, gamma-prime and delta precipitates has been challenging due to their size, low volume fractions, and similar chemistries. A technique combining high resolution distortion corrected SEM imaging and with x-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy has been developed to accurately and independently measure the size and volume fractions of the three precipitates. These results were further validated using x-ray diffraction and phase extraction methods and compared to the precipitation kinetics predicted by PANDAT and JMatPro. Discrepancies are discussed in context of materials properties, model assumptions, sampling, and experimental errors.

  4. Modeling of fingerlike functionally graded microstructure piezoelectric actuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almajid, Abdulhakim; Hudnut, Steven W.; Taya, Minoru

    2000-06-01

    The mechanical behavior of a cylindrical, finger-like shaped, piezoelectric actuator with Functionally Graded Microstructure (FGM) was modeled by our analytical model and FEM. Different layers or lamina of different piezoelectric volume fraction in a polymer matrix were stacked to create FGM. Although the bimorph plate exhibit reasonably high out-of-plane displacement, induced stress field remains very high limiting its long life use. FGM piezoelectric plates have been developed to increase the out-of-plane displacement while reducing the stresses where the electro-elastic properties are graded through the plate thickness. Finger-like shape piezo actuators are developed where the properties are graded in the radial direction. FGM piezoelectric type actuator showed promising results in that the deflections to any direction can be obtained by manipulating the magnitude and direction of the applied electric field. Analytical modeling in computing the deflection of the finger-like actuator and stress field induced in each lamina was developed and compared to FEM modeling. The theory of cylindrical FGM is based on lamination theory in which the coordinate system is changed from the rectangular to cylindrical one and from infinite to finite plate.

  5. Recent Developments in Micro-Structured Fiber Optic Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanping Xu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments in fiber-optic sensing have involved booming research in the design and manufacturing of novel micro-structured optical fiber devices. From the conventional tapered fiber architectures to the novel micro-machined devices by advanced laser systems, thousands of micro-structured fiber-optic sensors have been proposed and fabricated for applications in measuring temperature, strain, refractive index (RI, electric current, displacement, bending, acceleration, force, rotation, acoustic, and magnetic field. The renowned and unparalleled merits of sensors-based micro-machined optical fibers including small footprint, light weight, immunity to electromagnetic interferences, durability to harsh environment, capability of remote control, and flexibility of directly embedding into the structured system have placed them in highly demand for practical use in diverse industries. With the rapid advancement in micro-technology, micro-structured fiber sensors have benefitted from the trends of possessing high performance, versatilities and spatial miniaturization. Here, we comprehensively review the recent progress in the micro-structured fiber-optic sensors with a variety of architectures regarding their fabrications, waveguide properties and sensing applications.

  6. Microstructural modelling of creep crack growth from a blunted crack

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Onck, P.R.; Giessen, E. van der

    1998-01-01

    The effect of crack tip blunting on the initial stages of creep crack growth is investigated by means of a planar microstructural model in which grains are represented discretely. The actual linking-up process of discrete microcracks with the macroscopic crack is simulated, with full account of the

  7. Domainal fabric development, associated microstructures and PT ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The granulite complex around Jenapore, Orissa, Eastern Ghats granulite belt, bears the imprint of two episodes of strong deformation (D1 and D2) attended with foliation (fabric) development (S1 and S2). Two distinct metamorphic events at P-T conditions of ∼900° C at ∼9 kbar and ∼600° C at ∼6 kbar are correlated with ...

  8. Microstructure Characterization and Modeling for Improved Electrode Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Kandler A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Usseglio Viretta, Francois L [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Graf, Peter A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Santhanagopalan, Shriram [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Pesaran, Ahmad A [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Yao, Koffi (Pierre) [Argonne National Laboratory; ; Dees, Dennis [Argonne National Laboratory; Jansen, Andy [Argonne National Laboratory; Mukherjee, Partha [Texas A& M University; Mistry, Aashutosh [Texas A& M University; Verma, Ankit [Texas A& M University

    2017-08-03

    This presentation describes research work led by NREL with team members from Argonne National Laboratory and Texas A&M University in microstructure analysis, modeling and validation under DOE's Computer-Aided Engineering of Batteries (CAEBAT) program. The goal of the project is to close the gaps between CAEBAT models and materials research by creating predictive models that can be used for electrode design.

  9. Stochastic model for the 3D microstructure of pristine and cyclically aged cathodes in Li-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchler, Klaus; Westhoff, Daniel; Feinauer, Julian; Mitsch, Tim; Manke, Ingo; Schmidt, Volker

    2018-04-01

    It is well-known that the microstructure of electrodes in lithium-ion batteries strongly affects their performance. Vice versa, the microstructure can exhibit strong changes during the usage of the battery due to aging effects. For a better understanding of these effects, mathematical analysis and modeling has turned out to be of great help. In particular, stochastic 3D microstructure models have proven to be a powerful and very flexible tool to generate various kinds of particle-based structures. Recently, such models have been proposed for the microstructure of anodes in lithium-ion energy and power cells. In the present paper, we describe a stochastic modeling approach for the 3D microstructure of cathodes in a lithium-ion energy cell, which differs significantly from the one observed in anodes. The model for the cathode data enhances the ideas of the anode models, which have been developed so far. It is calibrated using 3D tomographic image data from pristine as well as two aged cathodes. A validation based on morphological image characteristics shows that the model is able to realistically describe both, the microstructure of pristine and aged cathodes. Thus, we conclude that the model is suitable to generate virtual, but realistic microstructures of lithium-ion cathodes.

  10. Microstructural evolution modelling of low carbon steel sheets during continuous annealing. Prediction of the mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petite, M.M.; Monsalve, A.; Gutierrez, I.; Zaitegui, J.; Larburu, J.I.

    1998-01-01

    A model has been developed which allows the prediction of both, the evolution of the microstructure during continuous annealing and the final mechanical properties as a function of the steel composition, the variables defining the annealing cycle and those during hot and cold rolling. (Author) 10 refs

  11. Finite element modeling of grain size effects on the ultrasonic microstructural noise backscattering in polycrystalline materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, X; Tie, B; Schmitt, J-H; Aubry, D

    2018-07-01

    The correlation between ultrasonic wave propagation and polycrystalline microstructures has significant implications in nondestructive evaluation. An original numerical approach using the finite element method to quantify in both time and frequency domains the ultrasonic noise scattering due to the elastic heterogeneity of polycrystalline microstructures is presented. Based on the reciprocity theorem, it allows the scattering evaluation using mechanical data recorded only on the boundary of polycrystal instead of within its volume and is applicable to any polycrystalline aggregate regardless of its crystallographic or morphological characteristics. Consequently it gives a more realistic and accurate access of polycrystalline microstructures than the classical analytical models developed under the assumption of single scattering and the Born approximation. The numerical approach is proposed within the same unified theoretical framework as the classical analytical models, so it is possible to validate it in the cases of idealized microstructures for which the considered analytical models remain relevant. As an original result, assuming single phase, untextured and equiaxed microstructures, two-dimensional (2D) theoretical formulas are developed and a frequency-dependent coefficient is found compared to the classical three-dimensional (3D) formulas. 2D numerical simulations are then performed for idealized microstructures composed of hexagonal grains with a uniform grain-size. Three grain sizes are considered herein and involve different scattering regions. Good comparisons are obtained between theoretical and numerical estimates of the backscattering coefficient, which validate the numerical approach. Effects of the grain boundary orientations are analyzed by modeling an irregular hexagonal grain morphology and a random grain morphology generated by an established Voronoi approach. The origin of the significant oscillation level of backscattering is then investigated

  12. Modelling of Filling, Microstructure Formation, Local Mechanical Properties and Stress – Strain Development in High-Pressure Die Cast Aluminium Castings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kotas, Petr; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Thorborg, Jesper

    2009-01-01

    .e. whether the casting is based on cast iron- or aluminium-alloys. The distribution of local properties in a casting might vary substantially which makes it complex to optimize the casting with good accuracy. Often, mechanical simulations of the load situation are based on the assumption that the cast...... in an aluminium alloy is considered including simulation of the entire casting process with emphasis on microstructure formation related to mechanical properties such as elastic modulus, yield stress, ultimate strength and elongation as well as residual stresses. Subsequently, the casting is subjected to service...

  13. A 3D multilevel model of damage and strength of wood: Analysis of microstructural effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Qing, Hai; Mishnaevsky, Leon

    2011-01-01

    A 3D hierarchical computational model of damage and strength of wood is developed. The model takes into account the four scale microstructures of wood, including the microfibril reinforced structure at nanoscale, multilayered cell walls at microscale, hexagon-shape-tube cellular structure at meso...... arrangements and cellulose strength distributions on the tensile strength of wood is studied numerically. Good agreement of the theoretical results with experimental data has been obtained.......A 3D hierarchical computational model of damage and strength of wood is developed. The model takes into account the four scale microstructures of wood, including the microfibril reinforced structure at nanoscale, multilayered cell walls at microscale, hexagon-shape-tube cellular structure...

  14. Hybrid models for the simulation of microstructural evolution influenced by coupled, multiple physical processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tikare, Veena [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hernandez-Rivera, Efrain [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Madison, Jonathan D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Holm, Elizabeth Ann [Carnegie Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Patterson, Burton R. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering; Homer, Eric R. [Brigham Young Univ., Provo, UT (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2013-09-01

    Most materials microstructural evolution processes progress with multiple processes occurring simultaneously. In this work, we have concentrated on the processes that are active in nuclear materials, in particular, nuclear fuels. These processes are coarsening, nucleation, differential diffusion, phase transformation, radiation-induced defect formation and swelling, often with temperature gradients present. All these couple and contribute to evolution that is unique to nuclear fuels and materials. Hybrid model that combines elements from the Potts Monte Carlo, phase-field models and others have been developed to address these multiple physical processes. These models are described and applied to several processes in this report. An important feature of the models developed are that they are coded as applications within SPPARKS, a Sandiadeveloped framework for simulation at the mesoscale of microstructural evolution processes by kinetic Monte Carlo methods. This makes these codes readily accessible and adaptable for future applications.

  15. Electronic ceramic structure within the Voronoi cells model and microstructure fractals contacts surfaces new frontier applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mitić V.V.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, in order to establish grain shapes of sintered ceramics, new approach on correlation between microstructure and doped BaTiO3 -ceramics properties based, on Voronoi model and mathematical statistics calculations on fractal geometry, has been developed. BaTiO3-ceramics doped with Yb2O3 (from 0.1 to 1.0wt% of Yb were prepared by using conventional solid state procedure and were sintered from 1320°C to 1380°C for four hours. The microstructure of sintered specimens was investigated by Scanning electron microscope JEOL-SEM-5300. For better and deeper characterization and understanding of the ceramics material microstructure, the methods which include the fractal nature structure, and also Voronoi model and mathematical statistics calculations, are applied. In our research the Voronoi is one specific interface between fractal structure nature and different stochastically contact surfaces, defined by statistical mathematical methods. Also, the Voronoi model practically provided possibility to control the ceramics microstructure fractal nature. Mathematical statistic methods enabled establishing the real model for the prognosis based on correlation: synthesis-structures-properties. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 172057 i br. III44006

  16. Microstructural and mechanical development and characterization of glass ionomer cements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freire, W.P.; Barbosa, R.C.; Castanha, E.M.M.; Barbosa, E. F.; Fook, M.V.L.

    2013-01-01

    Glass Ionomer Cements (GICs) are widely used in dentistry, indicated as a restorative material, cement for orthopedic and dental prostheses. However, there is need for development of new bone cements as alternative or replacement to current polymethylmethacrylate cements. Thus the aim of this research was develop of an experimental GIC and the mechanical and microstructural characterization of this composite; as a control group it was used a commercial GIC called Vidrion R (SS WHITE). These composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Infrared Spectroscopy Fourier Transform and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The mechanical properties of the composites were measured by Vickers microhardness testing, flexural strength and compression. These cements were characterized as a semicrystalline; in FTIR spectra observed characteristic bands of these materials and microstructural studies of experimental GIC revealed that there was no proper interaction of the inorganic particles in the polymer matrix, whereas in the control group this interaction was effective resulting in greater homogeneity among its constituent phases. Experimental cement showed a higher value of microhardness in the control group, however, flexural strength of cement experimental cement was lower than the control group, and this behavior can possibly be attributed to inadequate interaction particle / matrix. In tests of compressive strength, experimental GIC showed resistance similar to that shown for control group after variation in the processing conditions of the material. (author)

  17. Computational microstructure modeling of asphalt mixtures subjected to rate-dependent fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aragao, Francisco Thiago Sacramento

    2011-12-01

    Computational microstructure models have been actively pursued by the pavement mechanics community as a promising and advantageous alternative to limited analytical and semi-empirical modeling approaches. The primary goal of this research is to develop a computational microstructure modeling framework that will eventually allow researchers and practitioners of the pavement mechanics community to evaluate the effects of constituents and mix design characteristics (some of the key factors directly affecting the quality of the pavement structures) on the mechanical responses of asphalt mixtures. To that end, the mixtures are modeled as heterogeneous materials with inelastic mechanical behavior. To account for the complex geometric characteristics of the heterogeneous mixtures, an image treatment process is used to generate finite element meshes that closely reproduce the geometric characteristics of aggregate particles (size, shape, and volume fraction) that are distributed within a fine aggregate asphaltic matrix (FAM). These two mixture components, i.e., aggregate particles and FAM, are modeled, respectively, as isotropic linear elastic and isotropic linear viscoelastic materials and the material properties required as inputs for the computational model are obtained from simple and expedited laboratory tests. In addition to the consideration of the complex geometric characteristics and inelastic behavior of the mixtures, this study uses the cohesive zone model to simulate fracture as a gradual and rate-dependent phenomenon in which the initiation and propagation of discrete cracks take place in different locations of the mixture microstructure. Rate-dependent cohesive zone fracture properties are obtained using a procedure that combines laboratory tests of semi-circular bending specimens of the FAM and their numerical simulations. To address the rate-dependent fracture characteristics of the FAM phase, a rate-dependent cohesive zone model is developed and

  18. Theory and modeling of microstructural evolution in polycrystalline materials: Solute segregation, grain growth and phase transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning

    2005-11-01

    To accurately predict microstructure evolution and, hence, to synthesis metal and ceramic alloys with desirable properties involves many fundamental as well as practical issues. In the present study, novel theoretical and phase field approaches have been developed to address some of these issues including solute drag and segregation transition at grain boundaries and dislocations, grain growth in systems of anisotropic boundary properties, and precipitate microstructure development in polycrystalline materials. The segregation model has allowed for the prediction of a first-order segregation transition, which could be related to the sharp transition of solute concentration of grain boundary as a function of temperature. The incorporating of interfacial energy and mobility as functions of misorientation and inclination in the phase field model has allowed for the study of concurrent grain growth and texture evolution. The simulation results were analyzed using the concept of local grain boundary energy density, which simplified significantly the development of governing equations for texture controlled grain growth in Ti-6Al-4V. Quantitative phase field modeling techniques have been developed by incorporating thermodynamic and diffusivity databases. The models have been validated against DICTRA simulations in simple 1D problems and applied to simulate realistic microstructural evolutions in Ti-6Al-4V, including grain boundary a and globular a growth and sideplate development under both isothermal aging and continuous cooling conditions. The simulation predictions agree well with experimental observations.

  19. Modeling of the flow behavior of SAE 8620H combing microstructure evolution in hot forming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Xiaobin; Wang, Baoyu; Tang, Xuefeng

    2017-10-01

    With the development of net-shape forming technology, hot forming process is widely applied to manufacturing gear parts, during which, materials suffer severe plastic distortion and microstructure changes continually. In this paper, to understand and model the flow behavior and microstructure evolution, SAE 8620H, a widely used gear steel, is selected as the object and the flow behavior and microstructure evolution are observed by an isothermal hot compression tests at 1273-1373 K with a strain rate of 0.1-10 s-1. Depending on the results of the compression test, a set of internal-state-variable based unified constitutive equations is put forward to describe the flow behavior and microstructure evaluation of SAE 8620H. Moreover, the evaluation of the dislocation density and the fraction of dynamic recrystallization based on the theory of thermal activation is modeled and reincorporated into the constitutive law. The material parameters in the constitutive model are calculated based on the measured flow stress and dynamic recrystallization fraction. The predicted flow stress under different deformation conditions has a good agreement with the measured results.

  20. An Integrated Approach Linking Process to Structural Modeling With Microstructural Characterization for Injections-Molded Long-Fiber Thermoplastics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Ba Nghiep; Bapanapalli, Satish K.; Smith, Mark T.; Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara; Norris, Robert E.; Phelps, Jay; Tucker III, Charles L.; Jin, Xiaoshi; Wang, Jin

    2008-09-01

    The objective of our work is to enable the optimum design of lightweight automotive structural components using injection-molded long fiber thermoplastics (LFTs). To this end, an integrated approach that links process modeling to structural analysis with experimental microstructural characterization and validation is developed. First, process models for LFTs are developed and implemented into processing codes (e.g. ORIENT, Moldflow) to predict the microstructure of the as-formed composite (i.e. fiber length and orientation distributions). In parallel, characterization and testing methods are developed to obtain necessary microstructural data to validate process modeling predictions. Second, the predicted LFT composite microstructure is imported into a structural finite element analysis by ABAQUS to determine the response of the as-formed composite to given boundary conditions. At this stage, constitutive models accounting for the composite microstructure are developed to predict various types of behaviors (i.e. thermoelastic, viscoelastic, elastic-plastic, damage, fatigue, and impact) of LFTs. Experimental methods are also developed to determine material parameters and to validate constitutive models. Such a process-linked-structural modeling approach allows an LFT composite structure to be designed with confidence through numerical simulations. Some recent results of our collaborative research will be illustrated to show the usefulness and applications of this integrated approach.

  1. A 3-D microstructural level model for analyzing the response of polymer bonded explosives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardin, David; Zhou, Min

    2011-06-01

    A three-dimensional finite element model is developed to study the microstructural level response of polymer-bonded explosives (PBX) under impact loading. The study focuses on the effect of the morphology and packing of energetic grains on the overall thermomechanical response of the composites. A cohesive finite element method (CFEM) is utilized to account for failure in the form of debonding between the HMX grains and the polymer matrix. Frictional heating along crack faces is tracked through a contact algorithm. Microstructures with cubic and multifaceted three-dimensional polygonal granules with packing densities between 0.42 and 0.74 are generated and used. Both 2D and 3D calculations are carried to analyze the differences between the models. To ensure consistency, the 2D microstructures are sections of the 3D microstructures. In this presentation, we will discuss differences in results from the 2D and 3D calculations, with a particular focus on the progression of damage and heating under impact loading.

  2. Microstructure effects and modelling of Incoloy 800 behaviour

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumaz, P.; Terriez, J.M.; Regnard, C.; Robert, G.

    1987-01-01

    At 550 0 C Incoloy 800 undergoes γ' hardening. The phase dispersion characteristics, which closely control the strength properties, are time dependent. The behaviour of Incoloy 800 has been studied with mechanical cycle tests. A microstructural study, from which an analysis of the γ' precipitate size effect on the strain phenomena and on rupture at high temperature could be made, was undertaken. A model is proposed which is able to describe the cycle consolidation phenomenon for low cycle fatigue and the fatigue stress relaxation tests, when using the characteristic parameters of the γ' precipitation. (U.K.)

  3. Microstructure development in particulate composite coatings by cryo-SEM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hui

    Understanding microstructure development starting from dispersion to a final coating during drying is critical to achieve desirable microstructures and coating properties. Cryo-SEM technique is used to study the microstructure evolutions of three particulate composite coating systems: aqueous latex/ceramic nanoparticle coatings, ordered latex/ceramic nanoparticle coatings, and non-aqueous magnetic coatings. In the first study, cryo-SEM images reveal different colloidal states of two latex/ceramic nanoparticle dispersions, which confirm the DLVO theory-based calculations of total interaction energies from past research. Moreover, images at different drying stages show how nanoparticles segregate in interstitial spaces among large latex particles. As water evaporates, the latex particles consolidate, and the nanoparticles concentrate in interstitial spaces between the latex particles. With continued drying, the latex particles compact, and the nanoparticles are forced to pack more closely in the interstitial spaces. Finally, the latex particles partially coalesce to form a coherent coating. Ordered latex/nanoparticle coatings with a nanoparticle-rich surface and a latexrich body were developed by drying dispersions of monodispersed latex and nanosized ceramic particles. The nanoparticles uniformly occupy the interstitial spaces among the orderly packed latex particles near the surface, but are absent from the compacted latex structure beneath. Cryo-SEM images captured at successive drying times document two important sequences to form this unique structure. Latex particles consolidate at the airwater interface at an early drying stage, and the curved menisci among them create a pressure difference to drive a convective flow. This vertical flow then transports nanoparticles to the evaporating surface. The mechanism is supported by other evidence. The cryo-SEM technique was also applied to a non-aqueous system consisting of a solvent mixture of toluene, cyclohexanone

  4. Microstructure Modeling of 3rd Generation Disk Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jou, Herng-Jeng

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this initiative, funded by NASA's Aviation Safety Program, is to model, validate, and predict, with high fidelity, the microstructural evolution of third-generation high-refractory Ni-based disc superalloys during heat treating and service conditions. This initiative is a natural extension of the DARPA-AIM (Accelerated Insertion of Materials) initiative with GE/Pratt-Whitney and with other process simulation tools. Strong collaboration with the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) is a key component of this initiative and the focus of this program is on industrially relevant disk alloys and heat treatment processes identified by GRC. Employing QuesTek s Computational Materials Dynamics technology and PrecipiCalc precipitation simulator, physics-based models are being used to achieve high predictive accuracy and precision. Combining these models with experimental data and probabilistic analysis, "virtual alloy design" can be performed. The predicted microstructures can be optimized to promote desirable features and concurrently eliminate nondesirable phases that can limit the reliability and durability of the alloys. The well-calibrated and well-integrated software tools that are being applied under the proposed program will help gas turbine disk alloy manufacturers, processing facilities, and NASA, to efficiently and effectively improve the performance of current and future disk materials.

  5. Microstructure Engineering in Hot Strip Mills, Part 1 of 2: Integrated mathematical Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.K. Brimacombe; I.V. Samaraseker; E.B. Hawbolt; T.R. Meadowcroft; M. Militzer; W.J. Pool; D.Q. Jin

    1998-09-30

    This report describes the work of developing an integrated model used to predict the thermal history, deformation, roll forces, microstructural evaluation and mechanical properties of steel strip in a hot-strip mill. This achievement results from a join research effort that is part of the American Iron and Steel Institute's (AISI) Advanced Process Control Program, a collaboration between the U.S. DOE and fifteen North American steel makers.

  6. Microstructural and mechanical property changes in model Fe-Cu alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rice, P.M.; Stoller, R.E.; Lucas, B.N.

    1995-01-01

    This paper describes a technique developed to determine values for the dislocation barrier strength of the defects believed to be responsible for the embrittlement of light water reactor (LWR) pressure vessel steels. Microstructures consisting of a single defect type were introduced by ion irradiation or thermal annealing, and the defect distributions were determined by TEM. Hardness changes were measured using a nano indenter and the dislocation barrier strengths for the defects involved were computed based on a dispersed barrier hardening model

  7. Texture and microstructure development during hot deformation of ME20 magnesium alloy: Experiments and simulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, X.; Al-Samman, T.; Mu, S.; Gottstein, G.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Second phase precipitates in ME20 hindered activation of tensile twinning at 300 deg. C. → New off-basal sheet texture during c-axis compression at low Z conditions. → Ce amplifies the role of pyramidal -slip over prismatic slip at 0.3T m . → Prismatic slip becomes equally important to deformation at 0.6T m . → Accurate texture predictions using a cluster-type Taylor model with grain interaction. - Abstract: The influence of deformation conditions and starting texture on the microstructure and texture evolution during hot deformation of a commercial rare earth (RE)-containing magnesium alloy sheet ME20 was investigated and compared with a conventional Mg sheet alloy AZ31. For all the investigated conditions, the two alloys revealed obvious distinctions in the flow behavior and the development of texture and microstructure, which was primarily attributed to the different chemistry of the two alloys. The presence of precipitates in the fine microstructure of the ME20 sheet considerably increased the recrystallization temperature and suppressed tensile twinning. This gave rise to an uncommon Mg texture development during deformation. Texture simulation using an advanced cluster-type Taylor approach with consideration of grain interaction was employed to correlate the unique texture development in the ME20 alloy with the activation scenarios of different deformation modes.

  8. Accurate modeling and evaluation of microstructures in complex materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahmasebi, Pejman

    2018-02-01

    Accurate characterization of heterogeneous materials is of great importance for different fields of science and engineering. Such a goal can be achieved through imaging. Acquiring three- or two-dimensional images under different conditions is not, however, always plausible. On the other hand, accurate characterization of complex and multiphase materials requires various digital images (I) under different conditions. An ensemble method is presented that can take one single (or a set of) I(s) and stochastically produce several similar models of the given disordered material. The method is based on a successive calculating of a conditional probability by which the initial stochastic models are produced. Then, a graph formulation is utilized for removing unrealistic structures. A distance transform function for the Is with highly connected microstructure and long-range features is considered which results in a new I that is more informative. Reproduction of the I is also considered through a histogram matching approach in an iterative framework. Such an iterative algorithm avoids reproduction of unrealistic structures. Furthermore, a multiscale approach, based on pyramid representation of the large Is, is presented that can produce materials with millions of pixels in a matter of seconds. Finally, the nonstationary systems—those for which the distribution of data varies spatially—are studied using two different methods. The method is tested on several complex and large examples of microstructures. The produced results are all in excellent agreement with the utilized Is and the similarities are quantified using various correlation functions.

  9. A nonlinear mechanics model of bio-inspired hierarchical lattice materials consisting of horseshoe microstructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Qiang; Cheng, Huanyu; Jang, Kyung-In; Luan, Haiwen; Hwang, Keh-Chih; Rogers, John A; Huang, Yonggang; Zhang, Yihui

    2016-05-01

    Development of advanced synthetic materials that can mimic the mechanical properties of non-mineralized soft biological materials has important implications in a wide range of technologies. Hierarchical lattice materials constructed with horseshoe microstructures belong to this class of bio-inspired synthetic materials, where the mechanical responses can be tailored to match the nonlinear J-shaped stress-strain curves of human skins. The underlying relations between the J-shaped stress-strain curves and their microstructure geometry are essential in designing such systems for targeted applications. Here, a theoretical model of this type of hierarchical lattice material is developed by combining a finite deformation constitutive relation of the building block (i.e., horseshoe microstructure), with the analyses of equilibrium and deformation compatibility in the periodical lattices. The nonlinear J-shaped stress-strain curves and Poisson ratios predicted by this model agree very well with results of finite element analyses (FEA) and experiment. Based on this model, analytic solutions were obtained for some key mechanical quantities, e.g., elastic modulus, Poisson ratio, peak modulus, and critical strain around which the tangent modulus increases rapidly. A negative Poisson effect is revealed in the hierarchical lattice with triangular topology, as opposed to a positive Poisson effect in hierarchical lattices with Kagome and honeycomb topologies. The lattice topology is also found to have a strong influence on the stress-strain curve. For the three isotropic lattice topologies (triangular, Kagome and honeycomb), the hierarchical triangular lattice material renders the sharpest transition in the stress-strain curve and relative high stretchability, given the same porosity and arc angle of horseshoe microstructure. Furthermore, a demonstrative example illustrates the utility of the developed model in the rapid optimization of hierarchical lattice materials for

  10. A Mathematical Model to Capture Complex Microstructure Orientation on Insect Wings.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delyle T Polet

    Full Text Available Microstructures on insect wings can promote directional drop shedding, and the local orientation of these structures is expected to facilitate drop removal. However, microstructures may exhibit very different orientations at different locations on the wing. Using the march fly Penthetria heteroptera, we propose that local orientation of small hairs (microtrichia reflects a balance of three nonexclusive strategies: (1 preventing water from becoming stuck in intervenous grooves (microtrichia point upslope, (2 shedding water off the wing as readily as possible (microtrichia point towards the nearest edge, and, (3 shedding water away from the body (microtrichia point distally. We present evidence for all three and show that local microtrichial orientation is seldom determined by any one factor. We develop a mathematical model that employs factor-specific weighting values determined via optimization. Our predictions are tested against the orientation of microtrichia randomly sampled from a P. heteroptera specimen. Using the best-fit weighting parameters, the model displays a median residual of 20°; no residual is greater than 46°. The model also reproduces qualitative aspects of microtrichial orientation, such as bifurcation midway between veins and convergence toward peaks. This strong correspondence between modelled and observed orientation supports the role of microtrichia as directional antiwetting devices and highlights the importance of considering both function and wing geometry to explain the organization of natural microstructure arrays.

  11. Microstructural development during laser cladding of low-C martensitic stainless steel.

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Rooyen, C

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Heat input plays an important role in the microstructural development of 12%Cr martensitic stainless steel. The microstructure of low-C 12%Cr martensitic stainless steel resulting from laser cladding was investigated. For 410L a ferritic...

  12. Laser-induced microstructural development and phase evolution in magnesium alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Y.C.; Zhou, W.; Li, Z.L.; Zheng, H.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Secondary phase evolution caused by laser processing was firstly reported. • Microstructure development was controlled by heat flow thermodynamics and kinetics. • Solid-state transformation resulted in submicron and nano-scale precipitates. • Cluster-shaped particles in overlapped region were due to precipitation coarsening. • Properties of materials can be tailored selectively by laser processing. -- Abstract: Secondary phase plays an important role in determining microstructures and properties of magnesium alloys. This paper focuses on laser-induced microstructure development and secondary phase evolution in AZ91D Mg alloy studied by SEM, TEM and EDS analyses. Compared to bulk shape and lamellar structure of the secondary phase in as-received cast material, rapid-solidified microstructures with various morphologies including nano-precipitates were observed in laser melt zone. Formation mechanisms of microstructural evolution and effect of phase development on surface properties were further discussed

  13. Microstructural defects modeling in the Al-Mo system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pascuet, Maria I.; Fernandez, Julian R.; Monti, Ana M.

    2006-01-01

    In this work we have utilized computer simulation techniques to study microstructural defects, such as point defects and interfaces, in the Al-Mo alloy. Such alloy is taken as a model to study the Al(fcc)/U-Mo(bcc) interface. The EAM interatomic potential used has been fitted to the formation energy and lattice constant of the AlMo 3 intermetallic. Formation of vacancies for both components Al and Mo and anti-sites, Al Mo and Mo Al , as well as vacancy migration was studied in this structure. We found that the lowest energy defect complex that preserves stoichiometry is the antisite pair Al Mo +Mo Al , in correspondence with other intermetallics of the same structure. Our results also suggest that the structure of the Al(fcc)/Mo(bcc) interface is unstable, while that of the Al(fcc)/Al 5 Mo interface is stable, as observed experimentally. (author) [es

  14. Objective Characterization of Snow Microstructure for Microwave Emission Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durand, Michael; Kim, Edward J.; Molotch, Noah P.; Margulis, Steven A.; Courville, Zoe; Malzler, Christian

    2012-01-01

    Passive microwave (PM) measurements are sensitive to the presence and quantity of snow, a fact that has long been used to monitor snowcover from space. In order to estimate total snow water equivalent (SWE) within PM footprints (on the order of approx 100 sq km), it is prerequisite to understand snow microwave emission at the point scale and how microwave radiation integrates spatially; the former is the topic of this paper. Snow microstructure is one of the fundamental controls on the propagation of microwave radiation through snow. Our goal in this study is to evaluate the prospects for driving the Microwave Emission Model of Layered Snowpacks with objective measurements of snow specific surface area to reproduce measured brightness temperatures when forced with objective measurements of snow specific surface area (S). This eliminates the need to treat the grain size as a free-fit parameter.

  15. 3D modeling of unconstrained HPT process: role of strain gradient on high deformed microstructure formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Kaabar, A.; Aoufi, A.; Descartes, S.; Desrayaud, C.

    2017-05-01

    During tribological contact’s life, different deformation paths lead to the formation of high deformed microstructure, in the near-surface layers of the bodies. The mechanical conditions (high pressure, shear) occurring under contact, are reproduced through unconstrained High Pressure Torsion configuration. A 3D finite element model of this HPT test is developed to study the local deformation history leading to high deformed microstructure with nominal pressure and friction coefficient. For the present numerical study the friction coefficient at the interface sample/anvils is kept constant at 0.3; the material used is high purity iron. The strain distribution in the sample bulk, as well as the main components of the strain gradients according to the spatial coordinates are investigated, with rotation angle of the anvil.

  16. A microstructurally based fracture model for nuclear graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burchell, T.D.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports the physical basis of, and assumptions behind, a fracture model for nuclear graphites. Microstructurally related inputs, such as filler particle size, filler particle fracture toughness (K Ic ), density, pore size distribution, number of pores and specimen geometry (size and volume), are utilized in the model. The model has been applied to two graphites, Great Lakes Carbon Corporation grade H-451 and Toyo Tanso grade IG-110. For each graphite, the predicted tensile failure probabilities are compared with experimental data generated using ASTM Standard C-749 tensile test specimens. The predicted failure probabilities are in close agreement with the experimental data, particularly in the case of the H-451. The model is also shown to qualitatively predict the influence on the failure probabilities of changes in filler particle size, density, pore size, pore size distribution, number of pores and specimen geometry (stressed volume). The good performance is attributed to the sound physical basis of the model, which recognizes the dominant role of porosity in controlling crack initiation and propagation during graphite fracture. 8 refs., 12 figs., 1 tab

  17. Modeling Financial Time Series Based on a Market Microstructure Model with Leverage Effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhui Xi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic market microstructure model specifies that the price/return innovation and the volatility innovation are independent Gaussian white noise processes. However, the financial leverage effect has been found to be statistically significant in many financial time series. In this paper, a novel market microstructure model with leverage effects is proposed. The model specification assumed a negative correlation in the errors between the price/return innovation and the volatility innovation. With the new representations, a theoretical explanation of leverage effect is provided. Simulated data and daily stock market indices (Shanghai composite index, Shenzhen component index, and Standard and Poor’s 500 Composite index via Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC method are used to estimate the leverage market microstructure model. The results verify the effectiveness of the model and its estimation approach proposed in the paper and also indicate that the stock markets have strong leverage effects. Compared with the classical leverage stochastic volatility (SV model in terms of DIC (Deviance Information Criterion, the leverage market microstructure model fits the data better.

  18. Human eye cataract microstructure modeling and its effect on simulated retinal imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Wen-Shuang; Chang, Chung-Hao; Horng, Chi-Ting; Yao, Hsin-Yu; Sun, Han-Ying; Huang, Shu-Fang; Wang, Hsiang-Chen

    2017-02-01

    We designed a crystalline microstructure during cataract lesions and calculated the aberration value of the eye by using ray trace modeling to identify the corresponding spherical aberration, coma aberration, and trefoil aberration value under different pathological-change degrees. The mutual relationship between microstructure and aberration was then discussed using these values. Calculation results showed that with increased layer number of microstructure, the influence of aberration value on spherical aberration was the greatest. In addition, the influence of a relatively compact microstructure on spherical aberration and coma aberration was small, but that on trefoil aberration was great.

  19. The microstructure and rheology of a model, thixotropic nanoparticle gel under steady shear and large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Min Kim, Jung; Kate Gurnon, A.; Wagner, Norman J., E-mail: wagnernj@udel.edu [Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering and Center for Neutron Science, University of Delaware, Newark, Delaware 19716 (United States); Eberle, Aaron P. R. [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 (United States); Porcar, Lionel [NIST Center for Neutron Research, National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, Maryland 20899 and Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France)

    2014-09-01

    The microstructure-rheology relationship for a model, thermoreversible nanoparticle gel is investigated using a new technique of time-resolved neutron scattering under steady and time-resolved large amplitude oscillatory shear (LAOS) flows. A 21 vol. % gel is tested with varying strength of interparticle attraction. Shear-induced structural anisotropy is observed as butterfly scattering patterns and quantified through an alignment factor. Measurements in the plane of flow show significant, local anisotropy develops with alignment along the compressional axis of flow, providing new insights into how gels flow. The microstructure-rheology relationship is analyzed through a new type of structure-Lissajous plot that shows how the anisotropic microstructure is responsible for the observed LAOS response, which is beyond a response expected for a purely viscous gel with constant structure. The LAOS shear viscosities are observed to follow the “Delaware-Rutgers” rule. Rheological and microstructural data are successfully compared across a broad range of conditions by scaling the shear rate by the strength of attraction, providing a method to compare behavior between steady shear and LAOS experiments. However, important differences remain between the microstructures measured at comparatively high frequency in LAOS experiments and comparable steady shear experiments that illustrate the importance of measuring the microstructure to properly interpret the nonlinear, dynamic rheological response.

  20. A model problem concerning ionic transport in microstructured solid electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curto Sillamoni, Ignacio J.; Idiart, Martín I.

    2015-11-01

    We consider ionic transport by diffusion and migration through microstructured solid electrolytes. The assumed constitutive relations for the constituent phases follow from convex energy and dissipation potentials which guarantee thermodynamic consistency. The effective response is determined by homogenizing the relevant field equations via the notion ofmulti-scale convergence. The resulting homogenized response involves several effective tensors, but they all require the solution of just one standard conductivity problem over the representative volume element. A multi-scale model for semicrystalline polymer electrolytes with spherulitic morphologies is derived by applying the theory to a specific class of two-dimensional microgeometries for which the effective response can be computed exactly. An enriched model accounting for a random dispersion of filler particles with interphases is also derived. In both cases, explicit expressions for the effective material parameters are provided. The models are used to explore the effect of crystallinity and filler content on the overall response. Predictions support recent experimental observations on doped poly-ethylene-oxide systems which suggest that the anisotropic crystalline phase can actually support faster ion transport than the amorphous phase along certain directions dictated by the morphology of the polymeric chains. Predictions also support the viewpoint that ceramic fillers improve ionic conductivity and cation transport number via interphasial effects.

  1. Micro-Structural Evolution and Size-Effects in Plastically Deformed Single Crystals: Strain Gradient Continuum Modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Naaman, Salim Abdallah

    An extensive amount of research has been devoted to the development of micro-mechanics based gradient plasticity continuum theories, which are necessary for modeling micron-scale plasticity when large spatial gradients of plastic strain appear. While many models have proven successful in capturing...... the macroscopic effects related to strain gradients, most predict smooth micro-structures. The evolution of dislocation micro-structures, during plastic straining of ductile crystalline materials, is highly complex and nonuniform. Published experimental measurements on deformed metal crystals show distinct......, to focus on their ability to capture realistic micro-structural evolution. This challenge is the main focus of the present thesis, which takes as starting point a non-work conjugate type back stress based higher order crystal plasticity theory. Within this framework, several possibilities for the back...

  2. Phase Field Modeling of Microstructure Banding in Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maalekian, Mehran; Azizi-Alizamini, Hamid; Militzer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    A phase field model (PFM) is applied to simulate the effects of microsegregation, cooling rate, and austenite grain size on banding in a C-Mn steel. The PFM simulations are compared with experimental observations of continuous cooling transformation tests in the investigated steel. Using electron probe microanalysis, the microsegregation characteristics of Mn were determined and introduced into the model. Ferrite nucleation is assumed to occur at austenite grain boundaries, and ferrite growth is simulated as mixed-mode reaction for para-equilibrium conditions. The driving pressure for the austenite to ferrite transformation depends on Mn concentration and thus varies between the alternating microsegregation layers. In agreement with experimental observations, the simulation results demonstrate that by increasing the cooling rate and/or austenite grain size, banding tends to disappear as the transformation shifts to lower temperatures such that ferrite also forms readily in the layers with higher Mn levels. Further, a parametric study is conducted by changing thickness and Mn content of the bands. In accordance with experimental observations, it is shown that for sufficiently large band thickness, band splitting takes place where ferrite grains form close to the center of the Mn-rich band. Changing the degree of Mn segregation indicates that a segregation level of 0.2 wt pct is necessary in the present case to achieve banded microstructures.

  3. Changes in Rat Brain Tissue Microstructure and Stiffness during the Development of Experimental Obstructive Hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jugé, Lauriane; Pong, Alice C.; Bongers, Andre; Sinkus, Ralph; Bilston, Lynne E.; Cheng, Shaokoon

    2016-01-01

    Understanding neural injury in hydrocephalus and how the brain changes during the course of the disease in-vivo remain unclear. This study describes brain deformation, microstructural and mechanical properties changes during obstructive hydrocephalus development in a rat model using multimodal magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Hydrocephalus was induced in eight Sprague-Dawley rats (4 weeks old) by injecting a kaolin suspension into the cisterna magna. Six sham-injected rats were used as controls. MR imaging (9.4T, Bruker) was performed 1 day before, and at 3, 7 and 16 days post injection. T2-weighted MR images were collected to quantify brain deformation. MR elastography was used to measure brain stiffness, and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was conducted to observe brain tissue microstructure. Results showed that the enlargement of the ventricular system was associated with a decrease in the cortical gray matter thickness and caudate-putamen cross-sectional area (P hydrocephalus development, increased space between the white matter tracts was observed in the CC+PVWM (P hydrocephalus development. PMID:26848844

  4. Microstructural proliferation in human cortex is coupled with the development of face processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, Jesse; Barnett, Michael A.; Natu, Vaidehi; Mezer, Aviv; Palomero-Gallagher, Nicola; Weiner, Kevin S.; Amunts, Katrin; Zilles, Karl; Grill-Spector, Kalanit

    2017-01-01

    How does cortical tissue change as brain function and behavior improve from childhood to adulthood? By combining quantitative and functional magnetic resonance imaging in children and adults, we find differential development of high-level visual areas that are involved in face and place recognition. Development of face-selective regions, but not place-selective regions, is dominated by microstructural proliferation. This tissue development is correlated with specific increases in functional selectivity to faces, as well as improvements in face recognition, and ultimately leads to differentiated tissue properties between face-and place-selective regions in adulthood, which we validate with postmortem cytoarchitectonic measurements. These data suggest a new model by which emergent brain function and behavior result from cortical tissue proliferation rather than from pruning exclusively. PMID:28059764

  5. Modeling of Ti-W Solidification Microstructures Under Additive Manufacturing Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolchigo, Matthew R.; Mendoza, Michael Y.; Samimi, Peyman; Brice, David A.; Martin, Brian; Collins, Peter C.; LeSar, Richard

    2017-07-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) processes have many benefits for the fabrication of alloy parts, including the potential for greater microstructural control and targeted properties than traditional metallurgy processes. To accelerate utilization of this process to produce such parts, an effective computational modeling approach to identify the relationships between material and process parameters, microstructure, and part properties is essential. Development of such a model requires accounting for the many factors in play during this process, including laser absorption, material addition and melting, fluid flow, various modes of heat transport, and solidification. In this paper, we start with a more modest goal, to create a multiscale model for a specific AM process, Laser Engineered Net Shaping (LENS™), which couples a continuum-level description of a simplified beam melting problem (coupling heat absorption, heat transport, and fluid flow) with a Lattice Boltzmann-cellular automata (LB-CA) microscale model of combined fluid flow, solute transport, and solidification. We apply this model to a binary Ti-5.5 wt pct W alloy and compare calculated quantities, such as dendrite arm spacing, with experimental results reported in a companion paper.

  6. Modeling of microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during the high pressure die casting process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu Mengwu; Xiong Shoumei

    2012-01-01

    Two important microstructure characteristics of high pressure die cast magnesium alloy are the externally solidified crystals (ESCs) and the fully divorced eutectic which form at the filling stage of the shot sleeve and at the last stage of solidification in the die cavity, respectively. Both of them have a significant influence on the mechanical properties and performance of magnesium alloy die castings. In the present paper, a numerical model based on the cellular automaton (CA) method was developed to simulate the microstructure evolution of magnesium alloy during cold-chamber high pressure die casting (HPDC) process. Modeling of dendritic growth of magnesium alloy with six-fold symmetry was achieved by defining a special neighbourhood configuration and calculating of the growth kinetics from complete solution of the transport equations. Special attention was paid to establish a nucleation model considering both of the nucleation of externally solidified crystals in the shot sleeve and the massive nucleation in the die cavity. Meanwhile, simulation of the formation of fully divorced eutectic was also taken into account in the present CA model. Validation was performed and the capability of the present model was addressed by comparing the simulated results with those obtained by experiments.

  7. Microstructure evolution during cyclic tests on EUROFER 97 at room temperature. TEM observation and modelling

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Giordana, M. F.; Giroux, P. F.; Alvarez; Armas, I.; Sauzay, M.; Armas, A.; Kruml, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 550, JUL (2012), s. 103-111 ISSN 0921-5093 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : martensitic steels * softening behaviour * microstructural evolution * modelling Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.108, year: 2012

  8. Microstructure-based modelling of multiphase materials and complex structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Ewald; Wesenjak, Robert; Fillafer, Alexander; Meier, Felix; Krempaszky, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Micromechanical approaches are frequently employed to monitor local and global field quantities and their evolution under varying mechanical and/or thermal loading scenarios. In this contribution, an overview on important methods is given that are currently used to gain insight into the deformational and failure behaviour of multiphase materials and complex structures. First, techniques to represent material microstructures are reviewed. It is common to either digitise images of real microstructures or generate virtual 2D or 3D microstructures using automated procedures (e.g. Voronoï tessellation) for grain generation and colouring algorithms for phase assignment. While the former method allows to capture exactly all features of the microstructure at hand with respect to its morphological and topological features, the latter method opens up the possibility for parametric studies with respect to the influence of individual microstructure features on the local and global stress and strain response. Several applications of these approaches are presented, comprising low and high strain behaviour of multiphase steels, failure and fracture behaviour of multiphase materials and the evolution of surface roughening of the aluminium top metallisation of semiconductor devices.

  9. Fatigue-stress relaxation behaviour of alloy 800: Microstructure and modeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dumaz, P.; Terriez, J.M.; Regnard, C.; Robert, G.

    1985-01-01

    This paper deals with the results found by completing a study work aimed at giving due consideration to the variables controlling the microstructure variation in modeling the alloy 800 fatigue-stress relaxation behaviour along with their effect on the fracturing process. The related push-pull cycles were performed in forced strain condition and the relaxing operation was carried out with the material exhibiting its maximum tension strained condition. Microstructure investigations and behaviour modeling are presented. (orig./RF)

  10. Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    REPORT Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY...NAMES AND ADDRESSES U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 15. SUBJECT TERMS AISI 1005, finite-element...Computational Modeling of Microstructural-Evolution in AISI 1005 Steel During Gas Metal Arc Butt Welding Report Title ABSTRACT A fully coupled (two-way

  11. Effect of Metal Bond-Pad Configurations on the Solder Microstructure Development of Flip-Chip Solder Joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y. J.; Hsu, Y. C.; Huang, T. S.; Lu, C. T.; Wu, Albert T.; Liu, C. Y.

    2014-01-01

    Various microstructural zones were observed in the solidified solder of flip-chip solder joints with three metal bond-pad configurations (Cu/Sn/Cu, Ni/Sn/Cu, and Cu/Sn/Ni). The developed microstructures of the solidified flip-chip solder joints were strongly related to the associated metal bond pad. A hypoeutectic microstructure always developed near the Ni bond pad, and a eutectic or hypereutectic microstructure formed near the Cu pad. The effect of the metal bond pads on the solder microstructure alters the Cu solubility in the molten solder. The Cu content (solubility) in the molten Sn(Cu) solder eventually leads to the development of particular microstructures. In addition to the effect of the associated metal bond pads, the developed microstructure of the flip-chip solder joint depends on the configuration of the metal bond pads. A hypereutectic microstructure formed near the bottom Cu pad, and a eutectic microstructure formed near the top Cu pad. Directional cooling in the flip-chip solder joint during the solidification process causes the effects of the metal bond-pad configuration. Directional cooling causes the Cu content to vary in the liquid Sn(Cu) phase, resulting in the formation of distinct microstructural zones in the developed microstructure of the flip-chip solder joint.

  12. Concurrent multiscale modeling of microstructural effects on localization behavior in finite deformation solid mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alleman, Coleman N.; Foulk, James W.; Mota, Alejandro; Lim, Hojun; Littlewood, David J.

    2018-02-01

    The heterogeneity in mechanical fields introduced by microstructure plays a critical role in the localization of deformation. To resolve this incipient stage of failure, it is therefore necessary to incorporate microstructure with sufficient resolution. On the other hand, computational limitations make it infeasible to represent the microstructure in the entire domain at the component scale. In this study, the authors demonstrate the use of concurrent multiscale modeling to incorporate explicit, finely resolved microstructure in a critical region while resolving the smoother mechanical fields outside this region with a coarser discretization to limit computational cost. The microstructural physics is modeled with a high-fidelity model that incorporates anisotropic crystal elasticity and rate-dependent crystal plasticity to simulate the behavior of a stainless steel alloy. The component-scale material behavior is treated with a lower fidelity model incorporating isotropic linear elasticity and rate-independent J2 plasticity. The microstructural and component scale subdomains are modeled concurrently, with coupling via the Schwarz alternating method, which solves boundary-value problems in each subdomain separately and transfers solution information between subdomains via Dirichlet boundary conditions. In this study, the framework is applied to model incipient localization in tensile specimens during necking.

  13. Development and Application of Acoustic Metamaterials with Locally Resonant Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-21

    metamaterials can be fully understood. Moreover, more microstructures for metamaterials will be designed and stidied. The 3D printing technology will be...in the time and frequency domain than any other wavelets based on Heisenberg Uncertainty. 41 (a) (b) Fig. 6.7 The magnitudes of WT...in Tables 7.1 – 7.3, respectively. The three types of metamaterials were fabricated with a 3D printer using a polymer ink. Figs 7.4 and 7.5 show a

  14. Effect of Mo on dynamic recrystallization and microstructure development of microalloyed steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schambron, Thomas; Dehghan-Manshadi, Ali; Chen, Liang; Gooch, Taliah; Killmore, Chris; Pereloma, Elena

    2017-07-01

    The dynamic recrystallization (DRX) behaviour, mechanical properties and microstructure development of four low carbon, Nb-Ti-containing micro-alloyed steels with Mo contents from 0 to 0.27 wt% were studied. Plane strain compression tests were performed in a Gleeble 3500 thermomechanical simulator. The effects of composition, deformation temperature and strain rate on the DRX parameters and resultant microstructures were examined. The volume fraction of recrystallised grains was estimated from micrographs and a DRX model. The stress-strain curves showed the typical signs of DRX over a wide range of deformation conditions. Dynamic recovery was only observed for higher strain rates (5 s-1) and/or lower deformation temperatures (below 1000 °C). It was shown that Mo increases the hot strength by around 100 MPa per weight percent. In addition, it has an effect on retarding recrystallization in microalloyed steels by increasing the activation energy for DRX by 320 kJ/molK per weight percent. This was attributed to solute drag and the interaction with other microalloying elements.

  15. Phase-field model and its numerical solution for coring and microstructure evolution studies in alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turchi, Patrice E. A.; Fattebert, Jean-Luc; Dorr, Milo R.; Wickett, Michael E.; Belak, James F.

    2011-03-01

    We describe an algorithm for the numerical solution of a phase-field model (PFM) of microstructure evolution in alloys using physical parameters from thermodynamic (CALPHAD) and kinetic databases. The coupled system of PFM equations includes a local order parameter, a quaternion representation of local crystal orientation and a species composition parameter. Time evolution of microstructures and alloy composition is obtained using an implicit time integration of the system. Physical parameters in databases can be obtained either through experiment or first-principles calculations. Application to coring studies and microstructure evolution of Au-Ni will be presented. Prepared by LLNL under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344

  16. Methods and apparatuses for the development of microstructured nuclear fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarvinen, Gordon D [Los Alamos, NM; Carroll, David W [Los Alamos, NM; Devlin, David J [Santa Fe, NM

    2009-04-21

    Microstructured nuclear fuel adapted for nuclear power system use includes fissile material structures of micrometer-scale dimension dispersed in a matrix material. In one method of production, fissile material particles are processed in a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) fluidized-bed reactor including a gas inlet for providing controlled gas flow into a particle coating chamber, a lower bed hot zone region to contain powder, and an upper bed region to enable powder expansion. At least one pneumatic or electric vibrator is operationally coupled to the particle coating chamber for causing vibration of the particle coater to promote uniform powder coating within the particle coater during fuel processing. An exhaust associated with the particle coating chamber and can provide a port for placement and removal of particles and powder. During use of the fuel in a nuclear power reactor, fission products escape from the fissile material structures and come to rest in the matrix material. After a period of use in a nuclear power reactor and subsequent cooling, separation of the fissile material from the matrix containing the embedded fission products will provide an efficient partitioning of the bulk of the fissile material from the fission products. The fissile material can be reused by incorporating it into new microstructured fuel. The fission products and matrix material can be incorporated into a waste form for disposal or processed to separate valuable components from the fission products mixture.

  17. Homogenization procedures for the constitutive material modeling and analysis of aperiodic micro-structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghalaya Manjunatha, Preetham

    Composite materials are the well-known substitutes for traditional metals in various industries because of their micro-structural character. Micro-structures provide a high strength-to-weight ratio, which makes them suitable for manufacturing large variety of applications ranging from simple toys to complicated space/aircraft structures. Since, these materials are widely used in high performance structures, their stress/thermal analysis issues are of major concern. Due to the high degree of material heterogeneity, it is extremely difficult to analyze such structures. Homogenization (rigorous averaging) is a process that overcomes the difficulty of modeling each micro-structure. It replaces an individual micro-structure by an equivalent material model representation (unit cell). Periodic micro-structures appear in regular intervals throughout the domain, in contrast aperiodic micro-structures follows an irregular pattern. Further, this method bridges the analysis gap between micro and macro domain of the structures. In this thesis, Homogenization procedure based on anti-periodic displacement fields for aperiodic micro-structures and aperiodic boundary conditions are considered to model the constitutive material matrix. This work could be easily implemented with the traditional finite element packages. In addition, it eventually increases the convergence accuracy and reduces the high computational expenses. Different problems are analyzed by the implementation of digital image processing schemes for the extraction of a unit cell around the Gauss quadrature points and the mesh-generation. In the future, this research defines a new path for the analysis of any random heterogeneous materials by its ease of implementation and the state-of-the-art micro-structure material modeling capabilities and digital image based micro-meshing.

  18. Hot Deformation Behavior of Alloy 800H at Intermediate Temperatures: Constitutive Models and Microstructure Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y.; Di, H. S.; Misra, R. D. K.; Zhang, Jiecen

    2014-12-01

    The hot deformation behavior of a Fe-Ni-Cr austenitic Alloy 800H was explored in the intermediate temperature range of 825-975 °C and strain rate range of 0.01-10 s-1. The study indicates that dynamic recrystallization (DRX) occurred at 875-975 °C for strain rates of 0.01-0.1 s-1 and adiabatic heating generated at high strain rates accelerated the DRX process. Based on the experimental data, the Johnson-Cook, modified Johnson-Cook, and Arrhenius-type constitutive models were established to predict the flow stress during hot deformation. A comparative study was made on the accuracy and effectiveness of the above three developed models. The microstructure analysis indicated that all the deformation structures exhibited elongated grains and evidence of some degree of DRX. The multiple DRX at 975 °C and 0.01 s-1 led to an increase in the intensity of {001} "cube" texture component and a significant reduction in the intensity of {011} "brass" component. Additionally, the average values of grain average misorientation and grain orientation spread for deformed microstructure were inversely proportional to the fraction of DRX.

  19. Development of a large area microstructure photomultiplier assembly (LAMPA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifford, E. T. H.; Dick, M.; Facina, M.; Wakeford, D.; Andrews, H. R.; Ing, H.; Best, D.; Baginski, M. J.

    2017-05-01

    Large area (> m2) position-sensitive readout of scintillators is important for passive/active gamma and neutron imaging for counter-terrorism applications. The goal of the LAMPA project is to provide a novel, affordable, large-area photodetector (8" x 8") by replacing the conventional dynodes of photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with electron multiplier microstructure boards (MSBs) that can be produced using industrial manufacturing techniques. The square, planar format of the LAMPA assemblies enables tiling of multiple units to support large area applications. The LAMPA performance objectives include comparable gain, noise, timing, and energy resolution relative to conventional PMTs, as well as spatial resolution in the few mm range. The current LAMPA prototype is a stack of 8" x 8" MSBs made commercially by chemical etching of a molybdenum substrate and coated with hydrogen-terminated boron-doped diamond for high secondary emission yield (SEY). The layers of MSBs are electrically isolated using ceramic standoffs. Field-shaping grids are located between adjacent boards to achieve good transmission of electrons from one board to the next. The spacing between layers and the design of the microstructure pattern and grids were guided by simulations performed using an electro-optics code. A position sensitive anode board at the back of the stack of MSBs provides 2-D readout. This presentation discusses the trade studies performed in the design of the MSBs, the measurements of SEY from various electro-emissive materials, the electro-optics simulations conducted, the design of the 2-D readout, and the mechanical aspects of the LAMPA design, in order to achieve a gain of > 104 in an 8-stage stack of MSBs, suitable for use with various scintillators when coupled to an appropriate photocathode.

  20. 3D Microstructure Modeling of Porous Metal Filters

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hejtmánek, Vladimír; Čapek, M.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 2, č. 3 (2012), s. 344-352 ISSN 2075-4701. [International Conference on Porous Metals and Metallic Foams /7./. Busan, 18.09.2011-21.09.2011] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP204/11/1206; GA ČR GA203/09/1353 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : porous metal filter * stochastic reconstruction * microstructural descriptors Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  1. Simulation of mixture microstructures via particle packing models and their direct comparison with real mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulliver, Eric A.

    The objective of this thesis to identify and develop techniques providing direct comparison between simulated and real packed particle mixture microstructures containing submicron-sized particles. This entailed devising techniques for simulating powder mixtures, producing real mixtures with known powder characteristics, sectioning real mixtures, interrogating mixture cross-sections, evaluating and quantifying the mixture interrogation process and for comparing interrogation results between mixtures. A drop and roll-type particle-packing model was used to generate simulations of random mixtures. The simulated mixtures were then evaluated to establish that they were not segregated and free from gross defects. A powder processing protocol was established to provide real mixtures for direct comparison and for use in evaluating the simulation. The powder processing protocol was designed to minimize differences between measured particle size distributions and the particle size distributions in the mixture. A sectioning technique was developed that was capable of producing distortion free cross-sections of fine scale particulate mixtures. Tessellation analysis was used to interrogate mixture cross sections and statistical quality control charts were used to evaluate different types of tessellation analysis and to establish the importance of differences between simulated and real mixtures. The particle-packing program generated crescent shaped pores below large particles but realistic looking mixture microstructures otherwise. Focused ion beam milling was the only technique capable of sectioning particle compacts in a manner suitable for stereological analysis. Johnson-Mehl and Voronoi tessellation of the same cross-sections produced tessellation tiles with different the-area populations. Control charts analysis showed Johnson-Mehl tessellation measurements are superior to Voronoi tessellation measurements for detecting variations in mixture microstructure, such as altered

  2. Microstructural development in a rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si alloy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, W.J.; Baek, E.R.; Lee, Sunghak; Kim, N.J.

