WorldWideScience

Sample records for modeling hourly diurnal

  1. TransCom model simulations of hourly atmospheric CO2: Experimental overview and diurnal cycle results for 2002

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, R. M.; Peters, W.; RöDenbeck, C.; Aulagnier, C.; Baker, I.; Bergmann, D. J.; Bousquet, P.; Brandt, J.; Bruhwiler, L.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Christensen, J. H.; Delage, F.; Denning, A. S.; Fan, S.; Geels, C.; Houweling, S.; Imasu, R.; Karstens, U.; Kawa, S. R.; Kleist, J.; Krol, M. C.; Lin, S.-J.; Lokupitiya, R.; Maki, T.; Maksyutov, S.; Niwa, Y.; Onishi, R.; Parazoo, N.; Patra, P. K.; Pieterse, G.; Rivier, L.; Satoh, M.; Serrar, S.; Taguchi, S.; Takigawa, M.; Vautard, R.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Zhu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    A forward atmospheric transport modeling experiment has been coordinated by the TransCom group to investigate synoptic and diurnal variations in CO2. Model simulations were run for biospheric, fossil, and air-sea exchange of CO2 and for SF6 and radon for 2000-2003. Twenty-five models or model varian

  2. Hourly elemental concentrations in PM2.5 aerosols sampled simultaneously at urban background and road site during SAPUSS - diurnal variations and PMF receptor modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Querol, X.; Amato, F.; Karanasiou, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.

    2013-04-01

    Hourly-resolved aerosol chemical speciation data can be a highly powerful tool to determine the source origin of atmospheric pollutants in urban environments. Aerosol mass concentrations of seventeen elements (Na, Mg, Al, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr and Pb) were obtained by time (1 h) and size (PM2.5 particulate matter < 2.5 μm) resolved aerosol samples analysed by Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE) measurements. In the Marie Curie European Union framework of SAPUSS (Solving Aerosol Problems by Using Synergistic Strategies), the approach used is the simultaneous sampling at two monitoring sites in Barcelona (Spain) during September-October 2010: an urban background site (UB) and a street canyon traffic road site (RS). Elements related to primary non-exhaust traffic emission (Fe, Cu), dust resuspension (Ca) and anthropogenic Cl were found enhanced at the RS, whereas industrial related trace metals (Zn, Pb, Mn) were found at higher concentrations at the more ventilated UB site. When receptor modelling was performed with positive matrix factorization (PMF), nine different aerosol sources were identified at both sites: three types of regional aerosols (regional sulphate (S) - 27%, biomass burning (K) - 5%, sea salt (Na-Mg) - 17%), three types of dust aerosols (soil dust (Al-Ti) - 17%, urban crustal dust (Ca) - 6%, and primary traffic non-exhaust brake dust (Fe-Cu) - 7%), and three types of industrial aerosol plumes-like events (shipping oil combustion (V-Ni) - 17%, industrial smelters (Zn-Mn) - 3%, and industrial combustion (Pb-Cl) - 5%, percentages presented are average source contributions to the total elemental mass measured). The validity of the PMF solution of the PIXE data is supported by very good correlations with external single particle mass spectrometry measurements. Some important conclusions can be drawn about the PM2.5 mass fraction simultaneously measured at the UB and RS sites: (1) the regional aerosol sources impact both

  3. Hourly elemental concentrations in PM2.5 aerosols sampled simultaneously at urban background and road site during SAPUSS – diurnal variations and PMF receptor modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Dall'Osto

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Hourly-resolved aerosol chemical speciation data can be a highly powerful tool to determine the source origin of atmospheric pollutants in urban environments. Aerosol mass concentrations of seventeen elements (Na, Mg, Al, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr and Pb were obtained by time (1 h and size (PM2.5 particulate matter 2.5 mass fraction simultaneously measured at the UB and RS sites: (1 the regional aerosol sources impact both monitoring sites at similar concentrations regardless their different ventilation conditions; (2 by contrast, local industrial aerosol plumes associated with shipping oil combustion and smelters activities have a higher impact on the more ventilated UB site; (3 a unique source of Pb-Cl (associated with combustion emissions is found to be the major (82% source of fine Cl in the urban agglomerate; (4 the mean diurnal variation of PM2.5 primary traffic non-exhaust brake dust (Fe-Cu suggests that this source is mainly emitted and not resuspended, whereas PM2.5 urban dust (Ca is found mainly resuspended by both traffic vortex and sea breeze; (5 urban dust (Ca is found the aerosol source most affected by land wetness, reduced by a factor of eight during rainy days and suggesting that wet roads may be a solution for reducing urban dust concentrations.

  4. Hourly elemental concentrations in PM2.5 aerosols sampled simultaneously at urban background and road site during SAPUSS -diurnal variations and PMF receptor modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dall'Osto, M.; Querol, X.; Amato, F.; Karanasiou, A.; Lucarelli, F.; Nava, S.; Calzolai, G.; Chiari, M.

    2013-01-01

    Hourly-resolved aerosol chemical speciation data can be a highly powerful tool to determine the source origin of atmospheric pollutants in urban environments. Aerosol mass concentrations of seventeen elements (Na, Mg, Al, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Ni, Cu, Zn, Sr and Pb) were obtained by time

  5. SST Diurnal Variability: Regional Extent & Implications in Atmospheric Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna; Høyer, Jacob L.

    2013-01-01

    and quantify regional diurnal warming from the experimental MSG/SEVIRI hourly SST fields, for the period 2006-2012. ii) To investigate the impact of the increased SST temporal resolution in the atmospheric model WRF, in terms of modeled 10-m winds and surface heat fluxes. Withing this context, 3 main tasks...... regional diurnal warming over the SEVIRI disk, a SEVIRI derived reference field representative of the well mixed night-time conditions is required. Different methodologies are tested and the results are validated against SEVIRI pre-dawn SSTs and in situ data from moored and drifting buoys....

  6. Modelling of diurnal cycle under climate change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eliseev, A.V.; Bezmenov, K.V.; Demchenko, P.F.; Mokhov, I.I.; Petoukhov, V.K. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation). Inst. of Atmospheric Physics

    1995-12-31

    The observed diurnal temperature range (DTR) displays remarkable change during last 30 years. Land air DTR generally decreases under global climate warming due to more significant night minimum temperature increase in comparison with day maximum temperature increase. Atmosphere hydrological cycle characteristics change under global warming and possible background aerosol atmosphere content change may cause essential errors in the estimation of DTR tendencies of change under global warming. The result of this study is the investigation of cloudiness effect on the DTR and blackbody radiative emissivity diurnal range. It is shown that in some cases (particularly in cold seasons) it results in opposite change in DTR and BD at doubled CO{sub 2} atmosphere content. The influence of background aerosol is the same as the cloudiness one

  7. Time of sunrise and hours with daylight may have an effect on the seasonality and diurnal variation of heart attack

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jozsef Bodis; Miklos Koppan; Imre Boncz; Ildiko Kriszbacher

    2009-01-01

    Background The time of onset of myocardial infarction shows seasonal and daily variation. We aimed to investigate whether the number of hours with daylight has an effect on the seasonal variation of heart attack, and whether the time of sunrise has an effect on the diurnal rhythm of myocardial infarction.Methods We carried out a retrospective database study covering all patients admitted to any acute care hospital with the diagnosis of myocardial infarction in Hungary between January 2004 and December 2005 (n=32 329). Data were collected from the National Health Insurance Fund Administration (OEP) according to the International Classification of Diseases (ICD 121,122) and National Meteorology Service (OMSZ). In case of patients who occurred in the database several times the events have been considered as a separate case.Results With consideration to seasonal variation, the peak period of heart attack was found in the spring, with the lowest number of events in the summer. The number of hours with daylight showed a weak negative correlation with the occurrence of myocardial infarction (r=-0.108, P <0.05). With respect to diumal variation, the peak period of daily events was between 6-12 in the morning (35.57%). We have found a positive correlation between the time of sunrise and sunset and the occurrence of myocardial infarction (P<0.01).Conclusion Based on our findings, the number of hours with daylight and the time of sunrise may be connected with the chances of having heart attack; however other factors, such as high blood pressure, diabetes or smoking may also have an influence.

  8. Time series models to simulate and forecast hourly averaged wind speeds in Quetta, Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lalarukh Kamal [Balochistan University, Quetta (Pakistan). Dept. of Mathematics; Yasmin Zahra Jafri [Balochistan University, Quetta (Pakistan). Dept. of Statistics

    1997-07-01

    Stochastic simulation and forecast models of hourly average wind speeds are presented. Time series models take into account several basic features of wind speed data including autocorrelation, non-Gaussian distribution and diurnal nonstationarity. The positive correlation between consecutive wind speed observations is taken into account by fitting an ARMA (p,q) process to wind speed data transformed to make their distribution approximately Gaussian and standardized to remove scattering of transformed data. Diurnal variations have been taken into account to observe forecasts and its dependence on lead times. We find the ARMA (p,q) model suitable for prediction intervals and probability forecasts. (author)

  9. The 24-Hour Mathematical Modeling Challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galluzzo, Benjamin J.; Wendt, Theodore J.

    2015-01-01

    Across the mathematics curriculum there is a renewed emphasis on applications of mathematics and on mathematical modeling. Providing students with modeling experiences beyond the ordinary classroom setting remains a challenge, however. In this article, we describe the 24-hour Mathematical Modeling Challenge, an extracurricular event that exposes…

  10. Work stress models and diurnal cortisol variations: The SALVEO study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchand, Alain; Juster, Robert-Paul; Durand, Pierre; Lupien, Sonia J

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study was to assess components, subscales, and interactions proposed by the popular Job Demand-Control (JDC), Job Demand-Control-Support (JDCS), and Effort-Reward Imbalance (ERI) work stress models in relation to diurnal variation of the stress hormone cortisol. Participants included 401 day-shift workers employed from a random sampling of 34 Canadian workplaces. Questionnaires included the Job Content Questionnaire to measure psychological demands, decision latitude, and social support as well as the Effort-Reward Imbalance Questionnaire to measure effort, reward, and overcommitment. Salivary cortisol was collected on 2 working days at awaking, +30 min after awaking, 1400h, 1600h, and bedtime. Multilevel regressions with 3 levels (time of day, workers, workplaces) were performed. Results revealed that JDC, JDCS and ERI interactions were not statistically associated with variations in diurnal cortisol concentrations. By contrast when assessing specific work stress subscales, increased psychological demands were linked to decreased bedtime cortisol, increased job recognition was linked to increased cortisol +30 min after waking and at bedtime, and finally increased overcommitment was linked to increased awakening cortisol and decreased cortisol at 1400h, 1600h, and bedtime. Sex moderation effects principally among men were additionally detected for psychological demands, total social support, and supervisor support. Our findings suggest that components and subsubscales of these popular work stress models rather than theorized interactions are more meaningful in explaining diurnal cortisol variations. In particular, psychological demands, job recognition, overcommitment, and to a lesser extent social support at work are the most significant predictors of diurnal cortisol variation in this large sample of Canadian workers. Importantly, the overall effect sizes of these subscales that explained diurnal cortisol concentrations were weak.

  11. Modeling diurnal hormone profiles by hierarchical state space models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ziyue; Guo, Wensheng

    2015-10-30

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) diurnal patterns contain both smooth circadian rhythms and pulsatile activities. How to evaluate and compare them between different groups is a challenging statistical task. In particular, we are interested in testing (1) whether the smooth ACTH circadian rhythms in chronic fatigue syndrome and fibromyalgia patients differ from those in healthy controls and (2) whether the patterns of pulsatile activities are different. In this paper, a hierarchical state space model is proposed to extract these signals from noisy observations. The smooth circadian rhythms shared by a group of subjects are modeled by periodic smoothing splines. The subject level pulsatile activities are modeled by autoregressive processes. A functional random effect is adopted at the pair level to account for the matched pair design. Parameters are estimated by maximizing the marginal likelihood. Signals are extracted as posterior means. Computationally efficient Kalman filter algorithms are adopted for implementation. Application of the proposed model reveals that the smooth circadian rhythms are similar in the two groups but the pulsatile activities in patients are weaker than those in the healthy controls. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. De-noising Diurnal Variation Data in Geomagnetic Field Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onovughe, E.

    2017-01-01

    Ground based geomagnetic observatory series have been used to investigate and describe the residuals between a continuous geomagnetic field model and observed diurnal variation for noise-removal of signal due to external field of magnetospheric ring current sources. In all the observatories studied, the residuals in the X-direction consistently show the noisiest signal. Results show that the residuals in the X-direction correlates closely with the RC-index, suggesting an origin from unmodelled external field variation. Notable cross-correlation is also seen between the residuals and the RC-index at zero-lag. Removal/reduction of this unmodelled signal enhances resolution of fine-scale detail in diurnal variation studies.

  13. A stochastic differential equation model of diurnal cortisol patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, E. N.; Meehan, P. M.; Dempster, A. P.

    2001-01-01

    Circadian modulation of episodic bursts is recognized as the normal physiological pattern of diurnal variation in plasma cortisol levels. The primary physiological factors underlying these diurnal patterns are the ultradian timing of secretory events, circadian modulation of the amplitude of secretory events, infusion of the hormone from the adrenal gland into the plasma, and clearance of the hormone from the plasma by the liver. Each measured plasma cortisol level has an error arising from the cortisol immunoassay. We demonstrate that all of these three physiological principles can be succinctly summarized in a single stochastic differential equation plus measurement error model and show that physiologically consistent ranges of the model parameters can be determined from published reports. We summarize the model parameters in terms of the multivariate Gaussian probability density and establish the plausibility of the model with a series of simulation studies. Our framework makes possible a sensitivity analysis in which all model parameters are allowed to vary simultaneously. The model offers an approach for simultaneously representing cortisol's ultradian, circadian, and kinetic properties. Our modeling paradigm provides a framework for simulation studies and data analysis that should be readily adaptable to the analysis of other endocrine hormone systems.

  14. A statistical model of diurnal variation in human growth hormone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klerman, Elizabeth B.; Adler, Gail K.; Jin, Moonsoo; Maliszewski, Anne M.; Brown, Emery N.

    2003-01-01

    The diurnal pattern of growth hormone (GH) serum levels depends on the frequency and amplitude of GH secretory events, the kinetics of GH infusion into and clearance from the circulation, and the feedback of GH on its secretion. We present a two-dimensional linear differential equation model based on these physiological principles to describe GH diurnal patterns. The model characterizes the onset times of the secretory events, the secretory event amplitudes, as well as the infusion, clearance, and feedback half-lives of GH. We illustrate the model by using maximum likelihood methods to fit it to GH measurements collected in 12 normal, healthy women during 8 h of scheduled sleep and a 16-h circadian constant-routine protocol. We assess the importance of the model components by using parameter standard error estimates and Akaike's Information Criterion. During sleep, both the median infusion and clearance half-life estimates were 13.8 min, and the median number of secretory events was 2. During the constant routine, the median infusion half-life estimate was 12.6 min, the median clearance half-life estimate was 11.7 min, and the median number of secretory events was 5. The infusion and clearance half-life estimates and the number of secretory events are consistent with current published reports. Our model gave an excellent fit to each GH data series. Our analysis paradigm suggests an approach to decomposing GH diurnal patterns that can be used to characterize the physiological properties of this hormone under normal and pathological conditions.

  15. Rhythmic 24-hour variations of frequently used clinical biochemical parameters in healthy young males - The Bispebjerg study of diurnal variations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sennels, Henriette P; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Gøtze, Jens Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the influence of time of day on the circulating concentrations of 14 frequently used clinical biochemical parameters in the Bispebjerg study of diurnal variations. Materials and methods. Venous blood samples were obtained under controlled environmental, activities and food...

  16. The simulation of the diurnal cycle of convective precipitation over land in a global model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bechtold, P.; Chaboureau, J. P.; Beljaars, A.; Betts, A. K.; Köhler, M.; Miller, M.; Redelsperger, J. L.

    2004-10-01

    In the context of the European Cloud Systems project, the problem of the simulation of the diurnal cycle of convective precipitation over land is addressed with the aid of cloud-resolving (CRM) and single-column (SCM) model simulations of an idealized midlatitude case for which observations of large-scale and surface forcing are available. The CRM results are compared to different versions of the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) convection schemes using different convective trigger procedures and convective closures. In the CRM, maximum rainfall intensity occurs at 15 h (local time). In this idealized midlatitude case, most schemes do not reproduce the afternoon precipitation peak, as (i) they cannot reproduce the gradual growth (typically over 3 hours) of the deep convective cloud layer and (ii) they produce a diurnal cycle of precipitation that is in phase with the diurnal cycle of the convective available potential energy (CAPE) and the convective inhibition (CIN), consistent with the parcel theory and CAPE closure used in the bulk mass-flux scheme. The scheme that links the triggering to the large-scale vertical velocity gets the maximum precipitation at the right time, but this may be artificial as the vertical velocity is enforced in the single-column context. The study is then extended to the global scale using ensembles of 72-hour global forecasts at resolution T511 (40 km), and long-range single 40-day forecasts at resolution T159 (125 km) with the ECMWF general-circulation model. The focus is on tropical South America and Africa where the diurnal cycle is most pronounced. The forecasts are evaluated against analyses and observed radiosonde data, as well as observed surface and satellite-derived rainfall rates. The ECMWF model version with improved convective trigger produces the smallest biases overall. It also shifts the rainfall maximum to 12 h compared to 9.5 h in the original version. In contrast to the SCM, the vertical

  17. Modeling multi-frequency diurnal backscatter from a walnut orchard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcdonald, Kyle C.; Dobson, Myron C.; Ulaby, Fawwaz T.

    1991-01-01

    The Michigan Microwave Canopy Scattering Model (MIMICS) is used to model scatterometer data that were obtained during the August 1987 EOS (Earth Observing System) synergism study. During this experiment, truck-based scatterometers were used to measure radar backscatter from a walnut orchard in Fresno County, California. Multipolarized L- and X-band data were recorded for orchard plots for which dielectric and evapotranspiration characteristics were monitored. MIMICS is used to model a multiangle data set in which a single orchard plot was observed at varying impedance angles and a series of diurnal measurements in which backscatter from this same plot was measured continuously over several 24-h periods. MIMICS accounts for variations in canopy backscatter driven by changes in canopy state that occur diurnally as well as on longer time scales. L-band backscatter is dependent not only on properties of the vegetation but also on properties of the underlying soil surface. The behavior of the X-band backscatter is dominated by properties of the tree crowns.

  18. A Modeling Study of Diurnal Rainfall Variations during the 21-Day Period of TOGA COARE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Shouting; CUI Xiaopeng; Xiaofan LI

    2009-01-01

    The surface rainfall processes and diurnal variations associated with tropical oceanic convection are examined by analyzing a surface rainfall equation and thermal budget based on hourly zonal-mean data from a series of two-dimensional cloud-resolving simulations.The model is integrated for 21 days with imposed large-scale vertical velocity,zonal wind,and horizontal advection obtained from the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (TOGA COARE) in the control experiment.Diurnal analysis shows that the infrared radiative cooling after sunset,as well as the advective cooling associated with imposed large-scale ascending motion,destabilize the atmosphere and release convective available potential energy to energize nocturnal convective development.Substantial local atmospheric drying is associated with the nocturnal rainfall peak in early morning,which is a result of the large condensation and deposition rates in the vapor budget.Sensitivity experiments show that diurnal variations of radiation and large-scale forcing can produce a nocturnal rainfall peak through infrared and advective cooling,respectively.

  19. Using a 1-D model to reproduce diurnal SST signals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna; Høyer, Jacob L.

    2014-01-01

    of measurement. A generally preferred approach to bridge the gap between in situ and remotely obtained measurements is through modelling of the upper ocean temperature. This ESA supported study focuses on the implementation of the 1 dimensional General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM), in order to resolve...... profiles, along with the selection of the coefficients for the 2-band parametrisation of light’s penetration in the water column, hold a key role in the agreement of the modelled output with observations. To improve the surface heat budget and the distribution of heat, the code was modified to include...... Institution Upper Ocean Processes Group archive. The successful implementation of the new parametrisations is verified while the model reproduces the diurnal signals seen from in situ measurements. Special focus is given to testing and validation of different set-ups using campaign data from the Atlantic...

  20. Diurnal and twenty-four hour patterning of human diseases: acute and chronic common and uncommon medical conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolensky, Michael H; Portaluppi, Francesco; Manfredini, Roberto; Hermida, Ramon C; Tiseo, Ruana; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda L; Haus, Erhard L

    2015-06-01

    The symptom intensity and mortality of human diseases, conditions, and syndromes exhibit diurnal or 24 h patterning, e.g., skin: atopic dermatitis, urticaria, psoriasis, and palmar hyperhidrosis; gastrointestinal: esophageal reflux, peptic ulcer (including perforation and hemorrhage), cyclic vomiting syndrome, biliary colic, hepatic variceal hemorrhage, and proctalgia fugax; infection: susceptibility, fever, and mortality; neural: frontal, parietal, temporal, and occipital lobe seizures, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease, hereditary progressive dystonia, and pain (cancer, post-surgical, diabetic neuropathic and foot ulcer, tooth caries, burning mouth and temporomandibular syndromes, fibromyalgia, sciatica, intervertebral vacuum phenomenon, multiple sclerosis muscle spasm, and migraine, tension, cluster, hypnic, and paroxysmal hemicranial headache); renal: colic and nocturnal enuresis and polyuria; ocular: bulbar conjunctival redness, keratoconjunctivitis sicca, intraocular pressure and anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, and recurrent corneal erosion syndrome; psychiatric/behavioral: major and seasonal affective depressive disorders, bipolar disorder, parasuicide and suicide, dementia-associated agitation, and addictive alcohol, tobacco, and heroin cravings and withdrawal phenomena; plus autoimmune and musculoskeletal: rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, axial spondylarthritis, gout, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic lupus erythematosus. Knowledge of these and other 24 h patterns of human pathophysiology informs research of their underlying circadian and other endogenous mechanisms, external temporal triggers, and more effective patient care entailing clinical chronopreventive and chronotherapeutic strategies.

  1. Diurnal and twenty-four hour patterning of human diseases: cardiac, vascular, and respiratory diseases, conditions, and syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smolensky, Michael H; Portaluppi, Francesco; Manfredini, Roberto; Hermida, Ramon C; Tiseo, Ruana; Sackett-Lundeen, Linda L; Haus, Erhard L

    2015-06-01

    Various medical conditions, disorders, and syndromes exhibit predictable-in-time diurnal and 24 h patterning in the signs, symptoms, and grave nonfatal and fatal events, e.g., respiratory ones of viral and allergic rhinorrhea, reversible (asthma) and non-reversible (bronchitis and emphysema) chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, cystic fibrosis, high altitude pulmonary edema, and decompression sickness; cardiac ones of atrial premature beats and tachycardia, paroxysmal atrial fibrillation, 3rd degree atrial-ventricular block, paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia, ventricular premature beats, ventricular tachyarrhythmia, symptomatic and non-symptomatic angina pectoris, Prinzmetal vasospastic variant angina, acute (non-fatal and fatal) incidents of myocardial infarction, sudden cardiac arrest, in-bed sudden death syndrome of type-1 diabetes, acute cardiogenic pulmonary edema, and heart failure; vascular and circulatory system ones of hypertension, acute orthostatic postprandial, micturition, and defecation hypotension/syncope, intermittent claudication, venous insufficiency, standing occupation leg edema, arterial and venous branch occlusion of the eye, menopausal hot flash, sickle cell syndrome, abdominal, aortic, and thoracic dissections, pulmonary thromboembolism, and deep venous thrombosis, and cerebrovascular transient ischemic attack and hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke. Knowledge of these temporal patterns not only helps guide patient care but research of their underlying endogenous mechanisms, i.e., circadian and others, and external triggers plus informs the development and application of effective chronopreventive and chronotherapeutic strategies.

  2. Modelling hourly rates of evaporation from small lakes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. J. Granger

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of a field study of open water evaporation carried out on three small lakes in Western and Northern Canada. In this case small lakes are defined as those for which the temperature above the water surface is governed by the upwind land surface conditions; that is, a continuous boundary layer exists over the lake, and large-scale atmospheric effects such as entrainment do not come into play. Lake evaporation was measured directly using eddy covariance equipment; profiles of wind speed, air temperature and humidity were also obtained over the water surfaces. Observations were made as well over the upwind land surface.

    The major factors controlling open water evaporation were examined. The study showed that for time periods shorter than daily, the open water evaporation bears no relationship to the net radiation; the wind speed is the most significant factor governing the evaporation rates, followed by the land-water temperature contrast and the land-water vapour pressure contrast. The effect of the stability on the wind field was demonstrated; relationships were developed relating the land-water wind speed contrast to the land-water temperature contrast. The open water period can be separated into two distinct evaporative regimes: the warming period in the Spring, when the land is warmer than the water, the turbulent fluxes over water are suppressed; and the cooling period, when the water is warmer than the land, the turbulent fluxes over water are enhanced.

    Relationships were developed between the hourly rates of lake evaporation and the following significant variables and parameters (wind speed, land-lake temperature and humidity contrasts, and the downwind distance from shore. The result is a relatively simple versatile model for estimating the hourly lake evaporation rates. The model was tested using two independent data sets. Results show that the modelled evaporation follows the observed values

  3. Assessing the diurnal cycle of precipitation in a multi-scale climate model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Pritchard

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available A promising result that has emerged from the new Multi-scale Modeling Framework (MMF approach to atmospheric modeling is a global improvement in the daily timing of peak precipitation over the continents, which is suggestive of improved moist dynamics at diurnal timescales overall. We scrutinize the simulated seasonal composite diurnal cycle of precipitation in an MMF developed by the Center for Multiscale Modeling of Atmospheric Processes (CMMAP using a comprehensive suite of diurnal cycle diagnostics including traditional harmonic analysis, and non-traditional diagnostics such as the broadness of the peak precipitation in the mean summer day, reduced dimension transect analysis, and animations of the full spatial and temporal variability of the composite mean summer day. Precipitation in the MMF is evaluated against multi-satellite merged satellite data and a control simulation with a climate model that employs conventional cloud and boundary layer parameterizations. Our analysis highlights several improved features of the diurnal cycle of precipitation in the multi-scale climate model: It is less sinusoidal over the most energetic diurnal rainfall regimes, more horizontally inhomogeneous within continents and oceans, and more faithful to observed structural transitions in the composite diurnal cycle chronology straddling coastlines than the conventional climate model. A regional focus on North America links a seasonal summer dry bias over the continental United States in the CMMAP MMF at T42 resolution to its inability to capture diurnally propagating precipitation signals associated with organized convection in the lee of the Rockies. The chronology of precipitation events elsewhere in the vicinity of North America is improved in the MMF, especially over sea breeze circulation regions along the eastern seaboard and the Gulf of Mexico, as well as over the entirety of the Gulf Stream. Comparison of the convective heating and moistening

  4. Reproducibility of summertime diurnal precipitation over northern Eurasia simulated by CMIP5 climate models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, N.; Takayabu, Y. N.

    2015-12-01

    Reproducibility of diurnal precipitation over northern Eurasia simulated by CMIP5 climate models in their historical runs were evaluated, in comparison with station data (NCDC-9813) and satellite data (GSMaP-V5). We first calculated diurnal cycles by averaging precipitation at each local solar time (LST) in June-July-August during 1981-2000 over the continent of northern Eurasia (0-180E, 45-90N). Then we examined occurrence time of maximum precipitation and a contribution of diurnally varying precipitation to the total precipitation.The contribution of diurnal precipitation was about 21% in both NCDC-9813 and GSMaP-V5. The maximum precipitation occurred at 18LST in NCDC-9813 but 16LST in GSMaP-V5, indicating some uncertainties even in the observational datasets. The diurnal contribution of the CMIP5 models varied largely from 11% to 62%, and their timing of the precipitation maximum ranged from 11LST to 20LST. Interestingly, the contribution and the timing had strong negative correlation of -0.65. The models with larger diurnal precipitation showed precipitation maximum earlier around noon. Next, we compared sensitivity of precipitation to surface temperature and tropospheric humidity between 5 models with large diurnal precipitation (LDMs) and 5 models with small diurnal precipitation (SDMs). Precipitation in LDMs showed high sensitivity to surface temperature, indicating its close relationship with local instability. On the other hand, synoptic disturbances were more active in SDMs with a dominant role of the large scale condensation, and precipitation in SDMs was more related with tropospheric moisture. Therefore, the relative importance of the local instability and the synoptic disturbances was suggested to be an important factor in determining the contribution and timing of the diurnal precipitation. Acknowledgment: This study is supported by Green Network of Excellence (GRENE) Program by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology

  5. Entrainment rate diurnal cycle in marine stratiform clouds estimated from geostationary satellite retrievals and a meteorological forecast model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painemal, David; Xu, Kuan-Man; Palikonda, Rabindra; Minnis, Patrick

    2017-07-01

    The mean diurnal cycle of cloud entrainment rate (we) over the northeast Pacific region is for the first time computed by combining, in a mixed-layer model framework, the hourly composited GOES-15 satellite-based cloud top height (HT) tendency, advection, and large-scale vertical velocity (w) during May to September 2013, with horizontal winds and w taken from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) model. The tendency term dominates the magnitude and phase of the we diurnal cycle, with a secondary role of w, and a modest advective contribution. The peak and minimum in we occur between 20:00-22:00 LT and 9:00-11:00 LT, respectively, in close agreement with the diurnal cycle of turbulence driven by cloud top longwave cooling. Uncertainties in HT and ECMWF fields are assessed with in situ observations and three meteorological reanalysis data sets. This study provides the basis for constructing nearly global climatologies of we by combining a suite of well-calibrated geostationary satellites.

  6. Cloud cover diurnal cycles in satellite data and regional climate model simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pfeifroth, Uwe; Ahrens, Bodo [Frankfurt Univ., Frankfurt am Main (Germany). Inst. for Atmospheric and Environmental Sciences; Hollmann, Rainer [Deutscher Wetterdienst, Offenbach (Germany)

    2012-12-15

    The amount and diurnal cycle of cloud cover play an important role in the energy and water cycle of the earth-atmosphere system and influence the radiation budget of the earth. Due to its importance and the challenging nature of its quantification, cloud cover is considered the biggest uncertainty factor in climate modeling. There is a clear need for reliable cloud datasets suitable for climate model evaluation studies. This study analyzes two datasets of cloud cover and its diurnal cycle derived from satellite observations by the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) and by EUMETSAT's Satellite Application Facility on Climate Monitoring (CM SAF) in Africa and Europe. Two regions, Europe and the subtropical southern Atlantic Ocean, were identified as offering distinct cloud cover diurnal cycles reasonably observed by both satellite datasets. In these regions, simulations by the regional climate model COSMO-CLM (CCLM) were evaluated in terms of cloud cover and its diurnal cycle during the time period of 1990 to 2007. Results show that the satellite derived cloud diurnal cycles largely agree, while discrepancies occur under extreme conditions like in the Sahara region. The CCLM is able to simulate the diurnal cycle observed consistently in the two satellite datasets in the South-Atlantic ocean, but not in Europe. CCLM misses the afternoon maximum cloud cover in Summer in Europe, which implies deficiencies in the parameterization of convection and in the treatment of surface-atmosphere interactions. The simulation of the diurnal cycle of the more stratiform cloud cover over the subtropical Atlantic was satisfactory in CCLM. (orig.)

  7. Diurnal Cycle Computations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Covey, Curt [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Doutriaux, Charles [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Directory /export_backup/covey1/CMIP5/Precipitation/DiurnalCycle/GridpointTimeseries/CMCCBCM_etal/ on crunchy.llnl.gov contains Python / UV-CDAT scripts compositeDiurnalStatistics.py and fourierDiurB nalAllGrid.py. compositeDiurnalStatistics.py reads high-time-frequency climate data from one or more years and computes 24 hour composite-mean and composite-standard-deviation cycles for one requested month.

  8. Examination of evaporative fraction diurnal behaviour using a soil-vegetation model coupled with a mixed-layer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-P. Lhomme

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available In many experimental conditions, the evaporative fraction, defined as the ratio between evaporation and available energy, has been found stable during daylight hours. This constancy is investigated over fully covering vegetation by means of a land surface scheme coupled with a mixed-layer model, which accounts for entrainment of overlying air. The evaporation rate follows the Penman-Monteith equation and the surface resistance is given by a Jarvis type parameterization involving solar radiation, saturation deficit and leaf water potential. The diurnal course of the evaporative fraction is examined, together with the influence of environmental factors (soil water availability, solar radiation input, wind velocity, saturation deficit above the well-mixed layer. In conditions of fair weather, the curves representing the diurnal course of the evaporative fraction have a typical concave-up shape. Around midday (solar time these curves appear as relatively constant, but always lower that the daytime mean value. Evaporative fraction decreases when soil water decreases or when solar energy increases. An increment of saturation deficit above the mixed-layer provokes only a slight increase of evaporative fraction, and wind velocity has almost no effect. The possibility of estimation daytime evaporation from daytime available energy multiplied by the evaporative fraction at a single time of the day is also investigated. It appears that it is possible to obtain fairly good estimates of daytime evaporation by choosing adequately the time of the measurement of the evaporative fraction. The central hours of the day, and preferably about 3 hr before or after noon, are the most appropriate to provide good estimates. The estimation appears also to be much better when soil water availability (or evaporation is high than when it is low.

  9. Scale interactions on diurnal toseasonal timescales and their relevanceto model systematic errors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Yang

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available Examples of current research into systematic errors in climate models are used to demonstrate the importance of scale interactions on diurnal,intraseasonal and seasonal timescales for the mean and variability of the tropical climate system. It has enabled some conclusions to be drawn about possible processes that may need to be represented, and some recommendations to be made regarding model improvements. It has been shown that the Maritime Continent heat source is a major driver of the global circulation but yet is poorly represented in GCMs. A new climatology of the diurnal cycle has been used to provide compelling evidence of important land-sea breeze and gravity wave effects, which may play a crucial role in the heat and moisture budget of this key region for the tropical and global circulation. The role of the diurnal cycle has also been emphasized for intraseasonal variability associated with the Madden Julian Oscillation (MJO. It is suggested that the diurnal cycle in Sea Surface Temperature (SST during the suppressed phase of the MJO leads to a triggering of cumulus congestus clouds, which serve to moisten the free troposphere and hence precondition the atmosphere for the next active phase. It has been further shown that coupling between the ocean and atmosphere on intraseasonal timescales leads to a more realistic simulation of the MJO. These results stress the need for models to be able to simulate firstly, the observed tri-modal distribution of convection, and secondly, the coupling between the ocean and atmosphere on diurnal to intraseasonal timescales. It is argued, however, that the current representation of the ocean mixed layer in coupled models is not adequate to represent the complex structure of the observed mixed layer, in particular the formation of salinity barrier layers which can potentially provide much stronger local coupling between the atmosphere and ocean on diurnal to intraseasonal timescales.

  10. Multiplicative ARMA models to generate hourly series of global irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora-Lopez, L. [Universidad de Malaga (Spain). Dpto. Lenguajes y C. Computacion; Sidrach-de-Cardona, M. [Universidad de Malaga (Spain). Dpto. Fisica Aplicada

    1998-11-01

    A methodology to generate hourly series of global irradiation is proposed. The only input parameter which is required is the monthly mean value of daily global irradiation, which is available for most locations. The procedure to obtain new series is based on the use of a multiplicative autoregressive moving-average statistical model for time series with regular and seasonal components. The multiplicative nature of these models enables capture of the two types of relationships observed in recorded hourly series of global irradiation: on the one hand, the relationship between the value at one hour and the value at the previous hour; and on the other hand, the relationship between the value at one hour in one day and the value at the same hour in the previous day. In this paper the main drawback which arises when using these models to generate new series is solved: namely, the need for available recorded series in order to obtain the three parameters contained in the statistical ARMA model which is proposed (autoregressive coefficient, moving-average coefficient and variance of the error term). Specifically, expressions which enable estimation of these parameters using only monthly mean values of daily global irradiation are proposed in this paper. (author)

  11. RBC Models and the Hours-Wages Puzzle: Puzzle Solved!

    OpenAIRE

    Vasilev, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    This paper shows that a modified real business cycle (RBC) model, one that includes home production and fiscal spending shocks, can solve one of the RBC puzzles and generates zero correlation between wages and hours. In addition, the micro-founded model presented here provides a sound theoretical model to analyze fiscal policy in a neoclassical framework and is able to capture many aspects of the data that the benchmark RBC model was missing.

  12. Diurnal variation in insulin-stimulated systemic glucose and amino acid utilization in pigs fed with identical meals at 12-hour intervals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, S.J.; Meulen, van der J.; Dekker, R.A.; Corbijn, H.; Mroz, Z.

    2006-01-01

    The diurnal variation in insulin-stimulated systemic glucose and amino acid utilization was investigated in eleven pigs of similar to 40 kg. Pigs were fed isoenergetic/isoproteinic diets (366kj/kg BW0.75 per meal) in two daily rations (06:00 and 18:00h). After a 3-week habituation period, hyperinsul

  13. Investigating the mechanisms of diurnal rainfall variability over Peninsular Malaysia using the non-hydrostatic regional climate model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamaluddin, Ahmad Fairudz; Tangang, Fredolin; Chung, Jing Xiang; Juneng, Liew; Sasaki, Hidetaka; Takayabu, Izuru

    2017-07-01

    This study aims to provide a basis for understanding the mechanisms of diurnal rainfall variability over Peninsular Malaysia by utilising the Non-Hydrostatic Regional Climate Model (NHRCM). The present day climate simulations at 5 km resolution over a period of 20 years, from 1st December 1989 to 31st January 2010 were conducted using the six-hourly Japanese re-analysis 55 years (JRA-55) data and monthly Centennial in situ Observation Based Estimates (COBE) of sea surface temperature as lateral and lower boundary conditions. Despite some biases, the NHRCM performed reasonably well in simulating diurnal rainfall cycles over Peninsular Malaysia. During inter-monsoon periods, the availability of atmospheric moisture played a major role in modulating afternoon rainfall maxima over the foothills of the Titiwangsa mountain range (FT sub-region). During the southwest monsoon, a lack of atmospheric moisture inhibits the occurrence of convective rainfall over the FT sub-region. The NHRCM was also able to simulate the suppression of the diurnal rainfall cycle over the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia (EC sub-region) and afternoon rainfall maximum over the Peninsular Malaysia inland-valley (IN sub-region) area during the northeast monsoon. Over the EC sub-region, daytime radiational warming of the top of clouds enhanced atmospheric stability, thus reducing afternoon rainfall. On the other hand, night-time radiational cooling from cloud tops decreases atmospheric stability and increases nocturnal rainfall. In the early morning, the rainfall maximum was confined to the EC sub-region due to the retardation of the north-easterly monsoonal wind by the land breeze and orographic blocking. However, in the afternoon, superimposition of the sea breeze on the north-easterly monsoonal wind strengthened the north-easterly wind, thus causing the zone of convection to expand further inland.

  14. Disaggregation of Rainy Hours: Compared Performance of Various Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Haha, M.; Hingray, B.; Musy, A.

    In the urban environment, the response times of catchments are usually short. To de- sign or to diagnose waterworks in that context, it is necessary to describe rainfall events with a good time resolution: a 10mn time step is often necessary. Such in- formation is not always available. Rainfall disaggregation models have thus to be applied to produce from rough rainfall data that short time resolution information. The communication will present the performance obtained with several rainfall dis- aggregation models that allow for the disaggregation of rainy hours into six 10mn rainfall amounts. The ability of the models to reproduce some statistical character- istics of rainfall (mean, variance, overall distribution of 10mn-rainfall amounts; ex- treme values of maximal rainfall amounts over different durations) is evaluated thanks to different graphical and numerical criteria. The performance of simple models pre- sented in some scientific papers or developed in the Hydram laboratory as well as the performance of more sophisticated ones is compared with the performance of the basic constant disaggregation model. The compared models are either deterministic or stochastic; for some of them the disaggregation is based on scaling properties of rainfall. The compared models are in increasing complexity order: constant model, linear model (Ben Haha, 2001), Ormsbee Deterministic model (Ormsbee, 1989), Ar- tificial Neuronal Network based model (Burian et al. 2000), Hydram Stochastic 1 and Hydram Stochastic 2 (Ben Haha, 2001), Multiplicative Cascade based model (Olsson and Berndtsson, 1998), Ormsbee Stochastic model (Ormsbee, 1989). The 625 rainy hours used for that evaluation (with a hourly rainfall amount greater than 5mm) were extracted from the 21 years chronological rainfall series (10mn time step) observed at the Pully meteorological station, Switzerland. The models were also evaluated when applied to different rainfall classes depending on the season first and on the

  15. Development of a Stochastic Hourly Solar Irradiation Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristijan Brecl

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We have developed a new solar irradiation model and implemented it in the SunIrradiance photovoltaic cell/module simulator. This model uses stochastic methods to generate the hourly distribution of solar irradiation on a horizontal or inclined surface from monthly irradiation values on the horizontal surface of a selected location and was verified with the measured irradiance data in Ljubljana, located in Central Europe. The new model shows better simulation results with regard to the share of the diffuse irradiation in the region than the other models. The simulation results show that the new solar irradiation model is excellent for photovoltaic system simulations of single junction PV technologies.

  16. KINETIC MODELLING OF CONTINUOUS-MIX ANAEROBIC REACTORS OPERATING UNDER DIURNALLY CYCLIC TEMPERATURE ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. A. Echiegu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A two-culture dynamic model which incorporated the effects of diurnally cyclic temperature was developed and used to predict the dynamic response of anaerobic reactors operated on dairy manure under two diurnally cyclic temperature ranges of 20-40°C and 15-25°C which represent the summer and winter in Nigeria. The digesters were operated at various hydraulic retention times and solid concentrations and some useful kinetic parameters were determined. The model predicted biogas production, volatile solid reduction, methane yield and treatment efficiency with reasonable accuracy (R2 = 0.70 to 0.90. The model, however, under-predicted the cell mass concentration in the reactor probably because the Volatile Suspended Solid (VSS, which was used as the estimator of the actual cell mass concentration in the reactor, was not a good indicator of the active cell mass concentration in anaerobic reactors operating on dairy manure.

  17. Modelled and Observed Diurnal SST Signals: "SSTDV:R.EX.-IM.A.M." Project Preliminary Results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna; Høyer, Jacob; LeBorgne, Pierre

    2013-01-01

    This study presents some of the preliminary results from the ESA Support To Science Element (STSE) funded project on the Diurnal Variability of the Sea Surface Temperature, regarding its Regional Extend and Implications in Atmospheric Modelling (SSTDV:R.EX.–IM.A.M.). During this phase...... of the project, the focus is on the regional extend of diurnal variability. Particularly, extensive sensitivity tests regarding the definition of SSTfound fields show that using only quality 5 SEVIRI data results in warmer foundation fields SSTfound while there is an added ∼0.2 K variability when using multi...... Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) is applied. Preliminary results show that the initial temperature profiles may give a warmer start-up in the model while the light extinction scheme is a controlling factor for the amplitude and vertical extend of the daily signal....

  18. Modelling the diurnal variability of SST and its vertical extent

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna; Høyer, Jacob L.; Donlon, Craig J.

    2014-01-01

    for the transport of heat, momentum and salt. GOTM is a model resolving the basic hydrodynamic and thermodynamic processes related to vertical mixing in the water column, that includes most of the basic methods for calculating the turbulent fluxes. Surface heat and momentum can be either calculated or externally...... of the modelled output with observations. To improve the surface heat budget calculation and distribution of heat in the water column, the GOTM code was modified to include an additional method for the estimation of the total outgoing long-wave radiation and a 9-band parametrisation for the light extinction...... between in situ and remotely obtained measurements, is through modelling of the upper ocean temperature. Models that have been used for this purpose vary from empirical parametrisations mostly based on the wind speed and solar insolation to ocean models that solve the 1 dimensional equations...

  19. Air-sea fluxes in a climate model using hourly coupling between the atmospheric and the oceanic components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Fangxing; von Storch, Jin-Song; Hertwig, Eileen

    2016-06-01

    We analyse the changes in the air-sea fluxes of momentum, heat and fresh water flux caused by increasing the ocean-atmosphere coupling frequency from once per day to once per hour in the Max Planck Institute Earth System Model. We diagnose the relative influences of daily averaging and high-frequency feedbacks on the basic statistics of the air-sea fluxes at grid point level and quantify feedback modes responsible for large scale changes in fluxes over the Southern Ocean and the Equatorial Pacific. Coupling once per hour instead of once per day reduces the mean of the momentum-flux magnitude by up to 7 % in the tropics and increases it by up to 10 % in the Southern Ocean. These changes result solely from feedbacks between atmosphere and ocean occurring on time scales shorter than 1 day . The variance and extremes of all the fluxes are increased in most parts of the oceans. Exceptions are found for the momentum and fresh water fluxes in the tropics. The increases result mainly from the daily averaging, while the decreases in the tropics are caused by the high-frequency feedbacks. The variance increases are substantial, reaching up to 50 % for the momentum flux, 100 % for the fresh water flux, and a factor of 15 for the net heat flux. These diurnal and intra-diurnal variations account for up to 50-90 % of the total variances and exhibit distinct seasonality. The high-frequency coupling can influence the large-scale feedback modes that lead to large-scale changes in the magnitude of wind stress over the Southern Ocean and Equatorial Pacific. In the Southern Ocean, the dependence of the SST-wind-stress feedback on the mean state of SST, which is colder in the experiment with hourly coupling than in the experiment with daily coupling, leads to an increase of westerlies. In the Equatorial Pacific, Bjerknes feedback in the hourly coupled experiment reveals a diurnal cycle during the El Niño events, with the feedback being stronger in the nighttime than in the daytime and

  20. Mathematical modelling of the diurnal regulation of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokhilko, Alexandra; Bou-Torrent, Jordi; Pulido, Pablo; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel; Ebenhöh, Oliver

    2015-05-01

    Isoprenoid molecules are essential elements of plant metabolism. Many important plant isoprenoids, such as chlorophylls, carotenoids, tocopherols, prenylated quinones and hormones are synthesised in chloroplasts via the 2-C-methyl-d-erythritol 4-phosphate (MEP) pathway. Here we develop a mathematical model of diurnal regulation of the MEP pathway in Arabidopsis thaliana. We used both experimental and theoretical approaches to integrate mechanisms potentially involved in the diurnal control of the pathway. Our data show that flux through the MEP pathway is accelerated in light due to the photosynthesis-dependent supply of metabolic substrates of the pathway and the transcriptional regulation of key biosynthetic genes by the circadian clock. We also demonstrate that feedback regulation of both the activity and the abundance of the first enzyme of the MEP pathway (1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase, DXS) by pathway products stabilizes the flux against changes in substrate supply and adjusts the flux according to product demand under normal growth conditions. These data illustrate the central relevance of photosynthesis, the circadian clock and feedback control of DXS for the diurnal regulation of the MEP pathway.

  1. Aerobic Toluene Degraders in the Rhizosphere of a Constructed Wetland Model Show Diurnal Polyhydroxyalkanoate Metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lünsmann, Vanessa; Kappelmeyer, Uwe; Taubert, Anja; Nijenhuis, Ivonne; von Bergen, Martin; Heipieper, Hermann J; Müller, Jochen A; Jehmlich, Nico

    2016-07-15

    Constructed wetlands (CWs) are successfully applied for the treatment of waters contaminated with aromatic compounds. In these systems, plants provide oxygen and root exudates to the rhizosphere and thereby stimulate microbial degradation processes. Root exudation of oxygen and organic compounds depends on photosynthetic activity and thus may show day-night fluctuations. While diurnal changes in CW effluent composition have been observed, information on respective fluctuations of bacterial activity are scarce. We investigated microbial processes in a CW model system treating toluene-contaminated water which showed diurnal oscillations of oxygen concentrations using metaproteomics. Quantitative real-time PCR was applied to assess diurnal expression patterns of genes involved in aerobic and anaerobic toluene degradation. We observed stable aerobic toluene turnover by Burkholderiales during the day and night. Polyhydroxyalkanoate synthesis was upregulated in these bacteria during the day, suggesting that they additionally feed on organic root exudates while reutilizing the stored carbon compounds during the night via the glyoxylate cycle. Although mRNA copies encoding the anaerobic enzyme benzylsuccinate synthase (bssA) were relatively abundant and increased slightly at night, the corresponding protein could not be detected in the CW model system. Our study provides insights into diurnal patterns of microbial processes occurring in the rhizosphere of an aquatic ecosystem. Constructed wetlands are a well-established and cost-efficient option for the bioremediation of contaminated waters. While it is commonly accepted knowledge that the function of CWs is determined by the interplay of plants and microorganisms, the detailed molecular processes are considered a black box. Here, we used a well-characterized CW model system treating toluene-contaminated water to investigate the microbial processes influenced by diurnal plant root exudation. Our results indicated stable

  2. An empirical model simulating long-term diurnal CO2 flux for diverse vegetation types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Richardson

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available We present an empirical model for the estimation of diurnal variability in net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE. The model is based on the use of a nonrectangular hyperbola for photosynthetic response of canopy and was constructed by using a dataset obtained from the AmeriFlux network and containing continuous eddy covariance CO2 flux from 26 ecosystems over seven biomes. The model uses simplified empirical expression of seasonal variability in biome-specific physiological parameters with air temperature, vapor pressure deficit, and precipitation. The physiological parameters of maximum CO2 uptake rate by the canopy and ecosystem respiration had biome-specific responses to environmental variables. The estimated physiological parameters had reasonable magnitudes and seasonal variation and gave reasonable timing of the beginning and end of the growing season over various biomes, but they were less satisfactory for disturbed grassland and savanna than for forests. Comparison with observational data revealed that the diurnal cycle of NEE was generally well predicted all year round by the model. The model gave satisfactory results even for tundra, which had very small amplitudes of NEE variability. These results suggest that this model with biome-specific parameters will be applicable to numerous terrestrial biomes, particularly forest ones.

  3. Evaluating the performance of ENVI-met model in diurnal cycles for different meteorological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acero, Juan A.; Arrizabalaga, Jon

    2016-11-01

    Urban areas are known to modify meteorological variables producing important differences in small spatial scales (i.e. microscale). These affect human thermal comfort conditions and the dispersion of pollutants, especially those emitted inside the urban area, which finally influence quality of life and the use of public open spaces. In this study, the diurnal evolution of meteorological variables measured in four urban spaces is compared with the results provided by ENVI-met (v 4.0). Measurements were carried out during 3 days with different meteorological conditions in Bilbao in the north of the Iberian Peninsula. The evaluation of the model accuracy (i.e. the degree to which modelled values approach measured values) was carried out with several quantitative difference metrics. The results for air temperature and humidity show a good agreement of measured and modelled values independently of the regional meteorological conditions. However, in the case of mean radiant temperature and wind speed, relevant differences are encountered highlighting the limitation of the model to estimate these meteorological variables precisely during diurnal cycles, in the considered evaluation conditions (sites and weather).

  4. Diurnal Variation and Twenty-Four Hour Sleep Deprivation Do Not Alter Supine Heart Rate Variability in Healthy Male Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvsåshagen, Torbjørn; Zak, Nathalia; Norbom, Linn B.; Pedersen, Per Ø.; Quraishi, Sophia H.; Bjørnerud, Atle; Malt, Ulrik F.; Groote, Inge R.; Kaufmann, Tobias; Andreassen, Ole A.; Westlye, Lars T.

    2017-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV) has become an increasingly popular index of cardiac autonomic control in the biobehavioral sciences due to its relationship with mental illness and cognitive traits. However, the intraindividual stability of HRV in response to sleep and diurnal disturbances, which are commonly reported in mental illness, and its relationship with executive function are not well understood. Here, in 40 healthy adult males we calculated high frequency HRV—an index of parasympathetic nervous system (PNS) activity—using pulse oximetry during brain imaging, and assessed attentional and executive function performance in a subsequent behavioral test session at three time points: morning, evening, and the following morning. Twenty participants were randomly selected for total sleep deprivation whereas the other 20 participants slept as normal. Sleep deprivation and morning-to-night variation did not influence high frequency HRV at either a group or individual level; however, sleep deprivation abolished the relationship between orienting attention performance and HRV. We conclude that a day of wake and a night of laboratory-induced sleep deprivation do not alter supine high frequency HRV in young healthy male adults. PMID:28151944

  5. Model independent result on possible diurnal effect in DAMA/LIBRA-phase1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernabei, R.; D' Angelo, S.; Di Marco, A. [Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipt. di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Belli, P. [INFN, Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Cappella, F.; D' Angelo, A.; Prosperi, D. [Universita di Roma ' ' La Sapienza' ' , Dipt. di Fisica, Rome (Italy); INFN, Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy); Caracciolo, V.; Castellano, S.; Cerulli, R. [INFN, Laboratori Nazionali del Gran Sasso, Assergi (Italy); Dai, C.J.; He, H.L.; Kuang, H.H.; Ma, X.H.; Sheng, X.D.; Wang, R.G. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); Incicchitti, A. [INFN, Sezione Roma, Rome (Italy); Montecchia, F. [INFN, Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Rome (Italy); Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Dipt. di Ingegneria Civile e Ingegneria Informatica, Rome (Italy); Ye, Z.P. [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Institute of High Energy Physics, Beijing (China); University of Jing Gangshan, Jiangxi (China)

    2014-03-15

    The results obtained in the search for possible diurnal effect in the single-hit low energy data collected by DAMA/LIBRA-phase1 (total exposure 1.04 ton x year) deep underground at the Gran Sasso National Laboratory (LNGS) of the INFN are presented. At the present level of sensitivity the presence of any significant diurnal variation and of diurnal time structures in the data can be excluded for both the cases of solar and sidereal time. In particular, the diurnal modulation amplitude expected, because of the Earth diurnal motion, on the basis of the DAMA dark matter annual modulation results is below the present sensitivity. (orig.)

  6. Modeling the diurnal variability of agricultural ammonia in Bakersfield, California, during the CalNex campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lonsdale, Chantelle R.; Hegarty, Jennifer D.; Cady-Pereira, Karen E.; Alvarado, Matthew J.; Henze, Daven K.; Turner, Matthew D.; Capps, Shannon L.; Nowak, John B.; Neuman, J. Andy; Middlebrook, Ann M.; Bahreini, Roya; Murphy, Jennifer G.; Markovic, Milos Z.; VandenBoer, Trevor C.; Russell, Lynn M.; Scarino, Amy Jo

    2017-02-01

    NH3 retrievals from the NASA Tropospheric Emission Spectrometer (TES), as well as surface and aircraft observations of NH3(g) and submicron NH4(p), are used to evaluate modeled concentrations of NH3(g) and NH4(p) from the Community Multiscale Air Quality (CMAQ) model in the San Joaquin Valley (SJV) during the California Research at the Nexus of Air Quality and Climate Change (CalNex) campaign. We find that simulations of NH3 driven with the California Air Resources Board (CARB) emission inventory are qualitatively and spatially consistent with TES satellite observations, with a correlation coefficient (r2) of 0.64. However, the surface observations at Bakersfield indicate a diurnal cycle in the model bias, with CMAQ overestimating surface NH3 at night and underestimating it during the day. The surface, satellite, and aircraft observations all suggest that daytime NH3 emissions in the CARB inventory are underestimated by at least a factor of 2, while the nighttime overestimate of NH3(g) is likely due to a combination of overestimated NH3 emissions and underestimated deposition.Running CMAQ v5.0.2 with the bi-directional NH3 scheme reduces NH3 concentrations at night and increases them during the day. This reduces the model bias when compared to the surface and satellite observations, but the increased concentrations aloft significantly increase the bias relative to the aircraft observations. We attempt to further reduce model bias by using the surface observations at Bakersfield to derive an empirical diurnal cycle of NH3 emissions in the SJV, in which nighttime and midday emissions differ by about a factor of 4.5. Running CMAQv5.0.2 with a bi-directional NH3 scheme together with this emissions diurnal profile further reduces model bias relative to the surface observations. Comparison of these simulations with the vertical profile retrieved by TES shows little bias except for the lowest retrieved level, but the model bias relative to flight data aloft increases

  7. Experimental earth tidal models in considering nearly diurnal free wobble of the Earth's liquid core

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    Based on the 28 series of the high precision and high minute sampling tidal gravity observations at 20 stations in Global Geodynamics Project (GGP) network, the resonant parameters of the Earth's nearly diurnal free wobble (including the eigenperiods, resonant strengths and quality factots) are precisely determined. The discrepancy of the eigenperiod between observed and theoretical values is studied, the important conclusion that the real dynamic ellipticity of the liquid core is about 5% larger than the one under the static equilibrium assumption is approved by using our gravity technique. The experimental Earth's tidal gravity models with considering the nearly diurnal free wobble of the Earth's liquid core are constructed in this study. The numerical results show that the difference among three experimental models is less than 0.1%, and the largest discrepancy compared to those widely used nowdays given by Dehant (1999) and Mathews (2001) is only about 0.4%. It can provide with the most recent real experimental tidal gravity models for the global study of the Earth's tides, geodesy and space techniques and so on.

  8. Stochastic modeling of hourly rainfall times series in Campania (Italy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgio, M.; Greco, R.

    2009-04-01

    Occurrence of flowslides and floods in small catchments is uneasy to predict, since it is affected by a number of variables, such as mechanical and hydraulic soil properties, slope morphology, vegetation coverage, rainfall spatial and temporal variability. Consequently, landslide risk assessment procedures and early warning systems still rely on simple empirical models based on correlation between recorded rainfall data and observed landslides and/or river discharges. Effectiveness of such systems could be improved by reliable quantitative rainfall prediction, which can allow gaining larger lead-times. Analysis of on-site recorded rainfall height time series represents the most effective approach for a reliable prediction of local temporal evolution of rainfall. Hydrological time series analysis is a widely studied field in hydrology, often carried out by means of autoregressive models, such as AR, ARMA, ARX, ARMAX (e.g. Salas [1992]). Such models gave the best results when applied to the analysis of autocorrelated hydrological time series, like river flow or level time series. Conversely, they are not able to model the behaviour of intermittent time series, like point rainfall height series usually are, especially when recorded with short sampling time intervals. More useful for this issue are the so-called DRIP (Disaggregated Rectangular Intensity Pulse) and NSRP (Neymann-Scott Rectangular Pulse) model [Heneker et al., 2001; Cowpertwait et al., 2002], usually adopted to generate synthetic point rainfall series. In this paper, the DRIP model approach is adopted, in which the sequence of rain storms and dry intervals constituting the structure of rainfall time series is modeled as an alternating renewal process. Final aim of the study is to provide a useful tool to implement an early warning system for hydrogeological risk management. Model calibration has been carried out with hourly rainfall hieght data provided by the rain gauges of Campania Region civil

  9. The hourly updated US High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) storm-scale forecast model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Curtis; Dowell, David; Benjamin, Stan; Weygandt, Stephen; Olson, Joseph; Kenyon, Jaymes; Grell, Georg; Smirnova, Tanya; Ladwig, Terra; Brown, John; James, Eric; Hu, Ming

    2016-04-01

    The 3-km convective-allowing High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) is a US NOAA hourly updating weather forecast model that use a specially configured version of the Advanced Research WRF (ARW) model and assimilate many novel and most conventional observation types on an hourly basis using Gridpoint Statistical Interpolation (GSI). Included in this assimilation is a procedure for initializing ongoing precipitation systems from observed radar reflectivity data (and proxy reflectivity from lightning and satellite data), a cloud analysis to initialize stable layer clouds from METAR and satellite observations, and special techniques to enhance retention of surface observation information. The HRRR is run hourly out to 15 forecast hours over a domain covering the entire conterminous United States using initial and boundary conditions from the hourly-cycled 13km Rapid Refresh (RAP, using similar physics and data assimilation) covering North America and a significant part of the Northern Hemisphere. The HRRR is continually developed and refined at NOAA's Earth System Research Laboratory, and an initial version was implemented into the operational NOAA/NCEP production suite in September 2014. Ongoing experimental RAP and HRRR model development throughout 2014 and 2015 has culminated in a set of data assimilation and model enhancements that will be incorporated into the first simultaneous upgrade of both the operational RAP and HRRR that is scheduled for spring 2016 at NCEP. This presentation will discuss the operational RAP and HRRR changes contained in this upgrade. The RAP domain is being expanded to encompass the NAM domain and the forecast lengths of both the RAP and HRRR are being extended. RAP and HRRR assimilation enhancements have focused on (1) extending surface data assimilation to include mesonet observations and improved use of all surface observations through better background estimates of 2-m temperature and dewpoint including projection of 2-m temperature

  10. Contemporary model fidelity over the Maritime Continent: Examination of the diurnal cycle, synoptic, intraseasonal and seasonal variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranowski, Dariusz

    2017-04-01

    One of the key challenges in subseasonal weather forecasting is the fidelity in representing the propagation of the Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) across the Maritime Continent (MC). In reality both propagating and non-propagating MJO events are observed, but in numerical forecast the latter group largely dominates. The fact that models still struggle to realistically represent the MJO over MC is generally attributed to its complex terrain and associated vigorous diurnal cycle of convection, multi-scale interactions between local and propagating modes of convection and regional air-sea interactions. In this study, multi-model simulations from the GEWEX Atmospheric System Study (GASS) / Year of Tropical Convection (YOTC) MJO Project are analyzed to quantify contemporary model performance in representing the MC mean climate and its variability, including the diurnal cycle, synoptic, intraseasonal, and seasonal variability. This dataset has been shown to be useful in such multi-model evaluation studies over different regions and/or focusing on different physical processes (e.g. Jiang et al., JGR, 2015; Mani et al., Clim. Dyn, 2016) For this study, comprehensive model performances are evaluated using metrics that utilize the mean precipitation pattern and the amplitude and phase of the diurnal cycle, with a particular focus on the linkage between a model's local MC variability and its fidelity in representing propagation of the MJO and equatorial Kelvin waves across the MC. Subseasonal to seasonal variability of mean precipitation and its diurnal cycle in 20 year long climate simulations from over 20 general circulation models (GCMs) is examined to benchmark model performance. Furthermore, we utilize cross model differences to gain insight into which processes are most critical to realistically represent multi-scale interactions over the MC region. This includes distinguishing the behavior between a number of land (Sumatra, Borneo, New Guinea and Southeast Asia) and

  11. Modeling and Observational Framework for Diagnosing Local Land-Atmosphere Coupling on Diurnal Time Scales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santanello, Joseph A., Jr.; Peters-Lidard, Christa D.; Kumar, Sujay V.; Alonge, Charles; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    Land-atmosphere interactions play a critical role in determining the diurnal evolution of both planetary boundary layer (PBL) and land surface temperature and moisture states. The degree of coupling between the land surface and PBL in numerical weather prediction and climate models remains largely unexplored and undiagnosed due to the complex interactions and feedbacks present across a range of scales. Further, uncoupled systems or experiments (e.g., the Project for Intercomparison of Land Parameterization Schemes, PILPS) may lead to inaccurate water and energy cycle process understanding by neglecting feedback processes such as PBL-top entrainment. In this study, a framework for diagnosing local land-atmosphere coupling is presented using a coupled mesoscale model with a suite of PBL and land surface model (LSM) options along with observations during field experiments in the U. S. Southern Great Plains. Specifically, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model has been coupled to the Land Information System (LIS), which provides a flexible and high-resolution representation and initialization of land surface physics and states. Within this framework, the coupling established by each pairing of the available PBL schemes in WRF with the LSMs in LIS is evaluated in terms of the diurnal temperature and humidity evolution in the mixed layer. The co-evolution of these variables and the convective PBL is sensitive to and, in fact, integrative of the dominant processes that govern the PBL budget, which are synthesized through the use of mixing diagrams. Results show how the sensitivity of land-atmosphere interactions to the specific choice of PBL scheme and LSM varies across surface moisture regimes and can be quantified and evaluated against observations. As such, this methodology provides a potential pathway to study factors controlling local land-atmosphere coupling (LoCo) using the LIS-WRF system, which will serve as a testbed for future experiments to evaluate

  12. Modeling the Distribution of Rainfall Intensity using Hourly Data

    OpenAIRE

    Salisu Dan'azumi; Supiah Shamsudin; Azmi Aris

    2010-01-01

    Problem statement: Design of storm water best management practices to control runoff and water pollution can be achieved if a prior knowledge of the distribution of rainfall characteristics is known. Rainfall intensity, particularly in tropical climate, plays a major role in the design of runoff conveyance and erosion control systems. This study is aimed to explore the statistical distribution of rainfall intensity for Peninsular Malaysia using hourly rainfall data. Approach: Hourly rainfall ...

  13. Upscaling diurnal cycles of carbon fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodesheim, Paul; Jung, Martin; Mahecha, Miguel; Reichstein, Markus

    2017-04-01

    Carbon fluxes like Gross Primary Production (GPP) and Net Ecosystem Exchange (NEE) are important variables for studying interactions between the atmosphere and the biosphere in different ecosystems. They are typically derived from measurements at Eddy covariance towers and the FLUXNET global network consists of hundreds of such sites. In order to diagnose global GPP and NEE patterns from FLUXNET, upscaling approaches have been used in the past to extrapolate the site measurements to continental and global scale. However, respective products have a daily or monthly temporal resolution and do not allow for analyzing patterns related to diurnal variations of GPP and NEE. To raise these upscaling approaches to the next level, we present our first results on upscaling diurnal cycles of GPP and NEE with half-hourly resolution. We use random forest regression models to estimate the relationship between predictor variables and fluxes based on more than four million half-hourly observations from FLUXNET sites. We have developed and tested two approaches that overcome the mismatch in the temporal resolution between predictor variables at daily resolution and fluxes at half-hourly resolution. Based on thorough leave-one-site-out cross-validation we show that the approach works very well. Finally, we used the trained models for computing global products of half-hourly GPP and NEE that cover the years 2001 to 2014 and present global patterns of diurnal carbon flux variations derived from the upscaling approach.

  14. Diurnal Cycle of the North American Monsoon in a Mesoscale Model Simulation: Evolution of Key Parameters in Relation to Precipitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhong Zheng

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal cycle of the North American monsoon is analyzed based on the output from a mesoscale model simulation. Statistically significant diurnal cycle in precipitation is identified, with heavy precipitation—essentially convective—dominating in local afternoons. Temporal evolution of key parameters in relation to precipitation is investigated, based on which a sequence of the dynamic/thermodynamic processes underlying precipitation development is proposed. Particularly, the afternoon peak in precipitation is found preceded by enhanced static instability and low-level convergence.

  15. Diurnal and annual exchanges of mass and energy between an aspen-hazelnut forest and the atmosphere: Testing the mathematical model Ecosys with data from the BOREAS experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, R. F.; Black, T. A.; den Hartog, G.; Berry, J. A.; Neumann, H. H.; Blanken, P. D.; Yang, P. C.; Russell, C.; Nalder, I. A.

    1999-11-01

    There is much uncertainty about the net carbon (C) exchange of boreal forest ecosystems, although this exchange may be an important part of global C dynamics. To resolve this uncertainty, net C exchange has been measured at several sites in the boreal forest of Canada as part of the Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS). One of these sites is the Southern Old Aspen site at which diurnal CO2 and energy (radiation, latent, and sensible heat) fluxes were measured during 1994 using eddy correlation techniques at different positions within a mixed 70 year old aspen-hazelnut forest. These measurements were used to test a complex ecosystem model "ecosys" in which mass and energy exchanges between terrestrial ecosystems and the atmosphere are simulated hourly under diverse conditions of soil, management, and climate. These simulations explained between 70% and 80% of diurnal variation in ecosystem CO2 and energy fluxes measured during three 1 week intervals in late April, early June, and mid-July. Total annual CO2 fluxes indicated that during 1994, aspen was a net sink of 540 (modeled) versus 670 (measured) g C m-2 yr-1, while hazelnut plus soil were a net source of 472 (modeled) versus 540 (measured) g C m-2 yr-1. The aspen-hazelnut forest at the BOREAS site was therefore estimated to be a net sink of about 68 (modeled) versus 130 (measured) g C m-2 yr-1 during 1994. Long-term simulations indicated that this sink may be larger during cooler years and smaller during warmer years because C fixation in the model was less sensitive to temperature than respiration. These simulations also indicated that the magnitude of this sink declines with forest age because respiration increases with respect to fixation as standing phytomass grows. Confidence in the predictive capabilities of ecosystem models at decadal or centennial timescales is improved by well-constrained tests of these models at hourly timescales.

  16. Generating Hourly Rainfall Model using Bayesian Time Series Model (A Case Study at Sentral Station, Bondowoso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Entin Hidayah

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Disaggregation of hourly rainfall data is very important to fulfil the input of continual rainfall-runoff model, when the availability of automatic rainfall records are limited. Continual rainfall-runoff modeling requires rainfall data in form of series of hourly. Such specification can be obtained by temporal disaggregation in single site. The paper attempts to generate single-site rainfall model based upon time series (AR1 model by adjusting and establishing dummy procedure. Estimated with Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC the objective variable is hourly rainfall depth. Performance of model has been evaluated by comparison of history data and model prediction. The result shows that the model has a good performance for dry interval periods. The performance of the model good represented by smaller number of MAE by 0.21 respectively.

