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Sample records for modeling individual effects

  1. Estimation of Nonlinear Dynamic Panel Data Models with Individual Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Hu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper suggests a generalized method of moments (GMM based estimation for dynamic panel data models with individual specific fixed effects and threshold effects simultaneously. We extend Hansen’s (Hansen, 1999 original setup to models including endogenous regressors, specifically, lagged dependent variables. To address the problem of endogeneity of these nonlinear dynamic panel data models, we prove that the orthogonality conditions proposed by Arellano and Bond (1991 are valid. The threshold and slope parameters are estimated by GMM, and asymptotic distribution of the slope parameters is derived. Finite sample performance of the estimation is investigated through Monte Carlo simulations. It shows that the threshold and slope parameter can be estimated accurately and also the finite sample distribution of slope parameters is well approximated by the asymptotic distribution.

  2. Modeling individual effects in the Cormack-Jolly-Seber Model: A state-space formulation

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    Royle, J. Andrew

    2008-01-01

    In population and evolutionary biology, there exists considerable interest in individual heterogeneity in parameters of demographic models for open populations. However, flexible and practical solutions to the development of such models have proven to be elusive. In this article, I provide a state-space formulation of open population capture-recapture models with individual effects. The state-space formulation provides a generic and flexible framework for modeling and inference in models with individual effects, and it yields a practical means of estimation in these complex problems via contemporary methods of Markov chain Monte Carlo. A straightforward implementation can be achieved in the software package WinBUGS. I provide an analysis of a simple model with constant parameter detection and survival probability parameters. A second example is based on data from a 7-year study of European dippers, in which a model with year and individual effects is fitted.

  3. The true-change model with individual method effects : Reliability issues

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    Vautier, Stephane; Steyer, Rolf; Boomsma, Anne

    2008-01-01

    The true intra-individual change model is generalized by defining individual method effects. This allows the analysis of non-congeneric test-retest variables assumed to measure a common, possibly (temporally) transient, attribute. Temporal change in the attribute between different times of measureme

  4. The effect of ignoring individual heterogeneity in Weibull log-normal sire frailty models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Lars Holm; Korsgaard, Inge Riis; Simonsen, J;

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study was, by means of simulation, to quantify the effect of ignoring individual heterogeneity in Weibull sire frailty models on parameter estimates and to address the consequences for genetic inferences. Three simulation studies were evaluated, which included 3 levels...... the software Survival Kit for the incomplete sire model. For the incomplete sire model, the Monte Carlo and Survival Kit parameter estimates were similar. This study established that when unobserved individual heterogeneity was ignored, the parameter estimates that included sire effects were biased toward zero...

  5. Video Modeling for Individuals with Autism: A Review of Model Types and Effects

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    McCoy, Kathleen; Hermansen, Emily

    2007-01-01

    Efficacy research on video modeling as an instructional approach for individuals with autism has been found to be a promising area for teachers and researchers. Over the last three decades the literature has shown successful use of video modeling for teaching a variety of social, academic, and functional skills. The purpose of this literature…

  6. The effect of ignoring individual heterogeneity in Weibull log-normal sire frailty models.

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    Damgaard, L H; Korsgaard, I R; Simonsen, J; Dalsgaard, O; Andersen, A H

    2006-06-01

    The objective of this study was, by means of simulation, to quantify the effect of ignoring individual heterogeneity in Weibull sire frailty models on parameter estimates and to address the consequences for genetic inferences. Three simulation studies were evaluated, which included 3 levels of individual heterogeneity combined with 4 levels of censoring (0, 25, 50, or 75%). Data were simulated according to balanced half-sib designs using Weibull log-normal animal frailty models with a normally distributed residual effect on the log-frailty scale. The 12 data sets were analyzed with 2 models: the sire model, equivalent to the animal model used to generate the data (complete sire model), and a corresponding model in which individual heterogeneity in log-frailty was neglected (incomplete sire model). Parameter estimates were obtained from a Bayesian analysis using Gibbs sampling, and also from the software Survival Kit for the incomplete sire model. For the incomplete sire model, the Monte Carlo and Survival Kit parameter estimates were similar. This study established that when unobserved individual heterogeneity was ignored, the parameter estimates that included sire effects were biased toward zero by an amount that depended in magnitude on the level of censoring and the size of the ignored individual heterogeneity. Despite the biased parameter estimates, the ranking of sires, measured by the rank correlations between true and estimated sire effects, was unaffected. In comparison, parameter estimates obtained using complete sire models were consistent with the true values used to simulate the data. Thus, in this study, several issues of concern were demonstrated for the incomplete sire model.

  7. Changes in speed distribution: Applying aggregated safety effect models to individual vehicle speeds.

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    Vadeby, Anna; Forsman, Åsa

    2017-06-01

    This study investigated the effect of applying two aggregated models (the Power model and the Exponential model) to individual vehicle speeds instead of mean speeds. This is of particular interest when the measure introduced affects different parts of the speed distribution differently. The aim was to examine how the estimated overall risk was affected when assuming the models are valid on an individual vehicle level. Speed data from two applications of speed measurements were used in the study: an evaluation of movable speed cameras and a national evaluation of new speed limits in Sweden. The results showed that when applied on individual vehicle speed level compared with aggregated level, there was essentially no difference between these for the Power model in the case of injury accidents. However, for fatalities the difference was greater, especially for roads with new cameras where those driving fastest reduced their speed the most. For the case with new speed limits, the individual approach estimated a somewhat smaller effect, reflecting that changes in the 15th percentile (P15) were somewhat larger than changes in P85 in this case. For the Exponential model there was also a clear, although small, difference between applying the model to mean speed changes and individual vehicle speed changes when speed cameras were used. This applied both for injury accidents and fatalities. There were also larger effects for the Exponential model than for the Power model, especially for injury accidents. In conclusion, applying the Power or Exponential model to individual vehicle speeds is an alternative that provides reasonable results in relation to the original Power and Exponential models, but more research is needed to clarify the shape of the individual risk curve. It is not surprising that the impact on severe traffic crashes was larger in situations where those driving fastest reduced their speed the most. Further investigations on use of the Power and/or the

  8. Effects of Model Formulation on Estimates of Health in Individual Right Whales (Eubalaena glacialis).

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    Schick, Robert S; Kraus, Scott D; Rolland, Rosalind M; Knowlton, Amy R; Hamilton, Philip K; Pettis, Heather M; Thomas, Len; Harwood, John; Clark, James S

    2016-01-01

    Right whales are vulnerable to many sources of anthropogenic disturbance including ship strikes, entanglement with fishing gear, and anthropogenic noise. The effect of these factors on individual health is unclear. A statistical model using photographic evidence of health was recently built to infer the true or hidden health of individual right whales. However, two important prior assumptions about the role of missing data and unexplained variance on the estimates were not previously assessed. Here we tested these factors by varying prior assumptions and model formulation. We found sensitivity to each assumption and used the output to make guidelines on future model formulation.

  9. The individual tolerance concept is not the sole explanation for the probit dose-effect model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Newman, M.C.; McCloskey, J.T.

    2000-02-01

    Predominant methods for analyzing dose- or concentration-effect data (i.e., probit analysis) are based on the concept of individual tolerance or individual effective dose (IED, the smallest characteristic dose needed to kill an individual). An alternative explanation (stochasticity hypothesis) is that individuals do not have unique tolerances: death results from stochastic processes occurring similarly in all individuals. These opposing hypotheses were tested with two types of experiments. First, time to stupefaction (TTS) was measured for zebra fish (Brachydanio rerio) exposed to benzocaine. The same 40 fish were exposed during five trials to test if the same order for TTS was maintained among trials. The IED hypothesis was supported with a minor stochastic component being present. Second, eastern mosquitofish (Gambusia holbrooki) were exposed to sublethal or lethal NaCl concentrations until a large portion of the lethally exposed fish died. After sufficient time for recovery, fish sublethally exposed and fish surviving lethal exposure were exposed simultaneously to lethal NaCl concentrations. No statistically significant effect was found of previous exposure on survival time but a large stochastic component to the survival dynamics was obvious. Repetition of this second type of test with pentachlorophenol also provided no support for the IED hypothesis. The authors conclude that neither hypothesis alone was the sole or dominant explanation for the lognormal (probit) model. Determination of the correct explanation (IED or stochastic) or the relative contributions of each is crucial to predicting consequences to populations after repeated or chronic exposures to any particular toxicant.

  10. Individual Colorimetric Observer Model.

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    Yuta Asano

    Full Text Available This study proposes a vision model for individual colorimetric observers. The proposed model can be beneficial in many color-critical applications such as color grading and soft proofing to assess ranges of color matches instead of a single average match. We extended the CIE 2006 physiological observer by adding eight additional physiological parameters to model individual color-normal observers. These eight parameters control lens pigment density, macular pigment density, optical densities of L-, M-, and S-cone photopigments, and λmax shifts of L-, M-, and S-cone photopigments. By identifying the variability of each physiological parameter, the model can simulate color matching functions among color-normal populations using Monte Carlo simulation. The variabilities of the eight parameters were identified through two steps. In the first step, extensive reviews of past studies were performed for each of the eight physiological parameters. In the second step, the obtained variabilities were scaled to fit a color matching dataset. The model was validated using three different datasets: traditional color matching, applied color matching, and Rayleigh matches.

  11. Modelling the effects of environmental and individual variability when measuring the costs of first reproduction

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    Barbraud, C.

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available How do animals balance their investment in young against their own chances to survive and reproduce in the future? This life–history trade–off, referred to as the cost of reproduction (Williams, 1966, holds a central place in life–history theory (Roff, 1992; Stearns, 1992; McNamara & Houston, 1996. Because individuals can only acquire a limited amount of energy, reproduction and survival as well as current and future reproduction are considered as functions competing for the same resources. In this framework, individuals may optimise life–history decisions. If the reproductive effort in one year leads to a loss in future reproductive output through decreased adult survival or reduced fecundity, then the optimal effort in the current season is less than the effort that would maximize the number of offspring produced in that season (Charnov & Krebs, 1974. There are at least two kinds of factors likely to confound the measurement of the costs of reproduction in the wild. First, there could be differences in the amount of energy individuals acquire and allocate to various functions. This phenotypic heterogeneity can mask or exacerbate individual allocation patterns when trends are averaged across a population (Vaupel & Yashin, 1985; McDonald et al., 1996; Cam & Monnat, 2000. Second, there could be variations in resource availability affecting energy acquisition and allocation. Theoretical models examining the optimal phenotypic balance between reproduction and survival under variable breeding conditions have investigated the influence of environmental stochasticity on the cost of reproduction in birds (Erikstad et al., 1998; Orzack & Tuljapurkar, 2001. However, there is little empirical evidence supporting these theoretical models. Here, we present analysis of the influence of experience, but also of the differential effects of environmental and individual variation on survival and future breeding probability. We address the question of the

  12. Effects of landscape composition and configuration on migrating songbirds: inference from an individual-based model.

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    Cohen, Emily B; Pearson, Scott M; Moore, Frank R

    2014-01-01

    The behavior of long-distance migrants during stopover is constrained by the need to quickly and safely replenish energetic reserves. Replenishing fuel stores at stopover sites requires adjusting to unfamiliar landscapes with little to no information about the distribution of resources. Despite their critical importance to the success of songbird migration, the effects of landscape composition and configuration on fuel deposition rates (FDR [g/d]), the currency of migration, has not been tested empirically. Our objectives were to understand the effects of heterogeneous landscapes on FDR of forest-dwelling songbirds during spring migration. The results of field experiments were used to parameterize a spatially explicit, individual-based model of forest songbird movement and resulting FDR. Further field experiments were used to validate the results from the individual-based model. In simulation experiments, we altered a Gulf South landscape in a factorial design to predict the effects of future patterns under different scenarios of land use change in which the abundance of high-quality hardwood habitat and the spatial aggregation of habitat varied. Simulated FDR decreased as the amount of hardwood in the landscape decreased from 41% to 22% to 12%. Further, migrants that arrived in higher-quality habitat types gained more mass. Counter to our expectations, FDR was higher with lower spatial aggregation of habitat. Differences in refueling rates may be most influenced by whether or not an individual experiences an initial searching cost after landing in poor-quality habitat. Therefore, quickly locating habitat with sufficient food resources at each stopover may be the most important factor determining a successful migration. Our findings provide empirical evidence for the argument that hardwood forest cover is a primary determinant of the quality of a stopover site in this region. This study represents the first effort to empirically quantify FDRs based on the

  13. A multi-scale modeling framework for individualized, spatiotemporal prediction of drug effects and toxicological risk

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    Juan Guillermo eDiaz Ochoa

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we focus on a novel multi-scale modeling approach for spatiotemporal prediction of the distribution of substances and resulting hepatotoxicity by combining cellular models, a 2D liver model, and whole-body model. As a case study, we focused on predicting human hepatotoxicity upon treatment with acetaminophen based on in vitro toxicity data and potential inter-individual variability in gene expression and enzyme activities. By aggregating mechanistic, genome-based in silico cells to a novel 2D liver model and eventually to a whole body model, we predicted pharmacokinetic properties, metabolism, and the onset of hepatotoxicity in an in silico patient. Depending on the concentration of acetaminophen in the liver and the accumulation of toxic metabolites, cell integrity in the liver as a function of space and time as well as changes in the elimination rate of substances were estimated. We show that the variations in elimination rates also influence the distribution of acetaminophen and its metabolites in the whole body. Our results are in agreement with experimental results. What is more, the integrated model also predicted variations in drug toxicity depending on alterations of metabolic enzyme activities. Variations in enzyme activity, in turn, reflect genetic characteristics or diseases of individuals. In conclusion, this framework presents an important basis for efficiently integrating inter-individual variability data into models, paving the way for personalized or stratified predictions of drug toxicity and efficacy.

  14. Analysis of individual versus group behavior of zebrafish: a model using pH sublethal effects.

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    Magalhães, Danielly de Paiva; Buss, Daniel Forsin; da Cunha, Rodolfo Armando; Linde-Arias, Ana Rosa; Baptista, Darcilio Fernandes

    2012-06-01

    An image analysis biomonitoring system was used to evaluate sublethal effects of pH on the mean swimming velocity of zebrafish. Responses to stress were tested comparing individual and group responses. Group analysis indicated no effect for all acid pH and for pH 9.0-9.5. Individual analysis indicated behavioral differences for most acid pH and higher than 9.5. Sensitivity to sublethal pH was best assessed when using individual analysis. Zebrafish decreased hyperactivity and increased hypoactivity with more acid or alkaline pH. Individual approach allowed to determine hyperactivity or hypoactivity and the species' thresholds of exposure, which is critical for the management of impairments.

  15. A two DOF simulation of meshing in spur gear sets with modelling of the effect of individual tooth mass

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    Komitopoulos, Nikolaos; Vakouftsis, Christos

    2014-10-01

    A Two-Degree Of Freedom analytical model of meshing in a single-stage spur gear set was developed and used for time-domain dynamic simulation. Apart from the time-varying tooth stiffness, the individual tooth mass, reduced to the meshing point, was also taken into consideration and modeled. The simulations that were performed by means of MatLab software using numerical methods highlight the effect of the individual tooth mass in the dynamic response of the gear stage.

  16. Multi-state models for clustered duration data: an application to workplace effects on individual sickness absenteeism

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    Lindeboom, M.; Kerkhofs, M.

    1998-01-01

    In this paper we specify and estimate three state duration models of work, sickness and exit from the job to explain individual absenteeism behaviour of primary school teachers. There is a large variation of sickness absenteeism records across schools and absenteeism records of workers within a school appear to be related. This clustering of individual absenteeism data may to a large extend be caused by workplace effects. Since it will be difficult to fully capture workplace effects with obse...

  17. A Bioecological Model of Mass Trauma: Individual, Community, and Societal Effects

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    Hoffman, Mary Ann; Kruczek, Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Biopsychosocial consequences of catastrophic events create an ongoing need for research that examines the effects of mass traumas, developing psychosocial interventions, and advocacy to address the needs of affected individuals, systems, and communities. Because it is neither possible nor necessarily desirable to intervene with all touched by…

  18. A Bioecological Model of Mass Trauma: Individual, Community, and Societal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Mary Ann; Kruczek, Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Biopsychosocial consequences of catastrophic events create an ongoing need for research that examines the effects of mass traumas, developing psychosocial interventions, and advocacy to address the needs of affected individuals, systems, and communities. Because it is neither possible nor necessarily desirable to intervene with all touched by…

  19. The effects of tree species grouping in tropical rain forest modelling - simulations with the individual based model FORMIND

    OpenAIRE

    Köhler, Peter; Huth, A.

    1998-01-01

    Due to high biodiversity in tropical rainforests, tree species are aggregatedinto functional groups for modelling purposes. In this article the influencesof two different classifications of tropical tree species into functionalgroups on the output of a rainforest model are analysed. The FORMIND modelis documented. FORMIND simulates the tree growth of tropical rainforests.The model is individual-based and developed from the FORMIX3 model. In themodel, trees compete for light and space in plots...

  20. Individual Differences in Equity Models

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    Hofmans, Joeri

    2012-01-01

    In the present paper, we (1) study whether people differ in the equity models they use, and (2) test whether individual differences in equity models relate to individual differences in equity sensitivity. To achieve this goal, an Information Integration experiment was performed in which participants were given information on the performance of two…

  1. Linear mixed-effects models to describe individual tree crown width for China-fir in Fujian Province, southeast China.

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    Xu Hao

    Full Text Available A multiple linear model was developed for individual tree crown width of Cunninghamia lanceolata (Lamb. Hook in Fujian province, southeast China. Data were obtained from 55 sample plots of pure China-fir plantation stands. An Ordinary Linear Least Squares (OLS regression was used to establish the crown width model. To adjust for correlations between observations from the same sample plots, we developed one level linear mixed-effects (LME models based on the multiple linear model, which take into account the random effects of plots. The best random effects combinations for the LME models were determined by the Akaike's information criterion, the Bayesian information criterion and the -2logarithm likelihood. Heteroscedasticity was reduced by three residual variance functions: the power function, the exponential function and the constant plus power function. The spatial correlation was modeled by three correlation structures: the first-order autoregressive structure [AR(1], a combination of first-order autoregressive and moving average structures [ARMA(1,1], and the compound symmetry structure (CS. Then, the LME model was compared to the multiple linear model using the absolute mean residual (AMR, the root mean square error (RMSE, and the adjusted coefficient of determination (adj-R2. For individual tree crown width models, the one level LME model showed the best performance. An independent dataset was used to test the performance of the models and to demonstrate the advantage of calibrating LME models.

  2. Estimating individual influences of behavioral intentions: an application of random-effects modeling to the theory of reasoned action.

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    Hedeker, D; Flay, B R; Petraitis, J

    1996-02-01

    Methods are proposed and described for estimating the degree to which relations among variables vary at the individual level. As an example of the methods, M. Fishbein and I. Ajzen's (1975; I. Ajzen & M. Fishbein, 1980) theory of reasoned action is examined, which posits first that an individual's behavioral intentions are a function of 2 components: the individual's attitudes toward the behavior and the subjective norms as perceived by the individual. A second component of their theory is that individuals may weight these 2 components differently in assessing their behavioral intentions. This article illustrates the use of empirical Bayes methods based on a random-effects regression model to estimate these individual influences, estimating an individual's weighting of both of these components (attitudes toward the behavior and subjective norms) in relation to their behavioral intentions. This method can be used when an individual's behavioral intentions, subjective norms, and attitudes toward the behavior are all repeatedly measured. In this case, the empirical Bayes estimates are derived as a function of the data from the individual, strengthened by the overall sample data.

  3. Nonlinear mixed-effects (NLME diameter growth models for individual China-Fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata trees in Southeast China.

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    Hao Xu

    Full Text Available An individual-tree diameter growth model was developed for Cunninghamia lanceolata in Fujian province, southeast China. Data were obtained from 72 plantation-grown China-fir trees in 24 single-species plots. Ordinary non-linear least squares regression was used to choose the best base model from among 5 theoretical growth equations; selection criteria were the smallest absolute mean residual and root mean square error and the largest adjusted coefficient of determination. To account for autocorrelation in the repeated-measures data, we developed one-level and nested two-level nonlinear mixed-effects (NLME models, constructed on the selected base model; the NLME models incorporated random effects of the tree and plot. The best random-effects combinations for the NLME models were identified by Akaike's information criterion, Bayesian information criterion and -2 logarithm likelihood. Heteroscedasticity was reduced with two residual variance functions, a power function and an exponential function. The autocorrelation was addressed with three residual autocorrelation structures: a first-order autoregressive structure [AR(1], a combination of first-order autoregressive and moving average structures [ARMA(1,1] and a compound symmetry structure (CS. The one-level (tree NLME model performed best. Independent validation data were used to test the performance of the models and to demonstrate the advantage of calibrating the NLME models.

  4. Effects of individual attitudes and motion decisions in room evacuation models

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    Dossetti, Víctor; Kuperman, Marcelo N

    2016-01-01

    In this work we present a model for the evacuation of pedestrians from an enclosure considering a continuous space substrate and discrete time. We analyze the influence of behavioral features that affect the use of the empty space, that can be linked to the attitudes or characters of the pedestrians. We study how the interaction of different behavioral profiles affects the needed time to evacuate completely a room and the occurrence of clogging. We find that neither fully egotistic nor fully cooperative attitudes are optimal from the point of view of the crowd. In contrast, intermediate behaviors provide lower evacuation times. This lead us to identify some phenomena closely analogous to the {\\em faster-is-slower} effect. The proposed model enables for the introduction of Game Theory elements to solve conflicts between pedestrians which try to occupy the same space. Moreover, it allows for distinguishing between the role of the attitudes in the search for empty space and the attitudes in the conflicts. In the...

  5. Multilevel Nonlinear Mixed-Effect Crown Ratio Models for Individual Trees of Mongolian Oak (Quercus mongolica) in Northeast China.

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    Fu, Liyong; Zhang, Huiru; Lu, Jun; Zang, Hao; Lou, Minghua; Wang, Guangxing

    2015-01-01

    In this study, an individual tree crown ratio (CR) model was developed with a data set from a total of 3134 Mongolian oak (Quercus mongolica) trees within 112 sample plots allocated in Wangqing Forest Bureau of northeast China. Because of high correlation among the observations taken from the same sampling plots, the random effects at levels of both blocks defined as stands that have different site conditions and plots were taken into account to develop a nested two-level nonlinear mixed-effect model. Various stand and tree characteristics were assessed to explore their contributions to improvement of model prediction. Diameter at breast height, plot dominant tree height and plot dominant tree diameter were found to be significant predictors. Exponential model with plot dominant tree height as a predictor had a stronger ability to account for the heteroskedasticity. When random effects were modeled at block level alone, the correlations among the residuals remained significant. These correlations were successfully reduced when random effects were modeled at both block and plot levels. The random effects from the interaction of blocks and sample plots on tree CR were substantially large. The model that took into account both the block effect and the interaction of blocks and sample plots had higher prediction accuracy than the one with the block effect and population average considered alone. Introducing stand density into the model through dummy variables could further improve its prediction. This implied that the developed method for developing tree CR models of Mongolian oak is promising and can be applied to similar studies for other tree species.

  6. Estimating multi-factor cumulative watershed effects on fish populations with an individual-based model

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    Bret C. Harvey; Steven F. Railsback

    2007-01-01

    While the concept of cumulative effects is prominent in legislation governing environmental management, the ability to estimate cumulative effects remains limited. One reason for this limitation is that important natural resources such as fish populations may exhibit complex responses to changes in environmental conditions, particularly to alteration of multiple...

  7. AGENT MODEL ANALYSIS TO EXPLORE EFFECTS OF INTERACTION AND ENVIRONMENT ON INDIVIDUAL PERFORMANCE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tomoko KIKUCHI; Yoshiteru NAKAMORI

    2007-01-01

    This paper tries to find interaction rules between members and self-reform rules of members in some scientific research laboratories at a graduate school.The candidate of rules are extracted from the personality description sentences about factors:extroversion,agreeableness,conscientiousness,neuroticism and openness in the big five theory of personality psychology.In this paper,interaction and sel-reform rules are not described by personalities themselves;instead,they are described by corresponding phenomena:activity,empathy,persistence,autonomy,and analytical ability which appear in the behavior side.Each member's initial value is determined from the main 5-factor personality investigation to the member.and the target value is given by the member's self-declaration.The rule selection is carried out by the genetic algorithm,where a sigmoid function is introduced in the renewal algorithm of the value,whereby a difficulty of setting the renewal parameters is avoided.An analysis is added about the obtained rules,and the validity of this approach and the subjects for future study are discussed.Finally.consideration is extended to the effect of environment on the behavior of members to reinforce the set of rules.

  8. Cost-effectiveness of adolescent pertussis vaccination for the Netherlands: using an individual-based dynamic model.

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    Robin de Vries

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Despite widespread immunization programs, a clear increase in pertussis incidence is apparent in many developed countries during the last decades. Consequently, additional immunization strategies are considered to reduce the burden of disease. The aim of this study is to design an individual-based stochastic dynamic framework to model pertussis transmission in the population in order to predict the epidemiologic and economic consequences of the implementation of universal booster vaccination programs. Using this framework, we estimate the cost-effectiveness of universal adolescent pertussis booster vaccination at the age of 12 years in the Netherlands. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We designed a discrete event simulation (DES model to predict the epidemiological and economic consequences of implementing universal adolescent booster vaccination. We used national age-specific notification data over the period 1996-2000--corrected for underreporting--to calibrate the model assuming a steady state situation. Subsequently, booster vaccination was introduced. Input parameters of the model were derived from literature, national data sources (e.g. costing data, incidence and hospitalization data and expert opinions. As there is no consensus on the duration of immunity acquired by natural infection, we considered two scenarios for this duration of protection (i.e. 8 and 15 years. In both scenarios, total pertussis incidence decreased as a result of adolescent vaccination. From a societal perspective, the cost-effectiveness was estimated at €4418/QALY (range: 3205-6364 € per QALY and €6371/QALY (range: 4139-9549 € per QALY for the 8- and 15-year protection scenarios, respectively. Sensitivity analyses revealed that the outcomes are most sensitive to the quality of life weights used for pertussis disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: To our knowledge we designed the first individual-based dynamic framework to model pertussis transmission in

  9. Modeling the population-level effects of hypoxia on a coastal fish: implications of a spatially-explicit individual-based model

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    Rose, K.; Creekmore, S.; Thomas, P.; Craig, K.; Neilan, R.; Rahman, S.; Wang, L.; Justic, D.

    2016-02-01

    The northwestern Gulf of Mexico (USA) currently experiences a large hypoxic area ("dead zone") during the summer. The population-level effects of hypoxia on coastal fish are largely unknown. We developed a spatially-explicit, individual-based model to analyze how hypoxia effects on reproduction, growth, and mortality of individual Atlantic croaker could lead to population-level responses. The model follows the hourly growth, mortality, reproduction, and movement of individuals on a 300 x 800 spatial grid of 1 km2 cells for 140 years. Chlorophyll-a concentration and water temperature were specified daily for each grid cell. Dissolved oxygen (DO) was obtained from a 3-D water quality model for four years that differed in their severity of hypoxia. A bioenergetics model was used to represent growth, mortality was assumed stage- and age-dependent, and movement behavior was based on temperature preferences and avoidance of low DO. Hypoxia effects were imposed using exposure-effects sub-models that converted time-varying exposure to DO to reductions in growth and fecundity, and increases in mortality. Using sequences of mild, intermediate, and severe hypoxia years, the model predicted a 20% decrease in population abundance. Additional simulations were performed under the assumption that river-based nutrients loadings that lead to more hypoxia also lead to higher primary production and more food for croaker. Twenty-five percent and 50% nutrient reduction scenarios were simulated by adjusting the cholorphyll-a concentrations used as food proxy for the croaker. We then incrementally increased the DO concentrations to determine how much hypoxia would need to be reduced to offset the lower food production resulting from reduced nutrients. We discuss the generality of our results, the hidden effects of hypoxia on fish, and our overall strategy of combining laboratory and field studies with modeling to produce robust predictions of population responses to stressors under

  10. From individual to population level effects of toxicants in the tubicifid Branchiura sowerbyi using threshold effect models in a Bayesian framework.

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    Ducrot, Virginie; Billoir, Elise; Péry, Alexandre R R; Garric, Jeanne; Charles, Sandrine

    2010-05-01

    Effects of zinc were studied in the freshwater worm Branchiura sowerbyi using partial and full life-cycle tests. Only newborn and juveniles were sensitive to zinc, displaying effects on survival, growth, and age at first brood at environmentally relevant concentrations. Threshold effect models were proposed to assess toxic effects on individuals. They were fitted to life-cycle test data using Bayesian inference and adequately described life-history trait data in exposed organisms. The daily asymptotic growth rate of theoretical populations was then simulated with a matrix population model, based upon individual-level outputs. Population-level outputs were in accordance with existing literature for controls. Working in a Bayesian framework allowed incorporating parameter uncertainty in the simulation of the population-level response to zinc exposure, thus increasing the relevance of test results in the context of ecological risk assessment.

  11. Gaussian process modeling in conjunction with individual patient simulation modeling: a case study describing the calculation of cost-effectiveness ratios for the treatment of established osteoporosis.

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    Stevenson, M D; Oakley, J; Chilcott, J B

    2004-01-01

    Individual patient-level models can simulate more complex disease processes than cohort-based approaches. However, large numbers of patients need to be simulated to reduce 1st-order uncertainty, increasing the computational time required and often resulting in the inability to perform extensive sensitivity analyses. A solution, employing Gaussian process techniques, is presented using a case study, evaluating the cost-effectiveness of a sample of treatments for established osteoporosis. The Gaussian process model accurately formulated a statistical relationship between the inputs to the individual patient model and its outputs. This model reduced the time required for future runs from 150 min to virtually-instantaneous, allowing probabilistic sensitivity analyses-to be undertaken. This reduction in computational time was achieved with minimal loss in accuracy. The authors believe that this case study demonstrates the value of this technique in handling 1st- and 2nd-order uncertainty in the context of health economic modeling, particularly when more widely used techniques are computationally expensive or are unable to accurately model patient histories.

  12. Individual-Based Spatially-Explicit Model of an Herbivore and Its Resource: The Effect of Habitat Reduction and Fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostova, T; Carlsen, T; Kercher, J

    2002-06-17

    We present an individual-based, spatially-explicit model of the dynamics of a small mammal and its resource. The life histories of each individual animal are modeled separately. The individuals can have the status of residents or wanderers and belong to behaviorally differing groups of juveniles or adults and males or females. Their territory defending and monogamous behavior is taken into consideration. The resource, green vegetation, grows depending on seasonal climatic characteristics and is diminished due to the herbivore's grazing. Other specifics such as a varying personal energetic level due to feeding and starvation of the individuals, mating preferences, avoidance of competitors, dispersal of juveniles, as a result of site overgrazing, etc. are included in the model. We determined model parameters from real data for the species Microtus ochrogaster (prairie vole). The simulations are done for a case of an enclosed habitat without predators or other species competitors. The goal of the study is to find the relation between size of habitat and population persistence. The experiments with the model show the populations go extinct due to severe overgrazing, but that the length of population persistence depends on the area of the habitat as well as on the presence of fragmentation. Additionally, the total population size of the vole population obtained during the simulations exhibits yearly fluctuations as well as multi-yearly peaks of fluctuations. This dynamics is similar to the one observed in prairie vole field studies.

  13. Individual Influence on Model Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sterba, Sonya K.; Pek, Jolynn

    2012-01-01

    Researchers in psychology are increasingly using model selection strategies to decide among competing models, rather than evaluating the fit of a given model in isolation. However, such interest in model selection outpaces an awareness that one or a few cases can have disproportionate impact on the model ranking. Though case influence on the fit…

  14. The effect of education based on individual empowerment model on the quality of life in the menopause women in Zarandieh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mahmood Karimy

    2014-09-01

    Conclusion: The findings support the educational program designed based on empowerment model effects on quality of life, design and performance of similar educational program is recommended to promote the quality of life in menopausal women.

  15. A minimal limit-cycle model to profile movement patterns of individuals during agility drill performance: Effects of skill level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Sina; Arshi, Ahmed Reza; Davids, Keith

    2015-06-01

    Identification of control strategies during agility performance is significant in understanding movement behavior. This study aimed at providing a fundamental mathematical model for describing the motion of participants during an agility drill and to determine whether skill level constrained model components. Motion patterns of two groups of skilled and unskilled participants (n=8 in each) during performance of a forward/backward agility drill modeled as limit-cycles. Participant movements were recorded by motion capture of a reflective marker attached to the sacrum of each individual. Graphical and regression analyses of movement kinematics in Hooke's plane, phase plane and velocity profile were performed to determine components of the models. Results showed that the models of both skilled and unskilled groups had terms from Duffing stiffness as well as Van der Pol damping oscillators. Data also indicated that the proposed models captured on average 97% of the variance for both skilled and unskilled groups. Findings from this study revealed the movement patterning associated with skilled and unskilled performance in a typical forward/backward agility drill which might be helpful for trainers and physiotherapists in enhancing agility.

  16. [The usage of individual-oriented model in studies on the role of the maternal effect in the reproductive switch in Cladocera].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, V R; Kazantseva, T I

    2007-01-01

    An individual-oriented model of the population of Daphnia longispina, an abundant zooplankton species in lakes and temporary water bodies of the Palaearctic temperate zone, is described. The concept of the model is based on the growth and reproduction potential of an individual and its ability to switch from parthenogenesis to gamogenesis, which is determined by the life conditions of three successive generations. The model was used for testing hypotheses on the role of maternal effect in the population dynamics of Daphnia. Several important conclusions are made, including the verification of the importance of this phenomenon for the seasonal adaptations in crustaceans. The possibility of maternal effect accumulation in a series of successive generations probably increases the tolerance of populations to annual oscillations of environmental factors. The model affirms the role of the maternal effect, along with the interpopulational polimorphism, as a mechanism providing for the stability of biological systems at the species (population) level.

  17. EXAMINING THE MODEL OF THE USE OF FACEBOOK EFFECTS ON INDIVIDUAL BEHAVIOR (A Study to the Students of High Schools in Surakarta City

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irwan Christanto Edy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed to examine how the use of facebook affects students’ behavior. The objects of the research were SMK/SMU (high school students in Surakarta City. Data were taken from a random sample comprising of 132 respondents. We used analysis tools such as: 1 Instrument Validity & Reliability test, 2 Descriptive Statistics analysis, and 3 Structural Equation Modeling (SEM analysis. The instrument tests proved that all items in the questionnaire were valid and reliable. The descriptive analysis described our respondents characteristics such as: gender, internet apps used, their school internet facility. By using SEM analysis, we conclude that the use of facebook has significant effect on individual behavior which comprises of 4 indicators: attitude, personality, learning, and perception. T-test results shows that: 1 The use of Facebook has significant effect on individual attitude, 2 The use of Facebook has significant effect on individual personality, 3 The use of Facebook has significant effect on individual learning, 4 The use of Facebook has significant effect on individual perception. Thus, the use of Facebook has significant effects on individual behavior.

  18. Effects of fishing effort allocation scenarios on energy efficiency and profitability: an individual-based model applied to Danish fisheries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastardie, Francois; Nielsen, J. Rasmus; Andersen, Bo Sølgaard

    2010-01-01

    engine specifications, and fish and fuel prices. The outcomes of scenarios A and B indicate a trade-off between fuel savings and energy efficiency improvements when effort is displaced closer to the harbour compared to reductions in total landing amounts and profit. Scenario C indicates that historic...... efficiency (quantity of fish caught per litre of fuel used), and profitability are factors that we simulated in developing a spatially explicit individual-based model (IBM) for fishing vessel movements. The observed spatial and seasonal patterns of fishing effort for each fishing activity are evaluated...... to the harbour, and (C) allocating effort towards optimising the expected area-specific profit per trip. The model is informed by data from each Danish fishing vessel >15 m after coupling its high resolution spatial and temporal effort data (VMS) with data from logbook landing declarations, sales slips, vessel...

  19. Hierarchical mixture models for assessing fingerprint individuality

    OpenAIRE

    Dass, Sarat C.; Li, Mingfei

    2009-01-01

    The study of fingerprint individuality aims to determine to what extent a fingerprint uniquely identifies an individual. Recent court cases have highlighted the need for measures of fingerprint individuality when a person is identified based on fingerprint evidence. The main challenge in studies of fingerprint individuality is to adequately capture the variability of fingerprint features in a population. In this paper hierarchical mixture models are introduced to infer the extent of individua...

  20. Modeling contextual effects using individual-level data and without aggregation: an illustration of multilevel factor analysis (MLFA) with collective efficacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, Erin C; Masyn, Katherine E; Johnston, William R; Subramanian, S V

    2015-01-01

    Population health scientists increasingly study how contextual-level attributes affect individual health. A major challenge in this domain relates to measurement, i.e., how best to measure and create variables that capture characteristics of individuals and their embedded contexts. This paper presents an illustration of multilevel factor analysis (MLFA), an analytic method that enables researchers to model contextual effects using individual-level data without using derived variables. MLFA uses the shared variance in sets of observed items among individuals within the same context to estimate a measurement model for latent constructs; it does this by decomposing the total sample variance-covariance matrix into within-group (e.g., individual-level) and between-group (e.g., contextual-level) matrices and simultaneously modeling distinct latent factor structures at each level. We illustrate the MLFA method using items capturing collective efficacy, which were self-reported by 2,599 adults in 65 census tracts from the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhood Survey (LAFANS). MLFA identified two latent factors at the individual level and one factor at the neighborhood level. Indicators of collective efficacy performed differently at each level. The ability of MLFA to identify different latent factor structures at each level underscores the utility of this analytic tool to model and identify attributes of contexts relevant to health.

  1. The Effects of Consultation on Individualized Education Program Outcomes for Young Children with Autism: The Collaborative Model for Promoting Competence and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruble, Lisa A.; Dalrymple, Nancy J.; McGrew, John H.

    2010-01-01

    The effects of a teacher consultation intervention were examined--namely, the collaborative model for promoting competence and success (COMPASS), which was designed to improve objectives of individualized education programs for children with autism. The intervention consists of an initial parent-teacher consultation, followed by four teacher…

  2. Hierarchical generalized linear models for multiple groups of rare and common variants: jointly estimating group and individual-variant effects.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nengjun Yi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Complex diseases and traits are likely influenced by many common and rare genetic variants and environmental factors. Detecting disease susceptibility variants is a challenging task, especially when their frequencies are low and/or their effects are small or moderate. We propose here a comprehensive hierarchical generalized linear model framework for simultaneously analyzing multiple groups of rare and common variants and relevant covariates. The proposed hierarchical generalized linear models introduce a group effect and a genetic score (i.e., a linear combination of main-effect predictors for genetic variants for each group of variants, and jointly they estimate the group effects and the weights of the genetic scores. This framework includes various previous methods as special cases, and it can effectively deal with both risk and protective variants in a group and can simultaneously estimate the cumulative contribution of multiple variants and their relative importance. Our computational strategy is based on extending the standard procedure for fitting generalized linear models in the statistical software R to the proposed hierarchical models, leading to the development of stable and flexible tools. The methods are illustrated with sequence data in gene ANGPTL4 from the Dallas Heart Study. The performance of the proposed procedures is further assessed via simulation studies. The methods are implemented in a freely available R package BhGLM (http://www.ssg.uab.edu/bhglm/.

  3. Hierarchical Generalized Linear Models for Multiple Groups of Rare and Common Variants: Jointly Estimating Group and Individual-Variant Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Nengjun; Liu, Nianjun; Zhi, Degui; Li, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Complex diseases and traits are likely influenced by many common and rare genetic variants and environmental factors. Detecting disease susceptibility variants is a challenging task, especially when their frequencies are low and/or their effects are small or moderate. We propose here a comprehensive hierarchical generalized linear model framework for simultaneously analyzing multiple groups of rare and common variants and relevant covariates. The proposed hierarchical generalized linear models introduce a group effect and a genetic score (i.e., a linear combination of main-effect predictors for genetic variants) for each group of variants, and jointly they estimate the group effects and the weights of the genetic scores. This framework includes various previous methods as special cases, and it can effectively deal with both risk and protective variants in a group and can simultaneously estimate the cumulative contribution of multiple variants and their relative importance. Our computational strategy is based on extending the standard procedure for fitting generalized linear models in the statistical software R to the proposed hierarchical models, leading to the development of stable and flexible tools. The methods are illustrated with sequence data in gene ANGPTL4 from the Dallas Heart Study. The performance of the proposed procedures is further assessed via simulation studies. The methods are implemented in a freely available R package BhGLM (http://www.ssg.uab.edu/bhglm/). PMID:22144906

  4. Individual tree diameter increment model for managed even-aged stands of ponderosa pine throughout the western United States using a multilevel linear mixed effects model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabian C.C. Uzoh; William W. Oliver

    2008-01-01

    A diameter increment model is developed and evaluated for individual trees of ponderosa pine throughout the species range in the United States using a multilevel linear mixed model. Stochastic variability is broken down among period, locale, plot, tree and within-tree components. Covariates acting at tree and stand level, as breast height diameter, density, site index...

  5. Modeling individual and collective opinion in online social networks: drivers of choice behavior and effects of marketing interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, S.E.; Langley, D.J.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate factors influencing choice behavior in online social networks. We use twitter data from a Dutch television talent show. In study one, we implement a nested conditional logit model with latent classes. We find heterogeneous effects. For two latent classes, cognitive factors most strong

  6. Age-related changes in predictive capacity versus internal model adaptability: electrophysiological evidence that individual differences outweigh effects of age

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina eBornkessel-Schlesewsky

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hierarchical predictive coding has been identified as a possible unifying principle of brain function, and recent work in cognitive neuroscience has examined how it may be affected by age–related changes. Using language comprehension as a test case, the present study aimed to dissociate age-related changes in prediction generation versus internal model adaptation following a prediction error. Event-related brain potentials (ERPs were measured in a group of older adults (60–81 years; n=40 as they read sentences of the form The opposite of black is white/yellow/nice. Replicating previous work in young adults, results showed a target-related P300 for the expected antonym (white; an effect assumed to reflect a prediction match, and a graded N400 effect for the two incongruous conditions (i.e. a larger N400 amplitude for the incongruous continuation not related to the expected antonym, nice, versus the incongruous associated condition, yellow. These effects were followed by a late positivity, again with a larger amplitude in the incongruous non-associated versus incongruous associated condition. Analyses using linear mixed-effects models showed that the target-related P300 effect and the N400 effect for the incongruous non-associated condition were both modulated by age, thus suggesting that age-related changes affect both prediction generation and model adaptation. However, effects of age were outweighed by the interindividual variability of ERP responses, as reflected in the high proportion of variance captured by the inclusion of by-condition random slopes for participants and items. We thus argue that – at both a neurophysiological and a functional level – the notion of general differences between language processing in young and older adults may only be of limited use, and that future research should seek to better understand the causes of interindividual variability in the ERP responses of older adults and its relation to cognitive

  7. Model-based estimation of individual fitness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, W.A.; Cooch, E.G.; Cam, E.

    2002-01-01

    Fitness is the currency of natural selection, a measure of the propagation rate of genotypes into future generations. Its various definitions have the common feature that they are functions of survival and fertility rates. At the individual level, the operative level for natural selection, these rates must be understood as latent features, genetically determined propensities existing at birth. This conception of rates requires that individual fitness be defined and estimated by consideration of the individual in a modelled relation to a group of similar individuals; the only alternative is to consider a sample of size one, unless a clone of identical individuals is available. We present hierarchical models describing individual heterogeneity in survival and fertility rates and allowing for associations between these rates at the individual level. We apply these models to an analysis of life histories of Kittiwakes (Rissa tridactyla ) observed at several colonies on the Brittany coast of France. We compare Bayesian estimation of the population distribution of individual fitness with estimation based on treating individual life histories in isolation, as samples of size one (e.g. McGraw & Caswell, 1996).

  8. Individual Hearing Loss: Characterization, Modelling, Compensation Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob;

    2016-01-01

    account for such individual differences, which make it challenging to find adequate compensation strategies in hearing devices. How to characterize, model, and compensate for individual hearing loss were the main topics of the fifth International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research (ISAAR...

  9. Multilevel mixed effects parametric survival models using adaptive Gauss-Hermite quadrature with application to recurrent events and individual participant data meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowther, Michael J; Look, Maxime P; Riley, Richard D

    2014-09-28

    Multilevel mixed effects survival models are used in the analysis of clustered survival data, such as repeated events, multicenter clinical trials, and individual participant data (IPD) meta-analyses, to investigate heterogeneity in baseline risk and covariate effects. In this paper, we extend parametric frailty models including the exponential, Weibull and Gompertz proportional hazards (PH) models and the log logistic, log normal, and generalized gamma accelerated failure time models to allow any number of normally distributed random effects. Furthermore, we extend the flexible parametric survival model of Royston and Parmar, modeled on the log-cumulative hazard scale using restricted cubic splines, to include random effects while also allowing for non-PH (time-dependent effects). Maximum likelihood is used to estimate the models utilizing adaptive or nonadaptive Gauss-Hermite quadrature. The methods are evaluated through simulation studies representing clinically plausible scenarios of a multicenter trial and IPD meta-analysis, showing good performance of the estimation method. The flexible parametric mixed effects model is illustrated using a dataset of patients with kidney disease and repeated times to infection and an IPD meta-analysis of prognostic factor studies in patients with breast cancer. User-friendly Stata software is provided to implement the methods. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Error propagation models to examine the effects of geocoding quality on spatial analysis of individual-level datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zandbergen, P A; Hart, T C; Lenzer, K E; Camponovo, M E

    2012-04-01

    The quality of geocoding has received substantial attention in recent years. A synthesis of published studies shows that the positional errors of street geocoding are somewhat unique relative to those of other types of spatial data: (1) the magnitude of error varies strongly across urban-rural gradients; (2) the direction of error is not uniform, but strongly associated with the properties of local street segments; (3) the distribution of errors does not follow a normal distribution, but is highly skewed and characterized by a substantial number of very large error values; and (4) the magnitude of error is spatially autocorrelated and is related to properties of the reference data. This makes it difficult to employ analytic approaches or Monte Carlo simulations for error propagation modeling because these rely on generalized statistical characteristics. The current paper describes an alternative empirical approach to error propagation modeling for geocoded data and illustrates its implementation using three different case-studies of geocoded individual-level datasets. The first case-study consists of determining the land cover categories associated with geocoded addresses using a point-in-raster overlay. The second case-study consists of a local hotspot characterization using kernel density analysis of geocoded addresses. The third case-study consists of a spatial data aggregation using enumeration areas of varying spatial resolution. For each case-study a high quality reference scenario based on address points forms the basis for the analysis, which is then compared to the result of various street geocoding techniques. Results show that the unique nature of the positional error of street geocoding introduces substantial noise in the result of spatial analysis, including a substantial amount of bias for some analysis scenarios. This confirms findings from earlier studies, but expands these to a wider range of analytical techniques.

  11. Crosslinking with transglutaminase does not change metabolic effects of sodium caseinate in model beverage in healthy young individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juvonen Kristiina R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Postprandial metabolic and appetitive responses of proteins are dependent on protein source and processing technique prior to ingestion. Studies on the postprandial effects of enzymatic crosslinking of milk proteins are sparse. Our aim was to study the effect of transglutaminase (TG-induced crosslinking of sodium caseinate on postprandial metabolic and appetite responses. Whey protein was included as reference protein. Methods Thirteen healthy individuals (23.3 ± 1.1 y, BMI 21.7 ± 0.4 kg/m2 participated in a single-blind crossover design experiment in which the subjects consumed three different isovolumic (500 g pourable beverages containing either sodium caseinate (Cas, 29 g, TG-treated sodium caseinate (Cas-TG, 29 g or whey protein (Wh, 30 g in a randomized order. Blood samples were collected at baseline and for 4 h postprandially for the determination of plasma glucose, insulin and amino acid (AA concentrations. Gastric emptying (GE was measured using the 13 C-breath test method. Appetite was assessed using visual analogue scales. Results All examined postprandial responses were comparable with Cas and Cas-TG. The protein type used in the beverages was reflected as differences in plasma AA concentrations between Wh and Cas, but there were no differences in plasma glucose or insulin responses. A tendency for faster GE rate after Wh was detected. Appetite ratings or subsequent energy intake did not differ among the protein beverages. Conclusions Our results indicate that the metabolic responses of enzymatically crosslinked and native sodium caseinate in a liquid matrix are comparable, suggesting similar digestion and absorption rates and first pass metabolism despite the structural modification of Cas-TG.

  12. Assessing the effect of quantitative and qualitative predictors on gastric cancer individuals survival using hierarchical artificial neural network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amiri, Zohreh; Mohammad, Kazem; Mahmoudi, Mahmood; Parsaeian, Mahbubeh; Zeraati, Hojjat

    2013-01-01

    ). Probabilities of survival were calculated using three neural network models with 3, 5, and 7 nodes in the hidden layer, and it has been observed that none of the predictions was significantly different from results with the Kaplan-Meier method and they appeared more comparable towards the last months (fifth year). However, we observed better accuracy using the neural network with 5 nodes in the hidden layer. Using the Cox proportional hazards and a neural network with 3 nodes in the hidden layer, we found enhanced accuracy with the neural network model. Neural networks can provide more accurate predictions for survival probabilities compared to the Cox proportional hazards mode, especially now that advances in computer sciences have eliminated limitations associated with complex computations. It is not recommended in order to adding too many hidden layer nodes because sample size related effects can reduce the accuracy. We recommend increasing the number of nodes to a point that increased accuracy continues (decrease in mean standard error), however increasing nodes should cease when a change in this trend is observed.

  13. Routine OGTT: a robust model including incretin effect for precise identification of insulin sensitivity and secretion in a single individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Gaetano, Andrea; Panunzi, Simona; Matone, Alice; Samson, Adeline; Vrbikova, Jana; Bendlova, Bela; Pacini, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    In order to provide a method for precise identification of insulin sensitivity from clinical Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) observations, a relatively simple mathematical model (Simple Interdependent glucose/insulin MOdel SIMO) for the OGTT, which coherently incorporates commonly accepted physiological assumptions (incretin effect and saturating glucose-driven insulin secretion) has been developed. OGTT data from 78 patients in five different glucose tolerance groups were analyzed: normal glucose tolerance (NGT), impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), impaired fasting glucose (IFG), IFG+IGT, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). A comparison with the 2011 Salinari (COntinuos GI tract MOdel, COMO) and the 2002 Dalla Man (Dalla Man MOdel, DMMO) models was made with particular attention to insulin sensitivity indices ISCOMO, ISDMMO and kxgi (the insulin sensitivity index for SIMO). ANOVA on kxgi values across groups resulted significant overall (P<0.001), and post-hoc comparisons highlighted the presence of three different groups: NGT (8.62×10(-5)±9.36×10(-5) min(-1)pM(-1)), IFG (5.30×10(-5)±5.18×10(-5)) and combined IGT, IFG+IGT and T2DM (2.09×10(-5)±1.95×10(-5), 2.38×10(-5)±2.28×10(-5) and 2.38×10(-5)±2.09×10(-5) respectively). No significance was obtained when comparing ISCOMO or ISDMMO across groups. Moreover, kxgi presented the lowest sample average coefficient of variation over the five groups (25.43%), with average CVs for ISCOMO and ISDMMO of 70.32% and 57.75% respectively; kxgi also presented the strongest correlations with all considered empirical measures of insulin sensitivity. While COMO and DMMO appear over-parameterized for fitting single-subject clinical OGTT data, SIMO provides a robust, precise, physiologically plausible estimate of insulin sensitivity, with which habitual empirical insulin sensitivity indices correlate well. The kxgi index, reflecting insulin secretion dependency on glycemia, also significantly differentiates clinically

  14. Routine OGTT: a robust model including incretin effect for precise identification of insulin sensitivity and secretion in a single individual.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea De Gaetano

    Full Text Available In order to provide a method for precise identification of insulin sensitivity from clinical Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT observations, a relatively simple mathematical model (Simple Interdependent glucose/insulin MOdel SIMO for the OGTT, which coherently incorporates commonly accepted physiological assumptions (incretin effect and saturating glucose-driven insulin secretion has been developed. OGTT data from 78 patients in five different glucose tolerance groups were analyzed: normal glucose tolerance (NGT, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT, impaired fasting glucose (IFG, IFG+IGT, and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM. A comparison with the 2011 Salinari (COntinuos GI tract MOdel, COMO and the 2002 Dalla Man (Dalla Man MOdel, DMMO models was made with particular attention to insulin sensitivity indices ISCOMO, ISDMMO and kxgi (the insulin sensitivity index for SIMO. ANOVA on kxgi values across groups resulted significant overall (P<0.001, and post-hoc comparisons highlighted the presence of three different groups: NGT (8.62×10(-5±9.36×10(-5 min(-1pM(-1, IFG (5.30×10(-5±5.18×10(-5 and combined IGT, IFG+IGT and T2DM (2.09×10(-5±1.95×10(-5, 2.38×10(-5±2.28×10(-5 and 2.38×10(-5±2.09×10(-5 respectively. No significance was obtained when comparing ISCOMO or ISDMMO across groups. Moreover, kxgi presented the lowest sample average coefficient of variation over the five groups (25.43%, with average CVs for ISCOMO and ISDMMO of 70.32% and 57.75% respectively; kxgi also presented the strongest correlations with all considered empirical measures of insulin sensitivity. While COMO and DMMO appear over-parameterized for fitting single-subject clinical OGTT data, SIMO provides a robust, precise, physiologically plausible estimate of insulin sensitivity, with which habitual empirical insulin sensitivity indices correlate well. The kxgi index, reflecting insulin secretion dependency on glycemia, also significantly differentiates clinically

  15. Individual Hearing Loss: Characterization, Modelling, Compensation Strategies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Santurette, Sébastien; Dau, Torsten; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    It is well-established that hearing loss does not only lead to a reduction of hearing sensitivity. Large individual differences are typically observed among listeners with hearing impairment in a wide range of suprathreshold auditory measures. In many cases, audiometric thresholds cannot fully...... account for such individual differences, which make it challenging to find adequate compensation strategies in hearing devices. How to characterize, model, and compensate for individual hearing loss were the main topics of the fifth International Symposium on Auditory and Audiological Research (ISAAR...

  16. Individual eye model based on wavefront aberration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Huanqing; Wang, Zhaoqi; Zhao, Qiuling; Quan, Wei; Wang, Yan

    2005-03-01

    Based on the widely used Gullstrand-Le Grand eye model, the individual human eye model has been established here, which has individual corneal data, anterior chamber depth and the eyeball depth. Furthermore, the foremost thing is that the wavefront aberration calculated from the individual eye model is equal to the eye's wavefront aberration measured with the Hartmann-shack wavefront sensor. There are four main steps to build the model. Firstly, the corneal topography instrument was used to measure the corneal surfaces and depth. And in order to input cornea into the optical model, high-order aspheric surface-Zernike Fringe Sag surface was chosen to fit the corneal surfaces. Secondly, the Hartmann-shack wavefront sensor, which can offer the Zernike polynomials to describe the wavefront aberration, was built to measure the wavefront aberration of the eye. Thirdly, the eye's axial lengths among every part were measured with A-ultrasonic technology. Then the data were input into the optical design software-ZEMAX and the crystalline lens's shapes were optimized with the aberration as the merit function. The individual eye model, which has the same wavefront aberrations with the real eye, is established.

  17. Bivalves: From individual to population modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraiva, S.; van der Meer, J.; Kooijman, S. A. L. M.; Ruardij, P.

    2014-11-01

    An individual based population model for bivalves was designed, built and tested in a 0D approach, to simulate the population dynamics of a mussel bed located in an intertidal area. The processes at the individual level were simulated following the dynamic energy budget theory, whereas initial egg mortality, background mortality, food competition, and predation (including cannibalism) were additional population processes. Model properties were studied through the analysis of theoretical scenarios and by simulation of different mortality parameter combinations in a realistic setup, imposing environmental measurements. Realistic criteria were applied to narrow down the possible combination of parameter values. Field observations obtained in the long-term and multi-station monitoring program were compared with the model scenarios. The realistically selected modeling scenarios were able to reproduce reasonably the timing of some peaks in the individual abundances in the mussel bed and its size distribution but the number of individuals was not well predicted. The results suggest that the mortality in the early life stages (egg and larvae) plays an important role in population dynamics, either by initial egg mortality, larvae dispersion, settlement failure or shrimp predation. Future steps include the coupling of the population model with a hydrodynamic and biogeochemical model to improve the simulation of egg/larvae dispersion, settlement probability, food transport and also to simulate the feedback of the organisms' activity on the water column properties, which will result in an improvement of the food quantity and quality characterization.

  18. Crosslinking with transglutaminase does not change metabolic effects of sodium caseinate in model beverage in healthy young individuals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Juvonen, Kristiina R; Lille, Martina E; Laaksonen, David E; Mykkänen, Hannu M; Niskanen, Leo K; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Poutanen, Kaisa S; Karhunen, Leila J

    2012-01-01

    .... Whey protein was included as reference protein. Thirteen healthy individuals (23.3 ± 1.1 y, BMI 21.7 ± 0.4 kg/m2) participated in a single-blind crossover design experiment in which the subjects consumed three different isovolumic...