    1991-01-01

    TEM is used to investigate microstructural development in a rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si alloy. The as-cast microstructure of a rapidly solidified Al-Fe-V-Si alloy was found to vary depending on casting conditions and also through the thickness of ribbon. For completely Zone A ribbon, intercellular phase consists of a microquasi-crystalline phase, while for the Zone A and Zone B mixed ribbon, it consists of a silicide phase. In either case, formation of globular particles of a cluster microquasi-crystalline phase is observed near the air side of the ribbon. Annealing study shows significant differences in the final microstructure depending on the initial status of the ribbon. Completely Zone A ribbon, whose microstructure is composed of a microquasi-crystalline phase, results in a very coarse microstructure after annealing as compared to the Zone A and Zone B mixed ribbon. This result has important implications for the development of high-performance elevated-temperature Al alloys. 12 refs

  3. Microstructural developments in TLP bonds using thin interlayers based on Ni-B coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saha, R.K. [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada); Khan, T.I., E-mail: tkhan@ucalgary.ca [Department of Mechanical and Manufacturing Engineering, University of Calgary, 2500 University Drive NW, Calgary, Alberta, T2N 1N4 (Canada)

    2009-09-15

    Oxide dispersion strengthened alloy MA 758 was transient liquid phase (TLP) bonded using thin interlayers based on Ni-B electrodeposited coatings and the microstructural developments across the joint region were studied. The bonding surfaces were electrodeposited with a coat thickness of 2-9 {mu}m and microstructural features were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The homogeneity of the joint was assessed performing micro-hardness test. The results showed that the coating thickness as well as the amount of melting point depressants (boron) in the coatings had a significant effect on the microstructural developments within the joint region. TLP bonds made using a 2 {mu}m thick coating interlayer produced a joint with no visible precipitate formation and parent metal dissolution, and the absence of precipitates was attributed to the lower volume concentration of boron in the 2 {mu}m thick coating interlayer.

  4. Microstructural developments in TLP bonds using thin interlayers based on Ni-B coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, R.K.; Khan, T.I.

    2009-01-01

    Oxide dispersion strengthened alloy MA 758 was transient liquid phase (TLP) bonded using thin interlayers based on Ni-B electrodeposited coatings and the microstructural developments across the joint region were studied. The bonding surfaces were electrodeposited with a coat thickness of 2-9 μm and microstructural features were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The homogeneity of the joint was assessed performing micro-hardness test. The results showed that the coating thickness as well as the amount of melting point depressants (boron) in the coatings had a significant effect on the microstructural developments within the joint region. TLP bonds made using a 2 μm thick coating interlayer produced a joint with no visible precipitate formation and parent metal dissolution, and the absence of precipitates was attributed to the lower volume concentration of boron in the 2 μm thick coating interlayer.

  5. Modelling of microstructural creep damage in welded joints of 316L stainless steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouche, G.

    2000-01-01

    Welded joints of 316L stainless steel under service conditions at elevated temperature are known to be preferential sites of creep damage, as compared to the base material. This damage results in the formation of cavities and the development of creep cracks which can lead to a premature failure of welded components. The complex two-phase microstructure of 316L welds was simulated by manually filling a mould with longitudinal deposited weld beads. The moulded material was then aged during 2000 hours at 600 deg. C. High resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy was largely used to examine the microstructure of the simulated material before and after ageing. Smooth and notched creep specimens were cut from the mould and tested at 600 deg. C under various stress levels. A comparison of the lifetime versus nominal stress curves for the base and welded materials shows a greater dependence of the welded material to creep phenomena. Observation and EBSD analysis show that damage is preferentially located along the austenite grain boundaries. The stress and strain fields in the notched specimens were calculated by finite element method. A correlation of this field to the observed damage was made in order to propose a predictive law relating the creep damage to the mechanical conditions applied locally. Further mechanical tests and simulation on CT specimens and mode II tubular specimens allowed validating the model under various multiaxial loading conditions. (author)

  6. Characterisation and modelling of the microstructural and mechanical evolution of a steam turbine rotor steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, T.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation deals with the effective mechanical analysis of steam turbine parts which is not only required for the reliable and safe use of newly built steam turbines, but also for the remaining life assessment of components that have been exposed to service duty over long periods of time. This Thesis aims to develop a physically motivated evolutionary constitutive model for a low-alloy bainitic 2CrMoNiWV (23CrMoNiWV8-8) steam turbine rotor steels. A comprehensive experimental characterisation is performed concerning the mechanical and microstructural evolution of 2CrMoNiWV as subjected to low cycle fatigue (LCF) deformation at elevated temperatures, at different strain rates and for various strain amplitudes. This cyclic plastic deformation causes the rearrangement of dislocations in the microstructure of the steels used for such rotor applications. Symmetric, strain controlled LCF experiments have been carried out in the Laboratory of the High Temperature Integrity Group at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology EMPA. These include mechanical tests in the temperature range between 20 °C to 600 °C at strain rates of 0.001%/s to 1.0%/s and strain amplitudes of ±0.25% to ±1.0%. The LCF experiments reported on comprehensively characterise the temperature, strain rate and strain amplitude dependent cyclic elastic-plastic behaviour of 2CrMoNiWV. Both complete single-specimen endurance tests and interrupted multi-specimen tests have been performed. On the basis of this experimental evidence, an evolutionary formulation of the model is further developed that excellently reproduces the strain amplitude dependent mechanical evolution of 2CrMoNiWV when subjected to LCF loading at different constant strain amplitudes but equal temperature and strain rate. The simulation of benchmark experiments introducing increasing or decreasing strain amplitude steps into the LCF deformation history provide promising results. A further important

  7. Creating physically-based three-dimensional microstructures: Bridging phase-field and crystal plasticity models.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Owen, Steven J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Abdeljawad, Fadi F. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hanks, Byron [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Battaile, Corbett Chandler [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    In order to better incorporate microstructures in continuum scale models, we use a novel finite element (FE) meshing technique to generate three-dimensional polycrystalline aggregates from a phase field grain growth model of grain microstructures. The proposed meshing technique creates hexahedral FE meshes that capture smooth interfaces between adjacent grains. Three dimensional realizations of grain microstructures from the phase field model are used in crystal plasticity-finite element (CP-FE) simulations of polycrystalline a -iron. We show that the interface conformal meshes significantly reduce artificial stress localizations in voxelated meshes that exhibit the so-called "wedding cake" interfaces. This framework provides a direct link between two mesoscale models - phase field and crystal plasticity - and for the first time allows mechanics simulations of polycrystalline materials using three-dimensional hexahedral finite element meshes with realistic topological features.

  8. Dynamics of multiphase systems with complex microstructure. I. Development of the governing equations through nonequilibrium thermodynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sagis, L.M.C.; Öttinger, H.C.

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we present a general model for the dynamic behavior of multiphase systems in which the bulk phases and interfaces have a complex microstructure (for example, immiscible polymer blends with added compatibilizers, or polymer stabilized emulsions with thickening agents dispersed in the

  9. Nd-Fe-B-Cu hot deformation processing: a comparison of deformation modes, microstructural development and magnetic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferrante, M.; Sinka, V.; Assis, O.B.G.; Oliveira, I. de; Freitas, E. de

    1996-01-01

    Due to its relative simplicity and low cost the hot deformation of Nd-Fe-B ingots is rapidly reaching the status of a valid alternative to sintering. Among the possible deformation modes, pressing, rolling and forging are perhaps the most successful. This paper describes the research programme undertaken so far, by discussing the relationship between deformation mode, microstructure and magnetic properties of magnets produced by hot deformation mode, microstructure and magnetic properties of magnets produced by hot deformation of a number of Nd-fe-B-Cu alloys. Microstructural observation showed that both pressed and forged samples are characterized by a heterogeneous microstructure and from magnetic measurements it was concluded that magnetic properties differ when taken in the center or in the periphery of the sample. On the other hand roller magnets were homogeneous both in terms of microstructure and magnetic properties, and interpretations of the mechanisms of texture development and of microstructural development of hot deformed magnets is put forward. (author)

  10. Microstructure Development during Roughing and Intermediate Cooling of Thick HTP Linepipe Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Kevin; Maubane, Rorisang

    The microstructural development during roughing and early finishing of thick, high Nb-Ti steels containing high and low Mn contents has been investigated for conventional cold charging (CCR) and quasi compact strip production (CSP) conditions. Multi-pass rolling simulations were performed, followed by interrupted accelerated cooling, to study the "as-coiled" ferrite/pearlite microstructure. Local heterogeneous regions, LHR, were often found after CSP simulations, but not after CCR where the microstructure was generally uniform. Coarse, local heterogeneous regions can be prevented in HTP steels though complete recrystallization of the as-cast austenite during and after roughing by i) applying sufficient strain at roughing temperatures above the TiNb(C,N) precipitation region, ii) slow intermediate cooling and iii) using high Mn contents to suppress precipitation. For thick HTP skelp, the initiation of dynamic recrystallization is of little use in avoiding LHR due to limited strain available for completing the necklacing process.

  11. Microstructural analysis of geopolymer developed from wood fly ash, post-mortem doloma refractory and metakaolin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moura, Jailes de Santana; Mafra, Marcio Paulo de Araujo; Rabelo, Adriano Alves; Fagury, Renata Lilian Ribeiro Portugal; Fagury Neto, Elias

    2016-01-01

    Geopolymers are one of the widely discussed topics of materials science in recent times due to its vast potential as an alternative binder material to cement. This work aimed to evaluate the microstructure of geopolymers developed from wood fly ash, post-mortem doloma refractory and metakaolin. A preliminary study has been completed and achieved significant results compressive strength: the best formulation of geopolymer paste obtained approximately 25 MPa. Microstructural analysis by scanning electron microscopy, the geopolymer paste, allowed to verify the homogeneity, distribution of components, and providing evidence of raw materials that do not respond if there was crystalline phase, porosity and density of the structure. (author)

  12. Towards a phase field model of the microstructural evolution of duplex steel with experimental verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Stefan Othmar; Voorhees, P.W.; Lauridsen, Erik Mejdal

    2012-01-01

    A phase field model to study the microstructural evolution of a polycrystalline dual-phase material with conserved phase fraction has been implemented, and 2D simulations have been performed. For 2D simulations, the model predicts the cubic growth well-known for diffusion-controlled systems. Some...

  13. Microstructural modeling of early-age creep in hydrating cement paste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Do, Q.H.; Bishnoi, Shashank; Scrivener, K.L.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a new approach to model the creep behavior of cement paste at early ages. The creep behavior is simulated by applying a time-varying generalized Maxwell model on the individual elements of a finite-element mesh of a simulated three-dimensional microstructure and compared with

  14. Modeling the Anisotropic Reflectance of a Surface with Microstructure Engineered to Obtain Visible Contrast after Rotation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luongo, Andrea; Falster, Viggo; Doest, Mads Emil Brix

    2017-01-01

    rotating it 90 degrees around its normal axis. We build an analytic anisotropic reflectance model based on the microstructure engineered to obtain such contrast. Using our model to render synthetic images, we predict the above mentioned contrasts and compare our predictions with the measurements reported...

  15. Transport processes in directional solidification and their effects on microstructure development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazumder, Prantik [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    1999-11-08

    The processing of materials with unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties plays a crucial role in modern technology. The quality of these materials depend strongly on the microstructure and the solute/dopant fields in the solid product, that are strongly influenced by the intricate coupling of heat and mass transfer and melt flow in the growth systems. An integrated research program is developed that include precisely characterized experiments and detailed physical and numerical modeling of the complex transport and dynamical processes. Direct numerical simulation of the solidification process is carried out that takes into account the unsteady thermo-solutal convection in the vertical Bridgman crystal growth system, and accurately models the thermal interaction between the furnace and the ampoule by appropriately using experimentally measured thermal profiles. The flow instabilities and transitions and the nonlinear evolution following the transitions are investigated by time series and flow pattern analysis. A range of complex dynamical behavior is predicted with increasing thermal Rayleigh number. The route to chaos appears as: steady convection → transient mono-periodic → transient bi-periodic → transient quasi-periodic → transient intermittent oscillation-relaxation → stable intermittent oscillation-relaxation attractor. The spatio-temporal dynamics of the melt flow is found to be directly related to the spatial patterns observed experimentally in the solidified crystals. The application of the model to two phase Sn-Cd peritectic alloys showed that a new class of tree-like oscillating microstructure develops in the solid phase due to unsteady thermo-solutal convection in the liquid melt. These oscillating layered structures can give the illusion of band structures on a plane of polish. The model is applied to single phase solidification in the Al-Cu and Pb-Sn systems to characterize the effect of convection on the macroscopic

  16. Deformation microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, N.; Huang, X.; Hughes, D.A.

    2004-01-01

    Microstructural characterization and modeling has shown that a variety of metals deformed by different thermomechanical processes follows a general path of grain subdivision, by dislocation boundaries and high angle boundaries. This subdivision has been observed to very small structural scales...

  17. Reassessment of the role of stress in development of radiation-induced microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garner, F.A.; Wolfer, W.G.; Brager, H.R.

    1978-10-01

    Data are now accumulating which clearly demonstrate that the stress state plays a strong role in the development of void and dislocation microstructure in metals during neutron irradiation. In these experiments the application of a tensile biaxial stress state at constant fluence and temperature has been found to lead to a progressively decreasing metal density with increasing stress. The effect of stress on the concurrent development of voids, Frank interstitial loops and dislocation networks has been studied with transmission electron microscopy. The results of these experiments clearly show that the densities of both Frank loops and voids are enhanced by a tensile stress field, with the relevant operating variable being the hydrostatic stress. More importantly it appears that any anisotropy in the stress field is reflected in a corresponding anisotropy that develops in the number of Frank loops that form on the various (111) planes. The loop density that develops on each plane exhibits a clear and direct dependence on the resolved normal stress component at each plane. Although the data from these experiments have been previously interpreted to support the existence of stress-assisted nucleation mechanisms for both loops and voids, further analysis has shown both of these explanations to be deficient in one or more respects, and both models have been replaced

  18. Modeling transmission parameters of polymer microstructured fibers for applications in FTTH networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gdula, P.; Welikow, K.; Szczepański, P.; Buczyński, R.; Piramidowicz, R.

    2011-10-01

    This paper is focused on selected aspects of designing and modeling of transmission parameters of plastic optical fibers (POFs), considered in the context of their potential applications in optical access networks and, specifically, in Fiber-To- The-Home (FTTH) systems. The survey of state-of-the-art solutions is presented and possibility of improving transmission properties of POFs by microstructurization is discussed on the basis of the first results of numerical modeling. In particular, the microstructured POF was designed supporting propagation of limited number of modes while keeping relatively large mode area and, simultaneously, significantly lowered bending losses.

  19. Neutron irradiation effects on the microstructural development of tungsten and tungsten alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Akira; Fukuda, Makoto; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei

    2016-04-01

    Data on the microstructural development of tungsten (W) and tungsten rhenium (Re) alloys were obtained after neutron irradiation at 400-800 °C in the Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR), the experimental fast test reactor Joyo, and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for irradiation damage levels in the range of 0.09-1.54 displacement per atom (dpa). Microstructural observations showed that a small amount of Re (3-5%) in W-Re alloys is effective in suppressing void formation. In W-Re alloys with Re concentrations greater than 10%, acicular precipitates are the primary structural defects. In the HFIR-irradiated specimen, in which a large amount of Re was expected to be produced by the nuclear transmutation of W to Re because of the reactor's high thermal neutron flux, voids were not observed even in pure W. The synergistic effects of displacement damage and solid transmutation elements on microstructural development are discussed, and the microstructural development of tungsten materials utilized in fusion reactors is predicted.

  20. Wetting on micro-structured surfaces: modelling and optimization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavalli, Andrea

    The present thesis deals with the wetting of micro-structured surfaces by various fluids, and its goal is to elucidate different aspects of this complex interaction. In this work we address some of the most relevant topics in this field such as superhydrophobicity, oleophobicity, unidirectional......-off angles. Such behaviour arises when drops are suspended on a micron or submicron texture, so that their contact with the substrate is minute. This suspended state (known as Cassie-Baxter state) is however prone to failure if the liquid-air interface is perturbed, a common situation in real life...... circumstances. We apply the numerical method of Topology Optimization to this problem, in order to find the optimal texture to support the superhydrophobic configuration. Our optimization provides designs which are consistent with strategies employed by Nature to achieve the same effect. Furthermore, our...

  1. Microstructural modeling of collagen network mechanics and interactions with the proteoglycan gel in articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinn, T M; Morel, V

    2007-01-01

    Cartilage matrix mechanical function is largely determined by interactions between the collagen fibrillar network and the proteoglycan gel. Although the molecular physics of these matrix constituents have been characterized and modern imaging methods are capable of localized measurement of molecular densities and orientation distributions, theoretical tools for using this information for prediction of cartilage mechanical behavior are lacking. We introduce a means to model collagen network contributions to cartilage mechanics based upon accessible microstructural information (fibril density and orientation distributions) and which self-consistently follows changes in microstructural geometry with matrix deformations. The interplay between the molecular physics of the collagen network and the proteoglycan gel is scaled up to determine matrix material properties, with features such as collagen fibril pre-stress in free-swelling cartilage emerging naturally and without introduction of ad hoc parameters. Methods are developed for theoretical treatment of the collagen network as a continuum-like distribution of fibrils, such that mechanical analysis of the network may be simplified by consideration of the spherical harmonic components of functions of the fibril orientation, strain, and stress distributions. Expressions for the collagen network contributions to matrix stress and stiffness tensors are derived, illustrating that only spherical harmonic components of orders 0 and 2 contribute to the stress, while orders 0, 2, and 4 contribute to the stiffness. Depth- and compression-dependent equilibrium mechanical properties of cartilage matrix are modeled, and advantages of the approach are illustrated by exploration of orientation and strain distributions of collagen fibrils in compressed cartilage. Results highlight collagen-proteoglycan interactions, especially for very small physiological strains where experimental data are relatively sparse. These methods for

  2. Textural and microstructural development of the Barro Alto Complex: implications for seismic anisotropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Camila; Lagoeiro, Leonardo; Barbosa, Paola; Cavalcante, Geane Carolina; Ferreira, Filippe; Suita, Marcos; Conte, Thailli

    2017-04-01

    Crustal rheology is associated with the behavior of its constituents in response to stress and strain, while the seismic anisotropy is a property that can correlate these parameters. Seismic properties are strongly related to the microstructures and crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) of the rocks. In this work, we study CPO-derived seismic anisotropy of metamorphosed gabbro-norites from the Barro Alto (Brazil central) layered complex. The EBSD technique was employed to analyze the crystallographic orientation of the main mineral assembly, diopside and feldspar. The Barro Alto complex belongs to the Tocantins Structural Province, developed between the Amazon and São Francisco cratons, during the Neoproterozoic Brasiliano orogenic cycle. This complex was formed by a mafic-ultramafic layered intrusion mylonitized and metamorphosed under granulite facies conditions. The mylonitic foliation shows compositional segregation into felsic and mafic bands. The samples are composed of porphyroclasts of plagioclase and diopside in a fine matrix of plagioclase, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene and, less commonly, amphibole and biotite. The plagioclase porphyroclasts exhibit undulose extinction and core-mantle structure. In fine matrix samples the poles to a(100), b(010) and c(001) are randomly distributed in both phases. However, for increasing matrix grain size plagioclase grains shows maxima of a(100) poles sub-parallel to the foliation and b(010) normal to the foliation. The low value of the J index (2.4 for plagioclase and 1.8 for diopside) indicates poorly developed fabric. Misorientation profiles showing high frequency of small angle boundaries are typical of recrystallization by subgrain rotation mechanisms. The microstructural and CPO analyses suggest deformation controlled by diffusive processes. The CPO models were compared to models described in the literature, based on the anorthite + diopside assembly, since these are the major phases, and thus control the

  3. Microstructure representations for sound absorbing fibrous media: 3D and 2D multiscale modelling and experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zieliński, Tomasz G.

    2017-11-01

    The paper proposes and investigates computationally-efficient microstructure representations for sound absorbing fibrous media. Three-dimensional volume elements involving non-trivial periodic arrangements of straight fibres are examined as well as simple two-dimensional cells. It has been found that a simple 2D quasi-representative cell can provide similar predictions as a volume element which is in general much more geometrically accurate for typical fibrous materials. The multiscale modelling allowed to determine the effective speeds and damping of acoustic waves propagating in such media, which brings up a discussion on the correlation between the speed, penetration range and attenuation of sound waves. Original experiments on manufactured copper-wire samples are presented and the microstructure-based calculations of acoustic absorption are compared with the corresponding experimental results. In fact, the comparison suggested the microstructure modifications leading to representations with non-uniformly distributed fibres.

  4. Differential microstructural alterations in rat cerebral cortex in a model of chronic mild stress depression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khan, Ahmad Raza; Kroenke, Christopher D; Wiborg, Ove

    2018-01-01

    Chronic mild stress leads to depression in many cases and is linked to several debilitating diseases including mental disorders. Recently, neuronal tracing techniques, stereology, and immunohistochemistry have revealed persistent and significant microstructural alterations in the hippocampus......, hypothalamus, prefrontal cortex, and amygdala, which form an interconnected system known as the stress circuit. Most studies have focused only on this circuit, however, some studies indicate that manipulation of sensory and motor systems may impact genesis and therapy of mood disorders and therefore...... these areas should not be neglected in the study of brain microstructure alterations in response to stress and depression. For this reason, we explore the microstructural alterations in different cortical regions in a chronic mild stress model of depression. The study employs ex-vivo diffusion MRI (d...

  5. Microstructural strength of tidal soils – a rheometric approach to develop pedotransfer functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stoppe Nina

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Differences in soil stability, especially in visually comparable soils can occur due to microstructural processes and interactions. By investigating these microstructural processes with rheological investigations, it is possible to achieve a better understanding of soil behaviour from the mesoscale (soil aggregates to macroscale (bulk soil. In this paper, a rheological investigation of the factors influencing microstructural stability of riparian soils was conducted. Homogenized samples of Marshland soils from the riparian zone of the Elbe River (North Germany were analyzed with amplitude sweeps (AS under controlled shear deformation in a modular compact rheometer MCR 300 (Anton Paar, Germany at different matric potentials. A range physicochemical parameters were determined (texture, pH, organic matter, CaCO3 etc. and these factors were used to parameterize pedotransfer functions. The results indicate a clear dependence of microstructural elasticity on texture and water content. Although the influence of individual physicochemical factors varies depending on texture, the relevant features were identified taking combined effects into account. Thus, stabilizing factors are: organic matter, calcium ions, CaCO3 and pedogenic iron oxides; whereas sodium ions and water content represent structurally unfavorable factors. Based on the determined statistical relationships between rheological and physicochemical parameters, pedotransfer functions (PTF have been developed.

  6. Microstructure, length, and connection of limbic tracts in normal human brain development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiaowen eYu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The cingulum and fornix play an important role in memory, attention, spatial orientation and feeling functions. Both microstructure and length of these limbic tracts can be affected by mental disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, depression, autism, anxiety, and schizophrenia. To date, there has been little systematic characterization of their microstructure, length and functional connectivity in normally developing brains. In this study, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI and resting state functional MRI (rs-fMRI data from 65 normally developing right-handed subjects from birth to young adulthood was acquired. After cingulate gyrus part of the cingulum (cgc, hippocampal part of the cingulum (cgh and fornix (fx were traced with DTI tractography, absolute and normalized tract lengths and DTI-derived metrics including fractional anisotropy, mean, axial and radial diffusivity were measured for traced limbic tracts. Free water elimination (FWE algorithm was adopted to improve accuracy of the measurements of DTI-derived metrics. The role of these limbic tracts in the functional network at birth and adulthood was explored. We found a logarithmic age-dependent trajectory for FWE-corrected DTI metric changes with fast increase of microstructural integrity from birth to 2-year-old followed by a slow increase to 25-year-old. Normalized tract length of cgc increases with age, while no significant relationship with age was found for normalized tract lengths of cgh and fx. Stronger microstructural integrity on the left side compared to that of right side was found. With integrated DTI and rs-fMRI, the key connectional role of cgc and cgh in the default mode network (DMN was confirmed as early as birth. Systematic characterization of length and DTI metrics after FWE correction of limbic tracts offers insight into their morphological and microstructural developmental trajectories. These trajectories may serve as a normal reference for pediatric patients with

  7. 3D RECONSTRUCTION OF A MULTISCALE MICROSTRUCTURE BY ANISOTROPIC TESSELLATION MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hellen Altendorf

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In the area of tessellation models, there is an intense activity to fully understand the classical models of Voronoi, Laguerre and Johnson-Mehl. Still, these models are all simulations of isotropic growth and are therefore limited to very simple and partly convex cell shapes. The here considered microstructure of martensitic steel has a much more complex and highly non convex cell shape, requiring new tessellation models. This paper presents a new approach for anisotropic tessellation models that resolve to the well-studied cases of Laguerre and Johnson-Mehl for spherical germs. Much better reconstructions can be achieved with these models and thus more realistic microstructure simulations can be produced for materials widely used in industry like martensitic and bainitic steels.

  8. Cluster dynamics modeling of the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructure of austenitic stainless steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brimbal, Daniel, E-mail: Daniel.brimbal@areva.com [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Fournier, Lionel [AREVA NP, Tour AREVA, 1 Place Jean Millier, 92084 Paris La Défense (France); Barbu, Alain [Alain Barbu Consultant, 6 Avenue Pasteur Martin Luther King, 78230 Le Pecq (France)

    2016-01-15

    A mean field cluster dynamics model has been developed in order to study the effect of high dose irradiation and helium on the microstructural evolution of metals. In this model, self-interstitial clusters, stacking-fault tetrahedra and helium-vacancy clusters are taken into account, in a configuration well adapted to austenitic stainless steels. For small helium-vacancy cluster sizes, the densities of each small cluster are calculated. However, for large sizes, only the mean number of helium atoms per cluster size is calculated. This aspect allows us to calculate the evolution of the microstructural features up to high irradiation doses in a few minutes. It is shown that the presence of stacking-fault tetrahedra notably reduces cavity sizes below 400 °C, but they have little influence on the microstructure above this temperature. The binding energies of vacancies to cavities are calculated using a new method essentially based on ab initio data. It is shown that helium has little effect on the cavity microstructure at 300 °C. However, at higher temperatures, even small helium production rates such as those typical of sodium-fast-reactors induce a notable increase in cavity density compared to an irradiation without helium. - Highlights: • Irradiation of steels with helium is studied through a new cluster dynamics model. • There is only a small effect of helium on cavity distributions in PWR conditions. • An increase in helium production causes an increase in cavity density over 500 °C. • The role of helium is to stabilize cavities via reduced emission of vacancies.

  9. Development of Metallographic Etchants for the Microstructure Evolution of A6082-T6 BFSW Welds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbas Tamadon

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND—The solid-phase joining of A6082-T6 plates by bobbin friction stir welding (BFSW is problematic. Better methods are needed to evaluate the microstructural evolution of the weld. However, conventional Al reagents (e.g., Keller’s and Kroll’s do not elucidate the microstructure satisfactorily, specifically regarding grain size and morphology within the weld region. APPROACH—We developed innovative etchants for metallographic observations for optical microscopy. RESULTS—The macrostructure and microstructure of A6082-T6 BFSW welds were clearly demonstrated by optical microscopy analysis. The microetching results demonstrated different microstructures of the Stir Zone (S.Z distinct from the Base Metal (B.M and Heat Affected Zone (HAZ & Thermo-mechanical Affected Zone (TMAZ. The micrographs showed a significant decrease in grain size from 100 μm in B.M to ultrafine 4–10 μm grains for the S.Z. Also, the grain morphology changed from directional columnar in the B.M to equiaxed in the S.Z. Furthermore, thermomechanical recrystallization was observed by the morphological flow of the grain distortion in HAZ and TMAZ. The etchants also clearly show the polycrystalline structure, microflow patterns, and the incoherent interface around inclusion defects. ORIGINALITY—Chemical compositions are identified for a suite of etchant reagents for metallographic examination of the friction-stir welded A6082-T6 alloy. The reagents have made it possible to reveal microstructures not previously evident with optical microscopy.

  10. Determination of Basic Structure-Property Relations for Processing and Modeling in Advanced Nuclear Fuel: Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wheeler, Kirk; Parra, Manuel; Peralta, Pedro

    2009-01-01

    The project objective is to study structure-property relations in solid solutions of nitrides and oxides with surrogate elements to simulate the behavior of fuels of inert matrix fuels of interest to the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative (AFCI), with emphasis in zirconium-based materials. Work with actual fuels will be carried out in parallel in collaboration with Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Three key aspects will be explored: microstructure characterization through measurement of global texture evolution and local crystallographic variations using Electron Backscattering Diffraction (EBSD); determination of mechanical properties, including fracture toughness, quasi-static compression strength, and hardness, as functions of load and temperature, and, finally, development of structure-property relations to describe mechanical behavior of the fuels based on experimental data. Materials tested will be characterized to identify the mechanisms of deformation and fracture and their relationship to microstructure and its evolution. New aspects of this research are the inclusion of crystallographic information into the evaluation of fuel performance and the incorporation of statistical variations of microstructural variables into simplified models of mechanical behavior of fuels that account explicitly for these variations. The work is expected to provide insight into processing conditions leading to better fuel performance and structural reliability during manufacturing and service, as well as providing a simplified testing model for future fuel production

  11. Development of Structural Steel Containing 3÷5 wt% Al with Microlaminated Microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garbarz B.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to develop basic parameters of hot rolling and controlled cooling technology allowing to obtain the microlaminated (lamellar microstructure in a lean-alloy structural steel containing 3÷5 wt % Al. Thermo-mechanical rolling tests of two experimental steels were carried out in a semi-industrial line comprising a one – stand reversing rolling mill. The final microstructure of the specimens subjected to rolling in the γ + α stability region characterised with the microlaminated morphology composed of lamellae of ferrite with thickness down to 1 μm or less and lamellae or grains of phases developed during transformation of the austenite. Determined parameters of the thermo-mechanical processing allowed to achieve very attractive mechanical properties of the experimental steels: tensile strength over 1.0 GPa and ductility level (total elongation better than 15%.

  12. Microstructural and Texture Development in Two Austenitic Steels with High-Manganese Content

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattacharya, Basudev; Ray, Ranjit Kumar; Leffers, Torben

    2015-01-01

    Two austenitic steels, Fe-21.3Mn-3.44Si-3.74Al-0.5C and Fe-29.8Mn-2.96Si-2.73Al-0.52C, were subjected to cold rolling with 30 to 80 pct reduction with an increment of 10 pct and subsequently the development of their microstructures and textures were studied. The overall texture after 80 pct cold ...

  13. Blended cement-lime mortars for conservation purposes: Microstructure and strength development

    OpenAIRE

    Cizer, Özlem; Van Balen, Koenraad; Van Gemert, Dionys; Elsen, Jan

    2008-01-01

    Blended lime-cement mortars are commonly used in conservation practices even though they may show lack of adequate strength and durability for certain cement-lime compositions. This paper focuses on understanding the hardening reactions and their influence on the strength development, microstructure and porosity for the cement-lime mortars in various compositions. Mortars composed of 30%, 50% and 70% ce-ment replacement with lime hydrate and lime putty by mass were studied. Cement hydration h...

  14. Development of a new dual phase steel with laminated microstructural morphology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeidi, N., E-mail: navidsae@gmail.com [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 4156–83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Karimi, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Shahrood University of Technology, Shahrood, 3619995161 (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Toroghinejad, M.R. [Department of Materials Engineering, Isfahan University of Technology, Isfahan, 4156–83111 (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2017-05-01

    The development of dual phase steels to meet the current world demands, for the purpose of decreasing the fuel consumption with increasing the strength to weight ratio, requires certain microstructural modifications. In the present research, a new morphology of DP steel, known as Laminated–DP steel, as well as its unique production method has been introduced. The new process developed involved properly selecting low carbon steels, stacking them in a laminated manner and performing a roll bonding process followed by short austenitization treatment. The martensite volume fraction was designed and obtained to be 24%. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was employed for microstructural examination. Moreover, deformation and tensile behavior of the newly developed steel were studied and compared with those of some ordinary DP steel (ODP). Room temperature uniaxial tensile tests also revealed mechanical properties comparable with those of the commercial DP600 steel, a kind of structural automotive steel. - Highlights: • A new method for producing dual phase steels was introduced. • Employing a new thermo-mechanical process a laminated microstructure was obtained. • Mechanical properties of the new laminated DP steel were studied. • Tensile properties of the new DP steel were comparable with those of the commercial DP600 steel.

  15. Microstructure and texture development during high-strain torsion of NiAl

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kloeden, B.

    2006-07-01

    In this study polycrystalline NiAl has been subjected to torsion deformation. The deformation, microstructure and texture development subject to the shear strain are studied by different techniques (Electron Back-Scatter and High Energy Synchrotron Radiation). Beside the development of microstructure and texture with shear strain, the effect of an initial texture as well as the deformation temperature on the development of texture and microstructure constitute an important part of this study. Therefore, samples with three different initial textures were deformed in the temperature range T=700 K-1300 K. The shear stress-shear strain curves are characterized by a peak at low strains, which is followed by softening and a steady state at high strains. Grain refinement takes place for all samples and the average grain size decreases with temperature. For temperatures T>1000 K, discontinuous dynamic recrystallization occurs, by which new grains form by nucleation and subsequent growth. The texture is characterized by two components, {l_brace}100{r_brace}<100> (cube,C) and {l_brace}110{r_brace}<100> (Goss,G). Torsional creep of NiAl is characterized by a stress exponent, which depends on temperature and an activation energy, which is stress dependent. The Swift effect, due to which samples change their axial dimension during torsion without applied axial stress, is observed for NiAl. (orig.)

  16. Role of Polycarboxylate-ether superplasticizers on cement hydration kinetics and microstructural development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentini L.

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycarboxylate-ether (PCE superplasticizers are a fundamental constituent of modern cementbased materials due to their impact on the rheology of the fresh mix and mechanical performance of the hardened material. The effect of PCEs on cement hydration kinetics has been known since their introduction in the early 1980s. However, detailed knowledge of the role played by PCE macromolecules on the basic mechanisms of cement hydration (dissolution, diffusion, precipitation is still lacking. A better understanding of how such mechanisms are influenced by the addition of PCE is no doubt beneficial to the design of novel superplasticizing admixtures. Here, I report on some recent findings about the role of PCE superplasticizers on cement hydration kinetics and microstructural development. The interaction between PCE and C3S pastes was investigated by an ad-hoc kinetic model based on a combination of generalized forms of the Avrami and BNG (Boundary Nucleation and Growth models. The model is used to fit the rate of C-S-H precipitation measured by in-situ X-ray powder diffraction combined with mass balance calculations. The results show that a switch from heterogeneous to homogeneous C-S-H nucleation occurs in the presence of PCEs and that the C-S-H growth rate decreases proportionally to the amount of PCE used. The predicted switch to homogeneous nucleation is in agreement with experimental results obtained by XRD-enhanced micro-tomography imaging, showing that, in the presence of PCE, C-S-H preferentially forms in the pore space rather than at the surface of clinker particles.

  17. Microstructural development of tungsten and tungsten-rhenium alloys due to neutron irradiation in HFIR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Makoto; Yabuuchi, Kiyohiro; Nogami, Shuhei; Hasegawa, Akira; Tanaka, Teruya

    2014-12-01

    The microstructural development of pure tungsten (W) and tungsten-rhenium (Re) alloys due to neutron irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, TN, USA, was investigated in this work. The irradiation conditions were ∼1 displacements per atom (dpa) at 500 and 800 °C. After the neutron irradiation, microstructural observations were performed using a transmission electron microscope (TEM). Large amounts of precipitates identified as sigma- and chi-phases were observed in not only the W-Re alloys but also in the pure W after the neutron irradiation. The precipitates observed in the pure W were coarse and larger than those in the W-Re alloys. This was considered to be caused by the transmutation products of W and Re, namely, Re and osmium (Os), respectively, under irradiation in the HFIR with a higher contents of thermal neutron flux.

  18. Microstructure based model for sound absorption predictions of perforated closed-cell metallic foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevillotte, Fabien; Perrot, Camille; Panneton, Raymond

    2010-10-01

    Closed-cell metallic foams are known for their rigidity, lightness, thermal conductivity as well as their low production cost compared to open-cell metallic foams. However, they are also poor sound absorbers. Similarly to a rigid solid, a method to enhance their sound absorption is to perforate them. This method has shown good preliminary results but has not yet been analyzed from a microstructure point of view. The objective of this work is to better understand how perforations interact with closed-cell foam microstructure and how it modifies the sound absorption of the foam. A simple two-dimensional microstructural model of the perforated closed-cell metallic foam is presented and numerically solved. A rough three-dimensional conversion of the two-dimensional results is proposed. The results obtained with the calculation method show that the perforated closed-cell foam behaves similarly to a perforated solid; however, its sound absorption is modulated by the foam microstructure, and most particularly by the diameters of both perforation and pore. A comparison with measurements demonstrates that the proposed calculation method yields realistic trends. Some design guides are also proposed.

  19. A Monte-Carlo Model for Microstructure-Induced Ultrasonic Signal Fluctuations in Titanium Alloy Inspections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Linxiao; Thompson, R.B.; Margetan, F.J.; Wang Yurong

    2004-01-01

    In ultrasonic inspections of some jet-engine alloys, microstructural inhomogeneities act to significantly distort the amplitude and phase profiles of the incident sonic beam, and these distortions lead in turn to ultrasonic amplitude variations. For example, in pulse/echo inspections the back-wall signal amplitude is often seen to fluctuate dramatically when scanning a transducer parallel to a flat specimen. The stochastic nature of the ultrasonic response has obvious implications for both flaw characterization and probability of detection, and tools to estimate fluctuation levels are needed. In this study, as a first step, we develop a quantitative Monte-Carlo model to predict the back-wall amplitude fluctuations seen in ultrasonic pulse/echo inspections. Inputs to the model include statistical descriptions of various beam distortion effects, namely: the lateral 'drift' of the center-of-energy about its expected position; the distortion of pressure amplitude about its expected pattern; and two types of wave-front distortion ('wrinkling' and 'tilting'). The model inputs are deduced by analyzing through-transmission measurements in which the sonic beam emerging from an immersed metal specimen is mapped using a small receiver. The mapped field is compared to the model prediction for a homogeneous metal, and statistical parameters describing the differences are deduced using the technique of 'maximum likelihood estimation' (MLE). Our modeling approach is demonstrated using rectangular coupons of jet-engine Titanium alloys, and predicted back-wall fluctuation levels are shown to be in good agreement with experiment. As a new way of modeling ultrasonic signal fluctuations, the approach outlined in this paper suggests many possibilities for future research

  20. Characteristics of solid-core square-lattice microstructured optical fibers using an analytical field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Sharma, Anurag; Tripathi, Saurabh Mani

    2017-11-01

    The excellent propagation properties of square-lattice microstructured optical fibers (MOFs) have been widely recognized. We generalized our recently developed analytical field model (Sharma and Sharma, 2016), for index-guiding MOFs with square-lattice of circular air-holes in the photonic crystal cladding. Using the field model, we have studied the propagation properties of the fundamental mode of index-guiding square-lattice MOFs with different hole-to-hole spacing and the air-hole diameter. Results for the modal effective index, near and the far-field patterns and the group-velocity dispersion have been included. The evolution of the mode shape has been investigated in transition from the near to the far-field domain. We have also studied the splice losses between two identical square-lattice MOFs and also between an MOF and a traditional step-index single-mode fiber. Comparisons with available numerical simulation results, e.g., those based on the full-vector finite element method have also been included.

  1. Fatigue lifetime investigations on aluminium 2024 under two stage cyclic loading by means of experiments and three microstructural models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burkart, K.; Schleicher, M.; Jansen, C.; Bomas, H.; Mayr, P.

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this work is to achieve information about the development of fatigue failure in the aluminium alloy 2024. The attention was focused on short fatigue cracks under cyclic loading and the occurring load sequence effects on lifetime under two-level cyclic loading. Following the experiments, a revision of three different microstructural crack growth models, which were found in the literature, was made. Based on the data of constant-level cyclic loading, predictions of two-level cyclic loading behaviour were made and compared with the experimentally measured crack propagation rates and reached lifetimes. (orig.) [de

  2. Factors governing microstructure development of Cr2O3-doped UO2 during sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bourgeois, L.; Dehaudt, Ph.; Lemaignan, C.; Hammou, A.

    2001-01-01

    Sintering and grain growth of compacted uranium dioxide powder pellets doped with Cr 2 O 3 were investigated at constant heating rates ranging from 75 to 500 K h -1 . The influence of parameters such as the oxygen potential of the sintering atmosphere and pellet green density on the final microstructure was studied. Dilatometric analysis and monitoring of microstructural development revealed a phenomenon of abnormal grain growth promoting densification. The existence of a eutectic between Cr and Cr 2 O 3 is also discussed. Grain growth does not appear to be widely affected by small differences in residual porosity, which is a function of green density, so that it is possible to propose a solubility limit for Cr 2 O 3 in stoichiometric UO 2 at 1700 deg. C. Examination of microstructural changes during annealing, with or without pore formers, showed the existence of limiting grain sizes for doped samples above the solubility limit. Lastly, experimental sintering conditions need to be checked in order to obtain reproducible results [fr

  3. Neutron energy spectrum influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development of tungsten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Makoto, E-mail: makoto.fukuda@qse.tohoku.ac.jp [Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan); Kiran Kumar, N.A.P.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Garrison, Lauren M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Snead, Lance L. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 02139 (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN, 37831 (United States); Hasegawa, Akira [Tohoku University, Sendai, 980-8579 (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    Neutron irradiation to single crystal pure tungsten was performed in the mixed spectrum High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). To investigate the influences of neutron energy spectrum, the microstructure and irradiation hardening were compared with previous data obtained from the irradiation campaigns in the mixed spectrum Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the sodium-cooled fast reactor Joyo. The irradiation temperatures were in the range of ∼90–∼800 °C and fast neutron fluences were 0.02–9.00 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV). Post irradiation evaluation included Vickers hardness measurements and transmission electron microscopy. The hardness and microstructure changes exhibited a clear dependence on the neutron energy spectrum. The hardness appeared to increase with increasing thermal neutron flux when fast fluence exceeds 1 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV). Irradiation induced precipitates considered to be χ- and σ-phases were observed in samples irradiated to >1 × 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} (E > 0.1 MeV), which were pronounced at high dose and due to the very high thermal neutron flux of HFIR. Although the irradiation hardening mainly caused by defects clusters in a low dose regime, the transmutation-induced precipitation appeared to impose additional significant hardening of the tungsten. - Highlights: • The microstructure and irradiation hardening of single crystal pure W irradiated in HFIR was investigated. • The neutron energy spectrum influence was evaluated by comparing the HFIR results with previous work in Joyo and JMTR. • In the dose range up to ∼1 dpa, the neutron energy spectrum influence of irradiation hardening was not clear. • In the dose range above 1 dpa, the neutron energy influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development was clearly observed. • The irradiation induced precipitates caused significant irradiation hardening of pure W irradiated in HFIR.

  4. A numerical model for modeling microstructure and THM couplings in fault gouges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veveakis, M.; Rattez, H.; Stefanou, I.; Sulem, J.; Poulet, T.

    2017-12-01

    When materials are subjected to large deformations, most of them experience inelastic deformations, accompanied by a localization of these deformations into a narrow zone leading to failure. Localization is seen as an instability from the homogeneous state of deformation. Therefore a first approach to study it consists at looking at the possible critical conditions for which the constitutive equations of the material allow a bifurcation point (Rudnicki & Rice 1975). But in some cases, we would like to know the evolution of the material after the onset of localization. For example, a fault in the crustal part of the lithosphere is a shear band and the study of this localized zone enables to extract information about seismic slip. For that, we need to approximate the solution of a nonlinear boundary value problem numerically. It is a challenging task due to the complications that arise while dealing with a softening behavior. Indeed, the classical continuum theory cannot be used because the governing system of equations is ill-posed (Vardoulakis 1985). This ill-posedness can be tracked back to the fact that constitutive models don't contain material parameters with the dimension of a length. It leads to what is called "mesh dependency" for numerical simulations, as the deformations localize in only one element of the mesh and the behavior of the system depends thus on the mesh size. A way to regularize the problem is to resort to continuum models with microstructure, such as Cosserat continua (Sulem et al. 2011). Cosserat theory is particularly interesting as it can explicitly take into account the size of the microstructure in a fault gouge. Basically, it introduces 3 degrees of freedom of rotation on top of the 3 translations (Godio et al. 2016). The original work of (Mühlhaus & Vardoulakis 1987) is extended in 3D and thermo-hydro mechanical couplings are added to the model to study fault system in the crustal part of the lithosphere. The system of equations is

  5. Final Report on Developing Microstructure-Property Correlation in Reactor Materials using in situ High-Energy X-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Meimei [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Almer, Jonathan D. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Yang, Yong [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States); Tan, Lizhen [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a summary of research activities on understanding microstructure – property correlation in reactor materials using in situ high-energy X-rays. The report is a Level 2 deliverable in FY16 (M2CA-13-IL-AN_-0403-0111), under the Work Package CA-13-IL-AN_- 0403-01, “Microstructure-Property Correlation in Reactor Materials using in situ High Energy Xrays”, as part of the DOE-NE NEET Program. The objective of this project is to demonstrate the application of in situ high energy X-ray measurements of nuclear reactor materials under thermal-mechanical loading, to understand their microstructure-property relationships. The gained knowledge is expected to enable accurate predictions of mechanical performance of these materials subjected to extreme environments, and to further facilitate development of advanced reactor materials. The report provides detailed description of the in situ X-ray Radiated Materials (iRadMat) apparatus designed to interface with a servo-hydraulic load frame at beamline 1-ID at the Advanced Photon Source. This new capability allows in situ studies of radioactive specimens subject to thermal-mechanical loading using a suite of high-energy X-ray scattering and imaging techniques. We conducted several case studies using the iRadMat to obtain a better understanding of deformation and fracture mechanisms of irradiated materials. In situ X-ray measurements on neutron-irradiated pure metal and model alloy and several representative reactor materials, e.g. pure Fe, Fe-9Cr model alloy, 316 SS, HT-UPS, and duplex cast austenitic stainless steels (CASS) CF-8 were performed under tensile loading at temperatures of 20-400°C in vacuum. A combination of wide-angle X-ray scattering (WAXS), small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), and imaging techniques were utilized to interrogate microstructure at different length scales in real time while the specimen was subject to thermal-mechanical loading. In addition, in situ X-ray studies were

  6. Modeling macro-and microstructures of Gas-Metal-Arc Welded HSLA-100 steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Z.; Debroy, T.

    1999-06-01

    Fluid flow and heat transfer during gas-metal-arc welding (GMAW) of HSLA-100 steel were studied using a transient, three-dimensional, turbulent heat transfer and fluid flow model. The temperature and velocity fields, cooling rates, and shape and size of the fusion and heat-affected zones (HAZs) were calculated. A continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagram was computed to aid in the understanding of the observed weld metal microstructure. The computed results demonstrate that the dissipation of heat and momentum in the weld pool is significantly aided by turbulence, thus suggesting that previous modeling results based on laminar flow need to be re-examined. A comparison of the calculated fusion and HAZ geometries with their corresponding measured values showed good agreement. Furthermore, “finger” penetration, a unique geometric characteristic of gas-metal-arc weld pools, could be satisfactorily predicted from the model. The ability to predict these geometric variables and the agreement between the calculated and the measured cooling rates indicate the appropriateness of using a turbulence model for accurate calculations. The microstructure of the weld metal consisted mainly of acicular ferrite with small amounts of bainite. At high heat inputs, small amounts of allotriomorphic and Widmanstätten ferrite were also observed. The observed microstructures are consistent with those expected from the computed CCT diagram and the cooling rates. The results presented here demonstrate significant promise for understanding both macro-and microstructures of steel welds from the combination of the fundamental principles from both transport phenomena and phase transformation theory.

  7. Mechanical Modelling of Cancellous Bone from their Microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruiz–Cervantes O.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper is established a spongy bone bidimensional models methodology for its analysis by finite element software. The models are focused to represent the bone trabecular structure by Voronoi cells, using the coordinates of the porous center, contained within the bone structure, obtained by optical microscope images. Looking for a better geometrical similarity, it was assigned a thicker transversal area in the trabecula union zone, because has been reported that this factor gives a better approximation to experimental results. To feed the finite element models, compression test has been done to trabecular specimens, taking the maximum strain and maximum stress, to obtain the elastic modulus. By means of strained specimen images analysis, it has been established the structure collapse moment. It was when the 36% of total trabeculae failed. Finally it was obtained a tissue Young modulus of 323 [MPa] and with this value, the resistance variation in function of density and trabecular architecture.

  8. Microstructure evolution during cyclic tests on EUROFER 97 at room temperature. TEM observation and modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giordana, M.F., E-mail: giordana@ifir-conicet.gov.ar [Instituto de Fisica Rosario, CONICET-UNR, Bv. 27 de Febrero 210 Bis, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Giroux, P.-F. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Alvarez-Armas, I. [Instituto de Fisica Rosario, CONICET-UNR, Bv. 27 de Febrero 210 Bis, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Sauzay, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, DEN/DANS/DMN/SRMA, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France); Armas, A. [Instituto de Fisica Rosario, CONICET-UNR, Bv. 27 de Febrero 210 Bis, 2000 Rosario (Argentina); Kruml, T. [CEITEC IPM, Institute of Physics of Materials, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Zizkova 22, Brno, 616 62 (Czech Republic)

    2012-07-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Low cycle fatigue test are carried out on EUROFER 97 at room temperature. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EUROFER 97 shows a pronounced cyclic softening accompanied by microstructural changes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cycling induces a decrement in dislocation density and subgrain growth. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A simple mean-field model based on crystalline plasticity is proposed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mean subgrain size evolution is predicted by modelling. - Abstract: The 9% Cr quenched and tempered reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steel EUROFER 97 is one of the candidates for structural components of fusion reactors. Isothermal, plastic strain-controlled, low-cycle fatigue tests are performed. Tested at room temperature, this steel suffers a cyclic softening effect linked to microstructural changes observed by transmission electron microscopy, such as the decrease of dislocation density inside subgrains or the growth of subgrain size. From the assumed mechanisms of softening a simple mean-field model based on crystalline plasticity is proposed to predict these microstructure evolutions during cycling and monotonic deformation.

  9. Microstructured optical fibers for terahertz waveguiding regime by using an analytical field model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Dinesh Kumar; Sharma, Anurag; Tripathi, Saurabh Mani

    2017-12-01

    Microstructured optical fibres (MOFs) are seen as novel optical waveguide for the potential applications in the terahertz (THz) band as they provide a flexible route towards THz waveguiding. Using the analytical field model (Sharma et al., 2014) developed for index-guiding MOFs with hexagonal lattice of circular air-holes in the photonic crystal cladding; we aim to study the propagation characteristics such as effective index, near and the far-field radiation patterns and its evolution from near-to-far-field domain, spot size, effective mode area, and the numerical aperture at the THz regime. Further, we present an analytical field expression for the next higher-order mode of the MOF for studying the modal properties at terahertz frequencies. Also, we investigate the mode cut-off conditions for identifying the single-mode operation range at THz frequencies. Emphasis is put on studying the coupling characteristics of MOF geometries for efficient mode coupling. Comparisons with available experimental and numerical simulation results, e.g., those based on the full-vector finite element method (FEM) and the finite-difference frequency-domain (FDFD) method have been included.

  10. Microstructure development in latex coatings: High-resolution cryo-scanning electron microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Haiyan

    2005-07-01

    High-resolution cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-SEM) was used to investigate microstructure development in drying latex coatings: from a colloidal stable suspension into a coherent strong film by drying. Useful sample preparation artifacts during the freeze-fracture, i.e., pullouts were documented and analyzed. Pullouts indicate both physical properties of latex particles and the drying stages in latex coatings. The mechanism of pullout formation was studied both theoretically and experimentally. Latex coatings must possess satisfactory freeze-thaw stability to avoid problems during transportation and storage in cold winter. The behavior of latex particles during freeze-thaw cycles was visualized by Cryo-SEM. The images indicated that high concentration of polymerizable surfactant in a latex suspension improved its freeze-thaw stability. In film formation, skinning was captured from edge in and top down in coatings of 80nm diameter styrene-butadiene latex particles with exceptional low Tg (-65°C). Effects on skinning of drying conditions and the way the latex was initially stabilized against flocculation were investigated. A skinned pocket was unexpectedly found in the coating. The cause of such a skin around the air bubble was explained by both simple models calculating the dissolution time and force analysis on the particles. The film formation processes in conventional and low volatile organic compound (VOC) latex coatings were compared by time-sectioning Cryo-SEM. Some low-VOC latex coatings were found to dry as fast as conventional ones without deteriorating final good film properties.

  11. A model for the grain refinement mechanism in equal channel angular pressing of Mg alloy from microstructural studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, C.W. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore); Lu, L. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)]. E-mail: mpeluli@nus.edu.sg; Lai, M.O. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National University of Singapore, 9 Engineering Drive 1, Singapore 117576 (Singapore)

    2006-10-25

    AZ31 Mg alloy samples were processed by the equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) process at 200 deg. C for up to four passes. Microstructural evolution during ECAP was studied systematically using optical microscope and transmission electron microscope. Using data observed from the microstructure analysis, a model for the grain refinement mechanism of Mg during ECAP is proposed. Multiple pass ECAP was also conducted at different temperatures to further confirm the proposed model.

  12. Developing strong concurrent multiphysics multiscale coupling to understand the impact of microstructural mechanisms on the structural scale

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foulk, James W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Alleman, Coleman N. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Mota, Alejandro [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Lim, Hojun [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Littlewood, David John [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bergel, Guy Leshem [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Popova, Evdokia [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering; Montes de Oca Zapiain, David [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering; Kalidindi, Suryanarayana Raju [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States). Woodruff School of Mechanical Engineering; Ernst, Corey [Elemental Technologies, Provo, UT (United States)

    2017-09-01

    The heterogeneity in mechanical fields introduced by microstructure plays a critical role in the localization of deformation. To resolve this incipient stage of failure, it is therefore necessary to incorporate microstructure with sufficient resolution. On the other hand, computational limitations make it infeasible to represent the microstructure in the entire domain at the component scale. In this study, the authors demonstrate the use of concurrent multi- scale modeling to incorporate explicit, finely resolved microstructure in a critical region while resolving the smoother mechanical fields outside this region with a coarser discretization to limit computational cost. The microstructural physics is modeled with a high-fidelity model that incorporates anisotropic crystal elasticity and rate-dependent crystal plasticity to simulate the behavior of a stainless steel alloy. The component-scale material behavior is treated with a lower fidelity model incorporating isotropic linear elasticity and rate-independent J 2 plas- ticity. The microstructural and component scale subdomains are modeled concurrently, with coupling via the Schwarz alternating method, which solves boundary-value problems in each subdomain separately and transfers solution information between subdomains via Dirichlet boundary conditions. Beyond cases studies in concurrent multiscale, we explore progress in crystal plastic- ity through modular designs, solution methodologies, model verification, and extensions to Sierra/SM and manycore applications. Advances in conformal microstructures having both hexahedral and tetrahedral workflows in Sculpt and Cubit are highlighted. A structure-property case study in two-phase metallic composites applies the Materials Knowledge System to local metrics for void evolution. Discussion includes lessons learned, future work, and a summary of funded efforts and proposed work. Finally, an appendix illustrates the need for two-way coupling through a single degree of

  13. Phase-field models of microstructure evolution in a system with elastic inhomogeneity and defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shenyang

    In this thesis, the phase-field approach is employed to study the effect of elastic inhomogeneity and structural defects on phase separation kinetics and morphological evolution in bulk and film systems, the precipitation of theta ' phase (Al2Cu) in Al-Cu alloys, and solute strengthening of alloys. By combining the iteration method for calculating the elastic energy and a semi-implicit spectral method for solving the Cahn-Hilliard equation an extremely efficient phase-field model is developed for studying morphological evolution in coherent systems with large elastic inhomogeneity. Spinodal decomposition in a thin film with periodically distributed arrays of interfacial dislocations is simulated. The results show that the periodic stress field associated with the array of interfacial dislocations leads to a directional phase separation and the formation of ordered microstructures. The metastable theta' (Al2Cu) precipitates are one of the primary strengthening precipitates in Al-Cu alloys. They are of a plate-like shape with strong interfacial energy and mobility anisotropies. A phase-field model which can automatically incorporate the thermodynamic and kinetic information from databases is developed. The relationships between phase-field model parameters and material thermodynamic and kinetic properties are established. Systematic simulations of theta' growth in 1D, 2D and 3D are carried out. The growth of a single theta ' precipitate in 1D exactly reproduces the results from analytical solutions. The phase-filed model can serve as a basis for quantitative understanding of the influence of elastic energy, interface energy anisotropy and interface mobility anisotropy on the precipitation of theta' in Al-Cu alloys. Precipitates and solutes are commonly used to strengthen alloys. A phase field model of dislocation dynamics, which employs 12 order parameter fields to describe the dislocation distribution in a single fcc crystal, and one composition field to describe

  14. Constitutive Model Of Graded Micro-Structure Obtained Via Strain Induced Phase Transformation

    CERN Document Server

    Ortwein, Rafał

    The literature review has been divided into three main sub-chapters. The first one is concentrated on the general information about stainless steels and their applications. It is important to perform a general overview and get an idea where the results of the present thesis could be applied. Description of all the brands of stainless steels, their microstructures and properties are important, as similar characteristics can be found in the newly created functionally graded structures. The second sub-chapter is an overview of the most important constitutive models and the experimental results for materials that undergo plastic strain induced phase transformation. Finally, the last one is devoted to functionally graded microstructures obtained via strain induced martensitic transformation – the subject of particular importance for the present thesis. As a general note, the literature review is organized mainly in a chronological order. In some cases similar publications or publications of the same Authors were...

  15. Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs

  16. Effects of helium content of microstructural development in Type 316 stainless steel under neutron irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maziasz, P.J.

    1985-11-01

    This work investigated the sensitivity of microstructural evolution, particularly precipitate development, to increased helium content during thermal aging and during neutron irradiation. Helium (110 at. ppM) was cold preinjected into solution annealed (SA) DO-heat type 316 stainess steel (316) via cyclotron irradiation. These specimens were then exposed side by side with uninjected samples. Continuous helium generation was increased considerably relative to EBR-II irradiation by irradiation in HFIR. Data were obtained from quantitative analytical electron microscopy (AEM) in thin foils and on extraction replicas. 480 refs., 86 figs., 19 tabs.