  17. Evaluating the impacts of climate change on diurnal wind power cycles using multiple regional climate models

    KAUST Repository

    Goddard, Scott D.

    2015-05-01

    Electrical utility system operators must plan resources so that electricity supply matches demand throughout the day. As the proportion of wind-generated electricity in the US grows, changes in daily wind patterns have the potential either to disrupt the utility or increase the value of wind to the system over time. Wind power projects are designed to last many years, so at this timescale, climate change may become an influential factor on wind patterns. We examine the potential effects of climate change on the average diurnal power production cycles at 12 locations in North America by analyzing averaged and individual output from nine high-resolution regional climate models comprising historical (1971–1999) and future (2041–2069) periods. A semi-parametric mixed model is fit using cubic B-splines, and model diagnostics are checked. Then, a likelihood ratio test is applied to test for differences between the time periods in the seasonal daily averaged cycles, and agreement among the individual regional climate models is assessed. We investigate the significant changes by combining boxplots with a differencing approach and identify broad categories of changes in the amplitude, shape, and position of the average daily cycles. We then discuss the potential impact of these changes on wind power production.

  18. Examining diurnal cycle influences on convective intensity in idealized cloud resolving model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Z.; Back, L. E.

    2016-12-01

    There is a large observed contrast in the lightning flash rate per unit precipitation between land and ocean in the tropics. Higher lightning flash rates are associated with faster updraft velocities, and thus greater lightning flash rate per unit precipitation is associated with faster updrafts per unit precipitation, a clear measure of convective intensity. As it is the land regions exhibiting the greater lightning flash rate per unit precipitation, there is an expectation that tropical land areas exhibit greater convective intensity than tropical oceans. Using a cloud resolving model (CRM) we tested whether the application of a diurnal cycle in sea surface temperature (SST) over a portion of the domain would result in faster updrafts per unit precipitation over that domain. We applied a Bernoulli sampling technique to the area of oscillating SST to give it the same effective mean precipitation as the fixed SST area. Once the mean precipitation values were equal, it was found that there were no differences in high intensity updraft velocity that could be associated with lightning flash rate per unit precipitation variations in the real world.

  19. The Zodiacal Cloud Model applied to the Martian atmosphere. Diurnal variations in Meteoric ion layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diego Carrillo-Sánchez, Juan; Plane, John M. C.; Withers, Paul; Fallows, Kathryn; Nesvorný, David; Pokorný, Petr; Feng, Wuhu

    2016-04-01

    Sporadic metal layers have been detected in the Martian atmosphere by radio occultation measurements using the Mars Express Orbiter and Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft. More recently, metallic ion layers produced by the meteor storm event following the close encounter between Comet Siding Spring (C/2013 A1) and Mars were identified by the Imaging UltraViolet Spectrograph (IUVS) aboard the Mars Atmosphere and Volatile EvolutioN (MAVEN) spacecraft. However, the background metal layers produced by the influx of sporadic meteors have not yet been detected at Mars (contrary to the permanent metal layers identified in the Earth's atmosphere). The Zodiacal Dust Cloud (ZDC) model for particle populations released by asteroids (AST), and dust grains from Jupiter Family Comets (JFC) and Halley-Type Comets (HTC) has been combined with a Monte Carlo sampling method and the Chemical ABlation MODel (CABMOD) to predict the ablation rates of Na, K, Fe, Si, Mg, Ca and Al above 40 km altitude in the Martian atmosphere. CABMOD considers the standard treatment of meteor physics, including the balance of frictional heating by radiative losses and the absorption of heat energy through temperature increases, melting phase transitions and vaporization, as well as sputtering by inelastic collisions with the air molecules. These vertical profiles are input into the Leeds 1-D Mars atmospheric model which includes photo-ionization, and gas-phase ion-molecule and neutral chemistry, in order to explore the evolution of the resulting metallic ions and atoms. We conclude that the formation of the sporadic ion layers observed below 100 km with a plasma density exceeding 104 cm-3 requires the combination of the three different influx sources considered by the ZDC model, with a significant asteroidal contribution. Finally, we explore the changes of the neutral and ionized Mg and Fe layers over a diurnal cycle.

  20. On the diurnal cycle of surface energy fluxes in the North American monsoon region using the WRF-Hydro modeling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Tiantian; Vivoni, Enrique R.; Gochis, David J.; Mascaro, Giuseppe

    2017-09-01

    The diurnal cycles of surface energy fluxes are important drivers of atmospheric boundary layer development and convective precipitation, particularly in regions with heterogeneous land surface conditions such as those under the influence of the North American monsoon (NAM). Characterization of diurnal surface fluxes and their controls has not been well constrained due to the paucity of observations in the NAM region. In this study, we evaluate the performance of the uncoupled WRF-Hydro modeling system in its ability to represent soil moisture, turbulent heat fluxes, and surface temperature observations and compare these to operational analyses from other commonly used land surface models (LSMs). After a rigorous model evaluation, we quantify how the diurnal cycles of surface energy fluxes vary during the warm season for the major ecosystems in a regional basin. We find that the diurnal cycle of latent heat flux is more sensitive to ecosystem type than sensible heat flux due to the response of plant transpiration to variations in soil water content. Furthermore, the peak timing of precipitation affects the shape and magnitude of the diurnal cycle of plant transpiration in water-stressed ecosystems, inducing mesoscale heterogeneity in land surface conditions between the major ecosystems within the basin. Comparisons to other LSMs indicate that ecosystem differences in the diurnal cycle of turbulent fluxes are underestimated in these products. While this study shows how land surface heterogeneity affects the simulated diurnal cycle of turbulent fluxes, additional coupled modeling efforts are needed to identify the potential impacts of these spatial differences on convective precipitation.

  1. Evaluation of simulated climatological diurnal temperature range in CMIP5 models from the perspective of planetary boundary layer turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Nan; Zhou, Liming; Dai, Yongjiu

    2017-07-01

    This study examines the effects of modeled planetary boundary layer (PBL) mixing on the simulated temperature diurnal cycle climatology over land in 20 CMIP5 models with AMIP simulations. When compared with observations, the magnitude of diurnal temperature range (DTR) is systematically underestimated over almost all land areas due to a widespread warm bias of daily minimum temperature (Tmin) and mostly a cold bias of daily maximum temperature (Tmax). Analyses of the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble means suggest that the biases of the simulated PBL mixing could very likely contribute to the temperature biases. For the regions with the cold bias in Tmax, the daytime PBL mixing is generally underestimated. The consequent more dry air entrainment from the free atmosphere could help maintain the surface humidity gradient, and thus produce more surface evaporation and potentially lower the Tmax. The opposite situation holds true for the regions with the warm bias of Tmax. This mechanism could be particularly applicable to the regions with moderate and wet climate conditions where surface evaporation depends more on the surface humidity gradient, but less on the available soil moisture. For the widespread warm bias of Tmin, the widely-recognized overestimated PBL mixing at nighttime should play a dominant role by transferring more heat from the atmosphere to the near-surface to warm the Tmin. Further analyses using the high resolution CFMIP2 output also support the CMIP5 results about the connections of the biases between the simulated turbulent mixing and the temperature diurnal cycle. The large inter-model variations of the simulated temperature diurnal cycle primarily appear over the arid and semi-arid regions and boreal arctic regions where the model differences in the PBL turbulence mixing could make equally significant contributions to the inter-model variations of DTR, Tmax and Tmin compared to the model differences in surface radiative processes. These results

  2. Evaluation of simulated climatological diurnal temperature range in CMIP5 models from the perspective of planetary boundary layer turbulent mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Nan; Zhou, Liming; Dai, Yongjiu

    2016-08-01

    This study examines the effects of modeled planetary boundary layer (PBL) mixing on the simulated temperature diurnal cycle climatology over land in 20 CMIP5 models with AMIP simulations. When compared with observations, the magnitude of diurnal temperature range (DTR) is systematically underestimated over almost all land areas due to a widespread warm bias of daily minimum temperature (Tmin) and mostly a cold bias of daily maximum temperature (Tmax). Analyses of the CMIP5 multi-model ensemble means suggest that the biases of the simulated PBL mixing could very likely contribute to the temperature biases. For the regions with the cold bias in Tmax, the daytime PBL mixing is generally underestimated. The consequent more dry air entrainment from the free atmosphere could help maintain the surface humidity gradient, and thus produce more surface evaporation and potentially lower the Tmax. The opposite situation holds true for the regions with the warm bias of Tmax. This mechanism could be particularly applicable to the regions with moderate and wet climate conditions where surface evaporation depends more on the surface humidity gradient, but less on the available soil moisture. For the widespread warm bias of Tmin, the widely-recognized overestimated PBL mixing at nighttime should play a dominant role by transferring more heat from the atmosphere to the near-surface to warm the Tmin. Further analyses using the high resolution CFMIP2 output also support the CMIP5 results about the connections of the biases between the simulated turbulent mixing and the temperature diurnal cycle. The large inter-model variations of the simulated temperature diurnal cycle primarily appear over the arid and semi-arid regions and boreal arctic regions where the model differences in the PBL turbulence mixing could make equally significant contributions to the inter-model variations of DTR, Tmax and Tmin compared to the model differences in surface radiative processes. These results

  3. A diurnal reflectance model using grass: Surface-substrate interaction and inverse solution - October 16, 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    We report an analysis of canopy reflectance (ρ) experiment, using hand-held radiometer to measure distribution of biomass in a grass field. The analysis: 1) separates the green-fraction from thatch and soil background, 2) accounts for the changing diurnal ρ with the sun elevation...

  4. Evaluation of the sensitivity of the Amazonian diurnal cycle to convective intensity in reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itterly, Kyle F.; Taylor, Patrick C.

    2017-02-01

    Model parameterizations of tropical deep convection are unable to reproduce the observed diurnal and spatial variability of convection in the Amazon, which contributes to climatological biases in the water cycle and energy budget. Convective intensity regimes are defined using percentiles of daily minimum 3-hourly averaged outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES). This study compares the observed spatial variability of convective diurnal cycle statistics for each regime to MERRA-2 and ERA-Interim (ERA) reanalysis data sets. Composite diurnal cycle statistics are computed for daytime hours (06:00-21:00 local time) in the wet season (December-January-February). MERRA-2 matches observations more closely than ERA for domain averaged composite diurnal statistics—specifically precipitation. However, ERA reproduces mesoscale features of OLR and precipitation phase associated with topography and the propagation of the coastal squall line. Both reanalysis models are shown to underestimate extreme convection.

  5. Nonlinear interaction between the diurnal and semidiurnal tides: Terdiurnal and diurnal secondary waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teitelbaum, H.; Vial, F.; Manson, A. H.; Giraldez, R.; Masseboeuf, M.

    1989-01-01

    Many years of measurements obtained using French meteor radars at Garchy (latitude 47 N) and Montpazier (latitude 44 N) are used to show the existence of an 8 hour oscillation. Some examples of the structure of this wave are displayed and compared with measurements performed at Saskatoon (latitude 52 N) and Budrio (latitude 45 N). This wave can be interpreted as the solar driven terdiurnal tide, or as the result of the nonlinear interaction between the diurnal and semidiurnal tides. Both hypotheses are tested with numerical models. Incidentally, the possible existence of a 24 hour wave resulting from this interaction is also studied.

  6. Diurnal and Semidiurnal Variations in Earth Rotation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijing, Q.; Xu, X.; Dong, D.; Zhou, Y.

    2016-12-01

    In recent decades, earth orientation has been monitored with increasing accuracy by advanced space-geodetic techniques, including Satellite Laser ranging (SLR), Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) and the Global Positioning System (GPS). We are able to obtain the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP, polar motion and rotation rate changes) by even 1 to 2 hours observation data, form which obvious diurnal and semidiurnal signals can be detected, and compare them with the predicted results by the ocean model. Both the amplitude and phase are in good agreement in the main diurnal and semidiurnal wave frequency, especially for the UT1 with Consistency of 90% , and 60% for polar motion, there are 30% motivating factor of the diurnal and semidiurnal polar motion have not been identified. This work add the motivating term libration to the empirical tidal models, which can reduce the difference between the high frequency earth rotation model and observations. Then the numerical simulated ocean tidal model is obtained with the newest ERP datas from GPS, and the Scaled Sensitivity Matrix (SSM) approach is used to separate the sidebands in major ocean tides.

  7. An empirical model simulating diurnal and seasonal CO2 flux for diverse vegetation types and climate conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. D. Richardson

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available We present an empirical model for the estimation of diurnal variability in net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE in various biomes. The model is based on the use of a simple saturated function for photosynthetic response of the canopy, and was constructed using the AmeriFlux network dataset that contains continuous eddy covariance CO2 flux data obtained at 24 ecosystems sites from seven biomes. The physiological parameters of maximum CO2 uptake rate by the canopy and ecosystem respiration have biome-specific responses to environmental variables. The model uses simplified empirical expression of seasonal variability in biome-specific physiological parameters based on air temperature, vapor pressure deficit, and annual precipitation. The model was validated using measurements of NEE derived from 10 AmeriFlux and four AsiaFlux ecosystem sites. The predicted NEE had reasonable magnitude and seasonal variation and gave adequate timing for the beginning and end of the growing season; the model explained 83–95% and 76–89% of the observed diurnal variations in NEE for the AmeriFlux and AsiaFlux ecosystem sites used for validation, respectively. The model however worked less satisfactorily in two deciduous broadleaf forests, a grassland, a savanna, and a tundra ecosystem sites where leaf area index changed rapidly. These results suggest that including additional plant physiological parameters may improve the model simulation performance in various areas of biomes.

  8. Progress in Modeling Global Atmospheric CO2 Fluxes and Transport: Results from Simulations with Diurnal Fluxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collatz, G. James; Kawa, R.

    2007-01-01

    Progress in better determining CO2 sources and sinks will almost certainly rely on utilization of more extensive and intensive CO2 and related observations including those from satellite remote sensing. Use of advanced data requires improved modeling and analysis capability. Under NASA Carbon Cycle Science support we seek to develop and integrate improved formulations for 1) atmospheric transport, 2) terrestrial uptake and release, 3) biomass and 4) fossil fuel burning, and 5) observational data analysis including inverse calculations. The transport modeling is based on meteorological data assimilation analysis from the Goddard Modeling and Assimilation Office. Use of assimilated met data enables model comparison to CO2 and other observations across a wide range of scales of variability. In this presentation we focus on the short end of the temporal variability spectrum: hourly to synoptic to seasonal. Using CO2 fluxes at varying temporal resolution from the SIB 2 and CASA biosphere models, we examine the model's ability to simulate CO2 variability in comparison to observations at different times, locations, and altitudes. We find that the model can resolve much of the variability in the observations, although there are limits imposed by vertical resolution of boundary layer processes. The influence of key process representations is inferred. The high degree of fidelity in these simulations leads us to anticipate incorporation of realtime, highly resolved observations into a multiscale carbon cycle analysis system that will begin to bridge the gap between top-down and bottom-up flux estimation, which is a primary focus of NACP.

  9. Progress in Research on Diurnal and Semidiurnal Earth Rotation Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xueqing

    2015-08-01

    We mainly focus on the progress of research on high frequency changes in the earth rotation. Firstly, we review the development course and main motivating factors of the diurnal and semidiurnal earth rotation change. In recent decades, earth orientation has been monitored with increasing accuracy by advanced space-geodetic techniques, including lunar and satellite laser ranging, very long baseline interferometry and the global positioning system. We are able to obtain the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP, polar motion and rotation rate changes) by even 1 to 2 hours observation data, form which obvious diurnal and semidiurnal signals can be detected, and compare them with the predicted results by the ocean model. Both the amplitude and phase are in good agreement in the main diurnal and semidiurnal wave frequency, especially for the UT1, whose compliance is 90%, and 60% for polar motion, there are 30% motivating factor of the diurnal and semidiurnal polar motion have not been identified. Then we comprehensively review the different types of global ocean tidal correction models since the last eighties century, as well as the application research on diurnal and semidiurnal polar motion and UT1, the current ocean tidal correction models have 10% to 20% uncertainty, and need for further refinement.

  10. Stochastic modeling and generation of synthetic sequences of hourly global solar irradiation at Quetta, Pakistan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamal, Lalarukh [Balochistan Univ., Dept. of Mathematics, Quetta (Pakistan); Jafri, Yasmin Zahra [Balochistan Univ., Dept. of Statistics, Quetta (Pakistan)

    1999-07-01

    Using hourly global radiation data at Quetta, Pakistan for 10 yr, an Autoregressive Moving Average (ARMA) process is fitted. Markov Transition Matrices have also been developed. These models are used for generating synthetic sequences for hourly radiations in MJ/m{sup 2} and that the generated sequences are compared with the observed data. We found the MTM approach relatively better as a simulator compared to ARMA modeling. (Author)

  11. Out-of-hours care in western countries: assessment of different organizational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huibers, Linda; Giesen, Paul; Wensing, Michel; Grol, Richard

    2009-06-23

    Internationally, different organizational models are used for providing out-of-hours care. The aim of this study was to assess prevailing models in order to identify their potential strengths and weaknesses. An international web-based survey was done in 2007 in a sample of purposefully selected key informants from 25 western countries. The questions concerned prevailing organizational models for out-of-hours care, the most dominant model in each country, perceived weaknesses, and national plans for changes in out-of-hours care. A total of 71 key informants from 25 countries provided answers. In most countries several different models existed alongside each other. The Accident and Emergency department was the organizational model most frequently used. Perceived weaknesses of this model concerned the coordination and continuity of care, its efficiency and accessibility. In about a third of the countries, the rota group was the most dominant organizational model for out-of-hours care. A perceived weakness of this model was lowered job satisfaction of physicians. The GP cooperative existed in a majority of the participating countries; no weaknesses were mentioned with respect to this model. Most of the countries had plans to change the out-of-hours care, mainly toward large scale organizations. GP cooperatives combine size of scale advantages with organizational features of strong primary care, such as high accessibility, continuity and coordination of care. While specific patients require other organizational models, the co-existence of different organizational models for out-of-hours care in a country may be less efficient for health systems.

  12. Final report on "Modeling Diurnal Variations of California Land Biosphere CO2 Fluxes"

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fung, Inez

    2014-07-28

    In Mediterranean climates, the season of water availability (winter) is out of phase with the season of light availability and atmospheric demand for moisture (summer). Multi-year half-hourly observations of sap flow velocities in 26 evergreen trees in a small watershed in Northern California show that different species of evergreen trees have different seasonalities of transpiration: Douglas-firs respond immediately to the first winter rain, while Pacific madrones have peak transpiration in the dry summer. Using these observations, we have derived species-specific parameterization of normalized sap flow velocities in terms of insolation, vapor pressure deficit and near-surface soil moisture. A simple 1-D boundary layer model showed that afternoon temperatures may be higher by 1 degree Celsius in an area with Douglas-firs than with Pacific madrones. The results point to the need to develop a new representation of subsurface moisture, in particular pools beneath the organic soil mantle and the vadose zone. Our ongoing and future work includes coupling our new parameterization of transpiration with new representation of sub-surface moisture in saprolite and weathered bedrock. The results will be implemented in a regional climate model to explore vegetation-climate feedbacks, especially in the dry season.

  13. Man-hour Estimation Model based on Standard Operation Unit for Flexible Manufacturing System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Zhenggeng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In flexible manufacturing system, the estimation of man-hour is a difficult problem because of its production-diversity. To explore a more effective method, this paper tried to estimate man-hour from the perspective of operation`s character by establishing standard operation unit (SOU in this paper. A method of parameterizing the SOU is proposed, and a new man-hour estimation model is established on the basis of SOU. At last, this paper verified the effectiveness of this method by the operation of large-scale welding parts.

  14. Out-of-hours care in western countries: assessment of different organizational models.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huibers, L.; Giesen, P.H.J.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Grol, R.P.T.M.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Internationally, different organizational models are used for providing out-of-hours care. The aim of this study was to assess prevailing models in order to identify their potential strengths and weaknesses. METHODS: An international web-based survey was done in 2007 in a sample of

  15. Evaluation of the Diurnal Cycle in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer Over Land as Represented by a Variety of Single-Column Models: The Second GABLS Experiment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Svensson, G.; Holtslag, A.A.M.; Kumar, V.; Mauritsen, T.; Steeneveld, G.J.; Angevine, W.M.; Bazile, E.; Beljaars, A.; Bruijn, de E.I.F.; Cheng, A.

    2011-01-01

    We present the main results from the second model intercomparison within the GEWEX (Global Energy andWater cycle EXperiment) Atmospheric Boundary Layer Study (GABLS). The target is to examine the diurnal cycle over land in today’s numerical weather prediction and climate models for operational and r

  16. Nonparametric temporal downscaling with event-based population generating algorithm for RCM daily precipitation to hourly: Model development and performance evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Taesam; Park, Taewoong

    2017-04-01

    It is critical to downscale temporally coarse GCM or RCM outputs (e.g., monthly or daily) to fine time scales, such as sub-daily or hourly. Recently, a temporal downscaling model employing a nonparametric framework (NTD) with k-nearest resampling and a genetic algorithm has been developed to preserve key statistics as well as the diurnal cycle. However, this model's usage can be limited in estimating precipitation for design storms or floods because the key statistics of annual maximum precipitation (AMP), especially for longer hourly durations, present a systematic bias that cannot be preserved due to the discontinuity of multiday consecutive precipitation events in the downscaling procedure. In the current study, we develop an approach to downscale a consecutive daily precipitation at once focusing on the reproduction of AMP totals for different durations instead of day-by-day downscaling. The proposed model has been verified with the precipitation datasets for the 60 stations across South Korea over the period 1979-2005. Additionally, two validation studies were performed with the recent datasets of 2006-2014 and nearest neighbor stations. The verification and the two validation tests conclude that the population-based NTD (PNTD) model proposed in the current study is superior to the existing NTD model in preserving the key statistics of the observed AMP series and suitable for downscaling future climate scenarios.

  17. An Hourly Streamflow Forecasting Model Coupled with an Enforced Learning Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Chang Wu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Floods, one of the most significant natural hazards, often result in loss of life and property. Accurate hourly streamflow forecasting is always a key issue in hydrology for flood hazard mitigation. To improve the performance of hourly streamflow forecasting, a methodology concerning the development of neural network (NN based models with an enforced learning strategy is proposed in this paper. Firstly, four different NNs, namely back propagation network (BPN, radial basis function network (RBFN, self-organizing map (SOM, and support vector machine (SVM, are used to construct streamflow forecasting models. Through the cross-validation test, NN-based models with superior performance in streamflow forecasting are detected. Then, an enforced learning strategy is developed to further improve the performance of the superior NN-based models, i.e., SOM and SVM in this study. Finally, the proposed flow forecasting model is obtained. Actual applications are conducted to demonstrate the potential of the proposed model. Moreover, comparison between the NN-based models with and without the enforced learning strategy is performed to evaluate the effect of the enforced learning strategy on model performance. The results indicate that the NN-based models with the enforced learning strategy indeed improve the accuracy of hourly streamflow forecasting. Hence, the presented methodology is expected to be helpful for developing improved NN-based streamflow forecasting models.

  18. Comparative analysis of hourly and dynamic power balancing models for validating future energy scenarios

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pillai, Jayakrishnan R.; Heussen, Kai; Østergaard, Poul Alberg

    2011-01-01

    Energy system analyses on the basis of fast and simple tools have proven particularly useful for interdisciplinary planning projects with frequent iterations and re-evaluation of alternative scenarios. As such, the tool “EnergyPLAN” is used for hourly balanced and spatially aggregate annual......, the model is verified on the basis of the existing energy mix on Bornholm as an islanded energy system. Future energy scenarios for the year 2030 are analysed to study a feasible technology mix for a higher share of wind power. Finally, the results of the hourly simulations are compared to dynamic frequency...... simulations incorporating the Vehicle-to-grid technology. The results indicate how the EnergyPLAN model may be improved in terms of intra-hour variability, stability and ancillary services to achieve a better reflection of energy and power capacity requirements....

  19. Lidar and CTIPe model studies of the fast amplitude growth with altitude of the diurnal temperature "tides" in the Antarctic winter lower thermosphere and dependence on geomagnetic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Weichun; Chu, Xinzhao; Lu, Xian; Chen, Cao; Fuller-Rowell, Timothy J.; Codrescu, Mihail; Richmond, Arthur D.

    2015-02-01

    Four years of lidar observations at McMurdo reveal that the fast amplitude growth with altitude of diurnal temperature tides from 100 to 110 km during Antarctic winters, exceeding that of the freely propagating tides from the lower atmosphere, increases in strength with the Kp magnetic activity index. Simulations with the Coupled Thermosphere Ionosphere Plasmasphere Electrodynamics (CTIPe) model reproduce the lidar observations and exhibit concentric ring structures of diurnal amplitudes encircling the south geomagnetic pole and overlapping the auroral zone. These findings point to a magnetospheric source origin. Mechanistic studies using CTIPe show that the adiabatic cooling/heating associated with Hall ion drag is the dominant source of this feature, while Joule heating is a minor contributor due to the counteraction by Joule-heating-induced adiabatic cooling. The sum of total dynamical effects and Joule heating explains ~80% of the diurnal amplitudes. Auroral particle heating, lower atmosphere tides, and direct solar heating have minor contributions.

  20. Technical note: 3-hourly temporal downscaling of monthly global terrestrial biosphere model net ecosystem exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Joshua B.; Sikka, Munish; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Schwalm, Christopher; Liu, Junjie

    2016-07-01

    The land surface provides a boundary condition to atmospheric forward and flux inversion models. These models require prior estimates of CO2 fluxes at relatively high temporal resolutions (e.g., 3-hourly) because of the high frequency of atmospheric mixing and wind heterogeneity. However, land surface model CO2 fluxes are often provided at monthly time steps, typically because the land surface modeling community focuses more on time steps associated with plant phenology (e.g., seasonal) than on sub-daily phenomena. Here, we describe a new dataset created from 15 global land surface models and 4 ensemble products in the Multi-scale Synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP), temporally downscaled from monthly to 3-hourly output. We provide 3-hourly output for each individual model over 7 years (2004-2010), as well as an ensemble mean, a weighted ensemble mean, and the multi-model standard deviation. Output is provided in three different spatial resolutions for user preferences: 0.5° × 0.5°, 2.0° × 2.5°, and 4.0° × 5.0° (latitude × longitude). These data are publicly available from doi:10.3334/ORNLDAAC/1315.

  1. Estimating sources of elemental and organic carbon and their temporal emission patterns using a least squares inverse model and hourly measurements from the St. Louis–Midwest supersite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. de Foy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Emission inventories of elemental carbon (EC and organic carbon (OC contain large uncertainties both in their spatial and temporal distributions for different source types. An inverse model was used to evaluate EC and OC emissions based on 1 year of hourly measurements from the St. Louis–Midwest supersite. The input to the model consisted of continuous measurements of EC and OC obtained for 2002 using two semicontinuous analyzers. High resolution meteorological simulations were performed for the entire time period using the Weather Research and Forecasting Model (WRF. These were used to simulate hourly back trajectories at the measurement site using a Lagrangian model (FLEXPART-WRF. In combination, an Eulerian model (CAMx: The Comprehensive Air Quality Model with Extensions was used to simulate the impacts at the measurement site using known emissions inventories for point and area sources from the Lake Michigan Directors Consortium (LADCO as well as for open burning from the Fire Inventory from NCAR (FINN. By considering only passive transport of pollutants, the Bayesian inversion simplifies to a single least squares inversion. The inverse model combines forward Eulerian simulations with backward Lagrangian simulations to yield estimates of emissions from sources in current inventories as well as from emissions that might be missing in the inventories. The CAMx impacts were disaggregated into separate time chunks in order to determine improved diurnal, weekday and monthly temporal patterns of emissions. Because EC is a primary species, the inverse model estimates can be interpreted directly as emissions. In contrast, OC is both a primary and a secondary species. As the inverse model does not differentiate between direct emissions and formation in the plume of those direct emissions, the estimates need to be interpreted as contributions to measured concentrations. Emissions of EC and OC in the St. Louis region from on-road, non-road, marine

  2. TK Modeler version 1.0, a Microsoft® Excel®-based modeling software for the prediction of diurnal blood/plasma concentration for toxicokinetic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCoy, Alene T; Bartels, Michael J; Rick, David L; Saghir, Shakil A

    2012-07-01

    TK Modeler 1.0 is a Microsoft® Excel®-based pharmacokinetic (PK) modeling program created to aid in the design of toxicokinetic (TK) studies. TK Modeler 1.0 predicts the diurnal blood/plasma concentrations of a test material after single, multiple bolus or dietary dosing using known PK information. Fluctuations in blood/plasma concentrations based on test material kinetics are calculated using one- or two-compartment PK model equations and the principle of superposition. This information can be utilized for the determination of appropriate dosing regimens based on reaching a specific desired C(max), maintaining steady-state blood/plasma concentrations, or other exposure target. This program can also aid in the selection of sampling times for accurate calculation of AUC(24h) (diurnal area under the blood concentration time curve) using sparse-sampling methodologies (one, two or three samples). This paper describes the construction, use and validation of TK Modeler. TK Modeler accurately predicted blood/plasma concentrations of test materials and provided optimal sampling times for the calculation of AUC(24h) with improved accuracy using sparse-sampling methods. TK Modeler is therefore a validated, unique and simple modeling program that can aid in the design of toxicokinetic studies.

  3. Modeling the Hourly Distribution of Population at a High Spatiotemporal Resolution Using Subway Smart Card Data: A Case Study in the Central Area of Beijing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunjia Ma

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The accurate estimation of the dynamic changes in population is a key component in effective urban planning and emergency management. We developed a model to estimate hourly dynamic changes in population at the community level based on subway smart card data. The hourly population of each community in six central districts of Beijing was calculated, followed by a study of the spatiotemporal patterns and diurnal dynamic changes of population and an exploration of the main sources and sinks of the observed human mobility. The maximum daytime population of the six central districts of Beijing was approximately 0.7 million larger than the night-time population. The administrative and commercial districts of Dongcheng and Xicheng had high values of population ratio of day to night of 1.35 and 1.22, respectively, whereas Shijingshan, a residential district, had the lowest value of 0.84. Areas with a high population ratio were mainly concentrated in Dongcheng, Xicheng, West Chaoyang, and Southeast Haidian. The daytime population distribution showed a hierarchical spatial pattern of planar centers and second scattered centers as opposed to multiple scattered centers during the night-time. This was because most people moved inward from the areas with a low–high to high–low population ratio of day to night from night-time to daytime, which can be explained by the process of commuting between residential areas and workplaces. Several distinctive phenomena (e.g., the distribution of new industrial parks, the so-called old residential areas, and colleges and universities in the development of China are reflected by the spatiotemporal pattern of the distribution of population. The general consistency of the population ratios of day to night, population distribution, population variation of typical communities, and population mobility pattern with previous research suggests that the subway smart card data has potential in analyzing dynamic diurnal

  4. The impact of observations on Mesoscale Model forecasts of three-hourly rainfall accumulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, S. R.; Graham, R. J.; Bader, M. J.

    2000-09-01

    The aim of data-impact studies at the UK Met. Office is to investigate how observations affect the accuracy of model forecasts. Results from such experiments provide useful evidence on which to base the design of observational networks. This project, using a case study approach, investigated the relative benefit of different observation types within The Met. Office's Mesoscale Model domain on forecasts of three-hourly precipitation accumulation over the UK up to 12 hours ahead. The method used assesses the impact of assimilating single observation types, or a limited combination of types, where impact is measured against a control forecast obtained after a dummy assimilation using no observations. In experiments for 13 case studies, the observation types that most frequently provided a beneficial impact when presented alone to the assimilation were sonde data, surface data and data from the Moisture Observation Processing System (MOPS).

  5. A space-time hybrid hourly rainfall model for derived flood frequency analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    U. Haberlandt

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available For derived flood frequency analysis based on hydrological modelling long continuous precipitation time series with high temporal resolution are needed. Often, the observation network with recording rainfall gauges is poor, especially regarding the limited length of the available rainfall time series. Stochastic precipitation synthesis is a good alternative either to extend or to regionalise rainfall series to provide adequate input for long-term rainfall-runoff modelling with subsequent estimation of design floods. Here, a new two step procedure for stochastic synthesis of continuous hourly space-time rainfall is proposed and tested for the extension of short observed precipitation time series.

    First, a single-site alternating renewal model is presented to simulate independent hourly precipitation time series for several locations. The alternating renewal model describes wet spell durations, dry spell durations and wet spell intensities using univariate frequency distributions separately for two seasons. The dependence between wet spell intensity and duration is accounted for by 2-copulas. For disaggregation of the wet spells into hourly intensities a predefined profile is used. In the second step a multi-site resampling procedure is applied on the synthetic point rainfall event series to reproduce the spatial dependence structure of rainfall. Resampling is carried out successively on all synthetic event series using simulated annealing with an objective function considering three bivariate spatial rainfall characteristics. In a case study synthetic precipitation is generated for some locations with short observation records in two mesoscale catchments of the Bode river basin located in northern Germany. The synthetic rainfall data are then applied for derived flood frequency analysis using the hydrological model HEC-HMS. The results show good performance in reproducing average and extreme rainfall characteristics as well as in

  6. Proposal of a regressive model for the hourly diffuse solar radiation under all sky conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruiz-Arias, J.A.; Alsamamra, H.; Tovar-Pescador, J.; Pozo-Vazquez, D. [Department of Physics, Building A3-066, University of Jaen, 23071 Jaen (Spain)

    2010-05-15

    In this work, we propose a new regressive model for the estimation of the hourly diffuse solar irradiation under all sky conditions. This new model is based on the sigmoid function and uses the clearness index and the relative optical mass as predictors. The model performance was compared against other five regressive models using radiation data corresponding to 21 stations in the USA and Europe. In a first part, the 21 stations were grouped into seven subregions (corresponding to seven different climatic regions) and all the models were locally-fitted and evaluated using these seven datasets. Results showed that the new proposed model provides slightly better estimates. Particularly, this new model provides a relative root mean square error in the range 25-35% and a relative mean bias error in the range -15% to 15%, depending on the region. In a second part, the potential global character of the new model was evaluated. To this end, the model was fitted using the whole dataset. Results showed that the global fitting model provides overall better estimates that the locally-fitted models, with relative root mean square error values ranging 20-35% and a relative mean bias error ranging -5% to -12%. Additionally, the new proposed model showed some advantages compared to other evaluated models. Particularly, the sigmoid behaviour of this model is able to provide physically reliable estimates for extreme values of the clearness index even though using less parameter than other tested models. (author)

  7. A Model for Hourly Solar Radiation Data Generation from Daily Solar Radiation Data Using a Generalized Regression Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamer Khatib

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a model for predicting hourly solar radiation data using daily solar radiation averages. The proposed model is a generalized regression artificial neural network. This model has three inputs, namely, mean daily solar radiation, hour angle, and sunset hour angle. The output layer has one node which is mean hourly solar radiation. The training and development of the proposed model are done using MATLAB and 43800 records of hourly global solar radiation. The results show that the proposed model has better prediction accuracy compared to some empirical and statistical models. Two error statistics are used in this research to evaluate the proposed model, namely, mean absolute percentage error and root mean square error. These values for the proposed model are 11.8% and −3.1%, respectively. Finally, the proposed model shows better ability in overcoming the sophistic nature of the solar radiation data.

  8. Modeling bulk canopy resistance from climatic variables for predicting hourly evapotranspiration of maize and buckwheat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Haofang; Shi, Haibin; Hiroki, Oue; Zhang, Chuan; Xue, Zhu; Cai, Bin; Wang, Guoqing

    2015-06-01

    This study presents models for predicting hourly canopy resistance ( r c) and evapotranspiration (ETc) based on Penman-Monteith approach. The micrometeorological data and ET c were observed during maize and buckwheat growing seasons in 2006 and 2009 in China and Japan, respectively. The proposed models of r c were developed by a climatic resistance ( r *) that depends on climatic variables. Non-linear relationships between r c and r * were applied. The measured ETc using Bowen ratio energy balance method was applied for model validation. The statistical analysis showed that there were no significant differences between predicted ETc by proposed models and measured ETc for both maize and buckwheat crops. The model for predicting ETc at maize field showed better performance than predicting ETc at buckwheat field, the coefficients of determination were 0.92 and 0.84, respectively. The study provided an easy way for the application of Penman-Monteith equation with only general available meteorological database.

  9. Improvement of AEP Predictions Using Diurnal CFD Modelling with Site-Specific Stability Weightings Provided from Mesoscale Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, Y.; Oxley, G.; Žagar, M.

    2014-06-01

    The Bolund measurement campaign, performed by Danish Technical University (DTU) Wind Energy Department (also known as RISØ), provided significant insight into wind flow modeling over complex terrain. In the blind comparison study several modelling solutions were submitted with the vast majority being steady-state Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) approaches with two equation k-epsilon turbulence closure. This approach yielded the most accurate results, and was identified as the state-of-the-art tool for wind turbine generator (WTG) micro-siting. Based on the findings from Bolund, further comparison between CFD and field measurement data has been deemed essential in order to improve simulation accuracy for turbine load and long-term Annual Energy Production (AEP) estimations. Vestas Wind Systems A/S is a major WTG original equipment manufacturer (OEM) with an installed base of over 60GW in over 70 countries accounting for 19% of the global installed base. The Vestas Performance and Diagnostic Centre (VPDC) provides online live data to more than 47GW of these turbines allowing a comprehensive comparison between modelled and real-world energy production data. In previous studies, multiple sites have been simulated with a steady neutral CFD formulation for the atmospheric surface layer (ASL), and wind resource (RSF) files have been generated as a base for long-term AEP predictions showing significant improvement over predictions performed with the industry standard linear WAsP tool. In this study, further improvements to the wind resource file generation with CFD are examined using an unsteady diurnal cycle approach with a full atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) formulation, with the unique stratifications throughout the cycle weighted according to mesoscale simulated sectorwise stability frequencies.

  10. Biases in the diurnal temperature range in Central Europe in an ensemble of regional climate models and their possible causes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kysely, Jan [Institute of Atmospheric Physics AS CR, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Plavcova, Eva [Institute of Atmospheric Physics AS CR, Prague 4 (Czech Republic); Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Prague (Czech Republic)

    2012-09-15

    The study examines how regional climate models (RCMs) reproduce the diurnal temperature range (DTR) in their control simulations over Central Europe. We evaluate 30-year runs driven by perfect boundary conditions (the ERA40 reanalysis, 1961-1990) and a global climate model (ECHAM5) of an ensemble of RCMs with 25-km resolution from the ENSEMBLES project. The RCMs' performance is compared against the dataset gridded from a high-density stations network. We find that all RCMs underestimate DTR in all seasons, notwithstanding whether driven by ERA40 or ECHAM5. Underestimation is largest in summer and smallest in winter in most RCMs. The relationship of the models' errors to indices of atmospheric circulation and cloud cover is discussed to reveal possible causes of the biases. In all seasons and all simulations driven by ERA40 and ECHAM5, underestimation of DTR is larger under anticyclonic circulation and becomes smaller or negligible for cyclonic circulation. In summer and transition seasons, underestimation tends to be largest for the southeast to south flow associated with warm advection, while in winter it does not depend on flow direction. We show that the biases in DTR, which seem common to all examined RCMs, are also related to cloud cover simulation. However, there is no general tendency to overestimate total cloud amount under anticyclonic conditions in the RCMs, which suggests the large negative bias in DTR for anticyclonic circulation cannot be explained by a bias in cloudiness. Errors in simulating heat and moisture fluxes between land surface and atmosphere probably contribute to the biases in DTR as well. (orig.)

  11. Particular Matrix in the Study of the Index Hour Mathematical Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihaela Poienar

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The three phase transformer clock hour figure mathematical model can be conceived in his regular form as a 3X3 square matrix, called matrix code, or as a matrix equation, called code equation and is conceived through the elementary matrices: Ma, Mb, Mc or by defining matrices: M100, M10, M1. The code equation expression is dependent on the definition function: the sgn function or the trivalent variable function. Interrelated with the two possibilities are shown, defined and explained the following particular matrix: transfer matrix T. Finally are presented the interrelation between these particular matrixes and highlighted the possibilities of exploitation.

  12. The Diurnal Variation of the Neutral Sodium Species in the Upper Atmosphere. A Model Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    reactions (RRIO, RRII ) and (RR7) still remain a possibility. The abundance of NaOH is also of interest for stratospheric ozone chemis- try. Murad and... RRII ’Trough NaO2 as an intermediate. Model C represents conditions of maxi- mum cc ipling to both temporary reservoirs with rates for reactions RR6

  13. Comparison of data-driven and model-driven approaches to brightness temperature diurnal cycle interpolation

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van den Bergh, F

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available RKHS model for the first experiment. MSE = (0.5363, 0.7331). motivation for this approach was that the amount of compu- tation per cycle would be reduced significantly. The specific example in Figure 4 shows the RKHS model—initially fitted to cycle...

  14. Modeling cloud microphysics using a two-moments hybrid bulk/bin scheme for use in Titan’s climate models: Application to the annual and diurnal cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgalat, J.; Rannou, P.; Cours, T.; Rivière, E. D.

    2014-03-01

    Microphysical models describe the way aerosols and clouds behave in the atmosphere. Two approaches are generally used to model these processes. While the first approach discretizes processes and aerosols size distributions on a radius grid (bin scheme), the second uses bulk parameters of the size distribution law (its mathematical moments) to represent the evolution of the particle population (moment scheme). However, with the latter approach, one needs to have an a priori knowledge of the size distributions. Moments scheme for Cloud microphysics modeling have been used and enhanced since decades for climate studies of the Earth. Most of the tools are based on Log-Normal law which are suitable for Earth, Mars or Venus. On Titan, due to the fractal structure of the aerosols, the size distributions do not follow a log-normal law. Then using a moment scheme in that case implies to define the description of the size distribution and to review the equations that are widely published in the literature. Our objective is to enable the use of a fully described microphysical model using a moment scheme within a Titan's Global Climate Model. As a first step in this direction, we present here a moment scheme dedicated to clouds microphysics adapted for Titan's atmosphere conditions. We perform comparisons between the two kinds of schemes (bin and moments) using an annual and a diurnal cycle, to check the validity of our moment description. The various forcing produce a time-variable cloud layer in relation with the temperature cycle. We compare the column opacities and the temperature for the two schemes, for each cycles. We also compare more detailed quantities as the opacity distribution of the cloud events at different periods of these cycles. Results show that differences between the two approaches have a small impact on the temperature (less than 1 K) and range between 1% and 10% for haze and clouds opacities. Both models behave in similar way when forced by an annual and

  15. Wind and Photovoltaic Large-Scale Regional Models for hourly production evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marinelli, Mattia; Maule, Petr; Hahmann, Andrea N.;

    2015-01-01

    This work presents two large-scale regional models used for the evaluation of normalized power output from wind turbines and photovoltaic power plants on a European regional scale. The models give an estimate of renewable production on a regional scale with 1 h resolution, starting from a mesoscale...... mete- orological data input and taking in account the characteristics of different plants technologies and spatial distribution. An evalu- ation of the hourly forecasted energy production on a regional scale would be very valuable for the transmission system operators when making the long-term planning...... of the transmission system, especially regarding the cross-border power flows. The tuning of these regional models is done using historical meteorological data acquired on a per-country basis and using publicly available data of installed capacity....

  16. Hourly runoff forecasting for flood risk management: Application of various computational intelligence models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badrzadeh, Honey; Sarukkalige, Ranjan; Jayawardena, A. W.

    2015-10-01

    Reliable river flow forecasts play a key role in flood risk mitigation. Among different approaches of river flow forecasting, data driven approaches have become increasingly popular in recent years due to their minimum information requirements and ability to simulate nonlinear and non-stationary characteristics of hydrological processes. In this study, attempts are made to apply four different types of data driven approaches, namely traditional artificial neural networks (ANN), adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS), wavelet neural networks (WNN), and, hybrid ANFIS with multi resolution analysis using wavelets (WNF). Developed models applied for real time flood forecasting at Casino station on Richmond River, Australia which is highly prone to flooding. Hourly rainfall and runoff data were used to drive the models which have been used for forecasting with 1, 6, 12, 24, 36 and 48 h lead-time. The performance of models further improved by adding an upstream river flow data (Wiangaree station), as another effective input. All models perform satisfactorily up to 12 h lead-time. However, the hybrid wavelet-based models significantly outperforming the ANFIS and ANN models in the longer lead-time forecasting. The results confirm the robustness of the proposed structure of the hybrid models for real time runoff forecasting in the study area.

  17. The diurnal evolution of the urban heat island of Paris: a model-based case study during Summer 2006

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Wouters

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The urban heat island (UHI over Paris during summer 2006 was simulated using the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS updated with a simple urban parametrization at a horizontal resolution of 1 km. Two integrations were performed, one with the urban land cover of Paris and another in which Paris was replaced by cropland. The focus is on a five-day clear-sky period, for which the UHI intensity reaches its maximum. The diurnal evolution of the UHI intensity was found to be adequately simulated for this five day period. The maximum difference at night in 2-m temperature between urban and rural areas stemming from the urban heating is reproduced with a relative error of less than 10%. The UHI has an ellipsoidal shape and stretches along the prevailing wind direction. The maximum UHI intensity of 6.1 K occurs at 23:00 UTC located 6 km downstream of the city centre and this largely remains during the whole night. An idealized one-column model study demonstrates that the nocturnal differential sensible heat flux, even though much smaller than its daytime value, is mainly responsible for the maximum UHI intensity. The reason for this nighttime maximum is that additional heat is only affecting a shallow layer of 150 m. At the same time, an idealized study shows that the orography around the city of Paris induces an uplift. This leads to a considerable nocturnal adiabatic cooling over cropland. In contrast, this uplift has little effect on the mixed-layer temperature over the city. About twenty percent of the total maximum UHI intensity is estimated to be caused by this uplift.

  18. Genetic, temporal and diurnal influences on L-dopa-induced dyskinesia in the 6-OHDA model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monville, Christelle; Torres, Eduardo M; Pekarik, Vladimir; Lane, Emma L; Dunnett, Stephen B

    2009-03-16

    Current treatments for Parkinson's disease rely on a dopamine replacement strategy and are reasonably effective, particularly in the early stages of the disease. However, chronic dopaminergic therapy is limited by the development of a range of side effects, including the onset of abnormal movements ('dyskinesia'). The neural mechanisms that underlie dyskinesia are far from clear but they have been associated with pulsatile stimulation of dopamine receptors, downstream changes in proteins and genes, and abnormalities in non-dopamine transmitter systems. However, there has been no pathophysiological explanation for the worsening motor symptoms in the afternoon and evening reported by Parkinsonian patients in long-term L-dopa therapy, and no direct relationship has been found with the pharmacokinetics of the drug. Moreover, there continues to be a debate about whether the development of dyskinesias in patients is dependent upon the duration of L-dopa treatment or on the degree of denervation/advanced stage of the disease, both factors that are difficult to resolve experimentally in the human disease. The objective of this study was to characterise, in an animal model, factors that predispose some individuals to develop dyskinesia after a prolonged treatment with L-dopa, whereas others continue to exhibit symptom alleviation without the side effects. We report that none of the parameters studied--genetic variation within and between strains, delay of treatment onset after lesion, or time of day of the drug treatment--were found to influence directly the formation of dyskinesias after L-dopa treatment. We conclude that a complex combination of individual factors are likely to interact to regulate the onset and development of abnormal movements in some animals but not others.

  19. The characteristics of summer sub-hourly rainfall over the southern UK in a high-resolution convective permitting model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S. C.; Kendon, E. J.; Roberts, N. M.; Fowler, H. J.; Blenkinsop, S.

    2016-09-01

    Flash flooding is often caused by sub-hourly rainfall extremes. Here, we examine southern UK sub-hourly 10 min rainfall from Met Office state-of-the-art convective-permitting model simulations for the present and future climate. Observational studies have shown that the duration of rainfall can decrease with temperature in summer in some regions. The duration decrease coincides with an intensification of sub-hourly rainfall extremes. This suggests that rainfall duration and sub-hourly rainfall intensity may change in future under climate change with important implications for future changes in flash flooding risk. The simulations show clear intensification of sub-hourly rainfall, but we fail to detect any decrease in rainfall duration. In fact, model results suggest the opposite with a slight (probably insignificant) lengthening of both extreme and non-extreme rainfall events in the future. The lengthening is driven by rainfall intensification without clear changes in the shape of the event profile. Other metrics are also examined, including the relationship between intense 10 min rainfall and temperature, and return levels changes; all are consistent with results found for hourly rainfall. No evaluation of model performance at the sub-hourly timescale is possible, highlighting the need for high-quality sub-hourly observations. Such sub-hourly observations will advance our understanding of the future risks of flash flooding.

  20. Preliminary results from the ESA STSE project on SST diurnal variability, its regional extent and implications in atmospheric modelling (SSTDV:R.EX.–IM.A.M.)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Høyer, Jacob L.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents some preliminary results of the ESA Support To Science Element (STSE) funded project on the Diurnal Variability of the Sea Surface Temperature, regarding its Regional Extend and Implications in Atmospheric Modelling (SSTDV:R.EX.–IM.A.M.). Comparisons of SEVIRI SST with AATSR......, the 1-dimensional General Ocean Turbulence Model (GOTM) is applied. Preliminary results show that the initial temperature and salinity profiles may give a warmer start-up in the model while the light extinction scheme is a controlling factor for the amplitude and vertical extend of the daily signal....

  1. ESA STSE Project “Sea Surface Temperature Diurnal Variability: Regional Extend – Implications in Atmospheric Modelling”

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karagali, Ioanna

    , atmospheric and oceanic modelling, bio-chemical processes and oceanic CO2 studies. The diurnal variability of SST, driven by the coincident occurrence of low enough wind and solar heating, is currently not properly understood. Atmospheric, oceanic and climate models are currently not adequately resolving...... present the final project findings regarding the analysis of hourly SEVIRI SSTs from SEVIRI over the Atlantic Ocean and the European Seas, revealing the regional extend of diurnal warming. As satellite SSTs are representative of the upper centimetre of the water column, they do not provide information...

  2. Proposal of a function for modelling the hourly frequency distributions of photosynthetically active radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovar-Pescador, J.; Pozo-Vazquez, D.; Batlles, J.; López, G.; Muñoz-Vicente, D.

    2004-10-01

    Solar irradiance is a key factor in the physiological processes of living beings. To obtain simple correlations for the estimation of the performance of biological systems, which transform the solar energy by photosynthesis, and to generate synthetic data, it is necessary to know the frequency distributions of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). In this work we carried out an analysis of the properties of hourly values of PAR data, using 9 years of data collected in southern Spain. In particularly, its dependence on the optical mass, for all type of skies including cloudy skies, is studied. Results shows that, for a given value of the optical mass, the PAR density distributions are not symmetrical and have a certain degree of bimodality. The increment in the optical mass value has two effects on the PAR distributions, the first one is a shift toward lower values of the maximum and the second one is a decrease in the range of PAR values. Finally, a model of the frequency distribution of PAR values, based on a new kind of functions related to the Boltzmann’s statistic, is proposed. The parameters of these functions depend just on the optical mass. Results show a very good agreement between the data and the model proposed.

  3. On the sensitivity of the diurnal cycle in the Amazon to convective intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itterly, Kyle F.; Taylor, Patrick C.; Dodson, Jason B.; Tawfik, Ahmed B.

    2016-07-01

    Climate and reanalysis models contain large water and energy budget errors over tropical land related to the misrepresentation of diurnally forced moist convection. Motivated by recent work suggesting that the water and energy budget is influenced by the sensitivity of the convective diurnal cycle to atmospheric state, this study investigates the relationship between convective intensity, the convective diurnal cycle, and atmospheric state in a region of frequent convection—the Amazon. Daily, 3-hourly satellite observations of top of atmosphere (TOA) fluxes from Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System Ed3a SYN1DEG and precipitation from Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission 3B42 data sets are collocated with twice daily Integrated Global Radiosonde Archive observations from 2002 to 2012 and hourly flux tower observations. Percentiles of daily minimum outgoing longwave radiation are used to define convective intensity regimes. The results indicate a significant increase in the convective diurnal cycle amplitude with increased convective intensity. The TOA flux diurnal phase exhibits 1-3 h shifts with convective intensity, and precipitation phase is less sensitive. However, the timing of precipitation onset occurs 2-3 h earlier and the duration lasts 3-5 h longer on very convective compared to stable days. While statistically significant changes are found between morning atmospheric state and convective intensity, variations in upper and lower tropospheric humidity exhibit the strongest relationships with convective intensity and diurnal cycle characteristics. Lastly, convective available potential energy (CAPE) is found to vary with convective intensity but does not explain the variations in Amazonian convection, suggesting that a CAPE-based convective parameterization will not capture the observed behavior without incorporating the sensitivity of convection to column humidity.

  4. A wind energy benchmark for ABL modelling of a diurnal cycle with a nocturnal low-level jet: GABLS3 revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz Rodrigo, J.; Churchfield, M.; Kosović, B.

    2016-09-01

    The third GEWEX Atmospheric Boundary Layer Studies (GABLS3) model intercomparison study, around the Cabauw met tower in the Netherlands, is revisited as a benchmark for wind energy atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) models. The case was originally developed by the boundary layer meteorology community, interested in analysing the performance of single-column and large-eddy simulation atmospheric models dealing with a diurnal cycle leading to the development of a nocturnal low-level jet. The case addresses fundamental questions related to the definition of the large-scale forcing, the interaction of the ABL with the surface and the evaluation of model results with observations. The characterization of mesoscale forcing for asynchronous microscale modelling of the ABL is discussed based on momentum budget analysis of WRF simulations. Then a single-column model is used to demonstrate the added value of incorporating different forcing mechanisms in microscale models. The simulations are evaluated in terms of wind energy quantities of interest.

  5. Sensitivity of Initial Conditions on Diurnal Variability of Indian Summer Monsoon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Sukanta Kumar; Deb, Sanjib Kumar; Kishtawal, C. M.; Pal, Pradip Kumar

    2015-10-01

    The diurnal cycle of different surface parameters, viz. surface air temperature, surface pressure, and rain intensities, simulated by the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM) in the operational seasonal forecast of ISM-2012 using initial conditions (ICs) taken at synoptic hours of the day has been examined and compared with observations. Four members were simulated with ICs at 0000, 0600, 1200, and 1800 UTC on 1 August 2012. The impact of the initial conditions at the synoptic hours of the day was more visible over the landmass compared with the oceanic regions. The diurnal variation of the surface temperature in the model simulation showed the major features when compared with the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) reanalysis except for the warm pool of northwest India and the Tibetan region. The surface pressure in the ECMWF reanalysis showed the semidiurnal cycle with two peaks at 0600 UTC and 1800 UTC; however, the range of the cycle was underestimated by the model simulation, showing only one peak at 0600 UTC. Significant variations in the diurnal cycle of rain intensities were seen among the different members. The model captured the diurnal cycle as the positive and negative peaks at 1200 and 0000 UTC with intensities at the peaks ~0.5 mm high and low, respectively, in the model simulation when compared with the observations. Presently, the seasonal forecast of ISM is generated through ensemble CAM experiments using different ICs taken from different dates but all at 0000 UTC. Consideration of ICs at different times of the day will add different ranges of diurnal variations in all the surface parameters within the family of ensemble members and also increase the number of members in the family. Indeed, these improve the ensemble processes in generating the seasonal forecast of ISM.

  6. Understanding the influence of orography on the precipitation diurnal cycle and the associated atmospheric processes in the central Andes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junquas, C.; Takahashi, K.; Condom, T.; Espinoza, J.-C.; Chavez, S.; Sicart, J.-E.; Lebel, T.

    2017-08-01

    In the tropical Andes, the identification of the present synoptic mechanisms associated with the diurnal cycle of precipitation and its interaction with orography is a key step to understand how the atmospheric circulation influences the patterns of precipitation variability on longer time-scales. In particular we aim to better understand the combination of the local and regional mechanisms controlling the diurnal cycle of summertime (DJF) precipitation in the Northern Central Andes (NCA) region of Southern Peru. A climatology of the diurnal cycle is obtained from 15 wet seasons (2000-2014) of 3-hourly TRMM-3B42 data (0.25° × 0.25°) and swath data from the TRMM-2A25 precipitation radar product (5 km × 5 km). The main findings are: (1) in the NCA region, the diurnal cycle shows a maximum precipitation occurring during the day (night) in the western (eastern) side of the Andes highlands, (2) in the valleys of the Cuzco region and in the Amazon slope of the Andes the maximum (minimum) precipitation occurs during the night (day). The WRF (Weather Research and Forecasting) regional atmospheric model is used to simulate the mean diurnal cycle in the NCA region for the same period at 27 km and 9 km horizontal grid spacing and 3-hourly output, and at 3 km only for the month of January 2010 in the Cuzco valleys. Sensitivity experiments were also performed to investigate the effect of the topography on the observed rainfall patterns. The model reproduces the main diurnal precipitation features. The main atmospheric processes identified are: (1) the presence of a regional-scale cyclonic circulation strengthening during the afternoon, (2) diurnal thermally driven circulations at local scale, including upslope (downslope) wind and moisture transport during the day (night), (3) channelization of the upslope moisture transport from the Amazon along the Apurimac valleys toward the western part of the cordillera.

  7. Global model simulation of summertime U.S. ozone diurnal cycle and its sensitivity to PBL mixing, spatial resolution, and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jin-Tai; Youn, Daeok; Liang, Xin-Zhong; Wuebbles, Donald J.

    Simulation of summertime U.S. surface ozone diurnal cycle is influenced by the model representation of planetary boundary layer (PBL) mixing, spatial resolution, and precursor emissions. These factors are investigated here for five major regions (Northeast, Midwest, Southeast, California, and Southwest) by using the Model for Ozone And Related chemical Tracers version 2.4 (MOZART-2.4), with important modifications, to conduct sensitivity experiments for summer 1999 with three PBL mixing schemes, two horizontal resolutions and two emissions datasets. Among these factors, the PBL mixing is dominant. The default non-local scheme well reproduces the observed ozone diurnal variation, where the timing for the afternoon maximum and the morning minimum is within 1 h of the observed; biases for the minimum are less than 5 ppb except over the Southeast; and the ozone maximum-minimum contrast (OMMC) is within 10 ppb of observations except for the overprediction by 18.9 ppb over the Northeast. In contrast, the local scheme significantly overestimates the OMMC by 10-34 ppb over all regions as ozone and precursors are trapped too close to the ground. On the other hand, the full-mixing assumption underestimates the OMMC by 0-25 ppb, except over the Northeast, as the nighttime ozone decline is greatly underpredicted. As compared to PBL mixing, the effects of horizontal resolutions and precursor emissions being used are smaller but non-negligible. Overall, with the non-local mixing scheme, relatively high horizontal resolution (˜1.1°) and updated emissions data, the modified MOZART is capable of simulating the main features of the observed ozone diurnal cycle.

  8. A Deterministic Model for Predicting Hourly Dissolved Oxygen Change: Development and Application to a Shallow Eutrophic Lake

    OpenAIRE

    Zhen Xu; Y. Jun Xu

    2016-01-01

    Predicting dissolved oxygen (DO) change at a high frequency in water bodies is useful for water quality management. In this study, we developed a deterministic model that can predict hourly DO change in a water body with high frequency weather parameters. The study was conducted during August 2008–July 2009 in a eutrophic shallow lake in Louisiana, USA. An environment monitoring buoy was deployed to record DO, water temperature and chlorophyll-a concentration at 15-min intervals, and hourly w...

  9. A Comparison of Hourly Typhoon Rainfall Forecasting Models Based on Support Vector Machines and Random Forests with Different Predictor Sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kun-Hsiang; Tseng, Hung-Wei; Kuo, Chen-Min; Yang, Tao-Chang; Yu, Pao-Shan

    2016-04-01

    Typhoons with heavy rainfall and strong wind often cause severe floods and losses in Taiwan, which motivates the development of rainfall forecasting models as part of an early warning system. Thus, this study aims to develop rainfall forecasting models based on two machine learning methods, support vector machines (SVMs) and random forests (RFs), and investigate the performances of the models with different predictor sets for searching the optimal predictor set in forecasting. Four predictor sets were used: (1) antecedent rainfalls, (2) antecedent rainfalls and typhoon characteristics, (3) antecedent rainfalls and meteorological factors, and (4) antecedent rainfalls, typhoon characteristics and meteorological factors to construct for 1- to 6-hour ahead rainfall forecasting. An application to three rainfall stations in Yilan River basin, northeastern Taiwan, was conducted. Firstly, the performance of the SVMs-based forecasting model with predictor set #1 was analyzed. The results show that the accuracy of the models for 2- to 6-hour ahead forecasting decrease rapidly as compared to the accuracy of the model for 1-hour ahead forecasting which is acceptable. For improving the model performance, each predictor set was further examined in the SVMs-based forecasting model. The results reveal that the SVMs-based model using predictor set #4 as input variables performs better than the other sets and a significant improvement of model performance is found especially for the long lead time forecasting. Lastly, the performance of the SVMs-based model using predictor set #4 as input variables was compared with the performance of the RFs-based model using predictor set #4 as input variables. It is found that the RFs-based model is superior to the SVMs-based model in hourly typhoon rainfall forecasting. Keywords: hourly typhoon rainfall forecasting, predictor selection, support vector machines, random forests

  10. Effects of sea surface temperature, cloud radiative and microphysical processes, and diurnal variations on rainfall in equilibrium cloud-resolving model simulations

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jiang Zhe; Li Xiao-Fan; Zhou Yu-Shu; Gao Shou-Ting

    2012-01-01

    The effects of sea surface temperature(SST),cloud radiative and microphysical processes,and diurnal variations on rainfall statistics are documented with grid data from the two-dimensional equilibrium cloud-resolving model simulations.For a rain rate of higher than 3 mm.h-1,water vapor convergence prevails.The rainfall amount decreases with the decrease of SST from 29℃ to 27 ℃,the inclusion of diurnal variation of SST,or the exclusion of microphysical effects of ice clouds and radiative effects of water clouds,which are primarily associated with the decreases in water vapor convergence.However,the amount of rainfall increases with the increase of SST from 29 ℃ to 31 ℃,the exclusion of diurnal variation of solar zenith angle,and the exclusion of the radiative effects of ice clouds,which are primarily related to increases in water vapor convergence.For a rain rate of less than 3 mm·h-1,water vapor divergence prevails.Unlike rainfall statistics for rain rates of higher than 3 mm.h-1,the decrease of SST from 29 ℃ to 27 ℃ and the exclusion of radiative effects of water clouds in the presence of radiative effects of ice clouds increase the rainfall amount,which corresponds to the suppression in water vapor divergence.The exclusion of microphysical effects of ice clouds decreases the amount of rainfall,which corresponds to the enhancement in water vapor divergence.The amount of rainfall is less sensitive to the increase of SST from 29℃ to 31℃ and to the radiative effects of water clouds in the absence of the radiative effects of ice clouds.

  11. Diurnal Variation Has Effect on Differential Gene Expression Analysis in the Hippocampus of the Pilocarpine-Induced Model of Mesial Temporal Lobe Epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelin Antonieli da Silva Santos

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms underlying epileptogenesis have been widely investigated by differential gene expression approach, especially RT-qPCR methodology. However, controversial findings highlight the occurrence of unpredictable sources of variance in the experimental designs. Here, we investigated if diurnal rhythms of transcript's levels may impact on differential gene expression analysis in hippocampus of rats with experimental epilepsy. For this, we have selected six core clock genes (Per1, Per3, Bmal1, Clock, Cry1 and Cry2, whose rhythmic expression pattern in hippocampus had been previously reported. Initially, we identified Tubb2a/Rplp1 and Tubb2a/Ppia as suitable normalizers for circadian studies in hippocampus of rats maintained to 12:12 hour light:dark (LD cycle. Next, we confirmed the temporal profiling of Per1, Per3, Bmal1, Cry1 and Cry2 mRNA levels in the hippocampus of naive rats by both Acrophase and CircWave statistical tests for circadian analysis. Finally, we showed that temporal differences of sampling can change experimental results for Per1, Per3, Bmal1, Cry1 and Cry2, but not for Clock, which was consistently decreased in rats with epilepsy in all comparison to the naive group. In conclusion, our study demonstrates it is mandatory to consider diurnal oscillations, in order to avoid erroneous conclusions in gene expression analysis in hippocampus of rats with epilepsy. Investigators, therefore, should be aware that genes with circadian expression could be out of phase in different animals of experimental and control groups. Moreover, our results indicate that a sub-expression of Clock may be involved in epileptogenicity, although the functional significance of this remains to be investigated.

  12. New fire diurnal cycle characterizations to improve fire radiative energy assessments made from low-Earth orbit satellites sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andela, N.; Kaiser, J. W.; van der Werf, G. R.; Wooster, M. J.

    2015-03-01

    errors, while generally overestimating FRE. Including information on the climatology of the fire diurnal cycle provided the most promising avenue to improve FRE estimations. This approach also improved the performance on relatively high spatiotemporal resolutions, although only when aggregating model results to coarser spatial and/or temporal scale good correlation was found with the full SEVIRI hourly reference dataset. In general model performance was best in areas of frequent fire and low errors of omission. We recommend the use of regionally varying fire diurnal cycle information within the Global Fire Assimilation System (GFAS) used in the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Services, which will improve FRE estimates and may allow for further reconciliation of biomass burning emission estimates from different inventories.

  13. Palliative Care Office Hours for Patients with Hematologic Malignancies: An Innovative Model for Symptom Management and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foxwell, Anessa M; Moyer, Mary E; Casarett, David J; O'Connor, Nina R

    2017-10-01

    Palliative care programs are experiencing rapid growth, with demand for consults surpassing staffing. Innovative models are needed to equip nonpalliative care providers to manage basic palliative care issues. To develop a novel program of palliative care office hours for hematologic oncology advanced practice providers, and to evaluate its impact on palliative care consult volume and composition. A palliative care nurse practitioner or pharmacist was available for weekday office hours to all inpatient hematologic oncology advanced practice providers at an academic medical center to offer advice on pain, nonpain symptoms, and psychosocial distress. A retrospective study looking at outcome measures after six months of office hour utilization and palliative care consults from the hematologic oncology services. Palliative care office hours had a mean duration of 16 minutes per day (range 5 to 55). A mean of 11 patients were discussed per week (range 4 to 20). Pain, nausea, and anxiety were the issues most frequently raised. Of 299 patients discussed during office hours, 44 (14.7%) subsequently required a full palliative care consult. Overall, palliative care consults from the hematologic oncology services decreased from 19.6% to 10.2% of admissions (87/445 vs. 61/594, p Office hours are an efficient way to address palliative care needs when demand for palliative care consults exceeds capacity. Office hours may serve an educational function as well, enabling primary teams to manage basic palliative care issues with increasing independence over time.

  14. Energy systems scenario modelling and long term forecasting of hourly electricity demand

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poul Alberg Østergaard

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Danish energy system is undergoing a transition from a system based on storable fossil fuels to a system based on fluctuating renewable energy sources. At the same time, more of and more of the energy system is becoming electrified; transportation, heating and fuel usage in industry and elsewhere. This article investigates the development of the Danish energy system in a medium year 2030 situation as well as in a long-term year 2050 situation. The analyses are based on scenario development by the Danish Climate Commission. In the short term, it is investigated what the effects will be of having flexible or inflexible electric vehicles and individual heat pumps, and in the long term it is investigated what the effects of changes in the load profiles due to changing weights of demand sectors are. The analyses are based on energy systems simulations using EnergyPLAN and demand forecasting using the Helena model. The results show that even with a limited short-term electric car fleet, these will have a significant effect on the energy system; the energy system’s ability to integrated wind power and the demand for condensing power generation capacity in the system. Charging patterns and flexibility have significant effects on this. Likewise, individual heat pumps may affect the system operation if they are equipped with heat storages. The analyses also show that the long-term changes in electricity demand curve profiles have little impact on the energy system performance. The flexibility given by heat pumps and electric vehicles in the long-term future overshadows any effects of changes in hourly demand curve profiles.