  19. Modelling larval movement data from individual bioassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLellan, Chris R; Worton, Bruce J; Deasy, William; Birch, A Nicholas E

    2015-05-01

    We consider modelling the movements of larvae using individual bioassays in which data are collected at a high-frequency rate of five observations per second. The aim is to characterize the behaviour of the larvae when exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. Mixtures of diffusion processes, as well as Hidden Markov models, are proposed as models of larval movement. These models account for directed and localized movements, and successfully distinguish between the behaviour of larvae exposed to attractant and repellent compounds. A simulation study illustrates the advantage of using a Hidden Markov model rather than a simpler mixture model. Practical aspects of model estimation and inference are considered on extensive data collected in a study of novel approaches for the management of cabbage root fly.

  20. Individual cortical current density reconstructions of the semantic N400 effect: using a generalized minimum norm model with different constraints (L1 and L2 norm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haan, H; Streb, J; Bien, S; Rösler, F

    2000-11-01

    Event-related brain potentials were recorded to study whether verbs and nouns activate topographically distinct cortical generators. Fifteen subjects performed a primed lexical decision task with verb/verb and noun/noun pairs. The relatedness between prime and target items was varied in three steps (unrelated, moderately, and strongly related) and the EEG was recorded from 124 scalp electrodes. The topography of cortical sources of the N400 effect was evaluated by standardized differences scores and by cortical current source estimates which were constrained by the individual MRI-determined cortex anatomy. A behavioral priming effect and a substantial N400 effect was found for both word categories. However, the topography of the grand average N400 effect of verbs and nouns did not differ, neither for raw nor for standardized amplitudes. Cortical current source estimates of the N400 effect revealed a very broad and scattered distribution of active locations with pronounced interindividual differences. Cortical current source estimates obtained with the L1-norm and L2-norm model, respectively, differed in the distribution of sources over the cortex but converged on the same "hot spots." The data give no indication that the N400 effect is generated by word category-specific networks which have a different topography. The marked individual differences are discussed with respect to the involved processes and the current source estimation procedures.

  1. Analysis of the effect of inoculum characteristics on the first stages of a growing yeast population in beer fermentations by means of an individual-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginovart, M; Prats, C; Portell, X; Silbert, M

    2011-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a limited replicative lifespan. The cell mass at division is partitioned unequally between a larger, old parent cell and a smaller, new daughter cell. Industrial beer fermentations maintain and reuse yeast. At the end of fermentation a portion of the yeast is 'cropped' from the vessel for 'serial repitching'. Harvesting yeast may select a population with an imbalance of young and aged individuals, but the output of any bioprocess is dependent on the physiology of each single cell in the population. Unlike continuous models, individual-based modelling is an approach that considers each microbe as an individual, a unique and discrete entity, with characteristics that change throughout its life. The aim of this contribution is to explore, by means of individual-based simulations, the effects of inoculum size and cell genealogical age on the dynamics of virtual yeast fermentation, focussing on: (1) the first stages of population growth, (2) the mean biomass evolution of the population, (3) the rate of glucose uptake and ethanol production, and (4) the biomass and genealogical age distributions. The ultimate goal is to integrate these results in order to make progress in the understanding of the composition of yeast populations and their temporal evolution in beer fermentations. Simulation results show that there is a clear influence of these initial features of the inocula on the subsequent growth dynamics. By contrasting both the individual and global properties of yeast cells and populations, we gain insight into the interrelation between these two types of data, which helps us to deal with the macroscopic behaviour observed in experimental research.

  2. Legacy effects of wildfire on stream thermal regimes and rainbow trout ecology: an integrated analysis of observation and individual-based models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Amanda E.; Dunham, Jason B.; Neuswanger, Jason R.; Railsback, Steven F.

    2015-01-01

    Management of aquatic resources in fire-prone areas requires understanding of fish species’ responses to wildfire and of the intermediate- and long-term consequences of these disturbances. We examined Rainbow Trout populations in 9 headwater streams 10 y after a major wildfire: 3 with no history of severe wildfire in the watershed (unburned), 3 in severely burned watersheds (burned), and 3 in severely burned watersheds subjected to immediate events that scoured the stream channel and eliminated streamside vegetation (burned and reorganized). Results of a previous study of this system suggested the primary lasting effects of this wildfire history on headwater stream habitat were differences in canopy cover and solar radiation, which led to higher summer stream temperatures. Nevertheless, trout were present throughout streams in burned watersheds. Older age classes were least abundant in streams draining watersheds with a burned and reorganized history, and individuals >1 y old were most abundant in streams draining watersheds with an unburned history. Burned history corresponded with fast growth, low lipid content, and early maturity of Rainbow Trout. We used an individual-based model of Rainbow Trout growth and demographic patterns to determine if temperature interactions with bioenergetics and competition among individuals could lead to observed phenotypic and ecological differences among populations in the absence of other plausible mechanisms. Modeling suggested that moderate warming associated with wildfire and channel disturbance history leads to faster individual growth, which exacerbates competition for limited food, leading to decreases in population densities. The inferred mechanisms from this modeling exercise suggest the transferability of ecological patterns to a variety of temperature-warming scenarios.

  3. INDIVIDUAL DIFFERENCES IN THE IRRELEVANT SPEECH EFFECT

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    MIYAHARA, Michiko; GOSHIKI, Toru

    2004-01-01

    This study examines the effect of irrelevant speech effect on a serial recall task, focusing on individual difference indexes, such as introversion/extraversion, field dependence/independence, and reading span...

  4. Effects of departing individuals on collective behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yuta; Okuda, Shoma; Migita, Masao; Murakami, Hisashi; Tomaru, Takenori

    2017-07-01

    Utilizing living organisms' abilities is an effective approach to realize flexible and unconventional computing. One possible bio-inspired computer might be developed from animal collective research by clarifying collective behaviors. Therefore, it is important to reveal how collective animal behaviors emerge. In many studies, individuals departing from the other individualsare generally ignored. Is it not possible that such departing individuals contribute to the organization of such collectives? To investigate the effects of individuals departing from a collective against collective behaviors, we observed and analyzed the behaviors of 40 soldier crabs in four types of experimental arenas. The recorded behaviors demonstrate a temporally changing pattern and the existence of departing individuals. We analyzed the relationship between global activity and cohesion levels and verified the features of departing individuals. The results imply that departing individuals contribute to collective behaviors.

  5. Understanding the effects of different HIV transmission models in individual-based microsimulation of HIV epidemic dynamics in people who inject drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monteiro, J F G; Escudero, D J; Weinreb, C; Flanigan, T; Galea, S; Friedman, S R; Marshall, B D L

    2016-06-01

    We investigated how different models of HIV transmission, and assumptions regarding the distribution of unprotected sex and syringe-sharing events ('risk acts'), affect quantitative understanding of HIV transmission process in people who inject drugs (PWID). The individual-based model simulated HIV transmission in a dynamic sexual and injecting network representing New York City. We constructed four HIV transmission models: model 1, constant probabilities; model 2, random number of sexual and parenteral acts; model 3, viral load individual assigned; and model 4, two groups of partnerships (low and high risk). Overall, models with less heterogeneity were more sensitive to changes in numbers risk acts, producing HIV incidence up to four times higher than that empirically observed. Although all models overestimated HIV incidence, micro-simulations with greater heterogeneity in the HIV transmission modelling process produced more robust results and better reproduced empirical epidemic dynamics.

  6. Potential effects of maternal contribution on egg and larva population dynamics of striped bass: Integrated individual-based model and directed field sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, J.H., Jr. (Maryland Univ., Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.); Rose, K.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01

    We have used a bioenergetically-driven, individual-based model (IBM) of striped bass as a framework for synthesizing available information on population biology and quantifying, in a relative sense, factors that potentially affect year class success. The IBM has been configured to simulate environmental conditions experienced by several striped bass populations; i.e., in the Potomac River, MD; in Hudson River, NY; in the Santee-Cooper River System, SC, and; in the San Joaquin-Sacramento River System CA. These sites represent extremes in the geographic distribution and thus, environmental variability of striped bass spawning. At each location, data describing the physio-chemical and biological characteristics of the spawning population and nursery area are being collected and synthesized by means of a prioritized, directed field sampling program that is organized by the individual-based recruitment model. Here, we employ the striped bass IBM configured for the Potomac River, MD from spawning into the larval period to evaluate the potential for maternal contribution to affect larva survival and growth. Model simulations in which the size distribution and spawning day of females are altered indicate that larva survival is enhanced (3.3-fold increase) when a high fraction of females in the spawning population are large. Larva stage duration also is less ({bar X} = 18.4 d and 22.2 d) when large and small females, respectively, are mothers in simulations. Although inconclusive, these preliminary results for Potomac River striped bass suggest that the effects of female size, timing of spawning nad maternal contribution on recruitment dynamics potentially are important and illustrate our approach to the study of recruitment in striped bass. We hope to use the model, field collections and management alternatives that vary from site to site, in an iterative manner for some time to come. 54 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  7. Potential effects of maternal contribution on egg and larva population dynamics of striped bass: Integrated individual-based model and directed field sampling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowan, J.H., Jr. (Maryland Univ., Solomons, MD (United States). Chesapeake Biological Lab.); Rose, K.A. (Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States))

    1991-01-01

    We have used a bioenergetically-driven, individual-based model (IBM) of striped bass as a framework for synthesizing available information on population biology and quantifying, in a relative sense, factors that potentially affect year class success. The IBM has been configured to simulate environmental conditions experienced by several striped bass populations; i.e., in the Potomac River, MD; in Hudson River, NY; in the Santee-Cooper River System, SC, and; in the San Joaquin-Sacramento River System CA. These sites represent extremes in the geographic distribution and thus, environmental variability of striped bass spawning. At each location, data describing the physio-chemical and biological characteristics of the spawning population and nursery area are being collected and synthesized by means of a prioritized, directed field sampling program that is organized by the individual-based recruitment model. Here, we employ the striped bass IBM configured for the Potomac River, MD from spawning into the larval period to evaluate the potential for maternal contribution to affect larva survival and growth. Model simulations in which the size distribution and spawning day of females are altered indicate that larva survival is enhanced (3.3-fold increase) when a high fraction of females in the spawning population are large. Larva stage duration also is less ({bar X} = 18.4 d and 22.2 d) when large and small females, respectively, are mothers in simulations. Although inconclusive, these preliminary results for Potomac River striped bass suggest that the effects of female size, timing of spawning nad maternal contribution on recruitment dynamics potentially are important and illustrate our approach to the study of recruitment in striped bass. We hope to use the model, field collections and management alternatives that vary from site to site, in an iterative manner for some time to come. 54 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Individualized Positron Emission Tomography–Based Isotoxic Accelerated Radiation Therapy Is Cost-Effective Compared With Conventional Radiation Therapy: A Model-Based Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bongers, Mathilda L., E-mail: ml.bongers@vumc.nl [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Coupé, Veerle M.H. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); De Ruysscher, Dirk [Radiation Oncology University Hospitals Leuven/KU Leuven, Leuven (Belgium); Department of Radiation Oncology, GROW Research Institute, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Oberije, Cary; Lambin, Philippe [Department of Radiation Oncology, GROW Research Institute, Maastricht University Medical Center, Maastricht (Netherlands); Uyl-de Groot, Cornelia A. [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam (Netherlands); Institute for Medical Technology Assessment, Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam (Netherlands)

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate long-term health effects, costs, and cost-effectiveness of positron emission tomography (PET)-based isotoxic accelerated radiation therapy treatment (PET-ART) compared with conventional fixed-dose CT-based radiation therapy treatment (CRT) in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Our analysis uses a validated decision model, based on data of 200 NSCLC patients with inoperable stage I-IIIB. Clinical outcomes, resource use, costs, and utilities were obtained from the Maastro Clinic and the literature. Primary model outcomes were the difference in life-years (LYs), quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), costs, and the incremental cost-effectiveness and cost/utility ratio (ICER and ICUR) of PET-ART versus CRT. Model outcomes were obtained from averaging the predictions for 50,000 simulated patients. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis and scenario analyses were carried out. Results: The average incremental costs per patient of PET-ART were €569 (95% confidence interval [CI] €−5327-€6936) for 0.42 incremental LYs (95% CI 0.19-0.61) and 0.33 QALYs gained (95% CI 0.13-0.49). The base-case scenario resulted in an ICER of €1360 per LY gained and an ICUR of €1744 per QALY gained. The probabilistic analysis gave a 36% probability that PET-ART improves health outcomes at reduced costs and a 64% probability that PET-ART is more effective at slightly higher costs. Conclusion: On the basis of the available data, individualized PET-ART for NSCLC seems to be cost-effective compared with CRT.

  9. A microcosmic discrete occupant evacuation model based on individual characteristics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Lizhong; LI Jian; ZHAO Daoliang; FANG Weifeng; FAN Weicheng

    2004-01-01

    The research of occupant evacuation in an emergency is of great benefit to building design and evacuation guidance. In this paper a microcosmic discrete evacuation model based on Cellular Automata (CA) is presented, in which the occupants' individual characteristics are considered. Thus, our model has given a description of evacuation route choice with influencing factors, including: individual knowledge of the building,individual realization of the emergency development, and the attractive and repulsive force between occupants. This model differs somewhat from other models in the attention to the associative and separate effect of influencing factors, based on occupant's behaviors. In addition, the model could reveal the phenomenon of escape in fire, as those simulations involving a fire condition have shown.

  10. Effective Free Energy for Individual Dynamics

    CERN Document Server

    Grauwin, Sebastian; Bertin, Eric; Jensen, Pablo; 10.1142/S0219525911003128

    2011-01-01

    Physics and economics are two disciplines that share the common challenge of linking microscopic and macroscopic behaviors. However, while physics is based on collective dynamics, economics is based on individual choices. This conceptual difference is one of the main obstacles one has to overcome in order to characterize analytically economic models. In this paper, we build both on statistical mechanics and the game theory notion of Potential Function to introduce a rigorous generalization of the physicist's free energy, which includes individual dynamics. Our approach paves the way to analytical treatments of a wide range of socio-economic models and might bring new insights into them. As first examples, we derive solutions for a congestion model and a residential segregation model.

  11. Trajectories and models of individual growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arseniy Karkach

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available It has long been recognized that the patterns of growth play an important role in the evolution of age trajectories of fertility and mortality (Williams, 1957. Life history studies would benefit from a better understanding of strategies and mechanisms of growth, but still no comparative research on individual growth strategies has been conducted. Growth patterns and methods have been shaped by evolution and a great variety of them are observed. Two distinct patterns - determinate and indeterminate growth - are of a special interest for these studies since they present qualitatively different outcomes of evolution. We attempt to draw together studies covering growth in plant and animal species across a wide range of phyla focusing primarily on the noted qualitative features. We also review mathematical descriptions of growth, namely empirical growth curves and growth models, and discuss the directions of future research.

  12. Individual neurophysiological profile in external effects investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schastlivtseva, Daria; Tatiana Kotrovskaya, D..

    Cortex biopotentials are the significant elements in human psychophysiological individuality. Considered that cortical biopotentials are diverse and individually stable, therefore there is the existence of certain dependence between the basic properties of higher nervous activity and cerebral bioelectric activity. The main purpose of the study was to reveal the individual neurophysiological profile and CNS initial functional state manifestation in human electroencephalogram (EEG) under effect of inert gases (argon, xenon, helium), hypoxia, pressure changes (0.02 and 0.2 MPa). We obtained 5-minute eyes closed background EEG on 19 scalp positions using Ag/AgCl electrodes mounted in an electrode cap. All EEG signals were re-referenced to average earlobes; Fast Furies Transformation analysis was used to calculate the relative power spectrum of delta-, theta-, alpha- and beta frequency band in artifact-free EEG. The study involved 26 healthy men who provided written informed consent, aged 20 to 35 years. Data obtained depend as individual EEG type and initial central nervous functional state as intensity, duration and mix of factors. Pronounced alpha rhythm in the raw EEG correlated with their adaptive capacity under studied factor exposure. Representation change and zonal distribution perversion of EEG alpha rhythm were accompanied by emotional instability, increased anxiety and difficulty adapting subjects. High power factor or combination factor with psychological and emotional or physical exertion minimizes individual EEG pattern.

  13. The effects of individual housing on mice and rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Thomas Cæcius; Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo; Ottesen, Jan Lund

    2006-01-01

    , growth, and behaviour was introduced, rather as a model for psychoneurosis than through any concern for animal welfare. Today, it is often stated as common knowledge in laboratory animal science textbooks that individual housing as well as isolation of rats and mice has an effect on physiology...... these animals individually without negative impact on welfare, eg by providing special housing improvements. A range of studies have shown that individual housing or isolation has effects on corticosterone, the open field behaviour, barbiturate sleeping time and the metabolism of different pharmaceuticals...

  14. Modeling the effects of positive and negative mood on the ability to resist eating in obese and non-obese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udo, Tomoko; Grilo, Carlos M; Brownell, Kelly D; Weinberger, Andrea H; Dileone, Ralph J; McKee, Sherry A

    2013-01-01

    This pilot study adapted a well-established drug self-administration paradigm to examine the effects of mood induction on the ability to resist high-calorie foods and subsequent food consumption differently in 15 obese individuals (40.0% women, BMI: 35.1±3.70) and 15 non-obese individuals (46.7% women, BMI: 23.0±1.96). Participants completed two laboratory sessions (positive vs. negative mood conditions) consisting of 3-hour food deprivation, followed by mood induction, and a 3-hour ad-lib eating period, where they were asked to choose between favorite high-calorie snacks and monetary reinforcement. Obese individuals were less able to resist eating and increased high-calorie food consumption during the positive mood condition than the negative condition. Non-obese individuals were less able to resist eating during the negative mood condition than the positive condition, but their total consumption was not affected by the mood conditions. In obese individuals, food craving was associated with less ability to resist eating and greater calorie consumption during the negative mood condition. This is the first study to experimentally demonstrate that mood state may increase vulnerability to food consumption by reducing the ability to resist eating. The ability to resist eating may be a novel dimension of eating behaviors that has a significant contribution to understanding mood-eating relationships.

  15. Individual learning effects on knowledge transfer in international joint ventures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Li Thuy; Napier, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines micro (individual-level) aspects of knowledge transfer and learning in international joint ventures in an emerging economy context. Learning by expatriate and local managers appears far more complex, mutually dependent, and significant to the knowledge transfer process than...... suggested in existing literature. Building upon conceptualizations of individual learning and cognitive – behavioural effects in an organisational context while drawing evidence from two cases of Danish – Vietnamese joint ventures, we propose a model of individual-level knowledge transfer and learning...

  16. Stress Process Model for Individuals with Dementia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Judge, Katherine S.; Menne, Heather L.; Whitlatch, Carol J.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Individuals with dementia (IWDs) face particular challenges in managing and coping with their illness. The experience of dementia may be affected by the etiology, stage, and severity of symptoms, preexisting and related chronic conditions, and available informal and formal supportive services. Although several studies have examined…

  17. Model and Analysis of Individual Rehearsals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristoffer; Frimodt-Møller, Søren

    2013-01-01

    of this attention over time, and discusses how this attention is dependent on the musician’s ability to memorize. A selection of musicians (playing guitar, bass clarinet, or violin) was made to individually rehearse short pieces (by Beethoven and Bach) up to and exceeding 20 times. The musicians were instructed...

  18. Composition, size distribution, optical properties and radiative effects of re-suspended local mineral dust of Rome area by individual-particle microanalysis and radiative transfer modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pietrodangelo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available New information on the PM10 mineral dust from site-specific (Rome area, Latium outcropped rocks, and on the microphysics, optical properties and radiative effects of mineral dust at local level were gained in this work. A multi-disciplinary approach was used, based on individual-particle scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy-dispersive microanalysis (SEM XEDS, X-ray diffraction (XRD analysis of dust, size distribution of mineral particles, and radiative transfer modelling (RTM.The mineral composition of Rome lithogenic PM10 varies between an end-member dominated by silicate minerals and one exclusively composed of calcite. The first is obtained from volcanic lithotypes, the second from travertine or limestones; lithogenic PM10 with intermediate composition derives mainly from siliciclastic rocks or marlstones of Rome area. Size and mineral species of PM10 particles of silicate-dominated dust types are tuned mainly by weathering and, to lesser extent, by debris formation or crystallization; chemical precipitation of CaCO3 plays a major role in calcite-dominated types. These differences are evidenced by the diversity of volume distributions, within either dust types, or mineral species. Further differences are observed between volume distributions of calcite from travertine (natural source and from road dust (anthropic source, specifically on the width, shape and enrichment of the fine fraction (unimodal at 5 μm a.d. for travertine, bimodal at 3.8 and 1.8 μm a.d. for road dust. Log-normal probability density functions of volcanics and travertine dusts affect differently the single scattering albedo (SSA and the asymmetry parameter (g in the VISible and Near Infrared (NIR regions, depending also on the absorbing/non-absorbing character of volcanics and travertine, respectively. The downward component of the BOA solar irradiance simulated by RTM for a volcanics-rich or travertine-rich atmosphere shows that volcanics contribution to the

  19. Composition, size distribution, optical properties and radiative effects of re-suspended local mineral dust of Rome area by individual-particle microanalysis and radiative transfer modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietrodangelo, A.; Salzano, R.; Bassani, C.; Pareti, S.; Perrino, C.

    2015-05-01

    New information on the PM10 mineral dust from site-specific (Rome area, Latium) outcropped rocks, and on the microphysics, optical properties and radiative effects of mineral dust at local level were gained in this work. A multi-disciplinary approach was used, based on individual-particle scanning electron microscopy with X-ray energy-dispersive microanalysis (SEM XEDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis of dust, size distribution of mineral particles, and radiative transfer modelling (RTM).The mineral composition of Rome lithogenic PM10 varies between an end-member dominated by silicate minerals and one exclusively composed of calcite. The first is obtained from volcanic lithotypes, the second from travertine or limestones; lithogenic PM10 with intermediate composition derives mainly from siliciclastic rocks or marlstones of Rome area. Size and mineral species of PM10 particles of silicate-dominated dust types are tuned mainly by weathering and, to lesser extent, by debris formation or crystallization; chemical precipitation of CaCO3 plays a major role in calcite-dominated types. These differences are evidenced by the diversity of volume distributions, within either dust types, or mineral species. Further differences are observed between volume distributions of calcite from travertine (natural source) and from road dust (anthropic source), specifically on the width, shape and enrichment of the fine fraction (unimodal at 5 μm a.d. for travertine, bimodal at 3.8 and 1.8 μm a.d. for road dust). Log-normal probability density functions of volcanics and travertine dusts affect differently the single scattering albedo (SSA) and the asymmetry parameter (g) in the VISible and Near Infrared (NIR) regions, depending also on the absorbing/non-absorbing character of volcanics and travertine, respectively. The downward component of the BOA solar irradiance simulated by RTM for a volcanics-rich or travertine-rich atmosphere shows that volcanics contribution to the solar

  20. Integrating Individual-Based Indices of Contaminant Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher L. Rowe

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Habitat contamination can alter numerous biological processes in individual organisms. Examining multiple individual-level responses in an integrative fashion is necessary to understand how individual health or fitness reflects environmental contamination. Here we provide an example of such an integrated perspective based upon recent studies of an amphibian (the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana that experiences several, disparate changes when larval development occurs in a trace element�contaminated habitat. First, we present an overview of studies focused on specific responses of individuals collected from, or transplanted into, a habitat contaminated by coal combustion residues (CCR. These studies have reported morphological, behavioral, and physiological modifications to individuals chronically interacting with sediments in the CCR-contaminated site. Morphological abnormalities in the oral and tail regions in contaminant-exposed individuals influenced other properties such as grazing, growth, and swimming performance. Behavioral changes in swimming activities and responses to stimuli appear to influence predation risk in the contaminant-exposed population. Significant changes in bioenergetics in the contaminated habitat, evident as abnormally high energetic expenditures for survival (maintenance costs, may ultimately influence production pathways (growth, energy storage in individuals. We then present a conceptual model to examine how interactions among the affected systems (morphological, behavioral, physiological may ultimately bring about more severe effects than would be predicted if the responses were considered in isolation. A complex interplay among simultaneously occurring biological changes emerges in which multiple, sublethal effects ultimately can translate into reductions in larval or juvenile survival, and thus reduced recruitment of juveniles into the population. In systems where individuals are exposed to low concentrations of

  1. Individualized Cognitive Modeling for Close-Loop Task Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guangfan; Xu, Roger; Wang, Wei; Li, Jiang; Schnell, Tom; Keller, Mike

    2010-01-01

    An accurate real-time operator functional state assessment makes it possible to perform task management, minimize risks, and improve mission performance. In this paper, we discuss the development of an individualized operator functional state assessment model that identifies states likely leading to operational errors. To address large individual variations, we use two different approaches to build a model for each individual using its data as well as data from subjects with similar responses. If a subject's response is similar to that of the individual of interest in a specific functional state, all the training data from this subject will be used to build the individual model. The individualization methods have been successfully verified and validated with a driving test data set provided by University of Iowa. With the individualized models, the mean squared error can be significantly decreased (by around 20%).

  2. Mental Models, Magical Thinking, And Individual Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phil Turner

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Broadly, there are two mutually exclusive accounts of how people (non-specialist users reason about and conceptualize interactive technology. The first is based on classical cognitive psychology and is characterized by the term mental model. The second, drawing on concepts from social cognition, observes that people often anthropomorphize technology. We argue that people are able to exhibit both of these quite different styles of cognition, which Baron-Cohen has described as systemizing and empathizing. The former is associated with the drive to analyze, explore, and construct a system, whereas the latter is the ability to spontaneously tune into another’s thoughts and feelings. The propensity to systemize might give rise to a mental model, while the empathizing tendency might tend to anthropomorphize technology. We present an empirical study that lends support for the above position.

  3. Seasonal patterns in growth, blood consumption, and effects on hosts by parasitic-phase sea lampreys in the Great Lakes: an individual-based model approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madenjian, Charles P.; Cochran, Philip A.; Bergstedt, Roger A.

    2003-01-01

    An individual-based model (IBM) was developed for sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) populations in the Laurentian Great Lakes. The IBM was then calibrated to observed growth, by season, for sea lampreys in northern Lake Huron under two different water temperature regimes: a regime experienced by Seneca-strain lake trout (Salvelinus namaycush) and a regime experienced by Marquettestrain lake trout. Modeling results indicated that seasonal blood consumption under the Seneca regime was very similar to that under the Marquette regime. Simulated mortality of lake trout directly due to blood removal by sea lampreys occurred at nearly twice the rate during August and September under the Marquette regime than under the Seneca regime. However, cumulative sea lamprey-induced mortality on lake trout over the entire duration of the sea lamprey's parasitic phase was only 7% higher for the Marquette regime compared with the Seneca regime. Thus, these modeling results indicated that the strain composition of the host (lake trout) population was not important in determining total number of lake trout deaths or total blood consumption attributable to the sea lamprey population, given the sea lamprey growth pattern. Regardless of water temperature regime, both blood consumption rate by sea lampreys and rate of sea lamprey-induced mortality on lake trout peaked in late October. Elevated blood consumption in late October appeared to be unrelated to changes in water temperature. The IBM approach should prove useful in optimizing control of sea lampreys in the Laurentian Great Lakes.

  4. The Croton-Yorktown Model of Individualized Earth Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthias, George F.; Snyder, Edward B.

    1980-01-01

    The individualized learning model, discussed in this article, uses an efficient feedback mechanism which incorporates an innovative student evaluation program and a unique system of classroom management. The design provides a model for monitoring student progress. (Author/SA)

  5. Heterogeneous individuals' behavioral biases model and numerical simulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Da-yong; LIANG Guo-wei

    2010-01-01

    A model of the relationships between individual cognitive biases and individual decision-making based on the analysis of cognitive biases of bonded rationality individual,has been established in this paper by introducing a set of new variables callod overconfidence coefficient and attribution bias coefficient to the sentiment model.The irrational expectation and irrational risk aversion as two inseparable aspects of bonded rationality are expressed in an unified model,and a method of measuring individual cognitive biases is proposed,which overcomes the shortcomings of traditional normative models that can not describe the differences of behaviors among heterogeneous individuals.As a result,numerical simulations show that individual cognitive risk is a positive interaction with overconfidence coefficient,and a negative interaction with attribution bias coefficient.

  6. A neural network evaluation model for individual thermal comfort

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Weiwei; Lian, Zhiwei; Zhao, Bo [Institute of Refrigeration and Cryogenics, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China)

    2007-10-15

    An evaluation model for individual thermal comfort is presented based on the BP neural network. The train data came from a thermal comfort survey. The evaluation results of the model showed a good match with the subject's real thermal sensation, which indicated that the model can be used to evaluate individual thermal comfort rightly. Taken a room air conditioner as an example, the application of the NNEM in creating a microenvironment for individual was discussed. The result showed that the NNEM can play an important role of connecting individual thermal comfort with the control on the air conditioner. (author)

  7. Stochastic wind turbine modeling for individual pitch control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Sven Creutz; Niemann, Hans Henrik; Poulsen, Niels Kjølstad

    2009-01-01

    By pitching the blades of a wind turbine individually it is possible to attenuate the asymmetric loads caused by a non-uniform wind field - this is denoted individual pitch control. In this work we investigate how to set up a simplified stochastic and deterministic description of the wind...... and a simplified description of the aerodynamics with sufficient detail to design model-based individual pitch controllers. Combined with a simplified model of the wind turbine, we exemplify how to use the model elements to systematically design an individual pitch controller. The design is investigated...

  8. The PIC [Process Individualization Curriculum] Model: Structure with Humanistic Goals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gow, Doris T.

    This paper describes a curriculum design model to train research and development personnel under USOE-NIE funding. This design model, called PIC (Process Individualization Curriculum), was chosen for coverting on-campus courses to extra-mural self-instructional courses. The curriculum specialists who work with professors to individualize their…

  9. Analysis of Individual and Combined Effects of Ochratoxin A and Zearalenone on HepG2 and KK-1 Cells with Mathematical Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuzhe; Zhang, Boyang; He, Xiaoyun; Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Xu, Wentao; Luo, Yunbo; Liang, Rui; Luo, Haoshu; Huang, Kunlun

    2014-01-01

    Ochratoxin A (OTA) and Zearalenone (ZEA) are widespread mycotoxins that contaminate foodstuffs simultaneously, but sufficient data regarding their mixed toxicities are lacking. This study aims to analyze the style of combined effects of OTA and ZEA on cells of their target organs. For this purpose, cytotoxicity was determined in HepG2 and KK-1 cells treated with single and combined forms of OTA and ZEA. Furthermore, we have analyzed the data using two mathematical models based on the concepts of concentration addition (CA) and independent addition (IA). By analyzing data with nonlinear regression, toxins applied singly showed classic sigmoid dose-response curves in HepG2 cells whereas in KK-1 cells hormetic responses were observed. Exposure to equieffective mixtures of OTA and ZEA showed additive effects, irrespective of different nonlinear regression models used. Our results demonstrate that IA is an appropriate concept to account for mixture effects of OTA and ZEA. The results in ROS generation indicate a departure from additivity to antagonism or synergism at different concentrations, probably due to potential interaction during ROS production. This study shows that a risk assessment of mycotoxins should account for mixture effects, and prediction models are valuable tools for mixture assessment. PMID:24674935

  10. Analysis of Individual and Combined Effects of Ochratoxin A and Zearalenone on HepG2 and KK-1 Cells with Mathematical Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzhe Li

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Ochratoxin A (OTA and Zearalenone (ZEA are widespread mycotoxins that contaminate foodstuffs simultaneously, but sufficient data regarding their mixed toxicities are lacking. This study aims to analyze the style of combined effects of OTA and ZEA on cells of their target organs. For this purpose, cytotoxicity was determined in HepG2 and KK-1 cells treated with single and combined forms of OTA and ZEA. Furthermore, we have analyzed the data using two mathematical models based on the concepts of concentration addition (CA and independent addition (IA. By analyzing data with nonlinear regression, toxins applied singly showed classic sigmoid dose-response curves in HepG2 cells whereas in KK-1 cells hormetic responses were observed. Exposure to equieffective mixtures of OTA and ZEA showed additive effects, irrespective of different nonlinear regression models used. Our results demonstrate that IA is an appropriate concept to account for mixture effects of OTA and ZEA. The results in ROS generation indicate a departure from additivity to antagonism or synergism at different concentrations, probably due to potential interaction during ROS production. This study shows that a risk assessment of mycotoxins should account for mixture effects, and prediction models are valuable tools for mixture assessment.

  11. A system model of the effects of exercise on plasma Interleukin-6 dynamics in healthy individuals: Role of skeletal muscle and adipose tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morettini, Micaela; Palumbo, Maria Concetta; Sacchetti, Massimo; Castiglione, Filippo; Mazzà, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) has been recently shown to play a central role in glucose homeostasis, since it stimulates the production and secretion of Glucagon-like Peptide-1 (GLP-1) from intestinal L-cells and pancreas, leading to an enhanced insulin response. In resting conditions, IL-6 is mainly produced by the adipose tissue whereas, during exercise, skeletal muscle contractions stimulate a marked IL-6 secretion as well. Available mathematical models describing the effects of exercise on glucose homeostasis, however, do not account for this IL-6 contribution. This study aimed at developing and validating a system model of exercise's effects on plasma IL-6 dynamics in healthy humans, combining the contributions of both adipose tissue and skeletal muscle. A two-compartment description was adopted to model plasma IL-6 changes in response to oxygen uptake's variation during an exercise bout. The free parameters of the model were estimated by means of a cross-validation procedure performed on four different datasets. A low coefficient of variation (definition of more tailored interventions for the treatment of type 2 diabetes.

  12. Predictive modelling of the individual and combined effect of water activity and temperature on the radial growth of Fusarium verticilliodes and F. proliferatum on corn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samapundo, S; Devlieghere, F; De Meulenaer, B; Geeraerd, A H; Van Impe, J F; Debevere, J M

    2005-11-15

    The major objective of this study was to develop validated models to describe the effect of a(w) and temperature on the radial growth on corn of the two major fumonisin producing Fusaria, namely Fusarium verticilliodes and F. proliferatum. The growth of these two isolates on corn was therefore studied at water activities between 0.810-0.985 and temperatures between 15 and 30 degrees C. Minimum a(w) for growth was 0.869 and 0.854 for F. verticilliodes and F. proliferatum, respectively. No growth took place at a(w) values equal to 0.831 and 0.838 for F. verticilliodes and F. proliferatum, respectively. The colony growth rates, g (mm d(-1)) were determined by fitting a flexible growth model describing the change in colony diameter (mm) with respect to time (days). Secondary models, relating the colony growth rate with a(w) or a(w) and temperature were developed. A third order polynomial equation and the linear Arrhenius-Davey model were used to describe the combined effect of temperature and a(w) on g. The combined modelling approaches, predicting g (mm d(-1)) at any a(w) and/or temperature were validated on independently collected data. All models proved to be good predictors of the growth rates of both isolates on maize within the experimental conditions. The third order polynomial equation had bias factors of 1.042 and 1.054 and accuracy factors of 1.128 and 1.380 for F. verticilliodes and F. proliferatum, respectively. The linear Arrhenius-Davey model had bias factors of 0.978 and 1.002 and accuracy factors of 1.098 and 1.122 for F. verticilliodes and F. proliferatum, respectively. The results confirm the general finding that a(w) has a greater influence on fungal growth than temperature. The developed models can be applied for the prevention of Fusarium growth on maize and the development of models that incorporate other factors important to mould growth on maize.

  13. Investigating the effect of recruitment variability on length-based recruitment indices for antarctic krill using an individual-based population dynamics model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphane Thanassekos

    Full Text Available Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba; herein krill is monitored as part of an on-going fisheries observer program that collects length-frequency data. A krill feedback management programme is currently being developed, and as part of this development, the utility of data-derived indices describing population level processes is being assessed. To date, however, little work has been carried out on the selection of optimum recruitment indices and it has not been possible to assess the performance of length-based recruitment indices across a range of recruitment variability. Neither has there been an assessment of uncertainty in the relationship between an index and the actual level of recruitment. Thus, until now, it has not been possible to take into account recruitment index uncertainty in krill stock management or when investigating relationships between recruitment and environmental drivers. Using length-frequency samples from a simulated population - where recruitment is known - the performance of six potential length-based recruitment indices is assessed, by exploring the index-to-recruitment relationship under increasing levels of recruitment variability (from ±10% to ±100% around a mean annual recruitment. The annual minimum of the proportion of individuals smaller than 40 mm (F40 min, % was selected because it had the most robust index-to-recruitment relationship across differing levels of recruitment variability. The relationship was curvilinear and best described by a power law. Model uncertainty was described using the 95% prediction intervals, which were used to calculate coverage probabilities and assess model performance. Despite being the optimum recruitment index, the performance of F40 min degraded under high (>50% recruitment variability. Due to the persistence of cohorts in the population over several years, the inclusion of F40 min values from preceding years in the relationship used to estimate recruitment in a given year

  14. Investigating the effect of recruitment variability on length-based recruitment indices for antarctic krill using an individual-based population dynamics model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thanassekos, Stéphane; Cox, Martin J; Reid, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba; herein krill) is monitored as part of an on-going fisheries observer program that collects length-frequency data. A krill feedback management programme is currently being developed, and as part of this development, the utility of data-derived indices describing population level processes is being assessed. To date, however, little work has been carried out on the selection of optimum recruitment indices and it has not been possible to assess the performance of length-based recruitment indices across a range of recruitment variability. Neither has there been an assessment of uncertainty in the relationship between an index and the actual level of recruitment. Thus, until now, it has not been possible to take into account recruitment index uncertainty in krill stock management or when investigating relationships between recruitment and environmental drivers. Using length-frequency samples from a simulated population - where recruitment is known - the performance of six potential length-based recruitment indices is assessed, by exploring the index-to-recruitment relationship under increasing levels of recruitment variability (from ±10% to ±100% around a mean annual recruitment). The annual minimum of the proportion of individuals smaller than 40 mm (F40 min, %) was selected because it had the most robust index-to-recruitment relationship across differing levels of recruitment variability. The relationship was curvilinear and best described by a power law. Model uncertainty was described using the 95% prediction intervals, which were used to calculate coverage probabilities and assess model performance. Despite being the optimum recruitment index, the performance of F40 min degraded under high (>50%) recruitment variability. Due to the persistence of cohorts in the population over several years, the inclusion of F40 min values from preceding years in the relationship used to estimate recruitment in a given year improved its

  15. Individualism in plant populations: using stochastic differential equations to model individual neighbourhood-dependent plant growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Qiming; Schneider, Manuel K; Pitchford, Jonathan W

    2008-08-01

    We study individual plant growth and size hierarchy formation in an experimental population of Arabidopsis thaliana, within an integrated analysis that explicitly accounts for size-dependent growth, size- and space-dependent competition, and environmental stochasticity. It is shown that a Gompertz-type stochastic differential equation (SDE) model, involving asymmetric competition kernels and a stochastic term which decreases with the logarithm of plant weight, efficiently describes individual plant growth, competition, and variability in the studied population. The model is evaluated within a Bayesian framework and compared to its deterministic counterpart, and to several simplified stochastic models, using distributional validation. We show that stochasticity is an important determinant of size hierarchy and that SDE models outperform the deterministic model if and only if structural components of competition (asymmetry; size- and space-dependence) are accounted for. Implications of these results are discussed in the context of plant ecology and in more general modelling situations.

  16. A model for individual egg production in chickens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grossman, M.; Koops, W.J.

    2001-01-01

    Our primary objective was to improve on an existing model for the individual weekly egg production curve by modeling the curve as a sum of logistic functions: one for the increasing phase of production and a sum for the decreasing phases. To illustrate the model, we used four data sets from two

  17. A paradox in individual-based models of populations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van der Meer, J.

    2016-01-01

    The standard dynamic energy budget model is widely used to describe the physiology of individual animals. It assumes thatassimilation rate scales with body surface area, whereas maintenance rate scales with body volume. When the model is usedas the building block of a population model, only limited

  18. Individual based and mean-field modeling of direct aggregation

    KAUST Repository

    Burger, Martin

    2013-10-01

    We introduce two models of biological aggregation, based on randomly moving particles with individual stochasticity depending on the perceived average population density in their neighborhood. In the firstorder model the location of each individual is subject to a density-dependent random walk, while in the second-order model the density-dependent random walk acts on the velocity variable, together with a density-dependent damping term. The main novelty of our models is that we do not assume any explicit aggregative force acting on the individuals; instead, aggregation is obtained exclusively by reducing the individual stochasticity in response to higher perceived density. We formally derive the corresponding mean-field limits, leading to nonlocal degenerate diffusions. Then, we carry out the mathematical analysis of the first-order model, in particular, we prove the existence of weak solutions and show that it allows for measure-valued steady states. We also perform linear stability analysis and identify conditions for pattern formation. Moreover, we discuss the role of the nonlocality for well-posedness of the first-order model. Finally, we present results of numerical simulations for both the first- and second-order model on the individual-based and continuum levels of description. 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Markovian Building Blocks for Individual-Based Modelling

    OpenAIRE

    Nilsson, Lars Anders Fredrik; Nielsen, Bo Friis; Thygesen, Uffe Høgsbro; Beyer, Jan

    2007-01-01

    The present thesis consists of a summary report, four research articles, one technical report and one manuscript. The subject of the thesis is individual-based stochastic models. The summary report is composed of three parts and a brief history of some basic models in population biology. This history is included in order to provide a reader that has no previous exposure to models in population biology with a sufficient background to understand some of the biological models that are mentioned ...

  20. Hybrid Modelling of Individual Movement and Collective Behaviour

    KAUST Repository

    Franz, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Mathematical models of dispersal in biological systems are often written in terms of partial differential equations (PDEs) which describe the time evolution of population-level variables (concentrations, densities). A more detailed modelling approach is given by individual-based (agent-based) models which describe the behaviour of each organism. In recent years, an intermediate modelling methodology - hybrid modelling - has been applied to a number of biological systems. These hybrid models couple an individual-based description of cells/animals with a PDE-model of their environment. In this chapter, we overview hybrid models in the literature with the focus on the mathematical challenges of this modelling approach. The detailed analysis is presented using the example of chemotaxis, where cells move according to extracellular chemicals that can be altered by the cells themselves. In this case, individual-based models of cells are coupled with PDEs for extracellular chemical signals. Travelling waves in these hybrid models are investigated. In particular, we show that in contrary to the PDEs, hybrid chemotaxis models only develop a transient travelling wave. © 2013 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg.

  1. Group level effects of social versus individual learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Jürgen; Li, Wei

    2013-06-01

    We study the effects of learning by imitating others within the framework of an iterated game in which the members of two complementary populations interact via random pairing at each round. This allows us to compare both the fitness of different strategies within a population and the performance of populations in which members have access to different types of strategies. Previous studies reveal some emergent dynamics at the population level, when players learn individually. We here investigate a different mechanism in which players can choose between two different learning strategies, individual or social. Imitating behavior can spread within a mixed population, with the frequency of imitators varying over generation time. When compared to a pure population with solely individual learners, a mixed population with both individual and social learners can do better, independently of the precise learning scheme employed. We can then search for the best imitating strategy. Imitating the neighbor with the highest payoff turns out to be consistently superior. This is in agreement with findings in experimental and model studies that have been carried out in different settings.

  2. Hearing dummies: individualized computer models of hearing impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panda, Manasa R; Lecluyse, Wendy; Tan, Christine M; Jürgens, Tim; Meddis, Ray

    2014-10-01

    Objective: Our aim was to explore the usage of individualized computer models to simulate hearing loss based on detailed psychophysical assessment and to offer hypothetical diagnoses of the underlying pathology. Individualized computer models of normal and impaired hearing were constructed and evaluated using the psychophysical data obtained from human listeners. Computer models of impaired hearing were generated to reflect the hypothesized underlying pathology (e.g. dead regions, outer hair cell dysfunction, or reductions in endocochlear potential). These models were evaluated in terms of their ability to replicate the original patient data. Auditory profiles were measured for two normal and five hearing-impaired listeners using a battery of three psychophysical tests (absolute thresholds, frequency selectivity, and compression). The individualized computer models were found to match the data. Useful fits to the impaired profiles could be obtained by changing only a single parameter in the model of normal hearing. Sometimes, however, it was necessary to include an additional dead region. The creation of individualized computer models of hearing loss can be used to simulate auditory profiles of impaired listeners and suggest hypotheses concerning the underlying peripheral pathology.

  3. An Opinion Interactive Model Based on Individual Persuasiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Xin; Chen, Bin; Liu, Liang; Ma, Liang; Qiu, Xiaogang

    2015-01-01

    In order to study the formation process of group opinion in real life, we put forward a new opinion interactive model based on Deffuant model and its improved models in this paper because current models of opinion dynamics lack considering individual persuasiveness. Our model has following advantages: firstly persuasiveness is added to individual's attributes reflecting the importance of persuasiveness, which means that all the individuals are different from others; secondly probability is introduced in the course of interaction which simulates the uncertainty of interaction. In Monte Carlo simulation experiments, sensitivity analysis including the influence of randomness, initial persuasiveness distribution, and number of individuals is studied at first; what comes next is that the range of common opinion based on the initial persuasiveness distribution can be predicted. Simulation experiment results show that when the initial values of agents are fixed, no matter how many times independently replicated experiments, the common opinion will converge at a certain point; however the number of iterations will not always be the same; the range of common opinion can be predicted when initial distribution of opinion and persuasiveness are given. As a result, this model can reflect and interpret some phenomena of opinion interaction in realistic society.

  4. Effects of Auditory Input in Individuation Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Christopher W.; Sloutsky, Vladimir M.

    2008-01-01

    Under many conditions auditory input interferes with visual processing, especially early in development. These interference effects are often more pronounced when the auditory input is unfamiliar than when the auditory input is familiar (e.g. human speech, pre-familiarized sounds, etc.). The current study extends this research by examining how…

  5. 随机截距效应在模拟杉木人工林单木胸径生长量中的应用%Using random intercept effects in DBH increment model of individual trees for firplantation.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李春明

    2011-01-01

    以江西省杉木人工林4次调查数据为例,建立单木胸径生长量随机截距效应混合模型,分别考虑样地层次、区域层次及多层次的随机截距效应,并在考虑多层次效应时考虑了存在的异方差和自相关问题,最后利用独立的抽样验证数据对模拟结果进行验证。结果表明:林分断面积、对象木胸径、林分内大于对象木的断面积之和与对象木胸径的比值以及海拔对单木胸径生长量有显著影响;与林业中常用的传统最小二乘法相比,采用混合效应模型方法后模型的模拟效果和验证精度均有提高;选择适合的异方差和白相关函数后,模拟结果比只考虑随机截距效应有更好的适应性;实际%In the paper, we developed a mixed model of random intercept effects for individual DBH increment, taking the example of four survey data of fir plantations in Jiangxi Province, eastern China. The model was defined as a linear mixed model with intercept effects of plot, area or plot and area simultaneous. The heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation matrix were added to the model when taking into account multilevel effects. In the end, mixed model calibration of DBH increment was carried out using the independent sampling. The results showed that total stand basal area, DBH of target tree, the ratio of basal area of larger trees to target tree DBH, and altitude were found to be significant effect on DBH increment. Both the simulation results and verified accuracy of the model indicated a substantial improvement compared with the conventional approach widely used in forest management. After adding to a reasonable variance function of heteroscedasticity and autocorrelation, the model showed better goodness of fit than taking into account random intercept effects only. The goodness of multilevel effects was better than that of individual-level effect in forest actual applied process.

  6. An Improved Methodology for Individualized Performance Prediction of Sleep-Deprived Individuals with the Two-Process Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    process model of sleep regulation for developing individualized biomathematical models that predict performance impairment for individuals subjected to total sleep loss. This new method advances our previous work in two important ways. First, it enables model customization to start as soon as the first performance measurement from an individual becomes available. This was achieved by optimally combining the performance information obtained from the individual’s performance measurements with a priori performance information using a Bayesian framework, while retaining

  7. Modelling community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijster, D.; van Loveren, C.; Dusseldorp, E.; Verrips, G.H.W.

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study empirically tested a theoretical model of pathways and inter-relationships among community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries in a sample of 630, 6-year-old children from the Netherlands. Children's decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft) sco

  8. An individuality model for online signatures using global Fourier descriptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kholmatov, Alisher; Yanikoglu, Berrin

    2008-03-01

    The discriminative capability of a biometric is based on its individuality/uniqueness and is an important factor in choosing a biometric for a large-scale deployment. Individuality studies have been carried out rigorously for only certain biometrics, in particular fingerprint and iris, while work on establishing handwriting and signature individuality has been mainly on feature level. In this study, we present a preliminary individuality model for online signatures using the Fourier domain representation of the signature. Using the normalized Fourier coefficients as global features describing the signature, we derive a formula for the probability of coincidentally matching a given signature. Estimating model parameters from a large database and making certain simplifying assumptions, the probability of two arbitrary signatures to match in 13 of the coefficients is calculated as 4.7x10 -4. When compared with the results of a verification algorithm that parallels the theoretical model, the results show that the theoretical model fits the random forgery test results fairly well. While online signatures are sometimes dismissed as not very secure, our results show that the probability of successfully guessing an online signature is very low. Combined with the fact that signature is a behavioral biometric with adjustable complexity, these results support the use of online signatures for biometric authentication.

  9. Knowledge Growth: Applied Models of General and Individual Knowledge Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silkina, Galina Iu.; Bakanova, Svetlana A.

    2016-01-01

    The article considers the mathematical models of the growth and accumulation of scientific and applied knowledge since it is seen as the main potential and key competence of modern companies. The problem is examined on two levels--the growth and evolution of objective knowledge and knowledge evolution of a particular individual. Both processes are…

  10. Modelling community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijster, D.; Loveren, C. van; Dusseldorp, E.; Verrips, G.H.W.

    2014-01-01

    This cross-sectional study empirically tested a theoretical model of pathways and inter-relationships among community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries in a sample of 630, 6-year-old children from the Netherlands. Children's decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft)

  11. A Cortical Edge-integration Model of Object-Based Lightness Computation that Explains Effects of Spatial Context and Individual Differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael E Rudd

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous work demonstrated that perceived surface reflectance (lightness can be modeled in simple contexts in a quantitatively exact way by assuming that the visual system first extracts information about local, directed steps in log luminance, then spatial integrates these steps along paths through the image to compute lightness (Rudd & Zemach, 2004, 2005, 2007. This method of computing lightness is called edge integration. Recent evidence (Rudd, 2013 suggests that the human vision employs a default strategy to integrate luminance steps only along paths from a common background region to the targets whose lightness is computed. This implies a role for gestalt grouping in edge-based lightness computation. Rudd (2010 further showed the perceptual weights applied to edges in lightness computation can be influenced by the observer’s interpretation of luminance steps as resulting from either spatial variation in surface reflectance or illumination. This implies a role for top-down factors in any edge-based model of lightness (Rudd & Zemach, 2005. Here, I show how the separate influences of grouping and attention on lightness can be together modeled by a cortical mechanism that first employs top-down signals to spatially select regions of interest for lightness computation. An object-based network computation, involving neurons that code for border-ownership, then automatically sets the neural gains applied to edge signals surviving the earlier spatial selection stage. Only the borders that survive both processing stages are spatially integrated to compute lightness. The model assumptions are consistent with those of the cortical lightness model presented earlier by Rudd (2010, 2013, and with neurophysiological data indicating extraction of local edge information in V1, network computations to establish figure-ground relations and border ownership in V2, and edge integration to encode lightness and darkness signals in V4.

  12. A cortical edge-integration model of object-based lightness computation that explains effects of spatial context and individual differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudd, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Previous work has demonstrated that perceived surface reflectance (lightness) can be modeled in simple contexts in a quantitatively exact way by assuming that the visual system first extracts information about local, directed steps in log luminance, then spatially integrates these steps along paths through the image to compute lightness (Rudd and Zemach, 2004, 2005, 2007). This method of computing lightness is called edge integration. Recent evidence (Rudd, 2013) suggests that human vision employs a default strategy to integrate luminance steps only along paths from a common background region to the targets whose lightness is computed. This implies a role for gestalt grouping in edge-based lightness computation. Rudd (2010) further showed the perceptual weights applied to edges in lightness computation can be influenced by the observer's interpretation of luminance steps as resulting from either spatial variation in surface reflectance or illumination. This implies a role for top-down factors in any edge-based model of lightness (Rudd and Zemach, 2005). Here, I show how the separate influences of grouping and attention on lightness can be modeled in tandem by a cortical mechanism that first employs top-down signals to spatially select regions of interest for lightness computation. An object-based network computation, involving neurons that code for border-ownership, then automatically sets the neural gains applied to edge signals surviving the earlier spatial selection stage. Only the borders that survive both processing stages are spatially integrated to compute lightness. The model assumptions are consistent with those of the cortical lightness model presented earlier by Rudd (2010, 2013), and with neurophysiological data indicating extraction of local edge information in V1, network computations to establish figure-ground relations and border ownership in V2, and edge integration to encode lightness and darkness signals in V4. PMID:25202253

  13. An Individual-based Probabilistic Model for Fish Stock Simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Buti

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available We define an individual-based probabilistic model of a sole (Solea solea behaviour. The individual model is given in terms of an Extended Probabilistic Discrete Timed Automaton (EPDTA, a new formalism that is introduced in the paper and that is shown to be interpretable as a Markov decision process. A given EPDTA model can be probabilistically model-checked by giving a suitable translation into syntax accepted by existing model-checkers. In order to simulate the dynamics of a given population of soles in different environmental scenarios, an agent-based simulation environment is defined in which each agent implements the behaviour of the given EPDTA model. By varying the probabilities and the characteristic functions embedded in the EPDTA model it is possible to represent different scenarios and to tune the model itself by comparing the results of the simulations with real data about the sole stock in the North Adriatic sea, available from the recent project SoleMon. The simulator is presented and made available for its adaptation to other species.

  14. Modelling biological invasions: Individual to population scales at interfaces

    KAUST Repository

    Belmonte-Beitia, J.

    2013-10-01

    Extracting the population level behaviour of biological systems from that of the individual is critical in understanding dynamics across multiple scales and thus has been the subject of numerous investigations. Here, the influence of spatial heterogeneity in such contexts is explored for interfaces with a separation of the length scales characterising the individual and the interface, a situation that can arise in applications involving cellular modelling. As an illustrative example, we consider cell movement between white and grey matter in the brain which may be relevant in considering the invasive dynamics of glioma. We show that while one can safely neglect intrinsic noise, at least when considering glioma cell invasion, profound differences in population behaviours emerge in the presence of interfaces with only subtle alterations in the dynamics at the individual level. Transport driven by local cell sensing generates predictions of cell accumulations along interfaces where cell motility changes. This behaviour is not predicted with the commonly used Fickian diffusion transport model, but can be extracted from preliminary observations of specific cell lines in recent, novel, cryo-imaging. Consequently, these findings suggest a need to consider the impact of individual behaviour, spatial heterogeneity and especially interfaces in experimental and modelling frameworks of cellular dynamics, for instance in the characterisation of glioma cell motility. © 2013 Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Classic models of population dynamics: assumptions about selfregulative mechanisms and numbers of interactions between individuals

    OpenAIRE

    L. V. Nedorezov

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic model of migrations of individuals within the limits of finite domain on a plane is considered. It is assumed that population size scale is homogeneous, and there doesn't exist an interval of optimal values of population size (Alley effect doesn't realize for population). For every fixed value of population size number of interactions between individuals is calculated (as average in space and time). Correspondence between several classic models and numbers of interactions between i...

  16. IBSEM: An Individual-Based Atlantic Salmon Population Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Castellani

    Full Text Available Ecology and genetics can influence the fate of individuals and populations in multiple ways. However, to date, few studies consider them when modelling the evolutionary trajectory of populations faced with admixture with non-local populations. For the Atlantic salmon, a model incorporating these elements is urgently needed because many populations are challenged with gene-flow from non-local and domesticated conspecifics. We developed an Individual-Based Salmon Eco-genetic Model (IBSEM to simulate the demographic and population genetic change of an Atlantic salmon population through its entire life-cycle. Processes such as growth, mortality, and maturation are simulated through stochastic procedures, which take into account environmental variables as well as the genotype of the individuals. IBSEM is based upon detailed empirical data from salmon biology, and parameterized to reproduce the environmental conditions and the characteristics of a wild population inhabiting a Norwegian river. Simulations demonstrated that the model consistently and reliably reproduces the characteristics of the population. Moreover, in absence of farmed escapees, the modelled populations reach an evolutionary equilibrium that is similar to our definition of a 'wild' genotype. We assessed the sensitivity of the model in the face of assumptions made on the fitness differences between farm and wild salmon, and evaluated the role of straying as a buffering mechanism against the intrusion of farm genes into wild populations. These results demonstrate that IBSEM is able to capture the evolutionary forces shaping the life history of wild salmon and is therefore able to model the response of populations under environmental and genetic stressors.

  17. Markovian Building Blocks for Individual-Based Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nilsson, Lars Anders Fredrik

    2007-01-01

    The present thesis consists of a summary report, four research articles, one technical report and one manuscript. The subject of the thesis is individual-based stochastic models. The summary report is composed of three parts and a brief history of some basic models in population biology....... This history is included in order to provide a reader that has no previous exposure to models in population biology with a sufficient background to understand some of the biological models that are mentioned in the thesis. The first part of the rest of the summary is a description of the dramatic changes...... in the degree of aggregation of sprat or herring in the Baltic during the day, with special focus on the dispersion of the fish from schools at dusk. The next part is a brief introduction to Markovian arrival processes, a type of stochastic processes with potential applications as sub-models in population...