  17. Computational model for microstructure and effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits in utility boilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kweon, Soon-Cheol

    The ash deposits formed in pulverized-coal fired power plants reduce heat transfer rate to furnace wall, super heater tubes, and other heat transfer surfaces. The thermal properties that influence strongly on this heat transfer depend mainly on the microstructure of the ash deposit. This dissertation examines three issues associated with the ash deposits in utility boilers: (1) the three-dimensional model for characterization of the ash deposit microstructures from the sample ash deposits, (2) the computational model for effective thermal conductivity of sintered packed beds with low conductive stagnant fluids, and (3) the application of thermal resistor network model for the effective thermal conductivity of ash deposits in utility boilers. The SEM image analysis was conducted on two sample ash deposits to characterize three-dimensional microstructure of the ash deposit with several structural parameters using stereology. A ballistic deposition model was adopted to simulate the deposit structure defined by the structural parameters. The inputs for the deposition model were chosen from the predicted and measured physical parameters, such as the size distribution, the probability of the particle rolling, and the degree of the particle sintering. The difference between the microstructure of the sample deposits and the simulated deposits was investigated and compared quantitatively based on the structural parameters defined. Both the sample and the simulated deposits agree in terms of the structural parameters. The computational model for predicting the effective thermal conductivity of sintered packed beds with low conductive stagnant fluid was built and the heat conduction through the contact area among sintered particles is the dominant mode of heat transfer. A thermal resistor network is used to model the heat conduction among the sintered particles and the thermal resistance among the contacting particles is estimated from both the contact area and the contact

  18. Creep and damage in argillaceous rocks: microstructural change and phenomenological modeling; Fluage et endommagement des roches argileuses: evolution de la microstructure et modelisation phenomenologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabre, G

    2005-06-15

    The underground radioactive waste disposal far exceeds the period of exploitation of common civil engineering works. These specific projects require to predict the irreversible deformations over a large time scale (several centuries) in order to assess the extension and to forecast the evolution of the EDZ (Excavation Damage Zone) around the cavity. In this study, the viscosity of three sedimentary argillaceous rocks has been studied under different conditions of uniaxial compression: static or cyclic creep tests, monotonic and quasistatic tests, performed across various strata orientations. Argillaceous rocks are studied as a possible host layer for radioactive waste disposals. Indeed, they present some of the physical characteristics and mechanical properties, which are essential for being a natural barrier: low permeability, high creep potential and important holding capacity of radioactive elements. The purpose of the experimental study was to shed some light over the mechanisms governing the development of delayed deformations and damage of argillaceous rocks. It relates three rocks: an argillite from East of France, a Tournemire argillite and a marl from Jurassic Mountains. On atomic scale, viscoplastic deformations are due to irreversible displacements of crystalline defects, called dislocations. The experimental study was also supplemented with observations on thin sections extracted from the argillite and marl samples using a SEM. The aim was to identify the mechanisms responsible for the time-dependent behaviour on a microstructural scale. Analytical simulations of the mechanical behaviour of the three rocks gave parameters used in different viscoplastic models. The best modeling was obtained with the viscoplastic model which takes account of the development of volumetric strains and of the damage anisotropy. (author)

  19. Microstructure and Property Evolution in Advanced Cladding and Duct Materials Under Long-Term and Elevated Temperature Irradiation: Modeling and Experimental Investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian; Morgan, Dane; Kaoumi, Djamel; Motta, Arthur

    2013-12-01

    The in-service degradation of reactor core materials is related to underlying changes in the irradiated microstructure. During reactor operation, structural components and cladding experience displacement of atoms by collisions with neutrons at temperatures at which the radiation-induced defects are mobile, leading to microstructure evolution under irradiation that can degrade material properties. At the doses and temperatures relevant to fast reactor operation, the microstructure evolves by dislocation loop formation and growth, microchemistry changes due to radiation-induced segregation, radiation-induced precipitation, destabilization of the existing precipitate structure, and in some cases, void formation and growth. These processes do not occur independently; rather, their evolution is highly interlinked. Radiationinduced segregation of Cr and existing chromium carbide coverage in irradiated alloy T91 track each other closely. The radiation-induced precipitation of Ni-Si precipitates and RIS of Ni and Si in alloys T91 and HCM12A are likely related. Neither the evolution of these processes nor their coupling is understood under the conditions required for materials performance in fast reactors (temperature range 300-600°C and doses beyond 200 dpa). Further, predictive modeling is not yet possible as models for microstructure evolution must be developed along with experiments to characterize these key processes and provide tools for extrapolation. To extend the range of operation of nuclear fuel cladding and structural materials in advanced nuclear energy and transmutation systems to that required for the fast reactor, the irradiation-induced evolution of the microstructure, microchemistry, and the associated mechanical properties at relevant temperatures and doses must be understood. Predictive modeling relies on an understanding of the physical processes and also on the development of microstructure and microchemical models to describe their evolution under

  20. A model relating remanence and microstructure of SmCo5 magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, M.F. de; Machado, R.; Landgraf, F.J.G.; Rodrigues, D.; Romero, S.A.; Neiva, A.C.; Missell, F.P.

    1998-01-01

    The question of remanence in SmCo 5 sintered magnets is reviewed, giving special attention to the influence of microstructure. In SmCo 5 magnets, the microstructural constituents are the matrix phase SmCo 5 , another ferromagnetic phase (Sm 2 Co 7 ), oxides (Sm 2 O 3 ), a recently reported carbide SmCoC 2 and pores. A method to estimate alignment via the ratio J r /J s from remanence measurements and microstructural analysis is proposed. The results agree very well with the degree of alignment calculated from Schulz pole figures. During sintering it was observed that the nucleation of SmCo 5 on the Sm 2 Co 7 phase is epitaxial. Hexagonal Sm 2 Co 7 is present in our sintered magnets but rhombohedral Sm 2 Co 7 may also be present. The effect of chemical composition (Sm content and oxygen content) on remanence and on the ratio J r /J s was evaluated. In the sintering step, the densification occurs more slowly for compositions with higher samarium content (or higher Sm 2 Co 7 volume fraction). A model able to calculate the best chemical composition to maximize coercivity and remanence is presented and discussed. (orig.)

  1. Effect of reversible hydrogen alloying and plastic deformation on microstructure development in titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murzinova, M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Hydrogen leads to degradation in fracture-related mechanical properties of titanium alloys and is usually considered as a very dangerous element. Numerous studies of hydrogen interaction with titanium alloys showed that hydrogen may be considered not only as an impurity but also as temporary alloying element. This statement is based on the following. Hydrogen stabilizes high-temperature β-phase, leads to decrease in temperature of β→α transformation and extends (α + β )-phase field. The BCC β-phase exhibits lower strength and higher ductility in comparison with HCP α -phase. As a result, hydrogen improves hot workability of hard-to-deform titanium alloys. Hydrogen changes chemical composition of the phases, kinetics of phase transformations, and at low temperatures additional phase transformation (β→α + TiH 2 ) takes place, which is accompanied with noticeable change in volumes of phases. As a result, fine lamellar microstructure may be formed in hydrogenated titanium alloys after heat treatment. It was shown that controlled hydrogen alloying improves weldability and machinability of titanium alloys. After processing hydrogenated titanium preforms are subjected to vacuum annealing, and the hydrogen content decreases up to safe level. Hydrogen removal is accompanied with hydrides dissolution and β→α transformation that makes possible to control structure formation at this final step of treatment. Thus, reversible hydrogen alloying of titanium alloys allows to obtain novel microstructure with enhanced properties. The aim of the work was to study the effect of hydrogen on structure formation, namely: i) influence of hydrogen content on transformation of lamellar microstructure to globular one during deformation in (α+β)-phase field; ii) effect of dissolved hydrogen on dynamic recrystallization in single α- and β- phase regions; iii) influence of vacuum annealing temperature on microstructure development. The work was focused on the optimization of

  2. The consequences of helium production on microstructural development in isotopically tailored ferritic alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gelles, D.S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    A series of alloys have been made adding various isotopes of nickel in order to vary the production of helium during irradiation by a two step nuclear reaction in a mixed spectrum reactor. The alloys use a base composition of Fe-12Cr with an addition of 1.5% nickel, either in the form of {sup 60}Ni which produces no helium, {sup 59}Ni which produces helium at a rate of about 10 appm He/dpa, or natural nickel ({sup Nat}Ni) which provides an intermediate level of helium due to delayed development of {sup 59}Ni. Specimens were irradiated in the HFIR at Oak Ridge, TN to {approx}7 dpa at 300 and 400{degrees}C. Microstructural examinations indicated that nickel additions promote precipitation in all alloys, but the effect appears to be much stronger at 400{degrees}C than at 300{degrees}C. There is sufficient dose by 7 dpa (and with 2 appm He) to initiate void swelling in ferritic/martensitic alloys. Little difference was found between response from {sup 59}Ni and {sup Nat}Ni. Also, helium bubble development for high helium generation conditions appeared to be very different at 300 and 400{degrees}C. At 300{degrees}C, it appeared that high densities of bubbles formed whereas at 400{degrees}C, bubbles could not be identified, possibly because of the complexity of the microstructure, but more likely because helium accumulated at precipitate interfaces.

  3. X-ray microstructural analysis of nanocrystalline TiZrN thin films by diffraction pattern modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, D. [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 Vía al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); PCM Computacional Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 Vía al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Ospina, R. [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 Vía al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Gómez, A.G. [Pontificia Universidad Javeriana Seccional Cali, Facultad de Ingeniería, Departamento de Ciencias de la Ingeniería y la Producción (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepopa@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 Vía al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); PCM Computacional Applications, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 Vía al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia); Arango, P.J. [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 Vía al Magdalena, Manizales (Colombia)

    2014-02-15

    A detailed microstructural characterization of nanocrystalline TiZrN thin films grown at different substrate temperatures (T{sub S}) was carried out by X-ray diffraction (XRD). Total diffraction pattern modeling based on more meaningful microstructural parameters, such as crystallite size distribution and dislocation density, was performed to describe the microstructure of the thin films more precisely. This diffraction modeling has been implemented and used mostly to characterize powders, but the technique can be very useful to study hard thin films by taking certain considerations into account. Nanocrystalline films were grown by using the cathodic pulsed vacuum arc technique on stainless steel 316L substrates, varying the temperature from room temperature to 200 °C. Further surface morphology analysis was performed to study the dependence of grain size on substrate temperature using atomic force microscopy (AFM). The crystallite and surface grain sizes obtained and the high density of dislocations observed indicate that the films underwent nanostructured growth. Variations in these microstructural parameters as a function of T{sub S} during deposition revealed a competition between adatom mobility and desorption processes, resulting in a specific microstructure. These films also showed slight anisotropy in their microstructure, and this was incorporated into the diffraction pattern modeling. The resulting model allowed for the films' microstructure during synthesis to be better understood according to the experimental results obtained. - Highlights: • Mobility and desorption competition generates a critical temperature. • A microstructure anisotropy related to the local strain was observed in thin films. • Adatom mobility and desorption influence grain size and microstrain.

  4. Connection between chemical zonation and microstructure as an indicator for the fabric development in eclogites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neufeld, Kai; Kongsro Finstad, Ane; Stünitz, Holger; Konopasek, Jiri

    2017-04-01

    Eclogites are the most important piece of evidence of high pressure conditions in subduction zones. The deformation of eclogites and the driving forces for their fabric development are an interesting topic potentially allowing to determine deformation rates in subduction zones. Most previous studies suggested disclocation creep to be the principal process causing the fabric development. The viability of this process may be tested by studying the chemical zonation of garnet and omphacite in order to track and quantify texture and microstructure development in eclogites. The aim of this study is to assess the influence of crystal growth on mineral preferred orientation and therefore its role in fabric development in eclogite-facies rocks. Caledonian, Variscan and Alpine eclogites from four different locations are studied, representing a wide range of metamorphic conditions as well as different subduction and exhumation rates. Variscan eclogites from the western Bohemian Massif (Czech Republic) show elongated garnet grain shapes parallel to the rock`s extension direction. Asymmetric chemical zoning developed during prograde garnet growth together with the elongated garnet grain shape and can be related to a corresponding prograde (in terms of pressure change) chemical zoning in omphacite grains. Crystal plastic deformation of garnet can be excluded based on chemical zonation patterns. Preliminary results of chemical, microstructural and texture data indicate a direct relationship between the growth of garnet and omphacite grains with fabric development during prograde and peak metamorphic conditions. A later stage of retrogression observed along garnet and omphacite grain boundaries produces mineral phases with an orientation clearly parallel to the prograde fabric orientation. The results will be compared with those of Caledonian eclogites from the Western Gneiss Region and the Tromsø Nappe (southwestern and northern Norway, respectively), as well as with Alpine

  5. Development of Ferrite-Coated Soft Magnetic Composites: Correlation of Microstructure to Magnetic Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunday, Katie Jo

    milling and analyzed for magnetic core loss dependence on particle size, cure temperature, and microstructure of both coating and core powder. We present a significant increase in core loss related to eddy current loss from coating particles sintering and Fe grain growth. Lastly, a more resistive coating material, NiZnCu-ferrite, is applied for improved resistivity, which leads to lower eddy current loss and improved magnetic performance. By highlighting the importance of microstructure and composition on magnetic properties, a closer look at interfacial features and local microstrain are necessary and accomplished in this work. Future developments of ferrite-based SMC coatings are required to transform the use of electromagnetic devices in today's society.

  6. Calibration of Eringen's small length scale coefficient for initially stressed vibrating nonlocal Euler beams based on microstructured beam model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, C M; Zhang, Z; Challamel, N; Duan, W H

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we calibrate Eringen's small length scale coefficient e 0 for an initially stressed vibrating nonlocal Euler beam via a microstructured beam modelled by some repetitive cells comprising finite rigid segments and elastic rotational springs. By adopting the pseudo-differential operator and Padé's approximation, an analytical solution for the vibration frequency in terms of initial stress may be developed for the microstructured beam model. When comparing this analytical solution with the established exact vibration solution from the nonlocal beam theory, one finds that the calibrated Eringen's small length scale coefficient e 0 is given by e 0 = √(1/6)-(1/12)(σ 0 /σ-breve m ) where σ 0 is the initial stress and σ-breve m is the mth mode buckling stress of the corresponding local Euler beam. It is shown that e 0 varies with respect to the initial axial stress, from 1/√(12)∼0.289 at the buckling compressive stress to 1/√6∼0.408 when the axial stress is zero and it monotonically increases with increasing initial tensile stress. The small length scale coefficient e 0 , however, does not depend on the vibration/buckling mode considered. (paper)

  7. Microstructure Evolution and Flow Stress Model of a 20Mn5 Hollow Steel Ingot during Hot Compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Min; Ma, Qing-Xian; Luo, Jian-Bin

    2018-03-21

    20Mn5 steel is widely used in the manufacture of heavy hydro-generator shaft due to its good performance of strength, toughness and wear resistance. However, the hot deformation and recrystallization behaviors of 20Mn5 steel compressed under high temperature were not studied. In this study, the hot compression experiments under temperatures of 850-1200 °C and strain rates of 0.01/s-1/s are conducted using Gleeble thermal and mechanical simulation machine. And the flow stress curves and microstructure after hot compression are obtained. Effects of temperature and strain rate on microstructure are analyzed. Based on the classical stress-dislocation relation and the kinetics of dynamic recrystallization, a two-stage constitutive model is developed to predict the flow stress of 20Mn5 steel. Comparisons between experimental flow stress and predicted flow stress show that the predicted flow stress values are in good agreement with the experimental flow stress values, which indicates that the proposed constitutive model is reliable and can be used for numerical simulation of hot forging of 20Mn5 hollow steel ingot.

  8. Development of microstructural heterogeneities in the initial stage of mild steel conformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, B.F. da.

    1980-07-01

    After determining the Forming Limit Diagrams (FLD) and discussing some changes in formability of mild aluminum-killed steel sheets, prestrained by various amounts by uniaxial tension and symmetrical biaxial stretching modes, the microstructural heterogeneities developed during uniform deformation, such as, internal and superficial damage, caracterized by inclusions, cracks, pores and surface roughness, were studied experimentally. In addition, the surface roughness behaviour of rimmed mild steel sheets developed during uniform deformation by uniaxial tension and symmetrical biaxial stretching modes, was studied. The results showed that, in the range of uniform deformation, the evolution of superficial damage, mainly the relief of these sheets, seems to be more important than internal damage. These observations could be a possible explanation for the development of localized necks in biaxially stretched sheets. (Author) [pt

  9. Microstructure Development and Its Influence on the Properties of Styrene-Ethylene-Butylene-Styrene/Polystyrene Blends

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritima Banerjee

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The present work is a novel attempt to understand the microstructure of styrene-ethylene-butylene-styrene (SEBS/polystyrene (PS blends not only through morphological studies, but also thermal, mechanical and rheological characterizations. SEBS/PS blends containing 10, 30 and 50 wt % PS were processed in a micro-compounder and characterized. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM studies, with selective staining of the PS phase, revealed the presence of PS as nanometer-sized domains, as well as phase-separated micrometer-sized aggregates. Blends with 30 and 50 wt % PS exhibited a fibrillar microstructure, obeying Hirsch’s model of short fiber composites. A remarkable increase in glass transition temperature indicated a strong interaction of the fibrils with SEBS. All blends showed two modes of relaxation corresponding to the two phases. A single mode of relaxation of the PS phase has been attributed to combined effects of the partial miscibility of the added PS, along with the interaction of the fibrils with SEBS. The long relaxation time of the elastomeric phase indicated the tendency of these materials to undergo time-dependent shrinkage in secondary processing operations. An increase in PS content resulted in the lowering of the shear viscosity and energy requirement for mixing, indicating the ease of processing.

  10. A Microstructure Evolution Model for Hot Rolling of a Mo-TRIP Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongsheng; Fazeli, F.; Militzer, M.; Poole, W. J.

    2007-04-01

    A comprehensive study of microstructure evolution for a Mo-TRIP (transformation-induced-plasticity) steel under hot strip rolling conditions has been conducted. This investigation includes austenite grain growth during reheating, deformation behavior, and static recrystallization kinetics of austenite as well as the effect of cooling rate and austenite conditioning on the continuous cooling transformation (CCT) behavior. The physically based Kocks Mecking model has been employed to describe the deformation behavior of austenite, while the Johnson Mehl Avrami Kolmogorov (JMAK) approach has been used to predict static recrystallization, and an empirical equation has been formulated for the recrystallized austenite grain size. Ferrite transformation start is described by a model considering early growth of corner nucleated ferrite. The fraction of ferrite transformed from austenite during continuous cooling is predicted by the semiempirical JMAK approach in combination with Scheil’s equation of additivity. The effect of carbon enrichment on ferrite transformation kinetics is explicitly included in the model. In addition, a phenomenological model for the bainite formation has been proposed. Martensite transformation start is described by an empirical equation taking into account carbon enrichment of remaining austenite. Finally, the entire hot strip rolling and controlled cooling process have been simulated by hot torsion tests, and the optimum coiling temperatures for the formation of TRIP microstructures have been determined.

  11. On the effects of leaflet microstructure and constitutive model on the closing behavior of the mitral valve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chung-Hao; Rabbah, Jean-Pierre; Yoganathan, Ajit P; Gorman, Robert C; Gorman, Joseph H; Sacks, Michael S

    2015-11-01

    Recent long-term studies showed an unsatisfactory recurrence rate of severe mitral regurgitation 3-5 years after surgical repair, suggesting that excessive tissue stresses and the resulting strain-induced tissue failure are potential etiological factors controlling the success of surgical repair for treating mitral valve (MV) diseases. We hypothesized that restoring normal MV tissue stresses in MV repair techniques would ultimately lead to improved repair durability through the restoration of MV normal homeostatic state. Therefore, we developed a micro- and macro- anatomically accurate MV finite element model by incorporating actual fiber microstructural architecture and a realistic structure-based constitutive model. We investigated MV closing behaviors, with extensive in vitro data used for validating the proposed model. Comparative and parametric studies were conducted to identify essential model fidelity and information for achieving desirable accuracy. More importantly, for the first time, the interrelationship between the local fiber ensemble behavior and the organ-level MV closing behavior was investigated using a computational simulation. These novel results indicated not only the appropriate parameter ranges, but also the importance of the microstructural tuning (i.e., straightening and re-orientation) of the collagen/elastin fiber networks at the macroscopic tissue level for facilitating the proper coaptation and natural functioning of the MV apparatus under physiological loading at the organ level. The proposed computational model would serve as a logical first step toward our long-term modeling goal-facilitating simulation-guided design of optimal surgical repair strategies for treating diseased MVs with significantly enhanced durability.

  12. Linking properties to microstructure through multiresolution mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McVeigh, Cahal James

    The macroscale mechanical and physical properties of materials are inherently linked to the underlying microstructure. Traditional continuum mechanics theories have focused on approximating the heterogeneous microstructure as a continuum, which is conducive to a partial differential equation mathematical description. Although this makes large scale simulation of material much more efficient than modeling the detailed microstructure, the relationship between microstructure and macroscale properties becomes unclear. In order to perform computational materials design, material models must clearly relate the key underlying microstructural parameters (cause) to macroscale properties (effect). In this thesis, microstructure evolution and instability events are related to macroscale mechanical properties through a new multiresolution continuum analysis approach. The multiresolution nature of this theory allows prediction of the evolving magnitude and scale of deformation as a direct function of the changing microstructure. This is achieved via a two-pronged approach: (a) Constitutive models which track evolving microstructure are developed and calibrated to direct numerical simulations (DNS) of the microstructure. (b) The conventional homogenized continuum equations of motion are extended via a virtual power approach to include extra coupled microscale stresses and stress couples which are active at each characteristic length scale within the microstructure. The multiresolution approach is applied to model the fracture toughness of a cemented carbide, failure of a steel alloy under quasi-static loading conditions and the initiation and velocity of adiabatic shear bands under high speed dynamic loading. In each case the multiresolution analysis predicts the important scale effects which control the macroscale material response. The strain fields predicted in the multiresolution continuum analyses compare well to those observed in direct numerical simulations of the

  13. Modeling of Microstructure Evolution During the Thermomechanical Processing of Titanium Alloys (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Semiatin, S. L; Furrer, D. U

    2008-01-01

    ... (or combination of properties) can be obtained through microstructural modification. Microstructure evolution and control in titanium alloys is heavily dependent on the allotropic transformation from a hexagonal-close-packed crystal structure...

  14. Phase-field modelling of as-cast microstructure evolution in nickel-based superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Warnken, N., E-mail: n.warnken@bham.ac.uk [University of Birmingham, Department of Metallurgy and Materials, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Ma, D. [Foundry Institute of the RWTH-Aachen, Intzestr. 5, 52072 Aachen (Germany); Drevermann, A. [ACCESS e.V., Intzestr. 5, 52072 Aachen (Germany); Reed, R.C. [University of Birmingham, Department of Metallurgy and Materials, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 2TT (United Kingdom); Fries, S.G. [SGF Consultancy, 52064 Aachen (Germany)] [ICAMS, Ruhr University Bochum, Stiepeler Strasse 129, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Steinbach, I. [ICAMS, Ruhr University Bochum, Stiepeler Strasse 129, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2009-11-15

    A modelling approach is presented for the prediction of microstructure evolution during directional solidification of nickel-based superalloys. A phase-field model is coupled to CALPHAD thermodynamic and kinetic (diffusion) databases, so that a multicomponent alloy representative of those used in industrial practice can be handled. Dendritic growth and the formation of interdendritic phases in an isothermal (2-D) cross-section are simulated for a range of solidification parameters. The sensitivity of the model to changes in the solidification input parameters is investigated. It is demonstrated that the predicted patterns of microsegregation obtained from the simulations compare well to the experimental ones; moreover, an experimentally observed change in the solidification sequence is correctly predicted. The extension of the model to 3-D simulations is demonstrated. Simulations of the homogenization of the as-cast structure during heat treatment are presented.

  15. Phase-field modelling of as-cast microstructure evolution in nickel-based superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Warnken, N.; Ma, D.; Drevermann, A.; Reed, R.C.; Fries, S.G.; Steinbach, I.

    2009-01-01

    A modelling approach is presented for the prediction of microstructure evolution during directional solidification of nickel-based superalloys. A phase-field model is coupled to CALPHAD thermodynamic and kinetic (diffusion) databases, so that a multicomponent alloy representative of those used in industrial practice can be handled. Dendritic growth and the formation of interdendritic phases in an isothermal (2-D) cross-section are simulated for a range of solidification parameters. The sensitivity of the model to changes in the solidification input parameters is investigated. It is demonstrated that the predicted patterns of microsegregation obtained from the simulations compare well to the experimental ones; moreover, an experimentally observed change in the solidification sequence is correctly predicted. The extension of the model to 3-D simulations is demonstrated. Simulations of the homogenization of the as-cast structure during heat treatment are presented.

  16. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 3 of 6 Microstructure Engineering in Hot Strip Mills, Part 1 of 2: Integrated Mathematical Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.K. Brimacombe; I.V. Samarasekera; E.B. Hawbolt; T.R. Meadowcroft; M. Militzer; W.J. Pool; D.Q. Jin

    1999-07-31

    This report describes the work of developing an integrated model used to predict the thermal history, deformation, roll forces, microstructural evolution and mechanical properties of steel strip in a hot-strip mill. This achievement results from a joint research effort that is part of the American Iron and Steel Institute's (AIS) Advanced Process Control Program, a collaboration between the U.S. DOE and fifteen North American Steelmakers.

  17. Physics-based simulation modeling and optimization of microstructural changes induced by machining and selective laser melting processes in titanium and nickel based alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arisoy, Yigit Muzaffer

    Manufacturing processes may significantly affect the quality of resultant surfaces and structural integrity of the metal end products. Controlling manufacturing process induced changes to the product's surface integrity may improve the fatigue life and overall reliability of the end product. The goal of this study is to model the phenomena that result in microstructural alterations and improve the surface integrity of the manufactured parts by utilizing physics-based process simulations and other computational methods. Two different (both conventional and advanced) manufacturing processes; i.e. machining of Titanium and Nickel-based alloys and selective laser melting of Nickel-based powder alloys are studied. 3D Finite Element (FE) process simulations are developed and experimental data that validates these process simulation models are generated to compare against predictions. Computational process modeling and optimization have been performed for machining induced microstructure that includes; i) predicting recrystallization and grain size using FE simulations and the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami-Kolmogorov (JMAK) model, ii) predicting microhardness using non-linear regression models and the Random Forests method, and iii) multi-objective machining optimization for minimizing microstructural changes. Experimental analysis and computational process modeling of selective laser melting have been also conducted including; i) microstructural analysis of grain sizes and growth directions using SEM imaging and machine learning algorithms, ii) analysis of thermal imaging for spattering, heating/cooling rates and meltpool size, iii) predicting thermal field, meltpool size, and growth directions via thermal gradients using 3D FE simulations, iv) predicting localized solidification using the Phase Field method. These computational process models and predictive models, once utilized by industry to optimize process parameters, have the ultimate potential to improve performance of

  18. Model and code development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1977-01-01

    Progress in model and code development for reactor physics calculations is summarized. The codes included CINDER-10, PHROG, RAFFLE GAPP, DCFMR, RELAP/4, PARET, and KENO. Kinetics models for the PBF were developed

  19. Durability of cement-based materials: modeling of the influence of physical and chemical equilibria on the microstructure and the residual mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillon, E.

    2004-09-01

    A large part of mechanical and durability characteristics of cement-based materials comes from the performances of the hydrated cement, cohesive matrix surrounding the granular skeleton. Experimental studies, in situ or in laboratory, associated to models, have notably enhanced knowledge on the cement material and led to adapted formulations to specific applications or particularly aggressive environments. Nevertheless, these models, developed for precise cases, do not permit to specifically conclude for other experimental conclusions. To extend its applicability domain, we propose a new evolutive approach, based on reactive transport expressed at the microstructure scale of the cement. In a general point of view, the evolution of the solid compounds of the cement matrix, by dissolutions or precipitations, during chemical aggressions can be related to the pore solution evolution, and this one relied to the ionic exchanges with the external environment. By the utilization of a geochemical code associated to a thermodynamical database and coupled to a 3D transport model, this approach authorizes the study of all aggressive solution. The approach has been validated by the comparison of experimental observations to simulated degradations for three different environments (pure water, mineralized water, seawater) and on three different materials (CEM I Portland cement with 0.25, 0.4 and 0.5 water-to cement ratio). The microstructural approach permits also to have access to mechanical properties evolutions. During chemical aggressions, the cement matrix evolution is traduced in a microstructure evolution. This one is represented from 3D images similarly to the models developed at NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology). A new finite-element model, validated on previous tests or models, evaluates the stiffness of the cement paste, using as a mesh these microstructures. Our approach identifies and quantifies the major influence of porosity and its spatial

  20. Microstructural development of PCAs irradiated in HFIR at 300 to 4000C

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanaka, M.P.; Maziasz, P.J.; Hishinuma, A.; Hamada, S.

    1986-01-01

    Microstructural developments were determined on solution-annealed (SA) and cold-worked (CW) JPCA and US PCAs irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at 300 and 400 0 C. Irradiation produced damage levels of about 10 and 34 dpa and helium concentrations of around 580 and 2500 at. ppM, respectively. High concentrations of fine bubbles and MC precipitates, as well as Frank faulted loops, were observed in both SA and CW PCAs. Mutual stability of the MC particles and associated fine bubbles contributed to the extension of the transient regime of swelling to higher fluence. The irradiation responses of JPCA and US-PCA were similar in the HFIR, despite minor compositional differences (P,B) between the two materials. Useful fusion applications of SA-PCA as well as CW-PCA in the 300 0 C temperature range are suggested from these data

  1. Development of banded microstructure in 34CrNiMo6 steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Nagode

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the development of a banded microstructure in hot-rolled 34CrNiMo6 steel which consisted of bainitic and martensitic bands is explained. The chemical compositions of the bands were measured with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS, which showed that the martensitic bands contained more alloying elements (Mn, Cr, Mo, Si than bainitic bands. By using Oberhoffer reagent, the segregations of phosphorus were also revealed. These phosphorus segregations coincided with the positive segregations of the alloying elements. The continuous cooling transformation (CCT diagrams of steel were calculated. They confirmed the formation of martensite in positive segregations and the formation of bainite in negative segregations.

  2. Microstructural Analysis and Rheological Modeling of Asphalt Mixtures Containing Recycled Asphalt Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Cannone Falchetto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The use of recycled materials in pavement construction has seen, over the years, a significant increase closely associated with substantial economic and environmental benefits. During the past decades, many transportation agencies have evaluated the effect of adding Reclaimed Asphalt Pavement (RAP, and, more recently, Recycled Asphalt Shingles (RAS on the performance of asphalt pavement, while limits were proposed on the amount of recycled materials which can be used. In this paper, the effect of adding RAP and RAS on the microstructural and low temperature properties of asphalt mixtures is investigated using digital image processing (DIP and modeling of rheological data obtained with the Bending Beam Rheometer (BBR. Detailed information on the internal microstructure of asphalt mixtures is acquired based on digital images of small beam specimens and numerical estimations of spatial correlation functions. It is found that RAP increases the autocorrelation length (ACL of the spatial distribution of aggregates, asphalt mastic and air voids phases, while an opposite trend is observed when RAS is included. Analogical and semi empirical models are used to back-calculate binder creep stiffness from mixture experimental data. Differences between back-calculated results and experimental data suggest limited or partial blending between new and aged binder.

  3. Process-scale modelling of microstructure in direct chill casting of aluminium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedel, M.; Heyvaert, L.; Založnik, M.; Combeau, H.; Daloz, D.; Lesoult, G.

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical properties of an alloy being related to its microstructure, the understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the grain structure formation in direct chill casting is crucial. However, the grain size prediction by modelling is difficult since a variety of multi-scale coupled phenomena have to be considered. Nucleation and growth of the grains are interrelated, and the macroscopic transport phenomena such as the motion of grains and inoculant particles with the flow impact the nucleation-gowth competition. Thus we propose to study the grain size distribution of a 5182 alloy industrial scale slab of 510 mm thickness, both non-inoculated and inoculated with Al-3Ti-1B, for which experimental grain size measurements are available. We use a volume-averaged two-phase multi-scale model that describes nucleation from inoculant particles and grain growth, fully coupled with macroscopic transport phenomena: fluid flow induced by natural convection and solidification shrinkage, heat, mass and solute mass transport, grains and inoculant particles motion. We analyze the effect of liquid and grain motion as the effect of grain morphology on microstructure formation and we show in which extent those phenomena are responsible for the grain size distribution observed experimentally. The effect of the refiner level is also studied.

  4. Exploring Ultrahigh Magnetic Field Processing of Materials for Developing Customized Microstructures and Enhanced Performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ludtka, GERALD M.

    2005-03-31

    Thermodynamic calculations based on Gibbs free energy in the magnetization-magnetic intensity-temperature (M-H-T) magnetic equation of state space demonstrate that significantly different phase equilibria may result for those material systems where the product and parent phases exhibit different magnetization responses. These calculations show that the Gibbs free energy is changed by a factor equal to -MdH, where M and H are the magnetization and applied field strength, respectively. Magnetic field processing is directly applicable to a multitude of alloys and compounds for dramatically influencing phase stability and phase transformations. This ability to selectively control microstructural stability and alter transformation kinetics through appropriate selection of the magnetic field strength promises to provide a very robust mechanism for developing and tailoring enhanced microstructures (and even nanostructures through accelerated kinetics) with superior properties for a broad spectrum of material applications. For this Industrial Materials for the Future (IMF) Advanced Materials for the Future project, ferrous alloys were studied initially since this alloy family exhibits ferromagnetism over part of its temperature range of stability and therefore would demonstrate the maximum impact of this novel processing mechanism. Additionally, with these ferrous alloys, the high-temperature parent phase, austenite, exhibits a significantly different magnetization response from the potential product phases, ferrite plus carbide or martensite; and therefore, the solid-state transformation behavior of these alloys will be dramatically influenced by the presence of ultrahigh magnetic fields. Finally, a thermodynamic calculation capability (within ThermoCalc for example) was developed during this project to enable parametric studies to be performed to predict the magnitude of the influence of magnetic processing variables on the phase stability (phase diagrams) in

  5. Phase-field modeling of the microstructure evolution and heterogeneous nucleation in solidifying ternary Al–Cu–Ni alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kundin, Julia; Pogorelov, Evgeny; Emmerich, Heike

    2015-01-01

    We have investigated the microstructure evolution during the isothermal and non-isothermal solidification of ternary Al–Cu–Ni alloys by means of a general multi-phase-field model for an arbitrary number of phases. The stability requirements for the model functions on every dual interface guarantee the absence of “ghost” phases. The aim was to generate a realistic microstructure by coupling the thermodynamic parameters of the phases and the thermodynamically consistent phase-field evolution equations. It is shown that the specially constructed thermal noise terms disturb the stability on the dual interfaces and can produce heterogeneous nucleation of product phases at energetically favorable points. Similar behavior can be observed in triple junctions where the heterogeneous nucleation of a fourth phase is more favorable. Finally, the model predicts the growth of a combined eutectic-like and peritectic-like structure that is comparable to the observed experimental microstructure in various alloys

  6. Development of the novel ferrous-based stainless steel for biomedical applications, part I: high-temperature microstructure, mechanical properties and damping behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ching-Zong; Chen, Shih-Chung; Shih, Yung-Hsun; Hung, Jing-Ming; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Lin, Li-Hsiang; Ou, Keng-Liang

    2011-10-01

    This research investigated the high-temperature microstructure, mechanical properties, and damping behavior of Fe-9 Al-30 Mn-1C-5 Co (wt.%) alloy by means of electron microscopy, experimental model analysis, and hardness and tensile testing. Subsequent microstructural transformation occurred when the alloy under consideration was subjected to heat treatment in the temperature range of 1000-1150 °C: γ → (γ+κ). The κ-phase carbides had an ordered L'1(2)-type structure with lattice parameter a = 0.385 nm. The maximum yield strength (σ(y)), hardness, elongation, and damping coefficient of this alloy are 645 MPa, Hv 292, ~54%, and 178.5 × 10(-4), respectively. These features could be useful in further understanding the relationship between the biocompatibility and the wear and corrosion resistance of the alloy, so as to allow the development of a promising biomedical material. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Morphological modelling of three-phase microstructures of anode layers using SEM images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Bassam; Willot, François; Jeulin, Dominique

    2016-07-01

    A general method is proposed to model 3D microstructures representative of three-phases anode layers used in fuel cells. The models are based on SEM images of cells with varying morphologies. The materials are first characterized using three morphological measurements: (cross-)covariances, granulometry and linear erosion. They are measured on segmented SEM images, for each of the three phases. Second, a generic model for three-phases materials is proposed. The model is based on two independent underlying random sets which are otherwise arbitrary. The validity of this model is verified using the cross-covariance functions of the various phases. In a third step, several types of Boolean random sets and plurigaussian models are considered for the unknown underlying random sets. Overall, good agreement is found between the SEM images and three-phases models based on plurigaussian random sets, for all morphological measurements considered in the present work: covariances, granulometry and linear erosion. The spatial distribution and shapes of the phases produced by the plurigaussian model are visually very close to the real material. Furthermore, the proposed models require no numerical optimization and are straightforward to generate using the covariance functions measured on the SEM images. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  8. A Microstructure-Based Model to Characterize Micromechanical Parameters Controlling Compressive and Tensile Failure in Crystallized Rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazerani, T.; Zhao, J.

    2014-03-01

    A discrete element model is proposed to examine rock strength and failure. The model is implemented by UDEC which is developed for this purpose. The material is represented as a collection of irregular-sized deformable particles interacting at their cohesive boundaries. The interface between two adjacent particles is viewed as a flexible contact whose stress-displacement law is assumed to control the material fracture and fragmentation process. To reproduce rock anisotropy, an innovative orthotropic cohesive law is developed for contact which allows the interfacial shear and tensile behaviours to be different from each other. The model is applied to a crystallized igneous rock and the individual and interactional effects of the microstructural parameters on the material compressive and tensile failure response are examined. A new methodical calibration process is also established. It is shown that the model successfully reproduces the rock mechanical behaviour quantitatively and qualitatively. Ultimately, the model is used to understand how and under what circumstances micro-tensile and micro-shear cracking mechanisms control the material failure at different loading paths.

  9. Microstructural characterization of atom clusters in irradiated pressure vessel steels and model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, P.; Pareige, P.; Akamatsu, M.; Van Duysen, J.C.

    1993-01-01

    In order to characterize the microstructural evolution of iron solid solution under irradiation, two pressure vessel steels irradiated in service conditions, and, for comparison, low copper model alloys irradiated with neutrons and electrons, have been studied through small angle neutron scattering and atom probe experiments. In Fe-Cu model alloys, copper clusters are formed containing uncertain proportions of iron. In the low copper industrial steels, the feature is more complex; solute atoms such as Ni, Mn and Si, sometimes associated with Cu, segregate as ''clouds'' more or less condensed in the iron solid solution. These silicides, or at least Si, Ni, Mn association, may facilitate the copper segregation although the initial iron matrix contains a low copper concentration. (authors). 24 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  10. Failure of thermal barrier coatings under thermal and mechanical fatigue loading. Microstructural observations and modelling aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brodin, Haakan

    2004-09-01

    Industrial and air-borne gas turbine hot components suffer from creep, oxidation, corrosion and microstructural degradation if not shielded from the hot and aggressive combustion gases. Two major strategies commercially available are adopted; film cooling by pressurised air and application of protective coatings. Protective coatings form a slow-growing oxide that protects from oxidation and corrosion. By application of a thermal insulator, a thermal barrier coating, the material will be protected from high temperature through good insulation properties of the coating system. If thermal barrier coatings are to be used in situations where capabilities and possibilities for inspections are limited, better knowledge of the fatigue properties of the coatings is also needed. Therefore development of a reliable fatigue life model is needed. The present work aims at serving as a basis from which a general physically founded thermal barrier coating life model can be formulated. The effects of exposure to high temperatures and mechanical loads on thermal barrier coatings under service like conditions have been investigated in the present thesis. Emphasis is put on the coupling between materials science and solid mechanics approaches in order to establish a better knowledge concerning degradation mechanisms and fatigue life issues than what is common if only one discipline is explored. Investigations of material exposed to isothermal oxidation and thermal cyclic fatigue were performed on plasma-sprayed systems with NiCoCrAlY or NiCrAlY bond coats and yttria partially stabilised zirconia top coats. It has been shown that the thermally grown oxide that will form upon high temperature exposure influences the failure behaviour. If the oxide is composed mainly of alumina, the fatigue properties are good since the adhesion between the ceramic top coat and the metallic bond coat is good. This is also shown in a comparison between different plasma sprayed thermal barrier coating

  11. AFM assessment of the surface nano/microstructure on chemically damaged historical and model glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmona, Noemi; Kowal, Andrzej; Rincon, Jesus-Maria; Villegas, Maria-Angeles

    2010-01-01

    Surface chemical damage on selected historical glasses from 13th to 19th centuries was evaluated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nano- and microstructure, roughness and topography of ancient glass samples have been compared with those of model glasses prepared by conventional melting at the laboratory with similar compositions to those most frequently found in historical glass pieces. The results obtained allow discussing the chemical degradation mechanisms in terms of the acid and/or basic chemical attack carried out by the combination of gaseous pollutants and environmental humidity. Even though deep corrosion features escape to the observation order of magnitude of the AF microscope used, the AFM technique proves to be quite useful for the study and evaluation of the most common surface pathologies of historical glasses with different compositions once submitted to natural weathering.

  12. AFM assessment of the surface nano/microstructure on chemically damaged historical and model glasses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carmona, Noemi [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Kowal, Andrzej [Institute of Catalysis and Surface Chemistry, PAN, ul. Niezapominajek 8, 30239 Cracow (Poland); Rincon, Jesus-Maria [Instituto Eduardo Torroja de Ciencias de la Construccion, CSIC, C. Serrano Galvache s/n, 28033 Madrid (Spain); Villegas, Maria-Angeles, E-mail: mariangeles.villegas@cchs.csic.es [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas, CSIC, Avda. Gregorio del Amo, 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Instituto de Historia, Centro de Ciencias Humanas y Sociales, CSIC, C. Albasanz, 26-28, 28037 Madrid (Spain)

    2010-01-15

    Surface chemical damage on selected historical glasses from 13th to 19th centuries was evaluated by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM). Nano- and microstructure, roughness and topography of ancient glass samples have been compared with those of model glasses prepared by conventional melting at the laboratory with similar compositions to those most frequently found in historical glass pieces. The results obtained allow discussing the chemical degradation mechanisms in terms of the acid and/or basic chemical attack carried out by the combination of gaseous pollutants and environmental humidity. Even though deep corrosion features escape to the observation order of magnitude of the AF microscope used, the AFM technique proves to be quite useful for the study and evaluation of the most common surface pathologies of historical glasses with different compositions once submitted to natural weathering.

  13. Modeling of Metallic Glass Matrix Composites Under Compression: Microstructure Effect on Shear Band Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yunpeng; Qiu, Kun; Sun, Longgang; Wu, Qingqing

    2018-01-01

    The relationship among processing, microstructure, and mechanical performance is the most important for metallic glass matrix composites (MGCs). Numerical modeling was performed on the shear banding in MGCs, and the impacts of particle concentration, morphology, agglomerate, size, and thermal residual stress were revealed. Based on the shear damage criterion, the equivalent plastic strain acted as an internal state variable to depict the nucleation, growth, and coalescence of shear bands. The element deletion technique was employed to describe the process of transformation from shear band to micro-crack. The impedance effect of particle morphology on the propagation of shear bands was discussed, whereby the toughening mechanism was clearly interpreted. The present work contributes to the subsequent strengthening and toughening design of MGCs.

  14. Image analysis and 2D/3D modeling of the MOX fuel microstructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oudinet, Ghislain

    2003-01-01

    The microstructure of the MOX fuel, made with UO 2 and PuO 2 , determines his 'in pile' behavior. The french companies CEA and COGEMA are highly interested in its description by image analysis, which is the object of the present work. The segmentation algorithms described here use pictures issued from a microprobe and a SEM, to analyse the plutonium and porosity distribution in the fuel pellets. They are innovating, automated and robust enough to be used with a small data set. They have been successfully tested on different fuels, before and after irradiation. Three-dimensional informations have been computed with a genetic algorithm. The obtained 3D object size distributions allowed the modeling of many different industrial and research fuels. 3D reconstruction is accurate and stable, and provides a basis for different studies among which the study of the MOX fuel 'in pile' behavior. (author)

  15. The Effect of Rolling As-Cast and Homogenized U-10Mo Samples on the Microstructure Development and Recovery Curves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Paxton, Dean M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Burkes, Douglas [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-07-30

    Over the past several years Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has been actively involved in supporting the U.S. Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration Office of Material Management and Minimization (formerly Global Threat Reduction Initiative). The U.S. High- Power Research Reactor (USHPRR) project is developing alternatives to existing highly enriched uranium alloy fuel to reduce the proliferation threat. One option for a high-density metal fuel is uranium alloyed with 10 wt% molybdenum (U-10Mo). Forming the U-10Mo fuel plates/foils via rolling is an effective technique and is actively being pursued as part of the baseline manufacturing process. The processing of these fuel plates requires systematic investigation/understanding of the pre- and post-rolling microstructure, end-state mechanical properties, residual stresses, and defects, their effect on the mill during processing, and eventually, their in-reactor performance. In the work documented herein, studies were conducted to determine the effect of cold and hot rolling the as-cast and homogenized U-10Mo on its microstructure and hardness. The samples were homogenized at 900°C for 48 h, then later annealed for several durations and temperatures to investigate the effect on the material’s microstructure and hardness. The rolling of the as-cast plate, both hot and cold, was observed to form a molybdenum-rich and -lean banded structure. The cold rolling was ineffective, and in some cases exacerbated the as-cast defects. The grains elongated along the rolling direction and formed a pancake shape, while the carbides fractured perpendicularly to the rolling direction and left porosity between fractured particles of UC. The subsequent annealing of these samples at sub-eutectoid temperatures led to rapid precipitation of the ' lamellar phase, mainly in the molybdenum-lean regions. Annealing the samples above the eutectoid temperature did not refine the grain size or the banded

  16. Thermomechanical Testing and Microstructural Development of Class L Steel Wheel Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    Macrostructure, microstructure, and quantitative metallographic analysis is conducted on Association of American Railroads Class L wheel steel specimens tested in a Gleeble 1500 under combined mechanical compression and resistance heating to temperat...

  17. Prenatal and adolescent exposure to tobacco smoke modulates the development of white matter microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobsen, Leslie K; Picciotto, Marina R; Heath, Christopher J; Frost, Stephen J; Tsou, Kristen A; Dwan, Rita A; Jackowski, Marcel P; Constable, Robert T; Mencl, W Einar

    2007-12-05

    Prenatal exposure to maternal smoking has been linked to cognitive and auditory processing deficits in offspring. Preclinical studies have demonstrated that exposure to nicotine disrupts neurodevelopment during gestation and adolescence, possibly by disrupting the trophic effects of acetylcholine. Given recent clinical and preclinical work suggesting that neurocircuits that support auditory processing may be particularly vulnerable to developmental disruption by nicotine, we examined white matter microstructure in 67 adolescent smokers and nonsmokers with and without prenatal exposure to maternal smoking. The groups did not differ in age, educational attainment, IQ, years of parent education, or symptoms of inattention. Diffusion tensor anisotropy and anatomical magnetic resonance images were acquired, and auditory attention was assessed, in all subjects. Both prenatal exposure and adolescent exposure to tobacco smoke was associated with increased fractional anisotropy (FA) in anterior cortical white matter. Adolescent smoking was also associated with increased FA of regions of the internal capsule that contain auditory thalamocortical and corticofugal fibers. FA of the posterior limb of the left internal capsule was positively correlated with reaction time during performance of an auditory attention task in smokers but not in nonsmokers. Development of anterior cortical and internal capsule fibers may be particularly vulnerable to disruption in cholinergic signaling induced by nicotine in tobacco smoke. Nicotine-induced disruption of the development of auditory corticofugal fibers may interfere with the ability of these fibers to modulate ascending auditory signals, leading to greater noise and reduced efficiency of neurocircuitry that supports auditory processing.

  18. Microstructural evaluation by confocal and electron microscopy in thrombi developed in central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Thabata Coaglio; Silva, Eliata Ester da; Souza, Danilo Olzon Dionysio; Santos, Amanda Rodrigues Dos; Lara, Maristela Oliveira

    2017-08-28

    Evaluating thrombi microstructure developed in central venous catheters using confocal and electron microscopy. An experimental, descriptive study carrying out a microstructural evaluation of venous thrombi developed in central venous catheters using Scanning Electron Microscopy and Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy. A total of 78 venous catheters were collected over a period of three months. Different fibrin structures were distinguished: fibrin plates, fibrin network, and fibrin fibers. It was observed that the thrombus had thick fibrin plates adhered to the catheter wall openings in both a catheter with three days of permanence as well as in a catheter with 20 days of insertion in the patient. However, a greater amount of erythrocytes and fibrin fibers were found in the central region of the thrombus. This study contributes to improving health care and can have a positive impact on clinical practice, as easy adherence of platelets and fibrins to the catheter wall demonstrated in this study makes it possible to adopt thrombus prevention strategies such as therapy discontinuation for an extended period, blood reflux by a catheter, slow infusion rate and hypercoagulo pathyclinical conditions. Avaliar a microestrutura por microscopia confocal e eletrônica em trombos desenvolvidos em cateteres venosos centrais. Pesquisa experimental, descritiva, em que foi feita uma avaliação microestrutural de trombos venosos desenvolvidos em cateteres venosos centrais por Microscopia Eletrônica de Varredura e Microscopia Confocal de Varredura a Laser. Foram coletados 78 cateteres venosos centrais num período de três meses. Distinguiram-se diferentes estruturas de fibrina: a placa de fibrina, a rede de fibrina e as fibras de fibrina. Observou-se que tanto em um cateter com três dias de permanência quanto em um cateter com 20 dias inserido no paciente o trombo apresentou placas de fibrina espessas aderidas às paredes dos orifícios dos cateteres. Na região central do

  19. Evolution of phase microstructure during irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1985-11-01

    The phase microstructure of alloys is frequently severely altered during irradiation. Sluggish precipitation reactions including precipitation coarsening are accelerated by irradiation-enhanced diffusion. Radiation-induced segregation redistributes existing precipitate phases within the microstructure, induces precipitation of nonequilibrium phases and affects the composition of phases in multicomponent alloys. The displacement process causes disordering of ordered alloys and frequently amorphization, especially in intermetallic compounds, at low temperature. Although a good qualitative understanding of the basic process involved, i.e., displacement mixing, radiation-enhanced diffusion and radiation-induced segregation exists, methods for detailed quantitative modeling of the evolution of the microstructure of alloys remain to be developed

  20. An Experimental Study on Mechanical Modeling of Ceramics Based on Microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Nan Zhang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The actual grinding result of ceramics has not been well predicted by the present mechanical models. No allowance is made for direct effects of materials microstructure and almost all the mechanical models were obtained based on crystalline ceramics. In order to improve the mechanical models of ceramics, surface grinding experiments on crystalline ceramics and non-crystalline ceramics were conducted in this research. The normal and tangential grinding forces were measured to calculate single grit force and specific grinding energy. Grinding surfaces were observed. For crystalline alumina ceramics, the predictive modeling of normal force per grit fits well with the experimental result, when the maximum undeformed chip thickness is less than a critical depth, which turns out to be close to the grain size of alumina. Meanwhile, there is a negative correlation between the specific grinding energy and the maximum undeformed chip thickness. With the decreasing maximum undeformed chip thickness, the proportions of ductile removal and transgranular fracture increase. However, the grinding force models are not applicable for non-crystalline ceramic fused silica and the specific grinding energy fluctuates irregularly as a function of maximum undeformed chip thickness seen from the experiment.

  1. Modeling the Microstructure Curvature of Boron-Doped Silicon in Bulk Micromachined Accelerometer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoping He

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Microstructure curvature, or buckling, is observed in the micromachining of silicon sensors because of the doping of impurities for realizing certain electrical and mechanical processes. This behavior can be a key source of error in inertial sensors. Therefore, identifying the factors that influence the buckling value is important in designing MEMS devices. In this study, the curvature in the proof mass of an accelerometer is modeled as a multilayered solid model. Modeling is performed according to the characteristics of the solid diffusion mechanism in the bulk-dissolved wafer process (BDWP based on the self-stopped etch technique. Moreover, the proposed multilayered solid model is established as an equivalent composite structure formed by a group of thin layers that are glued together. Each layer has a different Young’s modulus value and each undergoes different volume shrinkage strain owing to boron doping in silicon. Observations of five groups of proof mass blocks of accelerometers suggest that the theoretical model is effective in determining the buckling value of a fabricated structure.

  2. Modeling Tourism Sustainable Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shcherbina, O. A.; Shembeleva, E. A.

    The basic approaches to decision making and modeling tourism sustainable development are reviewed. Dynamics of a sustainable development is considered in the Forrester's system dynamics. Multidimensionality of tourism sustainable development and multicriteria issues of sustainable development are analyzed. Decision Support Systems (DSS) and Spatial Decision Support Systems (SDSS) as an effective technique in examining and visualizing impacts of policies, sustainable tourism development strategies within an integrated and dynamic framework are discussed. Main modules that may be utilized for integrated modeling sustainable tourism development are proposed.

  3. Microstructural evolution in a ferritic-martensitic stainless steel and its relation to high-temperature deformation and rupture models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiMelfi, R.J.; Gruber, E.E.; Kramer, J.M.

    1991-01-01

    The ferritic-martensitic stainless steel HT-9 exhibits an anomalously high creep strength in comparison to its high-temperature flow strength from tensile tests performed at moderate rates. A constitutive relation describing its high-temperature tensile behavior over a wide range of conditions has been developed. When applied to creep conditions the model predicts deformation rates orders of magnitude higher than observed. To account for the observed creep strength, a fine distribution of precipitates is postulated to evolve over time during creep. The precipitate density is calculated at each temperature and stress to give the observed creep rate. The apparent precipitation kinetics thereby extracted from this analysis is used in a model for the rupture-time kinetics that compares favorably with observation. Properly austenitized and tempered material was aged over times comparable to creep conditions, and in a way consistent with the precipitation kinetics from the model. Microstructural observations support the postulates and results of the model system. 16 refs., 10 figs.

  4. Kinetics of bacterial phospholipase C activity at micellar interfaces: effect of substrate aggregate microstructure and a model for the kinetic parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasmeet; Ranganathan, Radha; Hajdu, Joseph

    2008-12-25

    Activity at micellar interfaces of bacterial phospholipase C from Bacillus cereus on phospholipids solubilized in micelles was investigated with the goal of elucidating the role of the interface microstructure and developing further an existing kinetic model. Enzyme kinetics and physicochemical characterization of model substrate aggregates were combined, thus enabling the interpretation of kinetics in the context of the interface. Substrates were diacylphosphatidylcholine of different acyl chain lengths in the form of mixed micelles with dodecyldimethylammoniopropanesulfonate. An early kinetic model, reformulated to reflect the interfacial nature of the kinetics, was applied to the kinetic data. A better method of data treatment is proposed, use of which makes the presence of microstructure effects quite transparent. Models for enzyme-micelle binding and enzyme-lipid binding are developed, and expressions incorporating the microstructural properties are derived for the enzyme-micelle dissociation constant K(s) and the interface Michaelis-Menten constant, K(M). Use of these expressions in the interface kinetic model brings excellent agreement between the kinetic data and the model. Numerical values for the thermodynamic and kinetic parameters are determined. Enzyme-lipid binding is found to be an activated process with an acyl chain length dependent free energy of activation that decreases with micelle lipid molar fraction with a coefficient of about -15RT and correlates with the tightness of molecular packing in the substrate aggregate. Thus, the physical insight obtained includes a model for the kinetic parameters that shows that these parameters depend on the substrate concentration and acyl chain length of the lipid. Enzyme-micelle binding is indicated to be hydrophobic and solvent mediated with a dissociation constant of 1.2 mM.

  5. Development of a microstructural-related description for the high temperature stress-strain behaviour of the turbine blade material IN 738 LC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Londschien, B.; Penkalla, H.J.; Schubert, F.; Nickel, H.

    1991-04-01

    Since more than 15 years, the nickel-base alloy IN 738 LC is used for stationary gas-turbine blades because of its good high temperature strength coupled with acceptable hot corrosion resistance. The high strength in the temperature range 700deg C to 1000deg C results primarily from the intermetallic phase γ' = Ni 3 (Al,Ti). The γ' precipitates restrict the motion of the dislocations. The high temperature deformation behaviour has been correlated with the morphology of the γ' precipitates. It was found that the deformation rate in short term creep experiments (up to 1000 hours) depended on the initial microstructure of the cast alloy. The microstructure could be characterized by γ' particle size and distribution in the matrix. A heat treatment was applied with the aim of producing a more stable microstructure, so that the long time creep behaviour does not depend so strongly on the initial microstructure. The structure development in the experiments could be described by the growth of the γ' precipitates, calculated from the diffusion rates of aluminium and titanium in the nickel matrix. During operation, the turbine blade is loaded with a multi axial stress comprising the centrifugal force, the thermally induced stationary and instationary stresses, and the bending stresses from the gas flow. It was shown in strain-rate controlled tension-torsion tests on hollow round samples, that the multiaxial stress-strain behaviour could be calculated using the invariant theory for isotropic materials with a comparative stress value from the uniaxial creep experiment, applying the von Mises theory. This mathematical model is useful for calculating the life time for a turbine blade which is multiaxially loaded. (orig.) [de

  6. Machine learning based compartment models with permeability for white matter microstructure imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedjati-Gilani, Gemma L; Schneider, Torben; Hall, Matt G; Cawley, Niamh; Hill, Ioana; Ciccarelli, Olga; Drobnjak, Ivana; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M Gandini; Alexander, Daniel C

    2017-04-15

    Some microstructure parameters, such as permeability, remain elusive because mathematical models that express their relationship to the MR signal accurately are intractable. Here, we propose to use computational models learned from simulations to estimate these parameters. We demonstrate the approach in an example which estimates water residence time in brain white matter. The residence time τ i of water inside axons is a potentially important biomarker for white matter pathologies of the human central nervous system, as myelin damage is hypothesised to affect axonal permeability, and thus τ i . We construct a computational model using Monte Carlo simulations and machine learning (specifically here a random forest regressor) in order to learn a mapping between features derived from diffusion weighted MR signals and ground truth microstructure parameters, including τ i . We test our numerical model using simulated and in vivo human brain data. Simulation results show that estimated parameters have strong correlations with the ground truth parameters (R 2 ={0.88,0.95,0.82,0.99}) for volume fraction, residence time, axon radius and diffusivity respectively), and provide a marked improvement over the most widely used Kärger model (R 2 ={0.75,0.60,0.11,0.99}). The trained model also estimates sensible microstructure parameters from in vivo human brain data acquired from healthy controls, matching values found in literature, and provides better reproducibility than the Kärger model on both the voxel and ROI level. Finally, we acquire data from two Multiple Sclerosis (MS) patients and compare to the values in healthy subjects. We find that in the splenium of corpus callosum (CC-S) the estimate of the residence time is 0.57±0.05s for the healthy subjects, while in the MS patient with a lesion in CC-S it is 0.33±0.12s in the normal appearing white matter (NAWM) and 0.19±0.11s in the lesion. In the corticospinal tracts (CST) the estimate of the residence time is 0

  7. Cryo-SEM studies of latex/ceramic nanoparticle coating microstructure development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Hui; Scriven, L E; Francis, Lorraine F

    2007-12-15

    Cryogenic scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) was used to investigate microstructure development of composite coatings prepared from dispersions of antimony-doped tin oxide (ATO) nanoparticles (approximately 30 nm) or indium tin oxide (ITO) nanoparticles (approximately 40 nm) and latex particles (polydisperse, D(v): approximately 300 nm). Cryo-SEM images of ATO/latex dispersions as-frozen show small clusters of ATO and individual latex particles homogeneously distribute in a frozen water matrix. In contrast, cryo-SEM images of ITO/latex dispersions as-frozen show ITO particles adsorb onto latex particle surfaces. Electrostatic repulsion between negatively charged ATO and negatively charged latex particles stabilizes the ATO/latex dispersion, whereas in ITO/latex dispersion, positively charged ITO particles are attracted onto surfaces of negatively charged latex particles. These results are consistent with calculations of interaction potentials from past research. Cryo-SEM images of frozen and fractured coatings reveal that both ceramic nanoparticles and latex become more concentrated as drying proceeds; larger latex particles consolidate with ceramic nanoparticles in the interstitial spaces. With more drying, compaction flattens the latex-latex particle contacts and shrinks the voids between them. Thus, ceramic nanoparticles are forced to pack closely in the interstitial spaces, forming an interconnected network. Finally, latex particles partially coalesce at their flattened contacts, thereby yielding a coherent coating. The research reveals how nanoparticles segregate and interconnect among latex particles during drying.