  15. Do Financial Incentives Influence GPs' Decisions to Do After-hours Work? A Discrete Choice Labour Supply Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broadway, Barbara; Kalb, Guyonne; Li, Jinhu; Scott, Anthony

    2017-02-20

    This paper analyses doctors' supply of after-hours care (AHC), and how it is affected by personal and family circumstances as well as the earnings structure. We use detailed survey data from a large sample of Australian General Practitioners (GPs) to estimate a structural, discrete choice model of labour supply and AHC. This allows us to jointly model GPs' decisions on the number of daytime-weekday working hours and the probability of providing AHC. We simulate GPs' labour supply responses to an increase in hourly earnings, both in a daytime-weekday setting and for AHC. GPs increase their daytime-weekday working hours if their hourly earnings in this setting increase, but only to a very small extent. GPs are somewhat more likely to provide AHC if their hourly earnings in that setting increase, but again, the effect is very small and only evident in some subgroups. Moreover, higher earnings in weekday-daytime practice reduce the probability of providing AHC, particularly for men. Increasing GPs' earnings appears to be at best relatively ineffective in encouraging increased provision of AHC and may even prove harmful if incentives are not well targeted. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  16. The generation of hourly diffuse irradiation: A model from the analysis of the fluctuation of global irradiance series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Posadillo, R.; Lopez Luque, R. [Grupo de Investigacion de Fisica para las Energias y Recursos Renovables, Dpto. de Fisica Aplicada, UCO, Edificio C2 Campus de Rabanales, 14071 Cordoba (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    An analysis of models for the estimation of hourly diffuse irradiation based on the interrelations between the hourly diffuse fraction k{sub d} and the hourly clearness index k{sub t}, has concluded that k{sub t} is not a sufficient variable for parametrizing the effect of clouds on diffuse irradiation. A detailed study of the dispersion recorded by this diffuse component for a specific clearness index under partly cloudy sky conditions has led to analyzing how the variability in the instantaneous clearness index influences this dispersion. The data sets correspond to 10 years of hourly and instantaneous value records of global and diffuse radiation collected in Cordoba, Spain. In addition to the inclusion of the sine of solar elevation as a variable into the k{sub d}-k{sub t} correlations, this model propose the inclusion of others parameters related to the variability in the normalized clearness index within an hour and with the fluctuations presented by the time series of the instantaneous values of that index. Also presented is the implementation of an algorithm permitting both the determination of the hourly diffuse irradiation and the discrimination between the different sky conditions in those situations known by the designation partly cloudy sky. (author)

  17. Sub-Hour Solar Data for Power System Modeling From Static Spatial Variability Analysis: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hummon, M.; Ibanez, E.; Brinkman, G.; Lew, D.

    2012-12-01

    High penetration renewable integration studies need high quality solar power data with spatial-temporal correlations that are representative of a real system. This paper will summarize the research relating sequential point-source sub-hour global horizontal irradiance (GHI) values to static, spatially distributed GHI values. This research led to the development of an algorithm for generating coherent sub-hour datasets that span distances ranging from 10 km to 4,000 km. The algorithm, in brief, generates synthetic GHI values at an interval of one-minute, for a specific location, using SUNY/Clean Power Research, satellite-derived, hourly irradiance values for the nearest grid cell to that location and grid cells within 40 km.

  18. Impact of assimilation window length on diurnal features in a Mars atmospheric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongjing Zhao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Effective simulation of diurnal variability is an important aspect of many geophysical data assimilation systems. For the Martian atmosphere, thermal tides are particularly prominent and contribute much to the Martian atmospheric circulation, dynamics and dust transport. To study the Mars diurnal variability and Mars thermal tides, the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory Mars Global Climate Model with the 4D-local ensemble transform Kalman filter (4D-LETKF is used to perform an analysis assimilating spacecraft temperature retrievals. We find that the use of a ‘traditional’ 6-hr assimilation cycle induces spurious forcing of a resonantly enhanced semi-diurnal Kelvin waves represented in both surface pressure and mid-level temperature by forming a wave 4 pattern in the diurnal averaged analysis increment that acts as a ‘topographic’ stationary forcing. Different assimilation window lengths in the 4D-LETKF are introduced to remove the artificially induced resonance. It is found that short assimilation window lengths not only remove the spurious resonance, but also push the migrating semi-diurnal temperature variation at 50 Pa closer to the estimated ‘true’ tides even in the absence of a radiatively active water ice cloud parameterisation. In order to compare the performance of different assimilation window lengths, short-term to mid-range forecasts based on the hour 00 and 12 assimilation are evaluated and compared. Results show that during Northern Hemisphere summer, it is not the assimilation window length, but the radiatively active water ice clouds that influence the model prediction. A ‘diurnal bias correction’ that includes bias correction fields dependent on the local time is shown to effectively reduce the forecast root mean square differences between forecasts and observations, compensate for the absence of water ice cloud parameterisation and enhance Martian atmosphere prediction. The implications of these results for

  19. The 3-Hour-Interval Prediction of Ground-Level Temperature in South Korea Using Dynamic Linear Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keon-Tae SOHN; Deuk-Kyun RHA; Young-Kyung SEO

    2003-01-01

    The 3-hour-interval prediction of ground-level temperature from +00 h out to +45 h in South Korea(38 stations) is performed using the DLM (dynamic linear model) in order to eliminate the systematicerror of numerical model forecasts. Numerical model forecasts and observations are used as input values ofthe DLM. According to the comparison of the DLM forecasts to the KFM (Kalman filter model) forecastswith RMSE and bias, the DLM is useful to improve the accuracy of prediction.

  20. Diurnal variation of stratospheric and lower mesospheric HOCl, ClO and HO2 at the equator: comparison of 1-D model calculations with measurements by satellite instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Khosravi

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal variation of HOCl and the related species ClO, HO2 and HCl measured by satellites has been compared with the results of a one-dimensional photochemical model. The study compares the data from various limb-viewing instruments with model simulations from the middle stratosphere to the lower mesosphere. Data from three sub-millimetre instruments and two infrared spectrometers are used, namely from the Sub-Millimetre Radiometer (SMR on board Odin, the Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS on board Aura, the Superconducting Submillimeter-wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES on the International Space Station, the Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS on board ENVISAT, and the Atmospheric Chemistry Experiment Fourier Transform Spectrometer (ACE-FTS on board SCISAT. Inter-comparison of the measurements from instruments on sun-synchronous satellites (SMR, MLS, MIPAS and measurements from solar occultation instruments (ACE-FTS is challenging since the measurements correspond to different solar zenith angles (or local times. However, using a model which covers all solar zenith angles and data from the SMILES instrument which measured at all local times over a period of several months provides the possibility to verify the model and to indirectly compare the diurnally variable species. The satellite data were averaged for latitudes of 20° S to 20° N for the SMILES observation period from November 2009 to April 2010 and were compared at three altitudes: 35, 45 and 55 km. Besides presenting the SMILES data, the study also shows a first comparison of the latest MLS data (version 3.3 of HOCl, ClO, and HO2 with other satellite observations, as well as a first evaluation of HO2 observations made by Odin/SMR. The MISU-1D model has been carefully initialised and run for conditions and locations of the observations. The diurnal cycle features for the species investigated here are generally well reproduced by the model. The satellite

  1. A gridded hourly rainfall dataset for the UK applied to a national physically-based modelling system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Elizabeth; Blenkinsop, Stephen; Quinn, Niall; Freer, Jim; Coxon, Gemma; Woods, Ross; Bates, Paul; Fowler, Hayley

    2016-04-01

    An hourly gridded rainfall product has great potential for use in many hydrological applications that require high temporal resolution meteorological data. One important example of this is flood risk management, with flooding in the UK highly dependent on sub-daily rainfall intensities amongst other factors. Knowledge of sub-daily rainfall intensities is therefore critical to designing hydraulic structures or flood defences to appropriate levels of service. Sub-daily rainfall rates are also essential inputs for flood forecasting, allowing for estimates of peak flows and stage for flood warning and response. In addition, an hourly gridded rainfall dataset has significant potential for practical applications such as better representation of extremes and pluvial flash flooding, validation of high resolution climate models and improving the representation of sub-daily rainfall in weather generators. A new 1km gridded hourly rainfall dataset for the UK has been created by disaggregating the daily Gridded Estimates of Areal Rainfall (CEH-GEAR) dataset using comprehensively quality-controlled hourly rain gauge data from over 1300 observation stations across the country. Quality control measures include identification of frequent tips, daily accumulations and dry spells, comparison of daily totals against the CEH-GEAR daily dataset, and nearest neighbour checks. The quality control procedure was validated against historic extreme rainfall events and the UKCP09 5km daily rainfall dataset. General use of the dataset has been demonstrated by testing the sensitivity of a physically-based hydrological modelling system for Great Britain to the distribution and rates of rainfall and potential evapotranspiration. Of the sensitivity tests undertaken, the largest improvements in model performance were seen when an hourly gridded rainfall dataset was combined with potential evapotranspiration disaggregated to hourly intervals, with 61% of catchments showing an increase in NSE between

  2. Hourly photosynthetically active radiation estimation in Midwestern United States from artificial neural networks and conventional regressions models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaolei; Guo, Xulin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between hourly photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and the global solar radiation (R s ) was analyzed from data gathered over 3 years at Bondville, IL, and Sioux Falls, SD, Midwestern USA. These data were used to determine temporal variability of the PAR fraction and its dependence on different sky conditions, which were defined by the clearness index. Meanwhile, models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) were established for predicting hourly PAR. The performance of the proposed models was compared with four existing conventional regression models in terms of the normalized root mean square error (NRMSE), the coefficient of determination (r (2)), the mean percentage error (MPE), and the relative standard error (RSE). From the overall analysis, it shows that the ANN model can predict PAR accurately, especially for overcast sky and clear sky conditions. Meanwhile, the parameters related to water vapor do not improve the prediction result significantly.

  3. Hourly photosynthetically active radiation estimation in Midwestern United States from artificial neural networks and conventional regressions models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiaolei; Guo, Xulin

    2016-08-01

    The relationship between hourly photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) and the global solar radiation ( R s ) was analyzed from data gathered over 3 years at Bondville, IL, and Sioux Falls, SD, Midwestern USA. These data were used to determine temporal variability of the PAR fraction and its dependence on different sky conditions, which were defined by the clearness index. Meanwhile, models based on artificial neural networks (ANNs) were established for predicting hourly PAR. The performance of the proposed models was compared with four existing conventional regression models in terms of the normalized root mean square error (NRMSE), the coefficient of determination ( r 2), the mean percentage error (MPE), and the relative standard error (RSE). From the overall analysis, it shows that the ANN model can predict PAR accurately, especially for overcast sky and clear sky conditions. Meanwhile, the parameters related to water vapor do not improve the prediction result significantly.

  4. Considering Renewables in Capacity Expansion Models: Capturing Flexibility with Hourly Dispatch

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrows, Clayton; Mai, Trieu; Hale, Elaine; Lopez, Anthony; Eurek, Kelly

    2015-07-03

    The Resource Planning Model co-optimizes dispatch and capacity expansion using a simplified, chronological dispatch period representation and high-resolution resource, load and infrastructure data. The computational tractability of capacity expansion models depends on model simplifications. We demonstrate the effects of various dispatch period representations on model results using the Resource Planning Model.

  5. The 3-Hour-Interval Prediction of Ground-Level Temperature in South Korea Using Dynamic Linear Models

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Keon-TaeSOHN; Deuk-KyunRHA; Young-KyungSEO

    2003-01-01

    The 3-hour-interval prediction of ground-level temperature from +00 h out to +45 h in South Korea(38 stations) is performed using the DLM (dynamic linear model) in order to eliminate the systematic error of numerical model forecasts. Numerical model forecasts and observations are used as input values of the DLM. According to the comparison of the DLM forecasts to the KFM (Kalman filter model) forecasts with RMSE and bias, the DLM is useful to improve the accuracy of prediction.

  6. Using GOCI Retrieval Data to Initialize and Validate a Sediment Transport Model for Monitoring Diurnal Variation of SSC in Hangzhou Bay, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuefei Yang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal variation of the suspended sediment concentration (SSC in Hangzhou Bay, China has been investigated using remotely-sensed SSC derived from the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI in combination with a coupled hydrodynamic-ecological model for regional and shelf seas (COHERENS. The SSC maps were inferred through a UV-AC atmospheric correction algorithm and an empirical inversion algorithm from the GOCI Level-1B data. The sediment transport model was initialized from maps of the GOCI-derived SSC and the model results were validated through a comparison with remotely-sensed data. The comparison demonstrated that the model results agreed well with the observations. The relationship between SSC distribution and hydrodynamic conditions was analyzed to investigate the sediment transport dynamics. The model’s results indicate that the action of tidal currents dominate the sediment deposition and re-suspension in the coastal waters of the East China Sea. This is especially the case in Hangzhou Bay where the tidal currents are strongest. The satellite-derived sediment data product can not only dramatically improve the specification of the initial conditions for the sediment model, but can also provide valuable information for the model validation, thereby improving the model’s overall performance.

  7. Specific Diurnal EMG Activity Pattern Observed in Occlusal Collapse Patients: Relationship between Diurnal Bruxism and Tooth Loss Progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawakami, Shigehisa; Kumazaki, Yohei; Manda, Yosuke; Oki, Kazuhiro; Minagi, Shogo

    2014-01-01

    Aim The role of parafunctional masticatory muscle activity in tooth loss has not been fully clarified. This study aimed to reveal the characteristic activity of masseter muscles in bite collapse patients while awake and asleep. Materials and Methods Six progressive bite collapse patients (PBC group), six age- and gender-matched control subjects (MC group), and six young control subjects (YC group) were enrolled. Electromyograms (EMG) of the masseter muscles were continuously recorded with an ambulatory EMG recorder while patients were awake and asleep. Diurnal and nocturnal parafunctional EMG activity was classified as phasic, tonic, or mixed using an EMG threshold of 20% maximal voluntary clenching. Results Highly extended diurnal phasic activity was observed only in the PBC group. The three groups had significantly different mean diurnal phasic episodes per hour, with 13.29±7.18 per hour in the PBC group, 0.95±0.97 per hour in the MC group, and 0.87±0.98 per hour in the YC group (p<0.01). ROC curve analysis suggested that the number of diurnal phasic episodes might be used to predict bite collapsing tooth loss. Conclusion Extensive bite loss might be related to diurnal masticatory muscle parafunction but not to parafunction during sleep. Clinical Relevance: Scientific rationale for study Although mandibular parafunction has been implicated in stomatognathic system breakdown, a causal relationship has not been established because scientific modalities to evaluate parafunctional activity have been lacking. Principal findings This study used a newly developed EMG recording system that evaluates masseter muscle activity throughout the day. Our results challenge the stereotypical idea of nocturnal bruxism as a strong destructive force. We found that diurnal phasic masticatory muscle activity was most characteristic in patients with progressive bite collapse. Practical implications The incidence of diurnal phasic contractions could be used for the prognostic

  8. Specific diurnal EMG activity pattern observed in occlusal collapse patients: relationship between diurnal bruxism and tooth loss progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehisa Kawakami

    Full Text Available AIM: The role of parafunctional masticatory muscle activity in tooth loss has not been fully clarified. This study aimed to reveal the characteristic activity of masseter muscles in bite collapse patients while awake and asleep. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Six progressive bite collapse patients (PBC group, six age- and gender-matched control subjects (MC group, and six young control subjects (YC group were enrolled. Electromyograms (EMG of the masseter muscles were continuously recorded with an ambulatory EMG recorder while patients were awake and asleep. Diurnal and nocturnal parafunctional EMG activity was classified as phasic, tonic, or mixed using an EMG threshold of 20% maximal voluntary clenching. RESULTS: Highly extended diurnal phasic activity was observed only in the PBC group. The three groups had significantly different mean diurnal phasic episodes per hour, with 13.29±7.18 per hour in the PBC group, 0.95±0.97 per hour in the MC group, and 0.87±0.98 per hour in the YC group (p<0.01. ROC curve analysis suggested that the number of diurnal phasic episodes might be used to predict bite collapsing tooth loss. CONCLUSION: Extensive bite loss might be related to diurnal masticatory muscle parafunction but not to parafunction during sleep. CLINICAL RELEVANCE SCIENTIFIC RATIONALE FOR STUDY: Although mandibular parafunction has been implicated in stomatognathic system breakdown, a causal relationship has not been established because scientific modalities to evaluate parafunctional activity have been lacking. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This study used a newly developed EMG recording system that evaluates masseter muscle activity throughout the day. Our results challenge the stereotypical idea of nocturnal bruxism as a strong destructive force. We found that diurnal phasic masticatory muscle activity was most characteristic in patients with progressive bite collapse. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: The incidence of diurnal phasic contractions could be used for

  9. Diurnal variation of tropospheric temperature at a tropical station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Revathy

    Full Text Available The vertical velocity in the troposphere-lower stratosphere region measured using MST radar has been utilized to evaluate the temperature profile in the region. The diurnal variation of the tropospheric temperature on one day in August 1998 at the tropical station Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E has been studied using the MST radar technique. The diurnal variation of the temperature revealed a prominent diurnal variation with the peak in the afternoon hours increasingly delayed in altitude. The tropopause temperature and altitude exhibited a clear diurnal cycle.

    Key words. Atmospheric composition and structure (pressure, density and temperature; troposphere - composition and chemistry; instruments and technique

  10. Robust fitting of diurnal brightness temperature cycle

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Udahemuka, G

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available for a pixel concerned. Robust fitting of observed Diurnal Temperature Cycle (DTC) taken over a day of a given pixel without cloud cover and other abnormally conditions such as fire can give a data based brightness temperature model for a given pixel...

  11. Determination of fleet hourly emission and on-road vehicle emission factor using integrated monitoring and modeling approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim Oanh, N. T.; Martel, M.; Pongkiatkul, P.; Berkowicz, R.

    Roadside air quality and vehicle emission are important and challenging issues in urban air quality management which need to be adequately characterized. This study involves designing a monitoring program that produces suitable data to determine the on-road hourly fleet emission and emission factors of individual vehicles in a street canyon. Simultaneous hourly monitoring of roadside gaseous pollutants (both windward and leeward sides), traffic volume and speed, and wind in a busy street of Bangkok was conducted in the rainy season when traffic emission was predominant in the city. Higher pollutant concentrations often occurred at midday (11:00 to 14:00h) when higher traffic density (3700-3800vehicles h - 1, weekdays) was observed. The levels of toluene and xylenes found in this study are higher than the roadside levels reported in other Asian cities. Hourly maximum concentrations reached 258ppb for toluene, 51ppb for m, p-xylenes, 15ppb for o-xylene, 526ppb for NO x, and 10.5ppm for CO. Hourly monitoring data during the periods when the street canyon effects were pronounced were selected for determination of the fleet hourly emission and vehicle emission factors by back calculation using a street canyon model (Operational Street Pollution Model). The average fleet hourly emission at daytime of NO x (6.2kg km - 1 h - 1), CO (54kg km - 1 h - 1), toluene (2.1kg km - 1 h - 1), m, p-xylenes (0.73kg km - 1 h - 1) and o-xylene (0.27kg km - 1 h - 1) did not vary much. However, the emission rates were substantially reduced at nighttime following the traffic pattern. The obtained pollutant emission factors varied within each group of vehicles with the average values agreed reasonably with the chassis dynamometer results for NO x but somewhat higher for CO and TX. The model estimated results are, however, considered to better represent the real driving conditions in the street at the average vehicle travel speed of around 20km h - 1. A statistical sampling design is proposed

  12. Generalized regression neural network-based approach for modelling hourly dissolved oxygen concentration in the Upper Klamath River, Oregon, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddam, Salim

    2014-08-01

    In this study, a comparison between generalized regression neural network (GRNN) and multiple linear regression (MLR) models is given on the effectiveness of modelling dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in a river. The two models are developed using hourly experimental data collected from the United States Geological Survey (USGS Station No: 421209121463000 [top]) station at the Klamath River at Railroad Bridge at Lake Ewauna. The input variables used for the two models are water, pH, temperature, electrical conductivity, and sensor depth. The performances of the models are evaluated using root mean square errors (RMSE), the mean absolute error (MAE), Willmott's index of agreement (d), and correlation coefficient (CC) statistics. Of the two approaches employed, the best fit was obtained using the GRNN model with the four input variables used.

  13. Verification of hourly forecasts of wind turbine power output

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wegley, H.L.

    1984-08-01

    A verification of hourly average wind speed forecasts in terms of hourly average power output of a MOD-2 was performed for four sites. Site-specific probabilistic transformation models were developed to transform the forecast and observed hourly average speeds to the percent probability of exceedance of an hourly average power output. (This transformation model also appears to have value in predicting annual energy production for use in wind energy feasibility studies.) The transformed forecasts were verified in a deterministic sense (i.e., as continuous values) and in a probabilistic sense (based upon the probability of power output falling in a specified category). Since the smoothing effects of time averaging are very pronounced, the 90% probability of exceedance was built into the transformation models. Semiobjective and objective (model output statistics) forecasts were made compared for the four sites. The verification results indicate that the correct category can be forecast an average of 75% of the time over a 24-hour period. Accuracy generally decreases with projection time out to approx. 18 hours and then may increase due to the fairly regular diurnal wind patterns that occur at many sites. The ability to forecast the correct power output category increases with increasing power output because occurrences of high hourly average power output (near rated) are relatively rare and are generally not forecast. The semiobjective forecasts proved superior to model output statistics in forecasting high values of power output and in the shorter time frames (1 to 6 hours). However, model output statistics were slightly more accurate at other power output levels and times. Noticeable differences were observed between deterministic and probabilistic (categorical) forecast verification results.

  14. A Deterministic Model for Predicting Hourly Dissolved Oxygen Change: Development and Application to a Shallow Eutrophic Lake

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Predicting dissolved oxygen (DO change at a high frequency in water bodies is useful for water quality management. In this study, we developed a deterministic model that can predict hourly DO change in a water body with high frequency weather parameters. The study was conducted during August 2008–July 2009 in a eutrophic shallow lake in Louisiana, USA. An environment monitoring buoy was deployed to record DO, water temperature and chlorophyll-a concentration at 15-min intervals, and hourly weather data including air temperature, precipitation, wind speed, relative humidity, and solar radiation were gathered from a nearby weather station. These data formed a foundation for developing a DO model that predicts rapid change of source and sink components including photosynthesis, re-aeration, respiration, and oxygen consumption by sediments. We then applied the model to a studied shallow lake that is widely representative of lake water conditions in the subtropical southern United States. Overall, the model successfully simulated high-time fluctuation of DO in the studied lake, showing good predictability for extreme algal bloom events. However, a knowledge gap still exists in accurately quantifying oxygen source produced by photosynthesis in high frequency DO modeling.

  15. Predicting medical specialists’ working (long) hours: testing a contemporary career model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, B.R.; Eisinga, R.; Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    With the feminization (in numbers) of several professions, changing gender role prescriptions regarding parenthood and an increased attention for work-life balance, career theorists recently addressed the need for a more contemporary career model taking a work–home perspective. In this study, we tes

  16. Predicting medical specialists' working (long) hours: Testing a contemporary career model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, B.R.; Eisinga, R.N.; Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    With the feminization (in numbers) of several professions, changing gender role prescriptions regarding parenthood and an increased attention for work-life balance, career theorists recently addressed the need for a more contemporary career model taking a work-home perspective. In this study, we tes

  17. Predicting medical specialists' working (long) hours: Testing a contemporary career model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, B.R.; Eisinga, R.N.; Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    With the feminization (in numbers) of several professions, changing gender role prescriptions regarding parenthood and an increased attention for work-life balance, career theorists recently addressed the need for a more contemporary career model taking a work-home perspective. In this study, we

  18. Predicting medical specialists’ working (long) hours: Testing a contemporary career model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pas, B.R.; Eisinga, R.; Doorewaard, J.A.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    With the feminization (in numbers) of several professions, changing gender role prescriptions regarding parenthood and an increased attention for work-life balance, career theorists recently addressed the need for a more contemporary career model taking a work–home perspective. In this study, we

  19. Sensitivity of 96 and 120-hour Numerical Model Tropical Cyclone Position Forecasts to Initial Position Errors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    to thank my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ who has graciously granted me the opportunities in this life. Secondly, to my beautiful wife, I am indebted... original Matrix Laboratory (MATLAB R©) software routine performed numerical computations using JTWC best track data, JTWC warning bulletins, and GFS...weighting function and the model parameter values at the model’s original grid resolution, but regardless of the ultimate grid resolution, the vortex

  20. Hourly predictive artificial neural network and multivariate regression tree models of Alternaria and Cladosporium spore concentrations in Szczecin (Poland)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinn-Gofroń, Agnieszka; Strzelczak, Agnieszka

    2009-11-01

    A study was made of the link between time of day, weather variables and the hourly content of certain fungal spores in the atmosphere of the city of Szczecin, Poland, in 2004-2007. Sampling was carried out with a Lanzoni 7-day-recording spore trap. The spores analysed belonged to the taxa Alternaria and Cladosporium. These spores were selected both for their allergenic capacity and for their high level presence in the atmosphere, particularly during summer. Spearman correlation coefficients between spore concentrations, meteorological parameters and time of day showed different indices depending on the taxon being analysed. Relative humidity (RH), air temperature, air pressure and clouds most strongly and significantly influenced the concentration of Alternaria spores. Cladosporium spores correlated less strongly and significantly than Alternaria. Multivariate regression tree analysis revealed that, at air pressures lower than 1,011 hPa the concentration of Alternaria spores was low. Under higher air pressure spore concentrations were higher, particularly when RH was lower than 36.5%. In the case of Cladosporium, under higher air pressure (>1,008 hPa), the spores analysed were more abundant, particularly after 0330 hours. In artificial neural networks, RH, air pressure and air temperature were the most important variables in the model for Alternaria spore concentration. For Cladosporium, clouds, time of day, air pressure, wind speed and dew point temperature were highly significant factors influencing spore concentration. The maximum abundance of Cladosporium spores in air fell between 1200 and 1700 hours.

  1. Energy Systems Scenario Modelling and Long Term Forecasting of Hourly Electricity Demand

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alberg Østergaard, Poul; Møller Andersen, Frits; Kwon, Pil Seok

    2015-01-01

    . The results show that even with a limited short term electric car fleet, these will have a significant effect on the energy system; the energy system’s ability to integrate wind power and the demand for condensing power generation capacity in the system. Charging patterns and flexibility have significant...... or inflexible electric vehicles and individual heat pumps, and in the long term it is investigated what the effects of changes in the load profiles due to changing weights of demand sectors are. The analyses are based on energy systems simulations using EnergyPLAN and demand forecasting using the Helena model...... effects on this. Likewise, individual heat pumps may affect the system operation if they are equipped with heat storages. The analyses also show that the long term changes in electricity demand curve profiles have little impact on the energy system performance. The flexibility given by heat pumps...

  2. Seasonal and diurnal variability of thermal structure in the coastal waters off Visakhapatnam

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Rao, B.P.; RameshBabu, V.; Chandramohan, P.

    Seasonal and diurnal variability of thermal structure in the coastal waters off Visakhapatnam has been examined in relation to the flow field and surface winds utilizing the hourly data of temperature and currents taken at a fixed location over a...

  3. Estimation of Diurnal Cycle of Land Surface Temperature at High Temporal and Spatial Resolution from Clear-Sky MODIS Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Si-Bo Duan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal cycle of land surface temperature (LST is an important element of the climate system. Geostationary satellites can provide the diurnal cycle of LST with low spatial resolution and incomplete global coverage, which limits its applications in some studies. In this study, we propose a method to estimate the diurnal cycle of LST at high temporal and spatial resolution from clear-sky MODIS data. This method was evaluated using the MSG-SEVIRI-derived LSTs. The results indicate that this method fits the diurnal cycle of LST well, with root mean square error (RMSE values less than 1 K for most pixels. Because MODIS provides at most four observations per day at a given location, this method was further evaluated using only four MSG-SEVIRI-derived LSTs corresponding to the MODIS overpass times (10:30, 13:30, 22:30, and 01:30 local solar time. The results show that the RMSE values using only four MSG-SEVIRI-derived LSTs are approximately two times larger than those using all LSTs. The spatial distribution of the modeled LSTs at the MODIS pixel scale is presented from 07:00 to 05:00 local solar time of the next day with an increment of 2 hours. The diurnal cycle of the modeled LSTs describes the temporal evolution of the LSTs at the MODIS pixel scale.

  4. Human prolactin - 24-hour pattern with increased release during sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassin, J. F.; Weitzman, E. D.; Kapen, S.; Frantz, A. G.

    1972-01-01

    Human prolactin was measured in plasma by radioimmunoassay at 20-minute intervals for a 24-hour period in each of six normal adults, whose sleep-wake cycles were monitored polygraphically. A marked diurnal variation in plasma concentrations was demonstrated, with highest values during sleep. Periods of episodic release occurred throughout the 24 hours.

  5. An operational model to estimate hourly and daily crop evapotranspiration in hilly terrain: validation on wheat and oat crops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Gianfranco; Katerji, Nader; Ferrara, Rossana M.; Martinelli, Nicola

    2011-03-01

    In this paper, we present an operational model to estimate the actual evapotranspiration (ET) of crops cultivated on hilly terrains. This new model has the following three characteristics: (1) ET modelling is based on a Penman-Monteith (PM) type equation (Monteith 1965) where canopy resistance is simulated by following an approach already illustrated by Katerji and Perrier (Agronomie 3(6):513-521, 1983); (2) the estimation of ET, by means of the PM equation, is made by using meteorological variables simulated on sloped sites as input; (3) these variables are simulated by using simple relationships linking the variables measured at a reference site on plane to the topographic characteristics of the site (slope, orientation, altitude as difference between reference, and sloped sites). This approach presents two advantages if compared with previously proposed models: Not only computation steps are greatly simplified but also error sources due to the simulation of climatic variables in sloped sites and the ET estimation are well distinguished. This model was validated at hourly and daily scales at four sites cultivated with wheat and oats offering a wide range of slope and orientation values: a reference site on plane, site 1 (9° sloping, NW orientation, 7 m from the reference site in plane), site 2 (6°, SE, 12 m) and site 3 (1°, SE, 18 m). At hourly scale, the new model performed well at all sites studied. The observed slope of the linear relationships between estimated and measured ET values ranged between 0.93 and 1.03, with coefficients of determination, r 2, between 0.80 and 0.98. At daily scale, the slopes of the linear relationships between measured and estimated ET for the sites on plane and the sloped sites were practically the same (0.98 ± 0.01); however, the coefficient of determination r 2 observed in the site on plane was clearly greater (0.98) than that observed in the sloped sites (0.83). The presented analysis does not show any significant

  6. Hourly changes in sea surface salinity in coastal waters recorded by Geostationary Ocean Color Imager

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Rongjie; Zhang, Jie; Yao, Haiyan; Cui, Tingwei; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Lingjuan; An, Jubai

    2017-09-01

    In this study, we monitored hourly changes in sea surface salinity (SSS) in turbid coastal waters from geostationary satellite ocean color images for the first time, using the Bohai Sea as a case study. We developed a simple multi-linear statistical regression model to retrieve SSS data from Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI) based on an in situ satellite matched-up dataset (R2 = 0.795; N = 41; Range: 26.4 to 31.9 psμ). The model was then validated using independent continuous SSS measurements from buoys, with the average percentage difference of 0.65%. The model was applied to GOCI images from the dry season during an astronomical tide to characterize hourly changes in SSS in the Bohai Sea. We found that the model provided reasonable estimates of the hourly changes in SSS and that trends in the modeled and measured data were similar in magnitude and direction (0.43 vs 0.33 psμ, R2 = 0.51). There were clear diurnal variations in the SSS of the Bohai Sea, with a regional average of 0.455 ± 0.079 psμ (0.02-3.77 psμ). The magnitude of the diurnal variations in SSS varied spatially, with large diurnal variability in the nearshore, particularly in the estuary, and small variability in the offshore area. The model for the riverine area was based on the inverse correlation between SSS and CDOM absorption. In the offshore area, the water mass of the North Yellow Sea, characterized by high SSS and low CDOM concentrations, dominated. Analysis of the driving mechanisms showed that the tidal current was the main control on hourly changes in SSS in the Bohai Sea.

  7. Regression model-based predictions of diel, diurnal and nocturnal dissolved oxygen dynamics after wavelet denoising of noisy time series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evrendilek, F.; Karakaya, N.

    2014-06-01

    Continuous time-series measurements of diel dissolved oxygen (DO) through online sensors are vital to better understanding and management of metabolism of lake ecosystems, but are prone to noise. Discrete wavelet transforms (DWT) with the orthogonal Symmlet and the semiorthogonal Chui-Wang B-spline were compared in denoising diel, daytime and nighttime dynamics of DO, water temperature, pH, and chlorophyll-a. Predictive efficacies of multiple non-linear regression (MNLR) models of DO dynamics were evaluated with or without DWT denoising of either the response variable alone or all the response and explanatory variables. The combined use of the B-spline-based denoising of all the variables and the temporally partitioned data improved both the predictive power and the errors of the MNLR models better than the use of Symmlet DWT denoising of DO only or all the variables with or without the temporal partitioning.

  8. Boreal lakes moderate seasonal and diurnal temperature variation and perturb atmospheric circulation: analyses in the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William J. Riley

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We used a lake thermal physics model recently coupled into the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1 to study the effects of lake distribution in present and future climate. Under present climate, correcting the large underestimation of lake area in CESM1 (denoted CCSM4 in the configuration used here caused 1 °C spring decreases and fall increases in surface air temperature throughout large areas of Canada and the US. Simulated summer surface diurnal air temperature range decreased by up to 4 °C, reducing CCSM4 biases. These changes were much larger than those resulting from prescribed lake disappearance in some present-day permafrost regions under doubled-CO2 conditions. Correcting the underestimation of lake area in present climate caused widespread high-latitude summer cooling at 850 hPa. Significant remote changes included decreases in the strength of fall Southern Ocean westerlies. We found significantly different winter responses when separately analysing 45-yr subperiods, indicating that relatively long simulations are required to discern the impacts of surface changes on remote conditions. We also investigated the surface forcing of lakes using idealised aqua-planet experiments which showed that surface changes of 2 °C in the Northern Hemisphere extra-tropics could cause substantial changes in precipitation and winds in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere. Shifts in the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone were opposite in sign to those predicted by some previous studies. Zonal mean circulation changes were consistent in character but much larger than those occurring in the lake distribution experiments, due to the larger magnitude and more uniform surface forcing in the idealised aqua-planet experiments.

  9. Boreal lakes moderate seasonal and diurnal temperature variation and perturb atmospheric circulation: Analyses in the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subin, Zachary M. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Murphy, Lisa N. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Li, Fiyu [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.; Bonfils, Celine [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Program for Climate Model Diagnosis and Intercomparison; Riley, William J. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Earth Sciences Div.

    2012-01-15

    We used a lake thermal physics model recently coupled into the Community Earth System Model 1 (CESM1) to study the effects of lake distribution in present and future climate. Under present climate, correcting the large underestimation of lake area in CESM1 (denoted CCSM4 in the configuration used here) caused 1 °C spring decreases and fall increases in surface air temperature throughout large areas of Canada and the US. Simulated summer surface diurnal air temperature range decreased by up to 4 °C, reducing CCSM4 biases. These changes were much larger than those resulting from prescribed lake disappearance in some present-day permafrost regions under doubled-CO2 conditions. Correcting the underestimation of lake area in present climate caused widespread high-latitude summer cooling at 850 hPa. Significant remote changes included decreases in the strength of fall Southern Ocean westerlies. We found significantly different winter responses when separately analysing 45-yr subperiods, indicating that relatively long simulations are required to discern the impacts of surface changes on remote conditions. We also investigated the surface forcing of lakes using idealised aqua-planet experiments which showed that surface changes of 2 °C in the Northern Hemisphere extra-tropics could cause substantial changes in precipitation and winds in the tropics and Southern Hemisphere. Shifts in the Inter-Tropical Convergence Zone were opposite in sign to those predicted by some previous studies. Zonal mean circulation changes were consistent in character but much larger than those occurring in the lake distribution experiments, due to the larger magnitude and more uniform surface forcing in the idealised aqua-planet experiments.

  10. Evaporation from soils under diurnal boundary conditions: Experimental and modeling investigation to evaluate Non-equilibrium-based approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trautz, Andrew; Smits, Kathleen; Cihan, Abdullah; Illangasekare, Tissa

    2013-04-01

    Evaporation from bare soil is a key component of the hydrologic cycle and the process primarily responsible for governing water and energy exchanges between the land and atmosphere. Despite its importance, there is still a great deal of uncertainty associated with our current understanding of this complex multiphase phenomenon. A common approach when modeling the movement of liquid water, water vapor and heat in the soil immediately below the land-atmosphere interface is to assume that water vapor concentration in air is always in equilibrium with liquid water. However, this equilibrium assumption is called into question by experiments about liquid/gas phase change in porous media suggesting that the equilibrium establishment is not instantaneous; a volatilization or condensation time is observed at the macroscopic scale under certain conditions. Introduction of such a non-equilibrium mass transfer relationship is based on the Hertz-Knudsen equation (HKE) derived from the kinetic theory of gases. Multiple formulations have been presented to represent the rate of phase change between water and vapor, many relying on empirical fitting parameters due to limited experimental data. The purpose of this work is to perform an unbiased comparison between various conceptual and mathematical formulations for non-equilibrium phase change on evaporation and develop appropriate numerical models to be used in simulations. The key to such a comparison is the availability of accurate data. As such data at the scale of interest is not possible to obtain in field settings, a unique two-dimensional cell apparatus was developed. The test cell was equipped with a network of sensors for automated and continuous monitoring of soil moisture, soil and air temperature and relative humidity, and wind velocity to generate precision data. A fully-coupled numerical model to solve the governing equations for heat, liquid water and water vapor transport in soil was developed. The code implements a

  11. Estimation of Hourly Solar Radiation at the Surface under Cloudless Conditions on the Tibetan Plateau Using a Simple Radiation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIANG Hong; ZHANG Renhe; LIU Jingmiao; SUN Zhian; CHENG Xinghong

    2012-01-01

    In this study,the clear sky hourly global and net solar irradiances at the surface determined using SUNFLUX,a simple parameterization scheme,for three stations (Gaize,Naqu,and Lhasa) on the Tibetan Plateau were evaluated against observation data.Our modeled results agree well with observations.The correlation coefficients between modeled and observed values were >0.99 for all three stations.The relative error of modeled results,in average was < 7%,and the root-mean-square variance was < 27 W m-2.The solar irradiances in the radiation model were slightly overestimated compared with observation data;there were at least two likely causes.First,the radiative effects of aerosols were not included in the radiation model.Second,solar irradiances determined by thermopile pyranometers include a thermal offset error that causes solar radiation to be slightly underestimated.The solar radiation absorbed by the ozone and water vapor was estimated. The results show that monthly mean solar radiation absorbed by the ozone is < 2% of the global solar radiation (< 14 W m-2).Solar radiation absorbed by water vapor is stronger in summer than in winter.The maximum amount of monthly mean solar radiation absorbed by water vapor can be up to 13% of the global solar radiation (95W m-2).This indicates that water vapor measurements with high precision are very important for precise determination of solar radiation.

  12. An integrated evaluation of thirteen modelling solutions for the generation of hourly values of air relative humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bregaglio, Simone; Donatelli, Marcello; Confalonieri, Roberto; Acutis, Marco; Orlandini, Simone

    2010-11-01

    The availability of hourly air relative humidity (HARH) data is a key requirement for the estimation of epidemic dynamics of plant fungal pathogens, in particular for the simulation of both the germination of the spores and the infection process. Most of the existing epidemic forecasting models require these data as input directly or indirectly, in the latter case for the estimation of leaf wetness duration. In many cases, HARH must be generated because it is not available in historical series and when there is the need to simulate epidemics either on a wide scale or with different climate scenarios. Thirteen modelling solutions (MS) for the generation of this variable were evaluated, with different input requirements and alternative approaches, on a large dataset including several sites and years. A composite indicator was developed using fuzzy logic to compare and to evaluate the performances of the models. The indicator consists of four modules: Accuracy, Correlation, Pattern and Robustness. Results showed that when available, daily maximum and minimum air relative humidity data substantially improved the estimation of HARH. When such data are not available, the choice of the MS is crucial, given the difference in predicting skills obtained during the analysis, which allowed a clear detection of the best performing MS. This study represents the first step of the creation of a robust modelling chain coupling the MS for the generation of HARH and disease forecasting models, including the systematic validation of each step of the simulation.

  13. Diurnal Ensemble Surface Meteorology Statistics

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Excel file containing diurnal ensemble statistics of 2-m temperature, 2-m mixing ratio and 10-m wind speed. This Excel file contains figures for Figure 2 in the...

  14. Diurnal variation of mountain waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. M. Worthington

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Mountain waves could be modified as the boundary layer varies between stable and convective. However case studies show mountain waves day and night, and above e.g. convective rolls with precipitation lines over mountains. VHF radar measurements of vertical wind (1990–2006 confirm a seasonal variation of mountain-wave amplitude, yet there is little diurnal variation of amplitude. Mountain-wave azimuth shows possible diurnal variation compared to wind rotation across the boundary layer.

  15. Main diurnal cycle pattern of rainfall in East Java

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rais, Achmad Fahruddin; Yunita, Rezky

    2017-08-01

    The diurnal cycle pattern of rainfall was indicated as an intense feature in East Java. The research of diurnal cycle generally was only based on satellite estimation which had limitations in accuracy and temporal resolution. The hourly rainfall data of Climate Prediction Center Morphing Technique (CMORPH) and gauge were blended using the best correction method between transformation distribution (DT) and quantile mapping (QM) to increase the accuracy. We used spatiotemporal composite to analyse the concentration patterns of maximum rainfall and principal component analysis (PCA) to identify the spatial and temporal dominant patterns of diurnal rainfall. QM was corrected CMORPH data since it was best method. The eastern region of East Java had a rainfall peak at 14 local time (LT) and the western region had a rainfall peak at 16 LT.

  16. Evaluating the diurnal cycle in cloud top temperature from SEVIRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Taylor

    2017-06-01

    diurnal cycle of cloud tops accurately in regions of stratiform cloud such as the southeast Atlantic Ocean and Europe, where cloud top temperature retrieval biases are small and exhibit limited spatial and temporal variability. Quantifying the diurnal cycle over the tropics and regions of desert is more difficult, as retrieval biases are larger and display significant diurnal variability. CLAAS-2 cloud top temperature data are found to be of limited skill in measuring the diurnal cycle accurately over desert regions. In tropical regions such as central Africa, the diurnal cycle can be described by the CLAAS-2 data to some extent, although retrieval biases appear to reduce the amplitude of the real diurnal cycle of cloud top temperatures. This is the first study to relate the diurnal variations in SEVIRI retrieval bias to observed diurnal cycles in cloud top temperature. Our results may be of interest to those in the observation and modelling communities when using cloud top properties data from SEVIRI, particularly for studies considering the diurnal cycle of convection.

  17. Evaluating the diurnal cycle in cloud top temperature from SEVIRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Sarah; Stier, Philip; White, Bethan; Finkensieper, Stephan; Stengel, Martin

    2017-06-01

    accurately in regions of stratiform cloud such as the southeast Atlantic Ocean and Europe, where cloud top temperature retrieval biases are small and exhibit limited spatial and temporal variability. Quantifying the diurnal cycle over the tropics and regions of desert is more difficult, as retrieval biases are larger and display significant diurnal variability. CLAAS-2 cloud top temperature data are found to be of limited skill in measuring the diurnal cycle accurately over desert regions. In tropical regions such as central Africa, the diurnal cycle can be described by the CLAAS-2 data to some extent, although retrieval biases appear to reduce the amplitude of the real diurnal cycle of cloud top temperatures. This is the first study to relate the diurnal variations in SEVIRI retrieval bias to observed diurnal cycles in cloud top temperature. Our results may be of interest to those in the observation and modelling communities when using cloud top properties data from SEVIRI, particularly for studies considering the diurnal cycle of convection.

  18. Sensitive analysis of low-flow parameters using the hourly hydrological model for two mountainous basins in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujimura, Kazumasa; Iseri, Yoshihiko; Kanae, Shinjiro; Murakami, Masahiro

    2014-05-01

    Accurate estimation of low flow can contribute to better water resources management and also lead to more reliable evaluation of climate change impacts on water resources. In the early study, the nonlinearity of low flow related to the storage in the basin was suggested by Horton (1937) as the exponential function of Q=KSN, where Q is the discharge, S is the storage, K is a constant and N is the exponent value. In the recent study by Ding (2011) showed the general storage-discharge equation of Q = KNSN. Since the constant K is defined as the fractional recession constant and symbolized as Au by Ando et al. (1983), in this study, we rewrite this equation as Qg=AuNSgN, where Qg is the groundwater runoff and Sg is the groundwater storage. Although this equation was applied to a short-term runoff event of less than 14 hours using the unit hydrograph method by Ding, it was not yet applied for a long-term runoff event including low flow more than 10 years. This study performed a sensitive analysis of two parameters of the constant Au and exponent value N by using the hourly hydrological model for two mountainous basins in Japan. The hourly hydrological model used in this study was presented by Fujimura et al. (2012), which comprise the Diskin-Nazimov infiltration model, groundwater recharge and groundwater runoff calculations, and a direct runoff component. The study basins are the Sameura Dam basin (SAME basin) (472 km2) located in the western Japan which has variability of rainfall, and the Shirakawa Dam basin (SIRA basin) (205km2) located in a region of heavy snowfall in the eastern Japan, that are different conditions of climate and geology. The period of available hourly data for the SAME basin is 20 years from 1 January 1991 to 31 December 2010, and for the SIRA basin is 10 years from 1 October 2003 to 30 September 2013. In the sensitive analysis, we prepared 19900 sets of the two parameters of Au and N, the Au value ranges from 0.0001 to 0.0100 in steps of 0

  19. Thermal aspect of the diurnal variation of tropical convective and stratiform rainfall

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cui Xiao-Peng; Li Xiao-Fan

    2011-01-01

    The diurnal variation of radiation plays a key role in determining the diurnal variations of tropical oceanic convective and stratiform rainfall,and the examination of such a relationship requires a direct link between the radiation term in a heat budget and the surface rain rate in a cloud budget.Thus,the thermally related surface rainfall budgets derived from the combination of cloud and heat budgets are analysed with two-dimensional equilibrium cloud-resolving model simulation data to study the effects of sea surface temperature (SST) and cloud radiative,and microphysical processes on the diurnal variations of convective and stratiform rainfall.The results show that the increase in SST,the inclusion of diurnal variation of SST and the exclusion of cloud radiative processes increase negative diurnal anomalies of heat divergence over rainfall-free regions during the nighttime through changing the vertical structures of diurnal anomaly of radiation in the troposphere.The strengthened negative diurnal anomalies of heat divergence over rainfallfree regions enhance positive diurnal anomalies of heat divergence over convective regions,which intensifies the positive diurnal anomaly of convective rainfall.The exclusion of microphysical effects of ice clouds increases the negative diurnal anomaly of heat divergence over rainfall-free regions during the nighttime through reducing latent heat; this appears to enhance the positive diurnal anomaly of heat divergence over raining stratiform regions,and thus stratiform rainfall.

  20. Diurnal warming in shallow coastal seas: Observations from the Caribbean and Great Barrier Reef regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, X.; Minnett, P. J.; Berkelmans, R.; Hendee, J.; Manfrino, C.

    2014-07-01

    A good understanding of diurnal warming in the upper ocean is important for the validation of satellite-derived sea surface temperature (SST) against in-situ buoy data and for merging satellite SSTs taken at different times of the same day. For shallow coastal regions, better understanding of diurnal heating could also help improve monitoring and prediction of ecosystem health, such as coral reef bleaching. Compared to its open ocean counterpart which has been studied extensively and modeled with good success, coastal diurnal warming has complicating localized characteristics, including coastline geometry, bathymetry, water types, tidal and wave mixing. Our goal is to characterize coastal diurnal warming using two extensive in-situ temperature and weather datasets from the Caribbean and Great Barrier Reef (GBR), Australia. Results showed clear daily warming patterns in most stations from both datasets. For the three Caribbean stations where solar radiation is the main cause of daily warming, the mean diurnal warming amplitudes were about 0.4 K at depths of 4-7 m and 0.6-0.7 K at shallower depths of 1-2 m; the largest warming value was 2.1 K. For coral top temperatures of the GBR, 20% of days had warming amplitudes >1 K, with the largest >4 K. The bottom warming at shallower sites has higher daily maximum temperatures and lower daily minimum temperatures than deeper sites nearby. The averaged daily warming amplitudes were shown to be closely related to daily average wind speed and maximum insolation, as found in the open ocean. Diurnal heating also depends on local features including water depth, location on different sections of the reef (reef flat vs. reef slope), the relative distance from the barrier reef chain (coast vs. lagoon stations vs. inner barrier reef sites vs. outer rim sites); and the proximity to the tidal inlets. In addition, the influence of tides on daily temperature changes and its relative importance compared to solar radiation was quantified by

  1. Diurnal Variation of Precipitation During MC3E Campaign

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Wu, Di; Matsui, Toshi; Peters-Lidard, Christa; Hou, Arthur; Rienecker, Michele

    2012-01-01

    The diurnal variation of precipitation processes in the United States (US) is well recognized but incompletely understood (Cabone et al. 2002). The diurnal cycle of precipitation has been studied using surface rainfall data, radar reflectivity data, and satellite-derived cloudiness and precipitation (Wallace 1975; Dai et al. 1999; Carbone et al. 2002; Carbone and Tuttle, 2008; Parker and Ahijevych, 2007; Matsui et al. 2010 and others). These observations indicate that the summer-time precipitation most of the North America and typically feature late-afternoon precipitation maxima. These diurnal variation of precipitation can also be generally categorized into three different types: 1) afternoon rainfall maxima due to mesoscale and local circulations over the south and east of the Mississippi and Ohio valleys, 2) nocturnal rainfall maxima from eastward-propagating mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) over the Lee side of Rocky Mountain regions and 3) afternoon rainfall maxima in the Appalachian Mountains, and then propagate eastward toward the coast. The main objective of this paper is to use a regional cloud-scale model with very high-resolution (i.e., WRF) to examine the WRF ability to simulate diurnal variation of precipitation. Specifically, the study will (1) identify the physical processes responsible to diurnal variation of precipitation, (2) examine the sensitivity of resolution (2, 6, 18, and 30 km) to model simulated diurnal variation of precipitation and (3) identify the relationships between microphysics and cumulus parameterization schemes.

  2. Radiation balance at the surface in the city of São Paulo, Brazil: diurnal and seasonal variations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferreira, M.J.; Oliveira, de A.P.; Soares, J.; Codato, G.; Wilde Barbaro, E.; Escobedo, J.F.

    2012-01-01

    The main goal of this work is to describe the diurnal and seasonal variations of the radiation balance components at the surface in the city of São Paulo based on observations carried out during 2004. Monthly average hourly values indicate that the amplitudes of the diurnal cycles of net radiation (

  3. Annual Climatology of the Diurnal Cycle on the Canadian Prairies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan K Betts

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We show the annual climatology of the diurnal cycle, stratified by opaque cloud, using the full hourly resolution of the Canadian Prairie data. The opaque cloud field itself has distinct cold and warm season diurnal climatologies; with a near-sunrise peak of cloud in the cold season and an early afternoon peak in the warm season. There are two primary climate states on the Canadian Prairies, separated by the freezing point of water, because a reflective surface snow cover acts as a climate switch. Both cold and warm season climatologies can be seen in the transition months of November, March and April with a large difference in mean temperature. In the cold season with snow, the diurnal ranges of temperature and relative humidity increase quasi-linearly with decreasing cloud, and increase from December to March with increased solar forcing. The warm season months, April to September, show a homogeneous coupling to the cloud cover, and a diurnal cycle of temperature and humidity that depends only on net longwave. Our improved representation of the diurnal cycle shows that the warm season coupling between diurnal temperature range and net longwave is weakly quadratic through the origin, rather than the linear coupling shown in earlier papers. We calculate the conceptually important 24-h imbalances of temperature and relative humidity (and other thermodynamic variables as a function of opaque cloud cover. In the warm season under nearly clear skies, there is a warming of +2oC and a drying of -6% over the 24-h cycle, which is about 12% of their diurnal ranges. We summarize results on conserved variable diagrams and explore the impact of surface windspeed on the diurnal cycle in the cold and warm seasons. In all months, the fall in minimum temperature is reduced with increasing windspeed, which reduces the diurnal temperature range. In July and August, there is an increase of afternoon maximum temperature and humidity at low windspeeds, and a

  4. Diurnal variations of summer precipitation in Beijing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Jian; YU RuCong; WANG JianJie

    2008-01-01

    Climatic characteristics and secular trends of diurnal variations of summer precipitation in Beijing are studied using hourly self-recording rain-gauge data during 1961-2004. The results show that both rainfall amount and rainfall frequency present high values from late afternoon to early morning and reach the minima around noon. Two separate peaks can be identified in the high value period, one in the late afternoon and the other in the early morning. Taking the rainfall duration into account, it is found that the rainfall during late afternoon to midnight mainly comes from the short-duration rainfall events (an event of 1-6 hours in duration), while the rainfall during midnight to early morning is ac-cumulated mostly by the long-duration rainfall events (an event that lasts longer than 6 hours). In the recent 40 years, the summer precipitation in Beijing has been considerably restructured. The total rainfall amount of short-duration events has increased significantly, while the total rainfall amount of long-duration events has decreased.

  5. Diurnal cycle of convection during the CAIPEEX 2011 experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Resmi, EA; Malap, Neelam; Kulkarni, Gayatri; Murugavel, P.; Nair, Sathy; Burger, Roelof; Prabha, Thara V.

    2016-10-01

    The diurnal cycle of convective storm events is investigated in the study with the help of C-band radar reflectivity data during the Cloud Aerosol Interaction and Precipitation Enhancement Experiment (CAIPEEX 2011) in combination with other ground-based observations. A threshold reflectivity of 25 dBZ is used to identify the initiation of storms. Observations from collocated sensors such as a microwave radiometer profiler, water vapor measurement from eddy covariance system, and wind lidar measurements are used to investigate the characteristic features and diurnal cycle of convectively initiated storms from 21st September to 5th November 2011. The maximum reflectivity follows a normal distribution with a mean value of 40 dBZ. The cloud depth over the domain varied between 5 and 15 km corresponding to a range of reflectivity of 30-50 dBZ values. In the diurnal cycle, double maximum in the precipitation flux is noted—one during the afternoon hours associated with the diurnal heating and the other in the nocturnal periods. The nocturnal precipitation maximum is attributed to initiation of several single-cell storms (of congestus type) with a duration that is larger than the storms initiated during the daytime. The convective available potential energy (CAPE) showed a diurnal variation and was directly linked with the surface level water vapor content. The high CAPE favored single storms with a reflectivity >40 dBZ and higher echo top heights. In the evening or late night hours, a nocturnal low-level jet present over the location together with the reduced stability above the cloud base favored enhancement of low-level moisture, CAPE, and further initiation of new convection. The study illustrated how collocated observations could be used to study storm initiation and associated thermodynamic features.

  6. Estimating the Diurnal Cycle and Daily Insolation of Ultraviolet and Photosynthetically Active Radiation at the Sea Surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwahara, Victor S; Taguchi, Satoru

    2015-01-01

    Accurate determination of the diurnal variability and daily insolation of surface (0(+) ) and subsurface (0(-) ) irradiance are essential to estimate several physical, chemical and biological processes occurring at the surface layer of marine environments. Natural downwelling PAR and spectral UVR were examined on eight occasions at 0(+) and 0(-) to refine empirical models, particularly in the UVR spectrum. The diurnal variability in UVR and PAR were wavelength dependent and were modeled by a sinusoidal equation. The best fit for PAR at 0(+) and 0(-) was the sinusoid power of n = 2 and n = 2.5, respectively. In the UVR spectrum, sinusoids increased as wavelengths decreased ranging from n = 2-5. Higher n values in the UV-B spectrum suggest sharper increase/decrease near sunrise and sunset hours, ultimately reducing the final value of daily insolation at specified wavelengths. Calculated daily insolation of UV-B/(UV-A + PAR) ratio suggests that photoinhibition from exposure to UV-B occurs within a shorter biologically effective day length than PAR, and is high during summer and low during winter. These results suggest that biogeochemical calculations based on diurnal models of irradiance measurements would benefit from accurate solar noon references and wavelength specificity, particularly in the UVR spectrum. © 2015 The American Society of Photobiology.

  7. Multiplicative models of analysis : a description and the use in analysing accident ratios as a function of hourly traffic volume and road-surface skidding resistance.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oppe, S.

    1977-01-01

    Accident ratios are analysed with regard to the variables road surface skidding resistance and hourly traffic volume. It is concluded that the multiplicative model describes the data better than the additive model. Moreover that there is no interaction between skidding resistance and traffic volume

  8. On the diurnal ranges of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) in the north Indian Ocean

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    S S C Shenoi; N Nasnodkar; G Rajesh; K Jossia Joseph; I Suresh; A M Almeida

    2009-10-01

    This paper describes the variability in the diurnal range of SST in the north Indian Ocean using in situ measurements and tests the suitability of simple regression models in estimating the diurnal range.SST measurements obtained from 1556 drifting and 25 moored buoys were used to determine the diurnal range of SSTs.The magnitude of diurnal range of SST was highest in spring and lowest in summer monsoon.Except in spring,nearly 75 –80%of the observations reported diurnal range below 0.5°C.The distributions of the magnitudes of diurnal warming across the three basins of north Indian Ocean (Arabian Sea,Bay of Bengal and Equatorial Indian Ocean)were similar except for the differences between the Arabian Sea and the other two basins during November-February (winter monsoon)and May.The magnitude of diurnal warming that depended on the location of temperature sensor below the water level varied with seasons.In spring,the magnitude of diurnal warming diminished drastically with the increase in the depth of temperature sensor.The diurnal range estimated using the drifting buoy data was higher than the diurnal range estimated using moored buoys fitted with temperature sensors at greater depths. A simple regression model based on the peak solar radiation and average wind speed was good enough to estimate the diurnal range of SST at ∼1.0 m in the north Indian Ocean during most of the seasons except under low wind-high solar radiation conditions that occur mostly during spring. The additional information on the rate of precipitation is found to be redundant for the estimation of the magnitude of diurnal warming at those depths.

  9. Diurnal distribution of sunshine probability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aydinli, S.

    1982-01-01

    The diurnal distribution of the sunshine probability is essential for the predetermination of average irradiances and illuminances by solar radiation on sloping surfaces. The most meteorological stations have only monthly average values of the sunshine duration available. It is, therefore, necessary to compute the diurnal distribution of sunshine probability starting from the average monthly values. It is shown how the symmetric component of the distribution of the sunshine probability which is a consequence of a ''sidescene effect'' of the clouds can be calculated. The asymmetric components of the sunshine probability depending on the location and the seasons and their influence on the predetermination of the global radiation are investigated and discussed.

  10. Impact of resolving the diurnal cycle in an ocean-atmosphere GCM. Pt. 2. A diurnally coupled CGCM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernie, D.J. [Met Office Hadley Centre, Exeter (United Kingdom); University of Reading, National Centre for Atmospheric Science-Climate, Department of Meteorology, Reading (United Kingdom); Numeriques, IPSL, Laboratoire d' Oceanographie et du Climat, Experimentation et Approches, Paris (France); Guilyardi, E. [University of Reading, National Centre for Atmospheric Science-Climate, Department of Meteorology, Reading (United Kingdom); Numeriques, IPSL, Laboratoire d' Oceanographie et du Climat, Experimentation et Approches, Paris (France); Madec, G. [Numeriques, IPSL, Laboratoire d' Oceanographie et du Climat, Experimentation et Approches, Paris (France); Slingo, J.M.; Woolnough, S.J.; Cole, J. [University of Reading, National Centre for Atmospheric Science-Climate, Department of Meteorology, Reading (United Kingdom)

    2008-12-15

    Coupled ocean atmosphere general circulation models (GCM) are typically coupled once every 24 h, excluding the diurnal cycle from the upper ocean. Previous studies attempting to examine the role of the diurnal cycle of the upper ocean and particularly of diurnal SST variability have used models unable to resolve the processes of interest. In part 1 of this study a high vertical resolution ocean GCM configuration with modified physics was developed that could resolve the diurnal cycle in the upper ocean. In this study it is coupled every 3 h to atmospheric GCM to examine the sensitivity of the mean climate simulation and aspects of its variability to the inclusion of diurnal ocean-atmosphere coupling. The inclusion of the diurnal cycle leads to a tropics wide increase in mean sea surface temperature (SST), with the strongest signal being across the equatorial Pacific where the warming increases from 0.2 C in the central and western Pacific to over 0.3 C in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Much of this warming is shown to be a direct consequence of the rectification of daily mean SST by the diurnal variability of SST. The warming of the equatorial Pacific leads to a redistribution of precipitation from the Inter tropical convergence zone (ITCZ) toward the equator. In the western Pacific there is an increase in precipitation between Papa new guinea and 170 E of up to 1.2 mm/day, improving the simulation compared to climatology. Pacific sub tropical cells are increased in strength by about 10%, in line with results of part 1 of this study, due to the modification of the exchange of momentum between the equatorially divergent Ekman currents and the geostropic convergence at depth, effectively increasing the dynamical response of the tropical Pacific to zonal wind stresses. During the spring relaxation of the Pacific trade winds, a large diurnal cycle of SST increases the seasonal warming of the equatorial Pacific. When the trade winds then re-intensify, the increase in

  11. Application of numerical weather prediction in wind power forecasting: Assessment of the diurnal cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias Heppelmann

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available For a secure integration of weather dependent renewable energies in Germany's mixed power supply, precise forecasts of expected wind power are indispensable. These in turn are heavily dependent on numerical weather prediction (NWP. With this relevant area of application, NWP models need to be evaluated concerning new variables such as wind speed at hub heights of wind power plants. This article presents verification results of the deterministic NWP forecasts of the global ICON model, its ICON-EU nest, the COSMO-EU, and the COSMO-DE as well as of the ensemble prediction system COSMO-DE-EPS of the German National Weather Service (DWD, against wind mast observations. The focus is on the diurnal cycle in the Planetary Boundary Layer as wind power forecasts for Germany exhibit pronounced systematic amplitude and phase errors in the morning and evening hours. NWP forecasts with lead times up to 48 hours are examined. All considered NWP models reveal shortcomings concerning the representation of the diurnal cycle. Especially in summertime at onshore locations, when Low-Level Jets form, nocturnal wind speeds at hub height are underestimated. In the COSMO model, stable conditions are not sufficiently reflected in the first part of the night and the vertical mixing after sunrise establishes too late. The verification results of the COSMO-DE-EPS confirm the deficiencies of the deterministic forecasts. The deficiencies are present in all ensemble members and thus indicate potential for improvement not only in the model physics parameterization but also concerning the physical ensemble perturbations.

  12. Surface Weather Observations Hourly

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Standard hourly observations taken at Weather Bureau/National Weather Service offices and airports throughout the United States. Hourly observations began during the...

  13. Comparison of hourly surface downwelling solar radiation estimated from MSG-SEVIRI and forecast by the RAMS model with pyranometers over Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Federico, Stefano; Torcasio, Rosa Claudia; Sanò, Paolo; Casella, Daniele; Campanelli, Monica; Fokke Meirink, Jan; Wang, Ping; Vergari, Stefania; Diémoz, Henri; Dietrich, Stefano

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, we evaluate the performance of two global horizontal solar irradiance (GHI) estimates, one derived from Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) and another from the 1-day forecast of the Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) mesoscale model. The horizontal resolution of the MSG-GHI is 3 × 5 km2 over Italy, which is the focus area of this study. For this paper, RAMS has the horizontal resolution of 4 km.The performances of the MSG-GHI estimate and RAMS-GHI 1-day forecast are evaluated for 1 year (1 June 2013-31 May 2014) against data of 12 ground-based pyranometers over Italy spanning a range of climatic conditions, i.e. from maritime Mediterranean to Alpine climate.Statistics for hourly GHI and daily integrated GHI are presented for the four seasons and the whole year for all the measurement sites. Different sky conditions are considered in the analysisResults for hourly data show an evident dependence on the sky conditions, with the root mean square error (RMSE) increasing from clear to cloudy conditions. The RMSE is substantially higher for Alpine stations in all the seasons, mainly because of the increase of the cloud coverage for these stations, which is not well represented at the satellite and model resolutions. Considering the yearly statistics computed from hourly data for the RAMS model, the RMSE ranges from 152 W m-2 (31 %) obtained for Cozzo Spadaro, a maritime station, to 287 W m-2 (82 %) for Aosta, an Alpine site. Considering the yearly statistics computed from hourly data for MSG-GHI, the minimum RMSE is for Cozzo Spadaro (71 W m-2, 14 %), while the maximum is for Aosta (181 W m-2, 51 %). The mean bias error (MBE) shows the tendency of RAMS to over-forecast the GHI, while no specific behaviour is found for MSG-GHI.Results for daily integrated GHI show a lower RMSE compared to hourly GHI evaluation for both RAMS-GHI 1-day forecast and MSG-GHI estimate. Considering the yearly evaluation, the RMSE of daily integrated GHI is at least 9

  14. Diurnal tides in the Arctic Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalik, Z.; Proshutinsky, A. Y.

    1993-01-01

    A 2D numerical model with a space grid of about 14 km is applied to calculate diurnal tidal constituents K(1) and O(1) in the Arctic Ocean. Calculated corange and cotidal charts show that along the continental slope, local regions of increased sea level amplitude, highly variable phase and enhanced currents occur. It is shown that in these local regions, shelf waves (topographic waves) of tidal origin are generated. In the Arctic Ocean and Northern Atlantic Ocean more than 30 regions of enhanced currents are identified. To prove the near-resonant interaction of the diurnal tides with the local bottom topography, the natural periods of oscillations for all regions have been calculated. The flux of energy averaged over the tidal period depicts the gyres of semitrapped energy, suggesting that the shelf waves are partially trapped over the irregularities of the bottom topography. It is shown that the occurrence of near-resonance phenomenon changes the energy flow in the tidal waves. First, the flux of energy from the astronomical sources is amplified in the shelf wave regions, and afterwards the tidal energy is strongly dissipated in the same regions.

  15. Diurnal variations in water vapor over Central and South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Amalia; Mendoza, Luciano; Bianchi, Clara

    2016-07-01

    Diurnal variations in atmospheric integrated water vapor (IWV) are studied employing IWV estimates, with a 30 minutes sampling rate, derived from Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) observations during the period 2007-2013. The analysis was performed in 73 GNSS tracking sites (GPS + GLONASS) which have more than 5 years of data. The selected area involves different climate types, from polar to tropical, with different diurnal variations of the integrated total humidity content. There are many processes that could induce diurnal variations in atmospheric water vapor (Dai et al, 1999 a,b), the most relevant causes are: surface evapotranspiration, atmospheric large-scale vertical motion, atmospheric low-level moisture convergence and precipitation and vertical mixing (which affects the vertical distribution of water vapor but does not affect the IWV). The numerical tools, Singular Value Decomposition and classical Multidimensional Scaling methods, are used to study these variations, considering the measurements made at each stations, as sample in the analysis. The aim of this investigation is to identify the IWV variability with respect to the local time associated to the different climate regions. In order to improve our analysis, all available weather information, such as radiosondes measurements (which are few), measurements of pressure and temperature and Numerical Weather Models reanalysis data, are used. Reference: Dai, A., K. E. Trenberth, and T. R. Karl, 1999 a: Effects of clouds, soil moisture, precipitation and water vapor on diurnal temperature range. J. Climate, 12, 2451-2473. Dai, A., F. Giorgi, and K. E. Trenberth, 1999 b: Observed and model simulated precipitation diurnal cycle over the contiguous United States.J. Geophys. Res., 104, 6377-6402. KEYWORDS: water vapor, diurnal cycle, GNSS

  16. Diurnality, nocturnality, and the evolution of primate visual systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ankel-Simons, F; Rasmussen, D T

    2008-01-01

    Much of the recent research on the evolution of primate visual systems has assumed that a minimum number of shifts have occurred in circadian activity patterns over the course of primate evolution. The evolutionary origins of key higher taxonomic groups have been interpreted by some researchers as a consequence of a rare shift from nocturnality to diurnality (e.g., Anthropoidea) or from diurnality to nocturnality (e.g., Tarsiidae). Interpreting the evolution of primate visual systems with an ecological approach without parsimony constraints suggests that the evolutionary transitions in activity pattern are more common than what would be allowed by parsimony models, and that such transitions are probably less important in the origin of higher level taxa. The analysis of 17 communities of primates distributed widely around the world and through geological time shows that primate communities consistently contain both nocturnal and diurnal forms, regardless of the taxonomic sources of the communities. This suggests that primates in a community will adapt their circadian pattern to fill empty diurnal or nocturnal niches. Several evolutionary transitions from one pattern to the other within narrow taxonomic groups are solidly documented, and these cases probably represent a small fraction of such transitions throughout the Cenozoic. One or more switches have been documented among platyrrhine monkeys, Malagasy prosimians, Eocene omomyids, Eocene adapoids, and early African anthropoids, with inconclusive but suggestive data within tarsiids. The interpretation of living and extinct primates as fitting into one of two diarhythmic categories is itself problematic, because many extant primates show significant behavioral activity both nocturnally and diurnally. Parsimony models routinely interpret ancestral primates to have been nocturnal, but analyses of morphological and genetic data indicate that they may have been diurnal, or that early primate radiations were likely to

  17. A Mathematical Model of Hourly Solar Radiation in Varying Weather Conditions for a Dynamic Simulation of the Solar Organic Rankine Cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taehong Sung

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model of hourly solar radiation with weather variability is proposed based on the simple sky model. The model uses a superposition of trigonometric functions with short and long periods. We investigate the effects of the model variables on the clearness (kD and the probability of persistence (POPD indices and also evaluate the proposed model for all of the kD-POPD weather classes. A simple solar organic Rankine cycle (SORC system with thermal storage is simulated using the actual weather conditions, and then, the results are compared with the simulation results using the proposed model and the simple sky model. The simulation results show that the proposed model provides more accurate system operation characteristics than the simple sky model.