  18. Individual Subjective Initiative Merge Model Based on Cellular Automaton

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Jie Xu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The merge control models proposed for work zones are classified into two types (Hard Control Merge (HCM model and Soft Control Merge (SCM model according to their own control intensity and are compared with a new model, called Individual Subjective Initiative Merge (ISIM model, which is based on the linear lane-changing probability strategy in the merging area. The attention of this paper is paid to the positive impact of the individual subjective initiative for the whole traffic system. Three models (ISIM, HCM, and SCM are established and compared with each other by two order parameters, that is, system output and average vehicle travel time. Finally, numerical results show that both ISIM and SCM perform better than HCM. Compared with SCM, the output of ISIM is 20 vehicles per hour higher under the symmetric input condition and is more stable under the asymmetric input condition. Meanwhile, the average travel time of ISIM is 2000 time steps less under the oversaturated input condition.

  19. Worked Example Effects in Individual and Group Work Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retnowati, Endah; Ayres, Paul; Sweller, John

    2010-01-01

    This study compared the effects of worked example and problem-solving approaches in individual or group work settings on learning to solve geometry problems. One hundred and one seventh graders from Indonesia were randomly allocated to four experimental groups using a 2 (problem-solving vs. worked examples) x 2 (individual vs. group study) design.…

  20. Comparing the effects of different individualized music interventions for elderly individuals with severe dementia

    OpenAIRE

    Sakamoto, Mayumi; Ando, Hiroshi; Tsutou, Akimitsu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Individuals with dementia often experience poor quality of life (QOL) due to behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD). Music therapy can reduce BPSD, but most studies have focused on patients with mild to moderate dementia. We hypothesized that music intervention would have beneficial effects compared with a no-music control condition, and that interactive music intervention would have stronger effects than passive music intervention. Methods: Thirty-nine individua...

  1. Are Androgynous Individuals More Effective Persons and Parents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Diana

    1982-01-01

    Using extensive, multifaceted observational and interview data from the Family Socialization and Developmental Competence Project (FSP), this paper examines the claims that androgynes, by comparison with sex-typed individuals, are more effective persons and parents. (Author/RH)

  2. Are Androgynous Individuals More Effective Persons and Parents?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumrind, Diana

    1982-01-01

    Using extensive, multifaceted observational and interview data from the Family Socialization and Developmental Competence Project (FSP), this paper examines the claims that androgynes, by comparison with sex-typed individuals, are more effective persons and parents. (Author/RH)

  3. Does individualism bring happiness? Negative effects of individualism on interpersonal relationships and happiness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogihara, Yuji; Uchida, Yukiko

    2014-01-01

    We examined the negative effects of individualism in an East Asian culture. Although individualistic systems decrease interpersonal relationships through competition, individualistic values have prevailed in European American cultures. One reason is because individuals could overcome negativity by actively constructing interpersonal relationships. In contrast, people in East Asian cultures do not have such strategies to overcome the negative impact of individualistic systems, leading to decreased well-being. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the relationship between individualistic values, number of close friends, and subjective well-being (SWB). Study 1 indicated that individualistic values were negatively related with the number of close friends and SWB for Japanese college students but not for American college students. Moreover, Study 2 showed that even in an individualistic workplace in Japan, individualistic values were negatively related with the number of close friends and SWB. We discuss how cultural change toward increasing individualism might affect interpersonal relationships and well-being.

  4. Does individualism bring happiness? Negative effects of individualism on interpersonal relationships and happiness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji eOgihara

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available We examined the negative effects of individualism in an East Asian culture. Although individualistic systems decrease interpersonal relationships through competition, individualistic values have prevailed in European American cultures. One reason is because individuals could overcome negativity by actively constructing interpersonal relationships. In contrast, people in East Asian cultures do not have such strategies to overcome the negative impact of individualistic systems, leading to decreased well-being. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the relationship between individualistic values, number of close friends, and subjective well-being (SWB. Study 1 indicated that individualistic values were negatively related with the number of close friends and SWB for Japanese college students but not for American college students. Moreover, Study 2 showed that even in an individualistic workplace in Japan, individualistic values were negatively related with the number of close friends and SWB. We discuss how cultural change toward increasing individualism might affect interpersonal relationships and well-being.

  5. Predicting individual responses to pravastatin using a physiologically based kinetic model for plasma cholesterol concentrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, N.C.A. van de; Rullmann, J.A.C.; Woutersen, R.A.; Ommen, B. van; Rietjens, I.M.C.M.; Graaf, A.A. de

    2014-01-01

    We used a previously developed physiologically based kinetic (PBK) model to analyze the effect of individual variations in metabolism and transport of cholesterol on pravastatin response. The PBK model is based on kinetic expressions for 21 reactions that interconnect eight different body

  6. Indigenous Adoption of Novaco's Model of Anger Management Among Individuals with Psychiatric Problems in Pakistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naz, Sumara; Khalily, Muhammad Tahir

    2016-04-01

    The present study was designed to indigenously adopt Novaco's model of anger management and examine its efficacy among individuals with psychiatric problems in Pakistan. For the assessment of anger and psychiatric problems, Urdu-translated versions of Novaco Anger Inventory (NAI), Anger Self-Report Questionnaire (ASR) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scale were used. A sample of 100 individuals was divided into two groups: a treatment group (received the indigenously adopted model of anger management) and a control group (received general counseling). Results of mixed repeated-measures ANOVA revealed that individuals in the treatment group significantly (p anger management was shown to be more effective than general counseling for anger management.

  7. Classic models of population dynamics: assumptions about selfregulative mechanisms and numbers of interactions between individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L.V. Nedorezov

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Stochastic model of migrations of individuals within the limits of finite domain on a plane is considered. It is assumed that population size scale is homogeneous, and there doesn't exist an interval of optimal values of population size (Alley effect doesn't realize for population. For every fixed value of population size number of interactions between individuals is calculated (as average in space and time. Correspondence between several classic models and numbers of interactions between individuals is analyzed.

  8. Individual brain structure and modelling predict seizure propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proix, Timothée; Bartolomei, Fabrice; Guye, Maxime; Jirsa, Viktor K

    2017-03-01

    See Lytton (doi:10.1093/awx018) for a scientific commentary on this article.Neural network oscillations are a fundamental mechanism for cognition, perception and consciousness. Consequently, perturbations of network activity play an important role in the pathophysiology of brain disorders. When structural information from non-invasive brain imaging is merged with mathematical modelling, then generative brain network models constitute personalized in silico platforms for the exploration of causal mechanisms of brain function and clinical hypothesis testing. We here demonstrate with the example of drug-resistant epilepsy that patient-specific virtual brain models derived from diffusion magnetic resonance imaging have sufficient predictive power to improve diagnosis and surgery outcome. In partial epilepsy, seizures originate in a local network, the so-called epileptogenic zone, before recruiting other close or distant brain regions. We create personalized large-scale brain networks for 15 patients and simulate the individual seizure propagation patterns. Model validation is performed against the presurgical stereotactic electroencephalography data and the standard-of-care clinical evaluation. We demonstrate that the individual brain models account for the patient seizure propagation patterns, explain the variability in postsurgical success, but do not reliably augment with the use of patient-specific connectivity. Our results show that connectome-based brain network models have the capacity to explain changes in the organization of brain activity as observed in some brain disorders, thus opening up avenues towards discovery of novel clinical interventions. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain.

  9. Video Self-Modeling: A Job Skills Intervention with Individuals with Intellectual Disability in Employment Settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Ailsa E.; Bambara, Linda M.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the effectiveness of video self-modeling (VSM) to teach chained job tasks to individuals with intellectual disability in community-based employment settings. Initial empirical evaluations have demonstrated that VSM when used in combination with other instructional strategies, are effective methods to teach…

  10. Individual-based modeling of fish: Linking to physical models and water quality.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.A.

    1997-08-01

    The individual-based modeling approach for the simulating fish population and community dynamics is gaining popularity. Individual-based modeling has been used in many other fields, such as forest succession and astronomy. The popularity of the individual-based approach is partly a result of the lack of success of the more aggregate modeling approaches traditionally used for simulating fish population and community dynamics. Also, recent recognition that it is often the atypical individual that survives has fostered interest in the individual-based approach. Two general types of individual-based models are distribution and configuration. Distribution models follow the probability distributions of individual characteristics, such as length and age. Configuration models explicitly simulate each individual; the sum over individuals being the population. DeAngelis et al (1992) showed that, when distribution and configuration models were formulated from the same common pool of information, both approaches generated similar predictions. The distribution approach was more compact and general, while the configuration approach was more flexible. Simple biological changes, such as making growth rate dependent on previous days growth rates, were easy to implement in the configuration version but prevented simple analytical solution of the distribution version.

  11. Individual-based modeling of fish: Linking to physical models and water quality.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.A.

    1997-08-01

    The individual-based modeling approach for the simulating fish population and community dynamics is gaining popularity. Individual-based modeling has been used in many other fields, such as forest succession and astronomy. The popularity of the individual-based approach is partly a result of the lack of success of the more aggregate modeling approaches traditionally used for simulating fish population and community dynamics. Also, recent recognition that it is often the atypical individual that survives has fostered interest in the individual-based approach. Two general types of individual-based models are distribution and configuration. Distribution models follow the probability distributions of individual characteristics, such as length and age. Configuration models explicitly simulate each individual; the sum over individuals being the population. DeAngelis et al (1992) showed that, when distribution and configuration models were formulated from the same common pool of information, both approaches generated similar predictions. The distribution approach was more compact and general, while the configuration approach was more flexible. Simple biological changes, such as making growth rate dependent on previous days growth rates, were easy to implement in the configuration version but prevented simple analytical solution of the distribution version.

  12. Individual Patient Factors Associated with Effective Tinnitus Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodoroff, Sarah M.; Schuette, Andrew; Griest, Susan; Henry, James A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Little is known about patient factors that might influence outcomes of tinnitus interventions. Determining such factors would offer insights into why some individuals benefit from tinnitus intervention whereas others do not. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate selected patient factors that may be associated with outcomes of tinnitus intervention. Factors studied include demographics, tinnitus characteristics, psychoacoustic tinnitus measures, audiometric data, and overall physical/emotional health status. Research Design A retrospective analysis was performed on data obtained from a controlled clinical study that compared factors associated with tinnitus relief after tinnitus masking and tinnitus retraining therapy. Study Sample A total of 126 military veterans participated in this controlled clinical study. Of these, 89 completed outcome measures at both baseline and 12 mo and were included in the present analysis. Data Collection and Analysis A “responder” to intervention was identified as having a decrease (improvement) of 20 or more points on the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory between baseline and 12 mo. A “nonresponder” did not achieve a 20-point improvement on the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory. Individual patient factors were examined using independent t-tests or χ2 analysis. A logistic regression model was used to determine how well each factor predicted treatment outcome (responder or nonresponder) while controlling for each of the other factors. Results Five patient factors were significantly different (p ≤ 0.05) between responders and nonresponders. Responders tended to (1) be younger in age; (2) have better low-frequency hearing sensitivity; (3) have greater problems with overall hearing; (4) be more likely to have tinnitus for shorter durations; and (5) perceive their tinnitus to be located “in the head” versus “in the ears.” A logistic regression was then performed to determine how well each factor predicted the

  13. Modelling community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duijster, Denise; van Loveren, Cor; Dusseldorp, Elise; Verrips, Gijsbert H W

    2014-04-01

    This cross-sectional study empirically tested a theoretical model of pathways and inter-relationships among community, family, and individual determinants of childhood dental caries in a sample of 630, 6-year-old children from the Netherlands. Children's decayed, missing, and filled teeth (dmft) scores were extracted from dental records. A validated parental questionnaire was used to collect data on sociodemographic characteristics, psychosocial factors, and oral hygiene behaviours. Data on neighbourhood quality were obtained from the Dutch Central Bureau of Statistics. Structural equation modelling indicated that the model was valid after applying a few modifications. In the revised model, lower maternal education level was related to poorer family organization, lower levels of social support, lower dental self-efficacy, and an external dental health locus of control. These, in turn, were associated with poorer oral hygiene behaviours, which were linked to higher levels of childhood dental caries. In addition, lower maternal education level and poorer neighbourhood quality were directly associated with higher caries levels in children. This model advances our understanding of determinants of childhood dental caries and the pathways in which they operate. Conception of these pathways is essential for guiding the development of caries-preventive programmes for children. Clues for further development of the model are suggested.

  14. An individual-based modeling approach to simulate the effects of cellular nutrient competition on Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 colony behavior and interactions in aerobic structured food systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tack, Ignace L M M; Logist, Filip; Noriega Fernández, Estefanía; Van Impe, Jan F M

    2015-02-01

    Traditional kinetic models in predictive microbiology reliably predict macroscopic dynamics of planktonically-growing cell cultures in homogeneous liquid food systems. However, most food products have a semi-solid structure, where microorganisms grow locally in colonies. Individual colony cells exhibit strongly different and non-normally distributed behavior due to local nutrient competition. As a result, traditional models considering average population behavior in a homogeneous system do not describe colony dynamics in full detail. To incorporate local resource competition and individual cell differences, an individual-based modeling approach has been applied to Escherichia coli K-12 MG1655 colonies, considering the microbial cell as modeling unit. The first contribution of this individual-based model is to describe single colony growth under nutrient-deprived conditions. More specifically, the linear and stationary phase in the evolution of the colony radius, the evolution from a disk-like to branching morphology, and the emergence of a starvation zone in the colony center are simulated and compared to available experimental data. These phenomena occur earlier at more severe nutrient depletion conditions, i.e., at lower nutrient diffusivity and initial nutrient concentration in the medium. Furthermore, intercolony interactions have been simulated. Higher inoculum densities lead to stronger intercolony interactions, such as colony merging and smaller colony sizes, due to nutrient competition. This individual-based model contributes to the elucidation of characteristic experimentally observed colony behavior from mechanistic information about cellular physiology and interactions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Individual-based lattice model for spatial spread of epidemics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henryk Fuks

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a lattice gas cellular automaton (LGCA to study spatial and temporal dynamics of an epidemic of SIR (susceptible-infected-removed type. The automaton is fully discrete, i.e., space, time and number of individuals are discrete variables. The automaton can be applied to study spread of epidemics in both human and animal populations. We investigate effects of spatial inhomogeneities in initial distribution of infected and vaccinated populations on the dynamics of epidemic of SIR type. We discuss vaccination strategies which differ only in spatial distribution of vaccinated individuals. Also, we derive an approximate, mean-field type description of the automaton, and discuss differences between the mean-field dynamics and the results ofLGCA simulation.

  16. A Stochastic LWR Model with Consideration of the Driver's Individual Property%A Stochastic LWR Model with Consideration of the Driver's Individual Property

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    唐铁桥; 王云鹏; 余贵珍; 黄海军

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we develop a stochastic LWR model based on the influences of the driver's individual property on his/her perceived density and speed deviation.The numerical results show that the driver's individual property has great effects on traffic flow only when the initial density is moderate,i.e.,at this time,oscillating traffic flow will occur and the oscillating phenomena in the traffic system consisting of the conservative and aggressive drivers is more serious than that in the traffic system consisting of the conservative (aggressive) drivers.

  17. Attractor-based models for individual and groups’ forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astakhova, N. N.; Demidova, L. A.; Kuzovnikov, A. V.; Tishkin, R. V.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper the questions of the attractors’ application in case of the development of the forecasting models on the base of the strictly binary trees have been considered. Usually, these models use the short time series as the training data sequence. The application of the principles of the attractors’ forming on the base of the long time series will allow creating the training data sequence more reasonably. The offered approach to creation of the training data sequence for the forecasting models on the base of the strictly binary trees was applied for the individual and groups’ forecasting of time series. At the same time the problems of one-objective and multiobjective optimization on the base of the modified clonal selection algorithm have been considered. The reviewed examples confirm the efficiency of the attractors’ application in sense of minimization of the used quality indicators of the forecasting models, and also the forecasting errors on 1 – 5 steps forward. Besides, the minimization of time expenditures for the development of the forecasting models is provided.

  18. Epidemic spreading in scale-free networks including the effect of individual vigilance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gong Yong-Wang; Song Yu-Rong; Jiang Guo-Ping

    2012-01-01

    In this paper,we study the epidemic spreading in scale-free networks and propose a new susceptible-infectedrecovered (SIR) model that includes the effect of individual vigilance. In our model,the effective spreading rate is dynamically adjusted with the time evolution at the vigilance period.Using the mean-field theory,an analytical result is derived.It shows that individual vigilance has no effect on the epidemic threshold.The numerical simulations agree well with the analytical result.Furthermore,we investigate the effect of individual vigilance on the epidemic spreading speed.It is shown that individual vigilance can slow the epidemic spreading speed effectively and delay the arrival of peak epidemic infection.

  19. Fraud, individuals, and networks: A biopsychosocial model of scientific frauds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leistedt, Samuel J; Linkowski, Paul

    2016-03-01

    The problem of fraud, especially scientific fraud, is global and its identification risk is still in its infancy. Based on an in-depth analysis of several financial and scientific fraud trials, the authors propose a new and integrative model of scientific fraud. This model identifies two major levels for committing fraud: (i) at the personal skills level (micro-level) and (ii) at the network skills level (macro-level). Interacting continuously with each other, they form a dynamic, efficient, and integrative system: an integrative model of fraud. The micro-level refers to three factors: (i) personality organization, (ii) social competence, and (iii) the so-called triangle of fraud. The macro-level refers essentially to social network organization and social engineering. Then, the key to understanding and mostly controlling fraud is to consider both the individual and the environment in which they operate. Based on our model, several steps at the micro- and macro-levels can be proposed. Copyright © 2016 The Chartered Society of Forensic Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Modeling structured population dynamics using data from unmarked individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Evan H. Campbell; Zipkin, Elise; Thorson, James T.; See, Kevin; Lynch, Heather J.; Kanno, Yoichiro; Chandler, Richard; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2014-01-01

    The study of population dynamics requires unbiased, precise estimates of abundance and vital rates that account for the demographic structure inherent in all wildlife and plant populations. Traditionally, these estimates have only been available through approaches that rely on intensive mark–recapture data. We extended recently developed N-mixture models to demonstrate how demographic parameters and abundance can be estimated for structured populations using only stage-structured count data. Our modeling framework can be used to make reliable inferences on abundance as well as recruitment, immigration, stage-specific survival, and detection rates during sampling. We present a range of simulations to illustrate the data requirements, including the number of years and locations necessary for accurate and precise parameter estimates. We apply our modeling framework to a population of northern dusky salamanders (Desmognathus fuscus) in the mid-Atlantic region (USA) and find that the population is unexpectedly declining. Our approach represents a valuable advance in the estimation of population dynamics using multistate data from unmarked individuals and should additionally be useful in the development of integrated models that combine data from intensive (e.g., mark–recapture) and extensive (e.g., counts) data sources.

  1. Using Decision Models to Enhance Investigations of Individual Differences in Cognitive Neuroscience

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Corey N.; Curl, Ryan A.; Sloane, Jennifer F.

    2016-01-01

    There is great interest in relating individual differences in cognitive processing to activation of neural systems. The general process involves relating measures of task performance like reaction times or accuracy to brain activity to identify individual differences in neural processing. One limitation of this approach is that measures like reaction times can be affected by multiple components of processing. For instance, some individuals might have higher accuracy in a memory task because they respond more cautiously, not because they have better memory. Computational models of decision making, like the drift–diffusion model and the linear ballistic accumulator model, provide a potential solution to this problem. They can be fitted to data from individual participants to disentangle the effects of the different processes driving behavior. In this sense the models can provide cleaner measures of the processes of interest, and enhance our understanding of how neural activity varies across individuals or populations. The advantages of this model-based approach to investigating individual differences in neural activity are discussed with recent examples of how this method can improve our understanding of the brain–behavior relationship. PMID:26903896

  2. Using decision models to enhance investigations of individual differences in cognitive neuroscience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey N White

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available There is great interest in relating individual differences in cognitive processing to activation of neural systems. The general process involves relating measures of task performance like reaction times or accuracy to brain activity to identify individual differences in neural processing. One limitation of this approach is that measures like reaction times can be affected by multiple components of processing. For instance, some individuals might have higher accuracy in a memory task because they respond more cautiously, not because they have better memory. Computational models of decision making, like the drift-diffusion model and the linear ballistic accumulator model, provide a potential solution to this problem. They can be fitted to data from individual participants to disentangle the effects of the different processes driving behavior. In this sense the models can provide cleaner measures of the processes of interest, and enhance our understanding of how neural activity varies across individuals or populations. The advantages of this model-based approach to investigating individual differences in neural activity are discussed with recent examples of how this method can improve our understanding of the brain-behavior relationship.

  3. Individual recognition, dominance hierarchies and winner and loser effects.

    OpenAIRE

    Dugatkin, Lee Alan; Earley, Ryan L.

    2004-01-01

    Winner and loser effects are defined as an increased probability of winning an aggressive interaction at time T, based on victories at time T-1, T-2, etc., and an increased probability of losing at time T, based on losses at time T-1, T-2, etc., respectively. Prior theoretical work on dominance hierarchy formation has demonstrated that when players are not capable of individual recognition, loser effects always produce a clear top-ranked (alpha) individual, but all other ranks in a group rema...

  4. An equation-free computational approach for extracting population-level behavior from individual-based models of biological dispersal

    CERN Document Server

    Erban, R; Othmer, H G; Erban, Radek; Kevrekidis, Ioannis G.; Othmer, Hans G.

    2005-01-01

    The movement of many organisms can be described as a random walk at either or both the individual and population level. The rules for this random walk are based on complex biological processes and it may be difficult to develop a tractable, quantitatively-accurate, individual-level model. However, important problems in areas ranging from ecology to medicine involve large collections of individuals, and a further intellectual challenge is to model population-level behavior based on a detailed individual-level model. Because of the large number of interacting individuals and because the individual-level model is complex, classical direct Monte Carlo simulations can be very slow, and often of little practical use. In this case, an equation-free approach may provide effective methods for the analysis and simulation of individual-based models. In this paper we analyze equation-free coarse projective integration. For analytical purposes, we start with known partial differential equations describing biological rando...

  5. Cognitive Modeling of Individual Variation in Reference Production and Comprehension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Petra

    2016-01-01

    A challenge for most theoretical and computational accounts of linguistic reference is the observation that language users vary considerably in their referential choices. Part of the variation observed among and within language users and across tasks may be explained from variation in the cognitive resources available to speakers and listeners. This paper presents a computational model of reference production and comprehension developed within the cognitive architecture ACT-R. Through simulations with this ACT-R model, it is investigated how cognitive constraints interact with linguistic constraints and features of the linguistic discourse in speakers' production and listeners' comprehension of referring expressions in specific tasks, and how this interaction may give rise to variation in referential choice. The ACT-R model of reference explains and predicts variation among language users in their referential choices as a result of individual and task-related differences in processing speed and working memory capacity. Because of limitations in their cognitive capacities, speakers sometimes underspecify or overspecify their referring expressions, and listeners sometimes choose incorrect referents or are overly liberal in their interpretation of referring expressions.

  6. Cognitive Modeling of Individual Variation in Reference Production and Comprehension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra eHendriks

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available A challenge for most theoretical and computational accounts of linguistic reference is the observation that language users vary considerably in their referential choices. Part of the variation observed among and within language users and across tasks may be explained from variation in the cognitive resources available to speakers and listeners. This paper presents a computational model of reference production and comprehension developed within the cognitive architecture ACT-R. Through simulations with this ACT-R model, it is investigated how cognitive constraints interact with linguistic constraints and features of the linguistic discourse in speakers’ production and listeners’ comprehension of referring expressions in specific tasks, and how this interaction may give rise to variation in referential choice. The ACT-R model of reference explains and predicts variation among language users in their referential choices as a result of individual and task-related differences in processing speed and working memory capacity. Because of limitations in their cognitive capacities, speakers sometimes underspecify or overspecify their referring expressions, and listeners sometimes choose incorrect referents or are overly liberal in their interpretation of referring expressions.

  7. Steady States in SIRS Epidemical Model of Mobile Individuals

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Duan-Ming; LIU Dan; HE Min-Hua; YU Xiao-Ling; PAN Gui-Jun; SUN Hong-Zhang; SU Xiang-Ying; SUN Fan; YIN Yan-Ping; LI Rui

    2006-01-01

    We consider an epidemical model within socially interacting mobile individuals to study the behaviors of steady statesof epidemic propagation in 2D networks. Using mean-field approximation and large scale simulations, we recover the usual epidemic behavior with critical thresholds δc and pc below which infectious disease dies out. For the population density δ far above δc, it is found that there is linear relationship between contact rate λ and the population density δ in the main. At the same time, the result obtained from mean-field approximation is compared with our numerical result, and it is found that these two results are similar by and large but not completely the same.

  8. Steady States in SIRS Epidemical Model of Mobile Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Duan-Ming; He, Min-Hua; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Pan, Gui-Jun; Sun, Hong-Zhang; Su, Xiang-Ying; Sun, Fan; Yin, Yan-Ping; Li, Rui; Liu, Dan

    2006-01-01

    We consider an epidemical model within socially interacting mobile individuals to study the behaviors of steady states of epidemic propagation in 2D networks. Using mean-field approximation and large scale simulations, we recover the usual epidemic behavior with critical thresholds δc and pc below which infectious disease dies out. For the population density δ far above δc, it is found that there is linear relationship between contact rate λ and the population density δ in the main. At the same time, the result obtained from mean-field approximation is compared with our numerical result, and it is found that these two results are similar by and large but not completely the same.

  9. Dosha brain-types: A neural model of individual differences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederick T Travis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores brain patterns associated with the three categories of regulatory principles of the body, mind, and behavior in Ayurveda, called Vata, Pitta, and Kapha dosha. A growing body of research has reported patterns of blood chemistry, genetic expression, physiological states, and chronic diseases associated with each dosha type. Since metabolic and growth factors are controlled by the nervous system, each dosha type should be associated with patterns of functioning of six major areas of the nervous system: The prefrontal cortex, the reticular activating system, the autonomic nervous system, the enteric nervous system, the limbic system, and the hypothalamus. For instance, the prefrontal cortex, which includes the anterior cingulate, ventral medial, and the dorsal lateral cortices, would exhibit a high range of functioning in the Vata brain-type leading to the possibility of being easily overstimulated. The Vata brain-type performs activity quickly. Learns quickly and forgets quickly. Their fast mind gives them an edge in creative problem solving. The Pitta brain-type reacts strongly to all challenges leading to purposeful and resolute actions. They never give up and are very dynamic and goal oriented. The Kapha brain-type is slow and steady leading to methodical thinking and action. They prefer routine and needs stimulation to get going. A model of dosha brain-types could provide a physiological foundation to understand individual differences. This model could help individualize treatment modalities to address different mental and physical dysfunctions. It also could explain differences in behavior seen in clinical as well as in normal populations.

  10. Effect of direction on loudness in individual binaural synthesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivonen, Ville Pekka; Minnaar, Pauli; Ellermeier, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    The effect of sound incidence angle on loudness is investigated in this study using binaural synthesis. Individual head-related transfer functions (HRTFs) and headphone equalization are used to present narrow-band noises from different directions to listeners. Their task is to match the loudness...... of these stimuli in an adaptive procedure to a reference noise in front of the listeners. The results are compared to an earlier investigation with the same experimental design in a real sound field. Based on the results the role of the individual HRTFs in loudness judgments is inspected, and finally, binaural...

  11. The effects of individual housing on mice and rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krohn, Thomas Cæcius; Sørensen, Dorte Bratbo; Ottesen, Jan Lund

    2006-01-01

    and behaviour. It is, however, unclear whether this effect actually impairs animal welfare. The aim of this paper is to analyse studies on individual housing of mice and rats to evaluate whether there is documented proof that individual housing affects welfare, and, alternatively whether it is possible to house...... in the animals. However, this review of 37 studies in rats and 17 studies in mice showed divergence in test results difficult to explain, as many studies lacked basal information about the study, eg information on genetic strains and housing conditions, such as bedding, enrichment and cage sizes. Furthermore...

  12. Decreased Pasteur effect in platelets of aged individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Aurelio, M; Merlo Pich, M; Catani, L; Sgarbi, G L; Bovina, C; Formiggini, G; Parenti Castelli, G; Baum, H; Tura, S; Lenaz, G

    2001-06-01

    We have investigated the mitochondrial energy state in human platelets of young (19-30 years old) and aged individuals (65-87 years old) exploiting the Pasteur effect, i.e. stimulation of lactate production by incubation of the purified platelets with the mitochondrial respiratory chain inhibitor, antimycin A. This assay allows the determination of mitochondrial function with respect to glycolysis, and the ratio of mitochondrial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) to glycolytic ATP. A significant increase of basal, non-stimulated lactate production and decrease of the stimulation by antimycin A were observed in the older individuals, suggesting that the impairment of oxidative phosphorylation detectable in post-mitotic tissues of aged individuals can be observed also in easily collectable blood cells.

  13. Effects of tongue pressing effortful swallow in older healthy individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Taeok; Kim, Youngsun

    2016-01-01

    The risk of swallowing disorders is increased for older individuals due to weak tongue and pharyngeal muscle strength. This study was appraised the value of a preventative approach by developing the tongue pressing effortful swallow (TPES) applied using a home-based and self-administered procedure. The TPES was developed by combining two swallowing exercises: tongue strengthening exercise and the effortful swallow. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of the TPES on maximum tongue pressure and peak amplitude of submental muscle activity in older individuals. 27 older individuals (mean 73 years) performed a 4-week TPES. The exercise program was adapted to a home-based and self-administered procedure. The maximum tongue pressure was measured by the Iowa Oral Performance Instrument and peak amplitude of submental muscle activity by surface electromyography (sEMG). Statistical comparisons were made by a matched pairs t-test (psEMG did not differ between before and after exercises. The TPES had a positive impact in older individuals. The TPES, a combining exercise, was possible because two exercises had common physiological events. The TPES was a more innovative and efficient approach than the tongue strengthening exercise alone. In addition, older individuals were able to perform the swallowing exercise at home and by themselves with little assistance. Future research needs to refine the TPES and apply it to patients with dysphagia. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  14. Understanding Individual Resilience in the Workplace: The International Collaboration of Workforce Resilience (ICWR Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clare Samantha Rees

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available When not managed effectively, high levels of workplace stress can lead to several negative personal and performance outcomes. Some professional groups work in highly stressful settings and are therefore particularly at risk of conditions such as anxiety, depression, secondary traumatic stress and burnout. However, some individuals are less affected by workplace stress and the associated negative outcomes. Such individuals have been described as ‘resilient’. A number of studies have found relationships between levels of individual resilience and specific negative outcomes such as burnout and compassion fatigue. However, because psychological resilience is a multi-dimensional construct it is necessary to more clearly delineate it from other related and overlapping constructs. The creation of a testable theoretical model of individual workforce resilience, which includes both stable traits (e.g. neuroticism as well as more malleable intrapersonal factors (e.g. coping style, enables information to be derived that can eventually inform interventions aimed at enhancing individual resilience in the workplace. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new theoretical model of individual workforce resilience that includes several intrapersonal constructs known to be central in the appraisal of and response to stressors and that also overlap with the construct of psychological resilience. We propose a model in which psychological resilience is hypothesised to mediate the relationship between neuroticism, mindfulness, self-efficacy, coping and psychological adjustment.

  15. Understanding individual resilience in the workplace: the international collaboration of workforce resilience model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Clare S; Breen, Lauren J; Cusack, Lynette; Hegney, Desley

    2015-01-01

    When not managed effectively, high levels of workplace stress can lead to several negative personal and performance outcomes. Some professional groups work in highly stressful settings and are therefore particularly at risk of conditions such as anxiety, depression, secondary traumatic stress, and burnout. However, some individuals are less affected by workplace stress and the associated negative outcomes. Such individuals have been described as "resilient." A number of studies have found relationships between levels of individual resilience and specific negative outcomes such as burnout and compassion fatigue. However, because psychological resilience is a multi-dimensional construct it is necessary to more clearly delineate it from other related and overlapping constructs. The creation of a testable theoretical model of individual workforce resilience, which includes both stable traits (e.g., neuroticism) as well as more malleable intrapersonal factors (e.g., coping style), enables information to be derived that can eventually inform interventions aimed at enhancing individual resilience in the workplace. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new theoretical model of individual workforce resilience that includes several intrapersonal constructs known to be central in the appraisal of and response to stressors and that also overlap with the construct of psychological resilience. We propose a model in which psychological resilience is hypothesized to mediate the relationship between neuroticism, mindfulness, self-efficacy, coping, and psychological adjustment.

  16. Understanding individual resilience in the workplace: the international collaboration of workforce resilience model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Clare S.; Breen, Lauren J.; Cusack, Lynette; Hegney, Desley

    2015-01-01

    When not managed effectively, high levels of workplace stress can lead to several negative personal and performance outcomes. Some professional groups work in highly stressful settings and are therefore particularly at risk of conditions such as anxiety, depression, secondary traumatic stress, and burnout. However, some individuals are less affected by workplace stress and the associated negative outcomes. Such individuals have been described as “resilient.” A number of studies have found relationships between levels of individual resilience and specific negative outcomes such as burnout and compassion fatigue. However, because psychological resilience is a multi-dimensional construct it is necessary to more clearly delineate it from other related and overlapping constructs. The creation of a testable theoretical model of individual workforce resilience, which includes both stable traits (e.g., neuroticism) as well as more malleable intrapersonal factors (e.g., coping style), enables information to be derived that can eventually inform interventions aimed at enhancing individual resilience in the workplace. The purpose of this paper is to introduce a new theoretical model of individual workforce resilience that includes several intrapersonal constructs known to be central in the appraisal of and response to stressors and that also overlap with the construct of psychological resilience. We propose a model in which psychological resilience is hypothesized to mediate the relationship between neuroticism, mindfulness, self-efficacy, coping, and psychological adjustment. PMID:25698999

  17. Competition of Dynamic Self-Confidence and Inhomogeneous Individual Influence in Voter Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xiong

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available In social systems, agents often have different ability to persuade neighbors to adopt their opinions. In this paper, we aim to investigate how the location and heterogeneity of influencers in social networks can improve convergence. We propose a voter model with dynamic self-conviction and heterogeneous individual influence which is related to the underlying network topology. An agent may keep its current opinion according to personal conviction, or otherwise, it may preferentially choose the opinion of the neighbor that has a great influence. Individual conviction evolves during the dynamic process, and can be strengthened by social recognition. Simulations indicate our model has three nontrivial results. First, the conservation of average magnetization in the voter model is broken under the effect of individual conviction and influence, and the system evolves to an ordered state in which one opinion is dominant, but total consensus is prevented by extremists. Furthermore, individual influence has a subtle action on opinion evolution. The heterogeneity of individual influence accelerates the relaxation process, but, with the action of dynamic conviction, more heterogeneous influence does not mean the average magnetization will be more ordered. In addition, when competing with agents’ conviction, more heterogeneous individual influence plays a more significant role in agents’ decisions. These results are helpful for understanding some aspects of collective phenomena that occur on online social media.

  18. Explorations in combining cognitive models of individuals and system dynamics models of groups.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Backus, George A.

    2008-07-01

    This report documents a demonstration model of interacting insurgent leadership, military leadership, government leadership, and societal dynamics under a variety of interventions. The primary focus of the work is the portrayal of a token societal model that responds to leadership activities. The model also includes a linkage between leadership and society that implicitly represents the leadership subordinates as they directly interact with the population. The societal model is meant to demonstrate the efficacy and viability of using System Dynamics (SD) methods to simulate populations and that these can then connect to cognitive models depicting individuals. SD models typically focus on average behavior and thus have limited applicability to describe small groups or individuals. On the other hand, cognitive models readily describe individual behavior but can become cumbersome when used to describe populations. Realistic security situations are invariably a mix of individual and population dynamics. Therefore, the ability to tie SD models to cognitive models provides a critical capability that would be otherwise be unavailable.

  19. Individual differences in dopamine level modulate the ego depletion effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Junhua; Xiao, Shanshan; Liu, Ying; Jiang, Yumeng; Mao, Lihua

    2016-01-01

    Initial exertion of self-control impairs subsequent self-regulatory performance, which is referred to as the ego depletion effect. The current study examined how individual differences in dopamine level, as indexed by eye blink rate (EBR), would moderate ego depletion. An inverted-U-shaped relationship between EBR and subsequent self-regulatory performance was found when participants initially engaged in self-control but such relationship was absent in the control condition where there was no initial exertion, suggesting individuals with a medium dopamine level may be protected from the typical ego depletion effect. These findings are consistent with a cognitive explanation which considers ego depletion as a phenomenon similar to "switch costs" that would be neutralized by factors promoting flexible switching.

  20. Ant groups optimally amplify the effect of transiently informed individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelblum, Aviram; Pinkoviezky, Itai; Fonio, Ehud; Ghosh, Abhijit; Gov, Nir; Feinerman, Ofer

    2015-01-01

    To cooperatively transport a large load, it is important that carriers conform in their efforts and align their forces. A downside of behavioural conformism is that it may decrease the group's responsiveness to external information. Combining experiment and theory, we show how ants optimize collective transport. On the single-ant scale, optimization stems from decision rules that balance individuality and compliance. Macroscopically, these rules poise the system at the transition between random walk and ballistic motion where the collective response to the steering of a single informed ant is maximized. We relate this peak in response to the divergence of susceptibility at a phase transition. Our theoretical models predict that the ant-load system can be transitioned through the critical point of this mesoscopic system by varying its size; we present experiments supporting these predictions. Our findings show that efficient group-level processes can arise from transient amplification of individual-based knowledge. PMID:26218613

  1. Ant groups optimally amplify the effect of transiently informed individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelblum, Aviram; Pinkoviezky, Itai; Fonio, Ehud; Ghosh, Abhijit; Gov, Nir; Feinerman, Ofer

    2015-07-01

    To cooperatively transport a large load, it is important that carriers conform in their efforts and align their forces. A downside of behavioural conformism is that it may decrease the group's responsiveness to external information. Combining experiment and theory, we show how ants optimize collective transport. On the single-ant scale, optimization stems from decision rules that balance individuality and compliance. Macroscopically, these rules poise the system at the transition between random walk and ballistic motion where the collective response to the steering of a single informed ant is maximized. We relate this peak in response to the divergence of susceptibility at a phase transition. Our theoretical models predict that the ant-load system can be transitioned through the critical point of this mesoscopic system by varying its size; we present experiments supporting these predictions. Our findings show that efficient group-level processes can arise from transient amplification of individual-based knowledge.

  2. Ant groups optimally amplify the effect of transiently informed individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelblum, Aviram; Pinkoviezky, Itai; Fonio, Ehud; Ghosh, Abhijit; Gov, Nir; Feinerman, Ofer

    2015-07-28

    To cooperatively transport a large load, it is important that carriers conform in their efforts and align their forces. A downside of behavioural conformism is that it may decrease the group's responsiveness to external information. Combining experiment and theory, we show how ants optimize collective transport. On the single-ant scale, optimization stems from decision rules that balance individuality and compliance. Macroscopically, these rules poise the system at the transition between random walk and ballistic motion where the collective response to the steering of a single informed ant is maximized. We relate this peak in response to the divergence of susceptibility at a phase transition. Our theoretical models predict that the ant-load system can be transitioned through the critical point of this mesoscopic system by varying its size; we present experiments supporting these predictions. Our findings show that efficient group-level processes can arise from transient amplification of individual-based knowledge.

  3. Individual balanced scorecard based on innovative models of personality structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Polozov

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Article focuses on integration of different views on personality structure, which comprises the type of person, the type of character and several types of intelligence. The paper shows practical application of the concept. Graduates who seek to realize their career must comply with the activities of his personality type, the type of character and the dominant type of intelligence.The aim of the article. The aim of the article is to offer the variant of integrating various psychological doctrines. This variant must have higher convergence of expected and actual behavior of selected groups than any of the local concepts. Personal balanced scorecard based on the innovative model of personality structure is building in the article.Practical work was carried out by the authors on the two groups of students. The main condition for the practical work was the fact that students do not impose something.The results of the analysis. We defined that personality structure is a complex concept. It is important to combine different views on the structure of individual and to include various aspects. From the analysis of other authors works we found out that BSC idea is to balance system performance in four groups. The first group includes traditional financial performance. The second group describes external environment of the company and its relationship with customers. The third group describes internal processes of the enterprise. The fourth group allows us to describe the company's ability to learn and grow.Conclusions and directions of further researches. The focus of interest is mainly determined by the type of personality. However, the selection should be such that:consistent hierarchy of motives at this age;trends of economy in general and in the chosen industry in particular;supported by appropriate kind of intelligence;absorbed all of the recommended activity profiles as private.

  4. Can plasticity make spatial structure irrelevant in individual-tree models?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar García

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Background Distance-dependent individual-tree models have commonly been found to add little predictive power to that of distance-independent ones. One possible reason is plasticity, the ability of trees to lean and to alter crown and root development to better occupy available growing space. Being able to redeploy foliage (and roots into canopy gaps and less contested areas can diminish the importance of stem ground locations. Methods Plasticity was simulated for 3 intensively measured forest stands, to see to what extent and under what conditions the allocation of resources (e.g., light to the individual trees depended on their ground coordinates. The data came from 50 × 60 m stem-mapped plots in natural monospecific stands of jack pine, trembling aspen and black spruce from central Canada. Explicit perfect-plasticity equations were derived for tessellation-type models. Results Qualitatively similar simulation results were obtained under a variety of modelling assumptions. The effects of plasticity varied somewhat with stand uniformity and with assumed plasticity limits and other factors. Stand-level implications for canopy depth, distribution modelling and total productivity were examined. Conclusions Generally, under what seem like conservative maximum plasticity constraints, spatial structure accounted for less than 10% of the variance in resource allocation. The perfect-plasticity equations approximated well the simulation results from tessellation models, but not those from models with less extreme competition asymmetry. Whole-stand perfect plasticity approximations seem an attractive alternative to individual-tree models.

  5. Priming and Habituation for Faces: Individual Differences and Inversion Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieth, Cory A.; Huber, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Immediate repetition priming for faces was examined across a range of prime durations in a threshold identification task. Similar to word repetition priming results, short duration face primes produced positive priming whereas long duration face primes eliminated or reversed this effect. A habituation model of such priming effects predicted that…

  6. Priming and Habituation for Faces: Individual Differences and Inversion Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieth, Cory A.; Huber, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Immediate repetition priming for faces was examined across a range of prime durations in a threshold identification task. Similar to word repetition priming results, short duration face primes produced positive priming whereas long duration face primes eliminated or reversed this effect. A habituation model of such priming effects predicted that…

  7. Effect of occlusion on joint sounds in asymptomatic individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Alício Rosalino; Zuim, Paulo R Junqueira; Goiato, Marcelo Coelho; dos Santos, Paulo H; Ribeiro, Adriana Barbosa; Pita, Murillo Sucena; Flacón-Antenucci, Rosse M

    2008-01-01

    Occlusion is a predisposing factor for Temporomandibular Dysfunctions (TMD) of the joint, whose first sign and/or symptom is usually joint sound. To verify the effect of occlusion on joint sounds, temporomandibular joints (TMJ) were analyzed in 78 asymptomatic individuals with various dental conditions. Electrosonography was used to determine the intensity of the vibration in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) on opening and closing the mouth. Transducers (piezoelectric accelerometer) were placed on the right and left joints. Results were tabled and analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test (a=0.05). It was concluded that TMJ vibration in partly edentulous individuals from Kennedy classes I, II and III is statistically higher than in dentate and fully edentulous subjects.

  8. Partially mixed household epidemiological model with clustered resistant individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebeler, David E; Criner, Amanda Keck

    2007-02-01

    We study the dynamics of the spread of an infectious disease within a population partitioned into households, and stratified into resistant and nonresistant individuals. Variability in the level of resistance between households increases the initial rate of spread of the infection, as well as the infection level at the endemic equilibrium. This phenomenon is seen even when all individuals in the population are equally likely to be resistant, and can also be predicted by including spatial clustering of resistant individuals within an improved mean-field approximation.

  9. Emergence of social cohesion in a model society of greedy, mobile individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roca, Carlos P; Helbing, Dirk

    2011-07-12

    Human wellbeing in modern societies relies on social cohesion, which can be characterized by high levels of cooperation and a large number of social ties. Both features, however, are frequently challenged by individual self-interest. In fact, the stability of social and economic systems can suddenly break down as the recent financial crisis and outbreaks of civil wars illustrate. To understand the conditions for the emergence and robustness of social cohesion, we simulate the creation of public goods among mobile agents, assuming that behavioral changes are determined by individual satisfaction. Specifically, we study a generalized win-stay-lose-shift learning model, which is only based on previous experience and rules out greenbeard effects that would allow individuals to guess future gains. The most noteworthy aspect of this model is that it promotes cooperation in social dilemma situations despite very low information requirements and without assuming imitation, a shadow of the future, reputation effects, signaling, or punishment. We find that moderate greediness favors social cohesion by a coevolution between cooperation and spatial organization, additionally showing that those cooperation-enforcing levels of greediness can be evolutionarily selected. However, a maladaptive trend of increasing greediness, although enhancing individuals' returns in the beginning, eventually causes cooperation and social relationships to fall apart. Our model is, therefore, expected to shed light on the long-standing problem of the emergence and stability of cooperative behavior.

  10. Considerations in representing human individuals in social ecological models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manfredo, Michael J.; Teel, Tara L.; Gavin, Michael C.; Fulton, David C.

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter we focus on how to integrate the human individual into social-ecological systems analysis, and how to improve research on individual thought and action regarding the environment by locating it within the broader social-ecological context. We discuss three key questions as considerations for future research: (1) is human thought conceptualized as a dynamic and adaptive process, (2) is the individual placed in a multi-level context (including within-person levels, person-group interactions, and institutional and structural factors), and (3) is human thought seen as mutually constructed with the social and natural environment. Increased emphasis on the individual will be essential if we are to understand agency, innovation, and adaptation in social-ecological systems.

  11. A model of individual differences in learning air traffic control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taatgen, NA; Altmann, EM; Cleeremans, A; Schunn, CD; Gray, WD

    2001-01-01

    Individual differences in skill acquisition are influenced by several architectural factors. According to Ackerman's theory, general intelligence, speed of proceduralization and psychomotor speed influence different stages of skill acquisition. Ackerman tested this theory by correlating performance

  12. Individual learning effects on knowledge transfer in international joint ventures: An exploratory framework

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dao, Li Thuy; Napier, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines micro (individual-level) aspects of knowledge transfer and learning in international joint ventures in an emerging economy context. Learning by expatriate and local managers appears far more complex, mutually dependent, and significant to the knowledge transfer process than...... suggested in existing literature. Building upon conceptualizations of individual learning and cognitive – behavioural effects in an organisational context while drawing evidence from two cases of Danish – Vietnamese joint ventures, we propose a model of individual-level knowledge transfer and learning...

  13. THE WORLD-MODELLING POTENCY OF THE INDIVIDUAL METAPHOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavlova, M.S.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes individual metaphors as a fundamental component of the artistic worldview. The research discusses the correlation between the individual metaphor and interdiscourse markedness that allows identifying some peculiarities of cultural identity of the English-language literary text. The central place belongs to the propositions connected with the ways of reality conceptualization in the minds of the English-speaking mentality, which are necessary for correct interpretation of the cultural-specific information.

  14. Therapeutic Effect Observations on Individualized Treatment of Peripheral Facial Palsy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    何希俊; 谭吉林; 王本国; 郭瑞兰; 韩丑萍

    2006-01-01

    目的:观察采用个体化方案治疗周围性面瘫的疗效.方法:治疗组121例患者根据其病情特点采用个体化方案进行针刺治疗,与118例常规针灸治疗者进行对照研究,比较其疗程与疗效的差异.结果:治疗组愈显率为90.9%,对照组愈显率为69.5%,差异有显著性(P<0.01);两组各疗程愈显率比较,差异有显著性(P<0.01).结论:采用个体化方案治疗周围性面瘫效果明显优于常规针刺方法,且疗程短.%To investigate the curative effect of individualized treatment on peripheral facial paralysis. Methods:A treatment group of 121 patients was treated with acupuncture under an individualized plan based on the condition of disease. For a control study,118 patients were treated with conventional acupuncture. The courses of treatment and the curative effects were compared. Results:The cure and marked efficacy rate was 90.9% in the treatment group and 69.5% in the control group. There was a significant difference (P<0.01).There was also a significant difference in the cure and marked efficacy rate in each courses of treatment between the two groups (P<0.01). Conclusion:Individualized acupuncture treatment is better in the effect and shorter in the courses than conventional acupuncture treatment for peripheral facial paralysis.

  15. A global model of stress in parents of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Pozo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This research sought to analyse stress among mothers and fathers of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD to determine the relevant variables for its explanation and the possible gender differences. To examine parents' stress, we propose a multidimensional model based on the Double ABCX theoretical model. We argue that the result of stress depends on the following four interrelated factors: the characteristics of the individual with ASD (the severity of the disorder and behaviour problems, the social supports, the parents' perception of the situation (evaluated by sense of coherence and the coping strategies. Fiftynine sets of parents (59 mothers and 59 fathers of individuals diagnosed with ASD participated in the study. The data were analysed using a path analysis through the LISREL 8.80 program. We obtained two empirical models of stress: one model for mothers and one for fathers. In both models, the severity of the disorder and the behaviour problems had a direct and positive effect on stress. The sense of coherence (SOC and active avoidance coping strategies had a mediating role in models. Social support was relevant only for mothers. Finally, the results offer some guidelines for professionals working with families.

  16. Predation and the phasing of sleep : an evolutionary individual-based model

    OpenAIRE

    Acerbi, Alberto; Nunn, Charles Lindsay

    2011-01-01

    All mammals thus far studied sleep, yet important questions remain concerning the ecological factors that influence sleep patterns. Here, we developed an evolutionary individual-based model to investigate the effect of predation pressure on prey sleep. We investigated three ecological conditions, including one that assumed a dynamic interaction between predator and prey behaviour. In condition 1, we found that monophasic predators (i.e. with one sleep bout per 24 h) select for monophasic prey...

  17. Impulsive vaccination and dispersal on dynamics of an SIR epidemic model with restricting infected individuals boarding transports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jianjun; Cai, Shaohong; Li, Limei

    2016-05-01

    To understand the effect of impulsive vaccination and restricting infected individuals boarding transports on disease spread, we establish an SIR model with impulsive vaccination, impulsive dispersal and restricting infected individuals boarding transports. This SIR epidemic model for two regions, which are connected by transportation of non-infected individuals, portrays the evolvement of diseases. We prove that all solutions of the investigated system are uniformly ultimately bounded. We also prove that there exists globally asymptotically stable infection-free boundary periodic solution. The condition for permanence is discussed. It is concluded that the approach of impulsive vaccination and restricting infected individuals boarding transports provides reliable tactic basis for preventing disease spread.

  18. Perceived Effects of Emotion Intensity on Athletic Performance: A Contingency-Based Individualized Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robazza, Claudio; Bortoli, Laura; Hanin, Yuri

    2006-01-01

    This study, based on the Individual Zones of Optimal Functioning model, examined the perceived effect of idiosyncratic emotions and bodily symptoms on athletic performance along the entire emotion-intensity range. The participants were 35 elite Italian athletes, 16 women and 19 men, competing in either figure skating or gymnastics. Idiosyncratic…

  19. Effects of Web-Based Collaborative Writing on Individual L2 Writing Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bikowski, Dawn; Vithanage, Ramyadarshanie

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of repeated in-class web-based collaborative writing tasks on second language writers' (L2) individual writing scores. A pre-test post-test research model was used in addition to participant surveys, class observations, and teacher interviews. Participants included 59 L2 writers in a writing class at a large U.S.…

  20. Perceived Effects of Emotion Intensity on Athletic Performance: A Contingency-Based Individualized Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robazza, Claudio; Bortoli, Laura; Hanin, Yuri

    2006-01-01

    This study, based on the Individual Zones of Optimal Functioning model, examined the perceived effect of idiosyncratic emotions and bodily symptoms on athletic performance along the entire emotion-intensity range. The participants were 35 elite Italian athletes, 16 women and 19 men, competing in either figure skating or gymnastics. Idiosyncratic…

  1. The effect of area size and predation on the time to extinction of prairie vole populations. simulation studies via SERDYCA: a Spatially-Explicit Individual-Based Model of Rodent Dynamics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kostova, T; Carlsen, T

    2003-11-21

    We present a spatially-explicit individual-based computational model of rodent dynamics, customized for the prairie vole species, M. Ochrogaster. The model is based on trophic relationships and represents important features such as territorial competition, mating behavior, density-dependent predation and dispersal out of the modeled spatial region. Vegetation growth and vole fecundity are dependent on climatic components. The results of simulations show that the model correctly predicts the overall temporal dynamics of the population density. Time-series analysis shows a very good match between the periods corresponding to the peak population density frequencies predicted by the model and the ones reported in the literature. The model is used to study the relation between persistence, landscape area and predation. We introduce the notions of average time to extinction (ATE) and persistence frequency to quantify persistence. While the ATE decreases with decrease of area, it is a bell-shaped function of the predation level: increasing for 'small' and decreasing for 'large' predation levels.

  2. Toxic effects of individual and combined effects of BTEX on Euglena gracilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Cheng; Lee, Jong-Wha; Sichani, Homa Teimouri; Ng, Jack C

    2015-03-02

    BTEX is a group of volatile organic compounds consisting of benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes. Environmental contamination of BTEX can occur in the groundwater with their effects on the aquatic organisms and ecosystem being sparsely studied. The aim of this study was to evaluate the toxic effects of individual and mixed BTEX on Euglena gracilis (E. gracilis). We examined the growth rate, morphological changes and chlorophyll contents in E. gracilis Z and its mutant SMZ cells treated with single and mixture of BTEX. BTEX induced morphological change, formation of lipofuscin, and decreased chlorophyll content of E. gracilis Z in a dose response manner. The toxicity of individual BTEX on cell growth and chlorophyll inhibition is in the order of xylenes>ethylbenzene>toluene>benzene. SMZ was found more sensitive to BTEX than Z at much lower concentrations between 0.005 and 5 μM. The combined effect of mixed BTEX on chlorophyll contents was shown to be concentration addition (CA). Results from this study suggested that E. gracilis could be a suitable model for monitoring BTEX in the groundwater and predicting the combined effects on aqueous ecosystem.

  3. The Combined Use of Video Modeling and Social Stories in Teaching Social Skills for Individuals with Intellectual Disability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gül, Seray Olçay

    2016-01-01

    There are many studies in the literature in which individuals with intellectual disabilities exhibit social skills deficits and which show the need for teaching these skills systematically. This study aims to investigate the effects of an intervention package of consisting computer-presented video modeling and Social Stories on individuals with…

  4. An individual-based growth and competition model for coastal redwood forest restoration

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mantgem, Phillip J.; Das, Adrian J.

    2014-01-01

    Thinning treatments to accelerate coastal redwood forest stand development are in wide application, but managers have yet to identify prescriptions that might best promote Sequoia sempervirens (Lamb. ex D. Don) Endl. (redwood) growth. The creation of successful thinning prescriptions would be aided by identifying the underlying mechanisms governing how individual tree growth responds to competitive environments in coastal redwood forests. We created a spatially explicit individual-based model of tree competition and growth parameterized using surveys of upland redwood forests at Redwood National Park, California. We modeled competition for overstory trees (stems ≥ 20 cm stem diameter at breast height, 1.37 m (dbh)) as growth reductions arising from sizes, distances, and species identity of competitor trees. Our model explained up to half of the variation in individual tree growth, suggesting that neighborhood crowding is an important determinant of growth in this forest type. We used our model to simulate the effects of novel thinning prescriptions (e.g., 40% stand basal area removal) for redwood forest restoration, concluding that these treatments could lead to substantial growth releases, particularly for S. sempervirens. The results of this study, along with continued improvements to our model, will help to determine spacing and species composition that best encourage growth.

  5. Conceptual Models of the Individual Public Service Provider

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Lotte Bøgh; Bhatti, Yosef; Petersen, Ole Helby

    Individual public service providers’ motivation can be conceptualized as either extrinsic, autonomous or prosocial, and the question is how we can best theoretically understand this complexity without losing too much coherence and parsimony. Drawing on Allison’s approach (1969), three perspectives...

  6. Individual Tree Biomass Models for Plantation Grown American Sycamore

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regan B. Willson; Bryce E. Schlaegel; Harvey E. Kennedy

    1982-01-01

    Individual tree volume and green and dry weight equations are derived for American sycamore from a 5-year-old plantation in southeast Arkansas. Two trees have been destructively sampled each year from each of 20 plots. Observations from 168 trees are used to predict tree weight and volume as a function of dbh, total height, age, and initial number of trees. Separate...

  7. Holland's RIASEC Model as an Integrative Framework for Individual Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Patrick Ian; Day, Susan X.; McVay, Jason P.; Rounds, James

    2008-01-01

    Using data from published sources, the authors investigated J. L. Holland's (1959, 1997) theory of interest types as an integrative framework for organizing individual differences variables that are used in counseling psychology. Holland's interest types were used to specify 2- and 3-dimensional interest structures. In Study 1, measures of…

  8. Holland's RIASEC Model as an Integrative Framework for Individual Differences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, Patrick Ian; Day, Susan X.; McVay, Jason P.; Rounds, James

    2008-01-01

    Using data from published sources, the authors investigated J. L. Holland's (1959, 1997) theory of interest types as an integrative framework for organizing individual differences variables that are used in counseling psychology. Holland's interest types were used to specify 2- and 3-dimensional interest structures. In Study 1, measures of…

  9. Bayesian analysis of multi-state data with individual covariates for estimating genetic effects on demography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Converse, Sarah J.; Royle, J. Andrew; Urbanek, Richard P.