  8. Development of hypoimmunogenic muffins: batter rheology, quality characteristics, microstructure and immunochemical validation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwini; Umashankar, K; Rajiv, Jyotsna; Prabhasankar, P

    2016-01-01

    A high demand exists for gluten free and hypoimmunogenic products from gluten sensitive population. The present study focuses on the development of hypoimmunogenic muffins using a combination of the blend (CB) consisting of modified (protease treated) Whole Wheat Flour (WWF) and Pearl Millet Flour (PMF). The batter density of CB was 0.97, and it varied between 0.91-0.93 and 0.97-0.99 g/cc with the use of emulsifiers and hydrocolloids respectively. The volume of the muffin made using CB was 70 mL, and it increased to 120 mL with the combination of additives (CAD) comprising of Carboxy Methyl Cellulose (CMC) and Polysorbate-60 (PS-60). The muffins made of CB + CAD had the lowest hardness (19.8 N) and gumminess (6.6 N) values and highest springiness value (13.3 mm) indicating that the texture was soft. Sensory characteristics of the muffin made with CB + CAD were good and had an overall quality score of 90.5 out of 100. Rheometer studies showed that the incorporation of additives improved the visco-elastic properties of muffin batters. Microstructure studies showed a change in gluten matrix of muffins followed by treatments. Immunochemical validation of muffins made using CB + CAD showed that the immunogenicity reduced by 70.8 % which may be suitable for patients with gluten sensitivity.

  9. Development of glass/glass-ceramics materials and devices and their micro-structural studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goswami, Madhumita; Sarkar, Arjun; Shingarvelan, Shobha; Kumar, Rakesh; Ananathanarayan, Arvind; Shrikhande, V.K.; Kothiyal, G.P.

    2009-01-01

    Materials and devices based on glass and glass-ceramics (GCs) find applications in various high pressure and vacuum applications. We have prepared different glasses/glass-ceramics with requisite thermal expansion coefficient, electrical, vacuum and wetting characteristics to fabricate hermetic seals with different metals/alloys as well as components for these applications. Some of these are, SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-Al 2 O 3 -B 2O3 (BS) for matched type of seal fabricated with Kovar alloy, SiO 2 -Na 2 O-K 2 O-BaO-PbO(LS) for fabrication of compressive type seals with stainless steel and SS 446 alloys, P 2 O 5 -Na 2 O-B 2 O 3 -BaO-PbO(NAP) for fabrication of matched type of seal with relatively low melting metals/alloys like AI/Cu-Be and Li 2 O-ZnO-SiO 2 -P 2 O 5 -B 2 O 3 -Na 2 O (LZS) and Lithium aluminium silicate (LAS) glass-ceramics to fabricate matched and compression types feedtroughs/conductivity probes Magnesium aluminium silicate (MAS) machinable glass-ceramics is another development for high voltage and ultra high vacuum applications. Micro-structural studies have been carried out on these materials to understand the mechanism of their behaviour and have also been deployed in various systems and plants in DAE. (author)

  10. Microstructural development of human brain assessed in utero by diffusion tensor imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bui, T.; Daire, J.L.; Chalard, F.; Sebag, G. [Hopital Robert Debre, Paris (France). Dept. of Paediatric Imaging; Zaccaria, I.; Alberti, C. [Hopital Robert Debre, Paris (France). Clinical Epidemiology; Elmaleh, M.; Garel, C. [Hopital Robert Debre, Paris (France). Dept. of Paediatric Imaging; Univ. of Paris-7 (France). Faculty of Medicine; Luton, D. [Hopital Robert Debre, Paris (France); Blanc, N. [Hopital Robert Debre, Paris (France). Neurology Service

    2006-11-15

    Diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DWI) has been shown to be a great tool to assess white matter development in normal infants. Comparison of cerebral diffusion properties between preterm infants and fetuses of corresponding ages should assist in determining the impact of premature ex utero life on brain maturation. To assess in utero maturation-dependent microstructural changes of fetal cerebral white matter using diffusion tensor MR imaging. An echoplanar sequence with diffusion gradient (b=700 s/mm{sup 2}) applied in six non-colinear directions was performed between 31 and 37{sup +3} weeks of gestation in 24 fetuses without cerebral abnormality on T1- and T2-weighted images. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were measured in the white matter. Mean ADC values were 1.8 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms in the centrum semiovale, 1.2 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms in the splenium of the corpus callosum and 1.1 {mu}m{sup 2}/ms in the pyramidal tract. The paired Wilcoxon rank test showed significant differences in ADC between these three white matter regions. Mean FA values were 1.1%, 3.8% and 4.7%, respectively, in the centrum semiovale, corpus callosum and pyramidal tract.

  11. Modeling of multi-phase microstructures in press hardened components: plastic deformation and fracture in different stress states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golling, S.; Östlund, R.; Oldenburg, M.

    2017-09-01

    Hot stamping or press hardening is an industrialized technique with the aim of improving material properties by heat treatment and forming of a component in a single production stage. Within the field of press hardening the method of tailored material properties evolved. Components with tailored material properties possess different mechanical properties in designated areas. This paper presents an approach for modeling the mechanical response of mixed microstructures under different stress states. A homogenization method is used to predict the hardening of the material; the strain decomposition provides the possibility of applying a fracture criterion per phase. To validate the modeling approach for different stress states a set of samples with different notch and hole geometries as well as microstructural composition are produced. The combination of a homogenization method and a fracture criterion show good agreement with experimental results. The homogenization method is suitable to predict the hardening of the material with good accuracy. Fracture for different microstructural compositions is well predicted over a range of stress triaxialities relevant for sheet metal applications. It is concluded that the use of a homogenization method combined with a fracture model can be used to predict the mechanical response of mixed microstructures for a range of different stress states.

  12. Polycarbonate as an Elasto-Plastic Material Model for Simulation of the Microstructure Hot Imprint Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rokas Šakalys

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The thermal imprint process of polymer micro-patterning is widely applied in areas such as manufacturing of optical parts, solar energy, bio-mechanical devices and chemical chips. Polycarbonate (PC, as an amorphous polymer, is often used in thermoforming processes because of its good replication characteristics. In order to obtain replicas of the best quality, the imprint parameters (e.g., pressure, temperature, time, etc. must be determined. Therefore finite element model of the hot imprint process of lamellar periodical microstructure into PC has been created using COMSOL Multiphysics. The mathematical model of the hot imprint process includes three steps: heating, imprinting and demolding. The material properties of amorphous PC strongly depend on the imprint temperature and loading pressure. Polycarbonate was modelled as an elasto-plastic material, since it was analyzed below the glass transition temperature. The hot imprint model was solved using the heat transfer and the solid stress-strain application modes with thermal contact problem between the mold and polycarbonate. It was used for the evaluation of temperature and stress distributions in the polycarbonate during the hot imprint process. The quality of the replica, by means of lands filling ratio, was determined as well.

  13. Quantification of microstructural features in α/β titanium alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tiley, J.; Searles, T.; Lee, E.; Kar, S.; Banerjee, R.; Russ, J.C.; Fraser, H.L.

    2004-01-01

    Mechanical properties of α/β Ti alloys are closely related to their microstructure. The complexity of the microstructural features involved makes it rather difficult to develop models for predicting properties of these alloys. Developing predictive rules-based models for α/β Ti alloys requires a huge database consisting of quantified microstructural data. This in turn requires the development of rigorous stereological procedures capable of quantifying the various microstructural features of interest imaged using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) micrographs. In the present paper, rigorous stereological procedures have been developed for quantifying four important microstructural features in these alloys: thickness of Widmanstaetten α laths, colony scale factor, prior β grain size, and volume fraction of Widmanstaetten α laths

  14. Developing mathematical modelling competence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomhøj, Morten; Jensen, Tomas Højgaard

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we introduce the concept of mathematical modelling competence, by which we mean being able to carry through a whole mathematical modelling process in a certain context. Analysing the structure of this process, six sub-competences are identified. Mathematical modelling competence...... cannot be reduced to these six sub-competences, but they are necessary elements in the development of mathematical modelling competence. Experience from the development of a modelling course is used to illustrate how the different nature of the sub-competences can be used as a tool for finding...... the balance between different kinds of activities in a particular educational setting. Obstacles of social, cognitive and affective nature for the students' development of mathematical modelling competence are reported and discussed in relation to the sub-competences....

  15. Continuous media with microstructure

    CERN Document Server

    2010-01-01

    This book discusses the extension of classical continuum models. To the first class addressed belong various thermodynamic models of multicomponent systems, and to the second class belong primarily microstructures created by phase transformations.

  16. Microstructure evolution and modeling of 2024 aluminum alloy sheets during hot deformation under different stress states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Lei; Zhou, Peng; Wang, Xinyun; Jin, Junsong; Zhao, Ting

    2018-01-01

    In this work, specimens of the 2024 aluminum alloy sheet were compressed and stretched along the original rolling direction at elevated temperatures. The microstructure evolution was investigated by characterizing the metallographic structures via electron backscattered diffraction technology before and after deformation. It was found that while recrystallization occurred in the compressed specimens, it was not observed to the same extent in the stretched specimens. This difference in the grain morphology has been attributed to the different movement behaviors of the grain boundaries, i.e., their significant migration in the compression deformation and the transformation from low-angle to high-angle boundaries observed mainly during tension deformation. The empirical model, which can describe the grain size evolution during compression, is not suitable in the case of tension, and therefore, a new model which ignores the detailed recrystallization process has been proposed. This model provides a description of the grain size change during hot deformation and can be used to predict the grain size in the plastic deformation process.

  17. Linking natural microstructures with numerical modeling of pinch-and-swell structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Max; Berger, Alfons; Herwegh, Marco; Regenauer-Lieb, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    For a variety of geological problems, the change from homogeneous to localized deformation and the establishment of steady-state conditions are equally important. Here, we show that pinch-and-swell structures are ideal candidates for the study of the switch in deformation style and mechanism during ductile creep. We present an interdisciplinary approach to the onset of pinch-and-swell structures and to the flow conditions during pre- to post-localization stages in ductile rocks. For this reason, naturally boudinaged calcite veins, embedded in a calc-mylonite, and their microfabrics were investigated quantitatively. Remnants of slightly deformed calcite hosts build up the swells, showing twinning and minor dislocation glide as crystal plastic deformation mechanisms which are accompanied by subgrain rotation recrystallization (SGR). Towards the pinches, we find a gradient of severe grain size reduction through progressive SGR, developing a characteristic dislocation creep crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO). Along this gradient, the finest recrystallized calcite grains appear randomly oriented, expressed by a "smearing-out" of the CPO and missing systematics of misorientation angles in the most extended areas. We interpret this microstructure as a switch from dislocation dominated creep to grain boundary sliding processes. Further, we show that the onset of boudinage is independent on both the original orientation and grain size of calcite hosts. We implemented these microstructural observations into a layered elasto-visco-plastic finite element framework, tracing variations in grain size (Peters et al., 2015). We base the microstructural evolution on thermo-mechanical-chemical principles and end-member flow laws (Herwegh et al., 2014). The simulated pinch-and-swell structures indicate that low strain rates in the swells favor dislocation creep, whereas accelerated rates provoke continuous grain size reduction allowing strain accommodation by diffusion creep

  18. The Relevance of Grain Dissection for Grain Size Reduction in Polar Ice: Insights from Numerical Models and Ice Core Microstructure Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Steinbach

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The flow of ice depends on the properties of the aggregate of individual ice crystals, such as grain size or lattice orientation distributions. Therefore, an understanding of the processes controlling ice micro-dynamics is needed to ultimately develop a physically based macroscopic ice flow law. We investigated the relevance of the process of grain dissection as a grain-size-modifying process in natural ice. For that purpose, we performed numerical multi-process microstructure modeling and analyzed microstructure and crystallographic orientation maps from natural deep ice-core samples from the North Greenland Eemian Ice Drilling (NEEM project. Full crystallographic orientations measured by electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD have been used together with c-axis orientations using an optical technique (Fabric Analyser. Grain dissection is a feature of strain-induced grain boundary migration. During grain dissection, grain boundaries bulge into a neighboring grain in an area of high dislocation energy and merge with the opposite grain boundary. This splits the high dislocation-energy grain into two parts, effectively decreasing the local grain size. Currently, grain size reduction in ice is thought to be achieved by either the progressive transformation from dislocation walls into new high-angle grain boundaries, called subgrain rotation or polygonisation, or bulging nucleation that is assisted by subgrain rotation. Both our time-resolved numerical modeling and NEEM ice core samples show that grain dissection is a common mechanism during ice deformation and can provide an efficient process to reduce grain sizes and counter-act dynamic grain-growth in addition to polygonisation or bulging nucleation. Thus, our results show that solely strain-induced boundary migration, in absence of subgrain rotation, can reduce grain sizes in polar ice, in particular if strain energy gradients are high. We describe the microstructural characteristics that can be

  19. Microstructure and mechanical properties of WC-Ni-Al based cemented carbides developed for engineering applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, Edmilson O.; Santos, Julio N. [Universidade Federal de Itajuba, Minas Gerais (Brazil). Inst. de Engenharia Mecanica; Klein, Aloisio N. [Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, Florianopolis (Brazil). Dept. de Engenharia de Materiais

    2011-11-15

    In this paper the influence of the Ni binder metal and Al as an additional alloying element on the microstructure and mechanical properties of WC-based cemented carbides processed by conventional powder metallurgy was studied. Microstructural examinations of the cemented carbides with 3 and 5 wt.% of Al in the binder metal indicated the presence of a very low and evenly distributed porosity as well as the presence of islands of metal binder in the microstructure. With the cemented carbide with 7 wt.% of Al in the metal binder, the presence of brittle needle-like regions was observed. The WC particles inside these regions were rounded and had a larger mean free path. Vickers hardness and flexural strength tests indicated that the cemented carbide WC-Ni - Al with addition of 5 wt.% of Al in the binder metal presented bulk hardness similar to the conventional WC-Co cemented carbides as well as superior flexure strength and fracture toughness. (orig.)

  20. Microstructural characterization and finite element modeling of AZ31 magnesium alloys welded joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Segarra

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, it has been studied how the microstructure of AZ31 magnesium alloy can be affected by the thermic cycles produced by welding processes, trying to modeling by element finite software the thermic cycles in this material. The AZ31 samples tested were welded using Gas Tugsten Arc Welding (GTAW and different filler materials. For this investigation, optic microscopy, scanning electronic microscopy, and finite elements method software has been used. This work indicates in one hand that in this type of alloys the microconstituyentes are Al-Mn o Al-Mn-Mg compounds, the presence of β-phase cannot be found at room temperature in this research at room, on the other hand the obtained simulation models indicate that the recrystallization takes place in the areas which reach maximum temperatures around 550 °C, this value is also the limit of the dissolution area for the Al-Mn o Al-Mn-Mg precipitated particles which are very likely to act as inhibitors of the corrosion in NaCl electrolytes.

  1. Microstructure-sensitive modelling of dislocation creep in polycrystalline FCC alloys: Orowan theory revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Galindo-Nava, E.I., E-mail: eg375@cam.ac.uk; Rae, C.M.F.

    2016-01-10

    A new approach for modelling dislocation creep during primary and secondary creep in FCC metals is proposed. The Orowan equation and dislocation behaviour at the grain scale are revisited to include the effects of different microstructures such as the grain size and solute atoms. Dislocation activity is proposed to follow a jog-diffusion law. It is shown that the activation energy for cross-slip E{sub cs} controls dislocation mobility and the strain increments during secondary creep. This is confirmed by successfully comparing E{sub cs} with the experimentally determined activation energy during secondary creep in 5 FCC metals. It is shown that the inverse relationship between the grain size and dislocation creep is attributed to the higher number of strain increments at the grain level dominating their magnitude as the grain size decreases. An alternative approach describing solid solution strengthening effects in nickel alloys is presented, where the dislocation mobility is reduced by dislocation pinning around solute atoms. An analysis on the solid solution strengthening effects of typical elements employed in Ni-base superalloys is also discussed. The model results are validated against measurements of Cu, Ni, Ti and 4 Ni-base alloys for wide deformation conditions and different grain sizes.

  2. Development of microstructure during sintering and aluminium exposure of titanium diboride ceramics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pettersen, Gunnar

    1997-12-31

    In the production of aluminium, much less energy need be consumed if an inert, wetted cathode is present in the electrolysis cell. Titanium diboride, TiB{sub 2}, is easily wetted and does not readily dissolve in liquid aluminium, but it degrades, probably because aluminium penetrates into it during electrolysis. This degradation is linked to impurities present in the TiB{sub 2} after sintering. This thesis studies the sintering process and how aluminium penetrates into the material. High-purity, high-density TiB{sub 2} compacts were made by hot pressing at 50 MPa in an argon atmosphere at 1790-1960 {sup o}C. Samples were made with different impurity additions. These samples were exposed to liquid aluminium at 980 {sup o}C for 24 hours. All samples were penetrated, but the amount and appearance depended on the sintering aid used. Unlike the other samples, pure TiB{sub 2} was easily penetrated by metallic aluminium because of the open porosity and microcracks of this material. Grain boundary penetration was common among the samples. Differences in penetration behaviour between grain boundaries are probably due to differences in grain boundary energy. But no relation to segregants or boundary misorientation was found. The orientation of grain boundary planes and de-wetting of thin films upon cooling may explain the observed microstructure development. The samples sintered with Ti addition suffered extensive penetration despite their high densities. The grain boundaries of these samples became faceted and contained thicker films of metallic aluminium, presumably because of increased solubility due to iron segregations. All secondary phases present in the grain junctions after sintering, except from the B{sub 4}C phase, reacted with the penetrated aluminium. This did not cause swelling and cracking, as has been suggested by other authors. 101 refs., 48 figs., 7 tabs.

  3. Discrete-element modeling of nacre-like materials: Effects of random microstructures on strain localization and mechanical performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Najmul; Mirkhalaf, Mohammad; Barthelat, Francois

    2018-03-01

    Natural materials such as nacre, collagen, and spider silk are composed of staggered stiff and strong inclusions in a softer matrix. This type of hybrid microstructure results in remarkable combinations of stiffness, strength, and toughness and it now inspires novel classes of high-performance composites. However, the analytical and numerical approaches used to predict and optimize the mechanics of staggered composites often neglect statistical variations and inhomogeneities, which may have significant impacts on modulus, strength, and toughness. Here we present an analysis of localization using small representative volume elements (RVEs) and large scale statistical volume elements (SVEs) based on the discrete element method (DEM). DEM is an efficient numerical method which enabled the evaluation of more than 10,000 microstructures in this study, each including about 5,000 inclusions. The models explore the combined effects of statistics, inclusion arrangement, and interface properties. We find that statistical variations have a negative effect on all properties, in particular on the ductility and energy absorption because randomness precipitates the localization of deformations. However, the results also show that the negative effects of random microstructures can be offset by interfaces with large strain at failure accompanied by strain hardening. More specifically, this quantitative study reveals an optimal range of interface properties where the interfaces are the most effective at delaying localization. These findings show how carefully designed interfaces in bioinspired staggered composites can offset the negative effects of microstructural randomness, which is inherent to most current fabrication methods.

  4. Fatigue crack initiation in nickel-based superalloys studied by microstructure-based FE modeling and scanning electron microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fried M.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work stage I crack initiation in polycrystalline nickel-based superalloys is investigated by analyzing anisotropic mechanical properties, local stress concentrations and plastic deformation on the microstructural length scale. The grain structure in the gauge section of fatigue specimens was characterized by EBSD. Based on the measured data, a microstructure-based FE model could be established to simulate the strain and stress distribution in the specimens during the first loading cycle of a fatigue test. The results were in fairly good agreement with experimentally measured local strains. Furthermore, the onset of plastic deformation was predicted by identifying shear stress maxima in the microstructure, presumably leading to activation of slip systems. Measurement of plastic deformation and observation of slip traces in the respective regions of the microstructure confirmed the predicted slip activity. The close relation between micro-plasticity, formation of slip traces and stage I crack initiation was demonstrated by SEM surface analyses of fatigued specimens and an in-situ fatigue test in a large chamber SEM.

  5. The effect of actinides on the microstructural development in a metallic high-level nuclear waste form

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keiser, D.D. Jr.; Sinkler, W.; Abraham, D.P.; Richardson, J.W. Jr.; McDeavitt, S.M.

    1999-01-01

    Waste forms to contain material residual from an electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear fuel have been developed by Argonne National Laboratory. One of these waste forms contains waste stainless steel (SS), fission products that are noble to the process (e.g., Tc, Ru, Pd, Rh), Zr, and actinides. The baseline composition of this metallic waste form is SS-15wt.% Zr. The metallurgy of this baseline alloy has been well characterized. On the other hand, the effects of actinides on the alloy microstructure are not well understood. As a result, SS-Zr alloys with added U, Pu, and/or Np have been cast and then characterized, using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and neutron diffraction, to investigate the microstructural development in SS-Zr alloys that contain actinides. Actinides were found to congregate non-uniformally in a Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni) 2+x phase. Apparently, the actinides were contained in varying amounts in the different polytypes (C14, C15, and C36) of the Zr(Fe,Cr,Ni) 2+x phase. Heat treatment of an actinide-containing SS-15 wt.% Zr alloy showed the observed microstructure to be stable

  6. Development of non-dendritic microstructures in AA6061 cast billets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, X.-D.; Chadwick, T.A.; Bryant, J.D. [Reynolds Metals Co., Chester, VA (United States)

    2000-07-01

    Non-dendritic structures have been shown to have many advantages over conventional, dendritic structures in castable aluminum alloys. Examples include high structural integrity, reduced porosity, excellent formability and enhanced near net-shape forming capability. Non-dendritic materials are characterized by an equiaxed, globularized grain structure. Previous work has focused on the application of these structures in traditional casting alloys such as A356 and A357, and on the processing of these alloys during semi-solid forming and squeeze casting. There is considerably less information on the impact of non-dendritic microstructures upon solid state deformation, and the use of such microstructures in the processing of traditional wrought aluminum alloys. In this paper, we will present our recent work in casting non-dendritic AA6061 alloy using different techniques, and discuss the effects of cast structure on deformation behavior during solid state processing at elevated temperatures. Cast microstructures were modified during direct chill casting using three different methods: magneto-hydrodynamic (MHD) agitation, mechanical stirring, and high loadings of grain refiner. A detailed microstructure characterization will be presented and discussed in terms of structural integrity, grain morphology, and their effects on deformation in the solid state. (orig.)

  7. VLSI electronics microstructure science

    CERN Document Server

    1981-01-01

    VLSI Electronics: Microstructure Science, Volume 3 evaluates trends for the future of very large scale integration (VLSI) electronics and the scientific base that supports its development.This book discusses the impact of VLSI on computer architectures; VLSI design and design aid requirements; and design, fabrication, and performance of CCD imagers. The approaches, potential, and progress of ultra-high-speed GaAs VLSI; computer modeling of MOSFETs; and numerical physics of micron-length and submicron-length semiconductor devices are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the optical linewi

  8. The extended distributed microstructure model for gradient-driven transport: A two-scale model for bypassing effective parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, E. J.; Perré, P.; Turner, I. W.

    2016-12-01

    Numerous problems involving gradient-driven transport processes-e.g., Fourier's and Darcy's law-in heterogeneous materials concern a physical domain that is much larger than the scale at which the coefficients vary spatially. To overcome the prohibitive computational cost associated with such problems, the well-established Distributed Microstructure Model (DMM) provides a two-scale description of the transport process that produces a computationally cheap approximation to the fine-scale solution. This is achieved via the introduction of sparsely distributed micro-cells that together resolve small patches of the fine-scale structure: a macroscopic equation with an effective coefficient describes the global transport and a microscopic equation governs the local transport within each micro-cell. In this paper, we propose a new formulation, the Extended Distributed Microstructure Model (EDMM), where the macroscopic flux is instead defined as the average of the microscopic fluxes within the micro-cells. This avoids the need for any effective parameters and more accurately accounts for a non-equilibrium field in the micro-cells. Another important contribution of the work is the presentation of a new and improved numerical scheme for performing the two-scale computations using control volume, Krylov subspace and parallel computing techniques. Numerical tests are carried out on two challenging test problems: heat conduction in a composite medium and unsaturated water flow in heterogeneous soils. The results indicate that while DMM is more efficient, EDMM is more accurate and is able to capture additional fine-scale features in the solution.

  9. New droplet model developments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorso, C.O.; Myers, W.D.; Swiatecki, W.J.; Moeller, P.; Treiner, J.; Weiss, M.S.

    1985-09-01

    A brief summary is given of three recent contributions to the development of the Droplet Model. The first concerns the electric dipole moment induced in octupole deformed nuclei by the Coulomb redistribution. The second concerns a study of squeezing in nuclei and the third is a study of the improved predictive power of the model when an empirical ''exponential'' term is included. 25 refs., 3 figs

  10. Microstructural evolution under high temperature irradiation: fundamental aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, G.; Valentin, P.

    1984-01-01

    In view of the impossibility to propose theoretically established scaling laws for extrapolating microstructural evolutions to unknown irradiation conditions, a full modelization of microstructural evolution at the atomistic level cannot be avoided. We briefly review the main models available for describing: defect balance under irradiation, the nucleation of clusters of various types, the development of each of the components of the microstructure, synergistic effects among the latter. Attention is called on the problems which remain to be solved at each step. In particular, the swelling incubation phenomenon is just being studied from the fundamental viewpoint. A table of available relevant observations thereof is given. The existence of dose-rate thresholds accross which microstructural evolution undergoes a qualitative change is stressed. Such thresholds call for a detailed modelization of microstructural evolution in order to propose safe extrapolation techniques [fr

  11. Coarsening of the Sn-Pb Solder Microstructure in Constitutive Model-Based Predictions of Solder Joint Thermal Mechanical Fatigue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vianco, P.T.; Burchett, S.N.; Neilsen, M.K.; Rejent, J.A.; Frear, D.R.

    1999-04-12

    Thermal mechanical fatigue (TMF) is an important damage mechanism for solder joints exposed to cyclic temperature environments. Predicting the service reliability of solder joints exposed to such conditions requires two knowledge bases: first, the extent of fatigue damage incurred by the solder microstructure leading up to fatigue crack initiation, must be quantified in both time and space domains. Secondly, fatigue crack initiation and growth must be predicted since this metric determines, explicitly, the loss of solder joint functionality as it pertains to its mechanical fastening as well as electrical continuity roles. This paper will describe recent progress in a research effort to establish a microstructurally-based, constitutive model that predicts TMF deformation to 63Sn-37Pb solder in electronic solder joints up to the crack initiation step. The model is implemented using a finite element setting; therefore, the effects of both global and local thermal expansion mismatch conditions in the joint that would arise from temperature cycling.

  12. Rate theory modeling of defect evolution under cascade damage conditions: the influence of vacancy-type cascade remnants and application to the defect production characterization by microstructural analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katoh, Yutai; Muroga, Takeo; Kohyama, Akira; Stoller, R.E.; Namba, Chusei; Motojima, Osamu.

    1995-11-01

    Recent computational and experimental studies have confirmed that high energy cascades produce clustered defects of both vacancy- and interstitial-types as well as isolated point defects. However, the production probability, configuration, stability and other characteristics of the cascade clusters are not well understood in spite of the fact that clustered defect production would substantially affect the irradiation-induced microstructures and the consequent property changes in a certain range of temperatures and displacement rates. In this work, a model of point defect and cluster evolution in irradiated materials under cascade damage conditions was developed by combining the conventional reaction rate theory and the results from the latest molecular dynamics simulation studies. This paper provides a description of the model and a model-based fundamental investigation of the influence of configuration, production efficiency and the initial size distribution of cascade-produced vacancy clusters. In addition, using the model, issues on characterizing cascade-induced defect production by microstructural analysis will be discussed. In particular, the determination of cascade vacancy cluster configuration, surviving defect production efficiency and cascade-interaction volume is attempted by analyzing the temperature dependence of swelling rate and loop growth rate in austenitic steels and model alloys. (author)

  13. Effect of Bainitic Microstructure on Ballistic Performance of Armour Steel Weld Metal Using Developed High Ni-Coated Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramanick, A. K.; Das, H.; Reddy, G. M.; Ghosh, M.; Nandy, S.; Pal, T. K.

    2018-04-01

    Welding of armour steel has gained significant importance during the past few years as recent civilian and military requirements demand weld metal properties matching with base metal having good ballistic performance along with high strength and toughness at - 40 °C as per specification. The challenge of armour steel welding therefore lies in controlling the weld metal composition which is strongly dependent on welding electrode/consumables, resulting in desired weld microstructure consisting of lower bainite along with retained austenite. The performance of butt-welded armour steel joints produced by the developed electrodes was evaluated using tensile testing, ballistic testing, impact toughness at room temperature and subzero temperature. Microstructures of weld metals are exclusively characterized by x-ray diffraction technique, scanning electron microscope and transmission electron microscopy with selected area diffraction pattern. Experimental results show that weld metal with relatively lower carbon, higher manganese and lower nickel content was attributed to lower bainite with film type of retained austenite may be considered as a most covetable microstructure for armour steel weld metal.

  14. Probabilistic Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, James H., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Develop a Probabilistic Model for the Solar Energetic Particle Environment. Develop a tool to provide a reference solar particle radiation environment that: 1) Will not be exceeded at a user-specified confidence level; 2) Will provide reference environments for: a) Peak flux; b) Event-integrated fluence; and c) Mission-integrated fluence. The reference environments will consist of: a) Elemental energy spectra; b) For protons, helium and heavier ions.

  15. Corrosion-induced microstructural developments in 316 stainless steel during exposure to molten Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4}(FLiBe) salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Guiqiu, E-mail: guiqiuzheng@gmail.com [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); He, Lingfeng [Idaho National Laboratory, Idaho Fall, ID (United States); Carpenter, David [Nuclear Reactor Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA (United States); Sridharan, Kumar [Department of Engineering Physics, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-12-15

    The microstructural developments in the near-surface regions of AISI 316 stainless steel during exposure to molten Li{sub 2}BeF{sub 4} (FLiBe) salt have been investigated with the goal of using this material for the construction of the fluoride salt-cooled high-temperature reactor (FHR), a leading nuclear reactor concept for the next generation nuclear plants (NGNP). Tests were conducted in molten FLiBe salt (melting point: 459 °C) at 700 °C in graphite crucibles and 316 stainless steel crucibles for exposure duration of up to 3000 h. Corrosion-induced microstructural changes in the near-surface regions of the samples were characterized using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in conjunction with energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) with EDS capabilities. Intergranular corrosion attack in the near-surface regions was observed with associated Cr depletion along the grain boundaries. High-angle grain boundaries (15–180°) were particularly prone to intergranular attack and Cr depletion. The depth of attack extended to the depths of 22 μm after 3000-h exposure for the samples tested in graphite crucible, while similar exposure in 316 stainless steel crucible led to the attack depths of only about 11 μm. Testing in graphite crucibles led to the formation of nanometer-scale Mo{sub 2}C, Cr{sub 7}C{sub 3} and Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} particle phases in the near-surface regions of the material. The copious depletion of Cr in the near-surface regions induced a γ-martensite to α-ferrite phase (FeNi{sub x}) transformation. Based on the microstructural analysis, a thermal diffusion controlled corrosion model was developed and experimentally validated for predicting long-term corrosion attack depth.

  16. RSMASS system model development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marshall, A.C.; Gallup, D.R.

    1998-01-01

    RSMASS system mass models have been used for more than a decade to make rapid estimates of space reactor power system masses. This paper reviews the evolution of the RSMASS models and summarizes present capabilities. RSMASS has evolved from a simple model used to make rough estimates of space reactor and shield masses to a versatile space reactor power system model. RSMASS uses unique reactor and shield models that permit rapid mass optimization calculations for a variety of space reactor power and propulsion systems. The RSMASS-D upgrade of the original model includes algorithms for the balance of the power system, a number of reactor and shield modeling improvements, and an automatic mass optimization scheme. The RSMASS-D suite of codes cover a very broad range of reactor and power conversion system options as well as propulsion and bimodal reactor systems. Reactor choices include in-core and ex-core thermionic reactors, liquid metal cooled reactors, particle bed reactors, and prismatic configuration reactors. Power conversion options include thermoelectric, thermionic, Stirling, Brayton, and Rankine approaches. Program output includes all major component masses and dimensions, efficiencies, and a description of the design parameters for a mass optimized system. In the past, RSMASS has been used as an aid to identify and select promising concepts for space power applications. The RSMASS modeling approach has been demonstrated to be a valuable tool for guiding optimization of the power system design; consequently, the model is useful during system design and development as well as during the selection process. An improved in-core thermionic reactor system model RSMASS-T is now under development. The current development of the RSMASS-T code represents the next evolutionary stage of the RSMASS models. RSMASS-T includes many modeling improvements and is planned to be more user-friendly. RSMASS-T will be released as a fully documented, certified code at the end of

  17. AISI/DOE Advanced Process Control Program Vol. 3 of 6: MICROSTRUCTURAL ENGINEERING IN HOT-STRIP MILLS Part 2 of 2: Constitutive Behavior Modeling of Steels Under Hot-Rolling Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi-Wen Cheng; Patrick Purtscher

    1999-07-30

    This report describes the development of models for predicting (1) constitutive behaviors and (2) mechanical properties of hot-rolled steels as functions of chemical composition, microstructural features, and processing variables. The study includes the following eight steels: A36, DQSK, HSLA-V, HSLA-Nb, HSLA-50/Ti-Nb, and two interstitial-free (IF) grades. These developed models have been integrated into the Hot-Strip Mill Model (HSMM), which simulates the hot strip rolling mills and predicts the mechanical properties of hot-rolled products. The HSMM model has been developed by the University of British Columbia-Canada as a part of project on the microstructural engineering in hot-strip mills.

  18. Developing Ultra-small Scale Mechanical Testing Methods and Microstructural Investigation Procedures for Irradiated Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosemann, Peter; Kaoumi, Djamel

    2018-04-02

    -beam irradiations have been utilized for decades to foster the understanding of materials’ behavior under radiation, and significant efforts at comparing ion-beam irradiations to neutron irradiations are ongoing [1]. While extensive microstructural and chemical characterizations of neutron-irradiated and ion-irradiated materials are essential to the understanding of the underlying physics of materials’ degradation in nuclear environments, the ultimate test is the mechanical performance of a material under the anticipated condition, since it is the final criterion for a material to be accepted for use in a specific nuclear component. Again, standard, large-scale, bulk evaluations are key for the licensing of materials in a specific component, but additional, more basic scientific testing can accelerate the process by targeting specific areas of interest. Small-scale mechanical testing has been applied on nuclear materials for decades [2]. Traditionally the driving forces to use non-standard-size samples are the limited space in reactors, the availability of new alloys, and a reduction in radioactive-materials volume. Shear punch testing [3,5], sub-sized micro tensile testing [4], sub-sized compact tension and charpy testing [6,7], micro bulge testing [8], and micro hardness testing [3] have been used. Small-scale mechanical testing also allows the targeting of specific regions of interest, be they single grains to evaluate a specific deformation mechanism [9], grain boundaries, heat-affected zones in welds, or any other specific critical area of interest. With further reducing of the sample size, it also holds the promise to obtain quantitative data from ion-beam irradiations and to compare such data to the microstructural changes observed. Over the last few decades, a number of small-scale mechanical characterization techniques have been developed and utilized for irradiated materials. In addition to the above-mentioned sample test techniques at the mm and sub mm length scale

  19. Experimental study and modelling of the effect of microstructure on friction and wear mechanisms of low alloy steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisiol, C.; Jourani, A.; Bouvier, S.

    2017-12-01

    Few models are focused on the combined effects of microstructure and roughness on the tribological behavior of materials. Hardness is the material property mainly used in the tribological models which are usually at a macroscopic scale. For a dual-phase steel, experimental and predicted values of friction coefficients and specific wear resistances are compared. The investigated models are declined into two pressure distribution modes between the phases. Friction tests are performed between steel pins composed of a ferrite-martensite dual-phase microstructure against abrasive papers with various abrasive particle sizes ranging from 15 µm to 200 µm. By using heat treatments on a low alloy steel, dual-phase microstructures with various martensite volume fractions, ranging from 45% to 100%, are generated. As martensite volume fraction increases, the experimental and predicted results show that the specific wear resistance increases whereas the friction coefficient decreases. Furthermore, the latter evolutions depend on roughness. For a predominance of abrasive wear mechanisms generated by coarse abrasive particles (~200 µm), the experimental tribological parameters tend to follow the predicted ones associated to the mode characterized by equal pressures between the phases. Then, as the abrasive particle size decreases, abrasive wear mechanisms reduce whereas adhesive wear mechanisms increase and the experimental tribological parameters tend to follow the predicted ones associated to the mode characterized by equal wear rate between the phases.

  20. Processing and microstructural development of Ag-clad Bi-Sr-Ca-Cu-O tapes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poeppel, R.B.; Goretta, K.C.; Balachandran, U.; Biondo, A.C.; Dorris, S.E.; Hathcox, S.C.; Kaufman, D.Y.; Lanagan, M.T.; Prorok, B.C.; Wu, C.T.; Hu, J.G.; Holesinger, T.G.; Miller, D.J.

    1992-10-01

    Ag-clad Bi 2 Sr 2 CaCu 2 O x (2212) and (Bi,Pb) 2 Sr 2 Ca 2 Cu 3 O x (2223) tapes were fabricated by drawing and rolling. Highly textured microstructures and high critical current density values were obtained for each system. However, the heat treatments and phase evolutions for 2212 and 2223 were different. For 2212, nearly phase-pure powder was used, and the heat treatments consisted of partial melting followed by solid-state sintering. For 2223, several compositions, initial phases, and sintering schedules were used. Results are discussed in terms of microstructural evolution as observed by X-ray diffraction and scanning and transmission electron microscopy

  1. Microstructure-sensitive flow stress modeling for force prediction in laser assisted milling of Inconel 718

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Zhipeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Inconel 718 is a typical hard-to-machine material that requires thermally enhanced machining technology such as laser-assisted milling. Based upon finite element analysis, this study simulates the forces in the laser-assisted milling process of Inconel 718 considering the effects of grain growth due to γ' and γ" phases. The γ" phase is unstable and becomes the δ phase, which is likely to precipitate at a temperature over 750 °C. The temperature around the center of spot in the experiments is 850 °C, so the phase transformation and grain growth happen throughout the milling process. In the analysis, this study includes the microstructure evolution while accounting for the effects of dynamic recrystallization and grain growth through the Avrami model. The grain growth reduces the yield stress and flow stress, which improves the machinability. In finite element analysis (FEA, several boundary conditions of temperature varying with time are defined to simulate the movement of laser spot, and the constitutive model is described by Johnson-Cook equation. In experiments, this study collects three sets of cutting forces and finds that the predicted values are in close agreements with measurements especially in feed direction, in which the smallest error is around 5%. In another three simulations, this study also examines the effect of laser preheating on the cutting forces by comparison with a traditional milling process without laser assist. When the laser is off, the forces increase in all cases, which prove the softening effect of laser-assisted milling. In addition, when the axial depth of milling increases, the laser has a more significant influence, especially in axial direction, in which the force with laser is more than 18% smaller than the one without laser. Overall, this study validates the influence of laser-assisted milling on Inconel 718 by predicting the cutting forces in FEA.

  2. Dependence of developing magnetic hysteresis characteristics on stages of evolving microstructure in polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodziah, N.; Hashim, M.; Idza, I.R.; Ismayadi, I.; Hapishah, A.N.; Khamirul, M.A.

    2012-01-01

    The microstructure evolution in several polycrystalline yttrium iron garnet samples as a result of a sintering scheme was studied in detail, in parallel with the changes in their magnetic properties. Samples with nanometer sized starting powder were synthesized by employing the High-Energy Ball Milling technique and then sintering toroidal compacts of the milled powder. Nine sintered samples were obtained, each corresponding to a particular sintering from 600 °C to 1400 °C. The samples were characterized for their evolution in crystalline phases, microstructure and magnetic hysteresis-loops parameters. The results showed an increasing tendency of the saturation magnetization and saturation induction with grain size, which is attributed to crystallinity increase and to reduction of demagnetizing fields in the grains. The variation in coercivity could be related to anisotropy field changes within the samples due to grain size changes. In particular, the starting appearance of room temperature ferromagnetic order suggested by the sigmoid-shaped B-H loops seems to be dependent on a sufficient number of large enough magnetic domain-containing grains having been formed in the microstructure. Viewed simultaneously, the hysteresis loops appear to belong to three groups with different magnetism-type dominance, respectively dependent on phase purity and three different groups of grain size distributions.

  3. Microstructure evolution and microstructure/mechanical properties relationships in alpha+beta titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunha

    In this study, the microstructural evolution of Timetal 550 was investigated. Timetal 550 showed two types of phase transformations (martensitic and nucleation and growth) depending on the cooling rate from the beta region. The alpha phase initially precipitated at the prior beta grain boundaries, and it had a Burgers OR with one of the adjacent grains. It was found that colonies could grow, even in the fast-cooled Timetal 550 sample, from the grain boundary alpha into the prior beta grain with which it exhibited the Burgers OR. Three orientation relationships were also found between alpha laths in the basketweave microstructure. Microhardness testing demonstrated that fast-cooled Timetal 550 samples with basketweave microstructure were harder than slowly-cooled samples with colony microstructure. Orientation-dependent deformation was found in the colony microstructure. Specifically, when the surface normal is perpendicular to the [0001] of alpha, the material deforms easily in the direction perpendicular to the [0001] of alpha. Fuzzy logic and Bayesian neural network models were developed to predict the room temperature tensile properties of Timetal 550. This involved the development of a database relating microstructural features to mechanical properties. A Gleeble 3800 thermal-mechanical simulator was used to develop various microstructures. Microstructural features of tensile-tested samples were quantified using stereological procedures. The quantified microstructural features and the tensile properties were used as inputs and outputs, respectively, for modeling the relationships between them. The individual influence of five microstructural features on tensile properties was determined using the established models. The microstructural features having the greatest impact on UTS and YS were the thickness of alpha laths and the width of grain boundary alpha layer, and the microstructural features having the greatest impact on elongation were the thickness of

  4. Microstructure for ferroelastic transitions from strain pseudo-spin clock models in two and three dimensions: a mean field analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lookman, Turab [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Vasseur, Romain [ECOLE NORMALE SUPERIEURE

    2009-01-01

    We obtain the microstructure of ferroelastic transitions in two and three dimensions from the solution of their corresponding discrete pseudo-spin models. In two dimensions we consider two transitions each from the high symmetry square and triangle symmetries: square-to-rectangle (SR), square-to-oblique (SO), triangle-to-centered rectangle (TR) and triangle-to-oblique (TO). In three dimensions we study the corresponding spin model for the cubic to tetragonal transition. The Landau free energies for these transitions result in N+ I states clock models (Z{sub N}) with long range interactions and we derive mean-field self-consistency equations for the clock model Hamiltonians. The microstructures from the mean-field solutions of the models are very similar to those obtained from the original continuum models or Monte Carlo simulations on the spin models (in the SR case), illustrating that these discrete models capture the salient physics. The models, in the presence of disorder, provide the basis for the study of the strain glass phase observed in martensitic alloys.

  5. From Modeling to Fabrication of Double Side Microstructured Silicon Windows for Infrared Gas Sensing in Harsh Environments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bergmann, René; Ivinskaya, Aliaksandra; Kafka, Jan Robert

    2014-01-01

    (∅1") were manufactured. The windows show high temperature resistant sub-wavelength anti-reflective surface microstructures on both side faces. Thus, a peak transmittance of 100% for a defined main wavelength (5 μm) and more than 90 % average transmittance for the wavelength range of 5-7 μm......Commercial infrared windows used for gas sensing in the mid-IR range usually possess an anti-reflective coating. Those coatings can normally not withstand harsh environments, particularly not high temperatures. With a simple “3-step” fabrication process, high temperature resistant silicon windows...... was achieved. The modeling of the anti-reflective microstructures, their fabrication process and final transmittance analysis of the windows is discussed....

  6. Phase-field modeling of microstructural pattern formation during directional solidification of peritectic alloys without morphological instability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shing Lo, Tak; Karma, Alain; Plapp, Mathis

    2001-01-01

    During the directional solidification of peritectic alloys, two stable solid phases (parent and peritectic) grow competitively into a metastable liquid phase of larger impurity content than either solid phase. When the parent or both solid phases are morphologically unstable, i.e., for a small temperature gradient/growth rate ratio (G/v p ), one solid phase usually outgrows and covers the other phase, leading to a cellular-dendritic array structure closely analogous to the one formed during monophase solidification of a dilute binary alloy. In contrast, when G/v p is large enough for both phases to be morphologically stable, the formation of the microstructure becomes controlled by a subtle interplay between the nucleation and growth of the two solid phases. The structures that have been observed in this regime (in small samples where convection effects are suppressed) include alternate layers (bands) of the parent and peritectic phases perpendicular to the growth direction, which are formed by alternate nucleation and lateral spreading of one phase onto the other as proposed in a recent model [R. Trivedi, Metall. Mater. Trans. A 26, 1 (1995)], as well as partially filled bands (islands), where the peritectic phase does not fully cover the parent phase which grows continuously. We develop a phase-field model of peritectic solidification that incorporates nucleation processes in order to explore the formation of these structures. Simulations of this model shed light on the morphology transition from islands to bands, the dynamics of spreading of the peritectic phase on the parent phase following nucleation, which turns out to be characterized by a remarkably constant acceleration, and the types of growth morphology that one might expect to observe in large samples under purely diffusive growth conditions

  7. Modelling of the isothermal replication of surface microstructures in polymer melts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Henrik Koblitz; Eriksson, Torbjörn Gerhard

    2005-01-01

    ) melt. A round PC or PS plate with a thickness of 3 mm and a diameter of 59 mm was placed between and at the centre of two squared steel plate. The bottom plate is equipped with a microstructured nickel insert, positioned 46 mm from the middle of the steel plate. The insert contained 10 parallel...... to the incoming molten plastic flow. Just before the flow-front of the melt reached the end of the inserts the polymer was frozen. The replicated PC and PS micro-structures were examined using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Uniaxial elongational viscosity and linear viscoelasticity were used...

  8. Microstructured polymer optical fibres

    CERN Document Server

    Large, Maryanne; Barton, Geoff; van Eijkelenborg, Martijn A

    2008-01-01

    Microstructured Polymer Optical Fibres describes the optical properties of microstructured fibres, how they are made and modelled, and outlines some potential applications. These applications include areas where polymer fibres are already used, such as high-data rate transmission for Fibre-to-the Home or within cars, as well as completely new areas such as the photonic bandgap transmission of ""difficult"" wavelengths. Emphasising a conceptual understanding of the underlying physics, Microstructured Polymer Optical Fibres is clearly written, and includes numerous illustrations. It provides an

  9. Developing a Model Component

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Christina M.

    2013-01-01

    The Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) Simulation Computer Software Configuration Item (CSCI) is responsible for providing simulations to support test and verification of SCCS hardware and software. The Universal Coolant Transporter System (UCTS) was a Space Shuttle Orbiter support piece of the Ground Servicing Equipment (GSE). The initial purpose of the UCTS was to provide two support services to the Space Shuttle Orbiter immediately after landing at the Shuttle Landing Facility. The UCTS is designed with the capability of servicing future space vehicles; including all Space Station Requirements necessary for the MPLM Modules. The Simulation uses GSE Models to stand in for the actual systems to support testing of SCCS systems during their development. As an intern at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), my assignment was to develop a model component for the UCTS. I was given a fluid component (dryer) to model in Simulink. I completed training for UNIX and Simulink. The dryer is a Catch All replaceable core type filter-dryer. The filter-dryer provides maximum protection for the thermostatic expansion valve and solenoid valve from dirt that may be in the system. The filter-dryer also protects the valves from freezing up. I researched fluid dynamics to understand the function of my component. The filter-dryer was modeled by determining affects it has on the pressure and velocity of the system. I used Bernoulli's Equation to calculate the pressure and velocity differential through the dryer. I created my filter-dryer model in Simulink and wrote the test script to test the component. I completed component testing and captured test data. The finalized model was sent for peer review for any improvements. I participated in Simulation meetings and was involved in the subsystem design process and team collaborations. I gained valuable work experience and insight into a career path as an engineer.

  10. Durability of cement-based materials: modeling of the influence of physical and chemical equilibria on the microstructure and the residual mechanical properties; Durabilite des materiaux cimentaires: modelisation de l'influence des equilibres physico-chimiques sur la microstructure et les proprietes mecaniques residuelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guillon, E

    2004-09-15

    A large part of mechanical and durability characteristics of cement-based materials comes from the performances of the hydrated cement, cohesive matrix surrounding the granular skeleton. Experimental studies, in situ or in laboratory, associated to models, have notably enhanced knowledge on the cement material and led to adapted formulations to specific applications or particularly aggressive environments. Nevertheless, these models, developed for precise cases, do not permit to specifically conclude for other experimental conclusions. To extend its applicability domain, we propose a new evolutive approach, based on reactive transport expressed at the microstructure scale of the cement. In a general point of view, the evolution of the solid compounds of the cement matrix, by dissolutions or precipitations, during chemical aggressions can be related to the pore solution evolution, and this one relied to the ionic exchanges with the external environment. By the utilization of a geochemical code associated to a thermodynamical database and coupled to a 3D transport model, this approach authorizes the study of all aggressive solution. The approach has been validated by the comparison of experimental observations to simulated degradations for three different environments (pure water, mineralized water, seawater) and on three different materials (CEM I Portland cement with 0.25, 0.4 and 0.5 water-to cement ratio). The microstructural approach permits also to have access to mechanical properties evolutions. During chemical aggressions, the cement matrix evolution is traduced in a microstructure evolution. This one is represented from 3D images similarly to the models developed at NIST (National Institute of Standards and Technology). A new finite-element model, validated on previous tests or models, evaluates the stiffness of the cement paste, using as a mesh these microstructures. Our approach identifies and quantifies the major influence of porosity and its spatial

  11. Microstructural path model and strain dependence of recrystallisation in commercial aluminium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vandermeer, Roy Allen; Wu, Guilin; Juul Jensen, Dorte

    2009-01-01

    The isothermal recrystallisation of commercial purity aluminium alloy AA1200 cold deformed to either a true strain of 2 (86.5% reduction in thickness) or 4 (98.2% reduction in thickness) was studied phenomenologically in each material by means of quantitative microscopy. The microstructural path ...

  12. Numerical modelling of softwood time-dependent behaviour based on microstructure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund, Emil Tang

    2010-01-01

    The time-dependent mechanical behaviour of softwood such as creep or relaxation can be predicted, from knowledge of the microstructural arrangement of the cell wall, by applying deformation kinetics. This has been done several times before; however, often without considering the constraints defined...

  13. On modeling micro-structural evolution using a higher order strain gradient continuum theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Naaman, S. A.; Nielsen, K. L.; Niordson, C. F.

    2016-01-01

    the experimentally observed micro-structural behavior, within a framework based on continuous field quantities, poses obvious challenges, since the evolution of dislocation structures is inherently a discrete and discontinuous process. This challenge, in particular, motivates the present study, and the aim...

  14. Phase transitions and steady-state microstructures in a two-temperature lattice-gas model with mobile active impurities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Sabra, Mads Christian; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    2000-01-01

    The nonequilibrium, steady-state phase transitions and the structure of the different phases of a two-dimensional system with two thermodynamic temperatures are studied via a simple lattice-gas model with mobile active impurities ("hot/cold spots'') whose activity is controlled by an external drive....... The properties of the model are calculated by Monte Carlo computer-simulation techniques. The two temperatures and the external drive on the system lead to a rich phase diagram including regions of microstructured phases in addition to macroscopically ordered (phase-separated) and disordered phases. Depending...

  15. The effect of relative humidity on the effectiveness of the cyanoacrylate fuming process for fingermark development and on the microstructure of the developed marks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paine, M; Bandey, H L; Bleay, S M; Willson, H

    2011-10-10

    Research has been conducted to establish the effect that changes in relative humidity have on both the effectiveness of the cyanoacrylate fuming technique and the microstructures formed by the polymerisation reaction during the development of the marks. The study investigated 'natural' fingermarks and deliberately groomed eccrine and sebaceous marks, all exposed to relative humidity levels in the range 60-100%. It was found that the optimum level of relative humidity for the development of the most high quality marks is approximately 80%, in accord with current recommendations for operational implementation which are based on previous unpublished work. The eccrine constituents of the fingerprints are most influenced by humidity changes. Three humidity regimes were identified, each giving different polycyanoacrylate microstructures. Humidity levels of 60% give flat, film-like structures whereas in the range 70-90% the characteristic noodle-like structure is formed. At higher humidities, thin, flat thread-like growth is observed with some 'collapsed sphere' structures observed close to pores and significant background development. The noodle-like structures are thought to scatter more light and retain fluorescent dye better than the structures formed at other humidity levels. Sebaceous marks produce a very different polymer microstructure, resembling a flat film with some fine nodular structures. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Effect of bioactive borate glass microstructure on bone regeneration, angiogenesis, and hydroxyapatite conversion in a rat calvarial defect model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Lianxiang; Rahaman, Mohamed N; Day, Delbert E; Brown, Zackary; Samujh, Christopher; Liu, Xin; Mohammadkhah, Ali; Dusevich, Vladimir; Eick, J David; Bonewald, Lynda F

    2013-08-01

    Borate bioactive glasses are biocompatible and enhance new bone formation, but the effect of their microstructure on bone regeneration has received little attention. In this study scaffolds of borate bioactive glass (1393B3) with three different microstructures (trabecular, fibrous, and oriented) were compared for their capacity to regenerate bone in a rat calvarial defect model. 12weeks post-implantation the amount of new bone, mineralization, and blood vessel area in the scaffolds were evaluated using histomorphometric analysis and scanning electron microscopy. The amount of new bone formed was 33%, 23%, and 15%, respectively, of the total defect area for the trabecular, oriented, and fibrous microstructures. In comparison, the percent new bone formed in implants composed of silicate 45S5 bioactive glass particles (250-300μm) was 19%. Doping the borate glass with copper (0.4 wt.% CuO) had little effect on bone regeneration in the trabecular and oriented scaffolds, but significantly enhanced bone regeneration in the fibrous scaffolds (from 15 to 33%). The scaffolds were completely converted to hydroxyapatite within the 12week implantation. The amount of hydroxyapatite formed, 22%, 35%, and 48%, respectively, for the trabecular, oriented, and fibrous scaffolds, increased with increasing volume fraction of glass in the as-fabricated scaffold. Blood vessels infiltrated into all the scaffolds, but the trabecular scaffolds had a higher average blood vessel area compared with the oriented and fibrous scaffolds. While all three scaffold microstructures were effective in supporting bone regeneration, the trabecular scaffolds supported more bone formation and may be more promising in bone repair. Copyright © 2013 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Phase-field modelling of microstructure formation during the solidification of continuously cast low carbon and HSLA steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böttger, B.; Apel, M.; Santillana, B.; Eskin, D. G.

    2012-07-01

    Cracking in continuous casting of steels has been one of the main problems for decades. Many of the cracks that occur during solidification are hot tears. To better understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low carbon (LCAK) and two high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel grades during the initial stage of the process where the first solidified shell is formed inside the mould and where breakouts typically occur. 2D simulation is performed using the multiphase-field software MICRESS [1], which is coupled to the thermodynamic database TCFE6 [2] and the mobility database MOB2 [2], taking into account all elements which may have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during or subsequent to solidification. The use of a moving-frame boundary condition allows travelling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. A heterogeneous nucleation model is included to permit the description of morphological transitions between the initial solidification and the subsequent columnar growth region. Furthermore, a macroscopic one-dimensional temperature solver is integrated to account for the transient and nonlinear temperature field during the initial stage of continuous casting. The external heat flux boundary conditions for this process were derived from thermal process data of the industrial slab caster. The simulation results for the three steel grades have been validated by thickness measurements of breakout shells and microstructure observation of the corresponding grades. Furthermore, the primary dendrite spacing has been measured across the whole thickness of the shell and compared with the simulated microstructures. Significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are discussed and correlated with their hot-cracking behavior.

  18. Phase-field modelling of microstructure formation during the solidification of continuously cast low carbon and HSLA steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Böttger, B; Apel, M; Santillana, B; Eskin, D G

    2012-01-01

    Cracking in continuous casting of steels has been one of the main problems for decades. Many of the cracks that occur during solidification are hot tears. To better understand the factors leading to this defect, microstructure formation is simulated for a low carbon (LCAK) and two high strength low alloyed (HSLA) steel grades during the initial stage of the process where the first solidified shell is formed inside the mould and where breakouts typically occur. 2D simulation is performed using the multiphase-field software MICRESS, which is coupled to the thermodynamic database TCFE6 and the mobility database MOB2, taking into account all elements which may have a relevant effect on the mechanical properties and structure formation during or subsequent to solidification. The use of a moving-frame boundary condition allows travelling through the entire solidification history starting from the slab surface, and tracking the morphology changes during growth of the shell. A heterogeneous nucleation model is included to permit the description of morphological transitions between the initial solidification and the subsequent columnar growth region. Furthermore, a macroscopic one-dimensional temperature solver is integrated to account for the transient and nonlinear temperature field during the initial stage of continuous casting. The external heat flux boundary conditions for this process were derived from thermal process data of the industrial slab caster. The simulation results for the three steel grades have been validated by thickness measurements of breakout shells and microstructure observation of the corresponding grades. Furthermore, the primary dendrite spacing has been measured across the whole thickness of the shell and compared with the simulated microstructures. Significant microstructure differences between the steel grades are discussed and correlated with their hot-cracking behavior.