  18. Diurnal Variation of Rainfall Associated with Tropical Depression in South China and its Relationship to Land-Sea Contrast and Topography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuchun Zhao

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Convective precipitation associated with tropical depression (TD is one primary type of post-flooding season rainfall in South China (SC. Observations of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM satellite have shown specific diurnal features of convective rainfall in South China, which is somewhat different from that in other seasons or regions of China. Convective precipitation is usually organized into a rainfall band along the southeastern coast of South China in the early morning hours. The rainfall band develops and intensifies quickly in the morning, then moves inland in the afternoon and, finally, diminishes at night. The daily convective rainfall along the coast is much more than that in the inland region, and heavy rainfall is often found along the coast. A long-duration heavy rainfall event associated with tropical depression “Fitow” during the period from 28 August to 6 September 2001, is selected in this study to explore the diurnal feature of convective rainfall and its formation mechanism. Modeling results of the 10-day heavy rainfall event are compared with both rain-gauge observation and satellite-retrieved rainfall. Total precipitation and its spatial distribution, as well as diurnal variations are reasonably simulated and agree well with observations. Further analysis reveals that the development and movement of convective precipitation is mainly related to the land and sea breezes. The anomalous height-latitudinal circulation in the morning-to-noon hours is completely reversed in the afternoon-to-late-evening hours, with the convective rainfall swinging back and forth, following its updraft branch. Sensitivity experiments show that the afternoon convective rainfall in the inland region of SC is caused by the diurnal variation of solar radiation forcing. The mountain range along the coast and the complex topography in the inland region of SC plays a critical role in the enhancement of diurnal convective rainfall

  19. Genome-wide RNA polymerase II profiles and RNA accumulation reveal kinetics of transcription and associated epigenetic changes during diurnal cycles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwendal Le Martelot

    Full Text Available Interactions of cell-autonomous circadian oscillators with diurnal cycles govern the temporal compartmentalization of cell physiology in mammals. To understand the transcriptional and epigenetic basis of diurnal rhythms in mouse liver genome-wide, we generated temporal DNA occupancy profiles by RNA polymerase II (Pol II as well as profiles of the histone modifications H3K4me3 and H3K36me3. We used these data to quantify the relationships of phases and amplitudes between different marks. We found that rhythmic Pol II recruitment at promoters rather than rhythmic transition from paused to productive elongation underlies diurnal gene transcription, a conclusion further supported by modeling. Moreover, Pol II occupancy preceded mRNA accumulation by 3 hours, consistent with mRNA half-lives. Both methylation marks showed that the epigenetic landscape is highly dynamic and globally remodeled during the 24-hour cycle. While promoters of transcribed genes had tri-methylated H3K4 even at their trough activity times, tri-methylation levels reached their peak, on average, 1 hour after Pol II. Meanwhile, rhythms in tri-methylation of H3K36 lagged transcription by 3 hours. Finally, modeling profiles of Pol II occupancy and mRNA accumulation identified three classes of genes: one showing rhythmicity both in transcriptional and mRNA accumulation, a second class with rhythmic transcription but flat mRNA levels, and a third with constant transcription but rhythmic mRNAs. The latter class emphasizes widespread temporally gated posttranscriptional regulation in the mouse liver.

  20. Diurnal variation of zooplankton in Bhoj Wetland, Bhopal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Najeeb Ahmad Bhat

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal dynamics of the vertical distribution of zooplankton was studied in Bhoj Wetland, Bhopal. Vertical distribution of the zooplankton community in general showed a clear diurnal variation in the water column of a typical stratified lake. Zooplankton concentration was found to be high at the surface layer during night hours with peak abundance around the middle of the night and another peak was observed just before sunrise, followed by a rapid nadir after sunrise. Zooplankton can offset the loss of daytime foraging opportunity by moving up into the water column to graze at night, when predation by visual predators is greatly reduced and it can be also attributed to light intensity which is responsible for vertical migration during the twenty four hour cycles. Among different classes, cladocerans and the copepod showed nocturnal migration conversely rotifers, had a relatively uniform distribution throughout the water column Out of the twenty three species, Bosmina species and Cyclops species ascended at night and descended during day hours, however, Keratella cochlearis showed uniformity in distribution throughout the water column during the study.

  1. MF radar observations of the diurnal tide over Syowa, Antarctica (69° S, 40° E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Tomikawa

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Characteristics of the diurnal tide in the Antarctic mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT are investigated using 10 years of medium frequency (MF radar data from Syowa Station (69° S, 39.6° E. Seasonal variations and height dependence of the diurnal amplitude and phase of zonal and meridional winds are mostly consistent with previous studies using the other Antarctic station data. The meridional momentum flux due to the diurnal tide shows a seasonal variation clearly different between above and below 90 km, which has never been reported in the literature. Finally, a cause of some discrepancy in the characteristics of the diurnal tide between the observation and simulation (i.e., GSWM-02 is discussed. It implies that the realistic representation of gravity waves in the simulation is crucial for realistic modeling of the diurnal tide.

  2. Modeling hourly dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) using two different adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS): a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddam, Salim

    2014-01-01

    This article presents a comparison of two adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems (ANFIS)-based neuro-fuzzy models applied for modeling dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration. The two models are developed using experimental data collected from the bottom (USGS station no: 420615121533601) and top (USGS station no: 420615121533600) stations at Klamath River at site KRS12a nr Rock Quarry, Oregon, USA. The input variables used for the ANFIS models are water pH, temperature, specific conductance, and sensor depth. Two ANFIS-based neuro-fuzzy systems are presented. The two neuro-fuzzy systems are: (1) grid partition-based fuzzy inference system, named ANFIS_GRID, and (2) subtractive-clustering-based fuzzy inference system, named ANFIS_SUB. In both models, 60 % of the data set was randomly assigned to the training set, 20 % to the validation set, and 20 % to the test set. The ANFIS results are compared with multiple linear regression models. The system proposed in this paper shows a novelty approach with regard to the usage of ANFIS models for DO concentration modeling.

  3. Twenty-four hour predictions of the solar wind speed peaks by the probability distribution function model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bussy-Virat, C. D.; Ridley, A. J.

    2016-10-01

    Abrupt transitions from slow to fast solar wind represent a concern for the space weather forecasting community. They may cause geomagnetic storms that can eventually affect systems in orbit and on the ground. Therefore, the probability distribution function (PDF) model was improved to predict enhancements in the solar wind speed. New probability distribution functions allow for the prediction of the peak amplitude and the time to the peak while providing an interval of uncertainty on the prediction. It was found that 60% of the positive predictions were correct, while 91% of the negative predictions were correct, and 20% to 33% of the peaks in the speed were found by the model. This represents a considerable improvement upon the first version of the PDF model. A direct comparison with the Wang-Sheeley-Arge model shows that the PDF model is quite similar, except that it leads to fewer false positive predictions and misses fewer events, especially when the peak reaches very high speeds.

  4. On Tidal Inference in the Diurnal Band

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, R. D.

    2017-01-01

    Standard methods of tidal inference should be revised to account for a known resonance that occurs mostly within the K(sub 1) tidal group in the diurnal band. The resonance arises from a free rotational mode of Earth caused by the fluid core. In a set of 110 bottom-pressure tide stations, the amplitude of the P(sub 1) tidal constituent is shown to be suppressed relative to K(sub 1), which is in good agreement with the resonance theory. Standard formulas for the K(sub 1) nodal modulation remain essentially unaffected. Two examples are given of applications of the refined inference methodology: one with monthly tide gauge data and one with satellite altimetry. For some altimeter-constrained tide models, an inferred P(sub 1) constituent is found to be more accurate than a directly determined one.

  5. Diurnal rhythm of melatonin binding in the rat suprachiasmatic nucleus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laitinen, J.T.; Castren, E.; Vakkuri, O.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1989-03-01

    We used quantitative in vitro autoradiography to localize and characterize 2-/sup 125/I-melatonin binding sites in the rat suprachiasmatic nuclei in relation to pineal melatonin production. In a light:dark cycle of 12:12 h, binding density exhibited significant diurnal variation with a peak at the dark-light transition and a trough 12 hours later. Saturation studies suggested that the decreased binding at light-dark transition might be due to a shift of the putative melatonin receptor to a low affinity state.

  6. Comparison of Hourly Solar Radiation from a Ground–Based Station, Remote Sensing and Weather Forecast Models at a Coastal Site of South Italy (Lamezia Terme)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feudo, Teresa Lo; Avolio, Elenio; Gullì, Daniel;

    2015-01-01

    The solar radiation is a critical input parameter when working with solar energy and radiation dependent surface processes. In this study, we present preliminary results from an inter-comparison between hourly values from a pyranometer, MSG-SEVIRI sensor and two meso-scale models, WRF and RAMS......, in clear and cloudy sky conditions. Cloudy sky condition is the most important because the attenuation of solar radiation in the atmosphere is strongly dependent on the cloud variability. Bias and RMSE errors are evaluated at a coastal site in the Mediterranean area. These statistics show the tendency...... of both models to overestimate short-wave radiation....

  7. Diurnal internal tides detected in the Adriatic

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihanovic, H. [Hydrographic Inst. of the Republic of Croatia, Split (Croatia); Orlic, M.; Pasaric, Z. [Andrija Mohorovicic Geophysical Inst., Univ. of Zagreb (Croatia)

    2006-07-01

    Strong diurnal oscillations, documented by temperature data that were collected along a submarine cliff on the Lastovo Island (southern Adriatic), are studied and compared with sea level and wind measurements at Dubrovnik and Komiza (island of Vis). Three thermistors were deployed at the depths of 15, 22 and 36 m between March 2001 and March 2002. Pronounced diurnal temperature oscillations were detected at 15 and 22 m during the stratified season. The correlation between the sea surface and thermocline displacements was highest in June 2001, when diurnal wind changes were not significant, while diurnal sea level oscillations achieved annual maxima. Thermocline oscillations were in phase with sea level changes. The range of diurnal sea surface variability was close to 19 cm, while the range of corresponding thermocline variability was about 5.4 m. The findings summarize the outcome of the first dedicated study of internal tides in the Adriatic. (orig.)

  8. Seasonal Variation of Diurnal Cycle of Rainfall in the Eastern Equatorial Indian Ocean

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    RameshKumar, M.R.; Pednekar, S.; Katsumata, M.; Antony, M.K.; Kuroda, Y.; Unnikrishnan, A.S.

    The diurnal cycle of rainfall over the eastern equatorial Indian Ocean is studied for the period 23rd October 2001 to 31st October 2003 using the hourly data from the Triton buoy positioned at 1.5°S and 90°E. An analysis of the active and weak...

  9. Illustrating the benefit of using hourly monitoring data on secondary inorganic aerosol and its precursors for model evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, M.; Otjes, R.P.; Weijers, E.P.

    2010-01-01

    Secondary inorganic aerosol, most notably ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulphate, is an important contributor to ambient particulate mass and provides a means for long range transport of acidifying components. The modelling of the formation and fate of these components is challenging. Especially, th

  10. Illustrating the benefit of using hourly monitoring data on secondary inorganic aerosol and its precursors for model evaluation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaap, M.; Otjes, R.P.; Weijers, E.P.

    2011-01-01

    Secondary inorganic aerosol, most notably ammonium nitrate and ammonium sulphate, is an important contributor to ambient particulate mass and provides a means for long range transport of acidifying components. The modelling of the formation and fate of these components is challenging. Especially, th

  11. Diurnal variation in exercise responses in angina pectoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, M; Pollard, C M; Nunan, T O

    1982-01-01

    Thirty caucasian male patients with stable angina were investigated in two groups of nine and one group of 12. Nine normal subjects were also studied. Patients in the first group (on no treatment) underwent symptom-limited exercise electrocardiography at 0800, 1200, and 1600 hours on the same day. Their heart rates and ST segment displacements at 1600 hours were significantly greater than at 0800 hours and the same phenomenon was seen in the second group who had been receiving propranolol 40 mg four times a day. A similar effect was noted for ST segment displacement but not for heart rate in the third group (on no treatment) tested at 0800 hours and 1600 hours on separate days, two to three weeks apart. Normal control subjects showed no diurnal variation in heart rate and their heart rate responses at 1600 hours were reduced by propranolol. The observations show a circadian variation in the ST segment response to exercise in patients with angina and a possible training effect on heart rate with multiple exercise testing on the same day. This variation is associated with a reduction in vagal parasympathetic tone to the heart and should be taken into account in the assessment of patients with angina and in particular when comparing responses to treatment. PMID:7201319

  12. Upgrade of an artificial neural network prediction method for electrical consumption forecasting using an hourly temperature curve model

    OpenAIRE

    Roldán Blay, Carlos; Escrivá-Escrivá, Guillermo; Álvarez Bel, Carlos María; Roldán Porta, Carlos; Rodriguez-Garcia, Javier

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the upgrading of a method for predicting short-term building energy consumption that was previously developed by the authors (EUs method). The upgrade uses a time temperature curve (TTC) forecast model. The EUs method involves the use of artificial neural networks (ANNs) for predicting each independent process end-uses (EUs). End-uses consume energy with a specific behaviour in function of certain external variables. The EUs method obtains the total consumption by the ad...

  13. Diurnal patterns of soluble amyloid precursor protein metabolites in the human central nervous system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justyna A Dobrowolska

    Full Text Available The amyloid-β (Aβ protein is diurnally regulated in both the cerebrospinal fluid and blood in healthy adults; circadian amplitudes decrease with aging and the presence of cerebral Aβ deposits. The cause of the Aβ diurnal pattern is poorly understood. One hypothesis is that the Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP is diurnally regulated, leading to APP product diurnal patterns. APP in the central nervous system is processed either via the β-pathway (amyloidogenic, generating soluble APP-β (sAPPβ and Aβ, or the α-pathway (non-amyloidogenic, releasing soluble APP-α (sAPPα. To elucidate the potential contributions of APP to the Aβ diurnal pattern and the balance of the α- and β- pathways in APP processing, we measured APP proteolytic products over 36 hours in human cerebrospinal fluid from cognitively normal and Alzheimer's disease participants. We found diurnal patterns in sAPPα, sAPPβ, Aβ40, and Aβ42, which diminish with increased age, that support the hypothesis that APP is diurnally regulated in the human central nervous system and thus results in Aβ diurnal patterns. We also found that the four APP metabolites were positively correlated in all participants without cerebral Aβ deposits. This positive correlation suggests that the α- and β- APP pathways are non-competitive under normal physiologic conditions where APP availability may be the limiting factor that determines sAPPα and sAPPβ production. However, in participants with cerebral Aβ deposits, there was no correlation of Aβ to sAPP metabolites, suggesting that normal physiologic regulation of cerebrospinal fluid Aβ is impaired in the presence of amyloidosis. Lastly, we found that the ratio of sAPPβ to sAPPα was significantly higher in participants with cerebral Aβ deposits versus those without deposits. Therefore, the sAPPβ to sAPPα ratio may be a useful biomarker for cerebral amyloidosis.

  14. Diurnal variations in water vapor over Central and South America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meza, Amalia; Mendoza, Luciano; Clara, Bianchi

    2017-04-01

    , 1999 a: Effects of clouds, soil moisture, precipitation and water vapor on diurnal temperature range. J. Climate, 12, 2451-2473. Dai, A., F. Giorgi, and K. E. Trenberth, 1999 b: Observed and model simulated precipitation diurnal cycle over the contiguous United States.J. Geophys. Res., 104, 6377-6402.

  15. Cellular trade-offs and optimal resource allocation during cyanobacterial diurnal growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimers, Alexandra-M; Knoop, Henning; Bockmayr, Alexander; Steuer, Ralf

    2017-07-18

    Cyanobacteria are an integral part of Earth's biogeochemical cycles and a promising resource for the synthesis of renewable bioproducts from atmospheric CO2 Growth and metabolism of cyanobacteria are inherently tied to the diurnal rhythm of light availability. As yet, however, insight into the stoichiometric and energetic constraints of cyanobacterial diurnal growth is limited. Here, we develop a computational framework to investigate the optimal allocation of cellular resources during diurnal phototrophic growth using a genome-scale metabolic reconstruction of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942. We formulate phototrophic growth as an autocatalytic process and solve the resulting time-dependent resource allocation problem using constraint-based analysis. Based on a narrow and well-defined set of parameters, our approach results in an ab initio prediction of growth properties over a full diurnal cycle. The computational model allows us to study the optimality of metabolite partitioning during diurnal growth. The cyclic pattern of glycogen accumulation, an emergent property of the model, has timing characteristics that are in qualitative agreement with experimental findings. The approach presented here provides insight into the time-dependent resource allocation problem of phototrophic diurnal growth and may serve as a general framework to assess the optimality of metabolic strategies that evolved in phototrophic organisms under diurnal conditions.

  16. ANALYSIS THE DIURNAL VARIATIONS ON SELECTED PHYSICAL AND PHYSIOLOGICAL PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. MAHABOOBJAN

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to analyze the diurnal variations on selected physical and physiological parameters such as speed, explosive power, resting heart rate and breath holding time among college students. To achieve the purpose of this study, a total of twenty players (n=20 from Government Arts College, Salem were selected as subjects To study the diurnal variation of the players on selected physiological and performance variables, the data were collected 4 times a day with every four hours in between the times it from 6.00 to 18.00 hours were selected as another categorical variable. One way repeated measures (ANOVA was used to analyze the data. If the obtained F-ratio was significant, Seheffe’s post-hoc test was used to find out the significant difference if anyamong the paired means. The level of significance was fixed at.05 level. It has concluded that both physical and physiological parameters were significantly deferred with reference to change of temperature in a day

  17. Diurnal cycles in water quality across the periodic table

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirchner, James

    2014-05-01

    Diurnal cycles in water quality can provide important clues to the processes that regulate aquatic chemistry, but they often are masked by longer-term, larger-amplitude variability, making their detection and quantification difficult. Here I outline methods that can detect diurnal cycles even when they are massively obscured by statistically ill-behaved noise. I demonstrate these methods using high-frequency water quality data from the Plylimon catchment in mid-Wales (Neal et al., 2013; Kirchner and Neal, 2013). Several aspects combine to make the Plynlimon data set unique worldwide. Collected at 7-hour intervals, the Plynlimon data set is much more densely sampled than typical long-term weekly or monthly water quality data. This 7-hour sampling was also continued for two years, much longer than typical intensive sampling campaigns, and the resulting time series encompass a wide range of climatic and hydrological conditions. Furthermore, each sample was analyzed for a wide range of solutes with diverse sources in the natural environment. However, the 7-hour sampling frequency is both coarse and irregular in comparison to diurnal cycles, making their detection and quantification difficult. Nonetheless, the methods outlined here enable detection of statistically significant diurnal cycles in over 30 solutes at Plynlimon, including alkali metals (Li, Na, K, Rb, and Cs), alkaline earths (Be, Mg, Ca, Sr, and Ba), transition metals (Al, Ti, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Zn, Mo, Cd, and Pb), nonmetals (B, NO3, Si, As, and Se), lanthanides and actinides (La, Ce, Pr, and U), as well as total dissolved nitrogen (TDN), dissolved organic carbon (DOC), Gran alkalinity, pH, and electrical conductivity. These solutes span every row of the periodic table, and more than six orders of magnitude in concentration. Many of these diurnal cycles are subtle, representing only a few percent, at most, of the total variance in the concentration time series. Nonetheless they are diagnostically useful

  18. Atmospheric diurnal and semi-diurnal variations observed with GPS radio occultation soundings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Mannucci

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal and semi-diurnal variations, driven by solar forcing, are two fundamental modes in the Earth's weather and climate system. Radio occultation (RO measurements from the six COSMIC satellites (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology Ionosphere and Climate provide rather uniform global coverage with high vertical resolution, all-weather and diurnal sampling capability. This paper analyzes the diurnal and semi-diurnal variations of both temperature and refractivity from two-year (2007–2008 COSMIC RO measurements in the troposphere and stratosphere. The RO observations reveal both propagating and trapped vertical structures of diurnal and semi-diurnal variations, including transition regions near the tropopause where data with high vertical resolution are critical. In the tropics the diurnal amplitude in refractivity decreases with altitude from a local maximum in the planetary boundary layer and reaches the minimum around 14 km and then further increase amplitude in the stratosphere. The upward propagating component of the migrating diurnal tides in the tropics is clearly captured by the GPS RO measurements, which show a downward progression in phase from upper troposphere to the stratopause with a vertical wavelength of about 25 km. Below 500 hPa (~5.5 km, seasonal variations of the peak diurnal amplitude in the tropics follow the solor forcing change in latitude, while at 30 km the seasonal pattern reverses with the diurnal amplitude peaking at the opposite side of the equator relative to the solar forcing. Polar regions shows large diurnal variations in the stratosphere with strong seasonal variations and the cause(s of these variations require further investigations.

  19. Diurnal variation of zooplankton off Versova (Bombay)

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Gajbhiye, S.N.; Nair, V.R.; Desai, B.N.

    Physicochemical parameters and diurnal variaion of zooplankton were studied off Versova on 17/18 February 1981. Salinity and dissolved oxygen showed limited variation during the period of study. Nutrient values followed the tidal rhythm and high...

  20. Diurnal and Seasonal Occurrence of Febrile Seizures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J Millichap

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Investigators from University of Oulu, Finland, evaluated the diurnal and seasonal occurrence of the first febrile seizures (FS in 461 children in a population-based study of 1522 children.

  1. Observations of diurnal to weekly variations of monoterpene-dominated fluxes of volatile organic compounds from mediterranean forests: implications for regional modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fares, Silvano; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Guenther, Alex; Hansel, Armin; Loreto, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    The Estate of Castelporziano (Rome, Italy) hosts many ecosystems representative of Mediterranean vegetation, especially holm oak and pine forests and dune vegetation. In this work, basal emission factors (BEFs) of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) obtained by Eddy Covariance in a field campaign using a proton transfer reaction-time-of-flight-mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) were compared to BEFs reported in previous studies that could not measure fluxes in real-time. Globally, broadleaf forests are dominated by isoprene emissions, but these Mediterranean ecosystems are dominated by strong monoterpene emitters, as shown by the new BEFs. The original and new BEFs were used to parametrize the model of emissions of gases and aerosols from nature (MEGAN v2.1), and model outputs were compared with measured fluxes. Results showed good agreement between modeled and measured fluxes when a model was used to predict radiative transfer and energy balance across the canopy. We then evaluated whether changes in BVOC emissions can affect the chemistry of the atmosphere and climate at a regional level. MEGAN was run together with the land surface model (community land model, CLM v4.0) of the community earth system model (CESM v1.0). Results highlighted that tropospheric ozone concentration and air temperature predicted from the model are sensitive to the magnitude of BVOC emissions, thus demonstrating the importance of adopting the proper BEF values for model parametrization.

  2. Observations of Diurnal to Weekly Variations of Monoterpene-Dominated Fluxes of Volatile Organic Compounds from Mediterranean Forests: Implications for Regional Modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fares, Silvano; Schnitzhofer, Ralf; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Guenther, Alex; Hansel, Armin; Loreto, Francesco

    2013-10-01

    The Estate of Castelporziano (Rome, Italy) hosts many ecosystems representative of Mediterranean vegetation, especially holm oak and pine forests and dune vegetation. In this work, basal emission factors (BEFs) of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs) obtained by Eddy Covariance in a field campaign using a proton transfer reaction–time-of-flight–mass spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS) were compared to BEFs reported in previous studies that could not measure fluxes in real-time. Globally, broadleaf forests are dominated by isoprene emissions, but these Mediterranean ecosystems are dominated by strong monoterpene emitters, as shown by the new BEFs. The original and new BEFs were used to parametrize the model of emissions of gases and aerosols from nature (MEGAN v2.1), and model outputs were compared with measured fluxes. Results showed good agreement between modeled and measured fluxes when a model was used to predict radiative transfer and energy balance across the canopy. We then evaluated whether changes in BVOC emissions can affect the chemistry of the atmosphere and climate at a regional level. MEGAN was run together with the land surface model (community land model, CLM v4.0) of the community earth system model (CESM v1.0). Finally, results highlighted that tropospheric ozone concentration and air temperature predicted from the model are sensitive to the magnitude of BVOC emissions, thus demonstrating the importance of adopting the proper BEF values for model parametrization.

  3. The diurnal cycle of clouds and precipitation : an evaluation of multiple data sources

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeifroth, Uwe Anton

    2016-01-01

    Clouds and precipitation are essential climate variables. Because of their high spatial and temporal variability, their observation and modeling is difficult. In this thesis multiple observational data sources, including satellite data and station data are globally analyzed to understand the distribution and variability of clouds and precipitation, while a special focus is on the diurnal cycle of both variables. Substantial diurnal cycles of clouds and precipitation are observed in the tropic...

  4. A global surface drifter data set at hourly resolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elipot, Shane; Lumpkin, Rick; Perez, Renellys C.; Lilly, Jonathan M.; Early, Jeffrey J.; Sykulski, Adam M.

    2016-05-01

    The surface drifting buoys, or drifters, of the Global Drifter Program (GDP) are predominantly tracked by the Argos positioning system, providing drifter locations with O(100 m) errors at nonuniform temporal intervals, with an average interval of 1.2 h since January 2005. This data set is thus a rich and global source of information on high-frequency and small-scale oceanic processes, yet is still relatively understudied because of the challenges associated with its large size and sampling characteristics. A methodology is described to produce a new high-resolution global data set since 2005, consisting of drifter locations and velocities estimated at hourly intervals, along with their respective errors. Locations and velocities are obtained by modeling locally in time trajectories as a first-order polynomial with coefficients obtained by maximizing a likelihood function. This function is derived by modeling the Argos location errors with t location-scale probability distribution functions. The methodology is motivated by analyzing 82 drifters tracked contemporaneously by Argos and by the Global Positioning System, where the latter is assumed to provide true locations. A global spectral analysis of the velocity variance from the new data set reveals a sharply defined ridge of energy closely following the inertial frequency as a function of latitude, distinct energy peaks near diurnal and semidiurnal frequencies, as well as higher-frequency peaks located near tidal harmonics as well as near replicates of the inertial frequency. Compared to the spectra that can be obtained using the standard 6-hourly GDP product, the new data set contains up to 100% more spectral energy at some latitudes.

  5. Hourly temporal distribution of wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligiannis, Ilias; Dimitriadis, Panayiotis; Koutsoyiannis, Demetris

    2016-04-01

    The wind process is essential for hydrometeorology and additionally, is one of the basic renewable energy resources. Most stochastic forecast models are limited up to daily scales disregarding the hourly scale which is significant for renewable energy management. Here, we analyze hourly wind timeseries giving emphasis on the temporal distribution of wind within the day. We finally present a periodic model based on statistical as well as hydrometeorological reasoning that shows good agreement with data. Acknowledgement: This research is conducted within the frame of the undergraduate course "Stochastic Methods in Water Resources" of the National Technical University of Athens (NTUA). The School of Civil Engineering of NTUA provided moral support for the participation of the students in the Assembly.

  6. Long-term Reliability of Diurnal Intraocular Pressure Patterns in Healthy Asians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Yeoun Sook; Park, In Ki; Shin, Ko Un

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine the long-term repeatability of diurnal intraocular pressure (IOP) patterns in healthy Asian subjects without glaucoma. Methods Twenty-three eyes in 23 healthy Asian subjects without glaucoma underwent diurnal IOP measurements using Goldmann applanation tonometry every 2 hours from 9 AM to 11 PM during two visits that were 8 weeks apart. To validate repeatability between visits, we calculated intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) mean IOP, peak IOP, minimum IOP, and IOP fluctuation at each time point and expressed the results as the difference between peak IOP and minimum IOP or as the standard deviation of all diurnal IOP values in the diurnal IOP curve. Results IOP repeatability was excellent at all time points, with ICCs ranging from 0.812 to 0.946 (p 929). However, IOP fluctuations showed poor repeatability, with an ICC lower than 0.15. Conclusions Long-term repeatability of diurnal IOP patterns in healthy Asian subjects was excellent. These findings suggest that IOP measurements at standardized times of the day will be useful for assessing the effectiveness of glaucoma therapy.

  7. Diurnal Variations of Air Pollution and Atmospheric Boundary Layer Structure in Beijing During Winter 2000/2001

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHOU Li; XU Xiangde; DING Guoan; ZHOU Mingyu; CHENG Xinghong

    2005-01-01

    The diurnal variations of gaseous pollutants and the dynamical and thermodynamic structures of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) in the Beijing area from January to March 2001 are analyzed in this study using data from the Beijing City Air Pollution Observation Field Experiment (BECAPEX). A heavy pollution day (22 February) and a good air quality day (24 February) are selected and individually analyzed and compared to reveal the relationships between gaseous pollutants and the diurnal variations of the ABL. The results show that gaseous pollutant concentrations exhibit a double-peak-double-valley-type diurnal variation and have similar trends but with different magnitudes at different sites in Beijing. The diurnal variation of the gaseous pollutant concentrations is closely related to (with a 1-2 hour delay of)changes in the atmospheric stability and the mean kinetic energy in the ABL.

  8. Moored surface buoy observations of the diurnal warm layer

    KAUST Repository

    Prytherch, J.

    2013-09-01

    An extensive data set is used to examine the dynamics of diurnal warming in the upper ocean. The data set comprises more than 4700 days of measurements at five sites in the tropics and subtropics, obtained from surface moorings equipped to make comprehensive meteorological, incoming solar and infrared radiation, and high-resolution subsurface temperature (and, in some cases, velocity) measurements. The observations, which include surface warmings of up to 3.4°C, are compared with a selection of existing models of the diurnal warm layer (DWL). A simple one-layer physical model is shown to give a reasonable estimate of both the magnitude of diurnal surface warming (model-observation correlation 0.88) and the structure and temporal evolution of the DWL. Novel observations of velocity shear obtained during 346 days at one site, incorporating high-resolution (1 m) upper ocean (5-15 m) acoustic Doppler current profile measurements, are also shown to be in reasonable agreement with estimates from the physical model (daily maximum shear model-observation correlation 0.77). Physics-based improvements to the one-layer model (incorporation of rotation and freshwater terms) are discussed, though they do not provide significant improvements against the observations reported here. The simplicity and limitations of the physical model are used to discuss DWL dynamics. The physical model is shown to give better model performance under the range of forcing conditions experienced across the five sites than the more empirical models. ©2013. American Geophysical Union. All Rights Reserved.

  9. Evaluation of Two Soil Water Redistribution Models (Finite Difference and Hourly Cascade Approach) Through The Comparison of Continuous field Sensor-Based Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreyra, R.; Stockle, C. O.; Huggins, D. R.

    2014-12-01

    Soil water storage and dynamics are of critical importance for a variety of processes in terrestrial ecosystems, including agriculture. Many of those systems are under significant pressure in terms of water availability and use. Therefore, assessing alternative scenarios through hydrological models is an increasingly valuable exercise. Soil water holding capacity is defined by the concepts of soil field capacity and plant available water, which are directly related to soil physical properties. Both concepts define the energy status of water in the root system and closely interact with plant physiological processes. Furthermore, these concepts play a key role in the environmental transport of nutrients and pollutants. Soil physical parameters (e.g. saturated hydraulic conductivity, total porosity and water release curve) are required as input for field-scale soil water redistribution models. These parameters are normally not easy to measure or monitor, and estimation through pedotransfer functions is often inadequate. Our objectives are to improve field-scale hydrological modeling by: (1) assessing new undisturbed methodologies for determining important soil physical parameters necessary for model inputs; and (2) evaluating model outputs, making a detailed specification of soil parameters and the particular boundary condition that are driving water movement under two contrasting environments. Soil physical properties (saturated hydraulic conductivity and determination of water release curves) were quantified using undisturbed laboratory methodologies for two different soil textural classes (silt loam and sandy loam) and used to evaluate two soil water redistribution models (finite difference solution and hourly cascade approach). We will report on model corroboration results performed using in situ, continuous, field measurements with soil water content capacitance probes and digital tensiometers. Here, natural drainage and water redistribution were monitored

  10. Diurnal variations in luminal and stromal areas of choroid in normal eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinoshita, Takamasa; Mitamura, Yoshinori; Shinomiya, Kayo; Egawa, Mariko; Iwata, Akiko; Fujihara, Akiko; Ogushi, Yoko; Semba, Kentaro; Akaiwa, Kei; Uchino, Eisuke; Sonoda, Shozo; Sakamoto, Taiji

    2017-03-01

    To determine the diurnal variations of the luminal and stromal areas of the choroid in normal eyes. This was a prospective observational study of 38 eyes of 38 normal subjects. The blood pressure, heart rate, intraocular pressure and enhanced depth imaging optical coherence tomographic (EDI-OCT) images were recorded every 3 hours between 6:00 and 21:00 hours. The horizontal EDI-OCT images of the subfoveal choroid were converted to binary images. The central choroidal thickness (CCT), total cross-sectional choroidal area, the luminal areas, stromal areas and the ratio of luminal area to total choroidal area (L/C ratio) were determined. There were significant diurnal variations in the CCT, total choroidal area, luminal area and L/C ratio with the maximum values at 6:00 hours and the minimum values at 15:00 hours (pchoroidal area, pchoroidal area (pchoroidal parameters. The changes in the luminal area are most likely responsible for the diurnal change in the CCT and subfoveal choroidal area. UMIN000019060, Pre-results. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  11. Simulation of the Universal-Time Diurnal Variation of the Global Electric Circuit Charging Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackerras, D.; Darvenzia, M.; Orville, R. E.; Williams, E. R.; Goodman, S. J.

    1999-01-01

    A global lightning model that includes diurnal and annual lightning variation, and total flash density versus latitude for each major land and ocean, has been used as the basis for simulating the global electric circuit charging rate. A particular objective has been to reconcile the difference in amplitude ratios [AR=(max-min)/mean] between global lightning diurnal variation (AR approx. = 0.8) and the diurnal variation of typical atmospheric potential gradient curves (AR approx. = 0.35). A constraint on the simulation is that the annual mean charging current should be about 1000 A. The global lightning model shows that negative ground flashes can contribute, at most, about 10-15% of the required current. For the purpose of the charging rate simulation, it was assumed that each ground flash contributes 5 C to the charging process. It was necessary to assume that all electrified clouds contribute to charging by means other than lightning, that the total flash rate can serve as an indirect indicator of the rate of charge transfer, and that oceanic electrified clouds contribute to charging even though they are relatively inefficient in producing lightning. It was also found necessary to add a diurnally invariant charging current component. By trial and error it was found that charging rate diurnal variation curves in Universal time (UT) could be produced with amplitude ratios and general shapes similar to those of the potential gradient diurnal variation curves measured over ocean and arctic regions during voyages of the Carnegie Institute research vessels.

  12. A mathematical model to describe the diurnal pattern of enteric methane emissions from non-lactating dairy cows post-feeding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Enteric methane emission is not only a source of energy loss in ruminants, but also a potent contributor to greenhouse gas production. To identify the nature and timing of interventions to reduce methane emissions requires knowledge of temporal kinetics of methane emissions during animal husbandry. Accordingly, a mathematical model was developed to investigate the pattern of enteric methane emissions after feeding in dairy cows. The model facilitated estimation of total enteric methane emissions (V, g produced by the residual substrate (V1, g and newly ingested feed (V2, g. The model was fitted to the 10 h methane emission patterns after morning feeding of 16 non-lactating dairy cows with various body weights (BW, and the obtained parameters were used to predict the kinetics of 24 h methane emission for each animal. The rate of methane emission (g/h reached a maximum within 1 to 2 h after feeding, followed by a gradual post-prandial decline to a basal value before the next feeding. The model satisfactorily fitted curves for each cow according to the criterion of goodness-of-fit, and provided biological descriptions for fluctuations in methane emissions based on basal V1 and feeding V2 in response to the changes in BW and dry matter intake (DMI of different dairy cows. The basal V1 and feeding V2 are probably maintained by slow- and readily-degradable substrates, respectively. The former contributed at least 0.6 of methane production. In summary, the model provides a means to separate basal V1 and feeding V2 within V, and can be used to predict 24 h emission from a single feeding period.

  13. Diurnal Variability of Turbidity Fronts Observed by Geostationary Satellite Ocean Color Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zifeng Hu

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Monitoring front dynamics is essential for studying the ocean’s physical and biogeochemical processes. However, the diurnal displacement of fronts remains unclear because of limited in situ observations. Using the hourly satellite imageries from the Geostationary Ocean Color Imager (GOCI with a spatial resolution of 500 m, we investigated the diurnal displacement of turbidity fronts in both the northern Jiangsu shoal water (NJSW and the southwestern Korean coastal water (SKCW in the Yellow Sea (YS. The hourly turbidity fronts were retrieved from the GOCI-derived total suspended matter using the entropy-based algorithm. The results showed that the entropy-based algorithm could provide fine structure and clearly temporal evolution of turbidity fronts. Moreover, the diurnal displacement of turbidity fronts in NJSW can be up to 10.3 km in response to the onshore-offshore movements of tidal currents, much larger than it is in SKCW (around 4.7 km. The discrepancy between NJSW and SKCW are mainly caused by tidal current direction relative to the coastlines. Our results revealed the significant diurnal displacement of turbidity fronts, and highlighted the feasibility of using geostationary ocean color remote sensing technique to monitor the short-term frontal variability, which may contribute to understanding of the sediment dynamics and the coupling physical-biogeochemical processes.

  14. Diurnal temperature asymmetries and fog at Churchill, Manitoba

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, William A.; He, Dianze

    2015-07-01

    A variety of methods are available to calculate daily mean temperature. We explore how the difference between two commonly used methods provides insight into the local climate of Churchill, Manitoba. In particular, we found that these differences related closely to seasonal fog. A strong statistically significant correlation was found between the fog frequency (hours per day) and the diurnal temperature asymmetries of the surface temperature using the difference between the min/max and 24-h methods of daily temperature calculation. The relationship was particularly strong for winter, spring and summer. Autumn appears to experience the joint effect of fog formation and the radiative effect of snow cover. The results of this study suggests that subtle variations of diurnality of temperature, as measured in the difference of the two mean temperature methods of calculation, may be used as a proxy for fog detection in the Hudson Bay region. These results also provide a cautionary note for the spatial analysis of mean temperatures using data derived from the two different methods particularly in areas that are fog prone.

  15. Diurnal Cycles of Tree Mass Obtained Using Accelerometers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llamas, R. A.; Niemeier, J. J.; Kruger, A.; Lintz, H. E.; Kleinknecht, G. J.; Miller, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    We used a non-invasive technique to estimate the mass of trees using accelerometers. The technique was inspired by Selker et al., 2011 who performed experiments with an oak tree to estimate the time-varying canopy mass. The technique consists of placing an accelerometer on the trunk of a live tree. The resonance frequency is related to the mass of the tree. Wind drives the tree and the accelerometer data are analyzed to obtain estimates of the resonance frequency and mass of the tree. In addition to wind speed and direction, we also collected ambient temperature and rain accumulation using co-located instruments. We collected data for 3 months using several accelerometers configured for different sampling rates. Analysis of the data revealed diurnal cycles in temperature, wind speed, and tree mass derived from the tree resonance frequency. We used the Welch method for power spectral density estimation to obtain hourly estimates of the tree resonance frequency. Our hypothesis is that the mass diurnal cycle is related to the tree water content.

  16. New gate opening hours

    CERN Multimedia

    GS Department

    2009-01-01

    Please note the new opening hours of the gates as well as the intersites tunnel from the 19 May 2009: GATE A 7h - 19h GATE B 24h/24 GATE C 7h - 9h\t17h - 19h GATE D 8h - 12h\t13h - 16h GATE E 7h - 9h\t17h - 19h Prévessin 24h/24 The intersites tunnel will be opened from 7h30 to 18h non stop. GS-SEM Group Infrastructure and General Services Department

  17. Eleventh Hour Security+

    CERN Document Server

    Dubrawsky, Ido

    2009-01-01

    This book will focus on just the essentials needed to pass the Security+ certification exam. It will be filled with critical information in a way that will be easy to remember and use for your quickly approaching exam. It will focus on the main objectives of the exam and include the following pedagogy for ease of use in those final hours. The book will include:. •Exam Objectives – Fast Track Review. •Key words/definitions. •Five Toughest questions and their answers. •Exam Warnings – What to pay attention to

  18. Eleventh Hour Linux+

    CERN Document Server

    Speake, Graham; Happel, Chris; Lillard, Terrence V

    2009-01-01

    The 11th Hour Linux+ Study Guide is keyed to the XK0-003 revision of the CompTIA Linux+exam. This book is streamlined to include only core certification information and is presented for ease of last-minute studying. Main objectives of the exam are covered with key concepts highlighted. ..: ..; Fast Facts quickly review fundamentals ..; Exam Warnings highlight particularly tough sections of the exam ..; Crunch Time sidebars point out key concepts to remember ..; Did You Know? sidebars cover sometimes forgotten details ..; Top Five Toughest Questions and answers help you to prepare .. The 11th H

  19. The effects of feedback lighting on the circadian drinking rhythm in the diurnal new world primate Saimiri sciureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, J. S.; Sulzman, F. M.

    1988-01-01

    Feedback lighting provides illumination primarily during the subjective night (i.e., the photosensitive portion of the circadian cycle) in response to a given behavior. This technique has previously been used to test the nonparametric model of entrainment in nocturnal rodents. In three species (Rattus norvegicus, Mesocricetus auratus, and Mus musculus), the free-running period of the locomotor activity rhythm was similar whether the animals were exposed to continuous light or discrete light pulses occurring essentially only during the subjective night (i.e., feedback lighting). In the current experiments, feedback lighting was presented to squirrel monkeys so that light fell predominantly during the subjective night. Feedback lighting was linked to the drinking behavior in this diurnal primate so that when the animal drank, the lights went out. Despite the seemingly adverse predicament, the monkeys maintained regular circadian drinking rhythms. Furthermore, just as the period of the free-running activity rhythms of nocturnal rodents exposed to continuous light or feedback lighting were similar, the period of the drinking rhythms of the squirrel monkeys in continuous light and feedback lighting were comparable (25.6 +/- 0.1 and 25.9 +/- 0.1 hours, respectively), despite a substantial decrease in the total amount of light exposure associated with feedback lighting. The free-running period of monkeys exposed to continuous dark (24.5 +/- 0.1 hours) was significantly shorter than either of the two lighting conditions (P squirrel monkeys to feedback lighting thus lends further support for the model and suggests that the major entrainment mechanisms are similar in nocturnal rodents and diurnal primates.

  20. Surface diurnal warming in the East China Sea derived from satellite remote sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dan; Duan, Zhigang; Zhai, Fangguo; He, Qiqi

    2017-09-01

    Process of sea surface diurnal warming has drawn a lot of attention in recent years, but that occurs in shelf seas was rarely addressed. In the present work, surface diurnal warming strength in the East China Sea was calculated by the sea surface temperature (SST) data derived from the MODIS sensors carried by the satellites Aqua and Terra. Due to transit time difference, both the number of valid data and the surface diurnal warming strength computed by the MODIS-Aqua data are relatively larger than Terra. Therefore, the 10-year MODIS-Aqua data from 2005 to 2014 were used to analyze the monthly variability of the surface diurnal warming. Generally, the surface diurnal warming in the East China sea is stronger in summer and autumn but weaker in winter and spring, while it shows different peaks in different regions. Large events with ΔT≥5 K have also been discussed. They were found mainly in coastal area, especially near the Changjiang (Yangtze) River estuary. And there exists a high-incidence period from April to July. Furthermore, the relationship between surface diurnal warming and wind speed was discussed. Larger diurnal warming mainly lies in areas with low wind speed. And its possibility decreases with the increase of wind speed. Events with ΔT≥2.5 K rarely occur when wind speed is over 12 m/s. Study on surface diurnal warming in the East China Sea may help to understand the daily scale air-sea interaction in the shelf seas. A potential application might be in the marine weather forecasts by numerical models. Its impact on the coastal eco-system and the activities of marine organisms can also be pursued.

  1. Modelling of the electron density height profiles in the mid-latitude ionospheric D-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Y. Mukhtarov

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A new mid-latitude D-region (50-105 km model of the electron density is presented obtained on the basis of a full wave theory and by a trial-and-error inversion method. Daytime (at different solar zenith angles absorption measurements by A3-technique made in Bulgaria yielded data with the aid of which the seasonal and diurnal courses of the Ne(h-profiles were derived. Special attention is drawn to the event diurnal asymmetry, or uneven formation of the ionosphere as a function of insulation. The latter is probably connected with the influence of the diurnal fluctuations in the local temperature on the chemistry involved in the electron loss rate, as well as the diurnal variations of the main ionizing agent (NO in the D-region. That is why the Ne(h-profiles in the midlatitude D-region are modelled separately for morning and afternoon hours.

  2. Cone photopigments in nocturnal and diurnal procyonids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, G H; Deegan, J F

    1992-10-01

    Procyonids are small, New World carnivores distributed among some 6 genera. Electroretinogram (ERG) flicker photometry was used to measure the spectra of the cone photopigments for members of two nocturnal species, the raccoon (Procyon lotor) and the kinkajou (Potos flavus), and a diurnal species, the coati (Nasua nasua). Each of the 3 has a class of cone photopigment with maximum sensitivity in the middle to long wavelengths. The spectral positioning of this cone is different for the three. Whereas the raccoon and kinkajou are monochromatic, the diurnal coati is a dichromat having an additional class of cone photopigment with peak sensitivity close to 433 nm.

  3. Standardised Resting Time Prior to Blood Sampling and Diurnal Variation Associated with Risk of Patient Misclassification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh Andersen, Ida; Brasen, Claus L.; Christensen, Henry;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: According to current recommendations, blood samples should be taken in the morning after 15 minutes' resting time. Some components exhibit diurnal variation and in response to pressures to expand opening hours and reduce waiting time, the aims of this study were to investigate...... the impact of resting time prior to blood sampling and diurnal variation on biochemical components, including albumin, thyrotropin (TSH), total calcium and sodium in plasma. METHODS: All patients referred to an outpatient clinic for blood sampling were included in the period Nov 2011 until June 2014 (opening...... hours: 7am-3pm). Each patient's arrival time and time of blood sampling were registered. The impact of resting time and the time of day for all components was analysed using simple linear regression. The "maximum allowable bias" was used as quality indicator for the change in reference interval. RESULTS...

  4. The diurnal and nocturnal effects of travoprost in normal-tension glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seibold LK

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Leonard K Seibold, Malik Y KahookDepartment of Ophthalmology, University of Colorado Eye Center, Aurora, CO, USAPurpose: To determine the diurnal and nocturnal effects of travoprost with sofZia® (Travatan Z® [TZ] on intraocular pressure (IOP and ocular perfusion pressure (OPP in patients with normal-tension glaucoma (NTG.Methods: Twenty-seven subjects with NTG were admitted to an inpatient sleep laboratory for three 24-hour sessions monitoring IOP, blood pressure (BP, and heart rate every 2 hours in the habitual position (diurnal period: upright; nocturnal period: supine. Baseline IOP and OPP levels were compared to those during active treatment with TZ and 3 days after stopping the medication. OPP was calculated as 2/3 [diastolic BP + 1/3 (systolic BP – diastolic BP] – IOP.Results: TZ significantly reduced the mean diurnal and nocturnal IOP levels compared to baseline at all time points. During treatment, mean IOP decreased from 17.1±3.4 to 14.7±3.0 mmHg during the diurnal period (P<0.01 and from 19.9±3.6 to 18.8±3.5 mmHg during the nocturnal period (P<0.01. Once treatment was discontinued, mean IOP remained at levels significantly less than baseline during both the diurnal (15.6±3.2 mmHg and nocturnal (18.7±3.7 mmHg periods. Mean OPP was not significantly changed with treatment during either period. Conclusion: In this population of NTG patients, TZ significantly lowers IOP at all time points throughout the diurnal and nocturnal periods. The treatment effect on IOP endures for up to 3 days after the last dose. Treatment did not significantly improve OPP.Keywords: ocular perfusion pressure, intraocular pressure, 24-hour, diurnal, nocturnal, sofZia®

  5. Geneva 24 hours swim

    CERN Document Server

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  6. Geneva 24 Hours Swim

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The 18th edition of the Geneva 24 hours swim competition will take place at the Vernets Swimming Pool on the 4th and 5th of October. More information and the results of previous years are given at: http://www.carouge-natation.com/24_heures/home_24_heures.htm Last year, CERN obtained first position in the inter-company category with a total of 152.3 kms swam by 45 participants. We are counting on your support to repeat this excellent performance this year. For those who would like to train, the Livron swimming pool in Meyrin is open as from Monday the 8th September. For further information please do not hesitate to contact us. Gino de Bilio and Catherine Delamare

  7. FEWER HOURS MORE ACHIEVEMENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    NingQuanxin; QiuLizhong

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this study is to improve instructional classes for “Extensive Reading”. We compare two approaches. The traditional method is based on the original procedure; the method we try is a “task-placemented” one. inspired by the method we try is a “task-placemented” one. inspired by the theory of “Tasks of Ascending Difficulty”.This paper provides a comparative evaluation of our experiments on Extensive Reading. Our aim is to resolve the logistical problem of heavy teaching loads and limited class hours, which often prevents English learners from fulfilling their study targets and our intended learning outcomes. In view of the experimental data,we have managed to establish a “feedback” to test the two hypotheses, and demonstrate that the new approach contributes to efficient acquisition of the information in the presented reading materials. Our study concludes with an interpretation of the function and merits of this approach.

  8. Diurnal variations of airborne fungal spores concentration in the town and rural area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idalia Kasprzyk

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Airborne fungal spores were monitored in 2001-2002 in Rzeszów (town and its neighborhood. The aim of investigations was to ascertain if there were differences in diurnal variations of airborne fungal spores concentration between town and rural area. The sampling was carried out using volumetric method. Traps were located at the same heights - app. 12 m. Airborne spores were sampled continuously. Microscopical slides were prepared for each day. Analysis was carried out on one longitudinal band of 48 mm long divided into 24 segments corresponding following hours of day. The results were expressed as mean number of fungal spores per cubic meter per 24 hours. For this survey, five geni of allergenic fungi were selected: Alternaria, Botrytis, Cladosporium, Epicoccum, Ganoderma. The concentrations of their airborne spores were high or very high. It was calculated theoretical day, where the hourly count was the percentage mean of number of spores at that time every chosen day without rainfall from 2001 and 2001 years. The diurnal periodicity of Alternaria, Cladosporium, Epicoccum and Ganoderma showed one peak, while Botrytis two. Anamorphic spores peaked in the afternoon, while their minima occurred in the morning. The highest concentrations of Ganoderma basidiospores were at down or at night, but minima during the day. There were no clear differences in the peak values between two studied sites. The results indicate that maximum concentrations of all spores generally occurred a few hour earlier in the rural area than in the town. Probably, in the rural area airborne spores came from many local sources and their diurnal periodicity reflected rhythm of spore liberation. Towns are characterized by specific microclimate with higher temperature and wind blowing to the centre. In Rzeszów fungal spores could be transported outside and carried out by wind from distant sources. This study showed, among others, that habitat conditions are an important factors

  9. Changes in the Diurnal Cycles of Precipitation over Eastern China in the Past 40 Years

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YUAN Weihua; YU Rucong; LI Jian

    2013-01-01

    This study analyzed the interdecadal changes in the diurnal variability of summer (June August) precipitation over eastern China during the period 1966 2005 using hourly station rain gauge data.The results revealed that rainfall diurnal variations experienced significant interdecadal changes.Over the area to the south of the Yangtze River,as well as the area between the Yangtze and Yellow Rivers,the percentages of morning rainfall (0000-1200 LST) to total rainfall in terms of amount,frequency and intensity,all exhibited increasing interdecadal trends.On the contrary,over North China,decreasing trends were found.As a result,diurnal rainfall peaks also presented pronounced interdecadal variations.Over the area between the Yangtze and Yellow Rivers,there were 16 out of 46 stations with afternoon (1200 0000 LST) frequency peaks in the first 20 years of the 40-year period of study,while only eight remained in the latter 20 years.In North China,seven stations experienced the opposite changes,which accounted for about 21% of the total number of stations.The possible causes for the interdecadal changes in diurnal features were discussed.As the rainfall in the active monsoon period presents morning diurnal peaks,with afternoon peaks in the break period,the decrease (increase) of rainfall in the active monsoon period over North China (the area south of the Yangtze River and the area between the Yangtze and Yellow Rivers) may contribute to interdecadal changes in diurnal rainfall variability.

  10. An effective approach to evaluate GCM simulated diurnal variation of clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Guoxing; Wang, Wei-Chyung

    2016-10-01

    Cloud radiative effects strongly depend on diurnal variations of insolation and cloud radiative properties. In general circulation models (GCMs), even when the daily-mean cloud properties agree with observations, errors in cloud diurnal cycle can still significantly impact the shortwave radiation and induce model biases. However, this aspect is overlooked in GCM evaluation and intercomparison programs (e.g., Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5)), which mainly consider the daily-mean cloud fraction. This study presents a simple approach of using a diagnostic parameter, the "effective-daytime cloud fraction" which accounts for the concurrent variation of clouds and insolation, to reveal GCM biases in cloud diurnal variations. The usefulness of the approach is illustrated by the significant biases of cloud diurnal cycle in the Modern-Era Retrospective analysis for Research and Applications (MERRA) reanalysis when compared with that in the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project (ISCCP) data. It is thus suggested that the parameter be included as one of the GCM diagnostics for evaluating cloud diurnal cycle in model intercomparisons.

  11. Diurnally entrained anticipatory behavior in archaea.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenia Whitehead

    Full Text Available By sensing changes in one or few environmental factors biological systems can anticipate future changes in multiple factors over a wide range of time scales (daily to seasonal. This anticipatory behavior is important to the fitness of diverse species, and in context of the diurnal cycle it is overall typical of eukaryotes and some photoautotrophic bacteria but is yet to be observed in archaea. Here, we report the first observation of light-dark (LD-entrained diurnal oscillatory transcription in up to 12% of all genes of a halophilic archaeon Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1. Significantly, the diurnally entrained transcription was observed under constant darkness after removal of the LD stimulus (free-running rhythms. The memory of diurnal entrainment was also associated with the synchronization of oxic and anoxic physiologies to the LD cycle. Our results suggest that under nutrient limited conditions halophilic archaea take advantage of the causal influence of sunlight (via temperature on O(2 diffusivity in a closed hypersaline environment to streamline their physiology and operate oxically during nighttime and anoxically during daytime.

  12. Diurnal Reflectance Changes in Vegetation Observed with AVIRIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderbilt, V. C.; Ambrosia, V. G.; Ustin, S. L.

    1998-01-01

    Among the most important short-term dynamic biological processes are diurnal changes in canopy water relations. Plant regulation of water transport through stomatal openings affects other gaseous transport processes, often dramatically decreasing photosynthetic fixation of carbon dioxide during periods of water stress. Water stress reduces stomatal conductance of water vapor through the leaf surface and alters the diurnal timing of stomatal opening. Under non-water stressed conditions, stomates typically open soon after dawn and transpire water vapor throughout the daylight period. During stress periods, stomates may close for part of the day, generally near mid-day. Under prolonged stress conditions, stomatal closure shifts to earlier times during the day; stomates may close by mid-morning and remain closed until the following morning - or remain closed entirely. Under these conditions the relationship between canopy greenness (e.g., measured with a vegetation index or by spectral mixture analysis) and photosynthetic fixation of carbon is lost and the remotely sensed vegetation metric is a poor predictor of gas exchange. Prediction of stomatal regulation and exchange of water and trace gases is critical for ecosystem and climate models to correctly estimate budgets of these gases and understand or predict other processes like gross and net ecosystem primary production. Plant gas exchange has been extensively studied by physiologists at the leaf and whole plant level and by biometeorologists at somewhat larger scales. While these energy driven processes follow a predictable if somewhat asymmetric diurnal cycle dependent on soil water availability and the constraints imposed by the solar energy budget, they are nonetheless difficult to measure at the tree and stand levels using conventional methods. Ecologists have long been interested in the potential of remote sensing for monitoring physiological changes using multi-temporal images. Much of this research has

  13. BOREAS AFM-08 ECMWF Hourly Surface and Upper Air Data for the SSA and NSA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viterbo, Pedro; Betts, Alan; Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Newcomer, Jeffrey A.; Smith, David E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The Boreal Ecosystem-Atmosphere Study (BOREAS) Airborne Fluxes and Meteorology (AFM)-8 team focused on modeling efforts to improve the understanding of the diurnal evolution of the convective boundary layer over the boreal forest. This data set contains hourly data from the European Center for for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) operational model from below the surface to the top of the atmosphere, including the model fluxes at the surface. Spatially, the data cover a pair of the points that enclose the rawinsonde sites at Candle Lake, Saskatchewan, in the Southern Study Area (SSA) and Thompson, Manitoba, in the Northern Study Area (NSA). Temporally, the data include the two time periods of 13 May 1994 to 30 Sept 1994 and 01 Mar 1996 to 31 Mar 1997. The data are stored in tabular ASCII files. The number of records in the upper air data files may exceed 20,000, causing a problem for some software packages. The ECMWF hourly surface and upper air data are available from the Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS) Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC). The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884).

  14. A gridded dataset of hourly precipitation in Germany: Its construction, climatology and application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcus Paulat

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A so-called disaggregation technique is used to combine daily rain gauge measurements and hourly radar composites in order to produce a dataset of hourly precipitation in Germany on a grid with a horizontal resolution of 7 km for the years 2001-2004. This state-of-the-art observation-based dataset of precipitation has a high temporal and spatial resolution and will be extended continuously during the upcoming years. Limitations of its quality, which are due to intrinsic problems with observing the highly variable field of precipitation, are discussed and quantified where possible. The dataset offers novel possibilities to investigate the climatology of precipitation and to verify precipitation forecasts from numerical weather prediction models. The frequency of hourly precipitation in Germany above the detection limit of 0.1 mm/h amounts to 10-30 % in winter, with clear maxima in the mountainous regions, and to 6-20 % in summer, when the spatial variability is considerably reduced. The 95th percentile of the frequency distribution is significantly larger in summer than in winter, with local maxima in the mountainous regions in winter, and in the Alpine Foreland and upper Elbe catchment in summer. It is shown that the operational model COSMO-7 with a horizontal resolution of 7 km captures the geographical distribution of the frequency and of the 95th percentile of hourly precipitation in Germany very well. In contrast, the model is not able to realistically simulate the diurnal cycle of precipitation in any region of Germany during summer.

  15. ESCIMO.spread – a spreadsheet-based point snow surface energy balance model to calculate hourly snow water equivalent and melt rates for historical and changing climate conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Marke

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the spreadsheet-based point energy balance model ESCIMO.spread which simulates the energy and mass balance as well as melt rates of a snow surface. The model makes use of hourly recordings of temperature, precipitation, wind speed, relative humidity, global and longwave radiation. The effect of potential climate change on the seasonal evolution of the snow cover can be estimated by modifying the time series of observed temperature and precipitation by means of adjustable parameters. Model output is graphically visualized in hourly and daily diagrams. The results compare well with weekly measured snow water equivalent (SWE. The model is easily portable and adjustable, and runs particularly fast: hourly calculation of a one winter season is instantaneous on a standard computer. ESICMO.spread can be obtained from the authors on request (contact: ulrich.strasser@uni-graz.at.

  16. Differentiation of the infarct core from ischemic penumbra within the first 4.5 hours, using diffusion tensor imaging-derived metrics: A rat model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuo, Duen Pang [Dept. of Electrical Engineering, National Taiwan University, Taipei (China); Lu, Chia Feng [Research Center of Translational Imaging, College of Medicine, Taipei Medical University, Taipei (China); Chen, Yung Chieh [Dept. of Biomedical Imaging and Radiological Sciences, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei (China); Liou, Michelle [Institute of Statistical Science, Academia Sinica, Taipei (China); Chung, Hsiao Wen [Graduate Institute of Biomedical Electrics and Bioinformatics, National Taiwan University, Taipei (China)

    2017-04-15

    To investigate whether the diffusion tensor imaging-derived metrics are capable of differentiating the ischemic penumbra (IP) from the infarct core (IC), and determining stroke onset within the first 4.5 hours. All procedures were approved by the local animal care committee. Eight of the eleven rats having permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion were included for analyses. Using a 7 tesla magnetic resonance system, the relative cerebral blood flow and apparent diffusion coefficient maps were generated to define IP and IC, half hour after surgery and then every hour, up to 6.5 hours. Relative fractional anisotropy, pure anisotropy (rq) and diffusion magnitude (rL) maps were obtained. One-way analysis of variance, receiver operating characteristic curve and nonlinear regression analyses were performed. The evolutions of tensor metrics were different in ischemic regions (IC and IP) and topographic subtypes (cortical, subcortical gray matter, and white matter). The rL had a significant drop of 40% at 0.5 hour, and remained stagnant up to 6.5 hours. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in rL values were found between IP, IC, and normal tissue for all topographic subtypes. Optimal rL threshold in discriminating IP from IC was about -29%. The evolution of rq showed an exponential decrease in cortical IC, from -26.9% to -47.6%; an rq reduction smaller than 44.6% can be used to predict an acute stroke onset in less than 4.5 hours. Diffusion tensor metrics may potentially help discriminate IP from IC and determine the acute stroke age within the therapeutic time window.

  17. Differentiation of the Infarct Core from Ischemic Penumbra within the First 4.5 Hours, Using Diffusion Tensor Imaging-Derived Metrics: A Rat Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Duen-Pang; Lu, Chia-Feng; Liou, Michelle; Chen, Yung-Chieh; Chung, Hsiao-Wen

    2017-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether the diffusion tensor imaging-derived metrics are capable of differentiating the ischemic penumbra (IP) from the infarct core (IC), and determining stroke onset within the first 4.5 hours. Materials and Methods All procedures were approved by the local animal care committee. Eight of the eleven rats having permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion were included for analyses. Using a 7 tesla magnetic resonance system, the relative cerebral blood flow and apparent diffusion coefficient maps were generated to define IP and IC, half hour after surgery and then every hour, up to 6.5 hours. Relative fractional anisotropy, pure anisotropy (rq) and diffusion magnitude (rL) maps were obtained. One-way analysis of variance, receiver operating characteristic curve and nonlinear regression analyses were performed. Results The evolutions of tensor metrics were different in ischemic regions (IC and IP) and topographic subtypes (cortical, subcortical gray matter, and white matter). The rL had a significant drop of 40% at 0.5 hour, and remained stagnant up to 6.5 hours. Significant differences (p < 0.05) in rL values were found between IP, IC, and normal tissue for all topographic subtypes. Optimal rL threshold in discriminating IP from IC was about -29%. The evolution of rq showed an exponential decrease in cortical IC, from -26.9% to -47.6%; an rq reduction smaller than 44.6% can be used to predict an acute stroke onset in less than 4.5 hours. Conclusion Diffusion tensor metrics may potentially help discriminate IP from IC and determine the acute stroke age within the therapeutic time window. PMID:28246507

  18. Diurnal variations and source apportionment of ozone at the summit of Mount Huang, a rural site in Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, J; Zhu, B; Xiao, H; Kang, H; Hou, X; Yin, Y; Zhang, L; Miao, Q

    2017-03-01

    Comprehensive measurements were conducted at the summit of Mount (Mt.) Huang, a rural site located in eastern China during the summer of 2011. They observed that ozone showed pronounced diurnal variations with high concentrations at night and low values during daytime. The Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry (WRF-Chem) model was applied to simulate the ozone concentrations at Mt. Huang in June 2011. With processes analysis and online ozone tagging method we coupled into the model system, the causes of this diurnal pattern and the contributions from different source regions were investigated. Our results showed that boundary layer diurnal cycle played an important role in driving the ozone diurnal variation. Further analysis showed that the negative contribution of vertical mixing was significant, resulting in the ozone decrease during the daytime. In contrast, ozone increased at night owing to the significant positive contribution of advection. This shifting of major factor between vertical mixing and advection formed this diurnal variation. Ozone source apportionment results indicated that approximately half was provided by inflow effect of ozone from outside the model domain (O3-INFLOW) and the other half was formed by ozone precursors (O3-PBL) emitted in eastern, central, and southern China. In the O3-PBL, 3.0% of the ozone was from Mt. Huang reflecting the small local contribution (O3-LOC) and the non-local contributions (O3-NLOC) accounted for 41.6%, in which ozone from the southerly regions contributed significantly, for example, 9.9% of the ozone originating from Jiangxi, representing the highest geographical contributor. Because the origin and variation of O3-NLOC was highly related to the diurnal movements in boundary layer, the similar diurnal patterns between O3-NLOC and total ozone both indicated the direct influence of O3-NLOC and the importance of boundary layer diurnal variations in the formation of such distinct diurnal ozone variations

  19. Factors determining the diurnal dynamics of blooming of chosen plant species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bożena Denisow

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper attempts to synthesize the determinants which may influence the diurnal rhythm of blooming. Additionally, I tried to explore and bring together topics that concern blooming and have always been considered separately because of their origin in different disciplines. The following species were included: Hydrangea arborescens L. subsp. discolor (Raf., H. paniculata Sieb., Viburnum opulus L., Chaenomeles japonica Lindl., Knautia arvensis L., Adonis vernalis L., Aster saggitifolius Willd., Taraxacum officinale L. Chelidonium majus L. The taxons were observed in Lublin (51008' - 51018' N and 21027' - 21041' E in the years 2001-2007. The blooming of species was determined at least for two vegetation seasons. During observations all flowers developed in one-hour intervals were counted. The diurnal dynamics of blooming differs among species and is modified by different endogenous and exogenous factors. The endogenous determinants of diurnal dynamics of blooming are morphological diversity of flowers (fertility or sterility within species or heterostyly. The different pattern of blooming succour different mechanisms which prevent self-pollination (Chaenomeles japonica Lindl., Knautia arvensis L.. The abiotic factors, such as day length and temperature during the vegetation season, influence the change in the process of diurnal dynamics of blooming (e. g. Taraxacum officinale, Chelidonium majus.

  20. Seasonal and Diurnal Variations of Atmospheric Non-Methane Hydrocarbons in Guangzhou, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longfeng Li

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, high ambient ozone concentrations have become one of the major regional air quality issues in the Pearl River Delta (PRD region. Non-methane hydrocarbons (NMHCs, as key precursors of ozone, were found to be the limiting factor in photochemical ozone formation for large areas in the PRD. For source apportioning of NMHCs as well as ozone pollution control strategies, it is necessary to obtain typical seasonal and diurnal patterns of NMHCs with a large pool of field data. To date, few studies have focused on seasonal and diurnal variations of NMHCs in urban areas of Guangzhou. This study explored the seasonal variations of most hydrocarbons concentrations with autumn maximum and spring minimum in Guangzhou. The diurnal variations of most anthropogenic NMHCs typically showed two-peak pattern with one at 8:00 in the morning and another at 20:00 in the evening, both corresponding to traffic rush hours in Guangzhou, whereas isoprene displayed a different bimodal diurnal curve. Propene, ethene, m, p-xylene and toluene were the four largest contributors to ozone formation in Guangzhou, based on the evaluation of individual NMHCs’ photochemical reactivity. Therefore, an effective strategy for controlling ozone pollution may be achieved by the reduction of vehicle emissions in Guangzhou.

  1. Hourly Precipitation Data (HPD) Publication

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly Precipitation Data (HPD) Publication is archived and available from the National Climatic Data Center (NCDC). This publication contains hourly precipitation...

  2. US Naval Observatory Hourly Observations

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Hourly observations journal from the National Observatory in Washington DC. The observatory is the first station in the United States to produce hourly observations...

  3. Diurnal Forcing of Planetary Atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houben, Howard C.

    1997-01-01

    Much progress has been made on calculations of the Martian seasonal water cycle using the Mars Climate Model developed for this purpose. Two papers, documenting the model and the water transport results obtained with it have been published in the Journal of Geophysical Research - Planets. An additional paper describing results related to the evolution of the seasonal water cycle as a result of orbital changes was published in Advances in Space Research. Since that time, further studies have concentrated on the consequences of the soil adsorption required to match the observed water cycle and its relation to the stability of ground ice and other potential water reservoirs. Earth-related studies have concentrated on incorporating an efficient and realistic microphysical model into the Ames Stratospheric General Circulation Model used to simulate the spread of the ML Pinatubo and other volcanic clouds in the stratosphere. In addition, visualizations of the simulations are being incorporated into a video describing the UARS mission. A paper describing the new stratospheric aerosol microphysics package (and its consequences for volcanic cloud evolution) will be submitted in the near future. The paper will discuss the relative importance of condensation and coagulation to early particle growth and the separation of the cloud by sedimentation of the larger particles. A more general paper which highlights the observation that particle number densities did not increase dramatically after the ML Pinatubo eruption is planned. Simulations of atmospheric transport will be extended to include studies of terrestrial tropospheric tracers using the Fifth-Generation Penn State/NCAR Mesoscale Model.