    2012-01-01

    Inbreeding depression is frequently a concern of managers interested in restoring endangered species. Decisions to reduce the potential for inbreeding depression by balancing genotypic contributions to reintroduced populations may exact a cost on long-term demographic performance of the population if those decisions result in reduced numbers of animals released and/or restriction of particularly successful genotypes (i.e., heritable traits of particular family lines). As part of an effort to restore a migratory flock of Whooping Cranes (Grus americana) to eastern North America using the offspring of captive breeders, we obtained a unique dataset which includes post-release mark-recapture data, as well as the pedigree of each released individual. We developed a Bayesian formulation of a multi-state model to analyze radio-telemetry, band-resight, and dead recovery data on reintroduced individuals, in order to track survival and breeding state transitions. We used studbook-based individual covariates to examine the comparative evidence for and degree of effects of inbreeding, genotype, and genotype quality on post-release survival of reintroduced individuals. We demonstrate implementation of the Bayesian multi-state model, which allows for the integration of imperfect detection, multiple data types, random effects, and individual- and time-dependent covariates. Our results provide only weak evidence for an effect of the quality of an individual's genotype in captivity on post-release survival as well as for an effect of inbreeding on post-release survival. We plan to integrate our results into a decision-analytic modeling framework that can explicitly examine tradeoffs between the effects of inbreeding and the effects of genotype and demographic stochasticity on population establishment.

  10. Therapeutic Enactment: Integrating Individual and Group Counseling Models for Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westwood, Marvin J.; Keats, Patrice A.; Wilensky, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to introduce the reader to a group-based therapy model known as therapeutic enactment. A description of this multimodal change model is provided by outlining the relevant background information, key concepts related to specific change processes, and the differences in this model compared to earlier psychodrama…

  11. Individual and population level effects of partner notification for Chlamydia trachomatis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian L Althaus

    Full Text Available Partner notification (PN or contact tracing is an important aspect of treating bacterial sexually transmitted infections (STIs, such as Chlamydia trachomatis. It facilitates the identification of new infected cases that can be treated through individual case management. PN also acts indirectly by limiting onward transmission in the general population. However, the impact of PN, both at the level of individuals and the population, remains unclear. Since it is difficult to study the effects of PN empirically, mathematical and computational models are useful tools for investigating its potential as a public health intervention. To this end, we developed an individual-based modeling framework called Rstisim. It allows the implementation of different models of STI transmission with various levels of complexity and the reconstruction of the complete dynamic sexual partnership network over any time period. A key feature of this framework is that we can trace an individual's partnership history in detail and investigate the outcome of different PN strategies for C. trachomatis. For individual case management, the results suggest that notifying three or more partners from the preceding 18 months yields substantial numbers of new cases. In contrast, the successful treatment of current partners is most important for preventing re-infection of index cases and reducing further transmission of C. trachomatis at the population level. The findings of this study demonstrate the difference between individual and population level outcomes of public health interventions for STIs.

  12. A linearization approach for the model-based analysis of combined aggregate and individual patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravva, Patanjali; Karlsson, Mats O; French, Jonathan L

    2014-04-30

    The application of model-based meta-analysis in drug development has gained prominence recently, particularly for characterizing dose-response relationships and quantifying treatment effect sizes of competitor drugs. The models are typically nonlinear in nature and involve covariates to explain the heterogeneity in summary-level literature (or aggregate data (AD)). Inferring individual patient-level relationships from these nonlinear meta-analysis models leads to aggregation bias. Individual patient-level data (IPD) are indeed required to characterize patient-level relationships but too often this information is limited. Since combined analyses of AD and IPD allow advantage of the information they share to be taken, the models developed for AD must be derived from IPD models; in the case of linear models, the solution is a closed form, while for nonlinear models, closed form solutions do not exist. Here, we propose a linearization method based on a second order Taylor series approximation for fitting models to AD alone or combined AD and IPD. The application of this method is illustrated by an analysis of a continuous landmark endpoint, i.e., change from baseline in HbA1c at week 12, from 18 clinical trials evaluating the effects of DPP-4 inhibitors on hyperglycemia in diabetic patients. The performance of this method is demonstrated by a simulation study where the effects of varying the degree of nonlinearity and of heterogeneity in covariates (as assessed by the ratio of between-trial to within-trial variability) were studied. A dose-response relationship using an Emax model with linear and nonlinear effects of covariates on the emax parameter was used to simulate data. The simulation results showed that when an IPD model is simply used for modeling AD, the bias in the emax parameter estimate increased noticeably with an increasing degree of nonlinearity in the model, with respect to covariates. When using an appropriately derived AD model, the linearization

  13. Dynamics of chemically stressed populations: the deduction of population consequences from effects on individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kooijman, S.A.; Metz, J.A.

    1984-06-01

    A general, simple, and explicit model for the age-dependent growth and reproduction of individuals as a function of food supply is presented. The model assumes a Holling-type functional response coupled with a von Bertalanffy body growth law, a fixed ratio between the energy utilized for reproduction and respiration, and a juvenile stage that ends as soon as the animal attains a sufficient weight. This model is shown to fit the available data on the development of Daphnia magna quite well. The model is used as a basis for studying the effects of chemicals on population growth rate, given the effects on individuals. Effects on individual growth and reproduction are reflected in a concentration-dependent relative reduction of the population growth rate. Effects on feeding rate, digestion, basal metabolism, and survival work out much more dramatically at low natural population growth rates. This already follows from a much simpler model that assumes age-independent reproduction, as exemplified to a good approximation by the rotifer Brachionus rubens. The theoretical results are supplemented with experimental evidence, implying that the stress on a population at a certain concentration of a chemical may indeed be strongly dependent on the feeding state of that population.

  14. How the spatial position of individuals affects their influence on swarms: a numerical comparison of two popular swarm dynamics models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Allison Kolpas

    Full Text Available Schools of fish and flocks of birds are examples of self-organized animal groups that arise through social interactions among individuals. We numerically study two individual-based models, which recent empirical studies have suggested to explain self-organized group animal behavior: (i a zone-based model where the group communication topology is determined by finite interacting zones of repulsion, attraction, and orientation among individuals; and (ii a model where the communication topology is described by Delaunay triangulation, which is defined by each individual's Voronoi neighbors. The models include a tunable parameter that controls an individual's relative weighting of attraction and alignment. We perform computational experiments to investigate how effectively simulated groups transfer information in the form of velocity when an individual is perturbed. A cross-correlation function is used to measure the sensitivity of groups to sudden perturbations in the heading of individual members. The results show how relative weighting of attraction and alignment, location of the perturbed individual, population size, and the communication topology affect group structure and response to perturbation. We find that in the Delaunay-based model an individual who is perturbed is capable of triggering a cascade of responses, ultimately leading to the group changing direction. This phenomenon has been seen in self-organized animal groups in both experiments and nature.

  15. An individual-based model of the krill Euphausia pacifica in the California Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorman, Jeffrey G.; Sydeman, William J.; Bograd, Steven J.; Powell, Thomas M.

    2015-11-01

    Euphausia pacifica is an abundant and important prey resource for numerous predators of the California Current and elsewhere in the North Pacific. We developed an individual-based model (IBM) for E. pacifica to study its bioenergetics (growth, stage development, reproduction, and mortality) under constant/ideal conditions as well as under varying ocean conditions and food resources. To model E. pacifica under varying conditions, we coupled the IBM to an oceanographic-ecosystem model over the period 2000-2008 (9 years). Model results under constant/ideal food conditions compare favorably with experimental studies conducted under food unlimited conditions. Under more realistic variable oceanographic conditions, mean growth rates over the continental shelf were positive only when individuals migrated diurnally to the depth of maximum phytoplankton layer during nighttime feeding. Our model only used phytoplankton as prey and coastal growth rates were lower than expected (0.01 mm d-1), suggesting that a diverse prey base (zooplankton, protists, marine snow) may be required to facilitate growth and survival of modeled E. pacifica in the coastal environment. This coupled IBM-ROMS modeling framework and its parameters provides a tool for understanding the biology and ecology of E. pacifica and could be developed to further the understanding of climatic effects on this key prey species and enhance an ecosystem approach to fisheries and wildlife management in this region.

  16. Job crafting: Towards a new model of individual job redesign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Tims

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: For a long time, employees have been viewed as passive performers of their assigned job tasks. Recently, several scholars have argued that job design theory needs to address the influence of employees on their job designs.Research purpose: The purpose of the study was to fit job crafting in job design theory.Motivation for the study: The study was an attempt to shed more light on the types of proactive behaviours of individual employees at work. Moreover, we explored the concept of job crafting and its antecedents and consequences.Research design, approach and method: A literature study was conducted in which the focus was first on proactive behaviour of the employee and then on job crafting.Main findings: Job crafting can be seen as a specific form of proactive behaviour in which the employee initiates changes in the level of job demands and job resources. Job crafting may be facilitated by job and individual characteristics and may enable employees to fit their jobs to their personal knowledge, skills and abilities on the one hand and to their preferences and needs on the other hand.Practical/managerial implications: Job crafting may be a good way for employees to improve their work motivation and other positive work outcomes. Employees could be encouraged to exert more influence on their job characteristics.Contribution/value-add: This article describes a relatively new perspective on active job redesign by the individual, called job crafting, which has important implications for job design theories.

  17. A multi-stage compartmental model for HIV-infected individuals: I--waiting time approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billard, L; Dayananda, P W A

    2014-03-01

    Traditionally, epidemic processes have focused on establishing systems of differential-difference equations governing the number of individuals at each stage of the epidemic. Except for simple situations such as when transition rates are linear, these equations are notoriously intractable mathematically. In this work, the process is described as a compartmental model. The model also allows for individuals to go directly from any prior compartment directly to a final stage corresponding to death. This allows for the possibility that individuals can die earlier due to some non-disease related cause. Then, the model is based on waiting times in each compartment. Survival probabilities of moving from a given compartment to another compartment are established. While our approach can be used for general epidemic processes, our framework is for the HIV/AIDS process. It is then possible to establish the impact of the HIV/AIDS epidemic process on, e.g., insurance premiums and payouts and health-care costs. The effect of changing model parameter values on these entities is investigated.

  18. [Individualized three-dimensional finite element model of facial soft tissue and preliminary application in orthodontics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Si; Xu, Tian-min; Lou, Hang-di; Rong, Qi-guo

    2012-12-01

    To get individualized facial three-dimensional finite element (FE) model from transformation of a generic one to assist orthodontic analysis and prediction of treatment-related morphological change of facial soft tissue. A generic three-dimensional FE model of craniofacial soft and hard tissue was constructed based on a volunteer's spiral CT data. Seven pairs of main peri-oral muscles were constructed based on a combination of CT image and anatomical method. Individualized model could be obtained through transformation of the generic model based on selection of corresponding anatomical landmarks and radial basis functions (RBF) method. Validation was analyzed through superimposition of the transformed model and cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction data. Pre- and post-treatment CBCT data of two patients were collected, which were superimposed to gain the amount of anterior teeth retraction and anterior alveolar surface remodeling that could be used as boundary condition. Different values of Poisson ratio ν and Young's modulus E were tested during simulation. Average deviation was 0.47 mm and 0.75 mm in the soft and hard tissue respectively. It could be decreased to a range of +0.29 mm and -0.21 mm after a second transformation at the lip-mouth region. The best correspondence between simulation and post-treatment result was found with elastic properties of soft tissues defined as follows. Poisson ratio ν for skin, muscle and fat being set as 0.45 while Young's modulus being set as 90.0 kPa, 6.2 kPa and 2.0 kPa respectively. Individualized three-dimensional facial FE model could be obtained through mathematical model transformation. With boundary condition defined according to treatment plan such FE model could be used to analyze the effect of orthodontic treatment on facial soft tissue.

  19. [Relationship between two models of personality in old individuals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Benjamin; Bricaud, Magali; Clément, Jean-Pierre

    2014-12-01

    The relationships between the seven dimensions of the Cloninger psychobiological model and the five factors of the Costa and McCrae model were examined in 54 elderly subjects from the French general population. The dimensions of temperament (novelty seeking, harm avoidance, reward dependence) and character (determination, cooperation, transcendence) from the Cloninger's model were measured by the temperament and character inventory whereas the five factors of Costa and McCrae model (neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeableness and conscientiousness) were evaluated using the NEO PI-R. Multiple regression analyses show that some dimensions of the temperament and character inventory predict some dimensions of the Big five and vice versa. Therefore we suggest that the Big five model could be related to brain monoaminergic activities.

  20. Job crafting: Towards a new model of individual job redesign

    OpenAIRE

    Maria Tims; Arnold B. Bakker

    2010-01-01

    Orientation: For a long time, employees have been viewed as passive performers of their assigned job tasks. Recently, several scholars have argued that job design theory needs to address the influence of employees on their job designs.Research purpose: The purpose of the study was to fit job crafting in job design theory.Motivation for the study: The study was an attempt to shed more light on the types of proactive behaviours of individual employees at work. Moreover, we explored the concept ...

  1. Effects of driver behavior style differences and individual differences on driver sleepiness detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyong Li

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Driving sleepiness is still a major causes of traffic accidents. Individual drivers, under various conditions, act and respond in different manners. This article presents the attempt of a straight-line driving simulator study that examined the effects of driver behavior style differences and individual differences on driver sleepiness detection which is based on driving performance measures. A total of 15 drivers who were classified into two categories through subjective assessment based on a Driver Behavior Questionnaire participated in driving simulator experiments. A total of 18 detection models, including 15 SE models for each subject, an A model for the aggressive drivers, an NA model for the non-aggressive drivers, and a G model for all experiment participants, were developed using support vector machine method based on driving performance characteristic parameters. The results show that the G model is not suitable for all drivers due to its lower mean accuracy of 69.88% (standard deviation = 7.70% and higher standard deviation. The SE models for each subject show the best detection accuracy performance of 84.26% (standard deviation = 5.38%; however, it is impossible to set up a special detection model for every individual driver. The SD models on different style categories show an accuracy value of 77.54% (standard deviation = 5.78%. The results demonstrate that driver style differences as well as individual differences have great effects on driver sleepiness detection (F = 19.148, p < 0.000.

  2. Individual-based model of yellow perch and walleye populations in Oneida Lake

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rose, K.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States). Environmental Sciences Div.; Rutherford, E.S. [Univ. of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI (United States). Inst. for Fisheries Research; McDermot, D.S. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States). Dept. of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Forney, J.L.; Mills, E.L. [Cornell Univ. Biological Station, Bridgeport, NY (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Predator-prey dynamics and density dependence are fundamental issues in ecology. The authors use a detailed, individual-based model of walleye and yellow perch to investigate the effects of alternative prey and compensatory responses on predator and prey population dynamics. The analyses focus on the numerical and developmental responses of the predator, rather than the traditional emphasis on functional responses. The extensive database for Oneida Lake, New York, USA was used to configure the model and ensure its realism. The model follows the daily growth, mortality, and spawning of individuals of each species through their lifetime. Three ecologically distinct periods in the history of Oneida Lake were simulated: baseline, high mayfly densities, and high forage fish densities. Mayflies and forage fish act as alternative prey for walleye. For model corroboration, the three periods were simulated sequentially as they occurred in Oneida Lake. Model predictions of abundances, size at age, and growth and survival rates compared favorably with Oneida Lake data. Three hypotheses suggested by the data were evaluated: alternative prey stabilizes yellow perch and walleye populations; alternative prey increases yellow perch and walleye recruitment; and density-dependent growth and survival compensate for changes in young-of-the-year mortality. Model simulations were performed under increased mayfly densities, increased forage fish densities, and increased egg mortality rates.

  3. Illustrative probabilistic biosphere model for Yucca Mountain individual risk calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilems, R.E. [Del Mar Consulting, Corpus Christi, TX (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The proposed EPA Standards for the disposal of spent fuel, high-level and transuranic radioactive waste prescribe future biosphere--one in which no sustained human activity occurs inside the controlled zone, yet sustained use of groundwater occurs just outside the controlled zone boundary. Performance assessments have generally assumed a person at this location extracts all his water needs directly from the projected contaminated plume for all of his life. Dose to this maximally-exposed individual is too conservative a measure of performance for a nuclear waste repository and does not reflect the isolation characteristics of a site. A better measure is individual risk in which uncertainties in biosphere characteristics for the longer periods of performance, for a site like Yucca Mountain only those characteristics associated with well water scenarios need be prescribed. Such a prescription of the biosphere is appropriate because the goal of the regulations is to provide indicators of future performance so the regulators can make a responsible decision regarding reasonable assurance of public health and safety.

  4. Efeitos de variáveis individuais e contextuais sobre desempenho individual no trabalho Effects of individuals and contextual variables on individual performance at work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Antonio Coelho Junior

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho objetivou testar empiricamente um modelo teórico multinível de predição de desempenho individual no trabalho. As variáveis antecedentes investigadas, isoladas ou em interação, corresponderam à idade, gênero, cargo, grau de escolaridade, tempo de serviço e percepção de suporte à aprendizagem, medidas no nível individual e de contexto, e satisfação no trabalho, de nível individual. A pesquisa foi realizada em uma empresa pública, do ramo de pesquisas agropecuária e atuação nacional. A amostra (N = 808 contou com funcionários distribuídos em 45 unidades centralizadas e descentralizadas da empresa pelo Brasil. A coleta de dados foi realizada à distância, via e-mail. Os resultados multiníveis corroboraram o modelo teórico de pesquisa hipotetizado e evidenciaram que a variância de desempenho foi explicada por distintos preditores de nível individual e de contexto, isoladamente ou em interação.This paper aims to empirically test a theoretical multilevel model for the prediction of individual performance at work. Antecedent variables, isolated or in interaction, were age, gender, function, scholarity, period of function and perception of learning support, in the individual and contextual levels, and satisfaction at work, an individual variable. This study was accomplished in a public corporation which deals with agricultural research in a national scope. The participants (N = 808 were distribute in 45 central and noncentral units for the Brazil. Data collection was done online, by e-mail. The multilevel results confirm the hypothetic theoretical model and make evident that the performance's variance were predicted by different individuals and context variables, isolated or in interaction.

  5. Collaborative recovery: an integrative model for working with individuals who experience chronic and recurring mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oades, Lindsay; Deane, Frank; Crowe, Trevor; Lambert, W Gordon; Kavanagh, David; Lloyd, Chris

    2005-09-01

    Recovery is an emerging movement in mental health. Evidence for recovery-based approaches is not well developed and approaches to implement recovery-oriented services are not well articulated. The collaborative recovery model (CRM) is presented as a model that assists clinicians to use evidence-based skills with consumers, in a manner consistent with the recovery movement. A current 5 year multisite Australian study to evaluate the effectiveness of CRM is briefly described. The collaborative recovery model puts into practice several aspects of policy regarding recovery-oriented services, using evidence-based practices to assist individuals who have chronic or recurring mental disorders (CRMD). It is argued that this model provides an integrative framework combining (i) evidence-based practice; (ii) manageable and modularized competencies relevant to case management and psychosocial rehabilitation contexts; and (iii) recognition of the subjective experiences of consumers.

  6. Ignoring Individual Differences in Times of Assessment in Growth Curve Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulombe, Patrick; Selig, James P.; Delaney, Harold D.

    2016-01-01

    Researchers often collect longitudinal data to model change over time in a phenomenon of interest. Inevitably, there will be some variation across individuals in specific time intervals between assessments. In this simulation study of growth curve modeling, we investigate how ignoring individual differences in time points when modeling change over…

  7. Ecological impacts of umbrella effects of radiation on the individual members

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, Masahiro [Regulatory Sciences Research Group, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, 263-8555 (Japan); Kawaguchi, Isao [Regulatory Sciences Research Group, Research Center for Radiation Protection, National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba-shi, 263-8555 (Japan)]. E-mail: kawag@nirs.go.jp

    2007-07-15

    In order to study the interactions in a model aquatic microcosm, an individual-based computer simulation model was developed. The microcosm consists of Euglena gracilis as an autotroph algae, Tetrahymena thermophila as a heterotroph protozoa and Escherichia coli as a saprotroph bacteria. There exists a strong interaction between Tetrahymena and E. coli as the first is the predator of the second. Ecological toxicity tests were conducted to test the population level impacts of the biological effects of radiation and toxicants on the lethality and mobility factors that influence directly or indirectly growth and reproduction. Radiological effects on lethality of E. coli individuals were translated to the reduction of the equilibrium population of Tetrahymena. A synergistic effect at the community level was also observed by the simulation of a combined exposure of radiation and a toxicant which reduced the feeding efficiency of Tetrahymena.

  8. Making leaps in amphibian ecotoxicology: translating individual-level effects of contaminants to population viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willson, J D; Hopkins, W A; Bergeron, C M; Todd, B D

    2012-09-01

    Concern that environmental contaminants contribute to global amphibian population declines has prompted extensive experimental investigation, but individual-level experimental results have seldom been translated to population-level processes. We used our research on the effects of mercury (Hg) on American toads (Bufo americanus) as a model for bridging the gap between individual-level contaminant effects and amphibian population viability. We synthesized the results of previous field and laboratory studies examining effects of Hg throughout the life cycle of B. americanus and constructed a comprehensive demographic population model to evaluate the consequences of Hg exposure on population dynamics. Our model explicitly considered density-dependent larval survival, which is known to be an important driver of amphibian population dynamics, and incorporated two important factors that have seldom been considered in previous amphibian modeling studies: environmental stochasticity and sublethal effects. We demonstrated that decreases in embryonic survival and sublethal effects (e.g., reduced body size) that delay maturation have minor effects on population dynamics, whereas contaminant effects that reduce late-larval or post-metamorphic survival have important population-level consequences. We found that excessive Hg exposure through maternal transfer or larval diet, alone, had minor effects on B. americanus populations. Simultaneous maternal and dietary exposure resulted in reduced population size and a dramatic increase in extinction probability, but explicit prediction of population-level effects was dependent on the strength of larval density dependence. Our results suggest that environmental contaminants can influence amphibian population viability, but that highly integrative approaches are needed to translate individual-level effects to populations.

  9. Departure time choice: Modelling individual preferences, intention and constraints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorhauge, Mikkel

    working hours) as the penalty of late arrival is very likely to be higher for individuals with constraints on arrival time. However, flexibility is not only a matter of fixed arrival time. Activities can be mandatory or discretionary (Yamamoto and Kitamura, 1999), performed alone or jointly with family......D thesis is as follows. Firstly, it provides evidence of a fully efficient stated choice design for a departure time context. Using a pivot design (Rose et al., 2008) built around a reference trip (usually from the day before), the thesis shows that the efficient design performs well in cases where good...... whether they are constrained. The thesis also provides empirical evidences of the policy implication of not accounting for other activities and their constraints. Thirdly, the thesis shows that the departure time choice can be partly explained by psychological factors, which have previously been neglected...

  10. Developing population models with data from marked individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hae Yeong Ryu,; Kevin T. Shoemaker,; Eva Kneip,; Anna Pidgeon,; Patricia Heglund,; Brooke Bateman,; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Reşit Akçakaya,

    2016-01-01

    Population viability analysis (PVA) is a powerful tool for biodiversity assessments, but its use has been limited because of the requirements for fully specified population models such as demographic structure, density-dependence, environmental stochasticity, and specification of uncertainties. Developing a fully specified population model from commonly available data sources – notably, mark–recapture studies – remains complicated due to lack of practical methods for estimating fecundity, true survival (as opposed to apparent survival), natural temporal variability in both survival and fecundity, density-dependence in the demographic parameters, and uncertainty in model parameters. We present a general method that estimates all the key parameters required to specify a stochastic, matrix-based population model, constructed using a long-term mark–recapture dataset. Unlike standard mark–recapture analyses, our approach provides estimates of true survival rates and fecundities, their respective natural temporal variabilities, and density-dependence functions, making it possible to construct a population model for long-term projection of population dynamics. Furthermore, our method includes a formal quantification of parameter uncertainty for global (multivariate) sensitivity analysis. We apply this approach to 9 bird species and demonstrate the feasibility of using data from the Monitoring Avian Productivity and Survivorship (MAPS) program. Bias-correction factors for raw estimates of survival and fecundity derived from mark–recapture data (apparent survival and juvenile:adult ratio, respectively) were non-negligible, and corrected parameters were generally more biologically reasonable than their uncorrected counterparts. Our method allows the development of fully specified stochastic population models using a single, widely available data source, substantially reducing the barriers that have until now limited the widespread application of PVA. This method

  11. Individual discriminative face recognition models based on subsets of features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder; Gomez, David Delgado; Ersbøll, Bjarne Kjær

    2007-01-01

    of the face recognition problem. The elastic net model is able to select a subset of features with low computational effort compared to other state-of-the-art feature selection methods. Furthermore, the fact that the number of features usually is larger than the number of images in the data base makes feature...... selection techniques such as forward selection or lasso regression become inadequate. In the experimental section, the performance of the elastic net model is compared with geometrical and color based algorithms widely used in face recognition such as Procrustes nearest neighbor, Eigenfaces, or Fisher...

  12. Direct and contextual effects of individual values on organizational citizenship behavior in teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthaud-Day, Marne L; Rode, Joseph C; Turnley, William H

    2012-07-01

    The authors use Schwartz's values theory as an integrative framework for testing the relationship between individual values and peer-reported organizational citizenship behavior (OCB) in teams, controlling for sex, satisfaction, and personality traits. Using hierarchical linear modeling in a sample of 582 students distributed across 135 class project teams, the authors find positive, direct effects for achievement on citizenship behaviors directed toward individuals (OCB-I), for benevolence on citizenship behaviors directed toward the group (OCB-O), and for self-direction on both OCB-I and OCB-O. Applying relational demography techniques to test for contextual effects, the authors find that group mean power scores negatively moderate the relationship between individual power and OCB-I, whereas group mean self-direction scores positively moderate the relationship between self-direction and both OCB-I and OCB-O.

  13. Good vibrations--effects of whole body vibration on attention in healthy individuals and individuals with ADHD.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anselm B M Fuermaier

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Most of the current treatment strategies of ADHD are associated with a number of disadvantages which strengthen the need for alternative or additional approaches for the treatment of ADHD. In this respect, Whole Body Vibration (WBV might be interesting as it was found to have beneficial effects on a variety of physiological measures. The present study explored the effects of WBV on attention of healthy individuals and adults diagnosed with ADHD. METHODS: Eighty-three healthy individuals and seventeen adults diagnosed with ADHD participated in the study. WBV treatment was applied passively, while participants were sitting on a chair which was mounted on a vibrating platform. A repeated measure design was employed in order to explore potential effects of WBV treatment on attention within subjects. Attention (i.e. inhibitory control was measured with a color-word interference paradigm. RESULTS: A period of two minutes of WBV treatment had significant beneficial effects of small to medium size on attention of both healthy individuals and adults with ADHD. The effect of WBV treatment on attention did not differ significantly between groups. CONCLUSIONS: WBV was demonstrated to improve cognitive performance of healthy individuals as well as of individuals with ADHD. WBV treatment is relatively inexpensive and easy to apply and might therefore be of potential relevance for clinical use. The application of WBV treatment as a cognitive enhancement strategy and as a potential treatment of cognitive impairments is discussed.

  14. Effects of hippotherapy on posture in individuals with Down Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Espindula, Ana Paula; Ribeiro,Mariane Fernandes; Souza,Luciane Aparecida Pascucci Sande de; Ferreira,Alex Abadio; Ferraz,Mara Lúcia da Fonseca; Teixeira,Vicente de Paula Antunes

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Individuals with Down syndrome (DS) have alterations that affect the musculoskeletal system, causing abnormal patterns, and alter the morphological anatomical and mechanical axes that provide intrinsic stability to the skeleton, and can trigger misalignments and orthopedic disorders in adulthood. Objective: The objective of student to evaluate posture and postural alignment before and after the hippotherapyin individuals with DS. Methods: Posture of five individual...

  15. Individual versus collective responses to membership in a low-status group: the effects of stability and individual ability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boen, F; Vanbeselaere, N

    2001-12-01

    To test predictions of social identity theory (SIT; M. A. Hogg & D. Abrams, 1988; H. Tajfel & J. C. Turner, 1979) and the 5-stage model (FSM; D. M. Taylor & D. J. McKirnan, 1984) concerning reactions to membership in a low-status group, the authors led 112 pupils to believe that another (anonymous) class outperformed their class. In an overall permeable and legitimate intergroup context, the authors manipulated the stability of the low group status and the individual ability of the group members. Contrary to SIT and FSM, the pupils generally favored collective normative action. Individual mobility was preferred only by group members, especially boys, with high individual ability who thought that the low status of their group was stable. The results support FSM assumptions (a) that individual ability is a powerful determinant of intergroup behavior but (b) that one should consider its impact in combination with perceived stability.

  16. Process mining for individualized behavior modeling using wireless tracking in nursing homes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Llatas, Carlos; Benedi, José-Miguel; García-Gómez, Juan M; Traver, Vicente

    2013-11-11

    The analysis of human behavior patterns is increasingly used for several research fields. The individualized modeling of behavior using classical techniques requires too much time and resources to be effective. A possible solution would be the use of pattern recognition techniques to automatically infer models to allow experts to understand individual behavior. However, traditional pattern recognition algorithms infer models that are not readily understood by human experts. This limits the capacity to benefit from the inferred models. Process mining technologies can infer models as workflows, specifically designed to be understood by experts, enabling them to detect specific behavior patterns in users. In this paper, the eMotiva process mining algorithms are presented. These algorithms filter, infer and visualize workflows. The workflows are inferred from the samples produced by an indoor location system that stores the location of a resident in a nursing home. The visualization tool is able to compare and highlight behavior patterns in order to facilitate expert understanding of human behavior. This tool was tested with nine real users that were monitored for a 25-week period. The results achieved suggest that the behavior of users is continuously evolving and changing and that this change can be measured, allowing for behavioral change detection.

  17. Individualized Human CAD Models: Anthropmetric Morphing and Body Tissue Layering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-31

    torso sub-assembly may have more fat in the abdomen than in the chest. A study 18 that could help refine this feature is being developed by the US...responses to various ensembles being developed, taking 3 into account human characteristics (height, weight, body fat , etc.), physical activity levels...model of the human body in a CAD (Computer- Aided Design) format which includes both surface features as well as internal composition, e.g., the fat

  18. Collaborative Model for Acceleration of Individualized Therapy of Colon Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    receive salvage therapy that results in only a few weeks of disease stability. We have proposed to employ a team science , systems biology based approach...Pertea, G., Mortazavi, A., Kwan, G., van Baren, M.J., Salzberg, S.L., Wold , B.J., and Pachter, L. 2010. Transcript assembly and quantification by...tumor xenografts (PDTX) have been widely used in predictive biomarker development and pathway modeling in cancer research. However, it has not been

  19. Multigeneration reproduction ratios and the effects of clustered unvaccinated individuals on epidemic outbreak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiebeler, David E; Michaud, Isaac J; Ackerman, Hamilton Hoxie; Reed Iosevich, Shannon; Robinson, Andre

    2011-12-01

    An SIR epidemiological community-structured model is constructed to investigate the effects of clustered distributions of unvaccinated individuals and the distribution of the primary case relative to vaccination levels. The communities here represent groups such as neighborhoods within a city or cities within a region. The model contains two levels of mixing, where individuals make more intra-group than inter-group contacts. Stochastic simulations and analytical results are utilized to explore the model. An extension of the effective reproduction ratio that incorporates more spatial information by predicting the average number of tertiary infections caused by a single infected individual is introduced to characterize the system. Using these methods, we show that both the vaccination coverage and the variation in vaccination levels among communities affect the likelihood and severity of epidemics. The location of the primary infectious case and the degree of mixing between communities are also important factors in determining the dynamics of outbreaks. In some cases, increasing the efficacy of a vaccine can in fact increase the effective reproduction ratio in early generations, due to the effects of population structure on the likely initial location of an infection.

  20. Antioxidative effects of propofol vs. ketamin in individuals undergoing surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoshraftar, Ebrahim; Ranjbar, Akram; Kharkhane, Behroz; Tavakol Heidary, Shayesteh; Gharebaghi, Zohre; Zadkhosh, Nahid

    2014-07-01

    Propofol (2, 6-diisopropylphenol) is a widely used intravenous sedative-hypnotic agent for both induction/maintenance of anesthesia and sedation of critically ill patients. The present study aimed to evaluate oxidative stress biomarkers in individuals undergoing surgery with propofol and ketamine at doses used to induce anesthesia. The plasma oxidative stress biomarkers such as total antioxidant capacity (TAC), lipid peroxidation (LPO), total thiol molecules (TTM) and antioxidant enzymes activity such as glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxidedismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) were studied in blood samples obtained from 40 patients with propofol, and compared to samples from 40 patients with ketamine aged 11 - 50 years. The results showed that the ketamine group had significantly higher blood LPO level, GPx and SOD activity while having lower blood TAC and TTM concentrations in comparison to the propofol group. In conclusion, our findings showed that propofol has antioxidant effects in human. Further studies need to be conducted to demonstrate the exact mechanism of oxidative stress caused by anesthesia in surgery patients.

  1. Magnetic field modeling with a set of individual localized coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juchem, Christoph; Nixon, Terence W; McIntyre, Scott; Rothman, Douglas L; de Graaf, Robin A

    2010-06-01

    A set of generic, circular individual coils is shown to be capable of generating highly complex magnetic field distributions in a flexible fashion. Arbitrarily oriented linear field gradients can be generated in three-dimensional as well as sliced volumes at amplitudes that allow imaging applications. The multi-coil approach permits the simultaneous generation of linear MRI encoding fields and complex shim fields by the same setup, thereby reducing system complexity. The choice of the sensitive volume over which the magnetic fields are optimized remains temporally and spatially variable at all times. The restriction of the field synthesis to experimentally relevant, smaller volumes such as single slices directly translates into improved efficiency, i.e. higher magnetic field amplitudes and/or reduced coil currents. For applications like arterial spin labeling, signal spoiling and diffusion weighting, perfect linearity of the gradient fields is not required and reduced demands on accuracy can also be readily translated into improved efficiency. The first experimental realization was achieved for mouse head MRI with 24 coils that were mounted on the surface of a cylindrical former. Oblique linear field gradients of 20 kHz/cm (47 mT/m) were generated with a maximum current of 1.4A which allowed radial imaging of a mouse head. The potential of the new approach for generating arbitrary magnetic field shapes is demonstrated by synthesizing the more complex, higher order spherical harmonic magnetic field distributions X2-Y2, Z2 and Z2X. The new multi-coil approach provides the framework for the integration of conventional imaging and shim coils into a single multi-coil system in which shape, strength, accuracy and spatial coverage of the magnetic field can be specifically optimized for the application at hand.

  2. Modeling auditory perception of individual hearing-impaired listeners

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jepsen, Morten Løve; Dau, Torsten

    showed that, in most cases, the reduced or absent cochlear compression, associated with outer hair-cell loss, quantitatively accounts for broadened auditory filters, while a combination of reduced compression and reduced inner hair-cell function accounts for decreased sensitivity and slower recovery from...... selectivity. Three groups of listeners were considered: (a) normal hearing listeners; (b) listeners with a mild-to-moderate sensorineural hearing loss; and (c) listeners with a severe sensorineural hearing loss. A fixed set of model parameters were derived for each hearing-impaired listener. The simulations...

  3. Method for evaluating prediction models that apply the results of randomized trials to individual patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kattan Michael W

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction The clinical significance of a treatment effect demonstrated in a randomized trial is typically assessed by reference to differences in event rates at the group level. An alternative is to make individualized predictions for each patient based on a prediction model. This approach is growing in popularity, particularly for cancer. Despite its intuitive advantages, it remains plausible that some prediction models may do more harm than good. Here we present a novel method for determining whether predictions from a model should be used to apply the results of a randomized trial to individual patients, as opposed to using group level results. Methods We propose applying the prediction model to a data set from a randomized trial and examining the results of patients for whom the treatment arm recommended by a prediction model is congruent with allocation. These results are compared with the strategy of treating all patients through use of a net benefit function that incorporates both the number of patients treated and the outcome. We examined models developed using data sets regarding adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer and Dutasteride for benign prostatic hypertrophy. Results For adjuvant chemotherapy, we found that patients who would opt for chemotherapy even for small risk reductions, and, conversely, those who would require a very large risk reduction, would on average be harmed by using a prediction model; those with intermediate preferences would on average benefit by allowing such information to help their decision making. Use of prediction could, at worst, lead to the equivalent of an additional death or recurrence per 143 patients; at best it could lead to the equivalent of a reduction in the number of treatments of 25% without an increase in event rates. In the Dutasteride case, where the average benefit of treatment is more modest, there is a small benefit of prediction modelling, equivalent to a reduction of

  4. Significance of genetic information in risk assessment and individual classification using silicosis as a case model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCanlies, E.; Landsittel, D.P.; Yucesoy, B.; Vallyathan, V.; Luster, M.L.; Sharp, D.S. [NIOSH, Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2002-06-01

    Over the last decade the role of genetic data in epidemiological research has expanded considerably. The authors recently published a case-control study that evaluated the interaction between silica exposure and minor variants in the genes coding for interleukin-1alpha. (IL-1alpha), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFalpha) as risk factors associated with silicosis, a fibrotic lung disease. In contrast, this report uses data generated from these studies to illustrate the utility of genetic information for the purposes of risk assessment and clinical prediction. Specifically, this study addresses how, given a known exposure, genetic information affects the characterization of risk groups. Relative operating characteristic (ROC) curves were then used to determine the impact of genetic information on individual classification. Logistic regression modeling procedures were used to estimate the predicted probability of developing silicosis. This probability was then used to construct predicted risk deciles, first for a model with occupational exposure only and then for a model containing occupational exposure and genetic main effects and interactions. The results indicate that genetic information plays a valuable role in effectively characterizing risk groups and mechanisms of disease operating in a substantial proportion of the population. However, in the case of fibrotic lung disease caused by silica exposure, information about the presence or absence of the minor variants of IL-1alpha, IL-1RA and TNFalpha is unlikely to be a useful tool for individual classification.

  5. Real beards and real networks: a spin-glass model for interacting individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Neale, Dion

    ''I want to be different, just like all the other different people'' sang the band King Missile. Whether they are the Beatniks of the 1950s, the punks of the 1970s, or the hipsters of today, non-conformists often tend to look the same, seemingly at odds with their goal of non-conformity. The spin-glass model, originally developed to describe the interaction of magnetic spins, and since applied to situations as diverse as the electrical activity of networks of neurons, to trades on a financial market, has recently been used in social science to study populations of interacting individuals comprised of a mix of both conformists and anti-conformists - or hipsters. Including delay effects for the interactions between individuals has been shown to give a system with non-trivial dynamics with a phase transition from stable behaviour to periodic switching between two states (let's call them bushy bearded and clean shaven). Analytic solutions to such a model are possible, but only for particular assumptions about the interaction and delay matrices. In this work we will show what happens when the interactions in the model are based on real-world networks with ''small-world'' effects and clustering.

  6. Effects of Computer Course on Computer Self-Efficacy, Computer Attitudes and Achievements of Young Individuals in Siirt, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Halil Coskun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of computer courses on young individuals' computer self-efficacy, attitudes and achievement. The study group of this research included 60 unemployed young individuals (18-25 ages) in total; 30 in the experimental group and 30 in the control group. An experimental research model with pretest…

  7. Starting a sport in the Netherlands : A life-course analysis of the effects of individual, parental and partner characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaykamp, Gerbert; Oldenkamp, Marloes; Breedveld, Koen

    2013-01-01

    In this article we investigate the effects of parental, individual and partner characteristics on the starting of a sport. Employing event history models we analyze 72,491 person-years of 2276 individuals from the Family Survey Dutch Population 1998 and 2003. Our results show that growing up in a fa

  8. Starting a sport in the Netherlands: A life-course analysis of the effects of individual, parental and partner characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaykamp, G.L.M.; Oldenkamp, M.; Breedveld, K.

    2013-01-01

    In this article we investigate the effects of parental, individual and partner characteristics on the starting of a sport. Employing event history models we analyze 72,491 person-years of 2276 individuals from the Family Survey Dutch Population 1998 and 2003. Our results show that growing up in a fa

  9. Effects of Computer Course on Computer Self-Efficacy, Computer Attitudes and Achievements of Young Individuals in Siirt, Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çelik, Halil Coskun

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of computer courses on young individuals' computer self-efficacy, attitudes and achievement. The study group of this research included 60 unemployed young individuals (18-25 ages) in total; 30 in the experimental group and 30 in the control group. An experimental research model with pretest…

  10. The effect of individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status on gastric cancer survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Chia Wu

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Gastric cancer is a leading cause of death, particularly in the developing world. The literature reports individual socioeconomic status (SES or neighborhood SES as related to survival, but the effect of both has not been studied. This study investigated the effect of individual and neighborhood SES simultaneously on mortality in gastric cancer patients in Taiwan. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A study was conducted of 3,396 patients diagnosed with gastric cancer between 2002 and 2006. Each patient was followed for five years or until death. Individual SES was defined by income-related insurance premium (low, moderate, and high. Neighborhood SES was based on household income dichotomized into advantaged and disadvantaged areas. Multilevel logistic regression model was used to compare survival rates by SES group after adjusting for possible confounding factors. RESULTS: In patients younger than 65 years, 5-year overall survival rates were lowest for those with low individual SES. After adjusting for patient characteristics (age, gender, Charlson Comorbidity Index Score, gastric cancer patients with high individual SES had 68% risk reduction of mortality (adjusted odds ratio [OR] of mortality, 0.32; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.17-0.61. Patients aged 65 and above had no statistically significant difference in mortality rates by individual SES group. Different neighborhood SES did not statistically differ in the survival rates. CONCLUSION: Gastric cancer patients aged less than 65 years old with low individual SES have higher risk of mortality, even under an universal healthcare system. Public health strategies, education and welfare policies should seek to correct the inequality in gastric cancer survival, especially in those with lower individual SES.

  11. Three-Mode Models and Individual Differences in Semantic Differential Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Takashi; Kroonenberg, Pieter M.

    2003-01-01

    Demonstrated how individual differences in semantic differential data can be modeled and assessed using three-mode models by studying the characterization of Chopin's "Preludes" by 38 Japanese college students. (SLD)

  12. Model-Based Individualized Treatment of Chemotherapeutics: Bayesian Population Modeling and Dose Optimization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devaraj Jayachandran

    Full Text Available 6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP is one of the key drugs in the treatment of many pediatric cancers, auto immune diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. 6-MP is a prodrug, converted to an active metabolite 6-thioguanine nucleotide (6-TGN through enzymatic reaction involving thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT. Pharmacogenomic variation observed in the TPMT enzyme produces a significant variation in drug response among the patient population. Despite 6-MP's widespread use and observed variation in treatment response, efforts at quantitative optimization of dose regimens for individual patients are limited. In addition, research efforts devoted on pharmacogenomics to predict clinical responses are proving far from ideal. In this work, we present a Bayesian population modeling approach to develop a pharmacological model for 6-MP metabolism in humans. In the face of scarcity of data in clinical settings, a global sensitivity analysis based model reduction approach is used to minimize the parameter space. For accurate estimation of sensitive parameters, robust optimal experimental design based on D-optimality criteria was exploited. With the patient-specific model, a model predictive control algorithm is used to optimize the dose scheduling with the objective of maintaining the 6-TGN concentration within its therapeutic window. More importantly, for the first time, we show how the incorporation of information from different levels of biological chain-of response (i.e. gene expression-enzyme phenotype-drug phenotype plays a critical role in determining the uncertainty in predicting therapeutic target. The model and the control approach can be utilized in the clinical setting to individualize 6-MP dosing based on the patient's ability to metabolize the drug instead of the traditional standard-dose-for-all approach.

  13. Model-Based Individualized Treatment of Chemotherapeutics: Bayesian Population Modeling and Dose Optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayachandran, Devaraj; Laínez-Aguirre, José; Rundell, Ann; Vik, Terry; Hannemann, Robert; Reklaitis, Gintaras; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami

    2015-01-01

    6-Mercaptopurine (6-MP) is one of the key drugs in the treatment of many pediatric cancers, auto immune diseases and inflammatory bowel disease. 6-MP is a prodrug, converted to an active metabolite 6-thioguanine nucleotide (6-TGN) through enzymatic reaction involving thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT). Pharmacogenomic variation observed in the TPMT enzyme produces a significant variation in drug response among the patient population. Despite 6-MP's widespread use and observed variation in treatment response, efforts at quantitative optimization of dose regimens for individual patients are limited. In addition, research efforts devoted on pharmacogenomics to predict clinical responses are proving far from ideal. In this work, we present a Bayesian population modeling approach to develop a pharmacological model for 6-MP metabolism in humans. In the face of scarcity of data in clinical settings, a global sensitivity analysis based model reduction approach is used to minimize the parameter space. For accurate estimation of sensitive parameters, robust optimal experimental design based on D-optimality criteria was exploited. With the patient-specific model, a model predictive control algorithm is used to optimize the dose scheduling with the objective of maintaining the 6-TGN concentration within its therapeutic window. More importantly, for the first time, we show how the incorporation of information from different levels of biological chain-of response (i.e. gene expression-enzyme phenotype-drug phenotype) plays a critical role in determining the uncertainty in predicting therapeutic target. The model and the control approach can be utilized in the clinical setting to individualize 6-MP dosing based on the patient's ability to metabolize the drug instead of the traditional standard-dose-for-all approach.

  14. Individual Decision-Making to Commit a Crime: A Survey of Early Models

    OpenAIRE

    Roman Horváth; Eva Kolomazníková

    2003-01-01

    The authors provide a survey of the most important findings of the early models of the economics of crime, namely the models of Becker, Ehrlich and Heineke. These models study rational individual decision-making about entering into illegal activities. Probability and size of punishment, attitudes towards risk, gains from crime and income are the main variables influencing the results of individual behavior. The authors also discuss weaknesses of these models such as their static nature or the...

  15. Modeling the Individual Within the Group: an Interdisciplinary Approach to Collaborative Knowledge Construction

    OpenAIRE

    Lund, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Constructing knowledge with others is fundamental for all human activity, and many disciplines have sought to understand how the individual, other people, and the context, all influence collaborative knowledge construction, be it individual or group knowledge. The goal of this Habilitation à Diriger des Recherches is to present an analytical model of the relations of the individual to the group in situations of collaborative knowledge construction. The model is inspired by the work of Levinso...

  16. An individual-based simulation model for mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi) in a southern Appalachian stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenda Rashleigh; Gary D. Grossman

    2005-01-01

    We describe and analyze a spatially explicit, individual-based model for the local population dynamics of mottled sculpin (Cottus bairdi). The model simulated daily growth, mortality, movement and spawning of individuals within a reach of stream. Juvenile and adult growth was based on consumption bioenergetics of benthic macroinvertebrate prey;...

  17. Beyond Dyadic Interdependence: Actor-Oriented Models for Co-Evolving Social Networks and Individual Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, William J.; Steglich, Christian E. G.; Snijders, Tom A. B.

    2007-01-01

    Actor-oriented models are described as a longitudinal strategy for examining the co-evolution of social networks and individual behaviors. We argue that these models provide advantages over conventional approaches due to their ability to account for inherent dependencies between individuals embedded in a social network (i.e., reciprocity,…

  18. Video Self-Modeling as an Intervention Strategy for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelbar, Nicholas W.; Anderson, Candace; McCarthy, Scott; Buggey, Tom

    2012-01-01

    Video self-modeling demonstrates promise as an intervention strategy to improve outcomes in individuals with autism spectrum disorders. This article summarizes the empirical evidence supporting the use of video self-modeling with individuals with autism spectrum disorders to increase language and communication, increase social skills, modify…

  19. Maximum likelihood estimators for extended growth curve model with orthogonal between-individual design matrices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Daniel; Zezula, Ivan

    The extended growth curve model is discussed in this paper. There are two versions of the model studied in the literature, which differ in the way how the column spaces of the design matrices are nested. The nesting is applied either to the between-individual or to the within-individual design

  20. 42 CFR Appendix to Part 54a - Model Notice of Individuals Receiving Substance Abuse Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., ET SEQ., FOR SUBSTANCE ABUSE PREVENTION AND TREATMENT SERVICES Pt. 54a, App. Appendix to Part 54a—Model Notice of Individuals Receiving Substance Abuse Services Model Notice to Individuals Receiving Substance Abuse Services No provider of substance abuse services receiving Federal funds from the...

  1. Predictor Relationships between Values Held by Married Individuals, Resilience and Conflict Resolution Styles: A Model Suggestion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosun, Fatma; Dilmac, Bulent

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present research is to reveal the predictor relationships between the values held by married individuals, resilience and conflict resolution styles. The research adopts a relational screening model that is a sub-type of the general screening model. The sample of the research consists of 375 married individuals, of which 173 are…

  2. Model for multi-stand management based on structural attributes of individual stands

    Science.gov (United States)

    G.W. Miller; J. Sullivan

    1997-01-01

    A growing interest in managing forest ecosystems calls for decision models that take into account attribute goals for large forest areas while continuing to recognize the individual stand as a basic unit of forest management. A dynamic, nonlinear forest management model is described that schedules silvicultural treatments for individual stands that are linked by multi-...

  3. [Effects of situational and individual variables on critical thinking expression].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Yuko; Kusumi, Takashi

    2016-04-01

    The present study examined when people decide to choose an expression that is based on critical thinking, and how situational and individual variables affect such a decision process. Given a conversation scenario including overgeneralization with two friends, participants decided whether to follow the conversation by a critical-thinking expression or not. The authors controlled purpose and topic as situational variables, and measured critical-thinking ability, critical-thinking disposition, and self-monitoring as individual variables. We conducted an experiment in which the situational variables were counterbalanced in a within-subject design with 60 university students. The results of logistic regression analysis showed differences within individuals in the decision process whether to choose a critical-thinking expression, and that some situational factors and some subscales of the individual measurements were related to the differences.

  4. Effect of head shape variations among individuals on the EEG/MEG forward and inverse problems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Ellenrieder, Nicolás; Muravchik, Carlos H; Wagner, Michael; Nehorai, Arye

    2009-03-01

    We study the effect of the head shape variations on the EEG/magnetoencephalography (MEG) forward and inverse problems. We build a random head model such that each sample represents the head shape of a different individual and solve the forward problem assuming this random head model, using a polynomial chaos expansion. The random solution of the forward problem is then used to quantify the effect of the geometry when the inverse problem is solved with a standard head model. The results derived with this approach are valid for a continuous family of head models, rather than just for a set of cases. The random model consists of three random surfaces that define layers of different electric conductivity, and we built an example based on a set of 30 deterministic models from adults. Our results show that for a dipolar source model, the effect of the head shape variations on the EEG/MEG inverse problem due to the random head model is slightly larger than the effect of the electronic noise present in the sensors. The variations in the EEG inverse problem solutions are due to the variations in the shape of the volume conductor, while the variations in the MEG inverse problem solutions, larger than the EEG ones, are caused mainly by the variations of the absolute position of the sources in a coordinate system based on anatomical landmarks, in which the magnetometers have a fixed position.

  5. A model-driven approach to quantify migration patterns: individual, regional and yearly differences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunnefeld, Nils; Börger, Luca; van Moorter, Bram; Rolandsen, Christer M; Dettki, Holger; Solberg, Erling Johan; Ericsson, Göran

    2011-03-01

    1. Animal migration has long intrigued scientists and wildlife managers alike, yet migratory species face increasing challenges because of habitat fragmentation, climate change and over-exploitation. Central to the understanding migratory species is the objective discrimination between migratory and nonmigratory individuals in a given population, quantifying the timing, duration and distance of migration and the ability to predict migratory movements. 2. Here, we propose a uniform statistical framework to (i) separate migration from other movement behaviours, (ii) quantify migration parameters without the need for arbitrary cut-off criteria and (iii) test predictability across individuals, time and space. 3. We first validated our novel approach by simulating data based on established theoretical movement patterns. We then formulated the expected shapes of squared displacement patterns as nonlinear models for a suite of movement behaviours to test the ability of our method to distinguish between migratory movement and other movement types. 4. We then tested our approached empirically using 108 wild Global Positioning System (GPS)-collared moose Alces alces in Scandinavia as a study system because they exhibit a wide range of movement behaviours, including resident, migrating and dispersing individuals, within the same population. Applying our approach showed that 87% and 67% of our Swedish and Norwegian subpopulations, respectively, can be classified as migratory. 5. Using nonlinear mixed effects models for all migratory individuals we showed that the distance, timing and duration of migration differed between the sexes and between years, with additional individual differences accounting for a large part of the variation in the distance of migration but not in the timing or duration. Overall, the model explained most of the variation (92%) and also had high predictive power for the same individuals over time (69%) as well as between study populations (74

  6. The Effect of Monetary Policy on Commodity Prices: Disentangling the Evidence for Individual Prices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Arteaga Cabrales

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We study the effect of monetary policy shocks on commodity prices. While most of the literature has found that expansionary shocks have a positive effect on aggregate price indices, we study the effect on individual prices of a sample of four commodities. This set of commodity prices is essential to understand the dynamics of the balance of payments in Colombia. The analysis is based on structural VAR models; we identify monetary policy shocks following Kim (1999, 2003 upon quarterly data for commodity prices and their fundamentals for the period from 1980q1 to 2010q3. Our results show that commodity prices overshoot their long run equilibrium in response to a contractionary shock in the US monetary policy and, in contrast with literature, the response of the individual prices considered is stronger than what has been found in aggregate indices. Additionally, it is found that the monetary policy explains a substantial share of the fluctuations in prices.

  7. Health behavior models for informing digital technology interventions for individuals with mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naslund, John A; Aschbrenner, Kelly A; Kim, Sunny Jung; McHugo, Gregory J; Unützer, Jürgen; Bartels, Stephen J; Marsch, Lisa A

    2017-09-01

    Theoretical models offer valuable insights for designing effective and sustainable behavioral health interventions, yet the application of theory for informing digital technology interventions for people with mental illness has received limited attention. We offer a perspective on the importance of applying behavior theories and models to developing digital technology interventions for addressing mental and physical health concerns among people with mental illness. In this commentary, we summarize prominent theories of human behavior, highlight key theoretical constructs, and identify opportunities to inform digital health interventions for people with mental illness. We consider limitations with existing theories and models, and examine recent theoretical advances that can specifically guide development of digital technology interventions. Established behavioral frameworks including health belief model, theory of planned behavior, transtheoretical model, and social cognitive theory consist of important and overlapping constructs that can inform digital health interventions for people with mental illness. As digital technologies continue to evolve and enable longitudinal data collection, real-time behavior monitoring, and adaptive features tailored to users' changing needs over time, there are new opportunities to broaden our understanding of health behaviors and mechanisms of behavior change. Recent advances include dynamic models of behavior, persuasive system design, the behavioral intervention technology model, and behavioral models for just-in-time adaptive interventions. Behavior theories offer advantages for guiding use of digital technologies. Future researchers must explore how theoretical models can effectively advance efforts to develop, evaluate, and disseminate digital health interventions targeting individuals with mental illness. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. State and trait effects on individual differences in children's mathematical development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Drew H; Watts, Tyler W; Littlefield, Andrew K; Geary, David C

    2014-11-01

    Substantial longitudinal relations between children's early mathematics achievement and their much later mathematics achievement are firmly established. These findings are seemingly at odds with studies showing that early educational interventions have diminishing effects on children's mathematics achievement across time. We hypothesized that individual differences in children's later mathematical knowledge are more an indicator of stable, underlying characteristics related to mathematics learning throughout development than of direct effects of early mathematical competency on later mathematical competency. We tested this hypothesis in two longitudinal data sets, by simultaneously modeling effects of latent traits (stable characteristics that influence learning across time) and states (e.g., prior knowledge) on children's mathematics achievement over time. Latent trait effects on children's mathematical development were substantially larger than state effects. Approximately 60% of the variance in trait mathematics achievement was accounted for by commonly used control variables, such as working memory, but residual trait effects remained larger than state effects. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  9. Coupling of an Individual-Based Model of Anchovy with Lower Trophic Level and Hydrodynamic Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Yuheng; WEI Hao; Michio J. Kishi

    2013-01-01

    Anchovy (Engraulisjaponicus),a small pelagic fish and food of other economic fishes,is a key species in the Yellow Sea ecosystem.Understanding the mechanisms of its recruitment and biomass variation is important for the prediction and management of fishery resources.Coupled with a hydrodynamic model (POM) and a lower trophic level ecosystem model (NEMURO),an individual-based model of anchovy is developed to study the influence of physical environment on anchovy's biomass variation.Seasonal variations of circulation,water temperature and mix-layer depth from POM are used as external forcing for NEMURO and the anchovy model.Biomasses of large zooplankton and predatory zooplankton which anchovy feeds on are output from NEMURO and are controlled by the consumption of anchovy on them.Survival fitness theory related to temperature and food is used to determine the swimming action of anchovy in the model.The simulation results agree well with observations and elucidate the influence of temperature in over-wintering migration and food in feeding migration.

  10. An Individual-based Model Approach for the Conservation of the Sumatran Tiger Panthera tigris sumatrae Population in Central Sumatra

    OpenAIRE

    Imron, Muhammad Ali

    2011-01-01

    This dissertation demonstrates the construction of the Panthera Population Persistence (PPP), an individual-based model for the Sumatran tiger (Panthera tigris sumatrae) which provides proper theoretical and application frameworks for the conservation of this tiger sub-species in central Sumatra. The PPP model was developed to gain insight into tiger-preyhabitat relationships as well as the effect of human impacts on the persistence of tiger populations. The model addresses three main problem...