  19. Neutron energy spectrum influence on irradiation hardening and microstructural development of tungsten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Makoto; Kiran Kumar, N. A. P.; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Garrison, Lauren M.; Snead, Lance L.; Katoh, Yutai; Hasegawa, Akira

    2016-10-01

    Neutron irradiation to single crystal pure tungsten was performed in the mixed spectrum High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). To investigate the influences of neutron energy spectrum, the microstructure and irradiation hardening were compared with previous data obtained from the irradiation campaigns in the mixed spectrum Japan Material Testing Reactor (JMTR) and the sodium-cooled fast reactor Joyo. The irradiation temperatures were in the range of ∼90-∼800 °C and fast neutron fluences were 0.02-9.00 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Post irradiation evaluation included Vickers hardness measurements and transmission electron microscopy. The hardness and microstructure changes exhibited a clear dependence on the neutron energy spectrum. The hardness appeared to increase with increasing thermal neutron flux when fast fluence exceeds 1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV). Irradiation induced precipitates considered to be χ- and σ-phases were observed in samples irradiated to >1 × 1025 n/m2 (E > 0.1 MeV), which were pronounced at high dose and due to the very high thermal neutron flux of HFIR. Although the irradiation hardening mainly caused by defects clusters in a low dose regime, the transmutation-induced precipitation appeared to impose additional significant hardening of the tungsten.

  20. High-Resolution Characterization of UMo Alloy Microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Devaraj, Arun [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Kovarik, Libor [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Joshi, Vineet V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jana, Saumyadeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Manandhar, Sandeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Arey, Bruce W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Lavender, Curt A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-11-30

    This report highlights the capabilities and procedure for high-resolution characterization of UMo fuels in PNNL. Uranium-molybdenum (UMo) fuel processing steps, from casting to forming final fuel, directly affect the microstructure of the fuel, which in turn dictates the in-reactor performance of the fuel under irradiation. In order to understand the influence of processing on UMo microstructure, microstructure characterization techniques are necessary. Higher-resolution characterization techniques like transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atom probe tomography (APT) are needed to interrogate the details of the microstructure. The findings from TEM and APT are also directly beneficial for developing predictive multiscale modeling tools that can predict the microstructure as a function of process parameters. This report provides background on focused-ion-beam–based TEM and APT sample preparation, TEM and APT analysis procedures, and the unique information achievable through such advanced characterization capabilities for UMo fuels, from a fuel fabrication capability viewpoint.

  1. Determination of microstructural parameters in damage models for ductile metals; Bestimmung von mikrostrukturellen Parametern in Schaedigungsmodellen fuer duktile Metalle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steglich, D. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Werkstofforschung

    1999-07-01

    For the determination of material parameters in micromechanical damage models the mechanical behaviour of representative volume elements of a two-phase material has been investigated and the phase morphology quantified by microstructural analysis. The material parameters have been successfully correlated to microstructural quantities and a prediction of the damage behaviour of structures is performed. Special emphasis is given to the model of Gurson, Tvergaard and Needleman, which has been used to predict the macroscopic behaviour of smooth tensile test specimens and the fracture resistance curves of bending specimens for two different materials, a nodular cast iron and a particle reinforced aluminium compound. (orig.) [German] Zur Bestimmung der Materialparameter in mikromechanischen Schaedigungsmodellen werden repraesentative Strukturelemente eines Werkstoffes untersucht und die Morphologie eines zweiphasigen Gefueges durch quantitative Gefuegeanalyse beschrieben. Mit dieser Strategie gelingen eine Identifikation der im Modell enthaltenen Parameter sowie die Vorhersage des Versagensverhaltens von Strukturen. Als mikromechanisches Materialmodell wird hauptsaechlich das Modell von Gurson, Tvergaard und Needleman verwendet. Seine Anwendbarkeit zur Vorhersage des globalen Verhaltens von glatten Zugproben und zur Simulation von Risswiderstandskurven wird bei zwei verschiedenen Werkstoffen gezeigt, einen Gusseisen und einem Aluminium-Verbundwerkstoff. (orig.)

  2. Development of the Microstructure of a Severely Plastically Deformed Mg Alloy, ZK60

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoica, G. M. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Payzant, E Andrew [ORNL; Wu, J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liao, J. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Spruiell, J. E. [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Liaw, Peter K [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK)

    2006-01-01

    The microstructural evolutions of a Mg alloy, ZK60, subjected to plastic deformation through equal-channel-angular processing (ECAP) and uniaxial compression were compared using X-ray diffraction (XRD) for both 2 -scans and pole-figure measurements to better understand their specific deformation modes. A larger microstrain was observed in the samples deformed by compression at room temperature, as compared to the samples ECAP-ed at 260C. Crystallographic texture changes due to uniaxial compression suggested a twinning deformation contribution. The texture evolution during ECAP was mapped on a partially processed sample, at locations with different shear-strain values. Microstrain relaxation in ECAP-ed samples indicates that the recovery/ recrystallization processes compete with the plastic deformation, which was supported by texture features observed in a late stage of the ECAP deformation.

  3. Microstructural development in tension and compression creep of magnesium alloy AE42

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dieringa, H.; Bowles, A.; Hort, N.; Kainer, K.U. [GKSS Research Center, Center for Magnesium Technology, Geesthacht (Germany)

    2005-07-01

    Investigations on creep resistant magnesium alloy AE42 were performed in creep tests in compressive and tensile mode. Minimum creep rates and stress exponents n were calculated and compared for tests with the same temperature and load. Linear fits of minimum creep rates in log/log plots at all temperatures shows a similar behavior. The higher the load the bigger is the difference between minimum creep rate at tensile and compression tests. At loads around 40 MPa rates adjust to similar values. During creep microstructural evolution is different. Wide twins form during compressive creep tests whereas double-directed fine twins with an angle of approximately 51 are formed during tensile creep test. The difference in twinning is supposed to be one of the reason for different creep rates. (orig.)

  4. Microstructural Investigations and Modelling of Interdiffusion between MCrAlY Coating and IN738 Superalloy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Hald, John

    2006-01-01

    Interdiffusion at the interface between a Co-36.5Ni-17.5Cr-8Al-0.5Y, MCrAlY coating and the underlying IN738 superalloy was studied in a large matrix of specimens isothermally heat treated for up to 12,000 hours at temperatures 875°C, 925°C or 950°C. Microstructural investigations and calculated ...

  5. Molecular- and Domain-level Microstructure-dependent Material Model for Nano-segregated Polyurea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-15

    microstructure and properties, while additionally allowing conventional spraying processes to be used in the application of polyurea as a protective...demonstrated improved blast survivability of masonry buildings that were externally and internally sprayed with polyurea (Porter et al., 2002). In addition...to enhancing blast survivability of the masonry structures by delaying/preventing their structural collapse, polyurea coatings/linings were found to

  6. Modelling the effect of coating on the stresses and microstructure evolution in chill casting of wind turbine main shafts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Thorborg, J.; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2017-01-01

    . Simulations of the casting process are performed with four different heat transfer coefficients (HTCs) between the casting and the chill, and the resulting transient stress fields are reported in the chill. The microstructural evolution in the casting in terms of the nodule count is also modelled......, it is concluded that the material quality obtained from casting the main shafts in chills (and hence the performance of the part) is still much better than for sand casting, even though a very thick layer of coating is applied. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  7. Microstructural evolution of a model, shear-banding micellar solution during shear startup and cessation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Barrón, Carlos R; Gurnon, A Kate; Eberle, Aaron P R; Porcar, Lionel; Wagner, Norman J

    2014-04-01

    We present direct measurements of the evolution of the segmental-level microstructure of a stable shear-banding polymerlike micelle solution during flow startup and cessation in the plane of flow. These measurements provide a definitive, quantitative microstructural understanding of the stages observed during flow startup: an initial elastic response with limited alignment that yields with a large stress overshoot to a homogeneous flow with associated micellar alignment that persists for approximately three relaxation times. This transient is followed by a shear (kink) band formation with a flow-aligned low-viscosity band that exhibits shear-induced concentration fluctuations and coexists with a nearly isotropic band of homogenous, highly viscoelastic micellar solution. Stable, steady banding flow is achieved only after approximately two reptation times. Flow cessation from this shear-banded state is also found to be nontrivial, exhibiting an initial fast relaxation with only minor structural relaxation, followed by a slower relaxation of the aligned micellar fluid with the equilibrium fluid's characteristic relaxation time. These measurements resolve a controversy in the literature surrounding the mechanism of shear banding in entangled wormlike micelles and, by means of comparison to existing literature, provide further insights into the mechanisms driving shear-banding instabilities in related systems. The methods and instrumentation described should find broad use in exploring complex fluid rheology and testing microstructure-based constitutive equations.

  8. Imaging brain microstructure with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alexander, Daniel C; Dyrby, Tim B; Nilsson, Markus

    2018-01-01

    on practicalities of designing a working microstructure imaging technique: model selection, experiment design, parameter estimation, validation, and the pipeline of development of this class of technique. The article concludes with some future perspectives on opportunities in this topic and expectations on how...

  9. White matter microstructure correlates of narrative production in typically developing children and children with high functioning autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Brian D; Lai, Janie; Brown, Timothy T; Erhart, Matthew; Halgren, Eric; Reilly, Judy; Dale, Anders; Appelbaum, Mark; Moses, Pamela

    2013-08-01

    This study investigated the relationship between white matter microstructure and the development of morphosyntax in a spoken narrative in typically developing children (TD) and in children with high functioning autism (HFA). Autism is characterized by language and communication impairments, yet the relationship between morphosyntactic development in spontaneous discourse contexts and neural development is not well understood in either this population or typical development. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to assess multiple parameters of diffusivity as indicators of white matter tract integrity in language-related tracts in children between 6 and 13 years of age. Children were asked to spontaneously tell a story about at time when someone made them sad, mad, or angry. The story was evaluated for morphological accuracy and syntactic complexity. Analysis of the relationship between white matter microstructure and language performance in TD children showed that diffusivity correlated with morphosyntax production in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), a fiber tract traditionally associated with language. At the anatomical level, the HFA group showed abnormal diffusivity in the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) relative to the TD group. Within the HFA group, children with greater white matter integrity in the right ILF displayed greater morphological accuracy during their spoken narrative. Overall, the current study shows an association between white matter structure in a traditional language pathway and narrative performance in TD children. In the autism group, associations were only found in the ILF, suggesting that during real world language use, children with HFA rely less on typical pathways and more on alternative ventral pathways that possibly mediate visual elements of language. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. White Matter Microstructure Correlates of Narrative Production in Typically Developing Children and Children with High Functioning Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mills, Brian; Lai, Janie; Brown, Timothy T.; Erhart, Matthew; Halgren, Eric; Reilly, Judy; Dale, Anders; Appelbaum, Mark; Moses, Pamela

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the relationship between white matter microstructure and the development of morphosyntax in a spoken narrative in typically developing children (TD) and in children with high functioning autism (HFA). Autism is characterized by language and communication impairments, yet the relationship between morphosyntactic development in spontaneous discourse contexts and neural development is not well understood in either this population or typical development. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was used to assess multiple parameters of diffusivity as indicators of white matter tract integrity in language-related tracts in children between 6 and 13 years of age. Children were asked to spontaneously tell a story about at time when someone made them sad, mad, or angry. The story was evaluated for morphological accuracy and syntactic complexity. Analysis of the relationship between white matter microstructure and language performance in TD children showed that diffusivity correlated with morphosyntax production in the superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF), a fiber tract traditionally associated with language. At the anatomical level, the HFA group showed abnormal diffusivity in the right inferior longitudinal fasciculus (ILF) relative to the TD group. Within the HFA group, children with greater white matter integrity in the right ILF displayed greater morphological accuracy during their spoken narrative. Overall, the current study shows an association between white matter structure in a traditional language pathway and narrative performance in TD children. In the autism group, associations were only found in the ILF, suggesting that during real world language use, children with HFA rely less on typical pathways and instead rely on alternative ventral pathways that possibly mediate visual elements of language. PMID:23810972

  11. Analysis of the mechanical response of biomimetic materials with highly oriented microstructures through 3D printing, mechanical testing and modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Obaldia, Enrique Escobar; Jeong, Chanhue; Grunenfelder, Lessa Kay; Kisailus, David; Zavattieri, Pablo

    2015-08-01

    Many biomineralized organisms have evolved highly oriented nanostructures to perform specific functions. One key example is the abrasion-resistant rod-like microstructure found in the radular teeth of Chitons (Cryptochiton stelleri), a large mollusk. The teeth consist of a soft core and a hard shell that is abrasion resistant under extreme mechanical loads with which they are subjected during the scraping process. Such remarkable mechanical properties are achieved through a hierarchical arrangement of nanostructured magnetite rods surrounded with α-chitin. We present a combined biomimetic approach in which designs were analyzed with additive manufacturing, experiments, analytical and computational models to gain insights into the abrasion resistance and toughness of rod-like microstructures. Staggered configurations of hard hexagonal rods surrounded by thin weak interfacial material were printed, and mechanically characterized with a cube-corner indenter. Experimental results demonstrate a higher contact resistance and stiffness for the staggered alignments compared to randomly distributed fibrous materials. Moreover, we reveal an optimal rod aspect ratio that lead to an increase in the site-specific properties measured by indentation. Anisotropy has a significant effect (up to 50%) on the Young's modulus in directions parallel and perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the rods, and 30% on hardness and fracture toughness. Optical microscopy suggests that energy is dissipated in the form of median cracks when the load is parallel to the rods and lateral cracks when the load is perpendicular to the rods. Computational models suggest that inelastic deformation of the rods at early stages of indentation can vary the resistance to penetration. As such, we found that the mechanical behavior of the system is influenced by interfacial shear strain which influences the lateral load transfer and therefore the spread of damage. This new methodology can help to elucidate

  12. Lower Length Scale Model Development for Embrittlement of Reactor Presure Vessel Steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yongfeng [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Schwen, Daniel [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Chakraborty, Pritam [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bai, Xianming [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report summarizes the lower-length-scale effort during FY 2016 in developing mesoscale capabilities for microstructure evolution, plasticity and fracture in reactor pressure vessel steels. During operation, reactor pressure vessels are subject to hardening and embrittlement caused by irradiation induced defect accumulation and irradiation enhanced solute precipitation. Both defect production and solute precipitation start from the atomic scale, and manifest their eventual effects as degradation in engineering scale properties. To predict the property degradation, multiscale modeling and simulation are needed to deal with the microstructure evolution, and to link the microstructure feature to material properties. In this report, the development of mesoscale capabilities for defect accumulation and solute precipitation are summarized. A crystal plasticity model to capture defect-dislocation interaction and a damage model for cleavage micro-crack propagation is also provided.

  13. Accounting for the Inhomogeneity of Deformation in Identification of Microstructure Evolution Model / Niejednorodność Odkształcenia W I Dentyfikacji Modelu Rozwoju Mikrostruktury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szeliga D.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the problem of identification of microstructure evolution model on the basis of two-step compression test. Classical interpretation of this test assumes uniform fields of strains, stresses and temperatures in the deformation zone and calculates the coefficients in the model on the basis of force measurements in the second step. In the present paper the inverse approach was applied. Finite element (FE simulations of the compression test were performed and local values of microstructural parameters were determined accounting for the inhomogeneity of deformation. Objective function was formulated as the Euclid norm for the error between measured and calculated forces for various interpass times. Coefficients in the microstructure evolution model were determined by searching for the minimum of the objective function. Optimized model was validated in simulations of plane strain compression tests.

  14. Preliminary Phase Field Computational Model Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yulan [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Hu, Shenyang Y. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Xu, Ke [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Suter, Jonathan D. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); McCloy, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Johnson, Bradley R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ramuhalli, Pradeep [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-12-15

    This interim report presents progress towards the development of meso-scale models of magnetic behavior that incorporate microstructural information. Modeling magnetic signatures in irradiated materials with complex microstructures (such as structural steels) is a significant challenge. The complexity is addressed incrementally, using the monocrystalline Fe (i.e., ferrite) film as model systems to develop and validate initial models, followed by polycrystalline Fe films, and by more complicated and representative alloys. In addition, the modeling incrementally addresses inclusion of other major phases (e.g., martensite, austenite), minor magnetic phases (e.g., carbides, FeCr precipitates), and minor nonmagnetic phases (e.g., Cu precipitates, voids). The focus of the magnetic modeling is on phase-field models. The models are based on the numerical solution to the Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equation. From the computational standpoint, phase-field modeling allows the simulation of large enough systems that relevant defect structures and their effects on functional properties like magnetism can be simulated. To date, two phase-field models have been generated in support of this work. First, a bulk iron model with periodic boundary conditions was generated as a proof-of-concept to investigate major loop effects of single versus polycrystalline bulk iron and effects of single non-magnetic defects. More recently, to support the experimental program herein using iron thin films, a new model was generated that uses finite boundary conditions representing surfaces and edges. This model has provided key insights into the domain structures observed in magnetic force microscopy (MFM) measurements. Simulation results for single crystal thin-film iron indicate the feasibility of the model for determining magnetic domain wall thickness and mobility in an externally applied field. Because the phase-field model dimensions are limited relative to the size of most specimens used in

  15. Rehydration reactions and microstructure development in lower crustal granulites from the Bergen Arcs, Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Timmons; Reddy, Steven; Clark, Chris; Hand, Martin; Bhowany, Kamini; Prent, Alex

    2017-04-01

    An investigation of the feedbacks generated between lower crust-derived fluids and deformation microstructures formed within retrogressed granulites from the Bergen Arcs on the west coast of Norway will be presented. We hope to assess the role of deformation microstructures in assisting fluid infiltration into nominally impermeable lower crustal rocks, the role of fluids in driving mineral reactions and thus weakening the rock strength, and the interplay between these mechanisms. Granulite wall-rock adjacent to an amphibolite facies shear zone near Isdal, Norway has been sectioned, texturally mapped using electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) and chemically mapped using energy dispersive x-ray spectrometry (EDS). The granuilte protolith is made up of a Precambrian anorthosite - gabbro assemblage of plagioclase and coronas of garnet around clinopyroxene. Local alteration of the granulite to eclogite and amphibolite occurred during the Caledonian orogen and has been attributed to the infiltration of fluids during the high strain event (Mukai et al., 2014). In thin section a thin ( 75 µm) rim of pargasite amphibole can be seen between the garnet and plagioclase, while the rim of amphibole is thicker (600 µm) when between the clinopyroxene and plagioclase. Plagioclase is coarse grained (mms in diameter) and displays prominent growth twins within the undeformed regions of the granulite. However, within a sheared domain of the granulite the grain size has been significantly reduced (max diameter = 74 µm) as has the growth twinning. The plagioclase from the sheared domain also displays a crystallographic preferred orientation (CPO) which does not appear to be inherited from the 'parent' grains. Within the strained domain there is also an increase in the reaction of garnet to pargasite, which also displays a strong CPO. These textural relationships offer the opportunity to study the active mechanisms during hydration of the lower crust and evaluate the relationships

  16. Final Project Report: Development of Micro-Structural Mitigation Strategies for PEM Fuel Cells: Morphological Simulations and Experimental Approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wessel, Silvia [Ballard Materials Products; Harvey, David [Ballard Materials Products

    2013-06-28

    performance/catalyst degradation. The key accomplishments of this project are: • The development of a molecular-dynamics based description of the carbon supported-Pt and ionomer system • The development of a composition-based, 1D-statistical Unit Cell Performance model • A modified and improved multi-pathway ORR model • An extension of the existing micro-structural catalyst model to transient operation • The coupling of a Pt Dissolution model to the modified ORR pathway model • The Development A Semi-empirical carbon corrosion model • The integration and release of an open-source forward predictive MEA performance and degradation model • Completion of correlations of BOT (beginning of test) and EOT (end of test) performance loss breakdown with cathode catalyst layer composition, morphology, material properties, and operational conditions • Catalyst layer durability windows and design curves • A design flow path of interactions from materials properties and catalyst layer effective properties to performance loss breakdown for virgin and degraded catalyst layers In order to ensure the best possible user experience we will perform a staged release of the software leading up to the webinar scheduled in October 2013. The release schedule will be as follows (please note that the manual will be released with the beta release as direct support is provided in Stage 1): • Stage 0 - Internal Ballard Release o Cross check of compilation and installation to ensure machine independence o Implement code on portable virtual machine to allow for non-UNIX use (pending) • Stage 1 - Alpha Release o The model code will be made available via a GIT, sourceforge, or other repository (under discussion at Ballard) for download and installation by a small pre-selected group of users o Users will be given three weeks to install, apply, and evaluate features of the code, providing feedback on issues or software bugs that require correction prior to beta release • Stage 2 - Beta

  17. Microstructural Developments Leading to New Advanced High Strength Sheet Steels: A Historical Assessment of Critical Metallographic Observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlock, David K [CSM/ASPPRC; Thomas, Larrin S [CSM/ASPPRC; Taylor, Mark D [CSM/ASPPRC; De Moor, Emmanuel [CSM/ASPPRC; Speer, John G [CSM/ASPPRC

    2015-08-03

    In the past 30+ years significant advancements have been made in the development of higher strength sheet steels with improved combinations of strength and ductility that have enabled important product improvements leading to safer, lighter weight, and more fuel efficient automobiles and in other applications. Properties of the primarily low carbon, low alloy steels are derived through careful control of time-temperature processing histories designed to produce multiphase ferritic based microstructures that include martensite and other constituents including retained austenite. The basis for these developments stems from the early work on dual-phase steels which was the subject of much interest. In response to industry needs, dual-phase steels have evolved as a unique class of advanced high strength sheet steels (AHSS) in which the thermal and mechanical processing histories have been specifically designed to produce constituent combinations for the purpose of simultaneously controlling strength and deformation behavior, i.e. stress-strain curve shapes. Improvements continue as enhanced dual-phase steels have recently been produced with finer microstructures, higher strengths, and better overall formability. Today, dual phase steels are the primary AHSS products used in vehicle manufacture, and several companies have indicated that the steels will remain as important design materials well into the future. In this presentation, fundamental results from the early work on dual-phase steels will be reviewed and assessed in light of recent steel developments. Specific contributions from industry/university cooperative research leading to product improvements will be highlighted. The historical perspective provided in the evolution of dual-phase steels represents a case-study that provides important framework and lessons to be incorporated in next generation AHSS products.

  18. An object kinetic Monte Carlo model for the microstructure evolution of neutron-irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messina, Luca; Olsson, Paer [KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm (Sweden); Chiapetto, Monica [SCK - CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Mol (Belgium); Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Universite de Lille 1, ENSCL, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Becquart, Charlotte S. [Unite Materiaux et Transformations (UMET), UMR 8207, Universite de Lille 1, ENSCL, Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Malerba, Lorenzo [SCK - CEN, Nuclear Materials Science Institute, Mol (Belgium)

    2016-11-15

    This work presents a full object kinetic Monte Carlo framework for the simulation of the microstructure evolution of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels. The model pursues a ''gray-alloy'' approach, where the effect of solute atoms is seen exclusively as a reduction of the mobility of defect clusters. The same set of parameters yields a satisfactory evolution for two different types of alloys, in very different irradiation conditions: an Fe-C-MnNi model alloy (high flux) and a high-Mn, high-Ni RPV steel (low flux). A satisfactory match with the experimental characterizations is obtained only if assuming a substantial immobilization of vacancy clusters due to solute atoms, which is here verified by means of independent atomistic kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The microstructure evolution of the two alloys is strongly affected by the dose rate; a predominance of single defects and small defect clusters is observed at low dose rates, whereas larger defect clusters appear at high dose rates. In both cases, the predicted density of interstitial loops matches the experimental solute-cluster density, suggesting that the MnNi-rich nanofeatures might form as a consequence of solute enrichment on immobilized small interstitial loops, which are invisible to the electron microscope. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  19. General introduction to microstructural evolution under cascade damage conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1993-06-01

    A short overview of the processes that affect the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation is given. The processes include defect production with an emphasis on the effects of the dynamic cascade events, defect clustering, irradiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation, phase decompositions and phase transformations. A simple model for the description of the development of the defect microstructure in a pure metal during cascade producing irradiation is also outlined which can provide, in principle, defect fluxes required for the description of the microstructural processes such as phase decomposition and irradiation-induced precipitation

  20. General introduction to microstructural evolution under cascade damage conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1993-06-01

    A short overview of the processes that affect the evolution of the microstructure during irradiation is given. The processes include defect production with an emphasis on the effects of the dynamic cascade events, defect clustering, irradiation-enhanced diffusion, radiation-induced segregation, phase decompositions and phase transformations. A simple model for the description of the development of the defect microstructure in a pure metal during cascade producing irradiation is also outlined which can provide, in principle, defect fluxes required for the description of the microstructural processes such as phase decomposition and irradiation-induced precipitation.

  1. A Microstructure Based Strength Model for Slag Blended Concrete with Various Curing Temperatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li-Na Zhang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ground granulated blast furnace slag, which is a byproduct obtained during steel manufacture, has been widely used for concrete structures in order to reduce carbon dioxide emissions and improve durability. This paper presents a numerical model to evaluate compressive strength development of slag blended concrete at isothermal curing temperatures and time varying curing temperatures. First, the numerical model starts with a cement-slag blended hydration model which simulates both cement hydration and slag reaction. The accelerations of cement hydration and slag reaction at elevated temperatures are modeled by Arrhenius law. Second, the gel-space ratios of hardening concrete are calculated using reaction degrees of cement and slag. Using a modified Powers’ gel-space ratio strength theory, the strength of slag blended concrete is evaluated considering both strengthening factors and weakening factors involved in strength development process. The proposed model is verified using experimental results of strength development of slag blended concrete with different slag contents and different curing temperatures.

  2. A second gradient continuum model accounting for some effects of micro-structure on reconstructed bone remodelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeo, Angela; George, D.; Lekszycki, T.; Nierenberger, Mathieu; Rémond, Yves

    2012-08-01

    We propose a second gradient, two-solids, continuum mixture model with variable masses to describe the effect of micro-structure on mechanically-driven remodelling of bones grafted with bio-resorbable materials. A one-dimensional numerical simulation is addressed showing the potentialities of the proposed generalized continuum model. In particular, we show that the used second gradient model allows for the description of some micro-structure-related size effects which are known to be important in hierarchically heterogeneous materials like reconstructed bones. Moreover, the influence of the introduced second gradient parameters on the final percentages of replacement of artificial bio-material with natural bone tissue is presented and discussed.

  3. Reactive sintering and microstructure development of tungsten carbide-AISI 304 stainless steel cemented carbides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, C.M. [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); CEMUC-Mechanical Engineering Department, University of Coimbra, Rua Luís Reis Santos, Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal); Oliveira, F.J. [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Senos, A.M.R., E-mail: anamor@ua.pt [Department of Materials and Ceramics Engineering, CICECO, University of Aveiro, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2017-06-01

    Sintering of WC-stainless steel (SS) composites within a typical binder range from 6 up to 15 wt% SS was investigated through constant heating rate dilatometry, in vacuum conditions, complemented by differential thermal analysis and by the study of the high temperature wetting behavior of SS on WC. The densification starts ∼900 °C with a typical densification curve for all compositions, where three distinct regions are discernible: the first one with a slow densification rate, followed by a second region where a sharp increase in the densification rate up to a maximum value dependent on the binder amount is observed and, finally, a third one with a slowdown of the densification rate until the end of the thermal cycle. The attained final density at 1450 °C is dependent on the binder amount, increasing proportionally to its initial content. The final microstructure presents a normal grain size distribution and appreciable amounts of eta-phase, besides the major WC phase and residual iron rich phase. The reactive densification behavior and the role of the liquid phase are interpreted accordingly with structural and kinetic data. - Highlights: • Sintering of WC-AISI304 composites starts ∼900 °C and involves three stages. • Densification is largely dominated by a reactive liquid phase sintering process. • Eta-phase constitutes a transient liquid phase during sintering. • Sintering cycles are dependent on the initial binder content.

  4. Inhomogeneous microstructural growth by irradiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krishan, K.; Singh, Bachu Narain; Leffers, Torben

    1985-01-01

    In the present paper we discuss the development of heterogeneous microstructure for uniform irradiation conditions. It is shown that microstructural inhomogeneities on a scale of 0.1 μm can develop purely from kinematic considerations because of the basic structure of the rate equations used...

  5. Evaluation of ferritic alloy Fe-2 1/4Cr-1Mo after neutron irradiation: Microstructural development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gelles, D.S.

    1986-10-01

    As part of a program to provide a data base on the bainitic alloy Fe-2-1/4-1Mo for fusion energy applications, microstructural examinations are reported for nine specimen conditions for 2-1/4Cr-1Mo steel which had been irradiated by fast neutrons over the temperature range 390 to 510 0 C. Void swelling is found following irradiation at 400 0 C to 480 0 C. Concurrently dislocation structure and precipitation developed. Peak void swelling, void density, dislocation density and precipitate number density formed at the lowest temperature, approximately 400 0 C, whereas mean void size, and mean precipitate size increased with increasing irradiation temperature. The examination results are used to provide interpretation of in-reactor creep, density change and post irradiation tensile behavior

  6. Microstructure-based approach for predicting crack initiation and early growth in metals.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cox, James V.; Emery, John M.; Brewer, Luke N.; Reedy, Earl David, Jr.; Puskar, Joseph David; Bartel, Timothy James; Dingreville, Remi P. M.; Foulk, James W., III; Battaile, Corbett Chandler; Boyce, Brad Lee

    2009-09-01

    Fatigue cracking in metals has been and is an area of great importance to the science and technology of structural materials for quite some time. The earliest stages of fatigue crack nucleation and growth are dominated by the microstructure and yet few models are able to predict the fatigue behavior during these stages because of a lack of microstructural physics in the models. This program has developed several new simulation tools to increase the microstructural physics available for fatigue prediction. In addition, this program has extended and developed microscale experimental methods to allow the validation of new microstructural models for deformation in metals. We have applied these developments to fatigue experiments in metals where the microstructure has been intentionally varied.

  7. TASK 7 DEMONSTRATION OF THAMES FOR MICROSTRUCTURE AND TRANSPORT PROPERTIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Langton, C.; Bullard, J.; Stutzman, P.; Snyder, K.; Garboczi, E.

    2010-03-29

    The goal of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) is to develop a reasonable and realible set of tools to reduce the uncertainty in predicting the structural, hydraulic and chemical performance of cement barriers used in nuclear applications that are exposed to dynamic environmental conditions over extended time frames. One of these tools, the responsibility of NIST, is THAMES (Thermodynamic Hydration and Microstructure Evolution Simulator), which is being developed to describe cementitious binder microstructures and calculate important engineering properties during hydration and degradation. THAMES is designed to be a 'micro-probe', used to evaluate changes in microstructure and properties occurring over time because of hydration or degradation reactions in a volume of about 0.001 mm{sup 3}. It will be used to map out microstructural and property changes across reaction fronts, for example, with spatial resolution adequate to be input into other models (e.g., STADIUM{reg_sign}, LeachSX{trademark}) in the integrated CBP package. THAMES leverages thermodynamic predictions of equilibrium phase assemblages in aqueous geochemical systems to estimate 3-D virtual microstructures of a cementitious binder at different times during the hydration process or potentially during degradation phenomena. These virtual microstructures can then be used to calculate important engineering properties of a concrete made from that binder at prescribed times. In this way, the THAMES model provides a way to calculate the time evolution of important material properties such as elastic stiffness, compressive strength, diffusivity, and permeability. Without this model, there would be no way to update microstructure and properties for the barrier materials considered as they are exposed to the environment, thus greatly increasing the uncertainty of long-term transport predictions. This Task 7 report demonstrates the current capabilities of THAMES. At the start of the CBP

  8. Microstructural changes in cartilage and bone related to repetitive overloading in an equine athlete model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turley, Sean M; Thambyah, Ashvin; Riggs, Christopher M; Firth, Elwyn C; Broom, Neil D

    2014-06-01

    The palmar aspect of the third metacarpal (MC3) condyle of equine athletes is known to be subjected to repetitive overloading that can lead to the accumulation of joint tissue damage, degeneration, and stress fractures, some of which result in catastrophic failure. However, there is still a need to understand at a detailed microstructural level how this damage progresses in the context of the wider joint tissue complex, i.e. the articular surface, the hyaline and calcified cartilage, and the subchondral bone. MC3 bones from non-fractured joints were obtained from the right forelimbs of 16 Thoroughbred racehorses varying in age between 3 and 8 years, with documented histories of active race training. Detailed microstructural analysis of two clinically important sites, the parasagittal grooves and the mid-condylar regions, identified extensive levels of microdamage in the calcified cartilage and subchondral bone concealed beneath outwardly intact hyaline cartilage. The study shows a progression in microdamage severity, commencing with mild hard-tissue microcracking in younger animals and escalating to severe subchondral bone collapse and lesion formation in the hyaline cartilage with increasing age and thus athletic activity. The presence of a clearly distinguishable fibrous tissue layer at the articular surface immediately above sites of severe subchondral collapse suggested a limited reparative response in the hyaline cartilage. © 2014 Anatomical Society.

  9. Microstructural characterization of Y2O3 ODS-Fe-Cr model alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, V. de; Leguey, T.; Munoz, A.; Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R.; Marquis, E.A.; Lozano-Perez, S.; Jenkins, M.L.

    2009-01-01

    Two Fe-12 wt% Cr alloys, one containing 0.4 wt% Y 2 O 3 and the other Y 2 O 3 -free, have been produced by mechanical alloying followed by hot isostatic pressing. These oxide dispersion strengthened and reference alloys were characterized both in the as-HIPed state and after tempering by transmission electron microscopy and atom-probe tomography. The as-HIPed alloys exhibited the characteristic microstructure of lath martensite and contained a high density of dislocations. Small voids with sizes 3 C and M 23 C 6 carbides (M = Cr, Fe) probably as a result of C ingress during milling. After tempering at 1023 K for 4 h the microstructures had partially recovered. In the recovered regions, martensite laths were replaced by equiaxed grains in which M 23 C 6 carbides decorated the grain boundaries. In the ODS alloy nanoparticles containing Y were commonly observed within grains, although they were also present at grain boundaries and adjacent to large carbides.

  10. Prediction of the behavior of structural materials under irradiation through modeling of the microstructure. Progress report, April 1, 1978-August 30, 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolfer, W.G.

    1979-08-01

    The development of the radiation-induced microstructure occurs in several stages: formation of small defect clusters, formation of dislocation loops, nucleation and growth of voids, and regeneration of the dislocation network. With the exception of the latter, these processes can be modeled with rate equations of similar form. However, instead of using one rate equation for each defect cluster of a given size, the discrete formulation is transformed in a continuous one leading to Fokker-Planck equations. It is shown by comparing the steady-state nucleation rates of both formulations that the Fokker-Planck equation derived is the correct continuous description. A path-integral solution for the Fokker-Planck equation was derived to provide the basis for a numerical solution procedure, capable of dealing with the vastly different time scales involved in cluster formation, nucleation, and growth.

  11. Development of microstructure of steel for thermal power generation: Razvoj mikrostrukture jekel za termično generacijo energije:

    OpenAIRE

    Bevilaqua, T.; Fujda, M.; Kuskulic, T.; Kvackaj, Tibor; Pokorny, I.; Weiss, M.

    2007-01-01

    The evolution of microstructure during the reheating and cooling of steel for thermal power generation was investigated. On the basis of the microstructure produced during cooling a CCT diagram is proposed Raziskan je bil razvoj mikrostrukture pri segrevanju in ohlajanju jekel za toplotno generacijo energije. Na podlagi mikrostrukture, ki je nastala pri ohlajanju, je bil predložen CCT-diagram.

  12. Basic research of developed the evaluation model of buffer material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawamura, K.; Ichikawa, Y.; Suzuki, S.; Shibata, M.; Sato, H.; Ueno, K.

    2003-07-01

    For the better understanding of mass transport property of the buffer material of the high-level radioactive waste disposal, the unified method of molecular dynamics simulations (MD) and homogenization analysis (HA) method and model were developed. Interaction of atoms and multi-body potential model which needed in MD calculation was improved. Na-smectite surface and water molecule system were calculated by MD, the structure of water molecule, viscosity of water nearby the Na-smectite surface and distribution of diffusion coefficient of which were estimated. According to the results of the MD calculation, first water layer adjacent to Na-smectite surface was structured, and about 1nm thick diffuse layer was observed in which viscosity of water in higher than ordinary water. Structure modeling for Na-smectite including edge was also discussed. The HA analysis needs the results of the micro-scale properties from MD calculation and the microstructure of the field, i.e. microstructure of buffer material. Microstructure of compacted Na-smectite were studied by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). On the basis of the simplified observation results, the equation was formulated that the external pore size was expressed as a function of the number of clay layers and dry density. Using MD simulation results and pore structure model, diffusion coefficient of water molecule in compacted Na-smectite were calculated by the unified MD/HA analysis method. For this analysis Multi-scale HA method which can handle for porous media consists of various scale particles was developed. Calculated diffusion coefficient of water was in agreement with the results of diffusion experiment of triturated water (HTO). Regarding solute diffusion through compacted bentonite, experimental results are accumulated and discussed. Modelling frameworks for diffusion and sorption of ion were also developed. (author)

  13. The Sustainable Development Model

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina BURGHELEA

    2012-01-01

    Sustainable development concept approaches quality of life in complexity, as economic, social and environmental issues, promoting the idea of balance between economic development, social equity, efficient utilization and environment conservation.     An essential condition for achieving sustainable development is the right mix of macroeconomic policies coherent, consistent with resources to ensure sustainability of materials and energy used for growth.

  14. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of ODS and non-ODS Fe–14Cr model alloys produced by spark plasma sintering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Auger, M.A.; Castro, V. de; Leguey, T.; Muñoz, A.; Pareja, R.

    2013-01-01

    In this work the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique has been explored as an alternative consolidation route for producing ultra-fine grained Fe–14Cr model alloys containing a dispersion of oxide nanoparticles. Elemental powders of Fe and Cr, and nanosized Y 2 O 3 powder have been mechanically alloyed in a planetary ball mill and rapidly sintered in a spark plasma furnace. Two alloys, with nominal compositions Fe–14%Cr and Fe–14%Cr–0.3%Y 2 O 3 (wt.%), have been fabricated and their microstructure and mechanical properties investigated. The results have been compared with those obtained for other powder metallurgy processed alloys of the same composition but consolidated by hot isostatic pressing. The SPS technique under the present conditions has produced Fe–14Cr materials that apparently exhibit different microstructures yielding inferior mechanical properties than the counterpart material consolidated by hot isostatic pressing. Although the presence of a dispersion of Y-rich particles is evident, the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe–14Cr alloy consolidated by SPS exhibits poor tensile properties. The extensive decoration of the powder particle surfaces with Cr-rich precipitates and the residual porosity appear to be responsible for the impaired properties of this ODS alloy consolidated by SPS

  15. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of ODS and non-ODS Fe–14Cr model alloys produced by spark plasma sintering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Auger, M.A.; Castro, V. de [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganés (Spain); Leguey, T., E-mail: leguey@fis.uc3m.es [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganés (Spain); Muñoz, A.; Pareja, R. [Departamento de Física, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganés (Spain)

    2013-05-15

    In this work the spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique has been explored as an alternative consolidation route for producing ultra-fine grained Fe–14Cr model alloys containing a dispersion of oxide nanoparticles. Elemental powders of Fe and Cr, and nanosized Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} powder have been mechanically alloyed in a planetary ball mill and rapidly sintered in a spark plasma furnace. Two alloys, with nominal compositions Fe–14%Cr and Fe–14%Cr–0.3%Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} (wt.%), have been fabricated and their microstructure and mechanical properties investigated. The results have been compared with those obtained for other powder metallurgy processed alloys of the same composition but consolidated by hot isostatic pressing. The SPS technique under the present conditions has produced Fe–14Cr materials that apparently exhibit different microstructures yielding inferior mechanical properties than the counterpart material consolidated by hot isostatic pressing. Although the presence of a dispersion of Y-rich particles is evident, the oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) Fe–14Cr alloy consolidated by SPS exhibits poor tensile properties. The extensive decoration of the powder particle surfaces with Cr-rich precipitates and the residual porosity appear to be responsible for the impaired properties of this ODS alloy consolidated by SPS.

  16. Porous media modeling and micro-structurally motivated material moduli determination via the micro-dilatation theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, J.; Ramézani, H.; Sardini, P.; Kondo, D.; Ponson, L.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.

    2015-07-01

    In the present contribution, the porous material modeling and micro-structural material parameters determination are scrutinized via the micro-dilatation theory. The main goal is to take advantage of the micro-dilatation theory which belongs to the generalized continuum media. In the first stage, the thermodynamic laws are entirely revised to reach the energy balance relation using three variables, deformation, porosity change and its gradient underlying the porous media as described in the micro-dilatation theory or so-called void elasticity. Two experiments over cement mortar specimens are performed in order to highlight the material parameters related to the pore structure. The shrinkage due to CO2 carbonation, porosity and its gradient are calculated. The extracted values are verified via 14C-PMMA radiographic image method. The modeling of swelling phenomenon of Delayed Ettringite Formation (DEF) is studied later on. This issue is performed via the crystallization pressure application using the micro-dilatation theory.

  17. Crystal Plasticity Modeling of Microstructure Evolution and Mechanical Fields During Processing of Metals Using Spectral Databases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Marko; Kalidindi, Surya R.

    2017-05-01

    This article reviews the advances made in the development and implementation of a novel approach to speeding up crystal plasticity simulations of metal processing by one to three orders of magnitude when compared with the conventional approaches, depending on the specific details of implementation. This is mainly accomplished through the use of spectral crystal plasticity (SCP) databases grounded in the compact representation of the functions central to crystal plasticity computations. A key benefit of the databases is that they allow for a noniterative retrieval of constitutive solutions for any arbitrary plastic stretching tensor (i.e., deformation mode) imposed on a crystal of arbitrary orientation. The article emphasizes the latest developments in terms of embedding SCP databases within implicit finite elements. To illustrate the potential of these novel implementations, the results from several process modeling applications including equichannel angular extrusion and rolling are presented and compared with experimental measurements and predictions from other models.

  18. Development of microstructure and mechanical properties during annealing of a cold-swaged Co-Cr-Mo alloy rod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Manami; Sato, Nanae; Yamanaka, Kenta; Yoshida, Kazuo; Kuramoto, Koji; Chiba, Akihiko

    2016-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the evolution of the microstructure and mechanical properties during annealing of a cold-swaged Ni-free Co-Cr-Mo alloy for biomedical applications. A Co-28Cr-6Mo-0.14N-0.05C (mass%) alloy rod was processed by cold swaging, with a reduction in area of 27.7%, and then annealed at 1173-1423K for various periods up to 6h. The duplex microstructure of the cold-swaged rod consisted of a face-centered cubic γ-matrix and hexagonal closed-packed ε-martensite developed during cold swaging. This structure transformed nearly completely to the γ-phase after annealing and many annealing twin boundaries were observed as a result of the heat treatment. A small amount of the ε-phase was identified in specimens annealed at 1173K. Growth of the γ-grains occurred with increasing annealing time at temperatures ≥1273K. Interestingly, the grain sizes remained almost unchanged at 1173K and a very fine grain size of approximately 8μm was obtained. The precipitation that occurred during annealing was attributed to the limited grain coarsening during heat treatment. Consequently, the specimens treated at this temperature showed the highest tensile strength and lowest ductility among the specimens prepared. An elongation-to-failure value larger than 30% is sufficient for the proposed applications. The other specimens treated at higher temperatures possessed similar tensile properties and did not show any significant variations with different annealing times. Optimization of the present rod manufacturing process, including cold swaging and interval annealing heat treatment, is discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Development of a fermented ice-cream as influenced by in situ exopolysaccharide production: Rheological, molecular, microstructural and sensory characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dertli, Enes; Toker, Omer S; Durak, M Zeki; Yilmaz, Mustafa T; Tatlısu, Nevruz Berna; Sagdic, Osman; Cankurt, Hasan

    2016-01-20

    This study aimed to investigate the role of in situ exopolysaccharide (EPS) production by EPS(+)Streptococcus thermophilus strains on physicochemical, rheological, molecular, microstructural and sensory properties of ice cream in order to develop a fermented and consequently functional ice-cream in which no stabilizers would be required in ice-cream production. For this purpose, the effect of EPS producing strains (control, strain 1, strain 2 and mixture) and fermentation conditions (fermentation temperature; 32, 37 and 42 °C and time; 2, 3 and 4h) on pH, S. thermophilus count, EPS amount, consistency coefficient (K), and apparent viscosity (η50) were investigated and optimized using single and multiple response optimization tools of response surface methodology. Optimization analyses indicated that functional ice-cream should be fermented with strain 1 or strain mixture at 40-42 °C for 4h in order to produce the most viscous ice-cream with maximum EPS content. Optimization analysis results also revealed that strain specific conditions appeared to be more effective factor on in situ EPS production amount, K and η50 parameters than did fermentation temperature and time. The rheological analysis of the ice-cream produced by EPS(+) strains revealed its high viscous and pseudoplastic non-Newtonian fluid behavior, which demonstrates potential of S. thermophilus EPS as thickening and gelling agent in dairy industry. FTIR analysis proved that the EPS in ice-cream corresponded to a typical EPS, as revealed by the presence of carboxyl, hydroxyl and amide groups with additional α-glycosidic linkages. SEM studies demonstrated that it had a web-like compact microstructure with pores in ice-cream, revealing its application possibility in dairy products to improve their rheological properties. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Modeling microstructure of incudostapedial joint and the effect on cochlear input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Rong Z.; Wang, Xuelin

    2015-12-01

    The incudostapedial joint (ISJ) connects the incus to stapes in human ear and plays an important role for sound transmission from the tympanic membrane (TM) to cochlea. ISJ is a synovial joint composed of articular cartilage on the lenticular process and stapes head with the synovial fluid between them. However, there is no study on how the synovial ISJ affects the middle ear and cochlear functions. Recently, we have developed a 3-dimensinal finite element (FE) model of synovial ISJ and connected the model to our comprehensive FE model of the human ear. The motions of TM, stapes footplate, and basilar membrane and the pressures in scala vestibule and scala tympani were derived over frequencies and compared with experimental measurements. Results show that the synovial ISJ affects sound transmission into cochlea and the frequency-dependent viscoelastic behavior of ISJ provides protection for cochlea from high intensity sound.

  1. Microstructural Development during Welding of Silicon- and Aluminum-Based Transformation-Induced Plasticity Steels—Inclusion and Elemental Partitioning Analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amirthalingam, M.; Hermans, M.; Richardson, I.

    2009-01-01

    Microstructural development in gas tungsten arc (GTA) welded silicon- and aluminum-based transformation-induced plasticity (TRIP) steels was studied by optical and electron microscopy. The fusion zone (FZ) of both welds contained complex inclusions. Energy-dispersive spectroscopic (EDS) analysis on

  2. Selected sports talent development models

    OpenAIRE

    Michal Vičar

    2017-01-01

    Background: Sports talent in the Czech Republic is generally viewed as a static, stable phenomena. It stands in contrast with widespread praxis carried out in Anglo-Saxon countries that emphasise its fluctuant nature. This is reflected in the current models describing its development. Objectives: The aim is to introduce current models of talent development in sport. Methods: Comparison and analysing of the following models: Balyi - Long term athlete development model, Côté - Developmen...

  3. Implications of defect clusters formed in cascades on free defect generation and microstructural development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiedersich, H.

    1992-12-01

    A large fraction of the defects produced by irradiation with energetic neutrons or heavy ions originates in cascades. Not only increased recombination of vacancy and interstitial defects but also significant clustering of like defects occur. Both processes reduce the number of point defects available for long range migration. Consequences of defect clustering in cascades will be discussed in a semi-quantitative form with the aid of calculations using a very simplified model: Quasi-steady-state distributions of immobile vacancy and/or interstitial clusters develop which, in turn, can become significant sinks for mobile defects, and, therefore reduce their lifetime. Although cluster sinks will cause segregation and, potentially, precipitation of second phases due to local changes of composition, the finite lifetime of clusters will not lead to lasting, local compositional changes. A transition from highly dense interstitial and vacancy cluster distributions to the void swelling regime occurs when the thermal evaporation of vacancies from small vacancy clusters becomes significant at higher temperatures. Unequal clustering of vacancies and interstitials leads to an imbalance of their fluxes of in the matrix and, hence, to unequal contributions to atom transport by interstitials and by vacancies even in the quasi-steady state approximation

  4. Microstructural imaging of human neocortex in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Luke J; Kirilina, Evgeniya; Mohammadi, Siawoosh; Weiskopf, Nikolaus

    2018-03-24

    The neocortex of the human brain is the seat of higher brain function. Modern imaging techniques, chief among them magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), allow non-invasive imaging of this important structure. Knowledge of the microstructure of the neocortex has classically come from post-mortem histological studies of human tissue, and extrapolations from invasive animal studies. From these studies, we know that the scale of important neocortical structure spans six orders of magnitude, ranging from the size of axonal diameters (microns), to the size of cortical areas responsible for integrating sensory information (centimetres). MRI presents an opportunity to move beyond classical methods, because MRI is non-invasive and MRI contrast is sensitive to neocortical microstructure over all these length scales. MRI thus allows inferences to be made about neocortical microstructure in vivo, i.e. MRI-based in vivo histology. We review recent literature that has applied and developed MRI-based in vivo histology to probe the microstructure of the human neocortex, focusing specifically on myelin, iron, and neuronal fibre mapping. We find that applications such as cortical parcellation (using R 1 maps as proxies for myelin content) and investigation of cortical iron deposition with age (using R 2 * maps) are already contributing to the frontiers of knowledge in neuroscience. Neuronal fibre mapping in the cortex remains challenging in vivo, but recent improvements in diffusion MRI hold promise for exciting applications in the near future. The literature also suggests that utilising multiple complementary quantitative MRI maps could increase the specificity of inferences about neocortical microstructure relative to contemporary techniques, but that further investment in modelling is required to appropriately combine the maps. In vivo histology of human neocortical microstructure is undergoing rapid development. Future developments will improve its specificity, sensitivity, and

  5. Physiological water model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Susan

    1993-01-01

    The water of the human body can be categorized as existing in two main compartments: intracellular water and extracellular water. The intracellular water consists of all the water within the cells and constitutes over half of the total body water. Since red blood cells are surrounded by plasma, and all other cells are surrounded by interstitial fluid, the intracellular compartment has been subdivided to represent these two cell types. The extracellular water, which includes all of the fluid outside of the cells, can be further subdivided into compartments which represent the interstitial fluid, circulating blood plasma, lymph, and transcellular water. The interstitial fluid surrounds cells outside of the vascular system whereas plasma is contained within the blood vessels. Avascular tissues such as dense connective tissue and cartilage contain interstitial water which slowly equilibrates with tracers used to determine extracellular fluid volume. For this reason, additional compartments are sometimes used to represent these avascular tissues. The average size of each compartment, in terms of percent body weight, has been determined for adult males and females. These compartments and the forces which cause flow between them are presented. The kidneys, a main compartment, receive about 25 percent of the cardiac output and filters out a fluid similar to plasma. The composition of this filtered fluid changes as it flows through the kidney tubules since compounds are continually being secreted and reabsorbed. Through this mechanism, the kidneys eliminate wastes while conserving body water, electrolytes, and metabolites. Since sodium accounts for over 90 percent of the cations in the extracellular fluid, and the number of cations is balanced by the number of anions, considering the renal handling sodium and water only should sufficiently describe the relationship between the plasma compartment and kidneys. A kidney function model is presented which has been adapted from a

  6. Microstructural Development in a TRIP-780 Steel Joined by Friction Stir Welding (FSW: Quantitative Evaluations and Comparisons with EBSD Predictions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gladys Perez Medina

    Full Text Available Abstract The present work describes the effect of FSW on the result microstructure in the stir zone (SZ, thermo-mechanically affected zone (TMAZ, heat affected zone (HAZ and base metal (BM of a TRIP-780 steel. X-ray diffraction (XRD, optical microscopy (OM and EBSD were used for determinations retained austenite (RA in the SZ, It was found that the amount of RA developed in SZ was relatively large, (approximately 11% to 15%. In addition, recrystallization and the formation of a grain texture were resolved using EBSD. During FSW, the SZ experienced severe plastic deformation which lead to an increase in the temperature and consequently grain recrystallization. Moreover, it was found that the recrystallized grain structure and relatively high martensite levels developed in the SZ lead to a significant drop in the mechanical properties of the steel. In addition, microhardness profiles of the welded regions indicated that the hardness in both the SZ and TMAZ were relatively elevated confirming the development of martensite in these regions. In particular, to evaluate the mechanical strength of the weld, lap shear tensile test was conducted; exhibited the fracture zone in the SZ with shear fracture with uniformly distributed elongation shear dimples.

  7. Hierarchical microstructures in CZT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sundaram, S.K.; Henager, C.H.; Edwards, D.J.; Schemer-Kohrn, A.L.; Bliss, M.; Riley, B.R.; Toloczko, M.B.; Lynn, K.G.

    2011-01-01

    Advanced characterization tools, such as electron backscatter diffraction and transmitted IR microscopy, are being applied to study critical microstructural features and orientation relations in as-grown CZT crystals to aid in understanding the relation between structure and properties in radiation detectors. Even carefully prepared single crystals of CZT contain regions of slight misorientation, Te-particles, and dislocation networks that must be understood for more accurate models of detector response. This paper describes initial research at PNNL into the hierarchy of microstructures observed in CZT grown via the vertical gradient freeze or vertical Bridgman method at PNNL and WSU.

  8. Numerical modeling and experimental validation of microstructure in gray cast iron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Masoud; Davami, Parviz; Varahram, Naser

    2012-01-01

    To predict the amount of different phases in gray cast iron by a finite difference model (FDM) on the basis of cooling rate (R), the volume fractions of total γ phase, graphite, and cementite were calculated. The results of phase composition were evaluated to find a proper correlation with cooling...... rate. More trials were carried out to find a good correlation between the hardness and phase composition. New proposed formulas show that the hardness of gray cast iron decreases as the amount of graphite phase increases, and increases as the amount of cementite increases. These formulas are developed...

  9. Econometric models for biohydrogen development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Duu-Hwa; Lee, Duu-Jong; Veziroglu, Ayfer

    2011-09-01

    Biohydrogen is considered as an attractive clean energy source due to its high energy content and environmental-friendly conversion. Analyzing various economic scenarios can help decision makers to optimize development strategies for the biohydrogen sector. This study surveys econometric models of biohydrogen development, including input-out models, life-cycle assessment approach, computable general equilibrium models, linear programming models and impact pathway approach. Fundamentals of each model were briefly reviewed to highlight their advantages and disadvantages. The input-output model and the simplified economic input-output life-cycle assessment model proved most suitable for economic analysis of biohydrogen energy development. A sample analysis using input-output model for forecasting biohydrogen development in the United States is given. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Fracture mechanics and microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gee, M.G.; Morrell, R.

    1986-01-01

    The influence of microstructure on defects in ceramics, and the consequences of their presence for the application of fracture mechanics theories are reviewed. The complexities of microstructures, especially the multiphase nature, the crystallographic anisotropy and the resultant anisotropic physical properties, and the variation of microstructure and surface finish from point to point in real components, all lead to considerable uncertainties in the actual performance of any particular component. It is concluded that although the concepts of fracture mechanics have been and will continue to be most useful for the qualitative explanation of fracture phenomena, the usefulness as a predictive tool with respect to most existing types of material is limited by the interrelation between material microstructure and mechanical properties. At present, the only method of eliminating components with unsatisfactory mechanical properties is to proof-test them, despite the fact that proof-testing itself is limited in ability to cope with changes to the component in service. The aim of the manufacturer must be to improve quality and consistency within individual components, from component to component, and from batch to batch. The aim of the fracture specialist must be to study longer-term properties to improve the accuracy of behaviour predictions with a stronger data base. Materials development needs to concentrate on obtaining defect-free materials that can be translated into more-reliable products, using our present understanding of the influence of microstructure on strength and toughness

  11. Solidification microstructures in single-crystal stainless steel melt pools

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sipf, J.B.; Boatner, L.A.; David, S.A.

    1994-03-01

    Development of microstructure of stationary melt pools of oriented stainless steel single crystals (70%Fe-15%Ni-15%Cr was analyzed. Stationary melt pools were formed by electron-beam and gas-tungsten-arc heating on (001), (011), and (111) oriented planes of the austenitic, fcc-alloy crystals. Characterization and analysis of resulting microstructure was carried out for each crystallographic plane and welding method. Results showed that crystallography which favors ``easy growth`` along the <100> family of directions is a controlling factor in the microstructural formation along with the melt-pool shape. The microstructure was found to depend on the melting method, since each method forms a unique melt-pool shape. These results are used in making a three-dimensional reconstruction of the microstructure for each plane and melting method employed. This investigation also suggests avenues for future research into the microstructural properties of electron-beam welds as well as providing an experimental basis for mathematical models for the prediction of solidification microstructures.

  12. Models for Sustainable Regional Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Lauge Baungaard

    2008-01-01

    The chapter presents a model for integrated cross-cultural knowledge building and entrepreneurship. In addtion, narrative and numeric simulations methods are suggested to promote a further development and implementation of the model in China.......The chapter presents a model for integrated cross-cultural knowledge building and entrepreneurship. In addtion, narrative and numeric simulations methods are suggested to promote a further development and implementation of the model in China....

  13. Quantifying brain microstructure with diffusion MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novikov, Dmitry S.; Jespersen, Sune N.; Kiselev, Valerij G.

    2016-01-01

    We review, systematize and discuss models of diffusion in neuronal tissue, by putting them into an overarching physical context of coarse-graining over an increasing diffusion length scale. From this perspective, we view research on quantifying brain microstructure as occurring along the three ma...... on the future research directions which can open exciting possibilities for developing markers of pathology and development based on methods of studying mesoscopic transport in disordered systems....

  14. Application of Bayesian neural network modeling to characterize the interrelationship between microstructure and mechanical property in alpha+beta-titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koduri, Santhosh K.

    Titanium alloys, especially alpha+beta titanium alloys are used extensively in the aerospace industry because of their attractive balance of properties. The mechanical properties of these materials are very much sensitive to their microstructure. Microstructure in these alloys can be controlled essentially through alloy composition and various thermomechanical processing routes. Microstructures in these alloys are characterized in terms of size, distribution and volume fraction of both alpha (HCP crystal structure) and beta (BCC crystal structure) phases. The above-mentioned features can coexist and span different length scales. The interrelationships between the microstructure and mechanical properties are characterized qualitatively in the literature. Physics based models are difficult to implement due to the presence of a wide variety of microstructural features with different length scales and mutual interaction of these features. The modeling of such properties is much more complex when composition is added as an additional degree of freedom. In this work neural network models with a Bayesian framework have been employed to characterize the microstructure and mechanical property interrelationships in alpha+beta Ti alloys based on Ti-xAl-yV (4.76 alpha+beta Ti alloys based on Ti-xAl-yV (4.76alloys are subjected to various heat treatments and thermomechanical processing conditions such as beta annealing and alpha+beta processing to obtain a range of microstructure and mechanical properties. The important microstructural features in alpha+beta processed alpha+beta titanium alloys are equiaxed alpha grain size, volume fraction of equiaxed alpha grains, width of the alpha lamellae in transformed beta matrix and important features in beta heat treated alpha+beta titanium alloys are size of alpha colony, width of the alpha lamellae, prior beta grain size, volume fraction of colony and grain boundary alpha thickness. A database is populated with the above

  15. Spindle-shaped Microstructures: Potential Models for Planktonic Life Forms on Other Worlds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oehler, Dorothy Z.; Walsh, Maud M.; Sugitani, Kenichiro; House, Christopher H.