  4. Parametrization of convective transport in the boundary layer and its impact on the representation of diurnal cycle of wind and dust emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hourdin

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the impact of the representation of the boundary layer transport in a climate model on the representation of the near surface wind and dust emission, with a focus on the Sahel/Sahara region. We show that the combination of vertical turbulent diffusion with a representation of the thermal cells of the convective boundary layer by a mass flux scheme leads to a more realistic representation of the diurnal cycle of wind in spring, with a maximum near surface wind in the morning. This maximum occurs when the thermal plumes reach the low level jet that forms during the night at a few hundred meters above surface. The horizontal momentum in the jet is transported downward to the surface by compensating subsidences around thermal plumes in typically less than one hour. This leads to a rapid increase of wind speed at surface and therefore of dust emissions owing to the strong non linearity of emission laws. The numerical experiments are performed with a zoomed and nudged configuration of the LMDZ general circulation model, coupled to the emission module of the CHIMERE Chemistry Transport Model, in which winds are relaxed toward that of the ERAI reanalyzes. The new set of parameterizations leads to a strong improvement of the representation of the diurnal cycle of wind when compared to a previous version of LMDZ as well as to the reanalyzes used for nudging themselves. It also reinforces dust emissions in better agreement with observations, but the aerosol optical thickness is still significantly underestimated.

  5. Diurnal cycling of urban aerosols under different weather regimes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregorič, Asta; Drinovec, Luka; Močnik, Griša; Remškar, Maja; Vaupotič, Janja; Stanič, Samo

    2016-04-01

    A one month measurement campaign was performed in summer 2014 in Ljubljana, the capital of Slovenia (population 280,000), aiming to study temporal and spatial distribution of urban aerosols and the mixing state of primary and secondary aerosols. Two background locations were chosen for this purpose, the first one in the city center (urban background - KIS) and the second one in the suburban background (Brezovica). Simultaneous measurements of black carbon (BC) and particle number size distribution of submicron aerosols (PM1) were conducted at both locations. In the summer season emission from traffic related sources is expected to be the main local contribution to BC concentration. Concentrations of aerosol species and gaseous pollutants within the planetary boundary layer are controlled by the balance between emission sources of primary aerosols and gases, production of secondary aerosols, chemical reactions of precursor gases under solar radiation and the rate of dilution by mixing within the planetary boundary layer (PBL) as well as with tropospheric air. Only local emission sources contribute to BC concentration during the stable PBL with low mixing layer height, whereas during the time of fully mixed PBL, regionally transported BC and other aerosols can contribute to the surface measurements. The study describes the diurnal behaviour of the submicron aerosol at the urban and suburban background location under different weather regimes. Particles in three size modes - nucleation (black carbon concentrations were observed at the urban background (KIS) than at the suburban background location (Brezovica). Significant diurnal pattern of total particle concentration and black carbon concentration was observed at both locations, with a distinct morning and late afternoon peak. As a consequence of different PBL dynamics and atmospheric processes (photochemical effects, humidity, wind speed and direction), diurnal profile differs for sunny, cloudy and rainy days

  6. Disruption of the sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation of β-amyloid in mice with Alzheimer's disease pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jee Hoon; Huang, Yafei; Bero, Adam W; Kasten, Tom; Stewart, Floy R; Bateman, Randall J; Holtzman, David M

    2012-09-05

    Aggregation of β-amyloid (Aβ) in the brain begins to occur years before the clinical onset of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Before Aβ aggregation, concentrations of extracellular soluble Aβ in the interstitial fluid (ISF) space of the brain, which are regulated by neuronal activity and the sleep-wake cycle, correlate with the amount of Aβ deposition in the brain seen later. The amount and quality of sleep decline with normal aging and to a greater extent in AD patients. How sleep quality as well as the diurnal fluctuation in Aβ change with age and Aβ aggregation is not well understood. We report a normal sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation in ISF Aβ in the brain of the APPswe/PS1δE9 mouse model of AD before Aβ plaque formation. After plaque formation, the sleep-wake cycle markedly deteriorated and diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ dissipated. As in mice, diurnal fluctuation of cerebrospinal fluid Aβ in young adult humans with presenilin mutations was also markedly attenuated after Aβ plaque formation. Virtual elimination of Aβ deposits in the mouse brain by active immunization with Aβ(42) normalized the sleep-wake cycle and the diurnal fluctuation of ISF Aβ. These data suggest that Aβ aggregation disrupts the sleep-wake cycle and diurnal fluctuation of Aβ. Sleep-wake behavior and diurnal fluctuation of Aβ in the central nervous system may be functional and biochemical indicators, respectively, of Aβ-associated pathology.

  7. Diurnal variations in the UV albedo of arctic snow

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Meinander

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available The relevance of snow for climate studies is based on its physical properties, such as high surface reflectivity. Surface ultraviolet (UV albedo is an essential parameter for various applications based on radiative transfer modeling. Here, new continuous measurements of the local UV albedo of natural Arctic snow were made at Sodankylä (67°22'N, 26°39'E, 179 m a.s.l. during the spring of 2007. The data were logged at 1-min intervals. The accumulation of snow was up to 68 cm. The surface layer thickness varied from 0.5 to 35 cm with the snow grain size between 0.2 and 2.5 mm. The midday erythemally weighted UV albedo ranged from 0.6 to 0.8 in the accumulation period, and from 0.5 to 0.7 during melting. During the snow melt period, under cases of an almost clear sky and variable cloudiness, an unexpected diurnal decrease of 0.05 in albedo soon after midday, and recovery thereafter, was detected. This diurnal decrease in albedo was found to be asymmetric with respect to solar midday, thus indicating a change in the properties of the snow. Independent UV albedo results with two different types of instruments confirm these findings. The measured temperature of the snow surface was below 0°C on the following mornings. Hence, the reversible diurnal change, evident for ~1–2 h, could be explained by the daily metamorphosis of the surface of the snowpack, in which the temperature of the surface increases, melting some of the snow to liquid water, after which the surface freezes again.

  8. Diurnal Emotional States Impact the Sleep Course

    OpenAIRE

    Julien Delannoy; Osamu Mandai; Jacques Honoré; Toshinori Kobayashi; Henrique Sequeira

    2015-01-01

    Background Diurnal emotional experiences seem to affect several characteristics of sleep architecture. However, this influence remains unclear, especially for positive emotions. In addition, electrodermal activity (EDA), a sympathetic robust indicator of emotional arousal, differs depending on the sleep stage. The present research has a double aim: to identify the specific effects of pre-sleep emotional states on the architecture of the subsequent sleep period; to relate such states to the sy...

  9. Single Dose of the Antivascular Agent, ZD6126 (N-Acetylcoichinol-O-Phosphate, Reduces Perfusion for at Least 96 Hours in the GH3 Prolactinoma Rat Tumor Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominick J.O. McIntyre

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumor vasculature is an attractive therapeutic target as it differs structurally from normal vasculature, and the destruction of a single vessel can lead to the death of many tumor cells. The effects of antivascular drugs are frequently short term, with regrowth beginning less than 24 hours posttreatment. This study investigated the duration of the response to the vascular targeting agent, ZD6126, of the GH3 prolactinoma, in which efficacy and dose-response have previously been demonstrated. GH3 prolactinomas were grown in the flanks of eight Wistar Furth rats. All animals were treated with 50 mg/kg ZD6126. The tumors were examined with dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI 24 hours pretreatment and posttreatment, and at a single time between 48 and 96 hours posttreatment. No evidence of recovery of perfusion was observed even at the longest (96-hour time point. Involvement of a statistician at the project planning stage and the use of DCE-MRI, which permits noninvasive quantitation of parameters related to blood flow in intact animals, allowed this highly significant result to be obtained using only eight rats.

  10. Hourly model to estimate solar global radiation for all months of the year for Botucatu, Sao Paulo State; Modelos horarios para estimativa da radiacao solar global para todos os meses do ano para Botucatu-SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laperuta Filho, Jayme; Lunardi, Dalva M. Cury [UNESP, Botucatu, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Agronomicas

    1997-12-31

    The objective of this work was establish and daily models for estimate of solar global radiation for the months of the year, in Botucatu-SP 22 deg C 52`S,48 deg C 26`W Grw). The obtention of these models showed be viable high degree of reliability considering that they are specific for hours and months that originated them. The coefficients a and b presented monthly and hourly variations, taking into account that b showed higher relative variability than a. In all months studied, the linear adjustment was not appropriate before 7 a.m and after 5 p.m. (author) 7 refs., 5 tabs.

  11. Diurnal fluctuations of cocaine and potential precursors in leaves of Erythroxylum coca.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, E L

    1993-01-01

    Cocaine is abundant in leaves of Erythroxylum coca var. coca Lam. Consequently, cocaine and two of its early biosynthetic precursors were monitored for 24 h to determine whether they fluctuated diurnally. E. coca was grown under controlled environmental conditions in a growth chamber in soil at pH 3.5. After 17.5 months of growth, leaves not less than 35 days old were harvested every 2 and 4 h for 24 h for arginine, phenylalanine and cocaine content, respectively. The content of cocaine was determined by GC/MS and amino acid content by HPLC. Diurnal fluctuation of cocaine occurred during the 24 h cycle. Cocaine was highest in leaves of E. coca at 8 and 16 h where its content was 7.67 and 9.45 mg.g-1 dry weight, respectively. Arginine and phenylalanine in leaves of E. coca also displayed diurnal rhythmic patterns of fluctuation. The content of arginine declined from hours 6 to 12 and increased to the highest content at 13 h (21.8 mg.g-1 dry weight). Overall, phenylalanine content was lower than arginine, but had two peak periods of accumulation during the 24 h cycle, occurring at 8 and 14 h. The content of phenylalanine in leaves of E. coca during the peak hours was 6.98 and 6.54 mg.g-1 dry weight, respectively.

  12. A Century of Human Capital and Hours

    OpenAIRE

    Diego Restuccia; Guillaume Vandenbroucke

    2012-01-01

    An average person born in the United States in the second half of the nineteenth century completed 7 years of schooling and spent 58 hours a week working in the market. By contrast, an average person born at the end of the twentieth century completed 14 years of schooling and spent 40 hours a week working. In the span of 100 years, completed years of schooling doubled and working hours decreased by 30 percent. What explains these trends? We consider a model of human capital and labor supply t...

  13. Climatology of diurnal tide and its long-term variability in the lower middle atmosphere over a tropical station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P. Vinay; Dutta, Gopa; Mohammad, Salauddin; Rao, B. Venkateswara

    2016-07-01

    ECMWF reanalysis (ERA-interim) data of winds for two solar cycles (1991-2012) are harmonically analyzed to delineate the characteristics and variability of diurnal tide over a tropical site (13.5° N, 79.5° E). The diurnal cycle horizontal winds measured by Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E) mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radar between May 2005 and April 2006 have been used to compute 24 h tidal amplitudes and phases and compared with the corresponding results obtained from ERA winds. The climatological diurnal tidal amplitudes and phases have been estimated from surface to ˜33 km using ERA interim data. The amplitudes and phases obtained in the present study are found to compare reasonably well with Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM-09). Diurnal tides show larger amplitudes in the lower troposphere below 5 km during summer and in the mid-stratosphere mainly during equinoctial months and early winter. Water vapor and convection in the lower troposphere are observed to play major roles in exciting 24-h tide. Correlations between diurnal amplitude and integrated water vapor and between diurnal amplitude and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR) are 0.59 and -0.34, respectively. Ozone mixing ratio correlates (ρ = 0.66) well with diurnal amplitude and shows annual variation in the troposphere whereas semi-annual variation is observed at stratospheric heights with stronger peaks in equinoctial months. A clear annual variation of diurnal amplitude is displayed in the troposphere and interannual variability becomes prominent in the stratosphere which could be partly due to the influence of equatorial stratospheric QBO. The influence of solar activity on diurnal oscillations is found to be insignificant.

  14. Effect of Static and Dynamic Stretching on the Diurnal Variations of Jump Performance in Soccer Players

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chtourou, Hamdi; Aloui, Asma; Hammouda, Omar; Chaouachi, Anis; Chamari, Karim; Souissi, Nizar

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The present study addressed the lack of data on the effect of different types of stretching on diurnal variations in vertical jump height - i.e., squat-jump (SJ) and countermovement-jump (CMJ). We hypothesized that dynamic stretching could affect the diurnal variations of jump height by producing a greater increase in short-term maximal performance in the morning than the evening through increasing core temperature at this time-of-day. Methods Twenty male soccer players (age, 18.6±1.3 yrs; height, 174.6±3.8 cm; body-mass, 71.1±8.6 kg; mean ± SD) completed the SJ and CMJ tests either after static stretching, dynamic stretching or no-stretching protocols at two times of day, 07:00 h and 17:00 h, with a minimum of 48 hours between testing sessions. One minute after warming-up for 5 minutes by light jogging and performing one of the three stretching protocols (i.e., static stretching, dynamic stretching or no-stretching) for 8 minutes, each subject completed the SJ and CMJ tests. Jumping heights were recorded and analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures (3 [stretching]×2 [time-of-day]). Results The SJ and CMJ heights were significantly higher at 17:00 than 07:00 h (pstretching protocol. These daily variations disappeared (i.e., the diurnal gain decreased from 4.2±2.81% (pstretching due to greater increases in SJ and CMJ heights in the morning than the evening (8.4±6.36% vs. 4.4±2.64%, pstretching on the diurnal variations of SJ and CMJ heights was observed. Conclusion Dynamic stretching affects the typical diurnal variations of SJ and CMJ and helps to counteract the lower morning values in vertical jump height. PMID:23940589

  15. Combined diurnal variations of discharge and hydrochemistry of the Isunnguata Sermia outlet, Greenland Ice Sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graly, Joseph; Harrington, Joel; Humphrey, Neil

    2017-05-01

    In order to examine daily cycles in meltwater routing and storage in the Isunnguata Sermia outlet of the Greenland Ice Sheet, variations in outlet stream discharge and in major element hydrochemistry were assessed over a 6-day period in July 2013. Over 4 days, discharge was assessed from hourly photography of the outlet from multiple vantages, including where midstream naled ice provided a natural gauge. pH, electrical conductivity, suspended sediment, and major element and anion chemistry were measured in samples of stream water collected every 3 h.Photography and stream observations reveal that although river width and stage have only slight diurnal variation, there are large diurnal changes in discharge shown by the doubling in width of what we term the active channel, which is characterized by large standing waves and fast flow. The concentration of dissolved solutes follows a sinusoidal diurnal cycle, except for large and variable increases in dissolved solutes during the stream's waning flow. Solute concentrations vary by ˜ 30 % between diurnal minima and maxima. Discharge maxima and minima lag temperature and surface melt by 3-7 h; diurnal solute concentration minima and maxima lag discharge by 3-6 h.This phase shift between discharge and solute concentration suggests that during high flow, water is either encountering more rock material or is stored in longer contact with rock material. We suggest that expansion of a distributed subglacial hydrologic network into seldom accessed regions during high flow could account for these phenomena, and for a spike of partial silicate reaction products during waning flow, which itself suggests a pressure threshold-triggered release of stored water.

  16. Aporphine alkaloid contents increase with moderate nitrogen supply in Annona diversifolia Saff. (Annonaceae) seedlings during diurnal periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orozco-Castillo, José Agustín; Cruz-Ortega, Rocío; Martinez-Vázquez, Mariano; González-Esquinca, Alma Rosa

    2016-10-01

    Aporphine alkaloids are secondary metabolites that are obtained in low levels from species of the Annonaceae family. Nitrogen addition may increase the alkaloid content in plants. However, previous studies published did not consider that nitrogen could change the alkaloid content throughout the day. We conducted this short-term study to determine the effects of nitrogen applied throughout the diurnal period on the aporphine alkaloids via measurements conducted on the roots, stems and leaves of Annona diversifolia seedlings. The 60-day-old seedlings were cultured with the addition of three levels of nitrogen (0, 30 and 60 mM), and alkaloid extracts were analysed using high-performance liquid chromatography. The highest total alkaloid content was measured in the treatment with moderate nitrogen supply. Further, the levels of aporphine alkaloids changed significantly in the first few hours of the diurnal period. We conclude that aporphine alkaloid content increased with moderate nitrogen supply and exhibited diurnal variation.

  17. Diurnal variation of marine stratocumulus over San Nicolas Island during the FIRE IFO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, R.; Blaskovic, M.

    1990-01-01

    Preliminary analysis was made of data collected at San Nicolas Island during the Intensive Field Observation (IFO) phase of the First International Satellite Cloud Climatology Program's Regional Experiment (FIRE). Of particular interest was an examination of a distinct diurnal variation in the cloud properties, despite an apparent absence of diurnal forcing from the surface. Direct or indirect radiative modulation of such clouds, as proposed by Fravalo at el. (1981) and Turton and Nicholls (1987) indeed seems likely. Preliminary observational evidence for diurnal change in the marine stratocumulus adjacent to San Nicolas Island is presented. A comparison is then made between the observed behavior and predictions from theoretical models of the interactive effect of radiation on boundary layer clouds.

  18. Ten-Year Climatology of Summertime Diurnal Rainfall Rate Over the Conterminous U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, Toshihisa; Mocko, David; Lee, Myong-In; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Suarez, Max J.; Pielke, Roger A., Sr.

    2010-01-01

    Diurnal cycles of summertime rainfall rates are examined over the conterminous United States, using radar-gauge assimilated hourly rainfall data. As in earlier studies, rainfall diurnal composites show a well-defined region of rainfall propagation over the Great Plains and an afternoon maximum area over the south and eastern portion of the United States. Zonal phase speeds of rainfall in three different small domains are estimated, and rainfall propagation speeds are compared with background zonal wind speeds. Unique rainfall propagation speeds in three different regions can be explained by the evolution of latent-heat theory linked to the convective available potential energy, than by gust-front induced or gravity wave propagation mechanisms.

  19. Diurnal variation and dispersion in QT interval in cirrhosis: relation to haemodynamic changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Stig; Møller, Søren; Bendtsen, Flemming

    2007-01-01

    with cirrhosis, undergoing a haemodynamic investigation. 24-h 12 lead Holter monitoring provided information on QT and heart rate variability. RESULTS: Mean QT(C) was above upper normal limit (440 ms(1/2)) in eleven patients (47%) and significantly higher than in controls (441 vs 400 ms(1/2), p...=0.03-0.001). No diurnal variation of QT(disp) was found in cirrhosis. Heart rate variability was reduced with a significant relation to central hypovolaemia (r=0.55, p=0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Twenty-four hours QT(C) is prolonged in a substantial fraction of patients with cirrhosis, but with normal...... diurnal variation. The combination of long QT(C) and normal QT(disp) suggests delayed myocyte repolarisation on the cellular level, rather than temporal and spatial heterogeneity in the myocardial wall....

  20. An interpretation of ion composition diurnal variation deduced from EISCAT observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikhailov, A.V. [Rossijskaya Akademiya Nauk, Troitsk (RU). Inst. Zemnogo Magnetizma, Ionosfery i Rasprostraneniya Radiovoln (IZMIRAN); Kofman, W. [Lab. de Planetologie de Grenoble, Grenoble (France)

    2001-03-01

    Physical interpretation is made of the O{sup +}/Ne diurnal variations in summer, revealed by Litvine et al. (1998) from the EISCAT observations. It is shown that the observed anti-correlation between the Z{sub 50} parameter, corresponding to the transition region between 50% of molecular and atomic ions, and the width D{sub z} of the transition, defined as the altitude width between 10% and 90% of the O{sup +}/Ne ratio, can be reproduced in model calculations and the result of different recombination laws (quadratic in the lower and linear in the upper ionosphere) as well as diurnal variations in the photoionization rates. (orig.)

  1. Developing an Aggregate Marginal Cost Per Flying Hour Model for the U.S. Air Force’s F-15 Fighter Aircraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-03-01

    conformal fuel tanks. The Multi-Stage Improvement Program ( MSIP ) phased in additional upgrades from 1985-1997. These upgrades included, “structural...Levels: An Analytical Assessment. MS Thesis, Naval Post Graduate School, Monterey CA, December 1992 (ADA261977). Energy Information Administration. “U.S...433-438 (2004). Hawkes, Eric M. Predicting the Cost per Flying Hour for the F-16 using Programmatic and Operational Variables. MS Thesis, AFIT/GOR

  2. Diurnal Variability in the Martian Atmosphere Inferred from Nearly Coincident Profiles at Semidiurnal Separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heavens, N. G.; Johnson, M. S.

    2013-12-01

    Long-term monitoring of the Martian atmosphere by mapping instruments on sun-synchronous polar orbiters with slight orbital inclinations has two underutilized advantages for studying diurnal variability in atmospheric structure. First, the orbital pattern implies that the nightside orbit will be followed ~ 12 hours later by a dayside orbit that intersects it. That dayside orbit will be followed by a nightside orbit that itself intersects the dayside orbit ~ 12 hours previously at another point. These intersection points mostly occur in the tropics. At the poles, orbit convergence produces a similar effect, such that these semidiurnally separated orbits will have a number of nearly coincident observations in space that sample diurnal change in time. For limb sounders like the Mars Climate Sounder on Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO-MCS), the horizontal resolution of the instrument at the limb may be comparable to the spatial separation between portions of sequentially intersecting dayside/nightside orbits. Indeed, this width (if simultaneously iterated) would resolve wavenumber 100 structures at the Equator. In other words, the characteristics of the instrument and orbiter combine to allow local, semidiurnal sampling of the atmosphere at synoptic or greater scales. This can be helpful at resolving diurnal and perhaps longitudinal variability when retrievals are typically successful on the nightside at different longitudes than they are successful on the dayside. Second, long-term monitoring allows fortuiitous observation of useful examples of interannual variability in the behavior of the atmosphere. Here, we will present a study of diurnal variability in the vertical dust distribution and other aspects of the atmospheric structure of Mars that makes use of the observational advantages of MRO-MCS as well as the fortuitous occurrence of a Mars Year without significant regional or global dust storm activity: the year before the landing of the Mars Science Laboratory

  3. Diurnal oscillations of soybean circadian clock and drought responsive genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Marcolino-Gomes

    Full Text Available Rhythms produced by the endogenous circadian clock play a critical role in allowing plants to respond and adapt to the environment. While there is a well-established regulatory link between the circadian clock and responses to abiotic stress in model plants, little is known of the circadian system in crop species like soybean. This study examines how drought impacts diurnal oscillation of both drought responsive and circadian clock genes in soybean. Drought stress induced marked changes in gene expression of several circadian clock-like components, such as LCL1-, GmELF4- and PRR-like genes, which had reduced expression in stressed plants. The same conditions produced a phase advance of expression for the GmTOC1-like, GmLUX-like and GmPRR7-like genes. Similarly, the rhythmic expression pattern of the soybean drought-responsive genes DREB-, bZIP-, GOLS-, RAB18- and Remorin-like changed significantly after plant exposure to drought. In silico analysis of promoter regions of these genes revealed the presence of cis-elements associated both with stress and circadian clock regulation. Furthermore, some soybean genes with upstream ABRE elements were responsive to abscisic acid treatment. Our results indicate that some connection between the drought response and the circadian clock may exist in soybean since (i drought stress affects gene expression of circadian clock components and (ii several stress responsive genes display diurnal oscillation in soybeans.

  4. Diurnal Solar Energy Conversion and Photoprotection in Rice Canopies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meacham, Katherine; Sirault, Xavier; Quick, W Paul; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Furbank, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Genetic improvement of photosynthetic performance of cereal crops and increasing the efficiency with which solar radiation is converted into biomass has recently become a major focus for crop physiologists and breeders. The pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorescence technique (PAM) allows quantitative leaf level monitoring of the utilization of energy for photochemical light conversion and photoprotection in natural environments, potentially over the entire crop lifecycle. Here, the diurnal relationship between electron transport rate (ETR) and irradiance was measured in five cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa) in canopy conditions with PAM fluorescence under natural solar radiation. This relationship differed substantially from that observed for conventional short term light response curves measured under controlled actinic light with the same leaves. This difference was characterized by a reduced curvature factor when curve fitting was used to model this diurnal response. The engagement of photoprotective processes in chloroplast electron transport in leaves under canopy solar radiation was shown to be a major contributor to this difference. Genotypic variation in the irradiance at which energy flux into photoprotective dissipation became greater than ETR was observed. Cultivars capable of higher ETR at midrange light intensities were shown to produce greater leaf area over time, estimated by noninvasive imaging.

  5. Deep greedy learning under thermal variability in full diurnal cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauss, Patrick; Rosario, Dalton

    2017-08-01

    We study the generalization and scalability behavior of a deep belief network (DBN) applied to a challenging long-wave infrared hyperspectral dataset, consisting of radiance from several manmade and natural materials within a fixed site located 500 m from an observation tower. The collections cover multiple full diurnal cycles and include different atmospheric conditions. Using complementary priors, a DBN uses a greedy algorithm that can learn deep, directed belief networks one layer at a time and has two layers form to provide undirected associative memory. The greedy algorithm initializes a slower learning procedure, which fine-tunes the weights, using a contrastive version of the wake-sleep algorithm. After fine-tuning, a network with three hidden layers forms a very good generative model of the joint distribution of spectral data and their labels, despite significant data variability between and within classes due to environmental and temperature variation occurring within and between full diurnal cycles. We argue, however, that more questions than answers are raised regarding the generalization capacity of these deep nets through experiments aimed at investigating their training and augmented learning behavior.

  6. Deep learning over diurnal and other environmental effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosario, Dalton; Rauss, Patrick

    2017-05-01

    We study the transfer learning behavior of a Hybrid Deep Network (HDN) applied to a challenging longwave infrared hyperspectral dataset, consisting of radiance from several manmade and natural materials within a fixed site located 500 m from an observation tower, over multiple full diurnal cycles and different atmospheric conditions. The HDN architecture adopted in this study stakes a number of Restricted Boltzmann Machines to form a deep belief network for generative pre-training, or initialization of weight parameters, and then combines with a discriminative learning procedure that fine-tune all of the weights jointly to improve the network's performance. After fine-tuning, a network with three hidden layers forms a very good generative model of the joint distribution of spectral data and their labels, despite of significant data variability observed between and within classes due to environmental and temperature variation, occurring within full diurnal cycles. We argue, however, that more question are raised than answers are provided regarding the generalization capacity of these deep nets through experiments aimed for investigating their training and transfer learning behavior in the longwave infrared region of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  7. The Effect of Diurnal Variations on Ionospheric Radio Occultations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelle, Roger V.; Koskinen, Tommi; Withers, Paul; Schinder, Paul J.; Moses, Julianne I.; Mueller-Wodarg, Ingo

    2016-10-01

    Radio occultations are a powerful technique for the study of atmospheres and ionospheres by planetary spacecraft. For missions to the outer solar system, the occultations always probe the terminator region of the planet. The analysis of radio occultations typically assumes symmetry along the ray path in the horizontal direction about the tangent point. While this is an excellent assumption for the neutral atmosphere where the scale length of horizontal gradients is large, it is suspect for the ionosphere where electron densities decrease rapidly from day to night. Diurnal variations in peak electron density are often several orders of magnitude and may occur over a region of a few degrees. We investigate the consequences of diurnal variations on ionospheric occultations with a ray tracing calculation for the angular deflection and frequency residual of the radio wave. The calculations are based on photochemical/diffusion models for the ionospheres of Saturn and Titan. Differences from analysis based on the assumption of horizontal symmetry are most pronounced in the bottom side ionosphere where chemical time constants are short.

  8. Research of the diurnal soil respiration dynamic in two typical vegetation communities in Tianjin estuarine wetland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Q.; Meng, W. Q.; Li, H. Y.

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the differences and diurnal variations of soil respiration in different vegetation communities in coastal wetland is to provide basic reliable scientific evidence for the carbon "source" function of wetland ecosystems in Tianjin.Measured soil respiration rate which changed during a day between two typical vegetation communities (Phragmites australis, Suaeda salsa) in coastal wetland in October, 2015. Soil temperature and moisture were measured at the same time. Each of the diurnal curves of soil temperature in two communities had a single peak value, and the diurnal variations of soil moisture showed a "two peak-one valley" trend. The diurnal dynamic of soil respiration under the two communities had obvious volatility which showed a single peak form with its maximum between 12:00-14:00 and minimum during 18:00. The diurnal average of soil respiration rate in Phragmites australis communities was 3.37 times of that in Suaeda salsa communities. Significant relationships were found by regression analysis among soil temperature, soil moisture and soil respiration rate in Suaeda salsa communities. There could be well described by exponential models which was y = -0.245e0.105t between soil respiration rate and soil temperature, by quadratic models which was y = -0.276×2 + 15.277× - 209.566 between soil respiration rate and soil moisture. But the results of this study showed that there were no significant correlations between soil respiration and soil temperature and soil moisture in Phragmites australis communities (P > 0.05). Therefore, under the specific wetland environment conditions in Tianjin, soil temperature and moisture were not main factors influencing the diurnal variations of soil respiration rate in Phragmites australis communities.

  9. The contribution of the pineal gland on daily rhythms and masking in diurnal grass rats, Arvicanthis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuboni, Dorela D; Agha, Amna A; Groves, Thomas K H; Gall, Andrew J

    2016-07-01

    Melatonin is a hormone rhythmically secreted at night by the pineal gland in vertebrates. In diurnal mammals, melatonin is present during the inactive phase of the rest/activity cycle, and in primates it directly facilitates sleep and decreases body temperature. However, the role of the pineal gland for the promotion of sleep at night has not yet been studied in non-primate diurnal mammalian species. Here, the authors directly examined the hypothesis that the pineal gland contributes to diurnality in Nile grass rats by decreasing activity and increasing sleep at night, and that this could occur via effects on circadian mechanisms or masking, or both. Removing the pineal gland had no effect on the hourly distribution of activity across a 12:12 light-dark (LD) cycle or on the patterns of sleep-like behavior at night. Masking effects of light at night on activity were also not significantly different in pinealectomized and control grass rats, as 1h pulses of light stimulated increases in activity of sham and pinealectomized animals to a similar extent. In addition, the circadian regulation of activity was unaffected by the surgical condition of the animals. Our results suggest that the pineal gland does not contribute to diurnality in the grass rat, thus highlighting the complexity of temporal niche transitions. The current data raise interesting questions about how and why genetic and neural mechanisms linking melatonin to sleep regulatory systems might vary among mammals that reached a diurnal niche via parallel and independent pathways.

  10. Sources and Transport of Particulate Matter on an Hourly Time-Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ancelet, T.; Davy, P.; Trompetter, B.; Markwitz, A.; Weatherburn, D.

    2012-12-01

    Particulate matter (PM) concentrations in New Zealand urban environments have been shown to have distinct diurnal cycles, independent of community size or population (Trompetter et al., 2010). Peak PM concentrations occur during the winter, when residential wood combustion for domestic heating is common. Little is known about PM sources and their contributions on an hourly timescale (Ancelet et al. 2012), creating a significant gap in current knowledge. As such, we have completed intensive ambient air monitoring campaigns in three locations across New Zealand during the winter (2010 and 2011) with the goal of identifying, using positive matrix factorization, the sources that contribute to measured PM10 concentrations on an hourly timescale. Size-segregated (PM10-2.5 and PM2.5) samples were collected on an hourly basis using Streaker samplers (Annegarn et al., 1988) at four sites within the airsheds of Masterton, Nelson and Alexandra, New Zealand. Three sites were located at ground level; upwind, central and downwind of the general nocturnal (katabatic) drainage flow. The fourth site was located centrally, but at a height of 26 m. Since Streaker filters cannot be used to obtain a gravimetric mass, continuous E-BAMs (MetOne Inc.) PM10 monitors were co-located at each sampling site as was meteorological equipment (Vaisala WXT520 sonic anemometers for wind speed, wind direction, temperature, relative humidity, barometric pressure). The hourly PM10-2.5 and PM2.5 samples were analyzed using ion beam analysis techniques (PIXE, PIGE and RBS) and black carbon was quantified using light reflection. PM10 concentrations at each site varied, but showed distinct diurnal patterns. Black carbon was highly correlated with PM10 concentrations, indicating that combustion sources were dominant at each site. The use of positive matrix factorization (PMF) revealed that biomass burning was the dominant source of PM10 at each site, with varying contributions from sources such as motor

  11. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Janssen, R.H.H.; Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Ganzeveld, L.N.; Kabat, P.; Jimenez, J.L.; Farmer, D.K.; Heerwaarden, van C.C.; Mammarella, I.

    2012-01-01

    We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the mod

  12. Diurnal variation of surface ozone in mountainous areas: Case study of Mt. Huang, East China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lei; Jin, Lianji; Zhao, Tianliang; Yin, Yan; Zhu, Bin; Shan, Yunpeng; Guo, Xiaomei; Tan, Chenghao; Gao, Jinhui; Wang, Haoliang

    2015-12-15

    To explore the variations in atmospheric environment over mountainous areas, measurements were made from an intensive field observation at the summit of Mt. Huang (30.13°N, 118.15°E, 1841m above sea level), a rural site located in East China, from June to August 2011. The measurements revealed a diurnal change of surface O3 with low concentrations during the daytime and high concentrations during the nighttime. The causes of diurnal O3 variations over the mountain peak in East China were investigated by using a fairly comprehensive WRF-Chem and HYSPLIT4 modeling approach with observational analysis. By varying model inputs and comparing the results to a baseline modeling and actual air quality observations, it is found that nearby ozone urban/anthropogenic emission sources were contributing to a nighttime increase in mountaintop ozone levels due to a regional transport lag and residual layer effects. Positive correlation of measured O3 and CO concentrations suggested that O3 was associated with anthropogenic emissions. Sensitivity modeling experiments indicated that local anthropogenic emissions had little impact on the diurnal pattern of O3. The diurnal pattern of O3 was mainly influenced by regional O3 transport from the surrounding urban areas located 100-150km away from the summit, with a lag time of 10h for transport.

  13. CMAQv502 Base AQS Hourly site compare output

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Monthly AQS hourly site compare output files for the CMAQv502 Base simulation. Monthly files contain hourly paired model/ob data for the AQS network. These data were...

  14. Global distributions of diurnal and semi-diurnal tides: observations from HRDI-UARS of the MLT region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. H. Manson

    Full Text Available HRDI (High Resolution Doppler Interferometer-UARS winds data have been analyzed in 4° latitude by 10° longitude cells at 96 km to obtain global contour maps of solar-tidal amplitudes and phases, and also mean winds. The solstices June–July (1993, December–January (1993–1994, and one equinox September–October (1994 are shown. 

    The 24-h diurnal tide that maximizes near the 20–25° latitude has significant seasonal changes with equinoctial maxima, and very clear longitudinal variability. Maxima are very clear over the oceans. In contrast, the 12-h semi-diurnal tides that maximize near the 40–55° latitude have very strong seasonal changes with winter maxima, and more modest longitudinal changes. The similarities with MLT (mesosphere-lower thermosphere radar observations (90 km and the GSWM (Global Scale Wave Model are very satisfactory. The mean winds are consistent with expectations and show clear poleward flow from summer to winter hemispheres in the solstices.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics; waves and tides Radio science (remote sensing

  15. GPS-derived height changes in diurnal and sub-diurnal timescales

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogusz, Janusz; Figurski, Mariusz

    2012-04-01

    This paper describes the research concerning precise short-time GPS solutions conducted in the Centre of Applied Geomatics, Military University of Technology, Warsaw, Poland. The data from ASG-EUPOS (Polish Active Geodetic Network) was processed using Bernese 5.0 software and EPN (EUREF Permanent Network) standards and models. In this study, the adapted 3-hour observation window is shifted every hour for obtaining hourly geocentric coordinates in ITRF2005 reference frame. The adjusted network consisted of over 130 stations from Poland and the neighbouring countries, the period covered observations collected from June 2008 through June 2010. These two years of observations allowed for examining short-period oscillations which were found to be closely related to the tidal (dynamic) frequencies. The analysis of the residua from the IERS2003 tidal model was performed using the least squares method with the Eterna software. It confirmed the existence of significant (several millimetres) oscillations in the frequencies corresponding to S1, K1 and K2. The paper describes the idea of data processing and analysis, presents the results of vertical (the Up component) oscillations in main tidal frequency bands, and also includes discussion of possible explanation of the existence of short-period oscillations in the GPS precise solutions and the possibility of propagation of short-period oscillations into long-period spurious changes in the daily (standard) GPS solutions.

  16. Diurnal resting in brown lemurs in a dry deciduous forest, northwestern Madagascar: implications for seasonal thermoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Hiroki

    2012-07-01

    Decreased activity has been reported in both nocturnal and diurnal primates during the prolonged dry season in western Madagascar, and this has been interpreted as a reaction to the severe environment, with its food scarcity and/or thermal stress. Several day-active lemurs rest more as trees defoliate, although the reason for this is unclear. To understand the mechanism underpinning the diurnal resting of lemurs in seasonal deciduous forests, I observed common brown lemurs (Eulemur fulvus fulvus) for one year in Ankarafantsika National Park, northwestern Madagascar. In Ankarafantsika, despite high fruit availability during the dry season, brown lemurs are known to engage in diurnal resting. To examine the effects of thermal factors and defoliation on lemur inactivity, I recorded the activity of a troop at 1 min intervals, hourly ambient temperature, daily rainfall, and weather during observations (06:00-18:00). I quantified the amount of leaves biweekly for 680 trees. I tested correlations between percentages of resting time and each factor across hours during the day and across seasons. During the rainy season, resting time did not differ between sunny and cloudy days, and lemurs were active throughout the daytime. At the hourly level during the dry season, lemurs rested exclusively at midday, apparently at peak sunlight intensity rather than at peak ambient temperature. At seasonal level, percentages of total resting time from 08:00 to 16:00 were greater during dry season (81.9%) than during rainy season (62.6%), and percentages increased as ambient temperatures increased. Defoliation was related to seasonal decrease in weekly rainfall, which served as an index of water retained in the forest. Defoliation probably reflected aridification as well as the penetration of sunlight into the forest. Diurnal resting increased as both the amount of leaves and weekly rainfall decreased seasonally. These results suggest that heat stress under dry conditions may promote

  17. A twin study of genetic influences on diurnal preference and risk for alcohol use outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Nathaniel F; Buchwald, Dedra; Harden, Kathryn Paige

    2013-12-15

    The population-based University of Washington Twin Registry (UWTR) was used to examine (1) genetic influences on chronobiology and (2) whether these genetic factors influence alcohol-use phenotypes. We used a reduced Horne-Östberg Morningness-Eveningness Questionnaire (rMEQ) to survey UWTR participants for diurnal preference. Frequency and quantity of alcohol use, as well as binge drinking (6+ drinks per occasion), were assessed on a 5-point Likert scale. Both diurnal preference and alcohol use were self-reported. Twin data were analyzed by using structural equation models. The sample consisted of 2,945 participants (mean age = 36.4 years), including 1,127 same-sex and opposite-sex twin pairs and 691 individual twins. The rMEQ range was 4-25, with a mean score of 15.3 (SD 4.0). Diurnal "morning types" comprised 30.7% (N = 903) of participants, while 17.4% (N = 513) were "evening types." Regarding alcohol use, 21.2% (N = 624) reported never drinking. Among drinkers, 35.7% (N = 829) reported ≥ 3 drinks per occasion and 48.1% (N = 1,116) reported at least one instance of binge drinking. Genetic influences accounted for 37% of the variance in diurnal preference, with the remaining 63% due to non-shared environmental influences. Genetic propensities toward diurnal eveningness were significantly associated with increased alcohol quantity (β = -0.17; SE = 0.05, p Genetic influences on diurnal preference confer elevated risk for problematic alcohol use, including increased quantity and binge drinking. Differences in circadian rhythm may be an important and understudied pathway of risk for genetic influences on alcohol use.

  18. Consequences of incongruency in diurnally varying resources for seedlings of Rumex crispus (Polygonaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavender-Bares, J M; Voss, P B; Bazzaz, F A

    1998-09-01

    The incongruency of diurnally varying resources essential to plants may detrimentally affect plants early in their development as indicated by reduced water use efficiency and carbon gain. Typical diurnal patterns of light and CO(2) availability in a midsized temperate herbaceous or forest gap were simulated in specially designed growth chambers. A sinusoidally varying CO(2) treatment (400 ppm minimum, 800 ppm maximum) approximated the diurnal cycle of CO(2) at the soil surface, while a steady-state CO(2) treatment (600 ppm) with the same average CO(2 )concentration provided a control. Crossed with these two CO(2) treatments were two light regimes, one with 3 h of high light (850 μmol·m·s) in the morning (west side of a gap), and the other with 3 h of high light in the afternoon (east side). All treatments received baseline low light (55 μmol·m·s) for 14 h during the day. Rumex crispus was selected as a model species because of its rosette leaves, which grow close to the ground where diurnal CO(2 )variation is greatest. The relative timing of diurnal variations in light and CO(2) significantly affected seedling water use efficiency, carbon gain, and morphology. Total biomass, photosynthetic rates, daily integrated carbon, water use efficiency, and leaf area were enhanced by morning exposure to high light. Seedlings that were exposed to peak values of light and CO(2) incongruently, i.e., those plants receiving intense afternoon light with diurnally varying CO(2), were detrimentally affected relative to control plants receiving intense afternoon light with steady-state CO(2). The results of this experiment indicate that the incongruent availability of required resources-such as light and CO(2)-can detrimentally affect performance relative to when resources are congruent. These contrasting resource regimes can occur on the east and west side of gaps.

  19. Diurnal Cycle of Convection in the East Pacific ITCZ during EPIC-2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.; Petersen, Walter A.; Cifelli, Robert; Rutledge, Steven A.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    During the last three weeks of September 2001, the EPIC-2001 intensive field campaign focused on studies of deep convection in the ITCZ over the Mexican warm pool region (10N, 95W) of the East Pacific. This study focuses on the pronounced observed diurnal cycle of environmental and convective parameters within the experiment domain. Data from three primary sources are examined: the R/V Ronald H. Brown C-band weather radar, 4-hourly soundings from the Brown and the Global Atmospherics, Inc. National Lightning Detection Network (long range product). Satellite data from TRMM, GOES and OV-1 are also used. The domain boundary layer shows a robust daily evolution of moist enthalpy (as reflect by equivalent potential temperature, theta-e, or wet bulb potential temperature, theta-w), with contributions from changes in both dry and moist entropy. Peak theta-w is found after local nightfall; the average diurnal range of theta-w is approximately 1 deg C. A composite diurnal cycle of convective properties was derived from the C-band volume scans, sampled continuously through the experiment at 10 minute updates. Products derived from the volumetric data include a surface PPI, 15 and 30 dBZ echo top height, vertically integrated liquid, and 6 km (mixed phase region) reflectivity CAPPIs. For almost all products, the parameter means showed virtually no diurnal cycle. However, for the upper-level products, the parameter spectra showed a clear peak in the occurrence of deep/vigorous convection (the "tail end of the distribution") between 7-9 UTC (1-3 AM local), while overall frequency of occurrence peaked later, from 12-15 UTC (6-9 AM local). This represents a daily "outbreak" of isolated deep cells a couple of hours after sunset and subsequent growth, organization and decay through the nighttime hours. The coherence of the diurnal cycle of the convective spectrum is impressive given the wide variety of convective organization observed during the experiment, and given the modulation

  20. Influence of dynamical equatorial flattening and orientation of a triaxial core on prograde diurnal polar motion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rong; Shen, WenBin

    2016-04-01

    The noise floor of empirical models of diurnal Earth Rotation could reach as low as 1μas as shown by several recent studies. In another aspect, the differences between these empirical models with the theoretical model predictions given by IERS Convention (2010) for certain diurnal frequencies are more than 10 μas (e.g. K1). The traxiality of the core is ignored in the theoretical model given by IERS Convention (2010) because it is highly uncertain. To explain the difference between the empirical model and theoretical model, we consider the possible influence of a triaxial core. We use the difference between empirical models and theoretical model predictions given by IERS Convention (2010) as input to invert the traxiality parameter of the core. In the inversion, we assume the ocean tide response obeys the admittance theory. So extra six admittance parameters are introduced to model the difference between smooth responses inferred from empirical models and that given by theoretical model predictions from IERS Convention (2010). The results show that adding core triaxiality into the theoretical model could narrow the difference between empirical model and theoretical model at diurnal frequencies. The residual of amplitude becomes smaller. For a set of tide components consisting of seven diurnal frequencies (Q1, O1, M1, P1, K1, J1, Oo1), the root mean square of the residual of this set have decreased from more than 10μas to 2˜3μas for most of the empirical models. As for the dynamical equatorial flattening of the core, estimates inverted based on different empirical models are consistent within standard deviation. The results also suggest that the principal axes of the triaxial core does not coincidence with the principal axes of the whole Earth. This study is supported by National 973 Project China (grant No. 2013CB733305), NSFC (grant Nos. 41174011, 41210006, 41504019).

  1. 周日、半日地球自转变化研究进展%Progress in Research on Diurnal and Semidiurnal Earth Rotation Change

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许雪晴; 董大南; 周永宏

    2014-01-01

    主要介绍了周日、半日地球自转变化研究进展。首先介绍了周日、半日地球自转变化的研究发展历程以及主要激发因素,近几十年来,由于GPS、VLBI、SLR 等观测技术和分析精度的提高,已能用几小时甚至1∼2 h的观测数据求解地球自转参数(极移和自转速率变化),并从中检测到明显的周日、半日自转变化。与海潮模型所预测的结果进行比较,在主要的周日、半日潮波频率上,两者的振幅和相位符合得较好,特别是对U T 1,符合度为90%左右,极移为60%左右。目前,仍有30%的极移周日、半日激发因素没有确定。然后对20世纪80年代以来关于极移和UT1的周日、半日变化研究应用,以及不同的全球海潮改正模型作了较为全面的综述,现有的海潮改正模型存在10%∼20%的误差,需要进一步的精化。最后对周日、半日地球自转变化的未来研究工作作了简单的展望。%We mainly focus on the progress of research on high frequency changes in the earth rotation. Firstly, we review the development course and main motivating factors of the diurnal and semidiurnal earth rotation change. In recent decades, earth orientation has been monitored with increasing accuracy by advanced space-geodetic techniques, including lunar and satellite laser ranging, very long baseline interferometry and the global positioning system. We are able to obtain the Earth Rotation Parameters (ERP, polar motion and rotation rate changes) by even 1 to 2 hours observation data, form which obvious diurnal and semidiurnal signals can be detected, and compare them with the predicted results by the ocean model. Both the amplitude and phase are in good agreement in the main diurnal and semidiurnal wave frequency, especially for the UT1, whose compliance is 90%, and 60%for polar motion, there are 30%motivating factor of the diurnal and semidiurnal polar motion have not been identified. Then

  2. Ozone Nonattainment Areas - 1 Hour

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This data layer identifies areas in the U.S. where air pollution levels have not met the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for Ozone - 1hour (Legacy...

  3. How extreme is extreme hourly precipitation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalexiou, Simon Michael; Dialynas, Yannis G.; Pappas, Christoforos

    2016-04-01

    The importance of accurate representation of precipitation at fine time scales (e.g., hourly), directly associated with flash flood events, is crucial in hydrological design and prediction. The upper part of a probability distribution, known as the distribution tail, determines the behavior of extreme events. In general, and loosely speaking, tails can be categorized in two families: the subexponential and the hyperexponential family, with the first generating more intense and more frequent extremes compared to the latter. In past studies, the focus has been mainly on daily precipitation, with the Gamma distribution being the most popular model. Here, we investigate the behaviour of tails of hourly precipitation by comparing the upper part of empirical distributions of thousands of records with three general types of tails corresponding to the Pareto, Lognormal, and Weibull distributions. Specifically, we use thousands of hourly rainfall records from all over the USA. The analysis indicates that heavier-tailed distributions describe better the observed hourly rainfall extremes in comparison to lighter tails. Traditional representations of the marginal distribution of hourly rainfall may significantly deviate from observed behaviours of extremes, with direct implications on hydroclimatic variables modelling and engineering design.

  4. Diurnal variation of atmospheric water vapor at Gale crater: Analysis from ground-based measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, German; McConnochie, Timothy; Renno, Nilton; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Fischer, Erik; Vicente-Retortillo, Alvaro; Borlina, Caue; Kemppinen, Osku; Genzer, Maria; Harri, Ari-Matti; de la Torre-Juárez, Manuel; Zorzano, Mari-Paz; Martin-Torres, Javier; Bridges, Nathan; Maurice, Sylvestre; Gasnault, Olivier; Gomez-Elvira, Javier; Wiens, Roger

    2016-04-01

    We analyze measurements obtained by Curiosity's Rover Environmental Monitoring Station (REMS) and ChemCam (CCAM) instruments to shed light on the hydrological cycle at Gale crater. In particular, we use nighttime REMS measurements taken when the atmospheric volume mixing ratio (VMR) and its uncertainty are the lowest (between 05:00 and 06:00 LTST) [1], and daytime CCAM passive sky measurements taken when the VMR is expected to be the highest (between 10:00 and 14:00 LTST) [2]. VMR is calculated from simultaneous REMS measurements of pressure (P), temperature (T) and relative humidity (RH) at 1.6 m (VMR is defined as RH×es(T)/P , where es is the saturation water vapor pressure over ice). The REMS relative humidity sensor has recently been recalibrated (June 2015), providing RH values slightly lower than those in the previous calibration (Dec 2014). The full diurnal cycle of VMR cannot be analyzed using only REMS data because the uncertainty in daytime VMR derived from REMS measurements is extremely high. Daytime VMR is inferred by fitting the output of a multiple-scattering discrete-ordinates radiative transfer model to CCAM passive sky observations [3]. CCAM makes these observations predominately in the vicinity of 11:00 - 12:00 LTST, but occasionally in the early morning near 08:00 LTST. We find that throughout the Martian year, the daytime VMR is higher than at night, with a maximum day-to-night ratio of about 6 during winter. Various processes might explain the differences between nighttime REMS and daytime CCAM VMR values. Potential explanations include: (i) surface nighttime frost formation followed by daytime sublimation [1], (ii) surface nighttime adsorption of water vapor by the regolith followed by daytime desorption and (iii) large scale circulations changing vertical H2O profiles at different times of the year. Potential formation of surface frost can only occur in late fall and winter [1], coinciding with the time when the diurnal amplitude of the near

  5. Observed diurnal variation changes of Jakarta precipitation from 144 available meteorological records

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siswanto, Siswanto; van Oldenborgh, Geert Jan; van den Hurk, Bart; Jilderda, Rudmer

    2013-04-01

    Using a long available meteorological observation for almost 114 years hourly and daily record from Jakarta Observatory, the temporal heterogeneity of climate trends and its variability over Jakarta, Indonesia has been studied. The analyses showed that the number of wet days has decreased between 1880 and 2010, while the precipitation exceeding 50 mm is observed to be slightly increased. An increased trend of heavy rainfall in the 80% and 95% percentile between April and September was detected. Diurnal variation of Jakarta precipitation and temperature changed markedly. In the wet season (DJF), the morning rainfall has increased in intensity, while in other seasons; delayed amplitude of late afternoon rainfall peak is observed. The diurnal variation of night time temperature considerably increased while daytime temperature remains similar. Changes in temporal characteristics of light and heavy precipitation, as well as the diurnal variation of precipitation and temperature lead to hypotheses concerning anthropogenic influence. Some theoretical arguments on Urban Heat Island and aerosol effect precipitation could be linked to our results. Jakarta is a metropolitan city where its development is characterized by mixing of many different land uses and economic activities, including large-scale housing projects, industrial estates, and agricultural activities. In the future, the separation of local response to large scale and local changes will be investigated.

  6. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenstein, O.

    2015-12-01

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand / biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  7. Diurnal emissivity dynamics in bare versus biocrusted sand dunes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozenstein, Offer; Agam, Nurit; Serio, Carmine; Masiello, Guido; Venafra, Sara; Achal, Stephen; Puckrin, Eldon; Karnieli, Arnon

    2015-02-15

    Land surface emissivity (LSE) in the thermal infrared depends mainly on the ground cover and on changes in soil moisture. The LSE is a critical variable that affects the prediction accuracy of geophysical models requiring land surface temperature as an input, highlighting the need for an accurate derivation of LSE. The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diurnal changes in emissivity, as detected from space, are larger for areas mostly covered by biocrusts (composed mainly of cyanobacteria) than for bare sand areas. The LSE dynamics were monitored from geostationary orbit by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infrared Imager (SEVIRI) over a sand dune field in a coastal desert region extending across both sides of the Israel-Egypt political borderline. Different land-use practices by the two countries have resulted in exposed, active sand dunes on the Egyptian side (Sinai), and dunes stabilized by biocrusts on the Israeli side (Negev). Since biocrusts adsorb more moisture from the atmosphere than bare sand does, and LSE is affected by the soil moisture, diurnal fluctuations in LSE were larger for the crusted dunes in the 8.7 μm channel. This phenomenon is attributed to water vapor adsorption by the sand/biocrust particles. The results indicate that LSE is sensitive to minor changes in soil water content caused by water vapor adsorption and can, therefore, serve as a tool for quantifying this effect, which has a large spatial impact. As biocrusts cover vast regions in deserts worldwide, this discovery has repercussions for LSE estimations in deserts around the globe, and these LSE variations can potentially have considerable effects on geophysical models from local to regional scales.

  8. Study of Diurnal Cycle Variability of Planetary Boundary Layer Characteristics over the Red Sea and Arabian Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Li, Weigang

    2012-07-01

    This work is aimed at investigating diurnal cycle variability of the planetary boundary layer characteristics over the Arabian Peninsula and the Red Sea region. To fulfill this goal the downscaling simulations are performed using Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model. We analyze planetary boundary layer height, latent and sensible heat fluxes, and surface air temperature. The model results are compared with observations in different areas, for different seasons, and for different model resolutions. The model results are analyzed in order to better quantify the diurnal cycle variability over the Arabian Peninsula and the Red Sea. The specific features of this region are investigated and discussed.

  9. Children's Diurnal Cortisol Activity during the First Year of School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pei-Jung; Lamb, Michael E.; Kappler, Gregor; Ahnert, Lieselotte

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined 4- to 5-year-old British children's diurnal cortisol activity during their first year of school. The children's cortisol was measured before enrollment (baseline), upon enrollment, and both 3 and 6 months after enrollment. On each day, cortisol was sampled four times, providing information about the diurnal amount of…

  10. Children's Diurnal Cortisol Activity during the First Year of School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Pei-Jung; Lamb, Michael E.; Kappler, Gregor; Ahnert, Lieselotte

    2017-01-01

    The present study examined 4- to 5-year-old British children's diurnal cortisol activity during their first year of school. The children's cortisol was measured before enrollment (baseline), upon enrollment, and both 3 and 6 months after enrollment. On each day, cortisol was sampled four times, providing information about the diurnal amount of…

  11. Why Surface Nanobubbles Live for Hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijs, Joost; Lohse, Detlef

    2013-01-01

    We present a theoretical model for the experimentally found but counterintuitive exceptionally long lifetime of surface nanobubbles. We can explain why, under normal experimental conditions, surface nanobubbles are stable for many hours or even up to days rather than the expected microseconds. The

  12. Constructing gridded hourly temperature data sets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumitrescu, Alexandru

    2013-04-01

    Air temperature is the main climatological element, with major impact on the earth-atmosphere energy balance. The characteristics of the surface air temperature in locations without meteorological measurements are obtained using spatio-temporal interpolation techniques. Gridded surface meteorological data are essential for evaluating the performance of regional climate models (RCMs), for applying Statistical Downscaling (SD) methods and as input data for hydrological models. In this study we proposed a methodolgy for interpolating hourly surface temperatures. Three gridding methods are compared. A two-step multivariate gridding approach was used. First we interpolated the hourly normal maps, considered as multiannual average (1961-2010), of air temperature for each hour (4 meteorological terms) of a standard year (366 days). In this step, the Residual Kriging method was used with potential predictors derived from DEM and Landcover Corinne. For interpolating the residuals of the regression model we tested 3 gridding methods: Multiquadratic (MQ), Ordinary Kriging (OK) and 3D Kriging (using time as a third dimension). In the second step, we calculated the anomalies of each hour, day, year for the period 1961-2010. The anomalies were interpolated using the same methods applied for gridding regression residuals. The final hourly surface air temperature maps were obtained by summing the maps from first step with the anomlies map. The main data used in this work were the hourly air temperatures of the 4 observation terms (01, 07, 13, 19), measured between 1961-2010 at the weather stations of the Romanian Meteorological Administration. The predictors were derived from SRTM (Shuttle Radar Topography Mission) DEM and from CORINE Land Cover 2000 product. The gridding was performed in a Romanian National Grid (Stereo 70), at 1 km2 spatial resolution, using R language. The study has been financed by the research project Changes in climate extremes and associated impact in

  13. A One-Year Study of the Diurnal Cycle of Meteorology, Clouds, and Radiation in the West African Sahel Region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marquardt-Collow, Allison; Ghate, Virendra P.; Miller, Mark A.; Trabachino, Lynne

    2016-01-09

    The diurnal cycles of meteorological and radiation variables are analyzed during the wet and dry seasons over the Sahel region of West Africa during 2006 using surface data collected by the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program’s Mobile Facility, satellite radiation measurements from the Geostationary Earth Radiation Budget (GERB) instrument aboard Meteosat 8, and reanalysis products from the National Center for Environmental Prediction (NCEP). The meteorological analysis builds upon past studies of the diurnal cycle in the region by incorporating diurnal cycles of lower tropospheric wind profiles, thermodynamic profiles, integrated water vapor and liquid water measurements, and cloud radar measurements of frequency and location. These meteorological measurements are complemented by 3-hour measurements of the diurnal cycles of the TOA and surface shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) radiative fluxes and cloud radiative effects (CREs), and the atmospheric radiative flux divergence (RFD) and atmospheric CREs. Cirrus cloudiness during the dry season is shown to peak in coverage in the afternoon, while convective clouds during the wet season are shown to peak near dawn and have an afternoon minimum related to the rise of the Lifting Condensation Level into the Saharan Air Layer. The LW and SW RFDs and CREs exhibit diurnal cycles during both seasons, but there is a relatively small difference in the LW cycles during the two seasons (10-30 Wm^(-2) depending on the variable and time of day). Small differences in the TOA CREs during the two seasons are overwhelmed by large differences in the surface SW CREs, which exceed 100 Wm^(-2). A significant surface SW CRE during the wet season combined with a negligible TOA SW CRE produces a diurnal cycle in the atmospheric CRE that is modulated primarily by the SW surface CRE, peaks at midday at ~150 Wm^(-2), and varies widely from day to day.

  14. The influence of high and low levels of estrogen on diurnal urine regulation in young women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bie Peter

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sex hormones have a pronounced effect on arginine vasopressin (AVP, and therefore on the diurnal water homeostasis. Low and high levels of plasma-estradiol as seen in the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle may therefore alter the diurnal regulation of urine production. Furthermore the structural resemblance of oxytocin to vasopressin has led to speculations about the possible antidiuretic properties of oxytocin under normal physiological conditions. To elucidate the influence of high and low p-estradiol on the regulation of the diurnal urine production, 15 normal menstruating women (21–33 y underwent two circadian in-patient investigations, both situated in follicular phase. Methods Admitting the participants solely in the follicular phase resulted in high and low plasma-estradiol whereas plasma-progesterone was similar. Urine and blood samples were taken at predetermined time points to determine plasma AVP, plasma oxytocin, plasma aldosterone, plasma natriuretic peptide (ANP, urinary solute excretions, and urinary excretions of prostaglandin E2 (PGE-2 and aquaporin-2 (AQP-2. Blood pressure was measured every hour. Results Plasma AVP, plasma aldosterone and plasma ANP were unaffected by the different levels of estradiol. All had marked circadian variations whereas oxytocin did not display any circadian rhythm. High estradiol resulted in lower p-osmolality and p-sodium reflecting the downward resetting of the osmoreceptors. Oxytocin did not correlate with either diuresis or urine osmolality. The diurnal urine production was similar in the two groups as were urine osmolality, excretion of PGE-2 and AQP-2. AQP-2 does not have a circadian rhythm and is not significantly correlated to either AVP or oxytocin under normal physiological conditions. Conclusion High and low level of estradiol has no influence on the circadian rhythm of AVP or the subsequent urine production. High p-estradiol resets the osmoreceptors for AVP

  15. Diurnal Emotional States Impact the Sleep Course.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julien Delannoy

    Full Text Available Diurnal emotional experiences seem to affect several characteristics of sleep architecture. However, this influence remains unclear, especially for positive emotions. In addition, electrodermal activity (EDA, a sympathetic robust indicator of emotional arousal, differs depending on the sleep stage. The present research has a double aim: to identify the specific effects of pre-sleep emotional states on the architecture of the subsequent sleep period; to relate such states to the sympathetic activation during the same sleep period.Twelve healthy volunteers (20.1 ± 1.0 yo. participated in the experiment and each one slept 9 nights at the laboratory, divided into 3 sessions, one per week. Each session was organized over three nights. A reference night, allowing baseline pre-sleep and sleep recordings, preceded an experimental night before which participants watched a negative, neutral, or positive movie. The third and last night was devoted to analyzing the potential recovery or persistence of emotional effects induced before the experimental night. Standard polysomnography and EDA were recorded during all the nights.Firstly, we found that experimental pre-sleep emotional induction increased the Rapid Eye Movement (REM sleep rate following both negative and positive movies. While this increase was spread over the whole night for positive induction, it was limited to the second half of the sleep period for negative induction. Secondly, the valence of the pre-sleep movie also impacted the sympathetic activation during Non-REM stage 3 sleep, which increased after negative induction and decreased after positive induction.Pre-sleep controlled emotional states impacted the subsequent REM sleep rate and modulated the sympathetic activity during the sleep period. The outcomes of this study offer interesting perspectives related to the effect of diurnal emotional influences on sleep regulation and open new avenues for potential practices designed to

  16. Temporal patterns, heterogeneity, and stability of diurnal cortisol rhythms in children with autism spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomarken, Andrew J; Han, Gloria T; Corbett, Blythe A

    2015-12-01

    The current study used a multifaceted approach to assess whether children with ASD have a distinctive diurnal rhythm of cortisol that differentiates them from typically developing (TD) peers and whether sub-groups of ASD children can be identified with unique diurnal profiles. Salivary cortisol was sampled at four time points during the day (waking, 30-min post-waking, afternoon, and evening) across three days in a sample of 36 children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and 27 typically developing (TD) peers. Between-group comparisons on both mean levels and featural components of diurnal cortisol indicated elevated evening cortisol and a dampened linear decline across the day in the ASD group. No differences were evident on the cortisol awakening response (CAR). Group-based trajectory modeling indicated that a subgroup (25%) of ASD children demonstrated an attenuated linear decline while the cortisol trajectory of the second subgroup was indistinguishable from that of the TD group. Intraclass correlations indicated that, when aggregated across days, cortisol measures were generally stable over the interval assessed. There were few significant relations between cortisol measures or sub-groups and measures of stress, temperament, and symptoms. Results encourage follow-up studies to investigate the functional significance, heterogeneity and longer-term stability of diurnal cortisol profiles in children with ASD.

  17. How Long Does It Take to Learn a Second Language?: Applying the "10,000-Hour Rule" as a Model for Fluency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Sarah Elaine

    2011-01-01

    This study applies the model of expertise developed by Ericsson et al (2007) to second and foreign language learning. Ericsson et al posits that in order to achieve expertise (as they define it) requires 10,000 or longer of "intense training". Applying this model to language learning, equating an expert level of competence with fluency, various…

  18. Diurnal Human Activity and Introduced Species Affect Occurrence of Carnivores in a Human-Dominated Landscape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dario Moreira-Arce

    Full Text Available Diurnal human activity and domestic dogs in agro-forestry mosaics should theoretically modify the diurnal habitat use patterns of native carnivores, with these effects being scale-dependent. We combined intensive camera trapping data with Bayesian occurrence probability models to evaluate both diurnal and nocturnal patterns of space use by carnivores in a mosaic of land-use types in southern Chile. A total of eight carnivores species were recorded, including human-introduced dogs. During the day the most frequently detected species were the culpeo fox and the cougar. Conversely, during the night, the kodkod and chilla fox were the most detected species. The best supported models showed that native carnivores responded differently to landscape attributes and dogs depending on both the time of day as well as the spatial scale of landscape attributes. The positive effect of native forest cover at 250 m and 500 m radius buffers was stronger during the night for the Darwin's fox and cougar. Road density at 250 m scale negatively affected the diurnal occurrence of Darwin´s fox, whereas at 500 m scale roads had a stronger negative effect on the diurnal occurrence of Darwin´s foxes and cougars. A positive effect of road density on dog occurrence was evidenced during both night and day. Patch size had a positive effect on cougar occurrence during night whereas it affected negatively the occurrence of culpeo foxes and skunks during day. Dog occurrence had a negative effect on Darwin's fox occurrence during day-time and night-time, whereas its negative effect on the occurrence of cougar was evidenced only during day-time. Carnivore occurrences were not influenced by the proximity to a conservation area. Our results provided support for the hypothesis that diurnal changes to carnivore occurrence were associated with human and dog activity. Landscape planning in our study area should be focused in reducing both the levels of diurnal human activity in

  19. Diurnal Human Activity and Introduced Species Affect Occurrence of Carnivores in a Human-Dominated Landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira-Arce, Dario; Vergara, Pablo M; Boutin, Stan

    2015-01-01

    Diurnal human activity and domestic dogs in agro-forestry mosaics should theoretically modify the diurnal habitat use patterns of native carnivores, with these effects being scale-dependent. We combined intensive camera trapping data with Bayesian occurrence probability models to evaluate both diurnal and nocturnal patterns of space use by carnivores in a mosaic of land-use types in southern Chile. A total of eight carnivores species were recorded, including human-introduced dogs. During the day the most frequently detected species were the culpeo fox and the cougar. Conversely, during the night, the kodkod and chilla fox were the most detected species. The best supported models showed that native carnivores responded differently to landscape attributes and dogs depending on both the time of day as well as the spatial scale of landscape attributes. The positive effect of native forest cover at 250 m and 500 m radius buffers was stronger during the night for the Darwin's fox and cougar. Road density at 250 m scale negatively affected the diurnal occurrence of Darwin´s fox, whereas at 500 m scale roads had a stronger negative effect on the diurnal occurrence of Darwin´s foxes and cougars. A positive effect of road density on dog occurrence was evidenced during both night and day. Patch size had a positive effect on cougar occurrence during night whereas it affected negatively the occurrence of culpeo foxes and skunks during day. Dog occurrence had a negative effect on Darwin's fox occurrence during day-time and night-time, whereas its negative effect on the occurrence of cougar was evidenced only during day-time. Carnivore occurrences were not influenced by the proximity to a conservation area. Our results provided support for the hypothesis that diurnal changes to carnivore occurrence were associated with human and dog activity. Landscape planning in our study area should be focused in reducing both the levels of diurnal human activity in native forest remnants

  20. Dysregulation of the cortisol diurnal rhythm following prenatal alcohol exposure and early life adversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Kaitlyn; Rasmussen, Carmen; Oberlander, Tim F; Loock, Christine; Pei, Jacqueline; Andrew, Gail; Reynolds, James; Weinberg, Joanne

    2016-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is impacted by a multitude of pre- and postnatal factors. Developmental programming of HPA axis function by prenatal alcohol exposure (PAE) has been demonstrated in animal models and in human infants, but remains understudied in older children and adolescents. Moreover, early life adversity (ELA), which occurs at higher rates in children with PAE than in non-exposed children, may also play a role in programming the stress response system. In a cohort of children and adolescents with PAE and ELA (PAE + ELA), we evaluated HPA function through assessment of diurnal cortisol activity compared to that in typically developing controls, as well as the associations among specific ELAs, adverse outcomes, protective factors, and diurnal cortisol. Morning and evening saliva samples were taken under basal conditions from 42 children and adolescents (5-18 years) with PAE + ELA and 43 typically developing controls. High rates of ELA were shown among children with PAE, and significantly higher evening cortisol levels and a flatter diurnal slope were observed in children with PAE + ELA, compared to controls. Medication use in the PAE + ELA group was associated with lower morning cortisol levels, which were comparable to controls. Complex associations were found among diurnal cortisol patterns in the PAE + ELA group and a number of ELAs and later adverse outcomes, whereas protective factors were associated with more typical diurnal rhythms. These results complement findings from research on human infants and animal models showing dysregulated HPA function following PAE, lending weight to the suggestion that PAE and ELA may interact to sensitize the developing HPA axis. The presence of protective factors may buffer altered cortisol regulation, underscoring the importance of early assessment and interventions for children with FASD, and in particular, for the many children with FASD who also have ELA.

  1. Water stress induced breakdown of carbon-water relations: indicators from diurnal FLUXNET patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Jacob; Carvalhais, Nuno; Migliavacca, Mirco; Reichstein, Markus; Jung, Martin

    2017-04-01

    Understanding of terrestrial carbon and water cycles is currently hampered by an uncertainty in how to capture the large variety of plant responses to drought across climates, ecological strategies, and environments. In FLUXNET, many sites do not uniformly report the ancillary variables needed to study drought response physiology such as soil moisture, sap flux, or species composition. In this sense, the use of diurnal patters to derive clues on ecosystem water limitation responses at a daily resolution from an existing dataset could prove valuable, if nothing less than a benchmark to test current hypotheses. To this end, we propose two data-driven indicators derived directly from the eddy covariance data and based on expected physiological responses to hydraulic and non-stomatal limitations. Hydraulic limitations are proxied using the normalized diurnal centroid, which measures the degree to which the flux of ET is shifted toward the morning. Non-stomatal limitations are characterized by the Diurnal Water:Carbon Index (DWCI), which measures the degree of coupling between daily ET and GPP fluxes. Globally, we found significantly high frequencies of morning shifted days in dry/Mediterranean climates and savanna plant functional types (PFT), whereas high frequencies of decoupling were found in dry climates and grassland/savanna PFTs. Overall, both the diurnal centroid and DWCI were associated with high net radiation and low latent energy. Using three water use efficiency (WUE) models, we found the mean difference between expected and observed WUE to be 0.09 to -0.23 umol/mmol and -0.42 to -0.49 umol/mmol for decoupled and morning shifted days respectively, indicating an increase in WUE associated with the metrics that the models were unable to capture. Furthermore we discuss the application of diurnal centroid and DWCI to methods of evapotranspiration partitioning and estimation of ecosystem isohydricity.