  11. Patient-specific modeling of individual sickle cell behavior under transient hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuejin; Du, E.; Dao, Ming; Suresh, Subra; Karniadakis, George Em

    2017-01-01

    Sickle cell disease (SCD) is a highly complex genetic blood disorder in which red blood cells (RBC) exhibit heterogeneous morphology changes and decreased deformability. We employ a kinetic model for cell morphological sickling that invokes parameters derived from patient-specific data. This model is used to investigate the dynamics of individual sickle cells in a capillary-like microenvironment in order to address various mechanisms associated with SCD. We show that all RBCs, both hypoxia-unaffected and hypoxia-affected ones, regularly pass through microgates under oxygenated state. However, the hypoxia-affected cells undergo sickling which significantly alters cell dynamics. In particular, the dense and rigid sickle RBCs are obstructed thereby clogging blood flow while the less dense and deformable ones are capable of circumnavigating dead (trapped) cells ahead of them by choosing a serpentine path. Informed by recent experiments involving microfluidics that provide in vitro quantitative information on cell dynamics under transient hypoxia conditions, we have performed detailed computational simulations of alterations to cell behavior in response to morphological changes and membrane stiffening. Our model reveals that SCD exhibits substantial heterogeneity even within a particular density-fractionated subpopulation. These findings provide unique insights into how individual sickle cells move through capillaries under transient hypoxic conditions, and offer novel possibilities for designing effective therapeutic interventions for SCD. PMID:28288152

  12. [Effect of environmental and individual factors in renal lithiasis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilescu, L; Ciochină, Al D; Corciovă, C

    2011-01-01

    The large number of cases with renal lithiasis occurring in the population of the south-east region of Iasi county has determined us to make a study in this region for the identification of environmental and individual factors involved in the etiopathogenesis of this disease. This study is performed to assert the corelation between the clinical and paraclinical patients data with those obtained through water and soil chemical analisys for identification of determinant environmental and individual factors involved in etiopathogenesis of this disease. This study indicates that the environment factors (water, soil) correlated with personal factors, especially the diet and standard of living are the favouring factors of renal lithiasis.

  13. Prediction of Individual Buying Behavior: A Poisson-Bernoulli Model with Arbitrary Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Dalal, S. R.; Lee, J. C.; D. J. Sabavala

    1984-01-01

    Patterns of customer purchases are often modeled as discrete behavioral events following some probability law. These stochastic models have been applied separately to the phenomena of product class purchase incidence and brand choice (conditional on the products being purchased). Most of these models are probability mixture models where the parameters of an individual customer model vary across the population according to some distribution. This paper proposes a simple model of purchase behav...

  14. Effects of an Individualized Activity Program on Elderly Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salter, Carlota de Lerma; Salter, Charles A.

    1975-01-01

    A combined program of Reality Orientation, Activities of Daily Living, and Recreational Activities, together with environmental stimulation, was applied on an individualized basis to 21 elderly patients suffering from both psychological disorders and long-term physical illness. The motivation to participate in the available activities increased…

  15. The Effect of Shared versus Individual Reflection on Team Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domke-Damonte, Darla J.; Keels, J. Kay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, teams in a strategic management classroom were given one of two versions of an assignment related to the development of a team contract: independent individual reflections on desired team behaviors versus team-level reflections on desired behavioral norms. Results of a multivariate analysis of covariance, controlling for gender and…

  16. Effects of positive interpretive bias modification in highly anxious individuals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Salemink, E.; van den Hout, M.; Kindt, M.

    2009-01-01

    Over the past 20 years evidence has accumulated that individuals suffering from anxiety tend to interpret ambiguous information as threatening. Considering the causal role of this interpretive bias in anxiety, it was recently established that modifying interpretive biases influences anxiety. This

  17. The Effect of Shared versus Individual Reflection on Team Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domke-Damonte, Darla J.; Keels, J. Kay

    2015-01-01

    In this study, teams in a strategic management classroom were given one of two versions of an assignment related to the development of a team contract: independent individual reflections on desired team behaviors versus team-level reflections on desired behavioral norms. Results of a multivariate analysis of covariance, controlling for gender and…

  18. An Individual-Based Diploid Model Predicts Limited Conditions Under Which Stochastic Gene Expression Becomes Advantageous

    KAUST Repository

    Matsumoto, Tomotaka

    2015-11-24

    Recent studies suggest the existence of a stochasticity in gene expression (SGE) in many organisms, and its non-negligible effect on their phenotype and fitness. To date, however, how SGE affects the key parameters of population genetics are not well understood. SGE can increase the phenotypic variation and act as a load for individuals, if they are at the adaptive optimum in a stable environment. On the other hand, part of the phenotypic variation caused by SGE might become advantageous if individuals at the adaptive optimum become genetically less-adaptive, for example due to an environmental change. Furthermore, SGE of unimportant genes might have little or no fitness consequences. Thus, SGE can be advantageous, disadvantageous, or selectively neutral depending on its context. In addition, there might be a genetic basis that regulates magnitude of SGE, which is often referred to as “modifier genes,” but little is known about the conditions under which such an SGE-modifier gene evolves. In the present study, we conducted individual-based computer simulations to examine these conditions in a diploid model. In the simulations, we considered a single locus that determines organismal fitness for simplicity, and that SGE on the locus creates fitness variation in a stochastic manner. We also considered another locus that modifies the magnitude of SGE. Our results suggested that SGE was always deleterious in stable environments and increased the fixation probability of deleterious mutations in this model. Even under frequently changing environmental conditions, only very strong natural selection made SGE adaptive. These results suggest that the evolution of SGE-modifier genes requires strict balance among the strength of natural selection, magnitude of SGE, and frequency of environmental changes. However, the degree of dominance affected the condition under which SGE becomes advantageous, indicating a better opportunity for the evolution of SGE in different genetic

  19. Agents, Individuals, and Networks: Modeling Methods to Inform Natural Resource Management in Regional Landscapes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lael Parrott

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Landscapes are complex systems. Landscape dynamics are the result of multiple interacting biophysical and socioeconomic processes that are linked across a broad range of spatial, temporal, and organizational scales. Understanding and describing landscape dynamics poses enormous challenges and demands the use of new multiscale approaches to modeling. In this synthesis article, we present three regional systems--i.e., a forest system, a marine system, and an agricultural system--and describe how hybrid, bottom-up modeling of these systems can be used to represent linkages across scales and between subsystems. Through the use of these three examples, we describe how modeling can be used to simulate emergent system responses to different conservation policy and management scenarios from the bottom up, thereby increasing our understanding of important drivers and feedback loops within a landscape. The first case study involves the use of an individual-based modeling approach to simulate the effects of forest harvesting on the movement patterns of large mammals in Canada's boreal forest and the resulting emergent population dynamics. This model is being used to inform forest harvesting and management guidelines. The second case study combines individual and agent-based approaches to simulate the dynamics of individual boats and whales in a marine park. This model is being used to inform decision-makers on how to mitigate the impacts of maritime traffic on whales in the Saint Lawrence Estuary in eastern Canada. The third example is a case study of biodiversity conservation efforts on the Eyre Peninsula, South Australia. In this example, the social-ecological system is represented as a complex network of interacting components. Methods of network analysis can be used to explore the emergent responses of the system to changes in the network structure or configuration, thus informing managers about the resilience of the system. These three examples

  20. Individual patient data meta-analysis of survival data using Poisson regression models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crowther Michael J

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An Individual Patient Data (IPD meta-analysis is often considered the gold-standard for synthesising survival data from clinical trials. An IPD meta-analysis can be achieved by either a two-stage or a one-stage approach, depending on whether the trials are analysed separately or simultaneously. A range of one-stage hierarchical Cox models have been previously proposed, but these are known to be computationally intensive and are not currently available in all standard statistical software. We describe an alternative approach using Poisson based Generalised Linear Models (GLMs. Methods We illustrate, through application and simulation, the Poisson approach both classically and in a Bayesian framework, in two-stage and one-stage approaches. We outline the benefits of our one-stage approach through extension to modelling treatment-covariate interactions and non-proportional hazards. Ten trials of hypertension treatment, with all-cause death the outcome of interest, are used to apply and assess the approach. Results We show that the Poisson approach obtains almost identical estimates to the Cox model, is additionally computationally efficient and directly estimates the baseline hazard. Some downward bias is observed in classical estimates of the heterogeneity in the treatment effect, with improved performance from the Bayesian approach. Conclusion Our approach provides a highly flexible and computationally efficient framework, available in all standard statistical software, to the investigation of not only heterogeneity, but the presence of non-proportional hazards and treatment effect modifiers.

  1. Linking individual-tree and whole-stand models for forest growth and yield prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quang V Cao

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Different types of growth and yield models provide essential information for making informed decisions on how to manage forests. Whole-stand models often provide well-behaved outputs at the stand level, but lack information on stand structures. Detailed information from individual-tree models and size-class models typically suffers from accumulation of errors. The disaggregation method, in assuming that predictions from a whole-stand model are reliable, partitions these outputs to individual trees. On the other hand, the combination method seeks to improve stand-level predictions from both whole-stand and individual-tree models by combining them. Methods Data from 100 plots randomly selected from the Southwide Seed Source Study of loblolly pine (Pinus taeda L. were used to evaluate the unadjusted individual-tree model against the disaggregation and combination methods. Results Compared to the whole-stand model, the combination method did not show improvements in predicting stand attributes in this study. The combination method also did not perform as well as the disaggregation method in tree-level predictions. The disaggregation method provided the best predictions of tree- and stand-level survival and growth. Conclusions The disaggregation approach provides a link between individual-tree models and whole-stand models, and should be considered as a better alternative to the unadjusted tree model.

  2. The effects of peroral glycerol on plasma osmolarity in diabetic patients and healthy individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thornit, Dorte Nellemann; Sander, Birgit; la Cour, Morten

    2009-01-01

    Glycerol is used as a peroral treatment of increased intraocular and intracranial pressure due to its osmotic effect despite the potential increase in blood pressure and blood glucose. We examined the effects of peroral glycerol in diabetic patients and healthy individuals on blood pressure......, non-significant increase occurred in blood pressure. Maximal DeltaCG was approximately 1 mM irrespective of the dose and presence of diabetes (p > 0.1). The pOSM response was analysed with a kinetic model and found independent of the presence of diabetes (p = 0.6). The maximal fitted DeltapOSM was 12......, capillary glucose, and plasma osmolarity. On two separate days, 15 diabetic patients ingested glycerol in doses of 855 and 1710 mg/kg body weight in a randomised, unmasked sequence. Five healthy individuals ingested a dose of 1710 mg/kg body weight. Mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), capillary glucose (CG...

  3. Why my classmates drink: drinking motives of classroom peers as predictors of individual drinking motives and alcohol use in adolescence -- a mediational model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntsche, Emmanuel; Stewart, Sherry H

    2009-05-01

    A structural equation model was estimated based on a Swiss national sample of 5649 12- to 18-year-olds to test whether individual drinking motives mediate the link between classmates' motives and individual alcohol use. Results showed that the social, enhancement, coping and conformity motives of individual students are associated with the corresponding motive dimension of other students in the class. No direct effect of the four classmates' motives on individual drinking, but an indirect effect via individual motives was observed. It appears that drinking motives within the adolescent social environment exert their influence on drinking by way of shaping individual motives.

  4. Individual Differences in Eye-Movements During Reading: Working Memory and Speed-of-Processing Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traxler, Matthew J; Long, Debra L; Tooley, Kristen M; Johns, Clinton L; Zirnstein, Megan; Jonathan, Eunike

    Theories of eye-movement control in reading should ultimately describe how differences in knowledge and cognitive abilities affect reading and comprehension. Current mathematical models of eye-movement control do not yet incorporate individual differences as a source of variation in reading, although developmental and group-difference effects have been studied. These models nonetheless provide an excellent foundation for describing and explaining how and why patterns of eye-movements differ across readers (e.g., Rayner, Chace, & Ashby, 2006). Our focus in this article is on two aspects of individual variation: global processing speed (e.g., Salthouse, 1996) and working-memory capacity (e.g., Just & Carpenter, 1992). Using Hierarchical Linear Modeling (HLM) (Raudenbush & Bryk, 2001), we tested the extent to which overall reading speed and working-memory capacity moderate the degree to which syntactic and semantic information affect fixation times. Previous published data (Traxler et al., 2005) showed that working memory capacity and syntactic complexity interacted to determine fixation times in an eye-movement monitoring experiment. In a new set of models based on this same data set, we found that working-memory capacity interacted with sentence-characteristic variables only when processing speed was not included in the model. We interpret these findings with respect to current accounts of sentence processing and suggest how they might be incorporated into eye-movement control models.

  5. Individual differences effects on the psychological refractory period

    OpenAIRE

    Laguë-Beauvais, Maude; Gagnon, Christine; Castonguay, Nathalie; Bherer, Louis

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to assess the impact of individual neuropsychological differences on the ability to share attention between concurrent tasks. Participants (n = 20) were trained on six single task practice sessions and dual-task was assessed with reaction time performance on a psychological refractory period (PRP) paradigm. Neuropsychological test scores were also acquired. Furthermore, one of the known variables that can influence performances on neuropsychological tests is gender,...

  6. Behavioral Biases of Individual Investors: The Effect of Anchoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Zaiane

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to investigate the presence of the anchoring bias in the financial decision making of individual investors. A survey study is carried out to find out how the studied bias affects the investment behavior on the Tunisian stock market. The survey is for exploratory purpose and it is based on multiple factorial correspondence analyses. The results reveal that Tunisian investors do not suffer from the anchoring bias.

  7. Comparative effectiveness of group and individual prenatal care on gestational weight gain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner-Smith, Emily E; Steinka-Fry, Katarzyna T; Gesell, Sabina B

    2014-09-01

    This study examined differences in gestational weight gain for women in CenteringPregnancy (CP) group prenatal care versus individually delivered prenatal care. We conducted a retrospective chart review and used propensity scores to form a matched sample of 393 women (76 % African-American, 13 % Latina, 11 % White; average age 22 years) receiving prenatal care at a community health center in the South. Women were matched on a wide range of demographic and medical background characteristics. Compared to the matched group of women receiving standard individual prenatal care, CP participants were less likely to have excessive gestational weight gain, regardless of their pre-pregnancy weight (b = -.99, 95 % CI [-1.92, -.06], RRR = .37). CP reduced the risk of excessive weight gain during pregnancy to 54 % of what it would have been in the standard model of prenatal care (NNT = 5). The beneficial effect of CP was largest for women who were overweight or obese prior to their pregnancy. Effects did not vary by gestational age at delivery. Post-hoc analyses provided no evidence of adverse effects on newborn birth weight outcomes. Group prenatal care had statistically and clinically significant beneficial effects on reducing excessive gestational weight gain relative to traditional individual prenatal care.

  8. Additive gamma frailty models with applications to competing risks in related individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksson, Frank; Scheike, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Epidemiological studies of related individuals are often complicated by the fact that follow-up on the event type of interest is incomplete due to the occurrence of other events. We suggest a class of frailty models with cause-specific hazards for correlated competing events in related individuals...

  9. Evaluation of an e-PBL model to promote individual reasoning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyong-Jee; Kee, Changwon

    2013-01-01

    Medical educators should promote the development of student clinical reasoning toward independence in clinical settings. The objective of this study was to evaluate an online problem-based learning (e-PBL) model designed to promote student individual reasoning in supplement to traditional PBL. Twelve e-PBL modules were added to the fully problem-based curriculum for Year 2 at Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine (SKKUSOM). In this e-PBL, students worked on the problems individually in an online setting, followed by face-to-face discussions in a colloquium. The cases were presented using interactive multimedia to enhance the authenticity of the case and stimulate student interest in learning. A formative evaluation study was conducted to determine student satisfaction with e-PBL and its effectiveness as perceived by the students using both quantitative and qualitative methods. A cohort of Year 2 students at SKKUSOM (n = 38) took part in this study. Students perceived e-PBL significantly more positively after they had taken a module in terms of its ability to foster problem-solving skills and its ability to allow them to learn in ways suited to individual learning styles. Additionally, student survey and interview revealed that a vast majority of students were satisfied with the overall learning process in e-PBL and perceived it positively in fostering knowledge acquisition and clinical reasoning. Moreover, students found the cases realistic and engaging. The results show the potential of e-PBL to enhance traditional PBL by promoting the development of individual reasoning in a flexible online-learning environment and offering cases in an interactive multimedia format, which warrants further investigation into its impact on student learning outcomes.

  10. From individual preference construction to group decisions: framing effects and group processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Milch, K.F.; Weber, E.U.; Appelt, K.C.; Handgraaf, M.J.J.; Krantz, D.H.

    2009-01-01

    Two choice tasks known to produce framing effects in individual decisions were used to test group sensitivity to framing, relative to that of individuals, and to examine the effect of prior, individual consideration of a decision on group choice. Written post-decision reasons and pre-decision group

  11. Career Planning: Towards a More Inclusive Model for Women and Diverse Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Claretha H.

    2006-01-01

    Since the 1953 introduction of Super's model of career development, many publications regarding career development and career planning have been developed. However, career planning models for women and diverse individuals are not prevalent. This paper contains a literature review of various well-known models that have few specific applications for…

  12. Teachers’ individual action theories about competence-based education: the value of the cognitive apprenticeship model

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Seezink, A., Poell, R. F., & Kirschner, P. A. (2009). Teachers' individual action theories about competence-based education: The value of the cognitive apprenticeship model. Journal of Vocational Education & Training, 61, 203-215.

  13. Evaluation of alternative PCB clean-up strategies using an individual-based population model of mink

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salice, Christopher J., E-mail: Chris.salice@ttu.edu [Department of Environmental Toxicology, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, TX 79410 (United States); Sample, Bradley E., E-mail: bsample@ecorisk.com [Ecological Risk Inc., Rancho Murieta, CA 95683 (United States); Miller Neilan, Rachael; Rose, Kenneth A.; Sable, Shaye [Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, Energy, Coast and Environment Building, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803 (United States)

    2011-12-15

    Population models can be used to place observed toxic effects into an assessment of the impacts on population-level endpoints, which are generally considered to provide greater ecological insight and relevance. We used an individual-based model of mink to evaluate the population-level effects of exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and the impact that different remediation strategies had on mink population endpoints (population size and extinction risk). Our simulations indicated that the initial population size had a strong impact on mink population dynamics. In addition, mink populations were extremely responsive to clean-up scenarios that were initiated soon after the contamination event. In fact, the rate of PCB clean-up did not have as strong a positive effect on mink as did the initiation of clean-up (start time). We show that population-level approaches can be used to understand adverse effects of contamination and to also explore the potential benefits of various remediation strategies. - Highlights: > We used an individual-based model of mink to evaluate population-level impacts of PCB contamination. > The model was also used to explore the population responses to different PCB remediation strategies. > Population size had a large impact on whether mink populations persisted or went extinct. > Starting remediation sooner had a stronger positive effect on mink populations than did the rate of PCB clean-up. > Individual-based models are useful in understanding effects of contamination and different remediation strategies. - An individual-based model of mink showed strong population-level effects of PCB contamination and provided insight into optimal PCB remediation strategies.

  14. Computational model, method, and system for kinetically-tailoring multi-drug chemotherapy for individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Shea Nicole

    2007-10-23

    A method and system for tailoring treatment regimens to individual patients with diseased cells exhibiting evolution of resistance to such treatments. A mathematical model is provided which models rates of population change of proliferating and quiescent diseased cells using cell kinetics and evolution of resistance of the diseased cells, and pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic models. Cell kinetic parameters are obtained from an individual patient and applied to the mathematical model to solve for a plurality of treatment regimens, each having a quantitative efficacy value associated therewith. A treatment regimen may then be selected from the plurlaity of treatment options based on the efficacy value.

  15. Effect of religious context on the content of visual hallucinations in individuals high in religiosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Phil; Clarke, Natasha

    2014-03-30

    This study investigated the interaction between the current environment and personality factors associated with religiosity in determining the content of false perceptions (used as a model for hallucinations). A primed word-detection task was used to investigate the effect of a 'religious' context on false perceptions in individuals scoring highly on religiosity. After a subliminal prime, participants viewed letter strings, and stated any words that they saw. The prime and the actual words could have a religious connotation or not. Participants measuring high on religiosity were more likely to report false perceptions of a religious type than participants low on religiosity. It is suggested that context affects the content of false perceptions through the activation of stored beliefs and values, which vary between individuals, offering a mechanism for the effect of context on idiosyncratic content of hallucinations in schizophrenia. The effect of context and individual differences on false-perception content in the current study provides possibilities for future work regarding the underlying nature of hallucinations and their treatment.

  16. Monitoring the antiviral effect of alpha interferon on individual cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chon Saeng; Jung, Jong Ha; Wakita, Takaji; Yoon, Seung Kew; Jang, Sung Key

    2007-08-01

    An infectious hepatitis C virus (HCV) cDNA clone (JFH1) was generated recently. However, quantitative analysis of HCV infection and observation of infected cells have proved to be difficult because the yield of HCV in cell cultures is fairly low. We generated infectious HCV clones containing the convenient reporters green fluorescent protein (GFP) and Renilla luciferase in the NS5a-coding sequence. The new viruses responded to antiviral agents in a dose-dependent manner. Responses of individual cells containing HCV to alpha interferon (IFN-alpha) were monitored using GFP-tagged HCV and time-lapse confocal microscopy. Marked variations in the response to IFN-alpha were observed among HCV-containing cells.

  17. The combined effect of individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status on cancer survival rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Ming Chang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: This population-based study investigated the relationship between individual and neighborhood socioeconomic status (SES and mortality rates for major cancers in Taiwan. METHODS: A population-based follow-up study was conducted with 20,488 cancer patients diagnosed in 2002. Each patient was traced to death or for 5 years. The individual income-related insurance payment amount was used as a proxy measure of individual SES for patients. Neighborhood SES was defined by income, and neighborhoods were grouped as living in advantaged or disadvantaged areas. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to compare the death-free survival rates between the different SES groups after adjusting for possible confounding and risk factors. RESULTS: After adjusting for patient characteristics (age, gender, Charlson Comorbidity Index Score, urbanization, and area of residence, tumor extent, treatment modalities (operation and adjuvant therapy, and hospital characteristics (ownership and teaching level, colorectal cancer, and head and neck cancer patients under 65 years old with low individual SES in disadvantaged neighborhoods conferred a 1.5 to 2-fold higher risk of mortality, compared with patients with high individual SES in advantaged neighborhoods. A cross-level interaction effect was found in lung cancer and breast cancer. Lung cancer and breast cancer patients less than 65 years old with low SES in advantaged neighborhoods carried the highest risk of mortality. Prostate cancer patients aged 65 and above with low SES in disadvantaged neighborhoods incurred the highest risk of mortality. There was no association between SES and mortality for cervical cancer and pancreatic cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings indicate that cancer patients with low individual SES have the highest risk of mortality even under a universal health-care system. Public health strategies and welfare policies must continue to focus on this vulnerable group.

  18. Effect of fragrance use on discrimination of individual body odor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline eAllen

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Previous research suggests that artificial fragrances may be chosen to complement or enhance an individual’s body odor, rather than simply masking it, and that this may create an odor blend with an emergent quality that is perceptually distinguishable from body odor or fragrance alone. From this, it can be predicted that a new emergent odor might be more easily identified than an individual’s body odor in isolation. We used a triangle test paradigm to assess whether fragrance affects people’s ability to distinguish between individual odors. Six male and six female donors provided axillary odor samples in three conditions (without fragrance, wearing their own fragrance, and wearing an assigned fragrance. In total, 296 female and 131 male participants selected the odd one out from three odor samples (two from one donor, one from another; both of the same sex. We found that participants could discriminate between the odors at above chance levels in all three odour conditions. Olfactory identification ability (measured using Sniffin’ Sticks positively predicted discrimination performance, and sex differences in performance were also observed, with female raters being correct more often than men. Success rates were also higher for odors of male donors. Additionally, while performance was above chance in all conditions, individual odor discrimination varied across the three conditions. Discrimination rate was significantly higher in the ‘no fragrance’ condition than either of the fragranced conditions. Importantly, however, discrimination rate was also significantly higher in the ‘own fragrance’ condition than the ‘assigned fragrance’ condition, suggesting that naturally occurring variance in body odor is more preserved when blended with fragrances that people choose for themselves, compared with other fragrances. Our data are consistent with the idea that fragrance choices are influenced by fragrance interactions with an

  19. Modelling dopaminergic and other processes involved in learning from reward prediction error: Contributions from an individual differences perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan David Pickering

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Phasic firing changes of midbrain dopamine neurons have been widely characterised as reflecting a reward prediction error (RPE. Major personality traits (e.g. extraversion have been linked to inter-individual variations in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Consistent with these two claims, recent research (Smillie, Cooper, & Pickering, 2011; Cooper, Duke, Pickering, & Smillie, 2014 found that extraverts exhibited larger RPEs than introverts, as reflected in feedback related negativity (FRN effects in EEG recordings. Using an established, biologically-localised RPE computational model, we successfully simulated dopaminergic cell firing changes which are thought to modulate the FRN. We introduced simulated individual differences into the model: parameters were systematically varied, with stable values for each simulated individual. We explored whether a model parameter might be responsible for the observed covariance between extraversion and the FRN changes in real data, and argued that a parameter is a plausible source of such covariance if parameter variance, across simulated individuals, correlated almost perfectly with the size of the simulated dopaminergic FRN modulation, and created as much variance as possible in this simulated output. Several model parameters met these criteria, while others did not. In particular, variations in the strength of connections carrying excitatory reward drive inputs to midbrain dopaminergic cells were considered plausible candidates, along with variations in a parameter which scales the effects of dopamine cell firing bursts on synaptic modification in ventral striatum. We suggest possible neurotransmitter mechanisms underpinning these model parameters. Finally, the limitations and possible extensions of our approach are discussed.

  20. Modeling dopaminergic and other processes involved in learning from reward prediction error: contributions from an individual differences perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickering, Alan D; Pesola, Francesca

    2014-01-01

    Phasic firing changes of midbrain dopamine neurons have been widely characterized as reflecting a reward prediction error (RPE). Major personality traits (e.g., extraversion) have been linked to inter-individual variations in dopaminergic neurotransmission. Consistent with these two claims, recent research (Smillie et al., 2011; Cooper et al., 2014) found that extraverts exhibited larger RPEs than introverts, as reflected in feedback related negativity (FRN) effects in EEG recordings. Using an established, biologically-localized RPE computational model, we successfully simulated dopaminergic cell firing changes which are thought to modulate the FRN. We introduced simulated individual differences into the model: parameters were systematically varied, with stable values for each simulated individual. We explored whether a model parameter might be responsible for the observed covariance between extraversion and the FRN changes in real data, and argued that a parameter is a plausible source of such covariance if parameter variance, across simulated individuals, correlated almost perfectly with the size of the simulated dopaminergic FRN modulation, and created as much variance as possible in this simulated output. Several model parameters met these criteria, while others did not. In particular, variations in the strength of connections carrying excitatory reward drive inputs to midbrain dopaminergic cells were considered plausible candidates, along with variations in a parameter which scales the effects of dopamine cell firing bursts on synaptic modification in ventral striatum. We suggest possible neurotransmitter mechanisms underpinning these model parameters. Finally, the limitations and possible extensions of our general approach are discussed.

  1. An individual-based model of zebrafish population dynamics accounting for energy dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rémy Beaudouin

    Full Text Available Developing population dynamics models for zebrafish is crucial in order to extrapolate from toxicity data measured at the organism level to biological levels relevant to support and enhance ecological risk assessment. To achieve this, a dynamic energy budget for individual zebrafish (DEB model was coupled to an individual based model of zebrafish population dynamics (IBM model. Next, we fitted the DEB model to new experimental data on zebrafish growth and reproduction thus improving existing models. We further analysed the DEB-model and DEB-IBM using a sensitivity analysis. Finally, the predictions of the DEB-IBM were compared to existing observations on natural zebrafish populations and the predicted population dynamics are realistic. While our zebrafish DEB-IBM model can still be improved by acquiring new experimental data on the most uncertain processes (e.g. survival or feeding, it can already serve to predict the impact of compounds at the population level.

  2. Effectiveness enhancement of a cycloidal wind turbine by individual active control of blade motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, In Seong; Lee, Yun Han; Kim, Seung Jo

    2007-04-01

    In this paper, a research for the effectiveness enhancement of a Cycloidal Wind Turbine by individual active control of blade motion is described. To improve the performance of the power generation system, which consists of several straight blades rotating about axis in parallel direction, the cycloidal blade system and the individual active blade control method are adopted. It has advantages comparing with horizontal axis wind turbine or conventional vertical axis wind turbine because it maintains optimal blade pitch angles according to wind speed, wind direction and rotor rotating speed to produce high electric power at any conditions. It can do self-starting and shows good efficiency at low wind speed and complex wind condition. Optimal blade pitch angle paths are obtained through CFD analysis according to rotor rotating speed and wind speed. The individual rotor blade control system consists of sensors, actuators and microcontroller. To realize the actuating device, servo motors are installed to each rotor blade. Actuating speed and actuating force are calculated to compare with the capacities of servo motor, and some delays of blade pitch angles are corrected experimentally. Performance experiment is carried out by the wind blowing equipment and Labview system, and the rotor rotates from 50 to 100 rpm according to the electric load. From this research, it is concluded that developing new vertical axis wind turbine, Cycloidal Wind Turbine which is adopting individual active blade pitch control method can be a good model for small wind turbine in urban environment.

  3. The obesity paradox: understanding the effect of obesity on mortality among individuals with cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banack, Hailey R; Kaufman, Jay S

    2014-05-01

    To discuss possible explanations for the obesity paradox and explore whether the paradox can be attributed to a form of selection bias known as collider stratification bias. The paper is divided into three parts. First, possible explanations for the obesity paradox are reviewed. Second, a simulated example is provided to describe collider stratification bias and how it could generate the obesity paradox. Finally, an example is provided using data from 17,636 participants in the US National and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). Generalized linear models were fit to assess the effect of obesity on mortality both in the general population and among individuals with diagnosed cardiovascular disease (CVD). Additionally, results from a bias analysis are presented. In the general population, the adjusted risk ratio relating obesity and all-cause mortality was 1.24 (95% CI 1.11, 1.39). Adjusted risk ratios comparing obese and non-obese among individuals with and without CVD were 0.79 (95% CI 0.68, 0.91) and 1.30 (95% CI=1.12, 1.50), indicating that obesity has a protective association among individuals with CVD. Results demonstrate that collider stratification bias is one plausible explanation for the obesity paradox. After conditioning on CVD status in the design or analysis, obesity can appear protective among individuals with CVD. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Postencoding cognitive processes in the cross-race effect: Categorization and individuation during face recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Michael R; Pezdek, Kathy

    2016-06-01

    The cross-race effect (CRE) describes the finding that same-race faces are recognized more accurately than cross-race faces. According to social-cognitive theories of the CRE, processes of categorization and individuation at encoding account for differential recognition of same- and cross-race faces. Recent face memory research has suggested that similar but distinct categorization and individuation processes also occur postencoding, at recognition. Using a divided-attention paradigm, in Experiments 1A and 1B we tested and confirmed the hypothesis that distinct postencoding categorization and individuation processes occur during the recognition of same- and cross-race faces. Specifically, postencoding configural divided-attention tasks impaired recognition accuracy more for same-race than for cross-race faces; on the other hand, for White (but not Black) participants, postencoding featural divided-attention tasks impaired recognition accuracy more for cross-race than for same-race faces. A social categorization paradigm used in Experiments 2A and 2B tested the hypothesis that the postencoding in-group or out-group social orientation to faces affects categorization and individuation processes during the recognition of same-race and cross-race faces. Postencoding out-group orientation to faces resulted in categorization for White but not for Black participants. This was evidenced by White participants' impaired recognition accuracy for same-race but not for cross-race out-group faces. Postencoding in-group orientation to faces had no effect on recognition accuracy for either same-race or cross-race faces. The results of Experiments 2A and 2B suggest that this social orientation facilitates White but not Black participants' individuation and categorization processes at recognition. Models of recognition memory for same-race and cross-race faces need to account for processing differences that occur at both encoding and recognition.

  5. Effects of individualized word retrieval in kindergarten vocabulary intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Damhuis, C.M.P.; Segers, P.C.J.; Scheltinga, F.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of adaptive word retrieval intervention on a classroom vocabulary program on children's vocabulary acquisition in kindergarten. In the experimental condition, word retrieval was provided in a classroom vocabulary program, combining implicit and explicit vocabulary

  6. Assessing visual green effects of individual urban trees using airborne Lidar data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ziyue; Xu, Bing; Gao, Bingbo

    2015-12-01

    Urban trees benefit people's daily life in terms of air quality, local climate, recreation and aesthetics. Among these functions, a growing number of studies have been conducted to understand the relationship between residents' preference towards local environments and visual green effects of urban greenery. However, except for on-site photography, there are few quantitative methods to calculate green visibility, especially tree green visibility, from viewers' perspectives. To fill this research gap, a case study was conducted in the city of Cambridge, which has a diversity of tree species, sizes and shapes. Firstly, a photograph-based survey was conducted to approximate the actual value of visual green effects of individual urban trees. In addition, small footprint airborne Lidar (Light detection and ranging) data was employed to measure the size and shape of individual trees. Next, correlations between visual tree green effects and tree structural parameters were examined. Through experiments and gradual refinement, a regression model with satisfactory R2 and limited large errors is proposed. Considering the diversity of sample trees and the result of cross-validation, this model has the potential to be applied to other study sites. This research provides urban planners and decision makers with an innovative method to analyse and evaluate landscape patterns in terms of tree greenness.

  7. Activity Recognition in Individuals Walking With Assistive Devices: The Benefits of Device-Specific Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonini, Luca; Gupta, Aakash; Deems-Dluhy, Susan; Hoppe-Ludwig, Shenan; Kording, Konrad; Jayaraman, Arun

    2017-08-10

    Wearable sensors gather data that machine-learning models can convert into an identification of physical activities, a clinically relevant outcome measure. However, when individuals with disabilities upgrade to a new walking assistive device, their gait patterns can change, which could affect the accuracy of activity recognition. The objective of this study was to assess whether we need to train an activity recognition model with labeled data from activities performed with the new assistive device, rather than data from the original device or from healthy individuals. Data were collected from 11 healthy controls as well as from 11 age-matched individuals with disabilities who used a standard stance control knee-ankle-foot orthosis (KAFO), and then a computer-controlled adaptive KAFO (Ottobock C-Brace). All subjects performed a structured set of functional activities while wearing an accelerometer on their waist, and random forest classifiers were used as activity classification models. We examined both global models, which are trained on other subjects (healthy or disabled individuals), and personal models, which are trained and tested on the same subject. Median accuracies of global and personal models trained with data from the new KAFO were significantly higher (61% and 76%, respectively) than those of models that use data from the original KAFO (55% and 66%, respectively) (Wilcoxon signed-rank test, P=.006 and P=.01). These models also massively outperformed a global model trained on healthy subjects, which only achieved a median accuracy of 53%. Device-specific models conferred a major advantage for activity recognition. Our results suggest that when patients use a new assistive device, labeled data from activities performed with the specific device are needed for maximal precision activity recognition. Personal device-specific models yield the highest accuracy in such scenarios, whereas models trained on healthy individuals perform poorly and should not be

  8. A simple model describes large individual differences in simultaneous colour contrast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekroll, Vebjørn; Faul, Franz

    2009-09-01

    We report experimental evidence for substantial individual differences in the susceptibility to simultaneous colour contrast. Interestingly, we found that not only the general amount of colour induction varies across observers, but also the general shape of the curves describing asymmetric matching data. A simple model based on von Kries adaptation and crispening describes the data rather well when we regard its free parameters as observer specific. We argue that the von Kries component reflects the action of a temporal adaptation mechanism, while the crispening component describes the action of the instantaneous, purely spatial mechanism most appropriately labeled simultaneous colour contrast. An interesting consequence of this view is that traditional ideas about the general characteristics of simultaneous contrast must be considered as misleading. According to Kirschmann's 4th law, for instance, the simultaneous contrast effect should increase with increasing saturation of the surround, but crispening predicts the converse. Based on this reasoning, we offer a plausible explanation for the mixed evidence on the validity of Kirschmann's 4th law. We also argue that simultaneous contrast, the crispening effect, Meyer's effect and the gamut expansion effect are just different names for the same basic phenomenon.

  9. Probabilistic Inference: Task Dependency and Individual Differences of Probability Weighting Revealed by Hierarchical Bayesian Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boos, Moritz; Seer, Caroline; Lange, Florian; Kopp, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive determinants of probabilistic inference were examined using hierarchical Bayesian modeling techniques. A classic urn-ball paradigm served as experimental strategy, involving a factorial two (prior probabilities) by two (likelihoods) design. Five computational models of cognitive processes were compared with the observed behavior. Parameter-free Bayesian posterior probabilities and parameter-free base rate neglect provided inadequate models of probabilistic inference. The introduction of distorted subjective probabilities yielded more robust and generalizable results. A general class of (inverted) S-shaped probability weighting functions had been proposed; however, the possibility of large differences in probability distortions not only across experimental conditions, but also across individuals, seems critical for the model's success. It also seems advantageous to consider individual differences in parameters of probability weighting as being sampled from weakly informative prior distributions of individual parameter values. Thus, the results from hierarchical Bayesian modeling converge with previous results in revealing that probability weighting parameters show considerable task dependency and individual differences. Methodologically, this work exemplifies the usefulness of hierarchical Bayesian modeling techniques for cognitive psychology. Theoretically, human probabilistic inference might be best described as the application of individualized strategic policies for Bayesian belief revision.

  10. Towards individualized dose constraints: Adjusting the QUANTEC radiation pneumonitis model for clinical risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Farr, Katherina P.;

    2014-01-01

    Background. Understanding the dose-response of the lung in order to minimize the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) is critical for optimization of lung cancer radiotherapy. We propose a method to combine the dose-response relationship for RP in the landmark QUANTEC paper with known clinical risk...... factors, in order to enable individual risk prediction. The approach is validated in an independent dataset. Material and methods. The prevalence of risk factors in the patient populations underlying the QUANTEC analysis was estimated, and a previously published method to adjust dose......-response relationships for clinical risk factors was employed. Effect size estimates (odds ratios) for risk factors were drawn from a recently published meta-analysis. Baseline values for D50 and γ50 were found. The method was tested in an independent dataset (103 patients), comparing the predictive power of the dose......-only QUANTEC model and the model including risk factors. Subdistribution cumulative incidence functions were compared for patients with high/low-risk predictions from the two models, and concordance indices (c-indices) for the prediction of RP were calculated. Results. The reference dose- response relationship...

  11. Individualized Responses of Gut Microbiota to Dietary Intervention Modeled in Humanized Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Samuel A; Marcobal, Angela; Higginbottom, Steven; Sonnenburg, Justin L; Kashyap, Purna C

    2016-01-01

    Diet plays an important role in shaping the structure and function of the gut microbiota. The microbes and microbial products in turn can influence various aspects of host physiology. One promising route to affect host function and restore health is by altering the gut microbiome using dietary intervention. The individuality of the microbiome may pose a significant challenge, so we sought to determine how different microbiotas respond to the same dietary intervention in a controlled setting. We modeled gut microbiotas from three healthy donors in germfree mice and defined compositional and functional alteration following a change in dietary microbiota-accessible carbohydrates (MACs). The three gut communities exhibited responses that differed markedly in magnitude and in the composition of microbiota-derived metabolites. Adjustments in community membership did not correspond to the magnitude of changes in the microbial metabolites, highlighting potential challenges in predicting functional responses from compositional data and the need to assess multiple microbiota parameters following dietary interventions. IMPORTANCE Dietary modification has long been used empirically to modify symptoms in inflammatory bowel disease, irritable bowel syndrome, and a diverse group of diseases with gastrointestinal symptoms. There is both anecdotal and scientific evidence to suggest that individuals respond quite differently to similar dietary changes, and the highly individualized nature of the gut microbiota makes it a prime candidate for these differences. To overcome the typical confounding factors of human dietary interventions, here we employ ex-germfree mice colonized by microbiotas of three different humans to test how different microbiotas respond to a defined change in carbohydrate content of diet by measuring changes in microbiota composition and function using marker gene-based next-generation sequencing and metabolomics. Our findings suggest that the same diet has very

  12. Perceptual compensation is correlated with individuals' "autistic" traits: implications for models of sound change.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan C L Yu

    Full Text Available Variation is a ubiquitous feature of speech. Listeners must take into account context-induced variation to recover the interlocutor's intended message. When listeners fail to normalize for context-induced variation properly, deviant percepts become seeds for new perceptual and production norms. In question is how deviant percepts accumulate in a systematic fashion to give rise to sound change (i.e., new pronunciation norms within a given speech community. The present study investigated subjects' classification of /s/ and // before /a/ or /u/ spoken by a male or a female voice. Building on modern cognitive theories of autism-spectrum condition, which see variation in autism-spectrum condition in terms of individual differences in cognitive processing style, we established a significant correlation between individuals' normalization for phonetic context (i.e., whether the following vowel is /a/ or /u/ and talker voice variation (i.e., whether the talker is male or female in speech and their "autistic" traits, as measured by the Autism Spectrum Quotient (AQ. In particular, our mixed-effect logistic regression models show that women with low AQ (i.e., the least "autistic" do not normalize for phonetic coarticulation as much as men and high AQ women. This study provides first direct evidence that variability in human's ability to compensate for context-induced variations in speech perceptually is governed by the individual's sex and cognitive processing style. These findings lend support to the hypothesis that the systematic infusion of new linguistic variants (i.e., the deviant percepts originate from a sub-segment of the speech community that consistently under-compensates for contextual variation in speech.

  13. Inter-individual variation in vertebral kinematics affects predictions of neck musculoskeletal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nevins, Derek D; Zheng, Liying; Vasavada, Anita N

    2014-10-17

    Experimental studies have found significant variation in cervical intervertebral kinematics (IVK) among healthy subjects, but the effect of this variation on biomechanical properties, such as neck strength, has not been explored. The goal of this study was to quantify variation in model predictions of extension strength, flexion strength and gravitational demand (the ratio of gravitational load from the weight of the head to neck muscle extension strength), due to inter-subject variation in IVK. IVK were measured from sagittal radiographs of 24 subjects (14F, 10M) in five postures: maximal extension, mid-extension, neutral, mid-flexion, and maximal flexion. IVK were defined by the position (anterior-posterior and superior-inferior) of each cervical vertebra with respect to T1 and its angle with respect to horizontal, and fit with a cubic polynomial over the range of motion. The IVK of each subject were scaled and incorporated into musculoskeletal models to create models that were identical in muscle force- and moment-generating properties but had subject-specific kinematics. The effect of inter-subject variation in IVK was quantified using the coefficient of variation (COV), the ratio of the standard deviation to the mean. COV of extension strength ranged from 8% to 15% over the range of motion, but COV of flexion strength was 20-80%. Moreover, the COV of gravitational demand was 80-90%, because the gravitational demand is affected by head position as well as neck strength. These results indicate that including inter-individual variation in models is important for evaluating neck musculoskeletal biomechanical properties.

  14. Driving-forces model on individual behavior in scenarios considering moving threat agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuying; Zhuang, Jun; Shen, Shifei; Wang, Jia

    2017-09-01

    The individual behavior model is a contributory factor to improve the accuracy of agent-based simulation in different scenarios. However, few studies have considered moving threat agents, which often occur in terrorist attacks caused by attackers with close-range weapons (e.g., sword, stick). At the same time, many existing behavior models lack validation from cases or experiments. This paper builds a new individual behavior model based on seven behavioral hypotheses. The driving-forces model is an extension of the classical social force model considering scenarios including moving threat agents. An experiment was conducted to validate the key components of the model. Then the model is compared with an advanced Elliptical Specification II social force model, by calculating the fitting errors between the simulated and experimental trajectories, and being applied to simulate a specific circumstance. Our results show that the driving-forces model reduced the fitting error by an average of 33.9% and the standard deviation by an average of 44.5%, which indicates the accuracy and stability of the model in the studied situation. The new driving-forces model could be used to simulate individual behavior when analyzing the risk of specific scenarios using agent-based simulation methods, such as risk analysis of close-range terrorist attacks in public places.

  15. Modeling of individual coherent structures in wall region of a turbulent boundary layer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周恒; 陆昌根; 罗纪生

    1999-01-01

    Models for individual coherent structures in the wall region of a turbulent boundary layer are proposed. Method of numerical simulations is used to follow the evolution of the structures. It is found that the proposed model does bear many features of coherent structures found in experiments.

  16. Medicaid Managed Care Model of Primary Care and Health Care Management for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kastner, Theodore A.; Walsh, Kevin K.

    2006-01-01

    Lack of sufficient accessible community-based health care services for individuals with developmental disabilities has led to disparities in health outcomes and an overreliance on expensive models of care delivered in hospitals and other safety net or state-subsidized providers. A functioning community-based primary health care model, with an…

  17. The Limit Behavior of a Stochastic Logistic Model with Individual Time-Dependent Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yilun Shang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigate a variant of the stochastic logistic model that allows individual variation and time-dependent infection and recovery rates. The model is described as a heterogeneous density dependent Markov chain. We show that the process can be approximated by a deterministic process defined by an integral equation as the population size grows.

  18. Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis or Diagnosis (TRIPOD) : explanation and elaboration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moons, Karel G M; Altman, Douglas G; Reitsma, Johannes B; Ioannidis, John P A; Macaskill, Petra; Steyerberg, Ewout W; Vickers, Andrew J; Ransohoff, David F; Collins, Gary S

    2015-01-01

    The TRIPOD (Transparent Reporting of a multivariable prediction model for Individual Prognosis Or Diagnosis) Statement includes a 22-item checklist, which aims to improve the reporting of studies developing, validating, or updating a prediction model, whether for diagnostic or prognostic purposes. T

  19. Effects of Individual and Group Contingency Interventions on Attendance in Adolescent Part-Time Employees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berkovits, Shira Melody; Sturmey, Peter; Alvero, Alicia M.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of individual and group monetary contingencies on the attendance of adolescent part-time employees. Attendance increased in both individual and group contingency phases; however staff questionnaire responses indicated a preference for the individual contingencies. Future research should consider staff acceptability…

  20. Modelling individual routines and spatio-temporal trajectories in human mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Pappalardo, Luca

    2016-01-01

    Human mobility modelling is of fundamental importance in a wide range of applications, such as the developing of protocols for mobile ad hoc networks or for what-if analysis and simulation in urban ecosystems. Current generative models generally fail in accurately reproducing the individuals' recurrent daily schedules and at the same time in accounting for the possibility that individuals may break the routine and modify their habits during periods of unpredictability of variable duration. In this article we present DITRAS (DIary-based TRAjectory Simulator), a framework to simulate the spatio-temporal patterns of human mobility in a realistic way. DITRAS operates in two steps: the generation of a mobility diary and the translation of the mobility diary into a mobility trajectory. The mobility diary is constructed by a Markov model which captures the tendency of individuals to follow or break their routine. The mobility trajectory is produced by a model based on the concept of preferential exploration and pref...

  1. Effects of Individualized Word Retrieval in Kindergarten Vocabulary Intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damhuis, Carmen M. P.; Segers, Eliane; Scheltinga, Femke; Verhoeven, Ludo

    2016-01-01

    We examined the effects of adaptive word retrieval intervention on a classroom vocabulary program on children's vocabulary acquisition in kindergarten. In the experimental condition, word retrieval was provided in a classroom vocabulary program, combining implicit and explicit vocabulary instructions. Children performed extra word retrieval…

  2. Assessment of Individual Direct Radiative Effects of Major Aerosol Species in East Asia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HAN Xiao; ZHANG Mei-Gen

    2012-01-01

    To assess individual direct radiative effects of diverse aerosol species on a regional scale, the air quality modeling system RAMS-CMAQ (Regional Atmospheric Modeling System and Community Multiscale Air Quality) coupled with an aerosol optical properties/radiative transfer module was used to simulate the temporal and spatial distributions of their optical and radiative properties over East Asia throughout 2005. Annual and seasonal averaged aerosol direct radiative forcing (ADRF) of all important aerosols and individual components, such as sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, black carbon (BC), organic carbon (OC), and dust at top-of-atmosphere (TOA) in clear sky are analyzed. Analysis of the model results shows that the annual average ADRF of all important aerosols was in the range of 0 to -18 W m-z, with the maximum values mainly distributed over the Sichuan Basin. The direct radiative effects of sulfate, nitrate, and ammonium make up most of the total ADRF in East Asia, being concentrated mainly over North and Southeast China. The model domain is also divided into seven regions based on different administrative regions or countries to investigate detailed information about regional ADRF variations over East Asia. The model results show that the ADRFs of sulfate, ammonium, BC, and OC were stronger in summer and weaker in winter over most regions of East Asia, except over Southeast Asia. The seasonal variation in the ADRF of nitrate exhibited the opposite trend. A strong ADRF of dust mainly appeared in spring over Northwest China and Mongolia.

  3. The Effects of Individual Disengagement on Insurgency Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    of Leadership.” 120 Harold H. Kelley, Attribution in Social Interaction, New York: General Learning Press, 1971. 32 outcomes to those positions and...Carrier and Thomson, Viet Cong Motivation, 32–33. 162 Paul Berman , Revolutionary Organization: Institution-Building within the People’s Liberation... Berman , Revolutionary Organization. 165 Koch et al., Chieu Hoi Program, 38. 54 ranking insurgents, the GVN managed to effectively appeal to low

  4. Age Effects on Cortical Thickness in Cognitively Normal Elderly Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sona Hurtz

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Atrophy in both grey and white matter is found in normal aging. The prefrontal cortex and the frontal lobe white matter are thought to be the most affected regions. Our aim was to examine the effects of normal aging on cortical grey matter using a 3D quantitative cortical mapping method. Methods: We analyzed 1.5-tesla brain magnetic resonance imaging data from 44 cognitively normal elderly subjects using cortical pattern matching and cortical thickness analyses. Linear regression analysis was used to study the effect of age on cortical thickness. 3D map-wide correction for multiple comparisons was conducted with permutation analyses using a threshold of p Results: We found a significant negative association between age and cortical thickness in the right hemisphere (pcorrected = 0.009 and a trend level association in the left hemisphere (pcorrected = 0.081. Age-related changes were greatest in the sensorimotor, bilateral dorsal anterior cingulate and supplementary motor cortices, and the right posterior middle and inferior frontal gyri. Age effects greater in the medial than lateral visual association cortices were also seen bilaterally. Conclusion: Our novel method further validates that normal aging results in diffuse cortical thinning that is most pronounced in the frontal and visual association cortices.

  5. Probabilistic inference: Task dependency and individual differences of probability weighting revealed by hierarchical Bayesian modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz eBoos

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive determinants of probabilistic inference were examined using hierarchical Bayesian modelling techniques. A classic urn-ball paradigm served as experimental strategy, involving a factorial two (prior probabilities by two (likelihoods design. Five computational models of cognitive processes were compared with the observed behaviour. Parameter-free Bayesian posterior probabilities and parameter-free base rate neglect provided inadequate models of probabilistic inference. The introduction of distorted subjective probabilities yielded more robust and generalizable results. A general class of (inverted S-shaped probability weighting functions had been proposed; however, the possibility of large differences in probability distortions not only across experimental conditions, but also across individuals, seems critical for the model’s success. It also seems advantageous to consider individual differences in parameters of probability weighting as being sampled from weakly informative prior distributions of individual parameter values. Thus, the results from hierarchical Bayesian modelling converge with previous results in revealing that probability weighting parameters show considerable task dependency and individual differences. Methodologically, this work exemplifies the usefulness of hierarchical Bayesian modelling techniques for cognitive psychology. Theoretically, human probabilistic inference might be best described as the application of individualized strategic policies for Bayesian belief revision.

  6. Animal models of human psychopathology based on individual differences in novelty-seeking and anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Cornelius R; Ho, Ying-Jui; Schwarting, Rainer K W

    2008-10-01

    The role of individual factors in behavioural neuroscience is an important, but still neglected area of research. The present review aims to give, first, an outline of the most elaborated theory on animal behaviour, and second, an overview of systematic approaches of historic and present animal models of human psychopathology based on individual differences. This overview will be focused on animal models of unselected subjects (i.e. natural variance of a specific behaviour within a given population) and selected breeding for a specific behaviour. Accordingly, an outline of the personality model from Gray and McNaughton of individual behaviour in animals is given first. Then, a comprehensive overview of past and current animal models in novelty-seeking (i.e. psychomotor activation and exploration behaviour) based on systematic individual differences and its relationship to addiction is presented. Third, this will be followed by a comprehensive overview of individual differences in previous and present animal models for anxiety. Finally, critical aspects of such approaches in animal research are discussed, and suggestions are given where to go from here.

  7. Individualization of the parameters of the three-elements Windkessel model using carotid pulse signal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żyliński, Marek; Niewiadomski, Wiktor; Strasz, Anna; GÄ siorowska, Anna; Berka, Martin; Młyńczak, Marcel; Cybulski, Gerard

    2015-09-01

    The haemodynamics of the arterial system can be described by the three-elements Windkessel model. As it is a lumped model, it does not account for pulse wave propagation phenomena: pulse wave velocity, reflection, and pulse pressure profile changes during propagation. The Modelflowmethod uses this model to calculate stroke volume and total peripheral resistance (TPR) from pulse pressure obtained from finger; the reliability of this method is questioned. The model parameters are: aortic input impedance (Zo), TPR, and arterial compliance (Cw). They were obtained from studies of human aorta preparation. Individual adjustment is performed based on the subject's age and gender. As Cw is also affected by diseases, this may lead to inaccuracies. Moreover, the Modelflowmethod transforms the pulse pressure recording from the finger (Finapres©) into a remarkably different pulse pressure in the aorta using a predetermined transfer function — another source of error. In the present study, we indicate a way to include in the Windkessel model information obtained by adding carotid pulse recording to the finger pressure measurement. This information allows individualization of the values of Cw and Zo. It also seems reasonable to utilize carotid pulse, which better reflects aortic pressure, to individualize the transfer function. Despite its simplicity, the Windkessel model describes essential phenomena in the arterial system remarkably well; therefore, it seems worthwhile to check whether individualization of its parameters would increase the reliability of results obtained with this model.

  8. Modelling and modal properties of the railway vehicle bogie with two individual wheelset drives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeman V.

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with mathematical modelling of vibration and modal analysis of two-axled bogie of a railway vehicle. In comparison with recent publications introducing mathematical models of an individual wheelset drive, this paper is focused on modelling of complex bogie vibration. The bogie frame is linked by primary suspension to the two wheelset drives with hollow shafts and by secondary suspension to the car body. The method is based on the system decomposition into three subsystems – two individual wheelset drives including the mass of the rail and the bogie frame coupled with a half of the car body – and on modelling of couplings among subsystems. The eigenvalues of a linearized autonomous model and stability conditions are investigated in dependence on longitudinal creepage and forward velocity of the railway vehicle. The nonlinear model will be used for investigating the dynamic loading of bogie components caused by different types of excitation.

  9. THE DYNAMIC MODEL FOR CONTROL OF STUDENT’S LEARNING INDIVIDUAL TRAJECTORY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Mitsel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In connection with the transition of the educational system to a competence-oriented approach, the problem of learning outcomes assessment and creating an individual learning trajectory of a student has become relevant. Its solution requires the application of modern information technologies. The third generation of Federal state educational standards of higher professional education (FSES HPE defines the requirements for the results of Mastering the basic educational programs (BEP. According to FSES HPE up to 50% of subjects have a variable character, i.e. depend on the choice of a student. It significantly influences on the results of developing various competencies. The problem of forming student’s learning trajectory is analyzed in general and the choice of an individual direction was studied in details. Various methods, models and algorithms of the student’s individual learning trajectory formation were described. The analysis of the model of educational process organization in terms of individual approach makes it possible to develop a decision support system (DSS. DSS is a set of interrelated programs and data used for analysis of situation, development of alternative solutions and selection of the most acceptable alternative. DSSs are often used when building individual learning path, because this task can be considered as a discrete multi-criteria problem, creating a significant burden on the decision maker. A new method of controlling the learning trajectory has been developed. The article discusses problem statement and solution of determining student’s optimal individual educational trajectory as a dynamic model of learning trajectory control, which uses score assessment to construct a sequence of studied subjects. A new model of management learning trajectory is based on dynamic models for tracking the reference trajectory. The task can be converted to an equivalent model of linear programming, for which a reliable solution

  10. Pervasive and strong effects of plants on soil chemistry: a meta-analysis of individual plant ‘Zinke’ effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Bonnie G.; Álvarez-Cansino, Leonor; Barry, Kathryn E.; Becklund, Kristen K.; Dale, Sarah; Gei, Maria G.; Keller, Adrienne B.; Lopez, Omar R.; Markesteijn, Lars; Mangan, Scott; Riggs, Charlotte E.; Rodríguez-Ronderos, María Elizabeth; Segnitz, R. Max; Schnitzer, Stefan A.; Powers, Jennifer S.