    2014-01-01

    Spindle-shaped, organic microstructures ("spindles") are now known from Archean cherts in three localities (Figs. 1-4): The 3 Ga Farrel Quartzite from the Pilbara of Australia [1]; the older, 3.3-3.4 Ga Strelley Pool Formation, also from the Pilbara of Australia [2]; and the 3.4 Ga Kromberg Formation of the Barberton Mountain Land of South Africa [3]. Though the spindles were previously speculated to be pseudofossils or epigenetic organic contaminants, a growing body of data suggests that these structures are bona fide microfossils and further, that they are syngenetic with the Archean cherts in which they occur [1-2, 4-10]. As such, the spindles are among some of the oldest-known organically preserved microfossils on Earth. Moreover, recent delta C-13 study of individual spindles from the Farrel Quartzite (using Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry [SIMS]) suggests that the spindles may have been planktonic (living in open water), as opposed to benthic (living as bottom dwellers in contact with muds or sediments) [9]. Since most Precambrian microbiotas have been described from benthic, matforming communities, a planktonic lifestyle for the spindles suggests that these structures could represent a segment of the Archean biosphere that is poorly known. Here we synthesize the recent work on the spindles, and we add new observations regarding their geographic distribution, robustness, planktonic habit, and long-lived success. We then discuss their potential evolutionary and astrobiological significance.

  16. Modelling of microstructured waveguides using a finite-element-based vectorial mode solver with transparent boundary condition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Uranus, H.P.; Hoekstra, Hugo; van Groesen, Embrecht W.C.; Bienstman, P.; Vanholme, L.

    2004-01-01

    Finite element vectorial optical mode solver is used to analyze microstructured waveguides in a relatively small computational domain. The presentation will consider the computational method, as well as the applications of it on a number of waveguides with 2-D cross section where microstructures are

  17. The modeling of coating thickness, heat transfer, and fluid flow and its correlation with the thermal barrier coating microstructure for a plasma sprayed gas turbine application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nylén, P.; Wigren, J.; Pejryd, L.; Hansson, M.-O.

    1999-09-01

    The plasma sprya deposition of a zirconia thermal barrier coating (TBC) on a gas turbine component was examined using analytical and experimental techniques. The coating thickness was simulated by the use of commercial off-line software. The impinging jet was modeled by means of a finite difference elliptic code using a simplified turbulence model. Powder particle velocity, temperature history, and trajectory were calculated using a stochastic discrete particle model. The heat transfer and fluid flow model were then used to calculate transient coating and substrate temperatures using the finite element method. The predicted thickness, temperature, and velocity of the particles and the coating temperatures were compared with these measurements, and good correlations were obtained. The coating microstructure was evaluated by optical and scanning microscopy techniques. Special attention was paid to the crack structures within the top coating. Finally, the correlation between the modeled parameters and the deposit microstructure was studied.

  18. Microstructure development of a drying tile mortar containing methylhydroxy-ethylcellulose (MHEC)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Faiyas, A.P.A.; Erich, S.J.F.; Nijland, T.G.; Hunnink, H.P.; Adan, O.C.G.

    2015-01-01

    Cement based mortars are widely used as adhesive for tiles in building and construction. They have a limited timespan during which a tile can be placed effectively in order to develop sufficient bond strength. This timespan, usually called ’open time’, is controlled, amongst others, by adding water

  19. Rapid solidification in thermal spary deposition: Microstructure and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This paper reviews a series of work in the area of mathematical modelling of phase and microstructure formation during the rapid solidification of single splats and coatings. The model development has been complimented by special experiments. Conditions under which plariar interface solidification occurs, columnar ...

  20. Quantitative image analysis of microstructure development during pressure sintering of CoO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miro, A; Notis, M R

    1979-01-01

    An automatic system for quantitative image analysis was developed to study the transition from intermediate to final stage pore structure in pressure-sintered CoO. One of the significant results from this study indicates that the projected length is a good parameter to observe the transition from open cylindrical to closed porosity. Quantitative image analysis indicates that the Zener relationship (r/G approx. P) is obeyed through the entire sintering process.

  1. Advances in the Development of Processing - Microstructure Relations for Titanium Alloys (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-06

    performed by part vendors and OEMs include closed-die forging of axi-symmetric or more- complex-shaped (e.g., rib-web) components, shape extrusion , ring...understand the development of deformation textures due to processes such as sheet rolling, extrusion , and forging. For the workhorse titanium alloy, Ti...and S-B. Kang, “Control of Layer Continuity in Metallic Multilayers Produced by Deformation Synthesis Method,” Mater. Sci. Eng. A, A406 (2005), 95

  2. A molecular dynamic model for analyzing concentrations of electrolytes: Fractional molar dependences of microstructure properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalansky, D.; Popova, E.; Gladyshev, P.; Dushanov, E.; Kholmurodov, Kh.

    2014-12-01

    Aqueous electrolyte solutions play an important role in many electrophysical and chemical processes in aerospace technology and industrial applications. As noncovalent interactions, the interactions between ions are crucially important for biomolecular structures as well (protein structure folding, molecular level processes followed by ionic pair correlations, the formation of flexible hydrate shells, and so on). Specifically, ions (cations and anions with the same valence charges) can form stable pairs if their sizes match. The formation of ionic pairs can substantially affect the thermodynamic stabilities of proteins in the alkali salts physiologically present in the human body. Research aims and problems impose severe demands on readjustments of the ionic force fields and potential parameters developed to describe aqueous solutions and electrolytic systems. Ionic solutions and their interaction with biomolecules have been observed for over 100 years [1], but the behavior of such solutions remains poorly studied today. New data obtained in this work deals with parameterization strategies and adjustments for the ionic force fields of the alkali cations and halide anions that should be helpful in biomolecular research. Using molecular dynamics (MD) models, four electrolytic systems (HCl-H2O, LiCl-H2O, NaCl-H2O, and KCl-H2O) are investigated as binary mixtures of water and cations and anions, respectively. The intermolecular interaction parameters are varied for two of the four model electrolytes (HCl-H2O and NaCl-H2O) to simulate the possibility of different ionic shells forming during interaction with water. It is found that varying the potential parameters strongly affects the dynamic and structural characteristics of electrolyte systems. MD simulations are performed in the temperature range of 300 to 600 K with a step of 50 K. MD simulations for all electrolyte models (HCl-H2O, LiCl-H2O, NaCl-H2O, KCl-H2O) are also conducted for different molar fractions of

  3. The effect of inhomogeneity of microstructure on ducility in superplasticity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Manonukul, A.; Dunne, F.P.E.

    1996-01-01

    Finite element cell models have been developed to represent inhomogeneous grain size fields that occur in commercial Ti-6Al-4V. The models are used to investigate the influence of microstructure on superplastic stress-strain behaviour, inhomogeneity of deformation, and on ductility in superplastic deformation. It is shown that increasing the level of initial microstructural inhomogeneity leads to increasing flow stress for given strain, and that the microstructural inhomogeneity leads to inhomogeneous deformation. As superplasticity proceeds, the level of microstructural inhomogeneity diminishes, but the inhomogeneity itself is preserved during the deformation. It is shown that the inhomogeneity of microstructure leads to strain localisation which increases in severity with deformation until material necking and failure occur. Increasing the initial microstructural inhomogeneity is shown to lead to a decrease in ductility, but the effect diminishes for grain size ranges in excess of 30 μm. An empirical relationship is presented that relates the ductility to the initial grain size range through a power law. (orig.)

  4. Microstructural Development in Al-Ni Alloys Directionally Solidified under Unsteady-State Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canté, Manuel V.; Spinelli, José E.; Ferreira, Ivaldo L.; Cheung, Noé; Garcia, Amauri

    2008-07-01

    Three Al-Ni hypoeutectic alloys were directionally solidified under upward unsteady-state heat-flow conditions. Primary ( λ 1) and secondary ( λ 2) dendrite arm spacings were measured along the castings for all alloys and correlated with transient solidification thermal variables. A combined theoretical and experimental approach was used to quantitatively determine such thermal variables, i.e., transient metal/mold heat-transfer coefficients, tip growth rates, thermal gradients, tip cooling rates, and local solidification time. The article also focuses on the dependence of dendrite arm spacings on the alloy solute content. Furthermore, the experimental data concerning the solidification of Al-1.0, 2.5, and 4.7 wt pct Ni alloys are compared with the main predictive dendritic models from the literature.

  5. Numerical simulation of AM1 microstructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rougier Luc

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A modelling approach is developed for the description of microstructure formation in the industrial AM1 Ni-base superalloy. Solidification and homogenization simulations are first carried out using a microsegregation model, before using the local compositions as an input for precipitation calculations, in order to characterize the influence of segregation on precipitation. First, the precipitation model was validated by comparing simulated and measured evolutions of the average precipitate radius during isothermal heat treatments at 1100 ∘C and 1210 ∘C. The chained microsegregation and precipitation simulations indicate that the global sequences of precipitation events remains are qualitatively the same at the different locations in the microstructure, but the growth and dissolution kinetics are strongly influenced by the local compositions. Local supersaturations have a larger effect on the average radius of the precipitates than certain stages of the precipitation heat treatment.

  6. Advanced Mirror & Modelling Technology Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Effinger, Michael; Stahl, H. Philip; Abplanalp, Laura; Maffett, Steven; Egerman, Robert; Eng, Ron; Arnold, William; Mosier, Gary; Blaurock, Carl

    2014-01-01

    The 2020 Decadal technology survey is starting in 2018. Technology on the shelf at that time will help guide selection to future low risk and low cost missions. The Advanced Mirror Technology Development (AMTD) team has identified development priorities based on science goals and engineering requirements for Ultraviolet Optical near-Infrared (UVOIR) missions in order to contribute to the selection process. One key development identified was lightweight mirror fabrication and testing. A monolithic, stacked, deep core mirror was fused and replicated twice to achieve the desired radius of curvature. It was subsequently successfully polished and tested. A recently awarded second phase to the AMTD project will develop larger mirrors to demonstrate the lateral scaling of the deep core mirror technology. Another key development was rapid modeling for the mirror. One model focused on generating optical and structural model results in minutes instead of months. Many variables could be accounted for regarding the core, face plate and back structure details. A portion of a spacecraft model was also developed. The spacecraft model incorporated direct integration to transform optical path difference to Point Spread Function (PSF) and between PSF to modulation transfer function. The second phase to the project will take the results of the rapid mirror modeler and integrate them into the rapid spacecraft modeler.

  7. Synthesis, Deposition, and Microstructure Development of Thin Films Formed by Sulfidation and Selenization of Copper Zinc Tin Sulfide Nanocrystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernomordik, Boris David

    stoichiometric kesterite CZTS. The ~2 nm nanocrystals synthesized at 150 °C exhibit quantum confinement, with a band gap of 1.67 eV. Larger nanocrystals have the expected bulk CZTS band gap of 1.5 eV. Several micron thick films deposited by drop casting colloidal dispersions of ~40 nm CZTS nanocrystals were crack-free, while those cast using 5 nm nanocrystals had micron-scale cracks. We showed the applicability of these nanocrystal coatings for thin film solar cells by demonstrating a CZTS thin film solar cell using coatings annealed in a sulfur atmosphere. We conducted a systematic study of the factors controlling crystal growth and microstructure development during sulfidation annealing of films cast from colloidal dispersions of CZTS nanocrystals. The film microstructure is controlled by concurrent normal and abnormal grain growth. At 600 °C to 800 °C and low sulfur pressures (50 Torr), abnormal CZTS grains up to 10 microm in size grow on the surface of the CZTS nanocrystal film via transport of material from the nanocrystals to the abnormal grains. Meanwhile, the nanocrystals coarsen, sinter, and undergo normal grain growth. The driving force for abnormal grain growth is the reduction in total energy associated with the high surface area nanocrystals. The eventual coarsening of the CZTS nanocrystals reduces the driving force for abnormal crystal growth. Increasing the sulfur pressure by an order of magnitude to 500 Torr accelerates both normal and abnormal crystal growth though sufficient acceleration of the former eventually reduces the latter by reducing the driving force for abnormal grain growth. For example, at high temperatures (700-800 oC) and sulfur pressures (500 Torr) normal grains quickly grow to ~500 nm which significantly reduces abnormal grain growth. The use of soda lime glass as the substrate, instead of quartz, accelerates normal grain growth. Normal grains grow to ~500 nm at lower temperatures and sulfur pressures (i.e., 600 °C and 50 Torr) than those

  8. Microstructural Analysis of the Oxidation Products of Metallic Alloys According to the HALOX Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Micco, G.

    2001-01-01

    This publication is a first stage in the development of an oxidation process of the fissile material, from spent nuclear fuel elements of research reactors, containing molybdenum.The oxidation of molybdenum powder with air at elevated temperatures (375-500 o C) has been studied by means of X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy.The results show that the only product was MoO 3 in two different phases: Monoclinic and Orthorhombic.MoO 2 and non-stoichiometric molybdenum oxide such as Mo 4 O 1 1 were not evidenced in any of the Mo oxidation steps. By monitoring the time required for the complete oxidation of Mo at different conditions of temperature and pressure, a rate equation has been determined for the whole process. The activation energy and the pressure and degree of reaction dependence, has been calculated.This values remain constant trough out the complete reaction

  9. Development of the Integrated Hydrogen Production System Using Micro-structured Devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung Min Sohn; Young Chang Byun; Jun Yeon Cho; Youngwoon Kwon; Jaehoon Choe

    2006-01-01

    A plate-type integrated fuel processor, which consisted of three different micro-reactors which were a reformer with combustor, two heat exchangers and an evaporator with combustor, was developed for the hydrogen production as feed of over 100 W-grade PEMFC. The methanol steam reforming was chosen in our fuel processor to produce highly pure hydrogen. Our system could be operated without any external electric heat supply. Hydrogen which might come from off gas was used as the combustion fuel at initial stage and methanol was used during the steam reaction. Cu/Zn/Al 2 O 3 and Pt/Al 2 O 3 catalysts were chosen for steam reforming of methanol and the combustion and coated on microchannel-patterned stainless steel sheets. The performance of the fuel processor was tested for long-term use. The integrated system was operated consistently with methanol conversion of over 80.0 mol% at 300 C for 20 hrs without deactivation of catalyst. The maximum composition of hydrogen and production rate on dry basis was about 70 % and 1.7 L/min, respectively. The efficiency of our system was calculated based on the LHV of methanol and hydrogen. Overall thermal efficiency of our fuel processor was 59.5 % and thermal power of hydrogen was about 300 W. (authors)

  10. Solidification of AM and AZ magnesium alloys characterized by heat-transfer modeled thermal and calorimetric analysis and microsegregation study of directionally solidified microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirkovic, Djordje

    2008-05-09

    The micro-scale solidification of commercial Mg alloys of the AZ and AM series is in the focus of the present thesis. Two approaches of investigating solidification are implemented, complementary regarding temperature gradient and solidification rate, and also with respect to the generated microstructure. The first approach considers solidification under a negligible spatial temperature gradient. Here the solidification curves, i.e. fraction solid versus temperature, were determined by developing an improved heat-transfer modeling applicable on both differential thermal analysis (DTA) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) signals. The correlation between solidification enthalpy and fraction solid during solidification was tested in detail. A better evaluation of the measured DTA and DSC signals is attained through an independent measurement of the time constant as function of temperature for the applied equipment. A further improvement is achieved through a more impartial interpretation of the measured curves. Both improvements enable a better desmearing of measured signals and reduce the error induced by the operator. The novel tantalum encapsulation enabled appropriate handling of challenging Mg-alloys. The viability and limitations of thermal analysis in general to determine start and end of solidification of AZ magnesium alloys was also studied. The second approach is based on directional solidification in a high temperature gradient and at constant solidification rate, achieved by the Bridgman technique. The resulting dendritic microstructure and inherent microsegregation are studied in this work. The solute profiles, i.e. solute content versus solid phase fraction during solidification, are determined by an advanced treatment of the EPMA data. Problems that are demonstrated in this work are Al-loss and melt pollution due to reaction with typical sample container material made of unprotected steel. The development of an optimized boron nitride (BN

  11. Elastic anisotropy of Tambo gneiss from Promontogno, Switzerland: a comparison of crystal orientation and microstructure-based modelling and experimental measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasin, R. N.; Kern, H.; Lokajíček, T.; Svitek, T.; Lehmann, E.; Mannes, D. C.; Chaouche, M.; Wenk, H.-R.

    2017-04-01

    Felsic and mafic gneisses constitute large proportions of the upper and lower continental crust. Gneisses often display high anisotropy of elastic properties associated with preferred orientations of sheet silicates. Here we study the elastic anisotropy of a sample of Tambo gneiss from Promontogno in the Central Alps. We apply optical microscopy, time-of-flight neutron diffraction, neutron and X-ray tomography to quantify mineral composition and microstructures and use them to construct self-consistent models of elastic properties. They are compared to results of ultrasonic measurements on a cube sample in a multi-anvil apparatus and on a spherical sample in an apparatus that can measure velocities in multiple directions. Both methods provide similar results. It is shown that models of microstructure-derived elastic properties provide a good match with ultrasonic experiment results at pressures above 100 MPa. At a pressure of 0.1 MPa the correspondence between the model and the experiment is worse. This may be caused by an oversimplification of the model with respect to microfractures or uncertainties in the experimental determination of S-wave velocities and elastic tensor inversion. The study provides a basis to determine anisotropic elastic properties of rocks either by ultrasonic experiments or quantitative models based on microstructures. This information can then be used for interpretation of seismic data of the crust.

  12. Micro-mechanical analysis and modelling of the behavior and brittle fracture of a french 16MND5 steel: role of microstructural heterogeneities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mathieu, J.Ph.

    2006-10-01

    Reactor Pressure Vessel is the second containment barrier between nuclear fuel and the environment. Electricite de France's reactors are made with french 16MND5 low-alloyed steel (equ. ASTM A508 Cl.3). Various experimental techniques (scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction...) are set up in order to characterize mechanical heterogeneities inside material microstructure during tensile testing at different low temperatures [-150 C;-60 C]. Heterogeneities can be seen as the effect of both 'polycrystalline' and 'composite' microstructural features. Interphase (until 150 MPa in average between ferritic and bainitic macroscopic stress state) and intra-phase (until 100 MPa in average between ferritic orientations) stress variations are highlighted. Modelling involves micro-mechanical description of plastic glide, mean fields models and realistic three-dimensional aggregates, all put together inside a multi-scale approach. Calibration is done on macroscopic stress-strain curves at different low temperatures, and modelling reproduces experimental stress heterogeneities. This modelling allows to apply a local micro-mechanical fracture criterion for crystallographic cleavage. Deterministic computations of time to fracture for different carbides random selection provide a way to express probability of fracture for the elementary volume. Results are in good agreement with hypothesis made by local approach to fracture. Hence, the main difference is that no dependence to loading nor microstructure features is supposed for probability of fracture on the representative volume: this dependence is naturally introduced by modelling. (author)

  13. Semiconductors and semimetals epitaxial microstructures

    CERN Document Server

    Willardson, Robert K; Beer, Albert C; Gossard, Arthur C

    1994-01-01

    Newly developed semiconductor microstructures can now guide light and electrons resulting in important consequences for state-of-the-art electronic and photonic devices. This volume introduces a new generation of epitaxial microstructures. Special emphasis has been given to atomic control during growth and the interrelationship between the atomic arrangements and the properties of the structures.Key Features* Atomic-level control of semiconductor microstructures* Molecular beam epitaxy, metal-organic chemical vapor deposition* Quantum wells and quantum wires* Lasers, photon(IR)detectors, heterostructure transistors

  14. Effects of Pressure and Number of Turns on Microstructural Homogeneity Developed in High-Pressure Double Torsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahedi, Mohammad; Beyerlein, Irene J.; Paydar, Mohammad Hossein; Zheng, Shijian; Xiong, Ting; Knezevic, Marko

    2017-03-01

    With electron backscatter diffraction and transmission electron microscopy, we study the rate of grain refinement and the uniformity in the evolution of microstructure in commercial purity Cu samples during high-pressure double torsion (HPDT). We aim to identify the processing conditions that would produce a microstructure that is both refined and uniform across the sample in grain size, texture, and intra-granular misorientation with minimal energy input. Two processing variables, pressure and number of turns, are probed. To provide a reference for HPDT, the investigation is also carried out using the standard high-pressure torsion (HPT) technique. For both processes, grain sizes decrease with the number of turns and applied pressure. Under pressure of 600 MPa and 4 torsional turns, HPDT provided a more homogeneous grain structure than HPT. Likewise, we also demonstrate that for the same processing condition, HPDT again produces the more homogeneous grain structure. It is found that a more homogeneous grain structure is achieved after doubling number of turns than doubling the pressure amount to 1.2 GPa. However, the rate of grain refinement substantially increases with doubling the pressure. Considering these results, the HPDT process, compared to HPT, takes better advantage of the role that high pressure plays in shear strain-induced grain refinement and homogenizing the microstructure. Last, analysis of the applied work finds that the least amount of work required for achieving fine and homogeneous microstructure occurs when the applied pressure is maximized and number of turns is minimized.

  15. Characterizing ingestive behavior through licking microstructure: Underlying neurobiology and its use in the study of obesity in animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alexander W

    2018-02-01

    Ingestive behavior is controlled by multiple distinct peripheral and central physiological mechanisms that ultimately determine whether a particular food should be accepted or avoided. As rodents consume a fluid they display stereotyped rhythmic tongue movements, and by analyzing the temporal distribution of pauses of licking, it is possible through analyses of licking microstructure to uncover dissociable evaluative and motivational variables that contribute to ingestive behavior. The mean number of licks occurring within each burst of licking (burst and cluster size) reflects the palatability of the consumed solution, whereas the frequency of initiating novel bouts of licking behavior (burst and cluster number) is dependent upon the degree of gastrointestinal inhibition that accrues through continued fluid ingestion. This review describes the analysis of these measures within a context of the behavioral variables that come to influence the acceptance or avoidance of a fluid, and the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie alterations in the temporal distribution of pauses of licks. The application of these studies to models of obesity in animals is also described. Copyright © 2017 ISDN. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Microstructural changes in ischemic cortical gray matter predicted by a model of diffusion-weighted MRI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard-Poulsen, Peter; Hansen, Brian; Østergaard, Leif

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: To understand the diffusion attenuated MR signal from normal and ischemic brain tissue in order to extract structural and physiological information using mathematical modeling, taking into account the transverse relaxation rates in gray matter. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We fit our diffusion...... compartment. A global optimum was found from a wide range of parameter permutations using cluster computing. We also present simulations of cell swelling and changes of exchange rate and intracellular diffusion as possible cellular mechanisms in ischemia. RESULTS: Our model estimates an extracellular volume...... fraction of 0.19 in accordance with the accepted value from histology. The absolute apparent diffusion coefficient obtained from the model was similar to that of experiments. The model and the experimental results indicate significant differences in diffusion and transverse relaxation between the tissue...

  17. Studies on the Microstructure of Epoxy-Cement Composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Łukowski P.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction of polymers into the cement composites improves same of the properties of concretes and mortars. Therefore, the polymer-cement composites are successfully used in construction. The model of microstructure formation in cement composites modified with thermoplastic polymer (pre-mix modifiers has already been developed and successfully implemented. However, the formation of microstructure in the case of epoxy-cement composites ( containing post-mix modifier demonstrates same peculiarities which should be taken into account when modelling the process. The microstructure of epoxy-cement composites and its formation is discussed in the paper. The model is offered, formulated on the basis of the microscopic observations and results of testing.

  18. Linking growth to environmental histories in central Baltic young-of-the-year sprat, Sprattus sprattus : an approach based on otolith microstructure analysis and hydrodynamic modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumann, H.; Hinrichsen, H.H.; Voss, R.

    2006-01-01

    Otolith microstructure analysis and hydrodynamic modelling were combined to study growth patterns in young-of-the-year (YoY) sprat, Sprattus sprattus, which were sampled in October 2002 in the central Baltic Sea. The observed 'window of survival', approximated by the distribution of back-calculat......Otolith microstructure analysis and hydrodynamic modelling were combined to study growth patterns in young-of-the-year (YoY) sprat, Sprattus sprattus, which were sampled in October 2002 in the central Baltic Sea. The observed 'window of survival', approximated by the distribution of back......-calculated days of first feeding (DFF), was narrow compared to the extended spawning season of sprat in the Baltic Sea (mean +/- SD = 22 June +/- 14.1 days) and indicated that only individuals born in summer survived until October 2002. Within the group of survivors, individuals born later in the season exhibited...

  19. Stress, microstructure and evolution under ion irradiation in thin films grown by ion beam sputtering: modelling and application to interfacial effects in metallic multilayers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debelle, A.

    2006-09-01

    We have investigated the formation of the interfacial chemical mixing in Mo/Ni multilayers, and particularly the influence of ballistic effects during the growth. For this purpose, hetero-epitaxial b.c.c./f.c.c. Mo(110)/Ni(111) multilayers were grown by two deposition methods: thermal evaporation and direct ion beam sputtering. As a preliminary, an accurate description of the stress state in pure sputtered Mo thin films was required. Microstructural and stress state analyses were essentially carried out by X-ray diffraction, and ion irradiation was used as a powerful tool to control the stress level. We showed that thermal evaporated thin films exhibit a weak tensile growth stress (∼ 0.6 GPa) that can be accounted for by the grain boundary relaxation model, whereas sputtered thin films develop large compressive growth stress (- 2 to - 4 GPa). This latter results from the bombardment of the growing film by the energetic particles involved during the sputtering process (atomic peening phenomenon), which induces the formation of defects in the layers, generating volume distortions. We thus developed a stress model that includes a hydrostatic stress component to account for these volume strains. This model allowed us to determine the 'unstressed and free of defects lattice parameter' a 0 , solely linked to chemical effects. For epitaxial Mo layers, it was possible to separate coherency stress from growth stress due to their distinct kinetic evolution during ion irradiation. Therefore, the stress analysis enabled us to determine the a 0 values in Mo sub-layers of Mo/Ni superlattices. A tendency to the formation of an interfacial alloy is observed independently of the growth conditions, which suggests that thermodynamic forces favour the exchange mechanism. However, the extent of the intermixing effect is clearly enhanced by ballistic effects. (author)

  20. Experiments for foam model development and validation.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bourdon, Christopher Jay; Cote, Raymond O.; Moffat, Harry K.; Grillet, Anne Mary; Mahoney, James F. (Honeywell Federal Manufacturing and Technologies, Kansas City Plant, Kansas City, MO); Russick, Edward Mark; Adolf, Douglas Brian; Rao, Rekha Ranjana; Thompson, Kyle Richard; Kraynik, Andrew Michael; Castaneda, Jaime N.; Brotherton, Christopher M.; Mondy, Lisa Ann; Gorby, Allen D.

    2008-09-01

    A series of experiments has been performed to allow observation of the foaming process and the collection of temperature, rise rate, and microstructural data. Microfocus video is used in conjunction with particle image velocimetry (PIV) to elucidate the boundary condition at the wall. Rheology, reaction kinetics and density measurements complement the flow visualization. X-ray computed tomography (CT) is used to examine the cured foams to determine density gradients. These data provide input to a continuum level finite element model of the blowing process.

  1. Characterization of the hierarchical microstructure of a Ni-Al-Ti model alloy; Charakterisierung der hierarchischen Mikrostruktur einer Ni-Al-Ti Modell-Legierung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, Florian

    2014-02-28

    Phase separation of γ{sup '} precipitates determines the microstructure and mechanical properties of nickel-based superalloys. Upon ageing, γ spheres form inside ordered (L1{sub 2}) γ{sup '} precipitates, undergo a morphological change to plates and finally split the γ{sup '} precipitates. To clarify the identity of the insufficiently characterized γ particles and to elucidate their influence on the evolution of the microstructure and the mechanical properties, differently heat treated samples of a Ni-Al-Ti modell alloy were investigated from the micrometer to the atomic scale. The single crystalline cast material was broadly characterized by means of light and scanning electron microscopy, the laue method (back-reflection), differential scanning calorimetry as well as electron probe microanalysis. Dendritic segregations were found, whereas the dendrite cores show an enrichment in nickel and aluminum and in turn the interdendritic regions show an enrichment in titanium. An adequate combination of temperature and time was determined on the basis of quantitative analyses after different homogenization treatments. The evolution of the hierarchical microstructure was investigated on the nanometer scale by means of transmission electron microscopy and on the atomic scale with atom probe tomography. The combined analyses reveal that Ni-rich clusters form within the γ{sup '} precipitates during the early stages of phase separation. These Ni-rich clusters coalesce and thereby form γ spheres which undergo a morphological change to plates accompanied by a chemical evolution. In the beginning the γ spheres are located well within the metastable γ + γ{sup '} two-phase region and later, after the morphological change, achieve the equilibrium composition of the γ phase. Furthermore the involved energies were considered in order to elucidate the driving forces for the phase separation of γ{sup '} precipitates. A correlation between the

  2. Microstructure of depleted uranium under uniaxial strain conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zurek, A.K.; Embury, J.D.; Kelly, A.; Thissell, W.R.; Gustavsen, R.L.; Vorthman, J.E.; Hixson, R.H.

    1997-09-01

    Uranium samples of two different purities were used for spall strength measurements. Samples of depleted uranium were taken from very high purity material (38 ppM carbon) and from material containing 280 ppM C. Experimental conditions were chosen to effectively arrest the microstructural damage at two places in the development to full spall separation. Samples were soft recovered and characterized with respect to the microstructure and the form of damage. This allowed determination of the dependence of spall mechanisms on stress level, stress state, and sample purity. This information is used in developing a model to predict the mode of fracture.

  3. Microstructure oriented modelling of hierarchically perfused porous media for cerebral blood flow evaluation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tonar, Z.; Kochová, P.; Cimrman, R.; Witter, K.; Janáček, Jiří; Rohan, V.

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 465, č. 2011 (2011), s. 286-289 ISSN 1013-9826. [International Conference on Materials Structure & Micromechanics of Fracture /6./. Brno, 28.06.2010-30.06.2010] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509 Keywords : brain * perfusion * morphometry * microvessels * stereology * modelling Subject RIV: EA - Cell Biology

  4. A microstructure-dependent model for fission product gas release and swelling in UO2 fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notley, M.J.F.; Hastings, I.J.

    1979-06-01

    A model for the release of fission gas from irradiated UO2 fuel is presented. It incorporates fission gas diffusion bubble and grain boundary movement,intergranular bubble formation and interlinkage. In addition, the model allows estimates of the extent of structural change and fuel swelling. In the latter, contributions of thermal expansion, densification, solid fission products, and gas bubbles are considered. When included in the ELESIM fuel performance code, the model yields predictions which are in good agreement with data from UO2 fuel elements irradiated over a range of water-cooled reactor conditions: linear power outputs between 40 and 120 kW/m, burnups between 10 and 300 MW.h/kg U and power histories including constant, high-to-low and low-to-high power periods. The predictions of the model are shown to be most sensitive to fuel power (temperature), the selection of diffusion coefficient for fission gas in UO2 and burnup. The predictions are less sensitive to variables such as fuel restraint, initial grain size and the rate of grain growth. (author)

  5. A microstructurally based continuum model of cartilage viscoelasticity and permeability incorporating measured statistical fiber orientations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierce, David M; Unterberger, Michael J; Trobin, Werner; Ricken, Tim; Holzapfel, Gerhard A

    2016-02-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of cartilage derive from an interplay of isotropically distributed, densely packed and negatively charged proteoglycans; a highly anisotropic and inhomogeneously oriented fiber network of collagens; and an interstitial electrolytic fluid. We propose a new 3D finite strain constitutive model capable of simultaneously addressing both solid (reinforcement) and fluid (permeability) dependence of the tissue's mechanical response on the patient-specific collagen fiber network. To represent fiber reinforcement, we integrate the strain energies of single collagen fibers-weighted by an orientation distribution function (ODF) defined over a unit sphere-over the distributed fiber orientations in 3D. We define the anisotropic intrinsic permeability of the tissue with a structure tensor based again on the integration of the local ODF over all spatial fiber orientations. By design, our modeling formulation accepts structural data on patient-specific collagen fiber networks as determined via diffusion tensor MRI. We implement our new model in 3D large strain finite elements and study the distributions of interstitial fluid pressure, fluid pressure load support and shear stress within a cartilage sample under indentation. Results show that the fiber network dramatically increases interstitial fluid pressure and focuses it near the surface. Inhomogeneity in the tissue's composition also increases fluid pressure and reduces shear stress in the solid. Finally, a biphasic neo-Hookean material model, as is available in commercial finite element codes, does not capture important features of the intra-tissue response, e.g., distributions of interstitial fluid pressure and principal shear stress.

  6. Microstructure Optimization of Dual-Phase Steels Using a Representative Volume Element and a Response Surface Method: Parametric Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belgasam, Tarek M.; Zbib, Hussein M.

    2017-12-01

    Dual-phase (DP) steels have received widespread attention for their low density and high strength. This low density is of value to the automotive industry for the weight reduction it offers and the attendant fuel savings and emission reductions. Recent studies on developing DP steels showed that the combination of strength/ductility could be significantly improved when changing the volume fraction and grain size of phases in the microstructure depending on microstructure properties. Consequently, DP steel manufacturers are interested in predicting microstructure properties and in optimizing microstructure design. In this work, a microstructure-based approach using representative volume elements (RVEs) was developed. The approach examined the flow behavior of DP steels using virtual tension tests with an RVE to identify specific mechanical properties. Microstructures with varied martensite and ferrite grain sizes, martensite volume fractions, carbon content, and morphologies were studied in 3D RVE approaches. The effect of these microstructure parameters on a combination of strength/ductility of DP steels was examined numerically using the finite element method by implementing a dislocation density-based elastic-plastic constitutive model, and a Response surface methodology to determine the optimum conditions for a required combination of strength/ductility. The results from the numerical simulations are compared with experimental results found in the literature. The developed methodology proves to be a powerful tool for studying the effect and interaction of key microstructural parameters on strength and ductility and thus can be used to identify optimum microstructural conditions.

  7. China Changes the Development Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grażyna Rzeszotarska

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The last decades of the twentieth century fundamentally changed the situation in the global economy. China's spectacular economic success has increased an interest in this country. The short time in which China moved on from the a poor agricultural country into a global economic power is admirable. China's model combines conflicted elements of different economic systems: the bureaucratic planning, island-capitalism, simple goods production and natural economy. The current development and transformation of the economy have brought about spectacular achievements and successes. However, the "the world's manufacturer" produces goods designed in other countries. In contrast, the modern idea is to build a modern and independent Chinese industry. The possibilities of the current model of economic development based on simple reserves and large statedriven infrastructure projects, which no longer drive the economy to the extent they previously did, dried out. Thus, the "Middle Kingdom" will have to compete against the rest of the world on quality and innovation. Therefore the development of the new model is a prerequisite to ensure progress in the future. Discussion on further development has been expedited in 2011, when it became abundantly clear that the Chinese economy would share the experience of the effects of the global crisis. The Chinese look at the challenges that the economy is facing realistically in thinking about the modern technology which begins to dominate the country. China is determined to become the leading technological superpower of the world. Today, many developing countries are looking towards China watching the development model implemented there with the hope of its adaptation in their economies. However, China is a unique entity. Therefore, it may be that adaptation of the Chinese model of development in other countries is not possible.

  8. Computational modeling of elastic properties of carbon nanotube/polymer composites with interphase regions. Part I: Micro-structural characterization and geometric modeling

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Fei

    2014-01-01

    A computational strategy to predict the elastic properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer composites is proposed in this two-part paper. In Part I, the micro-structural characteristics of these nano-composites are discerned. These characteristics include networks/agglomerations of carbon nanotubes and thick polymer interphase regions between the nanotubes and the surrounding matrix. An algorithm is presented to construct three-dimensional geometric models with large amounts of randomly dispersed and aggregated nanotubes. The effects of the distribution of the nanotubes and the thickness of the interphase regions on the concentration of the interphase regions are demonstrated with numerical results. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. OSPREY Model Development Status Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Veronica J Rutledge

    2014-04-01

    During the processing of used nuclear fuel, volatile radionuclides will be discharged to the atmosphere if no recovery processes are in place to limit their release. The volatile radionuclides of concern are 3H, 14C, 85Kr, and 129I. Methods are being developed, via adsorption and absorption unit operations, to capture these radionuclides. It is necessary to model these unit operations to aid in the evaluation of technologies and in the future development of an advanced used nuclear fuel processing plant. A collaboration between Fuel Cycle Research and Development Offgas Sigma Team member INL and a NEUP grant including ORNL, Syracuse University, and Georgia Institute of Technology has been formed to develop off gas models and support off gas research. Georgia Institute of Technology is developing fundamental level model to describe the equilibrium and kinetics of the adsorption process, which are to be integrated with OSPREY. This report discusses the progress made on expanding OSPREY to be multiple component and the integration of macroscale and microscale level models. Also included in this report is a brief OSPREY user guide.

  10. A Testbed for Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, J. A.; Van der Tol, C.; Kornfeld, A.

    2014-12-01

    Carbon cycle and land-surface models used in global simulations need to be computationally efficient and have a high standard of software engineering. These models also make a number of scaling assumptions to simplify the representation of complex biochemical and structural properties of ecosystems. This makes it difficult to use these models to test new ideas for parameterizations or to evaluate scaling assumptions. The stripped down nature of these models also makes it difficult to "connect" with current disciplinary research which tends to be focused on much more nuanced topics than can be included in the models. In our opinion/experience this indicates the need for another type of model that can more faithfully represent the complexity ecosystems and which has the flexibility to change or interchange parameterizations and to run optimization codes for calibration. We have used the SCOPE (Soil Canopy Observation, Photochemistry and Energy fluxes) model in this way to develop, calibrate, and test parameterizations for solar induced chlorophyll fluorescence, OCS exchange and stomatal parameterizations at the canopy scale. Examples of the data sets and procedures used to develop and test new parameterizations are presented.

  11. Microstructure Hierarchical Model of Competitive e+-Ps Trapping in Nanostructurized Substances: from Nanoparticle-Uniform to Nanoparticle-Biased Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpotyuk, Oleh; Ingram, Adam; Bujňáková, Zdenka; Baláž, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Microstructure hierarchical model considering the free-volume elements at the level of interacting crystallites (non-spherical approximation) and the agglomerates of these crystallites (spherical approximation) was developed to describe free-volume evolution in mechanochemically milled As4S4/ZnS composites employing positron annihilation spectroscopy in a lifetime measuring mode. Positron lifetime spectra were reconstructed from unconstrained three-term decomposition procedure and further subjected to parameterization using x3-x2-coupling decomposition algorithm. Intrinsic inhomogeneities due to coarse-grained As4S4 and fine-grained ZnS nanoparticles were adequately described in terms of substitution trapping in positron and positronium (Ps) (bound positron-electron) states due to interfacial triple junctions between contacting particles and own free-volume defects in boundary compounds. Compositionally dependent nanostructurization in As4S4/ZnS nanocomposite system was imagined as conversion from o-Ps trapping sites to positron traps. The calculated trapping parameters that were shown could be useful to characterize adequately the nanospace filling in As4S4/ZnS composites.

  12. Modeling a material from packing, through sintering and to the final microstructural properties

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein

    and magnetism known as the magnetocaloric effect. We present a 3-dimensional time-dependent numerical model that spatially resolves samples down to the grain size, and includes the demagnetizing field, chemical inhomogeneity realized as a spatial variation of Curie temperature across the sample, local...... hysteresis and heat transfer. We can thus model how particle size, packing, sintering and chemical inhomogeneity affect the observed properties of magnetocaloric samples. For example, we show that even a modest distribution in Curie temperature (TC) across the sample results in a significant broadening...... and lowering of the total entropy change of the sample around TC. We discuss how clustering of grains with similar values of TC across the sample influences the results....

  13. Strain gradient crystal plasticity: A continuum mechanics approach to modeling micro-structural evolution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El-Naaman, Salim Abdallah; Nielsen, Kim Lau; Niordson, Christian Frithiof

    2015-01-01

    In agreement with dislocation theory, recent experiments show, both quantitatively and qualitatively, how geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs) distribute in dislocation wall and cell structures. Hence, GND density fields are highly localized with large gradients and discontinuities occurri....... A phenomenological back stress formulation is proposed, through which the effect of the GND gradient exponent can be studied. It is shown that this model can lead to more localized GND distributions.......In agreement with dislocation theory, recent experiments show, both quantitatively and qualitatively, how geometrically necessary dislocations (GNDs) distribute in dislocation wall and cell structures. Hence, GND density fields are highly localized with large gradients and discontinuities occurring...... between the cells. This behavior is not typical for strain gradient crystal plasticity models. The present study employs a higher order extension of conventional crystal plasticity theory in which the viscous slip rate is influenced by the gradients of GND densities through a back stress...

  14. Numerical model to predict microstructure of the heat treated of steel elements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Domański

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In work the presented numerical models of tool steel hardening processes take into account thermal phenomena and phase transformations. Numerical algorithm of thermal phenomena was based on the Finite Elements Methods of the heat transfer equations. In the model of phase transformations, in simulations heating process continuous heating (CHT was applied, whereas in cooling process continuous cooling (CCT of the steel at issue. The phase fraction transformed (austenite during heating and fractions during cooling of ferrite, pearlite or bainite are determined by Johnson-Mehl-Avrami formulas. The nescent fraction of martensite is determined by Koistinen and Marburger formula or modified Koistinen and Marburger formula. In the simulations of hardening was subject the fang lathe of cone (axisymmetrical object made of tool steel.

  15. Shielding Effectiveness of Non-Woven Carbon Fibre Sheets: Modelling the Microstructure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, J. F.; Flintoft, I. D.; Austin, A. N.; Marvin, A. C.

    2016-05-01

    This paper describes work undertaken to understand how the structure of a nonwoven carbon fibre material determines its shielding effectiveness, including the effects of fibre orientation, and contact resistance. In order to facilitate understanding of the material behaviour, software has been written to generate Monte Carlo Models (MCMs) of the material structure. The results of our MCMs are compared with measurements and some empirical expressions.

  16. Shielding effectiveness of non-woven carbon fibre sheets : modelling the microstructure

    OpenAIRE

    Dawson, J. F.; Flintoft, I. D.; Austin, A. N.; Marvin, A. C.

    2016-01-01

    This paper describes work undertaken to understand how the structure of a nonwoven carbon fibre material determines its shielding effectiveness, including the effects of fibre orientation, and contact resistance. In order to facilitate understanding of the material behaviour, software has been written to generate Monte Carlo Models (MCMs) of the material structure. The results of our MCMs are compared with measurements and some empirical expressions.

  17. Microstructure-based numerical modeling method for effective permittivity of ceramic/polymer composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jylhä, Liisi; Honkamo, Johanna; Jantunen, Heli; Sihvola, Ari

    2005-05-01

    Effective permittivity was modeled and measured for composites that consist of up to 35vol% of titanium dioxide powder dispersed in a continuous epoxy matrix. The study demonstrates a method that enables fast and accurate numerical modeling of the effective permittivity values of ceramic/polymer composites. The model requires electrostatic Monte Carlo simulations, where randomly oriented homogeneous prism-shaped inclusions occupy random positions in the background phase. The computation cost of solving the electrostatic problem by a finite-element code is decreased by the use of an averaging method where the same simulated sample is solved three times with orthogonal field directions. This helps to minimize the artificial anisotropy that results from the pseudorandomness inherent in the limited computational domains. All the required parameters for numerical simulations are calculated from the lattice structure of titanium dioxide. The results show a very good agreement between the measured and numerically calculated effective permittivities. When the prisms are approximated by oblate spheroids with the corresponding axial ratio, a fairly good prediction for the effective permittivity of the mixture can be achieved with the use of an advanced analytical mixing formula.

  18. Modeling of nano-reinforced polymer composites: Microstructure effect on Young’s modulus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, R.D.; Zhou, H.W.; Wang, H.W.

    2012-01-01

    ” algorithm was developed in the ABAQUS Scripting Interface. In the computational studies, it was observed that the elastic modulus increases with the increasing the aspect ratio of nanoparticles. The thickness and properties of effective interface layers and the shape and degree of particles clustering have...

  19. Motorola Secure Software Development Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francis Mahendran

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In today's world, the key to meeting the demand for improved security is to implement repeatable processes that reliably deliver measurably improved security. While many organizations have announced efforts to institutionalize a secure software development process, there is little or no industry acceptance for a common process improvement framework for secure software development. Motorola has taken the initiative to develop such a framework, and plans to share this with the Software Engineering Institute for possible inclusion into its Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI®. This paper will go into the details of how Motorola is addressing this issue. The model that is being developed is designed as an extension of the existing CMMI structure. The assumption is that the audience will have a basic understanding of the SEI CMM® / CMMI® process framework. The paper will not describe implementation details of a security process model or improvement framework, but will address WHAT security practices are required for a company with many organizations operating at different maturity levels. It is left to the implementing organization to answer the HOW, WHEN, WHO and WHERE aspects. The paper will discuss how the model is being implemented in the Motorola Software Group.

  20. Deformable human body model development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wray, W.O.; Aida, T.

    1998-11-01

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). A Deformable Human Body Model (DHBM) capable of simulating a wide variety of deformation interactions between man and his environment has been developed. The model was intended to have applications in automobile safety analysis, soldier survivability studies and assistive technology development for the disabled. To date, we have demonstrated the utility of the DHBM in automobile safety analysis and are currently engaged in discussions with the U.S. military involving two additional applications. More specifically, the DHBM has been incorporated into a Virtual Safety Lab (VSL) for automobile design under contract to General Motors Corporation. Furthermore, we have won $1.8M in funding from the U.S. Army Medical Research and Material Command for development of a noninvasive intracranial pressure measurement system. The proposed research makes use of the detailed head model that is a component of the DHBM; the project duration is three years. In addition, we have been contacted by the Air Force Armstrong Aerospace Medical Research Laboratory concerning possible use of the DHBM in analyzing the loads and injury potential to pilots upon ejection from military aircraft. Current discussions with Armstrong involve possible LANL participation in a comparison between DHBM and the Air Force Articulated Total Body (ATB) model that is the current military standard.

  1. Microstructural Modeling of Dynamic Intergranular and Transgranular Fracture Modes in Zircaloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohammed, I. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Zikry, M.A. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States); Ziaei, S. [North Carolina State Univ., Raleigh, NC (United States)

    2017-04-01

    In this time period, we have continued to focus on (i) refining the thermo-mechanical fracture model for zirconium (Zr) alloys subjected to large deformations and high temperatures that accounts for the cracking of ZrH and ZrH2 hydrides, (ii) formulating a framework to account intergranular fracture due to iodine diffusion and pit formation in grain-boundaries (GBs). Our future objectives are focused on extending to a combined population of ZrH and ZrH2 populations and understanding how thermo-mechanical behavior affects hydride reorientation and cracking. We will also refine the intergranular failure mechanisms for grain boundaries with pits.

  2. The development of microstructure during hydrogenation–disproportionation–desorption–recombination treatment of sintered neodymium-iron-boron-type magnets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheridan, R.S.; Harris, I.R.; Walton, A., E-mail: a.walton@bham.ac.uk

    2016-03-01

    The hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics of the hydrogenation disproportionation desorption and recombination (HDDR) process on scrap sintered neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) type magnets have been investigated. At each stage of the process, the microstructural changes have been studied using high resolution scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the disproportionation reaction initiates at grain boundaries and triple points and then propagates towards the centre of the matrix grains. This process was accelerated at particle surfaces and at free surfaces produced by any cracks in the powder particles. However, the recombination reaction appeared to initiate randomly throughout the particles with no apparent preference for particle surfaces or internal cracks. During the hydrogenation of the grain boundaries and triple junctions, the disproportionation reaction was, however, affected by the much higher oxygen content of the sintered NdFeB compared with that of the as-cast NdFeB alloys. Throughout the entire HDDR reaction the oxidised triple junctions (from the sintered structure) remained unreacted and hence, remained in their original form in the fine recombined microstructure. This resulted in a very significant reduction in the proportion of cavitation in the final microstructure and this could lend to improved consolidation in the recycled magnets. - Highlights: • Disproportionation reaction initiates at grain boundaries and triple points. • Disproportionation then propagates towards the centre of the matrix grains. • Disproportionation was affected by the high oxygen content of sintered NdFeB. • Oxidised triple points remain unreacted in original form in final HDDR structure. • Significant reduction in the proportion of cavitation in the final microstructure.

  3. The development of microstructure during hydrogenation–disproportionation–desorption–recombination treatment of sintered neodymium-iron-boron-type magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sheridan, R.S.; Harris, I.R.; Walton, A.

    2016-01-01

    The hydrogen absorption and desorption characteristics of the hydrogenation disproportionation desorption and recombination (HDDR) process on scrap sintered neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) type magnets have been investigated. At each stage of the process, the microstructural changes have been studied using high resolution scanning electron microscopy. It was found that the disproportionation reaction initiates at grain boundaries and triple points and then propagates towards the centre of the matrix grains. This process was accelerated at particle surfaces and at free surfaces produced by any cracks in the powder particles. However, the recombination reaction appeared to initiate randomly throughout the particles with no apparent preference for particle surfaces or internal cracks. During the hydrogenation of the grain boundaries and triple junctions, the disproportionation reaction was, however, affected by the much higher oxygen content of the sintered NdFeB compared with that of the as-cast NdFeB alloys. Throughout the entire HDDR reaction the oxidised triple junctions (from the sintered structure) remained unreacted and hence, remained in their original form in the fine recombined microstructure. This resulted in a very significant reduction in the proportion of cavitation in the final microstructure and this could lend to improved consolidation in the recycled magnets. - Highlights: • Disproportionation reaction initiates at grain boundaries and triple points. • Disproportionation then propagates towards the centre of the matrix grains. • Disproportionation was affected by the high oxygen content of sintered NdFeB. • Oxidised triple points remain unreacted in original form in final HDDR structure. • Significant reduction in the proportion of cavitation in the final microstructure.

  4. Development of heat treated Zr-2.5 Wt% Nb pressure tube and its microstructural characterization using electron microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saibaba, N.

    2010-01-01

    Two phase Zr-2.5 wt % Nb alloy is widely used for manufacture of pressure tubes for pressurized heavy water reactors (PHWRs). These tubes are used in cold worked and stress relieved (CWSRs) condition and are manufactured by cold drawing or pilgering routes. The microstructure of the CWSR tube is characterized with presence of discontinuous β phase stringers sandwiched between elongated α-phase. Pressure tube undergoes dimensional changes and micro structural deterioration under the reactor operating conditions of temperature, pressure and neutron flux. This limits the life of the component and the availability of the power reactors. There is renewed interest in increasing the life of the pressure tube by bringing about a change in the microstructure of Zr-2.5 Nb material using various thermo mechanical processes during its manufacturing. Heat treatment of this two-phase alloy has been understood to uniquely stabilize the microstructure, which prevents degradation, under in-reactor service condition. This paper illustrates various heat treatment cycles carried out at intermediate cold working stage. Heat treatment involves solutionization of the Zr-2.5 wt % Nb tube from different temperatures followed by two types of quenching process viz, gas quenching and water quenching. The OIM-TEM studies were carried out for characterization of final tube. The technique confirmed the presence of β-phase relatively enriched in Nb content. The resulting SEM microstructures after ageing treatment at different soaking temperatures and time have been presented. Mechanical properties of heat treated pressure tubes, both at room temperature and elevated temperature have been compared with conventional CWSR pressure tube used in PHWRs. (author)

  5. A fiber-progressive-engagement model to evaluate the composition, microstructure, and nonlinear pseudoelastic behavior of porcine arteries and decellularized derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chih-Hsun; Kao, Yun-Chu; Lin, Yu-Heng; Ma, Hsu; Tsay, Ruey-Yug

    2016-12-01

    seeding and animal study. A comprehensive understanding of the composition, microstructure, and mechanical behavior of the arterial wall is the key to the development of decellularized vascular grafts. For this purpose, we proposed this "Fiber-Progressive-Engagement" model to evaluate the microstructure, composition and mechanical properties of porcine coronary artery. The model provides a new perspective regarding the non-linear behavior of arterial tissue and its decellularized derivatives. It can be widely applied to different types of tissues, as demonstrated in the aorta and coronary artery. This model has several advantages; it provides an improved fit of non-linear curves (R 2 >0.99), can be used to elucidate the pseudoelastic properties of porcine vascular tissues using the concept of fiber engagement, and can estimate an elastic modulus with greater accuracy (compared to the graphical estimation or calculation by simple linear fittings), as well as to plot typical stress-strain curves. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Computer vision in microstructural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Malur N.; Massarweh, W.; Hough, C. L.

    1992-01-01

    The following is a laboratory experiment designed to be performed by advanced-high school and beginning-college students. It is hoped that this experiment will create an interest in and further understanding of materials science. The objective of this experiment is to demonstrate that the microstructure of engineered materials is affected by the processing conditions in manufacture, and that it is possible to characterize the microstructure using image analysis with a computer. The principle of computer vision will first be introduced followed by the description of the system developed at Texas A&M University. This in turn will be followed by the description of the experiment to obtain differences in microstructure and the characterization of the microstructure using computer vision.

  7. Development of ultrafine-grained microstructure in Al-Cu-Mg alloy through equal-channel angular pressing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sai Anuhya, Danam; Gupta, Ashutosh; Nayan, Niraj; Narayana Murty, S. V. S.; Manna, R.; Sastry, G. V. S.

    2014-08-01

    Al-Cu-Mg alloys are extensively used for riveting applications in aerospace industries due to their relatively high shear strength coupled with high plasticity. The significant advantage of using V65 aluminum alloy ((Al-4Cu-0.2Mg) for rivet application also stems from its significantly slower natural aging kinetics, which gives operational flexibility to carryout riveting operation even after 4 days of solution heat treatment, in contrast to its equivalent alloy AA2024.Rivets are usually made by cold heading of wire rods. In order to form a defect free rivet head, grain size control in wire rods is essential at each and every stage of processing right from casting onwards upto the final wire drawing stage. Wire drawing is carried out at room temperature to reduce diameter as well as impart good surface finish. In the present study, different microstructures in V65 alloy bars were produced by rolling at different temperatures (room temperature to 523K) and subsequently deformed by equal channel angular pressing (ECAP) at 423K upto an equivalent strain of 7. ECAP was carried out to study the effect of initial microstructure on grain refinement and degree of deformation on the evolution of ultrafine grain structure. The refinement of V65 alloy by ECAP is significantly influenced by Initial microstructure but amount of deformation strongly affects the evolution processes as revealed by optical microscopy and transmission electron microscopy.

  8. Development of microstructure and irradiation hardening of Zircaloy during low dose neutron irradiation at nominally 358 °C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cockeram, B. V.; Smith, R. W.; Leonard, K. J.; Byun, T. S.; Snead, L. L.

    2011-11-01

    Wrought Zircaloy-2 and Zircaloy-4 were neutron irradiated at nominally 358 °C in the high flux isotope reactor (HFIR) at relatively low neutron fluences between 5.8 × 10 22 and 2.9 × 10 25 n/m 2 ( E > 1 MeV). The irradiation hardening and change in microstructure were characterized following irradiation using tensile testing and examinations of microstructure using Analytical Electron Microscopy (AEM). Small increments of dose (0.0058, 0.11, 0.55, 1.08, and 2.93 × 10 25 n/m 2) were used in the range where the saturation of irradiation hardening is typically observed so that the role of microstructure evolution and loop formation on irradiation hardening could be correlated. An incubation dose between 5.8 × 10 23 and 1.1 × 10 24 n/m 2 was needed for loop nucleation to occur that resulted in irradiation hardening. Increases in yield strength were consistent with previous results in this temperature regime, and as expected less irradiation hardening and lower loop number density values than those generally reported in literature for irradiations at 260-326 °C were observed. Unlike previous lower temperature data, there is evidence in this study that the irradiation hardening can decrease with dose over certain ranges of fluence. Irradiation induced voids were observed in very low numbers in the Zircaloy-2 materials at the highest fluence.

  9. Flexible fabrication of biomimetic compound eye array via two-step thermal reflow of simply pre-modeled hierarchic microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Shengzhou; Li, Mujun; Shen, Lianguan; Qiu, Jinfeng; Zhou, Youquan

    2017-06-01

    A flexible fabrication method for the biomimetic compound eye (BCE) array is proposed. In this method, a triple-layer sandwich-like coating configuration was introduced, and the required hierarchic microstructures are formed with a simple single-scan exposure in maskless digital lithography. Taking advantage of the difference of glass transition point (Tg) between photoresists of each layer, the pre-formed hierarchic microstructures are in turn reflowed to the curved substrate and the BCE ommatidia in a two-step thermal reflow process. To avoid affecting the spherical substrate formed in the first thermal reflow, a non-contact strategy was proposed in the second reflow process. The measurement results were in good agreement with the designed BCE profiles. Results also showed that the fabricated BCE had good performances in optical test. The presented method is flexible, convenient, low-cost and can easily adapt to the fabrications of other optical elements with hierarchic microstructures.

  10. Microstructure synthesis control of biological polyhydroxyalkanoates with mass spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pederson, Erik Norman

    Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA's) are a class of biologically produced polymers, or plastic, that is synthesized by various microorganisms. PHA's are made from biorenewable resources and are fully biodegradable and biocompatible, making them an environmentally friendly green polymer. A method of incorporating polymer microstructure into the PHA synthesized in Ralstonia eutropha was developed. These microstructures were synthesized with polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) and poly(hydroxybutyrate-co-hydroxyvalerate) (PHBV) as the polymer domains. To synthesize the PHB V copolymer, the additional presence of valerate was required. To control valerate substrate additions to the bioreactor, an off-gas mass spectrometry (MS) feedback control system was developed. Important process information including the cell physiology, growth kinetics, and product formation kinetics in the bioreactor was obtained with MS and used to control microstructure synthesis. The two polymer microstructures synthesized were core-shell granules and block copolymers. Block copolymers control the structure of the individual polymer chains while core-shell granules control the organization of many polymer chains. Both these microstructures result in properties unattainable by blending the two polymers together. The core-shell structures were synthesized with controlled domain thickness based on a developed model. Different block copolymers compositions were synthesized by varying the switching time of the substrate pulses responsible for block copolymer synthesis. The block copolymers were tested to determine their chemical properties and cast into films to determine the materials properties. These block copolymer films possessed new properties not achieved by copolymers or blends of the two polymers.