  2. Practical limitations on the use of diurnal temperature signals to quantify groundwater upwelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Martin; Lautz, Laura K.; Buckley, Sean F.; Lane, Jr., John W.

    2014-01-01

    Groundwater upwelling to streams creates unique habitat by influencing stream water quality and temperature; upwelling zones also serve as vectors for contamination when groundwater is degraded. Temperature time series data acquired along vertical profiles in the streambed have been applied to simple analytical models to determine rates of vertical fluid flux. These models are based on the downward propagation characteristics (amplitude attenuation and phase-lag) of the surface diurnal signal. Despite the popularity of these models, there are few published characterizations of moderate-to-strong upwelling. We attribute this limitation to the thermodynamics of upwelling, under which the downward conductive signal transport from the streambed interface occurs opposite the upward advective fluid flux. Governing equations describing the advection–diffusion of heat within the streambed predict that under upwelling conditions, signal amplitude attenuation will increase, but, counterintuitively, phase-lag will decrease. Therefore the extinction (measurable) depth of the diurnal signal is very shallow, but phase lag is also short, yielding low signal to noise ratio and poor model sensitivity. Conversely, amplitude attenuation over similar sensor spacing is strong, yielding greater potential model sensitivity. Here we present streambed thermal time series over a range of moderate to strong upwelling sites in the Quashnet River, Cape Cod, Massachusetts. The predicted inverse relationship between phase-lag and rate of upwelling was observed in the field data over a range of conditions, but the observed phase-lags were consistently shorter than predicted. Analytical solutions for fluid flux based on signal amplitude attenuation return results consistent with numerical models and physical seepage meters, but the phase-lag analytical model results are generally unreasonable. Through numerical modeling we explore reasons why phase-lag may have been over-predicted by the

  3. Investigating the diurnal and spatial variability of flows in the atmospheric boundary layer: A large eddy simulation study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Vijayant

    Large-eddy simulation (LES) studies of the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) have historically modeled the daytime (convective), nighttime (stable) and dawn/dusk windy (neutral) regimes separately under the assumption of a quasi-steady ABL. The real-world ABL however, continuously transitions between the different stability regimes and development of an LES capable of simulating the entire diurnal evolution of the ABL is needed. We have developed an LES tool (The JHU-LES code) with the new-generation Lagrangian dynamic models capable of dynamic adjustment of the subgrid-scale stresses thereby, making it apt for LES over entire diurnal cycles of the ABL. Preliminary LES studies demonstrate that the JHU-LES code reproduces well-known features of the quasi-steady convective and stable boundary layers, such as the well-known spectral scalings for production and inertial subranges. LES of the entire 24-hour diurnal evolution of the atmospheric boundary layer is then performed and compared successfully to field observations (HATS dataset). Important features of the diurnal ABL such as entrainment-based growth of the CBL, development of the stable boundary layer and evolution of the nocturnal low-level jet are well reproduced. The advantages of using a local Obukhov length-scale to normalize the results are highlighted. To investigate the role of surface boundary conditions and geostrophic wind forcing, LES investigations of multi-day evolution of the ABL flow are then performed with several combinations of surface boundary conditions (imposed temperature and heat flux) and geostrophic forcing (constant, time-varying, time and height varying). The variable geostrophic forcing significantly improves the agreement of LES results with surface flux observations but shows poor agreement with daytime surface fluxes and, daytime and nighttime mean profiles. The LES setup using an imposed surface temperature almost always yields better results than cases where the heat flux is

  4. Report on Integration of Existing Grid Models for N-R HES Interaction Focused on Balancing Authorities for Sub-hour Penalties and Opportunities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McJunkin, Timothy; Epiney, Aaron; Rabiti, Cristian

    2017-06-01

    This report provides a summary of the effort in the Nuclear-Renewable Hybrid Energy System (N-R HES) project on the level 4 milestone to consider integration of existing grid models into the factors for optimization on shorter time intervals than the existing electric grid models with the Risk Analysis Virtual Environment (RAVEN) and Modelica [1] optimizations and economic analysis that are the focus of the project to date.

  5. A Linear Regression Model Identifying the Primary Factors Contributing to Maintenance Man Hours for the C-17 Globemaster III in the Air National Guard

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-15

    correlations of the individual variables with each other in a one to one relationship. Variance Inflation Factor ( VIF ) analysis was also conducted to further...accuracy of the model.   31    VIF determines if the variances of the estimated coefficients in the regression model are inflated due to...larger the variance of bk (Simon, 2004). The VIF itself is comprised of the last portion of the equation: 1 1 According to Dr. Simon, VIF values

  6. Excel VBA 24-hour trainer

    CERN Document Server

    Urtis, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Master VBA automation quickly and easily to get more out of Excel Excel VBA 24-Hour Trainer, 2nd Edition is the quick-start guide to getting more out of Excel, using Visual Basic for Applications. This unique book/video package has been updated with fifteen new advanced video lessons, providing a total of eleven hours of video training and 45 total lessons to teach you the basics and beyond. This self-paced tutorial explains Excel VBA from the ground up, demonstrating with each advancing lesson how you can increase your productivity. Clear, concise, step-by-step instructions are combined wit

  7. Regional-scale simulation of transport and transformations of semi-volatile polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in East Asia: diurnal variations investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Qing; Lammel, Gerhard; Cheng, Yafang

    2015-04-01

    Semi-volatile PAHs are major pollutants of urban air, mostly regionally transported and reaching remote environments[1]. Some semi-volatile PAHs are carcinogenic. About 22% of global PAHs emissions are in China. The transport and sinks (atmospheric reactions, deposition) of semi-volatile PAHs in East Asia are studied using a modified version of the Weather Research and Forecasting model coupled with chemistry (WRF/Chem [2]). For this purpose, PAHs' gas and particulate phase chemical reactions and dry and wet deposition processes are included. We use emissions of 2008 [3] which include technical combustion processes (coal, oil, gas, waste and biomass) and open fires and apply diurnal time functions as those of black carbon. The model was run for phenanthrene (3-ring PAH, p = 1.5×10-2 Pa at 298 K) and benzo(a)pyrene (5-ring PAH, p = 7×10-7 Pa) for July 2013 with hourly output and 27 km horizontal grid spacing. The comparison of model predicted phenanthrene concentrations with measurements at a rural site near Beijing (own data, unpublished) validates the model's ability to simulate diurnal variations of gaseous PAHs. The model's performance is better in simulating day time than night time gaseous PAHs. The concentrations of PAHs had experienced significant diurnal variations in rural and remote areas of China. Elevated concentration levels of 40-60 ng m-3 for phenanthrene and 1-10 ng m-3 for benzo(a)pyrene are predicted in Shanxi, Guizhou, the North China Plain, the Sichuan Basin and Chongqing metropolitan areas due to the high emission densities at those locations. References [1] Keyte, I.J., Harrison, R.M., and Lammel, G., 2013: Chemical reactivity and long-range transport potential of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons - a review, Chem. Soc. Rev., 42, 9333-9391. [2] Grell, G.A, Peckham, S.E, Schmitz, R, McKeen, S.A, Frost, G, Skamarock, W.C, and Eder, B., 2005: Fully coupled online chemistry within the WRF model, Atmos. Environ., 39, 6957-6975. [3] Shen, H. Z

  8. [Twenty-four hour time and frequency domain variability of systolic blood pressure and heart rate in an experimental model of arterial hypertension plus obesity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelat, M; Verwaerde, P; Lazartiques, E; Cabrol, P; Galitzky, J; Berlan, M; Montastruc, J L; Senard, J M

    1998-08-01

    Modifications of heart rate (HR) and systolic blood pressure (SBP) variabilities (V) have been reported in the human syndrome arterial hypertension plus insulin-resistance. The aim of this study was to characterize the 24 h SBPV and HRV in both time and frequency domains during weight increase in dogs fed ad libitum with a high fat diet. Implantable transmitter units for measurement of blood pressure and heart rate were surgically implanted in five beagle male dogs. BP and HR were continuously recorded using telemetric measurements during 24 hours, before and after 6 and 9 weeks of hypercaloric diet in quiet animals submitted to a 12h light-dark cycle. To study nychtemeral cycle of SBP and HR, two periods were chosen: day (from 6.00 h to 19.00 h) and night (from 23.00 h to 6.00 h). Spontaneous baroreflex efficiency was measured using the sequence method. Spectral variability of HR and SBP was analyzed using a fast Fourier transformation on 512 consecutive values and normalized units of low (LF: 50-150 mHz, reflecting sympathetic activity) and high (HF: respiratory rate +/- 50 mHz, reflecting parasympathetic activity) frequency bands were calculated. The energy of total spectrum (from 0.004 to 1 Hz) was also studied. Body weight (12.4 +/- 0.9 vs 14.9 +/- 0.9 kg, p < 0.05). SBP (132 +/- 1 vs 147 +/- 1 mmHg, p < 0.05) significantly increased after 9 weeks of hypercaloric diet. A nycthemeral HR rhythm was present at baseline (day: 79 +/- 1 vs night: 71 +/- 1 bpm) but not after 9 weeks (day: 91 +/- 4 bpm ; night: 86 +/- 2 bpm). Concomitantly, the efficiency of spontaneous baroreflex decreased at 6 weeks (36 +/- 1 vs 42 +/- 2 mmHg/ms, p < 0.05). A significant decrease in HF energy of HRV was found after 6 but not after 9 weeks. LF energy of SBPV was increased at 6 but not at 9 weeks (table). [table: see text] In conclusion, this study shows that an hyperlipidic and hypercaloric diet induces transient variations in autonomic nervous system activity which could be the

  9. Effect of average diurnal barn airspace temperatures on prediction of their development during the day

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gustav Chládek

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A year-round (i.e. 365 days experiment was performed at the Mendel University Training Farm in Žabčice, Czech Republic (GPS 49°0’51.967”N and 16°36’14.614”E, the altitude 179 m with the aim to quantify the effect of the variation of average diurnal barn airspace temperatures on prediction of their changes during the day. Barn airspace temperatures were monitored daily in one-hour intervals and the recorded values were used for calculations of average diurnal temperatures. These were classified into 7 categories (i.e. below 0 °C; 0.1 to 5 °C; 5.1 to 10 °C; 10.1 to 15 °C; 15.1 to 20 °C; 20.1 to 25 °C and above 25 °C. Regarding this classification system, all differences between temperatures measured at identical hours but within various limits were statistically highly significant. The statistical analysis involved also the calculation of the third degree polynomial regression equations, which enabled to characterise the relationship between the temperature and the hour of measurement within the aforementioned categories of diurnal temperatures. Individual equations were markedly different and ranged from y = − 0.0019x3 + 0.0596x2 − 0.3797x − 1.2169 (for temperatures below 0 °C to y = − 0.0108x3 + 0.3297x2 − 1.9367x + 24.3931 (for temperatures above 25 °C. Correlation coefficients (r and coefficients of determination (R2 of these regression equations were generally very high and ranged from 0.872 to 0.976 and from 0.760 to 0.953, respectively. Regarding high values of both coefficients it can be concluded that the calculated equations enable a good and reliable prediction of the diurnal development of barn airspace temperatures.

  10. THE USE OF DIFFERENT LEVELS OF MULTI-ROOM MODELING APPROACH-APPLICATION TO BUILDING POLLUTION TRANSPORT AND EFFICIENCY OF OFF-HOUR VENTILATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Cherif Megri

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Several building simulation programs have been developed for design, analysis and prediction of the distribution of temperature, airflow and heat transfer between inside and outside of a building and/or between different zones of the same building. These programs are categorized as mono-zone models, multi-room models, zonal models, Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD models and multi-zone models. The number of computer programs continues to increase, each reflecting different objectives and concerns. Some of these computer programs are dedicated to research and others to design and auditing. However, none of the existing computer programs is able to translate automatically various steps of the design process as actually performed by design Architectural Engineering firms. This study addresses different levels of multi-room simulation programs developed through the last four decades. Two case studies using multi-room programs have been exposed to illustrate the appropriate use of various levels of this approach for design and analysis.

  11. [Assessment of arterial wall stiffness by 24-hour blood pressure monitoring].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korneva, V A; Kuznetsova, T Yu

    2016-01-01

    Arterial wall stiffness is an early marker of cardiovascular diseases. The gold standard for assessment of the stiffness of large vessels is presently pulse wave velocity (PWV). Work is in progress on the study of the reference values of PWV in people of different genders and ages. 24-hour blood pressure (BP) monitoring is not only a procedure that can estimate diurnal BP variability, but also monitor the indicators of vascular wall stiffness in a number of cases over a 24-hour period. The given review highlights the pathophysiology of arterial stiffness, methods for its assessment, and the aspects of use in therapeutic practice.

  12. 基于BP神经网络的城市时用水量分时段预测模型%Period-divided predictive model of urban hourly water consumption based on BP neural network

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向平; 张蒙; 张智; 张南

    2012-01-01

    At present there are scant studies on the impact factors of hourly water demand in the water demand prediction. This work investigated the main impact factors for the water consumption in different hours through the analysis on the correlation between the different impact factors and the hourly water consumption. The period-divided prediction model was established on the basis of three divided periods of one day. And BP neural network was used to predict. Precision index was indicated with MAPE value. Case analysis results show that for the established period-divided water consumption prediction model, MAPE values are all within 5%, which indicates a high prediction accuracy, and the water supply system optimization scheduling requirements can be met, providing a simple and feasible approach and method for the urban hourly water consumption prediction.%针对目前时用水量预测模型中对时用水量影响因素分析研究较少的问题,通过分析各种时用水量影响因素与时用水量之间的相关性,筛选出时用水量的主要影响因子;通过分类将1d划分为3个时段,建立分时段用水量模型.采用BP神经网络预测,精度指标采用平均绝对百分比误差(MAPE)表示.实例分析结果表明:模型预测MAPE均在5%以内,预测精度较高,满足供水系统优化调度的要求,为城市时用水量预测提供一种简单可行的思路和方法.

  13. Diurnal variation of precipitation over the Carolina Sandhills region

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Wootten; S Raman; A Sims

    2010-10-01

    The Carolina Sandhills are known to have an area of maximum precipitation on its western boundary during the summer mainly due to differences in soil types.Statistical analysis was performed on summer precipitation data from automated weather stations in the Carolinas,along the Sandhills for the years 2001 to 2006.Statistically significant difference was observed between the day and night precipitation amounts.A case study also revealed the diurnal pattern of convective precipitation. North American Mesoscale (NAM)model forecasts for the summers of 2004 to 2006 were evaluated using observations.The model underpredicted precipitation significantly during nights. A numerical simulation using Weather Research and Forecast (WRF)model was performed for August 9 –11,2001 and the forecasts were compared with observed precipitation data.The model precipitation forecasts were better for daytime as compared to the night.This feature is attributed to model physics not capturing cloud –radiation interaction processes dominant during nights. Although this study is for a specific region in the US,results are applicable for other regions for similar conditions.

  14. On the influence of the diurnal variations of aerosol content to estimate direct aerosol radiative forcing using MODIS data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hui; Guo, Jianping; Ceamanos, Xavier; Roujean, Jean-Louis; Min, Min; Carrer, Dominique

    2016-09-01

    Long-term measurements of aerosol optical depth (AOD) from the Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) located in Beijing reveal a strong diurnal cycle of aerosol load staged by seasonal patterns. Such pronounced variability is matter of importance in respect to the estimation of daily averaged direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF). Polar-orbiting satellites could only offer a daily revisit, which turns in fact to be even much less in case of frequent cloudiness. Indeed, this places a severe limit to properly capture the diurnal variations of AOD and thus estimate daily DARF. Bearing this in mind, the objective of the present study is however to evaluate the impact of AOD diurnal variations for conducting quantitative assessment of DARF using Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) AOD data over Beijing. We provide assessments of DARF with two different assumptions about diurnal AOD variability: taking the observed hourly-averaged AOD cycle into account and assuming constant MODIS (including Terra and Aqua) AOD value throughout the daytime. Due to the AOD diurnal variability, the absolute differences in annual daily mean DARFs, if the constant MODIS/Terra (MODIS/Aqua) AOD value is used instead of accounting for the observed hourly-averaged daily variability, is 1.2 (1.3) Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere, 27.5 (30.6) Wm-2 at the surface, and 26.4 (29.3) Wm-2 in the atmosphere, respectively. During the summertime, the impact of the diurnal AOD variability on seasonal daily mean DARF estimates using MODIS Terra (Aqua) data can reach up to 2.2 (3.9) Wm-2 at the top of the atmosphere, 43.7 (72.7) Wm-2 at the surface, and 41.4 (68.8) Wm-2 in the atmosphere, respectively. Overall, the diurnal variation in AOD tends to cause large bias in the estimated DARF on both seasonal and annual scales. In summertime, the higher the surface albedo, the stronger impact on DARF at the top of the atmosphere caused by dust and biomass burning (continental) aerosol. This

  15. Ozone Diurnal Variation in the PBL at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory During Summer 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newchurch, M.; Alvarez, R. J. _II, II; Brewer, A.; Brown, S. S.; Carrion, W.; Delgado, R.; De Young, R.; Huang, G.; Johnson, B.; Kuang, S.; Langford, A. O.; Lundquist, J. K.; McGee, T. J.; Pliutau, D.; Senff, C. J.; Sullivan, J. T.; Sumnicht, G. K.; Twigg, L.; Wang, L.

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the diurnal variation of PBL ozone at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory (BAO) in July 2014 using multiple observations, including three ozone DIALs, several wind Doppler lidars, free-launched and tethered ozonesondes, and in-situ measurements on the BAO tower. Three mobile lidars from the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar NETwork (TOLNET) provide high spatial and temporal ozone profiles from near surface to the top of the troposphere. The combination of multiple observations will provide detailed structure of the diurnal variation of ozone. This ozone information will help the satellite and modeling communities to study the character of lower tropospheric ozone for the improvements of satellite retrieval and air-quality models. In addition, a Large-Eddy Simulation model will calculate ozone in the mixed layer to explain the processes responsible for the observations.

  16. The effects of the diurnal atmospheric variability on entry, descent and landing on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marčeta D.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Landing on Mars is extremely challenging task due to the fact that the Martian atmosphere is the most hostile environment in the Solar system to perform the entry, descent and landing (EDL process, because it is thick enough to create substantial heating of the entry vehicle but not thick enough to reduce its velocity to the one necessary for safe landing. Beside this, the atmosphere is very dynamic mainly due to high eccentricity of the Martian orbit, obliquity of the orbital to the equatorial plane and close alignment of the winter solstice and the orbital perihelion. Although seasonal variations of atmospheric parameters are significantly larger than the diurnal, it is very important to analyze diurnal cycles as they can significantly change vertical and horizontal atmospheric profiles in very short time intervals. This can present a serious threat to missions which have very precise timings and specific requirements such as the requirement for the daytime landing to enable ground images acquisition during the descent and landing phase. A 3-degrees-of-freedom trajectory integration routine was combined with the Mars Global Reference Atmospheric Model (Mars-GRAM to identify the dependence of the EDL profiles on the diurnal cycles of atmospheric parameters throughout the Martian year. The obtained results show that the influence of the diurnal cycles is the largest at the equator and decreases relatively symmetrically towards the poles with a slightly stronger influence in the northern hemisphere. Also, there is a significant influence of the orbital position of Mars on the effect of diurnal atmospheric variations which causes that, around the orbital perihelion and winter solstice, there is some kind of inversion of the dependance of optimal entry timing on latitude of the landing site comparing to the rest of the Martian year. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 176002

  17. Development of a variational data assimilation system for the diurnal cycle of sea surface temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    While, J.; Martin, M.

    2013-06-01

    A variational data assimilation system based on an incremental 4D-Var approach is proposed for use with a zero-dimensional model of the diurnal cycle of sea surface temperature (SST). Traditional 4D-Var, which seeks to find the initial state of a system, is not appropriate for diurnal SST which is a wind and heat flux driven system that has only a limited memory of its prior state. Instead the proposed assimilation system corrects both the initial SST and the heat and wind fluxes applied throughout the day. The assimilation system is tested using ensembles in a set of idealized twin experiments. In these tests controlling parameters are varied around reasonable "default" values with the quality of the analyses assessed against a known "truth". Within our tests data assimilation is shown to improve diurnal SST under most circumstances. Analyzed heat fluxes are also sometimes improved, although the improvement is much less than that observed for diurnal SST. The system was not found to improve the wind stress. The only circumstances where diurnal SST was not found to be improved by the assimilation were where either observational errors were large (greater than 0.5 K in our tests), or biases in the observations were too big (less than -0.3 K or greater than 0.2 K). The non-Gaussian behavior of the wind stress was found to have an impact on the assimilation in low-wind conditions and under these conditions the best analyses were obtained by artificially inflating the observation error.

  18. TransCom model simulations of hourly atmospheric CO2: Analysis of synoptic-scale variations for the period 2002-2003

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Patra, P. K.; Law, R. M.; Peters, W.; RöDenbeck, C.; Takigawa, M.; Aulagnier, C.; Baker, I.; Bergmann, D. J.; Bousquet, P.; Brandt, J.; Bruhwiler, L.; Cameron-Smith, P. J.; Christensen, J. H.; Delage, F.; Denning, A. S.; Fan, S.; Geels, C.; Houweling, S.; Imasu, R.; Karstens, U.; Kawa, S. R.; Kleist, J.; Krol, M. C.; Lin, S.-J.; Lokupitiya, R.; Maki, T.; Maksyutov, S.; Niwa, Y.; Onishi, R.; Parazoo, N.; Pieterse, G.; Rivier, L.; Satoh, M.; Serrar, S.; Taguchi, S.; Vautard, R.; Vermeulen, A. T.; Zhu, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The ability to reliably estimate CO2 fluxes from current in situ atmospheric CO2 measurements and future satellite CO2 measurements is dependent on transport model performance at synoptic and shorter timescales. The TransCom continuous experiment was designed to evaluate the performance of forward t

  19. The diurnal variation in stratospheric ozone from the MACC reanalysis, the ERA-Interim reanalysis, WACCM and Earth observation data: characteristics and intercomparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Schanz

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study we compare the diurnal variation in stratospheric ozone derived from free-running simulations of the Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model (WACCM and from reanalysis data of the atmospheric service MACC (Monitoring Atmospheric Composition and Climate which both use a similar stratospheric chemistry module. We find good agreement between WACCM and the MACC reanalysis for the diurnal ozone variation in the high-latitude summer stratosphere based on photochemistry. In addition, we consult the ozone data product of the ERA-Interim reanalysis. The ERA-Interim reanalysis ozone system with its long-term ozone parametrization can not capture these diurnal variations in the upper stratosphere that are due to photochemistry. The good dynamics representations, however, reflects well dynamically induced ozone variations in the lower stratosphere. For the high-latitude winter stratosphere we describe a novel feature of diurnal variation in ozone where changes of up to 46.6% (3.3 ppmv occur in monthly mean data. For this effect good agreement between the ERA-Interim reanalysis and the MACC reanalysis suggest quite similar diurnal advection processes of ozone. The free-running WACCM model seriously underestimates the role of diurnal advection processes at the polar vortex at the two tested resolutions. The intercomparison of the MACC reanalysis and the ERA-Interim reanalysis demonstrates how global reanalyses can benefit from a chemical representation held by a chemical transport model. The MACC reanalysis provides an unprecedented description of the dynamics and photochemistry of the diurnal variation of stratospheric ozone which is of high interest for ozone trend analysis and research on atmospheric tides. We confirm the diurnal variation in ozone at 5 hPa by observations of the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES experiment and selected sites of the Network for Detection of Atmospheric Composition Change (NDACC

  20. Diurnal Dependence of Growth Responses to Shade in Arabidopsis: Role of Hormone, Clock,and Light Signaling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Romina Sellaro; Manuel Pacín; Jorge J. Casal

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the diurnal dependence of the hypocotyl-growth responses to shade under sunlight-night cycles in Arabidopsis thaliana.Afternoon shade events promoted hypocotyl growth,while morning shade was ineffective.The Ihy-D,elf3,lux,pif4 pif5,toc1,and quadruple della mutants retained the response to afternoon shade and the lack of response to morning shade while the Ihy cca 1 mutant responded to both morning and afternoon shade.The phyB mutant,plants overexpressing the multidrug resistance-like membrane protein ABCB19,and the iaa17/axr3 loss-of-function mutant failed to respond to shade.Transient exposure of sunlight-grown seedlings to synthetic auxin in the afternoon caused a stronger promotion of hypocotyl growth than morning treatments.The promotion of hypocotyl growth by afternoon shade or afternoon auxin required light perceived by phytochrome A or cryptochromes during the previous hours of the photoperiod.Although the ELF4-ELF3-LUX complex,PIF4,PIF5,and DELLA are key players in the generation of diurnal hypocotyl-growth patterns,they exert a minor role in the control of the diurnal pattern of growth responses to shade.We conclude that the strong diurnal dependency of hypocotyl-growth responses to shade relates to the balance between the antagonistic actions of LHY-CCA1 and a light-derived signal.

  1. Diurnal Salivary Cortisol is Associated With Body Mass Index and Waist Circumference: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Champaneri, Shivam; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Carnethon, Mercedes R.; Bertoni, Alain G.; Seeman, Teresa; DeSantis, Amy S.; Roux, Ana Diez; Shrager, Sandi; Golden, Sherita Hill

    2012-01-01

    Neuroendocrine abnormalities, such as activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, are associated with obesity; however, few large-scale population-based studies have examined HPA axis and markers of obesity. We examined the cross-sectional association of the cortisol awakening response (CAR) and diurnal salivary cortisol curve with obesity. The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis (MESA) Stress Study includes 1,002 White, Hispanic, and Black men and women (mean age 65±9.8 years) who collected up to 18 salivary cortisol samples over 3 days. Cortisol profiles were modeled using regression spline models that incorporated random parameters for subject-specific effects. Cortisol curve measures included awakening cortisol, CAR (awakening to 30 minutes post-awakening), early decline (30 minutes to 2 hours post-awakening), late decline (2 hours post-awakening to bedtime), and the corresponding areas under the curve (AUC). Body-mass-index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) were used to estimate adiposity. For the entire cohort, both BMI and WC were negatively correlated with awakening cortisol (p<0.05), AUC during awakening rise and early decline and positively correlated to the early decline slope (p<0.05) after adjustments for age, race/ethnicity, gender, diabetes status, socioeconomic status, beta blockers, steroids, hormone replacement therapy and smoking status. No heterogeneities of effects were observed by gender, age, and race/ethnicity. Higher BMI and WC are associated with neuroendocrine dysregulation, which is present in a large population sample, and only partially explained by other covariates. PMID:23404865

  2. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S.; Williams, H. R.

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system; and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  3. Simulation of diurnal thermal energy storage systems: Preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katipamula, S.; Somasundaram, S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Williams, H.R. [Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks, AK (United States). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    1994-12-01

    This report describes the results of a simulation of thermal energy storage (TES) integrated with a simple-cycle gas turbine cogeneration system. Integrating TES with cogeneration can serve the electrical and thermal loads independently while firing all fuel in the gas turbine. The detailed engineering and economic feasibility of diurnal TES systems integrated with cogeneration systems has been described in two previous PNL reports. The objective of this study was to lay the ground work for optimization of the TES system designs using a simulation tool called TRNSYS (TRaNsient SYstem Simulation). TRNSYS is a transient simulation program with a sequential-modular structure developed at the Solar Energy Laboratory, University of Wisconsin-Madison. The two TES systems selected for the base-case simulations were: (1) a one-tank storage model to represent the oil/rock TES system, and (2) a two-tank storage model to represent the molten nitrate salt TES system. Results of the study clearly indicate that an engineering optimization of the TES system using TRNSYS is possible. The one-tank stratified oil/rock storage model described here is a good starting point for parametric studies of a TES system. Further developments to the TRNSYS library of available models (economizer, evaporator, gas turbine, etc.) are recommended so that the phase-change processes is accurately treated.

  4. Sexual orientation and diurnal cortisol patterns in a cohort of U.S. young adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, S Bryn; Rosario, Margaret; McLaughlin, Katie A; Roberts, Andrea L; Gordon, Allegra R; Sarda, Vishnudas; Missmer, Stacey; Anatale-Tardiff, Laura; Scherer, Emily A

    2016-07-01

    Sexual minorities in the United States are at elevated risk of bullying, discrimination, and violence victimization, all stressors that have been linked to psychological and behavioral stress responses including depressive and anxious symptoms and substance use. Acute and chronic stressors may also elicit physiologic stress responses, including changes in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis. Few studies, however, have examined the relationship between minority sexual orientation and diurnal cortisol patterns. The present study included 1670 young adults ages 18-32 years (69% female, 31% male) from the Growing Up Today Study, a prospective cohort of U.S. youth. Participants provided five saliva samples over one day to estimate diurnal cortisol patterns. Sexual orientation groups included: completely heterosexual with no same-sex partners (referent), completely heterosexual with same-sex partners/mostly heterosexual, and gay/lesbian/bisexual. Covariates included perceived stress and stressful life events in the past month. Sex-stratified multilevel models of log-transformed cortisol values were used to model diurnal cortisol patterns, and generalized estimating equations were used to model area under the curve (AUC), both with respect to ground (AUCg) and increase (AUCi). Among females, sexual minorities reported significantly more stressful life events in the past month than their heterosexual counterparts. In adjusted multilevel models, sexual orientation was not significantly associated with diurnal cortisol patterns or with AUCg or AUCi in either females or males. There were no significant interactions between sexual orientation and stressful life events. Time-varying negative mood was significantly associated with higher cortisol levels across the day for both female and male participants, after adjusting for all covariates. This study from a large cohort of U.S. young adults did not detect a relationship between sexual

  5. Linking diurnal trends in methylmercury concentration and organic matter photo-reactivity in wetlands of the Yolo Bypass, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleck, J. A.; Downing, B. D.; Saraceno, J.; Gill, G.; Stephenson, M.; Bergamaschi, B. A.

    2008-12-01

    Aqueous concentrations of methylmercury (MeHg) are known to vary temporally and spatially due to multiple concurrent production and loss mechanisms, and due to variations in the hydrologic connectivity between the methylating substrate (most commonly the benthos) and the overlying water compartments. Diurnal trends in MeHg production, bacterial demethylation, photo-demethylation, diffusion and advection transport processes have been identified and investigated; however, the magnitude and relative importance of each process in mediating overlying water MeHg concentrations, is not well known in natural wetland systems. Temporal variations in aqueous MeHg concentrations may impact the biological accumulation of MeHg into the base of the aquatic food chain, and may challenge regulatory efforts designed to mitigate MeHg exports from point and non-point sources. To identify the possible "hot moments" during the diurnal cycle, surface water MeHg concentrations were monitored in two agricultural wetland settings (wild rice and white rice fields) over a 24- hour period within the Yolo Bypass Wildlife Area, California using a combination of in situ optical sensors and traditional surface-water grab samples. In the wild rice field, MeHg concentrations doubled from 1 ng/L to 2 ng/L over the nighttime hours and returned to 1 ng/L during the daylight hours, whereas the white rice field showed no significant variation in MeHg concentration (0.73 +/- 0.08 ng/L) throughout the diurnal cycle. Similar trends were observed when MeHg data was expressed as a percentage of total Hg, with both wetland habitats exhibiting similar levels (20% MeHg) following the nighttime period and the wild rice field declining to 10% in the early evening. Field parameters measured in situ (including: solar radiation, pH, dissolved oxygen, and temperature) exhibited large diurnal trends in both wetlands, whereas optical proxies for dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition mirrored the fluctuations in Me

  6. Diurnal Variation of Anterior Chamber Flare

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Adam

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To investigate the ideal time and reproducibility of anterior chamber flare measurements. Materials and Methods: Anterior chamber flare measurements were performed with laser flaremetre device at 8 am to 45 volunteers and these measurements were repeated on the same day at 12 pm and 4 pm. Results: Twenty-five (55.5% of the volunteers were women and 20 (44.5% were men; mean age was 28.67±7.40 (18-49 years. The mean anterior chamber flare measurements taken following the ophthalmologic examination were 5.94±1.41 foton/msn at 8 am, 5.65±1.45 foton/msn at 12 pm, and 5.79±1.20 foton/msn at 4 pm. No statistical difference was found between the measurements (p=0.08. Subgroup analysis according to eye color, revealed no significant difference between flare measurements in brown, hazel, and green eyes (p=0.21. Correlation analysis demonstrated association between age and all flare measurements within the day (r=0.24, p=0.03; r=0.41, p=0.01, r=0.27, p=0.01. Conclusion: No significant diurnal change was detected in the flare measurements of our study subjects but positive correlation with age was observed. Hence, all flare measurements within a day are reliable and have high repeatability in healthy subjects. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2015; 45: 52-5

  7. OPENING HOURS FOR CARDS OFFICE

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2001-01-01

    Due to the extra workload generated by the global renewal of French cards and in order to preserve the level of service offered by the cards office, please note that this office will in future be open every morning from 8.30 a.m. to 12.30 p.m. until further notice. The service can be contacted by telephone during the same hours. Thank you for your understanding.

  8. A diurnal animation of thermal images from a day-night pair

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, K.

    2000-01-01

    Interpretation of thermal images is often complicated because the physical property information is contained in both the spatial and temporal variations of the data and thermal models are necessary to extract and display this information. A linearized radiative transfer solution to the surface flux has been used to derive a function that is invariant with respect to thermal inertia. This relationship makes it possible to predict the temperature variation at any time in the diurnal cycle using only two distinct measurements (e.g., noon and midnight). An animation can then be constructed from a pair of day-night images to view both the spatial and temporal temperature changes throughout the diurnal cycle. A more complete solution for the invariant function, using the method of Laplace transforms and based on the linearized solution, was introduced. These results indicate that the linear model does not provide a sufficiently accurate estimate. Using standard conditions (latitude 30??, solar declination 0??, acquisition times at noon and midnight), this new relationship was used to predict temperature throughout the diurnal cycle to an rms error of 0.2??C, which is close to the system noise of most thermal scanners. The method was further extended to include the primary effects of topographic slope with similar accuracy. The temperature was computed at 48 equally spaced times in the diurnal cycle with this algorithm using a co-registered day and night TIMS (Thermal Infrared Multispectral Scanner) data pair (330 pixels, 450 lilies) acquired of the Carlin, Nevada, area and a co-registered DEM (Digital Elevation Model). (Any reader can view the results by downloading the animation file from an identified tip site). The results illustrate the power of animation to display subtle temporal and spatial temperature changes, which can provide clues to structural controls and material property differences. This 'visual change' approach could significantly increase the use of

  9. An interpretation of ion composition diurnal variation deduced from EISCAT observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. V. Mikhailov

    Full Text Available Physical interpretation is made of the O+/Ne diurnal variations in summer, revealed by Litvine et al. (1998 from the EISCAT observations. It is shown that the observed anti-correlation between the Z50 parameter, corresponding to the transition region between 50% of molecular and atomic ions, and the width Dz of the transition, defined as the altitude width between 10% and 90% of the O+/Ne ratio, can be reproduced in model calculations and the result of different recombination laws (quadratic in the lower and linear in the upper ionosphere as well as diurnal variations in the photo-ionization rates.

    Key words.Ionosphere (ion chemistry and composition; modeling and forecasting

  10. Effect of static and dynamic stretching on the diurnal variations of jump performance in soccer players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi Chtourou

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The present study addressed the lack of data on the effect of different types of stretching on diurnal variations in vertical jump height - i.e., squat-jump (SJ and countermovement-jump (CMJ. We hypothesized that dynamic stretching could affect the diurnal variations of jump height by producing a greater increase in short-term maximal performance in the morning than the evening through increasing core temperature at this time-of-day. METHODS: Twenty male soccer players (age, 18.6±1.3 yrs; height, 174.6±3.8 cm; body-mass, 71.1±8.6 kg; mean ± SD completed the SJ and CMJ tests either after static stretching, dynamic stretching or no-stretching protocols at two times of day, 07:00 h and 17:00 h, with a minimum of 48 hours between testing sessions. One minute after warming-up for 5 minutes by light jogging and performing one of the three stretching protocols (i.e., static stretching, dynamic stretching or no-stretching for 8 minutes, each subject completed the SJ and CMJ tests. Jumping heights were recorded and analyzed using a two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures (3 [stretching]×2 [time-of-day]. RESULTS: The SJ and CMJ heights were significantly higher at 17:00 than 07:00 h (p<0.01 after the no-stretching protocol. These daily variations disappeared (i.e., the diurnal gain decreased from 4.2±2.81% (p<0.01 to 1.81±4.39% (not-significant for SJ and from 3.99±3.43% (p<0.01 to 1.51±3.83% (not-significant for CMJ after dynamic stretching due to greater increases in SJ and CMJ heights in the morning than the evening (8.4±6.36% vs. 4.4±2.64%, p<0.05 for SJ and 10.61±5.49% vs. 6.03±3.14%, p<0.05 for CMJ. However, no significant effect of static stretching on the diurnal variations of SJ and CMJ heights was observed. CONCLUSION: Dynamic stretching affects the typical diurnal variations of SJ and CMJ and helps to counteract the lower morning values in vertical jump height.

  11. Diurnal variation in rates of calcification and carbonate sediment dissolution in Florida Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, K.K.; Halley, R.B.

    2006-01-01

    Water quality and circulation in Florida Bay (a shallow, subtropical estuary in south Florida) are highly dependent upon the development and evolution of carbonate mud banks distributed throughout the Bay. Predicting the effect of natural and anthropogenic perturbations on carbonate sedimentation requires an understanding of annual, seasonal, and daily variations in the biogenic and inorganic processes affecting carbonate sediment precipitation and dissolution. In this study, net calcification rates were measured over diurnal cycles on 27 d during summer and winter from 1999 to 2003 on mud banks and four representative substrate types located within basins between mud banks. Substrate types that were measured in basins include seagrass beds of sparse and intermediate density Thalassia sp., mud bottom, and hard bottom communities. Changes in total alkalinity were used as a proxy for calcification and dissolution. On 22 d (81%), diurnal variation in rates of net calcification was observed. The highest rates of net carbonate sediment production (or lowest rates of net dissolution) generally occurred during daylight hours and ranged from 2.900 to -0.410 g CaCO3 m-2 d-1. The lowest rates of carbonate sediment production (or net sediment dissolution) occurred at night and ranged from 0.210 to -1.900 g CaCO3 m -2 night-1. During typical diurnal cycles, dissolution during the night consumed an average of 29% of sediment produced during the day on banks and 68% of sediment produced during the day in basins. Net sediment dissolution also occurred during daylight, but only when there was total cloud cover, high turbidity, or hypersalinity. Diurnal variation in calcification and dissolution in surface waters and surface sediments of Florida Bay is linked to cycling of carbon dioxide through photosynthesis and respiration. Estimation of long-term sediment accumulation rates from diurnal rates of carbonate sediment production measured in this study indicates an overall average

  12. Why surface nanobubbles live for hours

    CERN Document Server

    Weijs, Joost H

    2012-01-01

    We present a theoretical model for the experimentally found but counter-intuitive exceptionally long lifetime of surface nanobubbles. We can explain why, under normal experimental conditions, surface nanobubbles are stable for many hours or even up to days rather than the expected microseconds. The limited gas diffusion through the water in the far field, the cooperative effect of nanobubble clusters, and the pinned contact line of the nanobubbles lead to the slow dissolution rate.

  13. Diurnal course of photosynthesis in Myriophyllum spicatum and Oedogonium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCracken, M.D. (Texas Christian Univ., Ft. Worth); Adams, M.S.; Titus, J.; Stone, W.

    1975-01-01

    Diurnal patterns of photosynthesis were determined for Myriophyllum and Oedogonium in Lake Wingra, Wisconsin, on four dates in 1971 and two in 1972. Photosynthesis was measured by the carbon-14 technique. Mid-day photosynthetic depression was observed on some dates, but not on others. Photosynthesis was also studied under controlled laboratory conditions. The possible influence of internal rhythms, light, and nutrients on diurnal photosynthesis patterns is discussed.

  14. Central melanopsin projections in the diurnal rodent, Arvicanthis niloticus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Langel, Jennifer L; Smale, Laura; Esquiva, Gema;

    2015-01-01

    The direct effects of photic stimuli on behavior are very different in diurnal and nocturnal species, as light stimulates an increase in activity in the former and a decrease in the latter. Studies of nocturnal mice have implicated a select population of retinal ganglion cells that are intrinsica...... in nocturnal rodents. Overall, these data suggest that although ipRGCs and their projections are very similar in diurnal and nocturnal rodents, they may not be identical....

  15. Diurnal odor, ammonia, hydrogen sulfide, and carbon dioxide emission profiles of confined swine grower/finisher rooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Gang; Guo, Huiqing; Peterson, Jonathan; Predicala, Bernardo; Laguë, Claude

    2008-11-01

    The objective of this study was to obtain diurnal variation profiles of odor and gas (ammonia [NH3], hydrogen sulfide [H2S], carbon dioxide [CO2]) concentrations and emission rate (OGCER) from confined swine grower/ finisher rooms under three typical weather conditions (warm, mild, and cold weather) in a year. Two grower/ finisher rooms, one with a fully slatted floor and the other with partially slatted floors, were measured for 2 consecutive days under each weather condition. The results revealed that the diurnal OGCER in the room with a fully slatted floor was 9.2-39.4% higher than that with a partially slatted floor; however, no significant differences in the diurnal OGCER were found between these two rooms, except for the NH3 concentrations in August, the NH3 and H2S concentrations and emissions in October, and odor concentrations and emissions in February (p > 0.05). The OGCER variations presented different diurnal patterns as affected by time of day, season, type of floor, ventilation rate, animal growth cycles, in-house manure storage, and weather conditions. Significant diurnal fluctuations in the OGCER (except for the odor concentrations and H2S emissions) were observed in August (p dispersion modeling to decrease the great incertitude of setback determination using randomly measured data.

  16. Atmospheric diurnal variations observed with GPS radio occultation soundings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xie

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal variation, driven by solar forcing, is a fundamental mode in the Earth's weather and climate system. Radio occultation (RO measurements from the six COSMIC satellites (Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate provide nearly uniform global coverage with high vertical resolution, all-weather and diurnal sampling capability. This paper analyzes the diurnal variations of temperature and refractivity from three-year (2007–2009 COSMIC RO measurements in the troposphere and stratosphere between 30° S and 30° N. The RO observations reveal both propagating and trapped vertical structures of diurnal variations, including transition regions near the tropopause where data with high vertical resolution are critical. In the tropics the diurnal amplitude in refractivity shows the minimum around 14 km and increases to a local maximum around 32 km in the stratosphere. The upward propagating component of the migrating diurnal tides in the tropics is clearly captured by the GPS RO measurements, which show a downward progression in phase from stratopause to the upper troposphere with a vertical wavelength of about 25 km. At ~32 km the seasonal variation of the tidal amplitude maximizes at the opposite side of the equator relative to the solar forcing. The vertical structure of tidal amplitude shows strong seasonal variations and becomes asymmetric along the equator and tilted toward the summer hemisphere in the solstice months. Such asymmetry becomes less prominent in equinox months.

  17. Quantitative and qualitative assessment of diurnal variability in tropospheric humidity using SAPHIR on-board Megha-Tropiques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uma, K. N.; Das, Siddarth Shankar

    2016-08-01

    The global diurnal variability of relative humidity (RH) from August 2012 to May 2014 is discussed for the first time using 'Sounder for Atmospheric Profiling of Humidity in the Inter-tropical Regions (SAPHIR)', a microwave humidity sounder onboard Megha-Tropiques (MT). It is superior to other microwave satellite humidity sounders in terms of its higher repetitive cycle in the tropics owing to its low-inclination orbit and the availability of six dedicated humidity sounding channels. The six layers obtained are 1000-850, 850-700, 700-550, 550-400, 400-250 and 250-100 hPa. Three hourly data over a month has been combined using equivalent day analysis to attain a composite profile of complete diurnal cycle in each grid (2.5°×2.5°). A distinct diurnal variation is obtained over the continental and the oceanic regions at all the layers. The magnitude in the lower tropospheric humidity (LTH), middle tropospheric humidity (MTH) and the upper tropospheric humidity (UTH) show a large variability over the continental regions compared to that over oceans. The monthly variability of the diurnal variation over the years has also been discussed by segregating into five different continental and four different oceanic regions. Afternoon peaks dominate in the LTH over the land and the desert regions. The MTH is found to vary between the evening and the early morning hours over different geographical regions and not as consistent as that of the LTH. The UTH maximum magnitude is generally observed during the early morning hours, over the continents. Interestingly, the Oceanic regions are found to have a dominant magnitude in the afternoon hours similar to that of the continents in the LTH, evening maximum in the MTH and the early morning maximum in the UTH. The underlying mechanisms involved in the variability of humidity over different regions are also discussed. The study reveals the complexity involved in the understanding the diurnal variability over the continents and open

  18. Modelling hourly dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) using dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy inference system (DENFIS)-based approach: case study of Klamath River at Miller Island Boat Ramp, OR, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heddam, Salim

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we present application of an artificial intelligence (AI) technique model called dynamic evolving neural-fuzzy inference system (DENFIS) based on an evolving clustering method (ECM), for modelling dissolved oxygen concentration in a river. To demonstrate the forecasting capability of DENFIS, a one year period from 1 January 2009 to 30 December 2009, of hourly experimental water quality data collected by the United States Geological Survey (USGS Station No: 420853121505500) station at Klamath River at Miller Island Boat Ramp, OR, USA, were used for model development. Two DENFIS-based models are presented and compared. The two DENFIS systems are: (1) offline-based system named DENFIS-OF, and (2) online-based system, named DENFIS-ON. The input variables used for the two models are water pH, temperature, specific conductance, and sensor depth. The performances of the models are evaluated using root mean square errors (RMSE), mean absolute error (MAE), Willmott index of agreement (d) and correlation coefficient (CC) statistics. The lowest root mean square error and highest correlation coefficient values were obtained with the DENFIS-ON method. The results obtained with DENFIS models are compared with linear (multiple linear regression, MLR) and nonlinear (multi-layer perceptron neural networks, MLPNN) methods. This study demonstrates that DENFIS-ON investigated herein outperforms all the proposed techniques for DO modelling.

  19. Background Concentrations for Use in the Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, S. S.

    A background model has been developed for application in the Operational Street Pollution Model (OSPM) in context of long-term exposure modelling. The back ground model is based on a semi-empirical method founded on a few monitor stations that estimates standardised one hour time-series of urban...... are based on measurements. The temporal variation is represented as indices for the monthly variation and the monthly diurnal variation. In this way concentration levels can be estimated on an hourly basis from 1960-95....

  20. Diurnal pattern of intraocular pressure is affected by microgravity when measured in space with the pressure phosphene tonometer (PPT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ki-Young; Woo, Se Joon; Yi, Soyeon; Choi, Gi-Hyuk; Ahn, Chang-Ho; Hur, Gang-Chul; Lim, Jung-Gu; Kim, Tae-Woo

    2011-10-01

    This study was designed to evaluate the effect of microgravity on the diurnal variation of intraocular pressure (IOP). IOPs were measured with the pressure phosphene tonometer in 1 subject (the first Korean astronaut) during spaceflight. IOPs were measured every 3 hours during day time (6 times per day) at 2 separate days in space with 3 repeated measurements at each time on both eyes. A total of 72 measurements were obtained during spaceflight. To obtain control IOP data, IOP was measured using the same protocol on ground before spaceflight. Mean IOP increased by 26.3% during spaceflight compared with that on ground [16.47 ± 0.60 (SD) mm Hg vs. 13.04 ± 0.74 mm Hg, P<0.001). The IOP elevation was maintained until Launch+8 days. There was no significant difference in IOP increase between right and left eyes (16.4 2 ± 0.65 mm Hg right eye vs. 16.53 ± 0.56 mm Hg left eye). There was a different pattern of diurnal variation of IOP during spaceflight compared with that on ground. The IOP at 7 AM was the lowest under microgravity, whereas it was the highest on ground. The slope of the best fit line for diurnal IOP measures was 0.0349 mm Hg/h (95% confidence interval: 0.0082-0.0616) under microgravity and -0.0294 mm Hg/h (95% confidence interval: -0.0063-0.0041) on ground. The study showed a different diurnal pattern of IOP under microgravity compared with that on ground. This result suggests that gravity and subsequent body fluid shift is one of the determining factors of IOP diurnal variation.

  1. MicroRNA mir-16 is anti-proliferative in enterocytes and exhibits diurnal rhythmicity in intestinal crypts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balakrishnan, Anita, E-mail: anita.balakrishnan@doctors.org.uk [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); School of Clinical Sciences, Division of Gastroenterology, University of Liverpool, Liverpool L69 3GE (United Kingdom); Stearns, Adam T. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Physiology, Anatomy and Genetics, University of Oxford, Oxford OX1 2JD (United Kingdom); Park, Peter J. [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Harvard Medical School, Center for Biomedical Informatics, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Dreyfuss, Jonathan M. [Department of Medicine, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Ashley, Stanley W. [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Rhoads, David B. [Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Pediatric Endocrine Unit, MassGeneral Hospital for Children, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Tavakkolizadeh, Ali, E-mail: atavakkoli@partners.org [Department of Surgery, Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Department of Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115 (United States)

    2010-12-10

    Background and aims: The intestine exhibits profound diurnal rhythms in function and morphology, in part due to changes in enterocyte proliferation. The regulatory mechanisms behind these rhythms remain largely unknown. We hypothesized that microRNAs are involved in mediating these rhythms, and studied the role of microRNAs specifically in modulating intestinal proliferation. Methods: Diurnal rhythmicity of microRNAs in rat jejunum was analyzed by microarrays and validated by qPCR. Temporal expression of diurnally rhythmic mir-16 was further quantified in intestinal crypts, villi, and smooth muscle using laser capture microdissection and qPCR. Morphological changes in rat jejunum were assessed by histology and proliferation by immunostaining for bromodeoxyuridine. In IEC-6 cells stably overexpressing mir-16, proliferation was assessed by cell counting and MTS assay, cell cycle progression and apoptosis by flow cytometry, and cell cycle gene expression by qPCR and immunoblotting. Results: mir-16 peaked 6 hours after light onset (HALO 6) with diurnal changes restricted to crypts. Crypt depth and villus height peaked at HALO 13-14 in antiphase to mir-16. Overexpression of mir-16 in IEC-6 cells suppressed specific G1/S regulators (cyclins D1-3, cyclin E1 and cyclin-dependent kinase 6) and produced G1 arrest. Protein expression of these genes exhibited diurnal rhythmicity in rat jejunum, peaking between HALO 11 and 17 in antiphase to mir-16. Conclusions: This is the first report of circadian rhythmicity of specific microRNAs in rat jejunum. Our data provide a link between anti-proliferative mir-16 and the intestinal proliferation rhythm and point to mir-16 as an important regulator of proliferation in jejunal crypts. This function may be essential to match proliferation and absorptive capacity with nutrient availability.

  2. Diurnal modulation signal from dissipative hidden sector dark matter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Foot

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We consider a simple generic dissipative dark matter model: a hidden sector featuring two dark matter particles charged under an unbroken U(1′ interaction. Previous work has shown that such a model has the potential to explain dark matter phenomena on both large and small scales. In this framework, the dark matter halo in spiral galaxies features nontrivial dynamics, with the halo energy loss due to dissipative interactions balanced by a heat source. Ordinary supernovae can potentially supply this heat provided kinetic mixing interaction exists with strength ϵ∼10−9. This type of kinetically mixed dark matter can be probed in direct detection experiments. Importantly, this self-interacting dark matter can be captured within the Earth and shield a dark matter detector from the halo wind, giving rise to a diurnal modulation effect. We estimate the size of this effect for detectors located in the Southern hemisphere, and find that the modulation is large (≳10% for a wide range of parameters.

  3. Diurnal modulation signal from dissipative hidden sector dark matter

    CERN Document Server

    Foot, R

    2014-01-01

    We consider a simple generic dissipative dark matter model: a hidden sector featuring two dark matter particles charged under an unbroken $U(1)'$ interaction. Previous work has shown that such a model has the potential to explain dark matter phenomena on both large and small scales. In this framework, the dark matter halo in spiral galaxies features nontrivial dynamics, with the halo energy loss due to dissipative interactions balanced by a heat source. Ordinary supernovae can potentially supply this heat provided kinetic mixing interaction exists with strength $\\epsilon \\sim 10^{-9}$. This type of kinetically mixed dark matter can be probed in direct detection experiments. Importantly, this self-interacting dark matter can be captured within the Earth and shield a dark matter detector from the halo wind, giving rise to a diurnal modulation effect. We estimate the size of this effect for detectors located in the Southern hemisphere, and find that the modulation is large ($\\gtrsim 10\\%$) for a wide range of pa...

  4. Diurnal signals in length-of-day changes and their geophysical excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schindelegger, Michael; Böhm, Johannes; Salstein, David

    2014-05-01

    State-of-the-art determinations of short period Earth rotation variations from long-term space geodetic observations all report an as-yet unexplained LOD (length-of-day) perturbation of roughly 4 microseconds at the principal diurnal frequency corresponding to 1 cycle per solar day. The present study gives a detailed account of this signal component in terms of its possible geophysical excitation from the atmosphere and oceans, including both a direct effect due to pure atmosphere dynamics as well as an indirect effect associated with the oceans' response to diurnal air pressure variations. In particular, we assemble multi-year excitation estimates from a number of modern-day meteorological analysis systems and different hydrodynamic time-stepping solutions for the oceans. A simultaneous application of two legitimate modeling approaches - using either mass and motion terms of fluid angular momentum or pressure and friction torques acting on the Earth's crust - allows for an examination of the balance relationship existing between torques and the angular momentum derivative within each model. Significant violations of this constraint for each of the atmospheric analysis systems mainly originate from seemingly deficient mass term values and cast doubt on the validity of those estimates for sub-diurnal Earth rotation studies. On the contrary, oceanic angular momentum changes are well balanced by the pressure torque on the bathymetry. In light of these results and after thoroughly discussing possible consistency issues between various model estimates, a combined excitation term is constructed on the basis of atmospheric torques and oceanic angular momentum. The obtained solution displays a sufficiently close agreement with observed diurnal changes in LOD, and by virtue of the computed pressure and friction torques, this result can be augmented by a regional analysis of the underlying angular momentum transfer in the axial direction between the solid Earth and its fluid

  5. Topography induced spatial variations in diurnal cycles of assimilation and latent heat of Mediterranean forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. van der Tol

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to explain topography induced spatial variations in the diurnal cycles of assimilation and latent heat of Mediterranean forest. Spatial variations of the fluxes are caused by variations in weather conditions and in vegetation characteristics. Weather conditions reflect short-term effects of climate, whereas vegetation characteristics, through adaptation and acclimation, long-term effects of climate. In this study measurements of plant physiology and weather conditions are used to explain observed differences in the fluxes. A model is used to study which part of the differences in the fluxes is caused by weather conditions and which part by vegetation characteristics. Data were collected at four experimental sub-Mediterranean deciduous forest plots in a heterogeneous terrain with contrasting aspect, soil water availability, humidity and temperature. We used a sun-shade model to scale fluxes from leaf to canopy, and calculated the canopy energy balance. Parameter values were derived from measurements of light interception, leaf chamber photosynthesis, leaf nitrogen content and 13C isotope discrimination in leaf material. Leaf nitrogen content is a measure of photosynthetic capacity, and 13C isotope discrimination of water use efficiency. For validation, sap-flux based measurements of transpiration were used. The model predicted diurnal cycles of transpiration and stomatal conductance, both their magnitudes and differences in afternoon stomatal closure between slopes of different aspect within the confidence interval of the validation data. Weather conditions mainly responsible for the shape of the diurnal cycles, and vegetation parameters for the magnitude of the fluxes. Although the data do not allow for a quantification of the two effects, the differences in vegetation parameters and weather among the plots and the sensitivity of the fluxes to them suggest that the diurnal cycles were more strongly affected by spatial

  6. 24 Hours of Meaty Torture

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Palesa; Temaswati; Mthethwa

    2011-01-01

    VEGETARIAN for a week! That was the plan.But it’s funny how side effects start kicking in so early when trying to let go of an everyday habit.The first morning of my experiment,I felt like I hadn’t eaten poultry in months(I had devoured a bucket of KFC the night before).Lunch was a disaster.I didn’t know whether to cook or spend an hour searching for a restaurant. That afternoon I received the worst phone call a first-time vegetarian can get:

  7. HTML5 24-Hour Trainer

    CERN Document Server

    Lowery, Joseph W

    2011-01-01

    Comprehensive written and interactive instruction for learning HTML5 HTML is the core technology for building websites. Today, with HTML5 opening the Internet to new levels of rich content and dynamic interactivity, developers are looking for information to learn and utilize HTML5. HTML5 24-Hour Trainer provides that information, giving new and aspiring web developers the knowledge they need to achieve early success when building websites. Covers the most basic aspects of a web page, including a brief introduction to Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) Provides lessons that are backed up by prof

  8. Java programming 24-hour trainer

    CERN Document Server

    Fain, Yakov

    2015-01-01

    Quick and painless Java programming with expert multimedia instruction Java Programming 24-Hour Trainer, 2nd Edition is your complete beginner's guide to the Java programming language, with easy-to-follow lessons and supplemental exercises that help you get up and running quickly. Step-by-step instruction walks you through the basics of object-oriented programming, syntax, interfaces, and more, before building upon your skills to develop games, web apps, networks, and automations. This second edition has been updated to align with Java SE 8 and Java EE 7, and includes new information on GUI b

  9. Effect of diurnal cycle in anthropogenic emissions on the vertical profile of black carbon over the Indian region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govardhan, G.; Nanjundiah, R. S.; Satheesh, S.

    2013-12-01

    South Asian region is considered to be a regional hot spot for natural as well as anthropogenic aerosols viz. mineral dust, black carbon (BC), organic matter and so on. Vehicular and industrial emissions, forest fires, biomass burning for agricultural purposes and cooking are the main sources for the carbonaceous aerosols over the region. On the other hand, seasonal wind patterns over the region are the mainly responsible for the abundance of the mineral dust. Climate impact of large aerosol abundance on the regional climate has been a topic of interest during the last decade. The anthropogenic aerosols over the region have a diurnal variation owing to their sources (vehicular and industrial emissions). In this study, we have analysed the effect of diurnal cycle in emissions on the overall meteorology and the aerosols' concentrations over the region. We have used the version 3.3 of the online chemistry transport model WRF-Chem for this study. The model simulations for control runs (No diurnal emission cycle for anthropogenic aerosols i.e. constant emissions) and sensitivity runs (diurnal cycle for anthropogenic aerosols) are done for the 3 selected months of 2011 viz. May, October and December. From the results it has been observed that, the monthly mean vertical profile of BC over the selected 18 stations (urban+semi-urban+rural) is significantly affected by the inclusion of the diurnal cycle in the emissions. The changes in BC mass concentration are more than 60% over a few of the selected stations. The effect of diurnal cycle in emissions on the vertical profile of BC is more prominent in May than in October and December. In May, the noteworthy changes in BC mass concentrations occur within 3-8 km. Additionally, the effect of the diurnal cycle in emissions is seen on the vertical profile of BC over the selected oceanic regions as well. The back trajectory analysis of our model data with HYSPLIT model indicates the changes in the overall wind directions

  10. The diurnal evolution of 222Rn and its progeny in the atmospheric boundary layer during the Wangara experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Galmarini

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal atmospheric boundary layer evolution of the 222Rn decaying family is studied by using a state-of-the-art large-eddy simulation model. In particular, a diurnal cycle observed during the Wangara experiment is successfully simulated together with the effect of diurnal varying turbulent characteristics on radioactive compounds in a secular equilibrium. This study allows us to clearly analyze and identify the boundary layer processes driving the 222Rn and its progeny concentration behaviors. The activity disequilibrium observed in the nocturnal boundary layer is due to the proximity of the radon source and the trapping of fresh 222Rn close to the surface induced by the weak vertical transport. During the morning transition, the secular equilibrium is fast restored by the vigorous turbulent mixing. The evolution of 222Rn and its progeny concentration in the unsteady growing convective boundary layer depends on the strength of entrainment events.

  11. Why the long hours? Job demands and social exchange dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genin, Emilie; Haines, Victor Y; Pelletier, David; Rousseau, Vincent; Marchand, Alain

    2016-11-22

    This study investigates the determinants of long working hours from the perspectives of the demand-control model [Karasek, 1979] and social exchange theory [Blau, 1964; Goulder, 1960]. These two theoretical perspectives are tested to understand why individuals work longer (or shorter) hours. The hypotheses are tested with a representative sample of 1,604 employed Canadians. In line with Karasek's model, the results support that high job demands are positively associated with longer work hours. The social exchange perspective would predict a positive association between skill discretion and work hours. This hypothesis was supported for individuals with a higher education degree. Finally, the results support a positive association between active jobs and longer work hours. Our research suggests that job demands and social exchange dynamics need to be considered together in the explanation of longer (or shorter) work hours.

  12. Diurnal Changes of Heart Rate and Sympathovagal Activity for Temporal Patterns of Transient Ischemic Episodes in 24-Hour Electrocardiograms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Jager

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We test the hypothesis that different temporal patterns of transient ST segment changes compatible with ischemia (ischemic episodes are a result of different physiologic mechanisms responsible for ischemia. We tested the hypothesis using records of the Long-Term ST Database. Each record was divided into three intervals of records: morning, day, and night intervals; and was inserted into one of three sets according to the temporal pattern of ischemia: salvo, periodic, and sporadic pattern. We derived time- and frequency-domain parameters of the heart rate time series in selected intervals in the neighborhood of ischemic episodes. We used the adaptive autoregressive method with a recursive least-square algorithm for consistent spectral tracking of heart rate time series and to study frequency-domain sympathovagal behavior during ischemia. The results support the hypothesis that there are at least two distinct populations, which differ according to mechanisms and temporal patterns of ischemia.

  13. Diurnal Variation In Behaviour Of Pink-Footed Geese (Anser Brachyrhynchus) During Spring Migration In Trøndelag, Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chudzińska, Magda Ewa; Madsen, Jesper; Nabe-Nielsen, Jacob

    in the behaviour of geese and to examine whether these variations are driven by digestibility of food geese feed on or also by external factors such as distance to the roost, disturbance and flock size. Based on diurnal flock scans of activity budgets (observations carried out between 05h00 and 22h00 hrs) in each...... habitat type, we fitted a model containing all predictors we believe may influence geese behaviour. The number of feeding and alert geese on fields displayed a strong diurnal trend, which varied among habitat types, frequent and sporadic disturbance, but not flock size. On roost sites, geese also showed...

  14. Spatial patterns in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. H. Holmes

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the structural difference in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle (DTC over land resulting from choice of measuring device or model framework. It is shown that the timing can be reliably estimated from temporally sparse observations acquired from a constellation of low Earth orbiting satellites given record lengths of at least three months. Based on a year of data, the spatial patterns of mean DTC timing are compared between Ka-band temperature estimates, geostationary thermal infrared (TIR temperature estimates and numerical weather prediction model output from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO. It is found that the spatial patterns can be explained by vegetation effects, sensing depth differences and more speculatively the orientation of orographic relief features. In absolute terms, the GMAO model puts the peak of the DTC on average at 12:50 local solar time, 23 min before TIR with a peak temperature at 13:13. Since TIR is the shallowest observation of the land surface, this small difference represents a structural error that possibly affects the models ability to assimilate observations that are closely tied to the DTC. For non-desert areas, the Ka-band observations have only a small delay of about 15 min with the TIR observations which is in agreement with their respective theoretical sensing depth. The results of this comparison provide insights into the structural differences between temperature measurements and models, and can be used as a first step to account for these differences in a coherent way.

  15. Spatial patterns in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. R. H. Holmes

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the structural difference in timing of the diurnal temperature cycle (DTC over land resulting from choice of measuring device or model framework. It is shown that the timing can be reliably estimated from temporally sparse observations acquired from a constellation of low Earth-orbiting satellites given record lengths of at least three months. Based on a year of data, the spatial patterns of mean DTC timing are compared between temperature estimates from microwave Ka-band, geostationary thermal infrared (TIR, and numerical weather prediction model output from the Global Modeling and Assimilation Office (GMAO. It is found that the spatial patterns can be explained by vegetation effects, sensing depth differences and more speculatively the orientation of orographic relief features. In absolute terms, the GMAO model puts the peak of the DTC on average at 12:50 local solar time, 23 min before TIR with a peak temperature at 13:13 (both averaged over Africa and Europe. Since TIR is the shallowest observation of the land surface, this small difference represents a structural error that possibly affects the model's ability to assimilate observations that are closely tied to the DTC. The equivalent average timing for Ka-band is 13:44, which is influenced by the effect of increased sensing depth in desert areas. For non-desert areas, the Ka-band observations lag the TIR observations by only 15 min, which is in agreement with their respective theoretical sensing depth. The results of this comparison provide insights into the structural differences between temperature measurements and models, and can be used as a first step to account for these differences in a coherent way.

  16. Overestimation of soil CO2 fluxes from closed chamber measurements at low atmospheric turbulence biases the diurnal pattern and the annual soil respiration budget

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braendholt, Andreas; Steenberg Larsen, Klaus; Ibrom, Andreas; Pilegaard, Kim

    2016-04-01

    Precise quantification of the diurnal and seasonal variation of soil respiration (Rs) is crucial to correctly estimate annual soil carbon fluxes as well as to correctly interpret the response of Rs to biotic and abiotic factors on different time scale. In this study we found a systematic effect of low atmospheric turbulence on continuous hourly Rs measurements with closed chambers throughout one year in a temperate Danish beech forest. Using friction velocity (u⋆) measured at the site above the canopy, we filtered out chamber flux data measured at low atmospheric turbulence. The non-filtered data showed a clear diurnal pattern of Rs across all seasons with highest fluxes during night time suggesting an implausible negative temperature sensitivity of Rs. When filtering out data at low turbulence, the annually averaged diurnal pattern changed, such that the highest Rs fluxes were seen during day time, i.e. following the course of soil temperatures. This effect on the diurnal pattern was due to low turbulence primarily occurring during night time. We calculated different annual Rs budgets by filtering out fluxes for different levels of u⋆. The highest annual Rs budget was found when including all data and it decreased with an increasing u⋆ filter threshold. Our results show that Rs was overestimated at low atmospheric turbulence throughout the year and that this overestimation considerably biased the diurnal pattern of Rs and led to an overestimation of the annual Rs budget. Thus we recommend that that any analysis of the diurnal pattern of Rs must consider overestimation of Rs at low atmospheric turbulence, to yield unbiased diurnal patterns. This is crucial when investigating temperature responses and potential links between CO2 production and Rs on a short time scale, but also for correct estimation of annual Rs budgets. Acknowledgements: This study was funded by the free Danish Ministry for Research, Innovation and higher Education, the free Danish Research

  17. Diurnal/Inertial Oscillations on the West Florida Shelf in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimova, E. V.; Weisberg, R. H.

    2015-12-01

    Oscillations of diurnal/inertial frequency on the West Florida Shelf in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico are thought to be seasonally important for mixing the shelf waters because of their tendency to have large vertical shear and to be quite energetic. Such oscillations are also thought to seasonally affect the ecology of the region through daily vertical thermocline migration. The presentation will focus on some novel findings about the diurnal/inertial coastal current fluctuations based on unique observational and modeled data sets on the West Florida Shelf. The properties of the oscillations, including spatial and temporal characteristics, and mechanisms of generation and propagation will be discussed. This presentation is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation Ocean Sciences Postdoctoral Research Fellowship under Grant OCE-1421180 (E. V. Maksimova).

  18. Dependence of Upper Atmosphere Photochemistry on the Shape of the Diurnal Cycle of the Photolysis Rates

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A photochemical model of the atmosphere constitutes a non-linear, non-autonomous dynamical system, enforced by the Earth's rotation. Some studies have shown that the region of the mesopause tends towards non-linear responses such as period-doubling cascades and chaos. In these studies, simple approximations for the diurnal variations of the photolysis rates are assumed. The goal of this article is to investigate what happens if the more realistic, calculated photolysis rates are introduced. It is found that,if the usual approximations-sinusoidal and step fiunctions-are assumed, the responses of the system are similar: it converges to a 2-day periodic solution. If the more realistic, calculated diurnal cycle is introduced, a new 4-day subharmonic appear.