    2015-01-01

    Plant species leave a chemical signature in the soils below them, generating fine-scale spatial variation that drives ecological processes. Since the publication of a seminal paper on plant-mediated soil heterogeneity by Paul Zinke in 1962, a robust literature has developed examining effects of individual plants on their local environments (individual plant effects). Here, we synthesize this work using meta-analysis to show that plant effects are strong and pervasive across ecosystems on six continents. Overall, soil properties beneath individual plants differ from those of neighbours by an average of 41%. Although the magnitudes of individual plant effects exhibit weak relationships with climate and latitude, they are significantly stronger in deserts and tundra than forests, and weaker in intensively managed ecosystems. The ubiquitous effects of plant individuals and species on local soil properties imply that individual plant effects have a role in plant–soil feedbacks, linking individual plants with biogeochemical processes at the ecosystem scale. PMID:26224711

  11. Modelling Holocene peatland dynamics with an individual-based dynamic vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Nitin; Miller, Paul A.; Smith, Benjamin

    2017-05-01

    Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are designed for the study of past, present and future vegetation patterns together with associated biogeochemical cycles and climate feedbacks. However, most DGVMs do not yet have detailed representations of permafrost and non-permafrost peatlands, which are an important store of carbon, particularly at high latitudes. We demonstrate a new implementation of peatland dynamics in a customized Arctic version of the LPJ-GUESS DGVM, simulating the long-term evolution of selected northern peatland ecosystems and assessing the effect of changing climate on peatland carbon balance. Our approach employs a dynamic multi-layer soil with representation of freeze-thaw processes and litter inputs from a dynamically varying mixture of the main peatland plant functional types: mosses, shrubs and graminoids. The model was calibrated and tested for a sub-Arctic mire in Stordalen, Sweden, and validated at a temperate bog site in Mer Bleue, Canada. A regional evaluation of simulated carbon fluxes, hydrology and vegetation dynamics encompassed additional locations spread across Scandinavia. Simulated peat accumulation was found to be generally consistent with published data and the model was able to capture reported long-term vegetation dynamics, water table position and carbon fluxes. A series of sensitivity experiments were carried out to investigate the vulnerability of high-latitude peatlands to climate change. We found that the Stordalen mire may be expected to sequester more carbon in the first half of the 21st century due to milder and wetter climate conditions, a longer growing season, and the CO2 fertilization effect, turning into a carbon source after mid-century because of higher decomposition rates in response to warming soils.

  12. Parental divorce: effects on individual behavior and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, J S; Friedman, H S; Schwartz, J E; Criqui, M H; Tomlinson-Keasey, C; Wingard, D L; Martin, L R

    1997-08-01

    Using an archival prospective design, the authors studied associations among parental divorce occurring during participants' childhood, adult psychosocial mediators, and mortality over the life span of a subgroup of participants (N = 1,261) in the Terman Life Cycle Study (1921-1991). Children from divorced families grew up to show a higher risk of premature mortality across the life span. The higher mortality risk for men was explained, in part, when 3 mediating factors were controlled: Men who had experienced parental divorce were more likely to have their own marriages end in divorce, obtained less education, and engaged in fewer service activities. Women who had experienced parental divorce smoked more and were more likely themselves to divorce, both of which predicted higher mortality risk. The findings extend previous work on the negative sequelae of parental divorce to long-term effects on personality and longevity.

  13. The construction of individual eye model based on eye's wavefront aberration measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhao-Qi; Guo, Huan-Qing

    2005-08-01

    Based on the widely used Gullstrand-Le Grand eye model, the individual human eye model has been established here, which has individual corneal data, anterior chamber depth and the eyeball depth. Furthermore the foremost thing is that the wavefront aberration calculated from the individual eye model is equal to the eye's wavefront aberration measured with the Hartmann-shack wavefront sensor. There were four main steps to build the model. Firstly, the corneal topography instrument was used to measure the corneal surfaces and depth. And in order to input cornea into the optical model, high order aspheric surface-Zernike Fringe Sag surface was chosen to fit the corneal surfaces. Secondly, the Hartmann-shack wavefront sensor, which can offer the Zernike polynomials to describe the wavefront aberration, was built to measure the wavefront aberration of the eye. Thirdly, the eye's axial lengths among every part were measured with A-ultrasonic technology. Then the data were input into the optical design software -ZEMAX and the crystalline lens's shapes were optimized with the aberration as the merit function. The individual eye model, which has the same wavefront aberrations with the real eye, is established.

  14. Effects of resistance exercise on cardiopulmonary factors in sedentary individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janyacharoen, Taweesak; Thayon, Methiya; Bushong, Wanwisa; Jaikla, Nussamol; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of resistance exercise on cardiopulmonary functions in young sedentary subjects. [Subjects] Forty-two young and healthy subjects with a sedentary lifestyle were included in this study. [Methods] The subjects were randomly divided into 2 groups: control and experimental. The control group (n=21) received health education and continued with normal activities of daily living. The experimental group (n=21) underwent resistance training, health education, and continued with normal activities of daily living. The resistance exercise program consisted of 3 postural exercises: chest press, dumbbell pullover, and flat-bench dumbbell fly. The subjects received this intervention 3 times/week for 8 weeks. [Results] The baseline characteristics were comparable between the 2 groups. The 6-minute-walk test score, peak expiratory flow, forced vital capacity, forced expiratory volume in 1 second, maximal voluntary ventilation, and chest expansions were significantly improved post-intervention in the experimental group and between the 2 groups. [Conclusion] Cardiopulmonary functions in young sedentary subjects were significantly improved with the 8-week resistance exercise program.

  15. Ecotoxicological effects extrapolation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suter, G.W. II

    1996-09-01

    One of the central problems of ecological risk assessment is modeling the relationship between test endpoints (numerical summaries of the results of toxicity tests) and assessment endpoints (formal expressions of the properties of the environment that are to be protected). For example, one may wish to estimate the reduction in species richness of fishes in a stream reach exposed to an effluent and have only a fathead minnow 96 hr LC50 as an effects metric. The problem is to extrapolate from what is known (the fathead minnow LC50) to what matters to the decision maker, the loss of fish species. Models used for this purpose may be termed Effects Extrapolation Models (EEMs) or Activity-Activity Relationships (AARs), by analogy to Structure-Activity Relationships (SARs). These models have been previously reviewed in Ch. 7 and 9 of and by an OECD workshop. This paper updates those reviews and attempts to further clarify the issues involved in the development and use of EEMs. Although there is some overlap, this paper does not repeat those reviews and the reader is referred to the previous reviews for a more complete historical perspective, and for treatment of additional extrapolation issues.

  16. Effectiveness of individual and group interventions for people with type 2 diabetes1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazu, Maria Fernanda Manoel; Faria, Barbara Nascimento; de Arruda, Guilherme Oliveira; Sales, Catarina Aparecida; Marcon, Sonia Silva

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to compare the effectiveness of two educational interventions used by a healthcare provider in the monitoring of individuals with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), regarding knowledge of the disease, impact on quality of life and adoption of self-care actions. METHODS: comparative, longitudinal, prospective study performed with 150 subjects with type 2 diabetes, analyzed according to the type of participation in the program (individual and/or group). Participants of the individual intervention (II) received nursing consultations every six months and those of the group intervention (GI) took part in weekly meetings for three months. Data were collected through four questionnaires: Identification questionnaire, Problem Areas in Diabetes Questionnaire (PAID), Summary of Diabetes Self-Care Activities Questionnaire (SDSCA) and the Diabetes Knowledge Scale (DKN-A). Data were analyzed using the Friedman and Mann Whitney tests, considering a statistical significance of p ≤ 0.05. RESULTS: there was an increase in knowledge about the disease in the II (p<0.003) and GI (p<0.007), with reduction of the impact on the quality of life in the II (p<0.007) and improvement in self-care actions in the GI (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: in both intervention models improvements were observed in the indicators, over the six month monitoring period. PMID:26039289

  17. Incidence of kala-azar in Nepal: estimating the effects of individual and household characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adhikari, Shiva Raj; Supakankunti, Siripen; Khan, M Mahmud

    2010-11-01

    Kala-azar (KA) remains a major public health problem in Nepal. The disease is preventable, but various environmental, socioeconomic, health care and health behaviour related variables affect its transmission. Household or individual related factors determine the magnitude and direction of impacts of these factors. Data were collected from clinically diagnosed KA patients and non-KA patients from hospitals in Nepal. The hospitals are located in the highest KA incidence rate districts. Logistic regressions are used to identify individual and household characteristics affecting the probability of having KA by estimating models with and without the introduction of interaction terms. Poverty incidence, being a member of disadvantaged population group, size of family and literacy are important in explaining the likelihood of having KA. Poverty directly influences the likelihood of KA and modifies the magnitude and direction of the effects of other variables. The traditional approach of controlling KA at the community level should be complemented by poverty alleviation and other developmental activities to ensure rapid decline and eradication of KA. Poverty and illiteracy magnifies the problem of KA at the community level and simultaneous implementation of KA control interventions with effective poverty alleviation strategies is likely to be much more effective than the traditional disease control program alone. Copyright © 2010 Royal Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of chronic low level lead exposure on the physiology of individually identifiable neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Audesirk, G; Audesirk, T

    1983-01-01

    Although chronic exposure to lead has been correlated with a variety of behavioral and neurochemical deficits in humans and other mammals, little is known of the mechanisms of action of chronic lead at the level of the individual nerve cell. We have used the individually identifiable neurons of the freshwater pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis as a model system to investigate the effects of chronic low level (5 microM) lead exposure on neuronal physiology. Thirteen neuronal parameters were measured with intracellular microelectrode recording in each of six different identifiable neurons or homogeneous neuron clusters. Results were analyzed by a multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA). MANOVA analysis indicates that there is a significant overall effect of lead exposure (p = 0.0001) and a significant interaction between lead and neuron type (p = 0.01). In most neuron types, chronic lead causes an increase in the resting potential, a slowing of recovery of the membrane potential after the undershoot of a spike, a decrease in spontaneous spiking activity, and a decrease in the input resistance. Lead also has differential effects on identifiable neurons, depressing excitability in some neuron types while not altering excitability in others.

  19. The Effect of Literature on Personality Development of Individuals Using Some Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatlilioglu, Kasim

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this work is to investigate whether literature has effect on the personality development of individuals or not. This works aims to provide answers to the following research questions: "Does literature have effect on individuals' general harmony level, their social cohesion levels, personal harmony level, self-actualization level,…

  20. Effects of Vibroacoustic Music on Challenging Behaviors in Individuals with Autism and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov; Andersson, Gunilla; Viding, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Vibroacoustic music has been proposed to be an effective treatment for individuals with developmental disorders and challenging behaviors. The present study experimentally tested the effects of vibroacoustic music on self-injurious, stereotypical, and aggressive destructive behaviors in 20 individuals with autism spectrum disorders and…

  1. The Effect of Using Cooperative and Individual Weblog to Enhance Writing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsak, H. Gulhan Orhan; Fer, Seval; Orhan, Feza

    2014-01-01

    Academic writing, whether individual or cooperative, is an essential skill for today's graduates. However, motivating and helping students to learn to write effectively, either in cooperative or individual scenarios, poses many challenges, many of which can be overcome by technical means. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of using…

  2. Effectiveness of Individually Delivered Indicated School-Based Interventions on Externalizing Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoltz, Sabine; van Londen, Monique; Dekovic, Maja; de Castro, Bram Orobio; Prinzie, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In the present study the results of two meta-analyses on the effectiveness of "individually" delivered indicated school-based interventions for externalizing behavior problems at elementary schools are presented. A distinction was made between studies that evaluated effects of interventions with only an individual component (k = 11 studies, n =…

  3. Effects of Vibroacoustic Music on Challenging Behaviors in Individuals with Autism and Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundqvist, Lars-Olov; Andersson, Gunilla; Viding, Jane

    2009-01-01

    Vibroacoustic music has been proposed to be an effective treatment for individuals with developmental disorders and challenging behaviors. The present study experimentally tested the effects of vibroacoustic music on self-injurious, stereotypical, and aggressive destructive behaviors in 20 individuals with autism spectrum disorders and…

  4. The Effect of Using Cooperative and Individual Weblog to Enhance Writing Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karsak, H. Gulhan Orhan; Fer, Seval; Orhan, Feza

    2014-01-01

    Academic writing, whether individual or cooperative, is an essential skill for today's graduates. However, motivating and helping students to learn to write effectively, either in cooperative or individual scenarios, poses many challenges, many of which can be overcome by technical means. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of…

  5. Systems approach to studying animal sociality: individual position versus group organization in dynamic social network models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karlo Hock

    Full Text Available Social networks can be used to represent group structure as a network of interacting components, and also to quantify both the position of each individual and the global properties of a group. In a series of simulation experiments based on dynamic social networks, we test the prediction that social behaviors that help individuals reach prominence within their social group may conflict with their potential to benefit from their social environment. In addition to cases where individuals were able to benefit from improving both their personal relative importance and group organization, using only simple rules of social affiliation we were able to obtain results in which individuals would face a trade-off between these factors. While selection would favor (or work against social behaviors that concordantly increase (or decrease, respectively fitness at both individual and group level, when these factors conflict with each other the eventual selective pressure would depend on the relative returns individuals get from their social environment and their position within it. The presented results highlight the importance of a systems approach to studying animal sociality, in which the effects of social behaviors should be viewed not only through the benefits that those provide to individuals, but also in terms of how they affect broader social environment and how in turn this is reflected back on an individual's fitness.

  6. Systems approach to studying animal sociality: individual position versus group organization in dynamic social network models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Karlo; Ng, Kah Loon; Fefferman, Nina H

    2010-12-23

    Social networks can be used to represent group structure as a network of interacting components, and also to quantify both the position of each individual and the global properties of a group. In a series of simulation experiments based on dynamic social networks, we test the prediction that social behaviors that help individuals reach prominence within their social group may conflict with their potential to benefit from their social environment. In addition to cases where individuals were able to benefit from improving both their personal relative importance and group organization, using only simple rules of social affiliation we were able to obtain results in which individuals would face a trade-off between these factors. While selection would favor (or work against) social behaviors that concordantly increase (or decrease, respectively) fitness at both individual and group level, when these factors conflict with each other the eventual selective pressure would depend on the relative returns individuals get from their social environment and their position within it. The presented results highlight the importance of a systems approach to studying animal sociality, in which the effects of social behaviors should be viewed not only through the benefits that those provide to individuals, but also in terms of how they affect broader social environment and how in turn this is reflected back on an individual's fitness.

  7. Systems Approach to Studying Animal Sociality: Individual Position versus Group Organization in Dynamic Social Network Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hock, Karlo; Ng, Kah Loon; Fefferman, Nina H.

    2010-01-01

    Social networks can be used to represent group structure as a network of interacting components, and also to quantify both the position of each individual and the global properties of a group. In a series of simulation experiments based on dynamic social networks, we test the prediction that social behaviors that help individuals reach prominence within their social group may conflict with their potential to benefit from their social environment. In addition to cases where individuals were able to benefit from improving both their personal relative importance and group organization, using only simple rules of social affiliation we were able to obtain results in which individuals would face a trade-off between these factors. While selection would favor (or work against) social behaviors that concordantly increase (or decrease, respectively) fitness at both individual and group level, when these factors conflict with each other the eventual selective pressure would depend on the relative returns individuals get from their social environment and their position within it. The presented results highlight the importance of a systems approach to studying animal sociality, in which the effects of social behaviors should be viewed not only through the benefits that those provide to individuals, but also in terms of how they affect broader social environment and how in turn this is reflected back on an individual's fitness. PMID:21203425

  8. Understanding individual resilience in the workplace: the international collaboration of workforce resilience model

    OpenAIRE

    Rees, Clare S.; Breen, Lauren J; Cusack, Lynette; Hegney, Desley

    2015-01-01

    When not managed effectively, high levels of workplace stress can lead to several negative personal and performance outcomes. Some professional groups work in highly stressful settings and are therefore particularly at risk of conditions such as anxiety, depression, secondary traumatic stress, and burnout. However, some individuals are less affected by workplace stress and the associated negative outcomes. Such individuals have been described as “resilient.” A number of studies have found rel...

  9. Understanding Individual Resilience in the Workplace: The International Collaboration of Workforce Resilience (ICWR) Model

    OpenAIRE

    Clare Samantha Rees; Breen, Lauren J; Lynette eCusack; Desley eHegney

    2015-01-01

    When not managed effectively, high levels of workplace stress can lead to several negative personal and performance outcomes. Some professional groups work in highly stressful settings and are therefore particularly at risk of conditions such as anxiety, depression, secondary traumatic stress and burnout. However, some individuals are less affected by workplace stress and the associated negative outcomes. Such individuals have been described as ‘resilient’. A number of studies have found rela...

  10. Use of pharmacokinetic modelling to individualize FFP dosing in factor V deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhnovich, V; Daniel, J; Wicklund, B; Kearns, G; Neville, K

    2013-03-01

    Therapy with fresh frozen plasma (FFP) confers serious risks, such as contraction of blood-borne viruses, allergic reaction, volume overload and development of alloantibodies. The aim of this study was to apply principles of pharmacokinetic (PK) modelling to individual factor content of FFP to optimize individualized dosing, while minimizing potential risks of therapy. We used PK modelling to successfully target individual factor replacement in an 8-month-old patient receiving FFP for treatment of a severe congenital factor V (FV) deficiency. The model fit for the FV activity vs. time data was excellent (r = 0.98) and the model accurately predicted FV activity during the intraoperative and postoperative period. Accurate PK modelling of individual factor activity in FFP has the potential to provide better targeted therapy, enabling clinicians to more precisely dose patients requiring coagulation products, while avoiding wasteful and expensive product overtreatment, minimizing potentially life-threatening complications due to undertreatment and limiting harmful product-associated risks.

  11. The relationship between relational models and individualism and collectivism: evidence from culturally diverse work groups.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodosek, Markus

    2009-04-01

    Relational models theory (Fiske, 1991 ) proposes that all thinking about social relationships is based on four elementary mental models: communal sharing, authority ranking, equality matching, and market pricing. Triandis and his colleagues (e.g., Triandis, Kurowski, & Gelfand, 1994 ) have suggested a relationship between the constructs of horizontal and vertical individualism and collectivism and Fiske's relational models. However, no previous research has examined this proposed relationship empirically. The objective of the current study was to test the association between the two frameworks in order to further our understanding of why members of culturally diverse groups may prefer different relational models in interactions with other group members. Findings from this study support a relationship between Triandis' constructs and Fiske's four relational models and uphold Fiske's ( 1991 ) claim that the use of the relational models is culturally dependent. As hypothesized, horizontal collectivism was associated with a preference for equality matching and communal sharing, vertical individualism was related to a preference for authority ranking, and vertical collectivism was related to a preference for authority ranking and communal sharing. However, contrary to expectations, horizontal individualism was not related to a preference for equality matching and market pricing, and vertical individualism was not associated with market pricing. By showing that there is a relationship between Triandis' and Fiske's frameworks, this study closes a gap in relational models theory, namely how culture relates to people's preferences for relational models. Thus, the findings from this study will enable future researchers to explain and predict what relational models are likely to be used in a certain cultural context.

  12. Perceived Risk of Burglary and Fear of Crime: Individual- and Country-Level Mixed Modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chon, Don Soo; Wilson, Mary

    2016-02-01

    Given the scarcity of prior studies, the current research introduced country-level variables, along with individual-level ones, to test how they are related to an individual's perceived risk of burglary (PRB) and fear of crime (FC), separately, by using mixed-level logistic regression analyses. The analyses of 104,218 individuals, residing in 50 countries, showed that country-level poverty was positively associated with FC only. However, individual-level variables, such as prior property crime victimization and female gender, had consistently positive relationships with both PRB and FC. However, age group and socioeconomic status were inconsistent between those two models, suggesting that PRB and FC are two different concepts. Finally, no significant difference in the pattern of PRB and FC was found between a highly developed group of countries and a less developed one.

  13. Optimization of Actuarial Model for Individual Account of Rural Social Pension Insurance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenxian; CAO

    2013-01-01

    This paper firstly analyzes different payment methods of individual account and the pension replacement rate under the pension payment method.Results show that it will be more scientific and reasonable for the individual account of new rural social pension insurance to adopt the actuarial model of payment according to proportion of income and periodic prestation at variable amount.The Guiding Opinions on New Rural Social Pension Insurance sets forth individual account should be paid at fixed amount,and the insured voluntarily selects payment level as per criteria set by the State.The monthly calculation and distribution amount of pension is the total amount of individual account divided by139.Therefore,it should start from continuation of policies and make adjustment of payment level in accordance with growth of per capita net income of rural residents.When condition permits,it is expected to realize transition to payment as per income proportion and periodic prestation at variable amount.

  14. An approach to incorporate individual personality in modeling fish dispersal across in-stream barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, Philipp Emanuel; Thorlacius, Magnus; Brodin, Tomas; Burkhardt-Holm, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Animal personalities are an important factor that affects the dispersal of animals. In the context of aquatic species, dispersal modeling needs to consider that most freshwater ecosystems are highly fragmented by barriers reducing longitudinal connectivity. Previous research has incorporated such barriers into dispersal models under the neutral assumption that all migrating animals attempt to ascend at all times. Modeling dispersal of animals that do not perform trophic or reproductive migrations will be more realistic if it includes assumptions of which individuals attempt to overcome a barrier. We aimed to introduce personality into predictive modeling of whether a nonmigratory invasive freshwater fish (the round goby, Neogobius melanostomus) will disperse across an in-stream barrier. To that end, we experimentally assayed the personalities of 259 individuals from invasion fronts and established round goby populations. Based on the population differences in boldness, asociability, and activity, we defined a priori thresholds with bolder, more asocial, and more active individuals having a higher likelihood of ascent. We then combined the personality thresholds with swimming speed data from the literature and in situ measurements of flow velocities in the barrier. The resulting binary logistic regression model revealed probabilities of crossing a barrier which depended not only on water flow and fish swimming speed but also on animal personalities. We conclude that risk assessment through predictive dispersal modeling across fragmented landscapes can be advanced by including personality traits as parameters. The inclusion of behavior into modeling the spread of invasive species can help to improve the accuracy of risk assessments.

  15. Sequential Learning Models for the Wisconsin Card Sort Task: Assessing Processes in Substance Dependent Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Anthony J.; Kruschke, John K.; Stout, Julie C.; Bechara, Antoine; McCabe, David P.; Busemeyer, Jerome R.

    2010-01-01

    The Wisconsin Card Sort Task (WCST) is a commonly used neuropsychological test of executive or frontal lobe functioning. Traditional behavioral measures from the task (e.g., perseverative errors) distinguish healthy controls from clinical populations, but such measures can be difficult to interpret. In an attempt to supplement traditional measures, we developed and tested a family of sequential learning models that allowed for estimation of processes at the individual subject level in the WCST. Testing the model with substance dependent individuals and healthy controls, the model parameters significantly predicted group membership even when controlling for traditional behavioral measures from the task. Substance dependence was associated with a) slower attention shifting following punished trials and b) reduced decision consistency. Results suggest that model parameters may offer both incremental content validity and incremental predictive validity. PMID:20495607

  16. Statistical Models for Solar Flare Interval Distribution in Individual Active Regions

    CERN Document Server

    Kubo, Yuki

    2008-01-01

    This article discusses statistical models for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. We analyzed solar flare data in 55 active regions that are listed in the GOES soft X-ray flare catalog. We discuss some problems with a conventional procedure to derive probability density functions from any data set and propose a new procedure, which uses the maximum likelihood method and Akaike Information Criterion (AIC) to objectively compare some competing probability density functions. We found that lognormal and inverse Gaussian models are more likely models than the exponential model for solar flare interval distribution in individual active regions. The results suggest that solar flares do not occur randomly in time; rather, solar flare intervals appear to be regulated by solar flare mechanisms. We briefly mention a probabilistic solar flare forecasting method as an application of a solar flare interval distribution analysis.

  17. Individual and culture-level components of survey response styles: A multi-level analysis using cultural models of selfhood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Peter B; Vignoles, Vivian L; Becker, Maja; Owe, Ellinor; Easterbrook, Matthew J; Brown, Rupert; Bourguignon, David; Garðarsdóttir, Ragna B; Kreuzbauer, Robert; Cendales Ayala, Boris; Yuki, Masaki; Zhang, Jianxin; Lv, Shaobo; Chobthamkit, Phatthanakit; Jaafar, Jas Laile; Fischer, Ronald; Milfont, Taciano L; Gavreliuc, Alin; Baguma, Peter; Bond, Michael Harris; Martin, Mariana; Gausel, Nicolay; Schwartz, Seth J; Des Rosiers, Sabrina E; Tatarko, Alexander; González, Roberto; Didier, Nicolas; Carrasco, Diego; Lay, Siugmin; Nizharadze, George; Torres, Ana; Camino, Leoncio; Abuhamdeh, Sami; Macapagal, Ma Elizabeth J; Koller, Silvia H; Herman, Ginette; Courtois, Marie; Fritsche, Immo; Espinosa, Agustín; Villamar, Juan A; Regalia, Camillo; Manzi, Claudia; Brambilla, Maria; Zinkeng, Martina; Jalal, Baland; Kusdil, Ersin; Amponsah, Benjamin; Çağlar, Selinay; Mekonnen, Kassahun Habtamu; Möller, Bettina; Zhang, Xiao; Schweiger Gallo, Inge; Prieto Gil, Paula; Lorente Clemares, Raquel; Campara, Gabriella; Aldhafri, Said; Fülöp, Márta; Pyszczynski, Tom; Kesebir, Pelin; Harb, Charles

    2016-12-01

    Variations in acquiescence and extremity pose substantial threats to the validity of cross-cultural research that relies on survey methods. Individual and cultural correlates of response styles when using 2 contrasting types of response mode were investigated, drawing on data from 55 cultural groups across 33 nations. Using 7 dimensions of self-other relatedness that have often been confounded within the broader distinction between independence and interdependence, our analysis yields more specific understandings of both individual- and culture-level variations in response style. When using a Likert-scale response format, acquiescence is strongest among individuals seeing themselves as similar to others, and where cultural models of selfhood favour harmony, similarity with others and receptiveness to influence. However, when using Schwartz's (2007) portrait-comparison response procedure, acquiescence is strongest among individuals seeing themselves as self-reliant but also connected to others, and where cultural models of selfhood favour self-reliance and self-consistency. Extreme responding varies less between the two types of response modes, and is most prevalent among individuals seeing themselves as self-reliant, and in cultures favouring self-reliance. As both types of response mode elicit distinctive styles of response, it remains important to estimate and control for style effects to ensure valid comparisons. © 2016 International Union of Psychological Science.

  18. Successful Succession in Family Businesses : Individual Level Factors and Succession Planning Models.

    OpenAIRE

    Aleem, Majid; Islam, Md. Shariful

    2009-01-01

    Individual level factors related to the successor have a central role to play in the succession process of the business. When these factors are viewed in relation to succession planning models, these factors have a direct relation to the succession models in terms of success or failure of the succession process. The major contributing factor to the success or failure of the succession process is that of the leadership provided to the organization by the predecessor. These leadership qualities...

  19. Individual-based models of collective dynamics in socio-economic systems

    OpenAIRE

    Carro Patiño, Adrián

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of this thesis is to contribute to the understanding of how complex collective behaviors emerge in social and economic systems. To this end, we use a combination of mathematical analysis and computational simulations along the lines of the agent- or individual-based modeling paradigm. In particular, we focus on three main topics: opinion dynamics, herding behavior in financial markets, and language competition. Opinion dynamics models focus on the processes of opinion for...

  20. Modeling Individual Subtests of the WAIS IV with Multiple Latent Factors

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Performance on a cognitive test can be viewed either as measuring a unitary function or as reflecting the operation of multiple factors. Individual subtests in batteries designed to measure human abilities are commonly modeled as a single latent factor. Several latent factors are then used to model groups of subtests. However these latent factors are not independent as they are related through hierarchical or oblique structures. As a result, the simple structure of subtest performance results...

  1. AccesSports: A Model for Adapting Mainstream Sports Activities for Individuals with Visual Impairments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponchilla, Paul E.

    1995-01-01

    The AccesSports Model allows professionals with basic knowledge of visual impairments and mainstream sports to analyze any sports activity and design adaptations needed for targets or goals, boundaries, and rules to enable individuals with visual impairments to participate. Suggestions for modifying baseball, table tennis, swim racing, wrestling,…

  2. Predictive Models of Alcohol Use Based on Attitudes and Individual Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo Rodríguez, José A. García; López-Sánchez, Carmen; Soler, M. Carmen Quiles; Del Castillo-López, Álvaro García; Pertusa, Mónica Gázquez; Campos, Juan Carlos Marzo; Inglés, Cándido J.

    2013-01-01

    Two predictive models are developed in this article: the first is designed to predict people' attitudes to alcoholic drinks, while the second sets out to predict the use of alcohol in relation to selected individual values. University students (N = 1,500) were recruited through stratified sampling based on sex and academic discipline. The…

  3. Selection of thrombolytic therapy for individual patients: development of a clinical model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.M. Califf (Robert); L.H. Woodlief (Lynn); F.E. Harrell (Frank); K.L. Lee (Kerry); H.D. White (Harvey); A.D. Guerci (Alan); G.I. Barbash; R.J. Simes (John); W.D. Weaver; M.L. Simoons (Maarten); E.J. Topol (Eric)

    1997-01-01

    textabstractWe developed a logistic regression model with data from the GUSTO-I trial to predict mortality rate differences in individual patients who received accelerated tissue plasminogen activator (TPA) versus streptokinase treatment for acute myocardial infarction. A nomogram was developed from

  4. Modelling collective foraging by means of individual behaviour rules in honey-bees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Vries, H; Biesmeijer, JC

    1998-01-01

    An individual-oriented model is constructed which simulates the collective foraging behaviour of a colony of honey-bees, Apis mellifera. Each bee follows the same set of behavioural rules. Each rule consists of a set of conditions followed by the behavioural act to be performed if the conditions are

  5. Using ROC curves to compare neural networks and logistic regression for modeling individual noncatastrophic tree mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan L. King

    2003-01-01

    The performance of two classifiers, logistic regression and neural networks, are compared for modeling noncatastrophic individual tree mortality for 21 species of trees in West Virginia. The output of the classifier is usually a continuous number between 0 and 1. A threshold is selected between 0 and 1 and all of the trees below the threshold are classified as...

  6. Assessing risk prediction models using individual participant data from multiple studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bladbjerg, Else-Marie; Jespersen, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    -reactive protein and conventional risk factors for coronary heart disease in the Emerging Risk Factors Collaboration, a collation of individual data from multiple prospective studies with an average follow-up duration of 9.8 years (dates varied). We derive risk prediction models using Cox proportional hazards...

  7. Personality Predicts Individual Variation in Fear Learning : A Multilevel Growth Modeling Approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, Femke J.; Kamphuis, Jan H.; Eigenhuis, Annemarie; Huizenga, Hilde M H; Soeter, Marieke; Bos, Marieke G N; Sevenster, Dieuwke|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/375491104; Kindt, Merel

    2015-01-01

    Although fear-learning research has tended to focus on typical responses, there is substantial individual variation in response to threat. Here, we investigated how personality is related to variability in associative fear learning. We used multilevel growth curve modeling to examine the unique and

  8. Personality predicts individual variation in fear learning: a multilevel growth modeling approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gazendam, F.J.; Kamphuis, J.H.; Eigenhuis, A.; Huizenga, H.M.; Soeter, M.; Bos, M.G.N.; Sevenster, D.; Kindt, M.

    2015-01-01

    Although fear-learning research has tended to focus on typical responses, there is substantial individual variation in response to threat. Here, we investigated how personality is related to variability in associative fear learning. We used multilevel growth curve modeling to examine the unique and

  9. Predictive Models of Alcohol Use Based on Attitudes and Individual Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Castillo Rodríguez, José A. García; López-Sánchez, Carmen; Soler, M. Carmen Quiles; Del Castillo-López, Álvaro García; Pertusa, Mónica Gázquez; Campos, Juan Carlos Marzo; Inglés, Cándido J.

    2013-01-01

    Two predictive models are developed in this article: the first is designed to predict people' attitudes to alcoholic drinks, while the second sets out to predict the use of alcohol in relation to selected individual values. University students (N = 1,500) were recruited through stratified sampling based on sex and academic discipline. The…

  10. Crowd of individuals walking in opposite directions. A toy model to study the segregation of the group into lanes of individuals moving in the same direction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldsztein, Guillermo H.

    2017-08-01

    Consider a corridor, street or bridge crowded with pedestrians walking in both directions. The individuals do not walk in a completely straight line. They adjust their path to avoid colliding with incoming pedestrians. As a result of these adjustments, the whole group sometimes end up split into lanes of individuals moving in the same direction. While this formation of lanes facilitates the flow and benefits the whole group, it is believed that results from the actions of the individuals acting only on their behalf, without considering others. This phenomenon is an example of self-organization. We analyze a simple model. We assume that individuals move around a two-lane circular track. All of them at the same speed. Half of them in one direction and the rest in the opposite direction. Each time two individuals collide, one of them moves to the other lane. The individual changing lanes is selected randomly. The system self-organizes. Eventually each lane is occupied with individuals moving in only one direction. We show that the time required for the system to self-organize is bounded by a linear function on the number of individuals. This toy model provides an example where global self-organization occurs even though each member of the group acts without considering the rest.

  11. Navigating the flow: individual and continuum models for homing in flowing environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, Kevin J; Hillen, Thomas

    2015-11-06

    Navigation for aquatic and airborne species often takes place in the face of complicated flows, from persistent currents to highly unpredictable storms. Hydrodynamic models are capable of simulating flow dynamics and provide the impetus for much individual-based modelling, in which particle-sized individuals are immersed into a flowing medium. These models yield insights on the impact of currents on population distributions from fish eggs to large organisms, yet their computational demands and intractability reduce their capacity to generate the broader, less parameter-specific, insights allowed by traditional continuous approaches. In this paper, we formulate an individual-based model for navigation within a flowing field and apply scaling to derive its corresponding macroscopic and continuous model. We apply it to various movement classes, from drifters that simply go with the flow to navigators that respond to environmental orienteering cues. The utility of the model is demonstrated via its application to 'homing' problems and, in particular, the navigation of the marine green turtle Chelonia mydas to Ascension Island.

  12. Adjudicating between face-coding models with individual-face fMRI responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan D Carlin

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The perceptual representation of individual faces is often explained with reference to a norm-based face space. In such spaces, individuals are encoded as vectors where identity is primarily conveyed by direction and distinctiveness by eccentricity. Here we measured human fMRI responses and psychophysical similarity judgments of individual face exemplars, which were generated as realistic 3D animations using a computer-graphics model. We developed and evaluated multiple neurobiologically plausible computational models, each of which predicts a representational distance matrix and a regional-mean activation profile for 24 face stimuli. In the fusiform face area, a face-space coding model with sigmoidal ramp tuning provided a better account of the data than one based on exemplar tuning. However, an image-processing model with weighted banks of Gabor filters performed similarly. Accounting for the data required the inclusion of a measurement-level population averaging mechanism that approximates how fMRI voxels locally average distinct neuronal tunings. Our study demonstrates the importance of comparing multiple models and of modeling the measurement process in computational neuroimaging.

  13. Random effect selection in generalised linear models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denwood, Matt; Houe, Hans; Forkman, Björn;

    We analysed abattoir recordings of meat inspection codes with possible relevance to onfarm animal welfare in cattle. Random effects logistic regression models were used to describe individual-level data obtained from 461,406 cattle slaughtered in Denmark. Our results demonstrate that the largest...

  14. Modeling individual subtests of the WAIS IV with multiple latent factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dennis J McFarland

    Full Text Available Performance on a cognitive test can be viewed either as measuring a unitary function or as reflecting the operation of multiple factors. Individual subtests in batteries designed to measure human abilities are commonly modeled as a single latent factor. Several latent factors are then used to model groups of subtests. However these latent factors are not independent as they are related through hierarchical or oblique structures. As a result, the simple structure of subtest performance results in complex latent factors. The present study used structural equation modeling to evaluate several multidimensional models of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales-fourth edition (WAIS-IV subtests. Multidimensional models of subtest performance provided better model fit as compared to several previously proposed one dimensional models. These multidimensional models also generalized well to new samples of populations differing in age from that used to estimate the model parameters. Overall these results show that models that describe subtests as multidimensional functions of uncorrelated factors provided a better fit to the WAIS-IV correlations than models that describe subtests as one dimensional functions of correlated factors. There appears to be a trade-off in modeling subtests as one dimensional and modeling with homogeneous latent traits. More consideration should be given to models that include multiple uncorrelated latent factors as determinants of the performance on a given subtest. These results support the view that performance on any given cognitive test is potentially the result of multiple factors. Simple structure may be too simple.

  15. Modeling individual subtests of the WAIS IV with multiple latent factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Dennis J

    2013-01-01

    Performance on a cognitive test can be viewed either as measuring a unitary function or as reflecting the operation of multiple factors. Individual subtests in batteries designed to measure human abilities are commonly modeled as a single latent factor. Several latent factors are then used to model groups of subtests. However these latent factors are not independent as they are related through hierarchical or oblique structures. As a result, the simple structure of subtest performance results in complex latent factors. The present study used structural equation modeling to evaluate several multidimensional models of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scales-fourth edition (WAIS-IV) subtests. Multidimensional models of subtest performance provided better model fit as compared to several previously proposed one dimensional models. These multidimensional models also generalized well to new samples of populations differing in age from that used to estimate the model parameters. Overall these results show that models that describe subtests as multidimensional functions of uncorrelated factors provided a better fit to the WAIS-IV correlations than models that describe subtests as one dimensional functions of correlated factors. There appears to be a trade-off in modeling subtests as one dimensional and modeling with homogeneous latent traits. More consideration should be given to models that include multiple uncorrelated latent factors as determinants of the performance on a given subtest. These results support the view that performance on any given cognitive test is potentially the result of multiple factors. Simple structure may be too simple.

  16. Automated MRI segmentation for individualized modeling of current flow in the human head

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu; Dmochowski, Jacek P.; Su, Yuzhuo; Datta, Abhishek; Rorden, Christopher; Parra, Lucas C.

    2013-12-01

    Objective. High-definition transcranial direct current stimulation (HD-tDCS) and high-density electroencephalography require accurate models of current flow for precise targeting and current source reconstruction. At a minimum, such modeling must capture the idiosyncratic anatomy of the brain, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and skull for each individual subject. Currently, the process to build such high-resolution individualized models from structural magnetic resonance images requires labor-intensive manual segmentation, even when utilizing available automated segmentation tools. Also, accurate placement of many high-density electrodes on an individual scalp is a tedious procedure. The goal was to develop fully automated techniques to reduce the manual effort in such a modeling process. Approach. A fully automated segmentation technique based on Statical Parametric Mapping 8, including an improved tissue probability map and an automated correction routine for segmentation errors, was developed, along with an automated electrode placement tool for high-density arrays. The performance of these automated routines was evaluated against results from manual segmentation on four healthy subjects and seven stroke patients. The criteria include segmentation accuracy, the difference of current flow distributions in resulting HD-tDCS models and the optimized current flow intensities on cortical targets.Main results. The segmentation tool can segment out not just the brain but also provide accurate results for CSF, skull and other soft tissues with a field of view extending to the neck. Compared to manual results, automated segmentation deviates by only 7% and 18% for normal and stroke subjects, respectively. The predicted electric fields in the brain deviate by 12% and 29% respectively, which is well within the variability observed for various modeling choices. Finally, optimized current flow intensities on cortical targets do not differ significantly.Significance. Fully

  17. The effect of relationship quality on individual perceptions of social responsibility in the US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Joseph C.

    2015-01-01

    Social responsibility (SR) has been of continuing interest in the U.S. and around the world. Organizations make a wide variety of SR decisions that represent differing viewpoints. While a number of definitions of SR exist, many of these definitions indicate that SR decisions may be viewed as existing of various facets, such as legal/regulatory, financial/economic, ethical, environmental, and voluntary. While drivers of SR have been proposed, there has been limited research at a micro-level on how individuals perceive SR activities by the organizations where they work. Based on a prior qualitative study (Thornton and Byrd, 2013) that found SR decisions are related to several traits and influenced by relationships, a model was proposed and tested in this research. The traits found relevant in the qualitative research were conscientiousness, especially in the sense of being responsible, and self-efficacy. Relationship quality was assessed based on positive and negative emotional attractors as proposed in intentional change theory. Perceptions of individuals in management and non-management showed that relationship quality mediated the effect of conscientiousness and general self-efficacy on the SR. Because there are multiple facets, the author made use of Carroll’s (1991) pyramid of SR to identify activities that business owners and managers consider relevant. The findings indicate that conscientiousness is related to specific SR activities in the areas of legal/regulatory, ethical and discretionary dimensions while general self-efficacy is related to financial/economic and legal/regulatory dimensions. The presence of relationship quality enhanced the effects of both conscientiousness and general self-efficacy on the various SR dimensions. This suggests that individuals perceived SR activities along different traits and that enhancing these traits might improve perceptions of SR decisions. PMID:26113830

  18. The effect of relationship quality on individual perceptions of social responsibility in the US.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Joseph C

    2015-01-01

    Social responsibility (SR) has been of continuing interest in the U.S. and around the world. Organizations make a wide variety of SR decisions that represent differing viewpoints. While a number of definitions of SR exist, many of these definitions indicate that SR decisions may be viewed as existing of various facets, such as legal/regulatory, financial/economic, ethical, environmental, and voluntary. While drivers of SR have been proposed, there has been limited research at a micro-level on how individuals perceive SR activities by the organizations where they work. Based on a prior qualitative study (Thornton and Byrd, 2013) that found SR decisions are related to several traits and influenced by relationships, a model was proposed and tested in this research. The traits found relevant in the qualitative research were conscientiousness, especially in the sense of being responsible, and self-efficacy. Relationship quality was assessed based on positive and negative emotional attractors as proposed in intentional change theory. Perceptions of individuals in management and non-management showed that relationship quality mediated the effect of conscientiousness and general self-efficacy on the SR. Because there are multiple facets, the author made use of Carroll's (1991) pyramid of SR to identify activities that business owners and managers consider relevant. The findings indicate that conscientiousness is related to specific SR activities in the areas of legal/regulatory, ethical and discretionary dimensions while general self-efficacy is related to financial/economic and legal/regulatory dimensions. The presence of relationship quality enhanced the effects of both conscientiousness and general self-efficacy on the various SR dimensions. This suggests that individuals perceived SR activities along different traits and that enhancing these traits might improve perceptions of SR decisions.

  19. The effect of relationship quality on individual perceptions of social responsibility in the US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph C. Thornton

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Social responsibility (SR has been of continuing interest in the United States and around the world. Organizations make a wide variety of SR decisions that represent differing viewpoints. While a number of definitions of SR exist, many of these definitions indicate that SR decisions may be viewed as existing of various facets, such as legal/regulatory, financial/economic, ethical, environmental, and voluntary. While drivers of SR have been proposed, there has been limited research at a micro-level on how individuals perceive SR activities by the organizations where they work. Based on a prior qualitative study (Thornton and Byrd, 2013 that found SR decisions are related to several traits and influenced by relationships, a model was proposed and tested in this research. The traits found relevant in the qualitative research were conscientiousness, especially in the sense of being responsible, and self-efficacy. Relationship quality was assessed based on positive and negative emotional attractors (PNEA as proposed in Intentional Change Theory (ICT. Perceptions of individuals in management and non-management showed that relationship quality mediated the effect of conscientiousness and general self-efficacy on the SR. Because there are multiple facets, the author made use of Carroll’s (1991 pyramid of social responsibility to identify activities that business owners and managers consider relevant. The findings indicate that conscientiousness is related to specific SR activities in the areas of legal/regulatory, ethical and discretionary dimensions while general self-efficacy is related to financial/economic and legal/regulatory dimensions. The presence of relationship quality enhanced the effects of both conscientiousness and general self-efficacy on the various SR dimensions. This suggests that individuals perceived SR activities along different traits and that enhancing these traits might improve perceptions of SR decisions.

  20. Development and validation of an individual based Daphnia magna population model: The influence of crowding on population dynamics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Preuss, T.G.; Hammers-Wirtz, M.; Hommen, U.; Rubach, M.N.; Ratte, H.T.

    2009-01-01

    An individual-based model was developed to predict the population dynamics of Daphnia magna at laboratory conditions from individual life-history traits observed in experiments with different feeding conditions. Within the model, each daphnid passes its individual life cycle including feeding on alg

  1. Examining individual and school characteristics associated with child obesity using a multilevel growth model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Yasuo; Stack, Maria

    2015-03-01

    The childhood obesity epidemic continues to be a serious concern in the U.S., disproportionately affecting low socioeconomic and minority groups. Because many interventions are based in schools, both individual and school factors contributing to obesity were examined in this study. Employing data from the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Class of 1998-1999 (ECLS-K), a three level hierarchical linear model was used to estimate children's body mass index (BMI) growth trajectories within their school contexts. Results indicated an inverse relationship between BMI and socioeconomic status (SES), except for black males. Additionally, results showed that low school SES and rural locality of the school were school-level risk factors of obesity. Lastly, a major portion of the between-schools variance was explained by aggregated student characteristics, indicating that students were more likely to attend schools with peers of similar BMI who had similar SES and race/ethnicity, supporting a school-level compositional effect associated with obesity.

  2. Daphnias: from the individual based model to the large population equation

    CERN Document Server

    Metz, J A J

    2012-01-01

    The class of deterministic 'Daphnia' models treated by Diekmann et al. (J Math Biol 61: 277-318, 2010) has a long history going back to Nisbet and Gurney (Theor Pop Biol 23: 114-135, 1983) and Diekmann et al. (Nieuw Archief voor Wiskunde 4: 82-109, 1984). In this note, we formulate the individual based models (IBM) supposedly underlying those deterministic models. The models treat the interaction between a general size-structured consumer population ('Daphnia') and an unstructured resource ('algae'). The discrete, size and age-structured Daphnia population changes through births and deaths of its individuals and throught their aging and growth. The birth and death rates depend on the sizes of the individuals and on the concentration of the algae. The latter is supposed to be a continuous variable with a deterministic dynamics that depends on the Daphnia population. In this model setting we prove that when the Daphnia population is large, the stochastic differential equation describing the IBM can be approxima...

  3. Is pertussis actually reemerging? Insights from an individual-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Codeço, C T; Luz, P M

    2001-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a spatially explicit, individual-based model developed to simulate the dynamics of pertussis in a small population. With this simulation approach, complex epidemic systems can be built using information on parasite population structure (strain diversity, virulence diversity, etc.), human population structure (individual risk, age structure, interaction matrices, immune response, etc.), as well as mechanisms of evolution and learning. We parameterized our model to describe pertussis in an age-structured community. Pertussis or whooping cough is an acute infection of the respiratory tract caused by Bordetella pertussis. Despite wide-scale vaccination in many countries, this disease is reemerging throughout the world in both adults and children. Emergence has been explained by many factors: wane of vaccine and natural immunity, increase of asymptomatic carriers, and/or natural selection of non-vaccine strains. Here, we model these hypotheses and analyze their potential impact on the observed increase of pertussis notification.

  4. Is pertussis actually reemerging? Insights from an individual-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Codeço Cláudia Torres

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a spatially explicit, individual-based model developed to simulate the dynamics of pertussis in a small population. With this simulation approach, complex epidemic systems can be built using information on parasite population structure (strain diversity, virulence diversity, etc., human population structure (individual risk, age structure, interaction matrices, immune response, etc., as well as mechanisms of evolution and learning. We parameterized our model to describe pertussis in an age-structured community. Pertussis or whooping cough is an acute infection of the respiratory tract caused by Bordetella pertussis. Despite wide-scale vaccination in many countries, this disease is reemerging throughout the world in both adults and children. Emergence has been explained by many factors: wane of vaccine and natural immunity, increase of asymptomatic carriers, and/or natural selection of non-vaccine strains. Here, we model these hypotheses and analyze their potential impact on the observed increase of pertussis notification.

  5. Is pertussis actually reemerging? Insights from an individual-based model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cláudia Torres Codeço

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce a spatially explicit, individual-based model developed to simulate the dynamics of pertussis in a small population. With this simulation approach, complex epidemic systems can be built using information on parasite population structure (strain diversity, virulence diversity, etc., human population structure (individual risk, age structure, interaction matrices, immune response, etc., as well as mechanisms of evolution and learning. We parameterized our model to describe pertussis in an age-structured community. Pertussis or whooping cough is an acute infection of the respiratory tract caused by Bordetella pertussis. Despite wide-scale vaccination in many countries, this disease is reemerging throughout the world in both adults and children. Emergence has been explained by many factors: wane of vaccine and natural immunity, increase of asymptomatic carriers, and/or natural selection of non-vaccine strains. Here, we model these hypotheses and analyze their potential impact on the observed increase of pertussis notification.

  6. Controlling chaos in ecology: from deterministic to individual-based models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solé, R V; Gamarra, J G; Ginovart, M; López, D

    1999-11-01

    The possibility of chaos control in biological systems has been stimulated by recent advances in the study of heart and brain tissue dynamics. More recently, some authors have conjectured that such a method might be applied to population dynamics and even play a nontrivial evolutionary role in ecology. In this paper we explore this idea by means of both mathematical and individual-based simulation models. Because of the intrinsic noise linked to individual behavior, controlling a noisy system becomes more difficult but, as shown here, it is a feasible task allowed to be experimentally tested.

  7. Effects of childhood trauma on hostility, family environment and narcissism of adult individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Gouva

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to investigate the effects of childhood trauma on hostility, family functioning and narcissismin adulthood. 595 healthy individuals participated, classified into two groups― trauma and no-trauma ― based onexperienced traumatic events.Methodology: The Hostility and Direction of Hostility Questionnaire, the Aggression subscale of The SymptomChecklist-90-R, the Family Environment Scale and The Narcissistic Personality Inventory were administered.Results: Higher levels of hostility (p=.040 and aggression (p=.041 were observed among participants reportedexposure to a traumatic event. Apart from the conflict subscale (p=.018, no dysfunctional family environment wasfound. Narcissistic traits did not differ between the two groups (p=.199. Logistic regression models found thatparticipants experienced childhood trauma had a higher risk of overall hostility (OR=0.92, 95% CI=.89-.99.

  8. Individual and community effectiveness of a cervical cancer screening program for semi-urban Mexican women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Muñoz Ledo, Adriana A; Márquez-Serrano, Margarita; Idrovo, Alvaro J; Allen-Leigh, Betania

    2014-06-01

    The effectiveness at the individual and community level of an educational intervention to increase cervical cancer screening self-efficacy among semi-urban Mexican women was evaluated and changes in reported community barriers were measured after the intervention was implemented. The educational intervention was evaluated with a quasi-experimental pre-test/post-test design and a control group, based on the Integrative Model of Behavior Prediction and AMIGAS project materials. For the intervention group, increased self-efficacy increased requests to obtain a Pap (p system affect the women's perceived ability to get a Pap. Better care for users is needed to increase consistent use of the test. The study shows the importance of using culturally adapted, multilevel, comprehensive interventions to achieve successful results in target populations.

  9. Modelling temporal networks of human face-to-face contacts with public activity and individual reachability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi-Qing; Cui, Jing; Zhang, Shu-Min; Zhang, Qi; Li, Xiang

    2016-02-01

    Modelling temporal networks of human face-to-face contacts is vital both for understanding the spread of airborne pathogens and word-of-mouth spreading of information. Although many efforts have been devoted to model these temporal networks, there are still two important social features, public activity and individual reachability, have been ignored in these models. Here we present a simple model that captures these two features and other typical properties of empirical face-to-face contact networks. The model describes agents which are characterized by an attractiveness to slow down the motion of nearby people, have event-triggered active probability and perform an activity-dependent biased random walk in a square box with periodic boundary. The model quantitatively reproduces two empirical temporal networks of human face-to-face contacts which are testified by their network properties and the epidemic spread dynamics on them.

  10. Individuality of breathing patterns in patients under noninvasive mechanical ventilation evidenced by chaotic global models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letellier, Christophe; Rodrigues, Giovani G.; Muir, Jean-François; Aguirre, Luis A.

    2013-03-01

    Autonomous global models based on radial basis functions were obtained from data measured from patients under noninvasive mechanical ventilation. Some of these models, which are discussed in the paper, turn out to have chaotic or quasi-periodic solutions, thus providing a first piece of evidence that the underlying dynamics of the data used to estimate the global models are likely to be chaotic or, at least, have a chaotic component. It is explicitly shown that one of such global models produces attractors characterized by a Horseshoe map, two models produce toroidal chaos, and one model produces a quasi-periodic regime. These topologically inequivalent attractors evidence the individuality of breathing profiles observed in patient under noninvasive ventilation.

  11. Deriving estimates of individual variability in genetic potentials of performance traits for 3 dairy breeds, using a model of lifetime nutrient partitioning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Phuong, H N; Martin, O; de Boer, I J M;

    2015-01-01

    , body reserve usage, and growth for different genotypes of cow. Moreover, it can be used to separate genetic variability in performance between individual cows from environmental noise. The model enables simulation of the effects of a genetic selection strategy on lifetime efficiency of individual cows......, which has a main advantage of including the rearing costs, and thus, can be used to explore the impact of future selection on animal performance and efficiency.......This study explored the ability of an existing lifetime nutrient partitioning model for simulating individual variability in genetic potentials of dairy cows. Generally, the model assumes a universal trajectory of dynamic partitioning of priority between life functions and genetic scaling...

  12. An individual-based model of Zebrafish population dynamics accounting for energy dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beaudouin, Remy; Goussen, Benoit; Piccini, Benjamin

    2015-01-01

    Developing population dynamics models for zebrafish is crucial in order to extrapolate from toxicity data measured at the organism level to biological levels relevant to support and enhance ecological risk assessment. To achieve this, a dynamic energy budget for individual zebrafish (DEB model......, the predictions of the DEB-IBM were compared to existing observations on natural zebrafish populations and the predicted population dynamics are realistic. While our zebrafish DEB-IBM model can still be improved by acquiring new experimental data on the most uncertain processes (e.g. survival or feeding), it can...

  13. Effects of Frequency of Feedback on the Learning of Motor Skill in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemayattalab, Rasool; Rostami, Leila Rashidi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of frequency of knowledge of results (KR) on the learning of dart in individuals with cerebral palsy type I. Twenty-four individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) between the ages of 5 and 17 were chosen for this study. They were put into 3 homogenous groups according to their records after 20…

  14. Effects of Frequency of Feedback on the Learning of Motor Skill in Individuals with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemayattalab, Rasool; Rostami, Leila Rashidi

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of frequency of knowledge of results (KR) on the learning of dart in individuals with cerebral palsy type I. Twenty-four individuals with cerebral palsy (CP) between the ages of 5 and 17 were chosen for this study. They were put into 3 homogenous groups according to their records after 20…

  15. The Effects of Individual Differences in Cognitive Styles on decision-Making Accuracy and Latency

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-02-01

    L., Grenblo, P., & Dean, J. B. (2002). Judgmental self-doubt: beliefs about one’s judgmental prowess. Personality and Individual Differences , 33 741...1998). Personal need for structure, the Einstellung task, and the effects of stress. Personality and Individual Differences , 24, 305-310. 29. Somers, M

  16. Costs and cost-effectiveness of family CBT versus individual CBT in clinically anxious children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D.H.M. Bodden; C.D. Dirksen; S.M. Bögels; M.H. Nauta; E. de Haan; J. Ringrose; C. Appelboom; A.G. Brinkman; K.C.M.M.J. Appelboom-Geerts

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the cost-effectiveness of family cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) compared with individual CBT in children with anxiety disorders. Clinically anxious children (aged 8—18 years) referred for treatment were randomly assigned to family or individual CBT

  17. Cortisol-dependent stress effects on cell distribution in healthy individuals and individuals suffering from chronic adrenal insufficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geiger, Ashley M; Pitts, Kenneth P; Feldkamp, Joachim; Kirschbaum, Clemens; Wolf, Jutta M

    2015-11-01

    Chronic adrenal insufficiency (CAI) is characterized by a lack of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid production due to destroyed adrenal cortex cells. However, elevated cortisol secretion is thought to be a central part in a well-orchestrated immune response to stress. This raises the question to what extent lack of cortisol in CAI affects stress-related changes in immune processes. To address this question, 28 CAI patients (20 females) and 18 healthy individuals (11 females) (age: 44.3 ± 8.4 years) were exposed to a psychosocial stress test (Trier Social Stress Test: TSST). Half the patients received a 0.03 mg/kg body weight injection of hydrocortisone (HC) post-TSST to mimic a healthy cortisol stress response. Catecholamines and immune cell composition were assessed in peripheral blood and free cortisol measured in saliva collected before and repeatedly after TSST. CAI patients showed norepinephrine (NE) stress responses similar to healthy participants, however, epinephrine (E) as well as cortisol levels were significantly lower. HC treatment post-TSST resulted in cortisol increases comparable to those observed in healthy participants (interaction effects--NE: F=1.05, p=.41; E: F=2.56, p=.045; cortisol: F=13.28, pcortisol's central involvement in post-stress lymphocyte migration from blood into immune-relevant body compartments. As such, future studies should investigate whether psychosocial stress exposure may put CAI patients at an increased health risk due to attenuated immune responses to pathogens.

  18. An individual reproduction model sensitive to milk yield and body condition in Holstein dairy cows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brun-Lafleur, L; Cutullic, E; Faverdin, P; Delaby, L; Disenhaus, C

    2013-08-01

    To simulate the consequences of management in dairy herds, the use of individual-based herd models is very useful and has become common. Reproduction is a key driver of milk production and herd dynamics, whose influence has been magnified by the decrease in reproductive performance over the last decades. Moreover, feeding management influences milk yield (MY) and body reserves, which in turn influence reproductive performance. Therefore, our objective was to build an up-to-date animal reproduction model sensitive to both MY and body condition score (BCS). A dynamic and stochastic individual reproduction model was built mainly from data of a single recent long-term experiment. This model covers the whole reproductive process and is composed of a succession of discrete stochastic events, mainly calving, ovulations, conception and embryonic loss. Each reproductive step is sensitive to MY or BCS levels or changes. The model takes into account recent evolutions of reproductive performance, particularly concerning calving-to-first ovulation interval, cyclicity (normal cycle length, prevalence of prolonged luteal phase), oestrus expression and pregnancy (conception, early and late embryonic loss). A sensitivity analysis of the model to MY and BCS at calving was performed. The simulated performance was compared with observed data from the database used to build the model and from the bibliography to validate the model. Despite comprising a whole series of reproductive steps, the model made it possible to simulate realistic global reproduction outputs. It was able to well simulate the overall reproductive performance observed in farms in terms of both success rate (recalving rate) and reproduction delays (calving interval). This model has the purpose to be integrated in herd simulation models to usefully test the impact of management strategies on herd reproductive performance, and thus on calving patterns and culling rates.