  11. Synchronous changes of cortical thickness and corresponding white matter microstructure during brain development accessed by diffusion MRI tractography from parcellated cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina eJeon

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Cortical thickness (CT changes during normal brain development is associated with complicated cellular and molecular processes including synaptic pruning and apoptosis. In parallel, the microstructural enhancement of developmental white matter (WM axons with their neuronal bodies in the cerebral cortex has been widely reported with measurements of metrics derived from diffusion tensor imaging (DTI, especially fractional anisotropy (FA. We hypothesized that the changes of CT and microstructural enhancement of corresponding axons are highly interacted during development. DTI and T1-weighted images of 50 healthy children and adolescents between the ages of 7 to 25 years were acquired. With the parcellated cortical gyri transformed from T1-weighted images to DTI space as the tractography seeds, probabilistic tracking was performed to delineate the WM fibers traced from specific parcellated cortical regions. CT was measured at certain cortical regions and FA was measured from the WM fibers traced from same cortical regions. The CT of all frontal cortical gyri, includeing Brodmann areas 4, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11, 44, 45, 46 and 47, decreased significantly and heterogeneously; concurrently, significant and heterogeneous increases of FA of WM traced from corresponding regions were found. We further revealed significant correlation between the slopes of the CT decrease and the slopes of corresponding WM FA increase in all frontal cortical gyri, suggesting coherent cortical pruning and corresponding WM microstructural enhancement. Such correlation was not found in cortical regions other than frontal cortex. The molecular and cellular mechanisms of these synchronous changes may be associated with overlapping signaling pathways of axonal guidance, synaptic pruning, neuronal apoptosis and more prevalent interstitial neurons in the prefrontal cortex. Revealing the coherence of cortical and WM structural changes during development may open a new window for

  12. Microstructural Characterization of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS-Fe-Cr Model Alloy s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Castro, V.; Jenkins, M.L. [Oxford Univ., Dept. of Materials (United Kingdom); Leguey, T.; Mufioz, A.; Pareja, R.; Monge, M.A. [Madrid Univ. Carlos 3, Dept. de Fisica (Spain)

    2007-07-01

    Full text of publication follows: Reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steels with Cr contents ranging between 9-12 wt% are promising candidates for use as structural materials in future fusion reactors. They are likely to be superior to austenitic steels because of their better thermal properties and higher swelling resistance. A major concern of these materials is their maximum service temperature, as this determines the overall efficiency of the reactor. It has been demonstrated that one way to increase this temperature is to homogeneously disperse hard nano-sized oxide particles, such as Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}, into the steel matrix. Oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steels produced by mechanical milling and hot isostatic pressing (HIP ) are considered as potential structural materials for fusion reactors. In Europe, efforts have been focused on the ODS-RAFM-9CrW steel EUROFER. These ODS steels show good tensile and creep properties, acceptable ductility, but poor impact properties. Microstructural characterization of real steels, especially of the structures of oxide/steel matrix interfaces which play an important role in the performance of the material, is a difficult task. In the present work we have fabricated and characterised a simpler model ODS system based on a Fe-Cr binary alloy, in the belief that this will help us better to understand complex ODS-RAFM steels. Two Fe-12wt% Cr batches, one containing 0.3 wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the other Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} free have been produced by milling plus compaction by HIP. These materials are being characterized by X-ray diffraction, electron microscopy and atom probe field ion microscopy. Results will be compared with those obtained for ODS-EUROFER produced under the same conditions. (authors)

  13. Mechanisms of microstructural changes of fuel under irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, P.; Carlot, G.; Dorado, B.; Maillard, S.; Sabathier, C.; Martin, G.; Oh, J.Y.; Welland, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear fuels are subjected to high levels of radiation damage mainly due to the slowing of fission fragments, which results in substantial modifications of the initial fuel microstructure. Microstructure changes alter practically all engineering fuel properties such as atomic transport or thermomechanical properties so understanding these changes is essential to predicting the performance of fuel elements. Also, with increasing burn-up, the fuel drifts away from its initial composition as the fission process produces new chemical elements. Because nuclear fuels operate at high temperature and usually under high-temperature gradients, damage annealing, foreign atom or defect clustering and migration occur on multiple time and length scales, which make long-term predictions difficult. The end result is a fuel microstructure which may show extensive differences on the scale of a single fuel pellet. The main challenge we are faced with is, therefore, to identify the phenomena occurring on the atom scale that are liable to have macroscopic effects that will determine the microstructure changes and ultimately the life-span of a fuel element. One step towards meeting this challenge is to develop and apply experimental or modelling methods capable of connecting events that occur over very short length and timescales to changes in the fuel microstructure over engineering length and timescales. In the first part of this chapter, we provide an overview of some of the more important microstructure modifications observed in nuclear fuels. The emphasis is placed on oxide fuels because of the extensive amount of data available in relation to these materials under neutron or ion irradiation. When possible and relevant, the specifics of other types of fuels such as metallic or carbide fuels are alluded to. Throughout this chapter but more specifically in the latter part, we attempt to give examples of how modelling and experimentation at various scales can provide us with

  14. Impact of food model (micro)structure on the microbial inactivation efficacy of cold atmospheric plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smet, C; Noriega, E; Rosier, F; Walsh, J L; Valdramidis, V P; Van Impe, J F

    2017-01-02

    The large potential of cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) for food decontamination has recently been recognized. Room-temperature gas plasmas can decontaminate foods without causing undesired changes. This innovative technology is a promising alternative for treating fresh produce. However, more fundamental studies are needed before its application in the food industry. The impact of the food structure on CAP decontamination efficacy of Salmonella Typhimurium and Listeria monocytogenes was studied. Cells were grown planktonically or as surface colonies in/on model systems. Both microorganisms were grown in lab culture media in petri dishes at 20°C until cells reached the stationary phase. Before CAP treatment, cells were deposited in a liquid carrier, on a solid(like) surface or on a filter. A dielectric barrier discharge reactor generated helium-oxygen plasma, which was used to treat samples up to 10min. Although L. monocytogenes is more resistant to CAP treatment, similar trends in inactivation behavior as for S. Typhimurium are observed, with log reductions in the range [1.0-2.9] for S. Typhimurium and [0.2-2.2] for L. monocytogenes. For both microorganisms, cells grown planktonically are easily inactivated, as compared to surface colonies. More stressing growth conditions, due to cell immobilization, result in more resistant cells during CAP treatment. The main difference between the inactivation support systems is the absence or presence of a shoulder phase. For experiments in the liquid carrier, which exhibit a long shoulder, the plasma components need to diffuse and penetrate through the medium. This explains the higher efficacies of CAP treatment on cells deposited on a solid(like) surface or on a filter. This research demonstrates that the food structure influences the cell inactivation behavior and efficacy of CAP, and indicates that food intrinsic factors need to be accounted when designing plasma treatment. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Space market model development project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Peter C.

    1987-01-01

    The objectives of the research program, Space Market Model Development Project, (Phase 1) were: (1) to study the need for business information in the commercial development of space; and (2) to propose a design for an information system to meet the identified needs. Three simultaneous research strategies were used in proceeding toward this goal: (1) to describe the space business information which currently exists; (2) to survey government and business representatives on the information they would like to have; and (3) to investigate the feasibility of generating new economical information about the space industry.

  16. Supo Thermal Model Development II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wass, Alexander Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-14

    This report describes the continuation of the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) model of the Supo cooling system described in the report, Supo Thermal Model Development1, by Cynthia Buechler. The goal for this report is to estimate the natural convection heat transfer coefficient (HTC) of the system using the CFD results and to compare those results to remaining past operational data. Also, the correlation for determining radiolytic gas bubble size is reevaluated using the larger simulation sample size. The background, solution vessel geometry, mesh, material properties, and boundary conditions are developed in the same manner as the previous report. Although, the material properties and boundary conditions are determined using the appropriate experiment results for each individual power level.

  17. Development of the physical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Zunqi; Morsy, Samir

    2001-01-01

    Full text: The Physical Model was developed during Program 93+2 as a technical tool to aid enhanced information analysis and now is an integrated part of the Department's on-going State evaluation process. This paper will describe the concept of the Physical Model, including its objectives, overall structure and the development of indicators with designated strengths, followed by a brief description of using the Physical Model in implementing the enhanced information analysis. The work plan for expansion and update of the Physical Model is also presented at the end of the paper. The development of the Physical Model is an attempt to identify, describe and characterize every known process for carrying out each step necessary for the acquisition of weapons-usable material, i.e., all plausible acquisition paths for highly enriched uranium (HEU) and separated plutonium (Pu). The overall structure of the Physical Model has a multilevel arrangement. It includes at the top level all the main steps (technologies) that may be involved in the nuclear fuel cycle from the source material production up to the acquisition of weapons-usable material, and then beyond the civilian fuel cycle to the development of nuclear explosive devices (weaponization). Each step is logically interconnected with the preceding and/or succeeding steps by nuclear material flows. It contains at its lower levels every known process that is associated with the fuel cycle activities presented at the top level. For example, uranium enrichment is broken down into three branches at the second level, i.e., enrichment of UF 6 , UCl 4 and U-metal respectively; and then further broken down at the third level into nine processes: gaseous diffusion, gas centrifuge, aerodynamic, electromagnetic, molecular laser (MLIS), atomic vapor laser (AVLIS), chemical exchange, ion exchange and plasma. Narratives are presented at each level, beginning with a general process description then proceeding with detailed

  18. Developing a Malaysia flood model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haseldine, Lucy; Baxter, Stephen; Wheeler, Phil; Thomson, Tina

    2014-05-01

    Faced with growing exposures in Malaysia, insurers have a need for models to help them assess their exposure to flood losses. The need for an improved management of flood risks has been further highlighted by the 2011 floods in Thailand and recent events in Malaysia. The increasing demand for loss accumulation tools in Malaysia has lead to the development of the first nationwide probabilistic Malaysia flood model, which we present here. The model is multi-peril, including river flooding for thousands of kilometres of river and rainfall-driven surface water flooding in major cities, which may cause losses equivalent to river flood in some high-density urban areas. The underlying hazard maps are based on a 30m digital surface model (DSM) and 1D/2D hydraulic modelling in JFlow and RFlow. Key mitigation schemes such as the SMART tunnel and drainage capacities are also considered in the model. The probabilistic element of the model is driven by a stochastic event set based on rainfall data, hence enabling per-event and annual figures to be calculated for a specific insurance portfolio and a range of return periods. Losses are estimated via depth-damage vulnerability functions which link the insured damage to water depths for different property types in Malaysia. The model provides a unique insight into Malaysian flood risk profiles and provides insurers with return period estimates of flood damage and loss to property portfolios through loss exceedance curve outputs. It has been successfully validated against historic flood events in Malaysia and is now being successfully used by insurance companies in the Malaysian market to obtain reinsurance cover.

  19. Representation of microstructural features and magnetic anisotropy of electrical steels in an energy-based vector hysteresis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacques, Kevin; Steentjes, Simon; Henrotte, François; Geuzaine, Christophe; Hameyer, Kay

    2018-04-01

    This paper demonstrates how the statistical distribution of pinning fields in a ferromagnetic material can be identified systematically from standard magnetic measurements, Epstein frame or Single Sheet Tester (SST). The correlation between the pinning field distribution and microstructural parameters of the material is then analyzed.

  20. Modelling of long term kinetic evolution: a fruitful relationship between experiment and theoretical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbu, A.

    2008-01-01

    Recent developments in multi-scale modelling, based on atomic scale calculations, are leading to a growing conviction that modelling will soon be used to design material components for nuclear reactors. In this article we discuss this assumption on the basis of the relationship between experimental studies and theoretical calculations of the microstructural evolution of materials under irradiation. In the first part of the paper, the available numerical models for long term microstructural evolutions are briefly reviewed. The experimental methods are presented in a second part. In the third part, several examples of fruitful relationships between modelling and experiments are discussed. The first example deals with the isochronal electrical resistivity recovery of electron irradiated ultra pure iron at 14 K, the second one is dedicated to the microstructural evolution of ferritic model alloy during continuous irradiation with 1 MeV electrons at large fluences, the third one is the modelling of He desorption of helium implanted iron, and the fourth example concerns the mechanisms of formation of solute rich clusters observed by 3-dimensional atom probe in irradiated pressure vessel steels of water pressurized nuclear reactors

  1. Investigation of the influence of the chemical composition of HSLA steel grades on the microstructure homogeneity during hot rolling in continuous rolling mills using a fast layer model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtchen, M.; Rimnac, A.; Warczok, P.; Kozeschnik, E.; Bernhard, C.; Bragin, S.; Kawalla, R.; Linzer, B.

    2016-03-01

    The newly developed LaySiMS simulation tool provides new insight for inhomogeneous material flow and microstructure evolution in an endless strip production (ESP) plant. A deepened understanding of the influence of inhomogeneities in initial material state, temperature profile and material flow and their impact on the finished product can be reached e.g. by allowing for variable layer thickness distributions in the roll gap. Coupling temperature, deformation work and work hardening/recrystallization phenomena accounts for covering important effects in the roll gap. The underlying concept of the LaySiMS approach will be outlined and new insight gained regarding microstructural evolution, shear and inhomogeneous stress and strain states in the roll gap as well as local residual stresses will be presented. For the case of thin slab casting and direct rolling (TSDR) the interrelation of inhomogeneous initial state, micro structure evolution and dissolution state of micro alloying elements within the roughing section of an ESP line will be discussed. Special emphasis is put on the influence of the local chemical composition arising from direct charging on throughthickness homogeneity of the final product. It is concluded that, due to the specific combination of large reductions in the high reduction mills (HRM) and the highly inhomogeneous inverse temperature profile, the ESP-concept provides great opportunities for homogenizing the microstructure across the strip thickness.

  2. Insights into the annealing process of sol-gel TiO2 films leading to anatase development: The interrelationship between microstructure and optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco, E.; Domínguez, M.; González-Leal, J. M.; Márquez, E.; Outón, J.; Ramírez-del-Solar, M.

    2018-05-01

    The microstructure and optical properties of TiO2 thin films, prepared by the sol-gel dip coating technique on glass substrates, were inspected. After deposition, the films were annealed at several temperatures in the 400-850 °C range and the resulting nanostructured films were studied by different techniques showing that their structural and optical characteristics evolved significantly with the increased annealing temperature. The analysis of these results by the assumption of the Tauc Lorenz model and the use of Wemple-DiDomenico equation leads to a correlation between microstructural aspects and optical characteristics of the films. Thus, crystallization processes (nucleation, growth and phase transformation) and the evolution of films texture and thickness with increasing annealing temperatures are related with the variation of the refractive index, average gap and extinction coefficient during annealing. Finally, the free-carrier concentration in the films, estimated from the Spitzer-Fan model, ranged from 1.44 × 1019 cm-3 to 3.07 × 1019 cm-3 with the changing annealing temperature, which is in agreement with those obtained in similar anatase thin films from electrical measurement techniques.

  3. Recent development of hydrodynamic modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Tetsufumi

    2014-09-01

    In this talk, I give an overview of recent development in hydrodynamic modeling of high-energy nuclear collisions. First, I briefly discuss about current situation of hydrodynamic modeling by showing results from the integrated dynamical approach in which Monte-Carlo calculation of initial conditions, quark-gluon fluid dynamics and hadronic cascading are combined. In particular, I focus on rescattering effects of strange hadrons on final observables. Next I highlight three topics in recent development in hydrodynamic modeling. These include (1) medium response to jet propagation in di-jet asymmetric events, (2) causal hydrodynamic fluctuation and its application to Bjorken expansion and (3) chiral magnetic wave from anomalous hydrodynamic simulations. (1) Recent CMS data suggest the existence of QGP response to propagation of jets. To investigate this phenomenon, we solve hydrodynamic equations with source term which exhibits deposition of energy and momentum from jets. We find a large number of low momentum particles are emitted at large angle from jet axis. This gives a novel interpretation of the CMS data. (2) It has been claimed that a matter created even in p-p/p-A collisions may behave like a fluid. However, fluctuation effects would be important in such a small system. We formulate relativistic fluctuating hydrodynamics and apply it to Bjorken expansion. We found the final multiplicity fluctuates around the mean value even if initial condition is fixed. This effect is relatively important in peripheral A-A collisions and p-p/p-A collisions. (3) Anomalous transport of the quark-gluon fluid is predicted when extremely high magnetic field is applied. We investigate this possibility by solving anomalous hydrodynamic equations. We found the difference of the elliptic flow parameter between positive and negative particles appears due to the chiral magnetic wave. Finally, I provide some personal perspective of hydrodynamic modeling of high energy nuclear collisions

  4. Development Model for Research Infrastructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wächter, Joachim; Hammitzsch, Martin; Kerschke, Dorit; Lauterjung, Jörn

    2015-04-01

    . The maturity of individual scientific domains differs considerably. • Technologically and organisationally many different RI components have to be integrated. Individual systems are often complex and have a long-term history. Existing approaches are on different maturity levels, e.g. in relation to the standardisation of interfaces. • The concrete implementation process consists of independent and often parallel development activities. In many cases no detailed architectural blue-print for the envisioned system exists. • Most of the funding currently available for RI implementation is provided on a project basis. To increase the synergies in infrastructure development the authors propose a specific RI Maturity Model (RIMM) that is specifically qualified for open system-of-system environments. RIMM is based on the concepts of Capability Maturity Models for organisational development, concretely the Levels of Conceptual Interoperability Model (LCIM) specifying the technical, syntactical, semantic, pragmatic, dynamic, and conceptual layers of interoperation [1]. The model is complemented by the identification and integration of growth factors (according to the Nolan Stages Theory [2]). These factors include supply and demand factors. Supply factors comprise available resources, e.g., data, services and IT-management capabilities including organisations and IT-personal. Demand factors are the overall application portfolio for RIs but also the skills and requirements of scientists and communities using the infrastructure. RIMM thus enables a balanced development process of RI and RI components by evaluating the status of the supply and demand factors in relation to specific levels of interoperability. [1] Tolk, A., Diallo, A., Turnitsa, C. (2007): Applying the Levels of Conceptual Interoperability Model in Support of Integratability, Interoperability, and Composability for System-of-Systems Engineering. Systemics, Cybernetics and Informatics, Volume 5 - Number 5. [2

  5. Microstructural and mechanical development and characterization of glass ionomer cements; Desenvolvimento e caracterizacao microestrutural e mecanica de cimentos de ionomero de vidro

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freire, W.P.; Barbosa, R.C.; Castanha, E.M.M.; Barbosa, E. F.; Fook, M.V.L., E-mail: waldeniafreire@hotmail.com [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UFCG), PB (Brazil). Departamento de Ciencias e Engenharia de Materiais

    2013-07-01

    Glass Ionomer Cements (GICs) are widely used in dentistry, indicated as a restorative material, cement for orthopedic and dental prostheses. However, there is need for development of new bone cements as alternative or replacement to current polymethylmethacrylate cements. Thus the aim of this research was develop of an experimental GIC and the mechanical and microstructural characterization of this composite; as a control group it was used a commercial GIC called Vidrion R (SS WHITE). These composites were characterized by X-ray diffraction, Infrared Spectroscopy Fourier Transform and Scanning Electron Microscopy. The mechanical properties of the composites were measured by Vickers microhardness testing, flexural strength and compression. These cements were characterized as a semicrystalline; in FTIR spectra observed characteristic bands of these materials and microstructural studies of experimental GIC revealed that there was no proper interaction of the inorganic particles in the polymer matrix, whereas in the control group this interaction was effective resulting in greater homogeneity among its constituent phases. Experimental cement showed a higher value of microhardness in the control group, however, flexural strength of cement experimental cement was lower than the control group, and this behavior can possibly be attributed to inadequate interaction particle / matrix. In tests of compressive strength, experimental GIC showed resistance similar to that shown for control group after variation in the processing conditions of the material. (author)

  6. Brain microstructural development at near-term age in very-low-birth-weight preterm infants: an atlas-based diffusion imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Jessica; Vassar, Rachel; Cahill-Rowley, Katelyn; Guzman, Ximena Stecher; Stevenson, David K; Barnea-Goraly, Naama

    2014-02-01

    At near-term age the brain undergoes rapid growth and development. Abnormalities identified during this period have been recognized as potential predictors of neurodevelopment in children born preterm. This study used diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to examine white matter (WM) microstructure in very-low-birth-weight (VLBW) preterm infants to better understand regional WM developmental trajectories at near-term age. DTI scans were analyzed in a cross-sectional sample of 45 VLBW preterm infants (BW≤1500g, GA≤32weeks) within a cohort of 102 neonates admitted to the NICU and recruited to participate prior to standard-of-care MRI, from 2010 to 2011, 66/102 also had DTI. For inclusion in this analysis, 45 infants had DTI, no evidence of brain abnormality on MRI, and were scanned at PMA ≤40weeks (34.7-38.6). White matter microstructure was analyzed in 19 subcortical regions defined by DiffeoMap neonatal brain atlas, using threshold values of trace 0.15. Regional fractional anisotropy (FA), mean diffusivity (MD), axial diffusivity (AD), and radial diffusivity (RD) were calculated and temporal-spatial trajectories of development were examined in relation to PMA and brain region location. Posterior regions within the corona radiata (CR), corpus callosum (CC), and internal capsule (IC) demonstrated significantly higher mean FA values compared to anterior regions. Posterior regions of the CR and IC demonstrated significantly lower RD values compared to anterior regions. Centrally located projection fibers demonstrated higher mean FA and lower RD values than peripheral regions including the posterior limb of the internal capsule (PLIC), cerebral peduncle, retrolenticular part of the IC, posterior thalamic radiation, and sagittal stratum. Centrally located association fibers of the external capsule had higher FA and lower RD than the more peripherally-located superior longitudinal fasciculus (SLF). A significant relationship between PMA-at-scan and FA, MD, and RD was

  7. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) based microstructural prediction model for 22MnB5 boron steel during tailored hot stamping

    OpenAIRE

    Chokshi, Prasun; Dashwood, R. J.; Hughes, Darren J.

    2017-01-01

    Because of demand for lower emissions and better crashworthiness, the use of hot stamped 22MnB5 boron steel has greatly increased in manufacturing of automobile components. However, for many applications it is required that only certain regions in hot stamped parts are fully hardened whereas other regions need be more ductile. The innovative process of tailored hot stamping does this by controlling the localized microstructures through tailored cooling rates by dividing the tooling into heate...

  8. VLSI electronics microstructure science

    CERN Document Server

    1982-01-01

    VLSI Electronics: Microstructure Science, Volume 4 reviews trends for the future of very large scale integration (VLSI) electronics and the scientific base that supports its development.This book discusses the silicon-on-insulator for VLSI and VHSIC, X-ray lithography, and transient response of electron transport in GaAs using the Monte Carlo method. The technology and manufacturing of high-density magnetic-bubble memories, metallic superlattices, challenge of education for VLSI, and impact of VLSI on medical signal processing are also elaborated. This text likewise covers the impact of VLSI t

  9. Residual strains and microstructure development in single and sequential double sided friction stir welds in RQT-701 steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnes, S.J.; Steuwer, A.; Mahawish, S.; Johnson, R.; Withers, P.J.

    2008-01-01

    Single and double sided partial penetration friction stir butt welds, in a rolled, quenched and tempered steel (RQT-701), were produced at The Welding Institute (TWI) under controlled process conditions. The residual strain distributions in the longitudinal and transverse directions have been measured using energy dispersive synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The measured strains were indicative of longitudinal tensile residual stresses at levels greater than the 0.2% yield stress of the parent metal in both the single and double pass welds. In both cases, the maximum tensile strain was found in the parent metal at the boundary of the heat affected zone (HAZ). Microstructural analysis of the welds was carried out using optical microscopy and hardness variations were also mapped across the weld-plate cross-section. The maximum hardness was observed in the mixed bainite/martensite structure of the weld nugget on the advancing side of the stir zone. The minimum hardness was observed in the HAZ

  10. Swelling and microstructural development in path A PCA and type 316 stainless steel irradiated in HFIR to about 22 dpa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maziasz, P.J.; Braski, D.N.

    1983-01-01

    Irradiation of several microstructural variants of PCA and 20%-cold-worked N-lot type 316 stainess steel (CW 316) in HFIR to about 10 dpa produced no visible cavities at 300 0 C, bubbles at 400 0 C, and varying distributions of bubbles and voids at 500 and 600 0 C. The PCA-B1 swells the most and CW 316 (N-lot) the least at 600 0 C. Irradiations have been extended to about 22 dpa. The PCA-Al swells 0.06%/dpa at 600 0 C but at a much lower rate at 500 0 C. The PCA-A3 shows the lowest swelling at 600 0 C, about the half the swelling rate of type 316 stainless steel

  11. Effect of Q&P parameters on microstructure development and mechanical behaviour of Q&P steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De Diego-Calderón, Irene

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Steel with a nominal composition of 0.25C–1.5Si–3Mn–0.023Al (mass % was subjected to Quenching and Partitioning (Q&P with varying parameters (quenching temperature, partitioning temperature and partitioning time resulting in formation of multi-phase microstructure, which was thoroughly studied using X-ray (XRD and Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD. Mechanical properties of the Q&P steel were measured by tensile tests. Plastic deformation of Q&P steel at micro-scale was investigated by in situ tensile testing and digital image correlation analysis. The effect of Q&P parameters on the microstructure (phase composition, size and volume fraction of micro constituents, texture and carbon content in retained austenite is discussed. After analyzing the mechanical properties, plastic deformation at the micro-scale and the microstructure, it is shown that the strain partitioning between phases strongly depends on the microstructure of the Q&P steel, which, in turn, can be tuned via manipulation with Q&P parameters.Con el objetivo de evaluar el efecto de los parámetros de procesado en un acero con una composición nominal de 0,25C–1,5Si–3Mn–0,023Al (% masa, éste ha sido sometido a un tratamiento térmico denominado “Quenching and Partitioning” (Q&P, en el que se han variado la temperatura de “quenching”, la temperatura de “partitioning” y el tiempo de “partitioning”. Como resultado se ha obtenido una microestructura multifásica, la cual ha sido analizada en detalle utilizando difracción de rayos-X (XRD y de electrones retrodispersados (EBSD. Asimismo, se han medido las propiedades mecánicas de los aceros Q&P mediante ensayos de tracción. La deformación plástica de los aceros Q&P a nivel micrométrico ha sido estudiada mediante ensayos “in situ” en el microscopio electrónico de barrido y la posterior aplicación de la técnica de correlación digital de imágenes. Se ha determinado el efecto de los par

  12. Microstructural-Scale Model for Surfaces Spreading of Intergranular Corrosion in Sensitized Stainless Steels and Aluminum-Magnesium (AA5XXX) Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Swati

    Components from AA5XXX (Al-Mg alloys with more than 3 wt% Mg) alloys are X attractive due to availability of low cost, high strength to weight ratio and good weldability. Therefore, these alloys have potential applications in Naval ships. However, these alloys become susceptible to IGC (intergranular corrosion) due to beta-phase precipitation due to improper heat treatment or inadvertent thermal exposure. Stainless steels may also become susceptible due to carbide precipitation and chromium depletion on grain boundaries. IGC susceptibility depends on the interplay between the metallurgical conditions, electrochemical conditions, and chemical conditions. Specific combinations cause IGC while others do not. The objective of this study is to investigate the conditions which bring about surface spreading of IGC in these alloy classes. To accomplish this goal, a microstructure scale model was developed with experimental inputs to understand the 2-D IGC spreading in stainless steels and AA5XXX alloys. The conditions strongly affecting IGC spreading were elucidated. Upon natural and artificial aging, the stainless steels become susceptible to intergranular corrosion because of chromium depletion in the grain boundaries. After aging Al-Mg (AA5XXX) alloys show susceptibility due to the precipitation of the beta-phase (Al3Mg7) in the grain boundaries. Chromium depleted grain boundaries in stainless steels are anodically more active as compared to the interior of the grains. (3-phase rich grain boundaries have lower OCP (open circuit potential) and pitting potentials as compared to the Al-Mg solid solutions. A new approach to modeling the IGC surface spreading in polycrystalline materials that is presented. This model is the first to couple several factors into one granular scale model that illustrates the way in which they interact and IGC occurs. It sheds new information on conditions which cause IGC spreading in two alloy classes and describes a new theory for the critical

  13. Microstructure Analysis of Heated Portland Cement Paste

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zhang, Q.; Ye, G.

    2011-01-01

    When a concrete structure is exposed to high temperature, the mechanical damage and chemical transformation take place simultaneously, which will change the microstructure of material. On the other hand, the mechanical properties and transport properties depend on the development of microstructure

  14. Microstructure, mechanical properties, castability and in vitro biocompatibility of Ti-Bi alloys developed for dental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, K J; Liu, Y; Zhou, F Y; Wang, B L; Li, L; Zheng, Y F; Liu, Y H

    2015-03-01

    In this study, the microstructure, mechanical properties, castability, electrochemical behaviors, cytotoxicity and hemocompatibility of Ti-Bi alloys with pure Ti as control were systematically investigated to assess their potential applications in the dental field. The experimental results showed that, except for the Ti-20Bi alloy, the microstructure of all other Ti-Bi alloys exhibit single α-Ti phase, while Ti-20Bi alloy is consisted of mainly α-Ti phase and a small amount of BiTi2 and BiTi3 phases. The tensile strength, hardness and wear resistance of Ti-Bi alloys were demonstrated to be improved monotonically with the increase of Bi content. The castability test showed that Ti-2Bi alloy increased the castability of pure Ti by 11.7%. The studied Ti-Bi alloys showed better corrosion resistance than pure Ti in both AS (artificial saliva) and ASFL (AS containing 0.2% NaF and 0.3% lactic acid) solutions. The concentrations of both Ti ion and Bi ion released from Ti-Bi alloys are extremely low in AS, ASF (AS containing 0.2% NaF) and ASL (AS containing 0.3% lactic acid) solutions. However, in ASFL solution, a large number of Ti and Bi ions are released. In addition, Ti-Bi alloys produced no significant deleterious effect to L929 cells and MG63 cells, similar to pure Ti, indicating a good in vitro biocompatibility. Besides, both L929 and MG63 cells perform excellent cell adhesion ability on Ti-Bi alloys. The hemolysis test exhibited that Ti-Bi alloys have an ultra-low hemolysis percentage below 1% and are considered nonhemolytic. To sum up, the Ti-2Bi alloy exhibits the optimal comprehensive performance and has great potential for dental applications. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Modelling of microstructural creep damage in welded joints of 316L stainless steel; Modelisation de l'endommagement a haute temperature dans le metal d'apport des joints soudes d'acier inoxydable austenitique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouche, G

    2000-07-01

    Welded joints of 316L stainless steel under service conditions at elevated temperature are known to be preferential sites of creep damage, as compared to the base material. This damage results in the formation of cavities and the development of creep cracks which can lead to a premature failure of welded components. The complex two-phase microstructure of 316L welds was simulated by manually filling a mould with longitudinal deposited weld beads. The moulded material was then aged during 2000 hours at 600 deg. C. High resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy was largely used to examine the microstructure of the simulated material before and after ageing. Smooth and notched creep specimens were cut from the mould and tested at 600 deg. C under various stress levels. A comparison of the lifetime versus nominal stress curves for the base and welded materials shows a greater dependence of the welded material to creep phenomena. Observation and EBSD analysis show that damage is preferentially located along the austenite grain boundaries. The stress and strain fields in the notched specimens were calculated by finite element method. A correlation of this field to the observed damage was made in order to propose a predictive law relating the creep damage to the mechanical conditions applied locally. Further mechanical tests and simulation on CT specimens and mode II tubular specimens allowed validating the model under various multiaxial loading conditions. (author)

  16. Microstructured optical fiber-based luminescent biosensing: Is there any light at the end of the tunnel? - A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pidenko, Sergey A; Burmistrova, Natalia A; Shuvalov, Andrey A; Chibrova, Anastasiya A; Skibina, Yulia S; Goryacheva, Irina Y

    2018-08-17

    This review covers the current state of the art of luminescent biosensors based on various types of microstructured optical fiber. The unique optical and structural properties of this type of optical fiber make them one of the most promising integrated platforms for bioassays. The individual sections of this review are devoted to a) classification of microstructured optical fibers, b) microstructured optical fiber materials, c) aspects of biosensing based on the biomolecules incorporated into the microstructured optical fibers, and d) development of models for prediction of the efficiency of luminescent signal processing. The authors' views on current trends and limitations of microstructured optical fibers for biosensing as well as the most promising areas and technologies for application in analytical practice are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Developing Personal Network Business Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saugstrup, Dan; Henten, Anders

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the paper is to examine the issue of business modeling in relation to personal networks, PNs. The paper builds on research performed on business models in the EU 1ST MAGNET1 project (My personal Adaptive Global NET). The paper presents the Personal Network concept and briefly reports...... on the 'state of the art' in the field of business modeling. Furthermore, the paper suggests three generic business models for PNs: a service oriented model, a self-organized model, and a combination model. Finally, examples of relevant services and applications in relation to three different cases...... are presented and analyzed in light of business modeling of PN....

  18. Modeling with FCA-Based Model of Microstructure Evolution of MgCa08 Alloy During Drawing of Thin Wire in Heated Die / Modelowanie Za Pomocą FCA Rozwoju Mikrostruktury Stopu MgCa08 Podczas Ciągnienia Cienkiego Drutu W Podgrzewanym Ciagadle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svyetlichnyy D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with a modeling of manufacturing process of thin wire of MgCa08 alloy used as biocompatible soluble threads for medical application. Some difficulties in material deformation subjected with its hexagonal structure can be solved with accurate establishment of the deformation conditions, especially temperature history of the whole process. In drawing process with heated die, wire is preheated in furnace and then deformed. The only narrow temperature range allows for multi-pass drawing without wire breaking. Diameter below 0.1 mm required for the final product makes very important the consideration of microstructure evolution because grain size is comparable with the wire dimensions. For this reason the problem is considered in the micro scale by using the frontal cellular automata (FCA-based model. The goals of present work are the development and validation of FCA-base model of microstructure evolution of MgCa0.8 magnesium alloy. To reach this objective, plastometric and relaxation tests of MgCA08 alloy were done on physical simulator GLEEBLE 3800. Results of the experimental studies were used for parameters identification of the hardening-softening model of the material. Then, initial microstructure and its evolution during the drawing passes were simulated with FCA-based model. FCA consider dislocation density and flow stress, hardening and softening including recovery and recrystallization, grain refinement and grain rotation, as well as grain growth. It allows one to obtain structures close to real ones. Two variants of the drawing process with different temperature history were considered. The deformation scheme was the same. Simulation results with following short discussion confirm usefulness of FCA-based model for explanation and selection of rational technological condition of thin wire drawing of MgCa08 alloy.

  19. Development of Fully Automated Serial-Sectioning 3D Microscope and Topological Approach to Pearlite and Dual-Phase Microstructure in Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, Yoshitaka; Sato, Naoko; Ojima, Mayumi; Nakayama, Makoto; Wang, Yuan-Tsung

    Using a newly developed fully automated serial-sectioning three-dimensional (3D) microscope, Genus_3D, and a conventional dual-beam SEM, we examined ferrite-martensite dual-phase and eutectoid pearlite microstructures. In particular, we consider the topology and differential geometry. Genus, Euler characteristics, Gaussian curvature, and mean curvatures were obtained from 3D reconstructions. A variation in the martensite morphology in dual-phase steel, i.e., connectivity, was examined to understand the ductile fracture mechanism. In addition, we investigated the 3D morphological variation of lamellar cementite in pearlite during spheroidizing. This 3D observation revealed many holes and fissures in cementite lamellae, which potentially accelerate the spheroidization. The disintegration of lamellar structure into particles was discussed with respect to surface area change per unit volume and local surface morphology (i.e., curvature).

  20. The effect of extrusion temperature on the development of deformation microstructures in 5052 aluminium alloy processed by equal channel angular extrusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Y.C.; Huang, Y.Y.; Chang, C.P.; Kao, P.W

    2003-04-18

    Commercial 5052 aluminium alloy was used to study the effect of extrusion temperature on the development of deformation microstructures processed by equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE). The extrusion temperatures used were between 50 and 300 deg. C, and the cumulative equivalent strain was 5.6. Transmission electron microscopy was adopted to characterize quantitatively the metallographical parameters, namely grain size, grain aspect ratio, and boundary disorientation. Raising extrusion temperature causes grain size to increase, grain shape to become more equiaxed-like, and a dramatic increase of low angle boundaries. Both grain and subgrain boundaries with low disorientations are formed at elevated temperatures. Comments on disorientation measuring techniques in transmission electron microscope are also given.

  1. Microstructural characterization of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} ODS-Fe-Cr model alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, V. de [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)], E-mail: vanessa.decastro@materials.ox.ac.uk; Leguey, T.; Munoz, A.; Monge, M.A.; Pareja, R. [Departamento de Fisica, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid, 28911 Leganes (Spain); Marquis, E.A.; Lozano-Perez, S.; Jenkins, M.L. [Department of Materials, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 3PH (United Kingdom)

    2009-04-30

    Two Fe-12 wt% Cr alloys, one containing 0.4 wt% Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and the other Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}-free, have been produced by mechanical alloying followed by hot isostatic pressing. These oxide dispersion strengthened and reference alloys were characterized both in the as-HIPed state and after tempering by transmission electron microscopy and atom-probe tomography. The as-HIPed alloys exhibited the characteristic microstructure of lath martensite and contained a high density of dislocations. Small voids with sizes <10 nm were also observed. Both alloys also contained M{sub 3}C and M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides (M = Cr, Fe) probably as a result of C ingress during milling. After tempering at 1023 K for 4 h the microstructures had partially recovered. In the recovered regions, martensite laths were replaced by equiaxed grains in which M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbides decorated the grain boundaries. In the ODS alloy nanoparticles containing Y were commonly observed within grains, although they were also present at grain boundaries and adjacent to large carbides.

  2. Predictive models of moth development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Degree-day models link ambient temperature to insect life-stages, making such models valuable tools in integrated pest management. These models increase management efficacy by predicting pest phenology. In Wisconsin, the top insect pest of cranberry production is the cranberry fruitworm, Acrobasis v...

  3. Developing the Business Modelling Method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meertens, Lucas Onno; Iacob, Maria Eugenia; Nieuwenhuis, Lambertus Johannes Maria; Shishkov, B; Shishkov, Boris

    2011-01-01

    Currently, business modelling is an art, instead of a science, as no scientific method for business modelling exists. This, and the lack of using business models altogether, causes many projects to end after the pilot stage, unable to fulfil their apparent promise. We propose a structured method to

  4. Three-dimensional modeling and simulation of asphalt concrete mixtures based on X-ray CT microstructure images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hainian Wang

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available X-ray CT (computed tomography was used to scan asphalt mixture specimen to obtain high resolution continuous cross-section images and the meso-structure. According to the theory of three-dimensional (3D reconstruction, the 3D reconstruction algorithm was investigated in this paper. The key to the reconstruction technique is the acquisition of the voxel positions and the relationship between the pixel element and node. Three-dimensional numerical model of asphalt mixture specimen was created by a self-developed program. A splitting test was conducted to predict the stress distributions of the asphalt mixture and verify the rationality of the 3D model.

  5. Towards a national cybersecurity capability development model

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Jacobs, Pierre C

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available - the incident management cybersecurity capability - is selected to illustrate the application of the national cybersecurity capability development model. This model was developed as part of previous research, and is called the Embryonic Cyberdefence Monitoring...

  6. A study on microstructures and extended defects in Ni- and Co-base superalloys. Development and application of advanced TEM techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Julian

    2016-04-21

    To improve the efficiency of stationary gas turbines and air craft jet engines, it is crucial to increase the maximum temperature capabilities of single crystalline superalloys by appropriate alloy design and microstructure tuning. The mechanical properties of superalloys are largely influenced by the physical constitution of the microstructure. To develop a better understanding of fundamental aspects of creep deformation, like the stress states, defect structures and other degradation processes, it is necessary to employ scale-bridging characterization. In the present work, Ni- and Co-based superalloys are investigated by a series of advanced transmission electron microscopy techniques and by the application of specifically developed characterization methods to identify dominating processes on atomic scale and hence to make a direct correlation to the macroscopic creep behavior. For instance, the misfit between γ and γ' in the initial microstructure is of great importance, since it strongly influences the rafting process and the interfacial dislocation network. To address the stress state, on the one hand misfit measurements in undeformed samples are conducted and are directly compared to finite-element simulations. On the other hand, deformed samples are investigated to assess the influence of an initial rafting process and the formation of an interface dislocation network. For this, characterization methods are used which are based on the evaluation of atomically resolved images and on electron diffraction. Moreover, the temperature dependency of the misfit and of the microstructure stability is specifically investigated for different Co-base alloys in in situ heating experiments. The characterization of defect structures in Ni-base superalloys after creep deformation builds the second pillar of this work. Specific cutting processes of superdislocations are studied to elucidate which atomic processes take place. A series of left angle 100 right angle and

  7. Microstructures and mechanical properties of aging materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liaw, P.K.; Viswanathan, R.; Murty, K.L.; Simonen, E.P.; Frear, D.

    1993-01-01

    This book contains a collection of papers presented at the symposium on ''Microstructures and Mechanical Properties of Aging Materials,'' that was held in Chicago, IL. November 2-5, 1992 in conjunction with the Fall Meeting of The Minerals, Metals and Materials Society (TMS). The subjects of interest in the symposium included: (1) mechanisms of microstructural degradation, (2) effects of microstructural degradation on mechanical behavior, (3) development of life prediction methodology for in-service structural and electronic components, (4) experimental techniques to monitor degradation of microstructures and mechanical properties, and (5) effects of environment on microstructural degradation and mechanical properties. Individual papers have been processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  8. Pore-scale modeling and simulation of flow, transport, and adsorptive or osmotic effects in membranes: the influence of membrane microstructure

    KAUST Repository

    Calo, Victor M.

    2015-07-17

    The selection of an appropriate membrane for a particular application is a complex and expensive process. Computational modeling can significantly aid membrane researchers and manufacturers in this process. The membrane morphology is highly influential on its efficiency within several applications, but is often overlooked in simulation. Two such applications which are very important in the provision of clean water are forward osmosis and filtration using functionalized micro/ultra/nano-filtration membranes. Herein, we investigate the effect of the membrane morphology in these two applications. First we present results of the separation process using resolved finger- and sponge-like support layers. Second, we represent the functionalization of a typical microfiltration membrane using absorptive pore walls, and illustrate the effect of different microstructures on the reactive process. Such numerical modeling will aid manufacturers in optimizing operating conditions and designing efficient membranes.

  9. Improved microstructures for better fuel performance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kutty, T.R.G.

    2009-01-01

    The microstructure of fuel pellet is very important since it is deeply related to the irradiation behaviour. It acts as the link between nuclear engineering and materials science of nuclear fuel for understanding thermal transport, swelling, fission-gas release, mechanical behavior. The microstructure of the fuel is intimately related to the behavior of the fission gases. The basic factors that have greatest influence on microstructure are crystal structure, defects concentration and phase stability. The improvement in plasticity and fission gas release can be attained by modifying the microstructures during fabrication. The role of microstructure and crystal defects in determining the engineering properties are always acknowledged. Conventional nuclear ceramic fabrication process consists of a number of stages including calcination, milling, incorporating additives, pressing, drying and densification. Since each of these steps affects the microstructure of fuel pellets they must all be understood. Moreover, the defect structures in the crystal lattice are very important for in-pile behaviour in classical UO 2 and MOX fuels. Defect structures, such as defect clusters or grain boundaries, play a crucial role in the stability of the matrices and the underlying mechanisms to defect stability are at least partly related to the nature of the 5f electrons. It is possible to obtain a wide range of microstructures by incorporating innovation in the fabrication procedure. This paper deals with the development fuels for improved performance by modifying the microstructures. (author)

  10. Microstructural analysis of geopolymer developed from wood fly ash, post-mortem doloma refractory and metakaolin; Analise microestrutural de geopolimero desenvolvido a partir de cinza de olaria, tijolo refratario dolomitico post-mortem e metacaulim

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura, Jailes de Santana; Mafra, Marcio Paulo de Araujo; Rabelo, Adriano Alves; Fagury, Renata Lilian Ribeiro Portugal; Fagury Neto, Elias, E-mail: jailesmoura@hotmail.com, E-mail: fagury@unifesspa.edu.br [Universidade Federal do Sul e Sudeste do Para (UNIFESSPA), PA (Brazil). Faculdade de Engenharia de Materiais

    2016-07-01

    Geopolymers are one of the widely discussed topics of materials science in recent times due to its vast potential as an alternative binder material to cement. This work aimed to evaluate the microstructure of geopolymers developed from wood fly ash, post-mortem doloma refractory and metakaolin. A preliminary study has been completed and achieved significant results compressive strength: the best formulation of geopolymer paste obtained approximately 25 MPa. Microstructural analysis by scanning electron microscopy, the geopolymer paste, allowed to verify the homogeneity, distribution of components, and providing evidence of raw materials that do not respond if there was crystalline phase, porosity and density of the structure. (author)

  11. Microstructure and hardness development in a copper-nickel diffusion gradient model system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duchstein, Linus Daniel Leonhard; Zhang, Xiaodan; Hansen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    increase from 120 to 135kp/mm² in the Cu phase with increasing strain. After annealing at 200°C for up to 4h the hardness first decreases, but raises above the value for the highly strained sample. The experimental findings are discussed with emphasis on surface mechanical alloying as a process of both...

  12. Predicting Microstructure Development During HighTemperature Nitriding of Martensitic Stainless SteelsUsing Thermodynamic Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tschiptschin André Paulo

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermodynamic calculations of the Fe-Cr-N System in the region of the Gas Phase Equilibria have been compared with experimental results of maximum nitrogen absorption during nitriding of two Martensitic Stainless Steels (a 6 mm thick sheet of AISI 410S steel and green powder compacts of AISI 434L steel under N2 atmospheres. The calculations have been performed combining the Fe-Cr-N System description contained in the SGTE Solid Solution Database and the gas phase for the N System contained in the SGTE Substances Database. Results show a rather good agreement for total nitrogen absorption in the steel and nitrogen solubility in austenite in the range of temperatures between 1273 K and 1473 K and in the range of pressures between 0.1 and 0.36 MPa. Calculations show that an appropriate choice of heat treatment parameters can lead to optimal nitrogen absorption in the alloy. It was observed in the calculations that an increased pressure stabilizes CrN at expenses of Cr2N - type nitrides.

  13. Predicting Microstructure Development During HighTemperature Nitriding of Martensitic Stainless SteelsUsing Thermodynamic Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Tschiptschin, André Paulo

    2002-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of the Fe-Cr-N System in the region of the Gas Phase Equilibria have been compared with experimental results of maximum nitrogen absorption during nitriding of two Martensitic Stainless Steels (a 6 mm thick sheet of AISI 410S steel and green powder compacts of AISI 434L steel) under N2 atmospheres. The calculations have been performed combining the Fe-Cr-N System description contained in the SGTE Solid Solution Database and the gas phase for the N System contained i...

  14. Curriculum Development: A Philosophical Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruening, William H.

    Presenting models based on the philosophies of Carl Rogers, John Dewey, Erich Fromm, and Jean-Paul Sartre, this paper proposes a philosophical approach to education and concludes with pragmatic suggestions concerning teaching based on a fully-functioning-person model. The fully-functioning person is characterized as being open to experience,…

  15. Time-course of venous wall biomechanical adaptation in pressure and flow-overload: assessment by a microstructure-based material model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassani, Sofia G; Theofani, Antonia; Tsangaris, Sokrates; Sokolis, Dimitrios P

    2013-09-27

    Arteriovenous fistulae have been previously created by our group, through implantation of e-PTFE grafts between the carotid artery and jugular vein in healthy pigs, to gather comprehensive data on the time-course of the adapted geometry, composition, and biomechanical properties of the venous wall exposed to chronic increases in pressure and flow. The aim of this study was to mathematically assess the biomechanical adaptation of venous wall, by characterizing our previous in vitro inflation/extension testing data obtained 2, 4, and 12 weeks post-fistula, using a microstructure-based material model. Our choice for such a model considered a quadratic function for elastin with a four-fiber family term for collagen, and permitted realistic data characterization for both overloaded and control veins. As structural validation to the hemodynamically-driven differences in the material response, computerized histology was employed to quantitate the composition and orientation of collagen and elastin-fiber networks. The parameter values optimized showed marked differences among the overloaded and control veins, namely decrease in the quadratic function parameters and increase in the four-fiber family parameters. Differences among the two vein types were highlighted with respect to the underlying microstructure, namely the reduced elastin and increased collagen contents induced by pressure and flow-overload. Explicit correlations were found of the material parameters with the two basic scleroprotein contents, substantiating the material model used and the characterization findings presented. Our results are expected to improve the current understanding of the dynamics of venous adaptation under sustained pressure- and flow-overload conditions, for which data are largely unavailable and contradictory. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Statistics associated with the scattering of ultrasound from microstructure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yongfeng; Kube, Christopher M; Turner, Joseph A; Li, Xiongbing

    2017-09-01

    The spatial statistics of an ensemble of waveforms containing ultrasonic scattering from microstructure are investigated. The standard deviation of the waveforms is of primary interest, because it is related to the maximum scattering amplitudes in the extreme value statistics theory. Further statistical measures are employed to define theoretical confidence bounds, which bound the experimentally calculated maximum amplitude when a finite number of waveforms are included in the ensemble. These statistical measures are applied in conjunction with a previously developed ultrasonic backscatter model. It is validated through ultrasonic scattering measurements performed on a stainless-steel pipe sample. These considerations are important for forward models related to the probability of detection (POD) of defects and inverse models used for characterization of polycrystalline microstructures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A Model of Optimal Development

    OpenAIRE

    Prabir C. Bhattacharya

    2015-01-01

    The paper addresses the question of optimal development of a developing economy. The framework presented, it is believed, can be of help in thinking about policies relating, inter alia, to population growth, inter-sectoral migration, agriculture-industry relationship, wages in different sectors, and income distribution in an inter-connected way in the context of optimal development of an economy with an informal sector.

  18. Thermo-Oxidative Induced Damage in Polymer Composites: Microstructure Image-Based Multi-Scale Modeling and Experimental Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Rafid M.; Chandrashekhara, K.

    2017-11-01

    A multi-scale modeling approach is presented to simulate and validate thermo-oxidation shrinkage and cracking damage of a high temperature polymer composite. The multi-scale approach investigates coupled transient diffusion-reaction and static structural at macro- to micro-scale. The micro-scale shrinkage deformation and cracking damage are simulated and validated using 2D and 3D simulations. Localized shrinkage displacement boundary conditions for the micro-scale simulations are determined from the respective meso- and macro-scale simulations, conducted for a cross-ply laminate. The meso-scale geometrical domain and the micro-scale geometry and mesh are developed using the object oriented finite element (OOF). The macro-scale shrinkage and weight loss are measured using unidirectional coupons and used to build the macro-shrinkage model. The cross-ply coupons are used to validate the macro-shrinkage model by the shrinkage profiles acquired using scanning electron images at the cracked surface. The macro-shrinkage model deformation shows a discrepancy when the micro-scale image-based cracking is computed. The local maximum shrinkage strain is assumed to be 13 times the maximum macro-shrinkage strain of 2.5 × 10-5, upon which the discrepancy is minimized. The microcrack damage of the composite is modeled using a static elastic analysis with extended finite element and cohesive surfaces by considering the modulus spatial evolution. The 3D shrinkage displacements are fed to the model using node-wise boundary/domain conditions of the respective oxidized region. Microcrack simulation results: length, meander, and opening are closely matched to the crack in the area of interest for the scanning electron images.

  19. Development and microstructure of tooth histotypes in the blue shark, Prionace glauca (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae) and the great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias (Lamniformes: Lamnidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, Joshua K; Riccio, Mark L; Bemis, William E

    2015-07-01

    Elasmobranchs exhibit two distinct arrangements of mineralized tissues in the teeth that are known as orthodont and osteodont histotypes. Traditionally, it has been said that orthodont teeth maintain a pulp cavity throughout tooth development whereas osteodont teeth are filled with osteodentine and lack a pulp cavity when fully developed. We used light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and high-resolution micro-computed tomography to compare the structure and development of elasmobranch teeth representing the two histotypes. As an example of the orthodont histotype, we studied teeth of the blue shark, Prionace glauca (Carcharhiniformes: Carcharhinidae). For the osteodont histotype, we studied teeth of the great white shark, Carcharodon carcharias (Lamniformes: Lamnidae). We document similarities and differences in tooth development and the microstructure of tissues in these two species and review the history of definitions and interpretations of elasmobranch tooth histotypes. We discuss a possible correlation between tooth histotype and tooth replacement and review the history of histotype differentiation in sharks. We find that contrary to a long held misconception, there is no orthodentine in the osteodont teeth of C. carcharias. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Gas Metal Arc Welding Process Modeling and Prediction of Weld Microstructure in MIL A46100 Armor-Grade Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grujicic, M.; Arakere, A.; Ramaswami, S.; Snipes, J. S.; Yavari, R.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.; Montgomery, J. S.

    2013-06-01

    A conventional gas metal arc welding (GMAW) butt-joining process has been modeled using a two-way fully coupled, transient, thermal-mechanical finite-element procedure. To achieve two-way thermal-mechanical coupling, the work of plastic deformation resulting from potentially high thermal stresses is allowed to be dissipated in the form of heat, and the mechanical material model of the workpiece and the weld is made temperature dependent. Heat losses from the deposited filler-metal are accounted for by considering conduction to the adjoining workpieces as well as natural convection and radiation to the surroundings. The newly constructed GMAW process model is then applied, in conjunction with the basic material physical-metallurgy, to a prototypical high-hardness armor martensitic steel (MIL A46100). The main outcome of this procedure is the prediction of the spatial distribution of various crystalline phases within the weld and the heat-affected zone regions, as a function of the GMAW process parameters. The newly developed GMAW process model is validated by comparing its predictions with available open-literature experimental and computational data.

  1. Development of a technoeconomic model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adjin, Daniel Michael Okwabi; Tadayoni, Reza

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we discuss the key technical features to be considered for developing and deploying intelligent transportation systems (ITSs) in developing countries. The empirical data are taken from a detailed case study of ITS deployment in Ghana. The methodology used for data collection...... included interviews and surveys-face-to-face discussions and questionnaires. The results show that deployment of intelligent vehicle tracking technology (IVTT) will address the problems of inefficiencies experienced in the Ghanaian road transport haulage tracking industry. Research for ITS development...

  2. Development Smart Water Aquaponics Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Adrian ZUGRAVU

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present paper contributes to the modeling aquaculture. The paper main objectives are to identify an analysis smart water aquaponics. The purpose is to add more value to end aquaponics products. Aquaculture production depends on physical, chemical and biological qualities of pond water to a greater extent. The successful pond management requires an understanding of water quality. Intensification of pond makes the water quality undesirable with a number of water quality parameters. The objective of this model is to test and predicts plant and fish growth and net ammonium and nitrate concentrations in water in an aquaponic system. This is done by comparing the model outputs with measurements under controlled conditions in order to assess the accuracy of the tool to simulate nutrient concentrations in water and fish and plant biomass production of the system.

  3. Model Driven Development of Data Sensitive Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Petur

    2014-01-01

    to the values of variables. This theses strives to improve model-driven development of such data-sensitive systems. This is done by addressing three research questions. In the first we combine state-based modeling and abstract interpretation, in order to ease modeling of data-sensitive systems, while allowing...... efficient model-checking and model-based testing. In the second we develop automatic abstraction learning used together with model learning, in order to allow fully automatic learning of data-sensitive systems to allow learning of larger systems. In the third we develop an approach for modeling and model-based...... detection and pushing error detection to earlier stages of development. The complexity of modeling and the size of systems which can be analyzed is severely limited when introducing data variables. The state space grows exponentially in the number of variable and the domain size of the variables...

  4. Development of a generalized integral jet model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duijm, Nijs Jan; Kessler, A.; Markert, Frank

    2017-01-01

    model is needed to describe the rapid combustion of the flammable part of the plume (flash fire) and a third model has to be applied for the remaining jet fire. The objective of this paper is to describe the first steps of the development of an integral-type model describing the transient development...

  5. Model Development for Graphene Spintronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-21

    Consequently, the impurity, in addition to the conventional elastic , spin-conserving scattering can give rise to spin-flip processes. The latter...been examined experimentally by other groups. The model results clearly indicate under which conditions significant enhancements of the magneto

  6. Maturity Models Development in IS Research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasrado, Lester Allan; Vatrapu, Ravi; Andersen, Kim Normann

    2015-01-01

    of maturity models. Specifically, it explores maturity models literature in IS and standard guidelines, if any to develop maturity models, challenges identified and solutions proposed. Our systematic literature review of IS publications revealed over hundred and fifty articles on maturity models. Extant...... literature reveals that researchers have primarily focused on developing new maturity models pertaining to domain-specific problems and/or new enterprise technologies. We find rampant re-use of the design structure of widely adopted models such as Nolan’s Stage of Growth Model, Crosby’s Grid, and Capability...

  7. Microstructured continua and scaling for wave motion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jüri Engelbrecht

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with wave motion in microstructured solids. A short introduction explains how the basic mathematical models for description of microstructure(s of solids are derived. Based on the Mindlin-type micromorphic theory, the governing equations for wave motion in such solids are presented in one-dimensional setting. The focus of the paper is in explaining the importance of internal scales in microstructured solids. It is shown that the proper scaling permits to construct the mathematical models which involve hierarchies of wave operators. Depending on the scale parameter (the ratio of an internal scale over the wave length, the various operators govern the wave propagation. The main case analysed here consists of the second-order operators but the first-order operators which are characteristic to evolution equations, are also briefly explained.

  8. Analysis and computation of microstructure in finite plasticity

    CERN Document Server

    Hackl, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    This book addresses the need for a fundamental understanding of the physical origin, the mathematical behavior, and the numerical treatment of models which include microstructure. Leading scientists present their efforts involving mathematical analysis, numerical analysis, computational mechanics, material modelling and experiment. The mathematical analyses are based on methods from the calculus of variations, while in the numerical implementation global optimization algorithms play a central role. The modeling covers all length scales, from the atomic structure up to macroscopic samples. The development of the models ware guided by experiments on single and polycrystals, and results will be checked against experimental data.