  19. 7 positions in 2 hours

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Ackerman

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available 7 positions in 2 hours (2013 is a drawing that documents the process of making the short film Role Reversal Rehearsal. It became quickly apparent that the process of making the work was more dynamic and interesting than the finished piece itself. Relationships between the childcare arrangements of the participants and the collective working process brought about the necessity of collaboration for parent artists. Each participant gave their time, energy and creative insight towards filming a series of birthing positions with roles reversed. The male performer became the central figure in an attempt to prompt empathy, humour, and to embody the importance of the male role in childbirth. There were two hours to choreograph, rehearse, and film the sequence. The drawing by Ackerman encapsulates the 'rhizomatic' approach to producing creative work under the constraints of parenthood. The 'arborescent' structure of hierarchy encouraged in industrial filmmaking is subsumed in favour of a horizontal structure. This new structure allows for the creative input, and flow of collaboration between all people involved - including the 3 and 5 year olds, who contributed ideas for camera and soundtrack in situ.

  20. North-South Asymmetry of Solar Diurnal Variations of Cosmic-Ray Intensity Throughout the Period 1975 - 2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Borie, M. A.; Abdel-halim, A. A.; El-Monier, S. Y.; Bishara, A. A.

    2016-12-01

    Hourly cosmic-ray intensities, recorded by 15 neutron monitor detectors in both Earth hemispheres, have been analyzed according to the interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) polarity sense (Toward (T) or Away (A)) to examine the asymmetry of solar diurnal variations (amplitudes and phases) during the time interval from 1975 to 2013. The vertical geomagnetic cut-off rigidity of these detectors is Ro ≤ 13 GV. Previously, the north-south asymmetries of cosmic-ray intensity, between the northern and southern sectors with respect to the neutral sheet, have been studied for different periods to give an explanation as regards the cosmic ray flow in the direction parallel to the rotation axis of the Earth. The observed cosmic ray asymmetries between the two sectors were related to a corresponding N-S asymmetry of solar activity. Our results showed that during the years of minima and maxima solar activity cycles, asymmetric of latitudinal southward or northward gradients have been observed at both hemispheres. In addition, the southward and northward cosmic ray latitudinal gradients were frequently observed at stations on both hemispheres during the active period of the northern and/or southern hemispheres of the Sun. On the other hand, the differences in the solar diurnal (T-A) vectors show that the time of maximum depends on latitude at the point of observation. In addition, when the interplanetary magnetic field IMF was directed away from the Sun north of the current sheet, the northern solar diurnal vectors (T-A) shifted to later hours. Moreover, when the solar magnetic field is reversed, the phase of solar diurnal (T-A) vectors changed from 1 to 11 h, and from 3 to 9 h for northern and southern observations, respectively.

  1. Diurnal cycle of the dust instantaneous direct radiative forcing over the Arabian Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Osipov, S.

    2015-08-27

    In this study we attempted to better quantify radiative effects of dust over the Arabian Peninsula and their dependence on input parameters. For this purpose we have developed a stand-alone column radiation transport model coupled with the Mie, T-matrix and geometric optics calculations and driven by reanalysis meteorological fields and atmospheric composition. Numerical experiments were carried out for a wide range of aerosol optical depths, including extreme values developed during the dust storm on 18–20 March 2012. Comprehensive ground-based observations and satellite retrievals were used to estimate aerosol optical properties, validate calculations and carry out radiation closure. The broadband surface albedo, fluxes at the bottom and top of the atmosphere as well as instantaneous dust radiative forcing were estimated both from the model and observations. Diurnal cycle of the shortwave instantaneous dust direct radiative forcing was studied for a range of aerosol and surface characteristics representative of the Arabian Peninsula. Mechanisms and parameters responsible for diurnal variability of the radiative forcing were evaluated. We found that intrinsic variability of the surface albedo and its dependence on atmospheric conditions, along with anisotropic aerosol scattering, are mostly responsible for diurnal effects.

  2. Hydroxyl in the stratosphere and mesosphere – Part 1: Diurnal variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Minschwaner

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal variations in hydroxyl (OH in the stratosphere and mesosphere are analyzed using measurements from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS. The primary driver for OH diurnal variations is the ultraviolet actinic flux that initiates the photochemical production of reactive hydrogen species. The magnitude of this flux is governed largely by changes in solar zenith angle (SZA throughout the day, and OH diurnal variations are well approximated by an exponential function of the secant of SZA. Measured OH concentrations are fit to a function of the form exp[−βsec(SZA], where the parameter β is a function of altitude. We examine the magnitude of β and show that it is related to the optical depths of ultraviolet absorption by ozone and molecular oxygen. Values of β from SLIMCAT model simulations show the same vertical structure as those from MLS and the average level of agreement between model and measurements is 6%. The vertical profile of β from MLS can be represented by a simple analytic formulation involving the ozone and water vapor photodissociation rates. This formulation is used to infer the altitude dependence of the primary production mechanisms for OH: the reaction of excited-state atomic oxygen with water vapor versus the direct photodissociation of water vapor.

  3. Diurnal Cycle of Convective Instability around the Central Mountains in Japan during the Warm Season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Tomonori; Kimura, Fujio

    2005-05-01

    Convective rainfall often shows a clear diurnal cycle. The nighttime peak of convective activity prevails in various regions near the world's mountains. The influence of the water vapor and convective instability upon nocturnal precipitation is investigated using a numerical model and observed data. Recent developments in GPS meteorology allow the estimation of precipitable water vapor (PWV) with a high temporal resolution. A dense network has been established in Japan. The GPS analysis in August 2000 provides the following results: In the early evening, a high-GPS-PWV region forms over mountainous areas because of the convergence of low-level moisture, which gradually propagates toward the adjacent plain before midnight. A region of convection propagates simultaneously eastward into the plain. The precipitating frequency correlates fairly well with the GPS-PWV and attains a maximum value at night over the plain. The model also provides similar characteristics in the diurnal cycles of rainfall and high PWV. Abundant moisture accumulates over the mountainous areas in the afternoon and then advects continuously toward the plain by the ambient wind. The specific humidity greatly increases at about the 800-hPa level over the plain at night, and the PWV reaches its nocturnal maximum. The increase in the specific humidity causes an increase of equivalent potential temperature at about the 800-hPa level; as a result, the convective instability index becomes more unstable over the plain at night. These findings are consistent with the diurnal cycle of the observed precipitating frequency.

  4. Large Eddy Simulation of the Diurnal Cycle in Southeast Pacific Stratocumulus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, P; Bretherton, C

    2008-03-03

    This paper describes a series of 6 day large eddy simulations of a deep, sometimes drizzling stratocumulus-topped boundary layer based on forcings from the East Pacific Investigation of Climate (EPIC) 2001 field campaign. The base simulation was found to reproduce the observed mean boundary layer properties quite well. The diurnal cycle of liquid water path was also well captured, although good agreement appears to result partially from compensating errors in the diurnal cycles of cloud base and cloud top due to overentrainment around midday. At other times of the day, entrainment is found to be proportional to the vertically-integrated buoyancy flux. Model stratification matches observations well; turbulence profiles suggest that the boundary layer is always at least somewhat decoupled. Model drizzle appears to be too sensitive to liquid water path and subcloud evaporation appears to be too weak. Removing the diurnal cycle of subsidence had little effect on simulated cloud albedo. Simulations with changed droplet concentration and drizzle susceptibility showed large liquid water path differences at night, but differences were quite small at midday. Droplet concentration also had a significant impact on entrainment, primarily through droplet sedimentation feedback rather than through drizzle processes.

  5. Quantifying Diurnal Cloud Radiative Effects by Cloud Type in the Tropical Western Pacific

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burleyson, Casey D.; Long, Charles N.; Comstock, Jennifer M.

    2015-06-01

    Cloud radiative effects are examined using long-term datasets collected at the three Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facilities in the tropical western Pacific. We quantify the surface radiation budget, cloud populations, and cloud radiative effects by partitioning the data by cloud type, time of day, and as a function of large scale modes of variability such as El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) phase and wet/dry seasons at Darwin. The novel facet of our analysis is that we break aggregate cloud radiative effects down by cloud type across the diurnal cycle. The Nauru cloud populations and subsequently the surface radiation budget are strongly impacted by ENSO variability whereas the cloud populations over Manus only shift slightly in response to changes in ENSO phase. The Darwin site exhibits large seasonal monsoon related variations. We show that while deeper convective clouds have a strong conditional influence on the radiation reaching the surface, their limited frequency reduces their aggregate radiative impact. The largest source of shortwave cloud radiative effects at all three sites comes from low clouds. We use the observations to demonstrate that potential model biases in the amplitude of the diurnal cycle and mean cloud frequency would lead to larger errors in the surface energy budget compared to biases in the timing of the diurnal cycle of cloud frequency. Our results provide solid benchmarks to evaluate model simulations of cloud radiative effects in the tropics.

  6. Resolution dependence of the simulated precipitation and diurnal cycle over the Maritime Continent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yue; Jourdain, Nicolas C.; Taschetto, Andréa S.; Gupta, Alex Sen; Argüeso, Daniel; Masson, Sébastien; Cai, Wenju

    2016-08-01

    The Maritime Continent is a region of intense rainfall characterised by a strong diurnal cycle. This study investigates the sensitivity of rainfall characteristics to resolution in a coupled regional climate model configuration, in particular focusing on processes that modulate the diurnal cycle. Model biases are resolution dependent. Increasing resolution from 3/4° to 1/4° improves the mean state sea surface temperature and precipitation biases. However, at higher resolutions (1/12°) rainfall becomes too strong in most areas. Daily maximum rainfall is simulated about 2-4 h earlier than in observations over both the land and the ocean, with only small improvements over high topography at higher resolution. We develop a technique to examine cross-coastal processes associated with the rainfall diurnal cycle along all coastlines. This is used to investigate the sensitivity of the diurnal cycle to resolution and to the direction of the prevailing wind. During offshore prevailing winds, most land rainfall is confined near the coastline and associated with a shallow land-sea breeze circulation at all resolution (though rainfall partly develops directly inland at 1/12°). During onshore prevailing winds, rainfall propagates from the coastline to the island interior at 1/4° and 1/12°, whereas it appears directly over the island interior at 3/4°, and this is associated with a deep convective cell across the coastline for all resolutions. Oceanic rainfall propagates far offshore during offshore prevailing winds at all resolutions, whereas it tends to remain confined near the coastline under onshore prevailing winds condition, particularly at higher resolution.

  7. Feature based man-hour forecasting model for aircraft structure parts NC machining%基于特征的飞机结构件数控加工工时预测模型

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘长青; 李迎光; 王伟; 林勇

    2011-01-01

    针对目前数控加工工时预测方法不能兼顾精度和效率的问题,通过分析飞机结构件的结构特点和工艺特点,基于加工特征属性提炼工时的影响因素,提出了一种基于特征的两级结构工时预测模型。首先依据加工特征属性的数据类型把加工特征分为枚举型和数值型,然后以枚举型特征属性作为分类器的输入构建模型第一级结构,数值型特征属性作为反向传播神经网络的输入构建模型第二级结构。基于该模型开发的系统已经在某大型数控企业得到了良好的应用,效率高且误差在10%以内。%Existing prediction methods for Numerical Control(NC) machining man-hours couldn't taken precision and efficiency into consideration simultaneously,by analzing the structure and process characteristics of aircraft structural parts,a feature-based two-level structure man-hour foresting model was proposed in view of man-hour influencing factors exteacted by machining feature attributes.Firstly,the machining features were classified into enumerative type and numerical value type according to machining feature attributes.Then,enumerative value type attribute was used as input of the classifier to establish first level of the model and numerical value type attribute was used as the input of back propagation neural network to set up second level of the model.The system developed based on this model was applied in a large NC enterprise with high efficiency and the error was within 10%.

  8. Diurnal microstructural variations in healthy adult brain revealed by diffusion tensor imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunxiang Jiang

    Full Text Available Biorhythm is a fundamental property of human physiology. Changes in the extracellular space induced by cell swelling in response to the neural activity enable the in vivo characterization of cerebral microstructure by measuring the water diffusivity using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI. To study the diurnal microstructural alterations of human brain, fifteen right-handed healthy adult subjects were recruited for DTI studies in two repeated sessions (8∶30 AM and 8∶30 PM within a 24-hour interval. Fractional anisotropy (FA, apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC, axial (λ// and radial diffusivity (λ⊥ were compared pixel by pixel between the sessions for each subject. Significant increased morning measurements in FA, ADC, λ// and λ⊥ were seen in a wide range of brain areas involving frontal, parietal, temporal and occipital lobes. Prominent evening dominant λ⊥ (18.58% was detected in the right inferior temporal and ventral fusiform gyri. AM-PM variation of λ⊥ was substantially left side hemisphere dominant (p<0.05, while no hemispheric preference was observed for the same analysis for ADC (p = 0.77, λ// (p = 0.08 or FA (p = 0.25. The percentage change of ADC, λ//, λ⊥, and FA were 1.59%, 2.15%, 1.20% and 2.84%, respectively, for brain areas without diurnal diffusivity contrast. Microstructural variations may function as the substrates of the phasic neural activities in correspondence to the environment adaptation in a light-dark cycle. This research provided a baseline for researches in neuroscience, sleep medicine, psychological and psychiatric disorders, and necessitates that diurnal effect should be taken into account in following up studies using diffusion tensor quantities.

  9. Diurnal changes of earthquake activity and geomagnetic Sq-variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Duma

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Statistic analyses demonstrate that the probability of earthquake occurrence in many earthquake regions strongly depends on the time of day, that is on Local Time (e.g. Conrad, 1909, 1932; Shimshoni, 1971; Duma, 1997; Duma and Vilardo, 1998. This also applies to strong earthquake activity. Moreover, recent observations reveal an involvement of the regular diurnal variations of the Earth’s magnetic field, commonly known as Sq-variations, in this geodynamic process of changing earthquake activity with the time of day (Duma, 1996, 1999. In the article it is attempted to quantify the forces which result from the interaction between the induced Sq-variation currents in the Earth’s lithosphere and the regional Earth’s magnetic field, in order to assess the influence on the tectonic stress field and on seismic activity. A reliable model is obtained, which indicates a high energy involved in this process. The effect of Sq-induction is compared with the results of the large scale electromagnetic experiment "Khibiny" (Velikhov, 1989, where a giant artificial current loop was activated in the Barents Sea.

  10. The role of boundary layer dynamics on the diurnal evolution of isoprene and the hydroxyl radical over tropical forests

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vilà-Guerau de Arellano, J.; Patton, E.G.; Karl, T.; Dries, van den K.; Barth, M.C.; Orlando, J.J.

    2011-01-01

    We investigate diurnal variability of isoprene and related chemical species in the Amazonian region. The dynamics and chemistry of an atmospheric boundary layer are studied with a large-eddy simulation code and a mixed-layer model which are guided by observations available for the same area. The mai

  11. Effects of building aspect ratio, diurnal heating scenario, and wind speed on reactive pollutant dispersion in urban street canyons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Nelson Y O; Leung, Dennis Y C

    2012-01-01

    A photochemistry coupled computational fluid dynamics (CFD) based numerical model has been developed to model the reactive pollutant dispersion within urban street canyons, particularly integrating the interrelationship among diurnal heating scenario (solar radiation affections in nighttime, daytime, and sun-rise/set), wind speed, building aspect ratio (building-height-to-street-width), and dispersion of reactive gases, specifically nitric oxide (NO), nitrogen dioxide (NO2) and ozone (O3) such that a higher standard of air quality in metropolitan cities can be achieved. Validation has been done with both experimental and numerical results on flow and temperature fields in a street canyon with bottom heating, which justifies the accuracy of the current model. The model was applied to idealized street canyons of different aspect ratios from 0.5 to 8 with two different ambient wind speeds under different diurnal heating scenarios to estimate the influences of different aforementioned parameters on the chemical evolution of NO, NO2 and O3. Detailed analyses of vertical profiles of pollutant concentrations showed that different diurnal heating scenarios could substantially affect the reactive gases exchange between the street canyon and air aloft, followed by respective dispersion and reaction. Higher building aspect ratio and stronger ambient wind speed were revealed to be, in general, responsible for enhanced entrainment of O3 concentrations into the street canyons along windward walls under all diurnal heating scenarios. Comparatively, particular attention can be paid on the windward wall heating and nighttime uniform surface heating scenarios.

  12. Short hours, long hours: Hour levels and trends in the retail industry in the United States, Canada, and Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Carré, Françoise; Tilly, Chris

    2012-01-01

    In settings where most workers have full-time schedules, hourly wages are appropriate primary indicators of job quality and worker outcomes. However, in sectors where full-time schedules do not dominate - primarily service-producing activities - total hours matter, in addition to hourly wages, for job quality and worker outcomes. In this paper we employ a sector-focused, comparative framework to further examine hours levels - measured as average weekly hours - and trends in Canada, the United...

  13. Absolute Cerebral Blood Flow Infarction Threshold for 3-Hour Ischemia Time Determined with CT Perfusion and 18F-FFMZ-PET Imaging in a Porcine Model of Cerebral Ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Eric A; d'Esterre, Christopher D; Morrison, Laura B; Cockburn, Neil; Kovacs, Michael; Lee, Ting-Yim

    2016-01-01

    CT Perfusion (CTP) derived cerebral blood flow (CBF) thresholds have been proposed as the optimal parameter for distinguishing the infarct core prior to reperfusion. Previous threshold-derivation studies have been limited by uncertainties introduced by infarct expansion between the acute phase of stroke and follow-up imaging, or DWI lesion reversibility. In this study a model is proposed for determining infarction CBF thresholds at 3hr ischemia time by comparing contemporaneously acquired CTP derived CBF maps to 18F-FFMZ-PET imaging, with the objective of deriving a CBF threshold for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. Endothelin-1 (ET-1) was injected into the brain of Duroc-Cross pigs (n = 11) through a burr hole in the skull. CTP images were acquired 10 and 30 minutes post ET-1 injection and then every 30 minutes for 150 minutes. 370 MBq of 18F-FFMZ was injected ~120 minutes post ET-1 injection and PET images were acquired for 25 minutes starting ~155-180 minutes post ET-1 injection. CBF maps from each CTP acquisition were co-registered and converted into a median CBF map. The median CBF map was co-registered to blood volume maps for vessel exclusion, an average CT image for grey/white matter segmentation, and 18F-FFMZ-PET images for infarct delineation. Logistic regression and ROC analysis were performed on infarcted and non-infarcted pixel CBF values for each animal that developed infarct. Six of the eleven animals developed infarction. The mean CBF value corresponding to the optimal operating point of the ROC curves for the 6 animals was 12.6 ± 2.8 mL·min-1·100g-1 for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. The porcine ET-1 model of cerebral ischemia is easier to implement then other large animal models of stroke, and performs similarly as long as CBF is monitored using CTP to prevent reperfusion.

  14. Absolute Cerebral Blood Flow Infarction Threshold for 3-Hour Ischemia Time Determined with CT Perfusion and 18F-FFMZ-PET Imaging in a Porcine Model of Cerebral Ischemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric A Wright

    Full Text Available CT Perfusion (CTP derived cerebral blood flow (CBF thresholds have been proposed as the optimal parameter for distinguishing the infarct core prior to reperfusion. Previous threshold-derivation studies have been limited by uncertainties introduced by infarct expansion between the acute phase of stroke and follow-up imaging, or DWI lesion reversibility. In this study a model is proposed for determining infarction CBF thresholds at 3hr ischemia time by comparing contemporaneously acquired CTP derived CBF maps to 18F-FFMZ-PET imaging, with the objective of deriving a CBF threshold for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. Endothelin-1 (ET-1 was injected into the brain of Duroc-Cross pigs (n = 11 through a burr hole in the skull. CTP images were acquired 10 and 30 minutes post ET-1 injection and then every 30 minutes for 150 minutes. 370 MBq of 18F-FFMZ was injected ~120 minutes post ET-1 injection and PET images were acquired for 25 minutes starting ~155-180 minutes post ET-1 injection. CBF maps from each CTP acquisition were co-registered and converted into a median CBF map. The median CBF map was co-registered to blood volume maps for vessel exclusion, an average CT image for grey/white matter segmentation, and 18F-FFMZ-PET images for infarct delineation. Logistic regression and ROC analysis were performed on infarcted and non-infarcted pixel CBF values for each animal that developed infarct. Six of the eleven animals developed infarction. The mean CBF value corresponding to the optimal operating point of the ROC curves for the 6 animals was 12.6 ± 2.8 mL·min-1·100g-1 for infarction after 3 hours of ischemia. The porcine ET-1 model of cerebral ischemia is easier to implement then other large animal models of stroke, and performs similarly as long as CBF is monitored using CTP to prevent reperfusion.

  15. Diurnal Regulation of Cellular Processes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Insights from Transcriptomic, Fluxomic, and Physiological Analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Rajib; Liu, Deng; Hoynes-O'Connor, Allison; Liberton, Michelle; Yu, Jingjie; Bhattacharyya-Pakrasi, Maitrayee; Balassy, Andrea; Zhang, Fuzhong; Moon, Tae Seok; Maranas, Costas D; Pakrasi, Himadri B

    2016-05-03

    Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, with a well-developed omics level knowledgebase. Like the lifestyles of other cyanobacteria, that of Synechocystis PCC 6803 is tuned to diurnal changes in light intensity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of all of the genes of this cyanobacterium over two consecutive diurnal periods. Using stringent criteria, we determined that the transcript levels of nearly 40% of the genes in Synechocystis PCC 6803 show robust diurnal oscillating behavior, with a majority of the transcripts being upregulated during the early light period. Such transcripts corresponded to a wide array of cellular processes, such as light harvesting, photosynthetic light and dark reactions, and central carbon metabolism. In contrast, transcripts of membrane transporters for transition metals involved in the photosynthetic electron transport chain (e.g., iron, manganese, and copper) were significantly upregulated during the late dark period. Thus, the pattern of global gene expression led to the development of two distinct transcriptional networks of coregulated oscillatory genes. These networks help describe how Synechocystis PCC 6803 regulates its metabolism toward the end of the dark period in anticipation of efficient photosynthesis during the early light period. Furthermore, in silico flux prediction of important cellular processes and experimental measurements of cellular ATP, NADP(H), and glycogen levels showed how this diurnal behavior influences its metabolic characteristics. In particular, NADPH/NADP(+) showed a strong correlation with the majority of the genes whose expression peaks in the light. We conclude that this ratio is a key endogenous determinant of the diurnal behavior of this cyanobacterium. Cyanobacteria are photosynthetic microbes that use energy from sunlight and CO2 as feedstock. Certain cyanobacterial strains are amenable to facile genetic manipulation, thus enabling

  16. Tissue specific diurnal rhythms of metabolites and their regulation during herbivore attack in a native tobacco, Nicotiana attenuata.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Gyu Kim

    Full Text Available Ecological performance is all about timing and the endogenous clock that allows the entrainment of rhythms and anticipation of fitness-determining events is being rapidly characterized. How plants anticipate daily abiotic stresses, such as cold in early mornings and drought at noon, as well as biotic stresses, such as the timing of pathogen infections, is being explored, but little is known about the clock's role in regulating responses to insect herbivores and mutualists, whose behaviors are known to be strongly diurnally regulated and whose attack is known to reconfigure plant metabolomes. We developed a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry procedure and analyzed its output with model-based peak picking algorithms to identify metabolites with diurnal accumulation patterns in sink/source leaves and roots in an unbiased manner. The response of metabolites with strong diurnal patterns to simulated attack from the specialist herbivore, Manduca sexta larvae was analyzed and annotated with in-house and public databases. Roots and leaves had largely different rhythms and only 10 ions of 182 oscillating ions in leaves and 179 oscillating ions in roots were rhythmic in both tissues: root metabolites mainly peaked at dusk or night, while leaf metabolites peaked during the day. Many oscillating metabolites showed tissue-specific regulation by simulated herbivory of which systemic responses in unattacked tissues were particularly pronounced. Diurnal and herbivory-elicited accumulation patterns of disaccharide, phenylalanine, tyrosine, lyciumoside I, coumaroyl tyramine, 12-oxophytodienoic acid and jasmonic acid and those of their related biosynthetic transcripts were examined in detail. We conclude that oscillating metabolites of N. attenuata accumulate in a highly tissue-specific manner and the patterns reveal pronounced diurnal rhythms in the generalized and specialized metabolism that mediates the plant's responses to herbivores and mutualists. We

  17. Diurnal cortisol after early institutional care—Age matters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica E. Flannery

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have shown that young children who have experienced early caregiving adversity (e.g. previously institutionalization (PI exhibit flattened diurnal cortisol slopes; however, less is known about how these patterns might differ between children and adolescents, since the transition between childhood and adolescence is a time of purported plasticity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA axis. PI youth experience a massive improvement in caregiving environment once adopted into families; therefore we anticipated that a developmental increase in HPA axis plasticity during adolescence might additionally allow for an enhanced enrichment effect by the adoptive family. In a cross-sectional sample of 197 youths (PI and Comparison; 4–15 years old we observed age-related group differences in diurnal slope. First replicating previous findings, PI children exhibited flattened diurnal slope. This group difference, however, was not observed in adolescents. Moderation analyses showed that pubertal development, increased time with family, and early adoption contributed to the steeper diurnal cortisol slope in PI adolescents. These findings add support to existing theories positing that the transition between middle childhood and adolescence may mark an additional sensitive period for diurnal cortisol patterning, allowing PI youth to benefit from the enriched environment provided by adoptive parents during this period of development.

  18. Does the Neuroprotective Role of Anandamide Display Diurnal Variations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Vargas, Marina; Morales-Gomez, Julio; Gonzalez-Rivera, Ruben; Hernandez-Enriquez, Carla; Perez-Arredondo, Adan; Estrada-Rojo, Francisco; Navarro, Luz

    2013-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system is a component of the neuroprotective mechanisms that an organism displays after traumatic brain injury (TBI). A diurnal variation in several components of this system has been reported. This variation may influence the recovery and survival rate after TBI. We have previously reported that the recovery and survival rate of rats is higher if TBI occurs at 1:00 than at 13:00. This could be explained by a diurnal variation of the endocannabinoid system. Here, we describe the effects of anandamide administration in rats prior to the induction of TBI at two different times of the day: 1:00 and 13:00. We found that anandamide reduced the neurological damage at both times. Nevertheless, its effects on bleeding, survival, food intake, and body weight were dependent on the time of TBI. In addition, we analyzed the diurnal variation of the expression of the cannabinoid receptors CB1R and CB2R in the cerebral cortex of both control rats and rats subjected to TBI. We found that CB1R protein was expressed more during the day, whereas its mRNA level was higher during the night. We did not find a diurnal variation for the CB2R. In addition, we also found that TBI increased CB1R and CB2R in the contralateral hemisphere and disrupted the CB1R diurnal cycle. PMID:24287910

  19. Does the Neuroprotective Role of Anandamide Display Diurnal Variations?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Martinez-Vargas

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The endocannabinoid system is a component of the neuroprotective mechanisms that an organism displays after traumatic brain injury (TBI. A diurnal variation in several components of this system has been reported. This variation may influence the recovery and survival rate after TBI. We have previously reported that the recovery and survival rate of rats is higher if TBI occurs at 1:00 than at 13:00. This could be explained by a diurnal variation of the endocannabinoid system. Here, we describe the effects of anandamide administration in rats prior to the induction of TBI at two different times of the day: 1:00 and 13:00. We found that anandamide reduced the neurological damage at both times. Nevertheless, its effects on bleeding, survival, food intake, and body weight were dependent on the time of TBI. In addition, we analyzed the diurnal variation of the expression of the cannabinoid receptors CB1R and CB2R in the cerebral cortex of both control rats and rats subjected to TBI. We found that CB1R protein was expressed more during the day, whereas its mRNA level was higher during the night. We did not find a diurnal variation for the CB2R. In addition, we also found that TBI increased CB1R and CB2R in the contralateral hemisphere and disrupted the CB1R diurnal cycle.

  20. Effects of stressor controllability on diurnal physiological rhythms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Robert S; Christianson, John P; Maslanik, Thomas M; Maier, Steve F; Greenwood, Benjamin N; Fleshner, Monika

    2013-03-15

    Disruptions in circadian and diurnal rhythms are associated with stress-related psychiatric disorders and stressor exposure can disrupt these rhythms. The controllability of the stressor can modulate various behavioral and neurochemical responses to stress. Uncontrollable, but not controllable, stress produces behaviors in rats that resemble symptoms of anxiety and depression. Whether acute stress-induced disruptions in physiological rhythms are sensitive to controllability of the stressor, however, remains unknown. To examine the role of controllability in diurnal rhythm disruption, adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were implanted with Data Sciences International (DSI) biotelemetry devices. Real-time measurements were obtained before, during and after exposure to a controllable or yoked uncontrollable stressor. Controllable and uncontrollable stress equally disrupted diurnal rhythms of locomotor activity and body temperature but not heart rate. The diurnal heart rate the day following stressor exposure was flattened to a greater extent and was significantly higher in rats with control over stress suggesting a relationship between stressor controllability and the heart rate response. Our results are consistent with the conclusion that acute stress-induced disruptions in diurnal physiological rhythms likely contribute little to the behavioral and affective consequences of stress that are sensitive to stressor controllability.

  1. Satellite-based Dust Source Identification over North Africa: Diurnal Cycle, Meteorological Controls, and Interannual Variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schepanski, Kerstin; Tegen, Ina; Macke, Andreas

    2010-05-01

    Mineral dust aerosol emitted from arid and semi-arid areas impacts on the weather and climate system by affecting e.g. radiation fluxes and nutrient cycles. To estimate the effect of dust aerosol, detailed knowledge on the spatio-temporal distribution of active dust sources is necessary. For a better representation of dust-related processes in numerical models and climate change projections the knowledge on the natural variability of dust source activity has to be improved. As dust sources are mostly located over remote areas satellite observations are suitable for identifying active dust sources. The accuracy of dust source identification using such an indirect method is limited by the temporal resolution and the ambiguities of the retrieval. Here, a data set on the spatial (1°x1°) and temporal (3-hourly) distribution of dust source activations (DSA) over North Africa is compiled by analyzing 15-minute Meteosat Second Generation (MSG) infra-red (IR) dust index images since March 2006. The index is designed using radiances measured by the Spinning Enhanced Visible and Infra-Red Imager (SEVIRI) on-board MSG at 8.7 µm, 10.8 µm and 12.0 µm which are converted to brightness temperatures (BTs). To strengthen the dust signal, differences of BTs are used to compute RGB-composite images. This newly data set providing information on the diurnal cycle of dust emission has been used (1) to identify most active dust source areas, and (2) to investigate on the temporal distribution of DSAs. Over the Sahara Desert 65% of dust sources become active during 06-09 UTC pointing towards an important role of the break-down of the nocturnal low-level jet (LLJ) for dust mobilization besides other meteorological features like density currents, haboobs, and cyclones. Furthermore the role of the nocturnal LLJs for dust mobilization over the Sahara is investigated by weather observations and a regional modeling study. Four years of DSA observations indicate an interannual variability in

  2. Hydroxyl in the stratosphere and mesosphere – Part 1: Diurnal variability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Minschwaner

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Diurnal variations in hydroxyl (OH in the stratosphere and mesosphere are analyzed using measurements from the Aura Microwave Limb Sounder (MLS. The primary driver for OH diurnal variations is the ultraviolet actinic flux that initiates photochemical reactions which produce OH. The magnitude of this flux is governed largely by changes in solar zenith angle (SZA throughout the day, and OH diurnal variations are well approximated by an exponential function of the secant of SZA. Measured OH concentrations are fit to a function of the form exp[−βsec(SZA], where the parameter β is a function of altitude. We examine the magnitude of β and show that it is related to the optical depths of ultraviolet absorption by ozone and oxygen. Comparison of β values obtained from SLIMCAT model simulations with those derived from MLS observations shows very good agreement. The vertical profile of β from MLS can be represented by a simple analytic formulation involving the ozone and water vapor photodissociation rates. This formulation is used to infer the altitude dependence of the primary production mechanisms for OH: the reaction of excited-state atomic oxygen with water vapor versus the direct photodissociation of water vapor.

  3. Diurnal Cycle of Clouds and Precipitation at the ARM SGP Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, W.; Marchand, R.; Fu, Q.

    2016-12-01

    Millimeter Wavelength Cloud Radar (MMCR) data from Dec. 1996 to Dec. 2010, collected at the U. S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program site in the U.S. Southern Great Plains (SGP), are categorized into clouds (-40dBZe≤reflectivityCRM). Observational and simulated radar reflectivity are compared and further sorted into different atmospheric states identified by Evans (2014). Evans used a neutral network to take ERA-Interim state variables (i.e. horizontal winds, relative humidity, temperature at seven predetermined pressure level and surface pressure) on an 8×8 grid with 1.5º×1.5º spatial resolution centered on the SGP site and found twenty-one atmospheric states which represent specific synoptic conditions. We use these states to study the differences in the diurnal cycle between observations and simulations. Differences in the (mean) annual diurnal cycle between the observations and model are decomposed into errors in the daily mean, errors in the diurnal variation in each state, and errors due to difference in the frequency of occurrence of atmospheric states between ERA and the MMF. The magnitude of various error sources is assessed.

  4. Sex hormones adjust "sex-specific" reactive and diurnal cortisol profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juster, Robert-Paul; Raymond, Catherine; Desrochers, Alexandra Bisson; Bourdon, Olivier; Durand, Nadia; Wan, Nathalie; Pruessner, Jens C; Lupien, Sonia J

    2016-01-01

    Sex differences in stress hormone functions are presumed to depend on sex hormones. And yet, surprisingly few psychoneuroendocrine studies actually assess within-sex variations of testosterone, estradiol, and progesterone when investigating sex-specific activities of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In this methodological study of 204 healthy adults (60 men), we assessed whether cortisol profiles would differ between the sexes when unadjusted or adjusted for basal sex hormones among both sexes. Reactive cortisol was sampled using 6 saliva samples measured every 10-min as part of the Trier Social Stress Test that generally activates cortisol among men more than women. Diurnal cortisol was sampled over two days at (1) awakening, (2) 30-min thereafter, (3) 1400 h, (4) 1600 h, and (5) bedtime. Sex hormones were collected at baseline before the psychosocial stressor and on two occasions during diurnal cortisol assessment. Repeated-measures analysis of covariance controlled for key covariates in analyses unadjusted or adjusted for sex hormones. Results revealed that men had higher reactive cortisol than women in unadjusted analysis, but this sex difference was attenuated when adjusting for sex hormones. While diurnal cortisol showed no sex differences in unadjusted models, adjusting for sex hormones revealed that women have higher morning cortisol. Correlations using area under the curve formulae revealed intriguing sex-specific associations with progesterone in men and testosterone in women that we propose have implications for social and affective neuroscience. In summary, our results reveal that adjusting for sex hormones alters "sex-specific" reactive and diurnal cortisol profiles.

  5. Investigation of diurnal patterns in vertical distributions of pollen in the lower troposphere using LIDAR technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. M. Noh

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal patterns in pollen vertical distributions in the lower troposphere were investigated by the LIDAR remote sensing technique. Meteorological and pollen concentration data was measured at the surface using a Burkard 7 day recording volumetric spore sampler. An aerosol extinction coefficient and depolarization ratio of 532 nm was obtained from LIDAR measurements in spring (4 May–2 June 2009 in Gwagnju, Korea. Depolarization ratios from 0.08 to 0.14 were observed only in daytime (09:00–17:00 local time (LT during high pollen concentration days from 4 to 9 May. Vertical distributions in the depolarization ratio with time showed a specific diurnal pattern. Depolarization ratios, which varied from 0.08 to 0.14, were measured near the surface in the morning. High depolarization ratios were detected even up to 2.0 km between 12:00 and 14:00 LT but subsequently were observed only close to the surface after 17:00 LT. Low values of depolarization ratios (≤ 0.05 were detected after 18:00 LT until next morning. During the measurement period, the daily variations in the high depolarization ratios close to the surface showed good agreement with those in surface pollen concentrations, which implies that high depolarization ratios can be attributed to high pollen concentrations. The diurnal characteristics in high values of depolarization ratios were closely associated with turbulent transport, which can be caused by increasing temperature and wind speed and decreasing relative humidity. Continuously measured diurnal and vertical characteristics of pollen data can be further used to enhance the accuracy of the pollen-forecasting model via data assimilation studies.

  6. Effects of unoprostone on diurnal variation of intraocular pressure in healthy volunteers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inoue K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Kenji Inoue1, Kei Noguchi1, Masato Wakakura1, Goji Tomita21Inouye Eye Hospital, Tokyo; 22nd Department of Ophthalmology, Toho University School of Medicine, Tokyo, JapanPurpose: To prospectively evaluate the diurnal variation of intraocular pressure (IOP during unoprostone treatment in 13 healthy volunteers.Method: IOP was measured by Goldmann applanation tonometry by the same observer every 3 hours from 9 am to 9 am the next morning. Unoprostone was then instilled at 9 am and 9 pm daily for 1 month. After 1 month, IOP was measured again with unoprostone instilled at 9 am and 9 pm during IOP measurement. We then compared the average daily IOP before and after the treatment (paired t-test.Results: After 1 month of treatment, the average IOP decreased at every time point but one (12 pm, 3 pm, 6 pm, 9 pm, 12 am, 3 am, and 9 am, but not at 6 am. There were no adverse reactions and none of the subjects discontinued unoprostone.Conclusion: The hypotensive effects of unoprostone persist throughout the day, but this study suggests that the effects may be weaker at nighttime and early in the morning.Keywords: unoprostone, intraocular pressure, diurnal variation, healthy volunteer

  7. How much do diurnal land-sea circulations contribute to coastal wind power?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, A. L.; Zender, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    Wind power is a renewable and underused energy source that can help meet energy demands sustainably. However, estimates of coastal wind power potential often rely on measurements that under-sample the diurnal increase in wind speed due to local land/sea circulations. In situ measurements show that the diurnal sea breeze explains a majority of wind power in coastal Southern California. Satellite-retrieved winds overestimate the amount of wind power available by about 15 percent relative to half-hourly measurements of wind speed at Crystal Cove State Park over four years, from 2008-2012. This is because twice-per-day polar satellite overflights (e.g., QuikSCAT) can over-represent the sea breeze component of the wind power potential. Using gridded NASA MERRA analyses, our study quantifies globally the fraction of coastal wind power attributable to land/sea breezes, and shows where wind power based on satellite retrieved wind speeds is most likely biased by these local circulations. Finally, we demonstrate how coastal wind power may change in the 21st century based on IPCC CMIP5 climate change simulations. Future simulations (RCP 8.5) are rescaled by the difference between present day simulations and MERRA analyses. These results highlight the importance of land/sea breezes in potential present day and future wind power.

  8. Spatial and temporal variability of carbon dioxide and methane fluxes over semi-diurnal and spring-neap-spring timescales in a mangrove creek

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, M.; Maher, D. T.; Santos, I. R.; Ruiz-Halpern, S.; Mangion, P.; Sanders, C. J.; Erler, D. V.; Oakes, J. M.; Rosentreter, J.; Murray, R.; Eyre, B. D.

    2015-02-01

    Automated in situ instrumentation captured high-resolution surface water pCO2, CH4 and 222Rn data at the creek mouth, and ∼500 m upstream in a sub-tropical mangrove ecosystem (Southern Moreton Bay, Australia, S27.78°, E153.38°) over a spring-neap-spring tidal cycle (∼15 days) during November 2013. The partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) ranged from 385 to 26,106 μatm, CH4 from 1.8 to 889 nM, and 222Rn from 280 to 108,172 dpm m-3. Average surface water pCO2, CH4 and 222Rn were 4-fold higher at the upstream station. Surface water fluxes of CO2 and CH4 ranged from 9.4 to 629.2 mmol CO2 m-2 d-1 and 13.1 to 632.9 μmol CH4 m-2 d-1 depending upon the gas transfer model used and station location. Creek pCO2, CH4 and 222Rn displayed changes over both semi-diurnal and spring-neap-spring tidal scales. Semi-diurnally, all gases had a significant inverse relationship with water depth. Over the spring-neap-spring cycle, all gases exhibited an inverse relationship with tidal amplitude, with higher values during neap tides than spring tides. Estimated fluxes, porewater observations, and the significant positive relationship between surface water pCO2 and CH4, and 222Rn suggests groundwater exchange (i.e., tidal pumping) drives pCO2 and CH4 within the mangrove creek. We hypothesize that a combination of hourly and weekly groundwater-surface water exchange processes drive surface water pCO2 and CH4 in mangrove creeks. Semi-diurnally, flushing of crab burrows leads to high pCO2 and CH4 concentrations at low tide. During the spring-neap-spring cycle, older groundwater enriched in CO2, CH4 and 222Rn seeps into the creek as tidal amplitude decreases, leading to higher concentrations at neap tides.

  9. Atmospheric mercury measurements at a suburban site in the Mid-Atlantic United States: Inter-annual, seasonal and diurnal variations and source-receptor relationships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Xinrong; Luke, Winston T.; Kelley, Paul; Cohen, Mark D.; Artz, Richard; Olson, Mark L.; Schmeltz, David; Puchalski, Melissa; Goldberg, Daniel L.; Ring, Allison; Mazzuca, Gina M.; Cummings, Kristin A.; Wojdan, Lisa; Preaux, Sandra; Stehr, Jeff W.

    2016-12-01

    Different atmospheric mercury forms have been measured at a suburban site in Beltsville, Maryland in the Mid-Atlantic United States since 2007 to investigate their inter-annual, seasonal and diurnal variabilities. Average concentrations and standard deviations of hourly measurements from 2007 to 2015 were 1.41 ± 0.23 ng m-3 for gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), 4.6 ± 33.7 pg m-3 for gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM), and 8.6 ± 56.8 pg m-3 for particulate-bound mercury (PBM). Observations show that on average, the rates of decrease were 0.020 ± 0.007 ng m-3 yr-1 (or 1.3 ± 0.5% yr-1, statistically significant, p-value 0.01) for PBM over this nine-year period. In addition, the collocated annual mercury wet deposition decreased at a rate of 0.51 ± 0.24 μg m-2 yr-2 (or 4.2 ± 1.9% yr-1, statistically insignificant, p-value > 0.01). Diurnal variation of GEM shows a slight peak in the morning, likely due to the shallow boundary layer. Seasonal variation of GEM shows lower levels in fall. Both diurnal variations of GOM and PBM show peaks in the afternoon likely due to the photochemical production of reactive mercury from the oxidation of GEM and the influence of boundary layer processes. Seasonally, GOM measurements show high levels in spring and constant low levels in the other three seasons, while PBM measurements exhibit higher levels from late fall to early spring and lower levels from late spring to fall. These measurement data were analyzed using the HYSPLIT back trajectory model in order to examine possible source-receptor relationships at this suburban site. Trajectory frequency analysis shows that high GEM/GOM/PBM events were generally associated with high frequencies of the trajectories passing through areas with high mercury emissions, while low GEM/GOM/PBM levels were largely associated the trajectories passing through relatively clean areas. This study indicates that local and regional sources appear to have a significant impact on the site and these

  10. 24-Hour Relativistic Bit Commitment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verbanis, Ephanielle; Martin, Anthony; Houlmann, Raphaël; Boso, Gianluca; Bussières, Félix; Zbinden, Hugo

    2016-09-01

    Bit commitment is a fundamental cryptographic primitive in which a party wishes to commit a secret bit to another party. Perfect security between mistrustful parties is unfortunately impossible to achieve through the asynchronous exchange of classical and quantum messages. Perfect security can nonetheless be achieved if each party splits into two agents exchanging classical information at times and locations satisfying strict relativistic constraints. A relativistic multiround protocol to achieve this was previously proposed and used to implement a 2-millisecond commitment time. Much longer durations were initially thought to be insecure, but recent theoretical progress showed that this is not so. In this Letter, we report on the implementation of a 24-hour bit commitment solely based on timed high-speed optical communication and fast data processing, with all agents located within the city of Geneva. This duration is more than 6 orders of magnitude longer than before, and we argue that it could be extended to one year and allow much more flexibility on the locations of the agents. Our implementation offers a practical and viable solution for use in applications such as digital signatures, secure voting and honesty-preserving auctions.

  11. Atmospheric boundary layer measurements at the 280 m high Hamburg weather mast 1995-2011. Mean annual and diurnal cycles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bruemmer, Burghard; Lange, Ingo; Konow, Heike [Hamburg Univ. (Germany). Meteorologisches Inst.

    2012-08-15

    height between the opposite cycles is around 130 m in summer and 80 m in winter. The wind direction difference (250 m-10 m) shows a strong diurnal variation between 15 (day) and 45 (night) in summer and a small one between 23 and 35 in winter. The annual and diurnal cycles of all primary climate variables together present an excellent basis for the validation of process, weather or climate models. (orig.)

  12. Seasonal variation in diurnal atmospheric grass pollen concentration profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peel, Robert George; Ørby, Pia Viuf; Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the diurnal atmospheric grass pollen concentration profile within the Danish city of Aarhus was shown to change in a systematic manner as the pollen season progressed. Although diurnal grass pollen profiles can differ greatly from day-to-day, it is common practice to establish...... the time of day when peak concentrations are most likely to occur using seasonally averaged diurnal profiles. Atmospheric pollen loads are highly dependent upon emissions, and different species of grass are known to flower and emit pollen at different times of the day and during different periods...... of the pollen season. Pollen concentrations are also influenced by meteorological factors - directly through those parameters that govern pollen dispersion and transport, and indirectly through the weather-driven flowering process. We found that three different profiles dominated the grass pollen season...

  13. A study of the hourly variability of the urban heat island effect in the Greater Athens Area during summer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourtidis, K; Georgoulias, A K; Rapsomanikis, S; Amiridis, V; Keramitsoglou, I; Hooyberghs, H; Maiheu, B; Melas, D

    2015-06-01

    Measurements of air temperature and humidity in the urban canopy layer during July 2009 in 26 sites in Athens, Greece, allowed for the mapping of the hourly spatiotemporal evolution of the urban heat island (UHI) effect. City districts neighboring to the mountains to the east were the hottest during the afternoon, while being among the coolest during the early morning hours. While during the early morning some coastal sites were the hottest, the warm air plume slowly moved to the densely urbanized center of the city until 14:00-15:00, moving then further west, to the Elefsis industrial area in the afternoon. Results from the UrbClim model agree fairly well with the observations. Satellite-derived land surface temperature (LST) data from AATSR, ASTER, AVHRR and MODIS, for pixels corresponding to ground stations measuring Tair, showed that LST can be up to 5K lower than the respective Tair during nighttime, while it can be up to 15K higher during the rest of the day. Generally, LST during late afternoon as acquired from AATSR is very near to Tair for all stations and all days, i.e., the AATSR LST afternoon retrieval can be used as a very good approximation of Tair. The hourly evolution of the spatial Tair distribution was almost the same during days with NE Etesian flow as in days with sea breeze circulation, indicating that the mean wind flow was not the main factor controlling the diurnal UHI evolution, although it influenced the temperatures attained. No unambiguous observation of the urban moisture excess (UME) phenomenon could be made.

  14. Diurnal variations of humidity and ice water content in the tropical upper troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Eriksson

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Observational results of diurnal variations of humidity from Odin-SMR and AURA-MLS, and cloud ice mass from Odin-SMR and CloudSat are presented for the first time. Comparisons show that the retrievals of humidity and cloud ice from these three satellite instruments are in good agreement. The retrieved data are combined from four almost evenly distributed times of the day allowing mean values, amplitudes and phases of the diurnal variations around 200 hPa to be estimated. This analysis is applied to six climatologically distinct regions, five located in the tropics and one over the subtropical northern Pacific Ocean. The strongest diurnal cycles are found over tropical land regions, where the amplitude is in the order of 6 %RHi for humidity and 50% for ice mass. The greatest ice mass is for these regions found during the afternoon, and the humidity maximum is observed to lag this peak by ~6 h. Over tropical ocean regions the variations are smaller and the maximum in both ice mass and humidity are found during the early morning. Observed results are compared with output from three climate models (ECHAM, EC-EARTH and CAM3. Direct measurement-model comparisons were not possible because the measured and modelled cloud ice masses represent different quantities. To make a meaningful comparison, the amount of snow had to be estimated from diagnostic parameters of the models. There is a high probability that the models underestimate the average ice mass (below the 1-σ uncertainty. The models show also clear deficiencies when it comes to amplitude and phase of the regional variations, but to a varying degree.

  15. Diurnal variations of humidity and ice water content in the tropical upper troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Eriksson

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Observational results of diurnal variations of humidity from Odin-SMR and AURA-MLS, and cloud ice mass from Odin-SMR and CloudSat are presented for the first time. Comparisons show that the retrievals of humidity and cloud ice from these two satellite combinations are in good agreement. The retrieved data are combined from four almost evenly distributed times of the day allowing mean values, amplitudes and phases of the diurnal variations around 200 hpa to be estimated. This analysis is applied to six climatologically distinct regions, five located in the tropics and one over the subtropical northern Pacific Ocean. The strongest diurnal cycles are found over tropical land regions, where the amplitude is ~7 RHi for humidity and ~50% for ice mass. The greatest ice mass for these regions is found during the afternoon, and the humidity maximum is observed to lag this peak by ~6 h. Over tropical ocean regions the variations are smaller and the maxima in both ice mass and humidity are found during the early morning. Observed results are compared with output from three climate models (ECHAM, EC-EARTH and CAM3. Direct measurement-model comparisons were not possible because the measured and modelled cloud ice masses represent different quantities. To make a meaningful comparison, the amount of snow had to be estimated from diagnostic parameters of the models. There is a high probability that the models underestimate the average ice mass (outside the 1-σ uncertainty. The models also show clear deficiencies when it comes to amplitude and phase of the regional variations, but to varying degrees.

  16. Inferring hydraulic properties of alpine aquifers from the propagation of diurnal snowmelt signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurylyk, Barret L.; Hayashi, Masaki

    2017-05-01

    Alpine watersheds source major rivers throughout the world and supply essential water for irrigation, human consumption, and hydroelectricity. Coarse depositional units in alpine watersheds can store and transmit significant volumes of groundwater and thus augment stream discharge during the dry season. These environments are typically data scarce, which has limited the application of physically based models to investigate hydrologic sensitivity to environmental change. This study focuses on a coarse alpine talus unit within the Lake O'Hara watershed in the Canadian Rockies. We investigate processes controlling the hydrologic functioning of the talus unit using field observations and a numerical groundwater flow model driven with a distributed snowmelt model. The model hydraulic parameters are adjusted to investigate how these properties influence the propagation of snowmelt-induced diurnal signals. The model results expectedly demonstrate that diurnal signals at the talus outlet are progressively damped and lagged with lower hydraulic conductivity and higher specific yield. The simulations further indicate that the lag can be primarily controlled by a higher hydraulic conductivity upper layer, whereas the damping can be strongly influenced by a lower hydraulic conductivity layer along the base of the talus. The simulations specifically suggest that the talus slope can be represented as a two layer system with a high conductivity zone (0.02 m s-1) overlying a 10 cm thick lower conductivity zone (0.002 m s-1). This study demonstrates that diurnal signals can be used to elucidate the hydrologic functioning and hydraulic properties of shallow aquifers and thus aid in the parameterization of hydrological models.

  17. Is there a diurnal difference in mortality of severely injured trauma patients?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dybdal, Bitten; Svane, Christian; Hesselfeldt, Rasmus;

    2015-01-01

    with daytime patients (20:00-07:59). An injury severity score (ISS) >15 defined severe injury. Patients with burns and patients who upon arrival were declared non-trauma patients were not included. The primary outcome measure was 30-day mortality. RESULTS: A total of 1985 patients were recorded, of whom 576......BACKGROUND: Mortality may be higher for admissions at odd hours than during daytime, although for trauma patients results are conflicting. The objective of this study was to assess whether diurnal differences in mortality among severely injured trauma patients in Denmark were present. METHODS......: This observational cohort study was conducted between 1 December 2009 and 30 April 2011 involving one level 1 trauma centre and seven local emergency departments in eastern Denmark. Patients were consecutively included if received by a designated trauma team. Night-time patients (20:00-07:59) were compared...

  18. [Effect of positive pressure respiration on diurnal catecholamine excretion by patients with obstructive sleep apnea].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieślicki, J; Wocial, B; Koziej, M; Pałasiewicz, G; Zieliński, J

    1996-02-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate effects of CPAP treatment on diurnal catecholamine excretion in urine in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). 12 males with severe OSA (mean AHI = 63) were measured in 3 separate 8 hour samples by fluorimetric method. NA levels were higher in OSA patients in all urine samples than in obese, mildly hypertensive males (control group = C). In C group patients NA levels were significantly lower at night than during the day contrary to OSA patients in whom NA levels dropped insignificantly during sleep. In OSA patients NA levels during sleep correlated with severity of apneas (r = 0.42) and night hypoxaemia (r = -0.46). CPAP treatment resulted in significant fall in NA levels during sleep (p sleep in OSA patients may be related to sleep fragmentation and hypoxia. CPAP treatment restores normal circadian rhythm of NA excretion.

  19. Trial of Oral Metoclopramide on Diurnal Bruxism of Brain Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Ho Sung; Seo, Mi Ri

    2013-01-01

    Bruxism is a diurnal or nocturnal parafunctional activity that includes tooth clenching, bracing, gnashing, and grinding. The dopaminergic system seems to be the key pathophysiology of bruxism and diminution of dopaminergic transmission at the prefrontal cortex seems to induce it. We report two patients with diurnal bruxism in whom a bilateral frontal lobe injury resulted from hemorrhagic stroke or traumatic brain injury. These patients' bruxism was refractory to bromocriptine but responded to low-dose metoclopramide therapy. We propose that administering low doses of metoclopramide is possibly a sound method for treating bruxism in a brain injury patient with frontal lobe hypoperfusion on positron emission tomography imaging. PMID:24466522

  20. A numerical study on nonlinear propagation and short-term variability of the migrating diurnal and semidiurnal tides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Chunming; ZHANG Shaodong; YI Fan

    2005-01-01

    By using a three-dimensional fully nonlinear numerical model in spherical coordinates and taking the linear steady solutions of the migrating diurnal and semidiurnal tides in January from the Global-Scale Wave Model (GSWM) as the initial values, we simulate the linear and nonlinear propagations of the migrating diurnal and semidiurnal tides in the atmosphere from the ground to the lower thermosphere. A comparison of our simulations with the results of GSWM is also presented. The simulation results show that affected by the nonlinearity, the migrating diurnal and semidiurnal tides propagating in the middle and upper atmosphere exhibit evident short-term variability. The nonlinear interactions between the migrating tides and the background atmosphere can obviously alter the background wind and temperature fields, which suggests that the nonlinear propagations of the migrating diurnal and semidiurnal tides impact significantly on the transient dynamical and thermal structures of the background middle and upper atmosphere and the nonlinear effect is an important cause of the difference between the results of GSWM and observations.

  1. Diurnal variation of stratospheric chlorine monoxide - A critical test of chlorine chemistry in the ozone layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, P. M.; De Zafra, R.; Parrish, A.; Barrett, J. W.

    1984-01-01

    Ground-based observations of a mm-wave spectral line at 278 GHz have yielded stratospheric chlorine monoxide column density diurnal variation records which indicate that the mixing ratio and column density of this compound above 30 km are about 20 percent lower than model predictions based on 2.1 parts/billion of total stratospheric chlorine. The observed day-to-night variation is, however, in good agreement with recent model predictions, both confirming the existence of a nighttime reservoir for chlorine and verifying the predicted general rate of its storage and retrieval.

  2. Diurnal Rhythm of Muscular Strength Depends on Temporal Specificity of Self-Resistance Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zbidi, Sana; Zinoubi, Badrane; Vandewalle, Henry; Driss, Tarak

    2016-03-01

    The study investigated the effect of the time-of-day at which maximal isometric voluntary co-contraction (MIVCC) training is conducted on the adaptation and diurnal variation of maximal and explosive force production. Twenty active men underwent a 6-week (3 times per week) MIVCC training of the right elbow joint. The participants were randomly assigned to a morning training group (MTG, 07:00-08:00 hours) and evening training group (ETG, 17:00-18:00 hours). The maximal voluntary force (MVF) and maximal rate of force development (MRFD) during isometric elbow flexion (MVFF and MRFD(F)) and extension (MVF(E) and MRFD(E)) were recorded before (T0) and after (T1) training in the morning and evening. At T0, MVF and MRFD were higher in the evening compared with those in the morning for the MTG and ETG (p ≤ 0.05). At T1, MVFF and MVFE increased in the morning and evening for both groups (p training and test session were scheduled at the same time. The relative increase of MVF was greater at the specific time of training for the MTG (12 and 17.6% in MVF(F) and MVF(E), respectively) and ETG (9.8 and 13.4% in MVF(F) and MVF(E), respectively). The diurnal variations in MVF and MRF(D) during flexion and extension disappeared in the MTG and persisted in the ETG. Maximal isometric voluntary co-contraction training enhanced muscle strength whatever the time-of-day at which the training was scheduled without alteration of explosive force. In contrast, to optimize the muscle strength, our results suggested that morning training may be accompanied by the greatest muscle strength gain and blunted muscle strength variation observed between the morning and evening.

  3. Diurnal cycle of precipitation over the British Isles in a 0.44° WRF multiphysics regional climate ensemble over the period 1990-1995

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, P. A.; Mulligan, F. J.; Broderick, C.

    2016-11-01

    The diurnal cycle of precipitation is an important and fundamental cycle in Earth's climate system, yet many aspects of this cycle remain poorly understood. As a result climate models have struggled to accurately simulate the timing of the peak and the amplitude of the cycle. This has led to a large number of modelling studies on the diurnal cycle of precipitation which have focussed mainly on the influence of grid spacing and/or convective parameterizations. Results from these investigations have shown that, while grid spacing and convective parameterizations are important factors in the diurnal cycle, it cannot be fully explained by these factors and it must also be subject to other factors. In this study, we use the weather research and forecasting (WRF) model to investigate four of these other factors, namely the land surface model (LSM), microphysics, longwave radiation and planetary boundary layer in the case of the diurnal cycle of precipitation over the British Isles. We also compare their impact with the effect of two different convective schemes. We find that all simulations have two main problems: (1) there is a large bias (too much precipitation) in both summer and winter (+19 and +38 % respectively for the ensemble averages), and (2) WRF summer precipitation is dominated by a diurnal (24-h) component ( 28 % of the mean precipitation) whereas the observations show a predominantly semidiurnal (12-h) component with a much smaller amplitude ( 10 % of mean precipitation). The choice of LSM has a large influence on the simulated diurnal cycle in summer with the remaining physics schemes showing very little effect. The magnitude of the LSM effect in summer is as large as 35 % on average and up to 50 % at the peak of the cycle. While neither of the two LSMs examined here capture the harmonic content of the diurnal cycle of precipitation very well, we find that use of the RUC LSM results in better agreement with the observations compared with Noah.

  4. A model of human sleep-related growth hormone secretion in dogs: effects of 3, 6, and 12 hours of forced wakefulness on plasma growth hormone, cortisol, and sleep stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Y; Ebihara, S; Nakamura, Y; Takahashi, K

    1981-07-01

    Twenty-four canine GH (cGH) and cortisol secretion patterns associated with sleep stages were studied in 10 male adult dogs. Plasma samples were obtained at 30- or 15-min intervals via an indwelling catheter. Under baseline conditions, all dogs showed irregular polyphasic sleep, and the episodic cGH secretion had no apparent relationship with sleep or the light-dark cycle. Five dogs were subjected to regular sleep-wake cycles; 3, 6, and 12 h of forced wakefulness (FW) were repeated at 3-, 6-, and 12-h intervals (recovery sleep periods), respectively. Peak cGH secretion (mean +/- SD, 6.4 ng/ml +/- 2.4) occurred soon after recovery sleep onset in 25 of 40 total recovery periods. The incidence of sleep-onset cGH peaks and cGH secretion during the first hour of recovery sleep significantly increased with the length of the preceding FW, but were not affected by the time of day. Delta wave sleep increased during this hour, suggesting a possible correlation with the sleep-onset cGH peak. During the first 3 h of recovery after 6 and 12 h of FW, cGH secretion was significantly enhanced, but cortisol was not. Considering the characteristics of human sleep-related GH secretion, we suggest that this peak cGH secretion represents a model of human GH secretion. Possibly, a close association of cGH secretion with sleep is concealed under the baseline condition and uncovered by inducing longer sleep-wake cycles in dogs. No circadian cortisol variation was detected under the baseline or the experimental conditions.

  5. PLANNING OF TRAINING AIRCRAFT FLIGHT HOURS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Visnja Vojvodić Rosenzweig

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of the training aircraft causes downtime of operations and thereby reduces the operational availability, which is crucial for flight planning in a training organisation. Manual daily planning within the fleet delivers suboptimal results and often causes discontinued flight of several aircraft that have to be maintained at the same time. Optimal maintenance schedule of training aircraft can be obtained by a sliding scale method. This paper presents a mathematical model of the sliding scale formulated by a mixed integer linear problem. Allocation of flight hours is optimised by using AMPL programming language, assuring that a sufficient number of aircraft are always available for training. The model can be used by a flight dispatch department in a training organisation as a basis for optimised planning and reduction of maintenance downtime.

  6. Assessment of periodic sub-diurnal Earth rotation variations at tidal frequencies through transformation of VLBI normal equation systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artz, Thomas; Tesmer Née Böckmann, Sarah; Nothnagel, Axel

    2011-09-01

    We present an empirical model for periodic variations of diurnal and sub-diurnal Earth rotation parameters (ERPs) that was derived based on the transformation of normal equation (NEQ) systems of Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) observing sessions. NEQ systems that contain highly resolved polar motion and UT1-TAI with a temporal resolution of 15 min were generated and then transformed to the coefficients of the tidal ERP model to be solved for. To investigate the quality of this model, comparisons with empirical models from the Global Positioning System (GPS), another VLBI model and the model adopted by the conventions of the International Earth Rotation and Reference Systems Service (IERS) were performed. The absolute coefficients of these models agree almost completely within 7.5 μ as in polar motion and 0.5 μ s in UT1-TAI. Several bigger differences exist, which are discussed in this paper. To be able to compare the model estimates with results of the continuous VLBI campaigns, where signals with periods of 8 and 6 h were detected, terms in the ter- and quarter-diurnal band were included in the tidal ERP model. Unfortunately, almost no common features with the results of continuous VLBI campaigns or ERP predictions in these tidal bands can be seen.

  7. Diurnal rhythms in neurexins transcripts and inhibitory/excitatory synapse scaffold proteins in the biological clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mika Shapiro-Reznik

    Full Text Available The neurexin genes (NRXN1/2/3 encode two families (α and β of highly polymorphic presynaptic proteins that are involved in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance. Recent studies indicate that neuronal activation and memory formation affect NRXN1/2/3α expression and alternative splicing at splice sites 3 and 4 (SS#3/SS#4. Neurons in the biological clock residing in the suprachiasmatic nuclei of the hypothalamus (SCN act as self-sustained oscillators, generating rhythms in gene expression and electrical activity, to entrain circadian bodily rhythms to the 24 hours day/night cycles. Cell autonomous oscillations in NRXN1/2/3α expression and SS#3/SS#4 exons splicing and their links to rhythms in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic balance in the circadian clock were explored. NRXN1/2/3α expression and SS#3/SS#4 splicing, levels of neurexin-2α and the synaptic scaffolding proteins PSD-95 and gephyrin (representing excitatory and inhibitory synapses, respectively were studied in mRNA and protein extracts obtained from SCN of C3H/J mice at different times of the 24 hours day/night cycle. Further studies explored the circadian oscillations in these components and causality relationships in immortalized rat SCN2.2 cells. Diurnal rhythms in mNRXN1α and mNRXN2α transcription, SS#3/SS#4 exon-inclusion and PSD-95 gephyrin and neurexin-2α levels were found in the SCN in vivo. No such rhythms were found with mNRXN3α. SCN2.2 cells also exhibited autonomous circadian rhythms in rNRXN1/2 expression SS#3/SS#4 exon inclusion and PSD-95, gephyrin and neurexin-2α levels. rNRXN3α and rNRXN1/2β were not expressed. Causal relationships were demonstrated, by use of specific siRNAs, between rNRXN2α SS#3 exon included transcripts and gephyrin levels in the SCN2.2 cells. These results show for the first time dynamic, cell autonomous, diurnal rhythms in expression and splicing of NRXN1/2 and subsequent effects on the expression of neurexin-2α and postsynaptic

  8. How Hours of Work Affect Occupational Earnings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecker, David

    1998-01-01

    In most managerial, management-related, sales, production, and transportation occupations, workers with longer hours earned a high hourly rate. The reverse was true for some jobs, including computer specialists, engineers, schoolteachers, and construction workers. (JOW)

  9. CERN restaurants: opening hours during summer

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    In the summer, the three CERN restaurants remain open during their usual hours. On Monday 1st August and Thursday 8 September, the Restaurant 1 will be open from 7:00 a.m. to 10:00 p.m.   The satellites will be open as follows: Building 6: normal hours Building 13: normal hours Building 30: normal hours Building 40: closing at 4:30 p.m. instead of 5:00 pm Building 54: normal hours in July, closed in August Building 864: normal hours Building 865: normal hours Building 774: normal hours

  10. Work Hours Constraints: Impacts and Policy Implications

    OpenAIRE

    Constant, Amelie F.; Otterbach, Steffen

    2011-01-01

    If individuals reveal their preference as consumers, then they are taken seriously. What happens if individuals, as employees, reveal their preferences in working hours? And what happens if there is a misalignment between actual hours worked and preferred hours, the so-called work hours constraints? How does this affect the productivity of workers, their health, and overall life satisfaction? Labor supply and corresponding demand are fundamental to production. Labor economists know for long t...

  11. Ecological consequences of diurnal flooding in tidal freshwater wetlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, A.; Wassen, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    Diurnal flooding can be observed in the upper end of tidal estuaries, where flooding water originating from the river is constantly fresh. Here, the input from the river is confronted with a tidal wave, so that the sand banks, mud flats, low and high marshes and tidal forests are flooded mostly

  12. Diurnal Changes in Angular Sensitivity of Crab Photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leggett, L.M.W.; Stavenga, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    The electrophysiological and anatomical consequences of diurnal changes in screening pigment position were investigated in the apposition eye of the portunid crab Scylla serrata. Intracellular recordings revealed that the acceptance angles of dark-adapted photoreceptors enlarged up to four-fold at n

  13. Diurnal Changes in Angular Sensitivity of Crab Photoreceptors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leggett, L.M.W.; Stavenga, D.G.

    1981-01-01

    The electrophysiological and anatomical consequences of diurnal changes in screening pigment position were investigated in the apposition eye of the portunid crab Scylla serrata. Intracellular recordings revealed that the acceptance angles of dark-adapted photoreceptors enlarged up to four-fold at

  14. Diurnal variation of von Willebrand factor in plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Timm, Annette; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Jørgensen, Henrik L;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Quantitation of von Willebrand factor (VWF) in plasma is a central element in assessing von Willebrand disease (VWD). VWF activity is known to vary, which has partly been ascribed to biological and preanalytical variation. However, a possible diurnal expression of VWF has not been tho...

  15. Successful Use of the Nocturnal Urine Alarm for Diurnal Enuresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friman, Patrick C.; Vollmer, Dennis

    1995-01-01

    A urine alarm, typically used to treat nocturnal enuresis, was effectively used to treat diurnal enuresis in a 15-year-old female with depression, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and conduct disorder. The study indicated that the alarm eliminated wetting in both treatment phases and that continence was maintained at three-month and…

  16. Sleep EEG spectral analysis in a diurnal rodent : Eutamias sibiricus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DIJK, DJ; DAAN, S

    1989-01-01

    1. Sleep was studied in the diurnal rodent Eutamias sibiricus, chronically implanted with EEG and EMG electrodes. Analysis of the distribution of wakefulness, nonrapid eye movement (NREM) sleep, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep over the 24 h period (LD 12:12) showed that total sleep time was 27.5%

  17. Unsupervised/supervised learning concept for 24-hour load forecasting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djukanovic, M. (Electrical Engineering Inst. ' Nikola Tesla' , Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Babic, B. (Electrical Power Industry of Serbia, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)); Sobajic, D.J.; Pao, Y.-H. (Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH (United States). Dept. of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science)

    1993-07-01

    An application of artificial neural networks in short-term load forecasting is described. An algorithm using an unsupervised/supervised learning concept and historical relationship between the load and temperature for a given season, day type and hour of the day to forecast hourly electric load with a lead time of 24 hours is proposed. An additional approach using functional link net, temperature variables, average load and last one-hour load of previous day is introduced and compared with the ANN model with one hidden layer load forecast. In spite of limited available weather variables (maximum, minimum and average temperature for the day) quite acceptable results have been achieved. The 24-hour-ahead forecast errors (absolute average) ranged from 2.78% for Saturdays and 3.12% for working days to 3.54% for Sundays. (Author)

  18. Impact of land convection on temperature diurnal variation in the tropical lower stratosphere inferred from COSMIC GPS radio occultations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Khaykin

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Following recent studies evidencing the influence of deep convection on the chemical composition and thermal structure of the tropical lower stratosphere, we explore its impact on the temperature diurnal variation in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere using the high-resolution COSMIC GPS radio-occultation temperature measurements spanning from 2006 through 2011. The temperature in the lowermost stratosphere over land during summer displays a marked diurnal cycle characterized by an afternoon cooling. This diurnal cycle is shown collocated with most intense land convective areas observed by the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM precipitation radar and in phase with the maximum overshooting occurrence frequency in late afternoon. Two processes potentially responsible for that are identified: (i non-migrating tides, whose physical nature is internal gravity waves, and (ii local cross-tropopause mass transport of adiabatically cooled air by overshooting turrets. Although both processes can contribute, only the lofting of adiabatically cooled air is well captured by models, making it difficult to characterize the contribution of non-migrating tides. The impact of deep convection on the temperature diurnal cycle is found larger in the southern tropics, suggesting more vigorous convection over clean rain forest continents than desert areas and polluted continents in the northern tropics.