  19. Electric Field Model of Transcranial Electric Stimulation in Nonhuman Primates: Correspondence to Individual Motor Threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Hee; Lisanby, Sarah H; Laine, Andrew F; Peterchev, Angel V

    2015-09-01

    To develop a pipeline for realistic head models of nonhuman primates (NHPs) for simulations of noninvasive brain stimulation, and use these models together with empirical threshold measurements to demonstrate that the models capture individual anatomical variability. Based on structural MRI data, we created models of the electric field (E-field) induced by right unilateral (RUL) electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) in four rhesus macaques. Individual motor threshold (MT) was measured with transcranial electric stimulation (TES) administered through the RUL electrodes in the same subjects. The interindividual anatomical differences resulted in 57% variation in median E-field strength in the brain at fixed stimulus current amplitude. Individualization of the stimulus current by MT reduced the E-field variation in the target motor area by 27%. There was significant correlation between the measured MT and the ratio of simulated electrode current and E-field strength (r(2) = 0.95, p = 0.026). Exploratory analysis revealed significant correlations of this ratio with anatomical parameters including of the superior electrode-to-cortex distance, vertex-to-cortex distance, and brain volume (r(2) > 0.96, p stimulation interventions, help link the results to clinical studies, and ultimately lead to more rational brain stimulation dosing paradigms.

  20. The effects of earthquake measurement concepts and magnitude anchoring on individuals' perceptions of earthquake risk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celsi, R.; Wolfinbarger, M.; Wald, D.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to explore earthquake risk perceptions in California. Specifically, we examine the risk beliefs, feelings, and experiences of lay, professional, and expert individuals to explore how risk is perceived and how risk perceptions are formed relative to earthquakes. Our results indicate that individuals tend to perceptually underestimate the degree that earthquake (EQ) events may affect them. This occurs in large part because individuals' personal felt experience of EQ events are generally overestimated relative to experienced magnitudes. An important finding is that individuals engage in a process of "cognitive anchoring" of their felt EQ experience towards the reported earthquake magnitude size. The anchoring effect is moderated by the degree that individuals comprehend EQ magnitude measurement and EQ attenuation. Overall, the results of this research provide us with a deeper understanding of EQ risk perceptions, especially as they relate to individuals' understanding of EQ measurement and attenuation concepts. ?? 2005, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  1. Individual and group-based learning from complex cognitive tasks: Effects on retention and transfer efficiency

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, Femke; Paas, Fred; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2009-01-01

    Kirschner, F., Paas, F., & Kirschner, P. (2009). Individual and group-based learning from complex cognitive tasks: Effects on retention and transfer efficiency. Computers in Human Behavior, 25, 306-314.

  2. Differential effects of problem-solving demands on individual and collaborative learning outcomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kirschner, Femke; Paas, Fred; Kirschner, Paul A.; Janssen, Jeroen

    2011-01-01

    Kirschner, F., Paas, F., Kirschner, P. A., & Janssen, J. (2011). Differential effects of problem-solving demands on individual and collaborative learning outcomes. Learning and Instruction, 21, 587-599.

  3. Effects of a mining‐altered environment on individual fitness of amphibians and reptiles

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sasaki, Kiyoshi; Lesbarrères, David; Beaulieu, Camille Tremblay; Watson, Glen; Litzgus, Jacqueline

    2016-01-01

    ...‐ranging animals remains poorly understood. By examining effects on individual fitness proxies, we aimed to determine the mechanisms behind documented amphibian and reptile declines in barren landscapes where vegetation was nearly decimated...

  4. The Effectiveness of Couple and Individual Relationship Education: Distress as a Moderator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Ryan G; Rappleyea, Damon L; Daire, Andrew P; Harris, Steven M; Liu, Xiaofeng

    2017-03-01

    Current literature yields mixed results about the effectiveness of relationship education (RE) with low-income participants and those who experience a high level of individual or relational distress. Scholars have called for research that examines whether initial levels of distress act as a moderator of RE outcomes. To test whether initial levels of relationship and/or individual distress moderate the effectiveness of RE, this study used two samples, one of couples who received couple-oriented relationship education with their partner (n = 192 couples) and one of individuals in a relationship who received individual-oriented RE by themselves (n = 60 individuals). We delivered RE in a community-based setting serving primarily low-income participants. For those attending with a partner, there was a significant interaction between gender, initial distress, and time. Findings indicate that women who were relationally distressed before RE reported the largest pre-postgains. Those who attended an individual-oriented RE program reported significant decreases in individual distress from pre to post, but no significant relationship gains. Findings also suggest that initial levels of distress did not moderate the effectiveness of individual-oriented RE. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  5. Variable effects of acoustic trauma on behavioral and neural correlates of tinnitus in individual animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan James Longenecker

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The etiology of tinnitus is known to be diverse in the human population. An appropriate animal model of tinnitus should incorporate this pathological diversity. Previous studies evaluating the effect of acoustic over exposure (AOE have found that animals typically display increased spontaneous firing rates and bursting activity of auditory neurons, which often has been linked to behavioral evidence of tinnitus. However, only a subset of studies directly associated these neural correlates to individual animals. Furthermore the vast majority of tinnitus studies were conducted on anesthetized animals. The goal of this study was to test for a possible relationship between tinnitus, hearing loss, hyperactivity, and bursting activity in the auditory system of individual unanesthetized animals following AOE. Sixteen mice were unilaterally exposed to 116dB SPL narrowband noise (centered at 12.5 kHz for 1 hour under ketamine/xylazine anesthesia. Gap-induced prepulse inhibition of the acoustic startle reflex (GPIAS was used to assess behavioral evidence of tinnitus whereas hearing performance was evaluated by measurements of auditory brainstem response (ABR thresholds and prepulse inhibition (PPI audiometry. Following behavioral assessments, single neuron firing activity was recorded from the inferior colliculus (IC of four awake animals and compared to recordings from four unexposed controls. We found that AOE increased spontaneous activity in all mice tested, independently of tinnitus behavior or severity of threshold shifts. Bursting activity did not increase in two animals identified as tinnitus positive (T+, but did so in a tinnitus negative (T- animal with severe hearing loss (SHL. Hyperactivity does not appear to be a reliable biomarker of tinnitus. Our data suggest that multidisciplinary assessments on individual animals following AOE could offer a powerful experimental tool to investigate mechanisms of tinnitus.

  6. Regional brain shrinkage over two years: individual differences and effects of pro-inflammatory genetic polymorphisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, N; Ghisletta, P; Dahle, C L; Bender, A R; Yang, Y; Yuan, P; Daugherty, A M; Raz, N

    2014-12-01

    We examined regional changes in brain volume in healthy adults (N=167, age 19-79years at baseline; N=90 at follow-up) over approximately two years. With latent change score models, we evaluated mean change and individual differences in rates of change in 10 anatomically-defined and manually-traced regions of interest (ROIs): lateral prefrontal cortex (LPFC), orbital frontal cortex (OF), prefrontal white matter (PFw), hippocampus (Hc), parahippocampal gyrus (PhG), caudate nucleus (Cd), putamen (Pt), insula (In), cerebellar hemispheres (CbH), and primary visual cortex (VC). Significant mean shrinkage was observed in the Hc, CbH, In, OF, and PhG, and individual differences in change were noted in all regions, except the OF. Pro-inflammatory genetic variants modified shrinkage in PhG and CbH. Carriers of two T alleles of interleukin-1β (IL-1β C-511T, rs16944) and a T allele of methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR C677T, rs1801133) polymorphisms showed increased PhG shrinkage. No effects of a pro-inflammatory polymorphism for C-reactive protein (CRP-286C>A>T, rs3091244) or apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele were noted. These results replicate the pattern of brain shrinkage observed in previous studies, with a notable exception of the LPFC, thus casting doubt on the unique importance of prefrontal cortex in aging. Larger baseline volumes of CbH and In were associated with increased shrinkage, in conflict with the brain reserve hypothesis. Contrary to previous reports, we observed no significant linear effects of age and hypertension on regional brain shrinkage. Our findings warrant further investigation of the effects of neuroinflammation on structural brain change throughout the lifespan.

  7. Aggregate and Individual Replication Probability within an Explicit Model of the Research Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeff; Schwarz, Wolf

    2011-01-01

    We study a model of the research process in which the true effect size, the replication jitter due to changes in experimental procedure, and the statistical error of effect size measurement are all normally distributed random variables. Within this model, we analyze the probability of successfully replicating an initial experimental result by…

  8. Aggregate and Individual Replication Probability within an Explicit Model of the Research Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jeff; Schwarz, Wolf

    2011-01-01

    We study a model of the research process in which the true effect size, the replication jitter due to changes in experimental procedure, and the statistical error of effect size measurement are all normally distributed random variables. Within this model, we analyze the probability of successfully replicating an initial experimental result by…

  9. A bioenergetic approach to model and reconstruct individual life traits from fish otoliths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; Høie, Hans

    2012-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm‐following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history, and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosy...... observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves...

  10. A bioenergetic approach to model and reconstruct individual life traits from fish otoliths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fablet, Ronan; Pecquerie, Laure; Høie, Hans;

    2012-01-01

    Otoliths are biocalcified bodies connected to the sensory system in the inner ears of fish. Their layered, biorhythm‐following formation provides individual records of the age, the individual history, and the natural environment of extinct and living fish species. Such data are critical for ecosy...... observations of otolith formation. It represents a unique simulation tool to improve otolith interpretation and applications, and, beyond, to address the effects of both climate change and ocean acidification on other biomineralizing organisms such as corals and bivalves...

  11. Long duration exercise program in individuals with parkinson´s disease: effects on functional capacity

    OpenAIRE

    Baptista, André Macari [UNESP; Beretta, Victor Spiandor [UNESP; Vitório,Rodrigo; Arroyo, Claudia Teixeira [UNESP; Lirani-Silva, Ellen [UNESP; Stella, Florindo [UNESP; Barbieri, Fabio Augusto [UNESP

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of long duration exercise program on physical fitness components of functional capacity in individuals with Parkinson disease (PD) and to evaluate ongoing effects of exercise after 8 to 10-week follow-up without exercise. Twenty-four individuals with PD were randomly assigned to two groups: generalized exercise program and stretching exercise program (control group). The generalized exercise program provided training in physical fitness com...

  12. Randomized trial of the effects of individual nutritional counseling in cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Grith Møller; Pedersen, Louise Lindkvist; Østerlind, Kell

    2014-01-01

    Cancer-related malnutrition is multifactorial and related to a bad prognosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intensive, individual dietary counseling of patients in radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy for gynecologic-, gastric-, or esophageal cancer.......Cancer-related malnutrition is multifactorial and related to a bad prognosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of intensive, individual dietary counseling of patients in radiotherapy and/or chemotherapy for gynecologic-, gastric-, or esophageal cancer....

  13. Speciation rates decline through time in individual-based models of speciation and extinction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shaopeng; Chen, Anping; Fang, Jingyun; Pacala, Stephen W

    2013-09-01

    A well-documented pattern in the fossil record is a long-term decline in the origination rate of new taxa after diversity rebounds from a mass extinction. The mechanisms for this pattern remain elusive. In this article, we investigate the macroevolutionary predictions of an individual-based birth-death model (BDI model) where speciation and extinction rates emerge from population dynamics. We start with the simplest neutral model in which every individual has the same per capita rates of birth, death, and speciation. Although the prediction of the simplest neutral model agrees qualitatively with the fossil pattern, the predicted decline in per-species speciation rates is too fast to explain the long-term trend in fossil data. We thus consider models with variation among species in per capita rates of speciation and a suite of alternative assumptions about the heritability of speciation rate. The results show that interspecific variation in per capita speciation rate can induce differences among species in their ability to resist extinction because a low speciation rate confers a small but important demographic advantage. As a consequence, the model predicts an appropriately slow temporal decline in speciation rates, which provides a mechanistic explanation for the fossil pattern.

  14. Modelling individual preferences, State of the art, recent advances and future directions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cherchi, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    Despite the above famous statement, individuals have always disputed about individual tastes, and the decision making processes behind consumers’ choices has been a focal interest for decades. Although challenges against the theory of rational behaviour date back to the work of von Neumann...... Value (GEV) formulation, which generalised the work of Williams (1977), provides a rigorous foundation for consumer choice modelling derived from economic theory. Although the original formulation of the random utility maximisation (RUM) as a behavioural model followed the economists’ theory of consumer...... the representation of the true phenomenon. However, the goal has always been that the measurable part of utility should be able to explain (as much as possible) the true behaviour in order to reduce the explanatory power left in the error term. This is correct except that, under the neo-classical theory...

  15. Analysis of capture-recapture models with individual covariates using data augmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royle, J. Andrew

    2009-01-01

    I consider the analysis of capture-recapture models with individual covariates that influence detection probability. Bayesian analysis of the joint likelihood is carried out using a flexible data augmentation scheme that facilitates analysis by Markov chain Monte Carlo methods, and a simple and straightforward implementation in freely available software. This approach is applied to a study of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) in which auxiliary data on a continuous covariate (body mass) are recorded, and it is thought that detection probability is related to body mass. In a second example, the model is applied to an aerial waterfowl survey in which a double-observer protocol is used. The fundamental unit of observation is the cluster of individual birds, and the size of the cluster (a discrete covariate) is used as a covariate on detection probability.

  16. Mathematical Analysis of a General Two-Patch Model of Tuberculosis Disease with Lost Sight Individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdias Laohombé

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-patch model, SEi1,…,EinIiLi,  i=1,2, is used to analyze the spread of tuberculosis, with an arbitrary number n of latently infected compartments in each patch. A fraction of infectious individuals that begun their treatment will not return to the hospital for the examination of sputum. This fact usually occurs in sub-Saharan Africa, due to many reasons. The model incorporates migrations from one patch to another. The existence and uniqueness of the associated equilibria are discussed. A Lyapunov function is used to show that when the basic reproduction ratio is less than one, the disease-free equilibrium is globally and asymptotically stable. When it is greater than one, there exists at least one endemic equilibrium. The local stability of endemic equilibria can be illustrated using numerical simulations. Numerical simulation results are provided to illustrate the theoretical results and analyze the influence of lost sight individuals.

  17. The impact of individual and organisational factors on engagement of individuals with intellectual disability living in community group homes: a multilevel model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, X; Tichá, R; Larson, S A; Stancliffe, R J; Wuorio, A

    2015-06-01

    Being engaged in daily activities is a strong indicator of quality of life for individuals with intellectual disability (ID) who live in small community group homes. This study aimed to identify individual and organisational factors that predict high levels of engagement. Individuals with ID (n = 78), direct support professionals (DSPs; n = 174) and supervisors (n = 21) from 21 US group homes participated in the study. For each individual with ID, we conducted 80 min of observation at the person's residence. Information was also gathered regarding demographic characteristics, DSP competence, supervisor years of experience and management practices. Data were analysed using multilevel modelling. On average, individuals were engaged in social activities 12% of observed time and non-social activities 35% of the time. Individuals with greater adaptive skills who were supported by more competent staff showed significantly higher levels of social engagement. Individuals with less severe deficits in adaptive behaviours and less challenging behaviour showed higher levels of non-social engagement. Although none of the factors related to group homes were significant, 24% of the variance in non-social engagement existed among group homes. These results suggested that engagement is a dynamic construct. The extent to which an individual with ID is engaged in daily life is a result of interplay between the individual's characteristics and the group home environment. Future research is needed to investigate the influence of variables specific to the group home on the engagement level of individuals with disabilities. © 2014 MENCAP and International Association of the Scientific Study of Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Individual Differences in the Effects of Retrieval from Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Gene A.; Unsworth, Nash

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined individual differences in the effects of retrieval from long-term memory (i.e., the testing effect). The effects of retrieving from memory make tested information more accessible for future retrieval attempts. Despite the broad applied ramifications of such a potent memorization technique there is a paucity of research…

  19. Individual Differences in the Effects of Retrieval from Long-Term Memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Gene A.; Unsworth, Nash

    2012-01-01

    The current study examined individual differences in the effects of retrieval from long-term memory (i.e., the testing effect). The effects of retrieving from memory make tested information more accessible for future retrieval attempts. Despite the broad applied ramifications of such a potent memorization technique there is a paucity of research…

  20. Study of Commercial Bank Risk Monitoring Model in Individual Consumption Credit

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘春红

    2003-01-01

    With the development of individual consumption credit (ICC) in China, commercial banks have been exposed to more and more risks. The loan failure has been an important problem that the banking must face and revolve. This paper develops a factor system to explain how the borrower's risk is affected, and then establishes a risk monitoring model with AHP to pre-warn the banks how much the risk is.

  1. Simulation Modeling and Analysis of the Impact of Individual Mobility Augmentee Loss at the Tanker Airlift Control Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    SIMULATION MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF INDIVIDUAL MOBILITY AUGMENTEE LOSS AT THE TANKER...States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. AFIT-OR-MS-ENS-12-18 SIMULATION MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF THE...58 1 SIMULATION MODELING AND ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF INDIVIDUAL MOBILITY AUGMENTEE LOSS AT THE TANKER AIRLIFT CONTROL CENTER I

  2. Cognitive reserve and emotional stimuli in older individuals: level of education moderates the age-related positivity effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Davide; Brown, Adam D; Kapucu, Aycan; Marmar, Charles R; Pomara, Nunzio

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND/STUDY CONTEXT: A frequently observed age-related effect is a preference in older individuals for positive stimuli. The cognitive control model proposes that this positivity effect may be mediated by executive functions. We propose that cognitive reserve, operationally defined as years of education, which tempers cognitive decline and has been linked to executive functions, should also influence the age-related positivity effect, especially as age advances. An emotional free recall test was administered to a group of 84 cognitively intact individuals aged 60 to 88, who varied in years of education. As part of a larger test battery, data were obtained on measures of executive functioning and depression. Multiple regression and moderation analyses were performed, controlling for general cognitive function, severity of depressive symptoms, and executive function. In our data, years of education appeared to moderate the effect of age on the positivity effect; age was negatively associated with recall of positive words in participants with fewer years of education, whereas a nonsignificant positive correlation was observed between age and positivity in participants with more education. Cognitive reserve appears to play a role in explaining individual differences in the positivity effect in healthy older individuals. Future studies should investigate whether cognitive reserve is also implicated in the ability to process a wide range of emotional stimuli and whether greater reserve is reflected in improved emotional regulation.

  3. Explaining the suicide risk of sexual minority individuals by contrasting the minority stress model with suicide models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plöderl, Martin; Sellmeier, Maximilian; Fartacek, Clemens; Pichler, Eva-Maria; Fartacek, Reinhold; Kralovec, Karl

    2014-11-01

    Many studies have found elevated levels of suicide ideation and attempts among sexual minority (homosexual and bisexual) individuals as compared to heterosexual individuals. The suicide risk difference has mainly been explained by minority stress models (MSTM), but the application of established suicidological models and testing their interrelations with the MSTM has been lacking so far. Therefore, we have contrasted two established models explaining suicide risk, the Interpersonal Psychological Theory (IPT) (Joiner, 2005) and the Clinical Model (CM) (Mann et al., 1999), with the MSTM (Meyer, 2003) in a Bavarian online-sample of 255 adult sexual minority participants and 183 heterosexual participants. The results suggested that the CM and the IPT model can well explain suicide ideation among sexual minorities according to the factors depression, hopelessness, perceived burdensomeness, and failed belongingness. The CM and the IPT were intertwined with the MSTM via internalized homophobia, social support, and early age of coming out. Early coming out was associated with an increased suicide attempt risk, perhaps through violent experiences that enhanced the capability for suicide; however, coming out likely changed to a protective factor for suicide ideation by enhanced social support and reduced internalized homophobia. These results give more insight into the development of suicide risk among sexual minority individuals and may be helpful to tailor minority-specific suicide prevention strategies.

  4. An individual-based model for population viability analysis of humpback chub in Grand Canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pine, William Pine; Healy, Brian; Smith, Emily Omana; Trammell, Melissa; Speas, Dave; Valdez, Rich; Yard, Mike; Walters, Carl; Ahrens, Rob; Vanhaverbeke, Randy; Stone, Dennis; Wilson, Wade

    2013-01-01

    We developed an individual-based population viability analysis model (females only) for evaluating risk to populations from catastrophic events or conservation and research actions. This model tracks attributes (size, weight, viability, etc.) for individual fish through time and then compiles this information to assess the extinction risk of the population across large numbers of simulation trials. Using a case history for the Little Colorado River population of Humpback Chub Gila cypha in Grand Canyon, Arizona, we assessed extinction risk and resiliency to a catastrophic event for this population and then assessed a series of conservation actions related to removing specific numbers of Humpback Chub at different sizes for conservation purposes, such as translocating individuals to establish other spawning populations or hatchery refuge development. Our results suggested that the Little Colorado River population is generally resilient to a single catastrophic event and also to removals of larvae and juveniles for conservation purposes, including translocations to establish new populations. Our results also suggested that translocation success is dependent on similar survival rates in receiving and donor streams and low emigration rates from recipient streams. In addition, translocating either large numbers of larvae or small numbers of large juveniles has generally an equal likelihood of successful population establishment at similar extinction risk levels to the Little Colorado River donor population. Our model created a transparent platform to consider extinction risk to populations from catastrophe or conservation actions and should prove useful to managers assessing these risks for endangered species such as Humpback Chub.

  5. DISPLACE: a dynamic, individual-based model for spatial fishing planning and effort displacement: Integrating underlying fish population models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bastardie, Francois; Nielsen, J. Rasmus; Miethe, Tanja

    We previously developed a spatially explicit, individual-based model (IBM) evaluating the bio-economic efficiency of fishing vessel movements between regions according to the catching and targeting of different species based on the most recent high resolution spatial fishery data. The main purpose...... version couples the vessel model to selected size-based population models and considers the underlying resource dynamics in the distribution and density patterns of the targeted stocks for the cases of Danish and German vessels harvesting the North Sea and Baltic fish stocks. The stochastic fishing...... by vessels on the fish stocks, with resulting fishing mortality, and the vessels’ economic consequences are evaluated on high spatial and seasonal disaggregation levels by simulating different individual choices of vessel speed, fishing grounds and ports. All tested scenarios led to increased overall energy...

  6. The Roy Adaptation Model: A Theoretical Framework for Nurses Providing Care to Individuals With Anorexia Nervosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennings, Karen M

    2017-08-18

    Using a nursing theoretical framework to understand, elucidate, and propose nursing research is fundamental to knowledge development. This article presents the Roy Adaptation Model as a theoretical framework to better understand individuals with anorexia nervosa during acute treatment, and the role of nursing assessments and interventions in the promotion of weight restoration. Nursing assessments and interventions situated within the Roy Adaptation Model take into consideration how weight restoration does not occur in isolation but rather reflects an adaptive process within external and internal environments, and has the potential for more holistic care.

  7. The effect of sound intensity on velopharyngeal function in normal individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Meng; Yang, Zhenyu; Feng, Bin; You, Meng; Wang, Hu

    2015-01-01

    Velopharyngeal closure is an important physiological process contributing to the normal function of speech and swallowing. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of sound intensity on velopharyngeal function in normal individuals. Lateral cephalograms of 38 volunteers obtained at rest and during phonation of vowel /i:/ at both high and low sound intensity were carefully analyzed. The digital sound level meter was used to evaluate and record the sound intensity of the phonation process. The angular and linear parameters on the lateral cephalograms were then measured to reveal the correlation between sound intensity and velopharyngeal closure. All the angular parameter values measured in the study were significantly greater in high sound intensity condition. As for linear parameters, all values were found to be significantly larger at high sound intensity, except for the effective velopharyngeal length and the vertical velopharyngeal length. A multiple linear regression model was set up to describe the correlation between the sound intensity, the effective velopharyngeal length, and velopharyngeal closure. With the increase of sound intensity and the decrease of the effective velopharyngeal length, the width of velopharyngeal closure is enlarged. As one of the characteristic features of sound wave, the sound intensity was found to affect the objectively measured parameters of velopharyngeal closure on lateral cephalograms. Copyright © 2015 The Voice Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Optimizing predictive performance of CASE Ultra expert system models using the applicability domains of individual toxicity alerts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarti, Suman K; Saiakhov, Roustem D; Klopman, Gilles

    2012-10-22

    Fragment based expert system models of toxicological end points are primarily comprised of a set of substructures that are statistically related to the toxic property in question. These special substructures are often referred to as toxicity alerts, toxicophores, or biophores. They are the main building blocks/classifying units of the model, and it is important to define the chemical structural space within which the alerts are expected to produce reliable predictions. Furthermore, defining an appropriate applicability domain is required as part of the OECD guidelines for the validation of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs). In this respect, this paper describes a method to construct applicability domains for individual toxicity alerts that are part of the CASE Ultra expert system models. Defining applicability domain for individual alerts was necessary because each CASE Ultra model is comprised of multiple alerts, and different alerts of a model usually represent different toxicity mechanisms and cover different structural space; the use of an applicability domain for the overall model is often not adequate. The domain for each alert was constructed using a set of fragments that were found to be statistically related to the end point in question as opposed to using overall structural similarity or physicochemical properties. Use of the applicability domains in reducing false positive predictions is demonstrated. It is now possible to obtain ROC (receiver operating characteristic) profiles of CASE Ultra models by applying domain adherence cutoffs on the alerts identified in test chemicals. This helps in optimizing the performance of a model based on their true positive-false positive prediction trade-offs and reduce drastic effects on the predictive performance caused by the active/inactive ratio of the model's training set. None of the major currently available commercial expert systems for toxicity prediction offer the possibility to explore a

  9. The effect of retrieval on recall of information in individuals with posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Nader; Badour, Christal L; Freese, Bettina

    2009-05-01

    Cognitive theories of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) suggest that associative memory processes may play a crucial role in the development and maintenance of the disorder. In the current study we examined the effect of associative pair rehearsal on recall ability for threatening and non-threatening information using the retrieval-practice paradigm in individuals with PTSD, traumatized controls (TC), and non-traumatized controls (NAC). Across word type, NACs demonstrated a typical retrieval-induced forgetting effect. However, individuals with PTSD benefited less from rehearsal, and failed to inhibit recall of unpracticed words in practiced categories. Participants in the TC group displayed a retrieval-induced forgetting effect similar to those individuals in the PTSD group. These findings are consistent with research indicating that individuals with PTSD may derive less benefit from rehearsal and display general inhibitory difficulties when compared to non-traumatized controls.

  10. Individualized model predicts brain current flow during transcranial direct-current stimulation treatment in responsive stroke patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Abhishek; Baker, Julie M; Bikson, Marom; Fridriksson, Julius

    2011-07-01

    Although numerous published reports have demonstrated the beneficial effects of transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) on task performance, fundamental questions remain regarding the optimal electrode configuration on the scalp. Moreover, it is expected that lesioned brain tissue will influence current flow and should therefore be considered (and perhaps leveraged) in the design of individualized tDCS therapies for stroke. The current report demonstrates how different electrode configurations influence the flow of electrical current through brain tissue in a patient who responded positively to a tDCS treatment targeting aphasia. The patient, a 60-year-old man, sustained a left hemisphere ischemic stroke (lesion size = 87.42 mL) 64 months before his participation. In this study, we present results from the first high-resolution (1 mm(3)) model of tDCS in a brain with considerable stroke-related damage; the model was individualized for the patient who received anodal tDCS to his left frontal cortex with the reference cathode electrode placed on his right shoulder. We modeled the resulting brain current flow and also considered three additional reference electrode positions: right mastoid, right orbitofrontal cortex, and a "mirror" configuration with the anode over the undamaged right cortex. Our results demonstrate the profound effect of lesioned tissue on resulting current flow and the ability to modulate current pattern through the brain, including perilesional regions, through electrode montage design. The complexity of brain current flow modulation by detailed normal and pathologic anatomy suggest: (1) That computational models are critical for the rational interpretation and design of individualized tDCS stroke-therapy; and (2) These models must accurately reproduce head anatomy as shown here.

  11. The Effect of Individual and Neighbourhood Socioeconomic Status on Diabetes Mellitus Survival in Working Age Patients in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Shih-Hsien; Liu, Chia-Lin; Lin, Yaoh-Shiang; Lee, Ching-Chih; Lin, Fu-Huang

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a global pandemic metabolic disorder. In recent years, the amount of medical resources required for the treatment of diabetes has increased as diabetes rates have gradually risen. The combined effects of individual and neighbourhood socio-economic status (SES) on DM survival rates are still not clear, especially in patients of working age. In this paper, we aim to analyze the combined effects of neighbourhood and individual SES on DM survival rates in patients of working age in Taiwan. Methods The study of 23,781 people who were diagnosed with DM by using population—based study between 2002 and 2006. Each sample was followed up for 4 years or as a sensor case. We defined Individual SES and neighbourhood SES by each patient’s job category and household income which characterized as advantaged or disadvantaged. Then we compared the survival rates by SES group used Cox proportional hazards model for adjust risk factors. Results The 4-year overall survival rates of diabetic patients were worst for those with low individual SES who living in advantaged neighbourhoods. After adjustment for patient characteristics, DM patients with high individual SES living in disadvantaged neighbourhoods had the same risk of mortality as those patients with high individual SES living in advantaged neighbourhoods (hazard ratio: 1.11; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.81–1.51). The study found that DM patients with low individual SES who live in disadvantaged areas had a greater risk of mortality than those with high SES (odds ratio: 2.57; 95% CI: 2.04–3.24). There were significant differences in survival rates between patients with high individual SES and patients with low individual SES. In contrast, the results did not statistically significant differences in survival rates between advantaged and disadvantaged neighbourhood SES groups. Conclusion DM patients with low individual SES had the worst survival rate, regardless of whether they were

  12. A model to assess the emission of individual isoprenoids emitted from Italian ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemper Pacheco, C. J.; Fares, S.; Loreto, F.; Ciccioli, P.

    2012-04-01

    The aim of this work was to develop a GIS-based model to estimate the emissions from the Italian forest ecosystems. The model was aimed at generating a species-specific emission inventory for isoprene and individual monoterpenes that could have been validated with experimental data collected in selected sites of the CARBOITALY network. The model was develop for the year 2006. At a resolution of 1 km2 with a daily time resolution. By using the emission rates of individual components obtained through several laboratory and field experiments carried out on different vegetation species of the Mediterranean basin, maps of individual isoprenoids were generated for the Italian ecosystems. The spatial distribution and fractional contents of vegetation species present in the Italian forest ecosystems was obtained by combining the CORINE IV land cover map with National Forest Inventory based on ground observations performed at local levels by individual Italian regions (22) in which the country is divided. In general, basal emission rates for individual isoprenoids was reported by Steinbrecher et al. 1997 and Karl et al. 2009 were used. In this case, classes were further subdivided into T and L+T emitters as functions of the active pool. In many instances, however they were revised based on the results obtained in our Institute through determinations performed at leaf, branch (cuvette method) or ecosystem level (REA and the gradient method). In the latter case, studies performed in Italy and/or Mediterranean countries were used. An empirical light extinction function as a function of the canopy type and structure was introduced. The algorithms proposed by (Guenther et al. 1993) were used, but, they were often adapted to fit with the experimental observations made in the Mediterranean Areas. They were corrected for a seasonality factor (Steinbrecher et al. 2009) taking into account a time lag in leaf sprouting due to the plant elevation. A simple parameterization with LAI was

  13. Innovations in individual feature history management - The significance of feature-based temporal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, J.; Seong, J.C.; Kim, B.; Usery, E.L.

    2008-01-01

    A feature relies on three dimensions (space, theme, and time) for its representation. Even though spatiotemporal models have been proposed, they have principally focused on the spatial changes of a feature. In this paper, a feature-based temporal model is proposed to represent the changes of both space and theme independently. The proposed model modifies the ISO's temporal schema and adds new explicit temporal relationship structure that stores temporal topological relationship with the ISO's temporal primitives of a feature in order to keep track feature history. The explicit temporal relationship can enhance query performance on feature history by removing topological comparison during query process. Further, a prototype system has been developed to test a proposed feature-based temporal model by querying land parcel history in Athens, Georgia. The result of temporal query on individual feature history shows the efficiency of the explicit temporal relationship structure. ?? Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2007.

  14. Self-optimization, community stability, and fluctuations in two individual-based models of biological coevolution

    CERN Document Server

    Rikvold, Per Arne

    2007-01-01

    We compare and contrast the long-time dynamical properties of two individual-based models of biological coevolution. Selection occurs via multispecies, stochastic population dynamics with reproduction probabilities that depend nonlinearly on the population densities of all species resident in the community. New species are introduced through mutation. Both models are amenable to exact linear stability analysis, and we compare the analytic results with large-scale kinetic Monte Carlo simulations, obtaining the population size as a function of an average interspecies interaction strength. Over time, the models self-optimize through mutation and selection to approximately maximize a community fitness function, subject only to constraints internal to the particular model. If the interspecies interactions are randomly distributed on an interval including positive values, the system evolves toward self-sustaining, mutualistic communities. In contrast, for the predator-prey case the matrix of interactions is antisym...

  15. An individual-based model for biofilm formation at liquid surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardré, Maxime; Henry, Hervé; Douarche, Carine; Plapp, Mathis

    2015-12-01

    The bacterium Bacillus subtilis frequently forms biofilms at the interface between the culture medium and the air. We present a mathematical model that couples a description of bacteria as individual discrete objects to the standard advection-diffusion equations for the environment. The model takes into account two different bacterial phenotypes. In the motile state, bacteria swim and perform a run-and-tumble motion that is biased toward regions of high oxygen concentration (aerotaxis). In the matrix-producer state they excrete extracellular polymers, which allows them to connect to other bacteria and to form a biofilm. Bacteria are also advected by the fluid, and can trigger bioconvection. Numerical simulations of the model reproduce all the stages of biofilm formation observed in laboratory experiments. Finally, we study the influence of various model parameters on the dynamics and morphology of biofilms.

  16. Modelling hen harrier dynamics to inform human-wildlife conflict resolution: a spatially-realistic, individual-based approach

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heinonen, Johannes P M; Palmer, Stephen C F; Redpath, Steve M; Travis, Justin M J

    2014-01-01

    Individual-based models have gained popularity in ecology, and enable simultaneous incorporation of spatial explicitness and population dynamic processes to understand spatio-temporal patterns of populations...

  17. Evaluating carbon fluxes of global forest ecosystems by using an individual tree-based model FORCCHN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jianyong; Shugart, Herman H; Yan, Xiaodong; Cao, Cougui; Wu, Shuang; Fang, Jing

    2017-02-14

    The carbon budget of forest ecosystems, an important component of the terrestrial carbon cycle, needs to be accurately quantified and predicted by ecological models. As a preamble to apply the model to estimate global carbon uptake by forest ecosystems, we used the CO2 flux measurements from 37 forest eddy-covariance sites to examine the individual tree-based FORCCHN model's performance globally. In these initial tests, the FORCCHN model simulated gross primary production (GPP), ecosystem respiration (ER) and net ecosystem production (NEP) with correlations of 0.72, 0.70 and 0.53, respectively, across all forest biomes. The model underestimated GPP and slightly overestimated ER across most of the eddy-covariance sites. An underestimation of NEP arose primarily from the lower GPP estimates. Model performance was better in capturing both the temporal changes and magnitude of carbon fluxes in deciduous broadleaf forest than in evergreen broadleaf forest, and it performed less well for sites in Mediterranean climate. We then applied the model to estimate the carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems on global scale over 1982-2011. This application of FORCCHN gave a total GPP of 59.41±5.67 and an ER of 57.21±5.32PgCyr(-1) for global forest ecosystems during 1982-2011. The forest ecosystems over this same period contributed a large carbon storage, with total NEP being 2.20±0.64PgCyr(-1). These values are comparable to and reinforce estimates reported in other studies. This analysis highlights individual tree-based model FORCCHN could be used to evaluate carbon fluxes of forest ecosystems on global scale.

  18. Simulating Amazon forest carbon cycling using an individual- and trait-based model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauset, S.; Fyllas, N.; Galbraith, D.; Christoffersen, B. O.; Baker, T. R.; Johnson, M. O.; Malhi, Y.; Phillips, O. L.; Lloyd, J.; Gloor, E. U.

    2014-12-01

    The Amazon forest, a regional and global regulator of climate and store of enormous biodiversity, is an incredibly complex ecosystem. Just one ha of forest can contain 300 different species of tree, with an estimated 16,000 tree species present in the region. Different tree species, and even different individuals of a species, vary in their functional traits, influencing how they behave in response to the environment. Dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs) are commonly used to simulate the response of the Amazon forest to global environmental change. Yet, such DGVMs typically use a plant functional type (PFT) approach where variation between individuals and species are not represented, which inherently limits the range of outcomes for Amazonia under climate change. Here, we report on recent advances in an alternative approach to tropical forest modeling that represents the size structure and variation of traits within a community, which we term the Trait-based Forest Simulator (TFS). As originally proposed, TFS was strictly a steady-state model and here we present an extension of TFS which includes full forest dynamics, and has been evaluated with data collected from intensive carbon cycling inventory plots from the GEM (Global Ecosystems Monitoring) network. Specifically, we compare the model output to stand-level data on productivity and respiration of the canopy, stems and roots. The model development process has highlighted ecological tradeoffs that are necessary to integrate into trait-based models, such as a shorter leaf lifetime with a lower leaf mass per area. The adapted TFS model simulates carbon cycling in forest plots, including variation in productivity between sites. These results lend confidence to the ability of next-generation vegetation models to accurately simulate forest sensitivity to future changes.

  19. Predicting longitudinal change in language production and comprehension in individuals with Down syndrome: hierarchical linear modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Robin S; Hesketh, Linda J; Kistler, Doris J

    2002-10-01

    Longitudinal change in syntax comprehension and production skill, measured four times across a 6-year period, was modeled in 31 individuals with Down syndrome who were between the ages of 5 and 20 years at the start of the study. Hierarchical Linear Modeling was used to fit individual linear growth curves to the measures of syntax comprehension (TACL-R) and mean length of spontaneous utterances obtained in 12-min narrative tasks (MLU-S), yielding two parameters for each participant's comprehension and production: performance at study start and growth trajectory. Predictor variables were obtained by fitting linear growth curves to each individual's concurrent measures of nonverbal visual cognition (Pattern Analysis subtest of the Stanford-Binet), visual short-term memory (Bead Memory subtest), and auditory short-term memory (digit span), yielding two individual predictor parameters for each measure: performance at study start and growth trajectory. Chronological age at study start (grand-mean centered), sex, and hearing status were also taken as predictors. The best-fitting HLM model of the comprehension parameters uses age at study start, visual short-term memory, and auditory short-term memory as predictors of initial status and age at study start as a predictor of growth trajectory. The model accounted for 90% of the variance in intercept parameters, 79% of the variance in slope parameters, and 24% of the variance at level 1. The some predictors were significant predictors of initial status in the best model for production, with no measures predicting slope. The model accounted for 81% of the intercept variance and 43% of the level 1 variance. When comprehension parameters are added to the predictor set, the best model, accounting for 94% of the intercept and 22% of the slope variance, uses only comprehension at study start as a predictor of initial status and comprehension slope as a predictor of production slope. These results reflect the fact that expressive

  20. Criteria for calculation of effective dose from the individual monitoring; Criterios para calculo de dose efetiva a partir da monitoracao individual

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-11-15

    This Regulation refers to the requirements of the Regulation CNEN-NN.3.01. 'Basic Act of Radiological Protection', as expressed in the section 5.9, and its application to the effective dose calculation for individual occupationally exposed. from the internal and external individual monitoring data

  1. Exact solution of gyration radius of individual's trajectory for a simplified human mobility model

    CERN Document Server

    Yan, Xiao-Yong; Zhou, Tao; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2010-01-01

    Gyration radius of individual's trajectory plays a key role in quantifying human mobility patterns. Of particular interests, empirical analyses suggest that the growth of gyration radius is slow versus time except the very early stage and may eventually arrive to a steady value. However, up to now, the underlying mechanism leading to such a possibly steady value has not been well understood. In this Letter, we propose a simplified human mobility model to simulate individual's daily travel with three sequential activities: commuting to workplace, going to do leisure activities and returning home. With the assumption that individual has constant travel speed and inferior limit of time at home and work, we prove that the daily moving area of an individual is an ellipse, and finally get an exact solution of the gyration radius. The analytical solution well captures the empirical observation reported in [M. C. Gonz`alez et al., Nature, 453 (2008) 779]. We also find that, in spite of the heterogeneous displacement ...

  2. Modeling stem increment in individual Pinus occidentalis Sw. trees in La Sierra, Dominican Republic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bueno, S.; Bevilacqua, E.

    2010-07-01

    One of the most common and important tree characteristics used in forest management decision-making is tree diameter-at-breast height (DBH). This paper presents results on an evaluation of two growth functions developed to model stem diameter increases in individual Pinus occidentalis Sw. trees in La Sierra, Dominican Republic. The first model was developed in order to predict future DBH (FDM) at different intervals of time and the other for predicting growth, that is, periodic annual diameter increment (PADIM). Each model employed two statistical techniques for fitting model parameters: stepwise ordinary least squares (OLS) regression, and mixed models. The two statistical approaches varied in how they accounted for the repeated measurements on individual trees over time, affecting standard error estimates and statistical inference of model parameters. Each approach was evaluated based on six goodness of- fit statistics, using both calibration and validation data sets. The objectives were 1) to determine the best model for predicting future tree DBH; 2) to determine the best model for predicting periodic annual diameter increment, both models using tree size, age, site index and different indices of competitive status; and 3) compare which of these two modeling approaches predicts better the future DBH. OLS provided a better fit for both of the growth functions, especially in regards to bias. Both models showed advantages and disadvantages when they were used to predict growth and future diameter. For the prediction of future diameter with FDM, accuracy of predictions were within one centimeter for a five-year projection interval. The PADIM presented negligible bias in estimating future diameter, although there was a small increase in bias as time of prediction increased. As expected, each model was the best in estimating the response variable it was developed for.. However, a closer examination of the distribution of errors showed a slight advantage of the FDM

  3. Modeling socioeconomic status effects on language development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Michael S C; Forrester, Neil A; Ronald, Angelica

    2013-12-01

    Socioeconomic status (SES) is an important environmental predictor of language and cognitive development, but the causal pathways by which it operates are unclear. We used a computational model of development to explore the adequacy of manipulations of environmental information to simulate SES effects in English past-tense acquisition, in a data set provided by Bishop (2005). To our knowledge, this is the first application of computational models of development to SES. The simulations addressed 3 new challenges: (a) to combine models of development and individual differences in a single framework, (b) to expand modeling to the population level, and (c) to implement both environmental and genetic/intrinsic sources of individual differences. The model succeeded in capturing the qualitative patterns of regularity effects in both population performance and the predictive power of SES that were observed in the empirical data. The model suggested that the empirical data are best captured by relatively wider variation in learning abilities and relatively narrow variation in (and good quality of) environmental information. There were shortcomings in the model's quantitative fit, which are discussed. The model made several novel predictions, with respect to the influence of SES on delay versus giftedness, the change of SES effects over development, and the influence of SES on children of different ability levels (gene-environment interactions). The first of these predictions was that SES should reliably predict gifted performance in children but not delayed performance, and the prediction was supported by the Bishop data set. Finally, the model demonstrated limits on the inferences that can be drawn about developmental mechanisms on the basis of data from individual differences. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2013 APA, all rights reserved.

  4. Regression models for estimating leaf area of seedlings and adult individuals of Neotropical rainforest tree species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Brito-Rocha

    Full Text Available Abstract Individual leaf area (LA is a key variable in studies of tree ecophysiology because it directly influences light interception, photosynthesis and evapotranspiration of adult trees and seedlings. We analyzed the leaf dimensions (length – L and width – W of seedlings and adults of seven Neotropical rainforest tree species (Brosimum rubescens, Manilkara maxima, Pouteria caimito, Pouteria torta, Psidium cattleyanum, Symphonia globulifera and Tabebuia stenocalyx with the objective to test the feasibility of single regression models to estimate LA of both adults and seedlings. In southern Bahia, Brazil, a first set of data was collected between March and October 2012. From the seven species analyzed, only two (P. cattleyanum and T. stenocalyx had very similar relationships between LW and LA in both ontogenetic stages. For these two species, a second set of data was collected in August 2014, in order to validate the single models encompassing adult and seedlings. Our results show the possibility of development of models for predicting individual leaf area encompassing different ontogenetic stages for tropical tree species. The development of these models was more dependent on the species than the differences in leaf size between seedlings and adults.

  5. Are individual based models a suitable approach to estimate population vulnerability? - a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Maria Griebeler

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available European populations of the Large Blue Butterfly Maculinea arion have experienced severe declines in the last decades, especially in the northern part of the species range. This endangered lycaenid butterfly needs two resources for development: flower buds of specific plants (Thymus spp., Origanum vulgare, on which young caterpillars briefly feed, and red ants of the genus Myrmica, whose nests support caterpillars during a prolonged final instar. I present an analytically solvable deterministic model to estimate the vulnerability of populations of M. arion. Results obtained from the sensitivity analysis of this mathematical model (MM are contrasted to the respective results that had been derived from a spatially explicit individual based model (IBM for this butterfly. I demonstrate that details in landscape configuration which are neglected by the MM but are easily taken into consideration by the IBM result in a different degree of intraspecific competition of caterpillars on flower buds and within host ant nests. The resulting differences in mortalities of caterpillars lead to erroneous estimates of the extinction risk of a butterfly population living in habitat with low food plant coverage and low abundance in host ant nests. This observation favors the use of an individual based modeling approach over the deterministic approach at least for the management of this threatened butterfly.

  6. CONCEPTUAL MODEL OF STAGED FORMATION OF AN INDIVIDUAL CREATIVE METHOD OF AN ARCHITECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kolstet O. A.

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the development of a model of gradual formation of individual creative method of an architect in the propaedeutic level since preuniversity stage (with the involvement of distance training and its continuity of the first courses of architectural disciplines in high school in terms of the Rostov school of architecture. There have been examined some studies by Nechaev N.N. and Sulimenko S.D. at the architectural department of the Far Eastern Technical University, that have revealed a non-linear nature of the formation of spatial thinking and the need to develop a systematic approach in the propaedeutic phase of training. These studies formed the basis of a new conceptual model. A list of the input competence requirements for applicants entering architectural universities to ensure the quality of training at university propaedeutic phase is done. Methodological feature of the Rostov school of architecture, which is both a synthesis of problems in the field of threedimensional composition and design problems is revealed, as well as a combination of methods of modeling and manual architectural drawing with computer graphics (SketchUp, CorelDraw, Photoshop, AutoCad. The schemes of a number of separate stages of the formation of individual creative method of the architect, as well as the general scheme of the whole conceptual model is given

  7. Development and evaluation of the herd dynamic milk model with focus on the individual cow component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruelle, E; Delaby, L; Wallace, M; Shalloo, L

    2016-12-01

    The herd dynamic milk (HDM) model is a dynamic model capable of simulating the performance of individual dairy animals (from birth to death), with a daily time step. Within this study, the HDM model is described and evaluated in relation to milk production, body condition score (BCS) and BCS change throughout lactation by comparing model simulations against data from published experimental studies. The model's response to variation in genetic potential, herbage allowance and concentrate supplementation was tested in a sensitivity analysis. Data from experiments in Ireland and France over a 3-year period (2009-11) were used to complete the evaluation. The aim of the Irish experiment was to determine the impact of different stocking rates (SRs) (SR1: 3.28 cow/ha, SR2: 2.51 cow/ha) on key physical, biological and economic performance. The aim of the French experiment was to evaluate over a prolonged time period, the ability of two breeds of dairy cows (Holstein and Normande) to produce and to reproduce under two feeding strategies (high level and low level) in the context of compact calving. The model evaluation was conducted at the herd level with separate evaluations for the primiparous and multiparous cows. The evaluation included the two extreme SRs for the Irish experiment, and an evaluation at the overall herd and individual animal level for the different breeds and feeding levels for the French data. The comparison of simulation and experimental data for all scenarios resulted in a relative prediction error, which was consistently model responded in a realistic fashion to variation in genetic potential for milk production, herbage allowance and concentrate supplementation.

  8. Predicting the efficacy of radiotherapy in individual glioblastoma patients in vivo: a mathematical modeling approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rockne, R; Alvord, E C Jr; Swanson, K R [Department of Pathology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Rockhill, J K; Kalet, I; Hendrickson, K [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Mrugala, M; Spence, A M [Department of Neurology, University of Washington, 1959 NE Pacific St, Seattle, WA 98195 (United States); Lai, A; Cloughesy, T, E-mail: krae@uw.ed [Department of Neurology, University of California, 710 Westwood Plaza, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2010-06-21

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant form of primary brain tumors known as gliomas. They proliferate and invade extensively and yield short life expectancies despite aggressive treatment. Response to treatment is usually measured in terms of the survival of groups of patients treated similarly, but this statistical approach misses the subgroups that may have responded to or may have been injured by treatment. Such statistics offer scant reassurance to individual patients who have suffered through these treatments. Furthermore, current imaging-based treatment response metrics in individual patients ignore patient-specific differences in tumor growth kinetics, which have been shown to vary widely across patients even within the same histological diagnosis and, unfortunately, these metrics have shown only minimal success in predicting patient outcome. We consider nine newly diagnosed GBM patients receiving diagnostic biopsy followed by standard-of-care external beam radiation therapy (XRT). We present and apply a patient-specific, biologically based mathematical model for glioma growth that quantifies response to XRT in individual patients in vivo. The mathematical model uses net rates of proliferation and migration of malignant tumor cells to characterize the tumor's growth and invasion along with the linear-quadratic model for the response to radiation therapy. Using only routinely available pre-treatment MRIs to inform the patient-specific bio-mathematical model simulations, we find that radiation response in these patients, quantified by both clinical and model-generated measures, could have been predicted prior to treatment with high accuracy. Specifically, we find that the net proliferation rate is correlated with the radiation response parameter (r = 0.89, p = 0.0007), resulting in a predictive relationship that is tested with a leave-one-out cross-validation technique. This relationship predicts the tumor size post-therapy to within inter

  9. The Relationships between Individualism, Nationalism, Ethnocentrism, and Authoritarianism in Flanders: A Continuous Time-Structural Equation Modeling Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angraini, Yenni; Toharudin, Toni; Folmer, Henk; Oud, Johan H L

    2014-01-01

    This article analyzes the relationships among nationalism (N), individualism (I), ethnocentrism (E), and authoritarianism (A) in continuous time (CT), estimated as a structural equation model. The analysis is based on the General Election Study for Flanders, Belgium, for 1991, 1995, and 1999. We find reciprocal effects between A and E and between E and I as well as a unidirectional effect from A on I. We furthermore find relatively small, but significant, effects from both I and E on N but no effect from A on N or from N on any of the other variables. Because of its central role in the N-I-E-A complex, mitigation of authoritarianism has the largest potential to reduce the spread of nationalism, ethnocentrism, and racism in Flanders.

  10. Effect of moderate- and high-intensity acute exercise on appetite in obese individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martins, Catia; Stensvold, Dorthe; Finlayson, Graham

    2015-01-01

    cycling (MICC) or short-duration HIIC (S-HIIC) (125 kcal) and a resting control condition on the appetite hormone responses, subjective feelings of appetite, energy intake (EI), and food reward in overweight/obese individuals. METHODS: This study is a randomized crossover study on 12 overweight/obese......, hunger or fullness ratings, EI, or food reward. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that, in overweight/obese individuals, isocaloric bouts of moderate- or high-intensity exercise lead to a similar appetite response. This strengthens previous findings in normal-weight individuals that acute exercise, even......PURPOSE: The effect of acute exercise, and exercise intensity, on appetite control in obese individuals requires further study. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of acute isocaloric bouts (250 kcal) of high-intensity intermittent cycling (HIIC) and moderate-intensity continuous...

  11. Effect of visual biofeedback to acquire supraglottic swallow in healthy individuals: a randomized-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imada, Miho; Kagaya, Hitoshi; Ishiguro, Yuriko; Kato, Miho; Inamoto, Yoko; Tanaka, Takashi; Shibata, Seiko; Saitoh, Eiichi

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of visual biofeedback therapy in acquiring supraglottic swallow (SGS) in a randomized-controlled trial with healthy individuals. Eighteen individuals (mean age, 26 years) who could not close or keep closed the vocal folds before and during the swallow in SGS were allocated randomly to either a visual biofeedback group (eight individuals) or a nonbiofeedback group (10 individuals). A videoendoscope was inserted intranasally and an SGS exercise, using 4 ml of green-colored water, was performed 30 times per day up to 5 days. When the participant failed to perform SGS, the result was provided only to the participants in the visual biofeedback group. The median length of time until acquiring SGS was 1.5 days in the visual biofeedback group and 3.5 days in the nonbiofeedback group (P=0.040). We concluded that visual biofeedback effectively enabled participants to acquire SGS earlier.

  12. The effects of individual differences and charismatic leadership on workplace aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Willie; Towler, Annette

    2004-04-01

    This study examined the effects of individual differences variables (trait anger, self-control, negative affectivity, attitudes toward revenge, and attributional style) and charismatic leadership on incidents of workplace aggression in a sample of 213 employees from a wide range of organizations. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses indicated that the individual differences variables accounted for 27% of the variance in workplace aggression and that charismatic leadership accounted for an additional 3% after controlling for individual differences. In addition, psychological empowerment partially mediated the relationship between charismatic leadership and workplace aggression.

  13. Moderators of the mediated effect of intentions, planning, and saturated-fat intake in obese individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soureti, Anastasia; Hurling, Robert; van Mechelen, Willem; Cobain, Mark; ChinAPaw, Mai

    2012-05-01

    The present study aimed to advance our understanding of health-related theory, that is, the alleged intention-behavior gap in an obese population. It examined the mediating effects of planning on the intention-behavior relationship and the moderated mediation effects of age, self-efficacy and intentions within this relationship. The study was conducted over a five-week period. Complete data from 571 obese participants were analyzed. The moderated mediation hypothesis was conducted using multiple-regression analysis. To test our theoretical model, intentions (Week 2), action self-efficacy (Week 2), maintenance self-efficacy (Week 5), planning (Week 5), and saturated-fat intake (Weeks 1 and 5) were measured by self-report. As hypothesized, planning mediated the intention-behavior relationship for perceived (two-item scale) and percentage-saturated-fat intake (measured by a food frequency questionnaire). Age, self-efficacy, and intention acted as moderators in the above mediation analysis. In specific, younger individuals, those with stronger intention, and people with higher levels of maintenance self-efficacy at higher levels of planning showed greater reductions in their perceived saturated-fat intake. For successful behavior change, knowledge of its mediators and moderators is needed. Future interventions targeting planning to change saturated-fat intake should be guided by people's intentions, age, and self-efficacy levels.

  14. Effects of EFL Individual Learner Variables on Foreign Language Reading Anxiety and Metacognitive Reading Strategy Use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lien, Hsin-Yi

    2016-08-01

    Past research has shown an association between foreign language reading anxiety and reading strategy. However, individual variables tend to affect foreign language anxiety and strategy use. The present study examined a hypothesized model that specified direct and indirect effects among English and foreign languages readers' distinct variables, including academic level; self-perceived English level; and satisfaction with reading proficiency, reading anxiety, and metacognitive awareness of reading strategies. A total of 523 volunteer Taiwanese college students provided 372 valid responses to a written questionnaire (281 women and 91 men; M age = 19.7 years, SD = 1.1) containing the translated versions of Foreign Language Reading Anxiety Scale, Survey of Reading Strategies Inventory, and self-assessment background questionnaire. The results showed that self-evaluation of reading proficiency did not correlate with academic level and readers' perceptions. Satisfaction had a direct effect on foreign language reading anxiety but not on metacognitive awareness of reading strategies. Results of path analysis demonstrated that the perception learners who had their own reading proficiency predicted their foreign language reading anxiety and was a mediating variable for metacognitive reading strategy use. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. Optimization of an individual re-identification modeling process using biometric features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heredia-Langner, Alejandro; Amidan, Brett G.; Matzner, Shari; Jarman, Kristin H.

    2014-09-24

    We present results from the optimization of a re-identification process using two sets of biometric data obtained from the Civilian American and European Surface Anthropometry Resource Project (CAESAR) database. The datasets contain real measurements of features for 2378 individuals in a standing (43 features) and seated (16 features) position. A genetic algorithm (GA) was used to search a large combinatorial space where different features are available between the probe (seated) and gallery (standing) datasets. Results show that optimized model predictions obtained using less than half of the 43 gallery features and data from roughly 16% of the individuals available produce better re-identification rates than two other approaches that use all the information available.

  16. Dimensions of individual religiosity and charity : Cross national effect differences in European countries?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, Peer; Grotenhuis, Manfred te; Reitsma, J.