  9. Organization Development: Strategies and Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckhard, Richard

    This book, written for managers, specialists, and students of management, is based largely on the author's experience in helping organization leaders with planned-change efforts, and on related experience of colleagues in the field. Chapter 1 presents the background and causes for the increased concern with organization development and planned…

  10. Modeling Energy and Development : An Evaluation of Models and Concepts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruijven, Bas van; Urban, Frauke; Benders, René M.J.; Moll, Henri C.; Sluijs, Jeroen P. van der; Vries, Bert de; Vuuren, Detlef P. van

    2008-01-01

    Most global energy models are developed by institutes from developed countries focusing primarily oil issues that are important in industrialized countries. Evaluation of the results for Asia of the IPCC/SRES models shows that broad concepts of energy and development. the energy ladder and the

  11. Language development at 2 years is correlated to brain microstructure in the left superior temporal gyrus at term equivalent age: a diffusion tensor imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aeby, Alec; De Tiège, Xavier; Creuzil, Marylise; David, Philippe; Balériaux, Danielle; Van Overmeire, Bart; Metens, Thierry; Van Bogaert, Patrick

    2013-09-01

    This study aims at testing the hypothesis that neurodevelopmental abilities at age 2 years are related with local brain microstructure of preterm infants at term equivalent age. Forty-one preterm infants underwent brain MRI with diffusion tensor imaging sequences to measure mean diffusivity (MD), fractional anisotropy (FA), longitudinal and transverse diffusivity (λ// and λ[perpendicular]) at term equivalent age. Neurodevelopment was assessed at 2 years corrected age using the Bayley III scale. A voxel-based analysis approach, statistical parametric mapping (SPM8), was used to correlate changes of the Bayley III scores with the regional distribution of MD, FA, λ// and λ[perpendicular]. We found that language abilities are negatively correlated to MD, λ// and λ[perpendicular] in the left superior temporal gyrus in preterm infants. These findings suggest that higher MD, λ// and λ[perpendicular] values at term-equivalent age in the left superior temporal gyrus are associated with poorer language scores in later childhood. Consequently, it highlights the key role of the left superior temporal gyrus for the development of language abilities in children. Further studies are needed to assess on an individual basis and on the long term the prognostic value of brain DTI at term equivalent age for the development of language. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Development and evaluation of a magnesium–zinc–strontium alloy for biomedical applications — Alloy processing, microstructure, mechanical properties, and biodegradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guan, Ren-guo; Cipriano, Aaron F.; Zhao, Zhan-yong; Lock, Jaclyn; Tie, Di; Zhao, Tong; Cui, Tong; Liu, Huinan

    2013-01-01

    A new biodegradable magnesium–zinc–strontium (Mg–Zn–Sr) alloy was developed and studied for medical implant applications. This first study investigated the alloy processing (casting, rolling, and heat treatment), microstructures, mechanical properties, and degradation properties in simulated body fluid (SBF). Aging treatment of the ZSr41 alloy at 175 °C for 8 h improved the mechanical properties when compared to those of the as-cast alloy. Specifically, the aged ZSr41 alloy had an ultimate tensile strength of 270 MPa, Vickers hardness of 71.5 HV, and elongation at failure of 12.8%. The mechanical properties of the ZSr41 alloy were superior as compared with those of pure magnesium and met the requirements for load-bearing medical implants. Furthermore, the immersion of the ZSr41 alloy in SBF showed a degradation mode that progressed cyclically, alternating between pitting and localized corrosion. The steady-state average degradation rate of the aged ZSr41 alloy in SBF was 0.96 g/(m 2 ·hr), while the pH of SBF immersion solution increased. The corrosion current density of the ZSr41 alloy in SBF solution was 0.41 mA/mm 2 , which was much lower than 1.67 mA/mm 2 for pure Mg under the same conditions. In summary, compared to pure Mg, the mechanical properties of the new ZSr41 alloy improved while the degradation rate decreased due to the addition of Zn and Sr alloying elements and specific processing conditions. The superior mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the new ZSr41 alloy make it a promising alloy for next-generation implant applications. - Highlights: • Developed a new biodegradable magnesium–zinc–strontium (Mg–Zn–Sr) alloy for medical implant applications • Reported Mg–Zn–Sr alloy processing and microstructure characterization • Improved mechanical properties of Mg alloy after aging treatment • Improved degradation properties of Mg alloy in simulated body fluid

  13. A predictive machine learning approach for microstructure optimization and materials design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ruoqian; Kumar, Abhishek; Chen, Zhengzhang; Agrawal, Ankit; Sundararaghavan, Veera; Choudhary, Alok

    2015-06-23

    This paper addresses an important materials engineering question: How can one identify the complete space (or as much of it as possible) of microstructures that are theoretically predicted to yield the desired combination of properties demanded by a selected application? We present a problem involving design of magnetoelastic Fe-Ga alloy microstructure for enhanced elastic, plastic and magnetostrictive properties. While theoretical models for computing properties given the microstructure are known for this alloy, inversion of these relationships to obtain microstructures that lead to desired properties is challenging, primarily due to the high dimensionality of microstructure space, multi-objective design requirement and non-uniqueness of solutions. These challenges render traditional search-based optimization methods incompetent in terms of both searching efficiency and result optimality. In this paper, a route to address these challenges using a machine learning methodology is proposed. A systematic framework consisting of random data generation, feature selection and classification algorithms is developed. Experiments with five design problems that involve identification of microstructures that satisfy both linear and nonlinear property constraints show that our framework outperforms traditional optimization methods with the average running time reduced by as much as 80% and with optimality that would not be achieved otherwise.

  14. Impact of anesthetic regimen on the respiratory pattern, EEG microstructure and sleep in the rat model of cholinergic Parkinson's disease neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazic, K; Petrovic, J; Ciric, J; Kalauzi, A; Saponjic, J

    2015-09-24

    We hypothesized that the impact of distinct anesthetic regimens could be differently expressed during anesthesia and on post-anesthesia sleep in the neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, we followed the impact of ketamine/diazepam and pentobarbital anesthesia in a rat model of the severe Parkinson's disease cholinergic neuropathology on the electroencephalographic (EEG) microstructure and respiratory pattern during anesthesia, and on the post-anesthesia sleep. We performed the experiments on adult, male, spontaneously breathing Wistar rats chronically instrumented for sleep recording. The bilateral pedunculopontine tegmental nucleus (PPT) lesion was done by ibotenic acid microinfusion. Following postoperative recovery, we recorded sleep for 6h, induced anesthesia 24h later using ketamine/diazepam or pentobarbital, and repeated sleep recordings sessions 48h and 6days later. During 20min of each anesthesia we recorded both the EEG and respiratory movements. For sleep and EEG analysis, Fourier analysis was applied on 6-h recordings, and each 10-s epoch was differentiated as a state of wakefulness (Wake), non-rapid eye movement (NREM) or rapid eye movement (REM). Additionally, the group probability density distributions of all EEG frequency band relative amplitudes were calculated for each state, with particular attention during anesthesia. For respiratory pattern analysis we used Monotone Signal Segments Analysis. The PPT lesion was identified through nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) diaphorase histochemistry. Our data show that the ketamine/diazepam anesthetic regimen in the PPT-lesioned rats induces more alterations in the EEG microstructure and respiratory pattern than does the pentobarbital anesthesia. In addition, the equal time required to establish an anesthetized state, and the long-term effect on post-anesthesia sleep in the PPT-lesioned vs. control rats suggest this anesthetic regimen as potentially more beneficial both for anesthesia

  15. GRA model development at Bruce Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, R.; Ngo, K.; Cruchley, I.

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, Bruce Power undertook a project, in partnership with AMEC NSS Limited, to develop a Generation Risk Assessment (GRA) model for its Bruce B Nuclear Generating Station. The model is intended to be used as a decision-making tool in support of plant operations. Bruce Power has recognized the strategic importance of GRA in the plant decision-making process and is currently implementing a pilot GRA application. The objective of this paper is to present the scope of the GRA model development project, methodology employed, and the results and path forward for the model implementation at Bruce Power. The required work was split into three phases. Phase 1 involved development of GRA models for the twelve systems most important to electricity production. Ten systems were added to the model during each of the next two phases. The GRA model development process consists of developing system Failure Modes and Effects Analyses (FMEA) to identify the components critical to the plant reliability and determine their impact on electricity production. The FMEAs were then used to develop the logic for system fault tree (FT) GRA models. The models were solved and post-processed to provide model outputs to the plant staff in a user-friendly format. The outputs consisted of the ranking of components based on their production impact expressed in terms of lost megawatt hours (LMWH). Another key model output was the estimation of the predicted Forced Loss Rate (FLR). (author)

  16. Instructional Development: Themata, Archetypes, Paradigms and Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Ivor

    This chapter discusses the foundations of instructional development and analyzes the development of various models, paradigms, archetypes, and themata used to describe instructional development. Two key strands in the literature of instructional development--instructional efficiency ("doing the right things") and instructional…

  17. Stress, microstructure and evolution under ion irradiation in thin films grown by ion beam sputtering: modelling and application to interfacial effects in metallic multilayers; Contraintes, microstructure et sollicitation sous irradiation aux ions de films minces elabores par pulverisation ionique: modelisation et application a l'etude des effets interfaciaux dans des multicouches metalliques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debelle, A

    2006-09-15

    We have investigated the formation of the interfacial chemical mixing in Mo/Ni multilayers, and particularly the influence of ballistic effects during the growth. For this purpose, hetero-epitaxial b.c.c./f.c.c. Mo(110)/Ni(111) multilayers were grown by two deposition methods: thermal evaporation and direct ion beam sputtering. As a preliminary, an accurate description of the stress state in pure sputtered Mo thin films was required. Microstructural and stress state analyses were essentially carried out by X-ray diffraction, and ion irradiation was used as a powerful tool to control the stress level. We showed that thermal evaporated thin films exhibit a weak tensile growth stress ({approx} 0.6 GPa) that can be accounted for by the grain boundary relaxation model, whereas sputtered thin films develop large compressive growth stress (- 2 to - 4 GPa). This latter results from the bombardment of the growing film by the energetic particles involved during the sputtering process (atomic peening phenomenon), which induces the formation of defects in the layers, generating volume distortions. We thus developed a stress model that includes a hydrostatic stress component to account for these volume strains. This model allowed us to determine the 'unstressed and free of defects lattice parameter' a{sub 0}, solely linked to chemical effects. For epitaxial Mo layers, it was possible to separate coherency stress from growth stress due to their distinct kinetic evolution during ion irradiation. Therefore, the stress analysis enabled us to determine the a{sub 0} values in Mo sub-layers of Mo/Ni superlattices. A tendency to the formation of an interfacial alloy is observed independently of the growth conditions, which suggests that thermodynamic forces favour the exchange mechanism. However, the extent of the intermixing effect is clearly enhanced by ballistic effects. (author)

  18. Microstructural development and characterization of lanthanum chromite-based ceramics to application in solid oxide fuel cells; Desenvolvimento microestrutural e caracterizacao de ceramicas a base de cromita de lantanio para aplicacao em celulas a combustivel de oxido solido

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, R.N.; Furtado, J.G. de M.; Soares, C.M.; Serra, E.T. [Centro de Pesquisas de Energia Eletrica (CEPEL), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)], e-mail: rnunes@cepel.br

    2006-07-01

    This work has for objective to investigate and to characterize the microstructural development of lanthanum chromite-based ceramics (LaCrO{sub 3}) doped with earth alkaline metals, correlating the microstructural parameters (mainly the densification level) and processing parameters with the electrothermal properties reached. Lanthanum chromite-based ceramic systems doped with earth-alkaline metals (Ca, Mg and Sr) had been produced from respective metallic nitrates by solid state reactions process. The phase compositions were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and the densification level by Archimedes method. The microstructural characterization was effected by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and thermal analysis techniques. Electrical tests were used to evaluate the electrical conductivity of the studied ceramics. The obtained results corroborate the literature comments concerning the difficulty of lanthanum chromite-based ceramics with high densification level and evidence the great influence of the nature of the dopants on the sintering mechanism and the microstructural and electric characteristics of the produced ceramics. The best ones results, in terms of densification and electrical conductivity, had been gotten through multiple doping with calcium and strontium, and in sintering temperature conditions lower that the normally considered to pure or monodoped lanthanum chromite-based ceramics. (author)

  19. Cytoview: Development of a cell modelling framework

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2007-07-06

    Jul 6, 2007 ... Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 32; Issue 5. Cytoview: Development of a cell modelling framework ... The framework serves as a first step in integrating different levels of data available for a biological cell and has the potential to lead to development of computational models in our pursuit to ...

  20. Problem Solving, Modeling, and Local Conceptual Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesh, Richard; Harel, Guershon

    2003-01-01

    Describes similarities and differences between modeling cycles and stages of development. Includes examples of relevant constructs underlying children's developing ways of thinking about fractions, ratios, rates, proportions, or other mathematical ideas. Concludes that modeling cycles appear to be local or situated versions of the general stages…

  1. Development of a modelling learning path

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buuren, O.P.M.

    2014-01-01

    A learning path on computational modelling, integrated into the Dutch lower secondary physics curriculum has been developed and tested in school practice. The instructional materials that have been developed cover the first two years of this curriculum. In the learning path, modelling has been

  2. Effect of Sintering Atmosphere and Solution Treatment on Density, Microstructure and Tensile Properties of Duplex Stainless Steels Developed from Pre-alloyed Powders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murali, Arun Prasad; Mahendran, Sudhahar; Ramajayam, Mariappan; Ganesan, Dharmalingam; Chinnaraj, Raj Kumar

    2017-10-01

    In this research, Powder Metallurgy (P/M) of Duplex Stainless Steels (DSS) of different compositions were prepared through pre-alloyed powders and elemental powders with and without addition of copper. The powder mix was developed by pot mill for 12 h to obtain the homogeneous mixture of pre-alloyed powder with elemental compositions. Cylindrical green compacts with the dimensions of 30 mm diameter and 12 mm height were compacted through universal testing machine at a pressure level of 560 ± 10 MPa. These green compacts were sintered at 1350 °C for 2 h in hydrogen and argon atmospheres. Some of the sintered stainless steel preforms were solution treated at 1050 °C followed by water quenching. The sintered as well as solution treated samples were analysed by metallography examination, Scanning Electron Microscopy and evaluation of mechanical properties. Ferrite content of sintered and solution treated DSS were measured by Fischer Ferritoscope. It is inferred that the hydrogen sintered DSS depicted better density (94% theoretical density) and tensile strength (695 MPa) than the argon sintered steels. Similarly the microstructure of solution treated DSS revealed existence of more volume of ferrite grains than its sintered condition. Solution treated hydrogen sintered DSS A (50 wt% 316L + 50 wt% 430L) exhibited higher tensile strength of 716 MPa and elongation of 17%, which are 10-13% increment than the sintered stainless steels.

  3. Final Report: A Transport Phenomena Based Approach to Probe Evolution of Weld Macro and Microstructures and A Smart Bi-directional Model of Fusion Welding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Tarasankar DebRoy

    2009-12-11

    In recent years, applications of numerical heat transfer and fluid flow models of fusion welding have resulted in improved understanding of both the welding processes and welded materials. They have been used to accurately calculate thermal cycles and fusion zone geometry in many cases. Here we report the following three major advancements from this project. First, we show how microstructures, grain size distribution and topology of welds of several important engineering alloys can be computed starting from better understanding of the fusion welding process through numerical heat transfer and fluid flow calculations. Second, we provide a conclusive proof that the reliability of numerical heat transfer and fluid flow calculations can be significantly improved by optimizing several uncertain model parameters. Third, we demonstrate how the numerical heat transfer and fluid flow models can be combined with a suitable global optimization program such as a genetic algorithm for the tailoring of weld attributes such as attaining a specified weld geometry or a weld thermal cycle. The results of the project have been published in many papers and a listing of these are included together with a list of the graduate thesis that resulted from this project. The work supported by the DOE award has resulted in several important national and international awards. A listing of these awards and the status of the graduate students are also presented in this report.

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Polycrystalline NiTi Shape Memory Alloy under Various Plastic Deformation Conditions by Coupling Microstructure Evolution and Macroscopic Mechanical Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Hu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerical modeling of microstructure evolution in various regions during uniaxial compression and canning compression of NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA are studied through combined macroscopic and microscopic finite element simulation in order to investigate plastic deformation of NiTi SMA at 400 °C. In this approach, the macroscale material behavior is modeled with a relatively coarse finite element mesh, and then the corresponding deformation history in some selected regions in this mesh is extracted by the sub-model technique of finite element code ABAQUS and subsequently used as boundary conditions for the microscale simulation by means of crystal plasticity finite element method (CPFEM. Simulation results show that NiTi SMA exhibits an inhomogeneous plastic deformation at the microscale. Moreover, regions that suffered canning compression sustain more homogeneous plastic deformation by comparison with the corresponding regions subjected to uniaxial compression. The mitigation of inhomogeneous plastic deformation contributes to reducing the statistically stored dislocation (SSD density in polycrystalline aggregation and also to reducing the difference of stress level in various regions of deformed NiTi SMA sample, and therefore sustaining large plastic deformation in the canning compression process.

  5. Multiscale Modeling of Polycrystalline NiTi Shape Memory Alloy under Various Plastic Deformation Conditions by Coupling Microstructure Evolution and Macroscopic Mechanical Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Li; Jiang, Shuyong; Zhou, Tao; Tu, Jian; Shi, Laixin; Chen, Qiang; Yang, Mingbo

    2017-10-13

    Numerical modeling of microstructure evolution in various regions during uniaxial compression and canning compression of NiTi shape memory alloy (SMA) are studied through combined macroscopic and microscopic finite element simulation in order to investigate plastic deformation of NiTi SMA at 400 °C. In this approach, the macroscale material behavior is modeled with a relatively coarse finite element mesh, and then the corresponding deformation history in some selected regions in this mesh is extracted by the sub-model technique of finite element code ABAQUS and subsequently used as boundary conditions for the microscale simulation by means of crystal plasticity finite element method (CPFEM). Simulation results show that NiTi SMA exhibits an inhomogeneous plastic deformation at the microscale. Moreover, regions that suffered canning compression sustain more homogeneous plastic deformation by comparison with the corresponding regions subjected to uniaxial compression. The mitigation of inhomogeneous plastic deformation contributes to reducing the statistically stored dislocation (SSD) density in polycrystalline aggregation and also to reducing the difference of stress level in various regions of deformed NiTi SMA sample, and therefore sustaining large plastic deformation in the canning compression process.

  6. Influence of composition on microstructural parameters of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MacKay, R.A., E-mail: Rebecca.A.MacKay@nasa.gov [NASA Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); Gabb, T.P. [NASA Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); Garg, A. [NASA Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States); University of Toledo, 2801 W. Bancroft, Toledo, Ohio 43606 (United States); Rogers, R.B.; Nathal, M.V. [NASA Glenn Research Center, 21000 Brookpark Rd., Cleveland, Ohio 44135 (United States)

    2012-08-15

    Fourteen nickel-base superalloy single crystals containing a range of chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), and rhenium (Re) levels, and fixed amounts of aluminum (Al) and tantalum (Ta), were examined to determine the effect of bulk composition on basic microstructural parameters, including {gamma} Prime solvus, {gamma} Prime volume fraction, topologically close-packed (TCP) phases, {gamma} and {gamma} Prime phase chemistries, and {gamma}-{gamma} Prime lattice mismatch. Regression models describing the influence of bulk alloy composition on each of the microstructural parameters were developed and compared to predictions by a commercially-available software tool that used computational thermodynamics. Co produced the largest change in {gamma} Prime solvus over the wide compositional range explored and Mo produced the biggest effect on the {gamma} lattice parameter over its range, although Re had a very potent influence on all microstructural parameters investigated. Changing the Cr, Co, Mo, and Re contents in the bulk alloy had an impact on their concentrations in the {gamma} matrix and to a smaller extent in the {gamma} Prime phase. The software tool under-predicted {gamma} Prime solvus temperatures and {gamma} Prime volume fractions, and over-predicted TCP phase volume fractions at 982 Degree-Sign C. However, the statistical regression models provided excellent estimations of the microstructural parameters and demonstrated the usefulness of such formulas. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effects of Cr, Co, Mo, and Re on microstructure in new low density superalloys Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Co produced a large change in {gamma} Prime solvus; Mo had a large effect on lattice mismatch. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Re exhibited very potent influence on all microstructural parameters was investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer {gamma} and {gamma} Prime phase chemistries both varied with temperature and alloy composition. Black

  7. Influence of composition on microstructural parameters of single crystal nickel-base superalloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacKay, R.A.; Gabb, T.P.; Garg, A.; Rogers, R.B.; Nathal, M.V.

    2012-01-01

    Fourteen nickel-base superalloy single crystals containing a range of chromium (Cr), cobalt (Co), molybdenum (Mo), and rhenium (Re) levels, and fixed amounts of aluminum (Al) and tantalum (Ta), were examined to determine the effect of bulk composition on basic microstructural parameters, including γ′ solvus, γ′ volume fraction, topologically close-packed (TCP) phases, γ and γ′ phase chemistries, and γ–γ′ lattice mismatch. Regression models describing the influence of bulk alloy composition on each of the microstructural parameters were developed and compared to predictions by a commercially-available software tool that used computational thermodynamics. Co produced the largest change in γ′ solvus over the wide compositional range explored and Mo produced the biggest effect on the γ lattice parameter over its range, although Re had a very potent influence on all microstructural parameters investigated. Changing the Cr, Co, Mo, and Re contents in the bulk alloy had an impact on their concentrations in the γ matrix and to a smaller extent in the γ′ phase. The software tool under-predicted γ′ solvus temperatures and γ′ volume fractions, and over-predicted TCP phase volume fractions at 982 °C. However, the statistical regression models provided excellent estimations of the microstructural parameters and demonstrated the usefulness of such formulas. - Highlights: ► Effects of Cr, Co, Mo, and Re on microstructure in new low density superalloys ► Co produced a large change in γ′ solvus; Mo had a large effect on lattice mismatch. ► Re exhibited very potent influence on all microstructural parameters was investigated. ► γ and γ′ phase chemistries both varied with temperature and alloy composition. ► Computational thermodynamic modeling tool did not accurately predict microstructure.

  8. Continuous Competence Development Model for Teacher Teams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weitze, Charlotte Lærke

    2014-01-01

    "This paper presents the development of the IT‐Pedagogical Think Tank for Teacher Teams (ITP4T), a continuous competence development model. The model was co‐designed following a design‐based research approach with teachers from VUC Storstrøm’s (VUC) Global Classroom (GC), an innovative hybrid...... to create their own continuous competence development. This article describes how and why the different components of the model were developed in response to the teachers’ challenges. Such challenges included lack of time, competence and support from the educational organisation to innovate learning design...

  9. Thermodynamics, Kinetics and Microstructural Evolution during Nitrocarburising

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Somers, Marcel A.J.; Du, Hong

    2000-01-01

    The evolution of the phase distribution, the composition and the growth kinetics of the compound layer is described for nitrocarburising experiments at well defined combinations of nitriding and carburising potentials in the gaseous environment. Initially, the compound layer development is associ......The evolution of the phase distribution, the composition and the growth kinetics of the compound layer is described for nitrocarburising experiments at well defined combinations of nitriding and carburising potentials in the gaseous environment. Initially, the compound layer development...... for compound layers where epsilon carbonitride phase is the dominant phase and extends from the surface to the interface with the substrate. Both cementite and gamma' phase, with narrow composition ranges, reduce the growth rate. Modelling of the microstructure evolution during nitrocarburising is hindered...

  10. A Career Roles Model of Career Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Hans A.

    2011-01-01

    Career development is described as the interactive progression of internal career identity formation and the growth of external career significance. Argued is the need for a content model of career development where the field is dominated by process theories. A theory is put forward of career development crystallizing in the acquisition of career…

  11. Model based development of engine control algorithms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, H.J.; Sturm, W.L.

    1996-01-01

    Model based development of engine control systems has several advantages. The development time and costs are strongly reduced because much of the development and optimization work is carried out by simulating both engine and control system. After optimizing the control algorithm it can be executed

  12. Simulations of Precipitate Microstructure Evolution during Heat Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kaisheng; Sterner, Gustaf; Chen, Qing; Jou, Herng-Jeng; Jeppsson, Johan; Bratberg, Johan; Engström, Anders; Mason, Paul

    Precipitation, a major solid state phase transformation during heat treatment processes, has for more than one century been intensively employed to improve the strength and toughness of various high performance alloys. Recently, sophisticated precipitation reaction models, in assistance with well-developed CALPHAD databases, provide an efficient and cost-effective way to tailor precipitate microstructures that maximize the strengthening effect via the optimization of alloy chemistries and heat treatment schedules. In this presentation, we focus on simulating precipitate microstructure evolution in Nickel-base superalloys under arbitrary heat treatment conditions. The newly-developed TC-PRISMA program has been used for these simulations, with models refined especially for non-isothermal conditions. The effect of different cooling profiles on the formation of multimodal microstructures has been thoroughly examined in order to understand the underlying thermodynamics and kinetics. Meanwhile, validations against several experimental results have been carried out. Practical issues that are critical to the accuracy and applicability of the current simulations, such as modifications that overcome mean-field approximations, compatibility between CALPHAD databases, selection of key parameters (particularly interfacial energy and nucleation site densities), etc., are also addressed.

  13. Development of a Scanning Microscale Fast Neutron Irradiation Platform for Examining the Correlation Between Local Neutron Damage and Graphite Microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinhero, Patrick [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-10

    The fast particle radiation damage effect of graphite, a main material in current and future nuclear reactors, has significant influence on the utilization of this material in fission and fusion plants. Atoms on graphite crystals can be easily replaced or dislocated by fast protons and result in interstitials and vacancies. The currently accepted model indicates that after most of the interstitials recombine with vacancies, surviving interstitials form clusters and furthermore gather to create loops with each other between layers. Meanwhile, surviving vacancies and interstitials form dislocation loops on the layers. The growth of these inserted layers cause the dimensional increase, i.e. swelling, of graphite. Interstitial and vacancy dislocation loops have been reported and they can easily been observed by electron microscope. However, observation of the intermediate atom clusters becomes is paramount in helping prove this model. We utilize fast protons generated from the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) cyclotron to irradiate highly- oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) as target for this research. Post-irradiation examination (PIE) of dosed targets with high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) has permit observation and analysis of clusters and dislocation loops to support the proposed theory. Another part of the research is to validate M.I. Heggie’s Ruck and Tuck model, which introduced graphite layers may fold under fast particle irradiation. Again, we employed microscopy to image irradiated specimens to determine how the extent of Ruck and Tuck by calculating the number of folds as a function of dose. Our most significant accomplishment is the invention of a novel class of high-intensity pure beta-emitters for long-term lightweight batteries. We have filed four invention disclosure records based on the research conducted in this project. These batteries are lightweight because they consist of carbon and tritium and can be

  14. Mechanical and Microstructural Effects of Thermal Aging on Cast Duplex Stainless Steels by Experiment and Finite Element Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarm, Samuel C.; Mburu, Sarah N.; Kolli, Ratna P.; Perea, Daniel E.; Liu, Jia; Ankem, Sreeramamurthy

    2017-02-05

    Cast duplex stainless steel piping in light water nuclear reactors expe- rience thermal aging embrittlement during operational service. Interest in extending the operational life to 80 years requires an increased understanding of the microstructural evolution and corresponding changes in mechanical behavior. We analyze the evolution of the microstructure during thermal aging of cast CF-3 and CF-8 stainless steels using electron microscopy and atom probe tomography. The evolution of the mechanical properties is measured concurrently by mechanical methods such as tensile tests, Charpy V-notch tests, and instrumented nanoinden- tation. A microstructure-based finite element method model is developed and uti- lized in conjunction with the characterization results in order to correlate the local stress-strain effects in the microstructure with the bulk measurements. This work is supported by the DOE Nuclear Energy University Programs (NEUP), contract number DE-NE0000724.

  15. Prediction of microstructure, residual stress, and deformation in laser powder bed fusion process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y. P.; Jamshidinia, M.; Boulware, P.; Kelly, S. M.

    2017-12-01

    Laser powder bed fusion (L-PBF) process has been investigated significantly to build production parts with a complex shape. Modeling tools, which can be used in a part level, are essential to allow engineers to fine tune the shape design and process parameters for additive manufacturing. This study focuses on developing modeling methods to predict microstructure, hardness, residual stress, and deformation in large L-PBF built parts. A transient sequentially coupled thermal and metallurgical analysis method was developed to predict microstructure and hardness on L-PBF built high-strength, low-alloy steel parts. A moving heat-source model was used in this analysis to accurately predict the temperature history. A kinetics based model which was developed to predict microstructure in the heat-affected zone of a welded joint was extended to predict the microstructure and hardness in an L-PBF build by inputting the predicted temperature history. The tempering effect resulting from the following built layers on the current-layer microstructural phases were modeled, which is the key to predict the final hardness correctly. It was also found that the top layers of a build part have higher hardness because of the lack of the tempering effect. A sequentially coupled thermal and mechanical analysis method was developed to predict residual stress and deformation for an L-PBF build part. It was found that a line-heating model is not suitable for analyzing a large L-PBF built part. The layer heating method is a potential method for analyzing a large L-PBF built part. The experiment was conducted to validate the model predictions.

  16. What Develops in Moral Development? A Model of Moral Sensibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherblom, Stephen A.

    2012-01-01

    The field of moral psychology would benefit from an integrative model of what develops in moral development, contextualized within the larger scope of social science research. Moral sensibility is proposed as the best concept to embody stated aims, but the content of this concept must be more finely articulated and conceptualized as a dynamic…

  17. Developing Fast and Reliable Flood Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thrysøe, Cecilie; Toke, Jens; Borup, Morten

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art flood modelling in urban areas are based on distributed physically based models. However, their usage is impeded by high computational demands and numerical instabilities, which make calculations both difficult and time consuming. To address these challenges we develop and test a...... accuracy. The model shows no instability, hence larger time steps can be applied, which reduces the computational time by more than a factor 1400. In conclusion, surrogate models show great potential for usage in urban water modelling.......State-of-the-art flood modelling in urban areas are based on distributed physically based models. However, their usage is impeded by high computational demands and numerical instabilities, which make calculations both difficult and time consuming. To address these challenges we develop and test...

  18. Development of new Co–Cr–W-based biomedical alloys: Effects of microalloying and thermomechanical processing on microstructures and mechanical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamanaka, Kenta; Mori, Manami; Kuramoto, Koji; Chiba, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • A strategy to design Co–Cr–W–Si–C alloys for dental restorations is proposed. • This approach combines microalloying with thermomechanical processing. • Hot-rolled alloys exhibited refined grains and high lattice defect densities. • Static recrystallization during cooling also modifies the mechanical properties. • The designed alloys excel in terms of both fabrication and mechanical properties. - Abstract: The application of computer-aided design and computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) to dentistry has recently attracted considerable attention as a new technique for designing and fabricating custom-made dental implants. Here, a strategy combining microalloying with thermomechanical processing are described to design new Co–28Cr–9W–1Si–C (wt%) alloys for use as disks in the CAD/CAM-based machining of dental restorations. On the basis of our thermodynamic calculations, Si and C were selected as alloying elements that cause the brittle σ phase precipitates to be replaced with the plastically deformable Laves phase and thus enhance the alloy’s hot workability. The effect of thermomechanical processing on the microstructure evolution and mechanical properties of the designed alloys was preliminarily studied by performing multipass hot rolling. The hot-rolled alloys exhibited refined grains (mean grain sizes ∼10 μm) and high densities of lattice defects (dislocations, stacking faults, etc.), both of which were obtained as a result of dynamic recrystallization during hot rolling. It was found experimentally that this approach permits the alloy strength and ductility to be increased simultaneously. The static recrystallization occurring during cooling after deformation also modifies the mechanical properties of the alloys. Carbon doping (<0.1 wt%) increases the amount of precipitates and further improves both the strength and elongation-to-failure of the hot-rolled alloys. Thus, the newly developed alloys have advantageous

  19. Microstructure and mechanical properties of a newly developed low Young's modulus Ti-15Zr-5Cr-2Al biomedical alloy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pan; Wu, Lihong; Feng, Yan; Bai, Jiaming; Zhang, Baicheng; Song, Jie; Guan, Shaokang

    2017-03-01

    The Ti-15Zr-5Cr-2Al alloy has been developed and various heat treatments have been investigated to develop new biomedical materials. It is found that the heat treatment conditions strongly affect the phase constitutions and mechanical properties. The as-cast specimen is comprised of β phase and a small fraction of α phase, which is attributed to the suppression of ω phase caused by adding Al. A high yield strength of 1148±36MPa and moderate Young's modulus of 96±3GPa are obtained in the as-cast specimen. Besides the β phase and α phase, ω phase is also detected in the air cooled and liquid nitrogen quenched specimens, which increases the Young's modulus and lowers the ductility. In contrast, only β phase is detected after ice water quenching. The ice water quenched specimen exhibits a good combination of mechanical properties with a high microhardness of 302±10HV, a large plastic strain of 23±2%, a low Young's modulus of 58±4GPa, a moderate yield strength of 625±32MPa and a high compressive strength of 1880±59MPa. Moreover, the elastic energies of the ice water quenched specimen (3.22MJ/m 3 ) and as-cast specimen (6.86MJ/m 3 ) are higher than that of c.p. Ti (1.25MJ/m 3 ). These results demonstrate that as-cast and ice water quenched Ti-15Zr-5Cr-2Al alloys with a superior combination of mechanical properties are potential materials for biomedical applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. [A staff development model in psychiatric nursing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koen, D; Muller, M; Poggenpoel, M

    1995-03-01

    The nursing service manager is accountable for the quality of nursing care delivered in the nursing service. It is therefore important that the nursing service manager facilitates staff development in the nursing service. It is not only the nursing service manager's responsibility to make provision for staff development--the nurse also has a responsibility in this regard. He/she should purposefully make an effort to keep up to date with the latest developments. This article focuses on the co-responsibility of the psychiatric nurse and nursing service manager regarding staff development. A model for staff development is described, in accordance with the guidelines of Dickoff, James & Wiedenbach for theory development. An inductive approach was primarily followed to describe the provisional model, after which a literature study was employed to refine and purify the model. This model was exposed to expert evaluation, after which the final model for staff development of psychiatric nurses was described. Recommendations include the testing of certain hypotheses and utilisation of this model in psychiatric nursing practice.

  1. PuMA: the Porous Microstructure Analysis software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Joseph C.; Panerai, Francesco; Borner, Arnaud; Mansour, Nagi N.

    2018-01-01

    The Porous Microstructure Analysis (PuMA) software has been developed in order to compute effective material properties and perform material response simulations on digitized microstructures of porous media. PuMA is able to import digital three-dimensional images obtained from X-ray microtomography or to generate artificial microstructures. PuMA also provides a module for interactive 3D visualizations. Version 2.1 includes modules to compute porosity, volume fractions, and surface area. Two finite difference Laplace solvers have been implemented to compute the continuum tortuosity factor, effective thermal conductivity, and effective electrical conductivity. A random method has been developed to compute tortuosity factors from the continuum to rarefied regimes. Representative elementary volume analysis can be performed on each property. The software also includes a time-dependent, particle-based model for the oxidation of fibrous materials. PuMA was developed for Linux operating systems and is available as a NASA software under a US & Foreign release.

  2. Diffusion MRI microstructure models with in vivo human brain Connectome data: results from a multi-group comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferizi, Uran; Scherrer, Benoit; Schneider, Torben; Alipoor, Mohammad; Eufracio, Odin; Fick, Rutger H J; Deriche, Rachid; Nilsson, Markus; Loya-Olivas, Ana K; Rivera, Mariano; Poot, Dirk H J; Ramirez-Manzanares, Alonso; Marroquin, Jose L; Rokem, Ariel; Pötter, Christian; Dougherty, Robert F; Sakaie, Ken; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia; Warfield, Simon K; Witzel, Thomas; Wald, Lawrence L; Raya, José G; Alexander, Daniel C

    2017-09-01

    A large number of mathematical models have been proposed to describe the measured signal in diffusion-weighted (DW) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). However, model comparison to date focuses only on specific subclasses, e.g. compartment models or signal models, and little or no information is available in the literature on how performance varies among the different types of models. To address this deficiency, we organized the 'White Matter Modeling Challenge' during the International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging (ISBI) 2015 conference. This competition aimed to compare a range of different kinds of models in their ability to explain a large range of measurable in vivo DW human brain data. Specifically, we assessed the ability of models to predict the DW signal accurately for new diffusion gradients and b values. We did not evaluate the accuracy of estimated model parameters, as a ground truth is hard to obtain. We used the Connectome scanner at the Massachusetts General Hospital, using gradient strengths of up to 300 mT/m and a broad set of diffusion times. We focused on assessing the DW signal prediction in two regions: the genu in the corpus callosum, where the fibres are relatively straight and parallel, and the fornix, where the configuration of fibres is more complex. The challenge participants had access to three-quarters of the dataset and their models were ranked on their ability to predict the remaining unseen quarter of the data. The challenge provided a unique opportunity for a quantitative comparison of diverse methods from multiple groups worldwide. The comparison of the challenge entries reveals interesting trends that could potentially influence the next generation of diffusion-based quantitative MRI techniques. The first is that signal models do not necessarily outperform tissue models; in fact, of those tested, tissue models rank highest on average. The second is that assuming a non-Gaussian (rather than purely Gaussian) noise model provides

  3. From single-pulsed field gradient to double-pulsed field gradient MR: gleaning new microstructural information and developing new forms of contrast in MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shemesh, Noam; Ozarslan, Evren; Komlosh, Michal E; Basser, Peter J; Cohen, Yoram

    2010-08-01

    One of the hallmarks of diffusion NMR and MRI is its ability to utilize restricted diffusion to probe compartments much smaller than the excited volume or the MRI voxel, respectively, and to extract microstructural information from them. Single-pulsed field gradient (s-PFG) MR methodologies have been employed with great success to probe microstructures in various disciplines, ranging from chemistry to neuroscience. However, s-PFG MR also suffers from inherent shortcomings, especially when specimens are characterized by orientation or size distributions: in such cases, the microstructural information available from s-PFG experiments is limited or lost. Double-pulsed field gradient (d-PFG) MR methodology, an extension of s-PFG MR, has attracted attention owing to recent theoretical studies predicting that it can overcome certain inherent limitations of s-PFG MR. In this review, we survey the microstructural features that can be obtained from conventional s-PFG methods in the different q regimes, and highlight its limitations. The experimental aspects of d-PFG methodology are then presented, together with an overview of its theoretical underpinnings and a general framework for relating the MR signal decay and material microstructure, affording new microstructural parameters. We then discuss recent studies that have validated the theory using phantoms in which the ground truth is well known a priori, a crucial step prior to the application of d-PFG methodology in neuronal tissue. The experimental findings are in excellent agreement with the theoretical predictions and reveal, inter alia, zero-crossings of the signal decay, robustness towards size distributions and angular dependences of the signal decay from which accurate microstructural parameters, such as compartment size and even shape, can be extracted. Finally, we show some initial findings in d-PFG MR imaging. This review lays the foundation for future studies, in which accurate and novel microstructural

  4. Modeling Internet Diffusion in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott McCoy

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Despite the increasing importance of the Internet, there is little work that addresses the degree to which the models and theories of Internet diffusion in developed countries can be applied to Internet diffusion in developing countries. This paper presents the first attempt to address this issue through theory driven modeling of Internet diffusion. Consistent with previous research, our findings suggest that economic development and technology infrastructure are musts for Internet diffusion. Interestingly, users’ cognition and government policies can accelerate Internet diffusion only after a certain level of human rights has been reached in a developing country.

  5. Characterization and reconstruction of 3D stochastic microstructures via supervised learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bostanabad, R; Chen, W; Apley, D W

    2016-12-01

    The need for computational characterization and reconstruction of volumetric maps of stochastic microstructures for understanding the role of material structure in the processing-structure-property chain has been highlighted in the literature. Recently, a promising characterization and reconstruction approach has been developed where the essential idea is to convert the digitized microstructure image into an appropriate training dataset to learn the stochastic nature of the morphology by fitting a supervised learning model to the dataset. This compact model can subsequently be used to efficiently reconstruct as many statistically equivalent microstructure samples as desired. The goal of this paper is to build upon the developed approach in three major directions by: (1) extending the approach to characterize 3D stochastic microstructures and efficiently reconstruct 3D samples, (2) improving the performance of the approach by incorporating user-defined predictors into the supervised learning model, and (3) addressing potential computational issues by introducing a reduced model which can perform as effectively as the full model. We test the extended approach on three examples and show that the spatial dependencies, as evaluated via various measures, are well preserved in the reconstructed samples. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  6. Average-passage flow model development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, John J.; Celestina, Mark L.; Beach, Tim A.; Kirtley, Kevin; Barnett, Mark

    1989-01-01

    A 3-D model was developed for simulating multistage turbomachinery flows using supercomputers. This average passage flow model described the time averaged flow field within a typical passage of a bladed wheel within a multistage configuration. To date, a number of inviscid simulations were executed to assess the resolution capabilities of the model. Recently, the viscous terms associated with the average passage model were incorporated into the inviscid computer code along with an algebraic turbulence model. A simulation of a stage-and-one-half, low speed turbine was executed. The results of this simulation, including a comparison with experimental data, is discussed.

  7. Microstructure-Sensitive Notch Root Analysis for Ni-Base Superalloys (Preprint)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tjiptowidjojo, Yustianto; Shenoy, Mahesh; Przybyla, Craig; McDowell, David

    2007-01-01

    .... An Artificial Neural Network (ANN) is used to correlate the material parameters in an internal state variable cyclic viscoplasticity model with these microstructure plasticity calculations performed on other microstructures...

  8. Simulation Model Development for Mail Screening Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vargo, Trish; Marvin, Freeman; Kooistra, Scott

    2005-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE: Provide decision analysis support to the Homeland Defense Business Unit, Special Projects Team, in developing a simulation model to help determine the most effective way to eliminate backlog...

  9. Formulation and validation of a reduced order model of 2D materials exhibiting a two-phase microstructure as applied to graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedetti, Ivano; Nguyen, Hoang; Soler-Crespo, Rafael A.; Gao, Wei; Mao, Lily; Ghasemi, Arman; Wen, Jianguo; Nguyen, SonBinh; Espinosa, Horacio D.

    2018-03-01

    Novel 2D materials, e.g., graphene oxide (GO), are attractive building blocks in the design of advanced materials due to their reactive chemistry, which can enhance interfacial interactions while providing good in-plane mechanical properties. Recent studies have hypothesized that the randomly distributed two-phase microstructure of GO, which arises due to its oxidized chemistry, leads to differences in nano- vs meso-scale mechanical responses. However, this effect has not been carefully studied using molecular dynamics due to computational limitations. Herein, a continuum mechanics model, formulated based on density functional based tight binding (DFTB) constitutive results for GO nano-flakes, is establish for capturing the effect of oxidation patterns on the material mechanical properties. GO is idealized as a continuum heterogeneous two-phase material, where the mechanical response of each phase, graphitic and oxidized, is informed from DFTB simulations. A finite element implementation of the model is validated via MD simulations and then used to investigate the existence of GO representative volume elements (RVE). We find that for the studied GO, an RVE behavior arises for monolayer sizes in excess to 40 nm. Moreover, we reveal that the response of monolayers with two main different functional chemistries, epoxide-rich and hydroxyl-rich, present distinct differences in mechanical behavior. In addition, we explored the role of defect density in GO, and validate the applicability of the model to larger length scales by predicting membrane deflection behavior, in close agreement with previous experimental and theoretical observations. As such the work presents a reduced order modeling framework applicable in the study of mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms in 2D multiphase materials.

  10. Fully Adaptive Radar Modeling and Simulation Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-01

    AFRL-RY-WP-TR-2017-0074 FULLY ADAPTIVE RADAR MODELING AND SIMULATION DEVELOPMENT Kristine L. Bell and Anthony Kellems Metron, Inc...SMALL BUSINESS INNOVATION RESEARCH (SBIR) PHASE I REPORT. Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. See additional restrictions...2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE FULLY ADAPTIVE RADAR MODELING AND SIMULATION DEVELOPMENT 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA8650-16-M-1774 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c

  11. The Regional Discharge Model development project

    OpenAIRE

    Mäenpää, Tiina; Koivunen, Marita; Lukka, Heli; Wanne, Olli

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Theory The goal of the Regional Discharge Model (RDM) project was to develop discharge models, avoid unnecessary hospitalization, and improves the transfer of the patient to the right follow-on treatment or care, utilizing the public and private sector, research and training as well as developing technologies like the Regional Health Information Systems (RHIS) in the Satakunta Hospital District area. The RDM project is part of the ‘Whole life at home’ initiative funded and administere...

  12. Dynamic Model Development for Interplanetary Navigation

    OpenAIRE

    Eun-Seo Park; Young-Joo Song; Sung-Moon Yoo; Sang-Young Park; Kyu-Hong Choi; Jae-Cheol Yoon; Jo Ryeong Yim; Joon-Min Choi; Byung-Kyo Kim

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, the dynamic model development for interplanetary navigation has been discussed. The Cowell method for special perturbation theories was employed to develop an interplanetary trajectory propagator including the perturbations due to geopotential, the Earth's dynamic polar motion, the gravity of the Sun, the Moon and the other planets in the solar system, the relativistic effect of the Sun, solar radiation pressure, and atmospheric drag. The equations of motion in dynamic model we...

  13. Modelling large-scale hydrogen infrastructure development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Groot, A.; Smit, R.; Weeda, M.

    2005-08-01

    In modelling a possible H2 infrastructure development the following questions are answered in this presentation: How could the future demand for H2 develop in the Netherlands?; and In which year and where would it be economically viable to construct a H2 infrastructure in the Netherlands? Conclusions are that: A model for describing a possible future H2 infrastructure is successfully developed; The model is strongly regional and time dependent; Decrease of fuel cell cost appears to be a sensitive parameter for development of H2 demand; Cost-margin between large-scale and small-scale H2 production is a main driver for development of a H2 infrastructure; A H2 infrastructure seems economically viable in the Netherlands starting from the year 2022

  14. Sectioning Clay Models Makes Anatomy & Development Tangible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Carina Endres; Howell, James Endres

    2010-01-01

    Clay models have proved to be useful teaching aids for many topics in biology that depend on three-dimensional reasoning. Students studying embryonic development struggle to mentally reconstruct the three-dimensional structure of embryos and larvae by observing prepared slides of cross-sectional slices. Students who build clay models of embryos…

  15. Experimental microstructures MOX fuels elaboration; Elaboration de combustible mox a microstructures experimentales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gotta, M.J.; Dubois, S.; Lechelle, J.; Sornay, P

    2000-07-01

    In order to propose a new MOX fuel, owning higher combustion rate, studies are realized at the CEA in collaboration with Cogema, EDF and Framatome. New microstructures of MOX are looked for around two approaches: the grains size and the plutonium distribution. These approaches are presented and discussed in this paper. The first one develops big grains microstructures obtained, either with anionic (sulfur), or cationic (Cr{sub 2}O{sub 3}) additives. The second one concerns the CER-CER type composite microstructures. (A.L.B.)

  16. Developing a TQM quality management method model

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zhihai

    1997-01-01

    From an extensive review of total quality management literature, the external and internal environment affecting an organization's quality performance and the eleven primary elements of TQM are identified. Based on the primary TQM elements, a TQM quality management method model is developed. This model describes the primary quality management methods which may be used to assess an organization's present strengths and weaknesses with regard to its use of quality management methods. This model ...

  17. Compositional Effects on Nickel-Base Superalloy Single Crystal Microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKay, Rebecca A.; Gabb, Timothy P.; Garg,Anita; Rogers, Richard B.; Nathal, Michael V.

    2012-01-01

    Fourteen nickel-base superalloy single crystals containing 0 to 5 wt% chromium (Cr), 0 to 11 wt% cobalt (Co), 6 to 12 wt% molybdenum (Mo), 0 to 4 wt% rhenium (Re), and fixed amounts of aluminum (Al) and tantalum (Ta) were examined to determine the effect of bulk composition on basic microstructural parameters, including gamma' solvus, gamma' volume fraction, volume fraction of topologically close-packed (TCP) phases, phase chemistries, and gamma - gamma'. lattice mismatch. Regression models were developed to describe the influence of bulk alloy composition on the microstructural parameters and were compared to predictions by a commercially available software tool that used computational thermodynamics. Co produced the largest change in gamma' solvus over the wide compositional range used in this study, and Mo produced the largest effect on the gamma lattice parameter and the gamma - gamma' lattice mismatch over its compositional range, although Re had a very potent influence on all microstructural parameters investigated. Changing the Cr, Co, Mo, and Re contents in the bulk alloy had a significant impact on their concentrations in the gamma matrix and, to a smaller extent, in the gamma' phase. The gamma phase chemistries exhibited strong temperature dependencies that were influenced by the gamma and gamma' volume fractions. A computational thermodynamic modeling tool significantly underpredicted gamma' solvus temperatures and grossly overpredicted the amount of TCP phase at 982 C. Furthermore, the predictions by the software tool for the gamma - gamma' lattice mismatch were typically of the wrong sign and magnitude, but predictions could be improved if TCP formation was suspended within the software program. However, the statistical regression models provided excellent estimations of the microstructural parameters based on bulk alloy composition, thereby demonstrating their usefulness.

  18. Modeling of mechanical properties in alpha/beta-titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kar, Sujoy Kumar

    2005-11-01

    The accelerated insertion of titanium alloys in component application requires the development of predictive capabilities for various aspects of their behavior, for example, phase stability, microstructural evolution and property-microstructure relationships over a wide range of length and time scales. In this presentation some navel aspects of property-microstructure relationships and microstructural evolution in alpha/beta Ti alloys will be discussed. Neural Network (NN) Models based on a Bayesian framework have been developed to predict the mechanical properties of alpha/beta Ti alloys. The development of such rules-based model requires the population of extensive databases, which in the present case are microstructurally-based. The steps involved in database development include producing controlled variations of the microstructure using novel approaches to heat-treatments, the use of standardized stereology protocols to characterize and quantify microstructural features rapidly, and mechanical testing of the heat-treated specimens. These databases have been used to train and test NN Models for prediction of mechanical properties. In addition, these models have been used to identify the influence of individual microstructural features on the mechanical properties, consequently guiding the efforts towards development of more robust mechanistically based models. In order to understand the property-microstructure relationships, a detailed understanding of microstructure evolution is imperative. The crystallography of the microstructure developing as a result of the solid-state beta → beta+alpha transformation has been studied in detail by employing Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Orientation Imaging Microscopy (in a high resolution SEM), site-specific TEM sample preparation using focused ion beam, and TEM based techniques. The influence of variant selection on the evolution of microstructure will be specifically addressed.

  19. A Generic Modeling Process to Support Functional Fault Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maul, William A.; Hemminger, Joseph A.; Oostdyk, Rebecca; Bis, Rachael A.

    2016-01-01

    Functional fault models (FFMs) are qualitative representations of a system's failure space that are used to provide a diagnostic of the modeled system. An FFM simulates the failure effect propagation paths within a system between failure modes and observation points. These models contain a significant amount of information about the system including the design, operation and off nominal behavior. The development and verification of the models can be costly in both time and resources. In addition, models depicting similar components can be distinct, both in appearance and function, when created individually, because there are numerous ways of representing the failure space within each component. Generic application of FFMs has the advantages of software code reuse: reduction of time and resources in both development and verification, and a standard set of component models from which future system models can be generated with common appearance and diagnostic performance. This paper outlines the motivation to develop a generic modeling process for FFMs at the component level and the effort to implement that process through modeling conventions and a software tool. The implementation of this generic modeling process within a fault isolation demonstration for NASA's Advanced Ground System Maintenance (AGSM) Integrated Health Management (IHM) project is presented and the impact discussed.

  20. Development and evaluation of a magnesium-zinc-strontium alloy for biomedical applications--alloy processing, microstructure, mechanical properties, and biodegradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Ren-guo; Cipriano, Aaron F; Zhao, Zhan-yong; Lock, Jaclyn; Tie, Di; Zhao, Tong; Cui, Tong; Liu, Huinan

    2013-10-01

    A new biodegradable magnesium-zinc-strontium (Mg-Zn-Sr) alloy was developed and studied for medical implant applications. This first study investigated the alloy processing (casting, rolling, and heat treatment), microstructures, mechanical properties, and degradation properties in simulated body fluid (SBF). Aging treatment of the ZSr41 alloy at 175 °C for 8h improved the mechanical properties when compared to those of the as-cast alloy. Specifically, the aged ZSr41 alloy had an ultimate tensile strength of 270 MPa, Vickers hardness of 71.5 HV, and elongation at failure of 12.8%. The mechanical properties of the ZSr41 alloy were superior as compared with those of pure magnesium and met the requirements for load-bearing medical implants. Furthermore, the immersion of the ZSr41 alloy in SBF showed a degradation mode that progressed cyclically, alternating between pitting and localized corrosion. The steady-state average degradation rate of the aged ZSr41 alloy in SBF was 0.96 g/(m(2)·hr), while the pH of SBF immersion solution increased. The corrosion current density of the ZSr41 alloy in SBF solution was 0.41 mA/mm(2), which was much lower than 1.67 mA/mm(2) for pure Mg under the same conditions. In summary, compared to pure Mg, the mechanical properties of the new ZSr41 alloy improved while the degradation rate decreased due to the addition of Zn and Sr alloying elements and specific processing conditions. The superior mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of the new ZSr41 alloy make it a promising alloy for next-generation implant applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. In situ synthesized TiC/Ti5Si3 nanocomposites by high-energy mechanical alloying: Microstructural development and its mechanism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gu Dongdong; Meiners, Wilhelm; Li Chuang; Shen Yifu

    2010-01-01

    In situ synthesis of TiC/Ti 5 Si 3 nanocomposites powder was performed by high-energy ball milling of a Ti-SiC powder mixture having an 8:3 molar ratio. The 25 h milled final product was featured by the nanocrystalline Ti 5 Si 3 matrix reinforced with the uniformly dispersed TiC nanoparticles. The crystalline size of the in situ formed Ti 5 Si 3 and TiC constituents was ∼14 and ∼8 nm, respectively. The evolutions of constitution phases and particle structures of the milled powders were studied and the predominant mechanisms behind the microstructural developments were elucidated. It showed that the disappearance of X-ray diffraction peaks of SiC in the milling system was significantly behind the disappearance of Ti peaks. The SiC constituent decomposed gradually within 25 h of milling, while the Ti constituent reacted speedily after a relatively short time of 10 h. The structures of the milled TiC/Ti 5 Si 3 nanocomposites powders experienced a successive change: pre-refining - coarsening - re-refining on increasing the applied milling time, due to the competitive action between the mechanisms of cold-welding and fracturing. The plastic deformation and cold-welding occurred at the initial milling stage where the ductile Ti element existed. Only fracturing of the particles was operative in a long-term milling system (≥15 h), due to the formation of brittle intermetallic compound Ti 5 Si 3 and ceramic compound TiC. The refinement of the milled powder particles was based on a layered fracturing mechanism.

  2. Development of Multiscale Materials Modeling Techniques and Coarse- Graining Strategies for Predicting Materials Degradation in Extreme Irradiation Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wirth, Brian [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)

    2016-01-12

    Exposure of metallic structural materials to irradiation environments results in significant microstructural evolution, property changes and performance degradation, which limits the extended operation of current generation light water reactors and restricts the design of advanced fission and fusion reactors [1-8]. This effect of irradiation on materials microstructure and properties is a classic example of an inherently multiscale phenomenon, as schematically illustrated in Figure 1a. Pertinent processes range from the atomic nucleus to structural component length scales, spanning more than 15 orders of magnitude. Time scales bridge more than 22 orders of magnitude, with the shortest being less than a femtosecond [1,8]. Further, the mix of radiation-induced features formed and the corresponding property degradation depend on a wide range of material and irradiation variables. This emphasizes the importance of closely integrating models with high-resolution experimental characterization of the evolving radiation- damaged microstructure, including measurements performed in-situ during irradiation. In this article, we review some recent successes through the use of closely coordinated modeling and experimental studies of the defect cluster evolution in irradiated body-centered cubic materials, followed by a discussion of outstanding challenges still to be addressed, which are necessary for the development of comprehensive models of radiation effects in structural materials.

  3. The development of a sustainable development model framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hannoura, Alim P.; Cothren, Gianna M.; Khairy, Wael M.

    2006-01-01

    The emergence of the 'sustainable development' concept as a response to the mining of natural resources for the benefit of multinational corporations has advanced the cause of long-term environmental management. A sustainable development model (SDM) framework that is inclusive of the 'whole' natural environment is presented to illustrate the integration of the sustainable development of the 'whole' ecosystem. The ecosystem approach is an inclusive framework that covers the natural environment relevant futures and constraints. These are dynamically interconnected and constitute the determinates of resources development component of the SDM. The second component of the SDM framework is the resources development patterns, i.e., the use of land, water, and atmospheric resources. All of these patterns include practices that utilize environmental resources to achieve a predefined outcome producing waste and by-products that require disposal into the environment. The water quality management practices represent the third component of the framework. These practices are governed by standards, limitations and available disposal means subject to quantity and quality permits. These interconnected standards, practices and permits shape the resulting environmental quality of the ecosystem under consideration. A fourth component, environmental indicators, of the SDM framework provides a measure of the ecosystem productivity and status that may differ based on societal values and culture. The four components of the SDM are interwoven into an outcome assessment process to form the management and feedback models. The concept of Sustainable Development is expressed in the management model as an objective function subject to desired constraints imposing the required bounds for achieving ecosystem sustainability. The development of the objective function and constrains requires monetary values for ecosystem functions, resources development activities and environmental cost. The

  4. A quantitative description of the morphological aspects of materials structures suitable for quantitative comparisons of 3D microstructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callahan, P. G.; Simmons, J. P.; De Graef, M.

    2013-01-01

    While several laboratories can produce 3D models of microstructure from serial sectioning or tomography, the more widespread practice is to attempt to infer 3D shapes from 2D sections of different orientations. We have developed a forward modeling approach that, given a 3D particle shape, produces statistically representative 2D sections whose projections are characterized by 2D moment invariants (MI). Since the sectioning plane is random, each particle will produce a statistical distribution of 2D moments and an ensemble of particles in a microstructure will produce its own characteristic distribution of 2D moments and can be used as a representation of the microstructure. This distribution can be represented as a point in a metric space. We use the Hellinger distance as the measure for this space, which allows us to quantify the similarity of two microstructures. Example applications include: determination of a 3D shape by computing the Hellinger distance between MI density maps derived from random 2D section micrographs and the density map database; automated detection and quantification of rafting in cuboidal microstructures; and quantitative comparison of pairs of microstructures.

  5. MODELS OF TOURIST DEVELOPMENT IN THE CONTEXT OF REGIONAL DEVELOPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borma Afrodita

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Third year PhD candidate at the University of Oradea, under the guidance of Professor Mrs. Alina Bădulescu in the doctoral research project entitled: "Doctoral studies and Ph.D. candidates for competitive research on a knowledge based society", a co-financed project by the European Social Fund through the Sectoral Operational Program for Human Resources Development 2007 - 2013, Priority Axis 1. "Education and training in support for growth and development of a knowledge based society" I chose to present this subject in order to demonstrate the connection that exists between tourism and regional development. Having as research topic "Tourism and development in the Euro regional context” I felt it would be appropriate to devote a subchapter in presenting the impact of tourism in regional development. Thus I have analysed a number of specialised papers found at national and international level in order to achieve a synthesis on the approached topic. Authors such as Williams and Shaw (1991, Sharma (2004, Keskin and Cansiz (2010 were concerned with presenting the positive aspects of tourism in regional development. Condes (2004 presents on one hand the secrets regarding success in matter of tourist development, and on the other side he presents the possible risks that follow the development of tourism in a country / region (Condes 2004. Following the gathered information we found that indeed tourism plays an important role in regional development. The used research methodology consisted in using specialised literature in order to identify some models that illustrate the potential success of tourism in regional development. The space-temporal development model of tourism proposed by Opperman (1993, although it was developed at national level represents a useful tool in illustrating the potential success of tourism in regional development. Miossec's model (Sharma 2004:300 describes the structural evolution of touristic regions in

  6. MODEL DRIVEN DEVELOPMENT OF ONLINE BANKING SYSTEMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bresfelean Vasile Paul

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available In case of online applications the cycle of software development varies from the routine. The online environment, the variety of users, the treatability of the mass of information created by them, the reusability and the accessibility from different devices are all factors of these systems complexity. The use of model drive approach brings several advantages that ease up the development process. Working prototypes that simplify client relationship and serve as the base of model tests can be easily made from models describing the system. These systems make possible for the banks clients to make their desired actions from anywhere. The user has the possibility of accessing information or making transactions.