  19. Changes in diurnal temperature range and national cereal yields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lobell, D

    2007-04-26

    Models of yield responses to temperature change have often considered only changes in average temperature (Tavg), with the implicit assumption that changes in the diurnal temperature range (DTR) can safely be ignored. The goal of this study was to evaluate this assumption using a combination of historical datasets and climate model projections. Data on national crop yields for 1961-2002 in the 10 leading producers of wheat, rice, and maize were combined with datasets on climate and crop locations to evaluate the empirical relationships between Tavg, DTR, and crop yields. In several rice and maize growing regions, including the two major nations for each crop, there was a clear negative response of yields to increased DTR. This finding reflects a nonlinear response of yields to temperature, which likely results from greater water and heat stress during hot days. In many other cases, the effects of DTR were not statistically significant, in part because correlations of DTR with other climate variables and the relatively short length of the time series resulted in wide confidence intervals for the estimates. To evaluate whether future changes in DTR are relevant to crop impact assessments, yield responses to projected changes in Tavg and DTR by 2046-2065 from 11 climate models were estimated. The mean climate model projections indicated an increase in DTR in most seasons and locations where wheat is grown, mixed projections for maize, and a general decrease in DTR for rice. These mean projections were associated with wide ranges that included zero in nearly all cases. The estimated impacts of DTR changes on yields were generally small (<5% change in yields) relative to the consistently negative impact of projected warming of Tavg. However, DTR changes did significantly affect yield responses in several cases, such as in reducing US maize yields and increasing India rice yields. Because DTR projections tend to be positively correlated with Tavg, estimates of yields

  20. Diurnal variation of tropospheric relative humidity in tropical regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi, Isaac; Arkin, Philip; Ferraro, Ralph; Eriksson, Patrick; Fetzer, Eric

    2016-06-01

    Despite the importance of water vapor especially in the tropical region, the diurnal variations of water vapor have not been completely investigated in the past due to the lack of adequate observations. Measurements from Sondeur Atmosphérique du Profil d'Humidité Intertropicale par Radiométrie (SAPHIR) onboard the low inclination Megha-Tropiques satellite with frequent daily revisits provide a valuable dataset for investigating the diurnal and spatial variation of tropospheric relative humidity in the tropical region. In this study, we first transformed SAPHIR observations into layer-averaged relative humidity, then partitioned the data based on local observation time into 24 bins with a grid resolution of one degree. Afterwards, we fitted Fourier series to the binned data. Finally, the mean, amplitude, and diurnal peak time of relative humidity in tropical regions were calculated for each grid point using either the measurements or Fourier series. The results were separately investigated for different SAPHIR channels as well as for relative humidity with respect to both liquid and ice phases. The results showed that the wet and dry regions are, respectively, associated with convective and subsidence regions which is consistent with the previous studies. The mean tropospheric humidity values reported in this study are generally 10 to 15 % higher than those reported using infrared observations which is because of strict cloud screening for infrared measurements. The results showed a large inhomogeneity in diurnal variation of tropospheric relative humidity in tropical region. The diurnal amplitude was larger over land than over ocean and the oceanic amplitude was larger over convective regions than over subsidence regions. The results showed that the diurnal amplitude is less than 10 % in middle and upper troposphere, but it is up to 30 % in lower troposphere over land. Although the peak of RH generally occurs over night or in early morning, there are several

  1. On the diurnal cycle of urban aerosols, black carbon and the occurrence of new particle formation events in springtime São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Backman

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Large conurbations are a significant source of the anthropogenic pollution and demographic differences between cities that result in a different pollution burden. The metropolitan area of São Paulo (MASP, population 20 million accounts for one fifth of the Brazilian vehicular fleet. A feature of MASP is the amount of ethanol used by the vehicular fleet, known to exacerbate air quality. The study describes the diurnal behaviour of the submicron aerosol and relies on total particle number concentration, particle number size distribution, light scattering and light absorption measurements. Modelled planetary boundary layer (PBL depth and air mass movement data were used to aid the interpretation. During morning rush-hour, stagnant air and a shallow PBL height favour the accumulation of aerosol pollution. During clear-sky conditions, there was a wind shift towards the edge of the city indicating a heat island effect with implications on particulate pollution levels at the site. The median total particle number concentration for the submicron aerosol typically varied in the range 1.6 × 104–3.2 × 104 cm−3 frequently exceeding 4 × 104 cm−3 during the day. During weekdays, nucleation-mode particles are responsible for most of the particles by numbers. The highest concentrations of total particle number concentrations and black carbon (BC were observed on Fridays. Median diurnal values for light absorption and light scattering (at 637 nm wavelength varied in the range 12–33 Mm−1 and 21–64 Mm−1, respectively. The former one is equal to 1.8–5.0 μg m−3 of BC. The growth of the PBL, from the morning rush-hour until noon, is consistent with the diurnal cycle of BC mass concentrations. Weekday hourly median single-scattering albedo (ω0 varied in the range 0.59–0.76. Overall, this suggests a top of atmosphere (TOA warming effect. However

  2. Combined effects of surface conditions, boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on diurnal SOA evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. H. H. Janssen

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We study the combined effects of land surface conditions, atmospheric boundary layer dynamics and chemistry on the diurnal evolution of biogenic secondary organic aerosol in the atmospheric boundary layer, using a model that contains the essentials of all these components. First, we evaluate the model for a case study in Hyytiälä, Finland, and find that it is able to satisfactorily reproduce the observed dynamics and gas-phase chemistry. We show that the exchange of organic aerosol between the free troposphere and the boundary layer (entrainment must be taken into account in order to explain the observed diurnal cycle in organic aerosol (OA concentration. An examination of the budgets of organic aerosol and terpene concentrations show that the former is dominated by entrainment, while the latter is mainly driven by emission and chemical transformation. We systematically investigate the role of the land surface, which governs both the surface energy balance partitioning and terpene emissions, and the large-scale atmospheric process of vertical subsidence. Entrainment is especially important for the dilution of organic aerosol concentrations under conditions of dry soils and low terpene emissions. Subsidence suppresses boundary layer growth while enhancing entrainment. Therefore, it influences the relationship between organic aerosol and terpene concentrations. Our findings indicate that the diurnal evolution of secondary organic aerosols (SOA in the boundary layer is the result of coupled effects of the land surface, dynamics of the atmospheric boundary layer, chemistry, and free troposphere conditions. This has potentially some consequences for the design of both field campaigns and large-scale modeling studies.

  3. Wake flow variability in a wind farm throughout the diurnal cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abkar, Mahdi; Sharifi, Ahmad; Porté-Agel, Fernando

    2015-04-01

    The atmospheric boundary layer (ABL) undergoes substantial changes in its structure and dynamics in the course of a day due to the transient nature of forcing factors such as the surface fluxes of heat and momentum. The non-stationary nature of the mean wind and turbulence in the ABL, associated with the diurnal cycle, can in turn affect the structure of wind turbine wakes and their effects on power losses within wind farms. In this research, large-eddy simulation (LES) is used to study the evolution of the turbine wakes and their effects on power losses inside an idealized finite-size wind farm in the course of two full diurnal cycles. In the LES, turbulent subgrid-scale stresses are modeled using tuning-free Lagrangian scale-dependent dynamic models, while the turbine-induced forces are parameterized using a dynamic actuator disk model with rotation. To minimize the effects of the initial conditions on the results, our analysis is focused on the second diurnal cycle. The simulation results show a strong effect of atmospheric stability on the wind farm wakes and associated power losses. During the night, the relatively low turbulence intensity of the ambient ABL flow results in a relatively slow rate of entrainment of momentum into the wake and, consequently, a slow wake recovery. In contrast, during the day the positive buoyancy flux and associated turbulence production lead to a relatively high turbulence level in the background ABL flow, which enhances turbulent mixing and wake recovery. As a result, the averaged power deficit in the wind farm is found to increase with increasing thermal stability. In particular for that day, the averaged power deficit increased from 28% under the most convective condition to about 66% under the most stable condition.

  4. Nerve remodeling in a canine model of atrial fibrillation induced by 48 hours right atrial pacing YU%快速右心房起搏致犬心房迷走神经重构的研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于付生; 张彦; 冯艳; 张玲; 马艳红; 宋伟; 侯月梅

    2010-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the nerve remodeling induced by 48 hours right atrial pacing in a canine model. Methods Rapid right atrial pacing (600 beats/min) was performed in 6 mongrel dogs of either sex for 48 hours to induce sustained atrial fibrillation (AF). Six dogs without pacing served as controls. Cardiac nerves were immunocytochemically stained using anti-growth-associated protein 43 (GAP43) and anti-choline acetyltransferase (CHAT) antibodies to compare nerve sprouting and pneumogastric nerve remodeling between the 2 groups. Results In dogs with AF, the GAP43-positive and CHAT-positive nerve densities in the left atrium, left auricular appendage, right atrium and right auricular appendage were significantly higher than in control animals (all P <0.05). Moreover, nerve density was significantly higher in the right atrium than in the left atrium in dogs with AF. Microscopic examinations revealed an inhomogeneous distribution of cardiac nerves. Conclusion Significant nerve sprouting and pneumogastric nerve remodeling were evidenced in the right and left atrium in a canine model of sustained AF induced by 48 hours right atrial pacing.%目的 通过对快速心房起搏犬的神经相关因子的研究,观察右心房快速起搏48 h是否引起神经重构及其在心房颤动(房颤)中的作用.方法 健康杂种犬12只,随机分为房颤组(6只)和对照组(6只).右心房起搏600次/min、持续48 h.通过一种在发芽轴突生长丘中表达的蛋白质(GAP-43)和乙酰胆碱转移酶(CHAT)来了解心脏神经萌发和迷走神经的重构.结果 在房颤犬的左心房、左心耳、右心房和右心耳,GAP-43和CHAT的神经密度同对照组相比明显增高,差异均有统计学意义(P<0.05).此外,房颤犬的右心房GAP-43和CHAT的神经密度与左心房有明显差异(P<0.05),显微镜下显示每个样点心脏神经不均匀分布.结论 48 h持续起搏犬右心房形成阵发性房颤,可见明显的神经萌发和迷走神经重构且不均一分布.

  5. Diurnal and semi-diurnal tidal currents in the deep mid-Arabian sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Shenoi, S.S.C.; Gouveia, A.D.; Shetye, S.R.

    been determined using the currents recorded at hourly intervals during May 1986-May 1987. The clockwise rotating M2 tidal currents were the strongest. The maximum horizontal velocities due to M2, S2 and K1 tides were 2.2 cm/s, 1.0 cm/s and 0.89 cm...

  6. A LONGITUDINAL-STUDY OF DIURNAL MOOD VARIATION IN DEPRESSION - CHARACTERISTICS AND SIGNIFICANCE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    GORDIJN, MCM; BEERSMA, DGM; BOUHUYS, AL; REININK, E; VANDENHOOFDAKKER, RH

    1994-01-01

    The course of 39 depressed in-patients' daily mood was recorded by means of frequent self-ratings during their entire stay (in total 3718 days). The frequency of diurnal variations largely varies between subjects without clear dichotomy in 'diurnal' and 'non-diurnal' subjects and the occurrence of d

  7. Diurnal effects of anoxia on the metabolome of the seagrass Zostera marina

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald; Fragner, Lena; Holmer, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the response, adaptation and tolerance mechanisms of the temperate seagrass Zostera marina to water column anoxia. We exposed Z. marina to a diurnal light/dark cycle under anoxia and assessed the metabolic response by measuring the metabolome with gas chromatography coupled to mass...... shunt as such mitigation mechanisms that alleviate pyruvate levels and lead to carbon and nitrogen storage during anoxia. This work demonstrates the applicability of metabolomics to assess low oxygen stress responses of Z. marina and allows us to propose an anoxia recovery model....

  8. Work hours, social value of leisure and globalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Molana, Hassan; Montagna, Catia

    2012-01-01

    and raises the wage rate; there is a U-shaped (inverse-U-shaped) relationship between work hours (wages) and the degree of coordination; coordination is welfare improving; and, the gap between the coordinated and uncoordinated work hours (and the corresponding wage rates) is affected by the extent and nature......We examine how openness interacts with the coordination of consumption-leisure decisions in determining the equilibrium working hours and wage rate when there are leisure externalities (e.g., due to social interactions). The latter are modelled by allowing a worker’s marginal utility of leisure...

  9. Work Hours, Social Value of Leisure and Globalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Nielsen, Jørgen Ulff-Møller; Montagna, Catia

    and raises the wage rate; there is a U-shaped (inverse-U-shaped) relationship between work hours (wages) and the degree of coordination; coordination is welfare improving; and, the gap between the coordinated and uncoordinated work hours (and the corresponding wage rates) is affected by the extent and nature......We examine how openness interacts with the coordination of consumption-leisure decisions in determining the equilibrium working hours and wage rate when there are leisure externalities (e.g., due to social interactions). The latter are modelled by allowing a worker's marginal utility of leisure...

  10. Work Hours, Social Value of Leisure and Globalisation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørgen Drud; Molana, Hassan; Montagna, Catia

    2010-01-01

    and raises the wage rate; there is a U-shaped (inverse-U-shaped) relationship between work hours (wages) and the degree of coordination; coordination is welfare improving; and, the gap between the coordinated and uncoordinated work hours (and the corresponding wage rates) is affected by the extent and nature......We examine how openness interacts with the coordination of consumption-leisure decisions in determining the equilibrium working hours and wage rate when there are leisure externalities (e.g., due to social interactions). The latter are modelled by allowing a worker's marginal utility of leisure...

  11. Diurnal Regulation of Cellular Processes in the Cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803: Insights from Transcriptomic, Fluxomic, and Physiological Analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajib Saha

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 is the most widely studied model cyanobacterium, with a well-developed omics level knowledgebase. Like the lifestyles of other cyanobacteria, that of Synechocystis PCC 6803 is tuned to diurnal changes in light intensity. In this study, we analyzed the expression patterns of all of the genes of this cyanobacterium over two consecutive diurnal periods. Using stringent criteria, we determined that the transcript levels of nearly 40% of the genes in Synechocystis PCC 6803 show robust diurnal oscillating behavior, with a majority of the transcripts being upregulated during the early light period. Such transcripts corresponded to a wide array of cellular processes, such as light harvesting, photosynthetic light and dark reactions, and central carbon metabolism. In contrast, transcripts of membrane transporters for transition metals involved in the photosynthetic electron transport chain (e.g., iron, manganese, and copper were significantly upregulated during the late dark period. Thus, the pattern of global gene expression led to the development of two distinct transcriptional networks of coregulated oscillatory genes. These networks help describe how Synechocystis PCC 6803 regulates its metabolism toward the end of the dark period in anticipation of efficient photosynthesis during the early light period. Furthermore, in silico flux prediction of important cellular processes and experimental measurements of cellular ATP, NADP(H, and glycogen levels showed how this diurnal behavior influences its metabolic characteristics. In particular, NADPH/NADP+ showed a strong correlation with the majority of the genes whose expression peaks in the light. We conclude that this ratio is a key endogenous determinant of the diurnal behavior of this cyanobacterium.

  12. Monitoring seasonal and diurnal changes in photosynthetic pigments with automated PRI and NDVI sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamon, J. A.; Kovalchuck, O.; Wong, C. Y. S.; Harris, A.; Garrity, S. R.

    2015-07-01

    The vegetation indices normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) and photochemical reflectance index (PRI) provide indicators of pigmentation and photosynthetic activity that can be used to model photosynthesis from remote sensing with the light-use-efficiency model. To help develop and validate this approach, reliable proximal NDVI and PRI sensors have been needed. We tested new NDVI and PRI sensors, "spectral reflectance sensors" (SRS sensors; recently developed by Decagon Devices, during spring activation of photosynthetic activity in evergreen and deciduous stands. We also evaluated two methods of sensor cross-calibration - one that considered sky conditions (cloud cover) at midday only, and another that also considered diurnal sun angle effects. Cross-calibration clearly affected sensor agreement with independent measurements, with the best method dependent upon the study aim and time frame (seasonal vs. diurnal). The seasonal patterns of NDVI and PRI differed for evergreen and deciduous species, demonstrating the complementary nature of these two indices. Over the spring season, PRI was most strongly influenced by changing chlorophyll : carotenoid pool sizes, while over the diurnal timescale, PRI was most affected by the xanthophyll cycle epoxidation state. This finding demonstrates that the SRS PRI sensors can resolve different processes affecting PRI over different timescales. The advent of small, inexpensive, automated PRI and NDVI sensors offers new ways to explore environmental and physiological constraints on photosynthesis, and may be particularly well suited for use at flux tower sites. Wider application of automated sensors could lead to improved integration of flux and remote sensing approaches for studying photosynthetic carbon uptake, and could help define the concept of contrasting vegetation optical types.

  13. Unemployment and Hours of Work: The North Atlantic Divide Revisited

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher Pissarides

    2006-01-01

    I examine the dynamic evolutions of unemployment, hours of work and the service share since the war in the United States and Europe. The theoretical model brings together all three and emphasizes technological growth. Computations show that the very low unemployment in Europe in the 1960s was due to the high productivity growth associated with technological catch-up. Productivity also played a role in the dynamics of hours but a full explanation for the fast rise of service employment and the...

  14. Effects of diurnal temperature range and drought on wheat yield in Spain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Barrera, S.; Rodriguez-Puebla, C.; Challinor, A. J.

    2017-07-01

    This study aims to provide new insight on the wheat yield historical response to climate processes throughout Spain by using statistical methods. Our data includes observed wheat yield, pseudo-observations E-OBS for the period 1979 to 2014, and outputs of general circulation models in phase 5 of the Coupled Models Inter-comparison Project (CMIP5) for the period 1901 to 2099. In investigating the relationship between climate and wheat variability, we have applied the approach known as the partial least-square regression, which captures the relevant climate drivers accounting for variations in wheat yield. We found that drought occurring in autumn and spring and the diurnal range of temperature experienced during the winter are major processes to characterize the wheat yield variability in Spain. These observable climate processes are used for an empirical model that is utilized in assessing the wheat yield trends in Spain under different climate conditions. To isolate the trend within the wheat time series, we implemented the adaptive approach known as Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition. Wheat yields in the twenty-first century are experiencing a downward trend that we claim is a consequence of widespread drought over the Iberian Peninsula and an increase in the diurnal range of temperature. These results are important to inform about the wheat vulnerability in this region to coming changes and to develop adaptation strategies.

  15. Spring leaf phenology and the diurnal temperature range in a temperate maple forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Jonathan M.

    2014-03-01

    Spring leaf phenology in temperate climates is intricately related to numerous aspects of the lower atmosphere [e.g., surface energy balance, carbon flux, humidity, the diurnal temperature range (DTR)]. To further develop and improve the accuracy of ecosystem and climate models, additional investigations of the specific nature of the relationships between spring leaf phenology and various ecosystem and climate processes are required in different environments. This study used visual observations of maple leaf phenology, below-canopy light intensities, and micrometeorological data collected during the spring seasons of 2008, 2009, and 2010 to examine the potential influence of leaf phenology on a seasonal transition in the trend of the DTR. The timing of a reversal in the DTR trend occurred near the time when the leaves were unfolding and expanding. The results suggest that the spring decline in the DTR can be attributed primarily to the effect of canopy closure on daily maximum temperature. These findings improve our understanding of the relationship between leaf phenology and the diurnal temperature range in temperate maple forests during the spring. They also demonstrate the necessity of incorporating accurate phenological data into ecosystem and climate models and warrant a careful examination of the extent to which canopy phenology is currently incorporated into existing models.

  16. Spring leaf phenology and the diurnal temperature range in a temperate maple forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanes, Jonathan M

    2014-03-01

    Spring leaf phenology in temperate climates is intricately related to numerous aspects of the lower atmosphere [e.g., surface energy balance, carbon flux, humidity, the diurnal temperature range (DTR)]. To further develop and improve the accuracy of ecosystem and climate models, additional investigations of the specific nature of the relationships between spring leaf phenology and various ecosystem and climate processes are required in different environments. This study used visual observations of maple leaf phenology, below-canopy light intensities, and micrometeorological data collected during the spring seasons of 2008, 2009, and 2010 to examine the potential influence of leaf phenology on a seasonal transition in the trend of the DTR. The timing of a reversal in the DTR trend occurred near the time when the leaves were unfolding and expanding. The results suggest that the spring decline in the DTR can be attributed primarily to the effect of canopy closure on daily maximum temperature. These findings improve our understanding of the relationship between leaf phenology and the diurnal temperature range in temperate maple forests during the spring. They also demonstrate the necessity of incorporating accurate phenological data into ecosystem and climate models and warrant a careful examination of the extent to which canopy phenology is currently incorporated into existing models.

  17. Long working hours and cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heikkila, Katriina; Nyberg, Solja T.; Madsen, Ida E. H.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Working longer than the maximum recommended hours is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, but the relationship of excess working hours with incident cancer is unclear. Methods: This multi-cohort study examined the association between working hours and cancer risk...... in 116 462 men and women who were free of cancer at baseline. Incident cancers were ascertained from national cancer, hospitalisation and death registers; weekly working hours were self-reported. Results: During median follow-up of 10.8 years, 4371 participants developed cancer (n colorectal cancer: 393......; n lung cancer: 247; n breast cancer: 833; and n prostate cancer: 534). We found no clear evidence for an association between working hours and the overall cancer risk. Working hours were also unrelated the risk of incident colorectal, lung or prostate cancers. Working greater than or equal to55 h...

  18. Effect of continuous light on diurnal rhythms in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghosh Bijoy K

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Life on earth is strongly affected by alternating day and night cycles. Accordingly, many organisms have evolved an internal timekeeping system with a period of approximately 24 hours. Cyanobacteria are the only known prokaryotes with robust rhythms under control of a central clock. Numerous studies have been conducted to elucidate components of the circadian clock and to identify circadian-controlled genes. However, the complex interactions between endogenous circadian rhythms and external cues are currently not well understood, and a direct and mathematical based comparison between light-mediated and circadian-controlled gene expression is still outstanding. Therefore, we combined and analyzed data from two independent microarray experiments, previously performed under alternating light-dark and continuous light conditions in Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142, and sought to classify light responsive and circadian controlled genes. Results Fourier Score-based methods together with random permutations and False Discovery Rates were used to identify genes with oscillatory expression patterns, and an angular distance based criterion was applied to recognize transient behaviors in gene expression under constant light conditions. Compared to previously reported mathematical approaches, the combination of these methods also facilitated the detection of modified amplitudes and phase-shifts of gene expression. Our analysis showed that the majority of diurnally regulated genes, essentially those genes that are maximally expressed during the middle of the light and dark period, are in fact light responsive. In contrast, most of the circadian controlled genes are up-regulated during the beginning of the dark or subjective dark, and are greatly enriched for genes associated with energy metabolism. Many of the circadian controlled and light responsive genes are found in gene clusters within the Cyanothece sp. ATCC 51142 genome. Interestingly, in

  19. A framework for global diurnally-resolved observations of Land Surface Temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghent, Darren; Remedios, John

    2014-05-01

    Land surface temperature (LST) is the radiative skin temperature of the land, and is one of the key parameters in the physics of land-surface processes on regional and global scales. Being a key boundary condition in land surface models, which determine the surface to atmosphere fluxes of heat, water and carbon; thus influencing cloud cover, precipitation and atmospheric chemistry predictions within Global models, the requirement for global diurnal observations of LST is well founded. Earth Observation satellites offer an opportunity to obtain global coverage of LST, with the appropriate exploitation of data from multiple instruments providing a capacity to resolve the diurnal cycle on a global scale. Here we present a framework for the production of global, diurnally resolved, data sets for LST which is a key request from users of LST data. We will show how the sampling of both geostationary and low earth orbit data sets could conceptually be employed to build combined, multi-sensor, pole-to-pole data sets. Although global averages already exist for individual instruments and merging of geostationary based LST is already being addressed operationally (Freitas, et al., 2013), there are still a number of important challenges to overcome. In this presentation, we will consider three of the issues still open in LST remote sensing: 1) the consistency amongst retrievals; 2) the clear-sky bias and its quantification; and 3) merging methods and the propagation of uncertainties. For example, the combined use of both geostationary earth orbit (GEO) and low earth orbit (LEO) data, and both infra-red and microwave data are relatively unexplored but are necessary to make the most progress. Hence this study will suggest what is state-of-the-art and how considerable advances can be made, accounting also for recent improvements in techniques and data quality. The GlobTemperature initiative under the Data User Element of ESA's 4th Earth Observation Envelope Programme (2013

  20. EFFECTS OF DIURNAL AND NOCTURNAL STRENUOUS EXERCISE ON SERUM MELATONIN LEVELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kilic

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Introduction: There are reports of a possible relationship between melatonin, a hormone secreted by the pineal gland, and exercise. Objective: The present study aims to investigate how diurnal and nocturnal strenuous exercise affects melatonin levels. Methods: The study enrolled 10 healthy sedentary males who did not actively exercise. The subjects had a mean age of 22.20±0.24 years, a mean height of 174.60±2.33 cm, and a mean weight of 69.70±2.42 kg. Two blood samples were collected from the subjects, one at rest, at 10:00 am, and the other immediately after strenuous exercise. Likewise, blood samples were taken from the same group of subjects after 48 hours: at 24:00 hours at rest and immediately after strenuous exercise. Samples were analyzed using the ELISA method to determine the serum melatonin levels (pg/ml. Results: By comparing the values at rest and after exercise, it was found that serum melatonin values remained unchanged with exercise. Serum melatonin values at rest or post-exercise measured at night were higher when compared with those measured during the day (p<0.05. Conclusions: Higher levels of melatonin found in the study appear to result from the increased release of melatonin at night, and not from exercise. The results of this study indicate that strenuous exercise carried out day or night, did not significantly influence serum melatonin levels.

  1. Diurnal and nocturnal activity budgets of zoo elephants in an outdoor facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horback, Kristina M; Miller, Lance J; Andrews, Jeff R M; Kuczaj, Stan A

    2014-01-01

    The present study examined the activity budgets of 15 African elephants (1 bull, 6 cows, 2 male juveniles, 2 female juveniles, and 4 male calves) living at the San Diego Zoo Safari Park during the summers of 2010 and 2011. Onsite behavioral data (n = 600 hr) were collected for approximately 12 weeks from 0400 to 0830 and 1100 to 2400 during the 2010 and 2011 summer season. Foraging was the most common behavior state during the day followed by resting, and walking. During the evening hours, the elephants spent majority of their time foraging, resting, and sleeping. The average rate of self-maintenance behavior events (dust, wallow, etc.) increased from 0600 to 0700, 1100 to 1500, and from 1700 to 1900. Positive social behavior events (touch other, play, etc.) remained high from 0500 to 2300, with peaks at 0600, 1300, 1500, and 1900. Negative social events occurred at low rates throughout the day and night, with peaks at 0600, 1900, and 2200. The majority of positive behavior events during the daylight and nighttime hours involved the mother-calf pairs. Furthermore, the calves and juveniles initiated approximately 60% of all social events during the daytime and 57% of all social interactions at night. The results of this study demonstrate the differences between diurnal and nocturnal activity budgets of a multi-age and sex elephant herd in a zoological facility, which highlights the importance of managing elephants to meet their 24 hr behavioral needs.

  2. Long-term variation of the solar diurnal anisotropy of galactic cosmic rays observed with the Nagoya multi-directional muon detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Munakata, K.; Kozai, M.; Kato, C. [Physics Department, Shinshu University, Matsumoto, Nagano 390-8621 (Japan); Kóta, J., E-mail: kmuna00@shinshu-u.ac.jp [Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 87721 (United States)

    2014-08-10

    We analyze the three-dimensional anisotropy of the galactic cosmic ray (GCR) intensities observed independently with a muon detector at Nagoya in Japan and neutron monitors over four solar activity cycles. We clearly see the phase of the free-space diurnal anisotropy shifting toward earlier hours around solar activity minima in A > 0 epochs, due to the reduced anisotropy component parallel to the mean magnetic field. This component is consistent with a rigidity-independent spectrum, while the perpendicular anisotropy component increases with GCR rigidity. We suggest that this harder spectrum of the perpendicular component is due to contribution from the drift streaming. We find that the bi-directional latitudinal density gradient is positive in the A > 0 epoch, while it is negative in the A < 0 epoch, in agreement with the drift model prediction. The radial density gradient of GCRs, on the other hand, varies with a ∼11 yr cycle with maxima (minima) in solar maximum (minimum) periods, but we find no significant difference between the radial gradients in the A > 0 and A < 0 epochs. The corresponding parallel mean free path is larger in A < 0 than in A > 0. We also find, however, that the parallel mean free path (radial gradient) appears to persistently increase (decrease) in the last three cycles of weakening solar activity. We suggest that simple differences between these parameters in A > 0 and A < 0 epochs are seriously biased by these long-term trends.

  3. Do Diurnal Aerosol Changes Affect Daily Average Radiative Forcing?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kassianov, Evgueni I.; Barnard, James C.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Berg, Larry K.; Michalsky, Joseph J.; Lantz, K.; Hodges, G. B.

    2013-06-17

    Strong diurnal variability of aerosol has been observed frequently for many urban/industrial regions. How this variability may alter the direct aerosol radiative forcing (DARF), however, is largely unknown. To quantify changes in the time-averaged DARF, we perform an assessment of 29 days of high temporal resolution ground-based data collected during the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) on Cape Cod, which is downwind of metropolitan areas. We demonstrate that strong diurnal changes of aerosol loading (about 20% on average) have a negligible impact on the 24-h average DARF, when daily averaged optical properties are used to find this quantity. However, when there is a sparse temporal sampling of aerosol properties, which may preclude the calculation of daily averaged optical properties, large errors (up to 100%) in the computed DARF may occur. We describe a simple way of reducing these errors, which suggests the minimal temporal sampling needed to accurately find the forcing.

  4. Phase and period responses to short light pulses in a wild diurnal rodent, Funambulus pennanti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Dhanananajay; Singaravel, Muniyandi

    2014-04-01

    Photic phase response curves (PRCs) have been extensively studied in many laboratory-bred diurnal and nocturnal rodents. However, comparatively fewer studies have addressed the effects of photic cues on wild diurnal mammals. Hence, we studied the effects of short durations of light pulses on the circadian systems of the diurnal Indian Palm squirrel, Funambulus pennanti. Adult males entrained to a light-dark cycle (12 h-12 h) were transferred to constant darkness (DD). Free-running animals were exposed to brief light pulses (250 lux) of 15 min, 3 circadian hours (CT) apart (CT 0, 3, 6, 9, 12, 15, 18 and 21). Phase shifts evoked at different phases were plotted against CT and a PRC was constructed. F. pennanti exhibited phase-dependent phase shifts at all the CTs studied, and the PRC obtained was of type 1 at the intensity of light used. Phase advances were evoked during the early subjective day and late subjective night, while phase delays occurred during the late subjective day and early subjective night, with maximum phase delay at CT 15 (-2.04 ± 0.23 h), and maximum phase advance at CT 21 (1.88 ± 0.31 h). No dead zone was seen at this resolution. The free-running period of the rhythm was concurrently lengthened (deceleration) during the late subjective day and early subjective night, while period shortening (acceleration) occurred during the late subjective night. The maximum deceleration was noticed at CT 15 (-0.40 ± 0.09 h) and the maximum acceleration at CT 21 (0.39 ± 0.07 h). A significant positive correlation exists between the phase shifts and the period changes (r = 0.684, p = 0.001). The shapes of both the PRC and period response curve (τRC) qualitatively resemble each other. This suggests that the palm squirrel's circadian system is entrained both by phase and period responses to light. Thus, F. pennanti exhibits robust clock-resetting in response to light pulses.

  5. Coral-algae metabolism and diurnal changes in the CO2-carbonate system of bulk sea water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul L. Jokiel

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Precise measurements were conducted in continuous flow seawater mesocosms located in full sunlight that compared metabolic response of coral, coral-macroalgae and macroalgae systems over a diurnal cycle. Irradiance controlled net photosynthesis (Pnet, which in turn drove net calcification (Gnet, and altered pH. Pnet exerted the dominant control on [CO32−] and aragonite saturation state (Ωarag over the diel cycle. Dark calcification rate decreased after sunset, reaching zero near midnight followed by an increasing rate that peaked at 03:00 h. Changes in Ωarag and pH lagged behind Gnet throughout the daily cycle by two or more hours. The flux rate Pnet was the primary driver of calcification. Daytime coral metabolism rapidly removes dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC from the bulk seawater and photosynthesis provides the energy that drives Gnet while increasing the bulk water pH. These relationships result in a correlation between Gnet and Ωarag, with Ωarag as the dependent variable. High rates of H+ efflux continued for several hours following mid-day peak Gnet suggesting that corals have difficulty in shedding waste protons as described by the Proton Flux Hypothesis. DIC flux (uptake followed Pnet and Gnet and dropped off rapidly following peak Pnet and peak Gnet indicating that corals can cope more effectively with the problem of limited DIC supply compared to the problem of eliminating H+. Over a 24 h period the plot of total alkalinity (AT versus DIC as well as the plot of Gnet versus Ωarag revealed a circular hysteresis pattern over the diel cycle in the coral and coral-algae mesocosms, but not the macroalgae mesocosm. Presence of macroalgae did not change Gnet of the corals, but altered the relationship between Ωarag and Gnet. Predictive models of how future global changes will effect coral growth that are based on oceanic Ωarag must include the influence of future localized Pnet on Gnet and changes in rate of reef carbonate

  6. Diurnal Blood Pressure Rhythmicity in Relation to Environmental and Genetic Cues in Untreated Referred Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Chang-Sheng; Cheng, Yi-Bang; Wei, Fang-Fei; Yang, Wen-Yi; Guo, Qian-Hui; Li, Fei-Ka; Huang, Qi-Fang; Thijs, Lutgarde; Staessen, Jan A; Wang, Ji-Guang; Li, Yan

    2017-01-01

    No previous study has addressed the relative contributions of environmental and genetic cues to the diurnal blood pressure rhythmicity. From 24-hour ambulatory recordings of systolic blood pressure obtained in untreated patients (51% women; mean age, 51 years), we computed the night-to-day ratio in 897 and morning surge in 637. Environmental cues included season, mean daily outdoor temperature, atmospheric pressure, humidity and weekday, and the genetic cues 14 single nucleotide polymorphisms in 10 clock genes. Systolic blood pressure averaged (±SD) 126.7±11.9 mm Hg, night-to-day ratio 0.86±0.07, and morning surge 24.8±10.7 mm Hg. In adjusted analyses, night-to-day ratio was 2.4% higher in summer and 1.8% lower in winter (Penvironmental cues did not add to the night-to-day ratio or morning surge variance (P≥0.37). Among the 14 genetic variations, only CLOCK rs180260 was significantly associated with morning surge after adjustment for season, temperature, and other host factors and after Bonferroni correction (P=0.044). In CLOCK rs1801260 C allele carriers (n=83), morning surge was 3.7 mm Hg higher than in TT homozygotes (n=554). Of the night-to-day ratio and morning surge variance, season and temperature explained ≈8% and ≈3%, while for genetic cues, these proportions were ≈1% or less. In conclusion, environmental compared with genetic cues are substantially stronger drivers of the diurnal blood pressure rhythmicity. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Diurnal variation in baseline human regional cerebral blood flow demonstrated by PET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diehl, D.J.; Mintun, M.A.; Moore, R.Y. [Univ. of Pittsburgh, PA (United States)] [and others

    1994-05-01

    We have previously described the diurnal variation in regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) response to bright light in human subjects as demonstrated by the positron emission tomography (PET) activation method. In this abstract, we report the differences in rCBF (an indicator of differences in regional neuronal activity) between the evening and midday dim light baseline scans which served as the control states in the above bright light activation study. Five right-handed, healthy volunteers underwent both an evening (8pm) and a midday (12N) O-15 water PET scanning session. Each scanning session was preceded by one hour of dim light adaptation (50 lux) and consisted of six rCBF scans at three different light intensities in an AABBCC sequence (A=50 lux, B=2500 lux, C=7000lux). Significant differences in rCBF between the evening and midday 50 lux states were identified using the statistical parametric mapping method developed by Friston et al (p<.001). The evening scans demonstrated areas of greater relative blood flow in the pineal gland, the lateral temporal cortex bilaterally, the right lateral prefrontal cortex, the superior aspect of the anterior cingulate, and the left thalamus. The midday scans showed areas of greater relative blood flow in the visual cortex, the left lateral prefrontal cortex. the inferior aspect of the anterior cingulate, the left parietal cortex and the cerebellum. Our results demonstrate an extensive diurnal variation in baseline human rCBF. This indicates that time of day may be an important variable in conducting and interpreting functional brain imaging studies. Furthermore, these results suggest possible neuroanatomical substrates through which the circadian system may regulate the various physiologic and behavioral processes that manifest circadian rhythms.

  8. Does river restoration affect diurnal and seasonal changes to surface water quality? A study along the Thur River, Switzerland

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chittoor Viswanathan, Vidhya [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water Resources and Drinking Water, Überlandstrasse 133, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Université de Neuchâtel, Centre d' Hydrogéologie et de Géothermie (CHYN), Rue Emile-Argand 11, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland); Molson, John [Université Laval, Département de Géologie et Génie Géologique, Québec City, Québec (Canada); Schirmer, Mario [Eawag, Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology, Department of Water Resources and Drinking Water, Überlandstrasse 133, 8600 Dübendorf (Switzerland); Université de Neuchâtel, Centre d' Hydrogéologie et de Géothermie (CHYN), Rue Emile-Argand 11, CH-2000 Neuchâtel (Switzerland)

    2015-11-01

    Changes in river water quality were investigated along the lower reach of the Thur River, Switzerland, following river restoration and a summer storm event. River restoration and hydrological storm events can each cause dramatic changes to water quality by affecting various bio-geochemical processes in the river, but have to date not been well documented, especially in combination. Evaluating the success of river restoration is often restricted in large catchments due to a lack of high frequency water quality data, which are needed for process understanding. These challenges were addressed in this study by measuring water quality parameters including dissolved oxygen (DO), temperature, pH, electrical conductivity (EC), nitrate and dissolved organic carbon (DOC) with a high temporal frequency (15 min–1 h) over selected time scales. In addition, the stable isotopes of water (δD and δ{sup 18}O-H{sub 2}O) as well as those of nitrate (δ{sup 15}N-NO{sub 3}{sup −} and δ{sup 18}O-NO{sub 3}{sup −}) were measured to follow changes in water quality in response to the hydrological changes in the river. To compare the spatial distribution of pre- and post-restoration water quality, the sampling stations were chosen upstream and downstream of the restored section. The diurnal and seasonal changes were monitored by conducting 24-hour campaigns in three seasons (winter, summer and autumn) in 2012 and 2013. The amplitude of the diurnal changes of the various observed parameters showed significant seasonal and spatial variability. Biological processes — mainly photosynthesis and respiration — were found to be the major drivers of these diurnal cycles. During low flow in autumn, a reduction of nitrate (attributed to assimilation by autotrophs) in the pre-dawn period and a production of DOC during the daytime (attributed to photosynthesis) were observed downstream of the restored site. Further, a summer storm event was found to override the influence of these biological

  9. Central melanopsin projections in the diurnal rodent, Arvicanthis niloticus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langel, Jennifer L; Smale, Laura; Esquiva, Gema; Hannibal, Jens

    2015-01-01

    The direct effects of photic stimuli on behavior are very different in diurnal and nocturnal species, as light stimulates an increase in activity in the former and a decrease in the latter. Studies of nocturnal mice have implicated a select population of retinal ganglion cells that are intrinsically photosensitive (ipRGCs) in mediation of these acute responses to light. ipRGCs are photosensitive due to the expression of the photopigment melanopsin; these cells use glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) as neurotransmitters. PACAP is useful for the study of central ipRGC projections because, in the retina, it is found exclusively within melanopsin cells. Little is known about the central projections of ipRGCs in diurnal species. Here, we first characterized these cells in the retina of the diurnal Nile grass rat using immunohistochemistry (IHC). The same basic subtypes of melanopsin cells that have been described in other mammals were present, but nearly 25% of them were displaced, primarily in its superior region. PACAP was present in 87.7% of all melanopsin cells, while 97.4% of PACAP cells contained melanopsin. We then investigated central projections of ipRGCs by examining the distribution of immunoreactive PACAP fibers in intact and enucleated animals. This revealed evidence that these cells project to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), pretectum, and superior colliculus. This distribution was confirmed with injections of cholera toxin subunit β coupled with Alexa Fluor 488 in one eye and Alexa Fluor 594 in the other, combined with IHC staining of PACAP. These studies also revealed that the ventral and dorsal LGN and the caudal olivary pretectal nucleus receive less innervation from ipRGCs than that reported in nocturnal rodents. Overall, these data suggest that although ipRGCs and their projections are very similar in diurnal and nocturnal rodents, they may not be identical.

  10. Central melanopsin projections in the diurnal rodent, Arvicanthis niloticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Lou Langel

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The direct effects of photic stimuli on behavior are very different in diurnal and nocturnal species, as light stimulates an increase in activity in the former and a decrease in the latter. Studies of nocturnal mice have implicated a select population of retinal ganglion cells that are intrinsically photosensitive (ipRGCs in mediation of these acute responses to light. ipRGCs are photosensitive due to the expression of the photopigment melanopsin; these cells use glutamate and pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP as neurotransmitters. PACAP is useful for the study of central ipRGC projections because, in the retina, it is found exclusively within melanopsin cells. Little is known about the central projections of ipRGCs in diurnal species. Here, we first characterized these cells in the retina of the diurnal Nile grass rat using immunohistochemistry (IHC. The same basic subtypes of melanopsin cells that have been described in other mammals were present, but nearly 25% of them were displaced, primarily in its superior region. PACAP was present in 87.7% of all melanopsin cells, while 97.4% of PACAP cells contained melanopsin. We then investigated central projections of ipRGCs by examining the distribution of immunoreactive PACAP fibers in intact and enucleated animals. This revealed evidence that these cells project to the suprachiasmatic nucleus, lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN, pretectum and superior colliculus. This distribution was confirmed with injections of cholera toxin subunit β coupled with Alexa Fluor 488 in one eye and Alexa Flour 594 in the other, combined with IHC staining of PACAP. These studies also revealed that the ventral and dorsal LGN and the caudal olivary pretectal nucleus receive less innervation from ipRGCs than that reported in nocturnal rodents. Overall, these data suggest that although ipRGCs and their projections are very similar in diurnal and nocturnal rodents, they may not be identical.

  11. Imitating Broadband Diurnal Light Variations Using Solid State Light Sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Ian; Melton, Andrew; Li, Nola; Nicol, David; Park, Eun Hyun; Tosini, Gianluca

    Many studies have documented the success of light therapy in treating disorders of the human internal clock (circadian rhythm). Recent biological research has shown the importance of developing light sources that are tunable in the blue region of the spectrum for treatment to be safe and effective. A novel tunable broadband solid-state light source is presented here that mimics the diurnal variation in sunlight by modulating the intensity of blue light emission.

  12. CMAQv5.1 Base NEIv1 AQS hourly site compare files

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — CMAQv5.1 Base NEIv1 AQS hourly sitex files containing hourly paired model/ob data for the AQS network. This dataset is associated with the following publication:...

  13. Diurnal rhythmicity in biological processes involved in bioavailability of functional food factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsurusaki, Takashi; Sakakibara, Hiroyuki; Aoshima, Yoshiki; Yamazaki, Shunsuke; Sakono, Masanobu; Shimoi, Kayoko

    2013-05-01

    In the past few decades, many types of functional factors have been identified in dietary foods; for example, flavonoids are major groups widely distributed in the plant kingdom. However, the absorption rates of the functional food factors are usually low, and many of these are difficult to be absorbed in the intact forms because of metabolization by biological processes during absorption. To gain adequate beneficial effects, it is therefore mandatory to know whether functional food factors are absorbed in sufficient quantity, and then reach target organs while maintaining beneficial effects. These are the reasons why the bioavailability of functional food factors has been well investigated using rodent models. Recently, many of the biological processes have been reported to follow diurnal rhythms recurring every 24 h. Therefore, absorption and metabolism of functional food factors influenced by the biological processes may vary with time of day. Consequently, the evaluation of the bioavailability of functional food factors using rodent models should take into consideration the timing of consumption. In this review, we provide a perspective overview of the diurnal rhythm of biological processes involved in the bioavailability of functional food factors, particularly flavonoids.

  14. Diurnal tracking of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in the Los Angeles basin megacity during spring 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Newman

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Attributing observed CO2 variations to human or natural cause is critical to deducing and tracking emissions from observations. We have used in situ CO2, CO, and planetary boundary layer height (PBLH measurements recorded during the CalNex-LA (CARB et al., 2008 ground campaign of 15 May–15 June 2010, in Pasadena, CA, to deduce the diurnally varying anthropogenic component of observed CO2 in the megacity of Los Angeles (LA. This affordable and simple technique, validated by carbon isotope observations and WRF-STILT (Weather Research and Forecasting model – Stochastic Time-Inverted Lagrangian Transport model predictions, is shown to robustly attribute observed CO2 variation to anthropogenic or biogenic origin over the entire diurnal cycle. During CalNex-LA, local fossil fuel combustion contributed up to ~50% of the observed CO2 enhancement overnight, and ~100% of the enhancement near midday. This suggests that sufficiently accurate total column CO2 observations recorded near midday, such as those from the GOSAT or OCO-2 satellites, can potentially be used to track anthropogenic emissions from the LA megacity.

  15. Non-migrating diurnal tides as measured by the TIMED Doppler interferometer: Preliminary results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberheide, J.; Wu, Q.; Ortland, D. A.; Killeen, T. L.; Hagan, M. E.; Roble, R. G.; Niciejewski, R. J.; Skinner, W. R.

    Preliminary meridional wind data from the TIMED Doppler interferometer (TIDI) onboard the TIMED satellite are analyzed for non-migrating diurnal tides. Tidal definitions are given for the most pronounced westward, eastward and standing oscillations ( w2, e3, s0). The analysis interval is March 2002 to June 2004 and covers the altitude range 85-105 km. Monthly tidal wind fields from 40°S to 40°N are presented. TIDI tides compare favorably with previously reported 95 km HRDI results. Non-migrating diurnal tidal wind speeds larger than 30 m/s are observed thus emphasizing the important role of non-migrating tides in middle atmosphere coupling. A comparative analysis with the global scale wave model (GSWM) and the thermosphere-ionosphere-mesosphere-electrodynamics general circulation model (TIME-GCM) indicates that both latent heat release in the tropical troposphere and non-linear planetary wave/migrating tide interaction are important sources of non-migrating tides in the mesosphere and lower thermosphere.

  16. Results of the GABLS3 diurnal-cycle benchmark for wind energy applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz Rodrigo, J.; Allaerts, D.; Avila, M.; Barcons, J.; Cavar, D.; Chávez Arroyo, RA; Churchfield, M.; Kosovic, B.; Lundquist, JK; Meyers, J.; Muñoz Esparza, D.; Palma, JMLM; Tomaszewski, JM; Troldborg, N.; van der Laan, MP; Veiga Rodrigues, C.

    2017-05-01

    We present results of the GABLS3 model intercomparison benchmark revisited for wind energy applications. The case consists of a diurnal cycle, measured at the 200-m tall Cabauw tower in the Netherlands, including a nocturnal low-level jet. The benchmark includes a sensitivity analysis of WRF simulations using two input meteorological databases and five planetary boundary-layer schemes. A reference set of mesoscale tendencies is used to drive microscale simulations using RANS k-ɛ and LES turbulence models. The validation is based on rotor-based quantities of interest. Cycle-integrated mean absolute errors are used to quantify model performance. The results of the benchmark are used to discuss input uncertainties from mesoscale modelling, different meso-micro coupling strategies (online vs offline) and consistency between RANS and LES codes when dealing with boundary-layer mean flow quantities. Overall, all the microscale simulations produce a consistent coupling with mesoscale forcings.

  17. Strato-mesospheric ClO observations by SMILES: error analysis and diurnal variation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. O. Sato

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Chlorine monoxide (ClO is the key species for anthropogenic ozone loss in the middle atmosphere. We observed the ClO diurnal variation using the Superconducting Submillimeter-Wave Limb-Emission Sounder (SMILES on the International Space Station which has a non sun-synchronous orbit. This is the first global observation of the ClO diurnal variation from the stratosphere up to the mesosphere. The SMILES observation reproduced the diurnal variation of stratospheric ClO, an enhancement during a daytime, as observed by the Microwave Limb Sounder on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS/MLS. Mesospheric ClO has shown a different diurnal behavior with an enhancement during nighttime. The ClO enhancement was found at a pressure of 0.02 hPa (about 70 km with an amplitude of about 100 pptv and reached up to 0.01 hPa (80 km in the zonal mean of 50° N–65° N in January–February 2010. The observation of mesospheric ClO was possible due to the 10–20 times better signal-to-noise ratio of the spectra than those of past microwave/submillimeter-wave limb-emission sounders. We performed a quantitative error analysis for the strato- and mesospheric ClO of the Level-2 research (L2r product version 2.1.5 taking into account all possible error contributions; i.e. errors due to spectrum noise, smoothing and uncertainties in the radiative transfer model and instrument function. The SMILES L2r v2.1.5 ClO data are useful over the range 0.01 and 100 hPa with a total error of 10–30 pptv (about 10% with averaging of 100 profiles. The vertical resolution is 3–5 km and 5–8 km for the stratosphere and mesosphere, respectively. The performance of the SMILES observation opens the new opportunity to investigate ClO up to the mesopause.

  18. Observing Seasonal and Diurnal Hydrometeorological Variability Within a Tropical Alpine Valley: Implications for Evapotranspiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellstrom, R. A.; Mark, B. G.

    2007-12-01

    Conditions of glacier recession in the seasonally dry tropical Peruvian Andes motivate research to better constrain the hydrological balance in alpine valleys. There is an outstanding need to better understand the impact of the pronounced tropical hygric seasonality on energy and water budgets within pro-glacial valleys that channel glacier runoff to stream flow. This paper presents a novel embedded network installed in the glacierized Llanganuco valley of the Cordillera Blanca (9°S) comprising eight low-cost, discrete temperature and humidity microloggers ranging from 3470 to 4740 masl and an automatic weather station at 3850 masl. Data are aggregated into distinct dry and wet periods sampled from two full annual cycles (2004-2006) to explore patterns of diurnal and seasonal variability. The magnitude of diurnal solar radiation varies little within the valley between the dry and wet periods, while wet season near-surface air temperatures are cooler. Seasonally characteristic diurnal fluctuations in lapse rate partially regulate convection and humidity. Steep lapse rates during the wet season afternoon promote up-slope convection of warm, moist air and nocturnal rainfall events. Standardized grass reference evapotranspiration (ET0) was estimated using the FAO-56 algorithm of the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization and compared with estimates of actual ET from the process-based BROOK90 model that incorporates more realistic vegetation parameters. Comparisons of composite diurnal cycles of ET for the wet and dry periods suggest about twice the daily ET0 during the dry period, attributed primarily to the 500% higher vapor pressure deficit and 20% higher daily total solar irradiance. Conversely, the near absence of rainfall during the dry season diminishes actual ET below that of the wet season by two orders of magnitude. Nearly cloud-free daylight conditions are critical for ET during the wet season. We found significant variability of ET with elevation

  19. 24-Hour Academic Libraries: Adjusting to Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Adam C.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the adaptive measures that academic libraries perform when implementing and operating a 24-hour schedule. Five in-depth interviews were conducted with current managerial-level librarians at 24-hour academic libraries. The exploratory interviews revealed similar measures for security, budgeting, employee…

  20. 17 CFR 201.104 - Business hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Business hours. 201.104 Section 201.104 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE Rules of Practice General Rules § 201.104 Business hours. The Headquarters office of the Commission, at...

  1. 20 CFR 801.304 - Business hours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Business hours. 801.304 Section 801.304 Employees' Benefits BENEFITS REVIEW BOARD, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR ESTABLISHMENT AND OPERATION OF THE BOARD Action by the Board § 801.304 Business hours. The office of the Clerk of the Board at Washington, DC...

  2. Cost-efficient staffing under annualized hours

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Veen, Egbert; Hans, Elias W.; Veltman, Bart; Berrevoets, Leo M.; Berden, Hubert J.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    We study how flexibility in workforce capacity can be used to efficiently match capacity and demand. Flexibility in workforce capacity is introduced by the annualized hours regime. Annualized hours allow organizations to measure working time per year, instead of per month or per week. An additional

  3. Characterization and simulation of hourly exposure series of global radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mora-Lopez, L. [Universidad de Malaga (Spain). Dpto. Lenguajes y C. Computacion; Sidrach-de-Cardona, M. [Universidad de Malaga (Spain). Dpto. Fisica Aplicada

    1997-06-01

    A statistical model which captures the main features of hourly exposure series of global radiation is proposed. This model is used to obtain a procedure to generate radiation series without imposing, a priori, any restriction on the form of the probability distribution function of the series. The statistical model was taken from the stationary stochastic processes theory. Data were obtained from ten different Spanish locations. As monthly hourly exposure series of global radiation are not stationary, they are modified in order to remove the observed trends. A multiplicative autoregressive moving average model with regular and seasonal components was used. It is statistically accepted that this is the true model which generates most of the analyzed sequences. However, the underlying parameters of the model vary from one location to another and from one month to another. Therefore, it is necessary to examine further the relationship between the parameters of the model and the available data from most locations. (author)

  4. Tropical Cyclone Diurnal Cycle as Observed by TRMM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leppert, Kenneth D., II; Cecil, D. J.

    2015-01-01

    Using infrared satellite data, previous work has shown a consistent diurnal cycle in the pattern of cold cloud tops around mature tropical cyclones. In particular, an increase in the coverage by cold cloud tops often occurs in the inner core of the storm around the time of sunset and subsequently propagates outward to several hundred kilometers over the course of the following day. This consistent cycle may have important implications for structure and intensity changes of tropical cyclones and the forecasting of such changes. Because infrared satellite measurements are primarily sensitive to cloud top, the goal of this study is to use passive and active microwave measurements from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) and Precipitation Radar (PR), respectively, to examine and better understand the tropical cyclone diurnal cycle throughout a larger depth of the storm's clouds. The National Hurricane Center's best track dataset was used to extract all PR and TMI pixels within 1000 km of each tropical cyclone that occurred in the Atlantic basin between 1998-2011. Then the data was composited according to radius (100-km bins from 0-1000 km) and local standard time (LST; 3-hr bins). Specifically, PR composites involved finding the percentage of pixels with reflectivity greater than or equal to 20 dBZ at various heights (i.e., 2-14 km in increments of 2 km) as a function of radius and time. The 37- and 85- GHz TMI channels are especially sensitive to scattering by precipitation-sized ice in the mid to upper portions of clouds. Hence, the percentage of 37- and 85-GHz polarization corrected temperatures less than various thresholds were calculated using data from all storms as a function of radius and time. For 37 GHz, thresholds of 260 K, 265 K, 270 K, and 275 K were used, and for 85 GHz, thresholds of 200-270 K in increments of 10 K were utilized. Note that convection forced by the interactions of a tropical cyclone with land (e.g., due

  5. EGATEC: A new high-resolution engineering model of the global atmospheric electric circuit—Currents in the lower atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odzimek, A.; Lester, M.; Kubicki, M.

    2010-09-01

    We present a new high-resolution model of the Earth's global atmospheric electric circuit (GEC) represented by an equivalent electrical network. Contributions of clouds to the total resistance of the atmosphere and as current generators are treated more realistically than in previous GEC models. The model of cloud current generators is constructed on the basis of the ISCCP cloud data and the OTD/LIS lightning flash rates and TRMM rainfall data. The current generated and the electric resistance can be estimated with a spatial resolution of several degrees in latitude and longitude and 3 hour time resolution. The resistance of the atmosphere is calculated using an atmospheric conductivity model which is spatially dependent and sensitive to the level of solar activity. An equivalent circuit is constructed assuming the ionosphere and ground are ideal conductors. The circuit solution provides diurnal variations of the ionospheric potential and the GEC global current at the 3 hour time resolution as well as the global distributions and diurnal variations of the air-Earth current density and electric field. The model confirms that the global atmospheric electric activity peaks daily at ˜21 UT. The diurnal variation of the ionospheric potential and the global current have a maximum at 12 and 21-24 UT in July and at 9 and 21 UT in December, and a global minimum at 3-6 UT independent of season. About 80% of the current is generated by thunderstorm convective clouds and 20% by mid-level rain clouds.

  6. The diurnal evolution of ²²²Rn and its progeny in the atmospheric boundary layer during the Wangara experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Galmarini

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The diurnal atmospheric boundary layer evolution of the 222Rn decaying family is studied using a state-of-the-art large-eddy simulation model. In particular, a diurnal cycle observed during the Wangara experiment is successfully simulated together with the effect of diurnal varying turbulent characteristics on radioactive compounds initially in a secular equilibrium. This study allows us to clearly analyze and identify the boundary layer processes driving the behaviour of 222Rn and its progeny concentrations. An activity disequilibrium is observed in the nocturnal boundary layer due to the proximity of the radon source and the trapping of fresh 222Rn close to the surface induced by the weak vertical transport. During the morning transition, the secular equilibrium is fast restored by the vigorous turbulent mixing. The evolution of 222Rn and its progeny concentrations in the unsteady growing convective boundary layer depends on the strength of entrainment events.

  7. Diurnal variability of regional cloud and clear-sky radiative parameters derived from GOES data. I - Analysis method. II - November 1978 cloud distributions. III - November 1978 radiative parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minnis, P.; Harrison, E. F.

    1984-01-01

    Cloud cover is one of the most important variables affecting the earth radiation budget (ERB) and, ultimately, the global climate. The present investigation is concerned with several aspects of the effects of extended cloudiness, taking into account hourly visible and infrared data from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satelite (GOES). A methodology called the hybrid bispectral threshold method is developed to extract regional cloud amounts at three levels in the atmosphere, effective cloud-top temperatures, clear-sky temperature and cloud and clear-sky visible reflectance characteristics from GOES data. The diurnal variations are examined in low, middle, high, and total cloudiness determined with this methodology for November 1978. The bulk, broadband radiative properties of the resultant cloud and clear-sky data are estimated to determine the possible effect of the diurnal variability of regional cloudiness on the interpretation of ERB measurements.

  8. The diurnal activity, movement and trypanosome infection rates of Glossina fuscipes fuscipes (Diptera: Glossinidae)in Buvuma Island, Lake Victoria, Uganda

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LONJINO M. OGWAL; ANDREW KALYEBI; JOHN B. KADDU

    2007-01-01

    The diurnal activity patterns, trypanosome infection rates and movement of Glossina fuscipes fuscipes(Diptera: Glossinidae) were investigated in Buvuma Island, Lake Victoria, Uganda. Hourly trapping of tsetse flies was undertaken to determine their activity rhythm while a capture-mark-release-recapture method was conducted to assess the movement and dispersal of tsetse flies between lakeshore, hinterland and further inland sites along a transected area. Dissection of tsetse flies was also undertaken to determine the trypanosome infection rates in salivary glands, proboscis and mid-gut. Results indicated a bimodal diurnal activity profile for G. f. fuscipes on the Island, both on the lakeshore and in the hinterland.Movement and dispersal of G. f. fuscipes tsetse flies occurred between lakeshore, hinterland and further inland sites with a greater tendency of flies to move to the lakeshore. Trypanosome infection rates of 4.32% for Trypasoma vivax and 1.15% for T. congolense were found in G. f. fuscipes.

  9. Duty hours and incidents in flight among commercial airline pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hagan, Anna Donnla; Issartel, Johann; Fletcher, Richard; Warrington, Giles

    2016-01-01

    Working long duty hours has often been associated with increased risk of incidents and accidents in transport industries. Despite this, information regarding the intermediate relationship between duty hours and incident risk is limited. This study aimed to test a work hours/incident model to identify the interplay of factors contributing to incidents within the aviation industry. Nine hundred and fifty-four European-registered commercial airline pilots completed a 30-item survey investigating self-report attitudes and experiences of fatigue. Path analysis was used to test the proposed model. The fit indices indicated this to be a good fit model (χ(2) = 11.066, df = 5, p = 0.05; Comparative Fit Index = 0.991; Normed Fit Index = 0.984; Tucker-Lewis Index = 0.962; Root Mean Square of Approximation = 0.036). Highly significant relationships were identified between duty hours and sleep disturbance (r = 0.18, p < 0.001), sleep disturbance and fatigue in the cockpit (r = 0.40, p < 0.001), and fatigue in the cockpit and microsleeps in the cockpit (r = 0.43, p < 0.001). A critical pathway from duty hours through to self-reported incidents in flight was identified. Further investigation employing both objective and subjective measures of sleep and fatigue is needed.

  10. Spatio-temporal variations of plant mediated exchange - diurnal and seasonal changes of the function status of plant canopies measured by sun-induced fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rascher, Uwe; Schickling, Anke; Crewell, Susanne; Schween, Jan; Geiß, Heiner

    2010-05-01

    Fluxes of plant mediated exchange processes are large and substantially influence patterns in atmospheric CO2 concentrations and water vapor. Plant canopies are not constant, but continuously adapt their physiology to the ever changing environmental conditions. Structural changes of plant canopies mainly occur on the time scale of weeks and seasons and are generally parametrized in regional and global carbon and water models. Changes of the physiological status of plant ecosystems, however, may occur within hours or a few days and are often not accounted for in models. Nevertheless, a reduction of photosynthesis because of e.g. stress may greatly reduce carbon and water exchange below the theoretical optimum. Such physiological changes are often are not correctly parametrized in spatially explicit and high resolution carbon and water models. For a better understanding of the diurnal and seasonal variations of soil-vegetation-atmosphere exchange processes, the structure and function of two main agricultural crops were monitored over two years in the frame of the collaborative research consortium Transregio TR32. Seasonal development of the two main crops of the region, winter wheat and sugar beet, has been characterized during diurnal courses using non invasive methods ranging from leaf to canopy level including gas exchange, PAM fluorometry and eddy correlation measurements. The day course of photosynthetic capacity varied between the two species by being constant during the day for winter wheat whereas sugar beet showed a constant decrease over the day. The highest photosynthetic electron transport rates appeared before solar noon. Additionally the region was scanned by an airborne high-resolution spectrometer that allowed the extraction of sun-induced fluorescence. Sun-induced fluorescence is currently evaluated to serve as a direct measure of photosynthetic efficiency from air- and spaceborne platforms. In this presentation we present the first conceptual view

  11. No PTSD-related differences in diurnal cortisol profiles of genocide survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckart, Cindy; Engler, Harald; Riether, Carsten; Kolassa, Stephan; Elbert, Thomas; Kolassa, Iris-Tatjana

    2009-05-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) has been associated with reduced cortisol levels. Opposing results have been interpreted as resulting from methodological differences between studies. We investigated the diurnal profile of salivary cortisol in a population of highly traumatized adult males from Rwanda with and without PTSD, who spent the whole day of examination together under a maximally standardized schedule. Besides the detection of PTSD-related alterations in cortisol release we aimed at determining physiologically relevant effects of cumulative trauma exposure on HPA functioning in interaction with or independent of diagnosis. There were no differences in the diurnal pattern of cortisol release between subjects with and without PTSD. We observed an increasing prevalence of PTSD with increasing number of different traumatic event types experienced, replicating earlier results on a "building-block effect" of multiple traumatization. However, size of cumulative exposure was not related to any of the cortisol measures. The results suggest that besides methodological constraints also confounding factors not previously controlled for, e.g., sex differences or current life stress, might contribute to the diverging results of lowered, unchanged or enhanced cortisol secretion in PTSD. Future research should therefore closely monitor these possible confounds to optimize models for cortisol in research on stress-dependent illnesses.

  12. Diurnal Solar Energy Conversion and Photoprotection in Rice Canopies1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quick, W. Paul; von Caemmerer, Susanne; Furbank, Robert

    2017-01-01

    Genetic improvement of photosynthetic performance of cereal crops and increasing the efficiency with which solar radiation is converted into biomass has recently become a major focus for crop physiologists and breeders. The pulse amplitude modulated chlorophyll fluorescence technique (PAM) allows quantitative leaf level monitoring of the utilization of energy for photochemical light conversion and photoprotection in natural environments, potentially over the entire crop lifecycle. Here, the diurnal relationship between electron transport rate (ETR) and irradiance was measured in five cultivars of rice (Oryza sativa) in canopy conditions with PAM fluorescence under natural solar radiation. This relationship differed substantially from that observed for conventional short term light response curves measured under controlled actinic light with the same leaves. This difference was characterized by a reduced curvature factor when curve fitting was used to model this diurnal response. The engagement of photoprotective processes in chloroplast electron transport in leaves under canopy solar radiation was shown to be a major contributor to this difference. Genotypic variation in the irradiance at which energy flux into photoprotective dissipation became greater than ETR was observed. Cultivars capable of higher ETR at midrange light intensities were shown to produce greater leaf area over time, estimated by noninvasive imaging. PMID:27895208

  13. Observations of seasonal and diurnal glacier velocities at Mount Rainier, Washington using terrestrial radar interferometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. E. Allstadt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available We present spatially continuous velocity maps using repeat terrestrial radar interferometry (TRI measurements to examine seasonal and diurnal dynamics of alpine glaciers at Mount Rainier, Washington. We show that the Nisqually and Emmons glaciers have small slope-parallel velocities near the summit (−1, high velocities over their upper and central regions (1.0–1.5 m day−1, and stagnant debris-covered regions near the terminus (−1. Velocity uncertainties are as low as ±0.02–0.08 m day−1. We document a large seasonal velocity decrease of 0.2–0.7 m day−1 (−25 to −50 % from July to November for most of the Nisqually glacier, excluding the icefall, suggesting significant seasonal subglacial water storage under most of the glacier. We did not detect diurnal variability above the noise level. Preliminary 2-D ice flow modeling using TRI velocities suggests that sliding accounts for roughly 91 and 99 % of the July velocity field for the Emmons and Nisqually glaciers, respectively. We validate our observations against recent in situ velocity measurements and examine the long-term evolution of Nisqually glacier dynamics through comparisons with historical velocity data. This study shows that repeat TRI measurements with > 10 km range can be used to investigate spatial and temporal variability of alpine glacier dynamics over large areas, including hazardous and inaccessible areas.

  14. Discovery of a widespread low-latitude diurnal CO2 frost cycle on Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piqueux, Sylvain; Kleinböhl, Armin; Hayne, Paul O.; Heavens, Nicholas G.; Kass, David M.; McCleese, Daniel J.; Schofield, John T.; Shirley, James H.

    2016-07-01

    While the detection of CO2 ice has only been reported outside the Martian polar regions at very high elevation (i.e., Elysium, Olympus Mons, and the Tharsis Montes), nighttime surface observations by the Mars Climate Sounder on board the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter document the widespread occurrence of atmospherically corrected ground temperatures consistent with the presence of extensive carbon dioxide frost deposits in the dusty low thermal inertia units at middle/low latitudes. Thermal infrared emissivities, interpreted in conjunction with mass balance modeling, suggest micrometer size CO2 ice crystals forming optically thin layers never exceeding a few hundreds of microns in thickness (i.e., 10-2 kg m-2) locally, which is insufficient to generate a measurable diurnal pressure cycle (atmosphere). Atmospheric temperatures at middle/low latitudes are not consistent with precipitation of CO2 ice, suggesting that condensation occurs on the surface. The recurring growth and sublimation of CO2 ice on Martian dusty terrains may be an important process preventing soil induration and promoting dynamic phenomena (soil avalanching and fluidization and regolith gardening), maintaining a reservoir of micrometer size dust particles that are mobile and available for lifting. The discovery of this diurnal CO2 cycle represents an important step forward in our understanding of the way the Martian atmosphere interacts with the surface.

  15. Radiation closure and diurnal cycle of the clear-sky dust instantaneous direct radiative forcing over Arabian Peninsula

    KAUST Repository

    Osipov, Sergey

    2015-04-01

    To better quantify radiative effects of dust over the Arabian Peninsula we have developed a standalone column radiation transport model coupled with the Mie calculations and driven by reanalysis meteorological fields and atmospheric composition. Numerical experiments are carried out for a wide range of aerosol optical depths, including extreme values developed during the dust storm on 18-20 March 2012. Comprehensive ground-based observations and satellite retrieva