    2006-01-01

    The relation between religiosity and donations to charity has frequently been subject of research. We analyzed effects of dimensions of individual religiosity (Glock and Stark 1966) on people's intention to donate to the poorest countries. We tested for cross-national effect differences in represent

  17. Midterm Peer Feedback in Problem-Based Learning Groups: The Effect on Individual Contributions and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Rachelle J. A.; van Berkel, Henk J. M.; Popeijus, Herman E.; Leppink, Jimmie; Schmidt, Henk G.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Even though peer process feedback is an often used tool to enhance the effectiveness of collaborative learning environments like PBL, the conditions under which it is best facilitated still need to be investigated. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of individual versus shared reflection and goal setting on students' individual…

  18. Dimensions of individual religiosity and charity : Cross national effect differences in European countries?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheepers, Peer; Grotenhuis, Manfred te; Reitsma, J.

    2006-01-01

    The relation between religiosity and donations to charity has frequently been subject of research. We analyzed effects of dimensions of individual religiosity (Glock and Stark 1966) on people's intention to donate to the poorest countries. We tested for cross-national effect differences in represent

  19. Effectiveness and feasibility of eccentric and task-oriented strength training in individuals with stroke

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folkerts, Mireille A; Hijmans, Juha M.; Elsinghorst, Anne L.; Mulderij, Yvon; Murgia, Alessio; Dekker, Rienk

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Strength training can increase function in individuals with stroke. However it is unclear which type of strength training is most effective and feasible. OBJECTIVE: To assess the effect and feasibility of an intervention combining eccentric and task-oriented strength training in

  20. Effectiveness of individually delivered indicated school-based interventions on externalizing behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stoltz, S.E.M.J.; Londen, M. van; Dekovic, Maja; Orobio de Castro, B.; Prinzie, P.

    2012-01-01

    In the present study the results of two meta-analyses on the effectiveness of individually delivered indicated school-based interventions for externalizing behavior problems at elementary schools are presented. A distinction was made between studies that evaluated effects of interventions with only

  1. Midterm Peer Feedback in Problem-Based Learning Groups: The Effect on Individual Contributions and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Rachelle J. A.; van Berkel, Henk J. M.; Popeijus, Herman E.; Leppink, Jimmie; Schmidt, Henk G.; Dolmans, Diana H. J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Even though peer process feedback is an often used tool to enhance the effectiveness of collaborative learning environments like PBL, the conditions under which it is best facilitated still need to be investigated. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of individual versus shared reflection and goal setting on students' individual…

  2. Best practice: E-Model--prescribing physical activity and exercise for individuals with fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busch, Angela J; Thille, Patty; Barber, Karen A R; Schachter, Candice L; Bidonde, Julia; Collacott, Brenda K

    2008-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) is a serious and debilitating condition, encompassing a wide range of symptoms. Physical therapists often advocate the incorporation of leisure time physical activity (exercise training or recreational physical activity) as an important management strategy for individuals with FM. Decisions about physical activity prescription in clinical practice are informed by a variety of sources. This topical review considers physical activity prescription using the E-Model as a framework for best practice decision making. We examine findings from randomized trials, published experts, and qualitative studies through the lens of the model's five Es: 1) evidence, 2) expectations, 3) environment, 4) ethics, and 5) experience. This approach provides a robust foundation from which to make best practice decisions. Application of this model also facilitates the identification of gaps and discrepancies in the literature, future opportunities for knowledge exchange and translation, and future research.

  3. Psychological resilience, pain catastrophizing, and positive emotions: perspectives on comprehensive modeling of individual pain adaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgeon, John A; Zautra, Alex J

    2013-03-01

    Pain is a complex construct that contributes to profound physical and psychological dysfunction, particularly in individuals coping with chronic pain. The current paper builds upon previous research, describes a balanced conceptual model that integrates aspects of both psychological vulnerability and resilience to pain, and reviews protective and exacerbating psychosocial factors to the process of adaptation to chronic pain, including pain catastrophizing, pain acceptance, and positive psychological resources predictive of enhanced pain coping. The current paper identifies future directions for research that will further enrich the understanding of pain adaptation and espouses an approach that will enhance the ecological validity of psychological pain coping models, including introduction of advanced statistical and conceptual models that integrate behavioral, cognitive, information processing, motivational and affective theories of pain.

  4. Towards individualized dose constraints: Adjusting the QUANTEC radiation pneumonitis model for clinical risk factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Vogelius, Ivan R.; Farr, Katherina P.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Understanding the dose-response of the lung in order to minimize the risk of radiation pneumonitis (RP) is critical for optimization of lung cancer radiotherapy. We propose a method to combine the dose-response relationship for RP in the landmark QUANTEC paper with known clinical risk......-only QUANTEC model and the model including risk factors. Subdistribution cumulative incidence functions were compared for patients with high/low-risk predictions from the two models, and concordance indices (c-indices) for the prediction of RP were calculated. Results. The reference dose- response relationship...... factors, in order to enable individual risk prediction. The approach is validated in an independent dataset. Material and methods. The prevalence of risk factors in the patient populations underlying the QUANTEC analysis was estimated, and a previously published method to adjust dose...

  5. Practical prediction model for the risk of 2-year mortality of individuals in the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb-Rumyantzev, Alexander; Gautam, Shiva; Brown, Robert S

    2016-04-01

    This study proposed to validate a prediction model and risk-stratification tool of 2-year mortality rates of individuals in the general population suitable for office practice use. A risk indicator (R) derived from data in the literature was based on only 6 variables: to calculate R for an individual, starting with 0, for each year of age above 60, add 0.14; for a male, add 0.9; for diabetes mellitus, add 0.7; for albuminuria > 30 mg/g of creatinine, add 0.7; for stage ≥ 3 chronic kidney disease (CKD), add 0.9; for cardiovascular disease (CVD), add 1.4; or for both CKD and CVD, add 1.7. We developed a univariate logistic regression model predicting 2-year individual mortality rates. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) data set (1999-2004 with deaths through 2006) was used as the target for validation. These 12,515 subjects had a mean age of 48.9 ± 18.1 years, 48% males, 9.5% diabetes, 11.7% albuminuria, 6.8% CVD, 5.4% CKD, and 2.8% both CKD and CVD. Using the risk indicator R alone to predict mortality demonstrated good performance with area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve of 0.84. Dividing subjects into low-risk (R=0-1.0), low intermediate risk (R > 1.0-3.0), high intermediate risk (R > 3.0-5.0) or high-risk (R > 5.0) categories predicted 2-year mortality rates of 0.52%, 1.44%, 5.19% and 15.24%, respectively, by the prediction model compared with actual mortality rates of 0.29%, 2.48%, 5.13% and 13.40%, respectively. We have validated a model of risk stratification using easily identified clinical characteristics to predict 2-year mortality rates of individuals in the general population. The model demonstrated performance adequate for its potential use for clinical practice and research decisions.

  6. A Review and Treatment Selection Model for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities Who Engage in Inappropriate Sexual Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Tonya N; Machalicek, Wendy; Scalzo, Rachel; Kobylecky, Alicia; Campbell, Vincent; Pinkelman, Sarah; Chan, Jeffrey Michael; Sigafoos, Jeff

    2016-12-01

    Some individuals with developmental disabilities develop inappropriate sexual behaviors such as public masturbation, disrobing, and touching others in an unwanted sexual manner. Such acts are problematic given the taboo nature of the behaviors and the potential for significant negative consequences, such as restricted community access, injury, and legal ramifications. Therefore, it is necessary to equip caregivers and practitioners with effective treatment options. The purpose of this paper is to review studies that have evaluated behavioral treatments to reduce inappropriate sexual behavior in persons with developmental disabilities. The strengths and weaknesses of each treatment are reviewed, and a model for treatment selection is provided.

  7. Meta-analysis of individual and combined effects of mycotoxins on growing pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Andretta

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Little is known about the toxicity of concomitantly occurring mycotoxins in pig diets. This study was conducted to evaluate, through meta-analysis, the individual and the combined effects of mycotoxins on pig performance. The meta-analysis followed three sequential analyses (graphical, correlation, and variance-covariance based on a database composed of 85 published papers, 1,012 treatments and 13,196 animals. Contamination of diets with individual mycotoxins reduced (p < 0.05 feed intake by 14 % and weight gain by 17 %, while combined mycotoxins reduced the same responses by 42 % and 45 %, respectively, in comparison with the non-challenged group. The correlation (p < 0.05 between reduction in weight gain (ΔG and reduction in feed intake (ΔFI was 0.67 in individual challenges and 0.93 in combined challenges. The estimated ΔG was –6 % in individual challenges and –7 % in combined challenges when ΔFI was zero, suggesting an increase in the maintenance requirements of challenged animals. Most of ΔG (58 % in individual challenges and 84 % in combined challenges was attributed to the changes in feed efficiency. The association of mycotoxins enhances individual toxic effects and the ΔFI is important in explaining the deleterious effects on the growth of challenged pigs.

  8. USING ECO-EVOLUTIONARY INDIVIDUAL-BASED MODELS TO INVESTIGATE SPATIALLY-DEPENDENT PROCESSES IN CONSERVATION GENETICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-evolutionary population simulation models are powerful new forecasting tools for exploring management strategies for climate change and other dynamic disturbance regimes. Additionally, eco-evo individual-based models (IBMs) are useful for investigating theoretical feedbacks ...

  9. USING ECO-EVOLUTIONARY INDIVIDUAL-BASED MODELS TO INVESTIGATE SPATIALLY-DEPENDENT PROCESSES IN CONSERVATION GENETICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eco-evolutionary population simulation models are powerful new forecasting tools for exploring management strategies for climate change and other dynamic disturbance regimes. Additionally, eco-evo individual-based models (IBMs) are useful for investigating theoretical feedbacks ...

  10. Testing the health promotion model for adherence and quality of life in individuals with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penwell-Waines, Lauren; Lewis, Kimberly; Valvano, Abbey; Smith, Suzanne; Rahn, Rebecca; Stepleman, Lara

    2017-02-01

    The nature of multiple sclerosis (MS) presents challenges to health-promoting behaviors (e.g. adherence) and quality of life. The Health Promotion Model (HPM) proposes that these outcomes are explained by individual characteristics (i.e. biological, social, psychological) and behavior-specific cognitions (e.g. self-efficacy). The current study sought to test the HPM in explaining self-reported adherence and MS quality of life among 121 MS patients receiving care in an MS clinic in the southeastern United States. Hierarchical regression models partially supported the HPM for adherence (R(2) = .27) and more fully for quality of life (QoL) (R(2) = .64). Depression and stigma were among the variables most strongly related to both adherence and QoL; contrary to HPM theory, self-efficacy was not significantly related to adherence but was to QoL. Thus, the HPM may help to guide strategies used to improve QoL among individuals living with MS; however, the model may need further refinement to be used with adherence.

  11. Explaining the Muslim employment gap in Western Europe: individual-level effects and ethno-religious penalties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Phillip; Koenig, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    It is well-documented that Muslims experience economic disadvantages in Western European labor markets. However, few studies comprehensively test individual-level explanations for the Muslim employment gap. Using data from the European Social Survey, this research note briefly examines the role of individual-level differences between Muslims and non-Muslims in mediating employment differences. Results reveal that human capital, migration background, religiosity, cultural values, and perceptions of discrimination jointly account for about 40% of the employment variance between Muslims and non-Muslims. Model specifications for first- and second-generation Muslim immigrants reveal a similar pattern, with migration background and perceived discrimination being of key relevance in mediating employment difference. While individual-level effects are indeed relevant, unexplained variance suggests that symbolic boundaries against Islam may still translate into tangible ethno-religious penalties.

  12. Effects of Maya ancestry and environmental variables on knee height and body proportionality in growing individuals in Merida, Yucatan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Vázquez, Adriana; Azcorra, Hugo; Falfán, Ina; Argáeź, Jorge; Kantun, Diódora; Dickinson, Federico

    2013-01-01

    Identify the biological, social, and economic conditions influencing the knee height/stature index (KHSI) in growing individuals of Maya ancestry in the city of Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. The hypothesis was that KHSI values would be lower in subjects with two Maya surnames. This was tested by analyzing the effect of a series of environmental, biological, and socioeconomic variables on stature and knee height (KH). Data were collected from 2008 to 2009 from 841 individuals (444 girls), 9 to 17 years of age, in Merida, Yucatan, Mexico. Ancestry was used as a proxy for genetics, and based on number of Maya surnames (2, 1, or none). The KHSI was calculated for all individuals. Multiple regression models were run to identify the variables that best explained variation in stature, KH, and KHSI. Ancestry negatively (P Mayas. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  13. Multiple mediation path model of pain's cascading influence on physical disability in individuals with SCI from Colombia, South America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrin, Paul B; Paredes, Alejandra Morlett; Olivera, Silvia Leonor; Lozano, Juan Esteban; Leal, Wendy Tatiana; Ahmad, Usman F; Arango-Lasprilla, Juan Carlos

    2017-01-01

    Research has begun to document the bivariate connections between pain in individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI) and various aspects of health related quality of life (HRQOL), such as fatigue, social functioning, mental health, and physical functioning. The purpose of this study was to construct and test a theoretical path model illuminating the stage-wise and sequential (cascading) HRQOL pathways through which pain increases physical disability in individuals with SCI in a sample from Colombia, South America. It was hypothesized that increased pain would lead to decreased energy, which would lead to decreased mental health and social functioning, which both would lead to emotional role limitations, which finally would lead to physical role limitations. A cross-sectional study assessed individuals with SCI (n = 40) in Neiva, Colombia. Participants completed a measure indexing various aspects of HRQOL. The path model overall showed excellent fit indices, and each individual path within the model was statistically significant. Pain exerted significant indirect effects through all possible mediators in the model, ultimately suggesting that energy, mental health, social functioning, and role limitations-emotional were likely pathways through which pain exerted its effects on physical disability in individuals with SCI. These findings uncover several potential nodes for clinical intervention which if targeted in the context of rehabilitation or outpatient services, could result in salubrious direct and indirect effects reverberating down the theoretical causal chain and ultimately reducing physical disability in individuals with SCI.

  14. Midterm peer feedback in problem-based learning groups: the effect on individual contributions and achievement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamp, Rachelle J A; van Berkel, Henk J M; Popeijus, Herman E; Leppink, Jimmie; Schmidt, Henk G; Dolmans, Diana H J M

    2014-03-01

    Even though peer process feedback is an often used tool to enhance the effectiveness of collaborative learning environments like PBL, the conditions under which it is best facilitated still need to be investigated. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of individual versus shared reflection and goal setting on students' individual contributions to the group and their academic achievement. In addition, the influence of prior knowledge on the effectiveness of peer feedback was studied. In this pretest-intervention-posttest study 242 first year students were divided into three conditions: condition 1 (individual reflection and goal setting), condition 2 (individual and shared reflection and goal setting), and condition 3 (control group). Results indicated that the quality of individual contributions to the tutorial group did not improve after receiving the peer feedback, nor did it differ between the three conditions. With regard to academic achievement, only males in conditions 1 and 2 showed better academic achievement compared with condition 3. However, there was no difference between both ways of reflection and goal setting with regard to achievement, indicating that both ways are equally effective. Nevertheless, it is still too early to conclude that peer feedback combined with reflection and goal setting is not effective in enhancing students' individual contributions. Students only had a limited number of opportunities to improve their contributions. Therefore, future research should investigate whether an increase in number of tutorial group meetings can enhance the effectiveness of peer feedback. In addition, the effect of quality of reflection and goal setting could be taken into consideration in future research.

  15. Within-Individual Variation in Preferences Equity Effects of Congestion Charges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borjesson, Maria; Cherchi, Elisabetta; Bierlaire, Michel

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to explore how the values of travel time (VTT) and preferences for different modes vary within individuals compared with the variation between observed trips. With 6-week revealed preference panel data and stated preference data from a mode choice context, both...... collected in Switzerland, a revealed stated preference logit mode choice model was estimated. The model was applied to simulate how VTT and change in consumer surplus vary across trips within and between individuals over the 6 weeks in response to a hypothetical congestion-charging scheme. The variation...... in VTT arising from income differences was found to be substantially smaller than the variation in VTT between trips. Moreover, the variability in VTT averaged over all trips within each individual was considerably smaller than the variability in VTT for all observed trips. Therefore, the assumption...

  16. The effect of varying the number of response alternatives in rating scales: experimental evidence from intra-individual effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maydeu-Olivares, Alberto; Kramp, Uwe; García-Forero, Carlos; Gallardo-Pujol, David; Coffman, Donna

    2009-05-01

    Despite a hundred years of questionnaire testing, no consensus has been reached on the optimal number of response alternatives in rating scales. Differences in prior research may have been due to the use of various psychometric models (classical test theory, item factor analysis, and item response theory) and different performance criteria (reliability, convergent/discriminant validity, and internal structure of the questionnaire). Furthermore, previous empirical studies on this issue have tackled the experimental design from a between-subjects perspective, thus ignoring intra-individual effects. In contrast with this approach, we propose a within-subjects experimental design and a comprehensive statistical methodology using structural equation models for studying all of these aspects simultaneously, therefore increasing statistical power. To illustrate the method, two personality questionnaires were examined using a repeated measures design. Results indicated that as the number of response alternatives increased, (1) internal consistency increased, (2) there was no effect on convergent validity, and (3) goodness of fit worsened. Finally, the article assesses the practical consequences of this research for the design of future personality questionnaires.

  17. A mediation model of individual differences in attitudes toward affirmative actions for women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscoso, Silvia; García-Izquierdo, Antonio L; Bastida, María

    2012-06-01

    A mediation model of the relation between gender and attitudes toward affirmative action in favor of working women was tested. Four mediation variables were considered: perceived unfairness in the situation of working women, perceived threat to the non-designated group (men), self-esteem, and gender self-concept (masculinity and femininity). 192 women and 128 men, with differing occupations, participated. Gender affects individuals' attitudes toward affirmative actions for women, mediated by perceived unfairness in the situation of working women, perceived threat to the non-designated group, and feminine self-concept. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  18. Differential effects of individual-linked and team-level status allocation on professionals' job performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Emmerik, H.; Lambooij, M.; Sanders, K.

    2002-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between status allocation and job performance of professionals. On the basis of Bergery's status characteristics model, it was hypothesized that individual-linked and team-level status allocation would positively affect compliance and contextual job performance.

  19. Extrapolating toxic effects on individuals to the population level: the role of dynamic energy budgets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jager, T.; Klok, T.C.

    2010-01-01

    The interest of environmental management is in the long-term health of populations and ecosystems. However, toxicity is usually assessed in short-term experiments with individuals. Modelling based on dynamic energy budget (DEB) theory aids the extraction of mechanistic information from the data,

  20. Representing the acquisition and use of energy by individuals in agent-based models of animal populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibly, Richard M.; Grimm, Volker; Martin, Benjamin T.; Johnston, Alice S.A.; Kulakowska, Katarzyna; Topping, Christopher J.; Calow, Peter; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob; Thorbek, Pernille; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    1. Agent-based models (ABMs) are widely used to predict how populations respond to changing environments. As the availability of food varies in space and time, individuals should have their own energy budgets, but there is no consensus as to how these should be modelled. Here, we use knowledge of physiological ecology to identify major issues confronting the modeller and to make recommendations about how energy budgets for use in ABMs should be constructed. 2. Our proposal is that modelled animals forage as necessary to supply their energy needs for maintenance, growth and reproduction. If there is sufficient energy intake, an animal allocates the energy obtained in the order: maintenance, growth, reproduction, energy storage, until its energy stores reach an optimal level. If there is a shortfall, the priorities for maintenance and growth/reproduction remain the same until reserves fall to a critical threshold below which all are allocated to maintenance. Rates of ingestion and allocation depend on body mass and temperature. We make suggestions for how each of these processes should be modelled mathematically. 3. Mortality rates vary with body mass and temperature according to known relationships, and these can be used to obtain estimates of background mortality rate. 4. If parameter values cannot be obtained directly, then values may provisionally be obtained by parameter borrowing, pattern-oriented modelling, artificial evolution or from allometric equations. 5. The development of ABMs incorporating individual energy budgets is essential for realistic modelling of populations affected by food availability. Such ABMs are already being used to guide conservation planning of nature reserves and shell fisheries, to assess environmental impacts of building proposals including wind farms and highways and to assess the effects on nontarget organisms of chemicals for the control of agricultural pests.

  1. Towards a Personalised, Learning Style Based Collaborative Blended Learning Model with Individual Assessment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilona BÉRES

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we aim to describe the process by which our personalised web-based collaborative teaching/learning methodology (CECIP - Collaboration - Evaluation - Critical thinking - Individual assessment - learner Profile evolved originating from Vygotsky's theory and based on the (C collaborative construction of student's knowledge, (E developing evaluation and assessment skills, (C developing critical thinking skills, (I integrating individual evaluation and (P generating learner profile. Our CECIP methodology integrates individual learning style dimensions and their preferences into e-learning environment by filling out MBTI, Gardner, GEFT and Felder-Silverman questionnaires during our four-semester-research. The paper covers the theoretical foundations of Learning Styles giving analogies to preferred learning strategies. A three-part-research process is described through which the described CECIP model emerged: (1 analysing Learning Styles and Learning Management Systems that claim to support their work; (2 raising the background knowledge of students in cognitive psychology in order to improve design and evaluation methodologies of multimedia learning materials; (3 personalising tasks and assessment based on Bloom's Taxonomy.

  2. Synergistic Effect of β-Amyloid and Neurodegeneration on Cognitive Decline in Clinically Normal Individuals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mormino, Elizabeth C.; Betensky, Rebecca A.; Hedden, Trey; Schultz, Aaron P.; Amariglio, Rebecca E.; Rentz, Dorene M.; Johnson, Keith A.; Sperling, Reisa A.

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Assessing the ability of Alzheimer disease neuroimaging markers to predict short-term cognitive decline among clinically normal (CN) individuals is critical for upcoming secondary prevention trials using cognitive outcomes. OBJECTIVE To determine whether neuroimaging markers of β-amyloid (Aβ) and neurodegeneration (ND) are independently or synergistically associated with longitudinal cognitive decline in CN individuals. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS Academic medical center longitudinal natural history study among 166 CN individuals (median age, 74 years; 92 women). MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES The Aβ status was determined with Pittsburgh Compound B–positron emission tomography, while ND was assessed using 2 a priori measures, hippocampus volume (magnetic resonance imaging) and glucose metabolism (positron emission tomography with fludeoxyglucose F 18), extracted from Alzheimer disease–vulnerable regions. Based on imaging markers, CN individuals were categorized into the following preclinical Alzheimer disease stages: stage 0 (Aβ−/ND−), stage 1 (Aβ+/ND−), stage 2 (Aβ+/ND+), and suspected non–Alzheimer disease pathology (Aβ−/ND+). Cognition was assessed with a composite of neuropsychological tests administered annually. RESULTS The Aβ+ CN individuals were more likely to be classified as ND+: 59.6% of Aβ+ CN individuals were ND+, whereas 31.9% of Aβ− CN individuals were ND+ (odds ratio, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.44–7.02; P = .004). In assessing longitudinal cognitive performance, practice effects were evident in CN individuals negative for both Aβ and ND, whereas diminished practice effects were observed in CN individuals positive for either Aβ or ND. Decline over time was observed only in CN individuals positive for both Aβ and ND, and decline in this group was significantly greater than that in all other groups (P < .001 for all). A significant interaction term between Aβ and ND confirmed that this decline was greater than the

  3. Modeling and Simulating Environmental Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Guest, Peter S.; Murphree, Tom; Frederickson, Paul A.; Guest, Arlene A.

    2012-01-01

    MOVES Research & Education Systems Seminar: Presentation; Session 4: Collaborative NWDC/NPS M&S Research; Moderator: Curtis Blais; Modeling and Simulating Environmental Effects; speakers: Peter Guest, Paul Frederickson & Tom Murphree Environmental Effects Group

  4. Effects of differences in nasal anatomy on airflow distribution: a comparison of four individuals at rest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segal, Rebecca A; Kepler, Grace M; Kimbell, Julia S

    2008-11-01

    Differences in nasal anatomy among human subjects may cause significant differences in respiratory airflow patterns and subsequent dosimetry of inhaled gases and particles in the respiratory tract. This study used computational fluid dynamics (CFD) to study inter-individual differences in nasal airflow among four healthy individuals. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were digitized and nasal-surface-area-to-volume ratios (SAVR) were calculated for 15 adults. Two males and two females, representative of the range of SAVR values, were selected for flow analysis. Nasal CFD models were constructed for each subject by a semi-automated process that provided input to a commercial mesh generator to generate structured hexahedral meshes (Gambit, Fluent, Inc., Lebanon, NH, USA). Steady-state inspiratory laminar airflow at 15 L/min was calculated using commercial CFD software (FIDAP, Fluent, Inc., Lebanon, NH, USA). Streamline patterns, velocities, and helicity values were compared. In all subjects, the majority of flow passed through the middle and ventral regions of the nasal passages; however, the amount and location of swirling flow differed among individuals. Cross-sectional flow allocation analysis also indicated inter-individual differences. Laboratory water-dye experiments confirmed streamlines and velocity magnitudes predicted by the computational model. These results suggest that significant inter-individual differences exist in bulk airflow patterns in the nose.

  5. An individual-based predator-prey model for biological coevolution: Fluctuations, stability, and community structure

    CERN Document Server

    Rikvold, Per Arne

    2007-01-01

    We study an individual-based predator-prey model of biological coevolution, using linear stability analysis and large-scale kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. The model exhibits approximate 1/f noise in diversity and population-size fluctuations, and it generates a sequence of quasi-steady communities in the form of simple food webs. These communities are quite resilient toward the loss of one or a few species, which is reflected in different power-law exponents for the durations of communities and the lifetimes of species. The exponent for the former is near -1, while the latter is close to -2. Statistical characteristics of the evolving communities, including degree (predator and prey) distributions and proportions of basal, intermediate, and top species, compare reasonably with data for real food webs.

  6. Participatory medicine: model based tools for engaging and empowering the individual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagar, Mark; Broadbent, Elizabeth

    2016-04-06

    The long-term goal of the Virtual Physiological Human and Digital Patient projects is to run 'simulations' of health and disease processes on the virtual or 'digital' patient, and use the results to make predictions about real health and determine the best treatment specifically for an individual. This is termed 'personalized medicine', and is intended to be the future of healthcare. How will people interact and engage with their virtual selves, and how can virtual models be used to motivate people to actively participate in their own healthcare? We discuss these questions, and describe our current efforts to integrate and realistically embody psychobiological models of face-to-face interaction to enliven and increase engagement of virtual humans in healthcare. Overall, this paper highlights the need for attention to the design of human-machine interfaces to address patient engagement in healthcare.

  7. Communities that care for families: the LINC Model for enhancing individual, family, and community resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landau, Judith

    2010-10-01

    The resilience of families and communities is inextricably linked. Their healthy functioning relies on a balance of stressors and resources. Both can be jeopardized by major challenges such as socioeconomic change or natural and man-made disasters. Such events can cause increased incidences of physical and mental problems such as addiction, posttraumatic stress syndrome, and heart disease. Trauma breeds marginalization, abuse of power, and prejudice. How these stressors are handled is profoundly influenced by the degree of connectedness-attachment-to family and culture of origin. Connectedness can be enhanced by mobilizing support systems, facilitating access to resources, strengthening family, community and cultural ties, and fostering resilience. The LINC Model increases connectedness at the individual, family, and community levels. This article includes methods for designing interventions, studies and clinical vignettes that illustrate the application of the LINC Model, and examples of communities that have overcome major stress.

  8. Technical note: A model to estimate individual feed intake of swine in group feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindemann, M D; Kim, B G

    2007-04-01

    In most animal growth experiments, groups of animals are housed within a pen. Occasionally, an individual animal shows a very different growth rate than its pen mates or dies during the experiment. When this happens, if pen feed intake (PFI) cannot be reestimated for the calculation of ADFI and feed efficiency, an observation will be lost from the data set. Therefore, we propose a model to estimate individual feed intake (IFI) of pigs in group feeding, with subsequent validation of the model using group feeding simulation studies. In the proposed model, the feed intake (FI) of each affected pen is partitioned into FI for maintenance (FI(m)) and FI for growth (FI(g)) for each animal within that pen. First, individual pig FI(m) for the period is calculated using the 1998 National Research Council estimation of ME for maintenance. Then, FI(m) for all pigs in the pen is summed. The difference between the summed FI(m) and the total PFI is that which supported growth in the pen. Next, FI(g) is calculated by apportioning the remaining feed equally to each unit of gain within the pen. Finally, the estimated IFI for the pig being removed from the pen is the sum of FI(m) and FI(g) for that pig; this FI estimate is subtracted from the original PFI to leave the new PFI for the remaining pigs. The validity of the estimated IFI is dependent on the accuracy of the maintenance energy equation and the energy analysis of the feedstuffs. In simulation studies, we compared the accuracy of the proposed method with 2 other methods. In simulation study 1, the proposed model showed better accuracy than at least one of the other methods during all tested periods (P Excel spreadsheet containing macros for FI correction. All of the calculation procedures in the proposed model are included within the feed intake correction spreadsheet. The Excel file and instructions are being made available via a Web site.

  9. The Effects of Individual Factors on the Formation of Cognitive Maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alinam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Human’s weakened bond to residential areas, compromised identity and stability of residents in residential areas, have resulted in higher rate of transfer. Individual and collective understanding of the environment could be seen as a major force in shaping that environment through the action of human choices and behavior. In this regard, Cognitive maps are of great theoretical and practical importance for understanding how humans interact with their environment. This research is aimed to investigate the effects of the individual factors on the formation of cognitive maps in the neighborhood. Research seeks to answer the question: "How and to what extent the individual factors affect the cognitive and metal maps of the residents in the neighborhood?" Research is a combination of qualitative (interview and quantitative (questionnaire methods which is conducted on 297 residents of a neighborhood in the city of Tabriz. Results indicate that individual characteristics such as gender, age, occupational status, housing ownership status, length of residence, transport mode and duration of walking have a significant relationship within the formation of three components of cognitive map (landmark, route-road and survey knowledge. Educational status is the only variable that does not interact significantly with the cognition knowledge of the neighborhood. Achievement of this research is to introduce the effective individual factors in the formation of cognitive and mental image within the neighborhood and effectiveness rate of each in this process.

  10. Recognizing "me" benefits "we": Investigating the positive spillover effects of formal individual recognition in teams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ning; Zheng, Xiaoming; Harris, T Brad; Liu, Xin; Kirkman, Bradley L

    2016-07-01

    Many organizations use formal recognition programs (e.g., "employee of the month") as a way to publically acknowledge an individual employee's outstanding performance and motivate continued high performance. However, it remains unclear whether emphasizing individual achievement in a team context is beneficial or detrimental for recipients' teammates and, by extension, the team as a whole. Drawing on a social influence perspective, we examine potential spillover effects of individual formal recognition programs in teams. We hypothesize that a single team member's recognition will produce positive spillover effects on other team members' performance, as well as overall team performance, via social influence processes, especially when the award recipient is located in a central position in a team. Findings from 2 lab experiments of 24 teams and 40 teams (Study 1 and Study 2, respectively) and a field experiment of 52 manufacturing teams (Study 3) reveal that formally recognizing a team member leads to positive changes in her/his teammates' individual and collective performance. Thus, formal social recognition programs can potentially provide a motivational effect beyond individual recipients. (PsycINFO Database Record

  11. Individual based modeling and parameter estimation for a Lotka-Volterra system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waniewski, J; Jedruch, W

    1999-03-15

    Stochastic component, inevitable in biological systems, makes problematic the estimation of the model parameters from a single sequence of measurements, despite the complete knowledge of the system. We studied the problem of parameter estimation using individual-based computer simulations of a 'Lotka-Volterra world'. Two kinds (species) of particles--X (preys) and Y (predators)--moved on a sphere according to deterministic rules and at the collision (interaction) of X and Y the particle X was changed to a new particle Y. Birth of preys and death of predators were simulated by addition of X and removal of Y, respectively, according to exponential probability distributions. With this arrangement of the system, the numbers of particles of each kind might be described by the Lotka-Volterra equations. The simulations of the system with low (200-400 particles on average) number of individuals showed unstable oscillations of the population size. In some simulation runs one of the species became extinct. Nevertheless, the oscillations had some generic properties (e.g. mean, in one simulation run, oscillation period, mean ratio of the amplitudes of the consecutive maxima of X and Y numbers, etc.) characteristic for the solutions of the Lotka-Volterra equations. This observation made it possible to estimate the four parameters of the Lotka-Volterra model with high accuracy and good precision. The estimation was performed using the integral form of the Lotka-Volterra equations and two parameter linear regression for each oscillation cycle separately. We conclude that in spite of the irregular time course of the number of individuals in each population due to stochastic intraspecies component, the generic features of the simulated system evolution can provide enough information for quantitative estimation of the system parameters.

  12. Individual-based models for adaptive diversification in high-dimensional phenotype spaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ispolatov, Iaroslav; Madhok, Vaibhav; Doebeli, Michael

    2016-02-07

    Most theories of evolutionary diversification are based on equilibrium assumptions: they are either based on optimality arguments involving static fitness landscapes, or they assume that populations first evolve to an equilibrium state before diversification occurs, as exemplified by the concept of evolutionary branching points in adaptive dynamics theory. Recent results indicate that adaptive dynamics may often not converge to equilibrium points and instead generate complicated trajectories if evolution takes place in high-dimensional phenotype spaces. Even though some analytical results on diversification in complex phenotype spaces are available, to study this problem in general we need to reconstruct individual-based models from the adaptive dynamics generating the non-equilibrium dynamics. Here we first provide a method to construct individual-based models such that they faithfully reproduce the given adaptive dynamics attractor without diversification. We then show that a propensity to diversify can be introduced by adding Gaussian competition terms that generate frequency dependence while still preserving the same adaptive dynamics. For sufficiently strong competition, the disruptive selection generated by frequency-dependence overcomes the directional evolution along the selection gradient and leads to diversification in phenotypic directions that are orthogonal to the selection gradient. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Python Executable Script for Estimating Two Effective Parameters to Individualize Brain-Computer Interfaces: Individual Alpha Frequency and Neurophysiological Predictor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alonso-Valerdi, Luz María

    2016-01-01

    A brain-computer interface (BCI) aims to establish communication between the human brain and a computing system so as to enable the interaction between an individual and his environment without using the brain output pathways. Individuals control a BCI system by modulating their brain signals through mental tasks (e.g., motor imagery or mental calculation) or sensory stimulation (e.g., auditory, visual, or tactile). As users modulate their brain signals at different frequencies and at different levels, the appropriate characterization of those signals is necessary. The modulation of brain signals through mental tasks is furthermore a skill that requires training. Unfortunately, not all the users acquire such skill. A practical solution to this problem is to assess the user probability of controlling a BCI system. Another possible solution is to set the bandwidth of the brain oscillations, which is highly sensitive to the users' age, sex and anatomy. With this in mind, NeuroIndex, a Python executable script, estimates a neurophysiological prediction index and the individual alpha frequency (IAF) of the user in question. These two parameters are useful to characterize the user EEG signals, and decide how to go through the complex process of adapting the human brain and the computing system on the basis of previously proposed methods. NeuroIndeX is not only the implementation of those methods, but it also complements the methods each other and provides an alternative way to obtain the prediction parameter. However, an important limitation of this application is its dependency on the IAF value, and some results should be interpreted with caution. The script along with some electroencephalographic datasets are available on a GitHub repository in order to corroborate the functionality and usability of this application.

  14. Modeling individual differences in randomized experiments using growth models: Recommendations for design, statistical analysis and reporting of results of internet interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Hesser

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Growth models (also known as linear mixed effects models, multilevel models, and random coefficients models have the capability of studying change at the group as well as the individual level. In addition, these methods have documented advantages over traditional data analytic approaches in the analysis of repeated-measures data. These advantages include, but are not limited to, the ability to incorporate time-varying predictors, handle dependence among repeated observations in a very flexible manner, and to provide accurate estimates with missing data under fairly unrestrictive missing data assumptions. The flexibility of the growth curve modeling approach to the analysis of change makes it the preferred choice in the evaluation of direct, indirect and moderated intervention effects. Although offering many benefits, growth models present challenges in terms of design, analysis and reporting of results. This paper provides a nontechnical overview of growth models in the analysis of change in randomized experiments and advocates for their use in the field of internet interventions. Practical recommendations for design, analysis and reporting of results from growth models are provided.

  15. Discovering the Power of Individual-Based Modelling in Teaching and Learning: The Study of a Predator-Prey System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginovart, Marta

    2014-01-01

    The general aim is to promote the use of individual-based models (biological agent-based models) in teaching and learning contexts in life sciences and to make their progressive incorporation into academic curricula easier, complementing other existing modelling strategies more frequently used in the classroom. Modelling activities for the study…

  16. Effects of Individual Tree Detection Error Sources on Forest Management Planning Calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harri Kaartinen

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The objective was to investigate the error sources of the airborne laser scanning based individual tree detection (ITD, and its effects on forest management planning calculations. The investigated error sources were detection of trees (etd, error in tree height prediction (eh and error in tree diameter prediction (ed. The effects of errors were analyzed with Monte Carlo simulations. etd was modeled empirically based on a tree’s relative size. A total of five different tree detection scenarios were tested. Effect of eh was investigated using 5% and 0% and effect of ed using 20%, 15%, 10%, 5%, 0% error levels, respectively. The research material comprised 15 forest stands located in Southern Finland. Measurements of 5,300 trees and their timber assortments were utilized as a starting point for the Monte Carlo simulated ITD inventories. ITD carried out for the same study area provided a starting point (Scenario 1 for etd. In Scenario 1, 60.2% from stem number and 75.9% from total volume (Vtotal were detected. When the only error source was etd (tree detection varying from 75.9% to 100% of Vtotal, root mean square errors (RMSEs in stand characteristics ranged between the scenarios from 32.4% to 0.6%, 29.0% to 0.5%, 7.8% to 0.2% and 5.4% to 0.1% in stand basal area (BA, Vtotal, mean height (Hg and mean diameter (Dg, respectively. Saw wood volume RMSE varied from 25.1% to 0.2%, as pulp wood volume respective varied from 37.8% to 1.0% when errors stemmed only from etd. The effect of ed was most significant for Vtotal and BA and the decrease in RMSE was from 12.0% to 0.6% (BA and from 10.9% to 0.5% (Vtotal in the most accurate tree detection scenario when ed varied from 20% to 0%. The effect of increased accuracy in tree height prediction was minor for all the stand characteristics. The results show that the most important error source in ITD is tree detection. At stand level, unbiased predictions for tree height and diameter are enough, given the

  17. Griffin and Neal's safety model: Determinants and components of individual safety performance in the Italian context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toderi, S; Gaggia, A; Mariani, M G; Mancini, G; Broccoli, M

    2015-11-22

    Griffin and Neal's model is a useful model to understand workers' different safety behaviour (compliance and participation) starting from their mastery of safety procedures (safety knowledge) and the motivation to put them in place (safety motivation). Although the theoretical model has proven to be adequate and is widely used in research, two problems arise: 1) there is no Italian validation of the four scales measuring the key constructs of the model; 2) the hypothesis regarding the differential impact of the determinants on the components of safety performance produced mixed evidence. The study had a twofold objective: 1) validate an Italian version of the four scales, primarily assessing their construct validity; 2) verify the relationships between the constructs according to the assumptions made within the theoretical model. The psychometric properties of the scales as well as the relationships between the constructs were investigated in a sample of 277 workers in the construction and logistics sectors, using questionnaires. The analyses were based on the use of structural equation modelling technique. Results confirmed the validity and reliability of the Italian scales, showing indices that were both satisfactory and aligned with those from previous studies. The relationships between the constructs were substantially consistent with the safety model. The study provided a valid version of the scales measuring determinants and components of individual safe performance. Such scales can be appropriately used in the Italian context for the development of theoretical as well as practical contributions on work safety. The results suggest that interventions to increase overall safe performance should address both knowledge and motivation for safety.

  18. Using connectome-based predictive modeling to predict individual behavior from brain connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xilin; Finn, Emily S; Scheinost, Dustin; Rosenberg, Monica D; Chun, Marvin M; Papademetris, Xenophon; Constable, R Todd

    2017-03-01

    Neuroimaging is a fast-developing research area in which anatomical and functional images of human brains are collected using techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), and electroencephalography (EEG). Technical advances and large-scale data sets have allowed for the development of models capable of predicting individual differences in traits and behavior using brain connectivity measures derived from neuroimaging data. Here, we present connectome-based predictive modeling (CPM), a data-driven protocol for developing predictive models of brain-behavior relationships from connectivity data using cross-validation. This protocol includes the following steps: (i) feature selection, (ii) feature summarization, (iii) model building, and (iv) assessment of prediction significance. We also include suggestions for visualizing the most predictive features (i.e., brain connections). The final result should be a generalizable model that takes brain connectivity data as input and generates predictions of behavioral measures in novel subjects, accounting for a considerable amount of the variance in these measures. It has been demonstrated that the CPM protocol performs as well as or better than many of the existing approaches in brain-behavior prediction. As CPM focuses on linear modeling and a purely data-driven approach, neuroscientists with limited or no experience in machine learning or optimization will find it easy to implement these protocols. Depending on the volume of data to be processed, the protocol can take 10-100 min for model building, 1-48 h for permutation testing, and 10-20 min for visualization of results.

  19. [Effects of multiple-trough sampling design and algorithm on the estimation of population and individual pharmacokinetic parameters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jing; Qian, Li-Xuan; Ding, Jun-Jie; Jiao, Zheng

    2014-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of multiple-trough sampling design and nonlinear mixed effect modeling (NONMEM) algorithm on the estimation of population and individual pharmacokinetic parameters. Oxcarbazepine and tacrolimus were used as one-compartment and two-compartment model drugs, respectively. Seven sampling designs were investigated using various number of trough concentrations per individual ranging from 1-4. Monte Carlo simulations were performed to produce state-steady trough concentrations. One-compartment model was used to fit simulated data from oxcarbazepine and tacrolimus. The accuracy and precision of the estimated parameters were evaluated using the median prediction error (PE), the median absolute PE and boxplot. The results indicated that trough concentrations could yield reliable estimates of apparent clearance (CL/F). For oxcarbazepine, as the number of trough concentrations per subject increased, the accuracy and precision of CL/F, between-subject variability (BSV) of CL/F and residual variability (RUV) tended to be improved. For tacrolimus, however, although no improvement were observed in the accuracy of CL/F and BSV of CL/F, the PE distribution ranges were significantly narrowed and the RUV estimates were less bias and imprecise. In terms of algorithm, Monte Carlo importance sampling (IMP) and IMP assisted by mode a posteriori estimation (IMPMAP) were consistently better than other methods. Additionally, the sampling design had no significant effects on the individual parameter estimates, which were only depended on the interaction between BSV and RUV in various algorithms. Decreased in BSV and RUV levels can improve the accuracy and precision of the estimation for both population and individual pharmacokinetic parameter estimates.

  20. Effects of Individual, Spousal, and Offspring Socioeconomic Status on Mortality Among Elderly People in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The relationship between socio-economic status and health among elderly people has been well studied, but less is known about how spousal or offspring’s education affects mortality, especially in non-Western countries. We investigated these associations using a large sample of Chinese elderly. Methods: The data came from the Chinese Longitudinal Healthy Longevity Survey (CLHLS from the years 2005 to 2011 (n = 15 355, aged 65–105 years at baseline; 5046 died in 2008, and 2224 died in 2011. Educational attainment, occupational status, and household income per capita were used as indicators of socio-economic status. Spousal and offspring’s education were added into the final models. The Cox proportional hazards model was used to study mortality risk by gender. Results: Adjusted for age, highly educated males and females had, on average, 29% and 37% lower mortality risk, respectively, than those with a lower education. Particularly among men, this effect was observed among those whose children had intermediate education only. A higher household income was also associated with lower mortality risk among the elderly. Male elderly living with a well-educated spouse (HR 0.79; 95% CI, 0.64–0.99 had a lower mortality risk than those living with a low-educated spouse. Conclusions: Both the socio-economic status of the individual and the educational level of a co-resident spouse or child are associated with mortality risk in elderly people. The socio-economic position of family members plays an important role in producing health inequality among elderly people.

  1. Evaluating the individual effects of temperature and salt on table olive related microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Gil, V; Bautista-Gallego, J; Rodríguez-Gómez, F; García-García, P; Jiménez-Díaz, R; Garrido-Fernández, A; Arroyo-López, F N

    2013-04-01

    Statistical modelling techniques were used in the present study to assess the individual effects of temperature and NaCl concentration on the growth of 10 lactic acid bacteria and 6 yeast strains mostly isolated from different forms of table olive processing and belonging to the species Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus plantarum, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Wickerhamomyces anomalus and Candida boidinii. The mathematical models obtained in synthetic laboratory media show that yeasts, except for C. boidinii, were more resistant to a high salt concentration than lactic acid bacteria, with an MIC value ranging from 163.5 (S. cerevisiae) to 166.9 g/L (W. anomalus); while for L. pentosus and L. plantarum this parameter ranged from 110.6 to 117.6 g/L, respectively. With regards to temperature, lactic acid bacteria showed a slight trend towards supporting higher temperature values than yeasts, with the exception of S. cerevisiae. The maximum temperatures for growth of L. pentosus and L. plantarum were 41.9 and 43.0 °C, respectively; while for W. anomalus and C. boidinii they were 38.2 and 36.5 °C. The optimum temperatures for growth were also higher for L. pentosus and L. plantarum (35.5 and 32.9 °C), compared to W. anomalus and C. boidinii (29.3 and 26.9 °C, respectively). Additional experiments carried out in natural olive brines confirmed previous results, showing that high NaCl concentrations clearly favoured yeast growth and that at high temperatures LAB slightly overcame yeasts. Results obtained in this paper could be useful for industry for a better control of both table olive fermentation and packaging.

  2. Individual-based and continuum models of growing cell populations: a comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Helen; Drasdo, Dirk

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we compare two alternative theoretical approaches for simulating the growth of cell aggregates in vitro: individual cell (agent)-based models and continuum models. We show by a quantitative analysis of both a biophysical agent-based and a continuum mechanical model that for densely packed aggregates the expansion of the cell population is dominated by cell proliferation controlled by mechanical stress. The biophysical agent-based model introduced earlier (Drasdo and Hoehme in Phys Biol 2:133-147, 2005) approximates each cell as an isotropic, homogeneous, elastic, spherical object parameterised by measurable biophysical and cell-biological quantities and has been shown by comparison to experimental findings to explain the growth patterns of dense monolayers and multicellular spheroids. Both models exhibit the same growth kinetics, with initial exponential growth of the population size and aggregate diameter followed by linear growth of the diameter and power-law growth of the cell population size. Very sparse monolayers can be explained by a very small or absent cell-cell adhesion and large random cell migration. In this case the expansion speed is not controlled by mechanical stress but by random cell migration and can be modelled by the Fisher-Kolmogorov-Petrovskii-Piskounov (FKPP) reaction-diffusion equation. The growth kinetics differs from that of densely packed aggregates in that the initial spread, as quantified by the radius of gyration, is diffusive. Since simulations of the lattice-free agent-based model in the case of very large random migration are too long to be practical, lattice-based cellular automaton (CA) models have to be used for a quantitative analysis of sparse monolayers. Analysis of these dense monolayers leads to the identification of a critical parameter of the CA model so that eventually a hierarchy of three model types (a detailed biophysical lattice-free model, a rule-based cellular automaton and a continuum approach

  3. Caregiver Burden Among Caregivers of Individuals With Severe Mental Illness: Testing the Moderation and Mediation Models of Resilience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulud, Zamzaliza Abdul; McCarthy, Geraldine

    2017-02-01

    The association between the socio-demographic characteristics of caregivers, such as gender and caregiver burden, is well documented; however, the process underlying this relationship is poorly understood. Based on the stress process model, we designed a cross-sectional study to examine the mediating and moderating effect of resilience on the relationship between gender and caregiver burden. Caregivers of individuals with severe mental illness (n=201) were recruited in two psychiatric outpatient clinics in Malaysia. The relationship between the gender of the caregiver and caregiver burden was mediated by resilience, thus supporting the stress process model. The findings from the present research contribute to the growing evidence of the interaction between socio-demographic variables of caregivers and resilience, and caregiver burden. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. An example of population-level risk assessments for small mammals using individual-based population models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmitt, Walter; Auteri, Domenica; Bastiansen, Finn

    2016-01-01

    This article presents a case study demonstrating the application of 3 individual-based, spatially explicit population models (IBMs, also known as agent-based models) in ecological risk assessments to predict long-term effects of a pesticide to populations of small mammals. The 3 IBMs each used...... and structural complexity. The toxicological profile of FungicideX was defined so that the deterministic long-term first tier risk assessment would result in high risk to small mammals, thus providing the opportunity to use the IBMs for risk assessment refinement (i.e., higher tier risk assessment). Despite...... assessments for small mammals, including consistent and transparent direct links to specific protection goals, and the consideration of more realistic scenarios....

  5. The Melanoma MAICare Framework: A Microsimulation Model for the Assessment of Individualized Cancer Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Meijde, Elisabeth; van den Eertwegh, Alfons J M; Linn, Sabine C; Meijer, Gerrit A; Fijneman, Remond J A; Coupé, Veerle M H

    2016-01-01

    Recently, new but expensive treatments have become available for metastatic melanoma. These improve survival, but in view of the limited funds available, cost-effectiveness needs to be evaluated. Most cancer cost-effectiveness models are based on the observed clinical events such as recurrence- free and overall survival. Times at which events are recorded depend not only on the effectiveness of treatment but also on the timing of examinations and the types of tests performed. Our objective was to construct a microsimulation model framework that describes the melanoma disease process using a description of underlying tumor growth as well as its interaction with diagnostics, treatments, and surveillance. The framework should allow for exploration of the impact of simultaneously altering curative treatment approaches in different phases of the disease as well as altering diagnostics. The developed framework consists of two components, namely, the disease model and the clinical management module. The disease model consists of a tumor level, describing growth and metastasis of the tumor, and a patient level, describing clinically observed states, such as recurrence and death. The clinical management module consists of the care patients receive. This module interacts with the disease process, influencing the rate of transition between tumor growth states at the tumor level and the rate of detecting a recurrence at the patient level. We describe the framework as the required input and the model output. Furthermore, we illustrate model calibration using registry data and data from the literature.

  6. Multimedia Learning and Individual Differences: Mediating the Effects of Working Memory Capacity with Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lusk, Danielle L.; Evans, Amber D.; Jeffrey, Thomas R.; Palmer, Keith R.; Wikstrom, Chris S.; Doolittle, Peter E.

    2009-01-01

    Research in multimedia learning lacks an emphasis on individual difference variables, such as working memory capacity (WMC). The effects of WMC and the segmentation of multimedia instruction were examined by assessing the recall and application of low (n = 66) and high (n = 67) working memory capacity students randomly assigned to either a…

  7. The effects of physiotherapy for female urinary incontinence: Individual compared with group treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, C.C.M.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.; Felling, A.J.A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare, in a randomized trial, the effects of individual and group physiotherapy for urinary incontinence in women referred by their general practitioner (GP). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study included women of all ages (mean 47.8 years) with stress, urge or mixed incontinence; 126

  8. The effects of physiotherapy for female urinary incontinence: individual compared with group treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, C.C.M.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.; Felling, A.J.A.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To compare, in a randomized trial, the effects of individual and group physiotherapy for urinary incontinence in women referred by their general practitioner (GP). PATIENTS AND METHODS: The study included women of all ages (mean 47.8 years) with stress, urge or mixed incontinence; 126

  9. Examination of Effects of Regular Sports Training on Individual Skills in Trainable Children with Autism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akyüz, Murat; Odabas, Cansu; Akyüz, Öznur; Dogru, Yeliz; Senel, Ömer; Tas, Murat; Besikçi, Tolga

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to examine the effects of regular sport training implemented at Integrated Disabled Athlete Department on autistic children's adolescence development of individual abilities as motor proficiencies. Method: The subject group of this study is composed of 12 boys with autism who practiced physical education programs…

  10. Understanding Effective Higher Education Programs in Prisons: Considerations from the Incarcerated Individuals Program in North Carolina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Allison Daniel; Noblit, George W.

    2011-01-01

    The North Carolina Workplace and Community Transition Youth Offender Program (YOP), recently renamed the Incarcerated Individuals Program (IPP), has proven to be effective in terms of its growth and expansion, the support of education directors across the correctional facilities, university collaboration, student evaluations, and a low recidivism…

  11. The Comparative Effect of Individually-Constructed vs. Collaboratively-Constructed Computer-Based Concept Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, So Young; Cifuentes, Lauren

    2009-01-01

    The researchers investigated the comparative effects of individually-constructed and collaboratively-constructed computer-based concept mapping on middle school science concept learning. One hundred and sixty one students completed the entire study. Using prior science performance scores to assure equivalence of student achievement across groups,…

  12. Effect of Rehabilitation Technology Services on Vocational Rehabilitation Outcomes of Individuals with Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Chung-Yi; Tansey, Timothy N.; Chan, Fong; Strauser, David; Frain, Michael P.; Arora, Simran

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the effect of rehabilitation technology interventions on the employment or job retention outcomes of individuals with multiple sclerosis (MS) served by the state-federal vocational rehabilitation program using a case-control study design. Participants: Data for this study were extracted from the Rehabilitation Services…

  13. Effects of an Individualized Narrative Intervention on Children's Storytelling and Comprehension Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Trina D.; Kajian, Mandana; Petersen, Douglas B.; Bilyk, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    Narrative skills that are important for preschoolers include retelling stories, telling personal stories, and answering questions about stories. Narrative abilities form the foundation of reading comprehension. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of an individually delivered language intervention on the narrative skills of…

  14. Cognitive behavioral therapy age effects in child and adolescent anxiety : An individual patient data metaanalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, Kathryn; Manassis, Katharina; Walter, Stephen D.; Cheung, Amy; Wilansky-Traynor, Pamela; Diaz-Granados, Natalia; Duda, Stephanie; Rice, Maureen; Baer, Susan; Barrett, Paula; Bodden, Denise; Cobham, Vanessa E.; Dadds, Mark R.; Flannery-Schroeder, Ellen; Ginsburg, Golda; Heyne, David; Hudson, Jennifer L.; Kendall, Philip C.; Liber, Juliette; Warner, Carrie Masia; Mendlowitz, Sandra; Nauta, Maaike H.; Rapee, Ronald M.; Silverman, Wendy; Siqueland, Lynne; Spence, Susan H.; Utens, Elisabeth; Wood, Jeffrey J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Investigations of age effects on youth anxiety outcomes in randomized trials (RCTs) of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) have failed to yield a clear result due to inadequate statistical power and methodologic weaknesses. We conducted an individual patient data metaanalysis to address this

  15. Cognitive behavioral therapy age effects in child and adolescent anxiety: An individual patient data metaanalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, K.; Manassis, K.; Walter, S.D.; Cheung, A.; Wilansky-Traynor, P.; Diaz-Granados, N.; Duda, S.; Rice, M.; Baer, S.; Barrett, P.; Bodden, D.H.M.; Cobham, V.E.; Dadds, M.R.; Flannery-Schroeder, E.; Ginsburg, G.; Heyne, D.; Hudson, J.L.; Kendall, P.C.; Liber, J.; Masia-Warner, C.; Mendlowitz, S.; Nauta, M.H.; Rapee, R.M.; Silverman, W.; Siqueland, L.; Spence, S.H.; Utens, E.; Wood, J.J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Investigations of age effects on youth anxiety outcomes in randomized trials (RCTs) of cognitive behavior therapy (CBT) have failed to yield a clear result due to inadequate statistical power and methodologic weaknesses. We conducted an individual patient data metaanalysis to address this

  16. Effects of Using a Web-Based Individualized Education Program Decision-Making Tutorial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shriner, James G.; Carty, Susan J.; Rose, Chad A.; Shogren, Karrie A.; Kim, Myungjin; Trach, John S.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored the effects of a web-based decision support system ("Tutorial") for writing standards-based Individualized Education Programs (IEPs). A total of 35 teachers and 154 students participated across two academic years. Participants were assigned to one of three intervention groups based on level of "Tutorial"…

  17. Train the Trainer Effectiveness Trials of Behavioral Intervention for Individuals with Autism: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shire, Stephanie Yoshiko; Kasari, Connie

    2014-01-01

    This systematic review examines train the trainer (TTT) effectiveness trials of behavioral interventions for individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Published methodological quality scales were used to assess studies including participant description, research design, intervention, outcomes, and analysis. Twelve studies including 9 weak…

  18. The Effect of Vibration on Postural Response of Down Syndrome Individuals on the Seesaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Regiane Luz; Almeida, Gil Lucio

    2009-01-01

    In order to better understand the role of proprioception in postural adjustments on unstable surfaces, we analyzed the effect of vibration on the pattern of muscle activity and joint displacements (ankle, knee and hip) of eight intellectually normal participants (control group-CG) and eight individuals with Down syndrome (DS) while balancing on…

  19. The Effect of Individual Differences on Learners' Translation Belief in EFL Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashouri, Amir Farzad; Fotovatnia, Zahra

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated learners' beliefs about translation and the effect of two variables of individual differences, risk taking and tolerance of ambiguity, on the mentioned variable. The participants of the study were 120 EFL learners homogenized through Oxford Placement Test. They received three questionnaires on translation belief,…

  20. Groups That Work: Student Achievement in Group Research Projects and Effects on Individual Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monson, Renee

    2017-01-01

    Group research projects frequently are used to teach undergraduate research methods. This study uses multivariate analyses to examine the characteristics of higher-achieving groups (those that earn higher grades on group research projects) and to estimate the effects of participating in higher-achieving groups on subsequent individual learning…